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Sample records for brown seaweed padina

  1. Characterization of alginates from Ghanaian brown seaweeds: Sargassum spp. and Padina spp

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rhein-Knudsen, Nanna; Ale, Marcel Tutor; Ajalloueian, Fatemeh

    2017-01-01

    Alginates of four locally harvested Ghanaian brown seaweeds from the Sargassum and Padina genus were assessed for their rheological and chemical characteristics. The seaweeds contained 16–30% by weight of alginate assessed as the sum of d-mannuronic acid (M) and l-guluronic acid (G). In comparison......, alginate samples from Laminaria digitata and Macrocystis pyrifera, used commercially for alginate extraction, contained 29% and 27% by weight of the two constituent uronic acids (M + G), respectively. Alginate extraction yields of the Ghanaian seaweeds ranged from 17 to 23% by weight of dry material......; the corresponding yields from L. digitata and M. pyrifera were 26–29% by weight; these yields were equivalent to ∼49–99% of the theoretical yields, but the purity of the extracted alginates varied, and were lowest for the Ghanaian seaweed alginates. 1H NMR analysis of the uronic acid block...

  2. Brown seaweed Padina gymnospora is a prominent natural wound-care product

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    Alegna P. Baliano

    Full Text Available ABSTRACT Seaweeds are related to anti-inflammatory, anti-bacterial and anti-noceptive effects. This work aimed to verify the potential of seaweed Padina gymnospora (Kützing Sonder 1871 to improve wound healing in vitro. P. gymnospora was collected at a bethonic area in Espirito Santo. Methanolic extract of P. gymnospora was obtained by percolation. To determine cytotoxicity, colorimetric MTT tests were performed against normal fibroblasts (L929, macrophages (RAW 264.7 and human ovarian carcinoma (OVCAR-3 cell lines using concentration range of 12–110 µg ml-1. To evaluate in vitro wound healing, monolayer of fibroblasts L929 was seeded and artificial wounded. Cell proliferation was blocked by 5 µg ml-1 Mytomycin C. Nitric oxide inhibition was quantified with Raw 264.7 by Griess reaction. Minimal inhibitory concentration (MIC against Staphylococcus aureus was determined. Eletrospray ionization with Fourier transform ion cyclotron resonance mass spectrometry (ESI-FT-ICR MS was applied to detail composition of P. gymnospora methanolic extract. No cytotoxic effect in all cell lines was detected until the maximum concentration of 110 µg ml-1. P. gymnospora promoted significantly migration at the concentration of 25 µg ml-1 (p < 0.05. A prominent inhibition of nitric oxide formation was achieved in a concentration of 20 µg ml-1 of methanolic extract of P. gymnospora (62.06 ± 1.20%. Antibacterial activity against S. aureus could be demonstrated with MIC of 500 µg ml-1. ESI-FT-ICR MS analysis indicated eleven molecules between then, linolenic, oleic and linoleic acid. P. gymnospora favored wound repair in vitro what could be related to its fatty acid composition. In addition, its antimicrobial effect, and NO inhibition activity contribute for a new approach of P. gymnospora as a promise natural product for treatment of cutaneous wound.

  3. Partial characterization and anticoagulant activity of a heterofucan from the brown seaweed Padina gymnospora.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Silva, T M A; Alves, L G; de Queiroz, K C S; Santos, M G L; Marques, C T; Chavante, S F; Rocha, H A O; Leite, E L

    2005-04-01

    The brown algae Padina gymnospora contain different fucans. Powdered algae were submitted to proteolysis with the proteolytic enzyme maxataze. The first extract of the algae was constituted of polysaccharides contaminated with lipids, phenols, etc. Fractionation of the fucans with increasing concentrations of acetone produced fractions with different proportions of fucose, xylose, uronic acid, galactose, and sulfate. One of the fractions, precipitated with 50% acetone (v/v), contained an 18-kDa heterofucan (PF1), which was further purified by gel-permeation chromatography on Sephadex G-75 using 0.2 M acetic acid as eluent and characterized by agarose gel electrophoresis in 0.05 M 1,3 diaminopropane/acetate buffer at pH 9.0, methylation and nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy. Structural analysis indicates that this fucan has a central core consisting mainly of 3-beta-D-glucuronic acid 1-> or 4-beta-D-glucuronic acid 1 ->, substituted at C-2 with alpha-L-fucose or beta-D-xylose. Sulfate groups were only detected at C-3 of 4-alpha-L-fucose 1-> units. The anticoagulant activity of the PF1 (only 2.5-fold lesser than low molecular weight heparin) estimated by activated partial thromboplastin time was completely abolished upon desulfation by solvolysis in dimethyl sulfoxide, indicating that 3-O-sulfation at C-3 of 4-alpha-L-fucose 1-> units is responsible for the anticoagulant activity of the polymer.

  4. Partial characterization and anticoagulant activity of a heterofucan from the brown seaweed Padina gymnospora

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    Silva T.M.A.

    2005-01-01

    Full Text Available The brown algae Padina gymnospora contain different fucans. Powdered algae were submitted to proteolysis with the proteolytic enzyme maxataze. The first extract of the algae was constituted of polysaccharides contaminated with lipids, phenols, etc. Fractionation of the fucans with increasing concentrations of acetone produced fractions with different proportions of fucose, xylose, uronic acid, galactose, and sulfate. One of the fractions, precipitated with 50% acetone (v/v, contained an 18-kDa heterofucan (PF1, which was further purified by gel-permeation chromatography on Sephadex G-75 using 0.2 M acetic acid as eluent and characterized by agarose gel electrophoresis in 0.05 M 1,3 diaminopropane/acetate buffer at pH 9.0, methylation and nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy. Structural analysis indicates that this fucan has a central core consisting mainly of 3-ß-D-glucuronic acid 1-> or 4-ß-D-glucuronic acid 1 ->, substituted at C-2 with alpha-L-fucose or ß-D-xylose. Sulfate groups were only detected at C-3 of 4-alpha-L-fucose 1-> units. The anticoagulant activity of the PF1 (only 2.5-fold lesser than low molecular weight heparin estimated by activated partial thromboplastin time was completely abolished upon desulfation by solvolysis in dimethyl sulfoxide, indicating that 3-O-sulfation at C-3 of 4-alpha-L-fucose 1-> units is responsible for the anticoagulant activity of the polymer.

  5. The effect of alginates, fucans and phenolic substances from the brown seaweed Padina gymnospora in calcium carbonate mineralization in vitro

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salgado, L. T.; Amado Filho, G. M.; Fernandez, M. S.; Arias, J. L.; Farina, M.

    2011-04-01

    The mineralization of calcium carbonate (CaCO 3) in the brown seaweed Padina gymnospora is a biologically induced process and is restricted to the cell wall surface. It has been suggested that the CaCO 3 crystallization that occurs over the thallus cell wall surface is induced by changes in the surface pH caused by a local efflux of OH -, Ca ++ and HCO3- ions. However, no studies on the roles of the P. gymnospora cell wall components in this mineralization process had been performed. Therefore, we evaluated the influence of a subset of P. gymnospora cell wall molecules on CaCO 3 crystallization in vitro. The molecules tested were the anionic polysaccharides alginates and fucans (with potential nucleation activity) and phenolic substances (secondary metabolites with amphipathic property). The crystallization assays were performed using polystyrene microbridges as the crystallization apparatus. Crystals formed in the microbridges were analyzed using scanning electron microscopy. Interestingly, the results confirmed that the phenolic substances have the specific capability of changing the morphology of calcite crystals grown in vitro by inducing an elongated morphology in the direction of the c-axis. This morphology is similar to that induced by molecules that attach to { h k 0}-crystal planes. It was also shown that the alginates and the fucans do not specifically modulate the morphology of the growing crystals. In fact, these crystals exhibited a rounded shape due to the slower growth rates of several new crystal planes that appeared in the place of the original corners and edges.

  6. Halogenated terpenoids from the brown alga Padina tetrastromatica (HAUCK)

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Parameswaran, P.S.; Bhat, K.L.; Das, B.; Kamat, S.Y.; Harnos, S.

    ranging from 14:0 to 22:0 with palmitic acid (16:0, 67.4%) and oleic acid (18:1, 17.1%) being the major constituents, have been isolated from the pet, ether soluble fraction of the methanol extract of the brown alga Padina tetrastromatica...

  7. Fucoidans from brown seaweeds

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ale, Marcel Tutor; Meyer, Anne S.

    2013-01-01

    Fucoidan or fucoidans cover a family of sulfated fucose-rich polysaccharides, built of a backbone of L-fucose units, and characteristically found in brown seaweeds. Fucoidans have potential therapeutic properties, including anti-inflammatory and anti-coagulant activities, as well as anti...

  8. New Enzyme-Inhibitory Triterpenoid from Marine Macro Brown Alga Padina boergesenii Allender & Kraft

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ali, Liaqat; Khan, Abdul Latif; Al-Broumi, Muhammad; Al-Harrasi, Rashid; Al-Kharusi, Lubna; Hussain, Javid; Al-Harrasi, Ahmed

    2017-01-01

    In continuation to our study of the chemical and biological potential of the secondary metabolites isolated from Omani seaweeds, we investigated a marine brown alga, Padina boergesenii. The phytochemical investigation resulted in the isolation of a new secondary metabolite, padinolic acid (1), along with some other semi-pure fractions and sub-fractions. The planar structure was confirmed through MS and NMR (1D and 2D) spectral data. The NOESY experiments coupled with the biogenetic consideration were helpful in assigning the stereochemistry in the molecule. Compound 1 was subjected to enzyme inhibition studies using urease, lipid peroxidase, and alpha-glucosidase enzymes. Compound 1 showed low to moderate α-glucosidase and urease enzyme inhibition, respectively, and moderate anti-lipid peroxidation activities. The current study indicates the potential of this seaweed and provides the basis for further investigation. PMID:28106757

  9. New Enzyme-Inhibitory Triterpenoid from Marine Macro Brown Alga Padina boergesenii Allender & Kraft.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ali, Liaqat; Khan, Abdul Latif; Al-Broumi, Muhammad; Al-Harrasi, Rashid; Al-Kharusi, Lubna; Hussain, Javid; Al-Harrasi, Ahmed

    2017-01-18

    In continuation to our study of the chemical and biological potential of the secondary metabolites isolated from Omani seaweeds, we investigated a marine brown alga, Padina boergesenii. The phytochemical investigation resulted in the isolation of a new secondary metabolite, padinolic acid (1), along with some other semi-pure fractions and sub-fractions. The planar structure was confirmed through MS and NMR (1D and 2D) spectral data. The NOESY experiments coupled with the biogenetic consideration were helpful in assigning the stereochemistry in the molecule. Compound 1 was subjected to enzyme inhibition studies using urease, lipid peroxidase, and alpha-glucosidase enzymes. Compound 1 showed low to moderate α-glucosidase and urease enzyme inhibition, respectively, and moderate anti-lipid peroxidation activities. The current study indicates the potential of this seaweed and provides the basis for further investigation.

  10. New Enzyme-Inhibitory Triterpenoid from Marine Macro Brown Alga Padina boergesenii Allender & Kraft

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    Liaqat Ali

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available In continuation to our study of the chemical and biological potential of the secondary metabolites isolated from Omani seaweeds, we investigated a marine brown alga, Padina boergesenii. The phytochemical investigation resulted in the isolation of a new secondary metabolite, padinolic acid (1, along with some other semi-pure fractions and sub-fractions. The planar structure was confirmed through MS and NMR (1D and 2D spectral data. The NOESY experiments coupled with the biogenetic consideration were helpful in assigning the stereochemistry in the molecule. Compound 1 was subjected to enzyme inhibition studies using urease, lipid peroxidase, and alpha-glucosidase enzymes. Compound 1 showed low to moderate α-glucosidase and urease enzyme inhibition, respectively, and moderate anti-lipid peroxidation activities. The current study indicates the potential of this seaweed and provides the basis for further investigation.

  11. Antioxidant and anti-inflammatory potential of the aqueous extract and polysaccharide fraction from brown marine macroalgae Padina sp. from Gulf of Mannar of Peninsular India

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Kajal Chakraborty

    2013-01-01

    Objective: To evaluate the antioxidant and anti-inflammatory potential of the aqueous extract and polysaccharide fraction from two brown marine macroalga, Padina gymnospora (P.gymnospora ) and Padina tetrastomatica (P. tetrastomatica) harvested from Gulf of Mannar of peninsular India.Methods:The antioxidant activity was evaluated using different in vitro systems, viz., 1,1-diphenyl-2-picrylhydrazyl (DPPH), 2, 2′-azino-bis-3ethylbenzothiozoline-6-sulfonic acid diammonium salt (ABTS), H2O2/ HO. radical scavenging, Fe2+ ion chelating ability, and reducing potential. Folin–Ciocalteu method was used to determine the total phenolic content, and the results were expressed as mg of gallic acid equivalents (GE). Thiobarbituric acid-reactive substance formation inhibition assay was employed to assess the ability of the samples to inhibit lipid oxidation in a model system. COXI and LOXV inhibition assays were employed to assess the anti-inflammatory potential of aqueous extract and polysaccharide fraction.Results:The aqueous extract fraction of P. tetrastomatica realized high total phenolic content (288 mg GE/g), and its activity towards scavenging short-lived radicals (OH. and H2O2) (27.8% and 68.3%, respectively; 0.6 mg/mL) are higher than those registered for Padina gymnospora. Aqueous extract and polysaccharide fractions of P. gymnospora showed higher anti-inflammatory activities against LOXV (56% and 53%, respectively) and COXI (30% and 35%, respectively; 1 mg/mL) enzymes. The correlation studies confirmed that polysaccharides present with the Padina sp. are responsible for their anti-inflammatory potential. IR spectral data of polysaccharide fraction revealed the presence of polysaccharide in alginate form and also confirmed the presence of sulphated polysaccharides as principle bioactive constituents.Conclusions:The study revealed that these seaweeds possess beneficial value as human food or health additives and can be used as a natural green remedy against

  12. Antioxidant and anti-inflammatory potential of the aqueous extract and polysaccharide fraction from brown marine macroalgae Padina sp. from Gulf of Mannar of Peninsular India

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    Nammunayathuputhenkotta Krishnankartha Praveen

    2013-08-01

    Full Text Available Objective: To evaluate the antioxidant and anti-inflammatory potential of the aqueous extract and polysaccharide fraction from two brown marine macroalga, Padina gymnospora (P. gymnospora and Padina tetrastomatica (P. tetrastomatica harvested from Gulf of Mannar of peninsular India. Methods: The antioxidant activity was evaluated using different in vitro systems, viz., 1,1- diphenyl-2-picrylhydrazyl (DPPH, 2, 2′-azino-bis-3ethylbenzothiozoline-6-sulfonic acid diammonium salt (ABTS, H2O2/ HO. radical scavenging, Fe2+ ion chelating ability, and reducing potential. Folin–Ciocalteu method was used to determine the total phenolic content, and the results were expressed as mg of gallic acid equivalents (GE. Thiobarbituric acid-reactive substance formation inhibition assay was employed to assess the ability of the samples to inhibit lipid oxidation in a model system. COXII and LOXV inhibition assays were employed to assess the anti-inflammatory potential of aqueous extract and polysaccharide fraction. Results: The aqueous extract fraction of P. tetrastomatica realized high total phenolic content (288 mg GE/g, and its activity towards scavenging short-lived radicals (OH. and H2O2 (27.8% and 68.3%, respectively; 0.6 mg/mL are higher than those registered for Padina gymnospora. Aqueous extract and polysaccharide fractions of P. gymnospora showed higher anti-inflammatory activities against LOXV (56% and 53%, respectively and COXII (30% and 35%, respectively; 1 mg/mL enzymes. The correlation studies confirmed that polysaccharides present with the Padina sp. are responsible for their anti-inflammatory potential. IR spectral data of polysaccharide fraction revealed the presence of polysaccharide in alginate form and also confirmed the presence of sulphated polysaccharides as principle bioactive constituents. Conclusions: The study revealed that these seaweeds possess beneficial value as human food or health additives and can be used as a natural green

  13. Identification of anti-inflammatory effects of extract of brown algae Padina sp. in mice (Mus musculus: A pilot study

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    Dwi Fitrah Ariani Bahar

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available Infection, tissue damage, or interference immune response are factors that cause inflasmmatory reactions of teeth and surrounding tissues. To reduce the side effects of pharmaceutical drugs, it is necessary to research which uses the principle of back to nature as a source of medicines. One of the natural ingredients that have anti-inflammatory activity is brown algae Padina sp. containing polysaccharides, PUFA, and fucoxanthin. The purpose of this research is to determine antiinflammatory effects of extract brown algae Padina sp. in mice. The research design is pretest and post test with control group design. Sample were 15 male mice weighing 14-35g. Mice were divided into three treatment groups (n=5. G1 (negative control NaCMC 1%, G2 (positive control sodium diclofenac 0.35mg/35g B/V, and G3 was extracted with methanol and Padina sp. dose 7mg/35g B/V. After 30 minutes of testing material was injected, peptone 1% (0.05ml is injected at subplantar area of mice left paw. Measurements were taken using plethysmometer. Data was analysis using repeated ANOVA test. The results showed that volume inflammation of the extract brown algae Padina sp. on V0=0.170ml, V1=0.164 ml, V2=0.120ml, V3=0.108ml, V4=0.138ml, respectively. Repeated ANOVA test obtained P value (<.05 in the Padina sp. group. In conclusion, extract brown algae Padina sp. has anti-inflammatory effects in mice.

  14. Active ingredients fatty acids as antibacterial agent from the brown algae Padina pavonica and Hormophysa triquetra

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Gihan Ahmed El Shoubaky; Essam Abd El Rahman Salem

    2014-01-01

    Objective: To estimate the fatty acids content in the brown algae Padina pavonica (P. pavonica) and Hormophysa triquetra (H. triquetra) and evaluate their potential antimicrobial activity as bioactive compounds.Methods:The fatty acid compositions of the examined species were analyzed using gas chromatography-mass spectrometry. The antimicrobial activity of crude and fatty acids was assessed using the agar plug technique.Results:The fatty acids profile ranged from C8:0 to C20:4. Concentration of saturated fatty acids in P. pavonica was in the order palmitic>myristic>stearic whereas concentration of the unsaturated fatty acids was oleic acid>palmitoleic>9-cis-hexadecenoic>linoleic acid>α-linolenic>arachidonic> elaidic acid. H. triquetra contained high concentration of saturated fatty acids than those of P. pavonica which was in the order as follows: palmitic>margaric>myristic>nonadecyclic>stearic>caprylic>tridecylic>pentadecylic>lauric while the unsaturated fatty acids consisted of oleic>nonadecenoic>non adecadienoate>margaroleic. The crude and fatty acid extracts of H. triquetra and P. pavonica were biologically active on the tested pathogens. H.triquetra exhibited a larger inhibitory zone than P. pavonica. Conclusions: The brown algae P. pavonica and H. triquetra have high efficient amount of fatty acids and showed strong antibacterial activity, especially H. triquetra.

  15. Facile green synthesis of variable metallic gold nanoparticle using Padina gymnospora, a brown marine macroalga

    Science.gov (United States)

    Singh, M.; Kalaivani, R.; Manikandan, S.; Sangeetha, N.; Kumaraguru, A. K.

    2013-04-01

    The process of development of reliable and eco-friendly metallic nanoparticles is an important step in the field of nanotechnology. To achieve this, use of natural sources like biological systems becomes essential. In the present work, extracellular biosynthesis of gold nanoparticles using Padina gymnospora has been attempted and achieved rapid formation of gold nanoparticles in a short duration. The UV-vis spectrum of the aqueous medium containing gold ion showed peak at 527 nm corresponding to the plasmon absorbance of gold nanoparticles. Scanning electron microscopy showed the formation of well-dispersed gold nanoparticles. FTIR spectra of brown alga confirmed that hydroxyl groups present in the algal polysaccharides were involved in the gold bioreduction. AFM analysis showed the results of particle sizes (53-67 nm) and average height of the particle roughness (60.0 nm). X-ray diffraction (XRD) spectrum of the gold nanoparticles exhibited Bragg reflections corresponding to gold nanoparticles. This environment-friendly method of biological gold nanoparticle synthesis can be applied potentially in various products that directly come in contact with the human body, such as cosmetics, and foods and consumer goods, besides medical applications.

  16. Profile of polychlorinated biphenyls in the brown alga Padina sanctae-crucis along the Orote dump coastline, Orote Peninsula, Western Guam.

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    Schaible, Brian Christopher

    2010-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to determine whether the brown seaweed Padina sanctae-crucis might be used as a biomonitor organism to determine the location, distribution, and type of polychlorinated biphenyls (PCB) present along a contaminated tropical coastline. Polychlorinated biphenyls were detected in P. sanctae-crucis collected from near-shore waters along a 4-km stretch of coastline. The profile of PCB levels from samples obtained at 13 sites along the coastline demonstrated a positive concentration gradient as sample locations progressed toward the dump site. Sample locations nearest the dump site revealed PCB levels twofold higher than background levels for P. sanctae-crucis. Chromatograms of samples obtained nearest the dump site indicated a similarity to the Aroclor 1260 fingerprint. The P. sanctae-crucis frond trimmings used for laboratory analysis were approximately 3-5 wk old. This study was conducted 8 mo following the completion of the removal actions at the dump site. Data suggest a release of Aroclor 1260 into the marine environment approximately 7 mo following the completion of removal actions at the dump site.

  17. Effects of a submarine eruption on the performance of two brown seaweeds

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    Betancor, Séfora; Tuya, Fernando; Gil-Díaz, Teba; Figueroa, Félix L.; Haroun, Ricardo

    2014-03-01

    World oceans are becoming more acidic as a consequence of CO2 anthropogenic emissions, with multiple physiological and ecological implications. So far, our understanding is mainly limited to some species through in vitro experimentation. In this study, we took advantage of a recent submarine eruption (from October 2011 to March 2012) at ~ 1 nautical mile offshore El Hierro Island (Canary Islands, central east Atlantic) to determine whether altered physical-chemical conditions, mainly sudden natural ocean acidification, affected the morphology, photosynthesis (in situ Chl-a fluorescence) and physiological performance (photo-protective mechanisms and oxidative stress) of the conspicuous brown seaweeds Padina pavonica-a species with carbonate deposition - and Lobophora variegata-a species without carbonate on thallus surfaces - , both with similar morphology. Seaweeds were sampled twice: November 2011 (eruptive phase with a pH drop of ca. 1.22 units relative to standard conditions) and March 2012 (post-eruptive phase with a pH of ca. 8.23), on two intertidal locations adjacent to the eruption and at a control location. P. pavonica showed decalcification and loss of photo-protective compounds and antioxidant activity at locations affected by the eruption, behaving as a sun-adapted species during lowered pH conditions. At the same time, L. variegata suffered a decrease in photo-protective compounds and antioxidant activity during the volcanic event, but its photosynthetic performance remained unaltered. These results reinforce the idea that calcareous seaweeds, as a whole, are more sensitive than non-calcareous seaweeds to alter their performance under scenarios of reduced pH.

  18. Effects of ocean acidification on the brown alga Padina pavonica: decalcification due to acute and chronic events.

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    Gil-Díaz, Teba; Haroun, Ricardo; Tuya, Fernando; Betancor, Séfora; Viera-Rodríguez, María A

    2014-01-01

    Since the industrial revolution, anthropogenic CO₂ emissions have caused ocean acidification, which particularly affects calcified organisms. Given the fan-like calcified fronds of the brown alga Padina pavonica, we evaluated the acute (short-term) effects of a sudden pH drop due to a submarine volcanic eruption (October 2011-early March 2012) affecting offshore waters around El Hierro Island (Canary Islands, Spain). We further studied the chronic (long-term) effects of the continuous decrease in pH in the last decades around the Canarian waters. In both the observational and retrospective studies (using herbarium collections of P. pavonica thalli from the overall Canarian Archipelago), the percent of surface calcium carbonate coverage of P. pavonica thalli were contrasted with oceanographic data collected either in situ (volcanic eruption event) or from the ESTOC marine observatory data series (herbarium study). Results showed that this calcified alga is sensitive to acute and chronic environmental pH changes. In both cases, pH changes predicted surface thallus calcification, including a progressive decalcification over the last three decades. This result concurs with previous studies where calcareous organisms decalcify under more acidic conditions. Hence, Padina pavonica can be implemented as a bio-indicator of ocean acidification (at short and long time scales) for monitoring purposes over wide geographic ranges, as this macroalga is affected and thrives (unlike strict calcifiers) under more acidic conditions.

  19. Effects of ocean acidification on the brown alga Padina pavonica: decalcification due to acute and chronic events.

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    Teba Gil-Díaz

    Full Text Available Since the industrial revolution, anthropogenic CO₂ emissions have caused ocean acidification, which particularly affects calcified organisms. Given the fan-like calcified fronds of the brown alga Padina pavonica, we evaluated the acute (short-term effects of a sudden pH drop due to a submarine volcanic eruption (October 2011-early March 2012 affecting offshore waters around El Hierro Island (Canary Islands, Spain. We further studied the chronic (long-term effects of the continuous decrease in pH in the last decades around the Canarian waters. In both the observational and retrospective studies (using herbarium collections of P. pavonica thalli from the overall Canarian Archipelago, the percent of surface calcium carbonate coverage of P. pavonica thalli were contrasted with oceanographic data collected either in situ (volcanic eruption event or from the ESTOC marine observatory data series (herbarium study. Results showed that this calcified alga is sensitive to acute and chronic environmental pH changes. In both cases, pH changes predicted surface thallus calcification, including a progressive decalcification over the last three decades. This result concurs with previous studies where calcareous organisms decalcify under more acidic conditions. Hence, Padina pavonica can be implemented as a bio-indicator of ocean acidification (at short and long time scales for monitoring purposes over wide geographic ranges, as this macroalga is affected and thrives (unlike strict calcifiers under more acidic conditions.

  20. Antiviral polysaccharides isolated from Hong Kong brown seaweed Hydroclathrus clathratus

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    WANG; Hui; OOI; Engchoon; Vincent; ANG; Put; O; Jr.

    2007-01-01

    Two relatively pure polysaccharides H3-a1 and H3-b1 had been isolated from the brown seaweed Hydroclathrus clathratus. They were characterized by HPLC, ultraviolet scanning, gas chromatography, infrared spectroscopy and elemental analysis, and shown to be two different sulfated polysaccharides with different monosaccharide content, but both with high relative molecular mass. They contained some proteins and uronic acid respectively. The sulfate content and bioactivity of these polysaccharides varied during purification. The fractions derived from the hot water extract also exhibited low anticoagulant effect. This is the first time that the antiherpetic and anticoagulant activities were evaluated for the polysaccharides from the Hong Kong brown seaweed Hydroclathrus clathratus.

  1. Antimicrobial activities of epiphytic bacteria associated of the brown alga Padina pavonica

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    Amel Ben Ali Ismail

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available Macroalgae belonging to the genus Padina are known to produce antibacterial compounds that may inhibit growth of human- and animal pathogens. Hitherto, it was unclear whether this antibacterial activity is produced by the macroalga itself or by secondary metabolite producing epiphytic bacteria. Here we report antibacterial activities of epiphytic bacteria isolated from Padina pavonica (Peacocks tail located on northern coast of Tunisia. Eighteen isolates were obtained in pure culture and tested for antimicrobial activities. Based on the 16S rRNA gene sequences the isolates were closely related to Proteobacteria (12 isolates; 2 Alpha- and 10 Gammaproteobacteria, Firmicutes (4 isolates and Actinobacteria (2 isolates. The antimicrobial activity was assessed as inhibition of growth of twelve species of pathogenic bacteria (Aeromonas salmonicida, A. hydrophila, Enterobacter xiangfangensis, Enterococcus faecium, Escherichia coli, Micrococcus sp., Salmonella typhimurium, Staphylococcus aureus, Streptococcus sp., Vibrio alginoliticus, V. proteolyticus, V. vulnificus and one pathogenic yeast (Candida albicans. Among the Firmicutes, isolate P8, which is closely related to Bacillus pumilus, displayed the largest spectrum of growth inhibition of the pathogenic bacteria tested. The results emphasize the potential use of P. pavonica associated antagonistic bacteria as producers of novel antibacterial compounds.

  2. Antioxidant activities of sulfated polysaccharides from brown and red seaweeds.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rocha de Souza, Micheline Cristiane; Marques, Cybelle Teixeira; Guerra Dore, Celina Maria; Ferreira da Silva, Fernando Roberto; Oliveira Rocha, Hugo Alexandre; Leite, Edda Lisboa

    2007-04-01

    The in vitro antioxidant activities of the following six sulfated polysaccharides were investigated: iota, kappa and lambda carrageenans, which are widely used in the food industry, fucoidan (homofucan) from the edible seaweed Fucus vesiculosus and fucans (heterofucans) F0.5 and F1.1 from the seaweed Padina gymnospora. With respect to the inhibition of superoxide radical formation, fucoidan had an IC(50) (the half maximal inhibitory concentration) of 0.058 mg.mL(-1), while the IC(50) for the kappa, iota and lambda carrageenans were 0.112, 0.332 and 0.046 mg.mL(-1), respectively. All of the samples had an inhibitory effect on the formation of hydroxyl radicals. The results of peroxidation tests showed that fucoidan had an IC(50) of 1.250 mg.mL(-1) and that the kappa, iota and lambda carrageenans had an IC(50) of 2.753 and 2.338 and 0.323 mg.mL(-1), respectively. Fucan fractions showed low antioxidant activity relative to fucoidan. These results clearly indicate the beneficial effect of algal polysaccharides as antioxidants.

  3. FATTY ACIDS, AMINO ACIDS, MINERAL CONTENTS, AND PROXIMATE COMPOSITION OF SOME BROWN SEAWEEDS(1).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tabarsa, Mehdi; Rezaei, Masoud; Ramezanpour, Zohreh; Robert Waaland, J; Rabiei, Reza

    2012-04-01

    This study was conducted to create a nutritional database on brown seaweeds and to popularize their consumption and utilization in Iran. The fatty acid contents, amino acids profiles, and certain mineral elements composition of some brown seaweeds, Padina pavonica (L.) Thivy, Dictyota dichotoma (Huds.) J. V. Lamour., and Colpomenia sinuosa (Mert. ex Roth) Derbés et Solier were determined. Total lipid content ranged from 1.46 ± 0.38 to 2.94 ± 0.94 g · 100 g(-1) dry weight (dwt), and the most abundant fatty acids were C16:0, C18:1, C20:4 ω6, and C20:5 ω3. The unsaturated fatty acids predominated in all species and had balanced sources of ω3 and ω6 acids. Highest total polyunsaturated fatty acid (PUFA) levels occurred in C. sinuosa. The protein content of D. dichotoma was 17.73 ± 0.29 g · 100 g(-1) dwt, significantly higher than the other seaweeds examined. Among amino acids essential to human nutrition, methionine (Met; in D. dichotoma and P. pavonica) and lysine (Lys; in C. sinuosa) were present in high concentrations. The crude fiber content varied by 9.5 ± 11.6 g · 100 g(-1) dwt in all species. Chemical analysis indicated that ash content was between 27.02 ± 0.6 and 39.28 ± 0.7 g · 100 g(-1) dwt, and that these seaweeds contained higher amounts of both macrominerals (7,308-9,160 mg · 100 g(-1) dwt; Na, K, Ca) and trace elements (263-1,594 mg · 100 g(-1) dwt; Fe, Ni, Mn, Cu, Co) than have been reported for edible land plants. C. sinuosa had the highest amount of Ca, Fe, and a considerable content of Na was measured in P. pavonica.

  4. Heavy metal concentrations in marine green, brown, and red seaweeds from coastal waters of Yemen, the Gulf of Aden

    Science.gov (United States)

    Al-Shwafi, Nabil A.; Rushdi, Ahmed I.

    2008-08-01

    The purpose of this study was to investigate the concentration levels of heavy metals in different species of the main three marine algal divisions from the Gulf of Aden coastal waters, Yemen. The divisions included Chlorophyta—green plants ( Halimeda tuna, Rhizoclonium kochiamum, Caldophora koiei, Enteromorpha compressa, and Caulerpa racemosa species), Phaeophyta—brown seaweeds ( Padina boryana, Turbinaria elatensis, Sargassum binderi, Cystoseira myrica, and Sargassum boveanum species), and Rhodophyta—red seaweeds ( Hypnea cornuta, Champia parvula, Galaxaura marginate, Laurencia paniculata, Gracilaria foliifere, and species). The heavy metals, which included cadmium (Cd), cobalt (Co), copper (Cu), chromium (Cr), Iron (Fe), manganese (Mn), nickel (Ni), lead (Pb), zinc (Zn), and vanadium (V) were measured by Atomic Absorption Spectrophotometer (AAs). The concentrations of heavy metals in all algal species are in the order of Fe >> Cu > Mn > Cr > Zn > Ni > Pb > Cd > V > Co. The results also showed that the uptake of heavy metals by different marine algal divisions was in the order of Chlorophyta > Phaeophyta > Rhodophyta. These heavy metals were several order of magnitude higher than the concentrations of the same metals in seawater. This indicates that marine alga progressively uptake heavy metals from seawater.

  5. NMR studies of polysaccharides from brown seaweeds

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Noseda, M.D.; Tisher, C.A.; Gorin, P.A.J.; Duarte, M.E.R. [Parana Univ., Curitiba, PR (Brazil). Dept. de Bioquimica; Cerezo, A.S. [Buenos Aires Univ. Nacional (Argentina). Dept. de Quimica Organica

    1997-12-31

    Alginic acid is the major intercellular polysaccharide serving as matrix in the brown algae and is comprised of an unbranched chain of (1->4)-linked {beta}-D-mannuronic acid (M) and {alpha}-L-guluronic acid (G), arranged in a blockwise fashion. The composition of the monomer residues and the block structure varies depending on the source of the polymer. The selective binding of cations to alginate accounts for its ability to form gels, which is dependent on the number and lenght of the G-blocks. They are widely used industrially for their ability to retain water, and for their gelling, viscosifying and stabilizing properties (Smidsrod and draget, 1996). In this study, alginate composition and block structure in Sargassum stenophyllum has been determined by chemical methods and NMR spectroscopic analysis. (author) 4 refs., 3 figs.

  6. Anti-allergic effects of ethanol extracts from brown seaweeds

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Haider SAMEE; Zhen-xing LI; Hong LIN; Jamil KHALID; Yong-chao GUO

    2009-01-01

    Ethanol extracts of brown seaweeds from Pakistan and China were isolated and compared for their antiallergenic activities.They included Sargassum tennerimum (ST) and Sargassum cervicorne (SC) from Pakistan,and Sargassum graminifolium turn (SG),Sargassum thunbergii (STH),and Laminariajaponica (LJ) from China.The ethanol extracts of these brown seaweeds were optimized at 85% (v/v) ethanol for the maximum yield of phlorotannin,an inhibitor against hyaluronidase.Total phlorotannins contained in the crude extracts were measured as 1.71% (SG),0.74% (STH),0.97% (LJ),3.30% (SC),and 5.06% (ST).The 50% inhibitory concentrations (IC50) of Pakistani SC and ST were 109.5 and 21 μg/ml,respectively,lower than those of Chinese SG,STH,and LJ (134,269,and 148 μg/ml,respectively).An antiallergic drug,disodium cromoglycate (DSCG),had an IC50=39 μg/ml,and a natural inhibitor of hyaluronidase,catechin,had an IC50=20 μg/ml.The IC50 of ST extract was found similar to that of catechin (21 vs 20 μg/ml) and lower than that of DSCG (21 vs 39 μg/ml).This suggests that ST is a potent inhibitor of hyaluronidase,indicating a promising future development of natural antiallergic medicines or functional foods.

  7. Nutritional and antioxidant properties of different brown and red Spanish edible seaweeds.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cofrades, S; López-López, I; Bravo, L; Ruiz-Capillas, C; Bastida, S; Larrea, M T; Jiménez-Colmenero, F

    2010-10-01

    This article reports a study of the nutritional composition, total dietary fiber (TDF), mineral contents, fatty acid and amino acid profiles, polyphenolic concentration and antioxidant activity of three Spanish seaweeds: two brown seaweeds (Himanthalia elongata and Undaria pinnatifida) and one red (Porphyra umbilicalis). TDF and ash were the most abundant components in the brown seaweeds, while TDF and protein were the main components in the red one. In all seaweeds, the lipid contents were very low but the polyunsaturated fatty acid contents were high. Although the red seaweed contained significantly (p Himanthalia elongata displayed remarkably high polyphenolic content, endowing it with appreciable antioxidant activity. These seaweeds offer considerable potential as functional food ingredients due to components like dietary fiber, minerals and trace elements, protein and lipids, which produce many different kinds of biological activities, and also to their high antioxidant capacity.

  8. Biorefinery of the brown seaweed Saccharina latissima for fuels and chemicals

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Lopez Contreras, A.M.; Harmsen, P.F.H.; Blaauw, R.; Houweling-Tan, G.B.N.; Wal, van der H.; Huijgen, W.J.J.; Hal, van J.W.

    2014-01-01

    Seaweeds (also called macroalgae) are considered a potential biomass feedstock for biorefineries for production of energy and chemicals. In this study, a biorefinery strategy for the brown seaweed Saccharina latissima is described. Fresh S. latissima harvested at the Irish coast contained glucose

  9. A study of fucoidan from the brown seaweed Chorda filum.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chizhov, A O; Dell, A; Morris, H R; Haslam, S M; McDowell, R A; Shashkov, A S; Nifant'ev, N E; Khatuntseva, E A; Usov, A I

    1999-07-20

    Fucoidan fractions from the brown seaweed Chorda filum were studied using solvolytic desulfation. Methylation analysis and NMR spectroscopy were applied for native and desulfated polysaccharides. Homofucan sulfate from C. filum was shown to contain poly-alpha-(1-->3)-fucopyranoside backbone with a high degree of branching, mainly of alpha-(1-->2)-linked single units. Some fucopyranose residues are sulfated at O-4 (mainly) and O-2 positions. Some alpha-(1-->3)-linked fucose residues were shown by NMR to be 2-O-acetylated. The 1H and 13C NMR spectra of desulfated, deacetylated fucan were completely assigned. The spectral data obtained correspond to a quasiregular polysaccharide structure with a branched hexasaccharide repeating unit. Other fucoidan fractions from C. filum have more complex carbohydrate composition and give rather complex methylation patterns. [formula: see text

  10. Pharmacognostical study and phytochemical evaluation of brown seaweed Sargassum wightii

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Jeyaraman Amutha Iswarya Devi; Gopalswamy Sathiya Balan; Kasiviswanathan Periyanayagam

    2013-01-01

    Objective: To explore the pharmacognostical and phytochemical properties of Sargassum wightii.Methods:and fluorescence analysis of the plant were carried out according to the standard procedure recommended in the WHO guidelines. The qualitative microscopy, phytochemical screening, physicochemical evaluation Results: Macroscopic study showed that plants were dark brown, 20-30 cm in height, leaves were 5-8 cm length, shape: linear to ovate, apex: midrib in conspicuous and having the entire, serrate margin. Microscopic evaluation of the transverse section of the leaf, stem, air bladder, receptacles showed the presence of epidermis layer followed by thick cuticle, conducting strand, mesophyll and possessed antheridia or oogonia at the swollen terminal portions. The different extracts of Sargassum wightii showed the presence of steroids, alkaloids, phenolic compounds, saponins and flavonoids with varied degree.Conclusions:Various pharmacognostical parameters evaluated in this study help in the identification and standardization of the of the seaweed Sargassum wightii.

  11. Seasonal variations of antioxidants in the brown seaweed Saccharina latissima

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sørensen, Ann-Dorit Moltke; Safafar, Hamed; Pedersen, Anja

    Mainly the brown seaweeds are known for their high antioxidative capacity within the specific compounds such as phlorotannins, polyphenols, flavonoids, pigments, and these natural antioxidants are of high industrial interest. Previous studies have shown large seasonal variations in biomass...... composition. The aim of this study was to see if there was a seasonal variation in the antioxidant content of sugar kelp (Saccharina latissima), compare two cultivation sites, REF and IMTA, and test different solvents applied for extractions, methanol or ethyl acetate. Rope cultivated sugar kelp were sampled....... The biological variability had a high impact revealed by large standard deviation. The pigment specimens did not change during the year, however the concentration did, and with fucoxanthin as the most interesting. No clear correlation was found between pigments and the antioxidants. This study showed high...

  12. Fucose-containing sulfated polysaccharides from brown seaweed: Extraction technolgy and bioactivity assessment

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ale, Marcel Tutor

    seaweeds, and investigate their bioactivity. To this effect, designed optimized extraction of fucose-containing sulfated polysaccharides (FCSPs) and/or crude fucoidan from brown seaweed were performed, and the bioactivity of the isolated FCSPs was investigated. Moreover, to assess the potential of seaweed...... to assimilate nitrogen-based nutrients, a technology for accurate monitoring of differential seaweed growth responses to nutrient assimilation was also developed. Fucoidan is a term used to describe a class of sulfated polysaccharides extracted from brown seaweed, which contains substantial amounts of fucose......; varying amounts of galactose, xylose, and glucuronic acid; and differing glycosidic linkages, and are variously substituted with sulfate and acetyl groups and side branches containing fucose or other glycosyl units. These FCSPs principally consist of a backbone of (1→3)- and/or (1→4)-linked α...

  13. Long term study of {sup 99}Tc in brown seaweed from the Swedish coast

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lindahl, P.; Gaefvert, T. [Lund Univ. Hospital, Dept. of Radiation Physics, Lund (Sweden); Ross, P.; Mattsson, S. [Malmoe Univ. Hospital, Dept. of Radiation Physics, Malmoe (Sweden); Erlandsson, B. [Lund Univ., Dept. of Nuclear Physics, Lund (Sweden); Holm, E. [Risoe National Lab., Roskilde (Denmark)

    2002-04-01

    Technetium was analysed in brown seaweed samples from Saerdal, located at the Swedish west coast. Since 1967 this location has been used for regular sampling of seaweed (Fucus serratus and Fucus vesiculosus). The activity concentration of {sup 99}Tc in seaweed is influenced by the liquid discharge from the nuclear fuel reprocessing plant in Sellafield, UK. Transit time and seasonal variations were estimated by comparing the concentration of technetium in seaweed with the annual discharge of that radionuclide from Sellafield. In this work samples collected from 1994 to 2000 were analysed and the results were combined with data from 1967 to 1993. The concentration of {sup 99}Tc in the 1994-2000 seaweed samples varied between 10 and 230 Bq/kg dry weight. The current high values of {sup 99}Tc in seaweed samples originate from the increased liquid discharge of technetium starting when the Enhanced Actinide Removal Plant (EARP) at Sellafield came into operation in 1994. (au)

  14. Long term study of {sup 99}Tc in brown seaweed from the Swedish west coast

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lindahl, P.; Gaefvert, T. [Lund Univ., Hospital, Dept. of Radiation Physics, Lund (Sweden); Mattsson, S. [Malmoe Univ., Hospital, Malmoe (Sweden); Erlandsson, B. [Lund Univ., Dept. of Nuclear Physics, Lund (Sweden); Roos, P.; Holm, E. [Risoe National Lab., Roskilde (Denmark)

    2002-12-01

    Technetium was analyzed in brown seaweed samples from Saerdal, located at the Swedish west coast. Since 1967 this location has been used for regular sampling of seaweed (Fucus serratus and Fucus vesiculosus). The activity concentration of {sup 99} Tc in seaweed is influenced by the liquid discharge from the nuclear fuel reprocessing plant in Sellafield, UK. Transit time and seasonal variations were estimated by comparing the concentration of technetium in seaweed with the annual discharge of that radionuclide from Sellafield. In this work samples collected from 1994 to 2000 were analyzed and the results were combined with data from 1967 to 1993. The concentration of {sup 99} Tc in the 1994-2000 seaweed samples varied between 10 and 230 Bq/kg dry weight. The current high values of {sup 99} Tc in seaweed samples originate from the increased liquid discharge of technetium starting when the Enhanced Actinide Removal Plant (EARP) at Sellafield came into operation in 1994. (au)

  15. Biosynthetic Pathway and Health Benefits of Fucoxanthin, an Algae-Specific Xanthophyll in Brown Seaweeds

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Masashi Hosokawa

    2013-07-01

    Full Text Available Fucoxanthin is the main carotenoid produced in brown algae as a component of the light-harvesting complex for photosynthesis and photoprotection. In contrast to the complete elucidation of the carotenoid biosynthetic pathways in red and green algae, the biosynthetic pathway of fucoxanthin in brown algae is not fully understood. Recently, two models for the fucoxanthin biosynthetic pathway have been proposed in unicellular diatoms; however, there is no such information for the pathway in brown seaweeds to date. Here, we propose a biosynthetic pathway for fucoxanthin in the brown seaweed, Ectocarpus siliculosus, derived from comparison of carotenogenic genes in its sequenced genome with those in the genomes of two diatoms, Thalassiosira pseudonana and Phaeodactylum tricornutum. Currently, fucoxanthin is receiving attention, due to its potential benefits for human health. Therefore, new knowledge regarding the medical and nutraceutical properties of fucoxanthin from brown seaweeds is also summarized here.

  16. Effects of Different Heat Processing on Fucoxanthin, Antioxidant Activity and Colour of Indonesian Brown Seaweeds

    Science.gov (United States)

    Susanto, Eko; Suhaeli Fahmi, A.; Winarni Agustini, Tri; Rosyadi, Septian; Dita Wardani, Ayunda

    2017-02-01

    Fucoxanthin (Fx) is major carotenoids in brown algae. It showed many health beneficial effects for oxidative stress. Fucoxanthin is lower stability which may cause problem in the application for functional food. The objective of this study was to evaluate the effects of various heat processing on Fx, antioxidant activity (IC50), total phenolic content, and colour stability of Sargassum ilicifolium. The various heat processing methods showed were not significantly affected to fucoxanthin and antioxidant activities however all treatments lower affected to brown seaweeds colour. Moreover, this study showed a useful proved in the design of brown seaweeds processing which minimize Fx, antioxidant activity and colour changes.

  17. Polymorphic microsatellite markers in the brown seaweed Fucus vesiculosus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Candeias, Rui; Casado-Amezúa, Pilar; Pearson, Gareth A; Serrão, Ester A; Teixeira, Sara

    2015-03-08

    Fucus vesiculosus is a brown seaweed dominant on temperate rocky shores of the northern hemisphere and, is typically distributed in the mid-upper intertidal zone. It is an external fertilizer that reproduces sexually, providing an excellent model to address conflicting theories related to mating systems and sexual selection. Microsatellite markers have been reported for several Fucus species, however the genomic libraries from where these markers have been isolated, have originated from two or more species pooled together (F. vesiculosus and F. serratus in one library; F. vesiculosus, F. serratus and Ascophyllum nodosum in a second library), or when the genomic DNA originated from only one species it was from Fucus spiralis. Although these markers cross-amplify F. vesiculosus individuals, the level of polymorphism has been low for relatedness studies. The microsatellite markers described here were obtained from an enriched genomic library, followed by 454 pyrosequencing. A total of 9 microsatellite markers were tested across 44 individuals from the North of Portugal. The mean number of alleles across loci was 8.7 and the gene diversity 0.67. The high variability displayed by these microsatellite loci should be useful for paternity analysis, assessing variance of reproductive success and in estimations of genetic variation within and between populations.

  18. Antiviral Sulfoquinovosyldiacylglycerols (SQDGs from the Brazilian Brown Seaweed Sargassum vulgare

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Erwan Plouguerné

    2013-11-01

    Full Text Available Total lipids from the Brazilian brown seaweed Sargassum vulgare were extracted with chloroform/methanol 2:1 and 1:2 (v/v at room temperature. After performing Folch partition of the crude lipid extract, the lipids recovered from the Folch lower layer were fractionated on a silica gel column eluted with chloroform, acetone and methanol. The fraction eluted with methanol, presented a strong orcinol-positive band characteristic of the presence of sulfatides when examined by TLC. This fraction was then purified by two successive silica gel column chromatography giving rise to fractions F4I86 and F4II90 that exhibited strong activity against herpes simplex virus type 1 and 2. The chemical structures present in both fractions were elucidated by ESI-MS and 1H/13C NMR analysis HSQC fingerprints based on their tandem–MS behavior as Sulfoquinovosyldiacylglycerols  (SQDGs. The main SQDG present in both fractions and responsible for the anti-herpes activity observed was identified as 1,2-di-O-palmitoyl-3-O-(6-sulfo-α-d-quinovopyranosyl-glycerol.

  19. Life cycle assessment of biofuel production from brown seaweed in Nordic conditions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alvarado-Morales, Merlin; Boldrin, Alessio; Karakashev, Dimitar B; Holdt, Susan L; Angelidaki, Irini; Astrup, Thomas

    2013-02-01

    The use of algae for biofuel production is expected to play an important role in securing energy supply in the next decades. A consequential life cycle assessment (LCA) and an energy analysis of seaweed-based biofuel production were carried out in Nordic conditions to document and improve the sustainability of the process. Two scenarios were analyzed for the brown seaweed (Laminaria digitata), namely, biogas production (scenario 1) and bioethanol+biogas production (scenario 2). Potential environmental impact categories under investigation were Global Warming, Acidification and Terrestrial Eutrophication. The production of seaweed was identified to be the most energy intensive step. Scenario 1 showed better performance compared to scenario 2 for all impact categories, partly because of the energy intensive bioethanol separation process and the consequently lower overall efficiency of the system. For improved environmental performance, focus should be on optimization of seaweed production, bioethanol distillation, and management of digestate on land. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  20. Antimicrobial potential of selected brown seaweeds from Vedalai coastal waters, Gulf of Mannar

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Manivannan K; Karthikai devi G; Anantharaman P; Balasubramanian T

    2011-01-01

    Objective:To evaluate the antimicrobial activity ofTurbinaria conoides(T. conoides), Padina gymnospora (P. gymnospora) andSargassum tenerrimum against human bacterial and fungal pathogens.Methods: The antimicrobial activities of the extracts against various organisms were tested by using disc diffusion method.Results:The methanol extract showed the better result than the other extracts. Whereas, the strong antibacterial inhibition was noted in methanol extracts ofP. gymnospora againstBacillus subtilus (26.33±1.86)and the mild inhibition of ethanol extracts fromT. conoides againstKlebsiella pneumoniae (2.33±0.51). Acetone extraction ofP. gymnospora had strong antifungal inhibition againstCryptococcus neoformans(23.00±1.78), and acetone extract ofT. conoides had mild inhibition againstAspergillus niger(3.00±0.89). Conclusions:The seven different solvent extracts of seaweeds used in the present study have shown significant bacterial action. Further, a detailed study on the principle compound in the seaweeds which is responsible for antimicrobial activity is still needed and it can be achieved by using advanced separation techniques.

  1. KARAKTERISASI NATRIUM ALGINAT DARI Sargassum sp., Turbinaria sp. DAN Padina sp. [Characterization of Sodium Alginate from Sargassum sp., Turbinaria sp. and Padina sp.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wahyu Mushollaeni*

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available This study aimed to obtain characteristics of Na-alginate from brown seaweeds. The characteristics studied include chemical, physical parameters and its functional group by FTIR. The brown seaweeds were S. crassifolium, S. polycystum, Padina australis, S. echinocarpum, S. duplicatum, S. binderi, T. conoides, T. decurrens, growing on the coral coast of Gunung Kidul Yogyakarta. Thewater content, ash content, purity, and also Pb and Hg were 12.50-13.43%; 18.20-28.59%; 15.86-28.80%; 0.083±0.01-0.36±0.04 ppm and 0.002±0.01-0.3±0.,05 ppm respectively. Physical properties of the alginate, i.e viscosity and lightness were 25-39 cps and 46.2-52.3 (yellow to light brown, respectively the average yield was 16.93-30.50%. The FTIR analysis showed that Na-alginate of the samples and standard had the same functional group.

  2. Butanol fermentation of the brown seaweed Laminaria digitata by Clostridium beijerinckii DSM-6422

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hou, Xiaoru; From, Nikolaj; Angelidaki, Irini

    2017-01-01

    Seaweed represents an abundant, renewable, and fast-growing biomass resource for 3rd generation biofuel production. This study reports an efficient butanol fermentation process carried out by Clostridium beijerinckii DSM-6422 using enzymatic hydrolysate of the sugar-rich brown seaweed Laminaria...... digitata harvested from the coast of the Danish North Sea as substrate. The highest butanol yield (0.42g/g-consumed-substrates) compared to literature was achieved, with a significantly higher butanol:acetone-butanol-ethanol (ABE) molar ratio (0.85) than typical (0.6). This demonstrates the possibility...... of using the seaweed L. digitata as a potential biomass for butanol production. For the first time, consumption of alginate components was observed by C. beijerinckii DSM-6422. The efficient utilization of sugars and lactic acid further highlighted the potential of using this strain for future development...

  3. Biological Properties of Fucoxanthin in Oil Recovered from Two Brown Seaweeds Using Supercritical CO2 Extraction

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Saravana Periaswamy Sivagnanam

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available The bioactive materials in brown seaweeds hold great interest for developing new drugs and healthy foods. The oil content in brown seaweeds (Saccharina japonica and Sargassum horneri was extracted by using environmentally friendly supercritical CO2 (SC-CO2 with ethanol as a co-solvent in a semi-batch flow extraction process and compared the results with a conventional extraction process using hexane, ethanol, and acetone mixed with methanol (1:1, v/v. The SC-CO2 method was used at a temperature of 45 °C and pressure of 250 bar. The flow rate of CO2 (27 g/min was constant for the entire extraction period of 2 h. The obtained oil from the brown seaweeds was analyzed to determine their valuable compounds such as fatty acids, phenolic compounds, fucoxanthin and biological properties including antioxidant, antimicrobial, and antihypertension effects. The amounts of fucoxanthin extracted from the SC-CO2 oils of S. japonica and S. horneri were 0.41 ± 0.05 and 0.77 ± 0.07 mg/g, respectively. High antihypertensive activity was detected when using mixed acetone and methanol, whereas the phenolic content and antioxidant property were higher in the oil extracted by SC-CO2. The acetone–methanol mix extracts exhibited better antimicrobial activities than those obtained by other means. Thus, the SC-CO2 extraction process appears to be a good method for obtaining valuable compounds from both brown seaweeds, and showed stronger biological activity than that obtained by the conventional extraction process.

  4. Biological Properties of Fucoxanthin in Oil Recovered from Two Brown Seaweeds Using Supercritical CO2 Extraction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sivagnanam, Saravana Periaswamy; Yin, Shipeng; Choi, Jae Hyung; Park, Yong Beom; Woo, Hee Chul; Chun, Byung Soo

    2015-05-29

    The bioactive materials in brown seaweeds hold great interest for developing new drugs and healthy foods. The oil content in brown seaweeds (Saccharina japonica and Sargassum horneri) was extracted by using environmentally friendly supercritical CO2 (SC-CO2) with ethanol as a co-solvent in a semi-batch flow extraction process and compared the results with a conventional extraction process using hexane, ethanol, and acetone mixed with methanol (1:1, v/v). The SC-CO2 method was used at a temperature of 45 °C and pressure of 250 bar. The flow rate of CO2 (27 g/min) was constant for the entire extraction period of 2 h. The obtained oil from the brown seaweeds was analyzed to determine their valuable compounds such as fatty acids, phenolic compounds, fucoxanthin and biological properties including antioxidant, antimicrobial, and antihypertension effects. The amounts of fucoxanthin extracted from the SC-CO2 oils of S. japonica and S. horneri were 0.41 ± 0.05 and 0.77 ± 0.07 mg/g, respectively. High antihypertensive activity was detected when using mixed acetone and methanol, whereas the phenolic content and antioxidant property were higher in the oil extracted by SC-CO2. The acetone-methanol mix extracts exhibited better antimicrobial activities than those obtained by other means. Thus, the SC-CO2 extraction process appears to be a good method for obtaining valuable compounds from both brown seaweeds, and showed stronger biological activity than that obtained by the conventional extraction process.

  5. Effect of brown seaweed lipids on fatty acid composition and lipid hydroperoxide levels of mouse liver.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Airanthi, M K Widjaja-Adhi; Sasaki, Naoya; Iwasaki, Sayaka; Baba, Nobuko; Abe, Masayuki; Hosokawa, Masashi; Miyashita, Kazuo

    2011-04-27

    Brown seaweed lipids from Undaria pinnatifida (Wakame), Sargassum horneri (Akamoku), and Cystoseira hakodatensis (Uganomoku) contained several bioactive compounds, namely, fucoxanthin, polyphenols, and omega-3 polyunsaturated fatty acids (PUFA). Fucoxanthin and polyphenol contents of Akamoku and Uganomoku lipids were higher than those of Wakame lipids, while Wakame lipids showed higher total omega-3 PUFA content than Akamoku and Uganomoku lipids. The levels of docosahexaenoic acid (DHA) and arachidonic acid (AA) in liver lipids of KK-A(y) mouse significantly increased by Akamoku and Uganomoku lipid feeding as compared with the control, but not by Wakame lipid feeding. Fucoxanthin has been reported to accelerate the bioconversion of omega-3 PUFA and omega-6 PUFA to DHA and AA, respectively. The higher hepatic DHA and AA level of mice fed Akamoku and Uganomoku lipids would be attributed to the higher content of fucoxanthin of Akamoku and Uganomoku lipids. The lipid hydroperoxide levels of the liver of mice fed brown seaweed lipids were significantly lower than those of control mice, even though total PUFA content was higher in the liver of mice fed brown seaweed lipids. This would be, at least in part, due to the antioxidant activity of fucoxanthin metabolites in the liver.

  6. Brown seaweed pigment as a dye source for photoelectrochemical solar cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Calogero, Giuseppe; Citro, Ilaria; Di Marco, Gaetano; Armeli Minicante, Simona; Morabito, Marina; Genovese, Giuseppa

    2014-01-01

    Chlorophylls based-dyes obtained from seaweeds represent attractive alternatives to the expensive and polluting pyridil based Ru complexes because of their abundance in nature. Another important characteristic is that the algae do not subtract either cropland or agricultural water, therefore do not conflict with agro-food sector. This pigment shows a typical intense absorption in the UV/blue (Soret band) and a less intense band in the red/near IR (Q band) spectral regions and for these reasons appear very promising as sensitizer dyes for DSSC. In the present study, we utilized chlorophylls from samples of the brown alga Undaria pinnatifida as sensitizer in DSSCs. The dye, extracted by frozen seaweeds and used without any chemical purification, showed a very good fill factor (0.69). Even the photelectrochemical parameters if compared with the existent literature are very interesting.

  7. Isolation and Partial Characterization of Bioactive Fucoxanthin from Himanthalia elongata Brown Seaweed: A TLC-Based Approach

    OpenAIRE

    2013-01-01

    Seaweeds are important sources of carotenoids, and numerous studies have shown the beneficial effects of these pigments on human health. In the present study, Himanthalia elongata brown seaweed was extracted with a mixture of low polarity solvents, and the crude extract was separated using analytical thin-layer chromatography (TLC). The separated compounds were tested for their potential antioxidant capacity and antimicrobial activity against Listeria monocytogenes bacteria using TLC bioautog...

  8. Galactolipids rather than phlorotannins as herbivore deterrents in the brown seaweed Fucus vesiculosus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deal, Michael S; Hay, Mark E; Wilson, Dean; Fenical, William

    2003-06-01

    The first investigation of seaweed chemical defense against herbivores involved the brown seaweed Fucus vesiculosus and suggested defense via phlorotannins. The first demonstration of seaweed induction of secondary metabolites in response to herbivory also involved the genus Fucus and assumed a defensive function for phlorotannins. Many other investigations correlate herbivore feeding preference with changing levels of phlorotannins in this genus and others, but few directly test the effects of phlorotannins. No studies have assessed Fucus chemical defenses using bioassay-guided separation to investigate the complete complement of compounds deterring herbivores. We investigated the deterrence of F. vesiculosus chemical extracts using herbivore bioassays to guide our chemical investigations. Although crude extracts from F. vesiculosus strongly deterred feeding by the sea urchin Arbacia punctulata, phlorotannins from this extract did not deter feeding at 2x or 4x natural concentration by dry mass. Feeding deterrence was due to: (1) a polar galactolipid in the ethyl acetate-soluble extract, and (2) a non-phenolic compound, or compounds, in the water-soluble extract. Although this is the first evidence of galactolipids deterring herbivores, such defenses could be geographically and taxonomically widespread. The galactolipid we discovered in Fucus occurs in marine dinoflagellates, and a related metabolite that deters herbivory has recently been discovered in a tropical green seaweed. We were unable to identify the second deterrent compound, but deterrence occurred in a fraction containing carbohydrates, including sulfated sugars, but no phlorotannins. Given the polarity of these chemical deterrents, they could co-occur with and confound bioassays of phlorotannins if investigators test phlorotannin-containing algal extracts without further purification.

  9. Bio-Prospecting of a Few Brown Seaweeds for Their Cytotoxic and Antioxidant Activities

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Vinayak, R.C.; Sabu, A.S.; Chatterji, A.

    australis > Spatoglossum variabile > Stoechospermum marginatum > Spatoglossum aspermum showed significant cytotoxic activity. A very high DPPH radical scavenging activity was exhibited by the methanolic extracts prepared from St. marginatum, Padina...

  10. Phytochemical analysis and antifungal activity of selected seaweeds from Okha coast, Gujarat, India

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    Isaiah Nirmal Kumar

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available Objective: To deal with the assessment of the chemical composition of carbohydrate, protein, phenol, flavanoid, chlorophyll, and carotenoid and antifungal activity of various marine seaweeds collected from Okha coast, Gujarat during September, 2013. Methods: Biochemical compounds of selected seaweeds were quantified and antifungal activity of these species belonging to red, green, and brown seaweeds was explored and the seaweeds were extracted in acetone, ethanol and chloroform. Results: The carbohydrate content was highest in Cystoseira indica Mairh, protein was highest in Gracilaria corticata J. Agardh and phenol content was highest in Padina boergesenii; flavanoid content was found greater in Cystoseira indica, chlorophyll content was found greater in Monostroma latissimum Wittrock and carotenoid content was more in Dictyopteris acrostichoides Bornet. The highest inhibiting effect was noted for Sargassum tenerrimum J. Agardh and Turbinaria ornata J. Agardh belonging to brown algae, against Aspergillus niger and Penicillium janthinellum in chloroform extracts and ethanolic extracts, which caused opportunistic infection of HIV-infected person, lung disease, aspergillosis, and otomycosis (fungal ear infections. Conclusions: The study reveals that the seaweeds contain high amount of biochemical constituents. Besides, the crude extracts of the seaweeds showed promising activity against the tested fungal pathogens. Therefore, seaweeds collected from Okha coast, Gujarat region are biochemical compounds with potential capacity which make them useful for screening natural products for pharmaceutical industry.

  11. Phytochemical analysis and antifungal activity of selected seaweeds from Okha coast, Gujarat, India

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Isaiah Nirmal Kumar; Megha Barot; Rita Kumar

    2015-01-01

    Objective:To deal with the assessment of the chemical composition of carbohydrate, protein, phenol, flavanoid, chlorophyll, and carotenoid and antifungal activity of various marine seaweeds collected from Okha coast, Gujarat during September, 2013. Methods:Biochemical compounds of selected seaweeds were quantified and antifungal activity of these species belonging to red, green, and brown seaweeds was explored and the seaweeds were extracted in acetone, ethanol and chloroform. Results:The carbohydrate content was highest inCystoseira indica Mairh, protein was highest inGracilaria corticataJ. Agardh and phenol content was highest inPadina boergesenii; flavanoid content was found greater inCystoseira indica, chlorophyll content was found greater inMonostroma latissimum Wittrock and carotenoid content was more inDictyopteris acrostichoides Bornet. The highest inhibiting effect was noted forSargassum tenerrimum J. Agardh andTurbinaria ornata J. Agardh belonging to brown algae, againstAspergillus niger andPenicillium janthinellum in chloroform extracts and ethanolic extracts, which caused opportunistic infection ofHIV-infected person, lung disease, aspergillosis, and otomycosis (fungal ear infections). Conclusions:The study reveals that the seaweeds contain high amount of biochemical constituents. Besides, the crude extracts of the seaweeds showed promising activity against the tested fungal pathogens. Therefore, seaweeds collected from Okha coast, Gujarat region are biochemical compounds with potential capacity which make them useful for screening natural products for pharmaceutical industry.

  12. The in Vitro Biological Activity of the Brazilian Brown Seaweed Dictyota mertensii against Leishmania amazonensis

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    Amanda Silva dos Santos Aliança

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available Seaweeds present a wide variety of interesting bioactive molecules. In the present work we evaluated the biological activity of the dichloromethane/methanol (2:1 extract (DME from the brown seaweed Dictyota mertensii against Leishmania amazonensis and its cytotoxic potential on mammalian cells. The extract showed significant inhibitory effect on the growth of promastigote forms (IC50 = 71.60 μg/mL and low toxicity against mammalian cells (CC50 = 233.10 μg/mL. The DME was also efficient in inhibiting the infection in macrophages, with CC50 of 81.4 μg/mL and significantly decreased the survival of amastigote forms within these cells. The selectivity index showed that DME was more toxic to both promastigote (SI = 3.25 and amastigote (SI = 2.86 forms than to macrophages. Increased NO production was observed in treated macrophages suggesting that besides acting directly on the parasites, the DME also shows an immunomodulatory effect on macrophages. Drastic ultrastructural alterations consistent with loss of viability and cell death were observed in treated parasites. Confocal microscopy and cytometry analyzes showed no significant impairment of plasma membrane integrity, whereas an intense depolarization of mitochondrial membrane could be observed by using propidium iodide and rhodamine 123 staining, respectively. The low toxicity to mammalian cells and the effective activity against promastigotes and amastigotes, point to the use of DME as a promising agent for the treatment of cutaneous leishmaniasis.

  13. The in vitro biological activity of the Brazilian brown seaweed Dictyota mertensii against Leishmania amazonensis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    dos Santos Aliança, Amanda Silva; dos Anjos, Keicyanne Fernanda Lessa; de Vasconcelos Reis, Thiago Nogueira; Higino, Taciana Mirely Maciel; Brelaz-de-Castro, Maria Carolina Accioly; Bianco, Éverson Miguel; de Figueiredo, Regina Celia Bressan Queiroz

    2014-09-09

    Seaweeds present a wide variety of interesting bioactive molecules. In the present work we evaluated the biological activity of the dichloromethane/methanol (2:1) extract (DME) from the brown seaweed Dictyota mertensii against Leishmania amazonensis and its cytotoxic potential on mammalian cells. The extract showed significant inhibitory effect on the growth of promastigote forms (IC50=71.60 μg/mL) and low toxicity against mammalian cells (CC50=233.10 μg/mL). The DME was also efficient in inhibiting the infection in macrophages, with CC50 of 81.4 μg/mL and significantly decreased the survival of amastigote forms within these cells. The selectivity index showed that DME was more toxic to both promastigote (SI=3.25) and amastigote (SI=2.86) forms than to macrophages. Increased NO production was observed in treated macrophages suggesting that besides acting directly on the parasites, the DME also shows an immunomodulatory effect on macrophages. Drastic ultrastructural alterations consistent with loss of viability and cell death were observed in treated parasites. Confocal microscopy and cytometry analyzes showed no significant impairment of plasma membrane integrity, whereas an intense depolarization of mitochondrial membrane could be observed by using propidium iodide and rhodamine 123 staining, respectively. The low toxicity to mammalian cells and the effective activity against promastigotes and amastigotes, point to the use of DME as a promising agent for the treatment of cutaneous leishmaniasis.

  14. Structural characterization of laminaran and galactofucan extracted from the brown seaweed Saccharina longicruris.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rioux, Laurie-Eve; Turgeon, Sylvie L; Beaulieu, Martin

    2010-09-01

    Brown seaweed contains several polysaccharides like laminaran, fucoidan and alginate. Laminaran is a beta-glucan that has shown anti-apoptotic and anti-tumoral activities, while galactofucan (fucoidan) is a sulfated polysaccharide that has displayed anticoagulant, anti-tumor, anti-thrombosis, anti-inflammatory and antiviral properties. In this study, crude laminaran and galactofucan (fucoidan) were extracted from the brown seaweed Saccharina longicruris at four harvest periods (M05, A05, N05 and J06). The galactofucan M05 and N05 fractions were depolymerized (RDP) over 2 or 4h to give 4 RDP fractions (M05 RDP 2H, M05 RDP 4H, N05 RDP 2H and N05 RDP 4H) whose molecular weights, monosaccharide compositions and glycosidic linkages were determined by GC-MS. The laminaran fraction gave a molecular weight range from 2900 to 3300 Da and contained between 50.6% and 68.6% d-glucose and an average of 1.3% D-mannitol. The presence of a beta-(1,3) linkage between D-glucose in the main chain was observed, with branching at positions 6 and 2. The M05 fraction contained less branching than other laminaran fractions, which might have influenced its conformation in solution and thus its activity. The crude galactofucan fractions displayed a molecular weight range from 638 to 1529 kDa, whereas the RDP fractions had molecular weights <30 kDa. The structure of the galactofucan fractions remained complex after depolymerization, with these also being more sulfated (30-39%) than the crude fractions (13-20%). The crude and RDP fractions contained 3-linked fucopyranose 4-sulfate and 6-linked galactopyranose 3-sulfate moieties, although the galactofucans isolated from M05 and J06 contained less 6-linked galactopyranose 3-sulfate than the A05 and N05 fractions.

  15. Value-added lipid production from brown seaweed biomass by two-stage fermentation using acetic acid bacterium and thraustochytrid.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arafiles, Kim Hazel V; Iwasaka, Hiroaki; Eramoto, Yuri; Okamura, Yoshiko; Tajima, Takahisa; Matsumura, Yukihiko; Nakashimada, Yutaka; Aki, Tsunehiro

    2014-11-01

    Thraustochytrid production of polyunsaturated fatty acids and xanthophylls have been generally sourced from crop-derived substrates, making the exploration of alternative feedstocks attractive since they promise increased sustainability and lower production costs. In this study, a distinct two-stage fermentation system was conceptualized for the first time, using the brown seaweed sugar mannitol as substrate for the intermediary biocatalyst Gluconobacter oxydans, an acetic acid bacterium, along with the marine thraustochytrid Aurantiochytrium sp. to produce the value-added lipids and xanthophylls. Jar fermenter culture resulted in seaweed mannitol conversion to fructose with an efficiency of 83 % by G. oxydans and, after bacteriostasis with sea salts, production of astaxanthin and docosahexaenoic acid by Aurantiochytrium sp. KH105. Astaxanthin productivity was high at 3.60 mg/L/day. This new system, therefore, widens possibilities of obtaining more varieties of industrially valuable products including foods, cosmetics, pharmaceuticals, and biofuel precursor lipids from seaweed fermentation upon the use of suitable thraustochytrid strains.

  16. Comparative study of polysaccharides from reproductive and sterile tissues of five brown seaweeds.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Skriptsova, Anna V; Shevchenko, Nataliya M; Tarbeeva, Daria V; Zvyagintseva, Tatiana N

    2012-06-01

    Sterile and reproductive tissues of five brown algae (Sargassum pallidum, Silvetia babingtonii, Fucus evanescens, Saccharina japonica, and Alaria ochotensis) from Russian Far East seas were compared for the content and monosaccharide composition of fucoidans as well as the content of laminarans and alginic acids. It was proved that reproduction has an apparent effect on fucoidan content and its monosaccharide composition. Fucoidan content in fertile tissues was shown to be 1.3-1.5 times as high as in sterile ones. Based on the present and previously reported data, we believe that fucoidan accumulation during the development of reproductive structure is a general trend for brown seaweeds. Reproduction also caused changes in the monosaccharide composition. As a result, fertile plants synthesized fucoidan with less heterogeneous monosaccharide composition in comparison with sterile ones. Structural changes of this polysaccharide are species-specific and perhaps depend on the type of the synthesized polysaccharide. The fertile plants of S. babingtonii yielded the highest fucoidan content [25% dry weight (dw)] among the tested species, whereas the maximum alginic acid content was found for the sterile tissues of S. japonica-up to 43% dw. There was no general trend in alginic acid content variation during sporulation. The alginic acid content was much higher in the sterile tissues of S. japonica in comparison with the fertile ones. On the contrary, the fertile tissues of A. ochotensis contained more alginic acid than the sterile ones.

  17. Fucoidans from the brown seaweed Adenocystis utricularis: extraction methods, antiviral activity and structural studies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ponce, Nora M A; Pujol, Carlos A; Damonte, Elsa B; Flores, María L; Stortz, Carlos A

    2003-01-20

    The brown seaweed Adenocystis utricularis (family Adenocystaceae, order Ectocarpales sensu lato) was extracted in parallel with three solvents usually utilized for obtaining fucoidans: distilled water, 2% calcium chloride solution and diluted hydrochloric acid (pH 2) solution. In each case, the extraction was effected at room temperature and then at 70 degrees C. The extraction yields and characteristics of the products were similar in the three cases, with only minor differences. The analytical features of the products indicate that two different types of fucoidans are present in this seaweed. One of them, mostly extracted at room temperature, is composed mainly of L-fucose, D-galactose and ester sulfate (the 'galactofucan'). The other product (the 'uronofucoidan') is the major component of the extracts obtained at 70 degrees C. It is composed mainly of fucose, accompanied by other monosaccharides (mostly Man, but also Glc, Xyl, Rha and Gal), significant amounts of uronic acids and low proportions of sulfate ester. Fractionation with the cationic detergent cetrimide has allowed achieving a better separation of the galactofucan and uronofucoidan components. The galactofucans show a high inhibitory activity against herpes simplex virus 1 and 2, with no cytotoxicity, whereas the uronofucoidans carry no antiviral activity. Structural studies on the galactofucan fractions were carried out by methylation analysis, desulfation and NMR spectroscopy. The fucan constituent is mainly composed of 3-linked alpha-L-fucopyranosyl backbone, mostly sulfated at C-4, and branched at C-2 with non-sulfated fucofuranosyl and fucopyranosyl units, and 2-sulfated fucopyranosyl units. The galactan moiety is more heterogeneous, with predominant D-galactopyranose units linked on C-3 and C-6, and sulfation mostly on C-4, even in terminal non-reducing units. It may be inferred that at least some of these galactose units carry the alpha-configuration.

  18. In vitro fermentation by human faecal bacteria of total and purified dietary fibres from brown seaweeds.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Michel, C; Lahaye, M; Bonnet, C; Mabeau, S; Barry, J L

    1996-02-01

    The in vitro degradation of dietary fibre from three brown seaweeds (Himanthalia elongata, Laminaria digitata and Undaria pinnatifida) was studied, using human faecal flora. Two sets of fibre were tested: (1) total algal fibres extracted from the whole algae, mainly composed of alginates, and (2) purified fibres (sulphated fucans, Na-alginates and laminarans) representative of those contained in the whole brown algae. Mannuronate, one algal component, was also investigated. Substrate disappearance and short-chain fatty acid (SCFA) production were monitored after 6, 12 and 24 h fermentation. Gas production was followed hourly during the first 9 h and then at 12 and 24 h. Sugarbeet fibre was used as a fermentation reference substrate. According to the fermentative indices used, most of each of the total algal fibres disappeared after 24 h (range 60-76%) but, unlike the reference substrate, they were not completely metabolized to SCFA (range 47-62%). Among the purified algal fibres, disappearance of laminarans was approximately 90% and metabolism to SCFA was approximately 85% in close agreement with the fermentation pattern of reference fibres. Sulphated fucans were not degraded. Na-alginates exhibited a fermentation pattern quite similar to those of the whole algal fibres with a more pronounced discrepancy between disappearance and production of SCFA: disappearance was approximately 83% but metabolism was only approximately 57%. Mannuronate was slowly fermented but its metabolism corresponded to its disappearance from the fermentative medium. Thus, the characteristic fermentation pattern of the total fibres from the three brown algae investigated was attributed to the peculiar fermentation of alginates, and mannuronate was shown not to be directly involved.

  19. Fucans, but not fucomannoglucuronans, determine the biological activities of sulfated polysaccharides from Laminaria saccharina brown seaweed.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Diego O Croci

    Full Text Available Sulfated polysaccharides from Laminaria saccharina (new name: Saccharina latissima brown seaweed show promising activity for the treatment of inflammation, thrombosis, and cancer; yet the molecular mechanisms underlying these properties remain poorly understood. The aim of this work was to characterize, using in vitro and in vivo strategies, the anti-inflammatory, anti-coagulant, anti-angiogenic, and anti-tumor activities of two main sulfated polysaccharide fractions obtained from L. saccharina: a L.s.-1.0 fraction mainly consisting of O-sulfated mannoglucuronofucans and b L.s.-1.25 fraction mainly composed of sulfated fucans. Both fractions inhibited leukocyte recruitment in a model of inflammation in rats, although L.s.-1.25 appeared to be more active than L.s.-1.0. Also, these fractions inhibited neutrophil adhesion to platelets under flow. Only fraction L.s.-1.25, but not L.s.-1.0, displayed anticoagulant activity as measured by the activated partial thromboplastin time. Investigation of these fractions in angiogenesis settings revealed that only L.s.-1.25 strongly inhibited fetal bovine serum (FBS induced in vitro tubulogenesis. This effect correlated with a reduction in plasminogen activator inhibitor-1 (PAI-1 levels in L.s.-1.25-treated endothelial cells. Furthermore, only parent sulfated polysaccharides from L. saccharina (L.s.-P and its fraction L.s.-1.25 were powerful inhibitors of basic fibroblast growth factor (bFGF induced pathways. Consistently, the L.s.-1.25 fraction as well as L.s.-P successfully interfered with fibroblast binding to human bFGF. The incorporation of L.s.-P or L.s.-1.25, but not L.s.-1.0 into Matrigel plugs containing melanoma cells induced a significant reduction in hemoglobin content as well in the frequency of tumor-associated blood vessels. Moreover, i.p. administrations of L.s.-1.25, as well as L.s.-P, but not L.s.-1.0, resulted in a significant reduction of tumor growth when inoculated into syngeneic mice

  20. The Edible Brown Seaweed Ecklonia cava Reduces Hypersensitivity in Postoperative and Neuropathic Pain Models in Rats

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jae Goo Kim

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available The current study was designed to investigate whether edible brown seaweed Ecklonia cava extracts exhibits analgesic effects in plantar incision and spared nerve injury (SNI rats. To evaluate pain-related behavior, we performed the mechanical withdrawal threshold (MWT and thermal hypersensitivity tests measured by von Frey filaments and a hot/cold plate analgesia meter. Pain-related behavior was also determined through analysis of ultrasonic vocalization. The results of experiments showed MWT values of the group that was treated with E. cava extracts by 300 mg/kg significantly increased; on the contrary, number of ultrasonic distress vocalization of the treated group was reduced at 6 h and 24 h after plantar incision operation (62.8%, p < 0.05. Moreover, E. cava 300 mg/kg treated group increased the paw withdrawal latency in hot-and cold-plate tests in the plantar incision rats. After 15 days of continuous treatment with E. cava extracts at 300 mg/kg, the treated group showed significantly alleviated SNI-induced hypersensitivity response by MWT compared with the control group. In conclusion, these results suggest that E. cava extracts have potential analgesic effects in the case of postoperative pain and neuropathic pain in rats.

  1. Inhibition of complement activation by natural sulfated polysaccharides (fucans) from brown seaweed.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blondin, C; Fischer, E; Boisson-Vidal, C; Kazatchkine, M D; Jozefonvicz, J

    1994-03-01

    In the present study, we demonstrate that natural sulfated polysaccharides (fucans) isolated from brown seaweed are potent inhibitors of human complement activation. A fucan fraction of chromatographic molecular weight 22,600, termed BS8, was found to inhibit classical and alternative pathway activation in whole serum in a dose-dependent fashion. Fucan BS8 inhibited formation of the classical pathway C3 convertase by interfering with C1 activation or by inhibiting C4 cleavage and the interaction between C4b and C2. The fucan also inhibited formation/function of the alternative pathway C3 convertase by suppressing the binding of B to C3b and by interfering with the stabilizing function of Properdin. The inhibitory effect of fucans on formation of the C3 convertases was dependent on the molecular weight of the polysaccharide for compounds of chromatographic molecular weight below 16,600. Fucan had no effect on the function of the terminal complex. Since fucans were more efficient than heparin in inhibiting activation of the classical pathway in whole serum and exhibited a lesser specific anticoagulant activity on a molar basis, our results suggest that these natural sulfated polysaccharides have a potential for use as anti-complementary and anti-inflammatory agents.

  2. Laminarin from Irish Brown Seaweeds Ascophyllum nodosum and Laminaria hyperborea: Ultrasound Assisted Extraction, Characterization and Bioactivity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shekhar U. Kadam

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available Ultrasound assisted extraction (UAE, purification, characterization and antioxidant activity of laminarin from Irish brown seaweeds Ascophyllum nodosum and Laminarina hyperborea were investigated. UAE was carried out using 60% ultrasonic power amplitude and 0.1 M hydrochloric acid for 15 min. Separately, solid-liquid extraction was carried in an orbital shaker using 0.1 M hydrochloric acid at 70 °C for 2.5 h. UAE with hydrochloric acid resulted in the highest concentration of laminarin, 5.82% and 6.24% on dry weight basis from A. nodosum and L. hyperborea, respectively. Purification of all extracts was carried out using molecular weight cut off dialysis at 10 kDa. Characterization of the laminarin fraction was carried out using matrix assisted laser desorption/ionization time-of-flight mass spectrometry. Antioxidant activity of A. nodosum and L. hyperborea extracts had 2,2-diphenyl-1-picrylhydrazyl (DPPH inhibition levels of 93.23% and 87.57%, respectively. Moreover, these extracts have shown inihibition of bacterial growth of Staphylcoccus aureus, Listeria monocytogenes, Escherichia coli and Salmonella typhimurium.

  3. Acid pretreatment and enzymatic saccharification of brown seaweed for polyhydroxybutyrate (PHB) production using Cupriavidus necator.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Azizi, Nahid; Najafpour, Ghasem; Younesi, Habibollah

    2017-08-01

    The brown seaweed Sargassum sp. was used as a feedstock to produce polyhydroxybutyarte (PHB) using Cupriavidus necator PTCC 1615. In order to release monomeric sugars, dilute acid hydrolysis of Sargassum sp. biomass was followed by enzymatic saccharification. In addition, the effect of different nitrogen sources was evaluated for PHB production. The fermentation of hydrolysate with the ammonium sulfate as selected nitrogen source resulted PHB yield of 0.54±0.01g/g reducing sugar. Then, NaCl was used as external stress factor which was added to the media. Addition of 8g/L NaCl had a positive impact on high PHB yield of 0.74±0.01g/g reducing sugar. Increasing trend of NaCl concentration to 16g/L was found to inhibit the production of PHB. Based on obtained results using 20g/L of reducing sugar, at desired condition the highest cell dry weight and PHB concentrations were 5.36±0.22 and 3.93±0.24g/L, respectively. The findings of this study reveal that Sargassum sp. is a promising feedstock for biopolymer production. The characteristics of produced PHB were analyzed by FTIR, differential scanning calorimetry and (1)H NMR. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  4. Extraction and characterization of protein from Irish brown seaweed Ascophyllum nodosum.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kadam, Shekhar U; Álvarez, Carlos; Tiwari, Brijesh K; O'Donnell, Colm P

    2017-09-01

    This study investigates traditional and non-conventional methods of extraction of protein from Irish brown seaweed A. nodosum. Acid, alkali, combined acid-alkali with and without ultrasound pretreatment were investigated for extraction of protein from A. nodosum. Molecular weight of protein was determined using high performance size exclusion chromatography and amino acid profiling was carried out using an amino acid analyzer. Combination of first acid and then alkali extraction was found to be the most efficient method of extraction among all methods investigated (59% of recovery); followed by single step of alkali extraction assisted with ultrasound (68.4μm) which was able to extract 57% of total protein. Alkaline extraction was shown to yield the best protein/algae liquefaction ratio (1.28). This can be attributed to the release of polysaccharide complexes first by acid and then solubilization of proteins by alkali solvent. The molecular weight of extracted protein was found to be relatively low, in the range of 2-4kDa average MW. The alkali method of extraction was found to be optimum for extraction of amino acids from A. nodosum. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  5. Evaluation of antibacterial activity of the brown Seaweed Turbinaria ornata (Turner J. Agardh from Egypt

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fatma Mohamed Elnabawy Ward

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available Objective: To investigate the potential antibacterial activities of ethanol extracts of Turbinaria ornata (T. ornata, Oleic acid (OA and palmitic acid (PA extracted from T. ornata as well as mixtures of OA and PA (1:1 against some bacterial species. Methods: Brown seaweed T. ornata was collected from Hurghada shores, Red Sea coast of Egypt. OA and PA were extracted from T. ornata. Ethanol extracts of T. ornata, OA, PA and mixtures of these two fatty acids (1:1 were tested for their antibacterial activities against Escherichia coli, Bacillus cereus, Bacillus subtilis, Klebsiella pneumonia and Staphylococcus aureus by the disc diffusion method. Results: Ethanol extracts of T. ornata, OA, PA and mixtures of OA and PA (1:1 showed antibacterial activities that increased significantly (least significant difference at 0.05 level with increasing concentrations against all tested bacteria. Different concentrations of ethanol extracts of T. ornata and extracted OA showed its highest activity against Bacillus subtilis, while PA and mixtures of PA and OA (1:1 showed its highest activity against Bacillus cereus. The maximum inhibition activities were shown for mixtures of OA and PA (1:1. Scanning electron microscope showed that mixtures of OA and PA (1:1 caused plasmolysis and reduction in cell size of Escherichia coli. Conclusions: Different concentrations of T. ornata and its fatty acids showed activities against all tested bacteria. Therefore, it is a potential source of natural antimicrobial compounds.

  6. Laminarin from Irish Brown Seaweeds Ascophyllum nodosum and Laminaria hyperborea: Ultrasound Assisted Extraction, Characterization and Bioactivity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kadam, Shekhar U; O'Donnell, Colm P; Rai, Dilip K; Hossain, Mohammad B; Burgess, Catherine M; Walsh, Des; Tiwari, Brijesh K

    2015-07-10

    Ultrasound assisted extraction (UAE), purification, characterization and antioxidant activity of laminarin from Irish brown seaweeds Ascophyllum nodosum and Laminarina hyperborea were investigated. UAE was carried out using 60% ultrasonic power amplitude and 0.1 M hydrochloric acid for 15 min. Separately, solid-liquid extraction was carried in an orbital shaker using 0.1 M hydrochloric acid at 70 °C for 2.5 h. UAE with hydrochloric acid resulted in the highest concentration of laminarin, 5.82% and 6.24% on dry weight basis from A. nodosum and L. hyperborea, respectively. Purification of all extracts was carried out using molecular weight cut off dialysis at 10 kDa. Characterization of the laminarin fraction was carried out using matrix assisted laser desorption/ionization time-of-flight mass spectrometry. Antioxidant activity of A. nodosum and L. hyperborea extracts had 2,2-diphenyl-1-picrylhydrazyl (DPPH) inhibition levels of 93.23% and 87.57%, respectively. Moreover, these extracts have shown inihibition of bacterial growth of Staphylcoccus aureus, Listeria monocytogenes, Escherichia coli and Salmonella typhimurium.

  7. Induction of attachment of the Mussel Perna perna by natural products from the brown seaweed Stypopodium zonale.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Soares, Angélica R; da Gama, Bernardo A P; da Cunha, Andrea P; Teixeira, Valéria L; Pereira, Renato C

    2008-01-01

    Marine invertebrates settle, attach, and/or metamorphose in response to signals from several sources, including seaweeds. In response to the aquaculture challenge of producing constant numbers of juveniles from cultured species, natural inducers have been screened for their ability to improve those processes. However, few chemical inducers of attachment of invertebrates have been identified, and even less of these were secondary metabolites. The goal of this work was to isolate the natural products responsible for induction activity using bioassay-guided fractionation of the organic extract of the brown seaweed Stypopodium zonale and the attachment of juveniles of the common brown mussel, Perna perna, as a model. The meroditerpene epitaondiol, identified by comparison of spectral data with the literature, promoted as much as 4.7 times more mussel attachment compared to controls at the natural concentration found in this alga (0.041% of the crude extract or 0.012% of algal dry weight). This is the first report showing that a seaweed produces terpenoid compounds as cues for invertebrate attachment, and future studies evaluating this action on settlement of mussels in the field are expected to improve aquaculture technology by increasing mussel spat production.

  8. Evaluation of the proximate, fatty acid and mineral composition of representative green, brown and red seaweeds from the Persian Gulf of Iran as potential food and feed resources.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rohani-Ghadikolaei, Kiuomars; Abdulalian, Eessa; Ng, Wing-Keong

    2012-12-01

    The proximate, fatty acid and mineral composition were determined for green (Ulva lactuca and Enteromorpha intestinalis), brown (Sargassum ilicifolium and Colpomenia sinuosa) and red (Hypnea valentiae and Gracilaria corticata) seaweeds collected from the Persian Gulf of Iran. Results showed that the seaweeds were high in carbohydrate (31.8-59.1%, dry weight) and ash (12.4-29.9%) but low in lipid content (1.5-3.6%). The protein content of red or green seaweeds was significantly higher (p brown seaweeds. The fatty acid composition of various seaweed lipids varied considerably with 51.9-67.4% of saturates, 22.0-32.9% of monoenes and 9.2-19.1% of polyunsaturated fatty acids (PUFA). E. intestinalis contained the highest total n-3 PUFA content with the lowest n-6/n-3 ratio. Persian Gulf seaweeds contained higher concentrations of all the minerals examined (K, Mg, Fe, Mn, Cu, Zn and Co) compared to terrestrial vegetables. Seaweeds could potentially be used as a food or feed additive in Iran.

  9. Antimicrobial potential of selected brown seaweeds from Vedalai coastal waters, Gulf of Mannar

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    K Manivannan

    2011-04-01

    Conclusions: The seven different solvent extracts of seaweeds used in the present study have shown significant bacterial action. Further, a detailed study on the principle compound in the seaweeds which is responsible for antimicrobial activity is still needed and it can be achieved by using advanced separation techniques.

  10. The effect of deodorization on volatile compositions of fucoidan extracted from brown seaweed (Sargassum sp.)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khalafu, Sharifah Habibah Syed; Mustapha, Wan Aida Wan; Lim, Seng Joe; Maskat, Mohamad Yusof

    2016-11-01

    Fucoidan is a biologically active polysaccharide that were made up of complex mixture of fucose, sulfate and uronic acid. This study was conducted to identify the volatile compositions of crude fucoidan and deodorized fucoidans extracted from brown seaweed Sargassum sp. (Fsar). The volatile compositions was also compared with a standard commercial fucoidan (Fysk). Fucoidan was extracted from Sargassum sp. originated in coastal area of Indonesia, by using a low pH acid extraction method. Approximately 20 mL of 1% freshly extracted fucoidan was then subjected to deodorization process by using three different method i.e., by treating it with 10 g activated carbon (Fac), 0.4 g ion exchange resin, Amberlite 67 (Fresin) and 2 mL of 1% calcium carbonate (FCaCO3) and incubated for 12 hrs before further analysis. Forty-six volatile compounds were successfully identified in all of the five samples by using Headspace-Solid Phase Microextraction (HS-SPME) and analysed by using Gas Chromatography Mass Spectrometer (GCMS). In Fsar, 72% of the total volatile constituents were identified as aromatic hydrocarbons, 23% hydrocarbons and 5% alcohols. In Fysk, all compounds detected are in group hydrocarbons. In Fsar, all of the compounds identified were classified as odor active compounds which had a contribution to unpleasant odor in fucoidan. After deodorization, 72% of aromatic hydrocarbons detected in Fsar were reported to be absent in all deodorized fucoidans. Both Fresin and FCaCO3 showed a reduction in peak area percentages of phenol, 2,4-bis (1,1-dimethylethyl)- from Fsar (1.30%) to 0.79 and 1.07% respectively. Meanwhile in Fac, no presence of phenol, 2,4-bis (1,1-dimethylethyl) was reported. These findings are essential to propel the advancement of research in deodorization technologies of marine products, especially fucoidans.

  11. Structural characterization of a new anticoagulant fucan sulfate from the brown seaweed Ecklonia kurome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nishino, T; Nagumo, T; Kiyohara, H; Yamada, H

    1991-04-02

    Methylation analysis of a fucose-containing, sulfated polysaccharide (C-II), which was isolated from the brown seaweed Ecklonia kurome and has a potent anticoagulant activity, showed the presence of 3-O- and 3,4-O-disubstituted fucopyranosyl residues in addition to small proportions of nonreducing, terminal fucofuranosyl and fucopyranosyl groups, and 2,3-di-O- and 2,3,4-tri-O-substituted fucopyranosyl and galactopyranosyl residues with various glycosidic linkages. Methanolysis of C-II gave several neutral oligosaccharide fractions in small proportions and two high-molecular-weight acidic fractions in large proportions. Methylation analysis of the low-sulfated acidic fraction showed that the proportion of 3-O-linked fucosyl residues increases and that of 3,4-O-disubstituted decreased as compared to C-II. Methylation and g.l.c.-m.s. analysis of the neutral oligosaccharide fractions showed the presence of Fuc-(1----3)-Fuc and a fucosyl trisaccharide, in addition to small proportions of Gal-(1----4)-Fuc, Fuc-(1----2)-Fuc, Fuc-(1----4)-Fuc, Fuc-(1----2)-Gal, and Fuc----Gal----Fuc. Methylated C-II was also desulfated by methanolysis, followed by remethylation with (2H3)methyl iodide, and most of (2H3)methyl groups were linked to O-4 of the 3-O-linked fucosyl residues. These results suggested a highly branched, new type of fucan sulfate containing a backbone of (1----3)-linked L-fucosyl residues having sulfate groups mainly attached to C-4.

  12. Evaluation of antibacterial activity of the brown SeaweedTurbinaria ornata (Turner) J. Agardh from Egypt

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Fatma Mohamed Elnabawy Ward; Mohamed Ali Deyab

    2016-01-01

    Objective:To investigate the potential antibacterial activities of ethanol extracts ofTurbinaria ornata(T. ornata), Oleic acid (OA) and palmitic acid (PA) extracted fromT. ornataas well as mixtures of OA and PA (1:1) against some bacterial species. Methods: Brown seaweedT. ornata was collected from Hurghada shores, Red Sea coast of Egypt. OA and PA were extracted fromT. ornata. Ethanol extracts ofT. ornata, OA, PA and mixtures of these two fatty acids (1:1) were tested for their antibacterial activities against Escherichia coli,Bacillus cereus,Bacillus subtilis,Klebsiella pneumonia andStaphylococcus aureusby the disc diffusion method. Results:Ethanol extracts ofT. ornata, OA, PA and mixtures of OA and PA (1:1) showed antibacterial activities that increased significantly (least significant difference at 0.05 level) with increasing concentrations against all tested bacteria. Different concentrations of ethanol extracts ofT. ornataand extracted OA showed its highest activity againstBacillus subtilis, while PA and mixtures of PA and OA (1:1) showed its highest activity againstBacillus cereus. The maximum inhibition activities were shown for mixtures of OA and PA (1:1). Scanning electron microscope showed that mixtures of OA and PA (1:1) caused plasmolysis and reduction in cell size ofEscherichia coli. Conclusions:Different concentrations ofT. ornata and its fatty acids showed activities against all tested bacteria. Therefore, it is a potential source of natural antimicrobial compounds.

  13. Assessment of the functional properties of protein extracted from the brown seaweed Himanthalia elongata (Linnaeus) S. F. Gray

    OpenAIRE

    2016-01-01

    A protein extract from the brown seaweed Himanthalia elongata (Linnaeus) S. F. Gray was prepared and its functional properties, colour and amino acid composition were assessed for its potential future use by the food industry. The total content of amino acids was determined as 54.02 ± 0.46 g amino acids/kg dry weight, with high levels of the essential amino acids lysine and methionine. SDS-PAGE showed 5 protein bands with molecular weights of 71.6, 53.7, 43.3, 36.4 and 27.1 kDa. The water hol...

  14. Induced resistance to periwinkle grazing in the brown seaweed Fucus vesiculosus (Phaeophyceae): molecular insights and seaweed-mediated effects on herbivore interactions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Flöthe, Carla R; Molis, Markus; John, Uwe

    2014-06-01

    Herbivory is a key factor for controlling seaweed biomass and community structure. To cope with grazers, constitutive and inducible defenses have evolved in macroalgae. Inducible chemical defenses show grazer-specificity and, at the same time, have the potential to mediate interactions among different herbivores. Furthermore, temporal variations in defense patterns, which may adjust antiherbivory responses to grazing pressure, were reported in two brown seaweeds. However, underlying cellular processes are only rudimentarily characterized. To investigate the response of Fucus vesiculosus (L.) to periwinkle (Littorina obtusata) grazing, feeding assays were conducted at several times during a 33 d induction experiment. Underlying cellular processes were analyzed through gene expression profiling. Furthermore, direct processes driving the antiherbivory response to periwinkle grazing and indirect effects on another herbivore, the isopod Idotea baltica, were elucidated. F. vesiculosus showed multiple defense pulses in response to periwinkle grazing, suggesting a high level of temporal variability in antiherbivory traits. Defense induction was accompanied by extensive transcriptome changes. Approximately 400 genes were significantly up-/down-regulated relative to controls, including genes relevant for translation and the cytoskeleton. Genes involved in photosynthesis were mostly down-regulated, while genes related to the respiratory chain were up-regulated, indicating alterations in resource allocation. The comparison of genes regulated in response to isopod (previous study) and periwinkle grazing suggests specific induction of several genes by each herbivore. However, grazing by both herbivores induced similar metabolic processes in F. vesiculosus. These common defense-related processes reflected in strong indirect effects as isopods were also repelled after previous grazing by L. obtusata.

  15. Methanolic Extracts from Brown Seaweeds Dictyota cilliolata and Dictyota menstrualis Induce Apoptosis in Human Cervical Adenocarcinoma HeLa Cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dayanne Lopes Gomes

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available Carcinoma of the uterine cervix is the second most common female tumor worldwide, surpassed only by breast cancer. Natural products from seaweeds evidencing apoptotic activity have attracted a great deal of attention as new leads for alternative and complementary preventive or therapeutic anticancer agents. Here, methanol extracts from 13 species of tropical seaweeds (Rhodophytas, Phaeophyta and Chlorophyta collected from the Northeast of Brazil were assessed as apoptosis-inducing agents on human cervical adenocarcinoma (HeLa. All extracts showed different levels of cytotoxicity against HeLa cells; the most potent were obtained from the brown alga Dictyota cilliolata (MEDC and Dictyota menstrualis (MEDM. In addition, MEDC and MEDM also inhibits SiHa (cervix carcinoma cell proliferation. Studies with these two extracts using flow cytometry and fluorescence microscopy showed that HeLa cells exposed to MEDM and MEDC exhibit morphological and biochemical changes that characterize apoptosis as shown by loss of cell viability, chromatin condensation, phosphatidylserine externalization, and sub-G1 cell cycle phase accumulation, also MEDC induces cell cycle arrest in cell cycle phase S. Moreover, the activation of caspases 3 and 9 by these extracts suggests a mitochondria-dependent apoptosis route. However, other routes cannot be ruled out. Together, these results point out the methanol extracts of the brown algae D. mentrualis and D. cilliolata as potential sources of molecules with antitumor activity.

  16. Life cycle assessment of biofuel production from brown seaweed in Nordic conditions

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Alvarado-Morales, Merlin; Boldrin, Alessio; Karakashev, Dimitar Borisov

    2013-01-01

    The use of algae for biofuelproduction is expected to play an important role in securing energy supply in the next decades. A consequential lifecycleassessment (LCA) and an energy analysis of seaweed-based biofuelproduction were carried out in Nordicconditions to document and improve the sustaina......The use of algae for biofuelproduction is expected to play an important role in securing energy supply in the next decades. A consequential lifecycleassessment (LCA) and an energy analysis of seaweed-based biofuelproduction were carried out in Nordicconditions to document and improve...

  17. EVALUATION OF RECOVERABLE FUNCTIONAL LIPID COMPONENTS OF SEVERAL BROWN SEAWEEDS (PHAEOPHYTA) FROM JAPAN WITH SPECIAL REFERENCE TO FUCOXANTHIN AND FUCOSTEROL CONTENTS(1).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Terasaki, Masaru; Hirose, Atsushi; Narayan, Bhaskar; Baba, Yuta; Kawagoe, Chikara; Yasui, Hajime; Saga, Naotsune; Hosokawa, Masashi; Miyashita, Kazuo

    2009-08-01

    Fucoxanthin (Fx) and fucosterol (Fs) are characteristic lipid components of brown seaweeds that afford several health benefits to humans. This article describes the quantitative evaluation of lipids of 15 species of brown seaweeds with specific reference to Fx, Fs, and functional long-chain omega-6/omega-3 polyunsaturated fatty acids (PUFAs). In addition, fatty-acid composition of selected species was also accomplished in the study. Major omega-3 PUFAs in the brown seaweeds analyzed were α-linolenic acid (18:3n-3), octadecatetraenoic acid (18:4n-3), arachidonic acid (20:4n-6), and eicosapentaenoic acid (20:5n-3). Both Fx (mg · g(-1) dry weight [dwt]) and Fs (mg · g(-1) dwt) were determined to be relatively abundant in Sargassum horneri (Turner) C. Agardh (Fx, 3.7 ± 1.6; Fs, 13.4 ± 4.4) and Cystoseira hakodatensis (Yendo) Fensholt (Fx, 2.4 ± 0.9; Fs, 8.9 ± 2.0), as compared with other brown seaweed species. Studies related to seasonal variation in Fx, Fs, and total lipids of six brown algae [S. horneri, C. hakodatensis, Sargassum fusiforme (Harv.) Setch., Sargassum thunbergii (Mertens ex Roth) Kuntze, Analipus japonicus (Harv.) M. J. Wynne, and Melanosiphon intestinalis (D. A. Saunders) M. J. Wynne] indicated that these functional lipid components reached maximum during the period between January and March. The functional lipid components present in these seaweeds have the potential for application as nutraceuticals and novel functional ingredients after their recovery.

  18. Antioxidant, Anti-inflammatory and Antiproliferative Effects of Aqueous Extracts of Three Mediterranean Brown Seaweeds of the Genus Cystoseira

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mhadhebi, Lamia; Mhadhebi, Amel; Robert, Jacques; Bouraoui, Abderrahman

    2014-01-01

    Seaweeds have caused an emerging interest in the biomedical area, mainly due to their contents of bioactive substances which show great potential as anti-inflammatory, anti-microbial, anti-viral and anti-tumoral drugs. Despite the diversity in quality and quantity of the Mediterranean Tunisian coast flora, with its large contains of marine organisms and seaweeds, most of them have not yet been investigated for pharmacological and biological activities. Antioxidant, anti-inflammatory and antiproliferative effects of the aqueous extracts (AQ) of three brown seaweed respectively, Cystoseira crinita (AQ-Ccri), Cystoseira sedoides (AQ-Csed) and Cystoseira compressa (AQ-Ccom) were investigated. Antioxidant activity was evaluated using the DPPH assay. Total phenolic contents were measured using Folin–Ciocalteu method. The anti-inflammatory activity of these extracts was determined in-vivo, using carrageenan induced rat paw oedema assay. The antiproliferative activity was studied on normal cells (MDCK and rat fibroblast) and cancer (A549, MCF7 and HCT15) cell lines by the ability of the cells to metabolically reduce MTT formazan dyes, in comparison to a reference drug the Cisplatin. Results demonstrated that AQ-Ccri, AQ-Csed and AQ-Ccom extracts exhibited significant radical scavenging activity. AQ-Ccom extract had the highest total phenolic content. AQ-Ccri, AQ-Csed and AQ-Ccom extracts exhibited significant anti-inflammatory activity in a dose dependent manner by comparison to reference drugs. Moreover, AQ-Ccri, AQ-Csed and AQ-Ccom extracts showed an important antiproliferative activity against both Human tumor cell lines HCT15 and MCF7. These pharmacological efficacies of these AQ- extracts of Cystoseira were positively correlated with their total phenol content and their good antioxidant activity. The purification and the determination of chemical structures of compounds of these active aqueous extracts are under investigation. It could have a promising role in the

  19. Impact of different alginate lyases on combined cellulase–lyase saccharification of brown seaweed

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Manns, Dirk Martin; Nyffenegger, Christian; Saake, B.

    2016-01-01

    Two bacterial polysaccharide lyase (PL) family 7 alginate lyases (EC 4.2.2.-) from Sphingomonas sp. (SALy) and Flavobacterium sp. (FALy), respectively, were selected for heterologous, monocomponent expression in Escherichia coli. The thermal stability, pH, and temperature reaction optima and subs...... solubilization of sulfated fucoidan, whereas most of the nitrogen was recovered in the residual seaweed solids....

  20. Isolation and Partial Characterization of Bioactive Fucoxanthin from Himanthalia elongata Brown Seaweed: A TLC-Based Approach.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rajauria, Gaurav; Abu-Ghannam, Nissreen

    2013-01-01

    Seaweeds are important sources of carotenoids, and numerous studies have shown the beneficial effects of these pigments on human health. In the present study, Himanthalia elongata brown seaweed was extracted with a mixture of low polarity solvents, and the crude extract was separated using analytical thin-layer chromatography (TLC). The separated compounds were tested for their potential antioxidant capacity and antimicrobial activity against Listeria monocytogenes bacteria using TLC bioautography approach. For bio-autography, the coloured band on TLC chromatogram was visualized after spraying with DPPH and triphenyl-tetrazolium chloride reagents which screen antioxidant and antimicrobial compounds, respectively, and only one active compound was screened on the TLC plate. Preliminary identification of this active compound was done by comparing its colour and R f (retention factor) value with the authentic fucoxanthin standard. Further, the active compound was purified using preparative TLC. This purified compound showed a strong antioxidant (EC50: 14.8 ± 1.27 µg/mL) and antimicrobial (inhibition zone: 10.27 mm, 25 µg compound/disc) activities, which were examined by DPPH scavenging and agar disc-diffusion bioassay, respectively. The bioactivity shown by the purified compound was almost similar to the fucoxanthin standard. The characteristic UV-visible and FT-IR spectra of the purified active compound completely matched with the standard. Hence, the main active compound in H. elongata was identified as fucoxanthin.

  1. Isolation and Partial Characterization of Bioactive Fucoxanthin from Himanthalia elongata Brown Seaweed: A TLC-Based Approach

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gaurav Rajauria

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Seaweeds are important sources of carotenoids, and numerous studies have shown the beneficial effects of these pigments on human health. In the present study, Himanthalia elongata brown seaweed was extracted with a mixture of low polarity solvents, and the crude extract was separated using analytical thin-layer chromatography (TLC. The separated compounds were tested for their potential antioxidant capacity and antimicrobial activity against Listeria monocytogenes bacteria using TLC bioautography approach. For bio-autography, the coloured band on TLC chromatogram was visualized after spraying with DPPH and triphenyl-tetrazolium chloride reagents which screen antioxidant and antimicrobial compounds, respectively, and only one active compound was screened on the TLC plate. Preliminary identification of this active compound was done by comparing its colour and Rf (retention factor value with the authentic fucoxanthin standard. Further, the active compound was purified using preparative TLC. This purified compound showed a strong antioxidant (EC50: 14.8±1.27 µg/mL and antimicrobial (inhibition zone: 10.27 mm, 25 µg compound/disc activities, which were examined by DPPH scavenging and agar disc-diffusion bioassay, respectively. The bioactivity shown by the purified compound was almost similar to the fucoxanthin standard. The characteristic UV-visible and FT-IR spectra of the purified active compound completely matched with the standard. Hence, the main active compound in H. elongata was identified as fucoxanthin.

  2. Comparing the relative importance of water-borne cues and direct grazing for the induction of defenses in the brown seaweed Fucus vesiculosus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Flöthe, Carla R; John, Uwe; Molis, Markus

    2014-01-01

    Some seaweed species have been shown to release water-borne cues after herbivore attack, for example, to attract natural enemies of the herbivore. These cues may also be sensed by neighboring seaweeds and used to adjust their defenses in anticipation of a possible herbivore attack. Several studies indicated information transfer between seaweed individuals in the past, including the brown seaweed Fucus vesiculosus. Previous work showed induction of defenses in F. vesiculosus in response to water-borne cues released by isopod-grazed conspecifics. In contrast, another study on induced responses after exposure to cues from isopod-grazed neighbors using the same seaweed species yielded contradictory results. This study reassessed the ability of F. vesiculosus individuals to sense water-borne cues released by isopod-grazed neighbors in a series of experiments that monitored F. vesiculosus palatability in response to direct grazing by Idotea baltica and water-borne cues from isopod-grazed neighbors relative to unmanipulated seaweed pieces. Two-choice feeding assays were conducted with both fresh and reconstituted seaweed pieces. Direct grazing by I. baltica induced a chemical defense in F. vesiculosus, confirming results of previous studies. In contrast, evidence for increased herbivore resistance in seaweed pieces that were located downstream of isopod-grazed F. vesiculosus could not be provided. The lack of defense induction in response to grazing of conspecific neighbors may be explained by the environmental conditions and the scattered distribution of F. vesiculosus individuals in the intertidal zone of Helgoland, which may render resource investment in the emission and/or response to water-borne cues at this site unprofitable.

  3. Comparing the relative importance of water-borne cues and direct grazing for the induction of defenses in the brown seaweed Fucus vesiculosus.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carla R Flöthe

    Full Text Available Some seaweed species have been shown to release water-borne cues after herbivore attack, for example, to attract natural enemies of the herbivore. These cues may also be sensed by neighboring seaweeds and used to adjust their defenses in anticipation of a possible herbivore attack. Several studies indicated information transfer between seaweed individuals in the past, including the brown seaweed Fucus vesiculosus. Previous work showed induction of defenses in F. vesiculosus in response to water-borne cues released by isopod-grazed conspecifics. In contrast, another study on induced responses after exposure to cues from isopod-grazed neighbors using the same seaweed species yielded contradictory results. This study reassessed the ability of F. vesiculosus individuals to sense water-borne cues released by isopod-grazed neighbors in a series of experiments that monitored F. vesiculosus palatability in response to direct grazing by Idotea baltica and water-borne cues from isopod-grazed neighbors relative to unmanipulated seaweed pieces. Two-choice feeding assays were conducted with both fresh and reconstituted seaweed pieces. Direct grazing by I. baltica induced a chemical defense in F. vesiculosus, confirming results of previous studies. In contrast, evidence for increased herbivore resistance in seaweed pieces that were located downstream of isopod-grazed F. vesiculosus could not be provided. The lack of defense induction in response to grazing of conspecific neighbors may be explained by the environmental conditions and the scattered distribution of F. vesiculosus individuals in the intertidal zone of Helgoland, which may render resource investment in the emission and/or response to water-borne cues at this site unprofitable.

  4. Effects of extraction solvent on fucose content in fucoidan extracted from brown seaweed (Sargassum sp.) from Pulau Langkawi, Kedah, Malaysia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baba, Bibi Marliana; Mustapha, Wan Aida Wan; Joe, Lim Seng

    2016-11-01

    The objective of this study was to determine the effects of extraction solvent on the fucose content in fucoidan that had been isolated from Sargassum sp., which is a type of brown seaweed that was harvested in Pulau Langkawi, Kedah, Malaysia. There were three different solvents that were used in the extraction process in order to isolate the crude fucoidan including the hydrochloric acid, HCl, calcium chloride, CaCl2 solution and also the papain ezyme solution. Other extraction parameters that were the extraction temperature and time were fixed at three hours, at 45°C respectively. It was found that there was a significant different (p 0.05) amongst each other. Hence, this study indicated that the extraction of fucoidan using HCl tend to possess higher fucose content which will increase the potential of the extraction method to be used in the industries such as pharmaceuticals as well as the nutraceuticals.

  5. A randomised crossover placebo-controlled trial investigating the effect of brown seaweed (Ascophyllum nodosum and Fucus vesiculosus) on postchallenge plasma glucose and insulin levels in men and women.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paradis, Marie-Eve; Couture, Patrick; Lamarche, Benoît

    2011-12-01

    This study examined the impact of brown seaweed on post-load plasma glucose and insulin concentrations in men and women. Twenty-three participants (11 men, 12 women) aged 19-59 years were recruited in this double-blind, randomized, placebo-controlled crossover study. The test product consisted of a commercially available blend of brown seaweed (Ascophyllum nodosum and Fucus vesiculosus) with known inhibitory action on α-amylase and α-glucosidase activities (InSea²). Two 250 mg seaweed capsules and 2 placebo capsules were consumed on each occasion 30 min prior to the consumption of 50 g of carbohydrates from bread. Plasma glucose and insulin concentrations were measured over a period of 3 h postcarbohydrate ingestion at predetermined time points. Both treatments were separated by a 1-week washout period. Data were analysed using mixed models for repeated measures. Compared with placebo, consumption of seaweed was associated with a 12.1% reduction in the insulin incremental area under the curve (p = 0.04, adjusted for baseline) and a 7.9% increase in the Cederholm index of insulin sensitivity (p < 0.05). The single ingestion of 500 mg of brown seaweed had no significant effect on the glucose response (p = 0.24, adjusted for baseline). Glucose and insulin responses were similar between men and women. Consumption of the seaweed capsules was not associated with any adverse event. These data suggest that brown seaweed may alter the insulin homeostasis in response to carbohydrate ingestion.

  6. Brown seaweed processing: enzymatic saccharification of Laminaria digitata requires no pre-treatment

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Manns, Dirk; Andersen, Stinus K.; Saake, Bodo;

    2016-01-01

    of lamina having decreasing average surface area (100–0.1 mm2) with increased milling severity. Higher milling severity (lower rotating disc distance) also induced higher spontaneous carbohydrate solubilization from the material. Due to the seaweed material consisting of flat blades, the milling did...... with a mixture of alginate lyase and a cellulase preparation (Cellic®CTec2) on large-sized milled material released all available glucose within 8 h. Application of the cellulase preparation alone released only half of the available glucose. The alginate lyase catalysis apparently induced selective removal...

  7. Potential antioxidant capacity of sulfated polysaccharides from the edible marine brown seaweed Fucus vesiculosus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rupérez, Pilar; Ahrazem, Oussama; Leal, J Antonio

    2002-02-13

    Fucus vesiculosus was sequentially extracted with water at 22 degrees C (fraction 1 (F1)) and 60 degrees C (F2), and with 0.1 M HCl (F3) and 2 M KOH (F4) at 37 degrees C. Soluble fractions (42.3% yield) were composed of neutral sugars (18.9-48 g/100 g), uronic acids (8.8-52.8 g/100 g), sulfate (2.4-11.5 g/100 g), small amounts of protein (water-soluble fractions. Sulfated polysaccharides from edible seaweeds potentially could be used as natural antioxidants by the food industry.

  8. Crustose coralline algae and associated microbial biofilms deter seaweed settlement on coral reefs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gomez-Lemos, Luis A.; Diaz-Pulido, Guillermo

    2017-06-01

    Crustose coralline algae (CCA), a group of calcifying red algae found commonly in benthic marine ecosystems worldwide, perform essential ecological functions on coral reefs, including creating benthic substrate, stabilizing the reef structure and inducing coral settlement. An important feature of CCA is the ability to keep their surfaces free of epiphytic algae, thereby reducing algal overgrowth and allowing them access to light. However, the mechanisms by which CCA prevent settlement of opportunistic seaweeds (fleshy macroalgae) are not fully understood, nor is whether these mechanisms vary among CCA species. In our study based on the Great Barrier Reef, we demonstrate that three common CCA species ( Titanoderma pustulatum, Porolithon onkodes and Neogoniolithon sp.) have a remarkable ability to deter settlement of seaweed spores. We provide experimental evidence that the CCA use allelopathy and microbial inhibition against the settlement of spores of the brown seaweed Padina boergesenii. Methanol extracts of allelopathic compounds from T. pustulatum, Po. onkodes and Neogoniolithon sp. significantly reduced the settlement of Pa. boergesenii spores by 4.3 times, 3.0 and 3.8 times, respectively. Further, we found that microbial biofilms, while having a lower inhibitory effect than allelopathic compounds, also reduced seaweed settlement of Pa. boergesenii. Our study demonstrates that allelopathy and microbial inhibition, in addition to epithallial tissue sloughing, are mechanisms employed by CCA to prevent the settlement of epiphytic algae. Understanding the mechanisms by which CCA avoid seaweed overgrowth contributes to our understanding of the dynamics of seaweed proliferations on reefs and to the ecological knowledge of this important group of reef-building organisms.

  9. Seasonal proximate and fatty acid variations of some seaweeds from the northeastern Mediterranean coast

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sevim Polat

    2013-05-01

    Full Text Available The seasonal nutritional value of red (Jania rubens, Laurencia papillosa, Spyridia filamentosa and Dasya rigidula and brown macroalgae (Padina pavonia and Stypopodium schimperi was evaluated as a dietary supplement for human and animal nutrition based on proximate and fatty acid profiles. The protein content varied from 0.80% (L. papillosa to 3.41% (J. rubens of wet weight with the highest values in winter. The highest lipid levels were recorded in S. schimperi (2.03% in spring, 2.16% in summer, the lowest in S. filamentosa (0.08% in spring. The ash content of J. rubens (46.11-51.63% was significantly higher than that of the other species (2.28-16.57%. Analysis of the fatty acid composition showed that these seaweed species are very rich in n-3 fatty acids.

  10. α-Amylase and α-Glucosidase Inhibition by Brown Seaweed (Sargassum sp Extracts

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Muhammad Firdaus

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Inhibition of intestinal α-amylase and α-glucosidase is an important strategy to control post-prandial hyperglycemia associated with diabetes mellitus. In vitro inhibitory effects of crude extracts of seaweed against α-amylase and α-glucosidase were studied. Crude ethyl acetate extracts of Sargassum aquifolium were the stronger inhibitor to α-amylase and α-glucosidase than others. Furthermore, Sargassum aquifolium ethyl acetate extract significantly suppressed the rise in postprandial glucose level after oral administration of glucose in normal rats. The results of this study suggest that the crude Sargassum aquifolium extract may suppress the rise in postprandial hyperglycemia in vivo in part, through inhibition of alpha amylase and glucosidase

  11. Fucans, sulfated polysaccharides extracted from brown seaweeds, inhibit vascular smooth muscle cell proliferation. II. Degradation and molecular weight effect.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Logeart, D; Prigent-Richard, S; Boisson-Vidal, C; Chaubet, F; Durand, P; Jozefonvicz, J; Letourneur, D

    1997-12-01

    Fucan, a sulfated polysaccharide extracted from brown seaweeds, inhibits smooth muscle cell (SMC) proliferation with a higher antiproliferative activity than heparin (Logeart et al., Eur. J. Cell Biol. 74, 1997, this issue). In order to investigate the structure-activity relationship of fucan on SMC growth, we have prepared by size exclusion chromatography fucan fractions of various molecular masses ranging from 5.5 to 556 kDa. Our experiments showed that the antiproliferative activity is dependent on the molecular weight of the polysaccharide. The molecular weight threshold indicated that about 30 saccharidic units on fucan were necessary to give the antiproliferative activity on SMCs. A kinetics study of DNA synthesis using tritiated thymidine uptake was also performed with different molecular weight fucan fractions. Although all tested fractions acted as soon as the cells enter the first cell cycle, the duration and potency of action varied. Moreover, displacement experiments of iodinated fucan revealed that the low molecular fucan fraction interacted weakly with the binding sites. Finally, gel permeation chromatography of internalized radiolabeled heparin and fucans was performed with SMCs. A rapid degradation of internalized heparin was observed, whereas only low molecular weight fucan fractions were partially degraded by SMCs. Together, these results indicate the significance of molecular weight on the antiproliferative activity of fucans on SMCs, and might help to understand their mechanism of action. In addition, the degradation experiments with internalized heparin and fucans ruled out a direct link between polysaccharide degradation and the antiproliferative effect on SMCs.

  12. Inhibition of complement activation by water-soluble polysaccharides of some far-eastern brown seaweeds.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zvyagintseva, T N; Shevchenko, N M; Nazarova, I V; Scobun, A S; Luk'yanov, P A; Elyakova, L A

    2000-07-01

    Fucoidans and laminarans from Laminaria cichorioides, Laminaria japonica, Fucus evanescens, laminaran from Laminaria gurjanovae, other beta-D-glucans (translam, pustulan and zymosan) and lambda-carrageenan from Chondrus armatus were used to study the effect of water-soluble polysaccharides from seaweeds on the alternative pathway of complement (APC). beta-D-Glucans and fucoidans under study differed appreciably from each other by structural characteristics, and also by degree of purification. beta-D-glucans, on ability to bind complement, ranked in a line according to a degree of their purification. Highly purified beta-D-glucans under study did not reveal an ability to bind complement. The fucoidans were divided conventionally into three groups according to their action on APC. Highly sulfated alpha-L-fucan from L. cichorioides with the greatest activity toward APC and caused 50% inhibition of reaction of activation (RA) of APC in a concentration of 0.5-0.7 mg/ml. Opposite 50% of inhibition of lysis of erythrocytes by sulfated heterogeneous fucoidan from L. japonica was achieved with 20 mg/ml. All other fucoidans and lambda-carrageenan have activity at 6-10 mg/ml concentration. Decreasing the sulfate content from 36% up to 9% in sample fucoidans under study was not reflected practically in the 50% inhibition concentration. Apparently, the degree of sulfating of fucoidans did not influence their action on APC. But the positive influence of fucose in structure of polysaccharide was obvious.

  13. Structural, physicochemical and antioxidant properties of sodium alginate isolated from a Tunisian brown seaweed.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sellimi, Sabrine; Younes, Islem; Ayed, Hanen Ben; Maalej, Hana; Montero, Veronique; Rinaudo, Marguerite; Dahia, Mostefa; Mechichi, Tahar; Hajji, Mohamed; Nasri, Moncef

    2015-01-01

    An original sodium alginate from Tunisian seaweed (Cystoseira barbata) was purified and characterized by circular dichroism (CD) and ATR-FTIR spectroscopies. ATR-FTIR spectrum of C. barbata sodium alginate (CBSA) showed the characteristic bands of mannuronic (M) and guluronic acids (G). The M/G ratio was estimated by CD (M/G = 0.59) indicating that CBSA was composed of 37% mannuronic acid and 63% guluronic acid. The analysis of viscosity of CBSA showed evidence of pseudoplastic fluid behaviour. The emulsifying capacity of CBSA was evaluated at different concentrations (0.25-3%), temperatures (25-100 °C) and pH (3.0-11.0). Compared to most commercial emulsifiers, the emulsion formulated by CBSA was found to be less sensitive to temperature changes and more stable at acidic pH. CBSA was examined for antioxidant properties using various antioxidant assays. CBSA exhibited important DPPH radical-scavenging activity (74% inhibition at a concentration of 0.5 mg/ml) and considerable ferric reducing potential. Effective hydroxyl-radical scavenging activity (82% at a concentration of 5 mg/ml) and potent protection activity against DNA breakage were also recorded for CBSA. However, in the linoleate-β-carotene system, CBSA exerted moderate antioxidant activity (60% at a concentration of 1.5 mg/ml). Therefore, CBSA can be used as a natural ingredient in food industry or in the pharmaceutical field. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  14. Important Determinants for Fucoidan Bioactivity: A Critical Review of Structure-Function Relations and Extraction Methods for Fucose-Containing Sulfated Polysaccharides from Brown Seaweeds

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ale, Marcel Tutor; Mikkelsen, Jørn Dalgaard; Meyer, Anne S.

    2011-01-01

    Seaweeds—or marine macroalgae—notably brown seaweeds in the class Phaeophyceae, contain fucoidan. Fucoidan designates a group of certain fucose-containing sulfated polysaccharides (FCSPs) that have a backbone built of (1→3)-linked α-l-fucopyranosyl or of alternating (1→3)- and (1→4)-linked α......-l-fucopyranosyl residues, but also include sulfated galactofucans with backbones built of (1→6)-β-d-galacto- and/or (1→2)-β-d-mannopyranosyl units with fucose or fuco-oligosaccharide branching, and/or glucuronic acid, xylose or glucose substitutions. These FCSPs offer several potentially beneficial bioactive functions...... for humans. The bioactive properties may vary depending on the source of seaweed, the compositional and structural traits, the content (charge density), distribution, and bonding of the sulfate substitutions, and the purity of the FCSP product. The preservation of the structural integrity of the FCSP...

  15. Intriguing asexual life in marginal populations of the brown seaweed Fucus vesiculosus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tatarenkov, A; Bergström, L; Jönsson, R B; Serrão, E A; Kautsky, L; Johannesson, K

    2005-02-01

    Reproduction of attached large brown algae is known to occur only by sexual zygotes. Using microsatellites we show evolution of asexual reproduction in the bladder wrack promoting population persistence in the brackish water Baltic Sea (Fucus vesiculosus is dominated by a single clone but clonal reproduction is also present in the common form of the species. We describe a possible mechanism for vegetative reproduction of attached algae, and conclude that clonality plays an important role in persistence and dispersal of these marginal populations, in which sexual reproduction is impaired by low salinity.

  16. LPS-induced NO inhibition and antioxidant activities of ethanol extracts and their solvent partitioned fractions from four brown seaweeds

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cho, Myoung Lae; Lee, Dong-Jin; Lee, Hyi-Seung; Lee, Yeon-Ju; You, Sang Guan

    2013-12-01

    The nitric oxide inhibitory (NOI) and antioxidant (ABTS and DPPH radical scavenging effects with reducing power) activities of the ethanol (EtOH) extracts and solvent partitioned fractions from Scytosiphon lomentaria, Chorda filum, Agarum cribrosum, and Desmarestia viridis were investigated, and the correlation between biological activity and total phenolic (TP) and phlorotannin (TPT) content was determined by PCA analysis. The yield of EtOH extracts from four brown seaweeds ranged from 2.6 to 6.6% with the highest yield from D. viridis, and the predominant compounds in their solvent partitioned fractions had medium and/or less polarity. The TP and TPT content of the EtOH extracts were in the ranges of 25.0-44.1 mg GAE/g sample and 0.2-4.6 mg PG/g sample, respectively, which were mostly included in the organic solvent partitioned fractions. Strong NOI activity was observed in the EtOH extracts and their solvent partitioned fractions from D. viridis and C. filum. In addition, the EtOH extract and its solvent partitioned fractions of D. viridis exhibited little cytotoxicity to Raw 264.7 cells. The most potent ABTS and DPPH radical scavenging capacity was shown in the EtOH extracts and their solvent partitioned fractions from S. lomentaria and C. filum, and both also exhibited strong reducing ability. In the PCA analysis the content of TPT had a good correlation with DPPH ( r = 0.62), ABTS ( r = 0.69) and reducing power ( r = 0.65), however, an unfair correlation was observed between the contents of TP and TPT and NOI, suggesting that the phlorotannins might be responsible for the DPPH and ABTS radical scavenging activities.

  17. Fucose-Containing Sulfated Polysaccharides from Brown Seaweeds Inhibit Proliferation of Melanoma Cells and Induce Apoptosis by Activation of Caspase-3 in Vitro

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ale, Marcel Tutor; Maruyama, Hiroko; Tamauchi, Hidekazu

    2011-01-01

    Fucose-containing sulfated polysaccharides (FCSPs) extracted from seaweeds, especially brown macro-algae, are known to possess essential bioactive properties, notably growth inhibitory effects on tumor cells. In this work, we conducted a series of in vitro studies to examine the influence of FCSPs...... of the FCSPs, particularly the presence of sulfated galactofucans (notably in S. henslowianum) and sulfated fucans (notably in F. vesiculosus). This study thus indicates that unfractionated FCSPs may exert bioactive effects on skin cancer cells via induction of apoptosis through cascades of reactions...

  18. Important determinants for fucoidan bioactivity: a critical review of structure-function relations and extraction methods for fucose-containing sulfated polysaccharides from brown seaweeds.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ale, Marcel Tutor; Mikkelsen, Jørn D; Meyer, Anne S

    2011-01-01

    Seaweeds--or marine macroalgae--notably brown seaweeds in the class Phaeophyceae, contain fucoidan. Fucoidan designates a group of certain fucose-containing sulfated polysaccharides (FCSPs) that have a backbone built of (1→3)-linked α-L-fucopyranosyl or of alternating (1→3)- and (1→4)-linked α-L-fucopyranosyl residues, but also include sulfated galactofucans with backbones built of (1→6)-β-D-galacto- and/or (1→2)-β-D-mannopyranosyl units with fucose or fuco-oligosaccharide branching, and/or glucuronic acid, xylose or glucose substitutions. These FCSPs offer several potentially beneficial bioactive functions for humans. The bioactive properties may vary depending on the source of seaweed, the compositional and structural traits, the content (charge density), distribution, and bonding of the sulfate substitutions, and the purity of the FCSP product. The preservation of the structural integrity of the FCSP molecules essentially depends on the extraction methodology which has a crucial, but partly overlooked, significance for obtaining the relevant structural features required for specific biological activities and for elucidating structure-function relations. The aim of this review is to provide information on the most recent developments in the chemistry of fucoidan/FCSPs emphasizing the significance of different extraction techniques for the structural composition and biological activity with particular focus on sulfate groups.

  19. Antioxidant, Anti-inflammatory and Antiproliferative Effects of Aqueous Extracts of Three Mediterranean Brown Seaweeds of the Genus Cystoseira

    OpenAIRE

    2014-01-01

    Seaweeds have caused an emerging interest in the biomedical area, mainly due to their contents of bioactive substances which show great potential as anti-inflammatory, anti-microbial, anti-viral and anti-tumoral drugs. Despite the diversity in quality and quantity of the Mediterranean Tunisian coast flora, with its large contains of marine organisms and seaweeds, most of them have not yet been investigated for pharmacological and biological activities. Antioxidant, anti-inflammatory and antip...

  20. AKTIVITAS ANTIOKSIDAN EKSTRAK RUMPUT LAUT COKELAT (Sargassum polycystum (Antioxidant Activity of Brown Seaweed (Sargassum polycystum Extracts

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kun Cahyaningrum

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available The purpose of this study was to determine antioxidant activity of polyphenol and phlorotannin extracts from brown algae Sargassum polycystum. Polyphenol was extracted with ethanol 96% then tested total phenolic content, while phlorotannin was extracted with methanol, chloroform, aquabidest, and ethyl acetate then tested total phlorotannin content. After crude polyphenol and crude phlorotannin extracts were obtained, the studied compounds were extracted using column chromatography. The extracts were then analyzed with HPLC (High Performance Liquid Chromatograpys. Antioxidant activity was analyzed by radical scavenging activity (RSA and ferrous ion chelating ability (FIC for four samples, crude polyphenol, crude phlorotannin, polyphenol, and phlorotannin. The result of total phenolic content was 1.18±0.67 mg GAE/g dry sample and total phlorotannin content was 0.61±0.27 mg PGE/g dry sample. Based on RSA and FIC analysis, phlorotannin (IC50 1.12±0.02 mg/mL and 1.34±0.01 mg/mL showed the highest activity followed by crude phlorotannin (IC50 1.20±0.01 mg/mL and 1.47±0.10 mg/mL, polyphenol (IC50 1.23±0.01 and 1.55±0.02 mg/mL, and crude polyphenol (IC50 1.27±0.01 mg/mL and 1.63±0.02 mg/mL. The results of chromatographic analysis showed that S. polycystum extract contains phenolic compounds similar to the phloroglucinol. Keywords: Sargassum polycystum, antioxidant, polyphenol, phlorotannin ABSTRAK Penelitian ini bertujuan untuk menentukan aktivitas antioksidan ekstrak polifenol dan florotanin dari rumput laut cokelat Sargassum polycystum. Polifenol diekstrak menggunakan pelarut etanol 96% kemudian diuji kandungan total fenolik, sedangkan florotanin diekstrak dengan menggunakan pelarut metanol, kloroform, akuades, dan etil asetat kemudian diuji kandungan total florotanin. Setelah memperoleh ekstrak polifenol dan florotanin, kedua senyawa tersebut dipurifikasi dengan kromatografi kolom. Hasil kromatografi kolom dianalisis menggunakan HPLC (High

  1. Pigmentation and dermal conservative effects of the astonishing algae Sargassum polycystum and Padina tenuis on guinea pigs, human epidermal melanocytes (HEM) and Chang cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Quah, Chin Chew; Kim, Kah Hwi; Lau, Mei Siu; Kim, Wee Ric; Cheah, Swee Hung; Gundamaraju, Rohit

    2014-01-01

    The preference for a fairer skin-tone has become a common trend among both men and women around the world. In this study, seaweeds Sargassum polycystum and Padina tenuis were investigated for their in vitro and in vivo potentials in working as skin whitening agents. Seaweed has been used as a revolutionary skin repairing agent in both traditional and modern preparations. The high antioxidant content is one of the prime reasons for its potent action. It has been employed in traditional Chinese and Japanese medicine. For centuries, most medical practitioners in the Asian cultures have known seaweed as an organic source of vitamins, minerals, fatty acids like omega-3 and omega-6 and antioxidants. The present objective of the study was to evaluate the potent dermal protective effect of the two seaweeds Sargassum polycystum and Padina tenuis on human cell lines and guinea pigs. Seaweeds were extracted with ethanol and further fractionated with hexane, ethyl acetate and water. The extracts were tested for mushroom tyrosinase inhibitory activity, cytotoxicity in human epidermal melanocyte (HEM), and Chang cells. Extracts with potent melanocytotoxicity were formulated into cosmetic cream and tested on guinea pigs in dermal irritation tests and de-pigmentation assessments. Both Sargassum polycystum and Padina tenuis seaweeds showed significant inhibitory effect on mushroom tyrosinase in the concentration tested. SPEt showed most potent cytotoxicity on HEM (IC50 of 36µg/ml), followed by SPHF (65µg/ml), and PTHF (78.5µg/ml). SPHF and SPEt reduced melanin content in skin of guinea pigs when assessed histologically. SPEt, SPHF and PTHF were able to inhibit HEM proliferation in vitro, with SPHF being most potent and did not cause any dermal irritation in guinea pigs. The results obtained indicate that SPHF is a promising pharmacological or cosmetic agent.

  2. Screening of marine algae (Padina sp. from the Lengeh Port, Persian Gulf for antibacterial and antifungal activities

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Azadeh Taherpour

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available Objective: To evaluate the antibacterial efficacy of different solvent extracts of Padina sp. against selected human pathogenic bacteria and fungi species such as Escherichia coli, Shigella sp., Staphylococcus aureus (S. aureus, Pseudomonas aeruginosa, Aspergillus flavus and Candida albicans. Methods: Various solvents including methanol, ethyl acetate, chloroform and hexane were used to acquire crude extracts from marine algae Padina sp. After crude preparation, antibacterial and antifungal activities were screened against clinically important human pathogenic bacteria using disc and well diffusion methods. For all the bacterial species used in this research, minimum inhibitory concentration was undertaken considering various solvent extracts of Padina sp. To ensure the accuracy of experiments, a positive control was also included. Results: Confirmed that hexane is the best solvent to extract antimicrobial agents from Padina sp. Among selected bacteria, S. aureus was the most sensitive test microorganism. While, all other microorganisms showed resistance against methanol, ethyl acetate, chloroform extracts. In fact, by increasing concentration of hexane extract, inhibition of S. aureus growth or antimicrobial activity was increased. Growth inhibition zone in well method showed better results compared to disc diffusion method. The minimum inhibitory concentration and minimum bactericidal concentration of hexane extract were 15 and 30 mg/mL against S. aureus, respectively. All Padina sp. extracts did not reveal any antifungal activities against fungi species in this study. Conclusions: Brown algae extracts showed sufficient antibacterial properties against S. aureus. Therefore, Padina sp. in this research can be a good candidate to design and manufacture novel antibacterial agents used in pharmaceutical industries.

  3. AGRICULTURAL USES OF SEAWEEDS EXTRACTS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Monica Popescu

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available Marine bioactive substances extracted from seaweed are currently used in food, animal feed, as a raw material in the industry and have therapeutic applications. Most of the products based on marine algae are extracted from Brown algae Ascophyllum nodosum. The use of extracts of seaweed in agriculture is beneficial because the amount of chemical fertilizers and obtaining organic yield.

  4. Evaluation of phenolic contents and antioxidant activities of brown seaweeds belonging to Turbinaria spp. (Phaeophyta, Sargassaceae) collected from Gulf of Mannar

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Kajal Chakraborty; Kodayan Kizekadath Vijayan; Gonugontla Syda Rao

    2013-01-01

    Objective: To evaluate the antioxidant activities and total phenolic contents of brown seaweeds belonging to Turbinaria spp. [Turbinaria conoides (T. conoides) and Turbinaria ornata (T. ornata) collected from Gulf of Mannar of southeastern coast of India in various in vitro systems. Methods:The antioxidant activity was evaluated using different in vitro systems, viz., 1, 1-diphenyl-2-picrylhydrazyl (DPPH), 2, 2′-azino-bis-3 ethylbenzothiozoline-6-sulfonic acid diammonium salt (ABTS), H2O2/HO radical scavenging, Fe2+ ion chelating ability, and reducing potential. Folin-Ciocalteu method was used to determine the total phenolic content of the extracts, and the results were expressed as mg of gallic acid equivalents (GE)/g of the seaweed extracts. Thiobarbituric acid-reactive substances assay was employed to assess the ability of the seaweed extracts to inhibit lipid oxidation. Results: Ethyl acetate (EtOAc) fraction of T. conoides registered significantly higher phenolic content (105.97 mg GE/g) than that of T. ornata (69.63 mg GE/g). Significantly higher antioxidant potential as determined by DPPH (64.14%) radical scavenging activity was registered in EtOAc fraction of T. ornata. A higher ABTS.+ radical scavenging (IC50 3.16 µg/mL), Fe2+ chelating (IC50 0.46 mg/mL), H2O2 scavenging (IC50 4.25 mg/mL), lipid peroxidation inhibitory (TBARS, IC50 0.21 mg/mL), and reducing abilities (IC50 52.67 mg/mL) (P<0.05) were realized in EtOAc fraction of T. ornata than other fractions. Conclusions: This study indicated the potential use ofT. conoides and T. ornata as candidate species to be used as food supplements/functional foods to increase shelf-life of food items for human consumption, and nutraceuticals to deter deleterious free radical-induced life-threatening diseases.

  5. Important Determinants for Fucoidan Bioactivity: A Critical Review of Structure-Function Relations and Extraction Methods for Fucose-Containing Sulfated Polysaccharides from Brown Seaweeds

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anne S. Meyer

    2011-10-01

    Full Text Available Seaweeds—or marine macroalgae—notably brown seaweeds in the class Phaeophyceae, contain fucoidan. Fucoidan designates a group of certain fucose-containing sulfated polysaccharides (FCSPs that have a backbone built of (1→3-linked α-l-fucopyranosyl or of alternating (1→3- and (1→4-linked α-l-fucopyranosyl residues, but also include sulfated galactofucans with backbones built of (1→6-β-d-galacto- and/or (1→2-β-d-mannopyranosyl units with fucose or fuco-oligosaccharide branching, and/or glucuronic acid, xylose or glucose substitutions. These FCSPs offer several potentially beneficial bioactive functions for humans. The bioactive properties may vary depending on the source of seaweed, the compositional and structural traits, the content (charge density, distribution, and bonding of the sulfate substitutions, and the purity of the FCSP product. The preservation of the structural integrity of the FCSP molecules essentially depends on the extraction methodology which has a crucial, but partly overlooked, significance for obtaining the relevant structural features required for specific biological activities and for elucidating structure-function relations. The aim of this review is to provide information on the most recent developments in the chemistry of fucoidan/FCSPs emphasizing the significance of different extraction techniques for the structural composition and biological activity with particular focus on sulfate groups.

  6. Cytotoxic effect of silver nanoparticles synthesized from Padina tetrastromatica on breast cancer cell line

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gnana Selvi, B. Clara; Madhavan, J.; Santhanam, Amutha

    2016-09-01

    In recent years researchers were attracted towards marine sources due to the presence of active components in it. Seaweeds were widely used in pharmaceutical research for their known biological activities. The biological synthesis method of silver nanoparticles (AgNPs) using Padina tetrastromatica seaweed extract and their cytotoxicity against breast cancer MCF-7 cells was reported in this study. The synthesized AgNPs using seaweed extract were subjected to x-ray diffraction, UV-visible spectroscopy, Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy, field emission scanning electron microscopy, transmission electron microscope, energy dispersive x-ray, zeta potential to elucidate the structural, morphology, size as well as surface potential parameters. An absorption peak at 430 nm in UV-visible spectrum reveals the excitation and surface plasmon resonance of AgNPs. FE-SEM micrographs exhibits the biosynthesized AgNPs, which are pre-dominantly round shaped and the size ranges between 40-50 nm. The zeta potential value of -27.6 mV confirms the stable nature of biosynthesized silver nanoparticles. Furthermore, the biological synthesized Ag NPs exhibited a dose-dependent cytotoxicity against human breast cancer cell (MCF-7) and the inhibitory concentration (IC50) was found for AgNPs against MCF-7 at 24 h incubation. Biological method of synthesizing silver nanoparticles shows a environmental friendly property which helps in effective electrifying usage in many fields.

  7. Observation of Wild Seaweed Species in Labuhanbua Waters, Indonesia: a preliminary assessment for aquaculture development

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Erlania .

    2017-05-01

    Full Text Available Seaweed industry has been growing up and is supplied by either wild or cultivated seaweed crops. This study was aimed to present relevant information regarding ecological availability of wild seaweed in Labuhanbua coastal waters, Sumbawa Regency, West Nusa Tenggara and potential use of important species as candidate species for aquaculture. 46 sampling stations were determined along line transects perpendicular to coastal line; and seaweeds sampling were conducted during low tide by using 1 x 1 m2 quadrat transect. Field data consist of in-situ parameter including number of seaweed species and coverage area of each species; and ex-situ parameters consist of carbohydrate, protein, total C, total N, and total P content of seaweeds. The results showed that 33 species were found and three species has the most widely distribu tion, i.e. Padina sp., Dictyota dichotoma, and Gracilaria salicornia. Turbinaria, Dictyota, Padina, Stoechospermum, Hydroclathrus, Halimeda, and Chaetomorpha might be some important species that could be develop as aquaculture species candidates among other uncultivated species that were found along this study location. They have potencies as human food, livestock feed, neutraceuicals, cosmetics, pulp, textile, biofuel and any other industries; but conversely, they were found in lower density at Labuhanbua coastal waters. These species should be develop through aquaculture technology, involve genetic improvement and possibly genetic engineering. Commercial scale cultivation of those important seaweed species will contribute to industrial needs and prevent decreasing of wild seaweed availability in natural ecosystem.

  8. Blade-order-dependent radiocarbon variability in brown seaweed (Undaria pinnatifida) reflected a cold Oyashio water intrusion event in an embayment of the Sanriku coast, northeastern Japan

    Science.gov (United States)

    Satoh, N.; Fukuda, H.; Miyairi, Y.; Yokoyama, Y.; Nagata, T.

    2015-12-01

    Radiocarbon in dissolved inorganic carbon (DIC) in seawater varies greatly, both geographically and with depth. This "reservoir effect" is thought to be reflected in the radiocarbon content (∆14C) of marine organisms, via DIC fixation by primary producers and subsequent trophic transfer. The ∆14C of marine organismal soft tissues might thus provide unique information about their habitats, diets, migration and other environmental histories. However, the effectiveness of this approach has yet to be extensively explored, with data on ∆14C variability in soft tissues of marine organisms being markedly limited. Here we examined whether ∆14C values of individual pinnate blades (leaf-like structures) of brown seaweed (Undaria pinnatifida) reflect the ∆14C of DIC in the water current prevailing at the time of blade formation. The study was conducted in Otsuchi Bay located in the Sanriku coastal region, northeastern Japan, where 14C-depleted cold Oyashio current and warm Tsugaru current (high ∆14C) converge, affecting the physiology and growth of marine organisms growing there. U. pinnatifida individuals cultured in the bay (length of saprophytes, 140-215 cm) were harvested in April 2014 and ∆14C of blades were determined by accelerator mass spectrometry. Younger blades formed after the Oyashio water intrusion had significantly lower ∆14C values compared to older blades formed before the event. The ∆14C values of younger and older blades were generally consistent with the ∆14C of DIC in Oyashio (-60.5 ‰) and Tsugaru (24.9 ‰) waters, respectively. Thus, despite possible turnover of organic carbon in seaweed soft tissues, blade-order-dependent ∆14C variability appeared to strongly reflect the Oyashio intrusion event (radiocarbon shift) in the bay.

  9. Enhancing growth, phytochemical constituents and aphid resistance capacity in cabbage with foliar application of eckol--a biologically active phenolic molecule from brown seaweed.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rengasamy, Kannan R R; Kulkarni, Manoj G; Pendota, Srinivasa C; Van Staden, Johannes

    2016-03-25

    Although foliar application of seaweed extracts on plant growth and development has and is extensively studied, reliable knowledge and understanding of the mode of action of particular compound(s) responsible for enhancing plant growth is lacking. A brown seaweed Ecklonia maxima is widely used commercially as a biostimulant to improve plant growth and crop protection. Eckol, a phenolic compound isolated from E. maxima has recently shown stimulatory effects in maize, indicating its potential use as a plant biostimulant. Cabbage is a widely cultivated vegetable crop throughout the world, which requires high input of fertilizers and is susceptible to several aphid borne diseases. This study was conducted to evaluate the effect of foliar application of eckol on the growth, phytochemical constituents and myrosinase activity (aphid resistance capacity) of commercially cultivated cabbage. Foliar application of eckol (10(-6) M) significantly enhanced shoot and root length, shoot and root fresh and dry weight, leaf area and leaf number. This treatment also showed a significant increase in photosynthetic pigments (chlorophyll 'a', chlorophyll 'b', total chlorophyll and carotenoid) compared to the untreated plants. The levels of protein, proline and iridoid glycosides were significantly higher in cabbage leaves with eckol treatment. All the control plants were severely infested with cabbage aphid (Brevicoryne brassicae) but no infestation was observed on the eckol-sprayed plants, which can be attributed to an increase in myrosinase activity. This study reveals dual effects (plant growth promoting and insect repelling) of eckol on cabbage plants that need further investigations both under field conditions and in other brassicaceous species.

  10. Evaluation of phenolic contents and antioxidant activities of brown seaweeds belonging to Turbinaria spp.(Phaeophyta,Sargassaceae) collected from Gulf of Mannar

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Kajal; Chakraborty; Nammunayathuputhenkotta; Krishnankartha; Praveen; Kodayan; Kizekadath; Vijayan; Gonugontla; Syda; Rao

    2013-01-01

    Objective:To evaluate the antioxidant activities and total phenolic contents of brown seaweeds belonging to Turbinaria spp.[Turbinaria conoides(T.conoides)and Turbinaria ornata(T.ornata)collected from Gulf of Mannar of southeastern coast of India in various in vitro systems.Methods:The antioxidant activity was evaluated using different in vitro systems,viz.,I,I-diphenyl-2-picrylhydrazyl(DPPH),2,2’-azino-bis-3 ethylbenzothiozoline-6-sulfonic acid diammonium salt(ABTS),H202/H0 radical scavenging,Fe2+ion chelating ability,and reducing potential.Folin-Ciocalteu method was used to determine the total phenolic content of the extracts,and the results were expressed as mg of gallic acid equivalents(GE)/g of the seaweed extracts.Thiobarbituric acid-reactive substances assay was employed to assess the ability of the seaweed extracts to inhibit lipid oxidation.Results:Ethyl acetate(EtOAc)fraction of T.conoides registered significantly higher phenolic content(105.97 mg GE/g)than that of T.ornata(69.63 mg GE/g).Significantly higher antioxidant potential as determined by DPPH(64.14%)radical scavenging activity was registered in EtOAc fraction of T.ornata.A higher ABTS(?)radical scavenging(IC503.16μg/mL),Fe2+chelating(IC500.46 mg/mL),H2O2 scavenging(IC504.25 mg/mL),lipid peroxidation inhibitory(TBARS,IC500.21 mg/mL),and reducing abilities(IC5052.67 mg/mL)(P<0.05)were realized in EtOAc fraction of T.ornata than other fractions.Conclusions:This study indicated the potential use of T.conoides and T.ornata as candidate species to be used as food supplements/functional foods to increase shelf-life of food items for human consumption,and nutraceuticals to deter deleterious free radical-induced life-threatening diseases.

  11. Spermatozoid life-span of two brown seaweeds, Saccharina japonica and Undaria pinnatifida, as measured by fertilization efficiency

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LI Jing; PANG Shaojun; LIU Feng; SHAN Tifeng; GAO Suqin

    2013-01-01

    During sexual reproduction of seaweeds,spermatozoid (sperm) discharge is triggered by chemical messengers (pheromones) released by the female gametes.The chemotactic ability of the sperm ensures fertilization success.Using unialgal male and female gametophyte material under designated standard gametogenesis testing (SGT) conditions,the potential life-span of the sperm of two seaweeds,Saccharinajaponica and Undaria pinnatifida,was assessed by their ability to fertilize eggs.Results show that within 20-30 min after being discharged,sperm of both species could complete fertilization without an apparent decline in fertilization rate.Although fertilization rate 60-120 min after sperm discharge dropped significantly in both species,some sperm were viable enough to fertilize the eggs.In S.japonica,at 12℃,some sperm were able to fertilize eggs up to 12 h after discharge.In both species,egg discharge rates (EDR) in the male and female mixed positive controls were significantly higher than those of all the sperm-testing groups.Doubling the seeded male gametophytes of S.japonica in the SGT tests significantly increased the EDR,further confirming the effect of the presence of the male on the female in terms of facilitating egg discharge from oogonia.

  12. Analysis by Vibrational Spectroscopy of Seaweed Polysaccharides with Potential Use in Food, Pharmaceutical, and Cosmetic Industries

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Leonel Pereira

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Polysaccharides present in several seaweeds (Kappaphycus alvarezii, Calliblepharis jubata, and Chondrus crispus—Gigartinales, Rhodophyta; Gelidium corneum and Pterocladiella capillacea—Gelidiales, Rhodophyta; Laurencia obtusa—Ceramiales, Rhodophyta; Himanthalia elongata, Undaria pinnatifida, Saccorhiza polyschides, Sargassum vulgare, and Padina pavonica—Phaeophyceae, Ochrophyta are analyzed by spectroscopic techniques. The nature of the polysaccharides (with extraction and without any type of extraction present in these seaweeds was determined with FTIR-ATR and FT-Raman analysis of extracted phycocolloids and ground dry seaweed.

  13. The effect of Fucus vesiculosus, an edible brown seaweed, upon menstrual cycle length and hormonal status in three pre-menopausal women: a case report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Skibola Christine F

    2004-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Rates of estrogen-dependent cancers are among the highest in Western countries and lower in the East. These variations may be attributable to differences in dietary exposures such as higher seaweed consumption among Asian populations. The edible brown kelp, Fucus vesiculosus (bladderwrack, as well as other brown kelp species, lower plasma cholesterol levels. Since cholesterol is a precursor to sex hormone biosynthesis, kelp consumption may alter circulating sex hormone levels and menstrual cycling patterns. In particular, dietary kelp may be beneficial to women with or at high risk for estrogen-dependent diseases. To test this, bladderwrack was administered to three pre-menopausal women with abnormal menstrual cycling patterns and/or menstrual-related disease histories. Case Presentation Intake of bladderwrack was associated with significant increases in menstrual cycle lengths, ranging from an increase of 5.5 to 14 days. In addition, hormone measurements ascertained for one woman revealed significant anti-estrogenic and progestagenic effects following kelp administration. Mean baseline 17β-estradiol levels were reduced from 626 ± 91 to 164 ± 30 pg/ml (P = 0.04 following 700 mg/d, which decreased further to 92.5.0 ± 3.5pg/ml (P = 0.03 with the1.4 g/d dose. Mean baseline progesterone levels rose from 0.58 ± 0.14 to 8.4 ± 2.6 ng/ml with the 700 mg/d dose (P = 0.1, which increased further to 16.8 ± 0.7 ng/ml with the 1.4 g/d dose (P = 0.002. Conclusions These pilot data suggest that dietary bladderwrack may prolong the length of the menstrual cycle and exert anti-estrogenic effects in pre-menopausal women. Further, these studies also suggest that seaweed may be another important dietary component apart from soy that is responsible for the reduced risk of estrogen-related cancers observed in Japanese populations. However, these studies will need to be performed in well-controlled clinical trials to confirm these

  14. The effect of Fucus vesiculosus, an edible brown seaweed, upon menstrual cycle length and hormonal status in three pre-menopausal women: a case report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Skibola, Christine F

    2004-08-04

    Rates of estrogen-dependent cancers are among the highest in Western countries and lower in the East. These variations may be attributable to differences in dietary exposures such as higher seaweed consumption among Asian populations. The edible brown kelp, Fucus vesiculosus (bladderwrack), as well as other brown kelp species, lower plasma cholesterol levels. Since cholesterol is a precursor to sex hormone biosynthesis, kelp consumption may alter circulating sex hormone levels and menstrual cycling patterns. In particular, dietary kelp may be beneficial to women with or at high risk for estrogen-dependent diseases. To test this, bladderwrack was administered to three pre-menopausal women with abnormal menstrual cycling patterns and/or menstrual-related disease histories. Intake of bladderwrack was associated with significant increases in menstrual cycle lengths, ranging from an increase of 5.5 to 14 days. In addition, hormone measurements ascertained for one woman revealed significant anti-estrogenic and progestagenic effects following kelp administration. Mean baseline 17beta-estradiol levels were reduced from 626 +/- 91 to 164 +/- 30 pg/ml (P = 0.04) following 700 mg/d, which decreased further to 92.5.0 +/- 3.5pg/ml (P = 0.03) with the 1.4 g/d dose. Mean baseline progesterone levels rose from 0.58 +/- 0.14 to 8.4 +/- 2.6 ng/ml with the 700 mg/d dose (P = 0.1), which increased further to 16.8 +/- 0.7 ng/ml with the 1.4 g/d dose (P = 0.002). These pilot data suggest that dietary bladderwrack may prolong the length of the menstrual cycle and exert anti-estrogenic effects in pre-menopausal women. Further, these studies also suggest that seaweed may be another important dietary component apart from soy that is responsible for the reduced risk of estrogen-related cancers observed in Japanese populations. However, these studies will need to be performed in well-controlled clinical trials to confirm these preliminary findings.

  15. Seaweed dermatitis:a case report

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Beuy Joob; Viroj Wiwanitkit

    2014-01-01

    Seaweed dermatitis is an uncommon kind of dermatitis that might be seen in some clinical centers at coastal area. Here, the authors report a case of seaweed dermatitis. This is a male patient presented to the physician in charge complaining of skin lesion. On examination, the clusters of reddish-brown vesicles along high right leg can be seen. This case was diagnosed to have seaweed dermatitis and treated by steroid therapy.

  16. Structure of Fucoidan from Brown Seaweed Turbinaria ornata as Studied by Electrospray Ionization Mass Spectrometry (ESIMS and Small Angle X-ray Scattering (SAXS Techniques

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tai Tien Nguyen

    2013-07-01

    Full Text Available The purpose of this study is to elucidate both the chemical and conformational structure of an unfractionated fucoidan extracted from brown seaweed Turbinaria ornata collected at Nha-trang bay, Vietnam. Electrospray ionization mass spectrometry (ESI-MS was used for determining the chemical structure and small angle X-ray scattering (SAXS provided conformational of the structure at the molecular level. The results showed that the fucoidan has a sulfate content of 25.6% and is mainly composed of fucose and galactose residues (Fuc:Gal ≈ 3:1. ESIMS analysis suggested that the fucoidan has a backbone of 3-linked α-l-Fucp residues with branches, →4-Galp(1→ at C-4 of the fucan chain. Sulfate groups are attached mostly at C-2 and sometimes at C-4 of both fucose and galactose residues. A molecular model of the fucoidan was built based on obtained chemical structure and scattering curves estimated from molecular model and observed SAXS measurement were fitted. The results indicated that fucoidan under study has a rod-like bulky chain conformation.

  17. A fucan from the brown seaweed Spatoglossum schröederi inhibits Chinese hamster ovary cell adhesion to several extracellular matrix proteins

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    H.A.O. Rocha

    2001-05-01

    Full Text Available Fucans, a family of sulfated polysaccharides present in brown seaweed, have several biological activities. Their use as drugs would offer the advantage of no potential risk of contamination with viruses or particles such as prions. A fucan prepared from Spatoglossum schröederi was tested as a possible inhibitor of cell-matrix interactions using wild-type Chinese hamster ovary cells (CHO-K1 and the mutant type deficient in xylosyltransferase (CHO-745. The effect of this polymer on adhesion properties with specific extracellular matrix components was studied using several matrix proteins as substrates for cell attachment. Treatment with the polymer inhibited the adhesion of fibronectin to both CHO-K1 (2 x 10(5(and CHO-745 (2 x 10(5 and 5 x 10(5 cells. No effect was detected with laminin, using the two cell types. On the other hand, adhesion to vitronectin was inhibited in CHO-K1 cells and adhesion to type I collagen was inhibited in CHO-745 cells. In spite of this inhibition, the fucan did not affect either cell proliferation or cell cycle. These results demonstrate that this polymer is a new anti-adhesive compound with potential pharmacological applications.

  18. Structure of Fucoidan from Brown Seaweed Turbinaria ornata as Studied by Electrospray Ionization Mass Spectrometry (ESIMS) and Small Angle X-ray Scattering (SAXS) Techniques

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thanh, Thuy Thi Thu; Tran, Van Thi Thanh; Yuguchi, Yoshiaki; Bui, Ly Minh; Nguyen, Tai Tien

    2013-01-01

    The purpose of this study is to elucidate both the chemical and conformational structure of an unfractionated fucoidan extracted from brown seaweed Turbinaria ornata collected at Nha-trang bay, Vietnam. Electrospray ionization mass spectrometry (ESI-MS) was used for determining the chemical structure and small angle X-ray scattering (SAXS) provided conformational of the structure at the molecular level. The results showed that the fucoidan has a sulfate content of 25.6% and is mainly composed of fucose and galactose residues (Fuc:Gal ≈ 3:1). ESIMS analysis suggested that the fucoidan has a backbone of 3-linked α-l-Fucp residues with branches, →4)-Galp(1→ at C-4 of the fucan chain. Sulfate groups are attached mostly at C-2 and sometimes at C-4 of both fucose and galactose residues. A molecular model of the fucoidan was built based on obtained chemical structure and scattering curves estimated from molecular model and observed SAXS measurement were fitted. The results indicated that fucoidan under study has a rod-like bulky chain conformation. PMID:23857110

  19. A fucan from the brown seaweed Spatoglossum schröederi inhibits Chinese hamster ovary cell adhesion to several extracellular matrix proteins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rocha, H A; Franco, C R; Trindade, E S; Carvalho, L C; Veiga, S S; Leite, E L; Dietrich, C P; Nader, H B

    2001-05-01

    Fucans, a family of sulfated polysaccharides present in brown seaweed, have several biological activities. Their use as drugs would offer the advantage of no potential risk of contamination with viruses or particles such as prions. A fucan prepared from Spatoglossum schröederi was tested as a possible inhibitor of cell-matrix interactions using wild-type Chinese hamster ovary cells (CHO-K1) and the mutant type deficient in xylosyltransferase (CHO-745). The effect of this polymer on adhesion properties with specific extracellular matrix components was studied using several matrix proteins as substrates for cell attachment. Treatment with the polymer inhibited the adhesion of fibronectin to both CHO-K1 (2 x 10(5)) and CHO-745 (2 x 10(5) and 5 x 10(5)) cells. No effect was detected with laminin, using the two cell types. On the other hand, adhesion to vitronectin was inhibited in CHO-K1 cells and adhesion to type I collagen was inhibited in CHO-745 cells. In spite of this inhibition, the fucan did not affect either cell proliferation or cell cycle. These results demonstrate that this polymer is a new anti-adhesive compound with potential pharmacological applications.

  20. Fucose-containing sulfated polysaccharides from brown seaweeds inhibit proliferation of melanoma cells and induce apoptosis by activation of caspase-3 in vitro.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ale, Marcel Tutor; Maruyama, Hiroko; Tamauchi, Hidekazu; Mikkelsen, Jørn D; Meyer, Anne S

    2011-12-01

    Fucose-containing sulfated polysaccharides (FCSPs) extracted from seaweeds, especially brown macro-algae, are known to possess essential bioactive properties, notably growth inhibitory effects on tumor cells. In this work, we conducted a series of in vitro studies to examine the influence of FCSPs products from Sargassumhenslowianum C. Agardh (FSAR) and Fucus vesiculosus (FVES), respectively, on proliferation of melanoma B16 cells and to investigate the underlying apoptosis promoting mechanisms. Cell viability analysis showed that both FCSPs products, i.e., FSAR and FVES, decreased the proliferation of the melanoma cells in a dose-response fashion, with FSAR being more potent at lower dosages, and FVES being relatively more anti-proliferative than FSAR at higher dosages. Flow cytometric analysis by Annexin V staining of the melanoma cells exposed to the FCSPs products confirmed that both FSAR and FVES induced apoptosis. The FCSPs-induced apoptosis was evidenced by loss of plasma membrane asymmetry and translocation of the cell membrane phospholipids and was accompanied by the activation of caspase-3. The FCSPs bioactivity is proposed to be attributable to distinct structural features of the FCSPs, particularly the presence of sulfated galactofucans (notably in S.henslowianum) and sulfated fucans (notably in F. vesiculosus). This study thus indicates that unfractionated FCSPs may exert bioactive effects on skin cancer cells via induction of apoptosis through cascades of reactions that involve activation of caspase-3.

  1. Fucose-Containing Sulfated Polysaccharides from Brown Seaweeds Inhibit Proliferation of Melanoma Cells and Induce Apoptosis by Activation of Caspase-3 in Vitro

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anne S. Meyer

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available Fucose-containing sulfated polysaccharides (FCSPs extracted from seaweeds, especially brown macro-algae, are known to possess essential bioactive properties, notably growth inhibitory effects on tumor cells. In this work, we conducted a series of in vitro studies to examine the influence of FCSPs products from Sargassum henslowianum C. Agardh (FSAR and Fucus vesiculosus (FVES, respectively, on proliferation of melanoma B16 cells and to investigate the underlying apoptosis promoting mechanisms. Cell viability analysis showed that both FCSPs products, i.e., FSAR and FVES, decreased the proliferation of the melanoma cells in a dose-response fashion, with FSAR being more potent at lower dosages, and FVES being relatively more anti-proliferative than FSAR at higher dosages. Flow cytometric analysis by Annexin V staining of the melanoma cells exposed to the FCSPs products confirmed that both FSAR and FVES induced apoptosis. The FCSPs-induced apoptosis was evidenced by loss of plasma membrane asymmetry and translocation of the cell membrane phospholipids and was accompanied by the activation of caspase-3. The FCSPs bioactivity is proposed to be attributable to distinct structural features of the FCSPs, particularly the presence of sulfated galactofucans (notably in S. henslowianum and sulfated fucans (notably in F. vesiculosus. This study thus indicates that unfractionated FCSPs may exert bioactive effects on skin cancer cells via induction of apoptosis through cascades of reactions that involve activation of caspase-3.

  2. Depressive effects on the central nervous system and underlying mechanism of the enzymatic extract and its phlorotannin-rich fraction from Ecklonia cava edible brown seaweed.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cho, Suengmok; Han, Daeseok; Kim, Seon-Bong; Yoon, Minseok; Yang, Hyejin; Jin, Young-Ho; Jo, Jinho; Yong, Hyeim; Lee, Sang-Hoon; Jeon, You-Jin; Shimizu, Makoto

    2012-01-01

    Marine plants have been reported to possess various pharmacological properties; however, there have been few reports on their neuropharmacological effects. Terrestrial plants have depressive effects on the central nervous system (CNS) because of their polyphenols which make them effective as anticonvulsants and sleep inducers. We investigated in this study the depressive effects of the polyphenol-rich brown seaweed, Ecklonia cava (EC), on CNS. An EC enzymatic extract (ECEE) showed significant anticonvulsive (>500 mg/kg) and sleep-inducing (>500 mg/kg) effects on the respective mice seizure induced by picrotoxin and on the mice sleep induced by pentobarbital. The phlorotannin-rich fraction (PTRF) from ECEE significantly potentiated the pentobarbital-induced sleep at >50 mg/kg. PTRF had binding activity to the gamma aminobutyric acid type A (GABA(A))-benzodiazepine (BZD) receptors. The sleep-inducing effects of diazepam (DZP, a well-known GABA(A)-BZD agonist), ECEE, and PTRF were completely blocked by flumazenil, a well-known antagonist of GABA(A)-BZD receptors. These results imply that ECEE produced depressive effects on CNS by positive allosteric modulation of its phlorotannins on GABA(A)-BZD receptors like DZP. Our study proposes EC as a candidate for the effective treatment of neuropsychiatric disorders such as anxiety and insomnia.

  3. Isolation, purification, and characterization of fucose-containing sulfated polysaccharides from the brown seaweed Ecklonia kurome and their blood-anticoagulant activities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nishino, T; Yokoyama, G; Dobashi, K; Fujihara, M; Nagumo, T

    1989-02-15

    A sulfated polysaccharide fraction, obtained from the hot-water extract of the brown seaweed, Ecklonia kurome by removing laminaran and the major part of alginic acid, gave sulfated polysaccharides (B-I, B-II, C-I, and C-II) by both anion-exchange chromatography on a column of Ecteola-cellulose and by fractional precipitation with ethanol containing 0.3% calcium acetate, and then by gel-filtration chromatography on a Sepharose 4B column. B-I and B-II are composed of fucose, galactose, mannose, xylose, glucuronic acid, and ester sulfate in the approximate molar ratios of 1.00:0.36:0.48:1.08:1.85:2.35 and 1.00:0.81:0.18:0.45:0.61:2.00, respectively. C-I and C-II are composed of fucose, galactose, glucuronic acid, and ester sulfate in approximate molar ratios of 1.00:0.03:0.03:1.61 and 1.00:0.19:0.07:1.48, respectively. Blood-anticoagulant activities with respect to activated partial thromboplastin time (APTT) were approximately 24, 19, 81, and 85% of that of heparin for B-I, B-II, C-I, and C-II, respectively. All the polysaccharides showed slight antithrombin activity. No antifactor Xa activity was observed for any of the polysaccharides.

  4. Constituents of the brown alga Padina tetrastromatica (Hauck)-II

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Parameswaran, P.S.; Naik, C.G.; Das, B.; Kamat, S.Y.; Bose, A.K.; Nair, M.S.R.

    Three terpenoids, (2R,4S)-4-acetoxy-2-hydroxy-2,6,6-trimethylcyclohexanone (1), 3'R,4'-[(2R,4S)-4-acetoxy-2-hydroxy-2,6,6-trimethylcyclohexylidene] but-3'-en-2'-one or apo-9'-fucoxanthinone (2) and loliolide (3) have been isolated from the CHCl sub...

  5. Fucans, sulfated polysaccharides extracted from brown seaweeds, inhibit vascular smooth muscle cell proliferation. I. Comparison with heparin for antiproliferative activity, binding and internalization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Logeart, D; Prigent-Richard, S; Jozefonvicz, J; Letourneur, D

    1997-12-01

    Smooth muscle cell (SMC) proliferation is inhibited both in vivo and in vitro by heparin. However, the precise mechanisms of action are still not understood. The analogy between two sulfated polysaccharides, heparin and fucan, has led us to compare in detail their effects on SMC growth. We have prepared and characterized a 19 kDa fucan fraction from brown seaweed, Ascophyllum nodosum. Fucan affects the growth of SMCs in a time- and dose-dependent, reversible and non-toxic fashion. As determined by cell counting, [3H]thymidine incorporation, and microcytofluorimetry analysis, heparin was less active than fucan in inhibiting SMC growth. Fucan and heparin act by preferential blocking of G0/G1, thus decreasing the G0/S transition. Binding experiments with [125I]fucan indicated saturable, unlabeled-fucan displaceable binding sites with an apparent Kd of 30 nM. Moreover, displacement experiments performed with various polysaccharides revealed that antiproliferative compounds interacted with these membrane sites, but non-antiproliferative polysaccharides (dextran, chondroitin sulfate) did not, providing evidence of a correlation between binding to SMCs and their antiproliferative activity. When cells were exposed at 37 degrees C to a fluorescent 5-([4,6-dichlorotriazin-2-yl]-amino)fluorescein (DTAF)-fucan, internalization occurred and punctate vesicles were observed which accumulated rapidly in the perinuclear region as previously reported for heparin. Nuclear preparations (membranes + contents) of cultured SMCs previously incubated with radiolabeled heparin or fucan indicated the presence of radioactivity, suggesting an antiproliferative action of both polysaccharides at the nuclear level. Collectively, these observations indicated that fucan and heparin share some similar mechanisms of action, such as SMC growth inhibition, binding, and internalization. In the accompanying paper (Logeart et al., Eur. J. Cell Biol. 74, 1997, this issue), we describe the effect of fucans

  6. Extracellular synthesis of zinc oxide nanoparticle using seaweeds of gulf of Mannar, India

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Nagarajan, Sangeetha; Arumugam Kuppusamy, Kumaraguru

    2013-01-01

    .... Seaweeds constitute one of the commercially important marine living renewable resources. Seaweeds such as green Caulerpa peltata, red Hypnea Valencia and brown Sargassum myriocystum were used for synthesis of Zinc oxide nanoparticle...

  7. Antibiotic resistant Esherichia coli strains from seafood and its susceptibility to seaweed extracts

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Subramanian Kumaran; Balaraman Deivasigamani; Kumarappan Alagappan; Mannikam Sakthivel; Rajamani Karthikeyan

    2010-01-01

    Objective: To determine the prevalence and antibiotic resistance of Escherichia coli (E.coli) , in seafood obtained from Cuddalore and Parangipettai fish landing centres. Also, to identify the susceptibility of E. coli against predominant seaweeds red alga Kappaphycusalvarezii (K. alvarezii) and brown alga Padina boergessenii (P. boergessenii) extracts as sulfated polysaccharides and polyphenols respectively. Methods: A total of 48 samples (Two stations Cuddalore and Parangipettai, Tamil Nadu, India). Sampling area are fish landing centre where fishes caught from sea and estuary, seafood processing plants (packing and ice packed fishes) and local fish markets (fish samples). After isolation totally 80 strains were analyzed for its antimicrobial resistance and sensitivity against commercially 10 antibiotics. The ampicillin resistant E. coli CE21 was identified through molecular techniques as 16S rDNA sequencing. Two seaweeds K. alvarezii and P. boergessenii were screened for antibacterial activity against 12 antibiotic resistant E. coli strains. Results: Totally 48 swabbed samples from two different fish handling area were characterized for total bacterial and E. coli count. Mostly, the E. coli strains were isolated from fish local market and seafood processing plants before and after packaging process. In that maximum 56.25% strains were resistant to ampicillin and the minimum 2.5% strains were resistant to chloramphenicol. Therefore, the E. coli CE21 was identified through molecular techniques E. coli (GenBank accession number GU065251), The MIC value for polyphenol extract was slightly less than sulfated polysaccharides. E. coli strain isolated from Parangipettai was considerably increased MIC value that Cuddalore. Conclusions:The polyphenol and sulfated polysaccharides showed promising inhibitory response against all antimicrobial resistant E. coli strains and in particular the inhibitory response of ampicillin resistant E. coli.

  8. Sulfated fucans extracted from algae Padina gymnospora have anti-inflammatory effect

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cybelle Teixeira Marques

    2012-02-01

    Full Text Available Sulfated polysaccharides were extracted with acetone from brown algae Padina gymnospora. The fraction precipitated with 1.5 volumes of acetone (F1.5 purified in Sephadex G-75 was characterized by infrared and nuclear magnetic resonance of 13C and ¹H, through which the presence of sulfate groups on the C4 of α-L-fucose could be observed. This polysaccharide showed that an MW of 25,000 Da was effective in reducing leukocyte influx into the peritoneal cavity in mice at 10 mg/kg and 25 mg/kg body weight, causing a decrease of 60 and 39%, respectively. In the present study, it was observed that this fucan has anti-inflammatory properties but no cytotoxic action, indicating its potential use in the pharmaceutical industry.

  9. On the biosorption, by brown seaweed, Lobophora variegata, of Ni(II) from aqueous solutions: equilibrium and thermodynamic studies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Basha, Shaik; Jaiswar, Santlal; Jha, Bhavanath

    2010-09-01

    The biosorption equilibrium isotherms of Ni(II) onto marine brown algae Lobophora variegata, which was chemically-modified by CaCl(2) were studied and modeled. To predict the biosorption isotherms and to determine the characteristic parameters for process design, twenty-three one-, two-, three-, four- and five-parameter isotherm models were applied to experimental data. The interaction among biosorbed molecules is attractive and biosorption is carried out on energetically different sites and is an endothermic process. The five-parameter Fritz-Schluender model gives the most accurate fit with high regression coefficient, R (2) (0.9911-0.9975) and F-ratio (118.03-179.96), and low standard error, SE (0.0902-0.0.1556) and the residual or sum of square error, SSE (0.0012-0.1789) values to all experimental data in comparison to other models. The biosorption isotherm models fitted the experimental data in the order: Fritz-Schluender (five-parameter) > Freundlich (two-parameter) > Langmuir (two-parameter) > Khan (three-parameter) > Fritz-Schluender (four-parameter). The thermodynamic parameters such as DeltaG (0), DeltaH (0) and DeltaS (0) have been determined, which indicates the sorption of Ni(II) onto L. variegata was spontaneous and endothermic in nature.

  10. A population genetics toolbox for the threatened canopy-forming brown seaweeds Cystoseira tamariscifolia and C. amentacea (Fucales, Sargassaceae)

    KAUST Repository

    Engelen, Aschwin H.

    2016-09-28

    The brown macroalga Cystoseira tamariscifolia is a foundation species along the northeastern Atlantic and western Mediterranean Sea. It occurs from lower intertidal rock pools to the shallow subtidal. Anthropogenic pollution and rising seawater temperatures can threaten its local distributions. In order to address impacts of historical and current environmental changes, to quantify effective dispersal and population connectivity, and to provide genetic tools for restoration and coastal management strategies, we have developed ten microsatellite markers, validated on 48 individuals from a single population. With 2–11 alleles per locus, the observed heterozygosity varied between 0.244 and 0.875. All of the developed microsatellites cross-amplified also on Cystoseira amentacea. The ten microsatellite loci developed here show high genetic diversity, making them useful for connectivity and population genetic studies aimed at small to large spatial scales, and provide essential insight for the development of conservation strategies for this important but threatened foundation species. © 2016 Springer Science+Business Media Dordrecht

  11. Seaweed resources

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Deshmukhe, G.V.; Dhargalkar, V.K.; Untawale, A.G.

    The chapter summarizes our present knowledge of the seaweed resources of the Indian Ocean region with regard to the phytogeographical distribution, composition, biomass, utilization, cultivation, conservation and management. The voluminous data...

  12. Research Progress of the Extraction Procedures and Bioactivities of Brown Seaweed Polysaccharide%褐藻多糖的分离提取及生理活性研究进展

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    吴泽; 魏琦峰; 邱庆庆; 任秀莲

    2015-01-01

    褐藻多糖是海藻胶、褐藻糖胶和褐藻淀粉的统称,主要存在于褐藻中。褐藻糖胶作为其主要的生理活性物质,主要由L-岩藻糖和硫酸酯基组成,具有抗氧化、抗凝血、防癌抗肿瘤、抗病毒和消炎等活性。综述了褐藻多糖的提取分离方法和褐藻糖胶的生理活性研究进展,以期为褐藻多糖的应用提供参考。%Brown seaweeds polysaccharide usually contains alginate, fucoidan, laminam and mainly exist in brown seaweeds.As the main physiological active substances, fucoidan composes of L-fucose and sulfate groups.Fucoidan has different beneficial biological activities including antioxidant, anticoagulant, anti-cancer, anti-tumor, anti-virus and anti-inflammatory, etc.This paper reviewed the latest research progress of the extraction procedures and bioactivities of fucoidan, which was expected to provided reference for fucoidan application.

  13. Effects of Supplementing Brown Seaweed By-products in the Diet of Holstein Cows during Transition on Ruminal Fermentation, Growth Performance and Endocrine Responses

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Z. S. Hong

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available This study was conducted to examine the effects of supplementing brown seaweed by-products (BSB in the diet of ruminants on ruminal fermentation characteristics, growth performance, endocrine response, and milk production in Holstein cows. In Experiment 1, the effects of different levels (0%, 2%, and 4% of basal diet as Control, 2% BSB, 4% BSB, respectively of BSB were evaluated at 3, 6, 9, 12, and 24 h in vitro batch culture rumen fermentation. The pH tended to be higher for the higher level of BSB supplementation, with the pH at 12 h being significantly higher (p<0.05 than that of the control. The concentration of ammonia nitrogen was lower at 3, 9, 12, and 24 h incubation (p<0.05 compared with the control, and tended to be low at other incubation times. Volatile fatty acid concentration appeared to be minimally changed while lower values were observed with 4% BSB treatment at 24 h (p<0.05. In Experiment 2, effects of levels (0%, 2%, and 4% of BSB on growth performance, endocrine responses and milk production were studied with Holstein dairy cows during transition. Dry matter intake, daily gain and feed efficiency were not affected by BSB supplementation. The concentration of plasma estrogen for the control, 2% BSB and 4% BSB after three months of pregnancy were 55.7, 94.1, and 72.3 pg/mL, respectively (p = 0.08. Although the differences of progesterone levels between BSB treatments and the control were minimal, the concentration in 4% BSB treatment increased to 157.7% compared with the initial level of the study. Triiodothyronine and thyroxine levels were also higher after both three months and eight months of pregnancy than the initial level at the beginning of the study. In addition, BSB treatments during one month after delivery did not affect daily milk yield and composition. In conclusion, the present results indicate that supplementation of BSB did not compromise ruminal fermentation, and animal performance at lower levels and hence may

  14. The Taurine Content of Japanese Seaweed.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kawasaki, Azusa; Ono, Ayuko; Mizuta, Shoshi; Kamiya, Mitsunobu; Takenaga, Takaaki; Murakami, Shigeru

    2017-01-01

    Japanese and South Koreans have a dietary habit of eating seaweed. Although it is known that some seaweed contains taurine, there have been few detailed analyses on the taurine content of seaweed other than the major types of edible seaweed. In the present study, we determined the content of free amino acids, including taurine, in seaweed obtained along the Sea of Japan coast. The taurine content in the seaweed varied according to the species. Among the 29 different types of seaweed that were studied, red algae contained relatively high concentrations of taurine. In contrast, the taurine content was low or undetectable in brown and green algae. The algal alanine level was relatively higher in brown sea algae, which was in sharp contrast to its taurine level. No clear trends were observed with regards to the distribution of the other free amino acids, including aspartic acid, glutamic acid, and phenylalanine. Considering the physiological role of taurine in cellular homeostasis, the algal taurine content may be associated with the growing environment. Taurine-rich red edible algae such as mafunori (Gloiopeltis tenax)/fukurofunori (Gloiopeltis furcata), kabanori (Gracilaria textorii), and ogonori (Gracilaria vermiculophylla) may be used to create functional foods that are rich in naturally occurring taurine.

  15. Effect of fly ash on the growth and biochemicals of some Seaweed

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sornalakshmi V

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available The effect of industrial waste fly ash was studied on daily growth rate (DGR, chlorophyll, carotenoids, protein, carbohydrate, lipid and phycocolloids (agar and algin content of four economically important seaweeds, Ulva lactuca, Caulerpa scalpelliformis, Padina tetrastromatica and Gracilaria corticata. The seaweeds were cultured in different concentration of fly ash mixed sterilized seawater. In Ulva lactuca, at lower concentrations of fly ash, the carbohydrate content was found to be more than the control. Protein content was slightly more than the control at 0.25% fly ash while that of lipid at 0.5 and 2.5% concentrations. In Caulerpa scalpelliformis, fly ash at all the concentrations induced reduced DGR and lipid content but increased chlorophyll a and chlorophyll b amount. The amount of protein was more than the control at 0.25, 0.50 and 1.0% fly ash. In Padina tetrastomatica, at almost all the concentrations of fly ash, the amount of Chlorophyll a, chlorophyll c and protein exceeded over the control. In the present study, of the four experimental seaweeds, the red seaweed Gracilaria corticata was found to be most tolerant as this exhibited enhanced growth and biochemical content at most of the concentrations of fly ash.

  16. Effects of seaweed sterols fucosterol and desmosterol on lipid membranes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mouritsen, Ole G.; Bagatolli, Luis A.; Duelund, Lars

    2017-01-01

    techniques, including calorimetry, fluorescence microscopy, vesicle-fluctuation analysis, and atomic force microscopy, we have found that fucosterol and desmosterol, found in red and brown macroalgae (seaweeds), similar to cholesterol support liquid-ordered membrane phases and induce coexistence between...

  17. Purification and characterization of a novel alginate lyase from the marine bacterium Cobetia sp. NAP1 isolated from brown algae.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yagi, Hisashi; Fujise, Asako; Itabashi, Narumi; Ohshiro, Takashi

    2016-12-01

    The application of marine resources, instead of fossil fuels, for biomass production is important for building a sustainable society. Seaweed is valuable as a source of marine biomass for producing biofuels such as ethanol, and can be used in various fields. Alginate is an anionic polysaccharide that forms the main component of brown algae. Various alginate lyases (e.g. exo- and endo-types and oligoalginate lyase) are generally used to degrade alginate. We herein describe a novel alginate lyase, AlgC-PL7, which belongs to the polysaccharide lyase 7 family. AlgC-PL7 was isolated from the halophilic Gram-negative bacterium Cobetia sp. NAP1 collected from the brown algae Padina arborescens Holmes. The optimal temperature and pH for AlgC-PL7 activity were 45 °C and 8, respectively. Additionally, AlgC-PL7 was thermostable and salt-tolerant, exhibited broad substrate specificity, and degraded alginate into monosaccharides. Therefore, AlgC-PL7 is a promising enzyme for the production of biofuels.

  18. Pre- and post-Chernobyl accident levels of 129I and 137Cs in the Southern Baltic Sea by brown seaweed Fucus vesiculosus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gómez-Guzmán, J M; Holm, E; Enamorado-Báez, S M; Abril, J A; Pinto-Gómez, A R; López-Gutiérrez, J M; García-León, M

    2013-01-01

    (129)I is a very long-lived radionuclide (T(1/2) = 15.7 × 10(6) years) that is present in the environment both because of natural and anthropogenic sources. In this work (129)I concentration and (129)I/(127)I ratio have been determined in seaweed Fucus vesiculosus collected in the Southern Baltic Sea during 1982 and 1986 (post-Chernobyl accident). The resulting data were evaluated in terms of (129)I concentrations, (129)I/(127)I and (129)I/(137)Cs ratios. (129)I concentrations were found to be in the order of (0.82-5.89) × 10(9) atoms g(-1) in 1982 and (1.33-38.83) × 10(9) atoms g(-1) in 1986. The (129)I/(127)I ratios ranged from (22.7-87.8) × 10(-10) for seaweed collected in 1982 and from (26.1-305.5) × 10(-10) for seaweed collected in 1986. Also a linear relationship was established for (127)I concentrations in seawater and salinity in this area, enabling the estimation of concentration factors for (127)I in F. vesiculosus. The high levels of (129)I and (129)I/(127)I in the Kattegat and their gradually decreasing trend to the Baltic Sea indicates that the most important contribution to the (129)I inventory in the Baltic Sea area comes from Sellafield and La Hague reprocessing plants. With respect to Chernobyl accident, (129)I concentrations in samples collected in 1986 were not much higher than those expected in less contaminated samples from 1982. This supports the view that the contribution of the Chernobyl accident to (129)I in the Baltic region was not significant.

  19. Biochar from commercially cultivated seaweed for soil amelioration

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roberts, David A.; Paul, Nicholas A.; Dworjanyn, Symon A.; Bird, Michael I.; de Nys, Rocky

    2015-01-01

    Seaweed cultivation is a high growth industry that is primarily targeted at human food and hydrocolloid markets. However, seaweed biomass also offers a feedstock for the production of nutrient-rich biochar for soil amelioration. We provide the first data of biochar yield and characteristics from intensively cultivated seaweeds (Saccharina, Undaria and Sargassum – brown seaweeds, and Gracilaria, Kappaphycus and Eucheuma – red seaweeds). While there is some variability in biochar properties as a function of the origin of seaweed, there are several defining and consistent characteristics of seaweed biochar, in particular a relatively low C content and surface area but high yield, essential trace elements (N, P and K) and exchangeable cations (particularly K). The pH of seaweed biochar ranges from neutral (7) to alkaline (11), allowing for broad-spectrum applications in diverse soil types. We find that seaweed biochar is a unique material for soil amelioration that is consistently different to biochar derived from ligno-cellulosic feedstock. Blending of seaweed and ligno-cellulosic biochar could provide a soil ameliorant that combines a high fixed C content with a mineral-rich substrate to enhance crop productivity. PMID:25856799

  20. SCREENING OF PHYCOCHEMICAL CONSTITUENTS QUALITATIVELY AND QUANTITATIVELY CERTAIN SEAWEEDS FROM GULF OF MANNAR BIOSPHERE RESERVE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Thillaikkannu Thinakaran

    2012-07-01

    Full Text Available The six seaweeds namely Ulva lactuca (L, Caulerpa racemosa C. Agardh, Sargassum wightii Greville, Padina tetrastomatica Hauck, Gracilaria corticata var. cylindrica J. Ag., and Acanthophora spicifera (vahl. Boergesen, collected from the Gulf of Mannar were screened for the presence of Phycochemical constituents like primary and secondary metabolites both qualitatively and quantitatively. The present investigation revealed that saponin and polyphenol were absent in the acetone extract of seaweeds and other extracts posses all the phycoconstituents. Maximum percentage of protein (210.31±6.3 mg/g, carbohydrate (317.11±9.51mg/g and phenol (3.02±0.09mg/g were recorded in Sargassum wightii whereas lipid (81.95±2.45mg/g, anthocyanin (0.202±0.006mg/g in Padina tetrastomatica and tannin (35.87±1.07 mg/g in Acanthophora spicifera. Phycochemical analysis of these seaweeds revealed the presence of potential pharmaceutical activity.

  1. Impact of enzyme- and ultrasound-assisted extraction methods on biological properties of red, brown, and green seaweeds from the central west coast of Portugal.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rodrigues, Dina; Sousa, Sérgio; Silva, Aline; Amorim, Manuela; Pereira, Leonel; Rocha-Santos, Teresa A P; Gomes, Ana M P; Duarte, Armando C; Freitas, Ana Cristina

    2015-04-01

    Seaweeds are an excellent source of bioactive compounds, and therefore the use of sustainable and food compatible extraction methods such as enzyme-assisted (EAE) and ultrasound-assisted extraction were applied on Sargassum muticum, Osmundea pinnatifida, and Codium tomentosum. Extracts were evaluated for proximate characterization and biological properties. Higher extraction yields were observed for C. tomentosum EAE (48-62%; p polysaccharide (44 ± 8 mgNa2SO4 acid/glyoph extract) contents characterized O. pinnatifida extracts. A higher effect on hydroxyl-radical scavenging activity (35-50%) was observed for all extracts, whereas S. muticum Alcalase and C. tomentosum Cellulase extracts exhibited higher prebiotic activity than fructooligosaccharides. O. pinnatifida and C. tomentosum EAE showed inhibitory potential against α-glucosidase (38-49%).

  2. Brown Seaweed Fucoidan Inhibits Cancer Progression by Dual Regulation of mir-29c/ADAM12 and miR-17-5p/PTEN Axes in Human Breast Cancer Cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Szu-Yuan; Yan, Ming-De; Wu, Alexander T.H.; Yuan, Kevin Sheng-Po; Liu, Shing Hwa

    2016-01-01

    In this study, we observed that brown seaweed fucoidan inhibited human breast cancer progression by upregulating microRNA (miR)-29c and downregulating miR-17-5p, thereby suppressing their target genes, a disintegrin and metalloproteinase 12 (ADAM12) and phosphatase and tensin homolog (PTEN), respectively. Moreover, fucoidan reduced the luciferase activity of 3'-untranslated region reporter; treatment of cells with the miR-29c mimic or miR-17-5p inhibitor also produced similar results. These effects of fucoidan inhibited the epithelial-mesenchymal transition in breast cancer cells, as evidenced by an increase in E-cadherin and a drop in N-cadherin, and inhibited breast cancer cell survival, as evidenced by the activation of the phosphoinositide 3-kinase/Akt pathway. Taken together, these findings demonstrate that fucoidan inhibits breast cancer progression by regulating the miR-29c/ADAM12 and miR-17-5p/PTEN axes. Fucoidan is a potential chemopreventive/chemotherapeutic agent for breast cancer. PMID:27994679

  3. An Expressed Sequence Tag Analysis of the Intertidal Brown Seaweeds Fucus serratus (L.) and F. vesiculosus (L.) (Heterokontophyta, Phaeophyceae) in Response to Abiotic Stressors

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Pearson, Gareth A.; Hoarau, Galice; Lago-Leston, Asuncion; Coyer, James A.; Kube, Michael; Reinhardt, Richard; Henckel, Kolja; Serrao, Ester T. A.; Corre, Erwan; Olsen, Jeanine L.

    2010-01-01

    In order to aid gene discovery and uncover genes responding to abiotic stressors in stress-tolerant brown algae of the genus Fucus, expressed sequence tags (ESTs) were studied in two species, Fucus serratus and Fucus vesiculosus. Clustering of over 12,000 ESTs from three libraries for heat shock/rec

  4. An Expressed Sequence Tag Analysis of the Intertidal Brown Seaweeds Fucus serratus (L.) and F. vesiculosus (L.) (Heterokontophyta, Phaeophyceae) in Response to Abiotic Stressors

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Pearson, Gareth A.; Hoarau, Galice; Lago-Leston, Asuncion; Coyer, James A.; Kube, Michael; Reinhardt, Richard; Henckel, Kolja; Serrao, Ester T. A.; Corre, Erwan; Olsen, Jeanine L.

    In order to aid gene discovery and uncover genes responding to abiotic stressors in stress-tolerant brown algae of the genus Fucus, expressed sequence tags (ESTs) were studied in two species, Fucus serratus and Fucus vesiculosus. Clustering of over 12,000 ESTs from three libraries for heat

  5. Farming techniques for seaweeds

    OpenAIRE

    Castaños, M.; Buendia, R.

    1998-01-01

    Details are given of farming methods developed by the SEAFDEC Aquaculture Department for 3 different seaweeds: 1) Bottom line culture method for Kappaphycus; 2) Pond culture of Gracilaria; and, 3) Gracilariopsis bailinae, the new seaweed on the block.

  6. On the presence of fertile gametophytes of Padina pavonica (Dictyotales, Phaeophyceae) from the Iberian coasts

    OpenAIRE

    Gómez Garreta, Amelia; Rull Lluch, Jordi; Barceló Martí, M. Carme; Ribera Siguan, M. Antonia

    2007-01-01

    The gametophytes of Padina pavonica (L.) Thivy have received little attention in literature. Both female and predominantly male monoecious gametophytes of P. pavonica are recorded for the first time in the Iberian Peninsula. A detailed description of the morphology and the disposition of oogonia and antheridia is presented. In addition, a comparison with literature data on this and other Padina species is carried out.Los gametófitos de Padina pavonica (L.) Thivy han sido escasamente reseñados...

  7. Skin anti-aging benefits of brown seaweed extract%褐藻萃取物的皮肤抗衰老效果

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    刘晓英

    2012-01-01

    皮肤老化会引起皮肤的基因表达水平的改变,从而影响皮肤超微细结构的完整性,引起皮肤干燥、松弛以及出现皱纹等现象。褐藻萃取物具有恢复皮肤成纤维细胞中特殊基因表达值的作用,进而提高皮肤的屏障机能以及皮肤的水合作用,增进皮肤的弹性,减少皱纹的产生。%Aging triggers the modification of gcne expression levels, negativcly affecting skin's ultra structural integrit) and resulting in dr3T, saggy skin and the appearance of wrinkles. However, an extract of brovcn seaweed saccharine longicruris has been found to restore the expression levels of specific genes in senescent fibroblasts, in turn imprfwing barrier function and hydration, increasing elasticity and reducing wrinkles, which are described here.

  8. Seaweeds as bioindicators of heavy metals off a hot spot area on the Egyptian Mediterranean Coast during 2008-2010.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shams El-Din, N G; Mohamedein, L I; El-Moselhy, Kh M

    2014-09-01

    Concentrations of Cu, Zn, Cd, Pb, Ni, Co, Fe, Mn, and Hg were measured successively in water, sediments, and six macroalgal species belonging to three algal classes during 3 years (2008-2010) from Abu Qir Bay, Alexandria, Egypt: Chlorophyceae (Enteromorpha compressa, Ulva fasciata), Phaeophyceae (Padina boryana), and Rhodophyceae (Jania rubens, Hypnea musciformis, Pterocladia capillacea). The study aimed to assess the bioaccumulation potential of the seaweeds, as well as to evaluate the extent of heavy metal contamination in the selected study site. Metals were analyzed using atomic absorption spectrophotometry coupled with MH-10 hydride system. The obtained data showed that the highest mean concentrations of Cu, Zn, Fe, and Mn were recorded in E. compressa; Cd, Ni, and Hg exhibited their highest mean concentrations in P. boryana, while Pb and Co were found in J. rubens. Abundance of the heavy metals in the algal species was as follow: Fe > Mn > Zn > Pb > Ni > Co > Cu > Cd > Hg. E. compressa showed the maximum metal pollution index (MPI) which was 11.55. Bioconcentration factor (BCF) for the metals in algae was relatively high with a maximum value for Mn. The Tomlinson pollution load index (PLI) values for the recorded algal species were low, which ranged between 1.00 in P. boryana and 2.72 in E. compressa. Enrichment factors for sediments were low fluctuating between 0.43 for Hg to 2.33 for Mn. Accordingly, the green alga E. compressa, brown alga P. boryana, and red alga J. rubens can be nominated as bioindicators. Based on MPI and PLI indices, Abu Qir Bay in the present study is considered as low-contaminated area.

  9. Isolation of bioactive compound from marine seaweeds against fish pathogenic bacteria Vibrio alginolyticus (VA09) and characterisation by FTIR

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Rajasekar Thirunavukkarasu; Priyadharshini Pandiyan; Deivasigamani Balaraman; Kumaran Subaramaniyan; George Edward Gnana Jothi; Sakthivel Manikkam; Balamurugan Sadaiyappan

    2013-01-01

    Objective: Fresh marine seaweeds Gracilaria edulis, Gracillaria verrcosa, Acanthospora spicifera,Ulva facita, Ulva lacta (U. lacta), Kappaphycus spicifera, Sargassum ilicifolium, Sargassum wightii (S. wightii), Padina tetramatica and Padina gymonospora were collected from Mandapam (Rameshwaram, Tamil Nadu) of South East coast of India and were screened for antibacterial activity.Methods:All the collected seaweeds were extracted by using five different solvent (methanol, isopropanol, acetone, chloroform, diethyl ether) to study their extracts against fish pathogenic bacteria V. alginolyticus (VA09) purchased from MTCC. And minimum inhibition carried out by using Resazurin micro-titre assay. Crude extract of S. wightii analysied by FTIR.Results:The methanolic extract of S. wightii produced a maximum zone of inhibition (1.95±0.11) cm, isopropanol extract maximum inhibition was produced by S. wightii (1.93±0.78) cm, Acetone extract of Gracilaria verrcosa showed maximum zone of inhibition (1.36±0.05) cm, chloroform extract of S. wightii produced a maximum zone (1.56±0.25) cm and diethyl ether extract of S.wightii produced maximum zone of inhibition(1.86±0.11) cm. Based on the antibacterial activity S. wightii, U. lacta and Padina tetramatica showed best antibacterial activity against Vibrio harveyi. In this three seaweeds were taken for MIC study. The S. wightii methanolic extract, U. lacta diethyl ether extract and Padina tetramatica methanolic extract showed a higher MIC values, and despectively were 25 mg/mL, 50 mg/mL and 50 mg/mL. FTIR result showed that mostly phenolic compounds were present in the S. wightii.Conclusions:Based on the FTIR result S. wightii have high amount of phenolic compound. Phenolic compound have the good antimicrobial activity. The results clearly show that seaweedS. wightii is an interesting source for biologically active compounds that may be applied for prophylaxis and therapy of bacterial fish diseases and it should be used for

  10. Seasonal variation in the chemical composition of two tropical seaweeds.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marinho-Soriano, E; Fonseca, P C; Carneiro, M A A; Moreira, W S C

    2006-12-01

    The chemical composition of red seaweed Gracilaria cervicornis and brown seaweed Sargassum vulgare from Brazil was investigated. In this study, the relationship between the nutritive components of each species and the environment was established. Protein content varied from 23.05+/-3.04% to 15.97+/-3.04%. The highest value was found in G. cervicornis. The protein levels were positively correlated with nitrogen content and negatively with water temperature and salinity. Carbohydrate contents of both species varied significantly (prelated to environment.

  11. Mineral Components and Anti-oxidant Activities of Tropical Seaweeds

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Suzuki Takeshi; Yoshie-Stark Yumiko; Santoso Joko

    2005-01-01

    Seaweeds are known to hold substances of high nutritional value; they are the richest resources of minerals important to the biochemical reactions in the human body. Seaweeds also hold non-nutrient compounds like dietary fiber and polyphenols. However, there is not enough information on the mineral compounds of tropical seaweeds. Also we are interested in the antioxidant activities of seaweeds, especially those in the tropical area. In this study, Indonesian green, brown and red algae were used as experimental materials with their mineral components analyzed by using an atomic absorption spectrophotometer. The catechins and flavonoids of these seaweeds were extracted with methanol and analyzed by high performance liquid chromatography (HPLC); the anti-oxidant activities of these seaweeds were evaluated in a fish oil emulsion system. The mineral components of tropical seaweeds are dominated by calcium, potassium and sodium, as well as small amounts of copper, iron and zinc. A green alga usually contains epigallocatechin, gallocatechin, epigallocatechin gallate and catechin. However, catechin and its isomers are not found in some green and red algae. In the presence of a ferrous ion catalyst, all the methanol extracts from the seaweeds show significantly lower peroxide values of the emulsion than the control,and that of a green alga shows the strongest anti-oxidant activity. The highest chelation on ferrous ions is also found in the extract of this alga, which is significantly different from the other methanol extracts in both 3 and 24 h incubations.

  12. Assessment of Dual Life Stage Antiplasmodial Activity of British Seaweeds

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Deniz Tasdemir

    2013-10-01

    Full Text Available Terrestrial plants have proven to be a prolific producer of clinically effective antimalarial drugs, but the antimalarial potential of seaweeds has been little explored. The main aim of this study was to assess the in vitro chemotherapeutical and prophylactic potential of the extracts of twenty-three seaweeds collected from the south coast of England against blood stage (BS and liver stage (LS Plasmodium parasites. The majority (14 of the extracts were active against BS of P. falciparum, with brown seaweeds Cystoseira tamariscifolia, C. baccata and the green seaweed Ulva lactuca being the most active (IC50s around 3 μg/mL. The extracts generally had high selectivity indices (>10. Eight seaweed extracts inhibited the growth of LS parasites of P. berghei without any obvious effect on the viability of the human hepatoma (Huh7 cells, and the highest potential was exerted by U. lactuca and red seaweeds Ceramium virgatum and Halopitys incurvus (IC50 values 14.9 to 28.8 μg/mL. The LS-active extracts inhibited one or more key enzymes of the malarial type-II fatty acid biosynthesis (FAS-II pathway, a drug target specific for LS. Except for the red seaweed Halopitys incurvus, all LS-active extracts showed dual activity versus both malarial intracellular stage parasites. This is the first report of LS antiplasmodial activity and dual stage inhibitory potential of seaweeds.

  13. Mineral components and anti-oxidant activities of tropical seaweeds

    Science.gov (United States)

    Takeshi, Suzuki; Yumiko, Yoshie-Stark; Joko, Santoso

    2005-07-01

    Seaweeds are known to hold substances of high nutritional value; they are the richest resources of minerals important to the biochemical reactions in the human body. Seaweeds also hold non-nutrient compounds like dietary fiber and polyphenols. However, there is not enough information on the mineral compounds of tropical seaweeds. Also we are interested in the antioxidant activities of seaweeds, especially those in the tropical area. In this study, Indonesian green, brown and red algae were used as experimental materials with their mineral components analyzed by using an atomic absorption spectrophotometer. The catechins and flavonoids of these seaweeds were extracted with methanol and analyzed by high performance liquid chromatography (HPLC); the antioxidant activities of these seaweeds were evaluated in a fish oil emulsion system. The mineral components of tropical seaweeds are dominated by calcium, potassium and sodium, as well as small amounts of copper, iron and zinc. A green alga usually contains epigallocatechin, gallocatechin, epigallocatechin gallate and catechin. However, catechin and its isomers are not found in some green and red algae. In the presence of a ferrous ion catalyst, all the methanol extracts from the seaweeds show significantly lower peroxide values of the emulsion than the control, and that of a green alga shows the strongest antioxidant activity. The highest chelation on ferrous ions is also found in the extract of this alga, which is significantly different from the other methanol extracts in both 3 and 24 h incubations.

  14. 21 CFR 184.1120 - Brown algae.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 3 2010-04-01 2009-04-01 true Brown algae. 184.1120 Section 184.1120 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) FOOD FOR HUMAN... Substances Affirmed as GRAS § 184.1120 Brown algae. (a) Brown algae are seaweeds of the species Analipus...

  15. Seaweed fails to prevent ocean acidification impact on foraminifera along a shallow-water CO2 gradient.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pettit, Laura R; Smart, Christopher W; Hart, Malcolm B; Milazzo, Marco; Hall-Spencer, Jason M

    2015-05-01

    Ocean acidification causes biodiversity loss, alters ecosystems, and may impact food security, as shells of small organisms dissolve easily in corrosive waters. There is a suggestion that photosynthetic organisms could mitigate ocean acidification on a local scale, through seagrass protection or seaweed cultivation, as net ecosystem organic production raises the saturation state of calcium carbonate making seawater less corrosive. Here, we used a natural gradient in calcium carbonate saturation, caused by shallow-water CO2 seeps in the Mediterranean Sea, to assess whether seaweed that is resistant to acidification (Padina pavonica) could prevent adverse effects of acidification on epiphytic foraminifera. We found a reduction in the number of species of foraminifera as calcium carbonate saturation state fell and that the assemblage shifted from one dominated by calcareous species at reference sites (pH ∼8.19) to one dominated by agglutinated foraminifera at elevated levels of CO2 (pH ∼7.71). It is expected that ocean acidification will result in changes in foraminiferal assemblage composition and agglutinated forms may become more prevalent. Although Padina did not prevent adverse effects of ocean acidification, high biomass stands of seagrass or seaweed farms might be more successful in protecting epiphytic foraminifera.

  16. pH-driven solubilization and isoelectric precipitation of proteins from the brown seaweed Saccharina latissima-effects of osmotic shock, water volume and temperature.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vilg, Jenny Veide; Undeland, Ingrid

    2017-01-01

    In the light of the global search for novel and sustainable protein sources, macroalgal proteins are becoming an attractive target. To date, mainly red and green macroalgae have been investigated in this respect, whereas the brown species are less studied, possibly because of the lower content of protein. In a biorefinery context, however, the protein content of brown macroalgae can still be economically interesting due to fast growth and the possibility to co-extract other compounds, such as alginates. The aim of this study was to develop a simple, scalable pH shift-based protein isolation technique applicable on wet Saccharina latissima biomass. Factors investigated were extraction volume, temperature, protein solubilization pH, osmoshock pretreatment and protein precipitation pH. Maximum protein solubility was obtained at pH 12, where 34 % of the total protein content could be extracted with 5.56 volumes of extraction solution (20 volumes on dry weight (dw) basis). Osmoshocking significantly increased the yield, and 20, 40 and 60 volumes of water (dw basis) gave 45.1, 46.8 and 59.5 % yield, respectively. The temperature during osmoshocking did not significantly affect the extraction yield, and extended time (16 vs. 1 or 2 h) reduced protein yield. Precipitation of solubilized proteins was possible below pH 4; the highest precipitation yield, 34.5 %, was obtained at pH 2. After combined alkaline extraction and acid precipitation, 16.01 % of the Saccharina proteins were recovered, which can be considered acceptable in comparison to other studies on algae but leaves some room for improvement when compared to protein extraction from, for instance, soy.

  17. Seaweeds of the Greek coasts. I. Phaeophyceae

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    K. TSIAMIS

    2013-04-01

    Full Text Available An updated checklist of the brown seaweeds (Phaeophyceae of Greece is provided, based on both literature records and new collections. The total number of species and infraspecific taxa currently accepted is 107. The occurrence of each taxon in the North Aegean, South Aegean and Ionian Seas is given. In addition, 17 taxa pending confirmation of their presence, 11 excludenda and 8 inquirenda are briefly discussed.

  18. Isolation of bioactive compound from marine seaweeds against fish pathogenic bacteria Vibrio alginolyticus (VA09 and characterisation by FTIR

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rajasekar Thirunavukkarasu

    2013-08-01

    Full Text Available Objective: Fresh marine seaweeds Gracilaria edulis, Gracillaria verrcosa, Acanthospora spicifera, Ulva facita, Ulva lacta (U. lacta, Kappaphycus spicifera, Sargassum ilicifolium, Sargassum wightii (S. wightii, Padina tetramatica and Padina gymonospora were collected from Mandapam (Rameshwaram, Tamil Nadu of South East coast of India and were screened for antibacterial activity. Methods: All the collected seaweeds were extracted by using five different solvent (methanol, isopropanol, acetone, chloroform, diethyl ether to study their extracts against fish pathogenic bacteria V. alginolyticus (VA09 purchased from MTCC. And minimum inhibition carried out by using Resazurin micro-titre assay. Crude extract of S. wightii analysied by FTIR. Results: The methanolic extract of S. wightii produced a maximum zone of inhibition (1.95±0.11 cm, isopropanol extract maximum inhibition was produced by S. wightii (1.93±0.78 cm, Acetone extract of Gracilaria verrcosa showed maximum zone of inhibition (1.36±0.05 cm, chloroform extract of S. wightii produced a maximum zone (1.56±0.25 cm and diethyl ether extract of S. wightii produced maximum zone of inhibition(1.86±0.11 cm. Based on the antibacterial activity S. wightii, U. lacta and Padina tetramatica showed best antibacterial activity against Vibrio harveyi. In this three seaweeds were taken for MIC study. The S. wightii methanolic extract, U. lacta diethyl ether extract and Padina tetramatica methanolic extract showed a higher MIC values, and despectively were 25 mg/mL, 50 mg/mL and 50 mg/mL. FTIR result showed that mostly phenolic compounds were present in the S. wightii. Conclusions: Based on the FTIR result S. wightii have high amount of phenolic compound. Phenolic compound have the good antimicrobial activity. The results clearly show that seaweed S. wightii is an interesting source for biologically active compounds that may be applied for prophylaxis and therapy of bacterial fish diseases and it should

  19. An expressed sequence tag analysis of the intertidal brown seaweeds Fucus serratus (L.) and F. vesiculosus (L.) (Heterokontophyta, Phaeophyceae) in response to abiotic stressors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pearson, Gareth A; Hoarau, Galice; Lago-Leston, Asuncion; Coyer, James A; Kube, Michael; Reinhardt, Richard; Henckel, Kolja; Serrão, Ester T A; Corre, Erwan; Olsen, Jeanine L

    2010-04-01

    In order to aid gene discovery and uncover genes responding to abiotic stressors in stress-tolerant brown algae of the genus Fucus, expressed sequence tags (ESTs) were studied in two species, Fucus serratus and Fucus vesiculosus. Clustering of over 12,000 ESTs from three libraries for heat shock/recovery and desiccation/rehydration resulted in identification of 2,503, 1,290, and 2,409 unigenes from heat-shocked F. serratus, desiccated F. serratus, and desiccated F. vesiculosus, respectively. Low overall annotation rates (18-31%) were strongly associated with the presence of long 3' untranslated regions in Fucus transcripts, as shown by analyses of predicted protein-coding sequence in annotated and nonannotated tentative consensus sequences. Posttranslational modification genes were overrepresented in the heat shock/recovery library, including many chaperones, the most abundant of which were a family of small heat shock protein transcripts, Hsp90 and Hsp70 members. Transcripts of LI818-like light-harvesting genes implicated in photoprotection were also expressed during heat shock in high light. The expression of several heat-shock-responsive genes was confirmed by quantitative reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction. However, candidate genes were notably absent from both desiccation/rehydration libraries, while the responses of the two species to desiccation were divergent, perhaps reflecting the species-specific physiological differences in stress tolerance previously established. Desiccation-tolerant F. vesiculosus overexpressed at least 17 ribosomal protein genes and two ubiquitin-ribosomal protein fusion genes, suggesting that ribosome function and/or biogenesis are important during cycles of rapid desiccation and rehydration in the intertidal zone and possibly indicate parallels with other poikilohydric organisms such as desiccation-tolerant bryophytes.

  20. Anti-inflammatory activity of a sulfated polysaccharide isolated from an enzymatic digest of brown seaweed Sargassum horneri in RAW 264.7 cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sanjeewa, Kalu Kapuge Asanka; Fernando, Ilekkuttige Priyan Shanura; Kim, Eun-A; Jee, Youngheun

    2017-01-01

    BACKGROUND/OBJECTIVES Sargassum horneri is an edible brown alga that grows in the subtidal zone as an annual species along the coasts of South Korea, China, and Japan. Recently, an extreme amount of S. horneri moved into the coasts of Jeju Island from the east coast of China, which made huge economic and environmental loss to the Jeju Island. Thus, utilization of this biomass becomes a big issue with the local authorities. Therefore, the present study was performed to evaluate the anti-inflammatory potential of crude polysaccharides (CPs) extracted from S. horneri China strain in lipopolysaccharide (LPS)-stimulated RAW 264.7 cells. MATERIALS/METHODS CPs were precipitated from S. horneri digests prepared by enzyme assistant extraction using four food-grade enzymes (AMG, Celluclast, Viscozyme, and Alcalase). The production levels of nitric oxide (NO) and pro-inflammatory cytokines, including tumor necrosis factor (TNF)-α and interleukin (IL)-1β were measured by Griess assay and enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay, respectively. The levels of inducible nitric oxide synthase (iNOS) and cyclooxygenase-2 (COX-2), nuclear factor (NF)-κB, and mitogen-activated protein kinases (MAPKs) were measured by using western blot. The IR spectrums of the CPs were recorded using a fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FT-IR) spectrometer. RESULTS The polysaccharides from the Celluclast enzyme digest (CCP) showed the highest inhibition of NO production in LPS-stimulated RAW 264.7 cells (IC50 value: 95.7 µg/mL). Also, CCP dose-dependently down-regulated the protein expression levels of iNOS and COX-2 as well as the production of inflammatory cytokines, including TNF-α and IL-1β, compared to the only LPS-treated cells. In addition, CCP inhibited the activation of NF-κB p50 and p65 and the phosphorylation of MAPKs, including p38 and extracellular signal-regulated kinase, in LPS-stimulated RAW 264.7 cells. Furthermore, FT-IR analysis showed that the FT-IR spectrum of CCP is similar

  1. On the presence of fertile gametophytes of Padina pavonica (Dictyotales, Phaeophyceae from the Iberian coasts

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gómez Garreta, Amelia

    2007-06-01

    Full Text Available The gametophytes of Padina pavonica (L. Thivy have received little attention in literature. Both female and predominantly male monoecious gametophytes of P. pavonica are recorded for the first time in the Iberian Peninsula. A detailed description of the morphology and the disposition of oogonia and antheridia is presented. In addition, a comparison with literature data on this and other Padina species is carried out.Los gametófitos de Padina pavonica (L. Thivy han sido escasamente reseñados en la bibliografía. En este trabajo se señala por primera vez en las costas de la Península Ibérica la presencia de gametófitos fértiles de P. pavonica, tanto femeninos como monoicos predominantemente masculinos. Se presenta una detallada descripción de la disposición y la morfología de los oogonios y anteridios. Asimismo, se realiza una comparación con los datos bibliográficos de esta especie y con los de otras especies de Padina

  2. Green synthesis of iron oxide (Fe3O4) nanoparticles using two selected brown seaweeds:Characterization and application for lead bioremediation

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    EL-KASSAS Hala Y; ALY-ELDEEN Mohamed A; GHARIB Samiha M

    2016-01-01

    The exploitation of different plant materials for the biosynthesis of nanoparticles is considered a green technology because it does not involve any harmful chemicals. In this study, iron oxide nanoparticles (Fe3O4-NPs) were synthesized using a completely green biosynthetic method by reduction of ferric chloride solution using brown seaweed water extracts. The two seaweedsPadina pavonica (Linnaeus) Thivy andSargassum acinarium (Linnaeus) Setchell 1933 were used in this study. The algae extract was used as a reductant of FeCl3 resulting in the phytosynthesis of Fe3O4-NPs. The phytogenic Fe3O4-NPs were characterized by surface plasmon band observed close to 402 nm and 415 nm; the obtained Fe3O4-NPs are in the particle sizes ranged from 10 to 19.5 nm and 21.6 to 27.4 nm forP. pavonica andS. acinarium, respectively. The strong signals of iron were reported in their corresponding EDX spectra. FTIR analyses revealed that sulphated polysaccharides are the main biomolecules in the algae extracts that do dual function of reducing the FeCl3 and stabilizing the phytogenic Fe3O4-NPs. The biosynthesized Fe3O4-NPs were entrapped in calcium alginates beads and used in Pb adsorption experiments. The biosynthesized Fe3O4-NPs alginate beads viaP. pavonica (Linnaeus) Thivy had high capacity for bioremoval of Pb (91%) while that ofS. acinarium (Linnaeus) Setchell 1933 had a capacity of (78%) after 75 min. The values of the process parameters for the maximum Pb removal efficiency by Fe3O4-NPs alginate beads synthesizedvia P. pavonica (Linnaeus) Thivy were also estimated.

  3. Analysis of Technetium Species and Fractions in Natural Seaweed Using Biochemical Separation and ICP-MS Measurement

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Shi, Keliang; Hou, Xiaolin; Qiao, Jixin

    2016-01-01

    An extremely high accumulation and retention of technetium in marine plants, especially brown seaweed, makes it a unique bioindicator of technetium. In the present work, a novel approach was developed for the speciation analysis of technetium in seaweed, wherein a series of biochemical separations...

  4. Seaweeds for umami flavour in the New Nordic Cuisine

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    Mouritsen Ole G

    2012-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Use of the term 'umami' for the fifth basic taste and for describing the sensation of deliciousness is finding its way into Western cuisine. The unique molecular mechanism behind umami sensation is now partly understood as an allosteric action of glutamate and certain 5'-ribonucleotides on the umami receptors. Chefs have started using this understanding to create dishes with delicious taste by adding old and new ingredients that enhance umami. In this paper, we take as our starting point the traditional Japanese soup broth dashi as the 'mother' of umami and demonstrate how dashi can be prepared from local, Nordic seaweeds, in particular the large brown seaweed sugar kelp (Saccharina latissima and the red seaweed dulse (Palmaria palmata, possibly combined with bacon, chicken meat or dried mushrooms to provide synergy in the umami taste. Optimal conditions are determined for dashi extraction from these seaweeds, and the corresponding glutamate, aspartate and alaninate contents are determined quantitatively and compared with Japanese dashi extracted from the brown seaweed konbu (Saccharina japonica. Dulse and dashi from dulse are proposed as promising novel ingredients in the New Nordic Cuisine to infuse a range of different dishes with umami taste, such as ice cream, fresh cheese and bread.

  5. Isolation of glycoproteins from brown algae

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    2015-01-01

    The present invention relates to a novel process for the isolation of unique anti-oxidative glycoproteins from the pH precipitated fractions of enzymatic extracts of brown algae. Two brown seaweeds viz, Fucus serratus and Fucus vesiculosus were hydrolysed by using 3 enzymes viz, Alcalase, Viscozyme...

  6. SEASONALITY OF SELECTED NUTRITIONAL CONSTITUENTS OF EDIBLE DELMARVA SEAWEEDS.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Madden, Matilda; Mitra, Madhumi; Ruby, Douglas; Schwarz, Jurgen

    2012-10-01

    Edible seaweeds have not been thoroughly explored for food, medicinal, or industrial purposes in the United States. This study compared selected proximate constituents of three edible seaweed species (Ulva lactuca L., Fucus vesiculosus L., and Gracilaria tikvahiae McLachan) at two sites for possible future development as a food crop on the Delmarva Peninsula. Sampling was conducted bimonthly at Chincoteague Memorial Park, Virginia, and Indian River Inlet, Delaware, from 2005 to 2008. Proximate constituents of moisture, ash, dietary fiber, proteins, and fat were measured seasonally and calorific values were calculated. Data were analyzed using correlation, paired samples t-tests and one- and two-way ANOVA. Significant variations in the proximate constituents were found among seasons, species, and between sites. The brown seaweed (Fucus) at both sites had higher fiber, fat, and ash (mineral) content than the green (Ulva) or the red (Gracilaria). Ulva and Gracilaria had higher protein content than Fucus. Seaweeds from Delaware had more fat, ash, and protein than from Virginia, potentially because of the more polluted, nutrient rich environment at the Delaware site. Positive correlations between seaweed fat and protein content may indicate an increase in the synthesis of both components under optimal growth conditions. Species' physiology differences and the water quality at the two sites likely impacted proximate constituent values. This study contributed new information to the existing body of knowledge in the areas of nutrition and ecology of seaweeds and their potential as a cash crop. © 2012 Phycological Society of America.

  7. Green biosynthesis and characterization of magnetic iron oxide (Fe₃O₄) nanoparticles using seaweed (Sargassum muticum) aqueous extract

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Mahdavi, Mahnaz; Namvar, Farideh; Ahmad, Mansor Bin; Mohamad, Rosfarizan

    2013-01-01

    .... In this study, iron oxide nanoparticles (Fe3O4-NPs) were synthesized using a rapid, single step and completely green biosynthetic method by reduction of ferric chloride solution with brown seaweed...

  8. A compiled checklist of seaweeds of Sudanese Red Sea coast

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    NahidAbdel Rahim Osman; Sayadat Eltigany Mohammed

    2016-01-01

    Objective: To present an updated and compiled checklist of Sudanese seaweeds as an example for the region for conservational as well as developmental purposes. Methods: The checklist was developed based on both field investigations using line transect method at 4 sites along the Red Sea coast of Sudan and review of available studies done on Sudanese seaweeds. Results: In total 114 macroalgal names were recorded and were found to be distributed in 16 orders, 34 families, and 62 genera. The Rhodophyceae macroalgae contained 8 orders, 17 families, 32 genera and 47 species. The Phaeophyceae macroalgae composed of 4 orders, 5 families, 17 genera, and 28 species. The 39 species of the Chlorophyceae macroalgae belong to 2 classes, 4 orders, 12 families, and 14 genera. The present paper proposed the addition of 11 macroalgal taxa to be included in Sudan seaweeds species list. These include 3 red seaweed species, 1 brown seaweed species and 7 green seaweed species. Conclusions: This list is not yet inclusive and it only represents the macroalgal species common to the intertidal areas of Sudan Red Sea coast. Further investigation may reveal the presence of more species. While significant levels of diversity and endemism were revealed for other groups of organisms in the Red Sea region, similar work still has to be performed for seaweeds. Considering the impact of climate change on communities’ structure and composition and the growing risk of maritime transportation through the Red Sea particularly that may originate from oil tankers as well as that may emanate from oil exploration, baseline data on seaweeds are highly required for management purposes.

  9. The Solvent Effectiveness on Extraction Process of Seaweed Pigment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Warkoyo Warkoyo

    2011-09-01

    Full Text Available Eucheuma cottonii seaweed is a species of seaweed cultured in Indonesian waters, because its cultivation is relatively easy and inexpensive. It has a wide variety of colors from green to yellow green, gray, red and brown, indicating photosynthetic pigments, such as chlorophyll and carotenoids. An important factor in the effectiveness of pigment extraction is the choice of solvent. The correct type of solvent in the extraction method of specific natural materials is important so that a pigment with optimum quality that is also benefical to the society can be produced. The target of this research is to obtain a high quality solvent type of carotenoid pigment. This research was conducted using a randomized block design with three (3 replications involving two factors namely solvent type (4 levels: aceton, ethanol, petroleum benzene, hexan & petroleum benzene and seaweed color (3 levels: brown, green and red. Research results indicated that each solvent reached a peak of maximal absorbance at  410-472 nm, namely carotenoids. The usage of acetone solvent gave the best pigment quality. Brown, green and red seaweed have pigment content of 1,28 mg/100 g; 0,98 mg/100 g; 1,35 mg/100 g and rendement of 6,24%; 4,85% and 6,65% respectively.

  10. New insights into seaweed polyphenols on glucose homeostasis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Murugan, Amarchand Chordia; Karim, Md Rezaul; Yusoff, Mashitah Binti Mohd; Tan, Suat Hian; Asras, Mohd Fazli Bin Farida; Rashid, Shah Samiur

    2015-08-01

    Polyphenol-rich marine macroalgae are gaining dietary importance due to their influence over diabetes mellitus and the role as a vital source of high-value nutraceuticals. Their assorted beneficial effects on human health include competitive inhibition of digestive enzymes, varying the activity of hepatic glucose-metabolizing enzymes, lowering the plasma glucose levels, and lipid peroxidation, delaying the aging process. In this paper, we review the health beneficial effects of polyphenols and phlorotannins from brown seaweeds with special emphasis on their inhibitory effects on carbohydrate-metabolizing enzymes. A survey of literature from databases such as Sciencedirect, Scopus, Pubmed, Springerlink, and Google Scholar from the year 1973 to 2013 was done to bring together the information relating to drug discovery from brown seaweeds as a source for diabetes treatment. Over the past two decades, 20 different bioactive polyphenols/phlorotannins have been isolated and studied from 10 different brown algae. Discussion of the positive effect on the inhibition of enzymes metabolizing carbohydrates in both in vitro and in vivo experiments are included. Despite the recent advancements in isolating bioactive compounds from seaweeds with potential health benefit or pharmaceutical behavior, studies on the polyphenol effectiveness on glucose homeostasis in human beings are very few in response to their functional characterization. Added research in this area is required to confirm the close connection of polyphenol rich seaweed-based diet consumption with glucose homeostasis and the exciting possibility of prescribing polyphenols to treat the diabetes pandemic.

  11. Antimicrobial Action of Compounds from Marine Seaweed

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    María José Pérez

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Seaweed produces metabolites aiding in the protection against different environmental stresses. These compounds show antiviral, antiprotozoal, antifungal, and antibacterial properties. Macroalgae can be cultured in high volumes and would represent an attractive source of potential compounds useful for unconventional drugs able to control new diseases or multiresistant strains of pathogenic microorganisms. The substances isolated from green, brown and red algae showing potent antimicrobial activity belong to polysaccharides, fatty acids, phlorotannins, pigments, lectins, alkaloids, terpenoids and halogenated compounds. This review presents the major compounds found in macroalga showing antimicrobial activities and their most promising applications.

  12. Anticancer Effects of Different Seaweeds on Human Colon and Breast Cancers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ghislain Moussavou

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available Seafoods and seaweeds represent some of the most important reservoirs of new therapeutic compounds for humans. Seaweed has been shown to have several biological activities, including anticancer activity. This review focuses on colorectal and breast cancers, which are major causes of cancer-related mortality in men and women. It also describes various compounds extracted from a range of seaweeds that have been shown to eradicate or slow the progression of cancer. Fucoidan extracted from the brown algae Fucus spp. has shown activity against both colorectal and breast cancers. Furthermore, we review the mechanisms through which these compounds can induce apoptosis in vitro and in vivo. By considering the ability of compounds present in seaweeds to act against colorectal and breast cancers, this review highlights the potential use of seaweeds as anticancer agents.

  13. Screening of marine algae (Padina sp.) from the Lengeh Port, Persian Gulf for antibacterial and antifungal activities

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Azadeh Taherpour; Bita Archangi; Sadraddin Ghaemmaghami; Hossein Zolgharnein; Kamal Ghanemi

    2016-01-01

    Objective:To evaluate the antibacterial efficacy of different solvent extracts ofPadinasp. against selected human pathogenic bacteria and fungi species such asEscherichia coli,Shigella sp.,Staphylococcus aureus(S. aureus),Pseudomonas aeruginosa,Aspergillus flavus and Candida albicans. Methods:Various solvents including methanol, ethyl acetate, chloroform and hexane were used to acquire crude extracts from marine algaePadinasp. After crude preparation, antibacterial and antifungal activities were screened against clinically important human pathogenic bacteria using disc and well diffusion methods. For all the bacterial species used in this research, minimum inhibitory concentration was undertaken considering various solvent extracts of Padinasp. To ensure the accuracy of experiments, a positive control was also included. Results:Confirmed that hexane is the best solvent to extract antimicrobial agents fromPadina sp. Among selected bacteria,S. aureus was the most sensitive test microorganism. While, all other microorganisms showed resistance against methanol, ethyl acetate, chloroform extracts. In fact, by increasing concentration of hexane extract, inhibition ofS. aureus growth or antimicrobial activity was increased. Growth inhibition zone in well method showed better results compared to disc diffusion method. The minimum inhibitory concentration and minimum bactericidal concentration of hexane extract were 15 and 30 mg/mL against S. aureus, respectively. AllPadinasp. extracts did not reveal any antifungal activities against fungi species in this study. Conclusions: Brown algae extracts showed sufficient antibacterial properties againstS. aureus. Therefore,Padinasp. in this research can be a good candidate to design and manufacture novel antibacterial agents used in pharmaceutical industries.

  14. Seaweed vitamins as nutraceuticals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Škrovánková, Soňa

    2011-01-01

    Seaweeds are a good source of some water- (B(1), B(2), B(12), C) and fat-soluble (β-carotene with vitamin A activity, vitamin E) vitamins. To ensure that the adequate intake of all vitamins is received in the diet, people (especially people on special diet, strict vegetarians, and vegans) can consume foods enriched with vitamins, for example, in the form of functional foods with vitamins as nutraceuticals, extracted from natural sources such as seaweeds. Seaweed vitamins are important not only due to their biochemical functions and antioxidant activity but also due to other health benefits such as decreasing of blood pressure (vitamin C), prevention of cardiovascular diseases (β-carotene), or reducing the risk of cancer (vitamins E and C, carotenoids). Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  15. Metals in edible seaweed.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rubio, C; Napoleone, G; Luis-González, G; Gutiérrez, A J; González-Weller, D; Hardisson, A; Revert, C

    2017-04-01

    The concentration levels of 20 metals were analyzed by ICP-OES in edible seaweed (Chondrus, Eisenia, Gelidium, Himanthalia, Laminaria, Palmaria, Porphyra, Undaria), from two origins (Asia vs EU) according to their cultivation practices (conventional vs organic). Red seaweed showed higher concentrations of trace and toxic elements. Porphyra may be used as a potential bioindicator for metals. Significant differences were found between the Asian vs European mean contents. The mean Cd level from the conventional cultivation (0.28 mg/kg) was two points higher than the organic cultivation (0.13 mg/kg). A daily consumption of seaweed (4 g/day) contributes to the dietary intake of metals, mainly Mg and Cr. The average intakes of Al, Cd and Pb were 0.064, 0.001 and 0.0003 mg/day, respectively. Based on obtained results, this study suggests that exposure to the toxic metals analyzed (Al, Cd and Pb) through seaweed consumption does not raise serious health concerns, but other toxic metals should be monitored. Copyright © 2017. Published by Elsevier Ltd.

  16. The potential of bacteria isolated from ruminal contents of seaweed-eating North Ronaldsay sheep to hydrolyse seaweed components and produce methane by anaerobic digestion in vitro.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Williams, Allan G; Withers, Susan; Sutherland, Alastair D

    2013-01-01

    The production of methane biofuel from seaweeds is limited by the hydrolysis of polysaccharides. The rumen microbiota of seaweed-eating North Ronaldsay sheep was studied for polysaccharidic bacterial isolates degrading brown-seaweed polysaccharides. Only nine isolates out of 65 utilized >90% of the polysaccharide they were isolated on. The nine isolates (eight Prevotella spp. and one Clostridium butyricum) utilized whole Laminaria hyperborea extract and a range of seaweed polysaccharides, including alginate (seven out of nine isolates), laminarin and carboxymethylcellulose (eight out of nine isolates); while two out of nine isolates additionally hydrolysed fucoidan to some extent. Crude enzyme extracts from three of the isolates studied further had diverse glycosidases and polysaccharidase activities; particularly against laminarin and alginate (two isolates were shown to have alginate lyase activity) and notably fucoidan and carageenan (one isolate). In serial culture rumen microbiota hydrolysed a range of seaweed polysaccharides (fucoidan to a notably lesser degree) and homogenates of L. hyperborea, mixed Fucus spp. and Ascophyllum nodosum to produce methane and acetate. The rumen microbiota and isolates represent potential adjunct organisms or enzymes which may improve hydrolysis of seaweed components and thus improve the efficiency of seaweed anaerobic digestion for methane biofuel production.

  17. Halocarbon emissions by selected tropical seaweeds: species-specific and compound-specific responses under changing pH

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leedham Elvidge, Emma C.; Sturges, William T.; Malin, Gill; Abd Rahman, Noorsaadah

    2017-01-01

    Five tropical seaweeds, Kappaphycus alvarezii (Doty) Doty ex P.C. Silva, Padina australis Hauck, Sargassum binderi Sonder ex J. Agardh (syn. S. aquifolium (Turner) C. Agardh), Sargassum siliquosum J. Agardh and Turbinaria conoides (J. Agardh) Kützing, were incubated in seawater of pH 8.0, 7.8 (ambient), 7.6, 7.4 and 7.2, to study the effects of changing seawater pH on halocarbon emissions. Eight halocarbon species known to be emitted by seaweeds were investigated: bromoform (CHBr3), dibro­momethane (CH2Br2), iodomethane (CH3I), diiodomethane (CH2I2), bromoiodomethane (CH2BrI), bromochlorometh­ane (CH2BrCl), bromodichloromethane (CHBrCl2), and dibro­mochloromethane (CHBr2Cl). These very short-lived halocarbon gases are believed to contribute to stratospheric halogen concentrations if released in the tropics. It was observed that the seaweeds emit all eight halocarbons assayed, with the exception of K. alvarezii and S. binderi for CH2I2 and CH3I respectively, which were not measurable at the achievable limit of detection. The effect of pH on halocarbon emission by the seaweeds was shown to be species-specific and compound specific. The highest percentage changes in emissions for the halocarbons of interest were observed at the lower pH levels of 7.2 and 7.4 especially in Padina australis and Sargassum spp., showing that lower seawater pH causes elevated emissions of some halocarbon compounds. In general the seaweed least affected by pH change in terms of types of halocarbon emission, was P. australis. The commercially farmed seaweed K. alvarezii was very sensitive to pH change as shown by the high increases in most of the compounds in all pH levels relative to ambient. In terms of percentage decrease in maximum quantum yield of photosynthesis (Fv∕Fm) prior to and after incubation, there were no significant correlations with the various pH levels tested for all seaweeds. The correlation between percentage decrease in the maximum quantum yield of photosynthesis

  18. Halocarbon emissions by selected tropical seaweeds: species-specific and compound-specific responses under changing pH

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Paramjeet Kaur Mithoo-Singh

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Five tropical seaweeds, Kappaphycus alvarezii (Doty Doty ex P.C. Silva, Padina australis Hauck, Sargassum binderi Sonder ex J. Agardh (syn. S. aquifolium (Turner C. Agardh, Sargassum siliquosum J. Agardh and Turbinaria conoides (J. Agardh Kützing, were incubated in seawater of pH 8.0, 7.8 (ambient, 7.6, 7.4 and 7.2, to study the effects of changing seawater pH on halocarbon emissions. Eight halocarbon species known to be emitted by seaweeds were investigated: bromoform (CHBr3, dibro­momethane (CH2Br2, iodomethane (CH3I, diiodomethane (CH2I2, bromoiodomethane (CH2BrI, bromochlorometh­ane (CH2BrCl, bromodichloromethane (CHBrCl2, and dibro­mochloromethane (CHBr2Cl. These very short-lived halocarbon gases are believed to contribute to stratospheric halogen concentrations if released in the tropics. It was observed that the seaweeds emit all eight halocarbons assayed, with the exception of K. alvarezii and S. binderi for CH2I2 and CH3I respectively, which were not measurable at the achievable limit of detection. The effect of pH on halocarbon emission by the seaweeds was shown to be species-specific and compound specific. The highest percentage changes in emissions for the halocarbons of interest were observed at the lower pH levels of 7.2 and 7.4 especially in Padina australis and Sargassum spp., showing that lower seawater pH causes elevated emissions of some halocarbon compounds. In general the seaweed least affected by pH change in terms of types of halocarbon emission, was P. australis. The commercially farmed seaweed K. alvarezii was very sensitive to pH change as shown by the high increases in most of the compounds in all pH levels relative to ambient. In terms of percentage decrease in maximum quantum yield of photosynthesis (Fv∕Fm prior to and after incubation, there were no significant correlations with the various pH levels tested for all seaweeds. The correlation between percentage decrease in the maximum quantum yield of

  19. Effect of domestic sewage and industrial effluents on biomass and species diversity of seaweeds

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tewari, A.; Joshi, H.V.

    1988-01-01

    The effect of two chlor-alkali industry effluents and domestic sewage has been studied, in situ, on tropical seaweeds of the Okhamandal coast. Maximum biomass was observed at a distance of 400 and 5000 m away from the discharge points of the two chlor-alkali industries. Ulva lactuca and Rhizoclonium kochianum were most resistant while Caulerpa scalpelliformis, Halimeda tuna and Codium dwarkense were most sensitive. Species of Sargassum, Cystoseira and Gelidiella were completely eradicated due to the long-term effect of the effluent from one chlor-alkali industry. Gracilaria corticata, G. foliifera and species of Hypnea produced good biomass under mildly polluted conditions and they may be cultivated in such areas. Algal species diversity (ASD) was not recorded up to 400 and 4000 m away from chlor-alkali industries outfalls as intensity of pollution was high in this region. The ASD increased as the distance from the outfall increased: In general, brown seaweeds were most sensitive to this type of pollution. Domestic sewage was much less inhibitory to seaweeds. Species of Ulva and Enteromorpha were maximum biomass producers while brown seaweeds were least productive in the near vicinity of the discharge. Species diversity was also high, in this area, as compared to the chlor-alkali industry effluents. Vertical distribution of seaweeds was not evident up to 400-4000 m away from chlor-alkali effluents outfall and up to 10 m away from domestic sewage discharge points. Seaweeds showed characteristic vertical distribution after these distances. (orig.).

  20. Seaweed allelopathy to corals: are active compounds on, or in, seaweeds?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Longo, G. O.; Hay, M. E.

    2017-03-01

    Numerous seaweeds produce secondary metabolites that are allelopathic to corals. To date, most of the compounds identified in this interaction are lipid-soluble instead of water-soluble. Thus, understanding whether these compounds are stored internally where they would not contact corals, or occur on external surfaces where they could be transferred to corals, is critical to understanding seaweed-coral interactions and to informing realistic experiments on chemically mediated interactions. We conducted field experiments assessing the effects of lipid-soluble extracts from macroalgal surfaces alone versus total lipid-soluble extracts from both internal and external tissues on the coral Pocillopora verrucosa. Extracts of the red algae Amansia rhodantha and Asparagopsis taxiformis, the green alga Chlorodesmis fastigiata, and the brown alga Dictyota bartayresiana suppressed coral photochemical efficiency; in these bioactive species, the total lipid-soluble extracts were not more potent than surface-only extracts despite the concentration of total extracts being many times greater than surface-only extracts. This suggests that previous assays with total extracts may be ecologically meaningful, but also that future assays should be conducted with the simpler, less concentrated, and more ecologically relevant surface extracts. Allelopathic effects of As. taxiformis and C. fastigiata were significantly greater than the effect of D. bartayresiana, with effects of Am. rhodantha intermediate between these groups. Neither surface-only nor total lipid-soluble extracts of the seaweed Turbinaria ornata were allelopathic, and its lack of potency differed significantly from all other species. Our results suggest that lipid-soluble, allelopathic compounds are usually deployed on seaweed surfaces where they can be effective in surface-mediated interactions against other species.

  1. Ameliorative effect of polyphenols from Padina boergesenii against ferric nitrilotriacetate induced renal oxidative damage: With inhibition of oxidative hemolysis and in vitro free radicals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rajamani, Karthikeyan; Renju, V C; Sethupathy, S; Thirugnanasambandan, Somasundaram S

    2015-07-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the antioxidant activities of diethyl ether (DEE) and methanol (M) extracts from brown alga Padina boergesenii using in vitro and in vivo antioxidant assay, which may help to relate the antioxidant properties with the possible outline of its ameliorative effect. M extract showed higher radical scavenging activity through ferric reducing antioxidant power 139.11 µmol tannic acid equivalent/g; DPPH 71.32 ± 0.56%; deoxyribose radical 88.31 ± 0.47%, and total antioxidant activity 0.47 ± 0.02 mg ascorbic acid equivalents/g. Oxidative red blood cell (RBC) hemolysis inhibition rate was significantly higher in M extract (150 mg/kg body weight) in reference to total phenolic content (r = 0.935). Rats administered with DEE and M extracts (150 mg/kg body weight) for seven days before the administration of ferric nitrilotriacetate (9 mg of Fe/mg/kg bodyweight). Rats pretreated with extracts significantly changed the level of renal microsomal lipid peroxidation, glutathione, and antioxidant enzymes in post-mitochondrial supernatant (P rutin with reference to retardation factor (Rf ) in both the extracts. These findings support the source of polyphenols (rutin) from P. boergesenii had potent antioxidant activity; further work on isolation of bioactive compounds can be channeled to develop as a natural antioxidant.

  2. Screening of Dengue virus antiviral activity of marine seaweeds by an in situ enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andrea Cristine Koishi

    Full Text Available Dengue is a significant public health problem worldwide. Despite the important social and clinical impact, there is no vaccine or specific antiviral therapy for prevention and treatment of dengue virus (DENV infection. Considering the above, drug discovery research for dengue is of utmost importance; in addition natural marine products provide diverse and novel chemical structures with potent biological activities that must be evaluated. In this study we propose a target-free approach for dengue drug discovery based on a novel, rapid, and economic in situ enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay and the screening of a panel of marine seaweed extracts. The in situ ELISA was standardized and validated for Huh7.5 cell line infected with all four serotypes of DENV, among them clinical isolates and a laboratory strain. Statistical analysis showed an average S/B of 7.2 and Z-factor of 0.62, demonstrating assay consistency and reliability. A panel of fifteen seaweed extracts was then screened at the maximum non-toxic dose previously determined by the MTT and Neutral Red cytotoxic assays. Eight seaweed extracts were able to reduce DENV infection of at least one serotype tested. Four extracts (Phaeophyta: Canistrocarpus cervicornis, Padina gymnospora; Rhodophyta: Palisada perforate; Chlorophyta: Caulerpa racemosa were chosen for further evaluation, and time of addition studies point that they might act at an early stage of the viral infection cycle, such as binding or internalization.

  3. Studies on in-vitro antioxidant activity of marine edible seaweeds from the east coastal region of Peninsular Malaysia using different extraction methods

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Tam Siow Foon; Lian Ai Ai; Palaniselvam Kuppusamy; Mashitah M.Yusoff; Natanamurugaraj Govindan

    2013-01-01

    Objective: To determine the antioxidant activity of two edible marine seaweeds Eucheumacottonii and Padina sp.. Methods: The two extraction methods such as conventional and soxhlet extraction were used to isolate the secondary metabolites using methanol as a solvent medium. Total phenolic content of crude seaweeds extract were analysed by standard FC method. The different antioxidant assays DPPH, ferric reducing antioxidant power and β-carotene bleaching assays confirmed the antioxidant activities.Results:with expressed higher total phenolic content in the seaweeds extract. Also β-carotene bleaching assay lower activity compare with BHT as reference control. Additionally IR spectra showed the phenolic related functional groups are present in the solvent extract. The phenolic related compounds are mainly responsible for higher rate of antioxidant activity.Conclusions:DPPH and ferric reducing antioxidant power assays showed the positive correlation higher phenolic contents than the Eucheuma cottonii. And also the soxhlet extraction showed higher yield and better radical scavenging activity compared to conventional method. Moreover the studies confirmed both seaweeds are an effective candidate for the control the free radical scavenging activity.

  4. Seaweeds - a field manual

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Dhargalkar, V.K.; Kavlekar, D.P.

    - thesis, absorption of nutrientThe most significant difference of seaweeds from the higher plants is that their sex organs and sporangia are usually one celled or if multi-cellular, their gametes and spores are not enclosed within a wall formed by a layer... and oogamy. In oogamous type of reproduction, the male sex organ (antheridium) and the female sex organ (oogamium) may be produced on the same plant or on different plants (Fig. 6). Alternation of gametophytic and sporophytic generations occurs in this group...

  5. Seaweed and Biomass production

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nadiradze, K. T.

    2016-02-01

    The Black Sea has a sensitive ecosystem, vulnerable to the potential impacts by climate, water quality, pollution and etc. Successfully restoring and sustaining healthy Black Sea aqua cultural farming will require concreted action by private sector, civil society, farmer organizations and other stakeholders. But to achieve agri-environmental goals at scale, well-organized policy goals, framework and strategy for Sea Agriculture Green energy, Algae Biomass, Sapropel Production, aquacultures farming are essential for Georgian Farmers. But we must recognizes the most sustainable and at least risky farming systems will be those that build in aqua cultural, environmental, and social management practices resilient to climate ch ange and other risks and shocks evident in Georgia and whole in a Black Sea Basin Countries. Black Sea has more than 600 kinds of seaweeds; these species contain biologically active substances also present in fish - vitamins and omega fatty acids. The task is to specify how Black Sea seaweeds can be used in preparing nutrition additives, medicines and cosmetic products. As elsewhere around the world, governments, civil society, and the private sector in Georgia should work together to develop and implement `Blue Economy' and Green Growth strategies to generate equitable, sustainable economic development through strengthening Sea Agriculture. We are very interested to develop Black Sea seaweed plantation ad farming for multiply purposes fo r livestock as food additives, for human as great natural source of iodine as much iodine are released by seaweeds into the atmosphere to facilitate the development of better models or aerosol formation and atmospheric chemistry. It is well known, that earth's oceans are thought to have absorbed about one quarter of the CO2 humans pumped into the atmosphere over the past 20 years. The flip side of this process is that, as they absorb co2, oceans also become more acidic with dramatic consequences for sea life

  6. Properties of polysaccharides in several seaweeds from Atlantic Canada and their potential anti-influenza viral activities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jiao, Guangling; Yu, Guangli; Wang, Wei; Zhao, Xiaoliang; Zhang, Junzeng; Ewart, Stephen H.

    2012-06-01

    To explore the polysaccharides from selected seaweeds of Atlantic Canada and to evaluate their potential anti-influenza virus activities, polysaccharides were isolated from several Atlantic Canadian seaweeds, including three red algae ( Polysiphonia lanosa, Furcellaria lumbricalis, and Palmaria palmata), two brown algae ( Ascophyllum nodosum and Fucus vesiculosus), and one green alga ( Ulva lactuca) by sequential extraction with cold water, hot water, and alkali solutions. These polysaccharides were analyzed for monosaccharide composition and other general chemical properties, and they were evaluated for anti-influenza virus activities. Total sugar contents in these polysaccharides ranged from 15.4% (in U. lactuca) to 91.4% (in F. lumbricalis); sulfation level was as high as 17.6% in a polysaccharide from U. lactuca, whereas it could not be detected in an alikali-extract from P. palmaria. For polysaccharides from red seaweeds, the main sugar units were sulfated galactans (agar or carrageenan) for P. lanosa, F. lumbricalis, and xylans for P. palmata. In brown seaweeds, the polysaccharides largely contained sulfated fucans, whereas the polysaccharides in green seaweed were mainly composed of heteroglycuronans. Screening for antiviral activity against influenza A/PR/8/34 (H1N1) virus revealed that brown algal polysaccharides were particularly effective. Seaweeds from Atlantic Canada are a good source of marine polysaccharides with potential antiviral properties.

  7. Phylogeography of the seaweed Ishige okamurae (Phaeophyceae) : evidence for glacial refugia in the northwest Pacific region

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Lee, Kyung Min; Yang, Eun Chan; Coyer, James A.; Zuccarello, Giuseppe C.; Wang, Wei-Lui; Choi, Chang Geun; Boo, Sung Min

    2012-01-01

    Although benthic marine algae are essential components of marine coastal systems that have been influenced profoundly by past and present climate change, our knowledge of seaweed phylogeography is limited. The brown alga Ishige okamurae Yendo occurs in the northwest Pacific, where it occupies a char

  8. Antioxidant Effect of Seaweed Extracts in Vitro and in Food Emulsion Systems Enriched With Fish Oil

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Larsen, Ditte Baun; Farvin, Sabeena; Jacobsen, Charlotte

    ongoing work on the brown algae Fucus vesiculosus. This seaweed contains a wide range of polyphenols with potential antioxidant activity. Thus, in vitro antioxidant properties of F. vesiculosus extracts have been found to be related to the total polyphenolic content. It has been suggested that the primary...... extracts of F. Vesiculosus in a range of different food models will be presented....

  9. Phylogeography of the seaweed Ishige okamurae (Phaeophyceae) : Evidence for glacial refugia in the northwest Pacific region

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Lee, Kyung Min; Yang, Eun Chan; Coyer, James A.; Zuccarello, Giuseppe C.; Wang, Wei-Lui; Choi, Chang Geun; Boo, Sung Min

    2012-01-01

    Although benthic marine algae are essential components of marine coastal systems that have been influenced profoundly by past and present climate change, our knowledge of seaweed phylogeography is limited. The brown alga Ishige okamurae Yendo occurs in the northwest Pacific, where it occupies a char

  10. Nutritional profile of edible red marine seaweeds

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Catarina Guedes Costa

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available Marine biodiversity represents an exceptional source of natural resources. Their use in a sustainable way may ensure alternative food sources for human consumption, which scarcity is anticipated. Macroalgae, also known as seaweed, are an outstanding example of this biodiversity and are considered an excellent source of a wide number of chemical compounds with beneficial health effects [1]. According to their pigmentation, they can be distinguished in green (Chlorophytaea, brown (Phaeophytaea and red (Rhodophytaea, showing differences in nutritional and chemical compositions [1]. Some macroalgae are widely used as food ingredients in oriental countries as a good source of fiber and protein. Alternatively, they are also considered a source of nutraceuticals, providing health benefits such as anti-inflamatory, anti-allergic, antimutagenic, antitumor, antidiabetic, antioxidant, antihyperthensive and neuroprotective properties [2]. Indeed, macroalgae are a very attractive material for the food, pharmaceutical and cosmetic industries. According to some studies red seaweeds seem to be the most suitable source of proteins for human nutrition [3]. The aim of this study was to evaluate the nutritional profile of the most consumed species of red seaweed that are commercially available in the market. Red species as Palmaria palmata (Dulse, Porphyra tenera (Nori and Eisenia bicyclis (Arame, were analyzed. Moisture determination was performed using a Scaltec SMO01 moisture analyzer. The ashes were obtained by incineration at 500ºC. The protein content was determined using the Kjeldahl procedure and total fat was measured through Soxhlet method. The carbohydrates were calculated indirectly by difference. In addition, chlorides were volumetrically determined and vitamin E profile was analysed by HPLC/DAD/FLD. The algae samples are commercialized dry, so the moisture content was very low, around 10%. The ash content was around 10-17%. Protein levels ranged from

  11. Copper biosorption on immobilized seaweed biomass: column breakthrough characteristics

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2007-01-01

    The biosorption of copper by the brown seaweed Sargassum baccularia, immobilized onto polyvinyl alcohol (PVA) gel beads, was investigated with fixed-bed experiments. Laboratory-scale column tests were performed to determine breakthrough curves with varying flow rates and feed concentrations. A theoretical fixed-bed model, known as the Bohart-Adams equation, was evaluated in simulating the experimental breakthrough curves. The Bohart-Adams model qualitatively predicted the breakthrough trends. PVA-immobilized seaweed biomass beads were amenable to efficient regeneration with aqueous solution containing the chelating agent ethylenediaminetetraacetic acid (EDTA). The biosorbent retained most of its original uptake capacity over three cycles of use. The excellent reusability of the biosorbent could lead to the development of a viable metal remediation technology.

  12. An HPLC method for the quantification of sterols in edible seaweeds.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sánchez-Machado, D I; López-Hernández, J; Paseiro-Losada, P; López-Cervantes, J

    2004-04-01

    This study presents an HPLC method for the quantification of sterols in edible seaweeds. Sterols were identified by HPLC/mass spectrometry (HPLC-MS) in positive APCI mode. The samples were saponified by refluxing with 1 m ethanolic KOH, and the non-saponifiable fraction was extracted with hexane. Sterols were quantified by HPLC with UV detection (HPLC-UV), on a 15 x 0.4 cm Kromasil 100 C(18) 5 micro m column (mobile phase 30:70 v/v methanol:acetonitrile; fl ow rate 1.2 mL/min; column temperature 30 degrees C; detection wavelength 205 nm). Method repeatability for fucosterol was good (coefficient of variation 2.4%). Sterol contents were determined in canned or dried brown seaweeds (Himanthalia elongata, Undaria pinnatifida, Laminaria ochroleuca) and red seaweeds (Palmaria sp., Porphyra sp.). The predominant sterol was fucosterol in brown seaweeds (83-97% of total sterol content; 662-2320 micro g/g dry weight), and desmosterol in red seaweeds (87-93% of total sterol content; 187-337 micro g/g dry weight).

  13. Seaweed Aquaculture and Marine Biotechnology

    OpenAIRE

    Gonçalves Pereira, Rui

    2016-01-01

    Macroscopic marine algae, typically known as macroalgae or seaweeds, form an important living resource of the oceans, as primary producers. People have collected seaweeds for food, both for humans and animals for millennia. They also have been a source of nutrient rich fertilizers, as well as a source of gelling agents known as phycocolloids. More recently macroalgae are playing significant roles in medicine and biotechnology. Although Biotechnology and in particular marine biotechnology may ...

  14. Biogas production generated through continuous digestion of natural and cultivated seaweeds with dairy slurry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tabassum, Muhammad Rizwan; Wall, David M; Murphy, Jerry D

    2016-11-01

    The technical feasibility of long term anaerobic mono-digestion of two brown seaweeds, and co-digestion of both seaweeds with dairy slurry was investigated whilst increasing the organic loading rate (OLR). One seaweed was natural (L. digitata); the second seaweed (S. Latissima) was cultivated. Higher proportions of L. digitata in co-digestion (66.6%) allowed the digester to operate more efficiently (OLR of 5kgVSm(-3)d(-1) achieving a specific methane yield (SMY) of 232LCH4kg(-1)VS) as compared to lower proportions (33.3%). Co-digestion of 66.6% cultivated S. latissima, with dairy slurry allowed a higher SMY of 252LCH4kg(-1)VS but at a lower OLR of 4kgVSm(-3)d(-1). Optimum conditions for mono-digestion of both seaweeds were effected at 4kgVSm(-3)d(-1). Chloride concentrations increased to high levels in the digestion of both seaweeds but were not detrimental to operation.

  15. In vitro ruminal fermentation and methane production of different seaweed species

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Molina-Alcaide, E.; Carro, M.D.; Roleda, M. Y.

    2017-01-01

    methane production (P 0.05) by either seaweed species or the collection season. Higher final pH (P production, ammonia...... production kinetics and in vitro rumen fermentation in batch cultures of ruminal microorganisms. The seaweeds were three red species (Mastocarpus stellatus, Palmaria palmata and Porphyra sp.), three brown species (Alaria esculenta, Laminaria digitata and Pelvetia canaliculata) and one green species...... by collecting season (P = 0.208–0.341). The TEP values ranged from 1.46 to 50.3 mg/g dry matter (DM), and differed (P production parameters for a rumen passage...

  16. Phlorotannins from Alaskan Seaweed Inhibit Carbolytic Enzyme Activity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Joshua Kellogg

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available Global incidence of type 2 diabetes has escalated over the past few decades, necessitating a continued search for natural sources of enzyme inhibitors to offset postprandial hyperglycemia. The objective of this study was to evaluate coastal Alaskan seaweed inhibition of α-glucosidase and α-amylase, two carbolytic enzymes involved in serum glucose regulation. Of the six species initially screened, the brown seaweeds Fucus distichus and Alaria marginata possessed the strongest inhibitory effects. F. distichus fractions were potent mixed-mode inhibitors of α-glucosidase and α-amylase, with IC50 values of 0.89 and 13.9 μg/mL, respectively; significantly more efficacious than the pharmaceutical acarbose (IC50 of 112.0 and 137.8 μg/mL, respectively. The activity of F. distichus fractions was associated with phlorotannin oligomers. Normal-phase liquid chromatography-mass spectrometry (NPLC-MS was employed to characterize individual oligomers. Accurate masses and fragmentation patterns confirmed the presence of fucophloroethol structures with degrees of polymerization from 3 to 18 monomer units. These findings suggest that coastal Alaskan seaweeds are sources of α-glucosidase and α-amylase inhibitory phlorotannins, and thus have potential to limit the release of sugar from carbohydrates and thus alleviate postprandial hyperglycemia.

  17. Antimicrobial, antioxidant properties and chemical composition of seaweeds collected from Saudi Arabia (Red Sea and Arabian Gulf

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nadine M.S. Moubayed

    2017-01-01

    FTIR Infrared Spectrometer analysis together with the high performance liquid chromatography provided a detailed description of the possible functional constituents and the major chemical components present in marine macroalgae particularly in brown seaweeds to be mainly of phenolic nature to which the potent antimicrobial activity is being attributed.

  18. Influence of different types and proportions of added edible seaweeds on characteristics of low-salt gel/emulsion meat systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cofrades, S; López-López, I; Solas, M T; Bravo, L; Jiménez-Colmenero, F

    2008-08-01

    The effects of three different types of edible seaweeds, Sea Spaghetti (Himanthalia elongata), Wakame (Undaria pinnatifida), and Nori (Porphyra umbilicalis) added at two concentrations (2.5% and 5% dry matter) on the physicochemical and morphological characteristics of gel/emulsion systems were evaluated. The addition of seaweeds improved (P<0.05) water- and fat-binding properties except in the case of Nori added at 2.5%. Hardness and chewiness of the cooked products with added seaweed were higher (P<0.05), and springiness and cohesiveness were lower (P<0.05) than in control samples. Colour changes in meat systems were affected by the type of seaweed. The morphology of sample differed depending on the type of seaweed added, and this is the result of differences in physical and chemical characteristic of the seaweed powder used. In general, products formulated with the brown seaweeds (Sea Spaghetti and Wakame) exhibited similar behaviour, different from that of products made with the red seaweed Nori.

  19. The α-amylase and α-glucosidase inhibitory effects of Irish seaweed extracts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lordan, Sinéad; Smyth, Thomas J; Soler-Vila, Anna; Stanton, Catherine; Ross, R Paul

    2013-12-01

    To date, numerous studies have reported on the antidiabetic properties of various plant extracts through inhibition of carbohydrate-hydrolysing enzymes. The objective of this research was to evaluate extracts of seaweeds for α-amylase and α-glucosidase inhibitory effects. Cold water and ethanol extracts of 15 seaweeds were initially screened and from this, five brown seaweed species were chosen. The cold water and ethanol extracts of Ascophyllum nodosum had the strongest α-amylase inhibitory effect with IC50 values of 53.6 and 44.7 μg/ml, respectively. Moreover, the extracts of Fucus vesiculosus Linnaeus were found to be potent inhibitors of α-glucosidase with IC50 values of 0.32 and 0.49 μg/ml. The observed effects were associated with the phenolic content and antioxidant activity of the extracts, and the concentrations used were below cytotoxic levels. Overall, our findings suggest that brown seaweed extracts may limit the release of simple sugars from the gut and thereby alleviate postprandial hyperglycaemia. Copyright © 2013. Published by Elsevier Ltd.

  20. Nutritional and digestive health benefits of seaweed.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rajapakse, Niranjan; Kim, Se-Kwon

    2011-01-01

    Seaweed is a famous delicacy in some parts of the Asia and also a well-known source of important food hydrocolloids, such as agar, alginates, and carrageenan. In addition to the food value of seaweed, several health benefits have also been reported to be present in this valuable food source. It is presumed that the unique features of the marine environment, where the seaweeds are grown, are mainly responsible for most of its properties. Among the functional effects of the seaweed, nutritional and health-related benefits have been widely studied. Compared to the terrestrial plants and animal-based foods, seaweed is rich in some health-promoting molecules and materials such as, dietary fiber, ω-3 fatty acids, essential amino acids, and vitamins A, B, C, and E. In this chapter, the nutritive value of seaweed and the functional effects of its soluble fiber are discussed with a special reference to the digestive health promotion of human.

  1. Seaweed Polysaccharides and Derived Oligosaccharides Stimulate Defense Responses and Protection Against Pathogens in Plants

    OpenAIRE

    Alejandra Moenne; Jorge Castro; Jeannette Vera; Alberto Gonzalez

    2011-01-01

    Plants interact with the environment by sensing “non-self” molecules called elicitors derived from pathogens or other sources. These molecules bind to specific receptors located in the plasma membrane and trigger defense responses leading to protection against pathogens. In particular, it has been shown that cell wall and storage polysaccharides from green, brown and red seaweeds (marine macroalgae) corresponding to ulvans, alginates, fucans, laminarin and carrageenans can trigger defense res...

  2. Effect of dietary fiber in edible seaweeds on the development of D-galactosamine-induced hepatopathy in rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kawano, Naoko; Egashira, Yukari; Sanada, Hiroo

    2007-10-01

    Previous studies in our laboratory demonstrated the repressive effect of seaweeds (Laminaria sp., Sargassum fulvellum, Eisenia bicyclis and Gelidium sp.) against D-galactosamine (D-GalN)-induced hepatopathy. However, the mechanism by which these four seaweeds attenuate the D-GalN-hepatopathy has not been completely clarified. This study was carried out to determine the constituents of these seaweeds that protect rats against the D-GalN-hepatopathy. Male Wistar rats were fed for 8 d diets containing 5% seaweeds with or without the antibiotic neomycin (NEO) in experiment 1, and typical seaweed dietary fibers (laminaran, fucoidan, alginate, agar and kappa-carrageenan) of these seaweeds in experiment 2. On the 7th day, the rats were treated with D-GalN (1,900 mg in experiment 1 and 800 mg/kg in experiment 2) and then sacrificed 24 h after the injection of D-GalN. Their serum transaminase (aspartate and alanine aminotransferases: AST and ALT) activities were then determined. In experiment 1, the serum AST and ALT levels in the rats fed the four kinds of seaweeds without NEO were significantly low in comparison to that of the control group, but those with NEO were not significantly different among the groups. In experiment 2, the serum AST and ALT levels in the rats fed fucoidan were significantly low in comparison to those of the other groups fed the dietary fibers and the control. These results suggest that the protective effect of the three kinds of brown seaweeds Laminaria sp., Sargassum fulvellum and Eisenia bicyclis against D-GalN-hepatopathy was caused at least in part by fucoidan.

  3. Sourcing and bioprocessing of brown seaweed for maximizing glucose release

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Manns, Dirk Martin

    with lower enzyme loading. Simple application of only the cellulase preparation enabled the release of only half of the present glucose after 8 h. Analysis after the enzymatic treatment indicated a potential extraction of proteins from the solid residue and the sulfated polysaccharide fucoidan solubilized...

  4. Farming seaweeds at SEAFDEC/AQD

    OpenAIRE

    1995-01-01

    The article presents the practices that have been developed or documented by SEAFDEC Aquaculture Department for farming seaweeds. These practices are: the cage culture of Kappaphycus, and the ‘rice planting’ method for cultivating Gracilaria. The seaweed gathering practices in coastal communities in western Visayas is also presented.

  5. Seaweed Polysaccharides and Derived Oligosaccharides Stimulate Defense Responses and Protection Against Pathogens in Plants

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alejandra Moenne

    2011-11-01

    Full Text Available Plants interact with the environment by sensing “non-self” molecules called elicitors derived from pathogens or other sources. These molecules bind to specific receptors located in the plasma membrane and trigger defense responses leading to protection against pathogens. In particular, it has been shown that cell wall and storage polysaccharides from green, brown and red seaweeds (marine macroalgae corresponding to ulvans, alginates, fucans, laminarin and carrageenans can trigger defense responses in plants enhancing protection against pathogens. In addition, oligosaccharides obtained by depolymerization of seaweed polysaccharides also induce protection against viral, fungal and bacterial infections in plants. In particular, most seaweed polysaccharides and derived oligosaccharides trigger an initial oxidative burst at local level and the activation of salicylic (SA, jasmonic acid (JA and/or ethylene signaling pathways at systemic level. The activation of these signaling pathways leads to an increased expression of genes encoding: (i Pathogenesis-Related (PR proteins with antifungal and antibacterial activities; (ii defense enzymes such as pheylalanine ammonia lyase (PAL and lipoxygenase (LOX which determine accumulation of phenylpropanoid compounds (PPCs and oxylipins with antiviral, antifugal and antibacterial activities and iii enzymes involved in synthesis of terpenes, terpenoids and/or alkaloids having antimicrobial activities. Thus, seaweed polysaccharides and their derived oligosaccharides induced the accumulation of proteins and compounds with antimicrobial activities that determine, at least in part, the enhanced protection against pathogens in plants.

  6. Strategic Review and the Feasibility of Seaweed Aquaculture in Ireland

    OpenAIRE

    Werner, A; Clarke, D.; Kraan, S.

    2004-01-01

    The National Seaweed Forum, commissioned by the Minister for the Marine and Natural Resources in 1999, evaluated the current status of the Irish Seaweed Industry, investigated the potential uses of seaweeds and identified measures to be undertaken for developing the different industrial sectors. Seaweed aquaculture was identified as a key area for the development of the Irish Seaweed Industry to meet growing market demands and to create attractive and high–skilled jobs in peripheral communiti...

  7. Seasonal variations in biomass and species composition of seaweeds along the northern coasts of Persian Gulf (Bushehr Province)

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    A Dadolahi-Sohrab; M Garavand-Karimi; H Riahi; H Pashazanoosi

    2012-02-01

    This study was carried out to evaluate the seasonal variations of seaweed biomass and species composition at six different sites along the coastal areas in Bushehr Province. Sampling depths varied among sites, from 0.3 to 2.0 m below mean sea level. A total of 37 (i.e., 10 Chlorophyta, 12 Phaeophyta and 15 Rhodophyta) seaweed species were collected. Studies were conducted for quantifying the seaweeds during four seasons from October 2008 until July 2009. During present research, Ulva intestinalis and Cladophora nitellopsis of green, Polycladia myrica, Sirophysalia trinodis and Sargassum angustifolium of brown and Gracilaria canaliculata and Hypnea cervicornis of red seaweeds showed highest biomass in coastal areas of Bushehr Province. The Cheney’s ratio of 2.1 indicated a temperate algal flora to this area. All sites exhibited more than 50% similarity of algal species, indicating a relatively homogenous algal distribution. Total biomass showed the highest value of 3280.7 ± 537.8 g dry wt m−2 during summer and lowest value of 856.9 ± 92.0 g dry wt m−2 during winter. During this study, the highest and lowest seaweed biomass were recorded on the site 2 (2473.7 ± 311.0 g dry wt m−2) and site 5 (856.7 ± 96.8 g dry wt m−2), respectively.

  8. Seasonal variations in biomass and species composition of seaweeds along the northern coasts of Persian Gulf (Bushehr Province)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dadolahi-Sohrab, A.; Garavand-Karimi, M.; Riahi, H.; Pashazanoosi, H.

    2012-02-01

    This study was carried out to evaluate the seasonal variations of seaweed biomass and species composition at six different sites along the coastal areas in Bushehr Province. Sampling depths varied among sites, from 0.3 to 2.0 m below mean sea level. A total of 37 (i.e., 10 Chlorophyta, 12 Phaeophyta and 15 Rhodophyta) seaweed species were collected. Studies were conducted for quantifying the seaweeds during four seasons from October 2008 until July 2009. During present research, Ulva intestinalis and Cladophora nitellopsis of green, Polycladia myrica, Sirophysalia trinodis and Sargassum angustifolium of brown and Gracilaria canaliculata and Hypnea cervicornis of red seaweeds showed highest biomass in coastal areas of Bushehr Province. The Cheney`s ratio of 2.1 indicated a temperate algal flora to this area. All sites exhibited more than 50% similarity of algal species, indicating a relatively homogenous algal distribution. Total biomass showed the highest value of 3280.7 ± 537.8 g dry wt m - 2 during summer and lowest value of 856.9 ± 92.0 g dry wt m - 2 during winter. During this study, the highest and lowest seaweed biomass were recorded on the site 2 (2473.7 ± 311.0 g dry wt m - 2) and site 5 (856.7 ± 96.8 g dry wt m - 2), respectively.

  9. Foresight Brief: Seaweed & Algae as Biofuels Feedstocks

    OpenAIRE

    Institute, Marine

    2008-01-01

    Seaweed is a known potential carbon-dioxide (CO2) neutral source of second generation biofuels. When seaweed grows it absorbs CO2 from the atmosphere and this CO2 is released back to the atmosphere during combustion. What makes seaweed, and in particular micro algae, so promising as a fuel source is their growth rates and high lipid (oil) content. Algae are among the fastest-growing plants in the world. Energy is stored inside the cell as lipids and carbohydrates, and can be converted into fu...

  10. Feeding preferences of the endemic gastropod Astraea latispina in relation to chemical defenses of Brazilian tropical seaweeds

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    PEREIRA R. C.

    2002-01-01

    Full Text Available Seaweed preference by the Brazilian endemic gastropod Astraea latispina was examined in the laboratory to evaluate the role of secondary metabolites in determining food choice. Of three species of seaweeds examined, Plocamium brasiliense was highly preferred; less so were Sargassum furcatum and Dictyota cervicornis were preferred less. Extracts and/or pure major metabolites of the two potentially chemically-defended seaweeds (P. brasiliense and D. cervicornis were tested as feeding deterrents against A. latispina. Algal extract assays demonstrated that three concentrations of crude organic extract of the red alga P. brasiliense (50%, 100%: natural concentration, and 200% of dry weight: dw did not affect feeding of this gastropod. In contrast, the three concentrations of crude organic extract of the brown alga D. cervicornis (50%, 100% and 200% dw inhibited feeding by A. latispina. The chemical deterrent property of D. cervicornis extract against the gastropod A. latispina occurred due to a mixture of the secodolastane diterpenes isolinearol/linearol (4:1 -- 0.08% dry weight. This is the first report showing that Dictyota cervicornis produces a chemical defense against herbivores using secodolastane diterpenoid. In addition, these results widen the action spectrum of secondary metabolites found in seaweed belonging to this brown algal genus.

  11. Feeding preferences of the endemic gastropod Astraea latispina in relation to chemical defenses of Brazilian tropical seaweeds

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    R. C. PEREIRA

    Full Text Available Seaweed preference by the Brazilian endemic gastropod Astraea latispina was examined in the laboratory to evaluate the role of secondary metabolites in determining food choice. Of three species of seaweeds examined, Plocamium brasiliense was highly preferred; less so were Sargassum furcatum and Dictyota cervicornis were preferred less. Extracts and/or pure major metabolites of the two potentially chemically-defended seaweeds (P. brasiliense and D. cervicornis were tested as feeding deterrents against A. latispina. Algal extract assays demonstrated that three concentrations of crude organic extract of the red alga P. brasiliense (50%, 100%: natural concentration, and 200% of dry weight: dw did not affect feeding of this gastropod. In contrast, the three concentrations of crude organic extract of the brown alga D. cervicornis (50%, 100% and 200% dw inhibited feeding by A. latispina. The chemical deterrent property of D. cervicornis extract against the gastropod A. latispina occurred due to a mixture of the secodolastane diterpenes isolinearol/linearol (4:1 -- 0.08% dry weight. This is the first report showing that Dictyota cervicornis produces a chemical defense against herbivores using secodolastane diterpenoid. In addition, these results widen the action spectrum of secondary metabolites found in seaweed belonging to this brown algal genus.

  12. Antioxidant effect of seaweed extracts in food emulsion systems enriched with fish oil

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Larsen, Ditte Baun; Farvin, Sabeena; Jacobsen, Charlotte

    Natural antioxidants derived from marine algae have a high content of bioactive components with potential for improving oxidative stability of lipids in food systems. In this presentation we will discuss results from our ongoing work on the brown algae Fucus vesiculosus. This seaweed contains...... a wide range of polyphenols with potential antioxidant activity. Thus, in vitro antioxidant properties of F. vesiculosus extracts have been found to be related to the total polyphenolic content. It has been suggested that the primary antioxidant activity comes from secondary metabolites...... such as phlorotannins, a dominant polyphenolic compound. However, studies on the effectiveness of seaweed extracts in food model systems are sparse, therefore there is a need to look further into this area. Results obtained in our lab with different extracts of F. Vesiculosus in a range of different food models...

  13. Commercial Seaweed Farming in Zanzibar Coastal Villages ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    ... Coastal Villages: Potential for Innovative and Competitive Economic Growth. ... growth if: development of seaweed policy and strategic plan are developed; entrepreneurship, research, technology and innovative up scaling system are ...

  14. Seaweed: A valuable marine plant source

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Dhargalkar, V.K.; Pereira, N.

    Seaweed, one of the components of seashore, is the most unique and important marine living resource. Its multi-ranged applications are of economic as well as ecological importance. These plants have been a source of food, feed and medicine...

  15. Cu(II) binding by dried biomass of red, green and brown macroalgae.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Murphy, Vanessa; Hughes, Helen; McLoughlin, Peter

    2007-02-01

    Dried biomass of the marine macroalgae Fucus spiralis and Fucus vesiculosus (brown), Ulva spp. (comprising Ulva linza, Ulva compressa and Ulva intestinalis) and Ulva lactuca (green), Palmaria palmata and Polysiphonia lanosa (red) were studied in terms of their Cu(II) biosorption performance. This is the first study of its kind to compare Cu(II) uptake by these seaweeds in the South-East of Ireland. Potentiometric and conductimetric titrations revealed a variety of functionalities on the seaweed surface including carboxyl and amino groups, which are capable of metal binding. It was also found that, of the seaweeds investigated, F. vesiculosus contained the greatest number of acidic surface binding sites while Palmaria palmata contained the least. The metal uptake capacities of the seaweeds increased with increasing pH and kinetic behaviour followed a similar pattern for all seaweeds: a rapid initial sorption period followed by a longer equilibrium period. P. palmata reached equilibrium within 10min of exposure while F. vesiculosus required 60min. Correlation was found between the total number of acidic binding sites and the time taken to reach equilibrium. Fourier transform infra-red (FTIR) analysis of the seaweeds revealed the interaction of carboxyl, amino, sulphonate and hydroxyl groups on the seaweed surface with Cu(2+) ions while time course studies established the relative contribution of each of these groups in metal binding.

  16. Arsenic Species in Edible Seaweeds Using In Vitro Biomimetic Digestion Determined by High-Performance Liquid Chromatography Inductively Coupled Plasma Mass Spectrometry

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yan-Fang Zhao

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Arsenite [As (III], arsenate [As (V], methylarsonate (MMA, and dimethylarsinate (DMA in five edible seaweeds (the brown algae Laminaria japonica, red algae Porphyra yezoensis, brown algae Undaria pinnatifida, brown algae Hizikia fusiformis, and green algae Enteromorpha prolifera were analyzed using in vitro digestion method determined by high-performance liquid chromatography inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry. The results showed that DMA was found in the water extracts of all samples; As (III were detected in L. japonica and U. pinnatifida and about 23.0 and 0.15 mg/kg of As (V were found in H. fusiformis and E. prolifera respectively. However, after the gastrointestinal digestion, As (V was not detected in any of the five seaweeds. About 0.19 and 1.47 mg/kg of As (III was detected in the gastric extracts of L. japonica and H. fusiformis, respectively, and about 0.31 and 0.10 mg/kg of As (III were extracted from the intestinal extracts of Porphyra yezoensis and U. pinnatifida, respectively. The present results successfully reveal the differences of As species and levels in the water and biomimetic extracts of five edible seaweeds. The risk assessment of the inorganic arsenic in the five edible seaweeds based on present data showed almost no hazards to human health.

  17. Sponge-seaweed associations in species of Ptilophora (Gelidiaceae, Rhodophyta)

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Tronchin, E

    2006-06-01

    Full Text Available Sponge–seaweed associations in the seaweed genus Ptilophora are poorly understood; therefore, 94 specimens, representing all 17 species of Ptilophora, were examined to detail this phenomenon. All but 2 Ptilophora species were shown to produce...

  18. Seaweed utilization and its present status in India

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Untawale, A.G.; Dhargalkar, V.K.

    various applied aspects like evaluation of seaweed resources, utilization, management, harvesting techniques and conservation in India. there seems to be a vast potential of using seaweeds for food, feed, fertilization and medicine in the 21st century...

  19. Seaweed technology for India for the twentyfirst century

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Untawale, A.G.; Reddy, C.R.K.

    , underwater diving, tissue culture, genetic engineering, molecular biology, improvisation in cultivation and processing of seaweeds, popularization and utilization of seaweeds for food, feed, fertilizers, drugs and other economically important products...

  20. Characterization of Phlorotannins from Brown Algae by LC-HRMS.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Melanson, Jeremy E; MacKinnon, Shawna L

    2015-01-01

    Phlorotannins are a class of polyphenols found in brown seaweeds that have significant potential for use as therapeutics, owing to their wide range of bioactivities. Molecular characterization of phlorotannin-enriched extracts is challenging due to the extreme sample complexity and the wide range of molecular weights observed. Herein, we describe a method for characterizing phlorotannins employing ultrahigh-pressure liquid chromatography (UHPLC) operating in hydrophilic interaction liquid chromatography (HILIC) mode combined with high-resolution mass spectrometry (HRMS).

  1. Potential seaweed-based food ingredients to inhibit lipid oxidation in fish-oil-enriched mayonnaise

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Honold, Philipp; Jacobsen, Charlotte; Jónsdóttir, Rósa

    2016-01-01

    Brown seaweed Fucus vesiculosus has a high potential as a source of natural antioxidants due to a high diversity of bioactive compounds in its composition. In this study, four extracts were characterized with respect to composition of bioactive compounds, in vitro antioxidant properties...... and their partitioning between water and octanol. Additionally, the antioxidant activity of the extracts was evaluated in a fish-oil-enriched mayonnaise. Acetone and ethanol were found to extract the highest amount of phenolic compounds and carotenoids. Water used as extraction solvent, extracted some phenolic compounds...

  2. Hydrogen evolution by fermentation using seaweed as substrates and the contribution to the clean energy production

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tanisho, S.; Suganuma, T.; Yamaguchi, A. [Yokohama National Univ. (Japan). Dept. of Environmental Sciences

    2001-07-01

    It is an important theme in Japan to use the sea for energy production, because Japan is surrounded by seas on all sides. Brown algae such as Laminaria have high value as the substrate of fermentative hydrogen production, since they have very high growth rate and also have high ability on the productivity of mannitol. I would like to present about the affection of salt concentration on the hydrogen production of Enterobacter aerogenes, and also the contribution on clean energy production by the seaweed cultivation in Japan. (orig.)

  3. Antioxidant, Antiproliferative, and Antiangiogenesis Effects of Polyphenol-Rich Seaweed (Sargassum muticum)

    OpenAIRE

    Farideh Namvar; Rosfarizan Mohamad; Javad Baharara; Saeedeh Zafar-Balanejad; Fahimeh Fargahi; Heshu Sulaiman Rahman

    2013-01-01

    In the present study, we evaluated the effect of brown seaweeds Sargassum muticum methanolic extract (SMME), against MCF-7 and MDA-MB-231 breast cancer cell lines proliferation. This algae extract was also evaluated for reducing activity and total polyphenol content. The MTT assay results indicated that the extracts were cytotoxic against breast cancer cell lines in a dose-dependent manner, with IC50 of 22  μ g/ml for MCF-7 and 55  μ g/ml for MDA-MB-231 cell lines. The percentages of apoptoti...

  4. The major bioactive components of seaweeds and their mosquitocidal potential.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, Ke-Xin; Jantan, Ibrahim; Ahmad, Rohani; Wong, Ching-Lee

    2014-09-01

    Seaweeds are one of the most widely studied natural resources for their biological activities. Novel seaweed compounds with unique chemical structures have been reported for their pharmacological properties. The urge to search for novel insecticidal compound with a new mode of action for development of botanical insecticides supports the relevant scientific research on discovering the bioactive compounds in seaweeds. The mosquitocidal potential of seaweed extracts and their isolated compounds are documented in this review paper, along with the discussion on bioactivities of the major components of seaweeds such as polysaccharides, phenolics, proteins, terpenes, lipids, and halogenated compounds. The effects of seaweed extracts and compounds toward different life stages of mosquito (egg, larva, pupa, and adult), its growth, development, and reproduction are elaborated. The structure-activity relationships of mosquitocidal compounds are discussed to extrapolate the possible chemical characteristics of seaweed compounds responsible for insecticidal properties. Furthermore, the possible target sites and mode of actions of the mosquitocidal seaweed compounds are included in this paper. The potential synergistic effects between seaweeds and commercial insecticides as well as the toxic effects of seaweed extracts and compounds toward other insects and non-target organisms in the same habitat are also described. On top of that, various factors that influence the mosquitocidal potential of seaweeds, such as abiotic and biotic variables, sample preparation, test procedures, and considerations for a precise experimental design are discussed. The potential of active seaweed extracts and compounds in the development of effective bioinsecticide are also discussed.

  5. Attenuation of hyperglycemia and hyperlipidemia in high calorie fed/streptozotocin-treated rats by hydromethanolic extract of Padina tetrastromatica

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Divya S. Mohan

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available In the present study, the effect of defatted hydromethanolic extract of Padina tetrastromatica on carbohydrate metabolism and serum lipid profile were evaluated. Diabetes mellitus was induced in male Wistar rats by feeding high calorie/energy diet for two months followed by a single intraperitoneal injecttion of streptozotocin. Diabetic rats were administered with the extract intragastrically at doses of 150, 300, 450, and 600 mg/kg body weight daily for 45 days. Treatment with graded doses showed a dose dependent reduction in blood glucose and glycated hemoglobin levels. Treatment significantly increased the activity of hexokinase, glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase and glycogen content while there was significant reduction in the activity of glucose-6-phosphatase and fructose-1,6-bisphosphatase. Serum lipid profile was also brought back to near normal levels in a dose dependent manner. The present study clearly indicates the antihyperglycemic and hypolipidemic effects of P. tetrastromatica at an optimum dose of 450 mg/kg body weight.

  6. Antioxidant Activity and Gas Chromatographic-Mass Spectrometric Analysis of Extracts of the Marine Algae, Caulerpa peltata and Padina Gymnospora.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Murugan, Kavitha; Iyer, Vidhya V

    2014-01-01

    The results of our previous investigations on extracts of selected marine algae showed that Caulerpa peltata and Padina gymnospora had more promising antiproliferative and antioxidant activities than Gelidiella acerosa and Sargassum wightii. Based on these results, the more active chloroform extract of C. peltata and ethyl acetate extract of P. gymnospora were further analyzed for their constituents by using gas chromatography in tandem with mass spectrometry. The GC-MS analysis (GC % peak area given in parentheses) showed that fucosterol (12.45%) and L-(+)-ascorbic acid 2, 6-dihexadecanoate (8.13%) were the major compounds present in P. gymnospora ethyl acetate extract. On the other hand, C. peltata chloroform extract had 1-heptacosanol (10.52%), hexacosanol acetate (9.28%), tetradecyl ester of chloroacetic acid (7.22%), Z,Z-6, 28-heptatriactontadien-2-one (6.77%) and 10, 13-dimethyl-methyl ester of tetradecanoic acid (5.34%) as major compounds. Also described in the report are the beta-carotene bleaching inhibitory and total reducing activities of the chloroform and ethyl acetate extracts of C. peltata and P. gymnospora, respectively, relative to the other three extracts (aqueous, methanol, chloroform or ethyl acetate) of the two algae.

  7. Antioxidant activity and gas chromatographic-mass spectrometric analysis of extracts of the marine algae, caulerpa peltata and padina gymnospora

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kavitha Murugan

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available The results of our previous investigations on extracts of selected marine algae showed that Caulerpa peltata and Padina gymnospora had more promising antiproliferative and antioxidant activities than Gelidiella acerosa and Sargassum wightii. Based on these results, the more active chloroform extract of C. peltata and ethyl acetate extract of P. gymnospora were further analyzed for their constituents by using gas chromatography in tandem with mass spectrometry. The GC-MS analysis (GC % peak area given in parentheses showed that fucosterol (12.45% and L-(+-ascorbic acid 2,6-dihexadecanoate (8.13% were the major compounds present in P. gymnospora ethyl acetate extract. On the other hand, C. peltata chloroform extract had 1-heptacosanol (10.52%, hexacosanol acetate (9.28%, tetradecyl ester of chloroacetic acid (7.22%, Z,Z-6,28-heptatriactontadien-2-one (6.77% and 10,13-dimethyl-methyl ester of tetradecanoic acid (5.34% as major compounds. Also described in the report are the beta-carotene bleaching inhibitory and total reducing activities of the chloroform and ethyl acetate extracts of C. peltata and P. gymnospora, respectively, relative to the other three extracts (aqueous, methanol, chloroform or ethyl acetate of the two algae.

  8. Hiding and feeding in floating seaweed: floating seaweed clumps as possible refuges or feeding grounds for fishes

    OpenAIRE

    Vandendriessche, S.; Messiaen, M.; O'Flynn, S; M. Vincx; Degraer, S.

    2007-01-01

    Floating seaweed is considered to be an important habitat for juvenile fishes due to the provision of food, shelter, a visual orientation point and passive transport. The importance of the presence of the highly dynamical seaweed clumps from the North Sea to juvenile neustonic fishes was investigated by analysing both neuston samples (without seaweed) and seaweed samples concerning fish community structure, and length-frequency distributions and feeding habits of five associated fish species....

  9. Iodine Emissions from Seaweeds: Species-dependent and Seasonal Differences

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adams, Thomas; Ball, Stephen; Leblanc, Catherine; Potin, Philippe

    2015-04-01

    Emissions of iodine from macroalgae into the marine boundary layer (MBL) significantly impact tropospheric chemistry and the biogeochemical cycling of iodine. Gas-phase iodine chemistry perturbs the usual HOx and NOx radical cycles, provides additional sink reactions for tropospheric ozone, and modifies atmospheric oxidizing capacity. Iodine oxides (IxOywith x ≥ 2) formed through the reaction of iodine atoms with ozone nucleate new aerosol particles which, if they grow sufficiently, can act as cloud condensation nuclei (CCN) and so influence the local climate in coastal regions. Some seaweeds, such as brown algae, are important bio-accumulators of iodine. They specifically induce iodine metabolism to protect themselves against oxidative stress, both as a defence mechanism and when exposed to air around low tide. Indeed the dominant emission source of iodine into the atmosphere in coastal regions comes from intertidal macroalgal beds, particularly those of kelp species. We present results from an extensive laboratory study of molecular iodine (I2) emissions from five seaweed species (two Fucales, Ascophyllum nodosum and Fucus vesiculosus, and three kelp species, Laminaria digitata, L. hyperborea and Saccharina latissima). Eighty-four incubation experiments were performed at the Station Biologique in Roscoff (Brittany, France) between September 2012 and June 2013 to quantify species-dependent I2 emission rates in response to progressive air exposure, mimicking low tide, and to investigate any seasonal differences. Measurements were conducted on 'fresh' biological samples: Ascophyllum and Fucus thalli were collected whilst still submerged on an ebbing tide, transported in seawater to the laboratory and analysed immediately; kelp samples were collected by boat, stored in an outside aquarium in running seawater and analysed within a few days. I2 emissions were quantified at high time resolution by broadband cavity enhanced absorption spectrometry (1σ detection limit

  10. Nutritional Value of Seaweed to Ruminants

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Roger D. Applegate

    1995-12-01

    Full Text Available We compared the nutritional quality (apparent digestible dry matter (ADDM, crude protein, total phenolics, gross energy, of 3 seaweed species (Alaria esculenta, Ascophyllum nodosum, Fucus vesiculosis to that of 3 woody browse species{Acer rubrum, Thuja occidentalis, Abies balsamea, lichen (Usnea spp., and winter rye (Secale cereals for ruminants. The ADDM's of the 3 seaweeds (63-80% DM were 11-167% DM higher and crude protein contents (12.1-14.6% DM were 68-186% DM higher than the 3 browse species. Seaweeds had lower total phenolics (5.5-10.3% DM and gross energy (12-15 KJ/g DM, and moderate digestible energy (DE contents (9-10 KJ/g DM compared to the browse species. The 3 browse species had ADDM's of 30-57% DM, crude protein contents of 5.1-7.2% DM, total phenolic concentrations of 11.6-16.4% DM, and DE contents of 6-12 KJ/g DM. Winter rye and lichen had the lowest total phenolic concentrations (1.3 and 1.9% DM of forages examined, and had lower ADDM's (35 and 40% DM, DE contents (6-7 KJ/g DM, and crude protein (7.8 and 5.7% DM than seaweeds. The relatively high DE and protein contents of seaweed may explain high deer densities of Maine coastal islands where browse availability and use appears to be low.

  11. Immunolocalization of cell wall carbohydrate epitopes in seaweeds: presence of land plant epitopes in Fucus vesiculosus L. (Phaeophyceae).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Raimundo, Sandra Cristina; Avci, Utku; Hopper, Christina; Pattathil, Sivakumar; Hahn, Michael G; Popper, Zoë A

    2016-02-01

    Land plant cell wall glycan epitopes are present in Fucus vesiculosus. RG-I/AG mAbs recognize distinct glycan epitopes in structurally different galactans, and 3-linked glucans are also present in the cell walls. Cell wall-directed monoclonal antibodies (mAbs) have given increased knowledge of fundamental land plant processes but are not extensively used to study seaweeds. We profiled the brown seaweed Fucus vesiculosus glycome employing 155 mAbs that recognize predominantly vascular plant cell wall glycan components. The resulting profile was used to inform in situ labeling studies. Several of the mAbs recognized and bound to epitopes present in different thallus parts of Fucus vesiculosus. Antibodies recognizing arabinogalactan epitopes were divided into four groups based on their immunolocalization patterns. Group 1 bound to the stipe, blade, and receptacles. Group 2 bound to the antheridia, oogonia and paraphyses. Group 3 recognized antheridia cell walls and Group 4 localized on the antheridia inner wall and oogonia mesochite. This study reveals that epitopes present in vascular plant cell walls are also present in brown seaweeds. Furthermore, the diverse in situ localization patterns of the RG-I/AG clade mAbs suggest that these mAbs likely detect distinct epitopes present in structurally different galactans. In addition, 3-linked glucans were also detected throughout the cell walls of the algal tissues, using the β-glucan-directed LAMP mAb. Our results give insights into cell wall evolution, and diversify the available tools for the study of brown seaweed cell walls.

  12. Physico-chemical characterization and pharmacological evaluation of sulfated polysaccharides from three species of Mediterranean brown algae of the genus Cystoseira

    OpenAIRE

    2015-01-01

    Background Seaweed polysaccharides are highly active natural substances having valuable applications. The present study was conducted to characterize the physico-chemical properties of sulphated polysaccharides from three Mediterranean brown seaweeds (Cystoseira sedoides, Cystoseira compressa and Cystoseira crinita) and to evaluate their anti-radical, anti-inflammatory and gastroprotective activities. Methods The different rates of neutral sugars, uronic acids, L-fucose and sulphate content w...

  13. Bioactive compounds in seaweed; functional food applications and legislation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Holdt, Susan Løvstad; Kraan, Stefan

    2011-01-01

    Seaweed is more than the wrap that keeps rice together in sushi. Seaweed biomass is already used for a wide range of other products in food, including stabilising agents. Biorefineries with seaweed as feedstock are attracting worldwide interest and include low-volume, high value-added products an...... of uses to enhance comparisons. In addition, scientific experiments performed on seaweed used as animal feed are presented, and EU, US and Japanese legislation on functional foods is reviewed.......Seaweed is more than the wrap that keeps rice together in sushi. Seaweed biomass is already used for a wide range of other products in food, including stabilising agents. Biorefineries with seaweed as feedstock are attracting worldwide interest and include low-volume, high value-added products...

  14. Seaweed composition from Bintulu coast of Sarawak, Malaysia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zawawi, Mohd Hafizbillah; Idris, Mohd Hanafi; Kamal, Abu Hena Mustafa; King, Wong Sing

    2014-08-01

    Species composition of seaweed and distribution were investigated in the coastal waters of Bintulu, Sarawak. The seaweed samples were collected during low tide between May 2011 and May 2012 from the six different stations. In total 54 species of seaweeds were identified from study areas of Bintulu coastal waters. Among them, 23 species were from Rhodophyta with 11 families, 15 species were from Phaeophyta with 2 families and 16 species were from Chlorophyta with 10 families: Seventeen species of seaweeds were recorded from the Tanjung Batu, while 23 species from Pantai Telekom, 14 species from Golden Beach, 26 species from Kuala Similajau, 12 species from Kuala Nyalau and 21 species from Batu Mandi. Seaweeds abundance was high in rocky substrate and Rhodophyta (11 families and 23 species) was the common and highest group of seaweeds in this coastal areas. Present study recorded high diversified seaweed species at the rocky shore area compare to reef area.

  15. Seaweed: Promising plant of the millennium

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Dhargalkar, V.K.; Pereira, N.

    acid3,4 as well as minerals such as Ca, P, Na, K (Table 2). Their amino acid content is well balanced and contains all or most of the essential amino acids needed for life and health. They have more than 54 trace elements required for human body... they are bio-available. The importance of seaweeds for human consumption is well known since 300 BC in China and Japan. These two countries are the major seaweed cultivators, producers and consumers in the world. In the Indian Ocean region countries like...

  16. Seaweed to dendrite transition in directional solidification.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Provatas, Nikolas; Wang, Quanyong; Haataja, Mikko; Grant, Martin

    2003-10-10

    We simulate directional solidification using a phase-field model solved with adaptive mesh refinement. For small surface tension anisotropy directed at 45 degrees relative to the pulling direction we observe a crossover from a seaweed to a dendritic morphology as the thermal gradient is lowered, consistent with recent experimental findings. We show that the morphology of crystal structures can be unambiguously characterized through the local interface velocity distribution. We derive semiempirically an estimate for the crossover from seaweed to dendrite as a function of thermal gradient and pulling speed.

  17. Decoloración de alginato de sodio extraído de las algas pardas marinas del género Sargassum con el uso de peróxido de hidrógeno Bleaching of sodium alginate from the brown seaweeds Sargassum with hydrogen peroxide

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Erik L. Regalado

    2007-02-01

    Full Text Available Hydrogen peroxide bleaching of sodium alginate from seaweeds oh the Sargassum genus was studied. The influence of H2O2 concentration (percentage of H2O2 on a dry weight alginate basis, w/w and NaOH/H2O2 ratio (% NaOH/% H2O2, both referred to a dry weight alginate basis, w/w on the molecular weight, color removal and content of Fe3+ ions of bleached alginate samples was investigated by UV and IR spectroscopies, colorimetric determination of Fe3+ ions and vapor pressure osmometry. Higher yield, purity and molecular weight of alginate were obtained using 3% (or less of hydrogen peroxide and a NaOH/H2O2 ratio of 1.2 for bleaching.

  18. Decadal changes in a polluted bay as seen from its seaweed flora: the case of Santos Bay in Brazil.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oliveira, Eurico C; Qi, Yaobin

    2003-09-01

    The first comprehensive seaweed flora of a Brazilian region was published by Joly in 1957, describing and illustrating 105 taxa. Twenty years later Oliveira and Berchez resurveyed the area and found only 69 taxa, with a strong reduction in the number of brown algae. In another survey, performed in 1991 at the 3 studied stations with the largest species richness, the same reduction trend was found and no brown algae were observed. This reduction in biodiversity was attributed to increased pollution. Here we present the results of a new survey made in 1998-1999. This shows the return of some species recorded in the 1950s, including 7 species of brown algae. This increase in species number is thought to be a consequence of the efforts made by the local government to reduce pollution and the building of a submarine sewage terminal.

  19. Sulfated Seaweed Polysaccharides as Multifunctional Materials in Drug Delivery Applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cunha, Ludmylla; Grenha, Ana

    2016-01-01

    In the last decades, the discovery of metabolites from marine resources showing biological activity has increased significantly. Among marine resources, seaweed is a valuable source of structurally diverse bioactive compounds. The cell walls of marine algae are rich in sulfated polysaccharides, including carrageenan in red algae, ulvan in green algae and fucoidan in brown algae. Sulfated polysaccharides have been increasingly studied over the years in the pharmaceutical field, given their potential usefulness in applications such as the design of drug delivery systems. The purpose of this review is to discuss potential applications of these polymers in drug delivery systems, with a focus on carrageenan, ulvan and fucoidan. General information regarding structure, extraction process and physicochemical properties is presented, along with a brief reference to reported biological activities. For each material, specific applications under the scope of drug delivery are described, addressing in privileged manner particulate carriers, as well as hydrogels and beads. A final section approaches the application of sulfated polysaccharides in targeted drug delivery, focusing with particular interest the capacity for macrophage targeting. PMID:26927134

  20. Biosorption of nickel(II) from aqueous solution by brown algae: Equilibrium, dynamic and thermodynamic studies

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pahlavanzadeh, H., E-mail: pahlavzh@modares.ac.ir [Department of Chemical Engineering, Faculty of Engineering, Tarbiat Modares University, P.O. Box 14115-111, Tehran (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Keshtkar, A.R.; Safdari, J. [Atomic Energy Organization of Iran, Nuclear Science and Technology Research Institute, P.O. Box 11365, 8486 Tehran (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Abadi, Z. [Department of Chemical Engineering, Faculty of Engineering, Tarbiat Modares University, P.O. Box 14115-111, Tehran (Iran, Islamic Republic of)

    2010-03-15

    The biosorption characteristics of nickel(II) ions using the brown algae (Cystoseria indica, Nizmuddinia zanardini, Sargassum glaucescens and Padina australis) were investigated. Experimental parameters affecting the biosorption process such as pH level, contact time, initial metal concentration and temperature were studied. The equilibrium data fitted very well to the Langmuir adsorption model in the concentration range of nickel(II) ions and at all the temperatures studied. Evaluation of the experimental data in terms of biosorption dynamics showed that the biosorption of nickel(II) onto algal biomass followed the pseudo-second-order dynamics well. The calculated thermodynamic parameters ({Delta}G{sup o}, {Delta}H{sup o} and {Delta}S{sup o}) showed that the biosorption of nickel(II) ions were feasible, spontaneous and endothermic at the temperature ranges of 293-313 K.

  1. Seaweed allelopathy against coral: surface distribution of a seaweed secondary metabolite by imaging mass spectrometry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Andras, Tiffany D; Alexander, Troy S; Gahlena, Asiri; Parry, R Mitchell; Fernandez, Facundo M; Kubanek, Julia; Wang, May D; Hay, Mark E

    2012-10-01

    Coral reefs are in global decline, with seaweeds increasing as corals decrease. Although seaweeds inhibit coral growth, recruitment, and survivorship, the mechanism of these interactions is poorly understood. Here, we used field experiments to show that contact with four common seaweeds induces bleaching on natural colonies of Porites rus. Controls in contact with inert, plastic mimics of seaweeds did not bleach, suggesting seaweed effects resulted from allelopathy rather than shading, abrasion, or physical contact. Bioassay-guided fractionation of the hydrophobic extract from the red alga Phacelocarpus neurymenioides revealed a previously characterized antibacterial metabolite, neurymenolide A, as the main allelopathic agent. For allelopathy of lipid-soluble metabolites to be effective, the compounds would need to be deployed on algal surfaces where they could transfer to corals on contact. We used desorption electrospray ionization mass spectrometry (DESI-MS) to visualize and quantify neurymenolide A on the surface of P. neurymenioides, and we found the molecule on all surfaces analyzed, with highest concentrations on basal portions of blades.

  2. Assessment of oxidative stress indices in a marine macro brown alga Padina tetrastromatica (Hauck) from comparable polluted coastal regions of the Arabian Sea, west coast of India

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Maharana, D.; Jena, K.B.; Pise, N.M.; Jagtap, T.G.

    that, Cd levels in tissue induces a variety of cellular changes, such as damage of membrane integrity (Smeets et al., 2005), reduces photosynthesis (Van Assche and Clijsters, 1990), and impaired CO 2 assimilation (Gouia et al., 2003), which might... are significantly different from each other at P < 0.05. 2.3 Antioxidant defence systems Plants, as photosynthetic organisms, are continuously producing ROS during photosynthesis and other metabolic processes (Foyer and Noctor, 2000). In addition to this...

  3. Strategies for the production of high concentrations of bioethanol from seaweeds: production of high concentrations of bioethanol from seaweeds.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yanagisawa, Mitsunori; Kawai, Shigeyuki; Murata, Kousaku

    2013-01-01

    Bioethanol has attracted attention as an alternative to petroleum-derived fuel. Seaweeds have been proposed as some of the most promising raw materials for bioethanol production because they have several advantages over lignocellulosic biomass. However, because seaweeds contain low contents of glucans, i.e., polysaccharides composed of glucose, the conversion of only the glucans from seaweed is not sufficient to produce high concentrations of ethanol. Therefore, it is also necessary to produce ethanol from other specific carbohydrate components of seaweeds, including sulfated polysaccharides, mannitol, alginate, agar and carrageenan. This review summarizes the current state of research on the production of ethanol from seaweed carbohydrates for which the conversion of carbohydrates to sugars is a key step and makes comparisons with the production of ethanol from lignocellulosic biomass. This review provides valuable information necessary for the production of high concentrations of ethanol from seaweeds.

  4. Spatial patterns of seaweed distribution in Malaysia using GIS

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lian, Du Hai; Sim, Jillian Ooi Lean; Fauzi, Rosmadi; Moi, Phang Siew

    2008-10-01

    The objective of this article is to represent spatial patterns of seaweed distribution in Malaysia. Seaweeds have been collected since 1984 along coastlines of 4675 km of peninsular Malaysia, Sabah, and Sarawak. However, there is no seaweed database and they cannot be displayed in a geographic view. Therefore, a database with 805 georeferenced observations was setup and GIS is used to analyze seaweed diversity based on this database. The highest number of observations is 94 which occur along east coastline of peninsular Malaysia. The highest number of species richness is 82 which are also along east coastline of peninsular Malaysia. Rhodophyta has the highest species richness while Chlorophyta has the least species richness.

  5. Inducible defenses against herbivory and fouling in seaweeds

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pereira, Renato Crespo; Costa, Erica da Silva; Sudatti, Daniela Bueno; da Gama, Bernardo Antonio Perez

    2017-04-01

    Secondary metabolites play an important ecological role as a defense mechanism in seaweeds. Chemical defenses are well known to change in response to herbivory, but other driving factors, either biotic or abiotic, are often neglected. Epibiosis may not only reduce seaweed fitness, but also increase attractiveness to consumers, and thus defense production should also be triggered by epibionts. In this study, three Southwestern Atlantic seaweeds, Gracilaria cearensis, Pterocladiella capillacea (Rhodophyceae) and Codium decorticatum (Chlorophyceae) were investigated in laboratory bioassays designed to test whether the action of herbivory or simulated epibiosis influences chemical defenses. Crossed induction experiments were also performed in order to assess whether herbivore induction influences antifouling chemical defense, as well as whether epibiont induction would affect defense against herbivores. The effect of laboratory conditions on seaweeds in the absence of field stimuli was also investigated by comparing consumption of artificial food with extracts from acclimatized and non-acclimatized seaweeds (i.e., natural defense levels). Only the green seaweed C. decorticatum exhibited inducible antifouling defenses triggered by simulated epibiosis, but not by herbivores. In the other seaweeds there was no induction either by herbivory or simulated epibiosis. Acclimatization did not affect C. decorticatum defenses. However, non-acclimatized G. cearensis artificial foods were preferred over acclimatized ones, while extracts from acclimatized P. capillacea increased herbivore consumption, highlighting the need to acclimatize seaweeds before the main induction experiments. This is the first report of inducible defenses due to simulated fouling in seaweeds.

  6. Chemical defenses of the tropical marine seaweed Canistrocarpus cervicornis against herbivory by sea urchin

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Éverson Miguel Bianco

    2010-09-01

    Full Text Available This paper reports on the defensive chemical properties of the marine tropical brown seaweed Canistrocarpus cervicornis against herbivory. A natural concentration of dichloromethane crude extract (DCE obtained from this seaweed significantly inhibited feeding by the sea urchin Lytechinus variegatus. The major metabolite isolated from this active DCE extract was identified as the (4R,7R,14S-4α,7α-diacetoxy-14-hydroxydolast-1(15,8-diene that strongly inhibited feeding by the same sea urchin. This result suggests that the dolastane diterpenes class may constitute the defensive system of C. cervicornis against herbivory, and probably also of that of other brown seaweeds endowed with a biosynthetic pathway capable of producing compounds of the dolastane-type, a typical skeleton found in Dyctioteae species worldwide. This is the first report showing this compound-type (dolastane diterpenes as a chemical defense against herbivory in marine seaweeds. This study constitutes an additional report broadening the known spectrum of action and roles of secondary metabolites of the C. cervicornis and Dyctioteae species.Este artigo demonstra a química defensiva anti-herbivoria da macroalga parda marinha Canistrocarpus cervicornis. Em sua concentração natural, o extrato bruto em diclorometano (DCE inibiu significativamente o consumo alimentar do ouriço-do-mar Lytechinus variegatus. Deste extrato em DCE foi isolado o metabólito majoritário identificado como o diterpeno (4R,7R,14S-4α,7α-diacetoxi-14-hidroxidolasta-1(15,8-dieno. Esses resultados comprovam que diterpenos da classe dolastano podem compor o sistema defensivo anti-herbivoria de C. cervircornis e, supostamente, o de outras algas pardas capazes de produzi-los, uma vez que são composto típicos encontrados em esqueletos de Dyctiotas em todo o mundo. Este é o primeiro estudo demonstrando a ação anti-herbivoria desta classe de metabolitos (diterpenos dolastanos em macroalgas marinhas. Tais

  7. Potential pharmacological applications of polyphenolic derivatives from marine brown algae.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thomas, Noel Vinay; Kim, Se-Kwon

    2011-11-01

    Recently, the isolation and characterization of the biologically active components from seaweeds have gained much attention from various research groups across the world. The marine algae have been studied for biologically active components and phlorotannins are one among them. Among marine algae, brown algal species such as Ecklonia cava, Eisenia arborea, Ecklonia stolinifera and Eisenia bicyclis have been studied for their potential biological activities. Majority of the investigations on phlorotannins derived from brown algae have exhibited their potentiality as antioxidant, anti-inflammatory, antidiabetic, antitumor, antihypertensive, anti-allergic, hyaluronidase enzyme inhibition and in matrix metalloproteinases (MMPs) inhibition activity. In this review, we have made an attempt to discuss the potential biological activities of phlorotannins from marine brown algae and their possible candidature in the pharmaceutical applications. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  8. Hiding and feeding in floating seaweed: Floating seaweed clumps as possible refuges or feeding grounds for fishes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vandendriessche, Sofie; Messiaen, Marlies; O'Flynn, Sarah; Vincx, Magda; Degraer, Steven

    2007-02-01

    Floating seaweed is considered to be an important habitat for juvenile fishes due to the provision of food, shelter, a visual orientation point and passive transport. The importance of the presence of the highly dynamical seaweed clumps from the North Sea to juvenile neustonic fishes was investigated by analysing both neuston samples (without seaweed) and seaweed samples concerning fish community structure, and length-frequency distributions and feeding habits of five associated fish species. While the neustonic fish community was mainly seasonally structured, the seaweed-associated fish community was more complex: the response of the associated fish species to environmental variables was species specific and probably influenced by species interactions, resulting in a large multivariate distance between the samples dominated by Chelon labrosus and the samples dominated by Cyclopterus lumpus, Trachurus trachurus and Ciliata mustela. The results of the stomach analysis confirmed that C. lumpus is a weedpatch specialist that has a close spatial affinity with the seaweed and feeds intensively on the seaweed-associated invertebrate fauna. Similarly, C. mustela juveniles also fed on the seaweed fauna, but in a more opportunistic way. The shape of the size-frequency distribution suggested enhanced growth when associated with floating seaweed. Chelon labrosus and T. trachurus juveniles were generally large in seaweed samples, but large individuals were also encountered in the neuston. The proportion of associated invertebrate fauna in their diet was of minor importance, compared to the proportions in C. lumpus. Individuals of Syngnathus rostellatus mainly fed on planktonic invertebrates but had a discontinuous size-frequency distribution, suggesting that some of the syngnathids were carried with the seaweed upon detachment and stayed associated. Floating seaweeds can therefore be regarded as ephemeral habitats shared between several fish species (mainly juveniles) that use

  9. Effect of seaweed supplementation on growth performance, immune and oxidative stress responses in gilthead seabream (Sparus aurata

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Augusto Cesar dos Santos Queiroz

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available Seaweeds have important nutraceutical properties, including antioxidant and biological response-modifying qualities. Their dietary supplementation may increase the immune and antioxidant capacity of fish necessary to cope to stressful conditions and minimizing disease outbreaks. There are essentially four major groups of seaweed that can be classified by color, namely green (Chlorophyta, brown/yellow (Phaeophyta, red (Rhodophyta, and blue-green (Cyanophyta. Some green seaweed has active radical scavenging properties. Red and brown have bioactive compounds that play a vital role as antihypertensive and antioxidant. The current study was designed to evaluate the effects of seaweed supplementation on growth performance, immune and oxidative stress responses in gilthead seabream (Sparus aurata. Three seaweed species, each from one of the following groups, Rhodophyta (R, Phaeophyta (P and Chlorophyta (C, were supplemented to the experimental diets at 2.5% and 7.5% and tested against a control diet (Ctrl with no supplementation. In addition to six diets with seaweed in two different levels of supplementation: R2.5%, P2.5%, C2.5%, R7.5%, P7.5% and C7.5%; a diet with a mix (M, supplemented at 7.5% (2.5% of each algae was also tested. A total of 360 seabream fingerlings, 13.07 ± 0.13cm and 31.17 ± 0.63g were allocated in 24 rectangular tanks, 115L capacity each, with a 4L/min water output connected to a recirculation seawater system. Fish were fed twice a day until satiation and water quality (temperature: 20.5 ºC; D.O.: 8.13 mg/L; Ammonia: 0.5 mg/L Nitrite: 0.5 mg/L were daily monitored. At day 40 of the trial, an intermediate sampling was carried out. Standard zootechnical parameters were measured for the growth performance determination. In addition, blood, liver and intestine samples were collected for the evaluation of the immune (lysozyme and peroxidase and oxidative stress (lipid peroxidation, glutathione peroxidase, glutathione reductase

  10. Concentrations of phytochelatins and glutathione found in natural assemblages of seaweeds depend on species and metal concentrations of the habitat.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pawlik-Skowrońska, Barbara; Pirszel, Jacek; Brown, Murray T

    2007-07-20

    The occurrence of the metal-complexing thiol peptides, phytochelatins (PC) in natural populations of brown, red and green seaweeds (marine macroalgae) was studied. Concentrations of PCs and their precursor glutathione (GSH) were measured in seaweeds collected from locations in south-west England with different levels of contamination by trace metals, to evaluate their role under natural environmental conditions. The non-protein thiols were identified and quantified in seaweed extracts by HPLC and the molecular structures of PCs were confirmed by LC-ESIMS. The capacity for production of PCs of representative seaweeds under Cd and Zn exposure was also assessed, experimentally. The concentrations of metals/metalloids (As, Cu, Cd, Pb and Zn) accumulated by the seaweeds were determined by ICP-MS. For the first time, PCs are reported in native Phaeophyceae (Fucus spp.), Rhodophyceae (Solieria chordalis) and Chlorophyceae (Rhizoclonium tortuosum) but not in thalli of Ulva spp. and Codium fragile (Chlorophyceae). The concentrations of PCs in brown and red seaweeds correlated with the contamination history of sampling sites and total metal burden of thalli. The highest concentrations of metals (5.6-7.1micromolg(-1) DW), PCs (200-240nmolSHg(-1)DW) and GSH (1,550-3,960nmolSHg(-1)DW), and the longest PC chain lengths (PC(2-4)) were found in Fucus spp. collected from the most contaminated site. A combination of PC-production and maintenance of high concentrations of GSH allows Fucus spp. and R. tortuosum (2,000nmolGSHg(-1)DW) to thrive in highly contaminated environments whereas in Ulva spp. high concentrations of GSH (1,000-1,500nmolSHg(-1)DW) together with thick cells walls and a high polysaccharide content appear to be responsible for metal-resistance. The lack of production of PCs in these green macroalgae suggests lower intracellular metal accumulation rather than an inability for synthesizing PCs. The higher concentrations of Cu (approximately 3.4micromolg(-1)DW) found in

  11. Development of a seaweed species-selection index for successful culture in a seaweed-based integrated aquaculture system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kang, Yun Hee; Hwang, Jae Ran; Chung, Ik Kyo; Park, Sang Rul

    2013-03-01

    Integrated multi-trophic aquaculture (IMTA) has been proposed as a concept that combines the cultivation of fed aquaculture species ( e.g., finfish/shrimp) with extractive aquaculture species ( e.g., shellfish/seaweed). In seaweed-based integrated aquaculture, seaweeds have the capacity to reduce the environmental impact of nitrogen-rich effluents on coastal ecosystems. Thus, selection of optimal species for such aquaculture is of great importance. The present study aimed to develop a seaweed species-selection index for selecting suitable species in seaweed-based integrated aquaculture system. The index was synthesized using available literature-based information, reference data, and physiological seaweed experiments to identify and prioritize the desired species. Undaria pinnatifida, Porphyra yezoensis and Ulva compressa scored the highest according to a seaweed-based integrated aquaculture suitability index (SASI). Seaweed species with the highest scores were adjudged to fit the integrated aquaculture systems. Despite the application of this model limited by local aquaculture environment, it is considered to be a useful tool for selecting seaweed species in IMTA.

  12. Development of a Seaweed Species-Selection Index for Successful Culture in a Seaweed-Based Integrated Aquaculture System

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Yun Hee Kang; Jae Ran Hwang; Ik Kyo Chung; Sang Rul Park

    2013-01-01

    Integrated multi-trophic aquaculture (IMTA) has been proposed as a concept that combines the cultivation of fed aquaculture species (e.g.,finfish/shrimp) with extractive aquaculture species (e.g.,shellfish/seaweed).In seaweed-based integrated aquaculture,seaweeds have the capacity to reduce the environmental impact of nitrogen-rich effluents on coastal ecosystems.Thus,selection of optimal species for such aquaculture is of great importance.The present study aimed to develop a seaweed species-selection index for selecting suitable species in seaweed-based integrated aquaculture system.The index was synthesized using available literature-based information,reference data,and physiological seaweed experiments to identify and prioritize the desired species.Undaria pinnatifida,Porphyra yezoensis and Ulva compressa scored the highest according to a seaweed-based integrated aquaculture suitability index (SASI).Seaweed species with the highest scores were adjudged to fit the integrated aquaculture systems.Despite the application of this model limited by local aquaculture environment,it is considered to be a useful tool for selecting seaweed species in IMTA.

  13. Impacts of ambient salinity and copper on brown algae: 1. Interactive effects on photosynthesis, growth, and copper accumulation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Connan, Solène; Stengel, Dagmar B

    2011-07-01

    The effect of copper enrichment and salinity on growth, photosynthesis and copper accumulation of two temperate brown seaweeds, Ascophyllum nodosum and Fucus vesiculosus, was investigated in laboratory experiments. A significant negative impact of reduced salinity on photosynthetic activity and growth was observed for both species. After 15 days at a salinity of 5, photosynthesis of A. nodosum was entirely inhibited and growth ceased at a salinity of 15. Increased copper concentration negatively affected photosynthetic activity of A. nodosum and F. vesiculosus resulting in chlorosis and reduced seaweed growth; 5 mg L⁻¹ copper caused an inhibition of the photosynthesis and the degradation of seaweed tips. Under reduced salinity, copper toxicity was enhanced and caused an earlier impact on the physiology of seaweed tips. After exposure to copper and different salinities for 15 days, copper contents of seaweeds were closely related to copper concentration in the water; seaweed copper contents reached their maximum after 1 day of exposure; contents only increased again when additional, free copper was added to the water. At high water copper concentrations or low salinity, or a combination of both, copper content of A. nodosum decreased. By contrast, copper content of F. vesiculosus increased, suggesting that different binding sites or uptake mechanisms exist in the two species. The results suggest that when using brown seaweeds in biomonitoring in situ, any change in the environment will directly and significantly affect algal physiology and thus their metal binding capacity; the assessment of the physiological status of the algae in combination with the analysis of thallus metal content will enhance the reliability of the biomonitoring process. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  14. Opportunities and challenges for seaweed in the biobased economy

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hal, van J.W.; Huijgen, W.J.J.; Lopez Contreras, A.M.

    2014-01-01

    The unique chemical composition of seaweeds and their fast growth rates offer many opportunities for biorefining. In this article we argue that cascading biorefinery valorization concepts are viable alternatives to only using seaweeds as carbohydrate sources for the fermentative production of biofue

  15. The economic feasibility of seaweed production in the North Sea

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Burg, van den Sander W.K.; Duijn, van Arie Pieter; Bartelings, Heleen; Krimpen, van Marinus M.; Poelman, Marnix

    2016-01-01

    Seaweeds are increasingly seen as an alternative to land-grown products in food and feed applications. Interest in production of seaweeds in temperate waters is rising, in particular in combination with offshore wind energy generation. This article reports an investigation of the economic feasibi

  16. Detection and activity of iodine-131 in brown algae collected in the Japanese coastal areas

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Morita, Takami, E-mail: takam@affrc.go.jp [Fisheries Research Agency, 15F Queen' s Tower B, Minato Mirai Nishi-ku, Yokohama, Kanagawa 220-6115 (Japan); Niwa, Kentaro; Fujimoto, Ken; Kasai, Hiromi; Yamada, Haruya; Nishiutch, Kou [Fisheries Research Agency, 15F Queen' s Tower B, Minato Mirai Nishi-ku, Yokohama, Kanagawa 220-6115 (Japan); Sakamoto, Tatsuya; Godo, Waichiro [Ushimado Marine Laboratory, Okayama University, 130-17, Kashino 130-17, Ushimado, Setouchi, Okayama 701-43 (Japan); Taino, Seiya; Hayashi, Yoshihiro [Kochi Prefectural Fisheries Experimental Station, Uranoutchhaigata 1153-23, Susaki, Kouch, 785-0167 Japan (Japan); Takeno, Koji; Nishigaki, Tomokazu; Fujiwara, Kunihiro [Kyoto Prefectural Agriculture, Forestry and Fisheries Technology Research Center, Odashukuno, Miyazu, Kyoto, 626-0052 Japan (Japan); Aratake, Hisamichi [Miyazaki Prefectural Fisheries Experimental Station, Aoshima 6-16-3, Miyazaki, Miyazaki 889-2162 Japan (Japan); Kamonoshita, Shingo [Ibaragi Prefectural Fisheries Experimental Station, Mitsuzuka3551-8, Hiraiso, Hitachnaka, Ibaragi, 311-1203 Japan (Japan); Hashimoto, Hiroshi [Fukui Prefectural Fisheries Experimental Station, Urasoko 23-1, Tsuruga, Fukui, 914-0843 Japan (Japan); Kobayashi, Takuya; Otosaka, Sigeyoshi [Japan Atomic Energy Agency, Shirakata Shirane 2-4, Tokai, Ibaraki, 319-1195 Japan (Japan); Imanaka, Tetsuji [Research Reactor Institute, Kyoto University, Kumatori-cho, Osaka, 590-0494 Japan (Japan)

    2010-07-15

    Iodine-131 (physical half-life: 8.04 days) was detected in brown algae collected off the Japanese coast. Brown algae have been extensively used as bioindicators for radioiodine because of their ability to accumulate radionuclides in high concentration factors. The maximum measured specific activity of {sup 131}I in brown algae was 0.37 {+-} 0.010 Bq/kg-wet. Cesium-137 was also detected in all brown algal samples used in this study. There was no correlation between specific activities of {sup 131}I and {sup 137}Cs in these seaweeds. The specific activity of {sup 137}Cs ranged from 0.0034 {+-} 0.00075 to 0.090 {+-} 0.014 Bq/kg-wet. Low specific activity and minimal variability of {sup 137}Cs in brown algae indicated that past nuclear weapon tests were the source of {sup 137}Cs. Although nuclear power stations and nuclear fuel reprocessing plants are known to be pollution sources of {sup 131}I, there was no relationship between the sites where {sup 131}I was detected and the locations of nuclear power facilities. Most of the sites where {sup 131}I was detected were near big cities with large populations. Iodine-131 is frequently used in diagnostic and therapeutic nuclear medicine. On the basis of the results, we suggest that the likely pollution source of {sup 131}I, detected in brown seaweeds, is not nuclear power facilities, but nuclear medicine procedures.

  17. A physicochemical study of Al(+3) interactions with edible seaweed biomass in acidic waters.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lodeiro, Pablo; López-García, Marta; Herrero, Luz; Barriada, José L; Herrero, Roberto; Cremades, Javier; Bárbara, Ignacio; Sastre de Vicente, Manuel E

    2012-09-01

    In this article, a study of the Al(+3) interactions in acidic waters with biomass of different edible seaweeds: brown (Fucus vesiculosus, Saccorhiza polyschides), red (Mastocarpus stellatus, Gelidium sesquipedale, Chondrus crispus), and green (Ulva rigida, Codium tomentosum), has been performed. The influence of both, the initial concentration of metal and the solution pH, on the Al-uptake capacity of the biomass has been analyzed. From preliminary tests, species Fucus vesiculosus and Gelidium sesquipedale have been selected for a more exhaustive analysis. Sorption kinetic studies demonstrated that 60 min are enough to reach equilibrium. The intraparticle diffusion model has been used to describe kinetic data. Equilibrium studies have been carried out at pH values of 1, 2.5, and 4. Langmuir isotherms showed that the best uptake values, obtained at pH 4, were 33 mg/g for F. vesiculosus and 9.2 mg/g for G. sesquipedale. These edible seaweeds have been found particularly effective in binding aluminum metal ions for most of the conditions tested. Physicochemical data reported at these low pH values could be of interest, not only in modeling aluminum-containing antacids-food pharmacokinetic processes produced in the stomach (pH values 1 to 3) but in remediation studies in acidic waters. Aluminum is thought to be linked to neurological disruptions such as Alzheimer's disease. In this article, the adsorption ability of different types of edible seaweeds toward aluminum has been studied. The choice of low pH values is due to the fact that stomach region is acidic with a pH value between 1 and 3 as a consequence of hydrochloric secretion; so physicochemical data reported in this study could be of interest in modeling drug-food interactions, in particular those referring to aluminum-containing antacids-food pharmacokinetic processes produced in the gastrointestinal tract. © 2012 Institute of Food Technologists®

  18. Development of an ointment for burns based in dry extract of the seaweed Fucus spiralis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Clélia Neves Afonso

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available The Fucus spiralis is a brown seaweed found on the Portuguese coast used as wound healing in traditional medicine were their antioxidant, immunostimulant, anticoagulant, antibacterial properties and also remineralizing, smoothing, moisturizing capacities and anti-tumor action were studied with proved results. These seaweed are one of the several described in the European Pharmacopoeia, making F.spiralis a seaweed with great potential for the development of new drugs and/or pharmaceuticals. The objective of this project was to formulate an ointment with F. spiralis dry extracts using vaseline as a base for the treatment of burns. Fucus spiralis was collected on the coast of Peniche (west coast of Portugal, washed, sorted, lyophilized and crushed for the dry extract preparation. The ash (g/g and iodine (% content in F. spiralis were determined. The ointment was prepared and homogenized with three concentrations of dry extract (1%, 2% and 5% and were analyzed over time in parallel with the observation of the physical, chemical, organoleptic and rheological characteristics. The results showed that the F. spiralis presented a iodine content of 0,0076%, a low concentration in comparison with the Farmacopeia europea directives. The ointment prepared is a non-Newtonian fluid, and the absorption spectrum in ultraviolet light (UV detected that it behaves as UVB and UVC blocker, despite of not having the same effect on UVA radiation. With these results and the many properties of Fucus spiralis we conclude that the ointment with dry extract of F. spiralis with the three concentrations of dry extract established is likely to have a great potential in the area of pharmaceutical and medicine, especially for burns application or other skins disorders.

  19. Oxidative stress and antioxidant indices of marine alga Porphyra vietnamensis

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Pise, N.M.; Gaikwad, D.K.; Jagtap, T.G.

    . 2005), reduction in photosynthesis and impairment of CO2 assimi- lation (VAN ASSCHE and CLIJSTERS 1990, GOUIA et al. 2003), which may produce ROS and resulting LPX. Similar results were reported in brown seaweed Padina tetrastromatica at polluted... of reactive oxygen (PFLUGMACHER 2004). In addition, photosynthetic orga- nisms continuously produce reactive oxygen during photosynthesis and other metabolic processes (FOYER and NOCTOR 2000). The defence system against reactive oxygen in plants includes...

  20. Nutritional and Chemical Composition and Antiviral Activity of Cultivated Seaweed Sargassum naozhouense Tseng et Lu 

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yonghong Liu

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available Sargassum naozhouense is a brown seaweed used in folk medicine and applied for thousands of years in Zhanjiang, Guangdong province, China. This study is the first time to investigate its chemical composition and antiviral activity. On the dry weight basis, this seaweed was constituted of ca. 35.18% ash, 11.20% protein, 1.06% lipid and 47.73% total carbohydrate, and the main carbohydrate was water-soluble polysaccharide. The protein analysis indicated the presence of essential amino acids, which accounted for 36.35% of the protein. The most abundant fatty acids were C14:0, C16:0, C18:1 and C20:4. The ash fraction analysis indicated that essential minerals and trace elements, such as Fe, Zn and Cu, were present in the seaweed. IR analysis revealed that polysaccharides from cultivated S. naozhouense may be alginates and fucoidan. The polysaccharides possessed strong antiviral activity against HSV-1 in vitro with EC50 of 8.92 μg/mL. These results demonstrated cultivated S. naozhouense has a potential for its use in functional foods and antiviral new drugs.

  1. The effect of seasonal variation on biomethane production from seaweed and on application as a gaseous transport biofuel.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tabassum, Muhammad Rizwan; Xia, Ao; Murphy, Jerry D

    2016-06-01

    Biomethane produced from seaweed may be used as a transport biofuel. Seasonal variation will have an effect on this industry. Laminaria digitata, a typical Irish brown seaweed species, shows significant seasonal variation both in proximate, ultimate and biochemical composition. The characteristics in August were optimal with the lowest level of ash (20% of volatile solids), a C:N ratio of 32 and the highest specific methane yield measured at 327LCH4kgVS(-1), which was 72% of theoretical yield. The highest yield per mass collected of 53m(3)CH4t(-1) was achieved in August, which is 4.5 times higher than the lowest value, obtained in December. A seaweed cultivation area of 11,800ha would be required to satisfy the 2020 target for advanced biofuels in Ireland, of 1.25% renewable energy supply in transport (RES-T) based on the optimal gross energy yield obtained in August (200GJha(-1)yr(-1)).

  2. Antioxidant, Antiproliferative, and Antiangiogenesis Effects of Polyphenol-Rich Seaweed (Sargassum muticum

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Farideh Namvar

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available In the present study, we evaluated the effect of brown seaweeds Sargassum muticum methanolic extract (SMME, against MCF-7 and MDA-MB-231 breast cancer cell lines proliferation. This algae extract was also evaluated for reducing activity and total polyphenol content. The MTT assay results indicated that the extracts were cytotoxic against breast cancer cell lines in a dose-dependent manner, with IC50 of 22 μg/ml for MCF-7 and 55 μg/ml for MDA-MB-231 cell lines. The percentages of apoptotic MCF-7-treated cells increased from 13% to 67% by increasing the concentration of the SMME. The antiproliferative efficacy of this algal extract was positively correlated with the total polyphenol contents, suggesting a causal link related to extract content of phenolic acids. Cell cycle analysis showed a significant increase in the accumulation of SMME-treated cells at sub-G1 phase, indicating the induction of apoptosis by SMME. Further apoptosis induction was confirmed by Hoechst 33342 and AO/PI staining. Also SMME implanted in vivo into fertilized chicken eggs induced dose-related antiangiogenic activity in the chorioallantoic membrane (CAM. Our results imply a new insight on the novel function of Sargassum muticum polyphenol-rich seaweed in cancer research by induction of apoptosis, antioxidant, and antiangiogenesis effects.

  3. Antioxidant, antiproliferative, and antiangiogenesis effects of polyphenol-rich seaweed (Sargassum muticum).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Namvar, Farideh; Mohamad, Rosfarizan; Baharara, Javad; Zafar-Balanejad, Saeedeh; Fargahi, Fahimeh; Rahman, Heshu Sulaiman

    2013-01-01

    In the present study, we evaluated the effect of brown seaweeds Sargassum muticum methanolic extract (SMME), against MCF-7 and MDA-MB-231 breast cancer cell lines proliferation. This algae extract was also evaluated for reducing activity and total polyphenol content. The MTT assay results indicated that the extracts were cytotoxic against breast cancer cell lines in a dose-dependent manner, with IC50 of 22 μg/ml for MCF-7 and 55 μg/ml for MDA-MB-231 cell lines. The percentages of apoptotic MCF-7-treated cells increased from 13% to 67% by increasing the concentration of the SMME. The antiproliferative efficacy of this algal extract was positively correlated with the total polyphenol contents, suggesting a causal link related to extract content of phenolic acids. Cell cycle analysis showed a significant increase in the accumulation of SMME-treated cells at sub-G1 phase, indicating the induction of apoptosis by SMME. Further apoptosis induction was confirmed by Hoechst 33342 and AO/PI staining. Also SMME implanted in vivo into fertilized chicken eggs induced dose-related antiangiogenic activity in the chorioallantoic membrane (CAM). Our results imply a new insight on the novel function of Sargassum muticum polyphenol-rich seaweed in cancer research by induction of apoptosis, antioxidant, and antiangiogenesis effects.

  4. Comparison of cardiovascular protective effects of tropical seaweeds, Kappaphycus alvarezii, Caulerpa lentillifera, and Sargassum polycystum, on high-cholesterol/high-fat diet in rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matanjun, Patricia; Mohamed, Suhaila; Muhammad, Kharidah; Mustapha, Noordin Mohamed

    2010-08-01

    This study was designed to investigate the comparative in vivo cardiovascular protective effects of red, green, and brown tropical seaweeds, namely, Kappaphycus alvarezii (or Eucheuma cottonii), Caulerpa lentillifera, and Sargassum polycystum, in rats fed on high-cholesterol/high-fat (HCF) diets. Male Sprague-Dawley rats (weighing 260-300 g) on the HCF diet had significantly increased body weight, plasma total cholesterol (TC), plasma low-density lipoprotein cholesterol (LDL-C), plasma triglycerides (TG), lipid peroxidation, and erythrocyte glutathione peroxidase (GSH-Px) and superoxide dismutase levels after 16 weeks. Supplementing 5% seaweeds to HCF diet significantly reduced plasma TC (-11.4% to -18.5%), LDL-C (-22% to -49.3%), and TG (-33.7% to -36.1%) levels and significantly increased HDL-C levels (16.3-55%). Among the seaweeds, S. polycystum showed the best anti-obesity and blood GSH-Px properties, K. alvarezii showed the best antihyperlipemic and in vivo antioxidation effects, and C. lentillifera was most effective at reducing plasma TC. All seaweeds significantly reduced body weight gain, erythrocyte GSH-Px, and plasma lipid peroxidation of HCF diet rats towards the values of normal rats.

  5. Monitoring rainwater and seaweed reveals the presence of (131)I in southwest and central British Columbia, Canada following the Fukushima nuclear accident in Japan.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chester, A; Starosta, K; Andreoiu, C; Ashley, R; Barton, A; Brodovitch, J-C; Brown, M; Domingo, T; Janusson, C; Kucera, H; Myrtle, K; Riddell, D; Scheel, K; Salomon, A; Voss, P

    2013-10-01

    Detailed analysis of (131)I levels in rainwater and in three species of seaweed (Fucus distichus Linnaeus, Macrocystis pyrifera, and Pyropia fallax) collected in southwest British Columbia and Bella Bella, B.C., Canada was performed using gamma-ray spectroscopy following the Fukushima nuclear power plant accident on March 11, 2011. Maximum (131)I activity was found to be 5.8(7) Bq/L in rainwater collected at the campus of Simon Fraser University in Burnaby, B.C. nine days after the accident. Concomitantly, maximum observed activity in the brown seaweed F. distichus Linnaeus was observed to be 130(7) Bq/kg dry weight in samples collected in North Vancouver 11 days following the accident and 67(6) Bq/kg dry weight in samples collected from the Bamfield Marine Sciences Centre on Vancouver Island 17 days following the accident. The (131)I activity in seaweed samples collected in southwest B.C. following the Fukushima accident was an order of magnitude less than what was observed following Chernobyl. Iodine-131 activity in F. distichus Linnaeus remained detectable for 60 days following the accident and was detectable in each seaweed species collected. The Germanium Detector for Elemental Analysis and Radioactivity Studies (GEARS) was modeled using the Geant4 software package and developed as an analytical tool by the Nuclear Science group in the Simon Fraser University Department of Chemistry for the purpose of these measurements.

  6. Arsenic removal from water using iron-coated seaweeds.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vieira, Bárbara R C; Pintor, Ariana M A; Boaventura, Rui A R; Botelho, Cidália M S; Santos, Sílvia C R

    2017-05-01

    Arsenic is a semi-metal element that can enter in water bodies and drinking water supplies from natural deposits and from mining, industrial and agricultural practices. The aim of the present work was to propose an alternative process for removing As from water, based on adsorption on a brown seaweed (Sargassum muticum), after a simple and inexpensive treatment: coating with iron-oxy (hydroxides). Adsorption equilibrium and kinetics were studied and modeled in terms of As oxidation state (III and V), pH and initial adsorbate concentration. Maximum adsorption capacities of 4.2 mg/g and 7.3 mg/g were obtained at pH 7 and 20 °C for arsenite and arsenate, respectively. When arsenite was used as adsorbate, experimental evidences pointed to the occurrence of redox reactions involving As(III) oxidation to As(V) and Fe(III) reduction to Fe(II), with As(V) uptake by the adsorbent. The proposed adsorption mechanism was then based on the assumption that arsenate was the adsorbed arsenic species. The most relevant drawback found in the present work was the considerable leaching of iron to the solution. Arsenite removal from a mining-influenced water by adsorption plus precipitation was studied and compared to a traditional process of coagulation/flocculation. Both kinds of treatment provided practically 100% of arsenite removal from the contaminated water, leading at best in 12.9 μg/L As after the adsorption and precipitation assays and 14.2 μg/L after the coagulation/flocculation process. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  7. Global unbalance in seaweed production, research effort and biotechnology markets.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mazarrasa, Inés; Olsen, Ylva S; Mayol, Eva; Marbà, Núria; Duarte, Carlos M

    2014-01-01

    Exploitation of the world's oceans is rapidly growing as evidenced by a booming patent market of marine products including seaweed, a resource that is easily accessible without sophisticated bioprospecting technology and that has a high level of domestication globally. The investment in research effort on seaweed aquaculture has recently been identified to be the main force for the development of a biotechnology market of seaweed-derived products and is a more important driver than the capacity of seaweed production. Here, we examined seaweed patent registrations between 1980 and 2009 to assess the growth rate of seaweed biotechnology, its geographic distribution and the types of applications patented. We compare this growth with scientific investment in seaweed aquaculture and with the market of seaweed production. We found that both the seaweed patenting market and the rate of scientific publications are rapidly growing (11% and 16.8% per year respectively) since 1990. The patent market is highly geographically skewed (95% of all registrations belonging to ten countries and the top two holding 65% of the total) compared to the distribution of scientific output among countries (60% of all scientific publications belonging to ten countries and the top two countries holding a 21%), but more homogeneously distributed than the production market (with a 99.8% belonging to the top ten countries, and a 71% to the top two). Food industry was the dominant application for both the patent registrations (37.7%) and the scientific publications (21%) followed in both cases by agriculture and aquaculture applications. This result is consistent with the seaweed taxa most represented. Kelp, which was the target taxa for 47% of the patent registrations, is a traditional ingredient in Asian food and Gracilaria and Ulva, which were the focus of 15% and 13% of the scientific publications respectively, that are also used in more sophisticated applications such as cosmetics, chemical

  8. Canopy-forming seaweeds in urchin-dominated systems in eastern Canada: structuring forces or simple prey for keystone grazers?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Caitlin Blain

    Full Text Available Models of benthic community dynamics for the extensively studied, shallow rocky ecosystems in eastern Canada emphasize kelp-urchin interactions. These models may bias the perception of factors and processes that structure communities, for they largely overlook the possible contribution of other seaweeds to ecosystem resilience. We examined the persistence of the annual, acidic (H2SO4, brown seaweed Desmarestia viridis in urchin barrens at two sites in Newfoundland (Canada throughout an entire growth season (February to October. We also compared changes in epifaunal assemblages in D. viridis and other conspicuous canopy-forming seaweeds, the non-acidic conspecific Desmarestia aculeata and kelp Agarum clathratum. We show that D. viridis can form large canopies within the 2-to-8 m depth range that represent a transient community state termed "Desmarestia bed". The annual resurgence of Desmarestia beds and continuous occurrence of D. aculeata and A. clathratum, create biological structure for major recruitment pulses in invertebrate and fish assemblages (e.g. from quasi-absent gastropods to >150,000 recruits kg(-1 D. viridis. Many of these pulses phase with temperature-driven mass release of acid to the environment and die-off in D. viridis. We demonstrate experimentally that the chemical makeup of D. viridis and A. clathratum helps retard urchin grazing compared to D. aculeata and the highly consumed kelp Alaria esculenta. In light of our findings and related studies, we propose fundamental changes to the study of community shifts in shallow, rocky ecosystems in eastern Canada. In particular, we advocate the need to regard certain canopy-forming seaweeds as structuring forces interfering with top-down processes, rather than simple prey for keystone grazers. We also propose a novel, empirical model of ecological interactions for D. viridis. Overall, our study underscores the importance of studying organisms together with cross-scale environmental

  9. Effects of various kinds of edible seaweeds in diets on the development of D-galactosamine-induced hepatopathy in rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kawano, Naoko; Egashira, Yukari; Sanada, Hiroo

    2007-08-01

    In the present study we investigated the effects of 11 kinds of edible seaweeds (6 brown and 5 red algae) which contain characteristic seaweed dietary fibers on the induction of D-GalN (D-galactosamine)-hepatopathy in rats (Exps. 1 and 2). Then, the efficacy of various components prepared from Gelidium sp., which was found to alleviate the hepatopathy in Exps. 1 and 2, was examined (Exp. 3). The rats were fed the diets containing various kinds of seaweeds (Exps. 1 and 2), or several components of Gelidium sp. such as total dietary fiber (TDF), soluble dietary fiber (SDF), insoluble dietary fiber (IDF) and dietary fiber-free components (DFFC) (Exp. 3), for 8 d. The rats in all experiments were injected with D-GalN (800 mg/kg body weight) intraperitoneally at the 7th day to induce liver injury and were sacrificed 24 h after the injection of D-GalN. The serum transaminase activities (ALT and AST) and lactate dehydrogenase (LDH) were determined to evaluate the levels of hepatopathy. In Exp. 3, the total GSH concentration in the liver, plasma and cecal contents and organic acid concentration in cecal contents were also evaluated. In Exps. 1 and 2, repressive effects against D-GalN-hepatopathy were shown by four seaweeds Laminaria sp., Gelidium sp., Sargassum fulvellum and Eisenia bicyclis. In Exp. 3, it was found that protective activity in Gelidium sp. against D-GalN-hepatopathy existed not only in the SDF but also in the DFFC fraction. The results in Exp. 3 also indicated that the total GSH but not organic acid concentration in the cecal contents were significantly correlated with serum AST activity, suggesting that the protective effect of Gelidium sp. on D-GalN-hepatopathy in rats is related to GSH metabolism in the intestine.

  10. Hypoglycemic activity of several seaweed extracts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lamela, M; Anca, J; Villar, R; Otero, J; Calleja, J M

    1989-11-01

    The hypoglycemic activity of several seaweed extracts on rabbits was studied. Ethanol extracts of Laminaria ochroleuca, Saccorhiza polyschides and Fucus vesiculosus were administered orally to normal animals and their effects on glycemia and triglyceridemia evaluated. Crude polysaccharides and protein solutions from Himanthalia elongata and Codium tomentosum were also assayed. Polysaccharides and proteins from H. elongata caused a significant reduction in blood glucose 8 h after intravenous administration. A case of 5 mg/kg of crude polysaccharide lowered glycemia about 18% in normal rabbits and by about 50% in alloxan-diabetic animals, while the protein solution lowered glycemia in diabetic rabbits by about 30%.

  11. Brown algae (Phaeophyta) for monitoring heavy metals at the Sudanese Red Sea coast

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ali, Abuagla Y. A.; Idris, Abubakr M.; Ebrahim, Ammar M.; Eltayeb, Mohmaed A. H.

    2017-02-01

    This study aimed at monitoring some heavy metals at the Sudanese Red Sea coast using Brown algae (Phaeophyta) as biomonitor. The total contents of heavy metals in four species (Turbinaria sp., Sargassum sp., Cystoseira sp. and Padina sp.) as well as seawater were examined. Twenty-six algae samples were collected from seven locations. The ranges of concentrations (µg/g, dry wt.) of heavy metals in algae were 4.95-16.95 for Cr, 2.93-257.32 for Mn, 1.35-7.43 for Ni, 0.83-14.10 for Cu, 4.13-19.13 for Zn, 0.03-0.15 for Cd and 0.45-2.18 for Pb. The ranges of the pH and the salinity of seawater from the same locations were 8.11-8.82 and 38.00-41.00 PSU, respectively. The ranges of concentrations (µg/L) of heavy metals in seawater were 7.00-11.00 for Cr, 2.90-10.20 for Mn, 6.70-10.10 for Ni, 1.70-5.00 for Cu, 0.94-5.70 for Zn, 0.09-0.14 for Cd and 0.93-1.80 for Pb. No significant correlations between metal concentrations in algae and seawater were observed. Some locations in the study area recorded relatively high levels of heavy metals in algae indicating possible contribution from manmade activities. Cr recorded higher levels in the study area than those in other coastal areas in the word. Padina sp. and Cystoseira sp. were better bioindicator than Turbinaria sp., Sargassum sp. for their high metal uptake.

  12. Iron ore particles on four seaweed species from Camburi Beach (Espírito Santo state, Brazil

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cristina Aparecida Gomes Nassar

    2006-09-01

    Full Text Available The present study estimated the iron-ore concentration found on four species of seaweed. The species tested grow on a site heavily contaminated by this ore, in the city of Vitória, state of Espírito Santo, Brazil. Under natural conditions, the iron ore reached a temperature 5.0ºC higher than the sand on a sunny day. All the species had iron ore adhered to their fronds. Udotea cyathiformis was the species with the highest iron-ore concentration varing from 0.07 to 0.90 g wet weight, followed by Lobophora variegata (from 0.07 to 0.62 g wet weight, Padina gymnospora (from 0.08 to 0.55 g wet weight and Ulva fasciata (from 0.05 to 0.25 g wet weight. Even after four changes of water over a 12-hour period, the fronds still had particles adhered to their outside cell wall. All the species showed similar tendencies to release the iron, with the highest percentage of particles (40 to 60% released in the first change of water.Minério de ferro particulado sobre quatro macroalgas da Praia de Camburi (Estado do Espírito Santo-Brasil. O presente trabalho determinou a concentração de minério de ferro presente em quatro macroalgas. As espécies testadas ocorrem em um local extremamente contaminado por este particulado, na cidade de Vitória, Estado do Espírito Santo, Brasil. Sob condições naturais, o minério de ferro alcançou um temperatura de até 5,0ºC acima da temperatura da areia em um dia ensolarado.Todas as espécies estudadas apresentavam minério em suas paredes externas. A espécie Udotea cyathiformis apresentou a maior concentração de minério em sua fronde variando de 0,07 a 0,90 g massa úmida, seguida por Lobophora variegata (de 0,07 a 0,62 g massa úmida, Padina gymnospora (de 0,08 a 0,55 g massa úmida e Ulva fasciata (de 0,05 a 0,25 g massa úmida. Mesmo após sucessivas trocas de água, as frondes ainda apresentavam partículas aderidas às suas paredes celulares externas. As espécies apresentaram a mesma tendência de libera

  13. Environmental perspectives on using cast seaweed for biogas production

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Fredenslund, Anders Michael; Møller, Henrik Bjarne; Christensen, Thomas Budde

    Solrød Municipality, Denmark is working towards building a biogas plant utilizing locally available organic wastes including cast seaweed, which is collected each year, since the local inhabitants see this material as a nuisance. A preliminary study suggested favorable conditions for contstructing...... a mixed substrate biogas plant. Continuously fed reactor experiments showed that the intended mix of substrate including cast seaweed could be used as raw material for a biogas plant in thermophilic operation. The environmental analysis suggests existence of several positive benefits of utilizing cast...... seaweed in Solrød, among which are: Production of renewable energy, greenhouse gas reduction, nutrient recycling and odor reduction....

  14. Green and golden seaweed tides on the rise.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smetacek, Victor; Zingone, Adriana

    2013-12-05

    Sudden beaching of huge seaweed masses smother the coastline and form rotting piles on the shore. The number of reports of these events in previously unaffected areas has increased worldwide in recent years. These 'seaweed tides' can harm tourism-based economies, smother aquaculture operations or disrupt traditional artisanal fisheries. Coastal eutrophication is the obvious, ultimate explanation for the increase in seaweed biomass, but the proximate processes that are responsible for individual beaching events are complex and require dedicated study to develop effective mitigation strategies. Harvesting the macroalgae, a valuable raw material, before they beach could well be developed into an effective solution.

  15. Seaweed communities in retreat from ocean warming.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wernberg, Thomas; Russell, Bayden D; Thomsen, Mads S; Gurgel, C Frederico D; Bradshaw, Corey J A; Poloczanska, Elvira S; Connell, Sean D

    2011-11-08

    In recent decades, global climate change [1] has caused profound biological changes across the planet [2-6]. However, there is a great disparity in the strength of evidence among different ecosystems and between hemispheres: changes on land have been well documented through long-term studies, but similar direct evidence for impacts of warming is virtually absent from the oceans [3, 7], where only a few studies on individual species of intertidal invertebrates, plankton, and commercially important fish in the North Atlantic and North Pacific exist. This disparity of evidence is precarious for biological conservation because of the critical role of the marine realm in regulating the Earth's environmental and ecological functions, and the associated socioeconomic well-being of humans [8]. We interrogated a database of >20,000 herbarium records of macroalgae collected in Australia since the 1940s and documented changes in communities and geographical distribution limits in both the Indian and Pacific Oceans, consistent with rapid warming over the past five decades [9, 10]. We show that continued warming might drive potentially hundreds of species toward and beyond the edge of the Australian continent where sustained retreat is impossible. The potential for global extinctions is profound considering the many endemic seaweeds and seaweed-dependent marine organisms in temperate Australia.

  16. Seaweed culture and continental shelf protection

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Przhemenetskaya, V.F.

    1985-07-01

    The initial impression that the resources of the oceans were limitless has been replaced by a more rational appreciation that everything has its limits, including the seemingly infinite resources of marine plant life. In addition, experience in California, Australia, China, Japan and Korea has demonstrated that depletion of seaweed resources for commercial utilization has a deleterious effect on the biocenotic status of the continental shelf. In view of this, many countries, such as Japan, China, Korea, the Philippines and the USSR, have embarked on aquaculture programs, in which seaweeds are cultivated on marine plantations. Successful developments in this direction should go a long way to preserving the natural ecologic balance on the continental shelf, and yet provide mankind with the resources of the deep. Many difficulties remain to be resolved before aquaculture programs become fully cost effective, one of which deals with the susceptibility of a monoculture to a given predator or disease. To that end, such programs necessitate the creation of well balanced systems that would support a variety of marine plant and animal life without an adverse effect on the desired crop. 4 references, 6 figures.

  17. Bioactive compounds in industrial red seaweed used in carrageenan production

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Naseri, Alireza; Holdt, Susan Løvstad; Jacobsen, Charlotte

    The main seaweed species used in industrial scale for carrageenan production are Kappaphycus alvarezii, Eucheuma denticulatum, Chondrus crispus, Gigartina sp. and also Furcellaria lumbricalis as a source of furcellaran (Danish Agar) is also classified together with carrageenan. The chemical...

  18. Seaweed cultivation on the Southern and Southeastern Brazilian Coast

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Franciane Pellizzari

    2011-04-01

    Full Text Available Seaweeds are used directly as food or applied indirectly as texturing agents with gelling and thickening properties (carrageenan, agar and alginates in many industries. They can also be used as fertilizers, animal feed, biomass for fuel, cosmetics and a source of pharmaceuticals, among other applications. The aquaculture of macroalgae is an alternative for producing raw material. Brazil has a coastline with numerous locations suitable for this endeavor. However, despite the known economical and social relevance of seaweed cultivation, Brazilians do not have tradition of using edible seaweeds. In general, the raw material for indirect use (e.g., as a texturing agent is imported. Consequently, seaweed aquaculture is still incipient in Brazil. This contribution presents data and information about macroalgae cultivation on commercial and experimental scales performed on the Southern and Southeastern Brazilian Coastline, as well as a brief overview of research related to some species cultivated in the last decade.

  19. Seaweed-based economic activities in Lombok and Bali, Indonesia

    OpenAIRE

    Hatta, A.M.; Dahoklory, G.M.B.K.

    1996-01-01

    Seaweed production is an important secondary, activity for fishers in eastern Indonesia. In Lombok and Bali, however, it is a major enterprise involving whole village communities in a range of activities from trading to tourism.

  20. EFFECTS OF CLIMATE CHANGE ON GLOBAL SEAWEED COMMUNITIES.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harley, Christopher D G; Anderson, Kathryn M; Demes, Kyle W; Jorve, Jennifer P; Kordas, Rebecca L; Coyle, Theraesa A; Graham, Michael H

    2012-10-01

    Seaweeds are ecologically important primary producers, competitors, and ecosystem engineers that play a central role in coastal habitats ranging from kelp forests to coral reefs. Although seaweeds are known to be vulnerable to physical and chemical changes in the marine environment, the impacts of ongoing and future anthropogenic climate change in seaweed-dominated ecosystems remain poorly understood. In this review, we describe the ways in which changes in the environment directly affect seaweeds in terms of their physiology, growth, reproduction, and survival. We consider the extent to which seaweed species may be able to respond to these changes via adaptation or migration. We also examine the extensive reshuffling of communities that is occurring as the ecological balance between competing species changes, and as top-down control by herbivores becomes stronger or weaker. Finally, we delve into some of the ecosystem-level responses to these changes, including changes in primary productivity, diversity, and resilience. Although there are several key areas in which ecological insight is lacking, we suggest that reasonable climate-related hypotheses can be developed and tested based on current information. By strategically prioritizing research in the areas of complex environmental variation, multiple stressor effects, evolutionary adaptation, and population, community, and ecosystem-level responses, we can rapidly build upon our current understanding of seaweed biology and climate change ecology to more effectively conserve and manage coastal ecosystems. © 2012 Phycological Society of America.

  1. Floating seaweed in the neustonic environment: A case study from Belgian coastal waters

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vandendriessche, Sofie; Vincx, Magda; Degraer, Steven

    2006-02-01

    Floating seaweeds form the most important natural component of all floating material found on the surface of oceans and seas. Notwithstanding the absence of natural rocky shores, ephemeral floating seaweed clumps are frequently encountered along the Belgian coast. From October 2002 to April 2003, seaweed samples and control samples (i.e. surface water samples from a seaweed-free area) were collected every other week. Multivariate analysis on neustonic macrofaunal abundances showed significant differences between seaweed and control samples in the fraction > 1 mm. Differences were less conspicuous in the 0.5-1 mm fraction. Seaweed samples were characterised by the presence of seaweed fauna e.g. Acari, Idotea baltica, Gammarus sp ., while control samples mainly contained Calanoida, Larvacea, Chaetognatha, and planktonic larvae of crustaceans and polychaetes. Seaweed samples (1 mm fraction) harboured considerably higher diversities (× 3), densities (× 18) and biomasses (× 49) compared to the surrounding water column (control samples). The impact of floating seaweeds on the neustonic environment was quantified by the calculation of the added values of seaweed samples considering biomass and density. These calculations resulted in mean added values of 311 ind m - 2 in density and 305 mg ADW m - 2 in biomass. The association degree per species was expressed as the mean percentage of individuals found in seaweed samples in proportion to the total density and biomass of that species (seaweed samples + control samples). Thirteen species showed an association percentage > 95%, and can therefore be considered members of the floating seaweed fauna.

  2. The Strategy to Improve the Competitiveness of Indonesian Seaweeds in Global Market

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Delu Damelia

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available This research is aimed to know the position of Indonesian seaweeds exports’ competitiveness in global market, as well as the strategy to improve it. The research uses a quantitative approach, which specifically employs time series type that has been done within 10 years period (2003-2012. The data used are the data of seaweed product by the code product of HS 121220 Seaweeds and other algae (fresh or dried, HS 121221 Seaweeds fit for human consumption, HS 121229 Seaweeds and other algae unfit for human consumption. The data includes the value of Indonesian seaweeds exports commodity, the total of Indonesian exports, the value of seaweeds in global exports, the total of global exports, Indonesian seaweeds imports, Indonesian seaweeds production, and Indonesian seaweeds exports. The data is analyzed using Revealed Comparative Advantage (RCA, Import Dependency Ratio (IDR, Specialized Trading Index (ISP, Commodity Concentration Index (CCI, alongside with Strengths, Weaknesses, Opportunities, and Threats. The result shows that: (1 The RCA of seaweeds commodity though fluctuating but relatively increasing; (2 The Import Dependency Ratio of Indonesian seaweeds though fluctuating but relatively increasing, the fluctuation is due to their inability to produce plus value of ferments; (3 Index of Specialized trading appears to be positive; (4 Commodity Concentration Index of exports and imports though fluctuating but relatively increasing; (5 Indonesia can employ Rapid Growth Strategy. The result recommends Indonesian government to improve the quality of seaweeds products specifically using distribution improvements from farmers to consumer both in industrial scope and domestic consumer.

  3. Emergence of Seaweed and Seaweed-Containing Foods in the UK: Focus on Labeling, Iodine Content, Toxicity and Nutrition

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maria Bouga

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available Seaweed (edible algae is not a staple food in the Western diet, despite occasional use as a traditional ingredient in coastal areas. High nutritional value, combined with the expansion of the health-food industry, has led to a resurgence of seaweed in the British diet. While seaweed could be useful in tackling dietary iodine insufficiency, consumption of some species and sources of seaweed has also been associated with risks, such as toxicity from high iodine levels, or accumulation of arsenic, heavy metals and contaminants. The current retail level of seaweed and edible algae in the UK market, either as whole foods or ingredients, was evaluated with particular focus on labelling and iodine content. Seaweed-containing products (n = 224 were identified. Only 22 products (10% stated information regarding iodine content and another 40 (18% provided information sufficient to estimate the iodine content. For these products, the median iodine content was 110 μg/g (IQR 21–503 and 585 μg per estimated serving (IQR 105–2520. While calculations for iodine exposure per serving relied on assumptions, 26 products could potentially lead to an iodine intake above the (European tolerable adult upper level of 600 μg/day. In the context of the data presented, there is scope to improve product labelling (species, source, processing, content.

  4. Biotransformation and accumulation of arsenic in soil amended with seaweed.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Castlehouse, Hayley; Smith, Cassandra; Raab, Andrea; Deacon, Claire; Meharg, Andrew A; Feldmann, Jörg

    2003-03-01

    For many coastal regions of the world, it has been common practice to apply seaweed to the land as a soil improver and fertilizer. Seaweed is rich in arsenosugars and has a tissue concentration of arsenic up to 100 micro/g g(-1). These arsenic species are relatively nontoxic to humans; however, in the environment they may accumulate in the soil and decompose to more toxic arsenic species. The aim of this study was to determine the fate and biotransformation of these arsenosugars in soil using HPLC-ICP-MS analysis. Data from coastal soils currently manured with seaweeds were used to investigate if arsenic was accumulating in these soils. Long-term application of seaweed increased arsenic concentrations in these soils up to 10-fold (0.35 mg of As kg(-1) for nonagronomic peat, 4.3 mg of As kg(-1) for seaweed-amended peat). The biotransformation of arsenic was studied in microcosm experiments in which a sandy (machair) soil, traditionally manured with seaweed, was amended with Laminaria digitata and Fucus vesiculosus. In both seaweed species, the arsenic occurs in the form of arsenosugars (85%). The application of 50 g of seaweed to 1 kg of soil leads to an increase of arsenic in the soils, and the dominating species found in the soil pore water were dimethylarsinic acid (DMA(V)) and the inorganic species arsenate (As(V)) and arsenite (As(III)) after the initial appearance of arsenosugars. A proposed decomposition pathway of arsenosugars is discussed in which the arsenosugars are transformed to DMA(V) and further to inorganic arsenic without appreciable amounts of methylarsonic acid (MA(V)). Commercially available seaweed-based fertilizers contain arsenic concentration between 10 and 50 mg kg(-1). The arsenic species in these fertilizers depends on the manufacturing procedure. Some contain mainly arsenosugars while others contain mainly DMA(V) and inorganic arsenic. With the application rates suggested by the manufacturers, the application of these fertilizers is 2

  5. Southern Ocean seaweeds: A resource for exploration in food and drugs

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Dhargalkar, V.K.; Verlecar, X.N.

    . Recently, an active ingredient from Antarctic seaweed has been identified, which blocks the effects of metalloproteinase, an enzyme that accelerates the skin aging process. A skin care products derived from polar seaweeds has been a latest craze in France...

  6. [Human brown adipose tissue].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Virtanen, Kirsi A; Nuutila, Pirjo

    2015-01-01

    Adult humans have heat-producing and energy-consuming brown adipose tissue in the clavicular region of the neck. There are two types of brown adipose cells, the so-called classic and beige adipose cells. Brown adipose cells produce heat by means of uncoupler protein 1 (UCP1) from fatty acids and sugar. By applying positron emission tomography (PET) measuring the utilization of sugar, the metabolism of brown fat has been shown to multiply in the cold, presumably influencing energy consumption. Active brown fat is most likely present in young adults, persons of normal weight and women, least likely in obese persons.

  7. Atmospheres of Brown Dwarfs

    CERN Document Server

    Helling, Christiane

    2014-01-01

    Brown Dwarfs are the coolest class of stellar objects known to date. Our present perception is that Brown Dwarfs follow the principles of star formation, and that Brown Dwarfs share many characteristics with planets. Being the darkest and lowest mass stars known makes Brown Dwarfs also the coolest stars known. This has profound implication for their spectral fingerprints. Brown Dwarfs cover a range of effective temperatures which cause brown dwarfs atmospheres to be a sequence that gradually changes from a M-dwarf-like spectrum into a planet-like spectrum. This further implies that below an effective temperature of < 2800K, clouds form already in atmospheres of objects marking the boundary between M-Dwarfs and brown dwarfs. Recent developments have sparked the interest in plasma processes in such very cool atmospheres: sporadic and quiescent radio emission has been observed in combination with decaying Xray-activity indicators across the fully convective boundary.

  8. Floating seaweed in the neustonic environment: a case study from Belgian coastal waters

    OpenAIRE

    Vandendriessche, S.; M. Vincx; Degraer, S.

    2006-01-01

    Floating seaweeds form the most important natural component of all floating material found on the surface of oceans and seas. Notwithstanding the absence of natural rocky shores, ephemeral floating seaweed clumps are frequently encountered along the Belgian coast. From October 2002 to April 2003, seaweed samples and control samples (i.e. surface water samples from a seaweed-free area) were collected every other week. Multivariate analysis on neustonic macrofaunal abundances showed significant...

  9. The Roles of Seaweed on Climate Change, Food Security and Natural Product

    OpenAIRE

    A. Niarthiningsih; Wahyudin, Elly

    2013-01-01

    This paper gives an overview of the potential role of seaweed in reducing global warming and climate change, contributing to food security and producing natural products. The role of seaweed on controlling climate change is through reducing carbon dioxide and converting seaweed into the bio fuel. The use of bio-fuel could reduce the traditional hydrocarbon as energy that produces carbon emission. Fresh and processed seaweed are commonly used as a food. This may contribute significantly to ...

  10. Spatial distributions of floating seaweeds in the East China Sea from late winter to early spring

    OpenAIRE

    Mizuno, S.; Ajisaka, T.; Lahbib, S.; Kokubu, Y.; Alabsi, M. N.; Komatsu, T

    2013-01-01

    Floating seaweeds play an important role as a habitat for many animals accompanying or attaching to them in offshore waters. It was in 2000 that the first report described abundant distributions of floating seaweeds in offshore waters in the East China Sea in spring. Young individuals of the yellowtail Seriola quinqueradiata are captured for aquaculture purposes from floating seaweeds in the East China Sea. Therefore, a sound understanding of the distributions of floating seaweeds in the East...

  11. Antimicrobial and antifouling activities achieved by extracts of seaweeds from Gulf of California, Mexico Actividades antimicrobiana y anti-incrustante obtenidas de los extractos de algas marinas del Golfo de California, México

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ruth Noemí Águila-Ramírez

    2012-04-01

    Full Text Available Six species of common seaweed extracts were tested in laboratory assays: Dictyota flabellata, Padina concrescens, Laurencia johnstonii, Gymnogongrus martinensis, Ulva lactuca and Codium fragile for potential industrial applications through evaluation of the antibacterial activity against pathogenic bacteria (5 strains and the antifouling potency against the growth of key species of marine colonisers (7 bacteria, 5 fungi and 11 microalgae. The organic extract of L. johnstonii, U. lactuca and D. flabellata have bacterial antibiosis. The ethereal extracts were more active in comparison with buthanol extracts against the bacterial strain Staphylococcus aureus. The best antifouling results were obtained with U. lactuca and L. johnstonii(0.1-1 μg ml-1 against all strains tested. C.fragile exhibited significant antifouling activity with minimum inhibitory concentration (MIC between 1-10 μg ml-1 against marine microalgae Rhodosorus magnei, Neorhodella cyanea and Prymnesium calathiferum.Se analizaron seis especies de macroalgas comunes del Golfo de California: Dictyota flabellata, Padina concrescens, Laurencia johnstonii, Gymnogongrus martinensis, Ulva lactuca y Codium fragile para determinar su potencial aplicación industrial, a través de la evaluación de la actividad antibacteriana frente a bacterias patógenas (5 cepas, y el potencial anti-incrustante como inhibidores de crecimiento de especies colonizadoras en ambientes marinos (7 bacterias, 5 hongos y 11 microalgas. Los extractos orgánicos de L. johnstonii, U. lactuca y D. flabellata presentaron antibiosis bacteriana. Los extractos etéreos fueron más activos en comparación con los extractos de butanol frente a la cepa bacteriana Staphylococcus aureus. Los mejores resultados de actividad anti-incrustante se obtuvieron con U. lactuca y L. johnstonii (0.1-1 μg ml-1 frente a todas las cepas probadas. C. fragile mostró una significativa actividad anti-incrustante, presentando una concentraci

  12. Antibacterial and antioxidant effects from seaweed, Sargassum wightii (Greville, 1848) against marine ornamental fish pathogens

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Karuppiah Nanthini devi; Thangavel Balasubramanian

    2014-01-01

    Objective: To screen seaweed Sargassum wightii (S. wightii) for bioactive natural substance against marine ornamental fish bacterial pathogens, and also study the antioxidant properties, brine shrimp toxicity effect.Methods:screened for antibacterial activity and purified by column chromatography, purified fractions obtained were tested for the activity. The 1st fraction of acetone extract showed maximum activity, this was again subjected for purification and obtained three sub-fractions also tested for the activity. Total phenols and flavonoid contents, reducing power, free radical scavenging activities (DPPH and H2O2) and brine shrimp toxicity were also studied using purified acetone extract followed by standard methods.Results:Crude extract was made using three solvents (acetone, ethanol and methanol) and ten. GC-MS results revealed two major compounds such as 24-methylene cholesterol (79.9%) and methyl oleate (30.3%) which presented in higher percentage in purified extract and had highest phenols and flavonoid contents, reducing power, free radical scavenging activities, and also showed less toxicity effect. In he present study, the purified extract of S. wightii had potential antibacterial activity against Aeromonas hydrophila [(22.25±0.35) mm] and minimum activity against Streptococcus sp. [(10.00±0.00) mm]. The purified extract of S. wightii also had potential total antioxidant activity of (3.87±0.04) µg at 100 µg/mL concentration and the lowest activity was exhibited (1.52±0.01) µg at 25 µg/mL. The purified acetone extract showed maximum activity against eight pathogens among Conclusions: The present study concluded that the brown seaweed, S. wightii has potential antimicrobial and antioxidant activities, which can be used in aquaculture industry for treated bacterial diseases in infected fishes.

  13. Selection of yeast strains for bioethanol production from UK seaweeds.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kostas, Emily T; White, Daniel A; Du, Chenyu; Cook, David J

    Macroalgae (seaweeds) are a promising feedstock for the production of third generation bioethanol, since they have high carbohydrate contents, contain little or no lignin and are available in abundance. However, seaweeds typically contain a more diverse array of monomeric sugars than are commonly present in feedstocks derived from lignocellulosic material which are currently used for bioethanol production. Hence, identification of a suitable fermentative microorganism that can utilise the principal sugars released from the hydrolysis of macroalgae remains a major objective. The present study used a phenotypic microarray technique to screen 24 different yeast strains for their ability to metabolise individual monosaccharides commonly found in seaweeds, as well as hydrolysates following an acid pre-treatment of five native UK seaweed species (Laminaria digitata, Fucus serratus, Chondrus crispus, Palmaria palmata and Ulva lactuca). Five strains of yeast (three Saccharomyces spp, one Pichia sp and one Candida sp) were selected and subsequently evaluated for bioethanol production during fermentation of the hydrolysates. Four out of the five selected strains converted these monomeric sugars into bioethanol, with the highest ethanol yield (13 g L(-1)) resulting from a fermentation using C. crispus hydrolysate with Saccharomyces cerevisiae YPS128. This study demonstrated the novel application of a phenotypic microarray technique to screen for yeast capable of metabolising sugars present in seaweed hydrolysates; however, metabolic activity did not always imply fermentative production of ethanol.

  14. Seaweed community response to a massive CO2 input

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sangil, Carlos; Clemente, Sabrina; Brito, Alberto; Rodríguez, Adriana; Balsalobre, Marc; Mendoza, José Carlos; Martínez, David; Hernández, José Carlos

    2016-09-01

    Changes in the structure of seaweed communities were examined following a massive CO2 input caused by a submarine eruption near the coast of El Hierro island (Canary Islands, Spain). The event lasted almost five months (October 2011-March 2012) and created a significant pH gradient. Specifically, we compared three different zones: highly affected with extreme low pH (6.7-7.3), affected with low pH (7.6-7.8), and unaffected ambient pH zone (∼8.1) according to the pH gradient generated by the predominate currents and waves in the south of the island. Studies were carried out before, during and after the CO2 input event in each zone. We found community-wide effects on seaweed communities during the eruption; these included changes in species abundance and changes in the diversity. However, changes in all these community traits were only evident in the highly affected zone, where there were major shifts in the seaweed community, with a replacement of Lobophora variegata by ephemeral seaweeds. Lobophora variegata dropped in cover from 87-94 to 27% while ephemeral seaweeds increased 6-10 to 29%. When the impact ended Lobophora variegata began to recover reaching a cover higher than 60%. In the moderate affected area the Lobophora variegata canopies maintained their integrity avoiding phase shifts to turfs. Here the only significant changes were the reduction of the cover of the crustose and geniculate coralline algae.

  15. Potential Bioactive Compounds from Seaweed for Diabetes Management

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yusrizam Sharifuddin

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available Diabetes mellitus is a group of metabolic disorders of the endocrine system characterised by hyperglycaemia. Type II diabetes mellitus (T2DM constitutes the majority of diabetes cases around the world and are due to unhealthy diet, sedentary lifestyle, as well as rise of obesity in the population, which warrants the search for new preventive and treatment strategies. Improved comprehension of T2DM pathophysiology provided various new agents and approaches against T2DM including via nutritional and lifestyle interventions. Seaweeds are rich in dietary fibres, unsaturated fatty acids, and polyphenolic compounds. Many of these seaweed compositions have been reported to be beneficial to human health including in managing diabetes. In this review, we discussed the diversity of seaweed composition and bioactive compounds which are potentially useful in preventing or managing T2DM by targeting various pharmacologically relevant routes including inhibition of enzymes such as α-glucosidase, α-amylase, lipase, aldose reductase, protein tyrosine phosphatase 1B (PTP1B and dipeptidyl-peptidase-4 (DPP-4. Other mechanisms of action identified, such as anti-inflammatory, induction of hepatic antioxidant enzymes’ activities, stimulation of glucose transport and incretin hormones release, as well as β-cell cytoprotection, were also discussed by taking into consideration numerous in vitro, in vivo, and human studies involving seaweed and seaweed-derived agents.

  16. Potential Bioactive Compounds from Seaweed for Diabetes Management.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sharifuddin, Yusrizam; Chin, Yao-Xian; Lim, Phaik-Eem; Phang, Siew-Moi

    2015-08-21

    Diabetes mellitus is a group of metabolic disorders of the endocrine system characterised by hyperglycaemia. Type II diabetes mellitus (T2DM) constitutes the majority of diabetes cases around the world and are due to unhealthy diet, sedentary lifestyle, as well as rise of obesity in the population, which warrants the search for new preventive and treatment strategies. Improved comprehension of T2DM pathophysiology provided various new agents and approaches against T2DM including via nutritional and lifestyle interventions. Seaweeds are rich in dietary fibres, unsaturated fatty acids, and polyphenolic compounds. Many of these seaweed compositions have been reported to be beneficial to human health including in managing diabetes. In this review, we discussed the diversity of seaweed composition and bioactive compounds which are potentially useful in preventing or managing T2DM by targeting various pharmacologically relevant routes including inhibition of enzymes such as α-glucosidase, α-amylase, lipase, aldose reductase, protein tyrosine phosphatase 1B (PTP1B) and dipeptidyl-peptidase-4 (DPP-4). Other mechanisms of action identified, such as anti-inflammatory, induction of hepatic antioxidant enzymes' activities, stimulation of glucose transport and incretin hormones release, as well as β-cell cytoprotection, were also discussed by taking into consideration numerous in vitro, in vivo, and human studies involving seaweed and seaweed-derived agents.

  17. Tropical seaweed beds are important habitats for mobile invertebrate epifauna

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tano, Stina; Eggertsen, M.; Wikström, S. A.; Berkström, C.; Buriyo, A. S.; Halling, C.

    2016-12-01

    Marine macrophyte habitats in temperate regions provide productive habitats for numerous organisms, with their abundant and diverse invertebrate epifaunal assemblages constituting important linkages between benthic primary production and higher trophic levels. While it is commonly also recognized that certain vegetated habitats in the tropics, such as seagrass meadows, can harbour diverse epifaunal assemblages and may constitute important feeding grounds to fish, little is known about the epifaunal assemblages associated with tropical seaweed beds. We investigated the abundance, biomass and taxon richness of the mobile epifaunal community (≥1 mm) of tropical East African seaweed beds, as well as the abundance of invertivorous fishes, and compared it with that of closely situated seagrass meadows, to establish the ecological role of seaweed beds as habitat for epifauna as well as potential feeding grounds for fish. The results showed that seaweed beds had a higher abundance of mobile epifauna (mean ± SD: 10,600 ± 6000 vs 3700 ± 2800 per m2) than seagrass meadows, as well as a higher invertebrate biomass (35.9 ± 46.8 vs 1.9 ± 2.1 g per m2) and taxon richness (32.7 ± 11.8 vs 19.1 ± 6.3 taxa per sample), despite having a lower macrophyte biomass. Additionally, the high abundance of invertivorous fishes found in seaweed beds indicates that they act as important feeding grounds to several fish species in the region.

  18. Photosynthetic recovery of desiccated intertidal seaweeds after rehydration

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    JI Yan; GAO Kunshan; TANAKA Jiro

    2005-01-01

    Intertidal seaweeds experience periodical desiccation and rehydration to different extents due to the tidal cycles and their vertical distributions. Their photosynthetic recovery process during the rehydration may show different patterns among the seaweeds from different zonations or depths at intertidal zone. In this study 12 species of seaweeds collected from the upper, middle, lower and sublittoral zones were examined. The relationship of the photosynthetic recovery to vertical distribution was assessed by comparing their patterns of photosynthetic and respiratory performances after rehydration following desiccation. Both the photosynthesis and dark respiration declined during emersion, showing certain degrees of recovery after re-immersion into seawater for most species, but the extents were markedly different from one species to the other. The species from upper intertidal zone after being rehydrated for 1 hour, following 2 hours of desiccation, achieved 100 % recovery of their initial physiological activity, while most of the lower or sublittoral species did not achieve full recovery. It is the ability to withstand desiccation stress (fast recovery during rehydration), but not that to avoid desiccation (water retain ing ability) that determines the distribution of intertidal seaweeds. Such physiological behavior during rehydration after desiccation reflects the adaptive strategy of intertidal seaweeds against desiccation and their capabilityof primary production in the process of rehydration.

  19. Repeated-batch operation of surface-aerated fermentor for bioethanol production from the hydrolysate of seaweed Sargassum sagamianum.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yeon, Ji-Hyeon; Lee, Sang-Eun; Choi, Woon Yong; Kang, Do Hyung; Lee, Hyoen-Yong; Jung, Kyung-Hwan

    2011-03-01

    In this study, we investigated the feasibility of sustainable long-term bioethanol production from the hydrolysate of a brown seaweed, Sargassum sagamianum. Because the hydrolysate was prepared as a liquid solution using a hightemperature liquefying system, a repeated-batch operation was utilized as the operational strategy for bioethanol production. Additionally, we used surface aeration to improve bioethanol production from the hydrolysate containing C5 monosaccharides such as xylose. In this study, the C5 monosaccharide-utilizable yeast strain Pichia stipitis was used for bioethanol production. Therefore, based on this repeated-batch flask culture, we designed a surface-aerated repeated-batch fermentor culture, in which the aeration was finely controlled at 100 ml/min and delivered into the headspace of a 2.5-l fermentor. When the medium was replaced every 48 h, bioethanol was continuously produced for 200 h under repeated-batch fermentor culture, where the level of bioethanol production was about 9~10 (g/l). Additionally, the bioethanol yield based on the reducing sugar was about 0.386, which was the average value throughout four consecutive cultures and was about 74.5% of the theoretical value. In addition, the bioethanol yield based on quantitative TLC analyses of glucose and xylose was about 0.431, which was the average value throughout four consecutive cultures and was about 84.3% of theoretical value. Consequently, throughout this repeated-batch operation, we demonstrated that it was actually feasible to produce bioethanol from the hydrolysate of seaweed S. sagamianum. In addition, the approach described here is a practical strategy for commercial bioethanol production from seaweed, particularly for finely controlling aeration through surface aeration.

  20. Improved methane production from brown algae under high salinity by fed-batch acclimation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miura, Toyokazu; Kita, Akihisa; Okamura, Yoshiko; Aki, Tsunehiro; Matsumura, Yukihiko; Tajima, Takahisa; Kato, Junichi; Nakashimada, Yutaka

    2015-01-01

    Here, a methanogenic microbial community was developed from marine sediments to have improved methane productivity from brown algae under high salinity. Fed-batch cultivation was conducted by adding dry seaweed at 1wt% total solid (TS) based on the liquid weight of the NaCl-containing sediment per round of cultivation. The methane production rate and level of salinity increased 8-fold and 1.6-fold, respectively, at the 10th round of cultivation. Moreover, the rate of methane production remained high, even at the 10th round of cultivation, with accumulation of salts derived from 10wt% TS of seaweed. The salinity of the 10th-round culture was equivalent to 5% NaCl. The improved methane production was attributed to enhanced acetoclastic methanogenesis because acetate became rapidly converted to methane during cultivation. The family Fusobacteriaceae and the genus Methanosaeta, the acetoclastic methanogen, predominated in bacteria and archaea, respectively, after the cultivation.

  1. Emergent Sources of Prebiotics: Seaweeds and Microalgae

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Jesus Raposo, Maria Filomena; de Morais, Alcina Maria Miranda Bernardo; de Morais, Rui Manuel Santos Costa

    2016-01-01

    In recent years, scientists have become aware that human microbiota, in general, and gut microbiota, in particular, play a major role in human health and diseases, such as obesity and diabetes, among others. A large number of evidence has come to light regarding the beneficial effects, either for the host or the gut microbiota, of some foods and food ingredients or biochemical compounds. Among these, the most promising seem to be polysaccharides (PS) or their derivatives, and they include the dietary fibers. Some of these PS can be found in seaweeds and microalgae, some being soluble fibers, such as alginates, fucoidans, carrageenans and exopolysaccharides, that are not fermented, at least not completely, by colonic microbiota. This review gives an overview of the importance of the dietary fibers, as well as the benefits of prebiotics, to human health. The potential of the PS from marine macro- and microalgae to act as prebiotics is discussed, and the different techniques to obtain oligosaccharides from PS are presented. The mechanisms of the benefits of fiber, in general, and the types and benefits of algal fibers in human health are highlighted. The findings of some recent studies that present the potential effects of prebiotics on animal models of algal biomass and their extracts, as well as oligo- and polysaccharides, are presented. In the future, the possibility of using prebiotics to modulate the microbiome, and, consequently, prevent certain human diseases is foreseen. PMID:26828501

  2. Emergent Sources of Prebiotics: Seaweeds and Microalgae

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maria Filomena de Jesus Raposo

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available In recent years, scientists have become aware that human microbiota, in general, and gut microbiota, in particular, play a major role in human health and diseases, such as obesity and diabetes, among others. A large number of evidence has come to light regarding the beneficial effects, either for the host or the gut microbiota, of some foods and food ingredients or biochemical compounds. Among these, the most promising seem to be polysaccharides (PS or their derivatives, and they include the dietary fibers. Some of these PS can be found in seaweeds and microalgae, some being soluble fibers, such as alginates, fucoidans, carrageenans and exopolysaccharides, that are not fermented, at least not completely, by colonic microbiota. This review gives an overview of the importance of the dietary fibers, as well as the benefits of prebiotics, to human health. The potential of the PS from marine macro- and microalgae to act as prebiotics is discussed, and the different techniques to obtain oligosaccharides from PS are presented. The mechanisms of the benefits of fiber, in general, and the types and benefits of algal fibers in human health are highlighted. The findings of some recent studies that present the potential effects of prebiotics on animal models of algal biomass and their extracts, as well as oligo- and polysaccharides, are presented. In the future, the possibility of using prebiotics to modulate the microbiome, and, consequently, prevent certain human diseases is foreseen.

  3. Emergent Sources of Prebiotics: Seaweeds and Microalgae.

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Jesus Raposo, Maria Filomena; de Morais, Alcina Maria Miranda Bernardo; de Morais, Rui Manuel Santos Costa

    2016-01-28

    In recent years, scientists have become aware that human microbiota, in general, and gut microbiota, in particular, play a major role in human health and diseases, such as obesity and diabetes, among others. A large number of evidence has come to light regarding the beneficial effects, either for the host or the gut microbiota, of some foods and food ingredients or biochemical compounds. Among these, the most promising seem to be polysaccharides (PS) or their derivatives, and they include the dietary fibers. Some of these PS can be found in seaweeds and microalgae, some being soluble fibers, such as alginates, fucoidans, carrageenans and exopolysaccharides, that are not fermented, at least not completely, by colonic microbiota. This review gives an overview of the importance of the dietary fibers, as well as the benefits of prebiotics, to human health. The potential of the PS from marine macro- and microalgae to act as prebiotics is discussed, and the different techniques to obtain oligosaccharides from PS are presented. The mechanisms of the benefits of fiber, in general, and the types and benefits of algal fibers in human health are highlighted. The findings of some recent studies that present the potential effects of prebiotics on animal models of algal biomass and their extracts, as well as oligo- and polysaccharides, are presented. In the future, the possibility of using prebiotics to modulate the microbiome, and, consequently, prevent certain human diseases is foreseen.

  4. Development of an eco-protocol for seaweed chlorophylls extraction and possible applications in dye sensitized solar cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Armeli Minicante, S.; Ambrosi, E.; Back, M.; Barichello, J.; Cattaruzza, E.; Gonella, F.; Scantamburlo, E.; Trave, E.

    2016-07-01

    Seaweeds are a reserve of natural dyes (chlorophylls a, b and c), characterized by low cost and easy supply, without potential environmental load in terms of land subtraction, and also complying with the requirements of an efficient waste management policy. In particular, the brown seaweed Undaria pinnatifida is a species largely present in the Venice Lagoon area, and for it a removal strategy is actually mandatory. In this paper, we set-up an eco-protocol for the best extraction and preparation procedures of the pigment, with the aim of finding an easy and affordable method for chlorophyll c extraction, exploring at the same time the possibility of using these algae within local sustainable management integrated strategies, among which the possible use of chlorophylls as a dye source in dye sensitized solar cells (DSSCs) is investigated. Experimental results suggest that the developed protocols are useful to optimize the chlorophyll c extraction, as shown by optical absorption spectroscopy measurements. The DSSCs built with the chlorophyll extracted by the proposed eco-protocol exhibit solar energy conversion efficiencies are similar to those obtained following extraction protocols with larger environmental impacts.

  5. Seaweeds and halophytes to remove carbon from the atmosphere

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Glenn, E.P.; Kent, K.J.; Thompson, T.L.; Frye, R.J. (Arizona Univ., Tucson, AZ (USA). Environmental Research Lab.)

    1991-02-01

    The utility industry and other interested parties have investigated strategies to mitigate the buildup of atmospheric CO{sub 2}. One option that has been considered is the planting of trees on a massive scale to absorb carbon through photosynthesis. A dilemma of using tree plantations, however, is that they might occupy land that will be needed for food production or other needs for an expected doubling of human population in the tropical regions. We evaluated seaweeds and salt-tolerant terrestrial plants (halophytes) to be grown on the coastal shelves and salt deserts of the world as possible alternatives to tree plantations. An estimated 1.3 {times} 10{sup 6} km{sup 2} of continental shelf and 1.3 {times} 10{sup 6} km{sup 2} of salt desert may be usable for seaweed and halophyte plantations. The production rates of managed seaweed and halophyte plantings are similar to managed tree plantations. Seaweeds and halophytes could conceivably absorb 10--20% of annual fossil fuel carbon emissions through biomass production, similar to estimates made for tree plantations. Present costs of halophyte biomass production are similar to costs of tree biomass production, whereas seaweed biomass is much more expensive to produce using existing technologies. Storage of seaweed carbon might be accomplished by allowing it to enter the sediment detritus chain whereas halophyte carbon might be sequestered in the soil, or used as biomass fuel. As has been concluded for reforestation, these saline biomass crops could at best help delay rather than solve the carbon dioxide build-up problem. 1 fig., 13 tabs.

  6. Differences in macrofaunal and seagrass assemblages in seagrass beds with and without seaweed farms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eklöf, J. S.; de la Torre Castro, M.; Adelsköld, L.; Jiddawi, N. S.; Kautsky, N.

    2005-05-01

    Since it was introduced to Zanzibar (Tanzania), seaweed farming has significantly contributed to local, socio-economic development. However, several investigations have shown impacts on the coastal environment near where the farms are located. As many seaweed farms are located on seagrass beds, there is a risk that seaweed farming could affect seagrass beds, and thereby disturb important ecosystem functions and the flow of ecological goods and services. This study compares characteristics of macrophytes (focusing on seagrasses), benthic macrofauna and sediment in seagrass beds, with and without seaweed farms, and a sand bank without vegetation in Chwaka Bay, Zanzibar. The results showed that seagrass beds underneath seaweed farms generally had less seagrass and macroalgae, finer sediment, lower sediment organic matter content and a reduced abundance and biomass of macrofauna, than seagrass beds without seaweed farms. Further, the macrofaunal community structure in seaweed farms showed more similarities to that on the sand bank than in the unfarmed seagrass beds. Most of the dissimilarity was attributable to Lucinidae (suspension-feeding bivalves), which were almost absent in the seaweed farms, resulting in the large difference in biomass between the seaweed farms and the unfarmed seagrass beds. When interpreted together with information from farmers, the observed pattern is believed to be caused by the seaweed farming activities. This indicates that more research is needed to establish the effects of seaweed farming on seagrass beds, and that more attention should be given to the location of farms and the choice of farming methods.

  7. Seaweeds from the Portuguese coast: A potential food resource?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Soares, C.; Machado, S.; Vieira, E. F.; Morais, S.; Teles, M. T.; Correia, M.; Carvalho, A.; Domingues, V. F.; Ramalhosa, M. J.; Delerue-Matos, C.; Antunes, F.

    2017-09-01

    The Portuguese coast presents a large amount of potentially edible seaweeds that are underexploited. The identification of different macroalgae species and their availability in the northern and central coast of the continental territory was assessed. The nutritional value of seaweeds is discussed based on a literature review (when available) focused on data for species collected in Portugal with the aim to define the most important nutritional parameters that should be characterized in the samples. Possible health concerns related with the presence of contaminants are also considered.

  8. Father Brown, Selected sories

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Chesterton, G.K.

    2005-01-01

    Father Brown, a small, round Catholic priest with a remarkable understanding of the criminal mind, is one of literature's most unusual and endearing detectives, able to solve the strangest crimes in a most fascinating manner. This collection draws from all five Father Brown books, and within their r

  9. Intestinal Absorption of Fucoidan Extracted from the Brown Seaweed, Cladosiphon okamuranus

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Takeaki Nagamine

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this study was to examine the absorption of fucoidan through the intestinal tract. Fucoidan (0.1, 0.5, 1.0, 1.5 and 2.0 mg/mL was added to Transwell inserts containing Caco-2 cells. The transport of fucoidan across Caco-2 cells increased in a dose-dependent manner up to 1.0 mg/mL. It reached a maximum after 1 h and then rapidly decreased. In another experiment, rats were fed standard chow containing 2% fucoidan for one or two weeks. Immunohistochemical staining revealed that fucoidan accumulated in jejunal epithelial cells, mononuclear cells in the jejunal lamina propria and sinusoidal non-parenchymal cells in the liver. Since we previously speculated that nitrosamine may enhance the intestinal absorption of fucoidan, its absorption was estimated in rats administered N-butyl-N-(4-hydroxybutyl nitrosamine (BBN in their drinking water. Rats were fed 0.2% fucoidan chow (BBN + 0.2% fucoidan rats, 2% fucoidan chow (BBN + 2% fucoidan rats and standard chow for eight weeks. The uptake of fucoidan through the intestinal tract seemed to be low, but was measurable by our ELISA method. Fucoidan-positive cells were abundant in the small intestinal mucosa of BBN + 2% fucoidan rats. Most fucoidan-positive cells also stained positive for ED1, suggesting that fucoidan was incorporated into intestinal macrophages. The uptake of fucoidan by Kupffer cells was observed in the livers of BBN + 2% fucoidan rats. In conclusion, the absorption of fucoidan through the small intestine was demonstrated both in vivo and in vitro.

  10. In-vitro anticoagulant activity of fucoidan derivatives from brown seaweed Laminaria japonica

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Jing; Zhang, Quanbin; Zhang, Zhongshan; Hou, Yun; Zhang, Hong

    2011-05-01

    Fucoidan, a group of sulfated heteropolysaccharides, was extracted from Laminaria japonica, an important economic alga species in China. The anticoagulant activity of fucoidan and its derivatives (including sulfated, phosphorylated, and aminated fucoidan) was examined using in-vitro anticoagulant systems. The correlation between chemical variations within the fucoidan group and anticoagulant activity was determined. The in-vitro anticoagulant properties of fucoidan and its derivatives were determined by measuring activated partial thromboplastin time (APTT), prothrombin time (PT), and thrombin time (TT). The results indicate anticoagulant activity in all samples using APTT and TT assays; however, only the fucoidan derivatives affected the PT assay. Thus, the fucoidan derivatives were able to inhibit both intrinsic and extrinsic blood coagulants. Fucoidan (FPS) and its derivatives presented better anticoagulant activity than low molecular weight fucoidan (DFPS) and its derivatives, suggesting that molecular weight and proper conformation are contributing factors for anticoagulant activity of polysaccharides. Amino groups have a positive charge and can thus change the charge density of fucoidan. Accordingly, among the tested samples, aminated fucoidan (NF) was the most active reflecting the importance of charge density for anticoagulant activity. Available data obtained using in-vitro models suggest that the sulfate content, sulfate/total-sugar ratio, molecular weight, and the substituted group of fucoidan are important factors for anticoagulant activity but that the influence of sulfate, phosphate and amino groups on anticoagulant activity was different.

  11. Intestinal absorption of fucoidan extracted from the brown seaweed, Cladosiphon okamuranus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nagamine, Takeaki; Nakazato, Kyoumi; Tomioka, Satoru; Iha, Masahiko; Nakajima, Katsuyuki

    2014-12-25

    The aim of this study was to examine the absorption of fucoidan through the intestinal tract. Fucoidan (0.1, 0.5, 1.0, 1.5 and 2.0 mg/mL) was added to Transwell inserts containing Caco-2 cells. The transport of fucoidan across Caco-2 cells increased in a dose-dependent manner up to 1.0 mg/mL. It reached a maximum after 1 h and then rapidly decreased. In another experiment, rats were fed standard chow containing 2% fucoidan for one or two weeks. Immunohistochemical staining revealed that fucoidan accumulated in jejunal epithelial cells, mononuclear cells in the jejunal lamina propria and sinusoidal non-parenchymal cells in the liver. Since we previously speculated that nitrosamine may enhance the intestinal absorption of fucoidan, its absorption was estimated in rats administered N-butyl-N-(4-hydroxybutyl) nitrosamine (BBN) in their drinking water. Rats were fed 0.2% fucoidan chow (BBN + 0.2% fucoidan rats), 2% fucoidan chow (BBN + 2% fucoidan rats) and standard chow for eight weeks. The uptake of fucoidan through the intestinal tract seemed to be low, but was measurable by our ELISA method. Fucoidan-positive cells were abundant in the small intestinal mucosa of BBN + 2% fucoidan rats. Most fucoidan-positive cells also stained positive for ED1, suggesting that fucoidan was incorporated into intestinal macrophages. The uptake of fucoidan by Kupffer cells was observed in the livers of BBN + 2% fucoidan rats. In conclusion, the absorption of fucoidan through the small intestine was demonstrated both in vivo and in vitro.

  12. Intestinal Absorption of Fucoidan Extracted from the Brown Seaweed, Cladosiphon okamuranus

    OpenAIRE

    Takeaki Nagamine; Kyoumi Nakazato; Satoru Tomioka; Masahiko Iha; Katsuyuki Nakajima

    2014-01-01

    The aim of this study was to examine the absorption of fucoidan through the intestinal tract. Fucoidan (0.1, 0.5, 1.0, 1.5 and 2.0 mg/mL) was added to Transwell inserts containing Caco-2 cells. The transport of fucoidan across Caco-2 cells increased in a dose-dependent manner up to 1.0 mg/mL. It reached a maximum after 1 h and then rapidly decreased. In another experiment, rats were fed standard chow containing 2% fucoidan for one or two weeks. Immunohistochemical staining revealed that fucoi...

  13. Heterofucans from the brown seaweed Canistrocarpus cervicornis with anticoagulant and antioxidant activities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Camara, Rafael Barros Gomes; Costa, Leandro Silva; Fidelis, Gabriel Pereira; Nobre, Leonardo Thiago Duarte Barreto; Dantas-Santos, Nednaldo; Cordeiro, Sara Lima; Costa, Mariana Santana Santos Pereira; Alves, Luciana Guimaraes; Rocha, Hugo Alexandre Oliveira

    2011-01-24

    Fucan is a term used to denominate a family of sulfated polysaccharides rich in sulfated l-fucose. We extracted six fucans from Canistrocarpus cervicornis by proteolytic digestion followed by sequential acetone precipitation. These heterofucans are composed mainly of fucose, glucuronic acid, galactose and sulfate. No polysaccharide was capable of prolonging prothrombin time (PT) at the concentration assayed. However, all polysaccharides prolonged activated partial thromboplastin time (aPTT). Four sulfated polysaccharides (CC-0.3/CC-0.5/CC-0.7/CC-1.0) doubled aPTT with only 0.1 mg/mL of plasma, only 1.25-fold less than Clexane, a commercial low molecular weight heparin. Heterofucans exhibited total antioxidant capacity, low hydroxyl radical scavenging activity, good superoxide radical scavenging efficiency (except CC-1.0), and excellent ferrous chelating ability (except CC-0.3). These results clearly indicate the beneficial effect of C. cervicornis polysaccharides as anticoagulants and antioxidants. Further purification steps and additional studies on structural features as well as in vivo experiments are needed to test the viability of their use as therapeutic agents.

  14. Heterofucans from the Brown Seaweed Canistrocarpus cervicornis with Anticoagulant and Antioxidant Activities

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hugo Alexandre Oliveira Rocha

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Fucan is a term used to denominate a family of sulfated polysaccharides rich in sulfated L-fucose. We extracted six fucans from Canistrocarpus cervicornis by proteolytic digestion followed by sequential acetone precipitation. These heterofucans are composed mainly of fucose, glucuronic acid, galactose and sulfate. No polysaccharide was capable of prolonging prothrombin time (PT at the concentration assayed. However, all polysaccharides prolonged activated partial thromboplastin time (aPTT. Four sulfated polysaccharides (CC-0.3/CC-0.5/CC-0.7/CC-1.0 doubled aPTT with only 0.1 mg/mL of plasma, only 1.25-fold less than Clexane®, a commercial low molecular weight heparin. Heterofucans exhibited total antioxidant capacity, low hydroxyl radical scavenging activity, good superoxide radical scavenging efficiency (except CC-1.0, and excellent ferrous chelating ability (except CC-0.3. These results clearly indicate the beneficial effect of C. cervicornis polysaccharides as anticoagulants and antioxidants. Further purification steps and additional studies on structural features as well as in vivo experiments are needed to test the viability of their use as therapeutic agents.

  15. Glacial refugia and recolonization pathways in the brown seaweed Fucus serratus

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hoarau, G.; Coyer, J. A.; Veldsink, J. H.; Stam, W. T.; Olsen, J. L.

    2007-01-01

    The last glacial maximum (20 000-18 000 years ago) dramatically affected extant distributions of virtually all northern European biota. Locations of refugia and postglacial recolonization pathways were examined in Fucus serratus (Heterokontophyta; Fucaceae) using a highly variable intergenic spacer

  16. The renal effects of alginates isolated from brown seaweed Sargassum vulgare.

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Paula Alves Sousa, Alessandra; Barbosa, Paulo Sergio Ferreira; Torres, Márcia Rocha; Martins, Alice Maria Costa; Martins, René Duarte; de Sousa Alves, Renata; de Sousa, Daniel Freire; Alves, Claudênio Diógenes; Costa-Lotufo, Letícia Veras; Monteiro, Helena Serra Azul

    2008-04-01

    Alginates isolated from Sargassum vulgare, present a strong antitumor activity, associated with kidney reversible damage, as analysed by histopathology of treated animals. In the present study, the renal alteration mechanisms of S. vulgare alginates were investigated using the isolated perfused rat kidney and the isolated perfused rat mesenteric blood vessel methods. The results showed that the effects of Sargassum vulgare low viscosity (SVLV) alginate were more potent than those of Sargassum vulgare high viscosity (SVHV) alginate in the isolated rat kidney. The SVLV alginate caused considerable changes in renal physiology, as shown by an increase in parameters such as perfusion pressure, renal vascular resistance, glomerular filtration rate, urinary flow and sodium, potassium and chloride excretion and by reduction of chloride tubular transport. The effects of SVHV were weaker than those of SVLV. The effects of SVLV on kidney could be related to direct vascular action as demonstrated with SVLV alginate on mesenteric blood vessels. In conclusion, the Sargassum vulgare alginate altered the renal function parameters evaluated. S. vulgare low viscosity alginate renal effects were more potent than S. vulgare high viscosity alginate. It is suggested that physicochemical differences between SVHV and SVLV could explain the differences found in the results.

  17. Safety of Malaysian marine endophytic fungal extract S2 from a brown seaweed Turbinaria conoides

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Siti Alwani Ariffin

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available Objective: To evaluate the in vivo acute toxicity and antioxidant activity of the marine endophytic fungus extract S2 isolated from Turbinaria conoides. Methods: Two doses (100 mg/kg and 400 mg/kg of the S2 extract were administered to rats orally for acute toxicity and antioxidant test. The body weight, relative weight of six organs, haematological, biochemical and antioxidant properties were investigated on Day 14. Results: A single oral dose treatment did not cause any mortality or observable adverse effects in rats. No significant variations in the body and organ weights between the control and the treated groups were observed. Heamatological analysis and clinical blood chemistry also did not reveal any toxic effects of the extract. The total white blood cell count and haemoglobin levels were increased. The levels of total serum cholesterol in males treated with 100 and 400 mg/kg were significantly (P<0.05 decreased (1.28 and 1.34 mmol/L respectively compared to control (1.55 mmol/L rats. Pathologically, neither gross abnormalities nor histopathological changes were observed. This study showed strong evidence of the non-toxic effects of S2 extract. Furthermore the extract exhibited significant (P<0.05 antioxidant activity through increased levels of superoxide dismutase and glutathione peroxidase enzymes in serum, liver and kidney. Conclusions: The research findings from the present study showed the potential of marine natural products particularly in Malaysia as a source of bioactive compounds. Marine endophytic fungi as a potential source of anticancer drugs with great potential as they are potent yet safe, thus deserving further extensive investigation.

  18. Safety of Malaysian marine endophytic fungal extract S2 from a brown seaweed Turbinaria conoides

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Siti Alwani Ariffin; Kalavathy Ramasamy; Paul Davis; Vasudevan Mani; Mahmood Ameen Abdulla

    2014-01-01

    Objective: To evaluate the in vivo acute toxicity and antioxidant activity of the marine endophytic fungus extract S2 isolated from Turbinaria conoides.Methods:Two doses (100 mg/kg and 400 mg/kg) of the S2 extract were administered to rats orally for acute toxicity and antioxidant test. The body weight, relative weight of six organs, haematological, biochemical and antioxidant properties were investigated on Day 14.Results:A single oral dose treatment did not cause any mortality or observable adverse effects in rats. No significant variations in the body and organ weights between the control and the treated groups were observed. Heamatological analysis and clinical blood chemistry also did not reveal any toxic effects of the extract. The total white blood cell count and haemoglobin levels were increased. The levels of total serum cholesterol in males treated with 100 and 400 mg/kg were significantly (P<0.05) decreased (1.28 and 1.34 mmol/L respectively) compared to control (1.55 mmol/L rats. Pathologically, neither gross abnormalities nor histopathological changes were observed This study showed strong evidence of the non-toxic effects of S2 extract. Furthermore the extract exhibited significant (P<0.05) antioxidant activity through increased levels of superoxide dismutase and glutathione peroxidase enzymes in serum, liver and kidney.Conclusions:The research findings from the present study showed the potential of marine natural products particularly in Malaysia as a source of bioactive compounds. Marine endophytic fungi as a potential source of anticancer drugs with great potential as they are potent yet safe thus deserving further extensive investigation.

  19. Safety of Malaysian marine endophytic fungal extract S2 from a brown seaweed Turbinaria conoides

    OpenAIRE

    Siti Alwani Ariffin; Kalavathy Ramasamy; Paul Davis; Vasudevan Mani; Mahmood Ameen Abdulla

    2014-01-01

    Objective: To evaluate the in vivo acute toxicity and antioxidant activity of the marine endophytic fungus extract S2 isolated from Turbinaria conoides. Methods: Two doses (100 mg/kg and 400 mg/kg) of the S2 extract were administered to rats orally for acute toxicity and antioxidant test. The body weight, relative weight of six organs, haematological, biochemical and antioxidant properties were investigated on Day 14. Results: A single oral dose treatment did not cause any ...

  20. Glacial refugia and recolonization pathways in the brown seaweed Fucus serratus

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hoarau, G.G.; Coyer, J.A.; Veldsink, J.H.; Stam, W.T.; Olsen, J.L.

    The last glacial maximum (20 000-18 000 years ago) dramatically affected extant distributions of virtually all northern European biota. Locations of refugia and postglacial recolonization pathways were examined in Fucus serratus (Heterokontophyta; Fucaceae) using a highly variable intergenic spacer

  1. Compositional variations of brown seaweeds Laminaria digitata and Saccharina latissima in Danish waters

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Manns, Dirk Martin; Nielsen, Mette Møller; Bruhn, Annette

    2017-01-01

    . digitata from Kattegat peaked in October with 37.0% by dry weight compared to 22.6% by dry weight in wild S. latissima (Kattegat) and were accompanied by lower ash contents (18.5% w/w in L. digitata versus 26.5% w/w in S. latissima). Alginate contents were almost constant throughout the year...

  2. Methodology for quantitative determination of the carbohydrate composition of brown seaweeds (Laminariaceae)

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Manns, Dirk; Deutschle, A. L.; Saake, B.

    2014-01-01

    of 72% (w/w) H2SO4 + 4% (w/w) H2SO4 performed best, but cellulase treatment released more glucose than acid treatments. HPAEC with pulsed amperometric detection (PAD) allowed quantification of all present neutral sugars and the sugar alcohol mannitol. Furthermore, the use of guluronic, glucuronic......, and galacturonic acid as standards enabled quantification of the uronic acids. A complete map of amino acids, fatty compounds, minerals, and ash was also achieved. L. digitata and S. latissima harvested in Denmark April (Baltic Sea, 2012) were dominated by alginic acid and ash (each ∼30% by weight (w/w) of the dry...

  3. In-vitro anticoagulant activity of fucoidan derivatives from brown seaweed Laminaria japonica

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    WANG Jing; ZHANG Quanbin; ZHANG Zhongshan; HOU Yun; ZHANG Hong

    2011-01-01

    Fucoidan, a group of sulfated heteropolysaccharides, was extracted from Laminariajaponica,an important economic alga species in China. The anticoagulant activity of fucoidan and its derivatives (including sulfated, phosphorylated, and aminated fucoidan) was examined using in-vitro anticoagulant systems. The correlation between chemical variations within the fucoidan group and anticoagulant activity was determined. The in-vitro anticoagulant properties of fucoidan and its derivatives were determined by measuring activated partial thromboplastin time (APTT), prothrombin time (PT), and thrombin time (TT).The results indicate anticoagulant activity in all samples using APTT and TT assays; however, only the fucoidan derivatives affected the PT assay. Thus, the fucoidan derivatives were able to inhibit both intrinsic and extrinsic blood coagulants. Fucoidan (FPS) and its derivatives presented better anticoagulant activity than low molecular weight fucoidan (DFPS) and its derivatives, suggesting that molecular weight and proper conformation are contributing factors for anticoagulant activity of polysaccharides. Amino groups have a positive charge and can thus change the charge density of fucoidan. Accordingly, among the tested samples, aminated fucoidan (NF) was the most active reflecting the importance of charge density for anticoagulant activity. Available data obtained using in-vitro models suggest that the sulfate content,sulfate/total-sugar ratio, molecular weight, and the substituted group of fucoidan are important factors for anticoagulant activity but that the influence of sulfate, phosphate and amino groups on anticoagulant activity was different.

  4. TEMPERATURE REQUIREMENTS AND BIOGEOGRAPHY OF ANTARCTIC, ARCTIC AND AMPHIEQUATORIAL SEAWEEDS

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    WIENCKE, C; BARTSCH, [No Value; BISCHOFF, B; PETERS, AF; BREEMAN, AM

    1994-01-01

    The temperature requirements for growth and survival of cold water seaweeds from both Hemispheres are compared and discussed in relation to the climatic history of the various regions and in relation to the origin of amphiequatorial distribution patterns. Endemic Antarctic species are most strongly

  5. Seaweed utilization for integrated bioenergy and fish feed production

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Seghetta, Michele

    2016-01-01

    Linear production systems are not environmentally sustainable since they produce waste at a higher rate than nature is able to absorb. Creation of closed-loop production processes aiming at generating zero-waste is the foundation for a circular economy. Offshore seaweed cultivation can play a key...

  6. Seaweeds of the Spermonde Archipelago, SW Sulawesi, Indonesia

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Verheij, E.; Prud’homme van Reine, W.F.

    1993-01-01

    Seaweeds are important components of tropical reef systems. The present paper deals with the Chlorophyta, Phaeophyta and noncoralline Rhodophyta collected by the first author in the Spermonde Archipelago, SW Sulawesi, Indonesia, during the Buginesia-III project (November 1988-November 1990). Additio

  7. Consequences and Challenges of Tourism and Seaweed Farming ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Keywords: Zanzibar, coastal livelihoods, seaweed farming, tourism. Abstract ... This paper focuses on local responses to these two external drivers of change, from the ... Longitudinal social anthropological surveys using interactive methods were used to reveal the ... and cultural values for its inhabitants, and for people who ...

  8. Extraction, Purification, and NMR Analysis of Terpenes from Brown Algae.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gaysinski, Marc; Ortalo-Magné, Annick; Thomas, Olivier P; Culioli, Gérald

    2015-01-01

    Algal terpenes constitute a wide and well-documented group of marine natural products with structures differing from their terrestrial plant biosynthetic analogues. Amongst macroalgae, brown seaweeds are considered as one of the richest source of biologically and ecologically relevant terpenoids. These metabolites, mostly encountered in algae of the class Phaeophyceae, are mainly diterpenes and meroditerpenes (metabolites of mixed biogenesis characterized by a toluquinol or a toluquinone nucleus linked to a diterpene moiety).In this chapter, we describe analytical processes commonly employed for the isolation and structural characterization of the main terpenoid constituents obtained from organic extracts of brown algae. The successive steps include (1) extraction of lipidic content from algal samples; (2) purification of terpenes by column chromatography and semi-preparative high-performance liquid chromatography; and (3) structure elucidation of the isolated terpenes by means of 1D and 2D nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR). More precisely, we propose a representative methodology which allows the isolation and structural determination of the monocyclic meroditerpene methoxybifurcarenone (MBFC) from the Mediterranean brown alga Cystoseira amentacea var. stricta. This methodology has a large field of applications and can then be extended to terpenes isolated from other species of the family Sargassaceae.

  9. Nutrient removal from Chinese coastal waters by large-scale seaweed aquaculture

    KAUST Repository

    Xiao, Xi

    2017-04-21

    China is facing intense coastal eutrophication. Large-scale seaweed aquaculture in China is popular, now accounting for over 2/3\\'s of global production. Here, we estimate the nutrient removal capability of large-scale Chinese seaweed farms to determine its significance in mitigating eutrophication. We combined estimates of yield and nutrient concentration of Chinese seaweed aquaculture to quantify that one hectare of seaweed aquaculture removes the equivalent nutrient inputs entering 17.8 ha for nitrogen and 126.7 ha for phosphorus of Chinese coastal waters, respectively. Chinese seaweed aquaculture annually removes approximately 75,000 t nitrogen and 9,500 t phosphorus. Whereas removal of the total N inputs to Chinese coastal waters requires a seaweed farming area 17 times larger than the extant area, one and a half times more of the seaweed area would be able to remove close to 100% of the P inputs. With the current growth rate of seaweed aquaculture, we project this industry will remove 100% of the current phosphorus inputs to Chinese coastal waters by 2026. Hence, seaweed aquaculture already plays a hitherto unrealized role in mitigating coastal eutrophication, a role that may be greatly expanded with future growth of seaweed aquaculture.

  10. Pond culture of seaweed Sargassum hemiphyllum in southern China

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    YU Zonghe; HU Chaoqun; SUN Hongyan; LI Haipeng; PENG Pengfei

    2013-01-01

    The seaweed Sargassum hemiphyllum is widely distributed throughout the coastal waters of Asia and has high commercial value.In recent years,its natural biomass has declined due to over-exploitation and environmental pollution.To seek for a feasible way to culture this seaweed efficiently,we designed a simple long-line system in a shrimp pond for the culture during winter,and the growth and nutritional composition of the seaweed were examined.Results show that the culture system was durable and flexible allowing S.hemiphyllum to grow vertically offthe muddy bottom of the pond.Although the length of pondcultured S.hemiphyllum was inhibited by water depth,the weight-specific growth rate ((1.65±0.17)%/d)was nearly three times higher than that of wild plants ((0.62±0.19)%/d).The crude protein (6.92%±0.88%)and ash content (21.52%±0.07%) of the pond-cultured seaweed were significantly lower than those of the wild plants (9.38%±0.43% and 26.93%±0.07%,respectively); however,crude fat (1.01%±0.04%) was significantly higher than that of the wild plants (0.87%±0.02%).In addition,the nutritional composition of both pond-cultured and wild S.hemiphyllum was comparable to or even higher than those of other common seaweeds being used as food and/or aquaculture fodder.Future studies shall be focused on the impact of environmental parameters on its growth and nutritional composition.

  11. Pond culture of seaweed Sargassum hemiphyllum in southern China

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, Zonghe; Hu, Chaoqun; Sun, Hongyan; Li, Haipeng; Peng, Pengfei

    2013-03-01

    The seaweed Sargassum hemiphyllum is widely distributed throughout the coastal waters of Asia and has high commercial value. In recent years, its natural biomass has declined due to over-exploitation and environmental pollution. To seek for a feasible way to culture this seaweed efficiently, we designed a simple long-line system in a shrimp pond for the culture during winter, and the growth and nutritional composition of the seaweed were examined. Results show that the culture system was durable and flexible allowing S. hemiphyllum to grow vertically off the muddy bottom of the pond. Although the length of pondcultured S. hemiphyllum was inhibited by water depth, the weight-specific growth rate ((1.65±0.17)%/d) was nearly three times higher than that of wild plants ((0.62±0.19)%/d). The crude protein (6.92%±0.88%) and ash content (21.52%±0.07%) of the pond-cultured seaweed were significantly lower than those of the wild plants (9.38%±0.43% and 26.93%±0.07%, respectively); however, crude fat (1.01%±0.04%) was significantly higher than that of the wild plants (0.87%±0.02%). In addition, the nutritional composition of both pond-cultured and wild S. hemiphyllum was comparable to or even higher than those of other common seaweeds being used as food and/or aquaculture fodder. Future studies shall be focused on the impact of environmental parameters on its growth and nutritional composition.

  12. Ultrastructure of acidic polysaccharides from the cell walls of brown algae.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Andrade, Leonardo R; Salgado, Leonardo T; Farina, Marcos; Pereira, Mariana S; Mourão, Paulo A S; Amado Filho, Gilberto M

    2004-03-01

    We have studied the ultrastructure of acidic polysaccharides from the cell walls of brown algae using a variety of electron microscopy techniques. Polysaccharides from Padina gymnospora present self assembled structures, forming trabecular patterns. Purified fractions constituted by alginic acid and sulfated fucan also form well-organized ultrastructures, but the pattern of organization varies depending on the polysaccharide species. Alginic acid presents sponge-like structures. Sulfated fucan exhibits particles with polygonal forms with a polycrystalline structure. These particles are in fact constituted by sulfated fucan molecules since they are recognized by a lectin specific for alpha-l-fucosyl residues. X-ray microanalysis reveal that S is a constituent element, as expected for sulfated groups. Finally, an exhaustive purified sulfated fucan shows the same ultrastructure formed by polygonal forms. Furthermore, elemental analyses of acidic polysaccharides indicate that they retain Zn, when algae were collected from a contaminated area. This observation is supported by direct quantification of heavy metal in the biomass and also in the solubilized polysaccharides compared with the algae from a non-contaminated site. We conclude that these molecules have specific ultrastructure and elemental composition; and act as metal binder for the nucleation and precipitation of heavy metals when the algae are exposed to a metal contaminated environment.

  13. Oligomannuronates from Seaweeds as Renewable Sources for the Development of Green Surfactants

    Science.gov (United States)

    Benvegnu, Thierry; Sassi, Jean-François

    The development of surfactants based on natural renewable resources is a concept that is gaining recognition in detergents, cosmetics, and green chemistry. This new class of biodegradable and biocompatible products is a response to the increasing consumer demand for products that are both "greener", milder, and more efficient. In order to achieve these objectives, it is necessary to use renewable low-cost biomass that is available in large quantities and to design molecular structures through green processes that show improved performance, favorable ecotoxicological properties and reduced environmental impact. Within this context, marine algae represent a rich source of complex polysaccharides and oligosaccharides with innovative structures and functional properties that may find applications as starting materials for the development of green surfactants or cosmetic actives. Thus, we have developed original surfactants based on mannuronate moieties derived from alginates (cell-wall polyuronic acids from brown seaweeds) and fatty hydrocarbon chains derived from vegetable resources. Controlled chemical and/or enzymatic depolymerizations of the algal polysaccharides give saturated and/or unsaturated functional oligomannuronates. Clean chemical processes allow the efficient transformation of the oligomers into neutral or anionic amphiphilic molecules. These materials represent a new class of surface-active agents with promising foaming/emulsifying properties.

  14. Polyphenols from marine brown algae target radiotherapy-coordinated EMT and stemness-maintenance in residual pancreatic cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aravindan, Sheeja; Ramraj, Satish Kumar; Somasundaram, Somasundaram T; Herman, Terence S; Aravindan, Natarajan

    2015-09-22

    Therapy-associated onset of stemness-maintenance in surviving tumor-cells dictates tumor relapse/recurrence. Recently, we recognized the anti-pancreatic cancer (PC) potential of seaweed polyphenol manifolds and narrowed down three superior drug-deliverables that could serve as adjuvants and benefit PC cure. Utilizing the PC- cancer stem cells (PC-CSCs) grown ex vivo and mouse model of residual-PC, we investigated the benefits of seaweed polyphenols in regulating stemness-maintenance. ALDH(+)CD44(+)CD24(+) PC-CSCs from Panc-1, Panc-3.27, MiaPaCa-2, or BxPC-3 cells-derived xenografts grown ex vivo were either mock-irradiated, exposed to fractionated irradiation (FIR, 2Gy/D for 5 days), treated with polyphenols (100 μg/ml) of Hormophysa triquerta (HT-EA), Spatoglossum asperum (SA-EA) or Padina tetrastromatica (PT-EA) with/without FIR were examined for cell viability, transcription of 93 stem-cell-related molecules (QPCR profiling). Polyphenol-dependent regulation of FIR-transactivated Oct4, Zic3, EIF4C, Nanog, and LIF (QPCR) and functional translation of Nanog, SOX2, and OCT3/4 (immunoblotting) were examined in Panc-1/Panc-3.27/MiaPaCa-2/BxPC-3-xenografts derived PC-CSCs. Effect of seaweed-polyphenols in the regulation of EMT (N-Cadherin), pluripotency- (SOX2, OCT3/4, Nanog) and stemness-maintenance (PI3KR1, LIF, CD44) in therapy (FIR, 2Gy/D for 5D/wk for 3-weeks) resistant residual tumors were examined by tissue microarray construction and automated immunohistochemistry. Ex vivo exposure of PC-CSCs to SA-EA, PT-EA and HT-EA exhibit dose-dependent inhibition of cell viability. FIR amplified the transcription of 69, 80, 74 and 77 stem-cell related genes in MiaPaCa-2-, Panc-1-, Panc-3.27- and BXPC3-established xenograft-derived ALDH(+)CD44(+)CD24(+)PC-CSCs. Treatment with SA-EA, PT-EA, or HT-EA completely suppressed FIR-activated stem-cell transcriptional machinery in ALDH(+)CD44(+)CD24(+)PC-CSCs established from MiaPaCa-2, Panc-1, Panc-3.27 and BXPC3 xenografts. QPCR

  15. High CO2 enhances the competitive strength of seaweeds over corals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Diaz-Pulido, Guillermo; Gouezo, Marine; Tilbrook, Bronte; Dove, Sophie; Anthony, Kenneth R N

    2011-01-01

    Space competition between corals and seaweeds is an important ecological process underlying coral-reef dynamics. Processes promoting seaweed growth and survival, such as herbivore overfishing and eutrophication, can lead to local reef degradation. Here, we present the case that increasing concentrations of atmospheric CO2 may be an additional process driving a shift from corals to seaweeds on reefs. Coral (Acropora intermedia) mortality in contact with a common coral-reef seaweed (Lobophora papenfussii) increased two- to threefold between background CO2 (400 ppm) and highest level projected for late 21st century (1140 ppm). The strong interaction between CO2 and seaweeds on coral mortality was most likely attributable to a chemical competitive mechanism, as control corals with algal mimics showed no mortality. Our results suggest that coral (Acropora) reefs may become increasingly susceptible to seaweed proliferation under ocean acidification, and processes regulating algal abundance (e.g. herbivory) will play an increasingly important role in maintaining coral abundance. PMID:21155961

  16. The circular economy of seaweed as nutrient management instrument for biobased production

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Thomsen, Marianne; Seghetta, Michele; Bruhn, Annette

    A comparative analysis of the environmental and economic performance of seaweed production and biorefinery systems were modelled within the project MAB3 (www.mab3.dk). A framework for integrated sustainability modelling of the circular economy of offshore seaweed production and biorefinery systems...... using excess aquatic nutrients and atmospheric CO2 emissions as a resource for biobased production is proposed. The seaweed production system was pilot tested at two Danish coastal areas achieving relatively low productivities of 1 to 2 ton dry weight seaweed per hectare. Biorefinery systems producing...... is ongoing and requires expanding the scale of production. Regarding the product portfolio, especially use of seaweed for pharmaceuticals and cosmetics will increase the profitability of the seaweed utilization compared to use for energy, feed and fertilizers. There are not synergies between the economic...

  17. Seaweed raft and farm design in the United States and China

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    McKay, L.B.

    1983-01-01

    The following topics are discussed in this report: pilot-scale mariculture of seaweeds in Washington; experimental-scale raft culture of marine macroalgae in inland marine waters; macroalgal culture in California and China; land-based cultivation of seaweeds: an assessment of their potential yields for 'energy farming'; a design for energy-independent seaweed raft culture in tidal creeks and rivers; and the New York State marine biomass program.

  18. Competition induces allelopathy but suppresses growth and anti-herbivore defence in a chemically rich seaweed.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rasher, Douglas B; Hay, Mark E

    2014-02-22

    Many seaweeds and terrestrial plants induce chemical defences in response to herbivory, but whether they induce chemical defences against competitors (allelopathy) remains poorly understood. We evaluated whether two tropical seaweeds induce allelopathy in response to competition with a reef-building coral. We also assessed the effects of competition on seaweed growth and seaweed chemical defence against herbivores. Following 8 days of competition with the coral Porites cylindrica, the chemically rich seaweed Galaxaura filamentosa induced increased allelochemicals and became nearly twice as damaging to the coral. However, it also experienced significantly reduced growth and increased palatability to herbivores (because of reduced chemical defences). Under the same conditions, the seaweed Sargassum polycystum did not induce allelopathy and did not experience a change in growth or palatability. This is the first demonstration of induced allelopathy in a seaweed, or of competitors reducing seaweed chemical defences against herbivores. Our results suggest that the chemical ecology of coral-seaweed-herbivore interactions can be complex and nuanced, highlighting the need to incorporate greater ecological complexity into the study of chemical defence.

  19. STREPTOMYCETES FROM MARINE SEAWEEDS: THEIR ANTIMICROBIAL AND ANTIBIOTIC POTENTIAL

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sridevi K

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available Recent research has increased our knowledge and understanding of the antimicrobial effect of marine Streptomyces. In a systematic screening effect, Streptomyces isolates from different marine seaweeds were investigated for antimicrobial activity against Vibrio pathogens (V. harveyji, V. parahemolyticus, V. vulnificus and V. algniolyticus and potentially active secondary metabolites. The different solvent extracts (Butanol, Ethyl acetate, Methanol, hexane of selected isolates were screened for their antivibrio activity by disc method. The Zone of inhibition was measured in all extracts revealed a wide range of antimicrobial activity against pathogenic vibrios. The overall results of the antimicrobial activity indicates the abundance of purine riboside antibiotic in streptomycetes from marine seaweeds evidenced by the presence of precursor molecules such as guanosine, xanthosine in the extractions of Streptomyces which can be exploited for the production of purine riboside antibiotics which are in use of pharmaceutical industry.

  20. Economical process for growing seaweed as biomass fuel source

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lagovskiy, V.

    1985-10-10

    Calculations made by researchers of Moscow State University have shown that the Aral Sea is capable of providing energy for almost the entire country. An experimental unit called Biosolar, for growing such energy already exists. Up to 40 liters of fuel gas a day can be gathered from a single square meter of plant beds. Seaweed yields biomass, which is placed in special vats. There it is eaten by bacteria, which release methane.

  1. Bioprospecting for bioactives from seaweeds: potential, obstacles and alternatives

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Renato C. Pereira

    2012-08-01

    Full Text Available Seaweeds are potential sources of high biotechnological interest due to production of a great diversity of compounds exhibiting a broad spectrum of biological activities. On the other hand, there is an urgent need for management options for a sustainable approach to the use of marine organisms as a source of bioactive compounds. This review discusses the bioprospection for bioactive seaweed compounds as pharmaceuticals and antifouling agents, encompassing their potential and possible obstacles and alternatives. In spite of their potential, research on pharmaceuticals and antifouling agents from seaweeds includes mainly the search for molecules that exhibit these biological activities, but lacks of consideration of fundamental and limiting aspects such as the development of alternatives to sustainable supply. However, for the complete development of pharmaceuticals and antifouling compounds in Brazil, marine bioprospection should be more comprehensive, associating the search for molecules with an analysis of their supply. In this way, it is possible to promote sustainable development and conservation of biodiversity, as well as to assert the economic development of Brazil.

  2. The Red Seaweed Gracilaria gracilis as a Multi Products Source

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Massimo Monteleone

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available In recent years seaweeds have increasingly attracted interest in the search for new drugs and have been shown to be a primary source of bioactive natural compounds and biomaterials. In the present investigation, the biochemical composition of the red seaweed Gracilaria gracilis, collected seasonally in the Lesina Lagoon (Southern Adriatic Sea, Lesina, Italy, was assayed by means of advanced analytical techniques, such as gas-chromatography coupled with mass spectrometry and spectrophotometric tests. In particular, analysis of lipids, fatty acids, sterols, proteins, phycobiliproteins and carbohydrates as well as phenolic content, antioxidant and radical scavenging activity were performed. In winter extracts of G. gracilis, a high content of R-phycoerythrin together with other valuable products such as arachidonic acid (PUFA ω-6, proteins and carbohydrates was observed. High antioxidant and radical scavenging activities were also detected in summer extracts of the seaweed together with a high content of total phenols. In conclusion, this study points out the possibility of using Gracilaria gracilis as a multi products source for biotechnological, nutraceutical and pharmaceutical applications even although more investigations are required for separating, purifying and characterizing these bioactive compounds.

  3. Formulation of Red Seaweed and Spirulina platensis Based Jelly Drinks

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wini Trilaksani

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available Generally, jelly drinks in the market contain synthetic sweeteners, coloring and flavoring agents, as well as low in nutrients content, therefore it needs to be developed in order to obtain more healthy product by adding seaweed and Spirulina. The aims of this research were to determine the best formula of jelly drinks with seaweed (Eucheuma cottonii and Spirulina platensis and to compare the characteristics (nutrients and antioxidant activity of jelly drinks made from culture-based Spirulina and from commercial Spirulina. Jelly drinks made from commercial Spirulina (0.2%; 0.4%; and 0.6% had protein content 1.218-2.750% (db and the IC50 value was 3363.5-6070 ppm. Bayes test showed that jelly drink with commercial Spirulina 0.4% was the selected product and was used as the reference formula on this research. Types of Spirulina (commercial and culture gave no significant effect (p>0.05 to the hedonic test results and antioxidant activity however affected significantly on protein content (p<0.05. Jelly drink supplemented with 0.4% of culture-based Spirulina produced 92 kcal of energy; meanwhile the jelly drink with 0.4% of commercial Spirulina produced 79 kcal of energy. Keywords: Dietary fiber, jelly drink, protein, seaweed, Spirulina platensis

  4. The red seaweed Gracilaria gracilis as a multi products source.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Francavilla, Matteo; Franchi, Massimo; Monteleone, Massimo; Caroppo, Carmela

    2013-09-30

    In recent years seaweeds have increasingly attracted interest in the search for new drugs and have been shown to be a primary source of bioactive natural compounds and biomaterials. In the present investigation, the biochemical composition of the red seaweed Gracilaria gracilis, collected seasonally in the Lesina Lagoon (Southern Adriatic Sea, Lesina, Italy), was assayed by means of advanced analytical techniques, such as gas-chromatography coupled with mass spectrometry and spectrophotometric tests. In particular, analysis of lipids, fatty acids, sterols, proteins, phycobiliproteins and carbohydrates as well as phenolic content, antioxidant and radical scavenging activity were performed. In winter extracts of G. gracilis, a high content of R-phycoerythrin together with other valuable products such as arachidonic acid (PUFA ω-6), proteins and carbohydrates was observed. High antioxidant and radical scavenging activities were also detected in summer extracts of the seaweed together with a high content of total phenols. In conclusion, this study points out the possibility of using Gracilaria gracilis as a multi products source for biotechnological, nutraceutical and pharmaceutical applications even although more investigations are required for separating, purifying and characterizing these bioactive compounds.

  5. Macromolecular Antioxidants and Dietary Fiber in Edible Seaweeds.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sanz-Pintos, Nerea; Pérez-Jiménez, Jara; Buschmann, Alejandro H; Vergara-Salinas, José Rodrigo; Pérez-Correa, José Ricardo; Saura-Calixto, Fulgencio

    2017-02-01

    Seaweeds are rich in different bioactive compounds with potential uses in drugs, cosmetics and the food industry. The objective of this study was to analyze macromolecular antioxidants or nonextractable polyphenols, in several edible seaweed species collected in Chile (Gracilaria chilensis, Callophyllis concepcionensis, Macrocystis pyrifera, Scytosyphon lomentaria, Ulva sp. and Enteromorpha compressa), including their 1st HPLC characterization. Macromolecular antioxidants are commonly ignored in studies of bioactive compounds. They are associated with insoluble dietary fiber and exhibit significant biological activity, with specific features that are different from those of both dietary fiber and extractable polyphenols. We also evaluated extractable polyphenols and dietary fiber, given their relationship with macromolecular antioxidants. Our results show that macromolecular antioxidants are a major polyphenol fraction (averaging 42% to total polyphenol content), with hydroxycinnamic acids, hydroxybenzoic acids and flavonols being the main constituents. This fraction also showed remarkable antioxidant capacity, as determined by 2 complementary assays. The dietary fiber content was over 50% of dry weight, with some samples exhibiting the target proportionality between soluble and insoluble dietary fiber for adequate nutrition. Overall, our data show that seaweed could be an important source of commonly ignored macromolecular antioxidants. © 2017 Institute of Food Technologists®.

  6. Iodine-129 in human thyroids and seaweed in China

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hou, Xiaolin; Dahlgaard, H.; Nielsen, S.P.

    2000-01-01

    The concentrations of I-129 and the ratios of I-129/I-127 in normal human thyroids collected in Tianjin, China, and some seaweed samples from the Chinese coast were determined by neutron activation analysis. The mean I-129/I-127 ratio in these thyroids was found to be 1.13 x 10(-9), which is two...... orders of magnitude higher than the level of the pre-nuclear era, but one order of magnitude lower than the level in Europe in the post-nuclear era. There is no significant difference between the ratio of I-129/I-127 in the thyroids for the post-nuclear era from China and other areas, which...... are considered not to have been directly exposed to 129I emission from a nuclear source, such as Chile, Taiwan and Tokyo. The mean I-129/I-127 ratio in seaweed from the Chinese coast is 2.35 x 10(-10), approximately two orders of magnitude higher than in seaweed collected in the pre-nuclear age, and similar...

  7. Feeding habit of juvenile fishes associated with drifting seaweeds in the East China Sea with reference to oceanographic parameters

    OpenAIRE

    Hasegawa, Takamasa; Manda, Atsuyoshi; Takatsuki, Naoki; KAWABATA, YUUKI; NISHIHARA Gregory N.; Fujita, Shinji; Kawabe, Ryo; Yamada, Misato; Kinoshita, Tsukasa; Yamawaki, Nobuhiro; Morii, Yasuhiro; Sakakura, Yoshitaka

    2016-01-01

    Many commercially important fishes associate with drifting seaweeds in their juvenile stage, however, the ecological significance of drifting seaweeds for juvenile fishes is still unclear. We postulated that the following two hypotheses may be applicable for juvenile fishes associate with drifting seaweeds, the “concentration of food supply” hypothesis: juvenile fishes are attracted by phytal animals on the drifting seaweeds and the “indicator-log” hypothesis: fish use accumulations of drifti...

  8. The interaction between seaweed farming as an alternative occupation and fisher numbers in the central Philippines.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hill, Nicholas A O; Rowcliffe, J Marcus; Koldewey, Heather J; Milner-Gulland, E J

    2012-04-01

    Alternative occupations are frequently promoted as a means to reduce the number of people exploiting declining fisheries. However, there is little evidence that alternative occupations reduce fisher numbers. Seaweed farming is frequently promoted as a lucrative alternative occupation for artisanal fishers in Southeast Asia. We examined how the introduction of seaweed farming has affected village-level changes in the number of fishers on Danajon Bank, central Philippines, where unsustainable fishing has led to declining fishery yields. To determine how fisher numbers had changed since seaweed farming started, we interviewed the heads of household from 300 households in 10 villages to examine their perceptions of how fisher numbers had changed in their village and the reasons they associated with these changes. We then asked key informants (people with detailed knowledge of village members) to estimate fisher numbers in these villages before seaweed farming began and at the time of the survey. We compared the results of how fisher numbers had changed in each village with the wealth, education, seaweed farm sizes, and other attributes of households in these villages, which we collected through interviews, and with village-level factors such as distance to markets. We also asked people why they either continued to engage in or ceased fishing. In four villages, respondents thought seaweed farming and low fish catches had reduced fisher numbers, at least temporarily. In one of these villages, there was a recent return to fishing due to declines in the price of seaweed and increased theft of seaweed. In another four villages, fisher numbers increased as human population increased, despite the widespread uptake of seaweed farming. Seaweed farming failed for technical reasons in two other villages. Our results suggest seaweed farming has reduced fisher numbers in some villages, a result that may be correlated with socioeconomic status, but the heterogeneity of outcomes is

  9. Irradiated brown dwarfs

    CERN Document Server

    Casewell, S L; Lawrie, K A; Maxted, P F L; Dobbie, P D; Napiwotzki, R

    2014-01-01

    We have observed the post common envelope binary WD0137-349 in the near infrared $J$, $H$ and $K$ bands and have determined that the photometry varies on the system period (116 min). The amplitude of the variability increases with increasing wavelength, indicating that the brown dwarf in the system is likely being irradiated by its 16500 K white dwarf companion. The effect of the (primarily) UV irradiation on the brown dwarf atmosphere is unknown, but it is possible that stratospheric hazes are formed. It is also possible that the brown dwarf (an L-T transition object) itself is variable due to patchy cloud cover. Both these scenarios are discussed, and suggestions for further study are made.

  10. Seaweed-coral interactions: variance in seaweed allelopathy, coral susceptibility, and potential effects on coral resilience.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bonaldo, Roberta M; Hay, Mark E

    2014-01-01

    Tropical reefs are in global decline with seaweeds commonly replacing corals. Negative associations between macroalgae and corals are well documented, but the mechanisms involved, the dynamics of the interactions, and variance in effects of different macroalgal-coral pairings are poorly investigated. We assessed the frequency, magnitude, and dynamics of macroalgal-coral competition involving allelopathic and non-allelopathic macroalgae on three, spatially grouped pairs of no-take Marine Protected Areas (MPAs) and non-MPAs in Fiji. In non-MPAs, biomass of herbivorous fishes was 70-80% lower, macroalgal cover 4-9 fold higher, macroalgal-coral contacts 5-15 fold more frequent and 23-67 fold more extensive (measured as % of colony margin contacted by macroalgae), and coral cover 51-68% lower than in MPAs. Coral contacts with allelopathic macroalgae occurred less frequently than expected by chance across all sites, while contact with non-allelopathic macroalgae tended to occur more frequently than expected. Transplants of allelopathic macroalgae (Chlorodesmis fastigiata and Galaxaura filamentosa) against coral edges inflicted damage to Acropora aspera and Pocillopora damicornis more rapidly and extensively than to Porites cylindrica and Porites lobata, which appeared more resistant to these macroalgae. Montipora digitata experienced intermediate damage. Extent of damage from macroalgal contact was independent of coral colony size for each of the 10 macroalgal-coral pairings we established. When natural contacts with Galaxaura filamentosa were removed in the field, recovery was rapid for Porites lobata, but Pocillopora damicornis did not recover and damage continued to expand. As macroalgae increase on overfished tropical reefs, allelopathy could produce feedbacks that suppress coral resilience, prevent coral recovery, and promote the stability of algal beds in habitats previously available to corals.

  11. Seaweed-coral interactions: variance in seaweed allelopathy, coral susceptibility, and potential effects on coral resilience.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Roberta M Bonaldo

    Full Text Available Tropical reefs are in global decline with seaweeds commonly replacing corals. Negative associations between macroalgae and corals are well documented, but the mechanisms involved, the dynamics of the interactions, and variance in effects of different macroalgal-coral pairings are poorly investigated. We assessed the frequency, magnitude, and dynamics of macroalgal-coral competition involving allelopathic and non-allelopathic macroalgae on three, spatially grouped pairs of no-take Marine Protected Areas (MPAs and non-MPAs in Fiji. In non-MPAs, biomass of herbivorous fishes was 70-80% lower, macroalgal cover 4-9 fold higher, macroalgal-coral contacts 5-15 fold more frequent and 23-67 fold more extensive (measured as % of colony margin contacted by macroalgae, and coral cover 51-68% lower than in MPAs. Coral contacts with allelopathic macroalgae occurred less frequently than expected by chance across all sites, while contact with non-allelopathic macroalgae tended to occur more frequently than expected. Transplants of allelopathic macroalgae (Chlorodesmis fastigiata and Galaxaura filamentosa against coral edges inflicted damage to Acropora aspera and Pocillopora damicornis more rapidly and extensively than to Porites cylindrica and Porites lobata, which appeared more resistant to these macroalgae. Montipora digitata experienced intermediate damage. Extent of damage from macroalgal contact was independent of coral colony size for each of the 10 macroalgal-coral pairings we established. When natural contacts with Galaxaura filamentosa were removed in the field, recovery was rapid for Porites lobata, but Pocillopora damicornis did not recover and damage continued to expand. As macroalgae increase on overfished tropical reefs, allelopathy could produce feedbacks that suppress coral resilience, prevent coral recovery, and promote the stability of algal beds in habitats previously available to corals.

  12. Biorefinery of the green seaweed Ulva lactuca to produce animal feed, chemicals and biofuels

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bikker, Paul; Krimpen, van Marinus M.; Wikselaar, van Piet; Houweling-Tan, Bwee; Scaccia, Nazareno; Hal, van Jaap W.; Huijgen, Wouter J.J.; Cone, John W.; López-Contreras, Ana M.

    2016-01-01

    The growing world population demands an increase in animal protein production. Seaweed may be a valuable source of protein for animal feed. However, a biorefinery approach aimed at cascading valorisation of both protein and non-protein seaweed constituents is required to realise an economically

  13. Differential response of fish assemblages to coral reef-based seaweed farming.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    E James Hehre

    Full Text Available As the global demand for seaweed-derived products drives the expansion of seaweed farming onto shallow coral ecosystems, the effects of farms on fish assemblages remain largely unexplored. Shallow coral reefs provide food and shelter for highly diverse fish assemblages but are increasingly modified by anthropogenic activities. We hypothesized that the introduction of seaweed farms into degraded shallow coral reefs had potential to generate ecological benefits for fish by adding structural complexity and a possible food source. We conducted 210 transects at 14 locations, with sampling stratified across seaweed farms and sites adjacent to and distant from farms. At a seascape scale, locations were classified by their level of exposure to human disturbance. We compared sites where (1 marine protected areas (MPAs were established, (2 neither MPAs nor blast fishing was present (hence "unprotected", and (3 blast fishing occurred. We observed 80,186 fish representing 148 species from 38 families. The negative effects of seaweed farms on fish assemblages appeared stronger in the absence of blast fishing and were strongest when MPAs were present, likely reflecting the positive influence of the MPAs on fish within them. Species differentiating fish assemblages with respect to seaweed farming and disturbance were typically small but also included two key target species. The propensity for seaweed farms to increase fish diversity, abundance, and biomass is limited and may reduce MPA benefits. We suggest that careful consideration be given to the placement of seaweed farms relative to MPAs.

  14. Can Seaweed Farming Play a Role in Climate Change Mitigation and Adaptation?

    KAUST Repository

    Duarte, Carlos M.

    2017-04-12

    Seaweed aquaculture, the fastest-growing component of global food production, offers a slate of opportunities to mitigate, and adapt to climate change. Seaweed farms release carbon that maybe buried in sediments or exported to the deep sea, therefore acting as a CO2 sink. The crop can also be used, in total or in part, for biofuel production, with a potential CO2 mitigation capacity, in terms of avoided emissions from fossil fuels, of about 1,500 tons CO2 km−2 year−1. Seaweed aquaculture can also help reduce the emissions from agriculture, by improving soil quality substituting synthetic fertilizer and when included in cattle fed, lowering methane emissions from cattle. Seaweed aquaculture contributes to climate change adaptation by damping wave energy and protecting shorelines, and by elevating pH and supplying oxygen to the waters, thereby locally reducing the effects of ocean acidification and de-oxygenation. The scope to expand seaweed aquaculture is, however, limited by the availability of suitable areas and competition for suitable areas with other uses, engineering systems capable of coping with rough conditions offshore, and increasing market demand for seaweed products, among other factors. Despite these limitations, seaweed farming practices can be optimized to maximize climate benefits, which may, if economically compensated, improve the income of seaweed farmers.

  15. Castaways can't be choosers - Homogenization of rafting assemblages on floating seaweeds

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gutow, Lars; Beermann, Jan; Buschbaum, Christian; Rivadeneira, Marcelo M.; Thiel, Martin

    2015-01-01

    After detachment from benthic habitats, the epibiont assemblages on floating seaweeds undergo substantial changes, but little is known regarding whether succession varies among different seaweed species. Given that floating algae may represent a limiting habitat in many regions, rafting organisms may be unselective and colonize any available seaweed patch at the sea surface. This process may homogenize rafting assemblages on different seaweed species, which our study examined by comparing the assemblages on benthic and floating individuals of the fucoid seaweeds Fucus vesiculosus and Sargassum muticum in the northern Wadden Sea (North Sea). Species richness was about twice as high on S. muticum as on F. vesiculosus, both on benthic and floating individuals. In both seaweed species benthic samples were more diverse than floating samples. However, the species composition differed significantly only between benthic thalli, but not between floating thalli of the two seaweed species. Separate analyses of sessile and mobile epibionts showed that the homogenization of rafting assemblages was mainly caused by mobile species. Among these, grazing isopods from the genus Idotea reached extraordinarily high densities on the floating samples from the northern Wadden Sea, suggesting that the availability of seaweed rafts was indeed limiting. Enhanced break-up of algal rafts associated with intense feeding by abundant herbivores might force rafters to recolonize benthic habitats. These colonization processes may enhance successful dispersal of rafting organisms and thereby contribute to population connectivity between sink populations in the Wadden Sea and source populations from up-current regions.

  16. Biodegradable polymer films from seaweed polysaccharides: A review on cellulose as a reinforcement material

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    H. P. S. Abdul Khalil

    2017-04-01

    Full Text Available Seaweed and cellulose are promising natural polymers. This article reviews the basic information and recent developments of both seaweed and cellulose biopolymer materials as well as analyses the feasible formation of seaweed/cellulose composite films. Seaweed and cellulose both exhibit interesting film-forming properties. Nevertheless, seaweed has poor water vapour barrier and mechanical properties, whereas cellulose is neither meltable nor soluble in water or common organic solvents due to its highly crystalline structure. Therefore, modification of these hydrocolloids has been done to exploit their useful properties. Blending of biopolymers is a must recommended approach to improve the desired characteristics. From the review, seaweed is well compatible with cellulose, which possesses excellent mechanical strength and water resistance properties. Moreover, seaweed/cellulose composite films can prolong a product’s shelf life while maintaining its biodegradability. Additionally, the films show potential in contributing to the bioeconomy. In order to widen seaweed and cellulose in biocomposite application across various industries, some of the viewpoints are highlighted to be focused for future developments and applications.

  17. Production of genetically and developmentally modified seaweeds: exploiting the potential of artificial selection techniques.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Charrier, Bénédicte; Rolland, Elodie; Gupta, Vishal; Reddy, C R K

    2015-01-01

    Plant feedstock with specific, modified developmental features has been a quest for centuries. Since the development and spread of agriculture, there has been a desire for plants producing disproportionate-or more abundant and more nutritional-biomass that meet human needs better than their native counterparts. Seaweed aquaculture, targeted for human consumption and the production of various raw materials, is a rapidly expanding field and its stakeholders have increasing vested interest for cost-effective and lucrative seaweed cultivation processes. Thus, scientific research on seaweed development is particularly timely: the potential for expansion of seaweed cultivation depends on the sector's capacity to produce seaweeds with modified morphological features (e.g., thicker blades), higher growth rates or delayed (or even no) fertility. Here, we review the various technical approaches used to modify development in macroalgae, which have attracted little attention from developmental biologists to date. Because seaweed (or marine macroalgae) anatomy is much less complex than that of land plants and because seaweeds belong to three different eukaryotic phyla, the mechanisms controlling their morphogenesis are key to understanding their development. Here, we present efficient sources of developmentally and genetically modified seaweeds-somatic variants, artificial hybrids and mutants-as well as the future potential of these techniques.

  18. Production of genetically and developmentally modified seaweeds: Exploiting the potential of artificial selection techniques

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bénédicte eCharrier

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available Plant feedstock with specific, modified developmental features has been a quest for centuries. Since the development and spread of agriculture, there has been a desire for plants producing disproportionate — or more abundant and more nutritional — biomass that meet human needs better than their native counterparts. Seaweed aquaculture, targeted for human consumption and the production of various raw materials, is a rapidly expanding field and its stakeholders have increasing vested interest for cost-effective and lucrative seaweed cultivation processes. Thus, scientific research on seaweed development is particularly timely: the potential for expansion of seaweed cultivation depends on the sector’s capacity to produce seaweeds with modified morphological features (e.g. thicker blades, higher growth rates or delayed (or even no fertility. Here, we review the various technical approaches used to modify development in macroalgae, which have attracted little attention from developmental biologists to date. Because seaweed (or marine macroalgae anatomy is much less complex than that of land plants and because seaweeds belong to three different eukaryotic phyla, the mechanisms controlling their morphogenesis are key to understanding their development. Here, we present efficient sources of developmentally and genetically modified seaweeds — somatic variants, artificial hybrids and mutants — as well as the future potential of these techniques.

  19. Antimicrobial Activities of Bacteria Associated with the Brown Alga

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ismail, A.; Ktari, L.; Bolhuis, H.; Ahmed, M.; Boudabbous, A.; Stal, L.J.; Cretoiu, M.S.; El Bour, M.

    2016-01-01

    Macroalgae belonging to the genus Padina are known to produce antibacterial compounds that may inhibit growth of human- and animal pathogens. Hitherto, it was unclear whether this antibacterial activity is produced by the macroalga itself or by secondary metabolite producing epiphytic bacteria. Here

  20. Seaweeds in closed systems; Zeewieren in gesloten systemen

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hart, P. ' t [Koers en Vaart, Barendrecht (Netherlands); Schipper, J. [Hortimare, Heerhugowaard (Netherlands)

    2011-04-15

    Seaweed is a potential source of green raw materials. They are used for human consumption, contain specific thickening agents such as alginates and carrageenans, and can be applied as growth-promoting fertilizers, in animal feed and for the cultivation of shellfish (abalones). In addition, extracts from seaweed are used in cosmetics and pharmaceutical products and seaweeds also constitute a possible source of biofuels. Seaweed can possibly also serve as a protein platform for catering to the steadily growing demand for fish protein and soy protein. Though the Netherlands has a good reputation in offshore and hydraulic engineering as well as in seed cultivation and improvement, the knowledge of cultivating and harvesting seaweed is very limited. With the advent of wind farms in the North Sea and the commercial exploitation of the continental shelf, the opportunities for cultivating seaweed are now also being explored. Both extensive and intensive cultivation systems as used in agriculture and horticulture are being considered. Certain applications of seaweed require more controlled cultivation conditions. This is the case with specific plant substances, nutritional factors and with the propagation of seaweed for large-scale cultivation. Wherever the value of the cultivated seaweed increases, and hence the need for harvest security and risk control, closed systems are probably the best approach. As the cultivation conditions can be more easily controlled in closed systems, the yields are expected to be bigger, the quantities of plant substances more consistent and the overall quality better. In addition, pests are easier to control or prevent. In contrast with land-based seaweed cultivation, closed systems benefit from the abundant availability of clean and relatively low-mineral seawater. This makes it possible to control the temperature with the aid of seawater. The concept of seaweed in closed systems is in some ways comparable to greenhouse horticulture. Given

  1. A Meta-Analysis of Seaweed Impacts on Seagrasses: Generalities and Knowledge Gaps

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Thomsen, M. S.; Wernberg, T.; Engelen, A. H.

    2012-01-01

    are replaced with unstable sediments, turbid waters, hypoxia, and poor habitat conditions for fishes and invertebrates. Understanding the situations under which seaweeds impact seagrasses on local patch scales can help proactive management and prevent losses at greater scales. Here, we provide a quantitative......Seagrasses are important habitat-formers and ecosystem engineers that are under threat from bloom-forming seaweeds. These seaweeds have been suggested to outcompete the seagrasses, particularly when facilitated by eutrophication, causing regime shifts where green meadows and clear waters...... identified major knowledge gaps that need to be addressed before general predictive models on seaweed-seagrass interactions can be build, in order to effectively protect seagrass habitats from detrimental competition from seaweeds....

  2. Water-borne cues of a non-indigenous seaweed mediate grazer-deterrent responses in native seaweeds, but not vice versa.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yun, Hee Young; Engelen, Aschwin H; Santos, Rui O; Molis, Markus

    2012-01-01

    Plants optimise their resistance to herbivores by regulating deterrent responses on demand. Induction of anti-herbivory defences can occur directly in grazed plants or from emission of risk cues to the environment, which modifies interactions of adjacent plants with, for instance, their consumers. This study confirmed the induction of anti-herbivory responses by water-borne risk cues between adjoining con-specific seaweeds and firstly examined whether plant-plant signalling also exists among adjacent hetero-specific seaweeds. Furthermore, differential abilities and geographic variation in plant-plant signalling by a non-indigenous seaweed as well as native seaweeds were assessed. Twelve-day induction experiments using the non-indigenous seaweed Sargassum muticum were conducted in the laboratory in Portugal and Germany with one local con-familiar (Portugal: Cystoseira humilis, Germany: Halidrys siliquosa) and hetero-familiar native species (Portugal: Fucus spiralis, Germany: F. vesiculosus). All seaweeds were grazed by a local isopod species (Portugal: Stenosoma nadejda, Germany: Idotea baltica) and were positioned upstream of con- and hetero-specific seaweeds. Grazing-induced modification in seaweed traits were tested in three-day feeding assays between cue-exposed and cue-free ( = control) pieces of both fresh and reconstituted seaweeds. Both Fucus species reduced their palatability when positioned downstream of isopod-grazed con-specifics. Yet, the palatability of non-indigenous S. muticum remained constant in the presence of upstream grazed con-specifics and native hetero-specifics. In contrast, both con-familiar (but neither hetero-familiar) native species reduced palatability when located downstream of grazed S. muticum. Similar patterns of grazer-deterrent responses to water-borne cues were observed on both European shores, and were almost identical between assays using fresh and reconstituted seaweeds. Hence, seaweeds may use plant-plant signalling to

  3. Water-borne cues of a non-indigenous seaweed mediate grazer-deterrent responses in native seaweeds, but not vice versa.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hee Young Yun

    Full Text Available Plants optimise their resistance to herbivores by regulating deterrent responses on demand. Induction of anti-herbivory defences can occur directly in grazed plants or from emission of risk cues to the environment, which modifies interactions of adjacent plants with, for instance, their consumers. This study confirmed the induction of anti-herbivory responses by water-borne risk cues between adjoining con-specific seaweeds and firstly examined whether plant-plant signalling also exists among adjacent hetero-specific seaweeds. Furthermore, differential abilities and geographic variation in plant-plant signalling by a non-indigenous seaweed as well as native seaweeds were assessed. Twelve-day induction experiments using the non-indigenous seaweed Sargassum muticum were conducted in the laboratory in Portugal and Germany with one local con-familiar (Portugal: Cystoseira humilis, Germany: Halidrys siliquosa and hetero-familiar native species (Portugal: Fucus spiralis, Germany: F. vesiculosus. All seaweeds were grazed by a local isopod species (Portugal: Stenosoma nadejda, Germany: Idotea baltica and were positioned upstream of con- and hetero-specific seaweeds. Grazing-induced modification in seaweed traits were tested in three-day feeding assays between cue-exposed and cue-free ( = control pieces of both fresh and reconstituted seaweeds. Both Fucus species reduced their palatability when positioned downstream of isopod-grazed con-specifics. Yet, the palatability of non-indigenous S. muticum remained constant in the presence of upstream grazed con-specifics and native hetero-specifics. In contrast, both con-familiar (but neither hetero-familiar native species reduced palatability when located downstream of grazed S. muticum. Similar patterns of grazer-deterrent responses to water-borne cues were observed on both European shores, and were almost identical between assays using fresh and reconstituted seaweeds. Hence, seaweeds may use plant

  4. Possible change in distribution of seaweed, Sargassum horneri, in northeast Asia under A2 scenario of global warming and consequent effect on some fish.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Komatsu, Teruhisa; Fukuda, Masahiro; Mikami, Atsuko; Mizuno, Shizuha; Kantachumpoo, Attachai; Tanoue, Hideaki; Kawamiya, Michio

    2014-08-30

    Global warming effects on seaweed beds are already perceptible. Their geographical distributions greatly depend on water temperatures. To predict future geographical distributions of brown alga, Sargassum horneri, forming large beds in the northwestern Pacific, we referred to future monthly surface water temperatures at about 1.1° of longitude and 0.6° of latitude in February and August in 2050 and 2100 simulated by 12 organizations under an A2 scenario of global warming. The southern limit of S. horneri distribution is expected to keep moving northward such that it may broadly disappear from Honshu Island, the Chinese coast, and Korean Peninsula in 2100, when tropical Sargassum species such as Sargassum tenuifolium may not completely replace S. horneri. Thus, their forests in 2100 do not substitute those of S. horneri in 2000. Fishes using the beds and seaweed rafts consisting of S. horneri in East China Sea suffer these disappearances. Copyright © 2014 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Ltd.. All rights reserved.

  5. Arsenic metabolites in humans after ingestion of wakame seaweed

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hata A.

    2013-04-01

    Full Text Available Seaweed contains large amounts of various arsenic compounds such as arsenosugars (AsSugs, but their relative toxicities have not yet been fully evaluated. A risk evaluation of dietary arsenic would be necessary. After developing an arsenic speciation analysis of wakame seaweed (Undaria pinnatifida, we conducted a wakame ingestion experiment using volunteers. Five volunteers ingested 300 g of commercial wakame after refraining from seafood for 5 days. Arsenic metabolites in the urine were monitored over a 5-day period after ingestion. Total arsenic concentration of the wakame seaweed was 34.3 ± 2.1 mg arsenic/kg (dry weight, n = 3. Two AsSugs, 3-[5′-deoxy-5′-(dimethyl-arsinoyl-β-ribofuranosyloxy]-propylene glycol (AsSug328 and 3-[5′-deoxy-5′-(dimethyl-arsinoyl-β- ribofuranosyl-oxy]-2-hydroxypropyl-2,3-dihydroxy-propyl phosphate (AsSug482 were detected, but arsenobetaine, dimethylarsinic acid (DMA, monomethylarsonic acid, and inorganic arsenics (iAs were not detected. The major peak was AsSug328, which comprised 89% of the total arsenic. Approximately 30% of the total arsenic ingested was excreted in the urine during the 5-day observation. Five arsenic compounds were detected in the urine after ingestion, the major one being DMA, which comprised 58.1 ± 5.0% of the total urinary arsenic excreted over the 5 days. DMA was believed to be metabolized not from iAs but from AsSugs, and its biological half-time was approximately 13 h.

  6. The possible significance of long-range dispersal for the biogeography of seaweeds

    Science.gov (United States)

    van den Hoek, C.

    1987-09-01

    Indirect evidence of the existence of long-distance dispersal of seaweeds is provided by the fact that mid-oceanic islands of volcanic origin are inhabited by well-developed seaweed floras which could reach these islands only overseas from continental donor areas. For instance, the flora of Tristan da Cunha (S. Atlantic Ocean) was established by long-distance dispersal in less than 1 million years (the approximate age of the island); the seaweed flora of the Faeroes (N. Atlantic Ocean) could be constituted in less than 10,000 years (the end of the Pleistocene ice cover of these islands). There is no evidence for either supporting or discounting the possible role of planktonic stages of seaweeds (spores, propagules, zygotes) in the long-distance dispersal of seaweeds. There is, however, some evidence of long-distance dispersal as floating plants, or as plants attached to floating objects (including floating algae). There are a few examples of “artificial” long-range dispersal by man (possibly on ship hulls, oysters, in ballast water). Long-range dispersal of seaweeds does exist, but it is an exception rather than the rule. If it were the rule, the world’s seaweed floras would show similar latitudinal gradients in species composition in the oceans and on both hemispheres. This is, however, not the case.

  7. IN VITRO GROWTH RATE OF Kappaphycus alvarezii MICROPROPAGULE AND EMBRYO BY ENRICHMENT MEDIUM WITH SEAWEED EXTRACT

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Emma Suryati

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available The development of micropropagule and embryo of seaweed depend on nutrient and fertilizer used. Seaweed has been reported contain hormone regulators such as auxine, cytokinine, gibbereline, and various minerals applied in stimulating the growth ocra plant and wheat culture. The objectives of this study were to determine the potential of Kappaphycus alvarezii extract and its optimal concentration in accelerating of Kappaphycus alvarezii micropropagule and embryo growth. Micropropagule and embryo produced through callus induction were planted into PES 1/20 liquid medium supplemented with seaweed extract at the concentrations of 0 (control, 25, 50, 75, and 100 μL in 10 mL of medium. The results showed that medium enrichment with 50 μL of seaweed extract had the highest survival rate and growth of thallus. In addition, this concentration was also resulted in a good performance of K. alvarezii thallus with the lighter color. The advantage of this study for seaweed cultivation in Indonesia, among others, seaweed can be used as fertilizer, especially in the maintenance of seaweed seed, so that cultivation can be better develop.

  8. Chemical composition of red, brown and green macroalgae from Buarcos bay in Central West Coast of Portugal.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rodrigues, Dina; Freitas, Ana C; Pereira, Leonel; Rocha-Santos, Teresa A P; Vasconcelos, Marta W; Roriz, Mariana; Rodríguez-Alcalá, Luís M; Gomes, Ana M P; Duarte, Armando C

    2015-09-15

    Six representative edible seaweeds from the Central West Portuguese Coast, including the less studied Osmundea pinnatifida, were harvested from Buarcos bay, Portugal and their chemical characterization determined. Protein content, total sugar and fat contents ranged between 14.4% and 23.8%, 32.4% and 49.3% and 0.6-3.6%. Highest total phenolic content was observed in Codium tomentosum followed by Sargassum muticum and O. pinnatifida. Fatty acid (FA) composition covered the branched chain C13ai to C22:5 n3 with variable content in n6 and n3 FA; low n6:n3 ratios were observed in O. pinnatifida, Grateloupia turuturu and C. tomentosum. Some seaweed species may be seen as good sources of Ca, K, Mg and Fe, corroborating their good nutritional value. According to FTIR-ATR spectra, G. turuturu was associated with carrageenan seaweed producers whereas Gracilaria gracilis and O. pinnatifida were mostly agar producers. In the brown algae, S. muticum and Saccorhiza polyschides, alginates and fucoidans were the main polysaccharides found.

  9. Seaweeds: an opportunity for wealth and sustainable livelihood for coastal communities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rebours, Céline; Marinho-Soriano, Eliane; Zertuche-González, José A; Hayashi, Leila; Vásquez, Julio A; Kradolfer, Paul; Soriano, Gonzalo; Ugarte, Raul; Abreu, Maria Helena; Bay-Larsen, Ingrid; Hovelsrud, Grete; Rødven, Rolf; Robledo, Daniel

    2014-01-01

    The European, Canadian, and Latin American seaweed industries rely on the sustainable harvesting of natural resources. As several countries wish to increase their activity, the harvest should be managed according to integrated and participatory governance regimes to ensure production within a long-term perspective. Development of regulations and directives enabling the sustainable exploitation of natural resources must therefore be brought to the national and international political agenda in order to ensure environmental, social, and economic values in the coastal areas around the world. In Europe, Portugal requires an appraisal of seaweed management plans while Norway and Canada have developed and implemented coastal management plans including well-established and sustainable exploitation of their natural seaweed resources. Whereas, in Latin America, different scenarios of seaweed exploitation can be observed; each country is however in need of long-term and ecosystem-based management plans to ensure that exploitation is sustainable. These plans are required particularly in Peru and Brazil, while Chile has succeeded in establishing a sustainable seaweed-harvesting plan for most of the economically important seaweeds. Furthermore, in both Europe and Latin America, seaweed aquaculture is at its infancy and development will have to overcome numerous challenges at different levels (i.e., technology, biology, policy). Thus, there is a need for regulations and establishment of "best practices" for seaweed harvesting, management, and cultivation. Trained human resources will also be required to provide information and education to the communities involved, to enable seaweed utilization to become a profitable business and provide better income opportunities to coastal communities.

  10. Kinetics and equilibrium studies on biosorption of cadmium, lead, and nickel ions from aqueous solutions by intact and chemically modified brown algae

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Montazer-Rahmati, Mohammad Mehdi, E-mail: mrahmati@ut.ac.ir [School of Chemical Engineering, College of Engineering, University of Tehran, P.O. Box: 11155-4563, Tehran 4563 (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Rabbani, Parisa; Abdolali, Atefeh [School of Chemical Engineering, College of Engineering, University of Tehran, P.O. Box: 11155-4563, Tehran 4563 (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Keshtkar, Ali Reza [Nuclear Science and Technology Research Institute, Atomic Energy Organization of Iran, P.O. Box: 11365-8486, Tehran (Iran, Islamic Republic of)

    2011-01-15

    Research highlights: {yields} The present study deals with the evaluation of biosorptive removal of Cd (II), Ni (II) and Pb (II) ions by both intact and pre-treated brown marine algae: Cystoseira indica, Sargassum glaucescens, Nizimuddinia zanardini and Padina australis treated with formaldehyde (FA), glutaraldehyde (GA), polyethylene imine (PEI), calcium chloride (CaCl{sub 2}) and hydrochloric acid (HCl). From the results obtained, chemically modification leads to higher capacity of biosorption. {yields} The equilibrium experimental data were tested using the most common isotherms. The results are best fitted by the Freundlich model among two-parameter models and the Toth, Khan and Radke-Prausnitz models among three-parameter isotherm models for Cd (II), Ni (II) and Pb (II), respectively. {yields} One-way ANOVA and one sample t-tests were performed on experimental data to evaluate the statistical significance of biosorption capacities after five cycles of sorption and desorption. {yields} The kinetic data were fitted by models including pseudo-first-order and pseudo-second-order. From the results obtained, the pseudo-second-order kinetic model describes best the biosorption of cadmium, nickel and lead ions. - Abstract: The present study deals with the evaluation of biosorptive removal of Cd (II), Ni (II) and Pb (II) ions by both intact and pre-treated brown marine algae: Cystoseira indica, Sargassum glaucescens, Nizimuddinia zanardini and Padina australis treated with formaldehyde (FA), glutaraldehyde (GA), polyethylene imine (PEI), calcium chloride (CaCl{sub 2}) and hydrochloric acid (HCl). Batch shaking adsorption experiments were performed in order to examine the effects of pH, contact time, biomass concentration, biomass treatment and initial metal concentration on the removal process. The optimum sorption conditions for each heavy metal are presented. One-way ANOVA and one sample t-tests were performed on experimental data to evaluate the statistical

  11. Chemical characterization and antioxidant activity of sulfated polysaccharide from the red seaweed Gracilaria birdiae

    OpenAIRE

    Souza,B.W.S.; Cerqueira, M. A.; Bourbon, A. I.; A. C. Pinheiro; Martins, Joana; Teixeira, J. A.; Coimbra, Manuel A.; Vicente, A.A.

    2012-01-01

    Hydrocolloids from seaweeds have interesting functional properties, such as antioxidant activity and gelling ability. A polysaccharide was isolated by aqueous extraction at 90 C from the red seaweed Gracilaria birdiae (Gb), with a yield of 27.2% of the seaweed dry weight. The sulfate content of the polysaccharide was 8.4% and the main sugars present were galactose (65.4 mol%), 3,6-anhydrogalactose (25.1 mol%) and 6-O-methylgalactose (9.2 mol%). Gel permeation chromatography showed that ...

  12. Iodine toxicity from soy milk and seaweed ingestion is associated with serious thyroid dysfunction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Crawford, Bronwyn A; Cowell, Christopher T; Emder, Phillip J; Learoyd, Diana L; Chua, Elizabeth L; Sinn, John; Jack, Michelle M

    2010-10-04

    We report a series of cases of thyroid dysfunction in adults associated with ingestion of a brand of soy milk manufactured with kombu (seaweed), and a case of hypothyroidism in a neonate whose mother had been drinking this milk. We also report two cases of neonatal hypothyroidism linked to maternal ingestion of seaweed made into soup. These products were found to contain high levels of iodine. Despite increasing awareness of iodine deficiency, the potential for iodine toxicity, particularly from sources such as seaweed, is less well recognised.

  13. Innovative Alternative Technologies to Extract Carotenoids from Microalgae and Seaweeds

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mahesha M. Poojary

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available Marine microalgae and seaweeds (microalgae represent a sustainable source of various bioactive natural carotenoids, including β-carotene, lutein, astaxanthin, zeaxanthin, violaxanthin and fucoxanthin. Recently, the large-scale production of carotenoids from algal sources has gained significant interest with respect to commercial and industrial applications for health, nutrition, and cosmetic applications. Although conventional processing technologies, based on solvent extraction, offer a simple approach to isolating carotenoids, they suffer several, inherent limitations, including low efficiency (extraction yield, selectivity (purity, high solvent consumption, and long treatment times, which have led to advancements in the search for innovative extraction technologies. This comprehensive review summarizes the recent trends in the extraction of carotenoids from microalgae and seaweeds through the assistance of different innovative techniques, such as pulsed electric fields, liquid pressurization, supercritical fluids, subcritical fluids, microwaves, ultrasounds, and high-pressure homogenization. In particular, the review critically analyzes technologies, characteristics, advantages, and shortcomings of the different innovative processes, highlighting the differences in terms of yield, selectivity, and economic and environmental sustainability.

  14. Innovative Alternative Technologies to Extract Carotenoids from Microalgae and Seaweeds.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Poojary, Mahesha M; Barba, Francisco J; Aliakbarian, Bahar; Donsì, Francesco; Pataro, Gianpiero; Dias, Daniel A; Juliano, Pablo

    2016-11-22

    Marine microalgae and seaweeds (microalgae) represent a sustainable source of various bioactive natural carotenoids, including β-carotene, lutein, astaxanthin, zeaxanthin, violaxanthin and fucoxanthin. Recently, the large-scale production of carotenoids from algal sources has gained significant interest with respect to commercial and industrial applications for health, nutrition, and cosmetic applications. Although conventional processing technologies, based on solvent extraction, offer a simple approach to isolating carotenoids, they suffer several, inherent limitations, including low efficiency (extraction yield), selectivity (purity), high solvent consumption, and long treatment times, which have led to advancements in the search for innovative extraction technologies. This comprehensive review summarizes the recent trends in the extraction of carotenoids from microalgae and seaweeds through the assistance of different innovative techniques, such as pulsed electric fields, liquid pressurization, supercritical fluids, subcritical fluids, microwaves, ultrasounds, and high-pressure homogenization. In particular, the review critically analyzes technologies, characteristics, advantages, and shortcomings of the different innovative processes, highlighting the differences in terms of yield, selectivity, and economic and environmental sustainability.

  15. Formulation of Red Seaweed and Spirulina platensis Based Jelly Drinks

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wini Trilaksani

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available Generally, jelly drinks in the market contain synthetic sweeteners, coloring and flavoring agents, as well as low in nutrients content, therefore it needs to be developed in order to obtain more healthy product by adding seaweed and Spirulina. The aims of this research were to determine the best formula of jelly drinks with seaweed (Eucheuma cottonii and Spirulina platensis and to compare the characteristics (nutrients and antioxidant activity of jelly drinks made from culture-based Spirulina and from commercial Spirulina. Jelly drinks made from commercial Spirulina (0.2%; 0.4%; and 0.6% had protein content 1.218-2.750% (db and the IC50 value was 3363.5-6070 ppm. Bayes test showed that jelly drink with commercial Spirulina 0.4% was the selected product and was used as the reference formula on this research. Types of Spirulina (commercial and culture gave no significant effect (p>0.05 to the hedonic test results and antioxidant activity however affected significantly on protein content (p<0.05. Jelly drink supplemented with 0.4% of culture-based Spirulina produced 92 kcal of energy; meanwhile the jelly drink with 0.4% of commercial Spirulina produced 79 kcal of energy.

  16. Heavy metals in edible seaweeds commercialised for human consumption

    Science.gov (United States)

    Besada, Victoria; Andrade, José Manuel; Schultze, Fernando; González, Juan José

    2009-01-01

    Though seaweed consumption is growing steadily across Europe, relatively few studies have reported on the quantities of heavy metals they contain and/or their potential effects on the population's health. This study focuses on the first topic and analyses the concentrations of six typical heavy metals (Cd, Pb, Hg, Cu, Zn, total As and inorganic As) in 52 samples from 11 algae-based products commercialised in Spain for direct human consumption ( Gelidium spp.; Eisenia bicyclis; Himanthalia elongata; Hizikia fusiforme; Laminaria spp.; Ulva rigida; Chondrus crispus; Porphyra umbilicales and Undaria pinnatifida). Samples were ground, homogenised and quantified by atomic absorption spectrometry (Cu and Zn by flame AAS; Cd, Pb and total As by electrothermal AAS; total mercury by the cold vapour technique; and inorganic As by flame-hydride generation). Accuracy was assessed by participation in periodic QUASIMEME (Quality Assurance of Information in Marine Environmental Monitoring in Europe) and IAEA (International Atomic Energy Agency) intercalibration exercises. To detect any objective differences existing between the seaweeds' metal concentrations, univariate and multivariate studies (principal component analysis, cluster analysis and linear discriminant analysis) were performed. It is concluded that the Hizikia fusiforme samples contained the highest values of total and inorganic As and that most Cd concentrations exceeded the French Legislation. The two harvesting areas (Atlantic and Pacific oceans) were differentiated using both univariate studies (for Cu, total As, Hg and Zn) and a multivariate discriminant function (which includes Zn, Cu and Pb).

  17. The evolvability of growth form in a clonal seaweed.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Monro, Keyne; Poore, Alistair G B

    2009-12-01

    Although modular construction is considered the key to adaptive growth or growth-form plasticity in sessile taxa (e.g., plants, seaweeds and colonial invertebrates), the serial expression of genes in morphogenesis may compromise its evolutionary potential if growth forms emerge as integrated wholes from module iteration. To explore the evolvability of growth form in the red seaweed, Asparagopsis armata, we estimated genetic variances, covariances, and cross-environment correlations for principal components of growth-form variation in contrasting light environments. We compared variance-covariance matrices across environments to test environmental effects on heritable variation and examined the potential for evolutionary change in the direction of plastic responses to light. Our results suggest that growth form in Asparagopsis may constitute only a single genetic entity whose plasticity affords only limited evolutionary potential. We argue that morphological integration arising from modular construction may constrain the evolvability of growth form in Asparagopsis, emphasizing the critical distinction between genetic and morphological modularity in this and other modular taxa.

  18. Innovative Alternative Technologies to Extract Carotenoids from Microalgae and Seaweeds

    Science.gov (United States)

    Poojary, Mahesha M.; Barba, Francisco J.; Aliakbarian, Bahar; Donsì, Francesco; Pataro, Gianpiero; Dias, Daniel A.; Juliano, Pablo

    2016-01-01

    Marine microalgae and seaweeds (microalgae) represent a sustainable source of various bioactive natural carotenoids, including β-carotene, lutein, astaxanthin, zeaxanthin, violaxanthin and fucoxanthin. Recently, the large-scale production of carotenoids from algal sources has gained significant interest with respect to commercial and industrial applications for health, nutrition, and cosmetic applications. Although conventional processing technologies, based on solvent extraction, offer a simple approach to isolating carotenoids, they suffer several, inherent limitations, including low efficiency (extraction yield), selectivity (purity), high solvent consumption, and long treatment times, which have led to advancements in the search for innovative extraction technologies. This comprehensive review summarizes the recent trends in the extraction of carotenoids from microalgae and seaweeds through the assistance of different innovative techniques, such as pulsed electric fields, liquid pressurization, supercritical fluids, subcritical fluids, microwaves, ultrasounds, and high-pressure homogenization. In particular, the review critically analyzes technologies, characteristics, advantages, and shortcomings of the different innovative processes, highlighting the differences in terms of yield, selectivity, and economic and environmental sustainability. PMID:27879659

  19. Characterization of agarophytic seaweeds from the biorefinery context.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baghel, Ravi S; Reddy, C R K; Jha, Bhavanath

    2014-05-01

    The major seaweed components such as natural colorants (R-phycoerythrin (R-PE), R-phycocyanin (R-PC)), minerals, proteins, lipids, cellulose and agar which are of considerable commercial value were estimated in 15 different agarophytic seaweeds. R-PE and R-PC contents ranged from 138.33 ± 17.67 to 1039.43 ± 27.65 μg/g and 50.26 ± 6.63 to 818.2 ± 48 μg/g on fresh weight (fw) basis, respectively. Appreciable amounts of both macro-minerals (K, Na, Ca, Mg) and micro-minerals (Fe, Zn, Se, Mn) were estimated. The total lipid and protein contents were 0.65 ± 0.06% to 1.53 ± 0.07% and 4.75 ± 0.5% to 19.31 ± 3.5% on dry weight (dw) basis respectively while cellulose and agar contents varied from 3.7 ± 0.13% to 12.20 ± 0.45% and 9.17 ± 0.62% to 25.23 ± 0.50% dw, respectively. The overall finding of this study enable the selection and value addition of agarophytic feedstock for biorefinery. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  20. The influence of brown algae alginates on phenolic compounds capability of ultraviolet radiation absorption in vitro

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Leonardo Tavares Salgado

    2007-06-01

    Full Text Available Brown algae phenolic compounds (PC are secondary metabolites that participate in many biological processes, such as ultraviolet radiation (UV protection, polyspermy blocking and trace metals bounding. Recently, PC has also been studied due to possible interactions with cell wall polysaccharides. However, there are few evidences of these interactions and their influence in physiological processes. The interactions between PC from the brown alga Padina gymnospora and alginates and the influence of these interactions on the UV absorption properties of PC were investigated in this work. Chromatography and spectrophotometry techniques were used to isolate, characterize and determine UV absorption capacity of studied compounds. Even after the P. gymnospora polysaccharide extraction and isolating methods, the PC was maintained linked to the alginate. The interaction of alginates with PC did not cause modifications on absorbance pattern of electromagnetic spectrum (UV-VIS-IR. The UV absorbance capability of PC linked to alginate was maintained for a longer period of time if compared with the purified PC. The obtained results reveal the strong linkage between PC and alginates and that these linkages preserve the UV absorption capability of PC along time.Os compostos fenólicos (PC de algas pardas são metab��litos secundários que participam de diversos processos biológicos, como proteção contra radiação ultravioleta (UV, bloqueio de poliespermia e ligação de metais. Recentemente, os PC têm sido estudados devido a possíveis interações com polissacarídeos da parede celular. Entretanto, existem poucas evidências sobre estas interações e sua influência em processos fisiológicos. Neste trabalho, foram investigadas as interações entre os PC de Padina gymnospora e os alginatos e a influência destas interações na capacidade de absorção de UV pelos PC. Foram utilizadas técnicas cromatográficas e espectrofotométricas para o

  1. Searching for Brown Dwarf Outflows

    CERN Document Server

    Whelan, E T; Bacciotti, F; Randich, S; Natta, A

    2009-01-01

    As outflow activity in low mass protostars is strongly connected to ac- cretion it is reasonable to expect accreting brown dwarfs to also be driving out- flows. In the last three years we have searched for brown dwarf outflows using high quality optical spectra obtained with UVES on the VLT and the technique of spectro-astrometry. To date five brown dwarf outflows have been discovered. Here the method is discussed and the results to date outlined.

  2. Continuous cadmium removal from aqueous solutions by seaweed in a packed-bed column under consecutive sorption-desorption cycles

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jafari, Seyed Ali; Jamali, Abbas [Persian Gulf Research Institute, Persian Gulf University, 75169, Bushehr (Iran, Islamic Republic of)

    2016-04-15

    Packed-bed column process efficiency for cadmium adsorption from aqueous solution was investigated under different bed heights (2.6 to 7.5 cm) and feed flow rates (15 to 30 ml min{sup -1}). The column was filled with brown seaweed, Sargassum angustifolium. Three simplified models, including Bed Depth Service Time, Thomas, and Yoon- Nelson were employed for describing the experimental breakthrough curves as well as achieving design parameters. Bed lifetime was also evaluated in several consecutive sorption-desorption cycles. Cadmium concentration of 0.005mg l−1, as a standard limit for potable water, was considered as the breakthrough concentration. The maximum column performance was achieved 81% at 7.5 cm bed length and flow rate of 15 ml min{sup -1}. Indeed, increasing the bed height increased the sorption performance and service time, while increasing the feed flow rate had a negative effect. Maximum sorption capacity value remained almost constant by the bed height changes; however, increase in the feed flow rate slightly decreased it. The modeling results revealed that the Yoon-Nelson model was more accurate than Thomas for describing the experimental breakthrough data, especially at low flow rates. Column service time predictions were surprisingly achieved using the Bed Depth Service Time model even at extrapolations. 20% reduction in column adsorption efficiency was observed at the end of four consecutive sorption-desorption cycles; however, desorption efficiencies were achieved more than 99% in each cycle.

  3. Green biosynthesis and characterization of magnetic iron oxide (Fe₃O₄) nanoparticles using seaweed (Sargassum muticum) aqueous extract.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mahdavi, Mahnaz; Namvar, Farideh; Ahmad, Mansor Bin; Mohamad, Rosfarizan

    2013-05-21

    The synthesis of nanoparticles has become a matter of great interest in recent times due to their various advantageous properties and applications in a variety of fields. The exploitation of different plant materials for the biosynthesis of nanoparticles is considered a green technology because it does not involve any harmful chemicals. In this study, iron oxide nanoparticles (Fe3O4-NPs) were synthesized using a rapid, single step and completely green biosynthetic method by reduction of ferric chloride solution with brown seaweed (BS, Sargassum muticum) water extract containing sulphated polysaccharides as a main factor which acts as reducing agent and efficient stabilizer. The structural and properties of the Fe3O4-NPs were investigated by X-ray diffraction, Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy, field emission scanning electron microscopy (FESEM), energy dispersive X-ray fluorescence spectrometry (EDXRF), vibrating sample magnetometry (VSM) and transmission electron microscopy. The average particle diameter as determined by TEM was found to be 18 ± 4 nm. X-ray diffraction showed that the nanoparticles are crystalline in nature, with a cubic shape. The nanoparticles synthesized through this biosynthesis method can potentially useful in various applications.

  4. Green Biosynthesis and Characterization of Magnetic Iron Oxide (Fe3O4 Nanoparticles Using Seaweed (Sargassum muticum Aqueous Extract

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rosfarizan Mohamad

    2013-05-01

    Full Text Available The synthesis of nanoparticles has become a matter of great interest in recent times due to their various advantageous properties and applications in a variety of fields. The exploitation of different plant materials for the biosynthesis of nanoparticles is considered a green technology because it does not involve any harmful chemicals. In this study, iron oxide nanoparticles (Fe3O4-NPs were synthesized using a rapid, single step and completely green biosynthetic method by reduction of ferric chloride solution with brown seaweed (BS, Sargassum muticum water extract containing sulphated polysaccharides as a main factor which acts as reducing agent and efficient stabilizer. The structural and properties of the Fe3O4-NPs were investigated by X-ray diffraction, Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy, field emission scanning electron microscopy (FESEM, energy dispersive X-ray fluorescence spectrometry (EDXRF, vibrating sample magnetometry (VSM and transmission electron microscopy. The average particle diameter as determined by TEM was found to be 18 ± 4 nm. X-ray diffraction showed that the nanoparticles are crystalline in nature, with a cubic shape. The nanoparticles synthesized through this biosynthesis method can potentially useful in various applications.

  5. Characterization of protein, lipid and mineral contents in common Norwegian seaweeds and evaluation of their potential as food and feed.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maehre, Hanne K; Malde, Marian K; Eilertsen, Karl-Erik; Elvevoll, Edel O

    2014-12-01

    The objectives of this study were to examine protein and amino acid composition, lipid and fatty acid composition, along with a range of essential minerals in common Norwegian seaweed species representing the red (Palmaria palmata and Vertebrata lanosa), green (Cladophora rupestris, Enteromorpha intestinalis and Ulva lactuca) and brown (Alaria esculenta, Laminaria digitata, Laminaria hyperborea, Fucus vesiculosus and Pelvetia canaliculata) classes and assess their potential as alternatives to cereals in food and feed. As macroalgae accumulate heavy metals, arsenic, cadmium and mercury were also analyzed. Proteins ranged from 34 to 123 g kg(-1) dry weight (DW) and the essential amino acid levels may cover both human and salmonid requirements. Lipids were low (6-58 g kg(-1) DW), but the red algae had high relative content of long-chained omega-3 fatty acids (32-34 % of the fatty acids). Iodine contents were particularly high in the Laminaria species. Of the heavy metals only arsenic levels may be of concern. In total, the red alga P. palmata was regarded as the best alternative to cereals in food and feed. For several of the other species, single-component extraction for the ingredients market may be better than using the whole product. © 2014 Society of Chemical Industry.

  6. Bio-screening of a few green seaweeds from India for their cytotoxic and antioxidant potential

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Vinayak, R.C.; Sabu, A.S.; Chatterji, A.

    extracts (MEs) of five species of green seaweeds commonly found in India were screened for their cytotoxic activity by brine shrimp lethality assay and antioxidant properties using various in vitro assays, including 1,1-diphenyl-2-picrylhydrazyl (DPPH...

  7. Screening for the presence of antimicrobial activity in few Indian seaweeds

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Kotnala, S.; Garg, Aakriti; Chatterji, A.

    Methanolic extracts of 17 commonly found seaweeds in the west coast of India were screened for the presence of antimicrobial activity against Bacillus subtilis, Escherichia coli, Pseudomonas sp., Streptococcus pyrogenes, Staphylococcus aureus...

  8. A COMPARATIVE-STUDY OF TEMPERATURE RESPONSES OF CARIBBEAN SEAWEEDS FROM DIFFERENT BIOGEOGRAPHIC GROUPS

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    PAKKER, H; BREEMAN, AM; VANREINE, WFP; VANDENHOEK, C

    1995-01-01

    Temperature tolerances were determined for Caribbean isolates (total 31) of seaweeds belonging to three distributional groups: 1) species confined to the tropical western Atlantic (Botryocladia spinulifera, Chamaedoris peniculum, Cladophoropsis sundanensis, Dictyopteris justii, Dictyurus occidentali

  9. Anti-infective potential of marine invertebrates and seaweeds from the Brazilian coast

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Bianco, Everson Miguel; de Oliveira, Simone Quintana; Rigotto, Caroline; Tonini, Maiko Luis; da Rosa Guimarães, Tatiana; Bittencourt, Francine; Gouvêa, Lidiane Pires; Aresi, Cassandra; de Almeida, Maria Tereza Rojo; Moritz, Maria Izabel Goularte; Martins, Cintia Dalcuche Leal; Scherner, Fernando; Carraro, João Luís; Horta, Paulo Antunes; Reginatto, Flávio Henrique; Steindel, Mario; Simões, Cláudia Maria Oliveira; Schenkel, Eloir Paulo

    2013-01-01

    This manuscript describes the evaluation of anti-infective potential in vitro of organic extracts from nine sponges, one ascidian, two octocorals, one bryozoan, and 27 seaweed species collected along the Brazilian coast...

  10. Cloning and Functional Characterization of Cycloartenol Synthase from the Red Seaweed Laurencia dendroidea

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Calegario, Gabriela; Pollier, Jacob; Arendt, Philipp; de Oliveira, Louisi Souza; Thompson, Cristiane; Soares, Angélica Ribeiro; Pereira, Renato Crespo; Goossens, Alain; Thompson, Fabiano L

    2016-01-01

      The red seaweed Laurencia dendroidea belongs to the Rhodophyta, a phylum of eukaryotic algae that is widely distributed across the oceans and that constitute an important source of bioactive specialized metabolites...

  11. MANAGEMENT OF SUSTAINABLE SEAWEED (Kappaphycus alvarezii AQUACULTURE IN THE CONTEXT OF CLIMATE CHANGE MITIGATION

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Erlania Erlania

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available Seaweed is an important aquaculture commodity that could contribute on climate change mitigation, related to its ability on absorbing CO2, as one of the green house gases, through photosynthesis. This study aimed to analyze seaweed potencies on carbon sequestration in the context of climate change mitigation while still resulting optimum production as primary purpose and to analyze the carrying capacity of Gerupuk Bay in order to manage sustainability of seaweed aquaculture. Seaweed, (Kappaphycus alvarezii was cultivated with long-line system in Gerupuk Bay, West Nusa Tenggara, during five months for three cultivation cycles. Samplings were conducted at days-15, 30, and 45 with CO2 absorption rates as main parameters. Water carrying capacity was calculated to determine the ability of Gerupuk Bay waters for supporting development of sustainable seaweed aquaculture. The results showed that absorption rates of CO2 by seaweed (K. alvarezii were different at each sampling days of cultivation periods; the highest value was at 10-20 days of cultivation. CO2 absorption analysis resulted based on sampling days of cultivation period could be appl ied to formulate the strategies for management of sustainable seaweed aquaculture, with optimal production and positively contributed to the environment. However, waters carrying capacity should also be considered as major aspect in the application of seaweed cultivation management, thus it can run continuously without causing conflicts with other interests.

  12. Analysis of iodine content in seaweed by GC-ECD and estimation of iodine intake

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tai Sheng Yeh

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available Edible seaweed products have been consumed in many Asian countries. Edible seaweeds accumulate iodine from seawater, and are therefore a good dietary source of iodine. An adequate consumption of seaweed can eliminate iodine deficiency disorders, but excessive iodine intake is not good for health. The recommended dietary reference intake of 0.15 mg/d and 0.14 mg/d for iodine has been established in the United States and Taiwan, respectively. In this study, 30 samples of seaweed were surveyed for iodine content. The samples included 10 nori (Porphyra, 10 wakame (Undaria, and 10 kombu (Laminaria products. The iodine in seaweed was derivatized with 3-pentanone and detected by gas chromatography-electron capture detector (GC-ECD. The method detection limit was 0.5 mg/kg. The iodine content surveyed for nori was 29.3–45.8 mg/kg, for wakame 93.9–185.1 mg/kg, and for kombu 241–4921 mg/kg. Kombu has the highest average iodine content 2523.5 mg/kg, followed by wakame (139.7 mg/kg and nori (36.9 mg/kg. The GC-ECD method developed in this study is a low-cost alternative to inductively coupled plasma-optical emission spectroscopy for iodine detection in seaweeds. The iodine intake from seaweed in the current survey was calculated and compared with the iodine dietary reference intake of Taiwan. The risk and benefit of seaweed consumption is also discussed.

  13. Evaluation of different promoters driving the GFP reporter gene in seaweed Kappaphycus alvarezii

    OpenAIRE

    Muh. Alias L. Rajamuddin; Alimuddin A; Utut Widyastuti; Irvan Faizal

    2016-01-01

    Promoter regulates expression level of foreign gene in transgenic organism. This study was performed to select asuitable promoter as the fi rst step towards production of valuable trait-enhanced seaweed by transgenic technology. Greenfl uorescent protein (GFP) gene was used as a reporter to determine the activity of promoter in seaweed Kappaphycusalvarezii. GFP gene constructs driven by cytomegalovirus (pCMV-GFP), caulifl ower mosaic virus (pCaMV-GFP),medaka β-actin (pmBA-GFP) and Japanese fl...

  14. Biosynthesis of Silver Nanoparticles from Marine Seaweed Sargassum cinereum and their Antibacterial Activity

    OpenAIRE

    C Mohandass; A S Vijayaraj; R Rajasabapathy; S Satheeshbabu; S. V. Rao; Shiva, C.; De-Mello, I.

    2013-01-01

    Seaweed extracts of Sargassum cinereum was used as a reducing agent in the eco-friendly extracellular synthesis of silver nanoparticles from an aqueous solution of silver nitrate (AgNO 3 ). High conversion of silver ions to silver nanoparticles was achieved with a reaction temperature of 100΀ and a seaweed extract concentration of 10% with a residential time of 3 h. Formation of silver nanoparticles was characterised by spectrophotometry and the scanning electron microscope. The average parti...

  15. Seaweed intake and blood pressure levels in healthy pre-school Japanese children

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yamamoto Keiko

    2011-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Few studies have examined whether dietary factors might affect blood pressure in children. We purposed to investigate whether seaweed intake is associated with blood pressure level among Japanese preschool children. Methods The design of the study was cross-sectional and it was conducted in autumn 2006. Subjects were healthy preschoolers aged 3-6 years in Aichi, Japan. Blood pressure and pulse were measured once by an automated sphygmomanometer, which uses oscillometric methods. Dietary data, including seaweed intake, were assessed using 3-day dietary records covering 2 consecutive weekdays and 1 weekend day. Of a total of 533 children, 459 (86.1 percent agreed to be enrolled in our study. Finally, blood pressure measurement, complete dietary records and parent-reported height and weight were obtained for 223 boys and 194 girls. Results When we examined Spearman's correlation coefficients, seaweed intake was significantly negatively related to systolic blood pressure in girls (P = 0.008. In the one-way analysis of covariance for blood pressure and pulse after adjustments for age and BMI, the boys with the lowest, middle and highest tertiles of seaweed intake had diastolic blood pressure readings of 62.8, 59.3 and 59.6 mmHg, respectively (P = 0.11, trend P = 0.038. Girls with higher seaweed intake had significantly lower systolic blood pressure readings (102.4, 99.2 and 96.9 mmHg for girls with the lowest, middle and highest tertiles of seaweed intake, respectively; P = 0.037, trend P = 0.030. Conclusion Our study showed that seaweed intake was negatively related to diastolic blood pressure in boys and to systolic blood pressure in girls. This suggests that seaweed might have beneficial effects on blood pressure among children.

  16. Spatial distributions of floating seaweeds in the East China Sea from late winter to early spring.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mizuno, S; Ajisaka, T; Lahbib, S; Kokubu, Y; Alabsi, M N; Komatsu, T

    2014-01-01

    Floating seaweeds play an important role as a habitat for many animals accompanying or attaching to them in offshore waters. It was in 2000 that the first report described abundant distributions of floating seaweeds in offshore waters in the East China Sea in spring. Young individuals of the yellowtail Seriola quinqueradiata are captured for aquaculture purposes from floating seaweeds in the East China Sea. Therefore, a sound understanding of the distributions of floating seaweeds in the East China Sea is needed. Detailed information is especially important during the late winter to early spring, which corresponds to the juvenile period of the yellowtail. Thus, field surveys using R/V Tansei-Maru were conducted in the Japanese Exclusive Economic Zone in the East China Sea from late winter to early spring in 2010 and 2011. We obtained positions of the vessel by GPS and transversal distances from the vessel to a raft by visual observation. Distance sampling method (Thomas et al. 2010) was applied to estimation of floating seaweed densities (rafts km(-2)). Seaweed rafts were also randomly sampled using nets during the research cruises. In the East China Sea, seaweed rafts were distributed mainly on the continental shelf west of the Kuroshio, especially in waters between 26° N and 30° N. Collected rafts consisted of only one species, Sargassum horneri (Turner) C. Agardh. Taking into account surface currents and geographical distribution of S. horneri, it is estimated that these floating seaweeds originated from natural beds along the coast between mid and south China. Considering the approximate travel times, it is suggested that floating patches are colonized by yellowtails early on during their trips, i.e., close to the Chinese coast.

  17. A draft genome of the brown alga, Cladosiphon okamuranus, S-strain: a platform for future studies of 'mozuku' biology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nishitsuji, Koki; Arimoto, Asuka; Iwai, Kenji; Sudo, Yusuke; Hisata, Kanako; Fujie, Manabu; Arakaki, Nana; Kushiro, Tetsuo; Konishi, Teruko; Shinzato, Chuya; Satoh, Noriyuki; Shoguchi, Eiichi

    2016-12-01

    The brown alga, Cladosiphon okamuranus (Okinawa mozuku), is economically one of the most important edible seaweeds, and is cultivated for market primarily in Okinawa, Japan. C. okamuranus constitutes a significant source of fucoidan, which has various physiological and biological activities. To facilitate studies of seaweed biology, we decoded the draft genome of C. okamuranus S-strain. The genome size of C. okamuranus was estimated as ∼140 Mbp, smaller than genomes of two other brown algae, Ectocarpus siliculosus and Saccharina japonica Sequencing with ∼100× coverage yielded an assembly of 541 scaffolds with N50 = 416 kbp. Together with transcriptomic data, we estimated that the C. okamuranus genome contains 13,640 protein-coding genes, approximately 94% of which have been confirmed with corresponding mRNAs. Comparisons with the E. siliculosus genome identified a set of C. okamuranus genes that encode enzymes involved in biosynthetic pathways for sulfated fucans and alginate biosynthesis. In addition, we identified C. okamuranus genes for enzymes involved in phlorotannin biosynthesis. The present decoding of the Cladosiphon okamuranus genome provides a platform for future studies of mozuku biology. © The Author 2016. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of Kazusa DNA Research Institute.

  18. Effects of storage and solvent type in a lipophylic chemical profile of the seaweed Dictyota menstrualis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Diana Negrão Cavalcanti

    2008-03-01

    Full Text Available Crude extracts from specimens of the brown seaweed Dictyota menstrualis, known to produce diterpenes as their major secondary metabolites, were analyzed according to storage procedures before extraction, and the solvent types used to obtain the crude extracts. The specimens of D. menstrualis were submitted to three types of storage procedures, such as wet, dry, and frozen and were extracted with a mixture of dichloromethane:methanol (2:1 and acetone. Qualitative differences were not observed by GC/MS analyses of all crude extracts containing mainly the diterpenes pachydictyol A (I, 6-hydroxy-dichotoma-3,14-diene-1,17-dial (II, 6-hydroxy-2,7-cycloxenia-3,14-diene-1,17-dial (III, and 6-acetoxy-dichotoma-3,14-diene-1,17-dial (IV. The most efficient and selective extraction of the compounds with intermediate polarity produced by D. menstrualis was obtained using acetone, but with less mass production. In general, the storage procedures produced very similar results, but the frozen samples furnished low amount of total diterpenes. According to these results on chemical analysis of crude extracts of seaweeds, the choice of solvent to extraction should be considered as important aspect to better screening bioactive compounds.Os extratos brutos de espécimes da alga parda D. menstrualis, conhecida por produzir diterpenos como principais metabólitos secundários, foram analisados quanto ao modo de armazenamento antes da extração e tipo de solvente utilizado na obtenção do extrato bruto. Os solventes utilizados foram uma mistura diclorometano:metanol (2:1 e acetona. Os espécimes de D. menstrualis foram submetidos a três formas de armazenamento, denominados fresco, seco e congelado. Não foram observadas diferenças qualitativas nas amostras obtidas de quaisquer dos extratos brutos na análise por CG/EM, sendo compostas pelos diterpenos pachydictyol A (I, 6-hidroxi-dichotoma-3,14-dieno-1,17-dial (II, 6-hidroxi-2,7-cicloxenia-3,14-dieno-1,17-dial

  19. The Potential Role of Seaweeds in the Natural Manipulation of Rumen Fermentation and Methane Production

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maia, Margarida R. G.; Fonseca, António J. M.; Oliveira, Hugo M.; Mendonça, Carla; Cabrita, Ana R. J.

    2016-08-01

    This study is the first to evaluate the effects of five seaweeds (Ulva sp., Laminaria ochroleuca, Saccharina latissima, Gigartina sp., and Gracilaria vermiculophylla) on gas and methane production and ruminal fermentation parameters when incubated in vitro with two substrates (meadow hay and corn silage) for 24 h. Seaweeds led to lower gas production, with Gigartina sp. presenting the lowest value. When incubated with meadow hay, Ulva sp., Gigartina sp. and G. vermiculophylla decreased methane production, but with corn silage, methane production was only decreased by G. vermiculophylla. With meadow hay, L. ochroleuca and S. latissima promoted similar methane production as the control, but with corn silage, L. ochroleuca increased it. With the exception of S. latissima, all seaweeds promoted similar levels of total volatile fatty acid production. The highest proportion of acetic acid was produced with Ulva sp., G. vermiculophylla, and S. latissima; the highest proportion of butyric acid with the control and L. ochroleuca; and the highest proportion of iso-valeric acid with Gigartina sp. These results reveal the potential of seaweeds to mitigate ruminal methane production and the importance of the basal diet. To efficiently use seaweeds as feed ingredients with nutritional and environmental benefits, more research is required to determine the mechanisms underlying seaweed and substrate interactions.

  20. The Potential Role of Seaweeds in the Natural Manipulation of Rumen Fermentation and Methane Production

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maia, Margarida R. G.; Fonseca, António J. M.; Oliveira, Hugo M.; Mendonça, Carla; Cabrita, Ana R. J.

    2016-01-01

    This study is the first to evaluate the effects of five seaweeds (Ulva sp., Laminaria ochroleuca, Saccharina latissima, Gigartina sp., and Gracilaria vermiculophylla) on gas and methane production and ruminal fermentation parameters when incubated in vitro with two substrates (meadow hay and corn silage) for 24 h. Seaweeds led to lower gas production, with Gigartina sp. presenting the lowest value. When incubated with meadow hay, Ulva sp., Gigartina sp. and G. vermiculophylla decreased methane production, but with corn silage, methane production was only decreased by G. vermiculophylla. With meadow hay, L. ochroleuca and S. latissima promoted similar methane production as the control, but with corn silage, L. ochroleuca increased it. With the exception of S. latissima, all seaweeds promoted similar levels of total volatile fatty acid production. The highest proportion of acetic acid was produced with Ulva sp., G. vermiculophylla, and S. latissima; the highest proportion of butyric acid with the control and L. ochroleuca; and the highest proportion of iso-valeric acid with Gigartina sp. These results reveal the potential of seaweeds to mitigate ruminal methane production and the importance of the basal diet. To efficiently use seaweeds as feed ingredients with nutritional and environmental benefits, more research is required to determine the mechanisms underlying seaweed and substrate interactions. PMID:27572486

  1. Bioactivity and phytochemical constituents of marine red seaweeds (Jania rubens, Corallina mediterranea and Pterocladia capillacea

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Soad M. Mohy El-Din

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available Seaweeds are potential renewable resources in the marine environment. The antibacterial activity of Jania rubens, Corallina mediterranea and Pterocladia capillacea were analyzed against human pathogenic bacteria. The present study was performed to investigate the phytochemical constituents of seaweeds, such as alkaloids, flavonoids, steroids, terpenoids and phlobatannins. In this study, we estimated phenols, flavonoids, tannins, pigments and mineral contents and determined the hydrogen peroxide scavenging activity, reducing power and total antioxidant activity of various extracts of selected seaweeds. Phytochemicals were extracted from the three seaweeds using various solvents, such as methanol, ethanol, acetone and chloroform. Among the various extracts, the methanolic extract was found to have the highest reducing power and total antioxidant capacity. We evaluated the seaweeds against Vibrio fluvialis, and Pterocladia capillacea was the most effective at controlling its growth. The highest zone of inhibition was recorded in the methanol extract. The chemical constituents of the seaweeds were characterized by GC–MS, which showed that they contain organic compounds, such as 1,2-benzenedicarboxylic acid.

  2. The Effect of Seaweed Eucheuma cottonii on Superoxide Dismutase (SOD Liver of Hypercholesterolemic Rats

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    TUTIK WRESDIYATI

    2008-09-01

    Full Text Available Intracellular antioxidant superoxide dismutase (SOD was reported decreased in the liver and kidney of hypercholesterolemic rats. This study was conducted to observe the effect of seaweed Eucheuma cottonii powder on the profile of blood cholesterol and the level of SOD in liver tissues of hypercholesterolemic rats by using immunohistochemical technique. Twenty male Wistar rats were used for this study. Those rats were divided into four groups; (i negative control group (A, (ii hypercholesterolemia group treated by 5% seaweed powder (B, (iii hypercholesterolemia group treated by 10% seaweed powder (C, and (iv Positive control group or hypercholesterolemia group (D. The experiment was carried out for 35 days. Hypercholesterolemia condition (> 130 mg/dl, except group A, was achieved by feeding the rats with commercial diet containing 1% cholesterol. Drinking water was given ad libitum for 40 days. The results showed that seaweed powder decreased the total cholesterol, low density lipoprotein (LDL, triglyceride, and increased the level of high density lipoprotein (HDL and SOD status in the liver tissues of hypercholesterolemic rats. The treatment of 10% seaweed powder gave better results than that of 5%. These results suggested that dietary fiber such in the seaweed powder has antioxidant activity.

  3. Screening of biodiesel production from waste tuna oil (Thunnus sp.), seaweed Kappaphycus alvarezii and Gracilaria sp.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alamsjah, Mochammad Amin; Abdillah, Annur Ahadi; Mustikawati, Hutami; Atari, Suci Dwi Purnawa

    2017-09-01

    Biodiesel has several advantages over solar. Compared to solar, biodiesel has more eco-friendly characteristic and produces lower greenhouse gas emissions. Biodiesel that is made from animal fats can be produced from fish oil, while other alternative sources from vegetable oils are seaweed Kappaphycus alvarezii and Gracilaria sp. Waste tuna oil (Thunnus sp.) in Indonesia is commonly a side product of tuna canning industries known as tuna precook oil; on the other hand, seaweed Gracilaria sp. and Kappaphycus alvarezii are commonly found in Indonesia's seas. Seaweed waste that was used in the present study was 100 kg and in wet condition, and the waste oil was 10 liter. The seaweed was extracted with soxhletation method that used n-hexane as the solvent. To produce biodiesel, trans esterification was performed on the seaweed oil that was obtained from the soxhletation process and waste tuna oil. Biodiesel manufactured from seaweed K. alvarezii obtained the best score in flash point, freezing point, and viscosity test. However, according to level of manufacturing efficiency, biodiesel from waste tuna oil is more efficient and relatively easier compared to biodiesel from waste K. alvarezii and Gracilaria sp.

  4. The Potential Role of Seaweeds in the Natural Manipulation of Rumen Fermentation and Methane Production.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maia, Margarida R G; Fonseca, António J M; Oliveira, Hugo M; Mendonça, Carla; Cabrita, Ana R J

    2016-08-30

    This study is the first to evaluate the effects of five seaweeds (Ulva sp., Laminaria ochroleuca, Saccharina latissima, Gigartina sp., and Gracilaria vermiculophylla) on gas and methane production and ruminal fermentation parameters when incubated in vitro with two substrates (meadow hay and corn silage) for 24 h. Seaweeds led to lower gas production, with Gigartina sp. presenting the lowest value. When incubated with meadow hay, Ulva sp., Gigartina sp. and G. vermiculophylla decreased methane production, but with corn silage, methane production was only decreased by G. vermiculophylla. With meadow hay, L. ochroleuca and S. latissima promoted similar methane production as the control, but with corn silage, L. ochroleuca increased it. With the exception of S. latissima, all seaweeds promoted similar levels of total volatile fatty acid production. The highest proportion of acetic acid was produced with Ulva sp., G. vermiculophylla, and S. latissima; the highest proportion of butyric acid with the control and L. ochroleuca; and the highest proportion of iso-valeric acid with Gigartina sp. These results reveal the potential of seaweeds to mitigate ruminal methane production and the importance of the basal diet. To efficiently use seaweeds as feed ingredients with nutritional and environmental benefits, more research is required to determine the mechanisms underlying seaweed and substrate interactions.

  5. Effect of seaweed extracts on growth and yield of rice plants

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    ALUH NIKMATULLAH

    2010-07-01

    Full Text Available Sunarpi, Jupri A, Kurnianingsih R, Julisaniah NI, Nikmatullah A 2010. Effect of seaweed extracts on growth and yield of rice plants. Nusantara Bioscience 2: 73-77. Application of liquid seaweed fertilizers on some plant specieshas been reported to decrease application doses of nitrogen, phosphorus and potassium on some crop plants, as well as stimulating growth and production of many plants. It has been reported that there are at least 59 species of seaweeds found in coastal zone of West Nusa Tenggara Province, 15 of those species weres able to stimulate germination, growth and production of some horticultural and legume plants. The aim of this research is to investigate the effect of seaweed extracts obtained from ten species on growth and production of rice plants. To achive the goal, seaweed (100 g per species wasextracted with 100 mL of water, to obtain the concentration of 100%. Seaweed extract (15% was sprayed into the rice plants during vegetative and generative stages. Subsequently, the growth and yield parameters of rice plants were measured. The results shown that extracts of Sargassum sp.1, Sargassum sp.2, Sargassum polycistum, Hydroclathrus sp., Turbinaria ornata, and Turbinaria murayana, were able to induce growth of rice plants. However, only the Hydroclathrus sp. extract could enhance both growth and production of rice plants.

  6. DEVELOPMENTAL CHANGES IN THE GERMINATION, GROWTH AND CHLOROPHYLLASE ACTIVITY OF VIGNA MUNGO L. USING SEAWEED EXTRACT OF ULVA RETICULATA FORSSKAL.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ganapathy Selvam G.

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available The effect of seaweed extract prepared from Ulva reticulata on seed germination, seedling growth and chlorophyllase activity of Vigna mungo L. was studied. 100% germination was recorded in the seeds treated with lower concentration of seaweed extract. The V. mungo seeds soaked with lower concentrations of the seaweed extracts showed higher rates of germination, while the higher concentrations of the extracts inhibited the germination.

  7. Tune Your Brown Clustering, Please

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Derczynski, Leon; Chester, Sean; Bøgh, Kenneth Sejdenfaden

    2015-01-01

    unexplored. Accordingly, we present information for practitioners on the behaviour of Brown clustering in order to assist hyper-parametre tuning, in the form of a theoretical model of Brown clustering utility. This model is then evaluated empirically in two sequence labelling tasks over two text types. We...

  8. Methane production from the red seaweed gracilaria tikvahiae

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hanisak, M.D.

    1981-01-01

    Stable continuous anaerobic digestion of the title seaweed was maintained in large (120 L) digesters for more than 20 months, with an average gas (60% CH4) production of 0.4 L/g volatile solids. The average bioconversion efficiency was approximately 48%. When the retention time, t, was increased (i.e., loading rate decreased) from 10 to 60 days the total production of biogas and CH4 (as well as the percent CH4 and the reduction of total volatile solids) increased to maximum at t = 30 days and decreased at t = 60 days. Biogas and CH4 production on the basis of volatile solids added increased to less than or equal to 60 days, as did the percent volatile solids reduction. The pH in the digesters increased with increasing t.

  9. Coadjoint orbits of reductive type of seaweed Lie algebras

    CERN Document Server

    Moreau, Anne

    2011-01-01

    A connected algebraic group Q defined over a field of characteristic zero is quasi-reductive if there is an element of its dual of reductive type, that is such that the quotient of its stabiliser by the centre of Q is a reductive subgroup of GL(q), where q=Lie(Q). Due to results of M. Duflo, coadjoint representation of a quasi-reductive Q possesses a so called maximal reductive stabiliser and knowing this subgroup, defined up to a conjugation in Q, one can describe all coadjoint orbits of reductive type. In this paper, we consider quasi-reductive parabolic subalgebras of simple complex Lie algebras as well as all seaweed subalgebras of gl(n) and describe the classes of their maximal reductive stabilisers.

  10. Antimicrobial properties of cultivable bacteria associated with seaweeds in the Gulf of Mannar on the southeast coast of India

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Chakraborty, K; Thilakan, B; Chakraborty, R.D

    2016-01-01

    .... Antimicrobial activity analysis combined with the results of amplifying genes encoding for polyketide synthetase and nonribosomal peptide synthetase showed that seaweed-associated bacteria had broad...

  11. Cytotoxic effect of magnetic iron oxide nanoparticles synthesized via seaweed aqueous extract.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Namvar, Farideh; Rahman, Heshu Sulaiman; Mohamad, Rosfarizan; Baharara, Javad; Mahdavi, Mahnaz; Amini, Elaheh; Chartrand, Max Stanley; Yeap, Swee Keong

    2014-01-01

    Magnetic iron oxide nanoparticles (Fe3O4 MNPs) are among the most useful metal nanoparticles for multiple applications across a broad spectrum in the biomedical field, including the diagnosis and treatment of cancer. In previous work, we synthesized and characterized Fe3O4 MNPs using a simple, rapid, safe, efficient, one-step green method involving reduction of ferric chloride solution using brown seaweed (Sargassum muticum) aqueous extract containing hydroxyl, carboxyl, and amino functional groups mainly relevant to polysaccharides, which acts as a potential stabilizer and metal reductant agent. The aim of this study was to evaluate the in vitro cytotoxic activity and cellular effects of these Fe3O4 MNPs. Their in vitro anticancer activity was demonstrated in human cell lines for leukemia (Jurkat cells), breast cancer (MCF-7 cells), cervical cancer (HeLa cells), and liver cancer (HepG2 cells). The cancer cells were treated with different concentrations of Fe3O4 MNPs, and an MTT (3-[4,5-dimethylthiazol-2-yl]-2,5 diphenyl tetrazolium bromide) assay was used to test for cytotoxicity, resulting in an inhibitory concentration 50 (IC50) value of 23.83±1.1 μg/mL (HepG2), 18.75±2.1 μg/mL (MCF-7), 12.5±1.7 μg/mL (HeLa), and 6.4±2.3 μg/mL (Jurkat) 72 hours after treatment. Therefore, Jurkat cells were selected for further investigation. The representative dot plots from flow cytometric analysis of apoptosis showed that the percentages of cells in early apoptosis and late apoptosis were increased. Cell cycle analysis showed a significant increase in accumulation of Fe3O4 MNP-treated cells at sub-G1 phase, confirming induction of apoptosis by Fe3O4 MNPs. The Fe3O4 MNPs also activated caspase-3 and caspase-9 in a time-response fashion. The nature of the biosynthesis and therapeutic potential of Fe3O4 MNPs could pave the way for further research on the green synthesis of therapeutic agents, particularly in nanomedicine, to assist in the treatment of cancer.

  12. Antifouling activity of seaweed extracts from Guarujá, São Paulo, Brazil

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Heloisa Elias Medeiros

    2007-12-01

    Full Text Available Marine biofouling historically constitutes one of the major constraints faced by mankind in its oceanic activities. The search for alternatives to TBT-based antifouling paints has led several researchers to focus efforts in the development of environmentally friendly natural compounds. This work has contributed with this search, testing the antifouling potential of crude organic extracts from four seaweed species collected at Praia Branca, Guarujá district, São Paulo, Brazil. Throughout laboratory antifouling assays in which the attachment of a common fouling organism, the brown mussel Perna perna, was employed, antifouling activity (p A incrustação biológica constitui, historicamente, um dos maiores problemas encontrados pelo homem em suas atividades no mar. A busca por alternativas a tintas antiincrustantes contendo tributilestanho (TBT tem levado diversos pesquisadores a concentrar esforços no desenvolvimento de substâncias naturais menos danosas à biota marinha. Este trabalho procurou contribuir com essa busca, testando o potencial antiincrustante de quatro diferentes espécies de macroalgas da Praia Branca, município de Guarujá, SP. Através de testes antiincrustantes em laboratório utilizando a fixação de um organismo incrustante comum, o mexilhão Perna perna, foi constatado que os extratos de Jania rubens (Rhodophyta, Cryptonemiales e Bryothamnion seaforthii (Rhodophyta, Ceramiales, à concentração natural, apresentaram atividade antiincrustante significativa (p < 0,05, enquanto Dictyopteris delicatula (Phaeophyta, Dictyotales e Heterosiphonia gibbesii (Rhodophyta, Ceramiales não demonstraram eficiência na inibição da fixação de bissos do molusco. Das algas que indicaram potencial atividade contra a incrustação, J. rubens apresentou melhor desempenho em relação a B. seaforthii. Futuras investigações em campo serão necessárias para a obtenção de resultados que possam refletir melhor as condições naturais

  13. The use of seaweed from the Galician coast as a mineral supplement in organic dairy cattle.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rey-Crespo, F; López-Alonso, M; Miranda, M

    2014-04-01

    This study was designed to assess the value of seaweeds from the Galician coast as a source of minerals (especially iodine (I) but also other micro-minerals) in organic dairy cattle. It was conducted in an organic dairy farm in the Lugo province that typically represents the organic milk production in NW Spain. The animal's diet consisted mainly of local forage (at pasture or as hay and silage in the winter) and 5 kg of purchased concentrate/day per animal (representing 23.5% of feed intake). Based on the mineral composition of the diet, the physiological requirements and the EU maximum authorised levels in feed, a supplement composed by Sea Lettuce (Ulva rigida) (as flakes, 80%), Japanese Wireweed (Sargasum muticum) (flakes, 17.5%) and Furbelows (Saccorhiza polyschides) (powder, 2.5%) was formulated to give 100 g/animal per day. Sixteen Holstein Friesian lactating cows were randomly selected and assigned to the control (n=8) and algae-supplemented groups (n=8). Both groups had exactly the same feeding and management with the exception of the algae supplement, which was mixed with the concentrate feed and given to the animals at their morning milking for 10 weeks. Heparinised blood (for plasma analysis) and milk samples were collected at 2-week intervals and analysed for toxic and trace element concentrations by inductively coupled plasma-mass spectrometry or inductively coupled plasma-optical emission spectrometry. The algae supplement significantly improved the animals' mineral status, particularly I and selenium that were low on the farm. However, the effect of the algae supplement on the molybdenum status in cattle needs further investigation because of its great relevance on copper metabolism in ruminants. The I supply deserves special attention, since this element is at a very high concentration in brown-algae species and it is excreted in the milk proportionally to its concentration in plasma concentrations (mean ± s.e. in the algae-supplemented and control

  14. Kinetics and equilibrium studies on biosorption of cadmium, lead, and nickel ions from aqueous solutions by intact and chemically modified brown algae.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Montazer-Rahmati, Mohammad Mehdi; Rabbani, Parisa; Abdolali, Atefeh; Keshtkar, Ali Reza

    2011-01-15

    The present study deals with the evaluation of biosorptive removal of Cd (II), Ni (II) and Pb (II) ions by both intact and pre-treated brown marine algae: Cystoseira indica, Sargassum glaucescens, Nizimuddinia zanardini and Padina australis treated with formaldehyde (FA), glutaraldehyde (GA), polyethylene imine (PEI), calcium chloride (CaCl(2)) and hydrochloric acid (HCl). Batch shaking adsorption experiments were performed in order to examine the effects of pH, contact time, biomass concentration, biomass treatment and initial metal concentration on the removal process. The optimum sorption conditions for each heavy metal are presented. One-way ANOVA and one sample t-tests were performed on experimental data to evaluate the statistical significance of biosorption capacities after five cycles of sorption and desorption. The equilibrium experimental data were tested using the most common isotherms. The results are best fitted by the Freundlich model among two-parameter models and the Toth, Khan and Radke-Prausnitz models among three-parameter isotherm models for Cd (II), Ni (II) and Pb (II), respectively. The kinetic data were fitted by models including pseudo-first-order and pseudo-second-order. From the results obtained, the pseudo-second-order kinetic model best describes the biosorption of cadmium, nickel and lead ions.

  15. Dietary Supplementation of Seaweed (Ulva lactuca to alleviate the Impact of Heat Stress in Growing Lambs

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kkalid A. Abdoun, Aly B. Okab, Ahmed M. El-Waziry, Emad M. Samara and Ahmed A. Al-Haidary

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Several environmental and nutritional management approaches have been used to mitigate heat stress and improve performance of farm animals in semi-arid and arid regions. The present study was designed with the intention to alleviate the negative effects of heat stress and to promote the performance of growing lambs reared under hot environmental conditions. The study was conducted on 18 male Naimey lambs with average body weight of 22.78±0.49 kg, and 4-5 months old. The animals were randomly divided into 3 equal groups (A, B and C, and fed diets containing different concentrations of seaweed (Ulva lactuca for 90 days. Group A served as control and was offered diet containing 0.0% seaweed. Groups B and C served as treated groups and were offered diets containing 3.0 and 5.0% seaweed, respectively. Dietary inclusion of seaweed to the diet of growing lambs exposed to heat stress (max Ta 43.9oC, max RH 81.1%, max THI 84.6 neither influenced (P>0.05 the thermo-physiological parameters (rectal and skin temperatures, nor affected (P>0.05 the performance parameters (feed intake, body weight gain, feed conversion efficiency. Furthermore, dietary seaweed supplementation did not alter (P>0.05 blood constituents or blood antioxidant capacity. However, dietary seaweed supplementation significantly (P<0.05 reduced respiratory rate, and increased serum potassium concentration. Based on the data of the present study, seaweed (Ulva lactuca supplementation to the diets of growing lambs reared under heat stress conditions did not show any indication of promoting their production performance or heat tolerance.

  16. A New Benchmark Brown Dwarf

    CERN Document Server

    Tinney, C G; Forveille, T; Delfosse, Xavier

    1997-01-01

    We present optical spectroscopy of three brown dwarf candidates identified in the first 1% of the DENIS sky survey. Low resolution spectra from 6430--9000A show these objects to have similar spectra to the uncertain brown dwarf candidate GD 165B. High resolution spectroscopy shows that one of the objects -- DBD 1228-1547 -- has a strong EW=2.3+-0.05A absorption line of Li I 6708A, and is therefore a brown dwarf with mass below 0.065 Msol. DBD 1228-1547 can now be the considered proto-type for objects JUST below the hydrogen burning limit.

  17. 7 CFR 29.3505 - Brown colors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 2 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Brown colors. 29.3505 Section 29.3505 Agriculture... Type 95) § 29.3505 Brown colors. A group of colors ranging from a light brown to a dark brown. These colors vary from medium to low saturation and from medium to very low brillance. As used in...

  18. 7 CFR 29.2504 - Brown colors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 2 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Brown colors. 29.2504 Section 29.2504 Agriculture...-Cured Tobacco (u.s. Types 22, 23, and Foreign Type 96) § 29.2504 Brown colors. A group of colors ranging from a reddish brown to yellowish brown. These colors vary from low to medium saturation and from...

  19. A MODEL FOR THE DEVELOPMENT OF THE SEAWEED AGRO INDUSTRY IN THE SOUTHEAST MALUKU DISTRICT OF INDONESIA

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Simon Picaulima

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available Here we aimed to create a model of seaweed agro-industry development in the Southeast Maluku district of Indonesia. Data collected from respondents (n = 250 included information related to agro-seaweed, seaweed farming, and seaweed product marketing. Data collection included primary and secondary data sources, while the methods of analysis used structure model equations. We tested eight factors that influence the development of agro-seaweed industries in the southeast Maluku regency, namely, raw materials, human resources, technology, markets, infrastructure, policy, institutional, and capital, and concluded that all proposed hypotheses are proved correct because the value critical ratio ≥ 1.96, only the facilities and infrastructure factors were identified as significantly affecting the development of an agro-seaweed facility in southeast Maluku. We also found that optimal development of an agro-business in southeast Maluku will depend on relevant local government support and require cooperation between the internal local government, academia, the private sector, and the public. Development of human resources through formal and informal education programs directed at local business and focused on seaweed-based products will help to build business continuity by avoiding collusion and nepotism. Increased cooperation will also be required between government, employers, and the fishery community to monitor the sustainability and environmental impacts of the seaweed agro-industry in this region.

  20. Bioactivity of selected seaweeds from gulf of Mannar, South-east cost of India

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Amudha; Prabuseenivasan; Naga Harika; Vanaja Kumar

    2015-01-01

    Objective:To evaluate antimicrobial and antimycobacterial activity of three seaweeds [Gelidiella acerosa (G. acerosa), Turbinaria conoides (T. conoides) and Sargassum wightii (S. wightii)] from Gulf of Manner. Methods:Three seaweeds G. acerosa, T. conoides and S. wightii were collected from Gulf of Mannar, South-East Coast of India. Solvent extraction of the selected seaweeds was done using hexane and ethanol. These extracts were tested for antibacterial activity against four bacterial strains (Escherichia coli, Pseudomonas aeruginosa, Bacillus subtilis and Staphylococcus aureus) by disc diffusion method. The active extracts of T. conoides were tested for antimycobacterial activity by luciferase reporter phage assay at two different concentrations (100 µg/mL and 500 µg/mL). Results: Among the tested seaweeds, ethanol extract of T. conoides showed maximum antibacterial activity against Bacillus subtilis and Staphylococcus aureus followed by hexane extract at concentration of 1 mg/disc. The remaining two seaweeds (G. acerosa and S. wightii) did not show any activity. The ethanol extract of T. conoides exhibited maximum antimycobacterial activity (87.33%) followed by hexane extract (74.68%) against Mycobacterium tuberculosis H37Rv at 500 µg/mL. Conclusions:Ethanol extract of T. conoids showed both antibacterial and antimycobacterial activity. Further photochemical studies are needed to identify the active antimycobacterial agents.

  1. Seaweed Polysaccharide-Based Nanoparticles: Preparation and Applications for Drug Delivery

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jayachandran Venkatesan

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available In recent years, there have been major advances and increasing amounts of research on the utilization of natural polymeric materials as drug delivery vehicles due to their biocompatibility and biodegradability. Seaweed polysaccharides are abundant resources and have been extensively studied for several biological, biomedical, and functional food applications. The exploration of seaweed polysaccharides for drug delivery applications is still in its infancy. Alginate, carrageenan, fucoidan, ulvan, and laminarin are polysaccharides commonly isolated from seaweed. These natural polymers can be converted into nanoparticles (NPs by different types of methods, such as ionic gelation, emulsion, and polyelectrolyte complexing. Ionic gelation and polyelectrolyte complexing are commonly employed by adding cationic molecules to these anionic polymers to produce NPs of a desired shape, size, and charge. In the present review, we have discussed the preparation of seaweed polysaccharide-based NPs using different types of methods as well as their usage as carriers for the delivery of various therapeutic molecules (e.g., proteins, peptides, anti-cancer drugs, and antibiotics. Seaweed polysaccharide-based NPs exhibit suitable particle size, high drug encapsulation, and sustained drug release with high biocompatibility, thereby demonstrating their high potential for safe and efficient drug delivery.

  2. In vitro antiplasmodial activity of methanolic extracts from seaweeds of South West Coast of India

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    S Ravikumar; G Ramanathan; M Gnanadesigan; A Ramu; V Vijayakumar

    2011-01-01

    Objective:To identify thein vitro antiplasmodial activity of seaweed plants againstPlasmodium falciparum strains.Methods:A total of eight seaweeds were collected from Kanyakumari district, Tamilnadu, India. Thein vitro antiplasmodial activity was performed in 96 well plates againstPlasmodium falciparum, and preliminary phytochemcial analysis were performed for the extracts.Results:Of the selected plantsEnteromorpha intestinalis(2.61%)showed maximum percentage of extraction. The minimum concentration of inhibitory(IC50)value was observed with Chaetomorpha antennina [(26.37±4.14)μg/mL] further, the positive controls such as chloroquine and artemether showed antiplasmodial activities(IC50) with(19.10±5.93) and(6.03±0.21)μg/mL concentrations, respectively. The preliminary phytochemical analysis of the seaweed extracts showed a variety of phytochemical constituents such as carboxylic acids, phenols, protein, resins, steroids and sugars.Conclusions: The antiplasmodial activity of the seaweed extract might due to the presence of sugars and phenolic compounds. From the present findings, it is concluded that, the seaweed extract ofChaetomorpha antennina can be further used as a putative antiplasmodial drugs in near future.

  3. Antioxidant capacity and lipophilic content of seaweeds collected from the Qingdao coastline.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Hai-Lan; Wang, Bin-Gui

    2004-08-11

    Lipophilic extracts from 16 species of seaweeds collected along the Qingdao coastline were screened and evaluated for their antioxidant activities (AA) using the beta-carotene-linoleate assay system. The diethyl ether soluble extracts of all selected seaweeds exhibited various degrees of antioxidative efficacy in each screen. The highest antioxidant capacities among the tested samples were observed for Rhodomela confervoides and Symphyocladia latiuscula and were comparable with that of the well-known antioxidant butylated hydroxytoluene and greater than that of propyl gallate. The lipophilic content of all 16 samples and the chemical composition of 4 selected seaweeds, R. confervoidesand S. latiuscula, which had higher AA, Laminaria japonica, which had intermediate AA, and Plocamium telfairiae, which had lower AA, were analyzed by gas chromatography and gas chromatography-mass spectrometry, respectively. Fatty acids and alkanes were found. The present data indicated an increase in antioxidative property with increasing content of unsaturated fatty acid. The result of this study suggests that seaweeds can be considered as a potential source for the extraction of lipophilic antioxidants, which might be used as dietary supplements or in production in the food industry. This is the first report on the antioxidant activities of lipophilic extracts from seaweeds.

  4. Composition and antioxidant capacity of low-salt meat emulsion model systems containing edible seaweeds.

    Science.gov (United States)

    López-López, I; Bastida, S; Ruiz-Capillas, C; Bravo, L; Larrea, M T; Sánchez-Muniz, F; Cofrades, S; Jiménez-Colmenero, F

    2009-11-01

    The study was designed to determine the influence of the addition of edible seaweeds, Sea Spaghetti (Himanthalia elongata), Wakame (Undaria pinnatifida), and Nori (Porphyra umbilicalis), on fatty acid composition, amino acid profile, protein score, mineral content and antioxidant capacity in low-salt meat emulsion model systems. The addition of seaweeds caused an increase (P<0.05) in n-3 polyunsaturated fatty acids (PUFA) and a decrease (P<0.05) in the n-6/n-3 PUFA ratio. The thrombogenic index significantly decreased (P<0.05) in Nori and Wakame meat samples. Meat systems made with added seaweeds had lower (P<0.05) sodium contents than control samples. In general, addition of seaweeds to products increased (P<0.05) the concentrations of K, Ca, Mg and Mn. The presence of Nori caused an increase (P<0.05) in levels of serine, glycine, alanine, valine, tyrosine, phenylalanine and arginine, whereas Wakame and Sea Spaghetti produced no significant changes in amino acid profiles in the model systems. The inclusion of Sea Spaghetti increased the sulphur amino acid score by 20%. The added seaweeds supplied the meat samples with soluble polyphenolic compounds, which increased the antioxidant capacity of the systems. The polyphenol supply and antioxidant increase were greatest (P<0.05) in the samples containing Sea Spaghetti.

  5. Epifaunal assemblage on morphologically distinct intertidal seaweeds of Kodiyaghat (South Andaman, India

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    I. Anandavelu

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available Benthic macroalgae termed seaweed occupy coastal environments primarily on rocky intertidal areas. However, it has significant role by adding spatial complexity to the substratum and alter accessibility to other faunal and floral community. The studies of potential benefits of seaweeds have encouraged extensively yielding industrial, medicinal, pharmaceutical and cosmetic products. The present study deals with the quantitative distribution of epifaunal community associated with seaweeds of South Andaman and the influence of conspicuous morphology of seaweed on the assemblage of epifauna were compared. Galaxura sp. and Halimeda tuna supported higher faunal density than other seaweeds, with the respective mean density of 139.2 and 104.5 nos. per 100g of algal wet weight. Sargassum duplicatum held the lowest epifaunal density. Arthropoda was the major group found in this study, dominated by the Amphipoda (35.1%, Mysida (19.4% and Isopoda (2.8% followed by Annelida (20.1% and Mollusca (12%. The result indicated that the distribution and abundance of epifauna differ based on the structural morphology among macroalgal species which forms suitable habitat for these organisms. The present study suggests that the sediment retention capacity of weeds might play an important role on the assemblage of epifaunal community.

  6. Impact of cultivation of Mastocarpus stellatus in IMTA on the seaweeds chemistry and hybrid carrageenan properties.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Azevedo, Gabriela; Domingues, Bernardo; Abreu, Helena; Sousa-Pinto, Isabel; Feio, Gabriel; Hilliou, Loic

    2015-02-13

    The biomass yield potential of Mastocarpus stellatus, a commercially attractive carrageenophyte for foods and pharmaceutics, was investigated by cultivating the seaweeds in the nutrient-rich outflow of a commercial fish farm. Results from two consecutive 4 weeks experiments indicate that the cultivation of this seaweed produces a mean biomass of 21 to 40.6 gDW m(-2) day(-1) depending on the time of the experiment. DRIFT and CP-MAS NMR analyses of seaweeds indicate that cultivation during May affected quantitatively the seaweeds chemistry, and thus the chemical and gelling properties of native extracts of kappa/iota-hybrid carrageenan (KI). Overall, algal growth leads to the production of more sulphated KI, the percentage increase varying between 27% and 44% for the two experiments. However, alkali treatment of seaweeds before extraction reduces the variations in gelling properties of KI induced by the algal growth. This study demonstrates the capacity of growing M. stellatus in an integrated multi-trophic aquaculture system for the sustainable production of high value polysaccharides.

  7. Oxidative Stability of Granola Bars Enriched with Multilayered Fish Oil Emulsion in the Presence of Novel Brown Seaweed Based Antioxidants

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hermund, Ditte Baun; Karadaǧ, Ayşe; Andersen, Ulf

    2016-01-01

    Fucus vesiculosus extracts that have both radical scavenging activity and metal chelating ability in vitro were used as natural antioxidant in granola bars enriched with fish oil emulsion by using primary and secondary emulsion systems stabilized by sodium caseinate alone and sodium caseinate...... were added to the granola bars especially in combination with acetone and ethanol extracts of Fucus vesiculosus....

  8. Meiobenthos under mariculture conditions of the brown seaweed Saccharina japonica in Rifovaya Bay, Peter the Great Gulf, Sea of Japan

    Science.gov (United States)

    Belogurova, L. S.; Maslennikov, S. I.

    2016-07-01

    The qualitative and quantitative compositions of free-living marine nematodes were studied in Rifovaya Bay (Peter the Great Gulf, Sea of Japan). It was found that the density distribution of nematode populations in bottom sediments of Rifovaya Bay is nonuniform. In total, 72 nematode species were found, including Oncholaimium paraolium, Viscosia epapilosa, and Monoposthia latiannulata on all types of substrates. The dominant trophic group comprised "predators" (2B) and "scrapers" (2A). It was shown that the species composition of nematodes in Rifovaya Bay is very similar to the species composition of nematodes in the other areas of Peter the Great Gulf.

  9. Impact of foliar application of seaweed extract on growth, yield and quality of potato (Solanum tuberosum L.

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    Muhammad Wasim Haider, Chaudhary Muhammad Ayyub, Muhammad Aslam Pervez, Habat Ullah Asad, Abdul Manan, Syed Ali Raza and Irfan Ashraf

    2012-11-01

    Full Text Available A field trial was carried out in 2010 to investigate the effect of foliar application of seaweed extract “Primo” as an organic biostimulant on potato cv. ‘Sante’. Foliar application of seaweed extract was carried out at different growth stages of the crop (i.e. 30 days; 45 days; 60 days; 30 and 45 days; 30 and 60 days; 45 and 60 days; 30, 45 and 60 days after sowing. Control plants were sprayed with water without seaweed extract. A significant improvement in growth, yield and tuber quality of potato was observed where treatment was applied. The highest tuber yield was recorded with applications of seaweed extract at 30 + 60 days interval after planting. The treatment also improved nitrogen, total soluble solids and protein contents of the potato tubers. The results of the study concluded a positive response of potato plant growth and yield to the foliar application of seaweed extract.

  10. Seaweeds in ornamental aquaria in Brazil: anticipating introductions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Beatriz N Torrano-Silva

    2013-04-01

    Full Text Available Home and public sea aquaria are becoming more and more popular worldwide. Aquaria species are selected for their aesthetic appeal in terms of color, shape or behavior. In Brazil, most species are imported from remote places, usually tropical areas around the world. Water discarded from aquaria often includes organisms, or their propagula, that may become locally established. There have been extensive discussions concerning the vectors of species dispersion from their native areas, which includes ornamental aquaria. In order to evaluate the potential of local aquaria as a source of non native macro algae, we surveyed sea-aquaria shops and exhibition aquaria in São Paulo State. Thirty eight species of seaweeds were isolated in the aquaria surveyed. Among them, six have not been recorded from Brazil and nineteen were not reported for São Paulo littoral, including Caulerpa scalpelliformis var. denticulata the only species that so far deserves being designated as invasive in Brazil. The present paper should alert environmental agencies and aquaria shops about the risk of involuntarily introducing non-native species through aquariophyly.

  11. Antimicrobial properties of marine seaweed, Sargassum muticum against human pathogens

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Puthamohan Vinayaga Moorthi; Chelliah Balasubramanian

    2015-01-01

    Objective:To evaluate the antibacterial efficiency of the seaweed, Sargassum muticum (S. muticum) collected from Pudumadam, Ramanathapuram, Tamil Nadu, India. Methods:Crude solvent extracts of S. muticum were obtained by using Soxhlet extraction and the solvents like acetone, methanol and chloroform. These different extracts were tested against different human bacterial pathogens such as Micrococcus sp., Staphylococcus aureus (methicillin resistance), Salmonella paratyphi B, Staphylococcus epidermis (3615), Enterobacter aerogenus (111), Klebsiella pneumonia (109), Shigella fleschneri (1457) (S. fleschneri), Proteus vulgaris (1771), Staphylococcus aureus (96) and Salmonella typhymurium (SP7) which were obtained from Microbial Type Culture Collection, Indian Institute of Microbial Technology, Chandigarh, India. Results:The results revealed that acetone extract had unveiled the maximum of 11 mm zone of inhibition at 40 µL against S. fleschneri. Similar zone of inhibition (11 mm) was also observed at 50 µL against Micrococcus sp. and S. fleschneri. Followed by acetone extract, chloroform extract also contributed 11 mm zone of inhibition against S. fleschneri and Salmonella paratyphi B at 40 and 50 µL respectively. Besides, methanol extracts revealed meager antibacterial activity (9 mm). Conclusions:The present investigation suggests that the phytochemical constituent of the S. muticum might be suitable agents for the control of human deadly diseases.

  12. Protocol for seaweed decontamination to isolate unialgal cultures

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    Daniela R. P. Fernandes

    2011-04-01

    Full Text Available Decontamination protocols in seaweeds are essential tools for ecophysiological studies in laboratory cultures. These protocols consist of a set of procedures and physical and chemical treatments that must be adjusted for each species. Thus, the effects of explant size and of combinations of physical treatments (brushing and cutting and chemical treatments (sodium hypochlorite, detergent, seawater, distilled water, germanium dioxide on the process of obtaining unialgal culture of two pigmentar morphos of Hypnea musciformis were investigated. It was found that thallus segments 50 mm in length, when transported from the field to the laboratory, remained healthier and were less susceptible to epiphytes than those 7 mm in length. The collected material had surfaces contaminated by diatoms, which were weakly attached, as well as surface contamination caused by strongly attached Sahlingia subintegra. The most efficient combination of physical and chemical treatments was explant brushing, cutting and washing with detergent. This combination eliminated the contamination by S. subintegra, but not all of the diatom contamination. The population of the latter was reduced by using physical treatment and by washing with detergent and distilled water and then exterminated by using germanium dioxide (0.003 mg/L. Employing this protocol, unialgal cultures of H. musciformis could be established in approximately eight to ten weeks.

  13. Shelf Life and Quality Study of Minced Tilapia with Nori and Hijiki Seaweeds as Natural Additives

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ingridy Simone Ribeiro

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available The extraction of mechanically separated meat has emerged as an attractive process. However, it increases the incorporation of oxygen and, consequently, of flavors due to rancidity. Thus, preservatives must be added. The objective of this study was to evaluate the shelf life of minced tilapia to replace synthetic preservatives with Hijiki and Nori seaweeds extracts. The application of the extracts had no effect on the chemical composition of the minced tilapia. The seaweed extracts had inhibitory effect on total volatile base nitrogen. The minced tilapia complied with the microbiological standard set by Brazilin law. The panelists detected no differences in the rancid aroma and only minor differences were detected in the color of the products. It can be concluded that the minced tilapia with added seaweed extracts were within quality standards during frozen storage.

  14. Development, characterization and potential applications of edible film from seaweed (Kappaphycus alvarezii)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moey, Siah Watt; Abdullah, Aminah; Ahmad, Ishak

    2014-09-01

    A new patent pending process is proposed in this study to produce edible film directly from seaweed (Kappaphycus alvarezii). Seaweed together with other ingredients had been used to produce the film through casting technique. Physical and mechanical tests were performed on the edible film to examine the thickness, colour, transparency, solubility, tensile strength, elongation at break, water permeability rate, oxygen permeability rate and surface morphology. The produced film was transparent, stretchable, sealable and have basic properties for applications in food, pharmaceutical, cosmetic, toiletries and also agricultural industries. Edible film was successfully developed directly from dry seaweed instead of using alginate and carrageenan. The edible film processing method developed in this research was easier and cheaper compared with the method by using alginate and carrageenan.

  15. Effects of experimental seaweed deposition on lizard and ant predation in an island food web.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Piovia-Scott, Jonah; Spiller, David A; Schoener, Thomas W

    2011-01-28

    The effect of environmental change on ecosystems is mediated by species interactions. Environmental change may remove or add species and shift life-history events, altering which species interact at a given time. However, environmental change may also reconfigure multispecies interactions when both species composition and phenology remain intact. In a Caribbean island system, a major manifestation of environmental change is seaweed deposition, which has been linked to eutrophication, overfishing, and hurricanes. Here, we show in a whole-island field experiment that without seaweed two predators--lizards and ants--had a substantially greater-than-additive effect on herbivory. When seaweed was added to mimic deposition by hurricanes, no interactive predator effect occurred. Thus environmental change can substantially restructure food-web interactions, complicating efforts to predict anthropogenic changes in ecosystem processes.

  16. Determination of Total Arsenic in Seaweed Products by Neutron Activation Analysis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    N. Salim

    2013-04-01

    Full Text Available Seaweed products are widely consumed as food nowadays. Seaweeds are known to contain arsenic due to their capability to accumulate arsenic from the environment. Arsenic is a known toxic element which naturally occurs in the environment. Ingestion of high levels of arsenic will cause several adverse health effects. Arsenic in food occurs at trace concentrations which require sensitive and selective analysis methods to perform elemental analysis on. Validated neutron activation analysis was used to determine the arsenic contents in seaweed products namely catoni from domestic product and nori from foreign products. The total arsenic concentration in the samples analyzed ranges from 0.79 mg/kg to 30.14 mg/kg with mean concentration 14.39 mg/kg. The estimated exposure to arsenic contributed by the analyzed products is from 0.07% up to 8.54% of the established provisional tolerable daily intake (PTDI which is still far below the maximum tolerable level

  17. Apolar Compounds in Seaweeds from Fernando de Noronha Archipelago (Northeastern Coast of Brazil)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ferreira, Leandro De Santis; Turatti, Izabel Cristina Casanova; Lopes, Norberto Peporine; Guaratini, Thais; Colepicolo, Pio; Oliveira Filho, Eurico Cabral; Garla, Ricardo Clapis

    2012-01-01

    Hyphenated techniques of gas chromatography coupled to mass spectrometer were used to determine fatty acids in eleven species of seaweeds from Fernando de Noronha archipelago. The main compounds detected in all studied species were the alcohol phytol and the fatty acids 14 : 0; 15 : 0; 16 : 0; 18 : 0; 18 : 1 n9; 18 : 2 Δ9,12; 20 : 4; 20 : 5. These fatty acids are commonly found in seaweeds present in warm regions. Thus, we found no specificity in the presence of a particular set of fatty acids and the studied species indicating that they are not useful as taxonomic indicators. However, they could be used in a comparative study with algae found in polluted area because many of the studied seaweeds are widespread and Fernando de Noronha has low human influence. PMID:22272200

  18. In vitro antioxidant activities of selected seaweeds from Southeast coast of India

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Gopalraj Karthikai Devi; Karunamoorthy Manivannan; Ganapathy Thirumaran; Perumal Anantharaman

    2011-01-01

    Objective:In vitro antioxidant activities of three selected Indian seaweeds viz., Halimeda tuna (H. tuna), Turbinaria conoides (T. conoides) and Gracilaria foliifera (G. foliifera) were evaluated. Methods:Total antioxidant activity, total phenolic content, and reducing power of crude methanol and diethyl ether extracts were determined. Results: Total phenolic content and total antioxidant activity were higher (1.231±0.173 mg GAE/g, 1.675±0.361 mg GAE/g) in T. conoides respectively. Reducing power of crude methanol extract increased with concentrations of the extract. The Fourier transform-infra red spectrum analysis revealed the presence of polyphenolic signals. The seaweed extracts displayed moderate antioxidant activity compared to gallic acid standard. Conclusions:The seaweeds could be considered for curing diseases from oxidative deteriorations.

  19. A combined phase I and II open label study on the effects of a seaweed extract nutrient complex on osteoarthritis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stephen P Myers

    2010-02-01

    Full Text Available Stephen P Myers1,2, Joan O’Connor1,2, J Helen Fitton3, Lyndon Brooks4, Margaret Rolfe4, Paul Connellan5, Hans Wohlmuth2,5,6, Phil A Cheras1,2, Carol Morris51NatMed-Research, 2Centre for Health and Wellbeing, 4Graduate Research College, 5Centre for Phytochemistry and Pharmacology, 6Medicinal Plant Herbarium, Southern Cross University, Lismore, NSW, Australia; 3Marinova Pty Ltd, Hobart, Tasmania, AustraliaBackground: Isolated fucoidans from brown marine algae have been shown to have a range of anti-inflammatory effects.Purpose: This present study tested a Maritech® extract formulation, containing a blend of extracts from three different species of brown algae, plus nutrients in an open label combined phase I and II pilot scale study to determine both acute safety and efficacy in osteoarthritis of the knee. Patients and methods: Participants (n = 12, five females [mean age, 62 ± 11.06 years] and seven males [mean age, 57.14 ± 9.20 years] with a confirmed diagnosis of osteoarthritis of the knee were randomized to either 100 mg (n = 5 or 1000 mg (n = 7 of a Maritech® extract formulation per day. The formulation contained Maritech® seaweed extract containing Fucus vesiculosis (85% w/w, Macrocystis pyrifera (10% w/w and Laminaria japonica (5% w/w plus vitamin B6, zinc and manganese. Primary outcome was the average comprehensive arthritis test (COAT score which is comprised of four sub-scales: pain, stiffness, difficulty with physical activity and overall symptom severity measured weekly. Safety measures included full blood count, serum lipids, liver function tests, urea, creatinine and electrolytes determined at baseline and week 12. All adverse events were recorded.Results: Eleven participants completed 12 weeks and one completed 10 weeks of the study. Using a multilevel linear model, the average COAT score was reduced by 18% for the 100 mg treatment and 52% for the 1000 mg dose at the end of the study. There was a clear dose response effect

  20. Optimising reef-scale CO2 removal by seaweed to buffer ocean acidification

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mongin, Mathieu; Baird, Mark E.; Hadley, Scott; Lenton, Andrew

    2016-03-01

    The equilibration of rising atmospheric {{CO}}2 with the ocean is lowering {pH} in tropical waters by about 0.01 every decade. Coral reefs and the ecosystems they support are regarded as one of the most vulnerable ecosystems to ocean acidification, threatening their long-term viability. In response to this threat, different strategies for buffering the impact of ocean acidification have been proposed. As the {pH} experienced by individual corals on a natural reef system depends on many processes over different time scales, the efficacy of these buffering strategies remains largely unknown. Here we assess the feasibility and potential efficacy of a reef-scale (a few kilometers) carbon removal strategy, through the addition of seaweed (fleshy multicellular algae) farms within the Great Barrier Reef at the Heron Island reef. First, using diagnostic time-dependent age tracers in a hydrodynamic model, we determine the optimal location and size of the seaweed farm. Secondly, we analytically calculate the optimal density of the seaweed and harvesting strategy, finding, for the seaweed growth parameters used, a biomass of 42 g N m-2 with a harvesting rate of up 3.2 g N m-2 d-1 maximises the carbon sequestration and removal. Numerical experiments show that an optimally located 1.9 km2 farm and optimally harvested seaweed (removing biomass above 42 g N m-2 every 7 d) increased aragonite saturation by 0.1 over 24 km2 of the Heron Island reef. Thus, the most effective seaweed farm can only delay the impacts of global ocean acidification at the reef scale by 7-21 years, depending on future global carbon emissions. Our results highlight that only a kilometer-scale farm can partially mitigate global ocean acidification for a particular reef.

  1. Transcriptomic analysis of the red seaweed Laurencia dendroidea (Florideophyceae, Rhodophyta and its microbiome

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    de Oliveira Louisi

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Seaweeds of the Laurencia genus have a broad geographic distribution and are largely recognized as important sources of secondary metabolites, mainly halogenated compounds exhibiting diverse potential pharmacological activities and relevant ecological role as anti-epibiosis. Host-microbe interaction is a driving force for co-evolution in the marine environment, but molecular studies of seaweed-associated microbial communities are still rare. Despite the large amount of research describing the chemical compositions of Laurencia species, the genetic knowledge regarding this genus is currently restricted to taxonomic markers and general genome features. In this work we analyze the transcriptomic profile of L. dendroidea J. Agardh, unveil the genes involved on the biosynthesis of terpenoid compounds in this seaweed and explore the interactions between this host and its associated microbiome. Results A total of 6 transcriptomes were obtained from specimens of L. dendroidea sampled in three different coastal locations of the Rio de Janeiro state. Functional annotations revealed predominantly basic cellular metabolic pathways. Bacteria was the dominant active group in the microbiome of L. dendroidea, standing out nitrogen fixing Cyanobacteria and aerobic heterotrophic Proteobacteria. The analysis of the relative contribution of each domain highlighted bacterial features related to glycolysis, lipid and polysaccharide breakdown, and also recognition of seaweed surface and establishment of biofilm. Eukaryotic transcripts, on the other hand, were associated with photosynthesis, synthesis of carbohydrate reserves, and defense mechanisms, including the biosynthesis of terpenoids through the mevalonate-independent pathway. Conclusions This work describes the first transcriptomic profile of the red seaweed L. dendroidea, increasing the knowledge about ESTs from the Florideophyceae algal class. Our data suggest an important role for L

  2. Red Seaweed (Hypnea Bryodies and Melanothamnus Somalensis) Extracts Counteracting Azoxymethane-Induced Hepatotoxicity in Rats

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ibrahim Waly, Mostafa; Al Alawi, Ahmed Ali; Al Marhoobi, Insaaf Mohammad; Rahman, Mohammad Shafiur

    2016-12-01

    Background: Azoxymethane (AOM) is a well-known colon cancer-inducing agent in experimental animals via mechanisms that include oxidative stress in rat colon and liver tissue. Few studies have investigated AOM-induced oxidative stress in rat liver tissue. Red seaweeds of the genera Hypnea Bryodies and Melanothamnus Somalensis are rich in polyphenolic compounds that may suppress cancer through antioxidant properties, yet limited research has been carried out to investigate their anti-carcinogenic and antioxidant influence against AOM-induced oxidative stress in rat liver. Objective: This study aims to determine protective effects of red seaweed (Hypnea Bryodies and Melanothamnus Somalensis) extracts against AOM-induced hepatotoxicity and oxidative stress. Materials and Methods: Sprague–Dawley rats received intraperitoneal injections of AOM, 15 mg/kg body weight, once a week for two consecutive weeks and then orally administered red seaweed (100 mg/kg body-weight) extracts for sixteen weeks. At the end of the experiment all animals were overnight fasted then sacrificed and blood and liver tissues were collected. Results: AOM treatment significantly decreased serum liver markers and induced hepatic oxidative stress as evidenced by increased liver tissue homogenate levels of nitric oxide and malondialdehyde, decreased total antioxidant capacity and glutathione, and inhibition of antioxidant enzymes (catalase, glutathione peroxidase, glutathione S-transferase, glutathione reductase and superoxide dismutase). Both red seaweed extracts abolished the AOM-associated oxidative stress and protected against liver injury as evidenced by increased serum levels of liver function markers. In addition, histological findings confirmed protective effects of the two red seaweed extracts against AOM-induced liver injury. Conclusion: Our findings indicate that red seaweed (Hypnea Bryodies and Melanothamnus Somalensis) extracts counteracted oxidative stress-induced hepatotoxicity in a

  3. Sensitivity and Acclimation of Three Canopy-Forming Seaweeds to UVB Radiation and Warming

    KAUST Repository

    Xiao, Xi

    2015-12-02

    Canopy-forming seaweeds, as primary producers and foundation species, provide key ecological services. Their responses to multiple stressors associated with climate change could therefore have important knock-on effects on the functioning of coastal ecosystems. We examined interactive effects of UVB radiation and warming on juveniles of three habitat-forming subtidal seaweeds from Western Australia–Ecklonia radiata, Scytothalia dorycarpa and Sargassum sp. Fronds were incubated for 14 days at 16–30°C with or without UVB radiation and growth, health status, photosynthetic performance, and light absorbance measured. Furthermore, we used empirical models from the metabolic theory of ecology to evaluate the sensitivity of these important seaweeds to ocean warming. Results indicated that responses to UVB and warming were species specific, with Sargassum showing highest tolerance to a broad range of temperatures. Scytothalia was most sensitive to elevated temperature based on the reduced maximum quantum yields of PSII; however, Ecklonia was most sensitive, according to the comparison of activation energy calculated from Arrhenius’ model. UVB radiation caused reduction in the growth, physiological responses and thallus health in all three species. Our findings indicate that Scytothalia was capable of acclimating in response to UVB and increasing its light absorption efficiency in the UV bands, probably by up-regulating synthesis of photoprotective compounds. The other two species did not acclimate over the two weeks of exposure to UVB. Overall, UVB and warming would severely inhibit the growth and photosynthesis of these canopy-forming seaweeds and decrease their coverage. Differences in the sensitivity and acclimation of major seaweed species to temperature and UVB may alter the balance between species in future seaweed communities under climate change.

  4. Sensitivity and Acclimation of Three Canopy-Forming Seaweeds to UVB Radiation and Warming.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xi Xiao

    Full Text Available Canopy-forming seaweeds, as primary producers and foundation species, provide key ecological services. Their responses to multiple stressors associated with climate change could therefore have important knock-on effects on the functioning of coastal ecosystems. We examined interactive effects of UVB radiation and warming on juveniles of three habitat-forming subtidal seaweeds from Western Australia-Ecklonia radiata, Scytothalia dorycarpa and Sargassum sp. Fronds were incubated for 14 days at 16-30°C with or without UVB radiation and growth, health status, photosynthetic performance, and light absorbance measured. Furthermore, we used empirical models from the metabolic theory of ecology to evaluate the sensitivity of these important seaweeds to ocean warming. Results indicated that responses to UVB and warming were species specific, with Sargassum showing highest tolerance to a broad range of temperatures. Scytothalia was most sensitive to elevated temperature based on the reduced maximum quantum yields of PSII; however, Ecklonia was most sensitive, according to the comparison of activation energy calculated from Arrhenius' model. UVB radiation caused reduction in the growth, physiological responses and thallus health in all three species. Our findings indicate that Scytothalia was capable of acclimating in response to UVB and increasing its light absorption efficiency in the UV bands, probably by up-regulating synthesis of photoprotective compounds. The other two species did not acclimate over the two weeks of exposure to UVB. Overall, UVB and warming would severely inhibit the growth and photosynthesis of these canopy-forming seaweeds and decrease their coverage. Differences in the sensitivity and acclimation of major seaweed species to temperature and UVB may alter the balance between species in future seaweed communities under climate change.

  5. Bioextraction potential of seaweed in Denmark – an instrument for circular nutrient management

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Seghetta, Michele; Tørring, Ditte; Bruhn, Annette;

    2016-01-01

    The aim of the study is to assess the efficacy of seaweed for circular nutrient management to reduce eutrophication levels in the aquatic environment. We performed a comparative Life Cycle Assessment (LCA) of two reference waste management systems treating seaweed as biowaste, i.e. landfill...... economy that exploits manmade emissions as a resource for closed loop biobased production while significantly reducing eutrophication levels in 3 out of 7 Danish river basin districts. We obtained at least 10% bioextraction of phosphorus manmade emissions (10%, 89% and > 100%) and contributed...

  6. Evaluation of World View-2 Satellite Data for Mapping Seaweed Beds Along Karachi Coast

    Science.gov (United States)

    Danish Siddiqui, Muhammad; Abdullah, Muhammad

    2016-07-01

    INTRODUCTION One of the important components for the coastal system are seaweeds. Seaweed provides numerous ecosystem facilities such as; habitats, fishing nursery grounds, feed production for aquatic biota, and ability to absorb nutrients such as nitrogen and phosphorus and carbon fixation for seawater purification. It's an important coastal resource that has great economic potential due to its utilization in food, cosmetics and industrial products. It also plays an important role in aquaculture and fish breeding. The habitats of many sea species rely on seaweeds for their shelter and food requirements. Seaweed resources are present along Pakistan coastal areas mainly around Karachi shoreline and there exists a potential market for seaweed in the country that is yet untapped. Not only this but the seaweed resources in Pakistan are still unexplored and unmapped. The need to preserve and map seaweed sites along Karachi coast is, cannot be overlooked due to the economic potential of seaweed. To protect marine biodiversity, regular monitoring and mapping of seaweeds are important in order to regulate their growth and their dependent species to maintain their biological associations. The main purpose of this study is to map naturally existing seaweed resources along the Karachi coast and identify the environmental parameters which impact seaweed growth in coastal waters of Karachi using geospatial techniques. To estimate marine resources such as seaweed over a certain area using traditional methods require an extensive amount of labor, cost and time. Remote sensing techniques, on the other hand, offer a good alternative to performing studies on a larger scale using minimum resources as compared to the conventional methods. DATA AND DATA SOURCES WorldView-2 images of 2 meter multispectral and 0.5 meter panchromatic and MODIS (Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer) daily composite of Sea Surface Temperature (SST) product of 250 meter resolutions are used in this

  7. Report on Gamma-Ray Analysis of Seaweed Samples from Naturespirit Herbs LLC

    CERN Document Server

    Norman, Eric B; Guillaumon, Pedro; Smith, Alan R

    2014-01-01

    Five seaweed samples from Naturespirit Herbs LLC were counted using low-background high-resolution gamma-ray detectors to search for evidence of contamination from the Fukushima reactor accident. No evidence of Cs-134 was observed in any of the samples. Very low levels of Cs-137 were observed and are attributed to fallout from atmospheric nuclear weapons testing. However, these levels of Cs-137 are small compared to the levels of the naturally occurring K-40 observed from these seaweed samples.

  8. Bioextraction potential of seaweed in Denmark — An instrument for circular nutrient management

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Seghetta, Michele [Research Group on EcoIndustrial System Analysis, Department of Environmental Science, Faculty of Science and Technology, Aarhus University, Frederiksborgvej 399, 4000 Roskilde (Denmark); Tørring, Ditte [Orbicon A/S, Jens Juuls Vej 16, 8260 Viby (Denmark); Bruhn, Annette [Department of Bioscience, Faculty of Science and Technology, Aarhus University, Vejlsøvej 25, 8600 Silkeborg (Denmark); Thomsen, Marianne, E-mail: mth@envs.au.dk [Research Group on EcoIndustrial System Analysis, Department of Environmental Science, Faculty of Science and Technology, Aarhus University, Frederiksborgvej 399, 4000 Roskilde (Denmark)

    2016-09-01

    The aim of the study is to assess the efficacy of seaweed for circular nutrient management to reduce eutrophication levels in the aquatic environment. We performed a comparative Life Cycle Assessment (LCA) of two reference waste management systems treating seaweed as biowaste, i.e. landfill disposal and combustion, and an alternative scenario using the seaweed Saccharina latissima as a resource for biobased fertilizer production. Life Cycle Impact Assessment (LCIA) methods were improved by using a cradle-to-cradle approach, quantifying fate factors for nitrogen and phosphorus loss from fertilized agriculture to the aquatic environment. We also differentiated between nitrogen- and phosphorus-limited marine water to improve the traditional freshwater impact category, making this indicator suitable for decision support in relation to coastal water management schemes. Offshore cultivation of Saccharina latissima with an average productivity of 150 Mg/km{sup 2} in Danish waters in 2014 was applied to a cultivation scenario of 208 km{sup 2}. The bioresource scenario performs better than conventional biowaste management systems, delivering a net reduction in aquatic eutrophication levels of 32.29 kg N eq. and 16.58 kg PO{sub 4}{sup 3−} eq. per Mg (dry weight) of seaweed, quantified by the ReCiPe and CML impact assessment methods, respectively. Seaweed cultivation, harvest and reuse of excess nutrients from the aquatic environment is a promising approach for sustainable resource cycling in a future regenerative economy that exploits manmade emissions as a resource for closed loop biobased production while significantly reducing eutrophication levels in 3 out of 7 Danish river basin districts. We obtained at least 10% bioextraction of phosphorus manmade emissions (10%, 89% and > 100%) and contributed significantly to local nitrogen reduction goals according to the Water Framework Directive (23%, 78% and > 100% of the target). - Highlights: • Offshore seaweed production

  9. The rotation of brown dwarfs

    CERN Document Server

    Scholz, Aleks

    2016-01-01

    One of the characteristic features of low-mass stars is their propensity to shed large amounts of angular momentum throughout their evolution. This distinguishs them from brown dwarfs which remain fast rotators over timescales of gigayears. Brown dwarfs with rotation periods longer than a couple of days have only been found in star forming regions and young clusters. This is a useful constraint on the mass dependency of mechanisms for angular momentum regular in stars. Rotational braking by disks and winds become highly inefficient in the substellar regime. In this short review I discuss the observational evidence for the fast rotation in brown dwarfs, the implications, and the link to the spin-mass relation in planets.

  10. Gemmobacter megaterium sp. nov., isolated from coastal planktonic seaweeds.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Jin-Jin; Zhang, Xin-Qi; Chi, Fang-Tao; Pan, Jie; Sun, Cong; Wu, Min

    2014-01-01

    A Gram-stain-negative, non-motile and aerobic bacterium, designated CF17(T), was isolated from coastal planktonic seaweeds, East China Sea. The isolate grew at 18-37 °C (optimum 25-28 °C), pH 6.5-9.0 (optimum 7.0-8.0) and with 0-5 % NaCl (optimum 1-2 %, w/v) and 0.5-10 % sea salts (optimum 2-3 %, w/v). Growth of strain CF17(T) could be stimulated prominently by supplementing the growth medium with the autoclaved supernatant of a culture of strain CF5, which was isolated from the same sample along with strain CF17(T). The cell morphology of strain CF17(T) was a bean-shaped rod consisting of a swollen end and a long prostheca. The phylogenetic analysis of 16S rRNA gene sequences indicated that strain CF17(T) clustered with Gemmobacter nectariphilus DSM 15620(T) within the genus Gemmobacter. The DNA G+C content of strain CF17(T) was 61.4 mol%. The respiratory quinone was ubiquinone Q-10. The major fatty acids included C18 : 1ω7c and C18 : 0. The polar lipids of strain CF17(T) consisted of phosphatidylethanolamine, phosphatidylglycerol, phosphatidylcholine, two uncharacterized phospholipids, one uncharacterized aminolipid, three uncharacterized glycolipids and one uncharacterized lipid. On the basis of phenotypic, phylogenetic and chemotaxonomic data, strain CF17(T) ( = CGMCC 1.11024(T) = JCM 18498(T)) is considered to represent a novel species of the genus Gemmobacter, for which the name Gemmobacter megaterium sp. nov. is proposed.

  11. Environmental Chemistry and Chemical Ecology of "Green Tide" Seaweed Blooms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Van Alstyne, Kathryn L; Nelson, Timothy A; Ridgway, Richard L

    2015-09-01

    Green tides are large growths or accumulations of green seaweeds that have been increasing in magnitude and frequency around the world. Because green tides consist of vast biomasses of algae in a limited area and are often seasonal or episodic, they go through periods of rapid growth in which they take up large amounts of nutrients and dissolved gases and generate bioactive natural products that may be stored in the plants, released into the environment, or broken down during decomposition. As a result of the use and production of inorganic and organic compounds, the algae in these blooms can have detrimental impacts on other organisms. Here, we review some of the effects that green tides have on the chemistry of seawater and the effects of the natural products that they produce. As blooms are developing and expanding, algae in green tides take up inorganic nutrients, such as nitrate and ortho-phosphate, which can limit their availability to other photosynthetic organisms. Their uptake of dissolved inorganic carbon for use in photosynthesis can cause localized spikes in the pH of seawater during the day with concomitant drops in the pH at night when the algae are respiring. Many of the algae that form green-tide blooms produce allelopathic compounds, which are metabolites that affect other species. The best documented allelopathic compounds include dimethylsulfoniopropionate (DMSP), dopamine, and reactive oxygen species (ROS) and their breakdown products. DMSP and dopamine are involved in defenses against herbivores. Dopamine and ROS are released into seawater where they can be allelopathic or toxic to other organisms. Thus, these macroalgal blooms can have harmful effects on nearby organisms by altering concentrations of nutrients and dissolved gas in seawater and by producing and releasing allelopathic or toxic compounds.

  12. A draft genome of the brown alga, Cladosiphon okamuranus, S-strain: a platform for future studies of ‘mozuku’ biology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nishitsuji, Koki; Arimoto, Asuka; Iwai, Kenji; Sudo, Yusuke; Hisata, Kanako; Fujie, Manabu; Arakaki, Nana; Kushiro, Tetsuo; Konishi, Teruko; Shinzato, Chuya; Satoh, Noriyuki; Shoguchi, Eiichi

    2016-01-01

    The brown alga, Cladosiphon okamuranus (Okinawa mozuku), is economically one of the most important edible seaweeds, and is cultivated for market primarily in Okinawa, Japan. C. okamuranus constitutes a significant source of fucoidan, which has various physiological and biological activities. To facilitate studies of seaweed biology, we decoded the draft genome of C. okamuranus S-strain. The genome size of C. okamuranus was estimated as ∼140 Mbp, smaller than genomes of two other brown algae, Ectocarpus siliculosus and Saccharina japonica. Sequencing with ∼100× coverage yielded an assembly of 541 scaffolds with N50 = 416 kbp. Together with transcriptomic data, we estimated that the C. okamuranus genome contains 13,640 protein-coding genes, approximately 94% of which have been confirmed with corresponding mRNAs. Comparisons with the E. siliculosus genome identified a set of C. okamuranus genes that encode enzymes involved in biosynthetic pathways for sulfated fucans and alginate biosynthesis. In addition, we identified C. okamuranus genes for enzymes involved in phlorotannin biosynthesis. The present decoding of the Cladosiphon okamuranus genome provides a platform for future studies of mozuku biology. PMID:27501718

  13. Comparative study on the in vitro effects of Pseudomonas aeruginosa and seaweed alginates on human gut microbiota.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bai, Shaofeng; Chen, Huahai; Zhu, Liying; Liu, Wei; Yu, Hongwei D; Wang, Xin; Yin, Yeshi

    2017-01-01

    Alginates pertain to organic polysaccharides that have been extensively used in food- and medicine-related industries. The present study obtained alginates from an alginate overproducing Pseudomonas aeruginosa PAO1 mutant by screening transposon mutagenesis libraries. The interaction between bacterial and seaweed alginates and gut microbiota were further studied by using an in vitro batch fermentation system. Thin-layer chromatography (TLC) analysis indicated that both bacterial and seaweed alginates can be completely degraded by fecal bacteria isolated from study volunteers, indicating that a minor structural difference between bacterial and seaweed alginates (O-acetylation and lack of G-G blocks) didn't affect the digestion of alginates by human microbiota. Although, the digestion of bacterial and seaweed alginates was attributed to different Bacteroides xylanisolvens strains, they harbored similar alginate lyase genes. Genus Bacteroides with alginate-degrading capability were enriched in growth medium containing bacterial or seaweed alginates after in vitro fermentation. Short-chain fatty acid (SCFA) production in both bacterial and seaweed alginates was also comparable, but was significantly higher than the same medium using starch. In summary, the present study has isolated an alginate-overproducing P. aeruginosa mutant strain. Both seaweed and bacterial alginates were degraded by human gut microbiota, and their regulatory function on gut microbiota was similar.

  14. The effect of chronic seaweed subsidies on herbivory: plant-mediated fertilization pathway overshadows lizard-mediated predator pathways.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Piovia-Scott, Jonah; Spiller, David A; Takimoto, Gaku; Yang, Louie H; Wright, Amber N; Schoener, Thomas W

    2013-08-01

    Flows of energy and materials link ecosystems worldwide and have important consequences for the structure of ecological communities. While these resource subsidies typically enter recipient food webs through multiple channels, most previous studies focussed on a single pathway of resource input. We used path analysis to evaluate multiple pathways connecting chronic marine resource inputs (in the form of seaweed deposits) and herbivory in a shoreline terrestrial ecosystem. We found statistical support for a fertilization effect (seaweed increased foliar nitrogen content, leading to greater herbivory) and a lizard numerical response effect (seaweed increased lizard densities, leading to reduced herbivory), but not for a lizard diet-shift effect (seaweed increased the proportion of marine-derived prey in lizard diets, but lizard diet was not strongly associated with herbivory). Greater seaweed abundance was associated with greater herbivory, and the fertilization effect was larger than the combined lizard effects. Thus, the bottom-up, plant-mediated effect of fertilization on herbivory overshadowed the top-down effects of lizard predators. These results, from unmanipulated shoreline plots with persistent differences in chronic seaweed deposition, differ from those of a previous experimental study of the short-term effects of a pulse of seaweed deposition: while the increase in herbivory in response to chronic seaweed deposition was due to the fertilization effect, the short-term increase in herbivory in response to a pulse of seaweed deposition was due to the lizard diet-shift effect. This contrast highlights the importance of the temporal pattern of resource inputs in determining the mechanism of community response to resource subsidies.

  15. Role of dietary seaweed supplementation on growth performance, digestive capacity and immune and stress responsiveness in European seabass (Dicentrarchus labrax

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maria João Peixoto

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available This work aimed to appraise growth performance, digestive capacity and immune and stress responsiveness in European seabass (Dicentrarchus labrax when fed diets supplemented with seaweeds. A control diet (without supplementation was tested against 6 practical diets supplemented either with Gracilaria spp., Ulva spp., or Fucus spp., at 2.5 or 7.5% levels, plus an additional diet with a blend of the three seaweeds, each supplemented at 2.5% (Mix. Seabass juveniles (24.0 ± 6.3 g were fed the experimental diets for 84 days. Dietary seaweed supplementation had no effect on growth rate (DGI: 1.0–1.1, voluntary feed intake (11.3–12.6 g kg −1 ABW−1 day−1, feed conversion ratio (FCR: 1.2–1.4 and protein efficiency ratio (PER: 1.5–1.8. Lipase activity was significantly higher in fish fed Mix diet when compared to control (P < 0.05. Glutathione peroxidase (GPx was significantly affected by seaweeds presence regardless its level of supplementation (P < 0.05. The innate immune system was significantly altered by dietary seaweed supplementation (P < 0.05. Fish fed the 7.5% seaweed supplemented diets had a significant decrease in the ACH50 level, when compared to fish fed 2.5% seaweed supplemented diets (P < 0.05. Moreover, a combined effect of seaweed and supplementation level significantly affected lysozyme (LYS activity (P < 0.05. Fish fed diet with Ulva at 2.5% had an increase in LYS when compared to fish fed control and Ulva at 7.5% diets. Overall, our results indicate that the use of dietary seaweed supplementation improves immune and antioxidant responses in European seabass without compromising growth performance.

  16. Inhibition of reverse transcriptase activity of HIV by polysaccharides of brown algae.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Queiroz, K C S; Medeiros, V P; Queiroz, L S; Abreu, L R D; Rocha, H A O; Ferreira, C V; Jucá, M B; Aoyama, H; Leite, E L

    2008-06-01

    Brown algae have two kinds of acid polysaccharides present in the extracellular matrix: sulfated fucan and alginic acid. We have previously isolated and characterized fucans from several species of brown seaweed. The characterized fucans from Dictyotaceae are heterofucans containing mainly fucose, galactose, glucose, xylose, and/or uronic acid. The fucan from Fucus vesiculosus is a homofucan containing only sulfated fucose. We assessed the activity of these fucans as inhibitors of HIV from reverse transcriptase (RT). Using activated DNA and template primers poly(rA)-oligo(dT), we found that fucans at a concentration of 0.5-1.0 microg/mL had a pronounced inhibitory effect in vitro on the avian reverse transcriptase, with the exception of xylogalactofucan isolated from Spatoglossum schröederi, which had no inhibitory activity. The alginic acid (1.0 microg/mL) inhibited the reverse transcriptase activity by 51.1% using activated DNA. The inhibitory effect of fucans was eliminated by their desulfation. Furthermore, only xylofucoglucuronan from S. schröederi lost its activity after carboxyreduction. We suggest that fucan activity is not only dependent on the ionic changes but also on the sugar rings that act to spatially orientate the charges in a configuration that recognizes the enzyme, thus determining the specificity of the binding.

  17. Live-trapping and handling brown bear

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — This paper reports techniques developed to live trap and handle brown bears on the Kodiak National Wildlife Refuge. The brown bears (Ursus middendorffi) on the...

  18. Browns Park NWR Water Use Report- 1999

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — This report contains locations and water use at Browns Park NWR for 1999. A basic introduction highlighting the region that Browns Park NWR is a part of and the...

  19. Browns Park NWR Water Use Report- 1985

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — This report contains locations and water use at Browns Park NWR for 1985. Data for each diversion/impoundment at Browns Park NWR is supplied. This data includes the...

  20. Browns Park NWR Water Use Report- 1987

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — This report contains locations and water use at Browns Park NWR for 1987. Data for each diversion/impoundment at Browns Park NWR is supplied. This data includes the...

  1. Browns Park NWR Water Use Report- 1984

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — This report contains locations and water use at Browns Park NWR for 1984. Data for each diversion/impoundment at Browns Park NWR is supplied. This data includes the...

  2. Browns Park NWR Water Use Report- 1980

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — This report contains locations and water use at Browns Park NWR for 1980. Data for each diversion/impoundment at Browns Park NWR is supplied. This data includes the...

  3. Browns Park NWR Water Use Report- 2000

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — This report contains locations and water use at Browns Park NWR for 2000. A basic introduction highlighting the region that Browns Park NWR is a part of and the...

  4. Browns Park NWR Water Use Report- 1986

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — This report contains locations and water use at Browns Park NWR for 1986. Data for each diversion/impoundment at Browns Park NWR is supplied. This data includes the...

  5. Use of seaweeds for monitoring trace elements in coastal waters.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jayasekera, R; Rossbach, M

    1996-06-01

    Concentrations of a wide range of trace elements: arsenic, cadmium, cobalt, chromium, hafnium, nickel, thorium, uranium, zinc and the rare earth elements, cerium, europium, samarium, terbium and ytterbium were determined by instrumental neutron activation analysis in the brown alga,Fucus vesiculosus from Eckwarder Hörne, North Sea and from Rügen, Baltic Sea. Another brown alga,Sargassum filipendula from Sri Lanka, Indian ocean (representing an unpolluted control station) was similarly investigated. Cobalt, chromium and nickel concentrations were highest inF. vesiculosus from the North Sea while zinc was highest in samples from the Baltic Sea, reflecting high levels of these elements in coastal waters of the North and the Baltic sea. Cadmium, cobalt, nickel and zinc levels were lowest inS. filipendula from Sri Lanka, probably demonstrating lower levels of those elements in coastal waters. Concentration levels of hafnium, thorium, uranium, and the rare earth elements were highest inS. filipendula. Two years later in 1994,S. filipendula along withUlva sp. (green alga) was resampled from the same sampling site, and in addition to the above elements, six other trace elements (Ag, Ba, Br, Rb, Se and Sr) were determined.Sargassium filipendula showed a particular affinity for Ag, As, Br and Sr. For the other elements, marginal concentration differences were observed betweenS. filipendula andUlva sp., probably reflecting the regional background levels. Substantially higher concentrations of Hf, Th, U, and the rare earths were found again in the 1994Sargassum andUlva samples, reflecting the effect of a substrate rich in rare earth elements. The brown algae used in this study may be used to monitor trace elements in coastal waters.

  6. Biomass production, anaerobic digestion, and nutrient recycling of small benthic or floating seaweeds

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ryther, J.H.

    1982-02-01

    A number of experiments have been carried out supporting the development of a seaweed-based ocean energy farm. Beginning in 1976, forty-two species of seaweed indigenous to the coastal waters of Central Florida were screened for high biomass yields in intensive culture. Gracilaria tikvahiae achieved the highest annual yield of 34.8 g dry wt/m/sup 2/ day. Yield has been found to vary inversely with seawater exchange rate, apparently because of carbon dioxide limitation at low exchange rates. Gracilaria was anaerobically digested in 120 liter and 2 liter reactors. Gas yields in the large digesters averaged 0.4 1/g volatile solids (.24 1 CH/sub 4//gv.s.) with a bioconversion efficiency of 48%. Studies of the suitability of digester residue as a nutrient source for growing Gracilaria have been conducted. Nitrogen recycling efficiency from harvested plant through liquid digestion residue to harvested plant approached 75%. Studies of nutrient uptake and storage by Gracilaria, Ascophyllum, and Sargassum showed that nutrient starved plants are capable of rapidly assimilating and storing inorganic nutrients which may be used later for growth when no nutrients are present in the medium. A shallow water seaweed farm was proposed which would produce methane from harvested seaweed and use digester residues as a concentrated source of nutrients for periodic fertilizations.

  7. Development of Seaweed-based Biopolymers for Edible Films and Lectins

    Science.gov (United States)

    Praseptiangga, D.

    2017-04-01

    Marine macroalgae (seaweeds) as one of important groups of biopolymers play an important role in human life. Biopolymers have been studied regarding their film-forming properties to produce edible films intended as food packaging and active ingredient carriers. Edible film, a thin layer or which is an integral part of food and can be eaten together with, have been used to avoid food quality deterioration due to physico-chemical changes, texture changes, or chemical reactions. Film-forming materials can be utilized individually or as mixed composite blends. Proteins and polysaccharides used for their mechanical and structural properties, and hydrophobic substances (lipids, essential oils, and emulsifiers) to provide good moisture barrier properties. In addition, bioactive substances from marine natural products, including seaweeds, have been explored for being used in the fields of medicine, food science, pharmaceutical science, biochemistry, and glycobiology. Among them, lectins or carbohydrate-binding proteins from seaweeds have recently been remarked. Lectins (hemagglutinins) are widely distributed in nature and also good candidates in such prospecting of seaweeds. They are useful as convenient tools to discriminate differences in carbohydrate structures and reveal various biological activities through binding and interacting to carbohydrates, suggesting that they are promising candidates for medicinal and clinical application.

  8. Nutritional status and effect of seaweed chocolate on anemic adolescent girls

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. Thahira Banu

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available The study was carried out to study the nutritional status, develop a product incorporating seaweed and assess its impact on anemic adolescent girls. Five hundred adolescent girls in the age group of 15–18 years were selected from a women's college at Kilakarai, Tamil Nadu, India as the target group to find the prevalence of anemia. Among the 500 subjects 100 with a hemoglobin level of 7–9 g/dL (moderate anemia were selected by purposive sampling technique for supplementation. Seaweed incorporated chocolate was formulated, standardized, tested for consumer acceptability and in vitro iron bioavailability and supplemented to the selected subjects. The result of the study indicates that seaweed chocolate developed obtained the highest score for overall acceptability, 56 mg of iron/100 g and 11.80 mg of bioavailable iron. The results were found to be promising as there was a significant increase in hemoglobin, TIBC, MCH, MCV, serum iron and serum ferritin levels in the selected subjects. Seaweeds are a less consumed natural resource but abundantly available in the coastal areas of India as they are rich source of nutrients and can be used as an effective therapeutic and nutrient adjunct.

  9. Looking Beyond the Terrestrial: The Potential of Seaweed Derived Bioactives to Treat Non-Communicable Diseases

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kenneth G. Collins

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Seaweeds are a large and diverse group of marine organisms that are commonly found in the maritime regions of the world. They are an excellent source of biologically active secondary metabolites and have been shown to exhibit a wide range of therapeutic properties, including anti-cancer, anti-oxidant, anti-inflammatory and anti-diabetic activities. Several Asian cultures have a strong tradition of using different varieties of seaweed extensively in cooking as well as in herbal medicines preparations. As such, seaweeds have been used to treat a wide variety of health conditions such as cancer, digestive problems, and renal disorders. Today, increasing numbers of people are adopting a “westernised lifestyle” characterised by low levels of physical exercise and excessive calorific and saturated fat intake. This has led to an increase in numbers of chronic Non-communicable diseases (NCDs such as cancer, cardiovascular disease, and diabetes mellitus, being reported. Recently, NCDs have replaced communicable infectious diseases as the number one cause of human mortality. Current medical treatments for NCDs rely mainly on drugs that have been obtained from the terrestrial regions of the world, with the oceans and seas remaining largely an untapped reservoir for exploration. This review focuses on the potential of using seaweed derived bioactives including polysaccharides, antioxidants and fatty acids, amongst others, to treat chronic NCDs such as cancer, cardiovascular disease and diabetes mellitus.

  10. Certified Reference Material IAEA-446 for radionuclides in Baltic Sea seaweed

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pham, M.K.; Benmansour, M.; Carvalho, F.P.

    2014-01-01

    A Certified Reference Material (CRM) for radionuclides in seaweed (Fucus vesiculosus) from the Baltic Sea (IAEA-446) is described and the results of the certification process are presented. The 40K, 137Cs, 234U and 239þ240Pu radionuclides were certified for this material, and information values...

  11. Climate change impact on seaweed meadow distribution in the North Atlantic rocky intertidal

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Jueterbock, Alexander; Tyberghein, Lennert; Verbruggen, Heroen; Coyer, James A.; Olsen, Jeanine L.; Hoarau, Galice

    2013-01-01

    The North-Atlantic has warmed faster than all other ocean basins and climate change scenarios predict sea surface temperature isotherms to shift up to 600km northwards by the end of the 21st century. The pole-ward shift has already begun for many temperate seaweed species that are important intertid

  12. Development and phytochemical content analysis of bun incorporated with Kappaphycus Alvarezii seaweed powder

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sasue, Anita; Kasim, Zalifah Mohd

    2016-11-01

    Consumer awareness of the importance of functional foods has greatly grown in the past years. Functional foods with elevated levels of antioxidants are of high demand because of its associated health benefits. As bread is a common component in our daily diet, it may be convenient food to deliver antioxidants at a high concentration. The main approach of this study is to incorporate Kappaphycus alvarezii seaweed powder (SWP) and white flour in the bun formulation in order to develop seaweed bun with higher level of phytochemicals. The fresh Kappaphycus alvarezii seaweeds were washed, soaked in distilled water overnight, dried in a cabinet dryer at 40°C for 24 hours and ground into fine powder using universal miller. There were five different percentages of SWP incorporated into bun that were formulation A - control (0% SWP), B (3% SWP), C (6% SWP), D (9% SWP) and E (12% SWP). All the samples were undergone texture, total phenolic content and DPPH analysis. Seaweed concentration had most significant effect on phytochemical constituents of the bun with TPC (35.07 GAE, mg/100g) and DPPH activity (49.02%) maximized when 12% SWP was incorporated into the flour (P<0.05). The incorporation of the SWP also gives significant effects towards the texture of the bun where the bun becomes harder and denser as compared to the control.

  13. Production of acetone, butanol, and ethanol from biomass of the green seaweed Ulva lactuca

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wal, van der H.; Sperber, B.L.H.M.; Houweling-Tan, G.B.N.; Bakker, R.R.C.; Brandenburg, W.A.; Lopez Contreras, Ana

    2013-01-01

    Green seaweed Ulva lactuca harvested from the North Sea near Zeeland (The Netherlands) was characterized as feedstock for acetone, ethanol and ethanol fermentation. Solubilization of over 90% of sugars was achieved by hot-water treatment followed by hydrolysis using commercial cellulases. A

  14. Furthering knowledge of seaweed growth and development to facilitate sustainable aquaculture.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Charrier, Bénédicte; Abreu, Maria Helena; Araujo, Rita; Bruhn, Annette; Coates, Juliet C; De Clerck, Olivier; Katsaros, Christos; Robaina, Rafael R; Wichard, Thomas

    2017-08-11

    Macroalgae (seaweeds) are the subject of increasing interest for their potential as a source of valuable, sustainable biomass in the food, feed, chemical and pharmaceutical industries. Compared with microalgae, the pace of knowledge acquisition in seaweeds is slower despite the availability of whole-genome sequences and model organisms for the major seaweed groups. This is partly a consequence of specific hurdles related to the large size of these organisms and their slow growth. As a result, this basic scientific field is falling behind, despite the societal and economic importance of these organisms. Here, we argue that sustainable management of seaweed aquaculture requires fundamental understanding of the underlying biological mechanisms controlling macroalgal life cycles - from the production of germ cells to the growth and fertility of the adult organisms - using diverse approaches requiring a broad range of technological tools. This Viewpoint highlights several examples of basic research on macroalgal developmental biology that could enable the step-changes which are required to adequately meet the demands of the aquaculture sector. © 2017 The Authors. New Phytologist © 2017 New Phytologist Trust.

  15. Co-pyrolysis mechanism of seaweed polysaccharides and cellulose based on macroscopic experiments and molecular simulations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Shuang; Xia, Zhen; Hu, Yamin; He, Zhixia; Uzoejinwa, Benjamin Bernard; Wang, Qian; Cao, Bin; Xu, Shanna

    2017-03-01

    Co-pyrolysis conversion of seaweed (Enteromorpha clathrat and Sargassum fusiforme) polysaccharides and cellulose has been investigated. From the Py-GC/MS results, Enteromorpha clathrata (EN) polysaccharides pyrolysis mainly forms furans; while the products of Sargassum fusiforme (SA) polysaccharides pyrolysis are mainly acid esters. The formation mechanisms of H2O, CO2, and SO2 during the pyrolysis of seaweed polysaccharides were analyzed using the thermogravimetric-mass spectrometry. Meanwhile the pyrolysis of seaweed polysaccharide based on the Amber and the ReaxFF force fields, has also been proposed and simulated respectively. The simulation results coincided with the experimental results. During the fast pyrolysis, strong synergistic effects among cellulose and seaweed polysaccharide molecules have been simulated. By comparing the experimental and simulation value, it has been found that co-pyrolysis could increase the number of molecular fragments, increase the pyrolysis conversion rate, and increase gas production rate at the middle temperature range. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  16. Higher resistance to herbivory in introduced compared to native populations of a seaweed.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Forslund, Helena; Wikström, Sofia A; Pavia, Henrik

    2010-11-01

    Non-indigenous species (NIS) are important components of global change, and in order to manage such species it is important to understand which factors affect their success. Interactions with enemies in the new range have been shown to be important for the outcome of introductions, but thus far most studies on NIS-enemy interactions have considered only specialist herbivores in terrestrial systems. Here we present the results from the first biogeographic study that compares herbivore resistance between populations in the native and new region of a non-indigenous seaweed. We show that low consumption of the non-indigenous seaweed by a generalist herbivore is caused by higher chemical defence levels and herbivore resistance in the new range-and not by the failure of the herbivore to recognise the non-indigenous seaweed as a suitable host. Since most seaweed-herbivore interactions are dominated by generalist herbivores, this pattern could be common in marine communities. Our results also reveal that traits used to predict the invasive potential of species, such as their resistance to enemies, can change during the invasion process, but not always in the way predicted by dominant theories.

  17. Production of acetone, butanol, and ethanol from biomass of the green seaweed Ulva lactuca

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wal, van der H.; Sperber, B.L.H.M.; Houweling-Tan, G.B.N.; Bakker, R.R.C.; Brandenburg, W.A.; Lopez Contreras, Ana

    2013-01-01

    Green seaweed Ulva lactuca harvested from the North Sea near Zeeland (The Netherlands) was characterized as feedstock for acetone, ethanol and ethanol fermentation. Solubilization of over 90% of sugars was achieved by hot-water treatment followed by hydrolysis using commercial cellulases. A hydrolys

  18. Climate change impact on seaweed meadow distribution in the North Atlantic rocky intertidal

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Jueterbock, Alexander; Tyberghein, Lennert; Verbruggen, Heroen; Coyer, James A.; Olsen, Jeanine L.; Hoarau, Galice

    The North-Atlantic has warmed faster than all other ocean basins and climate change scenarios predict sea surface temperature isotherms to shift up to 600km northwards by the end of the 21st century. The pole-ward shift has already begun for many temperate seaweed species that are important

  19. Zinc Biosorption by Seaweed Illustrated by the Zincon Colorimetric Method and the Langmuir Isotherm

    Science.gov (United States)

    Areco, Maria Mar; dos Santos Afonso, Maria; Valdman, Erika

    2007-01-01

    An experiment is conducted to promote biotechnology knowledge that is an emerging technology on cleaning treatment, showing the potential of seaweed to remove heavy-metal ions from solution. The rapid and accurate determination of zinc in aqueous solution by the zincon colorimetric method gives an interesting and simple experiment for any…

  20. Arsenic speciation and fucoxanthin analysis from seaweed dietary supplements using LC-MS

    Science.gov (United States)

    Inorganic species are considered more toxic to humans than organic arsenic and total arsenic. Analysis of total arsenic in metallic form, organic and inorganic arsenic species from seaweeds and dietary supplements using LC-ICP-MS was developed. Solvent extraction with sonication and microwave extr...

  1. Taxonomy of economic seaweeds with reference to some pacific species. Volume 5

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Abbott, I.A.

    1995-11-16

    The series of workshops of which this one was part rests on the conviction that progress in seaweed aquaculture and marine natural products chemistry will advance appreciably once the taxonomy of commercially interesting species is better understood. California Sea Grant funded the first of these bienniel workshops more than a decade ago--in 1984, at the University of Guam.

  2. Impacts of anthropogenic stresses on the early development stages of seaweeds

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Coelho, S.; Rijstenbil, J.W.; Brown, M.

    2000-01-01

    Seaweeds are important primary producers, and as such contribute significantly to nearshore ecosystems. Studies on the effects of anthropogenic stresses on these organisms have largely been concerned with the vegetative adult stages of the life cycle. Here we review the limited information on the

  3. Phenolic compounds and in vitro antioxidant activity of selected species of seaweeds from Danish coast

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Farvin, Sabeena; Jacobsen, Charlotte

    2013-01-01

    Water and ethanolic extracts of 16 species of seaweeds collected along the Danish coasts were screened for antioxidant activities using four in vitro antioxidant assays (2,2-diphenyl-1-picrylhydrazyl radical scavenging activity, reducing power, ferrous ion-chelating and liposome model system...

  4. Impacts of anthropogenic stresses on the early development stages of seaweeds

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Coelho, S.; Rijstenbil, J.W.; Brown, M.

    2000-01-01

    Seaweeds are important primary producers, and as such contribute significantly to nearshore ecosystems. Studies on the effects of anthropogenic stresses on these organisms have largely been concerned with the vegetative adult stages of the life cycle. Here we review the limited information on the se

  5. 7 CFR 29.2254 - Brown colors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 2 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Brown colors. 29.2254 Section 29.2254 Agriculture Regulations of the Department of Agriculture AGRICULTURAL MARKETING SERVICE (Standards, Inspections, Marketing... colors. A group of colors ranging from a reddish brown to yellowish brown. These colors vary from low...

  6. Beth Starts Like Brown Bear!

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fawcett, Gay

    1994-01-01

    Recounts a reading teacher's illuminating experience with a first grader who enjoyed reading Bill Martin's "Brown Bear" books, despite being labeled as dyslexic. Dyslexia is an elusive condition that is biological in origin and distinct from other reading problems. New research shows that reading difficulties, including dyslexia, occur as part of…

  7. Tune Your Brown Clustering, Please

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Derczynski, Leon; Chester, Sean; Bøgh, Kenneth Sejdenfaden

    2015-01-01

    explore the dynamic between the input corpus size, chosen number of classes, and quality of the resulting clusters, which has an impact for any approach using Brown clustering. In every scenario that we examine, our results reveal that the values most commonly used for the clustering are sub-optimal....

  8. The fate of the Arctic seaweed Fucus distichus under climate change: an ecological niche modeling approach.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jueterbock, Alexander; Smolina, Irina; Coyer, James A; Hoarau, Galice

    2016-03-01

    Rising temperatures are predicted to melt all perennial ice cover in the Arctic by the end of this century, thus opening up suitable habitat for temperate and subarctic species. Canopy-forming seaweeds provide an ideal system to predict the potential impact of climate-change on rocky-shore ecosystems, given their direct dependence on temperature and their key role in the ecological system. Our primary objective was to predict the climate-change induced range-shift of Fucus distichus, the dominant canopy-forming macroalga in the Arctic and subarctic rocky intertidal. More specifically, we asked: which Arctic/subarctic and cold-temperate shores of the northern hemisphere will display the greatest distributional change of F. distichus and how will this affect niche overlap with seaweeds from temperate regions? We used the program MAXENT to develop correlative ecological niche models with dominant range-limiting factors and 169 occurrence records. Using three climate-change scenarios, we projected habitat suitability of F. distichus - and its niche overlap with three dominant temperate macroalgae - until year 2200. Maximum sea surface temperature was identified as the most important factor in limiting the fundamental niche of F. distichus. Rising temperatures were predicted to have low impact on the species' southern distribution limits, but to shift its northern distribution limits poleward into the high Arctic. In cold-temperate to subarctic regions, new areas of niche overlap were predicted between F. distichus and intertidal macroalgae immigrating from the south. While climate-change threatens intertidal seaweeds in warm-temperate regions, seaweed meadows will likely flourish in the Arctic intertidal. Although this enriches biodiversity and opens up new seaweed-harvesting grounds, it will also trigger unpredictable changes in the structure and functioning of the Arctic intertidal ecosystem.

  9. Bioextraction potential of seaweed in Denmark - An instrument for circular nutrient management.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seghetta, Michele; Tørring, Ditte; Bruhn, Annette; Thomsen, Marianne

    2016-09-01

    The aim of the study is to assess the efficacy of seaweed for circular nutrient management to reduce eutrophication levels in the aquatic environment. We performed a comparative Life Cycle Assessment (LCA) of two reference waste management systems treating seaweed as biowaste, i.e. landfill disposal and combustion, and an alternative scenario using the seaweed Saccharina latissima as a resource for biobased fertilizer production. Life Cycle Impact Assessment (LCIA) methods were improved by using a cradle-to-cradle approach, quantifying fate factors for nitrogen and phosphorus loss from fertilized agriculture to the aquatic environment. We also differentiated between nitrogen- and phosphorus-limited marine water to improve the traditional freshwater impact category, making this indicator suitable for decision support in relation to coastal water management schemes. Offshore cultivation of Saccharina latissima with an average productivity of 150Mg/km(2) in Danish waters in 2014 was applied to a cultivation scenario of 208km(2). The bioresource scenario performs better than conventional biowaste management systems, delivering a net reduction in aquatic eutrophication levels of 32.29kgNeq. and 16.58kgPO4(3-)eq. per Mg (dry weight) of seaweed, quantified by the ReCiPe and CML impact assessment methods, respectively. Seaweed cultivation, harvest and reuse of excess nutrients from the aquatic environment is a promising approach for sustainable resource cycling in a future regenerative economy that exploits manmade emissions as a resource for closed loop biobased production while significantly reducing eutrophication levels in 3 out of 7 Danish river basin districts. We obtained at least 10% bioextraction of phosphorus manmade emissions (10%, 89% and >100%) and contributed significantly to local nitrogen reduction goals according to the Water Framework Directive (23%, 78% and >100% of the target).

  10. Cloning and Characterization of a Novel Agarase from a Newly Isolated Bacterium Simiduia sp. Strain TM-2 Able to Degrade Various Seaweeds.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tawara, Mika; Sakatoku, Akihiro; Tiodjio, Rosine E; Tanaka, Daisuke; Nakamura, Shogo

    2015-10-01

    A new bacterial strain capable of reducing thalli of various seaweeds (red, green, and brown algae) was isolated from marine sediments of Uozu in Toyama Prefecture, Japan. We designated the strain Simiduia sp. TM-2 based on analyses of the 16S rRNA gene and gyrB gene sequences and its biochemical and morphological characteristics. Zymography methods revealed numerous active bands of alginate lyases, cellulases, and agarases in the cells and culture supernatants of TM-2, showing that the strain possessed multiple polysaccharide lyases. A novel agarase gene (agaTM2) was cloned from TM-2 and expressed in Escherichia coli. The resulting DNA sequence contained an open reading frame of 1764 bp that encoded a protein of 587 amino acids with an estimated molecular mass of 64 kDa and pI of 4.62. The deduced amino acid sequence, AgaTM2, had a typical signal peptide followed by a glycoside hydrolase family 16 catalytic domain and two carbohydrate-binding modules 6. A BLAST search indicated that AgaTM2 shared 75.5 % amino acid sequence identity with agarase from Simiduia agarivorans SA1. The cloned and purified AgaTM2 protein showed optimal activity at 35 °C and pH 8.0, and its thermostability increased in the presence of calcium ions. AgaTM2 degraded agarose to tetraose and hexaose.

  11. Sea-to-land transfer of technetium-99 through the use of contaminated seaweed as an agricultural soil conditioner

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Webster, Shona E-mail: shona.webster@stir.ac.uk; Salt, Carol A.; Howard, Brenda J

    2003-07-01

    The use of seaweed as an agricultural soil conditioner gives rise to a potential pathway for the transfer of Technetium-99 ({sup 99}Tc) from marine to terrestrial ecosystems and thence to man. However, to date there is little information on the extent of the release of {sup 99}Tc from seaweed into soil and the mechanisms involved. This pot experiment has shown that {sup 99}Tc is released fairly rapidly from Fucus vesiculosus into a sandy coastal soil. Despite low temperature conditions, 60% of the {sup 99}Tc added with the seaweed had accumulated in the soil 15 weeks after addition. Concurrent CO{sub 2} monitoring (used as a measure of microbial decomposition or catabolism) suggested that the initial {sup 99}Tc release (up to 40% in the first 8 weeks) was due to leaching from the seaweed and that microbial decomposition was responsible for the release of the remaining {sup 99}Tc in the latter phase (12-15 weeks)

  12. Evaluation of antibacterial activity and immunostimulant of red seaweed Chondrococcus hornemanni (Kuetzing, 1847 against marine ornamental fish pathogens

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Raghunathan Ganeshamurthy

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Objective: To evaluate the antibacterial activity and immunostimulant of red seaweed Chondrococcus hornemanni (C. hornemanni (Kuetzing, 1847 against marine ornamental fish pathogens. Methods: In the present study, seaweed extract of C. hornemanni showed significant antimicrobial activity against two fish pathogens and the partially purified potential compound was characterized by GC-MS. Purified seaweed extract was injected to the clownfish, Amphiprion sebae to study the innate immune response of these fishes. Results: The extracts was found effective and had more than 80% inhibitory activity against Aeromonas hydrophila (20 mm and Vibrio parahaemolyticus (19 mm at a concentration (25 mg/mL shown higher antimicrobial activity. The white blood cell count and respirator burst activity was significantly increased in the experimental tanks (E1 and (E2 when compared with control. Conclusions: Hence, it is concluded that the seaweed extracts of C. hornemanni had potential bioactive compounds and act an immunostimulant and improve the immune response to fish.

  13. Effects of Extracts from Tropical Seaweeds on DPPH Radicals and Caco-2 Cells Treated with Hydrogen Peroxide

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    GUNJI, Satoko; SANTOSO, Joko; YOSHIE-STARK, Yumiko; SUZUKI, Takeshi

    2007-01-01

    .... These extracts also had the highest concentrations of total phenol and flavonoid. Both the ethanol and acetone extracts of the 6 Indonesian seaweeds decreased Caco-2 cell viability when such cells were treated with 600μM hydrogen peroxide...

  14. Evaluation of antibacterial activity and immunostimulant of red seaweed Chondrococcus hornemanni (Kuetzing, 1847) against marine ornamental fish pathogens

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Raghunathan Ganeshamurthy; Saravanan Kumaresan

    2014-01-01

    Objective: To evaluate the antibacterial activity and immunostimulant of red seaweedChondrococcus hornemanni pathogens.Methods:(C. hornemanni) (Kuetzing, 1847) against marine ornamental fish antimicrobial activity against two fish pathogens and the partially purified potential compound was characterized by GC-MS. Purified seaweed extract was injected to the clownfish, Amphiprion sebae to study the innate immune response of these fishes.Results:In the present study, seaweed extract of C. hornemanni showed significant Aeromonas hydrophila (20 mm) and Vibrio parahaemolyticus (19 mm) at a concentration (25 mg/mL) shown higher antimicrobial activity. The white blood cell count and respirator burst activity was significantly increased in the experimental tanks (E1) and (E2) when compared with control. The extracts was found effective and had more than 80% inhibitory activity against Conclusions: Hence, it is concluded that the seaweed extracts of C. hornemanni had potential bioactive compounds and act an immunostimulant and improve the immune response to fish.

  15. Projecting the impacts of rising seawater temperatures on the distribution of seaweeds around Japan under multiple climate change scenarios

    OpenAIRE

    Takao, Shintaro; Kumagai, Naoki H; Yamano, Hiroya; FUJII, Masahiko; YAMANAKA, Yasuhiro

    2014-01-01

    Seaweed beds play a key role in providing essential habitats and energy to coastal areas, with enhancements in productivity and biodiversity and benefits to human societies. However, the spatial extent of seaweed beds around Japan has decreased due to coastal reclamation, water quality changes, rising water temperatures, and heavy grazing by herbivores. Using monthly mean sea surface temperature (SST) data from 1960 to 2099 and SST-based indices, we quantitatively evaluated the effects of war...

  16. Projecting the impacts of rising seawater temperatures on the distribution of seaweeds around Japan under multiple climate change scenarios

    OpenAIRE

    Takao, Shintaro; Kumagai, Naoki H; Yamano, Hiroya; FUJII, Masahiko; YAMANAKA, Yasuhiro

    2015-01-01

    Seaweed beds play a key role in providing essential habitats and energy to coastal areas, with enhancements in productivity and biodiversity and benefits to human societies. However, the spatial extent of seaweed beds around Japan has decreased due to coastal reclamation, water quality changes, rising water temperatures, and heavy grazing by herbivores. Using monthly mean sea surface temperature (SST) data from 1960 to 2099 and SST-based indices, we quantitatively evaluated the effects of war...

  17. Seasonal variation in biomass and species composition of seaweeds stranded along Port Okha, northwest coast of India

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Mukund C Thakur; C R K Reddy; Bhavanath Jha

    2008-06-01

    Port Okha coast,which is known for its luxuriant growth of a diverse assemblage of seaweeds on Saurashtra coast,is found to have abundant quantities of seaweeds being drifted and washed ashore every year.Studies conducted for quantifying the stranded seaweeds from May 2004 to April 2005 showed an average biomass value of 3.10 kg fresh wt/m2/month with maximum being 6.60 kg fresh wt/m2 in April.The stranded weeds constituted a total of 62 species during the entire study period.Of this,Rhodophyta ranked high with 26 species followed by Chlorophyta with 22 species and Phaeophyta with 14 species.The stranded seaweeds that were washed ashore provide valuable floristic information about the intertidal and near shore sub-tidal algae of the respective regions.Although natural senescence of seaweeds is one of the major factors,strong currents primarily forced by tides,also contribute to the uprooting and subsequent drifting of seaweeds on to the beach.This ultimately causes changes in floristic features of the existing algal beds.

  18. Thermal, mechanical, and physical properties of seaweed/sugar palm fibre reinforced thermoplastic sugar palm Starch/Agar hybrid composites.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jumaidin, Ridhwan; Sapuan, Salit M; Jawaid, Mohammad; Ishak, Mohamad R; Sahari, Japar

    2017-04-01

    The aim of this research is to investigate the effect of sugar palm fibre (SPF) on the mechanical, thermal and physical properties of seaweed/thermoplastic sugar palm starch agar (TPSA) composites. Hybridized seaweed/SPF filler at weight ratio of 25:75, 50:50 and 75:25 were prepared using TPSA as a matrix. Mechanical, thermal and physical properties of hybrid composites were carried out. Obtained results indicated that hybrid composites display improved tensile and flexural properties accompanied with lower impact resistance. The highest tensile (17.74MPa) and flexural strength (31.24MPa) was obtained from hybrid composite with 50:50 ratio of seaweed/SPF. Good fibre-matrix bonding was evident in the scanning electron microscopy (SEM) micrograph of the hybrid composites' tensile fracture. Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FT-IR) analysis showed increase in intermolecular hydrogen bonding following the addition of SPF. Thermal stability of hybrid composites was enhanced, indicated by a higher onset degradation temperature (259°C) for 25:75 seaweed/SPF composites than the individual seaweed composites (253°C). Water absorption, thickness swelling, water solubility, and soil burial tests showed higher water and biodegradation resistance of the hybrid composites. Overall, the hybridization of SPF with seaweed/TPSA composites enhances the properties of the biocomposites for short-life application; that is, disposable tray, plate, etc.

  19. Antibacterial activity of Green Seaweed Caulerpa racemosa from Takalar Waters against pathogenic bacteria promoting ice-ice diseases in the agar-producing red algae Gracilaria verrucosa.

    OpenAIRE

    Zainuddin, Elmi Nurhaidah; Anshary, Hilal; Huyyirnah; Hiola, Ridha

    2012-01-01

    The Ice-ice disease caused by bacterial pathogens which attack the algae tissue resulted white and brittle of seaweed thallus on red seaweed Gracilaria verrucosa farming. Study of antibacterial activity of green seaweed Caulerpa racemosa against the pathogens has been done using method include isolation of bacteria, pathogenicity test with Koch's postulates method, characterization of ice-ice bacteria, extraction of Caulerpa racemosa, and antibacterial test by agar diffusion method. The res...

  20. Evaluation of antioxidant and antimicrobial activity of seaweed ( Sargassum sp.) extract: A study on inhibition of glutathione-S-transferase Activity

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Patra, J.K.; Rath, S.K.; Jena, K.B.; Rathod, V.K.; Thatoi, H.

    ). Principal source of antioxidant chiefly include those of herbs, spices, and medicinal plants. There are reports that seaweeds are also rich sources of antioxidant compounds (3,4). Seaweeds provide for an excellent source of bioactive compounds such as Turk J... Evaluation of Antioxidant and Antimicrobial Activity of Seaweed (Sargassum sp.) Extract: A Study on Inhibition of Glutathione-S-Transferase Activity References 1. Halliwell B, Gutteridge JMC. Free Radicals in Biology and Medicine. Oxford: Clarendon Press...