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Sample records for brown norway rat

  1. Population Genomics Reveals Speciation and Introgression between Brown Norway Rats and Their Sibling Species.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Teng, Huajing; Zhang, Yaohua; Shi, Chengmin; Mao, Fengbiao; Cai, Wanshi; Lu, Liang; Zhao, Fangqing; Sun, Zhongsheng; Zhang, Jianxu

    2017-09-01

    Murine rodents are excellent models for study of adaptive radiations and speciation. Brown Norway rats (Rattus norvegicus) are successful global colonizers and the contributions of their domesticated laboratory strains to biomedical research are well established. To identify nucleotide-based speciation timing of the rat and genomic information contributing to its colonization capabilities, we analyzed 51 whole-genome sequences of wild-derived Brown Norway rats and their sibling species, R. nitidus, and identified over 20 million genetic variants in the wild Brown Norway rats that were absent in the laboratory strains, which substantially expand the reservoir of rat genetic diversity. We showed that divergence of the rat and its siblings coincided with drastic climatic changes that occurred during the Middle Pleistocene. Further, we revealed that there was a geographically widespread influx of genes between Brown Norway rats and the sibling species following the divergence, resulting in numerous introgressed regions in the genomes of admixed Brown Norway rats. Intriguing, genes related to chemical communications among these introgressed regions appeared to contribute to the population-specific adaptations of the admixed Brown Norway rats. Our data reveals evolutionary history of the Brown Norway rat, and offers new insights into the role of climatic changes in speciation of animals and the effect of interspecies introgression on animal adaptation. © The Author 2017. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the Society for Molecular Biology and Evolution.

  2. Ozone Induces Glucose Intolerance and Systemic Metabolic Effects in Young and Aged Brown Norway Rats

    Science.gov (United States)

    Air pollutants have been associated with increased diabetes in humans. We hypothesized that ozone could impair glucose homeostasis by altering insulin signaling and/or endoplasmic reticular (ER) stress in very young and aged rats. Brown Norway (BN) rats, 1,4, 12, and 24 months ol...

  3. Genome sequence of the Brown Norway rat yields insights into mammalian evolution

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gibbs, Richard A; Weinstock, George M; Metzker, Michael L

    2004-01-01

    The laboratory rat (Rattus norvegicus) is an indispensable tool in experimental medicine and drug development, having made inestimable contributions to human health. We report here the genome sequence of the Brown Norway (BN) rat strain. The sequence represents a high-quality 'draft' covering ove...

  4. Digested BLG can induce tolerance when co-administered with intact BLG in Brown Norway rats

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bøgh, Katrine Lindholm; Barkholt, Vibeke; Madsen, Charlotte Bernhard

    the human gastro-duodenal digestion process. Four different fractions of BLG-digest was made, based on sizes of peptides or aggregates hereof. Intact BLG and the four fractions of BLG-digesta were characterized by protein chemical analyses. Brown Norway (BN) rats were immunised i.p. three times without...

  5. Molecular characterization of trimellitic anhydride-induced respiratory allergy in Brown Norway rats

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kuper, C.F.; Heijne, W.H.; Dansen, M.; Verhoeckx, K.C.; Boorsma, A.; Radonjic, M.; Bruijntjes, J.; Stierum, R.; Muijser, H.; Arts, J.H.

    2008-01-01

    To contribute to the hazard identification of low molecular weight (LMW) respiratory allergens, respiratory allergy induced by trimellitic anhydride (TMA) was characterized by whole genome analysis of lung tissue and blood proteomics in Brown Norway rats. Dermal sensitization (50% and 25% w/v) with

  6. EFFECTS OF ALLERGIC AIRWAYS DISEASE ON INFLUENZA VIRUS INFECTION IN BROWN NORWAY RATS

    Science.gov (United States)

    EFFECTS OF ALLERGIC AIRWAYS DISEASE ON INFLUENZA VIRUS INFECTION IN BROWN NORWAY RATS (P. Singhl, D.W. Winsett2, M.J. Daniels2,C.A.J. Dick', K.B. Adlerl and M.I. Gilmour2, INCSU, Raleigh, N.C., 2NHEERL/ORD/ USEPA, RTP, N.C. and 3UNC, Chapel Hill, N.C.)The interaction between ...

  7. Age- and Brain Region-Specific Differences in Mitochondrial Bioenergetics in Brown Norway Rats

    Science.gov (United States)

    Differences in various mitochondrial bioenergetics parameters in different brain regions in different age groups.This dataset is associated with the following publication:Pandya, J.D., J. Royland , R.C. McPhail, P.G. Sullivan, and P. Kodavanti. Age-and Brain Region-Specific Differences in Mitochondrial Bioenergetics in Brown Norway Rats. NEUROBIOLOGY OF AGING. Elsevier Science Ltd, New York, NY, USA, 42: 25-34, (2016).

  8. Effects of lighting conditions on sleep and wakefulness in albino Lewis and pigmented Brown Norway rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Benca, R M; Gilliland, M A; Obermeyer, W H

    1998-08-01

    Previous studies have demonstrated that albino but not pigmented rats show acute increases in REM sleep following light-to-dark transitions. Light and dark have also been shown to have direct effects on NREM sleep and wakefulness in albino rats. Little is known, however, about the direct light-dark effects on sleep patterns in pigmented animals. The purpose of the present study was to compare the direct effects of light and dark on REM sleep, NREM sleep, and waking in albino Lewis and pigmented Brown Norway (BN) rats. Groups of albino Lewis and pigmented Brown Norway (BN) rats were exposed to various light-dark (LD) schedules. In the first experiment, the lighting schedules were LD 12:12 and LD 3:3. The second experiment compared LD 12:12 with an irregular schedule consisting of short light and dark periods of unequal length. Both Lewis and BN rats slept more during the light and were awake more during the dark on all schedules. REM sleep patterns in light and dark periods were opposite, however. Lewis rats spent more of their sleep in REM sleep during dark than the light, whereas BN rats had a higher proportion of REM sleep in the light. The results suggest that there are substantial direct effects of light and dark on sleep in pigmented as well as in albino rats, although these effects are not always the same in magnitude or even in direction.

  9. Reliability and sensitivity of the TonoLab rebound tonometer in awake Brown Norway rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morrison, John C; Jia, Lijun; Cepurna, William; Guo, Ying; Johnson, Elaine

    2009-06-01

    To compare the sensitivity of the TonoLab rebound tonometer with the Tono-Pen in awake Brown Norway rats and to compare their ability to predict optic nerve damage induced by experimental IOP elevation. TonoLab and Tono-Pen tonometers were calibrated in cannulated rat eyes connected to a pressure transducer. The TonoLab was used in awake animals housed in standard lighting to measure IOP during light and dark phases. Both instruments were used to monitor chronically elevated IOP produced by episcleral vein injection of hypertonic saline. Measured IOPs were correlated with quantified optic nerve damage in injected eyes. Although they were lower than transducer and Tono-Pen measurements at all levels, TonoLab readings showed an excellent linear fit with transducer readings from 20 to 80 mm Hg (R(2) = 0.99) in cannulated eyes. In awake animals housed in standard lighting, the TonoLab documented significantly higher pressures during the dark phase (27.9 +/- 1.7 mm Hg) than during the light phase (16.7 +/- 2.3 mm Hg). With elevated IOP, correlation between TonoLab and Tono-Pen readings (R(2) = 0.86, P awake Brown Norway rats, though instrument fluctuation may limit its ability to identify significant pressure elevations in eyes with minimal optic nerve damage.

  10. The importance of dietary control in the development of a peanut allergy model in Brown Norway rats

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Jonge, J.D. de; Knippels, L.M.J.; Ezendam, J.; Odink, J.; Penninks, A.H.; Loveren, H. van

    2007-01-01

    This report describes the further development of a peanut allergy model in Brown Norway (BN) rats and in particular the importance of allergen-free breeding of the laboratory animals for the allergen to be used. For this purpose BN rats were bred for 3 generations on soy- and peanut-free feed since

  11. Genome sequence of the brown Norway rat yields insights into mammalian evolution

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gibbs, Richard A.; Weinstock, George M.; Metzker, Michael L.; Muzny, Donna M.; Sodergren, Erica J.; Scherer, Steven; Scott, Graham; Steffen, David; Worley, Kim C.; Burch, Paula E.; Okwuonu, Geoffrey; Hines, Sandra; Lewis, Lora; DeRamo, Christine; Delgado, Oliver; Dugan-Rocha, Shannon; Miner, George; Morgan, Margaret; Hawes, Alicia; Gill, Rachel; Holt, Robert A.; Adams, Mark D.; Amanatides, Peter G.; Baden-Tillson, Holly; Barnstead, Mary; Chin, Soo; Evans, Cheryl A.; Ferriera, Steven; Fosler, Carl; Glodek, Anna; Gu, Zhiping; Jennings, Don; Kraft, Cheryl L.; Nguyen, Trixie; Pfannkoch, Cynthia M.; Sitter, Cynthia; Sutton, Granger G.; Venter, J. Craig; Woodage, Trevor; Smith, Douglas; Lee, Hong-Maei; Gustafson, Erik; Cahill, Patrick; Kana, Arnold; Doucette-Stamm, Lynn; Weinstock, Keith; Fechtel, Kim; Weiss, Robert B.; Dunn, Diane M.; Green, Eric D.; Blakesley, Robert W.; Bouffard, Gerard G.; de Jong, Pieter J.; Osoegawa, Kazutoyo; Zhu, Baoli; Marra, Marco; Schein, Jacqueline; Bosdet, Ian; Fjell, Chris; Jones, Steven; Krzywinski, Martin; Mathewson, Carrie; Siddiqui, Asim; Wye, Natasja; McPherson, John; Zhao, Shaying; Fraser, Claire M.; Shetty, Jyoti; Shatsman, Sofiya; Geer, Keita; Chen, Yixin; Abramzon, Sofyia; Nierman, William C.; Havlak, Paul H.; Chen, Rui; Durbin, K. James; Egan, Amy; Ren, Yanru; Song, Xing-Zhi; Li, Bingshan; Liu, Yue; Qin, Xiang; Cawley, Simon; Cooney, A.J.; D' Souza, Lisa M.; Martin, Kirt; Wu, Jia Qian; Gonzalez-Garay, Manuel L.; Jackson, Andrew R.; Kalafus, Kenneth J.; McLeod, Michael P.; Milosavljevic, Aleksandar; Virk, Davinder; Volkov, Andrei; Wheeler, David A.; Zhang, Zhengdong; Bailey, Jeffrey A.; Eichler, Evan E.; Tuzun, Eray; Birney, Ewan; Mongin, Emmanuel; Ureta-Vidal, Abel; Woodwark, Cara; Zdobnov, Evgeny; Bork, Peer; Suyama, Mikita; Torrents, David; Alexandersson, Marina; Trask, Barbara J.; Young, Janet M.; et al.

    2004-02-02

    The laboratory rat (Rattus norvegicus) is an indispensable tool in experimental medicine and drug development, having made inestimable contributions to human health. We report here the genome sequence of the Brown Norway (BN) rat strain. The sequence represents a high-quality 'draft' covering over 90 percent of the genome. The BN rat sequence is the third complete mammalian genome to be deciphered, and three-way comparisons with the human and mouse genomes resolve details of mammalian evolution. This first comprehensive analysis includes genes and proteins and their relation to human disease, repeated sequences, comparative genome-wide studies of mammalian orthologous chromosomal regions and rearrangement breakpoints, reconstruction of ancestral karyotypes and the events leading to existing species, rates of variation, and lineage-specific and lineage-independent evolutionary events such as expansion of gene families, orthology relations and protein evolution.

  12. Genome sequence of the Brown Norway rat yields insights into mammalian evolution.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gibbs, Richard A; Weinstock, George M; Metzker, Michael L; Muzny, Donna M; Sodergren, Erica J; Scherer, Steven; Scott, Graham; Steffen, David; Worley, Kim C; Burch, Paula E; Okwuonu, Geoffrey; Hines, Sandra; Lewis, Lora; DeRamo, Christine; Delgado, Oliver; Dugan-Rocha, Shannon; Miner, George; Morgan, Margaret; Hawes, Alicia; Gill, Rachel; Celera; Holt, Robert A; Adams, Mark D; Amanatides, Peter G; Baden-Tillson, Holly; Barnstead, Mary; Chin, Soo; Evans, Cheryl A; Ferriera, Steve; Fosler, Carl; Glodek, Anna; Gu, Zhiping; Jennings, Don; Kraft, Cheryl L; Nguyen, Trixie; Pfannkoch, Cynthia M; Sitter, Cynthia; Sutton, Granger G; Venter, J Craig; Woodage, Trevor; Smith, Douglas; Lee, Hong-Mei; Gustafson, Erik; Cahill, Patrick; Kana, Arnold; Doucette-Stamm, Lynn; Weinstock, Keith; Fechtel, Kim; Weiss, Robert B; Dunn, Diane M; Green, Eric D; Blakesley, Robert W; Bouffard, Gerard G; De Jong, Pieter J; Osoegawa, Kazutoyo; Zhu, Baoli; Marra, Marco; Schein, Jacqueline; Bosdet, Ian; Fjell, Chris; Jones, Steven; Krzywinski, Martin; Mathewson, Carrie; Siddiqui, Asim; Wye, Natasja; McPherson, John; Zhao, Shaying; Fraser, Claire M; Shetty, Jyoti; Shatsman, Sofiya; Geer, Keita; Chen, Yixin; Abramzon, Sofyia; Nierman, William C; Havlak, Paul H; Chen, Rui; Durbin, K James; Egan, Amy; Ren, Yanru; Song, Xing-Zhi; Li, Bingshan; Liu, Yue; Qin, Xiang; Cawley, Simon; Worley, Kim C; Cooney, A J; D'Souza, Lisa M; Martin, Kirt; Wu, Jia Qian; Gonzalez-Garay, Manuel L; Jackson, Andrew R; Kalafus, Kenneth J; McLeod, Michael P; Milosavljevic, Aleksandar; Virk, Davinder; Volkov, Andrei; Wheeler, David A; Zhang, Zhengdong; Bailey, Jeffrey A; Eichler, Evan E; Tuzun, Eray; Birney, Ewan; Mongin, Emmanuel; Ureta-Vidal, Abel; Woodwark, Cara; Zdobnov, Evgeny; Bork, Peer; Suyama, Mikita; Torrents, David; Alexandersson, Marina; Trask, Barbara J; Young, Janet M; Huang, Hui; Wang, Huajun; Xing, Heming; Daniels, Sue; Gietzen, Darryl; Schmidt, Jeanette; Stevens, Kristian; Vitt, Ursula; Wingrove, Jim; Camara, Francisco; Mar Albà, M; Abril, Josep F; Guigo, Roderic; Smit, Arian; Dubchak, Inna; Rubin, Edward M; Couronne, Olivier; Poliakov, Alexander; Hübner, Norbert; Ganten, Detlev; Goesele, Claudia; Hummel, Oliver; Kreitler, Thomas; Lee, Young-Ae; Monti, Jan; Schulz, Herbert; Zimdahl, Heike; Himmelbauer, Heinz; Lehrach, Hans; Jacob, Howard J; Bromberg, Susan; Gullings-Handley, Jo; Jensen-Seaman, Michael I; Kwitek, Anne E; Lazar, Jozef; Pasko, Dean; Tonellato, Peter J; Twigger, Simon; Ponting, Chris P; Duarte, Jose M; Rice, Stephen; Goodstadt, Leo; Beatson, Scott A; Emes, Richard D; Winter, Eitan E; Webber, Caleb; Brandt, Petra; Nyakatura, Gerald; Adetobi, Margaret; Chiaromonte, Francesca; Elnitski, Laura; Eswara, Pallavi; Hardison, Ross C; Hou, Minmei; Kolbe, Diana; Makova, Kateryna; Miller, Webb; Nekrutenko, Anton; Riemer, Cathy; Schwartz, Scott; Taylor, James; Yang, Shan; Zhang, Yi; Lindpaintner, Klaus; Andrews, T Dan; Caccamo, Mario; Clamp, Michele; Clarke, Laura; Curwen, Valerie; Durbin, Richard; Eyras, Eduardo; Searle, Stephen M; Cooper, Gregory M; Batzoglou, Serafim; Brudno, Michael; Sidow, Arend; Stone, Eric A; Venter, J Craig; Payseur, Bret A; Bourque, Guillaume; López-Otín, Carlos; Puente, Xose S; Chakrabarti, Kushal; Chatterji, Sourav; Dewey, Colin; Pachter, Lior; Bray, Nicolas; Yap, Von Bing; Caspi, Anat; Tesler, Glenn; Pevzner, Pavel A; Haussler, David; Roskin, Krishna M; Baertsch, Robert; Clawson, Hiram; Furey, Terrence S; Hinrichs, Angie S; Karolchik, Donna; Kent, William J; Rosenbloom, Kate R; Trumbower, Heather; Weirauch, Matt; Cooper, David N; Stenson, Peter D; Ma, Bin; Brent, Michael; Arumugam, Manimozhiyan; Shteynberg, David; Copley, Richard R; Taylor, Martin S; Riethman, Harold; Mudunuri, Uma; Peterson, Jane; Guyer, Mark; Felsenfeld, Adam; Old, Susan; Mockrin, Stephen; Collins, Francis

    2004-04-01

    The laboratory rat (Rattus norvegicus) is an indispensable tool in experimental medicine and drug development, having made inestimable contributions to human health. We report here the genome sequence of the Brown Norway (BN) rat strain. The sequence represents a high-quality 'draft' covering over 90% of the genome. The BN rat sequence is the third complete mammalian genome to be deciphered, and three-way comparisons with the human and mouse genomes resolve details of mammalian evolution. This first comprehensive analysis includes genes and proteins and their relation to human disease, repeated sequences, comparative genome-wide studies of mammalian orthologous chromosomal regions and rearrangement breakpoints, reconstruction of ancestral karyotypes and the events leading to existing species, rates of variation, and lineage-specific and lineage-independent evolutionary events such as expansion of gene families, orthology relations and protein evolution.

  13. Fluoxetine augments ventilatory CO2 sensitivity in Brown Norway but not Sprague Dawley rats

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hodges, Matthew R.; Echert, Ashley E.; Puissant, Madeleine M.; Mouradian, Gary C.

    2013-01-01

    The Brown Norway (BN; BN/NHsdMcwi) rat exhibits a deficit in ventilatory CO2 sensitivity and a modest serotonin (5-HT) deficiency. Here, we tested the hypothesis that the selective serotonin reuptake inhibitor fluoxetine would augment CO2 sensitivity in BN but not Sprague Dawley (SD) rats. Ventilation during room air or 7 % CO2 exposure was measured before, during and after 3 weeks of daily injections of saline or fluoxetine (10 mg/kg/day) in adult male BN and SD rats. Fluoxetine had minimal effects on room air breathing in BN and SD rats (p>0.05), although tidal volume (VT) was reduced in BN rats (pfluoxetine on CO2 sensitivity in SD rats, but fluoxetine increased minute ventilation, breathing frequency and VT during hypercapnia in BN rats (pfluoxetine. Brain levels of biogenic amines were largely unaffected, but 5-HIAA and the ratio of 5-HIAA/5-HT were reduced (pfluoxetine increases ventilatory CO2 sensitivity in BN but not SD rats, further suggesting altered 5-HT system function may contribute to the inherently low CO2 sensitivity in the BN rat. PMID:23454023

  14. Preexposure to amorphous silica particles attenuates but also enhances allergic reactions in trimellitic anhydride-sensitized brown Norway rats

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Arts, J.H.E.; Schijf, M.A.; Kuper, C.F.

    2008-01-01

    Irritant-induced inflammation of the airways may aggravate respiratory allergy induced by chemical respiratory allergens. Therefore, the effect of airway irritation by synthetic amorphous silica (SAS) on respiratory allergy to trimellitic anhydride (TMA) was studied. Brown Norway (BN) rats were

  15. Acute exacerbation of sleep apnea by hyperoxia impairs cognitive flexibility in Brown-Norway rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Topchiy, Irina; Amodeo, Dionisio A; Ragozzino, Michael E; Waxman, Jonathan; Radulovacki, Miodrag; Carley, David W

    2014-11-01

    To determine whether learning deficits occur during acute exacerbation of spontaneous sleep related breathing disorder (SRBD) in rats with high (Brown Norway; BN) and low (Zucker Lean; ZL) apnea propensity. Spatial acquisition (3 days) and reversal learning (3 days) in the Morris water maze (MWM) with polysomnography (12:00-08:00): (1) with acute SRBD exacerbation (by 20-h hyperoxia immediately preceding reversal learning) or (2) without SRBD exacerbation (room air throughout). Randomized, placebo-controlled, repeated-measures design. 14 BN rats; 16 ZL rats. 20-h hyperoxia. Apneas were detected as cessation of respiration ≥ 2 sec. Swim latency in MWM, apnea indices (AI; apneas/hour of sleep) and percentages of recording time for nonrapid eye movement (NREM), rapid eye movement (REM), and total sleep were assessed. Baseline AI in BN rats was more than double that of ZL rats (22.46 ± 2.27 versus 10.7 ± 0.9, P = 0.005). Hyperoxia increased AI in both BN (34.3 ± 7.4 versus 22.46 ± 2.27) and ZL rats (15.4 ± 2.7 versus 10.7 ± 0.9) without changes in sleep stage percentages. Control (room air) BN and ZL rats exhibited equivalent acquisition and reversal learning. Acute exacerbation of AI by hyperoxia produced a reversal learning performance deficit in BN but not ZL rats. In addition, the percentage of REM sleep and REM apnea index in BN rats during hyperoxia negatively correlated with reversal learning performance. Acute exacerbation of sleep related breathing disorder by hyperoxia impairs reversal learning in a rat strain with high apnea propensity, but not a strain with a low apnea propensity. This suggests a non-linear threshold effect may contribute to the relationships between sleep apnea and cognitive dysfunctions, but strain-specific differences also may be important.

  16. Male reproductive ageing: using the brown Norway rat as a model for man.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Christina; Hikim, Amiva Sinha; Ferrini, Monica; Bonavera, Juan J; Vernet, Dolores; Leung, Andrew; Lue, Yan-He; Gonzalez-Cadavid, Nestor F; Swerdloff, Ronald S

    2002-01-01

    The Brown Norway (BN) rat is an excellent model for male reproductive ageing. We and others have shown that with ageing, the BN rat exhibits low serum testosterone, low Leydig cell steroidogenic capacity, decreased Sertoli cell function and number, marked reduction in seminiferous tubule volume and sperm content, and accelerated germ cell apoptosis. These testicular changes are the result of a combination of a primary testicular defect and a secondary hypothalamic dysfunction. Leydig cell dysfunction results from decreased activities of the steroidogenic enzymes and Leydig cell secretory capacity and is not corrected by daily administration of replacement luteinizing hormone (LH), suggesting a primary testicular defect. However ageing in male BN rats is associated with decreased LH pulse amplitude, reduced gonadotropin releasing hormone (GnRH) and gonadotropin responsiveness to excitatory amino acids, and decreased GnRH mRNA and peptide in the hypothalamus. We have further shown in the hypothalamus of ageing BN rats that while the excitatory amino acid receptor content is reduced, nitric oxide synthase (NOS) activity is increased which is due to increased inducible (iNOS) but not neuronal NOS (nNOS). The increased iNOS protein in the hypothalamus is associated with increased peroxynitrite formation and neuronal cell apoptosis. We conclude that increased hypothalamic levels of iNOS may result in neurotoxicity in the hypothalamus leading to loss of hypothalamic GnRH secretory cells and impaired GnRH pulsatile secretion that contributes to the abnormal Leydig cell function characteristic of male reproductive ageing.

  17. Brown Norway and Zucker Lean rats demonstrate circadian variation in ventilation and sleep apnea.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fink, Anne M; Topchiy, Irina; Ragozzino, Michael; Amodeo, Dionisio A; Waxman, Jonathan A; Radulovacki, Miodrag G; Carley, David W

    2014-04-01

    Circadian rhythms influence many biological systems, but there is limited information about circadian and diurnal variation in sleep related breathing disorder. We examined circadian and diurnal patterns in sleep apnea and ventilatory patterns in two rat strains, one with high sleep apnea propensity (Brown Norway [BN]) and the other with low sleep apnea propensity (Zucker Lean [ZL]). Chronically instrumented rats were randomized to breathe room air (control) or 100% oxygen (hyperoxia), and we performed 20-h polysomnography beginning at Zeitgeber time 4 (ZT 4; ZT 0 = lights on, ZT12 = lights off). We examined the effect of strain and inspired gas (twoway analysis of variance) and analyzed circadian and diurnal variability. Strain and inspired gas-dependent differences in apnea index (AI; apneas/h) were particularly prominent during the light phase. AI in BN rats (control, 16.9 ± 0.9; hyperoxia, 34.0 ± 5.8) was greater than in ZL rats (control, 8.5 ± 1.0; hyperoxia, 15.4 ± 1.1, [strain effect, P < 0.001; gas effect, P = 0.001]). Hyperoxia reduced respiratory frequency in both strains, and all respiratory pattern variables demonstrated circadian variability. BN rats exposed to hyperoxia demonstrated the largest circadian fluctuation in AI (amplitude = 17.9 ± 3.7 apneas/h [strain effect, P = 0.01; gas effect, P < 0.001; interaction, P = 0.02]; acrophase = 13.9 ± 0.7 h; r (2) = 0.8 ± 1.4). Inherited, environmental, and circadian factors all are important elements of underlying sleep related breathing disorder. Our method to examine sleep related breathing disorder phenotypes in rats may have implications for understanding vulnerability for sleep related breathing disorder in humans.

  18. Ozone induces glucose intolerance and systemic metabolic effects in young and aged Brown Norway rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bass, V; Gordon, C J; Jarema, K A; MacPhail, R C; Cascio, W E; Phillips, P M; Ledbetter, A D; Schladweiler, M C; Andrews, D; Miller, D; Doerfler, D L; Kodavanti, U P

    2013-12-15

    Air pollutants have been associated with increased diabetes in humans. We hypothesized that ozone would impair glucose homeostasis by altering insulin signaling and/or endoplasmic reticular (ER) stress in young and aged rats. One, 4, 12, and 24 month old Brown Norway (BN) rats were exposed to air or ozone, 0.25 or 1.0 ppm, 6 h/day for 2 days (acute) or 2 d/week for 13 weeks (subchronic). Additionally, 4 month old rats were exposed to air or 1.0 ppm ozone, 6 h/day for 1 or 2 days (time-course). Glucose tolerance tests (GTT) were performed immediately after exposure. Serum and tissue biomarkers were analyzed 18 h after final ozone for acute and subchronic studies, and immediately after each day of exposure in the time-course study. Age-related glucose intolerance and increases in metabolic biomarkers were apparent at baseline. Acute ozone caused hyperglycemia and glucose intolerance in rats of all ages. Ozone-induced glucose intolerance was reduced in rats exposed for 13 weeks. Acute, but not subchronic ozone increased α2-macroglobulin, adiponectin and osteopontin. Time-course analysis indicated glucose intolerance at days 1 and 2 (2>1), and a recovery 18 h post ozone. Leptin increased day 1 and epinephrine at all times after ozone. Ozone tended to decrease phosphorylated insulin receptor substrate-1 in liver and adipose tissues. ER stress appeared to be the consequence of ozone induced acute metabolic impairment since transcriptional markers of ER stress increased only after 2 days of ozone. In conclusion, acute ozone exposure induces marked systemic metabolic impairments in BN rats of all ages, likely through sympathetic stimulation. © 2013.

  19. Ozone induces glucose intolerance and systemic metabolic effects in young and aged brown Norway rats

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bass, V. [Environmental Public Health Division, National Health and Environmental Effects Research Laboratory, U.S. Environmental Protection Agency, Research Triangle Park, NC (United States); Gordon, C.J.; Jarema, K.A.; MacPhail, R.C. [Toxicity Assessment Division, National Health and Environmental Effects Research Laboratory, U.S. Environmental Protection Agency, Research Triangle Park, NC (United States); Cascio, W.E. [Environmental Public Health Division, National Health and Environmental Effects Research Laboratory, U.S. Environmental Protection Agency, Research Triangle Park, NC (United States); Phillips, P.M. [Toxicity Assessment Division, National Health and Environmental Effects Research Laboratory, U.S. Environmental Protection Agency, Research Triangle Park, NC (United States); Ledbetter, A.D.; Schladweiler, M.C. [Environmental Public Health Division, National Health and Environmental Effects Research Laboratory, U.S. Environmental Protection Agency, Research Triangle Park, NC (United States); Andrews, D. [Research Cores Unit, National Health and Environmental Effects Research Laboratory, U.S. Environmental Protection Agency, Research Triangle Park, NC (United States); Miller, D. [Curriculum in Toxicology, University of North Carolina, Chapel Hill, NC (United States); Doerfler, D.L. [Research Cores Unit, National Health and Environmental Effects Research Laboratory, U.S. Environmental Protection Agency, Research Triangle Park, NC (United States); Kodavanti, U.P., E-mail: kodavanti.urmila@epa.gov [Environmental Public Health Division, National Health and Environmental Effects Research Laboratory, U.S. Environmental Protection Agency, Research Triangle Park, NC (United States)

    2013-12-15

    Air pollutants have been associated with increased diabetes in humans. We hypothesized that ozone would impair glucose homeostasis by altering insulin signaling and/or endoplasmic reticular (ER) stress in young and aged rats. One, 4, 12, and 24 month old Brown Norway (BN) rats were exposed to air or ozone, 0.25 or 1.0 ppm, 6 h/day for 2 days (acute) or 2 d/week for 13 weeks (subchronic). Additionally, 4 month old rats were exposed to air or 1.0 ppm ozone, 6 h/day for 1 or 2 days (time-course). Glucose tolerance tests (GTT) were performed immediately after exposure. Serum and tissue biomarkers were analyzed 18 h after final ozone for acute and subchronic studies, and immediately after each day of exposure in the time-course study. Age-related glucose intolerance and increases in metabolic biomarkers were apparent at baseline. Acute ozone caused hyperglycemia and glucose intolerance in rats of all ages. Ozone-induced glucose intolerance was reduced in rats exposed for 13 weeks. Acute, but not subchronic ozone increased α{sub 2}-macroglobulin, adiponectin and osteopontin. Time-course analysis indicated glucose intolerance at days 1 and 2 (2 > 1), and a recovery 18 h post ozone. Leptin increased day 1 and epinephrine at all times after ozone. Ozone tended to decrease phosphorylated insulin receptor substrate-1 in liver and adipose tissues. ER stress appeared to be the consequence of ozone induced acute metabolic impairment since transcriptional markers of ER stress increased only after 2 days of ozone. In conclusion, acute ozone exposure induces marked systemic metabolic impairments in BN rats of all ages, likely through sympathetic stimulation. - Highlights: • Air pollutants have been associated with increased diabetes in humans. • Acute ozone exposure produces profound metabolic alterations in rats. • Age influences metabolic risk factors in aging BN rats. • Acute metabolic effects are reversible and repeated exposure reduces these effects. • Ozone

  20. Brown Norway chromosome 1 congenic reduces symptoms of renal disease in fatty Zucker rats.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Craig H Warden

    Full Text Available We previously reported that a congenic rat with Brown Norway (BN alleles on chromosome 1 reduces renal disease of 15-week old fatty Zucker rats (ZUC. Development of renal disease in fatty BN congenic and fatty ZUC rats from 9 through 28 weeks is now examined. Analysis of urine metabolites by (1H nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR spectroscopy revealed a significantly increased urinary loss of glucose, myo-inositol, urea, creatine, and valine in ZUC. Food intake was lower in the BN congenic rats at weeks 9-24, but they weighed significantly more at 28 weeks compared with the ZUC group. Fasting glucose was significantly higher in ZUC than congenic and adiponectin levels were significantly lower in ZUC, but there was no significant genotype effect on Insulin levels. Glucose tolerance tests exhibited no significant differences between ZUC and congenic when values were normalized to basal glucose levels. Quantitative PCR on livers revealed evidence for higher gluconeogenesis in congenics than ZUC at 9 weeks. Plasma urea nitrogen and creatinine were more than 2-fold higher in 28-week ZUC. Twelve urine protein markers of glomerular, proximal and distal tubule disease were assayed at three ages. Several proteins that indicate glomerular and proximal tubular disease increased with age in both congenic and ZUC. Epidermal growth factor (EGF level, a marker whose levels decrease with distal tubule disease, was significantly higher in congenics. Quantitative histology of 28 week old animals revealed the most significant genotype effect was for tubular dilation and intratubular protein. The congenic donor region is protective of kidney disease, and effects on Type 2 diabetes are likely limited to fasting glucose and adiponectin. The loss of urea together with a small increase of food intake in ZUC support the hypothesis that nitrogen balance is altered in ZUC from an early age.

  1. Impact of diet on ozone-induced pulmonary and systemic effects in female Brown Norway (BN) rats

    Science.gov (United States)

    Impact of diet on ozone-induced pulmonary and systemic effects in female Brown Norway (BN) ratsV.L. Bass1, M.C. Schladweiler2, S. Snow5, C.J. Gordon4, K.A. Jarema4, P. Phillips4, A.D. Ledbetter2, D.B. Miller3, J.E. Richards2, U.P. Kodavanti2. 1. SPH, UNC, Chapel Hill2. EPHD, NHE...

  2. No priming of the immune response in newborn Brown Norway rats dosed with ovalbumin in the mouth

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Madsen, Charlotte Bernhard; Pilegaard, Kirsten

    2003-01-01

    Background: Other researchers have reported that the specific immune response to subsequent antigen challenge is primed in newborn mice or rats dosed orally by gavage. We wanted to investigate if priming of a subsequent specific IgE response could be achieved by dosing newborn rats orally......E and IgG responses were decreased compared to the control groups, however, not always reaching statistical significance. A statistical significant decrease in the specific immune response was found in young adult rats dosed in the mouth as compared to by gavage. Conclusions: Dosing Brown Norway rats...... with ovalbumin in the mouth as neonates do not prime the specific immune response. The decrease in immune response found in our experiments when dosing newborn animals in the mouth in opposition to the priming seen by others when dosing by intra-gastric intubation may be explained by a dissimilar antigen...

  3. Outer- and middle-ear contributions to presbycusis in the Brown Norway rat.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gratton, Michael Anne; Bateman, Kristin; Cannuscio, Joseph F; Saunders, James C

    2008-01-01

    This paper examines the contribution of the outer and middle ears to the hearing loss associated with presbycusis in Brown Norway rats. Animals were formed into two groups; young adults (2-3 months old) and aged animals (approximately 34 months old). Auditory brainstem response (ABR) thresholds were obtained with the outer ear intact or surgically removed. Tympanic membrane (TM) velocity transfer functions were measured from the umbo with the outer ear removed. The length of the auditory meatus, TM surface area, and TM thickness were quantified. The ABR thresholds were 17-26 dB less sensitive in the aged animals between 8.0 and 40.0 kHz when the outer ear was intact. A significant and reliable reduction in the aged rat velocity transfer function of 5-8 dB occurred between 10.0 and 32.0 kHz, while the low frequency velocity response was only a few decibels greater in the younger animals. The ABR threshold differences between young adult and aged ears were compensated by removing the outer/middle ear effects of aging to reveal a purely sensorineural component of presbycusis. The outer and middle ear effects were calculated directly when the ABR and TM velocity data were obtained with the outer ear removed. The outer ear intact condition was modeled in order to compare the ABR data obtained with the outer ear intact with the TM velocity data obtained with the outer removed. With either procedure, removal of the age-related contributions of the outer and middle ear to the ABR threshold resulted in similar age-related ABR threshold shifts between the two age groups. The pure sensorineural threshold shift component of the ABR response was restricted to frequencies between 5.0 and 20.0 kHz and reached a maximum of approximately 15 dB. These results support the conclusion that there is an outer- and middle-ear contribution to the threshold loss defining presbycusis. (c) 2008 S. Karger AG, Basel.

  4. Two months make a difference in spatial orientation learning in very old hybrid Fischer 344 X Brown Norway (FBNF1) rats

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Staay, van der F.J.

    2006-01-01

    Age-related changes in cognitive performance may be more pronounced in the period near or exceeding the median life span. Therefore, we compared the acquisition of a Morris water escape task by two groups of very old Fischer344 × Brown Norway hybrid rats. The mean age difference between the two

  5. Effect of High Fructose and High Fat Diets on Pulmonary Sensitivity, Motor Activity, and Body Composition of Brown Norway Rats Exposed to Ozone

    Science.gov (United States)

    Diet-induced obesity has been suggested to lead to increased susceptibility to air pollutants such as ozone (03); however, there is little experimental evidence. Thirty day old male and female Brown Norway rats were fed a normal, high-fructose or high-fat diet for 12 weeks and th...

  6. Age-related declines in thirst and salt appetite responses in male Fischer 344×Brown Norway rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thunhorst, Robert L; Beltz, Terry; Johnson, Alan Kim

    2014-08-01

    The F344×BN strain is the first generational cross between Fischer 344 (F344) and Brown Norway (BN) rats. The F344×BN strain is widely used in aging studies as it is regarded as a model of "healthy" aging (Sprott, 1991). In the present work, male F344×BN rats aged 4mo (young, n=6) and 20mo (old, n=9) received a series of experimental challenges to body fluid homeostasis to determine their thirst and salt appetite responses. Corresponding urinary responses were measured in some of the studies. Following sodium depletion, old rats ingested less saline solution (0.3M NaCl) than young rats on a body weight basis, but both ages drank enough saline solution to completely repair the accrued sodium deficits. Following intracellular dehydration, old rats drank less water than young rats, again on a body weight basis, and were less able than young rats to drink amounts of water proportionate to the osmotic challenge. Compared with young rats, old rats drank less of both water and saline solution after combined food and fluid restriction, and also were refractory to the stimulatory effects of low doses of captopril on water drinking and sodium ingestion. Age differences in urinary water and sodium excretion could not account for the age differences in accumulated water and sodium balances. These results extend observations of diminished behavioral responses of aging animals to the F344×BN rat strain and support the idea that impairments in behavior contribute more to the waning ability of aging animals to respond to body fluid challenges than do declines in kidney function. In addition, the results suggest that behavioral defense of sodium homeostasis is less diminished with age in the F344×BN strain compared to other strains so far studied. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  7. Accumulation of dietary methylmercury in the testes of the adult brown norway rat: Impaired testicular and epididymal function

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Friedmann, A.S.; Chen, H.; Zirkin, B.R. [Johns Hopkins Univ., Baltimore, MD (United States). School of Health and Public Hygiene; Rabuck, L.D. [Univ. of Wisconsin, La Crosse, WI (United States)

    1998-05-01

    The widespread consumption of fish containing elevated concentrations of methylmercury has prompted concern over the health effects of such a diet. Previous studies with rodents have indicated that exposure to dietary mercury (Hg) impairs male reproductive health. However, adverse effects were observed following doses in the range of milligrams per kilogram of body weight, whereas typical human consumption in the United States is in the range of micrograms per kilogram of body weight. This study examined the effects of dietary Hg on male rats using levels of the metal that are more similar to those typically consumed by humans. For 19 weeks, adult male Brown Norway rats were administered methylmercury twice weekly at 0.8, 8.0, or 80 {micro}g/kg. Intratesticular testosterone levels in the high-dose group were reduced by 44$, suggesting that steroidogenesis in these animals was dramatically impaired. Although sperm production was not significantly affected, numbers of sperm in the cauda epididymides of the high-dose group were reduced by 17%. Furthermore, there was a negative correlation between fertility and testicular Hg content. These results raise the possibility that exposure to Hg at levels consumed by humans may result in steroidogenic impairment, reduced sperm counts, and fertility problems.

  8. Assessment of the sensitizing potential of processed peanut proteins in Brown Norway rats: roasting does not enhance allergenicity.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stine Kroghsbo

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: IgE-binding of process-modified foods or proteins is the most common method for examination of how food processing affects allergenicity of food allergens. How processing affects sensitization capacity is generally studied by administration of purified food proteins or food extracts and not allergens present in their natural food matrix. OBJECTIVES: The aim was to investigate if thermal processing increases sensitization potential of whole peanuts via the oral route. In parallel, the effect of heating on sensitization potential of the major peanut allergen Ara h 1 was assessed via the intraperitoneal route. METHODS: Sensitization potential of processed peanut products and Ara h 1 was examined in Brown Norway (BN rats by oral administration of blanched or oil-roasted peanuts or peanut butter or by intraperitoneal immunization of purified native (N-, heated (H- or heat glycated (G-Ara h 1. Levels of specific IgG and IgE were determined by ELISA and IgE functionality was examined by rat basophilic leukemia (RBL cell assay. RESULTS: In rats dosed orally, roasted peanuts induced significant higher levels of specific IgE to NAra h 1 and 2 than blanched peanuts or peanut butter but with the lowest level of RBL degranulation. However, extract from roasted peanuts was found to be a superior elicitor of RBL degranulation. Process-modified Ara h 1 had similar sensitizing capacity as NAra h 1 but specific IgE reacted more readily with process-modified Ara h 1 than with native. CONCLUSIONS: Peanut products induce functional specific IgE when dosed orally to BN rats. Roasted peanuts do not have a higher sensitizing capacity than blanched peanuts. In spite of this, extract from roasted peanuts is a superior elicitor of RBL cell degranulation irrespectively of the peanut product used for sensitization. The results also suggest that new epitopes are formed or disclosed by heating Ara h 1 without glucose.

  9. Bis(tributyltin)oxide (TBTO) decreases the food allergic response against peanut and ovalbumin in Brown Norway rats

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Jonge, J.D. de; Ezendam, J.; Knippels, L.M.J.; Odink, J.; Pourier, M.S.; Penninks, A.H.; Pieters, R.; Loveren, H. van

    2007-01-01

    Other factors than the allergen itself may be of importance in the development of food allergy. This report describes the influence of the immunosuppressive compound bis(tributyltin)oxide (TBTO), present in the food chain, on the development of food allergy to peanut or ovalbumin in Brown Norway

  10. Toluene effects on oxidative stress in brain regions of young-adult, middle-age, and senescent Brown Norway rats

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kodavanti, Prasada Rao S., E-mail: kodavanti.prasada@epa.gov [Neurotoxicology Branch, Toxicity Assessment Division, NHEERL, ORD, U.S. Environmental Protection Agency, Research Triangle Park, NC 27711 (United States); Royland, Joyce E. [Genetic and Cellular Toxicology Branch, Integrated Systems Toxicology Division, NHEERL, ORD, U.S. Environmental Protection Agency, Research Triangle Park, NC 27711 (United States); Richards, Judy E. [Research Core Unit, NHEERL, ORD, U.S. Environmental Protection Agency, Research Triangle Park, NC 27711 (United States); Besas, Jonathan; MacPhail, Robert C. [Neurotoxicology Branch, Toxicity Assessment Division, NHEERL, ORD, U.S. Environmental Protection Agency, Research Triangle Park, NC 27711 (United States)

    2011-11-15

    The influence of aging on susceptibility to environmental contaminants is not well understood. To extend knowledge in this area, we examined effects in rat brain of the volatile organic compound, toluene. The objective was to test whether oxidative stress (OS) plays a role in the adverse effects caused by toluene exposure, and if so, if effects are age-dependent. OS parameters were selected to measure the production of reactive oxygen species (NADPH Quinone oxidoreductase 1 (NQO1), NADH Ubiquinone reductase (UBIQ-RD)), antioxidant homeostasis (total antioxidant substances (TAS), superoxide dismutase (SOD), {gamma}-glutamylcysteine synthetase ({gamma}-GCS), glutathione transferase (GST), glutathione peroxidase (GPX), glutathione reductase (GRD)), and oxidative damage (total aconitase and protein carbonyls). In this study, Brown Norway rats (4, 12, and 24 months) were dosed orally with toluene (0, 0.65 or 1 g/kg) in corn oil. Four hours later, frontal cortex, cerebellum, striatum, and hippocampus were dissected, quick frozen on dry ice, and stored at - 80 Degree-Sign C until analysis. Some parameters of OS were found to increase with age in select brain regions. Toluene exposure also resulted in increased OS in select brain regions. For example, an increase in NQO1 activity was seen in frontal cortex and cerebellum of 4 and 12 month old rats following toluene exposure, but only in the hippocampus of 24 month old rats. Similarly, age and toluene effects on glutathione enzymes were varied and brain-region specific. Markers of oxidative damage reflected changes in oxidative stress. Total aconitase activity was increased by toluene in frontal cortex and cerebellum at 12 and 24 months, respectively. Protein carbonyls in both brain regions and in all age groups were increased by toluene, but step-down analyses indicated toluene effects were statistically significant only in 12 month old rats. These results indicate changes in OS parameters with age and toluene exposure

  11. Gene expression profiling of the retina after transcorneal electrical stimulation in wild-type Brown Norway rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Willmann, Gabriel; Schäferhoff, Karin; Fischer, Manuel D; Arango-Gonzalez, Blanca; Bolz, Sylvia; Naycheva, Lubka; Röck, Tobias; Bonin, Michael; Bartz-Schmidt, Karl U; Zrenner, Eberhart; Schatz, Andreas; Gekeler, Florian

    2011-09-29

    Transcorneal electrical stimulation (TES) has been beneficial in several neurodegenerative ocular diseases, but the exact mechanisms remain to be elucidated. This study was conducted to investigate the effects of TES on the retinas of wild-type Brown Norway (BN) rats by gene expression profiling and to assess its effects on retinal function and morphology. TES was applied to BN wild-type rat retinas in vivo for 1 hour (1-ms biphasic pulses at 20 Hz; 200 μA). RNA was isolated and processed for microarray-based profiling 4 hours after TES; differentially expressed genes from TES compared with those from sham-treated animals were validated by quantitative real-time polymerase chain reaction. Furthermore, the effect of TES was assessed at the structural and functional levels using electroretinography, confocal scanning laser ophthalmoscopy, optical coherence tomography, and immunohistochemistry. Transcriptome changes associated with TES versus sham-stimulated BN wild-type retina were identified. Four hundred ninety genes were differentially expressed in TES and included potentially neuroprotective genes such as Bax or members of the tumor necrosis factor family (Tnfrsf11b, Tnrsf12a, Tnfsf13b, Tnfsf13). ERG recordings showed physiological retinal function after TES, and structural in vivo and ex vivo studies revealed intact retinal anatomy. These results demonstrate that TES applied to the retina of the wild-type BN rats induces distinct transcriptome level changes and may help in the understanding of the mechanisms underlying TES. In addition, TES treatment indicates no negative effect on structure and function of the wild-type BN retina up to 35 hours after application.

  12. Effect of high-fructose and high-fat diets on pulmonary sensitivity, motor activity, and body composition of brown Norway rats exposed to ozone

    Science.gov (United States)

    pulmonary parameters, BALF biomarkers, body composition, motor activity data collected from rats exposed to ozone after high fructose or high fat diets.This dataset is associated with the following publication:Gordon , C., P. Phillips , A. Johnstone , T. Beasley , A. Ledbetter , M. Schladweiler , S. Snow, and U. Kodavanti. Effect of High Fructose and High Fat Diets on Pulmonary Sensitivity, Motor Activity, and Body Composition of Brown Norway Rats Exposed to Ozone. INHALATION TOXICOLOGY. Taylor & Francis, Inc., Philadelphia, PA, USA, 28(5): 203-15, (2016).

  13. Effect of combined nitrogen dioxide and carbon nanoparticle exposure on lung function during ovalbumin sensitization in Brown Norway rat.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Skander Layachi

    Full Text Available The interaction of particulate and gaseous pollutants in their effects on the severity of allergic inflammation and airway responsiveness are not well understood. We assessed the effect of exposure to NO(2 in the presence or absence of repetitive treatment with carbon nanoparticle (CNP during allergen sensitization and challenges in Brown-Norway (BN rat, in order to assess their interactions on lung function and airway responses (AR to allergen and methacholine (MCH, end-expiratory lung volume (EELV, bronchoalveolar lavage fluid (BALF cellular content, serum and BALF cytokine levels and histological changes. Animals were divided into the following groups (n = 6: Control; CNP (Degussa-FW2: 13 nm, 0.5 mg/kg instilled intratracheally ×3 at 7-day intervals; OVA: ovalbumin-sensitised; OVA+CNP: both sensitized and exposed to CNP. Rats were divided into equal groups exposed either to air or to NO(2, 10 ppm, 6 h/d, 5d/wk for 4 weeks. Exposure to NO(2, significantly enhanced lung inflammation and airway reactivity, with a significantly larger effect in animals sensitized to allergen, which was related to a higher expression of TH1 and TH2-type cytokines. Conversely, exposure to NO(2 in animals undergoing repeated tracheal instillation of CNP alone, increased BALF neutrophilia and enhanced the expression of TH1 cytokines: TNF-α and IFN-γ, but did not show an additive effect on airway reactivity in comparison to NO(2 alone. The exposure to NO(2 combined with CNP treatment and allergen sensitization however, unexpectedly resulted in a significant decrease in both airway reactivity to allergen and to methacholine, and a reduction in TH2-type cytokines compared to allergen sensitization alone. EELV was significantly reduced with sensitization, CNP treatment or both. These data suggest an immunomodulatory effect of repeated tracheal instillation of CNP on the proinflammatory effects of NO(2 exposure in sensitized BN rat. Furthermore, our findings suggest

  14. Distribution of a 20-mer phosphorothioate oligonucleotide, CGP69846A (ISIS 5132), into airway leukocytes and epithelial cells following intratracheal delivery to brown-norway rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Danahay, H; Giddings, J; Christian, R A; Moser, H E; Phillips, J A

    1999-10-01

    To evaluate the pulmonary distribution of CGP69846A (ISIS 5132), a phosphorothioate oligonucleotide, following intra-tracheal (i.t.) instillation into Brown-Norway rats. The pharmacokinetic profile of [3H]-CGP69846A was investigated following i.t. instillation into both naive and inflamed airways of Brown-Norway rats. The cellular distribution was determined using autoradiography, immunohistochemistry and flow cytometry/fluorescence microscopy, in inflamed airways. CGP69846A displayed a dose-dependent lung retention following i.t. administration which was unaffected by local inflammation. Autoradiography and immunohistochemistry showed distribution to alveolar macrophages, eosinophils, bronchial and tracheal epithelium and alveolar cells. Studies with [FITC]-CGP69846A demonstrated a preferential association of oligonucleotide with leukocytes in bronchial lavage fluid of: macrophages > eosinophils = neutrophils > lymphocytes. The dose-dependency of lung retention together with cell-specific uptake suggests that the lung can be used as a local target for antisense molecules with potentially minimal systemic effects. Furthermore, the preferential targeting of macrophages and the airway epithelium by oligonucleotides may represent rational cellular targets for antisense therapeutics.

  15. In the male brown-Norway (BN) male rat, reproductive aging is associated with decreased LH-pulse amplitude and area.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bonavera, J J; Swerdloff, R S; Leung, A; Lue, Y H; Baravarian, S; Superlano, L; Sinha-Hikim, A P; Wang, C

    1997-01-01

    The Brown-Norway (BN) rat has been proposed as a rodent model for the study of human male reproductive aging. As in man, reduction in serum or plasma testosterone (T) and both testicular (primary) and hypothalamic-pituitary (secondary) reproductive dysfunction have been associated with aging in male BN rats. However, the presence of secondary testicular failure in this rodent, as indicated by low serum luteinizing hormone (LH) levels, needs further corroboration. The present study was designed to determine whether age-related differences in the pulsatile patterns of pituitary LH and follicle-stimulating hormone (FSH) secretion occur in gonad-intact male BN rats. Three age groups were examined: young (3-4 months), middle aged (12-13 months), and old (21-22 months). Using intra-atrial cannulae, serial 5-minute blood samples were withdrawn from conscious, unrestrained animals. Plasma LH concentrations were determined by a supersensitive immunofluorometric assay (FIA) and FSH and T by radioimmunoassay (RIA). Mean T levels were different among groups (young > middle age > old). In young rats, T levels were higher in the late morning/early afternoon than in the late afternoon: this variation was not found in older rats. Mean FSH concentrations were higher in the old than in the middle-aged and young rats. Significant differences in mean LH levels were not found among groups. Compared to young rats, shortened pulse interval and reduced area of pulses characterized the secretory pattern of both gonadotropins in old rats. In addition, LH-pulse amplitude and total area of LH pulses were also significantly lower in old than in young rats. Besides the well-recognized primary testicular failure that occurs in the old BN rat, this study confirms a hypothalamic-pituitary deficiency that makes this rodent model ideal for studying human male reproductive aging.

  16. Decline of prefrontal cortical-mediated executive functions but attenuated delay discounting in aged Fischer 344 × brown Norway hybrid rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hernandez, Caesar M; Vetere, Lauren M; Orsini, Caitlin A; McQuail, Joseph A; Maurer, Andrew P; Burke, Sara N; Setlow, Barry; Bizon, Jennifer L

    2017-12-01

    Despite the fact that prefrontal cortex (PFC) function declines with age, aged individuals generally show an enhanced ability to delay gratification, as evident by less discounting of delayed rewards in intertemporal choice tasks. The present study was designed to evaluate relationships between 2 aspects of PFC-dependent cognition (working memory and cognitive flexibility) and intertemporal choice in young (6 months) and aged (24 months) Fischer 344 × brown Norway F1 hybrid rats. Rats were also evaluated for motivation to earn rewards using a progressive ratio task. As previously reported, aged rats showed attenuated discounting of delayed rewards, impaired working memory, and impaired cognitive flexibility compared with young. Among aged rats, greater choice of delayed reward was associated with preserved working memory, impaired cognitive flexibility, and less motivation to work for food. These relationships suggest that age-related changes in PFC and incentive motivation contribute to variance in intertemporal choice within the aged population. Cognitive impairments mediated by PFC are unlikely, however, to fully account for the enhanced ability to delay gratification that accompanies aging. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  17. Episodic ozone exposure in adult and senescent Brown Norway rats: acute and delayed effect on heart rate, core temperature and motor activity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gordon, C J; Johnstone, A F; Aydin, C; Phillips, P M; MacPhail, R C; Kodavanti, U P; Ledbetter, A D; Jarema, K A

    2014-06-01

    Setting exposure standards for environmental pollutants may consider the aged as a susceptible population but the few published studies assessing susceptibility of the aged to air pollutants are inconsistent. Episodic ozone (O₃) is more reflective of potential exposures occurring in human populations and could be more harmful to the aged. This study used radiotelemetry to monitor heart rate (HR), core temperature (T(c)) and motor activity (MA) in adult (9-12 months) and senescent (20-24 months) male, Brown Norway rats exposed to episodic O₃ (6 h/day of 1 ppm O₃ for 2 consecutive days/week for 13 weeks). Acute O₃ initially led to marked drops in HR and T(c). As exposures progressed each week, there was diminution in the hypothermic and bradycardic effects of O₃. Senescent rats were less affected than adults. Acute responses were exacerbated on the second day of O₃ exposure with adults exhibiting greater sensitivity. During recovery following 2 d of O₃, adult and senescent rats exhibited an elevated T(c) and HR during the day but not at night, an effect that persisted for at least 48 h after O₃ exposure. MA was elevated in adults but not senescent rats during recovery from O₃. Overall, acute effects of O₃, including reductions in HR and T(c), were attenuated in senescent rats. Autonomic responses during recovery, included an elevation in T(c) with a pattern akin to that of a fever and rise in HR that were independent of age. An attenuated inflammatory response to O₃ in senescent rats may explain the relatively heightened physiological response to O₃ in younger rats.

  18. Acid hydrolysis of wheat gluten induces formation of new epitopes but does not enhance sensitizing capacity by the oral route: a study in "gluten free" Brown Norway rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kroghsbo, Stine; Andersen, Nanna B; Rasmussen, Tina F; Jacobsen, Susanne; Madsen, Charlotte B

    2014-01-01

    Acid hydrolyzed wheat proteins (HWPs) are used in the food and cosmetic industry as emulsifiers. Cases of severe food allergic reactions caused by HWPs have been reported. Recent data suggest that these reactions are caused by HWPs produced by acid hydrolysis. To examine the sensitizing capacity of gluten proteins per se when altered by acid or enzymatic hydrolysis relative to unmodified gluten in rats naïve to gluten. High IgE-responder Brown Norway (BN) rats bred on a gluten-free diet were sensitized without the use of adjuvant to three different gluten products (unmodified, acid hydrolyzed and enzymatic hydrolyzed). Rats were sensitized by intraperitoneal (i.p.) immunization three times with 200 µg gluten protein/rat or by oral dosing for 35 days with 0.2, 2 or 20 mg gluten protein/rat/day. Sera were analyzed for specific IgG and IgE and IgG-binding capacity by ELISA. IgE functionality was measured by rat basophilic leukemia (RBL) assay. Regardless of the route of dosing, all products had sensitizing capacity. When sensitized i.p., all three gluten products induced a strong IgG1 response in all animals. Acid hydrolyzed gluten induced the highest level of specific IgE but with a low functionality. Orally all three gluten products induced specific IgG1 and IgE but with different dose-response relations. Sensitizing rats i.p. or orally with unmodified or enzymatic hydrolyzed gluten induced specific IgG1 responses with similar binding capacity which was different from that of acid hydrolyzed gluten indicating that acid hydrolysis of gluten proteins induces formation of 'new' epitopes. In rats not tolerant to gluten acid hydrolysis of gluten enhances the sensitizing capacity by the i.p. but not by the oral route. In addition, acid hydrolysis induces formation of new epitopes. This is in contrast to the enzymatic hydrolyzed gluten having an epitope pattern similar to unmodified gluten.

  19. Impact of the chemotherapy cocktail used to treat testicular cancer on the gene expression profile of germ cells from male Brown-Norway rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Delbès, Geraldine; Chan, Donovan; Pakarinen, Pirjo; Trasler, Jacquetta M; Hales, Barbara F; Robaire, Bernard

    2009-02-01

    Advances in treatment for testicular cancer that include the coadministration of bleomycin, etoposide, and cisplatin (BEP) have brought the cure rate to higher than 90%%. The goal of this study was to elucidate the impact of BEP treatment on gene expression in male germ cells. Brown-Norway rats were treated for 9 wk with vehicle (0x) or BEP at doses equivalent to 0.3x and 0.6x the human dose. At the end of treatment, spermatogenesis was affected, showing altered histology and a decreased sperm count; spermatozoa had a higher number of DNA breaks. After 9 wk of treatment, round spermatids were isolated, and RNA was extracted and probed on Rat230-2.0 Affymetrix arrays. Of the 31 099 probe sets present on the array, 59%% were expressed in control round spermatids. BEP treatment significantly altered the expression of 221 probe sets, with at least a 1.5-fold change compared with controls; 80% were upregulated. We observed a dose-dependent increase in the expression of oxidative stress response genes and no change in the expression of genes involved in DNA repair. BEP upregulated genes were implicated in pathways related to Jun and Junb protooncogenes. Increased mRNA levels of Jun and Junb were confirmed by quantitative RT-PCR; furthermore, JUN protein was increased in elongating spermatids. Thus, BEP exposure triggers an oxidative stress response in round spermatids and induces many pathways that may lead to the survival of damaged cells and production of abnormal sperm.

  20. Effects of long-term exposures to low iron and branched-chain amino acid containing diets on aging skeletal muscle of Fisher 344 × Brown Norway rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Yuho; Men, Sok Sambo; Liang, Chen; Receno, Candace N; Brutsaert, Tom D; Korol, Donna L; Heffernan, Kevin S; DeRuisseau, Keith C

    2018-02-01

    Aging skeletal muscle displays an altered iron status that may promote oxidative stress and sarcopenia. A diet containing low iron (LI) could reduce muscle iron status and attenuate age-related muscle atrophy. Supplemental branched-chain amino acids (BCAA) may also alleviate sarcopenia by promoting muscle protein synthesis and iron status improvement. This study examined individual and combined effects of LI and BCAA diets on anabolic signaling and iron status in skeletal muscle of aging rats. Twenty-nine-month-old male Fisher 344 × Brown Norway rats consumed the following control-base diets: control + regular iron (35 mg iron/kg) (CR; n = 11); control + LI (∼6 mg iron/kg) (CL; n = 11); 2×BCAA + regular iron (BR; n = 10); and 2×BCAA + LI (BL; n = 12) for 12 weeks. Although LI and/or 2×BCAA did not affect plantaris muscle mass, 2×BCAA groups showed lower muscle iron content than did CR and CL groups (P < 0.05). p70 ribosomal protein S6 kinase phosphorylation was greater in 2×BCAA and LI animals compared with CR animals (P < 0.05). Interactions between IRON and BCAA were observed for proteins indicative of mitochondrial biogenesis (peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor gamma coactivator 1 alpha) and oxidative capacity (cytochrome c oxidase subunit 2 and citrate synthase) (P < 0.05) wherein the combined diet (BL) negated potential benefits of individual diets. Antioxidant capacity, superoxide dismutase activity, and oxidative injury (3-nitrotyrosine, protein carbonyls, and 4-hydroxynonenal) were similar between groups. In conclusion, 12 weeks of LI and 2×BCAA diets showed significant impacts on increasing anabolic signaling as well as ameliorating iron status; however, these interventions did not affect muscle mass.

  1. Toluene effects on Oxidative Stress in Brain regions of Young-adult, Middleage,and Senescent Brown Norway Rats

    Science.gov (United States)

    The influence of aging on susceptibility to environmental contaminants is not well understood. To extend knowledge in this area, we examined effects in rat brain of the volatile organic compound toluene. The objective was to test whether oxidative stress plays a role in the adver...

  2. Pre-exposure to sulfur dioxide attenuates most allergic reactions upon trimellitic anhydride challenge in sensitized Brown Norway rats

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Arts, J.H.E.; Jacobs, E.J.; Kuper, C.F.

    2010-01-01

    Irritant-induced inflammation of the airways may aggravate respiratory allergy induced by chemical respiratory allergens. Therefore, it was studied whether airway irritation by sulfur dioxide (SO2) would enhance respiratory allergic reactions to trimellitic anhydride (TMA), using a rat

  3. Assessment of the Sensitizing Potential of Processed Peanut Proteins in Brown Norway Rats: Roasting Does Not Enhance Allergenicity

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kroghsbo, Stine; Rigby, Neil M.; Johnson, Philip L F

    2014-01-01

    Background IgE-binding of process-modified foods or proteins is the most common method for examination of how food processing affects allergenicity of food allergens. How processing affects sensitization capacity is generally studied by administration of purified food proteins or food extracts...... but with the lowest level of RBL degranulation. However, extract from roasted peanuts was found to be a superior elicitor of RBL degranulation. Process-modified Ara h 1 had similar sensitizing capacity as NAra h 1 but specific IgE reacted more readily with process-modified Ara h 1 than with native. Conclusions Peanut...... products induce functional specific IgE when dosed orally to BN rats. Roasted peanuts do not have a higher sensitizing capacity than blanched peanuts. In spite of this, extract from roasted peanuts is a superior elicitor of RBL cell degranulation irrespectively of the peanut product used for sensitization...

  4. Acid Hydrolysis of Wheat Gluten Induces Formation of New Epitopes but Does Not Enhance Sensitizing Capacity by the Oral Route: A Study in “Gluten Free” Brown Norway Rats

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kroghsbo, Stine; Andersen, Nanna Birch; Rasmussen, Tina Frid

    2014-01-01

    the sensitizing capacity of gluten proteins per se when altered by acid or enzymatic hydrolysis relative to unmodified gluten in rats naïve to gluten. Methods High IgE-responder Brown Norway (BN) rats bred on a gluten-free diet were sensitized without the use of adjuvant to three different gluten products...... (unmodified, acid hydrolyzed and enzymatic hydrolyzed). Rats were sensitized by intraperitoneal (i.p.) immunization three times with 200 µg gluten protein/rat or by oral dosing for 35 days with 0.2, 2 or 20 mg gluten protein/rat/day. Sera were analyzed for specific IgG and IgE and IgG-binding capacity...... by ELISA. IgE functionality was measured by rat basophilic leukemia (RBL) assay. Results Regardless of the route of dosing, all products had sensitizing capacity. When sensitized i.p., all three gluten products induced a strong IgG1 response in all animals. Acid hydrolyzed gluten induced the highest level...

  5. Oral administration of drugs with hypersensitivity potential induces germinal center hyperplasia in secondary lymphoid organ/tissue in Brown Norway rats, and this histological lesion is a promising candidate as a predictive biomarker for drug hypersensitivity occurrence in humans

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tamura, Akitoshi, E-mail: akitoshi-tamura@ds-pharma.co.jp; Miyawaki, Izuru; Yamada, Toru; Kimura, Juki; Funabashi, Hitoshi

    2013-08-15

    It is important to evaluate the potential of drug hypersensitivity as well as other adverse effects during the preclinical stage of the drug development process, but validated methods are not available yet. In the present study we examined whether it would be possible to develop a new predictive model of drug hypersensitivity using Brown Norway (BN) rats. As representative drugs with hypersensitivity potential in humans, phenytoin (PHT), carbamazepine (CBZ), amoxicillin (AMX), and sulfamethoxazole (SMX) were orally administered to BN rats for 28 days to investigate their effects on these animals by examinations including observation of clinical signs, hematology, determination of serum IgE levels, histology, and flow cytometric analysis. Skin rashes were not observed in any animals treated with these drugs. Increases in the number of circulating inflammatory cells and serum IgE level did not necessarily occur in the animals treated with these drugs. However, histological examination revealed that germinal center hyperplasia was commonly induced in secondary lymphoid organs/tissues in the animals treated with these drugs. In cytometric analysis, changes in proportions of lymphocyte subsets were noted in the spleen of the animals treated with PHT or CBZ during the early period of administration. The results indicated that the potential of drug hypersensitivity was identified in BN rat by performing histological examination of secondary lymphoid organs/tissues. Data obtained herein suggested that drugs with hypersensitivity potential in humans gained immune reactivity in BN rat, and the germinal center hyperplasia induced by administration of these drugs may serve as a predictive biomarker for drug hypersensitivity occurrence. - Highlights: • We tested Brown Norway rats as a candidate model for predicting drug hypersensitivity. • The allergic drugs did not induce skin rash, whereas D-penicillamine did so in the rats. • Some of allergic drugs increased

  6. VARIABLE CHIMERISM, GRAFT-VERSUS-HOST DISEASE, AND TOLERANCE AFTER DIFFERENT KINDS OF CELL AND WHOLE ORGAN TRANSPLANTATION FROM LEWIS TO BROWN NORWAY RATS1

    Science.gov (United States)

    Murase, Noriko; Starzl, Thomas E.; Tanabe, Minoru; Fujisaki, Shigeru; Miyazawa, Hideaki; Ye, Qing; Delaney, Conor P.; Fung, John J.; Demetris, Anthony J.

    2010-01-01

    The bidirectional paradigm of tolerance involving reciprocal host vs. graft and graft vs. host reactions was examined after Lewis (LEW) → Brown Norway (BN) transplantation of different whole organs (liver, intestine, heart, and kidney) or of 2.5×108 LEW leukocytes obtained from bone marrow, spleen, lymph nodes, and thymus. The experiments were performed without immunosuppression or under 14 daily doses of postoperative tacrolimus, which were continued in weekly doses to 100 days in a “continuous treatment” subgroup, and to 27 days in a short treatment group. Without immunosuppression, all organs and cell suspensions failed to engraft or were acutely rejected. GVHD (usually fatal) was always caused when either the long or short treatment was used for recipients of intestinal grafts and cell suspensions of spleen and lymph nodes. In contrast, both immunosuppressive protocols allowed engraftment of bone marrow cells, liver, heart, and kidney without clinical GVHD, whereas thymus cell suspensions and small doses of whole blood neither engrafted nor caused GVHD. At 100 days, now drug-free for 73 days, the liver, bone marrow, and heart recipients were tolerant in that they accepted all challenge LEW heart and/or liver grafts for 100 more days despite in vitro evidence of donor-specific reactivity (split tolerance). At 200 days, histopathologic studies of the challenge livers were normal no matter what the priming graft. However, the still-beating challenge hearts had a spectrum from normal to severe chronic rejection that defined the tolerogenicity of the original primary grafts: liver best → bone marrow next → heart least. Both the GVHD propensity and tolerogenicity in these experiments were closely associated with recipient tissue chimerism 30 and 100 days after the experiments began. The tissue chimerism was invariably multilineage, but the GVHD outcome was associated with T cell over-representation. These observations provide guidelines that should be

  7. Oral administration of drugs with hypersensitivity potential induces germinal center hyperplasia in secondary lymphoid organ/tissue in Brown Norway rats, and this histological lesion is a promising candidate as a predictive biomarker for drug hypersensitivity occurrence in humans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tamura, Akitoshi; Miyawaki, Izuru; Yamada, Toru; Kimura, Juki; Funabashi, Hitoshi

    2013-08-15

    It is important to evaluate the potential of drug hypersensitivity as well as other adverse effects during the preclinical stage of the drug development process, but validated methods are not available yet. In the present study we examined whether it would be possible to develop a new predictive model of drug hypersensitivity using Brown Norway (BN) rats. As representative drugs with hypersensitivity potential in humans, phenytoin (PHT), carbamazepine (CBZ), amoxicillin (AMX), and sulfamethoxazole (SMX) were orally administered to BN rats for 28days to investigate their effects on these animals by examinations including observation of clinical signs, hematology, determination of serum IgE levels, histology, and flow cytometric analysis. Skin rashes were not observed in any animals treated with these drugs. Increases in the number of circulating inflammatory cells and serum IgE level did not necessarily occur in the animals treated with these drugs. However, histological examination revealed that germinal center hyperplasia was commonly induced in secondary lymphoid organs/tissues in the animals treated with these drugs. In cytometric analysis, changes in proportions of lymphocyte subsets were noted in the spleen of the animals treated with PHT or CBZ during the early period of administration. The results indicated that the potential of drug hypersensitivity was identified in BN rat by performing histological examination of secondary lymphoid organs/tissues. Data obtained herein suggested that drugs with hypersensitivity potential in humans gained immune reactivity in BN rat, and the germinal center hyperplasia induced by administration of these drugs may serve as a predictive biomarker for drug hypersensitivity occurrence. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  8. Acid Hydrolysis of Wheat Gluten Induces Formation of New Epitopes but Does Not Enhance Sensitizing Capacity by the Oral Route: A Study in “Gluten Free” Brown Norway Rats

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kroghsbo, Stine; Andersen, Nanna B.; Rasmussen, Tina F.; Madsen, Charlotte B.

    2014-01-01

    Background Acid hydrolyzed wheat proteins (HWPs) are used in the food and cosmetic industry as emulsifiers. Cases of severe food allergic reactions caused by HWPs have been reported. Recent data suggest that these reactions are caused by HWPs produced by acid hydrolysis. Objectives To examine the sensitizing capacity of gluten proteins per se when altered by acid or enzymatic hydrolysis relative to unmodified gluten in rats naïve to gluten. Methods High IgE-responder Brown Norway (BN) rats bred on a gluten-free diet were sensitized without the use of adjuvant to three different gluten products (unmodified, acid hydrolyzed and enzymatic hydrolyzed). Rats were sensitized by intraperitoneal (i.p.) immunization three times with 200 µg gluten protein/rat or by oral dosing for 35 days with 0.2, 2 or 20 mg gluten protein/rat/day. Sera were analyzed for specific IgG and IgE and IgG-binding capacity by ELISA. IgE functionality was measured by rat basophilic leukemia (RBL) assay. Results Regardless of the route of dosing, all products had sensitizing capacity. When sensitized i.p., all three gluten products induced a strong IgG1 response in all animals. Acid hydrolyzed gluten induced the highest level of specific IgE but with a low functionality. Orally all three gluten products induced specific IgG1 and IgE but with different dose-response relations. Sensitizing rats i.p. or orally with unmodified or enzymatic hydrolyzed gluten induced specific IgG1 responses with similar binding capacity which was different from that of acid hydrolyzed gluten indicating that acid hydrolysis of gluten proteins induces formation of ‘new’ epitopes. Conclusions In rats not tolerant to gluten acid hydrolysis of gluten enhances the sensitizing capacity by the i.p. but not by the oral route. In addition, acid hydrolysis induces formation of new epitopes. This is in contrast to the enzymatic hydrolyzed gluten having an epitope pattern similar to unmodified gluten. PMID:25207551

  9. Chow fed UC Davis strain female Lepr fatty Zucker rats exhibit mild glucose intolerance, hypertriglyceridemia, and increased urine volume, all reduced by a Brown Norway strain chromosome 1 congenic donor region.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Craig H Warden

    Full Text Available Our objective is to identify genes that influence the development of any phenotypes of type 2 diabetes (T2D or kidney disease in obese animals. We use the reproductively isolated UC Davis fatty Zucker strain rat model in which the defective chromosome 4 leptin receptor (LeprfaSte/faSte results in fatty obesity. We previously produced a congenic strain with the distal half of chromosome 1 from the Brown Norway strain (BN on a Zucker (ZUC background (BN.ZUC-D1Rat183-D1Rat90. Previously published studies in males showed that the BN congenic donor region protects from some phenotypes of renal dysfunction and T2D. We now expand our studies to include females and expand phenotyping to gene expression. We performed diabetes and kidney disease phenotyping in chow-fed females of the BN.ZUC-D1Rat183-D1Rat90 congenic strain to determine the specific characteristics of the UC Davis model. Fatty LeprfaSte/faSte animals of both BN and ZUC genotype in the congenic donor region had prediabetic levels of fasting blood glucose and blood glucose 2 hours after a glucose tolerance test. We observed significant congenic strain chromosome 1 genotype effects of the BN donor region in fatty females that resulted in decreased food intake, urine volume, glucose area under the curve during glucose tolerance test, plasma triglyceride levels, and urine glucose excretion per day. In fatty females, there were significant congenic strain BN genotype effects on non-fasted plasma urea nitrogen, triglyceride, and creatinine. Congenic region genotype effects were observed by quantitative PCR of mRNA from the kidney for six genes, all located in the chromosome 1 BN donor region, with potential effects on T2D or kidney function. The results are consistent with the hypothesis that the BN genotype chromosome 1 congenic region influences traits of both type 2 diabetes and kidney function in fatty UC Davis ZUC females and that there are many positional candidate genes.

  10. Effect of high-fructose and high-fat diets on pulmonary sensitivity, motor activity, and body composition of brown Norway rats exposed to ozone

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Environmental Protection Agency — pulmonary parameters, BALF biomarkers, body composition, motor activity data collected from rats exposed to ozone after high fructose or high fat diets. This dataset...

  11. A Two-Year Ecological Study of Norway Rats (Rattus norvegicus) in a Brazilian Urban Slum.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Panti-May, Jesús A; Carvalho-Pereira, Ticiana S A; Serrano, Soledad; Pedra, Gabriel G; Taylor, Josh; Pertile, Arsinoê C; Minter, Amanda; Airam, Vladimir; Carvalho, Mayara; Júnior, Nivison N; Rodrigues, Gorete; Reis, Mitermayer G; Ko, Albert I; Childs, James E; Begon, Mike; Costa, Federico

    2016-01-01

    The Norway or brown rat (Rattus norvegicus) is among the most ubiquitous of rodents. However, the lack of studies describing Norway rat populations from tropical areas have limited our understanding regarding their demography and seasonal dynamics. In this study, we describe seasonal pattern in the abundance, reproductive parameters, and morphometrics of Norway rat populations in Salvador, Brazil. Rodents were trapped over four seasonal trapping periods (2013-2014) from three valleys. A total of 802 Norway rats were trapped over the course of the study over 7653 trap-nights. Norway rat abundance was high, but there was no significant differences between seasons. The reproductive parameters (e.g. frequency of pregnant and lactating females) did not show statistical differences between seasons. Female rats collected in the rainy season were heavier and older than females from the dry season. Salvador rats had a high incidence of pregnancy and birth rate (estimated birth rate of 79 young per year) compared to previous studies. The information generated is critical for the understanding of the ecology of Norway rat, the main reservoir of Leptospira in Salvador. However, future studies examining the effect of rodent control programs aimed at reducing populations, and determining rates of recovery, will further clarify our understanding of population dynamics.

  12. Differential effects of enalapril and losartan on body composition and indices of muscle quality in aged male Fischer 344 × Brown Norway rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carter, Christy S; Giovannini, Silvia; Giovaninni, Silvia; Seo, Dong-Oh; DuPree, Jameson; Morgan, Drake; Chung, Hae Young; Lees, Hazel; Daniels, Michael; Hubbard, Gene B; Lee, Shuko; Ikeno, Yuji; Foster, Thomas C; Buford, Thomas W; Marzetti, Emanuele

    2011-06-01

    The primary purpose of the present set of studies was to provide a direct comparison of the effects of the angiotensin-converting enzyme inhibitor enalapril and the angiotensin receptor blocker losartan on body composition, physical performance, and muscle quality when administered late in life to aged rats. Overall, enalapril treatment consistently attenuated age-related increases in adiposity relative to both placebo and losartan. The maximal effect was achieved after 3 months of treatment (between 24 and 27 months of age), at a dose of 40 mg/kg and was observed in the absence of any changes in physical activity, body temperature, or food intake. In addition, the reduction in fat mass was not due to changes in pathology given that enalapril attenuated age-related increases in tumor development relative to placebo- and losartan-treated animals. Both enalapril and losartan attenuated age-related decreases in grip strength, suggesting that changes in body composition appear dissociated from improvements in physical function and may reflect a differential impact of enalapril and losartan on muscle quality. To link changes in adiposity to improvements in skeletal muscle quality, we performed gene array analyses to generate hypotheses regarding cell signaling pathways altered with enalapril treatment. Based on these results, our primary follow-up pathway was mitochondria-mediated apoptosis of myocytes. Relative to losartan- and placebo-treated rats, only enalapril decreased DNA fragmentation and caspase-dependent apoptotic signaling. These data suggest that attenuation of the severity of skeletal muscle apoptosis promoted by enalapril may represent a distinct mechanism through which this compound improves muscle strength/quality.

  13. Vitamin K requirement in Danish anticoagulant-resistant Norway rats (Rattus norvegicus)

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Markussen, Mette D.; Heiberg, Ann-Charlotte; Nielsen, Robert

    2003-01-01

    Norway rats, Rattus norvegicus, Denmark, anticoagulant rodenticide resistance, vitamin K requirement......Norway rats, Rattus norvegicus, Denmark, anticoagulant rodenticide resistance, vitamin K requirement...

  14. Use of Monte Carlo simulations with a realistic rat phantom for examining the correlation between hematopoietic system response and red marrow absorbed dose in Brown Norway rats undergoing radionuclide therapy with {sup 177}Lu- and {sup 90}Y-BR96 mAbs

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Larsson, Erik; Ljungberg, Michael; Martensson, Linda; Nilsson, Rune; Tennvall, Jan; Strand, Sven-Erik; Joensson, Bo-Anders [Department of Medical Radiation Physics, Clinical Sciences, Lund University, Lund (Sweden); Department of Oncology, Clinical Sciences, Lund University, Lund (Sweden); Department of Medical Radiation Physics, Clinical Sciences, Lund University, Lund (Sweden)

    2012-07-15

    Purpose: Biokinetic and dosimetry studies in laboratory animals often precede clinical radionuclide therapies in humans. A reliable evaluation of therapeutic efficacy is essential and should be based on accurate dosimetry data from a realistic dosimetry model. The aim of this study was to develop an anatomically realistic dosimetry model for Brown Norway rats to calculate S factors for use in evaluating correlations between absorbed dose and biological effects in a preclinical therapy study. Methods: A realistic rat phantom (Roby) was used, which has some flexibility that allows for a redefinition of organ sizes. The phantom was modified to represent the anatomic geometry of a Brown Norway rat, which was used for Monte Carlo calculations of S factors. Kinetic data for radiolabeled BR96 monoclonal antibodies were used to calculate the absorbed dose. Biological data were gathered from an activity escalation study with {sup 90}Y- and {sup 177}Lu-labeled BR96 monoclonal antibodies, in which blood cell counts and bodyweight were examined up to 2 months follow-up after injection. Reductions in white blood cell and platelet counts and declines in bodyweight were quantified by four methods and compared to the calculated absorbed dose to the bone marrow or the total body. Results: A red marrow absorbed dose-dependent effect on hematological parameters was observed, which could be evaluated by a decrease in blood cell counts. The absorbed dose to the bone marrow, corresponding to the maximal tolerable activity that could safely be administered, was determined to 8.3 Gy for {sup 177}Lu and 12.5 Gy for {sup 90}Y. Conclusions: There was a clear correlation between the hematological effects, quantified with some of the studied parameters, and the calculated red marrow absorbed doses. The decline in body weight was stronger correlated to the total body absorbed dose, rather than the red marrow absorbed dose. Finally, when considering a constant activity concentration, the phantom

  15. Survey for zoonotic pathogens in Norway rat populations from Europe.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heuser, Elisa; Fischer, Stefan; Ryll, René; Mayer-Scholl, Anne; Hoffmann, Donata; Spahr, Carina; Imholt, Christian; Alfa, Dewi Murni; Fröhlich, Andreas; Lüschow, Dörte; Johne, Reimar; Ehlers, Bernhard; Essbauer, Sandra; Nöckler, Karsten; Ulrich, Rainer G

    2017-02-01

    The Norway rat Rattus norvegicus is an important reservoir of various zoonotic pathogens, such as cowpox virus and Leptospira, but also for agents of no or unknown zoonotic potential. We describe a survey of 426 Norway rats originating from five European countries and different habitats for Leptospira spp., rickettsiae, orthopoxvirus (OPV), avian metapneumovirus subtypes A and B (aMPV) and rat polyomavirus (rat PyV). Leptospira DNA was detected in 60 out of 420 (14.3%) rats, and Rickettsia DNA was found in three out of 369 (0.8%) rats investigated. PCR-based typing resulted in the identification of L. interrogans sequence type 17, which corresponds to the serogroup Icterohaemorrhagiae, and Rickettsia helvetica respectively. Rat PyV DNA was detected in 103 out of 421 (24.5%) rats. OPV DNA and aMPV RNA were detected in none of the rats, but OPV-specific antibodies were detected in three out of 388 (0.8%) rats. The frequency of single Leptospira and rat PyV infections and coinfections was, independent of sex, greater for adults compared with juveniles/subadults and greater at rural sites compared with urban areas. Study results indicate a broad geographical distribution of Leptospira DNA in rats within Europe, underlining the need to investigate further the potential mechanisms leading to increased prevalence in rural habitats and to assess the relevance to public health. In contrast, rickettsia and OPV infections rarely occurred in wild rat populations. The potential influence of rat PyV on the susceptibility to infections with other pathogens should be investigated in future studies. © 2016 Society of Chemical Industry. © 2016 Society of Chemical Industry.

  16. Norway.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1987-03-01

    This background note for Norway by the U.S. State Department describes the geography, people, history, government, politics, and foreign relations of this newly oil-rich Scandinavian nation. Norwegians number 4.1 million, growing only at 0.3% per year, of Germanic origin, with 20,000 Laplanders. Infant mortality is 9/1000; life expectancy is 73 and 80 years. The government is a constitutional monarchy, with socialized medicine, education through university and social security. Norway became independent of Sweden in 1905, was a non-belligerent in both world wars, but was occupied by Nazi Germany. Subsequently Norway has required military service and is a member of NATO. Norway is a wealthy developed nation, with a positive foreign trade balance, a per capita income of $14,000, resources of oil, fish, timber, hydroelectric power, ores, and an industrial economy. Norway sends out about $471 million in foreign aid.

  17. Norway.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1992-08-01

    Norway with a territory of 386,000 sq. km or 150,000 sq. miles is slightly larger than New Mexico. In 1991 the population was estimated at 4.3 million with an annual growth rate of .5% and a literacy rate of 100%. The infant mortality rate is 7/1000 live births, and lie expectancy is 73 years for men and 80 years for women. Norway's government is a hereditary constitutional monarchy since independence n 1905. Ethnically, Norwegians are predominantly Germanic, but there are indigenous communities of Sami (Lapps) in the north, and in recent years almost 150,000 immigrants, foreign workers, and asylum-seekers have settled there. Norway's health system includes free hospital care, physicians compensation, cash benefits during illness and pregnancy, and other medical and dental plans. Until the 1981 election, Norway has been governed by Labor Party governments since 1935, except for 3 periods (1963, 1965-71, and 1972-73). Gro Harlem Brundtland is again the prime minister after forming her 3rd government in 10 years. Norway holds national elections in September 1993. Norway's large shipping fleet is modern; metals, pulp and paper products, chemicals, shipbuilding, and fishing are traditional industries, and major oil and gas discoveries in the mid-1970s transformed the economy. High oil prices in the 1983-85 period raised consumer spending, wages, and inflation. Norway is aspiring to restructure its nonoil economy in favor of efficient, nontraditional industry. The prime minister has indicated that Norway may apply for European Community (EC) membership before the end of 1992. Its main trading partners are the EC countries and its Scandinavian neighbors with the US in 5th place.

  18. Bromadiolone resistance does not respond to absence of anticoagulants in experimental populations of Norway rats

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Heiberg, A.C.; Leirs, H.; Siegismund, Hans Redlef

    2003-01-01

    Resistance to anticoagulant rodenticides in Norway rats (Rattus norvegicus) is documented to be associated with pleiotropic effects, notably with an increased dietary vitamin K requirement. The aim of this study was to quantify these effects in small populations of Norway rat in Denmark and to see...

  19. Analysis of vkorc1 polymorphisms in Norway rats using the roof rat as outgroup.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Díaz, Juan C; Song, Ying; Moore, Anthony; Borchert, Jeff N; Kohn, Michael H

    2010-05-24

    Certain mutations in the vitamin K epoxide reductase subcomponent 1 gene (vkorc1) mediate rodent resistance to warfarin and other anticoagulants. Testing for resistance often involves analysis of the vkorc1. However, a genetic test for the roof rat (Rattus rattus) has yet to be developed. Moreover, an available roof rat vkorc1 sequence would enable species identification based on vkorc1 sequence and the evaluation of natural selection on particular vkorc1 polymorphisms in the Norway rat (R. norvegicus). We report the coding sequence, introns and 5' and 3' termini for the vkorc1 gene of roof rats (R. r. alexandrinus and R. r. frugivorus) from Uganda, Africa. Newly designed PCR primers now enable genetic testing of the roof rat and Norway rat. Only synonymous and noncoding polymorphisms were found in roof rats from Uganda. Both nominal subspecies of roof rats were indistinguishable from each other but were distinct from R. losea and R. flavipectus; however, the roof rat also shares at least three coding sequence polymorphisms with R. losea and R. flavipectus. Many of recently published vkorc1 synonymous and non-synonymous single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) in Norway rats are likely SNPs from roof rats and/or other Rattus species. Tests applied to presumably genuine Norway rat vkorc1 SNPs are consistent with a role for selection in two populations carrying the derived Phe63Cys and Tyr139Cys mutations. Geographic mapping of vkorc1 SNPs in roof rats should be facilitated by our report. Our assay should be applicable to most species of Rattus, which are intermediate in genetic distance from roof and Norway rats. Vkorc1-mediated resistance due to non-synonymous coding SNPs is not segregating in roof rats from Uganda. By using the roof rat sequence as a reference vkorc1, SNPs now can be assigned to the correct rat species with more confidence. Sampling designs and genotyping strategies employed so far have helped detect candidate mutations underlying vkorc1-mediated

  20. Oral sensitization to food proteins: A Brown Norway rat model

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Knippels, L.M.J.; Penninks, A.H.; Spanhaak, S.; Houben, G.F.

    1998-01-01

    Background: Although several in vivo antigenicity assays using parenteral immunization are operational, no adequate enteral sensitization models are available to study food allergy and allergenicity of food proteins. Objective: This paper describes the development of an enteral model for food

  1. Assessment of protein allergenicity studies in brown Norway rats

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Knippels, L.M.J.; Penninks, A.H.

    2002-01-01

    For the safety evaluation of genetically engineered crops, the potential allergenicity of the newly introduced protein(s) has become an important issue. There is, however, no universal and reliable test system for the evaluation of the allergic sensitizing ability of food proteins. Therefore, there

  2. Rat hepatitis E virus: geographical clustering within Germany and serological detection in wild Norway rats (Rattus norvegicus).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johne, Reimar; Dremsek, Paul; Kindler, Eveline; Schielke, Anika; Plenge-Bönig, Anita; Gregersen, Henrike; Wessels, Ute; Schmidt, Katja; Rietschel, Wolfram; Groschup, Martin H; Guenther, Sebastian; Heckel, Gerald; Ulrich, Rainer G

    2012-07-01

    Zoonotic hepatitis E virus (HEV) infection in industrialised countries is thought to be caused by transmission from wild boar, domestic pig and deer as reservoir hosts. The detection of HEV-specific antibodies in rats and other rodents has suggested that these animals may represent an additional source for HEV transmission to human. Recently, a novel HEV (ratHEV) was detected in Norway rats from Hamburg, Germany, showing the typical genome organisation but a high nucleotide and amino acid sequence divergence to other mammalian and to avian HEV strains. Here we describe the multiple detection of ratHEV RNA and HEV-specific antibodies in Norway rats from additional cities in north-east and south-west Germany. The complete genome analysis of two novel strains from Berlin and Stuttgart confirmed the association of ratHEV to Norway rats. The present data indicated a continuing existence of this virus in the rat populations from Berlin and Hamburg. The phylogenetic analysis of a short segment of the open reading frame 1 confirmed a geographical clustering of the corresponding sequences. Serological investigations using recombinant ratHEV and genotype 3 capsid protein derivatives demonstrated antigenic differences which might be caused by the high amino acid sequence divergence in the immunodominant region. The high amount of animals showing exclusively ratHEV RNA or anti-ratHEV antibodies suggested a non-persistent infection in the Norway rat. Future studies have to prove the transmission routes of the virus in rat populations and its zoonotic potential. The recombinant ratHEV antigen generated here will allow future seroepidemiological studies to differentiate ratHEV and genotype 3 infections in humans and animals. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  3. Interstrain Differences in the Development of Pyometra after Estrogen Treatment of Rats

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brossia, Lisa Jane; Roberts, Christopher Sean; Lopez, Jennifer T; Bigsby, Robert M; Dynlacht, Joseph R

    2009-01-01

    This case report describes the unanticipated development of pyometra in Brown Norway rats after treatment with estrogen. Sprague Dawley and Brown Norway rats were ovariectomized and randomly assigned to treatment groups (subcutaneous implantation of either a capsule containing 20 mg 17β-estradiol or an empty capsule, as a control). After irradiation of only the right eye, the rats were followed for several months in an attempt to determine the effects of estrogen on radiation cataractogenesis and investigate potential strain differences in this phenomenon. However, all Brown Norway rats that received estradiol treatment developed pyometra, whereas none the Sprague Dawley or control Brown Norway rats did. This case demonstrates the potential adverse effects of exogenous estrogen therapy, which are strain-specific in the rat. Caution should be taken when designing estrogen-related experiments involving Brown Norway rats and other potentially sensitive strains. PMID:19807973

  4. Global population divergence and admixture of the brown rat (Rattus norvegicus)

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Puckett, Emily E.; Park, Jane; Combs, Matthew; Blum, Michael J.; Bryant, Juliet E.; Caccone, Adalgisa; Costa, Federico; Deinum, Eva E.; Esther, Alexandra; Himsworth, Chelsea G.; Keightley, Peter D.; Ko, Albert; Lundkvist, Åke; McElhinney, Lorraine M.; Morand, Serge; Robins, Judith; Russell, James; Strand, Tanja M.; Suarez, Olga; Yon, Lisa; Munshi-South, Jason

    2016-01-01

    Native to China and Mongolia, the brown rat (Rattus norvegicus) now enjoys a worldwide distribution. While black rats and the house mouse tracked the regional development of human agricultural settlements, brown rats did not appear in Europe until the 1500s, suggesting their range expansion was a

  5. Data from: Global population divergence and admixture of the brown rat (Rattus norvegicus)

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Puckett, Emily E.; Park, Jane; Combs, Matthew; Blum, Michael J.; Bryant, Juliet E.; Caccone, Adalgisa; Costa, Federico; Deinum, E.E.

    2016-01-01

    Native to China and Mongolia, the brown rat (Rattus norvegicus) now enjoys a worldwide distribution. While black rats and the house mouse tracked the regional development of human agricultural settlements, brown rats did not appear in Europe until the 1500s, suggesting their range expansion was a

  6. Hepatitis E virus in Norway rats (Rattus norvegicus captured around a pig farm

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kanai Yuta

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Hepatitis E virus (HEV transmitted via the oral route through the consumption of contaminated water or uncooked or undercooked contaminated meat has been implicated in major outbreaks. Rats may play a critical role in HEV outbreaks, considering their negative effects on environmental hygiene and food sanitation. Although the serological evidence of HEV infection in wild rodents has been reported worldwide, the infectivity and propagation of HEV in wild rats remain unknown. To investigate if rats are a possible carrier of HEV, we studied wild Norway rats (Rattus norvegicus that were caught near a pig farm, where HEV was prevalent among the pigs. Methods We examined 56 Norway rats for HEV. RNA from internal organs was examined for RT-PCR and positive samples were sequenced. Positive tissue samples were incubated with A549 cell line to isolate HEV. Anti-HEV antibodies were detected by ELISA. Results Sixteen rats were seropositive, and the HEV RNA was detected in 10 of the 56 rats. Sequencing of the partial ORF1 gene from 7 samples resulted in partially sequenced HEV, belonging to genotype 3, which was genetically identical to the HEV prevalent in the swine from the source farm. The infectious HEVs were isolated from the Norway rats by using the human A549 cell line. Conclusions There was a relatively high prevalence (17.9% of the HEV genome in wild Norway rats. The virus was mainly detected in the liver and spleen. The results indicate that these animals might be possible carrier of swine HEV in endemic regions. The HEV contamination risk due to rats needs to be examined in human habitats.

  7. Detection of rat hepatitis E virus in wild Norway rats (Rattus norvegicus) and Black rats (Rattus rattus) from 11 European countries.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ryll, René; Bernstein, Samuel; Heuser, Elisa; Schlegel, Mathias; Dremsek, Paul; Zumpe, Maxi; Wolf, Sandro; Pépin, Michel; Bajomi, Daniel; Müller, Gabi; Heiberg, Ann-Charlotte; Spahr, Carina; Lang, Johannes; Groschup, Martin H; Ansorge, Hermann; Freise, Jona; Guenther, Sebastian; Baert, Kristof; Ruiz-Fons, Francisco; Pikula, Jiri; Knap, Nataša; Tsakmakidis, Ιoannis; Dovas, Chrysostomos; Zanet, Stefania; Imholt, Christian; Heckel, Gerald; Johne, Reimar; Ulrich, Rainer G

    2017-09-01

    Rat hepatitis E virus (HEV) is genetically only distantly related to hepeviruses found in other mammalian reservoirs and in humans. It was initially detected in Norway rats (Rattus norvegicus) from Germany, and subsequently in rats from Vietnam, the USA, Indonesia, China, Denmark and France. Here, we report on a molecular survey of Norway rats and Black rats (Rattus rattus) from 12 European countries for ratHEV and human pathogenic hepeviruses. RatHEV-specific real-time and conventional RT-PCR investigations revealed the presence of ratHEV in 63 of 508 (12.4%) rats at the majority of sites in 11 of 12 countries. In contrast, a real-time RT-PCR specific for human pathogenic HEV genotypes 1-4 and a nested broad-spectrum (NBS) RT-PCR with subsequent sequence determination did not detect any infections with these genotypes. Only in a single Norway rat from Belgium a rabbit HEV-like genotype 3 sequence was detected. Phylogenetic analysis indicated a clustering of all other novel Norway and Black rat-derived sequences with ratHEV sequences from Europe, the USA and a Black rat-derived sequence from Indonesia within the proposed ratHEV genotype 1. No difference in infection status was detected related to age, sex, rat species or density of human settlements and zoological gardens. In conclusion, our investigation shows a broad geographical distribution of ratHEV in Norway and Black rats from Europe and its presence in all settlement types investigated. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  8. Involvement of hepatic xenobiotic related genes in bromadiolone resistance in wild Norway rats, Rattus norvegicus (Berk.)

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Markussen, Mette Drude; Heiberg, Ann-Charlotte; Alsbo, Carsten

    2007-01-01

    a role in bromadiolone resistance in the Norway rat. A high constitutive expression of Cyp2c13 and Cyp3a2 and induction of Cyp1a2, Cyp2e1 and Cyp3a3 expression during bromadiolone exposure may increase the resistance to bromadiolone presumably by facilitating increased detoxification and decreased liver...

  9. Leptospira in breast tissue and milk of urban Norway rats (Rattus norvegicus).

    Science.gov (United States)

    DE Oliveira, D; Figueira, C P; Zhan, L; Pertile, A C; Pedra, G G; Gusmão, I M; Wunder, E A; Rodrigues, G; Ramos, E A G; Ko, A I; Childs, J E; Reis, M G; Costa, F

    2016-08-01

    Leptospirosis is a zoonosis caused by bacteria of the genus Leptospira. The disease is globally distributed and a major public health concern. The Norway rat (Rattus norvegicus) is the main reservoir of the pathogen in urban slums of developing and developed countries. The potential routes of intra-specific leptospire transmission in rats are largely unknown. Herein, we identified pathogenic Leptospira spp. in breast tissue and milk of naturally infected rats. We examined kidney, breast tissue and milk from 24 lactating rats for the presence of leptospires using immunofluorescence, immunohistochemistry, polymerase chain reaction (PCR) and scanning electronic microscopy. All 24 rats had evidence for Leptospira in the kidneys, indicating chronic carriage. The majority of kidney-positive rats had detectable leptospires in milk (18, 75%) and breast tissue (16, 67%), as evidenced by immunofluorescence assay and immunohistochemistry. Four (17%) milk samples and two (8%) breast tissue samples were positive by quantitative real-time PCR. Scanning electron microscopy confirmed the presence of leptospires in breast tissue. No major pathological changes in breast tissue were found. This study, for the first time, identified leptospires in the milk and breast tissue of wild Norway rats, suggesting the possibility of milk-borne transmission of leptospirosis to neonates.

  10. Identification and genomic characterization of a novel rat bocavirus from brown rats in China.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lau, Susanna K P; Yeung, Hazel C; Li, Kenneth S M; Lam, Carol S F; Cai, Jian-Piao; Yuen, Ming-Chi; Wang, Ming; Zheng, Bo-Jian; Woo, Patrick C Y; Yuen, Kwok-Yung

    2017-01-01

    Despite recent discoveries of novel animal bocaparvoviruses, current understandings on the diversity and evolution of bocaparvoviruses are still limited. We report the identification and genome characterization of a novel bocaparvovirus, rat bocaparvovirus (RBoV), in brown rats (Rattus norvegicus) in China. RBoV was detected in 11.5%, 2.4%, 16.2% and 0.3% of alimentary, respiratory, spleen and kidney samples respectively, of 636 brown rats by PCR, but not in samples of other rodent species, suggesting that brown rats are the primary reservoir of RBoV. Six RBoV genomes sequenced from three brown rats revealed the presence of three ORFs, characteristic of bocaparvoviruses. Phylogenetic analysis showed that RBoV was distantly related to other bocaparvoviruses, forming a distinct cluster within the genus, with ≤55.5% nucleotide identities to the genome of ungulate bocaparvovirus 3, supporting its classification as a novel bocaparvovirus species. RBoV possessed a putative second exon encoding the C-terminal region of NS1 and conserved RNA splicing signals, similar to human bocaparvoviruses and canine bocaparvovirus. In contrast to human, feline and canine bocaparvoviruses which demonstrates inter/intra-host viral diversity, partial VP1/VP2 sequences of 49 RBoV strains demonstrated little inter-host genetic diversity, suggesting a single genetic group. Although the pathogenicity of RBoV remains to be determined, its presence in different host tissues suggests wide tissue tropism. RBoV represents the first bocaparvovirus in rodents with genome sequenced, which extends our knowledge on the host range of bocaparvoviruses. Further studies are required to better understand the epidemiology, genetic diversity and pathogenicity of bocaparvoviruses in different rodent populations. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  11. Norway rat (Rattus norvegicus) as a potential reservoir for Echinococcus granulosus: A public health implication.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abdel-Moein, Khaled A; Hamza, Dalia A

    2016-12-01

    Cystic hydatidosis is a re-emerging parasitic zoonosis with worldwide distribution. The current study was carried out to investigate the possible role of rats in the epidemiology of such disease in urban and suburban areas. For this purpose, a total of 50 feral Norway rats (Rattus norvegicus) were collected from urban and suburban settings, Cairo, Egypt. Rats were examined to be infected with cystic hydatidosis through serological examination by IHA test as well as post-mortem examination of internal organs, histopathological or molecular identification of the collected cysts. Moreover, 42 persons inhabiting suburban areas were tested for cystic hydatidosis by IHA. The overall seroprevalence rates of cystic hydatidosis in the examined rats and persons were 36% and 11.9% respectively. Cysts from 3 rats were identified as E. granulosus hydatid cysts (one via histopathological examination while the others by molecular technique and genotyped as G6 strain). The results of the current study highlight the possible role of Norway rat in the epidemiological cycle of E. granulosus especially in urban and suburban settings.

  12. Helminth parasites in black rats (Rattus rattus) and brown rats (Rattus norvegicus) from different environments in the Netherlands

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Franssen, Frits; Swart, Arno; van Knapen, Frans|info:eu-repo/dai/nl/070114749; van der Giessen, Joke

    2016-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Rattus norvegicus (brown rat) and Rattus rattus (black rat) are known carriers of bacteria, viruses, and parasites of zoonotic and veterinary importance. Moreover, rats may play a role in the transmission of muscle larvae of the zoonotic nematode Trichinella spiralis to farm animals. We

  13. Effects of high-carbohydrate diets on lipogenesis in rat interscapular brown adipose tissue

    OpenAIRE

    Weaire, P. John; Kanagasabai, Tazeen F.

    1982-01-01

    Cycloplasmic preparations from brown and white adipose tissues were assayed for three lipogenic enzymes throughout a programme of starvation followed by refeeding on either a normal or a white-bread diet. In the brown adipose tissue of rats fed on a white-bread diet the three enzymes were elevated to levels significantly higher than those in white adipose tissue.

  14. Capillaria hepatica in wild Norway rats (Rattus norvegicus) from Vancouver, Canada.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rothenburger, Jamie L; Himsworth, Chelsea G; Chang, Victoria; LeJeune, Manigandan; Leighton, Frederick A

    2014-07-01

    Capillaria hepatica is a parasitic nematode that infects the liver of rats (Rattus spp.), and occasionally other mammalian species, including humans. Despite its broad geographic distribution and host range, the ecology of this parasite remains poorly understood. We characterized the ecology of C. hepatica in urban Norway rats (Rattus norvegicus) in Vancouver, Canada. The overall prevalence of C. hepatica among Norway rats was 36% (241/671); however, there was significant variation in prevalence among city blocks. Using a generalized linear mixed model to control for clustering by block (where OR is odds ratio and CI is confidence interval), we found C. hepatica infection was negatively associated with season (spring [OR=0.14, 95% CI=0.05-0.39]; summer [OR=0.14, 95% CI=0.03-0.61]; winter [OR=0.34, 95% CI=0.13-0.84], compared to fall) and positively associated with sexual maturity (OR: 7.29, 95% CI=3.98-13.36) and presence of cutaneous bite wounds (OR=1.87, 95% CI=1.11-3.16). Our understanding of the ecology of C. hepatica in rats is hindered by a paucity of data regarding the main mechanisms of transmission (e.g., environmental exposure vs. active cannibalism). However, associations among infection, season, maturity, and bite wounds could suggest that social interactions, possibly including cannibalism, may be important in transmission.

  15. Avian Pathogenicity Genes and Antibiotic Resistance in Escherichia coli Isolates from Wild Norway Rats ( Rattus norvegicus ) in British Columbia, Canada.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Himsworth, Chelsea G; Zabek, Erin; Desruisseau, Andrea; Parmley, E Jane; Reid-Smith, Richard; Leslie, Mira; Ambrose, Neil; Patrick, David M; Cox, William

    2016-04-28

    We report avian pathogenic and antibiotic resistant Escherichia coli in wild Norway rats ( Rattus norvegicus ) trapped at a commercial chicken hatchery in British Columbia, Canada, and provide evidence that rats can become colonized with, and possibly act as a source of, poultry pathogens present in their environment.

  16. Bacteria isolated from conspecific bite wounds in Norway and black rats: implications for rat bite-associated infections in people.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Himsworth, Chelsea G; Zabek, Erin; Tang, Patrick; Parsons, Kirbee L; Koehn, Martha; Jardine, Claire M; Patrick, David M

    2014-02-01

    Bites associated with wild and domestic Norway and black rats (Rattus norvegicus and Rattus rattus) may have a variety of health consequences in people. Bite-related infections are among the most significant of these consequences; however, there is little data on the infectious agents that can be transmitted from rats to people through biting. This is problematic because without an accurate understanding of bite-related infection risks, it is difficult for health professionals to evaluate the adequacy of existing guidelines for empirical therapy. The objectives of this study were to increase our knowledge of the bacterial species associated with rat bites by studying bite wounds that wild rats inflict upon one another and to review the literature regarding rat bites and bite wound management. Wild Norway and black rats (n=725) were trapped in Vancouver, Canada, and examined for bite wounds in the skin. All apparently infected wounds underwent aerobic and anaerobic culture, and isolated bacteria were identified. Thirty-six rats had bite wound-related infections, and approximately 22 different species of bacteria belonging to 18 genera were identified. Staphylococcus aureus was the most common isolate; however, the majority of infections (72.5%) were polymicrobial. Rat bites can result in infection with a number of aerobic and anaerobic Gram-positive and Gram-negative bacteria. In humans, these wounds are best managed through early recognition and cleansing. The benefit of prophylactic antimicrobial treatment is debatable, but given the deep puncturing nature of rodent bites, we suggest that they should be considered a high risk for infection. Antibiotics selected should include coverage for a broad range of bacterial species.

  17. Helminth parasites in black rats (Rattus rattus) and brown rats (Rattus norvegicus) from different environments in the Netherlands.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Franssen, Frits; Swart, Arno; van Knapen, Frans; van der Giessen, Joke

    2016-01-01

    Rattus norvegicus (brown rat) and Rattus rattus (black rat) are known carriers of bacteria, viruses, and parasites of zoonotic and veterinary importance. Moreover, rats may play a role in the transmission of muscle larvae of the zoonotic nematode Trichinella spiralis to farm animals. We aimed to study the intestinal and intramuscular helminths in wild rats from three different environments to assess the relevance of rats as carrier of zoonotic parasites for public health. Wild brown rats (117 individuals) and black rats (44 individuals) were captured at farms, in suburban and in rural environments in the Netherlands. Intestinal helminths were isolated and identified morphologically. Artificial digestion was used to isolate muscle larvae. Morphological analysis of rat intestinal contents yielded six nematode species (Syphacia muris, Heterakis spumosa, Aonchotheca murissylvatici, Trichuris muris, Nippostrongylus brasiliensis, and Strongyloides sp.), three cestode species (Hymenolepis diminuta, H. nana and Hymenolepis (=Rodentolepis) fraterna), and four trematode species (Plagiorchis muris, Plagiorchis proximus, Echinostoma chloropodis, and Notocotylus imbricatus).Black rats at farms displayed the lowest intestinal helminth species variation (six species) and carried overall on average 0.93 species simultaneously. In comparison, brown rats at farms carried seven helminth species and 1.91 species simultaneously. Brown rats from suburban environments displayed the highest species variation (11 species) at 1.82 simultaneous helminth species. Absence of trematodes from rats at farms may suggest limited exchange of rats between farms and surrounding wet rural environments. We report four species of veterinary (Syphacia muris) or zoonotic relevance (Hymenolepis diminuta, Hymenolepis nana and Plagiorchis muris). We did not find Trichinella muscle larvae, consistent with long-term prevalence in Dutch wild rats.

  18. Helminth parasites in black rats (Rattus rattus and brown rats (Rattus norvegicus from different environments in the Netherlands

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Frits Franssen

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available Background: Rattus norvegicus (brown rat and Rattus rattus (black rat are known carriers of bacteria, viruses, and parasites of zoonotic and veterinary importance. Moreover, rats may play a role in the transmission of muscle larvae of the zoonotic nematode Trichinella spiralis to farm animals. We aimed to study the intestinal and intramuscular helminths in wild rats from three different environments to assess the relevance of rats as carrier of zoonotic parasites for public health. Materials and methods: Wild brown rats (117 individuals and black rats (44 individuals were captured at farms, in suburban and in rural environments in the Netherlands. Intestinal helminths were isolated and identified morphologically. Artificial digestion was used to isolate muscle larvae. Results and discussion: Morphological analysis of rat intestinal contents yielded six nematode species (Syphacia muris, Heterakis spumosa, Aonchotheca murissylvatici, Trichuris muris, Nippostrongylus brasiliensis, and Strongyloides sp., three cestode species (Hymenolepis diminuta, H. nana and Hymenolepis (=Rodentolepis fraterna, and four trematode species (Plagiorchis muris, Plagiorchis proximus, Echinostoma chloropodis, and Notocotylus imbricatus.Black rats at farms displayed the lowest intestinal helminth species variation (six species and carried overall on average 0.93 species simultaneously. In comparison, brown rats at farms carried seven helminth species and 1.91 species simultaneously. Brown rats from suburban environments displayed the highest species variation (11 species at 1.82 simultaneous helminth species. Absence of trematodes from rats at farms may suggest limited exchange of rats between farms and surrounding wet rural environments. We report four species of veterinary (Syphacia muris or zoonotic relevance (Hymenolepis diminuta, Hymenolepis nana and Plagiorchis muris. We did not find Trichinella muscle larvae, consistent with long-term prevalence in Dutch wild rats.

  19. Distribution of rodenticide resistance and zoonotic pathogens in Norway rats in Lower Saxony and Hamburg, Germany.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Runge, Martin; von Keyserlingk, Michael; Braune, Silke; Becker, Detlef; Plenge-Bönig, Anita; Freise, Jona F; Pelz, Hans-Joachim; Esther, Alexandra

    2013-03-01

    Genetically based resistance to anticoagulants has led to increasing difficulties in the control of rodents over recent decades. The possible impact of rodenticide-resistant rats on the infection risk of humans and livestock by zoonotic pathogens is generally unknown. Hence, in a monitoring programme in the German federal states of Lower Saxony and Hamburg, more than 500 Norway rats were analysed for both Tyr139Cys polymorphisms within the VKORC1 gene and zoonotic agents. Evidence of resistance was almost completely restricted to the known resistance area in southern Lower Saxony. Homozygous mutations were only found in urban areas sampled owing to the occurrence of rat control problems and were missing in bycatches of rats by muskrat trappers in rural areas. In more than 25% of the rats, zoonotic bacteria (Leptospira, Salmonella, Yersinia and Coxiella) were detected. There was no obvious correlation between the occurrence of rats carrying zoonotic pathogens and anticoagulant resistance. Zoonotic agents and genetically based resistance conferred by the Tyr139Cys polymorphism are both unevenly distributed in Lower Saxony. The study provides the basis for further studies focusing on districts with high levels of pathogens and resistance to assess the potential health risk of their combined occurrence. Copyright © 2012 Society of Chemical Industry.

  20. In vitro gastric digestion of cooked white and brown rice using a dynamic rat stomach model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Peng; Deng, Renpan; Wu, Xuee; Wang, Yong; Dong, Zhizhong; Dhital, Sushil; Chen, Xiao Dong

    2017-12-15

    The changes in physical, rheological and enzyme-digestive behaviours of cooked white and brown rice, with similar amylose content, were investigated using a dynamic in vitro rat stomach (DIVRS) model and a static soaking method. The brown rice had a higher resistance on disintegration and lower gastric emptying rate with 53% of the brown rice particles retained in the stomach at the end compared to 32% for the white rice. Furthermore, the release rate of maltose from the starch hydrolysis was higher in the white rice throughout the digestion suggesting the lower glycemic potency of the brown rice. These differences could be contributed from the rigid bran layer in the brown rice which would inhibit the moisture absorption into rice kernels, limit textural degradation, and generate higher gastric digesta viscosity leading to lower mixing and mass transfer efficiency. This study suggests that the structural difference could affect physiochemical properties during gastric digestion. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  1. Hypocholesterolemic action of pre-germinated brown rice in hepatoma-bearing rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miura, Daiki; Ito, Yukihiko; Mizukuchi, Aya; Kise, Mitsuo; Aoto, Hiromichi; Yagasaki, Kazumi

    2006-06-13

    The effect of pre-germinated brown rice (PGBR) on cholesterol metabolism was studied in Donryu rats subcutaneously implanted with the ascites hepatoma cell line AH109A and compared with that of white rice (WR). The effect of brown rice (BR), the source of PGBR, was also studied. Hepatoma-bearing rats fed a WR diet exhibited hypercholesterolemia compared with normal rats fed the same diet. Feeding hepatoma-bearing rats a PGBR or BR diet suppressed hepatoma-induced hypercholesterolemia, and enhanced fecal bile acid excretion and the activity of cholesterol 7alpha-hydroxylase, the rate-limiting enzyme of bile acid biosynthesis, in the microsomal fraction of the liver without affecting cholesterol synthesis in the host liver of hepatoma-bearing rats. These results suggest that PGBR as well as BR suppresses hypercholesterolemia induced by hepatoma growth by up-regulating cholesterol catabolism.

  2. Differential expression of cytochrome P450 genes between bromadiolone-resistant and anticoagulant-susceptible Norway rats:

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Markussen, Mette Drude; Heiberg, Ann-Charlotte; Fredholm, Merete

    2008-01-01

    Anticoagulant resistance in Norway rats (Rattus norvegicus) has been suggested to be due to mutations in the VKORC1 gene, encoding the target protein of anticoagulant rodenticides such as warfarin and bromadiolone. Other factors, e.g. pharmacokinetics, may however also contribute to resistance. We...

  3. Differential expression of cytochrome P450 genes between bromadiolone-resistant and anticoagulant-susceptible Norway rats

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Markussen, Mette Drude Kjær; Heiberg, Ann-Charlotte; Fredholm, Merete

    2008-01-01

    Background: Anticoagulant resistance in Norway rats, Rattus norvegicus (Berk.), has been suggested to be conferred by mutations in the VKORC1 gene, encoding the target protein of anticoagulant rodenticides. Other factors, e.g. pharmacokinetics, may also contribute to resistance, however. To examine...

  4. Occurrence of human hepatitis E virus in Norway rats: A zoonotic potential with great public health implications

    OpenAIRE

    Nahed Hamed Ghoneim; Khaled Abdel-Aziz Abdel-Moein; Dalia Anwar Hamza; Naglaa Mohamed Hagag

    2016-01-01

    Objective: To investigate the occurrence of human hepatitis E virus genotype I among sheep and rats as well as seroprevalence of hepatitis E virus immunoglobulin G (IgG) antibodies among people live in rural settings. Methods: Fecal samples were collected from 43 Norway rats and 30 sheep. All fecal samples were examined for the presence of human hepatitis E virus genotype I through direct detection using RT-PCR. In addition, serum samples collected from 90 apparently healthy pe...

  5. Low prevalence of human enteropathogenic Yersinia spp. in brown rats (Rattus norvegicus) in Flanders.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rouffaer, Lieze Oscar; Baert, Kristof; Van den Abeele, Anne-Marie; Cox, Ivo; Vanantwerpen, Gerty; De Zutter, Lieven; Strubbe, Diederik; Vranckx, Katleen; Lens, Luc; Haesebrouck, Freddy; Delmée, Michel; Pasmans, Frank; Martel, An

    2017-01-01

    Brown rats (Rattus norvegicus) have been identified as potential carriers of Yersinia enterocolitica and Y. pseudotuberculosis, the etiological agents of yersiniosis, the third most reported bacterial zoonosis in Europe. Enteropathogenic Yersinia spp. are most often isolated from rats during yersiniosis cases in animals and humans, and from rats inhabiting farms and slaughterhouses. Information is however lacking regarding the extent to which rats act as carriers of these Yersinia spp.. In 2013, 1088 brown rats across Flanders, Belgium, were tested for the presence of Yersinia species by isolation method. Identification was performed using MALDI-TOF MS, PCR on chromosomal- and plasmid-borne virulence genes, biotyping and serotyping. Yersinia spp. were isolated from 38.4% of the rats. Of these, 53.4% were designated Y. enterocolitica, 0.7% Y. pseudotuberculosis and 49.0% other Yersinia species. Two Y. enterocolitica possessing the virF-, ail- and ystA-gene were isolated. Additionally, the ystB-gene was identified in 94.1% of the other Y. enterocolitica isolates, suggestive for biotype 1A. Three of these latter isolates simultaneously possessed the ail-virulence gene. Significantly more Y. enterocolitica were isolated during winter and spring compared to summer. Based on our findings we can conclude that brown rats are frequent carriers for various Yersinia spp., including Y. pseudotuberculosis and (human pathogenic) Y. enterocolitica which are more often isolated during winter and spring.

  6. Low prevalence of human enteropathogenic Yersinia spp. in brown rats (Rattus norvegicus in Flanders.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lieze Oscar Rouffaer

    Full Text Available Brown rats (Rattus norvegicus have been identified as potential carriers of Yersinia enterocolitica and Y. pseudotuberculosis, the etiological agents of yersiniosis, the third most reported bacterial zoonosis in Europe. Enteropathogenic Yersinia spp. are most often isolated from rats during yersiniosis cases in animals and humans, and from rats inhabiting farms and slaughterhouses. Information is however lacking regarding the extent to which rats act as carriers of these Yersinia spp.. In 2013, 1088 brown rats across Flanders, Belgium, were tested for the presence of Yersinia species by isolation method. Identification was performed using MALDI-TOF MS, PCR on chromosomal- and plasmid-borne virulence genes, biotyping and serotyping. Yersinia spp. were isolated from 38.4% of the rats. Of these, 53.4% were designated Y. enterocolitica, 0.7% Y. pseudotuberculosis and 49.0% other Yersinia species. Two Y. enterocolitica possessing the virF-, ail- and ystA-gene were isolated. Additionally, the ystB-gene was identified in 94.1% of the other Y. enterocolitica isolates, suggestive for biotype 1A. Three of these latter isolates simultaneously possessed the ail-virulence gene. Significantly more Y. enterocolitica were isolated during winter and spring compared to summer. Based on our findings we can conclude that brown rats are frequent carriers for various Yersinia spp., including Y. pseudotuberculosis and (human pathogenic Y. enterocolitica which are more often isolated during winter and spring.

  7. Prevalence of Hymenolepis nana and H. diminuta from Brown Rats (Rattus norvegicus) in Heilongjiang Province, China.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Di; Zhao, Wei; Zhang, Yichi; Liu, Aiqin

    2017-06-01

    Hymenolepis nana and Hymenolepis diminuta are globally widespread zoonotic cestodes. Rodents are the main reservoir host of these cestodes. Brown rats (Rattus norvegicus) are the best known and most common rats, and usually live wherever humans live, especially in less than desirable hygiene conditions. Due to the little information of the 2 hymenolepidid species in brown rats in China, the aim of this study was to understand the prevalence and genetic characterization of H. nana and H. diminuta in brown rats in Heilongjiang Province, China. Total 114 fecal samples were collected from brown rats in Heilongjiang Province. All the samples were subjected to morphological examinations by microscopy and genetic analysis by PCR amplification of the mitochondrial cytochrome c oxidase subunit 1 (COX1) gene and the internal transcribed spacer 2 (ITS2) region of the nuclear ribosomal RNA gene. In total, 6.1% (7/114) and 14.9% (17/114) of samples were positive for H. nana and H. diminuta, respectively. Among them, 7 and 3 H. nana isolates were successfully amplified and sequenced at the COX1 and ITS2 loci, respectively. No nucleotide variations were found among H. nana isolates at either of the 2 loci. Seventeen H. diminuta isolates produced 2 different COX1 sequences while 7 ITS2 sequences obtained were identical to each other. The present results of H. nana and H. diminuta infections in brown rats implied the risk of zoonotic transmission of hymenolepiasis in China. These molecular data will be helpful to deeply study intra-specific variations within Hymenolepis cestodes in the future.

  8. Brodifacoum is effective against Norway rats (Rattus norvegicus) in a tyrosine139cysteine focus of anticoagulant resistance in Westphalia, Germany.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Buckle, Alan P; Klemann, Nicole; Prescott, Colin V

    2012-12-01

    The tyrosine to cysteine amino acid substitution at location 139 of the vkorc1 protein (i.e. tyrosine139cysteine or Y139C) is the most widespread anticoagulant resistance mutation in Norway rats (Rattus norvegicus Berk.) in Europe. Field trials were conducted to determine the incidence of the Y139C mutation at two rat-infested farms in Westphalia, Germany, and to estimate the practical efficacy against them of applications, using a pulsed baiting treatment regime, of a proprietary bait (Klerat™) containing 0.005% brodifacoum. DNA analysis for the Y139C mutation showed that resistant rats were prevalent at the two farms, with an incidence of 80.0 and 78.6% respectively. Applications of brodifacoum bait achieved results of 99.2 and 100.0% control at the two farms, when measured by census baiting, although the treatment was somewhat prolonged at one site, possibly owing to the abundance of attractive alternative food. The study showed that 0.005% brodifacoum bait is fully effective against Norway rats possessing the Y139C mutation at the Münsterland focus and is likely to be so elsewhere in Europe where this mutation is found. The pulsed baiting regime reduced to relatively low levels the quantity of bait required to control these two substantial resistant Norway rat infestations. Previous studies had shown much larger quantities of bromadiolone and difenacoum baits used in largely ineffective treatments against Y139C resistant rats in the Münsterland. These results should be considered when making decisions about the use of anticoagulants against resistant Norway rats and their potential environmental impacts. Copyright © 2012 Society of Chemical Industry.

  9. Effect of pre-germination time of brown rice on serum cholesterol levels of hypercholesterolaemic rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roohinejad, Shahin; Omidizadeh, Alireza; Mirhosseini, Hamed; Saari, Nazamid; Mustafa, Shuhaimi; Yusof, Rokiah Mohd; Hussin, Anis Shobirin Meor; Hamid, Azizah; Abd Manap, Mohd Yazid

    2010-01-30

    Brown rice is unpolished rice with immeasurable benefits for human health. Brown rice (BR) and pre-germinated brown rice (PGBR) are known to contain various functional compounds such as gamma-oryzanol, dietary fibre and gamma-aminobutyric acid (GABA). In the present study, the experimental diets containing BR and PGBR (24, 48 h pre-germination) were used to investigate the influence of pre-germination time of brown rice on blood cholesterol in Sprague-Dawley male rats. Hypercholesterolaemia and elevation of LDL-cholesterol were successfully ameliorated by the experimental diets containing BR and PGBR (24 and 48 h pre-germination). As compared to the control sample, the pre-germination time had a significant (P < 0.05) effect on blood cholesterol of Sprague-Dawley male rats. It was also found that the significantly (P < 0.05) better effect on lipid profile of hypercholesterolaemic rats was observed by prolonging the pre-germination time. As compared to non-germinated brown rice, the germinated brown rice showed the higher cardio-protective effect on hypercholesterolaemic Sprague-Dawley male rats. The present study suggests that the changes of blood cholesterol can be mainly modulated by using the PGBR rather than BR. The prolonging of pre-germination time led to an increase in the bioactive components, thereby providing a more efficient functional diet affecting the high blood cholesterol. This study suggests that PGBR can be used instead of BR and polished rice in the human diet. (c) 2009 Society of Chemical Industry.

  10. Sex differences in performance on a cognitive bias task in Norway rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brown, Gillian R; Cullum, Philippa; Martin, Stacey; Healy, Susan D

    2016-12-01

    Cognitive biases, which are defined as distortions in cognitive processes that are influenced by a background emotional state, can provide information about an individual's affective state. For instance, negative cognitive biases, where individuals assess ambiguous situations as unrewarding, are commonly found in humans suffering from anxiety disorders. Cognitive biases are also increasingly used as indicators of affective state in animals. As it is not clear whether female and male animals differ in performance on cognitive bias tasks, we used a spatial location task to examine cognitive bias in female and male adult Norway rats (Rattus norvegicus). We trained the rats to distinguish between reward and unrewarded locations, and then provided food pots at ambiguous, intermediate positions. We found that, during testing, females were slowest to approach the unrewarded location, while they approached ambiguous and rewarded locations similarly quickly. In contrast, the males approached all locations quickly. This sex difference is consistent with previous evidence that male rats are quicker than females to extinguish previously learned associations. Cognitive bias tasks could therefore be used to examine sex differences in learning strategies, as well as providing opportunities to test predictions about sex differences in welfare requirements. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  11. First record of Calodium hepaticum and Taenia taeniaeformis liver infection in wild Norway rats (Rattus norvegicus in Serbia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kataranovski Milena

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available The nematode Calodium hepaticum and the cestode Taenia taeniaeformis are zoonotic helminths primarly found in the liver of common wild rats. Most reports on these helminth species with cosmopolitan distribution are from Asia, and there is paucity of data for Europe. Wild Norway rats (Rattus norvegicus from urban and suburban habitats of the Belgrade area were examined for the presence of Calodium hepaticum and Taenia taeniaeformis larvae liver infections. The presence of visible cysts and a histomorphology of parasite-related inflammatory liver responses were sought as signs of infection. The total prevalence of infection was 10.9% (C. hepaticum and 29.9% (T. taeniaeformis, with no differences between the sexes. No difference in the annual prevalence of both helminth species was noted. Data obtained in this study provide new information relevant to wild Norway rats as sources of C. hepaticum and T. taeniaeformis liver infection in this geographic area, and, in a wider context, in Europe. .

  12. Immune-related health-relevant changes in natural populations of Norway rat (Rattus norvegicus Berkenhout, 1769: White blood cell counts, leukocyte activity, and peripheral organ infiltration

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kataranovski Milena V.

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Basic immune-related health-relevant changes (total and differential white blood cell counts and activity, leukocyte tissue infiltration, and related pathohistology were assessed in wild Norway rats from urban habitats. Comparative measurements were conducted in individuals of several laboratory strains of Norway rat in order to gain insight into environmental effects on the health of wild rats. Changes in leukocyte counts and activity along with tissue infiltration were noted only in wild rats, indicating systemic as well as tissue inflammation in these animals. Coincidence of these changes with chronic inflammatory pulmonary and kidney disease was observed in the majority of affected rats.

  13. Zoonotic helminths of urban brown rats (Rattus norvegicus) in the UK: neglected public health considerations?

    Science.gov (United States)

    McGarry, J W; Higgins, A; White, N G; Pounder, K C; Hetzel, U

    2015-02-01

    Urban brown rats (Rattus norvegicus) carry microbial human pathogens but their role as reservoir hosts for helminths of public health importance is less well known. In this study, 42 brown rats trapped on Merseyside were subject to thorough combined helminthological and pathohistological post-mortem examination. Eggs of the rodent-borne zoonotic nematode Calodium hepaticum were initially detected in histological sections of the livers of 9.5% of rats, but overall diagnostic sensitivity increased to 16.6% when entire liver tissue was disrupted and the resulting filtrates were examined for released eggs. In their rat host, mainly trapped inside the dockland, infections with C. hepaticum were associated with a chronic multifocal pyogranulomatous hepatitis with intralesional eggs and peripheral fibrosis. Mean intensity of hepatic C. hepaticum egg infections was 1041 eggs. This is the first report of C. hepaticum in an urban brown rat population in the UK and provides original data for liver egg burdens in this abundant commensal rodent. The zoonotic cestode Rodentolepis nana had a prevalence of infection of 14.3%. Rodent-specific, non-zoonotic helminths found were the spiruroid Mastophorus muris (16.0%) in the stomach, the trichuroid Trichosomoides crassicauda in the urinary bladder (31.0%); the ascarid Heterakis spumosa was the commonest helminth of the large intestine (76.2%). Many millions of brown rats inhabit cities and rural areas of the UK, and the infective stages of the zoonotic worm species, particularly C. hepaticum, are likely to be widely distributed in the environment presenting a threat to public health. © 2014 Blackwell Verlag GmbH.

  14. Large-scale structure of brown rat (Rattus norvegicus) populations in England: effects on rodenticide resistance

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haniza, Mohd Z.H.; Adams, Sally; Jones, Eleanor P.; MacNicoll, Alan; Mallon, Eamonn B.; Smith, Robert H.

    2015-01-01

    The brown rat (Rattus norvegicus) is a relatively recent (<300 years) addition to the British fauna, but by association with negative impacts on public health, animal health and agriculture, it is regarded as one of the most important vertebrate pest species. Anticoagulant rodenticides were introduced for brown rat control in the 1950s and are widely used for rat control in the UK, but long-standing resistance has been linked to control failures in some regions. One thus far ignored aspect of resistance biology is the population structure of the brown rat. This paper investigates the role population structure has on the development of anticoagulant resistance. Using mitochondrial and microsatellite DNA, we examined 186 individuals (from 15 counties in England and one location in Wales near the Wales–England border) to investigate the population structure of rural brown rat populations. We also examined individual rats for variations of the VKORC1 gene previously associated with resistance to anticoagulant rodenticides. We show that the populations were structured to some degree, but that this was only apparent in the microsatellite data and not the mtDNA data. We discuss various reasons why this is the case. We show that the population as a whole appears not to be at equilibrium. The relative lack of diversity in the mtDNA sequences examined can be explained by founder effects and a subsequent spatial expansion of a species introduced to the UK relatively recently. We found there was a geographical distribution of resistance mutations, and relatively low rate of gene flow between populations, which has implications for the development and management of anticoagulant resistance. PMID:26664802

  15. Large-scale structure of brown rat (Rattus norvegicus populations in England: effects on rodenticide resistance

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohd Z.H. Haniza

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available The brown rat (Rattus norvegicus is a relatively recent (<300 years addition to the British fauna, but by association with negative impacts on public health, animal health and agriculture, it is regarded as one of the most important vertebrate pest species. Anticoagulant rodenticides were introduced for brown rat control in the 1950s and are widely used for rat control in the UK, but long-standing resistance has been linked to control failures in some regions. One thus far ignored aspect of resistance biology is the population structure of the brown rat. This paper investigates the role population structure has on the development of anticoagulant resistance. Using mitochondrial and microsatellite DNA, we examined 186 individuals (from 15 counties in England and one location in Wales near the Wales–England border to investigate the population structure of rural brown rat populations. We also examined individual rats for variations of the VKORC1 gene previously associated with resistance to anticoagulant rodenticides. We show that the populations were structured to some degree, but that this was only apparent in the microsatellite data and not the mtDNA data. We discuss various reasons why this is the case. We show that the population as a whole appears not to be at equilibrium. The relative lack of diversity in the mtDNA sequences examined can be explained by founder effects and a subsequent spatial expansion of a species introduced to the UK relatively recently. We found there was a geographical distribution of resistance mutations, and relatively low rate of gene flow between populations, which has implications for the development and management of anticoagulant resistance.

  16. Vibration Training Triggers Brown Adipocyte Relative Protein Expression in Rat White Adipose Tissue

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chao Sun

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Recently, vibration training is considered as a novel strategy of weight loss; however, its mechanisms are still unclear. In this study, normal or high-fat diet-induced rats were trained by whole body vibration for 8 weeks. We observed that the body weight and fat metabolism index, blood glucose, triglyceride, cholesterol, and free fatty acid in obesity rats decreased significantly compared with nonvibration group (n=6. Although intrascapular BAT weight did not change significantly, vibration enhanced ATP reduction and increased protein level of the key molecule of brown adipose tissue (BAT, PGC-1α, and UCP1 in BAT. Interestingly, the adipocytes in retroperitoneal white adipose tissue (WAT became smaller due to vibration exercise and had higher protein level of the key molecule of brown adipose tissue (BAT, PGC-1α, and UCP1 and inflammatory relative proteins, IL-6 and TNFα. Simultaneously, ATP content and PPARγ protein level in WAT became less in rats compared with nonvibration group. The results indicated that vibration training changed lipid metabolism in rats and promoted brown fat-like change in white adipose tissues through triggering BAT associated gene expression, inflammatory reflect, and reducing energy reserve.

  17. Vibration Training Triggers Brown Adipocyte Relative Protein Expression in Rat White Adipose Tissue.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Chao; Zeng, Ruixia; Cao, Ge; Song, Zhibang; Zhang, Yibo; Liu, Chang

    2015-01-01

    Recently, vibration training is considered as a novel strategy of weight loss; however, its mechanisms are still unclear. In this study, normal or high-fat diet-induced rats were trained by whole body vibration for 8 weeks. We observed that the body weight and fat metabolism index, blood glucose, triglyceride, cholesterol, and free fatty acid in obesity rats decreased significantly compared with nonvibration group (n = 6). Although intrascapular BAT weight did not change significantly, vibration enhanced ATP reduction and increased protein level of the key molecule of brown adipose tissue (BAT), PGC-1α, and UCP1 in BAT. Interestingly, the adipocytes in retroperitoneal white adipose tissue (WAT) became smaller due to vibration exercise and had higher protein level of the key molecule of brown adipose tissue (BAT), PGC-1α, and UCP1 and inflammatory relative proteins, IL-6 and TNFα. Simultaneously, ATP content and PPARγ protein level in WAT became less in rats compared with nonvibration group. The results indicated that vibration training changed lipid metabolism in rats and promoted brown fat-like change in white adipose tissues through triggering BAT associated gene expression, inflammatory reflect, and reducing energy reserve.

  18. Age- and Brain Region-Specific Differences in Mitochondrial Bioenergetics in Brown Norway Rats

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Environmental Protection Agency — Differences in various mitochondrial bioenergetics parameters in different brain regions in different age groups. This dataset is associated with the following...

  19. Respiratory irritation by trimellitic anhydride in Brown Norway and Wistar rats

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Arts, J.H.E.; Koning, M.W.de; Bloksma, N.; Kuper, C.F.

    2001-01-01

    Several acid anhydrides are known for their sensitizing and irritative properties. Since both irritation and respiratory allergy can cause changes of lung function, proper testing of allergen-dependent effects on the respiratory tract requires knowledge of the respiratory irritant effects. To study

  20. Thermoregulatory, Cardiovascular, and Metabolic Responses to Mild Caloric Restriction in the Brown Norway Rat

    Science.gov (United States)

    Caloric restriction (CR) has been demonstrated to prolong the life span of a variety of species. CR-induced reduction in core temperature (Tc) is considered a key mechanism responsible for prolonging life span in rodents; however, little is known on the regulation of CR-induced h...

  1. Carbaryl neurotoxicity across the life-span of the Brown-Norway rat

    Science.gov (United States)

    Demographics show that the proportion of older adults is increasing every year. While there has been considerable attention paid to potential sensitivity of the young to environmental chemicals, there is much less known about the relative vulnerability of the aged. Differences in...

  2. TOXICITY PATHWAY ANALYSIS IN AGING BROWN NORWAY RAT BRAIN FOLLOWING ACUTE TOLUENE EXPOSURE

    Science.gov (United States)

    The influence of aging on susceptibility to environmental stressors is poorly understood. To investigate the contribution of different life stages on response to toxicants, we examined the effects of acute exposure by oral gavage of the volatile organic solvent toluene (0.00, 0.3...

  3. EFFECTS OF TOLUENE ON BRAIN OXIDATIVE STRESS PARAMETERS IN AGING BROWN NORWAY RATS

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aging-related susceptibility to environmental chemicals is poorly understood. Oxidative stress (OS) appears to play an important role in susceptibility and disease in old age. The objectives of this study, therefore, were to test whether OS is a potential toxicity pathway for tol...

  4. Does obesity increase susceptibility to ozone? Respiratory, behavioral, and metabolic assessments in Brown Norway rats

    Science.gov (United States)

    There may be a link between obesity and susceptibility to the respiratory, cardiovascular, and other health effects of air pollutants. Furthermore, it has been proposed that some air pollutants are obesogenic and may contribute to obesity. In view of the epidemic growth of obesit...

  5. Respiratory allergy and pulmonary irritation to trimellitic anhydride in Brown Norway rats

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Arts, J.H.E.; Bloksma, N.; Leusink-Muis, T.; Kuper, C.F.

    2003-01-01

    Occupational exposure to low-molecular-weight (LMW) allergens such as acid anhydrides can result in occupational asthma, an allergic disease characterized by episodic airway obstruction, airways inflammation, and non specific airways hyperresponsiveness. Since LMW irritants can provoke rather

  6. Effects of Maillard browned egg albumin on drug-metabolizing enzyme systems in the rat.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pintauro, S J; Lucchina, L A

    1987-05-01

    Adult male Sprague-Dawley rats were fed a purified diet containing 5% Maillard browned egg albumin (EA-B) or browned hydrolysed egg albumin (HEA-B) for 10 wk. Control animals were pair-fed a corresponding isocaloric, isonitrogenous non-browned egg albumin (EA-C) or hydrolysed egg albumin (HEA-C) diet. At the end of 10 wk, the rats were killed and hepatic, small intestinal and colonic microsomes and cytosol fractions were prepared by ultracentrifugation. Animals fed EA-B exhibited significantly (P less than 0.05) increased hepatic benzo[alpha]pyrene hydroxylase activity and significantly (P less than 0.05) decreased colonic aminopyrine N-demethylase activity compared to control (EA-C) animals. HEA-B-fed animals also exhibited a significant (P less than 0.05) decrease in colonic aminopyrine N-demethylase activity compared with HEA-C controls, but no significant differences were detected in hepatic or small intestinal enzyme activities in this group. These data suggest that Maillard browned protein products may modify hepatic and/or colonic drug-metabolizing enzyme system activities, and may thus contribute to alterations in the metabolism of endogenous substrates and of exogenous drugs, precarcinogens and other xenobiotics.

  7. Leanness of Lou/C rats does not require higher thermogenic capacity of brown adipose tissue.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Belouze, Maud; Sibille, Brigitte; Rey, Benjamin; Roussel, Damien; Romestaing, Caroline; Teulier, Loïc; Baetz, Delphine; Koubi, Harry; Servais, Stéphane; Duchamp, Claude

    2011-10-24

    Lou/C rats, an inbred strain of Wistar origin, remain lean throughout life and therefore represent a remarkable model of obesity resistance. To date, the exact mechanisms responsible for the leanness of Lou/C rats remain unknown. The aim of the present study was to investigate whether the leanness of Lou/C rats relies on increased thermogenic capacities in brown adipose tissue (BAT). Results showed that although daily energy expenditure was higher in Lou/C than in Wistar rats, BAT thermogenic capacity was not enhanced in Lou/C rats kept at thermoneutrality as demonstrated by reduced thermogenic response to norepinephrine in vivo, similar oxidative activity of BAT isolated mitochondria in vitro, similar levels of UCP1 mRNA and lower abundance of UCP1 protein in interscapular BAT depots. Relative abundance of β3-adrenergic receptor mRNA was lower in Lou/C BAT while that of GLUT4, FABP or CPT1 was not altered. Activity-related energy expenditure was however considerably increased at thermoneutrality as Lou/C rats demonstrated an impressively high spontaneous running activity in voluntary running wheels. Prolonged cold-exposure (4 °C) depressed the spontaneous running activity of Lou/C rats while BAT thermogenic capacity was increased as reflected by rises in BAT mass, oxidative activity and UCP1 expression. It is concluded that the leanness of Lou/C rats cannot be ascribed to higher thermogenic capacity of brown fat but rather to, at least in part, increased locomotor activity. BAT is not deficient in this rat strain as it can be stimulated by cold exposure when locomotor activity is reduced suggesting some substitution between these thermogenic processes. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  8. Expression profiling of the VKORC1 and Calumenin gene in a Danish strain of bromadiolone-resistant Norway rats

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Markussen, Mette Drude; Heiberg, Ann-Charlotte; Fredholm, Merete

    2008-01-01

    Anticoagulant resistance in Norway rats (Rattus norvegicus) has been associated with two genes, VKORC1 and Calumenin, which encodes proteins essential to the vitamin K-dependent gamma-carboxylation system. Mutations in the VKORC1 gene are considered the genetic basis for anticoagulant resistance...... lowered VKOR activity and the elevated requirement for vitamin K previously described for Danish resistant rats whereas the low Calumenin expression could be an adaptation to secure a high efficacy of the vitamin K-dependent gamma-carboxylation system during anticoagulant exposure. Our findings...

  9. Carriage of Clostridium difficile by wild urban Norway rats (Rattus norvegicus) and black rats (Rattus rattus).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Himsworth, Chelsea G; Patrick, David M; Mak, Sunny; Jardine, Claire M; Tang, Patrick; Weese, J Scott

    2014-02-01

    Clostridium difficile is an important cause of enteric infections in humans. Recently, concerns have been raised regarding whether animals could be a source of C. difficile spores. Although colonization has been identified in a number of domestic species, the ability of commensal pests to serve as a reservoir for C. difficile has not been well investigated. The objective of this study was to determine whether urban rats (Rattus spp.) from Vancouver, Canada, carry C. difficile. Clostridium difficile was isolated from the colon contents of trapped rats and was characterized using ribotyping, toxinotyping, and toxin gene identification. Generalized linear mixed models and spatial analysis were used to characterize the ecology of C. difficile in rats. Clostridium difficile was isolated from 95 of 724 (13.1%) rats, although prevalence differed from 0% to 46.7% among city blocks. The odds of being C. difficile positive decreased with increasing weight (odds ratio [OR], 0.67; 95% confidence interval [CI], 0.53 to 0.87), suggesting that carriage is more common in younger animals. The strains isolated included 9 ribotypes that matched recognized international designations, 5 identified by our laboratory in previous studies, and 21 "novel" ribotypes. Some strains were clustered geographically; however, the majority were dispersed throughout the study area, supporting environmental sources of exposure and widespread environmental contamination with a variety of C. difficile strains. Given that urban rats are the source of a number of other pathogens responsible for human morbidity and mortality, the potential for rats to be a source of C. difficile for humans deserves further consideration.

  10. Highly Pathogenic Leptospira Found in Urban Brown Rats (Rattus norvegicus) in the Largest Cities of Sweden.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Strand, Tanja M; Löhmus, Mare; Persson Vinnersten, Thomas; Råsbäck, Therese; Sundström, Karin; Bergström, Tomas; Lundkvist, Åke

    2015-12-01

    Leptospirosis is an emerging zoonosis of global concern; however, its contemporary occurrence in Sweden, a European country partly located north of the Arctic Circle, is poorly known. Four out of 30 brown rats, captured within urban districts in Sweden, were found to be positive for antibodies to Leptospira interrogans serovar Icterohaemorrhagiae. This serovar causes Weil's disease in humans, a severe infection with jaundice, renal failure, and hemorrhage. Our study is the first finding of this highly pathogenic serovar in Swedish rats since the 1930s.

  11. Detection of hemotropic mycoplasmas in free-living brown sewer rats (Rattus norvegicus).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sashida, Hinako; Sasaoka, Fumina; Suzuki, Jin; Watanabe, Yusaku; Fujihara, Masatoshi; Nagai, Kazuya; Kobayashi, Saori; Furuhama, Kazuhisa; Harasawa, Ryô

    2013-07-31

    The prevalence of hemotropic mycoplasmas in wild rodents is largely unknown. Here, we report the presence of hemoplasmas in blood samples collected from brown sewer rats (Rattus norvegicus) trapped during rodent control around an animal hospital in Morioka, Japan. We examined nine rats using real-time PCR and end-point PCR, and found one rat (11.1%) that was positive for a hemoplasma infection. The 16S rRNA gene and 16S to 23S rRNA intergenic spacer region of the hemoplasma detected in a wild-caught rat were amplified using PCR. The nucleotide sequences of the PCR products were further determined and compared to those of other hemoplasmas. Our examinations revealed the presence of a hemoplasma that has not previously been described in rodents. The pathogenic traits of this hemoplasma remain unexplored.

  12. Ultrasonic vocalizations of female Norway rats (Rattus norvegicus) in response to social partners.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Börner, Annegret; Hjemdahl, Rebecca; Götz, Thomas; Brown, Gillian R

    2016-02-01

    In many species of animals, male vocalizations function to attract mating partners and coordinate sexual interactions. Whereas male vocalizations have been well studied in several species, the function of female vocalizations in mating contexts is not fully understood. In Norway rats (Rattus norvegicus), both males and females produce ultrasonic vocalizations (USVs) during sexual encounters with opposite sex partners. The aim of this study was to test the hypothesis that female vocalizations play a role in sociosexual interactions by examining how rates of 50 kHz USV production vary in relation to the sex and gonadal status of the partner, and by examining whether the proportion of frequency modulated (FM) and constant frequency calls differs between these categories of social partner. The results showed that females produced a higher total number of 50 kHz USVs to intact males than castrated males, and produced similar numbers of calls to both categories of females. Females also produced a higher proportion of FM calls to male partners than to female partners, and spent more time in the vicinity of male than female partners, regardless of the partners' gonadal status. Female USVs therefore potentially provide a measure of sexual motivation and may function to promote female mate choice in this species with multimale mating and a high risk of infanticide. (c) 2016 APA, all rights reserved).

  13. Multiple Paternity in the Norway Rat, Rattus norvegicus, from Urban Slums in Salvador, Brazil.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Costa, Federico; Richardson, Jonathan L; Dion, Kirstin; Mariani, Carol; Pertile, Arsinoe C; Burak, Mary K; Childs, James E; Ko, Albert I; Caccone, Adalgisa

    2016-03-01

    The Norway rat, Rattus norvegicus, is one of the most important pest species globally and the main reservoir of leptospires causing human leptospirosis in the urban slums of tropical regions. Rodent control is a frequent strategy in those settings to prevent the disease but rapid growth from residual populations and immigration limit the long-term effectiveness of interventions. To characterize the breeding ecology of R. norvegicus and provide needed information for the level of genetic mixing, which can help identify inter-connected eradication units, we estimated the occurrence of multiple paternity, distances between mothers and sires, and inbreeding in rats from urban slum habitat in Salvador, Brazil. We genotyped 9 pregnant females, their 66 offspring, and 371 males at 16 microsatellite loci. Multiple paternity was observed in 22% (2/9) of the study litters. Of the 12 sires that contributed to the 9 litters, we identified 5 (42%) of those sires among our genotyped males. Related males were captured in close proximity to pregnant females (the mean inter-parent trapping distance per litter was 70 m, ±58 m SD). Levels of relatedness between mother-sire pairs were higher than expected and significantly higher than relatedness between all females and non-sire males. Our findings indicate multiple paternity is common, inbreeding is apparent, and that mother-sire dyads occur in close proximity within the study area. This information is relevant to improve the spatial definition of the eradication units that may enhance the effectiveness of rodent management programs aimed at preventing human leptospirosis. High levels of inbreeding may also be a sign that eradication efforts are successful. © The American Genetic Association 2016. All rights reserved. For permissions, please e-mail: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  14. Germinated brown rice ameliorates obesity in high-fat diet induced obese rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lim, See Meng; Goh, Yong Meng; Mohtarrudin, Norhafizah; Loh, Su Peng

    2016-05-23

    Germinated brown rice (GBR) is a novel functional food that is high in fiber and bioactive compounds with health-promoting properties. This study aims to evaluate anti-obesity effects of GBR in obese rats fed high-fat diet (HFD). Male Sprague-Dawley rats were fed HFD for 8 weeks to induce obesity. The rats were then administrated with GBR where the source of dietary carbohydrate of HFD was replaced by either 25 % GBR, 50 % GBR or 100 % GBR for another 8 weeks. Changes in anthropometry, dietary status, biochemical parameters and histopathology of liver and adipose tissue were measured. Rats fed with HFD were showed elevation in body weight gain and in white adipose tissue mass compared with rats consumed commercial diet. The GBR administration in 50 % GBR and 100 % GBR were significantly decreased body weight gains and food intakes as well as improved lipid profiles in obese rats. In addition, the administration of GBR  had reduced adiposity by showing declination in white adipose tissue mass, adipocytes size and leptin level concomitantly with a higher ratio of fat excretion into feces. Micro- and macrovesicular steatosis were evidently attenuated in obese rats fed GBR. These findings demonstrated that GBR exhibited anti-obesity effects through suppression of body weight gain and food intake, improvement of lipid profiles and reduction of leptin level and white adipose tissue mass in obese rats fed HFD.

  15. Differential expression of melanopsin mRNA and protein in the Brown Norwegian rats

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hannibal, Jens; Georg, Birgitte; Fahrenkrug, Jan

    2012-01-01

    Melanopsin is expressed in a subpopulation of retinal ganglion cells rendering these cells intrinsically photosensitive (ipRGCs). The ipRGCs are the primary RGCs mediating light entrainment of the circadian clock and control of the pupillary light reflex, light regulated melatonin secretion...... and negative masking behaviour. Previous studies have demonstrated that melanopsin expression in albino rats is regulated by light and darkness. The present study was undertaken to study the influence of light and darkness during the circadian day and after extended periods of constant light and darkness...... on melanopsin expression in the pigmented retina of the Brown Norwegian rat (Rattus norvegicus). The diurnal and circadian expressions were examined in retinal extracts from rats euthanized every 4 h during a 24 h light/dark (LD) and a 24 h dark cycle (DD) using quantitative real-time PCR and Western blotting...

  16. Commensal ecology, urban landscapes, and their influence on the genetic characteristics of city-dwelling Norway rats (Rattus norvegicus).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gardner-Santana, L C; Norris, D E; Fornadel, C M; Hinson, E R; Klein, S L; Glass, G E

    2009-07-01

    Movement of individuals promotes colonization of new areas, gene flow among local populations, and has implications for the spread of infectious agents and the control of pest species. Wild Norway rats (Rattus norvegicus) are common in highly urbanized areas but surprisingly little is known of their population structure. We sampled individuals from 11 locations within Baltimore, Maryland, to characterize the genetic structure and extent of gene flow between areas within the city. Clustering methods and a neighbour-joining tree based on pairwise genetic distances supported an east-west division in the inner city, and a third cluster comprised of historically more recent sites. Most individuals (approximately 95%) were assigned to their area of capture, indicating strong site fidelity. Moreover, the axial dispersal distance of rats (62 m) fell within typical alley length. Several rats were assigned to areas 2-11.5 km away, indicating some, albeit infrequent, long-distance movement within the city. Although individual movement appears to be limited (30-150 m), locations up to 1.7 km are comprised of relatives. Moderate F(ST), differentiation between identified clusters, and high allelic diversity indicate that regular gene flow, either via recruitment or migration, has prevented isolation. Therefore, ecology of commensal rodents in urban areas and life-history characteristics of Norway rats likely counteract many expected effects of isolation or founder events. An understanding of levels of connectivity of rat populations inhabiting urban areas provides information about the spatial scale at which populations of rats may spread disease, invade new areas, or be eradicated from an existing area without reinvasion.

  17. Seoul virus in the Brown Rat ( Rattus norvegicus ) from Ürümqi, Xinjiang, Northwest of China.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guo, Gang; Sheng, Jinliang; Wu, Xiran; Wang, Yuanzhi; Guo, Liping; Zhang, Xun; Yao, Hua

    2016-07-01

    Hantavirus infections among human populations are linked to the geographic distribution of the host rodents that carry the viruses. To determine the presence and distribution of hantaviruses in the northern region of Xinjiang Uygur Autonomous Region (XUAR), northwestern China, 844 rodents were captured from five locations in four dissimilar habitats during 2010-14 and examined for Hantavirus infection. Hantavirus nucleic acids were firstly detected in the brown rat ( Rattus norvegicus ) from Ürümqi, China, indicating that the Hantavirus was transmitted into Ürümqi in XUAR and circulated by the brown rat. Our results suggest that the brown rat may act as a natural reservoir for the virus in XUAR.

  18. Weight loss and brown adipose tissue reduction in rat model of sleep apnea

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    de Oliveira Patricia G

    2008-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background - Obesity is related to obstructive sleep apnea-hypopnea syndrome (OSAHS, but its roles in OSAHS as cause or consequence are not fully clarified. Isocapnic intermittent hypoxia (IIH is a model of OSAHS. We verified the effect of IIH on body weight and brown adipose tissue (BAT of Wistar rats. Methods Nine-month-old male breeders Wistar rats of two groups were studied: 8 rats submitted to IIH and 5 control rats submitted to sham IIH. The rats were weighed at the baseline and at the end of three weeks, after being placed in the IIH apparatus seven days per week, eight hours a day, in the lights on period, simulating an apnea index of 30/hour. After experimental period, the animals were weighed and measured as well as the BAT, abdominal, perirenal, and epididymal fat, the heart, and the gastrocnemius muscle. Results Body weight of the hypoxia group decreased 17 ± 7 grams, significantly different from the variation observed in the control group (p = 0,001. The BAT was 15% lighter in the hypoxia group and reached marginally the alpha error probability (p = 0.054. Conclusion Our preliminary results justify a larger study for a longer time in order to confirm the effect of isocapnic intermittent hypoxia on body weight and BAT.

  19. Species Abundance Distribution of Ectoparasites on Norway Rats (Rattus norvegicus) from a Localized Area in Southwest China.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guo, Xian Guo; Dong, Wen Ge; Men, Xing Yuan; Qian, Ti Jun; Wu, Dian; Ren, Tian Guang; Qin, Feng; Song, Wen Yu; Yang, Zhi Hua; Fletcher, Quinn E

    2016-06-01

    The species of ectoparasites that live on a specific host in a geographical region form an ectoparasite community. Species abundance distributions describe the number of individuals observed for each different species that is encountered within a community. Based on properties of the species abundance distribution, the expected total number of species present in the community can be estimated. Preston's lognormal distribution model was used to fit the expected species abundance distribution curve. Using the expected species abundance distribution curve, we estimated the total number of expected parasite species present and the amount of species that were likely missed by our sampling in the field. In total, 8040 ectoparasites (fleas, sucking lice, gamasid mites and chigger mites) were collected from 431 Norway rats (Rattus norvegicus) from a localized area in southwest China. These ectoparasites were identified to be 47 species from 26 genera in 10 families. The majority of ectoparasite species were chigger mites (family Trombiculidae) while the majority of individuals were sucking lice in the family Polyplacidae. The expected species abundance distribution curve demonstrated the classic pattern that the majority of ectoparasite species were rare and that there were a few common species. The total expected number of ectoparasite species on R. norvegicus was estimated to be 85 species, and 38 species were likely missed by our sampling in the field. Norway rats harbor a large suite of ectoparasites. Future field investigations should sample large numbers of host individuals to assess ectoparasite populations.

  20. 3,5-Diiodo-L-thyronine activates brown adipose tissue thermogenesis in hypothyroid rats.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Assunta Lombardi

    Full Text Available 3,5-Diiodo-l-thyronine (T2, a thyroid hormone derivative, is capable of increasing energy expenditure, as well as preventing high fat diet-induced overweight and related metabolic dysfunction. Most studies to date on T2 have been carried out on liver and skeletal muscle. Considering the role of brown adipose tissue (BAT in energy and metabolic homeostasis, we explored whether T2 could activate BAT thermogenesis. Using euthyroid, hypothyroid, and T2-treated hypothyroid rats (all maintained at thermoneutrality in morphological and functional studies, we found that hypothyroidism suppresses the maximal oxidative capacity of BAT and thermogenesis, as revealed by reduced mitochondrial content and respiration, enlarged cells and lipid droplets, and increased number of unilocular cells within the tissue. In vivo administration of T2 to hypothyroid rats activated BAT thermogenesis and increased the sympathetic innervation and vascularization of tissue. Likewise, T2 increased BAT oxidative capacity in vitro when added to BAT homogenates from hypothyroid rats. In vivo administration of T2 to hypothyroid rats enhanced mitochondrial respiration. Moreover, UCP1 seems to be a molecular determinant underlying the effect of T2 on mitochondrial thermogenesis. In fact, inhibition of mitochondrial respiration by GDP and its reactivation by fatty acids were greater in mitochondria from T2-treated hypothyroid rats than untreated hypothyroid rats. In vivo administration of T2 led to an increase in PGC-1α protein levels in nuclei (transient and mitochondria (longer lasting, suggesting a coordinate effect of T2 in these organelles that ultimately promotes net activation of mitochondrial biogenesis and BAT thermogenesis. The effect of T2 on PGC-1α is similar to that elicited by triiodothyronine. As a whole, the data reported here indicate T2 is a thyroid hormone derivative able to activate BAT thermogenesis.

  1. 3,5-Diiodo-L-Thyronine Activates Brown Adipose Tissue Thermogenesis in Hypothyroid Rats

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lombardi, Assunta; Senese, Rosalba; De Matteis, Rita; Busiello, Rosa Anna; Cioffi, Federica; Goglia, Fernando; Lanni, Antonia

    2015-01-01

    3,5-diiodo-l-thyronine (T2), a thyroid hormone derivative, is capable of increasing energy expenditure, as well as preventing high fat diet-induced overweight and related metabolic dysfunction. Most studies to date on T2 have been carried out on liver and skeletal muscle. Considering the role of brown adipose tissue (BAT) in energy and metabolic homeostasis, we explored whether T2 could activate BAT thermogenesis. Using euthyroid, hypothyroid, and T2-treated hypothyroid rats (all maintained at thermoneutrality) in morphological and functional studies, we found that hypothyroidism suppresses the maximal oxidative capacity of BAT and thermogenesis, as revealed by reduced mitochondrial content and respiration, enlarged cells and lipid droplets, and increased number of unilocular cells within the tissue. In vivo administration of T2 to hypothyroid rats activated BAT thermogenesis and increased the sympathetic innervation and vascularization of tissue. Likewise, T2 increased BAT oxidative capacity in vitro when added to BAT homogenates from hypothyroid rats. In vivo administration of T2 to hypothyroid rats enhanced mitochondrial respiration. Moreover, UCP1 seems to be a molecular determinant underlying the effect of T2 on mitochondrial thermogenesis. In fact, inhibition of mitochondrial respiration by GDP and its reactivation by fatty acids were greater in mitochondria from T2-treated hypothyroid rats than untreated hypothyroid rats. In vivo administration of T2 led to an increase in PGC-1α protein levels in nuclei (transient) and mitochondria (longer lasting), suggesting a coordinate effect of T2 in these organelles that ultimately promotes net activation of mitochondrial biogenesis and BAT thermogenesis. The effect of T2 on PGC-1α is similar to that elicited by triiodothyronine. As a whole, the data reported here indicate T2 is a thyroid hormone derivative able to activate BAT thermogenesis. PMID:25658324

  2. Ecology of Leptospira interrogans in Norway rats (Rattus norvegicus) in an inner-city neighborhood of Vancouver, Canada.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Himsworth, Chelsea G; Bidulka, Julie; Parsons, Kirbee L; Feng, Alice Y T; Tang, Patrick; Jardine, Claire M; Kerr, Thomas; Mak, Sunny; Robinson, John; Patrick, David M

    2013-01-01

    Leptospira interrogans is a bacterial zoonosis with a worldwide distribution for which rats (Rattus spp.) are the primary reservoir in urban settings. In order to assess, monitor, and mitigate the risk to humans, it is important to understand the ecology of this pathogen in rats. The objective of this study was to characterize the ecology of L. interrogans in Norway rats (Rattus norvegicus) in an impoverished inner-city neighborhood of Vancouver, Canada. Trapping was performed in 43 city blocks, and one location within the adjacent port, over a 12 month period. Kidney samples were tested for the presence of L. interrogans using PCR and sequencing. A multivariable model was built to predict L. interrogans infection status in individual rats using season and morphometric data (e.g., weight, sex, maturity, condition, etc.) as independent variables. Spatial analysis was undertaken to identify clusters of high and low L. interrogans prevalence. The prevalence of L. interrogans varied remarkably among blocks (0-66.7%), and spatial clusters of both high and low L. interrogans prevalence were identified. In the final cluster-controlled model, characteristics associated with L. interrogans-infection in rats included weight (OR = 1.14, 95% CI = 1.07-1.20), increased internal fat (OR = 2.12, 95% CI = 1.06-4.25), and number of bite wounds (OR = 1.20, 95% CI = 0.96-1.49). Because L. interrogans prevalence varied with weight, body fat, and bite wounds, this study suggests that social structure and interactions among rats may influence transmission. The prevalence and distribution of L. interrogans in rats was also highly variable even over a short geographic distance. These factors should be considered in future risk management efforts.

  3. Patterns in Leptospira Shedding in Norway Rats (Rattus norvegicus from Brazilian Slum Communities at High Risk of Disease Transmission.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Federico Costa

    Full Text Available We address some critical but unknown parameters of individuals and populations of Norway rats (Rattus norvegicus that influence leptospiral infection, maintenance and spirochetal loads shed in urine, which contaminates the environment ultimately leading to human infection.Our study, conducted in Salvador, Brazil, established the average load of leptospires in positive kidneys to be 5.9 x 10(6 per mL (range 3.1-8.2 x10(6 genome equivalents (GEq, similar to the 6.1 x 10(6 per ml (range 2.2-9.4 x10(6 average obtained from paired urines, with a significant positive correlation (R2=0.78 between the two. Based on bivariate and multivariate modeling, we found with both kidney and urine samples that leptospiral loads increased with the age of rats (based on the index of body length to mass, MAT titer and the presence of wounding/scars, and varied with site of capture. Some associations were modified by sex but trends were apparent. Combining with data on the demographic properties and prevalence of leptospiral carriage in rat populations in Salvador, we estimated that daily leptospiral loads shed in the urine of a population of 82 individuals exceeded 9.1 x 10(10 leptospires.These factors directly influence the risk of leptospiral acquisition among humans and provide essential epidemiological information linking properties of rat populations with risk of human infection.

  4. Patterns in Leptospira Shedding in Norway Rats (Rattus norvegicus) from Brazilian Slum Communities at High Risk of Disease Transmission.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Costa, Federico; Wunder, Elsio A; De Oliveira, Daiana; Bisht, Vimla; Rodrigues, Gorete; Reis, Mitermayer G; Ko, Albert I; Begon, Mike; Childs, James E

    2015-01-01

    We address some critical but unknown parameters of individuals and populations of Norway rats (Rattus norvegicus) that influence leptospiral infection, maintenance and spirochetal loads shed in urine, which contaminates the environment ultimately leading to human infection. Our study, conducted in Salvador, Brazil, established the average load of leptospires in positive kidneys to be 5.9 x 10(6) per mL (range 3.1-8.2 x10(6)) genome equivalents (GEq), similar to the 6.1 x 10(6) per ml (range 2.2-9.4 x10(6)) average obtained from paired urines, with a significant positive correlation (R2=0.78) between the two. Based on bivariate and multivariate modeling, we found with both kidney and urine samples that leptospiral loads increased with the age of rats (based on the index of body length to mass), MAT titer and the presence of wounding/scars, and varied with site of capture. Some associations were modified by sex but trends were apparent. Combining with data on the demographic properties and prevalence of leptospiral carriage in rat populations in Salvador, we estimated that daily leptospiral loads shed in the urine of a population of 82 individuals exceeded 9.1 x 10(10) leptospires. These factors directly influence the risk of leptospiral acquisition among humans and provide essential epidemiological information linking properties of rat populations with risk of human infection.

  5. The potential of coumatetralyl enhanced by cholecalciferol in the control of anticoagulant-resistant Norway rats (Rattus norvegicus).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Endepols, Stefan; Klemann, Nicole; Richter, Dania; Matuschka, Franz-Rainer

    2017-02-01

    We evaluated the potential of cholecalciferol as an enhancer of the first-generation anticoagulant coumatetralyl in the Westphalia anticoagulant-resistant strain of the Norway rat (Rattus norvegicus Berkenhout), characterised by the Tyr139Cys polymorphism on the VKOR enzyme. Because today only the most potent, but also most persistent anticoagulant rodenticides of the second generation remain available to control this strain, new rodenticide solutions are required. Feeding trials in the laboratory confirmed a significant level of efficacy, which was corroborated by field trials in the Münsterland resistance area. After frequency and level of resistance were assessed by blood clotting response tests, field trials were conducted with bait containing coumatetralyl at 375 mg kg(-1) and cholecalciferol at 50 mg kg(-1) or 100 mg kg(-1) . Control success was 94% when a large rat infestation comprising 42% resistant animals was treated. Another field trial applying the combination to a rat population that had survived a preceding treatment with bromadiolone resulted in a 99.5% control success according to the first census day, but with some increase in rat activity during subsequent census days. The combination of coumatetralyl and cholecalciferol is a promising alternative approach to the most potent second-generation anticoagulants in resistance management, particularly in respect of environmental risks, such as secondary poisoning. © 2016 Society of Chemical Industry. © 2016 Society of Chemical Industry.

  6. Anticoagulant resistance in the United Kingdom and a new guideline for the management of resistant infestations of Norway rats (Rattus norvegicus Berk.).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Buckle, Alan

    2013-03-01

    Anticoagulant resistance was first discovered in UK Norway rats (Rattus norvegicus Berk.) in 1958 and has been present ever since. The possible detrimental impact of resistance on effective rodent control was quickly recognised, and, for almost three decades, extensive research was conducted on the geographical distribution and severity of anticoagulant resistance in UK rats. Various schemes for the eradication of resistant rats were also implemented. At first, surveys showed resistance only to the first-generation anticoagulants, such as warfarin, chlorophacinone and coumatetralyl, but, later, resistance to the more potent second-generation anticoagulants, such as difenacoum and bromadiolone, was also discovered. Unlike some European countries, where only one or two resistance mutations occur, virtually all known rat resistance mutations occur in the United Kingdom, and five (Leu128Gln, Tyr139Ser, Tyr139Cys, Tyr139Phe and Leu120Gln) are known to have significant impacts on anticoagulant efficacy. Little is currently known of the geographical extent of anticoagulant resistance among Norway rats in the United Kingdom because no comprehensive survey has been conducted recently. At an operational level, anticoagulants generally retain their utility for Norway rat control, but it is impossible to control resistant rats in some areas because of restrictions on the use of the more potent resistance-breaking compounds. This paper reviews the development of resistance in Norway rats in the United Kingdom, outlines the present situation for resistance management and introduces a new resistance management guideline from the UK Rodenticide Resistance Action Group. Copyright © 2012 Society of Chemical Industry.

  7. Infections by Leptospira interrogans, Seoul virus, and Bartonella spp. among Norway rats (Rattus norvegicus) from the urban slum environment in Brazil.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Costa, Federico; Porter, Fleur Helena; Rodrigues, Gorete; Farias, Helena; de Faria, Marcus Tucunduva; Wunder, Elsio A; Osikowicz, Lynn M; Kosoy, Michael Y; Reis, Mitermayer Galvão; Ko, Albert I; Childs, James E

    2014-01-01

    Norway rats (Rattus norvegicus) are reservoir hosts for zoonotic pathogens that cause significant morbidity and mortality in humans. Studies evaluating the prevalence of zoonotic pathogens in tropical Norway rat populations are rare, and data on co-infection with multiple pathogens are nonexistent. Herein, we describe the prevalence of leptospiral carriage, Seoul virus (SEOV), and Bartonella spp. infection independently, in addition to the rates of co-infection among urban, slum-dwelling Norway rats in Salvador, Brazil, trapped during the rainy season from June to August of 2010. These data were complemented with previously unpublished Leptospira and SEOV prevalence information collected in 1998. Immunofluorescence staining of kidney impressions was used to identify Leptospira interrogans in 2010, whereas isolation was used in 1998, and western blotting was used to detect SEOV antibodies in 2010, whereas enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) was used in 1998: in 2010, Bartonella spp. were isolated from a subsample of rats. The most common pathogen in both years was Leptospira spp. (83%, n=142 in 1998, 63%, n=84 in 2010). SEOV was detected in 18% of individuals in both 1998 and 2010 (n=78 in 1998; n=73 in 2010), and two species of Bartonella were isolated from 5 of 26 rats (19%) tested in 2010. The prevalence of all agents increased significantly with rat mass/age. Acquisition of Leptospira spp. occurred at a younger mass/age than SEOV and Bartonella spp. infection, suggesting differences in the transmission dynamics of these pathogens. These data indicate that Norway rats in Salvador serve as reservoir hosts for all three of these zoonotic pathogens and that the high prevalence of leptospiral carriage in Salvador rats poses a high degree of risk to human health.

  8. Mutant Wars2 gene in spontaneously hypertensive rats impairs brown adipose tissue function and predisposes to visceral obesity

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Pravenec, Michal; Zídek, Václav; Landa, Vladimír; Mlejnek, Petr; Šilhavý, Jan; Šimáková, Miroslava; Trnovská, J.; Škop, V.; Marková, I.; Malínská, H.; Hüttl, M.; Kazdová, L.; Bardová, Kristina; Tauchmannová, Kateřina; Vrbacký, Marek; Nůsková, Hana; Mráček, Tomáš; Kopecký, Jan; Houštěk, Josef

    2017-01-01

    Roč. 66, č. 6 (2017), s. 917-924 ISSN 0862-8408 R&D Projects: GA ČR(CZ) GA13-04420S Institutional support: RVO:67985823 Keywords : brown adipose tissue * spontaneously hypertensive rat * quantitative trait loci * transgenic * Wars2 gene * mitochondrial proteosynthesis Subject RIV: EB - Genetics ; Molecular Biology Impact factor: 1.461, year: 2016

  9. Further experimental analysis of the social learning and transmission of foraging information amongst Norway rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Laland, K N; Plotkin, H C

    1992-01-01

    Adult male Norway rats were tested to see if their foraging efficiency could be improved by social learning and to investigate whether foraging information could be socially transmitted along a chain of animals. In Experiment 1, 'observers' were placed in one of four conditions, distinguished by the nature of their experience during an observation phase, in which they either observed: (1) a trained conspecific unearthing buried carrot; (2) a trained conspecific digging; (3) carrot pieces only; or (4) an empty enclosure (the control group). When tested 24 h later it was found that subjects in group 1 alone exhibited a significantly elevated foraging ability relative to the control group, being more active, and unearthing more carrot pieces in total. The results show that perception of a trained demonstrator conspecific successfully foraging for food is necessary for social learning of foraging information to occur, probably by a local enhancement mechanism. In Experiment 2, chains of transmission were established by allowing each observer to act 24 h later as the demonstrator for the next observer. In one of two transmission groups subjects were given an extra period of individual foraging experience in the test enclosure, with no demonstrator present. Enhanced levels of foraging efficiency were maintained across eight transmission episodes for both transmission groups relative to a no-transmission control. Subjects in the group with the additional experience unearthed significantly more buried food than subjects in the other transmission group. The experiments extend our standard transmission group was upheld. The superior performance of demonstrators in this group, as reflected in their higher level of carrot digging, suggests that the extra period of experience did indeed enhance their ability to act as effective demonstrators. The elevated performance of subjects in this group is attributed to a combination of social and individual learning. This finding

  10. Dietary calcium supplementation in adult rats reverts brown adipose tissue dysfunction programmed by postnatal early overfeeding.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Conceição, Ellen Paula Santos; Moura, Egberto Gaspar; Oliveira, Elaine; Guarda, Deysla Sabino; Figueiredo, Mariana Sarto; Quitete, Fernanda Torres; Calvino, Camila; Miranda, Rosiane Aparecida; Mathias, Paulo Cezar Freitas; Manhães, Alex Christian; Lisboa, Patricia Cristina

    2017-01-01

    Brown adipose tissue (BAT) dysfunction is associated with obesity and its comorbidities, such as hypertension, and the improvement of BAT function seems important for obesity management. Here we investigated the effects of dietary calcium supplementation on BAT autonomic nerve activity, sympathoadrenal function and cardiovascular parameters in adult obese rats that were raised in small litters (SL group). Three days after birth, SL litters were adjusted to three pups to induce early overfeeding. The control group remained with 10 pups/litter until weaning (NL group). At PN120, the SL group was randomly divided into the following: rats fed with standard chow (SL) and rats fed with dietary calcium carbonate supplementation (SL-Ca, 10g/kg chow). Animals were killed either at PN120 or PN180. At both ages, SL rats had higher BAT autonomic nervous system activity, mass and adipocyte area, as well as increased heart rate and blood pressure (systolic and diastolic); 2 months of calcium supplementation normalized these parameters. At PN180 only, UCP1 and TRβ1 in BAT were decreased in SL rats. These changes were also prevented by calcium treatment. Also at PN180, the SL group presented higher tyrosine hydroxylase and adrenal catecholamine contents, as well as lower hypothalamic POMC and MC4R contents. Calcium supplementation did not revert these alterations. Thus, we demonstrated that dietary calcium supplementation was able to improve cardiovascular parameters and BAT thermogenesis capacity in adult animals that were early overfed during lactation. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  11. The Edible Brown Seaweed Ecklonia cava Reduces Hypersensitivity in Postoperative and Neuropathic Pain Models in Rats

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jae Goo Kim

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available The current study was designed to investigate whether edible brown seaweed Ecklonia cava extracts exhibits analgesic effects in plantar incision and spared nerve injury (SNI rats. To evaluate pain-related behavior, we performed the mechanical withdrawal threshold (MWT and thermal hypersensitivity tests measured by von Frey filaments and a hot/cold plate analgesia meter. Pain-related behavior was also determined through analysis of ultrasonic vocalization. The results of experiments showed MWT values of the group that was treated with E. cava extracts by 300 mg/kg significantly increased; on the contrary, number of ultrasonic distress vocalization of the treated group was reduced at 6 h and 24 h after plantar incision operation (62.8%, p < 0.05. Moreover, E. cava 300 mg/kg treated group increased the paw withdrawal latency in hot-and cold-plate tests in the plantar incision rats. After 15 days of continuous treatment with E. cava extracts at 300 mg/kg, the treated group showed significantly alleviated SNI-induced hypersensitivity response by MWT compared with the control group. In conclusion, these results suggest that E. cava extracts have potential analgesic effects in the case of postoperative pain and neuropathic pain in rats.

  12. A Study on Brown Seaweed Therapy ( Sargassum sp. toward MDA Levels and Histological Improvement on Rat Foot Suffering Rheumatoid Arthritis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fauziah Fauziah

    2013-07-01

    Full Text Available Rheumatoid arthritis (AR, an autoimun disease, is characterized by the inflammation in the joint area caused an excessive of free radicals. An excessive of free radicals in the body cause oxidative stress, that increasing levels of malondialdehyde (MDA as an indicator of lipid peroxidation and the decreasing levels of anti-oxidants. The treated with extract of brown seaweed (Sargassum sp. intended to find out the MDA levels in serum and the histological of the foot joints rheumatoid arthritis rats. Malondialdehyde levels are determined through a TBA test (Thio Barbituric acid, meanwhile the histological of the rat foot joints was determined by Hematoxylen-Eosin staining (HE. The results showed the brown seaweed extract therapy (Sargassum sp. was significantly (p <0.01 reduce levels of malondialdehyde (MDA in the serum of 21,24% and improving histological foot joints rheumatoid arthritis rats.

  13. Characterization of Bromadiolone Resistance in a Danish Strain of Norway Rats, Rattus norvegicus, by Hepatic Gene Expression Profiling of VKORC1 and Calumenin

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Markussen, Mette Drude; Heiberg, Ann-Charlotte; Fredholm, Merete

    2007-01-01

    Anticoagulant agents, such as warfarin and bromadiolone, are used to control populations of Norway rats (Rattus norvegicus). The anticoagulants compromise the blood-coagulation process by inhibiting the vitamin K2,3 epoxide reductase enzyme complex (VKOR). Mutations in the VKORC1 gene, encoding...... indicate that bromadiolone resistance does not involve an over-expression of calumenin. We observed a low VKORC1 mRNA expression in resistant rats compared to susceptible rats, which may explain pleiotropic effects of resistance, such as a low VKOR activity and an enhanced need for vitamin K, observed...... a VKOR protein, are believed to confer anticoagulant resistance in European strains of rats, whereas hepatic over-expression of calumenin has been suggested responsible for warfarin-resistance in an US rat strain. To characterize the resistance mechanism in a Danish bromadiolone-resistant strain of rats...

  14. Accumulation of chlorinated and brominated persistent toxic substances (PTS) and their relationship to testosterone suppression in Norway rats from Japan

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Takasuga, T.; Senthilkumar, K. [Shimadzu Techno-Research Inc. (Japan); Ishizuka, M.; Fujita, S. [Graduate School of Veterinary Medicine, Hokkaido Univ. (Japan); Tanikawa, R. [Inst. of Tech., Ikari Corp. (Japan)

    2004-09-15

    Contamination of chlorinated/brominated persistent toxic substances (PTS) such as polychlorinated, -dibenzo-p-dioxins (PCDDs), -dibenzofurans (PCDFs), -biphenyls (PCBs), - organochlorine pesticides (OCPs) {l_brace}e.g., aldrin, dieldrin, endrin, chlordane compounds [cis/transchlordane, cis/trans-nonachlor, oxychlordane, heptachlor, heptachlor epoxide], hexachlorobenzene (HCB), 2,2-bis(p-chlorophenyl)-1,1,1-trichloroethane (DDTs) and its metabolities [o,p/p,p'-DDD and DDE] and hexachlorocyclohexane (HCHs){r_brace} and -brominated diphenyl ethers (PBDEs) are considered to important class of chemicals due to persistence in nature, bioaccumulation potential and adverse health effects in wildlife and humans. Among South East Asian countries, Japan reported to contaminated with aforesaid chemicals with considerable amounts. There is no document reports contamination of PTS in wild animals, which in-habit near humans. Norway rat (NR) inhabits not only near human environment but also distributed worldwide. Especially, NR feeds on human waste and shelter in and around human environment and thus exposure of toxic contaminants in this animal considered to similar with those in humans. In addition, rats have unique physiology that match with humans (e.g., they have similar pathogens as humans have). Therefore, analysis of toxic contaminants in NR considered as indirect measure in humans. Considering those facts, in this study, we analyzed NR collected from urban area, rural area, waste dumping or land fill site and isolated remote island from Japan. Particularly several chlorinated and brominated organic contaminants such as PCDDs, PCDFs, PCBs, DDTs, HCHs, chlordane compounds, heptachlor, heptachlor epoxide, HCB, aldrin, dieldrin, endrin and PBDEs were analyzed in rat livers by isotope dilution technique using HRGC-HRMS. In addition, laboratory Wistar rats (WR) were used as control.

  15. Calcium-induced alteration of mitochondrial morphology and mitochondrial-endoplasmic reticulum contacts in rat brown adipocytes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    I. Golic

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available Mitochondria are key organelles maintaining cellular bioenergetics and integrity, and their regulation of [Ca2+]i homeostasis has been investigated in many cell types. We investigated the short-term Ca-SANDOZ® treatment on brown adipocyte mitochondria, using imaging and molecular biology techniques. Two-month-old male Wistar rats were divided into two groups: Ca-SANDOZ® drinking or tap water (control drinking for three days. Alizarin Red S staining showed increased Ca2+ level in the brown adipocytes of treated rats, and potassium pyroantimonate staining localized electron-dense regions in the cytoplasm, mitochondria and around lipid droplets. Ca-SANDOZ® decreased mitochondrial number, but increased their size and mitochondrial cristae volume. Transmission electron microscopy revealed numerous enlarged and fusioned-like mitochondria in the Ca-SANDOZ® treated group compared to the control, and megamitochondria in some brown adipocytes. The Ca2+ diet affected mitochondrial fusion as mitofusin 1 (MFN1 and mitofusin 2 (MFN2 were increased, and mitochondrial fission as dynamin related protein 1 (DRP1 was decreased. Confocal microscopy showed a higher colocalization rate between functional mitochondria and endoplasmic reticulum (ER. The level of uncoupling protein-1 (UCP1 was elevated, which was confirmed by immunohistochemistry and Western blot analysis. These results suggest that Ca-SANDOZ® stimulates mitochondrial fusion, increases mitochondrial-ER contacts and the thermogenic capacity of brown adipocytes

  16. Factors affecting carriage and intensity of infection of Calodium hepaticum within Norway rats (Rattus norvegicus) from an urban slum environment in Salvador, Brazil.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Walker, R; Carvalho-Pereira, T; Serrano, S; Pedra, G; Hacker, K; Taylor, J; Minter, A; Pertile, A; Panti-May, A; Carvalho, M; Souza, F N; Nery, N; Rodrigues, G; Bahiense, T; Reis, M G; Ko, A I; Childs, J E; Begon, M; Costa, F

    2017-01-01

    Urban slum environments in the tropics are conducive to the proliferation and the spread of rodent-borne zoonotic pathogens to humans. Calodium hepaticum (Brancroft, 1893) is a zoonotic nematode known to infect a variety of mammalian hosts, including humans. Norway rats (Rattus norvegicus) are considered the most important mammalian host of C. hepaticum and are therefore a potentially useful species to inform estimates of the risk to humans living in urban slum environments. There is a lack of studies systematically evaluating the role of demographic and environmental factors that influence both carriage and intensity of infection of C. hepaticum in rodents from urban slum areas within tropical regions. Carriage and the intensity of infection of C. hepaticum were studied in 402 Norway rats over a 2-year period in an urban slum in Salvador, Brazil. Overall, prevalence in Norway rats was 83% (337/402). Independent risk factors for C. hepaticum carriage in R. norvegicus were age and valley of capture. Of those infected the proportion with gross liver involvement (i.e. >75% of the liver affected, a proxy for a high level intensity of infection), was low (8%, 26/337). Sixty soil samples were collected from ten locations to estimate levels of environmental contamination and provide information on the potential risk to humans of contracting C. hepaticum from the environment. Sixty percent (6/10) of the sites were contaminated with C. hepaticum. High carriage levels of C. hepaticum within Norway rats and sub-standard living conditions within slum areas may increase the risk to humans of exposure to the infective eggs of C. hepaticum. This study supports the need for further studies to assess whether humans are becoming infected within this community and whether C. hepaticum is posing a significant risk to human health.

  17. Carriage of methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus by wild urban Norway rats (Rattus norvegicus).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Himsworth, Chelsea G; Miller, Ruth R; Montoya, Vincent; Hoang, Linda; Romney, Marc G; Al-Rawahi, Ghada N; Kerr, Thomas; Jardine, Claire M; Patrick, David M; Tang, Patrick; Weese, J Scott

    2014-01-01

    Methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) is an important cause of multi-drug-resistant infections in people, particularly indigent populations. MRSA can be transmitted between people and domestic animals, but the potential for transmission between people and commensal pests, particularly rodents, had not been investigated. The objective of this study was to identify the presence and characterize the ecology of MRSA in rats (Rattus spp.) from in an impoverished, inner-city neighborhood. Oropharyngeal swabs were collected from rats trapped in 33 city blocks and one location within the adjacent port. Bacterial culture was performed and MRSA isolates were characterized using a variety of methods, including whole-genome sequencing (WGS). The ecology of MRSA in rats was described using phylogenetic analysis, geospatial analysis, and generalized linear mixed models. MRSA was identified 22 of 637 (3.5%) rats tested, although prevalence varied from 0 - 50% among blocks. Isolates belonged to 4 clusters according to WGS, with the largest cluster (n = 10) containing isolates that were genetically indistinguishable from community-acquired USA300 MRSA strains isolated from people within the study area. MRSA strains demonstrated both geographic clustering and dispersion. The odds of an individual rat carrying MRSA increased with increased body fat (OR = 2.53, 95% CI = 1.33-4.82), and in the winter (OR = 5.29, 95% CI = 1.04-26.85) and spring (OR = 5.50, 95% CI = 1.10-27.58) compared to the fall. The results show that urban rats carried the same MRSA lineages occurring in local human and/or animal populations, supporting recent transmission from external sources. MRSA carriage was influenced by season, most likely as a result of temporal variation in rat behavior and rat-human interactions.

  18. Carriage of methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus by wild urban Norway rats (Rattus norvegicus.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chelsea G Himsworth

    Full Text Available Methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA is an important cause of multi-drug-resistant infections in people, particularly indigent populations. MRSA can be transmitted between people and domestic animals, but the potential for transmission between people and commensal pests, particularly rodents, had not been investigated. The objective of this study was to identify the presence and characterize the ecology of MRSA in rats (Rattus spp. from in an impoverished, inner-city neighborhood. Oropharyngeal swabs were collected from rats trapped in 33 city blocks and one location within the adjacent port. Bacterial culture was performed and MRSA isolates were characterized using a variety of methods, including whole-genome sequencing (WGS. The ecology of MRSA in rats was described using phylogenetic analysis, geospatial analysis, and generalized linear mixed models. MRSA was identified 22 of 637 (3.5% rats tested, although prevalence varied from 0 - 50% among blocks. Isolates belonged to 4 clusters according to WGS, with the largest cluster (n = 10 containing isolates that were genetically indistinguishable from community-acquired USA300 MRSA strains isolated from people within the study area. MRSA strains demonstrated both geographic clustering and dispersion. The odds of an individual rat carrying MRSA increased with increased body fat (OR = 2.53, 95% CI = 1.33-4.82, and in the winter (OR = 5.29, 95% CI = 1.04-26.85 and spring (OR = 5.50, 95% CI = 1.10-27.58 compared to the fall. The results show that urban rats carried the same MRSA lineages occurring in local human and/or animal populations, supporting recent transmission from external sources. MRSA carriage was influenced by season, most likely as a result of temporal variation in rat behavior and rat-human interactions.

  19. The effects of rimonabant on brown adipose tissue in rat: implications for energy expenditure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Verty, Aaron N A; Allen, Andrew M; Oldfield, Brian J

    2009-02-01

    The cannabinoid CB1 receptor antagonist rimonabant (SR 141716) produces a sustained decrease in body weight on a background of a transient reduction in food intake. An increase in energy expenditure has been implicated, possibly mediated via peripheral endocannabinoid system; however, the role of the central endocannabinoid system is unclear. The present study investigates this role. Rimonabant (10 mg/kg IP) was administered for 21 days to rats surgically implanted with biotelemetry devices to measure temperature in the interscapular brown adipose tissue (BAT). BAT temperature as a putative measure of thermogenesis in the BAT, physical activity, body weight, food intake, as well as changes in UCP1 messenger RNA (mRNA) and protein were measured. In addition, role of the CNS in mediating these actions of rimonabant was determined in rats where the BAT was sympathetically denervated. As expected, chronic administration of rimonabant significantly reduced body weight for the entire treatment period despite only a transient decrease in food intake. There was a profound increase in BAT temperature, particularly during the dark phase of each circadian cycle throughout the treatment period. A corresponding increase in uncoupling protein (UCP1) was also observed following chronic rimonabant treatment. The rimonabant-induced elevation in BAT temperature and decrease in body weight were significantly attenuated following denervation, indicating an involvement of the CNS. These findings suggest that the long-term weight loss associated with rimonabant treatment is due at least in part to an elevation in energy expenditure, represented here by elevated temperature recorded in the BAT, which is mediated primarily by the central endocannabinoid system.

  20. Population genetics, community of parasites, and resistance to rodenticides in an urban brown rat (Rattus norvegicus) population.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Desvars-Larrive, Amélie; Pascal, Michel; Gasqui, Patrick; Cosson, Jean-François; Benoît, Etienne; Lattard, Virginie; Crespin, Laurent; Lorvelec, Olivier; Pisanu, Benoît; Teynié, Alexandre; Vayssier-Taussat, Muriel; Bonnet, Sarah; Marianneau, Philippe; Lacôte, Sandra; Bourhy, Pascale; Berny, Philippe; Pavio, Nicole; Le Poder, Sophie; Gilot-Fromont, Emmanuelle; Jourdain, Elsa; Hammed, Abdessalem; Fourel, Isabelle; Chikh, Farid; Vourc'h, Gwenaël

    2017-01-01

    Brown rats are one of the most widespread urban species worldwide. Despite the nuisances they induce and their potential role as a zoonotic reservoir, knowledge on urban rat populations remains scarce. The main purpose of this study was to characterize an urban brown rat population from Chanteraines park (Hauts-de-Seine, France), with regards to haematology, population genetics, immunogenic diversity, resistance to anticoagulant rodenticides, and community of parasites. Haematological parameters were measured. Population genetics was investigated using 13 unlinked microsatellite loci. Immunogenic diversity was assessed for Mhc-Drb. Frequency of the Y139F mutation (conferring resistance to rodenticides) and two linked microsatellites were studied, concurrently with the presence of anticoagulant residues in the liver. Combination of microscopy and molecular methods were used to investigate the occurrence of 25 parasites. Statistical approaches were used to explore multiple parasite relationships and model parasite occurrence. Eighty-six rats were caught. The first haematological data for a wild urban R. norvegicus population was reported. Genetic results suggested high genetic diversity and connectivity between Chanteraines rats and surrounding population(s). We found a high prevalence (55.8%) of the mutation Y139F and presence of rodenticide residues in 47.7% of the sampled individuals. The parasite species richness was high (16). Seven potential zoonotic pathogens were identified, together with a surprisingly high diversity of Leptospira species (4). Chanteraines rat population is not closed, allowing gene flow and making eradication programs challenging, particularly because rodenticide resistance is highly prevalent. Parasitological results showed that co-infection is more a rule than an exception. Furthermore, the presence of several potential zoonotic pathogens, of which four Leptospira species, in this urban rat population raised its role in the maintenance

  1. Population genetics, community of parasites, and resistance to rodenticides in an urban brown rat (Rattus norvegicus) population

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gasqui, Patrick; Cosson, Jean-François; Benoît, Etienne; Lattard, Virginie; Crespin, Laurent; Lorvelec, Olivier; Pisanu, Benoît; Teynié, Alexandre; Vayssier-Taussat, Muriel; Bonnet, Sarah; Marianneau, Philippe; Lacôte, Sandra; Bourhy, Pascale; Berny, Philippe; Pavio, Nicole; Le Poder, Sophie; Gilot-Fromont, Emmanuelle; Jourdain, Elsa; Hammed, Abdessalem; Fourel, Isabelle; Chikh, Farid; Vourc’h, Gwenaël

    2017-01-01

    Brown rats are one of the most widespread urban species worldwide. Despite the nuisances they induce and their potential role as a zoonotic reservoir, knowledge on urban rat populations remains scarce. The main purpose of this study was to characterize an urban brown rat population from Chanteraines park (Hauts-de-Seine, France), with regards to haematology, population genetics, immunogenic diversity, resistance to anticoagulant rodenticides, and community of parasites. Haematological parameters were measured. Population genetics was investigated using 13 unlinked microsatellite loci. Immunogenic diversity was assessed for Mhc-Drb. Frequency of the Y139F mutation (conferring resistance to rodenticides) and two linked microsatellites were studied, concurrently with the presence of anticoagulant residues in the liver. Combination of microscopy and molecular methods were used to investigate the occurrence of 25 parasites. Statistical approaches were used to explore multiple parasite relationships and model parasite occurrence. Eighty-six rats were caught. The first haematological data for a wild urban R. norvegicus population was reported. Genetic results suggested high genetic diversity and connectivity between Chanteraines rats and surrounding population(s). We found a high prevalence (55.8%) of the mutation Y139F and presence of rodenticide residues in 47.7% of the sampled individuals. The parasite species richness was high (16). Seven potential zoonotic pathogens were identified, together with a surprisingly high diversity of Leptospira species (4). Chanteraines rat population is not closed, allowing gene flow and making eradication programs challenging, particularly because rodenticide resistance is highly prevalent. Parasitological results showed that co-infection is more a rule than an exception. Furthermore, the presence of several potential zoonotic pathogens, of which four Leptospira species, in this urban rat population raised its role in the maintenance

  2. Differential responses of white adipose tissue and brown adipose tissue to caloric restriction in rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Okita, Naoyuki; Hayashida, Yusuke; Kojima, Yumiko; Fukushima, Mayumi; Yuguchi, Keiko; Mikami, Kentaro; Yamauchi, Akiko; Watanabe, Kyoko; Noguchi, Mituru; Nakamura, Megumi; Toda, Toshifusa; Higami, Yoshikazu

    2012-05-01

    Caloric restriction (CR) slows the aging process and extends longevity, but the exact underlying mechanisms remain debatable. It has recently been suggested that the beneficial action of CR may be mediated in part by adipose tissue remodeling. Mammals have two types of adipose tissue: white adipose tissue (WAT) and brown adipose tissue (BAT). In this study, proteome analysis using two-dimensional gel electrophoresis combined with MALDI-TOF MS, and subsequent analyses were performed on both WAT and BAT from 9-month-old male rats fed ad libitum or subjected to CR for 6 months. Our findings suggest that CR activates mitochondrial energy metabolism and fatty acid biosynthesis in WAT. It is likely that in CR animals WAT functions as an energy transducer from glucose to energy-dense lipid. In contrast, in BAT CR either had no effect on, or down-regulated, the mitochondrial electron transport chain, but enhanced fatty acid biosynthesis. This suggests that in CR animals BAT may change its function from an energy consuming system to an energy reservoir system. Based on our findings, we conclude that WAT and BAT cooperate to use energy effectively via a differential response of mitochondrial function to CR. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  3. HYPOCHOLESTEROLEMIC AND ANTI-OXIDATIVE PROPERTIES OF GERMINATED BROWN RICE (GBR IN HYPERCHOLESTEROLEMIA-INDUCED RATS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Froilan Bernard Matias

    2014-02-01

    Full Text Available Hypercholesterolemia, as one of the causes of obesity, affects vital organs in the body, such as the liver and kidney, resulting to oxidative stress. Germinated Brown Rice (GBR as a food-based solution in dealing with this condition is highly recommended. In this study, the effects of GBR on hypercholesterolemia-induced rats were evaluated by measuring and analyzing the changes on body weight, serum lipid profiles (TC, TG, LDL and HDL, liver function (ALT and AST, kidney function (Crea and Urea and its antioxidant capacity (MDA, SOD, GSH-PX and TAOC. Thirty (30 SD male rats were divided into 5 groups (6 rats per group; Group A was given normal basal diet, Group B (hypercholesterolemic group was given a high fat diet, while Groups C, D, and E were given 12.5%, 25% and 50% GBR, respectively. Groups C, D and E were fed with high fat diet for 4 weeks, then fed with the GBR feeds, accordingly, for another 5 weeks. Sera and liver samples were collected for testing and evaluation. Hypercholesterolemia was successfully induced in Groups B, C, D, and E after 4 weeks. Noticeable responses were observed in groups fed with GBR after 5 weeks. Group E fed with 50% GBR showed the satisfactory results (significant at p<0.05 in weight gain, serum lipid profiles, liver function enzymes, creatinine, urea and oxidative stress markers compared to the hypercholesterolemic group. The hypocholesterolemic and antioxidant properties of GBR were found to have a dose-response effect where higher percentage of GBR showed acceptable results as compared to the normal and hypercholesterolemic groups. GBR showed to effectively lessen TC, TG and LDL while increases HDL. It effectively protects the liver while its kidney protective ability was associated to its hypocholesterolemic properties. Oxidative stress was reduced as shown by a decline in lipid peroxidation and improved antioxidant production. In addition, the abovementioned GBR‘s properties are combined effects of its

  4. Natural and synthetic vocalizations of brown rat pups, Rattus norvegicus, enhance attractiveness of bait boxes in laboratory and field experiments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Takács, Stephen; Kowalski, Pawel; Gries, Gerhard

    2016-10-01

    Rats are often neophobic and thus do not readily enter trap boxes which are mandated in rodent management to help reduce the risk of accidental poisoning or capture of non-target animals. Working with brown rats, Rattus norvegicus, as a model species, our overall objective was to test whether sound cues from pups could be developed as a means to enhance captures of rats in trap boxes. Recording vocalizations from three-day-old pups after removal from their natal nest with both sonic and ultrasonic microphones revealed frequency components in the sonic range (1.8-7.5 kHz) and ultrasonic range (18-24 kHz, 33-55 kHz, 60-96 kHz). In two-choice laboratory bioassays, playback recordings of these vocalizations induced significant phonotactic and arrestment responses by juvenile, subadult and adult female and male rats. The effectiveness of engineered 'synthetic' rat pup sounds was dependent upon their frequency components, sound durations and the sound delivery system. Unlike other speakers, a piezoelectric transducer emitting sound bursts of 21 kHz with a 63-KHz harmonic, and persisting for 20-300 ms, proved highly effective in attracting and arresting adult female rats. In a field experiment, a battery-powered electronic device fitted with a piezoelectric transducer and driven by an algorithm that randomly generated sound cues resembling those recorded from rat pups and varying in fundamental frequency (19-23 kHz), duration (20-300 ms) and intermittent silence (300-5000 ms) significantly enhanced captures of rats in trap boxes baited with a food lure and soiled bedding material of adult female rats. Our study provides proof of concept that rat-specific sound cues or signals can be effectively reproduced and deployed as a means to enhance capture of wild rats. © 2016 Society of Chemical Industry. © 2016 Society of Chemical Industry.

  5. A combination of resveratrol and quercetin induces browning in white adipose tissue of rats fed an obesogenic diet.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arias, Noemí; Picó, Catalina; Teresa Macarulla, M; Oliver, Paula; Miranda, Jonatan; Palou, Andreu; Portillo, María P

    2017-01-01

    To analyze whether a combination of quercetin (Q) and resveratrol (RSV) would induce a white adipose tissue (WAT) browning effect. Thirty-six rats were fed an obesogenic diet and divided into four groups: control, treated with RSV (15 mg/kg body weight/day; RSV group), treated with Q (30 mg/kg body weight/day; Q group), or treated with both polyphenols (RSV + Q group). After 6 weeks, body and WAT weights were significantly reduced in the RSV + Q group. In perirenal WAT of the control, RSV, and Q groups, white unilocular adipocytes appeared in the majority of cells, while in the RSV + Q group numerous multilocular adipocytes with positive immunostaining for UCP1 were observed. The presence of UCP1 was confirmed by Western blot. This group also revealed increased mRNA levels of Cidea, Hocx9, Bmp4, Slc27a1, Pat2, Atgl, and Atp5d. Interscapular brown adipose tissue weight showed no differences between groups, but the Cidea mRNA level was increased in the RSV group, the Cox-2 mRNA level in the RSV + Q group, and UCP1 protein expression in the RSV and the RSV + Q groups. This study demonstrated that the RSV + Q combination produces a brown-like remodeling effect in perirenal WAT, as well as increased UCP1 protein expression in interscapular brown adipose tissue. © 2016 The Obesity Society.

  6. Extract of grains of paradise and its active principle 6-paradol trigger thermogenesis of brown adipose tissue in rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iwami, Momoe; Mahmoud, Fatma A; Shiina, Takahiko; Hirayama, Haruko; Shima, Takeshi; Sugita, Jun; Shimizu, Yasutake

    2011-04-26

    Grains of paradise (GP) is a species of the ginger family, Zingiberaceae, extracts of which have a pungent, peppery taste due to an aromatic ketone, 6-paradol. The aim of this study was to explore the thermogenic effects of GP extracts and of 6-paradol. Efferent discharges from sympathetic nerves entering the interscapular brown adipose tissue were recorded. Intragastric injection of a GP extract or 6-paradol enhanced the efferent discharges of the sympathetic nerves in a dose-dependent manner. The enhanced nerve discharges were sustained for as long as 3h. The rats did not become desensitized to the stimulatory effects these compounds on sympathetic nerve activity. The tissue temperature of brown adipose tissue showed significant increase in rats injected with 6-paradol. These results demonstrate that GP extracts and 6-paradol activate thermogenesis in brown adipose tissue, and may open up new avenues for the regulation of weight loss and weight maintenance. Copyright © 2010 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  7. Replacing white rice with pre-germinated brown rice mildly ameliorates hyperglycemia and imbalance of adipocytokine levels in type 2 diabetes model rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Torimitsu, Mariko; Nagase, Ryouhei; Yanagi, Megumi; Homma, Miyuki; Sasai, Yousuke; Ito, Yukihiko; Hayamizu, Kousuke; Nonaka, Shouta; Hosono, Takashi; Kise, Mitsuo; Seki, Taiichiro; Ariga, Toyohiko

    2010-01-01

    Pre-germinated brown rice (PR) has been developed industrially in order to enhance the nutritional functions of its source material, brown rice (BR). The present study was aimed at clarifying the effect of PR on the type 2 diabetes mellitus. We employed Otsuka Long-Evans Tokushima Fatty (OLETF) rats as a model of type-2 diabetes mellitus. OLETF rats were fed on either PR or white rice (WR) from the age of 4 to 35 wk. Age-matched male Long-Evans Tokushima Otsuka (LETO) rats as a non-diabetic control were also fed on WR. The HbA(1c) level in OLETF rats was significantly higher than that in LETO rats. However, the level was lower in PR-fed OLETF rats than in WR-fed OLETF rats. The plasma concentrations of TNF-α and PAI-1 in OLETF rats were higher than those in LETO rats. However, both elevated levels were decreased by the PR-feeding, but not by the WR-feeding. On the other hand, the plasma adiponectin concentration in OLETF rats was lower than that in LETO rats. The decrease in adiponectin level of OLETF rats was ameliorated by PR-feeding. The size of adipocytes in PR-fed OLETF rats was smaller than that in WR-fed OLETF rats. In summary, intake of PR instead of WR ameliorates both insulin resistance and imbalance of the levels of plasma adipocytokines leading to diabetic complications.

  8. Assessment of Biochemical and Behavioral Effects of Carbaryl and Methomyl in Brown-Norway Rats from Preweaning to Sensecence

    Science.gov (United States)

    Factors impacting life stage-specific sensitivity to chemicals include toxicokinetic and toxicodynamic changes. To evaluate age-related differences in the biochemical and behavioral impacts of two typical N-methyl carbamate pesticides, we systematically compared their dose-respo...

  9. Vasopressin and oxytocin excretion in the Brown-Norway rat in relation to aging, water metabolism and testosterone

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Goudsmit, E.; Fliers, E.; Swaab, D. F.

    1988-01-01

    There is considerable disagreement in the literature on changes in the hypothalamo-neurohypophyseal system (HNS) with aging: some reports support HNS degeneration, whereas others claim an activation of this system in senescence. In order to study age-related changes in vasopressin (VP) and oxytocin

  10. Assessment of the allergic potential of food protein extracts and proteins on oral application using the Brown Norway rat model

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Knippels, L.M.J.; Penninks, A.H.

    2003-01-01

    The need for widely accepted and validated animal models to test the potential allergenicity and potency of novel (biotechnology-derived) proteins has become an important issue for their safety evaluation.In this article, we summarize the results of the development of an oral sensitization protocol

  11. AGING AND LIFE-STAGE SUSCEPTIBILITY: TOLUENE EFFECTS ON BRAIN OXIDATIVE STRESS PARAMETERS IN BROWN NORWAY RATS.

    Science.gov (United States)

    The influence of aging on susceptibility to environmental contaminants is poorly understood. The objectives of this study were to test whether oxidative stress (OS) is a potential toxicity pathway following toluene exposure and to determine if these effects are age-dependent. We ...

  12. TOLUENE EFFECTS ON OXIDATIVE STRESS IN BRAIN REGIONS OF YOUNG-ADULT, MIDDLE-AGE AND SENESCENT BROWN NORWAY RATS

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aging-related susceptibility to environmental chemicals is poorly understood. Oxidative stress (OS) appears to play an important role in susceptibility and disease in old age. The objectives of this study, therefore, were to test whether OS is a potential toxicity pathway for tol...

  13. Toluene Effects on Gene Expression in the Hippocampus of Young-Adult, Middle-Age and Senescent Brown Norway Rats

    Science.gov (United States)

    Differential susceptibility to environmental exposure(s) across life stages is an area of toxicology about which little is known. We examined the effects of toluene, a known neurotoxicant with reported behavioral, electrophysiological and pathological effects, on transcriptomic...

  14. Age-related differences in pulmonary effects of acute and subchronic episodic ozone exposures in Brown Norway rats

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ozone (O3) is known to induce adverse pulmonary and systemic health effects. Importantly, children and older persons are considered at-risk populations for O3-induced dysfunction, yet the mechanisms accounting for the age-related pulmonary responses to O3 are uncertain. In this s...

  15. Episodic ozone exposure in adult and Senescent Brown Norway rats: Acute and delayed cardiovascular and thermoregulatory responses

    Science.gov (United States)

    Setting exposure standards for environmental pollutants may consider the aged as a susceptible population but the few published studies assessing susceptibility of the aged to air pollutants are inconsistent. Episodic ozone (O(3)) is more reflective of potential exposures occurri...

  16. Toxicology and senescence: Baseline variability and toluene effects on the motor function of aging brown Norway rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    The rapidly expanding population of older adults raises concern in EPA over aging-related vulnerability to environmental exposures. Deficits in motor function are frequent with advancing age. An increase in interindividual variability is also commonly accepted. Increased variabil...

  17. Susceptibility of the aging Brown Norway rat to carbaryl, an anti-cholinesterase-based insecticide: Thermoregulatory and cardiovascular responses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    The proportion of aged in the United States is projected to expand markedly for the next several decades. Hence, the U.S.EPA is assessing if the aged are more susceptible to environmental toxicants. The thermoregulatory and cardiovascular responses of young adult, mature adult, a...

  18. Hypoxic activation of arterial chemoreceptors inhibits sympathetic outflow to brown adipose tissue in rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Madden, C J; Morrison, S F

    2005-07-15

    In urethane-chloralose anaesthetized, neuromuscularly blocked, artificially ventilated rats, we demonstrated that activation of carotid chemoreceptors inhibits the elevated levels of brown adipose tissue (BAT) sympathetic nerve activity (SNA) evoked by hypothermia, by microinjection of prostaglandin E2 into the medial preoptic area or by disinhibition of neurones in the raphe pallidus area (RPa). Peripheral chemoreceptor stimulation with systemic administration of NaCN (50 microg in 0.1 ml) or with hypoxic ventilation (8% O2-92% N2, 30 s) completely inhibited BAT SNA. Arterial chemoreceptor-evoked inhibition of BAT SNA was eliminated by prior bilateral transections of the carotid sinus nerves or by prior inhibition of neurones within the commissural nucleus tractus solitarii (commNTS) with glycine (40 nmol/80 nl) or with the GABAA receptor agonist muscimol (160 pmol/80 nl; 77 +/- 10% attenuation), or by prior blockade of ionotropic excitatory amino acid receptors in the commNTS with kynurenate (8 nmol/80 nl; 82 +/- 10% attenuation). Furthermore, activation of commNTS neurones following local microinjection of bicuculline (30 pmol/60 nl) completely inhibited the elevated level of BAT SNA resulting from disinhibition of neurones in the RPa. These results demonstrate that hypoxic stimulation of arterial chemoreceptor afferents leads to an inhibition of BAT SNA and BAT thermogenesis through an EAA-mediated activation of second-order, arterial chemoreceptor neurones in the commNTS. Peripheral chemoreceptor-evoked inhibition of BAT SNA could directly contribute to (or be permissive for) the hypoxia-evoked reductions in body temperature and oxygen consumption that serve as an adaptive response to decreased oxygen availability.

  19. The endogenous actions of hypothalamic peptides on brown adipose tissue thermogenesis in the rat.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Verty, Aaron N A; Allen, Andrew M; Oldfield, Brian J

    2010-09-01

    Although the neuronal pathways within the hypothalamus critical in controlling feeding and energy expenditure and projecting to brown adipose tissue (BAT) have been identified and their peptidergic content characterized, endogenous action of such peptides in the control of BAT activity has not been elucidated. Here male Sprague Dawley rats received infusions of either melanin-concentrating hormone antagonist (SNAP-7941) (1 microg/microl x h), orexin A receptor antagonist (SB-334867-A; 1 microg/microl x h), combined SB-334867-A (1 microg/microl x h), and SNAP-7941 (1 microg/microl x h), or melanocortin-3/4 receptor antagonist (SHU9119) (1 microg/microl x h) via an indwelling cannula in the lateral ventricle attached to s.c. implanted osmotic minipump. BAT temperature, physical activity, body weight, food intake, and changes in uncoupling protein (UCP)-1 were measured. SB-334867-A and SNAP-7941 significantly increased BAT temperature and UCP1 expression and reduced food intake and body weight. Combined infusion of SB-334867-A and SNAP-7941 produced a pronounced response that was greater than the addition of the individual effects in all parameters measured. SHU9119 significantly decreased BAT temperature and UCP1 expression and increased feeding and body weight. In a second series of experiments, the effect of SB-334867-A and SNAP-7941 alone or combination on the expression of the Fos protein was determined. SB-334867-A and SNAP-7941 increased Fos expression in key hypothalamic and brainstem feeding-related regions. In combination, these antagonists produced a greater than additive elevation of Fos expression in most of the regions evaluated. These findings support a role for endogenous orexigenic and anorexigenic hypothalamic peptides acting in concert to create a thermogenic tone via BAT activity.

  20. Ear mange mites (Notoedres muris) in black and Norway rats (Rattus rattus and Rattus norvegicus) from inner-city Vancouver, Canada.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anholt, Heather; Himsworth, Chelsea; Rothenburger, Jamie; Proctor, Heather; Patrick, David M

    2014-01-01

    The ear mange mite, Notoedres muris (Astigmata: Sarcoptidae), is a parasitic burrowing mite of black and Norway rats (Rattus rattus and Rattus norvegicus), which causes a proliferative dermatitis primarily affecting the ears. We characterize the ecology of N. muris in a group of black and Norway rats trapped in an inner-city area of Vancouver, Canada. Rats (n = 725) were trapped for 1 yr (September 2011-August 2012) in 43 city blocks (0.82 km(2)) and one property (0.03 km(2)) within an international shipping port at the northern border of the study area. Mite infestation was diagnosed in 15 of 32 rats (47%, 95% confidence interval [CI] = 30.9-53.6%) trapped in a large indoor facility at the port property. No affected animals were identified outside this facility, either within the port property or in any of the blocks under study. There was a positive relationship between infestation and both weight and nose-to-rump length (proxies for age), suggesting transmission through intraspecific social contact within colonies. This is the first report of N. muris in Canada. The focal distribution of N. muris at the port may reflect an importation event.

  1. Genipin ameliorates diet-induced obesity via promoting lipid mobilization and browning of white adipose tissue in rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guan, Lili; Gong, Dezheng; Yang, Sirao; Shen, Nana; Zhang, Sai; Li, Yuchen; Wu, Qiong; Yuan, Bo; Sun, Yiping; Dai, Ning; Zhu, Liang; Zou, Yuan

    2018-01-29

    Genipin is the major active component of Gardeniae fructus and has been shown to ameliorate diabetes and insulin resistance in rat models. In this study, we first investigated the effect of genipin on obesity and the related lipid metabolism mechanisms in diet-induced obese rats. Our results showed that genipin reduced body weight, food intake, and visceral fat mass; ameliorated dyslipidemia, glucose intolerance, insulin intolerance, adipocyte hypertrophy, and hepatic steatosis; and reduced serum tumor necrosis factor-α level in diet-induced obese rats. Quantitative real-time reverse-transcription polymerase chain reaction results further illustrated that genipin promoted lipolysis and β-oxidation of fatty acid by upregulating gene expressions of hormone-sensitive lipase and adipose triglyceride lipase in white adipose tissue (WAT) and peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor-α and carnitine palmitoyltransferase 1α in hepatic tissue. Moreover, genipin promoted browning of WAT by upregulating the mRNA and protein levels of uncoupling protein 1 and PRD1-BF1-RIZ1 homologous domain containing 16 in WAT. Additionally, genipin inhibited gene expressions of activin receptor-like kinase 7, tumor necrosis factor-α, and interlukin-6 in WAT. These results indicated that genipin had a potential therapeutic role in obesity, in which regulation of lipid mobilization and browning of WAT were involved. Copyright © 2018 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  2. The effect of pre-germinated brown rice intake on blood glucose and PAI-1 levels in streptozotocin-induced diabetic rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hagiwara, Hiromi; Seki, Taiichiro; Ariga, Toyohiko

    2004-02-01

    Effects of pre-germinated brown rice (PGBR) on streptozotocin-induced diabetic rats were studied. The feeding of a PGBR diet to diabetic rats ameliorated the elevation of blood glucose and PAI-1 concentrations significantly, and tended to decrease the plasma lipid peroxide concentrations in comparison with rats fed a white rice diet. These results suggest that intake of PGBR instead of white rice is effective for the prevention of diabetic vascular complications.

  3. Duodenal lipid sensing activates vagal afferents to regulate non-shivering brown fat thermogenesis in rats.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Clémence Blouet

    Full Text Available Previous evidence indicates that duodenal lipid sensing engages gut-brain neurocircuits to determine food intake and hepatic glucose production, but a potential role for gut-brain communication in the control of energy expenditure remains to be determined. Here, we tested the hypothesis that duodenal lipid sensing activates a gut-brain-brown adipose tissue neuraxis to regulate thermogenesis. We demonstrate that direct administration of lipids into the duodenum increases brown fat temperature. Co-infusion of the local anesthetic tetracaine with duodenal lipids abolished the lipid-induced increase in brown fat temperature. Systemic administration of the CCKA receptor antagonist devazepide blocked the ability of duodenal lipids to increase brown fat thermogenesis. Parenchymal administration of the N-methyl-d-aspartate receptor blocker MK-801 directly into the caudomedial nucleus of the solitary tract also abolished duodenal lipid-induced activation of brown fat thermogenesis. These findings establish that duodenal lipid sensing activates a gut-brain-brown fat axis to determine brown fat temperature, and thereby reveal a previously unappreciated pathway that regulates thermogenesis.

  4. Enzymes involved in adenosine metabolism in rat white and brown adipocytes. Effects of streptozotocin-diabetes, hypothyroidism, age and sex differences.

    OpenAIRE

    Jamal, Z; Saggerson, E D

    1987-01-01

    1. Adipocytes were isolated from epididymal white fat and interscapular brown fat of male rats, and activities of 5'-nucleotidase, adenosine deaminase and adenosine kinase were measured in cell extracts. 2. 5'-Nucleotidase activity in white adipocytes was increased in streptozotocin-diabetes, decreased in hypothyroidism and increased with age. That activity in brown adipocytes was unchanged in diabetes, decreased in hypothyroidism and increased with age. 5'-Nucleotidase activity was higher in...

  5. Interscapular brown adipose tissue blood flow in the rat. Determination with 133xenon clearance compared to the microsphere method

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Astrup, A; Bülow, J; Madsen, J

    1984-01-01

    a close correlation to the blood flow values determined with microspheres. Y = 0.98. X + 0.15 (r = 0.96, P less than 0.001). The Xe clearance method has the advantages compared to the microsphere technique that it permits continuous monitoring of the blood flow and does not require the sacrifice......The xenon clearance method was adapted to continuous measurement of interscapular brown adipose tissue (ISBAT) blood flow in anesthetized rats. The ISBAT-blood partition coefficient for xenon was determined to 3.6 ml X g-1. The blood flow values obtained by Xe clearance were compared with flow...

  6. Efficacy of anticoagulant-free alternative bait products against house mice (Mus musculus) and brown rats (Rattus norvegicus).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schmolz, Erik

    2010-03-01

    The attractiveness and efficacy of four anonymous anticoagulant-free alternative rodenticides (active ingredients cellulose or plaster) were tested on wild strain groups of house mice (Mus musculus Linnaeus) and brown rats (Rattus norvegicus Berkenhout) in laboratory choice and no-choice experiments. In no-choice tests, the rodenticide product was offered ad libitum to the animals for 21 days (mice) and 10 days (rats), respectively. In choice tests, the rodenticide product and non-poisoned food were offered for 28 days (mice) and 14 days (rats). Two products with cellulose (C1 and C2) as the active ingredient were tested against both mice and rats. In two no-choice tests with mice, all animals died within 14 days (C1) and 21 days (C2); in a third no-choice test, 11% (2/18) of mice survived (C1: 21 days). In all three tests, numerous incidents of cannibalism were observed. The attractiveness of cellulose baits was tested for one product (C1) in three trials against normal food pellets. In all trials, bait consumption was low and all mice survived (15-34 days). Two no-choice trials with cellulose baits (C1) were conducted on groups of Rattus norvegicus; 11 of 12 rats survived the bait feeding period and no cannibalism or sign of aggression between conspecifics was observed. Two plaster-based (CaSO4 0.5H2O) products (P1 and P2) were tested against both mice and rats; in no-choice tests, only one mouse (n= 20) and no rats (n= 8) were killed, although the baits proved to be attractive for rats and mice in choice tests. The results of these experiments suggest that neither cellulose-based nor plaster-based rodenticides are suitable agents for the control of Mus musculus and Rattus norvegicus. © 2010 ISZS, Blackwell Publishing and IOZ/CAS.

  7. Repeated exposure to cat urine induces complex behavioral, hormonal, and c-fos mRNA responses in Norway rats ( Rattus norvegicus)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yin, Baofa; Gu, Chen; Lu, Yi; Hegab, Ibrahim M.; Yang, Shengmei; Wang, Aiqin; Wei, Wanhong

    2017-08-01

    Prey species show specific adaptations that allow recognition, avoidance, and defense against predators. This study was undertaken to investigate the processing of a chronic, life-threatening stimulus to Norway rats ( Rattus norvegicus). One hundred forty-four Norway rats were tested by repeated presentation of cat urine for 1 h at different days in a defensive withdrawal apparatus. Rats exposed to urine for short periods showed significantly larger defensive behavioral and medial hypothalamic c-fos messenger RNA (mRNA) responses than other groups. These defensive responses habituated shortly after the presentation of cat urine. Serum levels of adrenocorticotropic hormone and corticosterone increased significantly when animals were repeatedly exposed to cat urine. However, the hormonal responses took longer to habituate than the behavioral and molecular responses did. We conclude that the behavioral and c-fos mRNA responses are "primed" for habituation to repeated exposures to cat urine, while the hormonal responses show "resistance." The results support our hypothesis that the strongest anti-predator responses at three levels would occur during short-term exposure to cat urine and that these responses would subsequently disappear on prolonged exposure. This study assists understanding the way in which the different levels of defensive responses are integrated and react during chronic stress.

  8. Inhaled Ozone (O3)-Induces Changes in Serum Metabolomic and Liver Transcriptomic Profiles in Rats

    Science.gov (United States)

    Air pollution has been linked to increased incidence of diabetes. Recently, we showed that ozone (03) induces glucose intolerance, and increases serum leptin and epinephrine in Brown Norway rats. In this study, we hypothesized that 03 exposure will cause systemic changes in metab...

  9. Effect of pre-germinated brown rice intake on diabetic neuropathy in streptozotocin-induced diabetic rats

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ariga Toshio

    2007-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background To study the effects of a pre-germinated brown rice diet (PR on diabetic neuropathy in streptozotocin (STZ-induced diabetic rats. Methods The effects of a PR diet on diabetic neuropathy in STZ-induced diabetic rats were evaluated and compared with those fed brown rice (BR or white rice (WR diets with respect to the following parameters: blood-glucose level, motor-nerve conduction velocity (NCV, sciatic-nerve Na+/K+-ATPase activity, and serum homocysteine-thiolactonase (HTase activity. Results Compared with diabetic rats fed BR or WR diets, those fed a PR diet demonstrated significantly lower blood-glucose levels (p +/K+-ATPase activity (1.6- and 1.7-fold higher, respectively. The PR diet was also able to normalize decreased serum homocysteine levels normally seen in diabetic rats. The increased Na+/K+-ATPase activity observed in rats fed PR diets was associated with elevations in HTase activity (r = 0.913, p in vitro effect of the total lipid extract from PR bran (TLp on the Na+/K+-ATPase and HTase activity was also examined. Incubation of homocysteine thiolactone (HT with low-density lipoprotein (LDL in vitro resulted in generation of HT-modified LDL, which possessed high potency to inhibit Na+/K+-ATPase activity in the sciatic nerve membrane. The inhibitory effect of HT-modified LDL on Na+/K+-ATPase activity disappeared when TLp was added to the incubation mixture. Furthermore, TLp directly activated the HTase associated with high-density lipoprotein (HDL. Conclusion PR treatment shows efficacy for protecting diabetic deterioration and for improving physiological parameters of diabetic neuropathy in rats, as compared with a BR or WR diet. This effect may be induced by a mechanism whereby PR intake mitigates diabetic neuropathy by one or more factors in the total lipid fraction. The active lipid fraction is able to protect the Na+/K+-ATPase of the sciatic-nerve membrane from the toxicity of HT-modified LDL and to directly

  10. Effect of pre-germinated brown rice intake on diabetic neuropathy in streptozotocin-induced diabetic rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Usuki, Seigo; Ito, Yukihiko; Morikawa, Keiko; Kise, Mitsuo; Ariga, Toshio; Rivner, Michael; Yu, Robert K

    2007-11-23

    To study the effects of a pre-germinated brown rice diet (PR) on diabetic neuropathy in streptozotocin (STZ)-induced diabetic rats. The effects of a PR diet on diabetic neuropathy in STZ-induced diabetic rats were evaluated and compared with those fed brown rice (BR) or white rice (WR) diets with respect to the following parameters: blood-glucose level, motor-nerve conduction velocity (NCV), sciatic-nerve Na+/K+-ATPase activity, and serum homocysteine-thiolactonase (HTase) activity. Compared with diabetic rats fed BR or WR diets, those fed a PR diet demonstrated significantly lower blood-glucose levels (p < 0.001), improved NCV (1.2- and 1.3-fold higher, respectively), and increased Na+/K+-ATPase activity (1.6- and 1.7-fold higher, respectively). The PR diet was also able to normalize decreased serum homocysteine levels normally seen in diabetic rats. The increased Na+/K+-ATPase activity observed in rats fed PR diets was associated with elevations in HTase activity (r = 0.913, p < 0.001). The in vitro effect of the total lipid extract from PR bran (TLp) on the Na+/K+-ATPase and HTase activity was also examined. Incubation of homocysteine thiolactone (HT) with low-density lipoprotein (LDL) in vitro resulted in generation of HT-modified LDL, which possessed high potency to inhibit Na+/K+-ATPase activity in the sciatic nerve membrane. The inhibitory effect of HT-modified LDL on Na+/K+-ATPase activity disappeared when TLp was added to the incubation mixture. Furthermore, TLp directly activated the HTase associated with high-density lipoprotein (HDL). PR treatment shows efficacy for protecting diabetic deterioration and for improving physiological parameters of diabetic neuropathy in rats, as compared with a BR or WR diet. This effect may be induced by a mechanism whereby PR intake mitigates diabetic neuropathy by one or more factors in the total lipid fraction. The active lipid fraction is able to protect the Na+/K+-ATPase of the sciatic-nerve membrane from the

  11. The influence of social environment in early life on the behavior, stress response, and reproductive system of adult male Norway rats selected for different attitudes to humans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gulevich, R G; Shikhevich, S G; Konoshenko, M Yu; Kozhemyakina, R V; Herbeck, Yu E; Prasolova, L A; Oskina, I N; Plyusnina, I Z

    2015-05-15

    The influence of social disturbance in early life on behavior, response of blood corticosterone level to restraint stress, and endocrine and morphometric indices of the testes was studied in 2-month Norway rat males from three populations: not selected for behavior (unselected), selected for against aggression to humans (tame), and selected for increased aggression to humans (aggressive). The experimental social disturbance included early weaning, daily replacement of cagemates from days 19 to 25, and subsequent housing in twos till the age of 2months. The social disturbance increased the latent period of aggressive behavior in the social interaction test in unselected males and reduced relative testis weights in comparison to the corresponding control groups. In addition, experimental unselected rats had smaller diameters of seminiferous tubules and lower blood testosterone levels. In the experimental group, tame rats had lower basal corticosterone levels, and aggressive animals had lower hormone levels after restraint stress in comparison to the control. The results suggest that the selection in two directions for attitude to humans modifies the response of male rats to social disturbance in early life. In this regard, the selected rat populations may be viewed as a model for investigation of (1) neuroendocrinal mechanisms responsible for the manifestation of aggression and (2) interaction of the hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal and hypothalamic-pituitary-gonadal systems in stress. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  12. Effects of Inhaled Citronella Oil and Related Compounds on Rat Body Weight and Brown Adipose Tissue Sympathetic Nerve

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Irmanida Batubara

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available Citronella oil is one of the most famous Indonesian essential oils, having a distinctive aroma. As with other essential oils, it is crucial to explore the effects of inhalation of this oil. Therefore, the aim of this research was to elucidate the effects of inhalation of citronella oil and its components isolated from Cymbopogon nardus L. (Poaceae, Indonesian local name: “Sereh Wangi” on the body weight, blood lipid profile, and liver function of rats, as well as on the sympathetic nerve activity and temperature of brown adipose tissue. Sprague-Dawley male adult rats fed with high fat diet (HFD were made to inhale citronella oil, R-(+-citronellal, and β-citronellol for five weeks, and the observations were compared to those of HFD rats that were not subjected to inhalation treatment. The results showed that inhalation of β-citronellol decreased feed consumption. As a consequence, the percentage of weight gain decreased compared with that in control group and the blood cholesterol level in the β-citronellol group was significantly lowered. Concentration of liver function enzymes were not significantly different among the groups. In conclusion, inhalation of citronella oil, specifically β-citronellol, decreased body weight by decreasing appetite, without any marked changes in liver enzyme concentrations.

  13. COMPROMISED FERTILITY IN FREE FEEDING OF WILD-CAUGHT NORWAY RATS (RATTUS NORVEGICUS) WITH A LIQUID BAIT CONTAINING 4-VINYLCYCLOHEXENE DIEPOXIDE AND TRIPTOLIDE.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Witmer, Gary W; Raymond-Whish, Stefanie; Moulton, Rachael S; Pyzyna, Brandy R; Calloway, Elissa M; Dyer, Cheryl A; Mayer, Loretta P; Hoyer, Patricia B

    2017-03-01

    Wild rat pests in the environment cause crop and property damage and carry disease. Traditional methods of reducing populations of these pests involve poisons that can cause accidental exposures in other animals and humans. Fertility management with nonlethal chemicals would be an improved method of rat pest population control. Two chemicals known to target ovarian function in female rats are 4-vinylcyclohexene diepoxide (VCD) and triptolide. Additionally, triptolide impairs spermatogenesis in males. A liquid bait containing no active ingredients (control), or containing triptolide (0.001%) and VCD (0.109%; active) was prepared to investigate the potential use of these agents for wild rat pest population control. Liquid bait was made available to male (n = 8 control; n = 8 active) and female (n = 8 control; n = 8 active) Sprague Dawley rats ( Rattus norvegicus ) for oral consumption prior to breeding. Whereas, control bait-treated females produced normal-sized litters (10.0 ± 1.7 pups/litter), treated females delivered no pups. Wild Norway male (n = 20) and female (n = 20) rats ( Rattus norvegicus ) were trapped, individually housed, and one group given free access to control bait, one group to active bait. Following three cycles of treatment-matched mating pairs, females consuming control bait (control) produced normal litter sizes (9.73 ± 0.73 pups/litter). Females who had consumed active bait (treated) produced no litters on breeding cycles one and two; however, 2 of 10 females produced small litters on the third mating cycle. In a fourth breeding cycle, control females were crossmated with treated males, and treated females were crossmated with control males. In both groups, some dams produced litters, while others did not. The differences in response reflect a heterogeneity in return to cyclicity between females. These results suggest a potential approach to integrated pest management by compromising fertility, and could provide a novel alternative to

  14. Comparison of antibody responses to hen's egg and cow's milk proteins in orally sensitized rats and food-allergic patients

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Knippels, L.M.J.; Kleij, H.P.M. van der; Koppelman, S.J.; Houben, G.F.; Penninks, A.H.; Felius, A.A.

    2000-01-01

    Background: No adequate enteral sensitization models are available to study food allergy and the allergenicity of food proteins. To further validate an enteral brown Norway (BN) rat sensitization model under development, we studied specific protein recognition to determine whether a comparable

  15. Effects of chronic overload on muscle hypertrophy and mTOR signaling in adult and aged rats

    Science.gov (United States)

    We examined the effect of 28 days of overload on mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR) and extracellular signal-regulated kinase (ERK) signaling in young adult (Y; 6 mo old) and aged (O; 30 mo old) Fischer 344 x Brown Norway rats subjected to bilateral synergist ablation (SA) of two-thirds of the gas...

  16. Brown (BAT) and white (WAT) adipose tissue in high-fat junk food (HFJF) and chow-fed rats with dorsomedial hypothalamic lesions (DMNL rats).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bernardis, L L; Bellinger, L L

    1991-05-15

    Male weanling rats received dorsomedial hypothalamic nucleus lesions (DMNL) or sham operations and were fed for 173 postoperative days a high-fat diet and given a 32% sucrose solution as drinking fluid. This was supplemented with chocolate chip cookies, potato chips and marshmallows. Other DMNL and sham-operated controls were fed lab chow instead of the above high-fat junk food diet (HFJF) and given tap water instead of 32% sucrose solution. All animals were killed on postoperative day 174. Caloric intake per 100 g body weight was similar in all groups; however, the HFJF fed control and DMNL rats had significantly elevated carcass fat. Since HFJF-DMNL rats were not nearly as obese as the HFJF control animals, it appears that the DMNL offered some protection against the HFJF-diet-produced obesity. When their smaller body size is considered. DMN lesions had no effect on brown adipose tissue (BAT) mass in chow-fed or HFJF fed rats, whereas BAT size was significantly enlarged in HFJF-fed control animals. This suggests but does not prove that HFJF-fed controls, but not DMNL rats, may be using dietary-induced thermogenesis (DIT) to attenuate their obesity. We hypothesize that the HFJF-fed DMNL may not be enhancing DIT as reflected in normal BAT size, because they had not attained a degree of fatness to activate this system, or the DMN lesions impaired its activation. Both HFJF-fed groups showed reduced linear growth compared to their counterparts. The reason for stunting is uncertain, but may be related to their low plasma insulin concentrations.

  17. Vibration Training Triggers Brown Adipocyte Relative Protein Expression in Rat White Adipose Tissue

    OpenAIRE

    Chao Sun; Ruixia Zeng; Ge Cao; Zhibang Song; Yibo Zhang; Chang Liu

    2015-01-01

    Recently, vibration training is considered as a novel strategy of weight loss; however, its mechanisms are still unclear. In this study, normal or high-fat diet-induced rats were trained by whole body vibration for 8 weeks. We observed that the body weight and fat metabolism index, blood glucose, triglyceride, cholesterol, and free fatty acid in obesity rats decreased significantly compared with nonvibration group (n = 6). Although intrascapular BAT weight did not change significantly, vibrat...

  18. Trigeminal lesions and maternal behavior in Norway rats: I. Effects of cutaneous rostral snout denervation on maintenance of nurturance and maternal aggression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stern, J M; Kolunie, J M

    1991-12-01

    Cutaneous desensitization of the upper, rostral snout by bilateral section of the infraorbital nerves in lactating Norway rat dams markedly, but transiently, disrupted retrieval and licking of pups, nursing behavior, and fighting with a strange male intruder. Removal of the mystacial vibrissae, which provide major inputs to the infraorbital nerves, or cutaneous desensitization of the chin by bilateral sectioning of the mental nerves did not disrupt these behaviors. However, cutaneous desensitization of both the upper and lower rostral snout exacerbated and prolonged the effects produced by infraorbital denervation alone. The control of maternal behavior and aggression by somatosensory reflexes and the possible bases for rapid behavioral recovery after partial trigeminal sensory denervations are discussed.

  19. Differential effects of chronic overload-induced muscle hypertrophy on mTOR and MAPK signaling pathways in adult and aged rats

    Science.gov (United States)

    We examined activation of the mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR) and mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) signaling pathways in adult (Y; 6 mo old; n = 16) and aged (O; 30 mo old; n = 16) male rats (Fischer 344 x Brown Norway) subjected to chronic overload-induced muscle hypertrophy of the plan...

  20. Factors influencing the density of the brown rat (Rattus norvegicus) in and around houses in Amsterdam

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Adrichem, van M.H.C.; Buijs, J.A.; Goedhart, P.W.; Verboom, J.

    2013-01-01

    Abstract: The current strategy of the pest management department of the Public Health Service in Amsterdam is to identify causal factors in order to reduce the carrying capacity of pest populations and to minimise the use of pesticides. Rats have been controlled with rodenticides for decades, which

  1. PREVALENCE AND CHARACTERISTICS OF ESCHERICHIA COLI AND SALMONELLA SPP. IN THE FECES OF WILD URBAN NORWAY AND BLACK RATS (RATTUS NORVEGICUS AND RATTUS RATTUS) FROM AN INNER-CITY NEIGHBORHOOD OF VANCOUVER, CANADA.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Himsworth, Chelsea G; Zabek, Erin; Desruisseau, Andrea; Parmley, E Jane; Reid-Smith, Richard; Jardine, Claire M; Tang, Patrick; Patrick, David M

    2015-07-01

    Although rat feces are widely suspected to be a source of pathogenic bacteria, few investigators have studied fecal pathogens in rats. We investigated the prevalence and characteristics of Escherichia coli and Salmonella spp. in Norway and black rats (Rattus norvegicus and Rattus rattus, respectively) from an urban neighborhood of Vancouver, Canada, collected September 2011-August 2012. Colon content was cultured for E. coli and Salmonella spp. and screened for the seven most-common enteropathogenic Shiga toxin-producing E. coli (STEC) serotypes by PCR. Isolates were tested for antimicrobial resistance and Salmonella isolates were serotyped. We detected E. coli in 397/633 (62.7%) urban rats. Forty-one of 397 (6.5%) E. coli isolates were resistant to ≥ 1 antimicrobial while 17 (4.3%) were multidrug resistant (including two isolates demonstrating extended-spectrum β-lactamase resistance). Ten of 633 (1.6%) urban rats were carrying STEC serotypes including O145, O103, O26, and O45. Norway rats were more likely to be carrying E. coli compared to black rats, and there was geographic clustering of specific resistance patterns and STEC serotypes. Salmonella spp. were detected in 3/633 (0.5%) rats including serotypes Derby, Indiana, and Enteritidis. In contrast to zoonotic pathogens for which rats are the natural reservoir (e.g., Leptospira interrogans, Rickettsia typhi, Seoul virus), rats likely acquired E. coli and Salmonella spp. from their environment. The ability of rats to be a 'sponge' for environmental pathogens has received little consideration, and the ecology and public health significance of these organisms in rats requires further investigation.

  2. Activation of β3-adrenoceptors increases in vivo free fatty acid uptake and utilization in brown but not white fat depots in high-fat-fed rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Warner, Amy; Kjellstedt, Ann; Carreras, Alba; Böttcher, Gerhard; Peng, Xiao-Rong; Seale, Patrick; Oakes, Nicholas; Lindén, Daniel

    2016-12-01

    Activation of brown adipose tissue (BAT) and browning of white adipose tissue (WAT) present potential new therapies for obesity and type 2 diabetes. Here, we examined the effects of β3-adrenergic stimulation on tissue-specific uptake and storage of free fatty acids (FFA) and its implications for whole body FFA metabolism in diet-induced obese rats using a multi-radiotracer technique. Male Wistar rats were high fat-fed for 12 wk and administered β3-agonist CL316,243 (CL, 1 mg·kg(-1)·day(-1)) or saline via osmotic minipumps during the last 3 wk. The rats were then fasted and acutely infused with a tracer mixture ([(14)C]palmitate and the partially metabolized R-[(3)H]bromopalmitate) under anesthesia. CL infusion decreased body weight gain and fasting plasma glucose levels. While core body temperature was unaffected, infrared thermography showed an increase in tail heat dissipation following CL infusion. Interestingly, CL markedly increased both FFA storage and utilization in interscapular and perirenal BAT, whereas the flux of FFA to skeletal muscle was decreased. In this rat model of obesity, only sporadic populations of beige adipocytes were detected in the epididymal WAT depot of CL-infused rats, and there was no change in FFA uptake or utilization in WAT following CL infusion. In summary, β3-agonism robustly increased FFA flux to BAT coupled with enhanced utilization. Increased BAT activation most likely drove the increased tail heat dissipation to maintain thermostasis. Our results emphasize the quantitative role of brown fat as the functional target of β3-agonism in obesity. Copyright © 2016 the American Physiological Society.

  3. The effects of treadmill exercise on expression of UCP-2 of brown adipose tissue and TNF-α of soleus muscle in obese Zucker rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Dong-Hee; Kim, Seok-Hwan; Kim, Won-Hee; Moon, Chae-Ryen

    2013-12-01

    Sorts of abnormal state, obesity and inflammation are involved in a number of serious disease occurring and both of them became important research topics among molecular biologists. UCP-2 and TNF-α respectively reflecting obese and inflammatory status have often been used to evaluate the effects of independent variable, such as exercise, on them. Because exercise has shown its potent control on obesity and inflammation, it is necessary to determine if exercise is working via same bioindices. The purpose of this study was to determine the effects of different treadmill exercise intensities on UCP-2 of brown adipose tissue and TNF-α of soleus muscle during 8 weeks in Zucker rat. Zucker rats were divided into four groups (n = 7 in each group): control group, low intensity exercise group, moderate intensity exercise group and high intensity exercise group. Zucker rats of the exercise groups were made to run on a motorized treadmill for 30 minutes once a day during 8 weeks. Rats were sacrificed 24 hours after the last bout of exercise. Blood glucose in Zucker rats were measured by Gluco-Card Ⅱ. Brown adipose tissue were extracted to analyze the level of UCP-2 and TNF-α, respectively. UCP-2 and TNF-α were analyzed using the Western Blotting technique. Statistical techniques for data analysis were repeated measure ANOVA and one way ANOVA to determine the difference between groups, and for post hoc test was Duncan' test. The 5% level of significance was utilized as the critical level for acceptance of hypotheses for the study. The following results were obtained from this study; UCP-2 protein expression of brown adipose tissue in Zucker rats were increased significantly following exercise of the low and moderate intensities compared to those of control group after 8 weeks. It was shown that TNF-α protein expression of soleus muscle in Zucker rats were decreased significantly following exercise of the low and moderate intensities compared to those of control group

  4. beta3-Adrenergic-dependent and -independent mechanisms participate in cold-induced modulation of insulin signal transduction in brown adipose tissue of rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gasparetti, Alessandra L; Alvarez-Rojas, Fernanda; de Araujo, Eliana P; Hirata, Aparecida E; Saad, Mário J A; Velloso, Lício A

    2005-03-01

    During cold exposure, homeothermic animals mobilize glucose with higher efficiency than at thermoneutrality. An interaction between the insulin signal transduction machinery and high sympathetic tonus is thought to play an important role in this phenomenon. In the present study, rats were exposed to cold during 8 days and treated, or not, with a beta3-adrenergic agonist, BRL37344 sodium 4-2-2-(3-chlorophenyl)-2-hydroxyethyl amino propyl phenoxy-acetic acid sodium (BRL37344), or antagonist, SR59230A 3-(2-ethylphenoxy)-[(1S)-1,2,3,4-tetrahydronaphth-1-ylamino]-(2S)-2-propanol oxalate (SR59230A), to evaluate the cross-talk between insulin and beta3-adrenergic intracellular signaling in brown adipose tissue. The drugs did not modify food ingestion, body temperature, and body weight in control and cold-exposed rats. Treatment of control rats with BRL37344 led to higher insulin-induced tyrosine phosphorylation of the insulin receptors, insulin receptor substrate (IRS)-1 and ERK, higher insulin-induced IRS-1/PI3-kinase association, and higher [Ser(473)] phosphorylation of Akt. Cold exposure alone promoted higher insulin-induced tyrosine phosphorylation of the insulin receptors, IRS-1, IRS-2, and ERK, and higher insulin-induced IRS-1 and IRS-2/PI3-kinase association. Except for the regulation of ERK, SR59230A abolished all the cold-induced effects upon the insulin signal transduction pathway. However, this antagonist only partially inhibited the cold-induced increase of glucose uptake. Thus, the sympathetic tonus generated during cold-exposure acts, in brown adipose tissue, through the beta3-adrenergic receptor and modulates insulin signal transduction, with the exception of ERK. However, insulin-independent mechanisms other than beta3-adrenergic activation participate in cold-induced glucose uptake in brown adipose tissue of rats.

  5. Molecular identification of Heterakis spumosa obtained from brown rats (Rattus norvegicus) in Japan and its infectivity in experimental mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Šnábel, Viliam; Utsuki, Daisuke; Kato, Takehiro; Sunaga, Fujiko; Ooi, Hong-Kean; Gambetta, Barbara; Taira, Kensuke

    2014-09-01

    Heterakis spumosa is a nematode of invasive rodents, mainly affiliated with Rattus spp. of Asian origin. Despite the ecological importance and cosmopolitan distribution, little information is available on the genetic characteristics and infectivity to experimental animals of this roundworm. Heterakis isolates obtained from naturally infected brown rats caught in 2007 in the city of Sagamihara, east central Honshu, Japan, and maintained by laboratory passages were subjected to mitochondrial sequence analysis and experimental infection in mice. Sequencing of the cox1 gene revealed that nucleotides of H. spumosa and previously examined Heterakis isolonche isolates from gallinaceous birds in Japan differed by 11.2-12.2% that conforms to the range expected for interspecific differences. The two H. spumosa isolates differed by a single 138T/C non-synonymous substitution in the 393-bp mt sequence. In a dendrogram, the H. spumosa samples formed a subcluster with members of the nematode superfamily Heterakoidea, H. isolonche and Ascaridia galli. In an experimental infection study, ICR, AKR, B10.BR and C57BL/6 mice strains were inoculated with 200 H. spumosa eggs/head and necropsied at 14 and 90 days post-inoculation (DPI) when the number of worms was recorded. Eggs were initially detected in faeces from 32-35 DPI in ICR, AKR and B10.BR mice and the highest mean number of eggs per gram of faeces (EPG) was 4,800 at 38 DPI, 2,200 at 58 DPI and 800 at 44 and 72 DPI in ICR, AKR and B10.BR mice, respectively. No eggs were observed in faeces of the C57BL/6 mouse strain during the experiment. A similar number of juvenile worms were isolated from all mouse strains at 14 DPI, whereas no adult worms were detected in C57BL/6 mice at 90 DPI.

  6. Brown Syndrome

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... extraction) have also been linked to acquired Brown syndrome. Inflammation of the tendon-trochlea complex (from adult and juvenile rheumatoid arthritis, systemic lupus erythematosus and sinusitis) can be ... syndrome hereditary? Hereditary cases of Brown syndrome are rare. ...

  7. Effectiveness of Brown Algae Extract to Reduce Serum Malondialdehyde and Protein Carbonyl Levels in Streptozotocin-Induced Sprague Dawley Rats

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lusiana Batubara

    2017-03-01

    Results: There were no significant differences in serum MDA levels among groups (p=0,405. However, serum PCO level in group administered with 450mg/kgBW of brown algae extract decreased significantly compared to control group (p=0.001, group administered with 150mg/kgBW (p=0.001 and 300mg/kgBW (p=0,037. Conclusion: Administration of brown algae extract did not decrease serum MDA levels significantly. Administration of 450mg/kgBW brown algae extract is effective to decrease serum PCO level significantly.

  8. A Mixed Methods Approach to Exploring the Relationship between Norway Rat (Rattus norvegicus) Abundance and Features of the Urban Environment in an Inner-City Neighborhood of Vancouver, Canada

    Science.gov (United States)

    Himsworth, Chelsea G.; Parsons, Kirbee L.; Feng, Alice Y. T.; Kerr, Thomas; Jardine, Claire M.; Patrick, David M.

    2014-01-01

    Urban rats (Rattus spp.) are among the most ubiquitous pest species in the world. Previous research has shown that rat abundance is largely determined by features of the environment; however, the specific urban environmental factors that influence rat population density within cities have yet to be clearly identified. Additionally, there are no well described tools or methodologies for conducting an in-depth evaluation of the relationship between urban rat abundance and the environment. In this study, we developed a systematic environmental observation tool using methods borrowed from the field of systematic social observation. This tool, which employed a combination of quantitative and qualitative methodologies, was then used to identify environmental factors associated with the relative abundance of Norway rats (Rattus norvegicus) in an inner-city neighborhood of Vancouver, Canada. Using a multivariate zero-inflated negative binomial model, we found that a variety of factors, including specific land use, building condition, and amount of refuse, were related to rat presence and abundance. Qualitative data largely supported and further clarified observed statistical relationships, but also identified conflicting and unique situations not easily captured through quantitative methods. Overall, the tool helped us to better understand the relationship between features of the urban environment and relative rat abundance within our study area and may useful for studying environmental determinants of zoonotic disease prevalence/distribution among urban rat populations in the future. PMID:24830847

  9. Lenses from Brown‐Norway pigmented rats are more tolerant to in vitro ultraviolet irradiation than lenses from Fischer‐344 albino rats

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Löfgren, Stefan

    2012-01-01

    ...) cataractogenesis between pigmented and albino rats can be seen also with in vitro irradiation. The shielding effect of the iris and UVR absorption in the anterior segment is nullified, and inherent differences in lenticular UVR...

  10. The Growth of Brown Adipose Tissue in Cold-acclimatized Rats after Depletion of Mast Cell Histamine by Compound 48/80

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Daló Nelson L

    1998-01-01

    Full Text Available Cold acclimatization (4-5°C is accompanied by 2-3 fold increase of brown adipose tissue (BAT. This rapid growth of interscapular BAT was studied after histamine depletion. In control rats maintained at room temperature (28 ± 2°C the BAT histamine content was 23.4 ± 5.9 (mean ± SD µg/g of tissue and cold acclimatization (5±1°C produced a significant increase of BAT weight, but reduced the histamine content to 8.4 ± 1.9 µg/g. The total weight of BAT after 20 days of acclimatization was unaffected by depletion of histamine due to compound 48/80. The low level of histamine in BAT of cold acclimatized rats could be due to a fast rate of amine utilization; alternatively an altered synthesis or storage process may occur during acclimatization.

  11. Demodectic mites of the brown rat Rattus norvegicus (Berkenhout, 1769) (Rodentia, Muridae) with a new finding of Demodex ratticola Bukva, 1995 (Acari, Demodecidae).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Izdebska, Joanna N; Rolbiecki, Leszek

    2012-01-01

    Demodex ratticola was recorded in the brown rat Rattus norvegicus from northern Poland. It is a skin mite specific to this host, previously recorded only in the Czech Republic. D. ratticola was found at a prevalence 65.0% and mean intensity 12.7 in skin samples taken from the regions of lips, nose and chin. Furthermore, three other species from the family of Demodecidae were recorded, including Demodex nanus found in skin samples from different parts of the body and characterised by the highest parameters of infestation (100.0%, 25.2), D. ratti (50.0%, 3.3) found in the head skin and D. norvegicus (30.0%, 3.5) found in the genital and anal regions. The identified demodectic mites did not cause any pathological symptoms in rats.

  12. [The effects of prolonged selection for behavior on the stress response and Activity of the reproductive system of male Brown rats (Rattus norvegicus)].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prasolova, L A; Gerbek, Iu É; Gulevich, R G; Shikhevich, S G; Konoshenko, M Iu; Kozhemiakina, R V; Os'kina, I N; Pliusnina, I Z

    2014-08-01

    Two Norway rat (Rattus norvegicus) populations contrasting in behavior have been raised at the Institute of Cytology and Genetics, Novosibirsk, Russia with long-term selection for the absence or enhancement of an aggressive response towards humans. They are designated as tame and aggressive, respectively. In this work we investigated the effects of the selection on behavior, stress responsiveness, and fertility in males of the 78th generation. It is shown that the difference between the strains in their response to humans remains the same as in previous generations. However, the differences in stress response and maturation age contradict earlier data. For the first time, we note a higher glucocorticoid-mediated response to restriction stress and retarded sexual maturation in tame rats compared to aggressive ones, according to morphometric indices of gonads and testosterone levels. It is conceivable that the change in selection effects is determined by the disjunction of the directions of selection for behavior and the modification of the stress response. This study is the first to characterize males recently (six or seven generations of propagation in captivity) caught in the wild with regard to the indices under consideration and used as a control group. Wild rats have the highest stress response and rate of sexual maturation as compared to those selected.

  13. Alterations in lipid metabolism and thermogenesis with emergence of brown adipocytes in white adipose tissue in diet-induced obesity-resistant Lou/C rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Veyrat-Durebex, Christelle; Poher, Anne-Laure; Caillon, Aurélie; Montet, Xavier; Rohner-Jeanrenaud, Françoise

    2011-06-01

    Recent studies describe the Lou/C rat as a model of resistance to age- and diet-induced obesity and suggest a preferential channeling of nutrients toward utilization rather than storage under standard feeding conditions. The purpose of the present study was to evaluate lipid metabolism of Lou/C and Wistar rats under a high-fat (HF) diet. Four-month-old male Lou/C and Wistar animals were submitted to a 40% HF diet for 5-9 wk. Evolution of food intake, body weight, and body composition, hormonal parameters, and expression of key transcription factors and enzymes involved in lipid metabolism were determined. Wistar rats developed obesity after 5 wk of HF diet, as previously described. Among the various parameters measured, accumulation of intraperitoneal fat was particularly evident in HF-fed Wistar rats. In these animals, thermogenesis was, however, stimulated as a likely compensatory mechanism against the development of obesity. On the contrary, Lou/C animals failed to develop obesity under such a diet, and intraperitoneal fat, not including epididymal and retroperitoneal fat depots, was virtually absent. Enzyme measurements confirmed lipid utilization rather than storage, which was accompanied by the striking emergence of uncoupling protein-1, characteristic of brown adipocytes, in white adipose tissue, particularly in the subcutaneous depot.

  14. Protective effects of pre-germinated brown rice diet on low levels of Pb-induced learning and memory deficits in developing rat.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Rong; Lu, Hongzhi; Tian, Su; Yin, Jie; Chen, Qing; Ma, Li; Cui, Shijie; Niu, Yujie

    2010-03-30

    Lead (Pb) is a known neurotoxicant in humans and experimental animals. Numerous studies have provided evidence that humans, especially young children, and animals chronically intoxicated with low levels of Pb show learning and memory impairments. Unfortunately, Pb-poisoning cases continue to occur in many countries. Because the current treatment options are very limited, there is a need for alternative methods to attenuate Pb toxicity. In this study, the weaning (postnatal day 21, PND21) rats were randomly divided into five groups: the control group (AIN-93G diet, de-ionized water), the lead acetate (PbAC) group (AIN-93G diet, 2g/L PbAC in de-ionized water), the lead acetate+WR group (white rice diet, 2g/L PbAC in de-ionized water; PbAC+WR), the lead acetate+BR group (brown rice diet, 2g/L PbAC in de-ionized water; PbAC+BR) and the lead acetate+PR group (pre-germinated brown rice diet, 2g/L PbAC in de-ionized water; PbAC+PR). The animals received the different diets until PND60, and then the experiments were terminated. The protective effects of pre-germinated brown rice (PR) on Pb-induced learning and memory impairment in weaning rats were assessed by the Morris water maze and one-trial-learning passive avoidance test. The anti-oxidative effects of feeding a PR diet to Pb-exposed rats were evaluated. The levels of reactive oxygen species (ROS) were determined by flow cytometry. The levels of 8-hydroxy-2-deoxyguanosine (8-OHdG), gamma-aminobutyric acid (GABA) and glutamate were determined by HPLC. Our data showed that feeding a PR diet decreased the accumulation of lead and decreased Pb-induced learning and memory deficits in developing rats. The mechanisms might be related to the anti-oxidative effects and large amount of GABA in PR. Our study provides a regimen to reduce Pb-induced toxicity, especially future learning and memory deficits in the developing brain.

  15. Susceptibility of adult and senescent brown norway rats to repeated ozone exposure: An assessment of behavior, serum biochemistry and cardiopulmonary function

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tropospheric ozone (03) is a pervasive air pollutant that produces pulmonary and cardiovascular dysfunction and there is growing evidence suggesting neurological dysfunction as well. Young and old individuals are generally recognized as being susceptible to ozone toxicity; howeve...

  16. Dose-response and time-course of neurotoxicity and tissue concentrations of carbaryl in Brown Norway rats from preweaning to senescence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Factors impacting sensitivity to chemicals across life stages include toxicokinetic and toxicodynamic changes. We systematically compared the dose-response (3, 7.5, 15,22.5 mg/kg) and time-course (3 or 15 mg/kg at 30, 60, 120, 240 min) of acute effects of carbaryl (oral gavage) i...

  17. AGING AND LIFE-STAGE SUSCEPTIBILITY: TOLUENE EFFECTS ON PROTEIN CARBONYL CONTENT IN FRONTAL CORTEX AND CEREBELLUM OF BROWN NORWAY RATS.

    Science.gov (United States)

    The influence of aging on susceptibility to environmental contaminants is poorly understood, largely due to a lack of data on exposures in older adults and adequate animal models. We examined the acute effects of the volatile organic compound, toluene, in a study investigating m...

  18. Ozone Effects on Protein Carbonyl Content in the Frontal Cortex and Cerebellum of Young-Adult, Middle Age, and Senescent Brown Norway Rats

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oxidative stress (OS) plays an important role in susceptibility and disease in old age. Understanding age-related susceptibility is a critical part of community-based human health risk assessment of chemical exposures. There is growing concern over a common air pollutant, ozone ...

  19. Effects of physical exercise on myokines expression and brown adipose-like phenotype modulation in rats fed a high-fat diet.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rocha-Rodrigues, Sílvia; Rodríguez, Amaia; Gouveia, Alexandra M; Gonçalves, Inês O; Becerril, Sara; Ramírez, Beatriz; Beleza, Jorge; Frühbeck, Gema; Ascensão, António; Magalhães, José

    2016-11-15

    Exercise-stimulated myokine secretion into circulation may be related with browning in white adipose tissue (WAT), representing a positive metabolic effect on whole-body fat mass. However, limited information is yet available regarding the impact of exercise on myokine-related modulation of adipocyte phenotype in WAT from obese rats. Sprague-Dawley rats (n=60) were divided into sedentary and voluntary physical activity (VPA) groups and fed with standard (35kcal% fat) or high-fat (HFD, 71kcal% fat)-isoenergetic diets. The VPA-groups had unrestricted access to wheel running throughout the protocol. After-9weeks, half of sedentary standard (SS) and sedentary HFD (HS)-fed animals were exercised on treadmill (endurance training, ET) for 8-weeks while maintaining the dietary treatments. The adipocyte hypertrophy induced by HFD were attenuated by VPA and ET. HFD decreased 5' AMP-activated protein kinase (AMPK) activity in muscle as well as peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor gamma coactivator-1α (PGC-1α) and uncoupling protein 1 (UCP1) proteins in eWAT, while not affecting circulating irisin. VPA increased eWAT Tmem26 mRNA levels in the standard diet-fed group, whereas ET increased AMPK, interleukin 6 (IL-6) and fibronectin type III domain-containing protein 5 (FNDC5) protein expression in muscle, but had no impact on circulating irisin protein content. In eWAT, ET increased bone morphogenetic protein 7 (Bmp7), Cidea and PGC-1α in both diet-fed animals, whereas BMP7, Prdm16, UCP1 and FNDC5 only in standard diet-fed group. Data suggest that ET-induced myokine production seems to contribute, at least in part, to the "brown-like" phenotype in WAT from rats fed a HFD. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  20. Recovery effect of pre-germinated brown rice on the alteration of sperm quality, testicular structure and androgen receptor expression in rat model of depression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roboon, J; Nudmamud-Thanoi, S; Thanoi, S

    2017-02-01

    Depression and antidepressant drugs induce adverse effects in male reproduction. Therefore, it is important to investigate alternative treatment for depression without adverse effects on the male reproductive system. The aim of this study was to determine the effect of pre-germinated brown rice (PGBR) on sperm quality, testicular structure and androgen receptor (AR) expression in rat model of depression. Male Sprague Dawley rats were divided into five groups including control (distilled water only), depression induced by forced swimming test (FST), FST + fluoxetine (antidepressant drug), FST + GABA (gamma-aminobutyric acid) (standard) and FST + PGBR. When compared with the control, sperm motility showed a significant decrease in FST + fluoxetine group. Sperm morphology also decreased significantly in depression and FST + fluoxetine groups. The morphological changes of seminiferous tubules showed significant increases in depression and FST + fluoxetine groups, while AR expression showed significant decreases in depression, FST + fluoxetine and FST + GABA groups. Interestingly, there were no significant differences in all sperm quality parameters, testicular structure and AR expression in FST + PGBR group. These findings reflect the recovery effects of PGBR treatment on sperm quality, morphological changes of seminiferous tubules and AR expression in stress-induced rats. Therefore, PGBR may potentially develop for the treatment for depression without adverse effect on male reproduction. © 2016 Blackwell Verlag GmbH.

  1. Go, surf Norway

    OpenAIRE

    L'orange, Håkon

    2017-01-01

    How can a digital service encourage surfers in Norway to catch more Norwegian waves? Through a design ethnographic approach I have explored the surf community and daily life of surfers in Norway. Long travel distances, few surf friends and unpredictable surf conditions are amongst the challenges many surfers face. By applying these insights I have designed a solution that aims to lower the threshold to go surfing in Norway. The design proposal, Bølgen is a digital service provided by the Norw...

  2. Inhibition of Formation of Azoxymethane-induced Colonic Aberrant Crypt Foci in Rats by Edible Green AlgaeCapsosiphon fulvescensand Brown AlgaeHizikia fusiforme.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Son, Young-Sook; Ullah, H M Arif; Elfadl, Ahmed K; Ghim, Soong-Gu; Chung, Myung-Jin; Kim, Yong Deuk; Lee, Eun-Joo; Kang, Kyung-Ku; Jeong, Kyu-Shik

    2018-01-01

    Capsosiphon fulvescens (green seaweed) and Hizikia fusiforme (brown seaweed) are marine algae consumed as food supplements, especially in Japan, China and Korea, and are considered traditional medicinal tonics for certain ailments. The aim of this study was to investigate the possible inhibitory effects of dietary C. fulvescens and H. fusiforme on azoxymethane (AOM)-induced colorectal cancer (CRC) in rats. F344 male rats (5 weeks, 150 g) were divided into six groups as follows. Group 1: Injected with normal saline solution and fed control diet (untreated control). Group 2: Injected with AOM and fed control diet (treated control). Group 3: Injected with AOM and fed 1% C. fulvescens diet. Group 4: Injected with AOM and fed 2% C. fulvescens diet. Group 5: Injected with AOM and fed 2% H. fusiforme diet. Group 6: Injected with AOM and fed 6% H. fusiforme diet. Test animals received subcutaneous injections of AOM (15 mg/1 ml/kg body weight) once a week for 2 weeks to induce aberrant crypt foci (ACF) in treated control and experimental groups. We evaluated the effects of dietary C. fulvescens and H. fusiforme at two different dose levels: 1 and 2% C. fulvescens, and 2 and 6% H. fusiforme, on colonic carcinogenesis by AOM in rats. Our results suggest that body weights were not significantly different amongst groups. We found that feeding C. fulvescens and H. fusiforme with a control diet significantly (p<0.05) inhibited the development of ACF in experimental groups. C. fulvescens and H. fusiforme in food also significantly (p<0.05) reduced the proliferating cell nuclear antigen labeling index in the colonic tissues of experimental groups. These results demonstrate the chemopreventive potential of C. fulvescens and H. fusiforme against CRC in an AOM-induced rats. Copyright© 2018, International Institute of Anticancer Research (Dr. George J. Delinasios), All rights reserved.

  3. Discovery of a Novel Coronavirus, China Rattus Coronavirus HKU24, from Norway Rats Supports the Murine Origin of Betacoronavirus 1 and Has Implications for the Ancestor of Betacoronavirus Lineage A

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lau, Susanna K. P.; Woo, Patrick C. Y.; Li, Kenneth S. M.; Tsang, Alan K. L.; Fan, Rachel Y. Y.; Luk, Hayes K. H.; Cai, Jian-Piao; Chan, Kwok-Hung; Zheng, Bo-Jian; Wang, Ming

    2014-01-01

    ABSTRACT We discovered a novel Betacoronavirus lineage A coronavirus, China Rattus coronavirus (ChRCoV) HKU24, from Norway rats in China. ChRCoV HKU24 occupied a deep branch at the root of members of Betacoronavirus 1, being distinct from murine coronavirus and human coronavirus HKU1. Its unique putative cleavage sites between nonstructural proteins 1 and 2 and in the spike (S) protein and low sequence identities to other lineage A betacoronaviruses (βCoVs) in conserved replicase domains support ChRCoV HKU24 as a separate species. ChRCoV HKU24 possessed genome features that resemble those of both Betacoronavirus 1 and murine coronavirus, being closer to Betacoronavirus 1 in most predicted proteins but closer to murine coronavirus by G+C content, the presence of a single nonstructural protein (NS4), and an absent transcription regulatory sequence for the envelope (E) protein. Its N-terminal domain (NTD) demonstrated higher sequence identity to the bovine coronavirus (BCoV) NTD than to the mouse hepatitis virus (MHV) NTD, with 3 of 4 critical sugar-binding residues in BCoV and 2 of 14 contact residues at the MHV NTD/murine CEACAM1a interface being conserved. Molecular clock analysis dated the time of the most recent common ancestor of ChRCoV HKU24, Betacoronavirus 1, and rabbit coronavirus HKU14 to about the year 1400. Cross-reactivities between other lineage A and B βCoVs and ChRCoV HKU24 nucleocapsid but not spike polypeptide were demonstrated. Using the spike polypeptide-based Western blot assay, we showed that only Norway rats and two oriental house rats from Guangzhou, China, were infected by ChRCoV HKU24. Other rats, including Norway rats from Hong Kong, possessed antibodies only against N protein and not against the spike polypeptide, suggesting infection by βCoVs different from ChRCoV HKU24. ChRCoV HKU24 may represent the murine origin of Betacoronavirus 1, and rodents are likely an important reservoir for ancestors of lineage A βCoVs. IMPORTANCE While

  4. Invasive rats on tropical islands: Their population biology and impacts on native species

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Grant A. Harper

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available The three most invasive rat species, black or ship rat Rattus rattus, brown or Norway rats, R. norvegicus and Pacific rat, R. exulans have been incrementally introduced to islands as humans have explored the world’s oceans. They have caused serious deleterious effects through predation and competition, and extinction of many species on tropical islands, many of which are biodiversity hotspots. All three rat species are found in virtually all habitat types, including mangrove and arid shrub land. Black rats tend to dominate the literature but despite this the population biology of invasive rats, particularly Norway rats, is poorly researched on tropical islands. Pacific rats can often exceed population densities of well over 100 rats ha−1 and black rats can attain densities of 119 rats ha−1, which is much higher than recorded on most temperate islands. High densities are possibly due to high recruitment of young although the data to support this are limited. The generally aseasonally warm climate can lead to year-round breeding but can be restricted by either density-dependent effects interacting with resource constraints often due to aridity. Apparent adverse impacts on birds have been well recorded and almost all tropical seabirds and land birds can be affected by rats. On the Pacific islands, black rats have added to declines and extinctions of land birds caused initially by Pacific rats. Rats have likely caused unrecorded extinctions of native species on tropical islands. Further research required on invasive rats on tropical islands includes the drivers of population growth and carrying capacities that result in high densities and how these differ to temperate islands, habitat use of rats in tropical vegetation types and interactions with other tropical species, particularly the reptiles and invertebrates, including crustaceans.

  5. Unmaking Brown

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lockette, Tim

    2010-01-01

    America's schools are more segregated now than they were in the late 1960s. More than 50 years after "Brown v. Board of Education," educators need to radically rethink the meaning of "school choice." For decades at Wake County, buses would pick up public school students in largely minority communities along the Raleigh…

  6. Biotic and abiotic effects on the intestinal helminth community of the brown rat Rattus norvegicus from Rio de Janeiro, Brazil.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Simões, R O; Luque, J L; Gentile, R; Rosa, M C S; Costa-Neto, S; Maldonado, A

    2016-01-01

    Rattus norvegicus has attracted much attention because of its role as a reservoir of zoonotic pathogens. This work aimed to identify the intestinal helminth species in R. norvegicus and to analyse the effects of temperature, rainfall, host age and sex on the helminth community structure. Moreover, this study investigated the possible associations among helminth species in an urban population of R. norvegicus in São Gonçalo, Rio de Janeiro, sampled during the rainy and dry seasons over a span of 2 years. A total of 112 rats were infected by six species of helminths. The nematode Nippostrongylus brasiliensis was the most prevalent and abundant species, with high mean intensity in both seasons, followed by Strongyloides venezuelensis, Heterakis spumosa, Raillietina sp., Hymenolepis nana and Moniliformis moniliformis. Co-occurrence was found between N. brasiliensis and S. venezuelensis and between N. brasiliensis and H. spumosa. The occurrence of S. venezuelensis was related to rainfall. The understanding of the helminth community structure in this synanthropic rat provides basic information on parasites of public health importance, as two helminth species (H. nana and M. moniliformis) recovered from rats in the urban area studied can infect humans.

  7. Bone mass density estimation: Archimede’s principle versus automatic X-ray histogram and edge detection technique in ovariectomized rats treated with germinated brown rice bioactives

    Science.gov (United States)

    Muhammad, Sani Ismaila; Maznah, Ismail; Mahmud, Rozi Binti; Esmaile, Maher Faik; Zuki, Abu Bakar Zakaria

    2013-01-01

    Background Bone mass density is an important parameter used in the estimation of the severity and depth of lesions in osteoporosis. Estimation of bone density using existing methods in experimental models has its advantages as well as drawbacks. Materials and methods In this study, the X-ray histogram edge detection technique was used to estimate the bone mass density in ovariectomized rats treated orally with germinated brown rice (GBR) bioactives, and the results were compared with estimated results obtained using Archimede’s principle. New bone cell proliferation was assessed by histology and immunohistochemical reaction using polyclonal nuclear antigen. Additionally, serum alkaline phosphatase activity, serum and bone calcium and zinc concentrations were detected using a chemistry analyzer and atomic absorption spectroscopy. Rats were divided into groups of six as follows: sham (nonovariectomized, nontreated); ovariectomized, nontreated; and ovariectomized and treated with estrogen, or Remifemin®, GBR-phenolics, acylated steryl glucosides, gamma oryzanol, and gamma amino-butyric acid extracted from GBR at different doses. Results Our results indicate a significant increase in alkaline phosphatase activity, serum and bone calcium, and zinc and ash content in the treated groups compared with the ovariectomized nontreated group (P principle and the edge detection technique between the treated groups (r2 = 0.737, P = 0.004). Conclusion Our study shows that GBR bioactives increase bone density, which might be via the activation of zinc formation and increased calcium content, and that X-ray edge detection technique is effective in the measurement of bone density and can be employed effectively in this respect. PMID:24187491

  8. Beta-3 adrenergic agonist, BRL-26830A, and alpha/beta blocker, arotinolol, markedly increase regional blood flow in the brown adipose tissue in anesthetized rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Takahashi, H; Yoshida, T; Nishimura, M; Nakanishi, T; Kondo, M; Yoshimura, M

    1992-09-01

    Regional vascular effects of some adrenergic agents, focussing on brown adipose tissue (BAT), were investigated using tracer microspheres with a reference sample method in the anesthetized rat. Intravenous injections of 0.5 mg/kg BRL-26830A, a beta 3-adrenergic agonist, increased heart rate, but changes in blood pressure and cardiac output were not significant. The drug decreased blood flow in the brain, the spleen and the kidneys, but markedly increased it in BAT. At 2 mg/kg, arotinolol, an alpha/beta-adrenergic blocker, decreased blood pressure by 20 mmHg and increased cardiac output by 95 ml/min/kg. It slightly but significantly decreased blood flow in the liver and the spleen, but markedly increased the flow in BAT. Acebutolol, a beta 1-adrenergic blocker, decreased blood flow in the liver, the spleen, the pancreas, the kidneys, the adrenals, the skeletal muscle and the skin. Bunazosin, an alpha 1-adrenergic blocker, decreased it in all organs and tissue expect the brain and BAT. The pattern of redistribution of blood flow by arotinolol was very similar to that caused by BRL-26830A. Acebutolol and bunazosin rather decreased the blood flow in the BAT. These results indicate that stimulation of beta 3-adrenergic receptors, in BAT results in vasodilation, and that arotinolol may bind to those beta 3-adrenergic receptors.

  9. Elevated Aminopeptidase P Attenuates Cerebral Arterial Responses to Bradykinin in Fawn-Hooded Hypertensive Rats.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Md Abdul Hye Khan

    Full Text Available Cerebral arterial myogenic and autoregulatory responses are impaired in Fawn Hooded hypertensive (FHH rats. Cerebral autoregulatory responses are restored in the congenic rat strain in which a segment of chromosome 1 from the Brown Norway (BN rat was transferred into the FHH genetic background (FHH.1BN. The impact of this region on cerebral arterial dilator responses remains unknown. Aminopeptidase is a gene that was transferred into the FHH genetic background to generate the FHH.1BN rats and is responsible for degradation of the vasodilator bradykinin. Thus, we hypothesized that FHH rats will have increased aminopeptidase P levels with impaired cerebral arterial responses to bradykinin compared to BN and FHH.1BN rats. We demonstrated higher cerebral arterial expression of aminopeptidase P in FHH compared to BN rats. Accordingly, we demonstrated markedly impaired cerebral arterial dilation to bradykinin in FHH compared to BN rats. Interestingly, aminopeptidase P expression was lower in FHH.1BN compared to FHH rats. Decreased aminopeptidase P levels in FHH.1BN rats were associated with increased cerebral arterial bradykinin-induced dilator responses. Aminopeptidase P inhibition by apstatin improved cerebral arterial bradykinin dilator responses in FHH rats to a level similar to FHH.1BN rats. Unlike bradykinin, cerebral arterial responses to acetylcholine were similar between FHH and FHH.1BN groups. These findings indicate decreased bradykinin bioavailability contributes to impaired cerebral arterial dilation in FHH rats. Overall, these data indicate an important role of aminopeptidase P in the impaired cerebral arterial function in FHH rat.

  10. Malthus on norway.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Drake, M

    1966-11-01

    Abstract Malthus visited Norway in 1799 and his impression of the country's demographic experience was important in determining the character of the second edition of his Essay on the Principle of Population. He relied for the most part on non-statistical sources. This led him to exaggerate, e.g. the size of households, the number of unmarried farm servants and to miss important features, e.g. differences in marital age patterns, regional variations in fertility and nuptiality. The bias of his itinerary and of his main informants is also apparent. Statistical material not available to Malthus indicates that he was right to stress the late age at marriage in Norway but wrong to ignore the operation of the positive check. Mortality was frequently high in late eighteenth and early nineteenth-century Norway, much higher than Malthus ever realized. This destroys the symmetry, as well as the morality, of Malthus's exposition.

  11. Sports Diplomacy of Norway

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kobierecki Michał Marcin

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available Norway is perceived as a country with a clear international identity. The aim of the article is to investigate the sports diplomacy of Norway and to examine its influence on the international brand of this country. The author will define the term “sports diplomacy” and attempt to outline the strategy of Norway’s public diplomacy; an analysis of the methods used in Norwegian sports diplomacy will follow. The main hypothesis of this paper is that sports diplomacy only plays a subsidiary role in Norwegian nation branding.

  12. Brown kelp modulates endocrine hormones in female sprague-dawley rats and in human luteinized granulosa cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Skibola, Christine F; Curry, John D; VandeVoort, Catherine; Conley, Alan; Smith, Martyn T

    2005-02-01

    Epidemiological studies suggest that populations consuming typical Asian diets have a lower incidence of hormone-dependent cancers than populations consuming Western diets. These dietary differences have been mainly attributed to higher soy intakes among Asians. However, studies from our laboratory suggest that the anti-estrogenic effects of dietary kelp also may contribute to these reduced cancer rates. As a follow-up to previous findings of endocrine modulation related to kelp ingestion in a pilot study of premenopausal women, we investigated the endocrine modulating effects of kelp (Fucus vesiculosus) in female rats and human luteinized granulosa cells (hLGC). Kelp administration lengthened the rat estrous cycle from 4.3 +/- 0.96 to 5.4 +/- 1.7 d at 175 mg . kg(-1) body wt . d(-1) (P = 0.05) and to 5.9 +/- 1.9 d at 350 mg . kg(-1) . d(-1) (P = 0.002) and also led to a 100% increase in the length of diestrus (P = 0.02). Following 175 mg . kg(-1) . d(-1) treatment for 2 wk, serum 17beta-estradiol levels were reduced from 48.9 +/- 4.5 to 40.2 +/- 3.2 ng/L (P = 0.13). After 4 wk, 17beta-estradiol levels were reduced to 36.7 +/- 2.2 ng/L (P = 0.02). In hLGC, 25, 50, and 75 micromol/L treatment reduced 17beta-estradiol levels from 4732 +/- 591 to 3632 +/- 758, 3313 +/- 373, and 3060 +/- 538 ng/L, respectively. Kelp treatment also led to modest elevations in hLGC culture progesterone levels. Kelp extract inhibited the binding of estradiol to estrogen receptor alpha and beta and that of progesterone to the progesterone receptor, with IC(50) values of 42.4, 31.8, and 40.7 micromol/L, respectively. These data show endocrine modulating effects of kelp at relevant doses and suggest that dietary kelp may contribute to the lower incidence of hormone-dependent cancers among the Japanese.

  13. Distribution of Leptospira interrogans by Multispacer Sequence Typing in Urban Norway Rats (Rattus norvegicus): A Survey in France in 2011-2013.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ayral, Florence; Zilber, Anne-Laure; Bicout, Dominique J; Kodjo, Angeli; Artois, Marc; Djelouadji, Zoheira

    2015-01-01

    Urban leptospirosis has increasingly been reported in both developing and developed countries. The control of the disease is limited because our understanding of basic aspects of the epidemiology, including the transmission routes of leptospires among rat populations, remains incomplete. Through the ability to distinguish among Leptospira strains in rats, multispacer sequence typing (MST) could provide a modern understanding of Leptospira epidemiology; however, to our knowledge, the distribution of Leptospira strains among urban rat colonies has not been investigated using MST. The objective of this study was to identify the Leptospira strains present in rats (Rattus norvegicus) in Lyon (France) using MST and to characterize their spatial distribution. Kidneys and urine were collected from rats trapped live in seven locations in the city and in one suburban location. Each location was considered to represent a rat colony. Bacterial cultures and quantitative polymerase chain reaction (qPCR) assays were performed, and the L. interrogans DNA identified was then genotyped using MST. The distributions of Leptospira strains were spatially described. Among 84 wild rats, MST profiles were obtained in 35 of 37 rats that had a positive result for L. interrogans by bacterial culture and/or qPCR analyses. All of the MST profiles were related to reference strains previously isolated from human patients that belong to the serogroup Icterohaemorrhagiae and the serovars [strain(s)] Copenhageni [Wijinberg or M20] (n = 26), Icterohaemorrhagiae [CHU Réunion] (n = 7), Icterohaemorrhagiae [R1] (n = 1) and Copenhageni [Shibaura 9] (n = 1). Each colony was infected with leptospires having the same MST profile. This study demonstrated that MST could be used for the purpose of field studies, either on culture isolates or on DNA extracted from kidneys and urine, to distinguish among L. interrogans isolates in rats. MST could thus be used to monitor their distributions in urban rats from

  14. Bone mass density estimation: Archimede’s principle versus automatic X-ray histogram and edge detection technique in ovariectomized rats treated with germinated brown rice bioactives

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Muhammad SI

    2013-10-01

    Full Text Available Sani Ismaila Muhammad,1,2 Ismail Maznah,1,3 Rozi Binti Mahmud,4 Maher Faik Esmaile,5 Zuki Abu Bakar Zakaria6 1Laboratory of Molecular Biomedicine, Institute of Bioscience, 2Department of Pharmacology and Toxicology, Faculty of Veterinary Medicine, Usmanu Danfodiyo University, Sokoto, Nigeria; 3Department of Nutrition and Dietetics, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences, 4Department of Radiology, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences, 5Department of Electrical and Electronic Engineering, Faculty of Engineering, 6Department of Pre-clinical Studies, Faculty of Veterinary Medicine, University Putra Malaysia, Selangor, Malaysia Background: Bone mass density is an important parameter used in the estimation of the severity and depth of lesions in osteoporosis. Estimation of bone density using existing methods in experimental models has its advantages as well as drawbacks. Materials and methods: In this study, the X-ray histogram edge detection technique was used to estimate the bone mass density in ovariectomized rats treated orally with germinated brown rice (GBR bioactives, and the results were compared with estimated results obtained using Archimede’s principle. New bone cell proliferation was assessed by histology and immunohistochemical reaction using polyclonal nuclear antigen. Additionally, serum alkaline phosphatase activity, serum and bone calcium and zinc concentrations were detected using a chemistry analyzer and atomic absorption spectroscopy. Rats were divided into groups of six as follows: sham (nonovariectomized, nontreated; ovariectomized, nontreated; and ovariectomized and treated with estrogen, or Remifemin®, GBR-phenolics, acylated steryl glucosides, gamma oryzanol, and gamma amino-butyric acid extracted from GBR at different doses. Results: Our results indicate a significant increase in alkaline phosphatase activity, serum and bone calcium, and zinc and ash content in the treated groups compared with the ovariectomized

  15. Brown recluse spider (image)

    Science.gov (United States)

    The brown recluse is a venomous spider most commonly found in midwestern and southern states of the United States. It ... inch overall and has long skinny legs. The brown recluse is brown with a characteristic dark violin-shaped ...

  16. Cystic cholangioma in the thoracic cavity of a rat.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Michimae, Yoshiko; Okimoto, Kazuo; Toyosawa, Kaoru; Matsumoto, Izumi; Kouchi, Mami; Tochitani, Tomoaki; Koujitani, Takatoshi; Funabashi, Hitoshi; Seki, Takaki

    2012-03-01

    A female congenic rat produced by repeated backcrossing of Nihon rats, a model for hereditary renal cell carcinoma, to Brown Norway rats was necropsied at 24 months of age. At necropsy, a white mass about 1 centimeter in size was observed in the thoracic cavity, and the mass partly adhered to the esophagus and the diaphragm. Histologically, the mass was clearly circumscribed by connective tissue, and consisted of neoplastic cuboidal epithelial cells that showed cystic tubular proliferation. Some islands of well-differentiated hepatocytes and some vessels were observed in the mass. Immunohistochemically, the tumor cells were strongly positive for cytokeratin and partly positive for vimentin but were negative for mesothelin and Von Willebrand Factor. The positive rate for Ki-67 was 2.4%. Based on these histological and immunohistochemical evidences, we diagnosed this tumor as a cystic cholangioma that might have arisen from the ectopic hepatic tissue in the thoracic cavity.

  17. Effects of the nonagouti coat-color allele on behavior of deer mice (Peromyscus maniculatus): a comparison with Norway rats (Rattus norvegicus).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hayssen, V

    1997-12-01

    The agouti locus influences coat color by antagonizing melanocyte-stimulating hormone (MSH) at its receptor on pigment cells and may antagonize MSH in neural tissue. This study replicates work on rats to assess whether behavioral (neural) effects of the agouti locus are as similar across mammals as those on coat color. Handling, open-field, platform jump, and food-novelty tests were conducted on agouti and nonagouti deer mice (Peromyscus maniculatus) following protocols in C. A. Cottle and E. O. Price (1987). As with rats, nonagouti deer mice were less aggressive, less active, and easier to handle compared with their agouti counterparts. Nonagouti deer mice also groomed more than agouti subjects. Thus, behavioral effects of the agouti locus are conservative, and agouti may be an important modulator of melanocortins in neural as well as integumentary tissue.

  18. Porphyrias in Norway.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mykletun, Mira; Aarsand, Aasne Karine; Støle, Egil; Villanger, Jørild Haugen; Tollånes, Mette Christophersen; Baravelli, Carl; Sandberg, Sverre

    2014-04-29

    Porphyria is an umbrella term for a group of largely hereditary diseases that are due to defective haem synthesis. The diseases have a varied and partly overlapping range of symptoms and presentations. The commonest forms of porphyria are porphyria cutanea tarda, acute intermittent porphyria and erythropoietic protoporphyria. The purpose of this study is to provide an overview of the prevalence and pathological manifestations of porphyrias in Norway. Information on all patients registered with the Norwegian Porphyria Centre (NAPOS) up to 2012 was used to estimate the prevalence and incidence of porphyrias in Norway. Figures on symptoms, precipitating factors and follow-up routines were obtained from the Norwegian Porphyria Registry, which includes 70% of Norwegians registered with NAPOS as having porphyria. The prevalence of porphyria cutanea tarda was approximately 10 : 100,000 and that of acute intermittent porphyria approximately 4 : 100,000. The total incidence of all porphyrias was approximately 0.5-1 : 100,000 per year. Diagnostic delay, i.e. the time passing between the onset of symptoms and diagnosis, varied from 1-17 years depending on the type of porphyria. There was wide variation in the frequency with which patients with the various types of porphyria went for medical check-ups. The prevalence of acute intermittent porphyria and porphyria cutanea tarda appears to be higher in Norway than in most other countries. Data from the Norwegian Porphyria Registry makes it possible to demonstrate differences in treatment and follow-up of porphyria patients and may be used to initiate necessary measures.

  19. Arctic security and Norway

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tamnes, Rolf

    2013-03-01

    Global warming is one of the most serious threats facing mankind. Many regions and countries will be affected, and there will be many losers. The earliest and most intense climatic changes are being experienced in the Arctic region. Arctic average temperature has risen at twice the rate of the global average in the past half century. These changes provide an early indication for the world of the environmental and societal significance of global warming. For that reason, the Arctic presents itself as an important scientific laboratory for improving our understanding of the causes and patterns of climate changes. The rapidly rising temperature threatens the Arctic ecosystem, but the human consequences seem to be far less dramatic there than in many other places in the world. According to the U.S. National Intelligence Council, Russia has the potential to gain the most from increasingly temperate weather, because its petroleum reserves become more accessible and because the opening of an Arctic waterway could provide economic and commercial advantages. Norway might also be fortunate. Some years ago, the Financial Times asked: #Left Double Quotation Mark#What should Norway do about the fact that global warming will make their climate more hospitable and enhance their financial situation, even as it inflicts damage on other parts of the world?#Right Double Quotation Mark#(Author)

  20. Brown Recluse Spider

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... 6.4-19.1mm) • Color: Golden brown • A dark violin/fiddle shape (see top photo) is located ... Habitat The Brown Recluse Spider builds small retreat webs behind objects of any type. Symptoms • The severity ...

  1. Motor Unit Changes Seen With Skeletal Muscle Sarcopenia in Oldest Old Rats

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kung, Theodore A.; van der Meulen, Jack H.; Urbanchek, Melanie G.; Kuzon, William M.; Faulkner, John A.

    2014-01-01

    Sarcopenia leads to many changes in skeletal muscle that contribute to atrophy, force deficits, and subsequent frailty. The purpose of this study was to characterize motor unit remodeling related to sarcopenia seen in extreme old age. Whole extensor digitorum longus muscle and motor unit contractile properties were measured in 19 adult (11–13 months) and 12 oldest old (36–37 months) Brown-Norway rats. Compared with adults, oldest old rats had significantly fewer motor units per muscle, smaller muscle cross-sectional area, and lower muscle specific force. However, mean motor unit force generation was similar between the two groups due to an increase in innervation ratio by the oldest old rats. These findings suggest that even in extreme old age both fast- and slow-twitch motor units maintain the ability to undergo motor unit remodeling that offsets some effects of sarcopenia. PMID:24077596

  2. Speed enforcement in Norway

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Elvik, Rune

    2015-01-01

    the game-theoretic model empirically. Testing the model rigorously is difficult, mainly because some of the relevant variables are not reliably measured and are endogenous. Two models were developed: one to identify sources of changes in the rate of violations, one to identify sources of changes......This paper probes the relationship between changes in the risk of apprehension for speeding in Norway and changes in the amount of speeding. The paper is based on a game-theoretic model of how the rate of violations and the amount of enforcement is determined by the interaction between drivers...... and the police. This model makes predictions both about how drivers will adapt to changes in the amount of enforcement (the more enforcement, the less violations) as well as how the police will adapt to changes in the rate of violations (the less violations, the less enforcement). The paper attempts to test...

  3. [Human brown adipose tissue].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Virtanen, Kirsi A; Nuutila, Pirjo

    2015-01-01

    Adult humans have heat-producing and energy-consuming brown adipose tissue in the clavicular region of the neck. There are two types of brown adipose cells, the so-called classic and beige adipose cells. Brown adipose cells produce heat by means of uncoupler protein 1 (UCP1) from fatty acids and sugar. By applying positron emission tomography (PET) measuring the utilization of sugar, the metabolism of brown fat has been shown to multiply in the cold, presumably influencing energy consumption. Active brown fat is most likely present in young adults, persons of normal weight and women, least likely in obese persons.

  4. Sensitivity of brown-adipose-tissue carnitine palmitoyltransferase to inhibition by malonyl-CoA

    OpenAIRE

    Saggerson, E. David; Carpenter, Carol A.

    1982-01-01

    Overt carnitine palmitoyltransferase in mitochondria isolated from interscapular brown adipose tissue of cold-adapted rats or rats maintained at normal temperature is extremely sensitive to inhibition by malonyl-CoA.

  5. The protein structure determines the sensitizing capacity of Brazil nut 2S albumin (Ber e1) in a rat food allergy model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Van Bilsen, Jolanda Hm; Knippels, Léon Mj; Penninks, André H; Nieuwenhuizen, Willem F; De Jongh, Harmen Hj; Koppelman, Stef J

    2013-11-04

    : It is not exactly known why certain food proteins are more likely to sensitize. One of the characteristics of most food allergens is that they are stable to the acidic and proteolytic conditions in the digestive tract. This property is thought to be a risk factor in allergic sensitization. The purpose of the present study was to investigate the contribution of the protein structure of 2S albumin (Ber e1), a major allergen from Brazil nut, on the sensitizing capacity in vivo using an oral Brown Norway rat food allergy model. Disulphide bridges of 2S albumin were reduced and alkylated resulting in loss of protein structure and an increased pepsin digestibility in vitro. Both native 2S albumin and reduced/alkylated 2S albumin were administered by daily gavage dosing (0.1 and 1 mg) to Brown Norway rats for 42 days. Intraperitoneal administration was used as a positive control. Sera were analysed by ELISA and passive cutaneous anaphylaxis. Oral exposure to native or reduced/alkylated 2S albumin resulted in specific IgG1 and IgG2a responses whereas only native 2S albumin induced specific IgE in this model, which was confirmed by passive cutaneous anaphylaxis. This study has shown that the disruption of the protein structure of Brazil nut 2S albumin decreased the sensitizing potential in a Brown Norway rat food allergy model, whereas the immunogenicity of 2S albumin remained preserved. This observation may open possibilities for developing immunotherapy for Brazil nut allergy.

  6. NORWAY: a nuclear demonstration project?

    CERN Multimedia

    Clery, Daniel

    2007-01-01

    "Egil Lillestøl is a man with a rather unusual mission: he wants his homeland of Norway to take the lead in developement of of a new form of nuclear power. Norway is Europe's largest petroleum exporter, from its North Sea oil and gas fields, and Lillestøl, a physicist at the University of Bergen, believes the country needs to do something about its carbon emissions.

  7. Examining the determinants of inward FDI: Evidence from Norway

    OpenAIRE

    Boateng, A.; X. Hua; Nisar, S.; Wu, J

    2015-01-01

    This paper examines the impact of macroeconomic factors on foreign direct investment (FDI) inflows in Norway under the location-specific advantage. Using cointegrating regressions with Fully Modified OLS (FMOLS) and the vector autoregressive and error correction model (VAR/VECM) on quarterly data, the study finds that the real GDP, sector GDP, exchange rate and trade openness have a positive and significant impact on FDI inflows. However, money supply, inflation, unemployment and interest rat...

  8. Passive houses in Norway

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Halse, Andreas

    2008-12-15

    The paper analyzes the introduction of passive houses in the Norwegian house market. Passive houses are houses with extremely low levels of energy consumption for heating, and have not yet been built in Norway, but have started to enter the market in Germany and some other countries. The construction sector is analyzed as a sectoral innovation system. The different elements of the innovation system are studied. This includes government agencies, producers, consumers, finance and education. The analysis shows that passive and low-energy houses are on the verge of market breakthrough. This can partly be explained by economic calculations, and partly by processes of learning and change in the institutional set-up of the sector. The construction sector is a sector characterized by low innovative intensity and little interaction between different agents. Those working to promote passive houses have to some extent managed to cope with these challenges. This has happened by breaking away from the traditional focus of Norwegian energy efficiency policies on technology and the economically rational agents, by instead focusing on knowledge and institutional change at the level of the producers. (Author)

  9. Chemical composition and vasorelaxant effect induced by the essential oil of Lippia alba (Mill.) N.E. Brown. (Verbenaceae) in rat mesenteric artery

    OpenAIRE

    Luana G Maynard; Kátia C Santos; Patrícia S Cunha; André S. Barreto; Magna G Peixoto; Fátima Arrigoni-Blank; Arie F. Blank; Alves,Péricles B.; Bonjardin, Leonardo R.; Márcio R.V. Santos

    2011-01-01

    Objectives : To investigate the chemical composition and vasorelaxant effect of the essential oil of Lippia alba (EOLA) in rat mesenteric artery. Material and Methods : Chemical composition of EOLA was investigated by gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (GC/MS). Vasorelaxant effect was evaluated in vitro in rat superior mesenteric artery rings. Results : GC/MS analysis revealed the presence of 19 compounds, with geranial (48.58%) and neral (35.42%) being the major constituents. In in...

  10. Brown recluse spider envenomation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Furbee, R Brent; Kao, Louise W; Ibrahim, Danyal

    2006-03-01

    Brown recluse spider bite is a common diagnosis in almost every state in America. In fact, cases have been reported in areas where the spider has never been seen. A review of medical literature reveals that most current concepts regarding brown recluse spider envenomation are based on supposition. In this article, we attempt to review critically our present understanding of brown recluse bites with a focus on the published evidence.

  11. Brown Fat Cell Isolation

    OpenAIRE

    sprotocols

    2014-01-01

    Author: C.R. Kahn ### 1.) ISOLATION AND PRIMARY CULTURE OF BROWN FAT PREADIPOCYTES ### Rationale: To prepare primary brown preadipocytes for immortalization: useful for metabolic studies from knockout mice. This consists of the following five protocols. References: Fasshauer, M., J. Klein, K M. Kriauciunas, K. Ueki, M.Benito, and C.R. Kahn. 2001. Essential role of insulin substrate 1 in differentiation of brown adipocytes. *Mol Cell Biol* 21: 319-329. Fasshauer, M....

  12. Plasmodesmata of brown algae

    OpenAIRE

    Terauchi, Makoto; Nagasato, Chikako; Motomura, Taizo

    2014-01-01

    Plasmodesmata (PD) are intercellular connections in plants which play roles in various developmental processes. They are also found in brown algae, a group of eukaryotes possessing complex multicellularity, as well as green plants. Recently, we conducted an ultrastructural study of PD in several species of brown algae. PD in brown algae are commonly straight plasma membrane-lined channels with a diameter of 10?20?nm and they lack desmotubule in contrast to green plants. Moreover, branched PD ...

  13. Perinatal exposure to germinated brown rice and its gamma amino-butyric acid-rich extract prevents high fat diet-induced insulin resistance in first generation rat offspring

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hadiza Altine Adamu

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available Background: Evidence suggests perinatal environments influence the risk of developing insulin resistance. Objective: The present study was aimed at determining the effects of intrauterine exposure to germinated brown rice (GBR and GBR-derived gamma (γ aminobutyric acid (GABA extract on epigenetically mediated high fat diet–induced insulin resistance. Design: Pregnant Sprague Dawley rats were fed high-fat diet (HFD, HFD+GBR, or HFD+GABA throughout pregnancy until 4 weeks postdelivery. The pups were weighed weekly and maintained on normal pellet until 8 weeks postdelivery. After sacrifice, biochemical markers of obesity and insulin resistance including oral glucose tolerance test, adiponectin, leptin, and retinol binding protein-4 (RBP4 were measured. Hepatic gene expression changes and the global methylation and histone acetylation levels were also evaluated. Results: Detailed analyses revealed that mothers given GBR and GABA extract, and their offspring had increased adiponectin levels and reduced insulin, homeostasis model assessment of insulin resistance, leptin, oxidative stress, and RBP4 levels, while their hepatic mRNA levels of GLUT2 and IPF1 were increased. Furthermore, GBR and GABA extract lowered global DNA methylation levels and modulated H3 and H4 acetylation levels. Conclusions: These results showed that intrauterine exposure to GBR-influenced metabolic outcomes in offspring of rats with underlying epigenetic changes and transcriptional implications that led to improved glucose homeostasis.

  14. Emotional reactivity and cognitive performance in aversively motivated tasks: a comparison between four rat strains

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    van Reenen Cornelis G

    2009-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Cognitive function might be affected by the subjects' emotional reactivity. We assessed whether behavior in different tests of emotional reactivity is correlated with performance in aversively motivated learning tasks, using four strains of rats generally considered to have a different emotional reactivity. Methods The performance of male Brown Norway, Lewis, Fischer 344, and Wistar Kyoto rats in open field (OF, elevated plus-maze (EPM, and circular light-dark preference box (cLDB tasks, which are believed to provide measures of emotional reactivity, was evaluated. Spatial working and reference memory were assessed in two aversively motivated learning and memory tasks: the standard and the "repeated acquisition" versions of the Morris water maze escape task, respectively. All rats were also tested in a passive avoidance task. At the end of the study, levels of serotonin (5-HT and 5-hydroxyindoleacetic acid, and 5-HT turnover in the hippocampus and frontal cortex were determined. Results Strain differences showed a complex pattern across behavioral tests and serotonergic measures. Fischer 344 rats had the poorest performance in both versions of the Morris water escape task, whereas Brown Norway rats performed these tasks very well but the passive avoidance task poorly. Neither correlation analysis nor principal component analysis provided convincing support for the notion that OF, EPM, and cLDB tasks measure the same underlying trait. Conclusions Our findings do not support the hypothesis that the level of emotional reactivity modulates cognitive performance in aversively motivated tasks. Concepts such as "emotional reactivity" and "learning and memory" cannot adequately be tapped with only one behavioral test. Our results emphasize the need for multiple testing.

  15. Altered emotional behaviors in the diabetes mellitus OLETF type 1 congenic rat.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Watanabe, Akihito; Okuno, Shiro; Okano, Mai; Jordan, Shaun; Aihara, Koutoku; Watanabe, Takeshi K; Yamasaki, Yuki; Kitagawa, Hisashi; Sugawara, Kiyoshi; Kato, Satoru

    2007-10-31

    GPR10 is a G-protein-coupled receptor expressed in thalamic and hypothalamic brain regions, including the reticular thalamic nucleus (RTN) and periventricular nucleus (Pev), and the endogenous ligand for this receptor, prolactin-releasing peptide (PrRP), has demonstrated regulatory effects on the stress response. We produced a congenic rat by introducing the Dmo1 allele from the OLETF rat which encodes the amino acid sequences of GPR10 with a truncated NH2-terminus, into the Brown-Norway background. Using receptor autoradiography, we determined a lack of specific [125I]PrRP binding in the RTN and Pev of these mutant rats compared to the control rats. Furthermore, intracerebroventricular injection of PrRP did not induce a significant increase of c-fos-like immunoreactivity in the paraventricular nucleus of the mutant rats compared to the control rats. The mutant rats also displayed a less anxious-like phenotype in three behavioral-based models of anxiety-like behavior (open field, elevated plus maze and defensive withdrawal test). These data show the mutant congenic rat, of which GPR10 neither binds nor responds to PrRP, expresses less anxious-like phenotypes. On the basis of these observations, the GPR10 might be a novel target for the developing new drugs against anxiety and/or other stress-related diseases.

  16. Inherent Oxidative Stress in the Lewis Rat Is Associated with Resistance to Toxoplasmosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Witola, William H; Kim, Chi Yong; Zhang, Xuejin

    2017-10-01

    The course of Toxoplasma gondii infection in rats closely resembles that in humans. However, compared to the Brown Norway (BN) rat, the Lewis (LEW) rat is extremely resistant to T. gondii infection. Thus, we performed RNA sequencing analysis of the LEW rat versus the BN rat, with or without T. gondii infection, in order to unravel molecular factors directing robust and rapid early T. gondii-killing mechanisms in the LEW rat. We found that compared to the uninfected BN rat, the uninfected LEW rat has inherently higher transcript levels of cytochrome enzymes (Cyp2d3, Cyp2d5, and Cybrd1, which catalyze generation of reactive oxygen species [ROS]), with concomitant higher levels of ROS. Interestingly, despite having higher levels of ROS, the LEW rat had lower transcript levels for antioxidant enzymes (lactoperoxidase, microsomal glutathione S-transferase 2 and 3, glutathione S-transferase peroxidase kappa 1, and glutathione peroxidase) than the BN rat, suggesting that the LEW rat maintains cellular oxidative stress that it tolerates. Corroboratively, we found that scavenging of superoxide anion by Mn(III) tetrakis (4-benzoic acid) porphyrin (MnTBAP) decreased the refractoriness of LEW rat peritoneal cells to T. gondii infection, resulting in proliferation of parasites in LEW rat peritoneal cells which, in turn, led to augmented cell death in the infected cells. Together, our results indicate that the LEW rat maintains inherent cellular oxidative stress that contributes to resistance to invading T. gondii, and they thus unveil new avenues for developing therapeutic agents targeting induction of host cell oxidative stress as a mechanism for killing T. gondii. Copyright © 2017 American Society for Microbiology.

  17. [Occasional smoking in Norway].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kvaavik, Elisabeth; Scheffels, Janne; Lund, Marianne

    2014-01-28

    In recent decades, daily smoking has become less common, while occasional smoking has stayed at the same level. The purpose of the study is to describe occasional smokers on the basis of their smoking behaviour and socio-demographic characteristics. Data from Statistics Norway's quarterly surveys of tobacco use in 2010 and 2011 were used. Information on smoking habits, smoking-related behaviour and the respondents' attitudes to their own smoking was collected in telephone interviews. Of the 8,700 men and women aged 16-74 (response rate 57%) who were included, altogether 1,583 were daily smokers and 907 occasional smokers. The occasional smokers were younger, more frequently lived in large cities and had a higher level of education and income than the daily smokers. Twenty-nine of 174 (17%) occasional smokers used snus on a daily basis, compared to 10 of 394 (3%) of the daily smokers. The occasional smokers had great confidence in their ability to quit: 95% responded that they would be smoke-free in five years, compared to 55% of the daily smokers (n = 2,158). Fifty-five (35%) of the occasional smokers lit up several times weekly (16 cigarettes per week on average), while the remaining (65%) smoked only once per week as a maximum (five cigarettes per week on average). Those who smoked several times each week had attitudes to their own smoking and usage pattern for tobacco that were similar to those of the daily smokers. Nearly half of the occasional smokers defined themselves as non-smokers. Norwegian occasional smokers are a heterogeneous group in terms of their smoking pattern and frequency, and many define themselves as non-smokers.

  18. Father Brown, Selected sories

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Chesterton, G.K.

    2005-01-01

    Father Brown, a small, round Catholic priest with a remarkable understanding of the criminal mind, is one of literature's most unusual and endearing detectives, able to solve the strangest crimes in a most fascinating manner. This collection draws from all five Father Brown books, and within their

  19. Oleoylethanolamide enhances β-adrenergic-mediated thermogenesis and white-to-brown adipocyte phenotype in epididymal white adipose tissue in rat

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Juan Suárez

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available β-adrenergic receptor activation promotes brown adipose tissue (BAT β-oxidation and thermogenesis by burning fatty acids during uncoupling respiration. Oleoylethanolamide (OEA can inhibit feeding and stimulate lipolysis by activating peroxisome proliferator-activating receptor-α (PPARα in white adipose tissue (WAT. Here we explore whether PPARα activation potentiates the effect of β3-adrenergic stimulation on energy balance mediated by the respective agonists OEA and CL316243. The effect of this pharmacological association on feeding, thermogenesis, β-oxidation, and lipid and cholesterol metabolism in epididymal (eWAT was monitored. CL316243 (1 mg/kg and OEA (5 mg/kg co-administration over 6 days enhanced the reduction of both food intake and body weight gain, increased the energy expenditure and reduced the respiratory quotient (VCO2/VO2. This negative energy balance agreed with decreased fat mass and increased BAT weight and temperature, as well as with lowered plasma levels of triglycerides, cholesterol, nonessential fatty acids (NEFAs, and the adipokines leptin and TNF-α. Regarding eWAT, CL316243 and OEA treatment elevated levels of the thermogenic factors PPARα and UCP1, reduced p38-MAPK phosphorylation, and promoted brown-like features in the white adipocytes: the mitochondrial (Cox4i1, Cox4i2 and BAT (Fgf21, Prdm16 genes were overexpressed in eWAT. The enhancement of the fatty-acid β-oxidation factors Cpt1b and Acox1 in eWAT was accompanied by an upregulation of de novo lipogenesis and reduced expression of the unsaturated-fatty-acid-synthesis enzyme gene, Scd1. We propose that the combination of β-adrenergic and PPARα receptor agonists promotes therapeutic adipocyte remodelling in eWAT, and therefore has a potential clinical utility in the treatment of obesity.

  20. Brown adipocyte function

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Winther, Sally

    . The first part of this thesis explores this by identifying and investigating two novel kinase regulators of brown adipocyte function. Study 1 demonstrates that spleen tyrosine kinase is a hitherto undescribed regulator of brown adipocyte differentiation and activation. Study 2 identifies glycogen synthase...... kinase 3 as a negative regulator of the canonical p38 mitogen-activated protein kinase signaling cascade. Thus both studies add novel regulatory layers to the growing understanding of brown adipocyte signal transduction. Activated BAT also exerts great influence on whole body glucose homeostasis......, of great interest for diabetes treatment. The second part of this thesis explores this by investigating glycolytic flux in activated brown adipocytes. Study 3 identifies hypoxia-inducible factor 1α as an important regulator of glycolytic gene expression in brown adipocytes. Study 4 establishes...

  1. Effects of Plastoquinones from the Brown Alga Sargassum micracanthum and a New Chromene Derivative Converted from the Plastoquinones on Acute Gastric Lesions in Rats

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Mori, Jun; Hayashi, Toshimitsu; Iwashima, Makoto; Matsunaga, Takayuki; Saito, Haruo

    2006-01-01

    .... In hydrochloric acid/ethanol rat ulcer tests: 1) oral administrations of compounds 1, 2, and 3 1-10, 3-30 and 10-30 mg/kg, respectively, and omeprazole 3-30 mg/kg showed dose-dependent antiulcer effects: 2...

  2. Characterization of six rat strains (Rattus norvegicus by mitochondrial DNA restriction fragment length polymorphism

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hilsdorf A.W.

    1999-01-01

    Full Text Available Restriction fragment length polymorphism (RFLP was used to examine the extent of mtDNA polymorphism among six strains of rats (Rattus norvegicus - Wistar, Wistar Munich, Brown Norway, Wistar Kyoto, SHR and SHR-SP. A survey of 26 restriction enzymes has revealed a low level of genetic divergence among strains. The sites of cleavage by EcoRI, NcoI and XmnI were shown to be polymorphic. The use of these three enzymes allows the 6 strains to be classified into 4 haplotypes and identifies specific markers for each one. The percentage of sequence divergence among all pairs of haplotypes ranged from 0.035 to 0.33%, which is the result of a severe population constriction undergone by the strains. These haplotypes are easily demonstrable and therefore RFLP analysis can be employed for genetic monitoring of rats within animal facilities or among different laboratories.

  3. Motor activity as an unbiased variable to assess anaphylaxis in allergic rats

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abril-Gil, Mar; Garcia-Just, Alba; Cambras, Trinitat; Pérez-Cano, Francisco J; Castellote, Cristina; Franch, Àngels

    2015-01-01

    The release of mediators by mast cells triggers allergic symptoms involving various physiological systems and, in the most severe cases, the development of anaphylactic shock compromising mainly the nervous and cardiovascular systems. We aimed to establish variables to objectively study the anaphylactic response (AR) after an oral challenge in an allergy model. Brown Norway rats were immunized by intraperitoneal injection of ovalbumin with alum and toxin from Bordetella pertussis. Specific immunoglobulin (Ig) E antibodies were developed in immunized animals. Forty days after immunization, the rats were orally challenged with the allergen, and motor activity, body temperature and serum mast cell protease concentration were determined. The anaphylaxis induced a reduction in body temperature and a decrease in the number of animal movements, which was inversely correlated with serum mast cell protease release. In summary, motor activity is a reliable tool for assessing AR and also an unbiased method for screening new anti-allergic drugs. PMID:25716015

  4. Impact of animal strain on gene expression in a rat model of acute cardiac rejection

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Norsworthy Kelly J

    2009-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The expression levels of many genes show wide natural variation among strains or populations. This study investigated the potential for animal strain-related genotypic differences to confound gene expression profiles in acute cellular rejection (ACR. Using a rat heart transplant model and 2 different rat strains (Dark Agouti, and Brown Norway, microarrays were performed on native hearts, transplanted hearts, and peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMC. Results In heart tissue, strain alone affected the expression of only 33 probesets while rejection affected the expression of 1368 probesets (FDR 10% and FC ≥ 3. Only 13 genes were affected by both strain and rejection, which was Conclusion In ACR, genetic background has a large impact on the transcriptome of immune cells, but not heart tissue. Gene expression studies of ACR should avoid study designs that require cross strain comparisons between leukocytes.

  5. A genome-wide SNP panel for mapping and association studies in the rat

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Guryev Victor

    2008-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The laboratory rat (Rattus norvegicus is an important model for human disease, and is extensively used for studying complex traits for example in the physiological and pharmacological fields. To facilitate genetic studies like QTL mapping, genetic makers that can be easily typed, like SNPs, are essential. Results A genome-wide set of 820 SNP assays was designed for the KASPar genotyping platform, which uses a technique based on allele specific oligo extension and energy transfer-based detection. SNPs were chosen to be equally spread along all chromosomes except Y and to be polymorphic between Brown Norway and SS or Wistar rat strains based on data from the rat HapMap EU project. This panel was tested on 38 rats of 34 different strains and 3 wild rats to determine the level of polymorphism and to generate a phylogenetic network to show their genetic relationships. As a proof of principle we used this panel to map an obesity trait in Zucker rats and confirmed significant linkage (LOD 122 to chromosome 5: 119–129 Mb, where the leptin receptor gene (Lepr is located (chr5: 122 Mb. Conclusion We provide a fast and cost-effective platform for genome-wide SNP typing, which can be used for first-pass genetic mapping and association studies in a wide variety of rat strains.

  6. Salsalate ameliorates metabolic disturbances by reducing inflammation in spontaneously hypertensive rats expressing human C-reactive protein and by activating brown adipose tissue in nontransgenic controls

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Trnovská, J.; Šilhavý, Jan; Kuda, Ondřej; Landa, Vladimír; Zídek, Václav; Mlejnek, Petr; Šimáková, Miroslava; Strnad, Hynek; Škop, V.; Oliyarnyk, O.; Kazdová, L.; Haluzík, M.; Pravenec, Michal

    2017-01-01

    Roč. 12, č. 6 (2017), č. článku e0179063. E-ISSN 1932-6203 R&D Projects: GA ČR(CZ) GA13-04420S Institutional support: RVO:67985823 ; RVO:68378050 Keywords : inflammation * insulin resistance * C-reactive protein * spintaneously hypertensive rat * salsalate Subject RIV: EB - Genetics ; Molecular Biology Impact factor: 2.806, year: 2016

  7. Sex Education in Multicultural Norway

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bartz, Tiffany

    2007-01-01

    Scandinavia has long been admired by American liberals and sex education advocates who cite comparable rates of adolescent sexuality, yet lower rates of teenage pregnancy, sexually transmitted diseases and abortion in Scandinavia. The United States has, however, two variables with which Scandinavia in general, and Norway in particular, has not…

  8. Endurance training blocks uncoupling protein 1 up-regulation in brown adipose tissue while increasing uncoupling protein 3 in the muscle tissue of rats fed with a high-sugar diet.

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Queiroz, Karina Barbosa; Rodovalho, Gisele Vieira; Guimarães, Juliana Bohnen; de Lima, Daniel Carvalho; Coimbra, Cândido Celso; Evangelista, Elísio Alberto; Guerra-Sá, Renata

    2012-09-01

    The mitochondrial uncoupling proteins (UCPs) of interscapular brown adipose tissue (iBAT) and of muscles play important roles in energy balance. For instance, the expression of UCP1 and UCP3 are modulated by free fatty acid gradients induced by high-sugar diets and acute exercise that is dependent on sympathetic stimulation. However, the effects of endurance training in animals fed with high-sugar diets are unknown. This study aims to evaluate the long-term effects of diet and exercise on UCP1 and UCP3 levels and energy balance efficiency. Rats fed with standard or high-sugar (HSD) diets were simultaneously subjected to running training over an 8-week period. After the training period, the rats were decapitated, and the iBAT and gastrocnemius muscle tissues were removed for evaluation of the β₃-receptor, Ucp1, and Ucp3 mRNA and protein expression, which were analyzed by quantitative reverse transcriptase polymerase chain reaction and Western blot, respectively. Groups fed with an HSD displayed a higher adiposity index and iBAT weight (P < .05), whereas exhibited an up-regulation of Ucp1 mRNA and protein levels (P < .05). Training increased β₃-receptor mRNA in iBAT and reduced the Ucp3 mRNA in muscle tissues. In association with an HSD, training restored the increasing β₃-receptor mRNA and greatly up-regulated the levels of Ucp3 mRNA. Therefore, training blocked the HSD-induced up-regulation of UCP1 expression in iBAT, whereas it up-regulated the expression of Ucp3 mRNA in muscle. These results suggest that training enhances the relationship between Ucp1/Ucp3 mRNA levels, which could result in higher energy efficiency, but not when HSD-induced elevated sympathetic activity is maintained. Copyright © 2012. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  9. Behavioural response of sexually naïve and experienced male rats to the smell of 6-methyl-5-hepten-2-one and female rat faeces.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nielsen, Birte L; Jerôme, Nathalie; Saint-Albin, Audrey; Rampin, Olivier; Maurin, Yves

    2013-08-15

    Sexually experienced male rats display penile erections when exposed to faeces from mammalian females in oestrus (Rampin et al., Behav Brain Res, 172:169, 2006), suggesting that specific odours indicate female receptiveness across species. However, it is unknown to what extent the sexual response observed results from an odorous conditioning acquired during sexual experience. We tested the behavioural response of male Brown Norway rats both when sexually naïve and experienced to four odours, including oestrous rat faeces and 6-methyl-5-hepten-2-one (methylheptenone; a molecule found in higher concentrations during oestrus in female rats, foxes and horses). Odour had a significant effect on the sexual response of the naïve rats, with oestrus faeces provoking significantly more erections than herb odour, and with methylheptenone and di-oestrus faeces being intermediate. This indicates that sexually naïve male rats have an unconditioned ability to detect oestrous mediated via odour. After gaining sexual experience, the response to methylheptenone, di- and oestrus faeces was significantly higher than that observed with herb odour. These results strongly suggest that methylheptenone is part of the odorous bouquet of oestrus and contributes to the olfactory determination of female receptiveness. © 2013.

  10. Plasmodesmata of brown algae.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Terauchi, Makoto; Nagasato, Chikako; Motomura, Taizo

    2015-01-01

    Plasmodesmata (PD) are intercellular connections in plants which play roles in various developmental processes. They are also found in brown algae, a group of eukaryotes possessing complex multicellularity, as well as green plants. Recently, we conducted an ultrastructural study of PD in several species of brown algae. PD in brown algae are commonly straight plasma membrane-lined channels with a diameter of 10-20 nm and they lack desmotubule in contrast to green plants. Moreover, branched PD could not be observed in brown algae. In the brown alga, Dictyota dichotoma, PD are produced during cytokinesis through the formation of their precursor structures (pre-plasmodesmata, PPD). Clustering of PD in a structure termed "pit field" was recognized in several species having a complex multicellular thallus structure but not in those having uniseriate filamentous or multiseriate one. The pit fields might control cell-to-cell communication and contribute to the establishment of the complex multicellular thallus. In this review, we discuss fundamental morphological aspects of brown algal PD and present questions that remain open.

  11. Chemical composition and vasorelaxant effect induced by the essential oil of Lippia alba (Mill.) N.E. Brown. (Verbenaceae) in rat mesenteric artery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maynard, Luana G; Santos, Kátia C; Cunha, Patrícia S; Barreto, André S; Peixoto, Magna G; Arrigoni-Blank, Fátima; Blank, Arie F; Alves, Péricles B; Bonjardin, Leonardo R; Santos, Márcio R V

    2011-11-01

    To investigate the chemical composition and vasorelaxant effect of the essential oil of Lippia alba (EOLA) in rat mesenteric artery. Chemical composition of EOLA was investigated by gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (GC/MS). Vasorelaxant effect was evaluated in vitro in rat superior mesenteric artery rings. GC/MS analysis revealed the presence of 19 compounds, with geranial (48.58%) and neral (35.42%) being the major constituents. In intact rings precontracted with phenylephrine (Phe: 1 μM), EOLA (100-1000 μg/mL) induced relaxation, where the maximal effect (Emax) was 110.8 ± 10.8%. This effect was not modified after endothelium removal (Emax = 134.8 ± 16.5%), after tetraethylammonium (TEA) (Emax = 117.2 ± 4.96%), or in rings precontracted with KCl (80 mM) (Emax = 112.6 ± 6.70%). In addition, EOLA was able to inhibit the contraction caused by CaCl(2) and produced a small but significant (P<0.05) additional effect (from 70.5 ± 3.4 to 105.3 ± 13.5%, n = 5) on the maximal relaxation of nifedipine (NIF: 10 μM). The results demonstrated that EOLA induces endothelium-independent vasorelaxation, which appears to be caused, at least in part, by blocking Ca(2+) influx through voltage-operated Ca(2+) channels.

  12. How, Now, Brown Dwarfs?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brecher, Kenneth

    2009-01-01

    The vocabulary of astronomy is riddled with colorful names for stars, from red giants to blue stragglers. Objects with masses between roughly .01 and .1 solar masses are called "brown dwarfs". Do they - could they - ever actually appear brown? Color is not a one-dimensional physical parameter like wavelength. It is a complex, psychophysical phenomenon involving not only three degrees of freedom - hue (often incorrectly equated with "color"), saturation and brightness - but also observational context. The perceptual nature of color has been known since Newton wrote in his "Opticks” in 1704: "For the Rays to speak properly are not coloured. In them there is nothing else than a certain Power and disposition to stir up a Sensation of this or that Colour.” To most observers, the 2000 or so naked eye stars observable from the northern hemisphere all appear white, with the half dozen exceptions which look reddish/orange like Betelgeuse, Arcturus and Antares. But what color would Betelgeuse (effective temperature 3600 K) appear at a distance of, say, 100 times the Earth-Sun separation? Not red. In fact, it has a temperature about 40% higher than that of an ordinary incandescent light bulb. It would appear white (or yellowish)! Can a very cool radiating (emissive) object ever appear brown? What is brown anyway? It is not a primary or even secondary color. In this presentation, we will explore the nature and meaning of "brown” by the use of several physical and computer demonstrations developed as part of "Project LITE- Light Inquiry Through Experiments", an educational materials development project. These demonstrations show that an isolated thermally radiating object will never appear brown. Hence the term "Brown Dwarf” is as nonsensical as the phrase "How, Now, Brown Cow?". Project LITE is supported by the NSF through DUE Grant # 0715975.

  13. Step training in a rat model for complex aneurysmal vascular microsurgery

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Martin Dan

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Microsurgery training is a key step for the young neurosurgeons. Both in vascular and peripheral nerve pathology, microsurgical techniques are useful tools for the proper treatment. Many training models have been described, including ex vivo (chicken wings and in vivo (rat, rabbit ones. Complex microsurgery training include termino-terminal vessel anastomosis and nerve repair. The aim of this study was to describe a reproducible complex microsurgery training model in rats. Materials and methods: The experimental animals were Brown Norway male rats between 10-16 weeks (average 13 and weighing between 250-400g (average 320g. We performed n=10 rat hind limb replantations. The surgical steps and preoperative management are carefully described. We evaluated the vascular patency by clinical assessment-color, temperature, capillary refill. The rats were daily inspected for any signs of infections. The nerve regeneration was assessed by foot print method. Results: There were no case of vascular compromise or autophagia. All rats had long term survival (>90 days. The nerve regeneration was clinically completed at 6 months postoperative. The mean operative time was 183 minutes, and ischemia time was 25 minutes.

  14. Elevated BSC-1 and ROMK expression in Dahl salt-sensitive rat kidneys.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hoagland, Kimberly M; Flasch, Averia K; Dahly-Vernon, Annette J; dos Santos, Elisabete Alcantara; Knepper, Mark A; Roman, Richard J

    2004-04-01

    This study compared the expression of enzymes and transport and channel proteins involved in the regulation of sodium reabsorption in the kidney of Dahl salt-sensitive (DS) and salt-resistant Brown-Norway (BN) and consomic rats (SS.BN13), in which chromosome 13 from the BN rat has been introgressed into the DS genetic background. The expression of the Na+/K+/2Cl- (BSC-1) cotransporter, Na+/H+ exchanger (NHE3), and Na+-K+-ATPase proteins were similar in the renal cortex of DS, BN, and SS.BN13 rats fed either a low-salt (0.1% NaCl) or a high-salt (8% NaCl) diet. The expression of the BSC-1 and the renal outer medullary K+ channel (ROMK) were higher, whereas the expression of the cytochrome P4504A proteins responsible for the formation of 20-hydroxyeicosatetraenoic (20-HETE) was lower in the outer medulla of the kidney of DS than in BN or SS.BN13 rats fed either a low-salt or a high-salt diet. In addition, the renal formation and excretion of 20-HETE was lower in DS than in BN and SS.BN13 rats. These results suggest that overexpression of ROMK and BSC-1 in the thick ascending limb combined with a deficiency in renal formation of 20-HETE may predispose Dahl S rats fed a high-salt diet to Na+ retention and hypertension.

  15. Introgression of mountain hare (Lepus timidus mitochondrial DNA into wild brown hares (Lepus europaeus in Denmark

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Villesen Palle

    2006-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background In Europe the mountain hare (Lepus timidus exists in Great Britain, Norway, Sweden, Finland, parts of the Alps and in Eastern Europe, but not in Denmark. Interspecific hybridization has been demonstrated between native Swedish mountain hares and introduced brown hares (Lepus europaeus. During the data collection in a study concerning Danish brown hares we identified 16 hares with a single very divergent haplotype. Results Phylogenetic analysis shows that the divergent Danish haplotype is most closely related to the Swedish mountain hare. The frequency of Lepus timidus mtDNA haplotype in the Eastern Danish hare populations is estimated to 6%. Conclusion In contrast to what is known, the Danish hare populations are not pure L. europaeus populations but include introgressed brown hares with Swedish L. timidus mtDNA. The most probable explanation of this is natural migration or translocation of introgressed brown hares from Sweden. The impurity of hare populations has implications for conservation and population genetics.

  16. Tune Your Brown Clustering, Please

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Derczynski, Leon; Chester, Sean; Bøgh, Kenneth Sejdenfaden

    2015-01-01

    Brown clustering, an unsupervised hierarchical clustering technique based on ngram mutual information, has proven useful in many NLP applications. However, most uses of Brown clustering employ the same default configuration; the appropriateness of this configuration has gone predominantly...

  17. Natural Inhibitors of Maillard Browning

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-12-01

    incorporated into pre-selected candidate ration components for evaluation via storage, sensory and chemical analysis. The concentration of inhibitor was...inhibiting Maillard browning, also known as non-enzymatic browning, a complex reaction which can lead to darkening of color, off- odors , off-flavors...nutritional intake, and decrease waste due to non-consumption of sensory degraded ration components. 1.1 Maillard Browning Maillard browning, also

  18. Arctic Browning: vegetation damage and implications for carbon balance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Treharne, Rachael; Bjerke, Jarle; Emberson, Lisa; Tømmervik, Hans; Phoenix, Gareth

    2016-04-01

    'Arctic browning' is the loss of biomass and canopy in Arctic ecosystems. This process is often driven by climatic and biological extreme events - notably extreme winter warm periods, winter frost-drought and severe outbreaks of defoliating insects. Evidence suggests that browning is becoming increasingly frequent and severe at the pan-arctic scale, a view supported by observations from more intensely observed regions, with major and unprecedented vegetation damage reported at landscape (>1000km2) and regional (Nordic Arctic Region) scales in recent years. Critically, the damage caused by these extreme events is in direct opposition to 'Arctic greening', the well-established increase in productivity and shrub abundance observed at high latitudes in response to long-term warming. This opposition creates uncertainty as to future anticipated vegetation change in the Arctic, with implications for Arctic carbon balance. As high latitude ecosystems store around twice as much carbon as the atmosphere, and vegetation impacts are key to determining rates of loss or gain of ecosystem carbon stocks, Arctic browning has the potential to influence the role of these ecosystems in global climate. There is therefore a clear need for a quantitative understanding of the impacts of browning events on key ecosystem carbon fluxes. To address this, field sites were chosen in central and northern Norway and in Svalbard, in areas known to have been affected by either climatic extremes or insect outbreak and subsequent browning in the past four years. Sites were chosen along a latitudinal gradient to capture both conditions already causing vegetation browning throughout the Norwegian Arctic, and conditions currently common at lower latitudes which are likely to become more damaging further North as climate change progresses. At each site the response of Net Ecosystem CO2 Exchange to light was measured using a LiCor LI6400 Portable Photosynthesis system and a custom vegetation chamber with

  19. Pulmonary toxicity of instilled silver nanoparticles: influence of size, coating and rat strain.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Joanna Seiffert

    Full Text Available Particle size and surface chemistry are potential determinants of silver nanoparticle (AgNP respiratory toxicity that may also depend on the lung inflammatory state. We compared the effects of intratracheally-administered AgNPs (20 nm and 110 nm; polyvinylpyrrolidone (PVP and citrate-capped; 0.1 mg/Kg in Brown-Norway (BN and Sprague-Dawley (SD rats. In BN rats, there was both a neutrophilic and eosinophilic response, while in SD rats, there was a neutrophilic response at day 1, greatest for the 20 nm citrate-capped AgNPs. Eosinophilic cationic protein was increased in bronchoalveolar lavage (BAL in BN and SD rats on day 1. BAL protein and malondialdehyde levels were increased in BN rats at 1 and 7 days, and BAL KC, CCL11 and IL-13 levels at day 1, with increased expression of CCL11 in lung tissue. Pulmonary resistance increased and compliance decreased at day 1, with persistence at day 7. The 20 nm, but not the 110 nm, AgNPs increased bronchial hyperresponsiveness on day 1, which continued at day 7 for the citrate-capped AgNPs only. The 20 nm versus the 110 nm size were more proinflammatory in terms of neutrophil influx, but there was little difference between the citrate-capped versus the PVP-capped AgNPs. AgNPs can induce pulmonary eosinophilic and neutrophilic inflammation with bronchial hyperresponsiveness, features characteristic of asthma.

  20. Pulmonary toxicity of instilled silver nanoparticles: influence of size, coating and rat strain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seiffert, Joanna; Hussain, Farhana; Wiegman, Coen; Li, Feng; Bey, Leo; Baker, Warren; Porter, Alexandra; Ryan, Mary P; Chang, Yan; Gow, Andrew; Zhang, Junfeng; Zhu, Jie; Tetley, Terry D; Chung, Kian Fan

    2015-01-01

    Particle size and surface chemistry are potential determinants of silver nanoparticle (AgNP) respiratory toxicity that may also depend on the lung inflammatory state. We compared the effects of intratracheally-administered AgNPs (20 nm and 110 nm; polyvinylpyrrolidone (PVP) and citrate-capped; 0.1 mg/Kg) in Brown-Norway (BN) and Sprague-Dawley (SD) rats. In BN rats, there was both a neutrophilic and eosinophilic response, while in SD rats, there was a neutrophilic response at day 1, greatest for the 20 nm citrate-capped AgNPs. Eosinophilic cationic protein was increased in bronchoalveolar lavage (BAL) in BN and SD rats on day 1. BAL protein and malondialdehyde levels were increased in BN rats at 1 and 7 days, and BAL KC, CCL11 and IL-13 levels at day 1, with increased expression of CCL11 in lung tissue. Pulmonary resistance increased and compliance decreased at day 1, with persistence at day 7. The 20 nm, but not the 110 nm, AgNPs increased bronchial hyperresponsiveness on day 1, which continued at day 7 for the citrate-capped AgNPs only. The 20 nm versus the 110 nm size were more proinflammatory in terms of neutrophil influx, but there was little difference between the citrate-capped versus the PVP-capped AgNPs. AgNPs can induce pulmonary eosinophilic and neutrophilic inflammation with bronchial hyperresponsiveness, features characteristic of asthma.

  1. Alternative Education and Home Schooling in Norway.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beck, Christian W.

    2001-01-01

    Examines the issue of balance between community rules and personal freedom as it relates to who should control the education of children in Norway. Reviews the historical development of alternative education in Norway, including the growth of private schools and home schooling. Comments on future educational needs and the provision of good…

  2. INOPS Survey data report for Norway

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lindholst, Andrej Christian; Holt, Steffen

    This data report provides statistics on the organization, management and performance of different ways of providing maintenance services within the municipal park and road sector(s) in Norway. The statistics relies on data collected in the period from April 2015 to October 2015 through an online...... survey send to managers in all 428 municipalities in Norway....

  3. Statistical Yearbook of Norway 2012

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    2012-07-01

    The Statistical Yearbook of Norway 2012 contains statistics on Norway and main figures for the Nordic countries and other countries selected from international statistics. The international over-views are integrated with the other tables and figures. The selection of tables in this edition is mostly the same as in the 2011 edition. The yearbook's 480 tables and figures present the main trends in official statistics in most areas of society. The list of tables and figures and an index at the back of the book provide easy access to relevant information. In addition, source information and Internet addresses below the tables make the yearbook a good starting point for those who are looking for more detailed statistics. The statistics are based on data gathered in statistical surveys and from administrative data, which, in cooperation with other public institutions, have been made available for statistical purposes. Some tables have been prepared in their entirety by other public institutions. The statistics follow approved principles, standards and classifications that are in line with international recommendations and guidelines. Content: 00. General subjects; 01. Environment; 02. Population; 03. Health and social conditions; 04. Education; 05. Personal economy and housing conditions; 06. Labour market; 07. Recreational, cultural and sporting activities; 08. Prices and indices; 09. National Economy and external trade; 10. Industrial activities; 11. Financial markets; 12. Public finances; Geographical survey.(eb)

  4. Severe human Babesia divergens infection in Norway

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    K. Mørch

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available Human babesiosis is a rare but potentially life-threatening parasitic disease transmitted by ixodid ticks, and has not previously been reported in Norway. We report a case of severe babesiosis that occurred in Norway in 2007. The patient had previously undergone a splenectomy. He was frequently exposed to tick bites in an area endemic for bovine babesiosis in the west of Norway. The patient presented with severe haemolysis and multiorgan failure. Giemsa-stained blood smears revealed 30% parasitaemia with Babesia spp. He was treated with quinine in combination with clindamycin, apheresis, and supportive treatment with ventilatory support and haemofiltration, and made a complete recovery. This is the first case reported in Norway; however Babesia divergens seroprevalence in cattle in Norway is high, as is the risk of Ixodes ricinus tick bite in the general population. Babesiosis should be considered in the differential diagnosis of unexplained febrile haemolytic disease.

  5. Fucoidans from brown seaweeds

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ale, Marcel Tutor; Meyer, Anne S.

    2013-01-01

    structural details of fucoidans. Mild extraction techniques coupled with the use of new tools such as enzymes can provide the much needed knowledge about structural characteristics of different fucoidan molecules and thus pave the way for a better understanding of the structural chemistry and bioactivities......-proliferative effects on cancer cells. Recent work has revealed distinct structural features of fucoidans obtained from different brown seaweed sources. Fucoidans are classically obtained from brown seaweeds by multi-step, hot acid extraction, but the structural and compositional traits, and possibly the bioactivity......, of the fucoidan polysaccharides are significantly influenced by the extraction parameters. This review discusses the structural features of fucoidans, the significance of different extraction technologies, and reviews enzymatic degradation of fucoidans and the use of fucoidan-modifying enzymes for elucidating...

  6. Circadian rhythm of intraocular pressure in the rat.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moore, C G; Johnson, E C; Morrison, J C

    1996-02-01

    To define the characteristics of the diurnal variation of intraocular pressure (IOP) in eyes of awake rats, ten male brown Norway rats were entrained to a 12-hour light:12-hour dark (12L:12D) lighting schedule and were conditioned to IOP measurement with the TonoPen XL tonometer while awake, using only 0.5% proparacaine HCl anesthesia. The IOP measurements were performed in 4 experiments: Preliminary-IOP was measured at 6-hour intervals in both eyes of each animal, to determine correlation between right and left eyes; Light:Dark-lighting remained the same as in the preliminary experiment, but the measurement schedule was altered so that measurements were obtained at 4-hour intervals in alternating eyes, over two 24-hour light cycles; Dark:Dark-animals were placed in constant dark (0L:24D) and, after 72 h, measurements were obtained at 4-hour intervals in alternating eyes. Animals were then re-entrained to the previous 12L:12D schedule for 7 days, after which they were returned to constant dark and the experiment was repeated; and Dark:Light-animals were entrained to a reversed light:dark cycle (12D:12L) for 28 days, after which measurements were obtained in the same fashion as in the Light:Dark experiment. Close agreement was found between right- and left-eye IOPs. Animals on a 12L:12D schedule exhibited lowest IOP while the lights were on (19.3 +/- 1.9 mm Hg), and highest (31.3 +/- 1.3 mm Hg) while the lights were off. Pressure changes anticipated the change from light to dark and dark to light. This pattern persisted in constant dark, and was reversed when the cycle was changed to 12D:12L. Brown Norway rats possess a regular rhythm of IOP that is entrained by the cycle of light and dark, and persistence of this rhythm in constant dark establishes it as a circadian rhythm. Furthermore, our results indicate that reliable and physiologically meaningful IOP measurements can be obtained in awake rats using the TonoPen XL tonometer.

  7. Nutrient imbalance in Norway spruce

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Thelin, Gunnar

    2000-11-01

    The studies presented in my thesis indicate that growing Norway spruce in monoculture does not constitute sustainable forest management in a high N and S deposition environment, such as in southern Sweden. The combination of N-induced high growth rates and leaching due to soil acidification causes soil reserves of nutrients to decrease. This will increase the risk of nutrient imbalance within the trees when nutrient demands are not met. The development of nutrient imbalance in Scania, southern Sweden, was shown as negative trends in needle and soil nutrient status from the mid-80s to the present in Norway spruce and Scots pine stands. This imbalance appears to be connected to high levels of N and S deposition. Clear negative effects on tree vitality were found when using a new branch development method. Today, growth and vitality seems to be limited by K, rather than N, in spruce stands older than 40 years. However, younger stands appear to be able to absorb the deposited N without negative effects on growth and vitality. When investigating effects of nutrient stress on tree vitality, indicators such as branch length and shoot multiplication rate, which include effects accumulated over several years, are suitable. Countermeasures are needed in order to maintain the forest production at a high level. Positive effects on tree nutrient status after vitality fertilization (N-free fertilization) was shown in two micronutrient deficient stands in south-central Sweden. In addition, tree vitality was positively affected after the application of a site-adapted fertilizer to the canopy. Site-adaption of fertilizers will most likely improve the possibilities of a positive response on tree growth and vitality in declining stands. In a survey of Norway spruce in mixtures with beech, birch, or oak compared to monocultures it was shown that spruce nutrient status was higher in mixtures with deciduous species than in monocultures. By using mixed-species stands the need for

  8. Nociception and Conditioned Fear in Rats: Strains Matter

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schaap, Manon W. H.; van Oostrom, Hugo; Doornenbal, Arie; van 't Klooster, José; Baars, Annemarie M.; Arndt, Saskia S.; Hellebrekers, Ludo J.

    2013-01-01

    When using rats in pain research, strain-related differences in outcomes of tests for pain and nociception are acknowledged. However, very little is known about the specific characteristics of these strain differences. In this study four phylogenetically distant inbred rat strains, i.e. Wistar Kyoto (WKY), Fawn Hooded (FH), Brown Norway (BN) and Lewis (LE), were investigated in different tests related to pain and nociception. During Pavlovian fear conditioning, the LE and WKY showed a significantly longer duration of freezing behaviour than the FH and BN. Additionally, differences in c-Fos expression in subregions of the prefrontal cortex and amygdala between rat strains during retrieval and expression of conditioned fear were found. For example, the BN did not show recruitment of the basolateral amygdala, whereas the WKY, FH and LE did. During the hot plate test, the WKY and LE showed a lower thermal threshold compared to the BN and FH. In a follow-up experiment, the two most contrasting strains regarding behaviour during the hot plate test and Pavlovian fear conditioning (i.e. FH and WKY) were selected and the hot plate test, Von Frey test and somatosensory-evoked potential (SEP) were investigated. During the Von Frey test, the WKY showed a lower mechanical threshold compared to the FH. When measuring the SEP, the FH appeared to be less reactive to increasing stimulus intensities when considering both peak amplitudes and latencies. Altogether, the combined results indicate various differences between rat strains in Pavlovian fear conditioning, nociception related behaviours and nociceptive processing. These findings demonstrate the necessity of using multiple rat strains when using tests including noxious stimuli and suggest that the choice of rat strains should be considered. When selecting a strain for a particular study it should be considered how this strain behaves during the tests used in that study. PMID:24376690

  9. Upregulation of genes related to bone formation by γ-amino butyric acid and γ-oryzanol in germinated brown rice is via the activation of GABAB-receptors and reduction of serum IL-6 in rats

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Muhammad SI

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available Sani Ismaila Muhammad,1,2 Ismail Maznah,1,3 Rozi Mahmud,4 Abu Bakar Zakaria Zuki,5 Mustapha Umar Imam1 1Laboratory of Molecular Biomedicine, Institute of Bioscience, 2Department of Pharmacology and Toxicology, Faculty of Veterinary Medicine, Usmanu Danfodiyo University, Sokoto, Nigeria; 3Department of Nutrition and Dietetics, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences, 4Department of Radiology, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences, 5Department of Veterinary Anatomy, Faculty of Veterinary Medicine, University Putra Malaysia, Serdang, Selangor, Malaysia Background: Osteoporosis and other bone degenerative diseases are among the most challenging non-communicable diseases to treat. Previous works relate bone loss due to osteoporosis with oxidative stress generated by free radicals and inflammatory cytokines. Alternative therapy to hormone replacement has been an area of interest to researchers for almost three decades due to hormone therapy-associated side effects. Methods: In this study, we investigated the effects of gamma-amino butyric acid (GABA, gamma-oryzanol (ORZ, acylated steryl glucosides (ASG, and phenolic extracts from germinated brown rice (GBR on the expression of genes related to bone metabolism, such as bone morphogenic protein-2 (BMP-2, secreted protein acidic and rich in cysteine (SPARC, runt-related transcription factor 2 (RUNX-2, osteoblast-specific transcription factor osterix (Osx, periostin, osteoblast specific factor (Postn, collagen 1&2 (Col1&2, calcitonin receptor gene (CGRP; body weight measurement and also serum interleukin-6 (IL-6 and osteocalcin, in serum and bone. Rats were treated with GBR, ORZ, GABA, and ASG at (100 and 200 mg/kg; estrogen (0.2 mg/kg, or remifemin (10 and 20 mg/kg, compared to ovariectomized non-treated group as well as non-ovariectomized non-treated (sham group. Enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay was used to measure the IL-6 and osteocalcin levels at week 2, 4, and 8, while the gene expression in the

  10. Evaluation of Research in Engineering Science in Norway

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Van Brussel, Hendrik Van Brussel; Lindberg, Bengt; Cederwall, Klas

    This report presents the conclusions of Panel 1: Construction engineering, Production and Operation. The Research Council of Norway (NFR) appointed three expert panels to evaluate Research in Engineering Science in Norway .......This report presents the conclusions of Panel 1: Construction engineering, Production and Operation. The Research Council of Norway (NFR) appointed three expert panels to evaluate Research in Engineering Science in Norway ....

  11. Whole-Genome Sequences of DA and F344 Rats with Different Susceptibilities to Arthritis, Autoimmunity, Inflammation and Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guo, Xiaosen; Brenner, Max; Zhang, Xuemei; Laragione, Teresina; Tai, Shuaishuai; Li, Yanhong; Bu, Junjie; Yin, Ye; Shah, Anish A.; Kwan, Kevin; Li, Yingrui; Jun, Wang; Gulko, Pércio S.

    2013-01-01

    DA (D-blood group of Palm and Agouti, also known as Dark Agouti) and F344 (Fischer) are two inbred rat strains with differences in several phenotypes, including susceptibility to autoimmune disease models and inflammatory responses. While these strains have been extensively studied, little information is available about the DA and F344 genomes, as only the Brown Norway (BN) and spontaneously hypertensive rat strains have been sequenced to date. Here we report the sequencing of the DA and F344 genomes using next-generation Illumina paired-end read technology and the first de novo assembly of a rat genome. DA and F344 were sequenced with an average depth of 32-fold, covered 98.9% of the BN reference genome, and included 97.97% of known rat ESTs. New sequences could be assigned to 59 million positions with previously unknown data in the BN reference genome. Differences between DA, F344, and BN included 19 million positions in novel scaffolds, 4.09 million single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) (including 1.37 million new SNPs), 458,224 short insertions and deletions, and 58,174 structural variants. Genetic differences between DA, F344, and BN, including high-impact SNPs and short insertions and deletions affecting >2500 genes, are likely to account for most of the phenotypic variation between these strains. The new DA and F344 genome sequencing data should facilitate gene discovery efforts in rat models of human disease. PMID:23695301

  12. Whole-genome sequences of DA and F344 rats with different susceptibilities to arthritis, autoimmunity, inflammation and cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guo, Xiaosen; Brenner, Max; Zhang, Xuemei; Laragione, Teresina; Tai, Shuaishuai; Li, Yanhong; Bu, Junjie; Yin, Ye; Shah, Anish A; Kwan, Kevin; Li, Yingrui; Jun, Wang; Gulko, Pércio S

    2013-08-01

    DA (D-blood group of Palm and Agouti, also known as Dark Agouti) and F344 (Fischer) are two inbred rat strains with differences in several phenotypes, including susceptibility to autoimmune disease models and inflammatory responses. While these strains have been extensively studied, little information is available about the DA and F344 genomes, as only the Brown Norway (BN) and spontaneously hypertensive rat strains have been sequenced to date. Here we report the sequencing of the DA and F344 genomes using next-generation Illumina paired-end read technology and the first de novo assembly of a rat genome. DA and F344 were sequenced with an average depth of 32-fold, covered 98.9% of the BN reference genome, and included 97.97% of known rat ESTs. New sequences could be assigned to 59 million positions with previously unknown data in the BN reference genome. Differences between DA, F344, and BN included 19 million positions in novel scaffolds, 4.09 million single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) (including 1.37 million new SNPs), 458,224 short insertions and deletions, and 58,174 structural variants. Genetic differences between DA, F344, and BN, including high-impact SNPs and short insertions and deletions affecting >2500 genes, are likely to account for most of the phenotypic variation between these strains. The new DA and F344 genome sequencing data should facilitate gene discovery efforts in rat models of human disease.

  13. Two rare coprophilous ascomycetes from Norway

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Brummelen, van J.; Kristiansen, R.

    1998-01-01

    Two uncommon coprophilous ascomycetes, Ascobolus cervinus and Caccobius minusculus, only recorded once, each from two different continents, are reported for the first time from Norway. Both are provided with new descriptions and compared with authentic material.

  14. Pigmented and albino rats differ in their responses to moderate, acute and reversible intraocular pressure elevation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gurdita, Akshay; Tan, Bingyao; Joos, Karen M; Bizheva, Kostadinka; Choh, Vivian

    2017-06-01

    To compare the electrophysiological and morphological responses to acute, moderately elevated intraocular pressure (IOP) in Sprague-Dawley (SD), Long-Evans (LE) and Brown Norway (BN) rat eyes. Eleven-week-old SD (n = 5), LE (n = 5) and BN (n = 5) rats were used. Scotopic threshold responses (STRs), Maxwellian flash electroretinograms (ERGs) or ultrahigh-resolution optical coherence tomography (UHR-OCT) images of the rat retinas were collected from both eyes before, during and after IOP elevation of one eye. IOP was raised to ~35 mmHg for 1 h using a vascular loop, while the other eye served as a control. STRs, ERGs and UHR-OCT images were acquired on 3 days separated by 1 day of no experimental manipulation. There were no significant differences between species in baseline electroretinography. However, during IOP elevation, peak positive STR amplitudes in LE (mean ± standard deviation 259 ± 124 µV) and BN (228 ± 96 µV) rats were about fourfold higher than those in SD rats (56 ± 46 µV) rats (p = 0.0002 for both). Similarly, during elevated IOP, ERG b-wave amplitudes were twofold higher in LE and BN rats compared to those of SD rats (947 ± 129 µV and 892 ± 184 µV, vs 427 ± 138 µV; p = 0.0002 for both). UHR-OCT images showed backward bowing in all groups during IOP elevation, with a return to typical form about 30 min after IOP elevation. Differences in the loop-induced responses between the strains are likely due to different inherent retinal morphology and physiology.

  15. Chromosomes 18 and X are quantitative trait loci for nephrotic-range proteinuria in rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schachter, Asher D; Ichimura, Takaharu; Kohane, Isaac S

    2005-12-01

    Numerous cellular and molecular perturbations have been studied to elucidate the pathogenic mechanisms underlying nephrotic-range proteinuria, which may in turn shed light on disease-specific mechanisms. We have analyzed the publicly available data from the PhysGen partial panel of consomic rats to determine whether there are quantitative trait loci that associate with nephrotic-range proteinuria. As of this writing, consomic rat strains subjected to the renal protocol have been bred by the Program for Genomic Applications for 15 of the 22 rat chromosomes for both genders, predominantly with the Brown-Norway (BN) and Dahl salt-sensitive (SS) strains as parents. We defined chromosomes of interest as consomic SS-xBN strains whose phenotype measurements differed significantly from SS but not BN strains, stratified by gender. We filtered and clustered differentially expressed genes by function in renal tissue from relevant strains. Proteinuria was significantly higher in male SS vs. male SS-18BN, and it was significantly higher in male SS vs. female SS. Functional clustering of differentially expressed genes yielded two specific functional clusters: apoptosis (p=0.022) and angiogenesis (p=0.046). Gene expression profiles demonstrated differential expression of apoptotic and angiogenic genes. However, TUNEL stains of renal tissue showed no significant difference in the number of apoptotic nuclei. We conclude that chromosomes 18 and X are quantitative trait loci for nephrotic-range proteinuria in rats.

  16. [Brown recluse bite].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nehemya, Moshe

    2008-01-01

    Spider bites are not uncommon in our warm climate. The most prevalent species of venomous spiders in Israel are the brown recluse and the black widow. Although the black widow is more notorious than the recluse, for every bite by a black widow there are hundreds of recluse bites reported. Despite the numerous bites, there is little awareness amongst physicians with regard to the clinical signs of recluse bites, and very often the wrong diagnosis is made, resulting in complex and unnecessary treatments. The basis of this error stems from the numerous clinical diagnoses which closely imitate a recluse bite, the relative scarceness of documented recluse bites and the fact that in most cases the spider is not witnessed by the victim. The following article describes three cases of children admitted to our department, presenting with high fever, a necrotic lesion and an extensive maculopapular rash. The children were eventually diagnosed with brown recluse bites. Furthermore, the article summarizes the literature regarding the clinical signs of recluse bites, possible complications and treatment options. The objective of this review is to increase awareness towards recluse bites, thereby preventing misdiagnoses and unnecessary treatments.

  17. Monoclonal antibodies directed to fucoidan preparations from brown algae.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Thomas A Torode

    Full Text Available Cell walls of the brown algae contain a diverse range of polysaccharides with useful bioactivities. The precise structures of the sulfated fucan/fucoidan group of polysaccharides and their roles in generating cell wall architectures and cell properties are not known in detail. Four rat monoclonal antibodies, BAM1 to BAM4, directed to sulfated fucan preparations, have been generated and used to dissect the heterogeneity of brown algal cell wall polysaccharides. BAM1 and BAM4, respectively, bind to a non-sulfated epitope and a sulfated epitope present in the sulfated fucan preparations. BAM2 and BAM3 identified additional distinct epitopes present in the fucoidan preparations. All four epitopes, not yet fully characterised, occur widely within the major brown algal taxonomic groups and show divergent distribution patterns in tissues. The analysis of cell wall extractions and fluorescence imaging reveal differences in the occurrence of the BAM1 to BAM4 epitopes in various tissues of Fucus vesiculosus. In Ectocarpus subulatus, a species closely related to the brown algal model Ectocarpus siliculosus, the BAM4 sulfated epitope was modulated in relation to salinity levels. This new set of monoclonal antibodies will be useful for the dissection of the highly complex and yet poorly resolved sulfated polysaccharides in the brown algae in relation to their ecological and economic significance.

  18. Endothelin B receptors contribute to retinal ganglion cell loss in a rat model of glaucoma.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alena Z Minton

    Full Text Available Glaucoma is an optic neuropathy, commonly associated with elevated intraocular pressure (IOP characterized by optic nerve degeneration, cupping of the optic disc, and loss of retinal ganglion cells which could lead to loss of vision. Endothelin-1 (ET-1 is a 21-amino acid vasoactive peptide that plays a key role in the pathogenesis of glaucoma; however, the receptors mediating these effects have not been defined. In the current study, endothelin B (ET(B receptor expression was assessed in vivo, in the Morrison's ocular hypertension model of glaucoma in rats. Elevation of IOP in Brown Norway rats produced increased expression of ET(B receptors in the retina, mainly in retinal ganglion cells (RGCs, nerve fiber layer (NFL, and also in the inner plexiform layer (IPL and inner nuclear layer (INL. To determine the role of ET(B receptors in neurodegeneration, Wistar-Kyoto wild type (WT and ET(B receptor-deficient (KO rats were subjected to retrograde labeling with Fluoro-Gold (FG, following which IOP was elevated in one eye while the contralateral eye served as control. IOP elevation for 4 weeks in WT rats caused an appreciable loss of RGCs, which was significantly attenuated in KO rats. In addition, degenerative changes in the optic nerve were greatly reduced in KO rats compared to those in WT rats. Taken together, elevated intraocular pressure mediated increase in ET(B receptor expression and its activation may contribute to a decrease in RGC survival as seen in glaucoma. These findings raise the possibility of using endothelin receptor antagonists as neuroprotective agents for the treatment of glaucoma.

  19. Genetic factors control nicotine self-administration in isogenic adolescent rat strains.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hao Chen

    Full Text Available Adult cigarette smokers usually become dependent on cigarettes during adolescence. Despite recent advances in addiction genetics, little data delineates the genetic factors that account for the vulnerability of humans to smoke tobacco. We studied the operant nicotine self-administration (SA behavior of six inbred strains of adolescent male rats (Fisher 344, Brown Norway, Dark Agouti, Spontaneous Hypertensive Rat, Wistar Kyoto and Lewis and six selected F1 hybrids. All rats were trained to press a lever to obtain food starting on postnatal day (PN 32, and then nicotine (0.03 mg/kg/infusion, i.v. reinforcement was made available on PN41-42 (10 consecutive daily 2 h sessions. Of the 12 isogenic strains, Fisher rats self-administered the fewest nicotine infusions (1.45 ± 0.36/d during the last 3 d, while Lewis rats took the most nicotine (13.0 ± 1.4/d. These strains sorted into high, intermediate and low self-administration groups in 2, 2, and 8 strains, respectively. The influence of heredity on nicotine SA (0.64 is similar to that reported for humans. Therefore, this panel of isogenic rat strains effectively models the overall impact of genetics on the vulnerability to acquire nicotine-reinforced behavior during adolescence. Separate groups of rats responded for food starting on PN41. The correlation between nicotine and food reward was not significant. Hence, the genetic control of the motivation to obtain nicotine is distinctly different from food reward, indicating the specificity of the underlying genetic mechanisms. Lastly, the behavior of F1 hybrids was not predicted from the additive behavior of the parental strains, indicating the impact of significant gene-gene interactions on the susceptibility to nicotine reward. Taken together, the behavioral characteristics of this model indicate its strong potential to identify specific genes mediating the human vulnerability to smoke cigarettes.

  20. The relationship between young brown trout density and water quality in tributary streams to lakes in three acidic watersheds; Effekter av vannkvalitet og habitat paa tettheten av aureunger i tilloepsbekker til innsjoeer i tre forsuringsomraader

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hesthagen, Trygve; Larsen, Bjoern M.; Berger, Hans M.; Forseth, Torbjoern

    1998-09-01

    This publication examines the relationship between young brown trout densities in lake tributaries, and water chemistry and habitat variables. The study was carried out during the autumn in three acidic, freshwater river systems in western and southwestern Norway. The variability in brown trout density in the three watersheds in relation to varying concentrations of calcium and inorganic Al, were investigated. Water chemistry variables seem to limit the density. 38 refs., 3 figs., 5 tabs.

  1. Imaging-Based Biomarkers: Characterization of Post-Kawasaki Vasculitis in Infants and Hypertension Phenotype in Rat Model

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Roch Listz Maurice

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Background. Investigating the mechanical properties of the arteries is essential in cardiovascular diseases. Recent imaging modalities allow mapping mechanical properties within the arterial wall. Aims. We report the potential of imaging-based biomarker (ImBioMark to investigate the effect of aging on the rat. We also present preliminary data with ImBioMark characterizing vascular sequelae of Kawasaki disease (KD in young humans. Methods. We investigated in vivo the effect of aging on male Brown Norway (BN rats' (n=5 carotid stiffness. In a second experiment, the impact of KD on the ascending aorta (AA was examined in KD children (n=2 aged 13 ± 1.41 years old compared to KD-free children (n=5 aged 13.13 ± 0.18 years old. Results. The stiffness of BN's carotid artery was three times stiffer in the old rats, with a turning point at 40 weeks old (P=0.001. KD had a very significant impact on the AA stiffness with strain estimates of 2.39 ± 0.51% versus 4.24 ± 0.65% in controls (P<0.001. Conclusion. ImBioMark phenotypes hypertension in rat models noninvasively in vivo without resorting to euthanasia. Quantifying aortic wall remodeling is also feasible in humans. Future investigations target human cardiovascular disease.

  2. Language Policy and Corporate Law in Norway

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sanden, Guro Refsum

    This paper explores the relationship between national language policies and corporate law in Norwegian business. By adopting a legal perspective on the national language policy of Norway as it has been stipulated by the Norwegian Ministry of Church and Culture (2008) and The Language Council...... of Norway (2005) the paper investigates how the 500 largest companies in Norway comply with the language requirement of the Norwegian Accounting Act for the financial year of 2015. The results show that 44.9 % of the companies presented their financial statements in one or more foreign language in addition...... to the Norwegian language version, 36.2 % of the companies presented their financial statements in Norwegian only, while 18.9 % of the companies had been granted dispensation from the Norwegian Directorate of Taxes to deviate from the language requirement of the Accounting Act and presented their financial...

  3. Rats

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alexey Kondrashov

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available We aimed to perform a chemical analysis of both Alibernet red wine and an alcohol-free Alibernet red wine extract (AWE and to investigate the effects of AWE on nitric oxide and reactive oxygen species production as well as blood pressure development in normotensive Wistar Kyoto (WKY and spontaneously hypertensive rats (SHRs. Total antioxidant capacity together with total phenolic and selected mineral content was measured in wine and AWE. Young 6-week-old male WKY and SHR were treated with AWE (24,2 mg/kg/day for 3 weeks. Total NOS and SOD activities, eNOS and SOD1 protein expressions, and superoxide production were determined in the tissues. Both antioxidant capacity and phenolic content were significantly higher in AWE compared to wine. The AWE increased NOS activity in the left ventricle, aorta, and kidney of SHR, while it did not change NOS activity in WKY rats. Similarly, increased SOD activity in the plasma and left ventricle was observed in SHR only. There were no changes in eNOS and SOD1 expressions. In conclusion, phenolics and minerals included in AWE may contribute directly to increased NOS and SOD activities of SHR. Nevertheless, 3 weeks of AWE treatment failed to affect blood pressure of SHR.

  4. American Studies in Norway: Past and Present

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ole O. Moen

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available Norwegian “studies” of America started really more than a thousand years ago, when Leif Ericsson landed in Vinland, his name for that part of New Foundland where his party made quarters around the year A.D. 1000. However, it was not until 1825 that modern mass emigration from Norway to America started in earnest, when a small sailing vessel, the sloop Restaurationen, left the little village of Tysvær on the west coast of Norway, near Stavanger, for New York, carrying a load of 52 Quaker emigr...

  5. Tidal power in Norway; Maanekraft fra dypet

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    2003-07-01

    The world's first tidal power station is scheduled for stat-up in the spring of 2003. It is located in Kvalsundet, off Hammerfest, Norway. This is a pilot installation of a 300 kW tidal turbine at a depth of 50 metres. When fully developed in 2007, the tidal power plant will deliver 32 GWh per year. Hammerfest Stroem has patented the energy and the company hopes to be able to install similar power stations both in Norway and abroad. The potential worldwide is claimed to be more than 450 TWh per year.

  6. Identification of genetic modifiers of behavioral phenotypes in serotonin transporter knockout rats

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nijman Isaäc J

    2010-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Genetic variation in the regulatory region of the human serotonin transporter gene (SLC6A4 has been shown to affect brain functionality and personality. However, large heterogeneity in its biological effects is observed, which is at least partially due to genetic modifiers. To gain insight into serotonin transporter (SERT-specific genetic modifiers, we studied an intercross between the Wistar SERT-/- rat and the behaviorally and genetically divergent Brown Norway rat, and performed a QTL analysis. Results In a cohort of >150 intercross SERT-/- and control (SERT+/+ rats we characterized 12 traits that were previously associated with SERT deficiency, including activity, exploratory pattern, cocaine-induced locomotor activity, and abdominal and subcutaneous fat. Using 325 genetic markers, 10 SERT-/--specific quantitative trait loci (QTLs for parameters related to activity and exploratory pattern (Chr.1,9,11,14, and cocaine-induced anxiety and locomotor activity (Chr.5,8 were identified. No significant QTLs were found for fat parameters. Using in silico approaches we explored potential causal genes within modifier QTL regions and found interesting candidates, amongst others, the 5-HT1D receptor (Chr. 5, dopamine D2 receptor (Chr. 8, cannabinoid receptor 2 (Chr. 5, and genes involved in fetal development and plasticity (across chromosomes. Conclusions We anticipate that the SERT-/--specific QTLs may lead to the identification of new modulators of serotonergic signaling, which may be targets for pharmacogenetic and therapeutic approaches.

  7. Videofluorographic assessment of deglutitive behaviors in a rat model of aging and Parkinson disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    Russell, John A.; Ciucci, Michelle R.; Hammer, Michael J.; Connor, Nadine P.

    2012-01-01

    Dysphagia is commonly associated with aging and Parkinson disease and can have a significant impact on a person’s quality of life. In some cases, dysphagia may be life threatening. Animal models may be used to study underlying mechanisms of dysphagia, but paradigms that allow adequate imaging of the swallow in combination with measurement of physiological variables have not been forthcoming. To begin development of methods that allow this, we used videofluorography to record the deglutition behaviors of 22 Fischer 344-Brown Norway rats in young adult (9 months old), old (32 months old), and parkinsonian (unilateral lesion to the medial forebrain bundle) groups. We hypothesized that the old and parkinsonian rats would manifest deficits in deglutition behaviors analogous to those found in human clinical populations. Our results supported our hypotheses in that the old group demonstrated reductions in bolus transport speeds and mastication rate, while the parkinsonian rats showed impairments in oral processing. Interpretation of these results should consider the particular animal model, lesion type and videoflurographic protocol used in this work. Future studies will link swallow imaging data of this kind with physiological and anatomical data in a manner not possible with human participants. PMID:22763806

  8. Cordyceps sinensis extracts attenuate aortic transplant arteriosclerosis in rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Yan; Yang, Mei; Gong, Shuwen; Yang, Yu; Chen, Bicheng; Cai, Yong; Zheng, Shaoling; Yang, Yirong; Xia, Peng

    2012-06-01

    Transplant arteriosclerosis is a hallmark of chronic rejection and is still the major limiting factor affecting the success of long-term organ transplants. Development of transplant arteriosclerosis is refractory to conventional immunosuppressive drugs, and adequate therapy is not yet available. The aim of this study was to determine the role of Cordyceps sinensis extracts in reducing the formation of transplant arteriosclerosis in a rat aortic transplant model. Lewis rat aortic allografts were transplanted into Brown-Norway recipient rats. Recipients received 0.5, 1, 2, and 5 mg/kg of Cordyceps sinensis extracts (or control saline) daily via intragastric injection for 60 d. Grafts were harvested 60 d post-transplantation and intimal thickness determined microscopically following hematoxylin and eosin (H and E) staining and abdominal aorta protein profiles determined by Western blot analysis. Cellular localization was assessed by histology and immunohistochemistry and the serum analyzed for tumor necrosis factor alpha (TNF-α) and intercellular adhesion molecule-1 (ICAM-1) by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA). C. sinensis administration resulted in a significant reduction in neointimal formation (neointimal thickness 8.27 ± 1.95 μm [0.5 mg/kg], 3.69 ± 1.43 μm [1 mg/kg], 3.69 ± 1.43 μm [1 mg/kg], 3.69 ± 1.43 μm [1 mg/kg] versus 11.42 ± 2.67 μm [control]) and in the proliferative activity of vascular smooth muscle cells. In addition, localized expression of TNF-α and ICAM-1 in transplant aortas was characterized by immunohistochemistry and immunoblot analyses demonstrating that C. sinensis treatment significantly reduced TNF-α and ICAM-1 levels compared with levels observed in controls (P arteriosclerosis in a rat aortic transplant model. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  9. Acclimation of brown algal photosynthesis to ultraviolet radiation in Arctic coastal waters (Spitsbergen, Norway)

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bischof, K.; Hanelt, D.; Tug, H.; Karsten, U.; Brouwer, P.E.M.; Wiencke, C.

    1998-01-01

    In field studies conducted at the Kongsfjord (Spitsbergen) changes of the irradiance in the atmosphere and the sublittoral zone were monitored from the beginning of June until the end of August 1997, to register the minimum and maximum fluxes of ultraviolet and photosynthetically active radiation

  10. Comparison of anterior segment structures in two rat glaucoma models: an ultrasound biomicroscopic study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nissirios, Nikolaos; Chanis, Raul; Johnson, Elaine; Morrison, John; Cepurna, William O; Jia, Lijun; Mittag, Thomas; Danias, John

    2008-06-01

    Optic nerve disease in chronic IOP elevation rat glaucoma models develops at different rates. This study was undertaken to investigate whether anterior chamber (AC) changes develop in two popular models in vivo and whether the changes are related to IOP. Ten female Wistar rats and 12 male Brown-Norway rats were subjected to episcleral vein cauterization (EVC) and hypertonic saline episcleral vein sclerosis (HSEVS), respectively. Contralateral untreated eyes served as controls. IOP was recorded for a period of 5 to 6 weeks, and with the rats under anesthesia, the eyes were imaged with an ultrasound biomicroscope. Measurements of the AC depth (ACD), trabecular-iris angle (TIA), iris thickness at the thickest point near the pupillary margin (IT), angle opening distance (AOD; at 200 microm from the scleral spur), and ciliary body area (CBA) were compared between control eyes of the two strains and between experimental and control eyes within each strain. The differences were correlated with IOP history. Eyes subjected to EVC demonstrated greater increases in IOP than eyes subjected to HSEVS. Between rat strains, control eyes differed significantly in all the parameters studied, except for ACD. No difference was detected between experimental and control eyes in the EVC group. In contrast, experimental eyes in the HSEVS group had approximately 71% larger ACDs and approximately 32% smaller CBAs than did the contralateral control eyes (P EVC rat model of glaucoma do not undergo changes in the AC. In contrast, eyes subjected to HSEVS display deepening of the AC and reduction in size of the ciliary body within 5 to 6 weeks. These changes correlate to IOP exposure and may be the result of specific changes induced by the experimental intervention. These models are likely to rely on different mechanisms of pressure elevation and cannot be used interchangeably.

  11. New Moho map of southern Norway

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Stratford, Wanda Rose; Thybo, Hans; Faleide, J.-I.

    2009-01-01

    A recent seismic refraction study across southern Norway has revealed that the up to 2469 m high Southern Scandes Mountains are not isostatically compensated by a thick crust. Rather, the Moho depths are close to average for continental crust with elevations of ~1 km. Evidence from new seismic da...

  12. Accreditation of occupational health services in Norway.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lie, A; Bjørnstad, O

    2015-12-01

    In 2010, an accreditation system for occupational health services (OHS) in Norway was implemented. To examine OHS experiences of the accreditation system in Norway 4 years after its implementation. A web-based questionnaire was sent to all accredited OHS asking about their experiences with the accreditation system. Responses were compared with a similar survey conducted in 2011. The response rate was 76% (173/228). OHS reported that the most common changes they had had to make to achieve accreditation were: improvement of their quality assurance system (53%), a plan for competence development (44%) and increased staffing in occupational hygiene (36%) and occupational medicine (28%). The OHS attributed improved quality in their own OHS (56%) and in OHS in Norway (47%), to the accreditation process. The accreditation system was well accepted by OHS, who reported that it had improved the quality of their OHS and of OHS in Norway. The results are similar to the findings of a 2011 survey. © The Author 2015. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the Society of Occupational Medicine.

  13. The Bamble Sector, South Norway: A review

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Nijland, T.G.; Harlov, D.E.; Andersen, T.

    2014-01-01

    The Proterozoic Bamble Sector, South Norway, is one of the world’s classic amphibolite- to granulitefacies transition zones. It is characterized by a well-developed isograd sequence, with isolated ‘granulite-facies islands’ in the amphibolite-facies portion of the transition zone. The area is

  14. Improved predictions of atmospheric icing in Norway

    Science.gov (United States)

    Engdahl, Bjørg Jenny; Nygaard, Bjørn Egil; Thompson, Gregory; Bengtsson, Lisa; Berntsen, Terje

    2017-04-01

    Atmospheric icing of ground structures is a problem in cold climate locations such as Norway. During the 2013/2014 winter season two major power lines in southern Norway suffered severe damage due to ice loads exceeding their design values by two to three times. Better methods are needed to estimate the ice loads that affect various infrastructure, and better models are needed to improve the prediction of severe icing events. The Wind, Ice and Snow loads Impact on Infrastructure and the Natural Environment (WISLINE) project, was initiated to address this problem and to explore how a changing climate may affect the ice loads in Norway. Creating better forecasts of icing requires a proper simulation of supercooled liquid water (SLW). Preliminary results show that the operational numerical weather prediction model (HARMONIE-AROME) at MET-Norway generates considerably lower values of SLW as compared with the WRF model when run with the Thompson microphysics scheme. Therefore, we are piecewise implementing specific processes found in the Thompson scheme into the AROME model and testing the resulting impacts to prediction of SLW and structural icing. Both idealized and real icing cases are carried out to test the newly modified AROME microphysics scheme. Besides conventional observations, a unique set of specialized instrumentation for icing measurements are used for validation. Initial results of this investigation will be presented at the conference.

  15. New records of Marine Turbellaria from Norway

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Velde, van der G.

    1976-01-01

    INTRODUCTION During an excursion to Norway organized by the Department of Systematic Zoology of the Rijksuniversiteit of Leiden in August 1973, I had the opportunity to make some observations on Turbellarians of salt-marshes and rocky shores of the Trondheimsfjord (63o 37' N 9° 43' Ε) and the

  16. Measurement of acid precipitation in Norway

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arne Semb

    1976-01-01

    Since January 1972, chemical analysis of daily precipitation samples from about 20 background stations in Norway has been carried out on a routine basis. Air monitoring is carried out at six stations. The chemical analysis programme is: sulphate, pH and acidity in precipitation, sulphates and sulphur dioxide in air. In addition, more detailed chemical analysis of...

  17. Geographical distribution of Phytophthora ramorum in Norway

    Science.gov (United States)

    María- Luz Herrero; Brita Toppe; Trond Rafoss

    2008-01-01

    In November 2002, Phytophthora ramorum was detected for the first time in Norway. It was isolated from Rhododendron catawbiense imported earlier the same year. After the first detection, the Norwegian Food Safety Authority has carried out surveys from 2003 to 2006. The surveys were first directed to nurseries and garden centres....

  18. Energy consumption: energy consumption in mainland Norway

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Magnussen, Inger Helene; Killingland, Magnus; Spilde, Dag

    2012-07-25

    The purpose of this report is to describe trends in energy consumption in mainland Norway, with an emphasis on key trends within the largest consumer groups. We also explain common terms and concepts in the field of energy consumption. Finally, we look at forecasts for future energy consumption, produced by bodies outside NVE. Total final energy consumption in mainland Norway in 2009 was 207 TWh. The most important end-user groups are households, service industries, manufacturing industry and transport. In addition, the energy sector in mainland Norway consumed 15 TWh. Energy consumed in the energy sector is not considered as final consumption, as the energy is used to produce new energy products. The long-term trend in energy consumption in mainland Norway is that fuel in the transport sector and electricity for the energy sector increases, while energy consumption in other sectors flattens out. The main reason for an increased use of fuel in the transport sector is the rise in the number of motorised machinery and vehicles in mainland Norway. This has caused a rise in gasoline and diesel consumption of 75 per cent since 1976. The petroleum sector is the largest consumer of energy within the energy sector in mainland Norway, and electricity from onshore to platforms in the North Sea and to new shore side installations has led to a rise in electricity consumption from 1 TWh in 1995 to 5 TWh in 2009. The energy consumption in households showed flat trend from 1996 to 2009, after many years of growth. The main reasons are a warmer climate, higher energy prices, the use of heats pumps and more energy-efficient buildings. In the service industries, the growth in energy consumptions has slightly decreased since the late 1990s, for much the same reasons as for households. In manufacturing industries the energy consumption have flatten out mainly due to the closure of energy-intensive businesses and the establishment of new more energy-efficient businesses. Electricity is

  19. Thermogenic capacity is antagonistically regulated in classical brown and white subcutaneous fat depots by high fat diet and endurance training in rats: impact on whole-body energy expenditure

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Wu, Michelle V; Bikopoulos, George; Hung, Steven; Ceddia, Rolando B

    2014-01-01

    ...) and subcutaneous inguinal (SC Ing) white adipose tissue (WAT) and how it affects whole-body energy expenditure in sedentary and endurance-trained rats fed ad libitum either low fat or high fat (HF) diets...

  20. Sickness presenteeism in Norway and Sweden

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vegard Johansen

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Sickness presenteeism (SP refers to the practice of going to work despite illness. This article describes the distribution of SP in Norway and Sweden. It also discusses relations between SP and various work characteristics and personal factors in the two countries. Methods: More than 2500 Norwegian and Swedish workers between 20 and 60 years of age answered a postal questionnaire. The Norwegian and Swedish samples are weighed and representative with regard to both variables of regional background and demography, but the response rate was low. The distribution of SP is measured by frequency (episodes in the previous year and by length (total days of SP in the previous year. This study employed binary and multinomial logistic regression to detect which factors influence the frequency of SP. Results: Fifty-five per cent of the respondents in Norway and Sweden practised SP in the previous year. The frequency of SP episodes is similar in the two countries. Further, respondents with low/medium income, physical work, and managerial responsibilities report SP more often in both countries. Non-western immigrants, the less educated, and those employed by others are overrepresented with SP in Norway. Neither gender nor age had any particular influence. Discussion: In accordance with previous studies, this study among Norwegian and Swedish workers suggests that some SP during a working year may be more common than no SP. Our analyses of determinants of SP present some previously undocumented differences. Divisions between sedentary versus physical work and management versus non-management were important for SP in Norway and Sweden. Moreover, non-western immigrants are overrepresented with SP in Norway, but this pattern does not prevail in Sweden. Some possible causes for non-western immigrants to report more SP are suggested in the article, but we need more research to follow up on the missing correlation between ethnic background and SP in

  1. Ataxia with Vitamin E Deficiency in Norway

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Areej Elkamil

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Objective Ataxia with vitamin E deficiency (AVED is a rare autosomal recessive neurological disorder which usually starts in childhood. The clinical presentation is very similar to Friedreich ataxia, most patients have progressive truncal and extremity ataxia, areflexia, positive Babinski sign, dysarthria and sensory neuropathy. Methods We made an inquiry to our colleagues in Norway, we included information from a prevalence study published southern Norway and added data from our own known case. Results A newly published prevalence study of hereditary ataxias (total of 171 subjects found only one subject with AVED in Southeast Norway. We describe two more patients, one from the Central part and one from the Northern part of Norway. All 3 cases had age of onset in early childhood (age of 4–5 years and all experienced gait ataxia and dysarthria. The genetic testing confirmed that they had pathogenic mutations in the α-tocopherol transfer protein gene (TTPA. All were carriers of the non-sense c.400C > T mutation, one was homozygous for that mutation and the others were compound heterozygous, either with c.358G > A or c.513_514insTT. The homozygous carrier was by far the most severely affected case. Conclusions We estimate the occurrence of AVED in Norway to be at least 0.6 per million inhabitants. We emphasize that all patients who develop ataxia in childhood should be routinely tested for AVED to make an early diagnosis for initiating treatment with high dose vitamin E to avoid severe neurological deficits.

  2. Dynamic changes in cell-surface expression of mannose in the oral epithelium during the development of graft-versus-host disease of the oral mucosa in rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hanada, Hironori; Ohno, Jun; Seno, Kei; Ota, Nobutaka; Taniguchi, Kunihisa

    2014-01-16

    The role of cell-surface glycoconjugates in oral mucosal graft-versus-host disease (GVHD) is still unclear, even though molecular changes in the oral epithelium are essential for the pathogenesis of these lesions. In this study, we investigated changes in the binding of mannose (Man)-specific Lens culinaris lectin (LCA) in the oral mucosa of rats with GVHD. Lewis rat spleen cells were injected into (Lewis x Brown Norway) F1 rats to induce systemic GVHD, including oral mucosal lesions. Tongue and spleen samples were evaluated using lectin histochemistry, immunohistochemistry, Western blotting, transwell migration assays and Stamper-Woodruff binding assays. Binding of Man-specific LCA expanded to the epithelial layers of the tongue in GVHD-rats. An expansion of LCA binding was related to the increased expression of mannosyltransferase in the oral mucosa. CD8+ cells, effector cells of oral mucosal GVHD, expressed mannose-binding protein (MBP) and migrated to the medium containing Man in the transwell migration assay. Adherence of CD8+ cells to the oral epithelium could be inhibited by pretreating CD8+ cells with MBP antibody and/or by pretreating sections with Man-specific LCA. Increased expression of Man on keratinocytes leads to the migration and/or adhesion of CD8+ cells in the surface epithelium, which is mediated in part by the MBP/Man-binding pathway during the development of oral mucosal GVHD.

  3. Effects of noise exposure on development of tinnitus and hyperacusis: Prevalence rates 12 months after exposure in middle-aged rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Turner, Jeremy G; Larsen, Deb

    2016-04-01

    Fischer Brown Norway (FBN) rats (n = 233) were unilaterally exposed to 12 different combinations of noise intensity, duration, and spectrum, while 46 rats served as sham-exposed controls. Rats were behaviorally tested for tinnitus and hyperacusis using gap-induced inhibition of the acoustic startle reflex (Gap) and prepulse inhibition (PPI) using 60-dB SPL before noise-exposure and at regular intervals for 12 mo. 12-mo after noise exposure the middle-aged rats were then tested again for tinnitus and hyperacusis before collecting Auditory Brainstem Response (ABR) thresholds. Collapsing across all noise exposure conditions a significant tinnitus-like deficit in responding to silent gaps was observed, with the most likely tinnitus pitch around 16 kHz. Rates of tinnitus 12-mo after noise exposure were greatest in groups receiving the four least intense noise doses (110-dB for 30, 60 and 120 min, and 116-dB for 30 min), while some of the greatest rates of hyperacusis occurred in groups receiving more intense or longer exposures. The results suggest that rates for developing tinnitus in animal models may not be easily predicted based upon noise exposure dose, but that low-to-moderate noise exposures may result in the greatest likelihood for producing tinnitus. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  4. How brown is brown fat that we can see?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kolonin, Mikhail G

    2014-04-01

    There are many unanswered questions related to the heterogeneity of adipose tissue depots and the paucity of their function, development, and organization at the cellular level. Much effort has been directed at studying white adipose tissue (WAT), the driver of obesity and the associated metabolic disease. In recent years, the importance of brown adipose tissue (BAT) has also been appreciated. While BAT depots are prominent in many small mammal species, their detection in adult humans has been technically challenging and the identity of brown human adipocytes found within depots of WAT has remained controversial. We recently reported a peptide probe that binds to BAT vasculature and, when coupled with a near-infrared fluorophore, can be used to detect BAT in whole body imaging. This probe reliably discriminates between endothelium associated with brown or brown-like (beige/brite) adipocytes and endothelium of visceral WAT. Improved probes based on this approach could aid in assessing human adipose tissue body distribution and remodeling, which is a process underlying various pathologies. This commentary aims at discussing open questions that need to be addressed before full clinical advantage can be taken from adipose tissue imaging, as well as its metabolic activation strategies.

  5. Exercise-induced rescue of tongue function without striatal dopamine sparing in a rat neurotoxin model of Parkinson disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ciucci, Michelle R; Schaser, Allison J; Russell, John A

    2013-09-01

    Unilateral lesions to the medial forebrain bundle with 6-hydroxydopamine (6-OHDA) lead to force and timing deficits during a complex licking task. We hypothesized that training targeting tongue force generation during licking would improve timing and force measures and also lead to striatal dopamine sparing. Nine month-old male Fisher344/Brown Norway rats were used in this experiment. Sixteen rats were in the control condition and received tongue exercise (n=8) or no exercise (n=8). Fourteen rats were in the 6-OHDA lesion condition and underwent tongue exercise (n=7) and or no exercise (n=7). Following 4 weeks of training and post-training measures, all animals underwent bilateral stimulation of the hypoglossal nerves to measure muscle contractile properties and were then transcardially perfused and brain tissues collected for immunohistochemistry to examine striatal dopamine content. Results demonstrated that exercise animals performed better for maximal force, average force, and press rate than their no-exercise counterparts, and the 6-OHDA animals that underwent exercise performed as well as the Control No Exercise group. Interestingly, there were no group differences for tetanic muscle force, despite behavioral recovery of forces. Additionally, behavioral and neurochemical analyses indicate that there were no differences in striatal dopamine. Thus, targeted exercise can improve tongue force and timing deficits related to 6-OHDA lesions and this exercise likely has a central, versus peripheral (muscle strength) mechanism. However, this mechanism is not related to sparing of striatal dopamine content. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  6. Temporal course of cerebrospinal fluid dynamics and amyloid accumulation in the aging rat brain from three to thirty months

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chiu Catherine

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Amyloid accumulation in the brain parenchyma is a hallmark of Alzheimer's disease (AD and is seen in normal aging. Alterations in cerebrospinal fluid (CSF dynamics are also associated with normal aging and AD. This study analyzed CSF volume, production and turnover rate in relation to amyloid-beta peptide (Aβ accumulation in the aging rat brain. Methods Aging Fischer 344/Brown-Norway hybrid rats at 3, 12, 20, and 30 months were studied. CSF production was measured by ventriculo-cisternal perfusion with blue dextran in artificial CSF; CSF volume by MRI; and CSF turnover rate by dividing the CSF production rate by the volume of the CSF space. Aβ40 and Aβ42 concentrations in the cortex and hippocampus were measured by ELISA. Results There was a significant linear increase in total cranial CSF volume with age: 3-20 months (p p p p -1 to 12 months (11.30 day-1 and then a decrease to 20 months (10.23 day-1 and 30 months (6.62 day-1. Aβ40 and Aβ42 concentrations in brain increased from 3-30 months (p Conclusions In young rats there is no correlation between CSF turnover and Aβ brain concentrations. After 12 months, CSF turnover decreases as brain Aβ continues to accumulate. This decrease in CSF turnover rate may be one of several clearance pathway alterations that influence age-related accumulation of brain amyloid.

  7. Inhibition of Stat3 by a Small Molecule Inhibitor Slows Vision Loss in a Rat Model of Diabetic Retinopathy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vanlandingham, Phillip A; Nuno, Didier J; Quiambao, Alexander B; Phelps, Eric; Wassel, Ronald A; Ma, Jian-Xing; Farjo, Krysten M; Farjo, Rafal A

    2017-04-01

    Diabetic retinopathy is a leading cause of vision loss. Previous studies have shown signaling pathways mediated by Stat3 (signal transducer and activator of transcription 3) play a primary role in diabetic retinopathy progression. This study tested CLT-005, a small molecule inhibitor of Stat3, for its dose-dependent therapeutic effects on vision loss in a rat model of diabetic retinopathy. Brown Norway rats were administered streptozotocin (STZ) to induce diabetes. CLT-005 was administered daily by oral gavage for 16 weeks at concentrations of 125, 250, or 500 mg/kg, respectively, beginning 4 days post streptozotocin administration. Systemic and ocular drug concentration was quantified with mass spectrometry. Visual function was monitored at 2-week intervals from 6 to 16 weeks using optokinetic tracking to measure visual acuity and contrast sensitivity. The presence and severity of cataracts was visually monitored and correlated to visual acuity. The transcription and translation of multiple angiogenic factors and inflammatory cytokines were measured by real-time polymerase chain reaction and Multiplex immunoassay. Streptozotocin-diabetic rats sustain progressive vision loss over 16 weeks, and this loss in visual function is rescued in a dose-dependent manner by CLT-005. This positive therapeutic effect correlates to the positive effects of CLT-005 on vascular leakage and the presence of inflammatory cytokines in the retina. The present study indicates that Stat3 inhibition has strong therapeutic potential for the treatment of vision loss in diabetic retinopathy.

  8. Optical cryoimaging of rat kidney and the effective role of chromosome 13 in salt-induced hypertension

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salehpour, F.; Yang, C.; Kurth, T.; Cowley, A. W.; Ranji, M.

    2015-03-01

    The objective of this work is to assess oxidative stress levels in salt-sensitive hypertension animal model using 3D optical cryoimager to image mitochondrial redox ratio. We studied Dahl salt-induced (SS) rats, and compared the results with a consomic SS rat strain (SSBN13). The SSBN13 strain was developed by the introgression of chromosome from the Brown Norway (BN) rat into the salt-sensitive (SS) genetic background and exhibits significant protection from salt induced hypertension1 . These two groups were fed on a high salt diet of 8.0% NaCl for one week. Mitochondrial redox ratio (NADH/FAD=NADH RR), was used as a quantitative marker of the oxidative stress in kidney tissue. Maximum intensity projected images and their corresponding histograms in each group were acquired from each kidney group. The result showed a 49% decrease in mitochondrial redox ratio of SS compared to SSBN13 translated to an increase in the level of oxidative stress of the tissue. Therefore, the results quantify oxidative stress levels and its effect on mitochondrial redox in salt sensitive hypertension.

  9. Energy Efficiency in Norway 1990-2000

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rosenberg, Eva

    2003-06-01

    This is the national report for Norway in the EU/SAVE project ''Indicators for Energy Efficiency Monitoring and Target setting (ODYSSEE)''. The report deals with energy use and energy efficiency in Norway 1990-2000 (2001 for overall energy use). Final energy use per Gross Domestic Product (GDP) was reduced by approximately 1.9% pr year in the period 1990 to 2001. The energy efficiency improvement has been calculated to 0.6% pr year, while the role of structural changes has been 1.3% pr year. A detailed sector analysis has been done, applying Laspeyres indices to attribute changes in energy use to activity, structure or intensity (efficiency). Aggregating sectors, we have found a total efficiency improvement of approximately 11 TWh from 1990 to 2000. (author)

  10. Live-trapping and handling brown bear

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — This paper reports techniques developed to live trap and handle brown bears on the Kodiak National Wildlife Refuge. The brown bears (Ursus middendorffi) on the...

  11. Brown Adipose Tissue: Function and Physiological Significance

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    CANNON, BARBARA; NEDERGAARD, JAN

    2004-01-01

    .... Brown Adipose Tissue: Function and Physiological Significance. Physiol Rev 84: 277–359, 2004; 10.1152/physrev.00015.2003.—The function of brown adipose tissue is to transfer energy from food into heat...

  12. Happiness in Serbia and Norway:  

    OpenAIRE

    Jevtic, Tijana

    2010-01-01

    Happiness here is investigated by means of 12 young people from Serbia and Norway. The main instrument was interview with a short questionnaire. Happiness is in line with other studies found to be a complex human quality with a variety of meanings and numerous influences. These meanings can be divided into actual happiness (predominant positive feelings and satisfaction of life), ideal happiness (complete and lasting one), good fortune or luck, the pursuit of happiness, creation of happiness ...

  13. Moods of Norway: NY market entry

    OpenAIRE

    Haugom, Mats Klevengen; Throne, Sindre Raaen; Myrseth, Sebastian; Løvoll, Linda-Marie

    2012-01-01

    Purpose The purpose of this document is to identify the key strategic and supplementary measures the Moods of Norway(MoN) management must take under consideration, to successfully penetrate the New York marketplace, more importantly stay there. Methodology In order to identify those areas of importance stated in the purpose, we looked at the several areas of importance such as the company´s history of expansion, identified business objectives for the New York launch, anal...

  14. Neuroprotective Effects of Transcription Factor Brn3b in an Ocular Hypertension Rat Model of Glaucoma

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stankowska, Dorota L.; Minton, Alena Z.; Rutledge, Margaret A.; Mueller, Brett H.; Phatak, Nitasha R.; He, Shaoqing; Ma, Hai-Ying; Forster, Michael J.; Yorio, Thomas; Krishnamoorthy, Raghu R.

    2015-01-01

    Purpose. Glaucoma is an optic neuropathy commonly associated with elevated intraocular pressure (IOP), leading to optic nerve head (ONH) cupping, axon loss, and apoptosis of retinal ganglion cells (RGCs), which could ultimately result in blindness. Brn3b is a class-4 POU domain transcription factor that plays a key role in RGC development, axon outgrowth, and pathfinding. Previous studies suggest that a decrease in Brn3b levels occurs in animal models of glaucoma. The goal of this study was to determine if adeno-associated virus (AAV)-directed overexpression of the Brn3b protein could have neuroprotective effects following elevated IOP-mediated neurodegeneration. Methods. Intraocular pressure was elevated in one eye of Brown Norway rats (Rattus norvegicus), following which the IOP-elevated eyes were intravitreally injected with AAV constructs encoding either the GFP (rAAV-CMV-GFP and rAAV-hsyn-GFP) or Brn3b (rAAV-CMV-Brn3b and rAAV-hsyn-Brn3b). Retina sections through the ONH were stained for synaptic plasticity markers and neuroprotection was assessed by RGC counts and visual acuity tests. Results. Adeno-associated virus–mediated expression of the Brn3b protein in IOP-elevated rat eyes promoted an upregulation of growth associated protein-43 (GAP-43), actin binding LIM protein (abLIM) and acetylated α-tubulin (ac-Tuba) both posterior to the ONH and in RGCs. The RGC survival as well as axon integrity score were significantly improved in IOP-elevated rAAV-hsyn-Brn3b–injected rats compared with those of the IOP-elevated rAAV-hsyn-GFP– injected rats. Additionally, intravitreal rAAV-hsyn-Brn3b administration significantly restored the visual optomotor response in IOP-elevated rat eyes. Conclusions. Adeno-associated virus–mediated Brn3b protein expression may be a suitable approach for promoting neuroprotection in animal models of glaucoma. PMID:25587060

  15. [Water-borne disease outbreaks in Norway].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nygård, Karin; Gondrosen, Bjørn; Lund, Vidar

    2003-12-04

    The drinking water in Norway has traditionally been considered being of good quality. However, outbreaks related to drinking water are reported every year. We review waterborne outbreaks in Norway over the last 15 years, and describe the aetiology of and contributory factors in these outbreaks. We compiled data on waterborne outbreaks reported to the Norwegian Institute of Public Health and Norwegian Food Control Authority during 1988-2002. We included all events in which two or more people fell ill and water was the suspected source of infection. Over the 15-year period. 72 outbreaks were reported, affecting a total of 10 616 persons. Campylobacter was the cause in 26% (19/72) of the outbreaks, norovirus in 18% (13/72). The causative organism was unknown in 46% (33/72). The water came from public waterworks in 32 of the 54 outbreaks for which this information was available (59%); from a private supply in the remaining 22. For 62% (16/26) of the outbreaks related to waterworks, the water was not disinfected before distribution. None of the private water supplies were disinfected. Over the last five years, there were more outbreaks related to private supplies. The most important contributory factor to waterborne outbreaks in Norway is contamination of the raw water combined with missing or faulty disinfecting procedures. To prevent future outbreaks, a continuous upgrading of small and private water supplies is needed. Reporting of outbreaks is important for the implementation of targeted and effective preventive measures.

  16. Hydrothermal-mechanical dewatering of brown coal

    OpenAIRE

    Guo, Jian

    2017-01-01

    There are enormous reserves of brown coal in the world. In Australia, brown coal is used to generate most of electricity in the states of Victoria and South Australia. Brown coal is characterised by very high moisture content (around 60 wt% on a wet basis). Therefore, boilers used in the power station are very large and have low thermal efficiency, leading to high cost and large emissions of green house gas. High moisture content also makes brown coal uneconomical for transport...

  17. Fulfilling the Promise of Brown.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Winston, Judith A.

    1995-01-01

    Summarizes the U.S. Department of Education's efforts to implement the mandate of "Brown v. Board of Education of Topeka, Kansas" and the Civil Rights Act of 1964, examining traditional tools used in enforcing civil rights laws and reviewing new strategies to promote high quality education, equal educational opportunity, and diversity.…

  18. Nigrostriatal rAAV-mediated GDNF Overexpression Induces Robust Weight Loss in a Rat Model of Age-related Obesity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Manfredsson, Fredric P; Tumer, Nihal; Erdos, Benedek; Landa, Tessa; Broxson, Christopher S; Sullivan, Layla F; Rising, Aaron C; Foust, Kevin D; Zhang, Yi; Muzyczka, Nicholas; Gorbatyuk, Oleg S; Scarpace, Philip J; Mandel, Ronald J

    2009-01-01

    Intraventricular administration of glial cell line–derived neurotrophic factor (GDNF) in primate and humans to study Parkinson's disease (PD) has revealed the potential for GDNF to induce weight loss. Our previous data indicate that bilateral continuous hypothalamic GDNF overexpression via recombinant adeno-associated virus (rAAV) results in significant failure to gain weight in young rats and weight loss in aged rats. Based on these previous results, we hypothesized that because the nigrostriatal tract passes through the lateral hypothalamus, motor hyperactivity mediated by nigrostriatal dopamine (DA) may have been responsible for the previously observed effect on body weight. In this study, we compared bilateral injections of rAAV2/5-GDNF in hypothalamus versus substantia nigra (SN) in aged Brown-Norway X Fisher 344 rats. Nigrostriatal GDNF overexpression resulted in significantly greater weight loss than rats treated in hypothalamus. The nigral or hypothalamic GDNF-induced weight loss was unrelated to motor activity levels of the rats, though some of the weight loss could be attributed to a transient reduction in food intake. Forebrain DA levels did not account for the observed effects on body weight, although GDNF-induced increases in nucleus accumbens DA may have partially contributed to this effect in the hypothalamic GDNF-treated group. However, only nigrostriatal GDNF overexpression induced activation of phosphorylated extracellular signal-regulated kinase (p-ERK) in a small population of corticotrophin-releasing factor [corticotrophin-releasing hormone (CRH)] neurons located specifically in the medial parvocellullar division (MPD) of the paraventricular nucleus of the hypothalamus. Activation of these hypothalamic CRH neurons likely accounted for the observed metabolic effects leading to weight loss in obese rats. PMID:19277011

  19. Ambient Seismic Noise Tomography of Southern Norway

    Science.gov (United States)

    Köhler, Andreas; Weidle, Christian; Maupin, Valerie

    2010-05-01

    The noise cross-correlation technique is especially useful in regions like southern Norway since local seismicity is rare and teleseismic records are not able to resolve the upper crust. Within the TopoScandiaDeep project, which aims to investigate the relation between surface topography and lithosphere-asthenosphere structure, we process seismic broadband data from the temporary MAGNUS network in Southern Norway. The receivers were recording 20 months of continuous data between September 2006 and June 2008. Additionally, permanent stations of the National Norwegian Seismic Network, NORSAR and GSN stations in the region are used. After usual preprocessing steps (filtering, prewhitening, temporal normalization), we compute 820 cross-correlation functions from 41 receivers for three month time windows. Evaluation of the azimuthal and temporal variation of signal to noise ratios and f-k analysis of NORSAR array data shows that the dominant propagation direction of seismic noise is south-west to north, corresponding well to the Norwegian coast line. During summer months, the signal to noise ratios decrease and the azimuthal distribution becomes smoother. Time-frequency analysis is applied to measure Rayleigh and Love wave group velocity dispersion curves between each station pair for each three-month correlation stack. The mean and variance of all dispersion curves is computed for each path. After rejection of low-quality data using a signal to noise ratio, minimum wavelength and velocity variance criterion, we obtain a large number of reliable velocity estimates (about 600) for periods between 2 and 15 seconds, which we invert for group velocity maps at respective periods. At all inverted periods, we find positive and negative velocity anomalies for Rayleigh and Love waves that correlate very well with local surface geology. While higher velocities (+5%) can be associated with the Caledonian nappes in the central part of southern Norway, the Oslo Graben is reflected

  20. Habitat differentiation within the large-carnivore community of Norway's multiple-use landscapes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    May, Roel; van Dijk, Jiska; Wabakken, Petter; Swenson, Jon E; Linnell, John Dc; Zimmermann, Barbara; Odden, John; Pedersen, Hans C; Andersen, Reidar; Landa, Arild

    2008-10-01

    The re-establishment of large carnivores in Norway has led to increased conflicts and the adoption of regional zoning for these predators. When planning the future distribution of large carnivores, it is important to consider details of their potential habitat tolerances and strength of inter-specific differentiation. We studied differentiation in habitat and kill sites within the large-carnivore community of south-eastern Norway.We compared habitat selection of the brown bear Ursus arctos L., Eurasian lynx Lynx lynx L., wolf Canis lupus L. and wolverine Gulo gulo L., based on radio-tracking data. Differences in kill site locations were explored using locations of documented predator-killed sheep Ovis aries L. We modelled each species' selection for, and differentiation in, habitat and kill sites on a landscape scale using resource selection functions and multinomial logistic regression. Based on projected probability of occurrence maps, we estimated continuous patches of habitat within the study area.Although bears, lynx, wolves and wolverines had overlapping distributions, we found a clear differentiation for all four species in both habitat and kill sites. The presence of bears, wolves and lynx was generally associated with rugged, forested areas at lower elevations, whereas wolverines selected rugged terrain at higher elevations. Some degree of sympatry was possible in over 40% of the study area, although only 1.5% could hold all four large carnivores together.Synthesis and applications. A geographically differentiated management policy has been adopted in Norway, aimed at conserving viable populations of large carnivores while minimizing the potential for conflicts. Sympatry of all four carnivores will be most successful if regional zones are established of adequate size spanning an elevational gradient. High prey densities, low carnivore densities, low dietary overlap and scavenging opportunities have most probably led to reduced competitive exclusion

  1. Exercise-induced attenuation of obesity, hyperinsulinemia, and skeletal muscle lipid peroxidation in the OLETF rat.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morris, R Tyler; Laye, Matthew J; Lees, Simon J; Rector, R Scott; Thyfault, John P; Booth, Frank W

    2008-03-01

    The Otsuka Long-Evans Tokushima fatty (OLETF) rat is a model of hyperphagic obesity in which the animals retain the desire to run voluntarily. Running wheels were provided for 4-wk-old OLETF rats for 16 wk before they were killed 5 h (WL5), 53 h (WL53), or 173 h (WL173) after the wheels were locked. Sedentary (SED) OLETF rats that were not given access to running wheels served as age-matched cohorts. Epididymal fat pad mass, adipocyte volume, and adipocyte number were 58%, 39%, and 47% less, respectively, in WL5 than SED rats. Contrary to cessation of daily running in Fischer 344 x Brown Norway rats, epididymal fat did not increase during the first 173 h of running cessation in the OLETF runners. Serum insulin and glucose levels were 77% and 29% less, respectively, in WL5 than SED rats. Oil red O staining for intramyocellular lipid accumulation was not statistically different among groups. However, lipid peroxidation levels, as determined by total trans-4-hydroxy-2-nonenal (4-HNE) and 4-HNE normalized to oil red O, was higher in epitrochlearis muscles of SED than WL5, WL53, and WL173 rats. mRNA levels of glutathione S-transferase-alpha type 4, an enzyme involved in cellular defense against electrophilic compounds such as 4-HNE, were higher in epitrochlearis muscle of WL53 than WL173 and SED rats. In contrast, 4-HNE levels in omental fat were unaltered. Epitrochlearis muscle palmitate oxidation and relative transcript levels for peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor-delta and peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor-gamma coactivator type 1 were surprisingly not different between runners and SED rats. In summary, voluntary running was associated with lower levels of lipid peroxidation in skeletal muscle without significant changes in intramyocellular lipids or mitochondrial markers in OLETF rats at 20 wk of age. Therefore, even in a genetic animal model of extreme overeating, daily physical activity promotes improved health of skeletal muscle.

  2. NATO or Neutrality : Decisions by Denmark, Finland, Norway, and Sweden

    Science.gov (United States)

    2017-09-01

    NEUTRALITY?: DECISIONS BY DENMARK, FINLAND, NORWAY, AND SWEDEN by Kevin A. Chaney September 2017 Thesis Advisor: David S. Yost Second Reader...TYPE AND DATES COVERED Master’s thesis 4. TITLE AND SUBTITLE NATO OR NEUTRALITY?: DECISIONS BY DENMARK, FINLAND, NORWAY, AND SWEDEN 5. FUNDING...Distribution is unlimited. 12b. DISTRIBUTION CODE 13. ABSTRACT (maximum 200 words) Although Denmark, Finland, Norway, and Sweden are ethnically and

  3. Kinetics of disease progression and host response in a rat model of bubonic plague.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sebbane, Florent; Gardner, Donald; Long, Daniel; Gowen, Brian B; Hinnebusch, B Joseph

    2005-05-01

    Plague, caused by the gram-negative bacterium Yersinia pestis, primarily affects rodents but is also an important zoonotic disease of humans. Bubonic plague in humans follows transmission by infected fleas and is characterized by an acute, necrotizing lymphadenitis in the regional lymph nodes that drain the intradermal flea bite site. Septicemia rapidly follows with spread to spleen, liver, and other organs. We developed a model of bubonic plague using the inbred Brown Norway strain of Rattus norvegicus to characterize the progression and kinetics of infection and the host immune response after intradermal inoculation of Y. pestis. The clinical signs and pathology in the rat closely resembled descriptions of human bubonic plague. The bacteriology; histopathology; host cellular response in infected lymph nodes, blood, and spleen; and serum cytokine levels were analyzed at various times after infection to determine the kinetics and route of disease progression and to evaluate hypothesized Y. pestis pathogenic mechanisms. Understanding disease progression in this rat infection model should facilitate further investigations into the molecular pathogenesis of bubonic plague and the immune response to Y. pestis at different stages of the disease.

  4. Role of the bradykinin B2 receptor in a rat model of local heart irradiation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lieblong, Benjamin J; Sridharan, Vijayalakshmi; Srivastava, Anup K; Moros, Eduardo G; Sharma, Sunil K; Boerma, Marjan

    2015-08-01

    Radiation-induced heart disease (RIHD) is a delayed effect of radiotherapy for cancers of the chest, such as breast, esophageal, and lung. Kinins are small peptides with cardioprotective properties. We previously used a rat model that lacks the precursor kininogen to demonstrate that kinins are involved in RIHD. Here, we examined the role of the kinin B2 receptor (B2R) in early radiation-induced signaling in the heart. Male Brown Norway rats received the B2R-selective antagonist HOE-140 (icatibant) via osmotic minipump from 5 days before until 4 weeks after 21 Gy local heart irradiation. At 4 weeks, signaling events were measured in left ventricular homogenates and nuclear extracts using western blotting and real-time polymerase chain reaction. Numbers of CD68-positive (monocytes/macrophages), CD2-positive (T-lymphocytes), and mast cells were measured using immunohistochemistry. Radiation-induced c-Jun phosphorylation and nuclear translocation were enhanced by HOE-140. HOE-140 did not modify endothelial nitric oxide synthase (eNOS) phosphorylation or alter numbers of CD2-positive or mast cells, but enhanced CD68-positive cell counts in irradiated hearts. B2R signaling may regulate monocyte/macrophage infiltration and c-Jun signals in the irradiated heart. Although eNOS is a main target for kinins, the B2R may not regulate eNOS phosphorylation in response to radiation.

  5. Inhibition of the recombinant human endostatin adenavirus on experimental choroidal neovascularization in rats

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Li-Juan Chen

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available AIM: To investigate the inhibition of the recombinant human endostatin adenavirus(Ad-Eson the experimental choroidal neovascularization(CNVmodels by intravitreous injection. METHODS: Experimental CNV models were induced by semiconductor laser in 30 male Brown Norway(BNrats and randomly divided into 3 groups with 10 rats in each group. At 21d after photocoagulation, the single administration group were given intravitreous injection with Ad-Es 0.01mL; the repeated administration group were given intravitreous injection with Ad-Es 0.01mL and a repeated injection 7d later; the saline control group were given intravitreous injection with saline 0.01mL. At 7d after final administration, the leakage of fundus fluorescein angiography(FFAwas observed. Various CNV areas were measured by using laser confocal microscopy of choroidal flatmount method. Pathology and ultrastructure were observed with light microscopy, the expressions of CD105 were measured by immunohistochemistry. RESULTS: The leakage of CNV of the administration group abviously decreased as compared with those in the saline group, the leakage of repeated administration group decreased compared with that of single administration group(PPCONCLUSION: Ad-Es can effectively inhibit semiconductor laser induced CNV in BN rats, and the inhibition effect of repeated administration group is better than that of single administration group. It may be a useful new method in the treatment of CNV.

  6. INDEFINITE SURVIVAL OF RAT ISLET ALLOGRAFTS FOLLOWING INFUSION OF DONOR BONE MARROW WITHOUT CYTOABLATION

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ricordi, Camillo; Murase, Norico; Rastellini, Cristiana; Behboo, Roubik; Demetris, Anthony J.; Starzl, Thomas E.

    2010-01-01

    We have tested the effect of donor bone marrow cell (DBMC) infusion on the survival of pancreatic islet allografts in the rat, without the use of cytoablative recipient conditioning. Lewis and diabetic Brown Norway rats were used as donors and recipients, respectively. Donor islets were placed beneath the left renal capsule. Infusion of DBMC and temporary immunosuppression followed by delayed islet transplantation resulted in indefinite survival of all islet grafts (MST >180 days). Control animals demonstrated recurrent hyperglycemia (islet allografts rejection). Donor bone marrow derived cells were detected in the spleen and cervical lymph nodes of BN recipients of LEW bone marrow but not in the recipients of islet transplants alone. Second set full thickness skin grafts were performed in normal BN and in recipients of a previously successful ITX. Donor specific skin grafts were accepted in the animals that had received DBMC 40 days before the islet allograft, while animals receiving DBMC at the time of the islet allograft rejected the donor specific skin graft similarly to the controls. However, these animals did not reject a second set donor-specific islet transplant. The results indicate that radiation conditioning of the recipients was not necessary to induce microchimerism and graft acceptance in this rodent model of islet allotransplantation. PMID:8665077

  7. Prehabilitation and rehabilitation for attenuating hindlimb unweighting effects on skeletal muscle and gait in adult and old rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brown, Marybeth; Taylor, Jennifer

    2005-12-01

    To compare the effectiveness of no exercise with prehabilitation (exercise before hindlimb unweighting [HLU]) versus rehabilitation (exercise given after HLU) on gait function and skeletal muscle mass and force. Randomized controlled trial. Animal laboratory. Male-specific, pathogen-free Fisher344/Brown Norway rats (N=149). Groups consisted of adult and old controls, HLU, prehabilitation, rehabilitation, natural cage recovery (reloading), and exercise without HLU. Ten days of general conditioning exercise were given to 6-month-old adult and 30-month-old old rats before or after a week of HLU. Gait stride length and width; soleus, plantaris, extensor digitorum longus, and peroneus longus mass and peak contractile force; whole gastrocnemius mass; and total protein concentration for the soleus and gastrocnemius. Muscle mass (approximately 30%) and force (24%-36%) declined with age in all muscles studied. In adult rats declines in muscle mass occurred with HLU in the soleus, plantaris, and gastrocnemius. Prehabilitation did not prevent the loss of muscle mass in adult rats. Rehabilitation and natural recovery effectively restored soleus and gastrocnemius muscle mass in adult rats but not soleus peak force. Old rats had a significant 23% HLU effect only on gastrocnemius mass (control, 1670+/-129 mg; HLU, 1274+/-184 mg). Prehabilitation did not prevent the decline in gastrocnemius mass. Rehabilitation in old rats restored gastrocnemius mass to within 13% of control levels. Prehabilitation was effective for preventing and rehabilitation was effective for restoring soleus contractile force in old rats (control, 114+/-9 mg; HLU, 67+/-22 mg; prehabilitation, 106+/-31 mg; rehabilitation, 120+/-26 mg) compared with recovery without exercise (86+/-29 g). A significant reduction in stride length was observed with aging (136+/-18 mm vs 98+/-10 mm), which decreased further with HLU (78+/-14 mm). Prehabilitation attenuated HLU-related reductions in stride length, and rehabilitation

  8. Fern rhizomes as fodder in Norway.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alm, Torbjørn

    2016-09-06

    Although ferns are often known under collective names in Norway, e.g. blom, a substantial number of vernacular names for individual fern species are known, in particular for useful or poisonous taxa. In the past, the rhizomes (Norwegian: moldfôr) of selected species were collected for fodder. Only scattered records of such use are available from southern Norway, and the tradition's core area is found in the two North Norwegian counties of Nordland and Troms, in accordance with the longer winters encountered in the north, frequently leading to fodder shortage in early spring. The tradition extends northeastwards into Finnmark, but is less well documented there. Although numerous sources mention the use of fern rhizomes for fodder, the fern species hiding behind the tradition are incompletely known. This paper aims at reviewing available data in terms of identifyng the species used for fodder, the history and geographical distribution of such use, and other relevant traditions, e.g. the timing and mode of collection, and the way the rhizomes were used. The study is based on data extracted from a variety of archival and literature sources; the latter retrived from my database of more than 7500 publications providing information on plant names and plant uses in Norway. More than 200 individual records mention the use of fern rhizomes for fodder in Norway. Only a fraction of these, typically made by botanist recording data on plant uses, provides information on the identity of the species used. Based on these, Dryopteris filix-mas and Matteuccia struthiopteris stand out as the most important species serving as sources of fern rhizomes for fodder. Locally, Dryopteris expansa was the preferred species, and this taxon may to some extent be overlooked in the records so far available. With a few exceptions, Norwegian folk tradition singles out Athyrium filix-femina as a harmful and poisonous species, causing livestock to go blind and lame, but whether this is true or not

  9. Norway's ICT Accessibility Legislation, Methods and Indicators.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rygg, Malin; Rømen, Dagfinn; Sterri, Brynhild Runa

    2016-01-01

    This paper gives an overview of the Norwegian legislation on Universal Design of information and communication technology (ICT) and how the Norwegian Authority for Universal Design of ICT works to enforce and achieve the goals behind the legislation. The Authority uses indicators to check websites for compliance with the regulations. This paper describes the rationale and intended use for the indicators and how they are used for both supervision and benchmarks as well as a way of gathering data to give an overview of the current state of Universal Design of websites in Norway.

  10. ENOR - An Energy-Model for Norway

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. Ek

    1981-01-01

    Full Text Available The Energy model for Norway, ENOR, is a dynamic, multisectoral economic stimulation model to be used for long term energy analyses. Energy sectors and energy carriers are in principle treated in the same way as other sectors and economic commodities and integrated in the same general framework. The model has a two-level structure - a central coordination module ensures economic consistency, while the behaviour of each production and consumption sector is modelled in separate sector models. The model framework is thus capable of handling both engineering and economic knowledge.

  11. Wind power in Norway; Vindkraft i Norge

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1998-12-01

    This report analyses business costs and socio-economic costs in the development of wind power in Norway and policy instruments to encourage such a development. It is founded on an analysis of the development of wind power in other countries, notably U.S.A, Denmark, Germany, the Netherlands and Britain. The report describes the institutional background in each country, the policy instruments that have been used and still are and the results achieved. The various cost components in Norwegian wind power development and the expected market price of wind power are also discussed. The discussion of instruments distinguishes between investment oriented and production oriented instruments. 8 refs., 9 figs., 3 tabs.

  12. Lower limb amputations in Trondheim, Norway

    OpenAIRE

    Wits?, Eivind; Lium, Arne; Lydersen, Stian

    2010-01-01

    Background and purpose In the city of Trondheim, Norway, diabetic lower-limb amputations accounted for one-third of all lower-limb amputations (LLAs). In an attempt to reduce this rate, a diabetic foot team was established in 1996. We present the incidence of LLA in Trondheim as measured 10 years later. Patients and methods In 2004?07, we registered all LLAs performed in Trondheim and then compared the data with previously published data from 1994?1997. From 1996 through 2006, we registered t...

  13. China renewable energy in Africa and Norway

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    2011-07-01

    This study assesses the potential for Norwegian engagement in Sino-African renewable energy development. The study analyzes Norwegian competitiveness and complementarities towards Chinese energy actors in the African market, and identifies respective strengths and weaknesses against the backdrop of the African market. The report identifies barriers and opportunities for Norwegian commercial and developmental engagement towards upscaling renewable energy in Africa that may also apply to other OECD countries. Finally, the report points to possibilities for Norway to support sustainable Sino-African renewable energy development.(auth)

  14. Mechanical Stress and Antioxidant Protection in the Retina of Hindlimb Suspended Rats

    Science.gov (United States)

    Glass, Aziza; Theriot, Corey A.; Alway, Stephen E.; Zanello, Susana B.

    2012-01-01

    It has been postulated that hindlimb suspension (HS) causes a cephalad fluid shift in quadrupeds similar to that occurring to humans in microgravity. Therefore, HS may provide a suitable animal model in which to recapitulate the ocular changes observed in the human Visual Impairment and Intracranial Pressure (VIIP) syndrome. This work reports preliminary results from a tissue sharing project using 34 week-old Brown Norway rats. Two different experiments compared normal posture controls and HS rats for 2 weeks and rats exposed to HS for 2 weeks but allowed to recover in normal posture for 2 additional weeks. The effects of two nutritional countermeasures, green tea extract (GT) and plant polyphenol resveratrol (Rv), were also evaluated. Green tea contains the antioxidant epigallocatechin gallate (EGCG). qPCR gene expression analysis of selected targets was performed on RNA from isolated retinas, and histologic analysis was done on one fixed eye per rat. The transcription factor early growth response protein 1 (Egr1) was upregulated almost 2-fold in HS retinas relative to controls (P = 0.059), and its expression returned to control levels after 2 weeks of recovery in normal posture (P = 0.023). HS-induced upregulation of Egr1 was attenuated (but not significantly) in retinas from rats fed an antioxidant rich (GT extract) diet. In rats fed the GT-enriched diet, antioxidant enzymes were induced, evidenced by the upregulation of the gene heme oxygenase 1 (Hmox1) (P = 0.042) and the gene superoxide dismutase 2 (Sod2) (P = 0.0001). Egr1 is a stretch-activated transcription factor, and the Egr1 mechanosensitive response to HS may have been caused by a change in the translaminal pressure and/or mechanical deformation of the eye globe. The observed histologic measurements of the various retinal layers in the HS rats were lower in value than those of the control animal (n = 1), however insufficient data were available for statistical analysis. Aquaporin 4, a water

  15. Activation of brown adipose tissue in hypothyroidism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lapa, Constantin; Maya, Yoshifumi; Wagner, Martin; Arias-Loza, Paula; Werner, Rudolf A; Herrmann, Ken; Higuchi, Takahiro

    2015-01-01

    Brown adipose tissue (BAT) attracts growing interest as a potential therapeutic target for obesity and diabetes. Hyperthyroidism is well-known to increase BAT activity, but the role of hypothyroidism is controversial. We aimed to investigate the association between different thyroid hormone (TH) states and BAT activity. FDG-PET studies were retrospectively evaluated in thyroid cancer patients after total thyroidectomy both at euthyroidism during TH replacement or at hypothyroidism after TH cessation. Serum TH levels were compared between patients with active BAT and control patients with non-active BAT matched for age, gender, and body mass index. Additionally, animal experiments with controls (n = 5) and hypothyroid rats (n = 5) were performed. Out of 124 patients, 6 patients with active BAT were identified. These patients showed significantly higher thyroid-stimulating hormone (TSH) levels than matched controls (P hypothyroid animals showed BAT activation at room temperature (24 °C), whereas controls did not (P hypothyroidism, which might be the result of a feedback mechanism to maintain body temperature in a state of reduced basal thermogenesis. Future research needs to explore the underlying mechanistic and biological implications.

  16. Freshwater rotifers from Hordaland, western Norway, with a survey of freshwater rotifers previously found in Norway

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Brit Godske Bjørklund

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available   Bjørklund BG. 2009. Freshwater rotifers from Hordaland western Norway with a u survey of freshwater rotifers previously found in Norway. Fauna Norvegica29: 11-54. A total of 156 species (or subspecies o rotifers, mostly non-planktonic, have been identified from freshwater or slightly brackish-water localities in the county of Hordaland; 83 are new to Norway and 24 others are new to the county. One hundred of the species were collected from the two valleys of Eksingedalen and Teigdalen in spring and summer 1967. Samples were taken on the shallow shores of lake-like parts of the rivers, and in pools, tarns and small lakes. Forty more or less euryhaline fresh­water rotifers were also collected during studies of slightly brackish-water localities around Bergen in 1963-1969. A number of freshwater rotifers were collected at several localities in and around Bergen in 1968-1970, and on the western part of Hardangervidda. Of those so far identified ,23 are new to Norway and 8 more are new to the county. They are therefore included in the species list. A few additional ones are referred to in the taxonomical notes. All the species are listed with localities and habitat categories, or, in the case of the last-mentioned ones, just the district where they were collected. The paper includes notes, measurements and ,in most cases, figures regarding 44 little known, variable or taxonomically problematical species, especially in the genera Cephalodella and Trichocerca. Comments are given on the distribution , abundance and diversity of the species. The paper presents asurvey of previous investigations on rotifers in Norway, listing 200 previously recorded freshwater (a few euryhaline rotifers, giving other names, the authors who recorded the finds and, in most cases, the counties where the species were collected. 

  17. Dynamics of M1 macrophages in oral mucosal lesions during the development of acute graft-versus-host disease in rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seno, K; Yasunaga, M; Kajiya, H; Izaki-Hagio, K; Morita, H; Yoneda, M; Hirofuji, T; Ohno, J

    2017-12-01

    The role of macrophage infiltrates in oral mucosal acute graft-versus-host disease (AGVHD) remains unclear, although clinical studies suggest that macrophage infiltration correlates directly with the severity of AGVHD. In this study, we investigated the role of M1 macrophage infiltration in the oral mucosa of rats with AGVHD. Lewis rat spleen cells were injected into (Lewis × Brown Norway) F1 rats to induce systemic GVHD. Tongue samples were evaluated using histology, immunohistochemistry, dual immunofluorescence, real-time reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction, Transwell migration assays and Stamper-Woodruff binding assays. At the onset of oral mucosal AGVHD, dual immunofluorescence and migration assays revealed that M1 macrophages had accumulated in the basement membrane (BM) region via the laminin/CD29 β1 integrin pathway. Macrophage-secreted matrix metalloproteinase-2 was related to BM degradation. The adhesion of macrophages to the oral epithelium could be inhibited by pretreating macrophages with a CC chemokine receptor 2 (CCR2) antibody and/or pretreating lesion sections with monocyte chemoattractant protein-1 (MCP-1) antibody. Our data show that the migration and adhesion of M1 macrophages are associated with oral mucosal AGVHD, which is mediated in part by both laminin/CD29 β 1 intern and MCP-1/CCR2 pathways. Therefore, our study provides additional support for the contribution of macrophage infiltrate to the development of oral mucosal AGVHD. © 2017 British Society for Immunology.

  18. Polarization properties of single layers in the posterior eyes of mice and rats investigated using high resolution polarization sensitive optical coherence tomography

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fialová, Stanislava; Augustin, Marco; Glösmann, Martin; Himmel, Tanja; Rauscher, Sabine; Gröger, Marion; Pircher, Michael; Hitzenberger, Christoph K.; Baumann, Bernhard

    2016-01-01

    We present a high resolution polarization sensitive optical coherence tomography (PS-OCT) system for ocular imaging in rodents. The system operates at 840 nm and uses a broadband superluminescent diode providing an axial resolution of 5.1 µm in air. PS-OCT data was acquired at 83 kHz A-scan rate by two identical custom-made spectrometers for orthogonal polarization states. Pigmented (Brown Norway, Long Evans) and non-pigmented (Sprague Dawley) rats as well as pigmented mice (C57BL/6) were imaged. Melanin pigment related depolarization was analyzed in the retinal pigment epithelium (RPE) and choroid of these animals using the degree of polarization uniformity (DOPU). For all rat strains, significant differences between RPE and choroidal depolarization were observed. In contrast, DOPU characteristics of RPE and choroid were similar for C57BL/6 mice. Moreover, the depolarization within the same tissue type varied significantly between different rodent strains. Retinal nerve fiber layer thickness, phase retardation, and birefringence were mapped and quantitatively measured in Long Evans rats in vivo for the first time. In a circumpapillary annulus, retinal nerve fiber layer birefringence amounted to 0.16°/µm ± 0.02°/µm and 0.17°/µm ± 0.01°/µm for the left and right eyes, respectively. PMID:27446670

  19. King Harald V and Queen Sonja of Norway visit CERN

    CERN Multimedia

    Maximilien Brice

    2006-01-01

    Norway's King Harald V and Queen Sonja take a tour of the ATLAS detector with CERN's Director-General Robert Aymar in April 2006. During their visit the royal party met with members of CERN's Norwegian community. A group of about 40 students greeted the royal motorcade with a belting rendition of 'The King's Song', Norway's royal anthem.

  20. Young Christians in Norway, national socialism, and the German ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The German occupation of Norway during the Second World War caused unprecedented problems for the Evangelical Lutheran Church of Norway and other Christian denominations. The subordination of the church to the de facto Nazi state eventually led its bishops and most of its pastors to sever their ties to the ...

  1. Phlebotomy as a preventive measure for crocidolite-induced mesothelioma in male rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ohara, Yuuki; Chew, Shan-Hwu; Shibata, Takahiro; Okazaki, Yasumasa; Yamashita, Kyoko; Toyokuni, Shinya

    2018-02-01

    Malignant mesothelioma (MM) is a rare but socially important neoplasm due to its association with asbestos exposure. Malignant mesothelioma is difficult to diagnose at an early stage, yet there are no particularly effective treatments available at the advanced stage, thus necessitating efficient strategies to prevent MM in individuals already exposed to asbestos. We previously showed that persistent oxidative damage caused by foreign body reaction and affinity of asbestos both to hemoglobin and histones is one of the major pathogeneses. Accordingly, as an effective strategy to prevent asbestos-induced MM, we undertook the use of an iron chelator, deferasirox, which decreased the epithelial-mesenchymal transition in a crocidolite-induced rat MM model. However, this agent may show adverse effects. Here, we studied the effects of iron removal by phlebotomy as a realistic measure on the same rat model. We injected a total of 5 mg crocidolite i.p. to F1 hybrid rats between the Fischer-344 and Brown-Norway strains at the age of 6 weeks. We repeated weekly or biweekly phlebotomy of 6-8 mL/kg/time from 10 to 60 weeks of age. The animals were observed until 120 weeks. In male rats, phlebotomy significantly decreased the weight and nuclear grade of MM, and modestly reduced the associated ascites and the fraction of more malignant sarcomatoid subtype. Weekly phlebotomy prolonged long-term survival. Our results indicate that appropriate phlebotomy may be a practical preventive measure to attenuate the initiation and promotion capacity of asbestos towards MM by reducing iron in individuals exposed to asbestos. © 2017 The Authors. Cancer Science published by John Wiley & Sons Australia, Ltd on behalf of Japanese Cancer Association.

  2. Production of the blood pressure lowing peptides from brown alga ( Undaria pinnatifida)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Minoru, Sato; Takashi, Oba; Takao, Hosokawa; Toshiyasu, Yamaguchi; Toshiki, Nakano; Tadao, Saito; Koji, Muramoto; Takashi, Kahara; Katsura, Funayama; Akio, Kobayashi; Takahisa, Nakano

    2005-07-01

    Brown alga ( Undaria pinnatifida) was treated with alginate lyase and hydrolyzed using 17 kinds of proteases and the inhibitory activity of the hydrolysates for the angiotensin-I-converting enzyme (ACE) was measured. Four hydrolysates with potent ACE-inhibitory activity were administered singly and orally to spontaneously hypertensive rats (SHRs). The systolic blood pressure of SHRs decreases significantly after single oral administration of the brown alga hydrolysates by protease S ‘Amano’ (from Bacillus stearothermophilus) at the concentration of 10 (mg protein) (kg body weight)-1. In the 17 weeks of feeding experiment, 7-week-old SHRs were fed standard diet supplemented with the brown alga hydrolysates for 10 weeks. In SHRs fed 1.0 and 0.1% brown alga hydrolysates, elevating of systolic bloodpressure was significantly suppressed for 7 weeks. To elucidate the active components, the brown alga hydrolysates were fractionated by 1-butanol extraction and HPLC on a reverse-phase column. Seven kinds of ACE-inhibitory peptides were isolated and identified by amino acid composition analysis, sequence analysis, and LC-MS with the results Val-Tyr, Ile-Tyr, Ala-Trp, Phe-Tyr, Val-Trp, Ile-Trp, and Leu-Trp. Each peptide was determined to have an antihypertensive effect after a single oral administration in SHRs. The brown alga hydrolysates were also confirmed to decrease the blood pressure in humans.

  3. Coordinating health care: lessons from Norway

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Trond Tjerbo

    2005-11-01

    Full Text Available Objective: What influences the coordination of care between general practitioners and hospitals? In this paper, general practitioner satisfaction with hospital—GP interaction is revealed, and related to several background variables. Method: A questionnaire was sent to all general practitioners in Norway (3388, asking their opinion on the interaction and coordination of health care in their district. A second questionnaire was sent to all the somatic hospitals in Norway (59 regarding formal routines and structures. The results were analysed using ordinary least squares regression. Results: General practitioners tend to be less satisfied with the coordination of care when their primary hospital is large and cost-effective with a high share of elderly patients. Together with the degree to which the general practitioner is involved in arenas where hospital physicians and general practitioners interact, these factors turned out to be good predictors of general practitioner satisfaction. Implication: To improve coordination between general practitioners and specialists, one should focus upon the structural traits within the hospitals in different regions as well as creating common arenas where the physicians can interact.

  4. [Medical publishing in Norway 1905-2005].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nylenna, Magne; Larsen, Øivind

    2005-06-02

    The nation-building process in Norway took mainly place before the Norwegian-Swedish union came to a close in 1905. This was not a dramatic change, though the end of the union did bring a lift to Norwegian national consciousness. In 1905 there were three general medical journals in Norway and approximately 1200 doctors. German was the most important language of international science, but most scientific publishing was done in Norwegian. After the Second World War, English became the dominating language of scientific communication. Twentieth-century medicine and medical publishing was an era of specialisation and internationalisation. Norwegian medicine has to a large extent been internationalised through Nordic cooperation, with the Nordic specialist journals being of particular importance. With increasing professionalism in research, international English-language journals have become the major channels of communication, though several Norwegian-language journals (on paper or on the internet) have been established and are of crucial importance to a national identity within medical specialties. In 2005 there is only one general medical journal in Norwegian, in a country with approximately 20,000 doctors. A national identity related to medical publishing is not given much attention, though national medicine is still closely tied in with national culture. Good clinical practice should be based on a firm knowledge of local society and local tradition. This is a challenge in contemporary medical publishing.

  5. Results of workplace drug testing in Norway

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hilde Marie Erøy Lund

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available Workplace drug testing is less common in Norway than in many other countries. During the period from 2000-2006, 13469 urine or blood samples from employees in the offshore industry, shipping companies and aviation industry were submitted to the Norwegian Institute of Public Health for drug testing. The samples were analysed for benzodiazepines, illicit drugs, muscle relaxants with sedating properties, opioids and z-hypnotics. In total, 2.9% of the samples were positive for one or more substances. During the study period the prevalence decreased for morphine (from 1.9% to 1.1% and increased for amphetamine (from 0.04% to 0.6%, clonazepam (from 0% to 0.1%, methamphetamine (from 0.04% to 0.6%, nitrazepam (from 0% to 0.4% and oxazepam (from 0.5% to 1.3% (p<0.05. There was no significant change in prevalence for the other substances included in the analytical programme. Illicit drugs were significantly associated with lower age (OR: 0.93, p<0.05. This study found low prevalence of drugs among employees in companies with workplace drug testing programmes in Norway.

  6. Playing with LISEM: Experiences from Norway

    Science.gov (United States)

    Greipsland, Inga; Krzeminska, Dominika

    2017-04-01

    Reducing soil loss from agricultural land is an important environmental challenge that is of relevance for both the European Soil Thematic Strategy (EC 2002) and the Water Framework Directive (EC 2000). Agricultural land in Norway is scarce, covering only around 3% of the total land area (The World Bank, 2015), which puts stress on preserving soil quality for food production. Additionally, reducing sediment loss is a national priority because of associated transport of pollutants such as phosphorous, which can cause eutrophication in nearby waterbodies. It is necessary to find tools that can estimate the effect of different scenarios on erosion processes on agricultural areas. We would like to present the challenges experienced and the results obtained by using LISEM (Limburg Soil Erosion Model) on the plot- subcatchment- and catchment scale in southeastern Norway. The agricultural catchment has been the subject of long-term monitoring of water quality. Challenges included spatial upscaling of local calibration, calibration on areas with very low soil loss rates and equifinality. In this poster, we want to facilitate a discussion about the possibilities of and limitations to the model for predicting hydrological and soil erosion processes at different scales.

  7. 21 CFR 184.1120 - Brown algae.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 3 2010-04-01 2009-04-01 true Brown algae. 184.1120 Section 184.1120 Food and... Substances Affirmed as GRAS § 184.1120 Brown algae. (a) Brown algae are seaweeds of the species Analipus.../code_of_federal_regulations/ibr_locations.html. (c) In accordance with § 184.1(b)(2), the ingredient is...

  8. Loss of the tumour suppressor gene AIP mediates the browning of human brown fat tumours.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Magnusson, Linda; Hansen, Nils; Saba, Karim H; Nilsson, Jenny; Fioretos, Thoas; Rissler, Pehr; Nord, Karolin H

    2017-10-01

    Human brown fat tumours (hibernomas) show concomitant loss of the tumour suppressor genes MEN1 and AIP. We hypothesized that the brown fat phenotype is attributable to these mutations. Accordingly, in this study, we demonstrate that silencing of AIP in human brown preadipocytic and white fat cell lines results in the induction of the brown fat marker UCP1. In human adipocytic tumours, loss of MEN1 was found both in white (one of 51 lipomas) and in brown fat tumours. In contrast, concurrent loss of AIP was always accompanied by a brown fat morphology. We conclude that this white-to-brown phenotype switch in brown fat tumours is mediated by the loss of AIP. Copyright © 2017 Pathological Society of Great Britain and Ireland. Published by John Wiley & Sons, Ltd. Copyright © 2017 Pathological Society of Great Britain and Ireland. Published by John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  9. Repeated aerosol-vapor JP-8 jet fuel exposure affects neurobehavior and neurotransmitter levels in a rat model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baldwin, Carol M; Figueredo, Aurelio J; Wright, Lynda S; Wong, Simon S; Witten, Mark L

    2007-07-01

    Four groups of Fischer Brown Norway hybrid rats were exposed for 5, 10, 15, or 20 d to aerosolized-vapor jet propulsion fuel 8 (JP-8) compared to freely moving (5 and 10-d exposures) or sham-confined controls (15 and 20-d exposures). Behavioral testing utilized the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency Functional Observational Battery. Exploratory ethological factor analysis identified three salient factors (central nervous system [CNS] excitability, autonomic 1, and autonomic 2) for use in profiling JP-8 exposure in future studies. The factors were used as dependent variables in general linear modeling. Exposed animals were found to engage in more rearing and hyperaroused behavior compared to controls, replicating prior JP-8 exposure findings. Exposed animals also showed increasing but rapidly decelerating stool output (autonomic 1), and a significant increasing linear trend for urine output (autonomic 2). No significant trends were noted for either of the control groups for the autonomic factors. Rats from each of the groups for each of the time frames were randomly selected for tissue assay from seven brain regions for neurotransmitter levels. Hippocampal DOPAC was significantly elevated after 4-wk JP-8 exposure compared to both control groups, suggesting increased dopamine release and metabolism. Findings indicate that behavioral changes do not appear to manifest until wk 3 and 4 of exposure, suggesting the need for longitudinal studies to determine if these behaviors occur due to cumulative exposure, or due to behavioral sensitization related to repeated exposure to aerosolized-vapor JP-8.

  10. Surprising Legacies of Brown v. Board

    OpenAIRE

    Minow, Martha Louise

    2014-01-01

    Perhaps the most powerful legacy of Brown v. Board is this: opponents in varied political battles fifty years later each claim ties to the decision and its meaning. So although the analogy between Brown and same-sex marriage has divided Black clergy, each side vies to inherit the civil rights heritage. President George W. Bush invoked Brown in opposing race-conscious college admission practices. The success of Brown in reshaping the moral landscape has been so profound that I fear we do not f...

  11. Seasonality of brown recluse populations is reflected by numbers of brown recluse envenomations

    OpenAIRE

    Rader, RK; Stoecker, WV; Malters, JM; Marr, MT; Dyer, JA

    2012-01-01

    A significant seasonal correlation was recently shown for brown recluse spider activity. Vetter (2011) observed brown recluse spiders were submitted by the general public predominantly during April–October. For patients with suspected brown recluse spider bites (BRSB), we have observed the same seasonality. Among 45 cases with features consistent of a BRSB, 43 (95.6%) occurred during April–October. Both the Vetter study and our study serve to demonstrate seasonal activity for brown recluse sp...

  12. Enzymatic Browning: a practical class

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maria Teresa Pedrosa Silva Clerici

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available This paper presents a practical class about the enzymes polyphenol oxidases, which have been shown to be responsible for the enzymatic browning of fruits and vegetables. Vegetables samples were submitted to enzymatic inactivation process with chemical reagents, as well as by bleaching methods of applying heat by conventional oven and microwave oven. Process efficiency was assessed qualitatively by both observing the guaiacol peroxidase activity and after the storage period under refrigeration or freezing. The practical results obtained in this class allow exploring multidisciplinary knowledge in food science, with practical applications in everyday life.

  13. Brown Fat and Browning for the Treatment of Obesity and Related Metabolic Disorders

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    So Hun Kim

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available Brown fat is a specialized fat depot that can increase energy expenditure and produce heat. After the recent discovery of the presence of active brown fat in human adults and novel transcription factors controlling brown adipocyte differentiation, the field of the study of brown fat has gained great interest and is rapidly growing. Brown fat expansion and/or activation results in increased energy expenditure and a negative energy balance in mice and limits weight gain. Brown fat is also able to utilize blood glucose and lipid and results in improved glucose metabolism and blood lipid independent of weight loss. Prolonged cold exposure and beta adrenergic agonists can induce browning of white adipose tissue. The inducible brown adipocyte, beige adipocyte evolving by thermogenic activation of white adipose tissue have different origin and molecular signature from classical brown adipocytes but share the characteristics of high mitochondria content, UCP1 expression and thermogenic capacity when activated. Increasing browning may also be an efficient way to increase whole brown fat activity. Recent human studies have shown possibilities that findings in mice can be reproduced in human, making brown fat a good candidate organ to treat obesity and its related disorders.

  14. Functional outcome after facial allograft transplantation in rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Landin, Luis; Cavadas, Pedro C; Gonzalez, Emilio; Rodriguez, Jose C; Caballero, Araceli

    2008-09-01

    Full face, hemiface and facial subunit transplants have been reported before. However, the functional recovery of the face transplant largely remains unknown. The mystacial pad (also known as the vibrissal or whiskers region) is the main sensorimotor unit in rats' faces. We included the mystacial region in the hemifacial flap of the rat, and our aim was to study its functional recovery after transplant. Hemifacial flaps were transplanted from Brown-Norway RT(n) to Wistar-Lewis RT(l) rats, under tapered doses of tacrolimus immunosuppression monotherapy (8 mg/Kg/day to 2mg/Kg/day after 4 weeks). Group I (n=12) was the anatomic study group, in which the harvesting technique of the flap was trial run and angiographies of the flap were obtained. In group II (n=12), non-vascularized hemifacial allografts were transplanted. Group III (n=24) was the vascularized hemiface allotransplant group. This was divided into two subgroups relating to nerve repairs. In subgroup III(a) (n=12) no nerve repairs were performed, while in subgroup III(b) (n=12) the zygomaticoorbital, bucolabial and upper marginal mandibular branches of the facial nerve, and the infraorbital branch of the trigeminal nerve were repaired. Clinical, neurophysiological and histological studies were performed to evaluate the recovery of the mystacial region after six weeks. In group I the hemifacial flap harvesting technique to include the mystacial region was established, and angiographies confirmed a rich axial vascular network in the flaps. All grafts in group II necrosed. In group III, each procedure required an average of 7h (range 5-11). Of this group, 75% of the rats survived for 8 weeks. In subgroup III(a) no signs of recovery were noted, whilst in subgroup III(b) clinical, neurophysiological and histological recovery were found in face transplant recipients after 6 weeks. The hemifacial flap including the mystacial region could be transplanted successfully in the rat model. Face allotransplants in which

  15. Pregnancy outcome in Norway after Chernobyl

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Irgens, L.M.; Lie, R.T.; Ulstein, M.; Skeie Jensen, T.; Skjaerven, R.; Sivertsen, F.; Reitan, J.B.; Strand, F.; Strand, T. (Bergen Univ. (NO)); Egil Skjeldestad, F. (Trondheim, Univ. (NO))

    1991-01-01

    Pregnancy outcome has been studied in terms of legal abortions, early spontaneous abortions and total number of pregnancies (in an ad hoc study covering 6 counties) as well as various perinatal health problems (on the basis of routinely recorded data for epidemiological surveillance from the Medical Birth Registry of Norway). Apparently, no effects were observed in terms of an increased occurrence of legal abortions, while spontaneous abortions increased from 2.4% of all pregnancies during the last 12 months before the accident to 3% after the accident. At the same time, the total number of pregnancies somewhat decreased. Based on monthly measurements in each municipality of external and internal (food-based) doses, dose-response associations were assessed for a number of perinatal health problems. No associations were observed.

  16. Bio energy in Norway; Bioenergi i Noreg

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hamnaberg, Haavard; Sidelnikova, Maria

    2011-07-01

    The main conclusion in this report is that it is possible to make available about 14 TWh bio energy in Norway than what is used today to a charge that is located less than ca. 30 oere / kWh. Almost all this potential come from the forest and requires an increase in output up to the net sustained yield. Further 5 TWh may be available in the form of biogas at a cost that is both higher and have greater uncertainty than the fixed bio energy. It is set up a cost curve based on this work, which is quoted here. This reflects only the technical costs, and does not regard wages, commissions, taxes or fees. The value of alternative uses of biomass are not considered. The cost curve must therefore not be mixed with a supply curve. (eb)

  17. Energy carriers in Norway; Energibaerere i Norge

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    2008-01-15

    Within the Norwegian energy consumption, electricity is by far the most dominant energy carrier. In the last thirty years electricity has had an increased significance, while oil has been reduce. A trend that is likely to continue. Energy politics has among others these objectives: environment, reliability of supply and effective energy supply. These objectives are somewhat contradictory. In agreement with the environmental politic phasing out oil leads to a reduction in greenhouse gases. However this politic will have a local impact only effecting Norway, in a larger European connection it might lead to a larger net emission of CO{sub 2}. A political intervention in the energy market might also lead to a reduction in the energy markets effectiveness and flexibility. This report addresses this problem: If a total phase out of the stationary oil consumption is conducted, what energy carriers will this consumption convert to?

  18. THE STATUS OF SYNTAXONOMY IN NORWAY

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    E. FREMSTAD

    1996-01-01

    Full Text Available

    In Norway syntaxonomical work started approximately at the same time in Central Europe. Nordhagen was the pioneer, making the basis for the classification of especially alpine communities, followed by Dahl and Gjaerevoll, also focusing on alpine vegetation. During the 1970-80’s a large number of syntaxonomical studies were made on a diversity of topics; most of these studies were never published. The rather species-poor flora and the difficulties of applying the concept of character species have caused Norwegian botanists to develop a classification system of their own, as a summary of present knowledge. The next step should be to rework a large number of relevès with numerical methods to form the basis of a national vegetation survey.

  19. Diabetes: cost of illness in Norway

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jenssen Trond

    2010-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Diabetes mellitus places a considerable burden on patients in terms of morbidity and mortality and on society in terms of costs. Costs related to diabetes are expected to increase due to increasing prevalence of type 2 diabetes. The aim of this study was to estimate the health care costs attributable to type 1 and type 2 diabetes in Norway in 2005. Methods Data on inpatient hospital services, outpatient clinic visits, physician services, drugs, medical equipment, nutrition guidance, physiotherapy, acupuncture, foot therapy and indirect costs were collected from national registers and responses to a survey of 584 patients with diabetes. The study was performed with a prevalence approach. Uncertainty was explored by means of bootstrapping. Results When hospital stays with diabetes as a secondary diagnosis were excluded, the total costs were €293 million, which represents about 1.4% of the total health care expenditure. Pharmaceuticals accounted for €95 million (32%, disability pensions €48 million (16%, medical devices €40 million (14% and hospital admissions €21 million (7%. Patient expenditures for acupuncture, physiotherapy and foot therapy were many times higher than expenditure for nutritional guidance. Indirect costs (lost production from job absenteeism accounted for €70.1 million (24% of the €293 million and included sick leave (€16.7 million, disability support and disability pensions (€48.2 million and other indirect costs (€5.3 million. If all diabetes related hospital stays are included (primary- and secondary diagnosis total costs amounts to €535 million, about 2.6% of the total health care expenditure in Norway. Conclusions Diabetes represents a considerable burden to society in terms of health care costs and productivity losses.

  20. Brown dwarf disks with ALMA

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ricci, L.; Isella, A. [Department of Astronomy, California Institute of Technology, MC 249-17, Pasadena, CA 91125 (United States); Testi, L.; De Gregorio-Monsalvo, I. [European Southern Observatory, Karl-Schwarzschild-Strasse 2, D-85748 Garching (Germany); Natta, A. [INAF-Osservatorio Astrofisico di Arcetri, Largo E. Fermi 5, I-50125 Firenze (Italy); Scholz, A., E-mail: lricci@astro.caltech.edu [School of Cosmic Physics, Dublin Institute for Advanced Studies, 31 Fitzwilliam Place, Dublin 2 (Ireland)

    2014-08-10

    We present Atacama Large Millimeter/submillimeter Array continuum and spectral line data at 0.89 mm and 3.2 mm for three disks surrounding young brown dwarfs and very low mass stars in the Taurus star forming region. Dust thermal emission is detected and spatially resolved for all the three disks, while CO(J = 3-2) emission is seen in two disks. We analyze the continuum visibilities and constrain the disks' physical structure in dust. The results of our analysis show that the disks are relatively large; the smallest one has an outer radius of about 70 AU. The inferred disk radii, radial profiles of the dust surface density, and disk to central object mass ratios lie within the ranges found for disks around more massive young stars. We derive from our observations the wavelength dependence of the millimeter dust opacity. In all the three disks, data are consistent with the presence of grains with at least millimeter sizes, as also found for disks around young stars, and confirm that the early stages of the solid growth toward planetesimals occur also around very low-mass objects. We discuss the implications of our findings on models of solids evolution in protoplanetary disks, the main mechanisms proposed for the formation of brown dwarfs and very low-mass stars, as well as the potential of finding rocky and giant planets around very low-mass objects.

  1. The brain and brown fat.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Contreras, Cristina; Gonzalez, Francisco; Fernø, Johan; Diéguez, Carlos; Rahmouni, Kamal; Nogueiras, Rubén; López, Miguel

    2015-03-01

    Brown adipose tissue (BAT) is a specialized organ responsible for thermogenesis, a process required for maintaining body temperature. BAT is regulated by the sympathetic nervous system (SNS), which activates lipolysis and mitochondrial uncoupling in brown adipocytes. For many years, BAT was considered to be important only in small mammals and newborn humans, but recent data have shown that BAT is also functional in adult humans. On the basis of this evidence, extensive research has been focused on BAT function, where new molecules, such as irisin and bone morphogenetic proteins, particularly BMP7 and BMP8B, as well as novel central factors and new regulatory mechanisms, such as orexins and the canonical ventomedial nucleus of the hypothalamus (VMH) AMP- activated protein kinase (AMPK)-SNS-BAT axis, have been discovered and emerged as potential drug targets to combat obesity. In this review we provide an overview of the complex central regulation of BAT and how different neuronal cell populations co-ordinately work to maintain energy homeostasis.

  2. Polycystic kidney disease gene in the Lewis polycystic kidney rat is mapped to chromosome 10q21–q26

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yengkopiong JP

    2012-08-01

    Full Text Available Jada Pasquale YengkopiongDr John Garang Memorial University of Science and Technology, Faculty of Science and Technology, Bor, Republic of South SudanBackground: Polycystic kidney disease (PKD is a life-threatening disorder that affects the kidneys of millions of people across the world. The disease is normally inherited, but it can also be acquired, and leads to development of many cysts in the renal nephrons. In this study, the aim was to characterize PKD in the Lewis polycystic kidney (LPK rat, the newest model for human PKD.Methods: Mating experiments were performed between male LPK rats with PKD and female Brown Norway and Wistar Kyoto rats without PKD to raise second filial (F2 and backcross 1 (BC1 progeny, respectively. Rats that developed PKD were identified. Histological examination of the kidneys and liver was performed. Liver tissue samples were collected from each rat and used to extract DNA. The extracted DNA was amplified, and mapping and linkage analyses were performed to identify the quantitative trait locus that controlled the disease phenotypes.Results: It was established that the disease was controlled by a recessive mutation in a single gene (F2: PKD = 42, non-PKD = 110, χ2 = 0.53; BC1: PKD = 67, non-PKD = 72, χ2 = 0.18, P > 0.05 and that the disease was inherited as autosomal recessive polycystic kidney disease (ARPKD. The rats with PKD developed larger fluid-filled cystic kidneys, higher systolic blood pressure, and anemia. However, there were no extrarenal cysts and no pup deaths. Mapping studies and linkage analyses associated the disease phenotypes in both the F2 and BC1 rats to chromosome 10q21–q26, giving a maximum LOD score of 7.9 (P = 0.00001 between peak markers D10Rat180 and D10Rat26.Conclusion: The quantitative trait locus on chromosome 10q21–q26 does not contain the Pkhd-1 gene, and it is different from quantitative trait loci that control ARPKD in other murine models. The candidate genes located in the

  3. Spontaneous expression of inducible nitric oxide synthase in the hypothalamus and other brain regions of aging rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vernet, D; Bonavera, J J; Swerdloff, R S; Gonzalez-Cadavid, N F; Wang, C

    1998-07-01

    Our laboratory has demonstrated that aging in Brown-Norway rats is associated with decreased LH pulse amplitude and reduced GnRH and LH responsiveness to excitatory amino acids (EAA), presumably through the NMDA receptor (NMDAR). Nitric oxide (NO) is a neurotransmitter postulated to be involved in hypothalamic synaptic events required for normal GnRH regulation through the activation of neuronal nitric oxide synthase (nNOS). Paradoxically, excessive stimulation of nNOS by NMDAR or the expression of inducible nitric oxide synthase (iNOS) can lead to supraphysiological levels of NO acting as effector of apoptosis with resultant decreased regional neuronal function. The aims of this study were to determine: 1) whether aging in the preoptic area/medial basal hypothalamus is associated with altered NO synthesis; 2) the possible roles of the NMDAR/nNOS cascade and iNOS in this process; and 3) whether alterations in the levels of NOS isoforms are specific to this region of the brain. Brown Norway male rats (N = 5) at ages 1 (immature), 3 (adult), and 24 (old) months, were used for measuring NMDARs in hypothalamic membranes by the binding of a (3H)-NMDAR ligand. Another series of the same age groups of rats (N = 9) were used to determine by Western blot the contents of NMDAR, nNOS, and iNOS in the hypothalamus, and only iNOS in the frontal and parietal cortex, and cerebellum. NOS activity was measured in the hypothalamus by the arginine/citrulline assay. A significant decrease of NMDA analog binding was found in the hypothalamus from old rats as compared with adult (-66%) and immature animals (-57%), accompanied by a reduction in NMDAR content (-34% and -46%, respectively). NOS activity in the hypothalamus was 67% and 100% higher in old rats as compared with the other two groups, although no significant differences were observed in nNOS content. However, hypothalamic iNOS increased 3.8- and 7.6-fold in old rats, as compared with adult and immature, respectively. This

  4. Hey! A Brown Recluse Spider Bit Me!

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... System Taking Care of Your Teeth Bad Breath Hey! A Brown Recluse Spider Bit Me! KidsHealth > For Kids > Hey! A Brown Recluse Spider Bit Me! Print A ... For Kids For Parents MORE ON THIS TOPIC Hey! A Fire Ant Stung Me! Hey! A Tarantula ...

  5. Microlensing Binaries with Candidate Brown Dwarf Companions

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Shin, I.-G; Han, C.; Gould, A.

    2012-01-01

    Brown dwarfs are important objects because they may provide a missing link between stars and planets, two populations that have dramatically different formation histories. In this paper, we present the candidate binaries with brown dwarf companions that are found by analyzing binary microlensing ...

  6. Remembering "Brown": Silence, Loss, Rage, and Hope

    Science.gov (United States)

    Banks, James A.

    2004-01-01

    The author was in the seventh grade at the Newsome Training School in Aubrey, Arkansas when the Supreme Court handed down "Brown v. Board of Education" on May 17, 1954. His most powerful memory of the "Brown" decision is that he has no memory of it being rendered or mentioned by his parents, teachers, or preachers. In his rural…

  7. Isolation of glycoproteins from brown algae

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    2015-01-01

    The present invention relates to a novel process for the isolation of unique anti-oxidative glycoproteins from the pH precipitated fractions of enzymatic extracts of brown algae. Two brown seaweeds viz, Fucus serratus and Fucus vesiculosus were hydrolysed by using 3 enzymes viz, Alcalase, Viscozyme...

  8. Brown vs. Board of Education Booklet

    OpenAIRE

    IDEA, UCLA

    2004-01-01

    This booklet was designed for K-12 classrooms and community groups examining the legacy of Brown v Board for California. The booklet chronicles the national battle for equal schooling up to and since the Brown decision. It also highlights the history of school segregation in California and the ongoing struggle for equal schooling.

  9. "Brown" and Black-White Achievement

    Science.gov (United States)

    Armor, David J.

    2006-01-01

    "Brown v. Board of Education" only presumed to eliminate the "de jure" apartheid that existed in 1954. It was never intended to resolve the "de facto" gap in minority achievement that still faces education policymakers today. Sociologist David J. Armor goes beyond "Brown" to identify a set of definite risk…

  10. Brown recluse spider bite on the breast.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Norris, Kori; Misra, Subhasis

    2014-05-01

    Brown recluse spiders are one of two types of spiders in the United States that can cause significant tissue damage and, in rare cases, death. Brown recluse spider bites are most often benign and self-limiting, but in a few cases can cause severe necrotic skin lesions.

  11. Some Aspects of Enzymatic Browning in Apples

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liffen, C. L.; Cleeve, H. N.

    1975-01-01

    Describes material modified from the Nuffield advanced chemistry course to make it meaningful and relevant to pupils in the middle school. Discusses a series of simple experiments on apple browning and summarizes the browning process and its control. (Author/GS)

  12. Traumatic Brown-Séquard-plus syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McCarron, M O; Flynn, P A; Pang, K A; Hawkins, S A

    2001-09-01

    In the 1840s Brown-Séquard described the motor and sensory effects of sectioning half of the spinal cord. Penetrating injuries can cause Brown-Séquard or, more frequently, Brown-Séquard-plus syndromes. To report the case of a 25-year-old man who developed left-sided Brown-Séquard syndrome at the C8 level and left-sided Horner syndrome plus urinary retention and bilateral extensor responses following a stab wound in the right side of the neck. Magnetic resonance imaging demonstrated a low cervical lesion and somatosensory evoked potentials confirmed the clinical finding of left-side dorsal column disturbance. At follow-up, the patient's mobility and bladder function had returned to normal. This patient recovered well after a penetrating neck injury that disturbed function in more than half the lower cervical spinal cord (Brown-Séquard-plus syndrome).

  13. Genetic background specific hypoxia resistance in rat is correlated with balanced activation of a cross-chromosomal genetic network centering on physiological homeostasis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lei eMao

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available Genetic background of an individual can drastically influence an organism’s response upon environmental stress and pathological stimulus. Previous studies in inbred rats showed that compared to Brown Norway (BN, Dahl salt-sensitive (SS rat exerts strong hypoxia susceptibility. However, despite extensive narrow-down approaches via the chromosome substitution methodology, this genome-based physiological predisposition could not be traced back to distinct quantitative trait loci. Upon the completion and public data availability of PhysGen SS-BN consomic rat platform, I employed systems biology approach attempting to further our understanding of the molecular basis of genetic background effect in light of hypoxia response. I analyzed the physiological screening data of 22 consomic rat strains under normoxia and two-weeks of hypoxia, and cross-compared them to the parental strains. The analyses showed that SS-9BN and SS-18BN represent the most hypoxia resistant CS strains with phenotype similar to BN, whereas SS-6BN and SS-YBN segregated to the direction of SS. A meta-analysis on the transcriptomic profiles of these consomic rat strains under hypoxia treatment showed that although polymorphisms on the substituted BN chromosomes could be directly involved in hypoxia resistance, this seems to be embedded in a more complex trans-chromosomal genetic regulatory network. Via information theory based modeling approach, this hypoxia-relevant core genetic network was reverse-engineered. Network analyses showed that the protective effects of BN chromosome 9 and 18 were reflected by a balanced activation of this core network centering on physiological homeostasis. Presumably, it is the system robustness constituted on such differential network activation that acts as hypoxia response modifier. Understanding of the intrinsic link between the individual genetic background and the network robustness will set a basis in the current scientific efforts toward

  14. Unchanging Incidence of Hip Fracture in Southeastern Norway

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Polesie, Sam; Sigurdsen, Ulf; Bjørgul, Kristian

    2013-01-01

    Purpose: The aim of this study was to ascertain trends in the incidence of hip fracture in southeastern Norway by comparing the hip fracture incidence for the years 2008 to 2010 to that of a study from 1998...

  15. Rock glaciers from Norway and Svalbard, Version 1

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — A complete inventory of rock glaciers on mainland Norway and Svalbard has only been carried out in connection with coarse geomorphological mapping. The data...

  16. Exposure to organic solvents among car painters in Bergen, Norway

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Moen, B E; Hollund, B E

    2000-01-01

    .... This study evaluated some of the effects of these regulations, by measuring the levels of exposure to organic solvents in six car-painting garages and relating them to the limit values in Norway...

  17. Direct maternal deaths in Norway 1976-1995

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andersgaard, Alice Beate; Langhoff-Roos, J.; Oian, P.

    2008-01-01

    AIMS: To report direct maternal mortality ratio (MMR) in Norway between 1976 and 1995 including a description of the underlying complications in pregnancy, the causes of death and assessment of standard of care. METHODS: The maternal deaths were identified through the Cause of Death Registry......, Statistics Norway, and Medical Birth Registry of Norway. We requested copies of the hospital case records and the maternal death autopsies. The direct maternal deaths were classified on the basis underlying causes and assessed for substandard care according to the guidelines at the time of death...... and preventability provided optimal conditions and up to date guidelines. RESULTS: In the period 1976-1995 we identified 61 direct maternal deaths in Norway. The direct MMR was 5.5/100,000 births. Sufficient information was available for analysis in 51 of these cases. Six deaths occurred in early pregnancy. Among...

  18. Melissa officinalis extract inhibits laser-induced choroidal neovascularization in a rat model.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eun Kyoung Lee

    Full Text Available This study investigated the effect of Melissa officinalis extract on laser-induced choroidal neovascularization (CNV in a rat model. The mechanism by which M. officinalis extract acted was also investigated.Experimental CNV was induced by laser photocoagulation in Brown Norway rats. An active fraction of the Melissa leaf extract was orally administered (50 or 100 mg/kg/day beginning 3 days before laser photocoagulation and ending 14 days after laser photocoagulation. Optical coherence tomography and fluorescein angiography were performed in vivo to evaluate the thickness and leakage of CNV. Choroidal flat mount and histological analysis were conducted to observe the CNV in vitro. Vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF, matrix metalloproteinase (MMP-2, and MMP-9 expression were measured in retinal and choroidal-scleral lysates 7 days after laser injury. Moreover, the effect of M. officinalis extract on tertiary-butylhydroperoxide (t-BH-induced VEGF secretion and mRNA levels of VEGF, MMP-2, and MMP-9 were evaluated in human retinal epithelial cells (ARPE-19 as well as in human umbilical vein endothelial cells (HUVECs.The CNV thickness in M. officinalis-treated rats was significantly lower than in vehicle-treated rats by histological analysis. The CNV thickness was 33.93±7.64 µm in the high-dose group (P<0.001, 44.09±12.01 µm in the low-dose group (P = 0.016, and 51.00±12.37 µm in the control group. The proportion of CNV lesions with clinically significant fluorescein leakage was 9.2% in rats treated with high-dose M. officinalis, which was significantly lower than in control rats (53.4%, P<0.001. The levels of VEGF, MMP-2, and MMP-9 were significantly lower in the high-dose group than in the control group. Meanwhile, M. officinalis extract suppressed t-BH-induced transcription of VEGF and MMP-9 in ARPE-19 cells and HUVECs.Systemic administration of M. officinalis extract suppressed laser-induced CNV formation in rats. Inhibition of

  19. Brown Swiss cattle cytogenetic analysis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rita Maria Ladeira Pires

    2010-02-01

    Full Text Available At 1985, a Brown Swiss herd from the Institute of Animal Science and Pastures, APTA/ SAA was cytogenetically analyzed and 1/29 Robertsonian translocation was observed. Such anomaly is related to fertility reduction. Quimeric abnormality such as 60,XX/60,XY in freemartin females. This study aimed to evaluate the incidence of cromossomic abnormalities in Brown Swiss animals, descending form herd karyotyped earlier. After 25 years, 127 animals (97 females and 30 males from this herd were karyotyped by metaphases obtained from blood lymphocyte cultures. The typical diploid number 2n=60, 58 acrocentric and two X submetacentric chromosomes were confirmed in 94 females and in 27 males the sexual complement X and Y, both submetacentric, although from different sizes. Four females from gemelar parturition whit males were karyotyped. Three of them presented quimerism 60,XX/60,XY (one with 25.8% of female cells (XX and 74.2% male cells (XY; one another with 10% of cells XX e 90% of XY and the third with 50% of each type showing genital masculinization, diagnosed as freemartism and discarded from herd. Two hundred and five cells were analyzed from another female twins and only 60,XX cells were found, diagnosed as normal. His sister also were normal (60,XY. The another three males were also analyzed from gemelar heterosexual parturition, with karyotype 60,XX/60,XY. Cytogenetic analysis are a safe methodology for freemartin abnormalities identification in female bovine twins with male bovine, giving the opportunity of selecting fertile animals, avoiding loses in the management of sterile animals. Robertsonian’s translocation was not observed in any of the animals analyzed.

  20. Small Hydro Power Plants in a given region in Norway

    OpenAIRE

    Masoliver Verdaguer, Anna Carmen

    2008-01-01

    Nowadays, the hydropower development in Norway is more or less restricted to small scale installations without reservoirs as they are regarded as an environmentally solution. This thesis provides an overview of the hydropower potential of nine rivers in Sør-Trøndelag, a county in Norway. This feasibility study includes technical, economical and environmental considerations. There is a combination of theoretical, experimental and programming work. First of all, the hydropower pl...

  1. Ichneumonidae (Hymenoptera) new for the fauna of Norway, Part 5

    OpenAIRE

    RIEDEL, Matthias; Hansen, Lars Ove

    2012-01-01

    The family Ichneumonidae represents a very species-rich family of parasitoid Hymenoptera. In Norway, 1583 different Ichneumonid species have been reported so far. The present survey gives distributional records for 98 additional species of the family Ichneumonidae (Hymenoptera) previously not known from Norway. 21 of them have hitherto not been reported from Scandinavia, including the first Palaearctic record of Syrphophilus tricinctus (Ashmead, 1902). Posted here with permission from the...

  2. Adaptive Evolution and Demographic History of Norway Spruce (Picea Abies)

    OpenAIRE

    Källman, Thomas

    2009-01-01

    One of the major challenges in evolutionary biology is to determine the genetic basis of adaptive variation. In Norway spruce (Picea abies) the timing of bud set shows a very strong latitudinal cline despite a very low genetic differentiation between populations. The timing of bud set in Norway spruce is under strong genetic control and triggered by changes in photoperiod, but no genes controlling this response have so far been described. In this thesis we used a combination of functional stu...

  3. Energy efficiency policies and measures in Norway

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rosenberg, Eva

    2012-07-01

    This report represents the national case study of Norway for the IEE-project {sup M}onitoring of EU and national energy efficiency targets (ODYSSEE-MURE 2010)'. The Norwegian part of the project is co-funded by Enova. The report presents the recent energy efficiency trends in Norway on the basis of indicators extracted from the ODYSSEE database. The database contains information on energy use in a detailed level of the industry, transport, household and service sectors and other energy use. lt also contains information on energy drivers like heated square meters in the households and services sectors, transported passenger-km and ton-km of gods, value added, production index, production volumes etc. Final energy consumption has increased from 195 TWh in 1990 lo 229 TWh in 2010 The last ten years the energy consumption has varied between 212I Wh (2009) and 229 TWh (2010) with an annual average of 221TfUh. The sector using most energy is the industry, but the share has decreased from 40 % in 1990 to 31 % in 2010. From 1990 to 2010 the growth rate has been highest in the transport sector. Half of the energy end-use was electricity in 20,10, 42 % was fossil fuels and 6 % was biomass. The electricity use has an annual increase of 0.8 % since 1990, but the last decade the annual increase is reduced to 0.14 %. The consumption of oil products has decreased in stationary end-use (heating) and increased in the transport sector. In ODYSSEE, an aggregate bottom-up energy efficiency index, ODEX, is calculated. This energy efficiency index aggregates the trends in the detailed bottom-up indicators in one single indicator. This ODEX has improved by 26 o/o from 1990 to 2010 or by 1.3 o/o per year. This means that energy efficiency policies and measures implemented since 1990 have contributed to a decrease in the energy use of 2010 of approximately 59 TWh. (Author)

  4. Family and gender policies in Norway

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Arlung, Liera

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available The NorSpaR project aims to analyse the main public policy initiatives by which Norway and Spain cope with the new social and economic challenges derived from the so-called New Social Risks (NSR. Although both countries present significant differences in their institutional settings (such as Spanish EU membership, or its belonging to diverse welfare regimes types (Norway is generally included in the Nordic regime, while Spain is part of the Mediterranean one, both countries share a common interest in addressing the aforementioned challenges while maintaining social cohesion. In the last decade, governments in both countries have tried to respond to those challenges by reforming their labour markets, adapting their unemployment schemes, as well as their gender, family and long-term care policies. The analysis covered in this project includes three areas of public policy addressing NSR. First, dependency is one of the most daunting challenges for post-industrial societies experiencing population ageing and with an increasing number of frail people in need of care. This situation is forcing governments to rethink their long-term care policies. Second, family and gender public programs need to respond to the growing difficulties of families in reconciling professional and family life. Third, in the transition to a post-industrial order, and in a context of mass unemployment, social protection systems have a renewed prominence. Along with the so-called passive policies offering financial support to the unemployed, active labour market policies are geared to put people back into work. In our analysis we try to find answers to the following questions: What are the challenges that each of these policies have been trying to address in recent years? How have these policies evolved? What kinds of reforms have been implemented, and which ones have been neglected? Have the policy goals and targets of welfare programs been modified in any significant way

  5. Autocrine effects of transgenic resistin reduce palmitate and glucose oxidation in brown adipose tissue

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Pravenec, Michal; Mlejnek, Petr; Zídek, Václav; Landa, Vladimír; Šimáková, Miroslava; Šilhavý, Jan; Strnad, Hynek; Eigner, Sebastian; Eigner-Henke, Kateřina; Škop, V.; Malínská, H.; Trnovská, J.; Kazdová, L.; Drahota, Zdeněk; Mráček, Tomáš; Houštěk, Josef

    2016-01-01

    Roč. 48, č. 6 (2016), s. 420-427 ISSN 1094-8341 R&D Projects: GA MŠk(CZ) LL1204; GA ČR(CZ) GB14-36804G; GA MZd(CZ) NT14325 Institutional support: RVO:67985823 ; RVO:68378050 ; RVO:61389005 Keywords : brown adipose tissue * autocrine * transgenic * spontaneously hypertensive rat Subject RIV: FB - Endocrinology, Diabetology, Metabolism, Nutrition Impact factor: 3.044, year: 2016

  6. Patterns of intraocular pressure elevation after aqueous humor outflow obstruction in rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jia, L; Cepurna, W O; Johnson, E C; Morrison, J C

    2000-05-01

    To determine the diural intraocular pressure (IOP) response of Brown Norway rat eyes after sclerosis of the aqueous humor outflow pathways and its relationship to optic nerve damage. Hypertonic saline was injected into a single episcleral vein in 17 animals and awake IOP measured in both the light and dark phases of the circadian cycle for 34 days. Mean IOP for light and dark phases during the experimental period were compared with the respective pressures of the uninjected fellow eyes. Optic nerve cross sections from each nerve were graded for injury by five independent masked observers. For fellow eyes, mean light- and dark-phase IOP was 21 +/- 1 and 31 +/- 1 mm Hg, respectively. For four experimental eyes, mean IOPs for both phases were not altered. Six eyes demonstrated significant mean IOP elevations only during the dark phase. Of these, five showed persistent, large circadian oscillations, and four had partial optic nerve lesions. The remaining seven eyes experienced significant IOP elevations during both phases, and all had extensive optic nerve damage. Episcleral vein injection of hypertonic saline is more likely to increase IOP during the dark phase than the light. This is consistent with aqueous outflow obstruction superimposed on a circadian rhythm of aqueous humor production. Because these periodic IOP elevations produced optic nerve lesions, both light- and dark-phase IOP determinations are necessary for accurate correlation of IOP history to optic nerve damage in animals housed in a light- dark environment.

  7. Xenon treatment attenuates early renal allograft injury associated with prolonged hypothermic storage in rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Hailin; Yoshida, Akira; Xiao, Wei; Ologunde, Rele; O'Dea, Kieran P; Takata, Masao; Tralau-Stewart, Catherine; George, Andrew J T; Ma, Daqing

    2013-10-01

    Prolonged hypothermic storage elicits severe ischemia-reperfusion injury (IRI) to renal grafts, contributing to delayed graft function (DGF) and episodes of acute immune rejection and shortened graft survival. Organoprotective strategies are therefore needed for improving long-term transplant outcome. The aim of this study is to investigate the renoprotective effect of xenon on early allograft injury associated with prolonged hypothermic storage. Xenon exposure enhanced the expression of heat-shock protein 70 (HSP-70) and heme oxygenase 1 (HO-1) and promoted cell survival after hypothermia-hypoxia insult in human proximal tubular (HK-2) cells, which was abolished by HSP-70 or HO-1 siRNA. In the brown Norway to Lewis rat renal transplantation, xenon administered to donor or recipient decreased the renal tubular cell death, inflammation, and MHC II expression, while delayed graft function (DGF) was therefore reduced. Pathological changes associated with acute rejection, including T-cell, macrophage, and fibroblast infiltration, were also decreased with xenon treatment. Donors or recipients treated with xenon in combination with cyclosporin A had prolonged renal allograft survival. Xenon protects allografts against delayed graft function, attenuates acute immune rejection, and enhances graft survival after prolonged hypothermic storage. Furthermore, xenon works additively with cyclosporin A to preserve post-transplant renal function.

  8. CatWalk gait analysis in a rat model of multiple sclerosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Herold, Sabine; Kumar, Prateek; Jung, Klaus; Graf, Irina; Menkhoff, Henrike; Schulz, Xenia; Bähr, Mathias; Hein, Katharina

    2016-11-30

    Myelin oligodendrocyte glycoprotein (MOG)-induced experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis (EAE) is a widely used animal model for multiple sclerosis. The characteristic feature of the MOG-EAE model in Brown Norway rats is consistent involvement of the spinal cord resulting in limb paresis. The aim of the study was to investigate whether early subclinical gait abnormalities are present in this animal model and can be detected by CatWalk XT, a fully automated gait analysis system. Furthermore, we investigated the usability of CatWalk system for treatment studies. Our gait analysis showed no preclinical abnormalities in MOG-EAE animals. Nevertheless, we characterized a combination of gait parameters that display a high predictive capacity in regard to disease onset. Our detailed histopathological analysis of the spinal cord revealed that lesion formation starts in the lumbar region and propagates toward the cervical part of the spinal cord during the disease course. In the treatment study, the stabilization of gait parameters under the treatment with methylprednisolone was detected in CatWalk as well as in traditional EAE-scoring system. The results from CatWalk test indicate no benefit of lab-intensive automated gait system in EAE-model with chronic-progressive disease course as well as in therapeutic studies with pronounced effect on the severity of clinical symptoms. However, due to its quantitative and objective nature this system may display a refined test to detect small but functional relevant changes in regeneration-orientated studies.

  9. Pharmacogenetic interaction between dexamethasone and Cd36-deficient segment of spontaneously hypertensive rat chromosome 4 affects triacylglycerol and cholesterol distribution into lipoprotein fractions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Křen Vladimír

    2010-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Dexamethasone (DEX is known to induce diabetes and dyslipidemia. We have compared fasting triacylglycerol and cholesterol concentrations across 20 lipoprotein fractions and glucose tolerance in control (standard diet and DEX-treated 7-month-old males of two rat strains, Brown Norway (BN and congenic BN.SHR-(Il6-Cd36/Cub (BN.SHR4. These two inbred strains differ in a defined segment of chromosome 4, originally transferred from the spontaneously hypertensive rat (SHR including the mutant Cd36 gene, a known target of DEX. Compared to BN, the standard-diet-fed BN.SHR4 showed higher cholesterol and triacylglycerol concentrations across many lipoprotein fractions, particularly in small VLDL and LDL particles. Total cholesterol was decreased by DEX by more than 21% in BN.SHR4 contrasting with the tendency to increase in BN (strain*DEX interaction p = 0.0017. Similar pattern was observed for triacylglycerol concentrations in LDL. The LDL particle size was significantly reduced by DEX in both strains. Also, while control BN and BN.SHR4 displayed comparable glycaemic profiles during oral glucose tolerance test, we observed a markedly blunted DEX induction of glucose intolerance in BN.SHR4 compared to BN. In summary, we report a pharmacogenetic interaction between limited genomic segment with mutated Cd36 gene and dexamethasone-induced glucose intolerance and triacylglycerol and cholesterol redistribution into lipoprotein fractions.

  10. Exercise-Mediated Increase in Nigral Tyrosine Hydroxylase Is Accompanied by Increased Nigral GFR-α1 and EAAC1 Expression in Aging Rats

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arnold, Jennifer C.; Salvatore, Michael F.

    2016-01-01

    Exercise may alleviate locomotor impairment in Parkinson's disease (PD) or aging. Identifying molecular responses immediately engaged by exercise in the nigrostriatal pathway and allied tissue may reveal critical targets associated with its long-term benefits. In aging, there is loss of tyrosine hydroxylase (TH) and the glial cell line-derived neurotrophic factor (GDNF) receptor, GFR-α1, in the substantia nigra (SN). Exercise can increase GDNF expression, but its effect on GFR-α1 expression is unknown. Infusion of GDNF into striatum or GFR-α1 in SN, respectively, can increase locomotor activity and TH function in SN but not striatum in aged rats. GDNF may also increase glutamate transporter expression, which attenuates TH loss in PD models. We utilized a footshock-free treadmill exercise regimen to determine the immediate impact of short-term exercise on GFR-α1 expression, dopamine regulation, glutamate transporter expression, and glutamate uptake in 18 month old male Brown-Norway/Fischer 344 F1 hybrid rats. GFR-α1 and TH expression significantly increased in SN but not striatum. This exercise regimen did not affect glutamate uptake or glutamate transporter expression in striatum. However, EAAC1 expression increased in SN. These results indicate that nigral GFR-α1 and EAAC1 expression increased in conjunction with increased nigral TH expression following short-term exercise. PMID:26599339

  11. Atmospheric rivers and extreme precipitation in Norway

    Science.gov (United States)

    Whan, Kirien; Haarsma, Rein; Sillmann, Jana

    2017-04-01

    'Atmospheric rivers' are long, narrow regions of high water vapour content that are responsible for the horizontal transport of moisture to higher latitudes. They are associated with the majority of extreme precipitation events in Norway throughout the observational record. These extreme precipitation events can be associated with flooding that has large impacts on society, such as the October 2014 event in Flåm. We examined changes in extreme precipitation between the current and future climates in the coupled global climate model, EC-EARTH, using high-resolution simulations ( 25 km) that can resolve extratropical storms and atmospheric rivers. We use the r-largest method (r=3) to fit stationary (no covariates) and non-stationary (with an index of atmospheric rivers as a covariate) generalised extreme value distributions to the block maxima of annual precipitation. The value of a regional 'index flood' type approach is explored and future changes in the largest precipitation events of the year that are associated with atmospheric rivers are presented.

  12. The Bamble Sector, South Norway: A review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Timo G. Nijland

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available The Proterozoic Bamble Sector, South Norway, is one of the world's classic amphibolite- to granulite-facies transition zones. It is characterized by a well-developed isograd sequence, with isolated ‘granulite-facies islands’ in the amphibolite-facies portion of the transition zone. The area is notable for the discovery of CO2-dominated fluid inclusions in the granulite-facies rocks by Jacques Touret in the late 1960's, which triggered discussion of the role of carbonic fluids during granulite genesis. The aim of this review is to provide an overview of the current state of knowledge of the Bamble Sector, with an emphasis on the Arendal-Froland-Nelaug-Tvedestrand area and off shore islands (most prominantly Tromøy and Hisøy where the transition zone is best developed. After a brief overview of the history of geological research and mining in the area, aspects of sedimentary, metamorphic and magmatic petrology of the Bamble Sector are discussed, including the role of fluids. Issues relevant to current geotectonic models for SW Scandinavia, directly related to the Bamble Sector, are discussed at the end of the review.

  13. Brown recluse spider bite to the eyelid.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jarvis, R M; Neufeld, M V; Westfall, C T

    2000-08-01

    To present a photographically documented case of a known brown recluse spider bite to the eyelid. Interventional case report. The wound was photographed daily during an 11-day hospitalization and at 1 month and 6 months after the injury. Treatment included canthotomy and cantholysis; administration of dapsone, antibiotics, and steroids; and hyperbaric oxygen therapy. Clinical presentation and course of a known brown recluse spider bite. Complete recovery with cicatrization at the site of the bite. We present a case of a brown recluse spider bite to the left lower eyelid with a discussion of management and outcome of this rarely reported injury.

  14. NORADAPT. Community Adaptation and Vulnerability in Norway; NORADAPT. Community Adaptation and Vulnerability in Norway. Sluttrapport

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Oort, Bob van; Hovelsrud, Grete K.; Dannevig, Halvor; Bybraaten, Stine

    2012-10-15

    In NORADAPT, researchers from CICERO Center for Climate Research, Western Norway Research Institute, Eastern Norway Research Institute and the Norwegian Meteorological Institute worked in close cooperation with 8 selected municipalities, with the aim to help municipalities assess their vulnerability to climate change and develop adaptation strategies in collaboration with the research group. This report presents climate scenarios for all project municipalities and interprets the expected changes from the figures produced for each municipality. The report refers to socioeconomic scenarios which were developed as part of the project, describes progress throughout the project period and summarizes the main findings of the project through a summary of the final conference at Losby Gods 24-25 October 2011. The project has shown that municipalities are able to put climate change on the agenda, utilize scientific knowledge and implement adaptation measures, but that this depends on several factors, such as capacity, knowledge and involvement in local government, access to relevant knowledge and policy measures, and clear guidance and supervision from regional and national authorities. (Author)

  15. Admixture and Gene Flow from Russia in the Recovering Northern European Brown Bear (Ursus arctos)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kopatz, Alexander; Eiken, Hans Geir; Aspi, Jouni; Kojola, Ilpo; Tobiassen, Camilla; Tirronen, Konstantin F.; Danilov, Pjotr I.; Hagen, Snorre B.

    2014-01-01

    Large carnivores were persecuted to near extinction during the last centuries, but have now recovered in some countries. It has been proposed earlier that the recovery of the Northern European brown bear is supported by migration from Russia. We tested this hypothesis by obtaining for the first time continuous sampling of the whole Finnish bear population, which is located centrally between the Russian and Scandinavian bear populations. The Finnish population is assumed to experience high gene flow from Russian Karelia. If so, no or a low degree of genetic differentiation between Finnish and Russian bears could be expected. We have genotyped bears extensively from all over Finland using 12 validated microsatellite markers and compared their genetic composition to bears from Russian Karelia, Sweden, and Norway. Our fine masked investigation identified two overlapping genetic clusters structured by isolation-by-distance in Finland (pairwise FST = 0.025). One cluster included Russian bears, and migration analyses showed a high number of migrants from Russia into Finland, providing evidence of eastern gene flow as an important driver during recovery. In comparison, both clusters excluded bears from Sweden and Norway, and we found no migrants from Finland in either country, indicating that eastern gene flow was probably not important for the population recovery in Scandinavia. Our analyses on different spatial scales suggest a continuous bear population in Finland and Russian Karelia, separated from Scandinavia. PMID:24839968

  16. Admixture and gene flow from Russia in the recovering Northern European brown bear (Ursus arctos).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kopatz, Alexander; Eiken, Hans Geir; Aspi, Jouni; Kojola, Ilpo; Tobiassen, Camilla; Tirronen, Konstantin F; Danilov, Pjotr I; Hagen, Snorre B

    2014-01-01

    Large carnivores were persecuted to near extinction during the last centuries, but have now recovered in some countries. It has been proposed earlier that the recovery of the Northern European brown bear is supported by migration from Russia. We tested this hypothesis by obtaining for the first time continuous sampling of the whole Finnish bear population, which is located centrally between the Russian and Scandinavian bear populations. The Finnish population is assumed to experience high gene flow from Russian Karelia. If so, no or a low degree of genetic differentiation between Finnish and Russian bears could be expected. We have genotyped bears extensively from all over Finland using 12 validated microsatellite markers and compared their genetic composition to bears from Russian Karelia, Sweden, and Norway. Our fine masked investigation identified two overlapping genetic clusters structured by isolation-by-distance in Finland (pairwise FST = 0.025). One cluster included Russian bears, and migration analyses showed a high number of migrants from Russia into Finland, providing evidence of eastern gene flow as an important driver during recovery. In comparison, both clusters excluded bears from Sweden and Norway, and we found no migrants from Finland in either country, indicating that eastern gene flow was probably not important for the population recovery in Scandinavia. Our analyses on different spatial scales suggest a continuous bear population in Finland and Russian Karelia, separated from Scandinavia.

  17. Progress report: brown bear studies - 1984

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — Forty-four brown bears (22 adult female, 22 offspring) were captured in the Ayakulik River, Sturgeon River, and Frazer Lake drainages of Kodiak Island in July, 1983....

  18. Live-trapping and handling brown bear

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — In recent years bears have become increasingly important as big game animals. The brown bears (Ursus middendorfi) on the Kodiak National Wildlife Refuge, Kodiak...

  19. Brown bear telemetry and trapping: Special report

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — Brown bear studies were continued during the 1967 field season with emphasis on development of techniques for instrumenting bears with radio transmitters and...

  20. Seasonality of brown recluse populations is reflected by numbers of brown recluse envenomations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rader, R K; Stoecker, W V; Malters, J M; Marr, M T; Dyer, J A

    2012-07-01

    A significant seasonal correlation was recently shown for brown recluse spider activity. Vetter (2011) observed brown recluse spiders were submitted by the general public predominantly during April-October. For patients with suspected brown recluse spider bites (BRSB), we have observed the same seasonality. Among 45 cases with features consistent of a BRSB, 43 (95.6%) occurred during April-October. Both the Vetter study and our study serve to demonstrate seasonal activity for brown recluse spiders. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  1. Lightning on exoplanets and brown dwarfs

    OpenAIRE

    Hodosán, Gabriella

    2017-01-01

    Lightning is an important electrical phenomenon, known to exist in several Solar System planets. Amongst others, it carries information on convection and cloud formation, and may be important for pre-biotic chemistry. Exoplanets and brown dwarfs have been shown to host environments appropriate for the initiation of lightning discharges. In this PhD project, I aim to determine if lightning on exoplanets and brown dwarfs can be more energetic than it is known from Solar System planets, what are...

  2. Brown recluse spider bites: a case report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nunnelee, Janice D

    2006-02-01

    The brown recluse spider is found more commonly in the Southeast and the Central Midwest. Its bite is not common because it is a shy spider that only bites if cornered. A severe bite may necrose a large area that requires skin grafting; systemic reactions rarely occur. This article discusses the brown recluse spider and presents a case study of a patient with two spider bites that did require extensive grafting.

  3. Ecological pellets from brown coal and biomass

    OpenAIRE

    Pavel Sedláček; Nikolas Mucha; Iva Pečtová; Peter Fečko

    2007-01-01

    One way of renewable energy sources applications in the Czech republic is a cultivation of biomass plants. After the biomass reformation, it is possible to add it to palletizing mixes with coal and delulfurisative additives. Possibilities of brown coal of palletizing with biomass adds were tested recently. The product represents a new coal-biomass combustible wich can be used in some types of boilers with a low pollutant production level (specially SO2).In the past brown-coal pellets weremade...

  4. Genomic determinants of triglyceride and cholesterol distribution into lipoprotein fractions in the rat.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Miloslava Hodúlová

    Full Text Available The plasma profile of major lipoprotein classes and its subdivision into particular fractions plays a crucial role in the pathogenesis of atherosclerosis and is a major predictor of coronary artery disease. Our aim was to identify genomic determinants of triglyceride and cholesterol distribution into lipoprotein fractions and lipoprotein particle sizes in the recombinant inbred rat set PXO, in which alleles of two rat models of the metabolic syndrome (SHR and PD inbred strains segregate together with those from Brown Norway rat strain. Adult male rats of 15 PXO strains (n = 8-13/strain and two progenitor strains SHR-Lx (n = 13 and BXH2/Cub (n = 18 were subjected to one-week of high-sucrose diet feeding. We performed association analyses of triglyceride (TG and cholesterol (C concentrations in 20 lipoprotein fractions and the size of major classes of lipoprotein particles utilizing 704 polymorphic microsatellite markers, the genome-wide significance was validated by 2,000 permutations per trait. Subsequent in silico focusing of the identified quantitative trait loci was completed using a map of over 20,000 single nucleotide polymorphisms. In most of the phenotypes we identified substantial gradient among the strains (e.g. VLDL-TG from 5.6 to 66.7 mg/dl. We have identified 14 loci (encompassing 1 to 65 genes on rat chromosomes 3, 4, 7, 8, 11 and 12 showing suggestive or significant association to one or more of the studied traits. PXO strains carrying the SHR allele displayed significantly higher values of the linked traits except for LDL-TG and adiposity index. Cholesterol concentrations in large, medium and very small LDL particles were significantly associated to a haplotype block spanning part of a single gene, low density lipoprotein receptor-related protein 1B (Lrp1b. Using genome-wide association we have identified new genetic determinants of triglyceride and cholesterol distribution into lipoprotein fractions in the recombinant

  5. Lower limb amputations in Trondheim, Norway

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    Background and purpose In the city of Trondheim, Norway, diabetic lower-limb amputations accounted for one-third of all lower-limb amputations (LLAs). In an attempt to reduce this rate, a diabetic foot team was established in 1996. We present the incidence of LLA in Trondheim as measured 10 years later. Patients and methods In 2004–07, we registered all LLAs performed in Trondheim and then compared the data with previously published data from 1994–1997. From 1996 through 2006, we registered the activity of the diabetic foot team and we also registered the number of vascular procedures performed on citizens of Trondheim from 1998 through 2006. Results Comparing the two 3-year periods 1994–97 and 2004–07, we observed a decrease in all non-traumatic LLAs. The incidence of diabetic major LLAs per 103 diabetics per year decreased from 4.0 to 2.4, and in patients with peripheral vascular disease we observed a decrease in LLAs from 18 to 12 per 105 inhabitants per year. 5,915 consultations on diabetic subjects were conducted by the diabetic foot team during the period 1996–2006. From 1998 to 2006, the rate of vascular procedures decreased in the non-diabetic population, and was unchanged in diabetic subjects. Interpretation In the population of Trondheim city there appears to have been a reduction in the rate of vascular obstructive lower-limb disease between the two 3-year periods 1994–97 and 2004–07. In our judgment, the decline in diabetic LLA also reflects better care of the diabetic foot. PMID:20860446

  6. Effects of aerosol-vapor JP-8 jet fuel on the functional observational battery, and learning and memory in the rat.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baldwin, C M; Houston, F P; Podgornik, M N; Young, R S; Barnes, C A; Witten, M L

    2001-01-01

    To determine whether JP-8 jet fuel affects parameters of the Functional Observational Battery (FOB), visual discrimination, or spatial learning and memory, the authors exposed groups of male Fischer Brown Norway hybrid rats for 28 d to aerosol/vapor-delivered JP-8, or to JP-8 followed by 15 min of aerosolized substance P analogue, or to sham-confined fresh room air. Behavioral testing was accomplished with the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency's Functional Observational Battery. The authors used the Morris swim task to test visual and spatial learning and memory testing. The spatial test included examination of memory for the original target location following 15 d of JP-8 exposure, as well as a 3-d new target location learning paradigm implemented the day that followed the final day of exposure. Only JP-8 exposed animals had significant weight loss by the 2nd week of exposure compared with JP-8 with substance P and control rats; this finding compares with those of prior studies of JP-8 jet fuel. Rats exposed to JP-8 with or without substance P exhibited significantly greater rearing and less grooming behavior over time than did controls during Functional Observational Battery open-field testing. Exposed rats also swam significantly faster than controls during the new target location training and testing, thus supporting the increased activity noted during Functional Observational Battery testing. There were no significant differences between the exposed and control groups' performances during acquisition, retention, or learning of the new platform location in either the visual discrimination or spatial version of the Morris swim task. The data suggest that although visual discrimination and spatial learning and memory were not disrupted by JP-8 exposure, arousal indices and activity measures were distinctly different in these animals.

  7. Effect of saponin on the transmucosal passage of beta-lactoglobulin across the proximal small intestine of normal and beta-lactoglobulin-sensitised rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gee, J M; Wal, J M; Miller, K; Atkinson, H; Grigoriadou, F; Wijnands, M V; Penninks, A H; Wortley, G; Johnson, I T

    1997-02-28

    The ability of saponins and glycoalkaloids to permeabilise the mammalian intestinal barrier has been previously demonstrated in vitro, leading to the hypothesis that membranolytic saponins may facilitate transfer to the tissues of otherwise excluded macromolecules. An enhanced uptake of, for instance, potentially allergenic species from the lumen is one of the factors that may affect the induction of food allergy, and its presentation in already sensitised individuals. In the experiments described here, an increase in the transmucosal uptake of the milk allergen beta-lactoglobulin (beta LG) was assessed in non-sensitised and sensitised Brown Norway rats in the presence of Gypsophila saponin. Isolated jejunal loops were exposed in vivo to either beta LG followed by saponin, saponin followed by beta LG or the two compounds simultaneously. Portal vein blood samples were collected and assayed for beta LG and rat mucosal mast cell protease (RCMP II) activity. Mucosal tissue was also examined histologically and assayed for histamine content. Sham-operated animals, exposed to physiological buffer alone, were included as controls and beta LG measurements corrected for this component which was negligible. No transfer of beta LG occurred in the absence of saponin in non-sensitised rats, whereas a significant enhancement was observed in the presence of saponin. beta LG was detected in the portal circulation of sensitised rats exposed to beta LG alone; however addition of saponin to the intestinal lumen further enhanced this uptake, possibly by an independent mechanism. Histological examination of the mucosal epithelium exposed to saponin revealed damage, especially at the villus tips. Mucosal histamine and serum RCMP II concentrations were consistent with the differences observed between sensitised and non-sensitised animals. It is concluded that exposure to food constituents capable of permeabilising the mucosal epithelium may increase the risk of sensitisation to dietary

  8. [Effects of Chinese herbs for replenishing shen and strengthening qi on some indexes of neuro-endocrino-immune network in asthmatic rats].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Fu-dong; Dong, Jing-cheng; Xie, Jin-yu

    2007-08-01

    To study changes of several related indexes of neuro-endocrino-immune (NEI) network in rat asthma model, and to observe effects of epimedium herb (EH, a Chinese herb for replenishing Shen) and milkvetch root (MR, a Chinese herb for strengthening qi) on these indexes. One hundred and twenty male healthy Brown Norway rats of clean grade were randomly divided into 11 groups. Their mRNA expression of corticoid release hormone (CRH) in hypothalamus was tested by Realtime-PCR, serum ACTH and CORT, IL-6, IL-4, IFN-gamma were detected with radioimmunoassay and enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay respectively and pathological changes of lung tissue were observed with hematoxylin and eosin stain. As compared with the normal group, mRNA expression of CRH in hypothalamic tissue, plasma ACTH and serum concentration of IFN-gamma not changed significantly, but serum level of CORT raised significantly and the pre-inflammatory factors IL-6 and IL-4 showed an increasing trend in the model rats. As compared with the model group, level of CRH mRNA expression in groups treated with low dose and moderate dose of both EH and the formula (HE and MR), IFN-gamma in group treated with moderate dose of EH and serum CORT in group treated with low dose of MR were higher, and serum levels of IL-4 and IL-6 in groups treated with high dose of MR were lower. Rats suffered from repeated asthmatic attack for three weeks had some disorders in indexes of NEI network. Chinese herbs for replenish Shen and strengthening qi could improve the function of hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal axis and adjust the balance of Th1 and Th2 cytokines, which might be one of the mechanisms of Chinese herbs for treatment of repeated asthma attack.

  9. Isolation of a Genomic Region Affecting Most Components of Metabolic Syndrome in a Chromosome-16 Congenic Rat Model.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lucie Šedová

    Full Text Available Metabolic syndrome is a highly prevalent human disease with substantial genomic and environmental components. Previous studies indicate the presence of significant genetic determinants of several features of metabolic syndrome on rat chromosome 16 (RNO16 and the syntenic regions of human genome. We derived the SHR.BN16 congenic strain by introgression of a limited RNO16 region from the Brown Norway congenic strain (BN-Lx into the genomic background of the spontaneously hypertensive rat (SHR strain. We compared the morphometric, metabolic, and hemodynamic profiles of adult male SHR and SHR.BN16 rats. We also compared in silico the DNA sequences for the differential segment in the BN-Lx and SHR parental strains. SHR.BN16 congenic rats had significantly lower weight, decreased concentrations of total triglycerides and cholesterol, and improved glucose tolerance compared with SHR rats. The concentrations of insulin, free fatty acids, and adiponectin were comparable between the two strains. SHR.BN16 rats had significantly lower systolic (18-28 mmHg difference and diastolic (10-15 mmHg difference blood pressure throughout the experiment (repeated-measures ANOVA, P < 0.001. The differential segment spans approximately 22 Mb of the telomeric part of the short arm of RNO16. The in silico analyses revealed over 1200 DNA variants between the BN-Lx and SHR genomes in the SHR.BN16 differential segment, 44 of which lead to missense mutations, and only eight of which (in Asb14, Il17rd, Itih1, Syt15, Ercc6, RGD1564958, Tmem161a, and Gatad2a genes are predicted to be damaging to the protein product. Furthermore, a number of genes within the RNO16 differential segment associated with metabolic syndrome components in human studies showed polymorphisms between SHR and BN-Lx (including Lpl, Nrg3, Pbx4, Cilp2, and Stab1. Our novel congenic rat model demonstrates that a limited genomic region on RNO16 in the SHR significantly affects many of the features of metabolic

  10. Immunosuppression with 4SC-101, a novel inhibitor of dihydroorotate dehydrogenase, in a rat model of renal transplantation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rusai, Krisztina; Schmaderer, Christoph; Baumann, Marcus; Chmielewski, Stefan; Prókai, Agnes; Kis, Eva; Szabó, Attila J; Leban, Johann; Doblhofer, Robert; Ammendola, Aldo; Lutz, Jens; Heemann, Uwe

    2012-06-15

    4SC-101 is a novel dihydroorotate dehydrogenase inhibitor and a blocker of interleukin (IL)-17 secretion with beneficial effects in experimental lupus and inflammatory bowel disease. Its immunomodulatory effect on acute kidney rejection is not known; therefore, in this study, the impact of 4SC-101 was examined in a rat model of acute kidney rejection. The kidneys of Brown-Norway rats were orthotopically transplanted into bilaterally nephrectomized Lewis recipients. Allograft recipients were administered with 4SC-101 at dosages of 4, 20, or 60 mg/kg per day, and survival was assessed. In the second setting, the animals were harvested 3 or 5 days after transplantation (Tx), and graft histologic diagnosis was determined. The effects of 4SC-101 on impaired renal function were examined in a model of 5/6 nephrectomy in Lewis rats. The recipients treated with 20-mg/kg 4SC-101 showed prolonged survival compared with placebo-treated animals (mean±SEM, 24±9.3 vs. 5.4±3 days), paralleled by less severe histologic features of acute kidney rejection such as interstitial/perivascular infiltration and tubulitis 3 and 5 days after Tx, and a lower level of IL-17 messenger RNA 5 days after Tx compared with the placebo-treated animals. In the 5/6 nephrectomy model, 20-mg/kg 4SC-101 reduced proteinuria, glomerulosclerosis, and fibrosis with decreased IL-17 messenger RNA expression. 4SC-101 prolongs survival after Tx, paralleled by amelioration of histologic signs of acute rejection. Furthermore, it showed no worsening effects on kidney function in a remnant kidney model and even slowed the progression of proteinuria and kidney fibrosis. Therefore, 4SC-101 might be a promising pharmaceutical agent in Tx medicine for further investigations.

  11. European brown hare syndrome virus in free-ranging European brown hares from Argentina

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Frolich, K.; Kujawski, G.E.J.G.; Rudolph, M.

    2003-01-01

    From 1998 to 2000, serum samples of 80 shot European brown hares (Lepus europaeus) from Argentina were examined for antibodies against European brown hare syndrome virus (EBHSV) and 80 spleen samples were tested for EBHSV-antigen by enzyme linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA). Nine hares were...

  12. Population dynamics of Strongylocentrotus droebachiensis in kelpforests and barren grounds in Norway

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Fagerli, Camilla W.; Gran Stadniczeñko, Sandra; Pedersen, Morten Foldager

    2015-01-01

    A northward trend of declining abundance of sea urchins (Strongylocentrotus droebachiensis) and increasing kelp recovery along the coast of Norway has provided an opportunity to explore whether the decline of sea urchins can be explained by systematic variations in demographic or fitness......-related traits. The population density of sea urchins in mid-Norway (65°70′N) close to the boundary between barren grounds and recently recovered kelp forests was only 26 % of that on barren grounds in northern Norway (70°70′N). Populations were dominated by young (2–4 years) individuals and age-specific numbers...... in mid-Norway were 50 % higher than in northern Norway. We suggest that increasing predation pressure on sea urchins partly explains the higher mortality in mid-Norway. Recent studies have shown that recruitment of sea urchins is significantly lower in mid-Norway than in northern Norway. The lower mean...

  13. R&D statistics 2015 for the higher education sector in Norway

    OpenAIRE

    Wendt, Kaja

    2017-01-01

    Newsletter presenting main results from the R&D statistics of the higher education sector in Norway. Newsletter presenting main results from the R&D statistics of the higher education sector in Norway.

  14. NORPERM, the Norwegian Permafrost Database - a TSP NORWAY IPY legacy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Juliussen, H.; Christiansen, H. H.; Strand, G. S.; Iversen, S.; Midttømme, K.; Rønning, J. S.

    2010-10-01

    NORPERM, the Norwegian Permafrost Database, was developed at the Geological Survey of Norway during the International Polar Year (IPY) 2007-2009 as the main data legacy of the IPY research project Permafrost Observatory Project: A Contribution to the Thermal State of Permafrost in Norway and Svalbard (TSP NORWAY). Its structural and technical design is described in this paper along with the ground temperature data infrastructure in Norway and Svalbard, focussing on the TSP NORWAY permafrost observatory installations in the North Scandinavian Permafrost Observatory and Nordenskiöld Land Permafrost Observatory, being the primary data providers of NORPERM. Further developments of the database, possibly towards a regional database for the Nordic area, are also discussed. The purpose of NORPERM is to store ground temperature data safely and in a standard format for use in future research. The IPY data policy of open, free, full and timely release of IPY data is followed, and the borehole metadata description follows the Global Terrestrial Network for Permafrost (GTN-P) standard. NORPERM is purely a temperature database, and the data is stored in a relation database management system and made publically available online through a map-based graphical user interface. The datasets include temperature time series from various depths in boreholes and from the air, snow cover, ground-surface or upper ground layer recorded by miniature temperature data-loggers, and temperature profiles with depth in boreholes obtained by occasional manual logging. All the temperature data from the TSP NORWAY research project is included in the database, totalling 32 temperature time series from boreholes, 98 time series of micrometeorological temperature conditions, and 6 temperature depth profiles obtained by manual logging in boreholes. The database content will gradually increase as data from previous and future projects are added. Links to near real-time permafrost temperatures, obtained

  15. Monitoring of Agricultural Landscape in Norway

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wallin, H. G.; Engan, G.

    2012-07-01

    An overall societal aim is to ensure a sustainable use and management of agricultural landscapes. This requires continuous delivery of reliable and up-to-date information to decision-makers. To be able to deliver this information, a monitoring program for agricultural landscapes was initiated in Norway 13 years ago. The program documents and reports on land use / land cover changes from data captured through interpretation of true colour aerial photos using stereo instruments. The monitoring programme is based on a sample of 1000 squares of 1 × 1 km and the entire sample of squares is photographed over a five-year period. Each square is then mapped repeatedly every fifth year to record changes. Aerial photo interpretation is based on a custom classification system which is built up hierarchically, with three levels. The first level comprises seven land type classes: Agricultural land, Bare ground, Semi-natural open vegetation, Unforested wetland vegetation, Forest, Urban areas and Water. These land classes are further divided into 24 land types at level two, and approximately 100 land types at level 3. In addition to land type units we map both line elements like stone fences and point elements like buildings and solitary threes. By use of indicators that describe status and change focusing on themes of particular policy interest, we can report on whether policy aims are being fulfilled or not. Four indicator themes have been in focus hitherto: landscape spatial structure, biological diversity, cultural heritage and accessibility. Our data is stored in databases and most of the data quality check/structure process and analyses are now being made in open source software like PostGIS and PostSQL. To assess the accuracy of the photo-interpretation, ground truthing is carried out on 10 % of the squares. The results of this operation document the benefits of having access to photos of the same area from two different years. The program is designed first and foremost to

  16. Surveying perceptions of landslide risk management in Norway

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chiu, Jessica Ka Yi; Eidsvig, Unni

    2016-04-01

    Enhanced precipitation due to climate change leads to increase in both frequency and intensity of landslides in Norway. A proactive approach to risk management is therefore required to significantly reduce the losses associated with landslides. Opinions and perceptions from practitioners on the performance of landslide risk management can provide insights on areas for improvement in the landslide risk management strategies in Norway. The Risk Management Index (RMI), proposed by Cardona et al. (2004), is a well-established method to measure perceptions of disaster management of selected actors holistically. The RMI is measured based on opinion questionnaires to technical staff, decision-makers, and stakeholders involved in all stages of risk reduction strategies. It is a composite index that considers a wide variety of strategies to manage risks, including structural and non-structural measures, acceptance strategies, disaster management, and risk transfer. The RMI method was modified to be implemented in landslide hazards and to fit with Norwegian conditions. An opinion survey was conducted in autumn 2015 to measure perceptions of landslide risk management in Norway. Perceptions were surveyed for two time periods: 2015 and 2050, and are based on national, county, and municipality levels. Based on the survey results, performance of landslide risk management at any administrative levels in Norway is perceived to improve from `significant' in 2015 to `significant' to `outstanding' in 2050. Knowledge and technology, climate, risk perceptions, and anthropogenic activities are mostly considered by respondents for their 2050 perceptions. Several aspects of landslide risk management in Norway can be improved. For example, landslide hazard evaluation and mapping should be prioritised in Norway. Upgrading, retrofitting, and reconstruction of assets may also be included in the landslide risk reduction strategies. In addition, there should be more focus on inter

  17. Temperatures rising: brown fat and bone.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Motyl, Katherine J; Rosen, Clifford J

    2011-03-01

    Caloric restriction is associated with a reduction in body weight and temperature, as well as a reduction in trabecular bone volume and paradoxically an increase in adipocytes within the bone marrow. The nature of these adipocytes is uncertain, although there is emerging evidence of a direct relationship between bone remodeling and brown adipocytes. For example, in heterotrophic ossification, brown adipocytes set up a hypoxic gradient that leads to vascular invasion, chondrocyte differentiation, and subsequent bone formation. Additionally, deletion of retinoblastoma protein in an osteosarcoma model leads to increased hibernoma (brown fat tumor). Brown adipose tissue (BAT) becomes senescent with age at a time when thermoregulation is altered, bone loss becomes apparent, and sympathetic activity increases. Interestingly, heart rate is an unexpected but good predictor of fracture risk in elderly individuals, pointing to a key role for the sympathetic nervous system in senile osteoporosis. Hence the possibility exists that BAT could play an indirect role in age-related bone loss. However, evidence of an indirect effect from thermogenic dysfunction on bone loss is currently limited. Here, we present current evidence for a relationship between brown adipose tissue and bone as well as provide novel insights into the effects of thermoregulation on bone mineral density.

  18. The colored Hanbury Brown-Twiss effect

    Science.gov (United States)

    Silva, B.; Sánchez Muñoz, C.; Ballarini, D.; González-Tudela, A.; de Giorgi, M.; Gigli, G.; West, K.; Pfeiffer, L.; Del Valle, E.; Sanvitto, D.; Laussy, F. P.

    2016-12-01

    The Hanbury Brown-Twiss effect is one of the celebrated phenomenologies of modern physics that accommodates equally well classical (interferences of waves) and quantum (correlations between indistinguishable particles) interpretations. The effect was discovered in the late thirties with a basic observation of Hanbury Brown that radio-pulses from two distinct antennas generate signals on the oscilloscope that wiggle similarly to the naked eye. When Hanbury Brown and his mathematician colleague Twiss took the obvious step to propose bringing the effect in the optical range, they met with considerable opposition as single-photon interferences were deemed impossible. The Hanbury Brown-Twiss effect is nowadays universally accepted and, being so fundamental, embodies many subtleties of our understanding of the wave/particle dual nature of light. Thanks to a novel experimental technique, we report here a generalized version of the Hanbury Brown-Twiss effect to include the frequency of the detected light, or, from the particle point of view, the energy of the detected photons. Our source of light is a polariton condensate, that allows high-resolution filtering of a spectrally broad source with a high degree of coherence. In addition to the known tendencies of indistinguishable photons to arrive together on the detector, we find that photons of different colors present the opposite characteristic of avoiding each others. We postulate that fermions can be similarly brought to exhibit positive (boson-like) correlations by frequency filtering.

  19. Radial Velocity Variability of Field Brown Dwarfs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prato, L.; Mace, G. N.; Rice, E. L.; McLean, I. S.; Kirkpatrick, J. Davy; Burgasser, A. J.; Kim, Sungsoo S.

    2015-07-01

    We present paper six of the NIRSPEC Brown Dwarf Spectroscopic Survey, an analysis of multi-epoch, high-resolution (R ˜ 20,000) spectra of 25 field dwarf systems (3 late-type M dwarfs, 16 L dwarfs, and 6 T dwarfs) taken with the NIRSPEC infrared spectrograph at the W. M. Keck Observatory. With a radial velocity (RV) precision of ˜2 km s-1, we are sensitive to brown dwarf companions in orbits with periods of a few years or less given a mass ratio of 0.5 or greater. We do not detect any spectroscopic binary brown dwarfs in the sample. Given our target properties, and the frequency and cadence of observations, we use a Monte Carlo simulation to determine the detection probability of our sample. Even with a null detection result, our 1σ upper limit for very low mass binary frequency is 18%. Our targets included seven known, wide brown dwarf binary systems. No significant RV variability was measured in our multi-epoch observations of these systems, even for those pairs for which our data spanned a significant fraction of the orbital period. Specialized techniques are required to reach the high precisions sensitive to motion in orbits of very low-mass systems. For eight objects, including six T dwarfs, we present the first published high-resolution spectra, many with high signal to noise, that will provide valuable comparison data for models of brown dwarf atmospheres.

  20. Polar Bears, Hot Coffee, Wireless Schools, and Much More: Teaching American Studies in Norway

    Science.gov (United States)

    Potter, Lee Ann

    2010-01-01

    In this article, the author shares her experience and her observations as a Roving Scholar of American Studies in Norway through the Norway Fulbright Foundation grant. The author visited upper secondary schools all over Norway, teaching lessons to both students and teachers on topics related to U.S. history, government, culture, and geography. She…

  1. The Impact of Divorce on Suicide in Norway, 1951-1980.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stack, Steven

    1989-01-01

    Examined divorce and suicide data in Norway. Found that, in spite of Norway's institutional and cultural protection against suicide, a 1 percent increase in divorce was associated with 0.46 percent increase in suicide. Found no links between unemployment and suicide in Norway. Effects of divorce on suicide were independent of religiosity, and the…

  2. Genetic basis of inter- and intrastrain differences in diazepam p-hydroxylation in rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sakai, Noriaki; Saito, Konomu; Sakamoto, Kentaro Q; Ishizuka, Mayumi; Fujita, Shoichi

    2009-02-01

    Diazepam (7-chloro-1,3-dihydro-1-methyl-5-phenyl-2H-1,4-benzodiazepin-2-one) is widely used as a sedative, hypnotic, and anti-anxiety drug. At low diazepam concentrations, p-hydroxylation is the major metabolic pathway in rat liver microsomes. However, there are marked ( approximately 300-fold) inter- and intrastrain differences in the activity among Sprague-Dawley, Brown Norway, Dark Agouti, and Wistar rats. In our previous study, we determined that a deficiency of CYP2D3 protein, not CYP2D2, was responsible for the inter- and intrastrain differences in diazepam p-hydroxylation (Drug Metab Dispos 33:1657-1660, 2005). Quantitative real-time polymerase chain reaction (PCR) did not provide enough evidence to explain the inter- and intrastrain differences in the expression of CYP2D3 protein. Nucleotide sequence analysis revealed the insertion of a thymine in exon 8 of the CYP2D3 gene in the poor diazepam metabolizers. This single nucleotide mutation caused a shift in the reading frame and introduced a premature termination signal. It is noteworthy that the heme binding region, which is essential to maintain proper heme binding and active cytochrome P450 enzymes, was consequently deleted by the premature termination signal. In contrast, no mutation was detected in the CYP2D3 gene of extensive metabolizers. Thus, the truncated CYP2D3 must be a nonfunctional enzyme in poor metabolizers. In addition, we developed a convenient and specific genotyping assay using PCR-restriction, fragment-length polymorphism to distinguish homozygotes from heterozygotes. The genotyping gave results fully consistent with those of the inter- and intrastrain differences in diazepam p-hydroxylation.

  3. Whither do the microlensing Brown Dwarfs rove?

    CERN Document Server

    De Rújula, Alvaro; Mollerach, S; Roulet, Esteban; de Rujula, A; Giudice, G; Mollerach, S; Roulet, E

    1995-01-01

    The EROS and MACHO collaborations have reported observations of light curves of stars in the Large Magellanic Cloud that are compatible with gravitational microlensing by intervening massive objects, presumably Brown-Dwarf stars. The OGLE and MACHO teams have also seen similar events in the direction of the galactic Bulge. Current data are insufficient to decide whether the Brown-Dwarfs are dark-matter constituents of the non-luminous galactic Halo, or belong to a more conventional population, such as that of faint stars in the galactic Spheroid, in its Thin or Thick Disks, or in their possible LMC counterparts. We discuss in detail how further observations of microlensing rates and of the moments of the distribution of event durations, can help resolve the issue of the Brown-Dwarf location, and eventually provide information on the mass function of the dark objects.

  4. Epidemiology of the brown recluse spider bite.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rhoads, Jacqueline

    2007-02-01

    The purpose of this article was to provide a comprehensive epidemiological and clinical description of the brown recluse spider bite. Review of evidenced-based scientific literature and practice guidelines. A specific descriptive case study is interwoven through the article to tie in the clinical presenting figure associated with this bite. The brown recluse lives in a circumscribed area of the United States (the south central Midwest) with a few less common recluse species living in the more sparsely populated southwest United States. In these areas, where spider populations may be dense, recluse spiders may be a cause of significant morbidity. Most spider bites are asymptomatic but what makes this bite so devastating is the toxin injected by the brown recluse spider, which can cause considerable systemic symptoms as well as necrotic skin ulcers (necrotic arachnidism). The article presents process for diagnosis and stresses the importance of identifying the spider if at all possible.

  5. Novel nuances of human brown fat

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Scheele, Camilla; Larsen, Therese Juhlin; Nielsen, Søren

    2014-01-01

    There is a current debate in the literature on whether human fat derived from the supraclavicular region should be classified as brown, or as the white fat-derived less potent, brite/beige. This commentary addresses whether the existing classification defined in mice is sufficient to describe...... the types of thermogenic adipocytes in humans. We recently published a contradictory mRNA expression signature of human supraclavicular fat defined by an upregulation of the brite marker TBX1 along with the classical brown markers ZIC1 and LHX8, as well as genes indicating brown fat activity including UCP1......, PGC-1α, and PRDM16; and, finally, a downregulation of the white/brite markers HOXC8 and HOXC9. Subcutaneous fat was used as reference material. Another recent study presents a higher expression of ZIC1 and a lower expression of TBX1 in interscapular compared with supraclavicular fat. Here, however...

  6. Library Automation in Norway--Some Main Projects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Solvberg, Ingeborg

    1983-01-01

    Description of how aspects of library automation are dealt with in Norway highlights main centers for library automation (Norsk Senter for Informatik, two universities); Bibsys--integrated library automation system (bibliographic subsystem, circulation subsystem); and Bibnett project (project studying system-to-system communication between…

  7. Carbon sources in vertical profile of Norway spruce stand

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Pavelka, Marian; Janouš, Dalibor; Urban, Otmar; Acosta, Manuel; Pokorný, Radek; Havránková, Kateřina; Formanek, P.

    2003-01-01

    Roč. 2, č. 30 (2003), s. 199-206 ISSN 1336-5266 R&D Projects: GA MŠk(CZ) LN00A141; GA ČR(CZ) GA526/03/1021 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z6087904 Keywords : Carbon stock * respiration * Norway spruce Subject RIV: EH - Ecology, Behaviour

  8. Life satisfaction and competence of Bosnian refugees in Norway

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    VanSelm, K; Sam, DL; Van Oudenhoven, JP

    In this study the relative influence of age, gender, locus of control, preferred acculturation strategy, perceived majority members' attitude, and social support on life satisfaction and competence of Bosnian refugees was examined. Hundred and six Bosnians living temporarily in Norway completed a

  9. The Bookshelf: Digitisation and Access to Copyright Items in Norway

    Science.gov (United States)

    Skarstein, Vigdis Moe

    2010-01-01

    Purpose: The purpose of this paper is to provide an overview of the challenges faced in digitising copyright-protected books and other materials within the National Library of Norway. Design/methodology/approach: Following a description of Bokhylla, or The Bookshelf, the paper outlines the strategies adopted within the National Library of Norway…

  10. An Attempt to Simulate Historic Front Variations of Nigardsbreen, Norway

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Oerlemans, J.

    1986-01-01

    Nigardsbreen (Norway) is one of the very few highlatitude glaciers from which a long record of front positions is known (starting in the beginning of the 18th century). In this paper a dynamic glacier model is used to investigate the possible causes of the observed front variations. These

  11. Accelerating warming and degradation of permafrost in northern Norway

    Science.gov (United States)

    Etzelmuller, Bernd; Isaksen, Ketil; Westermann, Sebastian; Hauck, Christian; Hilbich, Christin

    2017-04-01

    Permafrost is sensitive to climate change, modulating geomorphological process rates and ultimately landscape development. In Norway, since the 1980ies many studies have been carried out to evaluate the permafrost distribution, its changing state and its relation especially to climate and snow conditions. This knowledge has flown into numerical models, calculating ground temperatures in space and time. At present Norway has an unique data set obtained from bore holes where we measure temperatures along both altitudinal and latitudinal gradients. In addition at all sites geophysical surveys are available using refraction seismic and electrical resistivity tomography, partly multi-temporal. Finally, daily gridded data sets of meteorological parameters such as air temperature, precipitation and associated snow cover are available back to 1957, allowing the evaluation of climate-ground thermal regime relations along regional gradients. This presentation summarises a c. 10 year record of ground thermal measurements and geophysical surveys from three main sites in northern Norway, along with new evaluations of changes in palsa distribution and size. For the first time we demonstrate the development of talliks in mountain permafrost in northern Norway, and relate and discuss the development of these talliks to changing atmospheric and snow conditions. The observations are also related to long-term change detection observations of palsa mires in the vicinity of the bore holes, highlighting accelerating thaw and degradation of permafrost during the last two decades.

  12. Reproduction of the shorthorn sculpin Myoxocephalus scorpius in northern Norway

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Luksenburg, JA; Pedersen, T; Falk-Petersen, IB

    The reproduction and life history events of the shorthorn sculpin Myoxocephalus scorpius were studied in an unexploited high latitude population in Tromso, northern Norway. Shorthorn sculpins were sampled from November 1998 to March 1999 to determine sex ratio, spawning period, oogenesis, fecundity,

  13. Topographical mineralogy of the Bamble sector, south Norway

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Nijland, T.G.; Zwaan, J.C.; Touret, L.

    1998-01-01

    The Bamble sector of southern Norway is a classic high grade metamorphic gneiss region, which provided specimens to many mineralogical collections all over the world. The topographical mineralogy of this area is described and reviewed. All minerals known to occur in the area are listed according to

  14. Mountain Norway spruce forests: Needle supply and its nutrient content

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Kovářová, Marcela; Vacek, S.

    2003-01-01

    Roč. 49, - (2003), s. 327-332 ISSN 1212-4834 R&D Projects: GA AV ČR KSK6005114; GA ČR GA206/99/1416 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z6005908 Keywords : Šumava Mts. * Mountain Norway spruce forest * needle mass Subject RIV: EF - Botanics

  15. Aligning Participation with Authorship: Independent Transmedia Documentary Production in Norway

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Karlsen, Joakim

    2016-01-01

    textabstractThe main contribution of this article is to describe how the concept of non-fiction transmedia has challenged the independent documentary film community in Norway. How the new possibilities afforded by web- and mobile media, with the potential of reconfiguring the current relation

  16. Impact of acid precipitation on freshwater ecosystems on Norway

    Science.gov (United States)

    Richard F. Wright; Torstein Dale; Egil T. Gjessing; George R. Hendrey; Arne Henriksen; Merete Johannessen; Ivar P. Muniz

    1976-01-01

    Extensive studies of precipitation chemistry during the last 20 years have clearly shown that highly polluted precipitation falls over large areas of Scandinavia, and that this pollution is increasing in severity and geographical extent. Precipitation in southern Norway, Sweden, and Finland contains large amounts of H+, SO4...

  17. Alternative Sport Programmes and Social Inclusion in Norway

    Science.gov (United States)

    Skille, Eivind Asrum; Waddington, Ivan

    2006-01-01

    This article examines the "alternative" sport and physical activities provided by the Sports City Programme (SCP) in Norway, which are designed to attract more young people (especially inactive young people) to take part in physical activities. In particular, it examines whether these "alternative" sports have been more…

  18. Brown adipogenesis of mouse embryonic stem cells in alginate microstrands

    Science.gov (United States)

    Unser, Andrea Mannarino

    The ability of brown adipocytes (fat cells) to dissipate energy as heat shows great promise for the treatment of obesity and other metabolic disorders. Employing pluripotent stem cells, with an emphasis on directed differentiation, may overcome many issues currently associated with primary fat cell cultures. However, brown adipocytes are difficult to transplant in vivo due to the instability of fat, in terms of necrosis and neovascularization, once injected. Thus, 3D cell culture systems that have the potential to mimic adipogenic microenvironments are needed, not only to advance brown fat implantation, but also to better understand the role of brown adipocytes in treating obesity. To address this need, we created 3D "Brown-Fat-in-Microstrands" by microfluidic synthesis of alginate hydrogel microstrands that encapsulated cells and directly induced cell differentiation into brown adipocytes, using mouse embryonic stem cells (ESCs) as a model of pluripotent stem cells and brown preadipocytes as a positive control. The effect of hydrogel formation parameters on brown adipogenesis was studied, leading to the establishment of "Brown-Fat-in-Microstrands". Brown adipocyte differentiation within microstrands was confirmed by lipid droplet accumulation, immunocytochemistry and qPCR analysis of gene expression of brown adipocyte marker uncoupling protein 1 (UCP1) in addition to adipocyte marker expression. Compared to a 2D approach, 3D differentiated "Brown-Fat-in-Microstrands" exhibited higher level of brown adipocyte marker expression. The functional analysis of "Brown-Fat-in-Microstrands" was attempted by measuring the mitochondrial activity of ESC-differentiated brown adipocytes in 3D using Seahorse XF24 3 Extracellular Flux Analyzer. The ability to create "Brown-Fat-in-Microstrands" from pluripotent stem cells opens up a new arena to understanding brown adipogenesis and its implications in obesity and metabolic disorders.

  19. Hanbury Brown-Twiss interference of anyons.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Campagnano, Gabriele; Zilberberg, Oded; Gornyi, Igor V; Feldman, Dmitri E; Potter, Andrew C; Gefen, Yuval

    2012-09-07

    We present a study of a Hanbury Brown-Twiss interferometer realized with anyons. Such a device can directly probe entanglement and fractional statistics of initially uncorrelated particles. We calculate Hanbury Brown-Twiss cross correlations of Abelian Laughlin anyons. The correlations we calculate exhibit partial bunching similar to bosons, indicating a substantial statistical transmutation from the underlying electronic degrees of freedom. We also find qualitative differences between the anyonic signal and the corresponding bosonic or fermionic signals, indicating that anyons cannot be simply thought of as intermediate between bosons and fermions.

  20. Briquetting of Coke-Brown Coal Mixture

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ïurove Juraj

    1998-09-01

    Full Text Available The paper presents the results of the research of briquetting a coke-brown coal composite The operation consists of the feeding crushed coal and coke to moulds and pressing into briquettes which have been made in the Laboratories at the Mining Faculty of Technical University of Košice (Slovakia. In this research, all demands will be analyzed including the different aspects of the mechanical quality of briquettes, the proportion of fine pulverulent coal and coke in bricks, the requirements for briquetting the coke-brown coal materials.

  1. A historical review of gravimetric observations in Norway

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ragnvald Pettersen, Bjørn

    2016-10-01

    The first gravity determinations in Norway were made by Edward Sabine in 1823 with a pendulum instrument by Henry Kater. Seventy years later a Sterneck pendulum was acquired by the Norwegian Commission for the International Arc Measurements. It improved the precision and eventually reduced the bias of the absolute calibration from 85 to 15 mGal. The last pendulum observations in Norway were made in 1955 with an instrument from Cambridge University. At a precision of ±1 mGal, the purpose was to calibrate a section of the gravity line from Rome, Italy, to Hammerfest, Norway. Relative spring gravimeters were introduced in Norway in 1946 and were used to densify and expand the national gravity network. These data were used to produce regional geoids for Norway and adjacent ocean areas. Improved instrument precision allowed them to connect Norwegian and foreign fundamental stations as well. Extensive geophysical prospecting was made, as in other countries. The introduction of absolute gravimeters based on free-fall methods, especially after 2004, improved the calibration by 3 orders of magnitude and immediately revealed the secular changes of the gravity field in Norway. This was later confirmed by satellite gravimetry, which provides homogeneous data sets for global and regional gravity models. The first-ever determinations of gravity at sea were made by pendulum observations onboard the Norwegian polar vessel Fram during frozen-in conditions in the Arctic Ocean in 1893-1896. Simultaneously, an indirect method was developed at the University of Oslo for deducing gravity at sea with a hypsometer. The precision of both methods was greatly superseded by relative spring gravimeters 50 years later. They were employed extensively both at sea and on land. When GPS allowed precise positioning, relative gravimeters were mounted in airplanes to cover large areas of ocean faster than before. Gravimetry is currently being applied to study geodynamical phenomena relevant to

  2. Forecast of useful energy for the TIMES-Norway model

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rosenberg, Eva

    2012-07-25

    A regional forecast of useful energy demand in seven Norwegian regions is calculated based on an earlier work with a national forecast. This forecast will be input to the energy system model TIMES-Norway and analyses will result in forecasts of energy use of different energy carriers with varying external conditions (not included in this report). The forecast presented here describes the methodology used and the resulting forecast of useful energy. lt is based on information of the long-term development of the economy by the Ministry of Finance, projections of population growths from Statistics Norway and several other studies. The definition of a forecast of useful energy demand is not absolute, but depends on the purpose. One has to be careful not to include parts that are a part of the energy system model, such as energy efficiency measures. In the forecast presented here the influence of new building regulations and the prohibition of production of incandescent light bulbs in EU etc. are included. Other energy efficiency measures such as energy management, heat pumps, tightening of leaks etc. are modelled as technologies to invest in and are included in the TIMES-Norway model. The elasticity between different energy carriers are handled by the TIMES-Norway model and some elasticity is also included as the possibility to invest in energy efficiency measures. The forecast results in an increase of the total useful energy from 2006 to 2050 by 18 o/o. The growth is expected to be highest in the regions South and East. The industry remains at a constant level in the base case and increased or reduced energy demand is analysed as different scenarios with the TIMES-Norway model. The most important driver is the population growth. Together with the assumptions made it results in increased useful energy demand in the household and service sectors of 25 o/o and 57 % respectively.(au)

  3. Ethnic differences in the incidence of cancer in Norway.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hjerkind, Kirsti V; Qureshi, Samera A; Møller, Bjørn; Weiderpass, Elisabete; Deapen, Dennis; Kumar, Bernadette; Ursin, Giske

    2017-04-15

    Traditionally there have been differences in cancer incidence across geographic regions. When immigrants have moved from low-income to high-income countries, their incidence have changed as they have adapted to the lifestyle in the new host country. Given worldwide changes in lifestyle factors over time, we decided to examine cancer incidence in immigrant groups in Norway, a country with a recent immigration history, complete cancer registration and universal public health care. We linked immigration history for the complete population to information on cancer diagnosis from the Cancer Registry of Norway for the period 1990-2012. Age-standardized (world) overall and site-specific cancer incidence were estimated for different immigrant groups and compared to incidence among individuals born in Norway. Among 850,008 immigrants, 9,158 men and 10,334 women developed cancer, and among 5,508,429 Norwegian-born, 263,316 men and 235,020 women developed cancer. While incidence of breast and colorectal cancer were highest among individuals born in Norway and other high-income countries, other cancer types were higher in immigrants from low-income countries. Lung cancer incidence was highest in Eastern European men, and men and women from Eastern Europe had high incidence of stomach cancer. Incidence of liver cancer was substantially higher in immigrants from low-income countries than in individuals born in Norway and other high-income countries. Our results mirror known cancer challenges across the world. Although cancer incidence overall is lower in immigrants from low-income countries, certain cancers, such as lung, liver and stomach cancer, represent major challenges in specific immigrant groups. © 2017 UICC.

  4. Adenosine activates brown adipose tissue and recruits beige adipocytes via A2A receptors

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gnad, Thorsten; Scheibler, Saskia; von Kügelgen, Ivar

    2014-01-01

    therapies based on cold exposure or β-adrenergic agonists are clinically not feasible, alternative strategies must be explored. Purinergic co-transmission might be involved in sympathetic control of BAT and previous studies reported inhibitory effects of the purinergic transmitter adenosine in BAT from...... hamster or rat. However, the role of adenosine in human BAT is unknown. Here we show that adenosine activates human and murine brown adipocytes at low nanomolar concentrations. Adenosine is released in BAT during stimulation of sympathetic nerves as well as from brown adipocytes. The adenosine A2A...... receptor is the most abundant adenosine receptor in human and murine BAT. Pharmacological blockade or genetic loss of A2A receptors in mice causes a decrease in BAT-dependent thermogenesis, whereas treatment with A2A agonists significantly increases energy expenditure. Moreover, pharmacological stimulation...

  5. Kodiak brown bear population on Kodiak Island, Alaska

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — Methods and estimates of the Brown bear population on Kodiak Island. The total number of Kodiak Brown Bears on Kodiak Island has been estimated to be 1669. Three...

  6. Trustworthy-looking face meets brown eyes.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Karel Kleisner

    Full Text Available We tested whether eye color influences perception of trustworthiness. Facial photographs of 40 female and 40 male students were rated for perceived trustworthiness. Eye color had a significant effect, the brown-eyed faces being perceived as more trustworthy than the blue-eyed ones. Geometric morphometrics, however, revealed significant correlations between eye color and face shape. Thus, face shape likewise had a significant effect on perceived trustworthiness but only for male faces, the effect for female faces not being significant. To determine whether perception of trustworthiness was being influenced primarily by eye color or by face shape, we recolored the eyes on the same male facial photos and repeated the test procedure. Eye color now had no effect on perceived trustworthiness. We concluded that although the brown-eyed faces were perceived as more trustworthy than the blue-eyed ones, it was not brown eye color per se that caused the stronger perception of trustworthiness but rather the facial features associated with brown eyes.

  7. Natural history of presumed congenital Brown syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaban, T J; Smith, K; Orton, R B; Noel, L P; Clarke, W; Cadera, W

    1993-07-01

    To evaluate the stability of the ocular alignment in patients with presumed congenital Brown syndrome. A retrospective review of patients with Brown syndrome with an emphasis on nonsurgical cases. Follow-up of at least 1 year was required for inclusion in the study. Patients were selected for this study from the pediatric ophthalmology services at the Ivey Institute of Ophthalmology, London, Ontario, and the Children's Hospital of Eastern Ontario, Ottawa. A cohort of 71 patients with presumed congenital Brown syndrome. Two cases were bilateral. Eleven cases were excluded because of insufficient length of follow-up, leaving 60 patients with an average follow-up of 46 months. All patients were assessed and followed up by a pediatric ophthalmologist. Of 38 patients who had no hypotropia in primary position at presentation, only two (5%) patients experienced a worsening with the development of a small vertical strabismus during the follow-up period. Six (10%) of the entire group of 60 patients experienced a complete spontaneous resolution of the deficiency in elevation at 4, 6, 8, 10, 12, and 15 years of age. Among patients with congenital Brown syndrome, those who are orthotropic in the primary position tend to remain stable or improve over time without surgical intervention.

  8. Brown Bodies, Racialisation and physical education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fitzpatrick, Katie

    2013-01-01

    This article explores how school physical education (PE) can both reinforce stereotyped notions of the brown body as inherently physical while also allowing young people to gain educational success. Drawing on a critical ethnographic study of Maori and Pasifika (Pacific Island) youth in PE in New Zealand, the article explores how the academic…

  9. Maxillary brown tumour: unusual presentation of parathyroid ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    This is a report of a maxillary brown tumour caused by primary hyperparathyroidism (HPT) secondary to parathyroid carcinoma. A 62-year-old man presented with a large swelling in the right maxilla, which caused right-sided nasal obstruction, intermittent bleeding and diplopia. A computed tomography scan demonstrated ...

  10. Molecular Selectivity of Brown Carbon Chromophores

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Laskin, Julia; Laskin, Alexander; Nizkorodov, Sergey; Roach, Patrick J.; Eckert, Peter A.; Gilles, Mary K.; Wang, Bingbing; Lee, Hyun Ji; Hu, Qichi

    2014-10-21

    Complementary methods of high-resolution mass spectrometry and micro-spectroscopy were utilized for molecular analysis of secondary organic aerosol (SOA) generated from ozonolysis of two structural monoterpene isomers: D-limonene (LSOA) and a-pinene (PSOA). Laboratory simulated aging of LSOA and PSOA, through conversion of carbonyls into imines mediated by NH3 vapors in humid air, resulted in selective browning of the LSOA sample, while the PSOA sample remained white. Comparative analysis of the reaction products in the aged LSOA and PSOA samples provided insights into chemistry relevant to formation of brown carbon chromophores. A significant fraction of carbonyl-imine conversion products with identical molecular formulas were detected in both samples. This reflects the high level of similarity in the molecular composition of these two closely related SOA materials. Several highly conjugated products were detected exclusively in the brown LSOA sample and were identified as potential chromophores responsible for the observed color change. The majority of the unique products in the aged LSOA sample with the highest number of double bonds contain two nitrogen atoms. We conclude that chromophores characteristic of the carbonyl- imine chemistry in LSOA are highly conjugated oligomers of secondary imines (Schiff bases) present at relatively low concentrations. Formation of this type of conjugated compounds in PSOA is hindered by the structural rigidity of the a-pinene oxidation products. Our results suggest that the overall light-absorbing properties of SOA may be determined by trace amounts of strong brown carbon chromophores.

  11. The browning of Alaska's boreal forest

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mary Beth Parent; David. Verbyla

    2010-01-01

    We used twelve Landsat scenes from the 1980s-2009 and regional 2000-2009 MODIS data to examine the long-term trend in the normalized difference vegetation index (NDVI) within unburned areas of the Alaskan boreal forest. Our analysis shows that there has been a declining trend in NDVI in this region, with the strongest "browning trend" occurring in eastern...

  12. Phospholipids of New Zealand Edible Brown Algae.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vyssotski, Mikhail; Lagutin, Kirill; MacKenzie, Andrew; Mitchell, Kevin; Scott, Dawn

    2017-07-01

    Edible brown algae have attracted interest as a source of beneficial allenic carotenoid fucoxanthin, and glyco- and phospholipids enriched in polyunsaturated fatty acids. Unlike green algae, brown algae contain no or little phosphatidylserine, possessing an unusual aminophospholipid, phosphatidyl-O-[N-(2-hydroxyethyl) glycine], PHEG, instead. When our routinely used technique of 31P-NMR analysis of phospholipids was applied to the samples of edible New Zealand brown algae, a number of signals corresponding to unidentified phosphorus-containing compounds were observed in total lipids. NI (negative ion) ESI QToF MS spectra confirmed the presence of more familiar phospholipids, and also suggested the presence of PHEG or its isomers. The structure of PHEG was confirmed by comparison with a synthetic standard. An unusual MS fragmentation pattern that was also observed prompted us to synthesise a number of possible candidates, and was found to follow that of phosphatidylhydroxyethyl methylcarbamate, likely an extraction artefact. An unexpected outcome was the finding of ceramidephosphoinositol that has not been reported previously as occurring in brown algae. An uncommon arsenic-containing phospholipid has also been observed and quantified, and its TLC behaviour studied, along with that of the newly synthesised lipids.

  13. Brown hares on the edge: Genetic population structure of the Danish brown hare

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andersen, Liselotte W.; Fredsted, Tina; Wincentz, Trine

    2009-01-01

    Andersen L. W., Fredsted T., Wincentz T. and Pertoldi C. 2009. Brown hares on the edge: Genetic population structure of the Danish brown hare. Acta Theriologica 54: 97-110. Denmark lies on the edge of the distributional range of the brown hare Lepus europaeus Pallas, 1778, where population......-69.8 respectively). There was no correlation between the geographic and the genetic distance. Population structure was influenced by genetic drift, anthropogenic effects (eg translocation and escapes from hare-farms) and by post-glacial recolonization from southern refuges or refuges north east of the Black Sea...... glaciations or by stocking effects. Colonization from southern refuges was supported by the observation that haplotype 2 in the Danish brown hare was identical to the central European ancestral haplotype c07....

  14. Kenai Peninsula Brown Bear Studies : Report of the Interagency Brown Bear Study Team, 1986

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — This report summarizes work conducted during the 1986 field season on brown bear (Ursus arctos) from the Kenai Peninsula, Alaska. Ground surveys were conducted to...

  15. Gas exchange and brown heart in conference pears

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Otma, E.C.; Peppelenbos, H.W.

    2003-01-01

    Brown heart is a tissue disorder found in Conference pears during CA storage. Differences in susceptibility for brown heart have been found between countries, orchards, harvest dates and storage conditions. One hypothesis is that brown heart is caused by increased internal CO2. This research

  16. 49 CFR 173.216 - Asbestos, blue, brown or white.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 2 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Asbestos, blue, brown or white. 173.216 Section... Class 7 § 173.216 Asbestos, blue, brown or white. (a) Asbestos, blue, brown or white, includes each of the following hydrated mineral silicates: chrysolite, crocidolite, amosite, anthophyllite asbestos...

  17. Thorium as an energy source. Opportunities for Norway

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    2008-01-15

    Final Recommendations of the Thorium Report Committee: 1) No technology should be idolized or demonized. All carbon-dioxide (Co2) emission-free energy production technologies should be considered. The potential contribution of nuclear energy to a sustainable energy future should be recognized. 2) An investigation into the resources in the Fen Complex and other sites in Norway should be performed. It is essential to assess whether thorium in Norwegian rocks can be defined as an economical asset for the benefit of future generations. Furthermore, the application of new technologies for the extraction of thorium from the available mineral sources should be studied. 3) Testing of thorium fuel in the Halden Reactor should be encouraged, taking benefit of the well recognized nuclear fuel competence in Halden. 4) Norway should strengthen its participation in international collaborations by joining the EURATOM fission program and the GIF program on Generation IV reactors suitable for the use of thorium. 5) The development of an Accelerator Driven System (ADS) using thorium is not within the capability of Norway working alone. Joining the European effort in this field should be considered. Norwegian research groups should be encouraged to participate in relevant international projects, although these are currently focused on waste management. 6) Norway should bring its competence in waste management up to an international standard and collaboration with Sweden and Finland could be beneficial. 7) Norway should bring its competence with respect to dose assessment related to the thorium cycle up to an international standard. 8) Since the proliferation resistance of uranium-233 depends on the reactor and reprocessing technologies, this aspect will be of key concern should any thorium reactor be built in Norway. 9) Any new nuclear activities in Norway, e.g. thorium fuel cycles, would need strong international pooling of human resources, and in the case of thorium, a strong long

  18. Effect of Brimonidine on Retinal and Choroidal Neovascularization in a Mouse Model of Retinopathy of Prematurity and Laser-Treated Rats

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kusari, Jyotirmoy; Padillo, Edwin; Zhou, Sheila X.; Bai, Yanyan; Wang, Juanjuan; Song, Zhiming; Zhu, Meili; Le, Yun-Zheng; Gil, Daniel W.

    2011-01-01

    Purpose. To determine whether chronic treatment with brimonidine (BRI) attenuates retinal vascular leakage and neovascularization in neonatal mice after exposure to high oxygen in a mouse model of retinopathy of prematurity (ROP), and choroidal neovascularization (CNV) in rats after laser treatment. Methods. Experimental CNV was induced by laser treatment in Brown Norway (BN) rats. BRI or vehicle (VEH) was administered by osmotic minipumps, and CNV formation was measured 11 days after laser treatment. Oxygen-induced retinopathy was generated in neonatal mice by exposure to 75% oxygen from postnatal day (P)7 to P12. BRI or VEH was administered by gavage, and vitreoretinal vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) concentrations and retinal vascular leakage, neovascularization, and vaso-obliteration were measured on P17. Experimental CNV was induced in rabbits by subretinal lipopolysaccharide/fibroblast growth factor-2 injection. Results. Systemic BRI treatment significantly attenuated laser-induced CNV formation in BN rats when initiated 3 days before or within 1 hour after laser treatment. BRI treatment initiated during exposure to high oxygen significantly attenuated vitreoretinal VEGF concentrations, retinal vascular leakage, and retinal neovascularization in P17 mice subjected to oxygen-induced retinopathy. Intravitreal treatment with BRI had no effect on CNV formation in a rabbit model of nonischemic angiogenesis. Conclusions. BRI treatment significantly attenuated vitreoretinal VEGF concentrations, retinal vascular leakage, and retinal and choroidal neovascularization in animal models of ROP and CNV. BRI may inhibit underlying event(s) of ischemia responsible for upregulation of vitreoretinal VEGF and thus reduce vascular leakage and retinal-choroidal neovascularization. PMID:21482645

  19. Green tea extract attenuates muscle loss and improves muscle function during disuse, but fails to improve muscle recovery following unloading in aged rats

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bennett, Brian T.; Wilson, Joseph C.; Sperringer, Justin; Mohamed, Junaith S.; Edens, Neile K.; Pereira, Suzette L.

    2014-01-01

    In this study we tested the hypothesis that green tea extract (GTE) would improve muscle recovery after reloading following disuse. Aged (32 mo) Fischer 344 Brown Norway rats were randomly assigned to receive either 14 days of hindlimb suspension (HLS) or 14 days of HLS followed by normal ambulatory function for 14 days (recovery). Additional animals served as cage controls. The rats were given GTE (50 mg/kg body wt) or water (vehicle) by gavage 7 days before and throughout the experimental periods. Compared with vehicle treatment, GTE significantly attenuated the loss of hindlimb plantaris muscle mass (−24.8% vs. −10.7%, P muscle function or mass compared with vehicle treatment, animals given green tea via gavage maintained the lower losses of muscle mass that were found during HLS (−25.2% vs. −16.0%, P muscle fiber cross-sectional area loss in both plantaris (−39.9% vs. −23.9%, P muscles after HLS. This green tea-induced difference was not transient but was maintained over the reloading period for plantaris (−45.6% vs. −21.5%, P muscle fiber cross-sectional area (−38.7% vs. −10.9%, P muscles during recovery from HLS compared with vehicle-treated muscles and decreased oxidative stress and abundance of the Bcl-2-associated X protein (Bax), yet this did not further improve muscle recovery in reloaded muscles. These data suggest that muscle recovery following disuse in aging is complex. Although satellite cell proliferation and differentiation are critical for muscle repair to occur, green tea-induced changes in satellite cell number is by itself insufficient to improve muscle recovery following a period of atrophy in old rats. PMID:25414242

  20. Biological activity is the likely origin of the intersection between the photoreceptor inner and outer segments of the rat retina as determined by optical coherence tomography

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yamauchi Y

    2011-11-01

    Full Text Available Yasuyuki Yamauchi, Hiromichi Yagi, Yoshihiko Usui, Keisuke Kimura, Tsuyoshi Agawa, Rintaro Tsukahara, Naoyuki Yamakawa, Hiroshi GotoDepartment of Ophthalmology, Tokyo Medical University Hospital, Tokyo, JapanBackground: Recent research on macular diseases has prompted investigations into the condition of the intersection between the photoreceptor inner and outer segments (IS/OS and the relationship with retinal photoreceptor abnormalities. Although the origin of the IS/OS in optical coherence tomography (OCT images is unclear, it may be related to either the cellular activity of the photoreceptors or the structure of the OS disks. To address this question, we compared the IS/OS status in OCT images of rat retinas before and after euthanasia.Methods: OCT images were taken before and after euthanasia in four eyes of two Brown Norway rats. After the OCT images were taken, the rats were used for histopathological studies to confirm that retinal structures were intact.Results: Before euthanasia, the IS/OS and external limiting membrane (ELM line were clearly identifiable on the OCT images. However, after euthanasia, neither the IS/OS nor the ELM line was evident in three out of four eyes, and a faint IS/OS and an ELM line were identified in one eye. Histopathological analysis did not show any abnormalities in the retina in any of the four eyes.Conclusion: The origin of the IS/OS identified in OCT images is likely related to the biological activities of the photoreceptor cells.Keywords: IS/OS, OCT, histopathology, biological activity

  1. Simulationsverfahren fuer Brown-Resnick-Prozesse (Simulation Techniques for Brown-Resnick Processes)

    OpenAIRE

    Oesting, Marco

    2009-01-01

    Generalized Brown-Resnick processes form a flexible class of stationary max-stable processes based on Gaussian random fields. With regard to applications fast and accurate simulation of these processes is an important issue. In fact, Brown-Resnick processes that are generated by a dissipative flow do not allow for good finite approximations using the definition of the processes. On large intervals we get either huge approximation errors or very long operating times. Looking for solutions of t...

  2. Determination of stanozolol and 3′-hydroxystanozolol in rat hair, urine and serum using liquid chromatography tandem mass spectrometry

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Deshmukh Nawed IK

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Anabolic androgenic steroids, such as stanozolol, are typically misused by athletes during preparation for competition. Out-of-competition testing presents a unique challenge in the current anti-doping detection system owing to logistic reasons. Analysing hair for the presence of a prohibited drug offers a feasible solution for covering the wider window in out-of-competition testing. To assist in vivo studies aiming to establish a relationship between drug levels detected in hair, urine and blood, sensitive methods for the determination of stanozolol and its major metabolite 3′-hydroxystanozolol were developed in pigmented hair, urine and serum, using brown Norway rats as a model system and liquid chromatography tandem mass spectrometry (LC-MS/MS. Results For method development, spiked drug free rat hair, blood and urine samples were used. The newly developed method was then applied to hair, urine and serum samples from five brown Norway rats after treatment (intraperitoneal with stanozolol for six consecutive days at 5.0 mg/kg/day. The assay for each matrix was linear within the quantification range with determination coefficient (r2 values above 0.995. The respective assay was capable of detecting 0.125 pg/mg stanozolol and 0.25 pg/mg 3′-hydroxystanozolol with 50 mg hair; 0.063 ng/mL stanozolol and 0.125 ng/mL 3′-hydroxystanozolol with 100 μL of urine or serum. The accuracy, precision and extraction recoveries of the assays were satisfactory for the detection of both compounds in all three matrices. The average concentrations of stanozolol and 3′-hydroxystanozolol, were as follows: hair = 70.18 ± 22.32 pg/mg and 13.01 ± 3.43 pg/mg; urine = 4.34 ± 6.54 ng/mL and 9.39 ± 7.42 ng/mL; serum = 7.75 ± 3.58 ng/mL and 7.16 ± 1.97 ng/mL, respectively. Conclusions The developed methods are sensitive, specific and reproducible for the determination of stanozolol

  3. Knockdown of NPY expression in the dorsomedial hypothalamus promotes development of brown adipocytes and prevents diet-induced obesity

    OpenAIRE

    Chao, Pei-Ting; Yang, Liang; Aja, Susan; Moran, Timothy H.; Bi, Sheng

    2011-01-01

    Hypothalamic neuropeptide Y (NPY) has been implicated in control of energy balance, but the physiological importance of NPY in the dorsomedial hypothalamus (DMH) remains unclear. Here we report that knockdown of NPY expression in the DMH by adeno-associated virus-mediated RNAi reduced fat depots in rats fed regular chow and ameliorated high-fat diet-induced hyperphagia and obesity. DMH NPY knockdown resulted in development of brown adipocytes in inguinal white adipose tissue through the sympa...

  4. Early Oral Ovalbumin Exposure during Maternal Milk Feeding Prevents Spontaneous Allergic Sensitization in Allergy-Prone Rat Pups

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Adaweyah El-Merhibi

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available There are conflicting data to support the practice of delaying the introduction of allergenic foods into the infant diet to prevent allergy development. This study investigated immune response development after early oral egg antigen (Ovalbumin; OVA exposure in a rat pup model. Brown Norway (BN rat pups were randomly allocated into groups: dam reared (DR, DR pups challenged daily (days 4–13 with oral OVA (DR + OVAc, DR pups challenged intermittently (on day 4, 10, 12, and 13 with oral OVA (DR + OVAi, formula-fed pups (FF, and FF pups challenged daily with oral OVA (FF + OVA. Immune parameters assessed included OVA-specific serum IgE, IgG1, and IgA. Ileal and splenic messenger ribonucleic acid (mRNA expression of transforming growth factor-beta (TGF-β1, mothers against decapentaplegic (Smad 2/4/7, and forkhead box P3 (Foxp3 were determined. Ileum was stained for TGF-β1 and Smad4. Results. Feeding OVA daily to DR pups maintained systemic and local gut antibody and immunoregulatory marker mRNA responses. Systemic TGF-β1 was lower in DR + OVAi pups compared to DR and DR + OVAc pups. Feeding OVA to FF pups resulted in significantly greater OVA-specific IgE and IgG1, and lower IgA and TGF-β1 and Smad expression compared to DR pups. Conclusions. Early daily OVA exposure in the presence of maternal milk maintains immune markers associated with a regulated immune response, preventing early allergic sensitization.

  5. Beneficial effects of a Q-ter based nutritional mixture on functional performance, mitochondrial function, and oxidative stress in rats.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jinze Xu

    2010-05-01

    Full Text Available Mitochondrial dysfunction and oxidative stress are central mechanisms underlying the aging process and the pathogenesis of many age-related diseases. Selected antioxidants and specific combinations of nutritional compounds could target many biochemical pathways that affect both oxidative stress and mitochondrial function and, thereby, preserve or enhance physical performance.In this study, we evaluated the potential anti-aging benefits of a Q-ter based nutritional mixture (commercially known as Eufortyn mainly containing the following compounds: terclatrated coenzyme Q(10 (Q-ter, creatine and a standardized ginseng extract. We found that Eufortyn supplementation significantly ameliorated the age-associated decreases in grip strength and gastrocnemius subsarcolemmal mitochondria Ca(2+ retention capacity when initiated in male Fischer344 x Brown Norway rats at 21 months, but not 29 months, of age. Moreover, the increases in muscle RNA oxidation and subsarcolemmal mitochondrial protein carbonyl levels, as well as the decline of total urine antioxidant power, which develop late in life, were mitigated by Eufortyn supplementation in rats at 29 months of age.These data imply that Eufortyn is efficacious in reducing oxidative damage, improving the age-related mitochondrial functional decline, and preserving physical performance when initiated in animals at early midlife (21 months. The efficacy varied, however, according to the age at which the supplementation was provided, as initiation in late middle age (29 months was incapable of restoring grip strength and mitochondrial function. Therefore, the Eufortyn supplementation may be particularly beneficial when initiated prior to major biological and functional declines that appear to occur with advancing age.

  6. National independence, women's political participation, and life expectancy in Norway.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nobles, Jenna; Brown, Ryan; Catalano, Ralph

    2010-05-01

    This study investigates the role of national independence and women's political participation on population health using historical lifespan data from Norway. We use time-series methods to analyze data measuring the actual length of time lived by Norwegian birth cohorts spanning a 61 year period surrounding the political emancipation of Norway from Sweden in 1905 and the establishment of a Norwegian monarchy in 1906. The use of a discrete, historical event improves our ability to interpret the population health effects of national independence and women's political participation as causal. We find a large and significant positive effect on the lifespan of Norwegian females born in the 1906 cohort. Interestingly, the effect does not extend to all living females during the Norwegian drive toward sovereignty. We conclude that the beneficial effects were likely conferred through intrauterine biological transfers and/or neonatal investments specific to the first year of life. Copyright 2010 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  7. Benthic monitoring of salmon farms in Norway using foraminiferal metabarcoding

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pawlowski, Jan; Esling, Philippe; Lejzerowicz, Franck

    2016-01-01

    The rapid growth of the salmon industry necessitates the development of fast and accurate tools to assess its environmental impact. Macrobenthic monitoring is commonly used to measure the impact of organic enrichment associated with salmon farm activities. However, classical benthic monitoring can...... of macrofauna-based benthic monitoring. Here, we tested the application of foraminiferal metabarcoding to benthic monitoring of salmon farms in Norway. We analysed 140 samples of eDNA and environmental RNA (eRNA) extracted from surface sediment samples collected at 4 salmon farming sites in Norway. We sequenced...... appears to be a promising alternative to classical benthic monitoring, providing a solution to the morpho-taxonomic bottleneck of macrofaunal surveys....

  8. The Alta schist, North Norway: unique rock with unique history

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heldal, Tom; Aasly, Kari; Meyer, Gurli

    2015-04-01

    Near the small town of Alta, northernmost Norway, are more than thousand small and large schist quarries, some of them dating back to the 1850's. It was the need for roofing material on a local church and a hospital that triggered the production. Since then, the Alta schist has been widely applied in Norway and abroad, known for its quality for roofing material and hard floor covering. The quality lies in the processes behind the formation of the schist. Emplacement of thrust nappes during the Caledonian mountain chain formation in the Silurian caused deformation and metamorphism of the rocks. The Alta schist is situated in one such nappe sheet, where arkosic sandstone where flattened and transformed into mylonite. This made fine mica layers along which the rock can be split, rythmically spaced and separated by quartz-dominated bands. The production of the Alta schist is still characterized by old craft traditions, reflecting a rich history and culture around the schist production.

  9. Transnational spaces of care: migrant nurses in Norway.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Isaksen, Lise Widding

    2012-01-01

    This article argues that international nurse recruitment from Latvia to Norway is not a win–win situation. The gains and losses of nurse migration are unevenly distributed between sender and receiver countries. On the basis of empirical research and interviews with Latvian nurses and families they left behind, this article argues that nurse migration transforms families and communities and that national health services now become global workplaces. Some decades ago feminist research pointed to the fact that the welfare state was based on a male breadwinner family and women’s unpaid production of care work at home. Today this production of unpaid care is “outsourced” from richer to poorer countries and is related to an emergence of transnational spaces of care. International nurse recruitment and global nurse care chains in Norway increasingly provide the labor that prevents the new adult worker model and gender equality politics from being disrupted in times where families are overloaded with elder care loads.

  10. Neurological melioidosis in Norway presenting with a cerebral abscess

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Liv Hesstvedt

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Neurological melioidosis is a rare condition, as less than 30 cases have been reported in the last 50 years. We present a case of neurological melioidosis, presenting with a cerebral abscess in a returning traveler from an endemic area. While traveling in Cambodia on holiday, the patient was admitted to local hospital for pneumonia. Her condition improved after antimicrobial treatment, and she returned to Norway when discharged. The patient had several contacts with the health care system after returning to Norway, due to recurrent fever and deterioration. Short-term antimicrobial treatment was given with temporary improvement in her condition. Eventually she developed stroke-like symptoms, and a cerebral abscess was found. Cultures from the abscess were positive for Burkholderia pseudomallei and the treatment was adjusted accordingly.

  11. An Evolutionary Psychological Analysis of Filicide in Norway

    OpenAIRE

    Ottesen, Vibeke K.

    2016-01-01

    This thesis presents the first study of the characteristics traits of caretaker perpetrated child homicide (filicide) in current day Norway, covering the years 1990–2009. Evolutionary psychological (EP) perspectives on filicide are currently the only theoretical approach that in a comprehensive manner details the underpinning psychological mechanisms of distinct filicide categories and predict what traits will be characteristic of perpetrators, victims and contexts from the respective mechani...

  12. Friendship relations of Southeast Asian immigrant children in Norway

    OpenAIRE

    Ryland, Fritzie

    2013-01-01

    The main focus and aim of this master thesis is to write about the nature of friendship and experiences of the Southeast Asian immigrant children in Norway. The overall methodological perspective of this study is based on the philosophy of the new social studies of childhood where children are constructed as social actors, listening to their voices, seeing them as active agents in their daily lives who are able to choose their friends and form friendship in their new country. I conducted semi...

  13. Pavement wear and airborne dust pollution in Norway

    OpenAIRE

    Snilsberg, Brynhild

    2008-01-01

    In several large cities in Norway the traffic volume is high. The use of studded tires and other friction enhancing measures during winter leads to significant pavement wear, which in turn leads to an increase in the amount of airborne particulate matter, often exceeding the limits set in the ambient air regulation. This represents a nuisance or health risk for people being exposed to the pollution. According to regulations set by the European Union particulate matter is measured and regulate...

  14. Ichneumonidae (Hymenoptera) new for the fauna of Norway, Part 4

    OpenAIRE

    Hansen, Lars Ove; Humala, Andrei; Reshchikov, Alexey

    2010-01-01

    The present survey reports 58 species of wasps belonging to the family Ichneumonidae hitherto not reported from Norway. The subfamilies Cryptinae, Ctenopelmatinae, Ichneumoninae, Microleptinae, Orthocentrinae, Pimplinae and Tryphoninae are represented. The distribution of each species is briefly discussed. Posted here with permission from the journal. Norwegian Journal of Entomology: http://www.entomologi.no/journals/nje/nje.htm. Norsk entomologisk forening: http://www.entomologi.n...

  15. Stauropoctonus bombycivorus (Gravenhorst, 1829) in Norway (Hymenoptera, Ichneumonidae, Ophioninae)

    OpenAIRE

    Hansen, Lars Ove; Berggren, Kai; Sørlibråten, Ove

    2010-01-01

    The conspicuous icneumonid fly Stauropoctonus bombycivorus (Gravenhorst, 1829) is recorded for the first time in Norway. Four specimens have been captured in light-traps at three different localities in 2007: Hvaler in Østfold (Ø) and Arendal in Aust Agder (AAY), respectively. The biology and distribution are briefly discussed. Posted here with permission from the journal. Norwegian Journal of Entomology: http://www.entomologi.no/journals/nje/nje.htm. Norsk entomologisk forening: ...

  16. 'Online Shopping’ Customer Satisfaction and Loyalty in Norway

    OpenAIRE

    Sankaran, Pervaiz Ali and Sudha

    2010-01-01

    The primary goal of this research is to analyze the customer satisfaction and loyalty of the online customers in Norway. The theoretical framework discusses in brief about the effects of customer loyalty and retention on customer satisfaction. The study on customer satisfaction and loyalty has been done from the perspective of a firm performing online business. To understand the customer satisfaction and loyalty level of online Norwegian shoppers, we pursued with the collection of quantitativ...

  17. Norway and the arctic: between multilateral governance and geopolitics

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Flikke, Geir

    2013-03-01

    The article analyzes Norwegian politics in the high north in light of multilateral institutions and new security challenges. The author maintains that Norway's politics is based on functional multilateral organizations and continuity and predictability in the UN framework. This can become more of a challenge if the competition for resource access hardens and the Arctic is defined as a strategically valuable area for one or more states.(Author)

  18. Ethnodemographic processes among the Sami of modern Norway

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kseniia S. Babenysheva

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available On the basis of statistics and comparative analysis the article shows ethnodemographic processes among the Sami of Norway in 2000–2013, including the dynamic of population, natural increase, factors and reasons which caused them in this period. The short analysis of references has been made. Stable economic situation is improving the conditions of Sami. At the modern stage, special conditions for keeping the Sami’s ethnic identity are arranged, the basis of which is the language development.

  19. Slow upper mantle beneath Southern Norway from surface waves

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weidle, C.; Maupin, V.

    2009-04-01

    A recent regional surface wave tomography for Northern Europe revealed unprecedented images of the upper mantle beneath the (Tertiary) North Atlantic and the bordering Fennoscandian craton of Archean-Proterozoic age. With respect to the circum-Atlantic regions of uplift, no common mantle pattern supporting the uplift of these regions is observed. The western boundary of the thick cratonic lithosphere follows the trend of the continental margin offshore northern Norway (i.e. the northern Scandes are underlain by thick lithosphere) whereas further south the boundary of the craton is located further east beneath southwestern Sweden. SV shear wave velocities beneath southern Norway are 10% slower than ak135 (at 70-115 km depth) and these low-velocities are clearly connected to the North Atlantic low-velocity regime through a ~ 400 km wide "channel". The low-velocity anomaly beneath Southern Norway coincides in geometry roughly with the dome-like high topography of the southern Scandes and may thus have a non-negligible contribution to the isostatic balance of the region. The amplitude and depth-distribution of this anomaly are due to be further constrained by new data that were acquired during the MAGNUS experiment in 2006-2008. The temporary seismic network, consisting of 40 broadband seismometers covers to a large extent the location of the anomaly as imaged by the regional tomography. This enables us to get unique control on the tomographic model at improved lateral and vertical resolution. Preliminary analysis of surface wave phase velocities yields an average 1-D shear wave velocity profile for southern Norway as a first step to constrain the presence and depth extent of this low-velocity anomaly.

  20. The Mesoproterozoic sub-Lifjell unconformity, central Telemark, Norway

    OpenAIRE

    Kauko Laajoki

    2006-01-01

    The sub-Lifjell unconformity subdivides the traditional Seljord group of the Telemark supracrustals, south Norway, into the Vindeggen and Lifjell groups. It is defined by an in situ weathering breccia and an angular unconformity above quartzites of the 1155 Ma old Vindeggen group and by a volcaniclastic palaeoregolith developed above the 1155±2 Ma old porphyry of the Brunkeberg formation. Due to the complex deformation of the Vindeggen and Lifjell groups this unconformity has often been shea...

  1. Russia’s Security Relations with Finland, Norway, and Sweden

    Science.gov (United States)

    2017-09-01

    trade relations as a means of “enticement” or “punishment,” and seeks to establish and deepen the energy dependence of neighboring states on gas and...International Energy Agency noted that in 2015 Finland was 100 percent dependent on imports of gas and oil, with 83 percent of oil and 100 percent of gas...Finland, Norway, Russia, Soviet Union, Sweden, United States, North Atlantic Treaty Organization, European Union, Article 5, collective defense

  2. Migrations in Norway and in Other Scandinavian Countries

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nils Olav Ǿstrem

    2004-09-01

    Full Text Available The article gives an overview of migration movements in Norway and other Scandinavian countries. The overview most of all focuses on history, but gives also comments on the present situation. The quantitative dimension of Norwegian and Scandinavian emigration in different periods is dealt with, but the article also discusses cultural circumstances in connection with emigration from and immigration to this north European region. Emigration started earlier in Norway than in the other Scandinavian or Nordic countries. Of the Scandinavian countries, “it was only from Norway that emigration to America took place on a larger scale during the 1850s”. Sweden and Denmark “during the 1860s … entered a stage of massive emigration which culminated during the 1880s”. Emigration from Iceland started later, but the country experienced “a veritable flood during the 1880s”, at the same time as Eastern and Western Europe. Finland did not reach “great numbers until the initial decades of the 20th century.” The reasons for emigration from the Scandinavian countries have in traditional migration studies been linked to economic and social factors. In this article, based on the author’s thesis on emigration from the local parish Skjold in Rogaland county, Norway, from 1837 to 1914, the focus is on the cultural factor when discussing underlying causes of Nordic mass emigration. By using the term emigrant culture – a personification of the migrants – a way to employ the individual psychological or motive factor is attempted. Considering migration a process of two sides also strengthens the cultural or psychological individual factor.

  3. River ice implications related to water power production in Norway

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Asvall, R.P. [Norwegian Water Resources and Energy Directorate, Oslo (Norway). Hydrology Dept.

    2009-07-01

    Nearly 99 per cent of the electricity produced in Norway is based on water power. While the period of large power development is over, the current focus lies in developing small hydroelectric power plants. A new market based energy law was implemented in Norway in 1991 to achieve more efficient use of electricity production by means of market forces. Since water regulation influences ice conditions in lakes and rivers, this paper focused on the implications of changes in ice conditions. In Norway, the expected changes in ice conditions are taken into account when issuing permits for water regulations and schemes for water discharge because some waterways are used as winter roads. Follow-up includes both close and long term observations and measurements. The impact of variable price on power was also discussed, with particular reference to ice conditions in cases where water discharge occurs on rivers. This paper summarized selected ice problems and how they have been handled. The paper also included a summary of anticipated climatic changes relevant to ice conditions.

  4. [Health effects of climatic changes--possible consequences for Norway].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ottesen, P S; Lassen, J

    1997-01-10

    In the year 2100 a global mean temperature increase of 2 degrees C, and a 50 cm rise in sea level are expected. An escalation in the intensity and duration of heat waves will increase mortality, whilst higher temperatures in cold regions may reduce it. On a global scale, vector-borne diseases such as malaria, dengue, yellow fever and some types of viral encephalitis are likely to increase. 50 to 80 million more cases of malaria could occur annually. Elevated temperatures and more frequent floods could cause an increase in salmonellosis, cholera and giardiasis. Indirectly, shortages of freshwater and foods may cause serious health problems. The world may see more environmental refugees. For Norway a temperature increase of 3-4 degrees C during winter and 2 degrees C in summer is expected, with more precipitation, especially in western parts. The possibility of the Gulf Stream turning at 40 degrees N and causing a temperature decrease of 10 degrees C, is not very likely. Malaria could reestablish itself in Europe, but hardly in Norway. The most harmful arthropod vector in Norway, the tick Ixodes ricinus, might extend its range into the most populated parts of the country. Marine algal blooms might increase the risk of cholera. Health problems caused by greater floods, poisonous algae and certain freshwater cercaria might increase.

  5. Mandibular brown tumor in renal osteodystrophy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Park, Jin Woo; Choi, Bo Ram; Huh, Kyung Hoe; Yi, Won Jin; Choi, Soon Chul [Department of Oral and Maxillofacial Radiology, School of Dentistry, Seoul National University, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Gang, In Tae [Department of Oral and Maxillofacial Surgery, Kangnam Sacred Heart Hospital, Hallym Medical Center, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2008-12-15

    Brown tumor is a histologically benign lesion that is a serious complication of renal osteodystrophy because it may result in severe deformity and discomfort. We report a case of brown tumor, which occurred in a 35-year-old woman with chronic renal failure, who had been treated with hemodialysis for 14 years. The lesion was found on the lingual side of the mandible. Standard panoramic radiograph showed generally decreased bone mineral density, loss of lamina dura, and thin cortical plates. Computed tomography (CT) revealed multilocular expansible lesions with heterogeneous attenuation in the anterior mandible, as well as generalized trabecular alteration with homogeneous sclerosis, and thinning or obliteration of cortical plates. Excision of the mandibular lesion and curettage of the affected bone were performed.

  6. Identifying and misidentifying the brown recluse spider.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vetter, R

    1999-11-01

    The brown recluse spider, Loxosceles reclusa, is often implicated as a cause of necrotic skin lesions.[1-3] Diagnoses are most commonly made by clinical appearance and infrequently is a spider seen, captured or identified at the time of the bite.[1, 2, 4-6] The brown recluse lives in a circumscribed area of the U.S. (the south central Midwest) with a few less common recluse species living in the more sparsely-populated southwest U.S.[7] In these areas, where spider populations may be dense, recluse spiders may be a cause of significant morbidity. However, outside the natural range of these recluse species, the conviction that they are the etiological agents behind necrotic lesions of unknown origin is widespread, and most often erroneous. In some states such as California, unsubstantiated reports concerning recluse spider bites have taken on the status of "urban legend" leading to overdiagnosis and, therefore, inappropriate treatment.

  7. Histological findings after brown recluse spider envenomation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Elston, D M; Eggers, J S; Schmidt, W E; Storrow, A B; Doe, R H; McGlasson, D; Fischer, J R

    2000-06-01

    Histologic specimens from 41 rabbits were studied for changes resulting from the manual injection of brown recluse spider venom. Major findings included a mixed inflammatory cell infiltrate, coagulative tissue necrosis, and vasculitis. All specimens demonstrated a well-delineated zone of eosinophilic staining recognizable as "mummified" coagulative necrosis of the epidermis and dermis. A dense band of neutrophils bordered the zone of necrosis. Immediately adjacent to the neutrophilic band, small vessel vasculitis was a universal finding. Degranulated eosinophils and neutrophils and macrophages filled with eosinophilic granules were common. Inflammatory foci were often centered on groups of lipocytes within the dermis. Large vessel vasculitis resembling that seen in polyarteritis nodosa was present deep to 7 of the 40 eschars. Large vessel vasculitis may contribute to the large zones of necrosis seen after some brown recluse spider bites. Eosinophils may play a role in tissue damage after envenomation.

  8. Thermodynamic study of brown-coal gasification

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vonka, P.; Holub, R.; Schoengut, S.; Schoengut, J.

    1988-04-01

    Describes a method for calculating and assessing results of partial adiabatic oxidation of brown coal from the North Bohemian brown-coal field, which may in future act as a source of raw material for production of energy and synthesis gas. Calculations assume idealized fluid and burner generators and reaction parameters were selected to cover a range of operational values (these parameters include pressure, temperature, gasification ratio, water content, ash content and degree of coal conversion). After describing mathematics involved, concludes that thermodynamic analysis shows burner generator to have some advantages over fluid generator for production of synthesis gas, and vice versa for production of energy gas. However, final conclusions must await experimental evidence with regard to degree of conversion and composition of gas mixture; also, validity of this assessment is limited by the fact that no account was taken of the possibility of using reaction heat for production of steam or of any energy consumption involved. 10 refs.

  9. Ecological pellets from brown coal and biomass

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pavel Sedláček

    2007-04-01

    Full Text Available One way of renewable energy sources applications in the Czech republic is a cultivation of biomass plants. After the biomass reformation, it is possible to add it to palletizing mixes with coal and delulfurisative additives. Possibilities of brown coal of palletizing with biomass adds were tested recently. The product represents a new coal-biomass combustible wich can be used in some types of boilers with a low pollutant production level (specially SO2.In the past brown-coal pellets weremade with an addition of melted wood mass (wood fibres, wood wastes and mustard straw. Practical tests have shown of an extension the waste field of coal-pellets utilization.

  10. Deterministic remote preparation via the Brown state

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ma, Song-Ya; Gao, Cong; Zhang, Pei; Qu, Zhi-Guo

    2017-04-01

    We propose two deterministic remote state preparation (DRSP) schemes by using the Brown state as the entangled channel. Firstly, the remote preparation of an arbitrary two-qubit state is considered. It is worth mentioning that the construction of measurement bases plays a key role in our scheme. Then, the remote preparation of an arbitrary three-qubit state is investigated. The proposed schemes can be extended to controlled remote state preparation (CRSP) with unit success probabilities. At variance with the existing CRSP schemes via the Brown state, the derived schemes have no restriction on the coefficients, while the success probabilities can reach 100%. It means the success probabilities are greatly improved. Moreover, we pay attention to the DRSP in noisy environments under two important decoherence models, the amplitude-damping noise and phase-damping noise.

  11. [Cancer cachexia and white adipose tissue browning].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, S T; Yang, H M

    2016-08-01

    Cancer cachexia occurs in a majority of advanced cancer patients. These patients with impaired physical function are unable to tolerance cancer treatment well and have a significantly reduced survival rate. Currently, there is no effective clinical treatment available for cancer cachexia, therefore, it is necessary to clarify the molecular mechanisms of cancer cachexia, moreover, new therapeutic targets for cancer cachexia treatment are urgently needed. Very recent studies suggest that, during cancer cachexia, white adipose tissue undergo a 'browning' process, resulting in increased lipid mobilization and energy expenditure, which may be necessary for the occurrence of cancer cachexia. In this article, we summarize the definition and characteristics of cancer cachexia and adipose tissue 'browning', then, we discuss the new study directions presented in latest research.

  12. Browning boreal forests of western North America

    Science.gov (United States)

    David. Verbyla

    2011-01-01

    The GIMMS NDVI dataset has been widely used to document a “browning trend” in North American boreal forests (Goetz et al. 2005, Bunn et al. 2007, Beck and Goetz 2011). However, there has been speculation (Alcaraz-Segura et al. 2010) that this trend may be an artifact due to processing algorithms rather than an actual decline in vegetation activity. This conclusion was...

  13. Finding Brown's peony a sweet attraction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nan. Vance

    2012-01-01

    I first encountered Brown’s peony (Paeonia brownie) with its verdant, lavender-tinged leaves and elegantly nodding maroon flowers growing among bitterbrush and bunchgrass on the eastern flank of the Oregon Cascades. My first thought was “What is a plant like you doing in a place like this?” It would be natural to visualize this native wild peony as...

  14. Drivers of hibernation in the brown bear

    OpenAIRE

    Evans, Alina; Singh, N.J.; Friebe, A.; Arnemo, Jon M.; Laske, T.G.; Fröbert, O.; Swenson, Jon E.; Blanc, S.

    2016-01-01

    Background Hibernation has been a key area of research for several decades, essentially in small mammals in the laboratory, yet we know very little about what triggers or ends it in the wild. Do climatic factors, an internal biological clock, or physiological processes dominate? Using state-of-the-art tracking and monitoring technology on fourteen free-ranging brown bears over three winters, we recorded movement, heart rate (HR), heart rate variability (HRV), body temperature (Tb), physical a...

  15. New brown dwarf candidates in the Pleiades

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eisenbeiss, T.; Moualla, M.; Mugrauer, M.; Schmidt, T. O. B.; Raetz, St.; Neuhäuser, R.; Ginski, Ch.; Hohle, M. M.; Koeltzsch, A.; Marka, C.; Rammo, W.; Reithe, A.; Roell, T.; Vaňko, M.

    2009-05-01

    We have performed deep, wide-field imaging on a ˜ 0.4 deg2 field in the Pleiades (Melotte 22). The selected field was not yet target of a deep search for low mass stars and brown dwarfs. Our limiting magnitudes are R˜22 mag and I˜20 mag, sufficient to detect brown dwarf candidates down to 40 MJ. We found 197 objects, whose location in the (I, R-I) color magnitude diagram is consistent with the age and the distance of the Pleiades. Using CTK R and I as well as JHK photometry from our data and the 2MASS survey we were able to identify 7 new brown dwarf candidates. We present our data reduction technique, which enables us to resample, calibrate, and co-add many images by just two steps. We estimate the interstellar extinction and the spectral type from our optical and the NIR data using a two-dimensional χ2 fitting. Based on observations obtained with telescopes of the University Observatory Jena, which is operated by the Astrophysical Institute of the Friedrich- Schiller-University. Table A3 is available at the CDS via http://cdsarc.u-strasbg.fr/pub/cats/J/AN/330/439

  16. Disintegration of brown coal using alkaline solution

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vydra, J.; Skalicka, J.

    1985-01-01

    Investigations carried out by the Institute of Geology and Geotechnics of the Academy of Sciences of Czechoslovakia are discussed. The investigations were aimed at determining the optimum conditions for in situ solution mining of brown coal using alkaline solutions. Twelve brown coal samples with carbon content ranging from 64.5 to 90.7% were treated with sodium hydroxide solution with concentration ranging from 1 to 5%. Effects of hydrogen peroxide (15%) and ethanolamine (5%) also were investigated. Proportion of the 3 compounds in water was the following: 500 ml sodium hydroxide, 100 ml ethanolamine and 20 ml hydrogen peroxide. Effects of coal grain size on its disintegration in the alkaline solution also were analyzed. Conditions of in situ solution mining were simulated in the laboratory. Investigations showed that the optimum coal grain size was 2 mm, in which case disintegration efficiency depended on carbon content in coal. The lower the carbon content was, the more efficient was the alkaline disintegration. Alkaline solutions did not influence brown coal with carbon content higher than 85%. The optimum concentration of sodium hydroxide was 3%. Addition of hydrogen peroxide and ethanolamine did not influence disintegration. When alkaline solution was pumped 96 h long into a borehole, it penetrated coal to a depth of 2 mm causing swelling of the borehole walls but not coal disintegration. 8 references.

  17. Growth strategy of Norway spruce under air elevated [CO2

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pokorny, R.; Urban, O.; Holisova, P.; Sprtova, M.; Sigut, L.; Slipkova, R.

    2012-04-01

    Plants will respond to globally increasing atmospheric CO2 concentration ([CO2]) by acclimation or adaptation at physiological and morphological levels. Considering the temporal onset, physiological responses may be categorized as short-term and morphological ones as long-term responses. The degree of plant growth responses, including cell division and cell expansion, is highly variable. It depends mainly on the specie's genetic predisposition, environment, mineral nutrition status, duration of CO2 enrichment, and/or synergetic effects of other stresses. Elevated [CO2] causes changes in tissue anatomy, quantity, size, shape and spatial orientation and can result in altered sink strength. Since, there are many experimental facilities for the investigation of elevated [CO2] effects on trees: i) closed systems or open top chambers (OTCs), ii) semi-open systems (for example glass domes with adjustable lamella windows - DAWs), and iii) free-air [CO2] enrichments (FACE); the results are still unsatisfactory due to: i) relatively short-term duration of experiments, ii) cultivation of young plants with different growth strategy comparing to old ones, iii) plant cultivation under artificial soil and weather conditions, and iv) in non-representative stand structure. In this contribution we are discussing the physiological and morphological responses of Norway spruce trees cultivated in DAWs during eight consecutive growing seasons in the context with other results from Norway spruce cultivation under air-elevated [CO2] conditions. On the level of physiological responses, we discuss the changes in the rate of CO2 assimilation, assimilation capacity, photorespiration, dark respiration, stomatal conductance, water potential and transpiration, and the sensitivity of these physiological processes to temperature. On the level of morphological responses, we discuss the changes in bud and growth phenology, needle and shoot morphology, architecture of crown and root system, wood

  18. Utilization of Higher Education : A Review of Employment Challenges and Job Practice among Refugees in Norway

    OpenAIRE

    Boayue, Kou Glaymehn

    2011-01-01

    Master i flerkulturell og internasjonal utdanning Purpose of the study: If refugees from Africa and Asia are able to use their foreign higher education in the labor market of Norway is the main topic of this study. Thus, the study explores the impact of Norwegian language training, foreign higher education recognition, NAV job seeker courses, service/job provision by employers, further higher education in Norway, etc., on the labor market outcomes of 18 refugees who fled to Norway with ter...

  19. Untraditional caring arrangements among parents living apart. The case of Norway

    OpenAIRE

    Ragni Hege Kitterød; Jan Lyngstad

    2011-01-01

    BACKGROUND In spite of quite symmetric parental roles in Norway, shared residence and father sole custody are still rare when parents split up. Several countries have witnessed an increase in shared residence for children recently, and this is also the case in Norway. OBJECTIVE We wish to add to the literature on untraditional caring arrangements among parents living apart by examining the determinants of shared residence and sole father custody in Norway, a country with high gender-equality ...

  20. Cannabidiol promotes browning in 3T3-L1 adipocytes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parray, Hilal Ahmad; Yun, Jong Won

    2016-05-01

    Recruitment of the brown-like phenotype in white adipocytes (browning) and activation of existing brown adipocytes are currently being investigated as a means to combat obesity. Thus, a wide variety of dietary agents that contribute to browning of white adipocytes have been identified. The present study was designed to investigate the effects of cannabidiol (CBD), a major nonpsychotropic phytocannabinoid of Cannabis sativa, on induction of browning in 3T3-L1 adipocytes. CBD enhanced expression of a core set of brown fat-specific marker genes (Ucp1, Cited1, Tmem26, Prdm16, Cidea, Tbx1, Fgf21, and Pgc-1α) and proteins (UCP1, PRDM16, and PGC-1α). Increased expression of UCP1 and other brown fat-specific markers contributed to the browning of 3T3-L1 adipocytes possibly via activation of PPARγ and PI3K. In addition, CBD increased protein expression levels of CPT1, ACSL, SIRT1, and PLIN while down-regulating JNK2, SREBP1, and LPL. These data suggest possible roles for CBD in browning of white adipocytes, augmentation of lipolysis, thermogenesis, and reduction of lipogenesis. In conclusion, the current data suggest that CBD plays dual modulatory roles in the form of inducing the brown-like phenotype as well as promoting lipid metabolism. Thus, CBD may be explored as a potentially promising therapeutic agent for the prevention of obesity.