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Sample records for brookhaven practical considerations

  1. Protocols for BNCT of glioblastoma multiforme at Brookhaven: Practical considerations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chanana, A.D.; Coderre, J.A.; Joel, D.D.; Slatkin, D.N.

    1996-12-31

    In this report we discuss some issues considered in selecting initial protocols for boron neutron capture therapy (BNCT) of human glioblastoma multiforme. First the tolerance of normal tissues, especially the brain, to the radiation field. Radiation doses limits were based on results with human and animal exposures. Estimates of tumor control doses were based on the results of single-fraction photon therapy and single fraction BNCT both in humans and experimental animals. Of the two boron compounds (BSH and BPA), BPA was chosen since a FDA-sanctioned protocol for distribution in humans was in effect at the time the first BNCT protocols were written and therapy studies in experimental animals had shown it to be more effective than BSH.

  2. Biosimilars: Practical Considerations for Pharmacists.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stevenson, James G; Popovian, Robert; Jacobs, Ira; Hurst, Susan; Shane, Lesley G

    2017-07-01

    To review the scientific and regulatory aspects of biosimilar development and practical considerations for the use of biosimilars that are relevant to pharmacists. Literature searches of PubMed and congress abstracts for publications pertaining to biosimilars were conducted from January 2016 to January 2017. Individual drug company web pages and governmental, regulatory, and other agency websites were also reviewed. Published articles, regulatory guidelines, and other sources covering biologic/biosimilar development and approval, reporting results of biosimilar studies or survey research, and/or identifying biosimilars in development or approved for use in Europe or the United States were reviewed and included. Biologic therapies have revolutionized the treatment of serious diseases, including hematological or autoimmune disorders and cancers. A biosimilar is highly similar to a licensed biologic (ie, reference or originator) and has no clinically meaningful differences in safety, purity, and potency. Unlike small-molecule drugs, biologics are large, complex proteins that cannot be exactly replicated, so the concept of a generic equivalent cannot be applied to biologics. Regulatory agencies have provided a framework for biosimilar approval, but there are many practical considerations for pharmacists, including interchangeability, substitution, naming, indication extrapolation, product labeling, therapeutic drug monitoring, manufacturer attributes, logistics of product use, and reimbursement. Pharmacists will play a key role in managing the introduction of biosimilars into health care systems. Understanding the principles of biosimilar development and evolving regulatory guidelines relevant to their use will allow pharmacists to make informed decisions regarding formulary inclusion and educate patients and other health care providers about biosimilars.

  3. Practical Considerations in Sepsis Resuscitation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Long, Brit; Koyfman, Alex; Modisett, Katharine L; Woods, Christian J

    2017-04-01

    Sepsis is a common condition managed in the emergency department, and the majority of patients respond to resuscitation measures, including antibiotics and i.v. fluids. However, a proportion of patients will fail to respond to standard treatment. This review elucidates practical considerations for management of sepsis in patients who fail to respond to standard treatment. Early goal-directed therapy revolutionized sepsis management. However, there is a paucity of literature that provides a well-defined treatment algorithm for patients who fail to improve with therapy. Refractory shock can be defined as continued patient hemodynamic instability (mean arterial pressure, ≤ 65 mm Hg, lactate ≥ 4 mmol/L, altered mental status) after adequate fluid loading (at least 30 mL/kg i.v.), the use of two vasopressors (with one as norepinephrine), and provision of antibiotics. When a lack of improvement is evident in the early stages of resuscitation, systematically considering source control, appropriate volume resuscitation, adequate antimicrobial coverage, vasopressor selection, presence of metabolic pathology, and complications of resuscitation, such as abdominal compartment syndrome and respiratory failure, allow emergency physicians to address the entire clinical scenario. The care of sepsis has experienced many changes in recent years. Care of the patient with sepsis who is not responding appropriately to initial resuscitation is troublesome for emergency physicians. This review provides practical considerations for resuscitation of the patient with septic shock. When a septic patient is refractory to standard therapy, systematically evaluating the patient and clinical course may lead to improved outcomes. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  4. Brookhaven highlights

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rowe, M.S.; Cohen, A.; Greenberg, D.; Seubert, L. (eds.)

    1992-01-01

    This publication provides a broad overview of the research programs and efforts being conducted, built, designed, and planned at Brookhaven National Laboratory. This work covers a broad range of scientific disciplines. Major facilities include the Alternating Gradient Synchrotron (AGS), with its newly completed booster, the National Synchrotron Light Source (NSLS), the High Flux Beam Reactor (HFBR), and the RHIC, which is under construction. Departments within the laboratory include the AGS department, accelerator development, physics, chemistry, biology, NSLS, medical, nuclear energy, and interdepartmental research efforts. Research ranges from the pure sciences, in nuclear physics and high energy physics as one example, to environmental work in applied science to study climatic effects, from efforts in biology which are a component of the human genome project to the study, production, and characterization of new materials. The paper provides an overview of the laboratory operations during 1992, including staffing, research, honors, funding, and general laboratory plans for the future.

  5. Brookhaven highlights - Brookhaven National Laboratory 1995

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1996-09-01

    This report highlights research conducted at Brookhaven National Laboratory in the following areas: alternating gradient synchrotron; physics; biology; national synchrotron light source; department of applied science; medical; chemistry; department of advanced technology; reactor; safety and environmental protection; instrumentation; and computing and communications.

  6. Brookhaven Linac Isotope Producer

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Laboratory Consortium — The Brookhaven Linac Isoptope Producer (BLIP)—positioned at the forefront of research into radioisotopes used in cancer treatment and diagnosis—produces commercially...

  7. Brookhaven National Laboratory

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Medical Data Analysis for U.S. Veterans Making Glass Invisible: A Nanoscience-Based Disappearing Act Our Mission We ... our diverse portfolio of licensable technologies. | More Outlook Web Access Brookhaven National Lab PO Box 5000 Upton, ...

  8. Practical considerations in voltage stability assessment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kundur, P.; Gao, B. [Powertech Labs. Inc., Surrey, BC (Canada)

    1994-12-31

    This paper deals with some of the most important practical issues related to voltage stability assessment of large practical systems. A brief discussion of the practical aspects of voltage stability problem and prevention of voltage instability is given first, followed by descriptions of different analytical techniques and tools for voltage stability analysis. Presentations of analytical tools is focused on the VSTAB program which incorporates the modal analysis, continuation power flow, and shortest distance to instability techniques, Finally, an example case study of a practical large system is presented. The case study illustrates how modal analysis is used to determine the most effective load shedding scheme for preventing voltage instability. (author) 15 refs., 2 figs., 2 tabs.

  9. Contractual considerations in contact lens practice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Classé, J G

    1986-03-01

    The use of forms in contact lens practice can save time, promote patient education, and reduce the opportunity for legal or economic disputes. The most commonly employed forms are those for contact lens fitting agreements, instructions for care and maintenance of lenses, prepaid service agreements, clinical investigations of investigatory lenses or solutions, and for extended wear patients. Sample forms are utilized for purposes of illustration.

  10. Landscape analysis: Theoretical considerations and practical needs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Godfrey, A.E.; Cleaves, E.T.

    1991-01-01

    Numerous systems of land classification have been proposed. Most have led directly to or have been driven by an author's philosophy of earth-forming processes. However, the practical need of classifying land for planning and management purposes requires that a system lead to predictions of the results of management activities. We propose a landscape classification system composed of 11 units, from realm (a continental mass) to feature (a splash impression). The classification concerns physical aspects rather than economic or social factors; and aims to merge land inventory with dynamic processes. Landscape units are organized using a hierarchical system so that information may be assembled and communicated at different levels of scale and abstraction. Our classification uses a geomorphic systems approach that emphasizes the geologic-geomorphic attributes of the units. Realm, major division, province, and section are formulated by subdividing large units into smaller ones. For the larger units we have followed Fenneman's delineations, which are well established in the North American literature. Areas and districts are aggregated into regions and regions into sections. Units smaller than areas have, in practice, been subdivided into zones and smaller units if required. We developed the theoretical framework embodied in this classification from practical applications aimed at land use planning and land management in Maryland (eastern Piedmont Province near Baltimore) and Utah (eastern Uinta Mountains). ?? 1991 Springer-Verlag New York Inc.

  11. SHORT REPORT Practical considerations in planning a cath-lab ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    image-intensifying screens. The FPDs have many advantages over the image intensifier: • Uniform brightness across image. • Increased resolution and no distortion. • High dynamic range. • Better technique control. Practical considerations in planning a cath-lab. SHORT REPORT. D H Schulenburg, MB ChB. Department of ...

  12. Brookhaven leak reactor to close

    CERN Multimedia

    MacIlwain, C

    1999-01-01

    The DOE has announced that the High Flux Beam Reactor at Brookhaven is to close for good. Though the news was not unexpected researchers were angry the decision had been taken before the review to assess the impact of reopening the reactor had been concluded (1 page).

  13. Ultrasound-guided renal transplant biopsy: practical and pragmatic considerations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Patel, Maitray D; Young, Scott W; Scott Kriegshauser, J; Dahiya, Nirvikar

    2018-02-09

    Sonographically guided percutaneous core biopsy of renal allografts has been performed for decades, providing valuable information in monitoring the status of normally functioning renal transplants as well as investigating the cause of renal transplant dysfunction. This article reviews practical aspects of biopsy technique using the cortical tangential approach, with consideration of factors that may influence biopsy success, including selection of biopsy device. Clinically important complications from renal transplant biopsy are uncommon; the most recent experience for one institution is analyzed in the context of existing evidence regarding the frequency and timing of these major complications, to understand pragmatic implications for peri-procedural care.

  14. "Journal of Space Economics - theoretical and practical considerations"

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beldavs, VZ; Sommers, J.

    2017-09-01

    This paper will address theoretical and practical considerations for the emerging field of space economics and propose an editorial policy for a journal of space economics to provide a forum for the discussion of space economics issues. It is anticipated that initially the Journal of Space Economics will operate from two different nodes one offering a European perspective (University of Latvia) and the other a U.S. perspective (University of Wisconsin at Milwaukee). The first edition of the Journal of Space Economics will focus on issues likely to arise during the course of the International Lunar Decade 2020-2030.

  15. DNA methylation based biomarkers: Practical considerations and applications

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Helene Myrtue; How Kit, Alexandre; Tost, Jorg

    2012-01-01

    of biomarker, DNA methylation, which is of great potential for many applications. This stable and heritable covalent modification mostly affects cytosines in the context of a CpG dinucleotide in humans. It can be detected and quantified by a number of technologies including genome-wide screening methods...... as a biomarker, the practical considerations for their development, and their use in disease detection, prediction of outcome or treatment response, through multiple examples mainly focusing on cancer, but also to evoke their potential for complex diseases and prenatal diagnostics....

  16. Libras academic articles translation to portuguese: Practice considerations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Natália Schleder Rigo

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available This article presents the findings of a study in translating academic articles written in Brazilian Sign Language (Libras - Língua Brasileira de Sinais to written Portuguese. Furthermore, this work has a cut from a PhD thesis translation (work in progress made in Libras and video recorded, by a deaf academic from Santa Catarina Federal University (UFSC - Universidade Federal de Santa Catarina. The present considerations follow Nord (1991 intratextual and extratextual factors, proposed as textual analysis aspects to translation. This research pursuit the advance of deliberation about practices performed by translators of sign language in Brazil, most important, about the practice of text translations involving sign language to Portuguese. Although still lacking of research and records, this activity is being done by professional in Higher Education Institutions.

  17. Scientists at Brookhaven contribute to the development of a better electron accelerator

    CERN Multimedia

    2004-01-01

    Scientists working at Brookhaven have developed a compact linear accelerator called STELLA (Staged Electron Laser Acceleration). Highly efficient, it may help electron accelerators become practical tools for applications in industry and medicine, such as radiation therapy (1 page)

  18. Brookhaven Highlights, January 1982-March 1983

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kuper, J.B.H.; Rustad, M.C. (eds.)

    1983-01-01

    Research at Brookhaven National Laboratory is summarized. Major headings are high energy physics, physics and chemistry, life sciences, applied energy science, support activities and administration. (GHT)

  19. Occlusal considerations in implantology: good occlusal practice in implantology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Davies, Stephen J

    2010-11-01

    This article is concerned with implants that are being used for fixed crown and bridgework rather than removable prostheses. The huge increase in the provision of implants over the past two decades is set to continue. Most of the research is related to avoiding failures in implants. This research, in the main, has concentrated on the essential interface between the artificial implant and living bone: osseointegration. The other interface, which is worthy of our full attention, is the one between the implant-supported crown and the antagonist tooth: the occlusion. This article aims to provide the basis for guidelines for good occlusal practice in implantology. It will consider these under two headings: those which could be considered as basic occlusal principles; and those occlusal considerations that are specific to implants.

  20. Practical considerations for measuring hydrogen concentrations in groundwater

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chapelle, F.H.; Vroblesky, D.A.; Woodward, J.C.; Lovley, D.R.

    1997-01-01

    Several practical considerations for measuring concentrations of dissolved molecular hydrogen (H2) in groundwater including 1 sampling methods 2 pumping methods and (3) effects of well casing materials were evaluated. Three different sampling methodologies (a downhole sampler, a gas- stripping method, and a diffusion sampler) were compared. The downhole sampler and gas-stripping methods gave similar results when applied to the same wells, the other hand, appeared to The diffusion sampler, on overestimate H2 concentrations relative to the downhole sampler. Of these methods, the gas-stripping method is better suited to field conditions because it is faster (~ 30 min for a single analysis as opposed to 2 h for the downhole sampler or 8 h for the diffusion sampler), the analysis is easier (less sample manipulation is required), and the data computations are more straightforward (H2 concentrations need not be corrected for water sample volume). Measurement of H2 using the gas-stripping method can be affected by different pumping equipment. Peristaltic, piston, and bladder pumps all gave similar results when applied to water produced from the same well. It was observed, however, that peristaltic-pumped water (which draws water under a negative pressure) enhanced the gas-stripping process and equilibrated slightly faster than either piston or bladder pumps (which push water under a positive pressure). A direct current(dc) electrically driven submersible pump was observed to produce H2 and was not suitable for measuring H2 in groundwater. Measurements from two field sites indicate that iron or steel well casings, produce H2, which masks H2 concentrations in groundwater. PVC-cased wells or wells cased with other materials that do not produce H2 are necessary for measuring H2 concentrations in groundwater.Several practical considerations for measuring concentrations of dissolved molecular hydrogen in groundwater including sampling methods, pumping methods, and effects of

  1. Practical considerations for bicarbonate loading and sports performance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burke, Louise M

    2013-01-01

    Consumption of sodium bicarbonate (300 mg/kg 1-2 h before exercise) can temporarily increase blood bicarbonate concentrations, enhancing extracellular buffering of hydrogen ions which accumulate and efflux from the working muscle. Such 'bicarbonate loading' provides an ergogenic strategy for sporting events involving high rates of anaerobic glycolysis which are otherwise limited by the body's capacity to manage the progressive increase in intracellular acidity. Studies show that bicarbonate loading strategies have a moderate positive effect on the performance of sports involving 1-7 min of sustained strenuous exercise, and may also be useful for prolonged sports involving intermittent or sustained periods of high-intensity work rates. This potential to enhance sports performance requires further investigation using appropriate research design, but may be limited by practical considerations such as gut discomfort or the logistics of the event. The effect of chronic use of bicarbonate supplementation prior to high-intensity workouts to promote better training performance and adaptations is worthy of further investigation. While this relatively simple dietary strategy has been studied and used by sports people for over 80 years, it is likely that there are still ways in which further benefits from bicarbonate supplementation can be developed and individualized for specific athletes or specific events. Copyright © 2013 Nestec Ltd., Vevey/S. Karger AG, Basel.

  2. Methods of prescribing relative exercise intensity: physiological and practical considerations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mann, Theresa; Lamberts, Robert Patrick; Lambert, Michael Ian

    2013-07-01

    stimulus than training prescribed as a %VO2max. However, many of these theoretical advantages of threshold-related exercise prescription have yet to be directly demonstrated. On a practical level, the use of threshold-related exercise prescription has distinct disadvantages compared to the use of %VO2max or %HRmax. Thresholds determined from single incremental tests cannot be assumed to be accurate in all individuals without verification trials. Verification trials would involve two or three additional laboratory visits and would add considerably to the testing burden on both the participant and researcher. Threshold determination and verification would also involve blood lactate sampling, which is aversive to some participants and has a number of intrinsic and extrinsic sources of variation. Threshold measurements also tend to show higher day-to-day variation than VO2max or HRmax. In summary, each method of prescribing relative exercise intensity has both advantages and disadvantages when both theoretical and practical considerations are taken into account. It follows that the most appropriate method of relative exercise intensity prescription may vary with factors such as exercise intensity, number of participants, and participant characteristics. Considering a method's limitations as well as advantages and increased reporting of individual exercise responses will facilitate accurate interpretation of findings and help to identify areas for further study.

  3. BROOKHAVEN NATIONAL LABORATORY WILDLIFE MANAGEMENT PLAN.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NAIDU,J.R.

    2002-10-22

    The purpose of the Wildlife Management Plan (WMP) is to promote stewardship of the natural resources found at the Brookhaven National Laboratory (BNL), and to integrate their protection with pursuit of the Laboratory's mission.

  4. Chinese L2 Literacy Practices: Material and Sociocultural Considerations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lo-Philip, Stephanie Wingyan

    2014-01-01

    Although there has been research on literacy as a sociocultural practice, L2 literacy researchers have yet to incorporate and consider how the material characteristics of a writing system interact with sociocultural factors in shaping literacy practices. Drawing on conceptions of literacy as a sociocultural practice, psycholinguistic and…

  5. ATLAS Overview Week at Brookhaven

    CERN Multimedia

    Pilcher, J

    Over 200 ATLAS participants gathered at Brookhaven National Laboratory during the first week of June for our annual overview week. Some system communities arrived early and held meetings on Saturday and Sunday, and the detector interface group (DIG) and Technical Coordination also took advantage of the time to discuss issues of interest for all detector systems. Sunday was also marked by a workshop on the possibilities for heavy ion physics with ATLAS. Beginning on Monday, and for the rest of the week, sessions were held in common in the well equipped Berkner Hall auditorium complex. Laptop computers became the norm for presentations and a wireless network kept laptop owners well connected. Most lunches and dinners were held on the lawn outside Berkner Hall. The weather was very cooperative and it was an extremely pleasant setting. This picture shows most of the participants from a view on the roof of Berkner Hall. Technical Coordination and Integration issues started the reports on Monday and became a...

  6. Impact of intensity of practice after stroke: issues for consideration.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kwakkel, G.

    2006-01-01

    PURPOSE: The present debate paper addresses four relevant issues related to the impact of intensity of practice after stroke. First, the best way to define intensity of practice is discussed. Second, the paper describes the evidence that exists for a dose-response relationship in stroke

  7. Practicing uneven age management: does it pay? Some economic considerations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gary W. Miller

    1991-01-01

    Unevenage silvicultural practices can be used to regenerate and manage many eastern hardwood stands. Single-tree cutting methods are feasible in stands where a desirable shade tolerant commercial species can be regenerated following periodic harvests. A variety of partial harvest practices, including single-tree selection and diameterlimit cutting have been used for 30...

  8. Practical Considerations for Clinical PET/MR Imaging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Galgano, Samuel; Viets, Zachary; Fowler, Kathryn; Gore, Lael; Thomas, John V; McNamara, Michelle; McConathy, Jonathan

    2018-01-01

    Clinical PET/MR imaging is currently performed at a number of centers around the world as part of routine standard of care. This article focuses on issues and considerations for a clinical PET/MR imaging program, focusing on routine standard-of-care studies. Although local factors influence how clinical PET/MR imaging is implemented, the approaches and considerations described here intend to apply to most clinical programs. PET/MR imaging provides many more options than PET/computed tomography with diagnostic advantages for certain clinical applications but with added complexity. A recurring theme is matching the PET/MR imaging protocol to the clinical application to balance diagnostic accuracy with efficiency. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  9. Ethical Issues and Best Practice Considerations for Internet Research

    Science.gov (United States)

    Colvin, Jan; Lanigan, Jane

    2005-01-01

    With rapidly increasing public use of the Internet and advances in Web technologies, family and consumer sciences researchers have the opportunity to conduct Internet-based research. However, online research raises critical ethical issues concerning human subjects that have an impact on research practices. This article provides a review of the…

  10. Practical considerations in planning a cath-lab | Schulenburg | SA ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    When planning a vascular laboratory it should be kept in mind that the main purpose of such a laboratory is to treat patients using various interventional skills. Planning a vascular laboratory depends on various factors like the geographic environment of the radiology practice, the need for interventional procedures, types of ...

  11. Anaesthesia for Baboons – Practical and ethical considerations

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Adele

    Animal research is still a cornerstone of modern scientific discovery. A practical approach to anaesthetising Chacma baboons (Papio ursinus) undergoing experimental cardiac surgery is described. This physiological model has many similarities to human physiology. Subtle differences exist which could influence outcome.

  12. Gifted and Learning Disabled Students: Practical Considerations for Teachers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Landrum, Timothy J.

    1989-01-01

    The article provides practical suggestions for teachers working with gifted learning-disabled students. It includes a discussion of whether students can be both gifted and learning disabled, and reviews service options, methods of identification, and programing for this population. (DB)

  13. Practical Considerations for Using Exploratory Factor Analysis in Educational Research

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beavers, Amy S.; Lounsbury, John W.; Richards, Jennifer K.; Huck, Schuyler W.; Skolits, Gary J.; Esquivel, Shelley L.

    2013-01-01

    The uses and methodology of factor analysis are widely debated and discussed, especially the issues of rotational use, methods of confirmatory factor analysis, and adequate sample size. The variety of perspectives and often conflicting opinions can lead to confusion among researchers about best practices for using factor analysis. The focus of the…

  14. Practical Considerations when Using Benchmarking for Accountability in Higher Education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Achtemeier, Sue D.; Simpson, Ronald D.

    2005-01-01

    The qualitative study on which this article is based examined key individuals' perceptions, both within a research university community and beyond in its external governing board, of how to improve benchmarking as an accountability method in higher education. Differing understanding of benchmarking revealed practical implications for using it as…

  15. Sri Lankan English O Level: Lever for Change. Practical Considerations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nanayakkara, Ethel; Webber, Richard

    A discussion of the new Sri Lankan General Certificate of Education (GCE) O-Level standardized test of English focuses on how new ideas in testing have been implemented in the test and on their effect on classroom practice and the quality of English instruction. The discussion begins with a brief outline of the history and context in which the new…

  16. Anaesthesia for Baboons – Practical and ethical considerations

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Adele

    Southern African Journal of Anaesthesia & Analgesia • March 2006. 26. Animal research is still a cornerstone of modern scientific discovery. A practical approach to anaesthetising Chacma baboons (Papio ursinus) undergoing experimental cardiac surgery is described. This physiological model has many similarities to ...

  17. Clinical and practical considerations in the pharmacologic management of narcolepsy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thorpy, Michael J; Dauvilliers, Yves

    2015-01-01

    Despite published treatment recommendations and the availability of approved and off-label pharmacologic therapies for narcolepsy, the clinical management of this incurable, chronic neurologic disorder remains challenging. While treatment is generally symptomatically driven, decisions regarding which drug(s) to use need to take into account a variety of factors that may affect adherence, efficacy, and tolerability. Type 1 narcolepsy (predominantly excessive daytime sleepiness with cataplexy) or type 2 narcolepsy (excessive daytime sleepiness without cataplexy) may drive treatment decisions, with consideration given either to a single drug that targets multiple symptoms or to multiple drugs that each treat a specific symptom. Other drug-related characteristics that affect drug choice are dosing regimens, tolerability, and potential drug-drug interactions. Additionally, the patient should be an active participant in treatment decisions, and the main symptomatic complaints, treatment goals, psychosocial setting, and use of lifestyle substances (ie, alcohol, nicotine, caffeine, and cannabis) need to be discussed with respect to treatment decisions. Although there is a lack of narcolepsy-specific instruments for monitoring therapeutic effects, clinically relevant subjective and objective measures of daytime sleepiness (eg, Epworth Sleepiness Scale and Maintenance of Wakefulness Test) can be used to provide guidance on whether treatment goals are being met. These considerations are discussed with the objective of providing clinically relevant recommendations for making treatment decisions that can enhance the effective management of patients with narcolepsy. Copyright © 2014 The Authors. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  18. Future directions in genetic counseling: practical and ethical considerations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Biesecker, Barbara Bowles

    1998-06-01

    The accelerated discovery of gene mutations that lead to increased risk of disease has led to the rapid development of predictive genetic tests. These tests improve the accuracy of assigning risk, but at a time when intervention or prevention strategies are largely unproved. In coming years, however, data will become increasingly available to guide treatment of genetic diseases. Eventually genetic testing will be performed for common diseases as well as for rare genetic conditions. This will challenge genetic counseling practice. The ethical principles that now guide this practice take into account the personal nature of test decision making, the need to respect individual self-determination, and the importance of client confidentiality. Certain of these principles may have to be modified as genetic testing becomes more widespread in order to meet the changing needs of clients and society. This paper offers recommendations to ensure that genetic counselors will take a leading role in the future delivery of ethical genetic services.

  19. Scientific, statistical, practical, and regulatory considerations in design space development.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Debevec, Veronika; Srčič, Stanko; Horvat, Matej

    2018-03-01

    The quality by design (QbD) paradigm guides the pharmaceutical industry towards improved understanding of products and processes, and at the same time facilitates a high degree of manufacturing and regulatory flexibility throughout the establishment of the design space. This review article presents scientific, statistical and regulatory considerations in design space development. All key development milestones, starting with planning, selection of factors, experimental execution, data analysis, model development and assessment, verification, and validation, and ending with design space submission, are presented and discussed. The focus is especially on frequently ignored topics, like management of factors and CQAs that will not be included in experimental design, evaluation of risk of failure on design space edges, or modeling scale-up strategy. Moreover, development of a design space that is independent of manufacturing scale is proposed as the preferred approach.

  20. Implant-assisted removable partial dentures: practical considerations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Omura, Aaron J; Latthe, Vaibhav; Marin, Mark M; Cagna, David R

    2016-01-01

    At the heart of prosthodontic treatment planning must be a sound understanding of the quality and reliability of the prosthodontic foundation. Implant prosthodontics relies almost entirely on the biological and mechanical properties of an osseous foundation. Initiation of therapy in the absence of a healthy and stable prosthodontic foundation risks unintended and suboptimal treatment outcomes. For conventional removable partial denture (RPD) therapy, consideration must be given to interactions between the soft and hard tissues available to support and stabilize planned prostheses. The strategic addition of implants to the partially edentulous foundation can improve the support, comfort, and esthetics of an RPD, resulting in elevated patient satisfaction and greater therapeutic success. This article discusses aspects of diagnosis, treatment planning, clinical management, laboratory execution, and maintenance that must be considered in order to obtain optimal results with implant-assisted RPDs.

  1. Ideology and community social psychology: theoretical considerations and practical implications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Montenegro, Marisela

    2002-08-01

    This paper addresses the importance of the concept of ideology in community work. The implications of a Marxist approach to ideology in community practice are analyzed in terms of the concepts of problematization (P. Freire, 1979) and consciousness-raising (J. Barreiro, 1976), illustrating the point with some examples. The traditional Marxist perspective is also examined in relation to the perspectives of social constructionism (I. Ibáñez, 1996), cultural studies (A. McRobbie, 1992), post-Marxism (E. Laclau & C. Mouffe, 1985), and feminism (D. Haraway, 1991). It is argued that the concepts of hegemony and habitus (P. Bourdieu, 1985) can be useful to community social psychology theory and practice. A "situated perspective"--in which it is possible to dialogue from different "subject positions," and articulate transformation and political action--is argued. The implications of this shifting in the concept of ideology by means of theoretical developments outside social communitypsychology can help to define the external (outside) agent's position in community practice.

  2. Some brief considerations on the relationship between theory and practice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Connolly, Angela

    2008-09-01

    The present crisis in models of training and in psychoanalytical education in general can be linked to the gulf that has come to be created between analytical theory and clinical practice. The paper(1) examines the historical facts that have led to this split and suggests the need to return to the models of Freud and Jung. Both these fathers of depth psychology stressed the dangers inherent in the dogmatic use of theory and both insisted that theory must always spring from and be able to account for clinical practice rather than vice versa, as is so often the case today. The paper also looks at how theory should be taught in our analytical institutes in order to ensure that what we transmit to our candidates is not knowledge in the form of dogma but rather a way of proceeding that will enable them to think creatively about their clinical practice and thus produce new knowledge, essential if depth psychology is to remain relevant to our post-modern culture.

  3. Frailty Screening and Interventions: Considerations for Clinical Practice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Walston, Jeremy; Buta, Brian; Xue, Qian-Li

    2018-02-01

    Frailty is recognized as a cornerstone of geriatric medicine. It increases the risk of geriatric syndromes and adverse health outcomes in older and vulnerable populations. Although multiple screening instruments have been developed and validated to improve feasibility in clinical practice, frequent lack of agreement between frailty instruments has slowed broad implementation of these tools. Despite this, interventions to improve frailty-related health outcomes developed to date include exercise, nutrition, multicomponent interventions, and individually tailored geriatric care models. Possible strategies to prevent frailty include lifestyle or behavioral interventions, proper nutrition, and increased activity levels and social engagement. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  4. Practical considerations for therapies targeting the prostacyclin pathway

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Harrison W. Farber

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available Therapies that target the prostacyclin pathway play a key role in the treatment of both early- and late-stage pulmonary arterial hypertension, and provide significant clinical benefits for patients. A number of agents have been approved, which are administered via intravenous, subcutaneous, inhaled or oral routes. The use of these therapies is associated with practical challenges, relating to the need for up-titration and their routes of administration. We discuss here a number of measures that can be taken to support patients and healthcare professionals in order to address the complexities of using these therapies and to encourage compliance. Providing patients with timely information and education, together with practical advice on managing their medication and associated equipment, assists patients with day-to-day management of therapy. Referral to patient associations and support groups can be of further benefit. With an effective management plan and an experienced multidisciplinary team, the use of therapies that target the prostacyclin pathway can be optimised.

  5. Dr. Praveen Chaudhari named director of Brookhaven National Laboratory

    CERN Multimedia

    2003-01-01

    "Brookhaven Science Associates announced today the selection of Dr. Praveen Chaudhari as Director of the U.S. Department of Energy's Brookhaven National Laboratory. Dr. Chaudhari, who will begin his new duties on April 1, joins Brookhaven Lab after 36 years of distinguished service at IBM as a scientist and senior manager of research" (1 page).

  6. Practical Considerations for Optic Nerve Estimation in Telemedicine

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Karnowski, Thomas Paul [ORNL; Aykac, Deniz [ORNL; Chaum, Edward [ORNL; Giancardo, Luca [ORNL; Li, Yaquin [University of Tennessee, Knoxville (UTK); Tobin Jr, Kenneth William [ORNL

    2009-01-01

    The projected increase in diabetes in the United States and worldwide has created a need for broad-based, inexpensive screening for diabetic retinopathy (DR), an eye disease which can lead to vision impairment. A telemedicine network with retina cameras and automated quality control, physiological feature location, and lesion / anomaly detection is a low-cost way of achieving broad-based screening. In this work we report on the effect of quality estimation on an optic nerve (ON) detection method with a confidence metric. We report on an improvement of the fusion technique using a data set from an ophthalmologists practice then show the results of the method as a function of image quality on a set of images from an on-line telemedicine network collected in Spring 2009 and another broad-based screening program. We show that the fusion method, combined with quality estimation processing, can improve detection performance and also provide a method for utilizing a physician-in-the-loop for images that may exceed the capabilities of automated processing.

  7. Theoretical and practical considerations on probation in labor disputes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marioara Țichindelean

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available Having the actori incubit onus probandi apothegm as a starting point, we shall examine the particular aspects of probation in work -related conflicts, as stipulated in the 272-273 Article within the 53/2003 Law regarding The Labour Code and 212 Article within 62/2011 Law on Social Dialogue. The objective of this paper is to examine distinct features related to the functions of evidence, to the set of fundamental principles which underlie the judicial proceedings of probation in work -related conflicts, as well as the active role of the judge in order to assure a righteous and fair trial. All the elements referred to will be regarded from historical, hermeneutic, teleological and comparative points of view. The specific character of regulations underpinning the management procedures regarding probation in work -related conflicts, differing from the provisions under statutory law, highlights the legislator's choice towards establishing a simple and urgent procedure. It should be adjusted to the work terms and to the individual right to work, representing a genuine guarantee for bringing the law claims which derive from adequate or inadequate performance of individual or collective contracts, performed by the employer. Examples provided by judicial practice uncloak the difficulties encountered by both parties of the trial and court when it comes to enforcing the specific provisions for the application of the legislation, fact which is not always compatible with the legislature’s aim, by means of regulation.

  8. Safety profile and practical considerations of monoclonal antibody treatment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Casanova Estruch, B

    2013-04-01

    Monoclonal antibodies are immunoglobulins specially designed to act against specific targets, in such a way that their administration stops a specific pathogenic process, stimulates a particular cellular action, or changes a cell mechanism to another pathway of interest. Their production is based on the establishment of modified immortal B lymphocytes to produce a specific immunoglobulin. Depending on the level of purity, this immunoglobulin may be murine complement (ending in "o", for example muromonab); chimeric, in which all the immunoglobulin is human, except in the variable region which is murine (ending in "xi", for example, rituximab); humanised, in which all the immunoglobulin is human, except in the variable complement region which remains murine (ending in "zu", for example, natalizumab); and human complement (ending in "u", for example, adalimumab). Therefore, there will be two types of secondary effects: those arising from the action of the antibody, such as opportunistic infections due to immunosuppression, and those arising from the administration of a protein, such as anaphylactic reactions. The sources used for the present articles were articles published in PubMed, located by searching for "Monoclonal antibodies and Secondary effects", and the web pages of the European Medicines Agency (EMEA) and the US Food and Drus Administration (FDA). The secondary effects arising from the mechanisms of action were opportunistic infections, common infections, development of tumours and autoimmune phenomena, and those arising from the administration of proteins: anaphylactic reaction, cytokine release syndrome, and the development of neutralising antibodies. Finally, the management of monoclonal antibodies in clinical practice and in special situations is discussed, including administering vaccines, pregnancy and paediatric use. Reference will be made to immune recovery syndrome. Monoclonal antibodies are highly effective drugs when specifically indicated, but

  9. Brookhaven highlights, October 1979-September 1980

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1980-01-01

    Highlights are given for the research areas of the Brookhaven National Laboratory. These areas include high energy physics, physics and chemistry, life sciences, applied energy science (energy and environment, and nuclear energy), and support activities (including mathematics, instrumentation, reactors, and safety). (GHT)

  10. [Consultation. Considerations on the practice of medical consultation].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leiss, O

    2007-01-01

    On the theme of Linus Geisler's nine steps for a successful consultation between doctor and patient, the ability for self-criticism, the ability to be able to listen to oneself and the value of the doctor-patient relationship in the context of medical practice will be discussed. Subsequently, the framework of the consultation, the consulting room atmosphere and the complete setting of the consultation will be dealt with. The importance of active listening and the recognition of all messages, both verbal and from body language, will be particularly emphasized. The capability for empathy is presented as the necessary bridge to recognition of the feelings and inner world of the patient. Because one only sees what one is looking for and only recognizes what one knows, the recognition of typical complaints presented by patients in a consultation represents the "something" which must be specifically elucidated. The problems and symptoms which the patient brings to the doctor are surrounded by a ring of fears and apprehensions. For this reason it is decisive to uncover the accompanying cloud of fears and apprehensions with appropriate questions, to correctly assign the unsettling symptoms of the patient and to be able to correctly interpret them. As illustrated by the language of nature - the translation of deoxyribonucleic acid (DNA) triplets into amino acids - the translation of biological, psychological and social aspects of the complaints symptomatic into the level of diagnosis and the translation of the referential, social and affective meaning of the expressions used by the patient, into the level of the significance will be discussed. The role of the doctor here is that of a producer of context and a skilled translator. In the management of functional disorders and chronic diseases the construction of a shared reality is important. The therapeutic function of consultations is due to an introduction of metaphors as bridges - bridges to an improved understanding of

  11. Searching for the H dibaryon at Brookhaven

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schwartz, A.J. [Princeton Univ., NJ (United States)

    1994-12-01

    This paper reviews the status of current experiments at Brookhaven, searching for the six-quark H dibaryon postulated by R. Jaffe in 1977. Two experiments, E813 and E888, have recently completed running and two new experiments, E836 and E885, are approved to run. The data recorded so far is under analysis and should have good sensitivity to both short-lived and long-lived Hs.

  12. The Brookhaven electron analogue, 1953--1957

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Plotkin, M.

    1991-12-18

    The following topics are discussed on the Brookhaven electron analogue: L.J. Haworth and E.L. VanHorn letters; Original G.K. Green outline for report; General description; Parameter list; Mechanical Assembly; Alignment; Degaussing; Vacuum System; Injection System; The pulsed inflector; RF System; Ferrite Cavity; Pick-up electrodes and preamplifiers; Radio Frequency power amplifier; Lens supply; Controls and Power; and RF acceleration summary.

  13. Brookhaven National Laboratory site environmental report for calendar year 1994

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Naidu, J.R.; Royce, B.A. [eds.

    1995-05-01

    This report documents the results of the Environmental Monitoring Program at Brookhaven National Laboratory and presents summary information about environmental compliance for 1994. To evaluate the effect of Brookhaven National Laboratory`s operations on the local environment, measurements of direct radiation, and a variety of radionuclides and chemical compounds in ambient air, soil, sewage effluent, surface water, groundwater, fauna and vegetation were made at the Brookhaven National Laboratory site and at sites adjacent to the Laboratory.

  14. Brookhaven highlights, October 1, 1989--September 30, 1990

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rowe, M.S.; Cohen, A.; Greenberg, D.; Seubert, L.; Kuper, J.B.H. (eds.)

    1990-01-01

    This report discusses research being conducted at Brookhaven National Laboratory. Highlights from all the department are illustrated. The main topics are on accelerator development and applications. (LSP)

  15. Systematic Screening for Behavior in K-12 Settings as Regular School Practice: Practical Considerations and Recommendations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oakes, Wendy Peia; Lane, Kathleen Lynne; Cantwell, Emily D.; Royer, David J.

    2017-01-01

    There is a priority for schools to address students' social and emotional needs as is done for academic learning. Tiered models of prevention provide a framework for teaching social skills and behavioral expectations, as well as academics, with positive, proactive, evidence-based practices. Central to responding to students' needs is accurate…

  16. Quasi-experimental designs in practice-based research settings: design and implementation considerations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Handley, Margaret A; Schillinger, Dean; Shiboski, Stephen

    2011-01-01

    Although randomized controlled trials are often a gold standard for determining intervention effects, in the area of practice-based research (PBR), there are many situations in which individual randomization is not possible. Alternative approaches to evaluating interventions have received increased attention, particularly those that can retain elements of randomization such that they can be considered "controlled" trials. Methodological design elements and practical implementation considerations for two quasi-experimental design approaches that have considerable promise in PBR settings--the stepped-wedge design, and a variant of this design, a wait-list cross-over design, are presented along with a case study from a recent PBR intervention for patients with diabetes. PBR-relevant design features include: creation of a cohort over time that collects control data but allows all participants (clusters or patients) to receive the intervention; staggered introduction of clusters; multiple data collection points; and one-way cross-over into the intervention arm. Practical considerations include: randomization versus stratification, training run in phases; and extended time period for overall study completion. Several design features of practice based research studies can be adapted to local circumstances yet retain elements to improve methodological rigor. Studies that utilize these methods, such as the stepped-wedge design and the wait-list cross-over design, can increase the evidence base for controlled studies conducted within the complex environment of PBR.

  17. What laser does your practice need? Advantages, considerations, and practice integration of laser dentistry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coluzzi, Donald J

    2008-12-01

    The use of lasers in dentistry has expanded and improved some treatment options for those clinicians who have adopted the technology. As with all dental materials and instruments, the practitioner must use clinical experience, receive proper training, become very familiar with the operating manual, and proceed within the scope of his or her practice. The potential purchaser should carefully analyze the style and type of the practice to decide how useful the device could be. Moreover, attending introductory courses, seminars, and presentations, such as those at the aforementioned Academy of Laser Dentistry's Annual Conference, or at various state and national scientific sessions, are essential before buying. Because of the varied composition of human tissue and the differing ways that laser energy is absorbed, there is no single perfect laser. However, our patients continue to agree that the dental laser is a wonderful instrument.

  18. Competence not Age Determines Ability to Practice: Ethical Considerations about Sensorimotor Agility, Dexterity, and Cognitive Capacity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaups, Krista L

    2016-10-01

    Consideration of the effects of aging on physicians' practice is crucial to addressing aging clinicians' competence, that is, their ability to practice with reasonable skill and safety. Given physician workforce shortages even in resource abundant countries, the establishment of a compulsory retirement age in the US is impractical and unlikely. Several US hospitals and institutions have sought to address concerns about competence by establishing mandatory age-linked testing and evaluation for physicians. However, these procedures have raised questions regarding age discrimination and test validity. © 2016 American Medical Association. All Rights Reserved.

  19. Medicaid Consent to Sterilization forms: historical, practical, ethical, and advocacy considerations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Block-Abraham, Dana; Arora, Kavita S; Tate, Danielle; Gee, Rebekah E

    2015-06-01

    The US government developed a Medicaid Consent to Sterilization form in the mid-1970s to protect vulnerable populations from coerced sterilization. US health care practices have evolved significantly since that time. The form, however, has not changed, and may be preventing access to desired services for the same vulnerable populations it was originally created to protect. This paper discusses the relevant historical, practical use, ethical, and advocacy considerations of the Medicaid sterilization consent form and proposes changes to make the form more pertinent to today's medical environment.

  20. Nurse drug diversion and nursing leader's responsibilities: legal, regulatory, ethical, humanistic, and practical considerations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tanga, Hazel Y

    2011-01-01

    Nurses who divert drugs pose significant threats to patient safety, but also become a liability to healthcare organizations and the nursing department where the diversion occurred. Healthcare and nursing leaders have a responsibility to ensure that security systems are in place to prevent diversion and protect patients if nursing impairment is suspected as a result of drug diversion. Nursing leaders must consider legal, regulatory, ethical, humanistic, and practical considerations in resolving this issue.

  1. Imaging of neurodegenerative cognitive and behavioral disorders: practical considerations for dementia clinical practice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Atri, Alireza

    2016-01-01

    This chapter reviews clinical applications and imaging findings useful in medical practice relating to neurodegenerative cognitive/dementing disorders. The preponderance of evidence and consensus guidelines support an essential role of multitiered neuroimaging in the evaluation and management of neurodegenerative cognitive/dementia syndrome that range in severity from mild impairments to frank dementia. Additionally, imaging features are incorporated in updated clinical and research diagnostic criteria for most dementias, including Alzheimer's disease (AD), Dementia with Lewy bodies (DLB), Frontotemporal Lobar Degenerations/Frontotemporal Dementia (FTD), and Vascular Cognitive Impairment (VCI). Best clinical practices dictate that structural imaging, preferably with magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) when possible and computed tomography when not, be obtained as a first-tier approach during the course of a thorough clinical evaluation to improve diagnostic confidence and assess for nonneurodegenerative treatable conditions that may cause or substantially contribute to cognitive/behavioral symptoms or which may dictate a substantial change in management. These conditions include less common structural (e.g., mass lesions such as tumors and hematomas; normal-pressure hydrocephalus), inflammatory, autoimmune and infectious conditions, and more common comorbid contributing conditions (e.g., vascular cerebral injury causing leukoaraiosis, infarcts, or microhemorrhages) that can produce a mixed dementia syndrome. When, after appropriate clinical, cognitive/neuropsychologic, and structural neuroimaging assessment, a dementia specialist remains in doubt regarding etiology and appropriate management, second-tier imaging with molecular methods, preferably with fluorodexoyglucose positron emission tomography (PET) (or single-photon emission computed tomography if PET is unavailable) can provide more diagnostic specificity (e.g., help differentiate between atypical AD and FTD as

  2. Brookhaven National Laboratory site environmental report for calendar year 1996

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schroeder, G.L.; Paquette, D.E.; Naidu, J.R.; Lee, R.J.; Briggs, S.L.K.

    1998-01-01

    This report documents the results of the Environmental Monitoring Program at Brookhaven National Laboratory and summarizes information about environmental compliance for 1996. To evaluate the effect of Brookhaven National Laboratory`s operations on the local environment, measurements of direct radiation, and of a variety of radionuclides and chemical compounds in the ambient air, soil, sewage effluent, surface water, groundwater, fauna, and vegetation were made at the Brookhaven National Laboratory site and at adjacent sites. The report also evaluates the Laboratory`s compliance with all applicable guides, standards, and limits for radiological and non-radiological emissions and effluents to the environment.

  3. Family-centered care for children with cerebral palsy: conceptual and practical considerations to advance care and practice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    King, Gillian; Chiarello, Lisa

    2014-08-01

    This article focuses on conceptual and practical considerations in family-centered care for children with cerebral palsy and their families. In the last 5 years, there have been important advances in our understanding of the components of family-centered care, and initial attempts to understand the client change processes at play. Recent research elaborates on family-centered care by delving into aspects of family-provider partnership, and applying family-centered principles to organizational service delivery to bring about organizational cultures of family-centered care. Recent research has also begun to consider mediators of client change, and new practice models have been proposed that embrace family-centered principles and illustrate the "art" of practice. Future research directions are discussed, including explorations of causal relationships between family-centered care principles, elements of caregiving practice, client change processes, and child and family outcomes. The meaning of the recent literature for pediatric neurology practice is considered. © The Author(s) 2014.

  4. Legal, Practical, and Ethical Considerations for Making Online Patient Portals Accessible for All.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lyles, Courtney R; Fruchterman, Jim; Youdelman, Mara; Schillinger, Dean

    2017-10-01

    Largely driven by the financial incentives of the HITECH Act's Meaningful Use program as part of federal US health care reform, access to portal Web sites has rapidly expanded, allowing many patients to view their medical record information online. Despite this expansion, there is little attention paid to the accessibility of portals for more vulnerable patient populations-especially patients with limited health literacy or limited English proficiency, and individuals with disabilities. We argue that there are potential legal mandates for improving portal accessibility (e.g., the Civil Rights and the Rehabilitation Acts), as well as ethical considerations to prevent the exacerbation of existing health and health care disparities. To address these legal, practical, and ethical considerations, we present standards and broad recommendations that could greatly improve the reach and impact of portal Web sites.

  5. Sex and gender considerations in Canadian clinical practice guidelines: a systematic review

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tannenbaum, Cara; Clow, Barbara; Haworth-Brockman, Margaret; Voss, Patrice

    2017-01-01

    Background: The importance of sex and gender in the diagnosis and management of health conditions is well established, but the extent to which this evidence is integrated into clinical practice guidelines remains unknown. We aimed to determine the proportion of Canadian clinical practice guidelines that integrate evidence on sex and gender considerations. Methods: We searched the Canadian Medical Association's CPG Infobase, PubMed, all provincial/territorial websites and websites of professional organizations for English- and French-language Canadian clinical practice guidelines published between January 2013 and June 2015 on selected conditions identified as priorities by policy-makers and practitioners. Citations and text were searched electronically using keyword terms related to sex and gender. Three investigators independently analyzed and categorized the content of text-positive clinical practice guidelines based on clinical relevance for practitioners. Results: Of the 118 clinical practice guidelines that met the inclusion criteria, 79 (66.9%) were text-positive for sex and/or gender keywords; 8 (10%) of the 79 used the keywords only in relation to pregnancy. Of the remaining 71 guidelines, 25 (35%) contained sex-related diagnostic or management recommendations. An additional 5 (7%) contained recommendations for sex-specific laboratory reference values, 29 (41%) referred to differences in epidemiologic features or risk factors only, and 12 (17%) contained nonrelevant mentions of search keywords. Twenty-five (35%) of the text-positive guidelines used the terms "sex" and/or "gender" correctly. Interpretation: Recommendations related to sex and gender are inconsistently reported in Canadian clinical practice guidelines. Guidelines such as the Sex and Gender Equity in Research guidelines may help inform the meaningful inclusion of sex and gender evidence in the development of clinical practice guidelines. PMID:28401121

  6. Practicalities and Research Considerations for Conducting Childhood Obesity Prevention Interventions with Families

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Philip J. Morgan

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available Internationally, childhood obesity is a major public health concern. Given the established difficulties in treating obesity, designing and evaluating effective obesity prevention interventions are research priorities. As parents play a crucial role in establishing positive health behaviours in children, they are a key target for child obesity prevention programs. However, recruiting and engaging parents in such interventions can be a considerable challenge for researchers and practitioners. Members of the ‘Parenting, Child Behaviour and Well-being’ stream of the Australasian Child and Adolescent Obesity Research Network (ACAORN have considerable and varied expertise in conducting such interventions and can provide insights into addressing these challenges. This paper aims to highlight considerations regarding the design, implementation, and evaluation of obesity prevention interventions with families and provide practical insights and recommendations for researchers and practitioners conducting family-based research in this area. Case studies of three family-based interventions conducted by ACAORN members are highlighted to provide examples and contextualise the recommendations proposed.

  7. Practical considerations in the pharmacological treatment of postherpetic neuralgia for the primary care provider

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Massengill JS

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available Jamie S Massengill,1 John L Kittredge2 1JSM Medical, Edmond, OK, USA; 2Michiana Spine, Sports and Occupational Rehab, PC, Mishawaka, IN, USA Abstract: An estimated one million individuals in the US are diagnosed with herpes zoster (HZ; shingles each year. Approximately 20% of these patients will develop postherpetic neuralgia (PHN, a complex HZ complication characterized by neuropathic pain isolated to the dermatome that was affected by the HZ virus. PHN is debilitating, altering physical function and quality of life, and commonly affects vulnerable populations, including the elderly and the immunocompromised. Despite the availability of an immunization for HZ prevention and several approved HZ treatments, the incidence of PHN is increasing. Furthermore, management of the neuropathic pain associated with PHN is often suboptimal, and the use of available therapeutics may be complicated by adverse effects and complex, burdensome treatment regimens, as well as by patients' comorbidities and polypharmacy, which may lead to drug–drug interactions. Informed and comprehensive assessments of currently available pharmacological treatment options to achieve effective pain control in the primary care setting are needed. In this article, we discuss the situation in clinical practice, review currently recommended prevention and treatment options for PHN, and outline practical considerations for the management of this neuropathic pain syndrome, with a focus on optimal, individual-based treatment plans for use in the primary care setting. Keywords: herpes zoster, postherpetic neuralgia, primary care, clinical practice, pharmacological treatment, practical guidelines

  8. Increased intensity performance of the Brookhaven AGS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Raka, E.; Ahrens, L.; Frey, W.; Gill, E.; Glenn, J.W.; Sanders, R.; Weng, W.

    1985-05-01

    With the advent of H/sup -/ injection into the Brookhaven AGS, circulating beams of up to 3 x 10/sup 13/ protons at 200 MeV have been obtained. Rf capture of 2.2 x 10/sup 13/ and acceleration of 1.73 x 10/sup 13/ up to the transition energy (approx. = 8 GeV) and 1.64 x 10/sup 13/ to full energy (approx. = 29 GeV) has been achieved. This represents a 50% increase over the best performance obtained with H/sup +/ injection. The increase in circulation beam current is obtained without filling the horizontal aperture. This allows the rf capture process to utilize a larger longitudinal phase space area (approx. = 1 eV sec/bunch vs less than or equal to 0.6 eV sec with H/sup +/ operation). The resulting reduction in relative longitudinal density partially offsets the increase in space charge effects at higher currents. In order to make the capture process independent of injected beam current, a dynamic beam loading compensation loop was installed on the AGS rf system. This is the only addition to the synchrotron itself that was required to reach the new intensity records. A discussion of injection, the rf capture process, and space charge effects is presented. 9 refs., 5 figs.

  9. Geothermal materials development at Brookhaven National Laboratory

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kukacka, L.E. [Brookhaven National Lab., Upton, NY (United States)

    1997-12-31

    As part of the DOE/OGT response to recommendations and priorities established by industrial review of their overall R&D program, the Geothermal Materials Program at Brookhaven National Laboratory (BNL) is focusing on topics that can reduce O&M costs and increase competitiveness in foreign and domestic markets. Corrosion and scale control, well completion materials, and lost circulation control have high priorities. The first two topics are included in FY 1997 BNL activities, but work on lost circulation materials is constrained by budgetary limitations. The R&D, most of which is performed as cost-shared efforts with U.S. geothermal firms, is rapidly moving into field testing phases. FY 1996 and 1997 accomplishments in the development of lightweight CO{sub 2}-resistant cements for well completions; corrosion resistant, thermally conductive polymer matrix composites for heat exchange applications; and metallic, polymer and ceramic-based corrosion protective coatings are given in this paper. In addition, plans for work that commenced in March 1997 on thermally conductive cementitious grouting materials for use with geothermal heat pumps (GHP), are discussed.

  10. Best research practices in psychology: Illustrating epistemological and pragmatic considerations with the case of relationship science.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Finkel, Eli J; Eastwick, Paul W; Reis, Harry T

    2015-02-01

    In recent years, a robust movement has emerged within psychology to increase the evidentiary value of our science. This movement, which has analogs throughout the empirical sciences, is broad and diverse, but its primary emphasis has been on the reduction of statistical false positives. The present article addresses epistemological and pragmatic issues that we, as a field, must consider as we seek to maximize the scientific value of this movement. Regarding epistemology, this article contrasts the false-positives-reduction (FPR) approach with an alternative, the error balance (EB) approach, which argues that any serious consideration of optimal scientific practice must contend simultaneously with both false-positive and false-negative errors. Regarding pragmatics, the movement has devoted a great deal of attention to issues that frequently arise in laboratory experiments and one-shot survey studies, but it has devoted less attention to issues that frequently arise in intensive and/or longitudinal studies. We illustrate these epistemological and pragmatic considerations with the case of relationship science, one of the many research domains that frequently employ intensive and/or longitudinal methods. Specifically, we examine 6 research prescriptions that can help to reduce false-positive rates: preregistration, prepublication sharing of materials, postpublication sharing of data, close replication, avoiding piecemeal publication, and increasing sample size. For each, we offer concrete guidance not only regarding how researchers can improve their research practices and balance the risk of false-positive and false-negative errors, but also how the movement can capitalize upon insights from research practices within relationship science to make the movement stronger and more inclusive. PsycINFO Database Record (c) 2015 APA, all rights reserved.

  11. Grading Practices and Considerations of Graduate Students at the Beginning of their Teaching Assignment

    CERN Document Server

    Yerushalmi, Edit; Maries, Alexandru; Henderson, Charles R; Singh, Chandralekha

    2016-01-01

    Research shows that expert-like approaches to problem-solving can be promoted by encouraging students to explicate their thought processes and follow a prescribed problem-solving strategy. Since grading communicates instructors' expectations, teaching assistants' grading decisions play a crucial role in forming students' approaches to problem-solving in physics. We investigated the grading practices and considerations of 43 graduate teaching assistants (TAs). The TAs were asked to grade a set of specially designed student solutions and explain their grading decisions. We found that in a quiz context, a majority of TAs noticed but did not grade on solution features which promote expert-like approaches to problem-solving. In addition, TAs graded differently in quiz and homework contexts, partly because of how they considered time limitations in a quiz. Our findings can inform professional development programs for TAs.

  12. Accommodation deficit in children with Down syndrome: practical considerations for the optometrist

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Little JA

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available Julie-Anne Little School of Biomedical Sciences, University of Ulster, Coleraine, Northern Ireland, UKAbstract: Down syndrome is the most common cause of intellectual impairment, and life expectancy in this group has increased in recent decades, meaning that health care is increasingly focused on quality of life and the management of treatable illnesses. There are frequent problems associated with vision in Down syndrome, including refractive errors, strabismus, reduced vision, and reduced accommodative ability. This review will discuss the importance of accommodative ability; describe the prevalence and nature of accommodative deficits in Down syndrome, which are found in approximately 55%–76% of individuals; discuss the management of this deficit with the prescription of bifocal correction; and summarize the possible etiologies of hypoaccommodation in Down syndrome. Finally, the review will consider practical considerations for the optometrist managing accommodative deficits in patients with Down syndrome. Keywords: Down syndrome, accommodation, accommodative deficits, dynamic retinoscopy, bifocals, refractive error

  13. Practical, regulatory and clinical considerations for development of inhalation drug products

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shuguang Hou

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available The formulation and device collectively constitute an inhalation drug product. Development of inhaled drugs must consider the compatibility between formulation and device in order to achieve the intended pharmaceutical performance and usability of the product to improve patient compliance with treatment instruction. From the points of formulation, device and patient use, this article summarizes the inhalation drugs, including pressurized metered dose inhaler (pMDI, dry powder inhaler (DPI, and nebulizer that are currently available in the US and UK markets. It also discusses the practical considerations for the development of inhalers and provides an update on the corresponding regulations of the FDA (U.S. Food and Drug Administration and the EMA (European Medicines Agency.

  14. MO-E-BRC-00: Online Adaptive Radiotherapy - Considerations for Practical Clinical Implementation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    2016-06-15

    Online adaptive radiation therapy has the potential to ensure delivery of optimal treatment to the patient by accounting for anatomical and potentially functional changes that occur from one fraction to the next and over the course of treatment. While on-line adaptive RT (ART) has been a topic of many publications, discussions, and research, it has until very recently remained largely a concept and not a practical implementation. However, recent advances in on-table imaging, use of deformable image registration for contour generation and dose tracking, faster and more efficient plan optimization, as well as fast quality assurance method has enabled the implementation of ART in the clinic in the past couple of years. The introduction of these tools into routine clinical use requires many considerations and progressive knowledge to understand how processes that have historically taken hours/days to complete can now be done in less than 30 minutes. This session will discuss considerations to perform real time contouring, planning and patient specific QA, as well as a practical workflow and the required resources. Learning Objectives: To understand the difficulties, challenges and available technologies for online adaptive RT. To understand how to implement online adaptive therapy in a clinical environment and to understand the workflow and resources required. To understand the limitations and sources of uncertainty in the online adaptive process I have research funding from ViewRay Inc. and Philips Medical Systems.; R. Kashani, I have research funding from ViewRay Inc. and Philips Medical Systems.; X. Li, Research supported by Elekta Inc.

  15. Using Smartphones to Collect Behavioral Data in Psychological Science: Opportunities, Practical Considerations, and Challenges

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harari, Gabriella M.; Lane, Nicholas D.; Wang, Rui; Crosier, Benjamin S.; Campbell, Andrew T.; Gosling, Samuel D.

    2017-01-01

    Smartphones now offer the promise of collecting behavioral data unobtrusively, in situ, as it unfolds in the course of daily life. Data can be collected from the onboard sensors and other phone logs embedded in today’s off-the-shelf smartphone devices. These data permit fine-grained, continuous collection of people’s social interactions (e.g., speaking rates in conversation, size of social groups, calls, and text messages), daily activities (e.g., physical activity and sleep), and mobility patterns (e.g., frequency and duration of time spent at various locations). In this article, we have drawn on the lessons from the first wave of smartphone-sensing research to highlight areas of opportunity for psychological research, present practical considerations for designing smartphone studies, and discuss the ongoing methodological and ethical challenges associated with research in this domain. It is our hope that these practical guidelines will facilitate the use of smartphones as a behavioral observation tool in psychological science. PMID:27899727

  16. Using Smartphones to Collect Behavioral Data in Psychological Science: Opportunities, Practical Considerations, and Challenges.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harari, Gabriella M; Lane, Nicholas D; Wang, Rui; Crosier, Benjamin S; Campbell, Andrew T; Gosling, Samuel D

    2016-11-01

    Smartphones now offer the promise of collecting behavioral data unobtrusively, in situ, as it unfolds in the course of daily life. Data can be collected from the onboard sensors and other phone logs embedded in today's off-the-shelf smartphone devices. These data permit fine-grained, continuous collection of people's social interactions (e.g., speaking rates in conversation, size of social groups, calls, and text messages), daily activities (e.g., physical activity and sleep), and mobility patterns (e.g., frequency and duration of time spent at various locations). In this article, we have drawn on the lessons from the first wave of smartphone-sensing research to highlight areas of opportunity for psychological research, present practical considerations for designing smartphone studies, and discuss the ongoing methodological and ethical challenges associated with research in this domain. It is our hope that these practical guidelines will facilitate the use of smartphones as a behavioral observation tool in psychological science. © The Author(s) 2016.

  17. A field ornithologist’s guide to genomics: Practical considerations for ecology and conservation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oyler-McCance, Sara J.; Oh, Kevin; Langin, Kathryn; Aldridge, Cameron L.

    2016-01-01

    Vast improvements in sequencing technology have made it practical to simultaneously sequence millions of nucleotides distributed across the genome, opening the door for genomic studies in virtually any species. Ornithological research stands to benefit in three substantial ways. First, genomic methods enhance our ability to parse and simultaneously analyze both neutral and non-neutral genomic regions, thus providing insight into adaptive evolution and divergence. Second, the sheer quantity of sequence data generated by current sequencing platforms allows increased precision and resolution in analyses. Third, high-throughput sequencing can benefit applications that focus on a small number of loci that are otherwise prohibitively expensive, time-consuming, and technically difficult using traditional sequencing methods. These advances have improved our ability to understand evolutionary processes like speciation and local adaptation, but they also offer many practical applications in the fields of population ecology, migration tracking, conservation planning, diet analyses, and disease ecology. This review provides a guide for field ornithologists interested in incorporating genomic approaches into their research program, with an emphasis on techniques related to ecology and conservation. We present a general overview of contemporary genomic approaches and methods, as well as important considerations when selecting a genomic technique. We also discuss research questions that are likely to benefit from utilizing high-throughput sequencing instruments, highlighting select examples from recent avian studies.

  18. Practical considerations and patient selection for intrathecal drug delivery in the management of chronic pain

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saulino, Michael; Kim, Philip S; Shaw, Erik

    2014-01-01

    Chronic pain continues to pose substantial and growing challenges for patients, caregivers, health care professionals, and health care systems. By the time a patient with severe refractory pain sees a pain specialist for evaluation and management, that patient has likely tried and failed several nonpharmacologic and pharmacologic approaches to pain treatment. Although relegated to one of the interventions of “last resort”, intrathecal drug delivery can be useful for improving pain control, optimizing patient functionality, and minimizing the use of systemic pain medications in appropriately selected patients. Due to its clinical and logistical requirements, however, intrathecal drug delivery may fit poorly into the classic pain clinic/interventional model and may be perceived as a “critical mass” intervention that is feasible only for large practices that have specialized staff and appropriate office resources. Potentially, intrathecal drug delivery may be more readily adopted into larger practices that can commit the necessary staff and resources to support patients’ needs through the trialing, initiation, monitoring, maintenance, and troubleshooting phases of this therapy. Currently, two agents – morphine and ziconotide – are approved by the United States Food and Drug Administration for long-term intrathecal delivery. The efficacy and safety profiles of morphine have been assessed in long-term, open-label, and retrospective studies of >400 patients with chronic cancer and noncancer pain types. The efficacy and safety profiles of ziconotide have been assessed in three double-blind, placebo-controlled trials of 457 patients, and safety has been assessed in 1,254 patients overall, with severe chronic cancer, noncancer, and acquired immunodeficiency syndrome pain types. Both agents are highlighted as first-line intrathecal therapy for the management of neuropathic or nociceptive pain. The purpose of this review is to discuss practical considerations

  19. Some practical considerations in finite element-based digital image correlation

    KAUST Repository

    Wang, Bo

    2015-04-20

    As an alternative to subset-based digital image correlation (DIC), finite element-based (FE-based) DIC method has gained increasing attention in the experimental mechanics community. However, the literature survey reveals that some important issues have not been well addressed in the published literatures. This work therefore aims to point out a few important considerations in the practical algorithm implementation of the FE-based DIC method, along with simple but effective solutions that can effectively tackle these issues. First, to better accommodate the possible intensity variations of the deformed images practically occurred in real experiments, a robust zero-mean normalized sum of squared difference criterion, instead of the commonly used sum of squared difference criterion, is introduced to quantify the similarity between reference and deformed elements in FE-based DIC. Second, to reduce the bias error induced by image noise and imperfect intensity interpolation, low-pass filtering of the speckle images with a 5×5 pixels Gaussian filter prior to correlation analysis, is presented. Third, to ensure the iterative calculation of FE-based DIC converges correctly and rapidly, an efficient subset-based DIC method, instead of simple integer-pixel displacement searching, is used to provide accurate initial guess of deformation for each calculation point. Also, the effects of various convergence criteria on the efficiency and accuracy of FE-based DIC are carefully examined, and a proper convergence criterion is recommended. The efficacy of these solutions is verified by numerical and real experiments. The results reveal that the improved FE-based DIC offers evident advantages over existing FE-based DIC method in terms of accuracy and efficiency. © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  20. Practical considerations in case study research: the relationship between methodology and process.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McDonnell, A; Lloyd Jones, M; Read, S

    2000-08-01

    This paper explores the extent to which the design of a research study is influenced by pragmatic as well as theoretical considerations by describing the authors' experience of conducting multiple case studies in the context of a policy-orientated research project. The case studies in question formed part of a collaborative project exploring the development of innovative roles in nursing and the professions allied to medicine. The researchers adopted Yin's approach to the conduct of multiple case studies to explore issues relating to the effectiveness of new roles, their resource implications and educational issues surrounding their development. They address the fact that methodological decisions have practical implications and also explore the effects of practical and ethical issues on research design. Three purposively selected acute National Health Service Trust hospitals in England formed the case study sites for the work recorded in this paper. In each Trust, three nursing roles were selected, making nine cases for study. A variety of data collection strategies were used including semi-structured interviews with post-holders and other stakeholders (n = 51), non-participant observation of meetings, collection of audit, financial and statistical data and review of relevant documentation. This paper describes some of the dilemmas which arose during the course of the study, the rationale for methodological decisions taken to resolve these dilemmas and the steps taken to enhance rigour. In particular, the authors discuss the problems associated with obtaining informed consent in the context of qualitative research and with member validation of transcripts in a context where confidentiality was crucial. The decision to present findings thematically rather than as individual cases is justified both in terms of the nature and purpose of the research and in relation to the particular importance of anonymity and confidentiality in this study. Finally, the degree of

  1. The Founding of the Brookhaven National Laboratory - Associated Universities, Inc.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    BROOKHAVEN NATIONAL LABORATORY

    1948-01-15

    report, the final report of the Columbia University contracts which financed the first year of development of the Brookhaven National Laboratory, summarizes the successive stages of organization, the considerations underlying some of its basic policies, and the methods of attack on the general problems encountered in founding the Laboratory. During the preliminary period of planning covered by this report, from early January 1946 until January 31, 1947, Columbia paid for salaries, office space, travel and consultant fees, and other expenses incurred by the new organization. These funds were provided through contracts held by the university with the War Department and later with the AEC. A supplement, dated April 3, to a contract with the War Department, W-7405-eng-50, covered the work to June 30, 1946. Contract W-3l-l09-eng-15, with the War Department, covered the work to December 31, 1946. On January 1, 1947, this contract was converted to a contract with the AEC, AT-30-1-GEN-71, which lasted until January 31, 1947. After this date a Letter Contract, AT-30-2-GEN-16, dated January 7, 1947, between AUI and the AEC, permitted AUI to assume all expenses.

  2. [Psychiatry as a practical science : Considerations following Wolfgang Wieland (1933-2015)].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jäger, M; Wigand, M E; Becker, T

    2017-01-01

    In the light of historical and modern criticism of the discipline of psychiatry and psychotherapy as a medical subspecialty, this paper deals with aspects of the theory of medicine as postulated by the physician and philosopher Wolfgang Wieland. According to his contributions medicine is a practical science aiming at establishing rational action. Central to this model is a diagnosis, which helps to subsume individual cases under general principles from which essential therapeutic options can be derived. Hence, psychiatry and psychotherapy become a medical subspecialty by adopting the basic model of medical reasoning and action as described by Wieland. Nevertheless, the limits of such an approach must be taken into consideration. Especially in a psychiatric and psychotherapeutic context it is of particular importance that even when being guided by general principles the responsibility for the personality of each individual patient should be adequately met. Furthermore, attention should be paid to the limits of the subspecialty of psychiatry and psychotherapy as a medical discipline, which also requires a critical analysis of the concept of psychiatric illness.

  3. Some practical considerations in three-arm non-inferiority trial design.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Ming; Kundu, Sudeep

    2016-11-01

    Non-inferiority trials aim to demonstrate whether an experimental therapy is not unacceptably worse than an active reference therapy already in use. When applicable, a three-arm non-inferiority trial, including an experiment therapy, an active reference therapy, and a placebo, is often recommended to assess assay sensitivity and internal validity of a trial. In this paper, we share some practical considerations based on our experience from a phase III three-arm non-inferiority trial. First, we discuss the determination of the total sample size and its optimal allocation based on the overall power of the non-inferiority testing procedure and provide ready-to-use R code for implementation. Second, we consider the non-inferiority goal of 'capturing all possibilities' and show that it naturally corresponds to a simple two-step testing procedure. Finally, using this two-step non-inferiority testing procedure as an example, we compare extensively commonly used frequentist p -value methods with the Bayesian posterior probability approach. Copyright © 2016 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd. Copyright © 2016 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  4. Direct-Acting Oral Anticoagulants: Practical Considerations for Emergency Medicine Physicians

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    W. Frank Peacock

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Nonvalvular atrial fibrillation- (NVAF- related stroke and venous thromboembolism (VTE are cardiovascular diseases associated with significant morbidity and economic burden. The historical standard treatment of VTE has been the administration of parenteral heparinoid until oral warfarin therapy attains a therapeutic international normalized ratio. Warfarin has been the most common medication for stroke prevention in NVAF. Warfarin use is complicated by a narrow therapeutic window, unpredictable dose response, numerous food and drug interactions, and requirements for frequent monitoring. To overcome these disadvantages, direct-acting oral anticoagulants (DOACs—dabigatran, rivaroxaban, apixaban, and edoxaban—have been developed for the prevention of stroke or systemic embolic events (SEE in patients with NVAF and for the treatment of VTE. Advantages of DOACs include predictable pharmacokinetics, few drug-drug interactions, and low monitoring requirements. In clinical studies, DOACs are noninferior to warfarin for the prevention of NVAF-related stroke and the treatment and prevention of VTE as well as postoperative knee and hip surgery VTE prophylaxis, with decreased bleeding risks. This review addresses the practical considerations for the emergency physician in DOAC use, including dosing recommendations, laboratory monitoring, anticoagulation reversal, and cost-effectiveness. The challenges of DOACs, such as the lack of specific laboratory measurements and antidotes, are also discussed.

  5. Measuring protein dynamics in live cells: protocols and practical considerations for fluorescence fluctuation microscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Youker, Robert T; Teng, Haibing

    2014-09-01

    Quantitative analysis of protein complex stoichiometries and mobilities are critical for elucidating the mechanisms that regulate cellular pathways. Fluorescence fluctuation spectroscopy (FFS) techniques can measure protein dynamics, such as diffusion coefficients and formation of complexes, with extraordinary precision and sensitivity. Complete calibration and characterization of the microscope instrument is necessary in order to avoid artifacts during data acquisition and to capitalize on the full capabilities of FFS techniques. We provide an overview of the theory behind FFS techniques, discuss calibration procedures, provide protocols, and give practical considerations for performing FFS experiments. One important parameter recovered from FFS measurements is the relative molecular brightness that can correlate with oligomerization. Three methods for measuring molecular brightness (fluorescence correlation spectroscopy, photon-counting histogram, and number and brightness analysis) recover similar values when measuring samples under ideal conditions in vitro. However, examples are given illustrating that these different methods used for calculating molecular brightness of fluorescent molecules in cells are not always equivalent. Methods relying on spot measurements are more prone to bleaching and movement artifacts that can lead to underestimation of brightness values. We advocate for the use of multiple FFS techniques to study molecular brightnesses to overcome and compliment limitations of individual techniques.

  6. Practical considerations and patient selection for intrathecal drug delivery in the management of chronic pain

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Saulino M

    2014-11-01

    assessed in three double-blind, placebo-controlled trials of 457 patients, and safety has been assessed in 1,254 patients overall, with severe chronic cancer, noncancer, and acquired immunodeficiency syndrome pain types. Both agents are highlighted as first-line intrathecal therapy for the management of neuropathic or nociceptive pain. The purpose of this review is to discuss practical considerations for intrathecal drug delivery, delineate criteria for the identification and selection of candidates for intrathecal drug delivery, and consider which agent may be more appropriate for individual patients. Keywords: review, patient selection, chronic pain, intrathecal, drug delivery

  7. Brookhaven Lab and Argonne Lab scientists invent a plasma valve

    CERN Multimedia

    2003-01-01

    Scientists from Brookhaven National Laboratory and Argonne National Laboratory have received U.S. patent number 6,528,948 for a device that shuts off airflow into a vacuum about one million times faster than mechanical valves or shutters that are currently in use (1 page).

  8. COMPUTATIONAL SCIENCE AT BROOKHAVEN NATIONAL LABORATORY: THREE SELECTED TOPICS.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    DAVENPORT,J.W.DENG,Y.GLIMM,J.SAMULYAK,R.

    2003-09-15

    We present an overview of computational science at Brookhaven National Laboratory (BNL), with selections from three areas: fluids, nanoscience, and biology. The work at BNL in each of these areas is itself very broad, and we select a few topics for presentation within each of them.

  9. Brookhaven National Laboratory site environmental report for calendar year 1995

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Naidu, J.R.; Paquette, D.E.; Schroeder, G.L. [eds.] [and others

    1996-12-01

    This report documents the results of the Environmental Monitoring Program at Brookhaven National Laboratory and summarizes information about environmental compliance for 1995. To evaluate the effect of Brookhaven National Laboratory`s operations on the local environment, measurements of direct radiation, and of a variety of radionuclides and chemical compounds in the ambient air, soil, sewage effluent, surface water, groundwater, fauna, and vegetation were made at the Brookhaven National Laboratory site and at adjacent sites. The report also evaluates the Laboratory`s compliance with all applicable guides, standards, and limits for radiological and nonradiological emissions and effluents to the environment. Areas of known contamination are subject to Remedial Investigation/Feasibility Studies under the Inter Agency Agreement established by the Department of Energy, Environmental Protection Agency and the New York Department of Environmental Conservation. Except for identified areas of soil and groundwater contamination, the environmental monitoring data has continued to demonstrate that compliance was achieved with the applicable environmental laws and regulations governing emission and discharge of materials to the environment. Also, the data show that the environmental impacts at Brookhaven National Laboratory are minimal and pose no threat to the public nor to the environment. This report meets the requirements of Department of Energy Orders 5484.1, Environmental Protection, Safety, and Health Protection Information reporting requirements and 5400.1, General Environmental Protection Programs.

  10. Review of Brookhaven nuclear transparency measurements in (p ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Home; Journals; Pramana – Journal of Physics; Volume 61; Issue 5. Review of Brookhaven nuclear transparency ... First, we describe the measurements with the newer experiment, E850, which has more complete kinematic definition of quasi-elastic events. E850 covers a larger range of incident momenta, and thus ...

  11. Brookhaven National Laboratory moves to the fast lane

    CERN Multimedia

    2006-01-01

    "The U.S. Department of Energy's energy sciences network (ESnet) continues to roll out its next-generation architecture on schedule with the March 14 completion of the Long Island Metropolitan Area Network, connecting Brookhaven National Laboratory (BNL) to the ESnet point of presente (PO) 60 miles away in New York City." (1 page)

  12. Measuring energy metabolism in the mouse – theoretical, practical and analytical considerations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    John Roger Speakman

    2013-03-01

    Full Text Available The mouse is one of the most important model organisms for understanding human genetic function and disease. This includes characterisation of the factors that influence energy expenditure and dysregulation of energy balance leading to obesity and its sequalae. Measuring energy metabolism in the mouse presents a challenge because the animals are small, and in this respect it presents similar challenges to measuring energy demands in many other species of small mammal. This paper considers some theoretical, practical and analytical considerations to be considered when measuring energy expenditure in mice. Theoretically total daily energy expenditure is comprised of several different components: basal or resting expenditure, physical activity, thermoregulation and the thermic effect of food. Energy expenditure in mice is normally measured using open flow indirect calorimetry apparatus. Two types of system are available – one of which involves a single small Spartan chamber linked to a single analyser, which is ideal for measuring the individual components of energy demand. The other type of system involves a large chamber which mimics the home cage environment and is generally configured with several chambers per analyser. These latter systems are ideal for measuring total daily energy expenditure but at present do not allow accurate decomposition of the total expenditure into its components. The greatest analytical challenge for mouse expenditure data is how to account for body size differences between individuals. This has been a matter of some discussion for at least 120 years. The statistically most appropriate approach is to use ANCOVA with individual aspects of body composition as independent predictors.

  13. Genetic Testing for Sports Performance, Responses to Training and Injury Risk: Practical and Ethical Considerations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Williams, Alun G; Wackerhage, Henning; Day, Stephen H

    2016-01-01

    This paper addresses practical and ethical considerations regarding genetic tests to predict performance and/or risk of exercise-related injury or illness. Various people might wish to conduct sport-related genetic tests for a variety of reasons. For example, an individual might seek personal genetic information to help guide their own sport participation. A sports coach might wish to test young athletes to aid team selection or individualize training. A physician might want to predict the risk of injury or illness in athletes and advise regarding selection or preventative measures. An insurance company might seek to estimate the risk of career-threatening injury for athletes based partly on genetic information. Whilst this information is, in part, encoded in our DNA sequence, the available tests allow generally only a poor prediction of the aforementioned variables. In other words, the current genetic tests and analysis methods are not powerful enough to inform important decisions in sport to a substantial degree. It is particularly disappointing that more than half of the commercially available genetic tests related to exercise and sport do not appear to identify publicly the genetic variants they assess, making scrutiny by academic scholars and consumers (or their representatives) impossible. There are also challenging ethical issues to consider. For example, the imposition of genetic tests on individuals (especially young people) by third parties is potentially susceptible to abuse. Scientists and practitioners should understand the limitations of the tests currently available, the ethical concerns and the importance of counselling before and after testing so that they are only used in a responsible manner. © 2016 S. Karger AG, Basel.

  14. Detection of coronary artery disease by exercise radionuclide ventriculography, (1). Practical consideration

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nishimura, T.; Saito, M.; Uehara, T.; Kozuka, T. (National Cardiovascular Center, Suita, Osaka (Japan))

    1982-02-01

    In order to assess the detection of coronary artery disease (CAD) and LV functional reserve, exercise radionuclide ventriculography (ERV) were performed in 80 patients who underwent selective cardiac catheterization for evaluation of chest pain syndrome. 70 patients had CAD (30 patients with angina pectoris and 40 patients with myocardial infarction) and 10 did not. In this study, to obtain accurate data by ERV, its practical considerations were mentioned. Radionuclide cardioangiography with sup(99m)Tc-in vivo RBC labelling were performed using an Auger camera attached with high-sense collimator and on-line minicomputer system. For data aquisition, multi-gated methods were used, especially during exercise, list mode collection was suitable for ERV because of variable R-R intervals. Patient stability was performed with an adjustable shoulder support and hand grip, ECG monitoring system by carbon electrolode was used to obtain during exercise. Exercise protocol was graded bicycle ergometer in supine position. As the results, in the patients of CAD, changes of LVEF from rest to exercise were under 5%, while in normal patients, LVEF increased over 5% in all patients. In 30 patients with angina pectoris, the ERV was abnormal in 25 for a sensitivity of 83.3% and specificity of 100%. The ERV were thought to be superior than stress ECG for the detection of CAD. In conclusion, with increasing clinical application, the use of ERV is rapidly becoming wider-spread but the excellent results were thought to depend upon the careful attention to equipment and exercise procedure.

  15. Early community-based family practice elective positively influences medical students' career considerations--a pre-post-comparison.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deutsch, Tobias; Hönigschmid, Petra; Frese, Thomas; Sandholzer, Hagen

    2013-02-21

    Demographic change and recruitment problems in family practice are increasingly threatening an adequate primary care workforce in many countries. Thus, it is important to attract young physicians to the field. The purpose of the present study was to examine the effect of an early community-based 28-h family practice elective with one-to-one mentoring on medical students' consideration of family practice as a career option, their interest in working office-based, and several perceptions with regard to specific aspects of a family physician's work. First- and second-year medical students completed questionnaires before and after a short community-based family practice elective, consisting of a preparatory course and a community-based practical experience with one-to-one mentoring by trained family physicians. We found a significantly higher rate of students favoring family practice as a career option after the elective (32.7% vs. 26.0%, p = 0.039). Furthermore, the ranking of family practice among other considered career options improved (p = 0.002). Considerations to work office-based in the future did not change significantly. Perceptions regarding a family physician's job changed positively with regard to the possibility of long-term doctor-patient relationships and treatment of complex disease patterns. The majority of the students described identification with the respective family physician tutor as a professional role model and an increased interest in the specialty. Our results indicate that a short community-based family practice elective early in medical education may positively influence medical students' considerations of a career in family practice. Furthermore, perceptions regarding the specialty with significant impact on its attractiveness may be positively adjusted. Further research is needed to evaluate the influence of different components of a family practice curriculum on the de facto career decisions of young physicians after graduation.

  16. Analytical Frameworks of Cooperative and Cognitive Radio Systems with Practical Considerations

    KAUST Repository

    Khan, Fahd Ahmed

    2013-08-01

    the performance of a network where two sources communicate with each other via fixed-gain amplify-and-forward relays is studied and for a Rayleigh faded channel, closed-form expressions for the outage probability (OP), moment generating function (MGF) and SER are derived. Relay location is also taken into consideration and it is shown that the performance can be improved by placing the relay closer to the source whose channel is more outdated. Some practical issues encountered in cognitive radio systems (CRS) are also investigated. The QoS of CRS can be improved through spatial diversity which can be achieved by either using multiple antennas or exploiting the independent channels of each user in a multi-user network. In this dissertation, both approaches are examined and in multi-antenna CRS, transmit antenna selection (TAS) is proposed where as in a multi-user CRS, user selection is proposed to achieve performance gains. TAS reduces the implementation cost and complexity and thus makes CRS more feasible. Additionally, unlike previous works, in accordance with real world systems, the transmitter is assumed to have limited peak transmit power. For both these schemes, considering practical channel models, closed-form expression for the OP performance, SER performance and ergodic capacity (EC) are obtained and the performance in the asymptotic regimes is also studied. Furthermore, the OP performance is also analyzed taking into account the interference from the primary network on the cognitive network.

  17. Practical considerations for maximizing heat production in a novel thermobrachytherapy seed prototype.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gautam, Bhoj; Warrell, Gregory; Shvydka, Diana; Subramanian, Manny; Ishmael Parsai, E

    2014-02-01

    demonstrates thermal self-regulation and adequate heating of a tissue-mimicking phantom by seed prototypes. The effect of self-shielding of the seed against the external magnetic field is small, and only minor thermal stress is induced in heating of the seeds from room temperature to well above the seed operating temperature. With proper selection of magnetic field parameters, the thermal dose distribution of an arrangement of TB and hyperthermia-only seeds may be made to match with its radiation dose distribution. The presented analyses address several practical considerations for manufacturing of the proposed TB seeds and identify critical issues for the prototype implementation. The authors' preliminary experiments demonstrate close agreement with the modeling results, confirming the feasibility of combining sources of heat and radiation into a single thermobrachytherapy seed.

  18. Some Considerations for Applying Business Sustainability Practices to Campus Environmental Challenges

    Science.gov (United States)

    Walton, Steve V.; Galea, Chris E.

    2005-01-01

    Purpose--To explore how universities can adopt sustainability practices that have proven to be successful in business. Design/methodology/approach--Draws on several sources of theory (internationally published literatures in business, sustainability, and education) and practice (primarily US business and university practice) to develop a…

  19. Team Deliberate Practice in Medicine and Related Domains: A Consideration of the Issues

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harris, Kevin R.; Eccles, David W.; Shatzer, John H.

    2017-01-01

    A better understanding of the factors influencing medical team performance and accounting for expert medical team performance should benefit medical practice. Therefore, the aim here is to highlight key issues with using deliberate practice to improve medical team performance, especially given the success of deliberate practice for developing…

  20. BROOKHAVEN NATIONAL LABORATORY INSTITUTIONAL PLAN FY2003-2007.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    2003-06-10

    This document presents the vision for Brookhaven National Laboratory (BNL) for the next five years, and a roadmap for implementing that vision. Brookhaven is a multidisciplinary science-based laboratory operated for the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE), supported primarily by programs sponsored by the DOE's Office of Science. As the third-largest funding agency for science in the U.S., one of the DOE's goals is ''to advance basic research and the instruments of science that are the foundations for DOE's applied missions, a base for U.S. technology innovation, and a source of remarkable insights into our physical and biological world, and the nature of matter and energy'' (DOE Office of Science Strategic Plan, 2000 http://www.osti.gov/portfolio/science.htm). BNL shapes its vision according to this plan.

  1. Practical Considerations in Creating School-Wide Positive Behavior Support in Public Schools

    Science.gov (United States)

    Handler, Marcie W.; Rey, Jannette; Connell, James; Thier, Kimberly; Feinberg, Adam; Putnam, Robert

    2007-01-01

    School-wide positive behavior support (SWPBS) has been identified as an effective and efficient method to teach students prosocial skills. It requires both effective behavior support practices and systems that will support these changes, including data-based decision making among the school leadership team. There are many practical and systemic…

  2. Silvicultural Practices in Forests of the Southern United States: Insect and Disease Considerations

    Science.gov (United States)

    T. Evan Nebeker; Theodor D. Leininger; James S. Meadows

    1999-01-01

    The relationship between silvicultural practices, e.g. thinning, and pest organisms (insects and diseases) has been investigated extensively in pine species but to a lesser degree in hardwoods. Of critical interest is the potential negative impact to the residual stand resulting from insect damage and diseases that develop as a consequence of silvicultural practices....

  3. Is Evidence-Based Practice Diverse Enough? Philosophy of Science Considerations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wendt, Dennis C., Jr.; Slife, Brent D.

    2007-01-01

    In its policy rationale for evidence-based practice in psychology (EBPP), the APA Presidential Task Force on Evidence-Based Practice (see record 2006-05893-001) claims to have constituted itself with "scientists and practitioners from a wide range of perspectives and traditions, reflecting the diverse perspectives within the field" (p. 273). We…

  4. ABA and Students with Autism Spectrum Disorders: Issues and Considerations for Effective Practice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Simpson, Richard L.

    2001-01-01

    This article discusses issues related to the use of applied behavior analysis (ABA) with students who have autism-related disabilities. These include: implementation forms, outcome expectations, exclusive versus selective use of ABA, time-related considerations, and personnel requirements for effective ABA implementation, evaluation, and…

  5. Telerehabilitation Store and Forward Applications: A Review of Applications and Privacy Considerations in Physical and Occupational Therapy Practice

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Christopher Peterson

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available An overview of store and forward applications commonly used in physical and occupational therapy practice is reviewed with respect to regulation, privacy, security, and clinical applications. A privacy and security checklist provides a clear reference of pertinent regulatory issues regarding these software applications. A case study format is used to highlight clinical applications of store and forward software features. Important considerations of successful implementation of store and forward applications are also identified and discussed.

  6. Teaching science and technology at primary school level: Theoretical and practical considerations for primary school teachers' professional training.

    OpenAIRE

    Walma van der Molen, Julie Henriëtte; van Aalderen-Smeets, Sandra; Asma, L.

    2010-01-01

    This paper focuses on the importance of starting science and technology education at a young age and at the consequential importance of providing primary school teachers with enough professional background to be able to effectively incorporate science and technology into their teaching. We will discuss a large-scale program in The Netherlands that is aimed at the professionalization of elementary school teachers in the field of science and technology. Theoretical and practical considerations ...

  7. BROOKHAVEN NATIONAL LABORATORY SITE ENVIRONMENTAL REPORT FOR CALENDAR YEAR 1994.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NAIDU,J.R.; ROYCE,B.A.

    1995-05-01

    This report documents the results of the Environmental Monitoring Program at Brookhaven National Laboratory and presents summary information about environmental compliance for 1994. To evaluate the effect of Brookhaven National Laboratory's operations on the local environment, measurements of direct radiation, and a variety of radionuclides and chemical compounds in ambient air, soil, sewage effluent, surface water, groundwater, fauna and vegetation were made at the Brookhaven National Laboratory site and at sites adjacent to the Laboratory. Brookhaven National Laboratory's compliance with all applicable guides, standards, and limits for radiological and nonradiological emissions and effluents to the environment were evaluated. Among the permitted facilities, two instances of pH exceedances were observed at recharge basins, possibly related to rain-water run-off to these recharge basins. Also, the discharge from the Sewage Treatment Plant to the Peconic River exceeded. on ten occasions, one each for fecal coliform and 5-day Biochemical Oxygen Demand (avg.) and eight for ammonia nitrogen. The ammonia and Biochemical Oxygen Demand exceedances were attributed to the cold winter and the routine cultivation of the sand filter beds which resulted in the hydraulic overloading of the filter beds and the possible destruction of nitrifying bacteria. The on-set of warm weather and increased aeration of the filter beds via cultivation helped to alleviate this condition. The discharge of fecal coliform may also be linked to this occurrence, in that the increase in fecal coliform coincided with the increased cultivation of the sand filter beds. The environmental monitoring data has identified site-specific contamination of groundwater and soil. These areas are subject to Remedial Investigation/Feasibility Studies under the Inter Agency Agreement. Except for the above, the environmental monitoring data has continued to demonstrate that compliance was achieved with

  8. Strategy-As-Practice Research: Initial Considerations on the Field in Brazil

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Julio Ernesto Colla

    2012-01-01

    The objective of the present article was to verify the conceptual position and onto-epistemological of the Brazilian researchers in Strategy-as-Practice from the concepts proclaimed for the movement...

  9. Clinical social work practice and technology: personal, practical, regulatory, and ethical considerations for the twenty-first century.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dombo, Eileen A; Kays, Lisa; Weller, Katelyn

    2014-10-01

    The world that social work exists in is no longer defined by traditional physical settings and boundaries, such as schools, agencies, or even offices. With the advent of the Internet and digital communications, social work now exists in a far more complex reality, with clients and social workers engaging across multiple platforms, and sometimes even unintentionally and without one another's awareness. The implications of this can be ethical, practical, regulatory, and personal. This article explores these areas of concern and suggests strategies professionals can use to navigate these complex issues related to technology and clinical practice.

  10. Brookhaven highlights for fiscal year 1991, October 1, 1990--September 30, 1991

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rowe, M.S.; Cohen, A.; Greenberg, D.; Seubert, L.; Kuper, J.B.H.

    1991-12-31

    This report highlights Brookhaven National Laboratory`s activities for fiscal year 1991. Topics from the four research divisions: Computing and Communications, Instrumentation, Reactors, and Safety and Environmental Protection are presented. The research programs at Brookhaven are diverse, as is reflected by the nine different scientific departments: Accelerator Development, Alternating Gradient Synchrotron, Applied Science, Biology, Chemistry, Medical, National Synchrotron Light Source, Nuclear Energy, and Physics. Administrative and managerial information about Brookhaven are also disclosed. (GHH)

  11. Brookhaven highlights for fiscal year 1991, October 1, 1990--September 30, 1991

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rowe, M.S.; Cohen, A.; Greenberg, D.; Seubert, L.; Kuper, J.B.H.

    1991-01-01

    This report highlights Brookhaven National Laboratory's activities for fiscal year 1991. Topics from the four research divisions: Computing and Communications, Instrumentation, Reactors, and Safety and Environmental Protection are presented. The research programs at Brookhaven are diverse, as is reflected by the nine different scientific departments: Accelerator Development, Alternating Gradient Synchrotron, Applied Science, Biology, Chemistry, Medical, National Synchrotron Light Source, Nuclear Energy, and Physics. Administrative and managerial information about Brookhaven are also disclosed. (GHH)

  12. Practical aspects of prostate MRI: hardware and software considerations, protocols, and patient preparation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Starobinets, Olga; Korn, Natalie; Iqbal, Sonam; Noworolski, Susan M; Zagoria, Ronald; Kurhanewicz, John; Westphalen, Antonio C

    2016-05-01

    The use of multiparametric MRI scans for the evaluation of men with prostate cancer has increased dramatically and is likely to continue expanding as new developments come to practice. However, it has not yet gained the same level of acceptance of other imaging tests. Partly, this is because of the use of suboptimal protocols, lack of standardization, and inadequate patient preparation. In this manuscript, we describe several practical aspects of prostate MRI that may facilitate the implementation of new prostate imaging programs or the expansion of existing ones.

  13. Practical considerations for integrating switch mode audio amplifiers and loudspeakers for a higher power efficiency

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Poulsen, Søren; Andersen, Michael Andreas E.

    2004-01-01

    An integration of electrodynamic loudspeakers and switch mode amplifiers has earlier been proposed in [1]. The work presented in this paper is related to the practical aspects of integration of switch mode audio amplifiers and electro dynamic loudspeakers, using the speaker’s voice coil as output...... filter, and the magnetic structure as heat sink for the amplifier.......An integration of electrodynamic loudspeakers and switch mode amplifiers has earlier been proposed in [1]. The work presented in this paper is related to the practical aspects of integration of switch mode audio amplifiers and electro dynamic loudspeakers, using the speaker’s voice coil as output...

  14. Theoretical and Practical Considerations for Combating Mental Illness Stigma in Health Care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ungar, Thomas; Knaak, Stephanie; Szeto, Andrew C H

    2016-04-01

    Reducing the stigma and discrimination associated with mental illness is becoming an increasingly important focus for research, policy, programming and intervention work. While it has been well established that the healthcare system is one of the key environments in which persons with mental illnesses experience stigma and discrimination there is little published literature on how to build and deliver successful anti-stigma programs in healthcare settings, towards healthcare providers in general, or towards specific types of practitioners. Our paper intends to address this gap by providing a set of theoretical considerations for guiding the design and implementation of anti-stigma interventions in healthcare.

  15. Technical Considerations: Best Practices for MR Imaging of the Foot and Ankle.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sofka, Carolyn M

    2017-02-01

    There are many challenges involved in obtaining diagnostic MR images of the foot and ankle. The complex anatomy and morphology, with curved and angular structures localized to the periphery of the body, make for an inherent challenge, let alone if an added level of complexity, such as orthopedic instrumentation, is added. This review outlines the technical considerations best designed to produce diagnostic images of the foot and ankle, with an emphasis on the postoperative state, including imaging in the presence of metal. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  16. Ethical Considerations in a Three-Tiered Approach to School Discipline Policy and Practice

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mayworm, Ashley M.; Sharkey, Jill D.

    2014-01-01

    Research indicates that school discipline policies and practices have a significant influence on both student and school functioning. The purpose of this article is to uncover how the ethical standards guiding the field of school psychology inform school decisions about discipline in a three-tiered approach. Various discipline approaches,…

  17. Work Contexts Matter: Practical Considerations for Improving New Special Educators' Experiences in Schools

    Science.gov (United States)

    Billingsley, Bonnie S.

    2010-01-01

    A growing body of evidence suggests teachers first experiences in the classroom have an impact on their effectiveness, their students' achievement, and the teaching practices they will use for many years. New special educators experience many of the same challenges as other new teachers. Both general and special educators struggle with addressing …

  18. Proposing a Center on Aging and Well-Being: Research, Education, and Practice Considerations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lindenbach, Jeannette M.; Jessup-Falcioni, Heather

    2016-01-01

    This environmental scan aimed to discover research interests and educational needs of faculty, graduate, and undergraduate students to inspire research, education, and practice in the development of a center on aging and well-being for older adults. The scan consisted of a search of university faculty and researchers regarding research on aging; a…

  19. Board Certified Behavior Analysts and Related Ethical and Professional Practice Considerations for Rural Schools

    Science.gov (United States)

    Menendez, Anthony L.; Mayton, Michael R.; Yurick, Amanda L.

    2017-01-01

    When rural school districts employ Board Certified Behavior Analysts (BCBAs) to assist in meeting the needs of students with disabilities, it is important that they be aware of the ethical and professional guidelines to which BCBAs are required to adhere. This article describes the role of these guidelines within the practice of BCBAs and presents…

  20. Confronting the Ubiquity of Electronic Communication and Social Media: Ethical and Legal Considerations for Psychoeducational Practice

    Science.gov (United States)

    Demers, Joseph A.; Sullivan, Amanda L.

    2016-01-01

    Most U.S. children and adults use computers and the Internet on a daily basis. The pervasiveness of electronic communication in a variety of contexts, including home and school, raises ethical and legal concerns for school psychologists and those in related fields of practice, because of the risks to privacy and confidentiality, boundaries,…

  1. Evidence-Based Practices in Special Education: Current Assumptions and Future Considerations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Russo-Campisi, Jacqueline

    2017-01-01

    Background: The research on evidence-based practices (EBP) in special education has shifted over the last decade from identifying efficacious interventions to exploring issues that impede implementation in the classroom. Common barriers to implementation include absence of training and resources, limited collaboration between researchers and…

  2. Practical Considerations When Supporting Transitions for Pupils with Speech, Language and Communication Needs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Perfitt, Ruth

    2013-01-01

    This article investigates the impact of transitions upon pupils aged 11-14 with speech, language and communication needs, including specific language impairment and autism. The aim is to identify stress factors, examine whether these affect any subgroups in particular and suggest practical strategies to support pupils through transitions. Stress…

  3. Open lung high frequency ventilation in preterm infants with respiratory distress syndrome: practical considerations and recommendations

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    De Jaegere, A.P.M.C.

    2012-01-01

    In premature infants ventilated because of RDS the favorable effect of HFV OLV compared to conventional mechanical ventilation on the incidence of BPD remains a matter of debate. An important lack in published human studies is the clinical practice surrounding the thorough application of OLV with

  4. General practitioners' management of mental disorders: A rewarding practice with considerable obstacles

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fleury Marie-Josée

    2012-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Primary care improvement is the cornerstone of current reforms. Mental disorders (MDs are a leading cause of morbidity worldwide and widespread in industrialised countries. MDs are treated mainly in primary care by general practitioners (GPs, even though the latter ability to detect, diagnose, and treat patients with MDs is often considered unsatisfactory. This article examines GPs' management of MDs in an effort to acquire more information regarding means by which GPs deal with MD cases, impact of such cases on their practices, factors that enable or hinder MD management, and patient-management strategies. Methods This study employs a mixed-method approach with emphasis on qualitative investigation. Based on a previous survey of 398 GPs in Quebec, Canada, 60 GPs representing a variety of practice settings were selected for further study. A 10-minute-long questionnaire comprising 27 items was administered, and 70-minute-long interviews were conducted. Quantitative (SPSS and qualitative (NVivo analyses were performed. Results At least 20% of GP visits were MD-related. GPs were comfortable managing common MDs, but not serious MDs. GPs' based their treatment of MDs on pharmacotherapy, support therapy, and psycho-education. They used clinical intuition with few clinical tools, and closely followed their patients with MDs. Practice features (salary or hourly fees payment; psycho-social teams on-site; strong informal networks, and GPs' individual characteristics (continuing medical education; exposure and interest in MDs; traits like empathy favoured MD management. Collaboration with psychologists and psychiatrists was considered key to good MD management. Limited access to specialists, system fragmentation, and underdeveloped group practice and shared-care models were impediments. MD management was seen as burdensome because it required more time, flexibility, and emotional investment. Strategies exist to reduce the burden (one

  5. Initial Freudian theories and practices: considerations on discovery of the unconscious

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Daniel Polimeni Maireno

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available This article compares some theoretical postulates and some clinical practices of early moments of Freudian works, favoring production periods of Studies on Hysteria and the Interpretation of Dreams. Other works are cited in order to complement. The study highlights the role of concepts such as repression, resistance and transference before the emergence of the concept of the unconscious – without which all previous lose much of their senses; suggests that, rather than a Freud’s willful disposition in the formulation of concept of the unconscious, what we see is, instead, his reluctance to admit such a concept, which justifies its late appearance compared to the others. We conclude, finally, that such reluctance itself, conveys a valuable model to psychoanalysts about how theoretical and practical developments of psychoanalysis must happens.

  6. Practical and theoretical considerations on the fracture toughness testing of dental restorative materials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Belli, Renan; Wendler, Michael; Zorzin, José I; Lohbauer, Ulrich

    2018-01-01

    An important tool in materials research, development and characterization regarding mechanical performance is the testing of fracture toughness. A high level of accuracy in executing this sort of test is necessary, with strict requirements given in extensive testing standard documents. Proficiency in quality specimen fabrication and test requires practice and a solid theoretical background, oftentimes overlooked in the dental community. In this review we go through some fundamentals of the fracture mechanics concepts that are relevant to the understanding of fracture toughness testing, and draw attention to critical aspects of practical nature that must be fulfilled for validity and accuracy in results. We describe our experience with some testing methodologies for CAD/CAM materials and discuss advantages and shortcomings of different tests in terms of errors in testing the applicability of the concept of fracture toughness as a single-value material-specific property. Copyright © 2017 The Academy of Dental Materials. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  7. Practical Considerations on the Multi-layer Mirrors for Superluminal Ring Laser Gyroscopes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Zhiguo; Yuan, Baolun

    2015-07-01

    We have created a simple model to analyze the restrictions on superluminal ring laser gyroscopes arising from the absorption of coating materials. For a ring laser gyroscope with a cavity length of 15 cm, the scale factor enhancement is nearly impossible due to absorption from the high dispersion mirror. In order to obtain a practical superluminal ring laser gyroscope, the extinction coefficient of coating materials should be less than 1E-10, which is a challenge at present.

  8. General Considerations on Leadership in the Hospitality Industry. Conceptual Analysis and Practical Studies

    OpenAIRE

    Andreia ISPAS

    2010-01-01

    Leadership in the hospitality industry is still an open research field especially in describing the effects of leadership style on hotel employees. The purpose of the paper is to present and analyze the following concepts: leadership and leadership style, hospitality industry; the practical aspects of leadership in the hospitality industry and to identify relevant studies regarding the importance of leadership styles applied in this industry. The research methodology consists of analyzing the...

  9. THE CRIMINAL OFFENCE OF MONEY LAUNDERING – A SERIES OF THEORETICAL AND PRACTICAL CONSIDERATIONS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Constantin NEDELCU

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available The paper at hand addresses the extremely complex and sensitive matter relating to one of the most controversial offences in the criminal laws of Romania – in particular, the criminal offence of money laundering. This paper bears both theoretical and practical interest, in that it points out specific instances of court case-law which were given different constructions by various judiciary authorities.

  10. One-step click engineering considerably ameliorates the practicality of an unqualified rhodamine probe.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Kai-Bin; Wang, Huan; Zang, Yi; He, Xiao-Peng; Li, Jia; Chen, Guo-Rong; Tian, He

    2014-11-26

    This study describes the exploitation of click chemistry in the one-step molecular engineering of an unqualified rhodamine probe, leading to its considerable functional enhancement in terms of water solubility, ion selectivity, and usefulness in detecting biological and environmental samples. A dipropargyl rhodamine dye previously identified as an unselective and poorly water-soluble mercury(II) probe was used to couple with an azido polyethylene glycol (PEG) by the Cu(I)-catalyzed azide-alkyne 1,3-dipolar cycloaddition click reaction in almost quantitative yield. The simple click-engineered rhodamine probe shows, remarkably, better water solubility and mercury(II) selectivity comparing to the raw counterpart, and can be used to sensitively image mercury ions internalized by live cells and to accurately quantify the ion spiked in river water specimens. This study provides insights into the simple functional improvement of unqualified molecular dye probes via the efficient "click engineering".

  11. An overview of age estimation in forensic anthropology: perspectives and practical considerations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Márquez-Grant, Nicholas

    2015-01-01

    Information on methods of age estimation in physical anthropology, in particular with regard to age-at-death from human skeletal remains, is widely available in the literature. However, the practicalities and real challenges faced in forensic casework are not always highlighted. To provide a practitioner's perspective, regarding age estimation in forensic anthropology (both in the living as well as the dead), with an emphasis on the types of cases, the value of such work and its challenges and limitations. The paper reviews the current literature on age estimation with a focus on forensic anthropology, but it also brings the author's personal perspective derived from a number of forensic cases. Although much is known about what methods to use, but not always how to apply them, little attention has been given in the literature to the real practicalities faced by forensic anthropologists, for example: the challenges in different types of scenarios; how to report age estimations; responsibilities; and ethical concerns. This paper gathers some of these aspects into one overview which includes the value of such work and the practical challenges, not necessarily with the methods themselves, but also with regard to how these are applied in the different cases where age estimation is required.

  12. Strategy-As-Practice Research: Initial Considerations on the Field in Brazil

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Julio Ernesto Colla

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available The objective of the present article was to verify the conceptual position and onto-epistemological of the Brazilian researchers in Strategy-as-Practice from the concepts proclaimed for the movement. The theoretical base presents the conceptual revision of the field that served of script for the analysis of the data. It treated, therefore of the elements of strategizig: praxis, practices and practitiones. After this deals with the agenda and agency in which the movement needs to insert itself. Following the theoretical base perspective onto-epistemológicas ontológicas are presented and that assist the agreement of the strategical phenomenon for the optics of that Strategy is what the people do. The data are the source documents. The determination of articles to be analyzed occurred for the manipulation of articles following a pre-established script. The results of the research make indication of a set sufficiently diversified of conceptual positions with sights to remedy the faced questionings that can be influenced by the context where the researcher is inserted. Also it was found that when passing of the years it had extrapolação of the subject for other seek areas, not having limitation of the subject only in the area of strategy as at the beginning of the presentation of papers in Brazil. The data of the research report that the characterization in a Brazilian onto-epistemological way of performance in the research in Strategy-as-Practice is not possible still.

  13. Practical guidance and considerations for transitioning patients from oxcarbazepine or carbamazepine to eslicarbazepine acetate--Expert opinion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peltola, Jukka; Holtkamp, Martin; Rocamora, Rodrigo; Ryvlin, Philippe; Sieradzan, Kasia; Villanueva, Vicente

    2015-09-01

    There is currently a lack of guidance on methodology and special considerations for transitioning patients from oxcarbazepine (OXC) or carbamazepine (CBZ) to eslicarbazepine acetate (ESL), if deemed clinically necessary. An advisory panel of epilepsy experts was convened to share their experience on the use of adjunctive ESL in clinical practice and to provide practical recommendations to help address this gap. When changing over from OXC to ESL, an OXC:ESL dose ratio of 1:1 should be employed to calculate the ESL target dose, and the changeover can take place overnight. No changes to comedication are required. Since CBZ has a different mechanism of action to ESL and is a stronger inducer of cytochrome P450 (CYP) enzymes, the transitioning of patients from CBZ to ESL requires careful consideration on a patient-by-patient basis. In general, a CBZ:ESL dose ratio of 1:1.3 should be employed to calculate the ESL target dose, and patients should be transitioned over a minimum period of 1-2weeks. Special considerations include adjustment of titration schedule and target dose in elderly patients and those with hepatic or renal impairment and potential adjustment of comedications metabolized by CYP enzymes. In summary, due to structural distinctions between ESL, OXC, and CBZ, which affect mechanism of action and tolerability, there are clinical situations in which it may be appropriate to consider transitioning patients from OXC or CBZ to ESL. Changing patients over from OXC to ESL is generally more straightforward than transitioning patients from CBZ to ESL, which requires careful consideration. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  14. 1995 Annual epidemiologic surveillance report for Brookhaven National Laboratory

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1995-12-31

    The US Department of Energy`s (DOE) conduct of epidemiologic surveillance provides an early warning system for health problems among workers. This program monitors illnesses and health conditions that result in an absence of five or more consecutive workdays, occupational injuries and illnesses, and disabilities and deaths among current workers. This report summarizes epidemiologic surveillance data collected from Brookhaven National Laboratory (BNL) from January 1, 1995 through December 31, 1995. The data were collected by a coordinator at BNL and submitted to the Epidemiologic Surveillance Data Center, located at Oak Ridge Institute for Science and Education, where quality control procedures and data analyses were carried out.

  15. Brookhaven National Laboratory site report for calendar year 1988

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Miltenberger, R.P.; Royce, B.A.; Naidu, J.R.

    1989-06-01

    Brookhaven National Laboratory (BNL) is managed by Associated Universities Inc. (AUI). AUI was formed in 1946 by a group of nine universities whose purpose was to create and manage a laboratory in the Northeast in order to advance scientific research in areas of interest to universities, industry, and government. On January 31, 1947, the contract for BNL was approved by the Manhattan District of the Army Corps of Engineers and BNL was established on the former Camp Upton army camp. 54 refs., 21 figs., 78 tabs.

  16. Brookhaven National Laboratory site environmental report for calendar year 1991

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Naidu, J.R.; Royce, B.A.; Miltenberger, R.P.

    1992-09-01

    This publication presents the results of BNL`s environmental monitoring and compliance effort and provides an assessment of the impact of Brookhaven National Laboratory (BNL) operations on the environment. This document is the responsibility of the Environmental Protection Section of the Safety and Envirorunental Protection Division. Within this Section, the Environmental Monitoring Group (EMG) sample the environment, interpreted the results, performed the impact analysis of the emissions from BNL, and compiled the information presented here. In this effort, other groups of the Section: Compliance; Analytical; Ground Water; and Quality played a key role in addressing the regulatory aspects and the analysis and documentation of the data, respectively.

  17. Brookhaven National Laboratory site environmental report for calendar year 1991

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Naidu, J.R.; Royce, B.A.; Miltenberger, R.P.

    1992-09-01

    This publication presents the results of BNL's environmental monitoring and compliance effort and provides an assessment of the impact of Brookhaven National Laboratory (BNL) operations on the environment. This document is the responsibility of the Environmental Protection Section of the Safety and Envirorunental Protection Division. Within this Section, the Environmental Monitoring Group (EMG) sample the environment, interpreted the results, performed the impact analysis of the emissions from BNL, and compiled the information presented here. In this effort, other groups of the Section: Compliance; Analytical; Ground Water; and Quality played a key role in addressing the regulatory aspects and the analysis and documentation of the data, respectively.

  18. Brookhaven National Laboratory site environmental report for calendar year 1990

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Miltenberger, R.P.; Royce, B.A.; Naidu, J.R.

    1992-01-01

    Brookhaven National Laboratory (BNL) carries out basic and applied research in the following fields: high-energy nuclear and solid state physics; fundamental material and structure properties and the interactions of matter; nuclear medicine, biomedical and environmental sciences; and selected energy technologies. In conducting these research activities, it is Laboratory policy to protect the health and safety of employees and the public, and to minimize the impact of BNL operations on the environment. This document is the BNL environmental report for the calendar year 1990 for the safety and Environmental Protection division and corners topics on effluents, surveillance, regulations, assessments, and compliance.

  19. Patient attributes warranting consideration in clinical practice guidelines, health workforce planning and policy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Segal Leonie

    2011-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background In order for clinical practice guidelines (CPGs to meet their broad objective of enhancing the quality of care and supporting improved patient outcomes, they must address the needs of diverse patient populations. We set out to explore the patient attributes that are likely to demand a unique approach to the management of chronic disease, and which are crucial if evidence or services planning is to reflect clinic populations. These were incorporated into a new conceptual framework; using diabetes mellitus as an exemplar. Methods The patient attributes that informed the framework were identified from CPGs, the diabetes literature, an expert academic panel, and two cross-disciplinary panels; and agreed upon using a modified nominal group technique. Results Full consensus was reached on twenty-four attributes. These factors fell into one of three themes: (1 type/stage of disease, (2 morbid events, and (3 factors impacting on capacity to self-care. These three themes were incorporated in a convenient way in the workforce evidence-based (WEB model. Conclusions While biomedical factors are frequently recognised in published clinical practice guidelines, little attention is given to attributes influencing a person's capacity to self-care. Paying explicit attention to predictable threats to effective self-care in clinical practice guidelines, by drawing on the WEB model, may assist in refinements that would address observed disparities in health outcomes across socio-economic groups. The WEB model also provides a framework to inform clinical training, and health services and workforce planning and research; including the assessment of healthcare needs, and the allocation of healthcare resources.

  20. Developing students' time management skills in clinical settings: practical considerations for busy nursing staff.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cleary, Michelle; Horsfall, Jan

    2011-06-01

    In clinical settings, nursing staff often find themselves responsible for students who have varying time management skills. Nurses need to respond sensitively and appropriately, and to teach nursing students how to prioritize and better allocate time. This is important not only for developing students' clinical skills but also for shaping their perceptions about the quality of the placement and their willingness to consider it as a potential work specialty. In this column, some simple, practical strategies that nurses can use to assist students with improving their time management skills are identified. Copyright 2011, SLACK Incorporated.

  1. Measurement-induced two-qubit entanglement in a bad cavity: Fundamental and practical considerations

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Julsgaard, Brian; Mølmer, Klaus

    2012-01-01

    An entanglement-generating protocol is described for two qubits coupled to a cavity field in the bad-cavity limit. By measuring the amplitude of a field transmitted through the cavity, an entangled spin-singlet state can be established probabilistically. Both fundamental limitations and practical...... measurement schemes are discussed, and the influence of dissipative processes and inhomogeneities in the qubits are analyzed. The measurement-based protocol provides criteria for selecting states with an infidelity scaling linearly with the qubit-decoherence rate....

  2. Measurement-induced two-qubit entanglement in a bad cavity: Fundamental and practical considerations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Julsgaard, Brian; Mølmer, Klaus

    2012-03-01

    An entanglement-generating protocol is described for two qubits coupled to a cavity field in the bad-cavity limit. By measuring the amplitude of a field transmitted through the cavity, an entangled spin-singlet state can be established probabilistically. Both fundamental limitations and practical measurement schemes are discussed, and the influence of dissipative processes and inhomogeneities in the qubits are analyzed. The measurement-based protocol provides criteria for selecting states with an infidelity scaling linearly with the qubit-decoherence rate.

  3. Gender and assistance: historical and conceptual considerations regarding assistance practices and policies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martins, Ana Paula Vosne

    2011-12-01

    The article offers some theoretical and historical reflections on the concept of gender as it relates to the notion of assistance. Explores the political dimensions of both concepts and problematizes the dichotomy between the gender-marked realms of the political and the pre-political, a dichotomy that has greatly influenced modern political theory and thought. It examines the modern state's care practices and the transformations in assistance which occurred within the charitable and assistance organizations that took shape in parallel and in consonance with this state action.

  4. Multicultural considerations for the advanced practice nurse anesthetist in the preoperative teaching area.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hanna, K

    1997-01-01

    This article investigates the effects of multiculturism and diversity on the ability of the preoperative certified registered nurse anesthetist (CRNA) educator to convey effective information to the culturally diverse surgical patient. It looks at the importance of preoperative instruction across all populations in relation to hospital length of stay, need for postoperative pain medication, ambulation, and postoperative urinary retention. The article extrapolates these data to the culturally diverse population and gives a concrete plan of care for the advanced practice CRNA to modify teaching methods to facilitate the teaching-learning encounter in the culturally diverse population.

  5. Integrating Motivational Interviewing and Brief Behavioral Activation Therapy: Theoretical and Practical Considerations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Balán, Iván C; Lejuez, C W; Hoffer, Marcela; Blanco, Carlos

    2016-05-01

    Behavioral Activation and specifically the Brief Behavioral Activation Therapy for Depression (BATD) has a strong record of empirical support but its focus on practical out of session activation-based assignments can lead to poor levels of adherence if efforts to enhance motivation are not prioritized. Towards this end, this manuscript describes the assimilative integration of Motivational Interviewing (MI) and BATD to improve clinical outcomes by integrating MI's focus on building and maintaining motivation to change into BATD. The manuscript provides an overview of MI and BATD, theoretical issue raised in integrating the two approaches, and examples of how this integration results in a nondirective and motivation-focused approach to conducting BATD.

  6. Ethical and practical considerations of withdrawal of treatment in the intensive care unit.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eschun, G M; Jacobsohn, E; Roberts, D; Sneiderman, B

    1999-05-01

    To discuss the medical, ethical and legal basis of decisions to discontinue life-support therapy in the adult intensive care unit (ICU), and to provide practical guidelines for the discontinuation of life support therapy. Relevant articles were retrieved through Medline (1991-present; terms: ethics, life support discontinuation, double effect, beneficence, non-maleficence). Other sources include legal references, and personal files. Understanding the legal and ethical principles of autonomy, beneficence, non-maleficence and double effect are crucial when withdrawing life support therapy. The law respects a competent patient's right to direct his/her healthcare but does not uphold his/her right to demand futile care. Surrogate decision makers can be used when the patient is incompetent, provided they are acting in the patient's best interest. Euthanasia is illegal and the distinction between discontinuation of therapy and euthanasia is legally clear. Skillful administration of palliative therapy cannot be construed as euthanasia when the aforementioned ethical principals are respected. The various practical methods of discontinuing therapy are discussed. Every ICU should develop its own guidelines and a checklist to help caregivers during this difficult time. Caregivers must anticipate the mechanism of death and direct interventions at the symptoms that are likely to cause discomfort. Drugs and dosages must be individualized, and depend on the underlying disease, anticipated mechanism of death, and the patient's pharmacological history. When prescribing a drug, the intention should be clear. Appropriate discontinuation of therapy in the ICU allows patients a dignified and comfortable death.

  7. Risk management in clinical practice. Part 5. Ethical considerations for dental enhancement procedures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ahmad, I

    2010-09-11

    After the demise of the Industrial Age, we currently live in an 'Information Age' fuelled mainly by the Internet, with an ever-increasing medically and dentally literate population. The media has played its role by reporting scientific advances, as well as securitising medical and dental practices. Reality television such as 'Extreme makeovers' has also raised public awareness of body enhancements, with a greater number of people seeking such procedures. To satiate this growing demand, the dental industry has flourished by introducing novel cosmetic products such as bleaching kits, tooth coloured filling materials and a variety of dental ceramics. In addition, one only has to browse through a dental journal to notice innumerable courses and lectures on techniques for providing cosmetic dentistry. The incessant public interest, combined with unrelenting marketing by companies is gradually shifting the balance of dental care from a healing to an enhancement profession. The purpose of this article is to endeavour to answer questions such as, What is aesthetic or cosmetic dentistry? Why do patients seek cosmetic dentistry? Are enhancement procedures a part of dental practice? What, if any, ethical guidelines and constraints apply to elective enhancement procedures? What is the role of the dentist in providing or encouraging this type of 'therapy'? What treatment modalities are available for aesthetic dental treatment?

  8. The interplay of text, meaning and practice: methodological considerations on discourse analysis in medical education.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kärreman, Dan; Levay, Charlotta

    2017-01-01

    The study of discourses (i.e. verbal interactions or written accounts) is increasingly used in social sciences to gain insight into issues connected to discourse, such as meanings, behaviours and actions. This paper situates discourse analysis in medical education, based on a framework developed in organisational discourse analysis and widely deployed in other social science disciplines. This paper aims to examine the constructs of 'discourse' and 'discourse analysis', and how various understandings of discourse and discourse analysis may play out in empirical and analytical settings, with a particular focus on the field of medical education. The study is based on a literature analysis of discourse analysis approaches published in Medical Education. Findings suggest that empirical studies through discourse analysis can be heuristically understood in terms of the links between text, practices and meaning. Discourse analysis provides a more strongly supported argument when it is possible to defend claims on three levels: practice, using observational data; meaning, using ethnographic data, and text, using conversational and textual data. © 2016 John Wiley & Sons Ltd and The Association for the Study of Medical Education.

  9. Theoretical Aspects And Practical Considerations In The Application Of Cnc To The Spherical Generator

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clarke, Fred W.; Hall, Hendley W.

    1987-02-01

    In response to a broad expression of customer interest, Rogers and Clarke Manufacturing Company has recently developed its first-generation CNC spherical generator. This paper presents some theoretical aspects of the design, and some of the obstacles we had to ad-dress. The fundamentals of manual generator setups are well known. The only mathematics involved was to solve a simple equation for the generator head angle, given the rough cutting diameter of the cup wheel, and the work radius to be achieved. Subsequent "cut and try" refinement of the setup is normally an "art" unsullied by mathematical analysis. But the computer requires more precise instruction. Our theoretical considerations, mathematical models, and applications experience are discussed. With the factor of diamond wheel radius wear, it is not possible to finish every lens with computer control. Therefore, the operator of a Rogers and Clarke CNC Spherical Generator has the availability of manual controls for individual machine functions. CNC Spherical Generators are designed specifically for the shop with numerous short runs and perhaps a low diamond wheel inventory. The computer controls system permits much faster setup times, particularly for less experienced operators.

  10. Technical Review: Microscopy and Image Processing Tools to Analyze Plant Chromatin: Practical Considerations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baroux, Célia; Schubert, Veit

    2018-01-01

    In situ nucleus and chromatin analyses rely on microscopy imaging that benefits from versatile, efficient fluorescent probes and proteins for static or live imaging. Yet the broad choice in imaging instruments offered to the user poses orientation problems. Which imaging instrument should be used for which purpose? What are the main caveats and what are the considerations to best exploit each instrument's ability to obtain informative and high-quality images? How to infer quantitative information on chromatin or nuclear organization from microscopy images? In this review, we present an overview of common, fluorescence-based microscopy systems and discuss recently developed super-resolution microscopy systems, which are able to bridge the resolution gap between common fluorescence microscopy and electron microscopy. We briefly present their basic principles and discuss their possible applications in the field, while providing experience-based recommendations to guide the user toward best-possible imaging. In addition to raw data acquisition methods, we discuss commercial and noncommercial processing tools required for optimal image presentation and signal evaluation in two and three dimensions.

  11. Practical considerations for investigation of protein conformational dynamics by 15N R 1ρ relaxation dispersion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Walinda, Erik; Morimoto, Daichi; Shirakawa, Masahiro; Sugase, Kenji

    2017-03-01

    It is becoming increasingly apparent that proteins are not static entities and that their function often critically depends on accurate sampling of multiple conformational states in aqueous solution. Accordingly, the development of methods to study conformational states in proteins beyond their ground-state structure ("excited states") has crucial biophysical importance. Here we investigate experimental schemes for optimally probing chemical exchange processes in proteins on the micro- to millisecond timescale by 15N R 1ρ relaxation dispersion. The schemes use selective Hartmann-Hahn cross-polarization (CP) transfer for excitation, and derive peak integrals from 1D NMR spectra (Korzhnev et al. in J Am Chem Soc 127:713-721, 2005; Hansen et al. in J Am Chem Soc 131:3818-3819, 2009). Simulation and experiment collectively show that in such CP-based schemes care has to be taken to achieve accurate suppression of undesired off-resonance coherences, when using weak spin-lock fields. This then (i) ensures that relaxation dispersion profiles in the absence of chemical exchange are flat, and (ii) facilitates extraction of relaxation dispersion profiles in crowded regions of the spectrum. Further improvement in the quality of the experimental data is achieved by recording the free-induction decays in an interleaved manner and including a heating-compensation element. The reported considerations will particularly benefit the use of CP-based R 1ρ relaxation dispersion to analyze conformational exchange processes in larger proteins, where resonance line overlap becomes the main limiting factor.

  12. Field theory approaches to new media practices: An introduction and some theoretical considerations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ida Willig

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available In this article introducing the theme of the special issue we argue that studies of new media practices might benefit from especially Pierre Bourdieu’s research on cultural production. We introduce some of the literature, which deals with the use of digital media, and which have taken steps to develop field theory in this context. Secondly, we present the four thematic articles in this issue and the articles outside the theme, which includes two translations of classic texts within communication and media research. This introduction article concludes by encouraging media scholars to embark on more studies within a field theory framework, as the ability of the comprehensive theoretical work and the ideas of a reflexive sociology is able to trigger the good questions, more than it claims to offer a complete and self-sufficient sociology of media and inherent here also new media.

  13. Sustainable ubiquitous home health care--architectural considerations and first practical experiences.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marschollek, Michael; Wolf, Klaus-H; Bott, Oliver-J; Geisler, Mirko; Plischke, Maik; Ludwig, Wolfram; Hornberger, Andreas; Haux, Reinhold

    2007-01-01

    Despite the abundance of past home care projects and the maturity of the technologies used, there is no widespread dissemination as yet. The absence of accepted standards and thus interoperability and the inadequate integration into transinstitutional health information systems (tHIS) are perceived as key factors. Based on the respective literature and previous experiences in home care projects we propose an architectural model for home care as part of a transinstitutional health information system using the HL7 clinical document architecture (CDA) as well as the HL7 Arden Syntax for Medical Logic Systems. In two short case studies we describe the practical realization of the architecture as well as first experiences. Our work can be regarded as a first step towards an interoperable - and in our view sustainable - home care architecture based on a prominent document standard from the health information system domain.

  14. Opioid therapy for chronic low back pain: prescribing considerations for advanced practice registered nurses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lall, Maureen Patricia

    2014-12-01

    Chronic low back pain is a common, disabling, and costly condition, and advanced practice registered nurses (APRNs) must carefully evaluate patients before considering long-term opioid therapy as a management strategy. APRNs should refer patients suspected of having a serious condition, or identifiable etiology, for specialist evaluation, as many patients improve with physical therapy, interventional pain management procedures, or surgical intervention. For patients unresponsive to nonopioid treatment, APRNs with an understanding of opioids, and the experience to assess and manage the risks of opioid misuse, abuse, and diversion, may consider long-term opioid therapy as part of a multimodal management plan. Such prescribing necessitates careful patient selection; informed consent; prudent opioid dosing and titration; and monitoring for response to treatment, adverse effects, and aberrant drug-taking behavior. Treatment and regulatory guidelines can assist APRNs in providing safe and effective care to patients with chronic low back pain.

  15. Treatment of Chronic Inflammatory Demyelinating Polyneuropathy: From Molecular Bases to Practical Considerations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ripellino, Paolo; Fleetwood, Thomas; Cantello, Roberto; Comi, Cristoforo

    2014-01-01

    Chronic inflammatory demyelinating polyneuropathy (CIDP) is an autoimmune disease of the peripheral nervous system, in which both cellular and humoral immune responses are involved. The disease is clinically heterogeneous with some patients displaying pure motor form and others also showing a variable degree of sensory dysfunction; disease evolution may also differ from patient to patient, since monophasic, progressive, and relapsing forms are reported. Underlying such clinical variability there is probably a broad spectrum of molecular dysfunctions that are and will be the target of therapeutic strategies. In this review we first explore the biological bases of current treatments and subsequently we focus on the practical management that must also take into account pharmacoeconomic issues. PMID:24527207

  16. Quagmires for clinical psychology and executive coaching? Ethical considerations and practice challenges.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gebhardt, Judith Ann

    2016-04-01

    As the coaching field burgeons, both the mental health and coaching professionals, and their respective professions, face a myriad of potential quagmires, especially if the unique challenges encountered are ignored. After a short introduction and presentation on ethics and morals related to executive coaching and clinical therapy, a discussion follows on the lengthy and intimate relationship between executive coaching and psychology. Next are definitions and comparisons and 6 areas that are potential quagmires. This includes roles, skill sets/core competencies, education/training, licensing/credentialing-certification, governing bodies and confidentiality, and fees/reimbursement. Each section includes a discussion and several questions to highlight potentially problematic areas, practice challenges, and/or ethical issues, followed with brief responses. This paper concludes with the inquiry, "Where do we go from here?" (c) 2016 APA, all rights reserved).

  17. Ethical and practical considerations in managing incidental findings in functional magnetic resonance imaging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Illes, Judy; Desmond, John E; Huang, Lynn F; Raffin, Thomas A; Atlas, Scott W

    2002-12-01

    Functional magnetic resonance imaging has emerged as a powerful tool for mapping the neurologic underpinnings of sensory, motor and cognitive function. Much of this evolution carries assumptions about the subject population under study and, in particular, the neurologic status of subjects entered into studies either as healthy controls or as belonging to a specific disease group. Recent reports of incidental MRI abnormalities in normal volunteers for fMRI studies have brought to attention a variety of practical challenges and ethical dilemmas for researchers, many of whom are not physicians and most of whom have no formal radiological training. We propose a minimum standard for consenting subjects in fMRI protocols, and consider strategies over the longer term that call for expert physician participation, archiving of incidental findings including false positives, and the adoption of guidelines for handling variation in neural activations or performance that appear outside expected norms.

  18. Identifying Depression in South Asian Patients with End-Stage Renal Disease: Considerations for Practice

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shivani Sharma

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available Depression is a prevalent burden for patients with end-stage renal disease (ESRD and one that is under-recognized and consequently under-treated. Although several studies have explored the association between depression symptoms, treatment adherence and outcomes in Euro-American patient groups, quantitative and qualitative exploration of these issues in patients from different cultural and ethnic backgrounds has been lacking. This review discusses the methodological issues associated with measuring depression in patients of South Asian origin who have a 3- to 5-fold greater risk of developing ESRD. There is a need to advance research into the development of accurate screening practices for this patient group, with an emphasis on studies utilizing rigorous approaches to evaluating the use of both emic (culture-specific and etic (universal or culture-general screening instruments.

  19. Identifying depression in South asian patients with end-stage renal disease: considerations for practice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sharma, Shivani; Bhui, Kamaldeep; Chilcot, Joseph; Wellsted, David; Farrington, Ken

    2011-01-01

    Depression is a prevalent burden for patients with end-stage renal disease (ESRD) and one that is under-recognized and consequently under-treated. Although several studies have explored the association between depression symptoms, treatment adherence and outcomes in Euro-American patient groups, quantitative and qualitative exploration of these issues in patients from different cultural and ethnic backgrounds has been lacking. This review discusses the methodological issues associated with measuring depression in patients of South Asian origin who have a 3- to 5-fold greater risk of developing ESRD. There is a need to advance research into the development of accurate screening practices for this patient group, with an emphasis on studies utilizing rigorous approaches to evaluating the use of both emic (culture-specific) and etic (universal or culture-general) screening instruments.

  20. Involving older people in research: practical considerations when using the authenticity criteria in constructivist inquiry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wilson, Christine Brown; Clissett, Philip

    2011-03-01

    The purpose of this paper is to identify practical suggestions that could enable other researchers to consider how quality may be evidenced using constructivist principles including the perspectives of older people and their caregivers. Constructivism suggests that reality is part of a social construction, which holds different meanings for each person, in which people are active agents, making autonomous decisions. This approach to research has been identified as suitable for health and social care professionals because these underpinning principles reflect the values of these professions, facilitating the involvement of users and carers. The authenticity criteria have been developed to reflect these philosophical principles but have been criticized for their inaccessible language. To incorporate user and carer perspectives, the criteria have been revised into a more accessible model matrix known as the AldreVast Sjuharad criteria. This paper reports on two constructivist studies that explored relationships between older people, families and staff in different settings--the community and care homes. Examples from both settings demonstrate how the perspectives of users and carers were incorporated throughout the research process. Following the AldreVast Sjuharad model matrix, practical guidance is provided on how the quality of constructivist research may be implemented in nursing research. The different settings in this paper influenced how the AldreVast Sjuharad model matrix was applied. Further work is needed in exploring how the perspective of users and carers may be incorporated into the quality process of constructivist research. © 2010 The Authors. Journal of Advanced Nursing © 2010 Blackwell Publishing Ltd.

  1. 75 FR 43611 - U S Rail Corporation-Construction and Operation Exemption-Brookhaven Rail Terminal

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-26

    ... TRANSPORTATION Surface Transportation Board U S Rail Corporation--Construction and Operation Exemption-- Brookhaven Rail Terminal On August 7, 2008, U S Rail Corporation (U S Rail), an existing class III short line...) of new rail line at a 28-acre site (the Brookhaven Rail Terminal or BRT) located in the Town of...

  2. Brookhaven National Laboratory Institutional Plan FY2001--FY2005

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Davis, S.

    2000-10-01

    Brookhaven National Laboratory is a multidisciplinary laboratory in the Department of Energy National Laboratory system and plays a lead role in the DOE Science and Technology mission. The Laboratory also contributes to the DOE missions in Energy Resources, Environmental Quality, and National Security. Brookhaven strives for excellence in its science research and in facility operations and manages its activities with particular sensitivity to environmental and community issues. The Laboratory's programs are aligned continuously with the goals and objectives of the DOE through an Integrated Planning Process. This Institutional Plan summarizes the portfolio of research and capabilities that will assure success in the Laboratory's mission in the future. It also sets forth BNL strategies for our programs and for management of the Laboratory. The Department of Energy national laboratory system provides extensive capabilities in both world class research expertise and unique facilities that cannot exist without federal support. Through these national resources, which are available to researchers from industry, universities, other government agencies and other nations, the Department advances the energy, environmental, economic and national security well being of the US, provides for the international advancement of science, and educates future scientists and engineers.

  3. The High Flux Beam Reactor at Brookhaven National Laboratory

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shapiro, S.M.

    1994-12-31

    Brookhaven National Laboratory`s High Flux Beam Reactor (HFBR) was built because of the need of the scientist to always want `more`. In the mid-50`s the Brookhaven Graphite reactor was churning away producing a number of new results when the current generation of scientists, led by Donald Hughes, realized the need for a high flux reactor and started down the political, scientific and engineering path that led to the BFBR. The effort was joined by a number of engineers and scientists among them, Chemick, Hastings, Kouts, and Hendrie, who came up with the novel design of the HFBR. The two innovative features that have been incorporated in nearly all other research reactors built since are: (i) an under moderated core arrangement which enables the thermal flux to peak outside the core region where beam tubes can be placed, and (ii) beam tubes that are tangential to the core which decrease the fast neutron background without affecting the thermal beam intensity. Construction began in the fall of 1961 and four years later, at a cost of $12 Million, criticality was achieved on Halloween Night, 1965. Thus began 30 years of scientific accomplishments.

  4. Transfer path analysis: Current practice, trade-offs and consideration of damping

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oktav, Akın; Yılmaz, Çetin; Anlaş, Günay

    2017-02-01

    Current practice of experimental transfer path analysis is discussed in the context of trade-offs between accuracy and time cost. An overview of methods, which propose solutions for structure borne noise, is given, where assumptions, drawbacks and advantages of methods are stated theoretically. Applicability of methods is also investigated, where an engine induced structure borne noise of an automobile is taken as a reference problem. Depending on this particular problem, sources of measurement errors, processing operations that affect results and physical obstacles faced in the application are analysed. While an operational measurement is common in all stated methods, when it comes to removal of source, or the need for an external excitation, discrepancies are present. Depending on the chosen method, promised outcomes like independent characterisation of the source, or getting information about mounts also differ. Although many aspects of the problem are reported in the literature, damping and its effects are not considered. Damping effect is embedded in the measured complex frequency response functions, and it is needed to be analysed in the post processing step. Effects of damping, reasons and methods to analyse them are discussed in detail. In this regard, a new procedure, which increases the accuracy of results, is also proposed.

  5. Bosutinib Therapy in Patients With Chronic Myeloid Leukemia: Practical Considerations for Management of Side Effects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ault, Patricia S; Rose PharmD, John; Nodzon PhD, Lisa A; Kaled, Elizabeth S

    2016-03-01

    The past decade has witnessed great advances in the treatment of chronic myeloid leukemia (CML), brought about in large part by the development of BCR-ABL tyrosine kinase inhibitors (TKIs). Bosutinib joins the armamentarium of approved TKIs for the treatment of chronic phase (CP), accelerated phase (AP), and blast phase (BP) Philadelphia chromosome (Ph)-positive CML resistant to or intolerant of prior therapy. Bosutinib has an adverse-event (AE) profile distinct from that of other TKIs. Diarrhea is the predominant toxicity associated with bosutinib treatment; other commonly reported nonhematologic AEs include rash and liver enzyme elevations. Cardiac events, fluid retention, and electrolyte abnormalities are infrequent. Optimal response to bosutinib requires adherence, which depends, in part, upon optimal management of associated toxicities. The oncology clinician can facilitate this process by providing patient education, timely patient follow-up, and close monitoring to promptly identify and manage AEs. Thus, optimal patient management requires a thorough and current understanding of toxicity profiles and AE management paradigms. This review provides an overview of bosutinib safety data derived from ongoing clinical trials and offers practical clinical strategies currently used to manage toxicities associated with bosutinib treatment in patients with Ph-positive CP, AP, and BP CML.

  6. Screening to identify mental health problems in pediatric primary care: considerations for practice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brown, Jonathan D; Wissow, Lawrence S

    2010-01-01

    Few pediatric primary care providers routinely use mental health screening tools, in part because they may have concerns about whether screening is useful and how it will affect their practice. This study examined the extent to which screening in primary care would increase the identification of mental health problems among a diverse population of children and youth. Prior to the visit, the parents of 767 patients age 5 to 16 completed the Strengths and Difficulties Questionnaire to report their child's mental health symptoms and impairment. Without viewing the screening results, each child's provider (N = 53) completed a questionnaire to report whether the child or youth demonstrated a mental health problem. Compared with providers, the screen identified twice as many patients with moderate symptoms and nearly 28% more patients with high symptoms. Among patients with high symptoms, providers failed to identify a problem among 78% of those who were Latino/Other and 55% of those who were African American compared with 27% of Caucasian patients (p Screening substantially increased the number of children and youth who would be identified as possibly having a mental health problem. Screening may have the most potential to increase the identification of problems among patients who have moderate mental health symptoms and those who are African American or Latino.

  7. Dancing through Cape Coast: ethical and practical considerations for health-related service-learning programs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saffran, Lise

    2013-09-01

    Short-term service-learning programs that focus on global health are expanding rapidly, spurred by students' desire to be of service in a world that has been made to seem small by new technology and universities' willingness to embrace the goal of educating global citizens. In this commentary, the author uses experiences from a recent trip she led to Ghana as a backdrop against which to explore some of the ethical and practical issues that arise when U.S. students work in health-related programs in developing countries. At minimum, the author argues, these programs should lead students to consider issues such as which basic services people are entitled to, regardless of where and in what circumstances they live, and how differences in access to social and economic resources contribute to health disparities on a global scale. She also suggests that sponsoring institutions should consider what is owed to the countries and communities in which their students learn. Finally, she underscores the circumstances under which service-learning programs can truly benefit the cause of global health.

  8. Practical Considerations for the Diagnosis and Management of Asthma in Older Adults.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yawn, Barbara P; Han, MeiLan K

    2017-11-01

    Although often considered a disease of childhood, the prevalence of asthma in US adults aged 65 years or older is similar to that in children, with the number of older patients needing care for asthma likely to continue to increase. As with most chronic diseases, there are challenges associated with the diagnosis and management of asthma in an older population. This review discusses these challenges, suggesting practical management strategies for primary care physicians and their teams. Asthma comprises a spectrum of phenotypes, some associated with adult onset. The symptoms and characteristics of patients with late-onset asthma can differ from those of patients with early-onset disease. Furthermore, older patients may fail to recognize respiratory symptoms as abnormal and have other comorbidities, complicating the differential diagnosis of asthma. Once diagnosed, the long-term goals of asthma management are no different in older adults than in anyone with asthma, with inhaled corticosteroids being the cornerstone of therapy. Comorbid conditions become more common with age and have a direct impact on a patient's respiratory symptoms and potential adverse effects of therapy, thereby influencing the choice of therapies and delivery systems and potentially increasing the likelihood of complex polypharmacy. In conclusion, asthma, although traditionally considered a disease of the young, should be considered as a potential diagnosis in older adults with respiratory symptoms, even without a history of asthma or allergies. As with all patients, the primary goals of asthma management in older adults are symptom control and exacerbation reduction. Copyright © 2017 Mayo Foundation for Medical Education and Research. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  9. Application of curvelet denoising to 2D and 3D seismic data - Practical considerations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Górszczyk, Andrzej; Adamczyk, Anna; Malinowski, Michał

    2014-06-01

    Contamination of seismic signal with noise of various origins is one of the main challenges encountered during processing and interpretation of seismic data. Several methods exist for eliminating different types of noises like coherent or incoherent noise and multiples, but optimal random noise attenuation remains difficult. Here we investigate relatively new technique based on discrete curvelet transform (DCT). Features like multi-resolution, multi-direction and locality of DCT introduce minimal overlapping between coefficients representing signal and noise in curvelet domain which is the prime advantage of this method. We present practical application of DCT describing its main features and focusing on useful details, especially more complex thresholding based on analyzing 2D Fourier spectrum and the vector of curvelet coefficients. We demonstrate that better understanding of relations between DCT properties and obtained results in pair with additional investigation of curvelet domain provides better localization and, in consequence, separation of noise and signal energy. Introduced scale and angle dependent weighting of curvelet coefficients leads to significant improvements of results with respect to noise attenuation and signal energy preservation. Effectiveness of our approach is demonstrated both on synthetic 2D sections with white and colored noise added, as well as on real 2D and 3D post-stack seismic data. Finally, we demonstrate the use of curvelet denoising as the data-preconditioning tool for frequency-domain full-waveform inversion. Curvelet denoising seems to be much more robust as compared with traditional filtering (e.g. F-X deconvolution), especially when noise and signal spectra overlap.

  10. Defining epitope coverage requirements for T cell-based HIV vaccines: Theoretical considerations and practical applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-01-01

    Background HIV vaccine development must address the genetic diversity and plasticity of the virus that permits the presentation of diverse genetic forms to the immune system and subsequent escape from immune pressure. Assessment of potential HIV strain coverage by candidate T cell-based vaccines (whether natural sequence or computationally optimized products) is now a critical component in interpreting candidate vaccine suitability. Methods We have utilized an N-mer identity algorithm to represent T cell epitopes and explore potential coverage of the global HIV pandemic using natural sequences derived from candidate HIV vaccines. Breadth (the number of T cell epitopes generated) and depth (the variant coverage within a T cell epitope) analyses have been incorporated into the model to explore vaccine coverage requirements in terms of the number of discrete T cell epitopes generated. Results We show that when multiple epitope generation by a vaccine product is considered a far more nuanced appraisal of the potential HIV strain coverage of the vaccine product emerges. By considering epitope breadth and depth several important observations were made: (1) epitope breadth requirements to reach particular levels of vaccine coverage, even for natural sequence-based vaccine products is not necessarily an intractable problem for the immune system; (2) increasing the valency (number of T cell epitope variants present) of vaccine products dramatically decreases the epitope requirements to reach particular coverage levels for any epidemic; (3) considering multiple-hit models (more than one exact epitope match with an incoming HIV strain) places a significantly higher requirement upon epitope breadth in order to reach a given level of coverage, to the point where low valency natural sequence based products would not practically be able to generate sufficient epitopes. Conclusions When HIV vaccine sequences are compared against datasets of potential incoming viruses important

  11. Defining epitope coverage requirements for T cell-based HIV vaccines: Theoretical considerations and practical applications

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Currier Jeffrey R

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background HIV vaccine development must address the genetic diversity and plasticity of the virus that permits the presentation of diverse genetic forms to the immune system and subsequent escape from immune pressure. Assessment of potential HIV strain coverage by candidate T cell-based vaccines (whether natural sequence or computationally optimized products is now a critical component in interpreting candidate vaccine suitability. Methods We have utilized an N-mer identity algorithm to represent T cell epitopes and explore potential coverage of the global HIV pandemic using natural sequences derived from candidate HIV vaccines. Breadth (the number of T cell epitopes generated and depth (the variant coverage within a T cell epitope analyses have been incorporated into the model to explore vaccine coverage requirements in terms of the number of discrete T cell epitopes generated. Results We show that when multiple epitope generation by a vaccine product is considered a far more nuanced appraisal of the potential HIV strain coverage of the vaccine product emerges. By considering epitope breadth and depth several important observations were made: (1 epitope breadth requirements to reach particular levels of vaccine coverage, even for natural sequence-based vaccine products is not necessarily an intractable problem for the immune system; (2 increasing the valency (number of T cell epitope variants present of vaccine products dramatically decreases the epitope requirements to reach particular coverage levels for any epidemic; (3 considering multiple-hit models (more than one exact epitope match with an incoming HIV strain places a significantly higher requirement upon epitope breadth in order to reach a given level of coverage, to the point where low valency natural sequence based products would not practically be able to generate sufficient epitopes. Conclusions When HIV vaccine sequences are compared against datasets of potential incoming

  12. Chronic Pain as a Hypothetical Construct: A Practical and Philosophical Consideration

    Science.gov (United States)

    Doleys, Daniel M.

    2017-01-01

    Pain has been defined by the International Association for the Study of Pain (IASP) as “an unpleasant sensory and emotional experience associated with actual or potential tissue damage, or described in terms of such damage.” Chronic pain is usually described as pain that has persisted for 3–6 months and/or beyond the expected time of healing. The numerical pain rating (NPR) is the customary metric and often considered as a proxy for the subjective experience of chronic pain. This definition of pain (chronic) has been of significant heuristic value. However, the definition and the models it has spawned tend to encourage the interpretation of pain as a measurable entity and implies that the patient’s experience of pain can be fully comprehended by someone other than the person in pain. Several major models of pain have been scrutinized and found to propagate the notion of pain as a ‘thing’ and fall prey to biomedical reductionism and Cartesian (mind-body) dualism. Furthermore, the NPR does not appear to capture the complexity of chronic pain and correlates poorly with other clinically meaningful outcomes. It, and other aspects of the current notion of chronic pain, appear to be an extension of our reliance on the philosophical principles of reductionism and materialism. These and other shortcomings identified in the IASP definition have resulted in an increased interest in a reexamination and possible updating of our view of pain (chronic) and its definition. The present paper describes an alternative view of pain, in particular chronic pain. It argues that chronic pain should be understood as a separate phenomenon from, rather than an extension of, acute pain and interpreted as a hypothetical construct (HC). HCs are contrasted to intervening variables (IV) and the use of HCs in science is illustrated. The acceptance of the principles of nonlinearity and emergence are seen as important characteristics. The practical implications and barriers of this

  13. Consideration of climate change impacts and adaptation in EIA practice — Perspectives of actors in Austria and Germany

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jiricka, Alexandra, E-mail: alexandra.jiricka@boku.ac.at [University of Natural Resources and Applied Life Sciences, Vienna (Austria); Department of Landscape, Spatial and Infrastructure Sciences, Institute for Landscape Development, Recreation and Conservation Planning, Peter-Jordan-Straße 82, 1190 Vienna (Austria); Formayer, Herbert; Schmidt, Anna [University of Natural Resources and Applied Life Sciences, Vienna (Austria); Department of Landscape, Spatial and Infrastructure Sciences, Institute for Landscape Development, Recreation and Conservation Planning, Peter-Jordan-Straße 82, 1190 Vienna (Austria); Völler, Sonja; Leitner, Markus [Environment Agency Austria, Environmental Impact Assessment and Climate Change, Spittelauer Lände 5, 1090 Wien (Austria); Fischer, Thomas B. [Environmental Assessment and Management, School of Environmental Sciences, University of Liverpool, 74 Bedford Street South, Liverpool L69 7ZQ (United Kingdom); Wachter, Thomas F. [Büro für Umweltplanung Dr. Wachter, Wiesnerring 2c, Hamburg (Germany)

    2016-02-15

    Current political discussions and developments indicate the importance and urgency of incorporating climate change considerations into EIA processes. The recent revision of the EU Directive 2014/52/EU on Environmental Impact Assessment (EIA) requires changes in the EIA practice of the EU member states. This paper investigates the extent to which the Environmental Impact Assessment (EIA) can contribute to an early consideration of climate change consequences in planning processes. In particular the roles of different actors in order to incorporate climate change impacts and adaptation into project planning subject to EIA at the appropriate levels are a core topic. Semi-structured expert interviews were carried out with representatives of the main infrastructure companies and institutions responsible in these sectors in Austria, which have to carry out EIA regularly. In a second step expert interviews were conducted with EIA assessors and EIA authorities in Austria and Germany, in order to examine the extent to which climate-based changes are already considered in EIA processes. This paper aims to discuss the different perspectives in the current EIA practice with regard to integrating climate change impacts as well as barriers and solutions identified by the groups of actors involved, namely project developers, environmental competent authorities and consultants (EIA assessors/practitioners). The interviews show that different groups of actors consider the topic to different degrees. Downscaling of climate change scenarios is in this context both, a critical issue with regards to availability of data and costs. Furthermore, assistance for the interpretation of relevant impacts, to be deducted from climate change scenarios, on the specific environmental issues in the area is needed. The main barriers identified by the EIA experts therefore include a lack of data as well as general uncertainty as to how far climate change should be considered in the process without

  14. Manufacture of Third-Generation Lentivirus for Preclinical Use, with Process Development Considerations for Translation to Good Manufacturing Practice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gándara, Carolina; Affleck, Valerie; Stoll, Elizabeth Ann

    2018-02-01

    Lentiviral vectors are used in laboratories around the world for in vivo and ex vivo delivery of gene therapies, and increasingly clinical investigation as well as preclinical applications. The third-generation lentiviral vector system has many advantages, including high packaging capacity, stable gene expression in both dividing and post-mitotic cells, and low immunogenicity in the recipient organism. Yet, the manufacture of these vectors is challenging, especially at high titers required for direct use in vivo, and further challenges are presented by the process of translating preclinical gene therapies toward manufacture of products for clinical investigation. The goals of this paper are to report the protocol for manufacturing high-titer third-generation lentivirus for preclinical testing and to provide detailed information on considerations for translating preclinical viral vector manufacture toward scaled-up platforms and processes in order to make gene therapies under Good Manufacturing Practice that are suitable for clinical trials.

  15. High field magnet program at Brookhaven National Laboratory

    CERN Document Server

    Ghosh, A; Muratore, J; Parker, B; Sampson, W; Wanderer, P J; Willen, E

    2000-01-01

    The magnet program at Brookhaven National Laboratory (BNL) is focussed on superconducting magnets for particle accelerators. The effort includes magnet production at the laboratory and in industry, magnet R&D, and test facilities for magnets and superconductors. Nearly 2000 magnets-dipoles, quadrupoles, sextupoles and correctors for the arc and insertion regions-were produced for the Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider (RHIC), which is being commissioned. Currently, production of helical dipoles for the polarized proton program at RHIC, insertion region dipoles for the Large Hadron Collider (LHC) at CERN, and an insertion magnet system for the Hadron-Elektron-Ring- Analage (HERA) collider at Deutsches Elektronen-Synchrotron (DESY) is underway. The R&D effort is exploring dipoles with fields above 10 T for use in post-LHC colliders. Brittle superconductors-Nb/sub 3/Sn or HTS-are being used for these magnets. The superconductor test facility measures short-sample currents and other characteristics of sample...

  16. Deriving cleanup guidelines for radionuclides at Brookhaven National Laboratory

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Meinhold, A.F.; Morris, S.C.; Dionne, B.; Moskowitz, P.D.

    1997-01-01

    Past activities at Brookhaven National Laboratory (BNL) resulted in soil and groundwater contamination. As a result, BNL was designated a Superfund site under the Comprehensive Environmental Response Compensation and Liability Act (CERCLA). BNL`s Office of Environmental Restoration (OER) is overseeing environmental restoration activities at the Laboratory. With the exception of radium, there are no regulations or guidelines to establish cleanup guidelines for radionuclides in soils at BNL. BNL must derive radionuclide soil cleanup guidelines for a number of Operable Units (OUs) and Areas of Concern (AOCs). These guidelines are required by DOE under a proposed regulation for radiation protection of public health and the environment as well as to satisfy the requirements of CERCLA. The objective of this report is to propose a standard approach to deriving risk-based cleanup guidelines for radionuclides in soil at BNL. Implementation of the approach is briefly discussed.

  17. Summary of failure analysis activities at Brookhaven National Laboratory

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cowgill, M.G.; Czajkowski, C.J.; Franz, E.M.

    1996-10-01

    Brookhaven National Laboratory has for many years conducted examinations related to the failures of nuclear materials and components. These examinations included the confirmation of root cause analyses, the determination of the causes of failure, identification of the species that accelerate corrosion, and comparison of the results of nondestructive examinations with those obtained by destructive examination. The results of those examinations, which had previously appeared in various formats (formal and informal reports, journal articles, etc.), have been collected together and summarized in the present report. The report is divided into sections according to the general subject matter (for example, corrosion, fatigue, etc.). Each section presents summaries of the information contained in specific reports and publications, all of which are fully identified as to title, authors, report number or journal reference, date of publication, and FIN number under which the work was performed.

  18. Practical considerations on frenectomy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moldoveanu, Lucia; Badea, Florin Ciprian; Odor, Alin A.

    2014-01-01

    Besides surgically classical frenectomy, modern dentistry currently allows its approach by dental laser. Materials and Method: We proposed clinical observation of the results obtained by frenectomy with/without frenoplasty made by laser Er,Cr:YSGG 2780 nm. Results: The patients reported no pain, bleeding, swelling or major discomfort during the postoperative control of the following day. In terms of psycho-emotional reactions, both patients well behave well, the calm being given by no pain, bleeding, suture or edema. Discussions: The accuracy of this method, as well as the use of additional means of healing, allow satisfactory results both for patient and physician. Working parameters depend on the type of laser that is used, in our case Biolase Waterlase MD Turbo, regularly used in Toldimed Clinic in Constanta. Conclusions: Our study reveals that the possibilities regarding the surgical modeling of the lower lip frenulum are higher due to laser than the classical surgical approach. Moreover, a major role in the prevention of relapse by inappropriate healing is represented by the approach of frenectomy accompanied by frenuloplasty.

  19. Proto-2, an ALICE detector prototype, part of the STAR experiment at the Brookhaven National Laboratory

    CERN Multimedia

    2002-01-01

    Proto-2, an LAICE detector prototype, overcame its prototype status to become a real part of the SDTAR, epxeriment at the US Brookhaven National Laboratory. After more than two years across the ocean, it has just arrived back at CERN.

  20. WILDLAND FIRE MANAGEMENT PLAN FOR BROOKHAVEN NATIONAL LABORATORY.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    ENVIRONMENTAL AND WASTE MANAGEMENT SERVICES DIVISION

    2003-09-01

    This Wildland Fire Management Plan (FMP) for Brookhaven National Lab (BNL) and the Upton Ecological and Research Reserve (Upton Reserve) is based on the U.S. Fish & Wildlife Service (FWS) fire management planning procedures and was developed in cooperation with the Department of Energy (DOE) by Brookhaven Science Associates. As the Upton Reserve is contained within the BNL 5,265-acre site, it is logical that the plan applies to both the Upton Reserve and BNL. The Department of the Interior policy for managing wildland fires requires that all areas managed by FWS that can sustain fire must have an FMP that details fire management guidelines for operational procedures and specifies values to be protected or enhanced. Fire management plans provide guidance on fire preparedness, fire prevention, wildfire suppression, and the use of controlled, ''prescribed'' fires and mechanical means to control the amount of available combustible material. Values reflected in the BNL/Upton Reserve Wildland FMP include protecting life and public safety; Lab properties, structures and improvements; cultural and historical sites; neighboring private and public properties; and endangered and threatened species and species of concern. Other values supported by the plan include the enhancement of fire-dependent ecosystems at BNL and the Upton Reserve. This FMP will be reviewed periodically to ensure the fire program advances and evolves with the missions of FWS, BNL, and the Upton Reserve. This Fire Management Plan is a modified version of the Long Island National Wildlife Refuge Complex Fire plan (updated in 2000), which contains all FWS fire plan requirements and is presented in the format specified by the national template for fire management plans adopted under the National Fire Plan. The DOE is one of the signatory agencies on the National Fire Plan. FWS shall be, through an Interagency Agreement dated November 2000 (Appendix C), responsible for coordinating and

  1. Practice of Environmentally Significant Behaviours in Rural China: From Being Motivated by Economic Gains to Being Motivated by Environmental Considerations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yanyan Chen

    2017-08-01

    Full Text Available A continuous and increasing crisis that present-day China is facing is environmental degradation. The cultivation of citizens who have environmentally friendly behaviours has been deemed as a fundamental way to solve environmental crises. However, the main focus of environmentalism studies has been urban residents, whereas rare research attention was put on rural Chinese. This paper focuses on environmentally significant behaviours in rural China and aims to clarify the practice of five environmentally significant behaviours and two motivations underlying these behaviours. In total, 508 rural residents in 51 villages of Ningyang county were interviewed. Analytical results derived from survey data showed that environmentally significant behaviours are widely conducted in rural areas. However, these behaviours are mainly motivated by economic gains rather than environmental considerations. In addition, based on the norm-activation theory and considering the influences of demographic factors, the formation of environmentally motivated behaviours were quantitatively analysed. Analytical results indicated that the more people worried about environmental deterioration, the more likely they were to form environmentally motivated behaviours, and people who ascribe the most important environmental responsibility to the government are less likely to form environmentally motivated behaviours. Increasing people’s anxiety towards the environment, decreasing people’s dependency on the government in protecting the environment, and using females, the elderly, and people with low income and education levels as the main targets of environmental education are suggested to promote environmentally motivated behaviours in rural China.

  2. Brookhaven National Laboratory 2008 Site Environment Report Volume 1

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Brookhaven National Laboratory

    2009-10-01

    Brookhaven National Laboratory (BNL) prepares an annual Site Environmental Report (SER) in accordance with DOE Order 231.1A, Environment, Safety and Health Reporting of the U.S. Department of Energy. The report is written to inform the public, regulators, employees, and other stakeholders of the Laboratory's environmental performance during the calendar year in review. Volume I of the SER summarizes environmental data; environmental management performance; compliance with applicable DOE, federal, state, and local regulations; and performance in restoration and surveillance monitoring programs. BNL has prepared annual SERs since 1971 and has documented nearly all of its environmental history since the Laboratory's inception in 1947. Volume II of the SER, the Groundwater Status Report, also is prepared annually to report on the status of and evaluate the performance of groundwater treatment systems at the Laboratory. Volume II includes detailed technical summaries of groundwater data and its interpretation, and is intended for internal BNL users, regulators, and other technically oriented stakeholders. A brief summary of the information contained in Volume II is included in this volume in Chapter 7, Groundwater Protection. Both reports are available in print and as downloadable files on the BNL web page at http://www.bnl.gov/ewms/ser/. An electronic version on compact disc is distributed with each printed report. In addition, a summary of Volume I is prepared each year to provide a general overview of the report, and is distributed with a compact disc containing the full report.

  3. Environmental Survey preliminary report, Brookhaven National Laboratory, Upton, New York

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1988-06-01

    This report presents the preliminary findings from the first phase of the Environmental Survey of the United States Department of Energy (DOE) Brookhaven National Laboratory (BNL) conducted April 6 through 17, 1987. The Survey is being conducted by an interdisciplinary team of environmental specialists, led and managed by the Office of Environment, Safety and Health's Office of Environmental Audit. Individual team components are being supplied by a private contractor. The objective of the Survey is to identify environmental problems and areas of environmental risk associated with BNL. The Survey covers all environmental media and all areas of environmental regulation. It is being performed in accordance with the DOE Environmental Survey Manual. This phase of the Survey involves the review of existing site environmental data, observations of the operations carried on at BNL, and interviews with site personnel. The Survey team developed a Sampling and Analysis Plan to assist in further assessing specific environmental problems identified during its on-site activities. The Sampling and Analysis Plan will be executed by Oak Ridge National Laboratory. When completed, the results will be incorporated into the BNL Environmental Survey Interim Report. The Interim Report will reflect the final determinations of the BNL Survey. 80 refs., 24 figs., 48 tabs.

  4. CULTURAL RESOURCE MANAGEMENT PLAN FOR BROOKHAVEN NATIONAL LABORATORY.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    DAVIS, M.

    2005-04-01

    The Cultural Resource Management Plan (CRMP) for Brookhaven National Laboratory (BNL) provides an organized guide that describes or references all facets and interrelationships of cultural resources at BNL. This document specifically follows, where applicable, the format of the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Environmental Guidelines for Development of Cultural Resource Management Plans, DOE G 450.1-3 (9-22-04[m1]). Management strategies included within this CRMP are designed to adequately identify the cultural resources that BNL and DOE consider significant and to acknowledge associated management actions. A principal objective of the CRMP is to reduce the need for additional regulatory documents and to serve as the basis for a formal agreement between the DOE and the New York State Historic Preservation Officer (NYSHPO). The BNL CRMP is designed to be a ''living document.'' Each section includes identified gaps in the management plan, with proposed goals and actions for addressing each gap. The plan will be periodically revised to incorporate new documentation.

  5. In vivo neutron activation facility at Brookhaven National Laboratory

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ma, R.; Yasumura, Seiichi; Dilmanian, F.A.

    1997-11-01

    Seven important body elements, C, N, Ca, P, K, Na, and Cl, can be measured with great precision and accuracy in the in vivo neutron activation facilities at Brookhaven National Laboratory. The facilities include the delayed-gamma neutron activation, the prompt-gamma neutron activation, and the inelastic neutron scattering systems. In conjunction with measurements of total body water by the tritiated-water dilution method several body compartments can be defined from the contents of these elements, also with high precision. In particular, body fat mass is derived from total body carbon together with total body calcium and nitrogen; body protein mass is derived from total body nitrogen; extracellular fluid volume is derived from total body sodium and chlorine; lean body mass and body cell mass are derived from total body potassium; and, skeletal mass is derived from total body calcium. Thus, we suggest that neutron activation analysis may be valuable for calibrating some of the instruments routinely used in clinical studies of body composition. The instruments that would benefit from absolute calibration against neutron activation analysis are bioelectric impedance analysis, infrared interactance, transmission ultrasound, and dual energy x-ray/photon absorptiometry.

  6. Tiger Team assessment of the Brookhaven National Laboratory

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1990-06-01

    This report documents the results of the Department of Energy's (DOE's) Tiger Team Assessment conducted at Brookhaven National Laboratory (BNL) in Upton, New York, between March 26 and April 27, 1990. The BNL is a multiprogram laboratory operated by the Associated Universities, Inc., (AUI) for DOE. The purpose of the assessment was to provide the status of environment, safety, and health (ES H) programs at the Laboratory. The scope of the assessment included a review of management systems and operating procedures and records; observations of facility operations; and interviews at the facilities. Subteams in four areas performed the review: ES H, Occupational Safety and Health, and Management and Organization. The assessment was comprehensive, covering all areas of ES H activities and waste management operations. Compliance with applicable Federal, State, and local regulations; applicable DOE Orders; and internal BNL requirements was assessed. In addition, the assessment included an evaluation of the adequacy and effectiveness of the DOE and the site contractor, Associated Universities, Inc. (AUI), management, organization, and administration of the ES H programs at BNL.

  7. HOM identification by bead pulling in the Brookhaven ERL cavity

    CERN Document Server

    Hahn, H; Jain, Puneet; Johnson, Elliott C; Xu, Wencan

    2014-01-01

    Exploratory measurements of the Brookhaven Energy Recovery Linac (ERL) cavity at superconducting temperature produced a long list of high order modes (HOMs). The niobium 5-cell cavity is terminated at each end with HOM ferrite dampers that successfully reduce the Q-factors to levels required to avoid beam break up (BBU) instabilities. However, a number of un-damped resonances with Q≥106 were found at 4 K and their mode identification forms the focus of this paper. The approach taken here consists of bead pulling on a copper (Cu) replica of the ERL cavity with dampers involving various network analyzer measurements. Several different S21 transmission measurements are used, including those taken from the fundamental input coupler to the pick-up probe across the cavity, others between beam-position monitor probes in the beam tubes, and also between probes placed into the cells. The bead pull technique suitable for HOM identification with a metallic needle or dielectric bead is detailed. This paper presents the...

  8. Tiger Team assessment of the Brookhaven National Laboratory

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1990-06-01

    This report documents the results of the Department of Energy's (DOE's) Tiger Team Assessment conducted at Brookhaven National Laboratory (BNL) in Upton, New York, between March 26 and April 27, 1990. The BNL is a multiprogram laboratory operated by the Associated Universities, Inc., (AUI) for DOE. The purpose of the assessment was to provide the status of environment, safety, and health (ES H) programs at the laboratory. The scope of the assessment included a review of management systems and operating procedures and records; observations of facility operations; and interviews at the facilities. Subteams in four areas performed the review: ES H, Occupational Safety and Health, and Management and Organization. The assessment was comprehensive, covering all areas of ES H activities and waste management operations. Compliance with applicable Federal, State, and local regulations; applicable DOE Orders; and internal BNL requirements was assessed. In addition, the assessment included an evaluation of the adequacy and effectiveness of the DOE and the site contractor, Associated Universities, Inc. (AUI), management, organization, and administration of the ES H programs at BNL. This volume contains appendices.

  9. Accelerometer Data Collection and Processing Criteria to Assess Physical Activity and Other Outcomes: A Systematic Review and Practical Considerations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Migueles, Jairo H; Cadenas-Sanchez, Cristina; Ekelund, Ulf; Delisle Nyström, Christine; Mora-Gonzalez, Jose; Löf, Marie; Labayen, Idoia; Ruiz, Jonatan R; Ortega, Francisco B

    2017-09-01

    Accelerometers are widely used to measure sedentary time, physical activity, physical activity energy expenditure (PAEE), and sleep-related behaviors, with the ActiGraph being the most frequently used brand by researchers. However, data collection and processing criteria have evolved in a myriad of ways out of the need to answer unique research questions; as a result there is no consensus. The purpose of this review was to: (1) compile and classify existing studies assessing sedentary time, physical activity, energy expenditure, or sleep using the ActiGraph GT3X/+ through data collection and processing criteria to improve data comparability and (2) review data collection and processing criteria when using GT3X/+ and provide age-specific practical considerations based on the validation/calibration studies identified. Two independent researchers conducted the search in PubMed and Web of Science. We included all original studies in which the GT3X/+ was used in laboratory, controlled, or free-living conditions published from 1 January 2010 to the 31 December 2015. The present systematic review provides key information about the following data collection and processing criteria: placement, sampling frequency, filter, epoch length, non-wear-time, what constitutes a valid day and a valid week, cut-points for sedentary time and physical activity intensity classification, and algorithms to estimate PAEE and sleep-related behaviors. The information is organized by age group, since criteria are usually age-specific. This review will help researchers and practitioners to make better decisions before (i.e., device placement and sampling frequency) and after (i.e., data processing criteria) data collection using the GT3X/+ accelerometer, in order to obtain more valid and comparable data. CRD42016039991.

  10. NATURAL RESOURCE MANAGEMENT PLAN FOR BROOKHAVEN NATIONAL LABORATORY.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    GREEN,T.ET AL.

    2003-12-31

    Brookhaven National Laboratory (BNL) is located near the geographic center of Long Island, New York. The Laboratory is situated on 5,265 acres of land composed of Pine Barrens habitat with a central area developed for Laboratory work. In the mid-1990s BNL began developing a wildlife management program. This program was guided by the Wildlife Management Plan (WMP), which was reviewed and approved by various state and federal agencies in September 1999. The WMP primarily addressed concerns with the protection of New York State threatened, endangered, or species of concern, as well as deer populations, invasive species management, and the revegetation of the area surrounding the Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider (RHIC). The WMP provided a strong and sound basis for wildlife management and established a basis for forward motion and the development of this document, the Natural Resource Management Plan (NRMP), which will guide the natural resource management program for BNL. The body of this plan establishes the management goals and actions necessary for managing the natural resources at BNL. The appendices provide specific management requirements for threatened and endangered amphibians and fish (Appendices A and B respectively), lists of actions in tabular format (Appendix C), and regulatory drivers for the Natural Resource Program (Appendix D). The purpose of the Natural Resource Management Plan is to provide management guidance, promote stewardship of the natural resources found at BNL, and to integrate their protection with pursuit of the Laboratory's mission. The philosophy or guiding principles of the NRMP are stewardship, adaptive ecosystem management, compliance, integration with other plans and requirements, and incorporation of community involvement, where applicable.

  11. Brookhaven National Laboratory site environmental report for calendar year 1993

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Naidu, J.R.; Royce, B.A. [eds.

    1994-05-01

    This report documents the results of the Environmental Monitoring Program at BNL and presents summary information about environmental compliance for 1993. To evaluate the effect of BNL operations on the local environment, measurements of direct radiation, and a variety of radionuclides and chemical compounds in ambient air, soil, sewage effluent, surface water, ground water and vegetation were made at the BNL site and at sites adjacent to the Laboratory. Brookhaven National Laboratory`s compliance with all applicable guides, standards, and limits for radiological and nonradiological emissions to the environment were evaluated. Among the permitted facilities, two instances, of pH exceedances were observed at recharge basins, possible related to rain-water run-off to these recharge basins. Also, the discharge from the Sewage Treatment Plant (STP) to the Peconic River exceeded on five occasions, three for residual chlorine and one each for iron and ammonia nitrogen. The chlorine exceedances were related to a malfunctioning hypochlorite dosing pump and ceased when the pump was repaired. While the iron and ammonia-nitrogen could be the result of disturbances to the sand filter beds during maintenance. The environmental monitoring data has identified site-specific contamination of ground water and soil. These areas are subject to Remedial Investigation/Feasibility Studies (RI/FS) under the Inter Agency Agreement (IAG). Except for the above, the environmental monitoring data has continued to demonstrate that compliance was achieved with applicable environmental laws and regulations governing emission and discharge of materials to the environment, and that the environmental impacts at BNL are minimal and pose no threat to the public or to the environment. This report meets the requirements of DOE Orders 5484. 1, Environmental Protection, Safety, and Health Protection Information reporting requirements and 5400.1, General Environmental Protection Programs.

  12. The Brookhaven National Laboratory electron beam ion source for RHIC.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alessi, J G; Barton, D; Beebe, E; Bellavia, S; Gould, O; Kponou, A; Lambiase, R; Lockey, R; McNerney, A; Mapes, M; Marneris, Y; Okamura, M; Phillips, D; Pikin, A I; Raparia, D; Ritter, J; Snydstrup, L; Theisen, C; Wilinski, M

    2010-02-01

    As part of a new heavy ion preinjector that will supply beams for the Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider and the National Aeronautics and Space Administration Space Radiation Laboratory, construction of a new electron beam ion source (EBIS) is now being completed. This source, based on the successful prototype Brookhaven National Laboratory Test EBIS, is designed to produce milliampere level currents of all ion species, with q/m=(1/6)-(1/2). Among the major components of this source are a 5 T, 2-m-long, 204 mm diameter warm bore superconducting solenoid, an electron gun designed to operate at a nominal current of 10 A, and an electron collector designed to dissipate approximately 300 kW of peak power. Careful attention has been paid to the design of the vacuum system, since a pressure of 10(-10) Torr is required in the trap region. The source includes several differential pumping stages, the trap can be baked to 400 C, and there are non-evaporable getter strips in the trap region. Power supplies include a 15 A, 15 kV electron collector power supply, and fast switchable power supplies for most of the 16 electrodes used for varying the trap potential distribution for ion injection, confinement, and extraction. The EBIS source and all EBIS power supplies sit on an isolated platform, which is pulsed up to a maximum of 100 kV during ion extraction. The EBIS is now fully assembled, and operation will be beginning following final vacuum and power supply tests. Details of the EBIS components are presented.

  13. Initial experiments with the Nevis Cyclotron, the Brookhaven Cosmotron, the Brookhaven AGS and their effects on high energy physics

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lindenbaum, S.J.

    1988-01-01

    The first experiment at the Nevis Cyclotron by Bernardini, Booth and Lindenbaum demonstrated that nuclear stars are produced by a nucleon-nucleon cascade within the nucleon. This solved a long standing problem in Cosmic rays and made it clear that where they overlap cosmic ray investigation would not be competitive with accelerator investigations. The initial experiments at the Brookhaven Cosmotron by Lindenbaum and Yuan demonstrated that low energy pion nucleon scattering and pion production were unexpectedly mostly due to excitation of the isotopic spin = angular momentum = 3/2 isobaric state of the nucleon. This contradicted the Fermi statistical theory and led to the Isobar model proposed by the author and a collaborator. The initial experiments at the AGS by the author and collaborators demonstrated that the Pomeronchuck Theorem would not come true till at least several hundred GeV. These scattering experiments led to the development of the ''On-line Computer Technique'' by the author and collaborators which is now the almost universal technique in high energy physics. The first accomplishment which flowed from this technique led to contradiction of the Regge pole theory as a dynamical asymptotic theory, by the author and collaborators. The first critical experimental proof of the forward dispersion relation in strong interactions was accomplished by the author and collaborators. They were then used as a crystal ball to predict that ''Asymptopia''---the theoretically promised land where all asymptotic theorems come true---would not be reached till at least 25,000 BeV and probably not before 1,000,000 BeV. 26 refs., 11 figs., 2 tabs.

  14. A woman like you: Women scientists and engineers at Brookhaven National Laboratory

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Benkovitz, Carmen; Bernholc, Nicole; Cohen, Anita; Eng, Susan; Enriquez-Leder, Rosario; Franz, Barbara; Gorden, Patricia; Hanson, Louise; Lamble, Geraldine; Martin, Harriet; Mastrangelo, Iris; McLane, Victoria; Villela, Maria-Alicia; Vivirito, Katherine; Woodhead, Avril

    1991-01-01

    This publication by the women in Science and Engineering introduces career possibilities in science and engineering. It introduces what work and home life are like for women who have already entered these fields. Women at Brookhaven National Laboratory work in a variety of challenging research roles -- from biologist and environmental scientist to safety engineer, from patent lawyer to technician. Brookhaven National Laboratory is a multi-program laboratory which carries out basic and applied research in the physical, biomedical and environmental sciences and in selected energy technologies. The Laboratory is managed by Associated University, Inc., under contract with the US Department of Energy. Brookhaven and the other national laboratories, because of their enormous research resources, can play a critical role in a education and training of the workforce.

  15. A woman like you: Women scientists and engineers at Brookhaven National Laboratory. Careers in action

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1991-12-31

    This publication by the women in Science and Engineering introduces career possibilities in science and engineering. It introduces what work and home life are like for women who have already entered these fields. Women at Brookhaven National Laboratory work in a variety of challenging research roles -- from biologist and environmental scientist to safety engineer, from patent lawyer to technician. Brookhaven National Laboratory is a multi-program laboratory which carries out basic and applied research in the physical, biomedical and environmental sciences and in selected energy technologies. The Laboratory is managed by Associated University, Inc., under contract with the US Department of Energy. Brookhaven and the other national laboratories, because of their enormous research resources, can play a critical role in a education and training of the workforce.

  16. Natural Resource Management Plan for Brookhaven National Laboratory

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    green, T.

    2011-08-15

    This comprehensive Natural Resource Management Plan (NRMP) for Brookhaven National Laboratory (BNL) was built on the successful foundation of the Wildlife Management Plan for BNL, which it replaces. This update to the 2003 plan continues to build on successes and efforts to better understand the ecosystems and natural resources found on the BNL site. The plan establishes the basis for managing the varied natural resources located on the 5,265 acre BNL site, setting goals and actions to achieve those goals. The planning of this document is based on the knowledge and expertise gained over the past 10 years by the Natural Resources management staff at BNL in concert with local natural resource agencies including the New York State Department of Environmental Conservation, Long Island Pine Barrens Joint Planning and Policy Commission, The Nature Conservancy, and others. The development of this plan is an attempt at sound ecological management that not only benefits BNL's ecosystems but also benefits the greater Pine Barrens habitats in which BNL is situated. This plan applies equally to the Upton Ecological and Research Reserve (Upton Reserve). Any difference in management between the larger BNL area and the Upton Reserve are noted in the text. The purpose of the Natural Resource Management Plan (NRMP) is to provide management guidance, promote stewardship of the natural resources found at BNL, and to sustainably integrate their protection with pursuit of the Laboratory's mission. The philosophy or guiding principles of the NRMP are stewardship, sustainability, adaptive ecosystem management, compliance, integration with other plans and requirements, and the incorporation of community involvement, where applicable. The NRMP is periodically reviewed and updated, typically every five years. This review and update was delayed to develop documents associated with a new third party facility, the Long Island Solar Farm. This two hundred acre facility will result in

  17. Wildland Fire Management Plan for Brookhaven National Laboratory

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Green,T.

    2009-10-23

    This Wildland Fire Management Plan (FMP) for Brookhaven National Lab (BNL) updates the 2003 plan incorporating changes necessary to comply with DOE Order 450.1 and DOE P 450.4, Federal Wildland Fire Management Policy and Program Review; Wildland and Prescribed Fire Management Policy and implementation Procedures Reference Guide. This current plan incorporates changes since the original draft of the FMP that result from new policies on the national level. This update also removes references and dependence on the U.S. Fish & Wildlife Service and Department of the Interior, fully transitioning Wildland Fire Management responsibilities to BNL. The Department of Energy policy for managing wildland fires requires that all areas, managed by the DOE and/or its various contractors, that can sustain fire must have a FMP that details fire management guidelines for operational procedures associated with wild fire, operational, and prescribed fires. Fire management plans provide guidance on fire preparedness, fire prevention, wildfire suppression, and the use of controlled, 'prescribed' fires and mechanical means to control the amount of available combustible material. Values reflected in the BNL Wildland FMP include protecting life and public safety; Lab properties, structures and improvements; cultural and historical sites; neighboring private and public properties; and endangered, threatened, and species of concern. Other values supported by the plan include the enhancement of fire-dependent ecosystems at BNL. This FMP will be reviewed periodically to ensure the fire program advances and evolves with the missions of the DOE and BNL. This Fire Management Plan is presented in a format that coverers all aspects specified by DOE guidance documents which are based on the national template for fire management plans adopted under the National Fire Plan. The DOE is one of the signatory agencies on the National Fire Plan. This FMP is to be used and implemented for the

  18. Study on Students' Impression Data in Practical Training Using Text Mining Method-Analysis of Considerable Communication.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Teramachi, Hitomi; Sugita, Ikuto; Ino, Yoko; Hayashi, Yuta; Yoshida, Aki; Otsubo, Manami; Ueno, Anri; Katsuno, Hayato; Noguchi, Yoshihiro; Iguchi, Kazuhiro; Tachi, Tomoya

    2017-09-01

    We analyzed impression data and the scale of communication skills of students using text mining method to clarify which area a student was conscious of in communication in practical training. The results revealed that students tended to be conscious of the difference between practical hospital training and practical pharmacy training. In practical hospital training, specific expressions denoting relationships were "patient-visit", "counseling-conduct", "patient-counseling", and "patient-talk". In practical pharmacy training, specific expressions denoting relationships were "patient counseling-conduct", "story-listen", "patient-many", and "patient-visit". In practical hospital training, the word "patient" was connected to many words suggesting that students were conscious of a patient-centered communication. In practical pharmacy training, words such as "patient counseling", "patient", and "explanation" were placed in center and connected with many other words and there was an independent relationship between "communication" and "accept". In conclusion, it was suggested that students attempted active patient-centered communication in practical hospital training, while they were conscious of listening closely in patient counseling in practical pharmacy training.

  19. Innovative, energy-efficient lighting for New York state roadways : opportunities for incorporating mesopic visibility considerations into roadway lighting practice

    Science.gov (United States)

    2008-04-01

    The present report outlines activities undertaken to assess the potential for implementing research on visibility at mesopic light levels into lighting practices for roadways in New York State. Through measurements of light levels at several roadway ...

  20. The establishment of Catchment Management Agencies in South Africa with reference to the Flussgebietsgemeinschaft Elbe: Some practical considerations

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Meissner, Richard

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available -governmental spheres are involved in establishing a CMA. Practices that are associated with CMA establishment often relate to personal experiences and the overall political landscape as well as administrative development trajectories. These are also context specific...

  1. Athlete Self-Report Measures in Research and Practice: Considerations for the Discerning Reader and Fastidious Practitioner.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saw, Anna E; Kellmann, Michael; Main, Luana C; Gastin, Paul B

    2017-04-01

    Athlete self-report measures (ASRM) have the potential to provide valuable insight into the training response; however, there is a disconnect between research and practice that needs to be addressed; namely, the measure or methods used in research are not always reflective of practice, or data primarily obtained from practice lacks empirical quality. This commentary reviews existing empirical measures and the psychometric properties required to be considered acceptable for research and practice. This information will allow discerning readers to make a judgment on the quality of ASRM data being reported in research papers. Fastidious practitioners and researchers are also provided with explicit guidelines for selecting and implementing an ASRM and reporting these details in research papers.

  2. Aberration-Coreected Electron Microscopy at Brookhaven National Laboratory

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhu,Y.; Wall, J.

    2008-04-01

    The last decade witnessed the rapid development and implementation of aberration correction in electron optics, realizing a more-than-70-year-old dream of aberration-free electron microscopy with a spatial resolution below one angstrom [1-9]. With sophisticated aberration correctors, modern electron microscopes now can reveal local structural information unavailable with neutrons and x-rays, such as the local arrangement of atoms, order/disorder, electronic inhomogeneity, bonding states, spin configuration, quantum confinement, and symmetry breaking [10-17]. Aberration correction through multipole-based correctors, as well as the associated improved stability in accelerating voltage, lens supplies, and goniometers in electron microscopes now enables medium-voltage (200-300kV) microscopes to achieve image resolution at or below 0.1nm. Aberration correction not only improves the instrument's spatial resolution but, equally importantly, allows larger objective lens pole-piece gaps to be employed thus realizing the potential of the instrument as a nanoscale property-measurement tool. That is, while retaining high spatial resolution, we can use various sample stages to observe the materials response under various temperature, electric- and magnetic- fields, and atmospheric environments. Such capabilities afford tremendous opportunities to tackle challenging science and technology issues in physics, chemistry, materials science, and biology. The research goal of the electron microscopy group at the Dept. of Condensed Matter Physics and Materials Science and the Center for Functional Nanomaterials, as well as the Institute for Advanced Electron Microscopy, Brookhaven National Laboratory (BNL), is to elucidate the microscopic origin of the physical- and chemical-behavior of materials, and the role of individual, or groups of atoms, especially in their native functional environments. We plan to accomplish this by developing and implementing various quantitative

  3. Journalism in new clothes: considerations on the identity and professional practice based on Prêmio Imprensa Embratel

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Milton Julio Faccin

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available This article addresses some ideas about current journalistic practices and their consequent interventions in redefining the professional ethos of the business environment in the Brazilian press. As in other professions, the journalistic identity results from a network of social representations that, through a set of concepts, techniques and procedures, reproduces and is produced by everyday practices originated in their field. Among these practices are the awards granted to professionals. Certain awards have become so relevant that they are taken as benchmarks for good professional practice and, concomitantly, evidence of journalistic practice paradigms. This is the case of Prêmio Imprensa Embratel, chosen here as the object of study. The choice is guided not only by the sponsoring company, but also by its connection with the associations. With different aspects from the most traditional prize in the field, Prêmio Esso de Jornalismo, Prêmio Imprensa Embratel emphasizes the ramifications of the reportage practice, through the categories that do not concern solely on the content of the coverages, but also seek recognition as a kind of prize made by and for journalists.

  4. Research With Considerations of Use: Problem-Driven Research and Attempts to Improve Public Policy and Practice Huff Vollmer Award

    OpenAIRE

    Huff, CR

    2015-01-01

    © 2015 American Society of Criminology. The August Vollmer Award Address is intended to focus on contributions to justice and the recipient's research and policy experiences. This is a story of one person's career focusing mainly on research with "considerations of use." After receiving a formal education in psychology, social work, and sociology, as well as experience as a practitioner, the author's academic career has primarily focused on the link between research and criminal justice polic...

  5. 75 FR 55631 - U. S. Rail Corporation-Construction and Operation Exemption-Brookhaven Rail Terminal

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-09-13

    ... Surface Transportation Board U. S. Rail Corporation--Construction and Operation Exemption-- Brookhaven Rail Terminal AGENCY: Surface Transportation Board. ACTION: Notice of Board Action. SUMMARY: Subject to... approval requirements of 49 U.S.C. 10901 for U. S. Rail Corporation (U. S. Rail) to construct and operate a...

  6. Brookhaven Lab physicist William Willis wins the 2003 W.K.H. Panofsky prize

    CERN Multimedia

    2003-01-01

    William Willis, a senior physicist Brookhaven National Laboratory, has won the American Physical Society's 2003 W.K.H. Panofsky Prize in Experimental Particle Physics. He received the prize, which consists of $5,000 and a certificate citing his contributions to physics, at the APS meeting in Philadelphia on April 6 (1 page).

  7. Brookhaven highlights, fiscal year 1985, October 1, 1984-September 30, 1985

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1985-01-01

    Activities at Brookhaven National Laboratory are briefly discussed. These include work at the National Synchrotron Light Source, the High Flux Beam Reactor, and the Alternating Gradient Synchrotron. Areas of research include heavy ion reactions, neutrino oscillations, low-level waste, nuclear data, medicine, biology, chemistry, parallel computing, optics. Also provided are general and administrative news, a financial report. (LEW)

  8. T.D. LEE: RELATIVISTIC HEAVY ION COLLISIONS AND THE RIKEN BROOKHAVEN CENTER.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    MCLERRAN,L.; SAMIOS, N.

    2006-11-24

    This paper presents the history of Professor T. D. Lee's seminal work on the theory of relativistic heavy ion collisions, and the founding and development of the Riken Brookhaven Center. A number of anecdotes are given about Prof. Lee, and his strong positive effect on his colleagues, particularly young physicists.

  9. The Future Use of Corporate Warriors with the U.S. Armed Forces: Legal, Policy, and Practical Considerations and Concerns

    Science.gov (United States)

    2009-07-01

    issues. Among the myriad of issues is what role, if any, private security contractors should play in augmenting the U.S. armed forces future force...military 15 to 20 years from now, a critical consideration will be what, if any, role private security contractors should play in augmenting that...and “private security companies” (Gillard, 2006; Perry, 2007); other less flattering names such as “mercenaries,” “ whores or dogs of war,” or “shadow

  10. An Approach to Life Skills Group Work with Youth in Transition to Independent Living: Theoretical, Practice, and Operational Considerations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Allen, Terrence T.; Williams, Larry D.

    2012-01-01

    Group work is fundamental to working with youth learning about independent living and in making the tough and challenging transition to independence. The authors, seasoned and experienced group workers and researchers with youth leaving the child welfare system, will present a conceptual framework and set of practices for helping youth gain those…

  11. Actor-Network Theory as a sociotechnical lens to explore the relationship of nurses and technology in practice: methodological considerations for nursing research.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Booth, Richard G; Andrusyszyn, Mary-Anne; Iwasiw, Carroll; Donelle, Lorie; Compeau, Deborah

    2016-06-01

    Actor-Network Theory is a research lens that has gained popularity in the nursing and health sciences domains. The perspective allows a researcher to describe the interaction of actors (both human and non-human) within networked sociomaterial contexts, including complex practice environments where nurses and health technology operate. This study will describe Actor-Network Theory and provide methodological considerations for researchers who are interested in using this sociotechnical lens within nursing and informatics-related research. Considerations related to technology conceptualization, levels of analysis, and sampling procedures in Actor-Network Theory based research are addressed. Finally, implications for future nursing research within complex environments are highlighted. © 2015 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  12. How Do Dyslexic Nursing Students Cope with Clinical Practice Placements? The Impact of the Dyslexic Profile on the Clinical Practice of Dyslexic Nursing Students: Pedagogical Issues and Considerations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Price, Geraldine A.; Gale, Anne

    2006-01-01

    The safety of dyslexic nurses, and whether they are a danger to their patients, has been widely discussed. This empirical study sought to discover the impact of the dyslexic profile on clinical practice for nursing students. Two focus groups of third-year nursing students in higher education were set up: a control group and a dyslexic group. The…

  13. Supporting Transfer of Learning: Practice-based considerations on the applicability of transfer literature in online design

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Noesgaard, Signe Schack

    2014-01-01

    for school teachers. The PhD-project is inspired by design-based research and the research into learning transfer. It aims to evaluate if, how, and why an online facilitated, collaborative learning solution can improve the teaching practices of science teachers in Danish elementary schools. Based...... on the ethnographic study, this paper attempts to answer the following questions: what characterizes the work environment at the schools, specifically in regards to collegial support, organizational support, and manager support? How does the empirical research relate to the learning transfer literature? Do...

  14. Considerations and Some Practical Solutions to Overcome Nanoparticle Interference with LAL Assays and to Avoid Endotoxin Contamination in Nanoformulations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Neun, Barry W; Dobrovolskaia, Marina A

    2018-01-01

    Monitoring endotoxin contamination in drugs and medical devices is required to avoid pyrogenic response and septic shock in patients receiving these products. Endotoxin contamination of engineered nanomaterials and nanotechnology-based medical products represents a significant translational hurdle. Nanoparticles often interfere with an in vitro Limulus Amebocyte Lysate (LAL) assay commonly used in the pharmaceutical industry for the detection and quantification of endotoxin. Such interference challenges the preclinical development of nanotechnology-formulated drugs and medical devices containing engineered nanomaterials. Protocols for analysis of nanoparticles using LAL assays have been reported before. Here, we discuss considerations for selecting an LAL format and describe a few experimental approaches for overcoming nanoparticle interference with the LAL assays to obtain more accurate estimation of endotoxin contamination in nanotechnology-based products. The discussed approaches do not solve all types of nanoparticle interference with the LAL assays but could be used as a starting point to address the problem. This chapter also describes approaches to prevent endotoxin contamination in nanotechnology-formulated products.

  15. Video-electroencephalography investigation of ictal alterations of consciousness in epilepsy and nonepileptic attack disorder: practical considerations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eddy, Clare M; Cavanna, Andrea E

    2014-01-01

    The ictal assessment of consciousness is of central importance in the differential diagnosis of epilepsy and nonepileptic attack disorder (NEAD). Long-term video-electroencephalography (video-EEG) is currently considered the gold standard investigative technique for the evaluation of patients with recurrent attacks associated with transient alterations of arousal (responsiveness) and/or awareness (experiential states). This paper offers a concise review focusing on the practical aspects of clinical relevance in the video-EEG diagnostic workout of inpatients with suspected epilepsy or NEAD, as outlined in existing guidelines and recommendations. The reviewed literature implies that both implementation of specific procedures (e.g., activation maneuvers) and interpersonal approach (e.g., monitoring protocols) during video-EEG should be tailored to the individual patient's presentation. © 2013.

  16. Lessons from the aftermath of Flight 232. Practical considerations for the mental health profession's response to air disasters.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jacobs, G A; Quevillon, R P; Stricherz, M

    1990-12-01

    The fiery crash of a DC-10 at Sioux City, Iowa, on July 19, 1989, caused a crisis of major proportions, with attendant mental health needs. Various articles have described the need for psychological response teams in such crises. The present article provides practical guidelines for the preparation of a mental health disaster plan and for the coordination of a mental health team responding to a major air disaster. Such disasters can occur in any part of the country at any time. It is hoped that the suggestions in the present article will help teams that respond to future air disasters provide more rapid, effective, and efficient delivery of services to the survivors and their families, and the families of those who are killed.

  17. Computing patient data in the cloud: practical and legal considerations for genetics and genomics research in Europe and internationally.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Molnár-Gábor, Fruzsina; Lueck, Rupert; Yakneen, Sergei; Korbel, Jan O

    2017-06-20

    Biomedical research is becoming increasingly large-scale and international. Cloud computing enables the comprehensive integration of genomic and clinical data, and the global sharing and collaborative processing of these data within a flexibly scalable infrastructure. Clouds offer novel research opportunities in genomics, as they facilitate cohort studies to be carried out at unprecedented scale, and they enable computer processing with superior pace and throughput, allowing researchers to address questions that could not be addressed by studies using limited cohorts. A well-developed example of such research is the Pan-Cancer Analysis of Whole Genomes project, which involves the analysis of petabyte-scale genomic datasets from research centers in different locations or countries and different jurisdictions. Aside from the tremendous opportunities, there are also concerns regarding the utilization of clouds; these concerns pertain to perceived limitations in data security and protection, and the need for due consideration of the rights of patient donors and research participants. Furthermore, the increased outsourcing of information technology impedes the ability of researchers to act within the realm of existing local regulations owing to fundamental differences in the understanding of the right to data protection in various legal systems. In this Opinion article, we address the current opportunities and limitations of cloud computing and highlight the responsible use of federated and hybrid clouds that are set up between public and private partners as an adequate solution for genetics and genomics research in Europe, and under certain conditions between Europe and international partners. This approach could represent a sensible middle ground between fragmented individual solutions and a "one-size-fits-all" approach.

  18. Practical considerations for investigation of protein conformational dynamics by {sup 15}N R{sub 1ρ} relaxation dispersion

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Walinda, Erik [Kyoto University, Department of Molecular and Cellular Physiology, Graduate School of Medicine (Japan); Morimoto, Daichi; Shirakawa, Masahiro; Sugase, Kenji, E-mail: sugase@moleng.kyoto-u.ac.jp [Kyoto University, Department of Molecular Engineering, Graduate School of Engineering (Japan)

    2017-03-15

    It is becoming increasingly apparent that proteins are not static entities and that their function often critically depends on accurate sampling of multiple conformational states in aqueous solution. Accordingly, the development of methods to study conformational states in proteins beyond their ground-state structure (“excited states”) has crucial biophysical importance. Here we investigate experimental schemes for optimally probing chemical exchange processes in proteins on the micro- to millisecond timescale by {sup 15}N R{sub 1ρ} relaxation dispersion. The schemes use selective Hartmann–Hahn cross-polarization (CP) transfer for excitation, and derive peak integrals from 1D NMR spectra (Korzhnev et al. in J Am Chem Soc 127:713–721, 2005; Hansen et al. in J Am Chem Soc 131:3818–3819, 2009). Simulation and experiment collectively show that in such CP-based schemes care has to be taken to achieve accurate suppression of undesired off-resonance coherences, when using weak spin-lock fields. This then (i) ensures that relaxation dispersion profiles in the absence of chemical exchange are flat, and (ii) facilitates extraction of relaxation dispersion profiles in crowded regions of the spectrum. Further improvement in the quality of the experimental data is achieved by recording the free-induction decays in an interleaved manner and including a heating-compensation element. The reported considerations will particularly benefit the use of CP-based R{sub 1ρ} relaxation dispersion to analyze conformational exchange processes in larger proteins, where resonance line overlap becomes the main limiting factor.

  19. W(h)ither human cardiac and body magnetic resonance at ultrahigh fields? technical advances, practical considerations, applications, and clinical opportunities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Niendorf, Thoralf; Paul, Katharina; Oezerdem, Celal; Graessl, Andreas; Klix, Sabrina; Huelnhagen, Till; Hezel, Fabian; Rieger, Jan; Waiczies, Helmar; Frahm, Jens; Nagel, Armin M; Oberacker, Eva; Winter, Lukas

    2016-09-01

    The objective of this study was to document and review advances and groundbreaking progress in cardiac and body MR at ultrahigh fields (UHF, B0 ≥ 7.0 T) with the goal to attract talent, clinical adopters, collaborations and resources to the biomedical and diagnostic imaging communities. This review surveys traits, advantages and challenges of cardiac and body MR at 7.0 T. The considerations run the gamut from technical advances to clinical opportunities. Key concepts, emerging technologies, practical considerations, frontier applications and future directions of UHF body and cardiac MR are provided. Examples of UHF cardiac and body imaging strategies are demonstrated. Their added value over the kindred counterparts at lower fields is explored along with an outline of research promises. The achievements of cardiac and body UHF-MR are powerful motivators and enablers, since extra speed, signal and imaging capabilities may be invested to overcome the fundamental constraints that continue to hamper traditional cardiac and body MR applications. If practical obstacles, concomitant physics effects and technical impediments can be overcome in equal measure, sophisticated cardiac and body UHF-MR will help to open the door to new MRI and MRS approaches for basic research and clinical science, with the lessons learned at 7.0 T being transferred into broad clinical use including diagnostics and therapy guiding at lower fields. Copyright © 2015 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd. Copyright © 2015 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  20. Embracing change: practical and theoretical considerations for successful implementation of technology assisting upper limb training in stroke

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-01-01

    phases therapists have to go through. The guidance includes criteria and conditions that motivate therapists, and make it possible for them, to actually use technology in their daily clinical practice. Conclusions The reported requirements are important as guidance for people involved in the development of rehabilitation technology for arm-hand therapy of stroke patients. The stepwise guide provides a tool for facilitating successful implementation of technology in clinical practice, thus meeting future therapy demand. PMID:22856548

  1. Embracing change: practical and theoretical considerations for successful implementation of technology assisting upper limb training in stroke

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hochstenbach-Waelen Ananda

    2012-08-01

    guidance that consists of five phases therapists have to go through. The guidance includes criteria and conditions that motivate therapists, and make it possible for them, to actually use technology in their daily clinical practice. Conclusions The reported requirements are important as guidance for people involved in the development of rehabilitation technology for arm-hand therapy of stroke patients. The stepwise guide provides a tool for facilitating successful implementation of technology in clinical practice, thus meeting future therapy demand.

  2. Radiological environmental monitoring report for Brookhaven National Laboratory 1967--1970

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Meinhold, C.B.; Hull, A.P.

    1998-10-01

    Brookhaven National Laboratory (BNL) was established in 1947 on the former Army Camp Upton site located in central Long Island, New York. From the very beginning, BNL has monitored the environment on and around the Laboratory site to assess the effects of its operations on the environment. This document summarizes the environmental data collected for the years 1967, 1968, 1969, and 1970. Thus, it fills a gap in the series of BNL annual environmental reports beginning in 1962. The data in this document reflect measurements for those four years of concentrations and/or amounts of airborne radioactivity, radioactivity in streams and ground water, and external radiation levels in the vicinity of BNL. Also included are estimates, made at that time, of BNL`s contribution to radioactivity in the environment. Among the major scientific facilities operated at BNL are the High Flux Beam Reactor, Medical Research Reactor, Brookhaven Graphite Research Reactor, Alternating Gradient Synchrotron, and the 60-inch Cyclotron.

  3. First magnet constructed for the LHC by Brookhaven National Laboratory, USA

    CERN Document Server

    Maximilien Brice

    2003-01-01

    CERN has taken delivery of the first US-built contribution to the LHC. The 25-tonne interaction-region dipole magnet, which will guide the LHC´s two counter-rotating beams of protons into collision, was built at the US Brookhaven National Laboratory. It is the first of 20 that the laboratory will ultimately provide and took nine months for more than 100 scientists, engineers and technicians to construct. Brookhaven´s Superconducting Magnet Division is now building the remaining 19 magnets, which will be shipped to CERN later this year. They are provided for the LHC under the terms of a 1998 agreement between CERN and the US Department of Energy and National Science Foundation.

  4. Wound closure and wound healing. Suture techniques in contemporary periodontal and implant surgery: Interactions, requirements, and practical considerations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zuhr, Otto; Akakpo, Dodji Lukas; Hürzeler, Markus

    2017-07-20

    In contemporary reconstructive periodontal and implant surgery, attaining uncomplicated wound healing in the early postoperative healing phase is the key to achieving a successful treatment outcome and is of central interest, from the clinical as well as the scientific perspective. The realization of primary wound healing is the central challenge in most cases. Two of the evidence-based factors that affect postoperative wound healing can be influenced by the surgeon: the blood supply to the surgical site and postoperative wound stability. The surgical suture is a key determinant of whether adequate wound stability is achieved in this context without complicating the course of wound healing by exerting unnecessary trauma or excessive tensile strain on the wound edges. Therefore, the inclusion of anchors in the suturing process that make it possible to achieve the best wound stability possible is often an important key to success. This article provides an overview of the principles of successful wound closure that are relevant to postoperative wound healing in order to equip dentists with the tools needed for the correct, indication-specific selection and performance of surgical suturing techniques in daily practice.

  5. Application of curvelet denoising to 2D and 3D post-stack seismic data - practical considerations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Górszczyk, Andrzej; Adamczyk, Anna; Malinowski, Michał

    2014-05-01

    Contamination of seismic signal with noise of various origins is one of the main challenges encountered during processing and interpretation of seismic data. Several methods exist for eliminating different type of noises like coherent or incoherent one, multiples etc., but optimal random noise attenuation still remains difficult. Here we investigate relatively new technique based on Discret Curvelet Transform (DCT). Features like multi-resolution, multi-direction and locality of DCT introduce minimal overlapping between coefficients representing signal and noise in curvelet domain which is prime advantage of this method. We present practical application of DCT describing its main features and focusing on useful details, especially more complex thresholding based on analyzing 2D Fourier spectrum and vector of curvelet coefficients. We demonstrate that better understanding of relations between DCT properties and obtained results in pair with additional investigation of curvelet domain provide better localization and, in consequence, separation of noise and signal energy. Introduced scale and angle dependent weighting of curvelet coefficients leads to significant improvements of results with respect to noise attenuation and signal energy preservation. Effectiveness of our approach is demonstrated both on synthetic 2D sections with white and colored noise applied, as well as on real 2D and 3D post-stack seismic data. Curvelet denoising seems to be much more robust as compared to coherency or band-pass filtering, especially when noise and signal spectra overlaps.

  6. The Vulnerability of Study Participants in the Context of Transnational Biomedical Research: From Conceptual Considerations to Practical Implications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Orth, Helen Grete; Schicktanz, Silke

    2017-08-01

    Outsourcing clinical trials sponsored by pharmaceutical companies from industrialized countries to low- (middle)-income countries - summarized as transnational biomedical research (TBR) - has lead to many concerns about ethical standards. Whether study participants are particularly vulnerable is one of those concerns. However, the concept of vulnerability is still vague and varies in its definition. Despite the fact that important international ethical guidelines such as the Declaration of Helsinki by the World Medical Association or the Ethical Guidelines for Biomedical Research Involving Human Subjects by the Council of International Organizations of Medical Sciences refer to vulnerability as ethical principle, each of their approaches are different. To overcome these shortcomings, we analyze and unite different approaches of vulnerability and develop practical criteria in order to operationalize the concept especially for the context of TBR. These criteria refer to the context of a study as well as the characteristics and the current living situation of study participants. Based on a case study of an HIV-vaccine-trial conducted in India we demonstrate how those criteria can be applied in a retrospective way to identify potential ethical conflicts. The criteria can also indicate a prospective function for ethical pre-assessment. For this, we provide an outlook for three major topics: 1. Vulnerability as a normative concept: Different ways of protection; 2. The relevance of transparency and 3. Vulnerability as an instrument to increase decision participation of human subjects. © 2016 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  7. Qualitative risk evaluation of environmental restoration programs at Brookhaven National Laboratory

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Morris, S.C.

    1996-05-01

    This report documents the evaluation of risks associated with environmental restoration activities at Brookhaven National Laboratory using two tools supplied by DOE to provide a consistent set of risk estimates across the DOE complex: Risk Data Sheets (RDS) and Relative Risk Ranking. The tools are described, the process taken characterized, results provided and discussed. The two approaches are compared and recommendations provided for continuing improvement of the process.

  8. Brookhaven experience with handling and shipping of, and cask design for, reactor spent-fuel elements

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dugan, Francis A.

    1965-12-01

    The general problems in the area are presented. Solutions to the specific problems at Brookhaven are discussed in relation to the general problem. Presentation covers (a) fuel removal tools and equipment, and canal storage facilities; (b) methods of shipment; (c) brief review of the AEC and ICC regulatory requirements; and (d) optimized design of the shipping container. Specific solutions used by BNL over a six -year period are described. The need for complete and early analysis of the specific problem is indicated.

  9. The first picosecond terawatt CO{sub 2} laser at the Brookhaven Accelerator Test Facility

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pogorelsky, I.V.; Ben-Zvi, I.; Babzien, M. [and others

    1998-02-01

    The first terawatt picosecond CO{sub 2} laser will be brought to operation at the Brookhaven Accelerator Test Facility in 1998. System consists of a single-mode TEA oscillator, picosecond semiconductor optical switch, multi-atmosphere. The authors report on design, simulation, and performance tests of the 10 atm final amplifier that allows for direct multi-joule energy extraction in a picosecond laser pulse.

  10. Strong interactions of hyperons. [Summaries of research activities of Brookhaven National Laboratory

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nemethy, P.; Hungerbuehler, V.; Majka, R.

    1975-01-01

    A summary of the strong interaction results obtained with the Yale--FNAL--BNL hyperon beam at the Brookhaven AGS is presented. Differential cross sections are reported for hyperon-proton elastic scattering with samples of 6200 ..sigma../sup -/p events and 67 ..xi../sup -/p events. Also a report is made on a search for hyperon resonances in inelastic scattering. Finally, the prospects for new results on hyperon interactions are reviewed.

  11. Brookhaven highlights. Report on research, October 1, 1992--September 30, 1993

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rowe, M.S.; Belford, M.; Cohen, A.; Greenberg, D.; Seubert, L. [eds.

    1993-12-31

    This report highlights the research activities of Brookhaven National Laboratory during the period dating from October 1, 1992 through September 30, 1993. There are contributions to the report from different programs and departments within the laboratory. These include technology transfer, RHIC, Alternating Gradient Synchrotron, physics, biology, national synchrotron light source, applied science, medical science, advanced technology, chemistry, reactor physics, safety and environmental protection, instrumentation, and computing and communications.

  12. 2003 Brookhaven National Laboratory Annual Illness and Injury Surveillance Report, Revised September 2007

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    U.S. Department of Energy, Office of Health, Safety and Security, Office of Illness and Injury Prevention Programs

    2007-10-02

    Annual Illness and Injury Surveillance Program report for 2003 for Brookhaven National Lab. The U.S. Department of Energy’s (DOE) commitment to assuring the health and safety of its workers includes the conduct of epidemiologic surveillance activities that provide an early warning system for health problems among workers. The IISP monitors illnesses and health conditions that result in an absence of workdays, occupational injuries and illnesses, and disabilities and deaths among current workers.

  13. Failure to label red blood cells adequately in daily practice using an in vivo method: methodological and clinical considerations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hambye, A.S. [Nuclear Medicine Dept., Middelheim General Hospital, Antwerp (Belgium); Vandermeiren, R. [Nuclear Medicine Dept., Middelheim General Hospital, Antwerp (Belgium); Vervaet, A. [Nuclear Medicine Dept., Middelheim General Hospital, Antwerp (Belgium); Vandevivere, J. [Nuclear Medicine Dept., Middelheim General Hospital, Antwerp (Belgium)

    1995-01-01

    This study was conducted to evaluate the frequency and possible causes of poor red blood cell (RBC) labelling when performing equilibrium gated blood pool (GBP) radionuclide angiography at rest with an in vivo method. The influence of the mode of administration on tagging efficiency was studied. The patients were subclassified into four groups according to the way both molecules involved in the tagging procedure were administered. When poor image quality was found, the labelling efficiency was quantified and the frequency of failed tagging in each group was calculated. A significant association was found between poor labelling and the use of a Teflon catheter or butterfly needle for the injection of the stannous agent. In another 737 patients a strict administration protocol was applied to analyse the frequency of poor tagging and its possible causes. Suboptimal image quality was present in 88 patients. Quantitatively confirmed poor tagging was present in 36 of the 88; the remaining 52 patients showed borderline normal labelling. Drug interference was studied by comparing the medications used by the 36 patients showing poor binding with those used by 44 control patients. A significant relationship was found between the use of heparin or chemotherapy and the tagging. A significant correlation was found between advanced age and poor labelling efficiency. Finally, in 36 patients with poor labelling, a second GBP test was performed. This allowed us to evaluate the accuracy of the obtained ejection fraction value when a suboptimal image set is used, and to assess the feasibility of using the new kit in daily practice. (orig.)

  14. Bone strength and management of postmenopausal fracture risk with antiresorptive therapies: considerations for women’s health practice

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cheung AM

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available Angela M Cheung,1–3 Heather Frame,4 Michael Ho,5 Erin S Mackinnon,6 Jacques P Brown7 1Department of Medicine, University of Toronto, 2Centre of Excellence in Skeletal Health Assessment, Joint Department of Medical Imaging, University Health Network (UHN, 3Mount Sinai Hospital, University of Toronto, Toronto, ON, 4Assiniboine Clinic, Winnipeg, MB, 5University Health Network, Toronto, 6Amgen Canada, Inc, Mississauga, ON, 7Rheumatology Division, CHU de Québec Research Centre, Laval University, Quebec City, QC, Canada Abstract: Bone strength – and, hence, fracture risk – reflects the structural and material properties of the skeleton, which changes with bone turnover during aging and following effective pharmacotherapy. A variety of powerful new techniques (quantitative computed tomography, as well as peripheral quantitative computed tomography and high-resolution peripheral quantitative computed tomography provide precise images of bone structure and can be used to model the response of specific bones to different types of mechanical load. This review explores the various components of bone strength and the clinical significance of measures, such as bone mineral density, bone turnover markers, and modern imaging data, with regard to fracture risk in women with postmenopausal osteoporosis, before and after initiating antiresorptive therapy. These imaging and related techniques offer an ever-clearer picture of the changes in bone structure and bone mineral metabolism during normal aging and in osteoporosis, as well as in response to treatment. However, because the newer techniques are not yet available in routine practice, validated tools for absolute fracture risk assessment remain essential for clinical decision making. These tools, which are tailored to patient risk data in individual countries, are based on bone mineral density and other readily available clinical data. In addition, bone turnover marker measurements can be useful in

  15. Introducing a new generation indirect calorimeter for estimating energy requirements in adult intensive care unit patients: feasibility, practical considerations, and comparison with a mathematical equation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    De Waele, Elisabeth; Spapen, Herbert; Honoré, Patrick M; Mattens, Sabrina; Van Gorp, Viola; Diltoer, Marc; Huyghens, Luc

    2013-10-01

    Indirect calorimetry (IC) is increasingly advocated for individualizing nutritional therapy in critically ill adult patients, but questions remain regarding its practical implementation. During 12 weeks, we prospectively assessed utility and practical aspects of IC use. Adult medico-surgical intensive care unit (ICU) patients were daily screened for malnutrition. Indirect calorimetry was planned in subjects considered unable to meet energy requirements on day 3 after admission. Measured energy expenditure (MEE) was compared with calculated (resting/total) energy expenditure. A total of 940 evaluations were performed in 266 patients (age, 63±16 years; 59% males; Acute Physiology and Chronic Health Evaluation II score, 14±8). A total of 230 patients (86.5%) were at risk for malnutrition, and in 118 of them, IC was indicated. Practical considerations precluded measurements in 72 cases (61%). Forty-six calorimetric evaluations revealed an MEE of 1649±544 kcal per 24 hours that poorly correlated with calculated resting energy expenditure (r2=0.19) and calculated total energy expenditure (r2=0.20). Indirect calorimetry measurements were not time-consuming. Indirect calorimetry was indicated in half but effectively performed in only 20% of a representative intensive care unit population at risk for malnutrition. Correlation between MEE and CEE was poor. Indirect calorimetry is increasingly advocated for individualizing nutritional therapy in critically ill adult patients. Practical feasibility is tested in this study. Large differences between measured and calculated energy expenditure are observed. Together with patients' characteristics, feasibility results can guide clinicians or institutes in using IC in their daily clinical practice. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  16. Evaluation of alternative designs for an injectable subsurface barrier at the Brookhaven National Laboratory Site, Long Island, New York

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moridis, George J.; Finsterle, Stefan; Heiser, John

    1999-10-01

    Two alternative designs for the demonstration emplacement of a viscous liquid barrier (VLB) at the Brookhaven National Laboratory (BNL), Long Island, New York, are investigated by means of numerical simulation. The application of the VLB technology at the BNL site involved a surface-modified colloidal silica (CS), which gels upon addition of an appropriate electrolyte. Lance injection was used for the CS barrier emplacement. The lance injections occur in three stages: primary, secondary, and tertiary. The geometry of the barrier is based on the wedge model. The first design is based on optimization principles and determines the parameters that maximize uniformity and minimize permeability by minimizing an appropriate objective function while meeting the design criteria. These include a maximum hydraulic conductivity of 10-7 cm/s and a minimum thickness of 1 m. The second design aims to meet the same criteria and reflects standard chemical grouting practices. The combined effects of the key design parameters (i.e., lance spacing, injection location and spacing, gel time, injection rate, and volume) on the barrier permeability are studied. The optimization-based design is shown to have a significantly better performance than the standard engineering design. The interpenetration of adjacent CS bulbs appears to be of critical importance in meeting the barrier specifications. The three-dimensional simulations show that the barrier performance depends heavily on the path by which the final state is achieved. The in situ field measurements of the barrier permeability are consistent with, and appear to validate, the model predictions.

  17. Enhancing rigor and practice of scoping reviews in social policy research: considerations from a worked example on the Americans with disabilities act.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harris, Sarah Parker; Gould, Robert; Fujiura, Glenn

    2015-01-01

    There is increasing theoretical consideration about the use of systematic and scoping reviews of evidence in informing disability and rehabilitation research and practice. Indicative of this trend, this journal published a piece by Rumrill, Fitzgerald and Merchant in 2010 explaining the utility and process for conducting reviews of intervention-based research. There is still need to consider how to apply such rigor when conducting more exploratory reviews of heterogeneous research. This article explores the challenges, benefits, and procedures for conducting rigorous exploratory scoping reviews of diverse evidence. The article expands upon Rumrill, Fitzgerald and Merchant's framework and considers its application to more heterogeneous evidence on the impact of social policy. A worked example of a scoping review of the Americans with Disabilities Act is provided with a procedural framework for conducting scoping reviews on the effects of a social policy. The need for more nuanced techniques for enhancing rigor became apparent during the review process. There are multiple methodological steps that can enhance the utility of exploratory scoping reviews. The potential of systematic consideration during the exploratory review process is shown as a viable method to enhance the rigor in reviewing diverse bodies of evidence.

  18. Introduction of organic/hydro-organic matrices in inductively coupled plasma optical emission spectrometry and mass spectrometry: A tutorial review. Part II. Practical considerations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Leclercq, Amélie, E-mail: amelie.leclercq@cea.fr [CEA Saclay, DEN, DANS, DPC, SEARS, Laboratoire de développement Analytique Nucléaire Isotopique et Elémentaire, 91191 Gif-sur-Yvette (France); Nonell, Anthony, E-mail: anthony.nonell@cea.fr [CEA Saclay, DEN, DANS, DPC, SEARS, Laboratoire de développement Analytique Nucléaire Isotopique et Elémentaire, 91191 Gif-sur-Yvette (France); Todolí Torró, José Luis, E-mail: jose.todoli@ua.es [Universidad de Alicante, Departamento de Quimica Analitica, Nutricion y Bromatología, Ap. de Correos, 99, 03080 Alicante (Spain); Bresson, Carole, E-mail: carole.bresson@cea.fr [CEA Saclay, DEN, DANS, DPC, SEARS, Laboratoire de développement Analytique Nucléaire Isotopique et Elémentaire, 91191 Gif-sur-Yvette (France); Vio, Laurent, E-mail: laurent.vio@cea.fr [CEA Saclay, DEN, DANS, DPC, SEARS, Laboratoire de développement Analytique Nucléaire Isotopique et Elémentaire, 91191 Gif-sur-Yvette (France); Vercouter, Thomas, E-mail: thomas.vercouter@cea.fr [CEA Saclay, DEN, DANS, DPC, SEARS, Laboratoire de développement Analytique Nucléaire Isotopique et Elémentaire, 91191 Gif-sur-Yvette (France); Chartier, Frédéric, E-mail: frederic.chartier@cea.fr [CEA Saclay, DEN, DANS, DPC, 91191 Gif-sur-Yvette (France)

    2015-07-23

    Graphical abstract: This tutorial review is dedicated to the analysis of organic/hydro-organic matrices by ICP techniques. A state-of-the-art focusing on sample introduction, relevant operating parameters optimization and analytical strategies for elemental quantification is provided. - Highlights: • Practical considerations to perform analyses in organic/hydro-organic matrices. • Description, benefits and drawbacks of recent introduction devices. • Optimization to improve plasma tolerance towards organic/hydro-organic matrices. • Analytical strategies for elemental quantification in organic/hydro-organic matrices. - Abstract: Inductively coupled plasma optical emission spectrometry (ICP-OES) and mass spectrometry (ICP-MS) are increasingly used to carry out analyses in organic/hydro-organic matrices. The introduction of such matrices into ICP sources is particularly challenging and can be the cause of numerous drawbacks. This tutorial review, divided in two parts, explores the rich literature related to the introduction of organic/hydro-organic matrices in ICP sources. Part I provided theoretical considerations associated with the physico-chemical properties of such matrices, in an attempt to understand the induced phenomena. Part II of this tutorial review is dedicated to more practical considerations on instrumentation, instrumental and operating parameters, as well as analytical strategies for elemental quantification in such matrices. Two important issues are addressed in this part: the first concerns the instrumentation and optimization of instrumental and operating parameters, pointing out (i) the description, benefits and drawbacks of different kinds of nebulization and desolvation devices and the impact of more specific instrumental parameters such as the injector characteristics and the material used for the cone; and, (ii) the optimization of operating parameters, for both ICP-OES and ICP-MS. Even if it is at the margin of this tutorial review

  19. Opioid Considerations for Emergency Practice

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Thomas Terndrup

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available On a backdrop of increasingly distressing opioid misuse in our communities, and safety concerns expressed by The Joint Commission and others, emergency physicians are further increasing their utilization of these important agents in our patients.

  20. Asbestos Abatement--Practical Considerations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sedrel, Roy A.

    Illinois Senate Bill 1644, the recently passed "Asbestos Abatement Act," requires all schools in the state, public and private alike, to remove friable asbestos by whichever comes first: July 1, 1989, or 3 years following the establishment of a system for state funding for corrective action. This document addresses practical…

  1. Tinnitus: considerations for nursing practice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Truscott, Gill

    2016-11-09

    Tinnitus is a common condition characterised by a subjective, and less commonly objective, noise sensation that is often described as ringing heard in one or both ears by the individual. The exact cause of tinnitus is not known, but it is related to physiological changes in the auditory system and is closely linked to psychological well-being. Tinnitus can have a significant effect on the lives of people who experience it on a continuous basis. Although there is no cure for tinnitus, various strategies are available to support individuals to manage the condition on a daily basis; these management strategies are discussed in this article.

  2. Practical Considerations before Installing Ground-Based Geodetic Infrastructure for Integrated InSAR and cGNSS Monitoring of Vertical Land Motion

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Amy L. Parker

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available Continuously operating Global Navigation Satellite Systems (cGNSS can be used to convert relative values of vertical land motion (VLM derived from Interferometric Synthetic Aperture Radar (InSAR to absolute values in a global or regional reference frame. Artificial trihedral corner reflectors (CRs provide high-intensity and temporally stable reflections in SAR time series imagery, more so than naturally occurring permanent scatterers. Therefore, it is logical to co-locate CRs with cGNSS as ground-based geodetic infrastructure for the integrated monitoring of VLM. We describe the practical considerations for such co-locations using four case-study examples from Perth, Australia. After basic initial considerations such as land access, sky visibility and security, temporary test deployments of co-located CRs with cGNSS should be analysed together to determine site suitability. Signal to clutter ratios from SAR imagery are used to determine potential sites for placement of the CR. A significant concern is whether the co-location of a deliberately designed reflecting object generates unwanted multipath (reflected signals in the cGNSS data. To mitigate against this, we located CRs >30 m from the cGNSS with no inter-visibility. Daily RMS values of the zero-difference ionosphere-free carrier-phase residuals, and ellipsoidal heights from static precise point positioning GNSS processing at each co-located site were then used to ascertain that the CR did not generate unwanted cGNSS multipath. These steps form a set of recommendations for the installation of such geodetic ground-infrastructure, which may be of use to others wishing to establish integrated InSAR-cGNSS monitoring of VLM elsewhere.

  3. Practical Considerations before Installing Ground-Based Geodetic Infrastructure for Integrated InSAR and cGNSS Monitoring of Vertical Land Motion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Featherstone, Will E.; Filmer, Mick S.

    2017-01-01

    Continuously operating Global Navigation Satellite Systems (cGNSS) can be used to convert relative values of vertical land motion (VLM) derived from Interferometric Synthetic Aperture Radar (InSAR) to absolute values in a global or regional reference frame. Artificial trihedral corner reflectors (CRs) provide high-intensity and temporally stable reflections in SAR time series imagery, more so than naturally occurring permanent scatterers. Therefore, it is logical to co-locate CRs with cGNSS as ground-based geodetic infrastructure for the integrated monitoring of VLM. We describe the practical considerations for such co-locations using four case-study examples from Perth, Australia. After basic initial considerations such as land access, sky visibility and security, temporary test deployments of co-located CRs with cGNSS should be analysed together to determine site suitability. Signal to clutter ratios from SAR imagery are used to determine potential sites for placement of the CR. A significant concern is whether the co-location of a deliberately designed reflecting object generates unwanted multipath (reflected signals) in the cGNSS data. To mitigate against this, we located CRs >30 m from the cGNSS with no inter-visibility. Daily RMS values of the zero-difference ionosphere-free carrier-phase residuals, and ellipsoidal heights from static precise point positioning GNSS processing at each co-located site were then used to ascertain that the CR did not generate unwanted cGNSS multipath. These steps form a set of recommendations for the installation of such geodetic ground-infrastructure, which may be of use to others wishing to establish integrated InSAR-cGNSS monitoring of VLM elsewhere. PMID:28758970

  4. Introduction of organic/hydro-organic matrices in inductively coupled plasma optical emission spectrometry and mass spectrometry: a tutorial review. Part II. Practical considerations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leclercq, Amélie; Nonell, Anthony; Todolí Torró, José Luis; Bresson, Carole; Vio, Laurent; Vercouter, Thomas; Chartier, Frédéric

    2015-07-23

    Inductively coupled plasma optical emission spectrometry (ICP-OES) and mass spectrometry (ICP-MS) are increasingly used to carry out analyses in organic/hydro-organic matrices. The introduction of such matrices into ICP sources is particularly challenging and can be the cause of numerous drawbacks. This tutorial review, divided in two parts, explores the rich literature related to the introduction of organic/hydro-organic matrices in ICP sources. Part I provided theoretical considerations associated with the physico-chemical properties of such matrices, in an attempt to understand the induced phenomena. Part II of this tutorial review is dedicated to more practical considerations on instrumentation, instrumental and operating parameters, as well as analytical strategies for elemental quantification in such matrices. Two important issues are addressed in this part: the first concerns the instrumentation and optimization of instrumental and operating parameters, pointing out (i) the description, benefits and drawbacks of different kinds of nebulization and desolvation devices and the impact of more specific instrumental parameters such as the injector characteristics and the material used for the cone; and, (ii) the optimization of operating parameters, for both ICP-OES and ICP-MS. Even if it is at the margin of this tutorial review, Electrothermal Vaporization and Laser Ablation will also be shortly described. The second issue is devoted to the analytical strategies for elemental quantification in such matrices, with particular insight into the isotope dilution technique, particularly used in speciation analysis by ICP-coupled separation techniques. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  5. Risk-based priority scoring for Brookhaven National Laboratory environmental restoration programs

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Morris, S.C.; Meinhold, A.F.

    1995-05-01

    This report describes the process of estimating the risk associated with environmental restoration programs under the Brookhaven National Laboratory Office of Environmental Restoration. The process was part of an effort across all Department of Energy facilities to provide a consistent framework to communicate risk information about the facilities to senior managers in the DOE Office of Environmental Management to foster understanding of risk activities across programs. the risk evaluation was a qualitative exercise. Categories considered included: Public health and safety; site personnel safety and health; compliance; mission impact; cost-effective risk management; environmental protection; inherent worker risk; environmental effects of clean-up; and social, cultural, political, and economic impacts.

  6. Assessment of Energy Efficiency Project Financing Alternatives for Brookhaven National Laboratory

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hunt, W. D.; Hail, John C.; Sullivan, Gregory P.

    2000-02-14

    This document provides findings and recommendations that resulted from an assessment of the Brookhaven National Laboratory by a team from Pacific Northwest National Laboratory to assess the site's potential for various alternative financing options as a means to implement energy-efficiency improvements. The assessment looked for life-cycle cost-effective energy-efficiency improvement opportunities, and through a series of staff interviews, evaluated the various methods by which these opportunities may be financed, while considering availability of funds, staff, and available financing options. This report summarizes the findings of the visit and the resulting recommendations.

  7. X-ray holographic microscopy experiments at the Brookhaven synchrotron light source

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Howells, M.R.; Iarocci, M.; Kenney, J.; Kirz, J.; Rarback, H.

    1983-01-01

    Soft x-ray holographic microscopy is discussed from an experimental point of view. Three series of measurements have been carried out using the Brookhaven 750 MeV storage ring as an x-ray source. Young slits fringes, Gabor (in line) holograms and various data pertaining to the soft x-ray performance of photographic plates are reported. The measurements are discussed in terms of the technique for recording them and the experimental limitations in effect. Some discussion is also given of the issues involved in reconstruction using visible light.

  8. Determination of floor response spectra for the Brookhaven HFBR reactor building structure

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Subudhi, M.; Goradia, H.

    1978-11-01

    In order to perform the dynamic analysis of various structural components of the HFBR reactor building at Brookhaven National Laboratory (BNL) subjected to seismic disturbances, it is necessary to obtain the floor response spectra of the primary structure. The mathematical model includes the four floor levels of the internal structure, the dome, and soil spring effects. The standard time history analysis is adopted to obtain the response spectrum for each floor of the internal structure. This report summarizes the results both in tabular and graphical form for various damping values.

  9. Applications of nuclear techniques for in vivo body composition studies at Brookhaven National Laboratory

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cohn, S.H.; Ellis, K.J.; Vartsky, D.; Vaswani, A.N.; Wielopolski, L.

    1981-01-01

    A series of technical developments and their clinical applications in various nuclear technologies at Brookhaven National Laboratory is described. These include the development of a portable neutron activation facility for measuring cadmium in vivo in kidney and liver, a technique for the measurement of body iron utilizing nuclear resonant scattering of gamma rays, a non-invasive measure of the skeletal levels of lead by an x-ray fluorescence technique, and the development of a pulsed Van de Graaff generator as a source of pulsed neutrons for the measurement of lung silicon. (ACR)

  10. Summary of proposed approach for deriving cleanup guidelines for radionuclides in soil at Brookhaven National Laboratory

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Meinhold, A.F.; Morris, S.C.; Dionne, B.; Moskowitz, P.D.

    1996-11-01

    Past activities at Brookhaven National Laboratory (BNL) resulted in soil and groundwater contamination. As a result, BNL was designated a Superfund site under the Comprehensive Environmental Response Compensation and Liability Act (CERCLA). BNL`s Office of Environmental Restoration (OER) is overseeing environmental restoration activities at the Laboratory, carried out under an Interagency Agreement (IAG) with the United States Department of Energy (DOE), the United States Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) and the New York State Department of Environmental Conservation (NYSDEC). The objective of this paper is to propose a standard approach to deriving risk-based cleanup guidelines for radionuclides in soil at BNL.

  11. Proceedings of Brookhaven National Laboratory's fusion/synfuel workshop

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fillo, J.A.; Powell, J.R. (eds.)

    1979-01-01

    The fusion synfuels workshop held at Brookhaven National Laboratory (BNL) on August 27-29, 1979 examined the current status of candidate synfuel processes and the R and D required to develop the capability for fusion synfuel production. Participants divided into five working groups, covering the following areas: (1) economics and applications; (2) high-temperature electrolysis; (3) thermochemical processes (including hybrid thermo-electrochemical); (4) blanket and materials; and (5) high-efficiency power cycles. Each working group presented a summary of their conclusions and recommendations to all participants during the third day of the Workshop. These summaries are given.

  12. Cardiovascular diseases in dental practice : Practical considerations

    OpenAIRE

    Margaix Muñoz, María; Jiménez Soriano, Yolanda; Poveda Roda, Rafael; Sarrión Pérez, María Gracia

    2008-01-01

    Coronary heart disease is the principal cause of death in the industrialized world. Its most serious expression, acute myocardial infarction, causes 7.2 million deaths each year worldwide, and it is estimated that 20% of all people will suffer heart failure in the course of their lifetime. The control of risk cardiovascular factors, including arterial hypertension, obesity and diabetes mellitus is the best way to prevent such diseases. The most frequent and serious cardiovascular emergenc...

  13. Cardiovascular diseases in dental practice. Practical considerations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Margaix Muñoz, María; Jiménez Soriano, Yolanda; Poveda Roda, Rafael; Sarrión, Gracia

    2008-05-01

    Coronary heart disease is the principal cause of death in the industrialized world. Its most serious expression, acute myocardial infarction, causes 7.2 million deaths each year worldwide, and it is estimated that 20% of all people will suffer heart failure in the course of their lifetime. The control of risk cardiovascular factors, including arterial hypertension, obesity and diabetes mellitus is the best way to prevent such diseases. The most frequent and serious cardiovascular emergencies that can manifest during dental treatment are chest pain (as a symptom of underlying disease) and acute lung edema. Due to the high prevalence and seriousness of these problems, the dental surgeon must be aware of them and should be able to act quickly and effectively in the case of an acute cardiovascular event. In patients with a history of cardiovascular disease, attention must center on the control of pain, the reduction of stress, and the use or avoidance of a vasoconstrictor in dental anesthesia. In turn, caution is required in relation to the antiplatelet, anticoagulant and antihypertensive medication typically used by such patients.

  14. Doing More with Less: Cost-effective, Compact Particle Accelerators (489th Brookhaven Lecture)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Trbojevic, Dejan [BNL Collider-Accelerator Department

    2013-10-22

    Replace a 135-ton magnet used for cancer-fighting particle therapies with a magnet that weighs only two tons? Such a swap is becoming possible thanks to new particle accelerator advances being developed by researchers at Brookhaven Lab. With an approach that combines techniques used by synchrotron accelerators with the ability to accept more energy, these new technologies could be used for more than fighting cancer. They could also decrease the lifecycle of byproducts from nuclear power plants and reduce costs for eRHIC—a proposed electron-ion collider for Brookhaven Lab that researchers from around the world would use to explore the glue that holds together the universe’s most basic building blocks and explore the proton-spin puzzle. During this lecture, Dr. Trbojevic provides an overview of accelerator technologies and techniques—particularly a non-scaling, fixed-focused alternating gradient—to focus particle beams using fewer, smaller magnets. He discusses how these technologies will benefit eRHIC and other applications, including particle therapies being developed to combat cancer.

  15. Magic Lenses for RHIC: Compensating Beam-beam Interaction (488th Brookhaven Lecture)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Luo, Yun [BNL Collider-Accelerator Department

    2013-07-17

    Scientists at Brookhaven Lab’s Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider (RHIC) smash atomic particles together to understand more about why the physical world works the way it does. Increasing rates of particle collisions, or luminosity, at RHIC is no small challenge, but the results—more data for better clues—are crucial for scientists trying answer big questions about the origins of matter and mass. When scientists at RHIC collide protons, they don’t hope for a head-on crash by focusing only two particles roaring toward each other from opposite directions. For all intents and purposes, that would be impossible. The scientists can smash protons because they significantly increase the likelihood of collisions by steering hundreds of billions clumped into bunches, which at RHIC are about 3.5 meters long and less than 1 millimeter tall. The particles of these bunches are all positively charged, so when they interact, they repel outwardly—think how magnets repel when their same poles are pushed together. Although this decreases the density of each bunch, reducing luminosity, scientists in Brookhaven Lab’s Collider-Accelerator Department (C-AD) have a solution. After more than seven years of development, the scientists have designed an electron-lens system that uses electrons’ negative charges to attract positively charged proton bunches and minimize their repelling tendencies. Combined with other upgrades to the RHIC accelerator complex, these lenses are important components in efforts towards the major task of doubling the luminosity for proton-proton collisions.

  16. Manipulating Light to Understand and Improve Solar Cells (494th Brookhaven Lecture)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Eisaman, Matthew [BNL, Sustainable Energy Technologies Department

    2014-04-16

    Energy consumption around the world is projected to approximately triple by the end of the century, according to the 2005 Report from the U.S. Department of Energy's Basic Energy Sciences Workshop on Solar Energy Utilization. Much will change in those next 86 years, but for all the power the world needs—for everything from manufacturing and transportation to air conditioning and charging cell phone batteries—improved solar cells will be crucial to meet this future energy demand with renewable energy sources. At Brookhaven Lab, scientists are probing solar cells and exploring variations within the cells—variations that are so small they are measured in billionths of a meter—in order to make increasingly efficient solar cells and ultimately help reduce the overall costs of deploying solar power plants. Dr. Eisaman will discuss DOE's Sunshot Initiative, which aims to reduce the cost of solar cell-generated electricity by 2020. He will also discuss how he and collaborators at Brookhaven Lab are probing different material compositions within solar cells, measuring how efficiently they collect electrical charge, helping to develop a new class of solar cells, and improving solar-cell manufacturing processes.

  17. Is Overeating Behavior Similar to Drug Addiction? (427th Brookhaven Lecture)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wang, Gene-Jack

    2007-09-27

    The increasing number of obese individuals in the U.S. and other countries world-wide adds urgency to the need to understand the mechanisms underlying pathological overeating. Research by the speaker and others at Brookhaven National Laboratory and elsewhere is compiling evidence that the brain circuits disrupted in obesity are similar to those involved in drug addiction. Using positron emission tomography (PET), the speaker and his colleagues have implicated brain dopamine in the normal and the pathological intake of food by humans. During the 427th Brookhaven Lecture, speaker will review the findings and implications of PET studies of obese subjects and then compare them to PET research involving drug-addicted individuals. For example, in pathologically obese subjects, it was found that reductions in striatal dopamine D2 receptors are similar to those observed in drug-addicted subjects. The speaker and his colleagues have postulated that decreased levels of dopamine receptors predisposed subjects to search for strongly rewarding reinforcers, be it drugs for the drug-addicted or food for the obese, as a means to compensate for decreased sensitivity of their dopamine-regulated reward circuits. As the speaker will summarize, multiple but similar brain circuits involved in reward, motivation, learning and inhibitory control are disrupted both in drug addiction and obesity, resulting in the need for a multimodal approach to the treatment of obesity.

  18. DOE handbook: Design considerations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1999-04-01

    The Design Considerations Handbook includes information and suggestions for the design of systems typical to nuclear facilities, information specific to various types of special facilities, and information useful to various design disciplines. The handbook is presented in two parts. Part 1, which addresses design considerations, includes two sections. The first addresses the design of systems typically used in nuclear facilities to control radiation or radioactive materials. Specifically, this part addresses the design of confinement systems and radiation protection and effluent monitoring systems. The second section of Part 1 addresses the design of special facilities (i.e., specific types of nonreactor nuclear facilities). The specific design considerations provided in this section were developed from review of DOE 6430.1A and are supplemented with specific suggestions and considerations from designers with experience designing and operating such facilities. Part 2 of the Design Considerations Handbook describes good practices and design principles that should be considered in specific design disciplines, such as mechanical systems and electrical systems. These good practices are based on specific experiences in the design of nuclear facilities by design engineers with related experience. This part of the Design Considerations Handbook contains five sections, each of which applies to a particular engineering discipline.

  19. Improving the Adherence to Antiretroviral Therapy, a Difficult but Essential Task for a Successful HIV Treatment—Clinical Points of View and Practical Considerations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Simona A. Iacob

    2017-11-01

    Full Text Available HIV infection is responsible for one the most devastating human pandemics. The advent of antiretroviral therapy has changed the course of the pandemic and saved millions of lives. Complex therapeutic regimens have been introduced since 1996 and have contributed to the transformation of HIV infection into a treatable chronic diseases. New types of potent antiretrovirals and their combinations, including “once daily” treatment, have simplified the regimens and diminished side effects. Nevertheless the adherence to antiretroviral therapy remains unsatisfactory and varies between 27 and 80% across different population in various studies, compared with the required level of 95%. The lack of adherence to antiretroviral therapy is a multi-factorial and dynamic process which raises considerable difficulties for long-term follow-up. Current solutions to this problem are complex. These should be applied by a multidisciplinary team and should take into account key features related to both the individual and social factors as well as to the population to whom it belongs (children, teenagers, elderly, marginalized population like drug users, incarcerated patients, sex workers, etc.. Importantly, adherence should continue to be monitored even in patients known to be compliant. In case of subsequent failure the team should identify the reasons for non-adherence and apply the appropriate methods. Where usual methods have no chance of success, a coordinated package of services also known as “harm reduction” can be offered in order to reduce the risks of transmission. The current article analyses the concept of adherence to antiretroviral therapy, the shortcomings of this medication and the methods that can be applied in practice to increase adherence. Emphasis is placed on the analysis of groups at high risk for HIV infection that currently represent the spearhead with which the HIV pandemic is spreading.

  20. Brookhaven Lab physicists Edward Beebe and Alexander Pikin win 'Brightness Award' for achievement in ion source physics and technology

    CERN Multimedia

    2003-01-01

    "Edward Beebe and Alexander Pikin, physicists at the U.S. Department of Energy's Brookhaven National Laboratory, have been awarded the Ion Source Prize, known as the "Brightness Award," which recognizes and encourages innovative and significant recent achievements in the fields of ion source physics and technology" (1 page).

  1. Structural biology facilities at Brookhaven National Laboratory`s high flux beam reactor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Korszun, Z.R.; Saxena, A.M.; Schneider, D.K. [Brookhaven National Laboratory, Upton, NY (United States)

    1994-12-31

    The techniques for determining the structure of biological molecules and larger biological assemblies depend on the extent of order in the particular system. At the High Flux Beam Reactor at the Brookhaven National Laboratory, the Biology Department operates three beam lines dedicated to biological structure studies. These beam lines span the resolution range from approximately 700{Angstrom} to approximately 1.5{Angstrom} and are designed to perform structural studies on a wide range of biological systems. Beam line H3A is dedicated to single crystal diffraction studies of macromolecules, while beam line H3B is designed to study diffraction from partially ordered systems such as biological membranes. Beam line H9B is located on the cold source and is designed for small angle scattering experiments on oligomeric biological systems.

  2. Brookhaven highlights. [Fiscal year 1992, October 1, 1991--September 30, 1992

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rowe, M.S.; Cohen, A.; Greenberg, D.; Seubert, L. [eds.

    1992-12-31

    This publication provides a broad overview of the research programs and efforts being conducted, built, designed, and planned at Brookhaven National Laboratory. This work covers a broad range of scientific disciplines. Major facilities include the Alternating Gradient Synchrotron (AGS), with its newly completed booster, the National Synchrotron Light Source (NSLS), the High Flux Beam Reactor (HFBR), and the RHIC, which is under construction. Departments within the laboratory include the AGS department, accelerator development, physics, chemistry, biology, NSLS, medical, nuclear energy, and interdepartmental research efforts. Research ranges from the pure sciences, in nuclear physics and high energy physics as one example, to environmental work in applied science to study climatic effects, from efforts in biology which are a component of the human genome project to the study, production, and characterization of new materials. The paper provides an overview of the laboratory operations during 1992, including staffing, research, honors, funding, and general laboratory plans for the future.

  3. Brookhaven highlights, October 1978-September 1979. [October 1978 to September 1979

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1979-01-01

    These highlights present an overview of the major research and development achievements at Brookhaven National Laboratory from October 1978 to September 1979. Specific areas covered include: accelerator and high energy physics programs; high energy physics research; the AGS and improvements to the AGS; neutral beam development; heavy ion fusion; superconducting power cables; ISABELLE storage rings; the BNL Tandem accelerator; heavy ion experiments at the Tandem; the High Flux Beam Reactor; medium energy physics; nuclear theory; atomic and applied physics; solid state physics; neutron scattering studies; x-ray scattering studies; solid state theory; defects and disorder in solids; surface physics; the National Synchrotron Light Source ; Chemistry Department; Biology Department; Medical Department; energy sciences; environmental sciences; energy technology programs; National Center for Analysis of Energy Systems; advanced reactor systems; nuclear safety; National Nuclear Data Center; nuclear materials safeguards; Applied Mathematics Department; and support activities. (GHT)

  4. An audit of health products advertised for sale on chiropractic Web sites in Canada and consideration of these practices in the context of Canadian chiropractic codes of ethics and conduct.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Page, Stacey A; Grod, Jaroslaw P

    2009-01-01

    This study describes the extent to which chiropractors with Web sites practicing in Canada advertise health products for sale and considers this practice in the context of chiropractic codes of ethics and conduct. Chiropractic Web sites in Canada were identified using a public online business directory (Canada 411). The Web sites were searched, and an inventory of the health products for sale was taken. The influences of type of practice and province of practice on the sale of health product were assessed. Textual comments about health product marketing were summarized. National and provincial codes of ethics were reviewed, and the content on health product advertising was summarized. Two hundred eighty-seven Web sites were reviewed. Just more than half of the Web sites contained information on health products for sale (n = 158, 54%). Orthotics were advertised most often (n = 136 practices, 47%), followed by vitamins/nutritional supplements (n = 53, 18%), pillows and supports (n = 40, 14%), and exercise/rehabilitation products (n = 20, 7%). Chiropractors in solo or group chiropractic practices were less likely to advertise health products than those in multidisciplinary practice (P ethics and conduct varied in their guidelines regarding health product sales. Variations in codes of ethics and in the proportions of practitioners advertising health products for sales across the country suggest that opinions may be divided on the acceptability of health product sales. Such practices raise questions and considerations for the chiropractic profession.

  5. Interactive radiopharmaceutical facility between Yale Medical Center and Brookhaven National Laboratory. Progress report, October 1976-June 1979

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gottschalk, A.

    1979-01-01

    DOE Contract No. EY-76-S-02-4078 was started in October 1976 to set up an investigative radiochemical facility at the Yale Medical Center which would bridge the gap between current investigation with radionuclides at the Yale School of Medicine and the facilities in the Chemistry Department at the Brookhaven National Laboratory. To facilitate these goals, Dr. Mathew L. Thakur was recruited who joined the Yale University faculty in March of 1977. This report briefly summarizes our research accomplishments through the end of June 1979. These can be broadly classified into three categories: (1) research using indium-111 labelled cellular blood components; (2) development of new radiopharmaceuticals; and (3) interaction with Dr. Alfred Wolf and colleagues in the Chemistry Department of Brookhaven National Laboratory.

  6. Department of Energy’s ARM Climate Research Facility External Data Center Operations Plan Located At Brookhaven National Laboratory

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cialella, A. [Brookhaven National Lab. (BNL), Upton, NY (United States); Gregory, L. [Brookhaven National Lab. (BNL), Upton, NY (United States); Lazar, K. [Brookhaven National Lab. (BNL), Upton, NY (United States); Liang, M. [Brookhaven National Lab. (BNL), Upton, NY (United States); Ma, L. [Brookhaven National Lab. (BNL), Upton, NY (United States); Tilp, A. [Brookhaven National Lab. (BNL), Upton, NY (United States); Wagener, R. [Brookhaven National Lab. (BNL), Upton, NY (United States)

    2015-05-01

    The External Data Center (XDC) Operations Plan describes the activities performed to manage the XDC, located at Brookhaven National Laboratory (BNL), for the Department of Energy’s Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) Climate Research Facility. It includes all ARM infrastructure activities performed by the Data Management and Software Engineering Group (DMSE) at BNL. This plan establishes a baseline of expectation within the ARM Operations Management for the group managing the XDC.

  7. RHIC and quark matter: proposal for a relativistic heavy ion collider at Brookhaven National Laboratory

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1984-08-01

    This document describes the Brookhaven National Laboratory Proposal for the construction of a Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider (RHIC). The construction of this facility represents the natural continuation of the laboratory's role as a center for nuclear and high-energy physics research and extends and uses the existing AGS, Tandem Van de Graaff and CBA facilities at BNL in a very cost effective manner. The Administration and Congress have approved a project which will provide a link between the Tandem Van de Graaf and the AGS. Completion of this project in 1986 will provide fixed target capabilities at the AGS for heavy ions of about 14 GeV/amu with masses up to approx. 30 (sulfur). The addition of an AGS booster would extend the mass range to the heaviest ions (A approx. 200, e.g., gold); its construction could start in 1986 and be completed in three years. These two new AGS experimental facilities can be combined with the proposed Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider to extend the energy range to 100 x 100 GeV/amu for the heaviest ions. BNL proposes to start construction of RHIC in FY 86 with completion in FY 90 at a total cost of 134 M$.

  8. The Shape and Flow of Heavy Ion Collisions (490th Brookhaven Lecture)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schenke, Bjoern [BNL Physics Department

    2014-12-18

    The sun can’t do it, but colossal machines like the Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider (RHIC) at Brookhaven Lab and Large Hadron Collider (LHC) in Europe sure can. Quarks and gluons make up protons and neutrons found in the nucleus of every atom in the universe. At heavy ion colliders like RHIC and the LHC, scientists can create matter more than 100,000 times hotter than the center of the sun—so hot that protons and neutrons melt into a plasma of quarks and gluons. The particle collisions and emerging quark-gluon plasma hold keys to understanding how these fundamental particles interact with each other, which helps explain how everything is held together—from atomic nuclei to human beings to the biggest stars—how all matter has mass, and what the universe looked like microseconds after the Big Bang. Dr. Schenke discusses theory that details the shape and structure of heavy ion collisions. He will also explain how this theory and data from experiments at RHIC and the LHC are being used to determine properties of the quark-gluon plasma.

  9. What Goes Up Must Come Down: The Lifecycle of Convective Clouds (492nd Brookhaven Lecture)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jensen, Michael [BNL Environmental Sciences

    2014-02-19

    Some clouds look like cotton balls and others like anvils. Some bring rain, some snow and sleet, and others, just shade. But, whether big and billowy or dark and stormy, clouds affect far more than the weather each day. Armed with measurements of clouds’ updrafts and downdrafts—which resemble airflow in a convection oven—and many other atmospheric interactions, scientists from Brookhaven Lab and other institutions around the world are developing models that are crucial for understanding Earth’s climate and forecasting future climate change. During his lecture, Dr. Jensen provides an overview of the importance of clouds in the Earth’s climate system before explaining how convective clouds form, grow, and dissipate. His discussion includes findings from the Midlatitude Continental Convective Clouds Experiment (MC3E), a major collaborative experiment between U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) and NASA scientists to document precipitation, clouds, winds, and moisture in 3-D for a holistic view of convective clouds and their environment.

  10. A Really Good Hammer: Quantification of Mass Transfer Using Perfluorocarbon Tracers (475th Brookhaven Lecture)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Watson, Tom [BNL Environmental Sciences, Tracer Technology Group

    2012-02-15

    Brookhaven Lab’s perfluorocarbon tracer (PFT) technology can be viewed as a hammer looking for nails. But, according to Tom Watson, leader of the Lab’s Tracer Technology Group in the Environmental Research and Technology Division (ERTD), “It’s a really good hammer!” The colorless, odorless and safe gases have a number of research uses, from modeling how airborne contaminants might move through urban canyons to help first responders plan their response to potential terrorist attacks and accidents to locating leaks in underground gas pipes. Their extremely low background level — detectable at one part per quadrillion — allows their transport to be easily tracked. Lab researchers used PFTs during the 2005 Urban Dispersion Program field studies in New York City, gathering data to help improve models of how a gas or chemical release might move around Manhattan’s tall buildings and canyons. Closer to home, scientists also used PFTs to make ventilation measurements in Bldg. 400 on the Lab site to provide data to test air flow models used in determining the effects of passive and active air exchange on the levels of indoor and outdoor air pollution, and to determine the effects of an accidental or intentional release of hazardous substances in or around buildings.

  11. Reliable operation of the Brookhaven EBIS for highly charged ion production for RHIC and NSRL

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Beebe, E., E-mail: beebe@bnl.gov; Alessi, J., E-mail: beebe@bnl.gov; Binello, S., E-mail: beebe@bnl.gov; Kanesue, T., E-mail: beebe@bnl.gov; McCafferty, D., E-mail: beebe@bnl.gov; Morris, J., E-mail: beebe@bnl.gov; Okamura, M., E-mail: beebe@bnl.gov; Pikin, A., E-mail: beebe@bnl.gov; Ritter, J., E-mail: beebe@bnl.gov; Schoepfer, R., E-mail: beebe@bnl.gov [Brookhaven National Laboratory, Upton, NY 11973 (United States)

    2015-01-09

    An Electron Beam Ion Source for the Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider (RHIC EBIS) was commissioned at Brookhaven in September 2010 and since then it routinely supplies ions for RHIC and NASA Space Radiation Laboratory (NSRL) as the main source of highly charged ions from Helium to Uranium. Using three external primary ion sources for 1+ injection into the EBIS and an electrostatic injection beam line, ion species at the EBIS exit can be switched in 0.2 s. A total of 16 different ion species have been produced to date. The length and the capacity of the ion trap have been increased by 20% by extending the trap by two more drift tubes, compared with the original design. The fraction of Au{sup 32+} in the EBIS Au spectrum is approximately 12% for 70-80% electron beam neutralization and 8 pulses operation in a 5 Hertz train and 4-5 s super cycle. For single pulse per super cycle operation and 25% electron beam neutralization, the EBIS achieves the theoretical Au{sup 32+} fractional output of 18%. Long term stability has been very good with availability of the beam from RHIC EBIS during 2012 and 2014 RHIC runs approximately 99.8%.

  12. In-situ containment of buried waste at Brookhaven National Laboratory

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dwyer, B.P. [Sandia National Labs., Albuquerque, NM (United States); Heiser, J. [Brookhaven National Lab., Upton, NY (United States); Stewart, W.; Phillips, S. [Applied Geotechnical Engineering and Construction, Inc., Richland, WA (United States)

    1997-12-31

    The primary objective of this project was to further develop close-coupled barrier technology for the containment of subsurface waste or contaminant migration. A close-coupled barrier is produced by first installing a conventional cement grout curtain followed by a thin inner lining of a polymer grout. The resultant barrier is a cement polymer composite that has economic benefits derived from the cement and performance benefits from the durable and chemically resistant polymer layer. The technology has matured from a regulatory investigation of issues concerning barriers and barrier materials to a pilot-scale, multiple individual column injections at Sandia National Labs (SNL) to full scale demonstration. The feasibility of this barrier concept was successfully proven in a full scale {open_quotes}cold test{close_quotes} demonstration at Hanford, WA. Consequently, a full scale deployment of the technology was conducted at an actual environmental restoration site at Brookhaven National Lab (BNL), Long Island, NY. This paper discusses the installation and performance of a technology deployment implemented at OU-1 an Environmental Restoration Site located at BNL.

  13. BESTIA (Brookhaven Experimental Supra-Terawatt Infrared at ATF) laser: A status report

    Science.gov (United States)

    Polyanskiy, Mikhail N.; Babzien, Marcus; Pogorelsky, Igor V.

    2017-03-01

    Development of a next-generation CO2 laser aiming at 100 TW peak power at a wavelength of 10 µm ts underway at the Brookhaven Accelerator Test Facility (ATF). A new laser facility is being deployed as part of the ATF-II upgrade. New high-pressure power amplifiers are being fabricated and assembled, while R&D continues with ATF's present 2 TW CO2 laser system. Our plan for increasing the peak laser power envisions several discrete steps in the upgrade. First will be demonstration of a 10 TW capability utilizing chirped pulse amplification, with an extended power amplifier chain filled with high-pressure isotopic gas. Further development aimed at a demonstration of 25 TW operation will require the addition of a nonlinear compressor system to shrink the pulse width below the nominal gain-bandwidth limit. These upgrades will then enable a longer-term R&D effort to achieve the 100 TW goal. Over the last two years, significant R&D effort has been focused on the development of chirped-pulse amplification, the study of the behavior of optical materials under the action of high-peak-power mid-IR pulses, and the optimization of the beam quality, which is required for nonlinear pulse compression. The results of this R&D have been implemented into the ongoing operation of the ATF's CO2 laser and have already benefited our users in their experimental programs.

  14. Higher-order-mode absorbers for energy recovery linac cryomodules at Brookhaven National Laboratory

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    H. Hahn

    2010-12-01

    Full Text Available Several future accelerator projects at Brookhaven for the Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider (RHIC are based on energy recovery linacs (ERLs with high-charge high-current electron beams. Their stable operation mandates effective higher-order-mode (HOM damping. The development of HOM dampers for these projects is pursued actively at this laboratory. Strong HOM damping was experimentally demonstrated both at room and at superconducting (SC temperatures in a prototype research and development (R&D five-cell niobium superconducting rf (SRF cavity with ferrite dampers. Two room-temperature mock-up five-cell copper cavities were used to study various damper configurations with emphasis on capacitive antenna dampers. An innovative type of ferrite damper over a ceramic break for an R&D SRF electron gun also was developed. For future SRF linacs longer cryomodules comprised of multiple superconducting cavities with reasonably short intercavity transitions are planned. In such a configuration, the dampers, located closer to the cavities, will be at cryogenic temperatures; this will impose additional constraints and complications. This paper presents the results of simulations and measurements of several damper configurations.

  15. [Counseling on life style delivered during cancer secondary prevention practice: considerations after the SPRINT study experience in Florence, Mantua and Turin].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grechi, Elisa; Chellini, Elisabetta; Bellati, Cristina

    2012-01-01

    In the short paper we report the results of a workshop on the feasibility to carried out a brief counselling on smoking cessation and physical activity to female smokers attending the Italian National Health System Cervical Cancer Screening Program. The considerations derived from the midwives' experience during the recruitment of women for the SPRINT study, an intervention trial designed in order to verify the effectiveness of a standard counselling intervention on smoking cessation delivered by trained midwives in a gender-specific setting, the outpatient cervical cancer screening visits.

  16. Threat Assessment and Targeted Violence at Institutions of Higher Education: Implications for Policy and Practice Including Unique Considerations for Community Colleges

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bennett, Laura; Bates, Michael

    2015-01-01

    This article provides an overview of the research on targeted violence, including campus violence, and the implications for policy and practice at institutions of higher education. Unique challenges of threat assessment in the community college setting are explored, and an overview of an effective threat assessment policy and team at William…

  17. Stability of the Positive Mood Effect on Creativity When Task Switching, Practice Effect, and Test Item Differences Are Taken into Consideration

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tan, Chee-Seng; Qu, Li

    2015-01-01

    Although experimentally induced positive mood can generally last for 20 min and the induced mood is conducive to creative performance, it is still unclear whether the facilitation effect is stable during these 20 min. Two studies were conducted to examine this issue while controlling for the impacts of task switching, practice effect, and test…

  18. Professional Game Artists: An investigation into the primary considerations that impact upon their work, and the effects upon their creative practice

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ken Fee

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available This article represents the author’s preliminary research into an area of creative practice that he pursued for some 20 years, namely that of a full time professional computer game artist. Initially collaborating with academics as a part time lecturer and industrial consultant, for the past eight years his roles within academia have focused on developing pedagogical models of professional practice within games education. Through his interaction with students, employers and graduates, the author began to identify an area of keen personal interest – namely, the actual realities of being a professional game artist, and the potential consequences on creative practice. In identifying the constraints and influences that direct such an artist’s work, it is the intention that a broader discussion may then follow, exploring how such artists can protect their creative muse, when the evidence would suggest that many aspects of the games industry are an absolute anathema to individual expression. In addition to his own experiences and research, the author has drawn on interviews with other professionals from games development, as well as artists who work in other areas of professional artistic practice (such as Fine Art, Illustration, and Comics. In this way his intention is to identify the areas of practice common to other areas of art, while highlighting any of the more unique elements present specifically within games development itself. While there is a large body or research into game design principles and technologies, there is very little discussion that focuses on the very people that make them. It is the author’s hope that this article plays some small part in starting to redress this balance, and may help the reader to appreciate the challenges such artists face.

  19. 915-MHz Wind Profiler for Cloud Forecasting at Brookhaven National Laboratory

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jensen, M. [Brookhaven National Lab. (BNL), Upton, NY (United States); Bartholomew, M. J. [Brookhaven National Lab. (BNL), Upton, NY (United States); Giangrande, S. [Brookhaven National Lab. (BNL), Upton, NY (United States)

    2016-03-01

    When considering the amount of shortwave radiation incident on a photovoltaic solar array and, therefore, the amount and stability of the energy output from the system, clouds represent the greatest source of short-term (i.e., scale of minutes to hours) variability through scattering and reflection of incoming solar radiation. Providing estimates of this short-term variability is important for determining and regulating the output from large solar arrays as they connect with the larger power infrastructure. In support of the installation of a 37-MW solar array on the grounds of Brookhaven National Laboratory (BNL), a study of the impacts of clouds on the output of the solar array has been undertaken. The study emphasis is on predicting the change in surface solar radiation resulting from the observed/forecast cloud field on a 5-minute time scale. At these time scales, advection of cloud elements over the solar array is of particular importance. As part of the BNL Aerosol Life Cycle Intensive Operational Period (IOP), a 915-MHz Radar Wind Profiler (RWP) was deployed to determine the profile of low-level horizontal winds and the depth of the planetary boundary layer. The initial deployment mission of the 915-MHz RWP for cloud forecasting has been expanded the deployment to provide horizontal wind measurements for estimating and constraining cloud advection speeds. A secondary focus is on the observation of dynamics and microphysics of precipitation during cold season/winter storms on Long Island. In total, the profiler was deployed at BNL for 1 year from May 2011 through May 2012.

  20. 915-Mhz Wind Profiler for Cloud Forecasting at Brookhaven National Laboratory

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jensen, M. [Brookhaven National Laboratory (BNL), Upton, NY (United States); Bartholomew, M. J. [Brookhaven National Laboratory (BNL), Upton, NY (United States); Giangrande, S. [Brookhaven National Laboratory (BNL), Upton, NY (United States)

    2016-03-01

    When considering the amount of shortwave radiation incident on a photovoltaic solar array and, therefore, the amount and stability of the energy output from the system, clouds represent the greatest source of short-term (i.e., scale of minutes to hours) variability through scattering and reflection of incoming solar radiation. Providing estimates of this short-term variability is important for determining and regulating the output from large solar arrays as they connect with the larger power infrastructure. In support of the installation of a 37-MW solar array on the grounds of Brookhaven National Laboratory (BNL), a study of the impacts of clouds on the output of the solar array has been undertaken. The study emphasis is on predicting the change in surface solar radiation resulting from the observed/forecast cloud field on a 5-minute time scale. At these time scales, advection of cloud elements over the solar array is of particular importance. As part of the BNL Aerosol Life Cycle Intensive Operational Period (IOP), a 915-MHz Radar Wind Profiler (RWP) was deployed to determine the profile of low-level horizontal winds and the depth of the planetary boundary layer. The initial deployment mission of the 915-MHz RWP for cloud forecasting has been expanded the deployment to provide horizontal wind measurements for estimating and constraining cloud advection speeds. A secondary focus is on the observation of dynamics and microphysics of precipitation during cold season/winter storms on Long Island. In total, the profiler was deployed at BNL for 1 year from May 2011 through May 2012.

  1. Radar Wind Profiler for Cloud Forecasting at Brookhaven National Laboratory (BNL) Field Campaign Report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jensen, M. P. [Brookhaven National Laboratory (BNL), Upton, NY (United States); Giangrande, S. E. [Brookhaven National Laboratory (BNL), Upton, NY (United States); Bartholomew, M. J. [Brookhaven National Laboratory (BNL), Upton, NY (United States)

    2016-04-01

    The Radar Wind Profiler for Cloud Forecasting at Brookhaven National Laboratory (BNL) [http://www.arm.gov/campaigns/osc2013rwpcf] campaign was scheduled to take place from 15 July 2013 through 15 July 2015 (or until shipped for the next U.S. Department of Energy Atmospheric Radiation Measurement [ARM] Climate Research Facility first Mobile Facility [AMF1] deployment). The campaign involved the deployment of the AMF1 Scintec 915 MHz Radar Wind Profiler (RWP) at BNL, in conjunction with several other ARM, BNL and National Weather Service (NWS) instruments. The two main scientific foci of the campaign were: 1) To provide profiles of the horizontal wind to be used to test and validate short-term cloud advection forecasts for solar-energy applications and 2) to provide vertical profiling capabilities for the study of dynamics (i.e., vertical velocity) and hydrometeors in winter storms. This campaign was a serendipitous opportunity that arose following the deployment of the RWP at the Two-Column Aerosol Project (TCAP) campaign in Cape Cod, Massachusetts and restriction from participation in the Green Ocean Amazon 2014/15 (GoAmazon 2014/15) campaign due to radio-frequency allocation restriction for international deployments. The RWP arrived at BNL in the fall of 2013, but deployment was delayed until fall of 2014 as work/safety planning and site preparation were completed. The RWP further encountered multiple electrical failures, which eventually required several shipments of instrument power supplies and the final amplifier to the vendor to complete repairs. Data collection began in late January 2015. The operational modes of the RWP were changed such that in addition to collecting traditional profiles of the horizontal wind, a vertically pointing mode was also included for the purpose of precipitation sensing and estimation of vertical velocities. The RWP operated well until the end of the campaign in July 2015 and collected observations for more than 20 precipitation

  2. TWENTY-YEAR PLANNING STUDY FOR THE RELATIVISTIC HEAVY ION COLLIDER FACILITY AT BROOKHAVEN NATIONAL LABORATORY.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    LUDLAM,T.ET AL.

    2003-12-31

    At the request of DOE's Office of Nuclear Physics (ONP), Brookhaven National Laboratory (BNL) has created this planning document to assemble and summarize a planning exercise that addresses the core scientific thrust of the Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider (RHIC) for the next twenty years and the facilities operation plan that will support this program. The planning work was carried out by BNL in close collaboration with the RHIC user community and within budgetary guidelines for the next five years supplied by the ONP. The resulting plans were reviewed by the BNL High Energy and Nuclear Physics Program Advisory Committee (PAC) at a special RHIC planning meeting held in December 2003. Planning input from each of the four RHIC experimental collaborations was absolutely central to the preparation of this overall Laboratory plan. Each collaboration supplied two key documents, a five-year ''Beam Use Proposal'' and a ten-year ''Decadal Plan''. These plans are posted on the BNL website http://www.bnl.gov/henp/, along with other planning documents germane to this paper, such as the complete written reports from the August and December 2003 PAC meetings that considered the five-year and decadal planning documents of the four RHIC collaborations and offered advice and commentary on these plans. Only in these collaboration documents can the full physics impact of the RHIC program be seen and the full scope of the efforts put into this planning process be appreciated. For this reason, the maximum value of the present planning paper can only be realized by making frequent reference to the collaboration documents.

  3. Molecular Pathology and Personalized Medicine: The Dawn of a New Era in Companion Diagnostics—Practical Considerations about Companion Diagnostics for Non-Small-Cell-Lung-Cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Till Plönes

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Companion diagnostics (CDx have become a major tool in molecular pathology and assist in therapy decisions in an increasing number of various cancers. Particularly, the developments in lung cancer have been most impressing in the last decade and consequently lung cancer mutation testing and molecular profiling has become a major business of diagnostic laboratories. However, it has become difficult to decide which biomarkers are currently relevant for therapy decisions, as many of the new biomarkers are not yet approved as therapy targets, remain in the status of clinical studies, or still have not left the experimental phase. The current review is focussed on those markers that do have current therapy implications, practical implications arising from the respective companion diagnostics, and thus is focused on daily practice.

  4. BROOKHAVEN NATIONAL LABORATORY SOURCE WATER ASSESSMENT FOR DRINKING WATER SUPPLY WELLS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    BENNETT,D.B.; PAQUETTE,D.E.; KLAUS,K.; DORSCH,W.R.

    2000-12-18

    The BNL water supply system meets all water quality standards and has sufficient pumping and storage capacity to meet current and anticipated future operational demands. Because BNL's water supply is drawn from the shallow Upper Glacial aquifer, BNL's source water is susceptible to contamination. The quality of the water supply is being protected through (1) a comprehensive program of engineered and operational controls of existing aquifer contamination and potential sources of new contamination, (2) groundwater monitoring, and (3) potable water treatment. The BNL Source Water Assessment found that the source water for BNL's Western Well Field (comprised of Supply Wells 4, 6, and 7) has relatively few threats of contamination and identified potential sources are already being carefully managed. The source water for BNL's Eastern Well Field (comprised of Supply Wells 10, 11, and 12) has a moderate number of threats to water quality, primarily from several existing volatile organic compound and tritium plumes. The g-2 Tritium Plume and portions of the Operable Unit III VOC plume fall within the delineated source water area for the Eastern Well Field. In addition, portions of the much slower migrating strontium-90 plumes associated with the Brookhaven Graphite Research Reactor, Waste Concentration Facility and Building 650 lie within the Eastern source water area. However, the rate of travel in the aquifer for strontium-90 is about one-twentieth of that for tritium and volatile organic compounds. The Laboratory has been carefully monitoring plume migration, and has made adjustments to water supply operations. Although a number of BNL's water supply wells were impacted by VOC contamination in the late 1980s, recent routine analysis of water samples from BNL's supply wells indicate that no drinking water standards have been reached or exceeded. The high quality of the water supply strongly indicates that the operational and engineered

  5. Proceedings of RIKEN BNL Research Center Workshop: Brookhaven Summer Program on Nucleon Spin Physics

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Aschenauer, A.; Qiu, Jianwei; Vogelsang, W.; Yuan, F.

    2011-08-02

    Understanding the structure of the nucleon is of fundamental importance in sub-atomic physics. Already the experimental studies on the electro-magnetic form factors in the 1950s showed that the nucleon has a nontrivial internal structure, and the deep inelastic scattering experiments in the 1970s revealed the partonic substructure of the nucleon. Modern research focuses in particular on the spin and the gluonic structure of the nucleon. Experiments using deep inelastic scattering or polarized p-p collisions are carried out in the US at the CEBAF and RHIC facilities, respectively, and there are other experimental facilities around the world. More than twenty years ago, the European Muon Collaboration published their first experimental results on the proton spin structure as revealed in polarized deep inelastic lepton-nucleon scattering, and concluded that quarks contribute very little to the proton's spin. With additional experimental and theoretical investigations and progress in the following years, it is now established that, contrary to naive quark model expectations, quarks and anti-quarks carry only about 30% of the total spin of the proton. Twenty years later, the discovery from the polarized hadron collider at RHIC was equally surprising. For the phase space probed by existing RHIC experiments, gluons do not seem to contribute any to the proton's spin. To find out what carries the remaining part of proton's spin is a key focus in current hadronic physics and also a major driving force for the new generation of spin experiments at RHIC and Jefferson Lab and at a future Electron Ion Collider. It is therefore very important and timely to organize a series of annual spin physics meetings to summarize the status of proton spin physics, to focus the effort, and to layout the future perspectives. This summer program on 'Nucleon Spin Physics' held at Brookhaven National Laboratory (BNL) on July 14-27, 2010 [http://www.bnl.gov/spnsp/] is the

  6. Towards an automated virtual slide screening: theoretical considerations and practical experiences of automated tissue-based virtual diagnosis to be implemented in the Internet

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bzdyl Piotr

    2006-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Aims To develop and implement an automated virtual slide screening system that distinguishes normal histological findings and several tissue – based crude (texture – based diagnoses. Theoretical considerations Virtual slide technology has to handle and transfer images of GB Bytes in size. The performance of tissue based diagnosis can be separated into a a sampling procedure to allocate the slide area containing the most significant diagnostic information, and b the evaluation of the diagnosis obtained from the information present in the selected area. Nyquist's theorem that is broadly applied in acoustics, can also serve for quality assurance in image information analysis, especially to preset the accuracy of sampling. Texture – based diagnosis can be performed with recursive formulas that do not require a detailed segmentation procedure. The obtained results will then be transferred into a "self-learning" discrimination system that adjusts itself to changes of image parameters such as brightness, shading, or contrast. Methods Non-overlapping compartments of the original virtual slide (image will be chosen at random and according to Nyquist's theorem (predefined error-rate. The compartments will be standardized by local filter operations, and are subject for texture analysis. The texture analysis is performed on the basis of a recursive formula that computes the median gray value and the local noise distribution. The computations will be performed at different magnifications that are adjusted to the most frequently used objectives (*2, *4.5, *10, *20, *40. The obtained data are statistically analyzed in a hierarchical sequence, and in relation to the clinical significance of the diagnosis. Results The system has been tested with a total of 896 lung cancer cases that include the diagnoses groups: cohort (1 normal lung – cancer; cancer subdivided: cohort (2 small cell lung cancer – non small cell lung cancer; non small cell lung

  7. The Spanish Society of Neurology's official clinical practice guidelines for epilepsy. Special considerations in epilepsy: comorbidities, women of childbearing age, and elderly patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mauri Llerda, J A; Suller Marti, A; de la Peña Mayor, P; Martínez Ferri, M; Poza Aldea, J J; Gomez Alonso, J; Mercadé Cerdá, J M

    2015-10-01

    The characteristics of some population groups (patients with comorbidities, women of childbearing age, the elderly) may limit epilepsy management. Antiepileptic treatment in these patients may require adjustments. We searched articles in Pubmed, clinical practice guidelines for epilepsy, and recommendations by the most relevant medical societies regarding epilepsy in special situations (patients with comorbidities, women of childbearing age, the elderly). Evidence and recommendations are classified according to the prognostic criteria of Oxford Centre of Evidence-Based Medicine (2001) and the European Federation of Neurological Societies (2004) for therapeutic interventions. Epilepsy treatment in special cases of comorbidities must be selected properly to improve efficacy with the fewest side effects. Adjusting antiepileptic medication and/or hormone therapy is necessary for proper seizure management in catamenial epilepsy. Exposure to antiepileptic drugs (AED) during pregnancy increases the risk of birth defects and may affect fetal growth and/or cognitive development. Postpartum breastfeeding is recommended, with monitoring for adverse effects if sedative AEDs are used. Finally, the elderly are prone to epilepsy, and diagnostic and treatment characteristics in this group differ from those of other age groups. Although therapeutic limitations may be more frequent in older patients due to comorbidities, they usually respond better to lower doses of AEDs than do other age groups. Copyright © 2014 Sociedad Española de Neurología. Published by Elsevier España, S.L.U. All rights reserved.

  8. Disorders related to sexuality and gender identity in the ICD-11: revising the ICD-10 classification based on current scientific evidence, best clinical practices, and human rights considerations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reed, Geoffrey M; Drescher, Jack; Krueger, Richard B; Atalla, Elham; Cochran, Susan D; First, Michael B; Cohen-Kettenis, Peggy T; Arango-de Montis, Iván; Parish, Sharon J; Cottler, Sara; Briken, Peer; Saxena, Shekhar

    2016-10-01

    In the World Health Organization's forthcoming eleventh revision of the International Classification of Diseases and Related Health Problems (ICD-11), substantial changes have been proposed to the ICD-10 classification of mental and behavioural disorders related to sexuality and gender identity. These concern the following ICD-10 disorder groupings: F52 Sexual dysfunctions, not caused by organic disorder or disease; F64 Gender identity disorders; F65 Disorders of sexual preference; and F66 Psychological and behavioural disorders associated with sexual development and orientation. Changes have been proposed based on advances in research and clinical practice, and major shifts in social attitudes and in relevant policies, laws, and human rights standards. This paper describes the main recommended changes, the rationale and evidence considered, and important differences from the DSM-5. An integrated classification of sexual dysfunctions has been proposed for a new chapter on Conditions Related to Sexual Health, overcoming the mind/body separation that is inherent in ICD-10. Gender identity disorders in ICD-10 have been reconceptualized as Gender incongruence, and also proposed to be moved to the new chapter on sexual health. The proposed classification of Paraphilic disorders distinguishes between conditions that are relevant to public health and clinical psychopathology and those that merely reflect private behaviour. ICD-10 categories related to sexual orientation have been recommended for deletion from the ICD-11. © 2016 World Psychiatric Association.

  9. Epigenetic considerations in aquaculture

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mackenzie R. Gavery

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available Epigenetics has attracted considerable attention with respect to its potential value in many areas of agricultural production, particularly under conditions where the environment can be manipulated or natural variation exists. Here we introduce key concepts and definitions of epigenetic mechanisms, including DNA methylation, histone modifications and non-coding RNA, review the current understanding of epigenetics in both fish and shellfish, and propose key areas of aquaculture where epigenetics could be applied. The first key area is environmental manipulation, where the intention is to induce an ‘epigenetic memory’ either within or between generations to produce a desired phenotype. The second key area is epigenetic selection, which, alone or combined with genetic selection, may increase the reliability of producing animals with desired phenotypes. Based on aspects of life history and husbandry practices in aquaculture species, the application of epigenetic knowledge could significantly affect the productivity and sustainability of aquaculture practices. Conversely, clarifying the role of epigenetic mechanisms in aquaculture species may upend traditional assumptions about selection practices. Ultimately, there are still many unanswered questions regarding how epigenetic mechanisms might be leveraged in aquaculture.

  10. Treinamento físico: considerações práticas e científicas Physical training: scientific and practical considerations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hamilton Roschel

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available O treinamento físico é uma importante área de atuação profissional da Educação Física e do Esporte. Ela tem por objetivo precípuo, a melhoria do desempenho físico-esportivo através da aplicação de um processo organizado e sistemático composto por exercícios físicos. Nos últimos anos, os progressos tecnológicos e nos métodos de investigação científica nas diferentes subáreas relacionadas ao treinamento físico trouxeram um avanço significativo na obtenção deste objetivo. Neste artigo será discutido, do ponto de vista acadêmico-científico e também da prática profissional, o estado da arte do conhecimento associado à avaliação do treinamento, ao controle da carga de treinamento, aos modelos de organização da carga de treinamento e ao desenvolvimento das capacidades motoras. Esperamos que ao final, o leitor possa ter um bom entendimento destes diferentes componentes, como eles contribuem para a modificação do desempenho motor e como aplicá-los para a elaboração, implementação, avaliação e reformulação de programas de treinamento físico.Physical training is an important field of work for the Physical Education and Sport professional. Its main goal is to develop the physical capacity and sports performance of an individual by means of an organized and systematic application of physical exercises. In the past years, the technological progress in the scientific investigation within the different disciplines related to physical training have contributed a great deal towards the accomplishment of such goal. In this manuscript we discuss, from both an academic-scientific and from a practical application point-of-view, the state of the art of the knowledge associated with the physical training evaluation, loading control, loading scheming, and the development of physical abilities. Our goal is to provide a comprehensive overview of the different components of the physical training and how they contribute to

  11. REVIEW OF PRACTICE FOR DEEPLY EMBEDDED/BURIED NPP STRUCTURES SUBJECT TO SEISMIC LOADINGS.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    XU,J.HOFMAYER,C.MILLER,C.GRAVES,H.

    2004-03-24

    Motivated by many design considerations, several conceptual designs for advanced reactors have proposed that the entire reactor building and a significant portion of the steam generator building will be either partially or completely embedded below grade. For the analysis of seismic events, the soil-structure interaction (SSI) effect and passive earth pressure for these types of deeply embedded structures will have a significant influence on the predicted seismic response. Sponsored by the US Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC), Brookhaven National Laboratory (BNL) is carrying out a research program to assess the significance of these proposed design features for advanced reactors, and to evaluate the existing analytical methods to determine their applicability and adequacy in capturing the seismic behavior of the proposed designs. This paper summarizes a literature review performed by BNL to determine the state of knowledge and practice for seismic analyses of deeply embedded and/or buried (DEB) nuclear containment type structures. Included in the paper is BNL's review of the open literature of existing standards, tests, and practices that have been used in the design and analysis of DEB structures. The paper also provides BNL's evaluation of available codes and guidelines with respect to seismic design practice of DEB structures. Based on BNL's review, a discussion is provided to highlight the applicability of the existing technologies for seismic analyses of DEB structures and to identify gaps that may exist in knowledge and potential issues that may require better understanding and further research.

  12. Mass isotopomer analysis: theoretical and practical considerations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, W N; Byerley, L O; Bergner, E A; Edmond, J

    1991-08-01

    A theory of mass isotopomer analysis based on the well-known principle of isotope dilution mass spectrometry is reviewed. An algorithm for the determination of isotope incorporation into a metabolic substrate from a labeled precursor using mass isotopomer analysis is presented. The steps include the determination of the contribution of the derivatization reagent to the observed spectrum of the derivatized substrate and the correction of contribution from 13C natural abundance using multiple linear regression analysis. Examples of the application of this theory to determine the spectrum of the trimethylsilyl derivative of the 'pure unlabeled' or mononuclidic cholesterol, and the calculation of mass isotopomer distribution in cholesterol due to tracer incorporation using this 'pure unlabeled' spectrum, are also provided.

  13. Diuretics in heart failure: practical considerations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Basraon, Jagroop; Deedwani, Prakash C

    2012-09-01

    This review discusses the role of diuretics in heart failure by focusing on different classifications and mechanisms of action. Pharmacodynamic and pharmacokinetic properties of diuretics are elucidated. The predominant discussion highlights the use of loop diuretics, which are the most commonly used drugs in heart failure. Different methods of using this therapy in different settings along with a comprehensive review of the side-effect profile are highlighted. Special situations necessitating adjustment and the phenomenon of diuretic resistance are explained. Copyright © 2012. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  14. Organ Donor Recognition: Practical and Ethical Considerations

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Y.J. de Groot (Yorick)

    2012-01-01

    textabstractThe brain dead patient is the ideal multiorgan donor. Conditions that can lead to the state of brain death are limited. A subarachnoid haemorrhage, intracerebral haemorrhage or traumatic brain injury precede in 83% of the cases the state of brain death. Because of better prevention and

  15. Life-cycle costing: Practical considerations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eisenberger, I.; Lorden, G.

    1977-01-01

    The history and methodology of life-cycle costing are presented and analyzed, contrasting the potential benefits of the technique with the difficulties of its application. Examples and a short survey of the literature are given.

  16. Risk assessment and optimization (ALARA) analysis for the environmental remediation of Brookhaven National Laboratory`s hazardous waste management facility

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dionne, B.J.; Morris, S.C. III; Baum, J.W. [and others

    1998-01-01

    The Department of Energy`s (DOE) Office of Environment, Safety, and Health (EH) sought examples of risk-based approaches to environmental restoration to include in their guidance for DOE nuclear facilities. Extensive measurements of radiological contamination in soil and ground water have been made at Brookhaven National Laboratory`s Hazardous Waste Management Facility (HWMF) as part of a Comprehensive Environmental Response, Compensation and Liability Act (CERCLA) remediation process. This provided an ideal opportunity for a case study. This report provides a risk assessment and an {open_quotes}As Low as Reasonably Achievable{close_quotes} (ALARA) analysis for use at other DOE nuclear facilities as an example of a risk-based decision technique. This document contains the Appendices for the report.

  17. Risk assessment and optimization (ALARA) analysis for the environmental remediation of Brookhaven National Laboratory`s hazardous waste management facility

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dionne, B.J.; Morris, S. III; Baum, J.W. [and others

    1998-03-01

    The Department of Energy`s (DOE) Office of Environment, Safety, and Health (EH) sought examples of risk-based approaches to environmental restoration to include in their guidance for DOE nuclear facilities. Extensive measurements of radiological contamination in soil and ground water have been made at Brookhaven National Laboratory`s Hazardous Waste Management Facility (HWMF) as part of a Comprehensive Environmental Response, Compensation and Liability Act (CERCLA) remediation process. This provided an ideal opportunity for a case study. This report provides a risk assessment and an {open_quotes}As Low as Reasonably Achievable{close_quotes} (ALARA) analysis for use at other DOE nuclear facilities as an example of a risk-based decision technique.

  18. Brookhaven Regional Energy Facility Siting Model (REFS): model development and application

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Meier, P.; Hobbs, B.; Ketcham, G.; McCoy, M.; Stern, R.

    1979-06-01

    A siting methodology developed specifically to bridge the gap between regional-energy-system scenarios and environmental transport models is documented. Development of the model is described in Chapter 1. Chapter 2 described the basic structure of such a model. Additional chapters on model development cover: generation, transmission, demand disaggregation, the interface to other models, computational aspects, the coal sector, water resource considerations, and air quality considerations. These subjects comprise Part I. Part II, Model Applications, covers: analysis of water resource constraints, water resource issues in the New York Power Pool, water resource issues in the New England Power Pool, water resource issues in the Pennsylvania-Jersey-Maryland Power Pool, and a summary of water resource constraint analysis. (MCW)

  19. Modelling Practice

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Cameron, Ian; Gani, Rafiqul

    2011-01-01

    requirements; model construction; model solution; model verification; model validation and finally model deployment and maintenance. Within the adopted methodology, each step is discussedthrough the consideration of key issues and questions relevant to the modelling activity. Practical advice, based on many...

  20. The RaDIATE High-Energy Proton Materials Irradiation Experiment at the Brookhaven Linac Isotope Producer Facility

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ammigan, Kavin; et al.

    2017-05-01

    The RaDIATE collaboration (Radiation Damage In Accelerator Target Environments) was founded in 2012 to bring together the high-energy accelerator target and nuclear materials communities to address the challenging issue of radiation damage effects in beam-intercepting materials. Success of current and future high intensity accelerator target facilities requires a fundamental understanding of these effects including measurement of materials property data. Toward this goal, the RaDIATE collaboration organized and carried out a materials irradiation run at the Brookhaven Linac Isotope Producer facility (BLIP). The experiment utilized a 181 MeV proton beam to irradiate several capsules, each containing many candidate material samples for various accelerator components. Materials included various grades/alloys of beryllium, graphite, silicon, iridium, titanium, TZM, CuCrZr, and aluminum. Attainable peak damage from an 8-week irradiation run ranges from 0.03 DPA (Be) to 7 DPA (Ir). Helium production is expected to range from 5 appm/DPA (Ir) to 3,000 appm/DPA (Be). The motivation, experimental parameters, as well as the post-irradiation examination plans of this experiment are described.

  1. Magnet design for the splitter/combiner regions of CBETA, the Cornell-Brookhaven Energy-Recovery-Linac Test Accelerator

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Crittendon, J. A. [Cornell Lab. for Accelerator-Based Sciences and Education, Ithaca, NY (United States); Burke, D. C. [Cornell Lab. for Accelerator-Based Sciences and Education, Ithaca, NY (United States); Fuentes, Y. L.P. [Cornell Lab. for Accelerator-Based Sciences and Education, Ithaca, NY (United States); Mayes, C. E. [Cornell Lab. for Accelerator-Based Sciences and Education, Ithaca, NY (United States); Smolenski, K. W. [Cornell Lab. for Accelerator-Based Sciences and Education, Ithaca, NY (United States)

    2017-01-06

    The Cornell-Brookhaven Energy-Recovery-Linac Test Accelerator (CBETA) will provide a 150-MeV electron beam using four acceleration and four deceleration passes through the Cornell Main Linac Cryomodule housing six 1.3-GHz superconducting RF cavities. The return path of this 76-m-circumference accelerator will be provided by 106 fixed-field alternating-gradient (FFAG) cells which carry the four beams of 42, 78, 114 and 150 MeV. Here we describe magnet designs for the splitter and combiner regions which serve to match the on-axis linac beam to the off-axis beams in the FFAG cells, providing the path-length adjustment necessary to energy recovery for each of the four beams. The path lengths of the four beamlines in each of the splitter and combiner regions are designed to be adapted to 1-, 2-, 3-, and 4-pass staged operations. Design specifi- cations and modeling for the 24 dipole and 32 quadrupole electromagnets in each region are presented. The CBETA project will serve as the first demonstration of multi-pass energy recovery using superconducting RF cavities with FFAG cell optics for the return loop.

  2. RADIATION MEASUREMENTS BY BROOKHAVEN NATIONAL LABORATORY DURING THE WOODS HOLE OCEANOGRAPHIC INSTITUTION INTERCOMPARISON STUDY, MAY-JUNE 2000.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    REYNOLDS, R.M.; BARTHOLOMEW, M.J.; MILLER, M.A.; SMITH, S.; EDWARDS, R.

    2000-12-01

    The WHOI buoy radiometer intercomparison took place during May and June, 2000 at the WHOI facility. The WHOI IMET, JAMSTEC Triton, and NOAA TAO buoy systems were operated from a beach site and the Brookhaven National Laboratory set up two Portable Radiation Package systems (P01 and P02) alongside the WHOI instrumentation on the roof of the Clark Building, about 300 m away. The BNL instruments were named ''P01'' and ''P02'' and were identical. Buoy instruments were all leveled to {+-}1{degree} to horizontal. The purpose of the project was to compare the buoy systems with precision measurements so that any differences in data collection or processing would be evaluated. BNL was pleased to participate so the PRP system could be evaluated as a calibration tool. The Portable Radiation Package is an integral component of the BNL Shipboard Oceanographic and Atmospheric Radiation (SOAR) system. It is designed to make accurate downwelling radiation measurements, including the three solar irradiance components (direct normal, diffuse and global) at six narrowband channels, aerosol optical depth measurements, and broadband longwave and shortwave irradiance measurements.

  3. Celiac disease - nutritional considerations

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... this page: //medlineplus.gov/ency/article/002443.htm Celiac disease - nutritional considerations To use the sharing features on this page, please enable JavaScript. Celiac disease is an immune disorder passed down through families. ...

  4. Dental Treatment Considerations

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... 5. Plasma Exchange (Plasmapheresis) • If the patient’s exchange protocol involves the use of anticoagulants (blood thinners), including ... should be used with caution to avoid respiratory depression. DENTAL TREATMENT CONSIDERATIONS The MGFA mission is to ...

  5. CSEWG SYMPOSIUM, A CSWEG RETROSPECTIVE. 35TH ANNIVERSARY CROSS SECTION EVALUATION WORKING GROUP, NOV. 5, 2001, BROOKHAVEN NATIONAL LABORATORY.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    DUNFORD, C.; HOLDEN, N.; PEARLSTEIN, S.

    2001-11-05

    This publication has been prepared to record some of the history of the Cross Section Evaluation Working Group (CSEWG). CSEWG is responsible for creating the evaluated nuclear data file (ENDF/B) which is widely used by scientists and engineers who are involved in the development and maintenance of applied nuclear technologies. This organization has become the model for the development of nuclear data libraries throughout the world. The data format (ENDF) has been adopted as the international standard. On November 5, 2001, a symposium was held at Brookhaven National Laboratory to celebrate the 50 th meeting of the CSEWG organization and the 35 th anniversary of its first meeting in November 1966. The papers presented in this volume were prepared by present and former CSEWG members for presentation at the November 2001 symposium. All but two of the presentations are included. I have included an appendix to list all of the CSEWG members and their affiliations, which has been compiled from the minutes of each of the CSEWG meetings. Minutes exist for all meetings except the 4 th meeting held in January 1968. The list includes 348 individuals from 71 organizations. The dates for each of the 50 CSEWG meetings are listed. The committee structure and chairmen of all committees and subcommittees are also included in the appendix. This volume is dedicated to three individuals whose foresight and talents made CSEWG possible and successful. They are Henry Honeck who lead the effort to develop the ENDF format and the CSEWG system, Ira Zartman, the Atomic Energy Commission program manager who provided the programmatic direction and support, and Sol Pearlstein who led the development of the CESWG organization and the ENDF/B evaluated nuclear data library.

  6. Striving Toward Energy Sustainability: How Plants Will Play a Role in Our Future (453rd Brookhaven Lecture)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ferrieri, Richard A. (Ph.D., Medical Department)

    2009-10-28

    Edible biomass includes sugars from sugar cane or sugar beets, starches from corn kernels or other grains, and vegetable oils. The fibrous, woody and generally inedible portions of plants contain cellulose, hemicellulose and lignin, three key cell-wall components that make up roughly 70 percent of total plant biomass. At present, starch can readily be degraded from corn grain into glucose sugar, which is then fermented into ethanol, and an acre of corn can yield roughly 400 gallons of ethanol. In tapping into the food supply to solve the energy crisis, however, corn and other crops have become more expensive as food. One solution lies in breaking down other structural tissues of plants, including the stalks and leaves of corn, grasses and trees. However, the complex carbohydrates in cellulose-containing biomass are more difficult to break down and convert to ethanol. So researchers are trying to engineer plants having optimal sugars for maximizing fuel yield. This is a challenge because only a handful of enzymes associated with the more than 1,000 genes responsible for cell-wall synthesis have had their roles in controlling plant metabolism defined. As Richard Ferrieri, Ph.D., a leader of a biofuel research initiative within the Medical Department, will discuss during the 453rd Brookhaven Lecture, he and his colleagues use short-lived radioisotopes, positron emission tomography and biomarkers that they have developed to perform non-invasive, real time imaging of whole plants. He will explain how the resulting metabolic flux analysis gives insight into engineering plant metabolism further.

  7. [Revised practice guideline 'Anaemia in midwifery practice'

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Beentjes, M.; Jans, S.M.P.J.

    2012-01-01

    The practice guideline of the Royal Dutch Organization of Midwives 'Anaemia in primary care midwifery practice' published in 2000, has recently been revised. The revised guideline takes physiological haemodilution during pregnancy into consideration and provides gestation specific reference values

  8. Tuberous sclerosis Anaesthetic considerations

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    QuickSilver

    Tuberous sclerosis. Anaesthetic considerations. Tuberous sclerosis. Tuberous sclerosis(TS) was first described by Bourneville in. 1880.1 TS is said to be one of the commonest autosomal domi- nant diseases. Epidemiological studies report an incidence rang- ing between1:10000 to 1:170000.2,3 Two gene loci have been ...

  9. Energy-related perturbations of the northeast coastal zone: five years (1974-1979) of oceanographic research at Brookhaven National Laboratory

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Walsh, J.J.

    1980-03-01

    Since inception of oceanographic research at Brookhaven National Laboratory in 1974, over 75 cruises and 150 papers and reports have been completed. In comparison of shelf ecosystems at high, mid, and low latitudes, an understanding of the natural variability of US coastal waters has been derived. Annual carbon and nitrogen budgets suggest that the energy flow is diverted to a pelagic food web in summer-fall and a demersal food web in winter-spring within the Mid-Atlantic Bight. The impact of energy-related perturbations can now be assessed within the context of natural oscillation of the coastal food web.

  10. Self-Assembly by Instruction: Designing Nanoscale Systems Using DNA-Based Approaches (474th Brookhaven Lecture)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gang, Oleg [Center for Functional Nanomaterials

    2012-01-18

    In the field of nanoscience, if you can control how nanoparticles self-assemble in particular structures — joining each other, for example, as molecules can form, atom-by-atom — you can design new materials that have unique properties that industry needs. Nature already uses the DNA genetic code to instruct the building of specific proteins and whole organisms in both plants and people. Taking a cue from nature, scientists at BNL devised a way of using strands of synthetic DNA attached to the surface of nanoparticles to instruct them to self-assemble into specific nanoscale structures, clusters, and three-dimensional organizations. Novel materials designed and fabricated this way promise use in photovoltaics, energy storage, catalysis, cell-targeted systems for more effective medical treatments, and biomolecular sensing for environmental monitoring and medical applications. To find out more about the rapid evolution of this nanoassembly method and its applications, join Physicist Oleg Gang of the Center for Functional Nanomaterials (CFN) as he gives the 474th Brookhaven Lecture, titled “Self-Assembly by Instruction: Designing Nanoscale Systems Using DNA-Based Approaches." Gang, who has led this work at the CFN, will explain the rapid evolution of this nanoassembly method, and discuss its present and future applications in highly specific biosensors, optically active nano-materials, and new ways to fabricate complex architectures in a rational manner via self-assembly. Gang and his colleagues used the CFN and the National Synchrotron Light Source (NSLS) facilities to perform their groundbreaking research. At the CFN, the scientists used electron microscopes and optical methods to visualize the clusters that they fabricated. At the NSLS, they applied x-rays to study a particles-assembly process in solution, DNA’s natural environment. Gang earned a Ph.D. in soft matter physics from Bar-Ilan University in 2000, and he was a Rothschild Fellow at Harvard

  11. Application of the SmartSampling Methodology to the Evaluation of Contaminated Landscape Soils at Brookhaven National Laboratory

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    RAUTMAN,CHRISTOPHER A.

    2000-08-01

    Portions of the SmartSampling{trademark} analysis methodology have been applied to the evaluation of radioactive contaminated landscape soils at Brookhaven National Laboratory. Specifically, the spatial, volumetric distribution of cesium-137 ({sup 137}Cs) contamination within Area of Concern 16E-1 has been modeled probabilistically using a geostatistical methodology, with the purpose of identifying the likelihood of successfully reducing, with respect to a pre-existing, baseline remediation plan, the volume of soil that must be disposed of offsite during clean-up. The principal objective of the analysis was to evaluate the likelihood of successful deployment of the Segmented Gate System (SGS), a novel remediation approach that emphasizes real-time separation of clean from contaminated materials during remediation operations. One primary requirement for successful application of the segmented gate technology investigated is that a variety of contaminant levels exist at the deployment site, which would enable to the SGS to discriminate material above and below a specified remediation threshold value. The results of this analysis indicate that there is potential for significant volume reduction with respect to the baseline remediation plan at a threshold excavation level of 23 pCi/g {sup 137}Cs. A reduction of approximately 50%, from a baseline volume of approximately 1,064.7 yd{sup 3} to less than 550 yd{sup 3}, is possible with acceptance of only a very small level of engineering risk. The vast majority of this volume reduction is obtained by not excavating almost all of levels 3 and 4 (from 12 to 24 inches in depth), which appear to be virtually uncontaminated, based on the available data. Additional volume reductions related to soil materials on levels 1 (depths of 0--6 inches) and 2 (6--12 inches) may be possible, specifically through use of the SGS technology. Level-by-level evaluation of simulation results suggests that as much as 26 percent of level 1 and as

  12. Proceedings of RIKEN BNL Research Center Workshop: Brookhaven Summer Program on Quarkonium Production in Elementary and Heavy Ion Collisions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dumitru, A.; Lourenco, C.; Petreczky, P.; Qiu, J., Ruan, L.

    2011-08-03

    Understanding the structure of the hadron is of fundamental importance in subatomic physics. Production of heavy quarkonia is arguably one of the most fascinating subjects in strong interaction physics. It offers unique perspectives into the formation of QCD bound states. Heavy quarkonia are among the most studied particles both theoretically and experimentally. They have been, and continue to be, the focus of measurements in all high energy colliders around the world. Because of their distinct multiple mass scales, heavy quarkonia were suggested as a probe of the hot quark-gluon matter produced in heavy-ion collisions; and their production has been one of the main subjects of the experimental heavy-ion programs at the SPS and RHIC. However, since the discovery of J/psi at Brookhaven National Laboratory and SLAC National Accelerator Laboratory over 36 years ago, theorists still have not been able to fully understand the production mechanism of heavy quarkonia, although major progresses have been made in recent years. With this in mind, a two-week program on quarkonium production was organized at BNL on June 6-17, 2011. Many new experimental data from LHC and from RHIC were presented during the program, including results from the LHC heavy ion run. To analyze and correctly interpret these measurements, and in order to quantify properties of the hot matter produced in heavy-ion collisions, it is necessary to improve our theoretical understanding of quarkonium production. Therefore, a wide range of theoretical aspects on the production mechanism in the vacuum as well as in cold nuclear and hot quark-gluon medium were discussed during the program from the controlled calculations in QCD and its effective theories such as NRQCD to various models, and to the first principle lattice calculation. The scientific program was divided into three major scientific parts: basic production mechanism for heavy quarkonium in vacuum or in high energy elementary collisions; the

  13. Water Quality Considerations and Related Dishwashing Problems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McClelland, Nina I.

    A number of the chemical and physical factors which cause dishwashing problems are presented in a series of charts. Water quality considerations are vital, but the importance of good housekeeping and proper operating practices cannot and must not be minimized. Topics discussed include--(1) dissolved minerals, (2) dissolved gases, (3) detergents,…

  14. Design considerations for space flight hardware

    Science.gov (United States)

    Glover, Daniel

    1990-01-01

    The environmental and design constraints are reviewed along with some insight into the established design and quality assurance practices that apply to low earth orbit (LEO) space flight hardware. It is intended as an introduction for people unfamiliar with space flight considerations. Some basic data and a bibliography are included.

  15. 32 CFR 310.15 - General considerations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... PROGRAM DOD PRIVACY PROGRAM Collecting Personal Information § 310.15 General considerations. (a) Collect directly from the individual. Collect to the greatest extent practicable personal information directly from... for program integrity and national security when information about an individual is disclosed outside...

  16. Conversion Therapy: Ethical Considerations in Family Counseling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Steigerwald, Fran; Janson, Gregory R.

    2003-01-01

    Explores the ethical and practical considerations of conversion therapy when counseling families and individuals within families with gay, lesbian, bisexual, and transsexual concerns. Emphasis is placed on the need for counselors to assess personal biases in the area of working with sexual minorities. Presents a reflective exercise and case study…

  17. Brookhaven highlights 1994

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1994-12-31

    Established in 1947 on Long Island, New York, on the site of the former army Camp Upton, BNL is a multidisciplinary laboratory that carries out basic and applied research in the physical, biomedical and environmental sciences and in selected energy technologies. The Laboratory is managed by Associated Universities, Inc., under contract to the US Department of Energy. BNL`s annual budget is about $400 million, and the Laboratory`s facilities are valued at replacements cost in excess of over $2.8 billion. Employees number around 3,300,and over 4,000 guests, collaborators and students come each year to use the Laboratory`s facilities and work with the staff. Scientific and technical achievements at BNL have made their way into daily life in areas as varied as health care, construction materials and video games. The backbone of these developments is fundamental research, which is and always will be an investment in the future.

  18. Educational Neuroscience: Neuroethical Considerations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lalancette, Helene; Campbell, Stephen R.

    2012-01-01

    Research design and methods in educational neuroscience involve using neuroscientific tools such as brain image technologies to investigate cognitive functions and inform educational practices. The ethical challenges raised by research in social neuroscience have become the focus of neuroethics, a sub-discipline of bioethics. More specifically…

  19. Genetic markers as a predictive tool based on statistics in medical practice: ethical considerations through the analysis of the use of HLA-B27 in rheumatology in France

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hélène eColineaux

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available INTRODUCTION. The use of genetic predictive markers in medical practice does not necessarily bear the same kind of medical and ethical consequences than that of genes directly involved in monogenic diseases. However, the French bioethics law framed in the same way the production and use of any genetic information. It seems therefore necessary to explore the practical and ethical context of the actual use of predictive markers in order to highlight their specific stakes. In this study, we document the uses of HLA-B*27, which are an interesting example of the multiple features of genetic predictive marker in general medical practice.MATERIAL & METHODS. The aims of this monocentric and qualitative study were to identify concrete and ethical issues of using the HLA-B*27 marker and the interests and limits of the legal framework as perceived by prescribers. In this regard, a thematic and descriptive analysis of five rheumatologists’ semi-structured and face-to-face interviews was performed.RESULTS. According to most of the interviewees, HLA-B*27 is an overframed test because they considered that this test is not really genetic or at least does not have the same nature as classical genetic tests; HLA-B*27 is not concerned by the ethical challenges of genetic test; the major ethics stake of this marker is not linked to its genetic nature but rather to the complexity of the probabilistic information. This study allows also showing that HLA-B*27, validated for a certain usage, may be used in different ways in practice.DISCUSSION. This marker and its clinical uses underline the challenges of translating both statistical concepts and unifying legal framework in clinical practice. This study allows identifying some new aspects and stakes of genetics in medicine and shows the need of additional studies about the use of predictive genetic markers, in order to provide a better basis for decisions and legal framework regarding these practices.

  20. SPS cost considerations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Woodcock, G. R.

    1978-01-01

    Recent solar power satellite (SPS) system definition studies have emphasized cost estimation for the operational phase of an SPS program, in order to assess economic practicality of SPS. A cost analysis approach is described. Cost results for a silicon photovoltaic SPS are reported, showing SPS costs from $1700 to $2700 per kilowatt and busbar power costs from 3 cents to 7 cents per kilowatt-hour. Rationales behind the estimates are discussed.

  1. The Importance of Elaboration in the Lesson of Mathematics from the Viewpoint of Vygotsky Development Theory : Through Consideration of the Practice of the Multiplication in Second Grade at Elementary School

    OpenAIRE

    小池, 嘉志

    2016-01-01

    In lessons of mathematics at elementary and second junior schools, problem solving is considered as effective and well-practiced method in Japan. Neriage is core of the process of problem solving, which is the process of expanding on some of the ideas from students, discussing and refining them. In this paper, the author described the lesson of multiplication in second grade at elementary school and analyzed it based upon the Vygotsky's development theory. It is found that Negiage is necessar...

  2. Specific Considerations for LGBT Eldercare

    OpenAIRE

    Claassen, Ashley

    2014-01-01

    The LGBT community has changed considerably in numbers, awareness, and acceptance in the past few decades. Due to the growing number of LGBT elderly, special considera-tions must be taken into account in planning their care. This study aimed at showcasing considerations that should be taken into account when planning elderly care and future elderly living arrangements. The research questions used were (a) are there special considerations for LGBT seniors? and (b), if so, what are the cons...

  3. Local Anesthetics: Review of Pharmacological Considerations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Becker, Daniel E; Reed, Kenneth L

    2012-01-01

    Local anesthetics have an impressive history of efficacy and safety in medical and dental practice. Their use is so routine, and adverse effects are so infrequent, that providers may understandably overlook many of their pharmacotherapeutic principles. The purpose of this continuing education article is to provide a review and update of essential pharmacology for the various local anesthetic formulations in current use. Technical considerations will be addressed in a subsequent article. PMID:22822998

  4. Manufacturability considerations for DSA

    Science.gov (United States)

    Farrell, Richard A.; Hosler, Erik R.; Schmid, Gerard M.; Xu, Ji; Preil, Moshe E.; Rastogi, Vinayak; Mohanty, Nihar; Kumar, Kaushik; Cicoria, Michael J.; Hetzer, David R.; DeVilliers, Anton

    2014-03-01

    Implementation of Directed Self-Assembly (DSA) as a viable lithographic technology for high volume manufacturing will require significant efforts to co-optimize the DSA process options and constraints with existing work flows. These work flows include established etch stacks, integration schemes, and design layout principles. The two foremost patterning schemes for DSA, chemoepitaxy and graphoepitaxy, each have their own advantages and disadvantages. Chemoepitaxy is well suited for regular repeating patterns, but has challenges when non-periodic design elements are required. As the line-space polystyrene-block-polymethylmethacrylate chemoepitaxy DSA processes mature, considerable progress has been made on reducing the density of topological (dislocation and disclination) defects but little is known about the existence of 3D buried defects and their subsequent pattern transfer to underlayers. In this paper, we highlight the emergence of a specific type of buried bridging defect within our two 28 nm pitch DSA flows and summarize our efforts to characterize and eliminate the buried defects using process, materials, and plasma-etch optimization. We also discuss how the optimization and removal of the buried defects impacts both the process window and pitch multiplication, facilitates measurement of the pattern roughness rectification, and demonstrate hard-mask open within a back-end-of-line integration flow. Finally, since graphoepitaxy has intrinsic benefits in terms of design flexibility when compared to chemoepitaxy, we highlight our initial investigations on implementing high-chi block copolymer patterning using multiple graphoepitaxy flows to realize sub-20 nm pitch line-space patterns and discuss the benefits of using high-chi block copolymers for roughness reduction.

  5. Regulatory considerations for biosimilars

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ranjani Nellore

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Currently there is considerable interest in the legislative debate around generic biological drugs or "biosimilars" in the EU and US due to the large, lucrative market that it offers to the industry. While some countries have issued a few regulatory guidelines as well as product specific requirements, there is no general consensus as to a single, simple mechanism similar to the bioequivalence determination that leads to approval of generic small molecules all over the world. The inherent complex nature of the molecules, along with complicated manufacturing and analytical techniques to characterize them make it difficult to rely on a single human pharmacokinetic study for assurance of safety and efficacy. In general, the concept of comparability has been used for evaluation of the currently approved "similar" biological where a step by step assessment on the quality, preclinical and clinical aspects is made. In India, the focus is primarily on the availability and affordability of life-saving drugs. In this context every product needs to be evaluated on its own merit irrespective of the innovator brand. The formation of the National Biotechnology Regulatory Authority may provide a step in the right direction for regulation of these complex molecules. However, in order to have an efficient machinery for initial approval and ongoing oversight with a country-specific focus, cooperation with international authorities for granting approvals and continuous risk-benefit review is essential. Several steps are still needed for India to be perceived as a country that leads the world in providing quality biological products.

  6. Structural considerations for the practical development of primary shielding of X-ray rooms of megavoltage; Consideracoes estruturais para o desenvolvimento pratico da blindagem primaria de salas de raios-x de megavoltagem

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lava, Deise D.; Borges, Diogo da S.; Affonso, Renato R.W.; Moreira, Maria de L.; Guimaraes, Antonio C.F., E-mail: deise_dy@hotmail.com, E-mail: diogosb@outlook.com, E-mail: raoniwa@yahoo.com.br, E-mail: malu@ien.gov.br, E-mail: tony@ien.gov.br [Instituto de Engenharia Nuclear (IEN/CNEN-RJ), Rio de Janeiro, RJ (Brazil)

    2014-07-01

    Due to the necessity of the use of accelerators with voltages above 10 MV in medical facilities, becomes necessary to evaluate the efficiency of the thickness of shielding materials used in rooms that contain these devices. This work presents the development of an algorithm able to provide data in a practical way, regarding the thickness of materials that can be used for an effective shielding against primary beams from these equipment. The use of the computer language C ++ allowed developing a practical tool for determining the thickness of materials required to protect the public and Individuals Occupationally Exposed (IOEs) against major powers beams. Furthermore, it was considered by calculations Intensity Modulated Radiotherapy Technique (IMRT). The construction of this tool was based to ensure the dose limits established in the CNEN-NN-3.01. The dose limiting is done through the use of loops able to validate the efficiency of thickness determined by the algorithm itself, and ensure if the radiation dose exceeds the limits set by the standard, it will be the inclusion of sufficient Half-Reducer Layers in so that the dose is within the parameters established by the Brazilian National Nuclear Energy Commission (CNEN). The code validation is performed by comparing results obtained in the examples p recalculated in the NCRP Report-151 (Structural Shielding Design and Evaluation for megavoltage X and Gamma-Ray Radiotherapy Facilities) with the results generated by the code. The results are satisfactory and consistent with that report.

  7. Prenatal nutrition: special considerations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cox, J T; Phelan, S T

    2009-10-01

    Awareness of the importance of nutrition during pregnancy has increased in recent years.Pregnancy outcomes vary by prepregnant weight as well as gestational weight gain. Inappropriate gain may have both short- and long-term consequences for mother and infant. This review article includes the newly released US Institute of Medicine prenatal weight gain guidelines, as well as the Dietary Reference Intakes for the US and selected European societies.Food safety topics are discussed including Listeria, Toxoplasma, peanuts, mercury and other contaminants. Preconceptual nutrition is discussed, as are specific at-risk prenatal nutrients, including folic acid, choline, vitamin B12, omega-3 fatty acids, iodine, calcium, vitamin D, and iron. Current controversies are discussed and practical suggestions are given to safely optimize nutrient intake. As part of the medical team, a local Registered Dietitian or other nutrition professional can give much more detailed guidance and support for a pregnant woman given her particular risk factors, including her pre-existing medical conditions and cultural concerns, and will emphasize nutritional quality rather than just pounds gained.

  8. Impact of genetic structures on haploid genome-based quantification of genetically modified DNA: theoretical considerations, experimental data in MON 810 maize kernels (Zea mays L.) and some practical applications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, David; Corlet, Aurélie; Fouilloux, Stephane

    2008-06-01

    Real-time Polymerase Chain Reaction (PCR) based assays are widely used to estimate the content of genetically modified (GM) materials in food, feed and seed. It has been known that the genetic structures of the analyte can significantly influence the GM content expressed by the haploid genome (HG) % estimated using real-time PCR assays; this kind of influence is also understood as the impact of biological factors. The influence was first simulated at theoretical level using maize as a model. We then experimentally assessed the impact of biological factors on quantitative results, analysing by quantitative real-time PCR six maize MON 810 hybrid kernels with different genetic structures: (1) hemizygous from transgenic male parent, (2) hemizygous from transgenic female parent and (3) homozygous at the transgenic locus. The results obtained in the present study showed clear influences of biological factors on GM DNA quantification: 1% of GM materials by weight (wt) for the three genetic structures contained 0.39, 0.55 and 1.0% of GM DNA by HG respectively, from quantitative real-time PCR analyses. The relationships between GM wt% and GM HG% can be empirically established as: (1) in the case of the presence of a single GM trait: GM HG% = GM wt% x (0.5 +/- 0.167Y), where Y is the endosperm DNA content (%) in the total DNA of a maize kernel, (2) in the case of the presence of multiple GM traits: GM HG% = N x GM wt% x (0.5 +/- 0.167Y), where N is the number of GM traits (stacked or not) present in an unknown sample. This finding can be used by stakeholders related to GMO for empirical prediction from one unit of expression to another in the monitoring of seed and grain production chains. Practical equations have also been suggested for haploid copy number calculations, using hemizygous GM materials for calibration curves.

  9. Ethical Considerations in Technology Transfer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Froehlich, Thomas J.

    1991-01-01

    Examines ethical considerations involved in the transfer of appropriate information technology to less developed countries. Approaches to technology are considered; two philosophical frameworks for studying ethical considerations are discussed, i.e., the Kantian approach and the utilitarian perspective by John Stuart Mill; and integration of the…

  10. Advanced LBB methodology and considerations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Olson, R.; Rahman, S.; Scott, P. [Battelle, Columbus, OH (United States)] [and others

    1997-04-01

    LBB applications have existed in many industries and more recently have been applied in the nuclear industry under limited circumstances. Research over the past 10 years has evolved the technology so that more advanced consideration of LBB can now be given. Some of the advanced considerations for nuclear plants subjected to seismic loading evaluations are summarized in this paper.

  11. Clinical and regulatory considerations in pharmacogenetic testing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schuck, Robert N; Marek, Elizabeth; Rogers, Hobart; Pacanowski, Michael

    2016-12-01

    Both regulatory science and clinical practice rely on best available scientific data to guide decision-making. However, changes in clinical practice may be driven by numerous other factors such as cost. In this review, we reexamine noteworthy examples where pharmacogenetic testing information was added to drug labeling to explore how the available evidence, potential public health impact, and predictive utility of each pharmacogenetic biomarker impacts clinical uptake. Advances in the field of pharmacogenetics have led to new discoveries about the genetic basis for variability in drug response. The Food and Drug Administration recognizes the value of pharmacogenetic testing strategies and has been proactive about incorporating pharmacogenetic information into the labeling of both new drugs and drugs already on the market. Although some examples have readily translated to routine clinical practice, clinical uptake of genetic testing for many drugs has been limited. Both regulatory science and clinical practice rely on data-driven approaches to guide decision making; however, additional factors are also important in clinical practice that do not impact regulatory decision making, and these considerations may result in heterogeneity in clinical uptake of pharmacogenetic testing. Copyright © 2016 by the American Society of Health-System Pharmacists, Inc. All rights reserved.

  12. Justification and radiology: some ethical considerations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sia, Santiago

    2009-07-01

    This paper, which seeks to address the issue of justification in radiology, intends firstly to comment on the current discussion of the ethical foundation of radiological practice that focuses on the move from utilitarianism to the rights-centred criterion. Secondly, and this constitutes the bulk of the paper, it aims to offer a philosophical perspective, which is hoped will lead to a consideration of certain specific areas in ethical decision-making in the attempts here to deal with the main issue of justification in radiology.

  13. Paediatricians, social media and blogs: Ethical considerations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    St-Laurent-Gagnon, Thérèse; Coughlin, Kevin W

    2012-05-01

    The use of blogs, Facebook and similar social networking sites is rapidly expanding and, when compared with e-mail, may be having a significantly different impact on the traditional doctor-patient relationship. Characteristics specific to these online platforms have major implications for professional relationships, including the 'Facebook effect' (the relative permanence of postings) and the 'online disinhibition effect'. The present practice point illustrates relevant ethical considerations and provides guidance to paediatricians and others concerning the prudent professional and personal use of social networking media.

  14. Report on summary results of the inspection of issues regarding the scope of the accident investigation of the TRISTAN Fire at the Brookhaven National Laboratory

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1996-03-01

    The subject final report is provided to inform you of our findings and recommendations concerning our review of issues regarding the scope of the accident investigation of a March 31, 1994, fire at the Terrific Reactor Isotope Separator To Analyze Nuclides (TRISTAN) experiment at the Department of Energy (DOE) Brookhaven National Laboratory (BNL), Upton, New York. The Chicago Operations Office (CH) Manager appointed a Type B Accident Investigation Board (Board) to investigate the fire. In a June 16, 1994, letter to the Inspector General, DOE, the CH Manager requested the Inspector General to look into an allegation by a former Board member that senior Chicago management consciously violated the requirements of DOE Order 5484.1, {open_quotes}Environmental Protection, Safety, And Health Protection Information Reporting Requirements,{close_quotes} in attempting to control the investigation. The former Board member alleged that there was not a clear verbal agreement among the Board members regarding the focus of the scope of the investigation. He said that the Board Chairman wanted to focus on the physical causes of the fire, while he (the former Board member) believed that the Board should focus on the apparent management deficiencies that allowed TRISTAN to operate without a proper safety analysis and in violation of DOE orders for so many years.

  15. A Fast, Versatile Nanoprobe for Complex Materials: The Sub-micron Resolution X-ray Spectroscopy Beamline at NSLS-II (491st Brookhaven Lecture)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Thieme, Juergen [BNL Photon Sciences Directorate

    2014-02-06

    Time is money and for scientists who need to collect data at research facilities like Brookhaven Lab’s National Synchrotron Light Source (NSLS), “beamtime” can be a precious commodity. While scanning a complex material with a specific technique and standard equipment today would take days to complete, researchers preparing to use brighter x-rays and the new sub-micron-resolution x-ray spectroscopy (SRX) beamline at the National Synchrotron Light Source II (NSLS-II) could scan the same sample in greater detail with just a few hours of beamtime. Talk about savings and new opportunities for researchers! Users will rely on these tools for locating trace elements in contaminated soils, developing processes for nanoparticles to deliver medical treatments, and much more. Dr. Thieme explains benefits for next-generation research with spectroscopy and more intense x-rays at NSLS-II. He discusses the instrumentation, features, and uses for the new SRX beamline, highlighting its speed, adjustability, and versatility for probing samples ranging in size from millimeters down to the nanoscale. He will talk about complementary beamlines being developed for additional capabilities at NSLS-II as well.

  16. Ethical considerations in cardiovascular prevention.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Follath, F

    2009-12-01

    patients and healthy subjects for the general population seen in everyday practice? Increasingly, the economic aspects of long-term prevention and problems of a fair allocation of limited healthcare resources are also important issues giving rise to contrasting views among patients, doctors, insurance providers and politicians. What are the priorities and who should decide? Ethical considerations relating to the above questions in CV prevention are discussed in this article.

  17. PROCEEDINGS OF RIKEN BNL RESEARCH CENTER WORKSHOP ON BARYON DYNAMICS AT RHIC, MARCH 28-30, 2002, BROOKHAVEN NATIONAL LABORATORY.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    GYULASSY,M.; KHARZEEV,D.; XU,N.

    2002-03-28

    One of the striking observations at RHIC is the large valence baryon rapidity density observed at mid rapidity in central Au+Au at 130 A GeV. There are about twice as many valence protons at mid-rapidity than predicted based on extrapolation from p+p collisions. Even more striking PHENIX observed that the high pt spectrum is dominated by baryons and anti-baryons. The STAR measured event anisotropy parameter v2 for lambdas are as high as charged particles at pt {approx} 2.5 GeV/c. These are completely unexpected based on conventional pQCD parton fragmentation phenomenology. One exciting possibility is that these observables reveal the topological gluon field origin of baryon number transport referred to as baryon junctions. Another is that hydrodynamics may apply up to high pt in A+A. There is no consensus on what are the correct mechanisms for producing baryons and hyperons at high pt and large rapidity shifts and the new RHIC data provide a strong motivation to hold a meeting focusing on this class of observables. The possible role of junctions in forming CP violating domain walls and novel nuclear bucky-ball configurations would also be discussed. In this workshop, we focused on all measured baryon distributions at RHIC energies and related theoretical considerations. To facilitate the discussions, results of heavy ion collisions at lower beam energies, results from p+A /p+p/e+e collisions were included. Some suggestions for future measurements have been made at the workshop.

  18. Practical considerations for adaptive trial design and implementation

    CERN Document Server

    Pinheiro, José; Kuznetsova, Olga

    2014-01-01

    This edited volume is a definitive text on adaptive clinical trial designs from creation and customization to utilization. As this book covers the full spectrum of topics involved in the adaptive designs arena, it will serve as a valuable reference for researchers working in industry, government and academia. The target audience is anyone involved in the planning and execution of clinical trials, in particular, statisticians, clinicians, pharmacometricians, clinical operation specialists, drug supply managers, and infrastructure providers.  In spite of the increased efficiency of adaptive trials in saving costs and time, ultimately getting drugs to patients sooner, their adoption in clinical development is still relatively low.  One of the chief reasons is the higher complexity of adaptive design trials as compared to traditional trials. Barriers to the use of clinical trials with adaptive features include the concerns about the integrity of study design and conduct, the risk of regulatory non-acceptance, t...

  19. Optical fiber sensors for medical applications: practical engineering considerations

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Heijmans, J.A.C.; Cheng, L.K.; Wieringa, F.P.

    2008-01-01

    The advantages of optical fibers as medical sensors are recognized world wide nowadays. Insensitivity to electromagnetic disturbances and relative small dimensions are the most well known properties. The advantages of fiber optic sensors are especially valuable within environments with high

  20. Ethical considerations in dental laser research, education, and practice

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goldstein, Alan T.; Coluzzi, Donald J.; Sulewski, John G.; White, Joel M.

    1995-05-01

    This presentation addresses the interplay between commerce and conscience. The relationship between industry and academia must be free of both true and apparent conflict of interest. Obviously, the matter is of great importance, since as scientists and clinicians, our integrity is our most valuable asset. This is no less true for the manufacturers of dental laser technology. Ethics, then, is a bottom-line issue for all concerned. Often, in spite of good intentions, there has been no clear-cut policy on this issue. Occasionally, when there has been policy, there has been no mechanism for implementation. Universities have conflict-of-interest requirements, while industry and others in the profession do not. In the academic sphere, we are obligated to be open, thorough, honest and scrupulous in our research and educational activities. Recently, the Board of Directors of the Academy of Laser Dentistry unanimously passed a resolution clarifying their position on conflict-of-interest issues. We offer it to SPIE so that ultimately, we may face our profession and business colleagues squarely, and with full and faithful disclosure. Issues of conflict of interest, principal investigators, financial interests, and recommendations for full disclosure are presented.

  1. Practical considerations for large-scale gut microbiome studies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vandeputte, Doris; Tito, Raul Y; Vanleeuwen, Rianne; Falony, Gwen; Raes, Jeroen

    2017-08-01

    First insights on the human gut microbiome have been gained from medium-sized, cross-sectional studies. However, given the modest portion of explained variance of currently identified covariates and the small effect size of gut microbiota modulation strategies, upscaling seems essential for further discovery and characterisation of the multiple influencing factors and their relative contribution. In order to guide future research projects and standardisation efforts, we here review currently applied collection and preservation methods for gut microbiome research. We discuss aspects such as sample quality, applicable omics techniques, user experience and time and cost efficiency. In addition, we evaluate the protocols of a large-scale microbiome cohort initiative, the Flemish Gut Flora Project, to give an idea of perspectives, and pitfalls of large-scale faecal sampling studies. Although cryopreservation can be regarded as the gold standard, freezing protocols generally require more resources due to cold chain management. However, here we show that much can be gained from an optimised transport chain and sample aliquoting before freezing. Other protocols can be useful as long as they preserve the microbial signature of a sample such that relevant conclusions can be drawn regarding the research question, and the obtained data are stable and reproducible over time. © FEMS 2017.

  2. Practical considerations for large-scale gut microbiome studies

    OpenAIRE

    Vandeputte, Doris; Tito, Raul Y.; Vanleeuwen, Rianne; Falony, Gwen; Raes, Jeroen

    2017-01-01

    Abstract: First insights on the human gut microbiome have been gained from medium-sized, cross-sectional studies. However, given the modest portion of explained variance of currently identified covariates and the small effect size of gut microbiota modulation strategies, upscaling seems essential for further discovery and characterisation of the multiple influencing factors and their relative contribution. In order to guide future research projects and standardisation efforts, we here review ...

  3. Easier Said than Done: Practical Considerations in User Interface Design.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Crow, Raymond W., Jr.; Starbird, Robert F.

    1992-01-01

    Describes the redesign of a CD-ROM database interface by the Congressional Information Service (CIS) that addressed the needs of novice, casual, and expert searchers in academic libraries. Topics discussed include the user profile, the task profile, redesign goals, interaction style, menu design and implementation, system structure and the search…

  4. Policies to Enable Bioenergy Deployment: Key Considerations and Good Practices

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Smolinksi, Sharon [National Renewable Energy Lab. (NREL), Golden, CO (United States); Cox, Sadie [National Renewable Energy Lab. (NREL), Golden, CO (United States)

    2016-05-01

    Bioenergy is renewable energy generated from biological source materials, and includes electricity, transportation fuels and heating. Source materials are varied types of biomass, including food crops such as corn and sugarcane, non-edible lignocellulosic materials such as agricultural and forestry waste and dedicated crops, and municipal and livestock wastes. Key aspects of policies for bioenergy deployment are presented in this brief as part of the Clean Energy Solutions Center's Clean Energy Policy Brief Series.

  5. Practical considerations for incomplete factorization methods in reservoir simulation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Behie, A.; Forsyth, P.A.

    1983-11-01

    Various incomplete factorization (ILU) methods coupled with ORTHOMIN acceleration are discussed. These include natural, D2 and D4 orderings with several degrees of factorization, the modified factorization (MILU) and the COMBINATIVE method. These techniques can also be used with the bordered systems resulting from fully-coupled, fully-implicit multi-block wells. Test results are reported for fully implicit black oil and fully implicit thermal simulations. Some results are also reported for vector and scalar modes on the CRAY.

  6. Oral Antiplatelet Treatment in STEMI: Current Practice and Future Considerations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xanthopoulou, Ioanna; Alexopoulos, Dimitrios

    2016-01-01

    Patients with ST-segment elevation myocardial infarction represent a high-risk population and an effective antiplatelet treatment adjunctive to primary percutaneous coronary intervention is of paramount importance. This topic will review the current evidence on clinical efficacy and safety of oral antiplatelet therapy in patients with an acute ST-segment elevation myocardial infarction. Unsettled issues and future perspectives for their use in these patients are also discussed. Added to aspirin, clopidogrel, prasugrel and ticagrelor represent viable options regarding oral P2Y12 inhibition, with prasugrel and ticagrelor being preferred over clopidogrel, according to results of large randomized clinical trials. Early clinical efficacy of oral antiplatelet agents in STEMI patients has been questioned, mainly because of their delayed onset of action in the clinical setting of ST-segment elevation myocardial infarction and the recently described adverse effect of morphine on their pharmacodynamic/pharmacokinetic profile. Whether these agents should be administered beyond 1 year after the index event is also under discussion, as there is clinical evidence that prolonged administration may be associated with clinical benefit. Use of oral P2Y12 inhibitors in patients with ST-segment elevation myocardial infarction still faces questions and future research is needed to establish which, when and how should be administered in this clinical setting.

  7. Dyslexia in general practice education: considerations for recognition and support.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shrewsbury, Duncan

    2016-07-01

    Dyslexia is a common developmental learning difficulty, which persists throughout life. It is highly likely that those working in primary care will know, or even work with someone who has dyslexia. Dyslexia can impact on performance in postgraduate training and exams. The stereotypical characteristics of dyslexia, such as literacy difficulties, are often not obvious in adult learners. Instead, recognition requires a holistic approach to evaluating personal strengths and difficulties, in the context of a supportive relationship. Strategies to support dyslexic learners should consider recommendations made in formal diagnostic reports, and aim to address self-awareness and coping skills.

  8. Considerations for 21st-Century Disciplinary Policy and Practice

    Science.gov (United States)

    Englehart, Joshua M.

    2014-01-01

    While the conceiving of 21st-century schools has rightly included much discussion on curriculum and instruction, changing demands and conditions also present necessary changes in the way that student behavior is managed. A review of the literature on student discipline over the past decade reveals three particular issues that warrant attention in…

  9. Contact lens associated microbial keratitis: practical considerations for the optometrist

    OpenAIRE

    Zimmerman AB; Nixon AD; Rueff EM

    2016-01-01

    Aaron B Zimmerman, Alex D Nixon, Erin M Rueff College of Optometry, The Ohio State University, Columbus, OH, USAAbstract: Microbial keratitis (MK) is a corneal condition that encompasses several different pathogens and etiologies. While contact lens associated MK is most often associated with bacterial infections, other pathogens (fungi, Acanthamoeba species, etc) may be responsible. This review summarizes the risk factors, microbiology, diagnostic characteristics, and treatment options for a...

  10. Contact lens associated microbial keratitis: practical considerations for the optometrist

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zimmerman AB

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Aaron B Zimmerman, Alex D Nixon, Erin M Rueff College of Optometry, The Ohio State University, Columbus, OH, USAAbstract: Microbial keratitis (MK is a corneal condition that encompasses several different pathogens and etiologies. While contact lens associated MK is most often associated with bacterial infections, other pathogens (fungi, Acanthamoeba species, etc may be responsible. This review summarizes the risk factors, microbiology, diagnostic characteristics, and treatment options for all forms of contact lens-related MK.Keywords: corneal ulcer, fungal keratitis, bacterial keratitis, Acanthamoeba, Fusarium, Pseudomonas

  11. Practical Consideration of Pair Problem Solving in Computer Literacy Education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oya, Yoshihiko; Uchida, Kimiko

    2013-01-01

    Direct instruction to students enrolled in a computer literacy program at the undergraduate level frequently involves difficulties due to varied knowledge levels and skills among the students, as well as an increase in the number of unmotivated students. An available solution is the pair problem solving approach which can prove to be effective as…

  12. Practical Considerations in Financing Required Postdoctoral General Dentistry Programs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Myall, Robert W. T.

    1987-01-01

    General and specific issues to be considered in examining program financing options are discussed, including perceptions of patient needs, faculty's role in patient care, public health policy, links with the patient care delivery system, the patient mix, resident stipends, and program management alternatives. (MSE)

  13. Feed-in Tariffs: Good Practices and Design Considerations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cox, Sadie [National Renewable Energy Lab. (NREL), Golden, CO (United States); Esterly, Sean [National Renewable Energy Lab. (NREL), Golden, CO (United States)

    2016-01-02

    In recent years, feed-in tariff (FIT) activity has focused primarily on revisions to current policies, underscoring the need for stable and predictable, yet flexible, policy environments. This policy brief provides a primer on key FIT design elements, lessons from country experience, and support resources to enable more detailed and country-specific FIT policy design.

  14. SHORT REPORT Practical considerations in planning a cath-lab ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    arm 'Fast Spin' (60º per sec) acquisition all in real time. The Magnetic Navigation System (Siemens), is the first magnetic catheter navigation system of its kind in the world. The system integrates an advanced digital fluoroscopic imaging system, ...

  15. Practical Considerations of Design, Fabrication and Tests for Composite Materials,

    Science.gov (United States)

    1982-09-01

    STIFFNESS AND STRENGTH OF FIBER COMPOSITES by R.Byron Pipes 4 INTRODUCTION TO THIN LAMINATE THEORY by R.Byron Pipes ’ FRACTURE OF COMPOSITES AND DAMAGE...stable by comparison with metals or ceramics and even the most stable, like polyimlde. polyimidaple. polybenzoxazole or polyether ether ketone (PEEK...Letters 11, 190 ( 1976 ). (6) M.G. Dobb, D.J. Johnson and B.P. Saville, Supramolecular structure of a high modulus polyaromatic s fiber . J. Poly. Sci

  16. Parents' Experiences with the IEP Process: Considerations for Improving Practice

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reiman, John W.; Beck, Laura; Coppola, Teresa; Engiles, Anita

    2010-01-01

    Since 1975 active parent participation in all aspects of educational programming for students receiving special education services has been legally mandated, initially with the Education for All Handicapped Children Act (PL 94-142), then in 1990 with the Individuals with Disabilities Education Act (IDEA) (PL 102-119), and most recently with the…

  17. Some Ethical Considerations in Astronomy Research and Practice

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koepsell, David

    2012-08-01

    Research ethics as an applied field has evolved due to a number of contentious and public lapses in ethical judgment over the past hundred years. But the main principles underlying good, ethical behavior in all of the sciences are rooted in what Robert Merton calls the ethos of science. Values and virtues, including the universal nature of its underlying objects, communal nature of scientific research, the necessity for individual disinterestedness on the part of researchers, and science's nature as organized skepticism, provide a foundation for conducting ethical research. Scientific integrity, the relation between basic science and the general public, and the social role of science all argue for adopting virtues, guiding behavior, and pursing science in ways we can now characterize as ethical in themselves. Being a good scientist and doing good science overlaps significantly with being a good person.

  18. Renewable Electricity Standards: Good Practices and Design Considerations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cox, Sadie [National Renewable Energy Lab. (NREL), Golden, CO (United States); Esterly, Sean [National Renewable Energy Lab. (NREL), Golden, CO (United States)

    2016-01-02

    In widespread use globally, renewable electricity standards (RES) are one of the most widely adopted renewable energy policies and a critical regulatory vehicle to accelerate renewable energy deployment. This policy brief provides an introduction to key RES design elements, lessons from country experience, and support resources to enable more detailed and country-specific RES policy design.

  19. Mangrove restoration in Vietnam : Key considerations and a practical guide

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Marchand, M.

    2008-01-01

    In Vietnam mangrove rehabilitation has a long history and gained momentum after the war that destroyed huge forested areas, especially in the Mekong Delta. In addition, in various places mangrove have been and still are being planted specifically as a way to protect shorelines and sea-dykes from

  20. CONSIDERATIONS ON TOURIST MARKETING THEORY AND PRACTICE IN ROMANIA

    OpenAIRE

    Erika KULCSÁR

    2012-01-01

    Tourism marketing as a distinct field of marketing services has been and will certainly be a discipline that will be studied in greater depth by experts in this field of great interest. Tourist destinations lead a fierce battle to capture and maintain consumer interest in tourism products and services. For this reason tourist destinations and tourist entities operating in the tourism market should pay special attention to tourism marketing mix elements (product, price, distribution, promotion...

  1. Incentives to participate in clinical trials: practical and ethical considerations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bernstein, Steven L; Feldman, James

    2015-09-01

    Clinical trials often offer incentives to encourage individuals to enroll and to enhance follow-up. The scope and nature of incentives used in emergency department (ED)-based trials are unknown. The objective of this study is to characterize the quantity and quality of incentives and other forms of compensation used in clinical trials of human subjects recruited in US EDs. A secondary goal is to provide an historical and ethical analysis of the use of incentives in clinical trials. We reviewed English-language randomized clinical trials conducted in US EDs from 2009 to 2013. Full text of the studies was reviewed to identify whether incentives were used, their value, and timing. Funding source was noted as well. Data are presented with descriptive statistics. Of 1151 articles identified, 76 (6.6%) fit criteria for review. Of these, 7 (9.2%) provided incentive payments. A recently published eighth trial was included as well. The total cash value of incentives offered ranged from $10 to $195. Four studies offered payment at enrollment only. Incentives included cash, debit cards, and gift cards. The use of financial incentives in ED-based trials is uncommon. Studies that use incentives are generally extramurally funded, usually by a federal agency, and include waves of follow-up that continue after discharge from the ED. Payment size is modest. Incentives may improve recruitment and retention in ED-based trials, but authoritative data are lacking. Investigators need to take care to avoid incentives that may be coercive or unduly influence research participants. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  2. Behavioral addictions in addiction medicine: from mechanisms to practical considerations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Banz, Barbara C; Yip, Sarah W; Yau, Yvonne H C; Potenza, Marc N

    2016-01-01

    Recent progress has been made in our understanding of nonsubstance or "behavioral" addictions, although these conditions and their most appropriate classification remain debated and the knowledge basis for understanding the pathophysiology of and treatments for these conditions includes important gaps. Recent developments include the classification of gambling disorder as a "Substance-Related and Addictive Disorder" in the 5th edition of the Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders (DSM-5) and proposed diagnostic criteria for Internet Gaming Disorder in Section 3 of DSM-5. This chapter reviews current neuroscientific understandings of behavioral addictions and the potential of neurobiological data to assist in the development of improved policy, prevention, and treatment efforts. © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  3. Practical Considerations for Perforator Flap Thinning Procedures Revisited

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Theddeus OH Prasetyono

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available BackgroundA thin perforator flap is one of the best methods for covering defects. This study aimed to revisit and further test the rapidly advancing field of flap thinning techniques.MethodsWe performed two cadaveric studies to test the known flap thinning methods, and then applied these methods to a clinical series. In the first study, five cadavers were used to observe the anatomical relation of the perforator with the subdermal plexuses and the subcutaneous fat layer by injecting a colored latex solution. The second study was done on four cadavers independently from the first study. Last, a clinical series was performed on 15 patients.ResultsThe areolar fat lobules of 10 anterolateral thigh perforator (ALT, seven deep inferior epigastric artery perforator (DIEAP, and six thoracodorsal artery perforator (TAP flaps were dissected to reduce the flap thickness guided by the colored vascular pattern. On average, the ALT, DIEAP, and TAP flaps were reduced to 32.76%±9.76%, 37.01%±9.21%, and 35.42%±9.41%, respectively. In the second study, the areolar fat lobules were directly dissected in six ALT, six TAP, and four MSAP flaps, and an average reduction in flap thickness of 53.41%±5.64%, 52.30%±2.88%, and 47.87%±6.41%, respectively, was found. In the clinical series, 13 out of the 15 cases yielded satisfactory outcomes with an average thickness reduction of 37.91%±7.15%.ConclusionsThese multiple studies showed that the deep fat layer could be safely removed to obtain a thin yet viable perforator flap. This evidence suggests that the macroscopic flap thinning technique can achieve thin flaps. Surgeons should consider this technique before embracing the latest technique of supermicrosurgery.

  4. Basic aspects and practical considerations in retinal detachment surgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Foulds, W S

    1986-05-01

    Factors responsible for retinal attachment include structural factors such as the integrity of the retina and the interdigitation of receptor cells with the retinal pigment epithelium combined with dynamic factors which include the movement of water from the vitreous to the choroid under the influence of colloid osmotic pressure in the presence of an intact posterior blood-ocular barrier. In successful retinal detachment surgery an intact cortical vitreous is important. Retinal detachments can be subdivided into simple or complex according to the degree of vitreous abnormality present. Complex detachments demand vitreous surgery and the use of vitreous substitutes. Silicone oil may have a dual role in the eye, tamponade of retinal breaks and waterproofing of the retina with which it is in contact, so reducing transretinal water movement and lightening the load on the mechanisms responsible for retinal reattachment.

  5. On-chip antenna: Practical design and characterization considerations

    KAUST Repository

    Shamim, Atif

    2012-07-28

    This paper highlights the challenges of an emergent field, namely, on-chip antenna design. Consistent with the RF System-on-Chip (SoC) concept, co-design strategy for circuits and on-chip antennas is described. A number of design and layout issues, arising from the highly integrated nature of this kind of systems, are discussed. The characterization difficulties related to on-chip antennas radiation properties are also highlighted. Finally, a novel on-wafer test fixture is proposed to measure the gain and radiation pattern of the on-chip antennas in the anechoic chamber.

  6. CONSIDERATIONS ON TOURIST MARKETING THEORY AND PRACTICE IN ROMANIA

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Erika KULCSÁR

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available Tourism marketing as a distinct field of marketing services has been and will certainly be a discipline that will be studied in greater depth by experts in this field of great interest. Tourist destinations lead a fierce battle to capture and maintain consumer interest in tourism products and services. For this reason tourist destinations and tourist entities operating in the tourism market should pay special attention to tourism marketing mix elements (product, price, distribution, promotion, people, physical evidence, processes. A key role in assessing the tourism services offered by a certain tourist destination lies with the universities that have as "task" superior human resource training in the tourism sector. This specific element of the tourism marketing mix has a key role in creating the image of tourist destinations.

  7. Biological imprinting: Some genetic considerations

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Mohammad Saad Zaghloul Salem

    REVIEW. Biological imprinting: Some genetic considerations. Mohammad Saad Zaghloul Salem. Faculty of Medicine, Ain-Shams University, Cairo, Egypt. Received 25 May 2014; accepted 27 May 2014. Available online 21 June 2014. KEYWORDS. Genetic imprinting;. Mutations;. Re-sense mutation;. Epigenetic alterations;.

  8. Considerations for GPU SEE Testing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wyrwas, Edward J.

    2017-01-01

    This presentation will discuss the considerations an engineer should take to perform Single Event Effects (SEE) testing on GPU devices. Notable topics will include setup complexity, architecture insight which permits cross platform normalization, acquiring a reasonable detail of information from the test suite, and a few lessons learned from preliminary testing.

  9. Civic ecology practices: insights from practice theory

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marianne E. Krasny

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available Our aim was to explore the use of practice theory as an approach to studying urban environmental stewardship. Urban environmental stewardship, or civic ecology practice, contributes to ecosystem services and community well-being and has been studied using social-ecological systems resilience, property rights, communities of practice, and governance frameworks. Practice theory, which previously has been applied in studies of consumer behaviors, adds a new perspective to urban stewardship research, focusing on how elements of a practice, such as competencies, meanings, and physical resource, together define the practice. We applied practice theory to eight different civic ecology practices, including oyster gardening in New York City, a civil society group engaged in litter cleanup in Iran, and village grove restoration in South Korea. Our analysis suggests that in applying practice theory to the civic ecology context, consideration should be given to social and communication competencies, how meanings can motivate volunteers and sustain practice, and the nature of the resource that is being stewarded. Future studies may want to focus on how practice elements interact within and vary across practices and may be used to more systematically analyze and share ideas among diverse civic ecology practices.

  10. Vocabulary Considerations for Teaching Mathematics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Munroe, Eula Ewing; Panchyshyn, Robert

    1996-01-01

    Notes that vocabulary provides access to mathematical concepts and that several kinds of vocabulary--technical, subtechnical, general, and symbolic--should be taught during each lesson. Gives 13 practical suggestions for planning and implementing math vocabulary instruction. (ET)

  11. Offsetting deficit conceptualisations: methodological considerations ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    ... nature of student learning experiences in ways that accommodate the influence of various contextual realities brings researchers and their research agendas closer to offsetting deficit conceptualisation. Keywords: deficit discourses, higher education, knowledge recontextualisation, literacy practices, research design.

  12. Safety considerations in MR imaging

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kanal, E.; Shellock, F.G.; Talagala, L. (Univ. of Pittsburgh, PA (USA))

    1990-09-01

    The authors identify eight areas of potential safety concern during clinical magnetic resonance (MR) imaging. These include (a) biologic effects of the static magnetic field; (b) ferromagnetic attractive projectile effects of the static magnetic field; (c) potential effects of the relatively slowly time-varying magnetic field gradients; (d) effects of the rapidly varying radio-frequency (RF) magnetic fields, including RF power deposition concerns; (e) auditory considerations from noise caused by the rapidly pulsed magnetic field gradients; (f) safety considerations concerning superconductive systems, including quenches, use of cryogens, and cryogen storage and handling; (g) psychological effects, such as claustrophobia and anxiety induced because of the examination; and (h) possible effects of the intravenous use of the MR contrast agent gadopentetate dimeglumine. The concerns in each of these categories are elaborated upon, and the available data are presented to clarify their status.155 references.

  13. Security considerations in distributed systems

    OpenAIRE

    Rhead, Donovan Ross

    1991-01-01

    Approved for public release; distribution is unlimited This thesis investigates computer security considerations in distributed systems. In particular, it concentrates on assisting managers to gain an appreciation for what distributed systems are, and what are the inherent security issues in these systems. A survey of the literature on computer security was conducted to identify those issues unique to distributed systems. Although many controls are discussed, management must design ...

  14. Transverse vibrations of wood-based products : equations and considerations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Joseph F. Murphy

    2011-01-01

    Four equations are presented to determine bending stiffness using transverse vibration. These equations are used for constant cross-section products, panels, rectangular cross-section products, and logs with and without taper. Practical considerations for their use are discussed and concluding remarks are included.

  15. Technical and business considerations of cobalt hydrometallurgy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peek, Edgar; Åkre, Torjus; Asselin, Edouard

    2009-10-01

    Approximately 55,000 tonnes of cobalt are produced annually worldwide, which represents an estimated 1-3 billion in annual sales depending on cobalt price changes. Cobalt is a common impurity in both non-ferrous mineral sulfide and oxide processing. In this paper some business and technical considerations are presented to facilitate the decision-making process required to produce either an intermediate or a finished cobalt product via a hydrometallurgical route. Methods currently available and practiced for the recovery of cobalt are considered, and process requirements up- and down-stream associated with each chosen method are discussed. In particular, some environmental, energy, or other sustainable development implications of each process are mentioned. An outlook on the future of the cobalt industry and anticipated future trends is included.

  16. Ideological Considerations in Official Dubbing in Iran

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Masood Khoshsaligheh

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available In our globalizing world, audiovisual products are understandably considered tools that advertise their original language and culture. Most societies do not stand any interference from the outside, especially if it considerably opposes the socio-cultural norms. Translation is a practice of cross-cultural communication which most often complies with the socio-cultural guidelines and norms of the recipient society. However, translated products might face resistance as they can be regarded threatening and hostile by the ruling gatekeepers. Given the dramatic disparities between most languages and cultures, translators are not the only decision-makers and other agents have pivotal roles in the process of adapting the translated product to the dominant conventions and socio-cultural norms. This paper aims at shedding some light on the role which agents play in the process of dubbing, both for public access national television and for private home distribution. The study explores the effects of preliminary and operational norms, and cultural appropriation conducted at both textual and visual levels through a method including interview data and textual analysis. The results show that foreign movies dubbed into Persian in the religious context of the contemporary Iran are strictly controlled both before the process of dubbing and during and after the process of dubbing due to a number of socio-cultural, political, and ideological considerations.

  17. Physiology Considerations in Geriatric Patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alvis, Bret D; Hughes, Christopher G

    2015-09-01

    Physiology changes at the structural, functional, and molecular levels as people age, and every major organ system experiences physiologic change with time. The changes to the nervous system result mostly in cognitive impairments, the cardiovascular system develops higher blood pressures with lower cardiac output, the respiratory system undergoes a reduction of arterial oxyhemoglobin levels, the gastrointestinal system experiences delayed gastric emptying and reduction of hepatic metabolism, and the renal system experiences a diminished glomerular filtration rate. Combined, these changes create a complex physiologic condition. This unique physiology must be taken into consideration for geriatric patients undergoing general anesthesia. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  18. Considerations Regarding Students’ Social Protection

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Iuliana Cenar

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available The paper entitled “Considerations Regarding Students’ Social Protection” addresses the main forms of support offered to students and their families, divided in relation to the aim pursued, which may be relate to stimulating students’ performance and discipline, material and financial support (social assistance, supplementing family income. For these components there were taken into account: the circumstances in which it acquires to status of beneficiary, evolutionary dimensions in terms of beneficiary numbers, the amounts awarded, the need to ensure the complementarities with the informal side of social protection.

  19. Preliminary considerations concerning actinide solubilities

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Newton, T.W.; Bayhurst, B.P.; Daniels, W.R.; Erdal, B.R.; Ogard, A.E.

    1980-01-01

    Work at the Los Alamos Scientific Laboratory on the fundamental solution chemistry of the actinides has thus far been confined to preliminary considerations of the problems involved in developing an understanding of the precipitation and dissolution behavior of actinide compounds under environmental conditions. Attempts have been made to calculate solubility as a function of Eh and pH using the appropriate thermodynamic data; results have been presented in terms of contour maps showing lines of constant solubility as a function of Eh and pH. Possible methods of control of the redox potential of rock-groundwater systems by the use of Eh buffers (redox couples) is presented.

  20. Teaming with Brookhaven National Laboratory

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yang, G. [Brookhaven National Lab. (BNL), Upton, NY (United States)

    2017-06-06

    BNL has started growing CdZnTeSe crystals for room-temperature radiation detector applications. The addition of Se to CdTe reduces the concentration of secondary phases and sub-grain boundary networks. The addition of Zn increases the energy band gap. Material characterization to understand the limiting factors of radiation detection material and to improve the properties continues to be a core element of an extensive R&D program at the LBNL’s ALS and BNL’s NSLS-II synchrotron facilities. ALS’s Beamline 3.3.2 is available for 60% of its beamtime and allows us to perform both White Beam X-ray Diffraction Topography and Micron Scale X-ray Detector Mapping. The latter technique is extremely useful when measuring scintillators because it allows us to subtract contributions from the variability in the counting statistics, and also the fluctuations due to delta electrons, and non-proportionality. BNL has recently developed a new type of thermal neutron detector using pad technology in combination with 3He gas operated in ionization mode. The new detector is used for coded aperture thermal neutron imaging.

  1. Psychological considerations in revision rhinoplasty.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ambro, Bryan T; Wright, Richard J

    2008-08-01

    Revision rhinoplasty is a unique challenge. In addition to the technical considerations that are inherently more difficult than those of primary cases, the surgeon must also be mindful of the psychological considerations that revision rhinoplasty presents. These patients are by definition unhappy with their prior rhinoplasty experience, and this perception of a suboptimal result is both legitimate and real, even if the surgeon is not in agreement. Tantamount to any intraoperative technique, the preoperative ability of the surgeon to sift through the myriad psychological and psychosocial issues is critical to achieving satisfactory outcomes for both patient and surgeon. Reasons for dissatisfaction with a primary surgery, reasons for seeking revision surgery, and the psychological profiles of revision rhinoplasty patients can differ from those related to other facial cosmetic procedures. This article attempts to provide the reader with a better understanding of the complex interplay of these issues and with this understanding help the reader to distinguish one who is a favorable surgical candidate from one who is best left unrevised.

  2. Considerations for climate intervention research

    Science.gov (United States)

    Duren, R. M.

    2015-12-01

    Action to mitigate greenhouse gas emissions is essential for addressing rapid environmental change in the Earth's polar regions. However, the potential for threshold crossing events in polar climate elements with untenable consequences for society and ecosystems may motivate consideration of additional "climate interventions". A recent National Research Council study identified risks and research needs associated with global scale intervention options such as atmospheric carbon removal and albedo modification. In addition to the issues raised by the NRC panel, any serious study of climate interventions would likely transcend the traditional scope of earth system science. Current observational systems are not designed to detect, attribute or monitor climate intervention attempts and would warrant significant augmentation. Potential field experiments to improve scientific understanding of albedo modification options would likely span a huge range of physical scales, material and energy (some in-family with established atmospheric research but others that would be wholly unprecedented). Targeted interventions focused on polar climate elements have received even less study than global-scale intervention and their consideration could present unique challenges. Finally, research priorities have not yet been informed by any strategy or scenarios about where and when climate interventions might fit in society's portfolio of climate responses.

  3. Mechanical considerations and design skills.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Alvis, Robert L.

    2008-03-01

    The purpose of the report is to provide experienced-based insights into design processes that will benefit designers beginning their employment at Sandia National Laboratories or those assuming new design responsibilities. The main purpose of this document is to provide engineers with the practical aspects of system design. The material discussed here may not be new to some readers, but some of it was to me. Transforming an idea to a design to solve a problem is a skill, and skills are similar to history lessons. We gain these skills from experience, and many of us have not been fortunate enough to grow in an environment that provided the skills that we now need. I was fortunate to grow up on a farm where we had to learn how to maintain and operate several different kinds of engines and machines. If you are like me, my formal experience is partially based upon the two universities from which I graduated, where few practical applications of the technologies were taught. What was taught was mainly theoretical, and few instructors had practical experience to offer the students. I understand this, as students have their hands full just to learn the theoretical. The practical part was mainly left up to 'on the job experience'. However, I believe it is better to learn the practical applications early and apply them quickly 'on the job'. System design engineers need to know several technical things, both in and out of their field of expertise. An engineer is not expected to know everything, but he should know when to ask an expert for assistance. This 'expert' can be in any field, whether it is in analyses, drafting, machining, material properties, testing, etc. The best expert is a person who has practical experience in the area of needed information, and consulting with that individual can be the best and quickest way for one to learn. If the information provided here can improve your design skills and save one design from having a problem

  4. Considerations for an exercise prescription

    Science.gov (United States)

    Convertino, Victor A.

    1989-01-01

    A number of past and most recent research findings that describe some of the physiological responses to exercise in man and their relationship with exposure to various gravitational environments are discussed. Most of the data pertain to adaptations of the cardiovascular and body fluid systems. It should be kept in mind that the data from studies on microgravity simulation in man include exposures of relatively short duration (5 hours to 14 days). However, it is argued that the results may provide important guidelines for the consideration of many variables which are pertinent to the development of exercise prescription for long-duration space flight. The following considerations for exercise prescriptions during long-duration space flight are noted: (1) Relatively high aerobic fitness and strength, especially of the upper body musculature, should be a criterion for selection of astronauts who will be involved in EVA, since endurance and strength appear to be predominant characteristics for work performance. (2) Some degree of upper body strength will probably be required for effective performance of EVA. However, the endurance and strength required by the upper body for EVA can probably be obtained through preflight exercise prescription which involves swimming. (3) Although some degree of arm exercise may be required to maintain preflight endurance and strength, researchers propose that regular EVA will probably be sufficient to maintain the endurance and strength required to effectively perform work tasks during space flight. (4) A minimum of one maximal aerobic exercise every 7 to 10 days during space flight may be all that is necessary for maintenance of normal cardiovascular responsiveness and replacement of body fluids for reentry following prolonged space flight. (5) The possible reduction in the amount of exercise required for maintenance of cardiovascular system and body fluids in combination with the use of electromyostimulation (EMS) or methods other

  5. Modern Dance: A Historical Consideration

    OpenAIRE

    Huxley, Michael

    2016-01-01

    HUXLEY, M. (1983) Early European modern dance. In: ADSHEAD, J. & LAYSON J. (eds.) Dance history: A methodology for study. London: Dance Books pp. 147-161. HUXLEY, M. (1988) A history of a dance: An analysis of Dark Elegies from written criticism. In: ADSHEAD, J. (ed.) Dance analysis: Theory and practice. London: Dance Books. pp. 141-160, 196-198. HUXLEY, M. (1994) European early modern dance. In: ADSHEAD-LANSDALE, J. & LAYSON, J. (eds.) Dance history: An introduction. London: Dance ...

  6. Seismic survey considerations in glaciology

    OpenAIRE

    Hofstede, Coen

    2015-01-01

    Seismic surveying of glaciers give both englacial and subglacial physical information and is as such an important tool in glaciology. In comparison with the collection of radar data, mainly performed from airborne platforms, seismic data acquisition is a time consuming process practiced in small survey areas and used less frequent. Over the last six years, AWI developed an effective strategy to collect seismic data on glaciers, ice sheets and ice shelves, at a high production rate with a smal...

  7. Design considerations for slurry bioreactors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zappi, M.E. [Army Corps of Engineers, Vicksburg, MS (United States). Waterways Experiment Station; Banerji, S.K.; Bajpai, R.K. [Univ. of Missouri, Columbia, MO (United States)

    1994-12-31

    Slurry treatment is an innovative approach for bioremediation of contaminated soils under controlled conditions of pH, temperature, and nutrients. This treatment of excavated soils permits better control of environmental conditions than in landfarming, composting, and biocell units, and therefore may achieve accelerated rates of decontamination. Bioslurry reactors have been used to remediate a variety of contaminants, such as soils and sludges from refinery wastes, wood-preserving wastes, wastes containing polychlorinated biphenyls and halogenated solvents. Key considerations in design of such reactors involve meeting the oxygen requirements for biodegradation, preventing the settling of soil particles, efficient mixing of additives, and control of foaming. The aspects of reactor design, specifically agitation system have been discussed in this paper.

  8. Cultural variation: considerations and implications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cohen, D

    2001-07-01

    Cultural systems vary widely across the world. Partly this is due to different cultures' occupying different ecological and environmental niches. But partly it is due to similar circumstances giving rise to multiple stable equilibriums, each with a distinct cultural form. Using insights and examples from various fields, this article illustrates the way that multiple equilibriums can emerge and the forces that push a culture toward one equilibrium point or another. Considerations of game theory principles, mutual interdependence, historical circumstance, dependence on initial conditions, and crucial choice points are highlighted in discussing the ways humans create and re-create their culture. Cultural traits develop within physical, social, intracultural, and intercultural niches, and implications of this for how culture might be studied and the benefits of combining an "equilibrium" perspective and a "meaning" perspective are discussed.

  9. Biosimilars: Considerations for Oncology Nurses
.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vizgirda, Vida; Jacobs, Ira

    2017-04-01

    Biosimilars are developed to be highly similar to and treat the same conditions as licensed biologics. As they are approved and their use becomes more widespread, oncology nurses should be aware of their development and unique considerations. This article reviews properties of biosimilars; their regulation and approval process; the ways in which their quality, safety, and efficacy are evaluated; their postmarketing safety monitoring; and their significance to oncology nurses and oncology nursing.
. A search of PubMed and regulatory agency websites was conducted for references related to the development and use of biosimilars in oncology. 
. Because biologics are large, structurally complex molecules, biosimilars cannot be considered generic equivalents to licensed biologic products. Consequently, regulatory approval for biosimilars is different from approval for small-molecule generics. Oncology nurses are in a unique position to educate themselves, other clinicians, and patients and their families about biosimilars to ensure accurate understanding, as well as optimal and safe use, of biosimilars.

  10. [Occult child abuse (opinions, considerations, personal observations)].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paci, A; Migliaccio, P; Paci, G

    1999-01-01

    At the beginning of the statement the authors point out some lesser aspects of child's ill-treatment (previously suggested by them in other occasions) as expressions of very strict educational systems which strongly limit childrens' freedom or impose them several extrascholastic activities (such as: athletics, music with participation in competitive examination, studies of foreign languages, Latin and so on) where the child must excel in (composex of the "leader-child"). Then these authors suggest using the term "abuse" to mean lexically every excessive, undue, arbitrary use and not only "sexual". They point out the seriousness of abuse as far as juvenile exploitation is concerned both in case of manual labour and prostitution. But the pay particularly attention to the problem of sport when it is gone in for too intensively (as athletics). These authors infact sum up the harms that sport can cause when it is gone in for during the age under the stabilized puberty. Physical harms may occur especially during the practice of risky sports such as: Alpine skiing, cycling on the road, swimming combined with diving, fencing, boxing) and during tiring condition, while psychic harms can entail a fall in scholastic performances, irritability, insomnia, anxiety. The authors depreciate the behaviour of those parents who stimulate their children' aggressiveness during competitions and scold them when their performances are insufficient, or give them forbidden stimulants of hormonal anabolic drugs instead of taking care of their children in order to keep away from the arms mentioned above. However, after all these observations and considerations about competitive sports in juvenile age, these authors can firmly state that all this could be meant as an important aspects of the juvenile exploitation that must be taken in great consideration.

  11. Pharmacists' considerations when serving Amish patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Crawford, Stephanie Y; Manuel, Aimée M; Wood, Bruce D

    2009-01-01

    To introduce historical and sociocultural influences on health and health care decisions that should be considered by pharmacists and other health professionals when serving Amish patients and to describe the roles of pharmacists in working with Amish populations, as an example of culturally and linguistically appropriate care. Community independent pharmacy in Arthur, IL, from 1991 to 2008. Reflections of a pharmacist-owner whose community practice serves a sizeable Amish population. The Old Order Amish are a religious group that values health and actively participates in its health care decisions. The Amish possess a strong sense of community responsibility and often seek advice of friends, family, and community in health care decisions. Their explanatory models of health and illness differ, in some respects, from the larger American society. The Amish are open to the use of folk medicine, complementary and alternative medicine, and conventional care when deemed necessary. They are receptive to health care information and explanations of options from trusted sources and use increased self-care modalities, including herbal remedies. Knowledge of salient cultural differences is important, but care should be given to avoid stereotyping patients because Amish rules and customs differ across districts. Culturally competent pharmacist care should be individualized based on patient needs and in consideration of aspects of differences in Amish cultures and districts. When serving Amish patients, special consideration should be given to addressing potential barriers to health care use, such as unique dialects, affordability issues for largely cash-paying customers, lower prenatal care use, and lower vaccination rates. Enhanced awareness and sensitivity to Amish lifestyles and beliefs can lessen misconceptions and minimize barriers that interfere with optimal provision of patient-centered pharmacy care and services. By working through established community norms, building

  12. Space Tourism: Orbital Debris Considerations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mahmoudian, N.; Shajiee, S.; Moghani, T.; Bahrami, M.

    2002-01-01

    Space activities after a phase of research and development, political competition and national prestige have entered an era of real commercialization. Remote sensing, earth observation, and communication are among the areas in which this growing industry is facing competition and declining government money. A project like International Space Station, which draws from public money, has not only opened a window of real multinational cooperation, but also changed space travel from a mere fantasy into a real world activity. Besides research activities for sending man to moon and Mars and other outer planets, space travel has attracted a considerable attention in recent years in the form of space tourism. Four countries from space fairing nations are actively involved in the development of space tourism. Even, nations which are either in early stages of space technology development or just beginning their space activities, have high ambitions in this area. This is worth noting considering their limited resources. At present, trips to space are available, but limited and expensive. To move beyond this point to generally available trips to orbit and week long stays in LEO, in orbital hotels, some of the required basic transportations, living requirements, and technological developments required for long stay in orbit are already underway. For tourism to develop to a real everyday business, not only the price has to come down to meaningful levels, but also safety considerations should be fully developed to attract travelers' trust. A serious hazard to space activities in general and space tourism in particular is space debris in earth orbit. Orbiting debris are man-made objects left over by space operations, hazardous to space missions. Since the higher density of debris population occurs in low earth orbit, which is also the same orbit of interest to space tourism, a careful attention should be paid to the effect of debris on tourism activities. In this study, after a

  13. Acrylamide: considerations for risk management.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Slayne, Martin A; Lineback, David R

    2005-01-01

    The presence of acrylamide in many carbohydrate-rich foods is due to its formation during conventional heating and preparation methods. Although acrylamide is established to be a toxic substance, the implications to public health from the amounts found in food are not clear. A better scientific understanding is required to help determine whether, and to what extent, formal risk management action might be necessary. Since acrylamide in food was highlighted in 2002, numerous investigations and initiatives have been developed, including international collaborations across governments, industry, research organizations, and consumer representations. The newly generated information is being used to help the overall understanding of this issue. In particular, new information on health aspects will be important to update the scientific risk assessment. The basis for decisions on possible risk management measures would then be clearer. If future risk assessment concludes that the amounts of acrylamide in food can pose a health threat, then options for risk management will need to be considered, such as limits, guide levels, codes of practice, guidance information, and advice to the food and catering industries and to consumers. In the meantime, it is possible to benefit from progress already made on how acrylamide is formed in food and on ways to lower the amounts present. Raising awareness to the approaches that can reduce the presence of acrylamide in food should be encouraged. Where feasible, such approaches can be assessed for practical use in production, processing, and preparation of the relevant food products.

  14. Report of Ethical Considerations Workshop

    Science.gov (United States)

    Race, Margaret; Conley, Catharine; Kminek, Gerhard; Rummel, John

    For more than four decades, planetary protection policy based on the Outer Space Treaty of 1967 has guided space missions in avoiding harmful cross-contamination during exploration. Throughout this time, the main emphasis of the policy has been based on protecting science and avoiding biological contamination. In light of new knowledge about planetary bodies and the diversity and capabilities of terrestrial microorganisms in extreme environments, as well as increased interest in human exploration activities beyond Earth orbit, it is appropriate to con-sider the ethical and policy implications of this approach. In June 2010, a workshop was held at Princeton, New Jersey, to focus on those implications, and to formulate recommendations for the space-faring nations of the world relating to concrete measures that might be undertaken to conduct space science studies and exploration within a sustainable framework that considers additional ethical perspectives as well as science protection. The workshop considered both current planetary protection policy (COSPAR, etc.) and the implications of protecting plan-ets beyond purely scientific considerations, especially in light of possible human missions of exploration. This talk provides a summary of the workshop discussions and results.

  15. Hypochondriasis: considerations for ICD-11

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Odile A. van den Heuvel

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available The World Health Organization (WHO is currently revisiting the ICD. In the 10th version of the ICD, approved in 1990, hypochondriacal symptoms are described in the context of both the primary condition hypochondriacal disorder and as secondary symptoms within a range of other mental disorders. Expansion of the research base since 1990 makes a critical evaluation and revision of both the definition and classification of hypochondriacal disorder timely. This article addresses the considerations reviewed by members of the WHO ICD-11 Working Group on the Classification of Obsessive-Compulsive and Related Disorders in their proposal for the description and classification of hypochondriasis. The proposed revision emphasizes the phenomenological overlap with both anxiety disorders (e.g., fear, hypervigilance to bodily symptoms, and avoidance and obsessive-compulsive and related disorders (e.g., preoccupation and repetitive behaviors and the distinction from the somatoform disorders (presence of somatic symptom is not a critical characteristic. This revision aims to improve clinical utility by enabling better recognition and treatment of patients with hypochondriasis within the broad range of global health care settings.

  16. Enabling fast charging - Vehicle considerations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meintz, Andrew; Zhang, Jiucai; Vijayagopal, Ram; Kreutzer, Cory; Ahmed, Shabbir; Bloom, Ira; Burnham, Andrew; Carlson, Richard B.; Dias, Fernando; Dufek, Eric J.; Francfort, James; Hardy, Keith; Jansen, Andrew N.; Keyser, Matthew; Markel, Anthony; Michelbacher, Christopher; Mohanpurkar, Manish; Pesaran, Ahmad; Scoffield, Don; Shirk, Matthew; Stephens, Thomas; Tanim, Tanvir

    2017-11-01

    To achieve a successful increase in the plug-in battery electric vehicle (BEV) market, it is anticipated that a significant improvement in battery performance is required to increase the range that BEVs can travel and the rate at which they can be recharged. While the range that BEVs can travel on a single recharge is improving, the recharge rate is still much slower than the refueling rate of conventional internal combustion engine vehicles. To achieve comparable recharge times, we explore the vehicle considerations of charge rates of at least 400 kW. Faster recharge is expected to significantly mitigate the perceived deficiencies for long-distance transportation, to provide alternative charging in densely populated areas where overnight charging at home may not be possible, and to reduce range anxiety for travel within a city when unplanned charging may be required. This substantial increase in charging rate is expected to create technical issues in the design of the battery system and the vehicle's electrical architecture that must be resolved. This work focuses on vehicle system design and total recharge time to meet the goals of implementing improved charge rates and the impacts of these expected increases on system voltage and vehicle components.

  17. MARKETING CONSIDERATIONS ON BRAND COMMUNITIES

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A.-C. Budac

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available Most consumers spend an important part of their free time looking for online information about the brands before taking a decision to purchase. The Internet is the main factor which has led to a considerable increase of the time allotted by consumers for search and comparing information about brands, as a step preceding the decision to purchase and also one of the most important factors that influence the interaction between the brand and the consumer. Although the general trend is that the public to become more active and more involved in the choice of the brand, consumer's responses to its messages obviously depend on cultural, social or economic factors. The work has the purpose to clarify what brand community means and how it appeared - if it was really built from scratch or it has already existed in a latent way and it must only be recognized - the characteristics of successful communities, which of the objectives of the brands can be achieved by means of these groups, what is the role of social media in the development of these communities, what kind of types of mem¬bers are likely to be encountered inside of the online communities and what is their proportion for each and which are the research methodologies that can give support to companies in monitoring these groups.

  18. CONSIDERATIONS ON CONSUMER PERCEIVED RISK

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Laura Catalina Timiras

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available In this article we identified a number of factors influencing the consumers’ perceived risk. In the first part we conducted a review of the main issues that define the perceived risk by the consumer at the time of purchase, some of the lines of action of the organizations to diminish this risk perception and a number of influencing factors presented in the literature, with significant impact on the intensity with which risk is perceived by consumers. The second part of the article is based on the statistical information regarding e-commerce market, market in which the perceived risk plays an important role in the purchasing decision. Thus, based on available official statistics provided by Eurostat we have revealed the existence of certain links between electronic commerce and orientation towards risk and income levels, age and consumer educational level. The review is not intended to be exhaustive, the study taking into consideration only those links that can be identified from using official statistical data.

  19. Dissociating Prediction Failure: Considerations from Music Perception

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ross, Suzi; Hansen, Niels Christian

    2016-01-01

    Dissociating Prediction Failure: Considerations from Music Perception The Journal of Neuroscience, 16 March 2016, 36(11): 3103-3105;......Dissociating Prediction Failure: Considerations from Music Perception The Journal of Neuroscience, 16 March 2016, 36(11): 3103-3105;...

  20. [Artificial nutrition: technical, scientific and ethical considerations].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fatati, Giuseppe

    2015-02-01

    Artificial nutrition (AN) is a relatively new medical treatment which started in the 1960 with parenteral nutrition (PN) and over the last 20 years has come to include enteral nutrition (EN) in hospitals and homes. Enormous clinical progress and continual evolution in techniques aimed at rendering organ funtion substitution more complete and efficient have come to the point where AN can only be suitably performed (indications for therapy, treatment regimen and monitoring) in specialized institutions. However, there has been much discussion about whether artificial nutrition should be considered a medical intervention or an essential intervention of care: in 2004 the Terri Schiavo case became worldwide news and the suspension of AN was decided by the law courts. In Italy, on 5 September 2014, the Council of State gave its opinion on case of Eluana Englaro. In 2007 the Italian Association for Dietetics and Clinical Nutrition (ADI) and the Professional Board of Physicians of the Province of Terni, have shared a paper that takes into account the scientific, technical and ethical considerations of AN in the light of the relative codes. The intent of this position paper was to supply a framework of clinical practices, ethical principles, and professional guidelines that will impart information and can assist decision making regarding AN and hydration. The document is still relevant today.

  1. Essential methodological considerations when using grounded theory.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Achora, Susan; Matua, Gerald Amandu

    2016-07-01

    To suggest important methodological considerations when using grounded theory. A research method widely used in nursing research is grounded theory, at the centre of which is theory construction. However, researchers still struggle with some of its methodological issues. Although grounded theory is widely used to study and explain issues in nursing practice, many researchers are still failing to adhere to its rigorous standards. Researchers should articulate the focus of their investigations - the substantive area of interest as well as the focal population. This should be followed by a succinct explanation of the strategies used to collect and analyse data, supported by clear coding processes. Finally, the resolution of the core issues, including the core category and related categories, should be explained to advance readers' understanding. Researchers should endeavour to understand the tenets of grounded theory. This enables 'neophytes' in particular to make methodological decisions that will improve their studies' rigour and fit with grounded theory. This paper complements the current dialogue on improving the understanding of grounded theory methodology in nursing research. The paper also suggests important procedural decisions researchers need to make to preserve their studies' scientific merit and fit with grounded theory.

  2. Considerations in Adapting Clinical Trial Design

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    H.M. James Hung

    2008-12-01

    Full Text Available The concept of adaptation of trial design during the course of a clinical trial has recently drawn much interest from the pharmaceutical industry. The interest arises partly because statistical decision trees employed to address multiple complex clinical hypotheses within a clinical trial are increasingly complex, and the statistical information generated from learning data prior to designing the trial is often insufficient to provide informative guidance for planning a pivotal trial. While the conventional fixed designs, which usually permit no modification influenced by the internal trial data of key design specifications, often cannot cover the range of complex statistical decision trees that must be prespecified in the study protocol, it seems natural to consider modifications of trial design at some point in the trial. In regulatory practice, some adjustments to study protocols are mostly made known to regulatory agencies in the form of so-called protocol amendments. However, such design modifications may demand careful consideration in dealing with any biases that may be caused by the adaptation, and may impede the interpretability of trial results.

  3. Three essays on resource economics. Demand systems for energy forecasting: Practical considerations for estimating a generalized logit model, To borrow or not to borrow: A variation on the MacDougal-Kemp theme, and, Valuing reduced risk for households with children or the retired

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weng, Weifeng

    This thesis presents papers on three areas of study within resource and environmental economics. "Demand Systems For Energy Forecasting" provides some practical considerations for estimating a Generalized Logit model. The main reason for using this demand system for energy and other factors is that the derived price elasticities are robust when expenditure shares are small. The primary objective of the paper is to determine the best form of the cross-price weights, and a simple inverse function of the expenditure share is selected. A second objective is to demonstrate that the estimated elasticities are sensitive to the units specified for the prices, and to show how price scales can be estimated as part of the model. "To Borrow or Not to Borrow: A Variation on the MacDougal-Kemp Theme" studies the impact of international capital movements on the conditional convergence of economies differing from each other only in initial wealth. We found that in assets, income, consumption and utility, convergence obtains, with and only with, the absence of international capital movement. When a rich country invests in a poor country, the balance of debt increases forever. Asset ownership is increased in all periods for the lender, and asset ownership of the borrower is deceased. Also, capital investment decreases the lender's utility for early periods, but increases it forever after a cross-over point. In contrast, the borrower's utility increases for early periods, but then decreases forever. "Valuing Reduced Risk for Households with Children or the Retired" presents a theoretical model of how families value risk and then exams family automobile purchases to impute the average Value of a Statistical Life (VSL) for each type of family. Data for fatal accidents are used to estimate survival rates for individuals in different types of accidents, and the probabilities of having accidents for different types of vehicle. These models are used to determine standardized risks for

  4. Evidence based practice

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hjørland, Birger

    2011-01-01

    Evidence-based practice (EBP) is an influential interdisciplinary movement that originated in medicine as evidence-based medicine (EBM) about 1992. EBP is of considerable interest to library and information science (LIS) because it focuses on a thorough documentation of the basis for the decision...

  5. Practice changing practices

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Thomsen, Rikke; Buch, Anders

    2016-01-01

    study about the practices of a study administration unit in a university college in Denmark. The study includes ten weeks of participation observation study and five qualitative interviews, both in the central part and in three local study administrations. Managerial initiated organizational change...... makes work intelligible. This provides possibilities for action and change. We claim that the practice-based studies can become an integrated part of doing critical action research, and we investigate and reflect upon our stewardship of the practices we engaged in....

  6. Early pregnancy wastage: ethical considerations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Benagiano, Giuseppe; Mori, Maurizio; Ford, Norman; Grudzinskas, Gedis

    2011-06-01

    Information on early embryo wastage is relevant for debating the status of human embryos. Two main points of view confront each other. Theists hold that human embryos should be treated as human persons from the moment of conception because, even accepting that human beings are the fruit of evolution, they are part of a divine project. Without a developmental event prior to which the human embryo could not be considered a human being, embryos should be regarded as if they were human subjects. After all, if one believes in the resurrection of the dead, it makes no difference at what stage one's life ends. Secularists oppose the idea of granting absolute value to human life from its beginning because early human embryos lack individuality and sentience. Personifying embryos is morally absurd because it would mean that countless human beings never had even the slightest chance to express their potential and, in the light of this catastrophic loss, one would expect early pregnancy wastage to have become an important research priority; this is not the case. In practical terms, most Western countries have legalized first-trimester abortion, de facto giving embryos a lower status than that of full person. Copyright © 2011 Reproductive Healthcare Ltd. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  7. Considerations about Cloud Services: Learning

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Riccardo Cognini

    2013-05-01

    Full Text Available Cloud services are ubiquitous: for small to large companies the phenomenon of cloud service is nowadays a standard business practice. This paper would compile an analysis over a possible implementation of a cloud system, treating especially the legal aspect of this theme. In the Italian market has a large number of issues arise form cloud computing. First of all, this paper investigates the legal issues associated to cloud computing, specific contractual scheme that is able to define rights a duties both of user (private and/or public body and cloud provider. On one side there is all the EU legislative production related to privacy over electronic communication and, furthermore, the Privacy Directive is under a revision process to be more adaptable to new challenges of decentralized data treatment, but concretely there are no any structured and well defined legal instruments. Objectives: we present a possible solution to address the uncertainty of this area, starting from the EU legislative production with the help of the specific Italian scenario that could offer an operative solution. Indeed the Italian legal system is particularly adaptable to changing technologies and it could use as better as possible to adapt the already existing legal tools to this new technological era. Prior work: after an introduction to the state of the art, we show the main issues and their critical points that must be solved. Approach: observation of the state of the art to propose a new approach to find the suitable disciple

  8. Community-Based Urban Teacher Education: Theoretical Frameworks and Practical Considerations for Developing Promising Practices

    Science.gov (United States)

    Noel, Jana

    2016-01-01

    Traditional campus-based teacher education programs, located on college or university campuses, have been criticized for being removed from the "real world" of community life, and a number of programs have moved directly into urban communities in order for preservice teachers to become immersed in the life of the community. This article…

  9. Some considerations about Sport Ethics

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    C.M. Moreira

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available In a society in which the values are in constant alterations in the behaviour of each individual, identification of the same values in the young athletes is of vital importance in order that better the process is understood by which you link they take determined decisions, in athletic situations. The questions associated to the ethics in the sport, and more specifically than concern the athletic spirit and the tolerance, assume today an added importance. In fact, we cannot deny the importance, in several extents, of the practice and of the athletic show, it is necessary to recognize them to me also what they reveal themselves how special fields, in which the ends - to win - justify any ways - violence, the corruption, the fraud, to wanting to win to all and any cost, the doping, the disloyalty, the absence of athletic spirit, etc. The Sports Ethics appears like a moral structure that defines some limits for the behaviour of the sportsmen, of form to preserve an athletic civilized system. It is possible to compete respecting the adversary, recognizing his value and competence, seeing it like an essential opponent, without whom there is not competition. Several investigators defend that the participation, of the children and adolescents in physical activities contributes to a global and harmonious development of the same, because it will have to give attention to the importance of the athletic spirit like component of the process of development of the child and adolescents. With this work some reflections were intended to present on the acquisition of values and beginnings in the athletic context.

  10. Pharmacogenomic considerations in opioid analgesia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vuilleumier PH

    2012-08-01

    Full Text Available Pascal H Vuilleumier,1 Ulrike M Stamer,1 Ruth Landau21Klinik für Anästhesiologie und Schmerztherapie, Inselspital Universität Bern, Switzerland; 2Department of Anesthesiology and Pain Medicine, University of Washington School of Medicine, Seattle, WA, USAAbstract: Translating pharmacogenetics to clinical practice has been particularly challenging in the context of pain, due to the complexity of this multifaceted phenotype and the overall subjective nature of pain perception and response to analgesia. Overall, numerous genes involved with the pharmacokinetics and dynamics of opioids response are candidate genes in the context of opioid analgesia. The clinical relevance of CYP2D6 genotyping to predict analgesic outcomes is still relatively unknown; the two extremes in CYP2D6 genotype (ultrarapid and poor metabolism seem to predict pain response and/or adverse effects. Overall, the level of evidence linking genetic variability (CYP2D6 and CYP3A4 to oxycodone response and phenotype (altered biotransformation of oxycodone into oxymorphone and overall clearance of oxycodone and oxymorphone is strong; however, there has been no randomized clinical trial on the benefits of genetic testing prior to oxycodone therapy. On the other hand, predicting the analgesic response to morphine based on pharmacogenetic testing is more complex; though there was hope that simple genetic testing would allow tailoring morphine doses to provide optimal analgesia, this is unlikely to occur. A variety of polymorphisms clearly influence pain perception and behavior in response to pain. However, the response to analgesics also differs depending on the pain modality and the potential for repeated noxious stimuli, the opioid prescribed, and even its route of administration.Keywords: pain perception, opioid analgesia, genetic variation, pharmacogenetics

  11. Nutritional considerations for vegetarian athletes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barr, Susan I; Rideout, Candice A

    2004-01-01

    With the growing interest in the potential health benefits of plant-based diets, it is relevant to consider whether vegetarian dietary practices could influence athletic performance. Accordingly, this review examines whether nutrients that may differ between vegetarian and omnivorous diets could affect physical performance. We also describe recent studies that attempt to assess the effects of a vegetarian diet on performance and comment on other nutritional aspects of vegetarianism of relevance to athletes. Although well-controlled long-term studies assessing the effects of vegetarian diets on athletes have not been conducted, the following observations can be made: 1) well-planned, appropriately supplemented vegetarian diets appear to effectively support athletic performance; 2) provided protein intakes are adequate to meet needs for total nitrogen and the essential amino acids, plant and animal protein sources appear to provide equivalent support to athletic training and performance; 3) vegetarians (particularly women) are at increased risk for non-anemic iron deficiency, which may limit endurance performance; and 4) as a group, vegetarians have lower mean muscle creatine concentrations than do omnivores, and this may affect supramaximal exercise performance. Because their initial muscle creatine concentrations are lower, vegetarians are likely to experience greater performance increments after creatine loading in activities that rely on the adenosine triphosphate/phosphocreatine system. 5) Coaches and trainers should be aware that some athletes may adopt a vegetarian diet as a strategy for weight control. Accordingly, the possibility of a disordered eating pattern should be investigated if a vegetarian diet is accompanied by unwarranted weight loss.

  12. Consideration of climate change on environmental impact assessment in Spain

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Enríquez-de-Salamanca, Álvaro, E-mail: aenriquez@draba.org [Escuela de Doctorado, Universidad Nacional de Educación a Distancia, UNED, Draba Ingeniería y Consultoría Medioambiental, Cañada Nueva, 29, 28200 San Lorenzo de El Escorial (Spain); Martín-Aranda, Rosa M., E-mail: rmartin@ccia.uned.es [Departamento de Química Inorgánica y Química Técnica, Facultad de Ciencias, Universidad Nacional de Educación a Distancia, UNED, Paseo Senda del Rey, 9, 28040, Madrid (Spain); Díaz-Sierra, Rubén, E-mail: sierra@dfmf.uned.es [Departamento de Física Matemática y de Fluidos, Facultad de Ciencias, Universidad Nacional de Educación a Distancia, UNED, Paseo Senda del Rey, 9, 28040, Madrid (Spain)

    2016-02-15

    Most of the projects subject to environmental impact assessment (EIA) are closely related to climate change, as they contribute to or are affected by it. The growing certainty about climate change and its impacts makes its consideration an essential part of the EIA process, as well as in strategic environmental assessment (SEA). This paper examines how climate change (CC) has been taken into account in EIA in Spain through the analysis of 1713 environmental records of decision (RODs) of projects submitted for EIA. In 2013 Spain approved one of the most advanced laws in terms of CC consideration in environmental assessment, although it had not yet accumulated extensive practice on the issue. This contrasts with the situation of countries like Canada or the USA, which have a significant body of experience without specific legal requirements. Only 14% of the RODs analysed included references to CC, and in more than half of the cases it was a mere citation. Thermal power plants, which are subject to specific GHG regulations, show the highest consideration, while transport infrastructures, which are important contributors to CC, show a very low consideration. Almost all the references are related to their contribution to CC, while consideration of the effects of CC is minimal. The increasingly common incorporation of CC into SEA, should not imply its exclusion from EIA, because both processes have different aims and uses. Including the obligation to consider CC in the EIA regulations is highly desirable, but probably not enough without other measures, such as practical guidance, training and motivational programmes for practitioners and evaluators. But even these actions cannot ensure effective and adequate assessments of CC. Probably more resources should be spent on creating greater awareness in all the agents involved in EIA. - Highlights: • We analyse how the climate change is considered in EIA in Spain. • Few projects seriously assess climate change.

  13. Audiology Assistants in Private Practice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hamill, Teri A; Andrews, Julia P

    2016-11-01

    Using audiology assistants allows a practice to meet the expected increase in patient demand in a cost-effective manner, without compromise to quality of patient care. Assistants are particularly valuable in private practice settings that have an emphasis in amplification, as many of the tasks involved do not require the unique skills of the doctor of audiology. Regulatory considerations, methods of training, and scope of practice of the assistant are discussed.

  14. 7 CFR 1703.310 - Environmental considerations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... § 1703.310 Environmental considerations. Prospective recipients of funds received from the deferment of loan payments are encouraged to consider the potential environmental impact of their proposed projects... 7 Agriculture 11 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Environmental considerations. 1703.310 Section 1703...

  15. Considerations for Infectious Disease Research Studies Using Animals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Colby, Lesley A; Quenee, Lauriane E; Zitzow, Lois A

    2017-01-01

    Animal models are vital in understanding the transmission and pathogenesis of infectious organisms and the host immune response to infection. In addition, animal models are essential in vaccine and therapeutic drug development and testing. Prior to selecting an animal model to use when studying an infectious agent, the scientific team must determine that sufficient in vitro and ex vivo data are available to justify performing research in an animal model, that ethical considerations are addressed, and that the data generated from animal work will add useful information to the body of scientific knowledge. Once it is established that an animal should be used, the questions become ‘Which animal model is most suitable?’ and ‘Which experimental design issues should be considered?’ The answers to these questions take into account numerous factors, including scientific, practical, welfare, and regulatory considerations, which are the focus of this article. PMID:28662751

  16. Employer Requirements to Work during Emergency Responses: Key Ethics Considerations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rutkow, Lainie; Taylor, Holly A; Powell, Tia

    2017-03-01

    Local health departments and their employees are at the forefront of emergency preparedness and response. Yet, recent studies have found that some local public health workers are unwilling to report to work in a variety of disaster scenarios. This can greatly compromise a response, as many local health departments need "all hands on deck" to effectively meet increased demands. To address these concerns, local health departments have employed varied policy strategies to ensure that employees do report to work. After describing different approaches taken by local health departments throughout the United States, we briefly identify and explore key ethics considerations that arise for local health departments when employees are required to report to work for emergency responses. We then discuss how these ethics considerations may inform local health department practices intended to promote a robust emergency response.

  17. Non-invasive prenatal testing: ethics and policy considerations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vanstone, Meredith; King, Carol; de Vrijer, Barbra; Nisker, Jeff

    2014-06-01

    New technologies analyzing fetal DNA in maternal blood have led to the wide commercial availability of non-invasive prenatal testing (NIPT). We present here for clinicians the ethical and policy issues related to an emerging practice option. Although NIPT presents opportunities for pregnant women, particularly women who are at increased risk of having a baby with an abnormality or who are otherwise likely to access invasive prenatal testing, NIPT brings significant ethics and policy challenges. The ethical issues include multiple aspects of informed decision-making, such as access to counselling about the possible results of the test in advance of making a decision about participation in NIPT. Policy considerations include issues related to offering and promoting a privately available medical strategy in publicly funded institutions. Ethics and policy considerations merge in NIPT with regard to sex selection and support for persons living with disabilities.

  18. Serum-free hybridoma culture: ethical, scientific and safety considerations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Even, Megha S; Sandusky, Chad B; Barnard, Neal D

    2006-03-01

    Despite considerable progress in the development of cell culture techniques, including the development of the serum- and protein-free media that now routinely support hybridoma and mammalian cell growth, fetal bovine serum (FBS) supplemented media are still commonly used: a practice that raises ethical, scientific and safety concerns. The use of FBS in hybridoma culture media is examined here, with regards to the development and production of monoclonal antibodies (mAbs), and it is our recommendation that researchers adopt serum-free cell culture methods to reduce animal use in this area.

  19. Sinusitis: Special Considerations for Aging Patients

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... there are special considerations for older Americans. Changing Physiology: With aging, the physiology and function of the nose changes. The nose ... American Academy of Otolaryngology–Head and Neck Surgery. Reproduction or republication strictly prohibited without prior written permission. ...

  20. Incest: psychological, legal and ethical considerations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rabinor, J; Miller, A M

    1989-01-01

    The psychological, legal and ethical considerations in treating victims and prosecuting offenders in the United States are described, and the dilemmas highlighted by the use of a detailed case study of an incest victim.

  1. Additional considerations on electrolysis in electromembrane extraction

    OpenAIRE

    Šlampová, A. (Andrea); Kubáň, P. (Pavel); Boček, P. (Petr)

    2016-01-01

    Additional considerations on quantitative aspects of electrolysis in EME have been evaluated. The most likely reasons for back-extraction of analytes during EMEs have been examined and efficient approaches for electrolysis elimination have been proposed.

  2. Diet and Blood Pressure Control in Chinese Canadians: Cultural Considerations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zou, Ping

    2017-04-01

    Hypertension is highly prevalent in Chinese Canadians and diet has been identified as an important modifiable risk factor for hypertension. The current anti-hypertensive dietary recommendations in hypertension care guidelines lack examination of cultural factors, are not culturally sensitive to ethnic populations, and cannot be translated to Chinese Canadian populations without cultural considerations. Guided by Leininger's Sunrise Model of culture care theory, this paper investigates how cultural factors impact Chinese Canadians' dietary practice. It is proposed that English language proficiency, health literacy, traditional Chinese diet, migration and acculturation, and Traditional Chinese Medicine influence Chinese Canadians' dietary practices. A culturally congruent nursing intervention should be established and tailored according to related cultural factors to facilitate Chinese Canadians' blood pressure control. In addition, further study is needed to test the model adapted from Sunrise Model and understand its mechanism.

  3. Simple and multiple linear regression: sample size considerations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hanley, James A

    2016-11-01

    The suggested "two subjects per variable" (2SPV) rule of thumb in the Austin and Steyerberg article is a chance to bring out some long-established and quite intuitive sample size considerations for both simple and multiple linear regression. This article distinguishes two of the major uses of regression models that imply very different sample size considerations, neither served well by the 2SPV rule. The first is etiological research, which contrasts mean Y levels at differing "exposure" (X) values and thus tends to focus on a single regression coefficient, possibly adjusted for confounders. The second research genre guides clinical practice. It addresses Y levels for individuals with different covariate patterns or "profiles." It focuses on the profile-specific (mean) Y levels themselves, estimating them via linear compounds of regression coefficients and covariates. By drawing on long-established closed-form variance formulae that lie beneath the standard errors in multiple regression, and by rearranging them for heuristic purposes, one arrives at quite intuitive sample size considerations for both research genres. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  4. Bridging Body and Mind: Considerations for Trauma-Informed Yoga.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Justice, Lauren; Brems, Christiane; Ehlers, Karrie

    2018-02-08

    Individuals who suffer from trauma-related symptoms are a unique population that could benefit from the mind-body practice of yoga-or have their symptoms reactivated by it, depending on the type of yoga. Trauma-informed yoga (TIY), that is, yoga adapted to the unique needs of individuals working to overcome trauma, may ameliorate symptoms by creating a safe, tailored practice for students to learn how to respond, rather than react, to symptoms and circumstances. Yoga not thus adapted, on the other hand, may increase reactivity and activate symptoms such as hyperarousal or dissociation. This article reports on expert input about adapting yoga for individuals with trauma, with special considerations for military populations. Eleven experts, recruited based on literature review and referrals, were interviewed in person or via telephone and asked seven questions about trauma-informed yoga. Verbatim transcripts were subjected to open-coding thematic analysis and a priori themes. Findings revealed that TIY needs to emphasize beneficial practices (e.g., diaphragmatic breath and restorative postures), consider contraindications (e.g., avoiding sequences that overly engage the sympathetic nervous system), adapt to limitations and challenges for teaching in unconventional settings (e.g., prisons, VA hospitals), and provide specialized training and preparation (e.g., specialized TIY certifications, self-care of instructors/therapists, adaptions for student needs). TIY for veterans must additionally consider gender- and culture-related barriers, differing relationships to pain and injury, and medication as a barrier to practice.

  5. Technical bulletin : geotechnical considerations for dam safety

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    2007-07-01

    The safety of dams requires a thorough understanding of the geotechnical elements of dam design. This technical bulletin outlined methods for conducting geotechnical assessments as part of dam safety analyses. It included an overview of methods for minimizing and control seepage, as well as preventing internal and surface erosion. Geotechnical considerations for foundation, abutments, and reservoir bank slope conditions were also presented. Geotechnical safety assessment techniques were presented for earthfill, embankment, and rockfill dams. Appurtenant structures, reservoir rims, and foundations were examined. Hazards and failure modes included overtopping, internal erosion, slope instability, and earthquake liquefaction. Foundation irregularities and surface erosion assesment methods were presented. Geotechnical considerations for loading conditions, shear strength, discontinuities, compatibilities, foundation permeability, and foundation compressibility were presented along with analysis, design, and remedial considerations. 53 refs., 6 tabs.

  6. Cross-flow Ultrafiltration Scaling Considerations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Duignan, M

    2006-04-10

    One legacy of the nuclear age is radioactive waste and it must be stabilized to be stored in a safe manner. An important part of the stabilization process is the separation of radioactive solids from the liquid wastes by cross-flow ultrafiltration. The performance of this technology with the wastes to be treated was unknown and, therefore, had to be obtained. However, before beginning a filter study the question of experimental scale had to be addressed. Of course, carrying out experiments using full-size equipment is always ideal, but rarely practical when dealing with plant size processes. Flow loops that will handle millions of liters of slurries, which are either highly caustic or acidic, with flow rates of 10,000 lpm make full-scale tests prohibitively expensive. Moreover, when the slurries happen to be radioactive such work is also very dangerous. All of these considerations lend themselves to investigations at smaller scales and in many situations can be treated with computational analyses. Unfortunately, as scale is reduced it becomes harder to provide prototypic results and the two and three phase multi-component mixtures challenge accurate computational results. To obtain accurate and representative filter results the use of two scales were chosen: (1) Small-scale--would allow the testing with actual radioactive waste samples and compare results with simulated wastes that were not radioactive. For this scale the feed tank held 6 liters of waste and it had a single cross-flow filter tube 0.61 m long. (2) Pilot-scale--would be restricted to use simulated non-radioactive wastes. At this larger scale the feed tank held 120 liters of waste and the filter unit was prototypic to the planned plant facility in pore size (0.1 micron), length (2.29 m), diameter (0.0127 m inside and 0.0159 m outside diameter), and being multi-tubed. The small-scale apparatus is convenient, easy to use, and can test both radioactive and non-radioactive wastes; therefore, there is a

  7. Marriage guidance counselling in a group practice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marsh, G N; Barr, J

    1975-01-01

    This paper describes the work of a marriage guidance cousellor in a group-practice centre. The considerable advantages to patient, doctor, and counsellor of her close association with the primary medical care team are discussed.

  8. Opening up education - some pedagogical considerations

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bang, Jørgen; Dalsgaard, Christian; Kjær, Arne

    2016-01-01

    would we need universities? Libraries could do the job!” In order to open up education, we need to develop a pedagogical framework for knowledge building to supplement the tradition for knowledge acquisition in higher education. In this article we present our strategic considerations for organising...... at universities and university colleges, but also teachers at high schools and primary schools, and staff involved with informal learning at museums and/or educational planning in companies, plus prospective future students. The focus in this article is on the strategic pedagogical considerations, whereas...

  9. TRANSLATION EQUIVALENCE AND CONTEXT CONSIDERATION IN GOOGLE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    I Made Sena Darmasetiyawan

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available This article aims at describing the translation methods of this tool through equivalence and context consideration which also suggest the account of language database within. The data was taken from Google Translate because it is one of the most reliable tools of translation through internet service. Results showed that there are three basic reference methods of frequency, graphology, and contextual matching database in the translation. Context in discourse and equivalence in translation are used in order to analyze the extent of this consideration.

  10. AGS-2000: Experiments for the 21. Century. Proceedings of the workshop held at Brookhaven National Laboratory, May 13--17, 1996

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Littenberg, L. [ed.] [Brookhaven National Lab., Upton, NY (United States); Sandweiss, J. [ed.] [Yale Univ., New Haven, CT (United States)

    1996-10-01

    The AGS has a vital and interesting potential for new research. The reasons for this are a fortunate concomitance of the energy chosen for the AGS and the steady stream of technological advances which have both increased the intensity and flexibility of the AGS beams, and the capability of detectors to use these new beam parameters. The physics potentials of the future AGS program can be roughly divided into three broad areas. (1) fundamental elementary particle studies (based on rare kaon decays, rare muon processes and searches for new particles); (2) non-perturbative QCD; and (3) heavy ion physics. The overriding considerations for the operation of the AGS in the next decade must, of course, be the interest and potential of the scientific program. However, once that has been established, there are other aspects of the AGS program which deserve mention. Although experiments at the AGS are of increasing sophistication, they are smaller, less expensive, and more quickly executed than experiments at newer, larger facilities. Finally, the authors note that since the AGS must be maintained as a viable accelerator to serve as an injector to RHIC, the cost of an AGS fixed target experiment need be only the incremental cost of the experiment itself along with some modest additional operating costs. This means that AGS fixed target experiments are substantially cheaper than they would have been before the RHIC era. The remainder of this document contains brief summaries of the experiments considered by the working groups in the AGS-2000 Workshop. These summaries expand on points discussed here.

  11. Reflective practice for personal and professional transformation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kofoed, Nancy A

    2011-01-01

    Reflection is the mindful (and prayerful) consideration of professional or personal actions in such a way as to transform present and future experience. Nurses will find ways to create transformation in patient care through reflection in practice, clinical supervision, leadership, education, and evidence-based practice. This article discusses models and processes for reflective practice for professional, personal, and Christian spiritual transformation, making application to case studies in nursing practice.

  12. [Theory? Practice?].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Medina Moya, José Luis

    2005-04-01

    This second article about the difficult balance between academic and professional development in pre-European Spain poses the issue of the theory-practice, or learning-treatment, relationship as the historical dissolution of the practical in the theoretical.

  13. Geotechnical Considerations For Road Development In The ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Geotechnical Considerations For Road Development In The Meander Belt Of The Niger Delta Region, Nigeria. ... fills would be required. Such fills will serve as surcharge for ground improvement and also elevate ground level above maximum expected flood height. Keywords: Geotechnical, Road, Meander belt, Niger Delta

  14. Design Criteria Based on Aesthetic Considerations

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Thomsen, Bente Dahl

    2009-01-01

    Aesthetic criteria for designs are often debated in a very subjective manner which makes it difficult to reach consensus. In order to have a more rational and transparent process, in particular in industrial design, we propose a procedure based on Baumgarten's aesthetic considerations and Thommesen...

  15. 7 CFR 1781.11 - Other considerations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 12 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Other considerations. 1781.11 Section 1781.11 Agriculture Regulations of the Department of Agriculture (Continued) RURAL UTILITIES SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE (CONTINUED) RESOURCE CONSERVATION AND DEVELOPMENT (RCD) LOANS AND WATERSHED (WS) LOANS AND...

  16. 32 CFR 215.4 - Legal considerations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ...) MISCELLANEOUS EMPLOYMENT OF MILITARY RESOURCES IN THE EVENT OF CIVIL DISTURBANCES § 215.4 Legal considerations. (a) Under the Constitution and laws of the United States, the protection of life and property and the... to execute or enforce the laws, except as authorized by the Constitution or Act of Congress. (c) The...

  17. Planning for an ageing population: strategic considerations

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    O'Shea, Dr Eamon

    2005-01-01

    This report presents both the proceedings of the Council’s conference, Planning for an Ageing Population: Strategic Considerations, and the Council’s discussion paper, ‘The Older Population: Information Issues and Deficits’, which was introduced at that conference.\\r\

  18. Polyelectrolyte solutions: Excluded-volume considerations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mattoussi, Hedi; Karasz, Frank E.

    1993-12-01

    We provide experimental evidence for the electrostatically related excluded-volume effects on the colligative properties and the single chain behavior of polyelectrolyte solutions in the dilute regime. The data are compared to the theory developed by Fixman, Skolnick, Odijk, and Houwaart. Good agreement between these theoretical considerations and the experimental data is observed.

  19. CONSIDERATION OF MULTISPECIES INTERACTIONS IN THE ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    CONSIDERATION OF MULTISPECIES INTERACTIONS IN THE ANTARCTIC: A PRELIMINARY MODEL OF THE MINKE WHALE – BLUE WHALE – KRILL ... Future projections show a gradual increasing trend in blue whale abundance and a gradual decrease in minke abundance, with large amplitude oscillations ...

  20. Surviving the Downsizing: Ethical and Economic Considerations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Perrault, Gerri

    1997-01-01

    To reduce the psychological and economic costs of downsizing, school administrators need planning and procedural guidelines. Administrators should have clear reduction-in-force policies, performance standards, employee development guidelines, and alternatives to layoffs. In the layoff mode, administrators should give careful consideration to those…

  1. 10 CFR 72.90 - General considerations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... 10 Energy 2 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false General considerations. 72.90 Section 72.90 Energy NUCLEAR... environmental impact of the ISFSI or MRS must be investigated and assessed. (b) Proposed sites for the ISFSI or... proposed site for an MRS, the potential for radiological and other environmental impacts on the region must...

  2. Formation of Massive Stars: Theoretical Considerations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yorke, Harold W.

    2008-01-01

    This slide presentation reviews theoretical considerations of the formation of massive stars. It addresses the questions that assuming a gravitationally unstable massive clump, how does enough material become concentrated into a sufficiently small volume within a sufficiently short time? and how does the forming massive star influence its immediate surroundings to limit its mass?

  3. Existential Considerations for Contemporary Career Counseling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maglio, Asa-Sophia T.; Butterfield, Lee D.; Borgen, William A.

    2005-01-01

    This article was written to remind career counselors of the potential depth and subjective impact of both unemployment and employment transitions. An existential framework is used in discussing today's world of work, previous and contemporary career counseling models, existential theory in career counseling, and existential considerations for…

  4. Animal Welfare Considerations: Should Context Matter?

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ohl, Frauke|info:eu-repo/dai/nl/314545255; Putman, R.J.

    2014-01-01

    Much consideration of animal welfare issues, as well as the bulk of welfare legislation, is closely related to context, with clear distinction between defined responsibilities towards farm-, laboratory-, companion- and wild animals. It has however been recognised that such distinction leads to

  5. Adult Learners: Considerations for Education and Training

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kistler, Mark J.

    2011-01-01

    As more and more adults seek out education and training programs to help them become more competitive in the job market, it provides an opportunity for career and technical education. Those who teach adult learners should take into consideration their particular learning traits. This article highlights a framework of core principles to be…

  6. 20 CFR 332.2 - General considerations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 20 Employees' Benefits 1 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false General considerations. 332.2 Section 332.2 Employees' Benefits RAILROAD RETIREMENT BOARD REGULATIONS UNDER THE RAILROAD UNEMPLOYMENT INSURANCE ACT... train-and-engine service, yard service, dining-car service, sleeping-car service, and other Pullman-car...

  7. Fetal Alcohol Syndrome: Implications and Counseling Considerations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Elliott, David J.; Johnson, Norbert

    1983-01-01

    Presents special considerations in counseling fetal alcohol syndrome children and their mothers. Preventive counseling must begin before conception. Adequate education, counseling, testing, treatment, and followup of patients and their families is essential to reduce or eliminate problems associated with maternal alcohol abuse. (JAC)

  8. 33 CFR 51.8 - Relevant considerations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 1 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Relevant considerations. 51.8 Section 51.8 Navigation and Navigable Waters COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY PERSONNEL COAST... which is brought to the board's attention. (b) The applicant's capability to serve. In determining the...

  9. Clinical Practice

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Contarino, Maria Fiorella; Van Den Dool, Joost; Balash, Yacov

    2017-01-01

    issues still remain open in the clinical practice. We performed a systematic review of the literature on botulinum toxin treatment for CD based on a question-oriented approach, with the aim to provide practical recommendations for the treating clinicians. Key questions from the clinical practice were...... of anticoagulants, neurological comorbidities) should also be further explored....

  10. A regrettable oversight or a significant omission? Ethical considerations in quantitative research in education

    OpenAIRE

    Jones, Keith

    2000-01-01

    This chapter examines the relevance of ethical issues in the practice of quantitative/ statistical research. By references to published ethical guidelines for statistical practice, the chapter provides a review of the key ethical considerations inherent in quantitative approaches to educational research. This range of issues is then used to examine a number of reports of influential quantitative-based research in education, including research on gender differences in achievement, teaching met...

  11. Practical aspects of cervical cancer

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Tillaart, Sabrina Ada Hendrika Maria van den

    2013-01-01

    The thesis describes studies on practical aspects of cervical cancer, concering surgical considerations, and aspects of tumour behaviour and tumour spread. The thesis comprises studies on: the comparison of nerve-sparing and non-nerve-sparing radical hysterectomy for cervical cancer; a new surgical

  12. Emotions and remote working: Are there inferences for the development of leadership theory and practice?

    OpenAIRE

    Wilkinson, J.; Knights, D.

    2012-01-01

    The aim of this presentation is to explore notions of flexible working practices and the emotional experiences of remote working, concluding in a consideration of these new working practices for the development of leadership theory and practice.

  13. Landscaping Considerations for Urban Stream Restoration Projects

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Bailey, Pam

    2004-01-01

    ... after restoration and its functionality for public use. The landscaping component of such stream and riparian restoration projects must be emphasized given its importance of visual success and public perception. The purpose of this technical note is to address landscaping considerations associated with urban stream and riparian restoration projects, and provide ideas to managers for enhancing the visual appeal and aesthetic qualities of urban projects.

  14. Local anesthesia in dentistry - Clinical Considerations

    OpenAIRE

    Sharmraaj Subramaniam; Prasanna Neelakantan

    2013-01-01

    Local anaesthesia is commonly employed prior to most dental procedures. It is imperative to understand the mechanisms by which local anaesthetics work, so that their efficacy can be improved for painless dental care. Local anaesthesia also has major clinical implications in that it can precipitate emergencies in patients with an underlying systemic disease. It is imperative that a dentist have a thorough knowledge of the considerations one must take when administering local anaesthesia in pat...

  15. D. S. Anichkov and his philosophic considerations

    OpenAIRE

    Vozchikov V. A.

    2013-01-01

    In the process of distributing of philosophic knowledge in Russia of XVIII century a prominent role was played by the lecturer of Moscow University Dmitry Sergeevich Anichkov. As a philosopher he was not an independent mind, his considerations were mostly an interpretation of european philosophical thought. But such a period of scientific «apprenticeship» is an indispensable part, preceding any formation of national way of philosophizing, that’s why creative works of D.S. Anichkov should be f...

  16. Planning for cancer control programs: Leadership considerations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    French, John; Sutcliffe, Simon B

    2018-01-01

    Cancer is a significant challenge globally. Reducing the impact of cancer requires a program and plans that address the main aspects of cancer from prevention through to end-of-life care. This article summarizes the requirements of a robust cancer control program and outlines the contextual and leadership considerations that are required to ensure that the planning and implementation of a control program can achieve improved cancer outcomes.

  17. Unaccompanied Children: Discourse Considerations and Policy Outcomes

    Science.gov (United States)

    2017-03-01

    Unaccompanied Children and the U.S. Immigration System: Challenges and Reforms,” Journal of International Affairs 2, no. 68 (2015);. 46 Terrio... environment , including the roles of political culture and socioeconomic conditions. 22 height of the unaccompanied children increase to a year and a half... CHILDREN : DISCOURSE CONSIDERATIONS AND POLICY OUTCOMES by Marie Louise Byrne March 2017 Thesis Co-Advisors: John Rollins Lauren

  18. Human Genome Editing and Ethical Considerations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krishan, Kewal; Kanchan, Tanuj; Singh, Bahadur

    2016-04-01

    Editing human germline genes may act as boon in some genetic and other disorders. Recent editing of the genome of the human embryo with the CRISPR/Cas9 editing tool generated a debate amongst top scientists of the world for the ethical considerations regarding its effect on the future generations. It needs to be seen as to what transformation human gene editing brings to humankind in the times to come.

  19. GENERAL CONSIDERATION OF GUILLIAIN BARRE SYNDROME

    OpenAIRE

    Zeel A. Gandhi, Brijal A. Maisuria, Rajesh G. Patel and Bhoomi Arora*

    2012-01-01

    Guillain-Barré syndrome is a rare but important disease that can lead to life threatening respiratory failure. This review summarises the verified consideration of Guillain-Barré syndrome (GBS) which are thought to be caused by direct autoimmune attack on peripheral nerves. Aim- Nerve conduction study helps differentiate the heterogeneous subtypes of GBS. Patients exhibit a progressive paralysis that reaches a plateau phase. Treatment and Result- Treatment with both intravenous immunoglobulin...

  20. Considerations of Dance Transmission Processes: Adapting Bharata Natyam in a Singapore Primary School

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lum, Chee Hoo; Gonda, Donn Emmanuel

    2014-01-01

    This qualitative case study has, for its purpose, an examination of the pedagogies and practices of a master Bharata Natyam dance instructor working within a Singapore primary school context. It explores the instructor's adaptation within an after-school weekly activity of the South Indian traditional classical dance form. Considerations of dance…

  1. Ethical Considerations for the Use of Family Therapy in Substance Abuse Treatment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Whittinghill, David

    2002-01-01

    This article examines the unique ethical considerations for the provision of family therapy as substance abuse treatment. Use of family therapy as substance abuse treatment has grown rapidly, but the ethical codes that guide clinical practice have not kept pace. Ethical pitfalls specific to family counseling within alcohol and drug treatment…

  2. Ethical Considerations for Cognitive-Behavioral Therapists in Psychotherapy Research Trials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haman, Kirsten L.; Hollon, Steven D.

    2009-01-01

    Psychotherapy research studies, which balance the pursuit of knowledge with the provision of treatment, can place unique demands on clinicians, patients, and research staff. However, the literature on ethical considerations in psychotherapy trials is minimal. The current paper depicts CBT community standards of practice in the context of two…

  3. Dental indications for the instrumental functional analysis in additional consideration of health-economic aspects

    OpenAIRE

    Willich, Stefan N.; Greiner, Wolfgang; Vauth, Christoph; Roll, Stephanie; Tinnemann, Peter

    2010-01-01

    Background: Besides clinical and radiological examination instrumental functional analyses are performed as diagnostic procedures for craniomandibular dysfunctions. Instrumental functional analyses cause substantial costs and shows a considerable variability between individual dentist practices. Objectives: On the basis of published scientific evidence the validity of the instrumental functional analysis for the diagnosis of craniomandibular dysfunctions compared to clinical diagnostic proced...

  4. How strategic considerations influence decision making on e-HRM applications

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Schalk, R.; Timmerman, V.; van den Heuvel, S.R.H.

    2013-01-01

    Although numerous studies indicate that the added value of human resource management is strongest when HRM decisions are linked to the organizational strategy, practical knowledge about how strategic considerations influence decision-making processes relating to e-HRM is limited. Therefore, the

  5. Considerations for restoring temperate forests of tomorrow: Forest restoration, assisted migration, and bioengineering

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kas Dumroese; Mary I. Williams; John A. Stanturf; Brad St. Clair

    2015-01-01

    Tomorrow’s forests face extreme pressures from contemporary climate change, invasive pests, and anthropogenic demands for other land uses. These pressures, collectively, demand land managers to reassess current and potential forest management practices. We discuss three considerations, functional restoration, assisted migration, and bioengineering, which are currently...

  6. Focusing the Sun: State Considerations for Designing Community Solar Policy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cook, Jeffrey J [National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL), Golden, CO (United States); Shah, Monisha R [National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL), Golden, CO (United States)

    2018-01-31

    This report summarizes outcomes from the National Community Solar Partnership State Best Practices working group by identifying key differences in state policies that enable community solar and illustrating how various policy design approaches may impact the market. For the latter question, it is too early to quantify a relationship between policy design and market impacts, because most state programs have not been fully implemented. So, the authors conducted interviews with 19 subject matter experts, including project developers, regulators, and utilities to better understand how various policy design approaches may impact community solar markets. These perspectives, along with those gleaned from the working group and relevant literature were synthesized to identify key considerations for policymakers designing community solar programs. Though state community solar policies vary in numerous ways, the report focuses on the following critical elements: program cap, project size cap, subscriber location requirements, subscriber eligibility requirements, low- and moderate-income stipulations, and subscriber compensation.

  7. Ethical considerations of teaching spirituality in the academy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Becker, Annette L

    2009-11-01

    Despite evidence in college students indicating a hunger for spiritual insight and spirituality's application in health care, there continues to be guardedness within the academy towards inclusion of curricula that address spirituality. The purpose of this article is to examine the ethical considerations of teaching spirituality in the academy by describing current trends, issues relevant to nursing education and practice, legitimate concerns of the academy, and the importance of an ethical instructional response when teaching about spirituality. Data supporting the interest and desire by students to explore meaning and purpose in the context of spirituality will be presented. Challenges and barriers inherent in teaching this topic will be described, including the affective response, the lack of a universally accepted definition of spirituality, and spirituality's relationship to religion. Pedagogical strategies consistent with an ethical instructional response will be discussed as the key to eliciting trust within the academy. A model of teaching spirituality and health will be offered to illustrate these possibilities.

  8. Vibration considerations for cryogenic tanks using glass bubbles insulation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Werlink, Rudy John; Fesmire, James; Sass, Jared P.

    2012-06-01

    The use of glass bubbles as an efficient and practical thermal insulation system hasbeen previously demonstrated in cryogenic storage tanks. One such example is a spherical,vacuum-jacketed liquid hydrogen vessel of 218,000 liter capacity where the boiloff rate hasbeen reduced by approximately 50 percent. Further applications may include non-stationarytanks such as mobile tankers and tanks with extreme duty cycles or exposed to significantvibration environments. Space rocket launch events and mobile tanker life cycles representtwo harsh cases of mechanical vibration exposure. A number of bulk fill insulationmaterials including glass bubbles, perlite powders, and aerogel granules were tested forvibration effects and mechanical behavior using a custom design holding fixture subjectedto random vibration on an Electrodynamic Shaker. The settling effects for mixtures ofinsulation materials were also investigated. The vibration test results and granular particleanalysis are presented with considerations and implications for future cryogenic tankapplications.

  9. Clinical considerations in restorative dentistry - A narrative review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ashwini Tumkur Shivakumar

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available The relationship between periodontal health and the restoration of teeth is intimate and inseparable. Human teeth are designed in such a way that the individual tooth contributes significantly to their own support as well as collectively the teeth in the arch. Decay on the proximal surfaces occurs mainly due to the faulty interrelationship between the contact area, marginal ridge, the embrasures and the gingiva. An adequate understanding of the relationship between periodontal tissues and restorative dentistry is paramount to ensure an adequate form, function, aesthetics and comfort of the dentition. For long-term survival of restoration, both functionally and esthetically, certain biological considerations are very critical to preserve the health of the periodontium and thus must be given due importance in clinical practice. While most clinicians are aware of this important relationship, uncertainly remains regarding specific concept such as biologic width and its maintainces.

  10. Secrets of safe laparoscopic surgery: Anaesthetic and surgical considerations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Srivastava Arati

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available In recent years, laparoscopic surgery has gained popularity in clinical practice. The key element in laparoscopic surgery is creation of pneumoperitoneum and carbon dioxide is commonly used for insufflation. This pneumoperitoneum perils the normal cardiopulmonary system to a considerable extent. Every laparoscopic surgeon should understand the consequences of pneumoperitoneum; so that its untoward effects can be averted. Pneumoperitoneum increases pressure on diaphragm, leading to its cephalic displacement and thereby decreasing venous return, which can be aggravated by the position of patient during surgery. There is no absolute contraindication of laparoscopic surgery, though we can anticipate some problems in conditions like obesity, pregnancy and previous abdominal surgery. This review discusses some aspects of the pathophysiology of carbon dioxide induced pneumoperitoneum, its consequences as well as strategies to counteract them. Also, we propose certain guidelines for safe laparoscopic surgery.

  11. DESIGN CONSIDERATIONS FOR THE MECHANICAL TUNER OF THE RHIC ELECTRON COOLER RF CAVITY.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    RANK, J.; BEN-ZVI,I.; HAHN,G.; MCINTYRE,G.; DALY,E.; PREBLE,J.

    2005-05-16

    The ECX Project, Brookhaven Lab's predecessor to the RHIC e-Cooler, includes a prototype RF tuner mechanism capable of both coarse and fast tuning. This tuner concept, adapted originally from a DESY design, has longer stroke and significantly higher loads attributable to the very stiff ECX cavity shape. Structural design, kinematics, controls, thermal and RF issues are discussed and certain improvements are proposed.

  12. [Special considerations in children under five years with asthma].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cuevas Schacht, Francisco J; Cano Salas, Maria del Carmen

    2009-01-01

    Currently, clinical practice guidelines and international guidelines on diagnosis and management of asthma, including special considerations in patients under five years old, given the frequent respiratory morbidity associated with this age group and poor or no cooperation from the child for testing respiratory function, favoring the underdiagnosis, delaying treatment and affecting the proper assessment of severity, level of control, and adequate clinical response to treatment. That is why the proper understanding of the natural history and the different phenotypes in infants and toddlers, allow for functional and clinical considerations on the progression of asthma from early childhood to adulthood, being necessary to make a special deal considering personal and family history, symptoms and progression of comorbidities exist which in turn will classify, monitor and plan treatment to achieve and maintain control of the disease, so far as asthma is not cured but their control is achieved in most patients. The doctor-patient interaction, family, education, control of risk factors and comorbidities, assessment, treatment and monitoring of the development of asthma are the foundation for success in the management of asthmatic patients.

  13. Thermal processing system concepts and considerations for RWMC buried waste

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Eddy, T.L.; Kong, P.C.; Raivo, B.D.; Anderson, G.L.

    1992-02-01

    This report presents a preliminary determination of ex situ thermal processing system concepts and related processing considerations for application to remediation of transuranic (TRU)-contaminated buried wastes (TRUW) at the Radioactive Waste Management Complex (RWMC) of the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory (INEL). Beginning with top-level thermal treatment concepts and requirements identified in a previous Preliminary Systems Design Study (SDS), a more detailed consideration of the waste materials thermal processing problem is provided. Anticipated waste stream elements and problem characteristics are identified and considered. Final waste form performance criteria, requirements, and options are examined within the context of providing a high-integrity, low-leachability glass/ceramic, final waste form material. Thermal processing conditions required and capability of key systems components (equipment) to provide these material process conditions are considered. Information from closely related companion study reports on melter technology development needs assessment and INEL Iron-Enriched Basalt (IEB) research are considered. Five potentially practicable thermal process system design configuration concepts are defined and compared. A scenario for thermal processing of a mixed waste and soils stream with essentially no complex presorting and using a series process of incineration and high temperature melting is recommended. Recommendations for applied research and development necessary to further detail and demonstrate the final waste form, required thermal processes, and melter process equipment are provided.

  14. Considerations for RNA-seq analysis of circadian rhythms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Jiajia; Grant, Gregory R; Hogenesch, John B; Hughes, Michael E

    2015-01-01

    Circadian rhythms are daily endogenous oscillations of behavior, metabolism, and physiology. At a molecular level, these oscillations are generated by transcriptional-translational feedback loops composed of core clock genes. In turn, core clock genes drive the rhythmic accumulation of downstream outputs-termed clock-controlled genes (CCGs)-whose rhythmic translation and function ultimately underlie daily oscillations at a cellular and organismal level. Given the circadian clock's profound influence on human health and behavior, considerable efforts have been made to systematically identify CCGs. The recent development of next-generation sequencing has dramatically expanded our ability to study the expression, processing, and stability of rhythmically expressed mRNAs. Nevertheless, like any new technology, there are many technical issues to be addressed. Here, we discuss considerations for studying circadian rhythms using genome scale transcriptional profiling, with a particular emphasis on RNA sequencing. We make a number of practical recommendations-including the choice of sampling density, read depth, alignment algorithms, read-depth normalization, and cycling detection algorithms-based on computational simulations and our experience from previous studies. We believe that these results will be of interest to the circadian field and help investigators design experiments to derive most values from these large and complex data sets. © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  15. Antenna theory and practice

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chatterjee, Rajeswari

    The fundamental operating principles and applications of antennas are examined in an introductory textbook for undergraduate engineering students. The theory of EM fields and radiation is reviewed, and consideration is given to thin linear, cylindrical, and biconical antennas; antenna arrays; loop, helical, slot, microstrip, horn, reflector, and lens antennas; leaky-wave and surface-wave antennas; dielectric and dielectric-loaded metallic antennas; and wideband antennas. Also discussed are antenna synthesis, practical antennas for different wavebands, antenna measurements, EM wave propagation, and problems in antenna design. Diagrams, drawings, graphs, and sample problems are provided.

  16. From theory to practice

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sinisalmi, T.; Oesch, P. [ed.

    1997-11-01

    Extensive research conducted at the Oulujoki River has led to practical measures aimed at alleviating the impact of short-term regulation. Amongst other things, the power plants on the river have begun to implement a fish management plan conceived for each individual reservoir and to create spawning areas for river-spawning fish. The raising of the reservoir level at Merikoski, the lowermost of the river plants, will be started in the autumn of 1997 and will considerably enhance recreational opportunities along the section of the river below the Montta plant, where the adverse effects of fluctuations in the river`s water level have been the most severe

  17. The Writing Consultation: Developing Academic Writing Practices

    Science.gov (United States)

    Murray, Rowena; Thow, Morag; Moore, Sarah; Murphy, Maura

    2008-01-01

    This article describes and analyses a specific mechanism, the writing consultation, designed to help academics to prioritise, reconceptualise and improve their writing practices. It makes the case for its potential to stimulate consideration of writing practices and motivations, a possible precondition for creating time for writing in academic…

  18. Qualitative Parameters of Practice during University Studies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stasiunaitiene, Egle; Norkute, Odeta

    2011-01-01

    In this article, relevance of practice during university studies is highlighted, as well as the main stages of its organisation, qualitative parameters, as well as criteria and indicators that validate them are defined. Discussion on the idea that taking into consideration qualitative parameters of organising practice as a component of studies…

  19. Librarian contributions to clinical practice guidelines.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cruse, Peggy; Protzko, Shandra

    2014-01-01

    Librarians have become more involved in developing high quality systematic reviews. Evidence-based practice guidelines are an extension of systematic reviews and offer another significant area for librarian involvement. This column highlights opportunities and challenges for the librarian working on guideline panels and provides practical considerations for meaningful contributions to the guideline creation process.

  20. APRENDIZAJE, DESARROLLO Y EVALUACIÓN EN CONTEXTOS ESCOLARES: CONSIDERACIONES TEÓRICAS Y PRÁCTICAS DESDE EL ENFOQUE HISTÓRICOCULTURAL (LEARNING, DEVELOPMENT AND ASSESSMENT IN EDUCATIONAL CONTEXTS: THEORETICAL, METHODOLOGICAL ANDA PRACTICAL CONSIDERATIONS FROM A CULTURAL-HISTORICAL PERSPECTIVE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rodríguez Arocho Wanda

    2011-04-01

    learning processes (appropriation and mastering of cultural artifacts and signs, development (transformations in consciousness and subjectivity rooted in cultural-historical and socio-institutional dynamics, and assessment (tool that could impact both learning and development. Some concrete examples of assessment practices to promote learning and development are presented and discussed. We conclude that from a cultural-historical perspective learning, development and assessment, constitute an indivisible unit with serious implications for teaching practices and psychoeducational evaluations. These implications urge to a critical look at the traditional ways of thinking and doing evaluation in educational contexts.

  1. A Multilevel Consideration of Service Design Conditions

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Karpen, Ingo; Gemser, Gerda; Calabretta, Giulia

    2017-01-01

    Purpose: The purpose of this paper is to advance the current understanding of organisational conditions that facilitate service design. Specifically, the focus is on organisational capabilities, interactive practices and individual abilities as units of analysis across service system levels....... Grounded in design principles, the paper conceptualises and delineates illustrative service design conditions and introduces a respective service design capability-practice-ability (CPA) portfolio. In doing so, an emerging microfoundations perspective in the context of service design is advanced. Design....../methodology/approach: Conceptual paper. Findings: This paper identifies and delineates a CPA that contributes to service design and ultimately customer experiences. The service design CPA consists of six illustrative constellations of service design capabilities, practices and abilities, which operate on different organisational...

  2. Personal Responsibility in Oral Health: Ethical Considerations

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Albertsen, Andreas

    2012-01-01

    oral health. These factors affect people’s oral health and their ability to take care of it. Both the conceptual and practical issues at stake are not reasons to abandon the idea of personal responsibility in oral health, but they do affect what the notion means and when it is reasonable to hold people...... responsible by introducing measures that decrease their share of available resources. Introducing personal responsibility in oral health also has limitations of a more practical nature. Knowledge, social status and other diseases affect the degree to which people can be said to be responsible for their poor...

  3. Considerations for the Next Revision of STRS

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnson, Sandra K.; Handler, Louis M.; Briones, Janette C.

    2016-01-01

    Development of NASAs Software Defined Radio architecture, the Space Telecommunication Radio System (STRS), was initiated in 2004 with a goal of reducing the cost, risk and schedule when implementing Software Defined Radios (SDR) for NASA space missions. Since STRS was first flown in 2012 on three Software Defined Radios on the Space Communication and Navigation (SCaN) Testbed, only minor changes have been made to the architecture. Multiple entities have since implemented the architecture and have provided significant feedback for consideration for the next revision of the standard. The focus for the first set of updates to the architecture is items that enhance application portability. Items that require modifications to existing applications before migrating to the updated architecture will only be considered if there is compelling reasons to make the change. The significant suggestions that were further evaluated for consideration include expanding and clarifying the timing Application Programming Interfaces (APIs), improving handle name and identification (ID) definitions and use, and multiple items related to implementation of STRS Devices. In addition to ideas suggested while implementing STRS, SDR technology has evolved significantly and this impact to the architecture needs to be considered. These include incorporating cognitive concepts - learning from past decisions and making new decisions that the radio can act upon. SDRs are also being developed that do not contain a General Purpose Module which is currently required for the platform to be STRS compliant. The purpose of this paper is to discuss the comments received, provide a summary of the evaluation considerations, and examine planned dispositions

  4. Best practices

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Baar, J.; Roestel, van A.J.J.

    2004-01-01

    In het convenant gewasbescherming wordt het zichtbaar maken van 'best practices' benoemd als één van de acties om meer innovatie een een beter management te krijgen. Het ministerie van LNV gaf in april 2003 het Praktijkonderzoek Plant en Omgeving (PPO) de opdracht om deze 'best practices' van

  5. Practicing Humanities

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gimmler, Antje

    2016-01-01

    and self-reflective democracy. Contemporary humanities have adopted a new orientation towards practices, and it is not clear how this fits with the ideals of ‘Bildung’ and ‘pure science’. A possible theoretical framework for this orientation towards practices could be found in John Dewey’s pragmatic...

  6. Ophthalmic practice

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sue Stevens

    2005-03-01

    Full Text Available Eye health workers carry out many basic routine procedures. Sometimes bad practice develops and this, in turn, may lead to new members of staff learning unsafe methods. Community Eye Health Journal plans to run a series on practical procedures, when applicable, relating to the theme.

  7. Implantable intraocular pressure monitoring systems: Design considerations

    KAUST Repository

    Arsalan, Muhammad

    2013-12-01

    Design considerations and limitations of implantable Intraocular Pressure Monitoring (IOPM) systems are presented in this paper. Detailed comparison with the state of the art is performed to highlight the benefits and challenges of the proposed design. The system-on-chip, presented here, is battery free and harvests energy from incoming RF signals. This low-cost design, in standard CMOS process, does not require any external components or bond wires to function. This paper provides useful insights to the designers of implantable wireless sensors in terms of design choices and associated tradeoffs. © 2013 IEEE.

  8. Considerations when using videos in lamaze classes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hotelling, Barbara A

    2012-01-01

    There are enough worthwhile videos available today so that a Lamaze Certified Childbirth Educator could literally teach an entire class series using only videos and feedback discussion. In this column, the author explores considerations in choosing videos for adult learners in Lamaze birth classes. Some things to consider when using videos should be the adult learner's attention span, whether the video increases fear of birth or empowers the learner, and if the video is appropriate for the culture of the class participants. Finally, the author provides a list of some of the many wonderful videos available to Lamaze birth educators.

  9. Total Knee Arthroplasty Considerations in Rheumatoid Arthritis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Danoff, Jonathan R.; Geller, Jeffrey A.

    2013-01-01

    The definitive treatment for advanced joint destruction in the late stages of rheumatoid arthritis can be successfully treated with total joint arthroplasty. Total knee arthroplasty has been shown to be a well-proven modality that can provide pain relief and restoration of mobility for those with debilitating knee arthritis. It is important for rheumatologists and orthopedic surgeons alike to share an understanding of the special considerations that must be addressed in this unique population of patients to ensure success in the immediate perioperative and postoperative periods including specific modalities to maximize success. PMID:24151549

  10. Isolation and confinement - Considerations for colonization

    Science.gov (United States)

    Akins, F. R.

    1978-01-01

    This paper discusses three types of isolation (sensory/perceptual, temporal, and social) that could adversely affect mankind in space. The literature dealing with laboratory and field experiments relevant to these areas is summarized and suggestions are given for dealing with these problems within the space colony community. Also, consideration is given to the potential effects of physical confinement and the need for usable space. Finally, a modification of Maslow's hierarchy of needs is proposed as a theoretical framework to understand and investigate mankind's psychological needs in space.

  11. Bioreactor design considerations for hollow organs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fish, Jeff; Halberstadt, Craig; McCoy, Darell W; Robbins, Neil

    2013-01-01

    There are many important considerations in the design, construction, and use of a bioreactor for growing hollow organs such as vessels, gastrointestinal tissue, esophagus, and others. The growth of new organs requires a specialized container that provides sterility and an environment conducive to cell-seeding and attachment onto a three-dimensional bioabsorbable porous scaffold, incubation, maturation, and shipping for implantation. The materials' selection, dimensions, manufacturing, testing, and use of the bioreactor are all factors that should be considered in designing a bioreactor for the development of hollow organs.

  12. VELO aperture considerations for the LHCb Upgrade

    CERN Document Server

    Appleby, RB; Ferro-Luzzi, M; Giovannozzi, M; Holzer, B

    2012-01-01

    In Long Shutdown 2 the VELO detectors will be replaced by new modules compatible with the LHCb Upgrade 40 MHz read-out system. A smaller inner radius of the VELO RF foil and of the silicon sensor active area will allow LHCb to considerably improve the impact parameter resolution. Here, a limit of the minimum VELO aperture during physics (Stable Beams) is discussed. A value of 3.5 mm for the nominal radius of the inner edge fo the RF foil seems acceptable.

  13. Team building: conceptual, methodological, and applied considerations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beauchamp, Mark R; McEwan, Desmond; Waldhauser, Katrina J

    2017-08-01

    Team building has been identified as an important method of improving the psychological climate in which teams operate, as well as overall team functioning. Within the context of sports, team building interventions have consistently been found to result in improvements in team effectiveness. In this paper we review the extant literature on team building in sport, and address a range of conceptual, methodological, and applied considerations that have the potential to advance theory, research, and applied intervention initiatives within the field. This involves expanding the scope of team building strategies that have, to date, primarily focused on developing group cohesion. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  14. Environmental considerations for levees and floodwalls

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nunnally, Nelson R.; Shields, F. Douglas; Hynson, James

    1987-03-01

    Levees and floodwalls are used extensively throughout the United States for flood control. Levee projects often lack ecological, recreational, and aesthetic values, except for incidental fish and wildlife benefits derived from borrow pits and recreational facilities found in some urban settings. In recent years increased environmental concern within construction agencies and greater responsiveness to public opinion have resulted in increasing numbers of levee projects designed, built, and maintained with environmental objectives in mind. This paper reviews environmental concepts successfully employed on levee projects constructed in recent years by the US Army Corps of Engineers. Some of the most innovative concepts are described and illustrated and design considerations are discussed.

  15. Design considerations for a gas microcontroller

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ritter, D. A.

    1986-01-01

    Some of the design problems that are now being addressed in consideration of a microcontroller for the upcoming GAS payload are discussed. Microcontrollers will be used to run the experiments and to collect and store the data from those experiments. Some of the requirements for a microcontroller are to be small, lightweight, have low power consumption, and high reliability. Some of the solutions that were developed to meet these design requirements are discussed. At present, the experiment is still in the design stage and the final design may change from what is presented here. The search for new integrated circuits which will do all that is needed all in one package continues.

  16. Aesthetic considerations in algorithmic and generative composition

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hagan, Kerry L.

    Models of chance operations, random equations, stochastic processes, and chaos systems have inspired composers as historical as Wolfgang Amadeus Mozart. As these models advance and new processes are discovered or defined, composers continue to find new inspirations for musical composition. Yet, the relative artistic merits of some of these works are limited. This paper explores the application of extra-musical processes to the sonic arts and proposes aesthetic considerations from the point of view of the artist. Musical examples demonstrate possibilities for working successfully with algorithmic and generative processes in sound, from formal decisions to synthesis.

  17. Advancing advanced practice - clarifying the conceptual confusion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stasa, Helen; Cashin, Andrew; Buckley, Thomas; Donoghue, Judith

    2014-03-01

    In recent years, there has been a substantial increase in the number of nurses holding advanced practice nursing positions. However, the lack of clarity regarding key terms such as 'advanced practice nursing', 'advanced nursing practice', 'scope of practice' and 'extended practice', and international variability in how these terms are used has created significant confusion. This lack of clarity is problematic for nurses, other health professionals, health service consumers, educators and policy makers, particularly given the global mobility of the nursing workforce. 1) To highlight the significant international variability in how advanced practice nursing, and associated terms such as extended and expanded practice, are defined and regulated across a variety of different English speaking countries, including the US, UK, New Zealand, Canada and Australia. 2) To propose innovative formulations for how the nursing profession may attempt to ensure greater precision and agreement around advanced practice terminology. Discursive paper. It was found that there is a considerable lack of clarity regarding the precise definitions of key terms surrounding the discussion of advanced practice. Additionally, there are large disparities in how the five chosen countries regulate advanced practice nursing, and roles such as that of the nurse practitioner. It is suggested that the confusion regarding advanced practice terminology can be reduced definitionally by minimising the use of the term 'expanded practice'; defining advanced practice nursing to refer to the type of practice in defined and regulated advanced practice nursing scopes; and defining advanced nursing practice as expert practice within a regulated nursing scope. © 2013.

  18. Modeling Unobserved Consideration Sets for Household Panel Data

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    J.E.M. van Nierop; R. Paap (Richard); B. Bronnenberg; Ph.H.B.F. Franses (Philip Hans)

    2000-01-01

    textabstractWe propose a new method to model consumers' consideration and choice processes. We develop a parsimonious probit type model for consideration and a multinomial probit model for choice, given consideration. Unlike earlier models of consideration ours is not prone to the curse of

  19. Cross Cultural Considerations for Education and Research.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Timpson, William M.

    Sociopolitical influences on education and research in the United States, China, and the Soviet Union are contrasted. Discussions with American scholars who have knowledge of educational practice in socialist nations are presented. The major philosophical difference stressed by these scholars is the pervasive influence of dialectical materialism…

  20. Solar Heating Considerations for Green Schools

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kelley, Brian; Fiedler, Lon

    2012-01-01

    As energy costs continue to rise, many schools and universities are considering energy-saving solutions, including solar heating options, to lower costs and to attract students and staff that support environmentally friendly practices. However, administrators and facility engineers should take several issues into account before pursuing a solar…