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Sample records for bromine-80m-labeled estrogens auger-electron

  1. Bromine-80m-labeled estrogens: Auger-electron emitting, estrogen receptor-directed ligands with potential for therapy of estrogen receptor positive cancers

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    DeSombre, E.R.; Mease, R.C.; Hughes, A.; Harper, P.V.; DeJesus, O.T.; Friedman, A.M.

    1988-01-01

    A triphenylbromoethylene, 1,1-bis(p-hydroxyphenyl)-2-bromo-2-phenylethylene, Br-BHPE, and a bromosteroidal estrogen, 17..cap alpha..- bromovinylestradiol, BrVE/sub 2/, were labeled with the Auger electron emitting nuclide bromine-80m, prepared by the (p,n) reaction with /sup 80/Se. To assess their potential as estrogen receptor (ER) directed therapeutic substrates the bromine-80m labeled estrogens were injected into immature female rats and the tissue distribution studied at 0.5 and 2 hours. Both radiobromoestrogens showed substantial diethylstilbesterol (DES)-inhibitable localization in the ER rich tissues, uterus, pituitary, ovary and vagina at both time points. While the percent dose per gram tissue was higher for the Br-BHPE, the BrVE/sub 2/ showed higher tissue to blood ratios, especially at 2 hr, reflecting the lower blood concentrations of radiobromine following administration of the steroidal bromoestrogen. Comparing intraperitoneal, intravenous and subcutaneous routes of administration for the radiobromine labeled Br-BHPE, the intraperitoneal route was particularly advantageous to provide maximum, DES-inhibitable concentrations in the peritoneal, ER-rich target organs, the uterus, ovary and vagina. While uterine concentrations after BrBHPE were from 10--48% dose/g and after BrVE/sub 2/ were 15--25% dose/g, similar treatment with /sup 80m/Br as sodium bromide showed uniform low concentrations in all tissues at about the levels seen in blood. The effective specific activity of (/sup 80m/Br)BrBHPE, assayed by specific binding to ER in rat uterine cytosol, was 8700 Ci/mmole. 23 refs., 9 figs., 2 tabs.

  2. Nanodosimetry of (125)I Auger electrons.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bantsar, Aliaksandr; Pszona, Stanislaw

    2012-12-01

    The nanodosimetric description of the radiation action of Auger electrons on nitrogen targets of nanometric size is presented. Experimental microdosimetry at nanometer scale for Auger electrons has been accomplished with the set-up called Jet Counter. This consists of a pulse-operated valve which injects an expanding nitrogen jet into an interaction chamber where a gaseous sensitive volume of cylindrical shape is created. The ionization cluster size distributions (ICSD) created by Auger electrons emitted by (125)I while crossing a nanometer-sized volume have been measured. The ICSD for the sensitive volumes corresponding to 3 and 12 nm in diameter (in unit density 1 g/cm(3)) irradiated by electrons emitted by a (125)I source were collected and compared with the corresponding Monte Carlo (MC) simulation. The preliminary results of the experiments with Auger electrons of (125)I interacting with a nitrogen jet having nanometric size comparable to a deoxyribonucleic acid (DNA) and nucleosome, showing the discrete spectrum of ICSD with extended cluster size, are described. The presented paper describes for the first time the nanodosimetric experiments with Auger electrons emitted by (125)I. A set of the new descriptors of the radiation quality describing the radiation effect at nanometer level is proposed. The ICSD were determined for the first time for an Auger emitter of (125)I.

  3. A stochastic cascade model for Auger-electron emitting radionuclides.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Boon Q; Nikjoo, Hooshang; Ekman, Jörgen; Jönsson, Per; Stuchbery, Andrew E; Kibédi, Tibor

    2016-11-01

    To benchmark a Monte Carlo model of the Auger cascade that has been developed at the Australian National University (ANU) against the literature data. The model is applicable to any Auger-electron emitting radionuclide with nuclear structure data in the format of the Evaluated Nuclear Structure Data File (ENSDF). Schönfeld's algorithms and the BrIcc code were incorporated to obtain initial vacancy distributions due to electron capture (EC) and internal conversion (IC), respectively. Atomic transition probabilities were adopted from the Evaluated Atomic Data Library (EADL) for elements with atomic number, Z = 1-100. Atomic transition energies were evaluated using a relativistic Dirac-Fock method. An energy-restriction protocol was implemented to eliminate energetically forbidden transitions from the simulations. Calculated initial vacancy distributions and average energy spectra of (123)I, (124)I, and (125)I were compared with the literature data. In addition, simulated kinetic energy spectra and frequency distributions of the number of emitted electrons and photons of the three iodine radionuclides are presented. Some examples of radiation spectra of individual decays are also given. Good agreement with the published data was achieved except for the outer-shell Auger and Coster-Kronig transitions. Nevertheless, the model needs to be compared with experimental data in a future study.

  4. Photoelectron spectroscopy and Auger electron spectroscopy of solids and surfaces

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kowalczyk, S.P.

    1976-01-01

    The use of photoelectron spectroscopy, primarily x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy, to obtain information on the electronic structure of a wide variety of solids (especially the bulk electronic structure of solids) is covered. Both valence band and core-level spectra, as well as a few cases of photon excited Auger electron spectroscopy, are employed in the investigations to derive information on N(E). The effect of several modulations inherent in the measured I(E)'s, such as final state band structure, cross section, and relaxation, is discussed. Examples of many-electron interactions in PES are given. Some experimental aspects of PES and AES studies are given with emphasis on sample preparation techniques. Multiple splitting of core levels is examined using the Mn levels in MnF/sub 2/ as a detailed case study. Core level splittings in transition metals, rare earth metals, transition metal halides and several alloys are also reported. The application of PES to the study of the chemical bond in some crystalline semiconductors and insulators, A/sup N/B/sup 8-N/ and A/sup N/B/sup 10-N/ compounds is treated, and a spectroscopic scale of ionicity for these compounds is developed from the measured ''s-band'' splitting in the valence band density of states. (GHT)

  5. Site-specific Auger electron spectra of ethyl trifluoroacelate molecules studied by magnetic bottle electron spectrometer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iwayama, Hiroshi; Shigemasa, Eiji; Hikosaka, Yasumasa; Nakano, Motoyoshi; Ito, Kenji; Lablanquie, Pascal; Penet, Francis; Andric, Lidija; Selles, Patricia

    2012-11-01

    We performed multielectron coincidence measurements for inner-shell photoionizations of ethyl trifluoroacelate molecules (C4H5F3O2) using a magnetic bottle electron spectrometer. From a two dimensional coincidence map between a photoelectron and Auger electron for C 1s ionizations, we extracted site-specific Auger electron spectra for each carbon site and corresponding binding energy of doubly charged states.

  6. Attosecond streaking of shake-up and Auger electrons in xenon

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Drescher M.

    2013-03-01

    Full Text Available We present first results of simultaneous attosecond streaking measurements of shake-up electrons and Auger electrons emitted from xenon. We extract relative photo-emission delays for electrons emitted from the 4d, 5s and 5p subshell, as well as for the 5p−25d correlation satellite (shake-up electrons.

  7. Chemical-state imaging of Li using scanning Auger electron microscopy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ishida, Nobuyuki, E-mail: ISHIDA.Nobuyuki@nims.go.jp [Global Research Center for Environment and Energy based on Nanomaterials Science (GREEN), National Institute for Materials Science, 1-2-1 Sengen, Tsukuba, Ibaraki 305-0047 (Japan); Fujita, Daisuke [Global Research Center for Environment and Energy based on Nanomaterials Science (GREEN), National Institute for Materials Science, 1-2-1 Sengen, Tsukuba, Ibaraki 305-0047 (Japan); Advanced Nanocharacterization Unit, National Institute for Materials Science, 1-2-1 Sengen, Tsukuba, Ibaraki 305-0047 (Japan)

    2013-02-15

    Highlights: •Scanning Auger electron microscopy is used to image chemical states of Li. •The combined use of AES and EELS signals for the elemental mapping is powerful. •Distribution corresponding to metallic and oxidized states of Li can be imaged. -- Abstract: The demand for measurement tools to detect Li with high spatial resolution and precise chemical sensitivity is increasing with the spread of lithium-ion batteries (LIBs) for use in a wide range of applications. In this work, scanning Auger electron microscopy (SAM) is used to image chemical states of a partially oxidized Li surface on the basis of the Auger electron spectroscopy (AES) and electron energy loss spectroscopy (EELS) data obtained during an oxidation process of a metal Li. We show that distribution of metallic and oxidized states of Li is clearly imaged by mapping the intensity of the corresponding AES and EELS peaks. Furthermore, a tiny difference in the extent of oxidation can be distinguished by comparing the elemental map of an AES peak with that of an EELS peak owing to the different behaviors of those signals to the chemical states of Li.

  8. The KLM + KLN Auger electron spectrum of rubidium in different matrices

    Science.gov (United States)

    Inoyatov, A. Kh; Kovalík, A.; Perevoshchikov, L. L.; Filosofov, D. V.; Vénos, D.; Lee, B. Q.; Ekman, J.; Baimukhanova, A.

    2017-08-01

    The KLM + KLN Auger electron spectrum of rubidium (Z = 37) emitted in the electron capture decay of radioactive 83Sr in a polycrystalline platinum matrix and also 85Sr in polycrystalline platinum and carbon matrices as well as in an evaporated layer onto a carbon backing were experimentally studied in detail for the first time using a combined electrostatic electron spectrometer. Energies, relative intensities, and natural widths of fifteen basic spectrum components were determined and compared with both theoretical predictions and experimental data for krypton (Z = 36). Relative spectrum line energies obtained from the semi-empirical calculations in intermediate coupling scheme were found to agree within 3σ with the measured values while disagreement with experiment exceeding 3σ was often observed for values obtained from our multiconfiguration Dirac-Hartree-Fock calculations. The absolute energy of the dominant spectrum component given by the semi-empirical approach agrees within 1σ with the measured value. Shifts of +(0.2 ± 0.2) and -(1.9 ± 0.2) eV were measured for the dominant KLM spectrum components between the 85Sr sources prepared by vacuum evaporation on and implanted into the carbon foil, respectively, relative to 85Sr implanted into the platinum foil. A value of (713 ± 2) eV was determined for the energy difference of the dominant components of the KLM + KLN Auger electron spectra of rubidium and krypton generated in the polycrystalline platinum matrix. From the detailed analysis of the measured data and available theoretical results, the general conclusion can be drawn that the proper description of the KLM + KLN Auger electron spectrum for Z around 37 should still be based on the intermediate coupling of angular momenta taking into account relativistic effects.

  9. Chirped Auger electron emission due to field-assisted post-collision interaction

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bonitz M.

    2013-03-01

    Full Text Available We have investigated the Auger decay in the temporal domain by applying a terahertz streaking light field. Xenon and krypton atoms were studied by implementing the free-electron laser in Hamburg (FLASH as well as a source of high-order harmonic radiation combined with terahertz pulses from an optical rectification source. The observed linewidth asymmetries in the streaked spectra suggest a chirped Auger electron emission which is understood in terms of field-assisted post-collision interaction. The experimentally obtained results agree well with model calculations.

  10. Tracking electron-induced carbon contamination and cleaning of Ru surfaces by Auger electron spectroscopy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kanjilal, Aloke; Catalfano, Mark; Harilal, Sivanandan S.; Hassanein, Ahmed; Rice, Bryan [Center for Materials under Extreme Environment, School of Nuclear Engineering, Purdue University, West Lafayette, Indiana 47907 (United States); SEMATECH Inc., Albany, New York 12203 (United States)

    2012-07-15

    Extreme ultraviolet (EUV) radiation induced growth of carbon and oxygen desorption were investigated on a Ru surface by Auger electron spectroscopy (AES) in the presence and absence of additional photoelectrons (PEs) from a focusing Ru mirror. A decrease in EUV reflectivity with carbon growth in the presence of additional PEs has been observed. Conversely, a carbonaceous Ru surface was cleaned in sequential AES, and discussed in terms of secondary electron assisted dissociation of residual hydrocarbons and water molecules, followed by a chemical reaction between adsorbed carbon and oxygen atoms.

  11. The characterisation of non-evaporable getters by Auger electron spectroscopy Analytical potential and artefacts

    CERN Document Server

    Scheuerlein, C; Taborelli, M

    2002-01-01

    The surfaces of getter materials are particularly difficult to analyse because of their high chemical reactivity. The results obtained can be strongly influenced by the experimental set-up and procedures. In this paper the experimental influence on the Auger electron spectroscopy results is discussed, based on the measurements of more than 100 different non-evaporable getter (NEG) materials. There are four typical changes in the Auger electron spectra when a NEG becomes activated. The oxygen peak intensity decreases, the shape of the metal peaks changes, the carbon peak shape changes shape and intensity and a chlorine peak occurs. All these changes are affected by instrumental artefacts. The Zr-MNV peak shape changes occurring during the reduction of ZrO2 are well suited to determine the onset of NEG activation, while the slope with which the O-KLL peak intensity decreases in a certain temperature range is a better criterion for the determination of the temperature at which activation is complete. The O-KLL i...

  12. Evaluating 99mTc Auger electrons for targeted tumor radiotherapy by computational methods.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tavares, Adriana Alexandre S; Tavares, João Manuel R S

    2010-07-01

    Technetium-99m (99mTc) has been widely used as an imaging agent but only recently has been considered for therapeutic applications. This study aims to analyze the potential use of 99mTc Auger electrons for targeted tumor radiotherapy by evaluating the DNA damage and its probability of correct repair and by studying the cellular kinetics, following 99mTc Auger electron irradiation in comparison to iodine-131 (131I) beta minus particles and astatine-211 (211At) alpha particle irradiation. Computational models were used to estimate the yield of DNA damage (fast Monte Carlo damage algorithm), the probability of correct repair (Monte Carlo excision repair algorithm), and cell kinetic effects (virtual cell radiobiology algorithm) after irradiation with the selected particles. The results obtained with the algorithms used suggested that 99mTc CKMMX (all M-shell Coster-Kroning--CK--and super-CK transitions) electrons and Auger MXY (all M-shell Auger transitions) have a therapeutic potential comparable to high linear energy transfer 211At alpha particles and higher than 131I beta minus particles. All the other 99mTc electrons had a therapeutic potential similar to 131I beta minus particles. 99mTc CKMMX electrons and Auger MXY presented a higher probability to induce apoptosis than 131I beta minus particles and a probability similar to 211At alpha particles. Based on the results here, 99mTc CKMMX electrons and Auger MXY are useful electrons for targeted tumor radiotherapy.

  13. {sup 99m}Tc Auger electrons - Analysis on the effects of low absorbed doses by computational methods

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tavares, Adriana Alexandre S., E-mail: adriana_tavares@msn.co [Faculdade de Engenharia da Universidade do Porto (FEUP), Rua Dr. Roberto Frias, S/N, 4200-465 Porto (Portugal); Tavares, Joao Manuel R.S., E-mail: tavares@fe.up.p [Faculdade de Engenharia da Universidade do Porto (FEUP), Rua Dr. Roberto Frias, S/N, 4200-465 Porto (Portugal)

    2011-03-15

    We describe here the use of computational methods for evaluation of the low dose effects on human fibroblasts after irradiation with Technetium-99m ({sup 99m}Tc) Auger electrons. The results suggest a parabolic relationship between the irradiation of fibroblasts with {sup 99m}Tc Auger electrons and the total absorbed dose. Additionally, the results on very low absorbed doses may be explained by the bystander effect, which has been implicated on the cell's effects at low doses. Further in vitro evaluation will be worthwhile to clarify these findings.

  14. Evaluation of DNA damage induced by Auger electrons from 137Cs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Watanabe, Ritsuko; Hattori, Yuya; Kai, Takeshi

    2016-11-01

    To understand the biological effect of external and internal exposure from 137Cs, DNA damage spectrum induced by directly emitted electrons (γ-rays, internal conversion electrons, Auger electrons) from 137Cs was compared with that induced by 137Cs γ-rays. Monte Carlo track simulation method was used to calculate the microscopic energy deposition pattern in liquid water. Simulation was performed for the two simple target systems in microscale. Radiation sources were placed inside for one system and outside for another system. To simulate the energy deposition by directly emitted electrons from 137Cs placed inside the system, the multiple ejections of electrons after internal conversion were considered. In the target systems, induction process of DNA damage was modeled and simulated for both direct energy deposition and the water radical reaction on the DNA. The yield and spatial distribution of simple and complex DNA damage including strand breaks and base lesions were calculated for irradiation by electrons and γ-rays from 137Cs. The simulation showed that the significant difference in DNA damage spectrum was not caused by directly ejected electrons and γ-rays from 137Cs. The result supports the existing perception that the biological effects by internal and external exposure by 137Cs are equivalent.

  15. Evaluation of Cobalt-Labeled Octreotide Analogs for Molecular Imaging and Auger Electron-Based Radionuclide Therapy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Thisgaard, Helge; Olsen, Birgitte Brinkmann; Dam, Johan Hygum

    2014-01-01

    The somatostatin receptor, which is overexpressed by many neuroendocrine tumors, is a well-known target for molecular imaging and peptide receptor radionuclide therapy. Recently, (57)Co-labeled DOTATOC, an octreotide analog, was shown to have the highest affinity yet found for somatostatin receptor...... subtype 2. The aim of this study was to evaluate the biologic effects of novel cobalt-labeled octreotide analogs targeting the somatostatin receptor to identify promising candidates for molecular imaging and Auger electron-based radionuclide therapy. METHODS: Cobalt-labeled DOTATATE, DOTATOC, and DOTANOC...... were prepared with (57)Co or (58m)Co for SPECT or Auger electron-based therapy, respectively. The cellular uptake and intracellular distribution of the radioligands were characterized with the pancreatic tumor cell line AR42J in vitro, including assessment of the therapeutic effects of (58m...

  16. Radioimmunotherapy of cancer with high linear energy transfer (LET) radiation delivered by radionuclides emitting α-particles or Auger electrons.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aghevlian, Sadaf; Boyle, Amanda J; Reilly, Raymond M

    2017-01-15

    Radioimmunotherapy (RIT) aims to selectively deliver radionuclides emitting α-particles, β-particles or Auger electrons to tumors by conjugation to monoclonal antibodies (mAbs) that recognize tumor-associated antigens/receptors. The approach has been most successful for treatment of non-Hodgkin's B-cell lymphoma but challenges have been encountered in extending these promising results to the treatment of solid malignancies. These challenges include the low potency of β-particle emitters such as 131I, 177Lu or 90Y which have been commonly conjugated to the mAbs, due to their low linear energy transfer (LET=0.1-1.0keV/μm). Furthermore, since the β-particles have a 2-10mm range, there has been dose-limiting non-specific toxicity to hematopoietic stem cells in the bone marrow (BM) due to the cross-fire effect. Conjugation of mAbs to α-particle-emitters (e.g. 225Ac, 213Bi, 212Pb or 211At) or Auger electron-emitters (e.g. 111In, 67Ga, 123I or 125I) would increase the potency of RIT due to their high LET (50-230keV/μm and 4 to 26keV/μm, respectively). In addition, α-particles have a range in tissues of 28-100μm and Auger electrons are nanometer in range which greatly reduces or eliminates the cross-fire effect compared to β-particles, potentially reducing their non-specific toxicity to the BM. In this review, we describe the results of preclinical and clinical studies of RIT of cancer using radioimmunoconjugates emitting α-particles or Auger electrons, and discuss the potential of these high LET forms of radiation to improve the outcome of cancer patients. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  17. Features of atomic images reconstructed from photoelectron, Auger electron, and internal detector electron holography using SPEA-MEM

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Matsushita, Tomohiro, E-mail: matusita@spring8.or.jp [Japan Synchrotron Radiation Research Institute, SPring-8, Sayo, Hyogo 679-5198 (Japan); Matsui, Fumihiko [Graduate School of Materials Science, Nara Institute of Science and Technology, Ikoma, Nara 630-0192 (Japan)

    2014-08-15

    Highlights: • We develop a 3D atomic image reconstruction algorithm for photoelectron, Auger electron, and internal detector holography. • We examine the shapes of the atomic images reconstructed by using a developed kernel function. • We examine refraction effect at surface, limitation effect of the hologram data, energy resolution effect, and angular resolution effect. • These discussions indicate the experimental requirements to obtain the clear 3D atomic image. - Abstract: Three-dimensional atomic images can be reconstructed from photoelectron, Auger electron, and internal detector electron holograms using a scattering pattern extraction algorithm using the maximum entropy method (SPEA-MEM) that utilizes an integral transform. An integral kernel function for the integral transform is the key to clear atomic image reconstruction. We composed the kernel function using a scattering pattern function and estimated its ability. Image distortion caused by multiple scattering was also evaluated. Four types of Auger electron wave functions were investigated, and the effect of these wave function types was estimated. In addition, we addressed refraction at the surface, the effects of data limitation, and energy and angular resolutions.

  18. Development of DNA-based radiopharmaceuticals carrying Auger-electron emitters for anti-gene radiotherapy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Panyutin, I.G.; Winters, T.A.; Feinendegen, L.E.; Neumann, R.D. [National Institutes of Health, Bethesda, MD (United States). Dept. of Nuclear Medicine

    2000-09-01

    Targeting of radiation damage to specific DNA sequences is the essence of antigen radiotherapy. This technique also provides a tool to study molecular mechanisms of DNA repair on a defined, single radio damaged site. It was achieved such sequence-specific radio damage by combining the highly localized DNA damage produced by the decay of Auger-electron-emitters such as {sup 125}I with the sequence-specific action of triplex-forming oligonucleotides (TFO). TFO complementary to polypurine-polypyrimidine regions of human genes were synthesized and labeled with {sup 125}I-dCTP by the primer extension method. {sup 125}I-TFO were delivered into cells with several delivery systems. In addition, human enzymes capable of supporting DNA single-strand-break repair were isolated and assessed for their role in the repair of this lesion. Also, the mutagenicity and repairability of {sup 125}I-TFO-induced double strand breaks (DSB) were assessed by repair of plasmid possessing a site-specific DSB lesion. Using plasmids containing target polypurine-polypyrimidine tracts, it was obtained the fine structure of sequence-specific DNA breaks produced by decay of {sup 125}I with single-nucleotide resolution. It was showed that the designed {sup 125}I-TFO in nanomolar concentrations could bind to and introduce double-strand breaks into the target sequences in situ, i.e., within isolated nuclei and intact digitonin-permeabilized cells. It was also showed {sup 125}I-TFO-induced DSB to be highly mutagenic lesions resulting in a mutation frequency of nearly 80%, with deletions comprising the majority of mutations. The results obtained demonstrate the ability of {sup 125}I-TFO to target specific sequences in their natural environment - within eukaryotic nucleus. Repair of {sup 125}I-TFO-induced DNA damage should typically result in mutagenic gene inactivation.

  19. Accelerator based production of auger-electron-emitting isotopes for radionuclide therapy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Thisgaard, H.

    2008-08-15

    In this research project the focus has been on the identification and production of new, unconventional Auger-electron-emitting isotopes for targeted radionuclide therapy of cancer. Based on 1st principles dosimetry calculations on the subcellular level, the Auger-emitter 119Sb has been identified as a potent candidate for therapy. The corresponding imaging analogue 117Sb has been shown from planar scintigraphy and single-photon emission computed tomography (SPECT) to be suitable for SPECT-based dosimetry of a future Sb-labeled radiopharmaceutical. The production method of these radioisotopes has been developed using a low-energy cyclotron via the nuclear reactions 119Sn(p,n)119Sb and 117Sn(p,n)117Sb including measurements of the excitation function for the former reaction. Moreover, a new high-yield radiochemical separation method has been developed to allow the subsequent separation of the produced 119Sb from the enriched 119Sn target material with high radionuclidic- and chemical purity. A method that also allows efficient recovery of the 119Sn for recycling. To demonstrate the ability of producing therapeutic quantities of 119Sb and other radioisotopes for therapy with a low-energy cyclotron, two new 'High Power' cyclotron targets were developed in this study. The target development was primarily based on theoretical thermal modeling calculations using finite-element-analysis software. With these targets, I have shown that it will be possible to produce several tens of GBq of therapeutics isotopes (e.g. 119Sb or 64Cu) using the PETtrace cyclotron commonly found at the larger PET-centers in the hospitals. Finally, research in a new method to measure the radiotoxicity of Auger-emitters invitro using cellular microinjection has been carried out. The purpose of this method is to be able to experimentally evaluate and compare the potency of the new and unconventional Auger-emitters (e.g. 119Sb). However, due to experimental complications, the development

  20. Rational evaluation of the therapeutic effect and dosimetry of auger electrons for radionuclide therapy in a cell culture model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shinohara, Ayaka; Hanaoka, Hirofumi; Sakashita, Tetsuya; Sato, Tatsuhiko; Yamaguchi, Aiko; Ishioka, Noriko S; Tsushima, Yoshito

    2017-12-13

    Radionuclide therapy with low-energy auger electron emitters may provide high antitumor efficacy while keeping the toxicity to normal organs low. Here we evaluated the usefulness of an auger electron emitter and compared it with that of a beta emitter for tumor treatment in in vitro models and conducted a dosimetry simulation using radioiodine-labeled metaiodobenzylguanidine (MIBG) as a model compound. We evaluated the cellular uptake of 125I-MIBG and the therapeutic effects of 125I- and 131I-MIBG in 2D and 3D PC-12 cell culture models. We used a Monte Carlo simulation code (PHITS) to calculate the absorbed radiation dose of 125I or 131I in computer simulation models for 2D and 3D cell cultures. In the dosimetry calculation for the 3D model, several distribution patterns of radionuclide were applied. A higher cumulative dose was observed in the 3D model due to the prolonged retention of MIBG compared to the 2D model. However, 125I-MIBG showed a greater therapeutic effect in the 2D model compared to the 3D model (respective EC50 values in the 2D and 3D models: 86.9 and 303.9 MBq/cell), whereas 131I-MIBG showed the opposite result (respective EC50 values in the 2D and 3D models: 49.4 and 30.2 MBq/cell). The therapeutic effect of 125I-MIBG was lower than that of 131I-MIBG in both models, but the radionuclide-derived difference was smaller in the 2D model. The dosimetry simulation with PHITS revealed the influence of the radiation quality, the crossfire effect, radionuclide distribution, and tumor shape on the absorbed dose. Application of the heterogeneous distribution series dramatically changed the radiation dose distribution of 125I-MIBG, and mitigated the difference between the estimated and measured therapeutic effects of 125I-MIBG. The therapeutic effect of 125I-MIBG was comparable to that of 131I-MIBG in the 2D model, but the efficacy was inferior to that of 131I-MIBG in the 3D model, since the crossfire effect is negligible and the homogeneous distribution

  1. Investigation of production routes for the 161Ho Auger-electron emitting radiolanthanide, a candidate for therapy

    OpenAIRE

    Tárkányi, F.; Ditrói, F.; Hermanne, A.; Takács, S.; Ignatyuk, A. V.

    2013-01-01

    The radiolanthanide 161Ho (2.48 h) is a promising Auger-electron emitter for internal radiotherapy that can be produced with particle accelerators. The excitation functions of the natDy(p,xn)161Ho and natDy(d,x)161Ho reactions were measured up to 40 and 50 MeV respectively by using the stacked foil activation method and gamma-ray spectrometry. The experimental data were compared with results of the TALYS code available in the TENDL 2011 library [1]. The main parameters of different production...

  2. Biodistribution of modular nanotransporter carrying Auger electron emitter and targeted at melanoma cells in murine tumor model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vorontsova, M. S.; Morozova, N. B.; Karmakova, T. A.; Rosenkranz, A. A.; Slastnikova, T. A.; Petriev, V. M.; Smoryzanova, O. A.; Tischenko, V. K.; Yakubovskaya, R. I.; Kaprin, A. D.; Sobolev, A. S.

    2017-09-01

    Recombinant modular nanotransporter containing α-melanocyte-stimulating hormone peptide sequence (MNT-MSH) as a ligand module was designed for nucleus-targeted delivery of cytotoxic agents into melanoma cells. MNT-MSH radiolabeled with Auger electron emitter (111In-NOTA-MNT-MSH) showed a high antitumor efficacy in mice bearing syngeneic melanoma after intratumoral (i.t.) injection. This study is aimed at evaluating the biodistribution of the radioconjugate in melanoma tumor model in vivo. 111In-NOTA-MNT-MSH was administered i.t. in C57Bl/6j mice bearing subcutaneously implanted B16-F1 murine melanoma cells, expressing high levels of MCR1. The tissue uptake of radioactivity was determined ex vivo by γ-counter measurements. The intravenous route of administration did not provide a desirable level of radioactivity accumulation in the tumor, possibly, due to a high uptake of the transporter in liver tissue. After i.t. administration 111In-NOTA-MNT-MSH provided a high local retention of radionuclide, ranged from 400 to 350 %ID/g within at least 48 hours post-injection. MNT containing Auger electron emitter and α-MSH peptide as vector ligand could be a promising basis for radiopharmaceutical preparations intended for melanoma treatment.

  3. Prominent conjugate processes in the PCI recapture of photoelectrons revealed by high resolution Auger electron measurements of Xe

    Science.gov (United States)

    Azuma, Yoshiro; Kosugi, Satoshi; Suzuki, Norihiro; Shigemasa, Eiji; Iwayama, Hiroshi; Koike, Fumihiro

    2016-05-01

    The Xe (N5O2 , 3O2 , 3) Auger electron spectrum originating from 4d5/ 2 - 1 photoionization was measured with the photon energy tuned very close above the ionization threshold. As the photon energy approached the 4d5/ 2 - 1 photoionization threshold, Rydberg series structures including several angular momentum components were formed within the Auger profile by the recapture of the photoelectrons into high-lying final ion orbitals. Our spectrum with resolution much narrower than the lifetime width of the corresponding core excited state allowed us to resolve detailed structures due to the orbital angular momenta very clearly. Unexpectedly, conjugate peaks originating from the exchange of angular momentum between the photoelectron and the Auger electron through Post-Collision-Interaction were found to dominate the spectrum. The new assignments were in accord with the quantum defect values obtained for the high Rydberg series for singly charged ionic Xe + 5 p(1S0) ml. This work was supported by Japan Society for the Promotion of Science through Grants-in-Aid for Scientific Research No. 23600009.

  4. High energy resolution and first time-dependent positron annihilation induced Auger electron spectroscopty

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mayer, Jakob

    2010-04-03

    It was the aim of this thesis to improve the existing positron annihilation induced Auger spectrometer at the highly intense positron source NEPOMUC (NEutron induced POsitron source MUniCh) in several ways: Firstly, the measurement time for a single spectrum should be reduced from typically 12 h to roughly 1 h or even less. Secondly, the energy resolution, which amounted to {delta}E/E{approx}10%, should be increased by at least one order of magnitude in order to make high resolution positron annihilation induced Auger spectroscopy (PAES)-measurements of Auger transitions possible and thus deliver more information about the nature of the Auger process. In order to achieve these objectives, the PAES spectrometer was equipped with a new electron energy analyzer. For its ideal operation all other components of the Auger analysis chamber had to be adapted. Particularly the sample manipulation and the positron beam guidance had to be renewed. Simulations with SIMION {sup registered} ensured the optimal positron lens parameters. After the adjustment of the new analyzer and its components, first measurements illustrated the improved performance of the PAES setup: Firstly, the measurement time for short overview measurements was reduced from 3 h to 420 s. The measurement time for more detailed Auger spectra was shortened from 12 h to 80 min. Secondly, even with the reduced measurement time, the signal to noise ratio was also enhanced by one order of magnitude. Finally, the energy resolution was improved to {delta}E/E < 1. The exceptional surface sensitivity and elemental selectivity of PAES was demonstrated in measurements of Pd and Fe, both coated with Cu layers of varying thickness. PAES showed that with 0.96 monolayer of Cu on Fe, more than 55% of the detected Auger electrons stem from Cu. In the case of the Cu coated Pd sample 0.96 monolayer of Cu resulted in a Cu Auger fraction of more than 30% with PAES and less than 5% with electron induced Auger spectroscopy

  5. Growth of cobalt ultra-thin films deposited on Pt(100) surfaces: An Auger electron spectroscopy study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boeglin, C.; Carrière, B.; Deville, J. P.; Heckmann, O.; Leroux, C.; Panissod, P.

    1989-04-01

    To investigate the possibility of building Co/Pt modulated multilayers, attention has been paid to the early stages of interface formation between cobalt and platinum. The growth of cobalt layers less than 10 monolayers thick on Pt(100) surfaces has been studied by Auger electron spectroscopy. Growth kinetics obtained by AES show that two different models of interface formation can be possible: the Volmer-Weber case (cobalt islands) or an interdiffusion process between the two metals (similar to suicide formation). Looking at the fine structure of the low-energy platinum Auger transitions suggests that there is a strong interaction between cobalt and platinum as soon as the equivalent of a cobalt 2 monolayer coverage is deposited. This would favor the interdiffusion process model.

  6. Auger electron spectroscopy study of initial stages of oxidation in a copper - 19.6-atomic-percent-aluminum alloy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ferrante, J.

    1973-01-01

    Auger electron spectroscopy was used to examine the initial stages of oxidation of a polycrystalline copper - 19.6 a/o-aluminum alloy. The growth of the 55-eV aluminum oxide peak and the decay of the 59-, 62-, and 937-eV copper peaks were examined as functions of temperature, exposure, and pressure. Pressures ranged from 1x10 to the minus 7th power to 0.0005 torr of O2. Temperatures ranged from room temperature to 700 C. A completely aluminum oxide surface layer was obtained in all cases. Complete disappearance of the underlying 937-eV copper peak was obtained by heating at 700 C in O2 at 0.0005 torr for 1 hr. Temperature studies indicated that thermally activated diffusion was important to the oxidation studies. The initial stages of oxidation followed a logarithmic growth curve.

  7. Thermal effects in equilibrium surface segregation in a copper/10-atomic-percent-aluminum alloy using Auger electron spectroscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ferrante, J.

    1972-01-01

    Equilibrium surface segregation of aluminum in a copper-10-atomic-percent-aluminum single crystal alloy oriented in the /111/ direction was demonstrated by using Auger electron spectroscopy. This crystal was in the solid solution range of composition. Equilibrium surface segregation was verified by observing that the aluminum surface concentration varied reversibly with temperature in the range 550 to 850 K. These results were curve fitted to an expression for equilibrium grain boundary segregation and gave a retrieval energy of 5780 J/mole (1380 cal/mole) and a maximum frozen-in surface coverage three times the bulk layer concentration. Analyses concerning the relative merits of sputtering calibration and the effects of evaporation are also included.

  8. Auger electron spectroscopy study of oxidation of a PdCr alloy used for high-temperature sensors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boyd, Darwin L.; Zeller, Mary V.; Vargas-Aburto, Carlos

    1993-01-01

    A Pd-13 wt. percent Cr solid solution is a promising high-temperature strain gage alloy. In bulk form it has a number of properties that are desirable in a resistance strain gage material, such as a linear electrical resistance versus temperature curve to 1000 C and stable electrical resistance in air at 1000 C. However, unprotected fine wire gages fabricated from this alloy perform well only to 600 C. At higher temperatures severe oxidation degrades their electrical performance. In this work Auger electron spectroscopy was used to study the oxidation chemistry of the alloy wires and ribbons. Results indicate that the oxidation is caused by a complex mechanism that is not yet fully understood. As expected, during oxidation, a layer of chromium oxide is formed. This layer, however, forms beneath a layer of metallic palladium. The results of this study have increased the understanding of the oxidation mechanism of Pd-13 wt. percent Cr.

  9. Interaction of oxygen with an AISI 314 stainless steel surface studied by ellipsometry and auger electron spectroscopy in combination with ion bombardment

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Stokkers, G.J.; van Silfhout, Arend; Bootsma, G.A.; Fransen, T.; Gellings, P.J.

    1983-01-01

    The influence of pretreatment (ion bombardment) on the initial oxidation of AISI 314 stainless steel has been investigated in ultra high vacuum systems with ellipsometry and Auger electron spectroscopy. The bombardment was carried out with Ar+ ions with energies up to 2.2 keV at various doses and

  10. Correlation between energy deposition and molecular damage from Auger electrons: A case study of ultra-low energy (5-18 eV) electron interactions with DNA.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rezaee, Mohammad; Hunting, Darel J; Sanche, Léon

    2014-07-01

    The present study introduces a new method to establish a direct correlation between biologically related physical parameters (i.e., stopping and damaging cross sections, respectively) for an Auger-electron emitting radionuclide decaying within a target molecule (e.g., DNA), so as to evaluate the efficacy of the radionuclide at the molecular level. These parameters can be applied to the dosimetry of Auger electrons and the quantification of their biological effects, which are the main criteria to assess the therapeutic efficacy of Auger-electron emitting radionuclides. Absorbed dose and stopping cross section for the Auger electrons of 5-18 eV emitted by(125)I within DNA were determined by developing a nanodosimetric model. The molecular damages induced by these Auger electrons were investigated by measuring damaging cross section, including that for the formation of DNA single- and double-strand breaks. Nanoscale films of pure plasmid DNA were prepared via the freeze-drying technique and subsequently irradiated with low-energy electrons at various fluences. The damaging cross sections were determined by employing a molecular survival model to the measured exposure-response curves for induction of DNA strand breaks. For a single decay of(125)I within DNA, the Auger electrons of 5-18 eV deposit the energies of 12.1 and 9.1 eV within a 4.2-nm(3) volume of a hydrated or dry DNA, which results in the absorbed doses of 270 and 210 kGy, respectively. DNA bases have a major contribution to the deposited energies. Ten-electronvolt and high linear energy transfer 100-eV electrons have a similar cross section for the formation of DNA double-strand break, while 100-eV electrons are twice as efficient as 10 eV in the induction of single-strand break. Ultra-low-energy electrons (electron emitting radionuclides; hence, they should be considered in the dosimetry calculation of such radionuclides. Moreover, absorbed dose is not an appropriate physical parameter for nanodosimetry

  11. Correlation between energy deposition and molecular damage from Auger electrons: A case study of ultra-low energy (5–18 eV) electron interactions with DNA

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rezaee, Mohammad; Hunting, Darel J.; Sanche, Léon

    2015-01-01

    Purpose The present study introduces a new method to establish a direct correlation between biologically related physical parameters (i.e., stopping and damaging cross sections, respectively) for an Auger-electron emitting radionuclide decaying within a target molecule (e.g., DNA), so as to evaluate the efficacy of the radionuclide at the molecular level. These parameters can be applied to the dosimetry of Auger electrons and the quantification of their biological effects, which are the main criteria to assess the therapeutic efficacy of Auger-electron emitting radionuclides. Methods Absorbed dose and stopping cross section for the Auger electrons of 5–18 eV emitted by 125I within DNA were determined by developing a nanodosimetric model. The molecular damages induced by these Auger electrons were investigated by measuring damaging cross section, including that for the formation of DNA single- and double-strand breaks. Nanoscale films of pure plasmid DNA were prepared via the freeze-drying technique and subsequently irradiated with low-energy electrons at various fluences. The damaging cross sections were determined by employing a molecular survival model to the measured exposure–response curves for induction of DNA strand breaks. Results For a single decay of 125I within DNA, the Auger electrons of 5–18 eV deposit the energies of 12.1 and 9.1 eV within a 4.2-nm3 volume of a hydrated or dry DNA, which results in the absorbed doses of 270 and 210 kGy, respectively. DNA bases have a major contribution to the deposited energies. Ten-electronvolt and high linear energy transfer 100-eV electrons have a similar cross section for the formation of DNA double-strand break, while 100-eV electrons are twice as efficient as 10 eV in the induction of single-strand break. Conclusions Ultra-low-energy electrons (electron emitting radionuclides; hence, they should be considered in the dosimetry calculation of such radionuclides. Moreover, absorbed dose is not an appropriate

  12. Auger-electron spectra of F{sub 3}SiCH{sub 2}CH{sub 2}Si(CH{sub 3}){sub 3} obtained by using monochromatized synchrotron radiation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nagaoka, Shin-ichi, E-mail: nagaoka@ehimegw.dpc.ehime-u.ac.j [Department of Chemistry, Faculty of Science, Ehime University, Matsuyama 790-8577 (Japan); Nitta, Akiko [Department of Chemistry, Faculty of Science, Ehime University, Matsuyama 790-8577 (Japan); Tamenori, Yusuke [Japan Synchrotron Radiation Research Institute/SPring-8, 1-1-1 Kouto, Sayo-cho, Sayo-gun 679-5198 (Japan); Fukuzawa, Hironobu; Ueda, Kiyoshi [Institute of Multidisciplinary Research for Advanced Materials, Tohoku University, Sendai 980-8577 (Japan); Takahashi, Osamu [Department of Chemistry, Graduate School of Science, Hiroshima University, Higashi-Hiroshima 739-8526 (Japan); Kakiuchi, Takuhiro [Department of Chemistry, Faculty of Science, Ehime University, Matsuyama 790-8577 (Japan); Institute of Materials Structure Science (IMSS), High Energy Accelerator Research Organization (KEK), 1-1 Oho, Tsukuba 305-0801 (Japan); Kitajima, Yoshinori; Mase, Kazuhiko; Suzuki, Isao H. [Institute of Materials Structure Science (IMSS), High Energy Accelerator Research Organization (KEK), 1-1 Oho, Tsukuba 305-0801 (Japan)

    2009-12-15

    A study on Auger-electron spectra of F{sub 3}SiCH{sub 2}CH{sub 2}Si(CH{sub 3}){sub 3} was performed by using monochromatized synchrotron radiation. The normal Si:L{sub 23}VV Auger-electron spectrum was measured in the vapor phase and characterized through the ab initio molecular orbital calculation. The cascade Si:L{sub 23}VV Auger-electron spectra were also obtained by L{sub 23}-holes creation through Si:KL{sub 23}L{sub 23} Auger transitions after Si:1s photoexcitation in the vapor phase or its photoelectron emission in the condensed phase. Further the C:KVV and F:KVV Auger-electron spectra were measured and discussed in comparison with those of some related molecules.

  13. Transcriptomic Signatures of Auger Electron Radioimmunotherapy Using Nuclear Targeting 111In-Trastuzumab for Potential Combination Therapies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Huizi Keiko; Morokoshi, Yukie; Daino, Kazuhiro; Furukawa, Takako; Kamada, Tadashi; Saga, Tsuneo

    2015-01-01

    Abstract 111In-labeled trastuzumab modified with nuclear localizing signal (NLS) peptides (111In-trastuzumab-NLS) efficiently delivers an Auger electron (AE) emitter 111In into the cell nucleus and is thus a promising radiopharmaceutical in AE radioimmunotherapy (AE-RIT) for targeted killing of HER2-positive cancer. However, further improvement of its therapeutic efficacy is required. In this study, the authors show a transcriptomic approach to identify potential targets for enhancing the cytotoxic effects of 111In-trastuzumab-NLS. They generated two types of 111In-trastuzumab-NLS harboring different numbers of NLS peptides, 111In-trastuzumab-NLS-S and -L. These radioimmunoconjugates (230 and 460 kBq) showed a significant higher cytotoxicity to SKBR3 human breast cancer cells overexpressing HER2 compared to 111In-trastuzumab. Microarray analysis revealed that NF-kB-related genes (38 genes) were significantly changed in transcription by 111In trastuzumab-NLS-L (230 kBq) treatment. Quantitative reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction confirmed the microarray data by showing transcriptional alternation of selected NF-κB target genes in cells treated with 111In-trastuzumab-NLS-L. Interestingly, bortezomib, a drug known as a NF-κB modulator, significantly enhanced the cytotoxicity of 111In-trastuzumab-NLS-L in SKBR3 cells. Taken together, the transcriptome data suggest the possibility that the modulation of NF-kB signaling activity is a molecular signature of 111In-trastuzumab-NLS and coadministration of bortezomib may be efficacious in enhancement of AE-RIT with 111In-trastuzumab-NLS. PMID:26447839

  14. Scanning Auger Electron Microscope

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Laboratory Consortium — A JEOL model 7830F field emission source, scanning Auger microscope.Specifications / Capabilities:Ultra-high vacuum (UHV), electron gun range from 0.1 kV to 25 kV,...

  15. Calculation of DNA strand breaks due to direct and indirect effects of Auger electrons from incorporated 123I and 125I radionuclides using the Geant4 computer code.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Raisali, Gholamreza; Mirzakhanian, Lalageh; Masoudi, Seyed Farhad; Semsarha, Farid

    2013-01-01

    In this work the number of DNA single-strand breaks (SSB) and double-strand breaks (DSB) due to direct and indirect effects of Auger electrons from incorporated (123)I and (125)I have been calculated by using the Geant4-DNA toolkit. We have performed and compared the calculations for several cases: (125)I versus (123)I, source positions and direct versus indirect breaks to study the capability of the Geant4-DNA in calculations of DNA damage yields. Two different simple geometries of a 41 base pair of B-DNA have been simulated. The location of (123)I has been considered to be in (123)IdUrd and three different locations for (125)I. The results showed that the simpler geometry is sufficient for direct break calculations while indirect damage yield is more sensitive to the helical shape of DNA. For (123)I Auger electrons, the average number of DSB due to the direct hits is almost twice the DSB due to the indirect hits. Furthermore, a comparison between the average number of SSB or DSB caused by Auger electrons of (125)I and (123)I in (125)IdUrd and (123)IdUrd shows that (125)I is 1.5 times more effective than (123)I per decay. The results are in reasonable agreement with previous experimental and theoretical results which shows the applicability of the Geant-DNA toolkit in nanodosimetry calculations which benefits from the open-source accessibility with the advantage that the DNA models used in this work enable us to save the computational time. Also, the results showed that the simpler geometry is suitable for direct break calculations, while for the indirect damage yield, the more precise model is preferred.

  16. Study of O/Ni(100) with LEED (low-energy electron diffraction) and AES (auger electron spectroscopy) from chemisorption to oxidation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wang, Wen-Di.

    1990-11-16

    The structures formed on the Ni(100) surface during oxygen adsorption, leading to oxidation, are studied with Video-LEED (low-energy electron diffraction) and AES (Auger electron spectroscopy). The temperature- and exposure-dependence in the development of LEED patterns observed during oxidation of Ni(100), at oxidation temperatures of 80 to 400 K, are investigated extensively. Integrated diffraction spot intensities and fractional spot profiles are measured quantitatively and continuously, allowing unambiguous correlation of various surface processes. AES is used to measure the oxidation onset during adsorption and the final relative thickness of the oxide. 48 figs., 79 refs.

  17. Observation of fine structure in auger electron spectra for chemical state analysis. Auger denshi bunko ho ni yoru jotai bunseki no tame no spectrum bisai kozo kansatsu

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hirokawa, K. (Tohoku Univ., Sendai (Japan). Inst. for Materials Research); Fukuda, Y. (Shizuoka Univ., Shizuoka (Japan). Research Inst. of Electronics); Suzuki, K. (Nippon Steel Corp., Tokyo (Japan)); Hashimoto, S. (NKK Corp., Tokyo (Japan)); Suzuki, T. (Kawasaki Steel Corp., Kobe (Japan)); Usuki, N. (Sumotomo Metal Industries, Ltd., Osaka (Japan)); Gennai, N. (Kobelco Research Inst., Inc., Kobe (Japan)); Yoshida, S. (Daido Steel Co. Ltd., Nagoya (Japan)); Koda, M. (Nisshin Steel Co. Ltd., Tokyo (Japan)); Sezaki, H. (Hitachi Metals, Ltd., Tokyo (Japan)); Horie, H. (Kyushu Electronic Metal Co. Ltd., Fukuoka (Japan)); Tanaka, A. (ULVAC-PHI Incorporated, Kanagawa (Japan)); Otsubo, T. (The Japan Iron and Steel Federation, Tokyo (Japan))

    1991-09-01

    Cooperative researches by participation of 8 analytical laboratories such as Institute for Materials Research, Tohoku University and Steel Research Center, NKK Corporation, etc. were conducted wherein the common samples of Au, Fe, Ni, Al and their oxides were measured by means of Auger electron spectra. By virtue of an elastic scattering peak apparatus and the standardization of the sample locations, peak energy values of Auger electron spectra obtained by the respective equipment are neutrally in good agreement. Auger profiles (peak intensity) considerably change according to the respective units and the measuring conditions. When the spectra are as sharp as in LMM, LMV and LVV of Fe, Ni and their oxides, and emerge, as in the case of LMM and LMV, in mutually close energy value, the difference in the ratio of spectrum intensity by the respective machines and measuring methods is small in metal oxides, but, in the case of LVV LMM, the state analysis can be made by its slight change. 10 refs., 9 figs., 1 tab.

  18. 111In-BnDTPA-F3: an Auger electron-emitting radiotherapeutic agent that targets nucleolin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cornelissen, Bart; Waller, Andrew; Target, Carol; Kersemans, Veerle; Smart, Sean; Vallis, Katherine A

    2012-02-20

    The F3 peptide (KDEPQRRSARLSAKPAPPKPEPKPKKAPAKK), a fragment of the human high mobility group protein 2, binds nucleolin. Nucleolin is expressed in the nuclei of normal cells but is also expressed on the membrane of some cancer cells. The goal was to investigate the use of 111In-labeled F3 peptide for Auger electron-targeted radiotherapy. F3 was labeled with fluorescein isothiocyanate (FITC) for confocal microscopy and conjugated to p-SCN-benzyl-diethylenetriaminepentaacetic acid (BnDTPA) for labeling with 111In to form 111In-BnDTPA-F3. MDA-MB-231-H2N (231-H2N) human breast cancer cells were exposed to 111In-BnDTPA-F3 and used in cell fractionation, γH2AX immunostaining (a marker of DNA double-strand breaks), and clonogenic assays. In vivo, biodistribution studies of 111In-BnDTPA-F3 were performed in 231-H2N xenograft-bearing mice. In tumor growth delay studies, 111In-BnDTPA-F3 (3 μg, 6 MBq/μg) was administered intravenously to 231-H2N xenograft-bearing mice once weekly for 3 weeks. Membrane-binding of FITC-F3 was observed in 231-H2N cells, and there was co-localization of FITC-F3 with nucleolin in the nuclei. After exposure of 231-H2N cells to 111In-BnDTPA-F3 for 2 h, 1.7% of 111In added to the medium was membrane-bound. Of the bound 111In, 15% was internalized, and of this, 37% was localized in the nucleus. Exposure of 231-H2N cells to 111In-BnDTPA-F3 (1 μM, 6 MBq/μg) resulted in a dose-dependent increase in γH2AX foci and in a significant reduction of clonogenic survival compared to untreated cells or cells exposed to unlabeled BnDTPA-F3 (46 ± 4.1%, 100 ± 1.8%, and 132 ± 7.7%, respectively). In vivo, tumor uptake of 111In-BnDTPA-F3 (3 μg, 6 MBq/μg) at 3-h post-injection was 1% of the injected dose per gram (%ID/g), and muscle uptake was 0.5%ID/g. In tumor growth delay studies, tumor growth rate was reduced 19-fold compared to untreated or unlabeled BnDTPA-F3-treated mice (p = 0.023). 111In-BnDTPA-F3 is internalized into 231-H2N cells and translocates

  19. Angular distributions of {sup 2}P{sub {minus}} and {sup 2}P{sub +} auger electrons arising from B{sup +} ions on He

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shafroth, S.M. [Univ. of North Carolina, Chapel Hill, NC (United States)

    1994-12-31

    Projectile Auger electrons arising from 66 keV/U and 136 keV/U B{sup +} ions incident on 10 mTorr differentially pumped He were studied. Specifically, {sup 2}P{sub {minus}} and {sup 2}P{sub +} Auger electron transitions to the {sup 1}S ground state were detected using a modified version of the Swenson movable-channel-plate electron spectrometer. Electron spectra were obtained at 10, 20, 30, 40, 50, 60 deg lab and were transformed to; the projectile frame, where the energies of the (1s2s2p){sup 2}P{sub {minus}} and (1s2s2p){sup 2}P{sub +} Auger electron transitions to the (1s{sup 2}){sup 1}S g.s. are 161 and 164 eV respectively. The {sup 2}P{sub {minus}} and {sup 2}P{sub +} states may arise from two step processes such as; 1s-2p excitation and 2s ionization or 1s ionization and 2s-2p excitation of ground state projectiles (1s{sup 2}2s{sup 2}){sup 1}S. {sup 2}P{sub {minus}} and {sup 2}P{sub +} states most probably arise from metastable (1s{sup 2}2s2p){sup 1}P, {sup 3}P ion beams via single ionization of a 1s electron. The angular distributions for the {sup 2}P{sub {minus}} and {sup 2}P{sub +} states are quite different. The P{sub +} states are more forward peaked than the P{sub {minus}} states, which are more isotropic. As the B{sup +} energy increases, the P{sub +} state becomes more isotropic. Deveney et al. show that for 1 MeV/U C{sup 3+} on He, the P{sub +}/P{sub {minus}} ratio at 10{degrees} lab is not statistical. This may be connected with the different behaviors in the angular distributions reported on here.

  20. The Effect of Stress in the Density of States of Amorphous Carbon Films Determined by X-Ray Excited Auger Electron Spectroscopy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    P. F. Barbieri

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Amorphous carbon films can be prepared with a large variety of structure and have been used in a number of technological applications. Many of their properties have been determined, but very little is known concerning the effect of pressure on their properties. In this work we investigate the influence of pressure of graphite-like amorphous carbon films on the density of states (DOS using X-ray Excited Auger Electron Spectroscopy (XAES and the second derivate method of the XAES. The films were deposited by ion beam deposition and simultaneously bombarded with argon, which is responsible for the variation of the film stress, reaching extremely high values (4.5 GPa. Marked variations of the density of states of the pπ, pσ, sp, and s components were observed with increasing stress.

  1. Direct measurement of Auger electrons emitted from a semiconductor light-emitting diode under electrical injection: identification of the dominant mechanism for efficiency droop.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iveland, Justin; Martinelli, Lucio; Peretti, Jacques; Speck, James S; Weisbuch, Claude

    2013-04-26

    We report on the unambiguous detection of Auger electrons by electron emission spectroscopy from a cesiated InGaN/GaN light-emitting diode under electrical injection. Electron emission spectra were measured as a function of the current injected in the device. The appearance of high energy electron peaks simultaneously with an observed drop in electroluminescence efficiency shows that hot carriers are being generated in the active region (InGaN quantum wells) by an Auger process. A linear correlation was measured between the high energy emitted electron current and the "droop current"--the missing component of the injected current for light emission. We conclude that the droop phenomenon in GaN light-emitting diodes originates from the excitation of Auger processes.

  2. Absorbed dose evaluation of Auger electron-emitting radionuclides: impact of input decay spectra on dose point kernels and S-values

    Science.gov (United States)

    Falzone, Nadia; Lee, Boon Q.; Fernández-Varea, José M.; Kartsonaki, Christiana; Stuchbery, Andrew E.; Kibédi, Tibor; Vallis, Katherine A.

    2017-03-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate the impact of decay data provided by the newly developed stochastic atomic relaxation model BrIccEmis on dose point kernels (DPKs - radial dose distribution around a unit point source) and S-values (absorbed dose per unit cumulated activity) of 14 Auger electron (AE) emitting radionuclides, namely 67Ga, 80mBr, 89Zr, 90Nb, 99mTc, 111In, 117mSn, 119Sb, 123I, 124I, 125I, 135La, 195mPt and 201Tl. Radiation spectra were based on the nuclear decay data from the medical internal radiation dose (MIRD) RADTABS program and the BrIccEmis code, assuming both an isolated-atom and condensed-phase approach. DPKs were simulated with the PENELOPE Monte Carlo (MC) code using event-by-event electron and photon transport. S-values for concentric spherical cells of various sizes were derived from these DPKs using appropriate geometric reduction factors. The number of Auger and Coster-Kronig (CK) electrons and x-ray photons released per nuclear decay (yield) from MIRD-RADTABS were consistently higher than those calculated using BrIccEmis. DPKs for the electron spectra from BrIccEmis were considerably different from MIRD-RADTABS in the first few hundred nanometres from a point source where most of the Auger electrons are stopped. S-values were, however, not significantly impacted as the differences in DPKs in the sub-micrometre dimension were quickly diminished in larger dimensions. Overestimation in the total AE energy output by MIRD-RADTABS leads to higher predicted energy deposition by AE emitting radionuclides, especially in the immediate vicinity of the decaying radionuclides. This should be taken into account when MIRD-RADTABS data are used to simulate biological damage at nanoscale dimensions.

  3. WE-AB-204-12: Dosimetry at the Sub-Cellular Scale of Auger-Electron Emitter 99m-Tc in a Mouse Single Thyroid Follicle Model

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Taborda, A; Benabdallah, N; Desbree, A [Institut de Radioprotection et de Surete Nucleaire, Fontenay-aux-roses (France)

    2015-06-15

    Purpose: To perform a dosimetry study at the sub-cellular scale of Auger-electron emitter 99m-Tc using a mouse single thyroid cellular model to investigate the contribution of the 99m-Tc Auger-electrons to the absorbed dose and possible link to the thyroid stunning in in vivo experiments in mice, recently reported in literature. Methods: The simulation of S-values for Auger-electron emitting radionuclides was performed using both the recent MCNP6 software and the Geant4-DNA extension of the Geant4 toolkit. The dosimetric calculations were validated through comparison with results from literature, using a simple model of a single cell consisting of two concentric spheres of unit density water and for six Auger-electron emitting radionuclides. Furthermore, the S-values were calculated using a single thyroid follicle model for uniformly distributed 123-I and 125-I radionuclides and compared with published S-values. After validation, the simulation of the S-values was performed for the 99m-Tc radionuclide within the several mouse thyroid follicle cellular compartments, considering the radiative and non-radiative transitions of the 99m-Tc radiation spectrum. Results: The calculated S-values using MCNP6 are in good agreement with the results from literature, validating its use for the 99m-Tc S-values calculations. The most significant absorbed dose corresponds to the case where the radionuclide is uniformly distributed in the follicular cell’s nucleus, with a S-value of 7.8 mGy/disintegration, due mainly to the absorbed Auger-electrons. The results show that, at a sub-cellular scale, the emitted X-rays and gamma particles do not contribute significantly to the absorbed dose. Conclusion: In this work, MCNP6 was validated for dosimetric studies at the sub-cellular scale. It was shown that the contribution of the Auger-electrons to the absorbed dose is important at this scale compared to the emitted photons’ contribution and can’t be neglected. The obtained S

  4. Estrogen Injection

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... estradiol cypionate and estradiol valerate forms of estrogen injection are used to treat hot flushes (hot flashes; ... consider a different treatment. These forms of estrogen injection are also sometimes used to treat the symptoms ...

  5. Estrogen Test

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... eGFR) Estrogen/Progesterone Receptor Status Estrogens Ethanol Extractable Nuclear Antigen Antibodies (ENA) Panel Factor V Leiden Mutation ... and Acute Coronary Syndrome Heart Disease Hemochromatosis Hemoglobin Abnormalities Hepatitis HIV Infection and AIDS Huntington Disease Hypertension ...

  6. (111)In-labeled trastuzumab (Herceptin) modified with nuclear localization sequences (NLS): an Auger electron-emitting radiotherapeutic agent for HER2/neu-amplified breast cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Costantini, Danny L; Chan, Conrad; Cai, Zhongli; Vallis, Katherine A; Reilly, Raymond M

    2007-08-01

    ] for (111)In-NLS-trastuzumab and 1.1 %ID/g for (111)In-trastuzumab). (111)In-NLS-trastuzumab was 5- and 2-fold more potent at killing SK-BR-3 and MDA-MB-361 cells than (111)In-trastuzumab, respectively, whereas toxicity toward MDA-MB-231 cells was minimal. (111)In-NLS-trastuzumab was 6-fold more effective at killing SK-BR-3 cells than unlabeled trastuzumab. Formation of gammaH2AX foci occurred in a greater proportion of BC cells after incubation with (111)In-NLS-trastuzumab compared with (111)In-trastuzumab or unlabeled trastuzumab. NLS-peptides routed (111)In-trastuzumab to the nucleus of HER2/neu-positive human BC cells, rendering the radiopharmaceutical lethal to the cells through the emission of nanometer-micrometer range Auger electrons. The greater cytotoxic potency of (111)In-NLS-trastuzumab compared with unlabeled trastuzumab in vitro and its favorable tumor-targeting properties in vivo suggest that it could be an effective targeted radiotherapeutic agent for HER2/neu-amplified BC in humans.

  7. ¹¹¹In-Bn-DTPA-nimotuzumab with/without modification with nuclear translocation sequence (NLS) peptides: an Auger electron-emitting radioimmunotherapeutic agent for EGFR-positive and trastuzumab (Herceptin)-resistant breast cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fasih, Aisha; Fonge, Humphrey; Cai, Zhongli; Leyton, Jeffrey V; Tikhomirov, Ilia; Done, Susan J; Reilly, Raymond M

    2012-08-01

    Increased expression of epidermal growth factor receptors (EGFR) in breast cancer (BC) is often associated with trastuzumab (Herceptin)-resistant forms of the disease and represents an attractive target for novel therapies. Nimotuzumab is a humanized IgG(1) monoclonal antibody that is in clinical trials for treatment of EGFR-overexpressing malignancies. We show here that nimotuzumab derivatized with benzylisothiocyanate diethylenetriaminepentaacetic acid for labelling with the subcellular range Auger electron-emitter, (111)In and modified with nuclear translocation sequence (NLS) peptides ((111)In-NLS-Bn-DTPA-nimotuzumab) was bound, internalized and transported to the nucleus of EGFR-positive BC cells. Emission of Auger electrons in close proximity to the nucleus caused multiple DNA double-strand breaks which diminished the clonogenic survival (CS) of MDA-MB-468 cells that have high EGFR density (2.4 × 10(6) receptors/cell) to less than 3 %. (111)In-Bn-DTPA-nimotuzumab without NLS peptide modification was sevenfold less effective for killing MDA-MB-468 cells. (111)In-Bn-DTPA-nimotuzumab with/without NLS peptide modification were equivalently cytotoxic to MDA-MB-231 and TrR1 BC cells that have moderate EGFR density (5.4 × 10(5) or 4.2 × 10(5) receptors/cell, respectively) reducing their CS by twofold. MDA-MB-231 cells have intrinsic trastuzumab resistance due to low HER2 density, whereas TrR1 cells have acquired resistance despite HER2 overexpression. Biodistribution and microSPECT/CT imaging revealed that (111)In-NLS-Bn-DTPA-nimotuzumab exhibited more rapid elimination from the blood and lower tumour uptake than (111)In-Bn-DTPA-nimotuzumab. Tumour uptake of the radioimmunoconjugates in mice with MDA-MB-468 xenografts was high (8-16 % injected dose/g) and was blocked by administration of an excess of unlabelled nimotuzumab, demonstrating EGFR specificity. We conclude that (111)In-Bn-DTPA-nimotuzumab with/without NLS peptide modification are promising Auger

  8. Utility of γH2AX as a molecular marker of DNA double-strand breaks in nuclear medicine: applications to radionuclide therapy employing auger electron-emitting isotopes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mah, Li-Jeen; Orlowski, Christian; Ververis, Katherine; El-Osta, Assam; Karagiannis, Tom C

    2011-01-01

    There is an intense interest in the development of radiopharmaceuticals for cancer therapy. In particular, radiopharmaceuticals which involve targeting radionuclides specifically to cancer cells with the use of monoclonal antibodies (radioimmunotherapy) or peptides (targeted radiotherapy) are being widely investigated. For example, the ultra-short range Auger electron-emitting isotopes, which are discussed in this review, are being considered in the context of DNAtargeted radiotherapy. The efficient quantitative evaluation of the levels of damage caused by such potential radiopharmaceuticals is required for assessment of therapeutic efficacy and determination of relevant doses for successful treatment. The DNA double-strand break surrogate marker, γH2AX, has emerged as a useful biomonitor of damage and thus effectiveness of treatment, offering a highly specific and sensitive means of assessment. This review will cover the potential applications of γH2AX in nuclear medicine, in particular radionuclide therapy.

  9. Auger electron emitter against multiple myeloma - targeted endo-radio-therapy with {sup 125}I-labeled thymidine analogue 5-iodo-4'-thio-2'-deoxyuridine

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Morgenroth, Agnieszka, E-mail: amorgenroth@ukaachen.de [Nuclear Medicine Clinic, University Ulm, Albert-Einstein-Allee 23, D-89081 Ulm (Germany); Nuclear Medicine Clinic, University Aachen, RWTH, Pauwelsstrasse 30, D-52074 Aachen (Germany); Dinger, Cornelia; Zlatopolskiy, Boris D.; Al-Momani, Ehab; Glatting, Gerhard [Nuclear Medicine Clinic, University Ulm, Albert-Einstein-Allee 23, D-89081 Ulm (Germany); Mottaghy, Felix M. [Nuclear Medicine Clinic, University Aachen, RWTH, Pauwelsstrasse 30, D-52074 Aachen (Germany); Reske, Sven N. [Nuclear Medicine Clinic, University Ulm, Albert-Einstein-Allee 23, D-89081 Ulm (Germany)

    2011-10-15

    Introduction: Multiple myeloma (MM) is a plasma cell malignancy characterized by accumulation of malignant, terminally differentiated B cells in the bone marrow. Despite advances in therapy, MM remains an incurable disease. Novel therapeutic approaches are, therefore, urgently needed. Auger electron-emitting radiopharmaceuticals are attractive for targeted nano-irradiation therapy, given that DNA of malignant cells is selectively addressed. Here we evaluated the antimyeloma potential of the Auger electron-emitting thymidine analogue {sup 125}I-labeled 5-iodo-4'-thio-2'-deoxyuridine ([{sup 125}I]ITdU). Methods: Cellular uptake and DNA incorporation of [{sup 125}I]ITdU were determined in fluorodeoxyuridine-pretreated KMS12BM, U266, dexamethasone-sensitive MM1.S and -resistant MM1.R cell lines. The effect of stimulation with interleukin 6 (IL6) or insulin-like growth factor 1 (IGF1) on the intracellular incorporation of [{sup 125}I]ITdU was investigated in cytokine-sensitive MM1.S and MM1.R cell lines. Apoptotic cells were identified using Annexin V. Cleavage of caspase 3 and PARP was visualized by Western blot. DNA fragmentation was investigated using laddering assay. Therapeutic efficiency of [{sup 125}I]ITdU was proven by clonogenic assay. Results: [{sup 125}I]ITdU was shown to be efficiently incorporated into DNA of malignant cells, providing a promising mechanism for delivering highly toxic Auger radiation emitters into tumor DNA. [{sup 125}I]ITdU had a potent antimyeloma effect in cell lines representing distinct disease stages and, importantly, in cell lines sensitive or resistant to the conventional therapeutic agent, but was not toxic for normal plasma and bone marrow stromal cells. Furthermore, [{sup 125}I]ITdU abrogated the protective actions of IL6 and IGF1 on MM cells. [{sup 125}I]ITdU induced massive damage in the DNA of malignant plasma cells, which resulted in efficient inhibition of clonogenic growth. Conclusion: These studies may provide a

  10. Auger electron spectroscopy study of surface segregation in the binary alloys copper-1 atomic percent indium, copper-2 atomic percent tin, and iron-6.55 atomic percent silicon

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ferrante, J.

    1973-01-01

    Auger electron spectroscopy was used to examine surface segregation in the binary alloys copper-1 at. % indium, copper-2 at. % tin and iron-6.55 at. % silicon. The copper-tin and copper-indium alloys were single crystals oriented with the /111/ direction normal to the surface. An iron-6.5 at. % silicon alloy was studied (a single crystal oriented in the /100/ direction for study of a (100) surface). It was found that surface segregation occurred following sputtering in all cases. Only the iron-silicon single crystal alloy exhibited equilibrium segregation (i.e., reversibility of surface concentration with temperature) for which at present we have no explanation. McLean's analysis for equilibrium segregation at grain boundaries did not apply to the present results, despite the successful application to dilute copper-aluminum alloys. The relation of solute atomic size and solubility to surface segregation is discussed. Estimates of the depth of segregation in the copper-tin alloy indicate that it is of the order of a monolayer surface film.

  11. Positron lifetime measurements and positron-annihilation induced auger electron spectroscpy using slow positron beams; Teisoku yodenshi bimu wo mochiita yodenshi jumyo sokutei oyobi yodenshi shometsu reiki oje denshi bunko

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Suzuki, R. [Electrotechnical Lab., Tsukuba (Japan)

    1996-02-20

    Slow positron beam with less than several eV can be controlled freely such as accelerating, throttling the beam size, shortening the pulse or making pulse with short time width and so forth. These low positron beams are applied to various measurements like Doppler broadening measurement of annihilation {gamma} rays or lifetime measurement of positron, and secondary particle measurements using positron microscope, positron electron ray diffraction, flight time method and so forth. In particular, these recent years, high intensity slow positron beams were possible using accelerators like electron linac and its application is increasing. In this report, pulse shortening method for high intensity slow positron beam, and incidence energy variable positron lifetime measurement method using this slow pulsed beam and flight time type positron-annihilation-induced auger electron spectroscopy are outlined. In future, these measurements can be possible to carry out with high resolution and also with high counting rate if higher intensity monochromatic excellent positron beam than present one is produced. 31 refs., 5 figs.

  12. Estrogen and Osteoporosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lindsay, Robert

    1987-01-01

    This article reviews the use of estrogen in the prevention and treatment of osteoporosis. Dosage levels, interactions with other factors, side effects, and the mechanism of estrogen action are discussed. (Author/MT)

  13. Estrogens and aging skin

    OpenAIRE

    Thornton, M. Julie

    2013-01-01

    Estrogen deficiency following menopause results in atrophic skin changes and acceleration of skin aging. Estrogens significantly modulate skin physiology, targeting keratinocytes, fibroblasts, melanocytes, hair follicles and sebaceous glands, and improve angiogenesis, wound healing and immune responses. Estrogen insufficiency decreases defense against oxidative stress; skin becomes thinner with less collagen, decreased elasticity, increased wrinkling, increased dryness and reduced vascularity...

  14. Metabolism of ethynyl estrogens.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Helton, E D; Goldzieher, J W

    1977-09-01

    The pharmacokinetics and metabolic conversion of the ethynylated estrogens are reviewed. Special emphasis is given to the comparative pharmacokinetics of ethynyl-estradiol in different populations of women. Similarly, the variability of ethynyl-estradiol and mestranol metabolism in humans resulting from presentation of radio-labeled steroid and purification of the metabolic products is presented and discussed. The concepts of estrogen hepatotoxicity are reviewed with respect to the known phenomenon of estrogen oxidative metabolism and covalent binding. Recent evidence for the metabolic removal of the 17alpha-ethynyl group is discussed, and its relationship to estrogen hepatoxicity is considered and related to the covalent binding phenomenon.

  15. [Estrogens and vascular thrombosis].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Colmou, A

    1982-09-01

    The incidence of thromboses among young women has increased with widespread use of oral contraceptives (OCs) due to the significant thromboembolic risk of estrogen. Estrogens intervene at the vascular, platelet, and plasma levels as a function of hormonal variations in the menstrual cycle, increasing the aggregability of the platelets and thrombocytes, accelerating the formation of clots, and decreasing the amount of antithrombin III. Estrogens are used in medicine to treat breast and prostate cancers and in gynecology to treat dysmenorrhea, during the menopause, and in contraception. Smoking, cardiovascular disease and hypertension, hypercholesterolemia, and diabetes are contraindicators to estrogen use. Thrombosis refers to blockage of a blood vessel by a clot or thrombus. Before estrogens are prescribed, a history of phlebitis, obesity, hyperlipidemia, or significant varicosities should be ruled out. A history of venous thrombosis, hyperlipoproteinemia, breast nodules, serious liver condition, allergies to progesterone, and some ocular diseases of vascular origin definitively rule out treatment with estrogens. A family history of infarct, embolism, diabetes, cancer, or vascular accidents at a young age signals a need for greater patient surveillance. All patients receiving estrogens should be carefully observed for signs of hypertension, hypercholesterolemia, hypercoagulability, or diabetes. Nurses have a role to play in carefully eliciting the patient's history of smoking, personal and family medical problems, and previous and current laboratory results, as well as in informing the patients of the risks and possible side effects of OCs, especially for those who smoke. Nurses should educate patients receiving estrogens, especially those with histories of circulatory problems, to avoid standing in 1 position for prolonged periods, avoid heat which is a vasodilator, avoid obesity, excercise regularly, wear appropriate footgear, and follow other good health

  16. Steroid estrogens, conjugated estrogens and estrogenic activity in farm dairy shed effluents

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gadd, Jennifer B., E-mail: j.gadd@niwa.co.n [Department of Chemistry, University of Canterbury, Private Bag 4800, Christchurch 8140 (New Zealand); Tremblay, Louis A., E-mail: tremblayl@landcareresearch.co.n [Landcare Research, PO Box 40, Lincoln, 7640 (New Zealand); Northcott, Grant L., E-mail: grant.northcott@plantandfood.co.n [Plant and Food Research, Private Bag 3123, Waikato Mail Centre, Hamilton 3240 (New Zealand)

    2010-03-15

    Agricultural wastes are a source of steroid estrogens and, if present, conjugated estrogens may add to the estrogen load released to soil and aquatic environments. Dairy shed effluent samples were collected from 18 farms for analysis of steroid estrogens by GC-MS, conjugated estrogens by LC-MS-MS, and estrogenic activity by E-screen in vitro bioassay. 17alpha-estradiol was found at highest concentrations (median 730 ng l{sup -1}), followed by estrone (100 ng l{sup -1}) and 17beta-estradiol (24 ng l{sup -1}). Conjugated estrogens (estrone-3-sulfate, 17alpha-estradiol-3-sulfate and 17beta-estradiol-3,17-disulfate) were measured in most samples (12-320 ng l{sup -1}). Median estrogenic activity was 46 ng l{sup -1} 17beta-estradiol equivalents. Conjugated estrogens contributed up to 22% of the total estrogen load from dairy farming, demonstrating their significance. Steroid estrogens dominated overall estrogenic activity measured in the samples. Significantly, 17alpha-estradiol contributed 25% of overall activity, despite potency 2% that of 17beta-estradiol, highlighting the importance in environmental risk assessments of this previously neglected compound. - In rural ecosystems, 17alpha-estradiol and conjugated estrogens are significant sources of environmental estrogens from agricultural wastes.

  17. Exercise, Eating, Estrogen, and Osteoporosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brown, Jim

    1986-01-01

    Osteoporosis affects millions of people, especially women. Three methods for preventing or managing osteoporosis are recommended: (1) exercise; (2) increased calcium intake; and (3) estrogen replacement therapy. (CB)

  18. Estrogen and Progestin (Hormone Replacement Therapy)

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Estrogen and progestin are two female sex hormones. Hormone replacement therapy works by replacing estrogen hormone that is no ... menopausal women. Progestin is added to estrogen in hormone replacement therapy to reduce the risk of uterine cancer in ...

  19. ESTROGEN IN THE LIMBIC SYSTEM

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    ter Horst, Gert J.; Litwack, G

    2010-01-01

    Estrogens are a group of steroid hormones that function as the primary female sex hormone. Estrogens not only have an important role in the regulation of the estrous or menstrual cycle but also control, for example, bone formation, the cardiovascular system, and cognitive functions. Estradiol (E2),

  20. Estrogen and gastrointestinal malignancy.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Hogan, A M

    2012-02-01

    The concept that E2 exerts an effect on the gastrointestinal tract is not new and its actions on intestinal mucosa have been investigated for at least three decades. An attempt to consolidate results of these investigations generates more questions than answers, thus suggesting that many unexplored avenues remain and that the full capabilities of this steroid hormone are far from understood. Evidence of its role in esophageal, gastric and gallbladder cancers is confusing and often equivocal. The most compelling evidence regards the protective role conferred by estrogen (or perhaps ERbeta) against the development and proliferation of colon cancer. Not only has the effect been described but also many mechanisms of action have been explored. It is likely that, along with surgery, chemotherapy and radiotherapy, hormonal manipulation will play an integral role in colon cancer management in the very near future.

  1. Estrogen Metabolism and Breast Cancer

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    pathway mediated by the generation and redox Cycling of reactive oxygen species through the metabolic effects of estrogen .... therapy. Several studies including the European. Organization for Research and Treatment of. Cancer ÇEORTC) trial,19 the ATAC (Arimidex, tamoxifen, alone or in combination) adjuvant breast.

  2. Mitochondria: Target organelles for estrogen action

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Małgorzata Chmielewska

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available Estrogens belong to a group of sex hormones, which have been shown to act in multidirectional way. Estrogenic effects are mediated by two types of intracellular receptors: estrogen receptor 1 (ESR1 and estrogen receptor 2 (ESR2. There are two basic mechanisms of estrogen action: 1 classical-genomic, in which the ligand-receptor complex acts as a transcriptional factor and 2 a nongenomic one, which is still not fully understood, but has been seen to lead to distinct biological effects, depending on tissue and ligand type. It is postulated that nongenomic effects may be associated with membrane signaling and the presence of classical nuclear receptors within the cell membrane. Estrogens act in a multidirectional way also within cell organelles. It is assumed that there is a mechanism which manages the migration of ESR into the mitochondrial membrane, wherein the exogenous estrogen affect the morphology of mitochondria. Estrogen, through its receptor, can directly modulate mitochondrial gene expression. Moreover, by regulating the level of reactive oxygen species, estrogens affect the biology of mitochondria. The considerations presented in this paper indicate the pleiotropic effects of estrogens, which represent a multidirectional pathway of signal transduction.

  3. Targeted Radiotherapy of Estrogen Receptor Positive Tumors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Raghavan Rajagopalan

    2006-08-31

    The overall objectives of the proposal were to develop estrogen receptor (ER) binding small molecule radiopharmaceuticals for targeted radiotherapy of ER positive (ER+) tumors. In particular, this proposal focused on embedding a {sup 186,188}Re or a {sup 32}P radionuclide into an estrogen steroidal framework by isosteric substitution such that the resulting structure is topologically similar to the estrogen (estrogen mimic). The estrogen mimic molecules expected to bind to the ER and exhibit biodistribution akin to that of native estrogen due to structural mimicry. It is anticipated that the {sup 186,188}Re- or a {sup 32}P-containing estrogen mimics will be useful for targeted molecular radiotherapy of ER+ tumors. It is well established that the in vivo target tissue uptake of estrogen like steroidal molecules is related to the binding of the steroids to sex hormone binding globulin (SHBG). SHBG is important in the uptake of estrogens and testosterone in target tissues by SHBG receptors on the cell surface. However, hitherto the design of estrogen like small molecule radiopharmaceuticals was focused on optimizing ER binding characteristics without emphasis on SHBG binding properties. Consequently, even the molecules with good ER affinity in vitro, performed poorly in biodistribution studies. Based on molecular modeling studies the proposal focused on developing estrogen mimics 1-3 which were topologically similar to native estrogens, and form hydrogen bonds in ER and SHBG in the same manner as those of native estrogens. To this end the technical objectives of the proposal focused on synthesizing the rhenium-estrone and estradiol mimics 1 and 2 respectively, and phosphorous estradiol mimic 3 and to assess their stability and in vitro binding characteristics to ER and SHBG.

  4. Estrogen turns down "the AIRE".

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bakhru, Pearl; Su, Maureen A

    2016-04-01

    Genetic alterations are known drivers of autoimmune disease; however, there is a much higher incidence of autoimmunity in women, implicating sex-specific factors in disease development. The autoimmune regulator (AIRE) gene contributes to the maintenance of central tolerance, and complete loss of AIRE function results in the development of autoimmune polyendocrinopathy syndrome type 1. In this issue of the JCI, Dragin and colleagues demonstrate that AIRE expression is downregulated in females as the result of estrogen-mediated alterations at the AIRE promoter. The association between estrogen and reduction of AIRE may at least partially account for the elevated incidence of autoimmune disease in women and has potential implications for sex hormone therapy.

  5. Distinct Effects of Estrogen on Mouse Maternal Behavior: The Contribution of Estrogen Synthesis in the Brain.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gen Murakami

    Full Text Available Estrogen surge following progesterone withdrawal at parturition plays an important role in initiating maternal behavior in various rodent species. Systemic estrogen treatment shortens the latency to onset of maternal behavior in nulliparous female rats that have not experienced parturition. In contrast, nulliparous laboratory mice show rapid onset of maternal behavior without estrogen treatment, and the role of estrogen still remains unclear. Here the effect of systemic estrogen treatment (for 2 h, 1 day, 3 days, and 7 days after progesterone withdrawal was examined on maternal behavior of C57BL/6 mice. This estrogen regimen led to different effects on nursing, pup retrieval, and nest building behaviors. Latency to nursing was shortened by estrogen treatment within 2 h. Moreover, pup retrieval and nest building were decreased. mRNA expression was also investigated for estrogen receptor α (ERα and for genes involved in regulating maternal behavior, specifically, the oxytocin receptor (OTR and vasopressin receptor in the medial amygdala (MeA and medial preoptic area (MPOA. Estrogen treatment led to decreased ERα mRNA in both regions. Although OTR mRNA was increased in the MeA, OTR and vasopressin receptor mRNA were reduced in the MPOA, showing region-dependent transcription regulation. To determine the mechanisms for the actions of estrogen treatment, the contribution of estrogen synthesis in the brain was examined. Blockade of estrogen synthesis in the brain by systemic letrozole treatment in ovariectomized mice interfered with pup retrieval and nest building but not nursing behavior, indicating different contributions of estrogen synthesis to maternal behavior. Furthermore, letrozole treatment led to an increase in ERα mRNA in the MeA but not in the MPOA, suggesting that involvement of estrogen synthesis is brain region dependent. Altogether, these results suggest that region-dependent estrogen synthesis leads to differential transcriptional

  6. CERAPP: Collaborative Estrogen Receptor Activity Prediction Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Environmental Protection Agency — Data from a large-scale modeling project called CERAPP (Collaborative Estrogen Receptor Activity Prediction Project) demonstrating using predictive computational...

  7. Estrogen and the brain: does estrogen treatment improve cognitive function?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hogervorst, Eef

    2013-03-01

    In this paper we describe potential reasons for the discrepancies between data from basic sciences and observational studies and those of large treatment studies investigating the association between brain function and sex steroids. Observational studies which often showed positive associations between hormone use and cognition can be affected by 'recall bias' and 'healthy user bias', while outcomes of treatment studies were hypothesized to be modified by age at treatment, age at or type of menopause, health status, addition of a progestogen or type of estrogen treatment. However, meta-analyses of data from treatment studies negate many of these hypotheses showing at best mainly short-term (up to 6 months) positive effects of estrogen treatment on cognition regardless of age. This positive effect may reverse, particularly in older women with prolonged hormone treatment, which was predominantly seen after addition of progestogen. Medroxyprogesterone acetate seemed to have worse effects on cognition than other types of progestogen in these long-term studies. Estradiol with or without a progestogen was three times more likely to have positive effects on cognition than conjugated equine estrogens. However, two-thirds of studies showed no associations at all which may be an underestimate given the possibility of publication bias. We briefly review alternative treatments, such as testosterone and soy-derived supplements, but currently insufficient data are available for conclusive comments. Women who have undergone surgical menopause or who undergo natural menopause before age 47 may benefit most from hormone treatment and a special case may need to be made for this group. Long-term safety studies for this group are urgently needed. 2013 © The Author(s).

  8. Quantum chemical studies of estrogenic compounds

    Science.gov (United States)

    Quantum chemical methods are potent tools to provide information on the chemical structure and electronic properties of organic molecules. Modern computational chemistry methods have provided a great deal of insight into the binding of estrogenic compounds to estrogenic receptors (ER), an important ...

  9. Estrogen induces glomerulosclerosis in analbuminemic rats

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Joles, JA; van Goor, H; Koomans, HA

    Progression of chronic renal disease: is usually more rapid in males, both In humans and in experimental animals. Estrogen-replacement studies indicate that this may be related to the beneficial effects of estrogen on the lipoprotein profile. However, in hyperlipidemic analbuminemic rats (NAR),

  10. Estrogen and progesterone receptors in gynecomastia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pensler, J M; Silverman, B L; Sanghavi, J; Goolsby, C; Speck, G; Brizio-Molteni, L; Molteni, A

    2000-10-01

    The etiology of gynecomastia is unknown. There seems to be no increased incidence of malignancies in patients with idiopathic gynecomastia; however, patients with Klinefelter syndrome exhibit an increased incidence of malignancy. The authors reviewed the results of 34 patients with gynecomastia diagnosed in adolescence who, following initial evaluation, had a mastectomy. The estrogen and progesterone receptors were analyzed in these patients. Three of the patients were diagnosed with Klinefelter syndrome. These three patients exhibited elevated amounts of estrogen and progesterone receptors. None of the patients who were not diagnosed with this syndrome demonstrated significant elevation of their estrogen or progesterone receptors. The presence of elevated estrogen and progesterone receptors in patients with Klinefelter syndrome provides a potential mechanism by which these patients may develop breast neoplasms. The absence of elevated estrogen and progesterone receptors in patients with idiopathic gynecomastia may serve to clarify why these patients' disease rarely degenerates into malignancy.

  11. Ozonation of estrogenic chemicals in biologically treated sewage

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, Kamilla Marie Speht; Andersen, Henrik Rasmus; Ledin, Anna

    2010-01-01

    for removal of 17 estrogenic chemicals. The estrogenic compounds included parabens, industrial phenols, sunscreen chemicals, and steroid estrogens. The obtained values of Electrical Energy per Order (EEOs) for the treatment of the estrogens were in the range 0.14–1.1 kWh/m3 corresponding to 1.7–14 g O3/m3...

  12. Estrogen Levels in the three Trimesters

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    into three trimester periods , as a means to simplify reference to ... In the normal non-pregnant female, estrogens are secreted in ... Department of Physiology, School of Basic Medical Sciences, College of Medical Sciences, University of Benin ...

  13. Sulfation of thyroid hormone by estrogen sulfotransferase

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    M.H.A. Kester (Monique); T.J. Visser (Theo); C.H. van Dijk (Caren); D. Tibboel (Dick); A.M. Hood (Margaret); N.J. Rose; W. Meinl; U. Pabel; H. Glatt; C.N. Falany; M.W. Coughtrie

    1999-01-01

    textabstractSulfation is one of the pathways by which thyroid hormone is inactivated. Iodothyronine sulfate concentrations are very high in human fetal blood and amniotic fluid, suggesting important production of these conjugates in utero. Human estrogen

  14. Breast Cancer and Estrogen-Alone Update

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Current Issue Past Issues Research News From NIH Breast Cancer and Estrogen-Alone Update Past Issues / Summer 2006 ... hormone therapy does not increase the risk of breast cancer in postmenopausal women, according to an updated analysis ...

  15. Urinary estrogen metabolites and breast cancer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Dallal, Cher M; Stone, Roslyn A; Cauley, Jane A

    2013-01-01

    ), and their ratio (2:16a-OHE1) in relation to breast cancer risk. ¿Methods: Primary data on 726 premenopausal women (183 invasive breast cancer cases and 543 controls) and 1,108 postmenopausal women (385 invasive breast cancer cases and 723 controls) were analyzed. Urinary estrogen metabolites were measured using...... enzyme linked immunosorbent assays. Study-specific and combined multivariable adjusted odds ratios (ORs) and 95% confidence intervals (CIs) were estimated based on tertiles of estrogen metabolites. Multinomial logistic regression models were fit according to hormone receptor status.¿Results: Higher......Background: Circulating estrogens are associated with increased breast cancer risk, yet the role of estrogen metabolites in breast carcinogenesis remains unclear. This combined analysis of 5 published studies evaluates urinary 2-hydroxyestrone (2-OHE1), 16a-hydroxyestrone (16a-OHE1...

  16. Estrogens, Genetic Polymorphisms and Breast Cancer Risk

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Okobia, Michael N; Bunker, Clareann H; Kuller, Lewis; Ferrell, Robert E; Anyanwu, Stanley N; Ezeome, Emmanuel R; Uche, Emmanuel E

    2004-01-01

    ... cancer in Nigerian women. A case-control study is being undertaken to investigate the exposure level to estrogen and its metabolites in these women by examining the genotype frequencies of the genes encoding aromatase...

  17. Estrogen May Influence Women's Depression Risk

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... news/fullstory_167353.html Estrogen May Influence Women's Depression Risk Early menstruation, more frequent periods seem to ... reproductive years may have a lower risk of depression, a new study finds. Previous research has suggested ...

  18. Immunosuppression Following Exposure to Exogenous Estrogens

    Science.gov (United States)

    1983-08-01

    and laboratory animals aad has been associated with endo- metrial cancer , breast cancer , and vaginal adenocarcinoma (McLachlan, 1980). In mice, DES...demonstrate binding affinity for the estrogen receptor are the flavones genistin, mirestrol, and the fluorescent coumestrol. The mycotoxin zearalanone (P...inhibition assay, Cancer Treatment Rep., 62:1807-1816. Eroschenko, V. P. and R. D. Palmiter (19?0), Estrogenicity of kepone in birds and mammals. In

  19. The relationship between estrogen, estrogen receptors and periodontal disease in adult women.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shapiro, Laurence F; Freeman, Katherine

    2014-11-01

    The literature supports the fact that estrogen plays an important role in skeletal maintenance and remodeling. Estrogen, acting through estrogen receptors in the cells of the periodontal ligament, has a regulatory interaction on bone dynamics through a complex set of basic multicellular units (BMUs). Deficiency of estrogen results in an increased number of BMUs and enhanced bone turnover. The impact of the changes in estrogen deficiency on bone dynamics is primarily mediated through osteoclasts, with greater interdiction of estrogen's actions on trabecular bone than on cortical bone. The purpose of this manuscript is to review the literature for evidence to support an association between estrogen and periodontal disease in adult women, as well as bone mineral density, and to help clarify the mechanism of action. We found in our review of all pertinent databases, including Cochrane, that there are few peer-reviewed clinical studies that examine the relationship between estrogen deficiency and periodontal disease, and bone mineral density (BMD) and periodontal disease. Thus, future research is needed to investigate these associations so that at-risk patients can be identified earlier to avoid functional and esthetic sequellae of periodontal disease.

  20. Vaginal estrogens for the treatment of dyspareunia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krychman, Michael L

    2011-03-01

    Vaginal atrophy, which is associated with vaginal itching, burning, dryness, irritation, and pain, is estimated to affect up to 40% of postmenopausal women. Estrogens play a key role in maintaining vaginal health; women with low serum estradiol are more likely to experience vaginal dryness, dyspareunia, and reduced sexual activity compared with women who have higher estradiol levels. The purpose of this review is to assess the prevalence and impact of dyspareunia, a symptom of vaginal atrophy, on the health of postmenopausal women and to evaluate treatment options using vaginal estrogens (U.S. Food and Drug Administration [FDA] approved). Relevant published literature was identified by searching Index Medicus using the PubMed online database. The search terms dyspareunia, vaginal estrogen, vaginal hormone therapy, vaginal atrophy, and atrophic vaginitis were the focus of the literature review. Current treatment guidelines for vaginal atrophy recommend the use of minimally absorbed local vaginal estrogens, along with non-hormonal lubricants or moisturizers, coupled with maintenance of sexual activity. Vaginal estrogen therapy has been shown to provide improvement in the signs and symptoms of vaginal or vulvar atrophy. Vaginal tablets, rings, and creams are indicated for the treatment of vaginal atrophy, and the FDA has recently approved a low-dose regimen of conjugated estrogens cream to treat moderate-to-severe postmenopausal dyspareunia. The use of low-dose vaginal estrogens has been shown to be effective in treating symptoms of vaginal atrophy without causing significant proliferation of the endometrial lining, and no significant differences have been seen among vaginal preparations in terms of endometrial safety. Women should be informed of the potential benefits and risks of the treatment options available, and with the help of their healthcare provider, choose an intervention that is most suitable to their individual needs and circumstances. © 2010

  1. Intratumoral levels of estrogens in breast cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blankenstein, M A; van de Ven, J; Maitimu-Smeele, I; Donker, G H; de Jong, P C; Daroszewski, J; Szymczak, J; Milewicz, A; Thijssen, J H

    1999-01-01

    Breast cancer tissue is an endocrine organ and particularly the estrogen biosynthetic properties of this tissue have been well studied. The concentration of estradiol in breast cancer tissue from postmenopausal patients is considerably higher than that in the circulation and appears to depend largely on local production. Androgenic precursor steroids are abundantly present, but estrogen storage pools like fatty acid derivatives appear to be less important than initially thought. New, potent and highly specific aromatase inhibitors effectively inhibit peripheral conversion of androgens to estrogens (Cancer Res. 53: 4563, 1993) as well as intratumour aromatase, median aromatase activity being 89% lower in the tissue from patients pretreated with aromatase inhibitor 7 days prior to surgery (P < 0.001). Also the intratissue concentrations of estrogens were decreased (64% and 80% reduction, respectively for estrone and estradiol; P = 0.001 and <0.05; Cancer Res. 57: 2109, 1997). These results illustrate that intratissue estrogen biosynthesis is effectively inhibited by the new generation of aromatase inhibitors. The pathophysiological consequences of this finding are currently under study.

  2. Estrogenicity of glabridin in Ishikawa cells.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Melissa Su Wei Poh

    Full Text Available Glabridin is an isoflavan from licorice root, which is a common component of herbal remedies used for treatment of menopausal symptoms. Past studies have shown that glabridin resulted in favorable outcome similar to 17β-estradiol (17β-E2, suggesting a possible role as an estrogen replacement therapy (ERT. This study aims to evaluate the estrogenic effect of glabridin in an in-vitro endometrial cell line -Ishikawa cells via alkaline phosphatase (ALP assay and ER-α-SRC-1-co-activator assay. Its effect on cell proliferation was also evaluated using Thiazoyl blue tetrazolium bromide (MTT assay. The results showed that glabridin activated the ER-α-SRC-1-co-activator complex and displayed a dose-dependent increase in estrogenic activity supporting its use as an ERT. However, glabridin also induced an increase in cell proliferation. When glabridin was treated together with 17β-E2, synergistic estrogenic effect was observed with a slight decrease in cell proliferation as compared to treatment by 17β-E2 alone. This suggest that the combination might be better suited for providing high estrogenic effects with lower incidences of endometrial cancer that is associated with 17β-E2.

  3. Non-feminizing estrogens: a novel neuroprotective therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Petrone, Ashley B; Gatson, Joshua W; Simpkins, James W; Reed, Miranda N

    2014-05-25

    While the conflict between basic science evidence for estrogen neuroprotection and the lack of effectiveness in clinical trials is only now being resolved, it is clear that strategies for estrogen neuroprotection that avoid activation of ERs have the potential for clinical application. Herein we review the evidence from both in vitro and in vivo studies that describe high potency neuroprotection with non-feminizing estrogens. We have characterized many of the essential chemical features of non-feminizing estrogens that eliminate or reduce ER binding while maintaining or enhancing neuroprotection. Additionally, we provide evidence that these non-feminizing estrogens have efficacy in protecting the brain from AD neuropathology and traumatic brain injury. In conclusion, it appears that the non-feminizing estrogen strategy for neuroprotection is a viable option to achieve the beneficial neuroprotective effects of estrogens while eliminating the toxic off-target effects of chronic estrogen administration. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  4. Estrogen receptor affinity chromatography: a new method for characterization of novel estrogenic disinfection by-products.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shang, Guodong; Xue, Jinling; Li, Man; Hu, Hong-Ying; Lu, Yun

    2014-06-01

    To identify the unknown estrogenic disinfection by-products (DBPs) from the chlorination extract, an effective method based on affinity chromatography with immobilized human recombinant estrogen receptor α (ERα) was developed, which has an advantage in targeting different potential estrogenic compounds from mixed sample simultaneously by comparing their relative binding activities to ER. The new method worked well for six known environmental estrogens. To further test the validity of this method for unknown chemicals, six DBPs of diethylstilbestrol (DES) with relatively strong ER binding affinity after chlorination were isolated and identified. It was found that except for 2-chloro-DES which showed 1.36 times stronger binding affinity than DES, most of the by-products bound to ER much more weakly than DES. All these seven by-products induced a dose-dependent transcriptional activation in two-hybrid-yeast assays. Z,Z-dienestrol (DE) and 2-chloro-DES, which exhibiting the weakest and the strongest binding affinity, were further tested for their transcriptional potential as 0.00243 and 0.014 compared to DES, respectively. However, they were still potential harmful environmental estrogenic disruptors as their estrogenic activities were much stronger than that of bisphenol A (BPA). These results demonstrated that the new method can help to screen unknown estrogenic compounds from mixture more efficiently. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  5. Estrogen-associated severe hypertriglyceridemia with pancreatitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aljenedil, Sumayah; Hegele, Robert A; Genest, Jacques; Awan, Zuhier

    Estrogen, whether therapeutic or physiologic, can cause hypertriglyceridemia. Hypertriglyceridemia-induced pancreatitis is a rare complication. We report 2 women who developed estrogen-associated severe hypertriglyceridemia with pancreatitis. The first patient developed pancreatitis secondary to hypertriglyceridemia associated with in vitro fertilization cycles. Marked reduction in her triglyceride was achieved with dietary restrictions and fibrate. The second patient developed pancreatitis secondary to hypertriglyceridemia during her pregnancies. She was noncompliant with the treatment; therefore, her triglyceride remained high after delivery. In both patients, no hypertriglyceridemia-associated genes mutations were identified, although the second patient had strong polygenic susceptibility to hypertriglyceridemia. Estrogen-induced severe hypertriglyceridemia with pancreatitis can be a life-threatening condition. Screening in high-risk patients is crucial to prevent subsequent complications. Copyright © 2016 National Lipid Association. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  6. Use of vaginal estrogen in Danish women

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Meaidi, Amani; Goukasian, Irina; Lidegaard, Oejvind

    2016-01-01

    INTRODUCTION: We know little about the use of vaginal estrogen in perimenopausal and postmenopausal women. We aimed to assess the prevalence of vaginal estrogen use in Denmark. MATERIAL AND METHODS: The study was designed as a nationwide cross-sectional study of all Danish women aged 40-79 years......, living in Denmark during the period 2007-2013. The Danish Prescription Register delivered data permitting us to assess the prevalence, age and regional geographical belonging of women purchasing prescribed vaginal estradiol. The number of women using over-the-counter vaginal estriol products...... was estimated from sale statistics from the same register. RESULTS: In 2013, 10.2% of all Danish women between 40 and 79 years of age used vaginal estradiol. The prevalence of women using this type of vaginal estrogen increased from 8.5% in year 2007 to 10.2% in 2013. The use peaked at 16.5% in women aged 60...

  7. Estrogenic and anti-estrogenic activity of 23 commercial textile dyes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bazin, Ingrid; Ibn Hadj Hassine, Aziza; Haj Hamouda, Yosra; Mnif, Wissem; Bartegi, Ahgleb; Lopez-Ferber, Miguel; De Waard, Michel; Gonzalez, Catherine

    2012-11-01

    The presence of dyes in wastewater effluent of textile industry is well documented. In contrast, the endocrine disrupting effects of these dyes and wastewater effluent have been poorly investigated. Herein, we studied twenty-three commercial dyes, usually used in the textile industry, and extracts of blue jean textile wastewater samples were evaluated for their agonistic and antagonistic estrogen activity. Total estrogenic and anti-estrogenic activities were measured using the Yeast Estrogen Screen bioassay (YES) that evaluates estrogen receptor binding-dependent transcriptional and translational activities. The estrogenic potencies of the dyes and wastewater samples were evaluated by dose-response curves and compared to the dose-response curve of 17β-estradiol (E2), the reference compound. The dose-dependent anti-estrogenic activities of the dyes and wastewater samples were normalized to the known antagonistic effect of 4-hydroxytamoxifen (4-OHT) on the induction of the lac Z reporter gene by E2. About half azo textile dyes have anti-estrogenic activity with the most active being Blue HFRL. Most azo dyes however have no or weak estrogenic activity. E2/dye or E2/waste water ER competitive binding assays show activity of Blue HFRL, benzopurpurine 4B, Everzol Navy Blue FBN, direct red 89 BNL 200% and waste water samples indicating a mechanism of action common to E2. Our results indicate that several textile dyes are potential endocrine disrupting agents. The presence of some of these dyes in textile industry wastewater may thus impact the aquatic ecosystem. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  8. Estrogenic activity of flavonoids in mice. The importance of estrogen receptor distribution, metabolism and bioavailability

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Breinholt, Vibeke; Hossaini, A.; Svendsen, Gitte W.

    2000-01-01

    The in vivo estrogenic potential of the flavonoids apigenin, kaempferol, genistein and equol was investigated in immature female mice. Genistein and equol, administered by gavage for 4 consecutive days [post-natal day (PND) 17-20, 100 mg/kg body weight], was found to significantly increase uterine...... or lower potency. Bioavailability, metabolism, the ability to alter ER alpha distribution in the uterus and the estrogenic potential of parent compound and metabolites may thus contribute to the differences in in vivo estrogenicity of dietary flavonoids....

  9. The Tissue-Selective Estrogen Complex (Bazedoxifene/Conjugated Estrogens for the Treatment of Menopause

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stefano Lello

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available The tissue-selective estrogen complex (TSEC pairs conjugated estrogens (CE with a selective estrogen receptor modulator (SERM, bazedoxifene acetate (BZA. A 2-year treatment with the TSEC improved vasomotor symptoms, quality of life, and vaginal atrophy in healthy postmenopausal women. In addition, the TSEC prevented vertebral and hip bone loss without increasing mammographic density, breast tenderness, the risk of myocardial infarction, stroke, or venous thromboembolism. Finally, the BZA 20 mg/CE 0.45 mg dose did not increase the risk of endometrial hyperplasia. Based on these findings, the TSEC can be considered as a first-line treatment for symptomatic postmenopausal women.

  10. Estrogen and colorectal cancer incidence and mortality.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lavasani, Sayeh; Chlebowski, Rowan T; Prentice, Ross L; Kato, Ikuko; Wactawski-Wende, Jean; Johnson, Karen C; Young, Alicia; Rodabough, Rebecca; Hubbell, F Allan; Mahinbakht, Ali; Simon, Michael S

    2015-09-15

    The preponderance of observational studies describe an association between the use of estrogen alone and a lower incidence of colorectal cancer. In contrast, no difference in the incidence of colorectal cancer was seen in the Women's Health Initiative (WHI) randomized, placebo-controlled trial with estrogen alone after a mean intervention of 7.1 years and cumulative follow-up of 13.2 years. This study extends these findings by providing detailed analyses of the effects of estrogen alone on the histology, grade, and stage of colorectal cancer, relevant subgroups, and deaths from and after colorectal cancer. The WHI study was a randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled trial involving 10,739 postmenopausal women with prior hysterectomy. Participants were assigned to conjugated equine estrogen at 0.625 mg/d (n = 5279) or a matching placebo (n = 5409). Rates of colorectal cancer diagnoses and deaths from and after colorectal cancer were assessed throughout the study. Colorectal cancer rates in the estrogen-alone and placebo groups were comparable: 0.14% and 0.12% per year, respectively (hazard ratio [HR], 1.13; 95% confidence interval [CI], 0.83-1.58; P = .43). Bowel screening examinations were comparable between the 2 groups throughout the study. The grade, stage, and location of colorectal cancer did not differ between the randomization groups. There were more colorectal cancer deaths in the estrogen-alone group (34 [0.05%] vs 24 [0.03%]; HR, 1.46, 95% CI, 0.86-2.46; P = .16), but the difference was not statistically significant. The colorectal cancer incidence was higher for participants with a history of colon polyp removal in the estrogen-alone group (0.23% vs 0.02%; HR, 13.47; nominal 95% CI, 1.76-103.0; P colorectal cancer or deaths from or after colorectal cancer. A possibly higher risk of colorectal cancer in women with prior colon polyp removal who use estrogen alone requires confirmation. © 2015 American Cancer Society.

  11. Neuroprotection from Brain Injury by Novel Estrogens

    Science.gov (United States)

    2001-08-01

    Cholst I, McEwen B, Amador R, Zabriskie J. Observations in a preliminary open trial of estradiol therapy for senile dementia -Alzheimer’s type...system- senile dementia (Alzheimer’s type). J Steroid Biochem 1989;34:521-25. 6. Ohkura T, Isse K, Akazawa K, Hamamoto M, Yaoi Y, Hagino N. Low-dose estro...Postmenopausal estrogen use and Parkinson’s disease with Neuronal effects of estrogens with weak ER agonist ac- and without dementia . Neurology 50:1141-1143

  12. CERAPP: Collaborative estrogen receptor activity prediction project

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mansouri, Kamel; Abdelaziz, Ahmed; Rybacka, Aleksandra

    2016-01-01

    Background: Humans are exposed to thousands of man-made chemicals in the environment. Some chemicals mimic natural endocrine hormones and, thus, have the potential to be endocrine disruptors. Most of these chemicals have never been tested for their ability to interact with the estrogen receptor (ER......). Risk assessors need tools to prioritize chemicals for evaluation in costly in vivo tests, for instance, within the U.S. EPA Endocrine Disruptor Screening Program. oBjectives: We describe a large-scale modeling project called CERAPP (Collaborative Estrogen Receptor Activity Prediction Project...

  13. 21 CFR 310.515 - Patient package inserts for estrogens.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... package inserts for estrogens. (a) Requirement for a patient package insert. FDA concludes that the safe... the Federal Food, Drug, and Cosmetic Act. (b) Distribution requirements. (1) For estrogen drug...) Exemptions. This section does not apply to estrogen-progestogen oral contraceptives. Labeling requirements...

  14. Cumulative Estrogen Exposure and Prospective Memory in Older Women

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hesson, Jacqueline

    2012-01-01

    This study looked at cumulative lifetime estrogen exposure, as estimated with a mathematical index (Index of Cumulative Estrogen Exposure (ICEE)) that included variables (length of time on estrogen therapy, age at menarche and menopause, postmenopausal body mass index, time since menopause, nulliparity and duration of breastfeeding) known to…

  15. Estrogen activates rapid signaling in the brain: role of estrogen receptor alpha and estrogen receptor beta in neurons and glia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mhyre, A J; Dorsa, D M

    2006-01-01

    The aging process is known to coincide with a decline in circulating sex hormone levels in both men and women. Due to an increase in the average lifespan, a growing number of post-menopausal women are now receiving hormone therapy for extended periods of time. Recent findings of the Women's Health Initiative, however, have called into question the benefits of long-term hormone therapy for treating symptoms of menopause. The results of this study are still being evaluated, but it is clear that a better understanding of the molecular effects of estradiol is needed in order to develop new estrogenic compounds that activate specific mechanisms but lack adverse side effects. Traditionally, the effects of estradiol treatment have been ascribed to changes in gene expression, namely transcription at estrogen response elements. This review focuses on emerging information that estradiol can also activate a repertoire of membrane-initiated signaling pathways and that these rapid signaling events lead to functional changes at the cellular level. The various types of cells in the brain can respond differently to estradiol treatment based on the signaling properties of the cell, as well as which receptor, estrogen receptor alpha and/or estrogen receptor beta, is expressed. Taken together, these findings suggest that the estradiol-induced activation of membrane-initiated signaling pathways occurs in a cell-type specific manner and can differentially influence how the cells respond to various insults.

  16. Effect of combining in vitro estrogenicity data with kinetic characteristics of estrogenic compounds on the invivo predictive value

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Punt, A.; Brand, W.; Murk, A.J.; Wezel, van A.P.; Schriks, M.; Heringa, M.B.

    2013-01-01

    With the ultimate aim of increasing the utility of in vitro assays for toxicological risk assessment, a method was developed to calculate in vivo estrogenic potencies from in vitro estrogenic potencies of compounds by taking into account systemic availability. In vitro estrogenic potencies of three

  17. Food-associated estrogenic compounds induce estrogen receptor-mediated luciferase gene expression in transgenic male mice

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Veld, ter M.G.R.; Zawadzka, E.; Berg, van den J.H.J.; Saag, van der P.T.; Rietjens, I.M.C.M.; Murk, A.J.

    2008-01-01

    The present paper aims at clarifying to what extent seven food-associated compounds, shown before to be estrogenic in vitro, can induce estrogenic effects in male mice with an estrogen receptor (ER)-mediated luciferase (luc) reporter gene system. The luc induction was determined in different tissues

  18. Estrogenicity of food-associated estrogenic compounds in the fetuses of female transgenic mice upon oral and IP maternal exposure

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Veld, ter M.G.R.; Zawadzka, E.; Rietjens, I.M.C.M.; Murk, A.J.

    2009-01-01

    The present study investigated to what extent seven food-associated in vitro estrogenic compounds can induce estrogenic effects in the fetuses of pregnant female mice with an estrogen receptor (ER)-mediated luciferase (luc) reporter gene system. The luc-induction was determined either 8 h after

  19. Food-associated estrogenic compounds induce estrogen receptor-mediated luciferase gene expression in transgenic male mice.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    ter Veld, M.G.R.; Zawadzka, E.; van den Berg, J.H.J.; van der Saag, P.T.; Rietjens, I.M.C.M.; Murk, A.J.

    2008-01-01

    The present paper aims at clarifying to what extent seven food-associated compounds, shown before to be estrogenic in vitro, can induce estrogenic effects in male mice with an estrogen receptor (ER)-mediated luciferase (luc) reporter gene system. The luc induction was determined in different tissues

  20. Validation and application of a robust yeast estrogen bioassay for the screening of estrogenic activity in animal feed

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bovee, T.F.H.; Bor, G.; Heskamp, H.H.; Hoogenboom, L.A.P.; Nielen, M.W.F.

    2006-01-01

    Previously we described the construction and properties of a rapid yeast bioassay stably expressing human estrogen receptor ¿ (hER¿) and yeast enhanced green fluorescent protein (yEGFP), the latter in response to estrogens. In the present study this yeast estrogen assay was validated as a

  1. Photoperiod affects estrogen receptor α, estrogen receptor β and aggressive behavior

    OpenAIRE

    Trainor, Brian C.; Rowland, Michael R.; Nelson, Randy J.

    2007-01-01

    Estrogens have important effects on male and female social behavior. Despite growing knowledge of the anatomy and behavioral effects of the two predominant estrogen receptor subtypes in mammals (ERα and ERβ), relatively little is known about how these receptors respond to salient environmental stimuli. Many seasonally breeding species respond to changing photoperiods that predict seasonal changes in resource availability. We characterized the effects of photoperiod on aggressive behavior in t...

  2. The androgen receptor and estrogen receptor

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Oosterkamp, H.M.; Bernards, R.A.

    2002-01-01

    The androgen receptor (AR) and the estrogen receptors (ER) are members of the nuclear receptor (NR) family. These NRs are distinguished from the other transcription factors by their ability to control gene expression upon ligand binding (steroids, retinoids, thyroid hormone, vitamin D, fatty

  3. Estrogen Metabolism and Prostate Cancer Risk

    Science.gov (United States)

    1999-10-01

    hormones. Panico and colleagues (27) reported more elevated levels of estrogen and progesterones in the morning hours. The good correlation between...16 27 Panico S, Pisani P, Muti P, Recchione C, Covelleri A, Totis A, Berrino F. Diurinal variation of testosterone and estradiol: a source of bias in

  4. Aging, estrogen loss and epoxyeicosatrienoic acids (EETs.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alison R Lee

    Full Text Available Inflammation is a key element in many cardiovascular diseases. Both estrogen loss, caused by menopause, and aging have inflammatory consequences. Epoxyeicosatrienoic acids (EETs are anti-inflammatory molecules synthesized by various cytochrome P450 (Cyp enzymes from arachidonic acid. EETs are in the third (Cytochrome P450 pathway of arachindonic acid metabolism, others being cyclooxygenases and lipoxygenases. We hypothesized that aging and estrogen loss would reduce levels of anti-inflammatory EETs. Adult (6 mo and aged (22 mo ovariectomized rats with (OP and without (Ovx 17-∃-estradiol replacement were used in this study. Mass spectrometry was used to measure levels of EETs and their metabolites, dihydroxyeicosatrienoic acids (DHETs. Levels of Cyp2C2, Cyp2C6, and Cyp2J2, the principal Cyps responsible for EETs synthesis, as well as soluble epoxide hydrolase (sEH, which metabolizes EETS to DHETs, were determined via western blot. Overall Cyp levels decreased with age, though Cyp2C6 increased in the liver. sEH was increased in the kidney with estrogen replacement. Despite protein changes, no differences were measured in plasma or aortic tissue levels of EETs. However, plasma 14,15 DHET was increased in aged Ovx, and 5,6 DHET in adult OP. In conclusion neither aging nor estrogen loss decreased the anti-inflammatory EETs in the cardiovascular system.

  5. Estrogen receptor, progesterone receptor, and human epidermal ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Current clinical practice employs the use of estrogen receptor (ER), progesterone receptor (PR), and human epidermal growth factor receptor 2 (HER2), as biomarkers to appropriately select patients that would benefit from targeted therapy against these major molecular pathways of the disease. This study aims at ...

  6. Targeted estrogen delivery reverses the metabolic syndrome

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Finan, Brian; Yang, Bin; Ottaway, Nickki; Stemmer, Kerstin; Müller, Timo D.; Yi, Chun-Xia; Habegger, Kirk; Schriever, Sonja C.; García-Cáceres, Cristina; Kabra, Dhiraj G.; Hembree, Jazzminn; Holland, Jenna; Raver, Christine; Seeley, Randy J.; Hans, Wolfgang; Irmler, Martin; Beckers, Johannes; de Angelis, Martin Hrabě; Tiano, Joseph P.; Mauvais-Jarvis, Franck; Perez-Tilve, Diego; Pfluger, Paul; Zhang, Lianshan; Gelfanov, Vasily; DiMarchi, Richard D.; Tschöp, Matthias H.

    2012-01-01

    We report the development of a new combinatorial approach that allows for peptide-mediated selective tissue targeting of nuclear hormone pharmacology while eliminating adverse effects in other tissues. Specifically, we report the development of a glucagon-like peptide-1 (GLP-1)-estrogen conjugate

  7. Estrogen and its role in gastrointestinal health and disease.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Hogan, Aisling M

    2012-02-01

    INTRODUCTION: While the concept of a role of estrogen in gastrointestinal (in particular, colonic) malignancy has generated excitement in recent years, no review has examined the role of this potent and omnipresent steroid hormone in physiological states or its contribution to the development of benign pathological processes. Understanding these effects (and mechanisms therein) may provide a platform for a deeper understanding of more complex disease processes. METHODS: A literature search was conducted using the PubMed database and the search terms were "estrogen," "estrogen AND gastrointestinal tract," "estrogen AND colon," "estrogen AND esophagus," "estrogen AND small intestine," "estrogen AND stomach," "estrogen AND gallbladder," and "estrogen AND motility." Bibliographies of extracted studies were further cross-referenced. In all, 136 full-text articles were selected for review. A logical organ-based approach was taken to enable extraction of data of clinical relevance and meaningful interpretation thereof. Insight is provided into the hypotheses, theories, controversies, and contradictions generated over the last five decades by extensive investigation of estrogen in human, animal, and cell models using techniques as diverse as autoradiographic studies of baboons to human population analysis. CONCLUSIONS: Effects from esophagus through to the colon and rectum are summarized in this first concise collection of data pertaining to estrogenic actions in gastrointestinal health and disease. Mechanisms of these actions are discussed where possible. Undoubtedly, this hormone exerts many actions yet to be elucidated, and its potential therapeutic applications remain, as yet, largely unexplored.

  8. Estrogen-gut microbiome axis: Physiological and clinical implications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baker, James M; Al-Nakkash, Layla; Herbst-Kralovetz, Melissa M

    2017-09-01

    Low levels of gonadal circulating estrogen observed in post-menopausal women can adversely impact a diverse range of physiological factors, with clinical implications for brain cognition, gut health, the female reproductive tract and other aspects of women's health. One of the principal regulators of circulating estrogens is the gut microbiome. This review aims to shed light on the role of the gut microbiota in estrogen-modulated disease. The gut microbiota regulates estrogens through secretion of β-glucuronidase, an enzyme that deconjugates estrogens into their active forms. When this process is impaired through dysbiosis of gut microbiota, characterized by lower microbial diversity, the decrease in deconjugation results in a reduction of circulating estrogens. The alteration in circulating estrogens may contribute to the development of conditions discussed herein: obesity, metabolic syndrome, cancer, endometrial hyperplasia, endometriosis, polycystic ovary syndrome, fertility, cardiovascular disease (CVD) and cognitive function. The bi-directional relationship between the metabolic profile (including estrogen levels) and gut microbiota in estrogen-driven disease will also be discussed. Promising therapeutic interventions manipulating the gut microbiome and the metabolic profile of estrogen-driven disease, such as bariatric surgery and metformin, will be detailed. Modulation of the microbiome composition subsequently impacts the metabolic profile, and vice versa, and has been shown to alleviate many of the estrogen-modulated disease states. Last, we highlight promising research interventions in the field, such as dietary therapeutics, and discuss areas that provide exciting unexplored topics of study. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  9. Estrogens and male reproduction: a new concept

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. Carreau

    2007-06-01

    Full Text Available The mammalian testis serves two main functions: production of spermatozoa and synthesis of steroids; among them estrogens are the end products obtained from the irreversible transformation of androgens by a microsomal enzymatic complex named aromatase. The aromatase is encoded by a single gene (cyp19 in humans which contains 18 exons, 9 of them being translated. In rats, the aromatase activity is mainly located in Sertoli cells of immature rats and then in Leydig cells of adult rats. We have demonstrated that germ cells represent an important source of estrogens: the amount of P450arom transcript is 3-fold higher in pachytene spermatocytes compared to gonocytes or round spermatids; conversely, aromatase activity is more intense in haploid cells. Male germ cells of mice, bank voles, bears, and monkeys express aromatase. In humans, we have shown the presence of a biologically active aromatase and of estrogen receptors (alpha and ß in ejaculated spermatozoa and in immature germ cells in addition to Leydig cells. Moreover, we have demonstrated that the amount of P450arom transcripts is 30% lower in immotile than in motile spermatozoa. Alterations of spermatogenesis in terms of number and motility of spermatozoa have been described in men genetically deficient in aromatase. These last observations, together with our data showing a significant decrease of aromatase in immotile spermatozoa, suggest that aromatase could be involved in the acquisition of sperm motility. Thus, taking into account the widespread localization of aromatase and estrogen receptors in testicular cells, it is obvious that, besides gonadotrophins and androgens, estrogens produced locally should be considered to be physiologically relevant hormones involved in the regulation of spermatogenesis and spermiogenesis.

  10. ESTROGEN RECEPTORS OF HAIRS BLACKS AND WHITES

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    H. Laswati

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Background: Aging is termed as same as degenerative process, in which all part of tissue organs retarted the microstructure either macrostructure, forming and function even the colour, including black hair change to white hair. Several researchers have been recommended that estrogen hormone be able ease black to white hair, but hormone without any presenting of receptor won’t be work properly. The main aim of this study were to determine amount of estrogen receptor contents in famales and males black and white hairs included the microscopically structure. Method: Twelve females and males there were 50 -56 years old each pairs black and white head hairs were plucked along with follicles. This estrogen receptors analyzed using radioreceptor binding assay there were 5mm eah hair follices including the root cutted and each pair put its in 2 ml glass tube already filled in with 500 µl 125I-estradiol and incubated in 37oC for 3 hrs. Following times were over the tube flushed twice carefully the hair won’t be flushed. Then count by putting in the gamma counter chamber for 1 minute each. The values that shown in the monitor as CPM (count per minute, recorded as receptor of estradiol. Results: Mean (±SD sum estrogen receptor in females black and white hairs were 479.3 ± 37.5 and 387.7 ± 33.0, but significantly decreased in male black hair was 316.9±17.8 and 274.0 ± 19.8. All those pairs significantly different either female black and white hairs or male black and white hair and also significantly different among groups. Conclusion: The lowest estrogen receptors recorded in male white hairs and microstructure decreasing of melanin contents.

  11. Yeast Estrogen Screen Assay as a Tool for Detecting Estrogenic Activity in Water Bodies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mirjana Bistan

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available The presence of endocrine-disrupting compounds in wastewater, surface water, groundwater and even drinking water has become a major concern worldwide, since they negatively affect wildlife and humans. Therefore, these substances should be effectively removed from effluents before they are discharged into surface water to prevent pollution of groundwater, which can be a source of drinking water. Furthermore, an efficient control of endocrine-disrupting compounds in wastewater based on biological and analytical techniques is required. In this study, a yeast estrogen screen (YES bioassay has been introduced and optimized with the aim to assess potential estrogenic activity of waters. First, assay duration, concentration of added substrate to the assay medium and wavelength used to measure the absorbance of the substrate were estimated. Several compounds, such as 17-β-estradiol, 17-α-ethinylestradiol, bisphenol A, nonylphenol, genisteine, hydrocortisone, dieldrin, atrazine, methoxychlor, testosterone and progesterone were used to verify its specificity and sensitivity. The optimized YES assay was sensitive and responded specifically to the selected estrogenic and nonestrogenic compounds in aqueous samples. Potential estrogenicity of influent and effluent samples of two wastewater treatment plants was assessed after the samples had been concentrated by solid-phase extraction (SPE procedure using Oasis® HLB cartridges and methanol as eluting solvent. Up to 90 % of relative estrogenic activity was detected in concentrated samples of influents to wastewater treatment plants and estrogenic activity was still present in the concentrated effluent samples. We found that the introduced YES assay is a suitable screening tool for monitoring the potential estrogenicity of effluents that are discharged into surface water.

  12. The protective role of estrogen and estrogen receptors in cardiovascular disease and the controversial use of estrogen therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iorga, Andrea; Cunningham, Christine M; Moazeni, Shayan; Ruffenach, Gregoire; Umar, Soban; Eghbali, Mansoureh

    2017-10-24

    Epidemiologic studies have previously suggested that premenopausal females have reduced incidence of cardiovascular disease (CVD) when compared to age-matched males, and the incidence and severity of CVD increases postmenopause. The lower incidence of cardiovascular disease in women during reproductive age is attributed at least in part to estrogen (E2). E2 binds to the traditional E2 receptors (ERs), estrogen receptor alpha (ERα), and estrogen receptor beta (ERβ), as well as the more recently identified G-protein-coupled ER (GPR30), and can exert both genomic and non-genomic actions. This review summarizes the protective role of E2 and its receptors in the cardiovascular system and discusses its underlying mechanisms with an emphasis on oxidative stress, fibrosis, angiogenesis, and vascular function. This review also presents the sexual dimorphic role of ERs in modulating E2 action in cardiovascular disease. The controversies surrounding the clinical use of exogenous E2 as a therapeutic agent for cardiovascular disease in women due to the possible risks of thrombotic events, cancers, and arrhythmia are also discussed. Endogenous local E2 biosynthesis from the conversion of testosterone to E2 via aromatase enzyme offers a novel therapeutic paradigm. Targeting specific ERs in the cardiovascular system may result in novel and possibly safer therapeutic options for cardiovascular protection.

  13. Estrogen Deficiency and the Origin of Obesity during Menopause

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fernando Lizcano

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Sex hormones strongly influence body fat distribution and adipocyte differentiation. Estrogens and testosterone differentially affect adipocyte physiology, but the importance of estrogens in the development of metabolic diseases during menopause is disputed. Estrogens and estrogen receptors regulate various aspects of glucose and lipid metabolism. Disturbances of this metabolic signal lead to the development of metabolic syndrome and a higher cardiovascular risk in women. The absence of estrogens is a clue factor in the onset of cardiovascular disease during the menopausal period, which is characterized by lipid profile variations and predominant abdominal fat accumulation. However, influence of the absence of these hormones and its relationship to higher obesity in women during menopause are not clear. This systematic review discusses of the role of estrogens and estrogen receptors in adipocyte differentiation, and its control by the central nervous systemn and the possible role of estrogen-like compounds and endocrine disruptors chemicals are discussed. Finally, the interaction between the decrease in estrogen secretion and the prevalence of obesity in menopausal women is examined. We will consider if the absence of estrogens have a significant effect of obesity in menopausal women.

  14. Estrogen Deficiency and the Origin of Obesity during Menopause.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lizcano, Fernando; Guzmán, Guillermo

    2014-01-01

    Sex hormones strongly influence body fat distribution and adipocyte differentiation. Estrogens and testosterone differentially affect adipocyte physiology, but the importance of estrogens in the development of metabolic diseases during menopause is disputed. Estrogens and estrogen receptors regulate various aspects of glucose and lipid metabolism. Disturbances of this metabolic signal lead to the development of metabolic syndrome and a higher cardiovascular risk in women. The absence of estrogens is a clue factor in the onset of cardiovascular disease during the menopausal period, which is characterized by lipid profile variations and predominant abdominal fat accumulation. However, influence of the absence of these hormones and its relationship to higher obesity in women during menopause are not clear. This systematic review discusses of the role of estrogens and estrogen receptors in adipocyte differentiation, and its control by the central nervous systemn and the possible role of estrogen-like compounds and endocrine disruptors chemicals are discussed. Finally, the interaction between the decrease in estrogen secretion and the prevalence of obesity in menopausal women is examined. We will consider if the absence of estrogens have a significant effect of obesity in menopausal women.

  15. 135La as an Auger-electron emitter for targeted internal radiotherapy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fonslet, J.; Lee, B. Q.; Tran, T. A.; Siragusa, M.; Jensen, M.; Kibédi, T.; E Stuchbery, A.; Severin, G. W.

    2018-01-01

    135La has favorable nuclear and chemical properties for Auger-based targeted internal radiotherapy. Here we present detailed investigations of the production, emissions, and dosimetry related to 135La therapy. 135La was produced by 16.5 MeV proton irradiation of metallic natBa on a medical cyclotron, and was isolated and purified by trap-and-release on weak cation-exchange resin. The average production rate was 407  ±  19 MBq µA‑1 (saturation activity), and the radionuclidic purity was 98% at 20 h post irradiation. Chemical separation recovered  >  98 % of the 135La with an effective molar activity of 70  ±  20 GBq µmol‑1. To better assess cellular and organ dosimetry of this nuclide, we have calculated the x-ray and Auger emission spectra using a Monte Carlo model accounting for effects of multiple vacancies during the Auger cascade. The generated Auger spectrum was used to calculate cellular S-factors. 135La was produced with high specific activity, reactivity, radionuclidic purity, and yield. The emission spectrum and the dosimetry are favorable for internal radionuclide therapy.

  16. sup>135sup>La as an auger-electron emitter for targeted internal radiotherapy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Fonslet, Jesper; Lee, Boon Quan; Tran, Thuy A.

    2018-01-01

    proton irradiation of metallic natBa on a medical cyclotron, and was isolated and purified by trap-and-release on weak cation-exchange resin. The average production rate was 407 ± 19 MBq/µA (saturation activity, n = 3), and the radionuclidic purity was 98% at 20 h post irradiation. Chemical separation......Introduction: 135La has favorable nuclear and chemical properties for Auger-based targeted internal radiotherapy. Here we present detailed investigations of the production, emissions, imaging characteristics, and dosimetry related to 135La therapy. Methods and Results: 135La was produced by 16.5 MeV...... recovered > 98 % of the 135La with an effective molar activity of 70 ±20 GBq/µmol. To better assess cellular and organ dosimetry of this nuclide, we have recalculated the X-ray and Auger emission spectra using a Monte Carlo model accounting for effects of multiple vacancies during the Auger cascade...

  17. Modification to an Auger Electron Spectroscopy system for measuring segregation in a bi-crystal

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Jafta, CJ

    2013-03-01

    Full Text Available to the scanning control unit of the AES electron beam to eliminate the difference in experimental parameters and specialized written software to automate the data acquisition process. This makes direct comparison of segregation parameters on two different...

  18. Epidermal Growth Factor Receptor Overexpression as a Target for Auger Electron Radiotherapy of Breast Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    2002-08-01

    procedure has previously been found by us [18] and was labeled to 40 MBq/ixg (2.4 X 105 MBq/ timol ) as others [16] to result in intact nuclei without...cells (Fig. 2). At the specific activity achieved in this study for .In-DTPA- hEGF (30 MBq/jtg, 1.8 x 105 MBq/ timol ), the most active chemotherapeutic

  19. High dose implantation of nitrogen in tool steel: Auger electron spectroscopy and hardness measurements

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bredell, L.J. (Dept. of Physics, Univ. of Pretoria (South Africa)); Malherbe, J.B. (Dept. of Physics, Univ. of Pretoria (South Africa))

    1993-05-15

    Tool stell samples were implanted with 100 keV N[sup +] ions at liquid nitrogen temperature to doses of 3 x 10[sup 17] and 1 x 10[sup 18] cm[sup -2]. Only the dose of 1 x 10[sup 18] cm[sup -2] caused a significant hardening effect. Two mechanisms contributed to this hardness increase, namely nitride formation and radiation damage. Cooling during implantation caused additional hardening, owing to a martensitic phase transformation. The projected range (R[sub p] = 110 nm) for the implanted species was obtained by Auger sputter depth profiling. If the hardened layer thickness was taken as 2R[sub p], then the Joensson-Hogmark model gave an average hardness value of 2010 HV for the implanted layer. However, a more realistic value of 900 HV was calculated under the assumption that typical radiation damage profiles (R[sub d] = 3R[sub p]) contributed to the hard film thickness. It is difficult to judge the accuracy of the model for predicting the correct absolute hardness of the implanted layer but it is shown that deep radiation-induced damage plays a major role in surface hardening. (orig.)

  20. Epidermal Growth Factor Receptor Overexpression as a Target for Auger Electron Radiotherapy of Breast Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    1999-08-01

    receptor 16. PRICE CODE 17. SECURITY CLASSIFICATION 18. SECURITY CLASSIFICATION 19. SECURITY CLASSIFICATION 20. LIMITATION OF ABSTRACT OF REPORT OF THIS...L1210 leukemia cells. Int J Radiat Biol Rel Stud Phys Chem Med 1975;28:225-41. 4. Martin RF, Bradley TR, Hodgson GS. Cytotoxicity of an 12 5l-labeled...previously observed between the elimination rate and tumour accumulation of different forms of radiolabelled mAbs (eg. IgG vs. F(ab’) 2 vs. Fab ’) (25

  1. Accelerator based Production of Auger-Electron-emitting Isotopes for Radionuclide Therapy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Thisgaard, Helge

    In this research project the focus has been on the identification and production of new, unconventional Augerelectron- emitting isotopes for targeted radionuclide therapy of cancer. Based on 1st principles dosimetry calculations on the subcellular level, the Augeremitter 119Sb has been identified...

  2. Pulmonary embolism due to exogenous estrogen intoxication.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Çelik, Caner; Carus, Murat; Büyükcam, Fatih

    2017-12-01

    Pulmonary embolism is a relatively common clinical presentation of venous thromboembolism, which develops in relation to acute pulmonary arterial occlusion mostly caused by thrombi of the lower limbs. 29year old female admitted to emergency department with pulmonary thromboembolism due to an ingestion of 17 Diana 35 pills (2 mg cyproterone acetate and 0.035mg ethinyl estradiol) in a suicide attempt without any previously known predisposing factors. After thrombolytic therapy, the patient was discharged with oral warfarin treatment. We know that exogenous estrogen increase the risk of venous thromboembolism in therapeutic use. It should be kept in mind that even single ingestion of a single high-dose exogenous estrogen intake may induce pulmonary thromboembolism. Copyright © 2017. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  3. Can estrogens promote hypertension during systemic lupus erythematosus?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Venegas-Pont, Marcia; Ryan, Michael J

    2010-11-01

    SLE is a chronic autoimmune inflammatory disorder that predominantly affects young women. Based on this observation, it has been speculated that sex steroids, particularly estrogens, contribute to SLE disease progression. Young women with SLE are at an increased risk for the development of hypertension yet the reasons for this are unclear. One potential mechanism for the increased risk of hypertension during SLE is the chronic inflammation caused by immune complex mediated tissue injury. Estrogens are known to have an immunomodulatory role that can lead to the production of characteristic autoantibodies important for immune complex formation. Therefore, it is conceivable that during SLE estrogens contribute to tissue injury, increased inflammation and hypertension. This brief review discusses the increased risk for hypertension during SLE, the role of estrogens in immune system function, evidence for estrogens in SLE, and a possible link between estrogens and SLE hypertension. Copyright 2010 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  4. The role of estrogen in bipolar disorder, a review

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Meinhard, Ninja; Kessing, Lars Vedel; Vinberg, Maj

    2014-01-01

    BACKGROUND: It appears that the female reproductive events and hormonal treatments may impact the course of bipolar disorder in women. In particular, childbirth is known to be associated with onset of affective episodes in women with bipolar disorder. During the female reproductive events the sex...... hormones, e.g. estrogen, are fluctuating and particularly postpartum there is a steep fall in the levels of serum estrogen. The role of estrogen in women with bipolar disorder is, however, not fully understood. AIM: The main objective of this review is to evaluate the possible relation between serum...... estrogen levels and women with bipolar disorder including studies of the anti manic effects of the selective estrogen receptor modulator tamoxifen. METHOD: A systematically literature search on PubMed was conducted: two studies regarding the connection between serum estrogen levels and women with bipolar...

  5. Computational estimation of rainbow trout estrogen receptor binding affinities for environmental estrogens.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shyu, Conrad; Cavileer, Timothy D; Nagler, James J; Ytreberg, F Marty

    2011-02-01

    Environmental estrogens have been the subject of intense research due to their documented detrimental effects on the health of fish and wildlife and their potential to negatively impact humans. A complete understanding of how these compounds affect health is complicated because environmental estrogens are a structurally heterogeneous group of compounds. In this work, computational molecular dynamics simulations were utilized to predict the binding affinity of different compounds using rainbow trout (Oncorhynchus mykiss) estrogen receptors (ERs) as a model. Specifically, this study presents a comparison of the binding affinity of the natural ligand estradiol-17β to the four rainbow trout ER isoforms with that of three known environmental estrogens 17α-ethinylestradiol, bisphenol A, and raloxifene. Two additional compounds, atrazine and testosterone, that are known to be very weak or non-binders to ERs were tested. The binding affinity of these compounds to the human ERα subtype is also included for comparison. The results of this study suggest that, when compared to estradiol-17β, bisphenol A binds less strongly to all four receptors, 17α-ethinylestradiol binds more strongly, and raloxifene has a high affinity for the α subtype only. The results also show that atrazine and testosterone are weak or non-binders to the ERs. All of the results are in excellent qualitative agreement with the known in vivo estrogenicity of these compounds in the rainbow trout and other fishes. Computational estimation of binding affinities could be a valuable tool for predicting the impact of environmental estrogens in fish and other animals. Copyright © 2010 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  6. Selectivity of natural, synthetic and environmental estrogens for zebrafish estrogen receptors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pinto, Caroline [Center for Nuclear Receptors and Cell Signaling, Department of Biology and Biochemistry, University of Houston, Houston, TX 77204-5056 (United States); Grimaldi, Marina; Boulahtouf, Abdelhay [Institut de Recherche en Cancérologie de Montpellier, Institut National de la Santé de la Recherche Médicale U896, Institut Régional de Cancérologie de Montpellier, Université Montpellier 1, 34298 Montpellier (France); Pakdel, Farzad [Institut de Recherche sur la Santé, Environnement et Travail (IRSET), INSERM U1085, Université de Rennes 1, Rennes (France); Brion, François; Aït-Aïssa, Sélim [Unité Écotoxicologie In Vitro et In Vivo, INERIS, Parc ALATA, 60550 Verneuil-en-Halatte (France); Cavaillès, Vincent [Institut de Recherche en Cancérologie de Montpellier, Institut National de la Santé de la Recherche Médicale U896, Institut Régional de Cancérologie de Montpellier, Université Montpellier 1, 34298 Montpellier (France); Bourguet, William [U1054, Centre de Biochimie Structurale, CNRS UMR5048, Université Montpellier 1 et 2, 34290 Montpellier (France); Gustafsson, Jan-Ake [Center for Nuclear Receptors and Cell Signaling, Department of Biology and Biochemistry, University of Houston, Houston, TX 77204-5056 (United States); Department of Biosciences and Nutrition, Karolinska Institutet, 14183 Huddinge (Sweden); and others

    2014-10-01

    Zebrafish, Danio rerio, is increasingly used as an animal model to study the effects of pharmaceuticals and environmental estrogens. As most of these estrogens have only been tested on human estrogen receptors (ERs), it is necessary to measure their effects on zebrafish ERs. In humans there are two distinct nuclear ERs (hERα and hERβ), whereas the zebrafish genome encodes three ERs, zfERα and two zfERβs (zfERβ1 and zfERβ2). In this study, we established HeLa-based reporter cell lines stably expressing each of the three zfERs. We first reported that estrogens more efficiently activate the zfERs at 28 °C as compared to 37 °C, thus reflecting the physiological temperature of zebrafish in wildlife. We then showed significant differences in the ability of agonist and antagonist estrogens to modulate activation of the three zfER isotypes in comparison to hERs. Environmental compounds (bisphenol A, alkylphenols, mycoestrogens) which are hER panagonists and hERβ selective agonists displayed greater potency for zfERα as compared to zfERβs. Among hERα selective synthetic agonists, PPT did not activate zfERα while 16α-LE2 was the most zfERα selective compound. Altogether, these results confirm that all hER ligands control in a similar manner the transcriptional activity of zfERs although significant differences in selectivity were observed among subtypes. The zfER subtype selective ligands that we identified thus represent new valuable tools to dissect the physiological roles of the different zfERs. Finally, our work also points out that care has to be taken in transposing the results obtained using the zebrafish as a model for human physiopathology. - Highlights: • Zebrafish is increasingly used to study the effects of estrogens. • We assessed the activity of pharmaceutical and environmental estrogens on zfERs. • Environmental estrogens displayed greater potency for zfERα compared to zfERβs. • hERβ selective agonists displayed greater potency for zf

  7. Estrogen receptor mRNA in mineralized tissues of rainbow trout: calcium mobilization by estrogen.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Armour, K J; Lehane, D B; Pakdel, F; Valotaire, Y; Graham, R; Russell, R G; Henderson, I W

    1997-07-07

    RT-PCR was undertaken on total RNA extracts from bone and scales of the rainbow trout, Oncorhynchus mykiss. The rainbow trout estrogen receptor (ER)-specific primers used amplified a single product of expected size from each tissue which, using Southern blotting, strongly hybridized with a 32P-labelled rtER probe under stringent conditions. These data provide the first in vivo evidence of ER mRNA in bone and scale tissues of rainbow trout and suggest that the effects of estrogen observed in this study (increased bone mineral and decreased scale mineral contents, respectively) may be mediated directly through ER.

  8. Estrogen signaling in the proliferative endometrium: implications in endometriosis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rita de Cássia Pereira da Costa e Silva

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available SUMMARY Even though the physiological role of estrogen in the female reproductive cycle and endometrial proliferative phase is well established, the signaling pathways by which estrogen exerts its action in the endometrial tissue are still little known. In this regard, advancements in cell culture techniques and maintenance of endometrial cells in cultures enabled the discovery of new signaling mechanisms activated by estrogen in the normal endometrium and in endometriosis. This review aims to present the recent findings in the genomic and non-genomic estrogen signaling pathways in the proliferative human endometrium specifically associated with the pathogenesis and development of endometriosis.

  9. Insights from the Study of Animals Lacking Functional Estrogen Receptor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Korach, Kenneth S.

    1994-12-01

    Estrogen hormones produce physiological actions within a variety of target sites in the body and during development by activating a specific receptor protein. Hormone responsiveness for the estrogen receptor protein was investigated at different stages of development with the use of gene knockout techniques because no natural genetic mutants have been described. A mutant mouse line without a functional estrogen receptor was created and is being used to assess estrogen responsiveness. Both sexes of these mutant animals are infertile and show a variety of phenotypic changes, some of which are associated with the gonads, mammary glands, reproductive tracts, and skeletal tissues.

  10. Estrogens and cognition: Friends or foes?: An evaluation of the opposing effects of estrogens on learning and memory.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Korol, Donna L; Pisani, Samantha L

    2015-08-01

    This article is part of a Special Issue "Estradiol and cognition". Estrogens are becoming well known for their robust enhancement on cognition particularly for learning and memory that relies upon functioning of the hippocampus and related neural systems. What is also emerging is that estrogen modulation of cognition is not uniform, at times enhancing yet at other times impairing learning. This review explores the bidirectional effects of estrogens on learning from a multiple memory systems view, focusing on the hippocampus and striatum, whereby modulation by estrogens sorts according to task attributes and neural systems engaged during cognition. We highlight our findings showing that the ability to solve hippocampus-sensitive tasks typically improves under relatively high estrogen status while the ability to solve striatum-sensitive tasks degrades with estrogen exposures. Though constrained by dose and timing of exposure, these opposing enhancements and impairments of cognition can be observed following treatments with different estrogenic compounds including the hormone estradiol, the isoflavone genistein found in soybeans, and agonists that are selective for specific estrogen receptors, suggesting that activation of a single receptor type is sufficient to produce the observed shifts in learning strategies. Using this multi-dimensional framework will allow us to extend our thinking of the relationship between estrogens and cognition to other brain regions and cognitive functions. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  11. Emerging Estrogenic Pollutants in the Aquatic Environment and Breast Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lecomte, Sylvain; Charlier, Thierry D.; Pakdel, Farzad

    2017-01-01

    The number and amount of man-made chemicals present in the aquatic environment has increased considerably over the past 50 years. Among these contaminants, endocrine-disrupting chemicals (EDCs) represent a significant proportion. This family of compounds interferes with normal hormonal processes through multiple molecular pathways. They represent a potential risk for human and wildlife as they are suspected to be involved in the development of diseases including, but not limited to, reprotoxicity, metabolic disorders, and cancers. More precisely, several studies have suggested that the increase of breast cancers in industrialized countries is linked to exposure to EDCs, particularly estrogen-like compounds. Estrogen receptors alpha (ERα) and beta (ERβ) are the two main transducers of estrogen action and therefore important targets for these estrogen-like endocrine disrupters. More than 70% of human breast cancers are ERα-positive and estrogen-dependent, and their development and growth are not only influenced by endogenous estrogens but also likely by environmental estrogen-like endocrine disrupters. It is, therefore, of major importance to characterize the potential estrogenic activity from contaminated surface water and identify the molecules responsible for the hormonal effects. This information will help us understand how environmental contaminants can potentially impact the development of breast cancer and allow us to fix a maximal limit to the concentration of estrogen-like compounds that should be found in the environment. The aim of this review is to provide an overview of emerging estrogen-like compounds in the environment, sum up studies demonstrating their direct or indirect interactions with ERs, and link their presence to the development of breast cancer. Finally, we emphasize the use of in vitro and in vivo methods based on the zebrafish model to identify and characterize environmental estrogens. PMID:28914763

  12. Factor XII mutations, estrogen-dependent inherited angioedema, and related conditions

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Binkley, Karen E

    2010-01-01

    The clinical, biochemical and genetic features of the conditions known as estrogen-dependent inherited angioedema, estrogen-associated angioedema, hereditary angioedema with normal C-1 inhibitor, type...

  13. The in vivo estrogenic and in vitro anti-estrogenic activity of permethrin and bifenthrin

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brander, Susanne M.; He, Guochun; Smalling, Kelly L.; Denison, Michael S.; Cherr, Gary N.

    2012-01-01

    Pyrethroids are highly toxic to fish at parts per billion or parts per trillion concentrations. Their intended mechanism is prolonged sodium channel opening, but recent studies reveal that pyrethroids such as permethrin and bifenthrin also have endocrine activity. Additionally, metabolites may have greater endocrine activity than parent compounds. We evaluated the in vivo concentration-dependent ability of bifenthrin and permethrin to induce choriogenin (an estrogen-responsive protein) in Menidia beryllina, a fish species known to reside in pyrethroid contaminated aquatic habitats. We then compared the in vivo response to an in vitro assay: CALUX (Chemical Activated Luciferase Gene Expression). Juvenile Menidia beryllina exposed to bifenthrin (1, 10, 100 ng/L), permethrin (0.1, 1, 10 µg/L), and ethinylestradiol (1, 10, 50 ng/L) had significantly higher ng/mL choriogenin (Chg) measured in whole body homogenate than controls. While Chg expression in fish exposed to ethinylestradiol (EE2) exhibited a traditional sigmoidal concentration-response, curves fit to Chg expressed in fish exposed to pyrethroids suggest a unimodal response, decreasing slightly as concentration increases. While the in vivo response indicated that bifenthrin and permethrin or their metabolites act as estrogen agonists, the CALUX assay demonstrated estrogen antagonism by the pyrethroids. Our results, supported by evidence from previous studies, suggest that bifenthrin and permethrin, and/or their metabolites, appear to act as estrogen receptor (ER) agonists in vivo, and that the unmetabolized pyrethroids, particularly bifenthrin, act as an ER antagonists in cultured mammalian cells. PMID:23007834

  14. Selective estrogen receptor down-regulator and selective estrogen receptor modulators differentially regulate lactotroph proliferation.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sanjay Kansra

    2010-04-01

    Full Text Available We recently reported that estrogen receptor alpha (ERalpha, even in absence of estrogen (E2, plays a critical role in lactotroph homeostasis. The anti-estrogen ICI 182780 (ICI, but not tamoxifen or raloxifene, rapidly promoted the degradation of ERalpha, and inhibited cell proliferation. However, all three ER antagonists suppressed PRL release, suggesting that receptor occupation is sufficient to inhibit prl gene expression whereas receptor degradation is required to suppress lactotroph proliferation. In this study our objective was to determine whether ERalpha degradation versus occupation, differentially modulates the biological outcome of anti-estrogens.Using the rat lactotroph cell line, GH3 cells, we report that ICI induced proteosome mediated degradation of ERalpha. In contrast, an ERalpha specific antagonist, MPP, that does not promote degradation of ERalpha, did not inhibit cell proliferation. Further, ICI, but not MPP, abolished anchorage independent growth of GH3 cells. Yet, both ICI and MPP were equally effective in suppressing prl expression and release, as well as ERE-mediated transcriptional activity.Taken together, our results demonstrate that in lactotrophs, ERalpha degradation results in decreased cell proliferation, whereas ERalpha occupation by an antagonist that does not promote degradation of ERalpha is sufficient to inhibit prl expression.

  15. Caffeine, coffee, and tea intake and urinary estrogens and estrogen metabolites in premenopausal women.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sisti, Julia S; Hankinson, Susan E; Caporaso, Neil E; Gu, Fangyi; Tamimi, Rulla M; Rosner, Bernard; Xu, Xia; Ziegler, Regina; Eliassen, A Heather

    2015-08-01

    Prior studies have found weak inverse associations between breast cancer and caffeine and coffee intake, possibly mediated through their effects on sex hormones. High-performance liquid chromatography/tandem mass spectrometry was used to quantify levels of 15 individual estrogens and estrogen metabolites (EM) among 587 premenopausal women in the Nurses' Health Study II with mid-luteal phase urine samples and caffeine, coffee, and/or tea intakes from self-reported food frequency questionnaires. Multivariate linear mixed models were used to estimate geometric means of individual EM, pathways, and ratios by intake categories, and P values for tests of linear trend. Compared with women in the lowest quartile of caffeine consumption, those in the top quartile had higher urinary concentrations of 16α-hydroxyestrone (28% difference; Ptrend = 0.01) and 16-epiestriol (13% difference; Ptrend = 0.04), and a decreased parent estrogens/2-, 4-, 16-pathway ratio (Ptrend = 0.03). Coffee intake was associated with higher 2-catechols, including 2-hydroxyestradiol (57% difference, ≥4 cups/day vs. ≤6 cups/week; Ptrend = 0.001) and 2-hydroxyestrone (52% difference; Ptrend = 0.001), and several ratio measures. Decaffeinated coffee was not associated with 2-pathway metabolism, but women in the highest (vs. lowest) category of intake (≥2 cups/day vs. ≤1-3 cups/month) had significantly lower levels of two 16-pathway metabolites, estriol (25% difference; Ptrend = 0.01) and 17-epiestriol (48% difference; Ptrend = 0.0004). Tea intake was positively associated with 17-epiestriol (52% difference; Ptrend = 0.01). Caffeine and coffee intake were both associated with profiles of estrogen metabolism in premenopausal women. Consumption of caffeine and coffee may alter patterns of premenopausal estrogen metabolism. ©2015 American Association for Cancer Research.

  16. Dietary Estrogens Act through Estrogen Receptor-Mediated Processes and Show No Antiestrogenicity in Cultured Breast Cancer Cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Makela; Davis; Tally; Korkman; Salo; Vihko; Santti; Korach

    1994-06-01

    Dietary estrogens are believed to exert their estrogenic or antiestrogenic (chemopreventive) action in estrogen responsive cells by interacting with the estrogen receptor (ER). The present study was undertaken to evaluate a direct role of ER in estrogenic or antiestrogenic activities of three dietary estrogens (coumestrol, genistein and zearalenone). HeLa cells were transiently co-transfected with an expression vector for ER and an estrogen-responsive reporter gene construct. Coumestrol, genistein, and zearalenone all increased the activity of the reporter gene, only in the presence of the ER, and the activation was blocked with the ER antagonist ICI 164,384, demonstrating an ER-specific, agonist response. In addition, in MCF-7 cells, coumestrol and zearalenone increased the expression of the estrogen-responsive pS2 gene. Coumestrol and genistein inhibited the purified estrogen-specific 17ß-hydroxysteroid oxidoreductase enzyme and the conversion of estrone to 17ß-estradiol in T-47D cells, which contain this enzyme. However, they did not inhibit the estrone-induced proliferation of T-47D cells. In conclusion, coumestrol, genistein, and zearalenone are all potent estrogens in vitro, and they act through ER mediated mechanism. Our findings give no evidence to support the idea that these compounds act as antiestrogens through competition for the binding sites of ER or by inhibition of the conversion of estrone to 17ß-estradiol in breast cancer cells, since this effect was nullified by their agonist action on cell proliferation. Therefore, their suggested chemopreventive action in estrogen-related cancers must be mediated through other mechanisms.

  17. Estrogen-dependent changes in estrogen receptor-β mRNA expression in middle-aged female rat brain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yamaguchi, Naoko; Yuri, Kazunari

    2014-01-16

    During aging, estrogen production and circulating levels of estrogen are markedly decreased in females. Although several differences exist in the process of reproductive aging between women and female rats, the results of many studies suggest that the female rat, especially the middle-aged or aged ovariectomized female, is an important animal model of hormone loss in women. In target tissues including the brain, the actions of estrogen are mediated mainly via the alpha and beta subtypes of the estrogen receptor (ER-α and ER-β). Estrogen treatment is known to change the expression of ER-α mRNA and protein in specific regions of the brain in middle-aged female rodents. In contrast, we do not know if estrogen regulates the expression of ER-β in the brain at this stage of life. In the present study, we performed in situ hybridization on brain sections of ovariectomized and estrogen-treated middle-aged female rats to reveal the effects of estrogen on the expression of ER-β throughout the brain. Our results showed that estrogen treatment decreased the number of ER-β mRNA-positive cells in the mitral cell and external plexiform layers of the olfactory bulb, central amygdaloid nucleus, medial geniculate nucleus, posterior hypothalamic nucleus, suprachiasmatic nucleus, and reticular part of the substantia nigra. As compared to the results of previous studies of young females, our data revealed that the regions in which expression of ER-β mRNA expression is affected by estrogen differ in middle age. These results suggest that the effects of estrogen on ER-β expression change with age. © 2013 Published by Elsevier B.V.

  18. Fate of estrogens in biological treatment of concentrated black water

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Mes, de T.Z.D.

    2007-01-01

    Feminisation of male fish is for a large part due to compounds entering surface waters via wastewater. For domestic wastewater, two natural estrogens, estrone and 17-estradiol and the synthetic estrogen, constituent of the contraceptive pill, are mainly responsible for this effect. These compounds

  19. Estrogen-related and other disease diagnoses preceding Parkinson's disease

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Latourelle, Jeanne C; Dybdal, Merete; Destefano, Anita L

    2010-01-01

    Estrogen exposure has been associated with the occurrence of Parkinson's disease (PD), as well as many other disorders, and yet the mechanisms underlying these relations are often unknown. While it is likely that estrogen exposure modifies the risk of various diseases through many different...

  20. Toxicogenomics-based in vitro alternatives for estrogenicity testing

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wang, S.

    2013-01-01

    Testing chemicals for their endocrine-disrupting potential, including interference with estrogen receptor signaling, is an important aspect to assess the safety of currently used and newly developed chemicals. The standard test for disruption of normal estrogen function is the in vivo uterotrophic

  1. Phytoestrogenic property of Labisia pumila for use as an estrogen ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    ... is still unknown. This is because the pathways which are affected by LP or the cross-talk with other estrogenic pathways are still unknown. Perhaps in future, these are areas in which research on LP could be focused on. Key words: Labisia pumila, Kacip Fatimah, traditional medicine, estrogen replacement therapy.

  2. Selective estrogen receptor modulators (SERMs): new alternatives for osteoarthritis?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lugo, L; Villalvilla, A; Largo, R; Herrero-Beaumont, G; Roman-Blas, J A

    2014-04-01

    The dramatic rise in the prevalence rate of osteoarthritis (OA) after the menopause and the presence of estrogen receptors in joint tissues suggest that estrogen may help protect against the development of OA. Trials of estrogen therapy have produced inconclusive results, however, partly because of flaws in study design and partly because of the complexity of the mechanisms underlying estrogen's effects on joint tissues. Initial studies of the use of selective estrogen receptor modulators (SERMs) have reported beneficial effects in OA. These agents may exert both a direct effect upon joint cartilage and indirect effects on subchondral bone, synovium, muscle, tendons and ligaments. SERMs may be particularly beneficial for postmenopausal patients with osteoporotic OA, a phenotype defined by decreased bone density, associated with high remodeling in subchondral bone. More research is needed, though, before SERMs can become a therapeutic option for OA. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  3. KBERG: KnowledgeBase for Estrogen Responsive Genes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Tang, Suisheng; Zhang, Zhuo; Tan, Sin Lam

    2007-01-01

    Estrogen has a profound impact on human physiology affecting transcription of numerous genes. To decipher functional characteristics of estrogen responsive genes, we developed KnowledgeBase for Estrogen Responsive Genes (KBERG). Genes in KBERG were derived from Estrogen Responsive Gene Database...... (ERGDB) and were analyzed from multiple aspects. We explored the possible transcription regulation mechanism by capturing highly conserved promoter motifs across orthologous genes, using promoter regions that cover the range of [-1200, +500] relative to the transcription start sites. The motif detection......-friendly system that provides links to other relevant resources such as ERGDB, UniGene, Entrez Gene, HomoloGene, GO, eVOC and GenBank, and thus offers a platform for functional exploration and potential annotation of genes responsive to estrogen. KBERG database can be accessed at http://research.i2r.a-star.edu.sg/kberg....

  4. Long-term use of estrogens: benefit or risk

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bogusława Pietrzak

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available Estrogens are widely used in hormone replacement therapy, gynecology, urogynecology and rarely in dermatology. Non-therapeutic use of estrogens is very widespread. Estrogens are used as contraceptives, which cause a lot of serious side effects. A common clinical problem is skin hyperpigmentation (melasma, occurring mainly in women who take contraceptives with high doses of estrogens. But low doses of estrogens may also cause skin side effects. The mechanism of melasma development is very complicated and not fully understood. It is very likely that UV radiation and genetic background can affect melasma development. Effective therapy should lead to prevention or alleviation of relapses. Treatment should also reduce the area of lesions and improve the appearance of skin. There is no effective and universal pattern of treatment, in which only one substance or method is used. A combination of different methods is used to optimize the therapy. An important role is attributed to prevention, especially protection from UV radiation.

  5. Regioselective deuterium labeling of estrone and catechol estrogen metabolites.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stack, Douglas E; Ritonya, Justin; Jakopovic, Scott; Maloley-Lewis, Brittney

    2014-12-01

    Increased exposure to estrogens and estrogen metabolites is linked with increased rates of breast, ovarian and other human cancers. Metabolism of estrogen can led to formation of electrophilic o-quinones capable of binding to DNA. In order to gain insight into the mechanism of estrogen-induced DNA damage, estrone and catechol estrogens derived from estrone, have been regioselectively labeled with deuterium at the 1-position. Estrone-1-d, estrone-1,2,4-d3, 4-hydroxyestrone-1-d and 2-hydroxyestrone-1-d have been synthesized with or without deuteriums at the 16-position. The key labeling step involves deuterated trifluoroacetic acid exchange catalyzed by t-butyl alcohol. This economical, straightforward labeling technique makes available a range of estrone compounds containing deuterium at the 1-position. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  6. Window Of Opportunity: Estrogen As A Treatment For Ischemic Stroke✰

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Ran; Yang, Shao-Hua

    2013-01-01

    The neuroprotection research in the last 2 decades has witnessed a growing interest in the functions of estrogens as neuroprotectants against neurodegenerative diseases including stroke. The neuroprotective action of estrogens has been well demonstrated in both in vitro and in vivo models of ischemic stroke. However, the major conducted clinical trials so far have raised concern for the protective effect of estrogen replacement therapy in postmenopausal women. The discrepancy could be partly due to the mistranslation between the experimental stroke research and clinical trials. While predominant experimental studies tested the protective action of estrogens on ischemic stroke using acute treatment paradigm, the clinical trials have mainly focused on the effect of estrogen replacement therapy on the primary and secondary stroke prevention which has not been adequately addressed in the experimental stroke study. Although the major conducted clinical trials have indicated that estrogen replacement therapy has an adverse effect and raise concern for long term estrogen replacement therapy for stroke prevention, these are not appropriate for assessing the potential effects of acute estrogen treatment on stroke protection. The well established action of estrogen in the neurovascular unit and its potential interaction with recombinant tissue plasminogen activator (rtPA) makes it a candidate for the combined therapy with rtPA for the acute treatment of ischemic stroke. On the other hand, the “critical period” and newly emerged “biomarkers window” hypotheses have indicated that many clinical relevant factors have been underestimated in the experimental ischemic stroke research. The development and application of ischemic stroke models that replicate the clinical condition is essential for further evaluation of acute estrogen treatment on ischemic stroke which might provide critical information for future clinical trials. PMID:23340160

  7. Contemporary alternatives to plant estrogens for menopause.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Geller, Stacie E; Studee, Laura

    2006-11-01

    Every year, millions of women begin the peri-menopause and may experience a number of symptoms related to this transition. Many women are reluctant to use exogenous hormone therapy for treatment of menopausal symptoms and are turning to botanical and dietary supplements (BDS) for relief. This paper reviews the literature on alternatives to plant estrogens for relief of menopausal symptoms. The MEDLINE database was searched for clinical trials of non-estrogenic plant extracts for menopausal symptoms. To be included, studies had to include peri- or postmenopausal women as subjects. All clinical trials (randomized-controlled trials, open trials, and comparison group studies) were included for this review. Black cohosh appears to be one of the most effective botanicals for relief of vasomotor symptoms, while St. John's wort can improve mood disorders related to the menopausal transition. Many other botanicals have limited evidence to demonstrate safety and efficacy for relief of symptoms related to menopause. A growing body of evidence suggests that some botanicals and dietary supplements could result in improved clinical outcomes. Health care providers should discuss these issues with their patients so they can assist them in managing these alternative therapies through an evidence-based approach.

  8. Androgens and estrogens in skeletal sexual dimorphism

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michaël Laurent

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available Bone is an endocrine tissue expressing androgen and estrogen receptors as well as steroid metabolizing enzymes. The bioactivity of circulating sex steroids is modulated by sex hormone-binding globulin and local conversion in bone tissue, for example, from testosterone (T to estradiol (E2 by aromatase, or to dihydrotestosterone by 5α-reductase enzymes. Our understanding of the structural basis for gender differences in bone strength has advanced considerably over recent years due to increasing use of (high resolution peripheral computed tomography. These microarchitectural insights form the basis to understand sex steroid influences on male peak bone mass and turnover in cortical vs trabecular bone. Recent studies using Cre/LoxP technology have further refi ned our mechanistic insights from global knockout mice into the direct contributions of sex steroids and their respective nuclear receptors in osteoblasts, osteoclasts, osteocytes, and other cells to male osteoporosis. At the same time, these studies have reinforced the notion that androgen and estrogen defi ciency have both direct and pleiotropic effects via interaction with, for example, insulin-like growth factor 1, inflammation, oxidative stress, central nervous system control of bone metabolism, adaptation to mechanical loading, etc., This review will summarize recent advances on these issues in the fi eld of sex steroid actions in male bone homeostasis.

  9. Epigenetic regulation of estrogen-dependent memory

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fortress, Ashley M.; Frick, Karyn M.

    2014-01-01

    Hippocampal memory formation is highly regulated by post-translational histone modifications and DNA methylation. Accordingly, these epigenetic processes play a major role in the effects of modulatory factors, such as sex steroid hormones, on hippocampal memory. Our laboratory recently demonstrated that the ability of the potent estrogen 17β-estradiol (E2) to enhance hippocampal-dependent novel object recognition memory in ovariectomized female mice requires ERK-dependent histone H3 acetylation and DNA methylation in the dorsal hippocampus. Although these data provide valuable insight into the chromatin modifications that mediate the memory-enhancing effects of E2, epigenetic regulation of gene expression is enormously complex. Therefore, more research is needed to fully understand how E2 and other hormones employ epigenetic alterations to shape behavior. This review discusses the epigenetic alterations shown thus far to regulate hippocampal memory, briefly reviews the effects of E2 on hippocampal function, and describes in detail our work on epigenetic regulation of estrogenic memory enhancement. PMID:24878494

  10. The relationship between estrogen, estrogen receptors and periodontal disease in adult women: a review of the literature.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shapiro, Laurence F; Freeman, Katherine

    2014-04-01

    The literature supports the fact that estrogen plays an important role in skeletal maintenance and remodeling. Estrogen, acting through estrogen receptors in the cells of the periodontal ligament, has a regulatory interaction on bone dynamics through a complex set of basic multicellular units (BMUs). Deficiency of estrogen results in an increased number of BMUs and enhanced bone turnover. The impact of the changes in estrogen deficiency on bone dynamics is primarily mediated through osteoclasts, with greater interdiction of estrogen's actions on trabecular bone than on cortical bone. The purpose of this manuscript is to review the literature for evidence to support an association between estrogen and periodontal disease in adult women, as well as bone mineral density, and to help clarify the mechanism of action. We found in our review of all pertinent databases, including Cochrane, that there are few peer-reviewed clinical studies that examine the relationship between estrogen deficiency and periodontal disease, and bone mineral density (BMD) and periodontal disease. Thus, future research is needed to investigate these associations so that at-risk patients can be identified earlier to avoid functional and esthetic sequellae of periodontal disease.

  11. Bioassay of estrogenic compounds in transgenic Arabidopsis plants carrying a recombinant human estrogen receptor gene and a GFP reporter gene.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Inui, Hideyuki; Sasaki, Hideaki; Chua, Nam-Hai; Ohkawa, Hideo

    2009-12-01

    Transgenic Arabidopsis plants carrying a recombinant human estrogen receptor gene and a green fluorescent protein reporter gene were used to bioassay estrogenic compounds. We constructed four recombinant human estrogen receptor genes by combining the DNA-binding domain of LexA, a synthetic nuclear localization signal, a ligand-binding domain of the human estrogen receptor, and a transactivation domain of VP16 in different orders; the XEV plants were the most sensitive, and were able to detect 0.001 ng ml(-1) of 17ss-estradiol (E(2)). The transgenic plants absorbed E(2) and 4-nonylphenol present in the nutrient solution, whereas most of the other compounds seemed to be retained in, or on, the roots. Estrone, methoxychlor, bisphenol A, 4-nonylphenol, and 4-t-octylphenol in the medium were clearly detected by RT-PCR and PCR of the genomic DNA. The transgenic Arabidopsis XEV plants thus have potential for the bioassay of estrogenic compounds.

  12. Estrogen in Cardiovascular Disease during Systemic Lupus Erythematosus

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gilbert, Emily L.; Ryan, Michael J.

    2015-01-01

    Purpose Systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE) is a chronic inflammatory autoimmune disease that disproportionately affects women during their childbearing years. Cardiovascular disease is the leading cause of mortality in this patient population at an age when women often have low cardiovascular risk. Hypertension is a major cardiovascular disease risk factor, and its prevalence is markedly increased in women with SLE. Estrogen has traditionally been implicated in SLE disease progression because of the prevalence of the disease in women; however, its role in cardiovascular risk factors such as hypertension is unclear. The objective of this review is to discuss evidence for the role of estrogen in both human and murine SLE with emphasis on the effect of estrogen on cardiovascular risk factors, including hypertension. Methods PubMed was used to search for articles with terms related to estradiol and SLE. The references of retrieved publications were also reviewed. Findings The potential permissive role of estrogen in SLE development is supported by studies from experimental animal models of lupus in which early removal of estrogen or its effects leads to attenuation of SLE disease parameters, including autoantibody production and renal injury. However, data about the role of estrogens in human SLE are much less clear, with most studies not reaching firm conclusions about positive or negative outcomes after hormonal manipulations involving estrogen during SLE (ie, oral contraceptives, hormone therapy). Significant gaps in knowledge remain about the effect of estrogen on cardiovascular risk factors during SLE. Studies in women with SLE were not designed to determine the effect of estrogen or hormone therapy on blood pressure even though hypertension is highly prevalent, and risk of premature ovarian failure could necessitate use of hormone therapy in women with SLE. Recent evidence from an experimental animal model of lupus found that estrogen may protect against

  13. Determination of estrogen receptor {beta}-mediated estrogenic potencies of hydroxylated PCBS by a yeast two-hybrid assay

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kuroki, H.; Kumate, M.; Nakaoka, H.; Yonekura, S. [Daiichi Coll. of Pharmaceutical Sciences, Fukuoka (Japan); Nishikawa, J.; Nishihara, T. [Osaka Univ., Osaka (Japan)

    2004-09-15

    Several environmental phenolic chemicals such as Nonylphenol and Bisphenol A (BPA) have been previously shown to possess estrogenic properties. In the previous paper, we have investigated the estrogenic activity of a series of hydroxylated PCBs (OH-PCBs) by a yeast two-hybrid assay (estrogen receptor{alpha} (ER{alpha}) -TIF2), in which the expression of estrogenic activity is based on the interaction of chemicals with ER{alpha}, and demonstrated that 4'-OH-CB30 and 4'-OH-CB61 are more estrogenic than BPA, one of the environmental estrogens. We have showed that one chlorine substitution adjacent to 4-OH at 3- or 5-position significantly reduces the ER{alpha}-mediated estrogenic activity of 4-OH-PCBs. Thus, 4'-OH-CB25 and 4-OH-CB56 showed a very weak estrogenicity. We have also showed that 4-OH-PCBs with two chlorine substitutions adjacent to 4-OH at 3- and 5-position such as 4'-OH-CB79 (hydroxylated metabolite of CB77) and persistent 4-OH-PCBs retained in human blood (4-OH-CB107, 4-OH-CB146 and 4-OH-CB187) have no ER{alpha}-mediated estrogenic activity. ER is known to have two subtypes, namely ER{alpha} and ER{beta} and it is reported that ligand, some agonist and antagonist have a different binding affinity for ER{alpha} and ER{beta}. However, there is limited information on ER{beta}-mediated endocrine disrupting potency. In this study, we examined the ER{beta}-mediated estrogenic activity of a series of OH-PCBs, including environmentally relevant 4-OH-PCBs by a yeast two-hybrid assay (ER{beta}-TIF2).

  14. Potential mechanisms underlying estrogen-induced expression of the molluscan estrogen receptor (ER) gene

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tran, Thi Kim Anh [School of Environmental and Life Sciences, The University of Newcastle, Callaghan, NSW 2308 (Australia); Department of Agriculture, Forestry and Fisheries, Vinh University, 182 Le Duan St., Vinh City, Nghe An (Viet Nam); MacFarlane, Geoff R. [School of Environmental and Life Sciences, The University of Newcastle, Callaghan, NSW 2308 (Australia); Kong, Richard Yuen Chong [Department of Biology and Chemistry, City University of Hong Kong, Tat Chee Avenue, Kowloon, Hong Kong Special Administrative Region (China); O’Connor, Wayne A. [New South Wales Department of Primary Industries, Port Stephens Fisheries Institute, Taylors Beach, NSW 2316 (Australia); Yu, Richard Man Kit, E-mail: Richard.Yu@newcastle.edu.au [School of Environmental and Life Sciences, The University of Newcastle, Callaghan, NSW 2308 (Australia)

    2016-10-15

    Highlights: • This is the first report on the putative promoter sequence of a molluscan ER gene. • The gene promoter contains putative binding sites for direct and indirect interaction with ER. • E2 upregulates ER gene expression in the ovary in vitro and in vivo. • E2-induced gene expression may require a novel ligand-dependent receptor. • The ER proximal promoter is hypomethylated regardless of gene expression levels. - Abstract: In vertebrates, estrogens and estrogen mimicking chemicals modulate gene expression mainly through a genomic pathway mediated by the estrogen receptors (ERs). Although the existence of an ER orthologue in the mollusc genome has been known for some time, its role in estrogen signalling has yet to be deciphered. This is largely due to its constitutive (ligand-independent) activation and a limited mechanistic understanding of its regulation. To fill this knowledge gap, we cloned and characterised an ER cDNA (sgER) and the 5′-flanking region of the gene from the Sydney rock oyster Saccostrea glomerata. The sgER cDNA is predicted to encode a 477-amino acid protein that contains a DNA-binding domain (DBD) and a ligand-binding domain (LBD) typically conserved among both vertebrate and invertebrate ERs. A comparison of the sgER LBD sequence with those of other ligand-dependent ERs revealed that the sgER LBD is variable at several conserved residues known to be critical for ligand binding and receptor activation. Ligand binding assays using fluorescent-labelled E2 and purified sgER protein confirmed that sgER is devoid of estrogen binding. In silico analysis of the sgER 5′-flanking sequence indicated the presence of three putative estrogen responsive element (ERE) half-sites and several putative sites for ER-interacting transcription factors, suggesting that the sgER promoter may be autoregulated by its own gene product. sgER mRNA is ubiquitously expressed in adult oyster tissues, with the highest expression found in the ovary

  15. 21 CFR 862.1270 - Estrogens (total, in pregnancy) test system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Estrogens (total, in pregnancy) test system. 862... Test Systems § 862.1270 Estrogens (total, in pregnancy) test system. (a) Identification. As estrogens (total, in pregnancy) test system is a device intended to measure total estrogens in plasma, serum, and...

  16. Estrogen and the central control of body fluid balance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Curtis, Kathleen S

    2009-05-25

    Body fluid volume and electrolyte concentration are maintained at optimal levels by complex behavioral and physiological mechanisms that are integrated and coordinated by the central nervous system. From initial studies of estrogen effects on salt and water intake in the 1970s and later investigations of the role of estrogen in cardiovascular and neuroendocrine function, it has become increasingly clear that body fluid volume and osmotic regulation are affected by estrogen. In the early 1990s, estrogen receptors were identified throughout the central nervous system, in areas including circumventricular organs that detect humoral signals associated with body fluid challenges, and hypothalamic and hindbrain nuclei involved in behavioral, neuroendocrine, and cardiovascular responses to body fluid challenges. Taken together, the body of evidence amassed from more than 40 years of investigations suggests that the central actions of estrogen influence body fluid regulation and, more specifically, compensatory responses to perturbations of osmotic or volume balance in two interrelated ways. Estrogen alter the detection of signals by the central nervous system and, at the same time, act within central pathways to modify neurotransmitter systems that mediate specific responses to osmotic or volume challenges. This review focuses on the central actions of estrogen in influencing the cardiovascular, neuroendocrine, and behavioral processes that subserve body fluid regulation.

  17. High salivary estrogen and risk of developing pregnancy gingivitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gürsoy, Mervi; Gürsoy, Ulvi Kahraman; Sorsa, Timo; Pajukanta, Riitta; Könönen, Eija

    2013-09-01

    Estrogen regulates the cellular functions of several tissues that may disturb the host response against bacteria. The present aim is to evaluate the contribution of estrogen to the severity of gingival inflammation during pregnancy. Salivary estrogen levels from 30 pregnant and 24 non-pregnant females were related to their periodontal health parameters, including visible plaque index (VPI) and bleeding on probing (BOP) from six sites per tooth. The pregnant group was examined three times during pregnancy and twice during postpartum, and the non-pregnant group was examined three times, once per subsequent month. Salivary estrogen levels increased significantly during the second (P high estrogen and high VPI levels had the highest frequency of pregnancy gingivitis. During the second and third trimesters, simultaneously enhanced estrogen levels and VPI scores brought an additional risk of developing gingivitis compared with a high VPI score alone. The present findings suggest that, during pregnancy, the estrogen level determines the magnitude of gingival inflammation developed against microbial plaque at the gingival margin.

  18. Estrogens mediate cardiac hypertrophy in a stimulus-dependent manner.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haines, Christopher D; Harvey, Pamela A; Leinwand, Leslie A

    2012-09-01

    The incidence of cardiac hypertrophy, an established risk factor for heart failure, is generally lower in women compared with men, but this advantage is lost after menopause. Although it is widely believed that estrogens are cardioprotective, there are contradictory reports, including increased cardiac events in postmenopausal women receiving estrogens and enhanced cardiac protection from ischemic injury in female mice without estrogens. We exposed aromatase knockout (ArKO) mice, which produce no estrogens, to both pathologic and physiologic stimuli. This model allows an investigation into the effects of a complete, chronic lack of estrogens in male and female hearts. At baseline, female ArKO mice had normal-sized hearts but decreased cardiac function and paradoxically increased phosphorylation of many progrowth kinases. When challenged with the pathological stimulus, isoproterenol, ArKO females developed 2-fold more hypertrophy than wild-type females. In contrast, exercise-induced physiological hypertrophy was unaffected by the absence of estrogens in either sex, although running performance was blunted in ArKO females. Thus, loss of estrogen signaling in females, but not males, impairs cardiac function and sensitizes the heart to pathological insults through up-regulation of multiple hypertrophic pathways. These findings provide insight into the apparent loss of cardioprotection after menopause and suggest that caution is warranted in the long-term use of aromatase inhibitors in the setting of breast cancer prevention.

  19. Mixture Effects of Estrogenic Pesticides at the Human Estrogen Receptor α and β

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seeger, Bettina; Klawonn, Frank; Nguema Bekale, Boris; Steinberg, Pablo

    2016-01-01

    Consumers of fruits and vegetables are frequently exposed to small amounts of hormonally active pesticides, some of them sharing a common mode of action such as the activation of the human estrogen receptor α (hERα) or β (hERβ). Therefore, it is of particular importance to evaluate risks emanating from chemical mixtures, in which the individual pesticides are present at human-relevant concentrations, below their corresponding maximum residue levels. Binary and ternary iso-effective mixtures of estrogenic pesticides at effect concentrations eliciting a 1 or 10% effect in the presence or absence of 17β-estradiol were tested experimentally at the hERα in the yeast-based estrogen screen (YES) assay as well as in the human U2-OS cell-based ERα chemical-activated luciferase gene expression (ERα CALUX) assay and at the hERβ in the ERβ CALUX assay. The outcome was then compared to predictions calculated by means of concentration addition. In most cases, additive effects were observed with the tested combinations in all three test systems, an observation that supports the need to expand the risk assessment of pesticides and consider cumulative risk assessment. An additional testing of mixture effects at the hERβ showed that most test substances being active at the hERα could also elicit additive effects at the hERβ, but the hERβ was less sensitive. In conclusion, effects of the same ligands at the hERα and the hERβ could influence the estrogenic outcome under physiological conditions. PMID:26812056

  20. Mixture Effects of Estrogenic Pesticides at the Human Estrogen Receptor α and β.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bettina Seeger

    Full Text Available Consumers of fruits and vegetables are frequently exposed to small amounts of hormonally active pesticides, some of them sharing a common mode of action such as the activation of the human estrogen receptor α (hERα or β (hERβ. Therefore, it is of particular importance to evaluate risks emanating from chemical mixtures, in which the individual pesticides are present at human-relevant concentrations, below their corresponding maximum residue levels. Binary and ternary iso-effective mixtures of estrogenic pesticides at effect concentrations eliciting a 1 or 10% effect in the presence or absence of 17β-estradiol were tested experimentally at the hERα in the yeast-based estrogen screen (YES assay as well as in the human U2-OS cell-based ERα chemical-activated luciferase gene expression (ERα CALUX assay and at the hERβ in the ERβ CALUX assay. The outcome was then compared to predictions calculated by means of concentration addition. In most cases, additive effects were observed with the tested combinations in all three test systems, an observation that supports the need to expand the risk assessment of pesticides and consider cumulative risk assessment. An additional testing of mixture effects at the hERβ showed that most test substances being active at the hERα could also elicit additive effects at the hERβ, but the hERβ was less sensitive. In conclusion, effects of the same ligands at the hERα and the hERβ could influence the estrogenic outcome under physiological conditions.

  1. Functional adaptation in female rats: the role of estrogen signaling.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Susannah J Sample

    Full Text Available Sex steroids have direct effects on the skeleton. Estrogen acts on the skeleton via the classical genomic estrogen receptors alpha and beta (ERα and ERβ, a membrane ER, and the non-genomic G-protein coupled estrogen receptor (GPER. GPER is distributed throughout the nervous system, but little is known about its effects on bone. In male rats, adaptation to loading is neuronally regulated, but this has not been studied in females.We used the rat ulna end-loading model to induce an adaptive modeling response in ovariectomized (OVX female Sprague-Dawley rats. Rats were treated with a placebo, estrogen (17β-estradiol, or G-1, a GPER-specific agonist. Fourteen days after OVX, rats underwent unilateral cyclic loading of the right ulna; half of the rats in each group had brachial plexus anesthesia (BPA of the loaded limb before loading. Ten days after loading, serum estrogen concentrations, dorsal root ganglion (DRG gene expression of ERα, ERβ, GPER, CGRPα, TRPV1, TRPV4 and TRPA1, and load-induced skeletal responses were quantified. We hypothesized that estrogen and G-1 treatment would influence skeletal responses to cyclic loading through a neuronal mechanism. We found that estrogen suppresses periosteal bone formation in female rats. This physiological effect is not GPER-mediated. We also found that absolute mechanosensitivity in female rats was decreased, when compared with male rats. Blocking of adaptive bone formation by BPA in Placebo OVX females was reduced.Estrogen acts to decrease periosteal bone formation in female rats in vivo. This effect is not GPER-mediated. Gender differences in absolute bone mechanosensitivity exist in young Sprague-Dawley rats with reduced mechanosensitivity in females, although underlying bone formation rate associated with growth likely influences this observation. In contrast to female and male rats, central neuronal signals had a diminished effect on adaptive bone formation in estrogen-deficient female rats.

  2. Estrogen modulates osteogenic activity and estrogen receptor mRNA in mesenchymal stem cells of women.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, F-P; Hu, C-H; Wang, K-C

    2013-02-01

    To determine whether estrogen regulates mesenchymal stem cell (MSC) activity in bone marrow from osteoporotic postmenopausal women. MSCs were collected from bone marrows which were aspirated simultaneously during iliac bone graft procedures in spine fusion surgery in osteoporotic postmenopausal women. We investigated proliferation, differentiation, osteogenic activity, and estrogen receptor (ER) α and β mRNA expression of primary culture MSCs isolated from four osteoporotic postmenopausal women, treated in vitro with or without 17β-estradiol. The expression of alkaline phosphatase (ALP), osteocalcin, interleukin-6, ERα and ERβ mRNA was evaluated. The expression of ALP and osteocalcin mRNA was detected during the cultures of MSCs and was observed to increase up to day 20. As compared with MSCs not treated with estradiol, a significant increase in DNA content, ERα mRNA, and ALP mRNA expression was observed in cultures with estradiol. The mRNA expression of osteocalcin and interleukin-6 was significantly lower in MSCs treated with estradiol than those without estradiol. There was no significant difference in the mRNA expression of ERβ between MSCs cultured with and without estradiol. In the proper environment, MSCs from osteoporotic women can differentiate into osteoblasts and estrogen enhances the osteogenic activity possibly via ERα activity.

  3. Biomarker Genes for Detecting Estrogenic Activity of Endocrine Disruptors via Estrogen Receptors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hyun Yang

    2012-02-01

    Full Text Available Endocrine disruptors (EDs are compounds used in various industrial products, drugs, and cosmetics. They can be found in the environment and disturb the endocrine and reproductive systems, resulting in adverse effects to humans and wildlife such as birth defects and developmental disorders. Since several EDs have a structure similar to that of endogenous steroid hormones such as estrogens, they intend to have an affinity for steroid hormone receptors and alter hormone-mediated metabolism by binding to these receptors. EDs are therefore a global concern and assays should be developed to efficiently determine whether these compounds are detrimental to biological systems. Diverse experimental methods may help determine the endocrine disrupting potential of EDs and evaluate the adverse effects of a single and/or combination of these reagents. Currently, biomarkers have been employed to objectively measure EDs potency and understand the underlying mechanisms. Further studies are required to develop ideal screening methods and biomarkers to determine EDs potency at environmentally relevant concentrations. In this review, we describe the biomarkers for estrogenicity of EDs identified both in vitro and in vivo, and introduce a biomarker, cabindin-D9k (CaBP-9k, that may be used to assess estrogenic activity of EDs.

  4. Alternatives to estrogen to manage hot flushes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Albertazzi, Paola

    2005-01-01

    Hot flushes are probably the most common symptom resulting in medical consultation in relation to the menopause and, when severe, they can affect quite dramatically women's quality of life. Hormone (estrogen) replacement therapy (HRT) is the most effective treatment for this symptom and in the ideal setting of clinical trials, under optimal selection of patients and compliance, it reduces hot flushes by about 70-80%. Recently, however, a series of 'scares' has had large resonance in the lay press about possible adverse effects of HRT. These have undermined both doctors' and women's confidence in the use of these compounds. This has been witnessed by the recent fall in HRT sales. A number of compounds, both pharmacological and herbal in origin, have been used for the treatment of neurovegetative symptoms in menopausal women. The present article critically reviews evidence of the efficacy of some of the most commonly used compounds and assesses their effect in relation to that of HRT.

  5. Computational method for discovery of estrogen responsive genes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Tang, Suisheng; Tan, Sin Lam; Ramadoss, Suresh Kumar

    2004-01-01

    of human genes are functionally well characterized. It is still unclear how many and which human genes respond to estrogen treatment. We propose a simple, economic, yet effective computational method to predict a subclass of estrogen responsive genes. Our method relies on the similarity of ERE frames...... across different promoters in the human genome. Matching ERE frames of a test set of 60 known estrogen responsive genes to the collection of over 18,000 human promoters, we obtained 604 candidate genes. Evaluating our result by comparison with the published microarray data and literature, we found...

  6. [Local estrogen therapy--clinical implications--2012 update].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kokot-Kierepa, Marta; Bartuzi, Aleksandra; Kulik-Rechberger, Beata; Rechberger, Tomasz

    2012-10-01

    With increasing longevity in Poland, women can now expect to live around 40% of their lives after menopause, and there is a growing desire for older women to preserve their vitality sexual function and quality of life. The most common urogenital symptoms associated with menopause are dryness, followed by irritation or itching, and discharge, with a substantial number of post-menopausal women also being affected by dysuria. These symptoms are the result of vaginal atrophy which is in turn caused by reduced transudation through the vaginal epithelium and reduced cervical gland secretions resulting from post-menopausal estrogen depletion. Vaginal atrophy generally occurs 4-5 years after the last menstrual period and progressively increases in prevalence in the subsequent years. Importantly vaginal atrophy is strongly associated with sexual dysfunction, and lower urinary tract symptoms, such as frequency urgency nocturia and dysuria, as well as incontinence and recurrent infection are reported more frequently in the presence of vaginal atrophy Those symptoms, apart from being bothersome for the patients also negatively impact their quality of life. Consequently before irreversible changes occur, early detection and treatment of vaginal atrophy should be implemented. Estrogen therapy is the most commonly prescribed treatment. Estrogens restore the cytology pH and vascularity of the vagina, resulting in symptom resolution for the majority of treated women. Because vaginal atrophy symptoms tend to occur later than vasomotor symptoms, many women do not necessarily require or wish to take systemic estrogen treatment if their symptoms are restricted to the urogenital tract. Vaginal estrogen products deliver estrogen locally to vaginal tissues with little or no systemic absorption and provide an effective alternative to systemic estrogen therapy for these women. Various vaginal estrogen preparations such as conjugated equine estrogens, estradiol and estriol vaginal creams, a

  7. Estrogens can disrupt amphibian mating behavior.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Frauke Hoffmann

    Full Text Available The main component of classical contraceptives, 17α-ethinylestradiol (EE2, has high estrogenic activity even at environmentally relevant concentrations. Although estrogenic endocrine disrupting compounds are assumed to contribute to the worldwide decline of amphibian populations by adverse effects on sexual differentiation, evidence for EE2 affecting amphibian mating behaviour is lacking. In this study, we demonstrate that EE2 exposure at five different concentrations (0.296 ng/L, 2.96 ng/L, 29.64 ng/L, 2.96 µg/L and 296.4 µg/L can disrupt the mating behavior of adult male Xenopus laevis. EE2 exposure at all concentrations lowered male sexual arousal, indicated by decreased proportions of advertisement calls and increased proportions of the call type rasping, which characterizes a sexually unaroused state of a male. Additionally, EE2 at all tested concentrations affected temporal and spectral parameters of the advertisement calls, respectively. The classical and highly sensitive biomarker vitellogenin, on the other hand, was only induced at concentrations equal or higher than 2.96 µg/L. If kept under control conditions after a 96 h EE2 exposure (2.96 µg/L, alterations of male advertisement calls vanish gradually within 6 weeks and result in a lower sexual attractiveness of EE2 exposed males toward females as demonstrated by female choice experiments. These findings indicate that exposure to environmentally relevant EE2 concentrations can directly disrupt male mate calling behavior of X. laevis and can indirectly affect the mating behavior of females. The results suggest the possibility that EE2 exposure could reduce the reproductive success of EE2 exposed animals and these effects might contribute to the global problem of amphibian decline.

  8. Estrogens can disrupt amphibian mating behavior.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hoffmann, Frauke; Kloas, Werner

    2012-01-01

    The main component of classical contraceptives, 17α-ethinylestradiol (EE2), has high estrogenic activity even at environmentally relevant concentrations. Although estrogenic endocrine disrupting compounds are assumed to contribute to the worldwide decline of amphibian populations by adverse effects on sexual differentiation, evidence for EE2 affecting amphibian mating behaviour is lacking. In this study, we demonstrate that EE2 exposure at five different concentrations (0.296 ng/L, 2.96 ng/L, 29.64 ng/L, 2.96 µg/L and 296.4 µg/L) can disrupt the mating behavior of adult male Xenopus laevis. EE2 exposure at all concentrations lowered male sexual arousal, indicated by decreased proportions of advertisement calls and increased proportions of the call type rasping, which characterizes a sexually unaroused state of a male. Additionally, EE2 at all tested concentrations affected temporal and spectral parameters of the advertisement calls, respectively. The classical and highly sensitive biomarker vitellogenin, on the other hand, was only induced at concentrations equal or higher than 2.96 µg/L. If kept under control conditions after a 96 h EE2 exposure (2.96 µg/L), alterations of male advertisement calls vanish gradually within 6 weeks and result in a lower sexual attractiveness of EE2 exposed males toward females as demonstrated by female choice experiments. These findings indicate that exposure to environmentally relevant EE2 concentrations can directly disrupt male mate calling behavior of X. laevis and can indirectly affect the mating behavior of females. The results suggest the possibility that EE2 exposure could reduce the reproductive success of EE2 exposed animals and these effects might contribute to the global problem of amphibian decline.

  9. Evaluation of on-site wastewater treatment technology to remove estrogens, nonylphenols, and estrogenic activity from wastewater.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stanford, Benjamin D; Weinberg, Howard S

    2010-04-15

    A series of five on-site wastewater treatment systems were monitored for the removal of steroid estrogens, nonylphenols, and total estrogenic activity through several stages of pretreatment including aerobic and anaerobic sand filters. The objectives of this study were (1) to examine the ability of traditional septic systems and different types of pretreatment add-ons to remove nonylphenols (NPs) and the steroid estrogens estrone (E1), 17beta- estradiol (E2), estriol (E3), and 17alpha- ethinylestradiol (EE2) from the final effluent prior to discharge into the environment and (2) to examine the ability of each system and each stage of treatment within the system to remove total estrogenic activity as measured by a yeast estrogen screen (YES) assay. YES data and instrumental data are compared in the context of analyte recovery and estradiol equivalents. Results indicate excellent removal of NPs and total estrogenic activity to near or below detection limits when multiple stages of pretreatment including aerobic sand filters are used. However, only moderate removal of the steroid estrogens was observed through the anaerobic sand filters.

  10. Channel catfish (Ictalurus punctatus) leukocytes express estrogen receptor isoforms ERα and ERβ2 and are functionally modulated by estrogens

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iwanowicz, Luke R.; Stafford, James L.; Patiño, Reynaldo; Bengten, Eva; Miller, Norman W.; Blazer, Vicki

    2014-01-01

    Estrogens are recognized as modulators of immune responses in mammals and teleosts. While it is known that the effects of estrogens are mediated via leukocyte-specific estrogen receptors (ERs) in humans and mice, leucocyte-specific estrogen receptor expression and the effects of estrogens on this cell population is less explored and poorly understood in teleosts. Here in, we verify that channel catfish (Ictalurus punctaus) leukocytes express ERα and ERβ2. Transcripts of these isoforms were detected in tissue-associated leukocyte populations by PCR, but ERβ2 was rarely detected in PBLs. Expression of these receptors was temporally regulated in PBLs following polyclonal activation by concanavalin A, lipopolysaccharide or alloantigen based on evaluation by quantitative and end-point PCR. Examination of long-term leukocyte cell lines demonstrated that these receptors are differentially expressed depending on leukocyte lineage and phenotype. Expression of ERs was also temporally dynamic in some leukocyte lineages and may reflect stage of cell maturity. Estrogens affect the responsiveness of channel catfish peripheral blood leukocytes (PBLs) to mitogens in vitro. Similarly, bactericidal activity and phorbol 12-myristate 13-acetate induced respiratory burst was modulated by 17β-estradiol. These actions were blocked by the pure ER antagonist ICI 182780 indicating that response is, in part, mediated via ERα. In summary, estrogen receptors are expressed in channel catfish leukocytes and participate in the regulation of the immune response. This is the first time leukocyte lineage expression has been reported in teleost cell lines.

  11. Are estrogen-related drugs new alternatives for the management of osteoarthritis?

    OpenAIRE

    Xiao, Ya-Ping; Tian, Fa-Ming; Dai, Mu-Wei; Wang, Wen-Ya; Shao, Li-Tao; Zhang, Liu

    2016-01-01

    Osteoarthritis (OA) is a chronic degenerative disease involving multiple physiopathological mechanisms. The increased prevalence of OA after menopause and the presence of estrogen receptors in joint tissues suggest that estrogen could help prevent development of OA. This review summarizes OA research with a focus on the effects of estrogen and selective estrogen receptor modulators (SERMs). Preclinical studies and clinical trials of estrogen therapy have reported inconsistent results. However...

  12. Estrogen-DNA Adducts as Novel Biomarkers for Ovarian Cancer Risk and for Use in Prevention

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-03-01

    unbalanced, leading to formation of higher levels of catechol estrogen quinones , which react with DNA to form adducts. A low ratio indicates that a...polymorphisms and risk of hormonal cancers. The estrogen quinone resulting from CYP1B1 activity may proceed to adduct formation in the presence of...person’s estrogen metabolism is balanced, and formation of estrogen-DNA adducts is relatively low. Figure 1. Ratios of depurinating estrogen-DNA

  13. Studies on estrogenic activities of food additives with human breast cancer MCF-7 cells and mechanism of estrogenicity by BHA and OPP

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Okubo, Tomoko; Kano, Itsu

    2003-01-01

    Estrogenic activities of more than 90 chemicals including food additives, foodstuffs of plant origin, and some chemicals, which could be orally ingested, were examined by assaying estrogen receptor (ER...

  14. Phytoestrogens and mycoestrogens bind to the rat uterine estrogen receptor

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Branham, William S; Dial, Stacey L; Moland, Carrie L; Hass, Bruce S; Blair, Robert M; Fang, Hong; Shi, Leming; Tong, Weida; Perkins, Roger G; Sheehan, Daniel M

    2002-01-01

    Consumption of phytoestrogens and mycoestrogens in food products or as dietary supplements is of interest because of both the potential beneficial and adverse effects of these compounds in estrogen...

  15. Role of estrogen receptor‐α on food demand elasticity

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Minervini, Vanessa; Rowland, Neil E; Robertson, Kimberly L; Foster, Thomas C

    2015-01-01

    ... lesser extent and, thus, are not well understood. Therefore, the purpose of the present experiment was to use a behavioral economics paradigm to assess differences in demand elasticity between mice with knockout of the estrogen receptor subtype α...

  16. Role of estrogen receptor-α on food demand elasticity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Minervini, Vanessa; Rowland, Neil E; Robertson, Kimberly L; Foster, Thomas C

    2015-05-01

    Estrogens have been shown to have an inhibitory effect on food intake under free-feeding conditions, yet the effects of estrogens on food-maintained operant responding have been studied to a much lesser extent and, thus, are not well understood. Therefore, the purpose of the present experiment was to use a behavioral economics paradigm to assess differences in demand elasticity between mice with knockout of the estrogen receptor subtype α, knockout of subtype β, and their wild type controls. The mice responded in a closed economy, and the price of food was increased by increasing the fixed-ratio response requirement every four sessions. Overall, we found that mice with the knockout of receptor subtype α had the most elastic demand functions. Therefore, under these conditions, estrogens increased food seeking via activation of the receptor subtype α. The results were inconsistent with those reported by previous studies that employed free-feeding conditions. © Society for the Experimental Analysis of Behavior.

  17. Weak estrogenic transcriptional activities of Bisphenol A and Bisphenol S

    OpenAIRE

    GRIGNARD ELISE; Bremer, Susanne; LAPENNA SILVIA

    2011-01-01

    In 2011, the European Commission has restricted the use of Bisphenol A in plastic infant feeding bottles. In a response to this restriction, Bisphenol S is now often used as a component of plastic substitutes for the production of babybottles. One of the major concerns leading to the restriction of Bisphenol A was its weak estrogenic activity. By using two highly standardised transactivation assays, we could demonstrate that the estrogenic activity of Bisphenol A and Bisphenol S i...

  18. Is there an estrogenic component in the metabolic syndrome?

    OpenAIRE

    Starcke, S.; Vollmer, G.

    2006-01-01

    One of the major upcoming concerns leading to health related problems in the industrialized societies is the metabolic syndrome which is characterized by central obesity, hypertension, raised fasting glucose and triglyceride levels. The focus of this review is on a potential estrogenic linkage between the metabolic mechanisms involved into the development of this disease cluster and specific estrogen related regulatory pattern. The candidate molecules for this link are insulin and insulin-lik...

  19. Estrogens and Coronary Artery Disease: New Clinical Perspectives.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meyer, M R; Barton, M

    2016-01-01

    In premenopausal women, endogenous estrogens are associated with reduced prevalence of arterial hypertension, coronary artery disease, myocardial infarction, and stroke. Clinical trials conducted in the 1990s such as HERS, WHI, and WISDOM have shown that postmenopausal treatment with horse hormone mixtures (so-called conjugated equine estrogens) and synthetic progestins adversely affects female cardiovascular health. Our understanding of rapid (nongenomic) and chronic (genomic) estrogen signaling has since advanced considerably, including identification of a new G protein-coupled estrogen receptor (GPER), which like the "classical" receptors ERα and ERβ is highly abundant in the cardiovascular system. Here, we discuss the role of estrogen receptors in the pathogenesis of coronary artery disease and review natural and synthetic ligands of estrogen receptors as well as their effects in physiology, on cardiovascular risk factors, and atherosclerotic vascular disease. Data from preclinical and clinical studies using nonselective compounds activating GPER, which include selective estrogen receptor modulators such as tamoxifen or raloxifene, selective estrogen receptor downregulators such as Faslodex™ (fulvestrant/ICI 182,780), vitamin B3 (niacin), green tea catechins, and soy flavonoids such as genistein or resveratrol, strongly suggest that activation of GPER may afford therapeutic benefit for primary and secondary prevention in patients with or at risk for coronary artery disease. Evidence from preclinical studies suggest similar efficacy profiles for selective small molecule GPER agonists such as G-1 which are devoid of uterotrophic activity. Further clinical research in this area is warranted to provide opportunities for future cardiovascular drug development. © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  20. Circulatory Estrogen Level Protects Against Breast Cancer in Obese Women

    Science.gov (United States)

    Suba, Zsuzsanna

    2013-01-01

    Literary data suggest apparently ambiguous interaction between menopausal status and obesity-associated breast cancer risk based on the principle of the carcinogenic capacity of estrogen. Before menopause, breast cancer incidence is relatively low and adiposity is erroneously regarded as a protective factor against this tumor conferred by the obesity associated defective estrogen-synthesis. By contrast, in postmenopausal cases, obesity presents a strong risk factor for breast cancer being mistakenly attributed to the presumed excessive estrogen-production of their adipose-tissue mass. Obesity is associated with dysmetabolism and endangers the healthy equilibrium of sexual hormone-production and regular menstrual cycles in women, which are the prerequisites not only for reproductive capacity but also for somatic health. At the same time, literary data support that anovulatory infertility is a very strong risk for breast cancer in young women either with or without obesity. In the majority of premenopausal women, obesity associated insulin resistance is moderate and may be counteracted by their preserved circulatory estrogen level. Consequently, it is not obesity but rather the still sufficient estrogen-level, which may be protective against breast cancer in young adult females. In obese older women, never using hormone replacement therapy (HRT) the breast cancer risk is high, which is associated with their continuous estrogen loss and increasing insulin-resistance. By contrast, obese postmenopausal women using HRT, have a decreased risk for breast cancer as the protective effect of estrogen-substitution may counteract to their obesity associated systemic alterations. The revealed inverse correlation between circulatory estrogen-level and breast cancer risk in obese women should advance our understanding of breast cancer etiology and promotes primary prevention measures. New patents recommend various methods for the prevention and treatment of obesity

  1. Distribution of estrogen and progesterone receptors in Epulis Fissuratum

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shahrabi Sh.

    2005-06-01

    Full Text Available Statement of Problem: Epulides Fissurata (EF are common proliferative and denture- induced lesions of the oral cavity with a predilection for female. This suggests a possible role for sex steroid hormones in the development and progression of these lesions. Purpose: The objective of this study was the immunohistochemical evaluation of epulis fissuratum of the oral cavity for estrogen and progesterone receptors expression in epithelial, stromal, inflammatory and endothelial cells populations. Materials and Methods: In this cross-sectional study, 15 samples of formalin- fixed, paraffin- embedded epulis fissuratums including marginal mucosal tissues in 4 cases as a control group, were immuno-histochemically evaluated for estrogen and progesterone receptors protein expression. Result: In 10 cases, estrogen receptor positivity was found within the epithelium and progesterone receptor immunoreactivity was present in 7 cases. Stromal cells exhibited estrogen and progesterone receptor immunostaining in many cases but only few cases showed expression of these receptors in the inflammatory and endothelial cells. Estrogen and progesterone receptors were also detected in some cases containing salivary glands tissue. Conclusion: Although chronic irritation may be the initiating factor for the occurence of epulis fissuratum, some of the cells in the lesion, could be potential targets for estrogen and progestrone hormones.

  2. Estrogenic terpenes and terpenoids: Pathways, functions and applications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kiyama, Ryoiti

    2017-11-15

    Terpenes are made of the isoprene unit (C 5 ), and along with their derivatives, terpenoids, they are widely distributed in plants as active ingredients involved in anti-inflammation, anti-carcinogenesis and neuroprotection. Estrogenic terpenes and terpenoids are an important category of phytoestrogens and have been used as traditional medicines. The comprehensive list of estrogenic terpenes and terpenoids includes hemi-, mono-, sesqui-, di-, tri-, tetra- and polyterpenes, their derivatives, and meroterpenes, along with the signaling pathways and cellular functions on which their estrogenicity is exerted. Signaling pathways are further classified as bidirectional or unidirectional, the latter being further divided into two types depending upon the presence of both ligands, or the absence of one or both ligands. Although estrogenic activity of terpenes and terpenoids was evaluated by ligand-binding assays, yeast two-hybrid assays, reporter-gene assays, transcription assays, protein assays, cell assays and animal testing, the mechanism of estrogenic activity is still not fully understood. Applications of estrogenic terpenes and terpenoids are categorized into cancer treatment and prevention, cardioprotection, endocrine toxicity/reproductive dysfunction, food/supplement/traditional medicine, immunology/inflammation, menopausal syndromes and neuroprotection, where their benefits are discussed based on their availability, stability and variations. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  3. Estrogen modulates mesenchyme-epidermis interactions in the adult nipple.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Hsing-Jung; Oh, Ji Won; Spandau, Dan F; Tholpady, Sunil; Diaz, Jesus; Schroeder, Laura J; Offutt, Carlos D; Glick, Adam B; Plikus, Maksim V; Koyama, Sachiko; Foley, John

    2017-04-15

    Maintenance of specialized epidermis requires signals from the underlying mesenchyme; however, the specific pathways involved remain to be identified. By recombining cells from the ventral skin of the K14-PTHrP transgenic mice [which overexpress parathyroid hormone-related protein (PTHrP) in their developing epidermis and mammary glands] with those from wild type, we show that transgenic stroma is sufficient to reprogram wild-type keratinocytes into nipple-like epidermis. To identify candidate nipple-specific signaling factors, we compared gene expression signatures of sorted Pdgfrα-positive ventral K14-PTHrP and wild-type fibroblasts, identifying differentially expressed transcripts that are involved in WNT, HGF, TGFβ, IGF, BMP, FGF and estrogen signaling. Considering that some of the growth factor pathways are targets for estrogen regulation, we examined the upstream role of this hormone in maintaining the nipple. Ablation of estrogen signaling through ovariectomy produced nipples with abnormally thin epidermis, and we identified TGFβ as a negatively regulated target of estrogen signaling. Estrogen treatment represses Tgfβ1 at the transcript and protein levels in K14-PTHrP fibroblasts in vitro, while ovariectomy increases Tgfb1 levels in K14-PTHrP ventral skin. Moreover, ectopic delivery of Tgfβ1 protein into nipple connective tissue reduced epidermal proliferation. Taken together, these results show that specialized nipple epidermis is maintained by estrogen-induced repression of TGFβ signaling in the local fibroblasts. © 2017. Published by The Company of Biologists Ltd.

  4. Rapid yeast estrogen bioassays stably expressing human estrogen receptors alpha and beta, and green fluorescent protein: a comparison of different compounds on both receptor types

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bovee, T.F.H.; Helsdingen, J.R.; Rietjens, I.M.C.M.; Keijer, J.; Hoogenboom, L.A.P.

    2004-01-01

    Previously, we described the construction of a rapid yeast bioassay stably expressing human estrogen receptor (hER) and yeast enhanced green fluorescent protein (yEGFP) in response to estrogens. In the present study, the properties of this assay were further studied by testing a series of estrogenic

  5. Estrogen-mediated hemangioma-derived stem cells through estrogen receptor-α for infantile hemangioma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhang L

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available Ling Zhang,1 Hai Wei Wu,1 Weien Yuan,2 Jia Wei Zheng1 1Shanghai Ninth People’s Hospital, Shanghai Jiao Tong University School of Medicine, Center for Specialty Strategy Research of Shanghai Jiao Tong University China Hospital Development Institute, 2School of Pharmacy, Shanghai Jiao Tong University, Shanghai, People’s Republic of China Background: Infantile hemangiomas (IHs are the most common benign vascular tumor of infancy. They occur more frequently in female infants. The cause of hemangioma is currently unknown; however, current studies suggested the importance of estrogen (E2 signaling in hemangioma proliferation. Methods: Hemangioma-derived stem cells (HemSCs were cultured with estrogen for 48–72 h; the cell viability and proliferation were evaluated with the messenger RNA (mRNA and protein expression levels of fibroblast growth factor 2 (FGF2, vascular endothelial growth factor-A (VEGF-A and estrogen receptor-α (ER-α, by application of several in vitro assays, such as methyl thiazolyl tetrazolium (MTT, reverse transcriptase–polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR, real-time PCR, enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA and Western blotting. Also, the cell population’s response to external estrogen was investigated by in vivo experiments. HemSCs and human umbilical vein endothelial cells (HUVECs were mixed and injected subcutaneously into 20 flank of BALB/c-nu mice, which were randomly divided into 5 groups based on different E2 treatment doses (0, 0.01, 0.1 and 1 mg, respectively, 0.1 mg dimethyl sulfoxide (DMSO as control. Each group of mice were treated intramuscularly every week, then 2 and 4 weeks later, the subcutaneous implants were harvested and evaluated the tumor tissues with microvessel density (MVD assay and immunohistochemistry. Results: The study demonstrated that application of E2 increased the expression of FGF2, VEGF-A, and ER-α in HemSCs with the optimal concentration from 10−9 to 10−5 M. Two

  6. A Chip for Estrogen Receptor Action: Detection of Biomarkers Released by MCF-7 Cells through Estrogenic and Anti-Estrogenic Effects

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Konstanze Gier

    2017-08-01

    Full Text Available The fluorescence-based multi-analyte chip platform for the analysis of estrogenic and anti-estrogenic substances is a new in vitro tool for the high throughput screening of environmental samples. In contrast to existing tools, the chip investigates the complex action of xenoestrogens in a human cell model by characterizing protein expression. It allows for the quantification of 10 proteins secreted by MCF-7 cells, representing various biological and pathological endpoints of endocrine action and distinguishing between estrogen- and anti-estrogen-dependent secretion of proteins. Distinct protein secretion patterns of the cancer cell line after exposure to known estrogen receptor agonists ß-estradiol, bisphenol A, genistein, and nonylphenol as well as antagonists fulvestrant and tamoxifen demonstrate the potential of the chip. Stimulation of cells with Interleukin-1ß shifts concentrations of low abundant biomarkers towards the working range of the chip. In the non-stimulated cell culture, Matrix Metalloproteinase 9 (MMP-9 and Vascular Endothelial Growth Factor (VEGF show differences upon treatment with antagonists and agonists of the estrogen receptor. In stimulated MCF-7 cells challenged with receptor agonists secretion of Monocyte Chemoattractant Protein (MCP-1, Interleukin-6 (IL-6, Rantes, and Interleukin-8 (IL-8 significantly decreases. In parallel, the proliferating effect of endocrine-disrupting substances in MCF-7 cells is assessed in a proliferation assay based on resazurin. Using ethanol as a solvent for test substances increases the background of proliferation and secretion experiments, while using dimethyl sulfoxide (DMSO does not show any adverse effects. The role of the selected biomarkers in different physiological processes such as cell development, reproduction, cancer, and metabolic syndrome makes the chip an excellent tool for either indicating endocrine-disrupting effects in food and environmental samples, or for screening the

  7. Red Clover Aryl Hydrocarbon Receptor (AhR) and Estrogen Receptor (ER) Agonists Enhance Genotoxic Estrogen Metabolism

    OpenAIRE

    Dunlap, Tareisha L.; Howell, Caitlin E.; Mukand, Nita; Chen, Shao-Nong; Pauli, Guido F.; Dietz, Birgit M.; Bolton, Judy L.

    2017-01-01

    Many women consider botanical dietary supplements (BDSs) as safe alternatives to hormone therapy for menopausal symptoms. However, the effect of BDSs on breast cancer risk is largely unknown. In the estrogen chemical carcinogenesis pathway, P450 1B1 metabolizes estrogens to 4-hydroxylated catechols, which are oxidized to genotoxic quinones that initiate and promote breast cancer. In contrast, P450 1A1 catalyzed 2-hydroxylation represents a detoxification pathway. The current study evaluated t...

  8. Estrogen mediated expression of nucleophosmin 1 in human endometrial carcinoma clinical stages through estrogen receptor-α signaling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Yunxiao; Shen, Jie; Xia, Liqun; Wang, Yanli

    2014-01-01

    Endometrial carcinoma is one of the most common gynecologic malignancies. Estrogen plays a critical role in its pathogenesis, but the underlying mechanism is not clear. Nucleophosmin 1 (NPM1), a multifunctional protein involved in many cellular activities, has been implicated in the tumorigenesis processes. However, the role of NPM1 in endometrial carcinogenesis remains to be elucidated. The present study was aimed to elucidate the role of NPM1 in different clinical stages of human endometrial carcinoma and the underlying mechanism of NPM1 action. The distribution and expression of NPM1 in normal endometrium, FIGO stages I to IV endometrial carcinoma tissues was analyzed using immunohistochemistry, RT-qPCR and Western blotting. The association between NPM1 expression and estrogen and estrogen receptor signaling was investigated in primary-cultured FIGO stage I endometrial adenocarcinoma cells. A strong positive correlation between NPM1 level and the clinical stage and histological grade of endometrial carcinomas was observed. Expression of NPM1 was up-regulated by estrogen in primary-cultured human endometrial adenocarcinoma cells. Furthermore, estrogen increased NPM1 level via estrogen receptor-α (ERα) signaling, nor estrogen receptor-β signaling. Expression of NPM1 was gradually increased with the increase of clinical stages of endometrial carcinomas. Overexpression of NPM1 may play a role in the effects of estrogen on the malignant progression of endometrioid adenocarcinoma via ERα signaling. These findings may extend our understanding of the oncogenesis of steroid hormone-related cancers and have significance for the diagnosis and treatment of this carcinoma.

  9. Occurrence of selected estrogenic compounds and estrogenic activity in surface water and sediment of Langat River (Malaysia).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Praveena, Sarva Mangala; Lui, Tang Seok; Hamin, Nur'Aqilah; Razak, Siti Quistina Noorain Abdul; Aris, Ahmad Zaharin

    2016-07-01

    The occurrence and estrogenic activities of steroid estrogens, such as the natural estrone (E1), 17β estradiol (E2), and estriol (E3), as well as the synthetic 17α-ethynylestradiol (EE2), were investigated in eight sampling points along the Langat River (Malaysia). Surface water samples were collected at 0.5 m and surface sediment 0-5 cm from the river surface. Instrument analysis of steroid estrogens was determined by UPLC-ESI-MS with an ultra-performance liquid chromatograph (Perkin Elmer FX15) coupled to a Q Trap function mass spectrophotometer (model 3200: AB Sciex). Steroid estrogen concentrations were higher in the Langat River sediments than those in its surface water. In surface water, E1 was not detected in any sampling point, E2 was only detected in two midstream sampling points (range 0-0.004 ng/L), E3 in three sampling points (range 0-0.002 ng/L), and EE2 in four sampling points (range 0-0.02 ng/L). E1 and E2 were detected in sediments from all sampling points, E3 in five sampling points, while EE2 only in one midstream sample (3.29E-4 ng/g). Sewage treatment plants, farming waste, and agricultural activities particularly present midstream and downstream were identified as potential sources of estrogens. Estrogenic activity expressed as estradiol equivalents (EEQs) was below 1 ng/L in all samples for both surface water and sediment, indicating therefore a low potential estrogenic risk to the aquatic environment. Although the health risks are still uncertain for drinking water consumers exposed to low levels of steroid estrogen concentrations, Langat River water is unacceptable for direct drinking purposes without treatment. Further studies of endocrine disruptors in Malaysian waters are highly recommended.

  10. Effects of gamma irradiation on the DNA-protein complex between the estrogen response element and the estrogen receptor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Stisova, Viktorie [Department of Radiation Dosimetry, Nuclear Physics Institute AS CR, Na Truhlarce 39/64, 18086 Praha 8 (Czech Republic); Goffinont, Stephane; Spotheim-Maurizot, Melanie [Centre de Biophysique Moleculaire CNRS, rue Charles Sadron, 45071 Orleans Cedex 2 (France); Davidkova, Marie, E-mail: davidkova@ujf.cas.c [Department of Radiation Dosimetry, Nuclear Physics Institute AS CR, Na Truhlarce 39/64, 18086 Praha 8 (Czech Republic)

    2010-08-15

    Signaling by estrogens, risk factors in breast cancer, is mediated through their binding to the estrogen receptor protein (ER), followed by the formation of a complex between ER and a DNA sequence, called estrogen response element (ERE). Anti-estrogens act as competitive inhibitors by blocking the signal transduction. We have studied in vitro the radiosensitivity of the complex between ERalpha, a subtype of this receptor, and a DNA fragment bearing ERE, as well as the influence of an estrogen (estradiol) or an anti-estrogen (tamoxifen) on this radiosensitivity. We observe that the complex is destabilized upon irradiation with gamma rays in aerated aqueous solution. The analysis of the decrease of binding abilities of the two partners shows that destabilization is mainly due to the damage to the protein. The destabilization is reduced when irradiating in presence of tamoxifen and is increased in presence of estradiol. These effects are due to opposite influences of the ligands on the loss of binding ability of ER. The mechanism that can account for our results is: binding of estradiol or tamoxifen induces distinct structural changes of the ER ligand-binding domain that can trigger (by allostery) distinct structural changes of the ER DNA-binding domains and thus, can differently affect ER-ERE interaction.

  11. The "busy life" of unliganded estrogen receptors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stellato, Claudia; Porreca, Immacolata; Cuomo, Danila; Tarallo, Roberta; Nassa, Giovanni; Ambrosino, Concetta

    2016-01-01

    Understanding of the role of estrogen receptors (ERα and ERβ) in the pathophysiology of breast cancer (BC) has considerably increased in last decades. Despite sharing a similar structure, these two transcription factors often exert opposite roles in BC. In addition, it has been shown that their transcriptional activity is not strictly associated to ligand activation and that unliganded ERs are able to "have a life on their own." This appears to be mainly due to ligand-independent mechanisms leading to ERs PTMs or to their recruitment to specific protein complexes, dependent on cellular context. Furthermore, a significant unliganded ER activity, probably independent by the activation of other pathways, has been recently reported to affect gene transcription, microRNA expression, and downstream proteome. In this review, we describe recent findings on nuclear and cytoplasmic unliganded ERα and ERβ activity. We focus on functional genomics, epigenomics, and interaction proteomics data, including PTM induced by ERs-modulated miRNAs in the BC context. A better comprehension of the molecular events controlled by unliganded ERs activity in BC pathogenesis is crucial since it may impact the therapeutic approach to the initial or acquired resistance to endocrine therapies, frequently experienced in the treatment of BC. © 2015 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  12. Pushing estrogen receptor around in breast cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lim, Elgene; Tarulli, Gerard; Portman, Neil; Hickey, Theresa E; Tilley, Wayne D; Palmieri, Carlo

    2016-12-01

    The estrogen receptor-α (herein called ER) is a nuclear sex steroid receptor (SSR) that is expressed in approximately 75% of breast cancers. Therapies that modulate ER action have substantially improved the survival of patients with ER-positive breast cancer, but resistance to treatment still remains a major clinical problem. Treating resistant breast cancer requires co-targeting of ER and alternate signalling pathways that contribute to resistance to improve the efficacy and benefit of currently available treatments. Emerging data have shown that other SSRs may regulate the sites at which ER binds to DNA in ways that can powerfully suppress the oncogenic activity of ER in breast cancer. This includes the progesterone receptor (PR) that was recently shown to reprogram the ER DNA binding landscape towards genes associated with a favourable outcome. Another attractive candidate is the androgen receptor (AR), which is expressed in the majority of breast cancers and inhibits growth of the normal breast and ER-positive tumours when activated by ligand. These findings have led to the initiation of breast cancer clinical trials evaluating therapies that selectively harness the ability of SSRs to 'push' ER towards anti-tumorigenic activity. Our review will focus on the established and emerging clinical evidence for activating PR or AR in ER-positive breast cancer to inhibit the tumour growth-promoting functions of ER. © 2016 Society for Endocrinology.

  13. Estrogenic and anti-estrogenic influences in cultured brown trout hepatocytes: Focus on the expression of some estrogen and peroxisomal related genes and linked phenotypic anchors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Madureira, Tânia Vieira, E-mail: tvmadureira@icbas.up.pt [Interdisciplinary Centre of Marine and Environmental Research (CIIMAR/CIMAR), U.Porto—University of Porto, Rua dos Bragas 289, P 4050-123 Porto (Portugal); Institute of Biomedical Sciences Abel Salazar, U.Porto (ICBAS)—University of Porto, Laboratory of Histology and Embryology, Department of Microscopy, Rua Jorge Viterbo Ferreira 228, P 4050-313 Porto (Portugal); Malhão, Fernanda; Pinheiro, Ivone; Lopes, Célia; Ferreira, Nádia [Interdisciplinary Centre of Marine and Environmental Research (CIIMAR/CIMAR), U.Porto—University of Porto, Rua dos Bragas 289, P 4050-123 Porto (Portugal); Institute of Biomedical Sciences Abel Salazar, U.Porto (ICBAS)—University of Porto, Laboratory of Histology and Embryology, Department of Microscopy, Rua Jorge Viterbo Ferreira 228, P 4050-313 Porto (Portugal); Urbatzka, Ralph [Interdisciplinary Centre of Marine and Environmental Research (CIIMAR/CIMAR), U.Porto—University of Porto, Rua dos Bragas 289, P 4050-123 Porto (Portugal); Castro, L. Filipe C. [Interdisciplinary Centre of Marine and Environmental Research (CIIMAR/CIMAR), U.Porto—University of Porto, Rua dos Bragas 289, P 4050-123 Porto (Portugal); Faculty of Sciences (FCUP), U.Porto—University of Porto, Department of Biology, Rua do Campo Alegre, P 4169-007 Porto (Portugal); Rocha, Eduardo [Interdisciplinary Centre of Marine and Environmental Research (CIIMAR/CIMAR), U.Porto—University of Porto, Rua dos Bragas 289, P 4050-123 Porto (Portugal); Institute of Biomedical Sciences Abel Salazar, U.Porto (ICBAS)—University of Porto, Laboratory of Histology and Embryology, Department of Microscopy, Rua Jorge Viterbo Ferreira 228, P 4050-313 Porto (Portugal)

    2015-12-15

    Highlights: • Evidence of crosstalk between estrogens and peroxisomal pathways in brown trout. • VtgA and ERα mRNA levels increased after 1, 10 and 50 μM of ethinylestradiol (EE2). • ERβ-1, catalase and urate oxidase mRNA levels decreased after estrogenic stimuli. • Estrogenic effects in VtgA, ERα and Uox mRNA levels were reverted by ICI 182,780. • Immunofluorescence/electron microscopy shows smaller peroxisomes after 50 μM of EE2. - Abstract: Estrogens, estrogenic mimics and anti-estrogenic compounds are known to target estrogen receptors (ER) that can modulate other nuclear receptor signaling pathways, such as those controlled by the peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor (PPAR), and alter organelle (inc. peroxisome) morphodynamics. By using primary isolated brown trout (Salmo trutta f. fario) hepatocytes after 72 and 96 h of exposure we evaluated some effects in selected molecular targets and in peroxisomal morphological features caused by: (1) an ER agonist (ethinylestradiol—EE2) at 1, 10 and 50 μM; (2) an ER antagonist (ICI 182,780) at 10 and 50 μM; and (3) mixtures of both (Mix I—10 μM EE2 and 50 μM ICI; Mix II—1 μM EE2 and 10 μM ICI and Mix III—1 μM EE2 and 50 μM ICI). The mRNA levels of the estrogenic targets (ERα, ERβ-1 and vitellogenin A—VtgA) and the peroxisome structure/function related genes (catalase, urate oxidase—Uox, 17β-hydroxysteroid dehydrogenase 4—17β-HSD4, peroxin 11α—Pex11α and PPARα) were analyzed by real-time polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR). Stereology combined with catalase immunofluorescence revealed a significant reduction in peroxisome volume densities at 50 μM of EE2 exposure. Concomitantly, at the same concentration, electron microscopy showed smaller peroxisome profiles, exacerbated proliferation of rough endoplasmic reticulum, and a generalized cytoplasmic vacuolization of hepatocytes. Catalase and Uox mRNA levels decreased in all estrogenic stimuli conditions. VtgA and ERα m

  14. Menopausal estrogen therapy predicts better nocturnal oxyhemoglobin saturation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saaresranta, Tarja; Polo-Kantola, Päivi; Virtanen, Irina; Vahlberg, Tero; Irjala, Kerttu; Polo, Olli

    2006-10-20

    The respiratory responses in the few previous studies evaluating the effects of short-term unopposed estrogen therapy on breathing in postmenopausal women have been inconsistent. We performed a study to investigate whether long-term estrogen therapy would prevent age-related decline in nocturnal arterial oxyhemoglobin saturation and whether higher serum estradiol concentration is associated with better arterial oxyhemoglobin saturation. Sixty-four healthy postmenopausal women were followed-up for 5 years in a 5-year prospective open follow-up study. The women were users or non-users of estrogen therapy according to their personal preference. Mean overnight arterial oxyhemoglobin saturation was similar at baseline (94.3 +/- 1.1%) and after follow-up (94.5 +/- 1.6%). Present estrogen users had higher mean arterial oxyhemoglobin saturation (95.2 +/- 1.4%) than present non-users (94.0 +/- 1.5%), when adjusted for age and body mass index (p = 0.042). The change in mean arterial oxyhemoglobin saturation during follow-up was not associated with serum estradiol concentration at baseline but associated with estradiol at follow-up (p = 0.042), when adjusted for age and body mass index. At follow-up, women with higher serum estradiol concentration had also higher mean nocturnal arterial oxyhemoglobin saturation (Pearson r = 0.29, p = 0.019) and lower apnea-hypopnea index (Spearman r = -0.28, p = 0.031). The pooled current estrogen users spent proportionally less time with SaO(2) below 90% than non-users (ANCOVA adjusted for age and BMI, p = 0.017). Estrogen use and especially high serum estradiol concentration predict higher mean overnight arterial oxyhemoglobin saturation. The present data suggest that estrogen therapy has favorable respiratory effects.

  15. Differential expression of estrogen receptors alpha and beta mRNA during differentiation of human osteoblast SV-HFO cells

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    J. Arts (Janine); J.M.M.F. Janssen (Josine); J.A. Gustafsson (Jan-Ake); C.W.G.M. Löwik (Clemens); H.A.P. Pols (Huib); J.P.T.M. van Leeuwen (Hans); G.G.J.M. Kuiper (George)

    1997-01-01

    textabstractEstrogens have been shown to be essential for maintaining a sufficiently high bone mineral density and ER alpha expression has been demonstrated in bone cells. Recently, a novel estrogen receptor, estrogen receptor beta (ERbeta) has been identified. Here

  16. Targeted basic research to highlight the role of estrogen and estrogen receptors in the cardiovascular system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dworatzek, Elke; Mahmoodzadeh, Shokoufeh

    2017-05-01

    Epidemiological, clinical and animal studies revealed that sex differences exist in the manifestation and outcome of cardiovascular disease (CVD). The underlying molecular mechanisms implicated in these sex differences are not fully understood. The reasons for sex differences in CVD are definitely multifactorial, but major evidence points to the contribution of sex steroid hormone, 17β-estradiol (E2), and its receptors, estrogen receptor alpha (ERα) and estrogen receptor beta (ERβ). In this review, we summarize past and present studies that implicate E2 and ER as important determinants of sexual dimorphism in the physiology and pathophysiology of the heart. In particular, we give an overview of studies aimed to reveal the role of E2 and ER in the physiology of the observed sex differences in CVD using ER knock-out mice. Finally, we discuss recent findings from novel transgenic mouse models, which have provided new information on the sexual dimorphic roles of ER specifically in cardiomyocytes under pathological conditions. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  17. Photoperiod affects estrogen receptor α, estrogen receptor β and aggressive behavior

    Science.gov (United States)

    Trainor, Brian C.; Rowland, Michael R.; Nelson, Randy J.

    2007-01-01

    Estrogens have important effects on male and female social behavior. Despite growing knowledge of the anatomy and behavioral effects of the two predominant estrogen receptor subtypes in mammals (ERα and ERβ), relatively little is known about how these receptors respond to salient environmental stimuli. Many seasonally breeding species respond to changing photoperiods that predict seasonal changes in resource availability. We characterized the effects of photoperiod on aggressive behavior in two species of Peromyscus that exhibit gonadal regression in short days. P. polionotus (old field mice) were more aggressive than P. maniculatus (deer mice) and both species were more aggressive in short days. We used immunocytochemistry and real-time polymerase chain reaction to characterize the effects of photoperiod on ERα and ERβ expression. In both species ERα-immunoreactive staining in the posterior bed nucleus of the stria terminalis (BNST) was increased in short vs. long days. Both species had reduced ERβ-immunoreactive expression in the posterior BNST in short days. In the medial amygdala ERβ immunoreactivity was increased in long days for both species. Using real-time polymerase chain reaction on punch samples that included the BNST, we observed that ERα mRNA was increased and ERβ mRNA was decreased in short days. These data suggest that the effects of photoperiod on ERα and ERβ expression may thus have important behavioral consequences. PMID:17614949

  18. Photoperiod affects estrogen receptor alpha, estrogen receptor beta and aggressive behavior.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Trainor, Brian C; Rowland, Michael R; Nelson, Randy J

    2007-07-01

    Estrogens have important effects on male and female social behavior. Despite growing knowledge of the anatomy and behavioral effects of the two predominant estrogen receptor subtypes in mammals (ERalpha and ERbeta), relatively little is known about how these receptors respond to salient environmental stimuli. Many seasonally breeding species respond to changing photoperiods that predict seasonal changes in resource availability. We characterized the effects of photoperiod on aggressive behavior in two species of Peromyscus that exhibit gonadal regression in short days. P. polionotus (old field mice) were more aggressive than P. maniculatus (deer mice) and both species were more aggressive in short days. We used immunocytochemistry and real-time polymerase chain reaction to characterize the effects of photoperiod on ERalpha and ERbeta expression. In both species ERalpha-immunoreactive staining in the posterior bed nucleus of the stria terminalis (BNST) was increased in short vs. long days. Both species had reduced ERbeta-immunoreactive expression in the posterior BNST in short days. In the medial amygdala ERbeta immunoreactivity was increased in long days for both species. Using real-time polymerase chain reaction on punch samples that included the BNST, we observed that ERalpha mRNA was increased and ERbeta mRNA was decreased in short days. These data suggest that the effects of photoperiod on ERalpha and ERbeta expression may thus have important behavioral consequences.

  19. Estrogen receptor coregulator binding modulators (ERXs) effectively target estrogen receptor positive human breast cancers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Raj, Ganesh V; Sareddy, Gangadhara Reddy; Ma, Shihong; Lee, Tae-Kyung; Viswanadhapalli, Suryavathi; Li, Rui; Liu, Xihui; Murakami, Shino; Chen, Chien-Cheng; Lee, Wan-Ru; Mann, Monica; Krishnan, Samaya Rajeshwari; Manandhar, Bikash; Gonugunta, Vijay K; Strand, Douglas; Tekmal, Rajeshwar Rao; Ahn, Jung-Mo; Vadlamudi, Ratna K

    2017-01-01

    The majority of human breast cancer is estrogen receptor alpha (ER) positive. While anti-estrogens/aromatase inhibitors are initially effective, resistance to these drugs commonly develops. Therapy-resistant tumors often retain ER signaling, via interaction with critical oncogenic coregulator proteins. To address these mechanisms of resistance, we have developed a novel ER coregulator binding modulator, ERX-11. ERX-11 interacts directly with ER and blocks the interaction between a subset of coregulators with both native and mutant forms of ER. ERX-11 effectively blocks ER-mediated oncogenic signaling and has potent anti-proliferative activity against therapy-sensitive and therapy-resistant human breast cancer cells. ERX-11 is orally bioavailable, with no overt signs of toxicity and potent activity in both murine xenograft and patient-derived breast tumor explant models. This first-in-class agent, with its novel mechanism of action of disrupting critical protein-protein interactions, overcomes the limitations of current therapies and may be clinically translatable for patients with therapy-sensitive and therapy-resistant breast cancers. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.26857.001 PMID:28786813

  20. Designer interface peptide grafts target estrogen receptor alpha dimerization

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chakraborty, S. [Laboratory of Computational Biophysics & Bioengineering, Department of Physics, Tougaloo College, Tougaloo, MS 39174 (United States); Asare, B.K. [Department of Pharmacology and Toxicology, University of Buffalo, Buffalo, NY 14214 (United States); Biswas, P.K., E-mail: pbiswas@tougaloo.edu [Laboratory of Computational Biophysics & Bioengineering, Department of Physics, Tougaloo College, Tougaloo, MS 39174 (United States); Rajnarayanan, R.V., E-mail: rajendra@buffalo.edu [Department of Pharmacology and Toxicology, University of Buffalo, Buffalo, NY 14214 (United States)

    2016-09-09

    The nuclear transcription factor estrogen receptor alpha (ERα), triggered by its cognate ligand estrogen, regulates a variety of cellular signaling events. ERα is expressed in 70% of breast cancers and is a widely validated target for anti-breast cancer drug discovery. Administration of anti-estrogen to block estrogen receptor activation is still a viable anti-breast cancer treatment option but anti-estrogen resistance has been a significant bottle-neck. Dimerization of estrogen receptor is required for ER activation. Blocking ERα dimerization is therefore a complementary and alternative strategy to combat anti-estrogen resistance. Dimer interface peptide “I-box” derived from ER residues 503–518 specifically blocks ER dimerization. Recently using a comprehensive molecular simulation we studied the interaction dynamics of ERα LBDs in a homo-dimer. Based on this study, we identified three interface recognition peptide motifs LDKITDT (ERα residues 479–485), LQQQHQRLAQ (residues 497–506), and LSHIRHMSNK (residues 511–520) and reported the suitability of using LQQQHQRLAQ (ER 497–506) as a template to design inhibitors of ERα dimerization. Stability and self-aggregation of peptide based therapeutics poses a significant bottle-neck to proceed further. In this study utilizing peptide grafted to preserve their pharmacophoric recognition motif and assessed their stability and potential to block ERα mediated activity in silico and in vitro. The Grafted peptides blocked ERα mediated cell proliferation and viability of breast cancer cells but did not alter their apoptotic fate. We believe the structural clues identified in this study can be used to identify novel peptidometics and small molecules that specifically target ER dimer interface generating a new breed of anti-cancer agents. - Highlights: • Designer peptide grafts retain core molecular recognition motif during MD simulations. • Designer peptide grafts with Poly-ALA helix form stable

  1. Immunohistochemical Expression of Estrogen and Progesterone Receptors in Epulis Fissuratum

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maryam Seyedmajidi

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Epulis Fissuratum (Epulis Fissuratum (EF or Denture Epulis or inflammatory fibrous hyperplasia is a common hyperplastic tumor-like lesion with reactive nature, related to loose and ill-fitting, full or partial removable dentures and it is more common in women than men. For this reason, hormonal influences may also play role in its creation. The effect of steroid hormones especially sex hormones (Estrogen and progesterone on oral mucosa is identified in some studies. In the present study, the distribution pattern and presence of estrogen and progesterone receptors in epithelial, stromal, endothelial and inflammatory cells in Epulis Fissuratum was investigated. Materials and Methods: This cross-sectional study was carried out on 30 samples of paraffin blocks with Epulis Fissuratum diagnosis and 30 samples of normal mucosal tissues as a control group who have had surgery as a margin beside the above lesions and had been obtained from the oral and maxillofacial pathology departement of Babol Dental School since 2003 up to 2010. Intensity of staining and immunoreactivity were evaluated using subjective index and considering the positive control group (breast carcinoma.Results: Epithelial, stromal, endothelial and inflammatory cells didn’t show reaction with monoclonal antibodies against estrogen and progesterone in none of the samples. Conclusion: It seems that the hypothesis of the existence of estrogen and progesterone receptors in epulis fissuratum and normal oral mucosa is ruled out. The possibility of direct effect of estrogen and progesterone in occurring of epulis fissuratum is rejected.

  2. Estrogens and atherosclerosis: insights from animal models and cell systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nofer, Jerzy-Roch

    2012-04-01

    Estrogens not only play a pivotal role in sexual development but are also involved in several physiological processes in various tissues including vasculature. While several epidemiological studies documented an inverse relationship between plasma estrogen levels and the incidence of cardiovascular disease and related it to the inhibition of atherosclerosis, an interventional trial showed an increase in cardiovascular events among postmenopausal women on estrogen treatment. The development of atherosclerotic lesions involves complex interplay between various pro- or anti-atherogenic processes that can be effectively studied only in vivo in appropriate animal models. With the advent of genetic engineering, transgenic mouse models of atherosclerosis have supplemented classical dietary cholesterol-induced disease models such as the cholesterol-fed rabbit. In the last two decades, these models were widely applied along with in vitro cell systems to specifically investigate the influence of estrogens on the development of early and advanced atherosclerotic lesions. The present review summarizes the results of these studies and assesses their contribution toward better understanding of molecular mechanisms underlying anti- and/or pro-atherogenic effects of estrogens in humans.

  3. Estrogenic and anti-estrogenic regulation of estrogen receptor in MCF-7 breast-cancer cells: comparison of immunocytochemical data with biochemical measurements.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seo, H S; Larsimont, D; Querton, G; El Khissiin, A; Laios, I; Legros, N; Leclercq, G

    1998-12-09

    Data from immunocytochemical assessment of estrogen receptor (ER) regulation in MCF-7 cells under estrogenic and anti-estrogenic stimulation were compared with those obtained by enzyme immunoassay (Abbott ER-EIA). Similar trends were observed, although ER level variations were less marked when assessed immunocytochemically. We confirmed reports of ER disappearance in the presence of estrogens (Es; E2 and DES) and pure anti-estrogens (AEs; RU 58,668 and ICI 164,384) as well as its increase with partial AEs (4-OH-TAM and RU 39,119). E2-induced ER down-regulation was partly blocked by actinomycin D (AMD), okadaic acid (OK) and cycloheximide (CHX) when assessed by these 2 methods. Down-regulation by pure AEs was not impeded by CHX, indicating that they operate differently from Es (i.e., transformation of ER to a form sensitive to constitutive degradation activity). In situ pre-labeling of the cells with [3H]TAZ indicated that all investigated ligands eliminate pre-existing ER through binding to newly synthetized receptors, since [3H]TAZ co-valently associates with ER; E2 and RU 58,668 were more effective than 4-OH-TAM in this regard. CHX blocked ER disappearance even in the presence of pure AEs, which is in contrast to the data established with cells not pre-exposed to [3H]TAZ. Nuclear location of [3H]TAZ-ER complexes may explain this discrepancy, since pure AE-ER complexes were reported to be incapable of nuclear translocation.

  4. Estrogen-Modulated Response of Breast Cancer To Vitamin D and Its Analogs: Role of IGF

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Dolezalova, Hana

    1999-01-01

    ... (LPA) and sphingosine 1-phosphate (S1P). Estrogen receptor positive and estrogen receptor negative cells express predominantly Edg-2 and Edg-4 Rs for LPA and Edg-3 for Sip, which transduce proliferative responses by direct nuclear signaling...

  5. Fate of the estrogen nonylphenol in river sediment: availability, mass transfer and biodegradation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Weert, de J.P.A.

    2009-01-01

    Veel riviersedimenten zijn in het verleden verontreinigd geraakt met estrogene verbindingen, die toxische effecten kunnen veroorzaken op aquatische organismen, zoals de vervrouwlijking van mannelijke vissen. Een van deze estrogene verbindingen is nonylfenol (NP). Nonylfenol is een organische

  6. Higher estrogen levels are not associated with larger hippocampi and better memory performance

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    T. den Heijer (Tom); M.I. Geerlings (Miriam); F.H. de Jong (Frank); L.J. Launer (Lenore); H.A.P. Pols (Huib); M.M.B. Breteler (Monique); A. Hofman (Albert)

    2003-01-01

    textabstractBACKGROUND: Estrogens may prevent cognitive decline and Alzheimer disease. Animal study findings have shown beneficial effects of estrogen on the brain, particularly on the hippocampus, a structure related to memory performance and early Alzheimer disease. OBJECTIVE:

  7. Estrogens regulate the hepatic effects of growth hormone, a hormonal interplay with multiple fates

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Fernández-Pérez, Leandro; Guerra, Borja; Díaz-Chico, Juan C

    2013-01-01

    The liver responds to estrogens and growth hormone (GH) which are critical regulators of body growth, gender-related hepatic functions, and intermediate metabolism. The effects of estrogens on liver can be direct, through the direct actions of hepatic ER, or indirect, which include the crosstalk...... with endocrine, metabolic, and sex-differentiated functions of GH. Most previous studies have been focused on the influence of estrogens on pituitary GH secretion, which has a great impact on hepatic transcriptional regulation. However, there is strong evidence that estrogens can influence the GH......-regulated endocrine and metabolic functions in the human liver by acting at the level of GHR-STAT5 signaling pathway. This crosstalk is relevant because the widespread exposition of estrogen or estrogen-related compounds in human. Therefore, GH or estrogen signaling deficiency as well as the influence of estrogens...

  8. PET imaging of brain sex steroid hormone receptors and the role of estrogen in depression

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Khayum, Mohamed Abdul

    2015-01-01

    Androgens and estrogens are steroid hormones that are involved in several neurodegenerative and psychiatric disorders. Decreased levels of steroid hormones are associated with e.g. decreased cognition, anxiety and depression. Androgens and estrogens exert their biological effects through their

  9. Tissue Specific Effects of Loss of Estrogen During Menopause and Aging

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Korinna eWend

    2012-02-01

    Full Text Available The roles of estrogens have been best studied in the breast, breast cancers and in the female reproductive tract. However, estrogens have important functions in almost every tissue in the body. Recent clinical trials such as the Women’s Health Initiative have highlighted both the importance of estrogens and how little we know about the molecular mechanism of estrogens in these other tissues. In this review, we illustrate the diverse functions of estrogens in the bone, adipose tissue, skin, hair, brain, skeletal muscle and cardiovascular system, and how the loss of estrogens during aging affects these tissues. Early transcriptional targets of estrogen are reviewed in each tissue. We also describe the tissue-specific effects of selective estrogen receptor modulators (SERMs used for the treatment of breast cancers and post-menopausal symptoms.

  10. Estetrol, a Fetal Selective Estrogen Receptor Modulator, Acts on the Vagina of Mice through Nuclear Estrogen Receptor α Activation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Benoit, Thibaut; Valera, Marie-Cecile; Fontaine, Coralie; Buscato, Melissa; Lenfant, Francoise; Raymond-Letron, Isabelle; Tremollieres, Florence; Soulie, Michel; Foidart, Jean-Michel; Game, Xavier; Arnal, Jean-Francois

    2017-11-01

    The genitourinary syndrome of menopause has a negative impact on quality of life of postmenopausal women. The treatment of vulvovaginal atrophy includes administration of estrogens. However, oral estrogen treatment is controversial because of its potential risks on venous thrombosis and breast cancer. Estetrol (E4) is a natural estrogen synthesized exclusively during pregnancy by the human fetal liver and initially considered as a weak estrogen. However, E4 was recently evaluated in phase 1 to 2 clinical studies and found to act as an oral contraceptive in combination with a progestin, without increasing the level of coagulation factors. We recently showed that E4 stimulates uterine epithelial proliferation through nuclear estrogen receptor (ER) α, but failed to elicit endothelial responses. Herein, we first evaluated the morphological and functional impacts of E4 on the vagina of ovariectomized mice, and we determined the molecular mechanism mediating these effects. Vaginal epithelial proliferation and lubrication after stimulation were found to increase after E4 chronic treatment. Using a combination of pharmacological and genetic approaches, we demonstrated that these E4 effects on the vagina are mediated by nuclear ERα activation. Altogether, we demonstrate that the selective activation of nuclear ERα is both necessary and sufficient to elicit functional and structural effects on the vagina, and therefore E4 appears promising as a therapeutic option to improve vulvovaginal atrophy. Copyright © 2017 American Society for Investigative Pathology. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  11. Environmental impact of estrogens on human, animal and plant life: A critical review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adeel, Muhammad; Song, Xiaoming; Wang, Yuanyuan; Francis, Dennis; Yang, Yuesuo

    2017-02-01

    Since the inception of global industrialization, steroidal estrogens have become an emerging and serious concern. Worldwide, steroid estrogens including estrone, estradiol and estriol, pose serious threats to soil, plants, water resources and humans. Indeed, estrogens have gained notable attention in recent years, due to their rapidly increasing concentrations in soil and water all over the world. Concern has been expressed regarding the entry of estrogens into the human food chain which in turn relates to how plants take up and metabolism estrogens. In this review we explore the environmental fate of estrogens highlighting their release through effluent sources, their uptake, partitioning and physiological effects in the ecological system. We draw attention to the potential risk of intensive modern agriculture and waste disposal systems on estrogen release and their effects on human health. We also highlight their uptake and metabolism in plants. We use MEDLINE and other search data bases for estrogens in the environment from 2005 to the present, with the majority of our sources spanning the past five years. Published acceptable daily intake of estrogens (μg/L) and predicted no effect concentrations (μg/L) are listed from published sources and used as thresholds to discuss reported levels of estrogens in the aquatic and terrestrial environments. Global levels of estrogens from river sources and from Waste Water Treatment Facilities have been mapped, together with transport pathways of estrogens in plants. Estrogens at polluting levels have been detected at sites close to waste water treatment facilities and in groundwater at various sites globally. Estrogens at pollutant levels have been linked with breast cancer in women and prostate cancer in men. Estrogens also perturb fish physiology and can affect reproductive development in both domestic and wild animals. Treatment of plants with steroid estrogen hormones or their precursors can affect root and shoot

  12. Is there an estrogenic component in the metabolic syndrome?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Starcke, S; Vollmer, G

    2006-09-01

    One of the major upcoming concerns leading to health related problems in the industrialized societies is the metabolic syndrome which is characterized by central obesity, hypertension, raised fasting glucose and triglyceride levels. The focus of this review is on a potential estrogenic linkage between the metabolic mechanisms involved into the development of this disease cluster and specific estrogen related regulatory pattern. The candidate molecules for this link are insulin and insulin-like growthfactor, C-reactive protein, peroxisome-proliferation-activatingreceptorgamma, and leptin which all seem to interact with each other and show a responsiveness to changing estrogen levels. From this perspective they might also represent target molecules for a phytochemical intervention with phytoestrogens.

  13. Bisphenol A in dental sealants and its estrogen like effect

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Manu Rathee

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Bisphenol A or BPA-based epoxy resins are widely used in the manufacture of commercial products, including dental resins, polycarbonate plastics, and the inner coating of food cans. BPA is a precursor to the resin monomer Bis-GMA. During the manufacturing process of Bis-GMA dental sealants, Bisphenol A (BPA might be present as an impurity or as a degradation product of Bis-DMA through esterases present in saliva. Leaching of these monomers from resins can occur during the initial setting period and in conjunction with fluid sorption and desorption over time and this chemical leach from dental sealants may be bioactive. Researchers found an estrogenic effect with BPA, Bis-DMA, and Bis-GMA because BPA lacks structural specificity as a natural ligand to the estrogen receptor. It generated considerable concern regarding the safety of dental resin materials. This review focuses on the BPA in dental sealants and its estrogen-like effect.

  14. Estrogen Receptor Beta Expression in the Mouse Forebrain: Age and Sex Differences

    OpenAIRE

    Zuloaga, Damian G.; Zuloaga, Kristen L.; Hinds, Laura R.; Carbone, David L.; Handa, Robert J.

    2014-01-01

    Estrogen receptors regulate multiple brain functions including stress, sexual, and memory associated behaviors as well as control of neuroendocrine and autonomic function. During development, estrogen signaling is involved in programming adult sex differences in physiology and behavior. Expression of estrogen receptor alpha changes across development in a region specific fashion. By contrast, estrogen receptor beta (ERβ) is expressed in many brain regions, yet few studies have explored sex an...

  15. Removal of Estrogens at Full and Pilot Scale Livestock Manure Treatment Systems

    OpenAIRE

    Zhao, Zunyang

    2008-01-01

    Abstract Three experiments were conducted to 1) develop appropriate methods for livestock manure estrogen analysis; 2) determine estrogen removal in different manure treatment systems; and 3) determine estrogen removal from dairy manure in pilot scale reactors. In Experiment I, the recoveries of 17Ã -estradiol (E2) and estriol (E3) were evaluated in double distilled water and dairy manure after a base extraction and analysis of estrogens by enzyme-linked immunoassay (ELISA) and yeast ...

  16. The estrogen-injected female mouse: new insight into the etiology of PCOS

    OpenAIRE

    Chapman, John C; Min, Soo Hong; Freeh, Steven M; Michael, Sandra D

    2009-01-01

    Abstract Background Female mice and rats injected with estrogen perinatally become anovulatory and develop follicular cysts. The current consensus is that this adverse response to estrogen involves the hypothalamus and occurs because of an estrogen-induced alteration in the GnRH delivery system. Whether or not this is true has yet to be firmly established. The present study examined an alternate possibility in which anovulation and cyst development occurs through an estrogen-induced disruptio...

  17. Estrogen receptor determination in endometrial carcinoma: ligand binding assay versus enzyme immunoassay

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nyholm, H C; Nielsen, Anette Lynge; Lyndrup, J

    1995-01-01

    We compared concentrations of cytosolic estrogen receptors (ERc) measured in 35 postmenopausal endometrial carcinomas by ligand binding method (LBA) (dextran-coated charcoal assay) and enzyme immunoassay (EIA). Correlations between ERc, nuclear estrogen receptors (ERn) determined by EIA, and cyto......We compared concentrations of cytosolic estrogen receptors (ERc) measured in 35 postmenopausal endometrial carcinomas by ligand binding method (LBA) (dextran-coated charcoal assay) and enzyme immunoassay (EIA). Correlations between ERc, nuclear estrogen receptors (ERn) determined by EIA...

  18. Estrogens and the risk of complex regional pain syndrome (CRPS).

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Mos, M; Huygen, F J P M; Stricker, B H Ch; Dieleman, J P; Sturkenboom, M C J M

    2009-01-01

    Since complex regional pain syndrome (CRPS) shows a clear female predominance, we investigated the association between the cumulative as well as current exposure to estrogens, and CRPS. A population-based case-control study was conducted in the Integrated Primary Care Information (IPCI) project in the Netherlands. Cases were identified from electronic records (1996-2005) and included if they were confirmed during a visit (using International Association for the Study of Pain Criteria), or had been diagnosed by a specialist. Controls were matched to cases on gender, age, calendar time, and injury. Measures of cumulative endogenous estrogen exposure were obtained by questionnaire and included age of menarche and menopause, menstrual life, and cumulative months of pregnancy and breast-feeding. Current estrogen exposure at CRPS onset was retrieved from the electronic medical records and determined by current pregnancy or by the use of oral contraceptive (OC) drugs or hormonal replacement therapy (HRT). Hundred and forty-three female cases (1493 controls) were included in analyses on drug use and pregnancies, while cumulative endogenous estrogen exposure was studied in 53 cases (58 controls) for whom questionnaire data were available. There was no association between CRPS and either cumulative endogenous estrogen exposure, OC, or HRT use. CRPS onset was increased during the first 6 months after pregnancy (OR: 5.6, 95%CI: 1.0-32.4), although based on small numbers. We did not find an association between CRPS onset and cumulative endogenous estrogen exposure or current OC or HRT use, but more powered studies are needed to exclude potential minor associations.

  19. Use of alternatives to estrogen for treatment of menopause.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pinkerton, J V; Santen, R

    2002-03-01

    Women frequently chose alternatives to hormone replacement therapy (HRT) for treatment of menopause even though medical indications for estrogens may be present. Prior breast cancer or fear of breast cancer is a major consideration. This review of alternatives to estrogen discusses the evidence linking breast cancer to HRTs and compares potential risks and benefits of HRT to nonHRT alternatives for relief of vasomotor symptoms, vaginal atrophy, neurocognitive changes and prevention of heart disease and osteoporosis. Practical guidelines are suggested for use of alternatives for each problem.

  20. ESTROGEN IN THE TREATMENT OF DEPRESSION: A CASE REPORT

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Putu Andrika Kusuma

    2014-02-01

    Full Text Available Depression led to the decline quality of life. With more incidence in women due tohormonal cycle caused women more susceptible to depression. Hormone that fluctuatesand holds a key role in brain and nerve cells is estrogen. Estrogen in premenopausalwomen already decreases. Treatment of depression in premenopausal women who gopast the various considerations needs to consider the provision of hormonal therapy. Inthe case of patients treated with psychotherapy and pharmacotherapy in the form of 2 x20 mg Fluoxetine by mouth and hormonal therapy in the form of 1 x 2 mg Estradiol.Feasibility study to evaluate the hormonal therapy contraindications such as breastcancer also needs to be done.

  1. The estrogen hypothesis of schizophrenia implicates glucose metabolism

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Olsen, Line; Hansen, Thomas; Jakobsen, Klaus D

    2008-01-01

    . We undertook these challenges by using an established clinical paradigm, the estrogen hypothesis of schizophrenia, as the criterion to select candidates among the numerous genes experimentally implicated in schizophrenia. Bioinformatic tools were used to build and priorities the signaling networks...... implicated by the candidate genes resulting from the estrogen selection. We identified ten candidate genes using this approach that are all active in glucose metabolism and particularly in the glycolysis. Thus, we tested the hypothesis that variants of the glycolytic genes are associated with schizophrenia...

  2. Inter-laboratory exercise on steroid estrogens in aqueous samples

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Heath, E.; Kosjek, T.; Andersen, Henrik Rasmus

    2010-01-01

    matrices. As the main task three steroid estrogens. 17 alpha-ethinylestradiol, 17 beta-estradiol and estrone were determined in four spiked aqueous matrices' tap water, river water and wastewater treatment plant influent and effluent using GC-MS and LC-MS/MS Results were compared and discussed according...... to the analytical techniques applied, the accuracy and reproducibility of the analytical methods and the nature of the sample matrices. Overall, the results obtained in this inter-laboratory exercise reveal a high level of competence among the participating laboratories for the detection of steroid estrogens...

  3. Estrogen rapidly phosphorylates AMPK, Akt, and AS160 in isolated rat soleus muscles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Estrogen status is positively correlated with whole body insulin sensitivity, however direct effects of estrogen on skeletal muscle glucose uptake have not been demonstrated. The aim of this study was to determine if estrogen can acutely activate Akt, AMP-activated protein kinase (AMPK), and/or Akt...

  4. Identification of estrogenic compounds in fish bile using bioassay-directed fractionation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Houtman, C.J.; van Oostveen, A.M.; Brouwer, A.; Lamoree, M.H.; Legler, J.

    2004-01-01

    Conjugates of estrogenic chemicals, endogenous as well as xenobiotic, are mainly excreted via bile into the intestine. Therefore, measurement of estrogenic activity in bile yields useful information about an organism's internal exposure to (xeno-)estrogens. Although previous studies in The

  5. Bone marrow oxytocin mediates the anabolic action of estrogen on the skeleton

    Science.gov (United States)

    Estrogen withdrawal in women due to natural or artificial menopause is followed by rapid bone loss, osteoporosis, and a high fracture risk. Replacement with estrogen prevents this bone loss and reduces the risk of fracture. Estrogen uses two mechanisms to exert this effect: it inhibits bone resorpti...

  6. Melanocortin 4 receptor is not required for estrogenic regulations on energy homeostasis and reproduction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brain estrogen receptor-a (ERa) is essential for estrogenic regulation of energy homeostasis and reproduction. We previously showed that ERa expressed by pro-opiomelanocortin (POMC) neurons mediates estrogen's effects on food intake, body weight, negative regulation of hypothalamic–pituitary–gonadal...

  7. Development of a recombinant human ovarian (BG1) cell line containing estrogen receptor α and β for improved detection of estrogenic/antiestrogenic chemicals

    OpenAIRE

    Brennan, Jennifer C; Bassal, Arzoo; He, Guochun; Denison, Michael S.

    2015-01-01

    Estrogenic endocrine disrupting chemicals are found in environmental and biological samples, commercial and consumer products, food, and numerous other sources. Given their ubiquitous nature and potential for adverse effects, there is a critical need for rapidly detecting these chemicals. We developed an estrogen-responsive recombinant human ovarian (BG1Luc4E2) cell line recently accepted by the USEPA and OECD as a bioanalytical method to detect estrogen receptor (ER) agonists/antagonists. Un...

  8. Estrogen is essential but not sufficient to induce endometriosis

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Mosami Galvankar

    2017-05-11

    May 11, 2017 ... Molecular and Cellular Biology Laboratory, National Institute for Research in Reproductive Health,. Mumbai 400 012, India. *Corresponding author (Email, deepaknmodi@yahoo.com). Endometriosis is a common gynaecological disorder of unknown aetiology. Among the several factors, estrogen has.

  9. Postmenopausal Estrogen Therapy and Risk of Gallstone Disease

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Simonsen, Maja Hellfritzsch; Erichsen, Rune; Frøslev, Trine

    2013-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Female gender and increasing age are key risk factors for gallstone disease; therefore, postmenopausal women are at high risk. Estrogen increases cholesterol saturation of bile and may further increase gallstone risk, but population-based evidence is sparse. OBJECTIVE: Our objective...

  10. Microbial transformation of synthetic estrogen 17alpha-ethinylestradiol

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cajthaml, Tomas, E-mail: cajthaml@biomed.cas.c [Institute of Microbiology, Academy of Sciences of the Czech Republic, Videnska 1083, CZ-142 20 Prague 4 (Czech Republic); Kresinova, Zdena; Svobodova, Katerina; Sigler, Karel; Rezanka, Tomas [Institute of Microbiology, Academy of Sciences of the Czech Republic, Videnska 1083, CZ-142 20 Prague 4 (Czech Republic)

    2009-12-15

    Natural estrogens such as estrone, 17beta-estradiol, estriol, and the particularly recalcitrant synthetic estrogen 17alpha-ethinylestradiol used as oral contraceptive, accumulate in the environment and may give rise to health problems. The processes participating in their removal from soil, wastewater, water-sediments, groundwater-aquifer material, and wastewater or sewage treatment plant effluents may involve the action of bacterial and microbial consortia, and in some cases fungi and algae. This review discusses the different efficiencies of bacterial degradation of 17alpha-ethinylestradiol under aerobic and anaerobic conditions, the role of sulfate-, nitrate-, and iron-reducing conditions in anaerobic degradation, and the role of sorption. The participation of autotrophic ammonia oxidizing bacteria and heterotrophic bacteria in cometabolic degradation of estrogens, the estrogen-degrading action of ligninolytic fungi and their extracellular enzymes (lignin peroxidase, manganese-dependent peroxidase, versatile peroxidase, laccase), and of algae are discussed in detail. - Current knowledge of 17alpha-ethinylestradiol microbial transformation is summarized.

  11. Estrogen Receptor Gene Polymorphisms Associated with Incident Aging Macula Disorder

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Boekhoorn, S.S.; Vingerling, J.R.; Uitterlinden, A.G.; Meurs, J.B.J. van; Duijn, C.M. van; Pols, H.A.P.; Hofman, A.; de Jong, P.T.V.M.

    2007-01-01

    PURPOSE. It has been suggested that early menopause increases the risk of aging-macula disorder (AMD), the major cause of incurable blindness with a dry and wet late subtype, and that exposure to endogenous or postmenopausal exogenous estrogens reduces this risk. This study was undertaken to

  12. Hypothalamic regulation of metabolism : Role of thyroid hormone and estrogen

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Zhang, Z.

    2017-01-01

    Thyroid hormone and estrogen both play an essential role in energy metabolism. The current thesis investigated the possible central effects of these hormones in the control of energy metabolism by administrating triiodothyronine (T3), estradiol (E2) and thyrotropin-releasing hormone (TRH) in

  13. Estrogenic response of bisphenol A in rainbow trout (Oncorhynchus mykiss)

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lindholst, Christian; Pedersen, Knud Ladegaard; Pedersen, Søren Nørby

    2000-01-01

    Bisphenol A (BPA) previously shown to possess xenoestrogenic activities was administered to rainbow trout (Oncorhynchus mykiss) through a continuos flow system. The estrogenic response expressed as the induction of vitellogenin (VTG) synthesis was measured during 12 days of exposure, using a direct...

  14. Estrogen Receptor Mutants/Variants in Human Breast Cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1997-12-01

    Recherche Louis- Charles Simard, Montreal, Canada. Four nor- mal human breast tissues from reduction mammoplasties of pre- menopausal women were obtained...to hormone resistance. Cancer Res 1990; 50: 6208-17. 22. Karnik PS, Kulkarni S, Lui XP, Budd GT, Bukowski RM. Estrogen receptor mutations in

  15. Multiparametric flow cytometric analysis of estrogen receptor: a ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    These sections from forty breast cancer patients were subjected to multiparametric flow cytometric analysis for simultaneous assessment of estrogen receptor and DNA content analysis as well as immunohistochemical staining for steroid receptors. Moreover, tumor markers were estimated in the preoperable sera of these ...

  16. Estrogenicity and metabolism of prenylated flavonoids and isoflavonoids

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Schans, van de M.G.M.

    2015-01-01

      Binding of (prenylated) flavonoids and isoflavonoids to the human estrogen receptors (hERs) might result in beneficial health effects in vivo. To understand structure-activity relationships of prenylated (iso)flavonoids towards the hERs, prenylated (iso)flavonoids were purified from extracts

  17. Ontogeny of estrogen receptor-beta expression in rat testis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Pelt, A. M.; de rooij, D. G.; van der Burg, B.; van der Saag, P. T.; Gustafsson, J. A.; Kuiper, G. G.

    1999-01-01

    The recently discovered estrogen receptor-beta (ERbeta) is expressed in rodent and human testes. To obtain insight in the physiological role of ERbeta we have investigated the cell type-specific expression pattern of ERbeta messenger RNA (mRNA) and protein in the testis of rats of various ages by in

  18. Pollution by endocrine disrupting estrogens in aquatic ecosystems ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The study was carried out in Morogoro urban and peri-urban areas. The main sources of fresh water for domestic uses, fishing and agricultural activities in the study areas including the Mindu dam catchment area, Ngerengere and Morogoro Rivers were assessed. The endocrine disrupting estrogens in water samples were ...

  19. The potential protective effects of erythropoietin and estrogen on ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Noha I. Hussien

    2015-12-30

    Dec 30, 2015 ... and estrogen on renal ischemia reperfusion injury in ovariectomized rats ... blood flow; TNF-o, Tumor necrosis factor-o; MPO, Myeloperoxidase activity; NO, nitric oxide; ET-1, endothelin-1. * Corresponding author. .... and the abdominal muscle layer and the peritoneum were incised. Both fallopian tubes ...

  20. Estrogen is essential but not sufficient to induce endometriosis

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Endometriosis is a common gynaecological disorder of unknown aetiology. Among the several factors, estrogen hasbeen implicated as a causative factor in endometriosis. In the present study using mouse model, we assessed the role ofestrogen in the initial implantation and growth of endometrium in ectopic locations.

  1. Estrogen is essential but not sufficient to induce endometriosis ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    30

    endometrial fragments in the mouse but not humans, to understand the role of host tissue biology in occurrence of endometriosis. Finally, an unusual observation in our study was the failure to sustain the growth of endometriotic lesions despite excessive estrogen supplementation. These results are in contrast with earlier ...

  2. The potential protective effects of erythropoietin and estrogen on ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Background: Renal ischemia–reperfusion (RIR) is an important etiopathological mechanism of acute renal failure (ARF). Erythropoietin (EPO) has been candidate as a nephroprotectant agent. However, its nephroprotective effect when it is accompanied with estrogen has not been studied in female. Methods: Fifty-six female ...

  3. Estrogen formulations and beauty care practices in Japanese women

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Takeda T

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Takashi Takeda, Tze Fang Wong, Mari Kitamura, Nobuo YaegashiDepartment of Obstetrics and Gynecology, Tohoku University Graduate School of Medicine, Miyagi, JapanPurpose: Traditionally, oral estrogens have been used for hormone replacement therapy. However, in Japan, additional estrogen formulations have been used, including transdermal patches and transdermal gels. The latter have a unique commonality with cosmetics because both of them are applied to the skin. Beauty care is one of the most important lifestyle factors for women, and it has been reported that the amount of attention paid to beauty care has an effect in determining whether or not women will choose to undergo HRT during menopause. Therefore, our study focused on estrogen formulations and beauty care practices.Patients and methods: Fifty women who use hormone replacement therapy were recruited from the outpatient clinic of Tohoku University Hospital. They were treated with oral conjugated estrogen (n = 11, transdermal 17ß -estradiol patch (n = 11, and transdermal 17ß-estradiol gel (n = 28. They completed a questionnaire to assess their lifestyle (beauty care practices and exercise habits and their compliance. The transdermal gel users were further interviewed about their subjective impressions regarding “smell”, “sticky feeling”, “spreadability”, and “irritation” on the skin using a five-grade scale.Results: There were no differences in the usability of medicines and patient compliance among the estrogen formulations. We observed a positive tendency between the level of beauty care and transdermal gel use (P = 0.0645, ordinary logistic regression analysis. The gel users placed top priority on a lack of “sticky feeling” but the subjective impression regarding “sticky feeling” was worst among the four factors (P < 0.01, Steel–Dwass test. Correspondence analysis showed that the subjective impressions of transdermal gel corresponding to usability in the

  4. Fate of Estrogens in Soils and Detection by ELISA

    Science.gov (United States)

    Caron, Emmanuelle; Sheedy, Claudia; Farenhorst, Annemieke; Zvomuya, Francis; Gaultier, Jeanette; Goddard, Tom

    2010-05-01

    Land application of manure can contribute to the release of estrogenic compounds in the environment. Estrogens may move from soils to water by processes such as runoff and leaching. The objectives of the present study were to determine the fate of estrogens in soils and to develop a detection method for these compounds. The sorption (soil sorption coefficient (Kd) and sorption coefficient per unit organic carbon (Koc)) of 17β-estradiol, estrone, estriol and equol were studied, using batch equilibrium experiments, in 121 surface soils from Alberta, Canada. The mineralization of [4-14C] 17β-estradiol was determined in soil microcosms in a subset of 36 samples. Quantitative relationships at the regional level were explored using partial least squares regression (PLS) (between Kd or Koc values and soil properties) and by ordinary least squares regression (between Kd or Koc values of different estrogens). Soil properties (r2 0.51-0.87 for Kd and 0.32-0.44 for Koc) provided better prediction models than using the data of different estrogens (r2 0.38-0.71 for Kd and 0.18-0.40 for Koc). PLS regression models for mineralization parameters of 17ß-estradiol had lower predictive power (lower r2)than models developed for sorption parameters. In addition, it has become of primary importance to develop sensitive detection methods that are able to detect low estrogen concentrations (ng L-1) in a wide variety of environmental matrices in order to validate the prediction of their fate and to study their presence in affected ecosystems. Conjugates were synthesized using a mixed anhydride reaction and two Enzyme-Linked Immunosorbent Assays (ELISAs) were developed using polyclonal antibodies. One ELISA was highly specific for 17β-estradiol (with an IC50 of 243 ng mL-1) and the second allowed for the broader detection of 17β-estradiol, estrone and estriol (with an IC50 of 18 ng mL-1 for 17β-estradiol). The cross-reactivity of both ELISAs was studied against 13 compounds (natural

  5. Progress in the molecular understanding of central regulation of body weight by estrogens

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saito, Kenji; Cao, Xuehong; He, Yanlin; Xu, Yong

    2015-01-01

    Objective Estrogens can act in the brain to prevent body weight gain. Tremendous research efforts have been focused on estrogen physiology in the brain in the context of body weight control; estrogen receptors and the related signals have been attractive targets for development of new obesity therapies. The objective is to review recent findings in these aspects. Methods We reviewed recent studies, primarily from those using the conventional and conditional knockout mouse strains, regarding the cellular and molecular mechanisms for the beneficial effects of estrogens on body weight balance. We also discuss emerging genetic tools that could further benefit the field of estrogen research, and newly developed estrogen-based regimen that produce body weight-lowering benefits. Results The body weight-lowering effects of estrogens are mediated by multiple forms of estrogen receptors, in different brain regions through distinct but coordinated mechanisms. Both rapid signals and “classic” nuclear receptor actions of estrogen receptors appear to contribute to estrogenic regulation on body weight. Conclusion Estrogen receptors and associated signal networks are potential targets for obesity treatment, and further investigations are warranted. PMID:25865677

  6. Proteomic Analysis of Estrogen-Mediated Signal Transduction in Osteoclasts Formation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Qi Xiong

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Estrogen plays an important role in inhibiting osteoclast differentiation and protecting against bone loss from osteoporosis, especially in postmenopausal women. However, the precise mechanisms underlying the effect of estrogen on osteoclasts are not well known. In the present study, we performed proteomics analysis and bioinformatics analysis to comprehensively compare the differential expression of proteins in receptor activator of nuclear factor-κB ligand RANKL-induced osteoclasts in the presence and absence of estrogen. We identified 6403 proteins, of which 124 were upregulated and 231 were downregulated by estrogen. Bioinformatics analysis showed that estrogen treatment interfered with 77 intracellular pathways, including both confirmed canonical and unconfirmed pathways of osteoclast formation. Our findings validate the inhibitory effect of estrogen on osteoclasts via the promotion of apoptosis and suppression of differentiation and polarization and suggest that estrogen might inhibit osteoclast formation via other pathways, which requires further investigation and verification.

  7. Alpha-fetoprotein protects the developing female mouse brain from masculinization and defeminization by estrogens.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bakker, Julie; De Mees, Christelle; Douhard, Quentin; Balthazart, Jacques; Gabant, Philippe; Szpirer, Josiane; Szpirer, Claude

    2006-02-01

    Two clearly opposing views exist on the function of alpha-fetoprotein (AFP), a fetal plasma protein that binds estrogens with high affinity, in the sexual differentiation of the rodent brain. AFP has been proposed to either prevent the entry of estrogens or to actively transport estrogens into the developing female brain. The availability of Afp mutant mice (Afp(-/-)) now finally allows us to resolve this longstanding controversy concerning the role of AFP in brain sexual differentiation, and thus to determine whether prenatal estrogens contribute to the development of the female brain. Here we show that the brain and behavior of female Afp(-/-) mice were masculinized and defeminized. However, when estrogen production was blocked by embryonic treatment with the aromatase inhibitor 1,4,6-androstatriene-3,17-dione, the feminine phenotype of these mice was rescued. These results clearly demonstrate that prenatal estrogens masculinize and defeminize the brain and that AFP protects the female brain from these effects of estrogens.

  8. Brain Sex Matters: estrogen in cognition and Alzheimer’s disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Rena; Cui, Jie; Shen, Yong

    2014-01-01

    Estrogens are the primary female sex hormones and play important roles in both reproductive and non-reproductive systems. Estrogens can be synthesized in non-reproductive tissues such as liver, heart, muscle, bone and the brain. During the past decade, increasing evidence suggests that brain estrogen can not only be synthesized by neurons, but also by astrocytes. Brain estrogen also works locally at the site of synthesis in paracrine and/or intracrine fashion to maintain important tissue-specific functions. Here, we will focus on the biology of brain estrogen and its impact on cognitive function and Alzheimer’s disease. This comprehensive review provides new insights into brain estrogens by presenting a better understanding of the tissue-specific estrogen effects and their roles in healthy ageing and cognitive function. PMID:24418360

  9. The Role of Estrogens in Control of Energy Balance and Glucose Homeostasis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clegg, Deborah J.; Hevener, Andrea L.

    2013-01-01

    Estrogens play a fundamental role in the physiology of the reproductive, cardiovascular, skeletal, and central nervous systems. In this report, we review the literature in both rodents and humans on the role of estrogens and their receptors in the control of energy homeostasis and glucose metabolism in health and metabolic diseases. Estrogen actions in hypothalamic nuclei differentially control food intake, energy expenditure, and white adipose tissue distribution. Estrogen actions in skeletal muscle, liver, adipose tissue, and immune cells are involved in insulin sensitivity as well as prevention of lipid accumulation and inflammation. Estrogen actions in pancreatic islet β-cells also regulate insulin secretion, nutrient homeostasis, and survival. Estrogen deficiency promotes metabolic dysfunction predisposing to obesity, the metabolic syndrome, and type 2 diabetes. We also discuss the effect of selective estrogen receptor modulators on metabolic disorders. PMID:23460719

  10. Occurrence and removal of estrogens in Brazilian wastewater treatment plants

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pessoa, Germana P. [Department of Hydraulic and Environmental Engineering, Federal University of Ceará, Rua do Contorno, S/N Campus do Pici, Bl. 713, CEP: 60455-900, Fortaleza, CE (Brazil); Souza, Neyliane C. de [Department Sanitary and Environmental Engineering, State University of Paraíba, Rua Juvêncio Arruda, S/N, Campus Universitário, Bodocongó, CEP: 58109-790, Campina Grande, PB (Brazil); Vidal, Carla B.; Alves, Joana A.C.; Firmino, Paulo Igor M. [Department of Hydraulic and Environmental Engineering, Federal University of Ceará, Rua do Contorno, S/N Campus do Pici, Bl. 713, CEP: 60455-900, Fortaleza, CE (Brazil); Nascimento, Ronaldo F. [Department of Analytical Chemistry and Physical Chemistry, Federal University of Ceará, Rua do Contorno, S/N Campus do Pici, Bl. 940, CEP: 60451-970, Fortaleza, CE (Brazil); Santos, André B. dos, E-mail: andre23@ufc.br [Department of Hydraulic and Environmental Engineering, Federal University of Ceará, Rua do Contorno, S/N Campus do Pici, Bl. 713, CEP: 60455-900, Fortaleza, CE (Brazil)

    2014-08-15

    This paper evaluated the occurrence and removal efficiency of four estrogenic hormones in five biological wastewater treatment plants (WWTPs), located in the State of Ceará, Brazil. The five WWTPs comprised: two systems consisted of one facultative pond followed by two maturation ponds, one facultative pond, one activated sludge (AS) system followed by a chlorination step, and one upflow anaerobic sludge blanket (UASB) reactor followed by a chlorination step. Estrogen occurrence showed a wide variation among the analyzed influent and effluent samples. Estrone (E1) showed the highest occurrence in the influent (76%), whereas both 17β-estradiol (E2) and 17α-ethynylestradiol (EE2) presented a 52% occurrence, and the compound 17β-estradiol 17-acetate (E2-17A), a 32% one. The occurrence in the effluent samples was 48% for E1, 28% for E2, 12% for E2-17A, and 40% for EE2. The highest concentrations of E1 and EE2 hormones in the influent were 3050 and 3180 ng L{sup −1}, respectively, whereas E2 and E2-17A had maximum concentrations of 776 and 2300 ng L{sup −1}, respectively. The lowest efficiencies for the removal of estrogenic hormones were found in WWTP consisted of waste stabilization ponds, ranging from 54 to 79.9%. The high-rate systems (AS and UASB), which have chlorination as post-treatment, presented removal efficiencies of approximately 95%. - Highlights: • The occurrence of four endocrine disrupting chemicals was evaluated. • The removal efficiency of four hormones in low-cost plants was examined. • Estrogen occurrence showed a wide variation in influent and effluent samples. • Estrone showed the highest occurrence in the influent and the effluent samples. • WSP treatment was observed to be less effective for removing estrogens.

  11. Estrogen concentration affects its biodegradation rate in activated sludge.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Nan; Johnson, Andrew C; Jürgens, Monika D; Llewellyn, Neville R; Hankins, Nick P; Darton, Richard C

    2009-11-01

    The effect of concentration on the biodegradation rate of the steroid estrogens, estrone (E1) and 17-alpha-ethinylestradiol (EE2), was studied in batch and continuous-flow reactor systems using fresh activated sludge from two sewage treatment plants. Between the concentrations of 0.03 to 10 μg/L in the batch system no consistent difference was found in the biodegradation rates for either estrogen. The biodegradation half-life was 0.3 to 0.7 h for E1, and 1.5 to 4.4 h for EE2 at 15 to 20°C. However, at 100 μg/L, biodegradation rates for both estrogens decreased, with the half-life prolonged to around 2.5 h for E1 and 12 to 18 h for EE2. In continuous-flow experiments, over a 2 h residence time, 95% of E1 and 48% of EE2 were removed on average at 0.1 μg/L, whilst 52% of E1 and 20% of EE2 were removed at 100 μg/L. In general, spiking concentration of estrogens did not appear to affect biodegradation rates between the ng/L to low μg/L levels in activated sludge; however, the rates greatly slowed down when the concentration increased up to 100 μg/L. The results suggest activated sludge biodegradation studies with estrogens in the high μg/L levels could give misleading results and should be avoided.

  12. Degradation of estrogenic hormones in a silt loam soil.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xuan, Richeng; Blassengale, Alma A; Wang, Qiquan

    2008-10-08

    Estrogenic hormones are endocrine-disrupting compounds, which disrupt the endocrine system function of animals and humans by mimicking and/or antagonizing endogenous hormones. With the application of sludge biosolid and animal manure as alternative fertilizers in agricultural lands, estrogens enter the soil and become an environmental concern. The degradation kinetics of 17beta-estradiol, an estrogenic hormone of major concern, in a silt loam soil were investigated in this study. It was found that 17beta-estradiol degraded rapidly in nonsterilized soil with a half-life of 0.17 day. The degradation rate constant was proportional to the percentage of nonsterilized soil, indicating that microorganisms are directly responsible for the rapid degradation of 17beta-estradiol in soil. The half-life of 17beta-estradiol in 20% nonsterilized soil was slightly shortened from 1.3 to 0.69 day with the increase of soil moisture from 10 to 20% and was greatly decreased from 4.9 to 0.92 day with the increase of temperature from 15 to 25 degrees C. The coexistence of 40 micromol kg (-1) sulfadimethoxine, a veterinary antibiotic, decreased the degradation rate constant of 17beta-estradiol from 0.750 +/- 0.038 to 0.492 +/- 0.016 day (-1). The degradation kinetics of another three estrogenic hormones, including 17alpha-estradiol, estrone, and estriol, were also investigated and compared. Estrone was identified as a degradation product of 17beta-estradiol and the most persistent hormone among the four investigated estrogens. Estriol was observed in the degradation of estrone and 17alpha-estradiol.

  13. Estrogenic and antiestrogenic regulation of the half-life of covalently labeled estrogen receptor in MCF-7 breast cancer cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Borrás, M; Laios, I; el Khissiin, A; Seo, H S; Lempereur, F; Legros, N; Leclercq, G

    1996-02-01

    Effect of estrogens and antiestrogens (AEs) on estrogen receptor (ER) half-life was analyzed in MCF-7 cells by assessing its progressive disappearance after covalent labeling in situ with [3H]tamoxifen aziridine ([3H]TAZ). Cells were incubated for 1 h with 20 nM [3H]TAZ either in the absence or presence of a 500-fold excess of unlabeled estradiol (E2) (non-specific binding). The entire ER population was labeled by this method as established by subsequent incubation of the cells with [125I]E2. [3H]TAZ labeled cells were maintained in culture for additional 5 h in the absence (control) or presence of increasing amounts (0.1 nM - 1 microM) of either a given estrogen (E2, estrone, diethylstilbestrol, bisphenol), a pure AE (RU 58 668, ICI 164 384) or an AE with residual estrogenic activity (RU 39 411, 4-hydroxytamoxifen, keoxifene). The progressive disappearance of nuclear and cytosolic [3H]TAZ-ER complex during 5 h incubation were assessed by their immunoprecipitation with anti-ER monoclonal antibody (H 222) followed by scintillation counting or SDS-PAGE and fluorography. Fading of labeled receptors was extremely slow (approximately 10% loss after 6 h) in absence of any hormone/antihormone indicating a long half-life of the [3H]TAZ-ER complex. Addition of estrogens as well as pure AEs led to a dramatic reduction of the half-life while AEs with residual estrogenic activity were extremely less efficient in this regard providing an explanation for the ability of latter compounds to up-regulate the receptor since they do not affect ER mRNA synthesis and stability. Receptor disappearance induced by estrogens was closely related to their binding affinity for ER. Newly synthesized ER emerged during the treatment with hormones or antihormones seems to be implicated in the phenomenon since [3H]TAZ was covalently bound and could, therefore, not be displaced by these compounds. Induction of synthesis of a short half-life peptide(s) with degradative activity was demonstrated by

  14. Simulation of Auger electron emission from nanometer-size gold targets using the Geant4 Monte Carlo simulation toolkit

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Incerti, S., E-mail: sebastien.incerti@tdt.edu.vn [Division of Nuclear Physics, Ton Duc Thang University, Tan Phong Ward, District 7, Ho Chi Minh City (Viet Nam); Faculty of Applied Sciences, Ton Duc Thang University, Tan Phong Ward, District 7, Ho Chi Minh City (Viet Nam); Univ. Bordeaux, CENBG, UMR 5797, F-33170 Gradignan (France); CNRS, IN2P3, CENBG, UMR 5797, F-33170 Gradignan (France); Suerfu, B.; Xu, J. [Department of Physics, Princeton University, Princeton, NJ (United States); Ivantchenko, V. [Ecoanalytica, Moscow (Russian Federation); Geant4 Associates International Ltd, Hebden Bridge (United Kingdom); Mantero, A. [SWHARD srl, via Greto di Cornigliano 6r, 16152 Genova (Italy); Brown, J.M.C. [School of Mathematics and Physics, Queen’s University Belfast, Belfast, Northern Ireland (United Kingdom); Bernal, M.A. [Instituto de Física Gleb Wataghin, Universidade Estadual de Campinas, SP (Brazil); Francis, Z. [Université Saint Joseph, Faculty of Sciences, Department of Physics, Beirut (Lebanon); Karamitros, M. [Notre Dame Radiation Laboratory, University of Notre Dame, Notre Dame, IN (United States); Tran, H.N. [Division of Nuclear Physics, Ton Duc Thang University, Tan Phong Ward, District 7, Ho Chi Minh City (Viet Nam); Faculty of Applied Sciences, Ton Duc Thang University, Tan Phong Ward, District 7, Ho Chi Minh City (Viet Nam)

    2016-04-01

    A revised atomic deexcitation framework for the Geant4 general purpose Monte Carlo toolkit capable of simulating full Auger deexcitation cascades was implemented in June 2015 release (version 10.2 Beta). An overview of this refined framework and testing of its capabilities is presented for the irradiation of gold nanoparticles (NP) with keV photon and MeV proton beams. The resultant energy spectra of secondary particles created within and that escape the NP are analyzed and discussed. It is anticipated that this new functionality will improve and increase the use of Geant4 in the medical physics, radiobiology, nanomedicine research and other low energy physics fields.

  15. Expression of estrogen-induced genes and estrogen receptor β in pancreatic neuroendocrine tumors: implications for targeted therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Estrella, Jeannelyn S; Ma, Ly T; Milton, Denái R; Yao, James C; Wang, Huamin; Rashid, Asif; Broaddus, Russell R

    2014-10-01

    The indolent nature and expression of progesterone receptor (PR), a well-known estrogen-induced gene, in a subset of pancreatic neuroendocrine tumors (PanNETs), raise the possibility of hormonal regulation in these tumors. Immunohistochemical expression of estrogen receptors (ERs) α and β as well as messenger RNA expression of estrogen-induced genes (PR, EIG121, IGF-1, IGF-1R, sFRP1, and sFRP4) by quantitative reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction were examined in 131 World Health Organization grade G1 and G2 PanNETs and correlated their expression with clinicopathological features. Thirty-nine PanNETs (30%) showed high positive ERβ staining, and 87 cases (66%) had low positive ERβ staining; only 5 cases (4%) had no nuclear staining. Pancreatic neuroendocrine tumors with small size (P = 0.02), low World Health Organization grade (P = 0.02), and low American Joint Committee on Cancer stage (P = 0.006) more frequently showed high positive ERβ staining. Among the estrogen-induced genes studied, PanNETs had significantly higher expression of PR, EIG121, IGF-1, sFRP1, and sFRP4 compared with normal pancreas, independent of age or sex. High positive ERβ staining was associated with an increased expression of PR (P < 0.001) and EIG121 (P = 0.02). Our study showed that PanNETs with favorable prognostic features have higher ERβ expression, which is associated with up-regulated PR and EIG121 messenger RNA expression. Estrogen regulation in PanNETs could potentially help in risk stratification and provide a rational target for novel treatment strategies.

  16. Estrogen receptor beta participate in the regulation of metabolizm of extracellular matrix in estrogen alpha negative breast cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leśniewska, Monika; Miltyk, Wojciech; Swiatecka, Jolanta; Tomaszewska, Małgorzata; Kuźmicki, Mariusz; Pałka, Jerzy; Wołczyński, Sławomir

    2009-01-01

    The biology of breast cancer is closely releted to sex steroid hormones. Estrogen receptor beta is overexpressed in around 70% breast cancer cases, referrd to as "ER positive". Estrogens bind to estrogen receptor and stimulate the transcription of genes involved in control of cell proliferation. Moreover, estrogens may induce growth factors and components of extracellular matrix and interact with them in a complex manner. Extracellular matrix and integrins play an important role in cell functions and their aberrant expressions are implicated in breast cancer development, invasion and metastasis. ER beta is certainly associated with more differentiated tumors, while evidence of role of ER beta is controversial. The highly invasive breast cancer ER beta negative cell line MDA-MB 231 can be the model of exam the role of ER beta in breast cancer. The aim of this study was to examine the role of activation of ER beta on the metabolism of the extracellular matrix and the expression of beta-1 integrin in the breast cancer cell line MDA-MB 231. The cells were exposed on the estradiol, tamoxifen, raloxifen and genisteina in dose dependent concentrations. To determine the relative rate of collagen syntesis we measured the time-dependent reduction of collagen-bound radioactivity after pulse-chase labeling with [3 H] prolina by Peterkofsky methods. The expression of beta-1 integrin was determine by Western blot analysis. The activity of MMP2 and 9 were measured using gelatin zymography with an image analysis system. Our data suggest on the role of estrogen receptor beta on the metabolism of extracellular matrix in the breast cancer line MDA - MB 231. Estradiol and SERMs regulate the expression of ECM proteins: collagen, integrins and enhance activity of metaloproteinases 2 and 9.

  17. Estrogen receptor beta participate in the regulation of metabolizm of extracellular matrix in estrogen alpha negative breast cancer.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mariusz Kuźmicki

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available The biology of breast cancer is closely releted to sex steroid hormones. Estrogen receptor beta is overexpressed in around 70% breast cancer cases, referrd to as "ER positive". Estrogens bind to estrogen receptor and stimulate the transcription of genes involved in control of cell proliferation. Moreover, estrogens may induce growth factors and components of extracellular matrix and interact with them in a complex manner. Extracellular matrix and integrins play an important role in cell functions and their aberrant expressions are implicated in breast cancer development, invasion and metastasis. ER beta is certainly associated with more differentiated tumors, while evidence of role of ER beta is controversial. The highly invasive breast cancer ER beta negative cell line MDA-MB 231 can be the model of exam the role of ER beta in breast cancer. The aim of this study was to examine the role of activation of ER beta on the metabolism of the extracellular matrix and the expression of beta-1 integrin in the breast cancer cell line MDA-MB 231. The cells were exposed on the estradiol, tamoxifen, raloxifen and genisteina in dose dependent concentrations. To determine the relative rate of collagen syntesis we measured the time-dependent reduction of collagen-bound radioactivity after pulse-chase labeling with [3 H] prolina by Peterkofsky methods. The expression of beta-1 integrin was determine by Western blot analysis. The activity of MMP2 and 9 were measured using gelatin zymography with an image analysis system. Our data suggest on the role of estrogen receptor beta on the metabolism of extracellular matrix in the breast cancer line MDA - MB 231. Estradiol and SERMs regulate the expression of ECM proteins: collagen, integrins and enhance activity of metaloproteinases 2 and 9.

  18. Estrogen treatment decreases matrix metalloproteinase (MMP)-9 in autoimmune demyelinating disease through estrogen receptor alpha (ERalpha).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gold, Stefan M; Sasidhar, Manda V; Morales, Laurie B; Du, Sienmi; Sicotte, Nancy L; Tiwari-Woodruff, Seema K; Voskuhl, Rhonda R

    2009-10-01

    Matrix metalloproteinases (MMPs) have a crucial function in migration of inflammatory cells into the central nervous system (CNS). Levels of MMP-9 are elevated in multiple sclerosis (MS) and predict the occurrence of new active lesions on magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). This translational study aims to determine whether in vivo treatment with the pregnancy hormone estriol affects MMP-9 levels from immune cells in patients with MS and mice with experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis (EAE). Peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs) collected from three female MS patients treated with estriol and splenocytes from EAE mice treated with estriol, estrogen receptor (ER) alpha ligand, ERbeta ligand or vehicle were stimulated ex vivo and analyzed for levels of MMP-9. Markers of CNS infiltration were assessed using MRI in patients and immunohistochemistry in mice. Supernatants from PBMCs obtained during estriol treatment in female MS patients showed significantly decreased MMP-9 compared with pretreatment. Decreases in MMP-9 coincided with a decrease in enhancing lesion volume on MRI. Estriol treatment of mice with EAE reduced MMP-9 in supernatants from autoantigen-stimulated splenocytes, coinciding with decreased CNS infiltration by T cells and monocytes. Experiments with selective ER ligands showed that this effect was mediated through ERalpha. In conclusion, estriol acting through ERalpha to reduce MMP-9 from immune cells is one mechanism potentially underlying the estriol-mediated reduction in enhancing lesions in MS and inflammatory lesions in EAE.

  19. Identification of estrogen responsive genes using esophageal squamous cell carcinoma (ESCC as a model

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Essack Magbubah

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Estrogen therapy has positively impact the treatment of several cancers, such as prostate, lung and breast cancers. Moreover, several groups have reported the importance of estrogen induced gene regulation in esophageal cancer (EC. This suggests that there could be a potential for estrogen therapy for EC. The efficient design of estrogen therapies requires as complete as possible list of genes responsive to estrogen. Our study develops a systems biology methodology using esophageal squamous cell carcinoma (ESCC as a model to identify estrogen responsive genes. These genes, on the other hand, could be affected by estrogen therapy in ESCC. Results Based on different sources of information we identified 418 genes implicated in ESCC. Putative estrogen responsive elements (EREs mapped to the promoter region of the ESCC genes were used to initially identify candidate estrogen responsive genes. EREs mapped to the promoter sequence of 30.62% (128/418 of ESCC genes of which 43.75% (56/128 are known to be estrogen responsive, while 56.25% (72/128 are new candidate estrogen responsive genes. EREs did not map to 290 ESCC genes. Of these 290 genes, 50.34% (146/290 are known to be estrogen responsive. By analyzing transcription factor binding sites (TFBSs in the promoters of the 202 (56+146 known estrogen responsive ESCC genes under study, we found that their regulatory potential may be characterized by 44 significantly over-represented co-localized TFBSs (cTFBSs. We were able to map these cTFBSs to promoters of 32 of the 72 new candidate estrogen responsive ESCC genes, thereby increasing confidence that these 32 ESCC genes are responsive to estrogen since their promoters contain both: a/mapped EREs, and b/at least four cTFBSs characteristic of ESCC genes that are responsive to estrogen. Recent publications confirm that 47% (15/32 of these 32 predicted genes are indeed responsive to estrogen. Conclusion To the best of our knowledge our

  20. Identification of estrogen responsive genes using esophageal squamous cell carcinoma (ESCC) as a model

    KAUST Repository

    Essack, Magbubah

    2012-10-26

    Background: Estrogen therapy has positively impact the treatment of several cancers, such as prostate, lung and breast cancers. Moreover, several groups have reported the importance of estrogen induced gene regulation in esophageal cancer (EC). This suggests that there could be a potential for estrogen therapy for EC. The efficient design of estrogen therapies requires as complete as possible list of genes responsive to estrogen. Our study develops a systems biology methodology using esophageal squamous cell carcinoma (ESCC) as a model to identify estrogen responsive genes. These genes, on the other hand, could be affected by estrogen therapy in ESCC.Results: Based on different sources of information we identified 418 genes implicated in ESCC. Putative estrogen responsive elements (EREs) mapped to the promoter region of the ESCC genes were used to initially identify candidate estrogen responsive genes. EREs mapped to the promoter sequence of 30.62% (128/418) of ESCC genes of which 43.75% (56/128) are known to be estrogen responsive, while 56.25% (72/128) are new candidate estrogen responsive genes. EREs did not map to 290 ESCC genes. Of these 290 genes, 50.34% (146/290) are known to be estrogen responsive. By analyzing transcription factor binding sites (TFBSs) in the promoters of the 202 (56+146) known estrogen responsive ESCC genes under study, we found that their regulatory potential may be characterized by 44 significantly over-represented co-localized TFBSs (cTFBSs). We were able to map these cTFBSs to promoters of 32 of the 72 new candidate estrogen responsive ESCC genes, thereby increasing confidence that these 32 ESCC genes are responsive to estrogen since their promoters contain both: a/mapped EREs, and b/at least four cTFBSs characteristic of ESCC genes that are responsive to estrogen. Recent publications confirm that 47% (15/32) of these 32 predicted genes are indeed responsive to estrogen.Conclusion: To the best of our knowledge our study is the first

  1. Estrogen signalling and the DNA damage response in hormone dependent breast cancers

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    C Elizabeth Caldon

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available Estrogen is necessary for the normal growth and development of breast tissue, but high levels of estrogen are a major risk factor for breast cancer. One mechanism by which estrogen could contribute to breast cancer is via the induction of DNA damage. This perspective discusses the mechanisms by which estrogen alters the DNA damage response (DDR and DNA repair through the regulation of key effector proteins including ATM, ATR, CHK1, BRCA1 and p53 and the feedback on estrogen receptor signalling from these proteins. We put forward the hypothesis that estrogen receptor signalling converges to suppress effective DNA repair and apoptosis in favour of proliferation. This is important in hormone-dependent breast cancer as it will affect processing of estrogen-induced DNA damage, as well as other genotoxic insults. DDR and DNA repair proteins are frequently mutated or altered in estrogen responsive breast cancer which will further change the processing of DNA damage. Finally the action of estrogen signalling on DNA damage is also relevant to the therapeutic setting as the suppression of a DNA damage response by estrogen has the potential to alter the response of cancers to anti-hormone treatment or chemotherapy that induces DNA damage.

  2. Estrogens regulate the hepatic effects of Growth Hormone, a hormonal interplay with multiple fates

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    Leandro eFernandez-Perez

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available The liver responds to estrogens and GH which are critical regulators of body growth, gender-related hepatic functions, and intermediate metabolism. The effects of estrogens on liver can be direct, through the direct actions of hepatic ER, or indirect, which include the crosstalk with endocrine, metabolic, and sex-differentiated functions of GH. Most previous studies have been focused on the influence of estrogens on pituitary GH secretion, which has a great impact on hepatic transcriptional regulation. However, there is strong evidence that estrogens can influence the GH-regulated endocrine and metabolic functions in the human liver by acting at the level of GHR-STAT5 signaling pathway. This cross-talk is relevant because the widespread exposition of estrogen or estrogen-related compounds in human. Therefore, GH or estrogen signaling deficiency as well as the influence of estrogens on GH biology can cause a dramatic impact in liver physiology during mammalian development and in adulthood. In this review, we will summarize the current status of the influence of estrogen on GH actions in liver. A better understanding of estrogen-GH interplay in liver will lead to improved therapy of children with growth disorders and of adults with GH deficiency.

  3. Comparison of in vitro estrogenic activity and estrogen concentrations in source and treated waters from 25 U.S. drinking water treatment plants

    Science.gov (United States)

    In vitro bioassays have been successfully used to screen for estrogenic activity in wastewater and surface water, however, few have been applied to treated drinking water. Here, extracts of source and treated drinking water samples were assayed for estrogenic activity using T47D...

  4. A RIKILT yeast estrogen bioassay (REA) for estrogen residue detection in urine of calves experimentally treated with 17ß-estradiol

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Divari, S.; Maria, De R.; Cannizzo, F.T.; Spada, F.; Mulasso, C.; Bovee, T.F.H.; Capra, P.; Leporati, M.; Biolatti, B.

    2010-01-01

    17ß-Estradiol is one of the most powerful sex steroids illegally used in bovine production. The objective of this study was to evaluate the application and the specificity of the RIKILT yeast estrogen bioassay (REA) for the detection of molecules with estrogenic activities in the urine of calves

  5. Interaction of putative estrogens and the estrogen receptor system in Leydig cells in the BALB/c mouse testis resulting in the initiation of DNA synthesis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Juriansz, R.L.

    1986-01-01

    Continuous administration of estrogens for 7-9 months, both steroidal and nonsteroidal, to male BALB/c mice, leads to the formation of testicular Leydig cell tumors. Three days following the subcutaneous implantation of a pellet of estrogen in cholesterol, there is a peak in the incorporation of /sup 3/H-thymidine into the DNA of the interstitial cells. These effects are hypothesized to be mediated by the estrogen receptor system in the Leydig cell. Common experimental techniques for the measurement of hormone binding, such as dextran coated charcoal treatment, proved to be impossible to employ in this system, therefore a procedure was developed using hydroxyapatite to obtain binding data. The cytosolic estrogen receptor was found to have a dissociation constant for estradiol-17..beta.. of 6.5 x 10/sup -8/ M, while that of the nuclear estrogen receptor was 1.25 x 10/sup -8/ M. Competition assays were utilized to determine the cytosolic estrogen receptor's affinity for nonsteroidal estrogens, steroidal estrogens, and triphenylethylene.

  6. Estrogenic Activity of Some Phytoestrogens on Bovine Oxytocin and Thymidine Kinase-ERE Promoter through Estrogen Receptor-α in MDA-MB 231 Cells

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    Ehsan Zayerzadeh

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available Background: Phytoestrogens, a group of plant-derived polyphenolic compounds have recently come into considerable attention due to the increasing information on their potential adverse effects in human health. Some of phytoestrogens show estrogenic activity that may be carcinogenic for human. In the present study, we investigated the transcriptional effects of variety of phytoestrogens on the bovine oxytocin and the thymidine kinase-ERE promoter by estrogen receptor α in MDA-MB 231 breast cancer cell line. Materials and Methods: Cells were seeded for transfections into 12- well plates at a density of 100000 cells per well were transfected with a total of 3 μg of plasmid DNA using calcium phosphate coprecipitation. Estrogen and some phytoestrogens (naringenin, 8-prenyl-naringenin and 6-( 1, 1 - dimethylallyl naringenin were used for the stimulation of transfected cells. Results: Findings of our study clearly demonstrated the subtype-selective activation of estrogen receptor (ERα and (ERβ by the p hytoestrogen naringenin (activating estrogen receptor β and its substituted forms 8-prenyl-naringenin and 6-( 1, 1 - dimethylallyl naringenin (activating estrogen receptor α , on the ERE-controlled promoter as well as on the oxytocin gene promoter. Conclusion: The study revealed that some p hytoestrogen s show estrogenic activity by classical or non-classical mechanisms as well as exhibit estrogenic activity by undetermined mechanisms in transfected MDA-MB 231 cell line.

  7. Expression of Estrogen Receptor Alpha and Beta is Decreased in Hypospadias

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qiao, Liang; Rodriguez, Esequiel; Weiss, Dana A.; Ferretti, Max; Risbridger, Gail; Cunha, Gerald R.; Baskin, Laurence S.

    2012-01-01

    Purpose Estrogenic endocrine disruptors acting via estrogen receptors α and β have been implicated in the etiology of hypospadias. However, the expression and distribution of estrogen receptors α and β in normal and hypospadiac human foreskins is unknown. We characterized the location and expression of estrogen receptors α and β in normal and hypospadiac foreskins. Materials and Methods We prospectively collected excess foreskin from 35 patients undergoing hypospadias repair and 15 patients undergoing elective circumcision. Hypospadias was classified as severe in 18 patients and mild in 17 based on the ectopic position of the meatus. mRNA expression levels in estrogen receptors α and β were quantified using reverse transcriptase polymerase chain reaction. Receptor location was characterized by immunohistochemical analysis. Additionally immunohistochemical analysis was performed in 4 archived human fetal penises. Results Mean ± SD ages were similar for the circumcision (9.5 ± 3 months) and hypospadias repair groups (9 ± 3 months, p = 0.75). mRNA expression levels in estrogen receptors α and β were significantly decreased in hypospadiac foreskin cases compared to controls (p hypospadias. Estrogen receptor β immunostaining was strong in normal foreskin but weak in hypospadiac foreskin. Estrogen receptor β immunoreactivity was most intense in the stratum basale and stratum spinosum. Estrogen receptor α immunostaining was weak in normal and mild hypospadias foreskin, and undetectable in severe hypospadias. Fetal penises expressed strong estrogen receptor β immunopositivity in the urethral plate epithelium, corpus spongiosum, corpora cavernosa and penile skin, while estrogen receptor α immunostaining was not detected. Conclusions These data demonstrate a difference in estrogen receptor α and β expression and location in the foreskin of patients with hypospadias compared to controls. These findings are consistent with aberrant estrogenic effects having

  8. Impact of secondary treatment types and sludge handling processes on estrogen concentration in wastewater sludge.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marti, Erica J; Batista, Jacimaria R

    2014-02-01

    Endocrine-disrupting compounds (EDCs), such as estrogen, are known to be present in the aquatic environment at concentrations that negatively affect fish and other wildlife. Wastewater treatment plants (WWTPs) are major contributors of EDCs into the environment. EDCs are released via effluent discharge and land application of biosolids. Estrogen removal in WWTPs has been studied in the aqueous phase; however, few researchers have determined estrogen concentration in sludge. This study focuses on estrogen concentration in wastewater sludge as a result of secondary treatment types and sludge handling processes. Grab samples were collected before and after multiple treatment steps at two WWTPs receiving wastewater from the same city. The samples were centrifuged into aqueous and solid phases and then processed using solid phase extraction. Combined natural estrogens (estrone, estradiol and estriol) were measured using an enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) purchased from a manufacturer. Results confirmed that activated sludge treatments demonstrate greater estrogen removal compared to trickling filters and mass concentration of estrogen was measured for the first time on trickling filter solids. Physical and mechanical sludge treatment processes, such as gravity thickeners and centrifuges, did not significantly affect estrogen removal based on mass balance calculations. Dissolved air flotation thickening demonstrated a slight decrease in estrogen concentration, while anaerobic digestion resulted in increased mass concentration of estrogen on the sludge and a high estrogen concentration in the supernatant. Although there are no state or federally mandated discharge effluent standards or sludge application standards for estrogen, implications from this study are that trickling filters would need to be exchanged for activated sludge treatment or followed by an aeration basin in order to improve estrogen removal. Also, anaerobic digestion may need to be replaced

  9. The correlation between immunoexpression of estrogen receptor and the severity of periodontal disease

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    Yuliana Mahdiyah Da’at Arina

    2010-09-01

    Full Text Available Background: The decreased level of estrogen during menopause may be one of the risk factors of periodontal disease. The influence of estrogen to periodontal tissue disturbance is mediated by the presence of estrogen receptor on tissue. The precise mechanism how the estrogens mediate this effect is still unclear. Purpose: The aim of this study was to determine the correlation between estrogen receptor α and ß on the periodontal pocket of women who had severe chronic periodontitis measured based on the periodontal pocket depth. Methods: Twenty four periodontitis patients from menopausal and productive women according to the criteria were examined upon her periodontal status and immunoexpression of estrogen receptor α and ß on their periodontal pocket wall. Results: The result showed that in the menopausal and productive women, immunoexpression of estrogen receptor α and ß was not correlated with the periodontal pocket depth (p>0.05. However, the pocket depth seemed to show higher correlation with immunoexpression of estrogen receptor α than that with estrogen receptor ß, r=0.37 vs. r=0.12 for menopausal women, and r=41 vs. r=0.11 for productive women. Conclusion: It was concluded that no significant correlation was found between the estrogen receptor and periodontal pocket depth both on menopausal and productive women, presumed that estrogen has little role in the severity of periodontitis based on periodontal pocket depth. However, the estrogen receptor α has valuable effect on the severity of periodontal disease more than the estrogen receptor ß.Estrogens, selective estrogen receptor modulators, and a selective estrogen receptor down-regulator inhibit endothelial production of tissue factor pathway inhibitor 1

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ree Anne

    2006-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Hormone therapy, oral contraceptives, and tamoxifen increase the risk of thrombotic disease. These compounds also reduce plasma content of tissue factor pathway inhibitor-1 (TFPI, which is the physiological inhibitor of the tissue factor pathway of coagulation. The current aim was to study if estrogens and estrogen receptor (ER modulators may inhibit TFPI production in cultured endothelial cells and, if so, identify possible mechanisms involved. Methods Human endothelial cell cultures were treated with 17β-estradiol (E2, 17α-ethinylestradiol (EE2, tamoxifen, raloxifene, or fulvestrant. Protein levels of TFPI in cell media and cell lysates were measured by an enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay, and TFPI mRNA levels were assessed by quantitative PCR. Expression of ERα was analysed by immunostaining. Results All compounds (each in a concentration of 10 nM reduced TFPI in cell medium, by 34% (E2, 21% (EE2, 16% (tamoxifen, and 28% (raloxifene, respectively, with identical inhibitory effects on cellular TFPI levels. Expression of TFPI mRNA was principally unchanged. Treatment with fulvestrant, which was also associated with down-regulation of secreted TFPI (9% with 10 nM and 26% with 1000 nM, abolished the TFPI-inhibiting effect of raloxifene, but not of the other compounds. Notably, the combination of 1000 nM fulvestrant and 10 nM raloxifene increased TFPI secretion, and, conversely, 10 nM of either tamoxifen or raloxifene seemed to partly (tamoxifen or fully (raloxifene counteract the inhibitory effect of 1000 nM fulvestrant. The cells did not express the regular nuclear 66 kDa ERα, but instead a 45 kDa ERα, which was not regulated by estrogens or ER modulators. Conclusion E2, EE2, tamoxifen, raloxifene, and fulvestrant inhibited endothelial production of TFPI by a mechanism apparently independent of TFPI transcription.

  10. Red Clover Aryl Hydrocarbon Receptor (AhR) and Estrogen Receptor (ER) Agonists Enhance Genotoxic Estrogen Metabolism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dunlap, Tareisha L; Howell, Caitlin E; Mukand, Nita; Chen, Shao-Nong; Pauli, Guido F; Dietz, Birgit M; Bolton, Judy L

    2017-11-20

    Many women consider botanical dietary supplements (BDSs) as safe alternatives to hormone therapy for menopausal symptoms. However, the effect of BDSs on breast cancer risk is largely unknown. In the estrogen chemical carcinogenesis pathway, P450 1B1 metabolizes estrogens to 4-hydroxylated catechols, which are oxidized to genotoxic quinones that initiate and promote breast cancer. In contrast, P450 1A1 catalyzed 2-hydroxylation represents a detoxification pathway. The current study evaluated the effects of red clover, a popular BDS used for women's health, and its isoflavones, biochanin A (BA), formononetin (FN), genistein (GN), and daidzein (DZ), on estrogen metabolism. The methoxy estrogen metabolites (2-MeOE 1 , 4-MeOE 1 ) were measured by LC-MS/MS, and CYP1A1 and CYP1B1 gene expression was analyzed by qPCR. Nonmalignant ER-negative breast epithelial cells (MCF-10A) and ER-positive breast cancer cells (MCF-7) were derived from normal breast epithelial tissue and ER+ breast cancer tissue. Red clover extract (RCE, 10 μg/mL) and isoflavones had no effect on estrogen metabolism in MCF-10A cells. However, in MCF-7 cells, RCE treatments downregulated CYP1A1 expression and enhanced genotoxic metabolism (4-MeOE 1 /CYP1B1 > 2-MeOE 1 /CYP1A1). Experiments with the isoflavones showed that the AhR agonists (BA, FN) preferentially induced CYP1B1 expression as well as 4-MeOE 1 . In contrast, the ER agonists (GN, DZ) downregulated CYP1A1 expression likely through an epigenetic mechanism. Finally, the ER antagonist ICI 182,780 potentiated isoflavone-induced XRE-luciferase reporter activity and reversed GN and DZ induced downregulation of CYP1A1 expression. Overall, these studies show that red clover and its isoflavones have differential effects on estrogen metabolism in "normal" vs breast cancer cells. In breast cancer cells, the AhR agonists stimulate genotoxic metabolism, and the ER agonists downregulate the detoxification pathway. These data may suggest that especially

  11. Food-associated estrogenic compounds induce estrogen receptor-mediated luciferase gene expression in transgenic male mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ter Veld, Marcel G R; Zawadzka, E; van den Berg, J H J; van der Saag, Paul T; Rietjens, Ivonne M C M; Murk, Albertinka J

    2008-07-30

    The present paper aims at clarifying to what extent seven food-associated compounds, shown before to be estrogenic in vitro, can induce estrogenic effects in male mice with an estrogen receptor (ER)-mediated luciferase (luc) reporter gene system. The luc induction was determined in different tissues 8h after dosing the ER-luc male mice intraperitoneally (IP) or 14h after oral dosing. Estradiol-propionate (EP) was used as a positive control at 0.3 and 1mg/kg bodyweight (bw), DMSO as solvent control. The food-associated estrogenic compounds tested at non-toxic doses were bisphenol A (BPA) and nonylphenol (NP) (both at 10 and 50mg/kgbw), dichlorodiphenyldichloroethylene (p,p'-DDE; at 5 and 25mg/kgbw), quercetin (at 1.66 and 16.6mg/kgbw), di-isoheptyl phthalate (DIHP), di-(2-ethylhexyl) phthalate (DEHP) and di-(2-ethylhexyl) adipate (DEHA) all at 30 and 100mg/kgbw. In general IP dosing resulted in higher luc inductions than oral dosing. EP induced luc activity in the liver in a statistically significant dose-related way with the highest induction of all compounds tested which was 20,000 times higher than the induction by the DMSO-control. NP, DDE, DEHA and DIHP did not induce luc activity in any of the tissues tested. BPA induced luc in the liver up to 420 times via both exposure routes. BPA, DEHP and quercetin induced luc activity in the liver after oral exposure. BPA (50mg/kgbw IP) also induced luc activity in the testis, kidneys and tibia. The current study reveals that biomarker-responses in ER-luc male mice occur after a single oral exposure to food-associated estrogenic model compounds at exposure levels 10 to 10(4) times higher than the established TDI's for some of these compounds. Given the facts that (i) the present study did not include chronic exposure and that (ii) simultaneous exposure to multiple estrogenic compounds may be a realistic exposure scenario, it remains to be seen whether this margin is sufficiently high.

  12. Hot flushes: are there effective alternatives to estrogen?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sassarini, Jenifer; Lumsden, Mary Ann

    2010-06-01

    Hot flushes are the most common indication for the prescription of hormone replacement therapy (HRT) since it is effective in over 80% of cases. In 1995, 37% of American women took HRT, principally for this purpose. However, over the last five years, publications such as those from the Women's Health Initiative (WHI) have caused concern among women since they perceive that the risks outweigh the benefits. Following this publication, half of the women taking HRT in the UK, USA and New Zealand discontinued HRT. With the discontinuation of estrogen many women re-developed hot flushes; however only a small number (18%) of women report restarting hormone therapy. The majority of these (76%) for the recurrence of severe hot flushes or night sweats. Alternatives are available, but limited knowledge on aetiology and mechanisms of hot flushing represents a major obstacle for the development of new, targeted, non-hormonal treatments, and no current alternatives are as effective as estrogen.

  13. Recurrent hepatic hemangiomas. Possible association with estrogen therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Conter, R L; Longmire, W P

    1988-01-01

    Hemangiomas are the most common benign tumors occurring in the liver. However, the natural history of hepatic hemangiomas has not been well defined. Four patients (3 women, 1 man) with recurrent giant liver hemangiomas underwent either surgical or radiation therapy as initial treatment for the primary tumor. The average time until recurrence was 14 years, and each tumor weighed more than 600 g. Each of the female patients had been given chronic estrogen (Premarin) replacement therapy. Three of the four patients underwent surgical resection for intractable symptoms or progressive enlargement. It is believed that estrogen replacement therapy may play a role in the pathogenesis of these tumors. Furthermore, operative intervention should be considered in patients with recurrent giant liver hemangioma. Images Fig. 1. Fig. 2. Fig. 3. Fig. 4. Figs. 5A-C. Figs. 5A-C. PMID:2829759

  14. Amelioration of estrogen deficiency-induced obesity by collagen hydrolysate.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chiang, Tsay-I; Chang, I-Chang; Lee, Hsueh-Hui; Hsieh, Kuang Hui; Chiu, Yung-Wei; Lai, Te-Jen; Liu, Jer-Yuh; Hsu, Li-Sung; Kao, Shao-Hsuan

    2016-01-01

    Objectives: Menopausal transition with declining estrogen levels significantly affects the physiological properties of women and consequently contributes to a series of medical conditions, including obesity. Obesity is a crucial risk factor associated with cardiovascular diseases, diabetes mellitus, and breast cancer. Increasing dietary protein content improves satiety and energy expenditure. Thus, we hypothesize that supplementing with collagen, a common dietary protein, may alleviate menopause-induced obesity. Methods: We used ovariectomized (OVX) rats to mimic a menopausal human. The body weight of OVX rats significantly increased compared with that of sham-operated rats (Pbody weight gain and adipocyte enlargement (Pbody weight gain and adipocyte enlargement in response to ovariectomy but slightly affected blood lipids, calcium, and glucose in both sham-operated and OVX rats. Collagen hydrolysate supplementation is beneficial in ameliorating estrogen deficiency-induced obesity and its associated risk factors.

  15. Evidence of an estrogen receptor form devoid of estrogen binding ability in MCF-7 cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    El Khissiin, A; Journé, F; Laïos, I; Seo, H S; Leclercq, G

    2000-12-01

    In MCF-7 breast cancer cells, hydroxytamoxifen (OH-Tam) up-regulates the estrogen receptor (ER) in a form unable to bind [(3)H]estradiol (E(2)). We show here that this property is not restricted to this antiestrogen. [(3)H]E(2) binding assays (whole cell assays, DCC assays on cell extracts) and enzyme immunoassays (Abbott) performed in parallel, establish the permanent presence of such unusual ERs in the absence of any exposure of the cells to a ligand. E(2) and the pure antiestrogen RU 58 668, which down-regulate ER, also decrease [(3)H]E(2) binding. In control cells, these ERs represent about the half of the whole receptor population; they also display a tendency to stabilize within the cell nucleus. Loss of E(2) binding ability appears irreversible, since we failed to label receptor accumulated under OH-Tam with [(3)H]E(2) or [(3)H]tamoxifen aziridine (TAZ). Cycloheximide (CHX), which blocks E(2)-induced down regulation of ER, failed to stabilize [(3)H]E(2) binding (whole cell assay) after an [(3)H]E(2) pulse (1 h), confirming that regulation of E(2) binding and peptide level are related to different regulatory mechanisms. Loss of binding ability could not be ascribed to any ER cleavage as demonstrated by Western blotting with a panel of ER antibodies raised against its various domains (67 kDa ER solely detected). We propose that loss of E(2) binding ability is related to the aging process of the receptor, i.e. it is progressively converted to a form devoted to degradation after it has accomplished its physiological role. Ligands may favor (E(2), RU 58 668) or impede (OH-Tam) this elimination process.

  16. Bacteria and the Fate of Estrogen in the Environment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Whitman, William B

    2017-06-22

    In this issue of Cell Chemical Biology, Chen et al. (2017) report that 4-hydroxyestrone and pyridinestrone acid are intermediates in the 4,5-seco pathway of aerobic estrogen degradation by the bacterium Sphingomonas. The authors identify a gene for 4-hydroxyestrone 4,5-dioxygenase and find it to be widely distributed in diverse proteobacteria, suggesting that this pathway is environmentally significant. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  17. Metabolic effects of alimentary estrogen in different age animals

    OpenAIRE

    Lykholat, O.A.; Grigoryuk, I.P.; Lykholat, T.Y.

    2016-01-01

    The article presents the results of studying the effect of alimentary exogenous estrogen that can be presented in agricultural products on state of lipid peroxidation, antioxidant system components and cholinergic neurotransmitter system in the organs of experimental different ages animals. It was established that the severity of the effects had been higher in females in puberty compared to sexually mature animals, which indicates the existence of specific age-related physiological conditions...

  18. DHEA metabolites activate estrogen receptors alpha and beta

    OpenAIRE

    Michael Miller, Kristy K.; Al-Rayyan, Numan; Ivanova, Margarita M.; Mattingly, Kathleen A.; Ripp, Sharon L.; KLINGE, CAROLYN M.; Prough, Russell A.

    2012-01-01

    Dehydroepiandrosterone (DHEA) levels were reported to associate with increased breast cancer risk in postmenopausal women, but some carcinogen-induced rat mammary tumor studies question this claim. The purpose of this study was to determine how DHEA and its metabolites affect estrogen receptors α or β (ERα or ERβ) -regulated gene transcription and cell proliferation. In transiently transfected HEK-293 cells, androstenediol, DHEA, and DHEA-S activated ERα. In ERβ transfected HepG2 cells, andro...

  19. Breast Cancer and Estrogen Biosynthesis in Adipose Tissue

    Science.gov (United States)

    1998-10-01

    translational cancer research. • 1997 Research Fellowship in Clinical Research: This Fellowship, sponsored by Bristol-Myers Squibb Oncology , will provide...was relatively unremarkable. Cynthia Bethea: Nursing decreases incidence of breast cancer, so does prolactin play a role in aromatase activity? 214...topical inunction of estrogen containing ointment. Helv Paediatr Acta. 38:361-366. 4. Salles G, Vital-Durand D, Mackiewicz R, Pugeat M, Levrat R. 1987

  1. Conservation of estrogen receptor function in invertebrate reproduction

    OpenAIRE

    Jones, Brande L.; Walker, Chris; Azizi, Bahareh; Tolbert, Laren; Williams, Loren Dean; Snell, Terry W.

    2017-01-01

    Background Rotifers are microscopic aquatic invertebrates that reproduce both sexually and asexually. Though rotifers are phylogenetically distant from humans, and have specialized reproductive physiology, this work identifies a surprising conservation in the control of reproduction between humans and rotifers through the estrogen receptor. Until recently, steroid signaling has been observed in only a few invertebrate taxa and its role in regulating invertebrate reproduction has not been clea...

  2. Hypothalamic regulation of metabolism: Role of thyroid hormone and estrogen

    OpenAIRE

    Zhang, Z.

    2017-01-01

    Thyroid hormone and estrogen both play an essential role in energy metabolism. The current thesis investigated the possible central effects of these hormones in the control of energy metabolism by administrating triiodothyronine (T3), estradiol (E2) and thyrotropin-releasing hormone (TRH) in distinct hypothalamic nuclei. We evaluated various aspects of metabolic alterations including glucose and lipid metabolism, food intake, body weight, body temperature, locomotor activity, energy expenditu...

  3. Estrogen replacement therapy for depression in perimenopausal women.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shaukat, Asma; Arain, Tariq Mahmud; Shahid, Amna; Irfan, Shahid; Farrukh, Soufia

    2005-10-01

    To determine the effect of a four-week course of oral estrogen therapy on depression in aging women. Quasi experimental. The OPD, Bahawal Victoria Hospital, Bahawalpur, from September 2000 to January 2004. Forty-two depressed women (aged 42-57) who were either perimenopausal (n = 20) or postmenopausal (n = 22) received open label treatment with oral estrogen tablets (1.25 mg/day) for 4 weeks. The Montgomery-Asberg Depression Rating Scale and the Beck Depression Inventory were used to assess depressive symptoms, the Greene Climacteric Scale was used to assess menopause-related symptoms, and the Clinical Global Impression(CGI) was used to assess global clinical improvement in these women at baseline and after treatment. Remission of depression was defined as a score < 10 on the Montgomery-Asberg Depression Rating Scale and a score < or = 2 on the CGI at week 4. The women who completed the study had a median Montgomery-Asberg Depression Rating Scale score of 20 (range = 15-32) at study entry and 11.50 (range = 10-31.0) at week 4 (z = -3.43, p < 0.01). This improvement was consistent with that reported by the women themselves on the Beck Depression Inventory (rs = 0.86, n = 20, p < 0.01). The improvement measured by CGI scores was also significant (p < 0.01). Remission of depression was noted in 5 of the 40 women (after 1 year) who completed the study. Anti-depressant response was not associated with severity or subtypes of depression at study entry or with concomitant improvement in menopause-related symptoms. Perimenopausal and postmenopausal women benefit from short-term use of estrogen therapy. Antidepressant effect of estrogen therapy is independent of improvement in menopause-related symptoms.

  4. In Utero Estrogen Exposure Increases Antiestrogen Resistance by Inducing EMT

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-02-01

    used in estrogen receptor positive (ER+) breast cancer, due to their efficacy and limited toxicity . However, the clinical reality is that of the ~50...and food containers, as well as the millions of women who took diesthylstilbesterol while pregnant before it was banned, it is likely that the number...biology techniques, including the use of RNA. Further, I have experience with in vivo models of breast cancer, including xenograft, transgenic and DMBA

  5. Sequential estrogen and radiation therapy for stage C prostate cancer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tachibana, Yuichi; Kawai, Tsuneo; Kobayashi, Tsuyoshi; Yamauchi, Tamio; Aizawa, Taku (Japanese Foundation for Cancer Research, Tokyo (Japan). Hospital)

    1993-03-01

    Twenty of 34 stage C cases have been treated by sequential estrogen and radiation in our hospital between 1980 and 1989 and half of them had actually been done staging operation. An average age was 69.3. Tumor differentiations were distributed well in 5 cases, moderately in 5 and poorly in 9. The other unknown differentiation case was diagnosed by fine needle aspiration cytology. Previously administered estrogens were diethylstilbestrol diphosphate in 15 cases and others in 5. Total doses of 70 Gy in 35 fractions were sequentially delivered to the prostate, involving if necessary the seminal vesicles over a seven-week period by bilateral 120deg pendel using linear accelerator. Radiation field was sized from 6 x 6 to 8 x 8 cm. Estrogens have been continuously administered following radiation in 11 cases. Therapeutic effects upon the prostate were evaluated by digital rectal palpation. Improvement rate and atrophy rate of the primary lesion were 94.4% and 50% respectively. Recurrences were observed in 4 cases and 3 of them recurred within 3 years after initiation of the treatment. Recurred sites were in primary lesion in 2 cases and in bone in two. Five year non-recurrence rate was 81% by Kaplan Meier's method. One of 3 who discontinued hormone administration during or immediately after radiotherapy had local recurrence after 65 months and the other 2 cases died of gastric cancer and unknown cause. Causes of 6 dead cases were one prostate cancer, one gastric cancer, one heart failure, one pneumonia and 2 unknown. The cancer death rate was 25% (1/4 cases). Five year cumulative survival rate by Kaplan-Meier's method was 59.0%. Our results support the view that the sequential estrogen and radiation therapy for the pathological stage C patients of the prostate cancer may be as preferable as radiation alone for the treatment of stage B prostate cancer. (J.P.N.).

  6. Endogenous Estrogen-Mediated Heme Oxygenase Regulation in Experimental Menopause

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anikó Pósa

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Estrogen deficiency is one of the main causes of age-associated diseases in the cardiovascular system. Female Wistar rats were divided into four experimental groups: pharmacologically ovariectomized, surgically ovariectomized, and 24-month-old intact aging animals were compared with a control group. The activity and expression of heme oxygenases (HO in the cardiac left ventricle, the concentrations of cardiac interleukin-6 (IL-6 and tumor necrosis factor-α (TNF-α, the myeloperoxidase (MPO activity in the cardiac left ventricle, and the effects of heme oxygenase blockade (by 24-hour and 1-hour pretreatment with tin-protoporphyrin IX, SnPP on the epinephrine and phentolamine-induced electrocardiogram ST segment changes in vivo were investigated. The cardiac HO activity and the expression of HO-1 and HO-2 were significantly decreased in the aged rats and after ovariectomy. Estrogen depletion was accompanied by significant increases in the expression of IL-6 and TNF-α. The aged and ovariectomized animals exhibited a significantly elevated MPO activity and a significant ST segment depression. After pretreatment with SnPP augmented ST segment changes were determined. These findings demonstrate that the sensitivity to cardiac ischemia in estrogen depletion models is associated with suppression of the activity and expression of the HO system and increases in the secretion of proinflammatory cytokines and biomarkers.

  7. Estrogen receptor alpha: molecular mechanisms and emerging insights.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Candelaria, Nicholes R; Liu, Ka; Lin, Chin-Yo

    2013-10-01

    Estrogen receptor alpha (ERα) is a cellular receptor for the female sex hormone estrogen and other natural and synthetic ligands and play critical roles in normal development and physiology and in the etiology and treatment of endocrine-related diseases. ERα is a member of the nuclear receptor superfamily of transcription factors and regulates target gene expression in a ligand-dependent manner. It has also been shown to interact with G-protein coupled receptors and associated signaling molecules in the cytoplasm. Transcriptionally, ERα either binds DNA directly through conserved estrogen response element sequence motifs or indirectly by tethering to other interacting transcription factors and nucleate transcriptional regulatory complexes which include an array of co-regulator proteins. Genome-scale studies of ERα transcriptional activity and localization have revealed mechanistic complexity and insights including novel interactions with several transcription factors, including FOXA1, AP-2g, GATA3, and RUNX1, which function as pioneering, collaborative, or tethering factors. The major challenge and exciting prospect moving forward is the comprehensive definition and integration of ERα complexes and mechanisms and their tissue-specific roles in normal physiology and in human diseases. Copyright © 2013 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  8. Endogenous Estrogen-Mediated Heme Oxygenase Regulation in Experimental Menopause

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pósa, Anikó; Veszelka, Médea; Berkó, Anikó Magyariné; Baráth, Zoltán; Ménesi, Rudolf; Pávó, Imre; László, Ferenc; Varga, Csaba

    2015-01-01

    Estrogen deficiency is one of the main causes of age-associated diseases in the cardiovascular system. Female Wistar rats were divided into four experimental groups: pharmacologically ovariectomized, surgically ovariectomized, and 24-month-old intact aging animals were compared with a control group. The activity and expression of heme oxygenases (HO) in the cardiac left ventricle, the concentrations of cardiac interleukin-6 (IL-6) and tumor necrosis factor-α (TNF-α), the myeloperoxidase (MPO) activity in the cardiac left ventricle, and the effects of heme oxygenase blockade (by 24-hour and 1-hour pretreatment with tin-protoporphyrin IX, SnPP) on the epinephrine and phentolamine-induced electrocardiogram ST segment changes in vivo were investigated. The cardiac HO activity and the expression of HO-1 and HO-2 were significantly decreased in the aged rats and after ovariectomy. Estrogen depletion was accompanied by significant increases in the expression of IL-6 and TNF-α. The aged and ovariectomized animals exhibited a significantly elevated MPO activity and a significant ST segment depression. After pretreatment with SnPP augmented ST segment changes were determined. These findings demonstrate that the sensitivity to cardiac ischemia in estrogen depletion models is associated with suppression of the activity and expression of the HO system and increases in the secretion of proinflammatory cytokines and biomarkers. PMID:26064421

  9. Estrogen Modulates Expression of Tight Junction Proteins in Rat Vagina.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oh, Kyung-Jin; Lee, Hyun-Suk; Ahn, Kyuyoun; Park, Kwangsung

    2016-01-01

    Background. The objectives of this study were to investigate the localization of tight junctions and the modulation of zonula occludens- (ZO-) 1, occludin and claudin-1 expression by estrogen in castrated female rat vagina. Female Sprague-Dawley rats (230-240 g, n = 45) were divided into three groups and subjected to a sham operation (control group, n = 15), bilateral ovariectomy (Ovx group, n = 15), or bilateral ovariectomy followed by daily subcutaneous injection of 17β-estradiol (50 μg/kg/day, Ovx + Est group, n = 15). The cellular localization and expression of ZO-1, occludin, and claudin-1 were determined in each group by immunohistochemistry and western blot. Results. Expression of ZO-1 was diffuse in all groups, with the highest intensity in the superficial epithelium in the control group. Occludin was localized in the intermediate and basal epithelium. Claudin-1 was most intense in the superficial layer of the vaginal epithelium in the control group. Expression of ZO-1, occludin, and claudin-1 was significantly decreased after ovariectomy and was restored to the level of the control after estrogen replacement. Conclusions. Tight junctions are distinctly localized in rat vagina, and estrogen modulates the expression of tight junctions. Further researches are needed to clarify the functional role of tight junctions in vaginal lubrication.

  10. Metabolic effects of alimentary estrogen in different age animals

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    O.A. Lykholat

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available The article presents the results of studying the effect of alimentary exogenous estrogen that can be presented in agricultural products on state of lipid peroxidation, antioxidant system components and cholinergic neurotransmitter system in the organs of experimental different ages animals. It was established that the severity of the effects had been higher in females in puberty compared to sexually mature animals, which indicates the existence of specific age-related physiological conditions defined high sensitivity to exogenous estrogen-like compounds. Presents results on the effects of nutritional estrogens on metabolic processes in animals of different ages testify to the potential health risks of consumer products that may be contaminated with endogenous hormones. Despite the steady growth of agricultural production, development of agro-industrial pollution drugs like compounds of food is very likely. This phenomenon is of concern and requires increased control of both the responsible organizations and public associations that will enable to avoid the negative effects of dietary factors on the population health. Particular attention should be paid to the safety and quality of children's food, because this population is extremely sensitive to the influence of previously alimentary factors.

  11. DHEA metabolites activate estrogen receptors alpha and beta

    Science.gov (United States)

    Michael Miller, Kristy K.; Al-Rayyan, Numan; Ivanova, Margarita M.; Mattingly, Kathleen A.; Ripp, Sharon L.; Klinge, Carolyn M.; Prough, Russell A.

    2012-01-01

    Dehydroepiandrosterone (DHEA) levels were reported to associate with increased breast cancer risk in postmenopausal women, but some carcinogen-induced rat mammary tumor studies question this claim. The purpose of this study was to determine how DHEA and its metabolites affect estrogen receptors α or β (ERα or ERβ) -regulated gene transcription and cell proliferation. In transiently transfected HEK-293 cells, androstenediol, DHEA, and DHEA-S activated ERα. In ERβ transfected HepG2 cells, androstenedione, DHEA, androstenediol, and 7-oxo DHEA stimulated reporter activity. ER antagonists ICI 182,780 (fulvestrant) and 4-hydroxytamoxifen, general P450 inhibitor miconazole, and aromatase inhibitor exemestane inhibited activation by DHEA or metabolites in transfected cells. ERβ-selective antagonist R,R-THC (R,R-cis-diethyl tetrahydrochrysene) inhibited DHEA and DHEA metabolite transcriptional activity in ERβ-transfected cells. Expression of endogenous estrogen-regulated genes: pS2, progesterone receptor, cathepsin D1, and nuclear respiratory factor-1 was increased by DHEA and its metabolites in an ER-subtype, gene, and cell-specific manner. DHEA metabolites, but not DHEA, competed with 17β-estradiol for ERα and ERβ binding and stimulated MCF-7 cell proliferation, demonstrating that DHEA metabolites interact directly with ERα and ERβ in vitro, modulating estrogen target genes in vivo. PMID:23123738

  12. Circulating Hepcidin-25 Is Reduced by Endogenous Estrogen in Humans.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mikael Lehtihet

    Full Text Available Hepcidin reduces iron absorption by binding to the intestinal iron transporter ferroportin, thereby causing its degradation. Although short-term administration of testosterone or growth hormone (GH has been reported to decrease circulating hepcidin levels, little is known about how hepcidin is influenced in human endocrine conditions associated with anemia.We used a sensitive and specific dual-monoclonal antibody sandwich immunoassay to measure hepcidin-25 in patients (a during initiation of in vitro fertilization when endogenous estrogens were elevated vs. suppressed, (b with GH deficiency before and after 12 months substitution treatment, (c with hyperthyroidism before and after normalization, and (d with hyperprolactinemia before and after six months of treatment with a dopamine agonist.In response to a marked stimulation of endogenous estrogen production, median hepcidin levels decreased from 4.85 to 1.43 ng/mL (p < 0.01. Hyperthyroidism, hyperprolactinemia, or GH substitution to GH-deficient patients did not influence serum hepcidin-25 levels.In humans, gonadotropin-stimulated endogenous estrogen markedly decreases circulating hepcidin-25 levels. No clear and stable correlation between iron biomarkers and hepcidin-25 was seen before or after treatment of hyperthyroidism, hyperprolactinemia or growth hormone deficiency.

  13. Measurement of phenolic environmental estrogens in women with uterine leiomyoma.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yang Shen

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVES: To investigate the effect of phenolic environmental estrogens on uterine leiomyoma from the perspective of clinical epidemiology. METHODS: Urine and blood samples were collected from Han women with uterine leiomyoma and women without uterine leiomyoma, living in Nanjing, China, between September 2011 and February 2013. A total of 156 urine samples and 214 blood samples were collected from the uterine leiomyoma group and 106 urine samples and 126 blood plasma samples from the control group. Bisphenol A (BPA, nonylphenol (NP and octylphenol (OP concentrations were determined by solid-phase extraction (SPE coupled with liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry (HPLC-MS/MS. RESULTS: Phenolic environmental estrogens in the uterine leiomyoma and control groups were compared based on: gravida>3 and gravida ≤ 3. In participants with gravida>3, urine OP concentration was significantly (P0.05 different between gravida>3 and gravida ≤ 3 patients. There was no significant (P>0.05 difference in plasma concentrations of BPA, OP and NP between the leiomyoma group and control group. Mean exposure concentration and range of distribution of BPA, OP and NP plasma concentration differed between the uterine leiomyoma and control group. CONCLUSION: Exposure level of phenolic environmental estrogens in human was related with leiomyoma tumorigenesis.

  14. Suburbanization, estrogen contamination, and sex ratio in wild amphibian populations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lambert, Max R.; Giller, Geoffrey S. J.; Barber, Larry B.; Fitzgerald, Kevin C.; Skelly, David K.

    2015-01-01

    Research on endocrine disruption in frog populations, such as shifts in sex ratios and feminization of males, has predominantly focused on agricultural pesticides. Recent evidence suggests that suburban landscapes harbor amphibian populations exhibiting similar levels of endocrine disruption; however the endocrine disrupting chemical (EDC) sources are unknown. Here, we show that sex ratios of metamorphosing frogs become increasingly female-dominated along a suburbanization gradient. We further show that suburban ponds are frequently contaminated by the classical estrogen estrone and a variety of EDCs produced by plants (phytoestrogens), and that the diversity of organic EDCs is correlated with the extent of developed land use and cultivated lawn and gardens around a pond. Our work also raises the possibility that trace-element contamination associated with human land use around suburban ponds may be contributing to the estrogenic load within suburban freshwaters and constitutes another source of estrogenic exposure for wildlife. These data suggest novel, unexplored pathways of EDC contamination in human-altered environments. In particular, we propose that vegetation changes associated with suburban neighborhoods (e.g., from forests to lawns and ornamental plants) increase the distribution of phytoestrogens in surface waters. The result of frog sex ratios varying as a function of human land use implicates a role for environmental modulation of sexual differentiation in amphibians, which are assumed to only have genetic sex determination. Overall, we show that endocrine disruption is widespread in suburban frog populations and that the causes are likely diverse.

  15. Pancreatic insulin content regulation by the estrogen receptor ER alpha.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Paloma Alonso-Magdalena

    Full Text Available The function of pancreatic beta-cells is the synthesis and release of insulin, the main hormone involved in blood glucose homeostasis. Estrogen receptors, ER alpha and ER beta, are important molecules involved in glucose metabolism, yet their role in pancreatic beta-cell physiology is still greatly unknown. In this report we show that both ER alpha and ER beta are present in pancreatic beta-cells. Long term exposure to physiological concentrations of 17beta-estradiol (E2 increased beta-cell insulin content, insulin gene expression and insulin release, yet pancreatic beta-cell mass was unaltered. The up-regulation of pancreatic beta-cell insulin content was imitated by environmentally relevant doses of the widespread endocrine disruptor Bisphenol-A (BPA. The use of ER alpha and ER beta agonists as well as ER alphaKO and ER betaKO mice suggests that the estrogen receptor involved is ER alpha. The up-regulation of pancreatic insulin content by ER alpha activation involves ERK1/2. These data may be important to explain the actions of E2 and environmental estrogens in endocrine pancreatic function and blood glucose homeostasis.

  16. Reduced estrogen in menopause may predispose women to takotsubo cardiomyopathy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuo, Bruce T; Choubey, Rakesh; Novaro, Gian M

    2010-02-01

    Takotsubo cardiomyopathy (apical ballooning syndrome) has been reported with increased frequency, most commonly in postmenopausal women. Despite the gender disparity, no clear link between estrogen and its possible cardioprotective effects has been shown. We present a case series of takotsubo cardiomyopathy in women and examine the prevalence of estrogen replacement therapy (ERT), in addition to conducting a systematic literature review on this topic. Consecutive cases of takotsubo cardiomyopathy were identified at our institution, Cleveland Clinic Florida, from January 2006 to December 2008, and patient-level data were extracted for analysis. For the literature review, we searched the MEDLINE database from January 1990 to March 2008 for English-language publications, using the terms apical ballooning syndrome, takotsubo, and stress cardiomyopathy, and identified case reports and series of takotsubo cardiomyopathy. Articles describing female patients and their medication use at time of presentation were included in the study. Eighteen cases of takotsubo cardiomyopathy were identified at our institution, all in postmenopausal women except for 2 who were still menstruating. Of the 16 postmenopausal cases, none were taking ERT at time of presentation. From the literature review, >400 publications were queried, of which 296 were recognized as case reports or series, with 7 articles meeting all of our inclusion criteria. From these reports, 13 women were identified, none of whom were taking ERT at time of presentation. Lack of estrogen replacement in the postmenopausal state may predispose women to takotsubo cardiomyopathy. Further studies are needed to establish the link more firmly. Copyright 2010. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  17. Correlation between insulin-induced estrogen receptor methylation and atherosclerosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Min, Jia; Weitian, Zhong; Peng, Cai; Yan, Peng; Bo, Zhang; Yan, Wang; Yun, Bai; Xukai, Wang

    2016-11-10

    Hyperinsulinemia and insulin resistance have been recently recognized as an important cause of atherosclerosis. Clinical studies have also found that expression of the estrogen receptor is closely related to the incidence of atherosclerosis. This study investigate the effects of insulin and estrogen receptor α (ER-α) in atherosclerosis. Double knockout ApoE/Lepr mice were given intraperitoneal injections of insulin, and their aortae were harvested for hematoxylin-eosin staining and immunohistochemical analysis. In addition, vascular smooth muscle cells (VSMCs) were treated with insulin or infected with a lentivirus encoding exogenous ER-α, and changes in gene expression were detected by real-time polymerase chain reaction and western blotting. The methylation levels of the ER-α gene were tested using bisulfite sequencing PCR, and flow cytometry and EdU assay were used to measure VSMCs proliferation. Our results showed that insulin can induce the formation of atherosclerosis. Gene expression analysis revealed that insulin promotes the expression of DNA methyltransferases and inhibits ER-α expression, while 5-aza-2'-deoxycytidine can inhibit this effect of insulin. Bisulfite sequencing PCR analysis showed that methylation of the ER-α second exon region increased in VSMCs treated with insulin. The results also showed that ER-α can inhibit VSMCs proliferation. Our data suggest that insulin promotes the expression of DNA methyltransferases, induces methylation of ER-α second exon region and decreases the expression of ER-α, thereby interfering with estrogen regulation of VSMCs proliferation, resulting in atherosclerosis.

  18. Anti-Estrogen Withdrawal Effect With Raloxifene? A Case Report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lemmo, Walter

    2016-09-01

    A 66-year-old patient presented with acute recurrent metastatic estrogen and progesterone receptor-positive, Her-2/neu-negative breast cancer, bone lesions (lumbar spine, pelvis), pulmonary nodules, hepatic metastasis, elevated cancer antigen 15 and liver enzymes, dyspepsia, and diarrhea. The patient had been taking raloxifene for approximately 8 years. After discontinuation, clinical parameters and symptoms improved rapidly without oncological therapy or other forms of treatment. Three months after raloxifene discontinuation, capecitabine was initiated by the treating oncologist who deemed an anti-estrogen withdrawal effect (AEWE) implausible. However, the lasting regression was more indicative of a raloxifene rebound effect than chemotherapy or other interventions. Today, the patient is asymptomatic with a good performance status. Hepatic metastatic regression has been confirmed, without any oncological treatment administered in the past 16 months and approximately 23 months following the withdrawal of raloxifene. This case highlights the need to screen breast cancer patients for the possibility of an AEWE if they are using raloxifene and possibly similar selective estrogen receptor modulators (SERMs) which includes tamoxifen, when diagnosed with advanced breast cancer, especially in the recurrent disease setting. © The Author(s) 2016.

  19. Ovarian epithelial carcinoma with estrogen-producing stroma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tokunaga, Hideki; Akahira, Jun-ichi; Suzuki, Takashi; Moriya, Takuya; Sasano, Hironobu; Ito, Kiyoshi; Yaegashi, Nobuo

    2007-05-01

    Malignant ovarian neoplasms derived from ovarian epithelium that produce estrogen are rare among postmenopausal women. Presented herein is a case of stage Ic(a) endometrioid adenocarcinoma in the right ovary of an 81-year-old woman, who complained of mammary tenderness, pain and atypical genital bleeding. Her serum estradiol (E2) concentration was 83 pg/mL before treatment, and the endometrial thickness measured by transvaginal ultrasonography was 5 cm, much thicker than that expected for a woman in her 80s. After surgery, her complaints disappeared and her serum E2 level decreased to normal postmenopausal levels. Immunohistochemical studies demonstrated that the enzymes required to produce estrogen were present in the tumor. Immunohistological data indicated that this epithelial ovarian cancer could produce estradiol by itself, through potential interactions between cancer cells and stromal cells, and that the high level of estradiol in the patient's serum was caused by intratumoral production. This case indicates that in addition to stromal tumors, such as granulosa cell tumors, theca cell tumors, adenofibroma and so on, malignant epithelial tumors with a functioning stroma should also be considered when evaluating ovarian tumors with estrogen production in the elderly.

  20. Estrogen therapy and noncognitive psychiatric signs and symptoms in elderly patients with dementia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kyomen, Helen H; Hennen, John; Gottlieb, Gary L; Wei, Jeanne Y

    2002-07-01

    This study investigated the efficacy and safety of short-term estrogen therapy in decreasing noncognitive signs and symptoms of dementia in demented elderly patients. Sixteen moderately to severely demented elderly patients with aggressive behavioral disturbances were randomly assigned to receive conjugated equine estrogens or placebo in a 4-week clinical trial. Frequency and severity of noncognitive signs and symptoms of dementia, as assessed with the Dementia Signs and Symptoms Scale, were compared between estrogen and placebo groups. Data were analyzed with intent-to-treat and regression modeling methods. Estrogen therapy was associated with a significantly greater improvement on the Dementia Signs and Symptoms Scale total score than placebo. All five Dementia Signs and Symptoms Scale subscale comparisons favored estrogen therapy. No adverse effects were observed. These preliminary data suggest that short-term estrogen therapy may safely decrease the frequency and severity of noncognitive signs and symptoms of dementia in elderly patients.

  1. Rapid control of male typical behaviors by brain-derived estrogens

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cornil, Charlotte A.; Ball, Gregory F.; Balthazart, Jacques

    2012-01-01

    Beside their genomic mode of action, estrogens also activate a variety of cellular signaling pathways through non-genomic mechanisms. Until recently, little was known regarding the functional significance of such actions in males and the mechanism that control local estrogen concentration with a spatial and time resolution compatible with these non-genomic actions had rarely been examined. Here, we review evidence that estrogens rapidly modulate a variety of behaviors in male vertebrates. Then, we present in vitro work supporting the existence of a control mechanism of local brain estrogen synthesis by aromatase along with in vivo evidence that rapid changes in aromatase activity also occur in a region-specific manner in response to changes in the social or environmental context. Finally, we suggest that the brain estrogen provision may also play a significant role in females. Together these data bolster the hypothesis that brain-derived estrogens should be considered as neuromodulators. PMID:22983088

  2. Estrogen receptor expression in melasma: results from facial skin of affected patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lieberman, Robert; Moy, Lawrence

    2008-05-01

    Melasma is a commonly acquired hypermelanosis of the skin due to various etiological factors, including pregnancy and oral contraceptives. Estrogen receptor expression in affected skin has not yet been investigated. The purpose of this study was to compare estrogen receptor expression in hyperpigmented and normal facial skin of patients with melasma. Biopsies of 3 mm were taken from affected and unaffected forehead skin of 2 female patients with melasma. Frozen sections of the tissues were obtained and mouse monoclonal antibody against human estrogen receptors was tested at various dilutions to determine the optimum concentrations required for reproducible immunostaining with minimal background staining. Fluorescence was evaluated and compared qualitatively. The immunohistochemical staining of tissue from both patients reflected a qualitative increase in estrogen receptor expression in melasma-affected skin compared to unaffected skin. This study demonstrates the increased expression of estrogen receptors in melasma-affected skin and may establish the basis for exploring topical anti-estrogen therapies in melasma.

  3. Expression of estrogen and progesterone receptors in astrocytomas: a literature review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cléciton Braga Tavares

    Full Text Available Gliomas are the most common type of primary central nervous system neoplasm. Astrocytomas are the most prevalent type of glioma and these tumors may be influenced by sex steroid hormones. A literature review for the presence of estrogen and progesterone receptors in astrocytomas was conducted in the PubMed database using the following MeSH terms: “estrogen receptor beta” OR “estrogen receptor alpha” OR “estrogen receptor antagonists” OR “progesterone receptors” OR “astrocytoma” OR “glioma” OR “glioblastoma”. Among the 111 articles identified, 13 studies met our inclusion criteria. The majority of reports showed the presence of estrogen and progesterone receptors in astrocytomas. Overall, higher tumor grades were associated with decreased estrogen receptor expression and increased progesterone receptor expression.

  4. Studies using the estrogen receptor alpha knockout uterus demonstrate that implantation but not decidualization-associated signaling is estrogen dependent.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Curtis Hewitt, Sylvia; Goulding, Eugenia H; Eddy, E M; Korach, Kenneth S

    2002-10-01

    Ovarian hormonal signaling is essential for proper functioning of the uterus in the establishment of pregnancy. Previous studies have demonstrated that decidualization, a stromal transformation that occurs in response to embryo implantation, can be elicited in the uterus of estrogen receptor alpha knockout (alphaERKO) mice in the absence of the estrogen dependence normally seen in wild-type (WT) mice for this response. While the alphaERKO stromal compartment demonstrated the necessary decidual response, embryo implantation is a process initiated in the epithelial layer, a uterine component that lacks estrogen responsiveness in the alphaERKO. To determine if the alphaERKO uterus would be competent for implantation, donor embryos were transferred into the uterine lumen of WT and alphaERKO females that had been ovariectomized and treated with exogenous estradiol and progesterone to mimic early pregnancy. No implantation occurred in the alphaERKO, while implantation sites containing live embryos were seen in similarly treated WT uteri, indicating that functional estrogen receptor alpha (ERalpha) is required for implantation. Previous observations of estrogen-independent decidualization in the alphaERKO prompted investigation of the mechanism leading to estrogen independence of this process. The disruption of progesterone receptor (PR), Hoxa10, Cox2, or LIF in transgenic mice results in the loss of decidualization response. Therefore, the expression of these genes was studied in WT and alphaERKO uteri by comparing expression following vehicle, progesterone alone (P), or estradiol priming followed by progesterone with nidatory estradiol (E+Pe) and by comparing expression following the above hormonal manipulations in addition to luminal infusion of oil used previously as decidualization-initiating stimulus. The whole-uterus level of PR and Hoxa10 mRNAs did not vary; however, the PR protein was induced in the stroma 24 h after oil infusion. Interestingly, in the WT, this

  5. Effect of estrogen withdrawal on energy-rich phosphates and prediction of estrogen dependence monitored by in vivo 31P magnetic resonance spectroscopy of four human breast cancer xenografts

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kristensen, C A; Kristjansen, P E; Brünner, N

    1995-01-01

    The effect of estrogen withdrawal on energy metabolism was studied in four human breast cancer xenografts: the estrogen-dependent MCF-7 and ZR75-1 and the estrogen-independent ZR75/LCC-3 and MDA-MB-231. The tumors were grown in ovariectomized nude mice with a s.c. implanted estrogen pellet. After......-clamped tumors prepared 14 days after estrogen removal were analyzed for ATP and phosphocreatine content. Our findings suggest a correlation between estrogen withdrawal and the steady-state concentrations of ATP, phosphocreatine, and Pi in human breast cancer xenografts. Discrimination analysis...

  6. Profile of bazedoxifene/conjugated estrogens for the treatment of estrogen deficiency symptoms and osteoporosis in women at risk of fracture

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rossini M

    2013-07-01

    Full Text Available Maurizio Rossini,1 Stefano Lello,2 Ignazio Sblendorio,3 Ombretta Viapiana,1 Elena Fracassi,1 Silvano Adami,1 Davide Gatti11Department of Medicine, Rheumatology Unit, University of Verona, Italy; 2Endocrinological Gynecology, Pathophysiology of Menopause and Osteoporosis, Dermopathic Institute of Immacolata, Roma, Italy; 3Medical Coach Italia Center, Bari, ItalyAbstract: Decreasing levels of estrogens during menopause are associated with reduced bone density and an increased risk of osteoporosis. Many women also experience bothersome vasomotor and vaginal symptoms during the menopausal transition. Results of systematic reviews and meta-analyses of randomized controlled trials have shown that both systemic estrogen therapy or hormone therapy (estrogen combined with a progestin are useful to prevent bone loss, and they are the most effective treatment for such climacteric symptoms as hot flushes, sweating, vaginal dryness, and dyspareunia. Unfortunately, estrogen therapy and hormone therapy increase the risk of endometrial and breast cancer, respectively. The selective estrogen receptor modulators (SERMs result in positive estrogenic effects on bone, with no negative effects on the endometrium and breast but do not provide relief from postmenopausal symptoms. The combination of a SERM with estrogen as a tissue selective estrogen complex (TSEC is a new strategy for the prevention of bone loss and the treatment of climacteric symptoms. This combination is particularly interesting from a clinical point of view, taking into account that estrogen alone did not increase breast cancer risk by the Women's Health Initiative. TSEC is hypothesized to provide the benefits of estrogen-alone therapy, with an improved tolerability profile because the SERM component can make possible the elimination of progestin. The objective of this review was to critically evaluate the evidence from the reports published to date on the use of bazedoxifene (a third

  7. Identification of estrogen target genes during zebrafish embryonic development through transcriptomic analysis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ruixin Hao

    Full Text Available Estrogen signaling is important for vertebrate embryonic development. Here we have used zebrafish (Danio rerio as a vertebrate model to analyze estrogen signaling during development. Zebrafish embryos were exposed to 1 µM 17β-estradiol (E2 or vehicle from 3 hours to 4 days post fertilization (dpf, harvested at 1, 2, 3 and 4 dpf, and subjected to RNA extraction for transcriptome analysis using microarrays. Differentially expressed genes by E2-treatment were analyzed with hierarchical clustering followed by biological process and tissue enrichment analysis. Markedly distinct sets of genes were up and down-regulated by E2 at the four different time points. Among these genes, only the well-known estrogenic marker vtg1 was co-regulated at all time points. Despite this, the biological functional categories targeted by E2 were relatively similar throughout zebrafish development. According to knowledge-based tissue enrichment, estrogen responsive genes were clustered mainly in the liver, pancreas and brain. This was in line with the developmental dynamics of estrogen-target tissues that were visualized using transgenic zebrafish containing estrogen responsive elements driving the expression of GFP (Tg(5xERE:GFP. Finally, the identified embryonic estrogen-responsive genes were compared to already published estrogen-responsive genes identified in male adult zebrafish (Gene Expression Omnibus database. The expressions of a few genes were co-regulated by E2 in both embryonic and adult zebrafish. These could potentially be used as estrogenic biomarkers for exposure to estrogens or estrogenic endocrine disruptors in zebrafish. In conclusion, our data suggests that estrogen effects on early embryonic zebrafish development are stage- and tissue- specific.

  8. An Assessment of Potential Exposure and Risk from Estrogens in Drinking Water

    OpenAIRE

    Caldwell, Daniel J.; Mastrocco, Frank; Nowak, Edward; Johnston, James; Yekel, Harry; Pfeiffer, Danielle; Hoyt, Marilyn; DuPlessie, Beth M.; Anderson, Paul D.

    2009-01-01

    Background Detection of estrogens in the environment has raised concerns in recent years because of their potential to affect both wildlife and humans. Objectives We compared exposures to prescribed and naturally occurring estrogens in drinking water to exposures to naturally occurring background levels of estrogens in the diet of children and adults and to four independently derived acceptable daily intakes (ADIs) to determine whether drinking water intakes are larger or smaller than dietary...

  9. Bisphenol A and estrogen induce proliferation of human thyroid tumor cells via an estrogen-receptor-dependent pathway.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, YongHong; Wei, Feng; Zhang, Jing; Hao, Lanxiang; Jiang, Jie; Dang, Liansheng; Mei, Dan; Fan, ShanShan; Yu, Yajin; Jiang, Ling

    2017-11-01

    To determine the relationship between papillary thyroid carcinoma and environmental exposure to bisphenol A (BPA) or 17-β estrogen (E2) by assessing the effects of these compounds on estrogen receptor expression and AKT/mTOR signaling. The effects of low levels of BPA (1mM-10nM) and 17β-estradiol (E2, 0.1mM-1nM) on ER expression and cellular proliferation were determined in human thyroid papillary cancer BHP10-3 cells. Protein and mRNA levels of estrogen nuclear receptors (ERα/ERβ) and membrane receptors (GPR30) were determined by immunofluorescence assay, Western blotting, and RT-PCR, respectively, and proliferation was assessed by CCK-8 assay. The proliferative effects of BPA and E2 were both concentration- and time-dependent. Expression of ERα/ERβ and GPR30 were enhanced by BPA and E2. BPA and E2 could quickly phosphorylate AKT/mTOR. Moreover, ICI suppressed ERα expression and activated GPR30 as did G-1. G-15 reversed the effects of E2 on GPR30 and AKT/mTOR, but did not alter the effect of BPA. BPA influences thyroid cancer proliferation by regulating expression of ERs and GPR30, a mechanism that differs from E2. In addition, ICI and G-15 may have the potential to be used as anti-thyroid cancer agents. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  10. Hispolon inhibits the growth of estrogen receptor positive human breast cancer cells through modulation of estrogen receptor alpha

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jang, Eun Hyang; Jang, Soon Young; Cho, In-Hye [Department of Pharmacy, Graduate School, Kyung Hee University, 26 Kyungheedae-ro, Dongdaemun-gu, Seoul 130-701 (Korea, Republic of); Hong, Darong [Department of Life and Nanopharmaceutical Science, Graduate School, Kyung Hee University, 26 Kyungheedae-ro, Dongdaemun-gu, Seoul 130-701 (Korea, Republic of); Jung, Bom; Park, Min-Ju [Department of Pharmacy, Graduate School, Kyung Hee University, 26 Kyungheedae-ro, Dongdaemun-gu, Seoul 130-701 (Korea, Republic of); Kim, Jong-Ho, E-mail: jonghokim@khu.ac.kr [Department of Pharmacy, Graduate School, Kyung Hee University, 26 Kyungheedae-ro, Dongdaemun-gu, Seoul 130-701 (Korea, Republic of)

    2015-08-07

    Human estrogen receptor α (ERα) is a nuclear transcription factor that is a major therapeutic target in breast cancer. The transcriptional activity of ERα is regulated by certain estrogen-receptor modulators. Hispolon, isolated from Phellinus linteus, a traditional medicinal mushroom called Sanghwang in Korea, has been used to treat various pathologies, such as inflammation, gastroenteric disorders, lymphatic diseases, and cancers. In this latter context, Hispolon has been reported to exhibit therapeutic efficacy against various cancer cells, including melanoma, leukemia, hepatocarcinoma, bladder cancer, and gastric cancer cells. However, ERα regulation by Hispolon has not been reported. In this study, we investigated the effects of Hispolon on the growth of breast cancer cells. We found that Hispolon decreased expression of ERα at both mRNA and the protein levels in MCF7 and T47D human breast cancer cells. Luciferase reporter assays showed that Hispolon decreased the transcriptional activity of ERα. Hispolon treatment also inhibited expression of the ERα target gene pS2. We propose that Hispolon, an anticancer drug extracted from natural sources, inhibits cell growth through modulation of ERα in estrogen-positive breast cancer cells and is a candidate for use in human breast cancer chemotherapy. - Highlights: • Hispolon decreased ERα expression at both mRNA and protein levels. • Hispolon decreased ERα transcriptional activity. • Hispolon treatment inhibited expression of ERα target gene pS2. • Shikonin is a candidate chemotherapeutic target in the treatment of human breast cancer.

  11. Cardioprotective Effect of Selective Estrogen Receptor Modulator Raloxifene Are Mediated by Heme Oxygenase in Estrogen-Deficient Rat

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anikó Posa

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Estrogens and raloxifene (RAL have beneficial effects on certain cardiovascular indices in postmenopausal women characterized by estrogen deficiency. Heme oxygenase (HO activity is increased by 17β-estradiol (E2 and RAL in estrogen-deficient rat resulting in vasorelaxation mediated by carbon monoxide. We determined the expressions of HO in cardiac and aortic tissues after ovariectomy (OVX and subsequent RAL or E2 treatment. We investigated the effects of pharmacological inhibition of HO enzyme on the arginine vasopressin- (AVP- induced blood pressure in vivo, the epinephrine- and phentolamine-induced electrocardiogram ST segment changes in vivo, and the myeloperoxidase (MPO enzyme activity. When compared with intact females, OVX decreased the HO-1 and HO-2 expression, aggravated the electrocardiogram signs of heart ischemia and the blood pressure response to AVP, and increased the cardiac MPO. E2 and RAL are largely protected against these negative impacts induced by OVX. The pharmacological inhibition of HO in E2- or RAL-treated OVX animals, however, restored the cardiovascular status close to that observed in nontreated OVX animals. The decreased expression of HO enzymes and the changes in blood pressure ischemia susceptibility and inflammatory state in OVX rat can be reverted by the administration of E2 or RAL partly through its antioxidant and anti-inflammatory roles.

  12. Free and conjugated estrogen exports in surface-runoff from poultry litter-amended soil.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dutta, Sudarshan; Inamdar, Shreeram; Tso, Jerry; Aga, Diana S; Sims, J Tom

    2010-01-01

    Land application of animal manures such as poultry litter is a common practice, especially in states with surplus manure. Past studies have shown that animal manure may contain estrogens, which are classified as endocrine-disrupting chemicals and may pose a threat to aquatic and wildlife species. We evaluated the concentrations of estrogens in surface runoff from experimental plots (5 x 12 m each) receiving raw and pelletized poultry litter. We evaluated the free (estrone, E1; 17beta-estradiol, E2beta; estriol, E3) and conjugate forms (glucuronides and sulfates) of estrogens, which differ in their toxicity. Sampling was performed for 10 natural storm events over a 4-mo period (April-July 2008). Estrogen concentrations were screened using enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA), followed by quantification using liquid chromatography with tandem mass spectrometry (LC/MS/MS). Concentrations of estrogens from ELISA were much higher than the LC/MS/MS values, indicating crossreactivity with organic compounds. Exports of estrogens were much lower from soils amended with pelletized poultry litter than the raw form of the litter. No-tillage management practice also resulted in a lower export of estrogens with surface runoff compared with reduced tillage. The concentrations and exports of conjugate forms of estrogens were much higher than the free forms for some treatments, indicating that the conjugate forms should be considered for a comprehensive assessment of the threat posed by estrogens.

  13. Long-term consequences of estrogens administered in midlife on female cognitive aging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Daniel, Jill M; Witty, Christine F; Rodgers, Shaefali P

    2015-08-01

    This article is part of a Special Issue "Estradiol and cognition". Many of the biochemical, structural, and functional changes that occur as the female brain ages are influenced by changes in levels of estrogens. Administration of estrogens begun during a critical window near menopause is hypothesized to prevent or delay age-associated cognitive decline. However, due to potential health risks women often limit use of estrogen therapy to a few years to treat menopausal symptoms. The long-term consequences for the brain of short-term use of estrogens are unknown. Interestingly, there are preliminary data to suggest that short-term use of estrogens during the menopausal transition may afford long-term cognitive benefits to women as they age. Thus, there is the intriguing possibility that short-term estrogen therapy may provide lasting benefits to the brain and cognition. The focus of the current review is an examination of the long-term impact for cognition of midlife use of estrogens. We review data from our lab and others indicating that the ability of midlife estrogens to impact estrogen receptors in the hippocampus may contribute to its ability to exert lasting impacts on cognition in aging females. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  14. Estrogen reduces endoplasmic reticulum stress to protect against glucotoxicity induced-pancreatic β-cell death.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kooptiwut, Suwattanee; Mahawong, Pitchnischa; Hanchang, Wanthanee; Semprasert, Namoiy; Kaewin, Suchada; Limjindaporn, Thawornchai; Yenchitsomanus, Pa-Thai

    2014-01-01

    Estrogen can improve glucose homeostasis not only in diabetic rodents but also in humans. However, the molecular mechanism by which estrogen prevents pancreatic β-cell death remains unclear. To investigate this issue, INS-1 cells, a rat insulinoma cell line, were cultured in medium with either 11.1mM or 40mM glucose in the presence or the absence of estrogen. Estrogen significantly reduced apoptotic β-cell death by decreasing nitrogen-induced oxidative stress and the expression of the ER stress markers GRP 78, ATF6, P-PERK, PERK, uXBP1, sXBP1, and CHOP in INS-1 cells after prolonged culture in medium with 40mM glucose. In contrast, estrogen increased the expression of survival proteins, including sarco/endoplasmic reticulum Ca(2+) ATPase (SERCA-2), Bcl-2, and P-p38, in INS-1 cells after prolonged culture in medium with 40mM glucose. The cytoprotective effect of estrogen was attenuated by addition of the estrogen receptor (ERα and ERβ) antagonist ICI 182,780 and the estrogen membrane receptor inhibitor G15. We showed that estrogen decreases not only oxidative stress but also ER stress to protect against 40mM glucose-induced pancreatic β-cell death. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  15. Estrogen and progesterone receptors in human breast cancer. Correlation with histologic subtype and degree of differentiation

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Mohammed, R H; Lakatua, D J; Haus, E; Yasmineh, W J

    1986-01-01

    Microscopic review of 490 consecutive human breast biopsy and mastectomy specimens were correlated with estrogen and progesterone receptor content of the tissue, by subtype and degree of differentiation...

  16. Uterine Micro-Environment and Estrogen-Dependent Regulation of Osteopontin Expression in Mouse Blastocyst

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Qing-Zhen Xie

    2013-07-01

    Full Text Available Embryo implantation is a highly synchronized bioprocess between an activated blastocyst and a receptive uterus. In mice, successful implantation relies on the dynamic interplay of estrogen and progesterone; however, the key mediators downstream of these hormones that act on blastocyst competency and endometrium receptivity acquisition are largely unknown. In this study, we showed that the expression of osteopontin (OPN in mouse blastocysts is regulated by ovarian estrogen and uterine micro-environment. OPN mRNA is up-regulated in mouse blastocyst on day 4 of pregnancy, which is associated with ovarian estrogen secretion peak. Hormone treatment in vivo demonstrated that OPN expression in a blastocyst is regulated by estrogen through an estrogen receptor (ER. Our results of the delayed and activated implantation model showed that OPN expression is induced after estrogen injection. While estrogen treatment during embryo culture in vitro showed less effect on OPN expression, the tubal ligation model on day 3 of pregnancy confirmed that the regulation of estrogen on OPN expression in blastocyst might, through some specific cytokines, have existed in a uterine micro-environment. Collectively, our study presents that estrogen regulates OPN expression and it may play an important role during embryo implantation by activating blastocyst competence and facilitating the endometrium acceptable for active blastocyst.

  17. Organization of Estrogen-Associated Circuits in the Mouse Primary Auditory Cortex

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Liisa A. Tremere

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Sex steroid hormones influence the perceptual processing of sensory signals in vertebrates. In particular, decades of research have shown that circulating levels of estrogen correlate with hearing function. The mechanisms and sites of action supporting this sensory-neuroendocrine modulation, however, remain unknown. Here we combined a molecular cloning strategy, fluorescence in-situ hybridization and unbiased quantification methods to show that estrogen-producing and -sensitive neurons heavily populate the adult mouse primary auditory cortex (AI. We also show that auditory experience in freely-behaving animals engages estrogen-producing and -sensitive neurons in AI. These estrogen-associated networks are greatly stable, and do not quantitatively change as a result of acute episodes of sensory experience. We further demonstrate the neurochemical identity of estrogen-producing and estrogen-sensitive neurons in AI and show that these cell populations are phenotypically distinct. Our findings provide the first direct demonstration that estrogen-associated circuits are highly prevalent and engaged by sensory experience in the mouse auditory cortex, and suggest that previous correlations between estrogen levels and hearing function may be related to brain-generated hormone production. Finally, our findings suggest that estrogenic modulation may be a central component of the operational framework of central auditory networks.

  18. Sources, mechanisms, and fate of steroid estrogens in wastewater treatment plants: a mini review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ting, Yien Fang; Praveena, Sarva Mangala

    2017-04-01

    Steroid estrogens, such as estrone (E1), 17β-estradiol (E2), estriol (E3), and 17α-ethinylestradiol (EE2), are natural and synthetic hormones released into the environment through incomplete sewage discharge. This review focuses on the sources of steroid estrogens in wastewater treatment plants (WWTPs). The mechanisms and fate of steroid estrogens throughout the entire wastewater treatment system are also discussed, and relevant information on regulatory aspects is given. Municipal, pharmaceutical industry, and hospitals are the main sources of steroid estrogens that enter WWTPs. A typical WWTP comprises primary, secondary, and tertiary treatment units. Sorption and biodegradation are the main mechanisms for removal of steroid estrogens from WWTPs. The fate of steroid estrogens in WWTPs depends on the types of wastewater treatment systems. Steroid estrogens in the primary treatment unit are removed by sorption onto primary sludge, followed by sorption onto micro-flocs and biodegradation by microbes in the secondary treatment unit. Tertiary treatment employs nitrification, chlorination, or UV disinfection to improve the quality of the secondary effluent. Activated sludge treatment systems for steroid estrogens exhibit a removal efficiency of up to 100%, which is higher than that of the trickling filter treatment system (up to 75%). Moreover, the removal efficiency of advance treatment systems exceeds 90%. Regulatory aspects related to steroid estrogens are established, especially in the European Union. Japan is the only Asian country that implements a screening program and is actively involved in endocrine disruptor testing and assessment. This review improves our understanding of steroid estrogens in WWTPs, proposes main areas to be improved, and provides current knowledge on steroid estrogens in WWTPs for sustainable development.

  19. Aerobic and Anaerobic Transformations in Estrogens and Nutrients in Swine Manure: Environmental Consequences

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ashok K. Singh

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available Pig manure is an excellent fertilizer and rich source of organic carbon and nitrogen compounds such organic nitrogen (O-N (95% of total nitrogen that is plant-unavailable-nitrogen (PUN and mineralized nitrogen (about 1% of total nitrogen such as ammonium (NH4+ and nitrate (NO3 that are plant-available-nitrogen (PAN. In addition, manure also contains two forms of estrogens: (i poorly estrogenic thus essentially nontoxic conjugated estrogens (cEs such as estrone (cE1, estradiol (cE2 and estriol (cE3; and (ii highly estrogenic and toxic free estrogens (fEs such as fE2, fE1 and fE3. This study showed that aerobic processing reduced concentrations of total carbon (TC, O-N, PAN and NH4+/NH3 ratio, transiently hydrolyzed cEs (cE2 > cE1 > cE3 into corresponding fEs, transiently increased estrogenic activity and potential toxicity, and rapidly degraded fEs (fE2, fE1 > fE3, thus reducing the estrogenic activity in manure. Unlike aerobic processing, anaerobic processing stabilized and increased PAN and NH4+/NH3 ratio, thus increasing the manure’s fertilizer value. However, anaerobic processing, relative to aerobic processing, poorly hydrolyzed cEs (reducing transient toxicity and increasing reserve toxicity potential and poorly degraded fEs (increasing toxicity in manure. Thus, aerobic and anaerobic environments have distinct effects on manures’ PAN and estrogenic activity, presenting an interesting dilemma: anaerobic incubation that increases manures’ PAN does not effectively degrade estrogens, while aerobic incubation that effectively degrades estrogens (after transiently increasing their estrogenic activity also decreases PAN, thus making manure less profitable. New techniques are need to fully use manure as organic fertilizer.

  20. A regional analysis of estrogen binding to hypothalamic cell nuclei in relation to masculinization and defeminization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nordeen, E J; Yahr, P

    1983-05-01

    Gonadal steroids masculinize and defeminize neuroendocrine development, including behavior. Defeminization makes males less sensitive than females to estrogen for showing female sexual behavior and cyclic gonadotropin secretion. Masculinization makes males more sensitive than females to estrogen for showing male sexual behavior. Thus masculinization and defeminization produce opposite effects on estrogen sensitivity. To study the relationship between estrogen sensitivity and estrogen binding, we studied sex differences in estrogen binding to hypothalamic cell nuclei on a regional and temporal basis. We measured the amount of estradiol (E2) bound to cell nuclei in the preoptic area (POA), mediobasal hypothalamus (MBH), corticomedial amygdala, and cortex of gonadectomized male and female rats 30 and 60 min after [3H]E2 was injected intravenously. In the MBH, males consistently bound less E2 than females did. In the POA, males bound less E2 than females after 60 min, but they bound more E2 than females after 30 min. Decreased estrogen binding in the MBH may underlie defeminized sexual behavior. Similarly, decreased estrogen binding in the POA at 60 min may be a correlate of defeminized gonadotropin secretion, whereas increased estrogen binding in the POA at 30 min may be a correlate of masculinized sexual behavior. To test the hypothesis that decreased estrogen binding in the MBH and POA are correlates of defeminization, we measured E2 binding at 60 min in female rats in which masculinization and defeminization were manipulated independently. Defeminization decreased E2 binding to cell nuclei in both the POA and MBH to the level seen in males at this time point. Masculinization had no effect at this time point. The data suggest that sex differences in E2 binding to hypothalamic cell nuclei correlate reliably with sex differences in estrogen sensitivity even though masculinization and defeminization produce opposing effects on these parameters.

  1. Intratumoral estrogen production and actions in luminal A type invasive lobular and ductal carcinomas.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Takagi, Mayu; Miki, Yasuhiro; Miyashita, Minoru; Hata, Shuko; Yoda, Tomomi; Hirakawa, Hisashi; Sagara, Yasuaki; Rai, Yoshiaki; Ohi, Yasuyo; Tamaki, Kentaro; Ishida, Takanori; Suzuki, Takashi; Ouchi, Noriaki; Sasano, Hironobu

    2016-02-01

    The great majority of invasive lobular carcinoma (ILC) is estrogen-dependent luminal A type carcinoma but the details of estrogen actions and its intratumoral metabolism have not been well studied compared to invasive ductal carcinoma (IDC). We first immunolocalized estrogen-related enzymes including estrogen sulfotransferase (EST), estrogen sulfatase (STS), 17β-hydroxysteroid dehydrogenase (HSD) 1/2, and aromatase. We then evaluated the tissue concentrations of estrogens in ILC and IDC and subsequently estrogen-responsive gene profiles in these tumors in order to explore the possible differences and/or similarity of intratumoral estrogen environment of these two breast cancer subtypes. The status of STS and 17βHSD1 was significantly lower in ILCs than IDCs (p = 0.022 and p < 0.0001), but that of EST and 17βHSD2 vice versa (p < 0.0001 and p = 0.0106). In ILCs, tissue concentrations of estrone and estradiol were lower than those in IDCs (p = 0.0709 and 0.069). In addition, the great majority of estrogen response genes tended to be lower in ILCs. Among those genes above, FOXP1 was significantly higher in ILCs than in IDCs (p = 0.002). FOXP1 expression was reported to be significantly higher in relapse-free IDC patients treated with tamoxifen. Therefore, tamoxifen may be considered an option of endocrine therapy for luminal A type ILC patients. This is the first study to demonstrate the detailed and comprehensive status of intratumoral production and metabolism of estrogens and the status of estrogen response genes in luminal A-like ILC with comparison to those in luminal A-like IDCs.

  2. DNA stabilization by the upregulation of estrogen signaling in BRCA gene mutation carriers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Suba Z

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available Zsuzsanna Suba Surgical and Molecular Tumor Pathology Centre, National Institute of Oncology, Budapest, Hungary Abstract: Currently available scientific evidence erroneously suggests that mutagenic weakness or loss of the BRCA1/2 genes may liberate the proliferative effects of estrogen signaling, which provokes DNA damage and genomic instability. Conversely, BRCA mutation seems to be an imbalanced defect, crudely inhibiting the upregulation of estrogen receptor expression and liganded transcriptional activity, whereas estrogen receptor-repressor functions become predominant. In BRCA-proficient cases, estrogen signaling orchestrates the activity of cell proliferation and differentiation with high safety, while upregulating the expression and DNA-stabilizing impact of BRCA genes. In turn, BRCA proteins promote estrogen signaling by proper estrogen synthesis via CYP19 gene regulation and by induction of the appropriate expression and transcriptional activity of estrogen receptors. In this exquisitely organized regulatory system, the dysfunction of each player may jeopardize genome stability and lead to severe chronic diseases, such as cancer development. Female organs, such as breast, endometrium, and ovary, exhibiting regular cyclic proliferative activity are particularly vulnerable in case of disturbances in either estrogen signaling or BRCA-mediated DNA repair. BRCA mutation carrier women may apparently be healthy or exhibit clinical signs of deficient estrogen signaling in spite of hyperestrogenism. Even women who enjoy sufficient compensatory DNA-defending activities are at risk of tumor development because many endogenous and environmental factors may jeopardize the mechanisms of extreme compensatory processes. Natural estrogens have numerous benefits in tumor prevention and therapy even in BRCA mutation carriers. There are no toxic effects even in sky-high doses and all physiologic cellular functions are strongly upregulated, while malignant

  3. Effects of Estrogens on Adipokines and Glucose Homeostasis in Female Aromatase Knockout Mice.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michelle L Van Sinderen

    Full Text Available The maintenance of glucose homeostasis within the body is crucial for constant and precise performance of energy balance and is sustained by a number of peripheral organs. Estrogens are known to play a role in the maintenance of glucose homeostasis. Aromatase knockout (ArKO mice are estrogen-deficient and display symptoms of dysregulated glucose metabolism. We aim to investigate the effects of estrogen ablation and exogenous estrogen administration on glucose homeostasis regulation. Six month-old female wildtype, ArKO, and 17β-estradiol (E2 treated ArKO mice were subjected to whole body tolerance tests, serum examination of estrogen, glucose and insulin, ex-vivo muscle glucose uptake, and insulin signaling pathway analyses. Female ArKO mice display increased body weight, gonadal (omental adiposity, hyperinsulinemia, and liver triglycerides, which were ameliorated upon estrogen treatment. Tolerance tests revealed that estrogen-deficient ArKO mice were pyruvate intolerant hence reflecting dysregulated hepatic gluconeogenesis. Analyses of skeletal muscle, liver, and adipose tissues supported a hepatic-based glucose dysregulation, with a down-regulation of Akt phosphorylation (a key insulin signaling pathway molecule in the ArKO liver, which was improved with E2 treatment. Concurrently, estrogen treatment lowered ArKO serum leptin and adiponectin levels and increased inflammatory adipokines such as tumour necrosis factor alpha (TNFα and interleukin 6 (IL6. Furthermore, estrogen deficiency resulted in the infiltration of CD45 macrophages into gonadal adipose tissues, which cannot be reversed by E2 treatment. This study describes the effects of estrogens on glucose homeostasis in female ArKO mice and highlights a primary phenotype of hepatic glucose dysregulation and a parallel estrogen modified adipokine profile.

  4. Effect of Estrogen and Progeterone on seed germination

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nirmala

    Full Text Available Early pregnancy detection in dairy cattle is an integral part of a successful animal husbandry practice. A simple seed germination technique (Punyakoti test comprises observation of differential seed germination response of wheat seeds to diluted fresh urine samples as reflected by significant inhibition of germination percentage in pregnant cow urine when compared to non pregnant cow urine. Hormone metabolites excreted through urine might affect the seed germination in pregnant cow urine. In the present study an attempt was made to test the effect of hormones (in their natural forms at different concentrations of estrogen (17-ß estradiol and progesterone on wheat and green gram germination. Stock solutions of estrogen and progesterone were prepared in alcohol (1mg/ml and serial dilutions made using distilled water to get the concentrations of T1=10, T2=1, T3=0.1 and T4=0.01 μg/ml respectively in treatment groups. About 15 seeds each of wheat and green gram were taken in sterile Petri dishes into which 15ml of each test preparation was poured. The treatments were compared with distilled water and alcohol controls. The study was conducted for a period of five days during which seed germination was observed after 48 hrs and shoot lengths were also measured by the end of study. The average seed germination and shoot length in treatment groups did not vary significantly (P>0.05 when compared with that of control groups. Thus from the present study, it can be concluded that estrogen and progesterone in their natural form will not affect seed germination and shoot length. [Veterinary World 2008; 1(8.000: 241-242

  5. Synergistic estrogenic effects of Fusarium and Alternaria mycotoxins in vitro.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vejdovszky, Katharina; Hahn, Kathrin; Braun, Dominik; Warth, Benedikt; Marko, Doris

    2017-03-01

    Mycotoxins are toxic secondary metabolites formed by various fungal species that are found as natural contaminants in food. This very heterogeneous group of compounds triggers multiple toxic mechanisms, including endocrine disruptive potential. Current risk assessment of mycotoxins, as for most chemical substances, is based on the effects of single compounds. However, concern on a potential enhancement of risks by interactions of single substances in naturally occurring mixtures has greatly increased recently. In this study, the combinatory effects of three mycoestrogens were investigated in detail. This includes the endocrine disruptors zearalenone (ZEN) and α-zearalenol (α-ZEL) produced by Fusarium fungi and alternariol (AOH), a cytotoxic and estrogenic mycotoxin formed by Alternaria species. For evaluation of effects, estrogen-dependent activation of alkaline phosphatase (AlP) and cell proliferation were tested in the adenocarcinoma cell line Ishikawa. The estrogenic potential varied among the single substances. Half maximum effect concentrations (EC50) for AlP activation were evaluated for α-ZEL, ZEN and AOH as 37 pM, 562 pM and 995 nM, respectively. All three mycotoxins were found to act as partial agonists. The majority of binary combinations, even at very low concentrations in the case of α-ZEL, showed strong synergism in the AlP assay. These potentiating phenomena of mycotoxin mixtures highlight the urgent need to incorporate combinatory effects into future risk assessment, especially when endocrine disruptors are involved. To the best of our knowledge, this study presents the first investigation on synergistic effects of mycoestrogens.

  6. Pharmacokinetics of a modified-release estrogen tablet.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bhamra, Rupinder; Kaercher, Uwe; Oleary, Christine M

    2010-01-01

    To determine steady-state plasma concentrations and the pharmacokinetic profile of the essential components of synthetic conjugated estrogens, B (SCE-B), particularly total estrone and delta8,9-dehydroestrone (DHE), after oral administration of a modified-released tablet. A randomized, multiple-dose, pharmacokinetic study of 28 healthy, postmenopausal women randomly assigned to receive two SCE-B 0.3-mg tablets or one 1.25-mg tablet daily for 14 days. Blood samples were obtained before and after dosing at designated times. Total (conjugated and free) and unconjugated estrogens, namely estrone, equilin, and delta8,9-DHE, were determined, and pharmacokinetic analysis was performed. Steady-state plasma levels of total estrone and total delta8,9-DHE measured on day 14 over a 24-hour period showed minor fluctuations and a similar time to maximum concentration (Tmax): mean Tmax of total estrone = 7.94 and 8.36 hours for 0.3-mg and 1.25-mg tablets, respectively; mean Tmax of total delta8,9-DHE = 7.08 and 8.36 hours for 0.3-mg and 1.25-mg tablets, respectively. Consistency in pharmacokinetic parameters was seen between the two doses of SCE-B. SCE-B 0.3-mg and SCE-B 1.25-mg tablets achieved consistent pharmacokinetic parameters and steady-state levels when administered to healthy postmenopausal women. Achieving smooth, predictable levels of component estrogens may result in more consistent relief of menopausal symptoms.

  7. Cigarette Smoke and Estrogen Signaling in Human Airway Smooth Muscle

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Venkatachalem Sathish

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available Aims: Cigarette smoke (CS in active smokers and second-hand smoke exposure exacerbate respiratory disorders such as asthma and chronic bronchitis. While women are known to experience a more asthmatic response to CS than emphysema in men, there is limited information on the mechanisms of CS-induced airway dysfunction. We hypothesize that CS interferes with a normal (protective bronchodilatory role of estrogens, thus worsening airway contractility. Methods: We tested effects of cigarette smoke extract (CSE on 17β-estradiol (E2 signaling in enzymatically-dissociated bronchial airway smooth muscle (ASM obtained from lung samples of non-smoking female patients undergoing thoracic surgery. Results: In fura-2 loaded ASM cells, CSE increased intracellular calcium ([Ca2+]i responses to 10µM histamine. Acute exposure to physiological concentrations of E2 decreased [Ca2+]i responses. However, in 24h exposed CSE cells, although expression of estrogen receptors was increased, the effect of E2 on [Ca2+]i was blunted. Acute E2 exposure also decreased store-operated Ca2+ entry and inhibited stromal interaction molecule 1 (STIM1 phosphorylation: effects blunted by CSE. Acute exposure to E2 increased cAMP, but less so in 24h CSE-exposed cells. 24h CSE exposure increased S-nitrosylation of ERα. Furthermore, 24h CSE-exposed bronchial rings showed increased bronchoconstrictor agonist responses that were not reduced as effectively by E2 compared to non-CSE controls. Conclusion: These data suggest that CS induces dysregulation of estrogen signaling in ASM, which could contribute to increased airway contractility in women exposed to CS.

  8. Unliganded estrogen receptor α stimulates bone sialoprotein gene expression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Takai, Hideki; Matsumura, Hiroyoshi; Matsui, Sari; Kim, Kyung Mi; Mezawa, Masaru; Nakayama, Yohei; Ogata, Yorimasa

    2014-04-10

    Estrogen is one of the steroid hormones essential for skeletal development. The estrogen receptor (ER) is a transcription factor and a member of the steroid receptor superfamily. There are two different forms of the ER, usually referred to as α and β, each encoded by a separate gene. Hormone-activated ERs form dimers, since the two forms are coexpressed in many cell types. Bone sialoprotein (BSP) is a tissue-specific acidic glycoprotein that is expressed by differentiated osteoblasts, odontoblasts and cementoblasts during the initial formation of mineralized tissue. To determine the molecular basis of the tissue-specific expression of BSP and its regulation by estrogen and the ER, we have analyzed the effects of β-estradiol and ERα on BSP gene transcription. ERα protein levels were increased after ERα overexpression in ROS17/2.8 cells. While BSP mRNA levels were increased by ERα overexpression, the endogenous and overexpressed BSP mRNA levels were not changed by β-estradiol (10(-8)M, 24 h). Luciferase activities of different sized BSP promoter constructs (pLUC3~6) were increased by ERα overexpression, whereas basal and induced luciferase activities by ERα overexpression were not influenced by β-estradiol. Effects of ERα overexpression were abrogated by 2 bp mutations in either the cAMP response element (CRE) or activator protein 1 (AP1)/glucocorticoid response element (GRE). Gel shift analyses showed that ERα overexpression increased binding to the CRE and AP1/GRE elements. Notably, the CRE-protein complexes were disrupted by ERα, CREB and phospho-CREB antibodies. The AP1/GRE-protein complexes were supershifted by the c-Fos antibody. These studies demonstrate that ERα stimulates BSP gene transcription in a ligand-independent manner by targeting the CRE and AP1/GRE elements in the rat BSP gene promoter. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  9. Interaction of 14-3-3 proteins with the Estrogen Receptor Alpha F domain provides a drug target interface

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    De Vries-van Leeuwen, Ingrid J; da Costa Pereira, Daniel; Flach, Koen D; Piersma, Sander R; Haase, Christian; Bier, David; Yalcin, Zeliha; Michalides, Rob; Feenstra, K Anton; Jiménez, Connie R; de Greef, Tom F A; Brunsveld, Luc; Ottmann, Christian; Zwart, Wilbert; de Boer, Albertus H

    2013-01-01

    Estrogen receptor alpha (ERα) is involved in numerous physiological and pathological processes, including breast cancer. Breast cancer therapy is therefore currently directed at inhibiting the transcriptional potency of ERα, either by blocking estrogen production through aromatase inhibitors or

  10. The estrogenic content of rodent diets, bedding, cages, and water bottles and its effect on bisphenol A studies

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Thigpen, Julius E; Setchell, Kenneth D R; Kissling, Grace E; Locklear, Jacqueline; Caviness, Gordon F; Whiteside, Tanya; Belcher, Scott M; Brown, Nadine M; Collins, Bradley J; Lih, Fred B; Tomer, Kenneth B; Padilla-Banks, Elizabeth; Camacho, Luísa; Adsit, Floyd G; Grant, Mary

    2013-01-01

    .... The objectives of the current study were to (1) compare the estrogenic content of rodent diets, bedding, cages, and water bottles to evaluate their impact on the estrogenic activity of BPA and (2...

  11. Estrogenic receptors a and p gene polymorphisms in postmenopausal osteoporosis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    K A Maslova

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available Objective. To assess frequency distribution of estrogenic receptor (ERa and ERfl gene polymorphisms and their influence on bone mineral density (BMD in groups of postmenopausal women with and without osteoporosis (OP. Material and methods. 200 residents of Moscow and Moscow region were divided into two groups considering BMD values according to WHO criteria; OP group and healthy control group Results. Differences of genotype and their combinations frequency distribution between OP and control groups show presence OP risk and protector genotypes. ER gene important role in pathogenesis of postmenopausal osteoporosis and possibility to use these genetic markers for assessment of risk of OP development in Russian population was confirmed.

  12. Ligands specify estrogen receptor alpha nuclear localization and degradation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Caze-Subra Stéphanie

    2010-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The estrogen receptor alpha (ERα is found predominately in the nucleus, both in hormone stimulated and untreated cells. Intracellular distribution of the ERα changes in the presence of agonists but the impact of different antiestrogens on the fate of ERα is a matter of debate. Results A MCF-7 cell line stably expressing GFP-tagged human ERα (SK19 cell line was created to examine the localization of ligand-bound GFP-ERα. We combined digitonin-based cell fractionation analyses with fluorescence and immuno-electron microscopy to determine the intracellular distribution of ligand-bound ERα and/or GFP-ERα. Using fluorescence- and electron microscopy we demonstrate that both endogenous ERα and GFP-ERα form numerous nuclear focal accumulations upon addition of agonist, 17β-estradiol (E2, and pure antagonists (selective estrogen regulator disruptor; SERD, ICI 182,780 or RU58,668, while in the presence of partial antagonists (selective estrogen regulator modulator; SERM, 4-hydroxytamoxifen (OHT or RU39,411, diffuse nuclear staining persisted. Digitonin based cell fractionation analyses confirmed that endogenous ERα and GFP-ERα predominantly reside in the nuclear fraction. Overall ERα protein levels were reduced after estradiol treatment. In the presence of SERMs ERα was stabilized in the nuclear soluble fraction, while in the presence of SERDs protein levels decreased drastically and the remaining ERα was largely found in a nuclear insoluble fraction. mRNA levels of ESR1 were reduced compared to untreated cells in the presence of all ligands tested, including E2. E2 and SERDs induced ERα degradation occurred in distinct nuclear foci composed of ERα and the proteasome providing a simple explanation for ERα sequestration in the nucleus. Conclusions Our results indicate that chemical structure of ligands directly affect the nuclear fate and protein turnover of the estrogen receptor alpha independently of their impact on

  13. How to target estrogen receptor-negative breast cancer?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rochefort, H; Glondu, M; Sahla, M E; Platet, N; Garcia, M

    2003-06-01

    Estrogen receptor (ER)-positive breast cancers generally have a better prognosis and are often responsive to anti-estrogen therapy, which is the first example of a successful therapy targeted on a specific protein, the ER. Unfortunately ER-negative breast cancers are more aggressive and unresponsive to anti-estrogens. Other targeted therapies are thus urgently needed, based on breast cancer oncogene inhibition or suppressor gene activation as far as molecular studies have demonstrated the alteration of expression, or structure of these genes in human breast cancer. Using the MDA-MB.231 human breast cancer cell line as a model of ER-negative breast cancers, we are investigating two of these approaches in our laboratory. Our first approach was to transfect the ER or various ER-deleted variants into an ER-negative cell line in an attempt to recover anti-estrogen responsiveness. The unliganded receptor, and surprisingly estradiol, were both found to inhibit tumor growth and invasiveness in vitro and in vivo. The mechanisms of these inhibitions in ER-negative cancer cells are being studied, in an attempt to target the ER sequence responsible for such inhibition in these cancer cells. Another strategy is trying to inhibit the activity or expression of an oncogene specifically overexpressed in most breast cancers. This approach was recently shown by others to be efficient in breast cancer therapy with HER2-Neu oncogene amplification using Herceptin. Without excluding other molecular putative targets, we have focused our research on cathepsin D as a potential target, since it is often overexpressed in aggressive human breast cancers, including ER-negative tumors, and rarely associated with HER2-Neu amplification. Our first results obtained in vitro on cell lines and in vivo in tumor xenografts in nude mice, illustrate that the mode of action of cathepsin D in breast cancer is useful to guide the development of these therapies. In the past 20 years we have learned that the

  14. Supramolecular recognition of estrogens via molecularly imprinted polymers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ričanyová, Júlia; Gadzała-Kopciuch, Renata; Szumski, Michał

    2010-01-01

    The isolation and preconcentration of estrogens from new types of biological samples (acellular and protein-free simulated body fluid) by molecularly imprinted solid-phase extraction has been described. In this technique, supramolecular receptors, namely molecularly imprinted polymers (MIPs) are used as a sorbent material. The recognition sites of MIPs were prepared by non-covalent multiple interactions and formed with the target 17β-estradiol as a template molecule. High-performance liquid chromatography with spectroscopic UV, selective, and a sensitive electrochemical CoulArray detector was used for the determination of 17β-estradiol, estrone, and estriol in simulated body fluid which mimicked human plasma. PMID:20549493

  15. Guppy sexual behavior as an effect biomarker of estrogen mimics

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bayley, M; Nielsen, J R; Baatrup, E

    1999-01-01

    strongly on the ability to perform the appropriate sexual behavior. The sexual display of the male guppy is strongly linked to reproductive success and is readily quantified under laboratory conditions. This preliminary study demonstrates that exposure of adult male guppies to water weakly contaminated...... with either natural estrogen (17beta-estradiol) or the xenoestrogen (4-tert-octylphenol) causes a dramatic decrease in the rate and intensity of sexual display. It is concluded that quantitative analysis of the sexual display of male guppies holds great promise as a biomarker at the organismal level...

  16. Ligands specify estrogen receptor alpha nuclear localization and degradation

    OpenAIRE

    Caze-Subra Stéphanie; Mazaheri Mahta; Kocanova Silvia; Bystricky Kerstin

    2010-01-01

    Abstract Background The estrogen receptor alpha (ERα) is found predominately in the nucleus, both in hormone stimulated and untreated cells. Intracellular distribution of the ERα changes in the presence of agonists but the impact of different antiestrogens on the fate of ERα is a matter of debate. Results A MCF-7 cell line stably expressing GFP-tagged human ERα (SK19 cell line) was created to examine the localization of ligand-bound GFP-ERα. We combined digitonin-based cell fractionation anal...

  17. Are estrogen-related drugs new alternatives for the management of osteoarthritis?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xiao, Ya-Ping; Tian, Fa-Ming; Dai, Mu-Wei; Wang, Wen-Ya; Shao, Li-Tao; Zhang, Liu

    2016-06-28

    Osteoarthritis (OA) is a chronic degenerative disease involving multiple physiopathological mechanisms. The increased prevalence of OA after menopause and the presence of estrogen receptors in joint tissues suggest that estrogen could help prevent development of OA. This review summarizes OA research with a focus on the effects of estrogen and selective estrogen receptor modulators (SERMs). Preclinical studies and clinical trials of estrogen therapy have reported inconsistent results. However, almost all studies assessing SERM treatment have obtained more consistent and favorable effects in OA with a relatively safety and tolerability profiles. At present, some SERMs including raloxifene and bazedoxifene have been approved for the treatment of osteoporosis. In summary, estrogen-related agents may exert both a direct effect on subchondral bone and direct and/or indirect effects upon the surrounding tissues, including the articular cartilage, synovium, and muscle, to name a few. Estrogen and SERMs may be particularly favorable for postmenopausal patients with early-stage OA or osteoporotic OA, a phenotype defined by reduced bone mineral density related to high remodeling in subchondral bone. At present, no single drug exists that can prevent OA progression. Although estrogen-related drugs provide insight into the continued work in the field of OA drug administration, further research is required before SERMs can become therapeutic alternatives for OA treatment.

  18. Fertility of tall girls treated with high-dose estrogen, a dose-response relationship

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    A.E.J. Hendriks (Emile); S.L.S. Drop (Stenvert); J.S.E. Laven (Joop); A.M. Boot (Annemieke)

    2012-01-01

    textabstractContext: High-dose estrogen treatment to reduce final height of tall girls increases their risk for infertility in later life. Objective: The aim was to study the effect of estrogen dose on fertility outcome of these women. Design/Setting: We conducted a retrospective cohort study of

  19. Association between estrogen levels and temporomandibular disorders: a systematic literature review

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berger, Marcin; Szalewski, Leszek; Bakalczuk, Magdalena; Bakalczuk, Szymon; Szkutnik, Jacek

    2015-01-01

    Introduction To evaluate whether the hypothesis that estrogen levels are associated with temporomandibular disorders (TMD) in humans can be confirmed or contradicted by available literature. Material and methods A systematic review based on the content of PubMed, Scopus, and Cochrane Library databases was performed. Studies were identified using a combination of key words ‘temporomandibular disorder’ and ‘estrogen’. Nine studies were included into our review. Results The relationship between estrogen levels and TMD was found in seven out of nine reviewed papers. Results from two papers suggest that a high estrogen level is associated with an increased prevalence of TMD. Five additional papers found a relationship between a low estrogen level and an increase in TMD pain. In considering the value of evidence and inconsistencies of results in the reviewed publications, we state that there is weak evidence to support the hypothesis that estrogen levels are associated with TMD. Conclusions Results of reviewed studies were divergent and sometimes contradictory. One possible explanation is that estrogen influences TMD pain processing differently than temporomandibular joints (TMJ) structures, as shown in many animal studies. Estrogen may influence TMD pain processing differently than TMJ structures. We suggest consideration of the dual action of estrogen when planning future studies on its association with TMD. PMID:26848299

  20. Phytoestrogens and Mycoestrogens Induce Signature Structure Dynamics Changes on Estrogen Receptor α

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xueyan Chen

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available Endocrine disrupters include a broad spectrum of chemicals such as industrial chemicals, natural estrogens and androgens, synthetic estrogens and androgens. Phytoestrogens are widely present in diet and food supplements; mycoestrogens are frequently found in grains. As human beings and animals are commonly exposed to phytoestrogens and mycoestrogens in diet and environment, it is important to understand the potential beneficial or hazardous effects of estrogenic compounds. Many bioassays have been established to study the binding of estrogenic compounds with estrogen receptor (ER and provided rich data in the literature. However, limited assays can offer structure information with regard to the ligand/ER complex. Our current study surveys the global structure dynamics changes for ERα ligand binding domain (LBD when phytoestrogens and mycoestrogens bind. The assay is based on the structure dynamics information probed by hydrogen deuterium exchange mass spectrometry and offers a unique viewpoint to elucidate the mechanism how phytoestrogens and mycoestrogens interact with estrogen receptor. The cluster analysis based on the hydrogen deuterium exchange (HDX assay data reveals a unique pattern when phytoestrogens and mycoestrogens bind with ERα LBD compared to that of estradiol and synthetic estrogen modulators. Our study highlights that structure dynamics could play an important role in the structure function relationship when endocrine disrupters interact with estrogen receptors.

  1. Short-term tests of estrogenic potential of plant stanols and plant stanol esters

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Turnbull, D.; Frankos, V.H.; Leeman, W.R.; Jonker, D.

    1999-01-01

    To test for potential estrogenic activity of plant stanols and plant stanol esters, two short-term tests were performed. These were the E-screen test, which measures a substance's ability to induce proliferation of estrogen-responsive human breast adenocarcinoma (MCF-7) cells in culture, and an in

  2. Identification and Biological Evaluation of Coactivator Binding Inhibitors for the Estrogen Receptor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gunther, Jillian Rebecca

    2009-01-01

    The physiologic effects of estrogen action through the estrogen receptor (ER) are widespread, as this hormone exerts actions in both reproductive (e.g., uterus) and non-reproductive (e.g., bone, brain) tissues in both men and women. As such, the regulation of the activity of this ligand-activated transcription factor is highly relevant to the…

  3. Estrogen and progesterone receptors in human breast cancer. Correlation with histologic subtype and degree of differentiation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mohammed, R H; Lakatua, D J; Haus, E; Yasmineh, W J

    1986-09-01

    Microscopic review of 490 consecutive human breast biopsy and mastectomy specimens were correlated with estrogen and progesterone receptor content of the tissue, by subtype and degree of differentiation. Of the 4 grades of differentiation, the less differentiated Grade III and IV tumors showed significantly lower levels of estrogen and progesterone receptors in infiltrating ductal and lobular carcinoma (P less than 0.001). In contrast, patients with medullary carcinoma had the lowest tissue levels of estrogen and progesterone receptors with approximately 80% of the cases with less than 10 fmol/mg protein. Patients with mucinous carcinoma had the highest percentages of positive estrogen and progesterone receptor levels (75% and 87%, respectively). Sixty-three percent of the patients with Grade IV infiltrating ductal carcinoma were younger than 53 years of age (P less than 0.001). Patients younger than 53 years of age with Grade II and III infiltrating ductal carcinoma also had significantly lower levels of estrogen receptors, but not of progesterone receptors, than those patients older than 53 years of age (P less than 0.001). Nineteen of 20 "normal" breast tissue specimens were negative (less than 3 fmol/mg protein) for estrogen and progesterone receptors. About 50% of 17 tissue specimens from benign breast lesions (fibroadenoma, fibrocystic disease, sclerosing adenosis) showed positive estrogen (greater than 10 fmol/mg protein) or progesterone receptor values. In two patients with gynecomastia, no estrogen or progesterone receptors were detectable.

  4. Estrogens stimulate serotonin neurons to inhibit binge-like eating in mice

    Science.gov (United States)

    Binge eating afflicts approximately 5% of US adults, though effective treatments are limited. Here, we showed that estrogen replacement substantially suppresses binge-like eating behavior in ovariectomized female mice. Estrogen-dependent inhibition of binge-like eating was blocked in female mice spe...

  5. Influence of Sex and Estrogen on Musculotendinous Protein Turnover at Rest and After Exercise

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, Mette; Kjær, Michael

    2014-01-01

    Women differ from men with regard to muscle and tendon, most likely because of sex differences in estrogen. The present experimental findings suggest the hypothesis that estrogen has an anabolic effect on muscle primarily by lowering the protein turnover and enhancing sensitivity to resistance tr...

  6. BMPR2 expression is suppressed by signaling through the estrogen receptor

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Austin Eric D

    2012-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Studies in multiple organ systems have shown cross-talk between signaling through the bone morphogenetic protein receptor type 2 (BMPR2 and estrogen pathways. In humans, pulmonary arterial hypertension (PAH has a female predominance, and is associated with decreased BMPR2 expression. The goal of this study was to determine if estrogens suppress BMPR2 expression. Methods A variety of techniques were utilized across several model platforms to evaluate the relationship between estrogens and BMPR2 gene expression. We used quantitative RT-PCR, gel mobility shift, and luciferase activity assays in human samples, live mice, and cell culture. Results BMPR2 expression is reduced in lymphocytes from female patients compared with male patients, and in whole lungs from female mice compared with male mice. There is an evolutionarily conserved estrogen receptor binding site in the BMPR2 promoter, which binds estrogen receptor by gel-shift assay. Increased exogenous estrogen decreases BMPR2 expression in cell culture, particularly when induced to proliferate. Transfection of increasing quantities of estrogen receptor alpha correlates strongly with decreasing expression of BMPR2. Conclusions BMPR2 gene expression is reduced in females compared to males in live humans and in mice, likely through direct estrogen receptor alpha binding to the BMPR2 promoter. This reduced BMPR2 expression may contribute to the increased prevalence of PAH in females.

  7. A parameter for detecting estrogenic exposure in the copepod Acartia tonsa

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andersen, Henrik Rasmus; Halling-Sørensen, Bent; Kusk, Kresten Ole

    1999-01-01

    in a steeper maturation profile. The proposed endpoint was identified by exposing copepods to the natural estrogen 17 beta-estradiol and the antropogenic estrogen bisphenol A. Both compounds produced significant effects at 23 and 20 mu g/L respectively. Since bisphenol A is traditionally believed to be less...

  8. Modulatory effect of raloxifene and estrogen on the metabolic action of growth hormone in hypopituitary women.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Birzniece, Vita

    2010-05-01

    The metabolic action of GH is attenuated by estrogens administered via the oral route. Selective estrogen receptor modulators lower IGF-I to a lesser degree than 17beta-estradiol in GH-deficient women, and their effect on fat and protein metabolism is unknown.

  9. Estrogen and phenol red free medium for osteoblast culture: study of the mineralization ability.

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Faria, A N; Zancanela, D C; Ramos, A P; Torqueti, M R; Ciancaglini, P

    2016-08-01

    To design an estrogen and phenol red free medium for cell culture and check its effectiveness and safety on osteoblast growth it is necessary to maintain the estrogen receptors free for tests. For this purpose, we tested some modifications of the traditional culture media: estrogen depleted fetal bovine serum; estrogen charcoal stripped fetal bovine serum and phenol red free α-MEM. The aim of this work is to examine the effects of its depletion in the proliferation, differentiation, and toxicity of mesenchymal stromal cells differentiated into osteoblasts to obtain an effective interference free culture medium for in vitro studies, focused on non-previously studied estrogen receptors. We performed viability tests using the following techniques: MTT, alkaline phosphatase specific activity, formation of mineralized matrix by Alizarin technique and analysis of SEM/EDX of mineralized nodules. The results showed that the culture media with estrogen free α-MEM + phenol red free α-MEM did not impact viability, alkaline phosphatase activity and mineralization of the osteoblasts culture compared to control. In addition, its nodules possess Ca/P ratio similar to hydroxyapatite nodules on the 14th and 21st day. In conclusion, the modified culture medium with phenol red free α-MEM with estrogen depleted fetal bovine serum can be safely used in experiments where the estrogen receptors need to be free.

  10. The Influence of Estrogens on the Biological and Therapeutic Actions of Growth Hormone in the Liver

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Leandro Fernández-Pérez

    2012-07-01

    Full Text Available GH is main regulator of body growth and composition, somatic development, intermediate metabolism and gender-dependent dimorphism in mammals. The liver is a direct target of estrogens because it expresses estrogen receptors which are connected with development, lipid metabolism and insulin sensitivity, hepatic carcinogenesis, protection from drug-induced toxicity and fertility. In addition, estrogens can modulate GH actions in liver by acting centrally, regulating pituitary GH secretion, and, peripherally, by modulating GHR-JAK2-STAT5 signalling pathway. Therefore, the interactions of estrogens with GH actions in liver are biologically and clinically relevant because disruption of GH signaling may cause alterations of its endocrine, metabolic, and gender differentiated functions and it could be linked to dramatic impact in liver physiology during development as well as in adulthood. Finally, the interplay of estrogens with GH is relevant because physiological roles these hormones have in human, and the widespread exposition of estrogen or estrogen-related compounds in human. This review highlights the importance of these hormones in liver physiology as well as how estrogens modulate GH actions in liver which will help to improve the clinical use of these hormones.

  11. Fertility of Tall Girls Treated with High-Dose Estrogen, a Dose-Response Relationship

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hendriks, A. E. J.; Drop, S. L. S.; Laven, J. S. E.; Boot, A. M.

    Context: High-dose estrogen treatment to reduce final height of tall girls increases their risk for infertility in later life. Objective: The aim was to study the effect of estrogen dose on fertility outcome of these women. Design/Setting: We conducted a retrospective cohort study of university

  12. Estrogenic plant extracts reverse weight gain and fat accumulation without causing mammary gland or uterine proliferation.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Elise F Saunier

    Full Text Available Long-term estrogen deficiency increases the risk of obesity, diabetes and metabolic syndrome in postmenopausal women. Menopausal hormone therapy containing estrogens might prevent these conditions, but its prolonged use increases the risk of breast cancer, as wells as endometrial cancer if used without progestins. Animal studies indicate that beneficial effects of estrogens in adipose tissue and adverse effects on mammary gland and uterus are mediated by estrogen receptor alpha (ERα. One strategy to improve the safety of estrogens to prevent/treat obesity, diabetes and metabolic syndrome is to develop estrogens that act as agonists in adipose tissue, but not in mammary gland and uterus. We considered plant extracts, which have been the source of many pharmaceuticals, as a source of tissue selective estrogens. Extracts from two plants, Glycyrrhiza uralensis (RG and Pueraria montana var. lobata (RP bound to ERα, activated ERα responsive reporters, and reversed weight gain and fat accumulation comparable to estradiol in ovariectomized obese mice maintained on a high fat diet. Unlike estradiol, RG and RP did not induce proliferative effects on mammary gland and uterus. Gene expression profiling demonstrated that RG and RP induced estradiol-like regulation of genes in abdominal fat, but not in mammary gland and uterus. The compounds in extracts from RG and RP might constitute a new class of tissue selective estrogens to reverse weight gain, fat accumulation and metabolic syndrome in postmenopausal women.

  13. Estrogenic plant extracts reverse weight gain and fat accumulation without causing mammary gland or uterine proliferation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saunier, Elise F; Vivar, Omar I; Rubenstein, Andrea; Zhao, Xiaoyue; Olshansky, Moshe; Baggett, Scott; Staub, Richard E; Tagliaferri, Mary; Cohen, Isaac; Speed, Terence P; Baxter, John D; Leitman, Dale C

    2011-01-01

    Long-term estrogen deficiency increases the risk of obesity, diabetes and metabolic syndrome in postmenopausal women. Menopausal hormone therapy containing estrogens might prevent these conditions, but its prolonged use increases the risk of breast cancer, as wells as endometrial cancer if used without progestins. Animal studies indicate that beneficial effects of estrogens in adipose tissue and adverse effects on mammary gland and uterus are mediated by estrogen receptor alpha (ERα). One strategy to improve the safety of estrogens to prevent/treat obesity, diabetes and metabolic syndrome is to develop estrogens that act as agonists in adipose tissue, but not in mammary gland and uterus. We considered plant extracts, which have been the source of many pharmaceuticals, as a source of tissue selective estrogens. Extracts from two plants, Glycyrrhiza uralensis (RG) and Pueraria montana var. lobata (RP) bound to ERα, activated ERα responsive reporters, and reversed weight gain and fat accumulation comparable to estradiol in ovariectomized obese mice maintained on a high fat diet. Unlike estradiol, RG and RP did not induce proliferative effects on mammary gland and uterus. Gene expression profiling demonstrated that RG and RP induced estradiol-like regulation of genes in abdominal fat, but not in mammary gland and uterus. The compounds in extracts from RG and RP might constitute a new class of tissue selective estrogens to reverse weight gain, fat accumulation and metabolic syndrome in postmenopausal women.

  14. Estrogen receptor-alpha-immunoreactive neurons in the periaqueductal gray of the adult ovariectomized female cat

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    VanderHorst, Veronique G.J.M.; Meijer, Ellie; Schasfoort, Fabienne C.; Leeuwen, Fred van; Holstege, Gert

    1998-01-01

    Anatomical and physiological studies in rodent and cat have shown that distinct parts of the midbrain periaqueductal gray (FAG) are important for the estrogen dependent, female reproductive behavior. The present study gives a detailed overview of the estrogen receptor-alpha-immunoreactive (ER-IR)

  15. Ethanolic extract of dandelion (Taraxacum mongolicum) induces estrogenic activity in MCF-7 cells and immature rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oh, Seung Min; Kim, Ha Ryong; Park, Yong Joo; Lee, Yong Hwa; Chung, Kyu Hyuck

    2015-11-01

    Plants of the genus Taraxacum, commonly known as dandelions, are used to treat breast cancer in traditional folk medicine. However, their use has mainly been based on empirical findings without sufficient scientific evidence. Therefore, we hypothesized that dandelions would behave as a Selective estrogen receptor modulator (SERM) and be effective as hormone replacement therapy (HRT) in the postmenopausal women. In the present study, in vitro assay systems, including cell proliferation assay, reporter gene assay, and RT-PCR to evaluate the mRNA expression of estrogen-related genes (pS2 and progesterone receptor, PR), were performed in human breast cancer cells. Dandelion ethanol extract (DEE) significantly increased cell proliferation and estrogen response element (ERE)-driven luciferase activity. DEE significantly induced the expression of estrogen related genes such as pS2 and PR, which was inhibited by tamoxifen at 1 μmol·L(-1). These results indicated that DEE could induce estrogenic activities mediated by a classical estrogen receptor pathway. In addition, immature rat uterotrophic assay was carried out to identify estrogenic activity of DEE in vivo. The lowest concentration of DEE slightly increased the uterine wet weight, but there was no significant effect with the highest concentration of DEE. The results demonstrate the potential estrogenic activities of DEE, providing scientific evidence supporting their use in traditional medicine. Copyright © 2015 China Pharmaceutical University. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  16. Roles of estrogen receptors alpha and beta in differentiation of mouse sexual behavior.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kudwa, A E; Michopoulos, V; Gatewood, J D; Rissman, E F

    2006-01-01

    Sex differences in brain and behavior are ubiquitous in sexually reproducing species. Developmental differences in circulating concentrations of gonadal steroids underlie many sexual dimorphisms. During the late embryonic and early perinatal periods, the testes produce androgens, thus, male brains are exposed to testosterone, and in situ testosterone is aromatized to estradiol. In contrast, females are not exposed to high concentrations of testosterone or estradiol until puberty. In many species, neural sex differences and sexually dimorphic behaviors in adults are initiated primarily by estradiol exposure during early development. In brain, estradiol activates two independent processes: masculinization of neural circuits and networks that are essential for expression of male-typical adult behaviors, and defeminization, the loss of the ability to display adult female-typical behaviors. Here, data for the roles of each of the known estrogen receptors (estrogen receptor alpha and estrogen receptor beta) in these two processes are reviewed. Based on work done primarily in knockout mouse models, separate roles for the two estrogen receptors are suggested. Estrogen receptor alpha is primarily involved in masculinization, while estrogen receptor beta has a major role in defeminization of sexual behaviors. In sum, estradiol can have selective effects on distinct behavioral processes via selective interactions with its two receptors, estrogen receptor alpha and estrogen receptor beta.

  17. Comprehensive assessment of hormones, phytoestrogens, and estrogenic activity in an anaerobic swine waste lagoon

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yost, Erin E.; Meyer, Michael T.; Dietze, Julie E.; Meissner, Benjamin M.; Williams, Mike; Worley-Davis, Lynn; Lee, Boknam; Kullman, Seth W.

    2013-01-01

    In this study, the distribution of steroid hormones, phytoestrogens, and estrogenic activity was thoroughly characterized within the anaerobic waste lagoon of a typical commercial swine sow operation. Three independent rounds of sampling were conducted in June 2009, April 2010, and February 2011. Thirty-seven analytes in lagoon slurry and sludge were assessed using LC/MS-MS, and yeast estrogen screen was used to determine estrogenic activity. Of the hormone analytes, steroidal estrogens were more abundant than androgens or progesterone, with estrone being the predominant estrogen species. Conjugated hormones were detected only at low levels. The isoflavone metabolite equol was by far the predominant phytoestrogen species, with daidzein, genistein, formononetin, and coumestrol present at lower levels. Phytoestrogens were often more abundant than steroidal estrogens, but contributed minimally towards total estrogenic activity. Analytes were significantly elevated in the solid phases of the lagoon; although low observed log KOC values suggest enhanced solubility in the aqueous phase, perhaps due to dissolved or colloidal organic carbon. The association with the solid phase, as well as recalcitrance of analytes to anaerobic degradation, results in a markedly elevated load of analytes and estrogenic activity within lagoon sludge. Overall, findings emphasize the importance of adsorption and transformation processes in governing the fate of these compounds in lagoon waste, which is ultimately used for broadcast application as a fertilizer.

  18. Integration of Nuclear- and Extranuclear-Initiated Estrogen Receptor Signaling in Breast Cancer Cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Madak Erdogan, Zeynep

    2009-01-01

    Estrogenic hormones exert their effects through binding to Estrogen Receptors (ERs), which work in concert with coregulators and extranuclear signaling pathways to control gene expression in normal as well as cancerous states, including breast tumors. In this thesis, we have used multiple genome-wide analysis tools to elucidate various ways that…

  19. Estrogen directly attenuates human osteoclastogenesis, but has no effect on resorption by mature osteoclasts

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sørensen, M G; Henriksen, K; Dziegiel, Morten Hanefeld

    2006-01-01

    not affect bone resorption or TRACP activity. We investigated expression of the estrogen receptors, using immunocytochemistry and Western blotting. We found that ER-alpha is expressed in osteoclast precursors, whereas ER- beta is expressed at all stages, indicating that the inhibitory effect of estrogen...

  20. Estrogen modulates inhibitory control in healthy human females: evidence from the stop-signal paradigm

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Colzato, L.S.; Hertsig, G.; van den Wildenberg, W.P.M.; Hommel, B.

    2010-01-01

    Animal studies point to a role of estrogen in explaining gender differences in striatal dopaminergic functioning, but evidence from human studies is still lacking. Given that dopamine is crucial for controlling and organizing goal-directed behavior, estrogen may have a specific impact on cognitive

  1. YEAST ESTROGEN SCREEN FOR EXAMINING THE RELATIVE EXPOSURE OF CELLS TO NATURAL AND XENOESTROGENS

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xenoestrogens, such as o,p'-DDT and octyl phenol (OP) have been associated with reproductive abnormalities in various wildlife species. Xenoestrogens mimic the natural estrogen 17b-estradiol and compete for binding to the estrogen receptor. Even though the affinity of o,p'-DDTan...

  2. Estrogen degradation and sorption onto colloids in a constructed wetland with different hydraulic retention times.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Ting-Chien; Yeh, Kuei-Jyum C; Kuo, Wen-Chien; Chao, How-Ran; Sheu, Shyang-Chwen

    2014-07-30

    Endocrine disrupting compounds are a global concern, owing to their interference with the endocrine system of wildlife. In particular, natural estrogens at concentrations as low as ng/L level can interrupt the endocrine system of many organisms. A constructed wetland is an effective means of removing the residual levels of estrogen. This study investigates the estrogen degradation and sorption on colloids in a constructed wetland at hydraulic retention times (HRTs) of 27.5, 45.9, and 137.5h. Three natural estrogens (i.e. estrone (E1), 17β-estradiol (E2), and estriol (E3)) are analyzed with liquid chromatography/tandem mass spectrometry. At HRT=27.5h, no degradation occurs; at HRT=45.9h, the degradation rates are 0-46.2%; and at HRT=137.5h, the degradation rates are 40-84.3%. Additionally, estrogen sorption coefficients (logKCOC values) range from 3.37 to 4.89. Average logKCOC values are 4.08±0.33, 4.04±0.34, and 4.11±0.28 for E1, E2, and E3, respectively. At different HRTs, values of logKCOC increase with an increasing HRT. Analytical results indicate that constructed wetlands can remove residual natural estrogens. With an increasing HRT, the estrogen degradation rate increases as well as the estrogen sorption on colloids. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  3. Serum estrogen and its metabolites in pregnant women exposed to dioxins and polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wang, Shuli; Chang, Y.C.; Li, C.M.; Chou, W.L. [National Health Research Insts., Kaohsiung (Taiwan). Div. of Environmental Health and Occupational Medicine; Chao, H.R.; Guo, Y.L. [National Chung Kung Univ., Tainan (Taiwan). Inst. of Environmental Medicine

    2004-09-15

    Dioxins and PCBs are environmental endocrine disruptors that have half-life of 7-10 years in human bodies and have toxicities including carcinogenesis. Studies showed a high estrogen 4-/2- hydroxylation ratio appears to be a marker for neoplasm. The aim is to examine dioxin and PCBs body burden1 in relation to estrogen metabolites and catabolites.

  4. Nucleus retroambiguus-spinal pathway in the mouse : Localization, gender differences, and effects of estrogen treatment

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    VanderHorst, VGJM

    2005-01-01

    Nucleus retroambiguus (NRA)-motoneuronal projections are species-specific and serve expiration, Valsalva maneuvers, vocalization, and sexual behavior. In cat and monkey, estrogen induces sprouting of NRA-spinal axons. This pathway may thus serve as a model to study mechanisms through which estrogen

  5. Comparison of short-term estrogenicity tests for identification of hormone-disrupting chemicals

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andersen, H R; Andersson, A M; Arnold, S F

    1999-01-01

    induced a strong estrogenic response in all test systems. Colchicine caused cytotoxicity only. Bisphenol A induced an estrogenic response in all assays. The results obtained for the remaining test compounds--tamoxifen, ICI 182.780, testosterone, bisphenol A dimethacrylate, 4-n-octylphenol, 4-n...

  6. Comparison of Short-Term Estrogenicity Tests for Identification of Hormone-Disrupting Chemicals

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andersen, Helle Raun; Andersson, Anna-Maria; Arnold, Steven F.

    1999-01-01

    estrogenic response in all test systems. Colchicine caused cytotoxicity only. Bisphenol A induced an estrogenic response in all assays. The results obtained for the remaining test compounds—tamoxifen, ICI 182.780, testosterone, bisphenol A dimethacrylate, 4-n-octylphenol, 4-n-nonylphenol, nonylphenol...

  7. Expression of aromatase and estrogen receptor alpha in chondrosarcoma, but no beneficial effect of inhibiting estrogen signaling both in vitro and in vivo

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Meijer, D.; Gelderblom, Hans; Karperien, Hermanus Bernardus Johannes; Cleton-Jansen, A.M.; Hogendoorn, C.W.; Bovee, J.

    2011-01-01

    Background: Chondrosarcomas are malignant cartilage-forming tumors which are highly resistant to conventional chemotherapy and radiotherapy. Estrogen signaling is known to play an important role in proliferation and differentiation of chondrocytes and in growth plate regulation at puberty. Our

  8. Estrogenicity patterns in the Swiss midland river Lützelmurg in relation to treated domestic sewage effluent discharges and hydrology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vermeirssen, Etiënne L M; Suter, Marc J F; Burkhardt-Holm, Patricia

    2006-09-01

    Sewage treatment works (STW) discharge estrogenic effluent into rivers, which leads to variable estrogenicity of river water. Here, we characterize how the factors effluent and hydrology influence the estrogenicity of river water. We selected a river for which good hydrological data are available and collected water samples upstream and downstream from a STW discharge; effluent was sampled as well. Sampling took place during four 12-d periods, associated with the seasons, and always occurred in the morning. We also investigated the estrogenicity along the river, both by grab sampling and by passive sampling. Estrogens were analyzed by a recombinant yeast assay (YES); the estrogenicity of a sample was equated to the 17beta-estradiol standard of the YES (ng/L). Estrogenicity upstream from the STW was mostly close to the detection limit of the YES (maximum, 0.4 ng/L). Estrogenicity of effluent ranged between 0.2 and 7.7 ng/L; lower estrogenicity was associated with higher hydraulic retention times. Downstream from the STW, estrogenicity exceeded 1 ng/L on 25% of the days (maximum, 2.1 ng/L). Measured river water estrogenicity correlated positively and significantly with predicted estrogenicity based on effluent estrogenicity and effluent dilution factor. Grab samples taken along the river indicate that no significant sources of estrogens were upstream from the STW; downstream from the STW, the pattern of estrogenicity was highly variable. However, passive sampling showed that the estrogenicity of river water downstream from the STW decreased continuously with increasing distance from the STW, which is largely explained by dilution.

  9. Post-Transcriptional Regulation of Chemokine Receptor CXCR4 by Estrogen in HER2 Overexpressing, Estrogen Receptor-Positive Breast Cancer Cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sengupta, Surojeet; Schiff, Rachel; Katzenellenbogen, Benita S.

    2008-01-01

    Expression of the chemokine receptor CXCR4, a G protein-coupled receptor, and HER2, a receptor tyrosine kinase, strongly correlates with the aggressive and metastatic potential of breast cancer cells. We studied estrogen regulation of CXCR4 in estrogen receptor (ER)-positive MCF-7 breast cancer cells overexpressing HER2 (MCF7-HER2). Although estrogen evoked no change in CXCR4 mRNA levels, CXCR4 protein was significantly up-regulated after estrogen treatment of these cells, whereas estrogen had no effect on CXCR4 protein level in parental MCF7 cells that are low in HER2. Use of the CXCR4 specific inhibitor, AMD 3100, indicated that this increase in CXCR4 protein was partially responsible for the increase in estrogen-induced migration of these cells. The estrogen-induced increase in CXCR4 protein in MCF-7-HER2 cells was abrogated by the antiestrogen ICI 182780 and by gefitinib (Iressa; a phosphotyrosine kinase inhibitor), indicating an ER-mediated effect and confirming involvement of receptor tyrosine kinases, respectively. Using specific pathway inhibitors, we show that the estrogen-induced increase in CXCR4 involves PI3K/AKT, MAPK and mTOR pathways. PI3K/AKT and MAPK pathways are known to result in the phosphorylation and functional inactivation of tuberin (TSC2) of tuberous sclerosis complex thereby negating its inhibitory effects on mTOR, which in turn stimulates the translational machinery. Small interfering RNA (siRNA) mediated knockdown of tuberin elevated the level of CXCR4 protein in MCF7-HER2 cells and also nullified further estrogen up-regulation of CXCR4. This study suggests a pivotal role of PI3K, MAPK and mTOR pathways, via tuberin, in post-transcriptional control of CXCR4, initiated through estrogen-stimulated crosstalk between ER and HER2. Thus, post-transcriptional regulation of CXCR4 by estrogens acting through ER via kinase pathways may play a critical role in determining the metastatic potential of breast cancer cells. PMID:18807177

  10. Detecting estrogenic activity in water samples withestrogen-sensitive yeast cells using spectrophotometry and fluorescencemicroscopy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wozei, E.; Holman, H-Y.N.; Hermanowicz, S.W.; Borglin S.

    2006-03-15

    Environmental estrogens are environmental contaminants that can mimic the biological activities of the female hormone estrogen in the endocrine system, i.e. they act as endocrine disrupters. Several substances are reported to have estrogen-like activity or estrogenic activity. These include steroid hormones, synthetic estrogens (xenoestrogens), environmental pollutants and phytoestrogens (plant estrogens). Using the chromogenic substrate ortho-nitrophenyl-{beta}-D-galactopyranoside (ONPG) we show that an estrogen-sensitive yeast strain RMY/ER-ERE, with human estrogen receptor (hER{alpha}) gene and the lacZ gene which encodes the enzyme {beta}-galactosidase, is able to detect estrogenic activity in water samples over a wide range of spiked concentrations of the hormonal estrogen 17{beta}-estradiol (E2). Ortho-nitrophenol (ONP), the yellow product of this assay can be detected using spectrophotometry but requires cell lysis to release the enzyme and allow product formation. We improved this aspect in a fluorogenic assay by using fluorescein di-{beta}-D-galactopyranoside (FDG) as a substrate. The product was visualized using fluorescence microscopy without the need to kill, fix or lyse the cells. We show that in live yeast cells, the uptake of E2 and the subsequent production of {beta}-galactosidase enzyme occur quite rapidly, with maximum enzyme-catalyzed fluorescent product formation evident after about 30 minutes of exposure to E2. The fluorogenic assay was applied to a selection of estrogenic compounds and the Synchrotron-based Fourier transform infrared (SR-FTIR) spectra of the cells obtained to better understand the yeast whole cell response to the compounds. The fluorogenic assay is most sensitive to E2, but the SR-FTIR spectra suggest that the cells respond to all the estrogenic compounds tested even when no fluorescent response was detected. These findings are promising and may shorten the duration of environmental water screening and monitoring regimes using

  11. Combinations of physiologic estrogens with xenoestrogens alter calcium and kinase responses, prolactin release, and membrane estrogen receptor trafficking in rat pituitary cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Watson Cheryl S

    2010-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Xenoestrogens such as alkylphenols and the structurally related plastic byproduct bisphenol A have recently been shown to act potently via nongenomic signaling pathways and the membrane version of estrogen receptor-α. Though the responses to these compounds are typically measured individually, they usually contaminate organisms that already have endogenous estrogens present. Therefore, we used quantitative medium-throughput screening assays to measure the effects of physiologic estrogens in combination with these xenoestrogens. Methods We studied the effects of low concentrations of endogenous estrogens (estradiol, estriol, and estrone at 10 pM (representing pre-development levels, and 1 nM (representing higher cycle-dependent and pregnancy levels in combinations with the same levels of xenoestrogens in GH3/B6/F10 pituitary cells. These levels of xenoestrogens represent extremely low contamination levels. We monitored calcium entry into cells using Fura-2 fluorescence imaging of single cells. Prolactin release was measured by radio-immunoassay. Extracellular-regulated kinase (1 and 2 phospho-activations and the levels of three estrogen receptors in the cell membrane (ERα, ERβ, and GPER were measured using a quantitative plate immunoassay of fixed cells either permeabilized or nonpermeabilized (respectively. Results All xenoestrogens caused responses at these concentrations, and had disruptive effects on the actions of physiologic estrogens. Xenoestrogens reduced the % of cells that responded to estradiol via calcium channel opening. They also inhibited the activation (phosphorylation of extracellular-regulated kinases at some concentrations. They either inhibited or enhanced rapid prolactin release, depending upon concentration. These latter two dose-responses were nonmonotonic, a characteristic of nongenomic estrogenic responses. Conclusions Responses mediated by endogenous estrogens representing different life stages are

  12. Estrogen levels, emotion regulation, and emotional symptoms of women with premenstrual dysphoric disorder: The moderating effect of estrogen receptor 1α polymorphism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yen, Ju-Yu; Wang, Peng-Wei; Su, Chen-Hsiang; Liu, Tai-Ling; Long, Cheng-Yu; Ko, Chih-Hung

    2017-11-14

    This study evaluated the association between estrogen levels, emotion regulation, depression, anxiety, and stress of women with premenstrual dysphoric disorder (PMDD). We also evaluated the moderating effect of estrogen receptor (ESR) α-Xbal polymorphism on the aforementioned association. A total of 100 women were diagnosed with PMDD based on psychiatric interviews and a prospective investigation of 3 menstrual cycles. A total of 96 normal individuals were recruited as controls. Their estrogen levels, depression, anxiety, stress, and ESR α-Xbal polymorphism in both premenstrual and follicular phases were assessed, and these data were included in the final analysis. The PMDD group had high depression, anxiety, and stress and low emotional adjusting and tolerating in the premenstrual phase. Emotional adjustment was negatively associated with depression, anxiety and stress. No association was observed between PMDD and estrogen level. However, premenstrual estrogen level was negatively correlated with anxiety and stress in women with PMDD. The association was only significant in G carriers of ESR α-Xbal, as was the difference in premenstrual emotion regulation between the PMDD and control groups. The results demonstrate the association between estrogen and anxiety in PMDD, supporting the claim that women with PMDD differ in their responses to normal estrogen levels. Furthermore, this association and dysfunctional emotional regulation in PMDD existed only among the G carriers of ESR α-Xbal polymorphism. Future studies should investigate the effect of estrogen on brain functions involving emotional regulation in women with PMDD, stratified by ESR α-Xbal polymorphism. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  13. Emergence of constitutively active estrogen receptor-α mutations in pretreated advanced estrogen receptor positive breast cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meric-Bernstam, Funda; Gonzalez-Angulo, Ana Maria; Ferrer-Lozano, Jaime; Perez-Fidalgo, Jose A.; Cristofanilli, Massimo; Gómez, Henry; Arteaga, Carlos L.; Giltnane, Jennifer; Balko, Justin M.; Cronin, Maureen T; Jarosz, Mirna; Sun, James; Hawryluk, Matthew; Lipson, Doron; Otto, Geoff; Ross, Jeffrey S; Dvir, Addie; Soussan-Gutman, Lior; Wolf, Ido; Rubinek, Tamar; Gilmore, Lauren; Schnitt, Stuart; Come, Steven E.; Pusztai, Lajos; Stephens, Philip; Brown, Myles; Miller, Vincent A.

    2014-01-01

    Purpose We undertook this study to determine the prevalence of estrogen receptor (ER) α (ESR1) mutations throughout the natural history of hormone dependent breast cancer and to delineate the functional roles of the most commonly detected alterations. Experimental Design We studied a total of 249 tumor specimens from 208 patients. The specimens include 134 ER positive (ER+/HER2–) and, as controls, 115 ER negative (ER−) tumors. The ER+ samples consist of 58 primary breast cancers and 76 metastatic samples. All tumors were sequenced to high unique coverage using next generation sequencing targeting the coding sequence of the estrogen receptor and an additional 182 cancer-related genes. Results Recurring somatic mutations in codons 537 and 538 within the ligand-binding domain of ER were detected in ER+ metastatic disease. Overall, the frequency of these mutations was 12% (9/76, 95% CI 6%-21%) in metastatic tumors and in a subgroup of patients who received an average of 7 lines of treatment the frequency was 20% (5/25, 95% CI 7%-41%). These mutations were not detected in primary or treatment naïve ER+ cancer or in any stage of ER− disease. Functional studies in cell line models demonstrate that these mutations render estrogen receptor constitutive activity and confer partial resistance to currently available endocrine treatments. Conclusions In this study we show evidence for the temporal selection of functional ESR1 mutations as potential drivers of endocrine resistance during the progression of ER positive breast cancer. PMID:24398047

  14. Classification of natural estrogen-like isoflavonoids and diphenolics by QSAR tools.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luan, Feng; Lu, Yuxi; Liu, Huitao; Cordeiro, Maria N D S

    2015-01-01

    This work reports a detailed study of the ability of linear and non-linear classification methods to estimate the estrogenic activities of a series of 55 natural estrogen-like isoflavonoid and diphenolic compounds. In doing so, we examined the use of linear discriminant analysis (LDA) and nonlinear support vector machines (SVMs) techniques along with feature selection algorithms. The structural characteristics of each of the studied compounds were calculated from the optimized molecular geometries. Both the LDA and SVMs models contain four descriptors, however, the SVMs model (total accuracy 89.1%) was found to be superior to the LDA model (total accuracy 80.0%). The analysis of molecular descriptors within our models provided essential insights towards a better understanding of the estrogenic mechanisms of natural estrogen-like phytoestrogens. Furthermore, the derived models can be applied in the future screening of other natural estrogen-like compounds.

  15. Estrogen Regulates Bone Turnover by Targeting RANKL Expression in Bone Lining Cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Streicher, Carmen; Heyny, Alexandra; Andrukhova, Olena; Haigl, Barbara; Slavic, Svetlana; Schüler, Christiane; Kollmann, Karoline; Kantner, Ingrid; Sexl, Veronika; Kleiter, Miriam; Hofbauer, Lorenz C; Kostenuik, Paul J; Erben, Reinhold G

    2017-07-25

    Estrogen is critical for skeletal homeostasis and regulates bone remodeling, in part, by modulating the expression of receptor activator of NF-κB ligand (RANKL), an essential cytokine for bone resorption by osteoclasts. RANKL can be produced by a variety of hematopoietic (e.g. T and B-cell) and mesenchymal (osteoblast lineage, chondrocyte) cell types. The cellular mechanisms by which estrogen acts on bone are still a matter of controversy. By using murine reconstitution models that allow for selective deletion of estrogen receptor-alpha (ERα) or selective inhibition of RANKL in hematopoietic vs. mesenchymal cells, in conjunction with in situ expression profiling in bone cells, we identified bone lining cells as important gatekeepers of estrogen-controlled bone resorption. Our data indicate that the increase in bone resorption observed in states of estrogen deficiency in mice is mainly caused by lack of ERα-mediated suppression of RANKL expression in bone lining cells.

  16. Ekspresi Gen CYP19 Aromatase, Estrogen, Androgen pada penderita Periodontitis Agresif

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dahlia Herawati

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available Kepadatan tulang tubuh ditentukan oleh gen CYP19 aromatase, hormon estrogen dan androgen. Pada periodontitis agresif terjadi perkembangan cepat kerusakan tulang alveolar, dan kerusakan tulang alveoler tersebut tidak diimbangioleh regenerasi tulang. Tujuan penelitian ini adalah menunjukkan ekspresi gen CYP19 aromatase, estrogen, androgen pada penderita periodontitis agresif agar dapat untuk menjadi pertimbangan pada saat melakukan perawatan periodontal. Metode penelitian, pemeriksaan ekspresi gen aromatse CYP19 berasal dari spesimen tulang alveolar menggunakan imunohistokimia, pengukuran hormon estrogen dan androgen dari serum menggunakan Vidas: Elfa. Hasil penelitian ekspresi gene CYP19 aromatase pada periodontitis agresif menunjukkan gambaran lebih rendah densitasnya dibandingkan pada nonperiodontitis. Estrogen dan androgen pad aperiodontitis agresif ada kecenderungan lebih rendah dibandingkan pada nonperiodontitis. Kesimpulan regenerasi tulang alveoler pad a periodontitis agresif terhambat karena sedikitnya gen CYP19 aromatase dan hormon estrogen dan androgen yang berperan pada pembentukan tulang alveoler kurang memadai.

  17. Estrogenic potency of food-packaging-associated plasticizers and antioxidants as detected in ERa and ERb reporter gene cell lines

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Veld, ter M.G.R.; Schouten, B.; Louisse, J.; Es, van D.S.; Saag, van der P.T.; Rietjens, I.M.C.M.; Murk, A.J.

    2006-01-01

    This study presents the estrogenic potency of 21 food-packaging-associated compounds determined for the first time, using two transfected U2-OS (human osteoblasts devoid of endogenous estrogen receptors) estrogen receptor (ER) alpha and beta cell lines. Six plasticizers and three antioxidants were

  18. Development and validation of fluorescent receptor assays based on the human recombinant estrogen receptor subtypes alpha and beta

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    de boer, T; Otjens, D; Muntendam, A; Meulman, E; van Oostijen, M; Ensing, K

    2004-01-01

    This article describes the development and validation of two fluorescent receptor assays for the hRec-estrogen receptor subtypes alpha and beta. As a labelled ligand an autofluorescent phyto-estrogen (coumestrol) has been used. The estrogen receptor (ER) belongs to the nuclear receptor family, a

  19. Estrogens increase the expression of fibulin-1, an extracellular matrix protein secreted by human ovarian cancer cells

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Clinton, GM; Rougeot, C; Derancourt, J; Roger, P; Defrenne, A; Godyna, S; Argraves, WS; Rochefort, H

    1996-01-01

    Ovarian cancers have a high ability to invade the peritoneal cavity and some are stimulated by estrogens, In an attempt to understand the mode of action of estrogens on these cancer cells and to develop new markers, we have characterized estrogen-regulated proteins, This study,vas aimed at

  20. Estrogens regulate neuroinflammatory genes via estrogen receptors α and β in the frontal cortex of middle-aged female rats

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mahó Sándor

    2011-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Estrogens exert anti-inflammatory and neuroprotective effects in the brain mainly via estrogen receptors α (ERα and β (ERβ. These receptors are members of the nuclear receptor superfamily of ligand-dependent transcription factors. This study was aimed at the elucidation of the effects of ERα and ERβ agonists on the expression of neuroinflammatory genes in the frontal cortex of aging female rats. Methods To identify estrogen-responsive immunity/inflammation genes, we treated middle-aged, ovariectomized rats with 17β-estradiol (E2, ERα agonist 16α-lactone-estradiol (16α-LE2 and ERβ agonist diarylpropionitrile (DPN, or vehicle by Alzet minipump delivery for 29 days. Then we compared the transcriptomes of the frontal cortex of estrogen-deprived versus ER agonist-treated animals using Affymetrix Rat230 2.0 expression arrays and TaqMan-based quantitative real-time PCR. Microarray and PCR data were evaluated by using Bioconductor packages and the RealTime StatMiner software, respectively. Results Microarray analysis revealed the transcriptional regulation of 21 immunity/inflammation genes by 16α-LE2. The subsequent comparative real-time PCR study analyzed the isotype specific effects of ER agonists on neuroinflammatory genes of primarily glial origin. E2 regulated the expression of sixteen genes, including down-regulation of complement C3 and C4b, Ccl2, Tgfb1, macrophage expressed gene Mpeg1, RT1-Aw2, Cx3cr1, Fcgr2b, Cd11b, Tlr4 and Tlr9, and up-regulation of defensin Np4 and RatNP-3b, IgG-2a, Il6 and ER gene Esr1. Similar to E2, both 16α-LE2 and DPN evoked up-regulation of defensins, IgG-2a and Il6, and down-regulation of C3 and its receptor Cd11b, Ccl2, RT1-Aw2 and Fcgr2b. Conclusions These findings provide evidence that E2, 16α-LE2 and DPN modulate the expression of neuroinflammatory genes in the frontal cortex of middle-aged female rats via both ERα and ERβ. We propose that ERβ is a promising target to suppress

  1. Degradation of estrogens by laccase from Myceliophthora thermophila in fed-batch and enzymatic membrane reactors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lloret, L. [Dept. of Chemical Engineering, School of Engineering, University of Santiago de Compostela, E-15782 Santiago de Compostela (Spain); Eibes, G., E-mail: gemma.eibes@usc.es [Dept. of Chemical Engineering, School of Engineering, University of Santiago de Compostela, E-15782 Santiago de Compostela (Spain); Feijoo, G.; Moreira, M.T.; Lema, J.M. [Dept. of Chemical Engineering, School of Engineering, University of Santiago de Compostela, E-15782 Santiago de Compostela (Spain)

    2012-04-30

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Estrogen removal was optimized in fed-batch bioreactors by evaluating the effect of the main process parameters. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer An enzyme membrane bioreactor (EMR) was proposed for the continuous degradation of estrogens. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Estrone was degraded up to 95% and estradiol was not detected in the effluent of the EMR under steady state conditions. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The residual estrogenic activity of the effluent was largely reduced up to 97%. - Abstract: Several studies reported that natural and synthetic estrogens are the major contributors to the estrogenic activity associated with the effluents of wastewater treatment plants. The ability of the enzyme laccase to degrade these compounds in batch experiments has been demonstrated in previous studies. Nevertheless, information is scarce regarding in vitro degradation of estrogens in continuous enzymatic bioreactors. The present work constitutes an important step forward for the implementation of an enzymatic reactor for the continuous removal of estrone (E1) and estradiol (E2) by free laccase from Myceliophthora thermophila. In a first step, the effect of the main process parameters (pH, enzyme level, gas composition (air or oxygen) and estrogen feeding rate) were evaluated in fed-batch bioreactors. E1 and E2 were oxidized by 94.1 and 95.5%, respectively, under the best conditions evaluated. Thereafter, an enzymatic membrane reactor (EMR) was developed to perform the continuous degradation of the estrogens. The configuration consisted of a stirred tank reactor coupled with an ultrafiltration membrane, which allowed the recovery of enzyme while both estrogens and degradation products could pass through it. The highest removal rates at steady state conditions were up to 95% for E1 and nearly complete degradation for E2. Furthermore, the residual estrogenic activity of the effluent was largely reduced up to 97%.

  2. Urinary estrogen levels in women on contraceptives in Enugu, South-East Nigeria

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ignatius C Maduka

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Substantial evidence supports a causal relationship between the risk of human breast cancer and levels of endogenous estrogens. Aim: To evaluate the urinary estrogen of women on contraceptives and also compare the levels in two different classes of contraceptives; hence, the possible predisposition of such women to the risk of breast cancer. Setting and Design: Urinary estrogen level was evaluated in 84 women attending family planning clinic in University of Nigeria Teaching Hospital Enugu, Nigeria, who have been on contraceptive device for 10 years or less (≤10 years. They were aged between 21 and 50 years and were divide into three groups (21-30 years, 31-40 years, and >40 years. The control group consisted of 30 age-matched apparently-healthy women who were not on any contraceptive device. Materials and Methods: Estrogen was analyzed using Ecologenia; Estrogen (E1/E2/E3 microplate enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA kit, Batch No. T2GR4, from Japan Envirochemicals Ltd, Japan. Statistical Analysis Used: Significant differences between means were determined by two-tailed Student′s t-test using graph pad prism computer software program. Result: There was a statistically significant increase (P=0.0462, in the mean urinary estrogen level of women on contraceptives when compared with the control. The highest amount of estrogen was excreted by the women in the 21-30 years age group. When the contraceptive devices were divided into two classes of intra-uterine device and oral/injectables, there was no statistical difference (P=0.8112 in the mean urinary estrogen output of the women. Conclusion: The synthetic estrogen content of contraceptive device most probably contributed to the level excreted in the urine. The increased estrogen output observed in women on contraceptive device was not dependent on the class of contraceptive device used.

  3. Estrogenic modulation of inflammation-related genes in male rats following volume overload

    Science.gov (United States)

    McLarty, Jennifer L.; Meléndez, Giselle C.; Levick, Scott P.; Bennett, Shanté; Sabo-Attwood, Tara; Brower, Gregory L.

    2012-01-01

    Our laboratory has previously reported significant increases of the proinflammatory cytokine TNF-α in male hearts secondary to sustained volume overload. These elevated levels of TNF-α are accompanied by left ventricular (LV) dilatation and cardiac dysfunction. In contrast, estrogen has been shown to protect against this adverse cardiac remodeling in both female and male rats. The purpose of this study was to determine whether estrogen has an effect on inflammation-related genes that contribute to this estrogen-mediated cardioprotection. Myocardial volume overload was induced by aortocaval fistula in 8 wk old male Sprague-Dawley rats (n = 30), and genes of interest were identified using an inflammatory PCR array in Sham, Fistula, and Fistula + Estrogen-treated (0.02 mg/kg per day beginning 2 wk prior to fistula) groups. A total of 55 inflammatory genes were modified (≥2-fold change) at 3 days postfistula. The number of inflammatory gene was reduced to 21 genes by estrogen treatment, whereas 13 genes were comparably modulated in both fistula groups. The most notable were TNF-α, which was downregulated by estrogen, and the TNF-α receptors, which were differentially regulated by estrogen. Specific genes related to arachidonic acid metabolism were downregulated by estrogen, including cyclooxygenase-1 and -2. Finally, gene expression for the β1-integrin cell adhesion subunit was significantly upregulated in the LV of estrogen-treated animals. Protein levels reflected the changes observed at the gene level. These data suggest that estrogen provides its cardioprotective effects, at least in part, via genomic modulation of numerous inflammation-related genes. PMID:22274565

  4. Chronic hepatitis C and fibrosis: evidences for possible estrogen benefits

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    Liana Codes

    Full Text Available The main injury caused by hepatitis C virus is the hepatic fibrosis, as a result of a chronic inflammatory process in the liver characterized by the deposit of components from the extracellular matrix. The fibrosis development leads to the modification of the hepatic architecture, of the hepatocellular function and to irregularities in the microcirculation. The tissue remodeling process observed in fibrosis has stellate cells, located at the space of Disse, as main acting agents. These cells, in response to a harmful stimulus, undergo phenotypic changes from non-proliferating cells to proliferating cells that express a- smooth-muscle actin (a-SMA, a process called as transdifferentiation. There are evidences that the oxidative stress is involved in the chronic liver disease and serves as bond between the injury and the hepatic fibrosis. A number of studies suggest that the estrogen, at physiological levels, presents an antifibrogenic action probably through an antioxidant effect, decreasing the levels of lipid peroxidation products in the liver and blood, thus inhibiting the myofibroblastic transformation of stellate cells and contributing for gender-associated differences in relation to the fibrosis development. The aim of this paper was to describe data from literature concerning the interaction between chronic hepatitis C and estrogens, pregnancy, use of oral contraceptives, menopause and hormone reposition therapy.

  5. Oxytocin and Estrogen Receptor β in the Brain: An Overview

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alexandra eAcevedo-Rodriguez

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available Oxytocin is a neuropeptide synthesized primarily by neurons of the paraventricular and supraoptic nuclei of the hypothalamus. These neurons have axons that project into the posterior pituitary and release oxytocin into the bloodstream to promote labor and lactation; however, oxytocin neurons also project to other brain areas where it plays a role in numerous brain functions. Oxytocin binds to the widely expressed oxytocin receptor, and, in doing so, it regulates homeostatic processes, social recognition and fear conditioning. In addition to these functions, oxytocin decreases neuroendocrine stress signaling and anxiety-related and depression-like behaviors. Steroid hormones differentially modulate stress responses and alter oxytocin receptor expression. In particular, estrogen receptor β activation has been found to both reduce anxiety-related behaviors and increase oxytocin peptide transcription, suggesting a role for oxytocin in this estrogen receptor β mediated anxiolytic effect. Further research is needed to identify modulators of oxytocin signaling and the pathways utilized and to elucidate molecular mechanisms controlling oxytocin expression to allow better therapeutic manipulations of this system in patient populations.

  6. A practical guide to prescribing estrogen replacement therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Corson, S L

    1995-01-01

    Discounting vaccinations, menopausal hormone replacement constitutes the most widely practiced form of long-term prophylactic therapy. Long acknowledged as a means of retarding net bone density loss, sufficient data have accumulated to document the cardioprotective aspects of estrogen replacement therapy (ERT). Not surprisingly, new questions concerning long-term effects on various tissues and interaction with progestins have arisen. Given that ERT alone increases risk for endometrial cancer to unacceptable levels, addition of progestins can fully obviate that risk. To what extent, however, do various progestins mute the beneficial estrogen effect on cholesterol lipoproteins and locally in the arterial wall? Does long-term ERT increase the risk for breast cancer and who is at greatest risk? Does the route of ERT matter with respect to metabolic changes? Considering that a woman may spend fully one third of her life in the postmenopausal state, it behooves physicians as primary care providers and as consultants to understand the pros and cons of ERT. Modulation of dose, route and agent, as well as the protocol for therapy, all affect long-term patient compliance. In order to sustain motivation, education of the patient is mandatory, and that process starts with the physician.

  7. The evolution of selective estrogen receptor modulators in osteoporosis therapy

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-01-01

    Selective estrogen receptor modulators (SERMs), which exhibit estrogen receptor agonist or antagonist activity based on the target tissue, have evolved through multiple generations for the prevention and/or treatment of postmenopausal osteoporosis. An ideal SERM would protect bone without stimulating the breast or endometrium. Raloxifene, lasofoxifene, and bazedoxifene have demonstrated unique preclinical profiles. Raloxifene, lasofoxifene, and bazedoxifene have shown significant reduction in the risk of vertebral fracture and improvement in bone mineral density versus placebo in postmenopausal women with osteoporosis. Raloxifene has been shown to reduce the risk of non-vertebral fractures in women with severe prevalent fractures at baseline. Lasofoxifene 0.5 mg, but not lasofoxifene 0.25 mg, has shown reduction in the incidence of non-vertebral fractures. Bazedoxifene 20 mg has been associated with a significant reduction in the risk of non-vertebral fracture versus placebo and raloxifene 60 mg in women at higher baseline fracture risk. Neither raloxifene, lasofoxifene, nor bazedoxifene has shown an increase in the incidence of endometrial hyperplasia or carcinoma. All SERMs have been associated with increased venous thromboembolic events and hot flushes. SERMs are effective alternatives for women who cannot tolerate or are unwilling to take bisphosphonates and may be appropriate for women at higher risk of fracture, particularly younger women who expect to remain on therapy for many years and are concerned about the long-term safety of bisphosphonates. PMID:22853318

  8. Estrogen receptor-dependent effects of bisphenol a

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    P. Bulzomi

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Bisphenol A (BPA, commonly used as building block of polycarbonate plastics, significantly affects human and animal health interfering with the action of natural hormones. Within BPA disrupting effects, a mitogenic activity and, consequently, an increased incidence of neoplastic transformations has been reported in exposed organisms. Among the several mechanisms proposed for the mitogenic BPA effects, its ability to bind to estrogen receptors (ERα and ERβ deserves particular attention. Aim of this work is to investigate ERα- and ERβ-dependent mechanisms underlying BPA proliferative effect. Binding assay confirms that BPA binds to both ERs. Cell vitality assay and Western blot analysis of protein involved in cell proliferation demonstrate that BPA acts as a double side disruptor of estrogenic effects. In fact in the presence of ERα, BPA mimics E2, increasing cell proliferation. On the contrary, in the presence of ERβ, BPA acts as an E2 antagonist preventing the hormone-induced cancer cells apoptosis. These two divergent aspects could act synergistically in the exposed organisms leading to the disruption of the balance between proliferation and apoptosis typical of E2 effects.

  9. Conservation of estrogen receptor function in invertebrate reproduction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jones, Brande L; Walker, Chris; Azizi, Bahareh; Tolbert, Laren; Williams, Loren Dean; Snell, Terry W

    2017-03-04

    Rotifers are microscopic aquatic invertebrates that reproduce both sexually and asexually. Though rotifers are phylogenetically distant from humans, and have specialized reproductive physiology, this work identifies a surprising conservation in the control of reproduction between humans and rotifers through the estrogen receptor. Until recently, steroid signaling has been observed in only a few invertebrate taxa and its role in regulating invertebrate reproduction has not been clearly demonstrated. Insights into the evolution of sex signaling pathways can be gained by clarifying how receptors function in invertebrate reproduction. In this paper, we show that a ligand-activated estrogen-like receptor in rotifers binds human estradiol and regulates reproductive output in females. In other invertebrates characterized thus far, ER ligand binding domains have occluded ligand-binding sites and the ERs are not ligand activated. We have used a suite of computational, biochemical and biological techniques to determine that the rotifer ER binding site is not occluded and can bind human estradiol. Our results demonstrate that this mammalian hormone receptor plays a key role in reproduction of the ancient microinvertebrate Brachinous manjavacas. The presence and activity of the ER within the phylum Rotifera indicates that the ER structure and function is highly conserved throughout animal evolution.

  10. Development of molecular imaging method for manitoring estrogen receptor activity

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jung, W. S.; Jung, J. G.; Kang, J. H.; Lee, Y. J.; Kim, K. I.; O, H. J.; Jung, J. M.; Lee, D. S.; Lee, M. C. [Seoul Nation University, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2004-07-01

    Estrogen receptor is expressed in 50-60% of the breast cancer and hormone therapy is effective for only ER-positive breast cancer. Therefore, we need to know whether or not the ER is expressed in breast cancer before hormone therapy. So far, the method for monitoring ER positiveness in breast tissue is radioreceptor assay or immunohistochemistry which is invasive method due to tissue biopsy. In this study, we develop the molecular imaging method of sodium iodide symporter (NIS) gene as a reporter gene for monitoring ER activity. Because molecular imaging is evaluation method through the comparison between the image intensities obtained in vivo, molecular imaging method is noninvasive and easily quantitative. We constructed the recombinant plasmid (pERE-NIS) which NIS gene expression is controlled by estrogen response element (ERE) promoter. MCF-7, ER-expressing human breast cancer cell line, was transfected with pERE-NIS with lipofectamine (Invitrogen Co). When pERE-NIS transfected MCF-7 was treated with estradiol or tamoxifen, intracellular uptake of {sup 125}I was higher than those of non-treated. The activation of ERE by drug treatment was occurred and it was caused to expression of NIS gene. The degree of {sup 125}I uptake depend on treated drug concentration. However, in case of pERE-NIS transfected breast cancer which do not express ER, there was no response with drug treatment. Therefore, we can monitor ER functionality and the efficacy of drugs with this pERE-NIS reporter system.

  11. Inter-laboratory exercise on steroid estrogens in aqueous samples

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Heath, E., E-mail: ester.heath@ijs.s [Department of Environmental Sciences, Jozef Stefan Institute, Jamova 39, 1000 Ljubljana (Slovenia); Kosjek, T. [Department of Environmental Sciences, Jozef Stefan Institute, Jamova 39, 1000 Ljubljana (Slovenia); Andersen, H.R.; Holten Luetzhoft, H.-C. [Department of Environmental Engineering, Technical University of Denmark, Miljoevej 113, DK-2800 Kgs. Lyngby (Denmark); Adolfson Erici, M. [Stockholm University, ITM SE-106 91 Stockholm (Sweden); Coquery, M. [Cemagref, U.R. QELY, F-69336 Lyon (France); Duering, R.-A. [Giessen University, Institute of Soil Science and Soil Conservation, Giessen (Germany); Gans, O. [Umweltbundesamt GmbH, Unit Organic Analysis, Spittelauer Laende 5, 1090 Vienna (Austria); Guignard, C. [CRP Gabriel Lippmann, EVA, 41 rue du Brill, L-4422 Belvaux (Luxembourg); Karlsson, P. [Lantmannen Analycen AB, Research and Development, Sjoehagsgatan 3 Box 905, 5319, Lidkoeping (Sweden); Manciot, F. [CAE VEOLIA ENVIRONMENT, 1 Place de Turenne, 94417 Saint Maurice Cedex (France); Moldovan, Z. [National Institute of Research and Development for Isotopic and Molecular Technology, Mass Spectrometry Department, Str. Donath 65-103, 400293 Cluj-Napoca (Romania); Patureau, D. [INRA, UR50, Laboratoire de Biotechnologie de l' Environnemet (LBE), Avenue des etangs, F-11100 Narbonne (France); Cruceru, L. [Pollution Control Department, National Research Institute for Industrial Ecology (ECOIND), Sos.Panduri 90-92, sector 5, Bucharest (Romania); Sacher, F. [DVGW-Technologiezentrum Wasser, Karlsruher Strasse 84, 76139 Karlsruhe (Germany); Ledin, A. [Department of Environmental Engineering, Technical University of Denmark, Miljoevej 113, DK-2800 Kgs. Lyngby (Denmark)

    2010-03-15

    An inter-laboratory comparison exercise was organized among European laboratories, under the aegis of EU COST Action 636: 'Xenobiotics in Urban Water Cycle'. The objective was to evaluate the performance of testing laboratories determining 'Endocrine Disrupting Compounds' (EDC) in various aqueous matrices. As the main task three steroid estrogens: 17alpha-ethinylestradiol, 17beta-estradiol and estrone were determined in four spiked aqueous matrices: tap water, river water and wastewater treatment plant influent and effluent using GC-MS and LC-MS/MS. Results were compared and discussed according to the analytical techniques applied, the accuracy and reproducibility of the analytical methods and the nature of the sample matrices. Overall, the results obtained in this inter-laboratory exercise reveal a high level of competence among the participating laboratories for the detection of steroid estrogens in water samples indicating that GC-MS as well as LC-MS/MS can equally be employed for the analysis of natural and synthetic hormones. - Herein are presented the results of the first international inter-laboratory study on determination of selected steroid hormones in environmental aqueous samples.

  12. Evaluation of estrogenic activity of licorice species in comparison with hops used in botanicals for menopausal symptoms.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Atieh Hajirahimkhan

    Full Text Available The increased cancer risk associated with hormone therapies has encouraged many women to seek non-hormonal alternatives including botanical supplements such as hops (Humulus lupulus and licorice (Glycyrrhiza spec. to manage menopausal symptoms. Previous studies have shown estrogenic properties for hops, likely due to the presence of 8-prenylnarigenin, and chemopreventive effects mainly attributed to xanthohumol. Similarly, a combination of estrogenic and chemopreventive properties has been reported for various Glycyrrhiza species. The major goal of the current study was to evaluate the potential estrogenic effects of three licorice species (Glycyrrhiza glabra, G. uralensis, and G. inflata in comparison with hops. Extracts of Glycyrrhiza species and spent hops induced estrogen responsive alkaline phosphatase activity in endometrial cancer cells, estrogen responsive element (ERE-luciferase in MCF-7 cells, and Tff1 mRNA in T47D cells. The estrogenic activity decreased in the order H. lupulus > G. uralensis > G. inflata > G. glabra. Liquiritigenin was found to be the principle phytoestrogen of the licorice extracts; however, it exhibited lower estrogenic effects compared to 8-prenylnaringenin in functional assays. Isoliquiritigenin, the precursor chalcone of liquiritigenin, demonstrated significant estrogenic activities while xanthohumol, a metabolic precursor of 8-prenylnaringenin, was not estrogenic. Liquiritigenin showed ERβ selectivity in competitive binding assay and isoliquiritigenin was equipotent for ER subtypes. The estrogenic activity of isoliquiritigenin could be the result of its cyclization to liquiritigenin under physiological conditions. 8-Prenylnaringenin had nanomolar estrogenic potency without ER selectivity while xanthohumol did not bind ERs. These data demonstrated that Glycyrrhiza species with different contents of liquiritigenin have various levels of estrogenic activities, suggesting the importance of precise labeling of

  13. The estrogen-injected female mouse: new insight into the etiology of PCOS

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    Freeh Steven M

    2009-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Female mice and rats injected with estrogen perinatally become anovulatory and develop follicular cysts. The current consensus is that this adverse response to estrogen involves the hypothalamus and occurs because of an estrogen-induced alteration in the GnRH delivery system. Whether or not this is true has yet to be firmly established. The present study examined an alternate possibility in which anovulation and cyst development occurs through an estrogen-induced disruption in the immune system, achieved through the intermediation of the thymus gland. Methods, Results and Conclusion A putative role for the thymus in estrogen-induced anovulation and follicular cyst formation (a model of PCOS was examined in female mice by removing the gland prior to estrogen injection. Whereas all intact, female mice injected with 20 ug estrogen at 5–7 days of age had ovaries with follicular cysts, no cysts were observed in animals in which thymectomy at 3 days of age preceded estrogen injection. In fact, after restoring immune function by thymocyte replacement, the majority of thymectomized, estrogen-injected mice had ovaries with corpora lutea. Thus, when estrogen is unable to act on the thymus, ovulation occurs and follicular cysts do not develop. This implicates the thymus in the cysts' genesis and discounts the role of the hypothalamus. Subsequent research established that the disease is transferable by lymphocyte infusion. Transfer took place between 100-day-old estrogen-injected and 15-day-old naïve mice only when recipients were thymectomized at 3 days of age. Thus, a prerequisite for cyst formation is the absence of regulatory T cells. Their absence in donor mice was judged to be the result of an estrogen-induced increase in the thymus' vascular permeability, causing de facto circumvention of the final stages of regulatory T cell development. The human thymus has a similar vulnerability to steroid action during the fetal stage. We

  14. Placental expression of estrogen receptor beta and its hormone binding variant – comparison with estrogen receptor alpha and a role for estrogen receptors in asymmetric division and differentiation of estrogen-dependent cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Henley Donald C

    2003-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract During human pregnancy, the production of 17-beta-estradiol (E2 rises steadily to eighty fold at term, and placenta has been found to specifically bind estrogens. We have recently demonstrated the expression of estrogen receptor alpha (ER-alpha protein in human placenta and its localization in villous cytotrophoblast (CT, vascular pericytes, and amniotic fibroblasts. In vitro, E2 stimulated development of large syncytiotrophoblast (ST aggregates. In the present study we utilized ER-beta affinity purified polyclonal (N19:sc6820 and ER-alpha monoclonal (clone h-151 antibodies. Western blot analysis revealed a single ~52 kDa ER-beta band in chorionic villi (CV protein extracts. In CV, strong cytoplasmic ER-beta immunoreactivity was confined to ST. Dual color immunohistochemistry revealed asymmetric segregation of ER-alpha in dividing villous CT cells. Prior to separation, the cell nuclei more distant from ST exhibited high ER-alpha, while cell nuclei associated with ST showed diminution of ER-alpha and appearance of ER-beta. In trophoblast cultures, development of ST aggregates was associated with diminution of ER-alpha and appearance of ER-beta immunoreactivity. ER-beta was also detected in endothelial cells, amniotic epithelial cells and fibroblasts, extravillous trophoblast (nuclear and cytoplasmic and decidual cells (cytoplasmic only. In addition, CFK-E12 (E12 and CWK-F12 (F12 monoclonal antibodies, which recognize ~64 kDa ER-beta with hormone binding domain, showed nuclear-specific reactivity with villous ST, extravillous trophoblast, and amniotic epithelium and fibroblasts. Western blot analysis indicated abundant expression of a ~64 kDa ER-beta variant in trophoblast cultures, significantly higher when compared to the chorionic villi and freshly isolated trophoblast cell protein extracts. This is the first report on ER-beta expression in human placenta and cultured trophoblast. Our data indicate that during trophoblast

  15. Re-Opening the Critical Window for Estrogen Therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bean, Linda A; Kumar, Ashok; Rani, Asha; Guidi, Mike; Rosario, Awilda M; Cruz, Pedro E; Golde, Todd E; Foster, Thomas C

    2015-12-09

    A decline in estradiol (E2)-mediated cognitive benefits denotes a critical window for the therapeutic effects of E2, but the mechanism for closing of the critical window is unknown. We hypothesized that upregulating the expression of estrogen receptor α (ERα) or estrogen receptor β (ERβ) in the hippocampus of aged animals would restore the therapeutic potential of E2 treatments and rejuvenate E2-induced hippocampal plasticity. Female rats (15 months) were ovariectomized, and, 14 weeks later, adeno-associated viral vectors were used to express ERα, ERβ, or green fluorescent protein (GFP) in the CA1 region of the dorsal hippocampus. Animals were subsequently treated for 5 weeks with cyclic injections of 17β-estradiol-3-benzoate (EB, 10 μg) or oil vehicle. Spatial memory was examined 48 h after EB/oil treatment. EB treatment in the GFP (GFP + EB) and ERβ (ERβ + EB) groups failed to improve episodic spatial memory relative to oil-treated animals, indicating closing of the critical window. Expression of ERβ failed to improve cognition and was associated with a modest learning impairment. Cognitive benefits were specific to animals expressing ERα that received EB treatment (ERα + EB), such that memory was improved relative to ERα + oil and GFP + EB. Similarly, ERα + EB animals exhibited enhanced NMDAR-mediated synaptic transmission compared with the ERα + oil and GFP + EB groups. This is the first demonstration that the window for E2-mediated benefits on cognition and hippocampal E2 responsiveness can be reinstated by increased expression of ERα. Estradiol is neuroprotective, promotes synaptic plasticity in the hippocampus, and protects against cognitive decline associated with aging and neurodegenerative diseases. However, animal models and clinical studies indicate a critical window for the therapeutic treatment such that the beneficial effects are lost with advanced age and/or with extended hormone deprivation. We used gene therapy to upregulate

  16. Skeletal effects of withdrawal of estrogen and diphosphonate treatment in ovariectomized rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wronski, T J; Dann, L M; Qi, H; Yen, C F

    1993-09-01

    The study was designed to determine the skeletal effects of withdrawal of estrogen and diphosphonate treatment in the estrogen-deplete state. Groups of ovariectomized (OVX) rats were treated with vehicle alone, estrogen, or the diphosphonates etidronate or risedronate for a 180-day period. A group of sham-operated control rats was treated for 180 days with vehicle alone. All treatments were then terminated, followed by sequential sacrifice of rats at 0, 35, 90, 180, and 360 days after withdrawal of treatment. The proximal tibia from each animal was processed undecalcified for quantitative bone histomorphometry. At the end of the treatment period, vehicle-treated OVX rats were characterized by cancellous osteopenia and increased bone turnover relative to vehicle-treated control rats. Treatment of OVX rats with estrogen or diphosphonates depressed bone turnover and protected against cancellous osteopenia. During the withdrawal period, OVX rats previously treated with estrogen exhibited rapid bone loss associated with increased bone turnover. The bone protective effect of the hormone in OVX rats was nearly completely lost by 90 days of withdrawal. In contrast, OVX rats maintained low levels of bone turnover and normal cancellous bone mass at 180 days of withdrawal from diphosphonate treatment. The results suggest that estrogen-deplete women who are withdrawn from estrogen replacement are at high risk for subsequent bone loss. They further suggest that widely spaced periods of intermittent diphosphonate treatment may be sufficient to prevent the development of osteopenia in postmenopausal and oophorectomized women.

  17. Epithelial estrogen receptor 1 intrinsically mediates squamous differentiation in the mouse vagina.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miyagawa, Shinichi; Iguchi, Taisen

    2015-10-20

    Estrogen-mediated actions in female reproductive organs are tightly regulated, mainly through estrogen receptor 1 (ESR1). The mouse vaginal epithelium cyclically exhibits cell proliferation and differentiation in response to estrogen and provides a unique model for analyzing the homeostasis of stratified squamous epithelia. To address the role of ESR1-mediated tissue events during homeostasis, we analyzed mice with a vaginal epithelium-specific knockout of Esr1 driven by keratin 5-Cre (K5-Esr1KO). We show here that loss of epithelial ESR1 in the vagina resulted in aberrant epithelial cell proliferation in the suprabasal cell layers and led to failure of keratinized differentiation. Gene expression analysis showed that several known estrogen target genes, including erbB growth factor ligands, were not induced by estrogen in the K5-Esr1KO mouse vagina. Organ culture experiments revealed that the addition of erbB growth factor ligands, such as amphiregulin, could activate keratinized differentiation in the absence of epithelial ESR1. Thus, epithelial ESR1 integrates estrogen and growth factor signaling to mediate regulation of cell proliferation in squamous differentiation, and our results provide new insights into estrogen-mediated homeostasis in female reproductive organs.

  18. Role of dietary bioactive natural products in estrogen receptor-positive breast cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bak, Min Ji; Das Gupta, Soumyasri; Wahler, Joseph; Suh, Nanjoo

    2016-10-01

    Estrogen receptor (ER)-positive breast cancer, including luminal-A and -B, is the most common type of breast cancer. Extended exposure to estrogen is associated with an increased risk of breast cancer. Both ER-dependent and ER-independent mechanisms have been implicated in estrogen-mediated carcinogenesis. The ER-dependent pathway involves cell growth and proliferation triggered by the binding of estrogen to the ER. The ER-independent mechanisms depend on the metabolism of estrogen to generate genotoxic metabolites, free radicals and reactive oxygen species to induce breast cancer. A better understanding of the mechanisms that drive ER-positive breast cancer will help optimize targeted approaches to prevent or treat breast cancer. A growing emphasis is being placed on alternative medicine and dietary approaches toward the prevention and treatment of breast cancer. Many natural products and bioactive compounds found in foods have been shown to inhibit breast carcinogenesis via inhibition of estrogen induced oxidative stress as well as ER signaling. This review summarizes the role of bioactive natural products that are involved in the prevention and treatment of estrogen-related and ER-positive breast cancer. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  19. Combined action of estrogen receptor agonists and antagonists in two-hybrid recombinant yeast in vitro.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Rong; Li, Na; Rao, Kaifeng; Ma, Mei; Wang, Zijian

    2015-01-01

    Estrogen receptor (ER) antagonistic chemicals in aquatic environments are believed to influence the binding of both endogenous and exogenous estrogens to ERs in aquatic organisms. Although the combined effects of estrogenic compounds have attracted much scientific concern, little work has been done on the influence of such antiestrogens on the biological effects of estrogens. This study focused on how the presence of different amounts of antagonists affects the results of ER agonist activity tests. To achieve this, three questions were stated and answered in sequence. A two-hybrid recombinant yeast assay mediated by ER was adopted, providing a single mode of action and single target of action for this study. Mixtures created by an ER agonist and three antagonists following the fixed-ratio principle were assessed. The concentration of 17β-estradiol causing maximum induction was set as the fixed dose of estrogen in the antagonist activity test (question 1). When the two classes of chemicals coexisted, antiestrogens, which as a whole behaved according to the concentration addition model (question 2), decreased the response of estrogen and compressed the concentration-response curves along the y-axis in the agonist activity test (question 3). This may cause the estradiol equivalent to be underestimated and potentially mask the action of estrogenic effects in toxicity evaluation of environmental samples. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  20. WISP-2 as a novel estrogen-responsive gene in human breast cancer cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Inadera, H; Hashimoto, S; Dong, H Y; Suzuki, T; Nagai, S; Yamashita, T; Toyoda, N; Matsushima, K

    2000-08-18

    In order to search for novel estrogen-responsive genes, we performed serial analysis of gene expression (SAGE) for estrogen-treated MCF-7 human breast cancer cells. SAGE analysis of 31,000 and 30,856 tags from non-treated and 17 beta-estradiol (E2)-treated cells for 24 h, respectively, facilitated the identification of 15,037 different transcripts. Comparison of these two SAGE libraries indicated a remarkable similarity in expression profiles. Among the identified transcripts, four genes were found to be markedly increased for E2-treated cells compared with control cells. Three of the transcripts were cathepsin D, pS2 and high mobility group 1 protein, which have been described as estrogen-inducible genes. The fourth gene was WISP-2 (Wnt-1 inducible signaling pathway protein 2) which has recently been reported as an up-regulated gene in the mammary epithelial cell line C57 MG transformed by the Wnt-1 oncogene. The increase in WISP-2 mRNA was completely prevented by co-incubation with a pure anti-estrogen ICI 182,780, but not by coincubation with cycloheximide, indicating that WISP-2 is directly regulated by the estrogen receptor. The WISP-2 gene was also induced by treating with environmental estrogens, such as bisphenol-A or nonylphenol. This study represents the first comprehensive gene expression analysis of estrogen-treated human breast cancer cells. Copyright 2000 Academic Press.

  1. Chronic kidney disease and the involvement of estrogen hormones in its pathogenesis and progression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gluhovschi, Gh; Gluhovschi, A; Anastasiu, D; Petrica, Ligia; Gluhovschi, Cristina; Velciov, Silvia

    2012-01-01

    The kidney is under the influence of sexual hormones. Estrogens have a favourable role in the progression of some chronic renal diseases. Estrogen hormones act upon the nephron component cells, regulating several processes going on at this level. One of the most important actions of the estrogens is represented by the protective effect on the kidneys, estrogens attenuating glomerulosclerosis and tubulo-interstitial fibrosis. Thus, estrogens have nephroprotective effects. Phosphorus-calcium metabolism disturbances during chronic kidney disease are influenced by numerous regulatory factors: parathormone, vitamin D fibroblast growth factor, 23. Estrogens play an important part in disturbances of the phosphorus-calcium metabolism, co-operating with these factors. They exert favourable effects on renal osteodystrophy, the main consequence of phosphorus-calcium disturbances. Hormonal dysfunction in chronic kidney disease is clinically accompanied by sexual dysfunction that influences the life quality of these patients. In advanced stages of chronic kidney disease, especially in dialysed patients, these sexual dysfunctions can be more evident. Hormonal replacement therapy and estrogen therapy- receptor modulating therapy have an important role in correcting hormonal dysfunctions manifest in chronic kidney disease. Caution is necessary in case of a would-be pregnancy in patients with chronic kidney disease, given its risks and the complexity of the problem. Renal transplantation corrects to a great extent hormonal dysfunctions in chronic kidney disease.

  2. An overlooked connection: serotonergic mediation of estrogen-related physiology and pathology

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gilders Roger M

    2005-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background In humans, serotonin has typically been investigated as a neurotransmitter. However, serotonin also functions as a hormone across animal phyla, including those lacking an organized central nervous system. This hormonal action allows serotonin to have physiological consequences in systems outside the central nervous system. Fluctuations in estrogen levels over the lifespan and during ovarian cycles cause predictable changes in serotonin systems in female mammals. Discussion We hypothesize that some of the physiological effects attributed to estrogen may be a consequence of estrogen-related changes in serotonin efficacy and receptor distribution. Here, we integrate data from endocrinology, molecular biology, neuroscience, and epidemiology to propose that serotonin may mediate the effects of estrogen. In the central nervous system, estrogen influences pain transmission, headache, dizziness, nausea, and depression, all of which are known to be a consequence of serotonergic signaling. Outside of the central nervous system, estrogen produces changes in bone density, vascular function, and immune cell self-recognition and activation that are consistent with serotonin's effects. For breast cancer risk, our hypothesis predicts heretofore unexplained observations of the opposing effects of obesity pre- and post-menopause and the increase following treatment with hormone replacement therapy using medroxyprogesterone. Summary Serotonergic mediation of estrogen has important clinical implications and warrants further evaluation.

  3. Spatial and temporal evaluations of estrogenic activity in tap water served by a water plant in Wuhan, China.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zeng, Qiang; Cao, Wen-Cheng; Xu, Liang; Chen, Yong-Zhe; Yun, Luo-Jia; Liu, Ai-Lin; Zhang, Jing; Lu, Wen-Qing

    2013-05-01

    This study aimed to evaluate the spatial and temporal characteristics of estrogenic activities in tap water served by a water plant in Wuhan, China. Tap water samples were monthly collected from the three sampling sites with different distances of distribution network from the plant during April 2010-March 2011: Min (less than 0.1km), Mid (approximately 4km) and Max (approximately 8km). Estrogenic activities of solid phase-extracted tap waters were measured by using recombinant yeast assay incorporated with and without exogenous metabolic activation system (rat liver S9 fractions) and expressed as 17β-estradiol equivalents (EEQ). Pro-estrogenic and estrogenic activity in tap water ranged from 151.4 to 1395.6pg EEQ/L and 35.2 to 1511pg EEQ/L, respectively. Average pro-estrogenic activity (680.3pg EEQ/L) was significantly higher than estrogenic activity (412.8pg EEQ/L) throughout the whole year. The pro-estrogenic activity significantly increased with the extending of distribution network, and was also statistically correlated with water temperature and pH. However, pro-estrogenic and estrogenic activity was not altered across four seasons. Our results suggest that the pro-estrogenic and estrogenic chemicals are present in tap water served by the water plant. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  4. Adsorption of Estrogen Contaminants by Graphene Nanomaterials under Natural Organic Matter Preloading: Comparison to Carbon Nanotube, Biochar, and Activated Carbon.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jiang, Luhua; Liu, Yunguo; Liu, Shaobo; Zeng, Guangming; Hu, Xinjiang; Hu, Xi; Guo, Zhi; Tan, Xiaofei; Wang, Lele; Wu, Zhibin

    2017-06-06

    Adsorption of two estrogen contaminants (17β-estradiol and 17α-ethynyl estradiol) by graphene nanomaterials was investigated and compared to those of a multi-walled carbon nanotube (MWCNT), a single-walled carbon nanotube (SWCNT), two biochars, a powdered activated carbon (PAC), and a granular activate carbon (GAC) in ultrapure water and in the competition of natural organic matter (NOM). Graphene nanomaterials showed comparable or better adsorption ability than carbon nanotubes (CNTs), biochars (BCs), and activated carbon (ACs) under NOM preloading. The competition of NOM decreased the estrogen adsorption by all adsorbents. However, the impact of NOM on the estrogen adsorption was smaller on graphenes than CNTs, BCs, and ACs. Moreover, the hydrophobicity of estrogens also affected the uptake of estrogens. These results suggested that graphene nanomaterials could be used to removal estrogen contaminants from water as an alternative adsorbent. Nevertheless, if transferred to the environment, they would also adsorb estrogen contaminants, leading to great environmental hazards.

  5. An in vitro model for screening estrogen activity of environmental samples after metabolism

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chahbane, N.; Schramm, K.W. [GSF - Forschungszentrum fuer Umwelt und Gesundheit Neuherberg GmbH, Oberschleissheim (Germany). Inst. fuer Oekologische Chemie; Kettrup, A. [Technische Univ. Muenchen, Freising (Germany). Lehrstuhl fuer Oekologische Chemie

    2004-09-15

    For a few years, yeast estrogen assay (YES) was accepted as a reliable and economic model for screening of environmental estrogens. Though the chemicals directly act with estrogen receptor (ER) can be filtered out by this model, there are still chemicals act with ER only after metabolism and some chemicals eliminate their estrogen activities after metabolism. That is to say, their metabolites exert or have stronger estrogen activities than themselves, which can be called bio-activation. In this case, for the lack of the metabolism enzyme system as human and other animals, only the assay with recombinant yeast cells is insufficient. So, it is necessary to combine the YES with metabolism procedure to evaluate the estrogen activities of these chemicals. The most common method used currently for in vitro metabolic activation in mutagenicity testing and also be applied to the estrogen screening field is S-9 mixture. Also, there is an attempt to develop a chemical model for cytochrome P450 as a bio-mimetic metabolic activation system. All these methods can be used as in vitro models for metabolism. Compare with these models, using whole H4II E cells for metabolism is an alternative and with superiorities. It has the excellence of short experiment period as all other in vitro models, but is much more close to the real surroundings as in vivo. Furthermore, the activity of 7-ethoxyresorufin-O-deethylase (EROD) can be easily measured during the whole incubation period for us to discuss the metabolic activities in a quantitative foundation, not only in qualitative. Methoxychlor is one of the chemicals with bio-activation ability. When directly used in the YES, it shows weak estrogen activity. But a main metabolite of methoxychlor, 2,2-bis (p-hydroxyphenyl) - 1,1,1-trichloroethane (HPTE) is a known estrogen mimic. For the long time using methoxychlor as a pesticide and its clear background, it is an ideal chemical to establish this in vitro system.

  6. Effect of Topical Estrogen in the Mangement of Traumatic Facial Wounds

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Seyed Amirhosein Ghazizadeh Hashemi

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Acute skin wound healing is a complicated process comprising various phases. Recent animal studies have shown that steroid sex hormones such as estrogen maybe helpful in the regulation of several pathophysiologic stages that are involved in wound healing. In this study we examined the effects of topical estrogen in the treatment of traumatic facial wounds.   Materials and Methods: Patients referred to Luqman Hospital, Tehran with traumatic wounds were enrolled in this case-control study into two groups of equal size. From the second week of the study, topical estrogen (0.625 mg conjugated topical estrogen ointment was administered in the case group, while the control group received a Eucerin dressing only. The two groups were then compared in terms of wound healing rate on Day 7,14, and 30.   Results: Thirty patients with mean age of 16.02+36.23 years were compared in the control and estrogen-treated groups. After treatment, no scars or keloids were observed in either group. The wound area in the estrogen group was lower than that in the control group on Day 14 and 30, but the difference was not significant (P>0.05. Healing rates in the control group on Day  14 (7.1+42.3 vs.50.3+4.9 mm2 and Day 30 (1.9+93.5 vs. + 97.3+0.6 mm2 (were lower than those in the estrogen group, but the differences were not significant (P>0.05. Findings show that the required time for wound healing in the estrogen-treated group was lower than that in the control group, but the difference was not significant (P>0.05.   Conclusion:  Based on this study, topical estrogen has no effect on the rate of wound healing or the rate of wound area .

  7. Effect of Topical Estrogen in the Mangement of Traumatic Facial Wounds

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ghazizadeh Hashemi, Seyed Amirhosein; Barati, Behrooz; Mohammadi, Hosein; Saeidi, Masumeh; Bahreini, Abbas; Kiani, Mohammad Ali

    2016-01-01

    Introduction: Acute skin wound healing is a complicated process comprising various phases. Recent animal studies have shown that steroid sex hormones such as estrogen maybe helpful in the regulation of several pathophysiologic stages that are involved in wound healing. In this study we examined the effects of topical estrogen in the treatment of traumatic facial wounds. Materials and Methods: Patients referred to Luqman Hospital, Tehran with traumatic wounds were enrolled in this case-control study into two groups of equal size. From the second week of the study, topical estrogen (0.625 mg conjugated topical estrogen ointment) was administered in the case group, while the control group received a Eucerin dressing only. The two groups were then compared in terms of wound healing rate on Day 7,14, and 30. Results: Thirty patients with mean age of 16.02+36.23 years were compared in the control and estrogen-treated groups. After treatment, no scars or keloids were observed in either group. The wound area in the estrogen group was lower than that in the control group on Day 14 and 30, but the difference was not significant (P>0.05). Healing rates in the control group on Day 14 (7.1+42.3 vs.50.3+4.9 mm2) and Day 30 (1.9+93.5 vs. + 97.3+0.6 mm2) (were lower than those in the estrogen group, but the differences were not significant (P>0.05). Findings show that the required time for wound healing in the estrogen-treated group was lower than that in the control group, but the difference was not significant (P>0.05). Conclusion: Based on this study, topical estrogen has no effect on the rate of wound healing or the rate of wound area. PMID:26878003

  8. Lung cancer mortality risk among breast cancer patients treated with anti-estrogens.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bouchardy, Christine; Benhamou, Simone; Schaffar, Robin; Verkooijen, Helena M; Fioretta, Gerald; Schubert, Hyma; Vinh-Hung, Vincent; Soria, Jean-Charles; Vlastos, Georges; Rapiti, Elisabetta

    2011-03-15

    The Women's Health Initiative randomized clinical trial reported that menopausal hormone therapy increases lung cancer mortality risk. If this is true, use of anti-estrogens should be associated with decreased lung cancer mortality risk. The authors compared lung cancer incidence and mortality among breast cancer patients with and without anti-estrogen therapy. Our study included all 6655 women diagnosed with breast cancer between 1980 and 2003 and registered at the Geneva Cancer Registry. Among these women, 46% (3066) received anti-estrogens. All women were followed for occurrence and death from lung cancer until December 2007. The authors compared incidence and mortality rates among patients with and without anti-estrogens with those expected in the general population by Standardized Incidence Ratios (SIRs) and Standardized Mortality Ratios (SMRs). After a total of 57,257 person-years, 40 women developed lung cancer. SIRs for lung cancer were not significantly decreased among breast cancer patients with and without anti-estrogens (0.63, 95% confidence intervals [CI], 0.33-1.10; and 1.12, 95% CI, 0.74-1.62, respectively) while SMR was decreased among women with anti-estrogens (0.13, 95% CI, 0.02-0.47, P<.001) but not for women without anti-estrogens (0.76, 95% CI, 0.43-1.23). Compared with expected outcomes in the general population, breast cancer patients receiving anti-estrogen treatment for breast cancer had lower lung cancer mortality. This study further supports the hypothesis that estrogen therapy modifies lung cancer prognosis. Copyright © 2011 American Cancer Society.

  9. The Effect of Estrogen Usage on Eccentric Exercise-Induced Damage in Rat Testes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Can, Serpil; Selli, Jale; Buyuk, Basak; Aydin, Sergulen; Kocaaslan, Ramazan; Guvendi, Gulname Findik

    2015-01-01

    Background: Recent years, lots of scientific studies are focused on the possible mechanism of inflammatory response and oxidative stress which are the mechanism related with tissue damage and exercise fatigue. It is well-known that free oxygen radicals may be induced under invitro conditions as well as oxidative stress by exhaustive physical exercise. Objectives: The aim of this study was to investigate the effects of anabolic steroids in conjunction with exercise in the process of spermatogenesis in the testes, using histological and stereological methods. Materials and Methods: Thirty-six male Sprague Dawley rats were divided to six groups, including the control group, the eccentric exercise administered group, the estrogen applied group, the estrogen applied and dissected one hour after eccentric exercise group, the no estrogen applied and dissected 48 hours after eccentric exercise group and the estrogen applied and dissected 48 hours after eccentric exercise group. Eccentric exercise was performed on a motorized rodent treadmill and the estrogen applied groups received daily physiological doses by subcutaneous injections. Testicular tissues were examined using specific histopathological, immunohistochemical and stereological methods. Sections of the testes tissue were stained using the TUNEL method to identify apoptotic cells. Apoptosis was calculated as the percentage of positive cells, using stereological analysis. A statistical analysis of the data was carried out with one-way analysis of variance (ANOVA) for the data obtained from stereological analysis. Results: Conventional light microscopic results revealed that testes tissues of the eccentric exercise administered group and the estrogen supplemented group exhibited slight impairment. In groups that were both eccentrically exercised and estrogen supplemented, more deterioration was detected in testes tissues. Likewise, immunohistochemistry findings were also more prominent in the eccentrically exercised

  10. Dangguijakyak-san ameliorates memory deficits in ovariectomized mice by upregulating hippocampal estrogen synthesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hwang, Deok-Sang; Kim, Namkwon; Choi, Jin Gyu; Kim, Hyo Geun; Kim, Hocheol; Oh, Myung Sook

    2017-11-25

    Dangguijakyak-san (DJS) is an herbal formulation that has been clinically applicable for treating postmenopausal symptoms and neurological disorders. It is reported that hippocampal estrogen attenuates memory impairment via neuroprotection and synaptogenesis. However, the effect of DJS on hippocampal estrogen synthesis remains unknown. In this study, we explored the effect of DJS and its neuroprotective mechanism against memory impairment in ovariectomized (OVX) mice, with respect to hippocampal estrogen stimulation. Cell cultures were prepared from the hippocampi of 18-day-old embryos from timed pregnant Sprague-Dawley rats. The hippocampi were dissected, collected, dissociated, and plated in 60-mm dishes. The cells were treated with DJS for 48 h and the supernatant was collected to determine estrogen levels. Female ICR mice (8-weeks-old) were housed for 1 week and ovariectomy was performed to remove the influence of ovary-synthesized estrogens. Following a 2-week post-surgical recovery period, the mice were administrated with DJS (50 and 100 mg/kg/day, p.o.) or 17β-estradiol (200 μg/kg/day, i.p.) once daily for 21 days. Hippocampal and serum estrogen levels were determined using enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay kit. Memory behavioral tests, western blot, and immunohistochemical analyses were performed to evaluate the neuroprotective effects of DJS in this model. DJS treatment promoted estrogen synthesis in primary hippocampal cells and the hippocampus of OVX mice, resulting in the amelioration of OVX-induced memory impairment. Hippocampal estrogen stimulated by DJS treatment contributed to the activation of cAMP response element-binding protein and synaptic protein in OVX mice. DJS may attenuate memory deficits in postmenopausal women via hippocampal estrogen synthesis.

  11. The polymorphism of estrogen receptor α is important for metabolic consequences associated with menopause.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pinkas, Jarosław; Gujski, Mariusz; Wierzbińska-Stępniak, Anna; Owoc, Alfred; Bojar, Iwona

    2016-01-01

    Menopause is associated with multiple health and metabolic consequences resulting from the decrease in estrogens level. Women at postmenopausal age are burdened with a higher risk of cardiovascular diseases, and the main cause of mortality in this group is ischemic heart disease. Estrogen deficiency is related, among other things, with frequent occurrence of dislipidemia, cessation of the beneficial effect of estrogens on the vascular wall, increase in body weight characterized by unfavourable redistribution of fatty tissue, with an increased amount of visceral fat and reduction of so-called non-fatty body mass. Estrogens exert an effect on metabolism, mainly through the genomic mechanism. The presence of α and β estrogen receptors was found in many tissues and organs. Recently, attention was paid to the fact that the effect of estrogens action on tissues and organs may depend not only on distribution, but also on their polymorphic types. The article presents the latest approach to the problem of metabolic consequences resulting from menopause, according to the possessed α estrogen receptor polymorphism (ERα).Genes encoding for ERα have many polymorphic variants, the most important of which from the clinical aspect are two single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) - Xba1 and PvuII. The review of literature indicates that ERα polymorphisms are of great importance with respect to the effect of estrogens on the functioning of the body of a woman after menopause, and may imply the development of many pathological states, including the prevention or development of metabolic disorders. Identifying ERα polymorphisms may be useful in case of estrogen therapy for menopausal women who may benefit from it.

  12. Transgenic zebrafish reveal tissue-specific differences in estrogen signaling in response to environmental water samples

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gorelick, Daniel A.; Iwanowicz, Luke R.; Hung, Alice L.; Blazer, Vicki; Halpern, Marnie E.

    2014-01-01

    Background: Environmental endocrine disruptors (EED) are exogenous chemicals that mimic endogenous hormones, such as estrogens. Previous studies using a zebrafish transgenic reporter demonstrated that the EEDs bisphenol A and genistein preferentially activate estrogen receptors (ER) in the larval heart compared to the liver. However, it was not known whether the transgenic zebrafish reporter was sensitive enough to detect estrogens from environmental samples, whether environmental estrogens would exhibit similar tissue-specific effects as BPA and genistein or why some compounds preferentially target receptors in the heart. Methods: We tested surface water samples using a transgenic zebrafish reporter with tandem estrogen response elements driving green fluorescent protein expression (5xERE:GFP). Reporter activation was colocalized with tissue-specific expression of estrogen receptor genes by RNA in situ hybridization. Results: Selective patterns of ER activation were observed in transgenic fish exposed to river water samples from the Mid-Atlantic United States, with several samples preferentially activating receptors in embryonic and larval heart valves. We discovered that tissue-specificity in ER activation is due to differences in the expression of estrogen receptor subtypes. ERα is expressed in developing heart valves but not in the liver, whereas ERβ2 has the opposite profile. Accordingly, subtype-specific ER agonists activate the reporter in either the heart valves or the liver. Conclusion: The use of 5xERE:GFP transgenic zebrafish has revealed an unexpected tissue-specific difference in the response to environmentally relevant estrogenic compounds. Exposure to estrogenic EEDs in utero is associated with adverse health effects, with the potentially unanticipated consequence of targeting developing heart valves.

  13. Dietary influence on estrogens and cytokines in breast cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xin Nian

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available Breast cancer affects one out of eight women in their lifetime. Many factors contribute to the development of breast cancer, such as hereditary mutations and lifetime exposure to environmental factors, including estrogen. In addition, overweight and obesity, especially with increased waist circumference, are known to be associated with breast cancer risk. This review will summarize our understanding of the effect of diet on breast cancer incidence and progression. Since some inflammatory cytokines that are changed by a high-fat diet are known to promote the growth of breast cancer cells, these cytokines may serve as biomarkers to monitor the dietary influence for women at high risk of breast cancer and as future therapeutic targets for breast cancer treatment.

  14. Role of Estrogen in Thyroid Function and Growth Regulation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ana Paula Santin

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Thyroid diseases are more prevalent in women, particularly between puberty and menopause. It is wellknown that estrogen (E has indirect effects on the thyroid economy. Direct effects of this steroid hormone on thyroid cells have been described more recently; so, the aim of the present paper was to review the evidences of these effects on thyroid function and growth regulation, and its mechanisms. The expression and ratios of the two E receptors, α and β, that mediate the genomic effects of E on normal and abnormal thyroid tissue were also reviewed, as well as nongenomic, distinct molecular pathways. Several evidences support the hypothesis that E has a direct role in thyroid follicular cells; understanding its influence on the growth and function of the thyroid in normal and abnormal conditions can potentially provide new targets for the treatment of thyroid diseases.

  15. Ethnic and racial differences in prostate stromal estrogen receptor alpha.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haqq, Christopher; Li, Rile; Khodabakhsh, Daniel; Frolov, Anna; Ginzinger, David; Thompson, Timothy; Wheeler, Thomas; Carroll, Peter; Ayala, Gustavo

    2005-10-01

    Prostate cancer incidence and mortality rates vary widely among individuals of different ethnic/racial groups. We identified a relationship between a subset of genes and race/ethnicity using gene expression profiling. Estrogen receptor alpha (ERalpha) was selected for confirmation due to its plausible biological role in cancer susceptibility. Quantitative polymerase chain reaction (Q-PCR) was used to verify gene expression results. Protein levels of ERalpha were determined by quantitative immunohistochemistry in a large-scale tissue microarray study (n = 183). ERalpha was significantly higher in stroma of Hispanic and Asian men than in Caucasian (P racial/ethnic background. Understanding the molecular basis for these differences may form the basis for prostate cancer prevention strategies with widespread public health impact. Copyright 2005 Wiley-Liss, Inc.

  16. Effects of currently used pesticides in assays for estrogenicity, androgenicity, and aromatase activity in vitro

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andersen, Helle Raun; Vinggaard, Anne; Rasmussen, Thomas Høj

    2002-01-01

    Twenty-four pesticides were tested for interactions with the estrogen receptor (ER) and the androgen receptor (AR) in transactivation assays. Estrogen-like effects on MCF-7 cell proliferation and effects on CYP19 aromatase activity in human placental microsomes were also investigated. Pesticides...... to their frequent use in Danish greenhouses. In addition, the metabolite mercaptodimethur sulfoxide, the herbicide tribenuron-methyl, and the organochlorine dieldrin, were included. Several of the pesticides, dieldrin, endosulfan, methiocarb, and fenarimol, acted both as estrogen agonists and androgen antagonists...

  17. Hormone-Related Migraine Headaches and Mood Disorders: Treatment with Estrogen Stabilization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Warnock, Julia K; Cohen, Lawrence J; Blumenthal, Harvey; Hammond, Jordan E

    2017-01-01

    Because estrogens and the trigeminal system are inherently linked, prescribers who are treating a woman with a hormonally related mood disorder and migraine headaches should consider hormonal options to optimize the patient's treatment. This article discusses the interrelationships of estrogen, serotonin, and the trigeminal system as they relate to menstrual migraine occurrence and hormone-related mood symptoms. In addition, clinical examples are provided to facilitate the prescribers treating women during reproductive transitions in which declining estrogens are related to their suffering. © 2016 Pharmacotherapy Publications, Inc.

  18. Incorporating bazedoxifene/conjugated estrogens into the current paradigm of menopausal therapy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Komm BS

    2012-03-01

    Full Text Available Barry S Komm, Sebastian MirkinPfizer Inc, Collegeville, PA, USAAbstract: Many women experience bothersome vasomotor and vaginal symptoms during the menopausal transition. Decreasing levels of estrogens during menopause are also associated with reduced bone density and an increased risk of osteoporosis. Combined estrogen/progestin therapy (hormone therapy effectively treats menopausal symptoms and prevents bone loss, but has been associated with some safety and tolerability concerns. A novel menopausal therapy is the tissue selective estrogen complex, which pairs a selective estrogen receptor modulator with one or more estrogens. In preclinical studies, the tissue selective estrogen complex partnering bazedoxifene (BZA with conjugated estrogens (CE antagonized stimulation of breast and endometrial tissue, reduced vasomotor instability, and preserved bone mass in rat and mouse models. The specific attributes seen with BZA/CE were different from those observed with other selective estrogen receptor modulator/estrogen pairings. BZA/CE has undergone clinical evaluation in the Phase III Selective estrogens, Menopause, And Response to Therapy (SMART trials in postmenopausal women with an intact uterus. Of the various doses of BZA/CE evaluated, BZA 20 mg/CE 0.45 mg and 0.625 mg were associated with a low incidence of endometrial hyperplasia (<1% similar to placebo, and showed significant improvements in hot flushes and vulvar/vaginal symptoms and increases in bone mineral density. BZA 20 mg/CE 0.45 mg and 0.625 mg were associated with a low incidence of breast-related adverse events and demonstrated no difference from placebo in age-related changes in mammographic breast density. Both BZA/CE doses showed a favorable tolerability profile, with no increases in uterine bleeding or breast tenderness, and had positive effects on metabolic parameters and quality of life. BZA/CE may be a promising alternative to hormone therapy for the treatment of menopausal

  19. Mechanisms of G Protein-Coupled Estrogen Receptor-Mediated Spinal Nociception

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Deliu, Elena; Brailoiu, G. Cristina; Arterburn, Jeffrey B.

    2012-01-01

    Human and animal studies suggest that estrogens are involved in the processing of nociceptive sensory information and analgesic responses in the central nervous system. Rapid pronociceptive estrogenic effects have been reported, some of which likely involve G protein-coupled estrogen receptor (GPER...... increase, ROS accumulation, and neuronal membrane depolarization. PerspectiveOur results suggest that GPER modulates pain processing in spinal sensory neurons via cytosolic calcium increase and ROS accumulation. These findings extend the current knowledge on GPER involvement in physiology and disease...

  20. Estrogen protection against EAE modulates the microbiota and mucosal-associated regulatory cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Benedek, Gil; Zhang, Jun; Nguyen, Ha; Kent, Gail; Seifert, Hilary A; Davin, Sean; Stauffer, Patrick; Vandenbark, Arthur A; Karstens, Lisa; Asquith, Mark; Offner, Halina

    2017-09-15

    Sex hormones promote immunoregulatory effects on multiple sclerosis. In the current study we evaluated the composition of the gut microbiota and the mucosal-associated regulatory cells in estrogen or sham treated female mice before and after autoimmune encephalomyelitis (EAE) induction. Treatment with pregnancy levels of estrogen induces changes in the composition and diversity of gut microbiota. Additionally, estrogen prevents EAE-associated changes in the gut microbiota and might promote the enrichment of bacteria that are associated with immune regulation. Our results point to a possible cross-talk between the sex hormones and the gut microbiota, which could promote neuroprotection. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  1. Assessment of estrogenic, mutagenic and antimutagenic activity of nemorosone

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mariana S. Camargo

    2011-08-01

    Full Text Available Currently, a wide range of research involving natural products is focused on the discovery of new drugs in many different therapeutic areas. A great number of the synthetic compounds on the market were derived from natural products, especially plants. Nemorosone is the major constituent of the floral resin of Clusia rosea Jacq., Clusiaceae, and in Cuban propolis. In vitro studies have shown cytotoxic activity in this substance against various tumor cell lines, including those resistant to various cytotoxic drugs, whereas it has low cytotoxicity to non-tumoral cells. Therefore, in order to characterize the biological activity of nemorosone, a substance with potential antitumor activity, and in view of preclinical testing of the toxicity of drug candidate compounds, the main aim of this study was to determine the mutagenic and antimutagenic activity of nemorosone by the Ames test, using the strains TA97a, TA98, TA100 and TA102 of Salmonella typhimurium. Secondly, to characterize the estrogenic activity in an experimental recombinant yeast model (Recombinant Yeast Assay mutagenic activity was observed at in any of the concentrations in any of the test strains. To evaluate the antimutagenic potential, direct and indirect mutagenic agents were used: 4 nitro-o-phenylenediamine (NPD, mitomycin C (MMC and aflatoxin B1 (AFL. Nemorosone showed moderate antimutagenic activity (inhibition level 31%, in strain TA100 in the presence of AFL, and strong antimutagenic activity in TA102 against MMC (inhibition level 53%. Estrogenic activity was observed, with an EEq of 0.41±0.16 nM at various tested concentrations.

  2. Assessment of estrogenic, mutagenic and antimutagenic activity of nemorosone

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mariana S. Camargo

    2011-10-01

    Full Text Available Currently, a wide range of research involving natural products is focused on the discovery of new drugs in many different therapeutic areas. A great number of the synthetic compounds on the market were derived from natural products, especially plants. Nemorosone is the major constituent of the floral resin of Clusia rosea Jacq., Clusiaceae, and in Cuban propolis. In vitro studies have shown cytotoxic activity in this substance against various tumor cell lines, including those resistant to various cytotoxic drugs, whereas it has low cytotoxicity to non-tumoral cells. Therefore, in order to characterize the biological activity of nemorosone, a substance with potential antitumor activity, and in view of preclinical testing of the toxicity of drug candidate compounds, the main aim of this study was to determine the mutagenic and antimutagenic activity of nemorosone by the Ames test, using the strains TA97a, TA98, TA100 and TA102 of Salmonella typhimurium. Secondly, to characterize the estrogenic activity in an experimental recombinant yeast model (Recombinant Yeast Assay mutagenic activity was observed at in any of the concentrations in any of the test strains. To evaluate the antimutagenic potential, direct and indirect mutagenic agents were used: 4 nitro-o-phenylenediamine (NPD, mitomycin C (MMC and aflatoxin B1 (AFL. Nemorosone showed moderate antimutagenic activity (inhibition level 31%, in strain TA100 in the presence of AFL, and strong antimutagenic activity in TA102 against MMC (inhibition level 53%. Estrogenic activity was observed, with an EEq of 0.41±0.16 nM at various tested concentrations.

  3. Distinct cognitive effects of estrogen and progesterone in menopausal women.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berent-Spillson, Alison; Briceno, Emily; Pinsky, Alana; Simmen, Angela; Persad, Carol C; Zubieta, Jon-Kar; Smith, Yolanda R

    2015-09-01

    The effects of postmenopausal hormone treatment on cognitive outcomes are inconsistent in the literature. Emerging evidence suggests that cognitive effects are influenced by specific hormone formulations, and that progesterone is more likely to be associated with positive outcomes than synthetic progestin. There are very few studies of unopposed progesterone in postmenopausal women, and none that use functional neuroimaging, a sensitive measure of neurobiological function. In this study of 29 recently postmenopausal women, we used functional MRI and neuropsychological measures to separately assess the effects of estrogen or progesterone treatment on visual and verbal cognitive function. Women were randomized to receive 90 days of either estradiol or progesterone counterbalanced with placebo. After each treatment arm, women were given a battery of verbal and visual cognitive function and working memory tests, and underwent functional MRI including verbal processing and visual working memory tasks. We found that both estradiol and progesterone were associated with changes in activation patterns during verbal processing. Compared to placebo, women receiving estradiol treatment had greater activation in the left prefrontal cortex, a region associated with verbal processing and encoding. Progesterone was associated with changes in regional brain activation patterns during a visual memory task, with greater activation in the left prefrontal cortex and right hippocampus compared to placebo. Both treatments were associated with a statistically non-significant increase in number of words remembered following the verbal task performed during the fMRI scanning session, while only progesterone was associated with improved neuropsychological measures of verbal working memory compared to placebo. These results point to potential cognitive benefits of both estrogen and progesterone. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  4. THE ROLE OF ESTROGEN IN WOMEN WITH ANDROGENETIC ALOPECIA

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Putu Diah Pratiwi

    2013-07-01

    Full Text Available Normal 0 false false false EN-US X-NONE X-NONE Hair loss may accured in both male and female population. Hair loss usually accured in Telogenic phase, meanwhile in Anagenic phase hair loss due to chemotherapy or radiation. Female pattern hair loss (FPHL is regarded as hair fall type which is accured in women in common and known as female androgenetic alopecia. Almost 40%, 50 years old female shown hair fall sign, which is developed progressive fibrosing alopecia of central scalp, especially in frontal and parietal area. There are two common treatment for Female pattern Hair Loss are Minoxidil for topical use, and Fenesteride by oral. However, it has long been known that estrogens also profoundly alter hair follicle growth and cycling by binding to locally expressed high-affinity estrogen receptors (ERs, in turn increase anagenic phase and represed telogenic phase. /* Style Definitions */ table.MsoNormalTable {mso-style-name:"Table Normal"; mso-tstyle-rowband-size:0; mso-tstyle-colband-size:0; mso-style-noshow:yes; mso-style-priority:99; mso-style-qformat:yes; mso-style-parent:""; mso-padding-alt:0in 5.4pt 0in 5.4pt; mso-para-margin-top:0in; mso-para-margin-right:0in; mso-para-margin-bottom:10.0pt; mso-para-margin-left:0in; line-height:115%; mso-pagination:widow-orphan; font-size:11.0pt; font-family:"Calibri","sans-serif"; mso-ascii-font-family:Calibri; mso-ascii-theme-font:minor-latin; mso-fareast-font-family:"Times New Roman"; mso-fareast-theme-font:minor-fareast; mso-hansi-font-family:Calibri; mso-hansi-theme-font:minor-latin; mso-bidi-font-family:"Times New Roman"; mso-bidi-theme-font:minor-bidi;}

  5. Associations between aerobic fitness and estrogen metabolites in premenopausal women.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Campbell, Kristin L; Westerlind, Kim C; Harber, Vicki J; Friedenreich, Christine M; Courneya, Kerry S

    2005-04-01

    Chronic physical activity may alter estrogen metabolism, a proposed biomarker of breast cancer risk, by causing a shift toward higher 2-OHE1 and lower 16alpha-OHE1 levels. To investigate the association between an objective indicator of chronic exercise, aerobic fitness, and 2-OHE1 and 16alpha-OHE1 in premenopausal women. Women with high aerobic fitness (N=17; VO2max>or=48 mL.kg.min-1) were compared with women with average aerobic fitness (N=13; VO2maxVO2max), using an incremental cycle ergometer test. Urine samples were collected during the follicular and luteal phase of the menstrual cycle. There were no statistically significant differences between average and highly fit women for 2-OHE1, 16alpha-OHE1, or the 2:16alpha-OHE1 ratio in either the follicular or luteal phase. However, the high-fitness group showed a trend toward a higher luteal 2:16alpha-OHE1 (P=0.20). In ancillary analyses, a higher sum of skinfolds was associated with significantly higher luteal 16-OHE1 levels (r=0.39, P=0.03) and lower luteal phase 2:16 OHE ratio (r=-0.41, P=0.02). Higher BMI was associated with lower follicular phase 2-OHE1 (r=-0.37, P=0.04) and lower follicular 2:16 OHE1 ratio (r=-40, P=0.03). This exploratory study is the first to investigate the association between aerobic fitness and estrogen metabolites in premenopausal women using metabolic parameters. We observed no statistically significant association between aerobic fitness and 2-OHE1 and 16alpha-OHE1, but found that body composition was associated with 2-OHE1 and 16alpha-OHE1 levels.

  6. Mechanism of Inhibition of Estrogen Biosynthesis by Azole Fungicides

    Science.gov (United States)

    Egbuta, Chinaza; Lo, Jessica

    2014-01-01

    Biosynthesis of estrogens from androgens is catalyzed by cytochrome P450 aromatase. Aromatase inhibition by the triazole compounds letrozole (LTZ) and anastrozole is a prevalent therapy for estrogen-dependent postmenopausal breast cancer. Azoles are widely used as agricultural fungicides and antimycotic drugs that target 14α-demethylase. Some were previously shown to inhibit aromatase, thereby raising the possibility of endocrine disruptive effects. However, mechanistic analysis of their inhibition has never been undertaken. We have evaluated the inhibitory effects of 3 common fungicides, bifonazole, imazalil, and flusilazole, in human aromatase purified from placenta and compared them with LTZ, the most potent inhibitor of aromatase. Bifonazole exhibits strong inhibitory effects with an IC50 of 270nM and Ki (Michaeles-Menten inhibition constant) of 68nM, compared with 10nM and 13nM, respectively, for LTZ. The IC50 and Ki are 1100nM and 278nM for imazilil and 3200nM and 547nM for flusilazole, respectively. Analyses of inhibition kinetics suggest that the modes of inhibition by azole fungicides are mixed or competitive, whereas LTZ inhibition could be noncompetitive or mixed. We interpret the inhibition mechanism in the context of the x-ray structure of aromatase-androstenedione complex. Structural data show that aromatase has 3 binding pockets in relation to the heme. The substrate-binding cavity at the heme-distal site closely compliments the structures of the natural substrate, androstenedione, and steroidal aromatase inhibitors. Because the structures of LTZ and the azole fungicides are entirely dissimilar to the androstenedione backbone, the azoles possibly inhibit by binding to a structurally rearranged active site, the 2 other catalytically important sites, or both, in agreement with the kinetics data. PMID:25243857

  7. Bisphenol AF as an Inducer of Estrogen Receptor β (ERβ): Evidence for Anti-estrogenic Effects at Higher Concentrations in Human Breast Cancer Cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Okazaki, Hiroyuki; Takeda, Shuso; Kakizoe, Kazuhiro; Taniguchi, Aya; Tokuyasu, Miki; Himeno, Taichi; Ishii, Hiroyuki; Kohro-Ikeda, Eriko; Haraguchi, Koichi; Watanabe, Kazuhito; Aramaki, Hironori

    2017-01-01

    Bisphenols are endocrine disruptors that are widely found in the environment. Accumulating experimental evidence suggests an adverse interaction between bisphenols and estrogen signaling. Most studies have performed experiments that focused on estrogen receptor (ER) engagement by bisphenols. Therefore, the effects of bisphenols on the expression of ERα (ESR1) and ERβ (ESR2) remain largely unknown. In the present study, we examined the effects of four bisphenols: bisphenol A (BPA), bisphenol B (BPB), bisphenol S (BPS), and bisphenol AF (BPAF), on estrogen signaling in two human breast cancer cell lines (MCF-7 and SK-BR-3). Among these bisphenols, BPAF up-regulated the expression of ERβ, and this was coupled with the abrogation of estrogen response element (ERE)-mediated transcriptional activities as well as the down-regulation of Cdc2 expression in MCF-7 cells, without influencing the expression of ERα. BPAF functioned as an agonist of ERα at lower concentrations (nanomolar order), but did not exhibit any modulatory action on ERα transiently expressed in SK-BR-3 cells in the presence or absence of 17β-estradiol (E2) at higher concentrations (micromolar order). The introduction of ERβ cDNA resulted in greater reductions in MCF-7 cell viability than with BPAF alone. Since ERβ is a suppressive molecule of ERα function, these results provide rational evidence for BPAF functioning as an anti-estrogenic compound via the induction of ERβ at higher concentrations.

  8. Early expression of aromatase and the membrane estrogen receptor GPER in neuromasts reveals a role for estrogens in the development of the frog lateral line system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hamilton, Christine K; Navarro-Martin, Laia; Neufeld, Miriam; Basak, Ajoy; Trudeau, Vance L

    2014-09-01

    Estrogens and their receptors are present at very early stages of vertebrate embryogenesis before gonadal tissues are formed. However, the cellular source and the function of estrogens in embryogenesis remain major questions in developmental endocrinology. We demonstrate the presence of estrogen-synthesizing enzyme aromatase and G protein-coupled estrogen receptor (GPER) proteins throughout early embryogenesis in the model organism, Silurana tropicalis. We provide the first evidence of aromatase in the vertebrate lateral line. High levels of aromatase were detected in the mantle cells of neuromasts, the mechanosensory units of the lateral line, which persisted throughout the course of development (Nieuwkoop and Faber stages 34-47). We show that GPER is expressed in both the accessory and hair cells. Pharmacological activation of GPER with the agonist G-1 disrupted neuromast development and migration. Future study of this novel estrogen system in the amphibian lateral line may shed light on similar systems such as the mammalian inner ear. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  9. In vivo imaging of estrogen receptor concentration in the endometrium and myometrium using FES PET - influence of menstrual cycle and endogenous estrogen level

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tsuchida, Tatsuro [Department of Radiology, Faculty of Medical Sciences, University of Fukui, Yoshida-gun, Fukui 910-1193 (Japan)]. E-mail: tsucchy@fmsrsa.fukui-med.ac.jp; Okazawa, Hidehiko [Biomedical Imaging Research Center, University of Fukui, Yoshida-gun, Fukui 910-1193 (Japan); Mori, Tetsuya [Biomedical Imaging Research Center, University of Fukui, Yoshida-gun, Fukui 910-1193 (Japan); Kobayashi, Masato [Biomedical Imaging Research Center, University of Fukui, Yoshida-gun, Fukui 910-1193 (Japan); Yoshida, Yoshio [Department of Obstetrics and Gynecology, Faculty of Medical Sciences, University of Fukui, Yoshida-gun, Fukui 910-1193 (Japan); Fujibayashi, Yasuhisa [Biomedical Imaging Research Center, University of Fukui, Yoshida-gun, Fukui 910-1193 (Japan); Itoh, Harumi [Department of Radiology, Faculty of Medical Sciences, University of Fukui, Yoshida-gun, Fukui 910-1193 (Japan)

    2007-02-15

    Purpose: The goals of this study were to measure estrogen receptor (ER) concentration in the endometrium and myometrium using 16{alpha}-[{sup 18}F]fluoro-17{beta}-estradiol (FES) positron emission tomography (PET) and to investigate the relationship between changes in these parameters with the menstrual cycle and endogenous estrogen levels. Methods: Sixteen female healthy volunteers were included in this study. After blood sampling to measure endogenous estrogen level, FES PET image was acquired 60 min postinjection of FES. After whole-body imaging of FES PET, averaged standardized uptake values (SUVs) in the endometrium and myometrium were measured, and the relationship between FES uptake and menstrual cycle or endogenous estrogen level was evaluated. Results: Endometrial SUV was significantly higher in the proliferative phase than in the secretory phase (6.03{+-}1.05 vs. 3.97{+-}1.29, P=.022). In contrast, there was no significant difference in myometrial SUV when the proliferative and secretory phases were compared (P=.23). Further, there was no correlation between SUV and endogenous estrogen level in the proliferative phase. Conclusions: The change of ER concentration relative to menstrual cycle as characterized by FES PET was consistent with those from previous reports that used an immunohistochemical technique. These data suggest that FES PET is a feasible, noninvasive method for characterizing changes in ER concentration.

  10. Activation of Penile Proadipogenic Peroxisome Proliferator-Activated Receptor with an Estrogen: Interaction with Estrogen Receptor Alpha during Postnatal Development

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mahmoud M. Mansour

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available Exposure to the estrogen receptor alpha (ER ligand diethylstilbesterol (DES between neonatal days 2 to 12 induces penile adipogenesis and adult infertility in rats. The objective of this study was to investigate the in vivo interaction between DES-activated ER and the proadipogenic transcription factor peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor gamma (PPAR. Transcripts for PPARs , , and and 1a splice variant were detected in Sprague-Dawley normal rat penis with PPAR predominating. In addition, PPAR1b and PPAR2 were newly induced by DES. The PPAR transcripts were significantly upregulated with DES and reduced by antiestrogen ICI 182, 780. At the cellular level, PPAR protein was detected in urethral transitional epithelium and stromal, endothelial, neuronal, and smooth muscular cells. Treatment with DES activated ER and induced adipocyte differentiation in corpus cavernosum penis. Those adipocytes exhibited strong nuclear PPAR expression. These results suggest a biological overlap between PPAR and ER and highlight a mechanism for endocrine disruption.

  11. c-Src modulates estrogen-induced stress and apoptosis in estrogen-deprived breast cancer cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fan, Ping; Griffith, Obi L; Agboke, Fadeke; Anur, Pavana; Zou, Xiaojun; McDaniel, Russell E; Creswell, Karen; Kim, Sung Hoon; Katzenellenbogen, John A; Gray, Joe W; Jordan, V Craig

    2013-01-01

    The emergence of antiestrogen resistance in breast cancer is an important clinical phenomenon affecting long-term survival in this disease. Identifying factors that convey cell survival in this setting may guide improvements in treatment. Estrogen (E2) can induce apoptosis in breast cancer cells that have been selected for survival after E2 deprivation for long periods (MCF-7:5C cells), but the mechanisms underlying E2-induced stress in this setting have not been elucidated. Here, we report that the c-Src kinase functions as a key adapter protein for the estrogen receptor (ER, ESR1) in its activation of stress responses induced by E2 in MCF-7:5C cells. E2 elevated phosphorylation of c-Src which was blocked by 4-hydroxytamoxifen (4-OHT), suggesting that E2 activated c-Src through the ER. We found that E2 activated the sensors of the unfolded protein response (UPR), IRE1α (ERN1) and PERK kinase (EIF2AK3), the latter of which phosphorylates eukaryotic translation initiation factor-2α (eIF2α). E2 also dramatically increased reactive oxygen species (ROS) production and up-regulated expression of heme oxygenase HO-1 (HMOX1), an indicator of oxidative stress, along with the central energy sensor kinase AMPK (PRKAA2). Pharmacological or RNAi-mediated inhibition of c-Src abolished the phosphorylation of eIF2α and AMPK, blocked E2-induced ROS production, and inhibited E2-induced apoptosis. Together, our results establish that c-Src kinase mediates stresses generated by E2 in long-term E2-deprived cells that trigger apoptosis. This work offers a mechanistic rationale for a new approach in the treatment of endocrine-resistant breast cancer. PMID:23704208

  12. Distinct effects of loss of classical estrogen receptor signaling versus complete deletion of estrogen receptor alpha on bone.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Syed, Farhan A; Fraser, Daniel G; Monroe, David G; Khosla, Sundeep

    2011-08-01

    Estrogen receptor (ER) α is a major regulator of bone metabolism which can modulate gene expression via a "classical" pathway involving direct DNA binding to estrogen-response elements (EREs) or via "non-classical" pathways involving protein-protein interactions. While the skeletal consequences of loss of ERE binding by ERα have been described, a significant unresolved question is how loss of ERE binding differs from complete loss of ERα. Thus, we compared the skeletal phenotype of wild-type (ERα(+/+)) and ERα knock out (ERα(-/-)) mice with that of mice in which the only ERα present had a knock-in mutation abolishing ERE binding (non-classical ERα knock-in [NERKI], ERα(-/NERKI)). All three groups were in the same genetic background (C57BL/6). As compared to both ERα(+/+) and ERα(-/-) mice, ERα(-/NERKI) mice had significantly reduced cortical volumetric bone mineral density and thickness at the tibial diaphysis; this was accompanied by significant decreases in periosteal and endocortical mineral apposition rates. Colony forming unit (CFU)-fibroblast, CFU-alkaline phosphatase, and CFU-osteoblast numbers were all increased in ERα(-/-) compared to ERα(+/+) mice, but reduced in ERα(-/NERKI) mice compared to the two other groups. Thus, using mice in identical genetic backgrounds, our data indicate that the presence of an ERα that cannot bind DNA but can function through protein-protein interactions may have more deleterious skeletal effects than complete loss of ERα. These findings suggest that shifting the balance of classical versus non-classical ERα signaling triggers pathways that impair bone formation. Further studies defining these pathways may lead to novel approaches to selectively modulate ER signaling for beneficial skeletal effects. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  13. An integrated assessment of estrogenic contamination and biological effects in the aquatic environment of the Netherlands

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Vethaak, A.D.; Lahr, J.; Schrap, S.M.; Belfroid, A.C.; Rijs, G.B.J.; Gerritsen, A.; Boer, de J.; Bulder, A.S.; Grinwis, G.C.M.; Kuiper, R.V.; Legler, J.; Murk, A.J.; Peijnenburg, W.; Verkaar, H.J.M.; Voogt, de P.

    2005-01-01

    An extensive study was carried out in the Netherlands on the occurrence of a number of estrogenic compounds in surface water, sediment, biota, wastewater, rainwater and on the associated effects in fish. Compounds investigated included natural and synthetic hormones, phthalates,

  14. Caffeine, Adenosine Receptors and Estrogen in Toxin Models of Parkinson's Disease

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Schwarzschild, Michael A; Xu, Kui

    2008-01-01

    Continued progress has been made toward each of the Specific Aims (SAs) 1 and 2 (SA 3 completed) of our research project, Caffeine, adenosine receptors and estrogen in toxin models of Parkinson's disease...

  15. Interstrain Differences in the Development of Pyometra after Estrogen Treatment of Rats

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brossia, Lisa Jane; Roberts, Christopher Sean; Lopez, Jennifer T; Bigsby, Robert M; Dynlacht, Joseph R

    2009-01-01

    This case report describes the unanticipated development of pyometra in Brown Norway rats after treatment with estrogen. Sprague Dawley and Brown Norway rats were ovariectomized and randomly assigned to treatment groups (subcutaneous implantation of either a capsule containing 20 mg 17β-estradiol or an empty capsule, as a control). After irradiation of only the right eye, the rats were followed for several months in an attempt to determine the effects of estrogen on radiation cataractogenesis and investigate potential strain differences in this phenomenon. However, all Brown Norway rats that received estradiol treatment developed pyometra, whereas none the Sprague Dawley or control Brown Norway rats did. This case demonstrates the potential adverse effects of exogenous estrogen therapy, which are strain-specific in the rat. Caution should be taken when designing estrogen-related experiments involving Brown Norway rats and other potentially sensitive strains. PMID:19807973

  16. Role of mitochondrial oxidative stress to explain the different longevity between genders: protective effect of estrogens.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Viña, J; Sastre, J; Pallardó, F V; Gambini, J; Borrás, C

    2006-12-01

    Females live longer than males. Work from our laboratory has shown that this may be due to the up-regulation of longevity-associated genes by estrogens. Estrogens bind to the estrogen receptors and subsequently activate the mitogen activated protein kinase and nuclear factor kappa B signalling pathways, resulting in an up-regulation of antioxidant enzymes. Estrogen administration, however, has serious undesirable effects and of course, cannot be administered to males because of its powerful feminizing effects. Thus, we tested the effect of genistein, a phytoestrogen of high nutritional importance whose structure is similar to estradiol, on the regulation of the expression of antioxidant, longevity-related genes and consequently on oxidant levels in mammary gland tumour cells in culture. Phytoestrogens mimic the protective effect of oestradiol using the same signalling pathway. The critical importance of up-regulating antioxidant genes, by hormonal and dietary manipulations, to increase longevity is discussed.

  17. Control of the Mammary Cell Cycle Clock by Estrogen and Progesterone

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Weinberg, Robert

    2001-01-01

    Both the growth and the development of the mammary gland are controlled by the female hormones estrogen, prolactin and progesterone, and by interactions between the epithelial and stromal compartments of the breast...

  18. Chemical Probes of Rapid Estrogen Signaling in Breast Cancer Treatment and Chemoprevention

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Weatherman, Rose V

    2007-01-01

    .... Over the course of the project, we synthesized and tested approximately 15 new estrogen receptor modulators, some with novel activity in terms of both classic transcriptional and rapid response modulation...

  19. Accurate Prediction of the Response of Freshwater Fish to a Mixture of Estrogenic Chemicals

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Jayne V. Brian; Catherine A. Harris; Martin Scholze; Thomas Backhaus; Petra Booy; Marja Lamoree; Giulio Pojana; Niels Jonkers; Tamsin Runnalls; Angela Bonfà; Antonio Marcomini; John P. Sumpter

    2005-01-01

    .... We investigated the implications of this by analyzing the combined effects of a multicomponent mixture of five estrogenic chemicals using vitellogenin induction in male fathead minnows as an end point...

  20. FIELD DEPLOYABLE TECHNIQUES TO MONITOR EXPOSURE TO ENVIRONMENTAL ESTROGENS THROUGHOUT THE REPRODUCTIVE CYCLE OF WILD BIRDS

    Science.gov (United States)

    Concern about potential for endocrine disrupting chemicals to interfere with normal breeding behaviors of wildlife prompted this study of effects of exposure to environmental estrogens during the breeding cycle of wild birds. The house finch (Carpodacus mexicanus) was selected as...

  1. Inhibition of Estrogen-induced Growth of Breast Cancer by Targeting Mitochondrial Oxidants

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Roy, Deodutta; Felty, Quentin; Kunkle, Brian

    2008-01-01

    ...) Anchorage-independent cell growth, and (c) tumor spheroid formation using new 3D HuBiogel bioassay whether estrogen induced conversion of normal cells to transformed cells is inhibited by treatment with antioxidants, over expression of MnSOD...

  2. Involvement of Granulin in Estrogen-Induced Neurogenesis in the Adult Rat Hippocampus

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    CHIBA, Shuichi; SUZUKI, Masatoshi; YAMANOUCHI, Keitaro; NISHIHARA, Masugi

    2007-01-01

    Recent studies have demonstrated the presence of neurogenesis in the adult mammalian hippocampus, and it has been suggested that estrogen and various growth factors influence the processes of adult neurogenesis...

  3. Estrogen and progesterone receptors in endometrial carcinoma: comparison of immunohistochemical and biochemical analysis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nyholm, H C; Nielsen, Anette Lynge; Lyndrup, J

    1993-01-01

    In 159 endometrial carcinomas, estrogen (ER) and progesterone receptors (PR) were determined biochemically by dextran-coated charcoal (DCC) assay and immunohistochemically (ICA) on frozen sections. ICA receptor content was estimated by a total histologic score (HSCORE), including all tissue...

  4. Identification and quantification of estrogenic compounds in recycled and virgin paper for household use as determined by an in vitro yeast estrogen screen and chemical analysis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Vinggaard, Anne; Körner, Wolfgang; Lund, Kirsten H.

    2000-01-01

    The use of recycled paper for the manufacture of food contact materials is widespread, but very little is known about the presence of potential contaminants in the paper. The purpose of this study was to assess the worst-case migration of estrogenic active compounds using extracts of paper...... contain bisphenol A and other xenoestrogens may apply to other types of recycled paper used for food packaging and emphasize the importance of identifying this and other contaminants in recycled paper in general. These data indicate that bisphenol A may be useful as a purity indicator for recycled paper....... for household use. Twenty different brands of kitchen rolls, nine of which were made from recycled paper and the remainder from virgin paper, were obtained from retail shops. Paper extracts were subjected to (a) determination of the total estrogenic activity by using an in vitro estrogen screen based on yeast...

  5. The regulation of MS-KIF18A expression and cross talk with estrogen receptor.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Margalit Zusev

    2009-07-01

    Full Text Available This study provides a novel view on the interactions between the MS-KIF18A, a kinesin protein, and estrogen receptor alpha (ERalpha which were studied in vivo and in vitro. Additionally, the regulation of MS-KIF18A expression by estrogen was investigated at the gene and protein levels. An association between recombinant proteins; ERalpha and MS-KIF18A was demonstrated in vitro in a pull down assay. Such interactions were proven also for endogenous proteins in MBA-15 cells were detected prominently in the cytoplasm and are up-regulated by estrogen. Additionally, an association between these proteins and the transcription factor NF-kappaB was identified. MS-KIF18A mRNA expression was measured in vivo in relation to age and estrogen level in mice and rats models. A decrease in MS-KIF18A mRNA level was measured in old and in OVX-estrogen depleted rats as compared to young animals. The low MS-KIF18A mRNA expression in OVX rats was restored by estrogen treatment. We studied the regulation of MS-KIF18A transcription by estrogen using the luciferase reporter gene and chromatin immuno-precipitation (ChIP assays. The luciferase reporter gene assay demonstrated an increase in MS-KIF18A promoter activity in response to 10(-8 M estrogen and 10(-7M ICI-182,780. Complimentary, the ChIP assay quantified the binding of ERalpha and pcJun to the MS-KIF18A promoter that was enhanced in cells treated by estrogen and ICI-182,780. In addition, cells treated by estrogen expressed higher levels of MS-KIF18A mRNA and protein and the protein turnover in MBA-15 cells was accelerated. Presented data demonstrated that ERalpha is a defined cargo of MS-KIF18A and added novel insight on the role of estrogen in regulation of MS-KIF18A expression both in vivo and in vitro.

  6. Estrogen deficiency attenuates fluid flow-induced [Ca2+]i oscillations and mechanoresponsiveness of MLO-Y4 osteocytes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deepak, Vishwa; Kayastha, Pushpalata; McNamara, Laoise M

    2017-07-01

    It has been proposed that estrogen regulates the mechanosensitivity of osteocytes; however, the effects of estrogen deficiency that arises during postmenopausal osteoporosis on mechanical stimulation-induced calcium signaling in osteocytes remain elusive. Here, we pretreated MLO-Y4 osteocytes with 10 nM E2 for 2, 3 and 5 d, then simulated postmenopausal conditions either by estrogen withdrawal (EW) from culture medium, or by inhibiting the estrogen receptor by using fulvestrant and estrogen (FE; ICI 182,780) in vitro We investigated [Ca2+]i oscillations and mechanobiologic responses of osteocytes (EW and FE) that were exposed to oscillatory fluid flow (OFF; 1 Pa, 0.5 Hz). We demonstrated that estrogen treatment enhanced OFF-induced [Ca2+]i oscillations and that this effect was abrogated both by FE and EW. Moreover, osteocytes in both estrogen-depleted groups (EW and FE) had reduced levels of NO and prostaglandin E2 release, down-regulated dentin matrix protein-1, sclerostin, osteopontin, osteocalcin, and alkaline phosphatase mRNA expression, and reduced F-actin fiber formation after OFF stimulation compared with estrogen-treated cells. We propose a link between estrogen deficiency and alterations in [Ca2+]i-mediated mechanosensitivity of osteocytes, which ultimately alter osteocyte function and differentiation.-Deepak, V., Kayastha, P., McNamara, L. M. Estrogen deficiency attenuates fluid flow-induced [Ca2+]i oscillations and mechanoresponsiveness of MLO-Y4 osteocytes. © FASEB.

  7. Application of the yeast-based reporter gene bioassay for the assessment of estrogenic activity in cow's milk from Poland.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stypuła-Trębas, Sylwia; Minta, Maria; Radko, Lidia; Żmudzki, Jan

    2015-11-01

    Milk contain compounds acting through the estrogen receptor signaling. The still open question whether such estrogens pose a risk for human health, encouraged us to measure the overall estrogenic activity of cow's milk in the in vitro yeast reporter bioassay. First, we assessed the ability of the bioassay to detect estrogens frequently detected in milk. The relative potencies of 16 compounds descended in the order: 17β-estradiol (17β-E2), 17α-ethinylestradiol, diethylstilbestrol, dienestrol, 17α-E2, estrone, zearalenone, estriol, equol, genistein, 17β-E2 glucuronide, bisphenol A, apigenin, daidzein. Flavone, 4-n-nonylphenol and 4-t-octylphenol shown no activity in the bioassay.The estrogenic activities of milk samples without hydrolysis were below the detection limit, whereas in 50% of the deconjugated samples they varied between 0.29 and 0.49 ng EEQ mL(-1). We also compared the estrogenic activity in raw cow's milk collected from rural and industrial locations in Poland. In our pilot study we did not observe statistically significant difference in estrogenic activities in milk collected from the two locations. We found that the daily intake of estrogens with milk may be higher than estrogen levels in human serum. Further studies are warranted to evaluate the significance of milk and dairy as a source of estrogens for humans. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  8. Genomic agonism and phenotypic antagonism between estrogen and progesterone receptors in breast cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Singhal, Hari; Greene, Marianne E; Tarulli, Gerard; Zarnke, Allison L; Bourgo, Ryan J; Laine, Muriel; Chang, Ya-Fang; Ma, Shihong; Dembo, Anna G; Raj, Ganesh V; Hickey, Theresa E; Tilley, Wayne D; Greene, Geoffrey L

    2016-06-01

    The functional role of progesterone receptor (PR) and its impact on estrogen signaling in breast cancer remain controversial. In primary ER(+) (estrogen receptor-positive)/PR(+) human tumors, we report that PR reprograms estrogen signaling as a genomic agonist and a phenotypic antagonist. In isolation, estrogen and progestin act as genomic agonists by regulating the expression of common target genes in similar directions, but at different levels. Similarly, in isolation, progestin is also a weak phenotypic agonist of estrogen action. However, in the presence of both hormones, progestin behaves as a phenotypic estrogen antagonist. PR remodels nucleosomes to noncompetitively redirect ER genomic binding to distal enhancers enriched for BRCA1 binding motifs and sites that link PR and ER/PR complexes. When both hormones are present, progestin modulates estrogen action, such that responsive transcriptomes, cellular processes, and ER/PR recruitment to genomic sites correlate with those observed with PR alone, but not ER alone. Despite this overall correlation, the transcriptome patterns modulated by dual treatment are sufficiently different from individual treatments, such that antagonism of oncogenic processes is both predicted and observed. Combination therapies using the selective PR modulator/antagonist (SPRM) CDB4124 in combination with tamoxifen elicited 70% cytotoxic tumor regression of T47D tumor xenografts, whereas individual therapies inhibited tumor growth without net regression. Our findings demonstrate that PR redirects ER chromatin binding to antagonize estrogen signaling and that SPRMs can potentiate responses to antiestrogens, suggesting that cotargeting of ER and PR in ER(+)/PR(+) breast cancers should be explored.

  9. Expression of the estrogen receptors and steroidogenic enzymes involved in estradiol formation in the monkey vagina.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bertin, Jonathan; Ouellet, Johanne; Dury, Alain Yves; Pelletier, Georges; Labrie, Fernand

    2014-11-01

    Estrogens are well recognized to have beneficial effects on vulvovaginal atrophy because of menopause. The distribution of estrogen receptors and enzymes responsible for estradiol (E2) formation within the vagina may provide insight into how dehydroepiandrosterone, a precursor of both estrogens and androgens, improves vulvovaginal atrophy. The purpose of the study was to determine where the steroidogenic enzymes responsible for E2 formation as well as estrogen receptors are localized in vaginal specimens collected from cynomolgus monkeys (Macaca fascicularis), the closest model to the human. HSD3B1, HSD17B1, HSD17B5, HSD17B12, aromatase (CYP19A1), estrogen receptor (ER)-α, and ER-β were measured or localized by quantitative real-time polymerase chain reaction, immunohistochemistry, and immunofluorescence. Estrogens were quantified by liquid chromatography/tandem mass spectrometry. All steroidogenic enzymes and estrogen receptors are localized mainly in the superficial layer of the stratified squamous epithelium, blood vessel walls, and muscle fibers of the vagina. Immunolabeling of HSD17B5 and HSD17B12 shows that these enzymes are uniformly distributed from the basal membrane to the superficial keratinized cells, whereas HSD3B1 and aromatase are particularly localized in the outer (external) portion of the epithelial layer. ER-α and ER-β are also distributed within the vaginal epithelium, with expression especially elevated at the basal membrane level. The enzymes responsible for E2 formation as well as ERs are expressed mainly in the superficial layer of the stratified epithelium as well as the muscle layer of the vagina. The present data provide morphologic and biochemical support for the role of local dehydroepiandrosterone transformation into estrogens in regulating epithelial cell maturation, pH, fluid secretion, smooth muscle activity, and blood flow regulation in the primate vagina. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  10. Actions of Tamoxifen and Estrogen on Osteoblast Protein Kinase C Expression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1996-07-01

    extended period of time over which estrogen deficiency -induced bone loss occurs. Postmenopausal bone loss occurs gradually over several years, and changes... vitamin D3, the osteoclast precursors differentiate into mature osteoclasts. These osteoclasts can then be treated with estrogen/tamoxifen and isozyme...postmenopausal women. Arch Intern Med 151:1842-1847. 11. Aufdemorte TB, Triplett RG, Holt GR 1988 Sex steroids, osteoporosis, and osteoarthritis . In

  11. Mammographic Density Change With Estrogen and Progestin Therapy and Breast Cancer Risk.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Byrne, Celia; Ursin, Giske; Martin, Christopher F; Peck, Jennifer D; Cole, Elodia B; Zeng, Donglin; Kim, Eunhee; Yaffe, Martin D; Boyd, Norman F; Heiss, Gerardo; McTiernan, Anne; Chlebowski, Rowan T; Lane, Dorothy S; Manson, JoAnn E; Wactawski-Wende, Jean; Pisano, Etta D

    2017-09-01

    Estrogen plus progestin therapy increases both mammographic density and breast cancer incidence. Whether mammographic density change associated with estrogen plus progestin initiation predicts breast cancer risk is unknown. We conducted an ancillary nested case-control study within the Women's Health Initiative trial that randomly assigned postmenopausal women to daily conjugated equine estrogen 0.625 mg plus medroxyprogesterone acetate 2.5 mg or placebo. Mammographic density was assessed from mammograms taken prior to and one year after random assignment for 174 women who later developed breast cancer (cases) and 733 healthy women (controls). Logistic regression analyses included adjustment for confounders and baseline mammographic density when appropriate. Among women in the estrogen plus progestin arm (97 cases/378 controls), each 1% positive change in percent mammographic density increased breast cancer risk 3% (odds ratio [OR] = 1.03, 95% confidence interval [CI] = 1.01 to 1.06). For women in the highest quintile of mammographic density change (>19.3% increase), breast cancer risk increased 3.6-fold (95% CI = 1.52 to 8.56). The effect of estrogen plus progestin use on breast cancer risk (OR = 1.28, 95% CI = 0.90 to 1.82) was eliminated in this study, after adjusting for change in mammographic density (OR = 1.00, 95% CI = 0.66 to 1.51). We found the one-year change in mammographic density after estrogen plus progestin initiation predicted subsequent increase in breast cancer risk. All of the increased risk from estrogen plus progestin use was mediated through mammographic density change. Doctors should evaluate changes in mammographic density with women who initiate estrogen plus progestin therapy and discuss the breast cancer risk implications.

  12. The role of estrogen in bone growth and formation: changes at puberty

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Divya Singh

    2010-12-01

    Full Text Available Divya Singh1, Sabyasachi Sanyal2, Naibedya Chattopadhyay11Division of Endocrinology, 2Division of Drug Target Discovery and Development, Central Drug Research Institute (Council of Scientific and Industrial Research, Lucknow, Uttar Pradesh, IndiaAbstract: A high peak bone mass (PBM at skeletal maturity is a good predictor for lower rate of fracture risks in later life. Growth during puberty contributes significantly to PBM achievement in women and men. The growth hormone (GH/insulin-like growth factor 1 (IGF-1 axis has a critical role in pubertal bone growth. There is an increase in GH and IGF-1 levels during puberty; thus, it is assumed that sex steroids contribute to higher GH/IGF-1 action during growth. Recent studies indicate that estrogen increases GH secretion in boys and girls, and the major effect of testosterone on GH secretion is via aromatization to estrogen. Estrogen is pivotal for epiphyseal fusion in young men and women. From studies of individuals with a mutated aromatase gene and a case study of male patient with defective estrogen receptor-alpha (ER-α, it is clear that estrogen is indispensable for normal pubertal growth and growth plate fusion. ER-α and estrogen receptor-beta (ER-β have been localized in growth plate and bone. ER knockout studies have shown that ER-α-/- female mice have reduced linear appendicular growth, while ER-β-/- mice have increased appendicular growth. No such effect is seen in ER-β-/- males; however, repressed growth is seen in ER-α-/- males, resulting in shorter long bones. Thus, ER-β represses longitudinal bone growth in female mice, while it has no function in the regulation of longitudinal bone growth in male mice. These findings indicate that estrogen plays a critical role in skeletal physiology of males as well as females.Keywords: peak bone mass, puberty, estrogen, growth plate

  13. Contraceptive Options and Their Associated Estrogenic Environmental Loads: Relationships and Trade-Offs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khan, Usman; Nicell, Jim A.

    2014-01-01

    This work explores the relationships between a user's choice of a given contraceptive option and the load of steroidal estrogens that can be associated with that choice. Family planning data for the USA served as a basis for the analysis. The results showed that collectively the use of contraception in the USA conservatively averts the release of approximately 4.8 tonnes of estradiol equivalents to the environment. 35% of the estrogenic load released over the course of all experienced pregnancies events and 34% the estrogenic load represented by all resultant legacies are a result of contraception failure and the non-use of contraception. A scenario analysis conducted to explore the impacts of discontinuing the use of ethinylestradiol-based oral contraceptives revealed that this would not only result in a 1.7-fold increase in the estrogenic loading of the users, but the users would also be expected to experience undesired family planning outcomes at a rate that is 3.3 times higher. Additional scenario analyses in which ethinylestradiol-based oral contraceptive users were modeled as having switched entirely to the use of male condoms, diaphragms or copper IUDs suggested that whether a higher or lower estrogenic load can be associated with the switching population depends on the typical failure rates of the options adopted following discontinuation. And, finally, it was estimated that, in the USA, at most 13% of the annual estrogenic load can be averted by fully meeting the contraceptive needs of the population. Therefore, while the issue of estrogen impacts on the environment cannot be addressed solely by meeting the population's contraceptive needs, a significant fraction of the estrogenic mass released to environment can be averted by improving the level with which their contraceptive needs are met. PMID:24670973

  14. Membrane Estrogen Receptor Alpha Targeting and its Association with SHC in Regulating Breast Cancer Cell Proliferation

    Science.gov (United States)

    2004-06-01

    1130-1131. 22. Mesbah , M, Nemere, 1, Papagerakis, P., Nefussi, J. R., Orestes-Cardoso, S., 5. Watson, C. S., Campbell, C. H . & Gametchu, B. (1999) F.p...Rodabough, R. J., Gilligan, M. A., Cyr, M. G., Thomson, C. A., Khandekar, J., Petrovitch, H ., and McTiernan, A. Influence of estrogen plus... H ., Gustafsson, J. A., Nilsson, S., and Ohlsson, C. Estren is a selective estrogen receptor modulator with transcriptional activity. Mol Pharmacol

  15. Developmental exposure to estrogen alters differentiation and epigenetic programming in a human fetal prostate xenograft model.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Camelia M Saffarini

    Full Text Available Prostate cancer is the most frequent non-cutaneous malignancy in men. There is strong evidence in rodents that neonatal estrogen exposure plays a role in the development of this disease. However, there is little information regarding the effects of estrogen in human fetal prostate tissue. This study explored early life estrogen exposure, with and without a secondary estrogen and testosterone treatment in a human fetal prostate xenograft model. Histopathological lesions, proliferation, and serum hormone levels were evaluated at 7, 30, 90, and 200-day time-points after xenografting. The expression of 40 key genes involved in prostatic glandular and stromal growth, cell-cycle progression, apoptosis, hormone receptors and tumor suppressors was evaluated using a custom PCR array. Epigenome-wide analysis of DNA methylation was performed on whole tissue, and laser capture-microdissection (LCM isolated epithelial and stromal compartments of 200-day prostate xenografts. Combined initial plus secondary estrogenic exposures had the most severe tissue changes as revealed by the presence of hyperplastic glands at day 200. Gene expression changes corresponded with the cellular events in the KEGG prostate cancer pathway, indicating that initial plus secondary exposure to estrogen altered the PI3K-Akt signaling pathway, ultimately resulting in apoptosis inhibition and an increase in cell cycle progression. DNA methylation revealed that differentially methylated CpG sites significantly predominate in the stromal compartment as a result of estrogen-treatment, thereby providing new targets for future investigation. By using human fetal prostate tissue and eliminating the need for species extrapolation, this study provides novel insights into the gene expression and epigenetic effects related to prostate carcinogenesis following early life estrogen exposure.

  16. Glutamic acid ameliorates estrogen deficiency-induced menopausal-like symptoms in ovariectomized mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Han, Na-Ra; Kim, Hee-Yun; Yang, Woong Mo; Jeong, Hyun-Ja; Kim, Hyung-Min

    2015-09-01

    Some amino acids are considered alternative therapies for improving menopausal symptoms. Glutamic acid (GA), which is abundant in meats, fish, and protein-rich plant foods, is known to be a neurotransmitter or precursor of γ-aminobutyric acid. Although it is unclear if GA functions in menopausal symptoms, we hypothesized that GA would attenuate estrogen deficiency-induced menopausal symptoms. The objective to test our hypothesis was to examine an estrogenic effect of GA in ovariectomized (OVX) mice, estrogen receptor (ER)-positive human osteoblast-like MG-63 cells, and ER-positive human breast cancer MCF-7 cells. The results demonstrated that administration with GA to mice suppressed body weight gain and vaginal atrophy when compared with the OVX mice. A microcomputed tomographic analysis of the trabecular bone showed increases in bone mineral density, trabecular number, and connectivity density as well as a significant decrease in total porosity of the OVX mice treated with GA. In addition, GA increased serum levels of alkaline phosphatase and estrogen compared with the OVX mice. Furthermore, GA induced proliferation and increased ER-β messenger RNA (mRNA) expression, estrogen response element (ERE) activity, extracellular signal-regulated kinase phosphorylation, and alkaline phosphatase activity in MG-63 cells. In MCF-7 cells, GA also increased proliferation, Ki-67 mRNA expression, ER-β mRNA expression, and ERE activity. Estrogen response element activity increased by GA was inhibited by an estrogen antagonist. Taken together, our data demonstrated that GA has estrogenic and osteogenic activities in OVX mice, MG-63 cells, and MCF-7 cells. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  17. Common soil of smoking-associated and hormone-related cancers: estrogen deficiency

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zsuzsanna Suba

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available Accumulation of non-smoker, non-drinker elderly postmenopausal female patients among smokingassociated oral cancer cases raised the plausible idea: estrogen deficiency maybe a cancer risk factor. On the other hand, the extremely rare cases of young women with oral cancer regularly exhibited hormonal disorders, such as irregular menstrual cycles and infertility. Furthermore, in the history of middle-aged female, oral cancer cases a primary ovarian failure or complete hysterectomy was a conspicuously frequent finding suggestive of an estrogen deficient milieu. There were many striking contradictions concerning the associations of female sexual steroids and cancer risk as well. Until now, breast and endometrial cancers were regarded as typically estrogen-induced tumors, particularly in postmenopausal cases. However, unexplained beneficial anti-cancer effects of hormonereplacement therapy were reported against cancers at several sites, even tumors of the highly hormone-responsive organs. Re-evaluation of results of the experimental and epidemiological studies, which endeavored to justify the carcinogenic capacity of estrogen, exhibited many shortcomings and controversies. The new findings both on smoking associated and on hormone related cancers added up to the same conversion; not estrogen but rather its deficiency might provoke cancer initiation. Thorough review of the literary data justified that the exquisite regulatory capacity of estrogen and its surveillance on growth, development, differentiation, and metabolism are indispensable, whereas an estrogen-deficient milieu may induce a breakdown in gene-regulation. Recognition of the anticancer capacity of estrogen may provide new insights into the etiology of malignancies and leads to new strategies for cancer prevention and cure.

  18. Physiological consequences of membrane-initiated estrogen signaling in the brain

    OpenAIRE

    Roepke, Troy A.; Ronnekleiv, Oline K.; Kelly, Martin J.

    2011-01-01

    Many of the actions of 17beta-estradiol (E2) in the central nervous system (CNS) are mediated via the classical nuclear steroid receptors, ERalpha and ERbeta, which interact with the estrogen response element to modulate gene expression. In addition to the nuclear-initiated estrogen signaling, E2 signaling in the brain can occur rapidly within minutes prior to any sufficient effects on transcription of relevant genes. These rapid, membrane-initiated E2 signaling mechanisms have now been chara...

  19. Identifying a Mechanism for Crosstalk Between the Estrogen and Glucocorticoid Receptors | Center for Cancer Research

    Science.gov (United States)

    Estrogen has long been known to play important roles in the development and progression of breast cancer. Its receptor (ER), a member of the steroid receptor family, binds to estrogen response elements (EREs) in DNA and regulates gene transcription. More recently, another steroid receptor family member, the glucocorticoid receptor (GR), has been implicated in breast cancer progression, and ER/GR status is an important predictor of breast cancer outcome.

  20. What's New in Estrogen Receptor Action in the Female Reproductive Tract:

    OpenAIRE

    Hewitt, Sylvia C.; Winuthayanon, Wipawee; Korach, Kenneth S.

    2016-01-01

    Estrogen receptor alpha (ERα) is a critical player in development and function of the female reproductive system. Perturbations in ERα response can affect wide-ranging aspects of health in humans as well as in livestock and wildlife. Because of its long-known and broad impact, ERα mechanisms of action continue to be the focus on cutting-edge research efforts. Consequently, novel insights have greatly advanced understanding of every aspect of estrogen signaling. In this review, we attempt to b...

  1. G protein-coupled estrogen receptor regulates embryonic heart rate in zebrafish.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Romano, Shannon N; Edwards, Hailey E; Souder, Jaclyn Paige; Ryan, Kevin J; Cui, Xiangqin; Gorelick, Daniel A

    2017-10-24

    Estrogens act by binding to estrogen receptors alpha and beta (ERα, ERβ), ligand-dependent transcription factors that play crucial roles in sex differentiation, tumor growth and cardiovascular physiology. Estrogens also activate the G protein-coupled estrogen receptor (GPER), however the function of GPER in vivo is less well understood. Here we find that GPER is required for normal heart rate in zebrafish embryos. Acute exposure to estrogens increased heart rate in wildtype and in ERα and ERβ mutant embryos but not in GPER mutants. GPER mutant embryos exhibited reduced basal heart rate, while heart rate was normal in ERα and ERβ mutants. We detected gper transcript in discrete regions of the brain and pituitary but not in the heart, suggesting that GPER acts centrally to regulate heart rate. In the pituitary, we observed gper expression in cells that regulate levels of thyroid hormone triiodothyronine (T3), a hormone known to increase heart rate. Compared to wild type, GPER mutants had reduced levels of T3 and estrogens, suggesting pituitary abnormalities. Exposure to exogenous T3, but not estradiol, rescued the reduced heart rate phenotype in gper mutant embryos, demonstrating that T3 acts downstream of GPER to regulate heart rate. Using genetic and mass spectrometry approaches, we find that GPER regulates maternal estrogen levels, which are required for normal embryonic heart rate. Our results demonstrate that estradiol plays a previously unappreciated role in the acute modulation of heart rate during zebrafish embryonic development and suggest that GPER regulates embryonic heart rate by altering maternal estrogen levels and embryonic T3 levels.

  2. Estrogenicity and androgenicity screening of PCB sulfate monoesters in human breast cancer MCF-7 cells

    OpenAIRE

    Flor, Susanne; He, Xianran; Lehmler, Hans-Joachim; Ludewig, Gabriele

    2015-01-01

    Recent studies identified PCB sulfate esters as a major product of PCB metabolism. Since hydroxy-PCBs (HO-PCBs), the immediate precursors of PCB sulfates and important contributors to PCB toxicity, were shown to have estrogenic activity, we investigated the estrogenicity/androgenicty of a series of PCB sulfate metabolites. We synthesized the five possible structural sulfate monoester metabolites of PCB 3, a congener shown to be biotransformed to sulfates, a sulfate ester of the paint-specific...

  3. Sustained Reprogramming of the Estrogen Response After Chronic Exposure to Endocrine Disruptors

    OpenAIRE

    Andrea R Patterson; Mo, Xiaokui; Shapiro, Ali; Wernke, Karen E.; Archer, Trevor K.; Burd, Craig J.

    2015-01-01

    The pervasive nature of estrogenic industrial and dietary compounds is a growing health concern linked to cancer, obesity, and neurological disorders. Prior analyses of endocrine disruptor action have focused primarily on the short-term consequences of exposure. However, these studies are unlikely to reflect the consequences of constant exposures common to industrialized countries. Here we examined the global effects of long-term endocrine disruption on gene transcription and estrogen signali...

  4. Prevention and treatment of cervical cancer in mice using estrogen receptor antagonists

    OpenAIRE

    Chung, Sang-Hyuk; Lambert, Paul F.

    2009-01-01

    The majority of human cervical cancers are associated with the high-risk human papillomavirus (HPV) types. In mouse models for HPV-associated cancers, estrogen is required for the development of cervical and vaginal cancers. The estrogen receptor α (ERα) also is required in mice for these cancers to arise. These data are consistent with the observation in women that long-term use of oral contraceptives or multiple pregnancies significantly increases the risk for cervical cancer in HPV-positiv...

  5. MiR-22/Sp-1 Links Estrogens With the Up-Regulation of Cystathionine γ-Lyase in Myocardium, Which Contributes to Estrogenic Cardioprotection Against Oxidative Stress.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Long; Tang, Zhi-Ping; Zhao, Wei; Cong, Bing-Hai; Lu, Jian-Qiang; Tang, Xiao-Lu; Li, Xiao-Han; Zhu, Xiao-Yan; Ni, Xin

    2015-06-01

    Hydrogen sulfide, generated in the myocardium predominantly via cystathionine-γ-lyase (CSE), is cardioprotective. Our previous study has shown that estrogens enhance CSE expression in myocardium of female rats. The present study aims to explore the mechanisms by which estrogens regulate CSE expression, in particular to clarify the role of estrogen receptor subtypes and the transcriptional factor responsible for the estrogenic effects. We found that either the CSE inhibitor or the CSE small interfering RNA attenuated the protective effect of 17β-estradiol (E2) against H2O2- and hypoxia/reoxygenation-induced injury in primary cultured neonatal cardiomyocytes. E2 stimulates CSE expression via estrogen receptor (ER)-α both in cultured cardiomyocytes in vitro and in the myocardium of female mice in vivo. A specificity protein-1 (Sp-1) consensus site was identified in the rat CSE promoter and was found to mediate the E2-induced CSE expression. E2 increases ERα and Sp-1 and inhibits microRNA (miR)-22 expression in myocardium of ovariectomized rats. In primary cardiomyocytes, E2 stimulates Sp-1 expression through the ERα-mediated down-regulation of miR-22. It was confirmed that both ERα and Sp-1 were targeted by miR-22. In the myocardium of ovariectomized rats, the level of miR-22 inversely correlated to CSE, ERα, Sp-1, and antioxidant biomarkers and positively correlated to oxidative biomarkers. In summary, this study demonstrates that estrogens stimulate Sp-1 through the ERα-mediated down-regulation of miR-22 in cardiomyocytes, leading to the up-regulation of CSE, which in turn results in an increase of antioxidative defense. Interaction of ERα, miR-22, and Sp-1 may play a critical role in the control of oxidative stress status in the myocardium of female rats.

  6. Expression of aromatase and estrogen receptor alpha in chondrosarcoma, but no beneficial effect of inhibiting estrogen signaling both in vitro and in vivo

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-01-01

    Background Chondrosarcomas are malignant cartilage-forming tumors which are highly resistant to conventional chemotherapy and radiotherapy. Estrogen signaling is known to play an important role in proliferation and differentiation of chondrocytes and in growth plate regulation at puberty. Our experiments focus on unraveling the role of estrogen signaling in the regulation of neoplastic cartilage growth and on interference with estrogen signaling in chondrosarcomas in vitro and in vivo. Methods We investigated the protein expression of estrogen receptor alpha (ESR1), androgen receptor (AR), and aromatase in tumor specimens of various chondrosarcoma subtypes, and (primary) chondrosarcoma cultures. Dose-response curves were generated of conventional central chondrosarcoma cell lines cultured in the presence of 17β-estradiol, dihydrotestosterone, 4-androstene-3,17 dione, 4-hydroxytamoxifen, fulvestrant and aromatase inhibitors. In a pilot series, the effect of anastrozole (n = 4) or exemestane (n = 2) treatment in 6 chondrosarcoma patients with progressive disease was explored. Results We showed protein expression of ESR1 and aromatase in a large majority of all subtypes. Only a minority of the tumors showed few AR positive cells. The dose-response assays showed no effect of any of the compounds on proliferation of conventional chondrosarcoma in vitro. The median progression-free survival of the patients treated with aromatase inhibitors did not significantly deviate from untreated patients. Conclusions The presence of ESR1 and aromatase in chondrosarcoma tumors and primary cultures supports a possible role of estrogen signaling in chondrosarcoma proliferation. However, our in vitro and pilot in vivo studies have shown no effect of estrogen-signaling inhibition on tumor growth. PMID:22613849

  7. Estrogenic, anti-estrogenic and cytotoxic effects elicited by water from the type localities of the endangered goodeid fish Girardinichthys viviparus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vega-López, Armando; Ramón-Gallegos, Eva; Galar-Martínez, Marcela; Jiménez-Orozco, F Alejandro; García-Latorre, Ethel; Domínguez-López, Maria Lilia

    2007-04-01

    Girardinichthys viviparus is a Mexican endangered endemic fish species living only in Lake Texcoco (LTX), one of two extant type localities for this species. The other type locality is Lake Zumpango (LZ). LTX and LZ are fed by wastewater treated at secondary level that contains several endocrine disrupting chemicals. Our goal was to assess the estrogenic and anti-estrogenic effects elicited in G. viviparus by water from the two type localities and by these same matrices enriched with PCBs in order to understand potential damage due to increased xenobiotic levels. Estrogenic and anti-estrogenic effects were evaluated in vitro by E-screen assay in MCF-7 cells and cytotoxicity by MTT assay. PCBs were quantified in type localities. In vivo vitellogenin (VTG) induction was determined by a hybrid ELISA in adult laboratory-born fish exposed during 1, 2, 4, 8 and 16 days to LTX or LZ water in static exposure systems, and by the same matrices enriched with PCBs. We found PCBs only in LTX, but the water from both type localities elicit estrogenic and anti-estrogenic effects in vitro. Cytotoxicity was not observed in MCF-7 cells exposed to LTX or LZ water. VTG induction was higher with LTX water than with LZ water; also the response of males was greater than in females. In the PCB-enriched matrices, VTG induction in both sexes exposed to LTX water was reduced compared to un-enriched matrices. Thus, the sublethal increases in PCB levels may be hazardous to both sexes since they are linked probably to hepatotoxicity.

  8. Demonstration of estrogen receptors and of estrogen responsiveness in the HKT-1097 cell line derived from diethylstilbestrol-induced kidney tumors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brohée, R; Nonclercq, D; Journé, D N; Toubeau, G; Falmagne, P; Leclercq, G; Heuson-Stiennon, J A; Laurent, G

    2000-01-01

    This study was undertaken in order to examine the estrogen sensitivity of HKT-1097, an established cell line recently derived from diethylstilbestrol (DES)-induced kidney tumors in Syrian hamsters. Estrogen receptor (ER) level in HKT-1097, determined by enzyme-linked immunoassay, was 67 fmol/mg protein, i.e., a value approx. 30% lower than that found in Syrian hamster kidney tumors. ER immunostaining in cells fixed with Carnoy's mixture, as well as ER demonstration by Western blotting, suggested DES-induced nuclear translocation or stabilization of the receptor within the nucleus. Kinetic parameters of estrogen binding to ER in HKT-1097 cells were 8.4 x 10(-11) M and 60.8 fmol/mg protein for Kd and Bmax, respectively. The Kd of estrogen binding to ER in HKT-1097 was close to that evaluated for the receptor in breast cancer-derived MCF-7 cell line, whereas the Bmax value was approx. seven times lower in HKT-1097 as compared to MCF-7. In HKT-1097 cells, antiestrogens ICI 182,780 and RU 58,668 induced ER downregulation and competed with estrogen binding to the receptor. As demonstrated by Western blot analysis, DES exposure led to an increased expression of progesterone receptor (PgR) in HKT-1097 cells. Addition of DES to estrogen-free medium produced a stimulation of growth in both HKT-1097 and MCF-7 cells, but the mitogenic effect was less marked for HKT-1097. Despite the fact that ICI 182,780 and RU 58,668 clearly interact with HKT-1097 cell ER, they appeared unable to suppress DES-induced stimulation of growth and increase of PgR expression.

  9. Toxicity and estrogenic endocrine disrupting activity of phthalates and their mixtures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Xueping; Xu, Shisan; Tan, Tianfeng; Lee, Sin Ting; Cheng, Shuk Han; Lee, Fred Wang Fat; Xu, Steven Jing Liang; Ho, Kin Chung

    2014-03-14

    Phthalates, widely used in flexible plastics and consumer products, have become ubiquitous contaminants worldwide. This study evaluated the acute toxicity and estrogenic endocrine disrupting activity of butyl benzyl phthalate (BBP), di(n-butyl) phthalate (DBP), bis(2-ethylhexyl) phthalate (DEHP), diisodecyl phthalate (DIDP), diisononyl phthalate (DINP), di-n-octyl phthalate (DNOP) and their mixtures. Using a 72 h zebrafish embryo toxicity test, the LC50 values of BBP, DBP and a mixture of the six phthalates were found to be 0.72, 0.63 and 0.50 ppm, respectively. The other four phthalates did not cause more than 50% exposed embryo mortality even at their highest soluble concentrations. The typical toxicity symptoms caused by phthalates were death, tail curvature, necrosis, cardio edema and no touch response. Using an estrogen-responsive ChgH-EGFP transgenic medaka (Oryzias melastigma) eleutheroembryos based 24 h test, BBP demonstrated estrogenic activity, DBP, DEHP, DINP and the mixture of the six phthalates exhibited enhanced-estrogenic activity and DIDP and DNOP showed no enhanced- or anti-estrogenic activity. These findings highlighted the developmental toxicity of BBP and DBP, and the estrogenic endocrine disrupting activity of BBP, DBP, DEHP and DINP on intact organisms, indicating that the widespread use of these phthalates may cause potential health risks to human beings.

  10. The pharmacognosy of Humulus lupulus L. (hops) with an emphasis on estrogenic properties.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chadwick, L R; Pauli, G F; Farnsworth, N R

    2006-01-01

    As the population ages, there is an ever-increasing need for therapeutic agents that can be used safely and efficaciously to manage symptoms related to postmenopausal estrogen deficiency. Endogenous estrogens, e.g., 17beta-estradiol, of exogenous mammalian origin, e.g., horses, have long been used to manage such symptoms. There are more than 20 different classes of phytochemicals that have demonstrated affinity for human estrogen receptors in vitro. Some studies on exogenous estrogenic substances of botanical origin (phytoestrogens), such as standardized formulations of plant extracts with in vitro and in vivo estrogenic activity from soy (Glycine max Merill.) and red clover (Trifolium pratense L.), suggest clinical efficacy. Few clinical data for phytoestrogens other than isoflavonoids are available. In an exhaustive review of the literature through 2003, only two clinical trials were identified that were designed to evaluate the effect of hops (Humulus lupulus L.) on symptoms related to menopause. Folkloric, chemical, and biological literature relating primarily to the use of hops for their estrogenic activity, and two human clinical trials, are reviewed.

  11. Development of a New Decision Tree to Rapidly Screen Chemical Estrogenic Activities of Xenopus laevis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Ting; Li, Weiying; Zheng, Xiaofeng; Lin, Zhifen; Kong, Deyang

    2014-02-01

    During the last past decades, there is an increasing number of studies about estrogenic activities of the environmental pollutants on amphibians and many determination methods have been proposed. However, these determination methods are time-consuming and expensive, and a rapid and simple method to screen and test the chemicals for estrogenic activities to amphibians is therefore imperative. Herein is proposed a new decision tree formulated not only with physicochemical parameters but also a biological parameter that was successfully used to screen estrogenic activities of the chemicals on amphibians. The biological parameter, CDOCKER interaction energy (Ebinding ) between chemicals and the target proteins was calculated based on the method of molecular docking, and it was used to revise the decision tree formulated by Hong only with physicochemical parameters for screening estrogenic activity of chemicals in rat. According to the correlation between Ebinding of rat and Xenopus laevis, a new decision tree for estrogenic activities in Xenopus laevis is finally proposed. Then it was validated by using the randomly 8 chemicals which can be frequently exposed to Xenopus laevis, and the agreement between the results from the new decision tree and the ones from experiments is generally satisfactory. Consequently, the new decision tree can be used to screen the estrogenic activities of the chemicals, and combinational use of the Ebinding and classical physicochemical parameters can greatly improves Hong's decision tree. Copyright © 2014 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  12. Expression of estrogen and progesterone receptors in vestibular schwannomas and their clinical significance

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    Pandey Rakesh

    2009-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Objective The objective was to determine the expression of estrogen and progesterone receptors in vestibular schwannomas as well as to determine predictive factors for estrogen and progesterone receptor positivity. Materials and methods The study included 100 cases of vestibular schwannomas operated from January 2006 to June 2009. The clinical details were noted from the medical case files. Formaldehyde-fixed parafiin-embedded archival vestibular schwannomas specimens were used for the immunohistochemical assessment of estrogen and progesterone receptors. Results Neither estrogen nor progesterone receptors could be detected in any of our cases by means of well known immunohistochemical method using well documented monoclonal antibodies. In the control specimens, a strongly positive reaction could be seen. Conclusion No estrogen and progesterone receptor could be found in any of our 100 cases of vestibular schwannomas. Hence our study does not support a causative role of estrogen and progesterone in the growth of vestibular schwannoma as well as hormonal manipulation in the treatment of this tumor.

  13. Effects of estrogen receptor modulators on cytoskeletal proteins in the central nervous system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Segura-Uribe, Julia J.; Pinto-Almazán, Rodolfo; Coyoy-Salgado, Angélica; Fuentes-Venado, Claudia E.; Guerra-Araiza, Christian

    2017-01-01

    Estrogen receptor modulators are compounds of interest because of their estrogenic agonistic/antagonistic effects and tissue specificity. These compounds have many clinical applications, particularly for breast cancer treatment and osteoporosis in postmenopausal women, as well as for the treatment of climacteric symptoms. Similar to estrogens, neuroprotective effects of estrogen receptor modulators have been described in different models. However, the mechanisms of action of these compounds in the central nervous system have not been fully described. We conducted a systematic search to investigate the effects of estrogen receptor modulators in the central nervous system, focusing on the modulation of cytoskeletal proteins. We found that raloxifene, tamoxifen, and tibolone modulate some cytoskeletal proteins such as tau, microtuble-associated protein 1 (MAP1), MAP2, neurofilament 38 (NF38) by different mechanisms of action and at different levels: neuronal microfilaments, intermediate filaments, and microtubule-associated proteins. Finally, we emphasize the importance of the study of these compounds in the treatment of neurodegenerative diseases since they present the benefits of estrogens without their side effects. PMID:28966632

  14. Shp2 controls female body weight and energy balance by integrating leptin and estrogen signals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    He, Zhao; Zhang, Sharon S; Meng, Qingyuan; Li, Shuangwei; Zhu, Helen H; Raquil, Marie-Astrid; Alderson, Nazilla; Zhang, Hai; Wu, Jiarui; Rui, Liangyou; Cai, Dongsheng; Feng, Gen-Sheng

    2012-05-01

    In mammals, leptin regulates food intake and energy balance mainly through the activation of LepRb in the hypothalamus, and estrogen has a leptin-like effect in the hypothalamic control of metabolism. However, it remains to be elucidated how estrogen signaling is intertwined with the leptin pathway. We show here that Shp2, a nonreceptor tyrosine phosphatase, acts to integrate leptin and estrogen signals. The expression of a dominant-active mutant (Shp2(D61A)) in forebrain neurons conferred female, but not male, transgenic mice resistance to high-fat diet (HFD)-induced obesity and liver steatosis, accompanied by improved insulin sensitivity and glucose homeostasis. Fed with either HFD or regular chow food, Shp2(D61A) female mice showed dramatically enhanced leptin sensitivity. Microinjection of Shp2(D61A)-expressing adeno-associated virus into mediobasal hypothalamus elicited a similar antiobese effect in female mice. Biochemical analyses showed a physical association of Shp2 with estrogen receptor alpha, which is necessary for the synergistic and persistent activation of Erk by leptin and estrogen. Together, these results elucidate a mechanism for the direct cross talk of leptin and estrogen signaling and offer one explanation for the propensity of postmenopausal women to develop obesity.

  15. Using Fenton Oxidation to Simultaneously Remove Different Estrogens from Cow Manure

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    Minxia Sun

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available The presence of estrogens in livestock excrement has raised concerns about their potential negative influence on animals and the overall food cycle. This is the first investigation to simultaneously remove estrogens, including estriol (E3, bisphenol A (BPA, diethylstilbestrol (DES, estradiol (E2, and ethinyl estradiol (EE2, from cow manure using a Fenton oxidation technique. Based on the residual concentrations and removal efficiency of estrogens, the Fenton oxidation reaction conditions were optimized as follows: a H2O2 dosage of 2.56 mmol/g, a Fe(II to H2O2 molar ratio of 0.125 M/M, a solid to water mass ratio of 2 g/mL, an initial pH of 3, and a reaction time of 24 h. Under these conditions, the simultaneous removal efficiencies of E3, BPA, DES, E2, and EE2, with initial concentrations in cow manure of 97.40, 96.54, 100.22, 95.01, and 72.49 mg/kg, were 84.9%, 99.5%, 99.1%, 97.8%, and 84.5%, respectively. We clarified the possible Fenton oxidation reaction mechanisms that governed the degradation of estrogens. We concluded that Fenton oxidation technique could be effective for efficient removal of estrogens in livestock excrement. Results are of great importance for cow manure reuse in agricultural management, and can be used to reduce the threat of environmental estrogens to human health and ecological safety.

  16. Preliminary Molecular Dynamic Simulations of the Estrogen Receptor Alpha Ligand Binding Domain from Antagonist to Apo

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    Adrian E. Roitberg

    2008-06-01

    Full Text Available Estrogen receptors (ER are known as nuclear receptors. They exist in the cytoplasm of human cells and serves as a DNA binding transcription factor that regulates gene expression. However the estrogen receptor also has additional functions independent of DNA binding. The human estrogen receptor comes in two forms, alpha and beta. This work focuses on the alpha form of the estrogen receptor. The ERα is found in breast cancer cells, ovarian stroma cells, endometrium, and the hypothalamus. It has been suggested that exposure to DDE, a metabolite of DDT, and other pesticides causes conformational changes in the estrogen receptor. Before examining these factors, this work examines the protein unfolding from the antagonist form found in the 3ERT PDB crystal structure. The 3ERT PDB crystal structure has the estrogen receptor bound to the cancer drug 4-hydroxytamoxifen. The 4-hydroxytamoxifen ligand was extracted before the simulation, resulting in new conformational freedom due to absence of van der Waals contacts between the ligand and the receptor. The conformational changes that result expose the binding clef of the co peptide beside Helix 12 of the receptor forming an apo conformation. Two key conformations in the loops at either end of the H12 are produced resulting in the antagonist to apo conformation transformation. The results were produced over a 42ns Molecular Dynamics simulation using the AMBER FF99SB force field.

  17. Toxicity and Estrogenic Endocrine Disrupting Activity of Phthalates and Their Mixtures

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    Xueping Chen

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available Phthalates, widely used in flexible plastics and consumer products, have become ubiquitous contaminants worldwide. This study evaluated the acute toxicity and estrogenic endocrine disrupting activity of butyl benzyl phthalate (BBP, di(n-butyl phthalate (DBP, bis(2-ethylhexyl phthalate (DEHP, diisodecyl phthalate (DIDP, diisononyl phthalate (DINP, di-n-octyl phthalate (DNOP and their mixtures. Using a 72 h zebrafish embryo toxicity test, the LC50 values of BBP, DBP and a mixture of the six phthalates were found to be 0.72, 0.63 and 0.50 ppm, respectively. The other four phthalates did not cause more than 50% exposed embryo mortality even at their highest soluble concentrations. The typical toxicity symptoms caused by phthalates were death, tail curvature, necrosis, cardio edema and no touch response. Using an estrogen-responsive ChgH-EGFP transgenic medaka (Oryzias melastigma eleutheroembryos based 24 h test, BBP demonstrated estrogenic activity, DBP, DEHP, DINP and the mixture of the six phthalates exhibited enhanced-estrogenic activity and DIDP and DNOP showed no enhanced- or anti-estrogenic activity. These findings highlighted the developmental toxicity of BBP and DBP, and the estrogenic endocrine disrupting activity of BBP, DBP, DEHP and DINP on intact organisms, indicating that the widespread use of these phthalates may cause potential health risks to human beings.

  18. Downregulation of beta-catenin and transdifferentiation of human osteoblasts to adipocytes under estrogen deficiency.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Foo, Clara; Frey, Soenke; Yang, Hong Hyun; Zellweger, Rene; Filgueira, Luis

    2007-09-01

    Postmenopausal osteoporosis, caused by estrogen deficiency, is characterized by the structural deterioration of bone accompanied by an increase in bone marrow adipocytes. Transgenic animal models have shown that there is a reciprocal relationship between osteoblastogenesis and adipogenesis in vivo. The present study investigated whether the estrogen and the canonical Wnt signaling pathways are linked together and regulate the phenotype and function, differentiation and proliferation of human osteoblasts using an in vitro estrogen-deficiency model. Human osteoblasts (hFOB 1.19) and fulvestrant, an estrogen receptor blocker, were used to mimic estrogen deficiency in vitro. Osteogenic and adipogenic differentiation was measured by using specific stains and microscopy, as well as by measuring the expression of bone cell-specific markers with reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction. Expression of estrogen receptor-alpha (ERalpha) and beta-catenin was detected in Western blots and by immunoprecipitation. The cells expressed the 46-kDa and the 77-kDa ERalpha isoforms and beta-catenin. Fulvestrant reduced expression of ERalpha and beta-catenin. beta-Catenin was co-immunoprecipitated with ERalpha, indicating that these two proteins form a new signaling complex and transcription factor. In addition, it induced intracellular lipid droplet accumulation and downregulation of bone cell markers, indicating adipocyte differentiation.

  19. GPR30 mediates anorectic estrogen-induced STAT3 signaling in the hypothalamus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kwon, Obin; Kang, Eun Seok; Kim, Insook; Shin, Sora; Kim, Mijung; Kwon, Somin; Oh, So Ra; Ahn, Young Soo; Kim, Chul Hoon

    2014-11-01

    Estrogen plays an important role in the control of energy balance in the hypothalamus. Leptin-independent STAT3 activation (i.e., tyrosine(705)-phosphorylation of STAT3, pSTAT3) in the hypothalamus is hypothesized as the primary mechanism of the estrogen-induced anorexic response. However, the type of estrogen receptor that mediates this regulation is unknown. We investigated the role of the G protein-coupled receptor 30 (GPR30) in estradiol (E2)-induced STAT3 activation in the hypothalamus. Regulation of STAT3 activation by E2, G-1, a specific agonist of GPR30 and G-15, a specific antagonist of GPR30 was analyzed in vitro and in vivo. Effect of GPR30 activation on eating behavior was analyzed in vivo. E2 stimulated pSTAT3 in cells expressing GPR30, but not expressing estrogen receptor ERα and ERβ. G-1 induced pSTAT3, and G-15 inhibited E2-induced pSTAT3 in primary cultures of hypothalamic neurons. A cerebroventricular injection of G-1 increased pSTAT3 in the arcuate nucleus of mice, which was associated with a decrease in food intake and body weight gain. These results suggest that GPR30 is the estrogen receptor that mediates the anorectic effect of estrogen through the STAT3 pathway in the hypothalamus. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  20. Estrogen for Alzheimer's disease in women: randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Henderson, V W; Paganini-Hill, A; Miller, B L; Elble, R J; Reyes, P F; Shoupe, D; McCleary, C A; Klein, R A; Hake, A M; Farlow, M R

    2000-01-25

    AD, the most prevalent cause of dementia, affects twice as many women as men. Therapeutic options are limited, but results of prior studies support the hypothesis that estrogen treatment may improve symptoms of women with this disorder. Forty-two women with mild-to-moderate dementia due to AD were enrolled into a randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled, parallel-group trial of unopposed conjugated equine estrogens (1.25 mg/day) for 16 weeks. Outcome data were available for 40 women at 4 weeks and 36 women at 16 weeks. At both 4 and 16 weeks, there were no significant differences or statistical trends between treatment groups on the primary outcome measure (the cognitive subscale of the Alzheimer's Disease Assessment Scale), clinician-rated global impression of change, or caregiver-rated functional status. Exploratory analyses of mood and specific aspects of cognitive performance also failed to demonstrate substantial group differences. Although conclusions are limited by small sample size and the possibility of a type II error, results suggest that short-term estrogen therapy does not improve symptoms of most women with AD. These findings do not address possible long-term effects of estrogen in AD, possible interactions between estrogen and other treatment modalities, or putative effects of estrogen in preventing or delaying onset of this disorder.

  1. Possibilities and potential roles of estrogen in the pathogenesis of proliferation hemangiomas formation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Zhi-Yong; Yang, Li; Yi, Cheng-Gang; Zhao, Huan; Han, Da-Li; Yang, Tao; Wang, Lu; Nie, Chun-Lei; Zhang, Guo-You; Yin, Guo-Qian; Wang, Gang; Teng, Xiao-Pin; Fei, Dong-Mei; Wang, Jin; Zhou, Wen-Kai; Li, Yang; Liu, Bin; Liu, Yin; Zhang, Man-Jing; Wu, Shang-Min; Zhang, Xi; Pan, Hua; Xiao, Bo; Zhao, Ke-Feng; Liu, Dan; Guo, Shu-Zhong

    2008-08-01

    Hemangiomas, often categorized as angiogenic diseases, are the most common tumors of infancy, the life span of which is generally divided into proliferating phase, involuting phase, and involuted phase. Despite their high prevalence, the mechanism leading to proliferation hemangiomas formation is poorly understood and the best approach to their management remains controversial. None of the current therapeutic modalities is ideal, partly because the pathogenesis of hemangioma and the mechanism of its proliferation are far from clear. Many clues reveal that estrogen has an important role in developing the vascular system, experimental and clinical evidences accumulated in recent years also suggest the potential for estrogen to influence neovascularization. Based on those, we hypothesize that estrogen play a potential role in the development of hemangiomas, mainly by regulating some key angiogenic factors, including MMP-9, EPCs, VEGF, NO, etc. Accepting the hypothesis to be correct, a therapy that identify estrogen as a potential target for the design of new, more specific treatments can be used to prevent the proliferation hemangiomas formation. The hypothesis may lead a new direction in the study of mechanisms for proliferation hemangiomas formation, and further study of the precise mechanisms for estrogen-induced hemangiomas will produce effective antiestrogens and estrogen receptor antagonists as new medication for the very difficult problem.

  2. G Protein-Coupled Estrogen Receptor-Selective Ligands Modulate Endometrial Tumor Growth

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    Whitney K. Petrie

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Endometrial carcinoma is the most common cancer of the female reproductive tract. GPER/GPR30 is a 7-transmembrane spanning G protein-coupled receptor that has been identified as the third estrogen receptor, in addition to ERα and ERβ. High GPER expression is predictive of poor survival in endometrial and ovarian cancer, but despite this, the estrogen-mediated signaling pathways and specific estrogen receptors involved in endometrial cancer remain unclear. Here, employing ERα-negative Hec50 endometrial cancer cells, we demonstrate that GPER mediates estrogen-stimulated activation of ERK and PI3K via matrix metalloproteinase activation and subsequent transactivation of the EGFR and that ER-targeted therapeutic agents (4-hydroxytamoxifen, ICI182,780/fulvestrant, and Raloxifene, the phytoestrogen genistein, and the “ERα-selective” agonist propylpyrazole triol also function as GPER agonists. Furthermore, xenograft tumors of Hec50 cells yield enhanced growth with G-1 and estrogen, the latter being inhibited by GPER-selective pharmacologic antagonism with G36. These results have important implications with respect to the use of putatively ER-selective ligands and particularly for the widespread long-term use of “ER-targeted” therapeutics. Moreover, our findings shed light on the potential mechanisms of SERM/SERD side effects reported in many clinical studies. Finally, our results provide the first demonstration that pharmacological inhibition of GPER activity in vivo prevents estrogen-mediated tumor growth.

  3. Effects of estrogen receptor modulators on cytoskeletal proteins in the central nervous system

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Julia J Segura-Uribe

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Estrogen receptor modulators are compounds of interest because of their estrogenic agonistic/antagonistic effects and tissue specificity. These compounds have many clinical applications, particularly for breast cancer treatment and osteoporosis in postmenopausal women, as well as for the treatment of climacteric symptoms. Similar to estrogens, neuroprotective effects of estrogen receptor modulators have been described in different models. However, the mechanisms of action of these compounds in the central nervous system have not been fully described. We conducted a systematic search to investigate the effects of estrogen receptor modulators in the central nervous system, focusing on the modulation of cytoskeletal proteins. We found that raloxifene, tamoxifen, and tibolone modulate some cytoskeletal proteins such as tau, microtuble-associated protein 1 (MAP1, MAP2, neurofilament 38 (NF38 by different mechanisms of action and at different levels: neuronal microfilaments, intermediate filaments, and microtubule-associated proteins. Finally, we emphasize the importance of the study of these compounds in the treatment of neurodegenerative diseases since they present the benefits of estrogens without their side effects.

  4. Control of fluid intake by estrogens in the female rat: role of the hypothalamus

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jessica eSantollo

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available Body fluid homeostasis is maintained by a complex network of central and peripheral systems that regulate blood pressure, fluid and electrolyte excretion, and fluid intake. The behavioral components, which include well regulated water and saline intake, are influenced by a number of hormones and neuropeptides. Since the early 1970s, it has been known that the ovarian estrogens play an important role in regulating fluid intake in females by decreasing water and saline intake under a variety of hypovolemic conditions. Behavioral, electrophysiological, gene and protein expression studies have identified nuclei in the hypothalamus, along with nearby forebrain structures such as the subfornical organ, as sites of action involved in mediating these effects of estrogens and, importantly, all of these brain areas are rich with estrogen receptors. This review will discuss the multiple estrogen receptor (ER subtypes, found both in the cell nucleus and associated with the plasma membrane, that provide diversity in the mechanism through which estrogens can induce behavioral changes in fluid intake. We then focus on the relevant brain structures, hypothesized circuits, and various peptides, such as angiotensin, oxytocin, and vasopressin, implicated in the anti-dipsogenic and anti-natriorexigenic actions of the estrogens.

  5. Estrogenic Activities of Fatty Acids and a Sterol Isolated from Royal Jelly

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    Kazu-Michi Suzuki

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available We have previously reported that royal jelly (RJ from honeybees (Apis mellifera has weak estrogenic activity mediated by interaction with estrogen receptors that leads to changes in gene expression and cell proliferation. In this study, we isolated four compounds from RJ that exhibit estrogenic activity as evaluated by a ligand-binding assay for the estrogen receptor (ER β. These compounds were identified as 10-hydroxy-trans-2-decenoic acid, 10-hydroxydecanoic acid, trans-2-decenoic acid and 24-methylenecholesterol. All these compounds inhibited binding of 17β-estradiol to ERβ, although more weakly than diethylstilbestrol or phytoestrogens. However, these compounds had little or no effect on the binding of 17β-estradiol to ERα. Expression assays suggested that these compounds activated ER, as evidenced by enhanced transcription of a reporter gene containing an estrogen-responsive element. Treatment of MCF-7 cells with these compounds enhanced their proliferation, but concomitant treatment with tamoxifen blocked this effect. Exposure of immature rats to these compounds by subcutaneous injection induced mild hypertrophy of the luminal epithelium of the uterus, but was not associated with an increase in uterine weight. These findings provide evidence that these compounds contribute to the estrogenic effect of RJ.

  6. Unique roles of estrogen-dependent Pten control in epithelial cell homeostasis of mouse vagina.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miyagawa, S; Sato, M; Sudo, T; Yamada, G; Iguchi, T

    2015-02-19

    Numerous studies support a role of phosphatase and tensin homolog deleted from chromosome 10 (Pten) as a tumor suppressor gene that controls epithelial cell homeostasis to prevent tumor formation. Mouse vaginal epithelium cyclically exhibits cell proliferation and differentiation in response to estrogen and provides a unique model for analyzing homeostasis of stratified squamous epithelia. We analyzed vaginal epithelium-specific Pten conditional knockout (CKO) mice to provide new insights into Pten/phosphoinositide-3-kinase (PI3K)/Akt function. The vaginal epithelium of ovariectomized (OVX) mice (control) was composed of 1-2 layers of cuboidal cells, whereas OVX CKO mice exhibited epithelial hyperplasia in the suprabasal cells with increased cell mass and mucin production. This is possibly due to misactivation of mammalian target of rapamycin and mitogen-activated protein kinase. Intriguingly, estrogen administration to OVX Pten CKO mice induced stratification and keratinized differentiation in the vaginal epithelium, as in estrogen-treated controls. We found that Pten is exclusively expressed in the suprabasal cells in the absence of estrogens, whereas estrogen administration induced Pten expression in the basal cells. This suggests that Pten acts to prevent excessive cell proliferation as in the case of other squamous tissues. Thus, Pten exhibits a dual role on the control of vaginal homeostasis, depending on whether estrogens are present or absent. Our results provide new insights into how Pten functions in tissue homeostasis.

  7. Medical contraindications to estrogen and contraceptive use among women veterans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Judge, Colleen P; Zhao, Xinhua; Sileanu, Florentina E; Mor, Maria K; Borrero, Sonya

    2017-10-27

    Women veterans have high rates of medical comorbidities and may be particularly vulnerable to adverse health outcomes associated with unintended pregnancy. The objective of the study was to estimate the prevalence of medical contraindications to estrogen-containing combined hormonal contraception among women veterans of reproductive age and to evaluate the relationship between contraindications and contraceptive use. This was a secondary analysis of data from a cross-sectional, telephone-based survey with a national sample of 2302 female veterans, aged 18-45 years, who use the Veterans Administration Healthcare System for primary care. This analysis included women at risk of unintended pregnancy, defined as heterosexually active and not pregnant or trying to conceive and with no history of hysterectomy or infertility. Seven contraindications to combined hormonal contraception were identified using survey data or medical diagnosis codes: hypertension; coronary artery disease; active migraine in women older than 35 years or migraine with aura; smoking in women older than 35 years; and a history of thromboembolism, stroke, or breast cancer. Outcomes were current use of combined hormonal contraception and contraceptive method type (combined hormonal contraception, and other prescription methods, nonprescription methods or no method). Multivariable logistic and multinomial regression were used to assess the relationship between contraindications and combined hormonal contraception use and method type, respectively. Among 1169 women veterans at risk of unintended pregnancy, 339 (29%) had at least 1 contraindication to combined hormonal contraception. The most prevalent conditions were hypertension (14.9%) and migraine (8.7%). In adjusted analyses, women with contraindications were less likely than women without contraindications to report use of combined hormonal contraception (adjusted odds ratio, 0.54, 95% confidence interval, 0.37-0.79). Relative to use of combined

  8. The role of transdermal estrogen sprays and estradiol topical emulsion in the management of menopause-associated vasomotor symptoms

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Amy M Egras

    2010-05-01

    Full Text Available Amy M Egras, Elena M UmlandJefferson School of Pharmacy, Thomas Jefferson University, Philadelphia, PA, USAAbstract: Vasomotor symptoms (VMS are among the most bothersome complaints of postmenopausal women. To date, the most widely studied and effective treatment for VMS is hormone replacement therapy, consisting of estrogen (in women without a uterus or estrogen plus progestin (in women with a uterus. Traditionally, oral estrogens have been used for treatment. However, over the years, additional estrogen formulations have been developed including transdermal patches; vaginal rings, creams, and tablets; and injectable preparations. Two newer formulations are transdermal estrogen spray and estradiol topical emulsion. This review evaluates the current literature assessing the use of these two newer formulations for the treatment of VMS associated with menopause.Keywords: menopause, vasomotor symptoms, transdermal estrogen spray, estradiol topical emulsion

  9. Factors Associated with Effectiveness of Treatment and Reproductive Outcomes in Patients with Thin Endometrium Undergoing Estrogen Treatment

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    Si-Miao Liu

    2015-01-01

    Conclusions: Thinner EMT before estrogen treatment requires longer treatment duration and predicts poorer treatment outcomes. The effectiveness of treatment depends on the duration of estrogen administration. Assisted reproductive outcomes of patients whose treatment is successful (i.e., achieves an EMT ≥8 mm are similar to those of controls. The quality of embryos transferred is an important predictor of assisted reproductive outcomes in patients treated successfully with exogenous estrogen.

  10. Steroid-Functionalized Titanocenes: Docking Studies with Estrogen Receptor Alpha

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    Li Ming Gao

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available Estrogen receptor alpha (ERα is a transcription factor that is activated by hormones, with 17β-estradiol being its most active agonist endogenous ligand. ERα is also activated or inactivated by exogenous ligands. ER is overexpressed in hormone-dependent breast cancer, and one of the treatments for this type of cancer is the use of an ER antagonist to halt cell proliferation. We have previously reported four steroid-functionalized titanocenes: pregnenolone, dehydroepiandrosterone (DHEA, trans-androsterone, and androsterone. These steroids have hormonal activity as well as moderate antiproliferative activity, thus these steroids could act as vectors for the titanocene dichloride to target hormone-dependent cancers. Also, these steroids could increase the antiproliferative activity of the resulting titanocenes based on synergism. In order to elucidate which factors contribute to the enhanced antiproliferative activity of these steroid-functionalized titanocenes, we performed docking studies between ERα and the titanocenes and the steroids. The binding affinities and type of bonding interactions of the steroid-functionalized titanocenes with ERα are herein discussed.

  11. UJI IN SILICO SENYAWA COUMESTROL SEBAGAI LIGAN RESEPTOR ESTROGEN ALFA

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    Felicia Felicia

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available Breast cancer is a cancer caused by uncontrolled cell growth at breast tissue. One of the most common triggers of breast cancer is overexpression of estrogen receptor alpha (ERα. This research’s goal is to test the ability of coumestrol as the ligand of ERα with in silico method and to discover coumestrol’s binding pose inside the ERα’s binding pocket. Coumestrol’s ability as ERα’s ligand was tested using structure-based virtual screening (SVBS method by Setiawati et al. (2014 that had been modified by Istyastono (2015. Results analysis was done using decision tree generated from recursive partition and regression tree method (RPART. If coumestrol is a ligand based on decision tree, it is concluded that coumestrol is active as ligand of ERα. At the end of analysis, coumestrol’s pose inside ERα’s binding pocket was visualized using MacPyMol. From the test acknowledged that the smallest ChemPLP value of coumestrol’s pose was -83.1487. Coumestrol interacts with GLY420, ARG394, and GLU353 using hydrogen bonds. However, coumestrol were perceived as decoy according to decision tree. Hence, coumestrol could not be recognized as ERα’s ligand by the protocol. Therefore, development of proper protocol to indentify ligand for ERα is required.

  12. Neuroprotection by estrogenic compounds following inflammatory insult in the brain

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    Luis Miguel Garcia-Segura

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available The steady-state microglia play an important role in monitoring and protecting the nerve tissue ensuring proper functioning of the Central Nervous System. Microglia respond to an immune stimulus with the subsequent activation of cascades that trigger the secretion of pro-inflammatory cytokines (IL-1, TNF-α, IL-12. Neurodegenerative diseases and disorders such as spinal cord injury, stroke, and head trauma are directly related to chronic activation of microglia. Depending on the injury severity, the microglial response and activity may range from acute (beneficial or chronic (detrimental, where this long-term activation are tightly associated to neurodegenerative processes. Several studies have reported that neuroactive steroids have protective effects and regulate the neuroinflammation associated to microglia. In cell therapy, microglia-induced inflammation may be modulated via the use of neurosteriods, due to their evidenced roles in the regulation of neuroinflammation. Estrogenic compounds, such as as SERM and STEARs, are currently under investigation. In this work, the regulatory mechanisms of inflammation of the microglia are discussed, including the reduction of inflammatory processes in the brain by treatment with neurosteroids.

  13. Zearalenone, an Estrogenic Mycotoxin, Is an Immunotoxic Compound

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    Isis M. Hueza

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this study was to assess the toxic effects of zearalenone (ZEA on the immune function. Ovariectomised rats were treated daily by gavage with 3.0 mg/kg of ZEA for 28 days. Body weight gain, food consumption, haemotological parameters, lymphoid organs, and their cellularities were evaluated. Moreover, acquired immune responses and macrophage activity were also assessed. ZEA promoted reduction in body weight gain, which is not fully explained by diminished food consumption. Despite no effect on haematological parameters, ZEA caused thymic atrophy with histological and thymocyte phenotype changes and decrease in the B cell percentage in the spleen. With respect to acquired and innate immune responses, no statistically significant differences in delayed-type hypersensitivity were noticed; however, in the ZEA-treated rats, antibody production and peroxide release by macrophages were impaired. The observed results could be related to ZEA activity on ERs; thus, ZEA is an immunotoxic compound similar to estrogen and some endocrine disruptors.

  14. PPARα in Obesity: Sex Difference and Estrogen Involvement

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    Michung Yoon

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor α (PPARα is a member of the steroid hormone receptor superfamily and is well known to act as the molecular target for lipid-lowering drugs of the fibrate family. At the molecular level, PPARα regulates the transcription of a number of genes critical for lipid and lipoprotein metabolism. PPARα activators are further shown to reduce body weight gain and adiposity, at least in part, due to the increase of hepatic fatty acid oxidation and the decrease in levels of circulating triglycerides responsible for adipose cell hypertrophy and hyperplasia. However, these effects of the PPARα ligand fenofibrate on obesity are regulated with sexual dimorphism and seem to be influenced by the presence of functioning ovaries, suggesting the involvement of ovarian steroids in the control of obesity by PPARα. In female ovariectomized mice, 17β-estradiol inhibits the actions of fenofibrate on obesity through its suppressive effects on the expression of PPARα target genes, and these processes may be mediated by inhibiting the coactivator recruitment of PPARα. Thus, it is likely that PPARα functions on obesity may be enhanced in estrogen-deficient states.

  15. Ovary-independent estrogen receptor expression in neonatal porcine endometrium.

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    Tarleton, B J; Wiley, A A; Spencer, T E; Moss, A G; Bartol, F F

    1998-04-01

    Effects of age and ovariectomy (OVX) at birth on uterine growth, endometrial development, and estrogen receptor (ER) expression were determined for intact and OVX gilts (n = 5 per day) hysterectomized on postnatal days (PND) 0, 15, 30, 60, 90, or 120. Uteri were evaluated histologically, and ER protein and mRNA expression were characterized immunohistochemically and by in situ hybridization. OVX did not affect uterine weight or endometrial thickness until after PND 60, when both increased more rapidly in intact gilts. Neither did it affect genesis of uterine glands, which were present and which proliferated after PND 0, or endometrial ER expression patterns in glandular epithelium (GE), luminal epithelium (LE), or stroma (S) between PND 0 and 120. Endometrium was ER negative at birth. On PND 15, the ER signal was strong in GE, weak in S, and effectively absent in LE. Thereafter, although the ER signal remained strong in GE and increased through PND 60 in S, it was not evident consistently until after PND 30 in LE. The data indicate that 1) porcine uterine growth and endometrial morphogenesis are ovary-independent processes before PND 60; 2) uterine gland genesis is associated temporally with development of ER-positive endometrial GE and S; and 3) regulation of endometrial ER expression is ovary independent between PND 0 and 120. The results establish the ER as a marker of GE differentiation and implicate this receptor in mechanisms regulating endometrial morphogenesis in the neonatal pig.

  16. Estrogen and Progesterone hormone receptor expression in oral cavity cancer.

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    Grimm, M; Biegner, T; Teriete, P; Hoefert, S; Krimmel, M; Munz, A; Reinert, S

    2016-09-01

    Recent studies have shown an increase in the incidence of oral squamous cell carcinoma (OSCC) in younger patients. The hypothesis that tumors could be hormonally induced during pregnancy or in young female patients without the well-known risk factors alcohol or tobacco abuse seems to be plausible. Estrogen Receptor alpha (ERα) and Progesterone Receptor (PR) expression were analyzed in normal oral mucosa (n=5), oral precursor lesions (simple hyperplasia, n=11; squamous intraepithelial neoplasia, SIN I-III, n=35), and OSCC specimen. OSCCs were stratified in a young female (n=7) study cohort and older patients (n=46). In the young female study cohort three patients (n=3/7) developed OSCC during or shortly after pregnancy. Breast cancer tissues were used as positive control for ERα and PR expression. ERα expression was found in four oral precursor lesions (squamous intraepithelial neoplasia, SIN I-III, n=4/35, 11%) and in five OSCC specimen (n=5/46, 11%). The five ERα positive OSCC samples were older male patients. All patients within the young female study cohort were negatively stained for both ERα and PR. ER expression could be regarded as a seldom risk factor for OSCC. PR expression seems to be not relevant for the development of OSCC.

  17. Urethral dysfunction in female mice with estrogen receptor β deficiency.

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    Yung-Hsiang Chen

    Full Text Available Estrogen has various regulatory functions in the growth, development, and differentiation of the female urogenital system. This study investigated the roles of ERβ in stress urinary incontinence (SUI. Wild-type (ERβ(+/+ and knockout (ERβ(-/- female mice were generated (aged 6-8 weeks, n = 6 and urethral function and protein expression were measured. Leak point pressures (LPP and maximum urethral closure pressure (MUCP were assessed in mice under urethane anesthesia. After the measurements, the urethras were removed for proteomic analysis using label-free quantitative proteomics by nano-liquid chromatography-mass spectrometry (LC-MS/MS analysis. The interaction between these proteins was further analysed using MetaCore. Lastly, Western blot was used to confirm the candidate proteins. Compared with the ERβ(+/+ group, the LPP and MUCP values of the ERβ(-/- group were significantly decreased. Additionally, we identified 85 differentially expressed proteins in the urethra of ERβ(-/- female mice; 57 proteins were up-regulated and 28 were down-regulated. The majority of the ERβ knockout-modified proteins were involved in cell-matrix adhesion, metabolism, immune response, signal transduction, nuclear receptor translational regelation, and muscle contraction and development. Western blot confirmed the up-regulation of myosin and collagen in urethra. By contrast, elastin was down-regulated in the ERβ(-/- mice. This study is the first study to estimate protein expression changes in urethras from ERβ(-/- female mice. These changes could be related to the molecular mechanism of ERβ in SUI.

  18. Estrogen provides neuroprotection against brain edema and blood brain barrier disruption through both estrogen receptors α and β following traumatic brain injury

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    Vida Naderi

    2015-02-01

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