WorldWideScience

Sample records for brome mosaic virus

  1. A mathematical model of rna3 recruitment in the replication cycle of brome mosaic virus

    OpenAIRE

    Huffman, Tori; Link, Kathryn; Nardini, John; Poag, Laura; Flores, Kevin; Banks, H. T.; Blasco, Bernat; Jungfleisch, Jennifer, 1986-; D??ez Ant??n, Juana, 1962-

    2014-01-01

    Positive-strand RNA viruses, such as the brome mosaic virus (BMV) and hepatitis C virus, utilize a replication cycle which involves the recruitment of RNA genomes from the cellular translation machinery to the viral replication complexes. Here, we coupled mathematical modeling with a statistical inverse problem methodology to better understand this crucial recruitment process. We developed a discrete-delay differential equation model that describes the production of BMV protein 1a and BMV RNA...

  2. Subcellular localization and rearrangement of endoplasmic reticulum by Brome mosaic virus capsid protein.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bamunusinghe, Devinka; Seo, Jang-Kyun; Rao, A L N

    2011-03-01

    Genome packaging in the plant-infecting Brome mosaic virus (BMV), a member of the alphavirus-like superfamily, as well as in other positive-strand RNA viruses pathogenic to humans (e.g., poliovirus) and animals (e.g., Flock House virus), is functionally coupled to replication. Although the subcellular localization site of BMV replication has been identified, that of the capsid protein (CP) has remained elusive. In this study, the application of immunofluorescence confocal microscopy to Nicotiana benthamiana leaves expressing replication-derived BMV CP as a green fluorescent protein (GFP) fusion, in conjunction with antibodies to the CP and double-stranded RNA, a presumed marker of RNA replication, revealed that the subcellular localization sites of replication and CP overlap. Our temporal analysis by transmission electron microscopy of ultrastructural modifications induced in BMV-infected N. benthamiana leaves revealed a reticulovesicular network of modified endoplasmic reticulum (ER) incorporating large assemblies of vesicles derived from ER accumulated in the cytoplasm during BMV infection. Additionally, for the first time, we have found by ectopic expression experiments that BMV CP itself has the intrinsic property of modifying ER to induce vesicles similar to those present in BMV infections. The significance of CP-induced vesicles in relation to CP-organized viral functions that are linked to replication-coupled packaging is discussed.

  3. Crystallographic structure of the T=1 particle of brome mosaic virus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Larson, Steven B; Lucas, Robert W; McPherson, Alexander

    2005-02-25

    T=1 icosahedral particles of amino terminally truncated brome mosaic virus (BMV) protein were created by treatment of the wild-type T=3 virus with 1M CaCl2 and crystallized from sodium malonate. Diffraction data were collected from frozen crystals to beyond 2.9 A resolution and the structure determined by molecular replacement and phase extension. The particles are composed of pentameric capsomeres from the wild-type virions which have reoriented with respect to the original particle pentameric axes by rotations of 37 degrees , and formed tenuous interactions with one another, principally through conformationally altered C-terminal polypeptides. Otherwise, the pentamers are virtually superimposable upon those of the original T=3 BMV particles. The T=1 particles, in the crystals, are not perfect icosahedra, but deviate slightly from exact symmetry, possibly due to packing interactions. This suggests that the T=1 particles are deformable, which is consistent with the loose arrangement of pentamers and latticework of holes that penetrate the surface. Atomic force microscopy showed that the T=3 to T=1 transition could occur by shedding of hexameric capsomeres and restructuring of remaining pentamers accompanied by direct condensation. Knowledge of the structures of the BMV wild-type and T=1 particles now permit us to propose a tentative model for that process. A comparison of the BMV T=1 particles was made with the reassembled T=1 particles produced from the coat protein of trypsin treated alfalfa mosaic virus (AlMV), another bromovirus. There is little resemblance between the two particles. The BMV particle, with a maximum diameter of 195 A, is made from distinctive pentameric capsomeres with large holes along the 3-fold axis, while the AlMV particle, of approximate maximum diameter 220 A, has subunits closely packed around the 3-fold axis, large holes along the 5-fold axis, and few contacts within pentamers. In both particles crucial linkages are made about

  4. Brome mosaic virus Infection of Rice Results in Decreased Accumulation of RNA1.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kitayama, Masahiko; Hoover, Haley; Middleton, Stefani; Kao, C Cheng

    2015-05-01

    Brome mosaic virus (BMV) (the Russian strain) infects monocot plants and has been studied extensively in barley and wheat. Here, we report BMV can systemically infect rice (Oryza sativa var. japonica), including cultivars in which the genomes have been determined. The BMV capsid protein can be found throughout the inoculated plants. However, infection in rice exhibits delayed symptom expression or no symptoms when compared with wheat (Triticum aestivum). The sequences of BMV RNAs isolated from rice did not reveal any nucleotide changes in RNA1 or RNA2, while RNA3 had only one synonymous nucleotide change from the inoculum sequence. Preparations of purified BMV virions contained RNA1 at a significantly reduced level relative to the other two RNAs. Analysis of BMV RNA replication in rice revealed that minus-strand RNA1 was replicated at a reduced rate when compared with RNA2. Thus, rice appears to either inhibit RNA1 replication or lacks a sufficient amount of a factor needed to support efficient RNA1 replication.

  5. Packaging and structural phenotype of brome mosaic virus capsid protein with altered N-terminal β-hexamer structure

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The first 45 amino acid region of brome mosaic virus (BMV) capsid protein (CP) contains RNA binding and structural domains that are implicated in the assembly of infectious virions. One such important structural domain encompassing amino acids 28QPVIV32, highly conserved between BMV and cowpea chlorotic mottle virus (CCMV), exhibits a β-hexamer structure. In this study we report that alteration of the β-hexamer structure by mutating 28QPVIV32 to 28AAAAA32 had no effect either on symptom phenotype, local and systemic movement in Chenopodium quinoa and RNA profile of in vivo assembled virions. However, sensitivity to RNase and assembly phenotypes distinguished virions assembled with CP subunits having β-hexamer from those of wild type. A comparison of 3-D models obtained by cryo electron microscopy revealed overall similar structural features for wild type and mutant virions, with small but significant differences near the 3-fold axes of symmetry.

  6. Inhibition of brome mosaic virus (BMV) amplification in protoplasts from transgenic tobacco plants expressing replicable BMV RNAs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaido, M; Mori, M; Mise, K; Okuno, T; Furusawa, I

    1995-11-01

    Transgenic tobacco plants (V123 plants) expressing a set of full-length brome mosaic virus (BMV) genomic RNAs from the cauliflower mosaic virus 35S promoter were produced. The accumulation level of BMV RNAs in V123 plant cells was approximately 1% of that in nontransgenic tobacco protoplasts inoculated with BMV RNAs. The level of BMV RNA in V123 protoplasts did not increase after inoculating the protoplasts with BMV RNAs, whereas V123 protoplasts supported the accumulation of cucumber mosaic virus (CMV) RNAs to a level similar to that in non-transgenic tobacco protoplasts after inoculation with CMV RNA. Such BMV-specific resistance was also observed in protoplasts from V12 plants expressing full-length BMV RNA1 and RNA2, both of which are required and sufficient for BMV RNA replication. On the other hand, protoplasts from M12 plants, expressing truncated BMV RNA1 and RNA2 in which the 3' 200 nucleotides required for BMV RNA replication were deleted, exhibited weaker resistance to infection with BMV RNA than V12 protoplasts, although the accumulation level of truncated BMV RNA1 and RNA2 in M12 protoplasts was higher than that of BMV RNA1 and RNA2 in V12 protoplasts. These results suggest that expression of BMV RNA replicons is involved in the induction of resistance, rather than high-level accumulation of BMV RNAs and/or their encoded proteins.

  7. Characterization of a Brome mosaic virus strain and its use as a vector for gene silencing in monocotyledonous hosts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ding, Xin Shun; Schneider, William L; Chaluvadi, Srinivasa Rao; Mian, M A Rouf; Nelson, Richard S

    2006-11-01

    Virus-induced gene silencing (VIGS) is used to analyze gene function in dicotyledonous plants but less so in monocotyledonous plants (particularly rice and corn), partially due to the limited number of virus expression vectors available. Here, we report the cloning and modification for VIGS of a virus from Festuca arundinacea Schreb. (tall fescue) that caused systemic mosaic symptoms on barley, rice, and a specific cultivar of maize (Va35) under greenhouse conditions. Through sequencing, the virus was determined to be a strain of Brome mosaic virus (BMV). The virus was named F-BMV (F for Festuca), and genetic determinants that controlled the systemic infection of rice were mapped to RNAs 1 and 2 of the tripartite genome. cDNA from RNA 3 of the Russian strain of BMV (R-BMV) was modified to accept inserts from foreign genes. Coinoculation of RNAs 1 and 2 from F-BMV and RNA 3 from R-BMV expressing a portion of a plant gene to leaves of barley, rice, and maize plants resulted in visual silencing-like phenotypes. The visual phenotypes were correlated with decreased target host transcript levels in the corresponding leaves. The VIGS visual phenotype varied from maintained during silencing of actin 1 transcript expression to transient with incomplete penetration through affected tissue during silencing of phytoene desaturase expression. F-BMV RNA 3 was modified to allow greater accumulation of virus while minimizing virus pathogenicity. The modified vector C-BMV(A/G) (C for chimeric) was shown to be useful for VIGS. These BMV vectors will be useful for analysis of gene function in rice and maize for which no VIGS system is reported.

  8. The coat protein leads the way: an update on basic and applied studies with the Brome mosaic virus coat protein.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kao, C Cheng; Ni, Peng; Hema, Masarapu; Huang, Xinlei; Dragnea, Bogdan

    2011-05-01

    The Brome mosaic virus (BMV) coat protein (CP) accompanies the three BMV genomic RNAs and the subgenomic RNA into and out of cells in an infection cycle. In addition to serving as a protective shell for all of the BMV RNAs, CP plays regulatory roles during the infection process that are mediated through specific binding of RNA elements in the BMV genome. One regulatory RNA element is the B box present in the 5' untranslated region (UTR) of BMV RNA1 and RNA2 that play important roles in the formation of the BMV replication factory, as well as the regulation of translation. A second element is within the tRNA-like 3' UTR of all BMV RNAs that is required for efficient RNA replication. The BMV CP can also encapsidate ligand-coated metal nanoparticles to form virus-like particles (VLPs). This update summarizes the interaction between the BMV CP and RNAs that can regulate RNA synthesis, translation and RNA encapsidation, as well as the formation of VLPs.

  9. The plant host can affect the encapsidation of brome mosaic virus (BMV) RNA: BMV virions are surprisingly heterogeneous.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ni, Peng; Vaughan, Robert C; Tragesser, Brady; Hoover, Haley; Kao, C Cheng

    2014-03-01

    Brome mosaic virus (BMV) packages its genomic and subgenomic RNAs into three separate viral particles. BMV purified from barley, wheat, and tobacco have distinct relative abundances of the encapsidated RNAs. We seek to identify the basis for the host-dependent differences in viral RNA encapsidation. Sequencing of the viral RNAs revealed recombination events in the 3' untranslated region of RNA1 of BMV purified from barley and wheat, but not from tobacco. However, the relative amounts of the BMV RNAs that accumulated in barley and wheat are similar and RNA accumulation is not sufficient to account for the difference in RNA encapsidation. Virions purified from barley and wheat were found to differ in their isoelectric points, resistance to proteolysis, and contacts between the capsid residues and the RNA. Mass spectrometric analyses revealed that virions from the three hosts had different post-translational modifications that should impact the physiochemical properties of the virions. Another major source of variation in RNA encapsidation was due to the purification of BMV particles to homogeneity. Highly enriched BMV present in lysates had a surprising range of sizes, buoyant densities, and distinct relative amounts of encapsidated RNAs. These results show that the encapsidated BMV RNAs reflect a combination of host effects on the physiochemical properties of the viral capsids and the enrichment of a subset of virions. The previously unexpected heterogeneity in BMV should influence the timing of the infection and also the host innate immune responses.

  10. The subgenomic promoter of brome mosaic virus folds into a stem-loop structure capped by a pseudo-triloop that is structurally similar to the triloop of the genomic promoter

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Skov, J.; Gaudin, M.; Podbevsek, P.;

    2012-01-01

    In brome mosaic virus, both the replication of the genomic (+)-RNA strands and the transcription of the subgenomic RNA are carried out by the viral replicase. The production of (-)-RNA strands is dependent on the formation of an AUA triloop in the stem-loop C (SLC) hairpin in the 3'-untranslated ...

  11. Downregulation of the NbNACa1 gene encoding a movement-protein-interacting protein reduces cell-to-cell movement of Brome mosaic virus in Nicotiana benthamiana.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaido, Masanori; Inoue, Yosuke; Takeda, Yoshika; Sugiyama, Kazuhiko; Takeda, Atsushi; Mori, Masashi; Tamai, Atsushi; Meshi, Tetsuo; Okuno, Tetsuro; Mise, Kazuyuki

    2007-06-01

    The 3a movement protein (MP) plays a central role in the movement of the RNA plant virus, Brome mosaic virus (BMV). To identify host factor genes involved in viral movement, a cDNA library of Nicotiana benthamiana, a systemic host for BMV, was screened with far-Western blotting using a recombinant BMV MP as probe. One positive clone encoded a protein with sequence similarity to the alpha chain of nascent-polypeptide-associated complex from various organisms, which is proposed to contribute to the fidelity of translocation of newly synthesized proteins. The orthologous gene from N. benthamiana was designated NbNACa1. The binding of NbNACa1 to BMV MP was confirmed in vivo with an agroinfiltration-immunoprecipitation assay. To investigate the involvement of NbNACa1 in BMV multiplication, NbNACa1-silenced (GSNAC) transgenic N. benthamiana plants were produced. Downregulation of NbNACa1 expression reduced virus accumulation in inoculated leaves but not in protoplasts. A microprojectile bombardment assay to monitor BMV-MP-assisted viral movement demonstrated reduced virus spread in GSNAC plants. The localization to the cell wall of BMV MP fused to green fluorescent protein was delayed in GSNAC plants. From these results, we propose that NbNACa1 is involved in BMV cell-to-cell movement through the regulation of BMV MP localization to the plasmodesmata.

  12. Live cell imaging of interactions between replicase and capsid protein of Brome mosaic virus using Bimolecular Fluorescence Complementation: Implications for replication and genome packaging

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chaturvedi, Sonali; Rao, A.L.N., E-mail: arao@ucr.edu

    2014-09-15

    In Brome mosaic virus, it was hypothesized that a physical interaction between viral replicase and capsid protein (CP) is obligatory to confer genome packaging specificity. Here we tested this hypothesis by employing Bimolecular Fluorescent Complementation (BiFC) as a tool for evaluating protein–protein interactions in living cells. The efficacy of BiFC was validated by a known interaction between replicase protein 1a (p1a) and protein 2a (p2a) at the endoplasmic reticulum (ER) site of viral replication. Additionally, co-expression in planta of a bona fide pair of interacting protein partners of p1a and p2a had resulted in the assembly of a functional replicase. Subsequent BiFC assays in conjunction with mCherry labeled ER as a fluorescent cellular marker revealed that CP physically interacts with p2a, but not p1a, and this CP:p2a interaction occurs at the cytoplasmic phase of the ER. The significance of the CP:p2a interaction in BMV replication and genome packaging is discussed. - Highlights: • YFP fusion proteins of BMV p1a and p2a are biologically active. • Self-interaction was observed for p1a, p2a and CP. • CP interacts with p2a but not p1a. • Majority of reconstituted YFP resulting from bona fide fusion protein partners localized on ER.

  13. Live cell imaging of interactions between replicase and capsid protein of Brome mosaic virus using Bimolecular Fluorescence Complementation: Implications for replication and genome packaging

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In Brome mosaic virus, it was hypothesized that a physical interaction between viral replicase and capsid protein (CP) is obligatory to confer genome packaging specificity. Here we tested this hypothesis by employing Bimolecular Fluorescent Complementation (BiFC) as a tool for evaluating protein–protein interactions in living cells. The efficacy of BiFC was validated by a known interaction between replicase protein 1a (p1a) and protein 2a (p2a) at the endoplasmic reticulum (ER) site of viral replication. Additionally, co-expression in planta of a bona fide pair of interacting protein partners of p1a and p2a had resulted in the assembly of a functional replicase. Subsequent BiFC assays in conjunction with mCherry labeled ER as a fluorescent cellular marker revealed that CP physically interacts with p2a, but not p1a, and this CP:p2a interaction occurs at the cytoplasmic phase of the ER. The significance of the CP:p2a interaction in BMV replication and genome packaging is discussed. - Highlights: • YFP fusion proteins of BMV p1a and p2a are biologically active. • Self-interaction was observed for p1a, p2a and CP. • CP interacts with p2a but not p1a. • Majority of reconstituted YFP resulting from bona fide fusion protein partners localized on ER

  14. RNA synthesis by the brome mosaic virus RNA-dependent RNA polymerase in human cells reveals requirements for de novo initiation and protein-protein interaction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Subba-Reddy, Chennareddy V; Tragesser, Brady; Xu, Zhili; Stein, Barry; Ranjith-Kumar, C T; Kao, C Cheng

    2012-04-01

    Brome mosaic virus (BMV) is a model positive-strand RNA virus whose replication has been studied in a number of surrogate hosts. In transiently transfected human cells, the BMV polymerase 2a activated signaling by the innate immune receptor RIG-I, which recognizes de novo-initiated non-self-RNAs. Active-site mutations in 2a abolished RIG-I activation, and coexpression of the BMV 1a protein stimulated 2a activity. Mutations previously shown to abolish 1a and 2a interaction prevented the 1a-dependent enhancement of 2a activity. New insights into 1a-2a interaction include the findings that helicase active site of 1a is required to enhance 2a polymerase activity and that negatively charged amino acid residues between positions 110 and 120 of 2a contribute to interaction with the 1a helicase-like domain but not to the intrinsic polymerase activity. Confocal fluorescence microscopy revealed that the BMV 1a and 2a colocalized to perinuclear region in human cells. However, no perinuclear spherule-like structures were detected in human cells by immunoelectron microscopy. Sequencing of the RNAs coimmunoprecipitated with RIG-I revealed that the 2a-synthesized short RNAs are derived from the message used to translate 2a. That is, 2a exhibits a strong cis preference for BMV RNA2. Strikingly, the 2a RNA products had initiation sequences (5'-GUAAA-3') identical to those from the 5' sequence of the BMV genomic RNA2 and RNA3. These results show that the BMV 2a polymerase does not require other BMV proteins to initiate RNA synthesis but that the 1a helicase domain, and likely helicase activity, can affect RNA synthesis by 2a.

  15. An amphipathic alpha-helix controls multiple roles of brome mosaic virus protein 1a in RNA replication complex assembly and function.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ling Liu

    2009-03-01

    Full Text Available Brome mosaic virus (BMV protein 1a has multiple key roles in viral RNA replication. 1a localizes to perinuclear endoplasmic reticulum (ER membranes as a peripheral membrane protein, induces ER membrane invaginations in which RNA replication complexes form, and recruits and stabilizes BMV 2a polymerase (2a(Pol and RNA replication templates at these sites to establish active replication complexes. During replication, 1a provides RNA capping, NTPase and possibly RNA helicase functions. Here we identify in BMV 1a an amphipathic alpha-helix, helix A, and use NMR analysis to define its structure and propensity to insert in hydrophobic membrane-mimicking micelles. We show that helix A is essential for efficient 1a-ER membrane association and normal perinuclear ER localization, and that deletion or mutation of helix A abolishes RNA replication. Strikingly, mutations in helix A give rise to two dramatically opposite 1a function phenotypes, implying that helix A acts as a molecular switch regulating the intricate balance between separable 1a functions. One class of helix A deletions and amino acid substitutions markedly inhibits 1a-membrane association and abolishes ER membrane invagination, viral RNA template recruitment, and replication, but doubles the 1a-mediated increase in 2a(Pol accumulation. The second class of helix A mutations not only maintains efficient 1a-membrane association but also amplifies the number of 1a-induced membrane invaginations 5- to 8-fold and enhances viral RNA template recruitment, while failing to stimulate 2a(Pol accumulation. The results provide new insights into the pathways of RNA replication complex assembly and show that helix A is critical for assembly and function of the viral RNA replication complex, including its central role in targeting replication components and controlling modes of 1a action.

  16. Genomic plus-strand RNA synthesis by the brome mosaic virus (BMV) RNA replicase requires a sequence that is complementary to the binding site of the BMV helicase-like protein.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sivakumaran, K; Kao, C C

    2000-11-01

    Summary Initiation of genomic plus-strand RNA synthesis by the brome mosaic virus (BMV) replicase in vitro requires a 26-nucleotide (nt) RNA sequence at the 3' end of the minus-strand RNA and a nontemplated nucleotide 3' of the initiation cytidylate [Sivakumaran, K. and Kao, C.C. (1999)J. Virol.64, 6415-6423]. At the 5' end of this RNA is a 9-nt sequence called the cB box, the complement of the previously defined B box. The cB box can not be functionally replaced by the B box and has specific positional and sequence requirements. The portion of the cB box that is required for RNA synthesis in vitro is well-conserved in species in the Bromoviridae family. An equivalent RNA from Cucumber mosaic virus was unable to direct efficient RNA synthesis by the BMV replicase until the cB box was positioned at the same site relative to the BMV RNA and guanylates were present at positions +6 and +7 from the initiation cytidylate. These results further define the elements required for the recognition and initiation of viral genomic plus-strand RNA synthesis and suggest that a sequence important for minus-strand RNA synthesis is also required for plus-strand RNA synthesis.

  17. Systemic transport of Alfalfa mosaic virus can be mediated by the movement proteins of several viruses assigned to five genera of the 30K family.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fajardo, Thor V M; Peiró, Ana; Pallás, Vicente; Sánchez-Navarro, Jesús

    2013-03-01

    We previously showed that the movement protein (MP) gene of Alfalfa mosaic virus (AMV) is functionally exchangeable for the cell-to-cell transport of the corresponding genes of Tobacco mosaic virus (TMV), Brome mosaic virus, Prunus necrotic ringspot virus, Cucumber mosaic virus and Cowpea mosaic virus. We have analysed the capacity of the heterologous MPs to systemically transport the corresponding chimeric AMV genome. All MPs were competent in systemic transport but required the fusion at their C terminus of the coat protein-interacting C-terminal 44 aa (A44) of the AMV MP. Except for the TMV MP, the presence of the hybrid virus in upper leaves correlated with the capacity to move locally. These results suggest that all the MPs assigned to the 30K superfamily should be exchangeable not only for local virus movement but also for systemic transport when the A44 fragment is present. PMID:23136366

  18. A Foxtail mosaic virus Vector for Virus-Induced Gene Silencing in Maize.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mei, Yu; Zhang, Chunquan; Kernodle, Bliss M; Hill, John H; Whitham, Steven A

    2016-06-01

    Plant viruses have been widely used as vectors for foreign gene expression and virus-induced gene silencing (VIGS). A limited number of viruses have been developed into viral vectors for the purposes of gene expression or VIGS in monocotyledonous plants, and among these, the tripartite viruses Brome mosaic virus and Cucumber mosaic virus have been shown to induce VIGS in maize (Zea mays). We describe here a new DNA-based VIGS system derived from Foxtail mosaic virus (FoMV), a monopartite virus that is able to establish systemic infection and silencing of endogenous maize genes homologous to gene fragments inserted into the FoMV genome. To demonstrate VIGS applications of this FoMV vector system, four genes, phytoene desaturase (functions in carotenoid biosynthesis), lesion mimic22 (encodes a key enzyme of the porphyrin pathway), iojap (functions in plastid development), and brown midrib3 (caffeic acid O-methyltransferase), were silenced and characterized in the sweet corn line Golden × Bantam. Furthermore, we demonstrate that the FoMV infectious clone establishes systemic infection in maize inbred lines, sorghum (Sorghum bicolor), and green foxtail (Setaria viridis), indicating the potential wide applications of this viral vector system for functional genomics studies in maize and other monocots. PMID:27208311

  19. Mutants of alfalfa mosaic virus

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In this thesis the isolation and characterization of a number of mutants of alfalfa mosaic virus, a plant virus with a coat protein dependent genome, is described. Thermo-sensitive (ts) mutants were selected since, at least theoretically, ts mutations can be present in all virus coded functions. It was found that a high percentage of spontaneous mutants, isolated because of their aberrant symptoms, were ts. The majority of these isolates could grow at the non-permissive temperature in the presence of a single wild type (wt) component. To increase the mutation rate virus preparations were treated with several mutagens. After nitrous acid treatment or irradiation with ultraviolet light, an increase in the level of mutations was observed. UV irradiation was preferred since it did not require large amounts of purified viral components. During the preliminary characterization of potential ts mutants the author also obtained one structural and several symptom mutants which were analysed further (chapter 7, 8 and 9). The properties of the ts mutants are described in chapter 3-7. (Auth.)

  20. 40 CFR 174.514 - Coat Protein of Watermelon Mosaic Virus-2 and Zucchini Yellow Mosaic Virus; exemption from the...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 23 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Coat Protein of Watermelon Mosaic... Coat Protein of Watermelon Mosaic Virus-2 and Zucchini Yellow Mosaic Virus; exemption from the requirement for a tolerance. Residues of Coat Protein of Watermelon Mosaic Virus-2 and Zucchini Yellow...

  1. Tobacco mosaic virus 126-kDa protein increases the susceptibility of Nicotiana tabacum to other viruses and its dosage affects virus-induced gene silencing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harries, Phillip A; Palanichelvam, Karuppaiah; Bhat, Sumana; Nelson, Richard S

    2008-12-01

    The Tobacco mosaic virus (TMV) 126-kDa protein is a suppressor of RNA silencing previously shown to delay the silencing of transgenes in Nicotiana tabacum and N. benthamiana. Here, we demonstrate that expression of a 126-kDa protein-green fluorescent protein (GFP) fusion (126-GFP) in N. tabacum increases susceptibility to a broad assortment of viruses, including Alfalfa mosaic virus, Brome mosaic virus, Tobacco rattle virus (TRV), and Potato virus X. Given its ability to enhance TRV infection in tobacco, we tested the effect of 126-GFP expression on TRV-mediated virus-induced gene silencing (VIGS) and demonstrate that this protein can enhance silencing phenotypes. To explain these results, we examined the poorly understood effect of suppressor dosage on the VIGS response and demonstrated that enhanced VIGS corresponds to the presence of low levels of suppressor protein. A mutant version of the 126-kDa protein, inhibited in its ability to suppress silencing, had a minimal effect on VIGS, suggesting that the suppressor activity of the 126-kDa protein is indeed responsible for the observed dosage effects. These findings illustrate the sensitivity of host plants to relatively small changes in suppressor dosage and have implications for those interested in enhancing silencing phenotypes in tobacco and other species through VIGS. PMID:18986250

  2. KARAKTERISASICYMBIDIUM MOSAIC VIRUS (CYMMV PADA TANAMAN ANGGREK

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    KHAMDAN KHALIMI

    2012-11-01

    Full Text Available Characterization ofCymbidium mosaic virus (CymMV on Orchid Plant Orchids are affected by more virus disease problems than most crops, reducing their commercial values considerably. Orchid viruses are widespread in cultivated orchids, withCymbidium mosaic potexvirus (CymMV being the most prevalent. CymMV high incidence in cultivated orchids has been attributed to the stability and ease of transmission of this virus through cultural practices. CymMV induces floral and foliar necrosis. The virus also reduce plant vigor and lower flower quality, which affect their economic value. The objective of the research is to characterize the virus causing mosaic or chlorotic and necrotic on orchids in West Java. A reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction (RT- PCR assays using oligonucleotide primers specific to CymMV were also successfully amplified the regions of the coat protein (CP gene of the virus. Analysis by using sodium dodecyl sulphate- polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis (SDS-PAGE revealed that the virus have a major structural protein with an estimated molecular weight of 28 kDa. Aligments of partial nucleotide sequences of the CP gene displayed 86 to 92% homology to CymMV isolates from other countries.

  3. Resistance to wheat streak mosaic virus and Triticum mosaic virus in wheat lines carrying Wsm1 and Wsm3

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wheat streak mosaic virus (WSMV) and Triticum mosaic virus (TriMV) are important viruses of wheat (Triticum aestivum L.) in the Great Plains of United States. In addition to agronomic practices to prevent damage from these viruses, temperature sensitive resistance genes Wsm1, Wsm2 and Wsm3, have bee...

  4. Immunochromatographic purification of Bean Yellow Mosaic Virus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bujarski, J J; Wiatroszak, I

    1981-01-01

    The method of immunoadsorptional purification of Bean Yellow Mosaic Virus has been worked out. Immunosorbents were obtained by coupling the antibody (IgG) fraction isolated from anti-BYMV and anti-pea leaf protein antisera with CNBr-activated 1% agarose beads. Conditions for preparation of immunosorbents, for BYMV adsorption and elution as well as the method of plant protein separation from BYMV were pointed out. The purity of BYMV was checked by double immunodiffusion as well as by SDS-acrylamide gel electrophoresis. Also biological activity was determined. TMV was used as the model virus for further BYMV studies. PMID:7025790

  5. Response of maize (Zea mays L.) lines carrying Wsm1, Wsm2 and Wsm3 to the potyviruses Johnsongrass mosaic virus and Sorghum mosaic virus

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maize dwarf mosaic disease is one of the most important viral diseases of maize throughout the world. It is caused by a set of related viruses in the family Potyviridae, genus Potyvirus, including Maize dwarf mosaic virus (MDMV), Sugarcane mosaic virus (SCMV), Johnsongrass mosaic virus (JGMV), and S...

  6. Identification of a strain of maize dwarf mosaic virus, related to sugarcane mosaic virus isolated from maize in Burundi

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Verhoyen, M.

    1983-01-01

    Full Text Available A strain of maize dwarf mosaic virus related to sugarcane mosaic virus has been isolated from maize in Burundi. The properties (including electron microscopy and serology of the virus are described, and elements for a control strategy are reviewed.

  7. Barley stripe mosaic virus: Structure and relationship to the tobamoviruses

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Barley stripe mosaic virus (BSMV) is the type member of the genus Hordeivirus, rigid, rod-shaped viruses in the family Virgaviridae. We have used fiber diffraction and cryo-electron microscopy to determine the helical symmetry of BSMV to be 23.2 subunits per turn of the viral helix, and to obtain a low-resolution model of the virus by helical reconstruction methods. Features in the model support a structural relationship between the coat proteins of the hordeiviruses and the tobamoviruses. - Highlights: • We report a low-resolution structure of barley stripe mosaic virus. • Barley stripe mosaic virus has 23.2 subunits per turn of the viral helix. • We compare barley stripe mosaic virus with tobacco mosaic virus

  8. Viral protein synthesis in cowpea mosaic virus infected protoplasts

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Some aspects of cowpea mosaic virus (CPMV) multiplication in cowpea mesophyll protoplasts were studied. The detection and characterization of proteins whose synthesis is induced or is stimulated upon virus infection was performed with the aid of radioactive labelling. (Auth.)

  9. Comparison of barley stripe mosaic virus strains.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hafez, Elsayed E; Abdel Aleem, Engy E; Fattouh, Faiza A

    2008-01-01

    BSMV (barley stripe mosaic virus) particles were obtained in a pure state from infected host plant tissues of Hordeum vulgare. The three genomic parities (alpha, beta and gamma) were amplified by PCR using specific primers for each particle; each was cloned. Partial sequence of the alpha, beta and gamma segments was determined for the Egyptian isolate of barley stripe mosaic virus (BSMV AE1). Alignment of nucleotide sequences with that of other known strains of the virus, BSMV type strains (CV17, ND18 and China), and the generation of phylogenetic trees was performed. A low level of homology was detected comparing 467 bp of the a and 643 bp of the segments to that of the other strains, and thus BSMV alpha and beta segments were in separate clusters. However, 1154 bp of the gamma segments of BSMV AE1 showed a high level of homology especially to strain BSMV ND18, as they both formed a distinct cluster. Northern blotting of pure BSMV AE1 virus and H. vulgare-infected tissue were compared using an alpha ND18 specific probe. Western blotting using antibodies specific for the coat protein (CP) and the triple gene block 1 (TGB1) protein, which are both encoded by the beta ND18 segment, still indicated a high level of similarity between proteins produced by BSMV ND18 and AE1. We suggest that the BSMV AE1 isolate is a distinct strain of BSMV which reflects the genetic evolutionary divergence among BSMV strains and members of the Hordeivirus group. PMID:18533473

  10. Evaluation of Seed Transmission of Turnip yellow mosaic virus and Tobacco mosaic virus in Arabidopsis thaliana.

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Assis Filho, F M; Sherwood, J L

    2000-11-01

    ABSTRACT The mechanism of virus transmission through seed was studied in Arabidopsis thaliana infected with Turnip yellow mosaic virus (TYMV) and Tobacco mosaic virus (TMV). Serological and biological tests were conducted to identify the route by which the viruses reach the seed and subsequently are located in the seed. Both TYMV and TMV were detected in seed from infected plants, however only TYMV was seed-transmitted. This is the first report of transmission of TYMV in seed of A. thaliana. Estimating virus seed transmission by grow-out tests was more accurate than enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay due to the higher frequency of antigen in the seed coat than in the embryo. Virus in the seed coat did not lead to seedling infection. Thus, embryo invasion is necessary for seed transmission of TYMV in A. thaliana. Crosses between healthy and virus-infected plants indicated that TYMV from either the female or the male parent could invade the seed. Conversely, invasion from maternal tissue was the only route for TMV to invade the seed. Pollination of flowers on healthy A. thaliana with pollen from TYMV-infected plants did not result in systemic infection of healthy plants, despite TYMV being carried by pollen to the seed.

  11. Recombination with coat protein transgene in a complemen-tation system based on Cucumber mosaic virus (CMV)

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LEI; Wanli

    2001-01-01

    plant cell suspension cultures, in Plant Tissue Culture Manual (ed. Lindsey, K.), Dordrecht: Kluwer Academic Publishers, 1991, A3: 1-21.[12]Damm, B., Willmitzer, L., Arabidopsis protoplast transformation and re-generation, in Plant Tissue Culture Manual (ed. Lindsey, K.), Dordrecht: Kluwer Academic Publishers, 1991, A7: 1-20.[13]Saunders, J. A., Rhodes, S. C., Kaper, J. M., Effects of electroporation pulse wave on the incorporation of viral RNA into tobacco protoplasts, BioTechniques, 1989, 7: 1124-1131.[14]Laemmli, U. K., Cleavage of structural proteins during the assembly of the head of bacteriophage T4, Nature, 1970, 227: 680-685.[15]Sambrook, J., Fritsch, E. F., Maniatis, T., Molecular Cloning: A Laboratory Manual, 2nd ed., New York: Cold Spring Har-bor Laboratory Press, 1989, 18.60-18.75.[16]Ding, S. W., Rathjen, J. P., Li, W. X. et al., Efficient infection from cDNA clones of cucumber mosaic cucumovirus RNAs in a new plasmid vector, J. Gen. Virol., 1995, 76: 459-464.[17]Chomczynski, P., Sacchi, N., Single-step method of RNA isolation by acid guanidinium thiocyanate-phenol-chloroform extraction, Anal. Biochem., 1987, 162: 156-159.[18]Owen, J., Shintaku, M., Aeschleman, P., Nucleotide sequence and evolutionary relationships of cucumber mosaic virus (CMV) strains: CMV RNA3, J. Gen. Virol., 1990, 71: 2243-2249.[19]Roossinck, M. J., Zhang, L., Hellwald, K. H., Rearrangements in the 5′ nontranslated region and phylogenetic analysis of cucumber mosaic virus RNA3 indicate radial evolution of three subgroups, J. Virol., 1999, 73: 6752-6758.[20]Mori, M., Mise, K., Kobayashi, K., Infectivity of plasmids containing brome mosaic virus cDNA linked to the cauliflower mosaic virus 35S RNA promoter, J. Gen. Virol., 1991, 72: 243-246.[21]Aaziz, R., Tepfer, M., Recombination in RNA viruses and in virus-resistant transgenic plants, J. Gen. Virol., 1999, 80: 1339-1346.[22]Rubio, T., Borja, M., Scholthof, H. B. et al., Recombination with

  12. Cell-to-cell movement of Alfalfa mosaic virus can be mediated by the movement proteins of Ilar-, bromo-, cucumo-, tobamo- and comoviruses and does not require virion formation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sánchez-Navarro, Jesús A; Carmen Herranz, María; Pallás, Vicente

    2006-03-01

    RNA 3 of Alfalfa mosaic virus (AMV) encodes the movement protein (MP) and coat protein (CP). Chimeric RNA 3 with the AMV MP gene replaced by the corresponding MP gene of Prunus necrotic ringspot virus, Brome mosaic virus, Cucumber mosaic virus or Cowpea mosaic virus efficiently moved from cell-to-cell only when the expressed MP was extended at its C-terminus with the C-terminal 44 amino acids of AMV MP. MP of Tobacco mosaic virus supported the movement of the chimeric RNA 3 whether or not the MP was extended with the C-terminal AMV MP sequence. The replacement of the CP gene in RNA 3 by a mutant gene encoding a CP defective in virion formation did not affect cell-to-cell transport of the chimera's with a functional MP. A GST pull-down technique was used to demonstrate for the first time that the C-terminal 44 amino acids of the MP of a virus belonging to the family Bromoviridae interact specifically with AMV virus particles. Together, these results demonstrate that AMV RNA 3 can be transported from cell-to-cell by both tubule-forming and non-tubule-forming MPs if a specific MP-CP interaction occurs. PMID:16316673

  13. The complete sequence of a sugarcane mosaic virus isolate causing maize dwarf mosaic disease in China

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    CHENG; Ye(程晔); CHEN; Jiong(陈炯); CHEN; Jianping(陈剑平)

    2002-01-01

    The complete sequence of a potyvirus from maize in Zhejiang Province was determined. The RNA was 9596 nucleotides long, excluding the 3′-poly (A) tail, and there was a single long open reading frame (ORF) of 9192 nts encoding a 346.1 ku polyprotein. The polyprotein had substantial amino acid sequence homology with those encoded by the RNAs of a Chinese isolate of sorghum mosaic virus (SrMV-C) and a Bulgarian isolate of maize dwarf mosaic virus, but it was most closely related to sugarcane mosaic virus (SCMV) isolates, for which only partial sequences have been published. According to the published criteria for distinguishing potyviruses, the sequence reported here is clearly a strain of SCMV, but it also showed a surprisingly high amino acid homology with SrMV-C in the HC-Pro, P3 and CI proteins.

  14. High sequence conservation among cucumber mosaic virus isolates from Lily

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Chen, Y.K.; Derks, A.F.L.M.; Langeveld, S.; Goldbach, R.; Prins, M.

    2001-01-01

    For classification of Cucumber mosaic virus (CMV) isolates from ornamental crops of different geographical areas, these were characterized by comparing the nucleotide sequences of RNAs 4 and the encoded coat proteins. Within the ornamental-infecting CMV viruses both subgroups were represented. CMV i

  15. Bemisia tabaci (Homoptera: Aleyrodidae) and Indian cassava mosaic virus transmission

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bemisia tabaci (Gennadius) adults from colonies reared on cassava or sweet potato plants were studied to determine their ability to transmit Indian cassava mosaic virus (ICMV) (Geminiviridae: Begomovirus) from cassava to cassava. Virus acquisition access (feeding) periods (AAP) of 48 h on ICMV-infec...

  16. Purification and properties of cowpea mosaic virus RNA replicase

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Zabel, P.

    1978-01-01

    This thesis concerns the partial purification and properties of an RNA-dependent RNA polymerase (RNA replicase) produced upon infection of Vigna unguiculata plants with Cowpea Mosaic Virus (CPMV). The enzyme is believed to be coded, at least in part, by the virus genome and to be responsible for the

  17. A study of variability of capsid protein genes of Radish mosaic virus

    OpenAIRE

    Holá, Marcela

    2008-01-01

    The part of RNA2 genome segment of several isolates of Radish mosaic virus (RaMV) including capsid protein genes was sequenced. Variability of capsid protein genes among the isolates of Radish mosaic virus was studied.

  18. The cell biology of Tobacco mosaic virus replication and movement

    OpenAIRE

    Liu, Chengke; Richard S Nelson

    2013-01-01

    Successful systemic infection of a plant by Tobacco mosaic virus (TMV) requires three processes that repeat over time: initial establishment and accumulation in invaded cells, intercellular movement, and systemic transport. Accumulation and intercellular movement of TMV necessarily involves intracellular transport by complexes containing virus and host proteins and virus RNA during a dynamic process that can be visualized. Multiple membranes appear to assist TMV accumulation, while membranes,...

  19. The use of tobacco mosaic virus and cowpea mosaic virus for the production of novel metal nanomaterials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Love, Andrew J; Makarov, Valentine; Yaminsky, Igor; Kalinina, Natalia O; Taliansky, Michael E

    2014-01-20

    Due to the nanoscale size and the strictly controlled and consistent morphologies of viruses, there has been a recent interest in utilizing them in nanotechnology. The structure, surface chemistries and physical properties of many viruses have been well elucidated, which have allowed identification of regions of their capsids which can be modified either chemically or genetically for nanotechnological uses. In this review we focus on the use of such modifications for the functionalization and production of viruses and empty viral capsids that can be readily decorated with metals in a highly tuned manner. In particular, we discuss the use of two plant viruses (Cowpea mosaic virus and Tobacco mosaic virus) which have been extensively used for production of novel metal nanoparticles (<100nm), composites and building blocks for 2D and 3D materials, and illustrate their applications.

  20. Sequence analysis of a soil-borne wheat mosaic virus isolate from Italy shows that it is the same virus as European wheat mosaic virus and Soil-borne rye mosaic virus

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2001-01-01

    The complete sequence of the two RNAs of a furovirus isolate fromdurum wheat in Italy was determined. Sequence comparisons and phylogenetic analysis were done to compare the Italian virus with Soil-borne wheat mosaic virus (SBWMV) from the USA and with furovirus sequences recently published as European wheat mosaic virus (EWMV), from wheat in France, and Soil-borne rye mosaic virus (SBRMV), from rye and wheat in Germany. Over the entire genome, the Italian isolate RNA1 and RNA2 had respectively 97.5% and 98.6% nucleotide identity with EWMV, 95.5% and 85.8% with SBRMV-G and 70.6% and 64.5% with SBWMV. The Italian isolate was therefore clearly distinct from SBWMV. The European isolates all appear to belong to the same virus and the name Soil-borne cereal mosaic virus may resolve earlier ambiguities.

  1. Relationship of lychnis ringspot virus to barley stripe mosaic virus and poa semilatent virus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hunter, B G; Smith, J; Fattouh, F; Jackson, A O

    1989-01-01

    Barley stripe mosaic virus (BSMV), poa semilatent virus (PSLV), and lychnis ringspot virus (LRSV) have previously been assigned to the hordeivirus group because of similarities in their particle morphology, physicochemical properties and serological analyses. However, the serological relationships of the three viruses have not been determined by direct comparison. The present study evaluated the relatedness of these viruses by Western and dot immunoblotting and by nucleic acid hybridizations. Serological analyses of the coat proteins separated by gel electrophoresis and of intact virus particles bound to nitrocellulose membranes revealed that BSMV and PSLV are distantly related, but that they are more closely related to each other than to LRSV. The genomic RNAs of the viruses failed to cross-hybridize in northern hybridization tests conducted at different temperatures. These comparisons showed that BSMV, PSLV and LRSV are distinct viruses with little nucleotide sequence relatedness. Thus our data provide additional support for their inclusion as separate members of the hordeivirus group. PMID:2722469

  2. Capsicum annum, a new host of watermelon mosaic virus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hajizadeh, Mohammad; Mohammadi, Kazhal

    2016-03-01

    The occurrence of Watermelon mosaic virus (WMV) in sweet pepper (Capsicum annuum L.) in Kurdistan province, Iran was confirmed by reverse transcriptase-polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR) and partial characterization of coat protein. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first report of WMV infecting C. annuum, adding a new host to list of more than 170 species infected by this virus. PMID:26925452

  3. Elucidation of the genome organization of tobacco mosaic virus.

    OpenAIRE

    Zaitlin, M

    1999-01-01

    Proteins unique to tobacco mosaic virus (TMV)-infected plants were detected in the 1970s by electrophoretic analyses of extracts of virus-infected tissues, comparing their proteins to those generated in extracts of uninfected tissues. The genome organization of TMV was deduced principally from studies involving in vitro translation of proteins from the genomic and subgenomic messenger RNAs. The ultimate analysis of the TMV genome came in 1982 when P. Goelet and colleagues sequenced the entire...

  4. First report of Sugarcane mosaic virus infecting Columbus Grass (Sorghum almum) in the United States

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mosaic symptoms in sorghum can be caused by several potyviruses [family Potyviridae], including Sorghum mosaic virus (SrMV) and Sugarcane mosaic virus (SCMV). SrMV and SCMV are responsible for global economic losses in sorghum, maize, and sugarcane. Ten plants of Columbus grass (Sorghum almum) exhib...

  5. Soil-borne wheat mosaic virus infectious clone and manipulation for gene-carrying capacity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Soilborne wheat mosaic virus (SBWMV) is a bipartite single stranded positive sense RNA virus with rigid-rod shaped virions. Taxonomically the virus is in the family Viragviridae, as are commonly used gene silencing or expression viral vectors, Tobacco rattle virus (TRV) and Barley stripe mosaic viru...

  6. Solanum americanum: reservoir for Potato virus Y and Cucumber mosaic virus in sweet pepper crops

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Monika Fecury Moura

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available Weeds can act as important reservoirs for viruses. Solanum americanum (Black nightshade is a common weed in Brazil and samples showing mosaic were collected from sweet pepper crops to verify the presence of viruses. One sample showed mixed infection between Cucumber mosaic virus (CMV and Potato virus Y (PVY and one sample showed simple infection by PVY. Both virus species were transmitted by plant extract and caused mosaic in tomato (Solanum lycopersicum cv. Santa Clara, sweet pepper (Capsicum annuum cv. Magda, Nicotiana benthamiana and N. tabaccum TNN, and local lesions on Chenopodium quinoa, C. murale and C. amaranticolor. The coat protein sequences for CMV and PVY found in S. americanum are phylogenetically more related to isolates from tomato. We conclude that S. americanum can act as a reservoir for different viruses during and between sweet pepper crop seasons.

  7. Genome sequence of vanilla distortion mosaic virus infecting Coriandrum sativum.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adams, I P; Rai, S; Deka, M; Harju, V; Hodges, T; Hayward, G; Skelton, A; Fox, A; Boonham, N

    2014-12-01

    The 9573-nucleotide genome of a potyvirus was sequenced from a Coriandrum sativum plant from India with viral symptoms. On analysis, this virus was shown to have greater than 85 % nucleotide sequence identity to vanilla distortion mosaic virus (VDMV). Analysis of the putative coat protein sequence confirmed that this virus was in fact VDMV, with greater than 91 % amino acid sequence identity. The genome appears to encode a 3083-amino-acid polyprotein potentially cleaved into the 10 mature proteins expected in potyviruses. Phylogenetic analysis confirmed that VDMV is a distinct but ungrouped member of the genus Potyvirus.

  8. Genome sequence of vanilla distortion mosaic virus infecting Coriandrum sativum.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adams, I P; Rai, S; Deka, M; Harju, V; Hodges, T; Hayward, G; Skelton, A; Fox, A; Boonham, N

    2014-12-01

    The 9573-nucleotide genome of a potyvirus was sequenced from a Coriandrum sativum plant from India with viral symptoms. On analysis, this virus was shown to have greater than 85 % nucleotide sequence identity to vanilla distortion mosaic virus (VDMV). Analysis of the putative coat protein sequence confirmed that this virus was in fact VDMV, with greater than 91 % amino acid sequence identity. The genome appears to encode a 3083-amino-acid polyprotein potentially cleaved into the 10 mature proteins expected in potyviruses. Phylogenetic analysis confirmed that VDMV is a distinct but ungrouped member of the genus Potyvirus. PMID:25252813

  9. Recombination analysis of Maize dwarf mosaic virus (MDMV) in the Sugarcane mosaic virus (SCMV) subgroup of potyviruses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gell, Gyöngyvér; Sebestyén, Endre; Balázs, Ervin

    2015-02-01

    Recombination among RNA viruses is a natural phenomenon that appears to have played a significant role in the species development and the evolution of many strains. It also has particular significance for the risk assessment of plants which have been genetically modified for disease resistance by incorporating viral sequences into their genomes. However, the exact recombination events taking place in viral genomes are not investigated in detail for many virus groups. In this analysis, different single-stranded positive-sense RNA potyviruses were compared using various in silico recombination detection methods and new recombination events in the Sugarcane mosaic virus (SCMV) subgroup were detected. For an extended in silico recombination analysis, two of the analyzed Maize dwarf mosaic virus full-length genomes were sequenced additionally during this work. These results strengthen the evidence that recombination is a major driving force in virus evolution, and the emergence of new virus variants in the SCMV subgroup, paired with mutations, could generate viruses with altered biological properties. The intra- and interspecific homolog recombinations seem to be a general trait in this virus group, causing little or no changes to the amino acid of the progenies. However, we found a few breakpoints between the members of SCMV subgroup and the weed-infecting distant relatives, but only a few methods of the RDP3 package predicted these events with low significance level.

  10. Apple Latent Spherical Virus Vector as Vaccine for the Prevention and Treatment of Mosaic Diseases in Pea, Broad Bean, and Eustoma Plants by Bean Yellow Mosaic Virus

    OpenAIRE

    Nozomi Satoh; Tatsuya Kon; Noriko Yamagishi; Tsubasa Takahashi; Tomohide Natsuaki; Nobuyuki Yoshikawa

    2014-01-01

    We investigated the protective effects of a viral vector based on an Apple latent spherical virus (ALSV) harboring a segment of the Bean yellow mosaic virus (BYMV) genome against mosaic diseases in pea, broad bean, and eustoma plants caused by BYMV infection. In pea plants pre-inoculated with the ALSV vaccine and challenge inoculated with BYMV expressing green fluorescence protein, BYMV multiplication occurred in inoculated leaves, but was markedly inhibited in the upper leaves. No mosaic sym...

  11. The cell biology of Tobacco mosaic virus replication and movement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Chengke; Nelson, Richard S

    2013-01-01

    Successful systemic infection of a plant by Tobacco mosaic virus (TMV) requires three processes that repeat over time: initial establishment and accumulation in invaded cells, intercellular movement, and systemic transport. Accumulation and intercellular movement of TMV necessarily involves intracellular transport by complexes containing virus and host proteins and virus RNA during a dynamic process that can be visualized. Multiple membranes appear to assist TMV accumulation, while membranes, microfilaments and microtubules appear to assist TMV movement. Here we review cell biological studies that describe TMV-membrane, -cytoskeleton, and -other host protein interactions which influence virus accumulation and movement in leaves and callus tissue. The importance of understanding the developmental phase of the infection in relationship to the observed virus-membrane or -host protein interaction is emphasized. Utilizing the latest observations of TMV-membrane and -host protein interactions within our evolving understanding of the infection ontogeny, a model for TMV accumulation and intracellular spread in a cell biological context is provided.

  12. Catharanthus mosaic virus: A potyvirus from a gymnosperm, Welwitschia mirabilis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koh, Shu Hui; Li, Hua; Admiraal, Ryan; Jones, Michael G K; Wylie, Stephen J

    2015-05-01

    A virus from a symptomatic plant of the gymnosperm Welwitschia mirabilis Hook. growing as an ornamental plant in a domestic garden in Western Australia was inoculated to a plant of Nicotiana benthamiana where it established a systemic infection. The complete genome sequence of 9636 nucleotides was determined using high-throughput and Sanger sequencing technologies. The genome sequence shared greatest identity (83% nucleotides and 91% amino acids) with available partial sequences of catharanthus mosaic virus, indicating that the new isolate belonged to that taxon. Analysis of the phylogeny of the complete virus sequence placed it in a monotypic group in the genus Potyvirus. This is the first record of a virus from W. mirabilis, the first complete genome sequence of catharanthus mosaic virus determined, and the first record from Australia. This finding illustrates the risk to natural and managed systems posed by the international trade in live plants and propagules, which enables viruses to establish in new regions and infect new hosts. PMID:25804761

  13. Protein synthesis directed by cowpea mosaic virus RNAs

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The thesis concerns the proteins synthesized under direction of Cowpea mosaic virus RNAs. Sufficient radioactive labelling of proteins was achieved when 35S as sulphate was administered to intact Vigna plants, cultivated in Hoagland solution. The large polypeptides synthesized under direction of B- and M-RNA are probably precursor molecules from which the coat proteins are generated by a mechanism of posttranslational cleavage. (Auth.)

  14. Proteins synthesized in tobacco mosaic virus infected protoplasts

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The author deals with research on the multiplication of tobacco mosaic virus (TMV) in leaf cell protoplasts. An attempt is made to answer three questions: (1) Which proteins are synthesized in TMV infected protoplasts as a result of TMV multiplication. (2) Which of the synthesized proteins are made under the direction of the TMV genome and, if any, which of the proteins are host specific. (3) In which functions are these proteins involved. (Auth.)

  15. High sequence conservation among cucumber mosaic virus isolates from lily.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Y K; Derks, A F; Langeveld, S; Goldbach, R; Prins, M

    2001-08-01

    For classification of Cucumber mosaic virus (CMV) isolates from ornamental crops of different geographical areas, these were characterized by comparing the nucleotide sequences of RNAs 4 and the encoded coat proteins. Within the ornamental-infecting CMV viruses both subgroups were represented. CMV isolates of Alstroemeria and crocus were classified as subgroup II isolates, whereas 8 other isolates, from lily, gladiolus, amaranthus, larkspur, and lisianthus, were identified as subgroup I members. In general, nucleotide sequence comparisons correlated well with geographic distribution, with one notable exception: the analyzed nucleotide sequences of 5 lily isolates showed remarkably high homology despite different origins. PMID:11676424

  16. First report of Alfalfa mosaic virus and Soybean dwarf virus on soybean in North Dakota

    Science.gov (United States)

    Soybean (Glycine max [L.] Merr.) is the major oilseed crop in North Dakota with production concentrated in the eastern half of the state. Only one virus, Soybean mosaic virus, has been reported from soybean in North Dakota. In 2010, 200 soybean fields from 25 counties that have the majority of soybe...

  17. Solution structures of potato virus X and narcissus mosaic virus from Raman optical activity

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Blanch, Ewan W.; Robinson, David J.; Hecht, Lutz;

    2002-01-01

    Potato virus X (PVX) and narcissus mosaic virus (NMV) were studied using vibrational Raman optical activity (ROA) in order to obtain new information on the structures of their coat protein subunits. The ROA spectra of the two intact virions are very similar to each other and similar to that of to...

  18. [Amplification and cloning of dahlia mosaic virus and carnation etched ring virus promoters].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuluev, B R; Chemeris, A V

    2007-12-01

    Amplification and cloning of dahlia mosaic virus promoter were carried out for the first time. Sequence analysis showed homology between this promoter and the promoters of other caulimoviruses. In addition, amplification and cloning of the carnation etched ring virus promoter was performed. PMID:18592695

  19. Beet mosaic virus: epidemiology and damage

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Dusi, A.N.

    1999-01-01

    Overview:The aim of the studies described in this thesis was to obtain a thorough understanding of the main factors determining the spread of a potyvirus in a high plant density crop. The factors studied included the relationships between virus, host and vector, the spread of the vi

  20. Phosphorylation of alfalfa mosaic virus movement protein in vivo.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Bong-Suk; Halk, Edward L; Merlo, Donald J; Nelson, Steven E; Loesch-Fries, L Sue

    2014-07-01

    The 32-kDa movement protein, P3, of alfalfa mosaic virus (AMV) is essential for cell-to-cell spread of the virus in plants. P3 shares many properties with other virus movement proteins (MPs); however, it is not known if P3 is posttranslationally modified by phosphorylation, which is important for the function of other MPs. When expressed in Nicotiana tabacum, P3 accumulated primarily in the cell walls of older leaves or in the cytosol of younger leaves. When expressed in Pischia pastoris, P3 accumulated primarily in a soluble form. Metabolic labeling indicated that a portion of P3 was phosphorylated in both tobacco and yeast, suggesting that phosphorylation regulates the function of this protein as it does for other virus MPs. PMID:24435161

  1. Structural lability of Barley stripe mosaic virus virions.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Valentin V Makarov

    Full Text Available Virions of Barley stripe mosaic virus (BSMV were neglected for more than thirty years after their basic properties were determined. In this paper, the physicochemical characteristics of BSMV virions and virion-derived viral capsid protein (CP were analyzed, namely, the absorption and intrinsic fluorescence spectra, circular dichroism spectra, differential scanning calorimetry curves, and size distributions by dynamic laser light scattering. The structural properties of BSMV virions proved to be intermediate between those of Tobacco mosaic virus (TMV, a well-characterized virus with rigid rod-shaped virions, and flexuous filamentous plant viruses. The BSMV virions were found to be considerably more labile than expected from their rod-like morphology and a distant sequence relation of the BSMV and TMV CPs. The circular dichroism spectra of BSMV CP subunits incorporated into the virions, but not subunits of free CP, demonstrated a significant proportion of beta-structure elements, which were proposed to be localized mostly in the protein regions exposed on the virion outer surface. These beta-structure elements likely formed during virion assembly can comprise the N- and C-terminal protein regions unstructured in the non-virion CP and can mediate inter-subunit interactions. Based on computer-assisted structure modeling, a model for BSMV CP subunit structural fold compliant with the available experimental data was proposed.

  2. Frequency and Molecular Characterization of Watermelon Mosaic Virus from Serbia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ana Vučurović

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Watermelon mosaic virus (WMV is widespread in cucurbit crops, most commonly occuring in temperate and Mediterranean regions. In Serbia WMV has been detected in single and mixed infections with Zucchini yellow mosaic virus and Cucumber mosaic virus in field-grown pumpkin and squash crops. Among pumpkin-affecting viruses WMV is the most frequent one, both by the number of localities and its incidence at each location. During the growing season of 2009, samples from 583 plants of Cucurbita pepo cvs. Olinka, Belgrade zucchini and Tosca (Zucchini group, as well as from C. maxima and C. moschata showing symptoms of virus infection were collected from 12 commercial fields at eight localities and analyzed by DAS-ELISA using polyclonal antisera specific to six most important cucurbit viruses. Interestingly, WMV was detected at fewer sites and had lower ncidence rate than in two previous years. In single infections, WMV was found in 11% of tested plants in three fields; in mixed infections with ZYMV, it was recorded in 9.9% of plants in five fields and with CMV in only 0.2% in one field. The partial coat protein gene and 3’ non-translated region from two representativeisolates of WMV originating from different localities and host plant species were amplified by RT-PCR, sequenced, and compared with the sequences available in GenBank database. The PCR-amplified fragment of predicted size of approximately 1017 bp was obtained. The sequences of isolates 137-08 (Acc. No. GQ259958 and 159-08 (GU144020 proved to be 94-99% identical at the nucleotide level with those from other parts of the world. The sequences of these two isolates differed from each other only at two nucleotide positions, without any amino acid substitution. Phylogenetic analysis of 57 isolates based on 750 bp sequences of the coat protein gene showed no correlation between isolates and their geographic origin, and italso indicated that these isolates fell into three molecular groups of

  3. Location of Grapevine Fardeaf and Yellow Mosaic Virus Particles in Xiphinema index.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Raski, D J; Maggenti, A R; Jones, N O

    1973-07-01

    Particles of fanleaf and yellow mosaic viruses are reported in the lumen of the esophagus of Xiphinerna index. Differences in cuticular morphology suggest differences in charged receptor sites which may offer an explanation for virus location and orderly arrangement.

  4. A BRIEF REVIEW ON "MOLECULAR DETECTION AND CHARACTERIZATION OF YELLOW MOSAIC VIRUS (YMV) INFECTING BLACKGRAM"

    OpenAIRE

    S.Obaiah; Bhaskara Reddy, B. V.; N.P. Eswara Reddy; K. Vijay Krishna Kumar

    2013-01-01

    Blackgram (Vigna mungo (L.) Hepper) is one of the major pulse crops of the tropics and sub tropics. It is the third major pulse crop cultivated in the Indian subcontinent. Pulses and grain legumes are major sources of dietary protein. These crops are subjected to yellow mosaic and golden mosaic diseases caused by white fly transmitted geminiviruses (WTG’s or begomovirus). Of these viruses, mungbean yellow mosaic virus (MYMV) is an important one, and it infects five major leguminous species...

  5. Characterization of Cucumber Mosaic Virus Originating from Cucurbits in Serbia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ana Vučurović

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Cucumber mosaic virus (CMV is considered one of the most economically importantplant viruses and has a worldwide distribution and a very wide host range including plantsfrom family Cucurbitaceae. In Serbia, on cucurbits CMV was detected in single and mixedinfections with Zucchini yellow mosaic virus (ZYMV and Watermelon mosaic virus (WMV. Viruses,including CMV, are constantly present in cucurbit crops, but their frequency changesby year and locality. Surveys and sample collections were conducted in cucurbit crops inthe period from 2008 to 2009 at 15 localities in Vojvodina province, and sample testing wascarried out using the DAS-ELISA method and commercially available antisera for six economicallymost important cucurbit viruses. In 2008, a total of 51 samples were collected from13 cucurbit crops of oilseed pumpkin Olinka variety, squash, and bottle gourd and CMV wasdetected in a total of 55% of tested samples with symptoms of viral infection. The most commoninfectious type was mixed infection with ZYMV and WMV (35.3%, and then mixedinfection with ZYMV (17.7% and WMV (2%. A total of 599 symptomatic samples of oilseedpumpkin Olinka variety, zucchini squash varieties Beogradska and Tosca, squash, and wintersquash were collected in 15 cucurbits crops in 2009. CMV was present in 4.4% of totalcollected samples, in single infections in 1.3%, and in mixed with WMV or ZYMV in 1.3%, and1.8%. Five CMV isolates were obtained by mechanical inoculations of N. glutinosa and oneof them was selected for further biological characterization. Test plants which were describedto be hosts of CMV expressed symptoms characteristic for those caused by CMV afterinoculations by isolate 115-08. CMV specific primers Au1u/Au2d were used to amplify an850 bp fragment using RT-PCR method. Amplified fragment encodes the entire viral coatprotein (CP gene and partial 5’ and 3’ UTRs of two selected CMV isolates. Amplified fragmentswere sequenced and deposited in the NCBI, where

  6. Vanilla mosaic virus isolates from French Polynesia and the Cook Islands are Dasheen mosaic virus strains that exclusively infect vanilla.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Farreyrol, K; Pearson, M N; Grisoni, M; Cohen, D; Beck, D

    2006-05-01

    Sequence was determined for the coat protein (CP) gene and 3' non-translated region (3'NTR) of two vanilla mosaic virus (VanMV) isolates from Vanilla tahitensis, respectively from the Cook Islands (VanMV-CI) and French Polynesia (VanMV-FP). Both viruses displayed distinctive features in the N-terminal region of their CPs; for VanMV-CI, a 16-amino-acid deletion including the aphid transmission-related DAG motif, and for VanMV-FP, a stretch of GTN repeats that putatively belongs to the class of natively unfolded proteins. VanMV-FP CP also has a novel DVG motif in place of the DAG motif, and an uncommon Q//V protease cleavage site. The sequences were compared to a range of Dasheen mosaic virus (DsMV) strains and to potyviruses infecting orchids. Identity was low to DsMV strains across the entire CP coding region and across the 3'NTR, but high across the CP core and the CI-6K2-NIa region. In accordance with current ICTV criteria for species demarcation within the family Potyviridae, VanMV-CI and VanMV-FP are strains of DsMV that exclusively infect vanilla.

  7. The entry of cucumber mosaic virus into cucumber xylem is facilitated by co-infection with zucchini yellow mosaic virus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mochizuki, Tomofumi; Nobuhara, Shinya; Nishimura, Miho; Ryang, Bo-Song; Naoe, Masaki; Matsumoto, Tadashi; Kosaka, Yoshitaka; Ohki, Satoshi T

    2016-10-01

    We investigated the synergistic effects of co-infection by zucchini yellow mosaic virus (ZYMV) and cucumber mosaic virus (CMV) on viral distribution in the vascular tissues of cucumber. Immunohistochemical observations indicated that ZYMV was present in both the phloem and xylem tissues. ZYMV-RNA was detected in both the xylem wash and guttation fluid of ZYMV-inoculated cucumber. Steam treatment at a stem internode indicated that ZYMV enters the xylem vessels and moves through them but does not cause systemic infection in the plant. CMV distribution in singly infected cucumbers was restricted to phloem tissue. By contrast, CMV was detected in the xylem tissue of cotyledons in plants co-infected with CMV and ZYMV. Although both ZYMV-RNA and CMV-RNA were detected in the xylem wash and upper internodes of steam-treated, co-infected cucumbers grown at 24 °C, neither virus was detected in the upper leaves using an ELISA assay. Genetically modified CMV harboring the ZYMV HC-Pro gene was distributed in the xylem and phloem tissues of singly inoculated cucumber cotyledons. These results indicate that the ZYMV HC-Pro gene facilitates CMV entry into the xylem vessels of co-infected cucumbers.

  8. Arabidopsis thaliana is an asymptomatic host of Alfalfa mosaic virus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Balasubramaniam, Muthukumar; Ibrahim, Amr; Kim, Bong-Suk; Loesch-Fries, L Sue

    2006-11-01

    The susceptibility of Arabidopsis thaliana ecotypes to infection by Alfalfa mosaic virus (AMV) was evaluated. Thirty-nine ecotypes supported both local and systemic infection, 26 ecotypes supported only local infection, and three ecotypes could not be infected. No obvious symptoms characteristic of virus infection developed on the susceptible ecotypes under standard conditions of culture. Parameters of AMV infection were characterized in ecotype Col-0, which supported systemic infection and accumulated higher levels of AMV than the symptomatic host Nicotiana tabacum. The formation of infectious AMV particles in infected Col-0 was confirmed by infectivity assays on a hypersensitive host and by electron microscopy of purified virions. Replication and transcription of AMV was confirmed by de novo synthesis of AMV subgenomic RNA in Col-0 protoplasts transfected with AMV RNA or plasmids harboring AMV cDNAs. PMID:16875753

  9. The cell biology of Tobacco mosaic virus replication and movement

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chengke eLiu

    2013-02-01

    Full Text Available Successful systemic infection of a plant by Tobacco mosaic virus (TMV requires three processes that repeat over time: initial establishment and accumulation in invaded cells, intercellular movement and systemic transport. Accumulation and intercellular movement of TMV necessarily involves intracellular transport by complexes containing virus and host proteins and virus RNA during a dynamic process that can be visualized. Multiple membranes appear to assist TMV accumulation, while membranes, microfilaments and microtubules appear to assist TMV movement. Here we review cell biological studies that describe TMV-membrane, -cytoskeleton and -other host protein interactions which influence virus accumulation and movement in leaves and callus tissue. The importance of understanding the developmental phase of the infection in relationship to the observed virus-membrane or -host protein interaction is emphasized. Utilizing the latest observations of TMV-membrane and -host protein interactions within our evolving understanding of the infection ontogeny, a model for TMV accumulation and intracellular spread in a cell biological context is provided.

  10. Presence and Distribution of Oilseed Pumpkin Viruses and Molecular Detection of Zucchini Yellow Mosaic Virus

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ana Vučurović

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Over the past decade, intensive spread of virus infections of oilseed pumpkin has resulted in significant economic losses in pumpkin crop production, which is currently expanding in our country. In 2007 and 2008, a survey for the presence and distribution of oilseed pumpkin viruses was carried out in order to identify viruses responsible for epidemics and incidences of very destructive symptoms on cucurbit leaves and fruits. Monitoring andcollecting samples of oil pumpkin, as well as other species such as winter and butternut squash and buffalo and bottle gourd with viral infection symptoms, was conducted in several localities of Vojvodina Province. The collected plant samples were tested by DAS-ELISA using polyclonal antisera specific for the detection of six most economically harmful pumpkin viruses: Cucumber mosaic virus (CMV, Zucchini yellow mosaic virus (ZYMV, Watermelon mosaic virus (WMW, Squash mosaic virus (SqMV, Papaya ringspot virus (PRSV and Tobaccoringspot virus (TRSV that are included in A1 quarantine list of harmful organisms in Serbia.Identification of viruses in the collected samples indicated the presence of three viruses, ZYMV, WMV and CMV, in individual and mixed infections. Frequency of the identified viruses varied depending on locality and year of investigations. In 2007, WMV was the most frequent virus (94.2%, while ZYMV was prevalent (98.04% in 2008. High frequency of ZYMV determined in both years of investigation indicated the need for its rapid and reliable molecular detection. During this investigation, a protocol for ZYMVdetection was developed and optimized using specific primers CPfwd/Cprev and commercial kits for total RNA extraction, as well as for RT-PCR. In RT-PCR reaction using these primers, a DNA fragment of approximately 1100 bp, which included coat protein gene, was amplified in the samples of infected pumkin leaves. Although serological methods are still useful for large-scale testing of a great number of

  11. Recombinant constructions and infectivity analysis of tobacco mosaic virus and attenuated tomato mosaic virus N14 genomes

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2000-01-01

    The recombinant clones of pTN and pNT have been constructed by exchanging the coding regions of the movement proteins (MP), coat proteins (CP) and 3′noncoding regions between the cDNAs of the tobacco mosaic virus (Chinese Isolate, TMV-Cv) and the attenuated tomato mosaic virus N14 genomes, and used as templates for in vitro runoff transcription. Their transcripts have been used for tobacco infection assays. The infection results show that the transcripts of pTN and pNT are infectious. Local lesions were observed in the leaves of Nicotiana tabacum cv. Samsun NN inoculated with pTN transcript, but were fewer than those in the same kind of plant induced by pTMV-Cv transcript. Systemic symptoms were also observed in N. tabacum cv. Huangmiaoyu induced by pTN transcript, but were slighter than those on the same kind of tobacco induced by pTMV-Cv transcript. Local lesions were shown in N. tabacum cv. Samsun NN inoculated with pNT transcript, but were more than those in the same kind of plant induced by pN14 transcript while no systemic symptom was displayed in N. tabacum cv. Huangmiaoyu. These results suggest that the recombinant viruses of TN and NT are able to propagate in the assayed tobaccos, and they keep the most same phenotypic character with pTMV-Cv and pN14 transcripts, and TMV-Cv and N14 as well. The conjunctions between the replicase and the MP, CP and 3′noncoding regions are not stringent. Apparently there is a compatible function complementation between the homologous subgenomes of TMV-Cv and N14. From those above it could be probably presumed that the mutagenized replicase gene of N14 plays a major role in contributing to the virus attenuation while its mutagenized MP gene could avianize the symptoms of the infected tobaccos.

  12. Coat protein gene and 3′ non-coding region of tobacco mosaic virus and tomato mosaic virus are associated with viral pathogenesis in Nicotiana tabacum

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2002-01-01

    The camellia isolate of tomato mosaic virus (ToMV-TL) can induce local necrotic lesions on the inoculated leaves in Nicotiana tabacum, whereas the broad bean isolate of tobacco mosaic virus (TMV-B) produces the mosaic symptom on systemic leaves. To examine viral determinant for differential infection phenotype in N. tabacum, the coat protein gene and the 3′ non-coding region of TMV was replaced with that of ToMV, the chimeric virus induced similar local necrotic lesions to that induced by ToMV. The results indicate that the coat protein gene and the 3′ non-coding region of TMV and ToMV influence the virus-induced pathogenesis in N. tabacum.

  13. Genetic diversity of Hungarian Maize dwarf mosaic virus isolates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gell, Gyöngyvér; Balázs, Ervin; Petrik, Kathrin

    2010-04-01

    The genetic diversity of the coat-protein (CP) region and the untranslated C-terminal region (3'UTR) of Maize dwarf mosaic virus (MDMV) was analyzed to evaluate the variability between isolates (inter-isolate sequence diversity). The results of inter-isolate sequence diversity analysis showed that the diversity of the MDMV CP gene is fairly high (p-distance: up to 0.136). During sequence analysis, a 13 amino-acid residue insertion and an 8 amino-acid residue deletion were found within the N-terminal region of the CP gene. The phylogenetic analysis showed that-unlike other potyvirus species in this subgroup-the MDMV isolates could not be distinguished on the basis of their host plants or geographic origins.

  14. The spreading of Alfalfa mosaic virus in lavandin in Croatia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ivana Stanković

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available survey was conducted in 2012 and 2013 to detect the presence and distribution of Alfalfa mosaic virus (AMV in lavandin crops growing in continental parts of Croatia. A total of 73 lavandin samples from six crops in different localities were collected and analyzed for the presence of AMV and Cucumber mosaic virus (CMV using commercial double-antibody sandwich (DAS-ELISA kits. AMV was detected serologically in 62 samples collected at three different localities, and none of the samples tested positive for CMV. For further analyses, six selected samples of naturally infected lavandin plants originating from different localities were mechanically transmitted to test plants: Chenopodium quinoa, C. amaranticolor, Nicotiana benthamiana and Ocimum basilicum, confirming the infectious nature of the disease. Molecular detection was performed by amplification of a 751 bp fragment in all tested samples, using the specific primers CP AMV1/CP AMV2 that amplify the part of the coat protein (CP gene and 3’-UTR. The RT-PCR products derived from the isolates 371-13 and 373-13 were sequenced (KJ504107 and KJ504108, respectively and compared with the AMV sequences available in GenBank. CP sequence analysis, conducted using the MEGA5 software, revealed that the isolate 371-13 had the highest nucleotide identity of 99.5% (100% amino acid identity with an isolate from Argentina originating from Medicago sativa (KC881010, while the sequence of isolate 373-13 had the highest identity with an Italian AMV isolate from Lavandula stoechas (FN667967 of 98.6% (99% amino acid identity. Phylogenetic analysis revealed the clustering of selected isolates into four molecular groups and the lavandin AMV isolates from Croatia grouped into two distinct groups, implying a significant variability within the AMV lavandin population.

  15. Endothelial targeting of cowpea mosaic virus (CPMV via surface vimentin.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kristopher J Koudelka

    2009-05-01

    Full Text Available Cowpea mosaic virus (CPMV is a plant comovirus in the picornavirus superfamily, and is used for a wide variety of biomedical and material science applications. Although its replication is restricted to plants, CPMV binds to and enters mammalian cells, including endothelial cells and particularly tumor neovascular endothelium in vivo. This natural capacity has lead to the use of CPMV as a sensor for intravital imaging of vascular development. Binding of CPMV to endothelial cells occurs via interaction with a 54 kD cell-surface protein, but this protein has not previously been identified. Here we identify the CPMV binding protein as a cell-surface form of the intermediate filament vimentin. The CPMV-vimentin interaction was established using proteomic screens and confirmed by direct interaction of CPMV with purified vimentin, as well as inhibition in a vimentin-knockout cell line. Vimentin and CPMV were also co-localized in vascular endothelium of mouse and rat in vivo. Together these studies indicate that surface vimentin mediates binding and may lead to internalization of CPMV in vivo, establishing surface vimentin as an important vascular endothelial ligand for nanoparticle targeting to tumors. These results also establish vimentin as a ligand for picornaviruses in both the plant and animal kingdoms of life. Since bacterial pathogens and several other classes of viruses also bind to surface vimentin, these studies suggest a common role for surface vimentin in pathogen transmission.

  16. Complete genome sequence of a dahlia common mosaic virus isolate from New Zealand.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hadfield, James; Linderme, Daphné; Shepherd, Dionne N; Bezuidenhout, Marion; Lefeuvre, Pierre; Martin, Darren P; Varsani, Arvind

    2011-12-01

    Dahlia mosaic disease of the ornamental flowering plant Dahlia is caused by two caulimoviruses, dahlia mosaic virus (DMV) and dahlia common mosaic virus (DCMV). We used a rolling-circle amplification method to amplify, clone and determine for the first time the full genome sequence of a DCMV isolate from New Zealand (DCMV-NZ). Within the 7949-bp circular double-stranded retro-transcribing DCMV-NZ DNA, we identified six putative open reading frames, typical of all genomes in the family Caulimoviridae. The availability of the complete DCMV sequence provides a reference genome against which all others can be compared. PMID:21960043

  17. Quantification of African cassava mosaic virus (ACMV) and East African cassava mosaic virus (EACMV-UG) in single and mixed infected Cassava (Manihot esculenta Crantz) using quantitative PCR.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Naseem, Saadia; Winter, Stephan

    2016-01-01

    The quantity of genomic DNA-A and DNA-B of African cassava mosaic virus (ACMV) and East African cassava mosaic virus Uganda (Uganda variant, EACMV-UG) was analysed using quantitative PCR to assess virus concentrations in plants from susceptible and tolerant cultivars. The concentrations of genome components in absolute and relative quantification experiments in single and mixed viral infections were determined. Virus concentration was much higher in symptomatic leaf tissues compared to non-symptomatic leaves and corresponded with the severity of disease symptoms. In general, higher titres were recorded for EACMV-UG Ca055 compared to ACMV DRC6. The quantitative assessment also showed that the distribution of both viruses in the moderately resistant cassava cv. TMS 30572 was not different from the highly susceptible cv. TME 117. Natural mixed infections with both viruses gave severe disease symptoms. Relative quantification of virus genomes in mixed infections showed higher concentrations of EACMV-UG DNA-A compared to ACMV DNA-A, but a marked reduction of EACMV-UG DNA-B. The higher concentrations of EACMV-UG DNA-B compared to EACMV DNA-A accumulation in single infections were consistent. Since DNA-B is implicated in virus cell-to-cell spread and systemic movement, the abundance of the EACMV-UG DNA-B may be an important factor driving cassava mosaic disease epidemic.

  18. Effects of mutated replicase and movement protein genes on attenuation of tobacco mosaic virus

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    YANG; Gong; (

    2001-01-01

    [1]Banerjee, N., Wang, J. Y., Zaitlin, M., A single nucleotide change in the coat protein gene of tobacco mosaic virus is involved in the induction of severe chlorosis, Virology, 1995, 207: 234-239.[2]Dawson, W. O., Bubrick, P., Grantham, G. L., Modifications of the tobacco mosaic virus coat protein gene affecting replication, movement, and symptomatology, Mol. Plant Pathol., 1988, 78: 783-789.[3]Lu, B., Stubbs, G., Culver, J. N., Coat protein interactions involved in tobacco mosaic tobamovirus cross-protection, Virology, 1998, 248: 188-198.[4]Bao, Y. M., Carter, S. A., Nelson,R. S., The 126- and 183-kilodalton proteins of tobacco mosaic virus, and not their common nucleotide sequence, control mosaic symptom formation in tobacco, J. Virol., 1996, 70: 6378-6383.[5]Holt, C. A., Hodgson, A. J., Coker, F. A. et al., Characterization of the masked strain of tobacco mosaic virus: identification of the region responsible for symptom attenuation by analysis of an infectious cDNA clone, Mol. Plant-Microbe Interact., 1990, 3: 417-423.[6]Nishiguchi, M., Kikuchi, S., Kiho, Y. et al., Molecular basis of plant viral virulence, the complete nucleotide sequence of an attenuated strain of tobacco mosaic virus, Nucleic Acids Res., 1985, 13: 5585-5590.[7]Watanabe, Y., Morita, N., Nishiguchi, M.et al., Attenuated strains of tobacco mosaic virus reduced synthesis of a viral protein with a cell to cell movement function, J. Mol. Biol., 1987, 194: 699-704.[8]Lewandowski, D. J., Dawson, W. O., A single amino acid change in tobacco mosaic virus replicase prevents symptom production, Mol. Plant-Microbe Interact., 1993, 6: 157-160.[9]Yang, G., Qiu, B. S., Cloning and infectivity analysis of the cDNAs of tobacco mosaic virus (tomato strain) and its attenuated virus (N14) genomes, Chinese Journal of Biotechnology (in Chinese), 2000, 16: 207-210.[10]Yang, G., Liu, X. G., Qiu, B. S., Complete nucleotid sequences and genome structures of two Chinese tobacco

  19. Apple latent spherical virus vector as vaccine for the prevention and treatment of mosaic diseases in pea, broad bean, and eustoma plants by bean yellow mosaic virus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Satoh, Nozomi; Kon, Tatsuya; Yamagishi, Noriko; Takahashi, Tsubasa; Natsuaki, Tomohide; Yoshikawa, Nobuyuki

    2014-11-01

    We investigated the protective effects of a viral vector based on an Apple latent spherical virus (ALSV) harboring a segment of the Bean yellow mosaic virus (BYMV) genome against mosaic diseases in pea, broad bean, and eustoma plants caused by BYMV infection. In pea plants pre-inoculated with the ALSV vaccine and challenge inoculated with BYMV expressing green fluorescence protein, BYMV multiplication occurred in inoculated leaves, but was markedly inhibited in the upper leaves. No mosaic symptoms due to BYMV infection were observed in the challenged plants pre-inoculated with the ALSV vaccine. Simultaneous inoculation with the ALSV vaccine and BYMV also prevented mosaic symptoms in broad bean and eustoma plants, and BYMV accumulation was strongly inhibited in the upper leaves of plants treated with the ALSV vaccine. Pea and eustoma plants were pre-inoculated with BYMV followed by inoculation with the ALSV vaccine to investigate the curative effects of the ALSV vaccine. In both plant species, recovery from mosaic symptoms was observed in upper leaves and BYMV accumulation was inhibited in leaves developing post-ALSV vaccination. These results show that ALSV vaccination not only prevents mosaic diseases in pea, broad bean, and eustoma, but that it is also effective in curing these diseases. PMID:25386843

  20. Apple Latent Spherical Virus Vector as Vaccine for the Prevention and Treatment of Mosaic Diseases in Pea, Broad Bean, and Eustoma Plants by Bean Yellow Mosaic Virus

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nozomi Satoh

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available We investigated the protective effects of a viral vector based on an Apple latent spherical virus (ALSV harboring a segment of the Bean yellow mosaic virus (BYMV genome against mosaic diseases in pea, broad bean, and eustoma plants caused by BYMV infection. In pea plants pre-inoculated with the ALSV vaccine and challenge inoculated with BYMV expressing green fluorescence protein, BYMV multiplication occurred in inoculated leaves, but was markedly inhibited in the upper leaves. No mosaic symptoms due to BYMV infection were observed in the challenged plants pre-inoculated with the ALSV vaccine. Simultaneous inoculation with the ALSV vaccine and BYMV also prevented mosaic symptoms in broad bean and eustoma plants, and BYMV accumulation was strongly inhibited in the upper leaves of plants treated with the ALSV vaccine. Pea and eustoma plants were pre-inoculated with BYMV followed by inoculation with the ALSV vaccine to investigate the curative effects of the ALSV vaccine. In both plant species, recovery from mosaic symptoms was observed in upper leaves and BYMV accumulation was inhibited in leaves developing post-ALSV vaccination. These results show that ALSV vaccination not only prevents mosaic diseases in pea, broad bean, and eustoma, but that it is also effective in curing these diseases.

  1. Making a Virus Visible: Francis O. Holmes and a biological assay for tobacco mosaic virus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scholthof, Karen-Beth G

    2014-01-01

    In the early twentieth century, viruses had yet to be defined in a material way. Instead, they were known better by what they were not - not bacteria, not culturable, and not visible with a light microscope. As with the ill-defined "gene" of genetics, viruses were microbes whose nature had not been revealed. Some clarity arrived in 1929 when Francis O. Holmes, a scientist at the Boyce Thompson Institute for Plant Research (Yonkers, NY) reported that Tobacco mosaic virus (TMV) could produce local necrotic lesions on tobacco plants and that these lesions were in proportion to dilutions of the inoculum. Holmes' method, the local lesion assay, provided the first evidence that viruses were discrete infectious particles, thus setting the stage for physicochemical studies of plant viruses. In a field where there are few eponymous methods or diseases, Holmes' assay continues to be a useful tool for the study of plant viruses. TMV was a success because the local lesion assay "made the virus visible" and standardized the work of virology towards determining the nature of the virus. PMID:23494396

  2. Complete genome sequence of bean rugose mosaic virus, genus Comovirus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Picoli, M H S; Garcia, A; Barboza, A A L; de Souto, Eliezer Rodrigues; Almeida, A M R

    2016-06-01

    Since the first report in Costa Rica in 1971, bean rugose mosaic virus (BRMV) has been found in Colombia, El Salvador, Guatemala and Brazil. In this study, the complete genome sequence of a soybean isolate of BRMV from Paraná State, Brazil, was determined. The BRMV genome consists of two polyadenylated RNAs. RNA1 is 5909 nucleotides long and encodes a single polypeptide of 1856 amino acids (aa), with an estimated molecular weight of 210 kDa. The RNA1 polyprotein contains the polypeptides for viral replication and proteolytic processing. RNA2 is 3644 nucleotides long and codes for a single polypeptide of 1097 aa, containing the movement and coat proteins. This is the first complete genome sequence of BRMV. When compared with available aa sequences of comoviruses, the highest identities of BRMV coat proteins and proteinase polymerase were 57.5 and 58 %, respectively. These were below the 75 and 80 % identity limits, respectively, established for species demarcation in the genus. This confirms that BRMV is a member of a distinct species in the genus Comovirus.

  3. Visualization of resistance responses in Phaseolus vulgaris using reporter tagged clones of Bean common mosaic virus

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Naderpour, Masoud; Johansen, Ida Elisabeth

    2011-01-01

    Reporter tagged virus clones can provide detailed information on virus–host interactions. In Phaseolus vulgaris (bean), four recessive and one dominant gene are known to control infection by strains of the potyvirus species Bean common mosaic virus (BCMV). To study the interactions between BCMV...

  4. Structure, morphogenesis and function of tubular structures induced by cowpea mosaic virus

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kasteel, D.

    1999-01-01

    During systemic plant infection, viruses move from the initially infected cells through plasmodesmata to neighbouring cells. Different mechanisms have been proposed for this cell-to-cell movement. Cowpea mosaic virus (CPMV) employs one of the major movement mechanisms, i.e. tubule-guided transport o

  5. First Complete Genome Sequence of Bean common mosaic necrosis virus from East Timor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maina, Solomon; Edwards, Owain R.; de Almeida, Luis; Ximenes, Abel

    2016-01-01

    We present here the first complete Bean common mosaic necrosis virus (BCMNV) genomic sequence isolated from virus-infected common bean (Phaseolus vulgaris) in East Timor, and compare it with six complete BMCNV genomes from the Netherlands, and one each from the United States, Tanzania, and an unspecified country. It most resembled the Netherlands strain NL-8 genome. PMID:27688343

  6. Intracellular distribution of cowpea mosaic virus movement protein as visualised by green fluorescent protein fusions

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Gopinath, K.; Bertens, P.; Pouwels, J.; Marks, H.; Lent, van J.W.M.; Wellink, J.E.; Kammen, van A.

    2003-01-01

    Cowpea mosaic virus (CPMV) derivatives expressing movement protein (MP) green fluorescent protein (GFP) fusions (MP:GFP) were used to study the intracellular targeting and localization of the MP in cowpea protoplasts and plants. In protoplasts, a virus coding for a wild type MP:GFP (MPfGFP) induced

  7. First Complete Genome Sequence of Bean common mosaic necrosis virus from East Timor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maina, Solomon; Edwards, Owain R; de Almeida, Luis; Ximenes, Abel; Jones, Roger A C

    2016-01-01

    We present here the first complete Bean common mosaic necrosis virus (BCMNV) genomic sequence isolated from virus-infected common bean (Phaseolus vulgaris) in East Timor, and compare it with six complete BMCNV genomes from the Netherlands, and one each from the United States, Tanzania, and an unspecified country. It most resembled the Netherlands strain NL-8 genome. PMID:27688343

  8. Occurrence and distribution of pepper veinal mottle virus and cucumber mosaic virus in pepper in Ibadan, Nigeria

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Arogundade Olawale

    2012-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Viral diseases constitute obstacles to pepper production in the world. In Nigeria, pepper plants are primarily affected by pepper veinal mottle virus (PVMV, Cucumber mosaic virus (CMV, Pepper leaf curl Virus (TLCV, Tobacco mosaic virus (TMV, Pepper mottle virus (PMV and a host of other viruses. The experiment was carried out with a diagnostic survey on the experimental field of the National Horticultural Research Institute, Ibadan, Nigeria and on pepper farms in six local government areas within Ibadan Oyo State, Nigeria, forty samples were collected from each of the farms. Diseased samples were obtained from the field and taken to the laboratory for indexing. In ELISA test some of the samples from the pepper farms showed positive reaction to single infection with PVMV (36.79%, CMV (22.14% while some others showed positive reaction to mixed infection of the two viruses (10% but some also negative reaction to PVMV and CMV antisera (31.07.

  9. First Report of Pepino Mosaic Virus Infecting Tomato in Mexico

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pepino mosaic has become endemic greenhouse tomato disease in many countries around the world. Its occurrence in Mexico has yet to be determined. In early spring of 2010, symptoms of yellow mosaic, chlorotic patches and fruit marbling were observed in approximately 50% of tomato plants in a commerc...

  10. Reação de genótipos de feijão-caupi revela resistência às coinfecções pelo Cucumber mosaic virus, Cowpea aphid-borne mosaic virus e Cowpea severe mosaic virus Reaction of cowpea genotypes reveals resistance to co-infection by Cucumber mosaic virus, Cowpea aphid-borne mosaic virus and Cowpea severe mosaic virus

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cláudia Roberta Ribeiro de Oliveira

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available O rendimento do feijão-caupi pode ser afetado por diversos fatores, em especial as viroses. As principais espécies de vírus que infectam o feijão-caupi, no Brasil, são: Cucumber mosaic virus (CMV, Cowpea aphid-borne mosaic virus (CABMV, Cowpea severe mosaic virus (CPSMV e o Bean golden mosaic virus (BGMV. Este trabalho foi realizado em duas etapas e teve como objetivo avaliar a reação de genótipos de feijão-caupi quanto à resistência à infecção simples pelo CMV e mista nas combinações CMV+CABMV, CMV+CPSMV-I e CMV+CABMV+CPSMV-I. Inicialmente, foram incluídos 57 genótipos, sendo três avaliações em gaiolas com tela antiafídeos sob infecção controlada, e uma em condição de campo sob infecção natural. Em seguida, foram selecionados 18 genótipos para serem desenvolvidos em nove ensaios, oito em gaiolas com tela antiafídeos sob infecção controlada, e um em campo sob infecção natural. Nesses ensaios, avaliaram-se os efeitos qualitativos e quantitativos resultantes das infecções. No ensaio de campo, foram avaliados o número de plantas assintomáticas, comprimento de vagem, número de grãos por vagem, massa de cem grãos e produtividade. As coinfecções reduziram a altura da planta e a massa seca. Além disso, nas infecções envolvendo os três vírus ocorreu a morte prematura de alguns genótipos. Os genótipos BR17-Gurguéia, Epace V-96, TE97-309G-9, TE97-309G-22, TE97-309G-24 e Patativa, além de bom comportamento diante das coinfecções virais, têm sementes com padrão comercial, podendo ser empregadas diretamente em programas de melhoramento.Many factors can affect the yield of cowpea, especially viruses. The main species of viruses infecting cowpea in Brazil are Cucumber mosaic virus (CMV, Cowpea aphid-borne mosaic virus (CABMV, Cowpea severe mosaic virus (CPSMV and Cowpea golden mosaic virus (CPGMV. This study aimed to evaluate the reaction of cowpea genotypes for resistance to CMV in single or in co

  11. Simultaneous detection of papaya ringspot virus, papaya leaf distortion mosaic virus, and papaya mosaic virus by multiplex real-time reverse transcription PCR.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huo, P; Shen, W T; Yan, P; Tuo, D C; Li, X Y; Zhou, P

    2015-12-01

    Both the single infection of papaya ringspot virus (PRSV), papaya leaf distortion mosaic virus (PLDMV) or papaya mosaic virus (PapMV) and double infection of PRSV and PLDMV or PapMV which cause indistinguishable symptoms, threaten the papaya industry in Hainan Island, China. In this study, a multiplex real-time reverse transcription PCR (RT-PCR) was developed to detect simultaneously the three viruses based on their distinctive melting temperatures (Tms): 81.0±0.8°C for PRSV, 84.7±0.6°C for PLDMV, and 88.7±0.4°C for PapMV. The multiplex real-time RT-PCR method was specific and sensitive in detecting the three viruses, with a detection limit of 1.0×10(1), 1.0×10(2), and 1.0×10(2) copies for PRSV, PLDMV, and PapMV, respectively. Indeed, the reaction was 100 times more sensitive than the multiplex RT-PCR for PRSV, and 10 times more sensitive than multiplex RT-PCR for PLDMV. Field application of the multiplex real-time RT-PCR demonstrated that some non-symptomatic samples were positive for PLDMV by multiplex real-time RT-PCR but negative by multiplex RT-PCR, whereas some samples were positive for both PRSV and PLDMV by multiplex real-time RT-PCR assay but only positive for PLDMV by multiplex RT-PCR. Therefore, this multiplex real-time RT-PCR assay provides a more rapid, sensitive and reliable method for simultaneous detection of PRSV, PLDMV, PapMV and their mixed infections in papaya.

  12. Nucleotide sequence of the coat protein genes of alstroemeria mosaic virus and amazon lily mosaic virus, a tentative species of genus potyvirus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fuji, S; Terami, F; Furuya, H; Naito, H; Fukumoto, F

    2004-09-01

    The nucleotide sequences of the 3' terminal region of the genomes of Alstroemeria mosaic virus (AlsMV) and the Amazon lily mosaic virus (ALiMV) have been determined. These sequences contain the complete coding region of the viral coat protein (CP) gene followed by a 3'-untranslated region (3'-UTR). AlsMV and ALiMV share 74.9% identity in the amino acid sequence of the CP, and 55.6% identity in the nucleotide sequence of the 3'-UTR. Phylogenetic analysis of these CP genes and 3'-UTRs in relation to those of 79 potyvirus species revealed that AlsMV and ALiMV should be assigned to the Potato virus Y (PVY) subgroup. AlsMV and ALiMV were concluded to have arisen independently within the PVY subgroup. PMID:15593424

  13. Complete genome sequencing of two causative viruses of cassava mosaic disease in Ghana.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oteng-Frimpong, R; Levy, Y; Torkpo, S K; Danquah, E Y; Offei, S K; Gafni, Y

    2012-01-01

    Cassava mosaic disease (CMV), caused by one or a combination of cassava mosaic geminiviruses, is ranked among the most important constraints to profitable and efficient production of cassava. Effective control measures require in-depth knowledge of the viral causative agent. Using rolling-circle amplification and unique enzymes, the full genome of two species of cassava mosaic geminivirus isolated from infected cassava plants in Ghana were cloned into pCambia 1300 and pET-28b. The sequences of the genome were determined on an ABI sequencer and a pairwise comparison was performed with other cassava-infecting geminiviruses from different countries. It was revealed that cassava grown in Ghana is attacked by two species of geminivirus in either single or mixed infections. These are the African cassava mosaic virus (ACMV) and the East African cassava mosaic virus (EACMV)-like, with high sequence similarity of 94% and 80%, respectively, between the DNA-A and DNA-B components of each virus, and 66% and 41% similarity of the common region (CR) (for A and B accordingly). The DNA-A of ACMV and EACMV-like contained 2781 and 2800 nucleotides, respectively, while their DNA-B components had 2725 and 2734 nucleotides, respectively. ACMV DNA-A was over 97% similar to those of other ACMVs from the continent. In contrast, EACMV-like DNA-A was over 98% similar to the isolates from Cameroon and other West African countries, and less than 88% similar to other EACMV species. Thus ACMV and EACMV-like were named African cassava mosaic virus-Ghana and East African cassava mosaic Cameroon virus-Ghana. Computer analysis revealed that their genome arrangement follows the typical old world bipartite begomovirus genome. The association of these two species and their interaction might account for the severe symptoms observed on infected plants in the field and in the greenhouse.

  14. Pepino mosaic virus and Tomato torrado virus: two emerging viruses affecting tomato crops in the Mediterranean basin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gómez, Pedro; Sempere, Raqueln; Aranda, Miguel A

    2012-01-01

    The molecular biology, epidemiology, and evolutionary dynamics of Pepino mosaic virus (PepMV) are much better understood than those of Tomato torrado virus (ToTV). The earliest descriptions of PepMV suggest a recent jump from nontomato species (e.g., pepino; Solanum muricatum) to tomato (Solanum lycopersicum). Its stability in contaminated plant tissues, its transmission through seeds, and the global trade of tomato seeds and fruits may have facilitated the global spread of PepMV. Stability and seed transmission also probably account for the devastating epidemics caused by already-established PepMV strains, although additional contributing factors may include the efficient transmission of PepMV by contact and the often-inconspicuous symptoms in vegetative tomato tissues. The genetic variability of PepMV is likely to have promoted the first phase of emergence (i.e., the species jump) and it continues to play an important role as the virus becomes more pervasive, progressing from regional outbreaks to pandemics. In contrast, the long-term progression of ToTV outbreaks is not yet clear and this may reflect factors such as the limited accumulation of the virus in infected plants, which has been shown to be approximately two orders of magnitude less than PepMV. The efficient dispersion of ToTV may therefore depend on dense populations of its principal vectors, Bemisia tabaci and Trialeurodes vaporariorum, as has been proposed for the necrogenic satellite RNA of Cucumber mosaic virus.

  15. Red clover necrotic mosaic virus: Biophysics and Biotechnology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lockney, Dustin M.

    Red clover necrotic mosaic virus (RCNMV) is a highly robust (Tm=60 °C), 36 nm icosahedral plant virus. The capsid of RCNMV is assembled from 180 chemically equivalent coat proteins (CPs). The CPs arrange in a T=3 symmetry, in 1 of 3 conformations forming the asymmetric subunit (ASU). There are two Ca(II) binding sites per CP; the removal of divalent cations causes the CP subunits of the ASU to rotate away from each other forming a ˜13 A channel. These channels lead to the highly organized bipartite genome of RCNMV and can be closed by adding back Ca(II). Titrimetric analysis and tryptophan fluorescence was used to determine the affinity of RCNMV for Ca(II) to be ˜Kd < 300 nM. It has been shown that doxorubicin (Dox) can be infused into the capsid at a mole ratio of ˜1000:1, Dox-to-virus, and unlike other nanoparticles, there is no detectable leakage. The high loading of Dox is most likely due to intercalation into the genome and significant intercalation or exposure to denaturants was observed to cause loss of capsid stability. To better understand the limitations of cargo loading, Dox and other intercalating molecules (rhodamine 800, ethidium bromide, and propidium iodide) were assayed to determine optimum infusion conditions. Dox was observed to have a propensity to aggregate. In order to manage the Dox aggregation, the infusion buffer was changed from 50 mM Tris-HCl/50 mM NaOAc/50 mM EDTA or 200 mM EDTA at pH 8.0 to 5 mM HEPES/5 mM Na4EDTA/10 mM NaCl pH 7.8. The Dox:RCNMV infusion mole ratio was also lowered from 5000:1 to 500:1 and the incubation temperature was changed from 4 °C to 22 °C for <12 hours, opposed to 24 hours. To impart targeting functionality to RCNMV, biomimetic peptides were conjugated to either the surface capsid lysines or cysteines using standard bioconjugation methods. For all of the biomimetic peptides screened, sulfosuccinimidyl 4-(N-maleimidomethyl) cyclohexane-1-carboxylate (sulfo-SMCC) was used to orthogonally attach the

  16. Transformation of Cowpea Vigna unguiculata with a Full-Length DNA Copy of Cowpea Mosaic Virus M-RNA

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hille, Jacques; Goldbach, Rob

    1987-01-01

    A full-length DNA copy of the M-RNA of cowpea mosaic virus (CPMV), supplied with either the 35S promoter from cauliflower mosaic virus (CaMV) or the nopaline synthase promoter from Agrobacterium tumefaciens, was introduced into the T-DNA region of a Ti-plasmid-derived gene vector and transferred to

  17. Infectivity analysis of a blackgram isolate of Mungbean yellow mosaic virus and genetic assortment with MYMIV in selective hosts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haq, Q M I; Rouhibakhsh, A; Ali, Arif; Malathi, V G

    2011-06-01

    Yellow mosaic disease in grain legumes in Indian subcontinent is caused by two important virus species viz. Mungbean yellow mosaic virus (MYMV) and Mungbean yellow mosaic India virus (MYMIV), belonging to the genus Begomovirus of the family Geminiviridae. The genomic components of a begomovirus causing yellow mosaic disease in blackgram in southern India were cloned and sequenced. Nucleotide sequence comparison of DNA A component shows the virus isolate to be a variant of Mungbean yellow mosaic virus:-(MYMV-[IN:Vam:05]). However, DNA B component of the present virus isolate has greater similarity (92%) to Mungbean yellow mosaic India virus. Agroinoculations of the viral clones produced typical yellow mosaic symptoms in blackgram and mungbean, severe leaf curl and stunting in French bean, similar to blackgram isolate of MYMIV. Blackgram isolates of both the virus species were only mildly infectious on cowpea, produced atypical leaf curl symptoms and not yellow or golden mosaic. In agroinoculations done by exchanging genomic components, symptom expression was seen only in French bean. In cowpea, blackgram and mungbean there was no visible symptoms though viral DNA could be detected by PCR.

  18. Immunogenic compositions comprising human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) mosaic Nef proteins

    Science.gov (United States)

    Korber, Bette T.; Perkins, Simon; Bhattacharya, Tanmoy; Fischer, William M.; Theiler, James; Letvin, Norman; Haynes, Barton F.; Hahn, Beatrice H.; Yusim, Karina; Kuiken, Carla

    2012-02-21

    The present invention relates to mosaic clade M HIV-1 Nef polypeptides and to compositions comprising same. The polypeptides of the invention are suitable for use in inducing an immune response to HIV-1 in a human.

  19. Emergence of a Latent Indian Cassava Mosaic Virus from Cassava Which Recovered from Infection by a Non-Persistent Sri Lankan Cassava Mosaic Virus

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karthikeyan, Chockalingam; Patil, Basavaprabhu L.; Borah, Basanta K.; Resmi, Thulasi R.; Turco, Silvia; Pooggin, Mikhail M.; Hohn, Thomas; Veluthambi, Karuppannan

    2016-01-01

    The major threat for cassava cultivation on the Indian subcontinent is cassava mosaic disease (CMD) caused by cassava mosaic geminiviruses which are bipartite begomoviruses with DNA A and DNA B components. Indian cassava mosaic virus (ICMV) and Sri Lankan cassava mosaic virus (SLCMV) cause CMD in India. Two isolates of SLCMV infected the cassava cultivar Sengutchi in the fields near Malappuram and Thiruvananthapuram cities of Kerala State, India. The Malappuram isolate was persistent when maintained in the Madurai Kamaraj University (MKU, Madurai, Tamil Nadu, India) greenhouse, whereas the Thiruvananthapuram isolate did not persist. The recovered cassava plants with the non-persistent SLCMV, which were maintained vegetative in quarantine in the University of Basel (Basel, Switzerland) greenhouse, displayed re-emergence of CMD after a six-month period. Interestingly, these plants did not carry SLCMV but carried ICMV. It is interpreted that the field-collected, SLCMV-infected cassava plants were co-infected with low levels of ICMV. The loss of SLCMV in recovered cassava plants, under greenhouse conditions, then facilitated the re-emergence of ICMV. The partial dimer clones of the persistent and non-persistent isolates of SLCMV and the re-emerged isolate of ICMV were infective in Nicotiana benthamiana upon agroinoculation. Studies on pseudo-recombination between SLCMV and ICMV in N. benthamiana provided evidence for trans-replication of ICMV DNA B by SLCMV DNA A. PMID:27690084

  20. Generation of transgenic watermelon resistant to Zucchini yellow mosaic virus and Papaya ringspot virus type W.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, Tsong-Ann; Chiang, Chu-Hui; Wu, Hui-Wen; Li, Chin-Mei; Yang, Ching-Fu; Chen, Jun-Han; Chen, Yu-Wen; Yeh, Shyi-Dong

    2011-03-01

    Zucchini yellow mosaic virus (ZYMV) and Papaya ringspot virus type W (PRSV W) are major limiting factors for production of watermelon worldwide. For the effective control of these two viruses by transgenic resistance, an untranslatable chimeric construct containing truncated ZYMV coat protein (CP) and PRSV W CP genes was transferred to commercial watermelon cultivars by Agrobacterium-mediated transformation. Using our protocol, a total of 27 putative transgenic lines were obtained from three cultivars of 'Feeling' (23 lines), 'China baby' (3 lines), and 'Quality' (1 line). PCR and Southern blot analyses confirmed that the chimeric construct was incorporated into the genomic DNA of the transformants. Greenhouse evaluation of the selected ten transgenic lines of 'Feeling' cultivar revealed that two immune lines conferred complete resistance to ZYMV and PRSV W, from which virus accumulation were not detected by Western blotting 4 weeks after inoculation. The transgenic transcript was not detected, but small interfering RNA (siRNA) was readily detected from the two immune lines and T(1) progeny of line ZW 10 before inoculation, indicating that RNA-mediated post-transcriptional gene silencing (PTGS) is the underlying mechanism for the double-virus resistance. The segregation ratio of T(1) progeny of the immune line ZW10 indicated that the single inserted transgene is nuclearly inherited and associated with the phenotype of double-virus resistance as a dominant trait. The transgenic lines derived from the commercial watermelon cultivars have great potential for control of the two important viruses and can be implemented directly without further breeding. PMID:21079966

  1. The symptom difference induced by Tobacco mosaic virus and Tomato mosaic virus in tobacco plants containing the N gene is determined by movement protein gene

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    YU; Cui; HU; Dongwei; DONG; Jiahong; CUI; Xiaofeng; WU; Jun

    2004-01-01

    Tobacco mosaic virus (TMV) and Tomato mosaic virus (ToMV) are two closely related viruses in the genus Tobamovirus, but they induce obviously different sizes of necrotic lesions in tobacco plants containing the N gene. Comparison of the symptoms produced by TMV, ToMV and a chimaeric virus (T/OMP), in which the TMV movement protein (MP) gene was replaced by the ToMV MP gene, showed T/OMP caused necrotic lesions that were similar in size to those of ToMV in tobacco plants containing the N gene. The coat protein and MP of the three viruses accumulated in planta with similar levels, and the replication level of TMV and T/OMP in protoplasts also had no difference. Comparison of the activities of defense-related enzymes (PAL, POD and PPO) induced by the three viruses also showed that the variability of enzyme activity induced by T/OMP was similar to that induced by TMV, but different from that induced by ToMV. The results indicate that the size difference of necrotic lesions induced by TMV and ToMV in tobacco plants containing the N gene results from the functional difference of their MP genes.

  2. Association of tomato leaf curl New Delhi virus DNA-B with bhendi yellow vein mosaic virus in okra showing yellow vein mosaic disease symptoms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Venkataravanappa, V; Lakshminarayana Reddy, C N; Jalali, S; Krishna Reddy, M

    2015-06-01

    Okra samples showing yellow vein mosaic, vein twisting and bushy appearance were collected from different locations of India during the surveys conducted between years 2005-2009. The dot blot and PCR detection revealed that 75.14% of the samples were associated with monopartite begomovirus and remaining samples with bipartite virus. Whitefly transmission was established for three samples representing widely separated geographical locations which are negative to betasatellites and associated with DNA-B. Genome components of these three representative isolates were cloned and sequenced. The analysis of DNA-A-like sequence revealed that three begomovirus isolates shared more than 93% nucleotide sequence identity with bhendi yellow vein mosaic virus from India (BYVMV), a monopartite begomovirus species that was reported previously as causative agent of bhendi yellow mosaic disease in association of bhendi yellow vein mosaic betasatellite. Further, the DNA-B-like sequences associated with the three virus isolates shared no more than 90% sequence identity with tomato leaf curl New Delhi virus (ToLCNDV). Analyses of putative iteron-binding sequence required for trans-replication suggests that begomovirus sequences shared compatible rep-binding iterons with DNA-B of ToLCNDV. Our data suggest that the monopartite begomovirus associated with okra yellow vein disease has captured DNA-B of ToLCNDV to infect okra. Widespread distribution of the complex shows the increasing trend of the capturing of DNA-B of ToLCNDV by monopartite begomoviruses in the Indian subcontinent. The recombination analysis showed that the DNA-A might have been derived from the inter-specific recombination of begomoviruses, while DNA-B was derived from the ToLCNDV infecting different hosts.

  3. First Report of Cucumber mosaic virus Isolated from Wild Vigna angularis var. nipponensis in Korea

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mi-Kyeong Kim

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available A viral disease causing severe mosaic, necrotic, and yellow symptoms on Vigna angularis var. nipponensis was prevalent around Suwon area in Korea. The causal virus was characterized as Cucumber mosaic virus (CMV on the basis of biological and nucleotide sequence properties of RNAs 1, 2 and 3 and named as CMV-wVa. CMV-wVa isolate caused mosaic symptoms on indicator plants, Nicotiana tabacum cv. Xanthi-nc, Petunia hybrida, and Cucumis sativus. Strikingly, CMV-wVa induced severe mosaic and malformation on Cucurbita pepo, and Solanum lycopersicum. Moreover, it caused necrotic or mosaic symptoms on V. angularis and V. radiate of Fabaceae. Symptoms of necrotic local or pin point were observed on inoculated leaves of V. unguiculata, Vicia fava, Pisum sativum and Phaseolus vulgaris. However, CMV-wVa isolate failed to infect in Glycine max cvs. ‘Sorok’, ‘Sodam’ and ‘Somyeong’. To assess genetic variation between CMV-wVa and the other known CMV isolates, phylogenetic analysis using 16 complete nucleotide sequences of CMV RNA1, RNA2, and RNA3 including CMV-wVa was performed. CMV-wVa was more closely related to CMV isolates belonging to CMV subgroup I showing about 85.1–100% nucleotide sequences identity to those of subgroup I isolates. This is the first report of CMV as the causal virus infecting wild Vigna angularis var. nipponensis in Korea.

  4. First Report of Cucumber mosaic virus Isolated from Wild Vigna angularis var. nipponensis in Korea.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Mi-Kyeong; Jeong, Rae-Dong; Kwak, Hae-Ryun; Lee, Su-Heon; Kim, Jeong-Soo; Kim, Kook-Hyung; Cha, Byeongjin; Choi, Hong-Soo

    2014-06-01

    A viral disease causing severe mosaic, necrotic, and yellow symptoms on Vigna angularis var. nipponensis was prevalent around Suwon area in Korea. The causal virus was characterized as Cucumber mosaic virus (CMV) on the basis of biological and nucleotide sequence properties of RNAs 1, 2 and 3 and named as CMV-wVa. CMV-wVa isolate caused mosaic symptoms on indicator plants, Nicotiana tabacum cv. Xanthi-nc, Petunia hybrida, and Cucumis sativus. Strikingly, CMV-wVa induced severe mosaic and malformation on Cucurbita pepo, and Solanum lycopersicum. Moreover, it caused necrotic or mosaic symptoms on V. angularis and V. radiate of Fabaceae. Symptoms of necrotic local or pin point were observed on inoculated leaves of V. unguiculata, Vicia fava, Pisum sativum and Phaseolus vulgaris. However, CMV-wVa isolate failed to infect in Glycine max cvs. 'Sorok', 'Sodam' and 'Somyeong'. To assess genetic variation between CMV-wVa and the other known CMV isolates, phylogenetic analysis using 16 complete nucleotide sequences of CMV RNA1, RNA2, and RNA3 including CMV-wVa was performed. CMV-wVa was more closely related to CMV isolates belonging to CMV subgroup I showing about 85.1-100% nucleotide sequences identity to those of subgroup I isolates. This is the first report of CMV as the causal virus infecting wild Vigna angularis var. nipponensis in Korea. PMID:25289004

  5. Nucleotide sequence and phylogenetic analysis of a new potexvirus: Malva mosaic virus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Côté, Fabien; Paré, Christine; Majeau, Nathalie; Bolduc, Marilène; Leblanc, Eric; Bergeron, Michel G; Bernardy, Michael G; Leclerc, Denis

    2008-01-01

    A filamentous virus isolated from Malva neglecta Wallr. (common mallow) and propagated in Chenopodium quinoa was grown, cloned and the complete nucleotide sequence was determined (GenBank accession # DQ660333). The genomic RNA is 6858 nt in length and contains five major open reading frames (ORFs). The genomic organization is similar to members and the viral encoded proteins shared homology with the group of the Potexvirus genus in the Flexiviridae family. Phylogenetic analysis revealed a close relationship with narcissus mosaic virus (NMV), scallion virus X (ScaVX) and, to a lesser extent, to Alstroemeria virus X (AlsVX) and pepino mosaic virus (PepMV). A novel putative pseudoknot structure is predicted in the 3'-UTR of a subgroup of potexviruses, including this newly described virus. The consensus GAAAA sequence is detected at the 5'-end of the genomic RNA and experimental data strongly suggest that this motif could be a distinctive hallmark of this genus. The name Malva mosaic virus is proposed. PMID:18054524

  6. Host range and transmission of Tobacco streak virus (TSV causing cotton mosaic disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    D. Utpal

    2012-07-01

    Full Text Available Tobacco streak virus (TSV causing cotton mosaic disease was found to be transmissible by mechanical means specially when extracts were made in neutral phosphate buffer 0.02M containing reducing agent like 2-Mercaptoethanol.The disease was found to be transmitted by Thrips palmi (cotton thrips and Thrips tobacci (onion thrips. TSV was detected in sample showing mosaic symptoms.TSV was readily graft transmissible but not transmissible by mechanical means, no evidence of its transmission through seed or by thrips was obtained. About 19 plant species belonging to five different families viz.malvaceae, chenopodiaceae, compositeae, leguminoceae and solanaceae were tested for host range and virus isolate causing cotton mosaic disease.

  7. Engineering Cowpea Mosaic Virus RNA-2 into a vector to express heterologous proteins in plants

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kodetham Gopinath,; Wellink, J.; Porta, C.; Taylor, K.M.; Lomonossoff, G.P.; Kammen, van A.

    2000-01-01

    series of new cowpea mosaic virus (CPMV) RNA-2-based expression vectors were designed. The jellyfish green fluorescent protein (GFP) was introduced between the movement protein (MP) and the large (L) coat protein or downstream of the small (S) coat protein. Release of the GFP inserted between the MP

  8. A BRIEF REVIEW ON "MOLECULAR DETECTION AND CHARACTERIZATION OF YELLOW MOSAIC VIRUS (YMV INFECTING BLACKGRAM"

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S.Obaiah

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available Blackgram (Vigna mungo (L. Hepper is one of the major pulse crops of the tropics and sub tropics. It is the third major pulse crop cultivated in the Indian subcontinent. Pulses and grain legumes are major sources of dietary protein. These crops are subjected to yellow mosaic and golden mosaic diseases caused by white fly transmitted geminiviruses (WTG’s or begomovirus. Of these viruses, mungbean yellow mosaic virus (MYMV is an important one, and it infects five major leguminous species, such as blackgram, greengram, Frenchbean, pigeonpea and soybean causing an annual yield loss of about US $ 300 million (Varma et al., 1992. The MYMV causes 85-100 per cent yield loss in the plants that are infected at the seedling stage (Nene, 1973.MYMV was first observed in Delhi in the late fifties (Nariani, 1960. Virus particles were first observed by Thongmeearkom et al. (1981 and purified by Honda et al. (1983. Hence the characterisation of Yellow Mosaic Virus is essential to study the variability and to identify any new strains/ variants of YMV prevalent in India and Abroad at molecular level for developing the new resistant genotypes.

  9. Complete Genome Sequence of Ornithogalum Mosaic Virus Infecting Gladiolus spp. in South Korea.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cho, Sang-Yun; Lim, Seungmo; Kim, Hongsup; Yi, Seung-In; Moon, Jae Sun

    2016-08-11

    We report here the first complete genome sequence of Ornithogalum mosaic virus (OrMV) isolated from Taean, South Korea, in 2011, which was obtained by next-generation sequencing and Sanger sequencing. The sequence information provided here may serve as a potential reference for other OrMV isolates.

  10. Complete Genome Sequence of a South Korean Isolate of Habenaria mosaic virus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Igori, Davaajargal; Lim, Seungmo; Zhao, Fumei; Baek, Dasom; Moon, Jae Sun

    2016-09-08

    Habenaria mosaic virus (HaMV), a member of the genus Potyvirus in the family Potyviridae, was first discovered from Habenaria radiata in Japan. The complete genomic sequence of a South Korean isolate (PA1) of HaMV infecting Plantago asiatica L. was determined with high-throughput RNA sequencing.

  11. Genes and sequences involved in the replication of cowpea mosaic virus RNAs.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Eggen, R.

    1989-01-01

    The aim of the studies described in this thesis was to gain more insight in the complex molecular mechanisms underlying the RNA replication of the cowpea mosaic virus genome. Previously the replication of CPMV RNA has been examined extensively with crude membrane fractions prepared from CPMV inf

  12. Complete Genome Sequence of a South Korean Isolate of Habenaria mosaic virus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Igori, Davaajargal; Lim, Seungmo; Zhao, Fumei; Baek, Dasom; Moon, Jae Sun

    2016-01-01

    Habenaria mosaic virus (HaMV), a member of the genus Potyvirus in the family Potyviridae, was first discovered from Habenaria radiata in Japan. The complete genomic sequence of a South Korean isolate (PA1) of HaMV infecting Plantago asiatica L. was determined with high-throughput RNA sequencing. PMID:27609926

  13. RNA-dependent RNA polymerases from cowpea mosaic virus-infected cowpea leaves

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Dorssers, L.C.J.

    1983-01-01

    The aim of the research described in this thesis was the purification and identification of the RNA-dependent RNA polymerase engaged in replicating viral RNA in cowpea mosaic virus (CPMV)- infected cowpea leaves.Previously, an RNA-dependent RNA polymerase produced upon infection of Vigna unguiculata

  14. Inter- and Intramolecular Recombinations in the Cucumber Mosaic Virus Genome Related to Adaptation to Alstroemeria

    OpenAIRE

    Chen, Y.K; Goldbach, R.W.; Prins, M.W.

    2002-01-01

    In four distinct alstroemeria-infecting cucumber mosaic virus (CMV) isolates, additional sequences of various lengths were present in the 3′ nontranslated regions of their RNAs 2 and 3, apparently the result of intra- and intermolecular recombination events. Competition experiments revealed that these recombined RNA 2 and 3 segments increased the biological fitness of CMV in alstroemeria.

  15. Inter- and intramolecular recombinations in the cucumber mosaic virus genome related to adaptation to alstroemeria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Yuh-Kun; Goldbach, Rob; Prins, Marcel

    2002-04-01

    In four distinct alstroemeria-infecting cucumber mosaic virus (CMV) isolates, additional sequences of various lengths were present in the 3' nontranslated regions of their RNAs 2 and 3, apparently the result of intra- and intermolecular recombination events. Competition experiments revealed that these recombined RNA 2 and 3 segments increased the biological fitness of CMV in alstroemeria. PMID:11907253

  16. Complete Genome Sequence of Rehmannia Mosaic Virus Infecting Rehmannia glutinosa in South Korea.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lim, Seungmo; Zhao, Fumei; Yoo, Ran Hee; Igori, Davaajargal; Jeong, Jae Cheol; Lee, Haeng-Soon; Kwak, Sang-Soo; Moon, Jae Sun

    2016-01-28

    The complete genome sequence of a South Korean isolate of Rehmannia mosaic virus (ReMV) infecting Rehmannia glutinosa was determined through next-generation sequencing and Sanger sequencing. To our knowledge, this is the first report of a natural infection of R. glutinosa by ReMV in South Korea.

  17. Subcellular location of the helper component-proteinase of Cowpea Aphid-Borne Mosaic Virus

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Mlotshwa, S.; Verver, J.; Sithole-Niang, I.; Gopinath, K.; Carette, J.; Kammen, van A.; Wellink, J.

    2002-01-01

    The helper component-proteinase (HC-Pro) of Cowpea aphid-borne mosaic virus (CABMV) was expressed in Escherichia coli and used to obtain HC-Pro antiserum that was used as an analytical tool for HC-Pro studies. The antiserum was used in immunofluorescence assays to study the subcellular location of H

  18. First characterization of infectious cDNA clones of Olive mild mosaic virus

    OpenAIRE

    Cardoso, Joana M.S.; Félix, M. Rosário; Clara, M.Ivone; Oliveira, Solange

    2012-01-01

    Full-length cDNA clones of an Olive mild mosaic virus (OMMV) isolate were constructed in order to find infectious cDNA clones. The sequencing of three individual full-length clones revealed some differences between them. In vitro transcription of these clones was performed and the effect of spontaneous mutations in the biological behaviour of the in vitro transcripts was evaluated by symptomatology, RNA accumulation and virus replication in inoculated plants. In vitro synthesized RNA from one...

  19. Cauliflower mosaic virus produces an aspartic proteinase to cleave its polyproteins.

    OpenAIRE

    Torruella, M; Gordon, K; Hohn, T

    1989-01-01

    Cauliflower mosaic virus (CaMV), a plant pararetrovirus, produces polyproteins from its adjacent genes for the coat protein (ORF IV) and for enzymatic functions (ORF V). The N-terminal domain of the latter gene includes a sequence showing homology to the active site of other retroviral and acid proteases. We have now shown that this domain does indeed produce a functional aspartic protease that can process both the polyproteins. Mutations in the putative active site abolished virus infectivit...

  20. Expression of Bottom Component RNA of Cowpea Mosaic Virus in Cowpea Protoplasts

    OpenAIRE

    Rezelman, Geertje; Goldbach, Rob; van Kammen, Albert

    1980-01-01

    Upon inoculation of cowpea protoplasts with the bottom component of cowpea mosaic virus, at least six virus-induced proteins (with sizes of 170, 110, 87, 84, 60, and 32 kilodaltons) are synthesized, but not the capsid proteins (37 and 23 kilodaltons). These bottom-component-induced proteins were studied with respect to their genetic origin and mode of synthesis. The analyses were based on their electrophoretic peptide patterns resulting from partial digestion with Staphylococcus aureus protea...

  1. Mosaic protein and nucleic acid vaccines against hepatitis C virus

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yusim, Karina; Korber, Bette T. M.; Kuiken, Carla L.; Fischer, William M.

    2013-06-11

    The invention relates to immunogenic compositions useful as HCV vaccines. Provided are HCV mosaic polypeptide and nucleic acid compositions which provide higher levels of T-cell epitope coverage while minimizing the occurrence of unnatural and rare epitopes compared to natural HCV polypeptides and consensus HCV sequences.

  2. Association of a distinct strain of hollyhock yellow vein mosaic virus and Ludwigia leaf distortion betasatellite with yellow vein mosaic disease of hollyhock (Alcea rosea) in India.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Srivastava, A; Kumar, S; Raj, S K; Pande, S S

    2014-10-01

    A distinct strain of hollyhock yellow vein mosaic virus (HoYVMV) and Ludwigia leaf distortion betasatellite (LuLDB) were associated with yellow vein mosaic of hollyhock. The viral DNA genome (JQ911766) and betasatellite (JQ408216) shared highest nucleotide sequence identity (89.2 %) with HoYVMV (the only available sequence in GenBank) and 92 % identity with LuLDB. Agroinfiltration of HoYVMV and LuLDB induced yellow vein mosaic symptoms on hollyhock, thereby demonstrating causality of the disease.

  3. First report of Potato virus V and Peru tomato mosaic virus on tamarillo (Solanum betaceum) orchards of Ecuador

    Science.gov (United States)

    In Ecuador, tamarillo (Solanum betaceum) represents an important cash crop for hundreds of small farmers. In 2013, leaves from tamarillo plants showing severe virus-like symptoms (mosaic, mottling and leaf deformation) were collected from old orchards in Pichincha and Tungurahua. Double-stranded RN...

  4. Synergy between Cucumber Mosaic Virus and Zucchini Yellow Mosaic Virus on Cucurbitaceae Hosts Tested by Real-time Reverse Transcription-Polymerase Chain Reaction

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Rong ZENG; Qiansheng LIAO; Junli FENG; Dingjun LI; Jishuang CHEN

    2007-01-01

    Cucumber mosaic virus (CMV) and zucchini yellow mosaic virus (ZYMV) are two principal viruses infecting cucurbitaceous crops, and their synergy has been repeatedly observed. In our present work, a real-time reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction procedure was established to study the accumulation kinetics of these two viruses in single and combined infections at the molecular level. The accumulations of open reading frames (ORFs) for 1a, 2a, 3a and coat protein (CP) of CMV and CP of ZYMV were tested. In the single infection, CMV-Fny ORFs accumulated to their maxima in cucumber or bottle gourd at 14 d post-inoculation (dpi), and gradually declined thereafter. ZYMV-SD CP ORF reached maximal accumulation at 14 and 28 dpi on cucumber and bottle gourd, respectively. However, when coinfected with CMV-Fny and ZYMV-SD, the maximal accumulation levels of all viral ORFs were delayed.CMV-Fny ORFs reached their maxima at 21 dpi on both hosts, and ZYMV-SD CP ORF reached maximal accumulation at 21 and 28 dpi on cucumber and bottle gourd, respectively. Generally, the accumulation levels of CMV-Fny ORFs in the co-infection were higher than those in the single infection, whereas the accumulation of ZYMV-SD CP ORF showed a reverse result.

  5. Classification of cucumber green mottle mosaic virus (CGMMV) infected watermelon seeds using Raman spectroscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Hoonsoo; Lim, Hyoun-Sub; Cho, Byoung-Kwan

    2016-05-01

    The Cucumber Green Mottle Mosaic Virus (CGMMV) is a globally distributed plant virus. CGMMV-infected plants exhibit severe mosaic symptoms, discoloration, and deformation. Therefore, rapid and early detection of CGMMV infected seeds is very important for preventing disease damage and yield losses. Raman spectroscopy was investigated in this study as a potential tool for rapid, accurate, and nondestructive detection of infected seeds. Raman spectra of healthy and infected seeds were acquired in the 400 cm-1 to 1800 cm-1 wavenumber range and an algorithm based on partial least-squares discriminant analysis was developed to classify infected and healthy seeds. The classification model's accuracies for calibration and prediction data sets were 100% and 86%, respectively. Results showed that the Raman spectroscopic technique has good potential for nondestructive detection of virus-infected seeds.

  6. Deep sequencing of dsRNAs recovered from mosaic-diseased pigeonpea reveals the presence of a novel emaravirus: pigeonpea sterility mosaic virus 2.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Elbeaino, Toufic; Digiaro, Michele; Uppala, Mangala; Sudini, Harikishan

    2015-08-01

    Deep-sequencing analysis of double-stranded RNA extracted from a mosaic-diseased pigeonpea plant (Cajanus cajan L., family Fabaceae) revealed the complete sequence of six emaravirus-like negative-sense RNA segments of 7009, 2229, 1335, 1491, 1833 and 1194 nucleotides in size. In the order from RNA1 to RNA6, these genomic RNAs contained ORFs coding for the RNA-dependent RNA polymerase (RdRp, p1 of 266 kDa), the glycoprotein precursor (GP, p2 of 74.5 kDa), the nucleocapsid (NC, p3 of 34.9 kDa), and the putative movement protein (MP, p4 of 40.7 kDa), while p5 (55 kDa) and p6 (27 kDa) had unknown functions. All RNA segments showed distant relationships to viruses of the genus Emaravirus, and in particular to pigeonpea sterility mosaic virus (PPSMV), with which they shared nucleotide sequence identity ranging from 48.5 % (RNA3) to 62.5 % (RNA1). In phylogenetic trees constructed from the sequences of the proteins encoded by RNA1, RNA2 and RNA3 (p1, p2 and p3), this new viral entity showed a consistent grouping with fig mosaic virus (FMV) and rose rosette virus (RRV), which formed a cluster of their own, clearly distinct from PPSMV-1. In experimental greenhouse trials, this novel virus was successfully transmitted to pigeonpea and French bean seedlings by the eriophyid mite Aceria cajani. Preliminary surveys conducted in the Hyderabad region (India) showed that the virus in question is widespread in pigeonpea plants affected by sterility mosaic disease (86.4 %) but is absent in symptomless plants. Based on molecular, biological and epidemiological features, this novel virus is the second emaravirus infecting pigeonpea, for which the provisional name pigeonpea sterility mosaic virus 2 (PPSMV-2) is proposed. PMID:26060057

  7. Crystal Structure and Proteomics Analysis of Empty Virus-like Particles of Cowpea Mosaic Virus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huynh, Nhung T; Hesketh, Emma L; Saxena, Pooja; Meshcheriakova, Yulia; Ku, You-Chan; Hoang, Linh T; Johnson, John E; Ranson, Neil A; Lomonossoff, George P; Reddy, Vijay S

    2016-04-01

    Empty virus-like particles (eVLPs) of Cowpea mosaic virus (CPMV) are currently being utilized as reagents in various biomedical and nanotechnology applications. Here, we report the crystal structure of CPMV eVLPs determined using X-ray crystallography at 2.3 Å resolution and compare it with previously reported cryo-electron microscopy (cryo-EM) of eVLPs and virion crystal structures. Although the X-ray and cryo-EM structures of eVLPs are mostly similar, there exist significant differences at the C terminus of the small (S) subunit. The intact C terminus of the S subunit plays a critical role in enabling the efficient assembly of CPMV virions and eVLPs, but undergoes proteolysis after particle formation. In addition, we report the results of mass spectrometry-based proteomics analysis of coat protein subunits from CPMV eVLPs and virions that identify the C termini of S subunits undergo proteolytic cleavages at multiple sites instead of a single cleavage site as previously observed.

  8. Natural occurrence of Cucumber mosaic virus infecting water mint (Mentha aquatica) in Antalya and Konya, Turkey

    OpenAIRE

    Sevik, Mehmet A.

    2012-01-01

    A virus causing a disease in mint (the aromatic and culinary plant) has recently become a problem in the Taurus Mountains, a mountain range in the Mediterranean region of Turkey. To detect the virus and investigate its distribution in the region, mint leaf samples were collected from the vicinity of spring areas in the plateaus of Antalya and Konya in 2009. It was found that Cucumber mosaic virus (CMV) was detected in 27.08% of symptomatic samples tested by DAS-ELISA. To the best of our knowl...

  9. Effects of single and double infections with Potato virus X and Tobacco mosaic virus on disease development, plant growth, and virus accumulation in tomato

    OpenAIRE

    BALOGUN OLUSEGUN S.; XU LEIXIN; TERAOKA TOHRU; HOSOKAWA DAIJIRO

    2002-01-01

    The tomato cv. Fukuju nº. 2 was used for studying the effect of single and double infections with Potato virus X (PVX) and Tobacco mosaic virus (TMV). Mixed infection resulted in a synergistic increase of disease severity, where more growth reduction was seen with simultaneous inoculations than with sequential inoculations at four-day intervals. At five and 12 days post-inoculation, the increased severity of the disease coincided with enhancement of virus accumulation in the rapidly expanding...

  10. The genomes of four novel begomoviruses and a new Sida micrantha mosaic virus strain from Bolivian weeds.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wyant, Patrícia Soares; Gotthardt, Diether; Schäfer, Benjamin; Krenz, Björn; Jeske, Holger

    2011-02-01

    Begomovirus is the largest genus within the family Geminiviridae and includes economically important plant DNA viruses infecting a broad range of plant species and causing devastating crop diseases, mainly in subtropical and tropical countries. Besides cultivated plants, many weeds act as virus reservoirs. Eight begomovirus isolates from Bolivian weeds were examined using rolling-circle amplification (RCA) and restriction fragment length polymorphism (RFLP). An efficient, novel cloning strategy using limited Sau3A digestion to obtain tandem-repeat inserts allowed the sequencing of the complete genomes. The viruses were classified by phylogenetic analysis as typical bipartite New World begomoviruses. Four of them represented distinct new virus species, for which the names Solanum mosaic Bolivia virus, Sida mosaic Bolivia virus 1, Sida mosaic Bolivia virus 2, and Abutilon mosaic Bolivia virus are proposed. Three were variants of a new strain of Sida micrantha mosaic virus (SimMV), SimMV-rho[BoVi07], SimMV-rho[Bo:CF1:07] and SimMV-rho[Bo:CF2:07], and one was a new variant of a previously described SimMV, SimMV-MGS2:07-Bo.

  11. Evidence for a Complex Mosaic Genome Pattern in a Full-length Hepatitis C Virus Sequence

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    R.S. Ross

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available The genome of the hepatitis C virus (HCV exhibits a high genetic variability. This remarkable heterogeneity is mainly attributed to the gradual accumulation of mutational changes, whereas the contribution of recombination events to the evolution of HCV remains controversial so far. While performing phylogenetic analyses including a large number of sequences deposited in the GenBank, we encountered a full-length HCV sequence (AY651061 that showed evidence for inter-subtype recombination and was, therefore, subjected to a detailed analysis of its molecular structure. The obtained results indicated that AY651061 does not represent a “simple” HCV 1c isolate, but a complex 1a/1c mosaic genome, showing five putative breakpoints in the core to NS3 regions. To our knowledge, this is the first report on a mosaic HCV full- length sequence with multiple breakpoints. The molecular structure of AY651061 is reminiscent of complex homologous recombinant variants occurring among other members of the flaviviridae family, e.g. GB virus C, dengue virus, and Japanese encephalitis virus. Our finding of a mosaic HCV sequence may have important implications for many fields of current HCV research which merit careful consideration.

  12. Expression and silencing of cowpea mosaic virus transgenes.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Sijen, T.

    1997-01-01

    Plant viruses are interesting pathogens because they can not exist without their hosts and exploit the plant machinery for their multiplication. Fundamental knowledge on viral processes is of great importance to understand, prevent and control virus infections which can cause drastic losses in crops

  13. Comparative analysis of chrysanthemum transcriptome in response to three RNA viruses: Cucumber mosaic virus, Tomato spotted wilt virus and Potato virus X.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Choi, Hoseong; Jo, Yeonhwa; Lian, Sen; Jo, Kyoung-Min; Chu, Hyosub; Yoon, Ju-Yeon; Choi, Seung-Kook; Kim, Kook-Hyung; Cho, Won Kyong

    2015-06-01

    The chrysanthemum is one of popular flowers in the world and a host for several viruses. So far, molecular interaction studies between the chrysanthemum and viruses are limited. In this study, we carried out a transcriptome analysis of chrysanthemum in response to three different viruses including Cucumber mosaic virus (CMV), Tomato spotted wilt virus (TSWV) and Potato virus X (PVX). A chrysanthemum 135K microarray derived from expressed sequence tags was successfully applied for the expression profiles of the chrysanthemum at early stage of virus infection. Finally, we identified a total of 125, 70 and 124 differentially expressed genes (DEGs) for CMV, TSWV and PVX, respectively. Many DEGs were virus specific; however, 33 DEGs were commonly regulated by three viruses. Gene ontology (GO) enrichment analysis identified a total of 132 GO terms, and of them, six GO terms related stress response and MCM complex were commonly identified for three viruses. Several genes functioning in stress response such as chitin response and ethylene mediated signaling pathway were up-regulated indicating their involvement in establishment of host immune system. In particular, TSWV infection significantly down-regulated genes related to DNA metabolic process including DNA replication, chromatin organization, histone modification and cytokinesis, and they are mostly targeted to nucleosome and MCM complex. Taken together, our comparative transcriptome analysis revealed several genes related to hormone mediated viral stress response and DNA modification. The identified chrysanthemums genes could be good candidates for further functional study associated with resistant to various plant viruses. PMID:25904110

  14. Datura Genus Weeds as an Epidemiological Factor of Alfalfa mosaic virus (AMV), Cucumber mosaic virus (CMV), and Potato virus Y (PVY) on Solanaceus Crops Malezas del Género Datura como Factor Epidemiológico del Virus del mosaico de la alfalfa (AMV), Virus del mosaico del pepino (CMV) y Virus Y de la papa (PVY) en Solanáceas Cultivadas

    OpenAIRE

    Juan Ormeño; Paulina Sepúlveda; Ricardo Rojas; Jaime E. Araya

    2006-01-01

    Plant samples of jimsonweed (Datura stramonium L.) and thornapple (D. ferox L.) were collected to determine the presence of Cucumber mosaic virus (CMV), Alfalfa mosaic virus (AMV), and Potato virus Y (PVY) in Santiago, Chile (33º34’ S lat, 70º38’ W long, altitude 625 mosl), using double stranded RNA (dsRNA) analysis and ELISA. Both weeds were positive to the three types of virus with a percentage of infection ranging from 20-30% except for PVY infection in D. stramonium with an incidence of 5...

  15. Induction of protective immunity in swine by recombinant bamboo mosaic virus expressing foot-and-mouth disease virus epitopes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lin Na-Sheng

    2007-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Plant viruses can be employed as versatile vectors for the production of vaccines by expressing immunogenic epitopes on the surface of chimeric viral particles. Although several viruses, including tobacco mosaic virus, potato virus X and cowpea mosaic virus, have been developed as vectors, we aimed to develop a new viral vaccine delivery system, a bamboo mosaic virus (BaMV, that would carry larger transgene loads, and generate better immunity in the target animals with fewer adverse environmental effects. Methods We engineered the BaMV as a vaccine vector expressing the antigenic epitope(s of the capsid protein VP1 of foot-and-mouth disease virus (FMDV. The recombinant BaMV plasmid (pBVP1 was constructed by replacing DNA encoding the 35 N-terminal amino acid residues of the BaMV coat protein with that encoding 37 amino acid residues (T128-N164 of FMDV VP1. Results The pBVP1 was able to infect host plants and to generate a chimeric virion BVP1 expressing VP1 epitopes in its coat protein. Inoculation of swine with BVP1 virions resulted in the production of anti-FMDV neutralizing antibodies. Real-time PCR analysis of peripheral blood mononuclear cells from the BVP1-immunized swine revealed that they produced VP1-specific IFN-γ. Furthermore, all BVP1-immunized swine were protected against FMDV challenge. Conclusion Chimeric BaMV virions that express partial sequence of FMDV VP1 can effectively induce not only humoral and cell-mediated immune responses but also full protection against FMDV in target animals. This BaMV-based vector technology may be applied to other vaccines that require correct expression of antigens on chimeric viral particles.

  16. Characteristics of rose mosaic diseases

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marek S. Szyndel

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available Presented review of rose diseases, associated with the mosaic symptoms, includes common and yellow rose mosaic, rose ring pattern, rose X disease, rose line pattern, yellow vein mosaic and rose mottle mosaic disease. Based on symptomatology and graft transmissibility of causing agent many of those rose disorders are called "virus-like diseases" since the pathogen has never been identified. However, several viruses were detected and identified in roses expressing mosaic symptoms. Currently the most prevalent rose viruses are Prunus necrotic ringspot virus - PNRSV, Apple mosaic virus - ApMV (syn. Rose mosaic virus and Arabis mosaic virus - ArMV Symptoms and damages caused by these viruses are described. Tomato ringspot virus, Tobacco ringspot virus and Rose mottle mosaic virus are also mentioned as rose pa thogcns. Methods of control of rose mosaic diseases are discussed.

  17. Cofolding organizes alfalfa mosaic virus RNA and coat protein for replication.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guogas, Laura M; Filman, David J; Hogle, James M; Gehrke, Lee

    2004-12-17

    Alfalfa mosaic virus genomic RNAs are infectious only when the viral coat protein binds to the RNA 3' termini. The crystal structure of an alfalfa mosaic virus RNA-peptide complex reveals that conserved AUGC repeats and Pro-Thr-x-Arg-Ser-x-x-Tyr coat protein amino acids cofold upon interacting. Alternating AUGC residues have opposite orientation, and they base pair in different adjacent duplexes. Localized RNA backbone reversals stabilized by arginine-guanine interactions place the adenosines and guanines in reverse order in the duplex. The results suggest that a uniform, organized 3' conformation, similar to that found on viral RNAs with transfer RNA-like ends, may be essential for replication. PMID:15604410

  18. Analysis of nucleotide sequence of wheat yellow mosaic virus genomic RNAs

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    于嘉林; 晏立英; 苏宁; 侯占军; 李大伟; 韩成贵; 杨莉莉; 蔡祝南; 刘仪

    1999-01-01

    Wheat yellow mosaic virus (WYMV) isolate HC was used for viral cDNA synthesis and sequencing. The results show that the viral RNA1 is 7629 nueleotides encoding a polyprotein with 2407 amino acids, from which seven putative proteins may be produced by an autolytie cleavage processing besides the viral coat protein. The RNA2 is 3639 nueleotides and codes for a polypretein of 903 amino acids, which may contain two putative non-structural proteins. Although WYMV shares a similarity in genetic organization to wheat spindle streak mosaic virus (WSSMV), the identities in their nucleotide sequences or deduced amino acid sequences are as low as 70% and 75 % respectively. Based on this result, it is confirmed that WYMV and WSSMV are different species within Bymovirus.

  19. Inheritance of resistance to yellow mosaic virus in blackgram (Vigna mungo (L.) Hepper).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Singh, D P

    1980-09-01

    The inheritance of resistance to mungbean yellow mosaic virus (MYMV) was studied in blackgram (Vigna mungo (L.) Hepper). The highly resistant donors Pant U-84 and UPU-2 and a highly susceptible line, UL-2, their F1's, F2's and backcrosses were grown with spreader located every 5 to 6 rows. The resistance was found to be digenic and recessive in all the crosses and free from cytoplasmic effect.

  20. PCNA Interacts with Indian Mung Bean Yellow Mosaic Virus Rep and Downregulates Rep Activity

    OpenAIRE

    Bagewadi, Basavaraj; Chen, Shoajiang; Sunil K. Lal; Choudhury, Nirupam Roy; Mukherjee, Sunil K

    2004-01-01

    Proliferative cell nuclear antigen (PCNA), a conserved plant protein as well as an important replication factor, is induced in response to geminivirus infection in the resting cells of the phloem tissues. The biochemical role of PCNA in rolling circle replication (RCR) of geminivirus DNA has not been explored in detail. The initiation of RCR of the bipartite genome of a geminivirus, Indian mung bean yellow mosaic virus (IMYMV), is mainly controlled by viral protein Rep (or AL1 or AC1). The ro...

  1. Monoclonal antibody-based serological methods for detection of Cucumber green mottle mosaic virus

    OpenAIRE

    Qian Yajuan; Zhou Xueping; Xie Yan; Shang Haili; Wu Jianxiang

    2011-01-01

    Abstract Background Cucumber green mottle mosaic virus (CGMMV), a member of the genus Tobamovirus, can be transmitted by seeds and infects many cucurbit species, causing serious yield losses in cucumber and watermelon plants. In this paper, five serological methods including antigen-coated plate enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ACP-ELISA), triple antibody sandwich enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (TAS-ELISA), Dot-immunobinding assay (DBIA), direct tissue blot immunoassay (DTBIA) and immuno...

  2. Deep sequencing of pigeonpea sterility mosaic virus discloses five RNA segments related to emaraviruses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Elbeaino, Toufic; Digiaro, Michele; Uppala, Mangala; Sudini, Harikishan

    2014-08-01

    The sequences of five viral RNA segments of pigeonpea sterility mosaic virus (PPSMV), the agent of sterility mosaic disease (SMD) of pigeonpea (Cajanus cajan, Fabaceae), were determined using the deep sequencing technology. Each of the five RNAs encodes a single protein on the negative-sense strand with an open reading frame (ORF) of 6885, 1947, 927, 1086, and 1,422 nts, respectively. In order, from RNA1 to RNA5, these ORFs encode the RNA-dependent RNA polymerase (p1, 267.9 kDa), a putative glycoprotein precursor (p2, 74.3 kDa), a putative nucleocapsid protein (p3, 34.6 kDa), a putative movement protein (p4, 40.8 kDa), while p5 (55 kDa) has an unknown function. All RNA segments of PPSMV showed the highest identity with orthologs of fig mosaic virus (FMV) and Rose rosette virus (RRV). In phylogenetic trees constructed with the amino acid sequences of p1, p2 and p3, PPSMV clustered consistently with other emaraviruses, close to clades comprising members of other genera of the family Bunyaviridae. Based on the molecular characteristics unveiled in this study and the morphological and epidemiological features similar to other emaraviruses, PPSMV seems to be the seventh species to join the list of emaraviruses known to date and accordingly, its classification in the genus Emaravirus seems now legitimate. PMID:24685674

  3. Transcriptome analysis of Nicotiana tabacum infected by Cucumber mosaic virus during systemic symptom development.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jie Lu

    Full Text Available Virus infection of plants may induce a variety of disease symptoms. However, little is known about the molecular mechanism of systemic symptom development in infected plants. Here we performed the first next-generation sequencing study to identify gene expression changes associated with disease development in tobacco plants (Nicotiana tabacum cv. Xanthi nc induced by infection with the M strain of Cucumber mosaic virus (M-CMV. Analysis of the tobacco transcriptome by RNA-Seq identified 95,916 unigenes, 34,408 of which were new transcripts by database searches. Deep sequencing was subsequently used to compare the digital gene expression (DGE profiles of the healthy plants with the infected plants at six sequential disease development stages, including vein clearing, mosaic, severe chlorosis, partial and complete recovery, and secondary mosaic. Thousands of differentially expressed genes were identified, and KEGG pathway analysis of these genes suggested that many biological processes, such as photosynthesis, pigment metabolism and plant-pathogen interaction, were involved in systemic symptom development. Our systematic analysis provides comprehensive transcriptomic information regarding systemic symptom development in virus-infected plants. This information will help further our understanding of the detailed mechanisms of plant responses to viral infection.

  4. Detection and Identification of Dasheen mosaic virus Infecting Colocasia esculenta in India.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Babu, Binoy; Hegde, Vinayaka; Makeshkumar, T; Jeeva, M L

    2011-06-01

    Reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction of the infected leaf samples of Colocasia esculenta plants showing severe whitish feathery symptoms were carried out using Potyvirus group specific primers, resulting in an amplicon of 327 bp, encoding the core region of the coat protein gene. Sequencing and BLAST analysis showed that the virus is distinct, closely related to Dasheen mosaic virus (DsMV). Sequence analysis revealed 86 and 96% identity at the nucleotide and amino acid level respectively with the DsMV isolate SY1(accession Number AJ628756). This is the first molecular level characterisation of the DsMV infecting C. esculenta in India.

  5. Genetic diversity and molecular evolution of arabis mosaic virus based on the CP gene sequence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gao, Fangluan; Lin, Wuzhen; Shen, Jianguo; Liao, Furong

    2016-04-01

    Arabis mosaic virus (ArMV) is a virus with a wide host range. In this study, the genetic diversity of ArMV and the molecular mechanisms underlying its evolution were investigated using the coat protein (CP) sequence. Of the 33 ArMV isolates studied, three were found to be recombinants. The other 30 recombination-free ArMV isolates could be separated into two major lineages with a significant F ST value (0.384) and tended to cluster according to their geographical origin. Different evolutionary constraints were detected for the two linages, pointing to a role of natural selection in the differentiation of ArMV. PMID:26758729

  6. Detection and Identification of Dasheen mosaic virus Infecting Colocasia esculenta in India.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Babu, Binoy; Hegde, Vinayaka; Makeshkumar, T; Jeeva, M L

    2011-06-01

    Reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction of the infected leaf samples of Colocasia esculenta plants showing severe whitish feathery symptoms were carried out using Potyvirus group specific primers, resulting in an amplicon of 327 bp, encoding the core region of the coat protein gene. Sequencing and BLAST analysis showed that the virus is distinct, closely related to Dasheen mosaic virus (DsMV). Sequence analysis revealed 86 and 96% identity at the nucleotide and amino acid level respectively with the DsMV isolate SY1(accession Number AJ628756). This is the first molecular level characterisation of the DsMV infecting C. esculenta in India. PMID:23637503

  7. Complete genome sequence of yam chlorotic necrotic mosaic virus from Dioscorea parviflora.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Pengyuan; Peng, Jiejun; Guo, Huachun; Chen, Jianping; Chen, Suiyun; Wang, Jianguang

    2016-06-01

    The complete genome sequence of yam chlorotic necrotic mosaic virus (YCNMV) was determined. It is a monopartite ssRNA 8208 nucleotides in length (excluding the poly(A) tail) and encoding a polyprotein of 2622 amino acids. Sequence analysis showed that the P1 region and some conserved motifs, such as the typical potyvirus aphid-transmission motifs DAG, PTK and KITC, are absent. Phylogenetic analysis based on the complete polyprotein sequences of YCNMV and selected members of the family Potyviridae clearly showed that this virus should be assigned to the genus Macluravirus and suggest that YCNMV is a new member of the genus Macluravirus. PMID:26973231

  8. Mosaic Structure Of Foot-And-Mouth Disease Virus Genomes

    Science.gov (United States)

    We report the results of a simple pairwise scanning analysis designed to identify inter-serotype recombination events applied to genome data from 144 isolates of foot-and-mouth disease virus (FMDV) representing all seven serotypes. We identify large numbers of candidate recombinant fragments from a...

  9. Interaction between the Alfalfa mosaic virus movement protein and plasmodesmata

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wel, van der N.N.

    2000-01-01

    For a full infection of a host, plant viruses should be able to multiply in the initially infected cell and to spread to neighbouring cells as to eventually invade the entire plant. The viral transport pathway can in principle be divided into two steps, i.e. cell-to-cell movement within tissues, and

  10. Origin of the membrane compartment for cowpea mosaic virus replication

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Carette, J.E.

    2002-01-01

    Replication of many positive-stranded RNA viruses takes place in association with intracellular membranes. Often these membranes are induced upon infection by vesiculation or rearrangement of membranes from different organelles including the early and late endomembrane system. Upon infection of cowp

  11. Nucleotide sequence of the 3'-terminal region of the genome confirms that pea mosaic virus is a strain of bean yellow mosaic potyvirus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xiao, X W; Frenkel, M J; Ward, C W; Shukla, D D

    1994-01-01

    The 1,035 nucleotides at the 3'end of the I strain of pea mosaic potyvirus (PMV-I) genomic RNA, encoding the coat protein, have been cloned and sequenced. A comparison of the derived coat protein sequence with those of the bean yellow mosaic virus (BYMV) strains, CS, S, D and GDD, indicates that PMV-I is a strain of BYMV. Sequence comparisons and hybridisation studies using the 3'-noncoding region support this classification. The nucleotide and protein sequence data also suggest that PMV-I and BYMV-CS form one subset of BYMV strains while the other three strains form another. PMID:8031241

  12. Effects of mutated replicase and movement protein genes on attenuation of tobacco mosaic virus

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    杨恭; 邱并生; 魏军亚; 刘广超

    2001-01-01

    Our previous reports showed that one opal mutation (UGA) and one ochre mutation (UAA) respectively located in the replicase and movement protein (MP) genes of the attenuated tomato mosaic virus K(ToMV-K) contribute to the viral attenuation. To explore a wider application of this attenuation pattern to other plant viruses, we have constructed three mutants which respectively contain one opal mutation of the replicase gene and/or one ochre mutation of the MP using PCR-mediated site-directed mutagenesis from a virulent tobacco mosaic virus isolated from China (TMV-Cv). Plant infection performed by in vitro transcripts revealed that the MP truncated mutant TMV-Cvmp and the replicase-MP truncated mutant TMV-Cvrase-mp were infectious on both local lesion (Nicotiana tabacum cv. Xanthi NC) and systemic (N. tabacum cv. K326) host plants, while the replicase truncated mutant TMV-Cvrase was non-infectious. The K326 plant infected by TMV- Cvrease-mp displayed only a little mild mosaic. By electronic microscopy (EM), plant re-inoculation, RNA Dot-blot, RT-PCR and sequencing we demonstrated that the progeny viruses of TMV-Cvmp and TMV-Cvrease-mp shared similar morphological character with TMV-Cv, owned the abilities to infect, replicate and propagate in the assayed plants, and maintained the mutated sites during infection. These data showed that both the opal and the ochre mutations are able to cooperatively induce the attenuated phenotypes of TMV-Cvrase-mp on plants, indicating that the mutation pattern of ToMV-K could be used to attenuate other virulent plant viruses.

  13. Detection of Alfalfa mosaic virus (AMV) in pea field in Iran.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Esfandiari, N; Kohi Habibi, M; Mosahebi, G H; Mozafari, J

    2005-01-01

    During the spring and summer, in 2003-2004, pea viruses were identified in twenty pea fields of Tehran. Some leaf samples were collected randomly from pea fields of Tehran. Samples were tested by Double Antibody Sandwich Enzyme Linked Immunosorbent Assay (DAS-ELISA) technique using polyclonal antiserum of Alfalfa mosaic virus (AMV), AS-0001, DSMZ, Braunschweig, Germany). The samples were extracted in 0.1 M Phosphate buffer pH 7 to 7.5 and inoculated on Chenopodium amaranticolor, Chenopodium quina, Phaseolus valgaris, Vicia faba, Vignia unguiculata. Pea cultivars were infected by AMV, causing mild mosaic, translucent veins and a diffuse green-yellow of tender parts and spots may also was involved necrosis of tissue. Infected plants grow slowly and malformed pods produce fewer ovules. In Chenopodium amranticolor, C. quina chlorotic and necrotic flecks, and Vicia faba systemic mosaic had produced. Phaselous vulgaris and Viginia unguiculata are good assay hosts for strains that produce local lesions after 3-5 days in these plants. Back inoculated on Pisum sativum and Vicia faba and tested with DAS-ELISA that had been confirmed the results. This is the first report of AMV on pea from Iran. PMID:16637206

  14. Transgenic Sugarcane Resistant to Sorghum mosaic virus Based on Coat Protein Gene Silencing by RNA Interference

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jinlong Guo

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available As one of the critical diseases of sugarcane, sugarcane mosaic disease can lead to serious decline in stalk yield and sucrose content. It is mainly caused by Potyvirus sugarcane mosaic virus (SCMV and/or Sorghum mosaic virus (SrMV, with additional differences in viral strains. RNA interference (RNAi is a novel strategy for producing viral resistant plants. In this study, based on multiple sequence alignment conducted on genomic sequences of different strains and isolates of SrMV, the conserved region of coat protein (CP genes was selected as the target gene and the interference sequence with size of 423 bp in length was obtained through PCR amplification. The RNAi vector pGII00-HACP with an expression cassette containing both hairpin interference sequence and cp4-epsps herbicide-tolerant gene was transferred to sugarcane cultivar ROC22 via Agrobacterium-mediated transformation. After herbicide screening, PCR molecular identification, and artificial inoculation challenge, anti-SrMV positive transgenic lines were successfully obtained. SrMV resistance rate of the transgenic lines with the interference sequence was 87.5% based on SrMV challenge by artificial inoculation. The genetically modified SrMV-resistant lines of cultivar ROC22 provide resistant germplasm for breeding lines and can also serve as resistant lines having the same genetic background for study of resistance mechanisms.

  15. Alfalfa mosaic virus replicase proteins P1 and P2 interact and colocalize at the vacuolar membrane

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Heijden, van der M.W.; Carette, J.E.; Reinhoud, P.J.; Haegi, A.; Bol, J.F.

    2001-01-01

    Replication of Alfalfa mosaic virus (AMV) RNAs depends on the virus-encoded proteins P1 and P2. P1 contains methyltransferase- and helicase-like domains, and P2 contains a polymerase-like domain. Coimmunoprecipitation experiments revealed an interaction between in vitro translated-P1 and P2 and show

  16. Occurrence of Cucumber mosaic virus on vanilla (Vanilla planifolia Andrews) in India.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Madhubala, R; Bhadramurthy, V; Bhat, A I; Hareesh, P S; Retheesh, S T; Bhai, R S

    2005-06-01

    Cucumber mosaic virus (CMV) causing mosaic, leaf distortion and stunting of vanilla (Vanilla planifolia Andrews) in India was characterized on the basis of biological and coat protein (CP) nucleotide sequence properties. In mechanical inoculation tests, the virus was found to infect members of Chenopodiaceae, Cucurbitaceae, Fabaceae and Solanaceae. Nicotiana benthamiana was found to be a suitable host for the propagation of CMV. The virus was purified from inoculated N. benthamiana plants and negatively stained purified preparations contained isometric particles of about 28 nm in diameter. The molecular weight of the viral coat protein subunits was found to be 25.0 kDa. Polyclonal antiserum was produced in New Zealand white rabbit, immunoglobulin G (IgG) was purified and conjugated with alkaline phosphatase enzyme. Double antibody sandwich-enzyme linked immunosorbent assay (DAS-ELISA) method was standardized for the detection of CMV infection in vanilla plants. CP gene of the virus was amplified using reverse transcriptase-polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR), cloned and sequenced. Sequenced region contained a single open reading frame of 657 nucleotides potentially coding for 218 amino acids. Sequence analyses with other CMV isolates revealed the greatest identity with black pepper isolate of CMV (99%) and the phylogram clearly showed that CMV infecting vanilla belongs to subgroup IB. This is the first report of occurrence of CMV on V. planifolia from India.

  17. Occurrence of Cucumber mosaic virus on vanilla (Vanilla planifolia Andrews) in India

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    R Madhubala; V Bhadramurthy; A I Bhat; P S Hareesh; S T Retheesh; R S Bhai

    2005-06-01

    Cucumber mosaic virus (CMV) causing mosaic, leaf distortion and stunting of vanilla (Vanilla planifolia Andrews) in India was characterized on the basis of biological and coat protein (CP) nucleotide sequence properties. In mechanical inoculation tests, the virus was found to infect members of Chenopodiaceae, Cucurbitaceae, Fabaceae and Solanaceae. Nicotiana benthamiana was found to be a suitable host for the propagation of CMV. The virus was purified from inoculated N. benthamiana plants and negatively stained purified preparations contained isometric particles of about 28 nm in diameter. The molecular weight of the viral coat protein subunits was found to be 25.0 kDa. Polyclonal antiserum was produced in New Zealand white rabbit, immunoglobulin G (IgG) was purified and conjugated with alkaline phosphatase enzyme. Double antibody sandwich-enzyme linked immunosorbent assay (DAS-ELISA) method was standardized for the detection of CMV infection in vanilla plants. CP gene of the virus was amplified using reverse transcriptase-polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR), cloned and sequenced. Sequenced region contained a single open reading frame of 657 nucleotides potentially coding for 218 amino acids. Sequence analyses with other CMV isolates revealed the greatest identity with black pepper isolate of CMV (99%) and the phylogram clearly showed that CMV infecting vanilla belongs to subgroup IB. This is the first report of occurrence of CMV on V. planifolia from India.

  18. Sequencing and computational analysis of complete genome sequences of Citrus yellow mosaic badna virus from acid lime and pummelo.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Borah, Basanta K; Johnson, A M Anthony; Sai Gopal, D V R; Dasgupta, Indranil

    2009-08-01

    Citrus yellow mosaic badna virus (CMBV), a member of the Family Caulimoviridae, Genus Badnavirus, is the causative agent of Citrus mosaic disease in India. Although the virus has been detected in several citrus species, only two full-length genomes, one each from Sweet orange and Rangpur lime, are available in publicly accessible databases. In order to obtain a better understanding of the genetic variability of the virus in other citrus mosaic-affected citrus species, we performed the cloning and sequence analysis of complete genomes of CMBV from two additional citrus species, Acid lime and Pummelo. We show that CMBV genomes from the two hosts share high homology with previously reported CMBV sequences and hence conclude that the new isolates represent variants of the virus present in these species. Based on in silico sequence analysis, we predict the possible function of the protein encoded by one of the five ORFs.

  19. Rapid turnover of intra-host genetic diversity in Zucchini yellow mosaic virus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Simmons, Heather E; Holmes, Edward C; Stephenson, Andrew G

    2011-02-01

    Genetic diversity in RNA viruses is shaped by a variety of evolutionary processes, including the bottlenecks that may occur at inter-host transmission. However, how these processes structure genetic variation at the scale of individual hosts is only partly understood. We obtained intra-host sequence data for the coat protein (CP) gene of Zucchini yellow mosaic virus (ZYMV) from two horizontally transmitted populations - one via aphid, the other without - and with multiple samples from individual plants. We show that although mutations are generated relatively frequently within infected plants, attaining similar levels of genetic diversity to that seen in some animal RNA viruses (mean intra-sample diversity of 0.02%), most mutations are likely to be transient, deleterious, and purged rapidly. We also observed more population structure in the aphid transmitted viral population, including the same mutations in multiple clones, the presence of a sub-lineage, and evidence for the short-term complementation of defective genomes. PMID:21138748

  20. Bunias orientalis L. as a natural overwintering host OF Turnip mosaic virus

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tadeusz Kobyłko

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available A virus was isolated, using mechanical inoculation, from hill mustard (Bunias orientalis L. plants exhibiting yellow mottling and blistering on leaves, which were frequently accompanied by asymmetric leaf narrowing. It systemically infected certain plants from the family Brassicaceae (Brassica rapa, Bunias orientalis, Hesperis matronalis, Sinapis alba as well as Cleome spinosa and Nicotiana clevelandii, and locally Atriplex hortensis, Chenopodium quinoa, Ch. amaranticolor, N. tabacum. In the sap, it maintained infectivity for 3-4 days and lost it after heating for 10 min. at a temperature of 55 - 60oC or when diluted with water at 10-3. Virus particles were thread- like with a length of 675 - 710 nm. Based on an analysis of biological properties of the pathogen, serological response, particle morphology and data from field observations, it was identified as an isolate of Turnip mosaic virus (TuMV, and hill mustard was recognised as a natural overwintering host for this pathogen.

  1. Monoclonal antibodies produced to bean yellow mosaic virus, clover yellow vein virus, and pea mosaic virus which cross-react among the three viruses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scott, S W; McLaughlin, M R; Ainsworth, A J

    1989-01-01

    Monoclonal antibodies prepared against individual potyviruses that infect forage legumes cross-reacted among the viruses. The reaction occurs between capsid subunits and presumably involves epitopes located in the trypsin-resistant core of the coat protein. PMID:2480762

  2. Complete nucleotide sequence of a Spanish isolate of alfalfa mosaic virus: evidence for additional genetic variability.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parrella, Giuseppe; Acanfora, Nadia; Orílio, Anelise F; Navas-Castillo, Jesús

    2011-06-01

    Alfalfa mosaic virus (AMV) is a plant virus that is distributed worldwide and can induce necrosis and/or yellow mosaic on a large variety of plant species, including commercially important crops. It is the only virus of the genus Alfamovirus in the family Bromoviridae. AMV isolates can be clustered into two genetic groups that correlate with their geographic origin. Here, we report for the first time the complete nucleotide sequence of a Spanish isolate of AMV found infecting Cape honeysuckle (Tecoma capensis) and named Tec-1. The tripartite genome of Tec-1 is composed of 3643 nucleotides (nt) for RNA1, 2594 nt for RNA2 and 2037 nt for RNA3. Comparative sequence analysis of the coat protein gene revealed that the isolate Tec-1 is distantly related to subgroup I of AMV and more closely related to subgroup II, although forming a distinct phylogenetic clade. Therefore, we propose to split subgroup II of AMV into two subgroups, namely IIA, comprising isolates previously included in subgroup II, and IIB, including the novel Spanish isolate Tec-1. PMID:21327783

  3. The complete genome sequence and genome structure of passion fruit mosaic virus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Song, Yeon Sook; Ryu, Ki Hyun

    2011-06-01

    In this study, we determined the complete sequence of the genomic RNA of a Florida isolate of maracuja mosaic virus (MarMV-FL) and compared it to that of a Peru isolate of the virus (MarMV-P) and those of other known tobamoviruses. Complete sequence analysis revealed that the isolate should be considered a member of a new species and named passion fruit mosaic virus (PafMV). The genomic RNA of PafMV consists of 6,791 nucleotides and encodes four open reading frames (ORFs) coding for proteins of 125 kDa (1,101 aa), 184 kDa (1,612 aa), 34 kDa (311 aa) and 18 kDa (164 aa) in consecutive order from the 5' to the 3' end. The sequence homologies of the four ORFs of PafMV were from 78.8% to 81.6% to those of MarMV-P at the amino acid level. The sequence homologies of the four ORFs of PafMV ranged from 36.0% to 77.9% and from 21.7% to 81.6% to those of other tobamoviruses, at the nucleotide and amino acid level, respectively. Phylogenetic analysis revealed that these PafMV-encoded proteins are closely related to those of MarMV-P. In conclusion, the results indicate that PafMV and MarMV-P belong to different species within the genus Tobamovirus. PMID:21547441

  4. Variabilidade genética de Sugarcane mosaic virus, causando mosaico em milho no Brasil

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marcos Cesar Gonçalves

    2011-04-01

    Full Text Available O objetivo deste trabalho foi caracterizar biológica e molecularmente três isolados de Sugarcane mosaic virus (SCMV de lavouras de milho, analisá-los filogeneticamente e discriminar polimorfismos do genoma. Plantas com sintomas de mosaico e nanismo foram coletadas em lavouras de milho, no Estado de São Paulo e no Município de Rio Verde, GO, e seus extratos foliares foram inoculados em plantas indicadoras e submetidos à análise sorológica com antissoros contra o SCMV, contra o Maize dwarf mosaic virus (MDMV e contra o Johnsongrass mosaic virus (JGMV. Mudas de sorgo 'Rio' e 'TX 2786' apresentaram sintomas de mosaico após a inoculação dos três isolados, e o DAS-ELISA confirmou a infecção pelo SCMV. O RNA total foi extraído e usado para amplificação por transcriptase reversa seguida de reação em cadeia de polimerase (RT-PCR. Fragmentos específicos foram amplificados, submetidos à análise por polimorfismo de comprimento de fragmento de restrição (RFLP e sequenciados. Foi possível discriminar os genótipos de SCMV isolados de milho de outros isolados brasileiros do vírus. Alinhamentos múltiplos e análises dos perfis filogenéticos corroboram esses dados e mostram diversidade nas sequências de nucleotídeos que codificam para a proteína capsidial, o que explica o agrupamento separado desses isolados e sugere sua classificação como estirpes distintas, em lugar de simples isolados geográficos.

  5. Sequences enhancing cassava mosaic disease symptoms occur in the cassava genome and are associated with South African cassava mosaic virus infection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maredza, A T; Allie, F; Plata, G; Rey, M E C

    2016-06-01

    Cassava is an important food security crop in Sub-Saharan Africa. Two episomal begomovirus-associated sequences, named Sequences Enhancing Geminivirus Symptoms (SEGS1 and SEGS2), were identified in field cassava affected by the devastating cassava mosaic disease (CMD). The sequences reportedly exacerbated CMD symptoms in the tolerant cassava landrace TME3, and the model plants Arabidopsis thaliana and Nicotiana benthamiana, when biolistically co-inoculated with African cassava mosaic virus-Cameroon (ACMV-CM) or East African cassava mosaic virus-UG2 (EACMV-UG2). Following the identification of small SEGS fragments in the cassava EST database, the intention of this study was to confirm their presence in the genome, and investigate a possible role for these sequences in CMD. We report that multiple copies of varying lengths of both SEGS1 and SEGS2 are widely distributed in the sequenced cassava genome and are present in several other cassava accessions screened by PCR. The endogenous SEGS1 and SEGS2 are in close proximity or overlapping with cassava genes, suggesting a possible role in regulation of specific biological processes. We confirm the expression of SEGS in planta using EST data and RT-PCR. The sequence features of endogenous SEGS (iSEGS) are unique but resemble non-autonomous transposable elements (TEs) such as MITEs and helitrons. Furthermore, many SEGS-associated genes, some involved in virus-host interactions, are differentially expressed in susceptible (T200) and tolerant TME3) cassava landraces infected by South African cassava mosaic virus (SACMV) of susceptible (T200) and tolerant (TME3) cassava landraces. Abundant SEGS-derived small RNAs were also present in mock-inoculated and SACMV-infected T200 and TME3 leaves. Given the known role of TEs and associated genes in gene regulation and plant immune responses, our observations are consistent with a role of these DNA elements in the host's regulatory response to geminiviruses.

  6. Sequences enhancing cassava mosaic disease symptoms occur in the cassava genome and are associated with South African cassava mosaic virus infection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maredza, A T; Allie, F; Plata, G; Rey, M E C

    2016-06-01

    Cassava is an important food security crop in Sub-Saharan Africa. Two episomal begomovirus-associated sequences, named Sequences Enhancing Geminivirus Symptoms (SEGS1 and SEGS2), were identified in field cassava affected by the devastating cassava mosaic disease (CMD). The sequences reportedly exacerbated CMD symptoms in the tolerant cassava landrace TME3, and the model plants Arabidopsis thaliana and Nicotiana benthamiana, when biolistically co-inoculated with African cassava mosaic virus-Cameroon (ACMV-CM) or East African cassava mosaic virus-UG2 (EACMV-UG2). Following the identification of small SEGS fragments in the cassava EST database, the intention of this study was to confirm their presence in the genome, and investigate a possible role for these sequences in CMD. We report that multiple copies of varying lengths of both SEGS1 and SEGS2 are widely distributed in the sequenced cassava genome and are present in several other cassava accessions screened by PCR. The endogenous SEGS1 and SEGS2 are in close proximity or overlapping with cassava genes, suggesting a possible role in regulation of specific biological processes. We confirm the expression of SEGS in planta using EST data and RT-PCR. The sequence features of endogenous SEGS (iSEGS) are unique but resemble non-autonomous transposable elements (TEs) such as MITEs and helitrons. Furthermore, many SEGS-associated genes, some involved in virus-host interactions, are differentially expressed in susceptible (T200) and tolerant TME3) cassava landraces infected by South African cassava mosaic virus (SACMV) of susceptible (T200) and tolerant (TME3) cassava landraces. Abundant SEGS-derived small RNAs were also present in mock-inoculated and SACMV-infected T200 and TME3 leaves. Given the known role of TEs and associated genes in gene regulation and plant immune responses, our observations are consistent with a role of these DNA elements in the host's regulatory response to geminiviruses. PMID:25920485

  7. Complete genome sequence of nine isolates of canna yellow streak virus reveals its relationship to the sugarcane mosaic virus (SCMV) subgroup of potyviruses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chauhan, Ravendra P; Rajakaruna, Punsasi; Verchot, Jeanmarie

    2015-03-01

    Complete genome sequences were obtained from nine isolates of canna yellow streak virus (CaYSV). CaYSV belongs to the sugarcane mosaic virus (SCMV) subgroup of potyviruses with johnsongrass mosaic virus (JGMV) as its closest relative. Multiple sequence alignments showed a pattern of amino acid substitutions in the CP sequences, which enabled us to relate these isolates to South East Asian or European isolates. Biological characterization of CaYSV identified Nicotiana benthamiana, Chenopodium quinoa and Phaseolus vulgaris as experimental hosts. Given the popularity and global trade of cannas, a clear picture of the genetic diversity of CaYSV is critical to disease management. PMID:25567205

  8. The complete sequence of Cymbidium mosaic virus from Vanilla fragrans in Hainan, China.

    Science.gov (United States)

    He, Zhen; Jiang, Dongmei; Liu, Aiqin; Sang, Liwei; Li, Wenfeng; Li, Shifang

    2011-06-01

    The complete nucleotide sequence of Cymbidium mosaic virus (CymMV) isolated from vanilla in Hainan province, China was determined for the first time. It comprised 6,224 nucleotides; sequence analysis suggested that the isolate we obtained was a member of the genus Potexvirus, and its sequence shared 86.67-96.61% identities with previously reported sequences. Phylogenetic analysis suggested that CymMV from vanilla fragrans was clustered into subgroup A and the isolates in this subgroup displayed little regional difference.

  9. Flavones from Cassia siamea and their anti-tobacco mosaic virus activity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Min; Zhou, Kun; Xiang, Neng-Jun; Yang, Liu; Zhang, Cheng-Ming; Wang, Yue-De; Dong, Wei; Lou, Jie; Ji, Bing-Kun; Gao, Xue-Mei; Miao, Ming-Ming; Hu, Qiu-Fen

    2015-01-01

    Two new flavones, siameflavones A and B (1 and 2), together with five known flavones (3-7) were isolated from the stem of Cassia siamea. Their structures were elucidated by spectroscopic methods including extensive 1D and 2D NMR techniques. Compounds 1-5 were evaluated for their anti-tobacco mosaic virus (Anti-TMV) activity. The results showed that compounds 1-5 showed weak anti-TMV activity with inhibition rates in the range of 11.6-18.5%.

  10. A genetically novel, narrow-host-range isolate of cucumber mosaic virus (CMV) from rosemary.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tepfer, Mark; Girardot, Gregory; Fénéant, Lucie; Ben Tamarzizt, Hana; Verdin, Eric; Moury, Benoît; Jacquemond, Mireille

    2016-07-01

    An isolate of cucumber mosaic virus (CMV), designated CMV-Rom, was isolated from rosemary (Rosmarinus officinalis) plants in several locations near Avignon, France. Laboratory studies showed that, unlike typical CMV isolates, CMV-Rom has a particularly narrow host range. It could be transmitted by aphids Aphis gossypii and Myzus persicae, but with low efficacy compared to a typical CMV isolate. Phylogenetic analysis of the nucleotide sequences of the CMV-Rom genomic RNAs shows that this isolate does not belong to any of the previously described CMV subgroups, IA, IB, II or III. PMID:27138549

  11. A genetically modified tobacco mosaic virus that can produce gold nanoparticles from a metal salt precursor.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andrew John Love

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available We genetically modified tobacco mosaic virus (TMV to surface display a characterized peptide with potent metal ion binding and reducing capacity (MBP TMV, and demonstrate that unlike wild type (WT TMV, this construct can lead to the formation of discrete 10-40 nm gold nanoparticles when mixed with 3 mM potassium tetrachloroaurate. Using a variety of analytical physicochemical approaches it was found that these nanoparticles were crystalline in nature and stable. Given that the MBP TMV can produce metal nanomaterials in the absence of chemical reductants, it may have utility in the green production of metal nanomaterials.

  12. Alstroemeria-infecting cucumber mosaic virus isolates contain additional sequences in the RNA 3 segment.

    OpenAIRE

    Chen, Y.K; Prins, M.W.; Derks, A.F.L.M.; Langeveld, S A; Goldbach, R.W.

    2002-01-01

    The coat protein (CP) genes and flanking regions of three alstroemeria-infecting cucumber mosaic virus isolates (CMV-ALS), denoted ALS-LBO, ALS-IPO, and ALS-NAK, were cloned and their nucleotide sequence determined and compared at both nucleic acid and deduced protein level with the published sequences of CMV RNA 3. The sequences of these isolates showed more than 95% nucleotide and peptide sequence homology to each other and to other members of subgroup II CMV. Strikingly, an additional sequ...

  13. Loop-mediated Isothermal Amplification Assay to Rapidly Detect Wheat Streak Mosaic Virus in Quarantined Plants

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Siwon Lee

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available We developed a loop-mediated isothermal amplification (LAMP method to rapidly diagnose Wheat streak mosaic virus (WSMV during quarantine inspections of imported wheat, corn, oats, and millet. The LAMP method was developed as a plant quarantine inspection method for the first time, and its simplicity, quickness, specificity and sensitivity were verified compared to current reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR and nested PCR quarantine methods. We were able to quickly screen for WSMV at quarantine sites with many test samples; thus, this method is expected to contribute to plant quarantine inspections.

  14. Yellow mosaic symptom caused by the nuclear shuttle protein gene of mungbean yellow mosaic virus is associated with single-stranded DNA accumulation and mesophyll spread of the virus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuruba, B L; Buvani, A P; Veluthambi, K

    2016-01-01

    Mungbean yellow mosaic virus-[India:Vigna] (MYMV-[IN:Vig]), a blackgram isolate of MYMV, causes yellow mosaic disease in blackgram and mungbean. Two variable DNA-B components, KA22 and KA27, cause distinct symptoms in blackgram [V. mungo (L.) Hepper] with the same DNA-A component. KA22 + DNA-A-agroinoculated blackgram plants displayed yellow mosaic symptom and accumulated high levels of viral single-stranded (ss) DNA. KA27 + DNA-A-agroinoculated blackgram plants displayed severe stunting symptom and accumulated very low levels of viral ssDNA. However, in mungbean [V. radiata (L.) Wilczek], KA27 + DNA-A caused yellow mosaic symptom and a high level of viral ssDNA accumulated. Swapping of KA27 DNA-B with the nuclear shuttle protein gene (NSP) of KA22 DNA-B (KA27xKA22 NSP) caused yellow mosaic symptom in blackgram, suggesting that KA22 NSP is the determinant of yellow mosaic symptom. Interestingly, KA27xKA22 NSP-infected blackgram plants accumulated high levels of viral ssDNA, comparable to that of KA22 DNA-B infection, suggesting that the KA22 NSP is responsible for accumulation of high levels of viral ssDNA. MYMV distribution was studied in blackgram and mungbean plants by leaf tissue hybridization, which showed mesophyll spread of the virus in KA22-infected blackgram leaflets and in KA27-infected mungbean leaflets, both of which displayed yellow mosaic symptom. However, the virus did not accumulate in the mesophyll in the case of KA27-infected blackgram leaflets. Interestingly, the swapped KA27xKA22 NSP-infected blackgram leaflets showed mesophyll accumulation of the virus, suggesting that KA22 NSP determines its mesophyll spread.

  15. Why mosaic? Gene expression profiling of African cassava mosaic virus-infected cassava reveals the effect of chlorophyll degradation on symptom development.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Jiao; Yang, Jun; Bi, Huiping; Zhang, Peng

    2014-02-01

    Cassava mosaic disease, caused by cassava begomoviruses, is the most serious disease for cassava in Africa. However, the pathogenesis of this disease is poorly understood. We employed high throughput digital gene expression profiling based on the Illumina Solexa sequencing technology to investigate the global transcriptional response of cassava to African cassava mosaic virus infection. We found that 3,210 genes were differentially expressed in virus-infected cassava leaves. Gene ontology term and Kyoto Encyclopedia of Genes and Genomes pathway analysis indicated that genes implicated in photosynthesis were most affected, consistent with the chlorotic symptoms observed in infected leaves. The upregulation of chlorophyll degradation genes, including the genes encoding chlorophyllase, pheophytinase, and pheophorbide a oxygenase, and downregulation of genes encoding the major apoproteins in light-harvesting complex II were confirmed by qRT-PCR. These findings, together with the reduction of chlorophyll b content and fewer grana stacks in the infected leaf cells, reveal that the degradation of chlorophyll plays an important role in African cassava mosaic virus symptom development. This study will provide a road map for future investigations into viral pathogenesis.

  16. Presence and Molecular Characterization of Alfalfa mosaic virus on Tobacco in Serbia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ivana Stanković

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Three-year investigation of the presence and distribution of tobacco viruses in Serbia revealed that Alfalfa mosaic virus (AMV appeared every year with different frequency in tobacco crops. During 2008, the presence of AMV was detected in most of the tested samples(58.82% and it was the second most common compared to all other viruses which presence was confirmed in Serbia. In 2006 and 2007, AMV was detected in a significantly lower percentage (2.80% and 13.64%, respectively. This study showed that Alfalfa mosaic virus was more commonly found in multiple infections with two, three or even four detected viruses. Single infections were detected only in 2006, in one tobacco field in the locality of Futog. During this investigation, a rapid and simple protocol was optimized and developed for molecular detection of AMV in tobacco leaves, using primers CPAMV1/CPAMV2 and commercially available kits for total RNA extraction as well as for RT-PCR (reverse transcription - polymerase chain reaction. Using RT-PCR and these primers that flank the AMV coat protein gene, a DNA fragment of 751 bp was amplified, sequenced, and compared with the sequences available in GenBank database. The sequence of isolate 196-08 (GenBank Acc. No. FJ527749 proved to be identical at the nucleotide level of 99 to 93% withthose from other parts of the world. Phylogenetic analysis of 27 isolates based on 528 bp sequences of the coat protein gene did not show correlation of the isolates with their geographic origin or plant host and showed that these isolates fall into four molecular groups of strains. Serbian AMV isolate from tobacco belongs to group IV, the group that includes most of the isolates selected for phylogenetic analysis.

  17. Biological and Molecular Variability of Alfalfa mosaic virus Affecting Alfalfa Crop in Riyadh Region.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Al-Saleh, Mohammed A; Amer, Mahmoud A

    2013-12-01

    In 2011-2012, sixty nine samples were collected from alfalfa plants showing viral infection symptoms in Riyadh region. Mechanical inoculation with sap prepared from two collected samples out of twenty five possitive for Alfalfa mosaic virus (AMV) by ELISA were produced systemic mosaic on Vigna unguiculata and Nicotiana tabacum, local lesion on Chenopodium amaranticolor and C. quinoa. Vicia faba indicator plants that induce mosaic and mottle with AMV-Sagir isolate and no infection with AMV-Wadi aldawasser isolate. Approximately 700-bp was formed by RT-PCR using AMV coat protein specific primer. Samples from infected alfalfa gave positive results, while healthy plant gave negative result using dot blot hybridization assay. The nucleotide sequences of the Saudi isolates were compared with corresponding viral nucleotide sequences reported in GenBank. The obtained results showed that the AMV from Australia, Brazil, Puglia and China had the highest similarity with AMV-Sajer isolate. While, the AMV from Spain and New Zealaland had the lowest similarity with AMV-Sajer and Wadi aldawasser isolates. The data obtained in this study has been deposited in the GenBank under the accession numbers KC434083 and KC434084 for AMV-Sajer and AMV- Wadialdawasser respectively. This is the first report regarding the gnetic make up of AMV in Saudi Arabia. PMID:25288969

  18. Biological and Molecular Variability of Alfalfa mosaic virus Affecting Alfalfa Crop in Riyadh Region

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohammed A. AL-Saleh

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available In 2011–2012, sixty nine samples were collected from alfalfa plants showing viral infection symptoms in Riyadh region. Mechanical inoculation with sap prepared from two collected samples out of twenty five possitive for Alfalfa mosaic virus (AMV by ELISA were produced systemic mosaic on Vigna unguiculata and Nicotiana tabacum, local lesion on Chenopodium amaranticolor and C. quinoa. Vicia faba indicator plants that induce mosaic and mottle with AMV-Sagir isolate and no infection with AMV-Wadi aldawasser isolate. Approximately 700-bp was formed by RT-PCR using AMV coat protein specific primer. Samples from infected alfalfa gave positive results, while healthy plant gave negative result using dot blot hybridization assay. The nucleotide sequences of the Saudi isolates were compared with corresponding viral nucleotide sequences reported in GenBank. The obtained results showed that the AMV from Australia, Brazil, Puglia and China had the highest similarity with AMV-Sajer isolate. While, the AMV from Spain and New Zealaland had the lowest similarity with AMV-Sajer and Wadi aldawasser isolates. The data obtained in this study has been deposited in the GenBank under the accession numbers KC434083 and KC434084 for AMV-Sajer and AMV- Wadialdawasser respectively. This is the first report regarding the gnetic make up of AMV in Saudi Arabia.

  19. Tobacco mosaic virus-directed reprogramming of auxin/indole acetic acid protein transcriptional responses enhances virus phloem loading.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Collum, Tamara D; Padmanabhan, Meenu S; Hsieh, Yi-Cheng; Culver, James N

    2016-05-10

    Vascular phloem loading has long been recognized as an essential step in the establishment of a systemic virus infection. In this study, an interaction between the replication protein of tobacco mosaic virus (TMV) and phloem-specific auxin/indole acetic acid (Aux/IAA) transcriptional regulators was found to modulate virus phloem loading in an age-dependent manner. Promoter expression studies show that in mature tissues TMV 126/183-kDa-interacting Aux/IAAs predominantly express and accumulate within the nuclei of phloem companion cells (CCs). Furthermore, CC Aux/IAA nuclear localization is disrupted upon infection with an interacting virus. In situ analysis of virus spread shows that the inability to disrupt Aux/IAA CC nuclear localization correlates with a reduced ability to load into the vascular tissue. Subsequent systemic movement assays also demonstrate that a virus capable of disrupting Aux/IAA localization is significantly more competitive at moving out of older plant tissues than a noninteracting virus. Similarly, CC expression and overaccumulation of a degradation-resistant Aux/IAA-interacting protein was found to inhibit TMV accumulation and phloem loading selectively in flowering plants. Transcriptional expression studies demonstrate a role for Aux/IAA-interacting proteins in the regulation of salicylic and jasmonic acid host defense responses as well as virus-specific movement factors, including pectin methylesterase, that are involved in regulating plasmodesmata size-exclusion limits and promoting virus cell-to-cell movement. Combined, these findings indicate that TMV directs the reprogramming of auxin-regulated gene expression within the vascular phloem of mature tissues as a means to enhance phloem loading and systemic spread. PMID:27118842

  20. [Morphological features of transgenic tobacco plants expressing the AINTEGUMENTA gene of rape under control of the Dahlia mosaic virus promoter].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuluev, B R; Kniazev, A V; Cheremis, A V; Vakhitov, V A

    2013-01-01

    Transgenic tobacco plants expressing the AINTEGUMENTA gene of rape under control of the 35S promoter and the promoter of dahlia mosaic virus were obtained. The transgenic plants were characterized by increase in the length of the leaves, flower sizes, stem height, and weight of seeds; at the same time, the degree of increase was greater in the case of use of the dahlia mosaic virus promoter as a regulator of transcription. Ectopic expression of the AINTEGUMENTA gene promoted prolongation of leaf growth, while sizes of epidermal cells of the leaves remained unchanged. PMID:23785848

  1. Partial biological and molecular characterization of a Cucumber mosaic virus isolate naturally infecting Cucumis melo in Iran.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rasoulpour, Rasoul; Afsharifar, Alireza; Izadpanah, Keramat

    2016-06-01

    Melon seedlings showing systemic chlorotic spots and mosaic symptoms were collected in central part of Iran, and a virus was isolated from diseased plants by mechanical inoculation. The virus systemically infected the most inoculated test plants by inducing mosaic symptoms, while, in the members of Fabaceae family and Chenopodium quinoa induced local lesions. Agar gel diffusion test using a polyclonal antiserum against a squash Cucumber mosaic virus (CMV) isolate showed the presence of CMV in the mechanically inoculated plants (designated CMV-Me). The virus was purified by polyethylene glycol precipitation and differential centrifugation. A polyclonal antiserum was produced against the virus that reacted specifically with virus antigen in ELISA and agar gel diffusion tests. The virus was molecularly characterized by PCR amplification of the full length of the coat protein gene using cucumovirus genus specific primer pair CPTALL-3/CPTALL-5 and sequence analysis of the resulting product. No RNA satellite was detected using the primer pair CMVsat3H/sat5T7P. Phylogenetic analysis based on the coat protein amino acid sequences showed that CMV-Me belongs to Subgroup IB. These results may be helpful in melon breeding programs, focusing on plant resistance to plant viruses including CMV. PMID:27366772

  2. Stability of Barley stripe mosaic virus-induced gene silencing in barley

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bruun-Rasmussen, Marianne; Madsen, Christian Toft; Jessing, Stine;

    2007-01-01

    for barley and wheat; however, silencing using this vector is generally transient, with efficient silencing often being confined to the first two or three systemically infected leaves. To investigate this further, part of the barley Phytoene desaturase (PDS) gene was inserted into BSMV and the...... length influenced stability but not efficiency of VIGS. Silencing was transient in most cases; however, the decrease in PDS mRNA levels measured by qRT-PCR began earlier and lasted longer than the photobleaching. Occasionally, silencing persisted and could be transmitted through seed as well as via......Virus-induced gene silencing (VIGS) can be used as a powerful tool for functional genomics studies in plants. With this approach, it is possible to target most genes and downregulate the messenger (m)RNA in a sequence-specific manner. Barley stripe mosaic virus (BSMV) is an established VIGS vector...

  3. Changes in Cell Ultrastructure in Maize Leaves Infected by Maize Dwarf Mosaic Virus

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    GUO Xing-qi; ZHU Xiao-ping; ZHANG Jie-dao; GUO Yan-kui

    2003-01-01

    Ultrastructural alterations in foliar cells were studied in leaves of resistant maize varietyLuyu16 and susceptible maize inbred line Luyuan92 infected by maize dwarf mosaic virus Shandong isolate(MDMV-SD), respectively. The results showed that marked cytopathological alterations were observed both inresistant plants and in susceptible plants, compared with that in healthy plants. However, some ultrastructur-al alterations, which observed in resistant plants, were different from those in susceptible plants. In resistantplants, which infected with the virus, the main organelles, including chloroplasts and mitochondria, wereslightly destroyed, the amount of mitochondria and peroxisome were increased. A few or no plasmodesmatawere observed. There were three kinds of inclusions including pinwheel, bundle and laminated aggregate, andthe virus particles in the cytoplasm. In susceptible plants, which infected with the virus, the chloroplasts wereheavily disrupted, including thylakoid swelling and envelope broking. The virus particles were more than thosein the resistant variety. Four kinds of inclusions including pinwheel, bundle, laminated aggregate and highelecton-dense body appeared in cytoplasm. Plasmodesmata and plasma membrane were abundant, and therewere frequent invaginations of the plasma membrane that led to the formation of vesicles and myelin-likestructures.

  4. Myosins VIII and XI play distinct roles in reproduction and transport of tobacco mosaic virus.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Khalid Amari

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available Viruses are obligatory parasites that depend on host cellular factors for their replication as well as for their local and systemic movement to establish infection. Although myosin motors are thought to contribute to plant virus infection, their exact roles in the specific infection steps have not been addressed. Here we investigated the replication, cell-to-cell and systemic spread of Tobacco mosaic virus (TMV using dominant negative inhibition of myosin activity. We found that interference with the functions of three class VIII myosins and two class XI myosins significantly reduced the local and long-distance transport of the virus. We further determined that the inactivation of myosins XI-2 and XI-K affected the structure and dynamic behavior of the ER leading to aggregation of the viral movement protein (MP and to a delay in the MP accumulation in plasmodesmata (PD. The inactivation of myosin XI-2 but not of myosin XI-K affected the localization pattern of the 126k replicase subunit and the level of TMV accumulation. The inhibition of myosins VIII-1, VIII-2 and VIII-B abolished MP localization to PD and caused its retention at the plasma membrane. These results suggest that class XI myosins contribute to the viral propagation and intracellular trafficking, whereas myosins VIII are specifically required for the MP targeting to and virus movement through the PD. Thus, TMV appears to recruit distinct myosins for different steps in the cell-to-cell spread of the infection.

  5. RNA viruses and their silencing suppressors boost Abutilon mosaic virus, but not the Old World Tomato yellow leaf curl Sardinia virus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sardo, Luca; Wege, Christina; Kober, Sigrid; Kocher, Conny; Accotto, Gian Paolo; Noris, Emanuela

    2011-11-01

    Mixed viral infections can induce different changes in symptom development, genome accumulation and tissue tropism. These issues were investigated for two phloem-limited begomoviruses, Abutilon mosaic virus (AbMV) and Tomato yellow leaf curl Sardinia virus (TYLCSV) in Nicotiana benthamiana plants doubly infected by either the potyvirus Cowpea aphid-borne mosaic virus (CABMV) or the tombusvirus Artichoke mottled crinkle virus (AMCV). Both RNA viruses induced an increase of the amount of AbMV, led to its occasional egress from the phloem and induced symptom aggravation, while the amount and tissue tropism of TYLCSV were almost unaffected. In transgenic plants expressing the silencing suppressors of CABMV (HC-Pro) or AMCV (P19), AbMV was supported to a much lesser extent than in the mixed infections, with the effect of CABMV HC-Pro being superior to that of AMCV P19. Neither of the silencing suppressors influenced TYLCSV accumulation. These results demonstrate that begomoviruses differentially respond to the invasion of other viruses and to silencing suppression. PMID:21843560

  6. Genetic variation of wheat streak mosaic virus in the United States Pacific Northwest.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Robinson, Megan D; Murray, Timothy D

    2013-01-01

    Wheat streak mosaic virus (WSMV), the cause of wheat streak mosaic, is a widespread and damaging pathogen of wheat. WSMV is not a chronic problem of annual wheat in the United States Pacific Northwest but could negatively affect the establishment of perennial wheat, which is being developed as an alternative to annual wheat to prevent soil erosion. Fifty local isolates of WSMV were collected from 2008 to 2010 near Lewiston, ID, Pullman, WA, and the United States Department of Agriculture Central Ferry Research Station, near Pomeroy, WA to determine the amount of genetic variation present in the region. The coat protein gene from each isolate was sequenced and the data subjected to four different methods of phylogenetic analyses. Two well-supported clades of WSMV were identified. Isolates in clade I share sequence similarity with isolates from Central Europe; this is the first report of isolates from Central Europe being reported in the United States. Isolates in clade II are similar to isolates originating from Australia, Argentina, and the American Pacific Northwest. Nine isolates showed evidence of recombination and the same two well-supported clades were observed when recombinant isolates were omitted from the analysis. More polymorphic sites, parsimony informative sites, and increased diversity were observed in clade II than clade I, suggesting more recent establishment of the virus in the latter. The observed diversity within both clades could make breeding for durable disease resistance in perennial wheat difficult if there is a differential response of WSMV resistance genes to isolates from different clades.

  7. Prediction of MHC binding peptides and epitopes from alfalfa mosaic virus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gomase, Virendra S; Kale, Karbhari V; Chikhale, Nandkishor J; Changbhale, Smruti S

    2007-08-01

    Peptide fragments from alfalfa mosaic virus involved multiple antigenic components directing and empowering the immune system to protect the host from infection. MHC molecules are cell surface proteins, which take active part in host immune reactions and involvement of MHC class-I & II in response to almost all antigens. Coat protein of alfalfa mosaic virus contains 221 aa residues. Analysis found five MHC ligands in coat protein as 64-LSSFNGLGV-72; 86- RILEEDLIY-94; 96-MVFSITPSY-104; 100- ITPSYAGTF-108; 110- LTDDVTTED-118; having rescaled binding affinity and c-terminal cleavage affinity more than 0.5. The predicted binding affinity is normalized by the 1% fractil. The MHC peptide binding is predicted using neural networks trained on c-terminals of known epitopes. In analysis predicted MHC/peptide binding is a log transformed value related to the IC50 values in nM units. Total numbers of peptides found are 213. Predicted MHC binding regions act like red flags for antigen specific and generate immune response against the parent antigen. So a small fragment of antigen can induce immune response against whole antigen. This theme is implemented in designing subunit and synthetic peptide vaccines. The sequence analysis method allows potential drug targets to identify active sites against plant diseases. The method integrates prediction of peptide MHC class I binding; proteosomal c-terminal cleavage and TAP transport efficiency. PMID:17691913

  8. Sequence analysis and genetic diversity of five new Indian isolates of cucumber mosaic virus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kumar, S; Gautam, K K; Raj, S K

    2015-12-01

    Cucumber mosaic virus (CMV) is an important virus since it causes severe losses to many economically important crops worldwide. Five new isolates of CMV were isolated from naturally infected Hippeastrum hybridum, Dahlia pinnata, Hemerocallis fulva, Acorus calamus and Typhonium trilobatum plants, all exhibiting severe leaf mosaic symptoms. For molecular identification and sequence analyses, the complete coat protein (CP) gene of these isolates was amplified by RT-PCR. The resulting amplicons were cloned and sequenced and isolates were designated as HH (KP698590), DP (JF682239), HF (KP698589), AC (KP698588) and TT (JX570732). For study of genetic diversity among these isolates, the sequence data were analysed by BLASTn, multiple alignment and generating phylogenetic trees along with the respective sequences of other CMV isolates available in GenBank Database were done. The isolates under study showed 82-99% sequence diversity among them at nucleotide and amino acid levels; however they showed close relationships with CMV isolates of subgroup IB. In alignment analysis of amino acid sequences of HH and AC isolates, we have found fifteen and twelve unique substitutions, compared to HF, DP and TT isolates, suggesting the cause of high genetic diversity. PMID:26666188

  9. Satellite RNA-mediated Reduction of Cucumber Mosaic Virus Genomic RNAs Accumulation in Nicotiana tabacum

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Qiansheng LIAO; Liping ZHU; Zhiyou DU; Rong ZENG; Junli FENG; Jishuang CHEN

    2007-01-01

    Satellite RNAs (satRNAs) are molecular parasites that interfere with the pathogenesis of the helper viruses.In this study,the relative accumulation of cucumber mosaic virus (CMV)-Fny genomic RNAs with or without satRNAs were quantitatively analyzed by real-time RT-PCR.The results showed that satRs apparently attenuated the symptoms of CMV-Fny on Nicotiana tabacum by depressing the accumulation of CMV-Fny genomic RNAs,tested as open reading frames.The accumulation of CMV-Fny la,2a,2b,3a,and CP genes was much higher than that of CMV-Fny with satRs added(CMV-Fsat),at different inoculation times.CMV-Fny△2b,in which the complete 2b gene and 41 amino acids at the C-terminal of the 2a gene were deleted,caused only a slight mosaic effect on N.tabacum seedlings,similar to that of CMVFsat,but the addition of satRs to CMV-Fny△2b showed further decrease in the accumulation of CMVFny△2b genomic RNAs.Our results indicated that the attenuation of CMV,by adding satRs or deleting the 2b gene,was due to the low accumulation of CMV genomic RNAs,and that satRNA-mediated reduction of CMV genomic RNAs accumulation in N.tabacum was possibly related to the 2b gene.

  10. Effective Thermophilic Composting of Crop Residues for Inactivation of Tobacco Mosaic Virus

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Abdel E. Ghaly

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available An effective thermophilic composting bioreactor, in which a homogenous distribution of temperature was maintained at 63-65°C by the addition of a bioavailable carbon and low mixing, was developed. The bioreactor operated on a mixture of tomato plant residues-wood shavings-municipal solid waste compost infected with tobacco mosaic virus (TMV. The initial C: N ratio and moisture content of the compost mixture were adjusted to 30:1 and 60%, respectively. The composting process was successful in destroying the tobacco mosaic virus. The results showed that the ability of the untreated virus (inoculum to infect tobacco plants (150 LL L-1 was much higher than its ability to infect tomato plants (22 LL L-1. The TMV completely lost its ability to infect the leaves of susceptible hosts (tobacco and tomato plants after 96 hrs of controlled thermophilic (63-65°C composting (or 126 h from the start of the composting process. Semilog plots of the ratio of the infection ability of the surviving virus to that of the initial inoculum (as measured by the number of local lesions were developed. The decimal reduction time (the time necessary to reduce the infection ability of TMV by 1-log or 90% was found to be 62.4 and 109.7 hrs for tobacco and tomato plants, respectively. The relatively short time required for complete inactivation of TMV in this study was achieved as a result of the extension of the thermophilic stage and maintaining a constant high temperature with a uniform temperature distribution by the continuous addition of the proper amount of bioavailable carbon (used cooking oil and low mixing.

  11. Complete nucleotide sequence analysis of Cymbidium mosaic virus Indian isolate: further evidence for natural recombination among potexviruses

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Ang Rinzing Sherpa; Vipin Hallan; Promila Pathak; Aijaz Asghar Zaidi

    2007-06-01

    The complete nucleotide sequence of an Indian strain of Cymbidium mosaic virus (CymMV) was determined and compared with other potexviruses. Phylogenetic analyses on the basis of RNA-dependent RNA polymerase (RdRp), triple gene block protein and coat protein (CP) amino acid sequences revealed that CymMV is closely related to the Narcissus mosaic virus (NMV), Scallion virus X (SVX), Pepino mosaic virus (PepMV) and Potato aucuba mosaic virus (PAMV). Different sets of primers were used for the amplification of different regions of the genome through RT-PCR and the amplified genes were cloned in a suitable vector. The full genome of the Indian isolate of CymMV from Phaius tankervilliae shares 96–97% similarity with isolates reported from other countries. It was found that the CP gene of CymMV shares a high similarity with each other and other potexviruses. One of the Indian isolates seems to be a recombinant formed by the intermolecular recombination of two other CymMV isolates. The phylogenetic analyses, Recombination Detection Program (RDP2) analyses and sequence alignment survey provided evidence for the occurrence of a recombination between an Indian isolate (AM055720) as the major parent, and a Korean type-2 isolate (AF016914) as the minor parent. Recombination was also observed between a Singapore isolate (U62963) as the major parent, and a Taiwan CymMV (AY571289) as the minor parent.

  12. Alfalfa mosaic virus replicase proteins, P1 and P2, localize to the tonoplast in the presence of virus RNA.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ibrahim, Amr; Hutchens, Heather M; Berg, R Howard; Loesch-Fries, L Sue

    2012-11-25

    To identify the virus components important for assembly of the Alfalfa mosaic virus replicase complex, we used live cell imaging of Arabidopsis thaliana protoplasts that expressed various virus cDNAs encoding native and GFP-fusion proteins of P1 and P2 replicase proteins and full-length virus RNAs. Expression of P1-GFP alone resulted in fluorescent vesicle-like bodies in the cytoplasm that colocalized with FM4-64, an endocytic marker, and RFP-AtVSR2, RabF2a/Rha1-mCherry, and RabF2b/Ara7-mCherry, all of which localize to multivesicular bodies (MVBs), which are also called prevacuolar compartments, that mediate traffic to the lytic vacuole. GFP-P2 was driven from the cytosol to MVBs when expressed with P1 indicating that P1 recruited GFP-P2. P1-GFP localized on the tonoplast, which surrounds the vacuole, in the presence of infectious virus RNA, replication competent RNA2, or P2 and replication competent RNA1 or RNA3. This suggests that a functional replication complex containing P1, P2, and a full-length AMV RNA assembles on MVBs to traffic to the tonoplast. PMID:22999257

  13. Alfalfa mosaic virus replicase proteins, P1 and P2, localize to the tonoplast in the presence of virus RNA

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ibrahim, Amr [Department of Botany and Plant Pathology, Purdue University, West Lafayette, IN 47907 (United States); Present address: Genomics Facility, Agricultural Genetic Engineering Research Institute, Agricultural Research Center, Giza 12619 (Egypt); Hutchens, Heather M. [Department of Botany and Plant Pathology, Purdue University, West Lafayette, IN 47907 (United States); Howard Berg, R. [Integrated Microscopy Facility, Donald Danforth Plant Science Center, Saint Louis, MO 63132 (United States); Sue Loesch-Fries, L., E-mail: loeschfr@purdue.edu [Department of Botany and Plant Pathology, Purdue University, West Lafayette, IN 47907 (United States)

    2012-11-25

    To identify the virus components important for assembly of the Alfalfa mosaic virus replicase complex, we used live cell imaging of Arabidopsis thaliana protoplasts that expressed various virus cDNAs encoding native and GFP-fusion proteins of P1 and P2 replicase proteins and full-length virus RNAs. Expression of P1-GFP alone resulted in fluorescent vesicle-like bodies in the cytoplasm that colocalized with FM4-64, an endocytic marker, and RFP-AtVSR2, RabF2a/Rha1-mCherry, and RabF2b/Ara7-mCherry, all of which localize to multivesicular bodies (MVBs), which are also called prevacuolar compartments, that mediate traffic to the lytic vacuole. GFP-P2 was driven from the cytosol to MVBs when expressed with P1 indicating that P1 recruited GFP-P2. P1-GFP localized on the tonoplast, which surrounds the vacuole, in the presence of infectious virus RNA, replication competent RNA2, or P2 and replication competent RNA1 or RNA3. This suggests that a functional replication complex containing P1, P2, and a full-length AMV RNA assembles on MVBs to traffic to the tonoplast.

  14. Alfalfa mosaic virus replicase proteins, P1 and P2, localize to the tonoplast in the presence of virus RNA

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    To identify the virus components important for assembly of the Alfalfa mosaic virus replicase complex, we used live cell imaging of Arabidopsis thaliana protoplasts that expressed various virus cDNAs encoding native and GFP-fusion proteins of P1 and P2 replicase proteins and full-length virus RNAs. Expression of P1-GFP alone resulted in fluorescent vesicle-like bodies in the cytoplasm that colocalized with FM4-64, an endocytic marker, and RFP-AtVSR2, RabF2a/Rha1-mCherry, and RabF2b/Ara7-mCherry, all of which localize to multivesicular bodies (MVBs), which are also called prevacuolar compartments, that mediate traffic to the lytic vacuole. GFP-P2 was driven from the cytosol to MVBs when expressed with P1 indicating that P1 recruited GFP-P2. P1-GFP localized on the tonoplast, which surrounds the vacuole, in the presence of infectious virus RNA, replication competent RNA2, or P2 and replication competent RNA1 or RNA3. This suggests that a functional replication complex containing P1, P2, and a full-length AMV RNA assembles on MVBs to traffic to the tonoplast.

  15. Obtenção de plantas de feijão-caupi resistentes ao Cowpea severe mosaic virus e ao Cowpea aphid-borne mosaic virus

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gislanne Brito Barros

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available Dentre os vírus que infectam o feijão-caupi (Vigna unguiculata L. Walp. destacam-se, respectivamente, pela severidade e ampla ocorrência o Cowpea severe mosaic virus (CPSMV e o Cowpea aphid-borne mosaic virus (CABMV. Portanto, objetivaram-se, no presente trabalho, obter e avaliar plantas de feijão-caupi com resistência ao CPSMV e ao CABMV, visando ao desenvolvimento de cultivares essencialmente derivadas e novas cultivares. Realizaram-se oito cruzamentos seguidos de retrocruzamentos, utilizando a linhagem TE 97-309G-9 e a cultivar Patativa como genitores resistentes, e as cultivares BR3-Tracuateua, BRS-Urubuquara, BRS-Novaera, BRS-Guariba e Pretinho como genitores suscetíveis. As gerações F2 e F2RC1 foram desafiadas quanto à resistência por meio de inoculação mecânica com isolados do CPSMV e do CABMV. Nas gerações F2RC1, além da resistência foram avaliados os caracteres: número de dias para o início da floração, comprimento das vagens, número de grãos. vagem-1, peso de cem grãos e produção de grãos.planta-1. Todos os indivíduos F2 e F2RC1 foram analisados pelo teste χ² e se ajustaram à frequência esperada de 15 plantas suscetíveis 1 planta resistente a ambos os vírus. As médias das plantas F2RC1 resistentes, de cada retrocruzamento, foram comparadas com a média do seu respectivo genitor recorrente pelo teste 't' e as médias dos retrocruzamentos foram comparadas pelo teste de Scott-Knott. Foi detectada variabilidade genética entre os retrocruzamentos para todos os caracteres. Todos os retrocruzamentos foram considerados promissores para produção de cultivares essencialmente derivadas resistentes ao CPSMV e ao CABMV e as plantas selecionadas possuem características que possibilitam a seleção de linhagens com grãos de bom padrão comercial e altamente produtivas.

  16. Colour break in reverse bicolour daffodils is associated with the presence of Narcissus mosaic virus

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Davies Kevin M

    2011-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Daffodils (Narcissus pseudonarcissus are one of the world's most popular ornamentals. They also provide a scientific model for studying the carotenoid pigments responsible for their yellow and orange flower colours. In reverse bicolour daffodils, the yellow flower trumpet fades to white with age. The flowers of this type of daffodil are particularly prone to colour break whereby, upon opening, the yellow colour of the perianth is observed to be 'broken' into patches of white. This colour break symptom is characteristic of potyviral infections in other ornamentals such as tulips whose colour break is due to alterations in the presence of anthocyanins. However, reverse bicolour flowers displaying colour break show no other virus-like symptoms such as leaf mottling or plant stunting, leading some to argue that the carotenoid-based colour breaking in reverse bicolour flowers may not be caused by virus infection. Results Although potyviruses have been reported to cause colour break in other flower species, enzyme-linked-immunoassays with an antibody specific to the potyviral family showed that potyviruses were not responsible for the occurrence of colour break in reverse bicolour daffodils. Colour break in this type of daffodil was clearly associated with the presence of large quantities of rod-shaped viral particles of lengths 502-580 nm in tepals. Sap from flowers displaying colour break caused red necrotic lesions on Gomphrena globosa, suggesting the presence of potexvirus. Red necrotic lesions were not observed in this indicator plant when sap from reverse bicolour flowers not showing colour break was used. The reverse transcriptase polymerase reactions using degenerate primers to carla-, potex- and poty-viruses linked viral RNA with colour break and sequencing of the amplified products indicated that the potexvirus Narcissisus mosaic virus was the predominant virus associated with the occurrence of the colour break

  17. Vascular invasion routes and systemic accumulation patterns of tobacco mosaic virus in Nicotiana benthamiana.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cheng, N H; Su, C L; Carter, S A; Nelson, R S

    2000-08-01

    Plant viruses must enter the host vascular system in order to invade the young growing parts of the plant rapidly. Functional entry sites into the leaf vascular system for rapid systemic infection have not been determined for any plant/virus system. Tobacco mosaic virus (TMV) entry into minor, major and transport veins from non-vascular cells of Nicotiana benthamiana in source tissue and its exit from veins in sink tissue was studied using a modified virus expressing green fluorescent protein (GFP). Using a surgical procedure that isolated specific leaf and stem tissues from complicating vascular tissues, we determined that TMV could enter minor, major or transport veins directly from non-vascular cells to produce a systemic infection. TMV first accumulated in abaxial or external phloem-associated cells in major veins and petioles of the inoculated leaf and stems below the inoculated leaf. It also initially accumulated exclusively in internal or adaxial phloem-associated cells in stems above the inoculated leaf and petioles or major veins of sink leaves. This work shows the functional equivalence of vein classes in source leaves for entry of TMV, and the lack of equivalence of vein classes in sink leaves for exit of TMV. Thus, the specialization of major veins for transport rather than loading of photoassimilates in source tissue does not preclude virus entry. During transport, the virus initially accumulates in specific vascular-associated cells, indicating that virus accumulation in this tissue is highly regulated. These findings have important implications for studies on the identification of symplasmic domains and host macromolecule vascular transport. PMID:10929128

  18. Coat protein-mediated resistance against an Indian isolate of the Cucumber mosaic virus subgroup IB in Nicotiana benthamiana

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    A Srivastava; S K Raj

    2008-06-01

    Coat protein (CP)-mediated resistance against an Indian isolate of the Cucumber mosaic virus (CMV) subgroup IB was demonstrated in transgenic lines of Nicotiana benthamiana through Agrobacterium tumefaciens-mediated transformation. Out of the fourteen independently transformed lines developed, two lines were tested for resistance against CMV by challenge inoculations. The transgenic lines exhibiting complete resistance remained symptomless throughout life and showed reduced or no virus accumulation in their systemic leaves after virus challenge. These lines also showed virus resistance against two closely related strains of CMV. This is the first report of CP-mediated transgenic resistance against a CMV subgroup IB member isolated from India.

  19. Advances in alfalfa mosaic virus-mediated expression of anthrax antigen in planta.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brodzik, R; Bandurska, K; Deka, D; Golovkin, M; Koprowski, H

    2005-12-16

    Plant viruses show great potential for production of pharmaceuticals in plants. Such viruses can harbor a small antigenic peptide(s) as a part of their coat proteins (CP) and elicit an antigen-specific immune response. Here, we report the high yield and consistency in production of recombinant alfalfa mosaic virus (AlMV) particles for specific presentation of the small loop 15 amino acid epitope from domain-4 of the Bacillus anthracis protective antigen (PA-D4s). The epitope was inserted immediately after the first 25 N-terminal amino acids of AlMV CP to retain genome activation and binding of CP to viral RNAs. Recombinant AlMV particles were efficiently produced in tobacco, easily purified for immunological analysis, and exhibited extended stability and systemic proliferation in planta. Intraperitional injections of mice with recombinant plant virus particles harboring the PA-D4s epitope elicited a distinct immune response. Western blotting and ELISA analysis showed that sera from immunized mice recognized both native PA antigen and the AlMV CP. PMID:16236249

  20. Advances in alfalfa mosaic virus-mediated expression of anthrax antigen in planta

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Plant viruses show great potential for production of pharmaceuticals in plants. Such viruses can harbor a small antigenic peptide(s) as a part of their coat proteins (CP) and elicit an antigen-specific immune response. Here, we report the high yield and consistency in production of recombinant alfalfa mosaic virus (AlMV) particles for specific presentation of the small loop 15 amino acid epitope from domain-4 of the Bacillus anthracis protective antigen (PA-D4s). The epitope was inserted immediately after the first 25 N-terminal amino acids of AlMV CP to retain genome activation and binding of CP to viral RNAs. Recombinant AlMV particles were efficiently produced in tobacco, easily purified for immunological analysis, and exhibited extended stability and systemic proliferation in planta. Intraperitional injections of mice with recombinant plant virus particles harboring the PA-D4s epitope elicited a distinct immune response. Western blotting and ELISA analysis showed that sera from immunized mice recognized both native PA antigen and the AlMV CP

  1. Comparative molecular epidemiology provides new insights into Zucchini yellow mosaic virus occurrence in France.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lecoq, H; Wipf-Scheibel, C; Nozeran, K; Millot, P; Desbiez, C

    2014-06-24

    Zucchini yellow mosaic virus (ZYMV, genus Potyvirus) causes important crop losses in cucurbits worldwide. In France, ZYMV epidemics are sporadic but occasionally very severe. This contrasts with Watermelon mosaic virus (WMV, genus Potyvirus) which causes regular and early epidemics. Factors influencing ZYMV epidemiology are still poorly understood. In order to gain new insights on the ecology and epidemiology of this virus, a 5-year multilocation trial was conducted in which ZYMV spread and populations were studied in each of the 20 plot/year combinations and compared with WMV. Search for ZYMV alternative hosts was conducted by testing weeds growing naturally around one plot and also by checking ZYMV natural infections in selected ornamental species. Although similar ZYMV populations were observed occasionally in the same plot in two successive years suggesting the occurrence of overwintering hosts nearby, only two Lamium amplexicaule plants were found to be infected by ZYMV of 3459 weed samples that were tested. The scarcity of ZYMV reservoirs contrasts with the frequent detection of WMV in the same samples. Since ZYMV and WMV have many aphid vectors in common and are transmitted with similar efficiencies, the differences observed in ZYMV and WMV reservoir abundances could be a major explanatory factor for the differences observed in the typology of ZYMV and WMV epidemics in France. Other potential ZYMV alternative hosts have been identified in ornamental species including begonia. Although possible in a few cases, exchanges of populations between different plots located from 500 m to 4 km apart seem uncommon. Therefore, the potential dissemination range of ZYMV by its aphid vectors seems to be rather limited in a fragmented landscape. PMID:24486486

  2. Complete Genome Sequence of Chinese Yam Necrotic Mosaic Virus from Dioscorea opposita in the Republic of Korea.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Joong-Hwan; Son, Chang-Gi; Kwon, Joong-Bae; Nam, Hyo-Hun; Kim, Yeongtae; Lee, Su-Heon; Zhao, Fumei; Moon, Jae Sun

    2016-08-04

    The complete genome sequence of Chinese yam necrotic mosaic virus (ChYNMV) consisting of 8,213 nucleotides containing one open reading frame was determined by the transcriptome data generated from Discorea opposita This is the first report of the complete nucleotide sequence of ChYNMV from Dioscorea opposita in the Republic of Korea.

  3. The location of coat protein and viral RNAs of alfalfa mosaic virus in infected tobacco leaves and protoplasts

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Pelt-Heerschap, H. van; Verbeek, H.; Slot, J.W.; Vloten-Doting, L. van

    1987-01-01

    The location of coat protein of alfalfa mosaic virus (AIMV) strain 425 was determined in protoplasts isolated from infected tobacco leaves and in in vitro inoculated tobacco protoplasts, using immunocytochemistry on ultrathin frozen sections labeled with colloidal gold. In infected tobacco leaves 5

  4. Introgression of chromosome segments from multiple alien species in wheat breeding lines with wheat streak mosaic virus resistance

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pyramiding of alien-derived Wheat streak mosaic virus (WSMV) resistance and resistance enhancing genes in wheat is a costeffective and environmentally safe strategy for disease control. PCR-based markers and cytogenetic analysis with genomic in situ hybridisation were applied to identify alien chrom...

  5. Molecular cloning and expression of full-length DNA copies of the genomic RNAs of cowpea mosaic virus.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Vos, P.A.J.

    1987-01-01

    The experiments described in this thesis were designed to unravel various aspects of the mechanism of gene expression of cowpea mosaic virus (CPMV). For this purpose full-length DNA copies of both genomic RNAs of CPMV were constructed. Using powerful invitro transcription systems RNA t

  6. Detection of cucumber green mottle mosaic virus-infected watermelon seeds using short wave infrared (SWIR) hyperspectral imaging system

    Science.gov (United States)

    The cucurbit diseases caused by cucumber green mottle mosaic virus (CGMMV) have led to a serious problem to growers and seed producers because it is difficult to prevent spreading through causal agent of seeds. Conventional detection methods for infected seed such as a biological, serological, and m...

  7. Cross-protection or enhanced symptom display in greenhouse tomato co-infected with different Pepino mosaic virus isolates

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hanssen, I.M.; Gutiérrez-Aguirre, I.; Paeleman, A.; Goen, K.; Wittemans, L.; Lievens, B.; Vanachter, A.C.R.C.; Ravnikar, M.; Thomma, B.P.H.J.

    2010-01-01

    The potential of three mild Pepino mosaic virus (PepMV) isolates, belonging to the CH2, EU and LP genotypes, to protect a tomato (Solanum lycopersicum) crop against an aggressive challenge isolate of the CH2 genotype was assessed in greenhouse trials and PepMV symptoms were rated at regular time poi

  8. A high throughput barley stripe mosaic virus vector for virus induced gene silencing in monocots and dicots.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cheng Yuan

    Full Text Available Barley stripe mosaic virus (BSMV is a single-stranded RNA virus with three genome components designated alpha, beta, and gamma. BSMV vectors have previously been shown to be efficient virus induced gene silencing (VIGS vehicles in barley and wheat and have provided important information about host genes functioning during pathogenesis as well as various aspects of genes functioning in development. To permit more effective use of BSMV VIGS for functional genomics experiments, we have developed an Agrobacterium delivery system for BSMV and have coupled this with a ligation independent cloning (LIC strategy to mediate efficient cloning of host genes. Infiltrated Nicotiana benthamiana leaves provided excellent sources of virus for secondary BSMV infections and VIGS in cereals. The Agro/LIC BSMV VIGS vectors were able to function in high efficiency down regulation of phytoene desaturase (PDS, magnesium chelatase subunit H (ChlH, and plastid transketolase (TK gene silencing in N. benthamiana and in the monocots, wheat, barley, and the model grass, Brachypodium distachyon. Suppression of an Arabidopsis orthologue cloned from wheat (TaPMR5 also interfered with wheat powdery mildew (Blumeria graminis f. sp. tritici infections in a manner similar to that of the A. thaliana PMR5 loss-of-function allele. These results imply that the PMR5 gene has maintained similar functions across monocot and dicot families. Our BSMV VIGS system provides substantial advantages in expense, cloning efficiency, ease of manipulation and ability to apply VIGS for high throughput genomics studies.

  9. Recombination and population mosaic of a multifunctional viral gene, adeno-associated virus cap.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yasuhiro Takeuchi

    Full Text Available Homologous recombination is a dominant force in evolution and results in genetic mosaics. To detect evidence of recombination events and assess the biological significance of genetic mosaics, genome sequences for various viral populations of reasonably large size are now available in the GenBank. We studied a multi-functional viral gene, the adeno-associated virus (AAV cap gene, which codes for three capsid proteins, VP1, VP2 and VP3. VP1-3 share a common C-terminal domain corresponding to VP3, which forms the viral core structure, while the VP1 unique N-terminal part contains an enzymatic domain with phospholipase A2 activity. Our recombinant detection program (RecI revealed five novel recombination events, four of which have their cross-over points in the N-terminal, VP1 and VP2 unique region. Comparison of phylogenetic trees for different cap gene regions confirmed discordant phylogenies for the recombinant sequences. Furthermore, differences in the phylogenetic tree structures for the VP1 unique (VP1u region and the rest of cap highlighted the mosaic nature of cap gene in the AAV population: two dominant forms of VP1u sequences were identified and these forms are linked to diverse sequences in the rest of cap gene. This observation together with the finding of frequent recombination in the VP1 and 2 unique regions suggests that this region is a recombination hot spot. Recombination events in this region preserve protein blocks of distinctive functions and contribute to convergence in VP1u and divergence of the rest of cap. Additionally the possible biological significance of two dominant VP1u forms is inferred.

  10. Development of a concentration method for detection of tobacco mosaic virus in irrigation water

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Wei Chen; Wenting Liu; Honghong Jiao; Huawei Zhang; Julong Cheng; Yunfeng Wu

    2014-01-01

    Tobacco mosaic virus (TMV) causes significant yield loss in susceptible crops irrigated with contaminated water. However, detection of TMV in water is difficult owing to extremely low concentrations of the virus. Here, we developed a simple method for the detection and quantiifcation of TMV in irrigation water. TMV was reliably detected at concentrations as low as 10 viral copies/µL with real-time PCR. The sensitivity of detection was further improved using polyethylene glycol 6000 (PEG6000, MW 6000) to concentrate TMV from water samples. Among the 28 samples from Shaanxi Province examined with our method, 17 were tested positive after virus concentration. Infectivity of TMV in the original water sample as well as after concentration was conifrmed using PCR. The limiting concentration of TMV in water to re-infect plants was determined as 102 viral copies/mL. The method developed in this study offers a novel approach to detect TMV in irrigation water, and may provide an effective tool to control crop infection.

  11. Development of a lateral-flow assay (LFA) for rapid detection of Soybean mosaic virus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, Min; Zhang, Wen-Na; Tian, Jin-Yan; Zhao, Wen-Yang; Chen, Zheng-Qiang; Sun, Li-Hua; Xue, Fan; Liu, Yong; Tan, Xin-Qiu; Wang, Li-Min; Liu, Feng-Quan; Tao, Xiao-Rong

    2016-09-01

    Soybean mosaic virus (SMV) is the most common virus in soybean and poses a serious threat to crop production and germplasm recession in many countries worldwide. In this study, a highly practical and rapid lateral-flow assay (LFA) was developed for the detection of SMV. The SMV coat protein (CP) was prokaryotically expressed and purified to immunize mice. After generation of hybridoma cell lines, four anti-SMV monoclonal antibodies were selected. The LFA-strip was then assembled using a double-antibody sandwich strategy. When the SMV-infected leaf sample was assayed using the assembled LFA-strip, the positive pink color appeared in the test line within 5-10min. The strip only gave positive results with SMV and not other viruses tested and could be used to detect 800 fold dilutions of infected leaf samples. The LFA could be used to detect SMV in infected leaf tissue as well as soybean seeds. To our knowledge, this is the first report of the development of a LFA for the detection of SMV. The practical, rapid and specific assay that was developed in this study can be widely applied to the diagnosis and surveillance of SMV in the laboratory and the field. PMID:27235541

  12. Isolation and characterization of ZH14 with antiviral activity against Tobacco mosaic virus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Wen-Wen; Zhang, Li-Xiang; Zhang, Bin; Wang, Fei; Liang, Zhi-Hong; Niu, Tian-Gui

    2008-06-01

    A large number of bacteria were isolated from plant samples and screened for antiviral activity against the Tobacco mosaic virus (TMV). The bacterium ZH14, which was isolated from Chinese Anxi oolong tea, secreted the antiviral substances, having 94.2% virus inhibition when the bacterial culture filtrate and TMV extract were mixed at a ratio of 1:1. The ZH14 strain is a gram-positive, spore-forming rod and has the ability to degrade ribonucleic acid. Based on its effectiveness on virus inhibition, ZH14 was selected for characterization and was identified as a strain of the Bacillus cereus group based on phenotypic tests and comparative analysis of its 16S rDNA sequence. At the same time, we determined the antiviral product of ZH14 as an extracellular protein with high molecular mass, having an optimum temperature of 15-60 degrees C and an optimum pH of 6-10. Hence, the ZH14 strain and its culture filtrate have potential application in controlling plant diseases caused by TMV.

  13. DNA methylation polymorphism in flue-cured tobacco and candidate markers for tobacco mosaic virus resistance

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Jie-hong ZHAO; Ji-shun ZHANG; Yi WANG; Ren-gang WANG; Chun WU; Long-jiang FAN; Xue-liang REN

    2011-01-01

    DNA methylation plays an important role in the epigenetic regulation of gene expression during plant growth,development,and polyploidization.However,there is still no distinct evidence in tobacco regarding the distribution of the methylation pattern and whether it contributes to qualitative characteristics.We studied the levels and patterns of methylation polymorphism at CCGG sites in 48 accessions of allotetraploid flue-cured tobacco,Nicotiana tabacum,using a methylation-sensitive amplified polymorphism (MSAP) technique.The results showed that methylation existed at a high level among tobacco accessions,among which 49.3% sites were methylated and 69.9% allelic sites were polymorphic.A cluster analysis revealed distinct patterns of geography-specific groups.In addition,three polymorphic sites significantly related to tobacco mosaic virus (TMV) resistance were explored.This suggests that tobacco breeders should pay more attention to epigenetic traits.

  14. Stimulated low-frequency Raman scattering in a suspension of tobacco mosaic virus

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karpova, O. V.; Kudryavtseva, A. D.; Lednev, V. N.; Mironova, T. V.; Oshurko, V. B.; Pershin, S. M.; Petrova, E. K.; Tcherniega, N. V.; Zemskov, K. I.

    2016-08-01

    The interaction of laser pulses with tobacco mosaic virus (TMV) in Tris-HCl pH7.5 buffer and in water has been investigated. Ruby laser pulses of 20 ns duration have been used for excitation. The spectrum of the light passing through the sample was registered with the help of a Fabry-Perot interferometer. In the case of TMV in water we observed in the spectrum only one line of the exciting laser light, but for TMV in Tris-HCl pH7.5 buffer a second line appeared, corresponding to stimulated low-frequency Raman scattering (SLFRS) on the breathing radial mode of TMV. The frequency shift of the SLFRS by 2 cm-1 (60 GHz), the conversion efficiency and the threshold are measured for the first time to the best of our knowledge.

  15. Stimulated low-frequency Raman scattering in tobacco mosaic virus suspension

    CERN Document Server

    Karpova, O V; Lednev, V N; Mironova, T V; Oshurko, V B; Pershin, S M; Petrova, E K; Tcherniega, N V; Zemskov, K I

    2016-01-01

    Laser pulses interaction with tobacco mosaic virus (TMV) in Tris-HCl pH7.5 buffer and in water has been investigated. 20 ns ruby laser pulses have been used for excitation. Spectrum of the light passing through the sample was registered with the help of Fabri-Perot interferometer. In the case of TMV in water we observed in the spectrum only one line of the exciting laser light, for TMV in Tris-HCl pH7.5 buffer second line appeared, corresponding to the stimulated low-frequency Raman scattering (SLFRS) on the breathing radial mode of TMV. SLFRS frequency shift by 2 cm-1, (60 GHz), conversion efficiency and threshold are measured for the first time to the best of our knowledge.

  16. Nucleotide sequence of maize dwarf mosaic virus capsid protein gene and its expression in Escherichia coli

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    赛吉庆; 康良仪; 黄忠; 史春霖; 田波; 谢友菊

    1995-01-01

    The 3’-terminal 1 279 nucleotide sequence of maize dwarf mosaic virus (MDMV) genome has been determined. This sequence contains an open reading frame of 1023 nudeotides and a 3’ -non-coding region of 256 nucleotides. The open reading frame includes all of the coding regions for the viral capsid protein (CP) and part of the viral nuclear inclusion protein (Nib). The predicted viral CP consists of 313 amino acid residues with a calculated molecular weight of 35400. The amino acid sequence of the viral CP derived from MDMV cDNA shows about 47%-54% homology to that of 4 other potyviruses. The viral CP gene was constructed in frame with the lacZ gene in pUC19 plasmid and expressed in E. coli cells. The fusion polypeptide positively reacted in Western blot with an antiserum prepared against the native viral CP.

  17. Solid flexible electrochemical supercapacitor using Tobacco mosaic virus nanostructures and ALD ruthenium oxide

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gnerlich, M.; Pomerantseva, E.; Gregorczyk, K.; Ketchum, D.; Rubloff, G.; Ghodssi, R.

    2013-11-01

    An all-solid electrochemical supercapacitor has been developed using a nanostructured nickel and titanium nitride template that is coated with ruthenium oxide by atomic layer deposition (ALD). The electrode morphology was based on a high surface area biotemplate of genetically modified Tobacco mosaic virus. The biotemplate automatically self-assembles at room temperature in aqueous solution. Nafion® perfluorosulfonate ionomer dispersion was cast on the electrodes and used as a solid proton-conducting electrolyte. A 5.8 F g-1 gravimetric capacity (578 µF cm-2 based on footprint) was achieved in Nafion electrolyte, and the device retained 80% of its capacity after 25 000 cycles. The technology presented here will enable thin, solid, flexible supercapacitors that are compatible with standard microfabrication techniques.

  18. Inheritance of resistance to Pepper yellow mosaic virus in Capsicum baccatum var. pendulum.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bento, C S; Rodrigues, R; Gonçalves, L S A; Oliveira, H S; Santos, M H; Pontes, M C; Sudré, C P

    2013-01-01

    We investigated inheritance of resistance to Pepper yellow mosaic virus (PepYMV) in Capsicum baccatum var. pendulum accessions UENF 1616 (susceptible) crossed with UENF 1732 (resistant). Plants from generations P1, P2, F1, F2, BC1:1, and BC1:2 were inoculated and the symptoms were evaluated for 25 days. Subsequently, an area under the disease progress curve was calculated and subjected to generation means analysis. Only the average and epistatic effects were significant. The broad and narrow sense heritability estimates were 35.52 and 21.79%, respectively. The estimate of the minimum number of genes that control resistance was 7, indicating that resistance is polygenic and complex. Thus, methods to produce segregant populations that advocate selection in more advanced generations would be the most appropriate to produce chili pepper cultivars resistant to PepYMV. PMID:23661433

  19. Solid flexible electrochemical supercapacitor using Tobacco mosaic virus nanostructures and ALD ruthenium oxide

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    An all-solid electrochemical supercapacitor has been developed using a nanostructured nickel and titanium nitride template that is coated with ruthenium oxide by atomic layer deposition (ALD). The electrode morphology was based on a high surface area biotemplate of genetically modified Tobacco mosaic virus. The biotemplate automatically self-assembles at room temperature in aqueous solution. Nafion® perfluorosulfonate ionomer dispersion was cast on the electrodes and used as a solid proton-conducting electrolyte. A 5.8 F g−1 gravimetric capacity (578 µF cm−2 based on footprint) was achieved in Nafion electrolyte, and the device retained 80% of its capacity after 25 000 cycles. The technology presented here will enable thin, solid, flexible supercapacitors that are compatible with standard microfabrication techniques. (paper)

  20. RNA-controlled assembly of tobacco mosaic virus-derived complex structures: from nanoboomerangs to tetrapods

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eber, Fabian J.; Eiben, Sabine; Jeske, Holger; Wege, Christina

    2014-11-01

    The in vitro assembly of artificial nanotubular nucleoprotein shapes based on tobacco mosaic virus-(TMV-)-derived building blocks yielded different spatial organizations of viral coat protein subunits on genetically engineered RNA molecules, containing two or multiple TMV origins of assembly (OAs). The growth of kinked nanoboomerangs as well as of branched multipods was determined by the encapsidated RNAs. A largely simultaneous initiation at two origins and subsequent bidirectional tube elongation could be visualized by transmission electron microscopy of intermediates and final products. Collision of the nascent tubes' ends produced angular particles with well-defined arm lengths. RNAs with three to five OAs generated branched multipods with a maximum of four arms. The potential of such an RNA-directed self-assembly of uncommon nanotubular architectures for the fabrication of complex multivalent nanotemplates used in functional hybrid materials is discussed.

  1. Diterpene alkaloids and diterpenes from Spiraea japonica and their anti-tobacco mosaic virus activity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ma, Yuan; Mao, Xin-Ying; Huang, Lie-Jun; Fan, Yi-Min; Gu, Wei; Yan, Chen; Huang, Tao; Zhang, Jian-Xin; Yuan, Chun-Mao; Hao, Xiao-Jiang

    2016-03-01

    Five new naturally occurring natural products, including two atisine-type diterpene alkaloids (1 and 2), two atisane-type diterpenes (3 and 4), and a new natural product spiramine C2 (5), along with nine known ones (6-14), were isolated from the ethanolic extracts of the whole plant of Spiraea japonica var. acuminata Franch. Their structures were elucidated by extensive spectroscopic analysis. The anti-tobacco mosaic virus (TMV) activities of all the compounds were evaluated by the conventional half-leaf method. Six compounds (2, 3, 6, 7, 11, and 12) exhibited moderate activities at 100 μg/mL with inhibition rates in the range of 69.4-92.9%, which were higher than that of the positive control, ningnanmycin. Their preliminary structure-activity relationships were also discussed.

  2. Peptide nanospheres self-assembled from a modified β-annulus peptide of Sesbania mosaic virus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matsuura, Kazunori; Mizuguchi, Yusaku; Kimizuka, Nobuo

    2016-11-01

    A novel β-annulus peptide of Sesbania mosaic virus bearing an FKFE sequence at the C terminus was synthesized, and its self-assembling behavior in water was investigated. Dynamic light scattering and transmission electron microscopy showed that the β-annulus peptide bearing an FKFE sequence self-assembled into approximately 30 nm nanospheres in water at pH 3.8, whereas the β-annulus peptide without the FKFE sequence afforded only irregular aggregates. The peptide nanospheres possessed a definite critical aggregation concentration (CAC = 26 μM), above which the size of nanospheres were nearly unaffected by the peptide concentration. The formation of peptide nanospheres was significantly affected by pH; the peptide did not form any assemblies at pH 2.2, whereas larger aggregates were formed at pH 6.4-11.6. © 2015 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. Biopolymers (Pept Sci) 106: 470-475, 2016. PMID:26573103

  3. Biphenyls from the Twigs of Garcinia multiflora and their AntiTobacco Mosaic Virus Activities

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xingmeng Xu

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available For more bioactive compounds, p hytochemical investigations of the acetone extract of the twigs G arcinia multiflora resulted in the isolation of two new bipheny ls, multiflorabiphenyls A and B (1 and 2 , along with four known biphenyl derivatives (3-6 . Structural elucidations of 1 and 2 were performed by spectral methods such as 1D and 2D NMR spectroscopy, in addition to high resolution mass spectrometry. Compounds 1 and 2 were also evaluated for their anti-tobacco mosaic virus (Anti-TMV activity. The results showed that compound s 1 and 2 showed high anti-TMV activit ies with inhibition rate s of 25.4 % and 28.3%, respectively, which is close d to that of Ningnanmycin ( 3 3.5 %.

  4. Metabolome of Vanilla planifolia (Orchidaceae) and related species under Cymbidium mosaic virus (CymMV) infection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Palama, Tony Lionel; Grisoni, Michel; Fock-Bastide, Isabelle; Jade, Katia; Bartet, Laetitia; Choi, Young Hae; Verpoorte, Robert; Kodja, Hippolyte

    2012-11-01

    The genus Vanilla which belongs to the Orchidaceae family comprises more than 110 species of which two are commercially cultivated (Vanilla planifolia and Vanilla xtahitensis). The cured pods of these species are the source of natural vanilla flavor. In intensive cultivation systems the vines are threatened by viruses such as Cymbidium mosaic virus (CymMV). In order to investigate the effect of CymMV on the growth and metabolome of vanilla plants, four accessions grown in intensive cultivation systems under shadehouse, CR01 (V. planifolia), CR17 (V. xtahitensis), CR03 (V. planifolia × V. xtahitensis) and CR18 (Vanilla pompona), were challenged with an isolate of CymMV. CymMV infected plants of CR01, CR03 and CR17 had a reduced growth compared to healthy plants, while there was no significant difference in the growth of CR18 vines. Interestingly, CR18 had qualitatively more phenolic compounds in leaves and a virus titre that diminished over time. No differences in the metabolomic profiles of the shadehouse samples obtained by nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) were observed between the virus infected vs. healthy plants. However, using in- vitro V. planifolia plants, the metabolomic profiles were affected by virus infection. Under these controlled conditions the levels of amino acids and sugars present in the leaves were increased in CymMV infected plants, compared to uninfected ones, whereas the levels of phenolic compounds and malic acid were decreased. The metabolism, growth and viral status of V. pompona accession CR18 contrasted from that of the other species suggesting the existence of partial resistance to CymMV in the vanilla germplasm.

  5. Paenibacillus lentimorbus Inoculation Enhances Tobacco Growth and Extenuates the Virulence of Cucumber mosaic virus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kumar, Susheel; Chauhan, Puneet Singh; Agrawal, Lalit; Raj, Rashmi; Srivastava, Ashish; Gupta, Swati; Mishra, Shashank Kumar; Yadav, Sumit; Singh, Poonam C; Raj, Shri Krishna; Nautiyal, Chandra Shekhar

    2016-01-01

    Previous studies with Paenibacillus lentimorbus B-30488" (hereafter referred as B-30488), a plant growth promoting rhizobacteria (PGPR) isolated from cow's milk, revealed its capabilities to improve plant quality under normal and stress conditions. Present study investigates its potential as a biocontrol agent against an economically important virus, Cucumber mosaic virus (CMV), in Nicotiana tabacum cv. White Burley plants and delineates the physical, biophysical, biochemical and molecular perturbations due to the trilateral interactions of PGPR-host-CMV. Soil inoculation of B-30488 enhanced the plant vigor while significantly decreased the virulence and virus RNA accumulation by ~12 fold (91%) in systemic leaves of CMV infected tobacco plants as compared to the control ones. Histology of these leaves revealed the improved tissue's health and least aging signs in B-30488 inoculated tobacco plants, with or without CMV infection, and showed lesser intercellular spaces between collenchyma cells, reduced amount of xyloglucans and pectins in connecting primary cells, and higher polyphenol accumulation in hypodermis layer extending to collenchyma cells. B-30488 inoculation has favorably maneuvered the essential biophysical (ion leakage and photosynthetic efficiency) and biochemical (sugar, proline, chlorophyll, malondialdehyde, acid phosphatase and alkaline phosphatase) attributes of tobacco plants to positively regulate and release the virus stress. Moreover, activities of defense related enzymes (ascorbate peroxidase, guaiacol peroxidase, superoxide dismutase and catalase) induced due to CMV-infection were ameliorated with inoculation of B-30488, suggesting systemic induced resistance mediated protection against CMV in tobacco. The quantitative RT-PCR analyses of the genes related to normal plant development, stress and pathogenesis also corroborate well with the biochemical data and revealed the regulation (either up or down) of these genes in favor of plant to combat

  6. Human T-cell Lymphotropic Virus Type-1 (HTLV-1)-associated Bronchioloalveolar Disorder Presenting with Mosaic Perfusion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yamakawa, Hideaki; Yoshida, Masahiro; Yabe, Masami; Ishikawa, Takeo; Takagi, Masamichi; Tanoue, Susumu; Sano, Koji; Nishiwaki, Kaichi; Sato, Shun; Shimizu, Yoshihiko; Kuwano, Kazuyoshi

    2015-01-01

    Human T-cell lymphotropic virus type-1 (HTLV-1)-associated bronchioloalveolar disorder (HABA) is a specific state with chronic and progressive respiratory symptoms caused by bronchiolar or alveolar disorder characterized by smoldering adult T-cell leukemia or the HTLV-I carrier state. We herein report a rare case of HABA with an initial presentation of mosaic perfusion in the lung. The diagnosis was made according to the results of a flow cytometry analysis of the bronchoalveolar lavage fluid and pathological findings. Clinicians must be careful to recognize that mosaic perfusion may be a radiological finding of HABA. PMID:26631889

  7. Spatio-temporal expression of miRNAs in tomato tissues upon Cucumber mosaic virus and Tomato aspermy virus infections

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Junli Feng; Xin Liu; Leiyu Lai; Jishuang Chen

    2011-01-01

    MicroRNAs (miRNAs) play vital roles in regulating plant growth and development. Recent work has shown that miRNA-mediated regulation of cellular mRNA expression is involved in pathogen-host interactions. However, knowledge about the timing and spatial regulation of plant miRNA expression is still limited. Here, we use stem-loop real-time reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction to quantify the expression changes of seven miRNAs and their target mRNAs in different tomato tissues during the pathogenic processes. Compared with mock-inoculated plants, the expression levels of investigated miRNAs and mRNAs were enhanced by different degrees upon Cucumber mosaic virus (CMV)-Fny and Tomato aspermy virus-Bj infections, but were almost unchanged in CMV-FnyA2b (a CMV-Fny 2b-deletion mutant)-infected tomato seedlings. In addition, the obvious up-regulation of several miRNAs and target mRNAs in some tomato tissues suggested their special roles in these tissues' organogenesis and development. Temporal analyses also revealed that the expressions of these miRNAs and mRNAs were highly regulated by different viral infections. Taken together, the observed spatially and temporally changes in miRNAs and target mRNAs expression levels indicate the abilities of different viruses to interfere with miRNA pathway, and are correlated with their respective functions in phenotype determination in different tomato tissues.

  8. Synergistic interaction between the Potyvirus, Turnip mosaic virus and the Crinivirus, Lettuce infectious yellows virus in plants and protoplasts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Jinbo; Turina, Massimo; Medina, Vicente; Falk, Bryce W

    2009-09-01

    Lettuce infectious yellows virus (LIYV), the type member of the genus Crinivirus in the family Closteroviridae, is specifically transmitted by the sweet potato whitefly (Bemisia tabaci) in a semipersistent manner. LIYV infections result in a low virus titer in plants and protoplasts, impeding reverse genetic efforts to analyze LIYV gene/protein functions. We found that synergistic interactions occurred in mixed infections of LIYV and Turnip mosaic virus (TuMV) in Nicotiana benthamiana plants, and these resulted in enhanced accumulation of LIYV. Furthermore, we examined the ability of transgenic plants and protoplasts expressing only the TuMV P1/HC-Pro sequence to enhance the accumulation of LIYV. LIYV RNA and protein titers increased by as much as 8-fold in these plants and protoplasts relative to control plants. LIYV infections remained phloem-limited in P1/HC-Pro transgenic plants, suggesting that enhanced accumulation of LIYV in these plants was due primarily to increased replication efficiency, not to greater spread.

  9. Amino acid substitutions of cysteine residues near the amino terminus of Wheat streak mosaic virus HC-Pro abolishes virus transmission by the wheat curl mite

    Science.gov (United States)

    The amino-terminal half of HC-Pro of Wheat streak mosaic virus (WSMV) is required for semi-persistent transmission by the wheat curl mite (Aceria tosichella Keifer). The amino-proximal region of WSMV HC-Pro is cysteine-rich with a zinc finger-like motif. Amino acid substitutions were made in this re...

  10. Novel roles for well-known players: from tobacco mosaic virus pests to enzymatically active assemblies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koch, Claudia; Eber, Fabian J; Azucena, Carlos; Förste, Alexander; Walheim, Stefan; Schimmel, Thomas; Bittner, Alexander M; Jeske, Holger; Gliemann, Hartmut; Eiben, Sabine; Geiger, Fania C; Wege, Christina

    2016-01-01

    The rod-shaped nanoparticles of the widespread plant pathogen tobacco mosaic virus (TMV) have been a matter of intense debates and cutting-edge research for more than a hundred years. During the late 19th century, their behavior in filtration tests applied to the agent causing the 'plant mosaic disease' eventually led to the discrimination of viruses from bacteria. Thereafter, they promoted the development of biophysical cornerstone techniques such as electron microscopy and ultracentrifugation. Since the 1950s, the robust, helically arranged nucleoprotein complexes consisting of a single RNA and more than 2100 identical coat protein subunits have enabled molecular studies which have pioneered the understanding of viral replication and self-assembly, and elucidated major aspects of virus-host interplay, which can lead to agronomically relevant diseases. However, during the last decades, TMV has acquired a new reputation as a well-defined high-yield nanotemplate with multivalent protein surfaces, allowing for an ordered high-density presentation of multiple active molecules or synthetic compounds. Amino acid side chains exposed on the viral coat may be tailored genetically or biochemically to meet the demands for selective conjugation reactions, or to directly engineer novel functionality on TMV-derived nanosticks. The natural TMV size (length: 300 nm) in combination with functional ligands such as peptides, enzymes, dyes, drugs or inorganic materials is advantageous for applications ranging from biomedical imaging and therapy approaches over surface enlargement of battery electrodes to the immobilization of enzymes. TMV building blocks are also amenable to external control of in vitro assembly and re-organization into technically expedient new shapes or arrays, which bears a unique potential for the development of 'smart' functional 3D structures. Among those, materials designed for enzyme-based biodetection layouts, which are routinely applied, e.g., for

  11. In vitro transcripts of wild-type and fluorescent protein-tagged triticum mosaic virus (family potyviridae) are biologically active in wheat

    Science.gov (United States)

    Triticum mosaic virus (TriMV) (genus Poacevirus, family Potyviridae) is a recently described eriophyid mite-transmitted wheat virus. In vitro RNA transcripts generated from full-length cDNA clones of TriMV proved infectious on wheat, and the progeny virus was efficiently transmitted by wheat curl m...

  12. Peroxidase is involved in Pepper yellow mosaic virus resistance in Capsicum baccatum var. pendulum.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gonçalves, L S A; Rodrigues, R; Diz, M S S; Robaina, R R; do Amaral Júnior, A T; Carvalho, A O; Gomes, V M

    2013-01-01

    Pathogenesis-related proteins (PRs) are among the defense mechanisms of plants that work as an important barrier to the development of pathogens. These proteins are classified into 17 families according to their amino acid sequences, serology, and/or biological or enzyme activity. The present study aimed to identify PRs associated with the pathosystem of Capsicum baccatum var. pendulum: Pepper yellow mosaic virus (PepYMV). Forty-five-day-old plants from accession UENF 1624, previously identified as resistant to PepYMV, were inoculated with the virus. Control and infected leaves were collected for analysis after 24, 48, 72, and 96 h. The inoculated and control plants were grown in cages covered with anti-aphid screens. Proteins were extracted from leaf tissue and the presence of β-1,3-glucanase, chitinase, peroxidase, and lipid transport protein was verified. No difference was observed between the protein pattern of control and infected plants when β-1,3-glucanase, chitinase, and lipid transport protein were compared. However, increased peroxidase expression was observed in infected plants at 48 and 72 h after inoculation, indicating that this PR is involved in the response of resistance to PepYMV in C. baccatum var. pendulum. PMID:23661464

  13. Cauliflower mosaic virus produces an aspartic proteinase to cleave its polyproteins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Torruella, M; Gordon, K; Hohn, T

    1989-10-01

    Cauliflower mosaic virus (CaMV), a plant pararetrovirus, produces polyproteins from its adjacent genes for the coat protein (ORF IV) and for enzymatic functions (ORF V). The N-terminal domain of the latter gene includes a sequence showing homology to the active site of other retroviral and acid proteases. We have now shown that this domain does indeed produce a functional aspartic protease that can process both the polyproteins. Mutations in the putative active site abolished virus infectivity. In transient expression studies in protoplasts, the N-terminal domain of ORF V was able to free active CAT enzyme from a precursor containing an N-terminal fusion of a portion of ORF IV. The junction between the two domains of this artificial polyprotein comprised sequences from the ORF IV product that had previously been shown to include a proteolytic processing site. The protease mutants were not able to free active CAT enzyme from this precursor. Direct analysis of cleavage at the same site in the ORF IV product using proteins expressed in Escherichia coli revealed the expected products. In vitro translation of a synthetic transcript covering ORF V was used to study the autocatalytic cleavage of the ORF product. Pulse-chase experiments showed that the 80 kd initial translation product was processed to yield a N-terminal doublet of polypeptides of 22 and 20 kd apparent mol. wt, which cover the protease domain. The mutants in the active site were not processed. PMID:2684630

  14. Foxtail Mosaic Virus-Induced Gene Silencing in Monocot Plants1[OPEN

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Na; Xie, Ke; Jia, Qi; Zhao, Jinping; Chen, Tianyuan; Li, Huangai; Wei, Xiang; Diao, Xianmin; Hong, Yiguo

    2016-01-01

    Virus-induced gene silencing (VIGS) is a powerful technique to study gene function in plants. However, very few VIGS vectors are available for monocot plants. Here we report that Foxtail mosaic virus (FoMV) can be engineered as an effective VIGS system to induce efficient silencing of endogenous genes in monocot plants including barley (Hordeum vulgare L.), wheat (Triticum aestivum) and foxtail millet (Setaria italica). This is evidenced by FoMV-based silencing of phytoene desaturase (PDS) and magnesium chelatase in barley, of PDS and Cloroplastos alterados1 in foxtail millet and wheat, and of an additional gene IspH in foxtail millet. Silencing of these genes resulted in photobleached or chlorosis phenotypes in barley, wheat, and foxtail millet. Furthermore, our FoMV-based gene silencing is the first VIGS system reported for foxtail millet, an important C4 model plant. It may provide an efficient toolbox for high-throughput functional genomics in economically important monocot crops. PMID:27225900

  15. The importance of alfalfa mosaic virus coat protein dimers in the initiation of replication.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Choi, Jiwon; Kim, Bong-Suk; Zhao, Xiaoxia; Loesch-Fries, Sue

    2003-01-01

    Deletion and substitution mutations affecting the oligomerization of alfalfa mosaic virus (AMV) coat protein (CP) were studied in protoplasts to determine their effect on genome activation, an early step in AMV replication. The CP mutants that formed dimers, CPDeltaC9 and CPC-A(R)F, were highly active in initiating replication with 63-84% of wild-type (wt) CP activity. However, all mutants that did not form dimers, CPDeltaC18, CPDeltaC19, CPC-WFP, and CPC-W, were much less active with 19-33% of wt CP activity. The accumulation and solubility of mutant CPs expressed from a virus-based vector in Nicotiana benthamiana were similar to that of wt CP. Analysis of CP-RNA interactions indicated that CP dimers and CP monomers interacted very differently with AMV RNA 3' ends. These results suggest that CP dimers are more efficient for replication than CP monomers because of differences in RNA binding rather than differences in expression and accumulation of the mutant CPs in infected cells. PMID:12504539

  16. Identification, Characterization, and Molecular Detection of Alfalfa mosaic virus in Potato.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, H; Nie, J

    2006-11-01

    ABSTRACT Alfalfa mosaic virus (AMV) was detected in potato fields in several provinces in Canada and characterized by bioassay, enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay, and reverse-transcription polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR). The identity of eight Canadian potato AMV isolates was confirmed by sequence analysis of their coat protein (CP) gene. Sequence and phylogenetic analysis indicated that these eight AMV potato isolates fell into one strain group, whereas a slight difference between Ca175 and the other Canadian AMV isolates was revealed. The Canadian AMV isolates, except Ca175, clustered together among other strains based on alignment of the CP gene sequence. To detect the virus, a pair of primers, AMV-F and AMV-R, specific to the AMV CP gene, was designed based on the nucleotide sequence alignment of known AMV strains. Evaluations showed that RT-PCR using this primer set was specific and sensitive for detecting AMV in potato leaf and tuber samples. AMV RNAs were easily detected in composite samples of 400 to 800 potato leaves or 200 to 400 tubers. Restriction analysis of PCR amplicons with SacI was a simple method for the confirmation of PCR tests. Thus, RT-PCR followed by restriction fragment length polymorphism analysis may be a useful approach for screening potato samples on a large scale for the presence of AMV. PMID:18943961

  17. Molecular characterization of Dasheen mosaic virus isolates infecting edible aroids in India.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Babu, B; Hegde, V

    2014-01-01

    Dasheen mosaic virus (DsMV) infecting three major edible aroids namely Amorphophallus paeoniifolius, Colocasia esculenta, and Xanthosoma sagittifolium cultivated in India was characterized. Infected plants showing typical DsMV symptoms were subjected to reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction, and an amplification of a 963 bp fragment which encoded the coat protein (CP) gene was obtained. BLAST analysis of the cloned DNA amplicon revealed the identity of the virus to be that of DsMV. Sequence identity matrix of the nucleotide sequences among the three isolates showed that the DsMV isolate infecting A. paeoniifolius and C. esculenta shared an identity as high as 93%, while the DsMV isolate from X. sagittifolium shared an identity of only 73% and 76% with the DsMV isolates from A. paeoniifolius and C. esculenta, respectively. Comparative analysis of the coat protein of the three DsMV isolates showed the presence of DVG motif (A. paeoniifolius and C. esculenta) and DTG motif in X. sagittifolium and several varying potential threonine and asparagine rich N-glycosylation motifs. Single amino acid substitution of the several conserved motifs occurs in all the three DsMV isolates. This is the first characterization of DsMV isolates infecting A. paeoniifolius, C. esculenta, and X. sagittifolium plants in India.

  18. Specific RNA binding by amino-terminal peptides of alfalfa mosaic virus coat protein.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baer, M L; Houser, F; Loesch-Fries, L S; Gehrke, L

    1994-01-01

    Specific RNA-protein interactions and ribonucleoprotein complexes are essential for many biological processes, but our understanding of how ribonucleoprotein particles form and accomplish their biological functions is rudimentary. This paper describes the interaction of alfalfa mosaic virus (A1MV) coat protein or peptides with viral RNA. A1MV coat protein is necessary both for virus particle formation and for the initiation of replication of the three genomic RNAs. We have examined protein determinants required for specific RNA binding and analyzed potential structural changes elicited by complex formation. The results indicate that the amino-terminus of the viral coat protein, which lacks primary sequence homology with recognized RNA binding motifs, is both necessary and sufficient for binding to RNA. Circular dichroism spectra and electrophoretic mobility shift experiments suggest that the RNA conformation is altered when amino-terminal coat protein peptides bind to the viral RNA. The peptide--RNA interaction is functionally significant because the peptides will substitute for A1MV coat protein in initiating RNA replication. The apparent conformational change that accompanies RNA--peptide complex formation may generate a structure which, unlike the viral RNA alone, can be recognized by the viral replicase. Images PMID:8313916

  19. Molecular characterization of Dasheen mosaic virus isolates infecting edible aroids in India.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Babu, B; Hegde, V

    2014-01-01

    Dasheen mosaic virus (DsMV) infecting three major edible aroids namely Amorphophallus paeoniifolius, Colocasia esculenta, and Xanthosoma sagittifolium cultivated in India was characterized. Infected plants showing typical DsMV symptoms were subjected to reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction, and an amplification of a 963 bp fragment which encoded the coat protein (CP) gene was obtained. BLAST analysis of the cloned DNA amplicon revealed the identity of the virus to be that of DsMV. Sequence identity matrix of the nucleotide sequences among the three isolates showed that the DsMV isolate infecting A. paeoniifolius and C. esculenta shared an identity as high as 93%, while the DsMV isolate from X. sagittifolium shared an identity of only 73% and 76% with the DsMV isolates from A. paeoniifolius and C. esculenta, respectively. Comparative analysis of the coat protein of the three DsMV isolates showed the presence of DVG motif (A. paeoniifolius and C. esculenta) and DTG motif in X. sagittifolium and several varying potential threonine and asparagine rich N-glycosylation motifs. Single amino acid substitution of the several conserved motifs occurs in all the three DsMV isolates. This is the first characterization of DsMV isolates infecting A. paeoniifolius, C. esculenta, and X. sagittifolium plants in India. PMID:24717027

  20. Analysis of the systemic colonization of cucumber plants by Cucumber green mottle mosaic virus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moreno, I M; Thompson, J R; García-Arenal, F

    2004-03-01

    Systemic movement of Cucumber green mottle mosaic virus (CGMMV) in cucumber plants was shown to be from photoassimilate source to sink, thus indicating phloem transport. Nevertheless, CGMMV was not detected by immunocytochemical procedures in the intermediary cell-sieve element complex in inoculated cotyledons, where photoassimilate loading occurs. In stem internodes, CGMMV was first localized in the companion cells of the external phloem and subsequently in all tissues except the medulla, therefore suggesting leakage of the virus from, and reloading into, the transport phloem during systemic movement. In systemically infected sink leaves, CGMMV was simultaneously detected in the xylem and phloem. Interestingly, CGMMV accumulated to high levels in the differentiating tracheids of young leaves implying that the xylem could be involved in the systemic movement of CGMMV. This possibility was tested using plants in which cell death was induced in a portion of the stem by steam treatment. At 24 degrees C, steam treatment effectively prevented the systemic movement of CGMMV, even though viral RNA was detected in washes of the xylem above the steamed internode suggesting that xylem circulation occurred. At 29 degrees C, CGMMV systemically infected steam-treated cucumber plants, indicating that CGMMV can move systemically via the xylem. Xylem transport of CGMMV was, however, less efficient than phloem transport in terms of the time required for systemic infection and the percentage of plants infected.

  1. Rapid and specific detection of Yam mosaic virus by reverse-transcription recombinase polymerase amplification.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Silva, Gonçalo; Bömer, Moritz; Nkere, Chukwuemeka; Kumar, P Lava; Seal, Susan E

    2015-09-15

    Yam mosaic virus (YMV; genus Potyvirus) is considered to cause the most economically important viral disease of yams (Dioscorea spp.) in West Africa which is the dominant region for yam production globally. Yams are a vegetatively propagated crop and the use of virus-free planting material forms an essential component of disease control. Current serological and PCR-based diagnostic methods for YMV are time consuming involving a succession of target detection steps. In this study, a novel assay for specific YMV detection is described that is based on isothermal reverse transcription-recombinase polymerase amplification (RT-exoRPA). This test has been shown to be reproducible and able to detect as little as 14 pg/μl of purified RNA obtained from an YMV-infected plant, a sensitivity equivalent to that obtained with the reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR) in current general use. The RT-exoRPA assay has, however, several advantages over the RT-PCR; positive samples can be detected in less than 30 min, and amplification only requires a single incubation temperature (optimum 37°C). These features make the RT-exoRPA assay a promising candidate for adapting into a field test format to be used by yam breeding programmes or certification laboratories. PMID:26115609

  2. An EDS1 orthologue is required for N-mediated resistance against tobacco mosaic virus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peart, Jack R; Cook, Graeme; Feys, Bart J; Parker, Jane E; Baulcombe, David C

    2002-03-01

    In Arabidopsis, EDS1 is essential for disease resistance conferred by a structural subset of resistance (R) proteins containing a nucleotide-binding site, leucine-rich-repeats and amino-terminal similarity to animal Toll and Interleukin-1 (so-called TIR-NBS-LRR proteins). EDS1 is not required by NBS-LRR proteins that possess an amino-terminal coiled-coil motif (CC-NBS-LRR proteins). Using virus-induced gene silencing (VIGS) of a Nicotiana benthaminana EDS1 orthologue, we investigated the role of EDS1 in resistance specified by structurally distinct R genes in transgenic N. benthamiana. Resistance against tobacco mosaic virus mediated by tobacco N, a TIR-NBS-LRR protein, was EDS1-dependent. Two other R proteins, Pto (a protein kinase), and Rx (a CC-NBS-LRR protein) recognizing, respectively, a bacterial and viral pathogen did not require EDS1. These data, together with the finding that expression of N. benthamiana and Arabidopsis EDS1 mRNAs are similarly regulated, lead us to conclude that recruitment of EDS1 by TIR-NBS-LRR proteins is evolutionarily conserved between dicotyledenous plant species in resistance against bacterial, oomycete and viral pathogens. We further demonstrate that VIGS is a useful approach to dissect resistance signaling pathways in a genetically intractable plant species.

  3. Detection and characterization of a Cucumber mosaic virus isolate infecting peperina, a species native to Argentina

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    P Rodríguez Pardina

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available Minthostachys mollis (Kunth. Griseb., "peperina", un miembro de la familia Lamiaceae, es una especie aromática que se emplea en la farmacología moderna y en medicina. Está ampliamente distribuida en los Andes, desde Venezuela y Colombia hasta Argentina. En el último país, la principal área de explotación de peperina incluye el área serrana de la provincia de Córdoba, donde la especie es arrancada indiscriminadamente, lo que conlleva una pérdida irreversible de germoplasma. A los fines de preservar este recurso nativo y fuente regional de ingresos, la especie está siendo domesticada. Durante este proceso, se observó la aparición de síntomas de un conspicuo mosaico amarillo, típico de infección viral. Análisis biológicos, serológicos y moleculares (RT-PCR, RFLP, clonado y secuenciación pusieron de manifiesto la presencia del subgrupo IA de Cucumber mosaic virus en las plantas domesticadas de peperina. El aislamiento viral estudiado está íntimamente relacionado con la raza Y previamente informada en Japón. Éste es el primer informe de un virus que infecta a la peperina.

  4. New Strategies and Methods to Study Interactions between Tobacco Mosaic Virus Coat Protein and Its Inhibitors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Xiangyang; Chen, Zhuo; Jin, Linhong; Hu, Deyu; Yang, Song

    2016-01-01

    Studies of the targets of anti-viral compounds are hot topics in the field of pesticide research. Various efficient anti-TMV (Tobacco Mosaic Virus) compounds, such as Ningnanmycin (NNM), Antofine (ATF), Dufulin (DFL) and Bingqingxiao (BQX) are available. However, the mechanisms of the action of these compounds on targets remain unclear. To further study the mechanism of the action of the anti-TMV inhibitors, the TMV coat protein (TMV CP) was expressed and self-assembled into four-layer aggregate disks in vitro, which could be reassembled into infectious virus particles with TMV RNA. The interactions between the anti-TMV compounds and the TMV CP disk were analyzed by size exclusion chromatography, isothermal titration calorimetry and native-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis methods. The results revealed that assembly of the four-layer aggregate disk was inhibited by NNM; it changed the four-layer aggregate disk into trimers, and affected the regular assembly of TMV CP and TMV RNA. The four-layer aggregate disk of TMV CP was little inhibited by ATF, DFL and BQX. Our results provide original data, as well as new strategies and methods, for research on the mechanism of action of anti-viral drugs.

  5. In situ vaccination with cowpea mosaic virus nanoparticles suppresses metastatic cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lizotte, P. H.; Wen, A. M.; Sheen, M. R.; Fields, J.; Rojanasopondist, P.; Steinmetz, N. F.; Fiering, S.

    2016-03-01

    Nanotechnology has tremendous potential to contribute to cancer immunotherapy. The ‘in situ vaccination’ immunotherapy strategy directly manipulates identified tumours to overcome local tumour-mediated immunosuppression and subsequently stimulates systemic antitumour immunity to treat metastases. We show that inhalation of self-assembling virus-like nanoparticles from cowpea mosaic virus (CPMV) reduces established B16F10 lung melanoma and simultaneously generates potent systemic antitumour immunity against poorly immunogenic B16F10 in the skin. Full efficacy required Il-12, Ifn-γ, adaptive immunity and neutrophils. Inhaled CPMV nanoparticles were rapidly taken up by and activated neutrophils in the tumour microenvironment as an important part of the antitumour immune response. CPMV also exhibited clear treatment efficacy and systemic antitumour immunity in ovarian, colon, and breast tumour models in multiple anatomic locations. CPMV nanoparticles are stable, nontoxic, modifiable with drugs and antigens, and their nanomanufacture is highly scalable. These properties, combined with their inherent immunogenicity and demonstrated efficacy against a poorly immunogenic tumour, make CPMV an attractive and novel immunotherapy against metastatic cancer.

  6. Prevalence of Tobacco mosaic virus in Iran and Evolutionary Analyses of the Coat Protein Gene

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Athar Alishiri

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available The incidence and distribution of Tobacco mosaic virus (TMV and related tobamoviruses was determined using an enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay on 1,926 symptomatic horticultural crops and 107 asymptomatic weed samples collected from 78 highly infected fields in the major horticultural crop-producing areas in 17 provinces throughout Iran. The results were confirmed by host range studies and reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction. The overall incidence of infection by these viruses in symptomatic plants was 11.3%. The coat protein (CP gene sequences of a number of isolates were determined and disclosed to be a high identity (up to 100% among the Iranian isolates. Phylogenetic analysis of all known TMV CP genes showed three clades on the basis of nucleotide sequences with all Iranian isolates distinctly clustered in clade II. Analysis using the complete CP amino acid sequence showed one clade with two subgroups, IA and IB, with Iranian isolates in both subgroups. The nucleotide diversity within each sub-group was very low, but higher between the two clades. No correlation was found between genetic distance and geographical origin or host species of isolation. Statistical analyses suggested a negative selection and demonstrated the occurrence of gene flow from the isolates in other clades to the Iranian population.

  7. Partial sequencing and phylogenetic analysis of Soybean mosaic virus isolated in Ukraine

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Polischuk V. P.

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available The aim of the present study is to compare the biological and molecular properties of Ukrainian soybean mosaic virus (SMV isolates with those of known strains or isolates from other countries, and to trace their possible origin. The methods of mechanical inoculation, reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction, DNA sequencing and phylogenetic analysis have been used. Results. Five SMV isolates have been collected and biologically purified from breeding plots in Vinnitsa region of Ukraine. It has been found that all these isolates show the same reaction patterns when infecting 11 differential soybean cultivars. Phylogenetic analysis of sequences of the coat protein coding region and P1 coding region revealed strong genetic relationships between representative Ukrainian (UA1Gr and SMV-VA2 isolates which together were sorted in one clade with G2 strain. The investigation of sequence identity showed that different genomic regions of SMV were under different evolutionary constraints. Conclusions. SMV, isolated in Ukraine for the first time, belongs to the G2 strain group that is widespread in North America. The SMV isolates obtained in this work may be employed in the Ukrainian national breeding programs to create soybean with durable virus resistance.

  8. Recombination analysis of Soybean mosaic virus sequences reveals evidence of RNA recombination between distinct pathotypes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Babu Mohan

    2008-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract RNA recombination is one of the two major factors that create RNA genome variability. Assessing its incidence in plant RNA viruses helps understand the formation of new isolates and evaluate the effectiveness of crop protection strategies. To search for recombination in Soybean mosaic virus (SMV, the causal agent of a worldwide seed-borne, aphid-transmitted viral soybean disease, we obtained all full-length genome sequences of SMV as well as partial sequences encoding the N-terminal most (P1 protease and the C-terminal most (capsid protein; CP viral protein. The sequences were analyzed for possible recombination events using a variety of automatic and manual recombination detection and verification approaches. Automatic scanning identified 3, 10, and 17 recombination sites in the P1, CP, and full-length sequences, respectively. Manual analyses confirmed 10 recombination sites in three full-length SMV sequences. To our knowledge, this is the first report of recombination between distinct SMV pathotypes. These data imply that different SMV pathotypes can simultaneously infect a host cell and exchange genetic materials through recombination. The high incidence of SMV recombination suggests that recombination plays an important role in SMV evolution. Obtaining additional full-length sequences will help elucidate this role.

  9. Properties of African Cassava Mosaic Virus Capsid Protein Expressed in Fission Yeast.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hipp, Katharina; Schäfer, Benjamin; Kepp, Gabi; Jeske, Holger

    2016-01-01

    The capsid proteins (CPs) of geminiviruses combine multiple functions for packaging the single-stranded viral genome, insect transmission and shuttling between the nucleus and the cytoplasm. African cassava mosaic virus (ACMV) CP was expressed in fission yeast, and purified by SDS gel electrophoresis. After tryptic digestion of this protein, mass spectrometry covered 85% of the amino acid sequence and detected three N-terminal phosphorylation sites (threonine 12, serines 25 and 62). Differential centrifugation of cell extracts separated the CP into two fractions, the supernatant and pellet. Upon isopycnic centrifugation of the supernatant, most of the CP accumulated at densities typical for free proteins, whereas the CP in the pellet fraction showed a partial binding to nucleic acids. Size-exclusion chromatography of the supernatant CP indicated high order complexes. In DNA binding assays, supernatant CP accelerated the migration of ssDNA in agarose gels, which is a first hint for particle formation. Correspondingly, CP shifted ssDNA to the expected densities of virus particles upon isopycnic centrifugation. Nevertheless, electron microscopy did not reveal any twin particles, which are characteristic for geminiviruses. PMID:27399762

  10. Trichoderma harzianum T-22 Induces Systemic Resistance in Tomato Infected by Cucumber mosaic virus

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vitti, Antonella; Pellegrini, Elisa; Nali, Cristina; Lovelli, Stella; Sofo, Adriano; Valerio, Maria; Scopa, Antonio; Nuzzaci, Maria

    2016-01-01

    Understanding the induction of plant defenses against viruses using biocontrol agents is essential for developing new strategies against these pathogens, given the ineffectiveness of chemical treatments. The ability of Trichoderma harzianum, strain T-22 (T22) to control Cucumber mosaic virus (CMV) in Solanum lycopersicum var. cerasiforme plants and the changes in the physiology of tomato treated/infected with T22/CMV were examined. Plant growth-promoting effects, photosynthetic performance, reactive oxygen species scavenging enzymes, and phytohormones were investigated. T22 improved tomato growth in terms of plant height and improved photosynthesis, total chlorophyll content and plant gas exchange. In contrast, CMV induced a negative effect on dry matter accumulation and inhibited the photosynthetic capacity. The analysis of plant hormones demonstrated that treating with T22 before or simultaneously to CMV infection, led to a systemic resistance by jasmonic acid/ethylene and salicylic acid signaling pathways. Conversely, systemic resistance was abscissic acid-dependent when T22 treatment was administered after the CMV infection. In conclusion, the data reported here indicate that the T22-based strategy may be the most effective measure against CMV. PMID:27777581

  11. Occurrence of Squash yellow mild mottle virus and Pepper golden mosaic virus in Potential New Hosts in Costa Rica.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Castro, Ruth M; Moreira, Lisela; Rojas, María R; Gilbertson, Robert L; Hernández, Eduardo; Mora, Floribeth; Ramírez, Pilar

    2013-09-01

    Leaf samples of Solanum lycopersicum, Capsicum annuum, Cucurbita moschata, Cucurbita pepo, Sechium edule and Erythrina spp. were collected. All samples were positive for begomoviruses using polymerase chain reaction and degenerate primers. A sequence of ∼1,100 bp was obtained from the genomic component DNA-A of 14 samples. In addition, one sequence of ∼580 bp corresponding to the coat protein (AV1) was obtained from a chayote (S. edule) leaf sample. The presence of Squash yellow mild mottle virus (SYMMoV) and Pepper golden mosaic virus (PepGMV) were confirmed. The host range reported for SYMMoV includes species of the Cucurbitaceae, Caricaceae and Fabaceae families. This report extends the host range of SYMMoV to include the Solanaceae family, and extends the host range of PepGMV to include C. moschata, C. pepo and the Fabaceae Erythrina spp. This is the first report of a begomovirus (PepGMV) infecting chayote in the Western Hemisphere.

  12. Occurrence of Squash yellow mild mottle virus and Pepper golden mosaic virus in Potential New Hosts in Costa Rica

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ruth M. Castro

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available Leaf samples of Solanum lycopersicum, Capsicum annuum, Cucurbita moschata, Cucurbita pepo, Sechium edule and Erythrina spp. were collected. All samples were positive for begomoviruses using polymerase chain reaction and degenerate primers. A sequence of ∼1,100 bp was obtained from the genomic component DNA-A of 14 samples. In addition, one sequence of ∼580 bp corresponding to the coat protein (AV1 was obtained from a chayote (S. edule leaf sample. The presence of Squash yellow mild mottle virus (SYMMoV and Pepper golden mosaic virus (PepGMV were confirmed. The host range reported for SYMMoV includes species of the Cucurbitaceae, Caricaceae and Fabaceae families. This report extends the host range of SYMMoV to include the Solanaceae family, and extends the host range of PepGMV to include C. moschata, C. pepo and the Fabaceae Erythrina spp. This is the first report of a begomovirus (PepGMV infecting chayote in the Western Hemisphere.

  13. AFLP Marker Linked to Turnip Mosaic Virus Susceptible Gene in Chinese Cabbage (Brassica rapa L.ssp.pekinensis)

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    HAN He-ping; SUN Ri-fei; ZHANG Shu-jiang; LI Fei; ZHANG Shi-fan; NIU Xin-ke

    2004-01-01

    Turnip mosaic virus (TuMV) which has several strains causes the most important virusdisease in Chinese cabbage in terms of crop damage. In China, Chinese cabbage is infectedby a mixture of strains, breeding of cultivar for the TuMV resistance has become themajor aim. Screening the molecular marker linked to the TuMV-resistance gene formolecular assisted selection is the major method to improve the breeding efficiency. Inthis study, we used AFLP technique and the method of bulked segregant analysis(BSA) tostudy the progeny of Brp0058 x Brp0108, and identified two DNA molecular marker linked toTurnip mosaic virus-resistance gene with a recombination frequency 7.5 cM and 8.4 cM.

  14. Immune response induced in mice oral immunization with cowpea severe mosaic virus

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M.I. Florindo

    2002-07-01

    Full Text Available There is increasing interest in the immune response induced by plant viruses since these could be used as antigen-expressing systems in vaccination procedures. Cowpea severe mosaic virus (CPSMV, as a purified preparation (300 g of leaves, 2 weeks post-inoculation, or crude extract from cowpea (Vigna unguiculata leaves infected with CPSMV both administered by gavage to Swiss mice induced a humoral immune response. Groups of 10 Swiss mice (2-month-old females were immunized orally with 10 daily doses of either 50 µg viral capsid protein (boosters of 50 µg at days 21 and 35 after immunization or 0.6 mg protein of the crude extract (boosters of 0.6 mg at days 21 and 35 after immunization. Anti-CPSMV antibodies were quantified by ELISA in pooled sera diluted at least 1:400 at days 7, 14, 21, 28, 35 and 42 after the 10th dose. IgG and IgA against CPSMV were produced systemically, but IgE was not detected. No synthesis of specific antibodies against the proteins of leaf extracts from V. unguiculata, infected or not with CPSMV, was detected. The use of CPSMV, a plant-infecting virus that apparently does not induce a pathogenic response in animals, induced a humoral and persistent (at least 6 months immune response through the administration of low antigen doses by gavage. These results raise the possibility of using CPSMV either as a vector for the production of vaccines against animal pathogens or in quick and easy methods to produce specific antisera for viral diagnosis.

  15. The 5' untranslated region of alfalfa mosaic virus RNA 1 is involved in negative-strand RNA synthesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vlot, A Corina; Bol, John F

    2003-10-01

    The three genomic RNAs of alfalfa mosaic virus each contain a unique 5' untranslated region (5' UTR). Replacement of the 5' UTR of RNA 1 by that of RNA 2 or 3 yielded infectious replicons. The sequence of a putative 5' stem-loop structure in RNA 1 was found to be required for negative-strand RNA synthesis. A similar putative 5' stem-loop structure is present in RNA 2 but not in RNA 3. PMID:14512577

  16. Engineering of papaya mosaic virus (PapMV) nanoparticles with a CTL epitope derived from influenza NP

    OpenAIRE

    Babin, Cindy; Majeau, Nathalie; Leclerc, Denis

    2013-01-01

    Background The ever-present threat of infectious disease, e.g. influenza pandemics, and the increasing need for new and effective treatments in immunotherapy are the driving forces that motivate research into new and innovative vaccine platforms. Ideally, such platforms should trigger an efficient CTL response, be safe, and easy to manufacture. We recently developed a novel nanoparticle adjuvant comprised of papaya mosaic virus (PapMV) coat protein (CP) assembled around an RNA. The PapMV nano...

  17. Engineering of soybean mosaic virus as a versatile tool for studying protein–protein interactions in soybean

    OpenAIRE

    Jang-Kyun Seo; Hong-Soo Choi; Kook-Hyung Kim

    2016-01-01

    Transient gene expression approaches are valuable tools for rapid introduction of genes of interest and characterization of their functions in plants. Although agroinfiltration is the most effectively and routinely used method for transient expression of multiple genes in various plant species, this approach has been largely unsuccessful in soybean. In this study, we engineered soybean mosaic virus (SMV) as a dual-gene delivery vector to simultaneously deliver and express two genes in soybean...

  18. Viral Coat Protein Peptides with Limited Sequence Homology Bind Similar Domains of Alfalfa Mosaic Virus and Tobacco Streak Virus RNAs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Swanson, Maud M.; Ansel-McKinney, Patricia; Houser-Scott, Felicia; Yusibov, Vidadi; Loesch-Fries, L. Sue; Gehrke, Lee

    1998-01-01

    An unusual and distinguishing feature of alfalfa mosaic virus (AMV) and ilarviruses such as tobacco streak virus (TSV) is that the viral coat protein is required to activate the early stages of viral RNA replication, a phenomenon known as genome activation. AMV-TSV coat protein homology is limited; however, they are functionally interchangeable in activating virus replication. For example, TSV coat protein will activate AMV RNA replication and vice versa. Although AMV and TSV coat proteins have little obvious amino acid homology, we recently reported that they share an N-terminal RNA binding consensus sequence (Ansel-McKinney et al., EMBO J. 15:5077–5084, 1996). Here, we biochemically compare the binding of chemically synthesized peptides that include the consensus RNA binding sequence and lysine-rich (AMV) or arginine-rich (TSV) environment to 3′-terminal TSV and AMV RNA fragments. The arginine-rich TSV coat protein peptide binds viral RNA with lower affinity than the lysine-rich AMV coat protein peptides; however, the ribose moieties protected from hydroxyl radical attack by the two different peptides are localized in the same area of the predicted RNA structures. When included in an infectious inoculum, both AMV and TSV 3′-terminal RNA fragments inhibited AMV RNA replication, while variant RNAs unable to bind coat protein did not affect replication significantly. The data suggest that RNA binding and genome activation functions may reside in the consensus RNA binding sequence that is apparently unique to AMV and ilarvirus coat proteins. PMID:9525649

  19. Plant virus-resembling optical nano-materials conjugated with anti-EGFR for targeted cancer imaging

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gupta, Sharad; Wilder, Hailey; Rao, A. L. N.; Vullev, V. I.; Anvari, Bahman

    2012-03-01

    We recently reported the construction of a new type of optically active nano-particles composed of genome-depleted plant infecting brome mosaic virus (BMV) doped with indocyanine green (ICG), an FDA-approved chromophore . We refer to these constructs as optical viral ghosts (OVGs) since only the capsid protein (CP) subunits of BMV remain to encapsulate ICG. Herein, we covalently conjugated the surface of OVGs with anti-epidermal growth factor receptors (anti-EGFR) to target cancerous human bronchial epithelial cells (C-HBECs) in-vitro. Our preliminary results demonstrate the utility of conjugated OVGs for targeted imaging of cancer cells.

  20. Fine mapping of the Bsr1 barley stripe mosaic virus resistance gene in the model grass Brachypodium distachyon.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yu Cui

    Full Text Available The ND18 strain of Barley stripe mosaic virus (BSMV infects several lines of Brachypodium distachyon, a recently developed model system for genomics research in cereals. Among the inbred lines tested, Bd3-1 is highly resistant at 20 to 25 °C, whereas Bd21 is susceptible and infection results in an intense mosaic phenotype accompanied by high levels of replicating virus. We generated an F(6:7 recombinant inbred line (RIL population from a cross between Bd3-1 and Bd21 and used the RILs, and an F(2 population of a second Bd21 × Bd3-1 cross to evaluate the inheritance of resistance. The results indicate that resistance segregates as expected for a single dominant gene, which we have designated Barley stripe mosaic virus resistance 1 (Bsr1. We constructed a genetic linkage map of the RIL population using SNP markers to map this gene to within 705 Kb of the distal end of the top of chromosome 3. Additional CAPS and Indel markers were used to fine map Bsr1 to a 23 Kb interval containing five putative genes. Our study demonstrates the power of using RILs to rapidly map the genetic determinants of BSMV resistance in Brachypodium. Moreover, the RILs and their associated genetic map, when combined with the complete genomic sequence of Brachypodium, provide new resources for genetic analyses of many other traits.

  1. Occurrence, Distribution and Biological variability of Zucchini Yellow Mosaic Virus in cucurbits of Khuzestan province, South west of Iran

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Somayeh Safara

    2011-11-01

    Full Text Available ZYMV is one of the most important plant viruses that cause economical damage in cucurbits. The symptoms of ZYMV in different cucurbits include stunting, yellowing, mottling, severe mosaic, leaf and fruit deformation, blistering and shoe string. Investigation on occurrence of this virus, in Khuzestan province was carried out in November 2009, April and May 2010 by collecting cucurbits samples from different cucurbits fields. After DAS-ELISA test, ZYMV was maintained in squash. Then total RNA were extracted and were tested by RT-PCR. Using RT-PCR, fragments belonging to N-terminal of coat protein and C-terminal of nuclear inclusion bodies were replicated. PCR product for investigation of replication was loaded in 1% agarose gel. From seven regions in Khuzestan, 175 leaf samples showing different symptoms (yellowing, mosaic, deformation and blistering were collected. Seventy one samples out of total samples (175 samples showed ZYMV infection. Occurrence of Zucchini Yellow Mosaic Virus in Khuzestan province was confirmed, using serological and RT-PCR tests. Infection of ZYMV in Khuzestan province (40.5% is higher than the average of Iran’s infection (38%. This article is first report of occurrence ZYMV in different regions of Khuzestan province except Dezful.

  2. The Agrobacterium tumefaciens Ti Plasmid Virulence Gene virE2 Reduces Sri Lankan Cassava Mosaic Virus Infection in Transgenic Nicotiana benthamiana Plants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Resmi, Thulasi Raveendrannair; Hohn, Thomas; Hohn, Barbara; Veluthambi, Karuppannan

    2015-05-01

    Cassava mosaic disease is a major constraint to cassava cultivation worldwide. In India, the disease is caused by Indian cassava mosaic virus (ICMV) and Sri Lankan cassava mosaic virus (SLCMV). The Agrobacterium Ti plasmid virulence gene virE2, encoding a nuclear-localized, single-stranded DNA binding protein, was introduced into Nicotiana benthamiana to develop tolerance against SLCMV. Leaf discs of transgenic N. benthamiana plants, harboring the virE2 gene, complemented a virE2 mutation in A. tumefaciens and produced tumours. Three tested virE2 transgenic plants displayed reduction in disease symptoms upon agroinoculation with SLCMV DNA A and DNA B partial dimers. A pronounced reduction in viral DNA accumulation was observed in all three virE2 transgenic plants. Thus, virE2 is an effective candidate gene to develop tolerance against the cassava mosaic disease and possibly other DNA virus diseases. PMID:26008704

  3. The Agrobacterium tumefaciens Ti Plasmid Virulence Gene virE2 Reduces Sri Lankan Cassava Mosaic Virus Infection in Transgenic Nicotiana benthamiana Plants

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Thulasi Raveendrannair Resmi

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available Cassava mosaic disease is a major constraint to cassava cultivation worldwide. In India, the disease is caused by Indian cassava mosaic virus (ICMV and Sri Lankan cassava mosaic virus (SLCMV. The Agrobacterium Ti plasmid virulence gene virE2, encoding a nuclear-localized, single-stranded DNA binding protein, was introduced into Nicotiana benthamiana to develop tolerance against SLCMV. Leaf discs of transgenic N. benthamiana plants, harboring the virE2 gene, complemented a virE2 mutation in A. tumefaciens and produced tumours. Three tested virE2 transgenic plants displayed reduction in disease symptoms upon agroinoculation with SLCMV DNA A and DNA B partial dimers. A pronounced reduction in viral DNA accumulation was observed in all three virE2 transgenic plants. Thus, virE2 is an effective candidate gene to develop tolerance against the cassava mosaic disease and possibly other DNA virus diseases.

  4. Evaluation of the tepary bean (Phaseolus acutifolius) diversity panel for response to the NL 3 strain of Bean Common Mosaic Necrosis Virus (BCMNV) and for biological nitrogen fixation with Bradyrhizobium strains

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aphid-transmitted Bean Common Mosaic Necrosis Virus (BCMNV) and Bean Common Mosaic Virus (BCMV) are potyviruses that are seed transmitted in tepary bean. Developing resistance to these viruses will be critical for expanding production in areas where they are endemic. Biological nitrogen fixation (BN...

  5. Exploiting the Combination of Natural and Genetically Engineered Resistance to Cassava Mosaic and Cassava Brown Streak Viruses Impacting Cassava Production in Africa

    OpenAIRE

    Hervé Vanderschuren; Isabel Moreno; Anjanappa, Ravi B.; Ima M Zainuddin; Wilhelm Gruissem

    2012-01-01

    Cassava brown streak disease (CBSD) and cassava mosaic disease (CMD) are currently two major viral diseases that severely reduce cassava production in large areas of Sub-Saharan Africa. Natural resistance has so far only been reported for CMD in cassava. CBSD is caused by two virus species, Cassava brown streak virus (CBSV) and Ugandan cassava brown streak virus (UCBSV). A sequence of the CBSV coat protein (CP) highly conserved between the two virus species was used to demonstrate that a CBSV...

  6. Contribution of host intracellular transport machineries to intercellular movement of turnip mosaic virus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Agbeci, Maxime; Grangeon, Romain; Nelson, Richard S; Zheng, Huanquan; Laliberté, Jean-François

    2013-01-01

    The contribution of different host cell transport systems in the intercellular movement of turnip mosaic virus (TuMV) was investigated. To discriminate between primary infections and secondary infections associated with the virus intercellular movement, a gene cassette expressing GFP-HDEL was inserted adjacent to a TuMV infectious cassette expressing 6K₂:mCherry, both within the T-DNA borders of the binary vector pCambia. In this system, both gene cassettes were delivered to the same cell by a single binary vector and primary infection foci emitted green and red fluorescence while secondarily infected cells emitted only red fluorescence. Intercellular movement was measured at 72 hours post infiltration and was estimated to proceed at an average rate of one cell being infected every three hours over an observation period of 17 hours. To determine if the secretory pathway were important for TuMV intercellular movement, chemical and protein inhibitors that blocked both early and late secretory pathways were used. Treatment with Brefeldin A or Concanamycin A or expression of ARF1 or RAB-E1d dominant negative mutants, all of which inhibit pre- or post-Golgi transport, reduced intercellular movement by the virus. These treatments, however, did not inhibit virus replication in primary infected cells. Pharmacological interference assays using Tyrphostin A23 or Wortmannin showed that endocytosis was not important for TuMV intercellular movement. Lack of co-localization by endocytosed FM4-64 and Ara7 (AtRabF2b) with TuMV-induced 6K₂-tagged vesicles further supported this conclusion. Microfilament depolymerizing drugs and silencing expression of myosin XI-2 gene, but not myosin VIII genes, also inhibited TuMV intercellular movement. Expression of dominant negative myosin mutants confirmed the role played by myosin XI-2 as well as by myosin XI-K in TuMV intercellular movement. Using this dual gene cassette expression system and transport inhibitors, components of the

  7. Contribution of host intracellular transport machineries to intercellular movement of turnip mosaic virus.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maxime Agbeci

    Full Text Available The contribution of different host cell transport systems in the intercellular movement of turnip mosaic virus (TuMV was investigated. To discriminate between primary infections and secondary infections associated with the virus intercellular movement, a gene cassette expressing GFP-HDEL was inserted adjacent to a TuMV infectious cassette expressing 6K₂:mCherry, both within the T-DNA borders of the binary vector pCambia. In this system, both gene cassettes were delivered to the same cell by a single binary vector and primary infection foci emitted green and red fluorescence while secondarily infected cells emitted only red fluorescence. Intercellular movement was measured at 72 hours post infiltration and was estimated to proceed at an average rate of one cell being infected every three hours over an observation period of 17 hours. To determine if the secretory pathway were important for TuMV intercellular movement, chemical and protein inhibitors that blocked both early and late secretory pathways were used. Treatment with Brefeldin A or Concanamycin A or expression of ARF1 or RAB-E1d dominant negative mutants, all of which inhibit pre- or post-Golgi transport, reduced intercellular movement by the virus. These treatments, however, did not inhibit virus replication in primary infected cells. Pharmacological interference assays using Tyrphostin A23 or Wortmannin showed that endocytosis was not important for TuMV intercellular movement. Lack of co-localization by endocytosed FM4-64 and Ara7 (AtRabF2b with TuMV-induced 6K₂-tagged vesicles further supported this conclusion. Microfilament depolymerizing drugs and silencing expression of myosin XI-2 gene, but not myosin VIII genes, also inhibited TuMV intercellular movement. Expression of dominant negative myosin mutants confirmed the role played by myosin XI-2 as well as by myosin XI-K in TuMV intercellular movement. Using this dual gene cassette expression system and transport inhibitors

  8. William L Finley - False Brome Eradication in Mill Hill Unit

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — False Brome is quickly becoming a major threat to the southern end of the refuge with new populations found along hiking trails, spreading into wooded areas via...

  9. The expression of foreign gene under the control of cauliflower mosaic virus 35s RNA promoter

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    WangHao; BaiYongyan

    1990-01-01

    The promoter region of cauliflower mosaic virus (CaMV) 35s RNA was employed to construct an intermediate expression vector which can be used in Ti plasmid system of Agrobacterium iumefaciens.The original plasmid,which contains a polylinker between CaMV 35s RNA and its 3' termination signal in pUC18 was modified to have another antibiotic resistance marker (kanamycin resistance gene Kmr) to facilitate the selection of recombinant with Ti plasmid.Octopine synthase (ocs) structural gene was inserted into this vector downstream of CaMV 35s RNA promoter.This chimaeric gene was introduced into integrative Ti plasmid vector pGV 3850,and then transformed into Nicotiana tobaccum the chimaeric gene into tobacco cells.In both cases,the expression of ocs gene was demonstrated.The amount of octopine was much more than the nopaline synthesized by nopaline synthase (nos) gene transferred at the same time with Ti plasmid vector.This demonstrated that CaMV 35s RNA promoter is stronger in transcriptional function than the promoter of nos in tobacco cells.

  10. Differentially expressed genes of Chenopodium amaranticolor in response to cymbidium mosaic virus infection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Su Min; Baek, Eseul; Ryu, Ki Hyun; Choi, Sun Hee

    2016-09-01

    Cymbidium mosaic virus (CymMV)-induced expressed sequence tag (EST) clones from Chenopodium amaranticolor were identified. CymMV was mechanically inoculated onto C. amaranticolor, and local lesion symptoms were observed. Inoculated leaves were collected on serial days post inoculation (dpi) to identify activated or suppressed genes. mRNA isolation and suppression subtractive hybridization (SSH) were then performed to identify differentially expressed genes related to the local lesion response. Fifty-three ESTs, including genes related to defense and stress responses (e.g., lipoxygenase, jasmonate-induced protein, and heat shock protein), were generated. In addition, a large proportion of the ESTs were found to be involved in photosynthesis, as determined by their functional categories. Expression levels of several EST genes were observed using quantitative real-time reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction, and the evaluated genes showed varying levels of expression during the experimental period. In this study, differentially expressed sequences via SSH were identified from CymMV-infected C. amaranticolor, and profiling and annotation were carried out to determine the expression pattern of CymMV and its interaction with C. amaranticolor. PMID:27364083

  11. Localization of the N-terminal domain of cauliflower mosaic virus coat protein precursor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cauliflower mosaic virus (CaMV) open reading frame (ORF) IV encodes a coat protein precursor (pre-CP) harboring an N-terminal extension that is cleaved off by the CaMV-encoded protease. In transfected cells, pre-CP is present in the cytoplasm, while the processed form (p44) of CP is targeted to the nucleus, suggesting that the N-terminal extension might be involved in keeping the pre-CP in the cytoplasm for viral assembly. This study reports for the first time the intracellular localization of the N-terminal extension during CaMV infection in Brassica rapa. Immunogold-labeling electron microscopy using polyclonal antibodies directed to the N-terminal extension of the pre-CP revealed that this region is closely associated with viral particles present in small aggregates, which we called small bodies, adjacent to the main inclusion bodies typical of CaMV infection. Based on these results, we propose a model for viral assembly of CaMV

  12. Genetic Diversity, Reassortment, and Recombination in Alfalfa mosaic virus Population in Spain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bergua, María; Luis-Arteaga, Marisol; Escriu, Fernando

    2014-11-01

    The variability and genetic structure of Alfalfa mosaic virus (AMV) in Spain was evaluated through the molecular characterization of 60 isolates collected from different hosts and different geographic areas. Analysis of nucleotide sequences in four coding regions--P1, P2, movement protein (MP), and coat protein (CP)--revealed a low genetic diversity and different restrictions to variation operating on each coding region. Phylogenetic analysis of Spanish isolates along with previously reported AMV sequences showed consistent clustering into types I and II for P1 and types I, IIA, and IIB for MP and CP regions. No clustering was observed for the P2 region. According to restriction fragment length polymorphism analysis, the Spanish AMV population consisted of seven haplotypes, including two haplotypes generated by reassortment and one involving recombination. The most frequent haplotypes (types for P1, MP, and CP regions, respectively) were I-I-I (37%), II-IIB-IIB (30%), and one of the reassortants, II-I-I (17%). Distribution of haplotypes was not uniform, indicating that AMV population was structured according to the geographic origin of isolates. Our results suggest that agroecological factors are involved in the maintenance of AMV genetic types, including the reassortant one, and in their geographic distribution. PMID:24779352

  13. Alfalfa mosaic virus coat protein bridges RNA and RNA-dependent RNA polymerase in vitro.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reichert, Vienna L; Choi, Mehee; Petrillo, Jessica E; Gehrke, Lee

    2007-07-20

    Alfalfa mosaic virus (AMV) RNA replication requires the viral coat protein (CP). AMV CP is an integral component of the viral replicase; moreover, it binds to the viral RNA 3'-termini and induces the formation of multiple new base pairs that organize the RNA conformation. The results described here suggest that AMV coat protein binding defines template selection by organizing the 3'-terminal RNA conformation and by positioning the RNA-dependent RNA polymerase (RdRp) at the initiation site for minus strand synthesis. RNA-protein interactions were analyzed by using a modified Northwestern blotting protocol that included both viral coat protein and labeled RNA in the probe solution ("far-Northwestern blotting"). We observed that labeled RNA alone bound the replicase proteins poorly; however, complex formation was enhanced significantly in the presence of AMV CP. The RNA-replicase bridging function of the AMV CP may represent a mechanism for accurate de novo initiation in the absence of canonical 3' transfer RNA signals. PMID:17400272

  14. Evaluation of Mungbean Genotypes Based on Yield Stability and Reaction to Mungbean Yellow Mosaic Virus Disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    AKM Mahbubul Alam

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available This work was conducted to identify mungbean genotypes showing yield stability and resistance to mungbean yellow mosaic virus (MYMV disease. Sixteen genotypes were evaluated in a randomized complete block design with two replications for two years (2011 and 2012 at three locations (Gazipur, Ishurdi and Madaripur of the Bangladesh Agricultural Research Institute. An analysis of variance exhibited significant effects of genotype (G, environment (E, and genotype × environment (G×E on grain yield. Among eight agronomic characters, the principal component 1 (PC1 was always higher than the PC2. Considering G×E interaction, BM6 was the best genotype at all three locations in both years. Based on grain yield and stability performance, BM6 ranked first while the worst performing genotypes were BM1 and G10. Based on discrimination and representation, Gazipur was identified as an ideal environment for these mungbeans. Relationship between soil-plant analysis developments (SPAD value was positive with yield but negative with MYMV severity. BM6, G1 and G2 were considered as promising sources of resistance for low disease score and stable response across the environments. The environment proved to have an influence on MYMV infection under natural infestation. A positive correlation was observed between disease score and the temperature under natural growing condition.

  15. Comparative QTL mapping of resistance to sugarcane mosaic virus in maize based on bioinformatics

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Xiangling L(U); Xinhai LI; Chuanxiao XIE; Zhuanfang HAO; Hailian JI; Liyu SHI; Shihuang ZHANG

    2008-01-01

    The development of genomics and bioinfor-matics offers new tools for comparative gene mapping. In this paper, an integrated QTL map for sugarcane mosaic virus (SCMV) resistance in maize was constructed by compiling a total of 81 QTL loci available, using the Genetic Map IBM2 2005 Neighbors as reference. These 81 QTL loci were scattered on 7 chromosomes of maize, and most of them were clustered on chromosomes 3 and 6. By using the method of meta-analysis, we identified one "consensus QTL" on chromosome 3 covering a genetic distance of 6.44 cM, and two on chromosome 6 covering genetic distances of 16 cM and 27.48 cM, respectively. Four positional candidate resistant genes were identified within the "consensus QTL" on chromosome 3 via the strategy of comparative genomics. These results suggest that application of a combination of meta-analysis within a species with sequence homology comparison in a related model plant is an efficient approach to identify the major QTL and its candidate gene(s) for the target traits. The results of this study provide useful information for iden-tifying and cloning the major gene(s) conferring resistance to SCMV in maize.

  16. Mutagenesis in ORF AV2 affects viral replication in Mungbean yellow mosaic India virus

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    A Rouhibakhsh; Q M I Haq; V G Malathi

    2011-06-01

    Mungbean yellow mosaic India virus (MYMIV) is a whitefly-transmitted begomovirus with a bipartite genome. We investigate the functions of the MYMIV-AV2 protein, the open reading frame present upstream of the coat protein gene in DNA A component. The ability of MYMIV-AV2 mutants to replicate, spread and cause symptoms in legume hosts, blackgram, cowpea and French bean was analysed. Plants agroinoculated with mutants K73R, C86S and the double mutant C84S, C86S showed increase in severity of symptoms compared with the wild type. However, mutants W2S and H14Q,G15E caused marked attenuation of symptoms. While the double mutants C84S,C86S caused a 50-fold increase in double-stranded supercoiled and single-stranded DNA accumulation, the mutations W2S and H14Q,G15E showed a decrease in double-stranded supercoiled and single-stranded viral DNA accumulation. Because AV2 mutants affect the ratio between open circular and supercoiled DNA forms, we hypothesize that these mutations may modulate the functions of the replication initiation protein.

  17. Trypsin inhibitors from Capsicum baccatum var. pendulum leaves involved in Pepper yellow mosaic virus resistance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moulin, M M; Rodrigues, R; Ribeiro, S F F; Gonçalves, L S A; Bento, C S; Sudré, C P; Vasconcelos, I M; Gomes, V M

    2014-01-01

    Several plant organs contain proteinase inhibitors, which are produced during normal plant development or are induced upon pathogen attack to suppress the enzymatic activity of phytopathogenic microorganisms. In this study, we examined the presence of proteinase inhibitors, specifically trypsin inhibitors, in the leaf extract of Capsicum baccatum var. pendulum inoculated with PepYMV (Pepper yellow mosaic virus). Leaf extract from plants with the accession number UENF 1624, which is resistant to PepYMV, was collected at 7 different times (0, 24, 48, 72, 96, 120, and 144 h). Seedlings inoculated with PepYMV and control seedlings were grown in a growth chamber. Protein extract from leaf samples was partially purified by reversed-phase chromatography using a C2/C18 column. Residual trypsin activity was assayed to detect inhibitors followed by Tricine-SDS-PAGE analysis to determine the N-terminal peptide sequence. Based on trypsin inhibitor assays, trypsin inhibitors are likely constitutively synthesized in C. baccatum var. pendulum leaf tissue. These inhibitors are likely a defense mechanism for the C. baccatum var. pendulum- PepYMV pathosystem. PMID:25501145

  18. ALFALFA MOSAIC VIRUS COAT PROTEIN BRIDGES RNA AND RNA-DEPENDENT RNA POLYMERASE IN VITRO

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reichert, Vienna L.; Choi, Mehee; Petrillo, Jessica E.; Gehrke, Lee

    2007-01-01

    Alfalfa mosaic virus (AMV) RNA replication requires the viral coat protein (CP). AMV CP is an integral component of the viral replicase; moreover, it binds to the viral RNA 3' termini and induces the formation of multiple new base pairs that organize the RNA conformation. The results described here suggest that AMV coat protein binding defines template selection by organizing the 3'-terminal RNA conformation and by positioning the RNA-dependent RNA polymerase (RdRp) at the initiation site for minus strand synthesis. RNA-protein interactions were analyzed by using a modified northwestern blotting protocol that included both viral coat protein and labeled RNA in the probe solution (“far-northwestern blotting”). We observed that labeled RNA alone bound the replicase proteins poorly; however, complex formation was enhanced significantly in the presence of AMV CP. The RNA-replicase bridging function of the AMV CP may represent a mechanism for accurate de novo initiation in the absence of canonical 3' transfer RNA signals. PMID:17400272

  19. Proteomic analysis of salicylic acid induced resistance to Mungbean Yellow Mosaic India Virus in Vigna mungo.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kundu, Subrata; Chakraborty, Dipjyoti; Pal, Amita

    2011-03-01

    The role of salicylic acid (SA) in inducing resistance to MYMIV infection in Vigna mungo has been elucidated by proteomics. Twenty-nine proteins identified by MALDI-TOF/TOF, predicted to be involved in stress responses, metabolism, photosynthesis, transport and signal transduction, showed increased abundance upon SA treatment. Susceptible plants showed characteristic yellow mosaic symptoms upon MYMIV infection. A concentration dependent decrease in physiological symptoms associated with MYMIV was observed upon exogenous SA treatment prior to viral inoculation; and no visible symptom was observed at 100 μM SA. SA treatment stimulated SOD and GPX activity and inhibited CAT activity thus preventing ROS mediated damage. Significant increase in chlorophyll, protein, carbohydrate, phenolic content and H(2)O(2) were observed. Involvement of calmodulin for transmission of defense signal by SA is suggested. A metabolic reprogramming leading to enhanced synthesis of proteins involved in primary and secondary metabolisms is necessary for SA mediated resistance to MYMIV. Identification of proteins showing increased abundance, involved in photosynthetic process is a significant finding which restores virus-induced degradation of the photosynthetic apparatus and provides enhanced metabolites required for repartition of resources towards defense.

  20. PCNA interacts with Indian mung bean yellow mosaic virus rep and downregulates Rep activity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bagewadi, Basavaraj; Chen, Shoajiang; Lal, Sunil K; Choudhury, Nirupam Roy; Mukherjee, Sunil K

    2004-11-01

    Proliferative cell nuclear antigen (PCNA), a conserved plant protein as well as an important replication factor, is induced in response to geminivirus infection in the resting cells of the phloem tissues. The biochemical role of PCNA in rolling circle replication (RCR) of geminivirus DNA has not been explored in detail. The initiation of RCR of the bipartite genome of a geminivirus, Indian mung bean yellow mosaic virus (IMYMV), is mainly controlled by viral protein Rep (or AL1 or AC1). The role of host PCNA in RCR of IMYMV was revealed by studying the physical and functional interactions between recombinant PCNA and recombinant IMYMV Rep. Pea nuclear PCNA as well as recombinant pea PCNA showed binding to recombinant Rep in experiments involving both affinity chromatography and yeast two-hybrid approaches. The contacting amino acid residues of PCNA seemed to be present throughout a wide region of the trimeric protein, while those of Rep appeared to be localized only in the middle part of the protein. The site-specific nicking-closing activity and the ATPase function of IMYMV Rep were impaired by PCNA. These observations lead to interesting speculations about the control of viral RCR and dynamic profiles of protein-protein interactions at the RCR origin of the geminiviruses. PMID:15479830

  1. cDNA cloning and sequence analysis of NIb gene of soybean mosaic virus

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    刘俊君; 彭学贤; 莽克强

    1995-01-01

    cDNA of soybean mosaic virus (Beijing isolate, SMV-BJ) has been synthesized, using viralgenomic RNA as template and random hexanucleotides as primers. Based on the sequences of SMV-BJ coat protein (CP) gene as well as SMV- and WMV-II-related regions, oligonucleotides were made as primers for polymerase chain reaction (PCR). NIb gene of SMV-BJ was amplified by PCR, and cloned into pBluescript SK. The complete sequence was determined. The comparison of NIb genes between SMV-BJ and WMV-II . (USA) shows that similarities for nucleotide sequence reach 80.3%, and the deduced amino acid sequence. 91 3%. In consideration of the high identities in between the CP gene and the 3’-non-coding region between them, WMV-II might be considered as a watermelon strain of SMV Besides, some unexpected sequences were found in the 3’-region of 2 NIb gene clones. Following modification and splicing, a binary vector of NIb gene has been constructed for its expression in higher plant for the purpose of studying the possible repl

  2. Emergence of a new satellite RNA from cucumber mosaic virus isolate P1

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2003-01-01

    The cucumber mosaic virus (CMV) isolate P1 caused very mild symptoms on many plant species. After serial passages by mechanical inoculation over five years, CMV P1 caused severe symptoms on several tobacco cultivars and tomato. A specific band of approximately 0.3 kb in length was amplified by RT-PCR with primers synthesized based on reported CMV satellite RNA (satRNA) sequences. Sequence analysis showed there were two satRNAs (Sat-P1-1 and Sat-P1-2). Sat-P1-1 contained 335 nucleotides, and Sat-P1-2 contained 394 nucleotides. These two satRNAs shared 64% overall nucleotide sequence homology, and differences between the two satRNAs included mutations as well as deletions. Sat-P1-1 was identical to a satRNA (Z96099) reported in 1995 in CMV P1. Based on differences in the sequence and secondary structure between these two satRNAs, we conclude that Sat-P1-2 represents the emergence of a new satellite (necrotic satellite) from attenuated satRNA populations. The possible effect of the emergence of this new satRNA is discussed.

  3. Emergence of a new satellite RNA from cucumber mosaic virus isolate P1

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    SandraPérezAlvarez; 薛朝阳; 周雪平

    2003-01-01

    The cucumber mosaic virus (CMV) isolate P1 caused very mild symptoms on many plant species.After serial passages by mechanical inoculation over five years, CMV P1 caused severe symptoms on several tobacco cultivars and tomato. A specific band of approximately 0.3 kb in length was amplified by RT-PCR with primers synthesized based on reported CMV satellite RNA (satRNA) sequences. Sequence analysis showed there were two satRNAs (Sat-Pl-1 and Sat-P1-2). Sat-Pl-1 contained 335 nucleotides, and Sat-P1-2 contained 394 nucleotides. These two satRNAs shared 64% overall nucleotide sequence homology, and differences between the two satRNAs included mutations as well as deletions. Sat-Pl-1 was identical to a satRNA (Z96099) reported in 1995 in CMV P1. Based on differences in the sequence and secondary structure between these two satRNAs, we conclude that Sat-P1-2 represents the emergence of a new satellite ( necrotic satellite) from attenuated satRNA populations. The possible effect of the emergence of this new satRNA is discussed.

  4. Genome analysis and characterization of a tobacco mosaic virus isolate infecting balsam (Impatiens balsamina).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Choi, Seung-Kook; Yoon, Ju-Yeon; Chung, Bong-Nam

    2009-01-01

    The complete RNA genomic sequence of a tobacco mosaic virus isolate infecting Impatiens balsamina, designated as TMV-IM, has been determined. The genomic sequence and the predicted gene products of TMV-IM were similar to those of other members of the genus Tobamovirus. The CP ORF of TMV-IM showed sequence identities of 95.0-99.5% with the corresponding ORFs of other TMV strains. Full-length cDNA of TMV-IM was amplified by RT-PCR with a 5'-end primer harboring a T7 promoter sequence and a 3'-end TMV-specific primer. Subsequently, the full-length cDNA was cloned into plasmid vectors. Capped transcripts synthesized from the cDNA clone were highly infectious and caused characteristic symptoms in balsam plants, similar to wild-type TMV-IM and TMV-U1. These results provide definitive evidence for the natural occurrence of TMV in balsam. PMID:19381775

  5. Performances and Germplasm Evaluation of Quantitative Resistance to Soybean Mosaic Virus in Soybeans

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZHI Hai-jian; GAI Jun-yi

    2004-01-01

    A sample composed of 96 soybean accessions was evaluated for their diseased rate (I),diseased rank (S), latent period (LP) and rate of disease development (R) in order tostudy the quantitative resistance to soybean mosaic virus (SMV) in soybeans. The resultsshowed that the performances of the above four resistance components were significantlydifferent among accessions and that some of the accessions, such as Zhongzihuangdou,Peixian Tianedan, Youbian30 could be infected by four SMV strains, Sa, SC8, N1 and N3,but their I, S, and R were lower and LP longer than most other accessions. These resultsdemonstrated the existence of quantitative resistance to SMV in soybeans. It was foundthat some soybean accessions, such as AGS19 and Lishui Zhongzihuangdou, previouslyidentified as resistant to SMV infection, performed some infection but resistant toexpansion in the present study. In addition, the resistance in Pixian Chadou and HuaiyinQiuheidou might be either qualitative or quantitative. Furthermore, the present studyalso indicated that the resistance spectrum and durability of accessions with quantitativeresistance might be wider and longer than those with qualitative resistance.

  6. Accumulation of helper component/proteinase and coat protein of turnip mosaic virus in intact plants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ohshima, K

    1999-02-01

    The helper component/proteinase (HC/Pro) protein of turnip mosaic virus (TuMV) was fused with glutathione S-transferase (GST) and expressed as a fusion protein in Escherichia coli. The quality of antiserum raised against the GST-HC/Pro fusion protein was compared to that of antiserum raised against coat protein (CP) by image analyser. The result showed that these antisera were of similar quality. Then the both antisera were used to follow the time course of accumulation of HC/Pro protein and CP in intact TuMV-infected leaves. CP appeared first at day 3 post inoculation (p.i.) and gradually accumulated in uninoculated upper leaves, whereas HC/Pro protein appeared first at day 4 p.i., accumulated up to day 7 p.i. and then gradually decreased. Potyvirus proteins are encoded by a single translation unit spanning most of the genome and are presumably synthesized in equimolar ratios. Therefore, the reduced accumulation of HC/Pro protein in relation to CP at one month p.i. in infected plants is presumed to be the result of its degradation. PMID:10672341

  7. Nicotiana small RNA sequences support a host genome origin of cucumber mosaic virus satellite RNA.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kiran Zahid

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Satellite RNAs (satRNAs are small noncoding subviral RNA pathogens in plants that depend on helper viruses for replication and spread. Despite many decades of research, the origin of satRNAs remains unknown. In this study we show that a β-glucuronidase (GUS transgene fused with a Cucumber mosaic virus (CMV Y satellite RNA (Y-Sat sequence (35S-GUS:Sat was transcriptionally repressed in N. tabacum in comparison to a 35S-GUS transgene that did not contain the Y-Sat sequence. This repression was not due to DNA methylation at the 35S promoter, but was associated with specific DNA methylation at the Y-Sat sequence. Both northern blot hybridization and small RNA deep sequencing detected 24-nt siRNAs in wild-type Nicotiana plants with sequence homology to Y-Sat, suggesting that the N. tabacum genome contains Y-Sat-like sequences that give rise to 24-nt sRNAs capable of guiding RNA-directed DNA methylation (RdDM to the Y-Sat sequence in the 35S-GUS:Sat transgene. Consistent with this, Southern blot hybridization detected multiple DNA bands in Nicotiana plants that had sequence homology to Y-Sat, suggesting that Y-Sat-like sequences exist in the Nicotiana genome as repetitive DNA, a DNA feature associated with 24-nt sRNAs. Our results point to a host genome origin for CMV satRNAs, and suggest novel approach of using small RNA sequences for finding the origin of other satRNAs.

  8. Complete nucleotide sequence of Alfalfa mosaic virus isolated from alfalfa (Medicago sativa L.) in Argentina.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Trucco, Verónica; de Breuil, Soledad; Bejerman, Nicolás; Lenardon, Sergio; Giolitti, Fabián

    2014-06-01

    The complete nucleotide sequence of an Alfalfa mosaic virus (AMV) isolate infecting alfalfa (Medicago sativa L.) in Argentina, AMV-Arg, was determined. The virus genome has the typical organization described for AMV, and comprises 3,643, 2,593, and 2,038 nucleotides for RNA1, 2 and 3, respectively. The whole genome sequence and each encoding region were compared with those of other four isolates that have been completely sequenced from China, Italy, Spain and USA. The nucleotide identity percentages ranged from 95.9 to 99.1 % for the three RNAs and from 93.7 to 99 % for the protein 1 (P1), protein 2 (P2), movement protein and coat protein (CP) encoding regions, whereas the amino acid identity percentages of these proteins ranged from 93.4 to 99.5 %, the lowest value corresponding to P2. CP sequences of AMV-Arg were compared with those of other 25 available isolates, and the phylogenetic analysis based on the CP gene was carried out. The highest percentage of nucleotide sequence identity of the CP gene was 98.3 % with a Chinese isolate and 98.6 % at the amino acid level with four isolates, two from Italy, one from Brazil and the remaining one from China. The phylogenetic analysis showed that AMV-Arg is closely related to subgroup I of AMV isolates. To our knowledge, this is the first report of a complete nucleotide sequence of AMV from South America and the first worldwide report of complete nucleotide sequence of AMV isolated from alfalfa as natural host. PMID:24510307

  9. Evaluation of the conformational switch model for alfalfa mosaic virus RNA replication.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Petrillo, Jessica E; Rocheleau, Gail; Kelley-Clarke, Brenna; Gehrke, Lee

    2005-05-01

    Key elements of the conformational switch model describing regulation of alfalfa mosaic virus (AMV) replication (R. C. Olsthoorn, S. Mertens, F. T. Brederode, and J. F. Bol, EMBO J. 18:4856-4864, 1999) have been tested using biochemical assays and functional studies in nontransgenic protoplasts. Although comparative sequence analysis suggests that the 3' untranslated regions of AMV and ilarvirus RNAs have the potential to fold into pseudoknots, we were unable to confirm that a proposed pseudoknot forms or has a functional role in regulating coat protein-RNA binding or viral RNA replication. Published work has suggested that the pseudoknot is part of a tRNA-like structure (TLS); however, we argue that the canonical sequence and functional features that define the TLS are absent. We suggest here that the absence of the TLS correlates directly with the distinctive requirement for coat protein to activate replication in these viruses. Experimental data are evidence that elevated magnesium concentrations proposed to stabilize the pseudoknot structure do not block coat protein binding. Additionally, covarying nucleotide changes proposed to reestablish pseudoknot pairings do not rescue replication. Furthermore, as described in the accompanying paper (L. M. Guogas, S. M. Laforest, and L. Gehrke, J. Virol. 79:5752-5761, 2005), coat protein is not, by definition, inhibitory to minus-strand RNA synthesis. Rather, the activation of viral RNA replication by coat protein is shown to be concentration dependent. We describe the 3' organization model as an alternate model of AMV replication that offers an improved fit to the available data. PMID:15827189

  10. Genetic and histological studies on the delayed systemic movement of Tobacco Mosaic Virus in Arabidopsis thaliana

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Matus José

    2008-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Viral infections and their spread throughout a plant require numerous interactions between the host and the virus. While new functions of viral proteins involved in these processes have been revealed, current knowledge of host factors involved in the spread of a viral infection is still insufficient. In Arabidopsis thaliana, different ecotypes present varying susceptibilities to Tobacco mosaic virus strain U1 (TMV-U1. The rate of TMV-U1 systemic movement is delayed in ecotype Col-0 when compared with other 13 ecotypes. We followed viral movement through vascular tissue in Col-0 plants by electronic microscopy studies. In addition, the delay in systemic movement of TMV-U1 was genetically studied. Results TMV-U1 reaches apical leaves only after 18 days post rosette inoculation (dpi in Col-0, whereas it is detected at 9 dpi in the Uk-4 ecotype. Genetic crosses between Col-0 and Uk-4 ecotypes, followed by analysis of viral movement in F1 and F2 populations, revealed that this delayed movement correlates with a recessive, monogenic and nuclear locus. The use of selected polymorphic markers showed that this locus, denoted DSTM1 (Delayed Systemic Tobamovirus Movement 1, is positioned on the large arm of chromosome II. Electron microscopy studies following the virion's route in stems of Col-0 infected plants showed the presence of curved structures, instead of the typical rigid rods of TMV-U1. This was not observed in the case of TMV-U1 infection in Uk-4, where the observed virions have the typical rigid rod morphology. Conclusion The presence of defectively assembled virions observed by electron microscopy in vascular tissue of Col-0 infected plants correlates with a recessive delayed systemic movement trait of TMV-U1 in this ecotype.

  11. Monoclonal antibody-based serological methods for detection of Cucumber green mottle mosaic virus

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Qian Yajuan

    2011-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Cucumber green mottle mosaic virus (CGMMV, a member of the genus Tobamovirus, can be transmitted by seeds and infects many cucurbit species, causing serious yield losses in cucumber and watermelon plants. In this paper, five serological methods including antigen-coated plate enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ACP-ELISA, triple antibody sandwich enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (TAS-ELISA, Dot-immunobinding assay (DBIA, direct tissue blot immunoassay (DTBIA and immunocapture reverse transcriptase polymerase chain reaction (IC-RT-PCR were described for detection and diagnosis of CGMMV. Results Using the purified CGMMV particles as immunogens, six murine monoclonal antibodies (MAbs were produced. Five serological methods were established using the MAb 4H1 and detection sensitivity was compared using purified preparations and infected-plant tissue extracts. The detection sensitivity of ACP-ELISA was 0.16 ng of purified CGMMV, whereas TAS-ELISA was more sensitive than ACP-ELISA with a minimum detection of 0.04 ng of purified CGMMV. The sensitivities of TAS-ELISA and DBIA were similar for detecting CGMMV in infected-plant tissue extracts, and were four times higher than ACP-ELISA. The IC-RT-PCR was the most sensitive method, which could detect as little as 0.1 pg of purified virus. The detection sensitivity of IC-RT-PCR for CGMMV-infected plant tissues was about 400 times higher than that of TAS-ELISA and DBIA. Conclusions The established ACP-ELISA, TAS-ELISA, DBIA and DTBIA are suitable for routine CGMMV detection of large-scale samples in the field survey, while IC-RT-PCR is more sensitive and suitable for acquiring information about the viral genome.

  12. Virus-Specific Read-Through Codon Preference Affects Infectivity of Chimeric Cucumber Green Mottle Mosaic Viruses Displaying a Dengue Virus Epitope

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pak-Guan Teoh

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available A Cucumber green mottle mosaic virus (CGMMV was used to present a truncated dengue virus type 2 envelope (E protein binding region from amino acids 379 to 423 (EB4. The EB4 gene was inserted at the terminal end of the CGMMV coat protein (CP open reading frame (ORF. Read-through sequences of TMV or CGMMV, CAA-UAG-CAA-UUA, or AAA-UAG-CAA-UUA were, respectively, inserted in between the CP and the EB4 genes. The chimeric clones, pRT, pRG, and pCG+FSRTRE, were transcribed into full-length capped recombinant CGMMV transcripts. Only constructs with the wild-type CGMMV read-through sequence yielded infectious viruses following infection of host plant, muskmelon (Cucumis melo leaves. The ratio of modified to unmodified CP for the read-through expression clone developed was also found to be approximately 1:1, higher than what has been previously reported. It was also observed that infectivity was not affected by differences in pI between the chimera and its wild counterpart. Analysis of recombinant viruses after 21-days-postinculation (dpi revealed that deletions occurred resulting in partial reversions of the viral population to near wild type and suggesting that this would be the limiting harvest period for obtaining true to type recombinants with this construct.

  13. Deletions within the 3' Non-Translated Region of Alfalfa mosaic virus RNA4 Do Not Affect Replication but Significantly Reduce Long-Distance Movement of Chimeric Tobacco mosaic virus

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vidadi Yusibov

    2013-07-01

    Full Text Available Alfalfa mosaic virus (AlMV RNAs 1 and 2 with deletions in their 3' non‑translated regions (NTRs have been previously shown to be encapsidated into virions by coat protein (CP expressed from RNA3, indicating that the 3' NTRs of RNAs 1 and 2 are not required for virion assembly. Here, we constructed various mutants by deleting sequences within the 3' NTR of AlMV subgenomic (sg RNA4 (same as of RNA3 and examined the effect of these deletions on replication and translation of chimeric Tobacco mosaic virus (TMV expressing AlMV sgRNA4 from the TMV CP sg promoter (Av/A4 in tobacco protoplasts and Nicotiana benthamiana plants. While the Av/A4 mutants were as competent as the wild-type Av/A4 in RNA replication in protoplasts, their encapsidation, long-distance movement and virus accumulation varied significantly in N. benthamiana. These data suggest that the 3' NTR of AlMV sgRNA4 contains potential elements necessary for virus encapsidation.

  14. Deletions within the 3' non-translated region of Alfalfa mosaic virus RNA4 do not affect replication but significantly reduce long-distance movement of chimeric Tobacco mosaic virus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roy, Gourgopal; Fedorkin, Oleg; Fujiki, Masaaki; Skarjinskaia, Marina; Knapp, Elisabeth; Rabindran, Shailaja; Yusibov, Vidadi

    2013-07-01

    Alfalfa mosaic virus (AlMV) RNAs 1 and 2 with deletions in their 3' non‑translated regions (NTRs) have been previously shown to be encapsidated into virions by coat protein (CP) expressed from RNA3, indicating that the 3' NTRs of RNAs 1 and 2 are not required for virion assembly. Here, we constructed various mutants by deleting sequences within the 3' NTR of AlMV subgenomic (sg) RNA4 (same as of RNA3) and examined the effect of these deletions on replication and translation of chimeric Tobacco mosaic virus (TMV) expressing AlMV sgRNA4 from the TMV CP sg promoter (Av/A4) in tobacco protoplasts and Nicotiana benthamiana plants. While the Av/A4 mutants were as competent as the wild-type Av/A4 in RNA replication in protoplasts, their encapsidation, long-distance movement and virus accumulation varied significantly in N. benthamiana. These data suggest that the 3' NTR of AlMV sgRNA4 contains potential elements necessary for virus encapsidation. PMID:23867804

  15. Seleção de linhagens de melancia resistentes ao Watermelon mosaic virus e ao Papaya ringspot virus Selection of resistant watermelon lines to Watermelon mosaic virus and Papaya ringspot virus

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    José Evando Aguiar Beserra Júnior

    2007-10-01

    Full Text Available Foram avaliadas 20 linhagens de melancia, provenientes do cruzamento da cultivar comercial suscetível Crimson Sweet e da introdução PI 595201 resistente ao Watermelon mosaic virus (WMV e Papaya ringspot virus (PRSV-W. As linhagens, e os parentais foram inoculados com o WMV ou com o PRSV-W em casa-de-vegetação distintas. Aos 35 e 49 dias após a primeira inoculação (DAI, as plantas foram avaliadas por meio de uma escala de notas, em que 1 (ausência de sintomas a 5 (intenso mosaico e deformações foliares. Pelos resultados infere-se que, aos 35 DAI, as linhagens 1, 2 e 20 apresentaram resistência tanto para o WMV como para o PRSV-W, com médias de 1,95, 1,80 e 2,25 para o WMV, e de 2,50, 2,30 e 2,50 para o PRSV-W, respectivamente. As linhagens 5, 7 e 13 foram resistentes somente ao WMV e as plantas das linhagens 3, 10 e 18 para o PRSV-W. A reação das linhagens permaneceu em geral pouco alterada aos 49 DAI. A existência de linhagens resistentes somente ao WMV e somente ao PRSV-W, ao lado de linhagens resistentes a ambos os vírus, é indicativo de que as resistências ao WMV e ao PRSV-W não são controladas pelos mesmos genes.Twenty advanced watermelon breeding lines, derived from the cross between cv. Crimson Sweet (susceptible and PI 595201 (resistant to WMV and PRSV-W, were screened for resistance to both potyviruses. The twenty lines, among with Crimson Sweet and PI 595201, were inoculated with either WMV or PRSV-W, in two different greenhouse trials. Plants were evaluated for symptoms 35 and 49 days after the first inoculation (DAI, using a scale from 1 (no symptoms to 5 (severe mosaic and foliar distortion. Evaluations at 35 DAI indicated that lines 1, 2 and 20 had good levels of resistance to both WMV and PRSV-W, with ratings of 1,95, 1,80 and 2,25 for WMV, and of 2,50, 2,30 and 2,50 for PRSV-W, respectively. Lines 5, 7 and 13 were resistant to WMV only, whereas lines 3, 10 and 18 were resistant to PRSV-W only. The reaction of

  16. Genomic variability and molecular evolution of Asian isolates of sugarcane streak mosaic virus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liang, Shan-Shan; Alabi, Olufemi J; Damaj, Mona B; Fu, Wei-Lin; Sun, Sheng-Ren; Fu, Hua-Ying; Chen, Ru-Kai; Mirkov, T Erik; Gao, San-Ji

    2016-06-01

    Sugarcane streak mosaic virus (SCSMV), an economically important causal agent of mosaic disease of sugarcane, is a member of the newly created genus Poacevirus in the family Potyviridae. In this study, we report the molecular characterization of three new SCSMV isolates from China (YN-YZ211 and HN-YZ49) and Myanmar (MYA-Formosa) and their genetic variation and phylogenetic relationship to SCSMV isolates from Asia and the type members of the family Potyviridae. The complete genome of each of the three isolates was determined to be 9781 nucleotides (nt) in size, excluding the 3' poly(A) tail. Phylogenetic analysis of the complete polyprotein amino acid (aa) sequences (3130 aa) revealed that all SCSMV isolates clustered into a phylogroup specific to the genus Poacevirus and formed two distinct clades designated as group I and group II. Isolates YN-YZ211, HN-YZ49 and MYA-Formosa clustered into group I, sharing 96.8-99.5 % and 98.9-99.6 % nt (at the complete genomic level) and aa (at the polyprotein level) identity, respectively, among themselves and 81.2-98.8 % and 94.0-99.6 % nt (at the complete genomic level) and aa (at the polyprotein level) identity, respectively, with the corresponding sequences of seven Asian SCSMV isolates. Population genetic analysis revealed greater between-group (0.190 ± 0.004) than within-group (group I = 0.025 ± 0.001 and group II = 0.071 ± 0.003) evolutionary divergence values, further supporting the results of the phylogenetic analysis. Further analysis indicated that natural selection might have contributed to the evolution of isolates belonging to the two identified SCSMV clades, with infrequent genetic exchanges occurring between them over time. These findings provide a comprehensive analysis of the population genetic structure and driving forces for the evolution of SCSMV with implications for global exchange of sugarcane germplasm. PMID:26973230

  17. Narrow bottlenecks affect Pea seedborne mosaic virus populations during vertical seed transmission but not during leaf colonization.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Frédéric Fabre

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available The effective size of populations (Ne determines whether selection or genetic drift is the predominant force shaping their genetic structure and evolution. Populations having high Ne adapt faster, as selection acts more intensely, than populations having low Ne, where random effects of genetic drift dominate. Estimating Ne for various steps of plant virus life cycle has been the focus of several studies in the last decade, but no estimates are available for the vertical transmission of plant viruses, although virus seed transmission is economically significant in at least 18% of plant viruses in at least one plant species. Here we study the co-dynamics of two variants of Pea seedborne mosaic virus (PSbMV colonizing leaves of pea plants (Pisum sativum L. during the whole flowering period, and their subsequent transmission to plant progeny through seeds. Whereas classical estimators of Ne could be used for leaf infection at the systemic level, as virus variants were equally competitive, dedicated stochastic models were needed to estimate Ne during vertical transmission. Very little genetic drift was observed during the infection of apical leaves, with Ne values ranging from 59 to 216. In contrast, a very drastic genetic drift was observed during vertical transmission, with an average number of infectious virus particles contributing to the infection of a seedling from an infected mother plant close to one. A simple model of vertical transmission, assuming a cumulative action of virus infectious particles and a virus density threshold required for vertical transmission to occur fitted the experimental data very satisfactorily. This study reveals that vertically-transmitted viruses endure bottlenecks as narrow as those imposed by horizontal transmission. These bottlenecks are likely to slow down virus adaptation and could decrease virus fitness and virulence.

  18. Method: a single nucleotide polymorphism genotyping method for Wheat streak mosaic virus

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rogers Stephanie M

    2012-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The September 11, 2001 attacks on the World Trade Center and the Pentagon increased the concern about the potential for terrorist attacks on many vulnerable sectors of the US, including agriculture. The concentrated nature of crops, easily obtainable biological agents, and highly detrimental impacts make agroterrorism a potential threat. Although procedures for an effective criminal investigation and attribution following such an attack are available, important enhancements are still needed, one of which is the capability for fine discrimination among pathogen strains. The purpose of this study was to develop a molecular typing assay for use in a forensic investigation, using Wheat streak mosaic virus (WSMV as a model plant virus. Method This genotyping technique utilizes single base primer extension to generate a genetic fingerprint. Fifteen single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs within the coat protein and helper component-protease genes were selected as the genetic markers for this assay. Assay optimization and sensitivity testing was conducted using synthetic targets. WSMV strains and field isolates were collected from regions around the world and used to evaluate the assay for discrimination. The assay specificity was tested against a panel of near-neighbors consisting of genetic and environmental near-neighbors. Result Each WSMV strain or field isolate tested produced a unique SNP fingerprint, with the exception of three isolates collected within the same geographic location that produced indistinguishable fingerprints. The results were consistent among replicates, demonstrating the reproducibility of the assay. No SNP fingerprints were generated from organisms included in the near-neighbor panel, suggesting the assay is specific for WSMV. Using synthetic targets, a complete profile could be generated from as low as 7.15 fmoles of cDNA. Conclusion The molecular typing method presented is one tool that could be

  19. Implicaciones de los abejorros (Bombus spp.) en la dispersión del virus del mosaico del pepino dulce (Pepino Mosaic Virus) en cultivos de tomate

    OpenAIRE

    Lacasa Plasencia, Alfredo; Guerrero Díaz, María del Mar; Hita, I.; Martínez Francés, María A.; Jordá Gutiérrez, María Concepción; Bielza Lino, Pablo; Contreras Gallego, Joséfa; Alcázar, A.; Cano, A.

    2002-01-01

    [ESP] Desde 1999 el virus del mosaico del pepino dulce (Pepino Mosaic Virus, PepMV) afecta el cultivo del tomate en varios países europeos. Produce abullonado, mosaicos y filiformismo en las hojas jóvenes y jaspeado y pardeamiento en los frutos. Se transmite fácilmente por contacto entre plantas y mecánicamente por las manipulaciones de las labores culturales (desbrotado, entutorado, etc.). Se han realizado ensayos para conocer las posibles implicaciones de los abejorros pol...

  20. Characterization of Rhynchosia yellow mosaic Yucatan virus, a new recombinant begomovirus associated with two fabaceous weeds in Yucatan, Mexico.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hernández-Zepeda, C; Brown, J K; Moreno-Valenzuela, O A; Argüello-Astorga, G; Idris, A M; Carnevali, G; Rivera-Bustamante, R F

    2010-10-01

    Rhynchosia minima (L.) DC. (Fabaceae) plants exhibiting bright golden mosaic symptoms were previously associated with begomovirus infection in Yucatan, México [1]. To characterize the begomovirus infecting these plants, the complete bipartite genome was cloned and sequenced. Sequence comparisons indicated that the virus was distinct from all other begomoviruses known to date, including those previously identified from symptomatic R. minima, and the name Rhynchosia yellow mosaic Yucatan virus (RhYMYuV) is proposed. Pairwise comparisons indicated that RhYMYuV DNA-A [2,597 nt, (EU021216)] and DNA-B [2,542 nt, (FJ792608)] components shared the highest nt sequence identity with Cabbage leaf curl virus (CaLCuV), 87% for component A and 71% for component B. Phylogenetic analysis indicated that both components of RhYMYuV are most closely related to other New World begomoviruses, having as closest relatives immediate outliers to the major Squash leaf curl virus (SLCV) clade. Recombination analysis of the RhYMYuV genome indicated that the DNA-A component has arisen through intermolecular recombination. R. minima plants inoculated with the monomeric clones developed a bright yellow mosaic similar to symptoms observed in naturally infected plants, confirming that the clones were infectious. Nicotiana benthamiana plants biolistically inoculated with monomeric clones developed curling and chlorosis in the newly emerging leaves. RhYMYuV was also detected in symptomatic Desmodium sect. Scorpiurus Benth. (Fabaceae) that were collected near the RhYMYuV-infected plants. PMID:20574644

  1. Early embryo invasion as a determinant in pea of the seed transmission of pea seed-borne mosaic virus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, D; Maule, A J

    1992-07-01

    Seed transmission of an isolate of pea seed-borne mosaic virus (PSbMV) in several pea genotypes has been studied. Cross-pollination experiments showed that pollen transmission of PSbMV did not occur and accordingly, virus was not detected in pollen grains by ELISA or electron microscopy. Comparative studies between two pea cultivars, one with a high incidence of seed transmission and one with none, showed that PSbMV infected the floral tissues (sepals, petals, anther and carpel) of both cultivars, but was not detected in ovules prior to fertilization. Virus was detected equally well in seed coats of the progeny in both cultivars. Analysis of virus incidence and concentration in pea seeds of different developmental stages demonstrated that in the cultivar with a high incidence of seed transmission, PSbMV directly invaded immature embryos, multiplied in the embryonic tissues and persisted during seed maturation. In contrast, the cultivar without seed transmission did not show invasion of immature embryos by the virus; there was no evidence for virus multiplication or persistence during embryo development and seed maturation. Hence seed transmission of PSbMV resulted from direct invasion of immature pea embryos by the virus and the block to seed transmission in the non-permissive cultivar probably occurred at this step.

  2. Temporal analysis of reassortment and molecular evolution of Cucumber mosaic virus: Extra clues from its segmented genome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ohshima, Kazusato; Matsumoto, Kosuke; Yasaka, Ryosuke; Nishiyama, Mai; Soejima, Kenta; Korkmaz, Savas; Ho, Simon Y W; Gibbs, Adrian J; Takeshita, Minoru

    2016-01-01

    Cucumber mosaic virus (CMV) is a damaging pathogen of over 200 mono- and dicotyledonous crop species worldwide. It has the broadest known host range of any virus, but the timescale of its evolution is unknown. To investigate the evolutionary history of this virus, we obtained the genomic sequences of 40 CMV isolates from brassicas sampled in Iran, Turkey and Japan, and combined them with published sequences. Our synonymous ('silent') site analyses revealed that the present CMV population is the progeny of a single ancestor existing 1550-2600 years ago, but that the population mostly radiated 295-545 years ago. We found that the major CMV lineages are not phylogeographically confined, but that recombination and reassortment is restricted to local populations and that no reassortant lineage is more than 251 years old. Our results highlight the different evolutionary patterns seen among viral pathogens of brassica crops across the world. PMID:26539800

  3. Feasibility Study for Detection of Turnip yellow mosaic virus (TYMV Infection of Chinese Cabbage Plants Using Raman Spectroscopy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Saetbyeol Kim

    2013-03-01

    Full Text Available Raman spectroscopy provides many advantages compared to other common analytical techniques due to its ability of rapid and accurate identification of unknown specimens as well as simple sample preparation. Here, we described potential of Raman spectroscopic technique as an efficient and high throughput method to detect plants infected by economically important viruses. To enhance the detection sensitivity of Raman measurement, surface enhanced Raman scattering (SERS was employed. Spectra of extracts from healthy and Turnip yellow mosaic virus (TYMV infected Chinese cabbage leaves were collected by mixing with gold (Au nanoparticles. Our result showed that TYMV infected plants could be discriminated from non-infected healthy plants, suggesting the current method described here would be an alternative potential tool to screen virus-infection of plants in fields although it needs more studies to generalize the technique.

  4. Nanoscale device architectures derived from biological assemblies: The case of tobacco mosaic virus and (apo)ferritin

    Science.gov (United States)

    Calò, Annalisa; Eiben, Sabine; Okuda, Mitsuhiro; Bittner, Alexander M.

    2016-03-01

    Virus particles and proteins are excellent examples of naturally occurring structures with well-defined nanoscale architectures, for example, cages and tubes. These structures can be employed in a bottom-up assembly strategy to fabricate repetitive patterns of hybrid organic-inorganic materials. In this paper, we review methods of assembly that make use of protein and virus scaffolds to fabricate patterned nanostructures with very high spatial control. We chose (apo)ferritin and tobacco mosaic virus (TMV) as model examples that have already been applied successfully in nanobiotechnology. Their interior space and their exterior surfaces can be mineralized with inorganic layers or nanoparticles. Furthermore, their native assembly abilities can be exploited to generate periodic architectures for integration in electrical and magnetic devices. We introduce the state of the art and describe recent advances in biomineralization techniques, patterning and device production with (apo)ferritin and TMV.

  5. Types of variation in DNA-A among isolates of East African cassava mosaic virus from Kenya, Malawi and Tanzania.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, X; Robinson, D J; Harrison, B D

    1998-11-01

    Complete nucleotide sequences of the DNA-A-like molecules of three East African cassava mosaic virus (EACMV) isolates from Kenya (-K, 2801 nt) and Malawi (-MH and -MK, both 2804 nt) were determined. These sequences were compared with that published for a Tanzanian isolate (-T, 2801 nt) and the partial sequence of a third Malawian isolate. Intergenic region sequences of all isolates, and deduced amino acid sequences of their AC1 (Rep) proteins, each formed a tightly related cluster that was distinct from the comparable components of other begomoviruses. Other complementary-sense genes (AC2, AC3, AC4) differed between EACMV isolates in a way consistent with the accumulation of point mutations. In contrast, virus-sense genes (CP, AV2) of isolates -MH and -MK differed (substantially for AV2) from those of other EACMV isolates but somewhat resembled those of tomato yellow leaf curl virus-Israel, suggesting they had been acquired by recombination with an unidentified begomovirus.

  6. Phylogenetic analysis of Tomato mosaic virus from Hemerocallis sp. and Impatiens hawkeri Análise filogenética de Tomato mosaic virus isolado de Hemerocallis sp. e Impatiens hawkeri

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lígia Maria Lembo Duarte

    2007-12-01

    Full Text Available The culture and commercialization of ornamental plants have considerably increased in the last years. To supply the commercial demand, several Hemerocallis and Impatiens varieties have been bred for appreciated qualities such as flowers with a diversity of shapes and colors. With the aim of characterizing the tobamovirus isolated from Hemerocallis sp. (tobamo-H and Impatiens hawkeri (tobamo-I from the USA and São Paulo, respectively, as well as to establish phylogenetic relationships between them and other Tobamovirus species, the viruses were submitted to RNA extraction, RT-PCR amplification, coat-protein gene sequencing and phylogenetic analyses. Comparison of tobamovirus homologous sequences yielded values superior to 98.5% of identity with Tomato mosaic virus (ToMV isolates at the nucleotide level. In relation to tobamo-H, 100% of identity with ToMV from tomatoes from Australia and Peru was found. Based on maximum likelihood (ML analysis it was suggested that tobamo-H and tobamo-I share a common ancestor with ToMV, Tobacco mosaic virus, Odontoglossum ringspot virus and Pepper mild mottle virus. The tree topology reconstructed under ML methodology shows a monophyletic group, supported by 100% of bootstrap, consisting of various ToMV isolates from different hosts, including some ornamentals, from different geographical locations. The results indicate that Hemerocallis sp. and I. hawkeri are infected by ToMV. This is the first report of the occurrence of this virus in ornamental species in Brazil.O cultivo e comercialização de plantas ornamentais têm aumentado consideravelmente nos últimos anos. Para suprir a demanda comercial, diversas variedades de Hemerocallis sp. e Impatiens hawkeri têm sido desenvolvidas pelas qualidades apreciáveis como flores com diversidade de formas e cores. Com o objetivo de caracterizar o tobamovirus isolado de Hemerocallis sp. (tobamo-H e Impatiens hawkeri (tobamo-I provenientes dos EUA e São Paulo

  7. Development of a Multivalent Subunit Vaccine against Tularemia Using Tobacco Mosaic Virus (TMV) Based Delivery System.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Banik, Sukalyani; Mansour, Ahd Ahmed; Suresh, Ragavan Varadharajan; Wykoff-Clary, Sherri; Malik, Meenakshi; McCormick, Alison A; Bakshi, Chandra Shekhar

    2015-01-01

    Francisella tularensis is a facultative intracellular pathogen, and is the causative agent of a fatal human disease known as tularemia. F. tularensis is classified as a Category A Biothreat agent by the CDC based on its use in bioweapon programs by several countries in the past and its potential to be used as an agent of bioterrorism. No licensed vaccine is currently available for prevention of tularemia. In this study, we used a novel approach for development of a multivalent subunit vaccine against tularemia by using an efficient tobacco mosaic virus (TMV) based delivery platform. The multivalent subunit vaccine was formulated to contain a combination of F. tularensis protective antigens: OmpA-like protein (OmpA), chaperone protein DnaK and lipoprotein Tul4 from the highly virulent F. tularensis SchuS4 strain. Two different vaccine formulations and immunization schedules were used. The immunized mice were challenged with lethal (10xLD100) doses of F. tularensis LVS on day 28 of the primary immunization and observed daily for morbidity and mortality. Results from this study demonstrate that TMV can be used as a carrier for effective delivery of multiple F. tularensis antigens. TMV-conjugate vaccine formulations are safe and multiple doses can be administered without causing any adverse reactions in immunized mice. Immunization with TMV-conjugated F. tularensis proteins induced a strong humoral immune response and protected mice against respiratory challenges with very high doses of F. tularensis LVS. This study provides a proof-of-concept that TMV can serve as a suitable platform for simultaneous delivery of multiple protective antigens of F. tularensis. Refinement of vaccine formulations coupled with TMV-targeting strategies developed in this study will provide a platform for development of an effective tularemia subunit vaccine as well as a vaccination approach that may broadly be applicable to many other bacterial pathogens.

  8. Characteristics of a Lettuce mosaic virus Isolate Infecting Lettuce in Korea

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Seungmo Lim

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available Lettuce mosaic virus (LMV causes disease of plants in the family Asteraceae, especially lettuce crops. LMV isolates have previously been clustered in three main groups, LMV-Yar, LMV-Greek and LMVRoW. The first two groups, LMV-Yar and LMV-Greek, have similar characteristics such as no seed-borne transmission and non-resistance-breaking. The latter one, LMV-RoW, comprising a large percentage of the LMV isolates contains two large subgroups, LMV-Common and LMV-Most. To date, however, no Korean LMV isolate has been classified and characterized. In this study, LMV-Muju, the Korean LMV isolate, was isolated from lettuce showing pale green and mottle symptoms, and its complete genome sequence was determined. Classification method of LMV isolates based on nucleotide sequence divergence of the NIb-CP junction showed that LMV-Muju was categorized as LMV-Common. LMV-Muju was more similar to LMV-O (LMV-Common subgroup than to LMV-E (LMV-RoW group but not LMV-Common subgroup even in the amino acid domains of HC-Pro associated with pathogenicity, and in the CI and VPg regions related to ability to overcome resistance. Taken together, LMV-Muju belongs to the LMV-Common subgroup, and is expected to be a seed-borne, non-resistance-breaking isolate. According to our analysis, all other LMV isolates not previously assigned to a subgroup were also included in the LMV-RoW group.

  9. In vitro and in vivo studies of the RNA conformational switch in Alfalfa mosaic virus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Shih-Cheng; Olsthoorn, René C L

    2010-02-01

    The 3' termini of Alfalfa mosaic virus (AMV) RNAs adopt two mutually exclusive conformations, a coat protein binding (CPB) and a tRNA-like (TL) conformer, which consist of a linear array of stem-loop structures and a pseudoknot structure, respectively. Previously, switching between CPB and TL conformers has been proposed as a mechanism to regulate the competing processes of translation and replication of the viral RNA (R. C. L. Olsthoorn et al., EMBO J. 18:4856-4864, 1999). In the present study, the switch between CPB and TL conformers was further investigated. First, we showed that recognition of the AMV 3' untranslated region (UTR) by a tRNA-specific enzyme (CCA-adding enzyme) in vitro is more efficient when the distribution is shifted toward the TL conformation. Second, the recognition of the 3' UTR by the viral replicase was similarly dependent on the ratio of CBP and TL conformers. Furthermore, the addition of CP, which is expected to shift the distribution toward the CPB conformer, inhibited recognition by the CCA-adding enzyme and the replicase. Finally, we monitored how the binding affinity to CP is affected by this conformational switch in the yeast three-hybrid system. Here, disruption of the pseudoknot enhanced the binding affinity to CP by shifting the balance in favor of the CPB conformer, whereas stabilizing the pseudoknot did the reverse. Together, the in vitro and in vivo data clearly demonstrate the existence of the conformational switch in the 3' UTR of AMV RNAs. PMID:19923185

  10. Coat protein activation of alfalfa mosaic virus replication is concentration dependent.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guogas, Laura M; Laforest, Siana M; Gehrke, Lee

    2005-05-01

    Alfalfa mosaic virus (AMV) and ilarvirus RNAs are infectious only in the presence of the viral coat protein; therefore, an understanding of coat protein's function is important for defining viral replication mechanisms. Based on in vitro replication experiments, the conformational switch model states that AMV coat protein blocks minus-strand RNA synthesis (R. C. Olsthoorn, S. Mertens, F. T. Brederode, and J. F. Bol, EMBO J. 18:4856-4864, 1999), while another report states that coat protein present in an inoculum is required to permit minus-strand synthesis (L. Neeleman and J. F. Bol, Virology 254:324-333, 1999). Here, we report on experiments that address these contrasting results with a goal of defining coat protein's function in the earliest stages of AMV replication. To detect coat-protein-activated AMV RNA replication, we designed and characterized a subgenomic luciferase reporter construct. We demonstrate that activation of viral RNA replication by coat protein is concentration dependent; that is, replication was strongly stimulated at low coat protein concentrations but decreased progressively at higher concentrations. Genomic RNA3 mutations preventing coat protein mRNA translation or disrupting coat protein's RNA binding domain diminished replication. The data indicate that RNA binding and an ongoing supply of coat protein are required to initiate replication on progeny genomic RNA transcripts. The data do not support the conformational switch model's claim that coat protein inhibits the initial stages of viral RNA replication. Replication activation may correlate with low local coat protein concentrations and low coat protein occupancy on the multiple binding sites present in the 3' untranslated regions of the viral RNAs. PMID:15827190

  11. Spatial determinants of the alfalfa mosaic virus coat protein binding site.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Laforest, Siana M; Gehrke, Lee

    2004-01-01

    The biological functions of RNA-protein complexes are, for the most part, poorly defined. Here, we describe experiments that are aimed at understanding the functional significance of alfalfa mosaic virus RNA-coat protein binding, an interaction that parallels the initiation of viral RNA replication. Peptides representing the RNA-binding domain of the viral coat protein are biologically active in initiating replication and bind to a 39-nt 3'-terminal RNA with a stoichiometry of two peptides: 1 RNA. To begin to understand how RNA-peptide interactions induce RNA conformational changes and initiate replication, the AMV RNA fragment was experimentally manipulated by increasing the interhelical spacing, by interrupting the apparent nucleotide symmetry, and by extending the binding site. In general, both asymmetric and symmetric insertions between two proposed hairpins diminished binding, whereas 5' and 3' extensions had minimal effects. Exchanging the positions of the binding site hairpins resulted in only a moderate decrease in peptide binding affinity without changing the hydroxyl radical footprint protection pattern. To assess biological relevance in viral RNA replication, the nucleotide changes were transferred into infectious genomic RNA clones. RNA mutations that disrupted coat protein binding also prevented viral RNA replication without diminishing coat protein mRNA (RNA 4) translation. These results, coupled with the highly conserved nature of the AUGC865-868 sequence, suggest that the distance separating the two proposed hairpins is a critical binding determinant. The data may indicate that the 5' and 3' hairpins interact with one of the bound peptides to nucleate the observed RNA conformational changes. PMID:14681584

  12. Inverted-repeat transgenic maize plants resistant to sugarcane mosaic virus

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2008-01-01

    RNA silencing is a post-transcriptional genesilencing phenomenon induced by double-stranded RNA (dsRNA).In an attempt to generate dsRNA-mediated transgenic maize plants resistant to sugarcane mosaic virus (SCMV),we cloned SCMV Nib gene-specificsequences and inserted it into the binary vector p3301 in the sense and antisense orientations (named SCMVir-Nib),which could produce RNAs capable of duplex formation in plant cells.Maize immature embryos were co-cultured with Agrobacterium carrying two vectors,one marker-free vector harboring the SCMVirNIb and one vector harboring bar gene as the selective marker.Resistant calli were recovered by selection on medium containing Biolaphos.Among the regenerated plantlets from resistant calli,14 plants have been certified to contain SCMVirNIb by PCR amplification and DNA dot blot.T1 plants derived from the 14 plants were challenged in a greenhouse with SCMV inoculums and the percentages of resistant plants in 11 T1 lines were higher than 60%.One plant in the T1 line was found to carry SCMVirNIb without bar gene by PCR assay.T2 plants derived from T1 SCMV resistant transgenic plants were challenged with SCMV inoculums in field.The percentages of resistant plants from 3 lines,including the line derived from the marker-free transgenic plant,were higher than 85%.The non-transgenic control plants were all susceptible.Further molecular analysis confirmed that the resistant plants from the marker-free transgenic line contained SCMVirNIb but not the bar gene.

  13. Development of a Multivalent Subunit Vaccine against Tularemia Using Tobacco Mosaic Virus (TMV Based Delivery System.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sukalyani Banik

    Full Text Available Francisella tularensis is a facultative intracellular pathogen, and is the causative agent of a fatal human disease known as tularemia. F. tularensis is classified as a Category A Biothreat agent by the CDC based on its use in bioweapon programs by several countries in the past and its potential to be used as an agent of bioterrorism. No licensed vaccine is currently available for prevention of tularemia. In this study, we used a novel approach for development of a multivalent subunit vaccine against tularemia by using an efficient tobacco mosaic virus (TMV based delivery platform. The multivalent subunit vaccine was formulated to contain a combination of F. tularensis protective antigens: OmpA-like protein (OmpA, chaperone protein DnaK and lipoprotein Tul4 from the highly virulent F. tularensis SchuS4 strain. Two different vaccine formulations and immunization schedules were used. The immunized mice were challenged with lethal (10xLD100 doses of F. tularensis LVS on day 28 of the primary immunization and observed daily for morbidity and mortality. Results from this study demonstrate that TMV can be used as a carrier for effective delivery of multiple F. tularensis antigens. TMV-conjugate vaccine formulations are safe and multiple doses can be administered without causing any adverse reactions in immunized mice. Immunization with TMV-conjugated F. tularensis proteins induced a strong humoral immune response and protected mice against respiratory challenges with very high doses of F. tularensis LVS. This study provides a proof-of-concept that TMV can serve as a suitable platform for simultaneous delivery of multiple protective antigens of F. tularensis. Refinement of vaccine formulations coupled with TMV-targeting strategies developed in this study will provide a platform for development of an effective tularemia subunit vaccine as well as a vaccination approach that may broadly be applicable to many other bacterial pathogens.

  14. Structure and Interaction in 2D Assemblies of Tobacco Mosaic Viruses

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fukuto, M.; Yang, L.; Wang, S.; Fukuto, M.; Checco, A.; Niu, Z.; Wang, Q.

    2009-12-07

    We created two-dimensional (2D) assemblies of tobacco mosaic viruses (TMVs) and characterized their structures using Atomic Force Microscopy (AFM) and X-ray scattering. The TMVs were adsorbed on an oppositely charged, fluid lipid monolayer supported by a solid substrate and submerged in a buffer solution. The lipid monolayer confined the viral particles within a plane, while providing them with lateral mobility so that overall the TMV assembly behaved like a 2D liquid. We controlled the inter-particle interaction by adjusting the chemical condition in the buffer to induce ordered TMV assemblies. We found that the presence of the lipid layer was essential for forming ordered TMV assemblies. Packed TMV assemblies formed on the lipid layer, with an average inter-particle spacing of 42 nm. By introducing Ca{sup 2+} ions into the buffer solution, we were able to improve the in-plane order within the TMV assemblies and reduce the average inter-particle spacing to 20 nm, compared to the TMV diameter of 18 nm. Quantitative analysis of the X-ray scattering data shows that the structural order within the TMV assemblies prepared under a Ca{sup 2+}-free buffer solution is consistent with purely repulsive, electrostatic inter-particle interaction. In contrast, the structural order within Ca{sup 2+}-induced TMV assemblies is consistent with the behavior of a fluid of sticky rods, implying the presence of a strong attraction between TMVs. In addition to the screening of Coulomb repulsion, this behavior is likely the result of counterion-induced as well as membrane-mediated attractions.

  15. Structure and interaction in 2D assemblies of tobacco mosaic viruses

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yang, L.; Wang. S.; Masafumi, F.; Checco, A.; Zhongwei, N.; Wang, Q.

    2009-08-27

    We created two-dimensional (2D) assemblies of tobacco mosaic viruses (TMVs) and characterized their structures using Atomic Force Microscopy (AFM) and X-ray scattering. The TMVs were adsorbed on an oppositely charged, fluid lipid monolayer supported by a solid substrate and submerged in a buffer solution. The lipid monolayer confined the viral particles within a plane, while providing them with lateral mobility so that overall the TMV assembly behaved like a 2D liquid. We controlled the inter-particle interaction by adjusting the chemical condition in the buffer to induce ordered TMV assemblies. We found that the presence of the lipid layer was essential for forming ordered TMV assemblies. Packed TMV assemblies formed on the lipid layer, with an average inter-particle spacing of 42 nm. By introducing Ca2+ ions into the buffer solution, we were able to improve the in-plane order within the TMV assemblies and reduce the average inter-particle spacing to 20 nm, compared to the TMV diameter of 18 nm. Quantitative analysis of the X-ray scattering data shows that the structural order within the TMV assemblies prepared under a Ca{sup 2+}-free buffer solution is consistent with purely repulsive, electrostatic inter-particle interaction. In contrast, the structural order within Ca{sup 2+}-induced TMV assemblies is consistent with the behavior of a fluid of sticky rods, implying the presence of a strong attraction between TMVs. In addition to the screening of Coulomb repulsion, this behavior is likely the result of counterion-induced as well as membrane-mediated attractions.

  16. Ascorbic acid accumulates as a defense response to Turnip mosaic virus in resistant Brassica rapa cultivars.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fujiwara, Ayaka; Togawa, Satoko; Hikawa, Takahiro; Matsuura, Hideyuki; Masuta, Chikara; Inukai, Tsuyoshi

    2016-07-01

    We initially observed that Brassica rapa cultivars containing the Turnip mosaic virus (TuMV) resistance gene, Rnt1-1, accumulated a high level of endogenous ascorbic acid (AS) and dehydroascobic acid (DHA) when infected with TuMV. We here hypothesized a possible contribution of an elevated level of AS+DHA (TAA) to the Rnt1-1-mediated resistance, and conducted a series of experiments using B. rapa and Arabidopsis plants. The application of l-galactose (the key substrate in AS synthesis) to a susceptible cultivar could increase the TAA level ~2-fold, and simultaneously lead to some degree of enhanced viral resistance. To confirm some positive correlation between TAA levels and viral resistance, we analyzed two Arabidopsis knockout mutants (ao and vtc1) in the AS pathways; the TAA levels were significantly increased and decreased in ao and vtc1 plants, respectively. While the ao plants showed enhanced resistance to TuMV, vtc1 plants were more susceptible than the control, supporting our hypothesis. When we analyzed the expression profiles of the genes involved in the AS pathways upon TuMV infection, we found that the observed TAA increase was mainly brought about by the reduction of AS oxidation and activation of AS recycling. We then investigated the secondary signals that regulate endogenous TAA levels in response to viral infection, and found that jasmonic acid (JA) might play an important role in TAA accumulation. In conclusion, we reason that the elevated TAA accumulation in B. rapa plants would be at least partly mediated by the JA-dependent signaling pathway and may significantly contribute to viral resistance. PMID:27255930

  17. Selection for Resistance to Yellow Vein Mosaic Virus Disease of Okra by Induced Mutation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yellow vein mosaic virus disease (YVMD) caused by a begomovirus is the most serious factor affecting okra (Abelmoschus esculentus) production for both exporting and domestic consumption in Thailand. Seeds of two okra varieties, Annie and Okura, were irradiated with Gamma-rays at doses of 400 and 600Gy. Screening of YVMD resistant plants was conducted for M3 and M4 plants under field conditions in Petchaburi and Phichit provinces, and greenhouse conditions using whitefly transmission in Bangkok. One M4 plant of Okura (B-21) irradiated at 400Gy was found to be highly resistant, but none of Annie. M5 plants of B-21 were screened further for YVMD resistance under both greenhouse and field conditions. Ten resistant lines obtained by screening for YVMD resistance up to the M7 generation were selected for yield trial observations at Phichit Horticultural Research Center (PHRC) and Chiengmai Horticultural Research Station (CHRS), both located in the northern Thailand. Three of the mutant lines were further tested at Kanchanaburi Horticultural Research Center (KHRC) in Kanchanaburi province, an okra growing area in the west of central Thailand where YVMD was seriously widespread. At the KHRC, all tested mutant lines showed resistance up to a month, when the susceptible check variety already showed symptoms of the disease. However, only a small portion of the plants of the mutant lines appeared to be resistant throughout the whole growth duration; others eventually exhibited the yellow vein symptom. Plants were further screened in two growers' fields. Growers were satisfied with the plant stature and fruit shape of the mutants and their delayed disease development, and further screening is underway to select uniformly YVMD resistant lines for okra production in Kanchanaburi. (author)

  18. Selection for resistance to yellow vein mosaic virus disease of okra by induced mutation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yellow vein mosaic virus disease (YVMD) caused by a begomovirus is the most serious factor affecting okra (Abelmochus esculentus) production for both export and domestic consumption in Thailand. Seeds of Annie and Okura okra varieties were gamma-irradiated at doses of 400 and 600 Gy and planted at Huaysai King's Project in Petchaburi Province. M3 plants were screened for OYVMD (Okra YVMD) resistance under field conditions at Huaysai King's Project and Phichit Horticultural Research Center (PHRC) in Phichit Province. In addition, M4 plants were screened for OYVMD resistance under greenhouse conditions at Crop Protection Research and Development Office using whitefly transmission. None of Annie was found resistant but one plant of Okura (B-21) irradiated at 400 Gy was found to be highly resistant. Ten resistant lines obtained through rescreening of B-21 descendants up to M7 generation were selected for yield trial observations at PHRC and Chiengmai Horticultural Research Station (CHRS). The mutants had good stature and fruit shape but the fruits have spines on the ridges. Selections for OYVMD resistance and spineless fruits were performed at PHRC in three generations and seven of the lines were chosen for yield trial at PHRC. Three of the mutant lines were also screened for OYVMD resistance at Kanchanaburi Horticultural Research Center (KHRC) in Kanchanaburi Province, okra growing area, where OYVMD was seriously widespread. All mutant lines showed resistance against the local OYVMV isolates up to a month before they started showing signs of the disease. Seeds were collected from resistant individuals and planted in farmers's fields for further selection. The farmers were very satisfied with the stature and fruit shape of the mutants when tested against a commercial variety. (author)

  19. The development and application of new crystallization method for tobacco mosaic virus coat protein

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Li Xiangyang

    2012-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Although tobacco mosaic virus (TMV coat protein (CP has been isolated from virus particles and its crystals have grown in ammonium sulfate buffers for many years, to date, no one has reported on the crystallization of recombinant TMV-CP connecting peptides expressed in E. coli. Methods In the present papers genetically engineered TMV-CP was expressed, into which hexahistidine (His tags or glutathione-S-transferase (GST tags were incorporated. Considering that GST-tags are long peptides and His-tags are short peptides, an attempt was made to grow crystals of TMV-CP cleaved GST-tags (WT-TMV-CP32 and TMV-CP incorporated His-tags (WT-His-TMV-CP12 simultaneously in ammonium sulfate buffers and commercial crystallization reagents. It was found that the 20S disk form of WT-TMV-CP32 and WT-His-TMV-CP12 did not form high resolution crystals by using various crystallization buffers and commercial crystallization reagents. Subsequently, a new experimental method was adopted in which a range of truncated TMV-CP was constructed by removing several amino acids from the N- or the C-terminal, and high resolution crystals were grown in ammonium sulfate buffers and commercial crystallization reagents. Results The new crystallization method was developed and 3.0 Å resolution macromolecular crystal was thereby obtained by removing four amino acids at the C-terminal of His-TMV-CP and connecting six His-tags at the N-terminal of His-TMV-CP (TR-His-TMV-CP19. The Four-layer aggregate disk structure of TR-His-TMV-CP19 was solved. This phenomenon showed that peptides at the C-terminus hindered the growth of high resolution crystals and the peptides interactions at the N-terminus were attributed to the quality of TMV-CP crystals. Conclusion A 3.0 Å resolution macromolecular crystal of TR-His-TMV-CP19 was obtained and the corresponding structure was solved by removing four amino acids at the C-terminus of TMV-CP and connecting His-tags at the N

  20. Evaluation of Jatropha curcas as an alternative host of African cassava mosaic virus

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A study was conducted to evaluate ten local accessions of Jatropha curcas L. (physic nut) as an alternative host of African cassava mosaic virus (ACMV). The ten local accessions of J. curcas were planted in a field trial at the research farm of the Biotechnology and Nuclear Agriculture Research Institute, intercropped with ACMV-infected cassava cultivar 'Afisiafi' and left to natural spread of ACMV from the cassava to J. curcas. The J. curcas plants which became infected generally showed mild symptoms, with severity ranging from 1.00 at eight weeks after planting (WAP) to 3.00 at 16 WAP on a scale of 1 (no symptoms) to 5 (severe symptoms). Whitefly populations recorded on the J. curcas accessions in the wet (Sept. - Oct., 2008) and dry (Jan. - Feb., 2009) seasons were generally low. However, significant differences (p < 0.05) were found in the mean whitefly numbers found on the individual J. curcas accessions in the dry season. Disease incidence as determined by symptom expression varied among accessions at eight, twelve and sixteen weeks after planting, though the differences not statistically significant. Leaf samples from the ten J. curcas accessions were tested at six, nine and twelve months after planting (MAP) for the presence of ACMV by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assays (ELISA) and by polymerase chain reaction (PCR). ELISA tests using monoclonal antibody SCRI 33, in a double antibody sandwich ELISA (DAS-ELISA) showed ACMV infection in the J. curcas accessions. Infection ranged from 0% at 6MAP to 50% at 12MAP. Molecular analysis by PCR with a virus-specific primer (JSP001/JSP002) of the viral DNA extracted from leaves of the number of samples tested, as against 37.7% by ELISA. Infection among the accessions as shown by to PCR varied significantly (p < 0.05) and ranged from as low as 16.6% to as high as 91.6%. ACMV infection of the J. curcas plants was further confirmed by infectivity tests on Nicotiana benthamiana indicator plants. Three of (3) out of 132

  1. Complete nucleotide sequence and host range of South African cassava mosaic virus: further evidence for recombination amongst begomoviruses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berrie, L C; Rybicki, E P; Rey, M E

    2001-01-01

    Complete nucleotide sequences of the DNA-A (2800 nt) and DNA-B (2760 nt) components of a novel cassava-infecting begomovirus, South African cassava mosaic virus (SACMV), were determined and compared with various New World and Old World begomoviruses. SACMV is most closely related to East African cassava mosaic virus (EACMV) in both its DNA-A (85% with EACMV-MH and -MK) and -B (90% with EACMV-UG2-Mld and EACMV-UG3-Svr) components; however, percentage sequence similarities of less than 90% in the DNA-A component allowed SACMV to be considered a distinct virus. One significant recombination event spanning the entire AC4 open reading frame was identified; however, there was no evidence of recombination in the DNA-B component. Infectivity of the cloned SACMV genome was demonstrated by successful agroinoculation of cassava and three other plant species (Phaseolus vulgaris, Malva parviflora and Nicotiana benthamiana). This is the first description of successful infection of cassava with a geminivirus using Agrobacterium tumefaciens.

  2. Low-dose glyphosate does not control annual bromes in the northern Great Plains

    Science.gov (United States)

    Annual bromes (downy brome and Japanese brome) have been shown to decrease perennial grass forage production and alter ecosystem functions in northern Great Plains rangelands. Large-scale chemical control might be a method for increasing rangeland forage production if low application rates confer co...

  3. Bioengineering of Tobacco Mosaic Virus to Create a Non-Infectious Positive Control for Ebola Diagnostic Assays

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lam, Patricia; Gulati, Neetu M.; Stewart, Phoebe L.; Keri, Ruth A.; Steinmetz, Nicole F.

    2016-03-01

    The 2014 Ebola epidemic is the largest to date. There is no cure or treatment for this deadly disease; therefore there is an urgent need to develop new diagnostics to accurately detect Ebola. Current RT-PCR assays lack sensitive and reliable positive controls. To address this critical need, we devised a bio-inspired positive control for use in RT-PCR diagnostics: we encapsulated scrambled Ebola RNA sequences inside of tobacco mosaic virus to create a biomimicry that is non-infectious, but stable, and could therefore serve as a positive control in Ebola diagnostic assays. Here, we report the bioengineering and validation of this probe.

  4. Bioengineering of Tobacco Mosaic Virus to Create a Non-Infectious Positive Control for Ebola Diagnostic Assays

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lam, Patricia; Gulati, Neetu M.; Stewart, Phoebe L.; Keri, Ruth A.; Steinmetz, Nicole F.

    2016-01-01

    The 2014 Ebola epidemic is the largest to date. There is no cure or treatment for this deadly disease; therefore there is an urgent need to develop new diagnostics to accurately detect Ebola. Current RT-PCR assays lack sensitive and reliable positive controls. To address this critical need, we devised a bio-inspired positive control for use in RT-PCR diagnostics: we encapsulated scrambled Ebola RNA sequences inside of tobacco mosaic virus to create a biomimicry that is non-infectious, but stable, and could therefore serve as a positive control in Ebola diagnostic assays. Here, we report the bioengineering and validation of this probe. PMID:27030058

  5. Cloning and Sequence Analysis of the 28.5ku Movement Protein of Frangipani Mosaic Virus (FMV)

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    DENG Xiao-dong; FEI Xiao-wen; LIU Zhi-xin; HU Xin-wen; ZHENG Xue-qin

    2001-01-01

    Based on conserved regions among genomic RNA of tobamoviruses, a pair of primers spanning the sequence encoding the movement protein were synthesized. A cDNA fragment of 1700bp was thus amplified by RT-PCR(reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction). The fragment was cloned into pGEM-T easy vector and sequenced. DNA sequence analysis showed that the fragment contained a region of 768 nucleotides encoding protein of 256 amino acid of frangipani mosaic virus (FMV) and also partial sequence corresponding to 180ku and 17. 5ku protein.

  6. Sequence analysis of a soil-borne wheat mosaic virus isolate from Italy shows that it is the same virus as European wheat mosaic virus and Soil-borne rye mosaic virus

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    YANG; Jianping

    2001-01-01

    [1]Hill, A. V., Elvin, J., Willis, A. C. et al., Molecular analysis of the association of HLA-B53 and resistance to severe malaria, Nature, 1992, 360: 434.[2]Perlmann, P., Miller, L., Fogarty/WHO international conference on cellular mechanisms in malaria immunity, Immun. Letter, 1990, 25: 1.[3]Perkus, M. E., Tartaglia, J., Paoletti, E. et al., Poxvirus-based vaccine candidates for cancer, AIDS and other infectious diseases, J. Leukocyte Biol., 1995, 58(1): 1.[4]Shen, H., Slifka, M. K., Matloubian, M. et al., Recombinant Listeria monocytogenes as a live vaccine vehicle for the induction of protective anti-viral cell-mediated immunity, Proc. Natl. Acad. Sci. USA, 1995, 92: 3987.[5]Waine, G. J., McManus, D. P., Nucleic acids: vaccines of the future, Parasitol Today, 1995, 11: 113.[6]Whitton, J. L., Sheng, N., Oldstone, M. B. A. et al., A "string-of beads" vaccine, comprising linked minigenes, confers protection from lethal-dose virus challenge, J. Virol., 1993, 67: 348.[7]Lalvani, A., Aidoo, M., Allsopp, C. E. et al., An-HLA-based approach to design of a CTL-inducing vaccine against Plasmodium falciparum, Res. Immunol., 1994, 145: 461.[8]Sidney, J., Grey, H. M., Kubo, R. T. et al., Practical, biochemical and evolutionary implications of the discovery of HLA class I supermotifs, Immunology Today, 1996, 17: 261.[9]Thomson, S. A., Elliott, S. L., Sherritt, M. A. et al., Recombinant polyepitope vaccines for the delivery of multiple CD8 cytotoxic T cell epitopes, J. Immun., 1996, 157: 822.[10] Hanke, T., Schneider, J., Gilbert, S. C. et al., DNA multi-CTL epitope vaccines for HIV and Plasmodium falciparum: immunogenicity in mice, Vaccine, 1998, 16: 426.[11] Townsend, A. R. M., Rothbard, J., Gotch, F. M. et al., The epitopes of influenza nucleoprotein recognized by cytotoxic T lymphocytes can be defined with short synthetic peptides, Cell, 1986, 44: 959.[12] Ojcius, D. M., Abastado, J. P., Casrouge, A. et al., Dissociation of

  7. Over-expression of putative transcriptional coactivator KELP interferes with Tomato mosaic virus cell-to-cell movement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sasaki, Nobumitsu; Ogata, Takuya; Deguchi, Masakazu; Nagai, Shoko; Tamai, Atsushi; Meshi, Tetsuo; Kawakami, Shigeki; Watanabe, Yuichiro; Matsushita, Yasuhiko; Nyunoya, Hiroshi

    2009-03-01

    Tomato mosaic virus (ToMV) encodes a movement protein (MP) that is necessary for virus cell-to-cell movement. We have demonstrated previously that KELP, a putative transcriptional coactivator of Arabidopsis thaliana, and its orthologue from Brassica campestris can bind to ToMV MP in vitro. In this study, we examined the effects of the transient over-expression of KELP on ToMV infection and the intracellular localization of MP in Nicotiana benthamiana, an experimental host of the virus. In co-bombardment experiments, the over-expression of KELP inhibited virus cell-to-cell movement. The N-terminal half of KELP (KELPdC), which had been shown to bind to MP, was sufficient for inhibition. Furthermore, the over-expression of KELP and KELPdC, both of which were co-localized with ToMV MP, led to a reduction in the plasmodesmal association of MP. In the absence of MP expression, KELP was localized in the nucleus and the cytoplasm by the localization signal in its N-terminal half. It was also shown that ToMV amplified normally in protoplasts prepared from leaf tissue that expressed KELP transiently. These results indicate that over-expressed KELP interacts with MP in vivo and exerts an inhibitory effect on MP function for virus cell-to-cell movement, but not on virus amplification in individual cells.

  8. Nucleotide sequence and structural determinants of specific binding of coat protein or coat protein peptides to the 3' untranslated region of alfalfa mosaic virus RNA 4.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Houser-Scott, F; Baer, M L; Liem, K F; Cai, J M; Gehrke, L

    1994-01-01

    The specific binding of alfalfa mosaic virus coat protein to viral RNA requires determinants in the 3' untranslated region (UTR). Coat protein and peptide binding sites in the 3' UTR of alfalfa mosaic virus RNA 4 have been analyzed by hydroxyl radical footprinting, deletion mapping, and site-directed mutagenesis experiments. The 3' UTR has several stable hairpins that are flanked by single-stranded (A/U)UGC sequences. Hydroxyl radical footprinting data show that five sites in the 3' UTR of alfalfa mosaic virus RNA 4 are protected by coat protein, and four of the five protected regions contain AUGC or UUGC. Electrophoretic mobility band shift results suggest four coat protein binding sites in the 3' UTR. A 3'-terminal 39-nucleotide RNA fragment containing four AUGC repeats bound coat protein and coat protein peptides with high affinity; however, coat protein bound poorly to antisense 3' UTR transcripts and poly(AUGC)10. Site-directed mutagenesis of AUGC865-868 resulted in a loss of coat protein binding and peptide binding by the RNA fragment. Alignment of alfalfa mosaic RNA sequences with those from several closely related ilarviruses demonstrates that AUGC865-868 is perfectly conserved; moreover, the RNAs are predicted to form similar 3'-terminal secondary structures. The data strongly suggest that alfalfa mosaic virus coat protein and ilavirus coat proteins recognize invariant AUGC sequences in the context of conserved structural elements. Images PMID:8139004

  9. Immunocapture RT-PCR detection of Bean common mosaic virus and strain blackeye cowpea mosaic in common bean and black gram in India

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Udayashankar, A.C.; Nayaka, S. Chandra; Niranjana, S.R.;

    2012-01-01

    The strains of Bean common mosaic virus (BCMV) and blackeye cowpea mosaic (BICM), genus Potyvirus, were detected from 25 common bean and 14 black gram seeds among 142 seed samples collected from different legume-growing regions of India. The samples were subjected to a growing-on test, an indicator...... revealed filamentous virion particles from the leaves of plants showing characteristic virus disease symptoms in growing-on and host inoculation tests. The identity of the strains was confirmed by immunocapture RT-PCR, with a final amplification product of approximately 700 bp for BCMV and BCMV......–BICM. The complete identity of the two viruses was further confirmed by nucleotide sequencing of the partial coat protein and 3'-UTR regions. The sequences of the four BCMV and BCMV–BICM isolates each consisted of 583–622 and 550–577 nucleotides. The present report confirms the widespread nature of these two serious...

  10. Utilizing virus-induced gene silencing for the functional characterization of maize genes during infection with the fungal pathogen Ustilago maydis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van der Linde, Karina; Doehlemann, Gunther

    2013-01-01

    While in dicotyledonous plants virus-induced gene silencing (VIGS) is well established to study plant-pathogen interaction, in monocots only few examples of efficient VIGS have been reported so far. One of the available systems is based on the brome mosaic virus (BMV) which allows gene silencing in different cereals including barley (Hordeum vulgare), wheat (Triticum aestivum), and maize (Zea mays).Infection of maize plants by the corn smut fungus Ustilago maydis leads to the formation of large tumors on stem, leaves, and inflorescences. During this biotrophic interaction, plant defense responses are actively suppressed by the pathogen, and previous transcriptome analyses of infected maize plants showed comprehensive and stage-specific changes in host gene expression during disease progression.To identify maize genes that are functionally involved in the interaction with U. maydis, we adapted a VIGS system based on the Brome mosaic virus (BMV) to maize at conditions that allow successful U. maydis infection of BMV pre-infected maize plants. This setup enables quantification of VIGS and its impact on U. maydis infection using a quantitative real-time PCR (q(RT)-PCR)-based readout.

  11. Maize Dwarf Mosaic Disease Occurred in Hangzhou Isolate Caused by Sugarcane Mosaic Virus%杭州地区发生的玉米花叶病由甘蔗花叶病毒引起

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    程晔; 陈炯; 郑滔; 杨建平; 陈剑平

    2001-01-01

    从杭州地区呈现玉米矮花叶典型症状的玉米病组织中提纯得到大量线状病毒粒子,大多数长度为750?nm。病组织中含有大量风轮状内含体和板状集结体。病毒外壳蛋白为33.6?kD。病毒RNA1 3’端序列(1.8?kb)与甘蔗花叶病毒(SCMV)同源性最高,达71.5%~99.1%,与高梁花叶病毒(SrMV)同源性次之,为67.8%~68.5%,与玉米矮花叶病毒(MDMV)同源性最低,仅为38.4%~48.4%,从而初步认为此病害由SCMV引起。根据已发表的SCMV外壳蛋白氨基酸序列作亲缘性分析,表明SCMV可分为美国、南非、澳大利亚;德国和中国三大类。%Recently maize dwarf mosaic disease was occurred on maize crop seriously in large scale in Hangzhou district. Purified preparations from the infected maize leaves contained numerous filamentous virus particles of c.750 nm in length. Cells of infected plants contained typical pinwheels and laminated aggregates. The coat protein of the virus was 33.6 kD. A 1.8 kb fragment of 3'-terminus of the viral RNA was amplified by RT-PCR, cloned and its sequence was determined. Sequence comparisons showed that it shared 71.5%~99.1% homology with isolates of sugarcane mosaic virus, 67.8%~68.5% with sorghum mosaic virus and 38.4%~48.4% with maize dwarf mosaic virus, indicating that the pathogen of this disease on maize in Hangzhou was sugarcane mosaic virus. In addition, the relationships of sugarcane mosaic virus isolates from different origins all over world were discussed based on coat protein sequences.

  12. Effects of single and double infections with Potato virus X and Tobacco mosaic virus on disease development, plant growth, and virus accumulation in tomato Efeito de infecções simples e dupla com Potato virus X e Tobacco mosaic virus sobre o desenvolvimento da doença, crescimento da planta e acumulação de vírus em tomate

    OpenAIRE

    OLUSEGUN S. BALOGUN; LEIXIN XU; TOHRU TERAOKA; DAIJIRO HOSOKAWA

    2002-01-01

    The tomato cv. Fukuju nº. 2 was used for studying the effect of single and double infections with Potato virus X (PVX) and Tobacco mosaic virus (TMV). Mixed infection resulted in a synergistic increase of disease severity, where more growth reduction was seen with simultaneous inoculations than with sequential inoculations at four-day intervals. At five and 12 days post-inoculation, the increased severity of the disease coincided with enhancement of virus accumulation in the rapidly expanding...

  13. 湖南省10种天南星科作物DsMV和CMV的检测%Detection of Dasheen Mosaic Virus and Cucumber Mosaic Virus in Ten Species of Areaceae Collected from Hunan Province

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    何煜波; 桂明; 李永伟; 唐爱菊; 陈集双

    2005-01-01

    利用32p标记的cDNA探针对采集于湖南省永州等地的10种天南星科观赏植物和大田作物绿帝王(Philodendron sodiroi)、半夏(Pinellia ternata)、海芋(Alocasia macrorhiza)、马蹄莲(Zantedeschia aethiopica)、龟背竹(Monstera deliciosa)、尖尾芋(Alocasia cucullata)、白蝶合果芋(Sygonium podophyllum)、羽裂蔓绿绒(Philodendron selloum)、广东万年青(Aglaonema modestum)、芋(Colocasia esculenta)进行了芋花叶病毒(Dasheen mosaic virus,DsMV)和黄瓜花叶病毒(Cucumber mosaic virus,CMV)的检测,同时对部分样品进行病毒提纯、病毒粒子观察和内含体结构检查.结果显示:DsMV在10种植物上普遍存在,是最主要的病毒病原;同时首次在芋、绿帝王和广东万年青等3种植物上检测到CMV和DsMV的复合侵染.

  14. Comparative spatial spread overtime of Zucchini Yellow Mosaic Virus (ZYMV) and Watermelon Mosaic Virus (WMV) in fields of transgenic squash expressing the coat protein genes of ZYMV and WMV, and in fields of nontransgenic squash.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Klas, Ferdinand E; Fuchs, Marc; Gonsalves, Dennis

    2006-10-01

    The spatial and temporal patterns of aphid-vectored spread of Zucchini Yellow Mosaic Virus (ZYMV) and Watermelon Mosaic Virus (WMV) were monitored over two consecutive years in plantings of nontransgenic and transgenic squash ZW-20H (commercial cv. Freedom II) and ZW-20B, both expressing the coat protein genes of ZYMV and WMV. All test plants were surrounded by nontransgenic plants that were mechanically inoculated with ZYMV or WMV, and served as primary virus source. Across all trials, none of the transgenic plants exhibited systemic symptoms upon infection by ZYMV and WMV but a few of them developed localized chlorotic dots and/or blotches, and had low mixed infection rates [4% (6 of 139) of ZW-20H and 9% (13 of 139) of ZW-20B], as shown by ELISA. Geostatistical analysis of ELISA positive transgenic plants indicated, (i) a lack of spatial relationship on spread of ZYMV and WMV for ZW-20H with flat omnidirectional experimental semivariograms that fitted poorly theoretical models, and (ii) some extent of spatial dependence on ZYMV spread for ZW-20B with a well structured experimental semivariogram that fitted poorly theoretical models during the first but not the second growing season. In contrast, a strong spatial dependence on spread of ZYMV and WMV was found for nontransgenic plants, which developed severe systemic symptoms, had prevalent mixed infection rates (62%, 86 of 139), and well-defined omnidirectional experimental semivariograms that fitted a spherical model. Geostatistical data were sustained by virus transmission experiments with Myzus persicae in screenhouses, showing that commercial transgenic squash ZW-20H alter the dynamics of ZYMV and WMV epidemics by preventing secondary plant-to-plant spread.

  15. Structural biology at the single particle level: imaging tobacco mosaic virus by low-energy electron holography

    CERN Document Server

    Longchamp, Jean-Nicolas; Escher, Conrad; Fink, Hans-Werner

    2014-01-01

    Modern structural biology relies on NMR, X-ray crystallography and cryo-electron microscopy for gaining information on biomolecules at nanometer, sub-nanometer or atomic resolution. All these methods, however, require averaging over a vast ensemble of entities and hence knowledge on the conformational landscape of an individual particle is lost. Unfortunately, there are now strong indications that even X-ray free electron lasers will not be able to image individual molecules but will require nanocrystal samples. Here, we show that non-destructive structural biology of single particles has now become possible by means of low-energy electron holography. Individual tobacco mosaic viruses deposited on ultraclean freestanding graphene are imaged at one nanometer resolution revealing structural details arising from the helical arrangement of the outer protein shell of the virus. Since low-energy electron holography is a lens-less technique and since electrons with a deBroglie wavelength of approximately 1 Angstrom ...

  16. Coat protein sequence shows that Cucumber mosaic virus isolate from geraniums (Pelargonium spp.) belongs to subgroup II

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Neeraj Verma; B K Mahinghara; Raja Ram; A A Zaidi

    2006-03-01

    A viral disease was identified on geraniums (Pelargonium spp.) grown in a greenhouse at the Institute of Himalayan Bioresource Technology (IHBT), Palampur, exhibiting mild mottling and stunting. The causal virus (Cucumber mosaic virus, CMV) was identified and characterized on the basis of host range, aphid transmission, enzyme linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA), DNA-RNA hybridization and reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction (RTPCR). A complete coat protein (CP) gene was amplified using degenerate primers and sequenced. The CP gene showed nucleotide and amino acid homology up to 97%–98% and 96%–99%, respectively with the sequences of CMV subgroup II. The CP gene also showed homologies of 75%–97% in nucleotide and 77%–96% in amino acid with the CMV Indian isolates infecting various crops. On the basis of sequence homology, it was concluded that CMV-infecting geraniums in India belong to subgroup II.

  17. Fusion coat protein of pumpkin yellow vein mosaic virus with maltose binding protein: Applications in immunodiagnosis of begomoviruses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Phaneendra, Chigurupati; Sambasiva Rao, K R S; Kapoor, Reetika; Jain, R K; Mandal, Bikash

    2014-01-01

    Availability of adequate quantity of purified virus preparation from plant tissue is the major limitation in producing polyclonal antibodies (PAb) to begomovirus. Very few examples show successful utilization of E. coli expressed recombinant coat protein (CP) for immuno diagnosis of begomoviruses. In the present study, ~771 bp CP gene (~29.0 kDa) of Pumpkin yellow vein mosaic virus (PYVMV) was expressed as a ~71.0 kDa fusion protein with maltose binding protein (MBP) (~42.0 kDa) in E. coli. The MBP-CP was obtained in soluble state. The PAb to the purified fusion protein successfully detected PYVMV and other bipartite and monopartite begomoviruses in the field samples at 1:250 dilution in enzyme linked immunosorbent assay. Our study for the first time showed that MBP-tag fusion CP was suitable to produce diagnostic antibody to begomoviruses. PMID:25674610

  18. Soilborne wheat mosaic virus (SBWMV 19K protein belongs to a class of cysteine rich proteins that suppress RNA silencing

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Howard Amanda

    2005-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Amino acid sequence analyses indicate that the Soilborne wheat mosaic virus (SBWMV 19K protein is a cysteine-rich protein (CRP and shares sequence homology with CRPs derived from furo-, hordei-, peclu- and tobraviruses. Since the hordei- and pecluvirus CRPs were shown to be pathogenesis factors and/or suppressors of RNA silencing, experiments were conducted to determine if the SBWMV 19K CRP has similar activities. The SBWMV 19K CRP was introduced into the Potato virus X (PVX viral vector and inoculated to tobacco plants. The SBWMV 19K CRP aggravated PVX-induced symptoms and restored green fluorescent protein (GFP expression to GFP silenced tissues. These observations indicate that the SBWMV 19K CRP is a pathogenicity determinant and a suppressor of RNA silencing.

  19. Production of a garlic mosaic virus tolerant mutant plantlet through meristem culture of Allium sativum L. growing points

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In 1983, a garlic mosaic virus (GMV) tolerant mutant plantlet was obtained for producing a virus free plantlet through meristem culture of the garlic growing points. In 1989, after the mutant plant had been in the field for several years, the average weight of the bulbs harvested was 66.32 g with an average diameter of 6.28 cm, whereas the average weight of the check bulbs was only 42.3 g and the average diameter only 4.38 cm. In 1984, the experiment was repeated on the culture system of 300 growing point meristem cultures. Nine plants were obtained from the laboratory tubes that were tougher than those of the other plants. These nine plants were observed for 3 years in the field (1987 to 1989). Only two grew well in 1989. It is evident that the two plants can grow into GMV tolerant mutant plants. (author). 9 refs, 5 tabs

  20. Short deletions in nuclear targeting sequences of African cassava mosaic virus coat protein prevent geminivirus twinned particle formation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Coat proteins (CPs) of geminiviruses are multifunctional proteins. Using transient expression experiments, we have recently identified putative sequence motifs of African cassava mosaic virus (ACMV) CP involved in nuclear import (NLS) and export (NES) (Virology 286 (2001) 373). Here, we report on the effect of corresponding deletion mutants in the context of infecting viruses. Since NLS and NES may overlap with DNA binding and multimerisation domains, we have investigated their effect on viral infection, particularly, on particle formation. All deletion mutants were infectious in Nicotiana benthamiana when co-inoculated with DNA B, but poorly sap-transmissible. Some of the mutants showed reduced levels of viral single-stranded DNA (ssDNA), whereas the amount of double-stranded DNA (dsDNA) was not greatly affected. None of these CP mutants was able to produce stable virus particles. In contrast, viruses with CP fused to Flag epitopes at the N- or C-terminus (CP:Flag or Flag:CP) were readily sap-transmissible and formed amorphous nucleoprotein particles but only few geminate structures. The relevance of the identified sequences in replicating viruses with reference to nuclear import and export as well as to particle stability and DNA binding is discussed

  1. Automated Solution-Phase Synthesis of Insect Glycans to Probe the Binding Affinity of Pea Enation Mosaic Virus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tang, Shu-Lun; Linz, Lucas B; Bonning, Bryony C; Pohl, Nicola L B

    2015-11-01

    Pea enation mosaic virus (PEMV)--a plant RNA virus transmitted exclusively by aphids--causes disease in multiple food crops. However, the aphid-virus interactions required for disease transmission are poorly understood. For virus transmission, PEMV binds to a heavily glycosylated receptor aminopeptidase N in the pea aphid gut and is transcytosed across the gut epithelium into the aphid body cavity prior to release in saliva as the aphid feeds. To investigate the role of glycans in PEMV-aphid interactions and explore the possibility of viral control through blocking a glycan interaction, we synthesized insect N-glycan terminal trimannosides by automated solution-phase synthesis. The route features a mannose building block with C-5 ester enforcing a β-linkage, which also provides a site for subsequent chain extension. The resulting insect N-glycan terminal trimannosides with fluorous tags were used in a fluorous microarray to analyze binding with fluorescein isothiocyanate-labeled PEMV; however, no specific binding between the insect glycan and PEMV was detected. To confirm these microarray results, we removed the fluorous tag from the trimannosides for isothermal titration calorimetry studies with unlabeled PEMV. The ITC studies confirmed the microarray results and suggested that this particular glycan-PEMV interaction is not involved in virus uptake and transport through the aphid. PMID:26457763

  2. Automated Solution-Phase Synthesis of Insect Glycans to Probe the Binding Affinity of Pea Enation Mosaic Virus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tang, Shu-Lun; Linz, Lucas B; Bonning, Bryony C; Pohl, Nicola L B

    2015-11-01

    Pea enation mosaic virus (PEMV)--a plant RNA virus transmitted exclusively by aphids--causes disease in multiple food crops. However, the aphid-virus interactions required for disease transmission are poorly understood. For virus transmission, PEMV binds to a heavily glycosylated receptor aminopeptidase N in the pea aphid gut and is transcytosed across the gut epithelium into the aphid body cavity prior to release in saliva as the aphid feeds. To investigate the role of glycans in PEMV-aphid interactions and explore the possibility of viral control through blocking a glycan interaction, we synthesized insect N-glycan terminal trimannosides by automated solution-phase synthesis. The route features a mannose building block with C-5 ester enforcing a β-linkage, which also provides a site for subsequent chain extension. The resulting insect N-glycan terminal trimannosides with fluorous tags were used in a fluorous microarray to analyze binding with fluorescein isothiocyanate-labeled PEMV; however, no specific binding between the insect glycan and PEMV was detected. To confirm these microarray results, we removed the fluorous tag from the trimannosides for isothermal titration calorimetry studies with unlabeled PEMV. The ITC studies confirmed the microarray results and suggested that this particular glycan-PEMV interaction is not involved in virus uptake and transport through the aphid.

  3. Tissue and cell tropism of Indian cassava mosaic virus (ICMV) and its AV2 (precoat) gene product

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In order to establish defined viruses for challenging plants in resistance breeding programmes, Indian cassava mosaic virus (ICMV; family Geminiviridae) DNA clones were modified to monitor viral spread in plants by replacing the coat protein gene with the green fluorescent protein (GFP) reporter gene. Comparative in situ hybridization experiments showed that ICMV was restricted to the phloem in cassava and tobacco. GFP-tagged virus spread similarly, resulting in homogeneous fluorescence within nuclei and cytoplasm of infected cells. To analyze viral intercellular transport in further detail, GFP was fused to AV2, a protein that has been implicated in viral movement. Expressed from replicating viruses or from plasmids, AV2:GFP became associated with the cell periphery in punctate spots, formed cytoplasmic as well as nuclear inclusion bodies, the latter as conspicuous paired globules. Upon particle bombardment of expression plasmids, AV2:GFP was transported into neighboring cells of epidermal tissues showing that the intercellular transport of the AV2 protein is not restricted to the phloem. The results are consistent with a redundant function of ICMV AV2 acting as a movement protein, presumably as an evolutionary relic of a monopartite geminivirus that may still increase virus fitness but is no longer necessary in a bipartite genome. The fusion of ICMV ORF AV2 to the GFP gene is the first example of a reporter construct that follows the whole track of viral DNA from inside the nucleus to the cell periphery and to the next cell

  4. Zucchini yellow mosaic virus: biological properties, detection procedures and comparison of coat protein gene sequences.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coutts, B A; Kehoe, M A; Webster, C G; Wylie, S J; Jones, R A C

    2011-12-01

    Between 2006 and 2010, 5324 samples from at least 34 weed, two cultivated legume and 11 native species were collected from three cucurbit-growing areas in tropical or subtropical Western Australia. Two new alternative hosts of zucchini yellow mosaic virus (ZYMV) were identified, the Australian native cucurbit Cucumis maderaspatanus, and the naturalised legume species Rhyncosia minima. Low-level (0.7%) seed transmission of ZYMV was found in seedlings grown from seed collected from zucchini (Cucurbita pepo) fruit infected with isolate Cvn-1. Seed transmission was absent in >9500 pumpkin (C. maxima and C. moschata) seedlings from fruit infected with isolate Knx-1. Leaf samples from symptomatic cucurbit plants collected from fields in five cucurbit-growing areas in four Australian states were tested for the presence of ZYMV. When 42 complete coat protein (CP) nucleotide (nt) sequences from the new ZYMV isolates obtained were compared to those of 101 complete CP nt sequences from five other continents, phylogenetic analysis of the 143 ZYMV sequences revealed three distinct groups (A, B and C), with four subgroups in A (I-IV) and two in B (I-II). The new Australian sequences grouped according to collection location, fitting within A-I, A-II and B-II. The 16 new sequences from one isolated location in tropical northern Western Australia all grouped into subgroup B-II, which contained no other isolates. In contrast, the three sequences from the Northern Territory fitted into A-II with 94.6-99.0% nt identities with isolates from the United States, Iran, China and Japan. The 23 new sequences from the central west coast and two east coast locations all fitted into A-I, with 95.9-98.9% nt identities to sequences from Europe and Japan. These findings suggest that (i) there have been at least three separate ZYMV introductions into Australia and (ii) there are few changes to local isolate CP sequences following their establishment in remote growing areas. Isolates from A-I and B

  5. Herança da resistência a Watermelon mosaic virus em melancia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lindomar Maria da Silveira

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available Entre as doenças que ocorrem na cultura da melancia (Citrullus lanatus, a virose ocasionada por Watermelon mosaic virus (WMV se destaca entre as principais, sendo a resistência genética a forma mais indicada de controle. Dessa forma, é importante o conhecimento do controle genético da resistência que se pretende trabalhar. Objetivando estudar a herança da resistência ao WMV em melancia, foram realizados cruzamentos entre o cultivar Crimson Sweet (CS suscetível e a linha L26 resistente. Populações segregantes e não segregantes obtidas dos cruzamentos foram inoculadas com um isolado de WMV e avaliadas quanto ao aparecimento de sintomas e à presença do vírus por testes de ELISA indireto contra antissoro específico para WMV. A hipótese de herança monogênica foi avaliada em diferentes graus médios de dominância e pelo método da máxima verossimilhança. Foram obtidas variâncias genética (σ²G, ambiental (σ²E, fenotípica (σ²F2, aditiva (σ²A e de dominância (σ²D, herdabilidades nos sentidos amplo (h²a e restrito (h²r. A herança monogênica foi rejeitada. O grau médio de dominância indicou efeito de dominância completa. As herdabilidades no sentido amplo foram baixas; portanto, constatou-se que o controle da resistência a WMV nas populações de melancia estudadas é do tipo oligogênica, com presença de efeitos aditivos e não aditivos e presença de genes maiores e poligenes.

  6. Effect of dipolar ions on the entropy-driven polymerization of tobacco mosaic virus protein.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lauffer, M A; Shalaby, R A

    1985-11-01

    The effect of the dipolar ions, glycine, glycylglycine, and glycylglycylglycine on the polymerization of tobacco mosaic virus (TMV) protein has been studied by the methods of light scattering and ultracentrifugation. All three dipolar ions promote polymerization. The major reaction in the early stage is transition from the 4 S to the 20 S state. As in the absence of dipolar ions, the polymerization is enhanced by an increase in temperature; it is endothermic and therefore entropy-driven. The effect of the dipolar ions can be understood in terms of their action as salting-out agents; they increase the activity coefficient of TMV A protein, the 4 S material, and thus shift the equilibrium toward the 20 S state. The salting-out constants, K, for the reaction in 0.10 ionic strength phosphate buffer at pH 6.7 was found by the light scattering method to be 1.6 for glycine, 2.5 for glycylglycine, and 2.5 for glycylglycylglycine. A value of 2.7 was obtained by the ultracentrifugation method for glycylglycine in phosphate buffer at 0.1 ionic strength and pH 6.8 at 10 degrees C. For both glycine and glycylglycine, K increases when the ionic strength of the phosphate buffer is decreased. This result suggests that electrolytes decrease the activity coefficient of the dipolar ions, a salting-in phenomenon. However, the salting-in constants evaluated from these results are substantially higher than those previously determined by solubility measurements. The effect of glycine and glycylglycine on polymerization was studied at pH values between 6.2 and 6.8. The effectiveness of both dipolar ions is approximately 50% greater at pH 6.8 than at pH 6.2. The variation of the extent of polymerization with pH in the presence of the dipolar ions is consistent with the interpretation that approximately one hydrogen ion is bound for half of the polypeptide units in the polymerized A protein.

  7. Molecular Characterization of Soybean Mosaic Virus NIa Protein and its Processing Event in Bacterial Expression

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bong K. Choi

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available Soybean mosaic virus (SMV-CN18 is an Rsv resistance-breaking (RB isolate to overcome soybean resistance genes Rsv1, Rsv3 and Rsv4. The aim of this study was to characterize nuclear inclusion protein a (NIa protein of RB isolate at the molecular level and demonstrate its processing into genome-linked protein (VPg and NIa-Pro domains in Esherichia coli containing a bacterial expression pET vector inserted with NIa gene. The full-length of NIa gene was synthesized by reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR and its 1298 nucleotides (nt and 432 amino acids (aa were deduced. The nt and aa sequences of NIa gene of SMV-CN18 shared high identities with the corresponding sequences of the NIa gene of the known SMV isolates, suggesting that the NIa is a highly conserved protein. The NIa-Pro domain contains a highly conserved structural motif for proteolysis, while the VPg domain contains a nuclear localization signal (NLS, a putative NTP-binding site and cellular factor-binding sites. The phylogenetic tree revealed that less divergence of NIa protein exists among twelve SMV isolates, which can be supported by a low bootstrap value between clades. In addition, the full-length of NIa gene, amplified by RT-PCR, was ligated into pET-28b E. coli expression vector with an N-terminal His6-tag. Optimal conditions for expression were at 1mM treatment of IPTG at 25°C for 5 hr. The released protein from bacterial lysates remained soluble and proved the processing form of the NIa polyprotein. E. coli expression system shows the processed product of 29 kDa VPg in SDS-PAGE confirmed by western blot analysis in both crude extracts and purified elution products, using Ni2+-NTA resin. The present study indicates that the N-terminal region of NIa which is processed and expressed in bacteria.

  8. Cauliflower mosaic virus protein P6 inhibits signaling responses to salicylic acid and regulates innate immunity.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andrew J Love

    Full Text Available Cauliflower mosaic virus (CaMV encodes a multifunctional protein P6 that is required for translation of the 35S RNA and also acts as a suppressor of RNA silencing. Here we demonstrate that P6 additionally acts as a pathogenicity effector of an unique and novel type, modifying NPR1 (a key regulator of salicylic acid (SA- and jasmonic acid (JA-dependent signaling and inhibiting SA-dependent defence responses We find that that transgene-mediated expression of P6 in Arabidopsis and transient expression in Nicotiana benthamiana has profound effects on defence signaling, suppressing expression of representative SA-responsive genes and increasing expression of representative JA-responsive genes. Relative to wild-type Arabidopsis P6-expressing transgenics had greatly reduced expression of PR-1 following SA-treatment, infection by CaMV or inoculation with an avirulent bacterial pathogen Pseudomonas syringae pv tomato (Pst. Similarly transient expression in Nicotiana benthamiana of P6 (including a mutant form defective in translational transactivation activity suppressed PR-1a transcript accumulation in response to Agrobacterium infiltration and following SA-treatment. As well as suppressing the expression of representative SA-regulated genes, P6-transgenic Arabidopsis showed greatly enhanced susceptibility to both virulent and avirulent Pst (titres elevated 10 to 30-fold compared to non-transgenic controls but reduced susceptibility to the necrotrophic fungus Botrytis cinerea. Necrosis following SA-treatment or inoculation with avirulent Pst was reduced and delayed in P6-transgenics. NPR1 an important regulator of SA/JA crosstalk, was more highly expressed in the presence of P6 and introduction of the P6 transgene into a transgenic line expressing an NPR1:GFP fusion resulted in greatly increased fluorescence in nuclei even in the absence of SA. Thus in the presence of P6 an inactive form of NPR1 is mislocalized in the nucleus even in uninduced plants

  9. Efficient and stable expression of GFP through Wheat streak mosaic virus-based vectors in cereal hosts using a range of cleavage sites: Formation of dense fluorescent aggregates for sensitive virus tracking

    Science.gov (United States)

    A series of Wheat streak mosaic virus (WSMV)-based expression vectors were developed by engineering cycle 3 GFP (GFP) cistron between P1 and HC-Pro cistrons with several catalytic/cleavage peptides at the C-terminus of GFP. WSMV-GFP vectors with the Foot-and-mouth disease virus 1D/2A or 2A catalytic...

  10. Pathogenesis of Alfalfa mosaic virus in Soybean (Glycine max) and Expression of Chimeric Rabies Peptide in Virus-Infected Soybean Plants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fleysh, N; Deka, D; Drath, M; Koprowski, H; Yusibov, V

    2001-10-01

    ABSTRACT Infection of soybean (Glycine max) plants inoculated with particles of Alfalfa mosaic virus (AlMV) isolate 425 at 12 days after germination was monitored throughout the life cycle of the plant (vegetative growth, flowering, seed formation, and seed maturation) by western blot analysis of tissue samples. At 8 to 10 days after inoculation, the upper uninoculated leaves showed symptoms of virus infection and accumulation of viral coat protein (CP). Virus CP was detectable in leaves, stem, roots, seedpods, and seed coat up to 45 days postinoculation (dpi), but only in the seedpod and seed coat at 65 dpi. No virus accumulation was detected in embryos and cotyledons at any time during infection, and no seed transmission of virus was observed. Soybean plants inoculated with recombinant AlMV passaged from upper uninoculated leaves of infected plants showed accumulation of full-length chimeric AlMV CP containing rabies antigen in systemically infected leaves and seed coat. These results suggest the potential usefulness of plants and plant viruses as vehicles for producing proteins of biomedical importance in a safe and inexpensive manner. Moreover, even the soybean seed coat, treated as waste tissue during conventional processing for oil and other products, may be utilized for the expression of value-added proteins. PMID:18944120

  11. Effects of host plant development and genetic determinants on the long-distance movement of cauliflower mosaic virus in Arabidopsis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leisner, S M; Turgeon, R; Howell, S H

    1993-02-01

    During systemic infections, viruses move long distances through the plant vascular system. The long-distance movement of cauliflower mosaic virus (CaMV) in Arabidopsis has been examined using a whole plant in situ hybridization technique called plant skeleton hybridization. CaMV moves long distance through the phloem largely following the flow of photoassimilates from source to sink leaves. During the course of plant development, sink-source relationships change and the region of the plant that CaMV can invade is progressively reduced. In Arabidopsis, we have found that conditions that influence the rate of plant development dramatically impact the long-distance movement of CaMV, because under normal conditions the rate of plant development is closely matched to the kinetics of virus movement. Ecotypes and mutants of Arabidopsis that flower early show a form of resistance to systemic CaMV infection, which we call "developmental resistance." Developmental resistance results from the fact that the rosette leaves mature early in the life of an early flowering plant and become inaccessible to virus. On the other hand, if the development of early flowering plants is retarded by suboptimal growth conditions, inoculated plants appear more susceptible to the virus and systemic infections become more widespread. We have found that other Arabidopsis ecotypes, such as Enkheim-2 (En-2), show another form of resistance to virus movement that is not based on developmental or growth conditions. The virus resistance in ecotype En-2 is largely conditioned by a dominant trait at a single locus. PMID:8453301

  12. Proteomic and phytohormone analysis of the response of maize (Zea mays L. seedlings to sugarcane mosaic virus.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Liuji Wu

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Sugarcane mosaic virus (SCMV is an important virus pathogen in crop production, causing serious losses in grain and forage yields in susceptible cultivars. Control strategies have been developed, but only marginal successes have been achieved. For the efficient control of this virus, a better understanding of its interactions and associated resistance mechanisms at the molecular level is required. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: The responses of resistant and susceptible genotypes of maize to SCMV and the molecular basis of the resistance were studied using a proteomic approach based on two-dimensional polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis (2-DE and matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization time of flight mass spectrometry (MALDI-TOF-MS/MS analysis. Ninety-six protein spots showed statistically significant differences in intensity after SCMV inoculation. The classification of differentially expressed proteins showed that SCMV-responsive proteins were mainly involved in energy and metabolism, stress and defense responses, and photosynthesis. Most of the proteins identified were located in chloroplasts, chloroplast membranes, and the cytoplasm. Analysis of changes in phytohormone levels after virus inoculation suggested that salicylic acid, abscisic acid, jasmonic acid, and azelaic acid may played important roles in the maize response to SCMV infection. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: Among these identified proteins, 19 have not been identified previously as virus-responsive proteins, and seven were new and did not have assigned functions. These proteins may be candidate proteins for future investigation, and they may present new biological functions and play important roles in plant-virus interactions. The behavioural patterns of the identified proteins suggest the existence of defense mechanisms operating during the early stages of infection that differed in two genotypes. In addition, there are overlapping and specific phytohormone

  13. 用质谱法研究烟草花叶病毒外壳蛋白%Study on Tobacco Mosaic Virus Coat Protein by Mass Spectrometry

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    马晓东; 李重九

    2004-01-01

    This paper introduced a rapid, sensitive, and exact method to identify the different strains of plant virus. One strain of tobacco mosaic virus(TMV)was isolated from tobacco plants, its coat protein (TMV-CP) was analyzed by MALDI-TOFMS, the molecular weight and peptide mass spectra of trypsin enzymolysis were used to identify virus strain. Compared it with other TMV strains in the internet PDBdatabase, the amino acid sequence of this stain was rather similar to one of 12 strains. The results shown mass spectrometry was suitable for identification plant virus rather than SDS-PAGE method.

  14. Introduction of East African cassava mosaic Zanzibar virus to Oman harks back to "Zanzibar, the capital of Oman".

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khan, Akhtar J; Akhtar, Sohail; Al-Matrushi, Abdulrahman M; Fauquet, Claude M; Briddon, Rob W

    2013-02-01

    Cassava mosaic disease (CMD) is the most devastating disease of the subsistence crop cassava (Manihot esculenta) across Africa and the Indian subcontinent. The disease is caused by viruses of the genus Begomovirus (family Geminiviridae)-seven species have been identified so far. The Sultanate of Oman is unusual among countries in Arabia in growing cassava on a small scale for local consumption. During a recent survey in A'Seeb wilayat of Muscat governorate, Oman, cassava plants were identified with symptoms typical of CMD. A begomovirus, East African cassava mosaic Zanzibar virus (EACMZV), was isolated from symptomatic plants. This virus was previously only known to occur in Zanzibar and Kenya. During the 19th Century, Zanzibar was governed by Oman and was so important that the Sultan of Oman moved his capital there from Muscat. After a period of colonial rule, the governing Arab elite was overthrown, following independence in the 1960s, and many expatriate Omanis returned to their homeland. Having gained a liking for the local Zanzibar cuisine, it appears that returning Omanis did not wish to do without dishes made from one particular favorite, cassava. Consequently, they carried planting material back to Oman for cultivation in their kitchen gardens. The evidence suggests that this material harbored EACMZV. Recently, Oman has been shown to be a nexus for geminiviruses and their associated satellites from diverse geographic origins. With their propensity to recombine, a major mechanism for evolution of geminiviruses, and the fact that Oman (and several other Arabian countries) is a major hub for trade and travel by air and sea, the possibility of onward spread is worrying. PMID:23085885

  15. Cowpea mosaic virus infection induces a massive proliferation of endoplasmic reticulum but not Golgi membranes and is dependent on de novo membrane synthesis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Carette, J.E.; Stuiver, M.; Lent, van J.; Wellink, J.; Kammen, van A.

    2000-01-01

    Replication of cowpea mosaic virus (CPMV) is associated with small membranous vesicles that are induced upon infection. The effect of CPMV replication on the morphology and distribution of the endomembrane system in living plant cells was studied by expressing green fluorescent protein (GFP) targete

  16. Brachypodium distachyon line Bd3-1 resistance is elicited by the barley stripe mosaic virus triple gene block 1 movement protein

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Lee, M.Y.; Yan, L.J.; Gorter, F.A.; Kim, B.Y.T.; Cui, Y.; Hu, Y.; Yuan, C.; Grindheim, J.; Ganesan, U.; Liu, Z.Y.; Han, C.G.; Yu, J.L.; Li, D.W.; Jackson, A.O.

    2012-01-01

    Barley stripe mosaic virus North Dakota 18 (ND18), Beijing (BJ), Xinjiang (Xi), Type (TY) and CV21 strains are unable to infect the Brachypodium distachyon Bd3-1 inbred line, which harbours a resistance gene designated Bsr1, but the Norwich (NW) strain is virulent on Bd3-1. Analysis of ND18 and NW g

  17. PCR-Denaturing Gradient Gel Electrophoresis Analysis To Assess the Effects of a Genetically Modified Cucumber Mosaic Virus-Resistant Tomato Plant on Soil Microbial Communities▿

    OpenAIRE

    Lin, Chih-Hui; Pan, Tzu-Ming

    2010-01-01

    The effects of a genetically modified cucumber mosaic virus (CMV)-resistant tomato on soil microbial communities were evaluated in this study. Soil position and environmental factors played more dominant roles than the tomato genotype in the variation of soil microbial communities.

  18. Comparison of helper component-protease RNA silencing suppression activity, subcellular localization, and aggregation of three Korean isolates of Turnip mosaic virus

    Science.gov (United States)

    In 2014, we performed a nationwide survey in Korean radish fields to investigate the distribution of Turnip mosaic virus (TuMV). Brassica chinensis sap-inoculated with TuMV-infected radish tissue showed different symptom severity with three isolates. In order to investigate variation among Korean Tu...

  19. Survey of aphid population in a yellow passion fruit crop and its relationship on the spread Cowpea aphid-borne mosaic virus in a subtropical region of Brazil

    OpenAIRE

    Garcêz, Renata Maia; Chaves, Alexandre Levi Rodrigues; Eiras, Marcelo; Meletti, Laura Maria Molina; de Azevedo Filho, Joaquim Adelino; da Silva, Leonardo Assis; Colariccio, Addolorata

    2015-01-01

    Background Passion fruit woodiness may be caused by Cowpea aphid-borne mosaic virus (CABMV) and is currently the major passion fruit disease in Brazil. To assess the virus-vector-host interactions, a newly introduced golden passion fruit plantation located in eastern region of São Paulo State, Brazil, was monitored. Methods Dissemination of CABMV was determined analyzing golden passion fruit plants monthly for 18 months by PTA-ELISA. Seasonality and aphid fauna diversity was determined by ide...

  20. First report of Catharanthus mosaic virus in Mandevilla in the United States

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mandevilla (Apocynaceae) is an ornamental tropical vine popular for its bright and attractive flowers. During 2012-2013 twelve Mandevilla sp. samples from Minnesota and Florida nurseries were submitted for analysis at the University of Minnesota Plant Disease Clinic. Plants showed mosaic symptoms, ...

  1. Pepper yellow mosaic virus, a new potyvirus in sweet-pepper. Archives of Virology

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Inoue-Nagata, A.K.; Fonseca, M.E.N.; Resende, de R.O.; Boiteux, L.S.; Monte, D.C.; Dusi, A.N.; Ávila, de A.C.; Vlugt, van der R.A.A.

    2002-01-01

    A potyvirus was found causing yellow mosaic and veinal banding in sweetpepper in Central and Southeast Brazil. The sequence analysis of the 3' terminal region of the viral RNA revealed a coat protein of 278 amino acids, followed by 275 nucleotides in the 3'-untranslated region preceding a polyadenyl

  2. Genotyping of Cucumber mosaic virus isolates in western New York State during epidemic years: Characterization of an emergent plant virus population.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thompson, Jeremy R; Langenhan, Jamie L; Fuchs, Marc; Perry, Keith L

    2015-12-01

    In the early 2000s an epidemic of cucumber mosaic virus (CMV) spread within the Midwestern and Eastern US affecting snap and dry bean (Phaseolus vulgaris L.) cultivation. Fifty one CMV isolates from this period were partially characterized from varied hosts by sequencing a section from each of the three genomic RNAs. Aside from one subgroup II strain from pepper, all isolates, including those from snap bean, fell within the IA subgroup. The nucleotide sequence diversity of virus populations sampled at multiple sites and at different years was significantly higher than that of a population from single site in a single year, although in general the number of polymorphisms was low (greenhouse assays, respectively. To our knowledge Bn57 is the first CMV strain isolated from P. vulgaris to be fully sequenced and cloned, providing a useful tool for analyses of CMV-host interactions. PMID:26254084

  3. I. Identification and characterization of dasheen mosaic virus in Chinese evergreen plants (Aglaonema commutatum) in California. II. New approaches for detecting plant viruses

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kositratana, W.

    1985-01-01

    Chinese evergreen plants (Aglaonema commutatum) with symptoms of mild stunting, chlorosis, leaf distortion and mosaic, were observed in Southern California. Flexuous rods (ca. 750 nm) were detected in leaf dip and partially purified preparations. Dasheen mosac virus (DMV) was identified as the causal agent on the basis of host range, morphology and reaction with DMV antiserum in immunodouble diffusion and immunosorbent electron microscopy (ISEM) tests. Tetragonia expansa was found to be a new host of this virus. Surveys indicate that DMV is not widespread in cultivars of A. commutatum in Southern California. The virus was purified from leaves of seedling Philodendron selloum by clarification with CCl/sub 4/, CHCl/sub 3/, and Triton X-100, precipitation with PEG-8000 and centrifugation in either Cs/sub 2/SO/sub 4/-sucrose cushion gradients or Cs/sub 2/SO/sub 4/ equilibrium density gradients. Purified virions formed a single UV-absorbing infectious band with densities of 1.31 and 1.245 g/ml in CsCl/sub 2/ and Cs/sub 2/SO/sub 4/ equilibrium density gradients, respectively, and a sedimentation coefficient of 154 S as determined by a linear-log sucrose density gradient centrifugation. Dasheen mosaic virus has a plus-sense ssRNA with the M.W. of 3.2 x 10/sup 6/ under denaturing conditions. Molecular hybridization analysis using /sup 3/H-complementary DNA specific to DMV-Ca RNA showed that DMV-Ca isolate was more closely related to DMV-Fiji isolate than to DMV-Fla isolate, and was very distantly related to ZYMV, TEV. PeMoC and PVY.

  4. 芝麻黄花叶病毒病田间流行规律%Epidemic Characteristics of Sesame Yellow Mosaic Virus Disease in Fields

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    高新国; 高宇溥; 杨正生

    2016-01-01

    Objective] To study the epidemic characteristics of sesame yellow mosaic virus disease in fields to provide references for the pre-vention and control of the disease.[Method] In 2014, the appearance and epidemic characteristics of sesame yellow mosaic virus disease in fields were investigated.[ Result] The appearance and epidemic characteristics of sesame yellow mosaic virus disease in fields was associated with the combination effect of the growing stage of sesame and aphid occurrence .Sesame plants were susceptible to sesame yellow mosaic virus in the seedling and early flowering stages.The morbidity peak occurred 15 d after the aphid peak.[Conclusion] Regulating the sowing date of sesame to prevent the aphid peak from occurring in the seedling and early flowering stages can effectively prevent the occurrence of sesame yellow mosaic virus disease.%[目的]明确芝麻黄花叶病毒病田间流行规律,为防治该病提供参考。[方法]于2014年调查芝麻黄花叶病毒病的田间发生、流行规律。[结果]芝麻黄花叶病毒病的发生、流行与芝麻的生育期和蚜虫发生密切相关。苗期、蕾期是感染芝麻黄花叶病毒病的敏感期。蚜虫发生高峰15 d后,病害出现发病高峰。[结论]调节芝麻播种期,使苗期、蕾期,特别是蕾期错过蚜虫发生高峰能有效预防芝麻黄花叶病毒病的发生。

  5. The Dahlia mosaic virus gene VI product N-terminal region is involved in self-association.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Raikhy, Gaurav; Krause, Charles; Leisner, Scott

    2011-07-01

    The genome of the floriculture pathogen Dahlia mosaic caulimovirus (DMV) encodes six open reading frames. Generally, caulimovirus gene VI products (P6s) are thought to be multifunctional proteins required for viral infection and it is likely that self-association is required for some of these functions. In this study, yeast two-hybrid and maltose binding protein (MBP) pull-down assays indicated that full-length DMV P6 specifically self-associates. Further analyses indicated that only the DMV P6 N-terminal region, consisting of 115 amino acids, interacts with full-length P6 and with itself. This distinguishes the DMV P6 from its Cauliflower mosaic virus counterpart, which contains four regions involved in self-association. Thus, our results suggest that each caulimovirus P6 may possess a unique pattern of protein-protein interactions. Bioinformatic tools identified a putative nuclear exclusion signal located between amino acid residues 10-20, suggesting another possible function for the P6 N-terminal region. PMID:21571015

  6. Molecular characterization and infectivity of a Tomato leaf curl New Delhi virus variant associated with newly emerging yellow mosaic disease of eggplant in India

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mukherjee Sunil K

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Begomoviruses have emerged as serious problem for vegetable and fiber crops in the recent past, frequently in tropical and subtropical region of the world. The association of begomovirus with eggplant yellow mosaic disease is hitherto unknown apart from one report from Thailand. A survey in Nagpur, Central India, in 2009-2010 showed severe incidence of eggplant yellow mosaic disease. Here, we have identified and characterized a begomovirus responsible for the newly emerging yellow mosaic disease of eggplant in India. Results The complete DNA-A and DNA-B genomic components of the causative virus were cloned and sequenced. Nucleotide sequence analysis of DNA-A showed that it shared highest 97.6% identity with Tomato leaf curl New Delhi virus-India[India:Udaipur:Okra:2007] and lowest 87.9% identity with Tomato leaf curl New Delhi virus-India[India:NewDelhi:Papaya:2005], while DNA-B showed highest 94.1% identity with ToLCNDV-IN[IN:UD:Ok:07] and lowest 76.2% identity with ToLCNDV-India[India:Lucknow]. Thus, it appears that this begomovirus is a variant of ubiquitous ToLCNDV and hence, we suggest the name ToLCNDV-India[India:Nagpur:Eggplant:2009] for this variant. The pathogenicity of ToLCNDV-IN[IN:Nag:Egg:09] isolate was confirmed by agroinfiltraion and dimeric clones of DNA-A and DNA-B induced characteristic yellow mosaic symptoms in eggplants and leaf curling in tomato plants. Conclusion This is the first report of a ToLCNDV variant moving to a new agriculturally important host, eggplant and causing yellow mosaic disease. This is also a first experimental demonstration of Koch's postulate for a begomovirus associated with eggplant yellow mosaic disease.

  7. Ability of Aphis gossypii and Myzus persicae to Transmit Cucumber mosaic virus in Single and Mixed Infection with Two Potyviruses to Zucchini Squash Eficiência dos afídeos Aphis gossypii e Myzus persicae na transmissão do Cucumber mosaic virus em infecção simples e mista com dois Potyvirus para abobrinha de moita

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zayame Vegette Pinto

    2008-06-01

    Full Text Available The main objective of this work was to investigate the ability of Aphis gossypii and Myzus persicae to transmit Cucumber mosaic virus (CMV singly and mixed with two potyviruses (Papaya ringspot virus - type W, PRSV-W and Zucchini yellow mosaic virus, ZYMV, to zucchini squash plants (Cucurbita pepo. The results showed that the potyviruses in general were more efficiently transmitted by both species of aphids as compared to CMV. The transmission of PRSV-W, ZYMV and CMV separately was more efficient than in mixture.O objetivo desse trabalho foi estudar a eficiência de Aphis gossypii e Myzus persicae na transmissão do vírus do mosaico do pepino (Cucumber mosaic virus, CMV, isoladamente e em mistura com duas espécies de potyvirus (Vírus do mosaico do mamoeiro = Papaya ringspot virus - type W, PRSV-W e Vírus do mosaico amarelo da abobrinha = Zucchini yellow mosaic virus, ZYMV, para planta-testes de abobrinha de moita (Cucurbita pepo. Os dois potyvirus em geral foram transmitidos com mais eficiência pelas duas espécies de afídeos do que o CMV. A transmissão do PRSV-W, ZYMV e CMV, separadamente, foi mais eficiente do que em mistura.

  8. Virus-specific mRNA capping enzyme encoded by hepatitis E virus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Magden, J; Takeda, N; Li, T; Auvinen, P; Ahola, T; Miyamura, T; Merits, A; Kääriäinen, L

    2001-07-01

    Hepatitis E virus (HEV), a positive-strand RNA virus, is an important causative agent of waterborne hepatitis. Expression of cDNA (encoding amino acids 1 to 979 of HEV nonstructural open reading frame 1) in insect cells resulted in synthesis of a 110-kDa protein (P110), a fraction of which was proteolytically processed to an 80-kDa protein. P110 was tightly bound to cytoplasmic membranes, from which it could be released by detergents. Immunopurified P110 catalyzed transfer of a methyl group from S-adenosylmethionine (AdoMet) to GTP and GDP to yield m(7)GTP or m(7)GDP. GMP, GpppG, and GpppA were poor substrates for the P110 methyltransferase. There was no evidence for further methylation of m(7)GTP when it was used as a substrate for the methyltransferase. P110 was also a guanylyltransferase, which formed a covalent complex, P110-m(7)GMP, in the presence of AdoMet and GTP, because radioactivity from both [alpha-(32)P]GTP and [(3)H-methyl]AdoMet was found in the covalent guanylate complex. Since both methyltransferase and guanylyltransferase reactions are strictly virus specific, they should offer optimal targets for development of antiviral drugs. Cap analogs such as m(7)GTP, m(7)GDP, et(2)m(7)GMP, and m(2)et(7)GMP inhibited the methyltransferase reaction. HEV P110 capping enzyme has similar properties to the methyltransferase and guanylyltransferase of alphavirus nsP1, tobacco mosaic virus P126, brome mosaic virus replicase protein 1a, and bamboo mosaic virus (a potexvirus) nonstructural protein, indicating there is a common evolutionary origin of these distantly related plant and animal virus families. PMID:11413290

  9. A transgenic plant cell-suspension system for expression of epitopes on chimeric Bamboo mosaic virus particles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Muthamilselvan, Thangarasu; Lee, Chin-Wei; Cho, Yu-Hsin; Wu, Feng-Chao; Hu, Chung-Chi; Liang, Yu-Chuan; Lin, Na-Sheng; Hsu, Yau-Heiu

    2016-01-01

    We describe a novel strategy to produce vaccine antigens using a plant cell-suspension culture system in lieu of the conventional bacterial or animal cell-culture systems. We generated transgenic cell-suspension cultures from Nicotiana benthamiana leaves carrying wild-type or chimeric Bamboo mosaic virus (BaMV) expression constructs encoding the viral protein 1 (VP1) epitope of foot-and-mouth disease virus (FMDV). Antigens accumulated to high levels in BdT38 and BdT19 transgenic cell lines co-expressing silencing suppressor protein P38 or P19. BaMV chimeric virus particles (CVPs) were subsequently purified from the respective cell lines (1.5 and 2.1 mg CVPs/20 g fresh weight of suspended biomass, respectively), and the resulting CVPs displayed VP1 epitope on the surfaces. Guinea pigs vaccinated with purified CVPs produced humoral antibodies. This study represents an important advance in the large-scale production of immunopeptide vaccines in a cost-effective manner using a plant cell-suspension culture system. PMID:25879277

  10. Populational survey of arthropods on transgenic common bean expressing the rep gene from Bean golden mosaic virus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pinheiro, Patrícia V; Quintela, Eliane D; Junqueira, Ana Maria R; Aragão, Francisco J L; Faria, Josias C

    2014-01-01

    Genetically modified (GM) crops is considered the fastest adopted crop technology in the history of modern agriculture. However, possible undesirable and unintended effects must be considered during the research steps toward development of a commercial product. In this report we evaluated effects of a common bean virus resistant line on arthropod populations, considered as non-target organisms. This GM bean line (named M1/4) was modified for resistance against Bean golden mosaic virus (BGMV) by expressing a mutated REP protein, which is essential for virus replication. Biosafety studies were performed for a period of three years under field conditions. The abundance of some species was significantly higher in specific treatments in a particular year, but not consistently different in other years. A regular pattern was not observed in the distribution of insects between genetically modified and conventional treatments. Data analyses showed that minor differences observed can be attributed to random variation and were not consistent enough to conclude that the treatments were different. Therefore the present study indicates that the relative abundance of species are similar in transgenic and non-transgenic fields. PMID:24922280

  11. Ultrastructural insights into tomato infections caused by three different pathotypes of Pepino mosaic virus and immunolocalization of viral coat proteins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Minicka, Julia; Otulak, Katarzyna; Garbaczewska, Grażyna; Pospieszny, Henryk; Hasiów-Jaroszewska, Beata

    2015-12-01

    This paper presents studies on an ultrastructural analysis of plant tissue infected with different pathotypes of Pepino mosaic virus (PepMV) and the immunolocalization of viral coat proteins. Because the PepMV virus replicates with a high mutation rate and exhibits significant genetic diversity, therefore, isolates of PepMV display a wide range of symptoms on infected plants. In this work, tomato plants of the Beta Lux cultivar were inoculated mechanically with three pathotypes representing the Chilean 2 (CH2) genotype: mild (PepMV-P22), necrotic (PepMV-P19) and yellowing (PepMV-P5-IY). The presence of viral particles in all infected plants in the different compartments of various cell types (i.e. spongy and palisade mesophyll, sieve elements and xylem vessels) was revealed via ultrastructural analyses. For the first time, it was possible to demonstrate the presence of crystalline inclusions, composed of virus-like particles. In the later stage of PepMV infection (14 dpi) various pathotype-dependent changes in the structure of the individual organelles (i.e. mitochondria, chloroplasts) were found. The strongest immunogold labeling of the viral coat proteins was also observed in plants infected by necrotic isolates. A large number of viral coat proteins were marked in the plant conductive elements, both xylem and phloem.

  12. Analysis of resistance to Yam mosaic virus, genus Potyvirus in white guinea yam (Dioscorea rotundata Poir. genotypes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Babajide Odu O.

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Resistance to Yam mosaic virus (YMV, genus Potyvirus was studied in 10 populations of selected white Guinea yam (Dioscorea rotundata. Plants of resistant genotypes: TDr 35, TDr 1621, TDr 93-1, TDr 93-32, TDr 95-107, TDr 93-23, and susceptible ones: TDr 87/00211, TDr 87/00571 and TDr 95-127 were screened for their reaction to the pathogen by symptom severity scoring scale of 1-5, and by quantifying virus multiplication by triple antibody sandwich enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (TAS-ELISA. Controlled crosses were made among the genotypes within and between the groups according to reactions to the pathogen. The resultant F1 progenies were evaluated for the infection by disease symptom development and by TAS ELISA to detect a symptomless infection in an insect-proof screenhouse for the assessment of inheritance of resistance to YMV. A genetic analysis of the reactions of progenies derived from the D. rotundata genotypes to inoculation with YMV strongly suggests that resistance to the virus is a dominantly inherited trait. Segregation ratios obtained from the families indicate that at least two dominant genes are involved.

  13. Tobacco Mosaic Virus-Based 1D Nanorod-Drug Carrier via the Integrin-Mediated Endocytosis Pathway.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tian, Ye; Gao, Sijia; Wu, Man; Liu, Xiangxiang; Qiao, Jing; Zhou, Quan; Jiang, Shidong; Niu, Zhongwei

    2016-05-01

    For cancer therapy, viruses have been utilized as excellent delivery vehicles because of their facile transfection efficiency in their host cells. However, their inherent immunogenicity has become the major obstacle for their translation into approved pharmaceuticals. Herein, we utilized rodlike plant virus, tobacco mosaic virus (TMV), which is nontoxic to mammals and mainly infects tobacco species, as anticancer nanorod-drug vector for cancer therapy study. Doxorubicin (DOX) was installed in the inner cavity of TMV by hydrazone bond, which enabled the pH-sensitive drug release property. Conjugation of cyclic Arg-Gly-Asp (cRGD) on the surface of TMV can enhance HeLa cell uptake of the carrier via the integrin-mediated endocytosis pathway. Comparing with free DOX, the cRGD-TMV-hydra-DOX vector had similar cell growth inhibition and much higher apoptosis efficiency on HeLa cells. Moreover, the in vivo assay assumed that cRGD-TMV-hydra-DOX behaved similar antitumor efficiency but much lower side effect on HeLa bearing Balb/c-nu mice. Our work provides novel insights into potentially cancer therapy based on rodlike plant viral nanocarriers. PMID:27062971

  14. One-step reverse transcription loop-mediated isothermal amplification for the rapid detection of cucumber green mottle mosaic virus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Jin-yu; Wei, Qi-wei; Liu, Yong; Tan, Xin-qiu; Zhang, Wen-na; Wu, Jian-yan; Charimbu, Miriam Karwitha; Hu, Bai-shi; Cheng, Zhao-bang; Yu, Cui; Tao, Xiao-rong

    2013-11-01

    Cucumber green mottle mosaic virus (CGMMV) has caused serious damage to Cucurbitaceae crops worldwide. The virus is considered one of the most serious Cucurbitaceae quarantine causes in many countries. In this study, a highly efficient and practical one-step reverse transcription loop-mediated isothermal amplification (RT-LAMP) was developed for the detection of CGMMV. The total RNA or crude RNA extracted from watermelon plants or seeds could be detected easily by this RT-LAMP assay. The RT-LAMP assay was conducted in isothermal (63°C) conditions within 1h. The amplified products of CGMMV could be detected as ladder-like bands using agarose gel electrophoresis or visualized in-tube under UV light with the addition of a fluorescent dye. The RT-LAMP amplification was specific to CGMMV, as no cross-reaction was observed with other viruses. The RT-LAMP assay was 100-fold more sensitive than that of reverse-transcription polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR). This is the first report of the application of the RT-LAMP assay to detect CGMMV. The sensitive, specific and rapid RT-LAMP assay developed in this study can be applied widely in laboratories, the field and quarantine surveillance of CGMMV. PMID:23933076

  15. Visual monitoring of Cucumber mosaic virus infection in Nicotiana benthamiana following transmission by the aphid vector Myzus persicae.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krenz, Bjoern; Bronikowski, Agathe; Lu, Xiaoyun; Ziebell, Heiko; Thompson, Jeremy R; Perry, Keith L

    2015-09-01

    The single-stranded, positive-sense and tripartite RNA virus Cucumber mosaic virus (CMV) was used in this study as a method for monitoring the initial stages of virus infection following aphid transmission. The RNA2 of CMV was modified to incorporate, in a variety of arrangements, an open reading frame (ORF) encoding an enhanced green fluorescent protein (eGFP). The phenotypes of five engineered RNA2s were tested in Nicotiana tabacum, Nicotiana clevelandii and Nicotiana benthamiana. Only one construct (F4), in which the 2b ORF was truncated at the 3' end and fused in-frame with the eGFP ORF, was able to systemically infect N. benthamiana plants, express eGFP and be transmitted by the aphid Myzus persicae. The utility of this construct was demonstrated following infection as early as one day post-transmission (dpt) continuing through to systemic infection. Comparisons of the inoculation sites in different petiole sections one to three dpt clearly showed that the onset of infection and eGFP expression always occurred in the epidermal or collenchymatous tissue just below the epidermis; an observation consistent with the rapid time frame characteristic of the non-persistent mode of aphid transmission. PMID:25979730

  16. [Use of three-hybrid system to detect RNA-binding activity of alfalfa mosaic virus coat protein].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spiridonov, V G; Smirnova, S A; Mel'nichuk, M D

    2003-01-01

    We used yeast three-hybrid system, for studying interaction of alfalfa mosaic virus coat protein AMVCP (AMVCP) with RNA4, which codes this protein. We have shown that AMVCP with high affinity is bound to plus-chain of RNA4 in vivo. The mutational analysis has shown, that the N-terminal part of AMVCP (aa 1 to 85) contains RNA-binding domain. C-terminal part of this protein (aa 86 to 221) does not participate in direct interaction with RNA4. However activity of the reporter-gene LacZ, which codes beta-galactosidase, in case of interaction only N-terminal part of AMVCP is five times lower, in comparison with full-length hybrid protein, that confirms that the tertiary structure of full-length AMVCP is more favourable for interaction with RNA4. PMID:14681978

  17. Establishment of a Simple and Rapid Gene Delivery System for Cucurbits by Using Engineered of Zucchini yellow mosaic virus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kang, Minji; Seo, Jang-Kyun; Choi, Hoseong; Choi, Hong-Soo; Kim, Kook-Hyung

    2016-02-01

    The infectious full-length cDNA clone of zucchini yellow mosaic virus (ZYMV) isolate PA (pZYMV-PA), which was isolated from pumpkin, was constructed by utilizing viral transcription and processing signals to produce infectious in vivo transcripts. Simple rub-inoculation of plasmid DNAs of pZYMV-PA was successful to cause infection of zucchini plants (Cucurbita pepo L.). We further engineered this infectious cDNA clone of ZYMV as a viral vector for systemic expression of heterologous proteins in cucurbits. We successfully expressed two reporter genes including gfp and bar in zucchini plants by simple rub-inoculation of plasmid DNAs of the ZYMV-based expression constructs. Our method of the ZYMV-based viral vector in association with the simple rub-inoculation provides an easy and rapid approach for introduction and evaluation of heterologous genes in cucurbits. PMID:26889118

  18. Selective deposition of nanostructured ruthenium oxide using Tobacco mosaic virus for micro-supercapacitors in solid Nafion electrolyte

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gnerlich, Markus; Ben-Yoav, Hadar; Culver, James N.; Ketchum, Douglas R.; Ghodssi, Reza

    2015-10-01

    A three-dimensional micro-supercapacitor has been developed using a novel bottom-up assembly method combining genetically modified Tobacco mosaic virus (TMV-1Cys), photolithographically defined micropillars and selective deposition of ruthenium oxide on multi-metallic microelectrodes. The three-dimensional microelectrodes consist of a titanium nitride current collector with two functionalized areas: (1) gold coating on the active electrode area promotes TMV-1Cys adhesion, and (2) sacrificial nickel pads dissolve in ruthenium tetroxide plating solution to produce ruthenium oxide on all electrically connected areas. The microfabricated electrodes are arranged in an interdigitated pattern, and the capacitance per electrode has been measured as high as 203 mF cm-2 with solid Nafion electrolyte. The process integration of bio-templated ruthenium oxide with microfabricated electrodes and solid electrolyte is an important advance towards the energy storage needs of mass produced self-sufficient micro-devices.

  19. Engineering of soybean mosaic virus as a versatile tool for studying protein-protein interactions in soybean.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seo, Jang-Kyun; Choi, Hong-Soo; Kim, Kook-Hyung

    2016-01-01

    Transient gene expression approaches are valuable tools for rapid introduction of genes of interest and characterization of their functions in plants. Although agroinfiltration is the most effectively and routinely used method for transient expression of multiple genes in various plant species, this approach has been largely unsuccessful in soybean. In this study, we engineered soybean mosaic virus (SMV) as a dual-gene delivery vector to simultaneously deliver and express two genes in soybean cells. We further show the application of the SMV-based dual vector for a bimolecular fluorescence complementation assay to visualize in vivo protein-protein interactions in soybean and for a co-immunoprecipitation assay to identify cellular proteins interacting with SMV helper component protease. This approach provides a rapid and cost-effective tool for transient introduction of multiple traits into soybean and for in vivo characterization of the soybean cellular protein interaction network. PMID:26926710

  20. 大豆花叶病毒病研究进展%Progress on Soybean Mosaic Virus (SMV)

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    徐莉; 顾国华; 葛红; 季桦; 高小红

    2010-01-01

    大豆花叶病毒(Soybean mosaic virus,SMV)病是在世界范围内广泛分布并普遍发生的病毒病害之一,可导致大豆严重减产和种质衰退.从大豆花叶病的症状、危害、SMV的特性、基因组学研究、株系分化、病害流行规律及预测模型等方面综述了近年来国内外SMV的科研方向和进展,旨在为进一步的研究提供依据.

  1. Development of an intra-molecularly shuffled efficient chimeric plant promoter from plant infecting Mirabilis mosaic virus promoter sequence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Acharya, Sefali; Sengupta, Soumika; Patro, Sunita; Purohit, Sukumar; Samal, Sabindra K; Maiti, Indu B; Dey, Nrisingha

    2014-01-01

    We developed an efficient chimeric promoter, MUASMSCP, with enhanced activity and salicylic acid (SA)/abscisic acid (ABA) inducibility, incorporating the upstream activation sequence (UAS) of Mirabilis mosaic virus full-length transcript (MUAS, -297 to -38) to the 5' end of Mirabilis mosaic virus sub-genomic transcript (MSCP, -306 to -125) promoter-fragment containing the TATA element. We compared the transient activity of the MUASMSCP promoter in tobacco/Arabidopsis protoplasts and in whole plant (Petunia hybrida) with the same that obtained from CaMV35S and MUAS35SCP promoters individually. The MUASMSCP promoter showed 1.1 and 1.5 times stronger GUS-activities over that obtained from MUAS35SCP and CaMV35S promoters respectively, in tobacco (Xanthi Brad) protoplasts. In transgenic tobacco (Nicotiana tabacum, var. Samsun NN), the MUASMSCP promoter showed 1.1 and 2.2 times stronger activities than MUAS35SCP and CaMV35S(2) promoters respectively. We observed a fair correlation between MUASMSCP-, MUAS35SCP- and CaMV35S(2)-driven GUS activities with the corresponding uidA-mRNA level in transgenic plants. X-gluc staining of transgenic germinating seed-sections and whole seedlings also support above findings. Protein-extracts made from tobacco protoplasts expressing GFP and human-IL-24 genes driven individually by the MUASMSCP promoter showed enhanced expression of the reporters compared to that obtained from the CaMV35S promoter. Furthermore, MUASMSCP-driven protoplast-derived human IL-24 showed enhanced cell inhibitory activity in DU-145 prostate cancer cells compared to that obtained from the CaMV35S promoter. We propose chimeric MUASMSCP promoter developed in the study could be useful for strong constitutive expression of transgenes in both plant/animal cells and it may become an efficient substitute for CaMV35S/CaMV35S(2) promoter.

  2. Complete genome sequence of an isolate of papaya leaf distortion mosaic virus from commercialized PRSV-resistant transgenic papaya in China.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tuo, D; Shen, W; Yan, P; Li, Ch; Gao, L; Li, X; Li, H; Zhou, P

    2013-01-01

    Papaya leaf distortion mosaic virus is highly destructive to commercial papaya production. Here, the complete genome sequence was determined for an isolate of papaya leaf distortion mosaic virus, designated PLDMV-DF, infecting the commercialized papaya ringspot virus (PRSV)-resistant transgenic papaya from China. Excluding the 3'-poly (A) tail, the sequence shares high sequence identity to several PLDMV isolates from Taiwan and Japan and is phylogenetically most closely related to the isolate from Japan. Infection of PLDMV-DF in transgenic PRSV-resistant papaya may indicate emergence of this disease in genetically engineered plants. The reported sequence for this isolate may help generate bi-transgenic papaya resistant to PRSV and PLDMV. PMID:24294960

  3. The photosystem II oxygen-evolving complex protein PsbP interacts with the coat protein of Alfalfa mosaic virus and inhibits virus replication.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Balasubramaniam, Muthukumar; Kim, Bong-Suk; Hutchens-Williams, Heather M; Loesch-Fries, L Sue

    2014-10-01

    Alfalfa mosaic virus (AMV) coat protein (CP) is essential for many steps in virus replication from early infection to encapsidation. However, the identity and functional relevance of cellular factors that interact with CP remain unknown. In an unbiased yeast two-hybrid screen for CP-interacting Arabidopsis proteins, we identified several novel protein interactions that could potentially modulate AMV replication. In this report, we focus on one of the novel CP-binding partners, the Arabidopsis PsbP protein, which is a nuclear-encoded component of the oxygen-evolving complex of photosystem II. We validated the protein interaction in vitro with pull-down assays, in planta with bimolecular fluorescence complementation assays, and during virus infection by co-immunoprecipitations. CP interacted with the chloroplast-targeted PsbP in the cytosol and mutations that prevented the dimerization of CP abolished this interaction. Importantly, PsbP overexpression markedly reduced virus accumulation in infected leaves. Taken together, our findings demonstrate that AMV CP dimers interact with the chloroplast protein PsbP, suggesting a potential sequestration strategy that may preempt the generation of any PsbP-mediated antiviral state. PMID:24940990

  4. Antagonism or synergism between papaya ringspot virus and papaya mosaic virus in Carica papaya is determined by their order of infection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chávez-Calvillo, Gabriela; Contreras-Paredes, Carlos A; Mora-Macias, Javier; Noa-Carrazana, Juan C; Serrano-Rubio, Angélica A; Dinkova, Tzvetanka D; Carrillo-Tripp, Mauricio; Silva-Rosales, Laura

    2016-02-01

    Antagonism between unrelated plant viruses has not been thoroughly described. Our studies show that two unrelated viruses, papaya ringspot virus (PRSV) and papaya mosaic virus (PapMV) produce different symptomatic outcomes during mixed infection depending on the inoculation order. Synergism occurs in plants infected first with PRSV or in plants infected simultaneously with PRSV and PapMV, and antagonism occurs in plants infected first with PapMV and later inoculated with PRSV. During antagonism, elevated pathogenesis-related (PR-1) gene expression and increased reactive oxygen species production indicated the establishment of a host defense resulting in the reduction in PRSV titers. Polyribosomal fractioning showed that PRSV affects translation of cellular eEF1α, PR-1, β-tubulin, and PapMV RNAs in planta, suggesting that its infection could be related to an imbalance in the translation machinery. Our data suggest that primary PapMV infection activates a defense response against PRSV and establishes a protective relationship with the papaya host.

  5. Helicase domain encoded by Cucumber mosaic virus RNA1 determines systemic infection of Cmr1 in pepper.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Won-Hee Kang

    Full Text Available The Cmr1 gene in peppers confers resistance to Cucumber mosaic virus isolate-P0 (CMV-P0. Cmr1 restricts the systemic spread of CMV strain-Fny (CMV-Fny, whereas this gene cannot block the spread of CMV isolate-P1 (CMV-P1 to the upper leaves, resulting in systemic infection. To identify the virulence determinant of CMV-P1, six reassortant viruses and six chimeric viruses derived from CMV-Fny and CMV-P1 cDNA clones were used. Our results demonstrate that the C-terminus of the helicase domain encoded by CMV-P1 RNA1 determines susceptibility to systemic infection, and that the helicase domain contains six different amino acid substitutions between CMV-Fny and CMV-P1(. To identify the key amino acids of the helicase domain determining systemic infection with CMV-P1, we then constructed amino acid substitution mutants. Of the mutants tested, amino acid residues at positions 865, 896, 957, and 980 in the 1a protein sequence of CMV-P1 affected the systemic infection. Virus localization studies with GFP-tagged CMV clones and in situ localization of virus RNA revealed that these four amino acid residues together form the movement determinant for CMV-P1 movement from the epidermal cell layer to mesophyll cell layers. Quantitative real-time PCR revealed that CMV-P1 and a chimeric virus with four amino acid residues of CMV-P1 accumulated more genomic RNA in inoculated leaves than did CMV-Fny, indicating that those four amino acids are also involved in virus replication. These results demonstrate that the C-terminal region of the helicase domain is responsible for systemic infection by controlling virus replication and cell-to-cell movement. Whereas four amino acids are responsible for acquiring virulence in CMV-Fny, six amino acid (positions at 865, 896, 901, 957, 980 and 993 substitutions in CMV-P1 were required for complete loss of virulence in 'Bukang'.

  6. Host range and genetic diversity of croton yellow vein mosaic virus, a weed-infecting monopartite begomovirus causing leaf curl disease in tomato.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pramesh, D; Mandal, Bikash; Phaneendra, Chigurupati; Muniyappa, V

    2013-03-01

    Croton yellow vein mosaic virus (CYVMV) is a widely occurring begomovirus in Croton bonplandianum, a common weed in the Indian subcontinent. In this study, CYVMV (genus Begomovirus, family Geminiviridae) was transmitted by whiteflies (Bemisia tabaci) to as many as 35 plant species belonging to 11 families, including many vegetables, tobacco varieties, ornamentals and weeds. CYVMV produced bright yellow vein symptoms in croton, whereas in all the other host species, the virus produced leaf curl symptoms. CYVMV produced leaf curl in 13 tobacco species and 22 cultivars of Nicotiana tabacum and resembled tobacco leaf curl virus (TobLCV) in host reactions. However, CYVMV was distinguished from TobLCV in four differential hosts, Ageratum conyzoides, C. bonplandianum, Euphorbia geniculata and Sonchus bracyotis. The complete genome sequences of four isolates originating from northern, eastern and southern India revealed that a single species of DNA-A and a betasatellite, croton yellow vein mosaic betasatellite (CroYVMB) were associated with the yellow vein mosaic disease of croton. The sequence identity among the isolates of CYVMV DNA-A and CroYVMB occurring in diverse plant species was 91.8-97.9 % and 83.3-100 %, respectively. The CYVMV DNA-A and CroYVMB generated through rolling-circle amplification of the cloned DNAs produced typical symptoms of yellow vein mosaic and leaf curling in croton and tomato, respectively. The progeny virus from both the croton and tomato plants was transmitted successfully by B. tabaci. The present study establishes the etiology of yellow vein mosaic disease of C. bonplandianum and provides molecular evidence that a weed-infecting monopartite begomovirus causes leaf curl in tomato.

  7. Biological stability of a strain of Cowpea severe mosaic virus over 20 years Estabilidade biológica de uma estirpe do Cowpea severe mosaic virus ao longo de 20 anos

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    José Albersio Araujo Lima

    2012-03-01

    Full Text Available Cowpea (Vigna unguiculata is an important crop of the traditional agriculture system in the Northeast of Brazil. It can be infected by more than 20 virus species and Cowpea severe mosaic virus (CPSMV is one of the most important pathogens that naturally infect cowpea in Brazil. Several CPSMV isolates were obtained and characterized in the Plant Virus Laboratory at the Federal University of Ceará: CPSMV-CE - the first characterized isolate of the virus obtained from cowpea in the State of Ceará; CPSMV-AL - isolated from cowpea in Alagoas; CPSMV-PE - isolated from cowpea in Pernambuco; CPSMV-PR - obtained from soybean (Glycine max in Paraná and CPSMV-CROT - isolated from Crotalaria paulinea, in Maranhão. An isolate of CPSMV with the property to infect the cv. Macaibo, a cowpea cultivar immune to most of CPSMV isolates was also biologically and serologically characterized as a new strain of the virus (CPSMV-MC. The CPSMV-MC was isolated in January 1990 and has been evaluated over 20 years by host range studies and maintenance in vivo by periodical mechanical inoculations in cowpea. The results of this periodical evaluation revealed that the biological integrity and the serological properties of CPSMV-MC were preserved over 20 years, indicating that the genetic preservation of a virus strain could occur over the years. Molecular studies involving part of the coat protein (CP gene of CPSMV-MC and five other Brazilian CPSMV isolates indicated a high degree of conservation, with 92-100% nucleotide sequence identity among the isolates.O feijão-caupi (Vigna unguiculata é uma cultura do sistema tradicional do Nordeste do Brasil, que pode ser infetada por mais de 20 espécies de vírus, sendo o vírus do mosaico severo do caupi (Cowpea severe mosaic virus, CPSMV um dos mais importantes patógenos que infeta naturalmente essa leguminosa no Brasil. Vários isolados do CPSMV foram obtidos e caracterizados no Laboratório de Virologia Vegetal da UFC

  8. Hsp90 interacts specifically with viral RNA and differentially regulates replication initiation of Bamboo mosaic virus and associated satellite RNA.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ying Wen Huang

    Full Text Available Host factors play crucial roles in the replication of plus-strand RNA viruses. In this report, a heat shock protein 90 homologue of Nicotiana benthamiana, NbHsp90, was identified in association with partially purified replicase complexes from BaMV-infected tissue, and shown to specifically interact with the 3' untranslated region (3' UTR of BaMV genomic RNA, but not with the 3' UTR of BaMV-associated satellite RNA (satBaMV RNA or that of genomic RNA of other viruses, such as Potato virus X (PVX or Cucumber mosaic virus (CMV. Mutational analyses revealed that the interaction occurs between the middle domain of NbHsp90 and domain E of the BaMV 3' UTR. The knockdown or inhibition of NbHsp90 suppressed BaMV infectivity, but not that of satBaMV RNA, PVX, or CMV in N. benthamiana. Time-course analysis further revealed that the inhibitory effect of 17-AAG is significant only during the immediate early stages of BaMV replication. Moreover, yeast two-hybrid and GST pull-down assays demonstrated the existence of an interaction between NbHsp90 and the BaMV RNA-dependent RNA polymerase. These results reveal a novel role for NbHsp90 in the selective enhancement of BaMV replication, most likely through direct interaction with the 3' UTR of BaMV RNA during the initiation of BaMV RNA replication.

  9. Short distance movement of genomic negative strands in a host and nonhost for Sugarcane mosaic virus (SCMV

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hernández-Vela Juan

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background In order to obtain an initial and preliminary understanding of host and nonhost resistance in the initial step of potyvirus replication, both positive and negative Sugarcane mosaic virus (SCMV strands where traced in inoculated and systemic leaves in host and nonhost resistant maize and sugarcane for one Mexican potyviral isolate (SCMV-VER1. Intermediary replication forms, such as the negative viral strand, seem to only move a short distance as surveyed by RT-PCR analysis and ELISA in different leaves. Virus purification was also done in leaves and stems. Results Susceptible maize plants allowed for viral SCMV replication, cell-to-cell, and long distance movement, as indicated by the presence of the coat protein along the plant. In the host resistant maize plants for the SCMV-VER1 isolate, the virus was able to establish the disease though the initial steps of virus replication, as detected by the presence of negative strands, in the basal area of the inoculated leaves at six and twelve days post inoculation. The nonhost sugarcane for SCMV-VER1 and the host sugarcane for SCMV-CAM6 also allowed the initial steps of viral replication for the VER1 isolate in the local inoculated leaf. SCMV-VER1 virions could be extracted from stems of susceptible maize with higher titers than leaves. Conclusion Nonhost and host resistance allow the initial steps of potyvirus SCMV replication, as shown by the negative strands' presence. Furthermore, both hosts allow the negative viral strands' local movement, but not their systemic spread through the stem. The presence of larger amounts of extractable virions from the stem (as compared to the leaves in susceptible maize lines suggests their long distance movement as assembled particles. This will be the first report suggesting the long distance movement of a monocot potyvirus as a virion.

  10. RNA Interference towards the Potato Psyllid, Bactericera cockerelli, Is Induced in Plants Infected with Recombinant Tobacco mosaic virus (TMV.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hada Wuriyanghan

    Full Text Available The potato/tomato psyllid, Bactericera cockerelli (B. cockerelli, is an important plant pest and the vector of the phloem-limited bacterium Candidatus Liberibacter psyllaurous (solanacearum, which is associated with the zebra chip disease of potatoes. Previously, we reported induction of RNA interference effects in B. cockerelli via in vitro-prepared dsRNA/siRNAs after intrathoracic injection, and after feeding of artificial diets containing these effector RNAs. In order to deliver RNAi effectors via plant hosts and to rapidly identify effective target sequences in plant-feeding B. cockerelli, here we developed a plant virus vector-based in planta system for evaluating candidate sequences. We show that recombinant Tobacco mosaic virus (TMV containing B. cockerelli sequences can efficiently infect and generate small interfering RNAs in tomato (Solanum lycopersicum, tomatillo (Physalis philadelphica and tobacco (Nicotiana tabacum plants, and more importantly delivery of interfering sequences via TMV induces RNAi effects, as measured by actin and V-ATPase mRNA reductions, in B. cockerelli feeding on these plants. RNAi effects were primarily detected in the B. cockerelli guts. In contrast to our results with TMV, recombinant Potato virus X (PVX and Tobacco rattle virus (TRV did not give robust infections in all plants and did not induce detectable RNAi effects in B. cockerelli. The greatest RNA interference effects were observed when B. cockerelli nymphs were allowed to feed on leaf discs collected from inoculated or lower expanded leaves from corresponding TMV-infected plants. Tomatillo plants infected with recombinant TMV containing B. cockerelli actin or V-ATPase sequences also showed phenotypic effects resulting in decreased B. cockerelli progeny production as compared to plants infected by recombinant TMV containing GFP. These results showed that RNAi effects can be achieved in plants against the phloem feeder, B. cockerelli, and the TMV

  11. Rapid detection of Piper yellow mottle virus and Cucumber mosaic virus infecting black pepper (Piper nigrum) by loop-mediated isothermal amplification (LAMP).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bhat, A I; Siljo, A; Deeshma, K P

    2013-10-01

    The loop-mediated isothermal amplification (LAMP) assay for Piper yellow mottle virus and the reverse transcription (RT) LAMP assay for Cucumber mosaic virus each consisted of a set of five primers designed against the conserved sequences in the viral genome. Both RNA and DNA isolated from black pepper were used as a template for the assay. The results were assessed visually by checking turbidity, green fluorescence and pellet formation in the reaction tube and also by gel electrophoresis. The assay successfully detected both viruses in infected plants whereas no cross-reactions were recorded with healthy plants. Optimum conditions for successful amplification were determined in terms of the concentrations of magnesium sulphate and betaine, temperature, and duration. The detection limit for both LAMP and RT-LAMP was up to 100 times that for conventional PCR and up to one-hundredth of that for real-time PCR. The optimal conditions arrived at were validated by testing field samples of infected vines of three species from different regions.

  12. Nanonets Derived from Turnip Mosaic Virus as Scaffolds for Increased Enzymatic Activity of Immobilized Candida antarctica Lipase B

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cuenca, Sol; Mansilla, Carmen; Aguado, Marta; Yuste-Calvo, Carmen; Sánchez, Flora; Sánchez-Montero, Jose M.; Ponz, Fernando

    2016-01-01

    Elongated flexuous plant viral nanoparticles (VNPs) represent an interesting platform for developing different applications in nanobiotechnology. In the case of potyviruses, the virion external surface is made up of helically arrayed domains of the viral structural coat protein (CP), repeated over 2000 times, in which the N- and C-terminal domains of each CP are projected toward the exterior of the external virion surface. These characteristics provide a chemical environment rich in functional groups susceptible to chemical conjugations. We have conjugated Candida antarctica lipase B (CALB) onto amino groups of the external surface of the potyvirus turnip mosaic virus (TuMV) using glutaraldehyde as a conjugating agent. Using this approach, TuMV virions were transformed into scaffolds for CALB nanoimmobilization. Analysis of the resulting structures revealed the formation of TuMV nanonets onto which large CALB aggregates were deposited. The functional enzymatic characterization of the CALB-bearing TuMV nanonets showed that CALB continued to be active in the nanoimmobilized form, even gaining an increased relative specific activity, as compared to the non-immobilized form. These novel virus-based nanostructures may provide a useful new approach to enzyme nanoimmobilization susceptible to be industrially exploited. PMID:27148295

  13. Characterization of Hungarian isolates of zucchini yellow mosaic virus (ZYMV, potyvirus) transmitted by seeds of Cucurbita pepo var Styriaca.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tóbiás, István; Palkovics, László

    2003-04-01

    Zucchini yellow mosaic virus (ZYMV) has emerged as an important pathogen of cucurbits within the last few years in Hungary. The Hungarian isolates show a high biological variability, have specific nucleotide and amino acid sequences in the N-terminal region of coat protein and form a distinct branch in the phylogenetic tree. The virus is spread very efficiently in the field by several aphid species in a non-persistent manner. It can be transmitted by seed in holl-less seeded oil pumpkin (Cucurbita pepo (L) var Styriaca), although at a very low rate. Three isolates from seed transmission assay experiments were chosen and their nucleotide sequences of coat proteins have been compared with the available CP sequences of ZYMV. According to the sequence analysis, the Hungarian isolates belong to the Central European branch in the phylogenetic tree and, together with the ZYMV isolates from Austria and Slovenia, share specific amino acids at positions 16, 17, 27 and 37 which are characteristic only to these isolates. The phylogenetic tree suggests the common origin of distantly distributed isolates which can be attributed to widespread seed transmission. PMID:12701712

  14. Nanonets Derived from Turnip Mosaic Virus as Scaffolds for Increased Enzymatic Activity of Immobilized Candida antarctica Lipase B.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cuenca, Sol; Mansilla, Carmen; Aguado, Marta; Yuste-Calvo, Carmen; Sánchez, Flora; Sánchez-Montero, Jose M; Ponz, Fernando

    2016-01-01

    Elongated flexuous plant viral nanoparticles (VNPs) represent an interesting platform for developing different applications in nanobiotechnology. In the case of potyviruses, the virion external surface is made up of helically arrayed domains of the viral structural coat protein (CP), repeated over 2000 times, in which the N- and C-terminal domains of each CP are projected toward the exterior of the external virion surface. These characteristics provide a chemical environment rich in functional groups susceptible to chemical conjugations. We have conjugated Candida antarctica lipase B (CALB) onto amino groups of the external surface of the potyvirus turnip mosaic virus (TuMV) using glutaraldehyde as a conjugating agent. Using this approach, TuMV virions were transformed into scaffolds for CALB nanoimmobilization. Analysis of the resulting structures revealed the formation of TuMV nanonets onto which large CALB aggregates were deposited. The functional enzymatic characterization of the CALB-bearing TuMV nanonets showed that CALB continued to be active in the nanoimmobilized form, even gaining an increased relative specific activity, as compared to the non-immobilized form. These novel virus-based nanostructures may provide a useful new approach to enzyme nanoimmobilization susceptible to be industrially exploited.

  15. Biochar Soil Amendment Effects on Arsenic Availability to Mountain Brome ().

    Science.gov (United States)

    Strawn, Daniel G; Rigby, April C; Baker, Leslie L; Coleman, Mark D; Koch, Iris

    2015-07-01

    Biochar is a renewable energy byproduct that shows promise for remediating contaminated mine sites. A common contaminant at mine sites is arsenic (As). In this study, the effects of biochar amendments to a mine-contaminated soil on As concentrations in mountain brome ( Nees ex Steud.) were investigated. In the biochar-amended soil, mountain brome had greater root biomass and decreased root and shoot As concentrations. X-ray absorption near-edge structure spectroscopy results showed that arsenate [As(V)] is the predominant species in both the nonamended and biochar-amended soils. Soil extraction tests that measure phosphate and arsenate availability to plants failed to accurately predict plant tissue As concentrations, suggesting the arsenate bioavailability behavior in the soils is distinct from phosphate. Results from this study indicate that biochar will be a beneficial amendment to As-contaminated mine sites for remediation. PMID:26437113

  16. Molecular and Biological Characterization of an Isolate of Cucumber mosaic virus from Glycine soja by Generating its Infectious Full-genome cDNA Clones

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mi Sa Vo Phan

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available Molecular and biological characteristics of an isolate of Cucumber mosaic virus (CMV from Glycine soja (wild soybean, named as CMV-209, was examined in this study. Comparison of nucleotide sequences and phylogenetic analyses of CMV-209 with the other CMV strains revealed that CMV-209 belonged to CMV subgroup I. However, CMV-209 showed some genetic distance from the CMV strains assigned to subgroup IA or subgroup IB. Infectious full-genome cDNA clones of CMV-209 were generated under the control of the Cauliflower mosaic virus 35S promoter. Infectivity of the CMV-209 clones was evaluated in Nicotiana benthamiana and various legume species. Our assays revealed that CMV-209 could systemically infect Glycine soja (wild soybean and Pisum sativum (pea as well as N. benthamiana, but not the other legume species.

  17. Translational Enhancer of Tobacco mosaic virus Enhancing Expression of Hepatitis B Surface Antigen in Transgenic Panax ginseng C. A. Meyer Callus

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2008-01-01

    The 5'-nontranslated leader(omega sequence) of Tobacco mosaic virus(TMV) was used as a translational enhancer sequence in the expression of the hepatitis B surface antigen(HBsAg) gene in transgenic ginseng callus cultures.The adr subtype HBsAg gene was placed under the control of the Cauliflower mosaic virus(CaMV) 35S promoter linking to the TMV leader sequence. The antisense omega sequence was used in a control construct. The resulting constructs cloned in the binary vector pBI121 were used to transform the ginseng callus tissue via the Agrobacterium-mediated procedure. The integration and expression of the HBsAg gene were evaluated by PCR and western blot, respectively. Enzyme-linked immunoassays(ELISA) using a monoclonal antibody directed against human serum-derived HBsAg revealed a three to four-fold enhanced expression of HBsAg in ginseng cells conferred by the TMV omega element.

  18. Resistance to Sri Lankan Cassava Mosaic Virus (SLCMV) in Genetically Engineered Cassava cv. KU50 through RNA Silencing

    KAUST Repository

    Ntui, Valentine Otang

    2015-04-22

    Cassava ranks fifth among the starch producing crops of the world, its annual bioethanol yield is higher than for any other crop. Cassava cultivar KU50, the most widely grown cultivar for non-food purposes is susceptible to Sri Lankan cassava mosaic virus (SLCMV). The objective of this work was to engineer resistance to SLCMV by RNA interference (RNAi) in order to increase biomass yield, an important aspect for bioethanol production. Here, we produced transgenic KU50 lines expressing dsRNA homologous to the region between the AV2 and AV1 of DNA A of SLCMV. High level expression of dsRNA of SLCMV did not induce any growth abnormality in the transgenic plants. Transgenic lines displayed high levels of resistance to SLCMV compared to the wild-type plants and no virus load could be detected in uninoculated new leaves of the infected resistant lines after PCR amplification and RT-PCR analysis. The agronomic performance of the transgenic lines was unimpaired after inoculation with the virus as the plants presented similar growth when compared to the mock inoculated control plants and revealed no apparent reduction in the amount and weight of tubers produced. We show that the resistance is correlated with post-transcriptional gene silencing because of the production of transgene specific siRNA. The results demonstrate that transgenic lines exhibited high levels of resistance to SLCMV. This resistance coupled with the desirable yield components in the transgenic lines makes them better candidates for exploitation in the production of biomass as well as bioethanol.

  19. Impact of transgenic wheat with wheat yellow mosaic virus resistance on microbial community diversity and enzyme activity in rhizosphere soil.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jirong Wu

    Full Text Available The transgenic wheat line N12-1 containing the WYMV-Nib8 gene was obtained previously through particle bombardment, and it can effectively control the wheat yellow mosaic virus (WYMV disease transmitted by Polymyxa graminis at turngreen stage. Due to insertion of an exogenous gene, the transcriptome of wheat may be altered and affect root exudates. Thus, it is important to investigate the potential environmental risk of transgenic wheat before commercial release because of potential undesirable ecological side effects. Our 2-year study at two different experimental locations was performed to analyze the impact of transgenic wheat N12-1 on bacterial and fungal community diversity in rhizosphere soil using polymerase chain reaction-denaturing gel gradient electrophoresis (PCR-DGGE at four growth stages (seeding stage, turngreen stage, grain-filling stage, and maturing stage. We also explored the activities of urease, sucrase and dehydrogenase in rhizosphere soil. The results showed that there was little difference in bacterial and fungal community diversity in rhizosphere soil between N12-1 and its recipient Y158 by comparing Shannon's, Simpson's diversity index and evenness (except at one or two growth stages. Regarding enzyme activity, only one significant difference was found during the maturing stage at Xinxiang in 2011 for dehydrogenase. Significant growth stage variation was observed during 2 years at two experimental locations for both soil microbial community diversity and enzyme activity. Analysis of bands from the gel for fungal community diversity showed that the majority of fungi were uncultured. The results of this study suggested that virus-resistant transgenic wheat had no adverse impact on microbial community diversity and enzyme activity in rhizosphere soil during 2 continuous years at two different experimental locations. This study provides a theoretical basis for environmental impact monitoring of transgenic wheat when the

  20. Resistance to Sri Lankan cassava mosaic virus (SLCMV in genetically engineered cassava cv. KU50 through RNA silencing.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Valentine Otang Ntui

    Full Text Available Cassava ranks fifth among the starch producing crops of the world, its annual bioethanol yield is higher than for any other crop. Cassava cultivar KU50, the most widely grown cultivar for non-food purposes is susceptible to Sri Lankan cassava mosaic virus (SLCMV. The objective of this work was to engineer resistance to SLCMV by RNA interference (RNAi in order to increase biomass yield, an important aspect for bioethanol production. Here, we produced transgenic KU50 lines expressing dsRNA homologous to the region between the AV2 and AV1 of DNA A of SLCMV. High level expression of dsRNA of SLCMV did not induce any growth abnormality in the transgenic plants. Transgenic lines displayed high levels of resistance to SLCMV compared to the wild-type plants and no virus load could be detected in uninoculated new leaves of the infected resistant lines after PCR amplification and RT-PCR analysis. The agronomic performance of the transgenic lines was unimpaired after inoculation with the virus as the plants presented similar growth when compared to the mock inoculated control plants and revealed no apparent reduction in the amount and weight of tubers produced. We show that the resistance is correlated with post-transcriptional gene silencing because of the production of transgene specific siRNA. The results demonstrate that transgenic lines exhibited high levels of resistance to SLCMV. This resistance coupled with the desirable yield components in the transgenic lines makes them better candidates for exploitation in the production of biomass as well as bioethanol.

  1. Resistance to Sri Lankan cassava mosaic virus (SLCMV) in genetically engineered cassava cv. KU50 through RNA silencing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ntui, Valentine Otang; Kong, Kynet; Khan, Raham Sher; Igawa, Tomoko; Janavi, Gnanaguru Janaky; Rabindran, Ramalingam; Nakamura, Ikuo; Mii, Masahiro

    2015-01-01

    Cassava ranks fifth among the starch producing crops of the world, its annual bioethanol yield is higher than for any other crop. Cassava cultivar KU50, the most widely grown cultivar for non-food purposes is susceptible to Sri Lankan cassava mosaic virus (SLCMV). The objective of this work was to engineer resistance to SLCMV by RNA interference (RNAi) in order to increase biomass yield, an important aspect for bioethanol production. Here, we produced transgenic KU50 lines expressing dsRNA homologous to the region between the AV2 and AV1 of DNA A of SLCMV. High level expression of dsRNA of SLCMV did not induce any growth abnormality in the transgenic plants. Transgenic lines displayed high levels of resistance to SLCMV compared to the wild-type plants and no virus load could be detected in uninoculated new leaves of the infected resistant lines after PCR amplification and RT-PCR analysis. The agronomic performance of the transgenic lines was unimpaired after inoculation with the virus as the plants presented similar growth when compared to the mock inoculated control plants and revealed no apparent reduction in the amount and weight of tubers produced. We show that the resistance is correlated with post-transcriptional gene silencing because of the production of transgene specific siRNA. The results demonstrate that transgenic lines exhibited high levels of resistance to SLCMV. This resistance coupled with the desirable yield components in the transgenic lines makes them better candidates for exploitation in the production of biomass as well as bioethanol.

  2. Tobacco mosaic virus movement protein enhances the spread of RNA silencing.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hannes Vogler

    2008-04-01

    Full Text Available Eukaryotic cells restrain the activity of foreign genetic elements, including viruses, through RNA silencing. Although viruses encode suppressors of silencing to support their propagation, viruses may also exploit silencing to regulate host gene expression or to control the level of their accumulation and thus to reduce damage to the host. RNA silencing in plants propagates from cell to cell and systemically via a sequence-specific signal. Since the signal spreads between cells through plasmodesmata like the viruses themselves, virus-encoded plasmodesmata-manipulating movement proteins (MP may have a central role in compatible virus:host interactions by suppressing or enhancing the spread of the signal. Here, we have addressed the propagation of GFP silencing in the presence and absence of MP and MP mutants. We show that the protein enhances the spread of silencing. Small RNA analysis indicates that MP does not enhance the silencing pathway but rather enhances the transport of the signal through plasmodesmata. The ability to enhance the spread of silencing is maintained by certain MP mutants that can move between cells but which have defects in subcellular localization and do not support the spread of viral RNA. Using MP expressing and non-expressing virus mutants with a disabled silencing suppressing function, we provide evidence indicating that viral MP contributes to anti-viral silencing during infection. Our results suggest a role of MP in controlling virus propagation in the infected host by supporting the spread of silencing signal. This activity of MP involves only a subset of its properties implicated in the spread of viral RNA.

  3. Extensive geographic mosaicism in avian influenza viruses from gulls in the northern hemisphere.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michelle Wille

    Full Text Available Due to limited interaction of migratory birds between Eurasia and America, two independent avian influenza virus (AIV gene pools have evolved. There is evidence of low frequency reassortment between these regions, which has major implications in global AIV dynamics. Indeed, all currently circulating lineages of the PB1 and PA segments in North America are of Eurasian origin. Large-scale analyses of intercontinental reassortment have shown that viruses isolated from Charadriiformes (gulls, terns, and shorebirds are the major contributor of these outsider events. To clarify the role of gulls in AIV dynamics, specifically in movement of genes between geographic regions, we have sequenced six gull AIV isolated in Alaska and analyzed these along with 142 other available gull virus sequences. Basic investigations of host species and the locations and times of isolation reveal biases in the available sequence information. Despite these biases, our analyses reveal a high frequency of geographic reassortment in gull viruses isolated in America. This intercontinental gene mixing is not found in the viruses isolated from gulls in Eurasia. This study demonstrates that gulls are important as vectors for geographically reassorted viruses, particularly in America, and that more surveillance effort should be placed on this group of birds.

  4. Preserving prairies: Understanding temporal and spatial patterns of invasive annual bromes in the Northern Great Plains

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ashton, Isabel; Symstad, Amy; Davis, Christopher; Swanson, Daniel J.

    2016-01-01

    Two Eurasian invasive annual brome grasses, cheatgrass (Bromus tectorum) and Japanese brome (Bromus japonicus), are well known for their impact in steppe ecosystems of the western United States where these grasses have altered fire regimes, reduced native plant diversity and abundance, and degraded wildlife habitat. Annual bromes are also abundant in the grasslands of the Northern Great Plains (NGP), but their impact and ecology are not as well studied. It is unclear whether the lessons learned from the steppe will translate to the mixed-grass prairie where native plant species are adapted to frequent fires and grazing. Developing a successful annual brome management strategy for National Park Service units and other NGP grasslands requires better understanding of (1) the impact of annual bromes on grassland condition; (2) the dynamics of these species through space and time; and (3) the relative importance of environmental factors within and outside managers' control for these spatiotemporal dynamics. Here, we use vegetation monitoring data collected from 1998 to 2015 in 295 sites to relate spatiotemporal variability of annual brome grasses to grassland composition, weather, physical environmental characteristics, and ecological processes (grazing and fire). Concern about the impact of these species in NGP grasslands is warranted, as we found a decline in native species richness with increasing annual brome cover. Annual brome cover generally increased over the time of monitoring but also displayed a 3- to 5-yr cycle of reduction and resurgence. Relative cover of annual bromes in the monitored areas was best predicted by park unit, weather, extant plant community, slope grade, soil composition, and fire history. We found no evidence that grazing reduced annual brome cover, but this may be due to the relatively low grazing pressure in our study. By understanding the consequences and patterns of annual brome invasion, we will be better able to preserve and restore

  5. Complete nucleotide sequence of Sida golden mosaic Florida virus and phylogenetic relationships with other begomoviruses infecting malvaceous weeds in the Caribbean.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fiallo-Olivé, Elvira; Martínez-Zubiaur, Yamila; Moriones, Enrique; Navas-Castillo, Jesús

    2010-09-01

    The complete genome sequence of two isolates of the bipartite begomovirus (genus Begomovirus, family Geminiviridae) Sida golden mosaic Florida virus (SiGMFV) is presented. We propose that both isolates, found infecting Malvastrum coromandelianum (family Malvaceae) in Cuba, belong to a new strain of SiGMFV. Phylogenetic analysis showed that SiGMFV DNA-A is located in a monophyletic cluster that includes begomoviruses infecting malvaceous weeds from the Caribbean.

  6. mRNAs containing the unstructured 5' leader sequence of alfalfa mosaic virus RNA 4 translate inefficiently in lysates from poliovirus-infected HeLa cells.

    OpenAIRE

    Hann, L E; Gehrke, L

    1995-01-01

    Poliovirus infection is accompanied by translational control that precludes translation of 5'-capped mRNAs and facilitates translation of the uncapped poliovirus RNA by an internal initiation mechanism. Previous reports have suggested that the capped alfalfa mosaic virus coat protein mRNA (AIMV CP RNA), which contains an unstructured 5' leader sequence, is unusual in being functionally active in extracts prepared from poliovirus-infected HeLa cells (PI-extracts). To identify the cis-acting nu...

  7. GFP is Efficiently Expressed by Wheat Streak Mosaic Virus Using a Range of Tritimovirus NIa Cleavage Sites and Forms Dense Aggregates in Cereal Hosts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wheat streak mosaic virus (WSMV)-based transient expression vector was developed to express GFP as a marker protein. The GFP cistron was engineered between the P1 and HC-Pro cistrons in an infectious cDNA clone of WSMV. The cleavage sites, P3/6KI, 6KI/CI, NIa/NIb, or NIb/CP, from WSMV were fused to ...

  8. Cloning and expression of the Chinese wheat mosaic virus RNA2 coat protein read- through and 19 ku cysteine- rich domains and localization of these proteins

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2002-01-01

    The 5′-terminal (RTn) and 3′-terminal (RTc) halves of the coat protein readthrough domain and the 19 ku cysteine-rich protein of Chinese wheat mosaic virus (CWMV) were amplified by RT-PCR, cloned and expressed in E. coli. Antisera and monoclonal antibodies against these proteins were prepared by immunising these purified proteins to mice. Detection of RTn, RTc and 19 ku proteins in CWMV infected wheat sap and leaf tissue indicated that the RTn and RTc proteins were distributed on the surface of virus particles whereas the 19 ku protein was in the cytoplasm of the infected wheat cells.

  9. P3N-PIPO of Clover yellow vein virus exacerbates symptoms in pea infected with white clover mosaic virus and is implicated in viral synergism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hisa, Yusuke; Suzuki, Haruka; Atsumi, Go; Choi, Sun Hee; Nakahara, Kenji S; Uyeda, Ichiro

    2014-01-20

    Mixed infection of pea (Pisum sativum) with Clover yellow vein virus (ClYVV) and White clover mosaic virus (WClMV) led to more severe disease symptoms (a phenomenon called viral synergism). Similar to the mixed ClYVV/WClMV infection, a WClMV-based vector encoding P3N-PIPO of ClYVV exacerbated the disease symptoms. Infection with the WClMV vector encoding ClYVV HC-Pro (a suppressor of RNA silencing involved in potyviral synergisms), also resulted in more severe symptoms, although to a lesser extent than infection with the vector encoding P3N-PIPO. Viral genomic RNA accumulated soon after inoculation (at 2 and 4 days) at higher levels in leaves inoculated with WClMV encoding HC-Pro but at lower levels in leaves inoculated with WClMV encoding P3N-PIPO than in peas infected with WClMV encoding GFP. Our results suggest that ClYVV P3N-PIPO is involved in the synergism between ClYVV and WClMV during pea infection through an unknown mechanism different from suppression of RNA silencing. PMID:24418553

  10. [Competitiveness of hard wheat (Triticum durum Desf.) varieties against ripgut brome (Bromus rigidus Roth)].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hamal, A; Benbella, M; Rzozi, S B; Bouhache, M; Msatef, Y

    2001-01-01

    Varieties with an excellent competitiveness against ripgut brome (Bromus rigidus Roth.) would be very important to reinforce others methods to control ripgut brome weed. This study was carried out in 1999-2000 season in a greenhouse experiment to test the aggressiveness degree of six varieties of hard wheat (Oum Rabia, Isly, Marzak, Karim, Sebou, and Massa) combined with ripgut brome. Plant density was fixed at 16 plants of wheat or Bromus for pure crop and 8 plants for wheat and 8 for Bromus mixture. The results showed that the numbers of kernels/spikes were higher in the mixture for on pure composition. For the kernel weight, the result was opposite except for Isly and Marzak varieties. Karim and Isly varieties obtained the highest grain yield and were more competitive in mixture composition but Sebou and Massa varieties were less competitive against ripgut brome. Results of ripgut brome productivity and water use efficiency were similar and were used to determine the aggressiveness coefficient of hard wheat varieties against ripgut brome. The reduction of the shoot dry matter of brome was 22 to 56% at flowering. The grain yield of brome was reduced from 57 to 81%.

  11. Long-distance movement of Cauliflower mosaic virus and host defence responses in Arabidopsis follow a predictable pattern that is determined by the leaf orthostichy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roberts, Karen; Love, Andrew J; Laval, Valérie; Laird, Janet; Tomos, A Deri; Hooks, Mark A; Milner, Joel J

    2007-01-01

    Long-distance virus transport takes place through the vascular system and is dependent on the movement of photoassimilates. Here, patterns of symptom development, virus movement and gene expression were analysed in Arabidopsis following inoculation with Cauliflower mosaic virus (CaMV) on a single leaf. Virus accumulation and expression of markers for the salicylic acid (SA) and ethylene/jasmonate (Et/JA) defence pathways, PR-1 and PDF1.2, were analysed on a leaf-by-leaf basis by real-time reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction (qRT-PCR). Virus spread followed a strictly defined pattern identical to that of a source-sink relationship. This was exploited to study differences between local and systemic defence responses in a developmental and spatial manner. In infected plants, PR-1 transcripts accumulated primarily but not exclusively in leaves with a direct vascular connection to the inoculated leaf. Abundances fell significantly as virus accumulated. By contrast, PDF1.2 transcripts were significantly lower than in controls in all leaves at early stages of infection, but recovered as virus accumulated. Virus and PR-1 transcript abundances are negatively correlated, and SA- and Et/JA-mediated signalling of gene expression occurs independently of the presence of virus. Although SA-dependent signalling responses were mainly linked to the orthostichy, Et/JA-dependent responses were independent of vascular connections. PMID:17688586

  12. First report of zucchini tigre mosaic virus infecting several cucurbit plants in China

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pumpkin (Cucurbita moschata Duch.), Cucumber (Cucumis sativus Linn.) and Zucchini (Cucurbita pepo Linn.) are important crops in tropical and subtropical regions in the world, and they are popular vegetable crops in China. There are currently 59 viruses known infecting cucurbit plants which including...

  13. First Report of Bean Yellow Mosaic Virus from Diseased Lupinus luteus L. in Eastern Washington

    Science.gov (United States)

    The USDA, ARS, Western Regional Plant Introduction Station, in Pullman, Washington is responsible for the acquisition, maintenance, storage, and distribution of lupine (genus Lupinus, family Fabaceae). Availability of sufficient quantities of healthy and virus-free seed from lupine collections is ma...

  14. The Am Gene Controlling Resistance to Alfalfa mosaic virus in Tomato Is Located in the Cluster of Dominant Resistance Genes on Chromosome 6.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parrella, Giuseppe; Moretti, André; Gognalons, Patrick; Lesage, Marie-Laure; Marchoux, George; Gebre-Selassie, Kashay; Caranta, Carole

    2004-04-01

    ABSTRACT The dominant gene Am from Lycopersicon hirsutum f. sp. glabratum PI134417 confers resistance to most strains of Alfalfa mosaic virus, including the recently identified necrotic strains. The phenotypic response includes a lack of symptom development following mechanical inoculation of leaves. To study the resistance mechanism controlled by Am, biological (back-inoculation to susceptible hosts), serological (double-antibody sandwich, enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay), and molecular (reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction and hybridization with specific riboprobes) methods of virus detection have been conducted on mechanically inoculated PI134417 leaves. The virus was never recovered, indicating that Am acts by an inhibition of viral accumulation during the early events of the virus life cycle. Am has been mapped genetically to the short arm of tomato chromosome 6 in the resistance hotspot, which includes the R-genes Mi and Cf-2/Cf-5 and the quantitative resistance factors Ty-1, Ol-1, and Bw-5. PMID:18944110

  15. Degenerate in vitro genetic selection reveals mutations that diminish alfalfa mosaic virus RNA replication without affecting coat protein binding.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rocheleau, Gail; Petrillo, Jessica; Guogas, Laura; Gehrke, Lee

    2004-08-01

    The alfalfa mosaic virus (AMV) RNAs are infectious only in the presence of the viral coat protein; however, the mechanisms describing coat protein's role during replication are disputed. We reasoned that mechanistic details might be revealed by identifying RNA mutations in the 3'-terminal coat protein binding domain that increased or decreased RNA replication without affecting coat protein binding. Degenerate (doped) in vitro genetic selection, based on a pool of randomized 39-mers, was used to select 30 variant RNAs that bound coat protein with high affinity. AUGC sequences that are conserved among AMV and ilarvirus RNAs were among the invariant nucleotides in the selected RNAs. Five representative clones were analyzed in functional assays, revealing diminished viral RNA expression resulting from apparent defects in replication and/or translation. These data identify a set of mutations, including G-U wobble pairs and nucleotide mismatches in the 5' hairpin, which affect viral RNA functions without significant impact on coat protein binding. Because the mutations associated with diminished function were scattered over the 3'-terminal nucleotides, we considered the possibility that RNA conformational changes rather than disruption of a precise motif might limit activity. Native polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis experiments showed that the 3' RNA conformation was indeed altered by nucleotide substitutions. One interpretation of the data is that coat protein binding to the AUGC sequences determines the orientation of the 3' hairpins relative to one another, while local structural features within these hairpins are also critical determinants of functional activity. PMID:15254175

  16. The second amino acid of alfalfa mosaic virus coat protein is critical for coat protein-mediated protection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tumer, N E; Kaniewski, W; Haley, L; Gehrke, L; Lodge, J K; Sanders, P

    1991-01-01

    Transgenic plants expressing the coat protein (CP) of alfalfa mosaic virus (AIMV) are resistant to infection by AIMV. A mutation was introduced into the second amino acid of the cDNA for the CP of AIMV. Three different transgenic tobacco lines expressing the mutant CP and two different transgenic tobacco lines expressing the wild-type CP at similar levels were challenged with AIMV virions and viral RNA. Whereas the lines expressing the wild-type CP were highly resistant to infection by AIMV virions and viral RNA, the lines expressing the mutant CP were susceptible to infection by both. The binding affinity of the mutant and the wild-type CPs for the 3' terminal protein binding site on AIMV RNAs was similar, as determined by electrophoretic mobility shift assay. A mixture of AIMV genomic RNAs 1-3 was infectious on the plants expressing the mutant CP but not on vector control plants or plants expressing the wild-type CP, indicating that the mutant CP can activate the AIMV genomic RNAs for infection. These results demonstrate that the second amino acid of the AIMV CP is critical for protection from AIMV but not for the initial interaction between the AIMV RNA and CP, suggesting that this initial interaction does not play a major role in CP-mediated protection. Images PMID:11607167

  17. Mapping of yellow mosaic virus (YMV) resistance in soybean (Glycine max L. Merr.) through association mapping approach.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kumar, Bhupender; Talukdar, Akshay; Verma, Khushbu; Bala, Indu; Harish, G D; Gowda, Sarmrat; Lal, S K; Sapra, R L; Singh, K P

    2015-02-01

    Yellow Mosaic Virus (YMV) is a serious disease of soybean. Resistance to YMV was mapped in 180 soybean genotypes through association mapping approach using 121 simple sequence repeats (SSR) and four resistance gene analogue (RGA)-based markers. The association mapping population (AMP) (96 genotypes) and confirmation population (CP) (84 genotypes) was tested for resistance to YMV at hot-spot consecutively for 3 years (2007-2009). The genotypes exhibited significant variability for YMV resistance (P Molecular genotyping and population structure analysis with 'admixture' co-ancestry model detected seven optimal sub-populations in the AMP. Linkage disequilibrium (LD) between the markers extended up to 35 and 10 cM with r2 > 0.15, and >0.25, respectively. The 4 RGA-based markers showed no association with YMV resistance. Two SSR markers, Satt301 and GMHSP179 on chromosome 17 were found to be in significant LD with YMV resistance. Contingency Chi-square test confirmed the association (P < 0.01) and the utility of the markers was validated in the CP. It would pave the way for marker assisted selection for YMV resistance in soybean. This is the first report of its kind in soybean.

  18. Use of recombinant tobacco mosaic virus to achieve RNA interference in plants against the citrus mealybug, Planococcus citri (Hemiptera: Pseudococcidae.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Arif Muhammad Khan

    Full Text Available The citrus mealybug, Planococcus citri, is an important plant pest with a very broad plant host range. P. citri is a phloem feeder and loss of plant vigor and stunting are characteristic symptoms induced on a range of host plants, but P. citri also reduces fruit quality and causes fruit drop leading to significant yield reductions. Better strategies for managing this pest are greatly needed. RNA interference (RNAi is an emerging tool for functional genomics studies and is being investigated as a practical tool for highly targeted insect control. Here we investigated whether RNAi effects can be induced in P. citri and whether candidate mRNAs could be identified as possible targets for RNAi-based P. citri control. RNAi effects were induced in P. citri, as demonstrated by specific target reductions of P. citri actin, chitin synthase 1 and V-ATPase mRNAs after injection of the corresponding specific double-stranded RNA inducers. We also used recombinant Tobacco mosaic virus (TMV to express these RNAi effectors in Nicotiana benthamiana plants. We found that P. citri showed lower fecundity and pronounced death of crawlers after feeding on recombinant TMV-infected plants. Taken together, our data show that actin, chitin synthase 1 and V-ATPase mRNAs are potential targets for RNAi against P. citri, and that recombinant TMV is an effective tool for evaluating candidate RNAi effectors in plants.

  19. Use of recombinant tobacco mosaic virus to achieve RNA interference in plants against the citrus mealybug, Planococcus citri (Hemiptera: Pseudococcidae).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khan, Arif Muhammad; Ashfaq, Muhammad; Kiss, Zsofia; Khan, Azhar Abbas; Mansoor, Shahid; Falk, Bryce W

    2013-01-01

    The citrus mealybug, Planococcus citri, is an important plant pest with a very broad plant host range. P. citri is a phloem feeder and loss of plant vigor and stunting are characteristic symptoms induced on a range of host plants, but P. citri also reduces fruit quality and causes fruit drop leading to significant yield reductions. Better strategies for managing this pest are greatly needed. RNA interference (RNAi) is an emerging tool for functional genomics studies and is being investigated as a practical tool for highly targeted insect control. Here we investigated whether RNAi effects can be induced in P. citri and whether candidate mRNAs could be identified as possible targets for RNAi-based P. citri control. RNAi effects were induced in P. citri, as demonstrated by specific target reductions of P. citri actin, chitin synthase 1 and V-ATPase mRNAs after injection of the corresponding specific double-stranded RNA inducers. We also used recombinant Tobacco mosaic virus (TMV) to express these RNAi effectors in Nicotiana benthamiana plants. We found that P. citri showed lower fecundity and pronounced death of crawlers after feeding on recombinant TMV-infected plants. Taken together, our data show that actin, chitin synthase 1 and V-ATPase mRNAs are potential targets for RNAi against P. citri, and that recombinant TMV is an effective tool for evaluating candidate RNAi effectors in plants.

  20. The nuclear inclusion a (NIa protease of turnip mosaic virus (TuMV cleaves amyloid-β.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hye-Eun Han

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: The nuclear inclusion a (NIa protease of turnip mosaic virus (TuMV is responsible for the processing of the viral polyprotein into functional proteins. NIa was previously shown to possess a relatively strict substrate specificity with a preference for Val-Xaa-His-Gln↓, with the scissile bond located after Gln. The presence of the same consensus sequence, Val(12-His-His-Gln(15, near the presumptive α-secretase cleavage site of the amyloid-β (Aβ peptide led us to hypothesize that NIa could possess activity against Aβ. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: Western blotting results showed that oligomeric as well as monomeric forms of Aβ can be degraded by NIa in vitro. The specific cleavage of Aβ was further confirmed by mass spectrometry analysis. NIa was shown to exist predominantly in the cytoplasm as observed by immunofluorescence microscopy. The overexpression of NIa in B103 neuroblastoma cells resulted in a significant reduction in cell death caused by both intracellularly generated and exogenously added Aβ. Moreover, lentiviral-mediated expression of NIa in APP(sw/PS1 transgenic mice significantly reduced the levels of Aβ and plaques in the brain. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: These results indicate that the degradation of Aβ in the cytoplasm could be a novel strategy to control the levels of Aβ, plaque formation, and the associated cell death.

  1. In situ small-angle X-ray scattering analysis of palladium nanoparticle growth on tobacco mosaic virus nanotemplates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Manocchi, Amy K; Seifert, Soenke; Lee, Byeongdu; Yi, Hyunmin

    2011-06-01

    We present an examination of palladium (Pd) nanoparticle growth on genetically modified tobacco mosaic virus (TMV1cys) nanotemplates via in situ small-angle X-ray scattering (SAXS). Specifically, we examine the role of the TMV1cys templates in Pd nanoparticle formation through the electroless reduction of Pd precursor by a chemical reducing agent as compared to identical conditions in the absence of the TMV1cys templates. We show that in the presence of TMV1cys, the viral nanotemplates provide preferential growth sites for Pd nanoparticle formation, as no measurable Pd particle growth was observed in the bulk solution. In situ SAXS confirmed that particle formation was due to the rapid adsorption of Pd atoms onto the TMV1cys templates at the very early stage of mixing, rather than adsorption of particles formed in the bulk solution. Importantly, Pd nanoparticles were significantly smaller and more uniform as compared to particle formation in the absence of TMV1cys. The Pd nanoparticle coating density was tunable based on Pd precursor concentration. Finally, we show that Pd particle growth on the TMV1cys templates was highly rapid, and complete within 33 s for most samples, in contrast to slower Pd particle growth in the absence of TMV templates. We envision that the results presented here will be valuable in furthering the fundamental understanding of the role of viral nanotemplates in particle formation, as well as of their utility in a wide range of applications. PMID:21520923

  2. Functional study of hot pepper 26S proteasome subunit RPN7 induced by Tobacco mosaic virus from nuclear proteome analysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Two-dimensional gel electrophoresis (2-DE) was applied for the screening of Tobacco mosaic virus (TMV)-induced hot pepper (Capsicum annuum cv. Bugang) nuclear proteins. From differentially expressed protein spots, we acquired the matched peptide mass fingerprint (PMF) data, analyzed by MALDI-TOF MS, from the non-redundant hot pepper EST protein FASTA database using the VEMS 2.0 software. Among six identified nuclear proteins, the hot pepper 26S proteasome subunit RPN7 (CaRPN7) was subjected to further study. The level of CaRPN7 mRNA was specifically increased during incompatible TMV-P0 interaction, but not during compatible TMV-P1.2 interaction. When CaRPN7::GFP fusion protein was targeted in onion cells, the nuclei had been broken into pieces. In the hot pepper leaves, cell death was exacerbated and genomic DNA laddering was induced by Agrobacterium-mediated transient overexpression of CaPRN7. Thus, this report presents that the TMV-induced CaRPN7 may be involved in programmed cell death (PCD) in the hot pepper plant

  3. Adaptation of lettuce mosaic virus to Catharanthus roseus involves mutations in the central domain of the VPg.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Svanella-Dumas, Laurence; Verdin, Eric; Faure, Chantal; German-Retana, Sylvie; Gognalons, Patrick; Danet, Jean Luc; Marais, Armelle; Candresse, Thierry

    2014-05-01

    An isolate of Lettuce mosaic virus (LMV, a Potyvirus) infecting Madagascar periwinckle (Catharanthus roseus) was identified and characterized by Illumina deep sequencing. LMV-Cr has no close affinities to previously sequenced LMV isolates and represents a novel, divergent LMV clade. Inoculation experiments with other representative LMV isolates showed that they are unable to infect C. roseus, which was not known to be a host for LMV. However, three C. roseus variants of one of these isolates, LMV-AF199, could be selected and partially or completely sequenced. These variants are characterized by the accumulation of mutations affecting the C-terminal part of the cylindrical inclusion (CI) helicase and the central part of the VPg. In particular, a serine to proline mutation at amino acid 143 of the VPg was observed in all three independently selected variants and is also present in the LMV-Cr isolate, making it a prime candidate as a host-range determinant. Other mutations at VPg positions 65 and 144 could also contribute to the ability to infect C. roseus. Inoculation experiments involving a recombinant LMV expressing a permissive lettuce eukaryotic translation initiation factor 4E (eIF4E) suggest that eIF4E does not contribute to the interaction of most LMV isolates with C. roseus. PMID:24400938

  4. Advances in study on Soybean mosaic virus(SMV)%大豆花叶病毒研究进展

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    孙浩华; 薛峰; 陈集双

    2007-01-01

    大豆花叶病毒(Soybean mosaic virus,SMV)病是在世界范围内广泛分布并普遍发生的病毒病害之一,导致大豆严重减产和种质衰退.这引起了国内外许多学者的科研兴趣,研究内容涉及SMV株系划分与发生分布、传播流行方式、寄主上的症状和影响因素、基因组结构组成及各基凶功能、植物生理生化抗性、大豆SMV抗性遗传育种等各方面.本文综述了近年来国内外SMV的科研方向和进展,旨在为进一步的研究提供依据.

  5. The relationship between host lifespan and pathogen reservoir potential: an analysis in the system Arabidopsis thaliana--cucumber mosaic virus.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jean Michel Hily

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available Identification of the determinants of pathogen reservoir potential is central to understand disease emergence. It has been proposed that host lifespan is one such determinant: short-lived hosts will invest less in costly defenses against pathogens, so that they will be more susceptible to infection, more competent as sources of infection and/or will sustain larger vector populations, thus being effective reservoirs for the infection of long-lived hosts. This hypothesis is sustained by analyses of different hosts of multihost pathogens, but not of different genotypes of the same host species. Here we examined this hypothesis by comparing two genotypes of the plant Arabidopsis thaliana that differ largely both in life-span and in tolerance to its natural pathogen Cucumber mosaic virus (CMV. Experiments with the aphid vector Myzus persicae showed that both genotypes were similarly competent as sources for virus transmission, but the short-lived genotype was more susceptible to infection and was able to sustain larger vector populations. To explore how differences in defense against CMV and its vector relate to reservoir potential, we developed a model that was run for a set of experimentally-determined parameters, and for a realistic range of host plant and vector population densities. Model simulations showed that the less efficient defenses of the short-lived genotype resulted in higher reservoir potential, which in heterogeneous host populations may be balanced by the longer infectious period of the long-lived genotype. This balance was modulated by the demography of both host and vector populations, and by the genetic composition of the host population. Thus, within-species genetic diversity for lifespan and defenses against pathogens will result in polymorphisms for pathogen reservoir potential, which will condition within-population infection dynamics. These results are relevant for a better understanding of host-pathogen co-evolution, and of

  6. Salicylic acid and jasmonic acid are essential for systemic resistance against tobacco mosaic virus in Nicotiana benthamiana.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, Feng; Xi, De-Hui; Yuan, Shu; Xu, Fei; Zhang, Da-Wei; Lin, Hong-Hui

    2014-06-01

    Systemic resistance is induced by pathogens and confers protection against a broad range of pathogens. Recent studies have indicated that salicylic acid (SA) derivative methyl salicylate (MeSA) serves as a long-distance phloem-mobile systemic resistance signal in tobacco, Arabidopsis, and potato. However, other experiments indicate that jasmonic acid (JA) is a critical mobile signal. Here, we present evidence suggesting both MeSA and methyl jasmonate (MeJA) are essential for systemic resistance against Tobacco mosaic virus (TMV), possibly acting as the initiating signals for systemic resistance. Foliar application of JA followed by SA triggered the strongest systemic resistance against TMV. Furthermore, we use a virus-induced gene-silencing-based genetics approach to investigate the function of JA and SA biosynthesis or signaling genes in systemic response against TMV infection. Silencing of SA or JA biosynthetic and signaling genes in Nicotiana benthamiana plants increased susceptibility to TMV. Genetic experiments also proved the irreplaceable roles of MeSA and MeJA in systemic resistance response. Systemic resistance was compromised when SA methyl transferase or JA carboxyl methyltransferase, which are required for MeSA and MeJA formation, respectively, were silenced. Moreover, high-performance liquid chromatography-mass spectrometry analysis indicated that JA and MeJA accumulated in phloem exudates of leaves at early stages and SA and MeSA accumulated at later stages, after TMV infection. Our data also indicated that JA and MeJA could regulate MeSA and SA production. Taken together, our results demonstrate that (Me)JA and (Me)SA are required for systemic resistance response against TMV. PMID:24450774

  7. Introgression of chromosome segments from multiple alien species in wheat breeding lines with wheat streak mosaic virus resistance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ali, N; Heslop-Harrison, Js Pat; Ahmad, H; Graybosch, R A; Hein, G L; Schwarzacher, T

    2016-08-01

    Pyramiding of alien-derived Wheat streak mosaic virus (WSMV) resistance and resistance enhancing genes in wheat is a cost-effective and environmentally safe strategy for disease control. PCR-based markers and cytogenetic analysis with genomic in situ hybridisation were applied to identify alien chromatin in four genetically diverse populations of wheat (Triticum aestivum) lines incorporating chromosome segments from Thinopyrum intermedium and Secale cereale (rye). Out of 20 experimental lines, 10 carried Th. intermedium chromatin as T4DL*4Ai#2S translocations, while, unexpectedly, 7 lines were positive for alien chromatin (Th. intermedium or rye) on chromosome 1B. The newly described rye 1RS chromatin, transmitted from early in the pedigree, was associated with enhanced WSMV resistance. Under field conditions, the 1RS chromatin alone showed some resistance, while together with the Th. intermedium 4Ai#2S offered superior resistance to that demonstrated by the known resistant cultivar Mace. Most alien wheat lines carry whole chromosome arms, and it is notable that these lines showed intra-arm recombination within the 1BS arm. The translocation breakpoints between 1BS and alien chromatin fell in three categories: (i) at or near to the centromere, (ii) intercalary between markers UL-Thin5 and Xgwm1130 and (iii) towards the telomere between Xgwm0911 and Xbarc194. Labelled genomic Th. intermedium DNA hybridised to the rye 1RS chromatin under high stringency conditions, indicating the presence of shared tandem repeats among the cereals. The novel small alien fragments may explain the difficulty in developing well-adapted lines carrying Wsm1 despite improved tolerance to the virus. The results will facilitate directed chromosome engineering producing agronomically desirable WSMV-resistant germplasm.

  8. Recombination with coat protein transgene in a complemen-tation system based on Cucumber mosaic virus (CMV)

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2001-01-01

    In order to study the feasibility of Cucumber mosaic virus (CMV) as an expression vector, the full-length cDNA of RNA 3 from strain SD was cloned and the sequence around the start codon of the coat protein (CP) gene was modified to create an NsiⅠ site for insertion of foreign genes. The CP gene was replaced by the green fluorescent protein (GFP) gene. The cDNAs of Fny RNAs 1 and 2 and the chimeric SD RNA 3 were cloned between the modified 35S promoter and terminator. Tobacco protoplasts were transfected with a mixture of the viral cDNAs containing 35S promoter and terminator as a replacement vector and expressed GFP. A complementation system was established when the replacement vector was inoculated onto the transgenic tobacco plants ex-pressing SD-CMV CP. GFP was detected in the inoculated leaves in 5 of 18 tested plants and in the first upper systemic leaf of one of the 5 plants ten days after inoculation. However, no GFP could be detected in all the plants one month after inoculation. Recombination between the CMV vector and the CP transgene was proved by retro-transcriptional polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR) and verified by DNA sequencing. Our results argue against the feasibility of the CMV-based replace-ment vector trans-complemented by the CP transgene, and at the same time, enlighten ways to improve the CMV-based expression vector and the biosafety of CMV CP-mediated virus resistant transgenic plants.

  9. Introgression of chromosome segments from multiple alien species in wheat breeding lines with wheat streak mosaic virus resistance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ali, N; Heslop-Harrison, Js Pat; Ahmad, H; Graybosch, R A; Hein, G L; Schwarzacher, T

    2016-08-01

    Pyramiding of alien-derived Wheat streak mosaic virus (WSMV) resistance and resistance enhancing genes in wheat is a cost-effective and environmentally safe strategy for disease control. PCR-based markers and cytogenetic analysis with genomic in situ hybridisation were applied to identify alien chromatin in four genetically diverse populations of wheat (Triticum aestivum) lines incorporating chromosome segments from Thinopyrum intermedium and Secale cereale (rye). Out of 20 experimental lines, 10 carried Th. intermedium chromatin as T4DL*4Ai#2S translocations, while, unexpectedly, 7 lines were positive for alien chromatin (Th. intermedium or rye) on chromosome 1B. The newly described rye 1RS chromatin, transmitted from early in the pedigree, was associated with enhanced WSMV resistance. Under field conditions, the 1RS chromatin alone showed some resistance, while together with the Th. intermedium 4Ai#2S offered superior resistance to that demonstrated by the known resistant cultivar Mace. Most alien wheat lines carry whole chromosome arms, and it is notable that these lines showed intra-arm recombination within the 1BS arm. The translocation breakpoints between 1BS and alien chromatin fell in three categories: (i) at or near to the centromere, (ii) intercalary between markers UL-Thin5 and Xgwm1130 and (iii) towards the telomere between Xgwm0911 and Xbarc194. Labelled genomic Th. intermedium DNA hybridised to the rye 1RS chromatin under high stringency conditions, indicating the presence of shared tandem repeats among the cereals. The novel small alien fragments may explain the difficulty in developing well-adapted lines carrying Wsm1 despite improved tolerance to the virus. The results will facilitate directed chromosome engineering producing agronomically desirable WSMV-resistant germplasm. PMID:27245423

  10. Spectral reflectance, chlorophyll fluorescence and virological investigations of tobacco plants (Nicotiana tabacum L.) infected with Tobacco mosaic virus (TMV)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krezhova, Dora; Hristova, Dimitrina; Iliev, Ilko; Yanev, Tony

    Application of multispectral remote sensing techniques to plant condition monitoring has been adopted for various purposes. Remote sensing is a reliable tool for detecting signs of vege-tation stress and diseases. Spectral reflectance and chlorophyll fluorescence are functions of tissue optical properties and biological status of the plants, and illumination conditions. The mean reflectance spectrum depends on the relative composition of all the pigments in the leaf including chlorophylls, carotenoids etc. Chlorophyll fluorescence results from the primary re-actions of photosynthesis and during the last decade it finds widening application as a means for revelation of stress and diseases. The changes in chlorophyll function take place before the alteration in chlorophyll content to occur so that changes in the fluorescence signal arise before any visible signs are apparent. The aim of our investigations was to study the development and spreading out of a viral infection on the leaves of two cultivars tobacco plants (Nicotiana tabacum L.) infected with Tobacco mosaic virus (TMV). We applied two remote sensing tech-niques (spectral reflectance and chlorophyll fluorescence measurements) for evaluation of the changes in the optical properties of the plants in accordance to their physiological status. The serological analyses via the Double antibody sandwich enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (DAS-ELISA) were made with appropriate kits (Leowe, Germany) for quantitative assessment of the concentration of viruses in the plants. The tobacco plants were grown in green house under controlled conditions. The first cultivar Nevrocop 1146 is known as resistive to the TMV, i.e. it shows hypersensitive response. The second cultivar named Krumovgrad is normally sen-sitive to the TMV. At growth stage 4-6 expanded leaf, up to one leaf from 20 plants for each cultivar were inoculated with TMV. The leaves opposite to the infected ones formed the group of control (untreated) leaves. The

  11. Nematode Interactions with Weeds and Sugarcane Mosaic Virus in Louisiana Sugarcane

    OpenAIRE

    Showler, A. T.; Reagan, T. E.; Shao, K. P.

    1990-01-01

    Weeds did not appear to serve as reservoirs for phytophagous Louisiana sugarcane nematode populations except for Criconemella spp., Meloidogyne spp., Tylenchorhynchus annulatus, and total phytophagous nematode densities were lower on weed-stressed cane and were accompanied by reduced accumulations of free cysteine, proline, and 13 other free amino acids in sugarcane. A significant weed-virus interaction for sugarcane free cysteine accumulation was detected; T. annulatus populations were highl...

  12. Incidence, Distribution and Characteristics of Major Tomato Leaf Curl and Mosaic Virus Diseases in Uganda

    OpenAIRE

    Ssekyewa, C

    2006-01-01

    In Uganda, about 3 million households consume tomato. However, tomato yields (10 ton/ ha) are low due to poor agronomic practices, lack of high yielding and disease resistant varieties, and pests (Varela, 1995; Hansen, 1990; Defrancq, 1989). Viral diseases are the third major cause of low tomato productivity in Uganda. Therefore, a survey was conducted; symptoms observed on tomato were categorized, and screened for both ribonucleic and deoxyribonucleic acid tomato viruses. Genetic identity fo...

  13. Multiplex RT-PCR detection of Cucumber mosaic virus subgroups and Tobamoviruses infecting Tomato using 18S rRNA as an internal control

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Shaoning Chen; Hao Gu; Xiaoming Wang; Jishuang Chen; Weimin Zhu

    2011-01-01

    A multiplex reverse-transcription polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR) protocol was developed for simultaneous detection and discrimination of subgroups of Cucumber mosaic virus (CMV), including its satellite RNA, Tomato mosaic virus (ToMV) and Tobacco mosaic virus (TMV),using 18S rRNA as an internal control.Species- and subgroups-specific primers designed to differentiate CMV subgroups Ⅰ and Ⅱ, ToMV and TMV, were assessed using the cDNA clones of viral genomes, CMV satellite RNA and 18S rRNA gene from tomato (Solanum lycopersicum L.) or tobacco (Nicotiana tobacum).Using total RNA extracted from artificial mixture of tomato leaf tissues infected by each virus, the reaction components and cycling parmeters were optimized and a multiplex RT-PCR procedure was established.Six fragments of 704, 593, 512, 421,385, 255 bp, specific to CMV subgroup ll, CMV subgroup I, ToMV, TMV, satellite RNA and 18S rRNA, respectively, were sinultaneously amplified.The sensitivity of the multiplex RT-PCR method for detecting CMV was 100 times higher than that of double-antibody sandwich-enzyme linked immunosorbent assay (DAS-ELISA).This method was successfully used for field detection.Among 141 samples collected from East China through tomato growth seasons, 106 single infections with one of the above isolates were detected and 13 mixed infections were found.The results showed the potential use of this method for investigating the epidemiology of viral diseases infecting tomato.

  14. High genetic diversity in the coat protein and 3' untranslated regions among geographical isolates of Cardamom mosaic virus from south India

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    T Jacob; T Jebasingh; M N Venugopal; R Usha

    2003-09-01

    A survey was conducted to study the biological and genetic diversity of Cardamom mosaic virus (CdMV) that causes the most widespread disease in the cardamom growing area in the Western Ghats of south India. Six distinct subgroups were derived based on their symptomatology and host range from the sixty isolates collected. The serological variability between the virus isolates was analysed by ELISA and Western blotting. The 3′ terminal region consisting of the coat protein (CP) coding sequence and 3′ untranslated region (3′UTR) was cloned and sequenced from seven isolates. Sequence comparisons revealed considerable genetic diversity among the isolates in their CP and 3′UTR, making CdMV one of the highly variable members of Potyviridae. The possible occurrence of recombination between the isolates and the movement of the virus in the cardamom tract of south India are discussed.

  15. Effect of Agaricus brasiliensis and Lentinula edodes mushrooms on the infection of passionflower with Cowpea aphid-borne mosaic virus

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Robson Marcelo Di Piero

    2010-04-01

    Full Text Available The objective of the present study was to evaluate the protection of passion fruit plants against CABMV by using preparations from Agaricus brasiliensis and Lentinula edodes mushrooms. In experiments carried out in the greenhouse, the fruiting body extracts from some of the isolates of both mushrooms significantly reduced CABMV incidence in passion fruit plants. This protective effect occurred when the plant leaves, pre-treated with extracts, were later inoculated mechanically with the virus. However, the extracts did not protect the plants in experiments involving CABMV transmission by aphid vectors. An inhibitory effect of mushroom extracts on the virus particles was also demonstrated on Chenopodium quinoa, a CABMV local lesion host, by inoculating the plants with a mixture of extracts and virus suspension. Still in C. quinoa, the mushroom extracts from some isolates induced systemic resistance against the virus. These results showed that aqueous extracts from A. brasiliensis and L. edodes fruiting bodies had CABMV infectivity inhibitors, but that was not enough to control the viral disease on passion fruit plants at all, considering they were infected through a vector.O endurecimento dos frutos do maracujazeiro, causado pelo Cowpea aphid-borne mosaic virus (CABMV, é um dos problemas mais sérios que atingem a cultura. Tentativas de se obter plantas resistentes ao vírus ou estirpes fracas premunizantes não apresentaram sucesso até o momento. O objetivo do presente estudo foi o de avaliar a proteção das plantas de maracujá contra o CABMV, utilizando preparações dos cogumelos Lentinula edodes e Agaricus blazei, através da indução de resistência. Em experimentos conduzidos no interior de casa de vegetação, os extratos de basidiocarpos de ambos os cogumelos reduziram significativamente a incidência da virose em plantas de maracujá que tiveram as folhas pré-tratadas com esses extratos e que foram posteriormente inoculadas

  16. Mosaic Horses

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rudecki, Maryanna

    2009-01-01

    This article describes a lesson inspired by Sicilian mosaics. The author first presented a PowerPoint presentation of mosaics from the Villa Romana del Casale and reviewed complementary and analogous colors. Students then created mosaics using a variety of art materials. They presented their work to their peers and discussed the thought and…

  17. Sonoran Desert winter annuals affected by density of red brome and soil nitrogen

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salo, L.F.; McPherson, G.R.; Williams, D.G.

    2005-01-01

    Red brome [Bromus madritensis subsp. rubens (L.) Husn.] is a Mediterranean winter annual grass that has invaded Southwestern USA deserts. This study evaluated interactions among 13 Sonoran Desert annual species at four densities of red brome from 0 to the equivalent of 1200 plants ma??2. We examined these interactions at low (3 I?g) and high (537 I?g NO3a?? g soila??1) nitrogen (N) to evaluate the relative effects of soil N level on survival and growth of native annuals and red brome. Red brome did not affect emergence or survival of native annuals, but significantly reduced growth of natives, raising concerns about effects of this exotic grass on the fecundity of these species. Differences in growth of red brome and of the three dominant non nitrogen-fixing native annuals at the two levels of soil N were similar. Total species biomass of red brome was reduced by 83% at low, compared to high, N levels, whereas that of the three native species was reduced by from 42 to 95%. Mean individual biomass of red brome was reduced by 87% at low, compared to high, N levels, whereas that of the three native species was reduced by from 72 to 89%.

  18. Research Progress on Maize Dwarf Mosaic Virus Diseases%玉米矮花叶病研究进展

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    周伦理

    2010-01-01

    玉米矮花叶病(maize dwarf mosaic virus,MDMv)是世界上玉米产区普遍发生的病毒病害之一.自20世纪90年代以来,我国玉米矮花叶病发生严重,山西、甘肃、山东、河北以及北京等省市先后大流行,造成了巨大的农业经济损失.在我国玉米产区造成危害的主要是该病毒的B株系,主要借蚜虫传播和种子传播;在玉米矮花叶病的防治中,种植抗病品种,并辅以合理的栽培管理,可有效防止MDMV.本文主要综述玉米矮花叶病病毒的理化特性、玉米矮花叶病的发生危害、病原及其传播方式、发病条件、流行与防治、品种(自交系)抗性、抗性鉴定、抗性遗传及其抗病基因工程研究等方面的研究进展,以期为以后玉米矮花叶病的有效防治提供一定的参考.

  19. Identification of a competitive translation determinant in the 3' untranslated region of alfalfa mosaic virus coat protein mRNA.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hann, L E; Webb, A C; Cai, J M; Gehrke, L

    1997-01-01

    We report that the competitive translational activity of alfalfa mosaic virus coat protein mRNA (CP RNA), a nonadenylated mRNA, is determined in part by the 3' untranslated region (UTR). Competitive translation was characterized both in vitro, with cotranslation assays, and in vivo, with microinjected Xenopus laevis oocytes. In wheat germ extracts, coat protein synthesis was constant when a fixed amount of full-length CP RNA was cotranslated with increasing concentrations of competitor globin mRNA. However, translation of CP RNA lacking the 3' UTR decreased significantly under competitive conditions. RNA stabilities were equivalent. In X. laevis oocytes, which are translationally saturated and are an inherently competitive translational environment, full-length CP RNA assembled into large polysomes and coat protein synthesis was readily detectable. Alternatively, CP RNA lacking the 3' UTR sedimented as small polysomes, and little coat protein was detected. Again, RNA stabilities were equivalent. Site-directed mutagenesis was used to localize RNA sequences or structures required for competitive translation. Since the CP RNA 3' UTR has an unusually large number of AUG nucleotide triplets, two AUG-containing sites were altered in full-length RNA prior to oocyte injections. Nucleotide substitutions at the sequence GAUG, 20 nucleotides downstream of the coat protein termination codon, specifically reduced full-length CP RNA translation, while similar substitutions at the next AUG triplet had little effect on translation. The competitive influence of the 3' UTR could be explained by RNA-protein interactions that affect translation initiation or by ribosome reinitiation at downstream AUG codons, which would increase the number of ribosomes committed to coat protein synthesis. PMID:9121448

  20. Apertureless scanning near-field optical microscopy of sparsely labeled tobacco mosaic viruses and the intermediate filament desmin

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alexander Harder

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available Both fluorescence imaging and atomic force microscopy (AFM are highly versatile and extensively used in applications ranging from nanotechnology to life sciences. In fluorescence microscopy luminescent dyes serve as position markers. Moreover, they can be used as active reporters of their local vicinity. The dipolar coupling of the tip with the incident light and the fluorophore give rise to a local field and fluorescence enhancement. AFM topographic imaging allows for resolutions down to the atomic scale. It can be operated in vacuum, under ambient conditions and in liquids. This makes it ideal for the investigation of a wide range of different samples. Furthermore an illuminated AFM cantilever tip apex exposes strongly confined non-propagating electromagnetic fields that can serve as a coupling agent for single dye molecules. Thus, combining both techniques by means of apertureless scanning near-field optical microscopy (aSNOM enables concurrent high resolution topography and fluorescence imaging. Commonly, among the various (apertureless SNOM approaches metallic or metallized probes are used. Here, we report on our custom-built aSNOM setup, which uses commercially available monolithic silicon AFM cantilevers. The field enhancement confined to the tip apex facilitates an optical resolution down to 20 nm. Furthermore, the use of standard mass-produced AFM cantilevers spares elaborate probe production or modification processes. We investigated tobacco mosaic viruses and the intermediate filament protein desmin. Both are mixed complexes of building blocks, which are fluorescently labeled to a low degree. The simultaneous recording of topography and fluorescence data allows for the exact localization of distinct building blocks within the superordinate structures.

  1. Investigations of barley stripe mosaic virus as a gene silencing vector in barley roots and in Brachypodium distachyon and oat

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nilsson Lena

    2010-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Gene silencing vectors based on Barley stripe mosaic virus (BSMV are used extensively in cereals to study gene function, but nearly all studies have been limited to genes expressed in leaves of barley and wheat. However since many important aspects of plant biology are based on root-expressed genes we wanted to explore the potential of BSMV for silencing genes in root tissues. Furthermore, the newly completed genome sequence of the emerging cereal model species Brachypodium distachyon as well as the increasing amount of EST sequence information available for oat (Avena species have created a need for tools to study gene function in these species. Results Here we demonstrate the successful BSMV-mediated virus induced gene silencing (VIGS of three different genes in barley roots, i.e. the barley homologues of the IPS1, PHR1, and PHO2 genes known to participate in Pi uptake and reallocation in Arabidopsis. Attempts to silence two other genes, the Pi transporter gene HvPht1;1 and the endo-β-1,4-glucanase gene HvCel1, in barley roots were unsuccessful, probably due to instability of the plant gene inserts in the viral vector. In B. distachyon leaves, significant silencing of the PHYTOENE DESATURASE (BdPDS gene was obtained as shown by photobleaching as well as quantitative RT-PCR analysis. On the other hand, only very limited silencing of the oat AsPDS gene was observed in both hexaploid (A. sativa and diploid (A. strigosa oat. Finally, two modifications of the BSMV vector are presented, allowing ligation-free cloning of DNA fragments into the BSMV-γ component. Conclusions Our results show that BSMV can be used as a vector for gene silencing in barley roots and in B. distachyon leaves and possibly roots, opening up possibilities for using VIGS to study cereal root biology and to exploit the wealth of genome information in the new cereal model plant B. distachyon. On the other hand, the silencing induced by BSMV in oat seemed too

  2. Alteration of intersubunit acid–base pair interactions at the quasi-threefold axis of symmetry of Cucumber mosaic virus disrupts aphid vector transmission

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bricault, Christine A. [Department of Plant Pathology and Plant-Microbe Biology, 334 Plant Science Building, Cornell University, Ithaca, NY 14850 (United States); Perry, Keith L., E-mail: KLP3@cornell.edu [Department of Plant Pathology and Plant-Microbe Biology, 334 Plant Science Building, Cornell University, Ithaca, NY 14850 (United States)

    2013-06-05

    In the atomic model of Cucumber mosaic virus (CMV), six amino acid residues form stabilizing salt bridges between subunits of the asymmetric unit at the quasi-threefold axis of symmetry. To evaluate the effects of these positions on virion stability and aphid vector transmissibility, six charged amino acid residues were individually mutated to alanine. All of the six engineered viruses were viable and exhibited near wild type levels of virion stability in the presence of urea. Aphid vector transmissibility was nearly or completely eliminated in the case of four of the mutants; two mutants demonstrated intermediate aphid transmissibility. For the majority of the engineered mutants, second-site mutations were observed following aphid transmission and/or mechanical passaging, and one restored transmission rates to that of the wild type. CMV capsids tolerate disruption of acid–base pairing interactions at the quasi-threefold axis of symmetry, but these interactions are essential for maintaining aphid vector transmissibility. - Highlights: ► Amino acids between structural subunits of Cucumber mosaic virus affect vector transmission. ► Mutant structural stability was retained, while aphid vector transmissibility was disrupted. ► Spontaneous, second-site mutations restored aphid vector transmissibility.

  3. Incidence of Lettuce mosaic virus in lettuce and its detection by polyclonal antibodies produced against recombinant coat protein expressed in Escherichia coli.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sharma, Prachi; Sharma, Susheel; Singh, Jasvir; Saha, Swati; Baranwal, V K

    2016-04-01

    Lettuce mosaic virus (LMV), a member of the genus Potyvirus of family Potyviridae, causes mosaic disease in lettuce has recently been identified in India. The virus is seed borne and secondary infection occurs through aphids. To ensure virus freedom in seeds it is important to develop diagnostic tools, for serological methods the production of polyclonal antibodies is a prerequisite. The coat protein (CP) gene of LMV was amplified, cloned and expressed using pET-28a vector in Escherichia coli BL21DE3 competent cells. The LMV CP was expressed as a fusion protein containing a fragment of the E. coli His tag. The LMV CP/His protein reacted positively with a commercial antiserum against LMV in an immunoblot assay. Polyclonal antibodies purified from serum of rabbits immunized with the fusion protein gave positive results when LMV infected lettuce (Lactuca sativa) was tested at 1:1000 dilution in PTA-ELISA. These were used for specific detection of LMV in screening lettuce accessions. The efficacy of the raised polyclonal antiserum was high and it can be utilized in quarantine and clean seed production. PMID:26850143

  4. Type I J-domain NbMIP1 proteins are required for both Tobacco mosaic virus infection and plant innate immunity.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yumei Du

    Full Text Available Tm-2² is a coiled coil-nucleotide binding-leucine rich repeat resistance protein that confers durable extreme resistance against Tomato mosaic virus (ToMV and Tobacco mosaic virus (TMV by recognizing the viral movement protein (MP. Here we report that the Nicotiana benthamiana J-domain MIP1 proteins (NbMIP1s associate with tobamovirus MP, Tm-2² and SGT1. Silencing of NbMIP1s reduced TMV movement and compromised Tm-2²-mediated resistance against TMV and ToMV. Furthermore, silencing of NbMIP1s reduced the steady-state protein levels of ToMV MP and Tm-2². Moreover, NbMIP1s are required for plant resistance induced by other R genes and the nonhost pathogen Pseudomonas syringae pv. tomato (Pst DC3000. In addition, we found that SGT1 associates with Tm-2² and is required for Tm-2²-mediated resistance against TMV. These results suggest that NbMIP1s function as co-chaperones during virus infection and plant immunity.

  5. Molecular evidence supporting the confirmation of maracuja mosaic virus as a species of the genus Tobamovirus and production of an infectious cDNA transcript.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Song, Y S; Min, B E; Hong, J S; Rhie, M J; Kim, M J; Ryu, K H

    2006-12-01

    The complete genome sequence of maracuja mosaic virus (MarMV) was determined and analyzed. The full MarMV genome consisted of 6794 nucleotides, and this is the largest genome size among known tobamoviruses. The MarMV genome RNA contained four open reading frames (ORFs) coding for proteins of M(r) 126, 181, 34 and 18 kDa from the 5' to 3' end, respectively. The lengths of the 5' nontranslated region (NTR) and the 3' NTR were 54 and 177 nucleotides, respectively. Phylogenetic tree analysis revealed that these MarMV-encoded proteins are related to members of the Malvaceae- and Cucurbitaceae-infecting tobamoviruses. MarMV is different from other tobamoviruses and forms a new Passifloraceae-infecting subgroup. Western blot analysis showed that MarMV cross-reacted strongly with antibodies against Kyuri green mottle mosaic virus and Hibiscus latent Singapore virus. Synthesized capped transcripts from full-length cDNA of MarMV were infectious. These data clearly indicate that MarMV belongs to a separate species of the genus Tobamovirus. PMID:16862384

  6. Complete nucleotide sequence and genome organization of tobacco mosaic virus isolated from Viciafaba

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    周雪平; 薛朝阳; 陈青; 戚益军; 李德葆

    2000-01-01

    Based on reported TMV-U1 sequence, primers were designed and fragments covering the entire genome of TMV broad bean strain (TMV-B) were obtained with RT-PCR. These fragments were cloned and sequenced and the 5’ and 3’ end sequences of genome were confirmed with RACE. The complete sequence of TMV-B comprises 6 395 nucleotides (nt) and four open reading frames, which correspond to 126 ku (1 116 amino acids), 183 ku (1 616 amino acids), 30 ku (268 amino acids) and 17.5 ku proteins (159 amino acids). The complete nucleotide sequence of TMV-B is 99.4% identical to that of TMV-U1. The two virus isolates share the same sequence of 5’, 3’ non-coding region and 17.5 K ORF, and 6, 1 and 3 amino acid changes are found in 126 K protein, 54 K protein and 30 K protein, respectively. The possible mechanism on the infection of TMV-B in Vicia faba is discussed.

  7. Transgenic tobacco plants expressing siRNA targeted against the Mungbean yellow mosaic virus transcriptional activator protein gene efficiently block the viral DNA accumulation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shanmugapriya, Gnanasekaran; Das, Sudhanshu Sekhar; Veluthambi, Karuppannan

    2015-06-01

    Mungbean yellow mosaic virus (MYMV) is a bipartite begomovirus that infects many pulse crops such as blackgram, mungbean, mothbean, Frenchbean, and soybean. We tested the efficacy of the transgenically expressed intron-spliced hairpin RNA gene of the transcriptional activator protein (hpTrAP) in reducing MYMV DNA accumulation. Tobacco plants transformed with the MYMV hpTrAP gene accumulated 21-22 nt siRNA. Leaf discs of the transgenic plants, agroinoculated with the partial dimers of MYMV, displayed pronounced reduction in MYMV DNA accumulation. Thus, silencing of the TrAP gene, a suppressor of gene silencing, emerged as an effective strategy to control MYMV. PMID:26436122

  8. Au nanocrystals grown on a better-defined one-dimensional tobacco mosaic virus coated protein template genetically modified by a hexahistidine tag

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In this paper, tobacco mosaic virus (TMV) coated protein (CP) was genetically modified by introducing a hexahistidine tag into it for a well-defined one-dimensional template, on which Au nanocrystals (NCs) were grown. The results showed that genetic modification could not only ameliorate the one-dimensional structure of the template, but also improve the growth density of Au NCs on the template. This indicated that genetic modification could be an effective method to modulate the structure of the TMVCP template-based nanocomposites allowing for a broader application of them. (paper)

  9. 基因芯片技术检测黄瓜花叶病毒、烟草花叶病毒和马铃薯Y病毒%Technique for Cucumber Mosaic Virus, Tobacco Mosaic Virus and Potato Virus Y by Gene Chip

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    贾慧; 王艳辉; 王进忠; 王升启; 董金皋

    2011-01-01

    The Cucumber mosaic virus ( CMV), Tobacco mosaic virus (TMV) and Potato virus Y ( PVY ) are significant worldwide plant viruses,which harm to agricultural production. Mixed infection with several viruses usually occurs complex symptom. So, rapid,sensitive and specific method,by which several viruses can be detected simultaneously,is needed urgently. In this study, according to three kinds of viral coat protein gene sequence,primers and probes were designed,gene chip was prepared. The downstream primers were labled by Cy3. The product amplified by RT-PCR using the labled primers was hybridized with the gene chip. The hybridization signal was detected and analyzed by a fluorescence scanner. The result showed that the specific signals were identified from virus-infected plants.The detection sensitivities of gene chip were 10-100 times higher than RT-PCR. The results indicate that gene chip can be used for detection of plant viruses fast and accurately.%黄瓜花叶病毒、烟草花叶病毒和马铃薯Y病毒是世界性分布的重要植物病毒,对农业生产危害较大.农作物感病多为复合侵染,症状表现较为复杂,急需建立快速、准确、能够一次检测多种病毒的检测方法.本研究根据3种病毒的外壳蛋白基因序列,设计引物和探针,制备基因芯片;用Cy3标记下游引物,RT-PCR扩增产物与芯片杂交,荧光扫描仪检测并分析信号.结果表明,该芯片可以从病毒侵染样本中检测到特异性识别信号,检测灵敏度比RT-PCR高10~100倍,该技术能对植物病毒做出快速、准确的检测.

  10. MONOCLONAL ANTIBODIES TO IDENTIFY TOMATO MOSAIC TOBAMOVIRUS (TOMV

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Duarte Keila M.R.

    2001-01-01

    Full Text Available Monoclonal antibodies were obtained against Tomato mosaic tobamovirus (ToMV isolated in Brazil. One antibody (8G7G2 isotyped as IgG2b (kappa light chain showed strong specificity and very low cross reaction with the Tobacco mosaic virus (TMV. It can be used in identification of tomato mosaic virus (ToMV.

  11. Infectivity analysis of two variable DNA B components of Mungbean yellow mosaic virus-Vigna in Vigna mungo and Vigna radiata

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    V Balaji; R Vanitharani; A S Karthikeyan; S Anbalagan; K Veluthambi

    2004-09-01

    Mungbean yellow mosaic virus-Vigna (MYMV-Vig), a Begomovirus that causes yellow mosaic disease, was cloned from field-infected blackgram (Vigna mungo). One DNA A clone (KA30) and five different DNA B clones (KA21, KA22, KA27, KA28 and KA34) were obtained. The sequence identity in the 150-nt common region (CR) between DNA A and DNA B was highest (95%) for KA22 DNA B and lowest (85.6%) for KA27 DNA B. The Rep-binding domain had three complete 11-nt (5′-TGTATCGGTGT-3′) iterons in KA22 DNA B (and KA21, KA28 and KA34), while the first iteron in KA27 DNA B (5′-ATCGGTGT-3′) had a 3-nt deletion. KA27 DNA B, which exhibited 93.9% CR sequence identity to the mungbean-infecting MYMV, also shared the 3-nt deletion in the first iteron besides having an 18-nt insertion between the third iteron and the conserved nonanucleotide. MYMV was found to be closely related to KA27 DNA B in amino acid sequence identity of BV1 (94.1%) and BC1 (97.6%) proteins and in the organization of nuclear localization signal (NLS), nuclear export signal (NES) and phosphorylation sites. Agroinoculation of blackgram (V. mungo) and mungbean (V. radiata) with partial dimers of KA27 and KA22 DNA Bs along with DNA A caused distinctly different symptoms. KA22 DNA B caused more intense yellow mosaic symptoms with high viral DNA titre in blackgram. In contrast, KA27 DNA B caused more intense yellow mosaic symptoms with high viral DNA titre in mungbean. Thus, DNA B of MYMV-Vig is an important determinant of host-range between V. mungo and V. radiata.

  12. Infectivity analysis of two variable DNA B components of Mungbean yellow mosaic virus-Vigna in Vigna mungo and Vigna radiata.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Balaji, V; Vanitharani, R; Karthikeyan, A S; Anbalagan, S; Veluthambi, K

    2004-09-01

    Mungbean yellow mosaic virus-Vigna (MYMV-Vig), a Begomovirus that causes yellow mosaic disease, was cloned from field-infected blackgram (Vigna mungo). One DNA A clone (KA30) and five different DNA B clones (KA21, KA22, KA27, KA28 and KA34) were obtained. The sequence identity in the 150-nt common region (CR) between DNA A and DNA B was highest (95%) for KA22 DNA B and lowest (85.6%) for KA27 DNA B. The Rep-binding domain had three complete 11-nt (5'-TGTATCGGTGT-3') iterons in KA22 DNA B (and KA21, KA28 and KA34), while the first iteron in KA27 DNA B (5'-ATCGGTGT-3') had a 3-nt deletion. KA27 DNA B, which exhibited 93.9% CR sequence identity to the mungbean-infecting MYMV, also shared the 3-nt deletion in the first iteron besides having an 18-nt insertion between the third iteron and the conserved nonanucleotide. MYMV was found to be closely related to KA27 DNA B in amino acid sequence identity of BV1 (94.1%) and BC1 (97.6%) proteins and in the organization of nuclear localization signal (NLS), nuclear export signal (NES) and phosphorylation sites. Agroinoculation of blackgram (V. mungo) and mungbean (V. radiata) with partial dimers of KA27 and KA22 DNA Bs along with DNA A caused distinctly different symptoms. KA22 DNA B caused more intense yellow mosaic symptoms with high viral DNA titre in blackgram. In contrast, KA27 DNA B caused more intense yellow mosaic symptoms with high viral DNA titre in mungbean. Thus, DNA B of MYMVVig is an important determinant of host-range between V. mungo and V. radiata.

  13. The RXL motif of the African cassava mosaic virus Rep protein is necessary for rereplication of yeast DNA and viral infection in plants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Geminiviruses, single-stranded DNA plant viruses, encode a replication-initiator protein (Rep) that is indispensable for virus replication. A potential cyclin interaction motif (RXL) in the sequence of African cassava mosaic virus Rep may be an alternative link to cell cycle controls to the known interaction with plant homologs of retinoblastoma protein (pRBR). Mutation of this motif abrogated rereplication in fission yeast induced by expression of wildtype Rep suggesting that Rep interacts via its RXL motif with one or several yeast proteins. The RXL motif is essential for viral infection of Nicotiana benthamiana plants, since mutation of this motif in infectious clones prevented any symptomatic infection. The cell-cycle link (Clink) protein of a nanovirus (faba bean necrotic yellows virus) was investigated that activates the cell cycle by binding via its LXCXE motif to pRBR. Expression of wildtype Clink and a Clink mutant deficient in pRBR-binding did not trigger rereplication in fission yeast. - Highlights: • A potential cyclin interaction motif is conserved in geminivirus Rep proteins. • In ACMV Rep, this motif (RXL) is essential for rereplication of fission yeast DNA. • Mutating RXL abrogated viral infection completely in Nicotiana benthamiana. • Expression of a nanovirus Clink protein in yeast did not induce rereplication. • Plant viruses may have evolved multiple routes to exploit host DNA synthesis

  14. The RXL motif of the African cassava mosaic virus Rep protein is necessary for rereplication of yeast DNA and viral infection in plants

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hipp, Katharina; Rau, Peter; Schäfer, Benjamin [Institut für Biomaterialien und biomolekulare Systeme, Abteilung für Molekularbiologie und Virologie der Pflanzen, Universität Stuttgart, Pfaffenwaldring 57, D-70550 Stuttgart (Germany); Gronenborn, Bruno [Institut des Sciences du Végétal, CNRS, 91198 Gif-sur-Yvette (France); Jeske, Holger, E-mail: holger.jeske@bio.uni-stuttgart.de [Institut für Biomaterialien und biomolekulare Systeme, Abteilung für Molekularbiologie und Virologie der Pflanzen, Universität Stuttgart, Pfaffenwaldring 57, D-70550 Stuttgart (Germany)

    2014-08-15

    Geminiviruses, single-stranded DNA plant viruses, encode a replication-initiator protein (Rep) that is indispensable for virus replication. A potential cyclin interaction motif (RXL) in the sequence of African cassava mosaic virus Rep may be an alternative link to cell cycle controls to the known interaction with plant homologs of retinoblastoma protein (pRBR). Mutation of this motif abrogated rereplication in fission yeast induced by expression of wildtype Rep suggesting that Rep interacts via its RXL motif with one or several yeast proteins. The RXL motif is essential for viral infection of Nicotiana benthamiana plants, since mutation of this motif in infectious clones prevented any symptomatic infection. The cell-cycle link (Clink) protein of a nanovirus (faba bean necrotic yellows virus) was investigated that activates the cell cycle by binding via its LXCXE motif to pRBR. Expression of wildtype Clink and a Clink mutant deficient in pRBR-binding did not trigger rereplication in fission yeast. - Highlights: • A potential cyclin interaction motif is conserved in geminivirus Rep proteins. • In ACMV Rep, this motif (RXL) is essential for rereplication of fission yeast DNA. • Mutating RXL abrogated viral infection completely in Nicotiana benthamiana. • Expression of a nanovirus Clink protein in yeast did not induce rereplication. • Plant viruses may have evolved multiple routes to exploit host DNA synthesis.

  15. [Comparative characteristics of reproduction of the wheat striped mosaic virus in winter and spring Triticum aestivum L. in natural agrocoenosis and during clinostatting].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mishchenko, L T

    2004-01-01

    Microgravity (a transformed environment) was produced with the use of a multi-purpose clinostat. Object of the investigation was wheat striped mosaic virus (WSMV) affecting a great variety of wheat species in natural agrocoenosis, and super-dwarf cultivar Apogee in the transformed environment. Enzyme immunodetection (das-ELISA) as well as electron microscopy were employed for virus identification. Viral reproduction was found high (titre 1/2560) in winter and spring wheat species in agrocoenosis (natural transmissible background). Clinostatting in the horizontal and vertical planes (R = 400 mm and R = 250 mm) inhibited virus reproduction by day 21, 25 and 18 post inoculation, respectively. Clinostatting improved health of WSMV-infected plants and resulted in harvesting the first Apogee crop. Productivity of WSMV-infected plants after clinostatting was increased owing to a large seed content of the heads as compared with stationary and clinostatted healthy crops. This experience of inhibiting virus reproduction should be taken into consideration in virus-free seed production biotechnology development. PMID:15372798

  16. Research progresson on maize dwarf mosaic virus%玉米矮花叶病研究进展

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    李新海; 韩晓清; 王振华; 张世煌

    2000-01-01

    玉米矮花叶病(Maize Dwarf Mosaic Virus,MDMV)是一种世界性病毒病害,近年来在我国危害越来越重,已经成为玉米产区的主要病害之一.在我国危害玉米生产的主要是MDMV-B株系,至今尚未发现MDMV-A株系.感染MDMV的症状因寄主抗病能力、生育时期及环境条件而不同.根据显症叶片数及叶绿素被破坏的程度,参考病株高度、单株产量等指标,提出了5级分级标准用以记载植株的发病级别.MDMV可以种子传毒,农田杂草为病毒的积累和越冬提供了有利条件,这些初侵染源为病害发生、流行创造了条件.MDMV是一种借蚜虫传播的非持久性病毒,实践证明采取以种植抗病品种为主,辅助以栽培管理的综合防治措施,是防治MDMV的有效途径.目前在我国主要的玉米种质资源中,只有塘四平头和获白系统抗或高抗MDMV,而具有国外或旅大红骨血缘的材料基本感MDMV.国外学者对MDMV-A株系的抗性遗传研究较深入,我国则需加强对MDMV-B株系的抗源筛选及抗性遗传研究工作.

  17. Mapping of Mungbean Yellow Mosaic India Virus (MYMIV and powdery mildew resistant gene in black gram [Vigna mungo(L. Hepper

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tuba Anjum,K. Sanjeev Gupta and Subhojit Datta

    2010-07-01

    Full Text Available Black gram, one of the important species of Asian Vigna group of grain legumes, is widely grown in South Asia and is animportant source of dietary protein. The two main biological constraints particularly Mungbean Yellow Mosaic IndiaVirus(MYMIV and powdery mildew pose a major threat to black gram production in India. Several reports on mappingmungbean yellow mosaic virus disease and powdery mildew resistant genes on black gram using parental lines suitable forcountries viz. Australia and Japan are available. However, to achieve precision in plant breeding, it is important that mappingof traits are done using parental lines which are best suited for the target area/country. Microsatellite markers facilitateeffective screening of mapping population and marker assisted selection for target traits such as disease resistance in manycrops. Linkage mapping for identification of genes conferring resistance to these target traits in the crop is underway. Theparents selected for MYMIV mapping population are DPU 88-31 as resistant source and AKU 9904 as susceptible one. Forestablishment of powdery mildew mapping population RBU 38 was used as resistant and DPU 88-31 as the susceptible one.Parental polymorphism was assessed using 363 SSR and 24 RGH markers. Efforts are being made to identify the markerstightly linked to the genes responsible for resistance which will be useful for marker assisted breeding for developingMYMIV and powdery mildew resistant cultivars in black gram.

  18. The coat protein of Alternanthera mosaic virus is the elicitor of a temperature-sensitive systemic necrosis in Nicotiana benthamiana, and interacts with a host boron transporter protein

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lim, Hyoun-Sub, E-mail: hyounlim@cnu.ac.kr [Department of Applied Biology, Chungnam National University, Daejeon 305-764 (Korea, Republic of); Nam, Jiryun, E-mail: jilyoon@naver.com [Department of Applied Biology, Chungnam National University, Daejeon 305-764 (Korea, Republic of); Seo, Eun-Young, E-mail: sey22@cnu.ac.kr [Department of Applied Biology, Chungnam National University, Daejeon 305-764 (Korea, Republic of); Nam, Moon, E-mail: moonlit51@cnu.ac.kr [Department of Applied Biology, Chungnam National University, Daejeon 305-764 (Korea, Republic of); Vaira, Anna Maria, E-mail: a.vaira@ivv.cnr.it [Floral and Nursery Plants Research Unit, US National Arboretum, USDA-ARS, 10300 Baltimore Avenue B-010A, Beltsville, MD 20705 (United States); Istituto di Virologia Vegetale, CNR, Strada delle Cacce 73, Torino 10135 (Italy); Bae, Hanhong, E-mail: hanhongbae@ynu.ac.kr [School of Biotechnology, Yeungnam University, Geongsan 712-749 (Korea, Republic of); Jang, Chan-Yong, E-mail: sunbispirit@gmail.com [Department of Applied Biology, Chungnam National University, Daejeon 305-764 (Korea, Republic of); Lee, Cheol Ho, E-mail: chlee1219@hanmail.net [Department of Chemical and Biological Engineering, Seokyoung University, Seoul 136-704 (Korea, Republic of); Kim, Hong Gi, E-mail: hgkim@cnu.ac.kr [Department of Applied Biology, Chungnam National University, Daejeon 305-764 (Korea, Republic of); Roh, Mark, E-mail: marksroh@gmail.com [Floral and Nursery Plants Research Unit, US National Arboretum, USDA-ARS, 10300 Baltimore Avenue B-010A, Beltsville, MD 20705 (United States); Laboratory of Floriculture and Plant Physiology, School of Bio-Resource Science, Dankook University, Cheonan, Chungnam 330-714 (Korea, Republic of); Hammond, John, E-mail: john.hammond@ars.usda.gov [Floral and Nursery Plants Research Unit, US National Arboretum, USDA-ARS, 10300 Baltimore Avenue B-010A, Beltsville, MD 20705 (United States)

    2014-03-15

    Different isolates of Alternanthera mosaic virus (AltMV; Potexvirus), including four infectious clones derived from AltMV-SP, induce distinct systemic symptoms in Nicotiana benthamiana. Virus accumulation was enhanced at 15 °C compared to 25 °C; severe clone AltMV 3-7 induced systemic necrosis (SN) and plant death at 15 °C. No interaction with potexvirus resistance gene Rx was detected, although SN was ablated by silencing of SGT1, as for other cases of potexvirus-induced necrosis. Substitution of AltMV 3-7 coat protein (CP{sub SP}) with that from AltMV-Po (CP{sub Po}) eliminated SN at 15 °C, and ameliorated symptoms in Alternanthera dentata and soybean. Substitution of only two residues from CP{sub Po} [either MN(13,14)ID or LA(76,77)IS] efficiently ablated SN in N. benthamiana. CP{sub SP} but not CP{sub Po} interacted with Arabidopsis boron transporter protein AtBOR1 by yeast two-hybrid assay; N. benthamiana homolog NbBOR1 interacted more strongly with CP{sub SP} than CP{sub Po} in bimolecular fluorescence complementation, and may affect recognition of CP as an elicitor of SN. - Highlights: • Alternanthera mosaic virus CP is an elicitor of systemic necrosis in N. benthamiana. • Virus-induced systemic necrosis is enhanced at 15 °C compared to 25 °C. • Induction of systemic necrosis is dependent on as few as two CP amino acid residues. • These residues are at subunit interfaces within the same turn of the virion helix. • Inducer/non-inducer CPs interact differentially with a boron transporter protein.

  19. 江苏黄瓜绿斑驳花叶病毒的鉴定%Identification of cucumber green mottle mosaic virus in Jiangsu

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    任春梅; 程兆榜; 缪倩; 王锋; 张重阳; 徐冬青; 周益军

    2013-01-01

    为确定从江苏省洪泽县大棚西瓜、仪征市露地瓠瓜、东台市露地南瓜上采集到3个表现为褪绿、斑驳花叶症状的病样是否为黄瓜绿斑驳花叶病毒(CGMMV)侵染,采用电子镜观察、RT-PCR和序列测定方法对其进行鉴定.电子显微镜下可见300 nm×18 nm大小的直杆状病毒粒子.根据已报道的CGMMV外壳蛋白质(cp)基因序列合成特异性引物,对所提取病样的总RNA进行RT-PCR扩增,3个分离物的RNA模板中均可扩增到大小为500bp左右的DNA片段,测序结果表明3个分离物的片段均含有486个核苷酸,包含完整的cp基因,编码161个氨基酸.3个分离物与已报道的7个CGMMV分离物核苷酸及其所推导的氨基酸序列同源性分别为91.8% ~99.8%和98.1%~100.0%,与同属的其他3个病毒(Kyuri绿斑驳花叶病毒、黄瓜果实斑驳花叶病毒和小西葫芦绿斑驳花叶病毒)cp基因核苷酸及其所推导的氨基酸序列同源性分别为40.7%~ 54.7%和44.4% ~60.2%,表明所采集的3个病样由CGMMV侵染引起.%This study was performed to identify three isolates with chlorisis and mottle mosaic symptom collected from greenhouse watermelon in Hongze of Jiangsu, openground gourd in Yizheng of Jiangsu and openground pumpkin in Dongtai of Jiangsu. Straight rod virus particles with size of 300 nm×18 nm were shown under the electron micrograph in the crude extract of above isolates. Total RNA were amplified by RT-PCR with the specific primers designed on the basis of the reported coat protein ( cp) gene of cucumber green mottle mosaic virus( CGMMV) . An 500-bp gene fragment was amplified from total RNA of all three isolates, and subsequent sequence analysis indicated that the 486 bp fragment contained complete cp gene which encoded 161 amino acids. The nucleotides and deduced amino acid sequences of the cp genes from these isolates shared homologies from 91. 8% to 99. 8% and from 98. 1% to 100. 0% with 7 reported CGMMV

  20. Purificação e propriedades do vírus do mosaico do quenopódio Purification and properties of chenopodium mosaic virus

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Darcy M. Silva

    1958-01-01

    Full Text Available O vírus do mosaico do quenopódio foi purificado por meio de centrifugações alternadas de baixa e alta velocidade, complementadas pelo tratamento com clorofórmio e álcool amílico. Foram obtidas preparações altamente ativas, que apresentaram as reações características das proteínas e um espectro de absorção da luz ultravioleta igual ao das nucleoproteínas, e que não apresentavam o fenômeno de anisotropia de fluxo. O sedimento dessas preparações purificadas, obtido na ultracentrífuga, retomado em um pequeno volume de solução de sulfato de amônio 0,2 saturada e guardado a 4°C, produz um grande número de microcristais. As partículas que compõem as preparações examinadas ao microscópio são de aspecto e dimensões bastante uniformes; são "esféricas" e de cerca de 30 milimicros de diâmetro. O material purificado se assemelha ao vírus do mosaico "southern bean", quanto ao aspecto dos cristais, mas os testes de hospedeiros e sorológicos indicaram tratar-se de dois vírus perfeitamente distintos.The Chenopodium mosaic virus was purified by means of alternated low and high speed centrifugations combined with chloroform N-amyl alcohol treatment. Such preparations have a high activity, give positive tests for protein and its ultra-violet absorption spectrum is that of a nucleoprotein solution. They do not show the phenomenon of anisotropy of flow. When examined in the electron microscope they showed to be constituted of "spherical" particles of uniform size having an approximate diameter of 30 mμ.. If a pellet of the purified virus is resuspended in a small volume of 0,2 saturated (NH42 SO4 solution and kept at 4°C for several hours, masses of roughly rhombic crystals are formed. As far as the size of particles and the form of crystals are concerned, the Chenopodium mosaic virus resembles the southern bean mosaic virus. They differ, however, in their host range and are not related serologically.

  1. Distributional changes and range predictions of downy brome (Bromus tectorum) in Rocky Mountain National Park

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bromberg, J.E.; Kumar, S.; Brown, C.S.; Stohlgren, T.J.

    2011-01-01

    Downy brome (Bromus tectorum L.), an invasive winter annual grass, may be increasing in extent and abundance at high elevations in the western United States. This would pose a great threat to high-elevation plant communities and resources. However, data to track this species in high-elevation environments are limited. To address changes in the distribution and abundance of downy brome and the factors most associated with its occurrence, we used field sampling and statistical methods, and niche modeling. In 2007, we resampled plots from two vegetation surveys in Rocky Mountain National Park for presence and cover of downy brome. One survey was established in 1993 and had been resampled in 1999. The other survey was established in 1996 and had not been resampled until our study. Although not all comparisons between years demonstrated significant changes in downy brome abundance, its mean cover increased nearly fivefold from 1993 (0.7%) to 2007 (3.6%) in one of the two vegetation surveys (P = 0.06). Although the average cover of downy brome within the second survey appeared to be increasing from 1996 to 2007, this slight change from 0.5% to 1.2% was not statistically significant (P = 0.24). Downy brome was present in 50% more plots in 1999 than in 1993 (P = 0.02) in the first survey. In the second survey, downy brome was present in 30% more plots in 2007 than in 1996 (P = 0.08). Maxent, a species-environmental matching model, was generally able to predict occurrences of downy brome, as new locations were in the ranges predicted by earlier generated models. The model found that distance to roads, elevation, and vegetation community influenced the predictions most. The strong response of downy brome to interannual environmental variability makes detecting change challenging, especially with small sample sizes. However, our results suggest that the area in which downy brome occurs is likely increasing in Rocky Mountain National Park through increased frequency and cover

  2. Serological and molecular detection of an isolate of Cucumber Mosaic Virus (CMV infecting cucumber (Cucumis sativus and cloning of its coat protein gene

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Prashant Shetti

    2012-08-01

    Full Text Available Cucumber mosaic virus (CMV is a widely prevalent plant virus infecting important vegetable, plantation and flower crops. Methods for early detection of viruses in plants and vectors transmitting them play a critical role in plant virus disease management. Direct plate and Dot- Enzyme Linked Immunosorbent Assay (ELISA was standardized for detection of CMV. Optimum OD of 1.249 (1.9 ng/μl and 1.242 (1.52 ng/μl was observed in 1:20 and 1:50 dilution of crude and ultrapurified antigen respectively, at a dilution of 1:1000 of both primary and secondary antibody. Polymerase Chain Reaction (PCR using CMV coat protein (CMV CP gene specific primers amplified a 657 base pair (bp fragment, which was then  cloned in pTZ57R/T cloning vector and positive clones were identified by band shift assay and colony PCR. This will aid in developing field diagnostic kits for detection of CMV in different crops and also in developing transgenics with the CP gene. 

  3. Recruitment of Arabidopsis RNA Helicase AtRH9 to the Viral Replication Complex by Viral Replicase to Promote Turnip Mosaic Virus Replication.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Yinzi; Xiong, Ruyi; Bernards, Mark; Wang, Aiming

    2016-01-01

    Positive-sense RNA viruses have a small genome with very limited coding capacity and are highly dependent on host components to fulfill their life cycle. Recent studies have suggested that DEAD-box RNA helicases play vital roles in many aspects of RNA metabolism. To explore the possible role of the RNA helicases in viral infection, we used the Turnip mosaic virus (TuMV)-Arabidopsis pathosystem. The Arabidopsis genome encodes more than 100 putative RNA helicases (AtRH). Over 41 Arabidopsis T-DNA insertion mutants carrying genetic lesions in the corresponding 26 AtRH genes were screened for their requirement in TuMV infection. TuMV infection assays revealed that virus accumulation significantly decreased in the Arabidopsis mutants of three genes, AtRH9, AtRH26, and PRH75. In the present work, AtRH9 was further characterized. Yeast two-hybrid and bimolecular fluorescence complementation (BiFC) assays showed that AtRH9 interacted with the TuMV NIb protein, the viral RNA-dependent RNA polymerase. Moreover, the subcellular distribution of AtRH9 was altered in the virus-infected cells, and AtRH9 was recruited to the viral replication complex. These results suggest that Arabidopsis AtRH9 is an important component of the TuMV replication complex, possibly recruited via its interaction with NIb. PMID:27456972

  4. Natural minus-strand RNAs of alfalfa mosaic virus as in vitro templates for viral RNA polymerase. 3'-Terminal non-coded guanosine and coat protein are insufficient factors for full-size plus-strand synthesis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Houwing, C.J.; Huis in 't Veld, M.; Zuidema, D.; Graaff, de M.; Jaspars, E.M.J.

    2001-01-01

    Replication complexes of alfalfa mosaic virus produce in vivo large quantities of plus-strand RNAs, but this production is fully dependent on the presence of coat protein. In order to study this process of RNA-dependent and coat protein-regulated RNA synthesis we have isolated the three natural minu

  5. Development of a new vector using Soybean yellow common mosaic virus for gene function study or heterologous protein expression in soybeans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lim, Seungmo; Nam, Moon; Kim, Kil Hyun; Lee, Su-Heon; Moon, Jung-Kyung; Lim, Hyoun-Sub; Choung, Myoung-Gun; Kim, Sang-Mok; Moon, Jae Sun

    2016-02-01

    A new vector using Soybean yellow common mosaic virus (SYCMV) was constructed for gene function study or heterologous protein expression in soybeans. The in vitro transcript with a 5' cap analog m7GpppG from an SYCMV full-length infectious vector driven by a T7 promoter infected soybeans (pSYCMVT7-full). The symptoms observed in the soybeans infected with either the sap from SYCMV-infected leaves or pSYCMVT7-full were indistinguishable, suggesting that the vector exhibits equivalent biological activity as the virus itself. To utilize the vector further, a DNA-based vector driven by the Cauliflower mosaic virus (CaMV) 35S promoter was constructed. The complete sequence of the SYCMV genome was inserted into a binary vector flanked by a CaMV 35S promoter at the 5' terminus of the SYCMV genome and a cis-cleaving ribozyme sequence followed by a nopaline synthase terminator at the 3' terminus of the SYCMV genome (pSYCMV-full). The SYCMV-derived vector was tested for use as a virus-induced gene silencing (VIGS) vector for the functional analysis of soybean genes. VIGS constructs containing either a fragment of the Phytoene desaturase (PDS) gene (pSYCMV-PDS1) or a fragment of the small subunit of ribulose-1,5-bisphosphate carboxylase/oxygenase (RbcS) gene (pSYCMV-RbcS2) were constructed. Plants infiltrated with each vector using the Agrobacterium-mediated inoculation method exhibited distinct symptoms, such as photo-bleaching in plants infiltrated with pSYCMV-PDS1 and yellow or pale green coloring in plants infiltrated with pSYCMV-RbcS2. In addition, down-regulation of the transcripts of the two target genes was confirmed via northern blot analysis. Particle bombardment and direct plasmid DNA rubbing were also confirmed as alternative inoculation methods. To determine if the SYCMV vector can be used for the expression of heterologous proteins in soybean plants, the vector encoding amino acids 135-160 of VP1 of Foot-and-mouth disease virus (FMDV) serotype O1 Campos (O1C

  6. Deep sequencing reveals persistence of intra- and inter-host genetic diversity in natural and greenhouse populations of zucchini yellow mosaic virus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Simmons, H E; Dunham, J P; Stack, J C; Dickins, B J A; Pagán, I; Holmes, E C; Stephenson, A G

    2012-08-01

    The genetic diversity present in populations of RNA viruses is likely to be strongly modulated by aspects of their life history, including mode of transmission. However, how transmission mode shapes patterns of intra- and inter-host genetic diversity, particularly when acting in combination with de novo mutation, population bottlenecks and the selection of advantageous mutations, is poorly understood. To address these issues, this study performed ultradeep sequencing of zucchini yellow mosaic virus in a wild gourd, Cucurbita pepo ssp. texana, under two infection conditions: aphid vectored and mechanically inoculated, achieving a mean coverage of approximately 10 ,000×. It was shown that mutations persisted during inter-host transmission events in both the aphid vectored and mechanically inoculated populations, suggesting that the vector-imposed transmission bottleneck is not as extreme as previously supposed. Similarly, mutations were found to persist within individual hosts, arguing against strong systemic bottlenecks. Strikingly, mutations were seen to go to fixation in the aphid-vectored plants, suggestive of a major fitness advantage, but remained at low frequency in the mechanically inoculated plants. Overall, this study highlights the utility of ultradeep sequencing in providing high-resolution data capable of revealing the nature of virus evolution, particularly as the full spectrum of genetic diversity within a population may not be uncovered without sequence coverage of at least 2500-fold. PMID:22592263

  7. Gain of virulence by Soybean mosaic virus on Rsv4-genotype soybeans is associated with a relative fitness loss in a susceptible host.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Y; Hajimorad, M R

    2016-09-01

    'Gene-for-gene' theory predicts that gain of virulence by an avirulent pathogen on plants expressing resistance (R) genes is associated with fitness loss in susceptible hosts. However, the validity of this prediction has been studied in only a few plant viral pathosystems. In this study, the Soybean mosaic virus (SMV)-Rsv4 pathosystem was exploited to test this prediction. In Rsv4-genotype soybeans, P3 of avirulent SMV strains provokes an as yet uncharacterized resistance mechanism that restricts the invading virus to the inoculated leaves. A single amino acid substitution in P3 functionally converts an avirulent to a virulent strain, suggesting that the genetic composition of P3 plays a crucial role in virulence on Rsv4-genotype soybeans. In this study, we examined the impact of gain of virulence mutation(s) on the fitness of virulent variants derived from three avirulent SMV strains in a soybean genotype lacking the Rsv4 gene. Our data demonstrate that gain of virulence mutation(s) by all avirulent viruses on Rsv4-genotype soybean is associated with a relative fitness loss in a susceptible host. The implications of this finding on the durable deployment of the Rsv4 gene in soybean are discussed.

  8. Deep sequencing of banana bract mosaic virus from flowering ginger (Alpinia purpurata) and development of an immunocapture RT-LAMP detection assay.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Jingxin; Borth, Wayne B; Lin, Birun; Dey, Kishore K; Melzer, Michael J; Shen, Huifang; Pu, Xiaoming; Sun, Dayuan; Hu, John S

    2016-07-01

    Banana bract mosaic virus (BBrMV) has never been reported in banana plants in Hawaii. In 2010, however, it was detected in a new host, flowering ginger (Alpinia purpurata). In this study, we characterize the A. purpurata isolate and study its spread in flowering ginger in Hawaii. A laboratory study demonstrated that BBrMV could be transmitted from flowering ginger to its natural host, banana, therefore raising a serious concern about the potential risk to the rapidly growing banana industry of Hawaii. To quickly monitor this virus in the field, we developed a robust immunocapture reverse transcription loop-mediated isothermal amplification (IC-RT-LAMP) assay. Deep sequencing of the BBrMV isolate from A. purpurata revealed a single-stranded RNA virus with a genome of 9,713 nt potentially encoding a polyprotein of 3,124 aa, and another predicted protein, PIPO, in the +2 reading-frame shift. Most of the functional motifs in the Hawaiian isolate were conserved among the genomes of isolates from one found in the Philippines and India. However, the A. purpurata isolate had an amino acid deletion in the Pl protein that was most similar to the Philippine isolate. Phylogenetic analysis of an eastern Pacific subpopulation that included A. purpurata was closest in genetic distance to a Southeast Asian subpopulation, suggesting frequent gene flow and supporting the hypothesis that the A. purpurata isolate arrived in Hawaii from Southeast Asia. PMID:27038825

  9. The P2 of Wheat yellow mosaic virus rearranges the endoplasmic reticulum and recruits other viral proteins into replication-associated inclusion bodies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Liying; Andika, Ida Bagus; Shen, Jiangfeng; Yang, Di; Chen, Jianping

    2014-06-01

    Viruses commonly modify host endomembranes to facilitate biological processes in the viral life cycle. Infection by viruses belonging to the genus Bymovirus (family Potyviridae) has long been known to induce the formation of large membranous inclusion bodies in host cells, but their assembly and biological roles are still unclear. Immunoelectron microscopy of cells infected with the bymovirus Wheat yellow mosaic virus (WYMV) showed that P1, P2 and P3 are the major viral protein constituents of the membranous inclusions, whereas NIa-Pro (nuclear inclusion-a protease) and VPg (viral protein genome-linked) are probable minor components. P1, P2 and P3 associated with the endoplasmic reticulum (ER), but only P2 was able to rearrange ER and form large aggregate structures. Bioinformatic analyses and chemical experiments showed that P2 is an integral membrane protein and depends on the active secretory pathway to form aggregates of ER membranes. In planta and in vitro assays demonstrated that P2 interacts with P1, P3, NIa-Pro or VPg and recruits these proteins into the aggregates. In vivo RNA labelling using WYMV-infected wheat protoplasts showed that the synthesis of viral RNAs occurs in the P2-associated inclusions. Our results suggest that P2 plays a major role in the formation of membranous compartments that house the genomic replication of WYMV.

  10. Analysis of the accumulation of Pea enation mosaic virus genomes in seed tissues and lack of evidence for seed transmission in pea (Pisum sativum).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Timmerman-Vaughan, Gail; Larsen, Richard; Murray, Sarah; McPhee, Kevin; Coyne, Clarice

    2009-11-01

    Pea enation mosaic virus (PEMV) is an important virus disease of pea. International movement of commercial pea cultivars and germplasm can be problematic due to uncertainty about seed transmission of the viruses responsible for the disease. Whether PEMV is seedborne was assessed by collecting developing seed from infected plants and determining the relative concentrations of the PEMV-1 and PEMV-2 viral genomes using quantitative real-time reverse-transcription polymerase chain reaction. The relative accumulation of PEMV-1 and PEMV-2 was approximately 1,240 and 13,000 times higher, respectively, in leaf than in embryo tissues. Accumulation of PEMV-1 and PEMV-2 RNA was also significantly higher in pod walls and seed coats than in cotyledons or embryo axes. No evidence was obtained for seed transmission of PEMV in pea. Although PEMV-1 and PEMV-2 genomic RNAs were found in developing seed, no PEMV symptoms were observed in the field on more than 50,000 plants from seed derived from PEMV-infected source plants. These data demonstrate that PEMV is seedborne in pea but do not support a previous report that PEMV is seed transmitted. Absence of seed transmission may result from the low abundance of PEMV viral genomes in embryo tissue.

  11. Microwave assisted synthesis and characterisation of a zinc oxide/tobacco mosaic virus hybrid material. An active hybrid semiconductor in a field-effect transistor device

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shawn Sanctis

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available Tobacco mosaic virus (TMV has been employed as a robust functional template for the fabrication of a TMV/zinc oxide field effect transistor (FET. A microwave based approach, under mild conditions was employed to synthesize stable zinc oxide (ZnO nanoparticles, employing a molecular precursor. Insightful studies of the decomposition of the precursor were done using NMR spectroscopy and material characterization of the hybrid material derived from the decomposition was achieved using dynamic light scattering (DLS, transmission electron microscopy (TEM, grazing incidence X-ray diffractometry (GI-XRD and atomic force microscopy (AFM. TEM and DLS data confirm the formation of crystalline ZnO nanoparticles tethered on top of the virus template. GI-XRD investigations exhibit an orientated nature of the deposited ZnO film along the c-axis. FET devices fabricated using the zinc oxide mineralized virus template material demonstrates an operational transistor performance which was achieved without any high-temperature post-processing steps. Moreover, a further improvement in FET performance was observed by adjusting an optimal layer thickness of the deposited ZnO on top of the TMV. Such a bio-inorganic nanocomposite semiconductor material accessible using a mild and straightforward microwave processing technique could open up new future avenues within the field of bio-electronics.

  12. Preparation of nanoporous polyimide thin films via layer-by-layer self-assembly of cowpea mosaic virus and poly(amic acid)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Peng Bo; Wu Guojun; Lin Yuan [State Key Laboratory of Polymer Physics and Chemistry, Changchun Institute of Applied Chemistry, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Changchun, Jilin 130022 (China); Wang Qian [Department of Chemistry and Biochemistry, University of South Carolina, Columbia, SC, 29208 (United States); Su Zhaohui, E-mail: zhsu@ciac.jl.cn [State Key Laboratory of Polymer Physics and Chemistry, Changchun Institute of Applied Chemistry, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Changchun, Jilin 130022 (China)

    2011-09-01

    Low dielectric (low-{kappa}) materials are of key importance for the performance of microchips. In this study, we show that nanosized cowpea mosaic virus (CPMV) particles can be assembled with poly(amic acid) (PAA) in aqueous solutions via the layer-by-layer technique. Then, upon thermal treatment CPMV particles are removed and PAA is converted into polyimide in one step, resulting in a porous low-{kappa} polyimide film. The multilayer self-assembly process was monitored by quartz crystal microbalance and UV-Vis spectroscopy. Imidization and the removal of the CPMV template was confirmed by Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy and atomic force microscopy respectively. The dielectric constant of the nanoporous polyimide film thus prepared was 2.32 compared to 3.40 for the corresponding neat polyimide. This work affords a facile approach to fabrication of low-{kappa} polyimide ultrathin films with tunable thickness and dielectric constant.

  13. Characterization of the complete genome of ribgrass mosaic virus isolated from Plantago major L. from New Zealand and Actinidia spp. from China.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chavan, Ramesh R; Cohen, Daniel; Blouin, Arnaud G; Pearson, Michael N

    2012-07-01

    The complete genomes of tobamovirus isolates from Plantago major L. from New Zealand (NZ-439), Plantago sp. from Germany (Kons 1105), Actinidia chinensis (Actinidia-AC) and A. deliciosa (Actinidia-AD) from China were sequenced and compared to previously published tobamovirus genomes. Their genome organization and phylogenetic analysis of the putative replicase component, replicase readthrough component, movement protein, coat protein and complete genome placed all four isolates in subgroup 3 of the tobamoviruses. The complete genomes differed from each other by Plantago and Actinidia isolates differed from each other by <4% and were most similar to published (partial) sequences of ribgrass mosaic virus (RMV). We propose that these sequences constitute the first complete published sequences for RMV.

  14. Inhibitory activity against tobacco mosaic virus (TMV) replication of pinoresinol and syringaresinol lignans and their glycosides from the root of Rhus javanica var. roxburghiana.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ouyang, Ming-An; Wein, Yung-Shung; Zhang, Zhen-Kun; Kuo, Yueh-Hsiung

    2007-08-01

    Four new diepoxylignan glycosides, pinoresinol-4'-O-[6' '-O-(E)-feruloyl]-beta-D-glucopyranoside (1), pinoresinol-4'-O-[4' ',6' '-O-(E)-diferuloyl]-beta-D-glucopyranoside (2), pinoresinol-4'-O-[3' ',6' '-O-(E)-diferuloyl]-beta-D-glucopyranoside (3), and syringaresinol- 4'-O-[4' ',6' '-O-(E)-diferuloyl]-beta-D-glucopyranoside (4), together with three known compounds, pinoresinol (5), syringaresinol (6), and pinoresinol-4'-O-beta-D-glucopyranoside (7), were isolated from the n-butanol extract of Rhus javanica var. roxburghiana, and their structures were established using various spectroscopic techniques. Three glycosides (2-4) of the lignans showed moderate inhibition of multiplication of the tobacco mosaic virus.

  15. Characterization of the complete genome of ribgrass mosaic virus isolated from Plantago major L. from New Zealand and Actinidia spp. from China.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chavan, Ramesh R; Cohen, Daniel; Blouin, Arnaud G; Pearson, Michael N

    2012-07-01

    The complete genomes of tobamovirus isolates from Plantago major L. from New Zealand (NZ-439), Plantago sp. from Germany (Kons 1105), Actinidia chinensis (Actinidia-AC) and A. deliciosa (Actinidia-AD) from China were sequenced and compared to previously published tobamovirus genomes. Their genome organization and phylogenetic analysis of the putative replicase component, replicase readthrough component, movement protein, coat protein and complete genome placed all four isolates in subgroup 3 of the tobamoviruses. The complete genomes differed from each other by Plantago and Actinidia isolates differed from each other by <4% and were most similar to published (partial) sequences of ribgrass mosaic virus (RMV). We propose that these sequences constitute the first complete published sequences for RMV. PMID:22456910

  16. Over-expression of 72 ku protein of wheat yellow mosaic virus in E.coli and preparation of its antiserum

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2000-01-01

    By reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR),cDNA fragment of wheat yellow mosaic virus (WYMV) RNA2 encoding 72 ku protein has been synthesized and cloned into plasmid pET30a(+) for overexpression in prokaryotic cells.BL21(DE3) pLys S of E.coli transformed with the recombinant plasmid pETP72 containing the fragment has been induced to express the 72 ku protein on high level.The produced protein has been purified from sodium dodecyl sulfate-polyacrylamide gel (SDS-PAGE) for its antiserum preparation.In Western-blotting analysis,the antibodies reacted with the 72 ku protein expressed in E.coli.

  17. Studies on the Changes of Superoxide Dismutase,Peroxidase and Polyphenoloxidase in Seed Coat of Soybeans after Infected with Soybean Mosaic Virus

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Zheng Cuiming; Teng Bing; Gao Fenglan; Wu Zongpu

    2000-01-01

    Resistant and susceptible soybean varieties were inoculated with Soybean Mosaic Virus(SMV). The seeds were taken for biochemical analysis . The results showed that both peroxidase (POD) and polyphenoloxidase (PPO) activities in seed coat of uninoculated resistant varieties were much higher than those of uninoculated susceptible varieties. Superoxide dismutase (SOD) activity in seed coat of uninoculated resistant varieties was a little stronger than that of susceptible varieties. There were two more bands of PPO and three more bands of POD in uninoculated resistant varieties than those in susceptible varieties. After inoculated with SMV,POD activity was increased a little in susceptible varieties. Both POD and PPO activities were rapidly decreased in seed coat of resistant varieties after inoculated with SMV and one band was vanished. SOD activity was increased in susceptible varieties after inoculated with SMV, while it remained stable in resistant varieties.

  18. A systemic increase in the recombination frequency upon local infection of Arabidopsis thaliana plants with oilseed rape mosaic virus depends on plant age, the initial inoculum concentration and the time for virus replication

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Youli eYao

    2013-03-01

    Full Text Available In the past, we showed that local infection of tobacco leaves with either Tobacco mosaic virus (TMV or Oilseed rape mosaic virus (ORMV resulted in a systemic increase in the homologous recombination frequency (HRF. Later on, we showed that a similar phenomenon occurs in Arabidopsis thaliana plants infected with ORMV. Here, we tested whether the time of removing the infected leaves as well as viral titer have any effect on the degree of changes in HRF in systemic tissues. An increase in HRF in systemic non-infected tissues was more pronounced when the infected leaves were detached from the infected plants at 60-96 hours post infection, rather than at earlier time. Next, we found that exposure to higher concentrations of inoculum was much more efficient in triggering an increase in HRF than exposure to lower concentrations. Finally, we showed that older plants exhibited a higher increase in HRF than younger plants. We found that an increase in genome instability in systemic tissues of locally infected plants depends on plant age, the concentration of initial inoculums and the time of viral replication.

  19. Tobacco Rar1, EDS1 and NPR1/NIM1 like genes are required for N-mediated resistance to tobacco mosaic virus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Yule; Schiff, Michael; Marathe, Rajendra; Dinesh-Kumar, S P

    2002-05-01

    The tobacco N gene confers resistance to tobacco mosaic virus (TMV) and encodes a Toll-interleukin-1 receptor/nucleotide binding site/leucine-rich repeat (TIR-NBS-LRR) class protein. We have developed and used a tobacco rattle virus (TRV) based virus induced gene silencing (VIGS) system to investigate the role of tobacco candidate genes in the N-mediated signalling pathway. To accomplish this we generated transgenic Nicotiana benthamiana containing the tobacco N gene. The transgenic lines exhibit hypersensitive response (HR) to TMV and restrict virus spread to the inoculated site. This demonstrates that the tobacco N gene can confer resistance to TMV in heterologous N. benthamiana. We have used this line to study the role of tobacco Rar1-, EDS1-, and NPR1/NIM1- like genes in N-mediated resistance to TMV using a TRV based VIGS approach. Our VIGS analysis suggests that these genes are required for N function. EDS1-like gene requirement for the N function suggests that EDS1 could be a common component of bacterial, fungal and viral resistance signalling mediated by the TIR-NBS-LRR class of resistance proteins. Requirement of Rar1- like gene for N-mediated resistance to TMV and some powdery mildew resistance genes in barley provide the first example of converging points in the disease resistance signalling pathways mediated by TIR-NBS-LRR and CC-NBS-LRR proteins. The TRV based VIGS approach as described here to study N-mediated resistance signalling will be useful for the analysis of not only disease resistance signalling pathways but also of other signalling pathways in genetically intractable plant systems.

  20. Examining the Heterogeneous Genome Content of Multipartite Viruses BMV and CCMV by Native Mass Spectrometry

    Science.gov (United States)

    van de Waterbeemd, Michiel; Snijder, Joost; Tsvetkova, Irina B.; Dragnea, Bogdan G.; Cornelissen, Jeroen J.; Heck, Albert J. R.

    2016-06-01

    Since the concept was first introduced by Brian Chait and co-workers in 1991, mass spectrometry of proteins and protein complexes under non-denaturing conditions (native MS) has strongly developed, through parallel advances in instrumentation, sample preparation, and data analysis tools. However, the success rate of native MS analysis, particularly in heterogeneous mega-Dalton (MDa) protein complexes, still strongly depends on careful instrument modification. Here, we further explore these boundaries in native mass spectrometry, analyzing two related endogenous multipartite viruses: the Brome Mosaic Virus (BMV) and the Cowpea Chlorotic Mottle Virus (CCMV). Both CCMV and BMV are approximately 4.6 megadalton (MDa) in mass, of which approximately 1 MDA originates from the genomic content of the virion. Both viruses are produced as mixtures of three particles carrying different segments of the genome, varying by approximately 0.1 MDA in mass (~2%). This mixture of particles poses a challenging analytical problem for high-resolution native MS analysis, given the large mass scales involved. We attempt to unravel the particle heterogeneity using both Q-TOF and Orbitrap mass spectrometers extensively modified for analysis of very large assemblies. We show that manipulation of the charging behavior can provide assistance in assigning the correct charge states. Despite their challenging size and heterogeneity, we obtained native mass spectra with resolved series of charge states for both BMV and CCMV, demonstrating that native MS of endogenous multipartite virions is feasible.

  1. Multifunctional roles for the N-terminal basic motif of Alfalfa mosaic virus coat protein: nucleolar/cytoplasmic shuttling, modulation of RNA-binding activity, and virion formation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Herranz, Mari Carmen; Pallas, Vicente; Aparicio, Frederic

    2012-08-01

    In addition to virion formation, the coat protein (CP) of Alfalfa mosaic virus (AMV) is involved in the regulation of replication and translation of viral RNAs, and in cell-to-cell and systemic movement of the virus. An intriguing feature of the AMV CP is its nuclear and nucleolar accumulation. Here, we identify an N-terminal lysine-rich nucleolar localization signal (NoLS) in the AMV CP required to both enter the nucleus and accumulate in the nucleolus of infected cells, and a C-terminal leucine-rich domain which might function as a nuclear export signal. Moreover, we demonstrate that AMV CP interacts with importin-α, a component of the classical nuclear import pathway. A mutant AMV RNA 3 unable to target the nucleolus exhibited reduced plus-strand RNA synthesis and cell-to-cell spread. Moreover, virion formation and systemic movement were completely abolished in plants infected with this mutant. In vitro analysis demonstrated that specific lysine residues within the NoLS are also involved in modulating CP-RNA binding and CP dimerization, suggesting that the NoLS represents a multifunctional domain within the AMV CP. The observation that nuclear and nucleolar import signals mask RNA-binding properties of AMV CP, essential for viral replication and translation, supports a model in which viral expression is carefully modulated by a cytoplasmic/nuclear balance of CP accumulation. PMID:22746826

  2. Patellins 3 and 6, two members of the Plant Patellin family, interact with the movement protein of Alfalfa mosaic virus and interfere with viral movement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peiro, Ana; Izquierdo-Garcia, Ana Cristina; Sanchez-Navarro, Jesus Angel; Pallas, Vicente; Mulet, Jose Miguel; Aparicio, Frederic

    2014-12-01

    Movement proteins (MPs) encoded by plant viruses interact with host proteins to facilitate or interfere with intra- and/or intercellular viral movement. Using yeast two-hybrid and bimolecular fluorescence complementation assays, we herein present in vivo evidence for the interaction between Alfalfa mosaic virus (AMV) MP and Arabidopsis Patellin 3 (atPATL3) and Patellin 6 (atPATL6), two proteins containing a Sec14 domain. Proteins with Sec14 domains are implicated in membrane trafficking, cytoskeleton dynamics, lipid metabolism and lipid-mediated regulatory functions. Interestingly, the overexpression of atPATL3 and/or atPATL6 interfered with the plasmodesmata targeting of AMV MP and correlated with reduced infection foci size. Consistently, the viral RNA levels increased in the single and double Arabidopsis knockout mutants for atPATL3 and atPATL6. Our results indicate that, in general, MP-PATL interactions interfere with the correct subcellular targeting of MP, thus rendering the intracellular transport of viral MP-containing complexes less efficient and diminishing cell-to-cell movement. PMID:24751128

  3. Influence of retinoblastoma-related gene silencing on the initiation of DNA replication by African cassava mosaic virus Rep in cells of mature leaves in Nicotiana benthamiana plants

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bruce Gareth

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Geminiviruses mainly infect terminally differentiated tissues and cells in plants. They need to reprogramme host cellular machinery for DNA replication. This process is thought to be mediated by inactivation of cell-cycle repressor proteins and by induction of host DNA synthesis protein expression through actions of the geminviral replication initiator protein (Rep. Findings Exploiting a Nicotiana benthamiana pOri2 line, which is transformed with a transgene consisting of a direct repeat of the African cassava mosaic virus (ACMV-replication origin (Ori flanking a non-viral DNA region, and virus-induced RNA silencing (VIGS, the impact of host gene expression on replication of the ACMV-derived replicon was investigated. The ACMV Rep trans-replicated the viral episomal replicon in leaves of young but not older pOri2 plants. Upon VIGS-mediated down-regulation of N. benthamiana NbRBR1, the retinoblastoma-related protein gene coding for a negative cell-cycle suppressor, recovered the ability of ACMV Rep for trans DNA replication, whereas the silencing of NbPCNA coding for the sliding clamp of DNA polymerase had no effect. Conclusions These results suggest that the cellular machinery for DNA replication in differentiated tissues of older leaves cannot be reprogrammed by Rep alone but may need other uncharacterised viral and plant factors.

  4. Identification of amino acid residues of the coat protein of Sri Lankan cassava mosaic virus affecting symptom production and viral titer in Nicotiana benthamiana.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kelkar, Vaishali; Kushawaha, Akhilesh Kumar; Dasgupta, Indranil

    2016-06-01

    Sri Lankan cassava mosaic virus (SLCMV) is bipartite begomovirus infecting cassava in India and Sri Lanka. Interestingly, the DNA-A component of the SLCMV alone is able to infect Nicotiana benthamiana causing symptoms of upward leaf rolling and stunting. One of the differences between monopartite and bipartite begomoviruses is the requirement of Coat Protein (CP) for infectivity; CP being essential for the former, but dispensable in the latter. This investigation was aimed to determine the importance of CP in the infectivity of the bipartite SLCMV, behaving as a monopartite virus in N. benthamiana. We tested CP-null mutants, single amino acid replacement mutants and double, triple and quadruple combinations of the above in SLCMV DNA-A, for infectivity, symptom development and viral DNA accumulation in N. benthamiana. While CP-null mutants were non-infectious, a majority of the single amino acid replacement mutants and their combinations retained infectivity, some with attenuated symptoms and reduced viral titers. Some of the combined mutations restored the attenuated symptoms to wild type levels. Some of the mutations were predicted to cause changes in the secondary structure of the CP, which roughly correlated with the attenuation of symptoms and the reduction in viral titers. PMID:26948262

  5. Design, Synthesis and Anti-Tobacco Mosaic Virus (TMV Activity of 5-Chloro-N-(4-cyano-1-aryl-1H-pyrazol-5-yl-1-aryl-3-methyl-1H-pyrazole-4-carboxamide Derivatives

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jin-Jing Xiao

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available A series of novel pyrazole amide derivatives 3a–3p which take TMV PC protein as the target has been designed and synthesized by the reactions of 5-chloro-1-aryl-3-methyl-1H-pyrazole-4-carboxylic acids with 5-amino-1-aryl-1H-pyrazole-4-carbonitriles. All the compounds were characterized by 1H-NMR, mass spectroscopy and elemental analysis. Preliminary bioassays indicated that all the compounds acted against the tobacco mosaic virus (TMV with different in vivo and in vitro modes at 500 μg/mL and were found to possess promising activity. Especially, compound 3p showed the most potent biological activity against tobacco mosaic virus (TMV compared to ningnanmycin, and a molecular docking study was performed and the binding model revealed that the pyrazole amide moiety was tightly embedded in the binding sites of TMV PC (PDB code: 2OM3.

  6. Presence and Distribution of Tobacco Viruses in Serbia

    OpenAIRE

    Nataša Duduk; Aleksandra Bulajić; Janoš Berenji; Ivana Đekić; Bojan Duduk; Branka Krstić

    2006-01-01

    Infection with a large number of plant viruses could imperil tobacco yield and quality. Tobacco is a natural host for more than 20 viruses, among which the most important and economically harmful are tobacco mosaic virus (TMV), tomato spotted wilt virus (TSWV), cucumber mosaic virus (CMV), potato virus Y (PVY), alfalfa mosaic virus (AMV), tobacco ringspot virus (TRSV), tobacco each virus (TEV) and tobacco vein mottling virus (TVMV).The occurence and distribution of tobacco viruses were invest...

  7. Short communication. Molecular analysis of the genomic RNAs 1 and 2 of the first Arabis mosaic virus isolate detected in Spanish grapevines

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    I. Lopez-Fabuel

    2013-02-01

    Full Text Available The Arabis mosaic virus (ArMV is one of the causative agent of the grapevine fanleaf disease, one of the most widespread and damaging viral diseases of grapevine. Recently, the ArMV has been detected in Spanish vineyards, and its determination and molecular characterization was undertaken. To this aim, the nucleotide sequence of the genomic RNAs 1 and 2 of the first isolate of ArMV infecting grapevine detected in Spain (ArMV-DU13 has been determined. The ArMV-DU13 genomic sequences were compared to the corresponding sequences of other isolates of ArMV, or nepoviruses. The most divergent genes among ArMV isolates were the X1 and VPg genes on the RNA 1, and the 2A gene on the RNA 2, with identity levels at the amino acid level of 78% (X1 and VPg or 69% (2A between the most distant isolates. Interestingly, the VPg genes were identical between the two grapevine isolates ArMV-Du13 and –NW, suggesting a possible implication of the host. The phylogenetic analysis of the RNA 2 showed that the Spanish isolate was close to Grapevine fanleaf virus isolates. The analysis of the full length RNA 2 suggests a recombination event between ArMV-DU13 and GFLV-GHu isolates between nucleotides 54 and 586 in the ArMV-DU13 isolate. Altogether, these results confirm the high variability between isolates of ArMV, and will be helpful to design more appropriate and reliable molecular diagnostic techniques for the control of this emerging virus in Spain.

  8. Genomic and biological characterization of chiltepin yellow mosaic virus, a new tymovirus infecting Capsicum annuum var. aviculare in Mexico.

    OpenAIRE

    Pagán Muñoz, Jesús Israel; Betancourt Vásquez, Mónica; Miguel, Jacinto de; Piñero, Daniel; Fraile Pérez, Aurora; Garcia-Arenal Rodriguez, Fernando

    2010-01-01

    The characterization of viruses infecting wild plants is a key step towards understanding the ecology of plant viruses. In this work, the complete genomic nucleotide sequence of a new tymovirus species infecting chiltepin, the wild ancestor of Capsicum annuum pepper crops, in Mexico was determined, and its host range has been explored. The genome of 6,517 nucleotides has the three open reading frames described for tymoviruses, putatively encoding an RNA-dependent RNA polymerase, a movement pr...

  9. Sources of resistance against the Pepper yellow mosaic virus in chili pepper Fontes de resistência ao Mosaico Amarelo do Pimentão em pimentas

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cíntia dos S Bento

    2009-06-01

    Full Text Available The Pepper yellow mosaic virus (PepYMV naturally infects chili and sweet pepper, as well as tomato plants in Brazil, leading to severe losses. This work reports the reaction to the PepYMV of 127 Capsicum spp. accessions, aiming at identifying resistance sources useful in breeding programs. The experiment was carried out in a completely randomized design, with eight replications, in greenhouse conditions. Plants were protected with an insect-proof screen to avoid virus dissemination by aphids. Leaves of Nicotiana debneyi infected with the PepYMV were used as the inoculum source. Plants were inoculated with three to four fully expanded leaves. A second inoculation was done 48 hours later to avoid escapes. Only the youngest fully expanded leaf was inoculated. Two plants were inoculated only with buffer, as negative control. Symptoms were visually scored using a rating scale ranging from 1 (assymptomatic plants to 5 (severe mosaic and leaf area reduction. Nine accessions were found to be resistant based on visual evaluation. Their resistance was confirmed by ELISA. Two resistance accessions belong to the species C. baccatum var. pendulum, while the seven other were C. chinense. No resistant accessions were identified in C. annuum var. annuum, C. annuum var. glabriusculum, and C. frutescens.O Mosaico Amarelo do Pimentão é causado pelo Pepper yellow mosaic virus (PepYMV e tem ocorrência natural na maioria das regiões produtoras de pimenta, pimentão e tomate do Brasil, causando sérias perdas nas culturas de pimentão e pimenta. Este trabalho teve como objetivo avaliar a resistência de 127 acessos de Capsicum spp. ao PepYMV, com o intuito de identificar fontes de resistência a serem utilizadas em programas de melhoramento. O experimento foi conduzido em delineamento inteiramente casualizado, com oito repetições, em casa de vegetação, protegida com tela à prova de insetos, para evitar a disseminação do vírus por afídeos vetores. Folhas

  10. Mosaic Messages

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baldauf, Annemarie

    2012-01-01

    Through the generosity of a Lowes Toolbox for Education Grant and a grant from the Bill Graham Foundation, an interdisciplinary mosaic mural was created and installed at Riverview Middle School in Bay Point, California. The actual mural, which featured a theme of nurturing students through music, art, sports, science, and math, took about three…

  11. Genetic Diversity of Chinese Soybean mosaic virus Strains and Their Relationships with Other Plant Potyviruses Based on P3 Gene Sequences

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    YANG Qing-hua; LI Kai; ZHI Hai-jian; GAI Jun-yi

    2014-01-01

    Soybean mosaic virus (SMV), a member of the genus Potyvirus, is a major pathogen of soybean plants in China, and 16 SMV strains have been identiifed nationwide based on a former detailed SMV classiifcation system. As the P3 gene is thought to be involved in viral replication, systemic infection, pathogenicity, and overcoming resistance, knowledge of the P3 gene sequences of SMV and other potyviruses would be useful in efforts to know the genetic relationships among them and control the disease. P3 gene sequences were obtained from representative isolates of the above-mentioned 16 SMV strains and were compared with other SMV strains and 16 Potyvirus species from the National Center for Biotechnology GenBank database. The P3 genes from the 16 SMV isolates are composed of 1 041 nucleotides, encoding 347 amino acids, and share 90.7-100%nucleotide (NT) sequence identities and 95.1-100%amino acid (AA) sequence identities. The P3 coding regions of the 16 SMV isolates share high identities (92.4-98.9%NT and 96.0-100%AA) with the reported Korean isolates, followed by the USA isolates (88.5-97.9%NT and 91.4-98.6%AA), and share low identities (80.5-85.2%NT and 82.1-84.7%AA) with the reported HZ1 and P isolates from Pinellia ternata. The sequence identities of the P3 genes between SMV and the 16 potyviruses varied from 44.4 to 81.9%in the NT sequences and from 21.4 to 85.3%in the AA sequences, respectively. Among them, SMV was closely related to Watermelon mosaic virus (WMV), with 76.0-81.9%NT and 77.5-85.3%AA identities. In addition, the SMV isolates and potyvirus species were clustered into six distinct groups. All the SMV strains isolated from soybean were clustered in Group I, and the remaining species were clustered in other groups. A multiple sequence alignment analysis of the C-terminal regions indicated that the P3 genes within a species were highly conserved, whereas those among species were relatively variable.

  12. Difference between maize dwarf mosaic virus and maize rough dwarf virus and the control technique%玉米矮花叶病与玉米粗缩病的区别及防治措施

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    孙海潮; 李会群

    2003-01-01

    @@ 玉米矮花叶病(Maize Dwarf Mosaic Virus MDMV)和玉米粗缩病(Maize Rough Dwarf Vivus,MRDV)都是病毒性病害,近年来在我国发生越来越频繁,危害也越来越重.二者在初侵染源、发病症状、分级标准、发病原因及防治措施上既有相似之处又有不同之点.因此,认识二者的区别对于正确防治两种病害的发生和危害至关重要.

  13. A Study of Oxalate-Induced Systemic Resistance of Muskmelon to Squash Mosaic Virus%草酸诱导甜瓜对南瓜花叶病毒的系统抗性的研究

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    赵荣乐

    2000-01-01

    By treatment with oxalate muskmelon cultivar "Wangwenxiang", which is sensitive to squash mosaic virus (SqMV), develops systemic resistance to SqMV significantly. The challenge inoculation experiments indicate that the symptom of oxalate-treated plants gets much slighter, the virus content is only 4 % reduced to. The peroxidase activity increases by five times, three new isoperoxidases are induced, and lignin content increases by 82.9 %. These results indicate that oxalate induces systemic resistance of muskmelon to SqMV while it induces increase of peroxidase activity, new isoperoxidases and content of lignin in the plants treated with oxalate.

  14. Multiple different defense mechanisms are activated in the young transgenic tobacco plants which express the full length genome of the Tobacco mosaic virus, and are resistant against this virus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jada, Balaji; Soitamo, Arto J; Siddiqui, Shahid Aslam; Murukesan, Gayatri; Aro, Eva-Mari; Salakoski, Tapio; Lehto, Kirsi

    2014-01-01

    Previously described transgenic tobacco lines express the full length infectious Tobacco mosaic virus (TMV) genome under the 35S promoter (Siddiqui et al., 2007. Mol Plant Microbe Interact, 20: 1489-1494). Through their young stages these plants exhibit strong resistance against both the endogenously expressed and exogenously inoculated TMV, but at the age of about 7-8 weeks they break into TMV infection, with typical severe virus symptoms. Infections with some other viruses (Potato viruses Y, A, and X) induce the breaking of the TMV resistance and lead to synergistic proliferation of both viruses. To deduce the gene functions related to this early resistance, we have performed microarray analysis of the transgenic plants during the early resistant stage, and after the resistance break, and also of TMV-infected wild type tobacco plants. Comparison of these transcriptomes to those of corresponding wild type healthy plants indicated that 1362, 1150 and 550 transcripts were up-regulated in the transgenic plants before and after the resistance break, and in the TMV-infected wild type tobacco plants, respectively, and 1422, 1200 and 480 transcripts were down-regulated in these plants, respectively. These transcriptome alterations were distinctly different between the three types of plants, and it appears that several different mechanisms, such as the enhanced expression of the defense, hormone signaling and protein degradation pathways contributed to the TMV-resistance in the young transgenic plants. In addition to these alterations, we also observed a distinct and unique gene expression alteration in these plants, which was the strong suppression of the translational machinery. This may also contribute to the resistance by slowing down the synthesis of viral proteins. Viral replication potential may also be suppressed, to some extent, by the reduction of the translation initiation and elongation factors eIF-3 and eEF1A and B, which are required for the TMV replication

  15. 侵染南瓜的西瓜花叶病毒和黄瓜花叶病毒CP基因的克隆和序列分析%Cloning and Sequence Analyses of the Coat Protein Genes of Watermelon mosaic virus and Cucumber mosaic virus from one Mix-infected Squash Plant

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    刘金亮; 王凤婷; 魏毅; 张世宏; 潘洪玉

    2010-01-01

    为从分子水平鉴定山东聊城的一表现明显花叶、黄化、蕨叶及果实畸形的南瓜病毒病的病原,采用RT-PCR的方法,用马铃薯Y病毒属病毒3'-末端序列的简并引物和黄瓜花叶病毒(Cucumber mosaic virus,CMV)外壳蛋白(CP)基因的特异引物,对该样品进行了检测,并对克隆到的基因序列进行分析.结果表明,该样品受西瓜花叶病毒(Watermelon mosaic virus,WMV)和CMV 2种病毒的复合侵染,分别命名为WMV-liaocheng和CMV-liaocheng,与其他相应病毒分离物CP基因核苷酸序列的同源性分别为91.2%~98.0%和77.0%~97.9%,推导的氨基酸序列同源性分别为96.4%~98.5%和81.2%~99.1%.根据完整CP基因核苷酸序列构建的系统进化树显示:18个WMV分离物可分为3组,其中WMV-liaocheng与HLJ、CHN及Habenaria等分离物表现出较近的亲缘关系,形成Ⅲ组;30个CMV分为2个亚组,其中CMV-liaocheng属于亚组Ⅰ,CMV-liaocheng可能发生过重组.

  16. Insights into Alternanthera mosaic virus TGB3 functions: interactions with Nicotiana benthamiana PsbO correlate with chloroplast vesiculation and veinal necrosis caused by TGB3 overexpression

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chanyong eJang

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Alternanthera mosaic virus (AltMV triple gene block 3 (TGB3 protein is involved in viral movement. AltMV TGB3 subcellular localization was previously shown to be distinct from that of Potato virus X (PVX TGB3, and a chloroplast binding domain identified; veinal necrosis and chloroplast vesiculation were observed in Nicotiana benthamiana when AltMV TGB3 was over-expressed from PVX. Plants with over-expressed TGB3 showed more lethal damage under dark conditions than under light. Yeast-two-hybrid analysis and bimolecular fluorescence complementation (BiFC reveal that A. thaliana PsbO1 has strong interactions with TGB3; N. benthamiana PsbO (NbPsbO also showed obvious interaction signals with TGB3 through BiFC. These results demonstrate an important role for TGB3 in virus cell-to-cell movement and virus-host plant interactions. The Photosystem II oxygen-evolving complex protein PsbO interaction with TGB3 is presumed to have a crucial role in symptom development and lethal damage under dark conditions. In order to further examine interactions between AtPsbO1, NbPsbO and TGB3, and to identify the binding domain(s in TGB3 protein, BiFC assays were performed between AtPsbO1 or NbPsbO and various mutants of TGB3. Interactions with C-terminally deleted TGB3 were significantly weaker than those with wild-type TGB3, and both N-terminally deleted TGB3 and a TGB3 mutant previously shown to lose chloroplast interactions failed to interact detectably with PsbO in BiFC. To gain additional information about TGB3 interactions in AltMV-susceptible plants, we cloned 12 natural AltMV TGB3 sequence variants into a PVX expression vector to examine differences in symptom development in N. benthamiana. Symptom differences were observed on PVX over-expression, with all AltMV TGB3 variants showing more severe symptoms than the WT PVX control, but without obvious correlation to sequence differences.

  17. Rapid Detection of Zucchini yellow mosaic virus by RT-PCR%小西葫芦黄花叶病毒(ZYMV)的RT-PCR检测

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    廖富荣; 林石明; 陈青; 陈红运; 黄蓬英; 吴媛

    2008-01-01

    小西葫芦黄花叶病毒(Zucchini yellow mosaic virus,ZYMV)是葫芦科作物上的一种重要病毒,近几年来已成了我国葫芦科作物上的一种重要病原物.根据已知的ZYMV基因组序列分别设计了2对特异性引物,在优化RT-PCR条件的基础上,成功建立了ZYMV的RT-PCR检测方法.引物ZYM1/ZYM2用于扩增整个CP基因序列(片段长度949 bp),而引物ZYM3/ZYM4用于扩增部分CP基因序列(片段长度449 bp),其中,引物ZYM3/ZYM4的检测灵敏度比引物ZYM1/ZYM2的检测灵敏度高.把所建立的方法用于南瓜(Cucurbita moschata)、丝瓜(Luffa cylindrica )病叶的检测,结果在这些病叶中也检出ZYMV.因此,该方法可用于ZYMV的快速、灵敏检测及分子流行病学的调查研究.

  18. Selective Interaction Between Chloroplast β-ATPase and TGB1L88 Retards Severe Symptoms Caused by Alternanthera mosaic virus Infection

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eun-Young Seo

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available The multifunctional triple gene block protein 1 (TGB1 of the Potexvirus Alternanthera mosaic virus (AltMV has been reported to have silencing suppressor, cell-to-cell movement, and helicase functions. Yeast two hybrid screening using an Arabidopsis thaliana cDNA library with TGB1 as bait, and co-purification with TGB1 inclusion bodies identified several host proteins which interact with AltMV TGB1. Host protein interactions with TGB1 were confirmed by biomolecular fluorescence complementation, which showed positive TGB1 interaction with mitochondrial ATP synthase delta′ chain subunit (ATP synthase delta′, light harvesting chlorophyll-protein complex I subunit A4 (LHCA4, chlorophyll a/b binding protein 1 (LHB1B2, chloroplast-localized IscA-like protein (ATCPISCA, and chloroplast β-ATPase. However, chloroplast β-ATPase interacts only with TGB1L88, and not with weak silencing suppressor TGB1P88. This selective interaction indicates that chloroplast β-ATPase is not required for AltMV movement and replication; however, TRV silencing of chloroplast β-ATPase in Nicotiana benthamiana induced severe tissue necrosis when plants were infected by AltMV TGB1L88 but not AltMV TGB1P88, suggesting that β-ATPase selectively responded to TGB1L88 to induce defense responses.

  19. Transfer of the Rsv3 locus from ‘Harosoy’ for resistance to soybean mosaic virus strains C and D in Japan

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kato, Shin; Takada, Yoshitake; Shimamura, Satoshi; Hirata, Kaori; Sayama, Takashi; Taguchi-Shiobara, Fumio; Ishimoto, Masao; Kikuchi, Akio; Nishio, Takeshi

    2016-01-01

    Resistance to soybean mosaic virus (SMV) is imperative for soybean (Glycine max (L.) Merr.) production in the Tohoku region. Molecular markers for SMV resistance were previously reported for U.S. SMV strains, but they cannot be applied because of the differences in strain classification between Japan and the U.S. A U.S. variety ‘Harosoy’ has been used mainly as a donor of resistance to SMV strains C and D in a Japanese breeding program, resulting in resistant varieties such as ‘Fukuibuki.’ Because ‘Harosoy’ harbors the Rsv3 gene conferring resistance to the virulent SMV strain groups, G5 through G7, it appears that the Rsv3 gene confers resistance to strains C and D. In this study, we introduced resistance to the two strains from ‘Fukuibuki’ into a leading variety ‘Ohsuzu’ by recurrent backcrossing with marker-assisted selection. All lines selected with markers near Rsv3 showed resistance to the strains, suggesting that the Rsv3 locus is responsible for the resistance. Three years of trials showed that one of the breeding lines, ‘Tohoku 169,’ was equivalent to ‘Ohsuzu’ with respect to agricultural characteristics such as seed size, maturity date, and seed yield, except for the SMV resistance. PMID:27162503

  20. A short insert in the leader sequence of RNA 3L, a long variant of Alfalfa mosaic virus RNA3, introduces two unidentified reading frames.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jayasena, Kithsiri W; Randles, John W

    2004-12-01

    N20-RNA 3L, a large form of RNA 3 associated with Alfalfa mosaic virus (AMV) strain N20 comprises 2281 nt and has approximately 97% overall sequence similarity to the longest previously described RNA 3 of AMV strain YSMV (YSMV-RNA 3; 2188 nt). Compared with YSMV-RNA 3, N20-RNA 3L contains an additional 97 nt in the 5' leader upstream of the open reading frames for movement protein (MP) and coat protein (CP). Two overlapping unidentified reading frames (URF1 and URF2) result from this modification, each of which code for putative translation products of 21 amino acids. The URF1 putative peptide has a hydrophilic N-terminus and a hydrophobic C-terminus, indicating a possible association with both host cell membrane and cytosol whereas the putative URF2 product is predominantly hydrophobic. A further structural modification found in N20-RNA 3L is a new tandem repeat of 243 nts which overlaps with the MP open reading frame. PMID:15550770