WorldWideScience

Sample records for broad-spectrum therapeutics discovering

  1. Nitroimidazoles: Molecular Fireworks That Combat a Broad Spectrum of Infectious Diseases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ang, Chee Wei; Jarrad, Angie M; Cooper, Matthew A; Blaskovich, Mark A T

    2017-09-28

    Infectious diseases claim millions of lives every year, but with the advent of drug resistance, therapeutic options to treat infections are inadequate. There is now an urgent need to develop new and effective treatments. Nitroimidazoles are a class of antimicrobial drugs that have remarkable broad spectrum activity against parasites, mycobacteria, and anaerobic Gram-positive and Gram-negative bacteria. While nitroimidazoles were discovered in the 1950s, there has been renewed interest in their therapeutic potential, particularly for the treatment of parasitic infections and tuberculosis. In this review, we summarize different classes of nitroimidazoles that have been described in the literature in the past five years, from approved drugs and clinical candidates to examples undergoing preclinical or early stage development. The relatively "nonspecific" mode of action and resistance mechanisms of nitromidazoles are discussed, and contemporary strategies to facilitate nitroimidazole drug development are highlighted.

  2. Broad spectrum antibiotic compounds and use thereof

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Koglin, Alexander; Strieker, Matthias

    2016-07-05

    The discovery of a non-ribosomal peptide synthetase (NRPS) gene cluster in the genome of Clostridium thermocellum that produces a secondary metabolite that is assembled outside of the host membrane is described. Also described is the identification of homologous NRPS gene clusters from several additional microorganisms. The secondary metabolites produced by the NRPS gene clusters exhibit broad spectrum antibiotic activity. Thus, antibiotic compounds produced by the NRPS gene clusters, and analogs thereof, their use for inhibiting bacterial growth, and methods of making the antibiotic compounds are described.

  3. Broad Spectrum Sanitizing Wipes with Food Additives Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — Microcide proposes to develop novel multipurpose non-toxic sanitizing wipes that are aqueous based, have shelf life of 3-5 years, have broad spectrum microbicidal...

  4. Broad-spectrum antibiotic activity of the arylomycin natural products is masked by natural target mutations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, Peter A; Roberts, Tucker C; Romesberg, Floyd E

    2010-11-24

    Novel classes of broad-spectrum antibiotics are needed to treat multidrug-resistant pathogens. The arylomycin class of natural products inhibits a promising antimicrobial target, type I signal peptidase (SPase), but upon initial characterization appeared to lack whole-cell activity against most pathogens. Here, we show that Staphylococcus epidermidis, which is sensitive to the arylomycins, evolves resistance via mutations in SPase and that analogous mutations are responsible for the natural resistance of Staphylococcus aureus, Escherichia coli, and Pseudomonas aeruginosa. We identify diverse bacteria lacking these mutations and demonstrate that most are sensitive to the arylomycins. The results illustrate that the arylomycins have a broad-spectrum of activity and are viable candidates for development into therapeutics. The results also raise the possibility that naturally occurring resistance may have masked other natural product scaffolds that might be developed into therapeutics. Copyright © 2010 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  5. Broad Spectrum Antibiotic Activity of the Arylomycin Natural Products is Masked by Natural Target Mutations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, Peter A.; Roberts, Tucker C.; Romesberg, Floyd E.

    2010-01-01

    Summary Novel classes of broad-spectrum antibiotics are needed to treat multidrug resistant pathogens. The arylomycin class of natural products inhibits a promising antimicrobial target, type I signal peptidase (SPase), but upon initial characterization appeared to lack whole cell activity against most pathogens. Here, we show that Staphylococcus epidermidis, which is sensitive to the arylomycins, evolves resistance via mutations in SPase and that analogous mutations are responsible for the natural resistance of Staphylococcus aureus, Escherichia coli, and Pseudomonas aeruginosa. We identify diverse bacteria lacking these mutations and demonstrate that most are sensitive to the arylomycins. The results illustrate that the arylomycins have a broad-spectrum of activity and are viable candidates for development into therapeutics. The results also raise the possibility that naturally occurring resistance may have masked other natural product scaffolds that might be developed into therapeutics. PMID:21095572

  6. Development of a Broad-Spectrum Antiviral Agent with Activity ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Development of a Broad-Spectrum Antiviral Agent with. Activity Against Herpesvirus Replication .... deviation. The data were analyzed by SPSS software, version 16. Significant differences (p <. 0.01) between groups were determined using unpaired Student's t-test. RESULTS. Cytotoxic and optimum drug concentrations.

  7. Development of a Broad-Spectrum Antiviral Agent with Activity ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Purpose: To evaluate the broad-spectrum antiviral activity of peptide H9 (H9) in vitro in order to gain insight into its underlying molecular mechanisms. Method: Antiviral activity against Herpes simplex virus type 1 (HSV-1) was determined using thiazolyl blue (MTT) assay. Polymerase Chain Reaction (PCR) was employed to ...

  8. Broad spectrum antiangiogenic treatment for ocular neovascular diseases.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ofra Benny

    2010-09-01

    Full Text Available Pathological neovascularization is a hallmark of late stage neovascular (wet age-related macular degeneration (AMD and the leading cause of blindness in people over the age of 50 in the western world. The treatments focus on suppression of choroidal neovascularization (CNV, while current approved therapies are limited to inhibiting vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF exclusively. However, this treatment does not address the underlying cause of AMD, and the loss of VEGF's neuroprotective can be a potential side effect. Therapy which targets the key processes in AMD, the pathological neovascularization, vessel leakage and inflammation could bring a major shift in the approach to disease treatment and prevention. In this study we have demonstrated the efficacy of such broad spectrum antiangiogenic therapy on mouse model of AMD.Lodamin, a polymeric formulation of TNP-470, is a potent broad-spectrum antiangiogenic drug. Lodamin significantly reduced key processes involved in AMD progression as demonstrated in mice and rats. Its suppressive effects on angiogenesis, vascular leakage and inflammation were studied in a wide array of assays including; a Matrigel, delayed-type hypersensitivity (DTH, Miles assay, laser-induced CNV and corneal micropocket assay. Lodamin significantly suppressed the secretion of various pro-inflammatory cytokines in the CNV lesion including monocyte chemotactic protein-1 (MCP-1/Ccl2. Importantly, Lodamin was found to regress established CNV lesions, unlike soluble fms-like tyrosine kinase-1 (sFlk-1. The drug was found to be safe in mice and have little toxicity as demonstrated by electroretinography (ERG assessing retinal and by histology.Lodamin, a polymer formulation of TNP-470, was identified as a first in its class, broad-spectrum antiangiogenic drug that can be administered orally or locally to treat corneal and retinal neovascularization. Several unique properties make Lodamin especially beneficial for ophthalmic

  9. Multivalent dendritic molecules as broad spectrum bacteria agglutination agents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xiao, Shuzhang; Abu-Esba, Lica; Turkyilmaz, Serhan; White, Alexander G; Smith, Bradley D

    2013-01-01

    This study reports the first set of synthetic molecules that act as broad spectrum agglutination agents and thus are complementary to the specific targeting of antibodies. The molecules have dendritic architecture and contain multiple copies of zinc(II)-dipicolylamine (ZnDPA) units that have selective affinity for the bacterial cell envelope. A series of molecular structures were evaluated, with the number of appended ZnDPA units ranging from four to thirty-two. Agglutination assays showed that the multivalent probes rapidly cross-linked ten different strains of bacteria, regardless of Gram-type and cell morphology. Fluorescence microscopy studies using probes with four ZnDPA units indicated a high selectivity for bacteria agglutination in the presence of mammalian cells and no measurable effect on the health of the cells. The high bacterial selectivity was confirmed by conducting in vivo optical imaging studies of a mouse leg infection model. The results suggest that multivalent ZnDPA molecular probes with dendritic structures have great promise as selective, broad spectrum bacterial agglutination agents for infection imaging and theranostic applications.

  10. Broad-spectrum antimicrobial polycarbonate hydrogels with fast degradability.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pascual, Ana; Tan, Jeremy P K; Yuen, Alex; Chan, Julian M W; Coady, Daniel J; Mecerreyes, David; Hedrick, James L; Yang, Yi Yan; Sardon, Haritz

    2015-04-13

    In this study, a new family of broad-spectrum antimicrobial polycarbonate hydrogels has been successfully synthesized and characterized. Tertiary amine-containing eight-membered monofunctional and difunctional cyclic carbonates were synthesized, and chemically cross-linked polycarbonate hydrogels were obtained by copolymerizing these monomers with a poly(ethylene glycol)-based bifunctional initiator via organocatalyzed ring-opening polymerization using 1,8-diazabicyclo[5.4.0]undec-7-ene catalyst. The gels were quaternized using methyl iodide to confer antimicrobial properties. Stable hydrogels were obtained only when the bifunctional monomer concentration was equal to or higher than 12 mol %. In vitro antimicrobial studies revealed that all quaternized hydrogels exhibited broad-spectrum antimicrobial activity against Staphylococcus aureus (Gram-positive), Escherichia coli (Gram-negative), Pseudomonas aeruginosa (Gram-negative), and Candida albicans (fungus), while the antimicrobial activity of the nonquaternized hydrogels was negligible. Moreover, the gels showed fast degradation at room temperature (4-6 days), which makes them ideal candidates for wound healing and implantable biomaterials.

  11. Nanomedicine for Infectious Disease Applications: Innovation towards Broad-Spectrum Treatment of Viral Infections.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jackman, Joshua A; Lee, Jaywon; Cho, Nam-Joon

    2016-03-02

    Nanomedicine enables unique diagnostic and therapeutic capabilities to tackle problems in clinical medicine. As multifunctional agents with programmable properties, nanomedicines are poised to revolutionize treatment strategies. This promise is especially evident for infectious disease applications, for which the continual emergence, re-emergence, and evolution of pathogens has proven difficult to counter by conventional approaches. Herein, a conceptual framework is presented that envisions possible routes for the development of nanomedicines as superior broad-spectrum antiviral agents against enveloped viruses. With lipid membranes playing a critical role in the life cycle of medically important enveloped viruses including HIV, influenza, and Ebola, cellular and viral membrane interfaces are ideal elements to incorporate into broad-spectrum antiviral strategies. Examples are presented that demonstrate how nanomedicine strategies inspired by lipid membranes enable a wide range of targeting opportunities to gain control of critical stages in the virus life cycle through either direct or indirect approaches involving membrane interfaces. The capabilities can be realized by enabling new inhibitory functions or improving the function of existing drugs through nanotechnology-enabled solutions. With these exciting opportunities, due attention is also given to the clinical translation of nanomedicines for infectious disease applications, especially as pharmaceutical drug-discovery pipelines demand new routes of innovation. © 2015 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  12. Brevibacillus laterosporus, a Pathogen of Invertebrates and a Broad-Spectrum Antimicrobial Species

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Luca Ruiu

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available Brevibacillus laterosporus, a bacterium characterized by the production of a unique canoe-shaped lamellar body attached to one side of the spore, is a natural inhabitant of water, soil and insects. Its biopesticidal potential has been reported against insects in different orders including Coleoptera, Lepidoptera, Diptera and against nematodes and mollusks. In addition to its pathogenicity against invertebrates, different B. laterosporus strains show a broad-spectrum antimicrobial activity including activity against phytopathogenic bacteria and fungi. A wide variety of molecules, including proteins and antibiotics, have been associated with the observed pathogenicity and mode of action. Before being considered as a biological control agent against plant pathogens, the antifungal and antibacterial properties of certain B. laterosporus strains have found medical interest, associated with the production of antibiotics with therapeutic effects. The recent whole genome sequencing of this species revealed its potential to produce polyketides, nonribosomal peptides, and toxins. Another field of growing interest is the use of this bacterium for bioremediation of contaminated sites by exploiting its biodegradation properties. The aim of the present review is to gather and discuss all recent findings on this emerging entomopathogen, giving a wider picture of its complex and broad-spectrum biocontrol activity.

  13. A Novel Scaffold for Developing Specific or Broad-Spectrum Chitinase Inhibitors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jiang, Xi; Kumar, Ashutosh; Liu, Tian; Zhang, Kam Y J; Yang, Qing

    2016-12-27

    Chitinases play important roles in pathogen invasion, arthropod molting, plant defense, and human inflammation. Inhibition of the activity of a typical chitinase by small molecules is of significance in drug development and biological research. On the basis of a recent reported crystal structure of OfChtI, the insect chitinase derived from the pest Ostrinia furnacalis, we computationally identified 17 compounds from a library of over 4 million chemicals by two rounds virtual screening. Among these, three compounds from one chemical class inhibited the activity of OfChtI with single-digit-micromolar IC50 values, and one compound from another chemical class exhibited a broad inhibitory activity not only toward OfChtI but also toward bacterial, fungal, and human chitinases. A new scaffold was discovered, and a structure-inhibitory activity relationship was proposed. This work may provide a novel starting point for the development of specific or broad-spectrum chitinase inhibitors.

  14. A Broad-Spectrum Inhibitor of CRISPR-Cas9.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harrington, Lucas B; Doxzen, Kevin W; Ma, Enbo; Liu, Jun-Jie; Knott, Gavin J; Edraki, Alireza; Garcia, Bianca; Amrani, Nadia; Chen, Janice S; Cofsky, Joshua C; Kranzusch, Philip J; Sontheimer, Erik J; Davidson, Alan R; Maxwell, Karen L; Doudna, Jennifer A

    2017-09-07

    CRISPR-Cas9 proteins function within bacterial immune systems to target and destroy invasive DNA and have been harnessed as a robust technology for genome editing. Small bacteriophage-encoded anti-CRISPR proteins (Acrs) can inactivate Cas9, providing an efficient off switch for Cas9-based applications. Here, we show that two Acrs, AcrIIC1 and AcrIIC3, inhibit Cas9 by distinct strategies. AcrIIC1 is a broad-spectrum Cas9 inhibitor that prevents DNA cutting by multiple divergent Cas9 orthologs through direct binding to the conserved HNH catalytic domain of Cas9. A crystal structure of an AcrIIC1-Cas9 HNH domain complex shows how AcrIIC1 traps Cas9 in a DNA-bound but catalytically inactive state. By contrast, AcrIIC3 blocks activity of a single Cas9 ortholog and induces Cas9 dimerization while preventing binding to the target DNA. These two orthogonal mechanisms allow for separate control of Cas9 target binding and cleavage and suggest applications to allow DNA binding while preventing DNA cutting by Cas9. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  15. Broad spectrum microarray for fingerprint-based bacterial species identification

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Frey Jürg E

    2010-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Microarrays are powerful tools for DNA-based molecular diagnostics and identification of pathogens. Most target a limited range of organisms and are based on only one or a very few genes for specific identification. Such microarrays are limited to organisms for which specific probes are available, and often have difficulty discriminating closely related taxa. We have developed an alternative broad-spectrum microarray that employs hybridisation fingerprints generated by high-density anonymous markers distributed over the entire genome for identification based on comparison to a reference database. Results A high-density microarray carrying 95,000 unique 13-mer probes was designed. Optimized methods were developed to deliver reproducible hybridisation patterns that enabled confident discrimination of bacteria at the species, subspecies, and strain levels. High correlation coefficients were achieved between replicates. A sub-selection of 12,071 probes, determined by ANOVA and class prediction analysis, enabled the discrimination of all samples in our panel. Mismatch probe hybridisation was observed but was found to have no effect on the discriminatory capacity of our system. Conclusions These results indicate the potential of our genome chip for reliable identification of a wide range of bacterial taxa at the subspecies level without laborious prior sequencing and probe design. With its high resolution capacity, our proof-of-principle chip demonstrates great potential as a tool for molecular diagnostics of broad taxonomic groups.

  16. Discovery of potent broad spectrum antivirals derived from marine actinobacteria.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Avi Raveh

    Full Text Available Natural products provide a vast array of chemical structures to explore in the discovery of new medicines. Although secondary metabolites produced by microbes have been developed to treat a variety of diseases, including bacterial and fungal infections, to date there has been limited investigation of natural products with antiviral activity. In this report, we used a phenotypic cell-based replicon assay coupled with an iterative biochemical fractionation process to identify, purify, and characterize antiviral compounds produced by marine microbes. We isolated a compound from Streptomyces kaviengensis, a novel actinomycetes isolated from marine sediments obtained off the coast of New Ireland, Papua New Guinea, which we identified as antimycin A1a. This compound displays potent activity against western equine encephalitis virus in cultured cells with half-maximal inhibitory concentrations of less than 4 nM and a selectivity index of greater than 550. Our efforts also revealed that several antimycin A analogues display antiviral activity, and mechanism of action studies confirmed that these Streptomyces-derived secondary metabolites function by inhibiting the cellular mitochondrial electron transport chain, thereby suppressing de novo pyrimidine synthesis. Furthermore, we found that antimycin A functions as a broad spectrum agent with activity against a wide range of RNA viruses in cultured cells, including members of the Togaviridae, Flaviviridae, Bunyaviridae, Picornaviridae, and Paramyxoviridae families. Finally, we demonstrate that antimycin A reduces central nervous system viral titers, improves clinical disease severity, and enhances survival in mice given a lethal challenge with western equine encephalitis virus. Our results provide conclusive validation for using natural product resources derived from marine microbes as source material for antiviral drug discovery, and they indicate that host mitochondrial electron transport is a viable

  17. Discovery of potent broad spectrum antivirals derived from marine actinobacteria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Raveh, Avi; Delekta, Phillip C; Dobry, Craig J; Peng, Weiping; Schultz, Pamela J; Blakely, Pennelope K; Tai, Andrew W; Matainaho, Teatulohi; Irani, David N; Sherman, David H; Miller, David J

    2013-01-01

    Natural products provide a vast array of chemical structures to explore in the discovery of new medicines. Although secondary metabolites produced by microbes have been developed to treat a variety of diseases, including bacterial and fungal infections, to date there has been limited investigation of natural products with antiviral activity. In this report, we used a phenotypic cell-based replicon assay coupled with an iterative biochemical fractionation process to identify, purify, and characterize antiviral compounds produced by marine microbes. We isolated a compound from Streptomyces kaviengensis, a novel actinomycetes isolated from marine sediments obtained off the coast of New Ireland, Papua New Guinea, which we identified as antimycin A1a. This compound displays potent activity against western equine encephalitis virus in cultured cells with half-maximal inhibitory concentrations of less than 4 nM and a selectivity index of greater than 550. Our efforts also revealed that several antimycin A analogues display antiviral activity, and mechanism of action studies confirmed that these Streptomyces-derived secondary metabolites function by inhibiting the cellular mitochondrial electron transport chain, thereby suppressing de novo pyrimidine synthesis. Furthermore, we found that antimycin A functions as a broad spectrum agent with activity against a wide range of RNA viruses in cultured cells, including members of the Togaviridae, Flaviviridae, Bunyaviridae, Picornaviridae, and Paramyxoviridae families. Finally, we demonstrate that antimycin A reduces central nervous system viral titers, improves clinical disease severity, and enhances survival in mice given a lethal challenge with western equine encephalitis virus. Our results provide conclusive validation for using natural product resources derived from marine microbes as source material for antiviral drug discovery, and they indicate that host mitochondrial electron transport is a viable target for the

  18. Tempered mlo broad-spectrum resistance to barley powdery mildew in an Ethiopian landrace.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ge, Xintian; Deng, Weiwei; Lee, Zheng Zhou; Lopez-Ruiz, Francisco J; Schweizer, Patrick; Ellwood, Simon R

    2016-07-12

    Recessive mutations in the Mlo gene confer broad spectrum resistance in barley (Hordeum vulgare) to powdery mildew (Blumeria graminis f. sp. hordei), a widespread and damaging disease. However, all alleles discovered to date also display deleterious pleiotropic effects, including the naturally occurring mlo-11 mutant which is widely deployed in Europe. Recessive resistance was discovered in Eth295, an Ethiopian landrace, which was developmentally controlled and quantitative without spontaneous cell wall appositions or extensive necrosis and loss of photosynthetic tissue. This resistance is determined by two copies of the mlo-11 repeat units, that occur upstream to the wild-type Mlo gene, compared to 11-12 in commonly grown cultivars and was designated mlo-11 (cnv2). mlo-11 repeat unit copy number-dependent DNA methylation corresponded with cytological and macroscopic phenotypic differences between copy number variants. Sequence data indicated mlo-11 (cnv2) formed via recombination between progenitor mlo-11 repeat units and the 3' end of an adjacent stowaway MITE containing region. mlo-11 (cnv2) is the only example of a moderated mlo variant discovered to date and may have arisen by natural selection against the deleterious effects of the progenitor mlo-11 repeat unit configuration.

  19. Immune Responses to Broad-Spectrum Antibiotic Treatment and Fecal Microbiota Transplantation in Mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ekmekciu, Ira; von Klitzing, Eliane; Fiebiger, Ulrike; Escher, Ulrike; Neumann, Christian; Bacher, Petra; Scheffold, Alexander; Kühl, Anja A; Bereswill, Stefan; Heimesaat, Markus M

    2017-01-01

    Compelling evidence demonstrates the pivotal role of the commensal intestinal microbiota in host physiology and the detrimental effects of its perturbations following antibiotic treatment. Aim of this study was to investigate the impact of antibiotics induced depletion and subsequent restoration of the intestinal microbiota composition on the murine mucosal and systemic immunity. To address this, conventional C57BL/6j mice were subjected to broad-spectrum antibiotic treatment for 8 weeks. Restoration of the intestinal microbiota by peroral fecal microbiota transplantation (FMT) led to reestablishment of small intestinal CD4 + , CD8 + , and B220 + as well as of colonic CD4 + cell numbers as early as 7 days post-FMT. However, at d28 following FMT, colonic CD4 + and B220 + cell numbers were comparable to those in secondary abiotic (ABx) mice. Remarkably, CD8 + cell numbers were reduced in the colon upon antibiotic treatment, and FMT was not sufficient to restore this immune cell subset. Furthermore, absence of gut microbial stimuli resulted in decreased percentages of memory/effector T cells, regulatory T cells, and activated dendritic cells in the small intestine, colon, mesenteric lymph nodes (MLN), and spleen. Concurrent antibiotic treatment caused decreased cytokine production (IFN-γ, IL-17, IL-22, and IL-10) of CD4 + cells in respective compartments. These effects were, however, completely restored upon FMT. In summary, broad-spectrum antibiotic treatment resulted in profound local (i.e., small and large intestinal), peripheral (i.e., MLN), and systemic (i.e., splenic) changes in the immune cell repertoire that could, at least in part, be restored upon FMT. Further studies need to unravel the distinct molecular mechanisms underlying microbiota-driven changes in immune homeostasis subsequently providing novel therapeutic or even preventive approaches in human immunopathologies.

  20. Unraveling novel broad-spectrum antibacterial targets in food and waterborne pathogens using comparative genomics and protein interaction network analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jadhav, Ankush; Shanmugham, Buvaneswari; Rajendiran, Anjana; Pan, Archana

    2014-10-01

    Food and waterborne diseases are a growing concern in terms of human morbidity and mortality worldwide, even in the 21st century, emphasizing the need for new therapeutic interventions for these diseases. The current study aims at prioritizing broad-spectrum antibacterial targets, present in multiple food and waterborne bacterial pathogens, through a comparative genomics strategy coupled with a protein interaction network analysis. The pathways unique and common to all the pathogens under study (viz., methane metabolism, d-alanine metabolism, peptidoglycan biosynthesis, bacterial secretion system, two-component system, C5-branched dibasic acid metabolism), identified by comparative metabolic pathway analysis, were considered for the analysis. The proteins/enzymes involved in these pathways were prioritized following host non-homology analysis, essentiality analysis, gut flora non-homology analysis and protein interaction network analysis. The analyses revealed a set of promising broad-spectrum antibacterial targets, present in multiple food and waterborne pathogens, which are essential for bacterial survival, non-homologous to host and gut flora, and functionally important in the metabolic network. The identified broad-spectrum candidates, namely, integral membrane protein/virulence factor (MviN), preprotein translocase subunits SecB and SecG, carbon storage regulator (CsrA), and nitrogen regulatory protein P-II 1 (GlnB), contributed by the peptidoglycan pathway, bacterial secretion systems and two-component systems, were also found to be present in a wide range of other disease-causing bacteria. Cytoplasmic proteins SecG, CsrA and GlnB were considered as drug targets, while membrane proteins MviN and SecB were classified as vaccine targets. The identified broad-spectrum targets can aid in the design and development of antibacterial agents not only against food and waterborne pathogens but also against other pathogens. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights

  1. Silver nanoparticles are broad-spectrum bactericidal and virucidal compounds

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ixtepan-Turrent Liliana

    2011-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract The advance in nanotechnology has enabled us to utilize particles in the size of the nanoscale. This has created new therapeutic horizons, and in the case of silver, the currently available data only reveals the surface of the potential benefits and the wide range of applications. Interactions between viral biomolecules and silver nanoparticles suggest that the use of nanosystems may contribute importantly for the enhancement of current prevention of infection and antiviral therapies. Recently, it has been suggested that silver nanoparticles (AgNPs bind with external membrane of lipid enveloped virus to prevent the infection. Nevertheless, the interaction of AgNPs with viruses is a largely unexplored field. AgNPs has been studied particularly on HIV where it was demonstrated the mechanism of antiviral action of the nanoparticles as well as the inhibition the transmission of HIV-1 infection in human cervix organ culture. This review discusses recent advances in the understanding of the biocidal mechanisms of action of silver Nanoparticles.

  2. A Broad-Spectrum Integrative Design for Cancer Prevention and Therapy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Block, Keith I.; Gyllenhaal, Charlotte; Lowe, Leroy; Amedei, Amedeo; Amin, A.R.M. Ruhul; Amin, Amr; Aquilano, Katia; Arbiser, Jack; Arreola, Alexandra; Arzumanyan, Alla; Ashraf, S. Salman; Azmi, Asfar S.; Benencia, Fabian; Bhakta, Dipita; Bilsland, Alan; Bishayee, Anupam; Blain, Stacy W.; Block, Penny B.; Boosani, Chandra S.; Carey, Thomas E.; Carnero, Amancio; Carotenuto, Marianeve; Casey, Stephanie C.; Chakrabarti, Mrinmay; Chaturvedi, Rupesh; Chen, Georgia Zhuo; Chen, Helen; Chen, Sophie; Chen, Yi Charlie; Choi, Beom K.; Ciriolo, Maria Rosa; Coley, Helen M.; Collins, Andrew R.; Connell, Marisa; Crawford, Sarah; Curran, Colleen S.; Dabrosin, Charlotta; Damia, Giovanna; Dasgupta, Santanu; DeBerardinis, Ralph J.; Decker, William K.; Dhawan, Punita; Diehl, Anna Mae E.; Dong, Jin-Tang; Dou, Q. Ping; Drew, Janice E.; Elkord, Eyad; El-Rayes, Bassel; Feitelson, Mark A.; Felsher, Dean W.; Ferguson, Lynnette R; Fimognari, Carmela; Firestone, Gary L.; Frezza, Christian; Fujii, Hiromasa; Fuster, Mark M.; Generali, Daniele; Georgakilas, Alexandros G.; Gieseler, Frank; Gilbertson, Michael; Green, Michelle F.; Grue, Brendan; Guha, Gunjan; Halicka, Dorota; Helferich, William G.; Heneberg, Petr; Hentosh, Patricia; Hirschey, Matthew D.; Hofseth, Lorne J.; Holcombe, Randall F.; Honoki, Kanya; Hsu, Hsue-Yin; Huang, Gloria S.; Jensen, Lasse D.; Jiang, Wen G.; Jones, Lee W.; Karpowicz, Phillip A.; Keith, W Nicol; Kerkar, Sid P.; Khan, Gazala N.; Khatami, Mahin; Ko, Young H.; Kucuk, Omer; Kulathinal, Rob J.; Kumar, Nagi B.; Kumara, H.M.C. Shantha; Kwon, Byoung S.; Le, Anne; Lea, Michael A.; Lee, Ho-Young; Lichtor, Terry; Lin, Liang-Tzung; Locasale, Jason W.; Lokeshwar, Bal L.; Longo, Valter D.; Lyssiotis, Costas A.; MacKenzie, Karen L.; Malhotra, Meenakshi; Marino, Maria; Martinez-Chantar, Maria L.; Matheu, Ander; Maxwell, Christopher; McDonnell, Eoin; Meeker, Alan K.; Mehrmohamadi, Mahya; Mehta, Kapil; Michelotti, Gregory A.; Mohammad, Ramzi M.; Mohammed, Sulma I.; Morre, D. James; Muqbil, Irfana; Muralidhar, Vinayak; Murphy, Michael P.; Nagaraju, Ganji Purnachandra; Nahta, Rita; Niccolai, Elena; Nowsheen, Somaira; Panis, Carolina; Pantano, Francesco; Parslow, Virginia R.; Pawelec, Graham; Pedersen, Peter L.; Poore, Brad; Poudyal, Deepak; Prakash, Satya; Prince, Mark; Raffaghello, Lizzia; Rathmell, Jeffrey C.; Rathmell, W. Kimryn; Ray, Swapan K.; Reichrath, Jörg; Rezazadeh, Sarallah; Ribatti, Domenico; Ricciardiello, Luigi; Robey, R. Brooks; Rodier, Francis; Rupasinghe, H.P. Vasantha; Russo, Gian Luigi; Ryan, Elizabeth P.; Samadi, Abbas K.; Sanchez-Garcia, Isidro; Sanders, Andrew J.; Santini, Daniele; Sarkar, Malancha; Sasada, Tetsuro; Saxena, Neeraj K.; Shackelford, Rodney E; Sharma, Dipali; Shin, Dong M.; Sidransky, David; Siegelin, Markus David; Signori, Emanuela; Singh, Neetu; Sivanand, Sharanya; Sliva, Daniel; Smythe, Carl; Spagnuolo, Carmela; Stafforini, Diana M.; Stagg, John; Subbarayan, Pochi R.; Sundin, Tabetha; Talib, Wamidh H.; Thompson, Sarah K.; Tran, Phuoc T.; Ungefroren, Hendrik; Vander Heiden, Matthew G.; Venkateswaran, Vasundara; Vinay, Dass S.; Vlachostergios, Panagiotis J.; Wang, Zongwei; Wellen, Kathryn E.; Whelan, Richard L.; Yang, Eddy S.; Yang, Huanjie; Yang, Xujuan; Yaswen, Paul; Yedjou, Clement; Yin, Xin; Zhu, Jiyue; Zollo, Massimo

    2016-01-01

    Targeted therapies and the consequent adoption of “personalized” oncology have achieved notable successes in some cancers; however, significant problems remain with this approach. Many targeted therapies are highly toxic, costs are extremely high, and most patients experience relapse after a few disease-free months. Relapses arise from genetic heterogeneity in tumors, which harbor therapy-resistant immortalized cells that have adopted alternate and compensatory pathways (i.e., pathways that are not reliant upon the same mechanisms as those which have been targeted). To address these limitations, an international task force of 180 scientists was assembled to explore the concept of a low-toxicity “broad-spectrum” therapeutic approach that could simultaneously target many key pathways and mechanisms. Using cancer hallmark phenotypes and the tumor microenvironment to account for the various aspects of relevant cancer biology, interdisciplinary teams reviewed each hallmark area and nominated a wide range of high-priority targets (74 in total) that could be modified to improve patient outcomes. For these targets, corresponding low-toxicity therapeutic approaches were then suggested; many of which were phytochemicals. Proposed actions on each target and all of the approaches were further reviewed for known effects on other hallmark areas and the tumor microenvironment. Potential contrary or procarcinogenic effects were found for 3.9% of the relationships between targets and hallmarks, and mixed evidence of complementary and contrary relationships was found for 7.1%. Approximately 67% of the relationships revealed potentially complementary effects, and the remainder had no known relationship. Among the approaches, 1.1% had contrary, 2.8% had mixed and 62.1% had complementary relationships. These results suggest that a broad-spectrum approach should be feasible from a safety standpoint. This novel approach has potential to help us address disease relapse, which is a

  3. Broad-spectrum L-amino acid sensing by class 3 G-protein-coupled receptors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Conigrave, Arthur D; Hampson, David R

    2006-12-01

    The sensing of nutrients is essential to the control of growth and metabolism. Although the sensing mechanisms responsible for the detection and coordination of metabolic responses to some nutrients, most notably glucose, are well understood, the molecular basis of amino acid sensing by cells and tissues is only now emerging. In this article, we consider evidence that some members of G-protein-coupled receptor class 3 are broad-spectrum amino acid sensors that couple changes in extracellular amino acid levels to the activation of intracellular signaling pathways. In particular, we consider both the molecular basis of specific and broad-spectrum amino acid sensing by different members of class 3 and the physiological significance of broad spectrum amino acid sensing by the extracellular calcium-sensing receptor, heterodimeric taste receptors and the recently "deorphanized" receptor GPRC6A and its goldfish homolog, the 5.24 chemoreceptor.

  4. Expression of mouse beta defensin 2 in Escherichia coli and its broad-spectrum antimicrobial activity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tianxiang Gong

    2011-09-01

    Full Text Available Mature mouse beta defensin 2 (mBD2 is a small cationic peptide with antimicrobial activity. Here we established a prokaryotic expression vector containing the cDNA of mature mBD2 fused with thioredoxin (TrxA, pET32a-mBD2. The vector was transformed into Escherichia Coli (E. coli Rosseta-gami (2 for expression fusion protein. Under the optimization of fermentation parameters: induce with 0.6 mM isopropylthiogalactoside (IPTG at 34ºC in 2×YT medium and harvest at 6 h postinduction, fusion protein TrxA-mBD2 was high expressed in the soluble fraction (>95%. After cleaved fusion protein by enterokinase, soluble mature mBD2 was achieved 6 mg/L with a volumetric productivity. Purified recombinant mBD2 demonstrated clear broad-spectrum antimicrobial activity for fungi, bacteria and virus. The MIC of antibacterial activity of against Staphylococcus aureus was 50 µg/ml. The MIC of against Candida albicans (C. albicans and Cryptococcus neoformans (C. neoformans was 12.5µg/ml and 25µg/ml, respectively. Also, the antimicrobial activity of mBD2 was effected by NaCl concentration. Additionally, mBD2 showed antiviral activity against influenza A virus (IAV, the protective rate for Madin-Darby canine kidney cells (MDCK was 93.86% at the mBD2 concentration of 100 µg/ml. These works might provide a foundation for the following research on the mBD2 as therapeutic agent for medical microbes.

  5. Inhibition of an Aquatic Rhabdovirus Demonstrates Promise of a Broad-Spectrum Antiviral for Use in Aquaculture.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Balmer, Bethany F; Powers, Rachel L; Zhang, Ting-Hu; Lee, Jihye; Vigant, Frederic; Lee, Benhur; Jung, Michael E; Purcell, Maureen K; Snekvik, Kevin; Aguilar, Hector C

    2017-02-15

    Many enveloped viruses cause devastating disease in aquaculture, resulting in significant economic impact. LJ001 is a broad-spectrum antiviral compound that inhibits enveloped virus infections by specifically targeting phospholipids in the lipid bilayer via the production of singlet oxygen (1O2). This stabilizes positive curvature and decreases membrane fluidity, which inhibits virus-cell membrane fusion during viral entry. Based on data from previous mammalian studies and the requirement of light for the activation of LJ001, we hypothesized that LJ001 may be useful as a preventative and/or therapeutic agent for infections by enveloped viruses in aquaculture. Here, we report that LJ001 was more stable with a prolonged inhibitory half-life at relevant aquaculture temperatures (15°C), than in mammalian studies at 37°C. When LJ001 was preincubated with our model virus, infectious hematopoietic necrosis virus (IHNV), infectivity was significantly inhibited in vitro (using the epithelioma papulosum cyprini [EPC] fish cell line) and in vivo (using rainbow trout fry) in a dose-dependent and time-dependent manner. While horizontal transmission of IHNV in a static cohabitation challenge model was reduced by LJ001, transmission was not completely blocked at established antiviral doses. Therefore, LJ001 may be best suited as a therapeutic for aquaculture settings that include viral infections with lower virus-shedding rates than IHNV or where higher viral titers are required to initiate infection of naive fish. Importantly, our data also suggest that LJ001-inactivated IHNV elicited an innate immune response in the rainbow trout host, making LJ001 potentially useful for future vaccination approaches. Viral diseases in aquaculture are challenging because there are few preventative measures and/or treatments. Broad-spectrum antivirals are highly sought after and studied because they target common components of viruses. In our studies, we used LJ001, a broad-spectrum antiviral

  6. A Potent, Broad-Spectrum Antiviral Agent that Targets Viral Membranes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jason A. Wojcechowskyj

    2010-05-01

    Full Text Available Commentary on Wolf, M.C.; Freiberg, A.N.; Zhang, T.; Akyol-Ataman, Z.; Grock, A.; Hong, P.W.; Li, J.; Watson, N.F.; Fang, A.Q.; Aguilar, H.C.; et al. A broad-spectrum antiviral targeting entry of enveloped viruses. Proc. Natl. Acad. Sci. U. S. A. 2010, 107, 3157-3162.

  7. Factors influencing success of clinical genome sequencing across a broad spectrum of disorders

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Taylor, Jenny C; Martin, Hilary C; Lise, Stefano

    2015-01-01

    To assess factors influencing the success of whole-genome sequencing for mainstream clinical diagnosis, we sequenced 217 individuals from 156 independent cases or families across a broad spectrum of disorders in whom previous screening had identified no pathogenic variants. We quantified the numb...

  8. Dissemination and genetic support of broad-spectrum beta-lactam ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Dissemination and genetic support of broad-spectrum beta-lactam-resistant. Escherichia coli strain isolated from two Tunisian hospitals during 2004-2012. Khaoula Ayari1, Amel Bourouis1, Hela Chihi1, Sihem Mahrouki1, Thierry Naas2, Omrane Belhadj1. 1. Laboratory of Biochemistry and technobiology, Faculty of ...

  9. Novel water-based antiseptic lotion demonstrates rapid, broad-spectrum kill compared with alcohol antiseptic.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Czerwinski, Steven E; Cozean, Jesse; Cozean, Colette

    2014-01-01

    A novel alcohol-based antiseptic and a novel water-based antiseptic lotion, both with a synergistic combination of antimicrobial ingredients containing 0.2% benzethonium chloride, were evaluated using the standard time-kill method against 25 FDA-specified challenge microorganisms. The purpose of the testing was to determine whether a non-alcohol product could have equivalent rapid and broad-spectrum kill to a traditional alcohol sanitizer. Both the alcohol- and water-based products showed rapid and broad-spectrum antimicrobial activity. The average 15-s kill was 99.999% of the challenge organism for the alcohol-based antiseptic and 99.971% for the water-based antiseptic. The alcohol-based product demonstrated 100% of peak efficacy (60s) within the first 15s, whereas the water-based product showed 99.97%. The novel alcohol-based antiseptic reduced concentrations of 100% of organisms by 99.999%, whereas the water-based antiseptic lotion showed the same reduction for 96% of organisms. A novel water-based antiseptic product demonstrated equivalent rapid, broad-spectrum antimicrobial activity to an alcohol-based sanitizer and provided additional benefits of reduced irritation, persistent effect, and greater efficacy against common viruses. The combination of rapid, broad-spectrum immediate kill and persistent efficacy against pathogens may have significant clinical benefit in limiting the spread of disease. Copyright © 2014 King Saud Bin Abdulaziz University for Health Sciences. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  10. Broad-Spectrum Antibiotic Treatment and Subsequent Childhood Type 1 Diabetes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Clausen, Tine D; Bergholt, Thomas; Bouaziz, Olivier

    2016-01-01

    of childhood type 1 diabetes and the potential effect-modification by mode of delivery. MATERIALS AND METHODS: A Danish nationwide cohort study including all singletons born during 1997-2010. End of follow-up by December 2012. Four national registers provided information on antibiotic redemptions, outcome...... and confounders. Redemptions of antibiotic prescriptions during the first two years of life was classified into narrow-spectrum or broad-spectrum antibiotics. Children were followed from age two to fourteen, both inclusive. The risk of type 1 diabetes with onset before the age of 15 years was assessed by Cox...... regression. A total of 858,201 singletons contributed 5,906,069 person-years, during which 1,503 children developed type 1 diabetes. RESULTS: Redemption of broad-spectrum antibiotics during the first two years of life was associated with an increased rate of type 1 diabetes during the following 13 years...

  11. Synthesis and Broad-Spectrum Antiviral Activity of Some Novel Benzo-Heterocyclic Amine Compounds

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Da-Jun Zhang

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available A series of novel unsaturated five-membered benzo-heterocyclic amine derivatives were synthesized and assayed to determine their in vitro broad-spectrum antiviral activities. The biological results showed that most of our synthesized compounds exhibited potent broad-spectrum antiviral activity. Notably, compounds 3f (IC50 = 3.21–5.06 μM and 3g (IC50 = 0.71–34.87 μM showed potent activity towards both RNA viruses (influenza A, HCV and Cox B3 virus and a DNA virus (HBV at low micromolar concentrations. An SAR study showed that electron-withdrawing substituents located on the aromatic or heteroaromatic ring favored antiviral activity towards RNA viruses.

  12. Artificial TALE as a Convenient Protein Platform for Engineering Broad-Spectrum Resistance to Begomoviruses

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xiaofei Cheng

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available Transcription activator–like effectors (TALEs are a class of sequence-specific DNA-binding proteins that utilize a simple and predictable modality to recognize target DNA. This unique characteristic allows for the rapid assembly of artificial TALEs, with high DNA binding specificity, to any target DNA sequences for the creation of customizable sequence-specific nucleases used in genome engineering. Here, we report the use of an artificial TALE protein as a convenient platform for designing broad-spectrum resistance to begomoviruses, one of the most destructive plant virus groups, which cause tremendous losses worldwide. We showed that artificial TALEs, which were assembled based on conserved sequence motifs within begomovirus genomes, could confer partial resistance in transgenic Nicotiana benthamiana to all three begomoviruses tested. Furthermore, the resistance was maintained even in the presence of their betasatellite. These results shed new light on the development of broad-spectrum resistance against DNA viruses, such as begomoviruses.

  13. The Probiotic Compound VSL#3 Modulates Mucosal, Peripheral, and Systemic Immunity Following Murine Broad-Spectrum Antibiotic Treatment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ira Ekmekciu

    2017-05-01

    Full Text Available There is compelling evidence linking the commensal intestinal microbiota with host health and, in turn, antibiotic induced perturbations of microbiota composition with distinct pathologies. Despite the attractiveness of probiotic therapy as a tool to beneficially alter the intestinal microbiota, its immunological effects are still incompletely understood. The aim of the present study was to assess the efficacy of the probiotic formulation VSL#3 consisting of eight distinct bacterial species (including Streptococcus thermophilus, Bifidobacterium breve, B. longum, B. infantis, Lactobacillus acidophilus, L. plantarum, L. paracasei, and L. delbrueckii subsp. Bulgaricus in reversing immunological effects of microbiota depletion as compared to reassociation with a complex murine microbiota. To address this, conventional mice were subjected to broad-spectrum antibiotic therapy for 8 weeks and perorally reassociated with either VSL#3 bacteria or a complex murine microbiota. VSL#3 recolonization resulted in restored CD4+ and CD8+ cell numbers in the small and large intestinal lamina propria as well as in B220+ cell numbers in the former, whereas probiotic intervention was not sufficient to reverse the antibiotic induced changes of respective cell populations in the spleen. However, VSL#3 application was as efficient as complex microbiota reassociation to attenuate the frequencies of regulatory T cells, activated dendritic cells and memory/effector T cells in the small intestine, colon, mesenteric lymph nodes, and spleen. Whereas broad-spectrum antibiotic treatment resulted in decreased production of cytokines such as IFN-γ, IL-17, IL-22, and IL-10 by CD4+ cells in respective immunological compartments, VSL#3 recolonization was sufficient to completely recover the expression of the anti-inflammatory cytokine IL-10 without affecting pro-inflammatory mediators. In summary, the probiotic compound VSL#3 has an extensive impact on mucosal, peripheral, and

  14. Broad-spectrum transgenic resistance against distinct tospovirus species at the genus level.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peng, Jui-Chu; Chen, Tsung-Chi; Raja, Joseph A J; Yang, Ching-Fu; Chien, Wan-Chu; Lin, Chen-Hsuan; Liu, Fang-Lin; Wu, Hui-Wen; Yeh, Shyi-Dong

    2014-01-01

    Thrips-borne tospoviruses cause severe damage to crops worldwide. In this investigation, tobacco lines transgenic for individual WLm constructs containing the conserved motifs of the L RNA-encoded RNA-dependent RNA polymerase (L) gene of Watermelon silver mottle virus (WSMoV) were generated by Agrobacterium-mediated transformation. The WLm constructs included: (i) translatable WLm in a sense orientation; (ii) untranslatable WLmt with two stop codons; (iii) untranslatable WLmts with stop codons and a frame-shift; (iv) untranslatable antisense WLmA; and (v) WLmhp with an untranslatable inverted repeat of WLm containing the tospoviral S RNA 3'-terminal consensus sequence (5'-ATTGCTCT-3') and an NcoI site as a linker to generate a double-stranded hairpin transcript. A total of 46.7-70.0% transgenic tobacco lines derived from individual constructs showed resistance to the homologous WSMoV; 35.7-100% plants of these different WSMoV-resistant lines exhibited broad-spectrum resistance against four other serologically unrelated tospoviruses Tomato spotted wilt virus, Groundnut yellow spot virus, Impatiens necrotic spot virus and Groundnut chlorotic fan-spot virus. The selected transgenic tobacco lines also exhibited broad-spectrum resistance against five additional tospoviruses from WSMoV and Iris yellow spot virus clades, but not against RNA viruses from other genera. Northern analyses indicated that the broad-spectrum resistance is mediated by RNA silencing. To validate the L conserved region resistance in vegetable crops, the constructs were also used to generate transgenic tomato lines, which also showed effective resistance against WSMoV and other tospoviruses. Thus, our approach of using the conserved motifs of tospoviral L gene as a transgene generates broad-spectrum resistance against tospoviruses at the genus level.

  15. Broad-spectrum transgenic resistance against distinct tospovirus species at the genus level.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jui-Chu Peng

    Full Text Available Thrips-borne tospoviruses cause severe damage to crops worldwide. In this investigation, tobacco lines transgenic for individual WLm constructs containing the conserved motifs of the L RNA-encoded RNA-dependent RNA polymerase (L gene of Watermelon silver mottle virus (WSMoV were generated by Agrobacterium-mediated transformation. The WLm constructs included: (i translatable WLm in a sense orientation; (ii untranslatable WLmt with two stop codons; (iii untranslatable WLmts with stop codons and a frame-shift; (iv untranslatable antisense WLmA; and (v WLmhp with an untranslatable inverted repeat of WLm containing the tospoviral S RNA 3'-terminal consensus sequence (5'-ATTGCTCT-3' and an NcoI site as a linker to generate a double-stranded hairpin transcript. A total of 46.7-70.0% transgenic tobacco lines derived from individual constructs showed resistance to the homologous WSMoV; 35.7-100% plants of these different WSMoV-resistant lines exhibited broad-spectrum resistance against four other serologically unrelated tospoviruses Tomato spotted wilt virus, Groundnut yellow spot virus, Impatiens necrotic spot virus and Groundnut chlorotic fan-spot virus. The selected transgenic tobacco lines also exhibited broad-spectrum resistance against five additional tospoviruses from WSMoV and Iris yellow spot virus clades, but not against RNA viruses from other genera. Northern analyses indicated that the broad-spectrum resistance is mediated by RNA silencing. To validate the L conserved region resistance in vegetable crops, the constructs were also used to generate transgenic tomato lines, which also showed effective resistance against WSMoV and other tospoviruses. Thus, our approach of using the conserved motifs of tospoviral L gene as a transgene generates broad-spectrum resistance against tospoviruses at the genus level.

  16. A Novel Surfactant Nanoemulsion with Broad Spectrum Sporicidal Activity against Bacillus Species

    Science.gov (United States)

    1999-12-01

    1939 A Novel Surfactant Nanoemulsion with Broad-Spectrum Sporicidal Activity against Bacillus Species Tarek Hamouda,1 Michael M. Hayes,1,a Zhengyi... nanoemulsions , BCTP and BCTP 401, have been developed. These emulsions are composed of detergents and oils in 80% water. BCTP diluted up to 1 : 1000...was reduced 3-fold. These nanoemulsion formulas are stable, easily dispersed, nonirritant, and nontoxic compared with other available sporicidal

  17. A comparison of effects of broad-spectrum antibiotics and biosurfactants on established bacterial biofilms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Quinn, Gerry A; Maloy, Aaron P; Banat, Malik M; Banat, Ibrahim M

    2013-11-01

    Current antibiofilm solutions based on planktonic bacterial physiology have limited efficacy in clinical and occasionally environmental settings. This has prompted a search for suitable alternatives to conventional therapies. This study compares the inhibitory properties of two biological surfactants (rhamnolipids and a plant-derived surfactant) against a selection of broad-spectrum antibiotics (ampicillin, chloramphenicol and kanamycin). Testing was carried out on a range of bacterial physiologies from planktonic and mixed bacterial biofilms. Rhamnolipids (Rhs) have been extensively characterised for their role in the development of biofilms and inhibition of planktonic bacteria. However, there are limited direct comparisons with antimicrobial substances on established biofilms comprising single or mixed bacterial strains. Baseline measurements of inhibitory activity using planktonic bacterial assays established that broad-spectrum antibiotics were 500 times more effective at inhibiting bacterial growth than either Rhs or plant surfactants. Conversely, Rhs and plant biosurfactants reduced biofilm biomass of established single bacterial biofilms by 74-88 and 74-98 %, respectively. Only kanamycin showed activity against biofilms of Bacillus subtilis and Staphylococcus aureus. Broad-spectrum antibiotics were also ineffective against a complex biofilm of marine bacteria; however, Rhs and plant biosurfactants reduced biofilm biomass by 69 and 42 %, respectively. These data suggest that Rhs and plant-derived surfactants may have an important role in the inhibition of complex biofilms.

  18. Broad spectrum antiviral activity of favipiravir (T-705: protection from highly lethal inhalational Rift Valley Fever.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Amy L Caroline

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Development of antiviral drugs that have broad-spectrum activity against a number of viral infections would be of significant benefit. Due to the evolution of resistance to currently licensed antiviral drugs, development of novel anti-influenza drugs is in progress, including Favipiravir (T-705, which is currently in human clinical trials. T-705 displays broad-spectrum in vitro activity against a number of viruses, including Rift Valley Fever virus (RVFV. RVF is an important neglected tropical disease that causes human, agricultural, and economic losses in endemic regions. RVF has the capacity to emerge in new locations and also presents a potential bioterrorism threat. In the current study, the in vivo efficacy of T-705 was evaluated in Wistar-Furth rats infected with the virulent ZH501 strain of RVFV by the aerosol route. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: Wistar-Furth rats are highly susceptible to a rapidly lethal disease after parenteral or inhalational exposure to the pathogenic ZH501 strain of RVFV. In the current study, two experiments were performed: a dose-determination study and a delayed-treatment study. In both experiments, all untreated control rats succumbed to disease. Out of 72 total rats infected with RVFV and treated with T-705, only 6 succumbed to disease. The remaining 66 rats (92% survived lethal infection with no significant weight loss or fever. The 6 treated rats that succumbed survived significantly longer before succumbing to encephalitic disease. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: Currently, there are no licensed antiviral drugs for treating RVF. Here, T-705 showed remarkable efficacy in a highly lethal rat model of Rift Valley Fever, even when given up to 48 hours post-infection. This is the first study to show protection of rats infected with the pathogenic ZH501 strain of RVFV. Our data suggest that T-705 has potential to be a broad-spectrum antiviral drug.

  19. Hexagonal 2H-MoSe2 broad spectrum active photocatalyst for Cr(VI) reduction

    OpenAIRE

    Haipeng Chu; Xinjuan Liu; Baibai Liu; Guang Zhu; Wenyan Lei; Huigang Du; Junying Liu; Jianwei Li; Can Li; Changqing Sun

    2016-01-01

    To make full use of the solar energy, exploring broad spectrum active photocatalysts has become one of the core issues for photocatalysis. Here we report a novel hexagonal 2H-MoSe2 photocatalyst with ultraviolet (UV)-visible-near infrared (NIR) light response for the first time. The results indicate that the MoSe2 displays excellent photo-absorption and photocatalytic activity in the reduction of Cr(VI) under UV and visible even NIR light irradiation. MoSe2 synthesized at pH value of 2 achiev...

  20. Hexagonal 2H-MoSe2 broad spectrum active photocatalyst for Cr(VI) reduction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chu, Haipeng; Liu, Xinjuan; Liu, Baibai; Zhu, Guang; Lei, Wenyan; Du, Huigang; Liu, Junying; Li, Jianwei; Li, Can; Sun, Changqing

    2016-10-01

    To make full use of the solar energy, exploring broad spectrum active photocatalysts has become one of the core issues for photocatalysis. Here we report a novel hexagonal 2H-MoSe2 photocatalyst with ultraviolet (UV)-visible-near infrared (NIR) light response for the first time. The results indicate that the MoSe2 displays excellent photo-absorption and photocatalytic activity in the reduction of Cr(VI) under UV and visible even NIR light irradiation. MoSe2 synthesized at pH value of 2 achieves the highest Cr(VI) reduction rates of 99%, 91% and 100% under UV, visible and NIR light irradiation, respectively, which should be attributed to its comparatively higher light absorption, efficient charge separation and transfer as well as relatively large number of surface active sites. The excellent broad spectrum active photocatalytic activity makes the MoSe2 to be a promising photocatalyst for the effective utilization of solar energy.

  1. Identification and Structural Characterization of Naturally-Occurring Broad-Spectrum Cyclic Antibiotics Isolated from Paenibacillus

    Science.gov (United States)

    Knolhoff, Ann M.; Zheng, Jie; McFarland, Melinda A.; Luo, Yan; Callahan, John H.; Brown, Eric W.; Croley, Timothy R.

    2015-08-01

    The rise of antimicrobial resistance necessitates the discovery and/or production of novel antibiotics. Isolated strains of Paenibacillus alvei were previously shown to exhibit antimicrobial activity against a number of pathogens, such as E. coli, Salmonella, and methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA). The responsible antimicrobial compounds were isolated from these Paenibacillus strains and a combination of low and high resolution mass spectrometry with multiple-stage tandem mass spectrometry was used for identification. A group of closely related cyclic lipopeptides was identified, differing primarily by fatty acid chain length and one of two possible amino acid substitutions. Variation in the fatty acid length resulted in mass differences of 14 Da and yielded groups of related MSn spectra. Despite the inherent complexity of MS/MS spectra of cyclic compounds, straightforward analysis of these spectra was accomplished by determining differences in complementary product ion series between compounds that differ in molecular weight by 14 Da. The primary peptide sequence assignment was confirmed through genome mining; the combination of these analytical tools represents a workflow that can be used for the identification of complex antibiotics. The compounds also share amino acid sequence similarity to a previously identified broad-spectrum antibiotic isolated from Paenibacillus. The presence of such a wide distribution of related compounds produced by the same organism represents a novel class of broad-spectrum antibiotic compounds.

  2. Towards establishing broad-spectrum disease resistance in plants: silicon leads the way.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Van Bockhaven, Jonas; De Vleesschauwer, David; Höfte, Monica

    2013-03-01

    Plants are constantly threatened by a wide array of microbial pathogens. Pathogen invasion can lead to vast yield losses and the demand for sustainable plant-protection strategies has never been greater. Chemical plant activators and selected strains of rhizobacteria can increase resistance against specific types of pathogens but these treatments are often ineffective or even cause susceptibility against others. Silicon application is one of the scarce examples of a treatment that effectively induces broad-spectrum disease resistance. The prophylactic effect of silicon is considered to be the result of both passive and active defences. Although the phenomenon has been known for decades, very little is known about the molecular basis of silicon-afforded disease control. By combining knowledge on how silicon interacts with cell metabolism in diatoms and plants, this review describes silicon-induced regulatory mechanisms that might account for broad-spectrum plant disease resistance. Priming of plant immune responses, alterations in phytohormone homeostasis, regulation of iron homeostasis, silicon-driven photorespiration and interaction with defence signalling components all are potential mechanisms involved in regulating silicon-triggered resistance responses. Further elucidating how silicon exerts its beneficial properties may create new avenues for developing plants that are better able to withstand multiple attackers.

  3. Biological activity of sedaxane---a novel broad-spectrum fungicide for seed treatment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zeun, Ronald; Scalliet, Gabriel; Oostendorp, Michael

    2013-04-01

    Sedaxane is a new broad-spectrum seed treatment fungicide developed by Syngenta Crop Protection for control of seed- and soil-borne diseases in a broad range of crops. Its physicochemical properties and activity spectrum have been optimised for use as a seed treatment providing both local and systemic protection of the seed and roots of target crops. Sedaxane inhibits respiration by binding to the succinate dehydrogenase complex in the fungal mitochondrium. Its activity spectrum covers seed-borne fungi such as Ustilago nuda, Tilletia caries, Monographella nivalis and Pyrenophora graminea, as well as the soil-borne fungi Rhizoctonia solani, R. cerealis and Typhula incarnata. Under greenhouse conditions, sedaxane showed high levels and consistent protection against U. nuda, P. graminea and Rhizoctonia spp. Under field conditions, efficacy against Rhizoctonia spp. resulted in increased yield compared with the untreated check. Efficacy against snow mould has been shown under very high disease pressure conditions. The combination of sedaxane plus fludioxonil against snow mould can provide resistance management for sustainable use. The broad spectrum and high level of activity in combination with excellent crop tolerance allow the use of sedaxane as a seed treatment in a wide variety of crops. It is a potential tool for precautionary resistance management when combined with other fungicides, especially against pathogens showing a potential for resistance development, such as M. nivalis. © 2012 Society of Chemical Industry.

  4. Insight into the mechanism of action of temporin-SHa, a new broad-spectrum antiparasitic and antibacterial agent

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Zahid Raja; Sonia André; Feten Abbassi; Vincent Humblot; Olivier Lequin; Tahar Bouceba; Isabelle Correia; Sandra Casale; Thierry Foulon; Denis Sereno; Bruno Oury; Ali Ladram

    2017-01-01

    ...), a small broad-spectrum AMP previously shown to be active against Leishmania infantum. To improve activity, we designed analogs of SHa and compared the antibacterial and antiparasitic mechanisms. [K3...

  5. Trends in broad-spectrum antibiotic prescribing for children with acute otitis media in the United States, 1998?2004

    OpenAIRE

    Coco, Andrew S; Horst, Michael A; Gambler, Angela S

    2009-01-01

    Abstract Background Overuse of broad-spectrum antibiotics is associated with antibiotic resistance. Acute otitis media (AOM) is responsible for a large proportion of antibiotics prescribed for US children. Rates of broad-spectrum antibiotic prescribing for AOM are unknown. Methods Analysis of the National Ambulatory Medical Care Survey and National Hospital Ambulatory Medical Care Survey, 1998 to 2004 (N = 6,878). Setting is office-based physicians, hospital outpatient departments, and emerge...

  6. Vancomycin and Five Broad-spectrum Antibiotic Utilization Evaluation in an Educational Medical Center in One Year

    OpenAIRE

    SiminDokht Shoaei; Aliasghar Bagherzadeh; Mehrdad Haghighi; Meinoosh Shabani

    2015-01-01

     Background: Antibiotics can be life saving if they are used correctly, and can have unwanted side effects specially resistance with incorrect use. Unfortunately in fear of no response, physicians use broad spectrum antibiotics meticulously. In this Drug Utilization Evaluation (DUE), improper use of Vancomycin and five broad-spectrum antibiotics are studied to find faults and solution for this problem. Methods:This descriptive cross-sectional study performed during the March of 2012 to March ...

  7. Tricyclic GyrB/ParE (TriBE inhibitors: a new class of broad-spectrum dual-targeting antibacterial agents.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Leslie W Tari

    Full Text Available Increasing resistance to every major class of antibiotics and a dearth of novel classes of antibacterial agents in development pipelines has created a dwindling reservoir of treatment options for serious bacterial infections. The bacterial type IIA topoisomerases, DNA gyrase and topoisomerase IV, are validated antibacterial drug targets with multiple prospective drug binding sites, including the catalytic site targeted by the fluoroquinolone antibiotics. However, growing resistance to fluoroquinolones, frequently mediated by mutations in the drug-binding site, is increasingly limiting the utility of this antibiotic class, prompting the search for other inhibitor classes that target different sites on the topoisomerase complexes. The highly conserved ATP-binding subunits of DNA gyrase (GyrB and topoisomerase IV (ParE have long been recognized as excellent candidates for the development of dual-targeting antibacterial agents with broad-spectrum potential. However, to date, no natural product or small molecule inhibitors targeting these sites have succeeded in the clinic, and no inhibitors of these enzymes have yet been reported with broad-spectrum antibacterial activity encompassing the majority of Gram-negative pathogens. Using structure-based drug design (SBDD, we have created a novel dual-targeting pyrimidoindole inhibitor series with exquisite potency against GyrB and ParE enzymes from a broad range of clinically important pathogens. Inhibitors from this series demonstrate potent, broad-spectrum antibacterial activity against Gram-positive and Gram-negative pathogens of clinical importance, including fluoroquinolone resistant and multidrug resistant strains. Lead compounds have been discovered with clinical potential; they are well tolerated in animals, and efficacious in Gram-negative infection models.

  8. Tricyclic GyrB/ParE (TriBE) inhibitors: a new class of broad-spectrum dual-targeting antibacterial agents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tari, Leslie W; Li, Xiaoming; Trzoss, Michael; Bensen, Daniel C; Chen, Zhiyong; Lam, Thanh; Zhang, Junhu; Lee, Suk Joong; Hough, Grayson; Phillipson, Doug; Akers-Rodriguez, Suzanne; Cunningham, Mark L; Kwan, Bryan P; Nelson, Kirk J; Castellano, Amanda; Locke, Jeff B; Brown-Driver, Vickie; Murphy, Timothy M; Ong, Voon S; Pillar, Chris M; Shinabarger, Dean L; Nix, Jay; Lightstone, Felice C; Wong, Sergio E; Nguyen, Toan B; Shaw, Karen J; Finn, John

    2013-01-01

    Increasing resistance to every major class of antibiotics and a dearth of novel classes of antibacterial agents in development pipelines has created a dwindling reservoir of treatment options for serious bacterial infections. The bacterial type IIA topoisomerases, DNA gyrase and topoisomerase IV, are validated antibacterial drug targets with multiple prospective drug binding sites, including the catalytic site targeted by the fluoroquinolone antibiotics. However, growing resistance to fluoroquinolones, frequently mediated by mutations in the drug-binding site, is increasingly limiting the utility of this antibiotic class, prompting the search for other inhibitor classes that target different sites on the topoisomerase complexes. The highly conserved ATP-binding subunits of DNA gyrase (GyrB) and topoisomerase IV (ParE) have long been recognized as excellent candidates for the development of dual-targeting antibacterial agents with broad-spectrum potential. However, to date, no natural product or small molecule inhibitors targeting these sites have succeeded in the clinic, and no inhibitors of these enzymes have yet been reported with broad-spectrum antibacterial activity encompassing the majority of Gram-negative pathogens. Using structure-based drug design (SBDD), we have created a novel dual-targeting pyrimidoindole inhibitor series with exquisite potency against GyrB and ParE enzymes from a broad range of clinically important pathogens. Inhibitors from this series demonstrate potent, broad-spectrum antibacterial activity against Gram-positive and Gram-negative pathogens of clinical importance, including fluoroquinolone resistant and multidrug resistant strains. Lead compounds have been discovered with clinical potential; they are well tolerated in animals, and efficacious in Gram-negative infection models.

  9. The broad-spectrum antiviral favipiravir protects guinea pigs from lethal Lassa virus infection post-disease onset.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Safronetz, David; Rosenke, Kyle; Westover, Jonna B; Martellaro, Cynthia; Okumura, Atsushi; Furuta, Yousuke; Geisbert, Joan; Saturday, Greg; Komeno, Takashi; Geisbert, Thomas W; Feldmann, Heinz; Gowen, Brian B

    2015-10-12

    With up to 500,000 infections annually, Lassa virus (LASV), the cause of Lassa fever, is one of the most prevalent etiological agents of viral hemorrhagic fever (VHF) in humans. LASV is endemic in several West African countries with sporadic cases and prolonged outbreaks observed most commonly in Sierra Leone, Liberia, Guinea and Nigeria. Additionally several cases of Lassa fever have been imported into North America, Europe and Asia making LASV a global threat to public health. Despite this, currently no approved therapeutic or vaccine exists to treat or prevent LASV infections. Here, using a passaged strain of LASV that is uniformly lethal in Hartley guinea pigs, we demonstrate that favipiravir, a broad-spectrum antiviral agent and leading treatment option for influenza, has potent activity against LASV infection. In this model, once daily treatment with favipiravir significantly reduced viral titers in tissue samples and reduced mortality rates when compared with animals receiving vehicle-only or ribavirin, the current standard of care for Lassa fever. Favipiravir remained highly effective against lethal LASV infection when treatments were initiated nine days post-infection, a time when animals were demonstrating advanced signs of disease. These results support the further preclinical evaluation of favipiravir for Lassa fever and other VHFs.

  10. Broad-spectrum inhibition of HIV-1 by a monoclonal antibody directed against a gp120-induced epitope of CD4.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Samuele E Burastero

    Full Text Available To penetrate susceptible cells, HIV-1 sequentially interacts with two highly conserved cellular receptors, CD4 and a chemokine receptor like CCR5 or CXCR4. Monoclonal antibodies (MAbs directed against such receptors are currently under clinical investigation as potential preventive or therapeutic agents. We immunized Balb/c mice with molecular complexes of the native, trimeric HIV-1 envelope (Env bound to a soluble form of the human CD4 receptor. Sera from immunized mice were found to contain gp120-CD4 complex-enhanced antibodies and showed broad-spectrum HIV-1-inhibitory activity. A proportion of MAbs derived from these mice preferentially recognized complex-enhanced epitopes. In particular, a CD4-specific MAb designated DB81 (IgG1Κ was found to preferentially bind to a complex-enhanced epitope on the D2 domain of human CD4. MAb DB81 also recognized chimpanzee CD4, but not baboon or macaque CD4, which exhibit sequence divergence in the D2 domain. Functionally, MAb DB81 displayed broad HIV-1-inhibitory activity, but it did not exert suppressive effects on T-cell activation in vitro. The variable regions of the heavy and light chains of MAb DB81 were sequenced. Due to its broad-spectrum anti-HIV-1 activity and lack of immunosuppressive effects, a humanized derivative of MAb DB81 could provide a useful complement to current preventive or therapeutic strategies against HIV-1.

  11. Synergistic effect of broad-spectrum Sunscreens and antihistamines in the control of idiopathic solar urticaria

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Faurschou, A.; Wulf, Hans Chr.

    2008-01-01

    . Observations: Three patients with idiopathic solar urticaria underwent phototesting with UV-B and UV-A radiation. The minimal urticarial dose (MUD) was determined 15 minutes after irradiation. The patients were subsequently tested with 5 times the MUD, and the reaction was graded every minute for 15 minutes......Background: It can be difficult to provide patients with idiopathic solar urticaria adequate protection from sunlight. In a nonrandomized controlled trial, we used a standardized phototest procedure to determine the effects of using sunscreen and antihistamine to control idiopathic solar urticaria....... The patients were then treated with a high-protection, broad-spectrum sunscreen and a nonsedative antihistamine alone and in combination and underwent similar phototesting. The use of sunscreen allowed the patients to tolerate much higher doses of UV radiation (32-38 times the MUD on untreated skin...

  12. Analysis of mobile health applications for a broad spectrum of consumers: a user experience approach.

    Science.gov (United States)

    García-Gómez, Juan M; de la Torre-Díez, Isabel; Vicente, Javier; Robles, Montserrat; López-Coronado, Miguel; Rodrigues, Joel J

    2014-03-01

    Mobile health (m-health) apps can bring health prevention and promotion to the general population. The main purpose of this article is to analyze different m-health apps for a broad spectrum of consumers by means of three different experiences. This goal was defined following the strategic documents generated by the main prospective observatories of Information and Communications Technology for health. After a general exploration of the app markets, we analyze the entries of three specific themes focused in this article: type 2 diabetes, obesity, and breast-feeding. The user experiences reported in this study mostly cover the segments of (1) chronically monitored consumers through a Web mobile app for predicting type 2 diabetes (Diab_Alert app), (2) information seekers through a mobile app for maternity (Lactation app) and partially (3) the motivated healthy consumers through a mobile app for a dietetic monitoring and assessment (SapoFit app). These apps were developed by the authors of this work.

  13. Surveillance of broad-spectrum antibiotic prescription in Singaporean hospitals: a 5-year longitudinal study.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yi-Xin Liew

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Inappropriate prescription of antibiotics may contribute towards higher levels antimicrobial resistance. A key intervention for improving appropriate antibiotic prescription is surveillance of prescription. This paper presents the results of a longitudinal surveillance of broad-spectrum antibiotic prescription in 5 public-sector hospitals in Singapore from 2006 to 2010. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: Quarterly antibiotic prescription data were obtained and converted to defined daily doses (DDDs per 1,000 inpatient-days. The presence of significant trends in antibiotic prescription over time for both individual and combined hospitals was tested by regression analysis and corrected for autocorrelation between time-points. Excluding fluoroquinolones, there was a significant increase in prescription of all monitored antibiotics from an average of 233.12 defined daily doses (DDD/1,000 inpatient-days in 2006 to 254.38 DDD/1,000 inpatient-days in 2010 (Coefficient = 1.13, 95%CI: 0.16-2.09, p = 0.025. Increasing utilization of carbapenems, piperacillin/tazobactam, and Gram-positive agents were seen in the majority of the hospitals, while cephalosporins were less prescribed over time. The combined expenditure for 5 hospitals increased from USD9.9 million in 2006 to USD16.7 million in 2010. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: The rate of prescription of broad-spectrum antibiotics in Singaporean hospitals is much higher compared to those of European hospitals. This may be due to high rates of antimicrobial resistance. The increase in expenditure on monitored antibiotics over the past 5 years outstripped the actual increase in DDD/1,000 inpatient-days of antibiotics prescribed. Longitudinal surveillance of antibiotic prescription on a hospital and countrywide level is important for detecting trends for formulating interventions or policies. Further research is needed to understand the causes for the various prescription trends and to act on these where

  14. Broad-Spectrum Inhibition of the CC-Chemokine Class Improves Wound Healing and Wound Angiogenesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ridiandries, Anisyah; Bursill, Christina; Tan, Joanne

    2017-01-13

    Angiogenesis is involved in the inflammation and proliferation stages of wound healing, to bring inflammatory cells to the wound and provide a microvascular network to maintain new tissue formation. An excess of inflammation, however, leads to prolonged wound healing and scar formation, often resulting in unfavourable outcomes such as amputation. CC-chemokines play key roles in the promotion of inflammation and inflammatory-driven angiogenesis. Therefore, inhibition of the CC-chemokine class may improve wound healing. We aimed to determine if the broad-spectrum CC-chemokine inhibitor "35K" could accelerate wound healing in vivo in mice. In a murine wound healing model, 35K protein or phosphate buffered saline (PBS, control) were added topically daily to wounds. Cohorts of mice were assessed in the early stages (four days post-wounding) and in the later stages of wound repair (10 and 21 days post-wounding). Topical application of the 35K protein inhibited CC-chemokine expression (CCL5, CCL2) in wounds and caused enhanced blood flow recovery and wound closure in early-mid stage wounds. In addition, 35K promoted neovascularisation in the early stages of wound repair. Furthermore, 35K treated wounds had significantly lower expression of the p65 subunit of NF-κB, a key inflammatory transcription factor, and augmented wound expression of the pro-angiogenic and pro-repair cytokine TGF-β. These findings show that broad-spectrum CC-chemokine inhibition may be beneficial for the promotion of wound healing.

  15. A mastoparan-derived peptide has broad-spectrum antiviral activity against enveloped viruses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sample, Christopher J; Hudak, Kathryn E; Barefoot, Brice E; Koci, Matthew D; Wanyonyi, Moses S; Abraham, Soman; Staats, Herman F; Ramsburg, Elizabeth A

    2013-10-01

    Broad-spectrum antiviral drugs are urgently needed to treat individuals infected with new and re-emerging viruses, or with viruses that have developed resistance to antiviral therapies. Mammalian natural host defense peptides (mNHP) are short, usually cationic, peptides that have direct antimicrobial activity, and which in some instances activate cell-mediated antiviral immune responses. Although mNHP have potent activity in vitro, efficacy trials in vivo of exogenously provided mNHP have been largely disappointing, and no mNHP are currently licensed for human use. Mastoparan is an invertebrate host defense peptide that penetrates lipid bilayers, and we reasoned that a mastoparan analog might interact with the lipid component of virus membranes and thereby reduce infectivity of enveloped viruses. Our objective was to determine whether mastoparan-derived peptide MP7-NH2 could inactivate viruses of multiple types, and whether it could stimulate cell-mediated antiviral activity. We found that MP7-NH2 potently inactivated a range of enveloped viruses. Consistent with our proposed mechanism of action, MP7-NH2 was not efficacious against a non-enveloped virus. Pre-treatment of cells with MP7-NH2 did not reduce the amount of virus recovered after infection, which suggested that the primary mechanism of action in vitro was direct inactivation of virus by MP7-NH2. These results demonstrate for the first time that a mastoparan derivative has broad-spectrum antiviral activity in vitro and suggest that further investigation of the antiviral properties of mastoparan peptides in vivo is warranted. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  16. Reversal of the Progression of Fatal Coronavirus Infection in Cats by a Broad-Spectrum Coronavirus Protease Inhibitor.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yunjeong Kim

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Coronaviruses infect animals and humans causing a wide range of diseases. The diversity of coronaviruses in many mammalian species is contributed by relatively high mutation and recombination rates during replication. This dynamic nature of coronaviruses may facilitate cross-species transmission and shifts in tissue or cell tropism in a host, resulting in substantial change in virulence. Feline enteric coronavirus (FECV causes inapparent or mild enteritis in cats, but a highly fatal disease, called feline infectious peritonitis (FIP, can arise through mutation of FECV to FIP virus (FIPV. The pathogenesis of FIP is intimately associated with immune responses and involves depletion of T cells, features shared by some other coronaviruses like Severe Acute Respiratory Syndrome Coronavirus. The increasing risks of highly virulent coronavirus infections in humans or animals call for effective antiviral drugs, but no such measures are yet available. Previously, we have reported the inhibitors that target 3C-like protease (3CLpro with broad-spectrum activity against important human and animal coronaviruses. Here, we evaluated the therapeutic efficacy of our 3CLpro inhibitor in laboratory cats with FIP. Experimental FIP is 100% fatal once certain clinical and laboratory signs become apparent. We found that antiviral treatment led to full recovery of cats when treatment was started at a stage of disease that would be otherwise fatal if left untreated. Antiviral treatment was associated with a rapid improvement in fever, ascites, lymphopenia and gross signs of illness and cats returned to normal health within 20 days or less of treatment. Significant reduction in viral titers was also observed in cats. These results indicate that continuous virus replication is required for progression of immune-mediated inflammatory disease of FIP. These findings may provide important insights into devising therapeutic strategies and selection of antiviral compounds for

  17. Reversal of the Progression of Fatal Coronavirus Infection in Cats by a Broad-Spectrum Coronavirus Protease Inhibitor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Yunjeong; Liu, Hongwei; Galasiti Kankanamalage, Anushka C.; Weerasekara, Sahani; Hua, Duy H.; Groutas, William C.; Chang, Kyeong-Ok; Pedersen, Niels C.

    2016-01-01

    Coronaviruses infect animals and humans causing a wide range of diseases. The diversity of coronaviruses in many mammalian species is contributed by relatively high mutation and recombination rates during replication. This dynamic nature of coronaviruses may facilitate cross-species transmission and shifts in tissue or cell tropism in a host, resulting in substantial change in virulence. Feline enteric coronavirus (FECV) causes inapparent or mild enteritis in cats, but a highly fatal disease, called feline infectious peritonitis (FIP), can arise through mutation of FECV to FIP virus (FIPV). The pathogenesis of FIP is intimately associated with immune responses and involves depletion of T cells, features shared by some other coronaviruses like Severe Acute Respiratory Syndrome Coronavirus. The increasing risks of highly virulent coronavirus infections in humans or animals call for effective antiviral drugs, but no such measures are yet available. Previously, we have reported the inhibitors that target 3C-like protease (3CLpro) with broad-spectrum activity against important human and animal coronaviruses. Here, we evaluated the therapeutic efficacy of our 3CLpro inhibitor in laboratory cats with FIP. Experimental FIP is 100% fatal once certain clinical and laboratory signs become apparent. We found that antiviral treatment led to full recovery of cats when treatment was started at a stage of disease that would be otherwise fatal if left untreated. Antiviral treatment was associated with a rapid improvement in fever, ascites, lymphopenia and gross signs of illness and cats returned to normal health within 20 days or less of treatment. Significant reduction in viral titers was also observed in cats. These results indicate that continuous virus replication is required for progression of immune-mediated inflammatory disease of FIP. These findings may provide important insights into devising therapeutic strategies and selection of antiviral compounds for further

  18. Inhibition of an aquatic rhabdovirus demonstrates promise of a broad-spectrum antiviral for use in aquaculture

    Science.gov (United States)

    Balmer, Bethany F.; Powers, Rachel L.; Zhang, Ting-Hu; Lee, Jihye; Vigant, Frederic; Lee, Benhur; Jung, Michael E.; Purcell, Maureen K.; Snekvik, Kevin; Aguilar, Hector C.

    2017-01-01

    Many enveloped viruses cause devastating disease in aquaculture, resulting in significant economic impact. LJ001 is a broad-spectrum antiviral compound that inhibits enveloped virus infections by specifically targeting phospholipids in the lipid bilayer via the production of singlet oxygen (1O2). This stabilizes positive curvature and decreases membrane fluidity, which inhibits virus-cell membrane fusion during viral entry. Based on data from previous mammalian studies and the requirement of light for the activation of LJ001, we hypothesized that LJ001 may be useful as a preventative and/or therapeutic agent for infections by enveloped viruses in aquaculture. Here, we report that LJ001 was more stable with a prolonged inhibitory half-life at relevant aquaculture temperatures (15°C), than in mammalian studies at 37°C. When LJ001 was preincubated with our model virus, infectious hematopoietic necrosis virus (IHNV), infectivity was significantly inhibited in vitro (using the epithelioma papulosum cyprini [EPC] fish cell line) and in vivo (using rainbow trout fry) in a dose-dependent and time-dependent manner. While horizontal transmission of IHNV in a static cohabitation challenge model was reduced by LJ001, transmission was not completely blocked at established antiviral doses. Therefore, LJ001 may be best suited as a therapeutic for aquaculture settings that include viral infections with lower virus-shedding rates than IHNV or where higher viral titers are required to initiate infection of naive fish. Importantly, our data also suggest that LJ001-inactivated IHNV elicited an innate immune response in the rainbow trout host, making LJ001 potentially useful for future vaccination approaches.

  19. Trends in broad-spectrum antibiotic prescribing for children with acute otitis media in the United States, 1998–2004

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gambler Angela S

    2009-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Overuse of broad-spectrum antibiotics is associated with antibiotic resistance. Acute otitis media (AOM is responsible for a large proportion of antibiotics prescribed for US children. Rates of broad-spectrum antibiotic prescribing for AOM are unknown. Methods Analysis of the National Ambulatory Medical Care Survey and National Hospital Ambulatory Medical Care Survey, 1998 to 2004 (N = 6,878. Setting is office-based physicians, hospital outpatient departments, and emergency departments. Patients are children aged 12 years and younger prescribed antibiotics for acute otitis media. Main outcome measure is percentage of broad-spectrum antibiotics, defined as amoxicillin/clavulanate, macrolides, cephalosporins and quinolones. Results Broad-spectrum prescribing for acute otitis media increased from 34% of visits in 1998 to 45% of visits in 2004 (P Conclusion Prescribing of broad-spectrum antibiotics for acute otitis media has steadily increased from 1998 to 2004. Associations with non-clinical factors suggest potential for improvement in prescribing practice.

  20. Development and characterization of novel chimeric monoclonal antibodies for broad spectrum neutralization of rabies virus.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pan Kyeom Kim

    Full Text Available Current post-exposure prophylaxis for rabies virus infection has several limitations in terms of supply, cost, safety, and efficacy. Attempts to replace human or equine rabies immune globulins (HRIG or ERIG have been made by several companies and institutes. We developed potent monoclonal antibodies to neutralize a broad spectrum of rabies viruses by screening hybridomas received from the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC. Two kinds of chimeric human antibodies (chimeric #7 and #17 were constructed by cloning the variable regions from selected hybridomas and the constant region of a human antibody. Two antibodies were bound to antigenic site III and I/IV, respectively, and were able to neutralize 51 field isolates of rabies virus that were isolated at different times and places such as Asia, Africa, North America, South America, and Australia. These two antibodies neutralize rabies viruses with high efficacy in an in vivo test using Syrian hamster and mouse models and show low risk for adverse immunogenicity.

  1. Development of broad-spectrum human monoclonal antibodies for rabies post-exposure prophylaxis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    De Benedictis, Paola; Minola, Andrea; Rota Nodari, Elena; Aiello, Roberta; Zecchin, Barbara; Salomoni, Angela; Foglierini, Mathilde; Agatic, Gloria; Vanzetta, Fabrizia; Lavenir, Rachel; Lepelletier, Anthony; Bentley, Emma; Weiss, Robin; Cattoli, Giovanni; Capua, Ilaria; Sallusto, Federica; Wright, Edward; Lanzavecchia, Antonio; Bourhy, Hervé; Corti, Davide

    2016-04-01

    Currently available rabies post-exposure prophylaxis (PEP) for use in humans includes equine or human rabies immunoglobulins (RIG). The replacement of RIG with an equally or more potent and safer product is strongly encouraged due to the high costs and limited availability of existing RIG. In this study, we identified two broadly neutralizing human monoclonal antibodies that represent a valid and affordable alternative to RIG in rabies PEP. Memory B cells from four selected vaccinated donors were immortalized and monoclonal antibodies were tested for neutralizing activity and epitope specificity. Two antibodies, identified as RVC20 and RVC58 (binding to antigenic site I and III, respectively), were selected for their potency and broad-spectrum reactivity. In vitro, RVC20 and RVC58 were able to neutralize all 35 rabies virus (RABV) and 25 non-RABV lyssaviruses. They showed higher potency and breath compared to antibodies under clinical development (namely CR57, CR4098, and RAB1) and commercially available human RIG. In vivo, the RVC20-RVC58 cocktail protected Syrian hamsters from a lethal RABV challenge and did not affect the endogenous hamster post-vaccination antibody response. © 2016 Humabs BioMed SA Published under the terms of the CC BY 4.0 license.

  2. Development and characterization of novel chimeric monoclonal antibodies for broad spectrum neutralization of rabies virus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Pan Kyeom; Keum, Sun Ju; Osinubi, Modupe O V; Franka, Richard; Shin, Ji Young; Park, Sang Tae; Kim, Man Su; Park, Mi Jung; Lee, Soo Young; Carson, William; Greenberg, Lauren; Yu, Pengcheng; Tao, Xiaoyan; Lihua, Wang; Tang, Qing; Liang, Guodong; Shampur, Madhusdana; Rupprecht, Charles E; Chang, Shin Jae

    2017-01-01

    Current post-exposure prophylaxis for rabies virus infection has several limitations in terms of supply, cost, safety, and efficacy. Attempts to replace human or equine rabies immune globulins (HRIG or ERIG) have been made by several companies and institutes. We developed potent monoclonal antibodies to neutralize a broad spectrum of rabies viruses by screening hybridomas received from the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC). Two kinds of chimeric human antibodies (chimeric #7 and #17) were constructed by cloning the variable regions from selected hybridomas and the constant region of a human antibody. Two antibodies were bound to antigenic site III and I/IV, respectively, and were able to neutralize 51 field isolates of rabies virus that were isolated at different times and places such as Asia, Africa, North America, South America, and Australia. These two antibodies neutralize rabies viruses with high efficacy in an in vivo test using Syrian hamster and mouse models and show low risk for adverse immunogenicity.

  3. Oxabicyclooctane-Linked Novel Bacterial Topoisomerase Inhibitors as Broad Spectrum Antibacterial Agents

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Singh, Sheo B.; Kaelin, David E.; Wu, Jin; Miesel, Lynn; Tan, Christopher M.; Meinke, Peter T.; Olsen, David; Lagrutta, Armando; Bradley, Prudence; Lu, Jun; Patel, Sangita; Rickert, Keith W.; Smith, Robert F.; Soisson, Stephen; Wei, Changqing; Fukuda, Hideyuki; Kishii, Ryuta; Takei, Masaya; Fukuda, Yasumichi (Merck); (WuXi App Tec); (Kyorin)

    2014-05-08

    Bacterial resistance is eroding the clinical utility of existing antibiotics necessitating the discovery of new agents. Bacterial type II topoisomerase is a clinically validated, highly effective, and proven drug target. This target is amenable to inhibition by diverse classes of inhibitors with alternative and distinct binding sites to quinolone antibiotics, thus enabling the development of agents that lack cross-resistance to quinolones. Described here are novel bacterial topoisomerase inhibitors (NBTIs), which are a new class of gyrase and topo IV inhibitors and consist of three distinct structural moieties. The substitution of the linker moiety led to discovery of potent broad-spectrum NBTIs with reduced off-target activity (hERG IC50 > 18 μM) and improved physical properties. AM8191 is bactericidal and selectively inhibits DNA synthesis and Staphylococcus aureus gyrase (IC50 = 1.02 μM) and topo IV (IC50 = 10.4 μM). AM8191 showed parenteral and oral efficacy (ED50) at less than 2.5 mg/kg doses in a S. aureus murine infection model. A cocrystal structure of AM8191 bound to S. aureus DNA-gyrase showed binding interactions similar to that reported for GSK299423, displaying a key contact of Asp83 with the basic amine at position-7 of the linker.

  4. Investigation of aryl isonitrile compounds with potent, broad-spectrum antifungal activity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mohammad, Haroon; Kyei-Baffour, Kwaku; Younis, Waleed; Davis, Dexter C; Eldesouky, Hassan; Seleem, Mohamed N; Dai, Mingji

    2017-06-01

    Invasive fungal infections present a formidable global public health challenge due to the limited number of approved antifungal agents and the emergence of resistance to the frontline treatment options, such as fluconazole. Three fungal pathogens of significant concern are Candida, Cryptococcus, and Aspergillus given their propensity to cause opportunistic infections in immunocompromised individuals. New antifungal agents composed of unique chemical scaffolds are needed to address this public health challenge. The present study examines the structure-activity relationship of a set of aryl isonitrile compounds that possess broad-spectrum antifungal activity primarily against species of Candida and Cryptococcus. The most potent derivatives are capable of inhibiting growth of these key pathogens at concentrations as low as 0.5µM. Remarkably, the most active compounds exhibit an excellent safety profile and are non-toxic to mammalian cells even at concentrations up to 256µM. The present study lays the foundation for further investigation of aryl isonitrile compounds as a new class of antifungal agents. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  5. Innovative cationic fullerenes as broad-spectrum light-activated antimicrobials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Liyi; Terakawa, Mitsuhiro; Zhiyentayev, Timur; Huang, Ying-Ying; Sawayama, Yohei; Jahnke, Ashlee; Tegos, George P; Wharton, Tim; Hamblin, Michael R

    2010-06-01

    Photodynamic inactivation is a rapidly developing antimicrobial technology that combines a nontoxic photoactivatable dye or photosensitizer in combination with harmless visible light of the correct wavelength to excite the dye to its reactive-triplet state that will then generate reactive oxygen species that are highly toxic to cells. Buckminsterfullerenes are closed-cage molecules entirely composed of sp2-hybridized carbon atoms, and although their main absorption is in the UV, they also absorb visible light and have a long-lived triplet state. When C(60) fullerene is derivatized with cationic functional groups it forms molecules that are more water-soluble and can mediate photodynamic therapy efficiently upon illumination; moreover, cationic fullerenes can selectively bind to microbial cells. In this report we describe the synthesis and characterization of several new cationic fullerenes. Their relative effectiveness as broad-spectrum antimicrobial photosensitizers against gram-positive and gram-negative bacteria, and a fungal yeast was determined by quantitative structure-function relationships. Photodynamic inactivation (PDI) is a rapidly developing antimicrobial technology in which a non-toxic photoactivatable dye or photosensitizer is excited with harmless visible light to its reactive state, where it will generate highly toxic reactive oxygen species. Buckminsterfullerenes derivatized with cationic functional groups form molecules that are water-soluble and mediate PDI efficiently. These fullerenes can also selectively bind to microbial cells. Several new cationic fullerenes are presented in this paper, and their efficacy against Gram-positive, Gram-negative bacteria, and a fungal yeast is also demonstrated.

  6. Broad-spectrum identification and discrimination between biothreat agents and near-neighbor species

    Science.gov (United States)

    Malanoski, Anthony P.; Leski, Tomasz A.; Cheng, Luke; Wang, Zheng; Stenger, David A.; Lin, Baochuan

    2009-05-01

    A comprehensive resequencing microarray "Tropical and Emerging Infections (TessArray RPM-TEI 1.0 array)" has been developed to identify and distinguish between biothreat organisms of interest and genetically close related species. This array has undergone validation using an innovative approach where synthetic DNA fragments are used for organisms that it is not safe to work with outside a biosafety 3 facilities. The approach was confirmed from testing a subset of target organisms, such as Ebola viruses and Lassa viruses, at USAMRIID. Most potential biothreat organisms are actually endemic in some part of the world. Proper surveillance of biothreat agents will require some form of monitoring the evolution of the indigenous organisms under their natural environment, so when changes in the organisms occur, the diagnostic assays for these organisms can be reviewed to assure they still provide detection. Using the resequencing microarray (RPM) for detection in locations such as the Africa can support indigenous monitoring as it provides sequence information. An ongoing collaboration with Njala University aims to establish a broad-spectrum pathogen surveillance capability in the Republic of Sierra Leone, West Africa using RPM technology combined with a Geographic Information System. This has the potential to improve the public health efforts in an infected area as well as provide monitoring of the changes occurring to a biothreat organism, i.e. Lassa viruses, in its natural location.

  7. Broad spectrum pro-quorum-sensing molecules as inhibitors of virulence in vibrios.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wai-Leung Ng

    Full Text Available Quorum sensing (QS is a bacterial cell-cell communication process that relies on the production and detection of extracellular signal molecules called autoinducers. QS allows bacteria to perform collective activities. Vibrio cholerae, a pathogen that causes an acute disease, uses QS to repress virulence factor production and biofilm formation. Thus, molecules that activate QS in V. cholerae have the potential to control pathogenicity in this globally important bacterium. Using a whole-cell high-throughput screen, we identified eleven molecules that activate V. cholerae QS: eight molecules are receptor agonists and three molecules are antagonists of LuxO, the central NtrC-type response regulator that controls the global V. cholerae QS cascade. The LuxO inhibitors act by an uncompetitive mechanism by binding to the pre-formed LuxO-ATP complex to inhibit ATP hydrolysis. Genetic analyses suggest that the inhibitors bind in close proximity to the Walker B motif. The inhibitors display broad-spectrum capability in activation of QS in Vibrio species that employ LuxO. To the best of our knowledge, these are the first molecules identified that inhibit the ATPase activity of a NtrC-type response regulator. Our discovery supports the idea that exploiting pro-QS molecules is a promising strategy for the development of novel anti-infectives.

  8. Novel cationic fullerenes as broad-spectrum light-activated antimicrobials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Liyi; Terakawa, Mitsuhiro; Zhiyentayev, Timur; Huang, Ying-Ying; Sawayama, Yohei; Jahnke, Ashlee; Tegos, George P; Wharton, Tim; Hamblin, Michael R

    2009-01-01

    Photodynamic inactivation (PDI) is a rapidly developing antimicrobial technology which combines a non-toxic photoactivatable dye or photosensitizer (PS) in combination with harmless visible light of the correct wavelength to excite the dye to its reactive triplet state that will then generate reactive oxygen species (ROS) that are highly toxic to cells. Buckminsterfullerenes are closed-cage molecules entirely composed of sp2 hybridized carbon atoms and although their main absorption is in the UV, they also absorb visible light and have a long-lived triplet state. When C60 fullerene is derivatized with cationic functional groups it forms molecules that are more water-soluble and can mediate PDT efficiently upon illumination, and moreover cationic fullerenes can selectively bind to microbial cells. In this report we describe the synthesis and characterization of several new cationic fullerenes. Their relative effectiveness as broad-spectrum antimicrobial photosensitizers against Gram-positive, Gram-negative bacteria, and a fungal yeast was determined by quantitative structure function relationships. PMID:19914400

  9. EFFECTIVE RELEASE OF A BROAD SPECTRUM ANTIBIOTIC FROM ELASTIN-LIKE POLYPEPTIDE-COLLAGEN COMPOSITE

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anderson, Tiffany R.; Marquart, Mary E.; Janorkar, Amol V.

    2014-01-01

    Preparation of hydrogels that possess an effective antibiotic release profile and better mechanical properties compared to the traditionally used collagen hydrogels has the potential to minimize post-surgical infections and support wound healing. Towards this goal, we prepared elastin-like polypeptide (ELP)-collagen composite hydrogels that displayed a significantly higher elastic modulus compared to the collagen hydrogels. We then characterized the release behavior of the collagen and ELP-collagen hydrogels loaded with varying dosages (1 – 5% w/w) of a commonly used broad spectrum antibiotic, doxycycline hyclate. Both collagen and ELP-collagen hydrogels showed a gradual time dependent doxycycline release over a period of 5 days. The ELP-collagen hydrogels, in general, showed a slower release of the doxycycline compared to the collagen hydrogels. The released doxycycline was found to be effective against four bacterial strains (Escherichia coli, Pseudomonas aeruginosa, Streptococcus sanguinis, and methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus) in a dose dependent manner. Combined with their improved mechanical properties, the gradual and effective drug release from the biocompatible ELP-collagen hydrogels shown here may be beneficial for drug delivery and tissue engineering applications. PMID:24825292

  10. Development of Broad-Spectrum Halomethyl Ketone Inhibitors Against Coronavirus Main Protease 3CL(pro)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bacha,U.; Barilla, J.; Gabelli, S.; Kiso, Y.; Amzel, L.; Freire, E.

    2008-01-01

    Coronaviruses comprise a large group of RNA viruses with diverse host specificity. The emergence of highly pathogenic strains like the SARS coronavirus (SARS-CoV), and the discovery of two new coronaviruses, NL-63 and HKU1, corroborates the high rate of mutation and recombination that have enabled them to cross species barriers and infect novel hosts. For that reason, the development of broad-spectrum antivirals that are effective against several members of this family is highly desirable. This goal can be accomplished by designing inhibitors against a target, such as the main protease 3CLpro (Mpro), which is highly conserved among all coronaviruses. Here 3CLpro derived from the SARS-CoV was used as the primary target to identify a new class of inhibitors containing a halomethyl ketone warhead. The compounds are highly potent against SARS 3CLpro with Ki's as low as 300 nm. The crystal structure of the complex of one of the compounds with 3CLpro indicates that this inhibitor forms a thioether linkage between the halomethyl carbon of the warhead and the catalytic Cys 145. Furthermore, Structure Activity Relationship (SAR) studies of these compounds have led to the identification of a pharmacophore that accurately defines the essential molecular features required for the high affinity.

  11. Dissecting disease entities out of the broad spectrum of bipolar-disorders.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Levine, Joseph; Toker, Lilach; Agam, Galila

    2017-11-01

    The etiopathology of bipolar disorders is yet unraveled and new avenues should be pursued. One such avenue may be based on the assumption that the bipolar broad spectrum includes, among others, an array of rare medical disease entities. Towards this aim we propose a dissecting approach based on a search for rare medical diseases with known etiopathology which also exhibit bipolar disorders symptomatology. We further suggest that the etiopathologic mechanisms underlying such rare medical diseases may also underlie a rare variant of bipolar disorder. Such an assumption may be further reinforced if both the rare medical disease and its bipolar clinical phenotype demonstrate a] a similar mode of inheritance (i.e, autosomal dominant); b] brain involvement; and c] data implicating that the etiopathological mechanisms underlying the rare diseases affect biological processes reported to be associated with bipolar disorders and their treatment. We exemplify our suggested approach by a rare case of autosomal dominant leucodystrophy, a disease entity exhibiting nuclear lamin B1 pathology also presenting bipolar symptomatology. Copyright © 2017. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  12. Broad spectrum pro-quorum-sensing molecules as inhibitors of virulence in vibrios.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ng, Wai-Leung; Perez, Lark; Cong, Jianping; Semmelhack, Martin F; Bassler, Bonnie L

    2012-01-01

    Quorum sensing (QS) is a bacterial cell-cell communication process that relies on the production and detection of extracellular signal molecules called autoinducers. QS allows bacteria to perform collective activities. Vibrio cholerae, a pathogen that causes an acute disease, uses QS to repress virulence factor production and biofilm formation. Thus, molecules that activate QS in V. cholerae have the potential to control pathogenicity in this globally important bacterium. Using a whole-cell high-throughput screen, we identified eleven molecules that activate V. cholerae QS: eight molecules are receptor agonists and three molecules are antagonists of LuxO, the central NtrC-type response regulator that controls the global V. cholerae QS cascade. The LuxO inhibitors act by an uncompetitive mechanism by binding to the pre-formed LuxO-ATP complex to inhibit ATP hydrolysis. Genetic analyses suggest that the inhibitors bind in close proximity to the Walker B motif. The inhibitors display broad-spectrum capability in activation of QS in Vibrio species that employ LuxO. To the best of our knowledge, these are the first molecules identified that inhibit the ATPase activity of a NtrC-type response regulator. Our discovery supports the idea that exploiting pro-QS molecules is a promising strategy for the development of novel anti-infectives.

  13. Ceftiofur sodium, a broad-spectrum cephalosporin: evaluation in vitro and in vivo in mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yancey, R J; Kinney, M L; Roberts, B J; Goodenough, K R; Hamel, J C; Ford, C W

    1987-07-01

    Ceftiofur sodium, a broad-spectrum beta-lactamase-resistant cephalosporin, was evaluated in vitro and in vivo in mice. Ceftiofur is the sodium salt of (6R, 7R)-7[( 2-amino-4-thiazolyl)-Z- (methoxyimino)acetyl]amino)-3-[( (2-furanylcarbonyl)thio]methyl)-8-oxo-5- thia-1-azabicyclo-[4.2.0]oct-2-ene-2-carboxylate. Minimal inhibitory concentration values were obtained with 264 strains representing 9 genera and 17 species of bacterial pathogens from cattle, swine, sheep, horses, poultry, dogs, cats, and human beings. Ceftiofur was more active than was ampicillin against all strains tested including beta-lactamase-producing organisms. In mice with systemic infections, ceftiofur was more active than or equivalent to ampicillin, cephalothin, cefamandole, cloxacillin, cefoperazone, or pirlimycin. These protection tests included infections with Escherichia coli, Haemophilus pleuropneumoniae, H somnus, Pasteurella haemolytica, P multocida, Salmonella typhimurium, or Staphylococcus aureus. In infant mice with E coli-induced lethal diarrhea and in mice with S aureus and E coli-induced mastitis, ceftiofur was comparable or more active than was ampicillin.

  14. Preclinical Evaluation of Novel Triphenylphosphonium Salts with Broad-Spectrum Activity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Millard, Melissa; Pathania, Divya; Shabaik, Yumna; Taheri, Laleh; Deng, Jinxia; Neamati, Nouri

    2010-01-01

    Background Recently, there has been a surge of interest in developing compounds selectively targeting mitochondria for the treatment of neoplasms. The critical role of mitochondria in cellular metabolism and respiration supports this therapeutic rationale. Dysfunction in the processes of energy production and metabolism contributes to attenuation of response to pro-apoptotic stimuli and increased ROS production both of which are implicated in the initiation and progression of most human cancers. Methodology/Principal Findings A high-throughput MTT-based screen of over 10,000 drug-like small molecules for anti-proliferative activity identified the phosphonium salts TP187, 197 and 421 as having IC50 concentrations in the submicromolar range. TP treatment induced cell cycle arrest independent of p53 status, as determined by analysis of DNA content in propidium iodide stained cells. In a mouse model of human breast cancer, TP-treated mice showed significantly decreased tumor growth compared to vehicle or paclitaxel treated mice. No toxicities or organ damage were observed following TP treatment. Immunohistochemical staining of tissue sections from TP187-treated tumors demonstrated a decrease in cellular proliferation and increased caspase-3 cleavage. The fluorescent properties of analog TP421 were exploited to assess subcellular uptake of TP compounds, demonstrating mitochondrial localization. Following mitochondrial uptake cells exhibited decreased oxygen consumption and concomittant increase in mitochondrial superoxide production. Proteomics analysis of results from a 600 target antibody microarray demonstrated that TP compounds significantly affected signaling pathways relevant to growth and proliferation. Conclusions/Significance Through our continued interest in designing compounds targeting cancer-cell metabolism, the Warburg effect, and mitochondria we recently discovered a series of novel, small-molecule compounds containing a triphenylphosphine moiety that

  15. Preclinical evaluation of novel triphenylphosphonium salts with broad-spectrum activity.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Melissa Millard

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Recently, there has been a surge of interest in developing compounds selectively targeting mitochondria for the treatment of neoplasms. The critical role of mitochondria in cellular metabolism and respiration supports this therapeutic rationale. Dysfunction in the processes of energy production and metabolism contributes to attenuation of response to pro-apoptotic stimuli and increased ROS production both of which are implicated in the initiation and progression of most human cancers. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: A high-throughput MTT-based screen of over 10,000 drug-like small molecules for anti-proliferative activity identified the phosphonium salts TP187, 197 and 421 as having IC₅₀ concentrations in the submicromolar range. TP treatment induced cell cycle arrest independent of p53 status, as determined by analysis of DNA content in propidium iodide stained cells. In a mouse model of human breast cancer, TP-treated mice showed significantly decreased tumor growth compared to vehicle or paclitaxel treated mice. No toxicities or organ damage were observed following TP treatment. Immunohistochemical staining of tissue sections from TP187-treated tumors demonstrated a decrease in cellular proliferation and increased caspase-3 cleavage. The fluorescent properties of analog TP421 were exploited to assess subcellular uptake of TP compounds, demonstrating mitochondrial localization. Following mitochondrial uptake cells exhibited decreased oxygen consumption and concomittant increase in mitochondrial superoxide production. Proteomics analysis of results from a 600 target antibody microarray demonstrated that TP compounds significantly affected signaling pathways relevant to growth and proliferation. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: Through our continued interest in designing compounds targeting cancer-cell metabolism, the Warburg effect, and mitochondria we recently discovered a series of novel, small-molecule compounds containing a

  16. Successful five-item triage for the broad spectrum of mental disorders in pregnancy - A validation study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    C. Quispel (Chantal); T.A.J. Schneider (Tom); W.J.G. Hoogendijk (Witte); G.J. Bonsel (Gouke); M.P. Lambregtse-van den Berg (Mijke)

    2015-01-01

    textabstractBackground: Mental disorders are prevalent during pregnancy, affecting 10% of women worldwide. To improve triage of a broad spectrum of mental disorders, we investigated the decision impact validity of: 1) a short set of currently used psychiatric triage items, 2) this set with the

  17. Competitive Interaction Between Phytophthora Infestans Effectors Leads to Increased Aggressiveness on Plants Containing Broad-spectrum Late Blight Resistance

    Science.gov (United States)

    The resistance (R) gene RB confers broad-spectrum resistance to potato late blight and belongs. The RB protein recognizes the presence of members of the Phytophthora infestans effector family IPI-O to elicit resistance. Most isolates of the pathogen contain IPI-O variants that are recognized by R...

  18. The broad-spectrum cation channel blocker pinokalant (LOE 908 MS) reduces brain infarct volume in rats

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Christensen, Thomas; Wienrich, Marion; Ensinger, Helmut A

    2005-01-01

    Activation of cation channels conducting Ca2+, Na+ and K+ is involved in the pathogenesis of infarction in experimental focal cerebral ischaemia. Pinokalant (LOE 908 MS) is a novel broad-spectrum inhibitor of several subtypes of such channels and has previously been shown to improve the metabolic...

  19. New Perspectives on How to Discover Drugs from Herbal Medicines: CAM's Outstanding Contribution to Modern Therapeutics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pan, Si-Yuan; Zhou, Shu-Feng; Gao, Si-Hua; Yu, Zhi-Ling; Zhang, Shuo-Feng; Tang, Min-Ke; Sun, Jian-Ning; Han, Yi-Fan; Fong, Wang-Fun; Ko, Kam-Ming

    2013-01-01

    With tens of thousands of plant species on earth, we are endowed with an enormous wealth of medicinal remedies from Mother Nature. Natural products and their derivatives represent more than 50% of all the drugs in modern therapeutics. Because of the low success rate and huge capital investment need, the research and development of conventional drugs are very costly and difficult. Over the past few decades, researchers have focused on drug discovery from herbal medicines or botanical sources, an important group of complementary and alternative medicine (CAM) therapy. With a long history of herbal usage for the clinical management of a variety of diseases in indigenous cultures, the success rate of developing a new drug from herbal medicinal preparations should, in theory, be higher than that from chemical synthesis. While the endeavor for drug discovery from herbal medicines is “experience driven,” the search for a therapeutically useful synthetic drug, like “looking for a needle in a haystack,” is a daunting task. In this paper, we first illustrated various approaches of drug discovery from herbal medicines. Typical examples of successful drug discovery from botanical sources were given. In addition, problems in drug discovery from herbal medicines were described and possible solutions were proposed. The prospect of drug discovery from herbal medicines in the postgenomic era was made with the provision of future directions in this area of drug development. PMID:23634172

  20. New Perspectives on How to Discover Drugs from Herbal Medicines: CAM's Outstanding Contribution to Modern Therapeutics

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Si-Yuan Pan

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available With tens of thousands of plant species on earth, we are endowed with an enormous wealth of medicinal remedies from Mother Nature. Natural products and their derivatives represent more than 50% of all the drugs in modern therapeutics. Because of the low success rate and huge capital investment need, the research and development of conventional drugs are very costly and difficult. Over the past few decades, researchers have focused on drug discovery from herbal medicines or botanical sources, an important group of complementary and alternative medicine (CAM therapy. With a long history of herbal usage for the clinical management of a variety of diseases in indigenous cultures, the success rate of developing a new drug from herbal medicinal preparations should, in theory, be higher than that from chemical synthesis. While the endeavor for drug discovery from herbal medicines is “experience driven,” the search for a therapeutically useful synthetic drug, like “looking for a needle in a haystack,” is a daunting task. In this paper, we first illustrated various approaches of drug discovery from herbal medicines. Typical examples of successful drug discovery from botanical sources were given. In addition, problems in drug discovery from herbal medicines were described and possible solutions were proposed. The prospect of drug discovery from herbal medicines in the postgenomic era was made with the provision of future directions in this area of drug development.

  1. Pyrodiversity and the anthropocene: the role of fire in the broad spectrum revolution.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bird, Douglas W; Bliege Bird, Rebecca; Codding, Brian F

    2016-05-06

    The Anthropocene colloquially refers to a global regime of human-caused environmental modification of earth systems associated with profound changes in patterns of human mobility, as well as settlement and resource use compared with prior eras. Some have argued that the processes generating the Anthropocene are mainly associated with population growth and technological innovation, and thus began only in the late Holocene under conditions of dense sedentism and industrial agriculture.(1) However, it now seems clear that the roots of the Anthropocene lie in complex processes of intensification that significantly predate transitions to agriculture.(2,3) What intensification is remains less clear. For some it is increasing economic productivity that increases carrying capacity, the drivers of which may be too diverse and too local to generalize.(4,5) For others using Boserup's ideas about agrarian intensification, increasing density in hunter-gatherer populations can produce declines in subsistence efficiency that increase incentives for investing labor to boost yield per unit area, which then elevates Malthusian limits on carrying capacity.(6-8) As Morgan(9) demonstrates in a comprehensive review, the legacy of such Boserupian intensification is alive, well, and controversial in hunter-gatherer archeology. This is a result of its potential for illuminating processes involved in transformations of forager socio-political and economic systems, including those dominated by harvesting more immediate-return resources and high residential mobility as well as those characterized by more delayed-return material economies with reduced residential mobility, a broader spectrum of resources, degrees of storage, and greater social stratification. Here we detail hypotheses about the processes involved in such transitions and explore the way that anthropogenic disturbance of ecosystems, especially the use of landscape fire, could be fundamentally entangled with many broad-spectrum

  2. Extensive sequence variation in rice blast resistance gene Pi54 makes it broad spectrum in nature

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shallu eThakur

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available Rice blast resistant gene, Pi54 cloned from rice line, Tetep, is effective against diverse isolates of Magnaporthe oryzae. In this study, we prospected the allelic variants of the dominant blast resistance gene from a set of 92 rice lines to determine the nucleotide diversity, pattern of its molecular evolution, phylogenetic relationships and evolutionary dynamics, and to develop allele specific markers. High quality sequences were generated for homologs of Pi54 gene. Using comparative sequence analysis, InDels of variable sizes in all the alleles were observed. Profiling of the selected sites of SNP (Single Nucleotide Polymorphism and amino acids (N sites ≥ 10 exhibited constant frequency distribution of mutational and substitutional sites between the resistance and susceptible rice lines, respectively. A total of 50 new haplotypes based on the nucleotide polymorphism was also identified. A unique haplotype (H_3 was found to be linked to all the resistant alleles isolated from indica rice lines. Unique leucine zipper and tyrosine sulfation sites were identified in the predicted Pi54 proteins. Selection signals were observed in entire coding sequence of resistance alleles, as compared to LRR domains for susceptible alleles. This is a maiden report of extensive variability of Pi54 alleles in different landraces and cultivated varieties, possibly, attributing broad-spectrum resistance to Magnaporthe oryzae. The sequence variation in two consensus region: 163 bp and 144 bp were used for the development of allele specific DNA markers. Validated markers can be used for the selection and identification of better allele(s and their introgression in commercial rice cultivars employing marker assisted selection.

  3. Overexpression of NPR1 in Brassica juncea Confers Broad Spectrum Resistance to Fungal Pathogens

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sajad Ali

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available Brassica juncea (Indian mustard is a commercially important oil seed crop, which is highly affected by many biotic stresses. Among them, Alternaria leaf blight and powdery mildew are the most devastating diseases leading to huge yield losses in B. juncea around the world. In this regard, genetic engineering is a promising tool that may possibly allow us to enhance the B. juncea disease resistance against these pathogens. NPR1 (non-expressor of pathogen-related gene 1 is a bonafide receptor of salicylic acid (SA which modulates multiple immune responses in plants especially activation of induced and systemic acquired resistance (SAR. Here, we report the isolation and characterization of new NPR1 homolog (BjNPR1 from B. juncea. The phylogenetic tree constructed based on the deduced sequence of BjNPR1 with homologs from other species revealed that BjNPR1 grouped together with other known NPR1 proteins of Cruciferae family, and was nearest to B. napus. Furthermore, expression analysis showed that BjNPR1 was upregulated after SA treatment and fungal infection but not by jasmonic acid or abscisic acid. To understand the defensive role of this gene, we generated B. juncea transgenic lines overexpressing BjNPR1, and further confirmed by PCR and Southern blotting. The transgenic lines showed no phenotypic abnormalities, and constitutive expression of BjNPR1 activates defense signaling pathways by priming the expression of antifungal PR genes. Moreover, BjNPR1 transgenic lines showed enhanced resistance to Alternaria brassicae and Erysiphe cruciferarum as there was delay in symptoms and reduced disease severity than non-transgenic plants. In addition, the rate of disease spreading to uninfected or distal parts was also delayed in transgenic plants thus suggesting the activation of SAR. Altogether, the present study suggests that BjNPR1 is involved in broad spectrum of disease resistance against fungal pathogens.

  4. Isolation and Characterization of a Broad Spectrum Bacteriocin from Bacillus amyloliquefaciens RX7

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kong Boon Lim

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available We isolated a Bacillus strain, RX7, with inhibitory activity against Listeria monocytogenes from soil and identified it as Bacillus amyloliquefaciens based on 16S rRNA gene sequencing. The inhibitory activity was stable over a wide range of pH and was fully retained after 30 min at 80°C, after which it decreased gradually at higher temperatures. The activity was sensitive to the proteolytic action of α-chymotrypsin, proteinase-K, and trypsin, indicating its proteinaceous nature. This bacteriocin was active against a broad spectrum of bacteria and the fungus Candida albicans. Direct detection of antimicrobial activity on a sodium dodecyl sulfate-polyacrylamide gel suggested an apparent molecular mass of approximately 5 kDa. Ammonium sulfate precipitation and anion-exchange and gel permeation chromatography integrated with reverse phase-high-performance liquid chromatography were used for bacteriocin purification. Automated N-terminal Edman degradation of the purified RX7 bacteriocin recognized the first 15 amino acids as NH2-X-Ala-Trp-Tyr-Asp-Ile-Arg-Lys-Leu-Gly-Asn-Lys-Gly-Ala, where the letter X in the sequence indicates an unknown or nonstandard amino acid. Based on BLAST similarity search and multiple alignment analysis, the obtained partial sequence showed high homology with the two-peptide lantibiotic haloduracin (HalA1 from Bacillus halodurans, although at least two amino acids differed between the sequences. A time-kill study demonstrated a bactericidal mode of action of RX7 bacteriocin.

  5. Mur-LH, the Broad-Spectrum Endolysin of Lactobacillus helveticus Temperate Bacteriophage φ-0303

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deutsch, Stéphanie-Marie; Guezenec, Stéphane; Piot, Michel; Foster, Simon; Lortal, Sylvie

    2004-01-01

    φ-0303 is a temperate bacteriophage isolated from Lactobacillus helveticus CNRZ 303 strain after mitomycin C induction. In this work, the gene coding for a lytic protein of this bacteriophage was cloned using a library of φ-0303 in Escherichia coli DH5α. The lytic activity was detected by its expression, using whole cells of the sensitive strain L. helveticus CNRZ 892 as the substrate. The lysin gene was within a 4.1-kb DNA fragment of φ-0303 containing six open reading frames (ORFs) and two truncated ORFs. No sequence homology with holin genes was found within the cloned fragment. An integrase-encoding gene was also present in the fragment, but it was transcribed in a direction opposite that of the lysin gene. The lysin-encoding lys gene was verified by PCR amplification from the total phage DNA and subcloned. The lys gene is a 1,122-bp sequence encoding a protein of 373 amino acids (Mur-LH), whose product had a deduced molecular mass of 40,207 Da. Comparisons with sequences in sequence databases showed homology with numerous endolysins of other bacteriophages. Mur-LH was expressed in E. coli BL21, and by renaturing sodium dodecyl sulfate-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis with L. helveticus CNRZ 892 as the substrate, the recombinant protein showed an apparent molecular mass of 40 kDa. The N-terminal sequence of the protein confirmed the start codon. Hydrolysis of cell walls of L. helveticus CNRZ 303 by the endolysin and biochemical analysis of the residues produced demonstrated that Mur-LH has N-acetylmuramidase activity. Last, the endolysin exhibited a broad spectrum of lytic activity, as it was active on different species, mainly thermophilic lactobacilli but also lactococci, pediococci, Bacillus subtilis, Brevibacterium linens, and Enterococcus faecium. PMID:14711630

  6. Overexpression of NPR1 in Brassica juncea Confers Broad Spectrum Resistance to Fungal Pathogens

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ali, Sajad; Mir, Zahoor A.; Tyagi, Anshika; Mehari, Hailay; Meena, Rajendra P.; Bhat, Javaid A.; Yadav, Prashant; Papalou, Pradeep; Rawat, Sandhya; Grover, Anita

    2017-01-01

    Brassica juncea (Indian mustard) is a commercially important oil seed crop, which is highly affected by many biotic stresses. Among them, Alternaria leaf blight and powdery mildew are the most devastating diseases leading to huge yield losses in B. juncea around the world. In this regard, genetic engineering is a promising tool that may possibly allow us to enhance the B. juncea disease resistance against these pathogens. NPR1 (non-expressor of pathogen-related gene 1) is a bonafide receptor of salicylic acid (SA) which modulates multiple immune responses in plants especially activation of induced and systemic acquired resistance (SAR). Here, we report the isolation and characterization of new NPR1 homolog (BjNPR1) from B. juncea. The phylogenetic tree constructed based on the deduced sequence of BjNPR1 with homologs from other species revealed that BjNPR1 grouped together with other known NPR1 proteins of Cruciferae family, and was nearest to B. napus. Furthermore, expression analysis showed that BjNPR1 was upregulated after SA treatment and fungal infection but not by jasmonic acid or abscisic acid. To understand the defensive role of this gene, we generated B. juncea transgenic lines overexpressing BjNPR1, and further confirmed by PCR and Southern blotting. The transgenic lines showed no phenotypic abnormalities, and constitutive expression of BjNPR1 activates defense signaling pathways by priming the expression of antifungal PR genes. Moreover, BjNPR1 transgenic lines showed enhanced resistance to Alternaria brassicae and Erysiphe cruciferarum as there was delay in symptoms and reduced disease severity than non-transgenic plants. In addition, the rate of disease spreading to uninfected or distal parts was also delayed in transgenic plants thus suggesting the activation of SAR. Altogether, the present study suggests that BjNPR1 is involved in broad spectrum of disease resistance against fungal pathogens. PMID:29046679

  7. Characterization of broad-spectrum Mycobacterium abscessus class A β-lactamase.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Soroka, Daria; Dubée, Vincent; Soulier-Escrihuela, Olivia; Cuinet, Guillaume; Hugonnet, Jean-Emmanuel; Gutmann, Laurent; Mainardi, Jean-Luc; Arthur, Michel

    2014-03-01

    Imipenem and cefoxitin are used to treat Mycobacterium abscessus infections and have moderate activity against this fast-growing mycobacterium (MIC₅₀ of 16 and 32 mg/L, respectively). M. abscessus is highly resistant to most other β-lactams, although the underlying mechanisms have not been explored. Here, we characterized M. abscessus class A β-lactamase (Bla(Mab)) and investigated its role in β-lactam resistance. Hydrolysis kinetic parameters of purified Bla(Mab) were determined by spectrophotometry for various β-lactams and compared with those of related BlaC from Mycobacterium tuberculosis. MICs of β-lactams were determined for M. abscessus CIP104536 and for Escherichia coli producing Bla(Mab) and BlaC. Bla(Mab) had a broad hydrolysis spectrum, similar to that of BlaC, but with overall higher catalytic efficiencies, except for cefoxitin. As expected from its in vivo efficacy, cefoxitin was very slowly hydrolysed by Bla(Mab) (k(cat)/K(m) = 6.7 M(-1) s(-1)). Bla(Mab) hydrolysed imipenem more efficiently (k(cat)/K(m) = 3.0 × 10(4) M(-1) s(-1)), indicating that the in vivo activity of this drug might be improved by combination with a β-lactamase inhibitor. β-Lactamase inhibitors clavulanate, tazobactam and sulbactam did not inhibit Bla(Mab). This enzyme efficiently hydrolysed clavulanate, in contrast to BlaC, which is irreversibly acylated by this inhibitor. Bla(Mab) and BlaC were functional in E. coli and the resistance profiles mediated by these enzymes were in agreement with the kinetic parameters. M. abscessus produces a clavulanate-insensitive broad-spectrum β-lactamase that limits the in vivo efficacy of β-lactams.

  8. Discovering and Developing Successful Cardiovascular Therapeutics: A Conversation With James N. Topper, MD, PhD.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Topper, James N; Rutherford, John D

    2016-11-15

    Dr James (also known as Jamie) N. Topper, MD, PhD, serves as Managing General Partner at Frazier Healthcare Partners, where he leads the Life Science Venture practice. In 2011, and 2016, he was named to the Midas List of leading venture capitalists, and, in 2013, he was recognized by Forbes as one of the top 10 healthcare investors. He has >25 years of experience working with entrepreneurs to found and build successful therapeutics-focused companies. Dr Topper holds a BS from the University of Michigan. He received an MD and PhD (in biophysics) from Stanford University School of Medicine. He completed postgraduate training in internal medicine and cardiovascular disease at the Brigham and Women's Hospital in Boston and is board certified in both disciplines. © 2016 American Heart Association, Inc.

  9. A mechanistic paradigm for broad-spectrum antivirals that target virus-cell fusion.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Frederic Vigant

    .01 delayed the time to death in a murine lethal challenge model of Rift Valley Fever Virus (RVFV. The viral membrane may be a viable target for broad-spectrum antivirals that target virus-cell fusion.

  10. Integrated DNA walking system to characterize a broad spectrum of GMOs in food/feed matrices.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fraiture, Marie-Alice; Herman, Philippe; Lefèvre, Loic; Taverniers, Isabel; De Loose, Marc; Deforce, Dieter; Roosens, Nancy H

    2015-08-14

    In order to provide a system fully integrated with qPCR screening, usually used in GMO routine analysis, as well as being able to detect, characterize and identify a broad spectrum of GMOs in food/feed matrices, two bidirectional DNA walking methods targeting p35S or tNOS, the most common transgenic elements found in GM crops, were developed. These newly developed DNA walking methods are completing the previously implemented DNA walking method targeting the t35S pCAMBIA element. Food/feed matrices containing transgenic crops (Bt rice or MON863 maize) were analysed using the integrated DNA walking system. First, the newly developed DNA walking methods, anchored on the sequences used for the p35S or tNOS qPCR screening, were tested on Bt rice that contains these two transgenic elements. Second, the methods were assessed on a maize sample containing a low amount of the GM MON863 event, representing a more complex matrix in terms of genome size and sensitivity. Finally, to illustrate its applicability in GMO routine analysis by enforcement laboratories, the entire workflow of the integrated strategy, including qPCR screening to detect the potential presence of GMOs and the subsequent DNA walking methods to characterize and identify the detected GMOs, was applied on a GeMMA Scheme Proficiency Test matrix. Via the characterization of the transgene flanking region between the transgenic cassette and the plant genome as well as of a part of the transgenic cassette, the presence of GMOs was properly confirmed or infirmed in all tested samples. Due to their simple procedure and their short time-frame to get results, the developed DNA walking methods proposed here can be easily implemented in GMO routine analysis by the enforcement laboratories. In providing crucial information about the transgene flanking regions and/or the transgenic cassettes, this DNA walking strategy is a key molecular tool to prove the presence of GMOs in any given food/feed matrix.

  11. Broad-spectrum enhanced absorption of graphene-molybdenum disulfide photovoltaic cells in Metal-Mirror Microcavity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Jiang Tao; Cao, Yunkai; Tong, Hong; Wang, Dahai; Wu, Zhenhua

    2018-01-29

    We investigate theoretically the optical absorption of graphene-molybdenum disulfide photovoltaic cells (GM-PVc) in wedge-shaped metal-mirror microcavities (w-MMCs) combined with spectrum-splitting structure. Results show that the combination of spectrum-splitting structure and w-MMC can enable the light absorption of GM-PVc to reach about 65% in the broad spectrum. The influence of processing errors on the absorption of GM-PVc in w-MMCs is effectively suppressed, i.e., 3 ~14 times lower than that of GM-PVc in common wedge photonic crystal microcavities. The light absorption of GM-PVc reaches 60% in broad spectrum even with the processing errors. This proposal of GM-PVc structure is easy to implement and has potentially important applications in the development of ultra-thin and high-efficiency solar cells and optoelectronic devices. © 2018 IOP Publishing Ltd.

  12. Characterization of the novel broad-spectrum kinase inhibitor CTx-0294885 as an affinity reagent for mass spectrometry-based kinome profiling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Luxi; Holmes, Ian P; Hochgräfe, Falko; Walker, Scott R; Ali, Naveid A; Humphrey, Emily S; Wu, Jianmin; de Silva, Melanie; Kersten, Wilhelmus J A; Connor, Theresa; Falk, Hendrik; Allan, Lynda; Street, Ian P; Bentley, John D; Pilling, Patricia A; Monahan, Brendon J; Peat, Thomas S; Daly, Roger J

    2013-07-05

    Kinase enrichment utilizing broad-spectrum kinase inhibitors enables the identification of large proportions of the expressed kinome by mass spectrometry. However, the existing inhibitors are still inadequate in covering the entire kinome. Here, we identified a novel bisanilino pyrimidine, CTx-0294885, exhibiting inhibitory activity against a broad range of kinases in vitro, and further developed it into a Sepharose-supported kinase capture reagent. Use of a quantitative proteomics approach confirmed the selectivity of CTx-0294885-bound beads for kinase enrichment. Large-scale CTx-0294885-based affinity purification followed by LC-MS/MS led to the identification of 235 protein kinases from MDA-MB-231 cells, including all members of the AKT family that had not been previously detected by other broad-spectrum kinase inhibitors. Addition of CTx-0294885 to a mixture of three kinase inhibitors commonly used for kinase-enrichment increased the number of kinase identifications to 261, representing the largest kinome coverage from a single cell line reported to date. Coupling phosphopeptide enrichment with affinity purification using the four inhibitors enabled the identification of 799 high-confidence phosphosites on 183 kinases, ∼10% of which were localized to the activation loop, and included previously unreported phosphosites on BMP2K, MELK, HIPK2, and PRKDC. Therefore, CTx-0294885 represents a powerful new reagent for analysis of kinome signaling networks that may facilitate development of targeted therapeutic strategies. Proteomics data have been deposited to the ProteomeXchange Consortium ( http://proteomecentral.proteomexchange.org ) via the PRIDE partner repository with the data set identifier PXD000239.

  13. Genetic engineering of the Xa10 promoter for broad-spectrum and durable resistance to Xanthomonas oryzae pv. oryzae.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zeng, Xuan; Tian, Dongsheng; Gu, Keyu; Zhou, Zhiyun; Yang, Xiaobei; Luo, Yanchang; White, Frank F; Yin, Zhongchao

    2015-09-01

    Many pathovars of plant pathogenic bacteria Xanthomonas species inject transcription activator-like (TAL) effectors into plant host cells to promote disease susceptibility or trigger disease resistance. The rice TAL effector-dependent disease resistance gene Xa10 confers narrow-spectrum race-specific resistance to Xanthomonas oryzae pv. oryzae (Xoo), the causal agent of bacterial blight disease in rice. To generate broad-spectrum and durable resistance to Xoo, we developed a modified Xa10 gene, designated as Xa10(E5) . Xa10(E5) has an EBE-amended promoter containing 5 tandemly arranged EBEs each responding specifically to a corresponding virulent or avirulent TAL effector and a stable transgenic rice line containing Xa10(E5) was generated in the cultivar Nipponbare. The Xa10(E5) gene was specifically induced by Xoo strains that harbour the corresponding TAL effectors and conferred TAL effector-dependent resistance to the pathogens at all developmental stages of rice. Further disease evaluation demonstrated that the Xa10(E5) gene in either Nipponbare or 9311 genetic backgrounds provided broad-spectrum disease resistance to 27 of the 28 Xoo strains collected from 11 countries. The development of Xa10(E5) and transgenic rice lines provides new genetic materials for molecular breeding of rice for broad-spectrum and durable disease resistance to bacterial blight. © 2015 Society for Experimental Biology, Association of Applied Biologists and John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  14. Detection of Mycobacteria in Crohn's Disease by a Broad Spectrum Polymerase Chain Reaction

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chi-Yuan Tzen

    2006-01-01

    Conclusion: Hsp65-based PCR can be employed to search for occult mycobacterial infection of the gastrointestinal tract in patients with a diagnosis or suspicion of Crohn's disease. This approach may have a therapeutic implication.

  15. Varespladib (LY315920 Appears to Be a Potent, Broad-Spectrum, Inhibitor of Snake Venom Phospholipase A2 and a Possible Pre-Referral Treatment for Envenomation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Matthew Lewin

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available Snakebite remains a neglected medical problem of the developing world with up to 125,000 deaths each year despite more than a century of calls to improve snakebite prevention and care. An estimated 75% of fatalities from snakebite occur outside the hospital setting. Because phospholipase A2 (PLA2 activity is an important component of venom toxicity, we sought candidate PLA2 inhibitors by directly testing drugs. Surprisingly, varespladib and its orally bioavailable prodrug, methyl-varespladib showed high-level secretory PLA2 (sPLA2 inhibition at nanomolar and picomolar concentrations against 28 medically important snake venoms from six continents. In vivo proof-of-concept studies with varespladib had striking survival benefit against lethal doses of Micrurus fulvius and Vipera berus venom, and suppressed venom-induced sPLA2 activity in rats challenged with 100% lethal doses of M. fulvius venom. Rapid development and deployment of a broad-spectrum PLA2 inhibitor alone or in combination with other small molecule inhibitors of snake toxins (e.g., metalloproteases could fill the critical therapeutic gap spanning pre-referral and hospital setting. Lower barriers for clinical testing of safety tested, repurposed small molecule therapeutics are a potentially economical and effective path forward to fill the pre-referral gap in the setting of snakebite.

  16. Isolation and Characterization of Broad Spectrum Coaggregating Bacteria from Different Water Systems for Potential Use in Bioaugmentation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Haichao; Chen, Mei; Li, Mengying

    2014-01-01

    The bridging bacteria with broad-spectrum coaggregation ability play an important role during multispecies-biofilm development. In this study, through a visual and semi-quantitative assay, twenty-two bacterial strains with aggregation ability were obtained from 8 different water environments, and these strains were assigned to 7 genera according to their 16S rDNA and they were Aeromonas, Bacillus, Comamonas, Exiguobacterium, Pseudomonas, Shewanella and Comamonas. Furthermore, all possible 231 pairwise combinations among these 22 strains were explored for coaggregation ability by spectrophotometric assay. Among all these strains, it was found that Bacillus cereus G5 and Bacillus megaterium T1 coaggregated with themajority of assayed other strains, 90.5% (19 of 21 strains) and 76.2% respectively (17 of 21 strains) at a higher coaggregation rates (A.I. greater than 50%), indicating they have a broad-spectrum coaggregation property. The images of coaggregates also confirmed the coexistence of G5 and T1 with their partner strains. Biofilm biomass development of G5 cocultured with each of its partner strains were further evaluateded. The results showed that 15 of 21 strains, when paired with G5, developed greater biofilm biomass than the monocultures. Furthermore, the images from both fluorescence microscopy and scanning electron microscopy (SEM) demonstrated that G5 and A3-GFP (a 3,5-dinitrobenzoic acid-degrading strain, staining with gfp),could develop a typical spatial structure of dual-species biofilm when cocultured. These results suggested that bridging-bacteria with a broad spectrum coaggregating ability, such as G5,could mediate the integration of exogenous degrading bacteria into biofilms and contribute to the bioaugmentation treatment. PMID:24736645

  17. Isolation and characterization of broad spectrum coaggregating bacteria from different water systems for potential use in bioaugmentation.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhongqin Cheng

    Full Text Available The bridging bacteria with broad-spectrum coaggregation ability play an important role during multispecies-biofilm development. In this study, through a visual and semi-quantitative assay, twenty-two bacterial strains with aggregation ability were obtained from 8 different water environments, and these strains were assigned to 7 genera according to their 16S rDNA and they were Aeromonas, Bacillus, Comamonas, Exiguobacterium, Pseudomonas, Shewanella and Comamonas. Furthermore, all possible 231 pairwise combinations among these 22 strains were explored for coaggregation ability by spectrophotometric assay. Among all these strains, it was found that Bacillus cereus G5 and Bacillus megaterium T1 coaggregated with themajority of assayed other strains, 90.5% (19 of 21 strains and 76.2% respectively (17 of 21 strains at a higher coaggregation rates (A.I. greater than 50%, indicating they have a broad-spectrum coaggregation property. The images of coaggregates also confirmed the coexistence of G5 and T1 with their partner strains. Biofilm biomass development of G5 cocultured with each of its partner strains were further evaluateded. The results showed that 15 of 21 strains, when paired with G5, developed greater biofilm biomass than the monocultures. Furthermore, the images from both fluorescence microscopy and scanning electron microscopy (SEM demonstrated that G5 and A3-GFP (a 3,5-dinitrobenzoic acid-degrading strain, staining with gfp,could develop a typical spatial structure of dual-species biofilm when cocultured. These results suggested that bridging-bacteria with a broad spectrum coaggregating ability, such as G5,could mediate the integration of exogenous degrading bacteria into biofilms and contribute to the bioaugmentation treatment.

  18. Discovery and development of kibdelomycin, a new class of broad-spectrum antibiotics targeting the clinically proven bacterial type II topoisomerase.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Singh, Sheo B

    2016-12-15

    Kibdelomycin is a complex novel antibiotic, discovered by applying a highly sophisticated chemical-genetic Staphylococcus aureus Fitness Test (SaFT) approach, that inhibits the clinically established bacterial targets, gyrase and topoisomerase IV. It exhibits broad-spectrum antibacterial activity against aerobic bacteria including MRSA and Acinetobacter baumannii. It is slowly bactericidal and has a low frequency of resistance. In an anaerobic environment, it exhibits narrow-spectrum activity and inhibits the growth of gut bacteria Clostridium difficile (MIC 0.125μg/mL) without affecting the growth of commensal Gram-negative organisms particularly, Bacteroides sp. It is highly efficacious in the hamster model of C. difficile infection providing 100% protection at >6mg/kg and 80% protection at 1.56mg/kg by oral dosing without systemic exposure. X-ray co-crystal structures of kibdelomycin bound to GyrB and ParE showed a unique dual arm 'U shaped' multisite binding never encountered with any other gyrase inhibitors. Kibdelomycin is poised for preclinical development for C. difficile treatment, and most importantly, the co-crystal structures of kibdelomycin provide unique insight for structure-guided structure modification, which could lead to better broader-spectrum systemic antibiotic potentially covering many ESKAPE pathogens. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  19. The Lipid-Associated 3D Structure of SPA, a Broad-Spectrum Neuropeptide Antagonist with Anticancer Properties

    OpenAIRE

    Keire, David A; Kumar, Mohanraja; Hu, Weidong; Sinnett-Smith, James; Rozengurt, Enrique

    2006-01-01

    [D-Arg1, D-Trp5,7,9, Leu11] substance P (SPA) belongs to a family of peptides including antagonist G and SpD that act as broad-spectrum neuropeptide antagonists at several peripheral receptors. The lipid-induced structure of these peptides may be important for the receptor interactions of these analogs. Thus we describe the tertiary structure of SPA in the presence of sodium dodecylsulfate micelles at pH 5.0, and 25°C as determined from two-dimensional 1H-NMR data recorded at 500 MHz. The res...

  20. “IF-pathies”: a broad spectrum of intermediate filament–associated diseases

    Science.gov (United States)

    Omary, M. Bishr

    2009-01-01

    Intermediate filaments (IFs) are encoded by the largest gene family among the three major cytoskeletal protein groups. Unique IF compliments are expressed in selective cell types, and this expression is reflected in their involvement, upon mutation, as a cause of or predisposition to more than 80 human tissue-specific diseases. This Review Series covers diseases and functional and structural aspects pertaining to IFs and highlights the molecular and functional consequences of IF-associated diseases (IF-pathies). Exciting challenges and opportunities face the IF field, including developing both a better understanding of the pathogenesis of IF-pathies and targeted therapeutic approaches. PMID:19587450

  1. Cytotoxic 2-phenyacrylnitriles, the importance of the cyanide moiety and discovery of potent broad spectrum cytotoxic agents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tarleton, Mark; Gilbert, Jayne; Sakoff, Jennette A; McCluskey, Adam

    2012-11-01

    We previously reported the discovery of a simple conjugated cyano pharmacophore which had led to the development of (Z)-2-(3,4-dichlorophenyl)-3-(4-nitrophenyl)acrylonitrile, as a selective inhibitor of oestrogen receptor positive (ER+ve) human breast cancer cell line, MCF-7. Further exploration though modification of the acrylonitrile and aromatic substituents has highlighted key structural components necessary for broad spectrum cytotoxicity. The acrylic acid derivates (Z)-2-(3,4-dichlorophenyl)-3-(4-nitrophenyl)acrylic acid and (Z)-2-(3,4-dichlorophenyl)-3-(4-methoxyphenyl)acrylic acid (9) were inactive; confirming the importance of the cyanide moiety. The most potent 2-phenylacrylonitriles synthesized were (Z)-2-(3,4-dichlorophenyl)-3-(1H-indol-3-yl)acrylonitrile and (Z)-2-(3,4-dichlorophenyl)-3-(1H-indol-5-yl)acrylonitrile (20) with an average GI(50) values of 1.4 and 0.53 μM respectively. Five additional (Z)-2-(3,4-dichlorophenyl)-3-(indolyl)acrylonitriles also displayed average GI(50) values of ≤8.4 μM. In the case of indole, this represents a 32-fold increase in broad spectrum cytotoxicity relative to the lead. Crown Copyright © 2012. Published by Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  2. The investigation of copper-based impregnated activated carbons prepared from water-soluble materials for broad spectrum respirator applications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, J W H; Westreich, P; Abdellatif, H; Filbee-Dexter, P; Smith, A J; Wood, T E; Croll, L M; Reynolds, J H; Dahn, J R

    2010-08-15

    The preparation of impregnated activated carbons (IACs) from aqueous, copper-containing solutions for broad spectrum gas filtration applications is studied here. Several samples were studied to determine the effect that impregnant loading, impregnant distribution and impregnant recipe had on the overall performance. Dynamic flow testing was used to determine the gas filtration capacity of the IAC samples versus a variety of challenge gases. X-ray diffraction (XRD), scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and energy dispersive X-ray analysis (EDX) were used to characterize the impregnant distribution on the carbon as a function of impregnant loading. Oven tests were performed to determine the thermal stability of the IAC samples exposed to elevated temperatures. The role impregnant distribution plays in gas filtration capacity and the overall performance of the IAC samples is discussed. The IAC samples prepared in this work were found to have gas filtration capacities as good as or better than broad spectrum respirator carbon samples prepared from the patent literature. IACs impregnated with an aqueous 2.4 M Cu(NO(3))(2)/0.04 M H(3)PO(4).12MoO(3)/4M HNO(3) solution that were heated to 200 degrees C under argon were found to have the best overall performance of the samples studied in this work. Copyright 2010 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  3. Comparison between pathogen directed antibiotic treatment and empirical broad spectrum antibiotic treatment in patients with community acquired pneumonia: a prospective randomised study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van der Eerden, M. M.; Vlaspolder, F.; de Graaff, C. S.; Groot, T.; Bronsveld, W.; Jansen, H. M.; Boersma, W. G.

    2005-01-01

    Background: There is much controversy about the ideal approach to the management of community acquired pneumonia ( CAP). Recommendations differ from a pathogen directed approach to an empirical strategy with broad spectrum antibiotics. Methods: In a prospective randomised open study performed

  4. Novel Naja atra cardiotoxin 1 (CTX-1) derived antimicrobial peptides with broad spectrum activity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sala, Andrea; Cabassi, Clotilde Silvia; Santospirito, Davide; Polverini, Eugenia; Flisi, Sara; Cavirani, Sandro; Taddei, Simone

    2018-01-01

    discovering a large number of novel and promising antimicrobial peptides families.

  5. Synthesis, Biological Evaluation and Modeling Studies of New Pyrido[3,4-b]indole Derivatives as Broad-Spectrum Potent Anticancer Agents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Patil, Shivaputra A; Addo, James K; Deokar, Hemantkumar; Sun, Shan; Wang, Jin; Li, Wei; Suttle, D Parker; Wang, Wei; Zhang, Ruiwen; Buolamwini, John K

    2017-03-01

    There is an urgent need drugs against particularly difficult to treat solid tumors such as pancreatic, triple negative breast, lung, colon, metastatic prostate cancers and melanoma. Thus, the objective of this study was to synthesize compounds based computational modeling that indicated the pyrido[3,4- b ]indole class bind to MDM2, a new cancer target for which there are still no drug on the market. Compounds were synthesized by established methods and tested for antiproliferative activity against a broad range of human cancer cell lines, comprising HCT116 colon, HPAC, MIA PaCa-2 and Panc-1 pancreatic, MCF-7 and MDA-MB-468 breast, A375 and WM164 melanoma, A549 lung, and LNCaP, DU145 and PC3 prostate cancer lines. Computational docking was also undertaken. The novel pyrido[3,4- b ]indoles synthesized exhibited a clear SAR with regards to antiproliferative activity, with potent broad-spectrum anticancer activity with IC 50 s down to 80, 130, 130 and 200 nM for breast, colon, melanoma and pancreatic cancer cells, respectively. 1-Naphthyl at C1 combined with methoxy at C6 provided the best antiproliferative activity. Thus, compound 11 (1-naphthyl-6-methoxy-9 H -pyrido[3,4-b]indole) showed the highest potency. A mechanistic feature of the compounds as a group is a strongly selective G2/M cell cycle phase arrest. Docking at on MDM2 suggested a hydrogen bond interaction between the 6-methoxy Tyr106, hydrophobic interaction with Val93, pi-pi stacking interactions with Tyr100 and His96 and hydrophobic interactions with Leu54 and Ile99. An N9-methyl group disrupted binding interactions, such as H-bond interactions involving the N9 hydrogen. We have identified a novel series of pyrido[3,4- b ]indoles with potent broad spectrum anticancer activity towards the most aggressive and difficult to treat cancers including metastatic pancreatic cancer, non-small cell lung cancer, triple negative breast cancers, and BRAF V600E mutant melanoma, as well as metastatic colon and prostate

  6. A natural component from Euphorbia humifusa Willd displays novel, broad-spectrum anti-influenza activity by blocking nuclear export of viral ribonucleoprotein

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chang, So Young; Park, Ji Hoon [Respiratory Viruses Research Laboratory, Discovery Biology Department, Institut Pasteur Korea, 16, Daewangpangyo-ro 712 Beon-gil, Bundang-gu, Seongnam-si, Gyeonggi-do, 463-400 (Korea, Republic of); Kim, Young Ho; Kang, Jong Seong [College of Pharmacy, Chungnam National University, Daejeon, 305-764 (Korea, Republic of); Min, Ji-Young, E-mail: jiyoung.min@ip-korea.org [Respiratory Viruses Research Laboratory, Discovery Biology Department, Institut Pasteur Korea, 16, Daewangpangyo-ro 712 Beon-gil, Bundang-gu, Seongnam-si, Gyeonggi-do, 463-400 (Korea, Republic of)

    2016-03-04

    The need to develop anti-influenza drugs with novel antiviral mechanisms is urgent because of the rapid rate of antigenic mutation and the emergence of drug-resistant viruses. We identified a novel anti-influenza molecule by screening 861 plant-derived natural components using a high-throughput image-based assay that measures inhibition of the influenza virus infection. 1,3,4,6-tetra-O-galloyl-β-D-glucopyranoside (TGBG) from Euphorbia humifusa Willd showed broad-spectrum anti-influenza activity against two seasonal influenza A strains, A/California/07/2009 (H1N1) and A/Perth/16/2009 (H3N2), and seasonal influenza B strain B/Florida/04/2006. We investigated the mode of action of TGBG using neuraminidase activity inhibition and time-of-addition assays, which evaluate the viral release and entry steps, respectively. We found that TGBG exhibits a novel antiviral mechanism that differs from the FDA-approved anti-influenza drugs oseltamivir which inhibits viral release, and amantadine which inhibits viral entry. Immunofluorescence assay demonstrated that TGBG significantly inhibits nuclear export of influenza nucleoproteins (NP) during the early stages of infection causing NP to accumulate in the nucleus. In addition, influenza-induced activation of the Akt signaling pathway was suppressed by TGBG in a dose-dependent manner. These data suggest that a putative mode of action of TGBG involves inhibition of viral ribonucleoprotein (vRNP) export from the nucleus to the cytoplasm consequently disrupting the assembly of progeny virions. In summary, TGBG has potential as novel anti-influenza therapeutic with a novel mechanism of action. - Highlights: • The plant-derived natural product TGBG has broad-spectrum antiviral activity against seasonal influenza A and B viruses. • TGBG has a novel anti-viral mechanism of action that from differs from the currently available anti-influenza drugs. • TGBG hinders nuclear export of the influenza virus ribonucleoprotein (v

  7. Synthesis and antibacterial evaluation of novel cationic chalcone derivatives possessing broad spectrum antibacterial activity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chu, Wen-Chao; Bai, Peng-Yan; Yang, Zhao-Qing; Cui, De-Yun; Hua, Yong-Gang; Yang, Yi; Yang, Qian-Qian; Zhang, En; Qin, Shangshang

    2018-01-01

    There is an urgent need to identify new antibiotics with novel mechanisms that combat antibiotic resistant bacteria. Herein, a series of chalcone derivatives that mimic the essential properties of cationic antimicrobial peptides were designed and synthesized. Antibacterial activities against drug-sensitive bacteria, including Staphylococcus aureus, Enterococcus faecalis, Escherichia coli and Salmonella enterica, as well as clinical multiple drug resistant isolates of methicillin-resistant S. aureus (MRSA), KPC-2-producing and NDM-1-producing Carbapenem-resistant Enterobacteriaceae were evaluated. Representative compounds 5a (MIC: 1 μg/mL against S. aureus, 0.5 μg/mL against MRSA) and 5g (MIC: 0.5 μg/mL against S. aureus, 0.25 μg/mL against MRSA) showed good bactericidal activity against both Gram-positive and Gram-negative bacteria, including the drug-resistant species MRSA, KPC and NDM. These membrane-active antibacterial compounds were demonstrated to reduce the viable cell counts in bacterial biofilms effectively and do not induce the development of resistance in bacteria. Additionally, these representative molecules exhibited negligible toxicity toward mammalian cells at a suitable concentration. The combined results indicate that this series of cationic chalcone derivatives have potential therapeutic effects against bacterial infections. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  8. Phytic acid (IP6), novel broad spectrum anti-neoplastic agent: a systematic review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fox, C H; Eberl, M

    2002-12-01

    Phytic acid or IP6 has been extensively studied in animals and is being promoted as an anti-cancer agent in health food stores. It is naturally found in legumes, wheat bran, and soy foods. It is believed to be the active ingredient that gives these substances their cancer fighting abilities. Proposed mechanisms of action include gene alteration, enhanced immunity, and anti-oxidant properties. A Medline search from 1966 to May 2002 using the keywords phytic acid and cancer, and limiting the search to the subheadings of therapeutic uses, prevention, and adverse effects revealed 28 studies. These studies were included in the review. A great majority of the studies were done in animals and showed that phytic acid had anti-neoplastic properties in breast, colon, liver, leukemia, prostate, sarcomas, and skin cancer. There were no human studies. Side effects included chelation of multivalent cations, and an increase in bladder and renal papillomas. This increase in papilloma formation only occurred with the sodium salt of phytic acid. It did not occur with either the potassium or magnesium salts. There is a large body of animal evidence to show that phytic acid may have a role in both the prevention and treatment of many forms of cancer. There is clearly enough evidence to justify the initiation of Phase I and Phase II clinical trials in humans.

  9. Toxicity modulation, resistance enzyme evasion, and A-site X-ray structure of broad-spectrum antibacterial neomycin analogs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maianti, Juan Pablo; Kanazawa, Hiroki; Dozzo, Paola; Matias, Rowena D; Feeney, Lee Ann; Armstrong, Eliana S; Hildebrandt, Darin J; Kane, Timothy R; Gliedt, Micah J; Goldblum, Adam A; Linsell, Martin S; Aggen, James B; Kondo, Jiro; Hanessian, Stephen

    2014-09-19

    Aminoglycoside antibiotics are pseudosaccharides decorated with ammonium groups that are critical for their potent broad-spectrum antibacterial activity. Despite over three decades of speculation whether or not modulation of pKa is a viable strategy to curtail aminoglycoside kidney toxicity, there is a lack of methods to systematically probe amine-RNA interactions and resultant cytotoxicity trends. This study reports the first series of potent aminoglycoside antibiotics harboring fluorinated N1-hydroxyaminobutyryl acyl (HABA) appendages for which fluorine-RNA contacts are revealed through an X-ray cocrystal structure within the RNA A-site. Cytotoxicity in kidney-derived cells was significantly reduced for the derivative featuring our novel β,β-difluoro-HABA group, which masks one net charge by lowering the pKa without compromising antibacterial potency. This novel side-chain assists in evasion of aminoglycoside-modifying enzymes, and it can be easily transferred to impart these properties onto any number of novel analogs.

  10. Technetium-99m Tricarbonyl Labeled a Broad-spectrum Quinolone as a Specific Imaging Agent in Infection Diseases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khoramrouz, Seyed Javad; Erfani, Mostafa; Athari Allaf, Mitra

    2017-01-01

    Nuclear medicine imaging has been used to localize infection sites, and efforts have been continued to develop modified infection specific radiopharmaceuticals. In this study gemifloxacin as a broad-spectrum quinolone has been labeled with [(99m)Tc (CO)3 (H2O)3](+) core in order to evaluate its feasibility as an infection imaging agent for in-vivo use. The stability of radioconjugate was checked in human serum at 37 °C and biodistribution was studied in mice. Labeling yield of > 95% was obtained corresponding to a specific activity of 0.14 GBq/μmol. The radioconjugate showed good stability in human serum. Our main achievement was the high accumulation in the infected muscle in mice (T/NT = 2.93 ± 0.3 at 1 h post injection), which may diagnostically be beneficial for differentiate sites of infection from sites of inflammation.

  11. An "All-In-One" Pharmacophoric Architecture for the Discovery of Potential Broad-Spectrum Anti-Flavivirus Drugs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ncube, Nomagugu B; Ramharack, Pritika; Soliman, Mahmoud E S

    2018-01-18

    A precipitous increase in the number of flaviviral infections has been noted over the last 5 years. Despite these outbreaks, treatment protocols for infected individuals remain ambiguous. Numerous studies have identified NITD008 as a potent flavivirus inhibitor; however, clinical testing was dismissed due to undesirable toxic effects. The binding landscape of NITD008 in complex with five detrimental flaviviruses at the RNA-dependent RNA polymerase active sites was explored. An "all-in-one" pharmacophore model was created for the design of small molecules that may inhibit a broad spectrum of flaviviruses. This pharmacophore model approach serves as a robust cornerstone, thus assisting medicinal experts in the composition of multifunctional inhibitors that will eliminate cross-resistance and toxicity and enhance patient adherence.

  12. Broad Spectrum Anti-Quorum Sensing Activity of Tannin-Rich Crude Extracts of Indian Medicinal Plants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shukla, Varsha; Bhathena, Zarine

    2016-01-01

    Quorum sensing (QS) mechanisms have been demonstrated to have significance in expression of pathogenicity in infectious bacteria. In Gram negative bacteria the autoinducer molecules that mediate QS are acyl homoserine lactones (AHL) and in Gram positive bacteria they are peptides called autoinducing peptides (AIP). A screening of tannin-rich medicinal plants was attempted to identify extracts that could interrupt the QS mechanisms in both Gram positive and Gram negative bacteria over a wide range of concentrations and therefore potentially be potent agents that could act as broad spectrum QS inhibitors. Six out of the twelve Indian medicinal plant extracts that were analyzed exhibited anti-QS activity in Chromobacterium violaceum 12472 and in S. aureus strain with agr:blaZ fusion over a broad range of subinhibitory concentrations, indicating that the extracts contain high concentration of molecules that can interfere with the QS mechanisms mediated by AHL as well as AIP.

  13. Vancomycin and Five Broad-spectrum Antibiotic Utilization Evaluation in an Educational Medical Center in One Year

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    SiminDokht Shoaei

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available  Background: Antibiotics can be life saving if they are used correctly, and can have unwanted side effects specially resistance with incorrect use. Unfortunately in fear of no response, physicians use broad spectrum antibiotics meticulously. In this Drug Utilization Evaluation (DUE, improper use of Vancomycin and five broad-spectrum antibiotics are studied to find faults and solution for this problem. Methods:This descriptive cross-sectional study performed during the March of 2012 to March of 2013.DUE of Imipenem, Meropenem, Piperacillin-Tazobactam, Cefepime, Ciprofloxacin and Vancomycin was done in 6 wards of Imam Hossein Hospital in Tehran. Demographic, clinical, laboratory, imaging and treatment data were looked for in medical records of 686 patients. Evaluation was done by three infectious disease specialist based on reference text book of Mandell’s Principles and Practice of Infectious Diseases 2010 and IDSA Guidelines. Results:This study showed 38.5% of prescriptions were correct and the remained 61.5% were incorrect with different faults predominantly incorrect overuse in 51.1%.Ciprofloxacin was the most common incorrect used drug in 74.8% cases and Piperacillin-Tazobactam with 48.7% cases had the least common incorrect use. There was no fault in prescription of antibiotics observing age and sex (pregnancy, breast feeding factors. Conclusions:Our results reveal a significant high level of the inappropriate use of Antibiotics mostly as overuse and empirically without culture results. It is needed to establish continuing medical education (CME courses and a locally conformable guideline of antibiotic use based on antibiogram results.

  14. Mechanisms of Broad-Spectrum Antiemetic Efficacy of Cannabinoids against Chemotherapy-Induced Acute and Delayed Vomiting

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nissar A. Darmani

    2010-09-01

    Full Text Available Chemotherapy-induced nausea and vomiting (CINV is a complex pathophysiological condition and consists of two phases. The conventional CINV neurotransmitter hypothesis suggests that the immediate phase is mainly due to release of serotonin (5-HT from the enterochromaffin cells in the gastrointestinal tract (GIT, while the delayed phase is a consequence of release of substance P (SP in the brainstem. However, more recent findings argue against this simplistic neurotransmitter and anatomical view of CINV. Revision of the hypothesis advocates a more complex, differential and overlapping involvement of several emetic neurotransmitters/modulators (e.g. dopamine, serotonin, substance P, prostaglandins and related arachidonic acid derived metabolites in both phases of emesis occurring concomitantly in the brainstem and in the GIT enteric nervous system (ENS [1]. No single antiemetic is currently available to completely prevent both phases of CINV. The standard antiemetic regimens include a 5-HT3 antagonist plus dexamethasone for the prevention of acute emetic phase, combined with an NK1 receptor antagonist (e.g. aprepitant for the delayed phase. Although NK1 antagonists behave in animals as broad-spectrum antiemetics against different emetogens including cisplatin-induced acute and delayed vomiting, by themselves they are not very effective against CINV in cancer patients. Cannabinoids such as D9-THC also behave as broad-spectrum antiemetics against diverse emetic stimuli as well as being effective against both phases of CINV in animals and patients. Potential side effects may limit the clinical utility of direct-acting cannabinoid agonists which could be avoided by the use of corresponding indirect-acting agonists. Cannabinoids (both phyto-derived and synthetic behave as agonist antiemetics via the activation of cannabinoid CB1 receptors in both the brainstem and the ENS emetic loci. An endocannabinoid antiemetic tone may exist since inverse CB1

  15. Evaluation of the effectiveness of a broad-spectrum sunscreen in the prevention of chloasma in pregnant women.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lakhdar, H; Zouhair, K; Khadir, K; Essari, A; Richard, A; Seité, S; Rougier, A

    2007-07-01

    Chloasma, or melasma, is a pigmentary disorder that can affect between 50% and 70% of pregnant women. During pregnancy, chloasma does not require any particular treatment beside the use of an effective sunscreen and avoiding the use of any photosensitizing products or inappropriate skin care routine. However, there exist very few studies related to the benefits of sunscreens to prevent this dermatosis. The aim of this study was to assess the role of a broad-spectrum sunscreen in the prevention and treatment of chloasma in pregnant women. We tested the effectiveness and tolerance of a sunscreen composition (SPF 50+, UVA-PF 28) during a 12-month clinical trial on 200 parturients. The 'excellent' tolerance of the sunscreen under evaluation was confirmed. Out of 185 patients who completed the study, only five new cases of chloasma were noted, an occurrence of 2.7%, which is much lower than the 53% previously observed in an usual condition study (same investigators, same geographical area and same time frame). In addition, the clinical effectiveness of the evaluated sunscreen was judged 'excellent' by the majority of parturients and by the research dermatologists during all the consultations. It is also worth noting that at 6 months, a clinical improvement was observed in 8 out of 12 volunteers who were affected by a pre-existing chloasma observed during their inclusion visit. Colorimetric measurements showed that, at the end of their pregnancy, the parturients' skin was, on average, significantly lightened (increase of parameter L* in 38% cases) and less pigmented (reduction of parameter b* in 50% cases); thus, resulting in a significantly lighter skin colour (increase of ITA degrees in 69% cases) compared to their inclusion visit. This study clearly demonstrates the effectiveness of the well-tolerated broad-spectrum sunscreen evaluated, in the prevention of the development of chloasma in pregnant women.

  16. Bioaugmentation of strain Methylobacterium sp. C1 towards p-nitrophenol removal with broad spectrum coaggregating bacteria in sequencing batch biofilm reactors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yue, Wenlong; Chen, Mei; Cheng, Zhongqin; Xie, Liqun; Li, Mengying

    2018-02-15

    This work was conducted in order to evaluate an instance of bioaugmentation, namely, the addition of a novel p-nitrophenol (PNP)-degrading bacterium Methylobacterium sp. C1 coaggregated with two other broad-spectrum coaggregating strains (Bacillus megaterium T1 and Bacillus cereus G5) within sequence batch biofilm reactors (SBBRs). Results showed that biofilms consisting of C1 and coaggregating bacteria were resistant to shock loads and were more efficient at PNP removal. High-throughput sequencing data revealed that biofilms formed in the presence of the coaggregating bacteria demonstrated greater microbial diversity. These results suggest that broad-spectrum coaggregating bacteria may be capable of mediating the immobilization of exogenous degrading bacteria into biofilms, rendering them more resistant to toxic compounds and environmental stresses. This represents the first attempt to assess the bioaugmentation of PNP-contaminated wastewater treatment through the utilization of broad-spectrum coaggregating bacteria. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  17. New insights into broad spectrum communities of the Early Holocene Near East: The birds of Hallan Çemi

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zeder, Melinda A.; Spitzer, Megan D.

    2016-11-01

    The Early Holocene in Near East was a pivotal transitional period that witnessed dramatic changes in climate and environment, human settlement, major changes in subsistence strategies focusing on a broad range of different plant and animal resources, and a radical restructuring of social relations. The remarkable corpus of avifauna from the Early Holocene site of Hallan Çemi in southeastern Turkey sheds new light on key issues about this dynamic period that has been termed the ;Broad Spectrum Revolution;. The avifauna from this important site demonstrate how Hallan Çemi occupants took advantage of the site's strategic location at the junction of multiple environmental zones by extracting a diverse range of seasonally available resources from both near-by and more distant eco-zones to cobble together a stable subsistence economy capable of supporting this small community throughout the year. They give testimony to the impacts of resource utilization over time, especially on species unable to rebound from sustained human hunting. At the same time, they show how Hallan Çemi residents mitigated these impacts by replacing depleted resources with alternative, more resilient ones that could be more sustainably harvested. They open a window onto the growing investment in feasting and ritual activity that helped bind this community together. In so doing they provide a means of empirically evaluating the efficacy of contrasting explanatory frameworks for the Broad Spectrum Revolution that gave rise to the subsequent domestication of plant and animals in the Near East. Contrary to frameworks that cast these developments as responses to resource depression, lessons learned from the Hallan Çemi avifauna lend support to frameworks that emphasize the human capacity to strategically target, capitalize, and improve upon circumscribed resource rich environments in a way that permits more permanent occupation of these niches. And they underscore the degree to which social and

  18. Eggplant Resistance to the Ralstonia solanacearum Species Complex Involves Both Broad-Spectrum and Strain-Specific Quantitative Trait Loci

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sylvia Salgon

    2017-05-01

    Full Text Available Bacterial wilt (BW is a major disease of solanaceous crops caused by the Ralstonia solanacearum species complex (RSSC. Strains are grouped into five phylotypes (I, IIA, IIB, III, and IV. Varietal resistance is the most sustainable strategy for managing BW. Nevertheless, breeding to improve cultivar resistance has been limited by the pathogen’s extensive genetic diversity. Identifying the genetic bases of specific and non-specific resistance is a prerequisite to breed improvement. A major gene (ERs1 was previously mapped in eggplant (Solanum melongena L. using an intraspecific population of recombinant inbred lines derived from the cross of susceptible MM738 (S × resistant AG91-25 (R. ERs1 was originally found to control three strains from phylotype I, while being totally ineffective against a virulent strain from the same phylotype. We tested this population against four additional RSSC strains, representing phylotypes I, IIA, IIB, and III in order to clarify the action spectrum of ERs1. We recorded wilting symptoms and bacterial stem colonization under controlled artificial inoculation. We constructed a high-density genetic map of the population using single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs developed from genotyping-by-sequencing and added 168 molecular markers [amplified fragment length polymorphisms (AFLPs, simple sequence repeats (SSRs, and sequence-related amplified polymorphisms (SRAPs] developed previously. The new linkage map based on a total of 1,035 markers was anchored on eggplant, tomato, and potato genomes. Quantitative trait locus (QTL mapping for resistance against a total of eight RSSC strains resulted in the detection of one major phylotype-specific QTL and two broad-spectrum QTLs. The major QTL, which specifically controls three phylotype I strains, was located at the bottom of chromosome 9 and corresponded to the previously identified major gene ERs1. Five candidate R-genes were underlying this QTL, with different alleles

  19. A cost analysis of a broad-spectrum antibiotic therapy in the empirical treatment of health care-associated infections in cirrhotic patients

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lucidi, Cristina; Di Gregorio, Vincenza; Ceccarelli, Giancarlo; Venditti, Mario; Riggio, Oliviero; Merli, Manuela

    2017-01-01

    Background Early diagnosis and appropriate treatment of infections in cirrhosis are crucial. As new guidelines in this context, particularly for health care-associated (HCA) infections, would be needed, we performed a trial documenting whether an empirical broad-spectrum antibiotic therapy is more effective than the standard one for these infections. Because of the higher daily cost of broad-spectrum than standard antibiotics, we performed a cost analysis to compare: 1) total drug costs, 2) profitability of hospital admissions. Methods This retrospective observational analysis was performed on patients enrolled in the trial NCT01820026, in which consecutive cirrhotic patients with HCA infections were randomly assigned to a standard vs a broad-spectrum treatment. Antibiotic daily doses, days of treatment, length of hospital stay, and DRG (diagnosis-related group) were recorded from the clinical trial medical records. The profitability of hospitalizations was calculated considering DRG tariffs divided by length of hospital stay. Results We considered 84 patients (42 for each group). The standard therapy allowed to obtain a first-line treatment cost lower than in the broad-spectrum therapy. Anyway, the latter, being related to a lower failure rate (19% vs 57.1%), resulted in cost saving in terms of cumulative antibiotic costs (first- and second-line treatments). The mean cost saving per patient for the broad-spectrum arm was €44.18 (−37.6%), with a total cost saving of about €2,000. Compared to standard group, we observed a statistically significant reduction in hospital stay from 17.8 to 11.8 days (pprofitable daily cost than standard group (€345.61 vs €252.23; +37%). Conclusion Our study supports the idea that the use of a broad-spectrum empirical treatment for HCA infections in cirrhosis would be cost-saving and that hospitals need to be aware of the clinical and economic consequences of a wrong antibiotic treatment in this setting. PMID:28721080

  20. The broad-spectrum metalloproteinase inhibitor BB-94 inhibits growth, HER3 and Erk activation in fulvestrant-resistant breast cancer cell lines

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kirkegaard, Tove; Yde, Christina Westmose; Kveiborg, Marie

    2014-01-01

    cells. This was prevented by treatment of resistant cells with the metalloproteinase inhibitor TAPI-2. Only the broad-spectrum metalloproteinase inhibitor BB-94, and not the more selective inhibitors GM6001 or TAPI-2, which inhibited shedding of the HER ligands produced by the fulvestrant...... of ligands. Only the broad-spectrum metalloproteinase inhibitor BB-94 could abrogate HER3 and Erk activation in the resistant cells, which stresses the complexity of the resistance mechanisms and the requirement of targeting signaling from HER receptors by multiple strategies....

  1. Rational design of broad spectrum antibacterial activity based on a clinically relevant enoyl-acyl carrier protein (ACP) reductase inhibitor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schiebel, Johannes; Chang, Andrew; Shah, Sonam; Lu, Yang; Liu, Li; Pan, Pan; Hirschbeck, Maria W; Tareilus, Mona; Eltschkner, Sandra; Yu, Weixuan; Cummings, Jason E; Knudson, Susan E; Bommineni, Gopal R; Walker, Stephen G; Slayden, Richard A; Sotriffer, Christoph A; Tonge, Peter J; Kisker, Caroline

    2014-06-06

    Determining the molecular basis for target selectivity is of particular importance in drug discovery. The ideal antibiotic should be active against a broad spectrum of pathogenic organisms with a minimal effect on human targets. CG400549, a Staphylococcus-specific 2-pyridone compound that inhibits the enoyl-acyl carrier protein reductase (FabI), has recently been shown to possess human efficacy for the treatment of methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus infections, which constitute a serious threat to human health. In this study, we solved the structures of three different FabI homologues in complex with several pyridone inhibitors, including CG400549. Based on these structures, we rationalize the 65-fold reduced affinity of CG400549 toward Escherichia coli versus S. aureus FabI and implement concepts to improve the spectrum of antibacterial activity. The identification of different conformational states along the reaction coordinate of the enzymatic hydride transfer provides an elegant visual depiction of the relationship between catalysis and inhibition, which facilitates rational inhibitor design. Ultimately, we developed the novel 4-pyridone-based FabI inhibitor PT166 that retained favorable pharmacokinetics and efficacy in a mouse model of S. aureus infection with extended activity against Gram-negative and mycobacterial organisms. © 2014 by The American Society for Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, Inc.

  2. MGCD0103, a novel isotype-selective histone deacetylase inhibitor, has broad spectrum antitumor activity in vitro and in vivo.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fournel, Marielle; Bonfils, Claire; Hou, Yu; Yan, Pu Theresa; Trachy-Bourget, Marie-Claude; Kalita, Ann; Liu, Jianhong; Lu, Ai-Hua; Zhou, Nancy Z; Robert, Marie-France; Gillespie, Jeffrey; Wang, James J; Ste-Croix, Hélène; Rahil, Jubrail; Lefebvre, Sylvain; Moradei, Oscar; Delorme, Daniel; Macleod, A Robert; Besterman, Jeffrey M; Li, Zuomei

    2008-04-01

    Nonselective inhibitors of human histone deacetylases (HDAC) are known to have antitumor activity in mice in vivo, and several of them are under clinical investigation. The first of these, Vorinostat (SAHA), has been approved for treatment of cutaneous T-cell lymphoma. Questions remain concerning which HDAC isotype(s) are the best to target for anticancer activity and whether increased efficacy and safety will result with an isotype-selective HDAC inhibitor. We have developed an isotype-selective HDAC inhibitor, MGCD0103, which potently targets human HDAC1 but also has inhibitory activity against HDAC2, HDAC3, and HDAC11 in vitro. In intact cells, MGCD0103 inhibited only a fraction of the total HDAC activity and showed long-lasting inhibitory activity even upon drug removal. MGCD0103 induced hyperacetylation of histones, selectively induced apoptosis, and caused cell cycle blockade in various human cancer cell lines in a dose-dependent manner. MGCD0103 exhibited potent and selective antiproliferative activities against a broad spectrum of human cancer cell lines in vitro, and HDAC inhibitory activity was required for these effects. In vivo, MGCD0103 significantly inhibited growth of human tumor xenografts in nude mice in a dose-dependent manner and the antitumor activity correlated with induction of histone acetylation in tumors. Our findings suggest that the isotype-selective HDAC inhibition by MGCD0103 is sufficient for antitumor activity in vivo and that further clinical investigation is warranted.

  3. A novel alkaloid from marine-derived actinomycete Streptomyces xinghaiensis with broad-spectrum antibacterial and cytotoxic activities.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wence Jiao

    Full Text Available Due to the increasing emergence of drug-resistant bacteria and tumor cell lines, novel antibiotics with antibacterial and cytotoxic activities are urgently needed. Marine actinobacteria are rich sources of novel antibiotics, and here we report the discovery of a novel alkaloid, xinghaiamine A, from a marine-derived actinomycete Streptomyces xinghaiensis NRRL B24674(T. Xinghaiamine A was purified from the fermentation broth, and its structure was elucidated based on extensive spectroscopic analysis, including 1D and 2D NMR spectrum as well as mass spectrometry. Xinghaiamine A was identified to be a novel alkaloid with highly symmetric structure on the basis of sulfoxide functional group, and sulfoxide containing compound has so far never been reported in microorganisms. Biological assays revealed that xinghaiamine A exhibited broad-spectrum antibacterial activities to both Gram-negative persistent hospital pathogens (e.g. Acinetobacter baumannii, Pseudomonas aeruginosa and Escherichia coli and Gram-positive ones, which include Staphylococcus aureus and Bacillus subtilis. In addition, xinghaiamine A also exhibited potent cytotoxic activity to human cancer cell lines of MCF-7 and U-937 with the IC50 of 0.6 and 0.5 µM, respectively.

  4. Sedaxane, Isopyrazam and Solatenol™: Novel Broad-spectrum Fungicides Inhibiting Succinate Dehydrogenase (SDH) - Synthesis Challenges and Biological Aspects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Walter, Harald; Tobler, Hans; Gribkov, Denis; Corsi, Camilla

    2015-08-19

    Sedaxane (SDX) 1, isopyrazam (IZM) 2 and Solatenol™ (STL) 3 are broad-spectrum pyrazole carboxamides, which originate from novel chemical classes of fungicides. Their mode of action (MoA) is inhibition of succinate dehydrogenase (SDH), which was recognized for a long time to deliver only compounds with a narrow biological spectrum. This view changed with the market introduction of BASF's boscalid in 2003. All major agro-companies subsequently worked in parallel on this MoA successfully and recently introduced new compounds to the market. Syngenta entered the SDHI area in 1998 and was able to introduce three complementary compounds to the market between 2010 and 2012. In this short review some synthesis challenges and biological effects of SDX 1, IZM 2 and STL 3 will be covered. New cost-efficient synthesis strategies for the preparation of o-biscyclopropyl-aniline, new benzonorbornene intermediates and the key pyrazole carboxylic acid intermediate which is essential for all three Syngenta SDHIs, will be in the focus of this review.

  5. Broad-spectrum antiviral activity of chebulagic acid and punicalagin against viruses that use glycosaminoglycans for entry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Liang-Tzung; Chen, Ting-Ying; Lin, Song-Chow; Chung, Chueh-Yao; Lin, Ta-Chen; Wang, Guey-Horng; Anderson, Robert; Lin, Chun-Ching; Richardson, Christopher D

    2013-08-07

    We previously identified two hydrolyzable tannins, chebulagic acid (CHLA) and punicalagin (PUG) that blocked herpes simplex virus type 1 (HSV-1) entry and spread. These compounds inhibited viral glycoprotein interactions with cell surface glycosaminoglycans (GAGs). Based on this property, we evaluated their antiviral efficacy against several different viruses known to employ GAGs for host cell entry. Extensive analysis of the tannins' mechanism of action was performed on a panel of viruses during the attachment and entry steps of infection. Virus-specific binding assays and the analysis of viral spread during treatment with these compounds were also conducted. CHLA and PUG were effective in abrogating infection by human cytomegalovirus (HCMV), hepatitis C virus (HCV), dengue virus (DENV), measles virus (MV), and respiratory syncytial virus (RSV), at μM concentrations and in dose-dependent manners without significant cytotoxicity. Moreover, the natural compounds inhibited viral attachment, penetration, and spread, to different degrees for each virus. Specifically, the tannins blocked all these steps of infection for HCMV, HCV, and MV, but had little effect on the post-fusion spread of DENV and RSV, which could suggest intriguing differences in the roles of GAG-interactions for these viruses. CHLA and PUG may be of value as broad-spectrum antivirals for limiting emerging/recurring viruses known to engage host cell GAGs for entry. Further studies testing the efficacy of these tannins in vivo against certain viruses are justified.

  6. From Broad-Spectrum Biocides to Quorum Sensing Disruptors and Mussel Repellents: Antifouling Profile of Alkyl Triphenylphosphonium Salts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martín-Rodríguez, Alberto J.; Babarro, Jose M. F.; Lahoz, Fernando; Sansón, Marta; Martín, Víctor S.; Norte, Manuel; Fernández, José J.

    2015-01-01

    ‘Onium’ compounds, including ammonium and phosphonium salts, have been employed as antiseptics and disinfectants. These cationic biocides have been incorporated into multiple materials, principally to avoid bacterial attachment. In this work, we selected 20 alkyl-triphenylphosphonium salts, differing mainly in the length and functionalization of their alkyl chains, in fulfilment of two main objectives: 1) to provide a comprehensive evaluation of the antifouling profile of these molecules with relevant marine fouling organisms; and 2) to shed new light on their potential applications, beyond their classic use as broad-spectrum biocides. In this regard, we demonstrate for the first time that these compounds are also able to act as non-toxic quorum sensing disruptors in two different bacterial models (Chromobacterium violaceum and Vibrio harveyi) as well as repellents in the mussel Mytilus galloprovincialis. In addition, their inhibitory activity on a fouling-relevant enzymatic model (tyrosinase) is characterized. An analysis of the structure-activity relationships of these compounds for antifouling purposes is provided, which may result useful in the design of targeted antifouling solutions with these molecules. Altogether, the findings reported herein provide a different perspective on the biological activities of phosphonium compounds that is particularly focused on, but, as the reader will realize, is not limited to their use as antifouling agents. PMID:25897858

  7. From broad-spectrum biocides to quorum sensing disruptors and mussel repellents: antifouling profile of alkyl triphenylphosphonium salts.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alberto J Martín-Rodríguez

    Full Text Available 'Onium' compounds, including ammonium and phosphonium salts, have been employed as antiseptics and disinfectants. These cationic biocides have been incorporated into multiple materials, principally to avoid bacterial attachment. In this work, we selected 20 alkyl-triphenylphosphonium salts, differing mainly in the length and functionalization of their alkyl chains, in fulfilment of two main objectives: 1 to provide a comprehensive evaluation of the antifouling profile of these molecules with relevant marine fouling organisms; and 2 to shed new light on their potential applications, beyond their classic use as broad-spectrum biocides. In this regard, we demonstrate for the first time that these compounds are also able to act as non-toxic quorum sensing disruptors in two different bacterial models (Chromobacterium violaceum and Vibrio harveyi as well as repellents in the mussel Mytilus galloprovincialis. In addition, their inhibitory activity on a fouling-relevant enzymatic model (tyrosinase is characterized. An analysis of the structure-activity relationships of these compounds for antifouling purposes is provided, which may result useful in the design of targeted antifouling solutions with these molecules. Altogether, the findings reported herein provide a different perspective on the biological activities of phosphonium compounds that is particularly focused on, but, as the reader will realize, is not limited to their use as antifouling agents.

  8. Chitosan hydrogels embedding hyper-crosslinked polymer particles as reusable broad-spectrum adsorbents for dye removal.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salzano de Luna, Martina; Castaldo, Rachele; Altobelli, Rosaria; Gioiella, Lucia; Filippone, Giovanni; Gentile, Gennaro; Ambrogi, Veronica

    2017-12-01

    The removal of dye and toxic ionic pollutants from water is an extremely important issue that requires systematic and efficient adsorbent preparation strategies. To address this challenge, we developed composite chitosan (CS)-based hydrogels containing hyper-crosslinked polymer (HCP) particles to be used as broad-spectrum adsorbents. The goal is to efficiently combine the dye adsorption ability of chitosan and the capacity of the porous particles of trapping pollutant molecules. The HCP particles are well distributed and firmly embedded into the chitosan matrix and the composite hydrogels exhibit improved mechanical properties. Adsorption experiments reveal a synergistic effect between CS and HCP particles, and the samples are able to remove both anionic and cationic dyes (indigo carmine, rhodamine 6G and sunset yellow) from water. The maximum dye uptake is higher than that of comparable biosorbents. Moreover, the mechanical properties of the composite hydrogels are enhanced respect to pure CS, and the samples can be regenerated and reused keeping their adsorption ability unaltered over successive cycles of adsorption, desorption, and washing. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  9. Synthesis and Properties of Benzo[a]phenoxazinium Chalcogen Analogues as Novel Broad-Spectrum Antimicrobial Photosensitizers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Foley, James W.; Song, Xiangzhi; Demidova, Tatiana N.; Jilal, Fatima; Hamblin, Michael R.

    2011-01-01

    The goal of this investigation was to develop improved photosensitizers for use as antimicrobial drugs in photodynamic therapy of localized infections. Replacement of the oxygen atom in 5-(ethylamino)-9-diethylaminobenzo[a]phenoxazinium chloride (1) with sulfur and selenium afforded thiazinium and selenazinium analogues 2 and 3, respectively. All three dyes are water soluble, lipophilic, and red light absorbers. The relative photodynamic activities of the chalcogen series were evaluated against a panel of prototypical pathogenic microorganisms: the Gram-positive Enterococcus faecalis, the Gram-negative Escherichia coli, and the fungus Candida albicans. Selenium dye 3 was highly effective as a broad-spectrum antimicrobial photosensitizer with fluences of 4–32 J/cm2 killing 2–5 more logs of all cell types than sulfur dye 2, which was slightly more effective than oxygen analogue 1. These data, taken with the findings of uptake and retention studies, suggest that the superior activity of selenium derivative 3 can be attributed to its much higher triplet quantum yield. PMID:16913718

  10. Endophytic Paraconiothyrium sp. from Zingiber officinale Rosc. Displays Broad-Spectrum Antimicrobial Activity by Production of Danthron.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anisha, C; Sachidanandan, P; Radhakrishnan, E K

    2017-11-03

    The bioactivity spectrum of fungal endophytes isolated from Zingiber officinale was analyzed against clinical pathogens and against the phytopathogen Pythium myriotylum, which causes Pythium rot in ginger. One of the isolates GFM13 showed broad bioactivity against various pathogens tested including P. myriotylum. The spore suspension as well as the culture filtrate of the endophytic fungal isolate was found to effectively protect ginger rhizomes from Pythium rot. By molecular identification, the fungal endophyte was identified as Paraconiothyrium sp. The bioactive compound produced by the isolate was separated by bioactivity-guided fractionation and was identified by GC-MS as danthron, an anthraquinone derivative. PCR amplification showed the presence of non-reducing polyketide synthase gene (NR-PKS) in the endophyte GFM13, which is reported to be responsible for the synthesis of anthraquinones in fungi. This is the first report of danthron being produced as the biologically active component of Paraconiothyrium sp. Danthron is reported to have wide pharmaceutical and agronomic applications which include its use as a fungicide in agriculture. The broad-spectrum antimicrobial activity of danthron and the endophytic origin of Paraconiothyrium sp. offer immense applications of the study.

  11. From broad-spectrum biocides to quorum sensing disruptors and mussel repellents: antifouling profile of alkyl triphenylphosphonium salts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martín-Rodríguez, Alberto J; Babarro, Jose M F; Lahoz, Fernando; Sansón, Marta; Martín, Víctor S; Norte, Manuel; Fernández, José J

    2015-01-01

    'Onium' compounds, including ammonium and phosphonium salts, have been employed as antiseptics and disinfectants. These cationic biocides have been incorporated into multiple materials, principally to avoid bacterial attachment. In this work, we selected 20 alkyl-triphenylphosphonium salts, differing mainly in the length and functionalization of their alkyl chains, in fulfilment of two main objectives: 1) to provide a comprehensive evaluation of the antifouling profile of these molecules with relevant marine fouling organisms; and 2) to shed new light on their potential applications, beyond their classic use as broad-spectrum biocides. In this regard, we demonstrate for the first time that these compounds are also able to act as non-toxic quorum sensing disruptors in two different bacterial models (Chromobacterium violaceum and Vibrio harveyi) as well as repellents in the mussel Mytilus galloprovincialis. In addition, their inhibitory activity on a fouling-relevant enzymatic model (tyrosinase) is characterized. An analysis of the structure-activity relationships of these compounds for antifouling purposes is provided, which may result useful in the design of targeted antifouling solutions with these molecules. Altogether, the findings reported herein provide a different perspective on the biological activities of phosphonium compounds that is particularly focused on, but, as the reader will realize, is not limited to their use as antifouling agents.

  12. Durable broad-spectrum powdery mildew resistance in pea er1 plants is conferred by natural loss-of-function mutations in PsMLO1

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Humphry, M.; Reinstädler, A.; Ivanov, S.; Bisseling, T.; Panstruga, R.

    2011-01-01

    Loss-of-function alleles of plant-specific MLO (Mildew Resistance Locus O) genes confer broad-spectrum powdery mildew resistance in monocot (barley) and dicot (Arabidopsis thaliana, tomato) plants. Recessively inherited powdery mildew resistance in pea (Pisum sativum) er1 plants is, in many aspects,

  13. Naturally occurring broad-spectrum powdery mildw resistance in a central American tomato accession is caused by loss of Mlo function

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bai, Y.; Pavan, S.N.C.; Zheng, Z.; Zappel, N.F.; Reinstadler, A.; Lotti, C.; Giovanni, de C.; Ricciardi, L.; Lindhout, P.; Visser, R.G.F.; Theres, K.; Panstruga, R.

    2008-01-01

    The resistant cherry tomato (Solanum lycopersicum var. cerasiforme) line LC-95, derived from an accession collected in Ecuador, harbors a natural allele (ol-2) that confers broad-spectrum and recessively inherited resistance to powdery mildew (Oidium neolycopersici). As both the genetic and

  14. Comparison of nitroethane, 2-nitro-1-propanol, lauric acid, Lauricidin and the Hawaiian marine algae, Chaetoceros, for potential broad-spectrum control of anaerobically grown lactic acid bacteria

    Science.gov (United States)

    The gastrointestinal tract of bovines often contains bacteria that contribute to disorders of the rumen and may also contain foodborne or opportunistic human pathogens as well as bacteria capable of causing mastitis in cows. Thus, there is a need to develop broad-spectrum therapies that are effecti...

  15. Draft Genome Sequence of Streptomyces sp. Strain Wb2n-11, a Desert Isolate with Broad-Spectrum Antagonism against Soilborne Phytopathogens

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Köberl, Martina; White, Richard A.; Erschen, Sabine; El-Arabi, Tarek F.; Jansson, Janet K.; Berg, Gabriele

    2015-08-06

    Streptomyces sp. strain Wb2n-11, isolated from native desert soil, exhibited broad-spectrum antagonism against plant pathogenic fungi, bacteria and nematodes. The 8.2 Mb draft genome reveals genes putatively responsible for its promising biocontrol activity and genes which enable the soil bacterium to directly interact beneficially with plants.

  16. Characterization of the UVA protection provided by avobenzone, zinc oxide, and titanium dioxide in broad-spectrum sunscreen products.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beasley, Donathan G; Meyer, Thomas A

    2010-12-01

    Solar UV radiation (UVR) is composed of UVB (290-320 nm) and UVA (320-400 nm) wavelengths. Only two sunscreen active ingredients approved in the US, avobenzone (butylmethoxydibenzoylmethane) and zinc oxide (ZnO), provide true broad-spectrum protection against UVA wavelengths >360 nm. Although effective against shorter UVR wavelengths sunscreen film during UVR exposure, avobenzone needs to be formulated into sunscreen products using sound formulation strategies. To characterize the efficacy of avobenzone, ZnO, and TiO(2) in terms of their abilities to provide broad UVA protection and to demonstrate the effectiveness of the different formulation strategies used today to maintain the efficacy of avobenzone even during prolonged exposures to UVR. UVA efficacy was assessed by measuring absorbance profiles in vitro using Vitro Skin® (IMS Inc., Orange, CT, USA) as an inert substrate and by determining UVA protection factors (PFA) on human skin. The impact of avobenzone loss on sun protection factor (SPF) and PFA values was evaluated by serially reducing avobenzone concentrations in an otherwise photostable product. The photostabilizing influence of specific formulation ingredients was monitored by measuring the extent to which they prevented UVR-induced degradation of avobenzone, whereas photostability of commercial sunscreen products was quantified by measuring the percentage change in absorbance within the UVB and UVA spectral regions following irradiation of thin product films on inert substrates. Model formulations containing 3% avobenzone or 5% ZnO provided superior attenuation of UVA wavelengths >360 nm compared with formulas containing 5% TiO(2). Additionally, sunscreen products of similar SPF containing avobenzone or ZnO exhibited significantly higher PFA values than those containing TiO(2). The addition of photostabilized avobenzone or ZnO increased PFA values nearly 3-fold, whereas the addition of TiO(2) increased PFA values only modestly. Judicious

  17. Broad-spectrum antiviral activity including human immunodeficiency and hepatitis C viruses mediated by a novel retinoid thiosemicarbazone derivative.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kesel, Andreas J

    2011-05-01

    Aromatic aldehyde-derived thiosemicarbazones 4-6, the S-substituted modified thiosemicarbazones 7/8, and a vitamin A-derived (retinoid) thiosemicarbazone derivative 12 were investigated as inhibitors of human hepatitis C virus (HCV) subgenomic RNA replicon Huh7 ET (luc-ubi-neo/ET) replication. Compounds 4-6 and 12 were found to be potent suppressors of HCV RNA replicon replication. The trifluoromethoxy-substituted thiosemicarbazone 6 and the retinoid thiosemicarbazone derivative 12 were even superior in selectivity to the included reference agent recombinant human alpha-interferon-2b, showing potencies in the nanomolar range of concentration. In addition, compounds 5, 6, 8 and 12 were tested as inhibitors of cytopathic effect (CPE) induced by human varicella-zoster virus (VZV) and/or human cytomegalovirus (HCMV). Compounds 4-6, 8 and 12 were additionally examined as inhibitors of CPE induced by cowpox virus and vaccinia virus. Thiosemicarbazone 4 was inhibitory on cowpox and vaccinia virus replication comparable in potency and selectivity to the reference agent cidofovir. Retinoid thiosemicarbazone derivative 12 was active as micromolar inhibitor of VZV, HCMV, and, in addition, human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) replication. These results indicate that thiosemicarbazone derivatives are appropriate lead structures to be evaluated in targeted antiviral therapies for hepatitis C (STAT-C), and that the vitamin A-related thiosemicarbazone derivative 12 emerges as a broad-spectrum antiviral agent, co-suppressing the multiplication of important RNA and DNA viruses. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  18. Broad-spectrum sunscreens prevent the secretion of proinflammatory cytokines in human keratinocytes exposed to ultraviolet A and phototoxic lomefloxacin

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Reinhardt, P.; Cybulski, M. [Lasers and Electro-Optics Div., Consumer and Clinical Radiation Protection Bureau, Product Safety Program, Healthy Environments and Consumer Safety Branch, Health Canada, Ottawa, Ontario (Canada)], E-mail: pascale_reinhardt@hc-sc.gc.ca; Miller, S.M.; Ferrarotto, C.; Wilkins, R. [Radiobiology Div., Consumer and Clinical Radiation Protection Bureau, Product Safety Program, Healthy Environments and Consumer Safety Branch, Health Canada, Ottawa, Ontario (Canada); Deslauriers, Y. [Lasers and Electro-Optics Div., Consumer and Clinical Radiation Protection Bureau, Product Safety Program, Healthy Environments and Consumer Safety Branch, Health Canada, Ottawa, Ontario (Canada)

    2006-02-15

    The combination of phototoxic drugs and ultraviolet (UV) radiation can trigger the release of proinflammatory cytokines. The present study measured the ability of sunscreens to prevent cytokine secretion in human keratinocytes following cotreatment of these cells with a known photoreactive drug and UVA. Keratinocytes were treated for 1 h with increasing concentrations of lomefloxacin (LOM) or norfloxacin (NOR), exposed to 15 J/cm{sup 2} UVA, and incubated for 24 h. NOR, owing to the absence of a fluorine atom in position 8, was non-phototoxic and used as a negative control. Cell viability and the release of 3 cytokines were assessed, namely interleukin-1{alpha} (IL-1{alpha}), interleukin-6 (IL-6), and tumour necrosis factor-{alpha} (TNF-{alpha}). The measurement of these cytokines may be a useful tool for detecting photoreactive compounds. To measure their ability to prevent cytokine secretion, various sunscreens were inserted between the UVA source and the cells. Treatment with NOR, NOR plus UVA, or LOM had no effect on the cells. LOM plus UVA, however, had an effect on cell viability and on cytokine secretion. IL-1{alpha} levels increased with LOM concentration. The release of TNF-{alpha} and IL-6 followed the same pattern at lower concentrations of LOM but peaked at 15 {mu}mol/L and decreased at higher concentrations. Sunscreens protected the cells from the effects of LOM plus UVA, as cell viability and levels of cytokines remained the same as in the control cells. In conclusion, the application of broad-spectrum sunscreen by individuals exposed to UVA radiation may prevent phototoxic reactions initiated by drugs such as LOM. (author)

  19. Controlled delivery of a new broad spectrum antibacterial agent against colitis: In vitro and in vivo performance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nieto-Bobadilla, M S; Siepmann, F; Djouina, M; Dubuquoy, L; Tesse, N; Willart, J-F; Dubreuil, L; Siepmann, J; Neut, C

    2015-10-01

    Coated pellets and mini-tablets were prepared containing a new broad spectrum antibacterial agent: CIN-102, a well-defined, synergistic blend of trans-cinnamaldehyde, trans-2-methoxycinnamaldehyde, cinnamyl acetate, linalool, β-caryophyllene, cineol and benzyl benzoate. The aim was to provide a new treatment method for colitis, especially for Inflammatory Bowel Disease (IBD) patients. Since the simple oral gavage of CIN-102 was not able to reduce the pathogenic bacteria involved in colitis (rat model), the drug was incorporated into multiparticulates. The idea was to minimize undesired drug release in the upper gastrointestinal tract and to control CIN-102 release in the colon, in order to optimize the resulting antibiotic concentration at the site of action. A particular challenge was the fact that CIN-102 is a volatile hydrophobic liquid. Pellet cores were prepared by extrusion-spheronization and coated with polymer blends, which are sensitive to colonic bacterial enzymes. Mini-tablets were prepared by direct compression. The release of the main compound of CIN-102 (cinnamaldehyde, 86.7% w/w) was monitored in vitro. Optimized coated pellets and mini-tablets were also tested in vivo: in seven-week-old, male mice suffering from dextran sodium sulfate induced colitis. Importantly, both types of multiparticulates were able: (i) to significantly reduce the number of luminal and mucosal enterobacteria in the mice (the levels of which are increased in the disease state), and (ii) to improve the clinical course of the intestinal inflammation (decrease in the percentages of mice with bloody stools and diarrhea). Thus, the proposed coated pellets and matrix mini-tablets allowing for controlled CIN-102 release show a promising potential for new treatment methods of colitis. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  20. Broad spectrum infrared thermal desorption of wipe-based explosive and narcotic samples for trace mass spectrometric detection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Forbes, Thomas P; Staymates, Matthew; Sisco, Edward

    2017-08-07

    Wipe collected analytes were thermally desorbed using broad spectrum near infrared heating for mass spectrometric detection. Employing a twin tube filament-based infrared emitter, rapid and efficiently powered thermal desorption and detection of nanogram levels of explosives and narcotics was demonstrated. The infrared thermal desorption (IRTD) platform developed here used multi-mode heating (direct radiation and secondary conduction from substrate and subsequent convection from air) and a temperature ramp to efficiently desorb analytes with vapor pressures across eight orders of magnitude. The wipe substrate experienced heating rates up to (85 ± 2) °C s(-1) with a time constant of (3.9 ± 0.2) s for 100% power emission. The detection of trace analytes was also demonstrated from complex mixtures, including plastic-bonded explosives and exogenous narcotics, explosives, and metabolites from collected artificial latent fingerprints. Manipulation of the emission power and duration directly controlled the heating rate and maximum temperature, enabling differential thermal desorption and a level of upstream separation for enhanced specificity. Transitioning from 100% power and 5 s emission duration to 25% power and 30 s emission enabled an order of magnitude increase in the temporal separation (single seconds to tens of seconds) of the desorption of volatile and semi-volatile species within a collected fingerprint. This mode of operation reduced local gas-phase concentrations, reducing matrix effects experienced with high concentration mixtures. IRTD provides a unique platform for the desorption of trace analytes from wipe collections, an area of importance to the security sector, transportation agencies, and customs and border protection.

  1. GLD-2/RNP-8 cytoplasmic poly(A) polymerase is a broad-spectrum regulator of the oogenesis program

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wilson, Tracy L.; Kimble, Judith

    2010-01-01

    Regulated polyadenylation is a broadly conserved mechanism that controls key events during oogenesis. Pivotal to that mechanism is GLD-2, a catalytic subunit of cytoplasmic poly(A) polymerase (PAP). Caenorhabditis elegans GLD-2 forms an active PAP with multiple RNA-binding partners to regulate diverse aspects of germline and early embryonic development. One GLD-2 partner, RNP-8, was previously shown to influence oocyte fate specification. Here we use a genomic approach to identify transcripts selectively associated with both GLD-2 and RNP-8. Among the 335 GLD-2/RNP-8 potential targets, most were annotated as germline mRNAs and many as maternal mRNAs. These targets include gld-2 and rnp-8 themselves, suggesting autoregulation. Removal of either GLD-2 or RNP-8 resulted in shortened poly(A) tails and lowered abundance of four target mRNAs (oma-2, egg-1, pup-2, and tra-2); GLD-2 depletion also lowered the abundance of most GLD-2/RNP-8 putative target mRNAs when assayed on microarrays. Therefore, GLD-2/RNP-8 appears to polyadenylate and stabilize its target mRNAs. We also provide evidence that rnp-8 influences oocyte development; rnp-8 null mutants have more germ cell corpses and fewer oocytes than normal. Furthermore, RNP-8 appears to work synergistically with another GLD-2–binding partner, GLD-3, to ensure normal oogenesis. We propose that the GLD-2/RNP-8 enzyme is a broad-spectrum regulator of the oogenesis program that acts within an RNA regulatory network to specify and produce fully functional oocytes. PMID:20855596

  2. Baulamycins A and B, broad-spectrum antibiotics identified as inhibitors of siderophore biosynthesis in Staphylococcus aureus and Bacillus anthracis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tripathi, Ashootosh; Schofield, Michael M; Chlipala, George E; Schultz, Pamela J; Yim, Isaiah; Newmister, Sean A; Nusca, Tyler D; Scaglione, Jamie B; Hanna, Philip C; Tamayo-Castillo, Giselle; Sherman, David H

    2014-01-29

    Siderophores are high-affinity iron chelators produced by microorganisms and frequently contribute to the virulence of human pathogens. Targeted inhibition of the biosynthesis of siderophores staphyloferrin B of Staphylococcus aureus and petrobactin of Bacillus anthracis hold considerable potential as a single or combined treatment for methicillin-resistant S. aureus (MRSA) and anthrax infection, respectively. The biosynthetic pathways for both siderophores involve a nonribosomal peptide synthetase independent siderophore (NIS) synthetase, including SbnE in staphyloferrin B and AsbA in petrobactin. In this study, we developed a biochemical assay specific for NIS synthetases to screen for inhibitors of SbnE and AsbA against a library of marine microbial-derived natural product extracts (NPEs). Analysis of the NPE derived from Streptomyces tempisquensis led to the isolation of the novel antibiotics baulamycins A (BmcA, 6) and B (BmcB, 7). BmcA and BmcB displayed in vitro activity with IC50 values of 4.8 μM and 19 μM against SbnE and 180 μM and 200 μM against AsbA, respectively. Kinetic analysis showed that the compounds function as reversible competitive enzyme inhibitors. Liquid culture studies with S. aureus , B. anthracis , E. coli , and several other bacterial pathogens demonstrated the capacity of these natural products to penetrate bacterial barriers and inhibit growth of both Gram-positive and Gram-negative species. These studies provide proof-of-concept that natural product inhibitors targeting siderophore virulence factors can provide access to novel broad-spectrum antibiotics, which may serve as important leads for the development of potent anti-infective agents.

  3. Identification and growth optimization of a Marine Bacillus DK1-SA11 having potential of producing broad spectrum antimicrobial compounds.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khan, Muhammad Naseem; Lin, Hong; Li, Meng; Wang, Jingxue; Mirani, Zulfiqar Ali; Khan, Seema Ismat; Buzdar, Muhammad Aslam; Ali, Imran; Jamil, Khalid

    2017-05-01

    Control of harmful bacteria in food, aquaculture, pharmaceuticals, agriculture, hospitals and recreation water pools are of great global concern. Marine bacteria are an enormous source of bio-controlling agents. The aim of this study was to identify and optimize the growth conditions including effect of different biotic and abiotic factors on antimicrobial activity of strain DK1-SA11 isolated from Qingdao Bay of China Yellow Sea. Microscopic characterization, API® 20E and 50 CHB kit base carbohydrates utilization, 16S rDNA and DNA gyrB gene sequencing studies identified the bacterium as Bacillus subtilis subsp. spizizenii DK1-SA11. Antimicrobial spectrum of cell free supernatant (CFS) has shown antimicrobial activities against all test strains including methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus, E. coli O157:H7, Candida albicans, Klebsiella pneumoniae, Listeria monocytogenes, Vibrio parahaemolyticus, E. coli, Pseudomonas fluorescens, Salmonella typhimurium and Vibrio cholerae. Among all the media tested, Marine Broth 2216 was found to be the best medium for bacterial growth and production of antibacterial compounds. The other optimum conditions for growth were pH:7 and incubation temperature: 25°C with tested, D-mannose increases the antibacterial activity by 33.3% while D-arabitol decreases it by 44.4%. Crude CFS showed activity even after three months of storage below -20°C and boiling for 10 min, whereas it loses 100% of its antimicrobial activity after enzymatic treatments of lipase, trypsin and papain. The production of antimicrobial compounds and broad spectrum of antimicrobial activity against all tested pathogens suggested that the strain DK1-SA11 can be used as a source for probiotics, synbiotics and antibiotics.

  4. Exoproteome and secretome derived broad spectrum novel drug and vaccine candidates in Vibrio cholerae targeted by Piper betel derived compounds.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Debmalya Barh

    Full Text Available Vibrio cholerae is the causal organism of the cholera epidemic, which is mostly prevalent in developing and underdeveloped countries. However, incidences of cholera in developed countries are also alarming. Because of the emergence of new drug-resistant strains, even though several generic drugs and vaccines have been developed over time, Vibrio infections remain a global health problem that appeals for the development of novel drugs and vaccines against the pathogen. Here, applying comparative proteomic and reverse vaccinology approaches to the exoproteome and secretome of the pathogen, we have identified three candidate targets (ompU, uppP and yajC for most of the pathogenic Vibrio strains. Two targets (uppP and yajC are novel to Vibrio, and two targets (uppP and ompU can be used to develop both drugs and vaccines (dual targets against broad spectrum Vibrio serotypes. Using our novel computational approach, we have identified three peptide vaccine candidates that have high potential to induce both B- and T-cell-mediated immune responses from our identified two dual targets. These two targets were modeled and subjected to virtual screening against natural compounds derived from Piper betel. Seven compounds were identified first time from Piper betel to be highly effective to render the function of these targets to identify them as emerging potential drugs against Vibrio. Our preliminary validation suggests that these identified peptide vaccines and betel compounds are highly effective against Vibrio cholerae. Currently we are exhaustively validating these targets, candidate peptide vaccines, and betel derived lead compounds against a number of Vibrio species.

  5. Competition between Phytophthora infestans effectors leads to increased aggressiveness on plants containing broad-spectrum late blight resistance.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dennis A Halterman

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: The destructive plant disease potato late blight is caused by the oomycete pathogen Phytophthora infestans (Mont. de Bary. This disease has remained particularly problematic despite intensive breeding efforts to integrate resistance into cultivated potato, largely because of the pathogen's ability to quickly evolve to overcome major resistance genes. The RB gene, identified in the wild potato species S. bulbocastanum, encodes a protein that confers broad-spectrum resistance to most P. infestans isolates through its recognition of highly conserved members of the corresponding pathogen effector family IPI-O. IpiO is a multigene family of effectors and while the majority of IPI-O proteins are recognized by RB to elicit host resistance, some variants exist that are able to elude detection (e.g. IPI-O4. METHODS AND FINDINGS: In the present study, analysis of ipiO variants among 40 different P. infestans isolates collected from Guatemala, Thailand, and the United States revealed a high degree of complexity within this gene family. Isolate aggressiveness was correlated with increased ipiO diversity and especially the presence of the ipiO4 variant. Furthermore, isolates expressing IPI-O4 overcame RB-mediated resistance in transgenic potato plants even when the resistance-eliciting IPI-O1 variant was present. In support of this finding, we observed that expression of IPI-O4 via Agrobacterium blocked recognition of IPI-O1, leading to inactivation of RB-mediated programmed cell death in Nicotiana benthamiana. CONCLUSIONS: In this study we definitively demonstrate and provide the first evidence that P. infestans can defeat an R protein through inhibition of recognition of the corresponding effector protein.

  6. Identification of a broad-spectrum antiviral small molecule against severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus and Ebola, Hendra, and Nipah viruses by using a novel high-throughput screening assay.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Elshabrawy, Hatem A; Fan, Jilao; Haddad, Christine S; Ratia, Kiira; Broder, Christopher C; Caffrey, Michael; Prabhakar, Bellur S

    2014-04-01

    Severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus (SARS-CoV) and Ebola, Hendra, and Nipah viruses are members of different viral families and are known causative agents of fatal viral diseases. These viruses depend on cathepsin L for entry into their target cells. The viral glycoproteins need to be primed by protease cleavage, rendering them active for fusion with the host cell membrane. In this study, we developed a novel high-throughput screening assay based on peptides, derived from the glycoproteins of the aforementioned viruses, which contain the cathepsin L cleavage site. We screened a library of 5,000 small molecules and discovered a small molecule that can inhibit the cathepsin L cleavage of all viral peptides with minimal inhibition of cleavage of a host protein-derived peptide (pro-neuropeptide Y). The small molecule inhibited the entry of all pseudotyped viruses in vitro and the cleavage of SARS-CoV spike glycoprotein in an in vitro cleavage assay. In addition, the Hendra and Nipah virus fusion glycoproteins were not cleaved in the presence of the small molecule in a cell-based cleavage assay. Furthermore, we demonstrate that the small molecule is a mixed inhibitor of cathepsin L. Our broad-spectrum antiviral small molecule appears to be an ideal candidate for future optimization and development into a potent antiviral against SARS-CoV and Ebola, Hendra, and Nipah viruses. We developed a novel high-throughput screening assay to identify small molecules that can prevent cathepsin L cleavage of viral glycoproteins derived from SARS-CoV and Ebola, Hendra, and Nipah viruses that are required for their entry into the host cell. We identified a novel broad-spectrum small molecule that could block cathepsin L-mediated cleavage and thus inhibit the entry of pseudotypes bearing the glycoprotein derived from SARS-CoV or Ebola, Hendra, or Nipah virus. The small molecule can be further optimized and developed into a potent broad-spectrum antiviral drug.

  7. A cost analysis of a broad-spectrum antibiotic therapy in the empirical treatment of health care-associated infections in cirrhotic patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lucidi, Cristina; Di Gregorio, Vincenza; Ceccarelli, Giancarlo; Venditti, Mario; Riggio, Oliviero; Merli, Manuela

    2017-01-01

    Early diagnosis and appropriate treatment of infections in cirrhosis are crucial. As new guidelines in this context, particularly for health care-associated (HCA) infections, would be needed, we performed a trial documenting whether an empirical broad-spectrum antibiotic therapy is more effective than the standard one for these infections. Because of the higher daily cost of broad-spectrum than standard antibiotics, we performed a cost analysis to compare: 1) total drug costs, 2) profitability of hospital admissions. This retrospective observational analysis was performed on patients enrolled in the trial NCT01820026, in which consecutive cirrhotic patients with HCA infections were randomly assigned to a standard vs a broad-spectrum treatment. Antibiotic daily doses, days of treatment, length of hospital stay, and DRG (diagnosis-related group) were recorded from the clinical trial medical records. The profitability of hospitalizations was calculated considering DRG tariffs divided by length of hospital stay. We considered 84 patients (42 for each group). The standard therapy allowed to obtain a first-line treatment cost lower than in the broad-spectrum therapy. Anyway, the latter, being related to a lower failure rate (19% vs 57.1%), resulted in cost saving in terms of cumulative antibiotic costs (first- and second-line treatments). The mean cost saving per patient for the broad-spectrum arm was €44.18 (-37.6%), with a total cost saving of about €2,000. Compared to standard group, we observed a statistically significant reduction in hospital stay from 17.8 to 11.8 days (pempirical treatment for HCA infections in cirrhosis would be cost-saving and that hospitals need to be aware of the clinical and economic consequences of a wrong antibiotic treatment in this setting.

  8. Insight into the mechanism of action of temporin-SHa, a new broad-spectrum antiparasitic and antibacterial agent.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zahid Raja

    Full Text Available Antimicrobial peptides (AMPs are promising drugs to kill resistant pathogens. In contrast to bacteria, protozoan parasites, such as Leishmania, were little studied. Therefore, the antiparasitic mechanism of AMPs is still unclear. In this study, we sought to get further insight into this mechanism by focusing our attention on temporin-SHa (SHa, a small broad-spectrum AMP previously shown to be active against Leishmania infantum. To improve activity, we designed analogs of SHa and compared the antibacterial and antiparasitic mechanisms. [K3]SHa emerged as a highly potent compound active against a wide range of bacteria, yeasts/fungi, and trypanosomatids (Leishmania and Trypanosoma, with leishmanicidal intramacrophagic activity and efficiency toward antibiotic-resistant strains of S. aureus and antimony-resistant L. infantum. Multipassage resistance selection demonstrated that temporins-SH, particularly [K3]SHa, are not prone to induce resistance in Escherichia coli. Analysis of the mode of action revealed that bacterial and parasite killing occur through a similar membranolytic mechanism involving rapid membrane permeabilization and depolarization. This was confirmed by high-resolution imaging (atomic force microscopy and field emission gun-scanning electron microscopy. Multiple combined techniques (nuclear magnetic resonance, surface plasmon resonance, differential scanning calorimetry allowed us to detail peptide-membrane interactions. [K3]SHa was shown to interact selectively with anionic model membranes with a 4-fold higher affinity (KD = 3 x 10-8 M than SHa. The amphipathic α-helical peptide inserts in-plane in the hydrophobic lipid bilayer and disrupts the acyl chain packing via a detergent-like effect. Interestingly, cellular events, such as mitochondrial membrane depolarization or DNA fragmentation, were observed in L. infantum promastigotes after exposure to SHa and [K3]SHa at concentrations above IC50. Our results indicate that these

  9. Fecal Microbiota Transplantation, Commensal Escherichia coli and Lactobacillus johnsonii Strains Differentially Restore Intestinal and Systemic Adaptive Immune Cell Populations Following Broad-spectrum Antibiotic Treatment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ekmekciu, Ira; von Klitzing, Eliane; Neumann, Christian; Bacher, Petra; Scheffold, Alexander; Bereswill, Stefan; Heimesaat, Markus M.

    2017-01-01

    The essential role of the intestinal microbiota in the well-functioning of host immunity necessitates the investigation of species-specific impacts on this interplay. Aim of this study was to examine the ability of defined Gram-positive and Gram-negative intestinal commensal bacterial species, namely Escherichia coli and Lactobacillus johnsonii, respectively, to restore immune functions in mice that were immunosuppressed by antibiotics-induced microbiota depletion. Conventional mice were subjected to broad-spectrum antibiotic treatment for 8 weeks and perorally reassociated with E. coli, L. johnsonii or with a complex murine microbiota by fecal microbiota transplantation (FMT). Analyses at days (d) 7 and 28 revealed that immune cell populations in the small and large intestines, mesenteric lymph nodes and spleens of mice were decreased after antibiotic treatment but were completely or at least partially restored upon FMT or by recolonization with the respective bacterial species. Remarkably, L. johnsonii recolonization resulted in the highest CD4+ and CD8+ cell numbers in the small intestine and spleen, whereas neither of the commensal species could stably restore those cell populations in the colon until d28. Meanwhile less efficient than FMT, both species increased the frequencies of regulatory T cells and activated dendritic cells and completely restored intestinal memory/effector T cell populations at d28. Furthermore, recolonization with either single species maintained pro- and anti-inflammatory immune functions in parallel. However, FMT could most effectively recover the decreased frequencies of cytokine producing CD4+ lymphocytes in mucosal and systemic compartments. E. coli recolonization increased the production of cytokines such as TNF, IFN-γ, IL-17, and IL-22, particularly in the small intestine. Conversely, only L. johnsonii recolonization maintained colonic IL-10 production. In summary, FMT appears to be most efficient in the restoration of

  10. Fecal Microbiota Transplantation, Commensal Escherichia coli and Lactobacillus johnsonii Strains Differentially Restore Intestinal and Systemic Adaptive Immune Cell Populations Following Broad-spectrum Antibiotic Treatment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ira Ekmekciu

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available The essential role of the intestinal microbiota in the well-functioning of host immunity necessitates the investigation of species-specific impacts on this interplay. Aim of this study was to examine the ability of defined Gram-positive and Gram-negative intestinal commensal bacterial species, namely Escherichia coli and Lactobacillus johnsonii, respectively, to restore immune functions in mice that were immunosuppressed by antibiotics-induced microbiota depletion. Conventional mice were subjected to broad-spectrum antibiotic treatment for 8 weeks and perorally reassociated with E. coli, L. johnsonii or with a complex murine microbiota by fecal microbiota transplantation (FMT. Analyses at days (d 7 and 28 revealed that immune cell populations in the small and large intestines, mesenteric lymph nodes and spleens of mice were decreased after antibiotic treatment but were completely or at least partially restored upon FMT or by recolonization with the respective bacterial species. Remarkably, L. johnsonii recolonization resulted in the highest CD4+ and CD8+ cell numbers in the small intestine and spleen, whereas neither of the commensal species could stably restore those cell populations in the colon until d28. Meanwhile less efficient than FMT, both species increased the frequencies of regulatory T cells and activated dendritic cells and completely restored intestinal memory/effector T cell populations at d28. Furthermore, recolonization with either single species maintained pro- and anti-inflammatory immune functions in parallel. However, FMT could most effectively recover the decreased frequencies of cytokine producing CD4+ lymphocytes in mucosal and systemic compartments. E. coli recolonization increased the production of cytokines such as TNF, IFN-γ, IL-17, and IL-22, particularly in the small intestine. Conversely, only L. johnsonii recolonization maintained colonic IL-10 production. In summary, FMT appears to be most efficient in the

  11. Evaluation of Carbohydrate-Derived Fulvic Acid (CHD-FA) as a Topical Broad-Spectrum Antimicrobial for Drug-Resistant Wound Infections

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-10-01

    Fulvic Acid (CHD-FA) as a Topical Broad-Spectrum Antimicrobial for Drug- Resistant Wound Infections. PRINCIPAL INVESTIGATOR: David S. Perlin...Spectrum Antimicrobial for Drug- Resistant Wound Infections. 5b. GRANT NUMBER W81XWH-12-2-0076 5c. PROGRAM ELEMENT NUMBER 6. AUTHOR(S) David S...Manchester, UK , and the Perlin Pfizer Reference Center for molecular characterization of echinocandin resistance in yeasts and molds and from the

  12. Evaluation of Carbohydrate-Derived Fulvic Acid (CHD-FA) as a Topical Broad-Spectrum Antimicrobial for Drug-Resistant Wound Infections

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-10-01

    acid is a highly promising topical agent to enhance healing of wounds infected with drug-resistant pathogens” on the Journal of Trauma and Acute Care...Drug- Resistant Wound Infections PRINCIPAL INVESTIGATOR: David S. Perlin, Ph.D. CONTRACTING ORGANIZATION: Rutgers, The State University of New Jersey...of Carbohydrate-Derived Fulvic Acid (CHD-FA) as a Topical Broad- Spectrum Antimicrobial for Drug-Resistant Wound Infections 5b. GRANT NUMBER 5c

  13. Effect of healthcare associated infections and broad spectrum antibiotic use in newborn period on development of asthma, allergic rhinitis and atopic dermatitis in early childhood

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hacer Yapicioglu Yildizdas

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available Purpose: The iam of this study was to investigate the effect of healthcare associated infections (HAIs and broad spectrum antibiotic use in newborn period on asthma, allergic rhinitis and atopic dermatitis. Material and Methods: Seventy three children treated for HAIs in newborn period in Neonatal Intesive Care Unitin a 6 years period, and their 41 siblings who were healthy in newborn period were included in the study. Parents answered a detailed questionnaire, children were examined and complete blood count, serum total Ig E and specific Ig E levels were studied. Results: Ventilator associated pneumonia was observed in 32 (45.2%, blood stream infection in 28 (38.4% and clinic sepsis in 12 (16.4% of 73 children with HAIs. Asthma was significantly higher in HAIs group compared to sibling group (32.9% vs. 4.9, whereas there was no significant difference in allergic rhinitis (4.1% vs.2.4% and atopic dermatitis (6.8% vs. 0% among groups. When non-allergic 85 subjects and allergic 29 children compared, children who had been hospitalised and treated with broad-spectrum antibiotics in newborn period were almost 11.5 times as likely to have an allergic disease. Conclusion: Asthma was significantly higher in HAI group, and allergic disease risk seems to increase in children treated with broad-spectrum antibiotics for HAIs in newborn period. [Cukurova Med J 2017; 42(1.000: 132-139

  14. Targeting N-Glycan Cryptic Sugar Moieties for Broad-Spectrum Virus Neutralization: Progress in Identifying Conserved Molecular Targets in Viruses of Distinct Phylogenetic Origins

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Denong Wang

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available Identifying molecular targets for eliciting broadly virus-neutralizing antibodies is one of the key steps toward development of vaccines against emerging viral pathogens. Owing to genomic and somatic diversities among viral species, identifying protein targets for broad-spectrum virus neutralization is highly challenging even for the same virus, such as HIV-1. However, viruses rely on host glycosylation machineries to synthesize and express glycans and, thereby, may display common carbohydrate moieties. Thus, exploring glycan-binding profiles of broad-spectrum virus-neutralizing agents may provide key information to uncover the carbohydrate-based virus-neutralizing epitopes. In this study, we characterized two broadly HIV-neutralizing agents, human monoclonal antibody 2G12 and Galanthus nivalis lectin (GNA, for their viral targeting activities. Although these agents were known to be specific for oligomannosyl antigens, they differ strikingly in virus-binding activities. The former is HIV-1 specific; the latter is broadly reactive and is able to neutralize viruses of distinct phylogenetic origins, such as HIV-1, severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus (SARS-CoV, and human cytomegalovirus (HCMV. In carbohydrate microarray analyses, we explored the molecular basis underlying the striking differences in the spectrum of anti-virus activities of the two probes. Unlike 2G12, which is strictly specific for the high-density Man9GlcNAc2Asn (Man9-clusters, GNA recognizes a number of N-glycan cryptic sugar moieties. These include not only the known oligomannosyl antigens but also previously unrecognized tri-antennary or multi-valent GlcNAc-terminating N-glycan epitopes (Tri/m-Gn. These findings highlight the potential of N-glycan cryptic sugar moieties as conserved targets for broad-spectrum virus neutralization and suggest the GNA-model of glycan-binding warrants focused investigation.

  15. N-alkyl-[1,1'-biphenyl]-2-sulfonamide derivatives as novel broad spectrum anti-epileptic drugs with efficacy equivalent to that of sodium valproate.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tanaka, Tomoyuki; Yajima, Nana; Kiyoshi, Tomoko; Miura, Yoshiki; Iwama, Seiji

    2017-09-01

    In order to develop phenyl sulfonamides as a novel class of anti-epileptic drugs (AED) for both general and partial seizure, we initiated in vivo screening of our chemical library in the mice MES and sc-PTZ models and found compounds 1 and 2 as lead compounds. Optimization of 1 and 2 led to the discovery of compound 21, which showed potent anticonvulsant effect in MES, scPTZ and rat amygdala kindling models. These findings indicate that compound 21 could be a useful new broad spectrum AED like sodium valproate and provide an opportunity to struggle current therapy-resistant epilepsy. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  16. Broad-spectrum amino acid-sensing class C G-protein coupled receptors: molecular mechanisms, physiological significance and options for drug development.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Conigrave, Arthur D; Hampson, David R

    2010-09-01

    In this article, we consider the molecular mechanisms that underlie broad-spectrum amino acid sensing by a discrete subgroup of class C G-protein-coupled receptors that includes the calcium-sensing receptor, GPRC6A and heterodimers composed of two closely related receptor subunits, T1R(1) and T1R(3). We consider their physiological significance highlighting their diverse spectrum of cellular responses and the phenotypes of global and conditional knock-out mice. In addition, we consider strategies for the development of new drugs that target these receptors. 2010 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  17. Global Mapping of Traditional Chinese Medicine into Bioactivity Space and Pathways Annotation Improves Mechanistic Understanding and Discovers Relationships between Therapeutic Action (Subclasses

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Siti Zuraidah Mohamad Zobir

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Traditional Chinese medicine (TCM still needs more scientific rationale to be proven for it to be accepted further in the West. We are now in the position to propose computational hypotheses for the mode-of-actions (MOAs of 45 TCM therapeutic action (subclasses from in silico target prediction algorithms, whose target was later annotated with Kyoto Encyclopedia of Genes and Genomes pathway, and to discover the relationship between them by generating a hierarchical clustering. The results of 10,749 TCM compounds showed 183 enriched targets and 99 enriched pathways from Estimation Score ≤ 0 and ≥ 5% of compounds/targets in a (subclass. The MOA of a (subclass was established from supporting literature. Overall, the most frequent top three enriched targets/pathways were immune-related targets such as tyrosine-protein phosphatase nonreceptor type 2 (PTPN2 and digestive system such as mineral absorption. We found two major protein families, G-protein coupled receptor (GPCR, and protein kinase family contributed to the diversity of the bioactivity space, while digestive system was consistently annotated pathway motif, which agreed with the important treatment principle of TCM, “the foundation of acquired constitution” that includes spleen and stomach. In short, the TCM (subclasses, in many cases share similar targets/pathways despite having different indications.

  18. Membrane Active Small Molecules Show Selective Broad Spectrum Antibacterial Activity with No Detectable Resistance and Eradicate Biofilms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hoque, Jiaul; Konai, Mohini M; Gonuguntla, Spandhana; Manjunath, Goutham B; Samaddar, Sandip; Yarlagadda, Venkateswarlu; Haldar, Jayanta

    2015-07-23

    Treating bacterial biofilms with conventional antibiotics is limited due to ineffectiveness of the drugs and higher propensity to develop bacterial resistance. Development of new classes of antibacterial therapeutics with alternative mechanisms of action has become imperative. Herein, we report the design, synthesis, and biological evaluations of novel membrane-active small molecules featuring two positive charges, four nonpeptidic amide groups, and variable hydrophobic/hydrophilic (amphiphilic) character. The biocides synthesized via a facile methodology not only displayed good antibacterial activity against wild-type bacteria but also showed high activity against various drug-resistant bacteria such as methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA), vancomycin-resistant Enterococcus faecium (VRE), and β-lactam-resistant Klebsiella pneumoniae. Further, these biocides not only inhibited the formation of biofilms but also disrupted the established S. aureus and E. coli biofilms. The membrane-active biocides hindered the propensity to develop bacterial resistance. Moreover, the biocides showed negligible toxicity against mammalian cells and thus bear potential to be used as therapeutic agents.

  19. In vitro evaluation of broad-spectrum beta-lactams tested in medical centers in Korea: role of fourth-generation cephalosporins. The Korean Antimicrobial Resistance Study Group.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lewis, M T; Biedenbach, D J; Jones, R N

    1999-12-01

    Levels of resistance to the "third-generation" cephalosporins among isolates of clinical bacteria in Korea have been increasing at a rapid rate. This study evaluated the activity of cefepime, a "fourth-generation" cephalosporin, and six other broad-spectrum beta-lactam antimicrobials (cefpirome, ceftazidime, ceftriaxone, imipenem, piperacillin/tazobactam 4 micrograms/mL fixed concentration[, oxacillin) against 404 isolates of clinical bacteria from Korea. Susceptibility profiles of each isolate were established using the Etest (AB BIODISK, Solna, Sweden) method of susceptibility testing. Only the carbapenem imipenem was > 90% effective in inhibiting each of the species tested (Escherichia coli, Klebsiella, spp., Citrobacter spp., Enterobacter spp., indole-positive Proteae, Serratia spp., Acinetobacter spp., Pseudomonas aeruginosa, and oxacillin-susceptible staphylococci). Imipenem was followed by cefepime > cefpirome > piperacillin/tazobactam > ceftazidime > ceftriaxone in overall rank order of usable spectrum against the isolates tested. Extended spectrum beta-lactamase producing phenotypes were much more prevalent among the Klebsiella spp. (48.8%) than the E. coli (5.0%) isolates. Cefepime was much more active than cefpirome, 95.1% susceptible as compared with 70.7% susceptible, against the 41 isolates of Klebsiella spp. The results of this study corroborates findings from earlier studies with levels of resistance to the broad-spectrum beta-lactams in Korea continuing to rise indicating the need for intervention strategies.

  20. Application of chitosan microparticles for treatment of metritis and in vivo evaluation of broad spectrum antimicrobial activity in cow uteri.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jeon, Soo Jin; Ma, Zhengxin; Kang, Minyoung; Galvão, Klibs N; Jeong, Kwangcheol Casey

    2016-12-01

    Uterine disease such as metritis is associated with multiple bacterial infections in the uteri after parturition. However, treatment of metritis is challenging due to considerably high antibiotic treatment failure rate with unknown reason. Recently, chitosan microparticles (CM) have been developed to exert broad spectrum antimicrobial activity against bacterial pathogens, including multi-drug resistant bacteria, without raising CM resistant mutants. In this study, we tested, using metagenomics analysis, if CM maintain strong antimicrobial activity against pathogenic bacteria such as Fusobacteriaceae and Bacteroidaceae in cow uteri and evaluated CM's potency as an alternative antimicrobial agent to cure metritis in cows. Here, we report that efficacy of CM treatment for metritis was comparable to the antibiotic ceftiofur, and CM greatly altered uterine microflora of sick animals to healthy uterine microflora. Among uterine bacteria, CM significantly decreased Fusobacterium necrophorum, which is known pathogenic bacteria within the uterus. Taken together, we observed the broad spectrum antimicrobial activity of CM in vivo with an animal model, and further evaluated treatment efficacy in cows with metritis, providing insights into promising use of CM as an alternative antimicrobial agent for controlling uterine disease. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  1. The broad-spectrum antiviral compound ST-669 restricts chlamydial inclusion development and bacterial growth and localizes to host cell lipid droplets within treated cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sandoz, Kelsi M; Valiant, William G; Eriksen, Steven G; Hruby, Dennis E; Allen, Robert D; Rockey, Daniel D

    2014-07-01

    Novel broad-spectrum antimicrobials are a critical component of a strategy for combating antibiotic-resistant pathogens. In this study, we explored the activity of the broad-spectrum antiviral compound ST-669 for activity against different intracellular bacteria and began a characterization of its mechanism of antimicrobial action. ST-669 inhibits the growth of three different species of chlamydia and the intracellular bacterium Coxiella burnetii in Vero and HeLa cells but not in McCoy (murine) cells. The antichlamydial and anti-C. burnetii activity spectrum was consistent with those observed for tested viruses, suggesting a common mechanism of action. Cycloheximide treatment in the presence of ST-669 abrogated the inhibitory effect, demonstrating that eukaryotic protein synthesis is required for tested activity. Immunofluorescence microscopy demonstrated that different chlamydiae grow atypically in the presence of ST-669, in a manner that suggests the compound affects inclusion formation and organization. Microscopic analysis of cells treated with a fluorescent derivative of ST-669 demonstrated that the compound localized to host cell lipid droplets but not to other organelles or the host cytosol. These results demonstrate that ST-669 affects intracellular growth in a host-cell-dependent manner and interrupts proper development of chlamydial inclusions, possibly through a lipid droplet-dependent process. Copyright © 2014, American Society for Microbiology. All Rights Reserved.

  2. Biogenic synthesis of Zinc oxide nanostructures from Nigella sativa seed: Prospective role as food packaging material inhibiting broad-spectrum quorum sensing and biofilm.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Al-Shabib, Nasser A; Husain, Fohad Mabood; Ahmed, Faheem; Khan, Rais Ahmad; Ahmad, Iqbal; Alsharaeh, Edreese; Khan, Mohd Shahnawaz; Hussain, Afzal; Rehman, Md Tabish; Yusuf, Mohammad; Hassan, Iftekhar; Khan, Javed Masood; Ashraf, Ghulam Md; Alsalme, Ali Mohammed; Al-Ajmi, Mohamed F; Tarasov, Vadim V; Aliev, Gjumrakch

    2016-12-05

    Bacterial spoilage of food products is regulated by density dependent communication system called quorum sensing (QS). QS control biofilm formation in numerous food pathogens and Biofilms formed on food surfaces act as carriers of bacterial contamination leading to spoilage of food and health hazards. Agents inhibiting or interfering with bacterial QS and biofilm are gaining importance as a novel class of next-generation food preservatives/packaging material. In the present study, Zinc nanostructures were synthesised using Nigella sativa seed extract (NS-ZnNPs). Synthesized nanostructures were characterized hexagonal wurtzite structure of size ~24 nm by UV-visible, XRD, FTIR and TEM. NS-ZnNPs demonstrated broad-spectrum QS inhibition in C. violaceum and P. aeruginosa biosensor strains. Synthesized nanostructures inhibited QS regulated functions of C. violaceum CVO26 (violacein) and elastase, protease, pyocyanin and alginate production in PAO1 significantly. NS-ZnNPs at sub-inhibitory concentrations inhibited the biofilm formation of four-food pathogens viz. C. violaceum 12472, PAO1, L. monocytogenes, E. coli. Moreover, NS-ZnNPs was found effective in inhibiting pre-formed mature biofilms of the four pathogens. Therefore, the broad-spectrum inhibition of QS and biofilm by biogenic Zinc oxide nanoparticles and it is envisaged that these nontoxic bioactive nanostructures can be used as food packaging material and/or as food preservative.

  3. A broad-spectrum sunscreen prevents UVA radiation-induced gene expression in reconstructed skin in vitro and in human skin in vivo.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marionnet, Claire; Grether-Beck, Susanne; Seité, Sophie; Marini, Alessandra; Jaenicke, Thomas; Lejeune, François; Bastien, Philippe; Rougier, André; Bernerd, Françoise; Krutmann, Jean

    2011-06-01

    The efficacy of sunscreens to protect against ultraviolet (UV) A radiation is usually assessed by measuring erythema formation and pigmentation. The biological relevance of these endpoints for UVA-induced skin damage, however, is not known. We therefore carried out two complementary studies to determine UVA protection provided by a broad-spectrum sunscreen product at a molecular level by studying UVA radiation-induced gene expression. One study was performed on human reconstructed skin in vitro with a semi-global gene expression analysis of 227 genes in fibroblasts and 244 in keratinocytes. The second one was conducted in vivo in human volunteers and focused on genes involved in oxidative stress response and photo-ageing (haeme oxygenase-1, superoxide dismutase-2, glutathione peroxidase, catalase, matrix metalloproteinase-1). In-vitro UVA radiation induced modulation of genes involved in extracellular matrix homeostasis, oxidative stress, heat shock responses, cell growth, inflammation and epidermal differentiation. Sunscreen pre-application abrogated or significantly reduced these effects, as underlined by unsupervised clustering analysis. The in vivo study confirmed that the sunscreen prevented UVA radiation-induced transcriptional expression of the five studied genes. These findings indicate the high efficacy of a broad-spectrum sunscreen in protecting human skin against UVA-induced gene responses and suggest that this approach is a biologically relevant complement to existing methods. © 2011 John Wiley & Sons A/S.

  4. A Broad Spectrum Catalytic System for Removal of Toxic Organics from Water by Deep Oxidation - Final Report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sen, Ayusman

    2000-12-01

    A most pressing need for the DOE environmental management program is the removal of toxic organic compounds present in groundwater and soil at specific DOE sites. While several remediation procedures have been proposed, they suffer from one or more drawbacks. The objective of the present research was to develop new catalytic procedures for the removal of toxic organic compounds from the environment through their deep oxidation to harmless products. In water, metallic palladium was found to catalyze the deep oxidation of a wide variety of toxic organic compounds by dioxygen at 80-90 C in the presence of carbon monoxide or dihydrogen. Several classes of organic compounds were examined: benzene, phenol and substituted phenols, nitro and halo organics, organophosphorus, and organosulfur compounds. In every case, deep oxidation to carbon monoxide, carbon dioxide, and water occurred in high yields, resulting in up to several hundred turnovers over a 24 hour period. For substrates susceptible to hydrogenation, the conversions were generally high with dihydrogen than with carbon monoxide. It is clear from the results obtained that we have discovered an exceptionally versatile catalytic system for the deep oxidation of toxic organic compounds in water. This system possesses several attractive features not found simultaneously in other reported systems. These are (a) the ability to directly utilize dioxygen as the oxidant, (b) the ability to carry out the deep oxidation of a particularly wide range of functional organics, and (c) the ease of recovery of the catalyst by simple filtration.

  5. Griffithsin: An Antiviral Lectin with Outstanding Therapeutic Potential

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sabrina Lusvarghi

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available Griffithsin (GRFT, an algae-derived lectin, is one of the most potent viral entry inhibitors discovered to date. It is currently being developed as a microbicide with broad-spectrum activity against several enveloped viruses. GRFT can inhibit human immunodeficiency virus (HIV infection at picomolar concentrations, surpassing the ability of most anti-HIV agents. The potential to inhibit other viruses as well as parasites has also been demonstrated. Griffithsin’s antiviral activity stems from its ability to bind terminal mannoses present in high-mannose oligosaccharides and crosslink these glycans on the surface of the viral envelope glycoproteins. Here, we review structural and biochemical studies that established mode of action and facilitated construction of GRFT analogs, mechanisms that may lead to resistance, and in vitro and pre-clinical results that support the therapeutic potential of this lectin.

  6. Epimedium koreanum Nakai Displays Broad Spectrum of Antiviral Activity in Vitro and in Vivo by Inducing Cellular Antiviral State

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Won-Kyung Cho

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Epimedium koreanum Nakai has been extensively used in traditional Korean and Chinese medicine to treat a variety of diseases. Despite the plant’s known immune modulatory potential and chemical make-up, scientific information on its antiviral properties and mode of action have not been completely investigated. In this study, the broad antiviral spectrum and mode of action of an aqueous extract from Epimedium koreanum Nakai was evaluated in vitro, and moreover, the protective effect against divergent influenza A subtypes was determined in BALB/c mice. An effective dose of Epimedium koreanum Nakai markedly reduced the replication of Influenza A Virus (PR8, Vesicular Stomatitis Virus (VSV, Herpes Simplex Virus (HSV and Newcastle Disease Virus (NDV in RAW264.7 and HEK293T cells. Mechanically, we found that an aqueous extract from Epimedium koreanum Nakai induced the secretion of type I IFN and pro-inflammatory cytokines and the subsequent stimulation of the antiviral state in cells. Among various components present in the extract, quercetin was confirmed to have striking antiviral properties. The oral administration of Epimedium koreanum Nakai exhibited preventive effects on BALB/c mice against lethal doses of highly pathogenic influenza A subtypes (H1N1, H5N2, H7N3 and H9N2. Therefore, an extract of Epimedium koreanum Nakai and its components play roles as immunomodulators in the innate immune response, and may be potential candidates for prophylactic or therapeutic treatments against diverse viruses in animal and humans.

  7. Broad-spectrum in vitro antibacterial activities of clay minerals against antibiotic-susceptible and antibiotic-resistant bacterial pathogens

    Science.gov (United States)

    HAYDEL, SHELLEY E.; REMENIH, CHRISTINE M.; WILLIAMS, LYNDA B.

    2008-01-01

    SYNOPSIS Objectives The capacity to properly address the worldwide incidence of infectious diseases lies in the ability to detect, prevent, and effectively treat these infections. Therefore, identifying and analyzing inhibitory agents are worthwhile endeavors in an era when few new classes of effective antimicrobials have been developed. The use of geological nanomaterials to heal skin infections has been evident since the earliest recorded history, and specific clay minerals may prove valuable in the treatment of bacterial diseases, including infections for which there are no effective antibiotics, such as Buruli ulcer and multi-drug resistant infections. Methods We have subjected two iron-rich clay minerals, which have previously been used to treat Buruli ulcer patients, to broth culture testing of antibiotic-susceptible and -resistant pathogenic bacteria to assess the feasibility of using clay minerals as therapeutic agents. Results One specific mineral, CsAg02, demonstrated bactericidal activity against pathogenic Escherichia coli, extended-spectrum β-lactamase (ESBL) E. coli, S. enterica serovar Typhimurium, Pseudomonas aeruginosa, and Mycobacterium marinum and a combined bacteriostatic/bactericidal effect against Staphylococcus aureus, penicillin-resistant S. aureus (PRSA), methicillin-resistant S. aureus (MRSA), and Mycobacterium smegmatis, while another mineral with similar structure and bulk crystal chemistry, CsAr02, had no effect on or enhanced bacterial growth. The <0.2 μm fraction of CsAg02 and CsAg02 heated to 200°C or 550°C retained bactericidal activity, while cation-exchanged CsAg02 and CsAg02 heated to 900°C no longer killed E. coli. Conclusions Our results indicate that specific mineral products have intrinsic, heat-stable antibacterial properties, which could provide an inexpensive treatment against numerous human bacterial infections. PMID:18070832

  8. Dissection of broad-spectrum resistance of the Thai rice variety Jao Hom Nin conferred by two resistance genes against rice blast.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chaipanya, Chaivarakun; Telebanco-Yanoria, Mary Jeanie; Quime, Berlaine; Longya, Apinya; Korinsak, Siripar; Korinsak, Siriporn; Toojinda, Theerayut; Vanavichit, Apichart; Jantasuriyarat, Chatchawan; Zhou, Bo

    2017-12-01

    Rice (Oryza sativa) is one of the most important food crops in the world. Rice blast, caused by the fungal pathogen Magnaporthe oryzae, is one of the most destructive rice diseases worldwide. To effectively cope with this problem, the use of rice blast resistance varieties through innovative breeding programs is the best strategy to date. The Thai rice variety Jao Hom Nin (JHN) showed broad-spectrum resistance against Thai rice blast isolates. Two QTLs for blast resistance in JHN were reported on chromosome 1 (QTL1) and 11 (QTL11). Monogenic lines of QTL1 (QTL1-C) and QTL11 (QTL11-C) in the CO39 genetic background were generated. Cluster analysis based on the disease reaction pattern of QTL1-C and QTL11-C, together with IRBLs, showed that those two monogenic lines were clustered with IRBLsh-S (Pish) and IRBL7-M (Pi7), respectively. Moreover, sequence analysis revealed that Pish and Pi7 were embedded within the QTL1 and QTL11 delimited genomic intervals, respectively. This study thus concluded that QTL1 and QTL11 could encode alleles of Pish and Pi7, designated as Pish-J and Pi7-J, respectively. To validate this hypothesis, the genomic regions of Pish-J and Pi7-J were cloned and sequenced. Protein sequence comparison revealed that Pish-J and Pi7-J were identical to Pish and Pi7, respectively. The holistic disease spectrum of JHN was found to be exactly attributed to the additive ones of both QTL1-C and QTL11-C. JHN showed broad spectrum resistance against Thai and Philippine rice blast isolates. As this study demonstrated, the combination of two resistance genes, Pish-J and Pi7-J, in JHN, with each controlling broad-spectrum resistance to rice blast disease, explains the high level of resistance. Thus, the combination of Pish and Pi7 can provide a practical scheme for breeding durable resistance in rice against rice blast disease.

  9. Facile synthesis of Fe3O4 nanoparticles decorated on 3D graphene aerogels as broad-spectrum sorbents for water treatment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Yong; Zhang, Ruofang; Tian, Xike; Yang, Chao; Zhou, Zhaoxin

    2016-04-01

    In order to develop efficient and environment benign sorbents for water purification, the macroscopic multifunctional magnetite-reduced graphene oxides aerogels (M-RGOs) with strong interconnected networks were prepared via a one pot solvothermal method of graphene oxide sheets adsorbing iron ions and in situ simultaneous deposition of Fe3O4 nanoparticles in ethylene glycol or triethylene glycol solvents. Such M-RGOs exhibited excellent sorption capacity to different contaminants, including oils, organic solvents, arsenite ions, as well as dyes. In addition, it was demonstrated that the M-RGOs could be used as column packing materials to manufacture column for water purification by filtration. The method proposed was proved to be versatile to induce synergistic assembly of RGO sheets with other functional metal oxides nanoparticles and as a kind of broad-spectrum sorbents for removing different types of contaminants in water purification, simultaneously.

  10. Multiple copies of eukaryotic translation initiation factors in Brassica rapa facilitate redundancy, enabling diversification through variation in splicing and broad-spectrum virus resistance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nellist, Charlotte F; Qian, Wei; Jenner, Carol E; Moore, Jonathan D; Zhang, Shujiang; Wang, Xiaowu; Briggs, William H; Barker, Guy C; Sun, Rifei; Walsh, John A

    2014-01-01

    Recessive strain-specific resistance to a number of plant viruses in the Potyvirus genus has been found to be based on mutations in the eukaryotic translation initiation factor 4E (eIF4E) and its isoform, eIF(iso)4E. We identified three copies of eIF(iso)4E in a number of Brassica rapa lines. Here we report broad-spectrum resistance to the potyvirus Turnip mosaic virus (TuMV) due to a natural mechanism based on the mis-splicing of the eIF(iso)4E allele in some TuMV-resistant B. rapa var. pekinensis lines. Of the splice variants, the most common results in a stop codon in intron 1 and a much truncated, non-functional protein. The existence of multiple copies has enabled redundancy in the host plant's translational machinery, resulting in diversification and emergence of the resistance. Deployment of the resistance is complicated by the presence of multiple copies of the gene. Our data suggest that in the B. rapa subspecies trilocularis, TuMV appears to be able to use copies of eIF(iso)4E at two loci. Transformation of different copies of eIF(iso)4E from a resistant B. rapa line into an eIF(iso)4E knockout line of Arabidopsis thaliana proved misleading because it showed that, when expressed ectopically, TuMV could use multiple copies which was not the case in the resistant B. rapa line. The inability of TuMV to access multiple copies of eIF(iso)4E in B. rapa and the broad spectrum of the resistance suggest it may be durable. © 2013 The Authors The Plant Journal © 2013 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  11. Discovering Technicolor

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    R. Andersen, J.; Antipin, O.; Azuelos, G.

    2011-01-01

    We provide a pedagogical introduction to extensions of the Standard Model in which the Higgs is composite. These extensions are known as models of dynamical electroweak symmetry breaking or, in brief, Technicolor. Material covered includes: motivations for Technicolor, the construction of underly...... the relevant experimental benchmarks for Vanilla, Running, Walking, and Custodial Technicolor, and a natural fourth family of leptons, by laying out the framework to discover these models at the Large Hadron Collider....

  12. Fungal Root Microbiome from Healthy and Brittle Leaf Diseased Date Palm Trees (Phoenix dactylifera L.) Reveals a Hidden Untapped Arsenal of Antibacterial and Broad Spectrum Antifungal Secondary Metabolites.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mefteh, Fedia B; Daoud, Amal; Chenari Bouket, Ali; Alenezi, Faizah N; Luptakova, Lenka; Rateb, Mostafa E; Kadri, Adel; Gharsallah, Neji; Belbahri, Lassaad

    2017-01-01

    In this study, we aimed to explore and compare the composition, metabolic diversity and antimicrobial potential of endophytic fungi colonizing internal tissues of healthy and brittle leaf diseased (BLD) date palm trees (Phoenix dactylifera L.) widely cultivated in arid zones of Tunisia. A total of 52 endophytic fungi were isolated from healthy and BLD roots of date palm trees, identified based on internal transcribed spacer-rDNA sequence analysis and shown to represent 13 species belonging to five genera. About 36.8% of isolates were shared between healthy and diseased root fungal microbiomes, whereas 18.4 and 44.7% of isolates were specific to healthy and BLD root fungal microbiomes, respectively. All isolates were able to produce at least two of the screened enzymes including amylase, cellulase, chitinase, pectinase, protease, laccase and lipase. A preliminary screening of the isolates using disk diffusion method for antibacterial activity against four Gram-positive and three Gram-negative bacteria and antifungal activities against three phytopathogenic fungi indicated that healthy and BLD root fungal microbiomes displayed interesting bioactivities against examined bacteria and broad spectrum bioactivity against fungal pathogens. Some of these endophytic fungi (17 isolates) were fermented and their extracts were evaluated for antimicrobial potential against bacterial and fungal isolates. Results revealed that fungal extracts exhibited antibacterial activities and were responsible for approximately half of antifungal activities against living fungi. These results suggest a strong link between fungal bioactivities and their secondary metabolite arsenal. EtOAc extracts of Geotrichum candidum and Thielaviopsis punctulata originating from BLD microbiome gave best results against Micrococcus luteus and Bacillus subtilis with minimum inhibitory concentration (MIC, 0.78 mg/mL) and minimum bactericidal concentration (6.25 mg/mL). G. candidum gave the best result against

  13. Fungal Root Microbiome from Healthy and Brittle Leaf Diseased Date Palm Trees (Phoenix dactylifera L.) Reveals a Hidden Untapped Arsenal of Antibacterial and Broad Spectrum Antifungal Secondary Metabolites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mefteh, Fedia B.; Daoud, Amal; Chenari Bouket, Ali; Alenezi, Faizah N.; Luptakova, Lenka; Rateb, Mostafa E.; Kadri, Adel; Gharsallah, Neji; Belbahri, Lassaad

    2017-01-01

    In this study, we aimed to explore and compare the composition, metabolic diversity and antimicrobial potential of endophytic fungi colonizing internal tissues of healthy and brittle leaf diseased (BLD) date palm trees (Phoenix dactylifera L.) widely cultivated in arid zones of Tunisia. A total of 52 endophytic fungi were isolated from healthy and BLD roots of date palm trees, identified based on internal transcribed spacer-rDNA sequence analysis and shown to represent 13 species belonging to five genera. About 36.8% of isolates were shared between healthy and diseased root fungal microbiomes, whereas 18.4 and 44.7% of isolates were specific to healthy and BLD root fungal microbiomes, respectively. All isolates were able to produce at least two of the screened enzymes including amylase, cellulase, chitinase, pectinase, protease, laccase and lipase. A preliminary screening of the isolates using disk diffusion method for antibacterial activity against four Gram-positive and three Gram-negative bacteria and antifungal activities against three phytopathogenic fungi indicated that healthy and BLD root fungal microbiomes displayed interesting bioactivities against examined bacteria and broad spectrum bioactivity against fungal pathogens. Some of these endophytic fungi (17 isolates) were fermented and their extracts were evaluated for antimicrobial potential against bacterial and fungal isolates. Results revealed that fungal extracts exhibited antibacterial activities and were responsible for approximately half of antifungal activities against living fungi. These results suggest a strong link between fungal bioactivities and their secondary metabolite arsenal. EtOAc extracts of Geotrichum candidum and Thielaviopsis punctulata originating from BLD microbiome gave best results against Micrococcus luteus and Bacillus subtilis with minimum inhibitory concentration (MIC, 0.78 mg/mL) and minimum bactericidal concentration (6.25 mg/mL). G. candidum gave the best result against

  14. In Vitro Activity of a Novel Broad-Spectrum Antifungal, E1210, Tested against Aspergillus spp. Determined by CLSI and EUCAST Broth Microdilution Methods ▿

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pfaller, Michael A.; Duncanson, Frederick; Messer, Shawn A.; Moet, Gary J.; Jones, Ronald N.; Castanheira, Mariana

    2011-01-01

    E1210 is a first-in-class broad-spectrum antifungal that suppresses hyphal growth by inhibiting fungal glycophosphatidylinositol (GPI) biosynthesis. In the present study, we extend these findings by examining the activity of E1210 and comparator antifungal agents against Aspergillus spp. by using the methods of the Clinical and Laboratory Standards Institute (CLSI) and the European Committee for Antimicrobial Susceptibility Testing (EUCAST) to test wild-type (WT) as well as amphotericin B (AMB)-resistant (-R) and azole-R strains (as determined by CLSI methods). Seventy-eight clinical isolates of Aspergillus were tested including 20 isolates of Aspergillus flavus species complex (SC), 22 of A. fumigatus SC, 13 of A. niger SC, and 23 of A. terreus SC. The collection included 15 AMB-R (MIC, ≥2 μg/ml) isolates of A. terreus SC and 10 itraconazole-R (MIC, ≥4 μg/ml) isolates of A. fumigatus SC (7 isolates), A. niger SC (2 isolates), and A. terreus SC (1 isolate). Comparator antifungal agents included anidulafungin, caspofungin, amphotericin B, itraconazole, posaconzole, and voriconazole. Both CLSI and EUCAST methods were highly concordant for E1210 and all comparators. The essential agreement (EA; ±2 log2 dilution steps) was 100% for all comparisons with the exception of posaconazole versus A. terreus SC (EA = 91.3%). The minimum effective concentration (MEC)/MIC90 values (μg/ml) for E1210, anidulafungin, caspofungin, itraconazole, posaconazole, and voriconazole, respectively, were as follows for each species: for A. flavus SC, 0.03, ≤0.008, 0.12, 1, 1, and 1; for A. fumigatus SC, 0.06, 0.015, 0.12, >8, 1, and 4; for A. niger SC, 0.015, 0.03, 0.12, 4, 1, and 2; and for A. terreus SC, 0.06, 0.015, 0.12, 1, 0.5, and 1. E1210 was very active against AMB-R strains of A. terreus SC (MEC range, 0.015 to 0.06 μg/ml) and itraconazole-R strains of A. fumigatus SC (MEC range, 0.03 to 0.12 μg/ml), A. niger SC (MEC, 0.008 μg/ml), and A. terreus SC (MEC, 0.015

  15. In vitro activity of a novel broad-spectrum antifungal, E1210, tested against Aspergillus spp. determined by CLSI and EUCAST broth microdilution methods.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pfaller, Michael A; Duncanson, Frederick; Messer, Shawn A; Moet, Gary J; Jones, Ronald N; Castanheira, Mariana

    2011-11-01

    E1210 is a first-in-class broad-spectrum antifungal that suppresses hyphal growth by inhibiting fungal glycophosphatidylinositol (GPI) biosynthesis. In the present study, we extend these findings by examining the activity of E1210 and comparator antifungal agents against Aspergillus spp. by using the methods of the Clinical and Laboratory Standards Institute (CLSI) and the European Committee for Antimicrobial Susceptibility Testing (EUCAST) to test wild-type (WT) as well as amphotericin B (AMB)-resistant (-R) and azole-R strains (as determined by CLSI methods). Seventy-eight clinical isolates of Aspergillus were tested including 20 isolates of Aspergillus flavus species complex (SC), 22 of A. fumigatus SC, 13 of A. niger SC, and 23 of A. terreus SC. The collection included 15 AMB-R (MIC, ≥ 2 μg/ml) isolates of A. terreus SC and 10 itraconazole-R (MIC, ≥ 4 μg/ml) isolates of A. fumigatus SC (7 isolates), A. niger SC (2 isolates), and A. terreus SC (1 isolate). Comparator antifungal agents included anidulafungin, caspofungin, amphotericin B, itraconazole, posaconzole, and voriconazole. Both CLSI and EUCAST methods were highly concordant for E1210 and all comparators. The essential agreement (EA; ± 2 log(2) dilution steps) was 100% for all comparisons with the exception of posaconazole versus A. terreus SC (EA = 91.3%). The minimum effective concentration (MEC)/MIC(90) values (μg/ml) for E1210, anidulafungin, caspofungin, itraconazole, posaconazole, and voriconazole, respectively, were as follows for each species: for A. flavus SC, 0.03, ≤ 0.008, 0.12, 1, 1, and 1; for A. fumigatus SC, 0.06, 0.015, 0.12, >8, 1, and 4; for A. niger SC, 0.015, 0.03, 0.12, 4, 1, and 2; and for A. terreus SC, 0.06, 0.015, 0.12, 1, 0.5, and 1. E1210 was very active against AMB-R strains of A. terreus SC (MEC range, 0.015 to 0.06 μg/ml) and itraconazole-R strains of A. fumigatus SC (MEC range, 0.03 to 0.12 μg/ml), A. niger SC (MEC, 0.008 μg/ml), and A. terreus SC (MEC, 0.015

  16. Transgenic Brassica rapa plants over-expressing eIF(iso)4E variants show broad-spectrum Turnip mosaic virus (TuMV) resistance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Jinhee; Kang, Won-Hee; Hwang, Jeena; Yang, Hee-Bum; Dosun, Kim; Oh, Chang-Sik; Kang, Byoung-Cheorl

    2014-08-01

    The protein-protein interaction between VPg (viral protein genome-linked) of potyviruses and eIF4E (eukaryotic initiation factor 4E) or eIF(iso)4E of their host plants is a critical step in determining viral virulence. In this study, we evaluated the approach of engineering broad-spectrum resistance in Chinese cabbage (Brassica rapa) to Turnip mosaic virus (TuMV), which is one of the most important potyviruses, by a systematic knowledge-based approach to interrupt the interaction between TuMV VPg and B. rapa eIF(iso)4E. The seven amino acids in the cap-binding pocket of eIF(iso)4E were selected on the basis of other previous results and comparison of protein models of cap-binding pockets, and mutated. Yeast two-hybrid assay and co-immunoprecipitation analysis demonstrated that W95L, K150L and W95L/K150E amino acid mutations of B. rapa eIF(iso)4E interrupted its interaction with TuMV VPg. All eIF(iso)4E mutants were able to complement an eIF4E-knockout yeast strain, indicating that the mutated eIF(iso)4E proteins retained their function as a translational initiation factor. To determine whether these mutations could confer resistance, eIF(iso)4E W95L, W95L/K150E and eIF(iso)4E wild-type were over-expressed in a susceptible Chinese cabbage cultivar. Evaluation of the TuMV resistance of T1 and T2 transformants demonstrated that the over-expression of the eIF(iso)4E mutant forms can confer resistance to multiple TuMV strains. These data demonstrate the utility of knowledge-based approaches for the engineering of broad-spectrum resistance in Chinese cabbage. © 2014 BSPP AND JOHN WILEY & SONS LTD.

  17. Novel Clostridium difficile Anti-Toxin (TcdA and TcdB) Humanized Monoclonal Antibodies Demonstrate In Vitro Neutralization across a Broad Spectrum of Clinical Strains and In Vivo Potency in a Hamster Spore Challenge Model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qiu, Hongyu; Cassan, Robyn; Johnstone, Darrell; Han, Xiaobing; Joyee, Antony George; McQuoid, Monica; Masi, Andrea; Merluza, John; Hrehorak, Bryce; Reid, Ross; Kennedy, Kieron; Tighe, Bonnie; Rak, Carla; Leonhardt, Melanie; Dupas, Brian; Saward, Laura; Berry, Jody D; Nykiforuk, Cory L

    2016-01-01

    Clostridium difficile (C. difficile) infection (CDI) is the main cause of nosocomial antibiotic-associated colitis and increased incidence of community-associated diarrhea in industrialized countries. At present, the primary treatment of CDI is antibiotic administration, which is effective but often associated with recurrence, especially in the elderly. Pathogenic strains produce enterotoxin, toxin A (TcdA), and cytotoxin, toxin B (TcdB), which are necessary for C. difficile induced diarrhea and gut pathological changes. Administration of anti-toxin antibodies provides an alternative approach to treat CDI, and has shown promising results in preclinical and clinical studies. In the current study, several humanized anti-TcdA and anti-TcdB monoclonal antibodies were generated and their protective potency was characterized in a hamster infection model. The humanized anti-TcdA (CANmAbA4) and anti-TcdB (CANmAbB4 and CANmAbB1) antibodies showed broad spectrum in vitro neutralization of toxins from clinical strains and neutralization in a mouse toxin challenge model. Moreover, co-administration of humanized antibodies (CANmAbA4 and CANmAbB4 cocktail) provided a high level of protection in a dose dependent manner (85% versus 57% survival at day 22 for 50 mg/kg and 20 mg/kg doses, respectively) in a hamster gastrointestinal infection (GI) model. This study describes the protective effects conferred by novel neutralizing anti-toxin monoclonal antibodies against C. difficile toxins and their potential as therapeutic agents in treating CDI.

  18. Novel Clostridium difficile Anti-Toxin (TcdA and TcdB Humanized Monoclonal Antibodies Demonstrate In Vitro Neutralization across a Broad Spectrum of Clinical Strains and In Vivo Potency in a Hamster Spore Challenge Model.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hongyu Qiu

    Full Text Available Clostridium difficile (C. difficile infection (CDI is the main cause of nosocomial antibiotic-associated colitis and increased incidence of community-associated diarrhea in industrialized countries. At present, the primary treatment of CDI is antibiotic administration, which is effective but often associated with recurrence, especially in the elderly. Pathogenic strains produce enterotoxin, toxin A (TcdA, and cytotoxin, toxin B (TcdB, which are necessary for C. difficile induced diarrhea and gut pathological changes. Administration of anti-toxin antibodies provides an alternative approach to treat CDI, and has shown promising results in preclinical and clinical studies. In the current study, several humanized anti-TcdA and anti-TcdB monoclonal antibodies were generated and their protective potency was characterized in a hamster infection model. The humanized anti-TcdA (CANmAbA4 and anti-TcdB (CANmAbB4 and CANmAbB1 antibodies showed broad spectrum in vitro neutralization of toxins from clinical strains and neutralization in a mouse toxin challenge model. Moreover, co-administration of humanized antibodies (CANmAbA4 and CANmAbB4 cocktail provided a high level of protection in a dose dependent manner (85% versus 57% survival at day 22 for 50 mg/kg and 20 mg/kg doses, respectively in a hamster gastrointestinal infection (GI model. This study describes the protective effects conferred by novel neutralizing anti-toxin monoclonal antibodies against C. difficile toxins and their potential as therapeutic agents in treating CDI.

  19. Discovering Wavelets

    CERN Document Server

    Aboufadel, Edward

    1999-01-01

    An accessible and practical introduction to wavelets. With applications in image processing, audio restoration, seismology, and elsewhere, wavelets have been the subject of growing excitement and interest over the past several years. Unfortunately, most books on wavelets are accessible primarily to research mathematicians. Discovering Wavelets presents basic and advanced concepts of wavelets in a way that is accessible to anyone with only a fundamental knowledge of linear algebra. The basic concepts of wavelet theory are introduced in the context of an explanation of how the FBI uses wavelets

  20. Dissemination and genetic support of broad-spectrum beta-lactam-resistant Escherichia coli strain isolated from two Tunisian hospitals during 2004-2012.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ayari, Khaoula; Bourouis, Amel; Chihi, Hela; Mahrouki, Sihem; Naas, Thierry; Belhadj, Omrane

    2017-06-01

    The dissemination of extended-spectrum β-lactamase (ESBL)-producing bacteria presented a great concern worldwide. Gram-negative organisms such as Escherichia coli and Klebsiella pneumoniae are the most frequently isolated pathogens responsible for nosocomial infections. The aim of this study was to investigate and to follow the emergence of resistance and the characterization of Extended-Spectrum Beta-Lactamases (ESBL) among broad-spectrum beta-lactam-Escherichia coli clinical isolates recovered from the military hospital and Habib Thameur hospital in Tunisia. A total of 113 E.coli isolates obtained during the period 2004 through 2012 showed a significant degree of multi-resistance. Among these strains, the double-disk synergy test confirmed the ESBL phenotype in 46 isolates. These included 32(70%) strains from Hospital A and 14(30%) from Hospital B. The ESBL was identified as CTX-M-15. The ESBL resistance was transferred by a 60 kb plasmid CTXM-15-producing isolates were unrelated according to the PFGE analysis and characterization of the regions surrounding the blaCTX-M-15 showed the ISEcp1 elements located in the upstream region of the bla gene and 20 of them truncated by IS26. ESBL producing E. coli strains are a serious threat in the community in Tunisia and we should take into consideration any possible spread of such epidemiological resistance.

  1. Protease-sensitive conformers in broad spectrum of distinct PrPSc structures in sporadic Creutzfeldt-Jakob disease are indicator of progression rate.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Chae; Haldiman, Tracy; Cohen, Yvonne; Chen, Wei; Blevins, Janis; Sy, Man-Sun; Cohen, Mark; Safar, Jiri G

    2011-09-01

    The origin, range, and structure of prions causing the most common human prion disease, sporadic Creutzfeldt-Jakob disease (sCJD), are largely unknown. To investigate the molecular mechanism responsible for the broad phenotypic variability of sCJD, we analyzed the conformational characteristics of protease-sensitive and protease-resistant fractions of the pathogenic prion protein (PrP(Sc)) using novel conformational methods derived from a conformation-dependent immunoassay (CDI). In 46 brains of patients homozygous for polymorphisms in the PRNP gene and exhibiting either Type 1 or Type 2 western blot pattern of the PrP(Sc), we identified an extensive array of PrP(Sc) structures that differ in protease sensitivity, display of critical domains, and conformational stability. Surprisingly, in sCJD cases homozygous for methionine or valine at codon 129 of the PRNP gene, the concentration and stability of protease-sensitive conformers of PrP(Sc) correlated with progression rate of the disease. These data indicate that sCJD brains exhibit a wide spectrum of PrP(Sc) structural states, and accordingly argue for a broad spectrum of prion strains coding for different phenotypes. The link between disease duration, levels, and stability of protease-sensitive conformers of PrP(Sc) suggests that these conformers play an important role in the pathogenesis of sCJD.

  2. Protease-sensitive conformers in broad spectrum of distinct PrPSc structures in sporadic Creutzfeldt-Jakob disease are indicator of progression rate.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chae Kim

    2011-09-01

    Full Text Available The origin, range, and structure of prions causing the most common human prion disease, sporadic Creutzfeldt-Jakob disease (sCJD, are largely unknown. To investigate the molecular mechanism responsible for the broad phenotypic variability of sCJD, we analyzed the conformational characteristics of protease-sensitive and protease-resistant fractions of the pathogenic prion protein (PrP(Sc using novel conformational methods derived from a conformation-dependent immunoassay (CDI. In 46 brains of patients homozygous for polymorphisms in the PRNP gene and exhibiting either Type 1 or Type 2 western blot pattern of the PrP(Sc, we identified an extensive array of PrP(Sc structures that differ in protease sensitivity, display of critical domains, and conformational stability. Surprisingly, in sCJD cases homozygous for methionine or valine at codon 129 of the PRNP gene, the concentration and stability of protease-sensitive conformers of PrP(Sc correlated with progression rate of the disease. These data indicate that sCJD brains exhibit a wide spectrum of PrP(Sc structural states, and accordingly argue for a broad spectrum of prion strains coding for different phenotypes. The link between disease duration, levels, and stability of protease-sensitive conformers of PrP(Sc suggests that these conformers play an important role in the pathogenesis of sCJD.

  3. Oldest human occupation of Wallacea at Laili Cave, Timor-Leste, shows broad-spectrum foraging responses to late Pleistocene environments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hawkins, Stuart; O'Connor, Sue; Maloney, Tim Ryan; Litster, Mirani; Kealy, Shimona; Fenner, Jack N.; Aplin, Ken; Boulanger, Clara; Brockwell, Sally; Willan, Richard; Piotto, Elena; Louys, Julien

    2017-09-01

    The Wallacea Archipelago provides an extraordinary laboratory for the study of human colonisation and adaptation, yet few detailed archaeological studies have been conducted in the region that span the earliest phase of human settlement. Laili Cave, in northern Timor-Leste, preserves the oldest human occupation in this insular region with a cultural sequence spanning 11,200 to 44,600 cal BP. Small-bodied vertebrates and invertebrates were recovered to the lowest excavated levels, associated with highly concentrated stone artefacts. We report on human behavioural adaptations within the context of Pleistocene environments and changing landscapes using zooarchaeological, stone artefact, bathymetric, and experimental isotopic analyses. Results indicate that Pleistocene humans used the abundant local chert liberally and engaged in mobile broad-spectrum exploitation of invertebrates and fishes from marine, estuarine, and freshwater environments within close proximity of Laili Cave. The faunal assemblage indicates heterogeneous but relatively stable environments during the late Pleistocene. Variability in subsistence strategies over time appears to be a response to changing landscapes and concomitant local resources. This record contrasts with marine specialisations evident from other sites in Timor-Leste and within the broader Wallacean region.

  4. Naturally occurring broad-spectrum powdery mildew resistance in a Central American tomato accession is caused by loss of mlo function.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bai, Yuling; Pavan, Stefano; Zheng, Zheng; Zappel, Nana F; Reinstädler, Anja; Lotti, Concetta; De Giovanni, Claudio; Ricciardi, Luigi; Lindhout, Pim; Visser, Richard; Theres, Klaus; Panstruga, Ralph

    2008-01-01

    The resistant cherry tomato (Solanum lycopersicum var. cerasiforme) line LC-95, derived from an accession collected in Ecuador, harbors a natural allele (ol-2) that confers broad-spectrum and recessively inherited resistance to powdery mildew (Oidium neolycopersici). As both the genetic and phytopathological characteristics of ol-2-mediated resistance are reminiscent of powdery mildew immunity conferred by loss-of-function mlo alleles in barley and Arabidopsis, we initiated a candidate-gene approach to clone Ol-2. A tomato Mlo gene (SlMlo1) with high sequence-relatedness to barley Mlo and Arabidopsis AtMLO2 mapped to the chromosomal region harboring the Ol-2 locus. Complementation experiments using transgenic tomato lines as well as virus-induced gene silencing assays suggested that loss of SlMlo1 function is responsible for powdery mildew resistance conferred by ol-2. In progeny of a cross between a resistant line bearing ol-2 and the susceptible tomato cultivar Moneymaker, a 19-bp deletion disrupting the SlMlo1 coding region cosegregated with resistance. This polymorphism results in a frameshift and, thus, a truncated nonfunctional SlMlo1 protein. Our findings reveal the second example of a natural mlo mutant that possibly arose post-domestication, suggesting that natural mlo alleles might be evolutionarily short-lived due to fitness costs related to loss of mlo function.

  5. Inclusion of Vancomycin as Part of Broad-Spectrum Coverage Does Not Improve Outcomes in Patients with Intra-Abdominal Infections: A Post Hoc Analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sanders, James M; Tessier, Jeffrey M; Sawyer, Robert G; Lipsett, Pam A; Miller, Preston R; Namias, Nicholas; O'Neill, Patrick J; Dellinger, E P; Coimbra, Raul; Guidry, Chris A; Cuschieri, Joseph; Banton, Kaysie L; Cook, Charles H; Moore, Billy J; Duane, Therese M

    2016-12-01

    Management of complicated intra-abdominal infections (cIAIs) includes broad-spectrum antimicrobial coverage and commonly includes vancomycin for the empiric coverage of methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA). Ideally, culture-guided de-escalation follows to promote robust antimicrobial stewardship. This study assessed the impact and necessity of vancomycin in cIAI treatment regimens. A post hoc analysis of the Study to Optimize Peritoneal Infection Therapy (STOP-IT) trial was performed. Patients receiving piperacillin-tazobactam (P/T) and/or a carbapenem were included with categorization based on use of vancomycin. Univariate and multivariable analyses evaluated effects of including vancomycin on individual and the composite of undesirable outcomes (recurrent IAI, surgical site infection [SSI], or death). The study cohort included 344 patients with 110 (32%) patients receiving vancomycin. Isolation of MRSA occurred in only eight (2.3%) patients. Vancomycin use was associated with a similar composite outcome, 29.1%, vs. no vancomycin, 22.2% (p = 0.17). Patients receiving vancomycin had (mean [standard deviation]) higher Acute Physiology and Chronic Health Evaluation II scores (13.1 [6.6] vs. 9.4 [5.7], p post hoc analysis reveals that addition of vancomycin occurred in nearly one third of patients and more often in sicker patients. Despite this selection bias, no appreciable differences in undesired outcomes were demonstrated, suggesting limited utility for adding vancomycin to cIAI treatment regimens.

  6. GhMPK7, a novel multiple stress-responsive cotton group C MAPK gene, has a role in broad spectrum disease resistance and plant development.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shi, Jing; An, Hai-Long; Zhang, Liang; Gao, Zheng; Guo, Xing-Qi

    2010-09-01

    Mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) cascades play a pivotal role in environmental responses and developmental processes in plants. Previous researches mainly focus on the MAPKs in groups A and B, and little is known on group C. In this study, we isolated and characterized GhMPK7, which is a novel gene from cotton belonging to the group C MAPK. RNA blot analysis indicated that GhMPK7 transcript was induced by pathogen infection and multiple defense-related signal molecules. Transgenic Nicotina benthamiana overexpressing GhMPK7 displayed significant resistance to fungus Colletotrichum nicotianae and virus PVY, and the transcript levels of SA pathway genes were more rapidly and strongly induced. Furthermore, the transgenic N. benthamiana showed reduced ROS-mediated injuries by upregulating expression of oxidative stress-related genes. Interestingly, the transgenic plants germinated earlier and grew faster in comparison to wild-type plants. beta-glucuronidase activity driven by the GhMPK7 promoter was detected in the apical meristem at the vegetative stage, and it was enhanced by treatments with signal molecules and phytohormones. These results suggest that GhMPK7 might play an important role in SA-regulated broad-spectrum resistance to pathogen infection, and that it is also involved in regulation of plant growth and development.

  7. Tallow amphopolycarboxyglycinate-stabilized silver nanoparticles: new frontiers in development of plant protection products with a broad spectrum of action against phytopathogens

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krutyakov, Yurii A.; Kudrinskiy, Alexey A.; Zherebin, Pavel M.; Yapryntsev, Alexey D.; Pobedinskaya, Marina A.; Elansky, Sergey N.; Denisov, Albert N.; Mikhaylov, Dmitry M.; Lisichkin, Georgii V.

    2016-07-01

    Sustainable agriculture calls for minimal use of agrochemicals in order to protect the environment. It has caused an increase in the rate of nanoparticles use, in particular silver nanoparticles (AgNPs) due to their safety for mammals, unique biological activity and a broad spectrum of action against fungal and bacterial pathogens. Until now the use of AgNPs dispersions in the agricultural sector has been essentially limited due to many factors decreased their stability (mixing with other pesticides, presence of electrolytes). We present a versatile synthesis of polyampholyte surfactant (tallow amphopolycarboxyglycinate) stabilized AgNPs. We took a close look at unique aggregation behavior (via dynamic light scattering and UV-vis spectroscopy) and biocidal activity of obtained silver colloids. AgNPs are characterized by exclusively high aggregative stability in the presence of coagulating agents NaNO3 and NaSO4 (up to 1 M), during drying/redispergation, and frost/defrost cycles. The dispersion of AgNPs shows high biocidal activity (EC50 is ten times lower than commercial species ones) with respect to Phytophthora infestans and phytopathogenic fungi. This points to the possibility of successful application of silver preparations within agriculture with the goal of partial reduction of the use of toxic and expensive synthetic antibiotics and pesticides.

  8. Efficacy of oral E1210, a new broad-spectrum antifungal with a novel mechanism of action, in murine models of candidiasis, aspergillosis, and fusariosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hata, Katsura; Horii, Takaaki; Miyazaki, Mamiko; Watanabe, Nao-Aki; Okubo, Miyuki; Sonoda, Jiro; Nakamoto, Kazutaka; Tanaka, Keigo; Shirotori, Syuji; Murai, Norio; Inoue, Satoshi; Matsukura, Masayuki; Abe, Shinya; Yoshimatsu, Kentaro; Asada, Makoto

    2011-10-01

    E1210 is a first-in-class, broad-spectrum antifungal with a novel mechanism of action-inhibition of fungal glycosylphosphatidylinositol biosynthesis. In this study, the efficacies of E1210 and reference antifungals were evaluated in murine models of oropharyngeal and disseminated candidiasis, pulmonary aspergillosis, and disseminated fusariosis. Oral E1210 demonstrated dose-dependent efficacy in infections caused by Candida species, Aspergillus spp., and Fusarium solani. In the treatment of oropharyngeal candidiasis, E1210 and fluconazole each caused a significantly greater reduction in the number of oral CFU than the control treatment (P candidiasis model, mice treated with E1210, fluconazole, caspofungin, or liposomal amphotericin B showed significantly higher survival rates than the control mice (P candidiasis caused by azole-resistant Candida albicans or Candida tropicalis. A 24-h delay in treatment onset minimally affected the efficacy outcome of E1210 in the treatment of disseminated candidiasis. In the Aspergillus flavus pulmonary aspergillosis model, mice treated with E1210, voriconazole, or caspofungin showed significantly higher survival rates than the control mice (P candidiasis, pulmonary aspergillosis, and disseminated fusariosis. These data suggest that further studies to determine E1210's potential for the treatment of disseminated fungal infections are indicated.

  9. Efficacy of Oral E1210, a New Broad-Spectrum Antifungal with a Novel Mechanism of Action, in Murine Models of Candidiasis, Aspergillosis, and Fusariosis▿

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hata, Katsura; Horii, Takaaki; Miyazaki, Mamiko; Watanabe, Nao-aki; Okubo, Miyuki; Sonoda, Jiro; Nakamoto, Kazutaka; Tanaka, Keigo; Shirotori, Syuji; Murai, Norio; Inoue, Satoshi; Matsukura, Masayuki; Abe, Shinya; Yoshimatsu, Kentaro; Asada, Makoto

    2011-01-01

    E1210 is a first-in-class, broad-spectrum antifungal with a novel mechanism of action—inhibition of fungal glycosylphosphatidylinositol biosynthesis. In this study, the efficacies of E1210 and reference antifungals were evaluated in murine models of oropharyngeal and disseminated candidiasis, pulmonary aspergillosis, and disseminated fusariosis. Oral E1210 demonstrated dose-dependent efficacy in infections caused by Candida species, Aspergillus spp., and Fusarium solani. In the treatment of oropharyngeal candidiasis, E1210 and fluconazole each caused a significantly greater reduction in the number of oral CFU than the control treatment (P candidiasis model, mice treated with E1210, fluconazole, caspofungin, or liposomal amphotericin B showed significantly higher survival rates than the control mice (P candidiasis caused by azole-resistant Candida albicans or Candida tropicalis. A 24-h delay in treatment onset minimally affected the efficacy outcome of E1210 in the treatment of disseminated candidiasis. In the Aspergillus flavus pulmonary aspergillosis model, mice treated with E1210, voriconazole, or caspofungin showed significantly higher survival rates than the control mice (P candidiasis, pulmonary aspergillosis, and disseminated fusariosis. These data suggest that further studies to determine E1210's potential for the treatment of disseminated fungal infections are indicated. PMID:21788462

  10. Use of artificial intelligence in the design of small peptide antibiotics effective against a broad spectrum of highly antibiotic-resistant superbugs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cherkasov, Artem; Hilpert, Kai; Jenssen, Håvard; Fjell, Christopher D; Waldbrook, Matt; Mullaly, Sarah C; Volkmer, Rudolf; Hancock, Robert E W

    2009-01-16

    Increased multiple antibiotic resistance in the face of declining antibiotic discovery is one of society's most pressing health issues. Antimicrobial peptides represent a promising new class of antibiotics. Here we ask whether it is possible to make small broad spectrum peptides employing minimal assumptions, by capitalizing on accumulating chemical biology information. Using peptide array technology, two large random 9-amino-acid peptide libraries were iteratively created using the amino acid composition of the most active peptides. The resultant data was used together with Artificial Neural Networks, a powerful machine learning technique, to create quantitative in silico models of antibiotic activity. On the basis of random testing, these models proved remarkably effective in predicting the activity of 100,000 virtual peptides. The best peptides, representing the top quartile of predicted activities, were effective against a broad array of multidrug-resistant "Superbugs" with activities that were equal to or better than four highly used conventional antibiotics, more effective than the most advanced clinical candidate antimicrobial peptide, and protective against Staphylococcus aureus infections in animal models.

  11. A P25/(NH4)xWO3 hybrid photocatalyst with broad spectrum photocatalytic properties under UV, visible, and near-infrared irradiation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Linfen; Liu, Bin; Liu, Tongyao; Ma, Xinlong; Li, Hao; Yin, Shu; Sato, Tsugio; Wang, Yuhua

    2017-04-01

    In this study, a series of hybrid nanostructured photocatalysts P25/(NH4)xWO3 nanocomposites with the average crystallite size of P25 and (NH4)xWO3 of the sample was calculated to be about 30 nm and 130 nm, were successfully synthesized via a simple one-step hydrothermal method. The as-obtained samples was characterized by transmission electron microscopy (TEM), which implies that the P25/(NH4)xWO3 nanocomposites are fabricated with favourable nanosizd interfacial. The XPS results confirmed that the obtained sample consists of mixed chemical valences of W5+ and W6+, the low-valance W5+ sites could be the origin of NIR absorption. As revealed by optical absorption results, P25/(NH4)xWO3 nanocomposites possess high optical absorption in the whole solar spectrum of 200-2500 nm. Benefiting from this unique photo-absorption property and the synergistic effect of P25 and (NH4)xWO3, broad spectrum response photocatalytic activities covering UV, visible and near infrared regions on degradation of Rhodamine B have been realized by P25/(NH4)xWO3 nanocomposites. Meanwhile, the stability of photocatalysts was examined by the XRD and XPS of the photocatalysts after the reaction. The results show that P25/(NH4)xWO3 photocatalysts has a brilliant application prospect in the energy utilization to solve deteriorating environmental issues.

  12. Hydroxy tricyclic 1,5-naphthyridinone oxabicyclooctane-linked novel bacterial topoisomerase inhibitors as broad-spectrum antibacterial agents-SAR of RHS moiety (Part-3).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Singh, Sheo B; Kaelin, David E; Wu, Jin; Miesel, Lynn; Tan, Christopher M; Gill, Charles; Black, Todd; Nargund, Ravi; Meinke, Peter T; Olsen, David B; Lagrutta, Armando; Wei, Changqing; Peng, Xuanjia; Wang, Xiu; Fukuda, Hideyuki; Kishii, Ryuta; Takei, Masaya; Takeuchi, Tomoko; Shibue, Taku; Ohata, Kohei; Takano, Hisashi; Ban, Shizuka; Nishimura, Akinori; Fukuda, Yasumichi

    2015-06-15

    Novel bacterial topoisomerase inhibitors (NBTIs) are a new class of broad-spectrum antibacterial agents targeting bacterial Gyrase A and ParC and have potential utility in combating antibiotic resistance. (R)-Hydroxy-1,5-naphthyridinone left-hand side (LHS) oxabicyclooctane linked pyridoxazinone right-hand side (RHS) containing NBTIs showed a potent Gram-positive antibacterial profile. SAR around the RHS moiety, including substitutions around pyridooxazinone, pyridodioxane, and phenyl propenoids has been described. A fluoro substituted pyridoxazinone showed an MIC against Staphylococcus aureus of 0.5 μg/mL with reduced functional hERG activity (IC50 333 μM) and good in vivo efficacy [ED90 12 mg/kg, intravenous (iv) and 15 mg/kg, oral (p.o.)]. A pyridodioxane-containing NBTI showed a S. aureus MIC of 0.5 μg/mL, significantly improved hERG IC50 764 μM and strong efficacy of 11 mg/kg (iv) and 5 mg/kg (p.o.). A phenyl propenoid series of compounds showed potent antibacterial activity, but also showed potent hERG binding activity. Many of the compounds in the hydroxy-tricyclic series showed strong activity against Acinetobacter baumannii, but reduced activity against Escherichia coli and Pseudomonas aeruginosa. Bicyclic heterocycles appeared to be the best RHS moiety for the hydroxy-tricyclic oxabicyclooctane linked NBTIs. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  13. Tricyclic 1,5-naphthyridinone oxabicyclooctane-linked novel bacterial topoisomerase inhibitors as broad-spectrum antibacterial agents-SAR of left-hand-side moiety (Part-2).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Singh, Sheo B; Kaelin, David E; Wu, Jin; Miesel, Lynn; Tan, Christopher M; Black, Todd; Nargund, Ravi; Meinke, Peter T; Olsen, David B; Lagrutta, Armando; Lu, Jun; Patel, Sangita; Rickert, Keith W; Smith, Robert F; Soisson, Stephen; Sherer, Edward; Joyce, Leo A; Wei, Changqing; Peng, Xuanjia; Wang, Xiu; Fukuda, Hideyuki; Kishii, Ryuta; Takei, Masaya; Takano, Hisashi; Shibasaki, Mitsuhito; Yajima, Masanobu; Nishimura, Akinori; Shibata, Takeshi; Fukuda, Yasumichi

    2015-05-01

    Novel bacterial topoisomerase inhibitors (NBTIs) represent a new class of broad-spectrum antibacterial agents targeting bacterial Gyrase A and ParC and have potential utility in combating antibiotic resistance. A series of novel oxabicyclooctane-linked NBTIs with new tricyclic-1,5-naphthyridinone left hand side moieties have been described. Compounds with a (R)-hydroxy-1,5-naphthyridinone moiety (7) showed potent antibacterial activity (e.g., Staphylococcus aureus MIC 0.25 μg/mL), acceptable Gram-positive and Gram-negative spectrum with rapidly bactericidal activity. The compound 7 showed intravenous and oral efficacy (ED50) at 3.2 and 27 mg/kg doses, respectively, in a murine model of bacteremia. Most importantly they showed significant attenuation of functional hERG activity (IC50 >170 μM). In general, lower logD attenuated hERG activity but also reduced Gram-negative activity. The co-crystal structure of a hydroxy-tricyclic NBTI bound to a DNA-gyrase complex exhibited a binding mode that show enantiomeric preference for R isomer and explains the activity and SAR. The discovery, synthesis, SAR and X-ray crystal structure of the left-hand-side tricyclic 1,5-naphthyridinone based oxabicyclooctane linked NBTIs are described. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  14. Cationic Oligo(thiophene ethynylene) with Broad-Spectrum and High Antibacterial Efficiency under White Light and Specific Biocidal Activity against S. aureus in Dark.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Qi; Li, Junting; Zhang, Xiaoqian; Li, Zhengping; Tang, Yanli

    2016-01-13

    We designed and synthesized a novel oligo(thiophene ethynylene) (OTE) to investigate the antibacterial activities against Gram-positive (Staphylococcus aureus and Staphylococcus epidermidis) and Gram-negative (Ralstonia solanacearum and Escherichia coli) bacteria in vitro by photodynamic therapy (PDT). Notably, OTE presents broad-spectrum and greatly high antibacterial activities after white light irradiation at nanogram per milliliter concentrations. The half inhibitory concentrations (IC50) values obtained for S. aureus, S. epidermidis, E. coli, and R. solanacearum are 8, 13, 24, and 52 ng/mL after illumination for 30 min, respectively, which are lower than that of other PDT agents. Interestingly, OTE shows the specific and very strong dark killing capability against S. aureus at the concentration of 180 ng/mL for 30 min, which is the highest efficiency biocide against S. aureus without the need of irradiation to date. The antibacterial mechanism investigated demonstrated that reactive oxygen species or singlet-oxygen generated by OTE kills bacteria irreversibly upon white light irradiation, and OTE as a v-type oligomer exerts its toxicity directly on destroying bacterial cytoplasmic membrane in the dark. Importantly, the OTE shows no cell cytotoxicity and excellent biocompatibility. The results indicate that it is potential to provide versatile applications in the efficient control of pathogenic organisms and specific application for killing S. aureus.

  15. A broad spectrum high-SPF photostable sunscreen with a high UVA-PF can protect against cellular damage at high UV exposure doses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cole, Curtis; Appa, Yohini; Ou-Yang, Hao

    2014-08-01

    Advances in sunscreen technologies have yielded broad spectrum sunscreens at high-sun protection factor (SPF) and ultraviolet A protection factor (UVA-PF) levels that are photostable and powerful in protecting skin from erythema. Questions arise whether these sunscreens protect proportionally against cellular skin damage caused by high ultraviolet exposures. The objective of this study is to evaluate if high-SPF sunscreen can protect skin at a cellular level under UV exposure doses [>50 minimal erythema dose (MED)] similarly to the SPF value. Sunburn cells, Langerhans cells, thymine dimers, protein 53 (p53), and matrix metalloproteinase (MMP)-1 and MMP-9 endpoints were evaluated in biopsies from 12 subjects following four treatments: unprotected exposed to 0, 1 and 3 MED and sunscreen (SPF 55) protected exposed to 55 MED of UV radiation. All the markers showed significantly more damage for the 3 MED-untreated sites when compared with non-irradiated control, and majority of the markers showed marked damage following unprotected 1 MED exposure. After 55 MEDs, sunscreen-protected sites showed significantly less p53 and MMP-9 (keratinocyte) staining than the 1 MED-exposed unprotected sites, while all the other biomarkers in sunscreen protected sites showed no statistical differences from 1 MED-exposed unprotected sites. A high-SPF photostable sunscreen with high UVA-PF can provide proportionately high protection against multiple cellular damage markers. © 2014 John Wiley & Sons A/S. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  16. A high-resolution map of the Grp1 locus on chromosome V of potato harbouring broad-spectrum resistance to the cyst nematode species Globodera pallida and Globodera rostochiensis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Finkers-Tomczak, A.M.; Danan, S.; Dijk, van T.; Beyene, A.; Bouwman-Smits, L.; Overmars, H.A.; Eck, van H.J.; Goverse, A.; Bakker, J.; Bakker, E.H.

    2009-01-01

    The Grp1 locus confers broad-spectrum resistance to the potato cyst nematode species Globodera pallida and Globodera rostochiensis and is located in the GP21-GP179 interval on the short arm of chromosome V of potato. A high-resolution map has been developed using the diploid mapping population

  17. Intervention to Reduce Broad-Spectrum Antibiotics and Treatment Durations Prescribed at the Time of Hospital Discharge: A Novel Stewardship Approach.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yogo, Norihiro; Shihadeh, Katherine; Young, Heather; Calcaterra, Susan L; Knepper, Bryan C; Burman, William J; Mehler, Philip S; Jenkins, Timothy C

    2017-05-01

    OBJECTIVE For most common infections requiring hospitalization, antibiotic treatment is completed after hospital discharge. Postdischarge therapy is often unnecessarily broad spectrum and prolonged. We developed an intervention to improve antibiotic selection and shorten treatment durations. DESIGN Single center, quasi-experimental retrospective cohort study METHODS Patients prescribed oral antibiotics at hospital discharge before (July 2012-June 2013) and after (October 2014-February 2015) an intervention consisting of (1) institutional guidance for oral step-down antibiotic selection and duration of therapy and (2) pharmacy audit of discharge prescriptions with real-time prescribing recommendations to providers. The primary outcomes measured were total prescribed duration of therapy and use of antibiotics with broad gram-negative activity (ie, fluoroquinolones or amoxicillin-clavulanate). RESULTS Overall, 300 cases from the preintervention period and 200 cases from the intervention period were included. Compared with the preintervention period, the use of antibiotics with broad gram-negative activity decreased during the intervention (51% vs 40%; P=.02), particularly fluoroquinolones (38% vs 25%; P=.002). The total duration of therapy decreased from a median of 10 days (interquartile range [IQR], 7-13 days) to 9 days (IQR, 6-13 days) but did not reach statistical significance (P=.13). However, the duration prescribed at discharge declined from 6 days (IQR, 4-10 days) to 5 days (IQR, 3-7 days) (P=.003). During the intervention, there was a nonsignificant increase in the overall appropriateness of discharge prescriptions from 52% to 66% (P=.15). CONCLUSIONS A multifaceted intervention to optimize antibiotic prescribing at hospital discharge was associated with less frequent use of antibiotics with broad gram-negative activity and shorter postdischarge treatment durations. Infect Control Hosp Epidemiol 2017;38:534-541.

  18. Molecular characterisation of the broad-spectrum resistance to powdery mildew conferred by the Stpk-V gene from the wild species Haynaldia villosa.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qian, C; Cui, C; Wang, X; Zhou, C; Hu, P; Li, M; Li, R; Xiao, J; Wang, X; Chen, P; Xing, L; Cao, A

    2017-11-01

    A key member of the Pm21 resistance gene locus, Stpk-V, derived from Haynaldia villosa, was shown to confer broad-spectrum resistance to wheat powdery mildew. The present study was planned to investigate the resistance mechanism mediated by Stpk-V. Transcriptome analysis was performed in Stpk-V transgenic plants and recipient Yangmai158 upon Bgt infection, and detailed histochemical observations were conducted. Chromosome location of Stpk-V orthologous genes in Triticeae species was conducted for evolutionary study and over-expression of Stpk-V both in barley and Arabidopsis was performed for functional study. The transcriptome results indicate, at the early infection stage, the ROS pathway, JA pathway and some PR proteins associated with the SA pathway were activated in both the resistant Stpk-V transgenic plants and susceptible Yangmai158. However, at the later infection stage, the genes up-regulated at the early stage were continuously held only in the transgenic plants, and a large number of new genes were also activated in the transgenic plants but not in Yangmai158. Results indicate that sustained activation of the early response genes combined with later-activated genes mediated by Stpk-V is critical for resistance in Stpk-V transgenic plants. Stpk-V orthologous genes in the representative grass species are all located on homologous group six chromosomes, indicating that Stpk-V is an ancient gene in the grasses. Over-expression of Stpk-V enhanced host resistance to powdery mildew in barley but not in Arabidopsis. Our results enable a better understanding of the resistance mechanism mediated by Stpk-V, and establish a solid foundation for its use in cereal breeding as a gene resource. © 2017 German Society for Plant Sciences and The Royal Botanical Society of the Netherlands.

  19. Structure activity relationship of pyridoxazinone substituted RHS analogs of oxabicyclooctane-linked 1,5-naphthyridinyl novel bacterial topoisomerase inhibitors as broad-spectrum antibacterial agents (Part-6).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Singh, Sheo B; Kaelin, David E; Wu, Jin; Miesel, Lynn; Tan, Christopher M; Meinke, Peter T; Olsen, David B; Lagrutta, Armando; Wei, Changqing; Liao, Yonggang; Peng, Xuanjia; Wang, Xiu; Fukuda, Hideyuki; Kishii, Ryuta; Takei, Masaya; Yajima, Masanobu; Shibue, Taku; Shibata, Takeshi; Ohata, Kohei; Nishimura, Akinori; Fukuda, Yasumichi

    2015-09-01

    Oxabicyclooctane linked 1,5-naphthyridinyl-pyridoxazinones are novel broad-spectrum bacterial topoisomerase inhibitors (NBTIs) targeting bacterial DNA gyrase and topoisomerase IV at a site different than quinolones. Due to lack of cross-resistance to known antibiotics they present excellent opportunity to combat drug-resistant bacteria. A structure activity relationship of the pyridoxazinone moiety is described in this Letter. Chemical synthesis and activities of NBTIs with substitutions at C-3, C-4 and C-7 of the pyridoxazinone moiety with halogens, alkyl groups and methoxy group has been described. In addition, substitutions of the linker NH proton and its transformation into amide analogs of AM-8085 and AM-8191 have been reported. Fluoro, chloro, and methyl groups at C-3 of the pyridoxazinone moiety retained the potency and spectrum. In addition, a C-3 fluoro analog showed 4-fold better oral efficacy (ED50 3.9 mg/kg) as compared to the parent AM-8085 in a murine bacteremia model of infection of Staphylococcus aureus. Even modest polarity (e.g., methoxy) is not tolerated at C-3 of the pyridoxazinone unit. The basicity and NH group of the linker is important for the activity when CH2 is at the linker position-8. However, amides (with linker position-8 ketone) with a position-7 NH or N-methyl group retained potency and spectrum suggesting that neither basicity nor hydrogen-donor properties of the linker amide NH is essential for the activity. This would suggest likely an altered binding mode of the linker position-7,8 amide containing compounds. The amides showed highly improved hERG (functional IC50 >30 μM) profile. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  20. Wheezing and asthma may be enhanced by broad spectrum antibiotics used in early childhood. Concept and results of a pharmacoepidemiology study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jedrychowski, W; Perera, F; Maugeri, U; Mroz, E; Flak, E; Perzanowski, M; Majewska, R

    2011-04-01

    One of the mechanisms supposed to explain the increasing prevalence of asthma, among children in particular, is the use of antibiotics because they may modify natural microbial exposure and development of the immune system in early childhood. The aim of this study is to investigate the association between the use of various classes of antibiotics (penicillin, cephalosporin and macrolide derivatives) in early childhood and the medical diagnosis of asthma or wheezing reported by mothers over the follow-up after adjustment for potential confounders and respiratory infections. In a population-based sample of 5-year-olds, a part of the ongoing birth cohort study, the standardized interviews on health outcomes, potential confounders (child's gender, maternal atopy, parity, prenatal and postnatal environmental tobacco smoke) and the use of antibiotics were gathered from mothers of 310 children. While the overall use of antibiotics during the early childhood was insignificantly associated with asthma (adjusted OR = 1.65, 95%CI: 0.93 - 2.93), the risk estimates were significant both for macrolide antibiotics (adjusted OR=2.14, 95%CI: 1.16-3.95) and cephalosporins (OR=1.98, 95%CI: 1.14-3.37). The significant excess in IRR (incident risk ratio) of wheezing episodes was related only to the use of macrolide antibiotics (adjusted IRR=1.91, 95%CI: 1.12-3.27). The use of other classes of antibiotics was found not to be associated with the medical diagnosis of asthma or wheezing episodes recorded in the study period. as early childhood use of broad spectrum antibiotics is associated with an increased risk of developing asthma in 5-year-olds, it may be hypothesized that the antibiotic- related suppression of allergic inflammatory responses in the course of treatment may later lead to greater than before atopic immune response in Th2 children or an impairment of Th1 immune responses in early childhood.

  1. Linear biocompatible glyco-polyamidoamines as dual action mode virus infection inhibitors with potential as broad-spectrum microbicides for sexually transmitted diseases

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mauro, Nicolò; Ferruti, Paolo; Ranucci, Elisabetta; Manfredi, Amedea; Berzi, Angela; Clerici, Mario; Cagno, Valeria; Lembo, David; Palmioli, Alessandro; Sattin, Sara

    2016-09-01

    The initial steps of viral infections are mediated by interactions between viral proteins and cellular receptors. Blocking the latter with high-affinity ligands may inhibit infection. DC-SIGN, a C-type lectin receptor expressed by immature dendritic cells and macrophages, mediates human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) infection by recognizing mannose clusters on the HIV-1 gp120 envelope glycoprotein. Mannosylated glycodendrimers act as HIV entry inhibitors thanks to their ability to block this receptor. Previously, an amphoteric, but prevailingly cationic polyamidoamine named AGMA1 proved effective as infection inhibitor for several heparan sulfate proteoglycan-dependent viruses, such as human papilloma virus HPV-16 and herpes simplex virus HSV-2. An amphoteric, but prevailingly anionic PAA named ISA23 proved inactive. It was speculated that the substitution of mannosylated units for a limited percentage of AGMA1 repeating units, while imparting anti-HIV activity, would preserve the fundamentals of its HPV-16 and HSV-2 infection inhibitory activity. In this work, four biocompatible linear PAAs carrying different amounts of mannosyl-triazolyl pendants, Man-ISA7, Man-ISA14, Man-AGMA6.5 and Man-AGMA14.5, were prepared by reaction of 2-(azidoethyl)-α-D-mannopyranoside and differently propargyl-substituted AGMA1 and ISA23. All mannosylated PAAs inhibited HIV infection. Both Man-AGMA6.5 and Man-AGMA14.5 maintained the HPV-16 and HSV-2 activity of the parent polymer, proving broad-spectrum, dual action mode virus infection inhibitors.

  2. Induction of a peptide with activity against a broad spectrum of pathogens in the Aedes aegypti salivary gland, following Infection with Dengue Virus.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Natthanej Luplertlop

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available The ultimate stage of the transmission of Dengue Virus (DENV to man is strongly dependent on crosstalk between the virus and the immune system of its vector Aedes aegypti (Ae. aegypti. Infection of the mosquito's salivary glands by DENV is the final step prior to viral transmission. Therefore, in the present study, we have determined the modulatory effects of DENV infection on the immune response in this organ by carrying out a functional genomic analysis of uninfected salivary glands and salivary glands of female Ae. aegypti mosquitoes infected with DENV. We have shown that DENV infection of salivary glands strongly up-regulates the expression of genes that encode proteins involved in the vector's innate immune response, including the immune deficiency (IMD and Toll signalling pathways, and that it induces the expression of the gene encoding a putative anti-bacterial, cecropin-like, peptide (AAEL000598. Both the chemically synthesized non-cleaved, signal peptide-containing gene product of AAEL000598, and the cleaved, mature form, were found to exert, in addition to antibacterial activity, anti-DENV and anti-Chikungunya viral activity. However, in contrast to the mature form, the immature cecropin peptide was far more effective against Chikungunya virus (CHIKV and, furthermore, had strong anti-parasite activity as shown by its ability to kill Leishmania spp. Results from circular dichroism analysis showed that the immature form more readily adopts a helical conformation which would help it to cause membrane permeabilization, thus permitting its transfer across hydrophobic cell surfaces, which may explain the difference in the anti-pathogenic activity between the two forms. The present study underscores not only the importance of DENV-induced cecropin in the innate immune response of Ae. aegypti, but also emphasizes the broad-spectrum anti-pathogenic activity of the immature, signal peptide-containing form of this peptide.

  3. Inhibition of hemorrhagic and edematogenic activities of snake venoms by a broad-spectrum protease inhibitor, murinoglobulin; the effect on venoms from five different genera in Viperidae family.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ribeiro Filho, Wilker; Sugiki, Masahiko; Yoshida, Etsuo; Maruyama, Masugi

    2003-08-01

    In order to obtain basic data on the effect of broad-spectrum protease inhibitor against local symptoms of Viperidae snake envenomation, inhibitory capacity of rat murinoglobulin on local hemorrhagic and edematogenic activities of venoms from Crotalus atrox, Bothrops jararaca, Lachesis muta muta, Trimeresurus flavoviridis and Echis carinatus sochureki were examined. Murinoglobulin, pre-incubated with the crude venoms at 37 degrees C for 15 min, inhibited hemorrhagic activity of all five venoms to various extents. The activity of C. atrox was almost completely inhibited at the murinoglobulin/venom ratio (w/w) of 20. The activity of B. jararaca, Lachesis muta muta and T. flavoviridis venoms was considerably inhibited at the ratio of 20 (77.2, 80.0 and 86.2% inhibition, respectively), however some of the activity still remained even at the ratio of 40 (84.2, 79.8 and 86.2% inhibition, respectively). Among the five venoms, E. c. sochureki venom is quite resistant to murinoglobulin treatment and statistically significant inhibition was only found at the ratio of 40 (64.1% inhibition). Fibrinolytic and gelatinase activities were more susceptible to murinoglobulin inhibition. The treatment at the ratios of 10 and 20 almost completely inhibited respectively the fibrinolytic and the gelatinase activities of all the venoms. Murinoglobulin treatment also significantly inhibited the edematogenic activity of L. muta muta, T. flavoviridis and Echis carinatus sochureki. The treatment of murinoglobulin at the ratio of 40 considerably suppressed the swelling up to 60 min after subcutaneous injection of L. muta muta and E. c. sochureki venoms, and up to 30 min after T. flavoviridis venom injection. Murinoglobulin is a potent inhibitor against local effects of multiple snake venoms in Viperidae family.

  4. A broad spectrum, one-step reverse-transcription PCR amplification of the neuraminidase gene from multiple subtypes of influenza A virus

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chen Wenbin

    2008-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The emergence of high pathogenicity strains of Influenza A virus in a variety of human and animal hosts, with wide geographic distribution, has highlighted the importance of rapid identification and subtyping of the virus for outbreak management and treatment. Type A virus can be classified into subtypes according to the viral envelope glycoproteins, hemagglutinin and neuraminidase. Here we review the existing specificity and amplification of published primers to subtype neuraminidase genes and describe a new broad spectrum primer pair that can detect all 9 neuraminidase subtypes. Results Bioinformatic analysis of 3,337 full-length influenza A neuraminidase segments in the NCBI database revealed semi-conserved regions not previously targeted by primers. Two degenerate primers with M13 tags, NA8F-M13 and NA10R-M13 were designed from these regions and used to generate a 253 bp cDNA product. One-step RT-PCR testing was successful in 31/32 (97% cases using a touchdown protocol with RNA from over 32 different cultured influenza A virus strains representing the 9 neuraminidase subtypes. Frozen blinded clinical nasopharyngeal aspirates were also assayed and were mostly of subtype N2. The region amplified was direct sequenced and then used in database searches to confirm the identity of the template RNA. The RT-PCR fragment generated includes one of the mutation sites related to oseltamivir resistance, H274Y. Conclusion Our one-step RT-PCR assay followed by sequencing is a rapid, accurate, and specific method for detection and subtyping of different neuraminidase subtypes from a range of host species and from different geographical locations.

  5. Transplastomic Nicotiana benthamiana plants expressing multiple defence genes encoding protease inhibitors and chitinase display broad-spectrum resistance against insects, pathogens and abiotic stresses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Peng-Jen; Senthilkumar, Rajendran; Jane, Wann-Neng; He, Yong; Tian, Zhihong; Yeh, Kai-Wun

    2014-05-01

    Plastid engineering provides several advantages for the next generation of transgenic technology, including the convenient use of transgene stacking and the generation of high expression levels of foreign proteins. With the goal of generating transplastomic plants with multiresistance against both phytopathogens and insects, a construct containing a monocistronic patterned gene stack was transformed into Nicotiana benthamiana plastids harbouring sweet potato sporamin, taro cystatin and chitinase from Paecilomyces javanicus. Transplastomic lines were screened and characterized by Southern/Northern/Western blot analysis for the confirmation of transgene integration and respective expression level. Immunogold localization analyses confirmed the high level of accumulation proteins that were specifically expressed in leaf and root plastids. Subsequent functional bioassays confirmed that the gene stacks conferred a high level of resistance against both insects and phytopathogens. Specifically, larva of Spodoptera litura and Spodoptera exigua either died or exhibited growth retardation after ingesting transplastomic plant leaves. In addition, the inhibitory effects on both leaf spot diseases caused by Alternaria alternata and soft rot disease caused by Pectobacterium carotovorum subsp. carotovorum were markedly observed. Moreover, tolerance to abiotic stresses such as salt/osmotic stress was highly enhanced. The results confirmed that the simultaneous expression of sporamin, cystatin and chitinase conferred a broad spectrum of resistance. Conversely, the expression of single transgenes was not capable of conferring such resistance. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first study to demonstrate an efficacious stacked combination of plastid-expressed defence genes which resulted in an engineered tolerance to various abiotic and biotic stresses. © 2014 Society for Experimental Biology, Association of Applied Biologists and John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  6. In vitro and clinical evaluation of SIG1273: a cosmetic functional ingredient with a broad spectrum of anti-aging and antioxidant activities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fernández, José R; Rouzard, Karl; Voronkov, Michael; Huber, Kristen L; Webb, Corey; Stock, Jeffry B; Stock, Maxwell; Gordon, Joel S; Pérez, Eduardo

    2016-06-01

    Isoprenylcysteine (IPC) small molecules were identified as a new class of anti-inflammatory compounds over 20 years ago. Since then, they have been developed as novel cosmetic functional ingredients (CFI) and topical drug candidates. SIG1273 is a second generation CFI that has previously been shown to provide a broad spectrum of benefits for the skin through its anti-inflammatory and antimicrobial properties. To determine whether SIG1273 possesses anti-aging properties in vitro and evaluate the tolerability and activity of SIG1273 when applied topically to human subjects. To model photoaging in vitro, human dermal fibroblasts (HDFs) were exposed in culture to UVA to induce collagenase (MMP-1) production. An in vitro wound-healing model was based on the activation of HDF migration into cell-free tissue culture surface. Hydrogen peroxide-induced oxidative stress was performed using HDFs to measure intracellular ROS activity. Radical scavenging capacity was determined using a colorimetric antioxidant assay kit (ABTS method). Lastly, a 4-week, 29-subject study was performed in which SIG1273 was applied topically as a cream to assess its tolerance and activity in reducing the appearance of aging. In vitro studies demonstrate SIG1273 inhibits UVA-induced MMP-1 production, hydrogen peroxide-induced oxidative stress and promotes wound healing. Moreover, SIG1273 was shown to be a radical scavenging antioxidant. Clinical assessment of SIG1273 cream (0.25%) showed it was well tolerated with significant improvement in the appearance of fine lines, coarse wrinkles, radiance/luminosity, pore size, texture/smoothness, hydration and increased firmness. SIG1273 represents a novel CFI with antioxidant, anti-aging, and anti-inflammatory properties that when applied topically is well tolerated and provides benefits to individuals with aging skin. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  7. Diversity of plasmid replicons encoding the bla(CMY-2) gene in broad-spectrum cephalosporin-resistant Escherichia coli from livestock animals in Japan.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hiki, Mototaka; Usui, Masaru; Kojima, Akemi; Ozawa, Manao; Ishii, Yoshikazu; Asai, Tetsuo

    2013-03-01

    Broad-spectrum cephalosporin (BSC) resistance has increased in Escherichia coli isolates from broiler chickens in Japan since 2004. The purpose of this study was to understand the epidemiology of BSC-resistant E. coli in livestock animals. Among 3274 E. coli isolates from 1767 feces of apparently healthy animals on 1767 farms between 2004 and 2009, 118 ceftiofur (CTF)-resistant isolates (CTF MIC ≥4 μg/mL) were identified on 74 farms. After elimination of apparently clonal isolates from a single animal, 75 selected CTF-resistant isolates (62 isolates from 61 broiler chickens, 10 isolates from 10 layer chickens, two isolates from two cows, and one isolate from a pig) were characterized. The bla(CMY-2) gene was most frequently detected in 50 isolates, followed by bla(CTX-M) (CTX-M-2: six isolates; CTX-M-14: four isolates; CTX-M-25: two isolates; CTX-M-1: one isolate) and bla(SHV) (SHV-12: seven isolates; SHV-2, SHV-2a, SHV-5: one isolate each). In particular, 42 of 62 broiler chicken isolates harbored bla(CMY-2). Pulsed-field gel electrophoresis analyses using XbaI revealed divergent profiles among the BSC-resistant isolates. The incompatibility groups of bla(CMY-2) plasmids from 34 of the 42 broiler chicken isolates belonged to IncIγ (10 isolates), IncA/C (nine isolates), IncB/O (seven isolates) and IncI1 (six isolates), or were nontypeable (two isolates). Co-transmission of resistance to non-β-lactam antibiotics was observed in transconjugants with IncA/C plasmids, but not with IncI1, IncIγ, and IncB/O plasmids except for one isolate with IncB/O. Our findings suggest that the bla(CMY-2) gene is a key player in BSC-resistant E. coli isolates and that coselection is unlikely to be associated with the abundance of bla(CMY-2) plasmids, except for IncA/C plasmids.

  8. Co-administration of the broad-spectrum antiviral, brincidofovir (CMX001), with smallpox vaccine does not compromise vaccine protection in mice challenged with ectromelia virus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parker, Scott; Crump, Ryan; Foster, Scott; Hartzler, Hollyce; Hembrador, Ed; Lanier, E Randall; Painter, George; Schriewer, Jill; Trost, Lawrence C; Buller, R Mark

    2014-11-01

    Natural orthopoxvirus outbreaks such as vaccinia, cowpox, cattlepox and buffalopox continue to cause morbidity in the human population. Monkeypox virus remains a significant agent of morbidity and mortality in Africa. Furthermore, monkeypox virus's broad host-range and expanding environs make it of particular concern as an emerging human pathogen. Monkeypox virus and variola virus (the etiological agent of smallpox) are both potential agents of bioterrorism. The first line response to orthopoxvirus disease is through vaccination with first-generation and second-generation vaccines, such as Dryvax and ACAM2000. Although these vaccines provide excellent protection, their widespread use is impeded by the high level of adverse events associated with vaccination using live, attenuated virus. It is possible that vaccines could be used in combination with antiviral drugs to reduce the incidence and severity of vaccine-associated adverse events, or as a preventive in individuals with uncertain exposure status or contraindication to vaccination. We have used the intranasal mousepox (ectromelia) model to evaluate the efficacy of vaccination with Dryvax or ACAM2000 in conjunction with treatment using the broad spectrum antiviral, brincidofovir (BCV, CMX001). We found that co-treatment with BCV reduced the severity of vaccination-associated lesion development. Although the immune response to vaccination was quantifiably attenuated, vaccination combined with BCV treatment did not alter the development of full protective immunity, even when administered two days following ectromelia challenge. Studies with a non-replicating vaccine, ACAM3000 (MVA), confirmed that BCV's mechanism of attenuating the immune response following vaccination with live virus was, as expected, by limiting viral replication and not through inhibition of the immune system. These studies suggest that, in the setting of post-exposure prophylaxis, co-administration of BCV with vaccination should be considered

  9. Patient and physician predictors of patient receipt of therapies recommended by a computerized decision support system when initially prescribed broad-spectrum antibiotics: a cohort study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chow, Angela L P; Lye, David C; Arah, Onyebuchi A

    2016-04-01

    Antibiotic computerized decision support systems (CDSSs) were developed to guide antibiotic decisions, yet prescriptions of CDSS-recommended antibiotics have remained low. Our aim was to identify predictors of patients' receipt of empiric antibiotic therapies recommended by a CDSS when the prescribing physician had an initial preference for using broad-spectrum antibiotics. We conducted a prospective cohort study in a 1 500-bed tertiary-care hospital in Singapore. We included all patients admitted from October 1, 2011 through September 30, 2012, who were prescribed piperacillin-tazobactam or carbapenem for empiric therapy and auto-triggered to receive antibiotic recommendations by the in-house antibiotic CDSS. Relevant data on the patient, prescribing and attending physicians were collected via electronic linkages of medical records and administrative databases. To account for clustering, we used multilevel logistic regression models to explore factors associated with receipt of CDSS-recommended antibiotic therapy. One-quarter of the 1 886 patients received CDSS-recommended antibiotics. More patients treated for pneumonia (33.2%) than sepsis (12.1%) and urinary tract infections (7.1%) received CDSS-recommended antibiotic therapies. The prescribing physician - but not the attending physician or clinical specialty - accounted for some (13.3%) of the variation. Prior hospitalization (odds ratio [OR] 1.32, 95% CI, 1.01-1.71), presumed pneumonia (OR 6.77, 95% CI, 3.28-13.99), intensive care unit (ICU) admission (OR 0.38, 95% CI, 0.21-0.66), and renal impairment (OR 0.70, 95% CI, 0.52-0.93) were factors associated with patients' receipt of CDSS-recommended antibiotic therapies. We observed that ICU admission and renal impairment were negative predictors of patients' receipt of CDSS-recommended antibiotic therapies. Patients admitted to ICU and those with renal impairment might have more complex clinical conditions that require a physician's assessment in addition to

  10. Efficacy of broad-spectrum sunscreens against the suppression of elicitation of delayed-type hypersensitivity responses in humans depends on the level of ultraviolet A protection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moyal, D D; Fourtanier, A M

    2003-04-01

    Sunscreens have been designed to protect against sunburn and their efficacy has, therefore, been labeled by the so-called sun protection factor (SPF). Although this value is well determined using a standardized protocol and it affords a good evaluation of the protection against erythema it may be inadequate to provide a relevant measurement of efficacy against other biologic damages. This is particularly true when action spectra and threshold dose are different from those of erythema. In the case of ultraviolet (UV)-induced immune suppression, the action spectrum is not known, so it cannot be asserted that SPF may accurately predict the level of protection against this endpoint. We addressed this issue by measuring in human volunteers the ability of two broad-spectrum SPF 15 sunscreens with different ultraviolet A (UVA) protection levels, to prevent the alteration of the efferent phase of the local delayed-type hypersensitivity (DTH) response to recall antigens (Multitest Pasteur/Mérieux, Lyon, France) after acute solar-simulated UV exposure. We first determined the ultraviolet radiation (UVR) dose needed to induce a significant DTH inhibition in several groups of 15 volunteers. Two minimal erythemal doses (2 MED) were found to be the minimal immunosuppressive dose (MISD). As a result, the immune DTH response is reduced in average by 36%. The lower doses tested (0.5 and 1 MED) were ineffective. Sunscreen-treated groups were exposed to either 1 or 2 MED x SPF doses. As expected, no alteration in DTH response was observed in the groups exposed to 1 MED x SPF whatever the sunscreen applied. In contrast, after exposure to 2 MED x SPF, the DTH response remained unaltered in the group pretreated with the sunscreen product with the higher protection in the UVA range but was significantly suppressed by 55.7% in the group pretreated with sunscreen with a much lower protection in the UVA range. These data suggest that SPF may not be sufficient to predict the ability of

  11. Detection and characterization of broad-spectrum antipathogen activity of novel rhizobacterial isolates and suppression of Fusarium crown and root rot disease of tomato.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, L; Khabbaz, S E; Wang, A; Li, H; Abbasi, P A

    2015-03-01

    To detect and characterize broad-spectrum antipathogen activity of indigenous bacterial isolates obtained from potato soil and soya bean leaves for their potential to be developed as biofungicides to control soilborne diseases such as Fusarium crown and root rot of tomato (FCRR) caused by Fusarium oxysporum f. sp. radicis-lycopersici (Forl). Thirteen bacterial isolates (Bacillus amyloliquefaciens (four isolates), Paenibacillus polymyxa (three isolates), Pseudomonas chlororaphis (two isolates), Pseudomonas fluorescens (two isolates), Bacillus subtilis (one isolate) and Pseudomonas sp. (one isolate)) or their volatiles showed antagonistic activity against most of the 10 plant pathogens in plate assays. Cell-free culture filtrates (CF) of five isolates or 1-butanol extracts of CFs also inhibited the growth of most pathogen mycelia in plate assays. PCR analysis confirmed the presence of most antibiotic biosynthetic genes such as phlD, phzFA, prnD and pltC in most Pseudomonas isolates and bmyB, bacA, ituD, srfAA and fenD in most Bacillus isolates. These bacterial isolates varied in the production of hydrogen cyanide (HCN), siderophores, β-1,3-glucanases, chitinases, proteases, indole-3-acetic acid, salicylic acid, and for nitrogen fixation and phosphate solubilization. Gas chromatography-mass spectrometry analysis identified 10 volatile compounds from 10 isolates and 18 compounds from 1-butanol extracts of CFs of five isolates. Application of irradiated peat formulation of six isolates to tomato roots prior to transplanting in a Forl-infested potting mix and field soil provided protection of tomato plants from FCRR disease and enhanced plant growth under greenhouse conditions. Five of the 13 indigenous bacterial isolates were antagonistic to eight plant pathogens, both in vitro and in vivo. Antagonistic and plant-growth promotion activities of these isolates might be related to the production of several types of antibiotics, lytic enzymes, phytohormones, secondary

  12. Discovering hidden viral piracy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Eddo; Kliger, Yossef

    2005-12-01

    Viruses and developers of anti-inflammatory therapies share a common interest in proteins that manipulate the immune response. Large double-stranded DNA viruses acquire host proteins to evade host defense mechanisms. Hence, viral pirated proteins may have a therapeutic potential. Although dozens of viral piracy events have already been identified, we hypothesized that sequence divergence impedes the discovery of many others. We developed a method to assess the number of viral/human homologs and discovered that at least 917 highly diverged homologs are hidden in low-similarity alignment hits that are usually ignored. However, these low-similarity homologs are masked by many false alignment hits. We therefore applied a filtering method to increase the proportion of viral/human homologous proteins. The homologous proteins we found may facilitate functional annotation of viral and human proteins. Furthermore, some of these proteins play a key role in immune modulation and are therefore therapeutic protein candidates.

  13. Antimicrobial peptides effectively kill a broad spectrum of Listeria monocytogenes and Staphylococcus aureus strains independently of origin, sub-type, or virulence factor expression

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gottlieb, Caroline Trebbien; Thomsen, L.E.; Ingmer, H.

    2008-01-01

    . Hence it is important to determine the natural variation in susceptibility to HDPs to ensure a successful use in clinical treatment regimes. Results Strains of two human bacterial pathogens, Listeria monocytogenes and Staphylococcus aureus, were selected to cover a wide range of origin, sub....... Conclusion Strains of L. monocytogenes and S. aureus were within each species equally sensitive to a range of HDPs despite variations in subtype, origin, and phenotypic behavior. Our results suggest that therapeutic use of HDPs will not be hampered by occurrence of naturally tolerant strains of the two...

  14. ETX2514 is a broad-spectrum β-lactamase inhibitor for the treatment of drug-resistant Gram-negative bacteria including Acinetobacter baumannii.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Durand-Réville, Thomas F; Guler, Satenig; Comita-Prevoir, Janelle; Chen, Brendan; Bifulco, Neil; Huynh, Hoan; Lahiri, Sushmita; Shapiro, Adam B; McLeod, Sarah M; Carter, Nicole M; Moussa, Samir H; Velez-Vega, Camilo; Olivier, Nelson B; McLaughlin, Robert; Gao, Ning; Thresher, Jason; Palmer, Tiffany; Andrews, Beth; Giacobbe, Robert A; Newman, Joseph V; Ehmann, David E; de Jonge, Boudewijn; O'Donnell, John; Mueller, John P; Tommasi, Rubén A; Miller, Alita A

    2017-06-30

    Multidrug-resistant (MDR) bacterial infections are a serious threat to public health. Among the most alarming resistance trends is the rapid rise in the number and diversity of β-lactamases, enzymes that inactivate β-lactams, a class of antibiotics that has been a therapeutic mainstay for decades. Although several new β-lactamase inhibitors have been approved or are in clinical trials, their spectra of activity do not address MDR pathogens such as Acinetobacter baumannii. This report describes the rational design and characterization of expanded-spectrum serine β-lactamase inhibitors that potently inhibit clinically relevant class A, C and D β-lactamases and penicillin-binding proteins, resulting in intrinsic antibacterial activity against Enterobacteriaceae and restoration of β-lactam activity in a broad range of MDR Gram-negative pathogens. One of the most promising combinations is sulbactam-ETX2514, whose potent antibacterial activity, in vivo efficacy against MDR A. baumannii infections and promising preclinical safety demonstrate its potential to address this significant unmet medical need.

  15. Crystal Structure of the New Investigational Drug Candidate VT-1598 in Complex with Aspergillus fumigatus Sterol 14α-Demethylase Provides Insights into Its Broad-Spectrum Antifungal Activity

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hargrove, Tatiana Y.; Garvey, Edward P.; Hoekstra, William J.; Yates, Christopher M.; Wawrzak, Zdzislaw; Rachakonda, Girish; Villalta, Fernando; Lepesheva, Galina I.

    2017-05-01

    ABSTRACT

    Within the past few decades, the incidence and complexity of human fungal infections have increased, and therefore, the need for safer and more efficient, broad-spectrum antifungal agents is high. In the study described here, we characterized the new tetrazole-based drug candidate VT-1598 as an inhibitor of sterol 14α-demethylase (CYP51B) from the filamentous fungusAspergillus fumigatus. VT-1598 displayed a high affinity of binding to the enzyme in solution (dissociation constant, 13 ± 1 nM) and in the reconstituted enzymatic reaction was revealed to have an inhibitory potency stronger than the potencies of all other simultaneously tested antifungal drugs, including fluconazole, voriconazole, ketoconazole, and posaconazole. The X-ray structure of the VT-1598/A. fumigatusCYP51 complex was determined and depicts the distinctive binding mode of the inhibitor in the enzyme active site, suggesting the molecular basis of the improved drug potency and broad-spectrum antifungal activity. These data show the formation of an optimized hydrogen bond between the phenoxymethyl oxygen of VT-1598 and the imidazole ring nitrogen of His374, the CYP51 residue that is highly conserved across fungal pathogens and fungus specific. Comparative structural analysis ofA. fumigatusCYP51/voriconazole andCandida albicansCYP51/VT-1161 complexes supports the role of H bonding in fungal CYP51/inhibitor complexes and emphasizes the importance of an optimal distance between this interaction and the inhibitor-heme iron interaction. Cellular experiments using twoA. fumigatusstrains (strains 32820 and 1022) displayed a direct

  16. Marker-Assisted Development and Evaluation of Near-Isogenic Lines for Broad-Spectrum Powdery Mildew Resistance Gene Pm2b Introgressed into Different Genetic Backgrounds of Wheat

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hongxing Xu

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available At present, most of released wheat cultivars or breeding lines in China are susceptible to powdery mildew (Pm (caused by Blumeria graminis f. sp. tritici, Bgt, so there is an urgent need to rapidly transfer effective and broad-spectrum Pm resistance genes into elite cultivars/lines. Near-isogenic lines (NILs with short target gene region are very important in molecular breeding and map-based cloning and can be developed by combining marker-assisted selection and conventional phenotypic identification. However, no Pm gene NILs were reported by using this method in the previous studies. A new broad-spectrum dominant resistance gene Pm2b, derived from the Chinese wheat breeding line KM2939, conferred high resistance to Pm at both the seedling and adult stages. In this study, with the aid of forward and background selection (FS and BS using molecular markers, the Pm2b gene was introgressed into three elite susceptible commercial cultivars Shimai 15, Shixin 828, and Kenong 199 through the back-crossing procedure. With the appropriate backcrossing generations, selected population sizes and marker number for BS, the homozygous resistant BC3F2:3 NILs of Pm2b gene in the three genetic backgrounds with the highest recipient genome composition of about 99%, confirmed by simple sequence repeat markers and 660K single nucleotide polymorphic array, were developed and evaluated for the powdery mildew resistance and agronomic traits. The different resistance and similar or improved agronomic performance between Pm2b NILs and their corresponding recurrent parents indicated their potential value in the marker-assisted breeding of the Pm2b gene. Moreover, the development of four flanked diagnostic markers (CFD81, BWM25, BWM20, and BWM21 of the Pm2 gene can effectively assist the forward selection and accelerate the transfer and use of this resistance gene.

  17. Rapid detection of amoxicillin-susceptible Escherichia coli in fresh uncultured urine: a new tool to limit the use of broad-spectrum empirical therapy of community-acquired pyelonephritis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chapelet, Guillaume; Corvec, Stéphane; Montassier, Emmanuel; Herbreteau, Guillaume; Berrut, Gilles; Batard, Eric; de Decker, Laure

    2016-06-01

    Because of the high prevalence of amoxicillin resistance among uropathogens, amoxicillin is not recommended as an empirical treatment of urinary tract infections (UTIs). Quick detection of an amoxicillin-susceptible Escherichia coli (ASEC) would allow prescribing amoxicillin without preliminary broad-spectrum empirical treatment in uncomplicated pyelonephritis. To quickly diagnose UTIs due to ASEC, we developed a real-time PCR that detects in fresh uncultured urine the E. coli-specific gene yccT as well as the blaTEM and blaCTX-M genes. The ASEC rapid test was considered positive if the PCR was positive for the yccT gene but negative for blaTEM and blaCTX-M. The test was compared with culture and susceptibility testing. Among 200 patients with a suspected community-acquired UTI, 61 (30.5%) had a monobacterial UTI due to ASEC. The ASEC rapid test result was obtained in 3 h 13 [95% confidence interval (CI) 3 h 12-3 h 15] and was positive for 43 patients (21.5%). Specificity and sensitivity were 97.8% (95% CI 95.8-99.8%) and 65.6% (95% CI 59.0-72.1%), respectively. Positive and negative predictive values were 93.0% (95% CI 89.5-96.5%) and 86.6% (95% CI 81.9-91.3%), respectively. Owing to its high specificity and positive predictive value, the ASEC rapid test allows the diagnosis of UTI due to ASEC only 3 h after urine sampling. A positive ASEC rapid test may be used to treat uncomplicated pyelonephritis with amoxicillin from the start, without preliminary broad-spectrum empirical treatment. The ASEC rapid test is a promising tool to spare fluoroquinolones and third-generation cephalosporins in UTIs. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. and International Society of Chemotherapy. All rights reserved.

  18. Prostate cancer heterogeneity: Discovering novel molecular targets for therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ciccarese, Chiara; Massari, Francesco; Iacovelli, Roberto; Fiorentino, Michelangelo; Montironi, Rodolfo; Di Nunno, Vincenzo; Giunchi, Francesca; Brunelli, Matteo; Tortora, Giampaolo

    2017-03-01

    Prostate cancer (PCa) shows a broad spectrum of biological and clinical behavior, which represents the epiphenomenon of an extreme genetic heterogeneity. Recent genomic profiling studies have deeply improved the knowledge of the genomic landscape of localized and metastatic PCa. The AR and PI3K/Akt/mTOR signaling pathways are the two most frequently altered, representing therefore interestingly targets for therapy. Moreover, somatic or germline aberrations of DNA repair genes (DRGs) have been observed at high frequency, supporting the potential role of platinum derivatives and PARP inhibitors as effective therapeutic strategies. In the future, the identification of driver mutations present at a specific stage of the disease, the classification PCa based on specific molecular alterations, and the selection of the most appropriate therapy based on biomarkers predictors of response represent the foundations for an increasingly more accurate personalized medicine. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  19. Improving qPCR methodology for detection of foaming bacteria by analysis of broad-spectrum primers and a highly specific probe for quantification of Nocardia spp. in activated sludge.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Asvapathanagul, P; Olson, B H

    2017-01-01

    To develop qPCR broad-spectrum primers combined with a Nocardia genus-specific probe for the identification of a broad spectrum of Nocardia spp. and to analyse the effects of using this developed primer and probe set on the ability to quantify Nocardia spp. in mixed DNA. The consequences of using a degenerative primer set and species-specific probe for the genus Nocardia on qPCR assays were examined using DNA extracts of pure cultures and activated sludge. The mixed DNA extracts where the target organism Nocardia flavorosea concentration ranged from 5 × 10(2) to 5 × 10(6) copies per reaction, while the background organism's DNA (Mycobacterium bovis) concentration was held at 5 × 10(6) copies per reaction, only produced comparable cycle threshold florescence levels when N. flavorosea concentration was greater than or equal to the background organism concentration. When concentrations of N. flavorosea were lowered in increments of 1 log, while holding M. bovis concentrations constant at 5 × 10(6) copies per reaction, all assays demonstrated delayed cycle threshold values with a maximum 34·6-fold decrease in cycle threshold at a ratio of 10(6) M. bovis: 10(2) N. flavorosea copies per reaction. The data presented in this study indicated that increasing the ability of a primer set to capture a broad group of organisms can affect the accuracy of quantification even when a highly specific probe is used. This study examined several applications of molecular tools in complex communities such as evaluating the effect of mispriming vs interference. It also elucidates the importance of understanding the community genetic make-up on primer design. Degenerative primers are very useful in amplifying bacterial DNA across genera, but reduce the efficiency of qPCR reactions. Therefore, standards that address closely related background species must be used to obtain accurate qPCR results. © 2016 The Society for Applied Microbiology.

  20. Novel pyrazolo[3,4-d]pyrimidine with 4-(1H-benzimidazol-2-yl)-phenylamine as broad spectrum anticancer agents: Synthesis, cell based assay, topoisomerase inhibition, DNA intercalation and bovine serum albumin studies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Singla, Prinka; Luxami, Vijay; Singh, Raja; Tandon, Vibha; Paul, Kamaldeep

    2017-01-27

    A series of new pyrazolo[3,4-d]pyrimidine possessing 4-(1H-benzimidazol-2-yl)-phenylamine moiety at C4 position and primary as well as secondary amines at C6 position has been designed and synthesized. Their antitumor activities were evaluated against a panel of 60 human cancer cell lines at National Cancer Institute (NCI). Six compounds displayed potent and broad spectrum anticancer activities at 10 μM. Compounds 8, 12, 14 and 17 proved to be the most active and efficacious candidate in this series, with mean GI50 values of 1.30 μM, 1.43 μM, 2.38 μM and 2.18 μM, respectively against several cancer cell lines. Further biological evaluation of these compounds suggested that these compounds induce apoptosis and inhibit human topoisomerase (Topo) IIα as a possible intracellular target. UV-visible and fluorescence studies of these compounds revealed strong interaction with ct-DNA and bovine serum albumin (BSA). Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  1. The monoamine oxidase A inhibitor clorgyline is a broad-spectrum inhibitor of fungal ABC and MFS transporter efflux pump activities which reverses the azole resistance of Candida albicans and Candida glabrata clinical isolates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Holmes, Ann R; Keniya, Mikhail V; Ivnitski-Steele, Irena; Monk, Brian C; Lamping, Erwin; Sklar, Larry A; Cannon, Richard D

    2012-03-01

    Resistance to the commonly used azole antifungal fluconazole (FLC) can develop due to overexpression of ATP-binding cassette (ABC) and major facilitator superfamily (MFS) plasma membrane transporters. An approach to overcoming this resistance is to identify inhibitors of these efflux pumps. We have developed a pump assay suitable for high-throughput screening (HTS) that uses recombinant Saccharomyces cerevisiae strains hyperexpressing individual transporters from the opportunistic fungal pathogen Candida albicans. The recombinant strains possess greater resistance to azoles and other pump substrates than the parental host strain. A flow cytometry-based HTS, which measured increased intracellular retention of the fluorescent pump substrate rhodamine 6G (R6G) within yeast cells, was used to screen the Prestwick Chemical Library (PCL) of 1,200 marketed drugs. Nine compounds were identified as hits, and the monoamine oxidase A inhibitor (MAOI) clorgyline was identified as an inhibitor of two C. albicans ABC efflux pumps, CaCdr1p and CaCdr2p. Secondary in vitro assays confirmed inhibition of pump-mediated efflux by clorgyline. Clorgyline also reversed the FLC resistance of S. cerevisiae strains expressing other individual fungal ABC transporters (Candida glabrata Cdr1p or Candida krusei Abc1p) or the C. albicans MFS transporter Mdr1p. Recombinant strains were also chemosensitized by clorgyline to other azoles (itraconazole and miconazole). Importantly, clorgyline showed synergy with FLC against FLC-resistant C. albicans clinical isolates and a C. glabrata strain and inhibited R6G efflux from a FLC-resistant C. albicans clinical isolate. Clorgyline is a novel broad-spectrum inhibitor of two classes of fungal efflux pumps that acts synergistically with azoles against azole-resistant C. albicans and C. glabrata strains.

  2. Structure activity relationship of C-2 ether substituted 1,5-naphthyridine analogs of oxabicyclooctane-linked novel bacterial topoisomerase inhibitors as broad-spectrum antibacterial agents (Part-5).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Singh, Sheo B; Kaelin, David E; Meinke, Peter T; Wu, Jin; Miesel, Lynn; Tan, Christopher M; Olsen, David B; Lagrutta, Armando; Fukuda, Hideyuki; Kishii, Ryuta; Takei, Masaya; Takeuchi, Tomoko; Takano, Hisashi; Ohata, Kohei; Kurasaki, Haruaki; Nishimura, Akinori; Shibata, Takeshi; Fukuda, Yasumichi

    2015-09-01

    Oxabicyclooctane linked novel bacterial topoisomerase inhibitors (NBTIs) are new class of recently reported broad-spectrum antibacterial agents. They target bacterial DNA gyrase and topoisomerase IV and bind to a site different than quinolones. They show no cross-resistance to known antibiotics and provide opportunity to combat drug-resistant bacteria. A structure activity relationship of the C-2 substituted ether analogs of 1,5-naphthyridine oxabicyclooctane-linked NBTIs are described. Synthesis and antibacterial activities of a total of 63 analogs have been summarized representing alkyl, cyclo alkyl, fluoro alkyl, hydroxy alkyl, amino alkyl, and carboxyl alkyl ethers. All compounds were tested against three key strains each of Gram-positive and Gram-negative bacteria as well as for hERG binding activities. Many key compounds were also tested for the functional hERG activity. Six compounds were evaluated for efficacy in a murine bacteremia model of Staphylococcus aureus infection. Significant tolerance for the ether substitution (including polar groups such as amino and carboxyl) at C-2 was observed for S. aureus activity however the same was not true for Enterococcus faecium and Gram-negative strains. Reduced clogD generally showed reduced hERG activity and improved in vivo efficacy but was generally associated with decreased overall potency. One of the best compounds was hydroxy propyl ether (16), which mainly retained the potency, spectrum and in vivo efficacy of AM8085 associated with the decreased hERG activity and improved physical property. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  3. Discover: Pharmaceutical Information

    OpenAIRE

    Wales, Tim

    1998-01-01

    Discovering user's information needs and expectations is a vitally important step when working in any specialised subject area, none more so than in the field of pharmaceutical information. Adjusting search and sourcing strategies accordingly can save unnecessary time and expense, given the rising cost of subscriptions for periodicals and new media and the inherently expensive nature of niche pharmaceutical monographs and reference tests. The needs of the health professional pharmacist are ge...

  4. Third generation cephalosporin resistant Enterobacteriaceae and multidrug resistant gram-negative bacteria causing bacteremia in febrile neutropenia adult cancer patients in Lebanon, broad spectrum antibiotics use as a major risk factor, and correlation with poor prognosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moghnieh, Rima; Estaitieh, Nour; Mugharbil, Anas; Jisr, Tamima; Abdallah, Dania I; Ziade, Fouad; Sinno, Loubna; Ibrahim, Ahmad

    2015-01-01

    Bacteremia remains a major cause of life-threatening complications in patients receiving anticancer chemotherapy. The spectrum and susceptibility profiles of causative microorganisms differ with time and place. Data from Lebanon are scarce. We aim at evaluating the epidemiology of bacteremia in cancer patients in a university hospital in Lebanon, emphasizing antibiotic resistance and risk factors of multi-drug resistant organism (MDRO)-associated bacteremia. This is a retrospective study of 75 episodes of bacteremia occurring in febrile neutropenic patients admitted to the hematology-oncology unit at Makassed General Hospital, Lebanon, from October 2009-January 2012. It corresponds to epidemiological data on bacteremia episodes in febrile neutropenic cancer patients including antimicrobial resistance and identification of risk factors associated with third generation cephalosporin resistance (3GCR) and MDRO-associated bacteremia. Out of 75 bacteremias, 42.7% were gram-positive (GP), and 57.3% were gram-negative (GN). GP bacteremias were mostly due to methicillin-resistant coagulase negative staphylococci (28% of total bacteremias and 66% of GP bacteremias). Among the GN bacteremias, Escherichia coli (22.7% of total, 39.5% of GN organisms) and Klebsiella pneumoniae(13.3% of total, 23.3% of GN organisms) were the most important causative agents. GN bacteremia due to 3GC sensitive (3GCS) bacteria represented 28% of total bacteremias, while 29% were due to 3GCR bacteria and 9% were due to carbapenem-resistant organisms. There was a significant correlation between bacteremia with MDRO and subsequent intubation, sepsis and mortality. Among potential risk factors, only broad spectrum antibiotic intake >4 days before bacteremia was found to be statistically significant for acquisition of 3GCR bacteria. Using carbapenems or piperacillin/tazobactam>4 days before bacteremia was significantly associated with the emergence of MDRO (p < 0.05). Our findings have major

  5. The therapeutic applications of antimicrobial peptides (AMPs): a patent review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kang, Hee-Kyoung; Kim, Cheolmin; Seo, Chang Ho; Park, Yoonkyung

    2017-01-01

    Antimicrobial peptides (AMPs) are small molecules with a broad spectrum of antibiotic activities against bacteria, yeasts, fungi, and viruses and cytotoxic activity on cancer cells, in addition to anti-inflammatory and immunomodulatory activities. Therefore, AMPs have garnered interest as novel therapeutic agents. Because of the rapid increase in drug-resistant pathogenic microorganisms, AMPs from synthetic and natural sources have been developed using alternative antimicrobial strategies. This article presents a broad analysis of patents referring to the therapeutic applications of AMPs since 2009. The review focuses on the universal trends in the effective design, mechanism, and biological evolution of AMPs.

  6. Students Discover Unique Planet

    Science.gov (United States)

    2008-12-01

    Three undergraduate students, from Leiden University in the Netherlands, have discovered an extrasolar planet. The extraordinary find, which turned up during their research project, is about five times as massive as Jupiter. This is also the first planet discovered orbiting a fast-rotating hot star. Omega Centauri ESO PR Photo 45a/08 A planet around a hot star The students were testing a method of investigating the light fluctuations of thousands of stars in the OGLE database in an automated way. The brightness of one of the stars was found to decrease for two hours every 2.5 days by about one percent. Follow-up observations, taken with ESO's Very Large Telescope in Chile, confirmed that this phenomenon is caused by a planet passing in front of the star, blocking part of the starlight at regular intervals. According to Ignas Snellen, supervisor of the research project, the discovery was a complete surprise. "The project was actually meant to teach the students how to develop search algorithms. But they did so well that there was time to test their algorithm on a so far unexplored database. At some point they came into my office and showed me this light curve. I was completely taken aback!" The students, Meta de Hoon, Remco van der Burg, and Francis Vuijsje, are very enthusiastic. "It is exciting not just to find a planet, but to find one as unusual as this one; it turns out to be the first planet discovered around a fast rotating star, and it's also the hottest star found with a planet," says Meta. "The computer needed more than a thousand hours to do all the calculations," continues Remco. The planet is given the prosaic name OGLE2-TR-L9b. "But amongst ourselves we call it ReMeFra-1, after Remco, Meta, and myself," says Francis. The planet was discovered by looking at the brightness variations of about 15 700 stars, which had been observed by the OGLE survey once or twice per night for about four years between 1997 and 2000. Because the data had been made public

  7. Discovering Phonemes of Bidayuh

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jecky Misieng

    2012-07-01

    Full Text Available There are generally three views of the notion of a phoneme. The structuralist view of the phoneme focuses on this language phenomenon as a phonetic reality. In discovering phonemes of a language, phonologists who hold this view will look for minimal contrasting pairs as a way to determine contrasting sounds of that language. They will also look for allophones or two sounds of the same phoneme which may appear in complementary distribution. This paper will discuss the possible application of the structuralist approach to analyzing the phonemes of a dialect of Bidayuh, one of the Malayo-Polynesian languages spoken in the northern region of Borneo.

  8. Discovering system requirements

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bahill, A.T.; Bentz, B. [Univ. of Arizona, Tucson, AZ (United States). Systems and Industrial Engineering; Dean, F.F. [Sandia National Labs., Albuquerque, NM (United States)

    1996-07-01

    Cost and schedule overruns are often caused by poor requirements that are produced by people who do not understand the requirements process. This report provides a high-level overview of the system requirements process, explaining types, sources, and characteristics of good requirements. System requirements, however, are seldom stated by the customer. Therefore, this report shows ways to help you work with your customer to discover the system requirements. It also explains terminology commonly used in the requirements development field, such as verification, validation, technical performance measures, and the various design reviews.

  9. Discovering genes underlying QTL

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vanavichit, Apichart [Kasetsart University, Kamphaengsaen, Nakorn Pathom (Thailand)

    2002-02-01

    A map-based approach has allowed scientists to discover few genes at a time. In addition, the reproductive barrier between cultivated rice and wild relatives has prevented us from utilizing the germ plasm by a map-based approach. Most genetic traits important to agriculture or human diseases are manifested as observable, quantitative phenotypes called Quantitative Trait Loci (QTL). In many instances, the complexity of the phenotype/genotype interaction and the general lack of clearly identifiable gene products render the direct molecular cloning approach ineffective, thus additional strategies like genome mapping are required to identify the QTL in question. Genome mapping requires no prior knowledge of the gene function, but utilizes statistical methods to identify the most likely gene location. To completely characterize genes of interest, the initially mapped region of a gene location will have to be narrowed down to a size that is suitable for cloning and sequencing. Strategies for gene identification within the critical region have to be applied after the sequencing of a potentially large clone or set of clones that contains this gene(s). Tremendous success of positional cloning has been shown for cloning many genes responsible for human diseases, including cystic fibrosis and muscular dystrophy as well as plant disease resistance genes. Genome and QTL mapping, positional cloning: the pre-genomics era, comparative approaches to gene identification, and positional cloning: the genomics era are discussed in the report. (M. Suetake)

  10. Chandra Discovers Cosmic Cannonball

    Science.gov (United States)

    2007-11-01

    One of the fastest moving stars ever seen has been discovered with NASA's Chandra X-ray Observatory. This cosmic cannonball is challenging theories to explain its blistering speed. Astronomers used Chandra to observe a neutron star, known as RX J0822-4300, over a period of about five years. During that span, three Chandra observations clearly show the neutron star moving away from the center of the Puppis A supernova remnant. This remnant is the stellar debris field created during the same explosion in which the neutron star was created about 3700 years ago. Chandra X-ray Image of RX J0822-4300 in Puppis A Chandra X-ray Image of RX J0822-4300 in Puppis A By combining how far it has moved across the sky with its distance from Earth, astronomers determined the neutron star is moving at over 3 million miles per hour. At this rate, RX J0822-4300 is destined to escape from the Milky Way after millions of years, even though it has only traveled about 20 light years so far. "This star is moving at 3 million miles an hour, but it's so far away that the apparent motion we see in five years is less than the height of the numerals in the date on a penny, seen from the length of a football field," said Frank Winkler of Middlebury College in Vermont. "It's remarkable, and a real testament to the power of Chandra, that such a tiny motion can be measured." Labeled Image of RX J0822-4300 in Puppis A Labeled Image of RX J0822-4300 in Puppis A "Just after it was born, this neutron star got a one-way ticket out of the Galaxy," said co-author Robert Petre of NASA's Goddard Space Flight Center in Greenbelt, Md. "Astronomers have seen other stars being flung out of the Milky Way, but few as fast as this." So-called hypervelocity stars have been previously discovered shooting out of the Milky Way with speeds around one million miles per hour. One key difference between RX J0822-4300 and these other reported galactic escapees is the source of their speed. The hypervelocity stars are

  11. Lightest exoplanet yet discovered

    Science.gov (United States)

    2009-04-01

    Well-known exoplanet researcher Michel Mayor today announced the discovery of the lightest exoplanet found so far. The planet, "e", in the famous system Gliese 581, is only about twice the mass of our Earth. The team also refined the orbit of the planet Gliese 581 d, first discovered in 2007, placing it well within the habitable zone, where liquid water oceans could exist. These amazing discoveries are the outcome of more than four years of observations using the most successful low-mass-exoplanet hunter in the world, the HARPS spectrograph attached to the 3.6-metre ESO telescope at La Silla, Chile. ESO PR Photo 15a/09 Artist's impression of Gliese 581 e ESO PR Photo 15b/09 A planet in the habitable zone ESO PR Video 15a/09 ESOcast 6 ESO PR Video 15b/09 VNR A-roll ESO PR Video 15c/09 Zoom-in on Gliese 581 e ESO PR Video 15d/09 Artist's impression of Gliese 581 e ESO PR Video 15e/09 Artist's impression of Gliese 581 d ESO PR Video 15f/09 Artist's impression of Gliese 581 system ESO PR Video 15g/09 The radial velocity method ESO PR Video 15h/09 Statement in English ESO PR Video 15i/09 Statement in French ESO PR Video 15j/09 La Silla Observatory "The holy grail of current exoplanet research is the detection of a rocky, Earth-like planet in the ‘habitable zone' -- a region around the host star with the right conditions for water to be liquid on a planet's surface", says Michel Mayor from the Geneva Observatory, who led the European team to this stunning breakthrough. Planet Gliese 581 e orbits its host star - located only 20.5 light-years away in the constellation Libra ("the Scales") -- in just 3.15 days. "With only 1.9 Earth-masses, it is the least massive exoplanet ever detected and is, very likely, a rocky planet", says co-author Xavier Bonfils from Grenoble Observatory. Being so close to its host star, the planet is not in the habitable zone. But another planet in this system appears to be. From previous observations -- also obtained with the HARPS spectrograph

  12. Digimarc Discover on Google Glass

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rogers, Eliot; Rodriguez, Tony; Lord, John; Alattar, Adnan

    2015-03-01

    This paper reports on the implementation of the Digimarc® Discover platform on Google Glass, enabling the reading of a watermark embedded in a printed material or audio. The embedded watermark typically contains a unique code that identifies the containing media or object and a synchronization signal that allows the watermark to be read robustly. The Digimarc Discover smartphone application can read the watermark from a small portion of printed image presented at any orientation or reasonable distance. Likewise, Discover can read the recently introduced Digimarc Barcode to identify and manage consumer packaged goods in the retail channel. The Digimarc Barcode has several advantages over the traditional barcode and is expected to save the retail industry millions of dollars when deployed at scale. Discover can also read an audio watermark from ambient audio captured using a microphone. The Digimarc Discover platform has been widely deployed on the iPad, iPhone and many Android-based devices, but it has not yet been implemented on a head-worn wearable device, such as Google Glass. Implementing Discover on Google Glass is a challenging task due to the current hardware and software limitations of the device. This paper identifies the challenges encountered in porting Discover to the Google Glass and reports on the solutions created to deliver a prototype implementation.

  13. Antimicrobial Peptides for Therapeutic Applications: A Review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tsogbadrakh Mishig-Ochir

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available Antimicrobial peptides (AMPs have been considered as potential therapeutic sources of future antibiotics because of their broad-spectrum activities and different mechanisms of action compared to conventional antibiotics. Although AMPs possess considerable benefits as new generation antibiotics, their clinical and commercial development still have some limitations, such as potential toxicity, susceptibility to proteases, and high cost of peptide production. In order to overcome those obstacles, extensive efforts have been carried out. For instance, unusual amino acids or peptido-mimetics are introduced to avoid the proteolytic degradation and the design of short peptides retaining antimicrobial activities is proposed as a solution for the cost issue. In this review, we focus on small peptides, especially those with less than twelve amino acids, and provide an overview of the relationships between their three-dimensional structures and antimicrobial activities. The efforts to develop highly active AMPs with shorter sequences are also described.

  14. Discover: What Is Public Health?

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Membership Contact About Membership Contact Discover What is Public Health? Public health protects and improves the health of individuals, families, communities, and populations, locally and globally. Public health is personal. Public health professionals focus on preventing ...

  15. An overview of leech and its therapeutic applications

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Parimannan Sivachandran

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available Hirudotherapy has a broad spectrum of therapeutic application in the medical field ranging from cardiology, gynaecology, ophthalmology, plastic and reconstructive surgeries. In medieval and early modern medicine, leeches were used to remove blood from patients in an attempt to balance the biological humours. Leeches are widely used to treat venous congestion in microvascular replantation, free and conventional flap surgery and traumatology. Recently, Food and Drug Administration has approved the usage of live leeches as medical device for therapeutic applications. Presently, some of the leech species have declined dramatically in its population due to the over utilization of leech for medicinal purposes and also due to pollution in several parts of the world particularly in European and Asian countries. This review presents an overview of leech including the history, biology, classification, and its application as medical device. Further, it also covers the controversies and misconception related to leech species identification and complications of post hirudotherapy.

  16. Discovering Network Structure Beyond Communities

    OpenAIRE

    Nishikawa, Takashi; Motter, Adilson E.

    2011-01-01

    To understand the formation, evolution, and function of complex systems, it is crucial to understand the internal organization of their interaction networks. Partly due to the impossibility of visualizing large complex networks, resolving network structure remains a challenging problem. Here we overcome this difficulty by combining the visual pattern recognition ability of humans with the high processing speed of computers to develop an exploratory method for discovering groups of nodes chara...

  17. Bacterial Inclusion Bodies: Discovering Their Better Half.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rinas, Ursula; Garcia-Fruitós, Elena; Corchero, José Luis; Vázquez, Esther; Seras-Franzoso, Joaquin; Villaverde, Antonio

    2017-09-01

    Bacterial inclusion bodies (IBs) are functional, non-toxic amyloids occurring in recombinant bacteria showing analogies with secretory granules of the mammalian endocrine system. The scientific interest in these mesoscale protein aggregates has been historically masked by their status as a hurdle in recombinant protein production. However, progressive understanding of how the cell handles the quality of recombinant polypeptides and the main features of their intriguing molecular organization has stimulated the interest in inclusion bodies and spurred their use in diverse technological fields. The engineering and tailoring of IBs as functional protein particles for materials science and biomedicine is a good example of how formerly undesired bacterial byproducts can be rediscovered as promising functional materials for a broad spectrum of applications. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  18. New Strategies for the Next Generation of Matrix-Metalloproteinase Inhibitors: Selectively Targeting Membrane-Anchored MMPs with Therapeutic Antibodies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Laetitia Devy

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available MMP intervention strategies have met with limited clinical success due to severe toxicities. In particular, treatment with broad-spectrum MMP-inhibitors (MMPIs caused musculoskeletal pain and inflammation. Selectivity may be essential for realizing the clinical potential of MMPIs. Here we review discoveries pinpointing membrane-bound MMPs as mediators of mechanisms underlying cancer and inflammation and as possible therapeutic targets for prevention/treatment of these diseases. We discuss strategies to target these therapeutic proteases using highly selective inhibitory agents (i.e., human blocking antibodies against individual membrane-bound MMPs.

  19. Antibiofilm Peptides: Potential as Broad-Spectrum Agents

    OpenAIRE

    Pletzer, Daniel; Hancock, Robert E. W.

    2016-01-01

    The treatment of bacterial diseases is facing twin threats, with increasing bacterial antibiotic resistance and relatively few novel compounds or strategies under development or entering the clinic. Bacteria frequently grow on surfaces as biofilm communities encased in a polymeric matrix. The biofilm mode of growth is associated with 65 to 80% of all clinical infections. It causes broad adaptive changes; biofilm bacteria are especially (10- to 1,000-fold) resistant to conventional antibiotics...

  20. Predictive compound accumulation rules yield a broad-spectrum antibiotic

    Science.gov (United States)

    Richter, Michelle F.; Drown, Bryon S.; Riley, Andrew P.; Garcia, Alfredo; Shirai, Tomohiro; Svec, Riley L.; Hergenrother, Paul J.

    2017-05-01

    Most small molecules are unable to rapidly traverse the outer membrane of Gram-negative bacteria and accumulate inside these cells, making the discovery of much-needed drugs against these pathogens challenging. Current understanding of the physicochemical properties that dictate small-molecule accumulation in Gram-negative bacteria is largely based on retrospective analyses of antibacterial agents, which suggest that polarity and molecular weight are key factors. Here we assess the ability of over 180 diverse compounds to accumulate in Escherichia coli. Computational analysis of the results reveals major differences from the retrospective studies, namely that the small molecules that are most likely to accumulate contain an amine, are amphiphilic and rigid, and have low globularity. These guidelines were then applied to convert deoxynybomycin, a natural product that is active only against Gram-positive organisms, into an antibiotic with activity against a diverse panel of multi-drug-resistant Gram-negative pathogens. We anticipate that these findings will aid in the discovery and development of antibiotics against Gram-negative bacteria.

  1. Studies on broad spectrum corrosion resistant oxide coatings

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    The corrosion resistant oxide coatings, developed and applied by the conventional vitreous enamelling techniques, showed superior resistance to a range of mineral acids at various strengths and temperatures, alkaline solutions, boiling water and chrome plating solutions. These coatings possess considerable abrasion ...

  2. Enhanced methanol production in plants provides broad spectrum insect resistance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dixit, Sameer; Upadhyay, Santosh Kumar; Singh, Harpal; Sidhu, Om Prakash; Verma, Praveen Chandra; K, Chandrashekar

    2013-01-01

    Plants naturally emit methanol as volatile organic compound. Methanol is toxic to insect pests; but the quantity produced by most of the plants is not enough to protect them against invading insect pests. In the present study, we demonstrated that the over-expression of pectin methylesterase, derived from Arabidopsis thaliana and Aspergillus niger, in transgenic tobacco plants enhances methanol production and resistance to polyphagous insect pests. Methanol content in the leaves of transgenic plants was measured using proton nuclear spectroscopy (1H NMR) and spectra showed up to 16 fold higher methanol as compared to control wild type (WT) plants. A maximum of 100 and 85% mortality in chewing insects Helicoverpa armigera and Spodoptera litura larvae was observed, respectively when fed on transgenic plants leaves. The surviving larvae showed less feeding, severe growth retardation and could not develop into pupae. In-planta bioassay on transgenic lines showed up to 99 and 75% reduction in the population multiplication of plant sap sucking pests Myzus persicae (aphid) and Bemisia tabaci (whitefly), respectively. Most of the phenotypic characters of transgenic plants were similar to WT plants. Confocal microscopy showed no deformities in cellular integrity, structure and density of stomata and trichomes of transgenic plants compared to WT. Pollen germination and tube formation was also not affected in transgenic plants. Cell wall enzyme transcript levels were comparable with WT. This study demonstrated for the first time that methanol emission can be utilized for imparting broad range insect resistance in plants.

  3. Enhanced Methanol Production in Plants Provides Broad Spectrum Insect Resistance

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dixit, Sameer; Upadhyay, Santosh Kumar; Singh, Harpal; Sidhu, Om Prakash; Verma, Praveen Chandra; K, Chandrashekar

    2013-01-01

    Plants naturally emit methanol as volatile organic compound. Methanol is toxic to insect pests; but the quantity produced by most of the plants is not enough to protect them against invading insect pests. In the present study, we demonstrated that the over-expression of pectin methylesterase, derived from Arabidopsis thaliana and Aspergillus niger, in transgenic tobacco plants enhances methanol production and resistance to polyphagous insect pests. Methanol content in the leaves of transgenic plants was measured using proton nuclear spectroscopy (1H NMR) and spectra showed up to 16 fold higher methanol as compared to control wild type (WT) plants. A maximum of 100 and 85% mortality in chewing insects Helicoverpa armigera and Spodoptera litura larvae was observed, respectively when fed on transgenic plants leaves. The surviving larvae showed less feeding, severe growth retardation and could not develop into pupae. In-planta bioassay on transgenic lines showed up to 99 and 75% reduction in the population multiplication of plant sap sucking pests Myzus persicae (aphid) and Bemisia tabaci (whitefly), respectively. Most of the phenotypic characters of transgenic plants were similar to WT plants. Confocal microscopy showed no deformities in cellular integrity, structure and density of stomata and trichomes of transgenic plants compared to WT. Pollen germination and tube formation was also not affected in transgenic plants. Cell wall enzyme transcript levels were comparable with WT. This study demonstrated for the first time that methanol emission can be utilized for imparting broad range insect resistance in plants. PMID:24223989

  4. Silver nanoparticles are broad-spectrum bactericidal and virucidal compounds

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Lara, Humberto H; Garza-Treviño, Elsa N; Ixtepan-Turrent, Liliana; Singh, Dinesh K

    2011-01-01

    .... Interactions between viral biomolecules and silver nanoparticles suggest that the use of nanosystems may contribute importantly for the enhancement of current prevention of infection and antiviral therapies...

  5. Improved PCR Amplification of Broad Spectrum GC DNA Templates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guido, Nicholas; Starostina, Elena; Leake, Devin; Saaem, Ishtiaq

    2016-01-01

    Many applications in molecular biology can benefit from improved PCR amplification of DNA segments containing a wide range of GC content. Conventional PCR amplification of DNA sequences with regions of GC less than 30%, or higher than 70%, is complex due to secondary structures that block the DNA polymerase as well as mispriming and mis-annealing of the DNA. This complexity will often generate incomplete or nonspecific products that hamper downstream applications. In this study, we address multiplexed PCR amplification of DNA segments containing a wide range of GC content. In order to mitigate amplification complications due to high or low GC regions, we tested a combination of different PCR cycling conditions and chemical additives. To assess the fate of specific oligonucleotide (oligo) species with varying GC content in a multiplexed PCR, we developed a novel method of sequence analysis. Here we show that subcycling during the amplification process significantly improved amplification of short template pools (~200 bp), particularly when the template contained a low percent of GC. Furthermore, the combination of subcycling and 7-deaza-dGTP achieved efficient amplification of short templates ranging from 10-90% GC composition. Moreover, we found that 7-deaza-dGTP improved the amplification of longer products (~1000 bp). These methods provide an updated approach for PCR amplification of DNA segments containing a broad range of GC content.

  6. Target amplification for broad spectrum microbial diagnostics and detection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leski, Tomasz A; Malanoski, Anthony P; Stenger, David A; Lin, Baochuan

    2010-02-01

    Microarrays are massively parallel detection platforms that were first used extensively for gene expression studies, but have also been successfully applied to microbial detection in a number of diverse fields requiring broad-range microbial identification. This technology has enabled researchers to gain an insight into the microbial diversity of environmental samples, facilitated discovery of a number of new pathogens and enabled studies of multipathogen infections. In contrast to gene expression studies, the concentrations of targets in analyzed samples for microbial detection are usually much lower, and require the use of nucleic acid amplification techniques. The rapid advancement of manufacturing technologies has increased the content of the microarrays; thus, the required amplification is a challenging problem. The constant parallel improvements in both microarray and sample amplification techniques in the near future may lead to a radical progression in medical diagnostics and systems for efficient detection of microorganisms in the environment.

  7. The broad spectrum of celiac disease and gluten sensitive enteropathy

    Science.gov (United States)

    MOCAN, OANA; DUMITRAŞCU, DAN L.

    2016-01-01

    The celiac disease is an immune chronic condition with genetic transmission, caused by the intolerance to gluten. Gluten is a protein from cereals containing the following soluble proteins: gliadine, which is the most toxic, and the prolamins. The average prevalence is about 1% in USA and Europe, but high in Africa: 5.6% in West Sahara. In the pathogenesis several factors are involved: gluten as external trigger, genetic predisposition (HLA, MYO9B), viral infections, abnormal immune reaction to gluten. Severity is correlated with the number of intraepithelial lymphocytes, cryptic hyperplasia and villous atrophy, as well as with the length of intestinal involvement. The severity is assessed according to the Marsh–Oberhuber staging. Diagnostic criteria are: positive serological tests, intestinal biopsy, the reversal after gluten free diet (GFD). Beside refractory forms, new conditions have been described, like the non celiac gluten intolerance. In a time when more and more people adhere to GFD for nonscientific reasons, practitioners should be updated with the progress in celiac disease knowledge. PMID:27547052

  8. Enhanced methanol production in plants provides broad spectrum insect resistance.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sameer Dixit

    Full Text Available Plants naturally emit methanol as volatile organic compound. Methanol is toxic to insect pests; but the quantity produced by most of the plants is not enough to protect them against invading insect pests. In the present study, we demonstrated that the over-expression of pectin methylesterase, derived from Arabidopsis thaliana and Aspergillus niger, in transgenic tobacco plants enhances methanol production and resistance to polyphagous insect pests. Methanol content in the leaves of transgenic plants was measured using proton nuclear spectroscopy (1H NMR and spectra showed up to 16 fold higher methanol as compared to control wild type (WT plants. A maximum of 100 and 85% mortality in chewing insects Helicoverpa armigera and Spodoptera litura larvae was observed, respectively when fed on transgenic plants leaves. The surviving larvae showed less feeding, severe growth retardation and could not develop into pupae. In-planta bioassay on transgenic lines showed up to 99 and 75% reduction in the population multiplication of plant sap sucking pests Myzus persicae (aphid and Bemisia tabaci (whitefly, respectively. Most of the phenotypic characters of transgenic plants were similar to WT plants. Confocal microscopy showed no deformities in cellular integrity, structure and density of stomata and trichomes of transgenic plants compared to WT. Pollen germination and tube formation was also not affected in transgenic plants. Cell wall enzyme transcript levels were comparable with WT. This study demonstrated for the first time that methanol emission can be utilized for imparting broad range insect resistance in plants.

  9. Physiological characterization of a broad spectrum reductively dechlorinating consortium

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lorah, M.M.; Majcher, E.; Jones, E.; Driedger, G.; Dworatzek, S.; Graves, D.

    2005-01-01

    A wetland sediment-derived microbial consortium (WBC-2) was developed by the US Geological Survey and propagated in vitro to large quantities by SiREM Laboratory for potential use in bioaugmentation applications. On the basis of bench-scale tests, the consortium could completely dechlorinate 1,1,2,2-tetrachloroethylene, tetrachloroethylene, trichloroethylene, 1,1,2-trichloroethane, cis- and trans-1,2-dichoroethylene, 1,1-dichloroethylene, 1,2-dichloroethane, and vinyl chloride in culture medium. Batch microcosms were carried out under anaerobic conditions in culture medium with neutral pH and with pH adjusted from acidic (pH 4, 5, and 6) to alkaline (pH 8 and 9). To evaluate oxygen sensitivity of WBC-2, an aliquot was removed from an anaerobic culture vessel and poured into smaller containers on the bench top where a series of oxygen exposures were applied to the culture by bubbling ambient air through the culture at a rate of ??? 100 mL/min. Chlorinated methanes tended to inhibit activity of a wide range of microorganisms. Although toxicity effects from CT addition were observed with WBC-2 in liquid culture at 3 mg/L concentration, WBC-2 in the columns could maintain degradation of CT and chloroform (CF) and of the chlorinated ethanes and ethylenes at CT and CF concentrations of 10 and 20 mg/L, respectively. This is an abstract of a paper presented at the Proceedings of the 8th International In Situ and On-Site Bioremediation Symposium (Baltimore, MD 6/6-9/2005).

  10. A Lead Compound for the Development of Broad-spectrum

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    NJD

    Gut and P.J. Rosenthal, Farmaco, 2005, 60, 307–311. 10 N. Yauli, O. Ucuncu, E. Aydin, Y. Gok, A.Yaar, C. Baltaci, N. Yildirim and M. Kucuk, J. Photochem. Photobiol. A: Chem., 2005, 169, 229–234. 11 A. Boumendjel, J. Boccard, P. Carrupt, E. Nicolle, M. Blanc, A. Geze,. L. Choisnard, D. Wouessidjewe, E.L. Matera and C.

  11. Studies on broad spectrum corrosion resistant oxide coatings

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Unknown

    are quartz, soda ash, hydrated borax, boric acid, titania, rutile, tri-sodium phosphate, potassium nitrate, lithium carbonate, barium carbonate, di-ammonium hydrogen phosphate, ammonium di-hydrogen phosphate, etc. The coating materials are prepared by melting the batch at ~ 1300°C and the average yield of frit is ~ 80% ...

  12. Broad Spectrum Photoelectrochemical Diodes for Solar Hydrogen Generation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Grimes, Craig A.

    2014-11-26

    Under program auspices we have investigated material chemistries suitable for the solar generation of hydrogen by water photoelectrolysis. We have built upon, and extended, our knowledge base on the synthesis and application of TiO2 nanotube arrays, a material architecture that appears ideal for water photoelectrolysis. To date we have optimized, refined, and greatly extended synthesis techniques suitable for achieving highly ordered TiO2 nanotube arrays of given length, wall thickness, pore diameter, and tube-to-tube spacing for use in water photoelectrolysis. We have built upon this knowledge based to achieve visible light responsive, photocorrosion stable n-type and p-type ternary oxide nanotube arrays for use in photoelectrochemical diodes.

  13. Discovering evolution equations with applications

    CERN Document Server

    McKibben, Mark

    2011-01-01

    Most existing books on evolution equations tend either to cover a particular class of equations in too much depth for beginners or focus on a very specific research direction. Thus, the field can be daunting for newcomers to the field who need access to preliminary material and behind-the-scenes detail. Taking an applications-oriented, conversational approach, Discovering Evolution Equations with Applications: Volume 2-Stochastic Equations provides an introductory understanding of stochastic evolution equations. The text begins with hands-on introductions to the essentials of real and stochast

  14. Evaluation of the immunogenicity and safety of different doses and formulations of a broad spectrum influenza vaccine (FLU-v) developed by SEEK: study protocol for a single-center, randomized, double-blind and placebo-controlled clinical phase IIb trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Doorn, Eva; Pleguezuelos, Olga; Liu, Heng; Fernandez, Ana; Bannister, Robin; Stoloff, Gregory; Oftung, Fredrik; Norley, Stephen; Huckriede, Anke; Frijlink, Henderik W; Hak, Eelko

    2017-04-04

    Current influenza vaccines, based on antibodies against surface antigens, are unable to provide protection against newly emerging virus strains which differ from the vaccine strains. Therefore the population has to be re-vaccinated annually. It is thus important to develop vaccines which induce protective immunity to a broad spectrum of influenza viruses. This trial is designed to evaluate the immunogenicity and safety of FLU-v, a vaccine composed of four synthetic peptides with conserved epitopes from influenza A and B strains expected to elicit both cell mediated immunity (CMI) and humoral immunity providing protection against a broad spectrum of influenza viruses. In a single-center, randomized, double-blind and placebo-controlled phase IIb trial, 222 healthy volunteers aged 18-60 years will be randomized (2:2:1:1) to receive two injections of a suspension of 500 μg FLU-v in saline (arm 1), one dose of emulsified 500 μg FLU-v in Montanide ISA-51 and water for injection (WFI) followed by one saline dose (arm 2), two saline doses (arm 3), or one dose of Montanide ISA-51 and WFI emulsion followed by one saline dose (arm 4). All injections will be given subcutaneously. Primary endpoints are safety and FLU-v induced CMI, evaluated by cytokine production by antigen specific T cell populations (flow-cytometry and ELISA). Secondary outcomes are measurements of antibody responses (ELISA and multiplex), whereas exploratory outcomes include clinical efficacy and additional CMI assays (ELISpot) to show cross-reactivity. Broadly protective influenza vaccines able to provide protection against multiple strains of influenza are urgently needed. FLU-v is a promising vaccine which has shown to trigger the cell-mediated immune response. The dosages and formulations tested in this current trial are also estimated to induce antibody response. Therefore, both cellular and humoral immune responses will be evaluated. EudraCT number 2015-001932-38 ; retrospectively registered

  15. Discovering network structure beyond communities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nishikawa, Takashi; Motter, Adilson E

    2011-01-01

    To understand the formation, evolution, and function of complex systems, it is crucial to understand the internal organization of their interaction networks. Partly due to the impossibility of visualizing large complex networks, resolving network structure remains a challenging problem. Here we overcome this difficulty by combining the visual pattern recognition ability of humans with the high processing speed of computers to develop an exploratory method for discovering groups of nodes characterized by common network properties, including but not limited to communities of densely connected nodes. Without any prior information about the nature of the groups, the method simultaneously identifies the number of groups, the group assignment, and the properties that define these groups. The results of applying our method to real networks suggest the possibility that most group structures lurk undiscovered in the fast-growing inventory of social, biological, and technological networks of scientific interest.

  16. Two newly discovered millisecond pulsars

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nice, D. J.; Taylor, J. H.; Fruchter, A. S.

    1993-01-01

    Two millisecond pulsars have been discovered in the course of systematic surveys being made with the Arecibo radio telescope. PSR J2019 + 2425 has a 3.935 ms period and moves in a nearly circular, 76.5 day orbit around a about 0.3 solar mass companion. PSR J2322 + 2057, with a period of 4.808 ms, is an isolated object. The two pulsars have unusually small period derivatives, corresponding to spin-down time scales of 7.5 +/- 0.5 and 11 +/- 5 Gyr, respectively. Both objects show pulse time-of-arrival residuals no larger than a few microseconds over many months, lending further support to the observation that 'recycled' pulsars have extremely stable rotational behavior. The timing results also confirm that physics related to the rotational dynamics of these strongly self-gravitating stars - in particular, the value of the gravitational coupling constant G - remains essentially constant over time scales comparable to the Hubble time. Dispersion measures of the two pulsars indicate distances of 0.8-0.9 kpc.

  17. COL4A1 and COL4A2 mutations and disease: insights into pathogenic mechanisms and potential therapeutic targets

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuo, Debbie S.; Labelle-Dumais, Cassandre; Gould, Douglas B.

    2012-01-01

    Heterotrimers composed of collagen type IV alpha 1 (COL4A1) and alpha 2 (COL4A2) constitute one of the most abundant components of nearly all basement membranes. Accordingly, mutations in COL4A1 or COL4A2 are pleiotropic and contribute to a broad spectrum of disorders, including myopathy, glaucoma and hemorrhagic stroke. Here, we summarize the contributions of COL4A1 and COL4A2 mutations in human disease, integrate knowledge gained from model organisms and evaluate the implications for pathogenic mechanisms and therapeutic approaches. PMID:22914737

  18. Discovering Classes of Strongly Equivalent Logic Programs

    OpenAIRE

    Chen, Y.; Lin, F.

    2011-01-01

    In this paper we apply computer-aided theorem discovery technique to discover theorems about strongly equivalent logic programs under the answer set semantics. Our discovered theorems capture new classes of strongly equivalent logic programs that can lead to new program simplification rules that preserve strong equivalence. Specifically, with the help of computers, we discovered exact conditions that capture the strong equivalence between a rule and the empty set, between two rules, between t...

  19. Discovering Mobile Social Networks by Semantic Technologies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jung, Jason J.; Choi, Kwang Sun; Park, Sung Hyuk

    It has been important for telecommunication companies to discover social networks from mobile subscribers. They have attempted to provide a number of recommendation services, but they realized that the services were not successful. In this chapter, we present semantic technologies for discovering social networks. The process is mainly composed of two steps; (1) profile identification and (2) context understanding. Through developing a Next generation Contents dElivery (NICE) platform, we were able to generate various services based on the discovered social networks.

  20. In Silico Models for Designing and Discovering Novel Anticancer Peptides

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tyagi, Atul; Kapoor, Pallavi; Kumar, Rahul; Chaudhary, Kumardeep; Gautam, Ankur; Raghava, G. P. S.

    2013-10-01

    Use of therapeutic peptides in cancer therapy has been receiving considerable attention in the recent years. Present study describes the development of computational models for predicting and discovering novel anticancer peptides. Preliminary analysis revealed that Cys, Gly, Ile, Lys, and Trp are dominated at various positions in anticancer peptides. Support vector machine models were developed using amino acid composition and binary profiles as input features on main dataset that contains experimentally validated anticancer peptides and random peptides derived from SwissProt database. In addition, models were developed on alternate dataset that contains antimicrobial peptides instead of random peptides. Binary profiles-based model achieved maximum accuracy 91.44% with MCC 0.83. We have developed a webserver, which would be helpful in: (i) predicting minimum mutations required for improving anticancer potency; (ii) virtual screening of peptides for discovering novel anticancer peptides, and (iii) scanning natural proteins for identification of anticancer peptides (http://crdd.osdd.net/raghava/anticp/).

  1. Scientists Discover Sugar in Space

    Science.gov (United States)

    2000-06-01

    . Glycolaldehyde is a simpler molecular cousin to table sugar, the scientists say. The sugar molecule was detected in a large cloud of gas and dust some 26,000 light-years away, near the center of our Galaxy. Such clouds, often many light-years across, are the material from which new stars are formed. Though very rarified by Earth standards, these interstellar clouds are the sites of complex chemical reactions that occur over hundreds of thousands or millions of years. So far, about 120 different molecules have been discovered in these clouds. Most of these molecules contain a small number of atoms, and only a few molecules with eight or more atoms have been found in interstellar clouds. The 12 Meter Telescope "Finding glycolaldehyde in one of these interstellar clouds means that such molecules can be formed even in very rarified conditions," said Hollis. "We don't yet understand how it could be formed there," he added. "A combination of more astronomical observations and theoretical chemistry work will be required to resolve the mystery of how this molecule is formed in space." "We hope this discovery inspires renewed efforts to find even more kinds of molecules, so that, with a better idea of the total picture, we may be able to deduce the details of the prebiotic chemistry taking place in interstellar clouds," Hollis said. The discovery was made by detecting faint radio emission from the sugar molecules in the interstellar cloud. Molecules rotate end-for-end, and as they change from one rotational energy state to another, they emit radio waves at precise frequencies. The "family" of radio frequencies emitted by a particular molecule forms a unique "fingerprint" that scientists can use to identify that molecule. The scientists identified glycolaldehyde by detecting six frequencies of radio emission in what is termed the millimeter-wavelength region of the electromagnetic spectrum -- a region between more-familiar microwaves and infrared radiation. The NRAO 12 Meter Telescope

  2. A novel method to discover fluoroquinolone antibiotic resistance (qnr) genes in fragmented nucleotide sequences.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boulund, Fredrik; Johnning, Anna; Pereira, Mariana Buongermino; Larsson, D G Joakim; Kristiansson, Erik

    2012-12-11

    Broad-spectrum fluoroquinolone antibiotics are central in modern health care and are used to treat and prevent a wide range of bacterial infections. The recently discovered qnr genes provide a mechanism of resistance with the potential to rapidly spread between bacteria using horizontal gene transfer. As for many antibiotic resistance genes present in pathogens today, qnr genes are hypothesized to originate from environmental bacteria. The vast amount of data generated by shotgun metagenomics can therefore be used to explore the diversity of qnr genes in more detail. In this paper we describe a new method to identify qnr genes in nucleotide sequence data. We show, using cross-validation, that the method has a high statistical power of correctly classifying sequences from novel classes of qnr genes, even for fragments as short as 100 nucleotides. Based on sequences from public repositories, the method was able to identify all previously reported plasmid-mediated qnr genes. In addition, several fragments from novel putative qnr genes were identified in metagenomes. The method was also able to annotate 39 chromosomal variants of which 11 have previously not been reported in literature. The method described in this paper significantly improves the sensitivity and specificity of identification and annotation of qnr genes in nucleotide sequence data. The predicted novel putative qnr genes in the metagenomic data support the hypothesis of a large and uncharacterized diversity within this family of resistance genes in environmental bacterial communities. An implementation of the method is freely available at http://bioinformatics.math.chalmers.se/qnr/.

  3. A novel method to discover fluoroquinolone antibiotic resistance (qnr genes in fragmented nucleotide sequences

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Boulund Fredrik

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Broad-spectrum fluoroquinolone antibiotics are central in modern health care and are used to treat and prevent a wide range of bacterial infections. The recently discovered qnr genes provide a mechanism of resistance with the potential to rapidly spread between bacteria using horizontal gene transfer. As for many antibiotic resistance genes present in pathogens today, qnr genes are hypothesized to originate from environmental bacteria. The vast amount of data generated by shotgun metagenomics can therefore be used to explore the diversity of qnr genes in more detail. Results In this paper we describe a new method to identify qnr genes in nucleotide sequence data. We show, using cross-validation, that the method has a high statistical power of correctly classifying sequences from novel classes of qnr genes, even for fragments as short as 100 nucleotides. Based on sequences from public repositories, the method was able to identify all previously reported plasmid-mediated qnr genes. In addition, several fragments from novel putative qnr genes were identified in metagenomes. The method was also able to annotate 39 chromosomal variants of which 11 have previously not been reported in literature. Conclusions The method described in this paper significantly improves the sensitivity and specificity of identification and annotation of qnr genes in nucleotide sequence data. The predicted novel putative qnr genes in the metagenomic data support the hypothesis of a large and uncharacterized diversity within this family of resistance genes in environmental bacterial communities. An implementation of the method is freely available at http://bioinformatics.math.chalmers.se/qnr/.

  4. The discovered preference hypothesis - an empirical test

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lundhede, Thomas; Ladenburg, Jacob; Olsen, Søren Bøye

    Using stated preference methods for valuation of non-market goods is known to be vulnerable to a range of biases. Some authors claim that these so-called anomalies in effect render the methods useless for the purpose. However, the Discovered Preference Hypothesis, as put forth by Plott [31], offers...... as respondents evaluate more and more choice sets. This finding supports the Discovered Preference Hypothesis interpretation and explanation of starting point bias....

  5. What if Fleming had not discovered penicillin?

    OpenAIRE

    Alharbi, Sulaiman Ali; Wainwright, Milton; Alahmadi, Tahani Awad; Salleeh, Hashim Bin; Faden, Asmaa A.; Chinnathambi, Arunachalam

    2014-01-01

    What would have happened had Alexander Fleming not discovered penicillin in 1928? Perhaps the obvious answer is that, someone else would have discovered penicillin during 1930s and the Oxford group, would still have purified it sometime in the early 1940s. Here, however, in this counterfactual account of the penicillin story, it is argued that without Fleming, penicillin might still be undiscovered and the antibiotic age would never have dawned. As a result, many of the recent developments in...

  6. Therapeutic Nanodevices

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Stephen; Ruegsegger, Mark; Barnes, Philip; Smith, Bryan; Ferrari, Mauro

    Therapeutic nanotechnology offers minimally invasive therapies with high densities of function concentrated in small volumes, features that may reduce patient morbidity and mortality. Unlike other areas of nanotechnology, novel physical properties associated with nanoscale dimensionality are not the raison d'être of therapeutic nanotechnology, whereas the aggregation of multiple biochemical (or comparably precise) functions into controlled nanoarchitectures is. Multifunctionality is a hallmark of emerging nanotherapeutic devices, and multifunctionality can allow nanotherapeutic devices to perform multistep work processes, with each functional component contributing to one or more nanodevice subroutine such that, in aggregate, subroutines sum to a cogent work process. Cannonical nanotherapeutic subroutines include tethering (targeting) to sites of disease, dispensing measured doses of drug (or bioactive compound), detection of residual disease after therapy and communication with an external clinician/operator. Emerging nanotherapeutics thus blur the boundaries between medical devices and traditional pharmaceuticals. Assembly of therapeutic nanodevices generally exploits either (bio)material self-assembly properties or chemoselective bioconjugation techniques, or both. Given the complexity, composition, and the necessity for their tight chemical and structural definition inherent in the nature of nanotherapeutics, their cost of goods (COGs) might exceed that of (already expensive) biologics. Early therapeutic nanodevices will likely be applied to disease states which exhibit significant unmet patient need (cancer and cardiovascular disease), while application to other disease states well-served by conventional therapy may await perfection of nanotherapeutic design and assembly protocols.

  7. Calcium Regulation of Hemorrhagic Fever Virus Budding: Mechanistic Implications for Host-Oriented Therapeutic Intervention.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ziying Han

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available Hemorrhagic fever viruses, including the filoviruses (Ebola and Marburg and arenaviruses (Lassa and Junín viruses, are serious human pathogens for which there are currently no FDA approved therapeutics or vaccines. Importantly, transmission of these viruses, and specifically late steps of budding, critically depend upon host cell machinery. Consequently, strategies which target these mechanisms represent potential targets for broad spectrum host oriented therapeutics. An important cellular signal implicated previously in EBOV budding is calcium. Indeed, host cell calcium signals are increasingly being recognized to play a role in steps of entry, replication, and transmission for a range of viruses, but if and how filoviruses and arenaviruses mobilize calcium and the precise stage of virus transmission regulated by calcium have not been defined. Here we demonstrate that expression of matrix proteins from both filoviruses and arenaviruses triggers an increase in host cytoplasmic Ca2+ concentration by a mechanism that requires host Orai1 channels. Furthermore, we demonstrate that Orai1 regulates both VLP and infectious filovirus and arenavirus production and spread. Notably, suppression of the protein that triggers Orai activation (Stromal Interaction Molecule 1, STIM1 and genetic inactivation or pharmacological blockade of Orai1 channels inhibits VLP and infectious virus egress. These findings are highly significant as they expand our understanding of host mechanisms that may broadly control enveloped RNA virus budding, and they establish Orai and STIM1 as novel targets for broad-spectrum host-oriented therapeutics to combat these emerging BSL-4 pathogens and potentially other enveloped RNA viruses that bud via similar mechanisms.

  8. Regulatory RNAs discovered in unexpected places.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pek, Jun Wei; Okamura, Katsutomo

    2015-01-01

    Recent studies have discovered both small and long noncoding RNAs (ncRNAs) encoded in unexpected places. These ncRNA genes were surprises at the time of their discovery, but many quickly became well-accepted families of functional regulatory RNA species. Even after years of extensive gene annotation studies using high-throughput sequencing technologies, new types of ncRNA genes continue to be discovered in unexpected places. We highlight ncRNAs that have atypical structures and that are encoded in what are generally considered 'junk' sequences, such as spacers and introns. We also discuss current bottlenecks in the approaches for identifying novel ncRNAs and the possibility that many remain to be discovered. © 2015 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  9. Therapeutic applications of ultrasonography in dentistry

    OpenAIRE

    Jyoti Mago; Soheyl Sheikh; Shambulingappa Pallagatti; Amit Aggarwal

    2014-01-01

    Ultrasonography is one of the most common imaging modality used in dental as well as medical sciences. The use of ultrasonography when discovered was as a therapeutic aid, but in recent times, it has become one of the most common imaging modality next to conventional radiology. Currently, its use as a therapeutic aid has been rediscovered along with its association with other specialized imaging. The aim of this paper is to highlight such advancements in the field of ultrasonography.

  10. Therapeutic applications of ultrasonography in dentistry

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jyoti Mago

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Ultrasonography is one of the most common imaging modality used in dental as well as medical sciences. The use of ultrasonography when discovered was as a therapeutic aid, but in recent times, it has become one of the most common imaging modality next to conventional radiology. Currently, its use as a therapeutic aid has been rediscovered along with its association with other specialized imaging. The aim of this paper is to highlight such advancements in the field of ultrasonography.

  11. Ultrasound: A Revenant Therapeutic Modality in Dentistry

    OpenAIRE

    Karumuri, Sunil Kumar; Rastogi, Trisha; Beeraka, Kartheeki; Penumatcha, Mohan Raju; Olepu, Sanjeeva Rao

    2016-01-01

    An ultrasound (US) gives a visible image of the organs that are present inside the body. In medicine it serves for diagnosing and also its therapeutic benefits are well established for bone healing, osteointegration and soft tissue healing. In dentistry it is widely used for diagnostic purposes. When it was discovered it was introduced for therapeutic purposes, but due to lack of clinical studies its use as therapy was remittent in dentistry. The aim of the present paper was to establish the ...

  12. Abdominal pregnancy discovered during laparotomy for ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    We report a case of abdominal pregnancy with a dead foetus of 19 gestational weeks and 3 days discovered incidentally during a laparotomy following complications of attempted abortion. Abdominal pregnancy is a rare form of ectopic pregnancy (1% of all ectopic pregnancies) usually diagnosed by ultrasound. In this case ...

  13. Discovering English with the Sketch Engine

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thomas, James

    2014-01-01

    "Discovering English with the Sketch Engine" is the title of a new book (Thomas, 2014) which introduces the use of corpora in language study, teaching, writing and translating. It focuses on using the Sketch Engine to identify patterns of normal usage in many aspects of English ranging from morphology to discourse and pragmatics. This…

  14. Why most discovered true associations are inflated.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ioannidis, John P A

    2008-09-01

    Newly discovered true (non-null) associations often have inflated effects compared with the true effect sizes. I discuss here the main reasons for this inflation. First, theoretical considerations prove that when true discovery is claimed based on crossing a threshold of statistical significance and the discovery study is underpowered, the observed effects are expected to be inflated. This has been demonstrated in various fields ranging from early stopped clinical trials to genome-wide associations. Second, flexible analyses coupled with selective reporting may inflate the published discovered effects. The vibration ratio (the ratio of the largest vs. smallest effect on the same association approached with different analytic choices) can be very large. Third, effects may be inflated at the stage of interpretation due to diverse conflicts of interest. Discovered effects are not always inflated, and under some circumstances may be deflated-for example, in the setting of late discovery of associations in sequentially accumulated overpowered evidence, in some types of misclassification from measurement error, and in conflicts causing reverse biases. Finally, I discuss potential approaches to this problem. These include being cautious about newly discovered effect sizes, considering some rational down-adjustment, using analytical methods that correct for the anticipated inflation, ignoring the magnitude of the effect (if not necessary), conducting large studies in the discovery phase, using strict protocols for analyses, pursuing complete and transparent reporting of all results, placing emphasis on replication, and being fair with interpretation of results.

  15. Did Viking discover life on Mars?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Klein, H. P.

    1999-01-01

    A major argument in the claim that life had been discovered during the Viking mission to Mars is that the results obtained in the Labeled Release (LR) experiment are analogous to those observed with terrestrial microorganisms. This assertion is critically examined and found to be implausible.

  16. Discovering Sentinel Rules for Business Intelligence

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Middelfart, Morten; Pedersen, Torben Bach

    2009-01-01

    to absolute data values, we are able to discover strong and useful sentinel rules that would otherwise be hidden when using sequential pattern mining or correlation techniques. We present a method for sentinel rule discovery and an implementation of this method that scales linearly on large data volumes....

  17. Discovering Science through Art-Based Activities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alberts, Rebecca

    2010-01-01

    Art and science are intrinsically linked; the essence of art and science is discovery. Both artists and scientists work in a systematic but creative way--knowledge and understanding are built up through pieces of art or a series of labs. In the classroom, integrating science and visual art can provide students with the latitude to think, discover,…

  18. Naturally Occurring Anthraquinones: Chemistry and Therapeutic Potential in Autoimmune Diabetes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shih-Chang Chien

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Anthraquinones are a class of aromatic compounds with a 9,10-dioxoanthracene core. So far, 79 naturally occurring anthraquinones have been identified which include emodin, physcion, cascarin, catenarin, and rhein. A large body of literature has demonstrated that the naturally occurring anthraquinones possess a broad spectrum of bioactivities, such as cathartic, anticancer, anti-inflammatory, antimicrobial, diuretic, vasorelaxing, and phytoestrogen activities, suggesting their possible clinical application in many diseases. Despite the advances that have been made in understanding the chemistry and biology of the anthraquinones in recent years, research into their mechanisms of action and therapeutic potential in autoimmune disorders is still at an early stage. In this paper, we briefly introduce the etiology of autoimmune diabetes, an autoimmune disorder that affects as many as 10 million worldwide, and the role of chemotaxis in autoimmune diabetes. We then outline the chemical structure and biological properties of the naturally occurring anthraquinones and their derivatives with an emphasis on recent findings about their immune regulation. We discuss the structure and activity relationship, mode of action, and therapeutic potential of the anthraquinones in autoimmune diabetes, including a new strategy for the use of the anthraquinones in autoimmune diabetes.

  19. Discovering discovery patterns with Predication-based Semantic Indexing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cohen, Trevor; Widdows, Dominic; Schvaneveldt, Roger W; Davies, Peter; Rindflesch, Thomas C

    2012-12-01

    In this paper we utilize methods of hyperdimensional computing to mediate the identification of therapeutically useful connections for the purpose of literature-based discovery. Our approach, named Predication-based Semantic Indexing, is utilized to identify empirically sequences of relationships known as "discovery patterns", such as "drug x INHIBITS substance y, substance y CAUSES disease z" that link pharmaceutical substances to diseases they are known to treat. These sequences are derived from semantic predications extracted from the biomedical literature by the SemRep system, and subsequently utilized to direct the search for known treatments for a held out set of diseases. Rapid and efficient inference is accomplished through the application of geometric operators in PSI space, allowing for both the derivation of discovery patterns from a large set of known TREATS relationships, and the application of these discovered patterns to constrain search for therapeutic relationships at scale. Our results include the rediscovery of discovery patterns that have been constructed manually by other authors in previous research, as well as the discovery of a set of previously unrecognized patterns. The application of these patterns to direct search through PSI space results in better recovery of therapeutic relationships than is accomplished with models based on distributional statistics alone. These results demonstrate the utility of efficient approximate inference in geometric space as a means to identify therapeutic relationships, suggesting a role of these methods in drug repurposing efforts. In addition, the results provide strong support for the utility of the discovery pattern approach pioneered by Hristovski and his colleagues. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  20. Therapeutic interventions for gut dysbiosis and related disorders in the elderly: antibiotics, probiotics or faecal microbiota transplantation?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vemuri, R C; Gundamaraju, R; Shinde, T; Eri, R

    2017-04-26

    Ageing and physiological functions of the human body are inversely proportional to each other. The gut microbiota and host immune system co-evolve from infants to the elderly. Ageing is accompanied by a decline in gut microbial diversity, immunity and metabolism, which increases susceptibility to infections. Any compositional change in the gut is directly linked to gastrointestinal disorders, obesity and metabolic diseases. Increase in opportunistic pathogen invasion in the gut like Clostridium difficile leading to C. difficile infection is more common in the elderly population. Frequent hospitalisation and high prevalence of nosocomial infections with the ageing is also well documented. Long-term utilisation of broad-spectrum antibiotic therapy is being followed in order to control these infections. Nosocomial infections and antibiotic therapy in combination or alone is leading to gastroenteritis followed by Clostridium associated diarrhoea or antibiotic associated diarrhoea. Above all, use of broad-spectrum antibiotics is highly debated all over the world due to growing antimicrobial resistance. The use of narrow spectrum antibiotics could be helpful to some extent. Dietary supplementation of probiotics with prebiotics (synbiotics) or without prebiotics has improved gut commensal diversity and regulated the immune system. The recent emergence of faecal microbiota transplantation has played an important role in treating recurrent Clostridium associated diarrhoea. This review focuses on various therapeutic interventions for gut dysbiosis and gastrointestinal diseases in the elderly. The possible mechanism for antimicrobial resistance and mechanism of action of probiotics are also discussed in detail.

  1. Discovery of (10 R )-7-Amino-12-fluoro-2,10,16-trimethyl-15-oxo-10,15,16,17-tetrahydro- 2H -8,4-(metheno)pyrazolo[4,3- h ][2,5,11]-benzoxadiazacyclotetradecine-3-carbonitrile (PF-06463922), a Macrocyclic Inhibitor of Anaplastic Lymphoma Kinase (ALK) and c-ros Oncogene 1 (ROS1) with Preclinical Brain Exposure and Broad-Spectrum Potency against ALK-Resistant Mutations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Johnson, Ted W.; Richardson, Paul F.; Bailey, Simon; Brooun, Alexei; Burke, Benjamin J.; Collins, Michael R.; Cui, J. Jean; Deal, Judith G.; Deng, Ya-Li; Dinh, Dac; Engstrom, Lars D.; He, Mingying; Hoffman, Jacqui; Hoffman, Robert L.; Huang, Qinhua; Kania, Robert S.; Kath, John C.; Lam, Hieu; Lam, Justine L.; Le, Phuong T.; Lingardo, Laura; Liu, Wei; McTigue, Michele; Palmer, Cynthia L.; Sach, Neal W.; Smeal, Tod; Smith, Graham L.; Stewart, Albert E.; Timofeevski, Sergei; Zhu, Huichun; Zhu, Jinjiang; Zou, Helen Y.; Edwards, Martin P.

    2014-06-12

    Although crizotinib demonstrates robust efficacy in anaplastic lymphoma kinase (ALK)-positive non-small-cell lung carcinoma patients, progression during treatment eventually develops. Resistant patient samples revealed a variety of point mutations in the kinase domain of ALK, including the L1196M gatekeeper mutation. In addition, some patients progress due to cancer metastasis in the brain. Using structure-based drug design, lipophilic efficiency, and physical-property-based optimization, highly potent macrocyclic ALK inhibitors were prepared with good absorption, distribution, metabolism, and excretion (ADME), low propensity for p-glycoprotein 1-mediated efflux, and good passive permeability. These structurally unusual macrocyclic inhibitors were potent against wild-type ALK and clinically reported ALK kinase domain mutations. Significant synthetic challenges were overcome, utilizing novel transformations to enable the use of these macrocycles in drug discovery paradigms. This work led to the discovery of 8k (PF-06463922), combining broad-spectrum potency, central nervous system ADME, and a high degree of kinase selectivity.

  2. Discovering phase transitions with unsupervised learning

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Lei

    2016-11-01

    Unsupervised learning is a discipline of machine learning which aims at discovering patterns in large data sets or classifying the data into several categories without being trained explicitly. We show that unsupervised learning techniques can be readily used to identify phases and phases transitions of many-body systems. Starting with raw spin configurations of a prototypical Ising model, we use principal component analysis to extract relevant low-dimensional representations of the original data and use clustering analysis to identify distinct phases in the feature space. This approach successfully finds physical concepts such as the order parameter and structure factor to be indicators of a phase transition. We discuss the future prospects of discovering more complex phases and phase transitions using unsupervised learning techniques.

  3. Discovering Implicit Schemas in JSON Data

    OpenAIRE

    Cánovas, Javier; Cabot, Jordi

    2013-01-01

    International audience; JSON has become a very popular lightweigth format for data exchange. JSON is human readable and easy for computers to parse and use. However, JSON is schemaless. Though this brings some benefits (e.g., flexibility in the representation of the data) it can become a problem when consuming and integrating data from different JSON services since developers need to be aware of the structure of the schemaless data. We believe that a mechanism to discover (and visualize) the ...

  4. What if Fleming had not discovered penicillin?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alharbi, Sulaiman Ali; Wainwright, Milton; Alahmadi, Tahani Awad; Salleeh, Hashim Bin; Faden, Asmaa A; Chinnathambi, Arunachalam

    2014-09-01

    What would have happened had Alexander Fleming not discovered penicillin in 1928? Perhaps the obvious answer is that, someone else would have discovered penicillin during 1930s and the Oxford group, would still have purified it sometime in the early 1940s. Here, however, in this counterfactual account of the penicillin story, it is argued that without Fleming, penicillin might still be undiscovered and the antibiotic age would never have dawned. As a result, many of the recent developments in medicine, such as organ transplantation, might have been delayed or, at best, made more hazardous. Penicillin might have come onto the scene a few years later but, had Fleming overlooked the discovery, it seems certain that penicillin would not have saved countless Allied lives, during and after D-Day. Instead of having enjoyed fifty and more years of the antibiotic age, it is argued here, that we would have had to rely upon highly developed sulphonamides, so-called "supasulfas", and other chemically-derived antibacterial drugs. Indeed, it might be the case that, even well into this new millennium, the antibiotic age has yet to dawn, and medicine is still waiting for someone to chance upon penicillin. Here we discuss what might have happened had Fleming not discovered penicillin and come to the conclusion that the medical armoury available today would have been far different and might have relied solely upon highly developed varieties of sulphonamides or similar, synthetic, non-antibiotic antibacterial agents.

  5. Bioengineering lantibiotics for therapeutic success

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Des eField

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available Several examples of highly modified antimicrobial peptides have been described. While many such peptides are non-ribosomally synthesized, ribosomally synthesised equivalents are being discovered with increased frequency. Of the latter group, the lantibiotics continue to attract most attention. In the present review, we discuss the implementation of in vivo and in vitro engineering systems to alter, and even enhance, the antimicrobial activity, antibacterial spectrum and physico-chemical properties, including heat stability, solubility, diffusion and protease resistance, of these compounds. Additionally, we discuss the potential applications of these lantibiotics for use as therapeutics.

  6. The Universe for all to discover

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ortiz-Gil, A.; Ballesteros, F.; Espinós, H.; Fernández-Soto, A.; Lanzara, M.; Moya, M. J.; Navarro, J.

    2015-05-01

    In the title of this paper, we have changed the slogan of the International Year of Astronomy, ``The Universe yours to discover" to ``The Universe for all to discover" in order to emphasize the need to think about broader audiences when we plan astronomical activities at school or during outreach events. The strategy we propose follows what is known as the Universal Design for Learning (UDL). UDL allows to reach to the general public as well as to audiences which might be regarded as ``special" because they have some disability. It has been shown that everybody has a preferred style of learning (some remember better what they see, others what they hear or what they touch) and therefore, everybody is more or less able under the different styles of learning. Through this talk I am going to outline some of the principles of the UDL that can be applied in the teaching and communication of Astronomy, along with an example of its implementation in the project ``A Touch of the Universe".

  7. Novel therapeutic targets in rheumatoid arthritis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Koenders, M.I.; Berg, W.B. van den

    2015-01-01

    Rheumatoid arthritis (RA) is an autoimmune disease that leads to inflammation and destruction of synovial joints. Despite the broad spectrum of antirheumatic drugs, this heterogeneous disease is still not well controlled in up to 30% of patients. Here, we discuss two pathways that are regarded as

  8. Colorectal cancer tumour markers and biomarkers: Recent therapeutic advances.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lech, Gustaw; Słotwiński, Robert; Słodkowski, Maciej; Krasnodębski, Ireneusz Wojciech

    2016-02-07

    Colorectal cancer (CRC) is the second most commonly diagnosed cancer among females and third among males worldwide. It also contributes significantly to cancer-related deaths, despite the continuous progress in diagnostic and therapeutic methods. Biomarkers currently play an important role in the detection and treatment of patients with colorectal cancer. Risk stratification for screening might be augmented by finding new biomarkers which alone or as a complement of existing tests might recognize either the predisposition or early stage of the disease. Biomarkers have also the potential to change diagnostic and treatment algorithms by selecting the proper chemotherapeutic drugs across a broad spectrum of patients. There are attempts to personalise chemotherapy based on presence or absence of specific biomarkers. In this review, we update review published last year and describe our understanding of tumour markers and biomarkers role in CRC screening, diagnosis, treatment and follow-up. Goal of future research is to identify those biomarkers that could allow a non-invasive and cost-effective diagnosis, as well as to recognise the best prognostic panel and define the predictive biomarkers for available treatments.

  9. Endophytic Fungi as Novel Resources of natural Therapeutics

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maheshwari Rajamanikyam

    2017-08-01

    Full Text Available ABSTRACT Fungal endophytes constitute a major part of the unexplored fungal diversity. Endophytic fungi (EF are an important source for novel, potential and active metabolites. Plant-endophyte interaction and endophyte -endophyte interactions study provide insights into mutualism and metabolite production by fungi. Bioactive compounds produced by endophytes main function are helping the host plants to resist external biotic and abiotic stress, which benefit the host survival in return. These organisms mainly consist of members of the Ascomycota, Basidiomycota, Zygomycota and Oomycota. Recently, the genome sequencing technology has emerged as one of the most efficient tools that can provide whole information of a genome in a small period of time. Endophytes are fertile ground for drug discovery. EFare considered as the hidden members of the microbial world and represent an underutilized resource for new therapeutics and compounds. Endophytes are rich source of natural products displaying broad spectrum of biological activities like anticancer, antibacterial, antiviral, immunomodulatory, antidiabetic, antioxidant, anti-arthritis and anti-inflammatory.

  10. Engineering a Therapeutic Lectin by Uncoupling Mitogenicity from Antiviral Activity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Swanson, Michael D.; Boudreaux, Daniel M.; Salmon, Loïc; Chugh, Jeetender; Winter, Harry C.; Meagher, Jennifer L.; André, Sabine; Murphy, Paul V.; Oscarson, Stefan; Roy, René; King, Steven; Kaplan, Mark H.; Goldstein, Irwin J.; Tarbet, E. Bart; Hurst, Brett L.; Smee, Donald F.; de la Fuente, Cynthia; Hoffmann, Hans-Heinrich; Xue, Yi; Rice, Charles M.; Schols, Dominique; Garcia, J. Victor; Stuckey, Jeanne A.; Gabius, Hans-Joachim; Al-Hashimi, Hashim M.; Markovitz, David M.

    2015-01-01

    Summary A key effector route of the Sugar Code involves lectins that exert crucial regulatory controls by targeting distinct cellular glycans. We demonstrate that a single amino acid substitution in a banana lectin, replacing histidine 84 with a threonine, significantly reduces its mitogenicity while preserving its broad-spectrum antiviral potency. X-ray crystallography, NMR spectroscopy, and glycocluster assays reveal that loss of mitogenicity is strongly correlated with loss of pi-pi stacking between aromatic amino acids H84 and Y83, which removes a wall separating two carbohydrate binding sites, thus diminishing multivalent interactions. On the other hand, monovalent interactions and antiviral activity are preserved by retaining other wild-type conformational features and possibly through unique contacts involving the T84 side chain. Through such fine-tuning, target selection and downstream effects of a lectin can be modulated so as to knock down one activity while preserving another, thus providing tools for therapeutics and for understanding the Sugar Code. PMID:26496612

  11. Therapeutic misadventure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Langford, N J

    2010-10-01

    Therapeutic misadventure can be defined as an injury or an adverse event caused by medical management rather than by an underlying disease. Within the National Health Service there were over 86,000 reported adverse incidents in 2007. In the USA medication errors have been rated as the fourth highest cause of death. Unfortunately one of the greatest contributors to iatrogenic injury is human error. The potential types of misadventure are infinite. Medication errors are a major part of this, being responsible for over 70% of cases that cause serious harm. However, many medication errors caused by slips, lapses, technical errors and mistakes are preventable; intentional violations of safe operating procedures are not. While medication errors were tolerated by society in the past, the readiness to institute criminal proceedings against health-care professionals has increased greatly in the UK over the last decade. The medication process consists of writing prescriptions, dispensing the product, administering it and monitoring its effects. Prescription errors arise owing to incomplete information, lack of appropriate labelling, environmental factors and human blunders. Even with a perfect prescription the right medication must be dispensed and appropriately labelled. Dispensing errors are not uncommon and may be compounded by non-clinical considerations. Administration of a drug by injection is one of the most dangerous aspects of the medication process, especially in inexperienced hands. The final component of medication supply is monitoring the effect of the medication. With short courses of medication such monitoring is easy, but with long-term medication, particularly with potent drugs where the margin between efficacy and toxicity is small, active procedures may be required to ensure toxicity does not ensue. Despite the endeavour of health-care professions to stick to the rule of 'first, do no harm', in reality this is difficult to achieve all of the time. When

  12. Therapeutic uses of somatostatin and its analogues: Current view and potential applications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rai, Uma; Thrimawithana, Thilini R; Valery, Celine; Young, Simon A

    2015-08-01

    Somatostatin is an endogeneous cyclic tetradecapeptide hormone that exerts multiple biological activities via five ubiquitously distributed receptor subtypes. Classified as a broad inhibitory neuropeptide, somatostatin has anti-secretory, anti-proliferative and anti-angiogenic effects. The clinical use of native somatostatin is limited by a very short half-life (1 to 3min) and the broad spectrum of biological responses. Thus stable, receptor-selective agonists have been developed. The majority of these somatostatin therapeutic agonists bind strongly to two of the five receptor subtypes, although recently an agonist of wider affinity has been introduced. Somatostatin agonists are established in the treatment of acromegaly with recently approved indications in the therapy of neuroendocrine tumours. Potential therapeutic uses for somatostatin analogues include diabetic complications like retinopathy, nephropathy and obesity, due to inhibition of IGF-1, VEGF together with insulin secretion and effects upon the renin-angiotensin-aldosterone system. Wider uses in anti-neoplastic therapy may also be considered and recent studies have further revealed anti-inflammatory and anti-nociceptive effects. This review provides a comprehensive, current view of the biological functions of somatostatin and potential therapeutic uses, informed by the wide range of pharmacological advances reported since the last published review in 2004 by P. Dasgupta. The pharmacology of somatostatin receptors is explained, the current uses of somatostatin agonists are discussed, and the potential future of therapeutic applications is explored. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  13. Kinetoplastida: new therapeutic strategies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Croft S.L.

    2008-09-01

    Full Text Available New formulations and therapeutic switching of the established drugs, amphotericin B and paromomycin, together with the discovery of miltefosine, have significantly improved the opportunities for treatment of visceral leishmaniasis (VL chemotherapy. However, for human African trypanosomiasis (HAT, Chagas disease and cutaneous leishmaniases there has been limited progress. For HAT, a novel diamidine, parfuramidine, is in phase III clinical trial for early-stage disease, but for the treatment of late-stage disease there are no new drugs and combinations of eflornithine with melarsoprol or nifurtimox have been the focus of clinical studies. For Chagas disease, different classes of compounds that have validated biochemical targets, sterol biosynthesis methylases and cysteine proteases, are in various stages of development. The genome sequences that are now available for the pathogens that cause the leishmaniases and trypanosomiases, and new methods for rapid validation of targets, are part of the solution to discover new drugs. The integration of medicinal chemistry, pharmacokinetics, project planning and interaction with the pharma/biotech sector are essential if progress is to be made. Although there are financial constraints, the appearance of new funding sources and not-for-profit product development partnerships offers hope for drug development.

  14. Discovering chemistry with an ab initio nanoreactor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Lee-Ping; Titov, Alexey; McGibbon, Robert; Liu, Fang; Pande, Vijay S.; Martínez, Todd J.

    2014-12-01

    Chemical understanding is driven by the experimental discovery of new compounds and reactivity, and is supported by theory and computation that provide detailed physical insight. Although theoretical and computational studies have generally focused on specific processes or mechanistic hypotheses, recent methodological and computational advances harken the advent of their principal role in discovery. Here we report the development and application of the ab initio nanoreactor—a highly accelerated first-principles molecular dynamics simulation of chemical reactions that discovers new molecules and mechanisms without preordained reaction coordinates or elementary steps. Using the nanoreactor, we show new pathways for glycine synthesis from primitive compounds proposed to exist on the early Earth, which provide new insight into the classic Urey-Miller experiment. These results highlight the emergence of theoretical and computational chemistry as a tool for discovery, in addition to its traditional role of interpreting experimental findings.

  15. Discovering the Library with Google Earth

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michaela Brenner

    2008-06-01

    Full Text Available Libraries need to provide attractive and exciting discovery tools to draw patrons to the valuable resources in their catalogs. The authors conducted a pilot project to explore the free version of Google Earth as such a discover tool for Portland State Library’s digital collection of urban planning documents. They created eye-catching placemarks with links to parts of this collection, as well as to other pertinent materials like books, images, and historical background information. The detailed how-to-do part of this article is preceded by a discussion about discovery of library materials and followed by possible applications of this Google Earth project.

  16. Discovering New Light States at Neutrino Experiments

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Essig, Rouven; /SLAC; Harnik, Roni; /Fermilab; Kaplan, Jared; /SLAC; Toro, Natalia; /Stanford U., Phys. Dept.

    2011-08-11

    Experiments designed to measure neutrino oscillations also provide major opportunities for discovering very weakly coupled states. In order to produce neutrinos, experiments such as LSND collide thousands of Coulombs of protons into fixed targets, while MINOS and MiniBooNE also focus and then dump beams of muons. The neutrino detectors beyond these beam dumps are therefore an excellent arena in which to look for long-lived pseudoscalars or for vector bosons that kinetically mix with the photon. We show that these experiments have significant sensitivity beyond previous beam dumps, and are able to partially close the gap between laboratory experiments and supernovae constraints on pseudoscalars. Future upgrades to the NuMI beamline and Project X will lead to even greater opportunities for discovery. We also discuss thin target experiments with muon beams, such as those available in COMPASS, and show that they constitute a powerful probe for leptophilic PNGBs.

  17. Discovering new information in bibliographic databases

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Emil Hudomalj

    2005-01-01

    Full Text Available Databases contain information that can usually not be revealed by standard query systems. For that purpose, the methods for knowledge discovery from databases can be applied, which enable the user to browse aggregated data, discover trends, produce online reports, explore possible new associations within the data etc. Such methods are successfully employed in various fields, such as banking, insurance and telecommunications, while they are seldom used in libraries. The article reviews the development of query systems for bibliographic databases, including some early attempts to apply modern knowledge discovery methods. Analytical databases are described in more detail, since they usually serve as the basis for knowledge discovery. Data mining approaches are presented, since they are a central step in the knowledge discovery process. The key role of librarians who can play a key part in developing systems for finding new information in existing bibliographic databases is stressed.

  18. Michael Maier--nine newly discovered letters.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lenke, Nils; Roudet, Nicolas; Tilton, Hereward

    2014-02-01

    The authors provide a transcription, translation, and evaluation of nine newly discovered letters from the alchemist Michael Maier (1568-1622) to Gebhardt Johann von Alvensleben (1576-1631), a noble landholder in the vicinity of Magdeburg. Stemming from the final year of his life, this correspondence casts new light on Maier's biography, detailing his efforts to secure patronage amid the financial crisis of the early Thirty Years' War. While his ill-fated quest to perfect potable gold continued to form the central focus of his patronage suits, Maier also offered his services in several arts that he had condemned in his printed works, namely astrology and "supernatural" magic. Remarks concerning his previously unknown acquaintance with Heinrich Khunrath call for a re-evaluation of Maier's negotiation of the discursive boundaries between Lutheran orthodoxy and Paracelsianism. The letters also reveal Maier's substantial contribution to a work previously ascribed solely to the English alchemist Francis Anthony.

  19. Therapeutic advancements in multiple myeloma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alessandro eGozzetti

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available Multiple myeloma survival has significantly improved in latest years, due to a broad spectrum of novel agents available for treatment. The introduction of thalidomide, bortezomib and lenalidomide together with autologous stem cell transplantation has dramatically prolonged complete remissions rate, progression free survivals resulting ultimately in prolonged survivals in myeloma patients. Moreover, novel strategies of treatment such as consolidation and maintenance are being used to implement responses. A number of new drugs such as carfilzomib and pomalidomide are already in clinical practice, and new kids on the block are entering, making the future of myeloma patients brighter.

  20. Discovering relations between indirectly connected biomedical concepts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weissenborn, Dirk; Schroeder, Michael; Tsatsaronis, George

    2015-01-01

    The complexity and scale of the knowledge in the biomedical domain has motivated research work towards mining heterogeneous data from both structured and unstructured knowledge bases. Towards this direction, it is necessary to combine facts in order to formulate hypotheses or draw conclusions about the domain concepts. This work addresses this problem by using indirect knowledge connecting two concepts in a knowledge graph to discover hidden relations between them. The graph represents concepts as vertices and relations as edges, stemming from structured (ontologies) and unstructured (textual) data. In this graph, path patterns, i.e. sequences of relations, are mined using distant supervision that potentially characterize a biomedical relation. It is possible to identify characteristic path patterns of biomedical relations from this representation using machine learning. For experimental evaluation two frequent biomedical relations, namely "has target", and "may treat", are chosen. Results suggest that relation discovery using indirect knowledge is possible, with an AUC that can reach up to 0.8, a result which is a great improvement compared to the random classification, and which shows that good predictions can be prioritized by following the suggested approach. Analysis of the results indicates that the models can successfully learn expressive path patterns for the examined relations. Furthermore, this work demonstrates that the constructed graph allows for the easy integration of heterogeneous information and discovery of indirect connections between biomedical concepts.

  1. Imminent science what remains to be discovered

    CERN Document Server

    Bignami, Giovanni F

    2014-01-01

    This is not science fiction. It’s a voyage on the arrow of time to the coming fifty years. The legendary palindromic character Mr. Qfwfq from Italo Calvino’s collection of short stories, The Cosmicomics, will go with us – he who knows all the answers but will give out no hints. He will help us to discover the innovations that will have changed our lives by 2062, when, riding astride Halley’s Comet, our omniscient extraterrestrial will return to visit us.In this book, we shall learn how astronomers will devote themselves to the study of the mysterious force of dark energy, which makes up some three-quarters of the Universe. We shall also delve deeply into the study of our Earth, to exploit the immense thermal energy that lies beneath our feet. We shall solve another enigma in today’s science: the origin of life. We shall come to understand how to develop direct contacts between our brains and the rest of the world. We shall learn about the future of genetics, the reason for the longevity of Methusela...

  2. Astronomers Discover Fastest-Spinning Pulsar

    Science.gov (United States)

    2006-01-01

    Astronomers using the National Science Foundation's Robert C. Byrd Green Bank Telescope have discovered the fastest-spinning neutron star ever found, a 20-mile-diameter superdense pulsar whirling faster than the blades of a kitchen blender. Their work yields important new information about the nature of one of the most exotic forms of matter known in the Universe. Pulsar Graphic Pulsars Are Spinning Neutron Stars CREDIT: Bill Saxton, NRAO/AUI/NSF (Click on image for larger version) "We believe that the matter in neutron stars is denser than an atomic nucleus, but it is unclear by how much. Our observations of such a rapidly rotating star set a hard upper limit on its size, and hence on how dense the star can be.," said Jason Hessels, a graduate student at McGill University in Montreal. Hessels and his colleagues presented their findings to the American Astronomical Society's meeting in Washington, DC. Pulsars are spinning neutron stars that sling "lighthouse beams" of radio waves or light around as they spin. A neutron star is what is left after a massive star explodes at the end of its "normal" life. With no nuclear fuel left to produce energy to offset the stellar remnant's weight, its material is compressed to extreme densities. The pressure squeezes together most of its protons and electrons to form neutrons; hence, the name "neutron star." "Neutron stars are incredible laboratories for learning about the physics of the fundamental particles of nature, and this pulsar has given us an important new limit," explained Scott Ransom, an astronomer at the National Radio Astronomy Observatory and one of Hessels' collaborators on this work. The scientists discovered the pulsar, named PSR J1748-2446ad, in a globular cluster of stars called Terzan 5, located some 28,000 light-years from Earth in the constellation Sagittarius. The newly-discovered pulsar is spinning 716 times per second, or at 716 Hertz (Hz), readily beating the previous record of 642 Hz from a pulsar

  3. Therapeutic Benefits of Cannabis: A Patient Survey

    OpenAIRE

    Webb, Charles W; Webb, Sandra M

    2014-01-01

    Clinical research regarding the therapeutic benefits of cannabis (“marijuana”) has been almost non-existent in the United States since cannabis was given Schedule I status in the Controlled Substances Act of 1970. In order to discover the benefits and adverse effects perceived by medical cannabis patients, especially with regards to chronic pain, we hand-delivered surveys to one hundred consecutive patients who were returning for yearly re-certification for medical cannabis use in Hawai‘i.

  4. [Does cannabis have a therapeutic value?].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lechat, Paul

    2002-01-01

    Among the numerous therapeutic applications claimed for cannabis, many come from anecdotal reports, a few have been subjected to clinical double-blind trials with comparison to a reference treatment. Their results are less than convincing and larger multicentre assays are needed to assess our knowledge. Researches on endogenous cannabinoids as well as on cannabinoids receptors agonists and antagonists may lead to discover new useful drugs devoid of the central nervous system unwanted effects of cannabis.

  5. ROSAT Discovers Unique, Distant Cluster of Galaxies

    Science.gov (United States)

    1995-06-01

    Brightest X-ray Cluster Acts as Strong Gravitational Lens Based on exciting new data obtained with the ROSAT X-ray satellite and a ground-based telescope at the ESO La Silla Observatory, a team of European astronomers [2] has just discovered a very distant cluster of galaxies with unique properties. It emits the strongest X-ray emission of any cluster ever observed by ROSAT and is accompanied by two extraordinarily luminous arcs that represent the gravitationally deflected images of even more distant objects. The combination of these unusual characteristics makes this cluster, now known as RXJ1347.5-1145, a most interesting object for further cosmological studies. DISCOVERY AND FOLLOW-UP OBSERVATIONS This strange cluster of galaxies was discovered during the All Sky Survey with the ROSAT X-ray satellite as a moderately intense X-ray source in the constellation of Virgo. It could not be identified with any already known object and additional ground-based observations were therefore soon after performed with the Max-Planck-Society/ESO 2.2-metre telescope at the La Silla observatory in Chile. These observations took place within a large--scale redshift survey of X-ray clusters of galaxies detected by the ROSAT All Sky Survey, a so-called ``ESO Key Programme'' led by astronomers from the Max-Planck-Institut fur Extraterrestrische Physik and the Osservatorio Astronomico di Brera. The main aim of this programme is to identify cluster X-ray sources, to determine the distance to the X-ray emitting clusters and to investigate their overall properties. These observations permitted to measure the redshift of the RXJ1347.5-1145 cluster as z = 0.45, i.e. it moves away from us with a velocity (about 106,000 km/sec) equal to about one-third of the velocity of light. This is an effect of the general expansion of the universe and it allows to determine the distance as about 5,000 million light-years (assuming a Hubble constant of 75 km/sec/Mpc). In other words, we see these

  6. Discovering biological progression underlying microarray samples.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Peng Qiu

    2011-04-01

    Full Text Available In biological systems that undergo processes such as differentiation, a clear concept of progression exists. We present a novel computational approach, called Sample Progression Discovery (SPD, to discover patterns of biological progression underlying microarray gene expression data. SPD assumes that individual samples of a microarray dataset are related by an unknown biological process (i.e., differentiation, development, cell cycle, disease progression, and that each sample represents one unknown point along the progression of that process. SPD aims to organize the samples in a manner that reveals the underlying progression and to simultaneously identify subsets of genes that are responsible for that progression. We demonstrate the performance of SPD on a variety of microarray datasets that were generated by sampling a biological process at different points along its progression, without providing SPD any information of the underlying process. When applied to a cell cycle time series microarray dataset, SPD was not provided any prior knowledge of samples' time order or of which genes are cell-cycle regulated, yet SPD recovered the correct time order and identified many genes that have been associated with the cell cycle. When applied to B-cell differentiation data, SPD recovered the correct order of stages of normal B-cell differentiation and the linkage between preB-ALL tumor cells with their cell origin preB. When applied to mouse embryonic stem cell differentiation data, SPD uncovered a landscape of ESC differentiation into various lineages and genes that represent both generic and lineage specific processes. When applied to a prostate cancer microarray dataset, SPD identified gene modules that reflect a progression consistent with disease stages. SPD may be best viewed as a novel tool for synthesizing biological hypotheses because it provides a likely biological progression underlying a microarray dataset and, perhaps more importantly, the

  7. Astronomers Discover Spectacular Structure in Distant Galaxy

    Science.gov (United States)

    1999-01-01

    Researchers using the National Science Foundation's Very Large Array (VLA) radio telescope have imaged a "spectacular and complex structure" in a galaxy 50 million light-years away. Their work both resolves a decades-old observational mystery and revises current theories about the origin of X-ray emission coming from gas surrounding the galaxy. The new VLA image is of the galaxy M87, which harbors at its core a supermassive black hole spewing out jets of subatomic particles at nearly the speed of light and also is the central galaxy of the Virgo Cluster of galaxies. The VLA image is the first to show detail of a larger structure that originally was detected by radio astronomers more than a half-century ago. Analysis of the new image indicates that astronomers will have to revise their ideas about the physics of what causes X-ray emission in the cores of many galaxy clusters. Frazer Owen of the National Radio Astronomy Observatory (NRAO) in Socorro, NM; Jean Eilek of the New Mexico Institute of Mining and Technology (NM Tech) in Socorro, NM; and Namir Kassim of the Naval Research Laboratory in Washington, DC, announced their discovery at the American Astronomical Society's meeting today in Austin, TX. The new observations show two large, bubble-like lobes, more than 200,000 light-years across, that emit radio waves. These lobes, which are intricately detailed, apparently are powered by gravitational energy released from the black hole at the galaxy's center. "We think that material is flowing outward from the galaxy's core into these large, bright, radio-emitting 'bubbles,'" Owen said. The newly-discovered "bubbles" sit inside a region of the galaxy known to be emitting X-rays. Theorists have speculated that this X-ray emission arises when gas that originally was part of the Virgo Cluster of galaxies, cools and falls inwards onto M87 itself, at the center of the cluster. Such "cooling flows" are commonly thought to be responsible for strong X-ray emission in many

  8. Discovering Extrasolar Planets with Microlensing Surveys

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wambsganss, J.

    2016-06-01

    An astronomical survey is commonly understood as a mapping of a large region of the sky, either photometrically (possibly in various filters/wavelength ranges) or spectroscopically. Often, catalogs of objects are produced/provided as the main product or a by-product. However, with the advent of large CCD cameras and dedicated telescopes with wide-field imaging capabilities, it became possible in the early 1990s, to map the same region of the sky over and over again. In principle, such data sets could be combined to get very deep stacked images of the regions of interest. However, I will report on a completely different use of such repeated maps: Exploring the time domain for particular kinds of stellar variability, namely microlens-induced magnifications in search of exoplanets. Such a time-domain microlensing survey was originally proposed by Bohdan Paczynski in 1986 in order to search for dark matter objects in the Galactic halo. Only a few years later three teams started this endeavour. I will report on the history and current state of gravitational microlensing surveys. By now, routinely 100 million stars in the Galactic Bulge are monitored a few times per week by so-called survey teams. All stars with constant apparent brightness and those following known variability patterns are filtered out in order to detect the roughly 2000 microlensing events per year which are produced by stellar lenses. These microlensing events are identified "online" while still in their early phases and then monitored with much higher cadence by so-called follow-up teams. The most interesting of such events are those produced by a star-plus-planet lens. By now of order 30 exoplanets have been discovered by these combined microlensing surveys. Microlensing searches for extrasolar planets are complementary to other exoplanet search techniques. There are two particular advantages: The microlensing method is sensitive down to Earth-mass planets even with ground-based telecopes, and it

  9. The Impact of Discovering Life beyond Earth

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dick, Steven J.

    2016-01-01

    Introduction: astrobiology and society Steven J. Dick; Part I. Motivations and Approaches. How Do We Frame the Problems of Discovery and Impact?: Introduction; 1. Current approaches to finding life beyond earth, and what happens if we do Seth Shostak; 2. The philosophy of astrobiology: the Copernican and Darwinian presuppositions Iris Fry; 3. History, discovery, analogy: three approaches to the impact of discovering life beyond earth Steven J. Dick; 4. Silent impact: why the discovery of extraterrestrial life should be silent Clément Vidal; Part II. Transcending Anthropocentrism. How Do We Move beyond our Own Preconceptions of Life, Intelligence and Culture?: Introduction; 5. The landscape of life Dirk Schulze-Makuch; 6. The landscape of intelligence Lori Marino; 7. Universal biology: assessing universality from a single example Carlos Mariscal; 8. Equating culture, civilization, and moral development in imagining extraterrestrial intelligence: anthropocentric assumptions? John Traphagan; 9. Communicating with the other: infinity, geometry, and universal math and science Douglas Vakoch; Part III. Philosophical, Theological, and Moral Impact. How Do We Comprehend the Cultural Challenges Raised by Discovery?: Introduction; 10. Life, intelligence and the pursuit of value in cosmic evolution Mark Lupisella; 11. 'Klaatu barada nikto' - or, do they really think like us? Michael Ruse; 12. Alien minds Susan Schneider; 13. The moral subject of astrobiology: guideposts for exploring our ethical and political responsibilities towards extraterrestrial life Elspeth Wilson and Carol Cleland; 14. Astrobiology and theology Robin Lovin; 15. Would you baptize an extraterrestrial? Guy Consolmagno, SJ; Part IV. Practical Considerations: How Should Society Prepare for Discovery - and Non-Discovery?: Introduction; 16. Is there anything new about astrobiology and society? Jane Maienschein; 17. Evaluating preparedness for the discovery of extraterrestrial life: considering potential

  10. Scientix in our school- discovering STEM

    Science.gov (United States)

    Melcu, Cornelia

    2017-04-01

    My name is Cornelia Melcu and I am a primary school teacher in Brasov. Additionally, I am a teacher trainer of Preparatory Class Curriculum, Google Application in Education Course and European Projects Course and a mentor to new teachers and students in university. I am an eTwinning, Scientix and ESERO ambassador too. During the last three school years my school was involved in several STEM projects, part of Scientix community. The main goal of those projects was to develop basic STEM skills of our students based on project work integrated into the curriculum. Open the Gates to the Universe (http://gatestotheuniverse.blogspot.ro; https://twinspace.etwinning.net/12520/home) is an eTwinning project for primary school students started on September 2015 and finished on September 2016. Some of our partners were from the Mediterranean area. The students discovered different aspects of space science and astronomy working on international groups. They explored some aspects of Science included in their curriculum using resources from ESERO, ROEDUSEIS and Space Awareness (e.g. Calculate with Rosetta, Writing the travel diary, Build Rosetta, How to become an astronaut, etc.) The project was a great opportunity to apply integrated learning methods for developing competencies which are a part of the primary school curriculum in Romania. In Language and Communication classes the students talked about their partners living places and their traditions and habits. They learnt some basic words in their partners language related to the weather. They created stories- both in Romanian and English; they described life in space and astronomical phenomena. They talked to the other partners during the several online meetings we organized and wrote short stories in English. In Mathematics and Science they found out about the Milky Way, the Solar System, the weather, famous astronauts and astronomers. They calculated, solved problems, made experiments and explained specific natural phenomena

  11. Astronomers Discover Six-Image Gravitational Lens

    Science.gov (United States)

    2001-08-01

    An international team of astronomers has used the National Science Foundation's Very Long Baseline Array (VLBA) radio telescope and NASA's Hubble Space Telescope (HST) to discover the first gravitational lens in which the single image of a very distant galaxy has been split into six different images. The unique configuration is produced by the gravitational effect of three galaxies along the line of sight between the more-distant galaxy and Earth. Optical and Radio Images of Gravitational Lens "This is the first gravitational lens with more than four images of the background object that is produced by a small group of galaxies rather than a large cluster of galaxies," said David Rusin, who just received his Ph.D. from the University of Pennsylvania. "Such systems are expected to be extremely rare, so this discovery is an important stepping stone. Because this is an intermediate case between gravitational lenses produced by single galaxies and lenses produced by large clusters of galaxies, it will give us insights we can't get from other types of lenses," Rusin added. The gravitational lens, called CLASS B1359+154, consists of a galaxy more than 11 billion light-years away in the constellation Bootes, with a trio of galaxies more than 7 billion light-years away along the same line of sight. The more-distant galaxy shows signs that it contains a massive black hole at its core and also has regions in which new stars are forming. The gravitational effect of the intervening galaxies has caused the light and radio waves from the single, more-distant galaxy to be "bent" to form six images as seen from Earth. Four of these images appear outside the triangle formed by the three intermediate galaxies and two appear inside that triangle. "This lens system is a very interesting case to study because it is more complicated than lenses produced by single galaxies, and yet simpler than lenses produced by clusters of numerous galaxies," said Chris Kochanek of the Harvard

  12. Carbon Atmosphere Discovered On Neutron Star

    Science.gov (United States)

    2009-11-01

    without pulsations would require a tiny size, consistent only with exotic stars made of strange quark matter. "Our carbon veil solves one of the big questions about the neutron star in Cas A," said Craig Heinke. "People have been willing to consider some weird explanations, so it's a relief to discover a less peculiar solution." Unlike most astronomical objects, neutron stars are small enough to understand on a human scale. For example, neutron stars typically have a diameter of about 14 miles, only slightly longer than a half-marathon. The atmosphere of a neutron star is on an even smaller scale. The researchers calculate that the carbon atmosphere is only about 4 inches thick, because it has been compressed by a surface gravity that is 100 billion times stronger than on Earth. "For people who are used to hearing about immense sizes of things in space, it might be a surprise that we can study something so small," said Ho. "It's also funny to think that such a thin veil over this star played a key role in frustrating researchers." In Earth's time frame, the estimated age of the neutron star in Cas A is only several hundred years, making it about ten times younger than other neutron stars with detected surface emission. Therefore, the Cas A neutron star gives a unique window into the early life of a cooling neutron star. The carbon itself comes from a combination of material that has fallen back after the supernova, and nuclear reactions on the hot surface of the neutron star which convert hydrogen and helium into carbon. The X-ray spectrum and lack of pulsar activity suggest that the magnetic field on the surface of this neutron star is relatively weak. Similarly low magnetic fields are implied for several other young neutron stars by study of their weak X-ray pulsations. It is not known whether these neutron stars will have low magnetic fields for their entire lives, and never become radio pulsars, or whether processes in their interior will lead to the development of

  13. 76 FR 4393 - Discover Financial Services Negotiated Service Agreement

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-01-25

    ... Discover Financial Services Negotiated Service Agreement AGENCY: Postal Regulatory Commission. ACTION... Financial Services negotiated service agreement to the market dominant product list. This notice addresses... 3020, et seq., to add a Discover Financial Services (DFS) negotiated service agreement to the market...

  14. RNA Interference as a Therapeutic Strategy for the Treatment of Liver Diseases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gonzalez-Rodriguez, Agueda; Valverde, Angela M

    2015-01-01

    RNA interference has emerged as an innovative technology for gene silencing that degrades mRNAs complementary to the antisense strands of double-stranded, short interfering RNAs (siRNAs). Its therapeutic application has important advantages over small-molecule drugs since offers the possibility of targeting virtually all genes and allows selective silencing of one or several genes. So far, a relative small proportion of cellular proteins can bind and respond to chemical drugs. Based on that, RNA interference-mediated gene silencing is widely considered as a crucial breakthrough in molecular biology with a direct translation to medicine. The liver has been widely chosen as a model system for the development of RNA interference therapy due to the convenience and availability of effective delivery into this tissue. Numerous preclinical models have revealed promising results, but the safety of this technology remains the primary challenge in developing siRNA based treatments. Liver diseases comprise a broad spectrum of genetic and non-genetic pathologies including acute fulminant liver injury that demands urgent medical care, or chronic pathologies such as nonalcoholic fatty liver (NAFLD), alcoholic liver disease, liver cirrhosis, viral hepatitis and hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC). In some cases restoration of liver function is not possible and alternatives to liver transplantation offering novel and efficient therapeutic approaches are urgently needed. In this review, we describe recent insights on the advantages of using RNA interference in preclinical settings as a targeted strategy with potential to markedly improve the treatment of liver diseases.

  15. Therapeutic charm of quercetin and its derivatives: a review of research and patents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sharma, Ajay; Kashyap, Dharambir; Sak, Katrin; Tuli, Hardeep Singh; Sharma, Anil K

    2018-01-01

    Bioactive polyphenolic compounds derived from plants are being utilized for prevention of various chronic diseases including cancer and cardiovascular disorders. Quercetin, a potential poly-phenolic flavonol, found in onions, apples and berries, has been implicated against cancer proliferation, chronic inflammation and various other oxidative manifestations. Evidences suggested that quercetin negatively regulates the numerous crucial signaling pathways associated with life-threatening diseases. Major signaling pathways including NF-κB, MAPK, PI3K-AKT and mTOR are found to be regulated by quercetin. In addition, several patents have reported recently on quercetin derivatives describing wide therapeutic applications such as anticancer/antiproliferatory, antioxidative/antiaging, antiviral, anti-inflammatory, cardioprotective. Present review emphasizes the chemistry and sources of quercetin followed by description of its broad-spectrum therapeutic potential along with proposed mechanisms of action. Furthermore, this review also highlights the important modifications in the basic chemical structure of quercetin in terms of published patents. Insolubility of the bioactive compounds restricts their medicinal importance which could be overcome by modifications in the chemical structure of so-called derivatives. Most of the patents deal with the modifications in chemical structure of quercetin mainly at hydroxyl groups and C-6 and C-7 positions.

  16. Youngest Stellar Explosion in Our Galaxy Discovered

    Science.gov (United States)

    2008-05-01

    Astronomers have found the remains of the youngest supernova, or exploded star, in our Galaxy. The supernova remnant, hidden behind a thick veil of gas and dust, was revealed by the National Science Foundation's Very Large Array (VLA) and NASA's Chandra X-Ray Observatory, which could see through the murk. The object is the first example of a "missing population" of young supernova remnants. 1985 and 2008 VLA Images Move cursor over image to blink. VLA Images of G1.9+0.3 in 1985 and 2008: Circle for size comparison. CREDIT: Green, et al., NRAO/AUI/NSF From observing supernovae in other galaxies, astronomers have estimated that about three such stellar explosions should occur in our Milky Way every century. However, the most recent one known until now occurred around 1680, creating the remnant called Cassiopeia A. The newly-discovered object is the remnant of an explosion only about 140 years ago. "If the supernova rate estimates are correct, there should be the remnants of about 10 supernova explosions in the Milky Way that are younger than Cassiopeia A," said David Green of the University of Cambridge in the UK, who led the VLA study. "It's great to finally track one of them down." Supernova explosions, which mark the violent death of a star, release tremendous amounts of energy and spew heavy elements such as calcium and iron into interstellar space. They thus seed the clouds of gas and dust from which new stars and planets are formed and, through their blast shocks, can even trigger such formation. The lack of evidence for young supernova remnants in the Milky Way had caused astronomers to wonder if our Galaxy, which appears otherwise normal, differed in some unknown way from others. Alternatively, scientists thought that the "missing" Milky Way supernovae perhaps indicated that their understanding of the relationship between supernovae and other galactic processes was in error. The astronomers made their discovery by measuring the expansion of the debris from

  17. Pathogenic Inflammation and Its Therapeutic Targeting in Systemic Lupus Erythematosus

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gottschalk, Timothy A.; Tsantikos, Evelyn; Hibbs, Margaret L.

    2015-01-01

    Systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE, lupus) is a highly complex and heterogeneous autoimmune disease that most often afflicts women in their child-bearing years. It is characterized by circulating self-reactive antibodies that deposit in tissues, including skin, kidneys, and brain, and the ensuing inflammatory response can lead to irreparable tissue damage. Over many years, clinical trials in SLE have focused on agents that control B- and T-lymphocyte activation, and, with the single exception of an agent known as belimumab which targets the B-cell survival factor BAFF, they have been disappointing. At present, standard therapy for SLE with mild disease is the agent hydroxychloroquine. During disease flares, steroids are often used, while the more severe manifestations with major organ involvement warrant potent, broad-spectrum immunosuppression with cyclophosphamide or mycophenolate. Current treatments have severe and dose-limiting toxicities and thus a more specific therapy targeting a causative factor or signaling pathway would be greatly beneficial in SLE treatment. Moreover, the ability to control inflammation alongside B-cell activation may be a superior approach for disease control. There has been a recent focus on the innate immune system and associated inflammation, which has uncovered key players in driving the pathogenesis of SLE. Delineating some of these intricate inflammatory mechanisms has been possible with studies using spontaneous mouse mutants and genetically engineered mice. These strains, to varying degrees, exhibit hallmarks of the human disease and therefore have been utilized to model human SLE and to test new drugs. Developing a better understanding of the initiation and perpetuation of disease in SLE may uncover suitable novel targets for therapeutic intervention. Here, we discuss the involvement of inflammation in SLE disease pathogenesis, with a focus on several key proinflammatory cytokines and myeloid growth factors, and review the known

  18. Treatment of Organic-Contaminated Mixed Waste Utilizing the Oak Ridge Broad Spectrum Contracts

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Estes, C. H.; Heacker, F. K.; Cunningham, J.; Westich, B.

    2003-02-25

    To meet the requirements of the State of Tennessee's Department of Environment and Conservation Commissioner's Order for treatment of mixed low level wastes, Oak Ridge has utilized commercial treatment companies to treat and dispose mixed waste. Over the past year, Oak Ridge has shipped organic-contaminated mixed waste for treatment to meet milestones under the Site Treatment Plan. Oak Ridge has established contracts with commercial treatment companies accessible by all DOE sites for treatment of a wide range of mixed wastes. The paper will describe and summarize the activities involved in treating and disposing of organic-contaminated mixed waste utilizing DOE complex-wide contracts and the treatment and disposal activities required. This paper will describe the case history of treatment of several organic-contaminated mixed wastes from the Oak Ridge Reservation requiring treatment prior to disposal. The paper will include waste category information, implementation activities, and contract access. The paper will discuss the specifics of the mixed waste treatment including waste characteristics, treatment process and equipment utilized, and treatment results. Additional information will be provided on task order development, waste profiling, treatment pricing, and the disposal process.

  19. Lipophosphonoxins II: Design, Synthesis, and Properties of Novel Broad Spectrum Antibacterial Agents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seydlová, Gabriela; Pohl, Radek; Zborníková, Eva; Ehn, Marcel; Šimák, Ondřej; Panova, Natalya; Kolář, Milan; Bogdanová, Kateřina; Večeřová, Renata; Fišer, Radovan; Šanderová, Hana; Vítovská, Dragana; Sudzinová, Petra; Pospíšil, Jiří; Benada, Oldřich; Křížek, Tomáš; Sedlák, David; Bartůněk, Petr; Krásný, Libor; Rejman, Dominik

    2017-07-27

    The increase in the number of bacterial strains resistant to known antibiotics is alarming. In this study we report the synthesis of novel compounds termed Lipophosphonoxins II (LPPO II). We show that LPPO II display excellent activities against Gram-positive and -negative bacteria, including pathogens and multiresistant strains. We describe their mechanism of action-plasmatic membrane pore-forming activity selective for bacteria. Importantly, LPPO II neither damage nor cross the eukaryotic plasmatic membrane at their bactericidal concentrations. Further, we demonstrate LPPO II have low propensity for resistance development, likely due to their rapid membrane-targeting mode of action. Finally, we reveal that LPPO II are not toxic to either eukaryotic cells or model animals when administered orally or topically. Collectively, these results suggest that LPPO II are highly promising compounds for development into pharmaceuticals.

  20. Broad spectrum anti-microbial compounds producing bacteria from coast of Qingdao bays.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khan, Muhammad Naseem; Li, Meng; Mirani, Zulfiqar Ali; Wang, Jingxue; Lin, Hong; Buzdar, Muhammad Aslam

    2015-03-01

    Anti-microbial resistance burden and hazard associated with chemical treatment of infections demanded for new anti-microbial natural products. Marine associated microorganisms are the enormous source of bioactive compounds. In this study we have isolated 272 marine bacteria among them 136 (50%) were antagonistic to at least one of the four pathogenic strains Listeria monocytogenes, Vibrio cholerae, E. coli and S. aureus. Only two strains exhibited antibacterial activity against all four test strains, which were identified by 16S rDNA sequencing as Bacillus sp. DK1-SA11 and Vibrio sp. DK6-SH8. Marine isolate DK1-SA11 has potential to resist boiling temperature and pH 2-12. Furthermore cell free extract (CFE) inhibited all test organisms including superbug MRSA and pathogenic yeast Candida albicans. Marine isolate Bacillus sp. DK1-SA11 could be a potential combatant for the battle of drugs and bugs.

  1. An Optically Active Polymer for Broad-Spectrum Enantiomeric Recognition of Chiral Acids.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yan, Jijun; Kang, Chuanqing; Bian, Zheng; Ma, Xiaoye; Jin, Rizhe; Du, Zhijun; Gao, Lianxun

    2017-04-27

    Recognition of enantiomers of chiral acids by anion-π or lone pair-π interactions has not yet been investigated but is a significant and attractive challenge. This study reports an optically active polymer-based supramolecular system with capabilities of discriminating enantiomers of various chiral acids. The polymer featuring alternate π-acidic naphthalenediimides (NDIs) and methyl l-phenylalaninates in the backbone exhibits an unprecedented slow self-assembly process that is susceptible to perturbation by various chiral acids. Thus, the combination of anion-π or lone pair-π interactions and sensitivity of the polymeric self-assembly process to external chiral species endows the system with recognition capabilities. This is the first time that anion-π or lone pair-π interactions have been applied in the recognition of enantiomers of various chiral acids with a single system. The results shed light on new strategies for material design by integrating π-acidic aromatic systems and chiral building blocks to afford relevant advanced functions. © 2017 Wiley-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  2. Investigating AAK1-and GAK-Regulated Virus-Host Interactions Uncovers Broad-Spectrum Antivirals

    Science.gov (United States)

    2017-02-16

    any virus. To test the hypothesis that HCV particles 157 shuttle with clathrin APs intracellularly, we utilized live cell imaging . The co-trafficking...activity, on HCV particle 179 trafficking by live cell imaging . Treatment of HCV-infected cells with sunitinib and erlotinib 180 reduced motility of...against emerging viral infections. 402 403 Using advanced live cell imaging , we provide the first direct evidence that viral particles co-404

  3. Naga chilli: a potential source of capsaicinoids with broad-spectrum ethnopharmacological applications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meghvansi, M K; Siddiqui, S; Khan, Md Haneef; Gupta, V K; Vairale, M G; Gogoi, H K; Singh, Lokendra

    2010-10-28

    Capsicum species are not only cultivated as vegetable and condiment crops but are also incorporated into a number of medicinal preparations in the ancient literature around the world. 'Naga chilli' or 'Bhoot Jolokia' (Capsicum chinense Jacq.) is a chilli variety indigenous to the northeast region of India and has been recognized as the hottest chilli in the world. It has also been used conventionally in treating various human ailments since time immemorial by the indigenous people of the northeast India. Despite being an important crop of the northeast India, the information on the biology and cultivation of Naga chilli is very scanty and scattered. The present article reviews the scientific literature on above aspects with particular emphasis on identifying the key regional issues which need to be addressed urgently by the policy makers in order to harness its potential as an important source of capsaicinoids. Further, an attempt has been made to collate the potential of capsaicinoids in various ethnopharmacological applications such as pain therapy, body temperature regulation, anti-obesity treatments, anticancer therapy and as antioxidant and antimicrobial agent. We anticipate that this literature analysis of traditional medicinal uses and experimental trials of Capsicum using modern scientific approaches shall provide a basis for suggesting important areas where sincere research efforts are warranted to bridge the gap between traditional medicinal knowledge and modern biomedical knowledge. Copyright © 2010 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  4. Azo-sulforhodamine dyes: a novel class of broad spectrum dark quenchers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chevalier, Arnaud; Renard, Pierre-Yves; Romieu, Anthony

    2014-08-01

    A rapid access to a novel class of water-soluble dark quencher dyes was achieved using an azo-coupling reaction between a fluorescent primary arylamine derived from a sulforhodamine 101 scaffold and a tertiary aniline equipped with different bioconjugatable groups. The thus obtained nonfluorescent azo-sulforhodamine hybrids display a broad quenching range spanning the visible to NIR regions. This was demonstrated through the preparation and enzymatic activation of FRET-based fluorogenic substrates of urokinase.

  5. The broad spectrum of signaling pathways regulated by unfolded protein response in neuronal homeostasis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saito, Atsushi; Imaizumi, Kazunori

    2017-06-28

    The protein folding capabilities in the endoplasmic reticulum (ER) are disturbed by alternations in the cellular homeostasis such as the disruption of calcium ion homeostasis, the expression of mutated proteins and oxidative stress. In response to these ER dysfunctions, eukaryotic cells activate canonical branches of signal transduction cascades to restore the protein folding capacity and avoid irreversible damages, collectively termed the unfolded protein response (UPR). Prolonged ER dysfunctions and the downregulation of UPR signaling pathways have been accepted as a crucial trigger for the pathogenesis of various neurodegenerative diseases. Furthermore, recent studies have revealed that the UPR has a wide spectrum of signaling pathways for unique physiological roles in the diverse developmental, differential and lipidomic processes. A developed and intricate ER network exists in the neurites of neurons. Neuronal ER functions and ER-derived signaling mediate efficient communication between cell soma and distal sites through local protein synthesis, sorting and lipogenesis. However, relevant of ER-derived UPR signaling pathways in the elaborate mechanisms regulating neuronal activities, synaptic functions and protective responses against injury is not fully elucidated. In this review, we summarized our current understanding of how the UPR functions provide the appropriate signals for neuronal capabilities. We also reviewed how UPR dysfunctions lead to the pathogenesis of neurodegenerative diseases, and the possibilities ameliorating their toxic effects by targeting UPR components. Copyright © 2017 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Ltd.. All rights reserved.

  6. Discovery of sarolaner: A novel, orally administered, broad-spectrum, isoxazoline ectoparasiticide for dogs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McTier, Tom L; Chubb, Nathan; Curtis, Michael P; Hedges, Laura; Inskeep, Gregory A; Knauer, Christopher S; Menon, Sanjay; Mills, Brian; Pullins, Aleah; Zinser, Erich; Woods, Debra J; Meeus, Patrick

    2016-05-30

    The novel isoxazoline ectoparasiticide, sarolaner, was identified during a lead optimization program for an orally-active compound with efficacy against fleas and ticks on dogs. The aim of the discovery program was to identify a novel isoxazoline specifically for use in companion animals, beginning with de novo synthesis in the Zoetis research laboratories. The sarolaner molecule has unique structural features important for its potency and pharmacokinetic (PK) properties, including spiroazetidine and sulfone moieties. The flea and tick activity resides in the chirally pure S-enantiomer, which was purified to alleviate potential off-target effects from the inactive enantiomer. The mechanism of action was established in electrophysiology assays using CHO-K1 cell lines stably expressing cat flea (Ctenocephalides felis) RDL (resistance-to-dieldrin) genes for assessment of GABA-gated chloride channel (GABACls) pharmacology. As expected, sarolaner inhibited GABA-elicited currents at both susceptible (CfRDL-A285) and resistant (CfRDL-S285) flea GABACls with similar potency. Initial whole organism screening was conducted in vitro using a blood feeding assay against C. felis. Compounds which demonstrated robust activity in the flea feed assay were subsequently tested in an in vitro ingestion assay against the soft tick, Ornithodoros turicata. Efficacious compounds which were confirmed safe in rodents at doses up to 30mg/kg were progressed to safety, PK and efficacy studies in dogs. In vitro sarolaner demonstrated an LC80 of 0.3μg/mL against C. felis and an LC100 of 0.003μg/mL against O. turicata. In a head-to-head comparative in vitro assay with both afoxolaner and fluralaner, sarolaner demonstrated superior flea and tick potency. In exploratory safety studies in dogs, sarolaner demonstrated safety in dogs≥8 weeks of age upon repeated monthly dosing at up to 20mg/kg. Sarolaner was rapidly and well absorbed following oral dosing. Time to maximum plasma concentration occurred within the first day post-dose. Bioavailability for sarolaner was calculated at >85% and the compound was highly protein bound (>99.9%). The half-life for sarolaner was calculated at 11-12 days. Sarolaner plasma concentrations indicated dose proportionality over the range 1.25-5mg/kg, and these same doses provided robust efficacy (>99%) for ≥35days against both fleas (C. felis) and multiple species of ticks (Rhipicephalus sanguineus, Ixodes ricinus and Dermacentor reticulatus) after oral administration to dogs. As a result of these exploratory investigations, sarolaner was progressed for development as an oral monthly dose for treatment and control of fleas and ticks on dogs. Copyright © 2016 The Authors. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  7. Laboratory simulation of interplanetary ultraviolet radiation (broad spectrum) and its effects on Deinococcus radiodurans

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paulino-Lima, Ivan Gláucio; Pilling, Sérgio; Janot-Pacheco, Eduardo; de Brito, Arnaldo Naves; Barbosa, João Alexandre Ribeiro Gonçalves; Leitão, Alvaro Costa; Lage, Claudia de Alencar Santos

    2010-08-01

    The radiation-resistant bacterium Deinococcus radiodurans was exposed to a simulated interplanetary UV radiation at the Brazilian Synchrotron Light Laboratory (LNLS). Bacterial samples were irradiated on different substrates to investigate the influence of surface relief on cell survival. The effects of cell multi-layers were also investigated. The ratio of viable microorganisms remained virtually the same (average 2%) for integrated doses from 1.2 to 12 kJ m -2, corresponding to 16 h of irradiation at most. The asymptotic profiles of the curves, clearly connected to a shielding effect provided by multi-layering cells on a cavitary substrate (carbon tape), means that the inactivation rate may not change significantly along extended periods of exposure to radiation. Such high survival rates reinforce the possibility of an interplanetary transfer of viable microbes.

  8. Real-Time Broad Spectrum Characterization of Hazardous Mixed Waste by Membrane Introduction Mass Spectrometry

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wilkerson Jr., Charles W.

    2000-12-31

    The goal of this project was to expand the range of chemical species that may be detected by membrane introduction mass spectrometry (MIMS) in environmental, and specifically in Mixed Waste, monitoring and characterization applications. Membrane introduction mass spectrometry (MIMS) functions as a near real-time monitor: there is little to no sample preparation and t analysis time is seconds to minutes. MIMS can be implemented as a flow injection technique, where samples, standards, and method blanks can be sequentially analyzed in a continuous fashion. The membrane acts as an interface between the sample (air or water) and the vacuum of the mass spectrometer. Transport of the analyte through the membrane occurs by the process of pervaporation. This process is described by adsorption to the outer surface of the membrane, diffusion through the membrane, and desorption from the inner membrane surface into a helium gas flow or into vacuum. The driving force for this work is the need for a rapid, sensitive, and broadly applicable tool for characterizing organic and metal-containing contaminants in a variety of DOE (and other) waste streams. In all characterization scenarios, a balance must be struck between evaluation of the hazards and their extent at a waste site, and the resources available for the overall mitigation of that risk. In the case of chemically, physically, and geometrically homogeneous waste, the situation is aided by the ability to reasonably assume that any sample collected is representative of the overall site constituents. However, few real environmental challenges are homogeneous. As a result, detailed sampling plans must be prepared, and chemical analyses must be performed on a number of samples in order to identify areas of contamination and assess further options. For many years, the chemical analysis part of this process has been accomplished by delivering the samples to a (typically) physically remote laboratory, where very detailed, and concomitantly expensive (both in time and money), procedures have been applied to the samples to determine their content; Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) methods for analyzing wastes for hazardous chemicals are 3 time-tested and very reliable. However, in many cases both time and resources may be conserved by being able to make survey analyses at the waste site to determine if any or all samples need to be exhaustively characterized by laboratory-based EPA analytical methods. A variety of groups worldwide are working on MIMS as a rapid screening tool for a variety of I applications; please see our review paper for a detailed overview of these efforts. Our primary innovations, developed during this project, have been the optimization of the ion source for environmental analyses and the study of chemically tailored pervaporation membranes for enhanced selectivity and sensitivity.

  9. Leapfrog diagnostics: Demonstration of a broad spectrum pathogen identification platform in a resource-limited setting.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leski, Tomasz A; Ansumana, Rashid; Malanoski, Anthony P; Jimmy, David H; Bangura, Umaru; Barrows, Brian R; Alpha, Morie; Koroma, Bashiru M; Long, Nina C; Sundufu, Abu J; Bockarie, Alfred S; Lin, Baochuan; Stenger, David A

    2012-07-04

    Resource-limited tropical countries are home to numerous infectious pathogens of both human and zoonotic origin. A capability for early detection to allow rapid outbreak containment and prevent spread to non-endemic regions is severely impaired by inadequate diagnostic laboratory capacity, the absence of a "cold chain" and the lack of highly trained personnel. Building up detection capacity in these countries by direct replication of the systems existing in developed countries is not a feasible approach and instead requires "leapfrogging" to the deployment of the newest diagnostic systems that do not have the infrastructure requirements of systems used in developed countries. A laboratory for molecular diagnostics of infectious agents was established in Bo, Sierra Leone with a hybrid solar/diesel/battery system to ensure stable power supply and a satellite modem to enable efficient communication. An array of room temperature stabilization and refrigeration technologies for reliable transport and storage of reagents and biological samples were also tested to ensure sustainable laboratory supplies for diagnostic assays. The laboratory demonstrated its operational proficiency by conducting an investigation of a suspected avian influenza outbreak at a commercial poultry farm at Bo using broad range resequencing microarrays and real time RT-PCR. The results of the investigation excluded influenza viruses as a possible cause of the outbreak and indicated a link between the outbreak and the presence of Klebsiella pneumoniae. This study demonstrated that by application of a carefully selected set of technologies and sufficient personnel training, it is feasible to deploy and effectively use a broad-range infectious pathogen detection technology in a severely resource-limited setting.

  10. Leapfrog diagnostics: Demonstration of a broad spectrum pathogen identification platform in a resource-limited setting

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Leski Tomasz A

    2012-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Resource-limited tropical countries are home to numerous infectious pathogens of both human and zoonotic origin. A capability for early detection to allow rapid outbreak containment and prevent spread to non-endemic regions is severely impaired by inadequate diagnostic laboratory capacity, the absence of a “cold chain” and the lack of highly trained personnel. Building up detection capacity in these countries by direct replication of the systems existing in developed countries is not a feasible approach and instead requires “leapfrogging” to the deployment of the newest diagnostic systems that do not have the infrastructure requirements of systems used in developed countries. Methods A laboratory for molecular diagnostics of infectious agents was established in Bo, Sierra Leone with a hybrid solar/diesel/battery system to ensure stable power supply and a satellite modem to enable efficient communication. An array of room temperature stabilization and refrigeration technologies for reliable transport and storage of reagents and biological samples were also tested to ensure sustainable laboratory supplies for diagnostic assays. Results The laboratory demonstrated its operational proficiency by conducting an investigation of a suspected avian influenza outbreak at a commercial poultry farm at Bo using broad range resequencing microarrays and real time RT-PCR. The results of the investigation excluded influenza viruses as a possible cause of the outbreak and indicated a link between the outbreak and the presence of Klebsiella pneumoniae. Conclusions This study demonstrated that by application of a carefully selected set of technologies and sufficient personnel training, it is feasible to deploy and effectively use a broad-range infectious pathogen detection technology in a severely resource-limited setting.

  11. Computer-aided identifications of thin-layer chromatographic patterns in broad-spectrum drug screening.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Siek, T J; Stradling, C W; McCain, M W; Mehary, T C

    1997-04-01

    We have developed a systematic thin-layer chromatographic (TLC) technique for detecting and identifying drugs and drug metabolites on 10-cm-long silica-gel plates with organic binder (fluorescent indicator); a computer program (SPOT CHEK) assists in matching the data from a particular chromatogram with those obtained for known drugs recovered from serum, urine, or other specimens. The plates are developed in a single mobile phase. Visualization and detection reagents used to characterize unknowns include fluorescamine, ferric chloride/perchloric acid/nitric acid, Dragendorff, Marquis, Mandelin, and iodinated Dragendorff solutions, 254 nm ultraviolet light, and vapor from chlorine or hydrochloric acid. Detection limits of 5-200 ng per sample spot were obtained for drugs in the database. The computer program database is based on nine reaction responses plus the plate zone locations for 243 drug substances but requires entry of only one TLC property to generate a matching list. We ran the program with an IBM-compatible 386/486 PC using an MS-DOS operating system (version 6.2).

  12. Marine toxins consist of a broad spectrum of bio- logically active ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    spamer

    tariff barriers. The GATT ... acceptance of different sanitary measures whenever the appropriate level of protection is demonstrated, and the ..... as vectors of ASP toxins (Shumway 1995), and therefore the latter should be included in surveillance.

  13. Graduated diagnostics required. Broad spectrum of differential diagnoses; Stufendiagnostik erforderlich. Breites Spektrum an Differentialdiagnosen

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Auer, I.O. [Medizinische Klinik Juliusspital, Schwerpunkt Gastroenterologie/Rheumatologie, Wuerzburg (Germany)

    1997-10-01

    The time lapse between initial symptoms and secured diagnosis of colitis ulcerosa still is 6-8 weeks, in case of M. Crohn even about 30 weeks. A graduated diagnostic approach is required: phase 1 relies on non-invasive methods such as anamnesis, physical examination, examination of stools, blood chemistry and sonography of the abdomen; phase 2 ecompasses endoscopy and radiological techniques, phase 3 computed tomography and MRI for detection of complications. The results of the leucodiagnosis by scintiscanning, for detection of inflammations of and out of the intestine, offer a still inhomogenous picture in terms of sensitivity and specificity. (orig./MG) [Deutsch] Noch immer betraegt die Zeitspanne von den ersten Symptomen bis zur Diagnose bei Colitis ulcerosa 6 bis 8 Wochen, bei M. Crohn sogar etwa 30 Wochen. Eine Stufendiagnostik ist gefordert: Stufe 1 umfasst nicht-invasive Methoden wie Anamnese, koerperliche Untersuchung, Stuhluntersuchung, Blutchemie und Abdomen-Sonographie, Stufe 2 die Endoskopie und radiologische Methoden, Stufe 3 die CT und die MRT zur Erkennung von Komplikationen. Die Ergebnisse der Leukozytenszintigraphie zum Nachweis entzuendlicher Veraenderungen am und ausserhalb des Darms sind hinsichtlich Spezifitaet und Sensitivitaet noch sehr uneinheitlich. (orig./MG)

  14. [Effect of a computer application on appropriate use and control of broad spectrum antibiotics].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Raveh-Brawer, David; Wiener-Well, Yonit; Lachish, Tamar; Ben-Chetrit, Eli; Megged, Orly; Bar-Meir, Maskit; Dahan, Maymone; Shraber, Tzipora; Bukatman, Estelle; Yinnon, Amos M

    2015-03-01

    Antibiotics are among the greatest contributions of modern medicine. However, since the onset of the antibiotic age, resistance has emerged, threatening the future usability of these drugs. The complexity of antibiotic prescribing and associated expense has led to the development of infectious disease (ID) expert stewardship programs. To describe an in-house created computer application, in use since 2005 with which all restricted antimicrobials are ordered and approved by ID physicians before being supplied by the pharmacy. In the nine years since the application was adopted by the entire hospital, 173,436 prescriptions for restricted antibiotics have been ordered through the application, of which 52% were for male patients, 8% for children ≤ 20 years, 31% for adults 21-70 years old and 61% for patients > 70. All prescriptions were reviewed by ID physicians; their response included approval (mean 87%, range 82-92%), rejection (7%, 3-12%), or change (6%, 4-18%). The latter two decisions always involved written and/or oral interaction with the prescribing physicians. The result analysis showed that: by clinical diagnoses, the approval rate ranged from 82% (for central line associated infection) to 94% (for tuberculosis); by class of antimicrobial, the approval rate ranged from 71% (IV ciprofloxacin) to 95% (IV amoxicillin-calvulanate). Overall hospital expenditure on antimicrobials, corrected by 100 admissions and 100 admission days, did not change significantly. During the nine years of its use, the described computer program has significantly contributed to physician awareness of appropriate antibiotic use, provided tools to assist physicians in their choice of antimicrobial treatment, allowed ID supervision with unprecedented scope and depth and has significantly contributed to cost control.

  15. Dissemination and genetic support of broad-spectrum beta-lactam ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    (100 μg/ml). Transformation experiments were carried out by using E. coli DH5α as the recipient as previously described31,36. Transformants were selected on Luria-Bertani medium agar plates supplemented with ampicillin (100 mg/ml). Transformants were subjected to DDST to confirm the presence of ESBL genes and ...

  16. POSACONAZOLE — NEW AZOLE BROAD-SPECTRUM ANTIFUNGAL AGENT FOR PREVENTION AND TREATMENT OF INVASIVE MYCOSES

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    N.N. Klimko

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available Invasive mycoses are a common complication of various categories of immune depressed patients that are characterized with heavy clinical presentations and high lethal rate. Many causatives of invasive mycoses are resistant to currently applied antifungal medications, and some are polybresistant. Posaconazole (Noksafil is a new triazole antimycotic of second generation that is active both in vitro and in vivo against most causatives of invasive mycoses, including poly resistant microbmycets. Clinical study demonstrate high efficiency and safety of applying this medication. in russia posaconazole is allowed for prevention of invasive mycoses for hematological patients with longbrunning neutropenia resulting from chemical therapy, who are prescribed large doses of immune suppressors, recipients of transplants of hemapoietic stem cells, as well as for treatment of invasive candidoses, aspergillus, zigomicosys, criptococcosis, fuzariosis, chromomycosis and micetoma, as well as cocsidiodosis that are refractory towards other anti fungal medications, or in cases of intolerance.Key words: mycoses, posaconazole, treatment.

  17. New broad-spectrum resistance to septoria tritici blotch derived from synthetic hexaploid wheat

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Tabib Ghaffary, M.S.; Faris, J.D.; Friesen, T.L.; Visser, R.G.F.; Lee, van der T.A.J.; Robert, O.; Kema, G.H.J.

    2012-01-01

    Septoria tritici blotch (STB), caused by the ascomycete Mycosphaerella graminicola, is one of the most devastating foliar diseases of wheat. We screened five synthetic hexaploid wheats (SHs), 13 wheat varieties that represent the differential set of cultivars and two susceptible checks with a global

  18. Black cobra (Naja naja karachiensis) lysates exhibit broad-spectrum antimicrobial activities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sagheer, Mehwish; Siddiqui, Ruqaiyyah; Iqbal, Junaid; Khan, Naveed Ahmed

    2014-04-01

    It is hypothesized that animals living in polluted environments possess antimicrobials to counter pathogenic microbes. The fact that snakes feed on germ-infested rodents suggests that they encounter pathogenic microbes and likely possess antimicrobials. The venom is used only to paralyze the rodent, but the ability of snakes to counter potential infections in the gut due to disease-ridden rodents requires robust action of the immune system against a broad range of pathogens. To test this hypothesis, crude lysates of different organs of Naja naja karachiensis (black cobra) were tested for antimicrobial properties. The antimicrobial activities of extracts were tested against selected bacterial pathogens (neuropathogenic Escherichia coli K1, methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA), Pseudomonas aeruginosa, and Streptococcus pneumonia), protist (Acanthamoeba castellanii), and filamentous fungus (Fusarium solani). The findings revealed that plasma and various organ extracts of N. n. karachiensis exhibited antimicrobial activity against E. coli K1, MRSA, P. aeruginosa, S. pneumoniae, A. castellanii, and F. solani in a concentration-dependent manner. The results of this study are promising for the development of new antimicrobials.

  19. Community fecal carriage of broad-spectrum cephalosporin-resistant Escherichia coli in Tunisian children.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ferjani, Sana; Saidani, Mabrouka; Hamzaoui, Zeineb; Alonso, Carla Andrea; Torres, Carmen; Maamar, Elaa; Slim, Amine Faouzi; Boutiba, Ben Boubaker Ilhem

    2017-02-01

    The spread of extended spectrum β-lactamases (ESBL) and plasmid mediated AmpC β-lactamases (pAmpC) was evaluated in Escherichia coli strains collected from the intestinal microbiota of healthy children in Tunisia. The carriage rate of CTX R E. coli was 6.6% (7 of 105 samples) and one strain/sample was further characterized (7 isolates). These isolates harbored bla CTX-M-1 (n = 4), bla CTX-M-15 (n = 2), and bla CMY-2 gene (n = 1), which were usually located on FIB replicon type and carried class 1 integrons. The acc(6')-Ib-cr variant was identified in one isolate that harbored bla CTX-M-15 . CTX R E. coli isolates were genetically unrelated and belonged to B1 (n = 3/ST155/ST398/ST58), D (n = 2/ST117/ST493), B2 (n = 1/ST127), and A (n = 1/ST746) phylogroups. Strain virulence scores varied from 3 to 12, and frequently harbored the pathogenicity island PAI IV 536 . The intestinal tract of healthy children constitute an important reservoir of ESBL producing E. coli. Thus, improvement of hygiene measures mainly in the school environment and rational use of antibiotics would be of great help in preventing selection and diffusion of resistant strains from intestinal microbiota. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  20. Kidney failure related to broad-spectrum antibiotics in critically ill patients

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, Jens-Ulrik Stæhr; Hein, Lars; Lundgren, Bettina

    2012-01-01

    To explore whether a strategy of more intensive antibiotic therapy leads to emergence or prolongation of renal failure in intensive care patients.......To explore whether a strategy of more intensive antibiotic therapy leads to emergence or prolongation of renal failure in intensive care patients....

  1. Light-Driven Contact Hearing Aid for Broad-Spectrum Amplification: Safety and Effectiveness Pivotal Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gantz, Bruce J; Perkins, Rodney; Murray, Michael; Levy, Suzanne Carr; Puria, Sunil

    2017-03-01

    Demonstrate safety and effectiveness of the light-driven contact hearing aid to support FDA clearance. A single-arm, open-label investigational-device clinical trial. Two private-practice and one hospital-based ENT clinics. Forty-three subjects (86 ears) with mild-to-severe bilateral sensorineural hearing impairment. Bilateral amplification delivered via a light-driven contact hearing aid comprising a Tympanic Lens (Lens) with a customized platform to directly drive the umbo and a behind-the-ear sound processor (Processor) that encodes sound into light pulses to wirelessly deliver signal and power to the Lens. The primary safety endpoint was a determination of "no change" (PTA4 hearing at the 120-day measurement interval. The primary efficacy endpoint was improvement in word recognition using NU-6 at the 30-day measurement interval over the baseline unaided case. Secondary efficacy endpoints included functional gain from 2 to 10 kHz and speech-in-noise improvement over the baseline unaided case using both omnidirectional and directional microphones. The results for the 86 ears in the study determined a mean change of -0.40 dB in PTA4, indicating no change in residual hearing (p Hearing in Noise Test was 0.75 dB (p = 0.028) and 3.14 dB (p < 0.0001) for the omnidirectional and directional microphone modes, respectively. The safety and effectiveness data supported a de novo 510(k) submission that received clearance from the FDA.

  2. Broad-Spectrum Antimicrobial Star Polycarbonates Functionalized with Mannose for Targeting Bacteria Residing inside Immune Cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Chuan; Krishnamurthy, Sangeetha; Liu, Jie; Liu, Shaoqiong; Lu, Xiaohua; Coady, Daniel J; Cheng, Wei; De Libero, Gennaro; Singhal, Amit; Hedrick, James L; Yang, Yi Yan

    2016-06-01

    In this study, a series of star-shaped polycarbonates are synthesized by metal-free organocatalytic ring-opening polymerization of benzyl chloride (BnCl) and mannose-functionalized cyclic carbonate monomers (MTC-BnCl and MTC-ipman) with heptakis-(2,3-di-O-acetyl)-β-cyclodextrin (DA-β-CD) as macroinitiator. The distributions and compositions of pendent benzyl chloride and protected mannose group (ipman) units are facilely modulated by varying the polymerization sequence and feed ratio of the monomers, allowing precise control over the molecular composition, and the resulting polymers have narrow molecular weight distribution. After deprotection of ipman groups and quaternization with various N,N-dimethylalkylamines, these star polymers with optimized compositions of cationic and mannose groups in block and random forms exhibit strong bactericidal activity and low hemolysis. Furthermore, the optimal mannose-functionalized polymer demonstrates mannose receptor-mediated intracellular bactericidal activity against BCG mycobacteria without inducing cytotoxicity on mammalian cells at the effective dose. Taken together, the materials designed in this study have potential use as antimicrobial agents against diseases such as tuberculosis, which is caused by intracellular bacteria. © 2016 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  3. A Broad-Spectrum Integrative Design for Cancer Prevention and Therapy

    OpenAIRE

    Block, Keith I.; Gyllenhaal, Charlotte; Lowe, Leroy; Amedei, Amedeo; Amin, A.R.M. Ruhul; Amin, Amr; Aquilano, Katia; Arbiser, Jack; Arreola, Alexandra; Arzumanyan, Alla; Ashraf, S Salman; Azmi, Asfar S.; Benencia, Fabian; Bhakta, Dipita; Bilsland, Alan

    2015-01-01

    Targeted therapies and the consequent adoption of "personalized" oncology have achieved notable successes in some cancers; however, significant problems remain with this approach. Many targeted therapies are highly toxic, costs are extremely high, and most patients experience relapse after a few disease-free months. Relapses arise from genetic heterogeneity in tumors, which harbor therapy-resistant immortalized cells that have adopted alternate and compensatory pathways (i.e., pathways that a...

  4. Broad-spectrum anti-biofilm peptide that targets a cellular stress response.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    César de la Fuente-Núñez

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available Bacteria form multicellular communities known as biofilms that cause two thirds of all infections and demonstrate a 10 to 1000 fold increase in adaptive resistance to conventional antibiotics. Currently, there are no approved drugs that specifically target bacterial biofilms. Here we identified a potent anti-biofilm peptide 1018 that worked by blocking (pppGpp, an important signal in biofilm development. At concentrations that did not affect planktonic growth, peptide treatment completely prevented biofilm formation and led to the eradication of mature biofilms in representative strains of both Gram-negative and Gram-positive bacterial pathogens including Pseudomonas aeruginosa, Escherichia coli, Acinetobacter baumannii, Klebsiella pneumoniae, methicillin resistant Staphylococcus aureus, Salmonella Typhimurium and Burkholderia cenocepacia. Low levels of the peptide led to biofilm dispersal, while higher doses triggered biofilm cell death. We hypothesized that the peptide acted to inhibit a common stress response in target species, and that the stringent response, mediating (pppGpp synthesis through the enzymes RelA and SpoT, was targeted. Consistent with this, increasing (pppGpp synthesis by addition of serine hydroxamate or over-expression of relA led to reduced susceptibility to the peptide. Furthermore, relA and spoT mutations blocking production of (pppGpp replicated the effects of the peptide, leading to a reduction of biofilm formation in the four tested target species. Also, eliminating (pppGpp expression after two days of biofilm growth by removal of arabinose from a strain expressing relA behind an arabinose-inducible promoter, reciprocated the effect of peptide added at the same time, leading to loss of biofilm. NMR and chromatography studies showed that the peptide acted on cells to cause degradation of (pppGpp within 30 minutes, and in vitro directly interacted with ppGpp. We thus propose that 1018 targets (pppGpp and marks it for degradation in cells. Targeting (pppGpp represents a new approach against biofilm-related drug resistance.

  5. Rapid In-situ hybridization for dematiaceous fungi using a broad-spectrum oligonucleotide DNA probe.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Montone, Kathleen T; Livolsi, Virginia A; Lanza, Donald C; Feldman, Michael D; Kennedy, David W; Palmer, James; Chiu, Alexander G; Nachamkin, Irving

    2011-09-01

    Dematiaceous fungi are a diverse group of "darkly" pigmented fungi, which contain melanin in their cell walls and are commonly found in soil worldwide. Although morphology and histochemical stains may aid identification in tissue sections, these means for species identification are not specific. In-situ hybridization (ISH) for abundant fungal rRNA sequences may provide a means for detecting dematiaceous fungi. In this study, a 24-base synthetic biotin-labeled oligonucleotide probe targeting rRNA sequences of a variety of dematiaceous fungi was developed. This probe was tested on a cohort of 29 patients with culture-proven cases of dematiaceous fungal-associated rhinosinusitis (26 allergic fungal sinusitis, 2 fungal ball, and 1 acute invasive fungal sinusitis). Fungal cultures were positive for Alternaria species (10), Bipolaris species (5), Curvularia species (10), Cladosporium species (1), Scedosporium prolificans (1), Scopulariopsis species (1), and dematiaceous species, not otherwise specific (1). ISH showed positivity in fungal organisms in 24 of 29 specimens. ISH was negative in culture-proven examples of Rhizopus species, Aspergillus species, Fusarium species, Paecilomyces species, Histoplasmosis capsulatum, Candida species, and Blastomyces dermatitidis. ISH with a dematiaceous-specific fungal probe may be useful for differentiating dematiaceous fungi from other filamentous fungi in tissues, particularly those responsible for fungal rhinosinusitis.

  6. Varo-achro-phobia: the fear of broad spectrum zoom optics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vogel, Steven; Pollica, Naomi

    2015-05-01

    Today's battlefield is evolving at light speed. Our war fighters are being tasked with highly complex missions requiring the very best technology our industry can offer. The demand for advanced ISR platforms is challenging designers and engineers in the optics industry to push the envelope and develop wider band solutions to support multiple and broadband sensor platforms. Recently, significant attention has been directed towards the development of optical systems that enable simultaneous operation in the visible and shortwave infrared spectral wavebands. This paper will present a review of the evolution of StingRay Optics' GhostSight™ continuous zoom optics that offer broad chromatic imaging capabilities from the visible through the shortwave infrared spectrum.

  7. Applications of a broad-spectrum tool for conservation and fisheries analysis: aquatic gap analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    McKenna, James E.; Steen, Paul J.; Lyons, John; Stewart, Jana S.

    2009-01-01

    Natural resources support all of our social and economic activities, as well as our biological existence. Humans have little control over most of the physical, biological, and sociological conditions dictating the status and capacity of natural resources in any particular area. However, the most rapid and threatening influences on natural resources typically are anthropogenic overuse and degradation. In addition, living natural resources (i.e., organisms) do not respect political boundaries, but are aware of their optimal habitat and environmental conditions. Most organisms have wider spatial ranges than the jurisdictional boundaries of environmental agencies that deal with them; even within those jurisdictions, information is patchy and disconnected. Planning and projecting effects of ecological management are difficult, because many organisms, habitat conditions, and interactions are involved. Conservation and responsible resource use involves wise management and manipulation of the aspects of the environment and biological communities that can be effectively changed. Tools and data sets that provide new insights and analysis capabilities can enhance the ability of resource managers to make wise decisions and plan effective, long-term management strategies. Aquatic gap analysis has been developed to provide those benefits. Gap analysis is more than just the assessment of the match or mis-match (i.e., gaps) between habitats of ecological value and areas with an appropriate level of environmental protection (e.g., refuges, parks, preserves), as the name suggests. Rather, a Gap Analysis project is a process which leads to an organized database of georeferenced information and previously available tools to examine conservation and other ecological issues; it provides a geographic analysis platform that serves as a foundation for aquatic ecological studies. This analytical tool box allows one to conduct assessments of all habitat elements within an area of interest. Aquatic gap analysis naturally focuses on aquatic habitats. The analytical tools are largely based on specification of the species-habitat relations for the system and organism group of interest (Morrison et al. 2003; McKenna et al. 2006; Steen et al. 2006; Sowa et al. 2007). The Great Lakes Regional Aquatic Gap Analysis (GLGap) project focuses primarily on lotic habitat of the U.S. Great Lakes drainage basin and associated states and has been developed to address fish and fisheries issues. These tools are unique because they allow us to address problems at a range of scales from the region to the stream segment and include the ability to predict species specific occurrence or abundance for most of the fish species in the study area. The results and types of questions that can be addressed provide better global understanding of the ecological context within which specific natural resources fit (e.g., neighboring environments and resources, and large and small scale processes). The geographic analysis platform consists of broad and flexible geospatial tools (and associated data) with many potential applications. The objectives of this article are to provide a brief overview of GLGap methods and analysis tools, and demonstrate conservation and planning applications of those data and tools. Although there are many potential applications, we will highlight just three: (1) support for the Eastern Brook Trout Joint Venture (EBTJV), (2) Aquatic Life classification in Wisconsin, and (3) an educational tool that makes use of Google Earth (use of trade or product names does not imply endorsement by the U.S. Government) and Internet accessibility.

  8. Surface structures for enhancement of quantum yield in broad spectrum emission nanocrystals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schreuder, Michael A.; McBride, James R.; Rosenthal, Sandra J.

    2014-07-22

    Disclosed are inorganic nanoparticles comprising a body comprising cadmium and/or zinc crystallized with selenium, sulfur, and/or tellurium; a multiplicity of phosphonic acid ligands comprising at least about 20% of the total surface ligand coverage; wherein the nanocrystal is capable of absorbing energy from a first electromagnetic region and capable of emitting light in a second electromagnetic region, wherein the maximum absorbance wavelength of the first electromagnetic region is different from the maximum emission wavelength of the second electromagnetic region, thereby providing a Stokes shift of at least about 20 nm, wherein the second electromagnetic region comprises an at least about 100 nm wide band of wavelengths, and wherein the nanoparticle exhibits has a quantum yield of at least about 10%. This abstract is intended as a scanning tool for purposes of searching in the particular art and is not intended to be limiting of the present invention.

  9. Broad-spectrum β-lactamase in Enterobacteriaceae: detection, prevalence, and source tracking

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Voets, G.M.|info:eu-repo/dai/nl/341771791

    2013-01-01

    Enterobacteriaceae can cause a wide variety of infections ranging from gastrointestinal syndromes to urinary tract infections. These infections have significant mortality rates. Many classes of antibiotics are used to treat these infections. In particular, third-generation cephalosporins are used as

  10. Fungal Glucosylceramide-Specific Camelid Single Domain Antibodies Are Characterized by Broad Spectrum Antifungal Activity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Barbara De Coninck

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available Chemical crop protection is widely used to control plant diseases. However, the adverse effects of pesticide use on human health and environment, resistance development and the impact of regulatory requirements on the crop protection market urges the agrochemical industry to explore innovative and alternative approaches. In that context, we demonstrate here the potential of camelid single domain antibodies (VHHs generated against fungal glucosylceramides (fGlcCer, important pathogenicity factors. To this end, llamas were immunized with purified fGlcCer and a mixture of mycelium and spores of the fungus Botrytis cinerea, one of the most important plant pathogenic fungi. The llama immune repertoire was subsequently cloned in a phage display vector to generate a library with a diversity of at least 108 different clones. This library was incubated with fGlcCer to identify phages that bind to fGlcCer, and VHHs that specifically bound fGlcCer but not mammalian or plant-derived GlcCer were selected. They were shown to inhibit the growth of B. cinerea in vitro, with VHH 41D01 having the highest antifungal activity. Moreover, VHH 41D01 could reduce disease symptoms induced by B. cinerea when sprayed on tomato leaves. Based on all these data, anti-fGlcCer VHHs show the potential to be used as an alternative approach to combat fungal plant diseases.

  11. Assessment of drug candidates for broad-spectrum antiviral therapy targeting cellular pyrimidine biosynthesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marschall, Manfred; Niemann, Ina; Kosulin, Karin; Bootz, Anna; Wagner, Sabrina; Dobner, Thomas; Herz, Thomas; Kramer, Bernd; Leban, Johann; Vitt, Daniel; Stamminger, Thomas; Hutterer, Corina; Strobl, Stefan

    2013-12-01

    Currently available antiviral drugs frequently induce side-effects or selection of drug-resistant viruses. We describe a novel antiviral principle based on targeting the cellular enzyme dihydroorotate dehydrogenase (DHODH). In silico drug design and biochemical evaluation identified Compound 1 (Cmp1) as a selective inhibitor of human DHODH in vitro (IC50 1.5±0.2nM). Crystallization data specified the mode of drug-target interaction. Importantly, Cmp1 displayed a very potent antiviral activity that could be reversed by co-application of uridine or other pyrimidine precursors, underlining the postulated DHODH-directed mode of activity. Human and animal cytomegaloviruses as well as adenoviruses showed strong sensitivity towards Cmp1 in cell culture-based infection systems with IC50 values in the low micromolar to nanomolar range. Particularly, broad inhibitory activity was demonstrated for various types of laboratory and clinically relevant adenoviruses. For replication of human cytomegalovirus in primary fibroblasts, antiviral mode of activity was attributed to the early stage of gene expression. A mouse in vivo model proved reduced replication of murine cytomegalovirus in various organs upon Cmp1 treatment. These findings suggested Cmp1 as drug candidate and validated DHODH as a promising cellular target for antiviral therapy. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  12. Broad-spectrum antibiotics for spontaneous preterm labour: the ORACLE II randomised trial. ORACLE Collaborative Group.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kenyon, S L; Taylor, D J; Tarnow-Mordi, W

    2001-03-31

    Preterm birth after spontaneous preterm labour is associated with death, neonatal disease, and long-term disability. Previous small trials of antibiotics for spontaneous preterm labour have reported inconclusive results. We did a randomised multicentre trial to resolve this issue. 6295 women in spontaneous preterm labour with intact membranes and without evidence of clinical infection were randomly assigned 250 mg erythromycin (n=1611), 325 mg co-amoxiclav (250 mg amoxicillin and 125 mg clavulanic acid; n=1550), both (n=1565), or placebo (n=1569) four times daily for 10 days or until delivery, whichever occurred earlier. The primary outcome measure was a composite of neonatal death, chronic lung disease, or major cerebral abnormality on ultrasonography before discharge from hospital. Analysis was by intention to treat. None of the trial antibiotics was associated with a lower rate of the composite primary outcome than placebo (erythromycin 90 [5.6%], co-amoxiclav 76 [5.0%], both antibiotics 91 [5.9%], vs placebo 78 [5.0%]). However, antibiotic prescription was associated with a lower occurrence of maternal infection. This trial provides evidence that antibiotics should not be routinely prescribed for women in spontaneous preterm labour without evidence of clinical infection.

  13. Broad spectrum activity of a lectin-like bacterial serine protease family on human leukocytes.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jorge Luis Ayala-Lujan

    Full Text Available The serine protease autotransporter from Enterobacteriaceae (SPATE family, which number more than 25 proteases with apparent diverse functions, have been phylogenetically divided into two distinct classes, designated 1 and 2. We recently demonstrated that Pic and Tsh, two members of the class-2 SPATE family produced by intestinal and extraintestinal pathogenic E. coli, were able to cleave a number of O-glycosylated proteins on neutrophils and lymphocytes resulting in impaired leukocyte functions. Here we show that most members of the class-2 SPATE family have lectin-like properties and exhibit differential protease activity reliant on glycoprotein type and cell lineage. Protease activity was seen in virtually all tested O-glycosylated proteins including CD34, CD55, CD164, TIM1, TIM3, TIM4 and C1-INH. We also show that although SPATE proteins bound and cleaved glycoproteins more efficiently on granulocytes and monocytes, they also targeted glycoproteins on B, T and natural killer lymphocytes. Finally, we found that the characteristic domain-2 of class-2 SPATEs is not required for glycoprotease activity, but single amino acid mutations in Pic domain-1 to those residues naturally occurring in domain-1 of SepA, were sufficient to hamper Pic glycoprotease activity. This study shows that most class-2 SPATEs have redundant activities and suggest that they may function as immunomodulators at several levels of the immune system.

  14. The broad spectrum of unbearable suffering in end of life cancer studied in dutch primary care

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ruijs, C.D.M.; Kerkhof, A.J.F.M.; van der Wal, G.; Onwuteaka-Philipsen, B.D.

    2012-01-01

    Background: Unbearable suffering most frequently is reported in end-of-life cancer patients in primary care. However, research seldom addresses unbearable suffering. The aim of this study was to comprehensively investigate the various aspects of unbearable suffering in end-of-life cancer patients

  15. Legionella shows a diverse secondary metabolism dependent on a broad spectrum Sfp-type phosphopantetheinyl transferase

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nicholas J. Tobias

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available Several members of the genus Legionella cause Legionnaires’ disease, a potentially debilitating form of pneumonia. Studies frequently focus on the abundant number of virulence factors present in this genus. However, what is often overlooked is the role of secondary metabolites from Legionella. Following whole genome sequencing, we assembled and annotated the Legionella parisiensis DSM 19216 genome. Together with 14 other members of the Legionella, we performed comparative genomics and analysed the secondary metabolite potential of each strain. We found that Legionella contains a huge variety of biosynthetic gene clusters (BGCs that are potentially making a significant number of novel natural products with undefined function. Surprisingly, only a single Sfp-like phosphopantetheinyl transferase is found in all Legionella strains analyzed that might be responsible for the activation of all carrier proteins in primary (fatty acid biosynthesis and secondary metabolism (polyketide and non-ribosomal peptide synthesis. Using conserved active site motifs, we predict some novel compounds that are probably involved in cell-cell communication, differing to known communication systems. We identify several gene clusters, which may represent novel signaling mechanisms and demonstrate the natural product potential of Legionella.

  16. Aerosol Absorption Retrievals from the PACE Broad Spectrum Ocean Color Instrument (OCI)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mattoo, Shana; Remer, Lorraine A.; Levy, Robert C.; Gupta, Pawan; Ahmad, Ziauddin; Martins, J. Vanderlei; Lima, Adriana Rocha; Torres, Omar

    2016-01-01

    The PACE (Pre-­Aerosol, Clouds and ocean Ecosystem) mission, anticipated for launch in the early 2020s, is designed to characterize oceanic and atmospheric properties. The primary instrument on-­-board will be a moderate resolution (approximately 1 km nadir) radiometer, called the Ocean Color Instrument (OCI). OCI will provide high spectral resolution (5 nm) from the UV to NIR (350 - 800 nm), with additional spectral bands in the NIR and SWIR. The OCI itself is an excellent instrument for atmospheric objectives, providing measurements across a broad spectral range that in essence combines the capabilities of MODIS and OMI, but with the UV channels from OMI to be available at moderate resolution. (Image credit: PACE Science Definition Team Report). Objective: Can we make use of the UV-­SWIR measurements to derive information about aerosol absorption when aerosol loading is high?

  17. Childhood psychosocial stressors and adult onset arthritis : Broad spectrum risk factors and allostatic load

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Von Korff, M.; Alonso, J.; Ormel, J.; Angermeyer, M.; Bruffaerts, R.; Fleiz, C.; De Girolamo, G.; Kessler, R.C.; Kovess-Masfety, V.; Posada-Villa, J.; Scott, K.M.; Uda, H.

    Neural, endocrine, and immune stress mediators are hypothesized to increase risks of diverse chronic diseases, including arthritis. Retrospective data from the World Mental Health Surveys (N = 18,309) were employed to assess whether adult onset of arthritis was associated with childhood adversities

  18. Broad Spectrum Microbicidal Activity of Photocatalysis by TiO2

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yoshinobu Kubota

    2013-03-01

    Full Text Available Photocatalytically active titanium dioxide (TiO2 is widely used as a self-cleaning and self-disinfecting material in many applications to keep environments biologically clean. Several studies on the inactivation of bacteria and viruses by photocatalytic reactions have also been reported; however, only few studies evaluated the spectrum of the microbicidal activity with photocatalysis for various species. There is a need to confirm the expected effectiveness of disinfection by photocatalysis against multidrug-resistant bacteria and viruses. In this study, microbicidal activity of photocatalysis was evaluated by comparing the inactivation of various species of bacteria and viruses when their suspensions were dropped on the surface of TiO2-coated glass. Gram-positive bacteria, e.g., methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus, vancomycin-resistant Enterococcus faecalis, and penicillin-resistant Streptococcus pneumoniae, were easily inactivated by photocatalysis, whereas some gram-negative bacteria, e.g., Escherichia coli and multidrug-resistant Pseudomonas aeruginosa, were gradually inactivated by photocatalysis. Influenza virus, an enveloped virus, was significantly inactivated by photocatalysis compared with feline calicivirus, a non-enveloped virus. The effectiveness of microbicidal activity by photocatalysis may depend on the surface structure. However, they are effectively inactivated by photocatalysis on the surface of TiO2-coated glass. Our data emphasize that effective cleaning and disinfection by photocatalysis in nosocomial settings prevents pathogen transmission.

  19. Broad Spectrum Anticancer Activity of Myo-Inositol and Inositol Hexakisphosphate

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mariano Bizzarri

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Inositols (myo-inositol and inositol hexakisphosphate exert a wide range of critical activities in both physiological and pathological settings. Deregulated inositol metabolism has been recorded in a number of diseases, including cancer, where inositol modulates different critical pathways. Inositols inhibit pRB phosphorylation, fostering the pRB/E2F complexes formation and blocking progression along the cell cycle. Inositols reduce PI3K levels, thus counteracting the activation of the PKC/RAS/ERK pathway downstream of PI3K activation. Upstream of that pathway, inositols disrupt the ligand interaction between FGF and its receptor as well as with the EGF-transduction processes involving IGF-II receptor and AP-1 complexes. Additionally, Akt activation is severely impaired upon inositol addition. Downregulation of both Akt and ERK leads consequently to NF-kB inhibition and reduced expression of inflammatory markers (COX-2 and PGE2. Remarkably, inositol-induced downregulation of presenilin-1 interferes with the epithelial-mesenchymal transition and reduces Wnt-activation, β-catenin translocation, Notch-1, N-cadherin, and SNAI1 release. Inositols interfere also with the cytoskeleton by upregulating Focal Adhesion Kinase and E-cadherin and decreasing Fascin and Cofilin, two main components of pseudopodia, leading hence to invasiveness impairment. This effect is reinforced by the inositol-induced inhibition on metalloproteinases and ROCK1/2 release. Overall, these effects enable inositols to remodel the cytoskeleton architecture.

  20. Self-esteem in a broad-spectrum approach for mental health promotion

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Mann, M.; Hosman, C.M.H.; Schaalma, H.P.; Vries, N.K. de

    2004-01-01

    Self-evaluation is crucial to mental and social well-being. It influences aspirations, personal goals and interaction with others. This paper stresses the importance of self-esteem as a protective factor and a non-specific risk factor in physical and mental health. Evidence is presented illustrating

  1. Effect of spectral range in surface inactivation of Listeria innocua using broad-spectrum pulsed light.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Woodling, Sarah E; Moraru, Carmen I

    2007-04-01

    Pulsed light (PL) treatment is an alternative to traditional thermal treatment that has the potential to achieve several log-cycle reductions in the concentration of microorganisms. One issue that is still debated is related to what specifically causes cell death after PL treatments. The main objective of this work was to elucidate which portions of the PL range are responsible for bacterial inactivation. Stainless steel coupons with controlled surface properties were inoculated with a known concentration of Listeria innocua in the stationary growth phase and treated with 1 to 12 pulses of light at a pulse rate of 3 pulses per s and a pulse width of 360 micros. The effects of the full spectrum (lambda = 180 to 1,100 nm) were compared with the effects obtained when only certain regions of UV, visible, and near-infrared light were used. The effectiveness of the treatments was determined in parallel by the standard plate count and most-probable-number techniques. At a fluence of about 6 J/cm(2), the full-spectrum PL treatment resulted in a 4.08-log reduction of L. innocua on a Mill finish surface, the removal of lambda light resulted in no lethal effects on L. innocua. Overwhelmingly, the portions of the PL spectrum responsible for bacterial death are the UV-B and UV-C spectral ranges (X light (lambda > 400 nm). This work provides additional supporting evidence that cell death in PL treatment is due to exposure to UV light. Additionally, it was shown that even a minor modification of the light path or the UV light spectrum in PL treatments can have a significant negative impact on the treatment intensity and effectiveness.

  2. A Broad-Spectrum Antimicrobial Activity of Bacillus subtilis RLID 12.1

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ramya Ramachandran

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available In the present study, an attempt was made to biochemically characterize the antimicrobial substance from the soil isolate designated as RLID 12.1 and explore its potential applications in biocontrol of drug-resistant pathogens. The antimicrobial potential of the wild-type isolate belonging to the genus Bacillus was determined by the cut-well agar assay. The production of antimicrobial compound was recorded maximum at late exponential growth phase. The ultrafiltered concentrate was insensitive to organic solvents, metal salts, surfactants, and proteolytic and nonproteolytic enzymes. The concentrate was highly heat stable and active over a wide range of pH values. Partial purification, zymogram analysis, and TLC were performed to determine the preliminary biochemical nature. The molecular weight of the antimicrobial peptide was determined to be less than 2.5 kDa in 15% SDS-PAGE and in zymogram analysis against Streptococcus pyogenes. The N-terminal amino acid sequence by Edman degradation was partially determined to be T-P-P-Q-S-X-L-X-X-G, which shows very insignificant identity to other antimicrobial peptides from bacteria. The minimum inhibitory concentrations of dialysed and partially purified ion exchange fractions were determined against some selected gram-positive and gram-negative bacteria and some pathogenic yeasts. The presence of three important antimicrobial peptide biosynthesis genes ituc, fend, and bmyb was determined by PCR.

  3. Snake Venom PLA2, a Promising Target for Broad-Spectrum Antivenom Drug Development

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liao, Keren; Yang, Mengxue

    2017-01-01

    Snakebite envenomation is a neglected global health problem, causing substantial mortality, disability, and psychological morbidity, especially in rural tropical and subtropical zones. Antivenin is currently the only specific medicine for envenomation. However, it is restricted by cold storage, snakebite diagnosis, and high price. Snake venom phospholipase A2s (svPLA2s) are found in all kinds of venomous snake families (e.g., Viperidae, Elapidae, and Colubridae). Along with their catalytic activity, svPLA2s elicit a wide variety of pharmacological effects that play a pivotal role in envenomation damage. Hence, neutralization of the svPLA2s could weaken or inhibit toxic damage. Here we overviewed the latest knowledge on the distribution, pathophysiological effects, and inhibitors of svPLA2s to elucidate the potential for a novel, wide spectrum antivenom drug targeting svPLA2s. PMID:29318152

  4. Molecular detection of TEM broad spectrum β-lactamase in clinical ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Resistance to β-lactam antibiotics, along with clinical isolates, frequently results to production of β- lactamase enzymes. In recent years, the production of extended spectrum β-lactamases (ESBLs) among clinical isolates, especially Escherichia coli has greatly increased. On the other hand, β lactamase genes have several ...

  5. Broad spectrum antimicrobial activity of forest-derived soil actinomycete, Nocardia sp. PB-52

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Priyanka eSharma

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available A mesophilic actinomycete strain designated as PB-52 was isolated from soil samples of Pobitora Wildlife Sanctuary of Assam, India. Based on phenotypic and molecular characteristics, the strain was identified as Nocardia sp. which shares 99.7% sequence similarity with Nocardia niigatensis IFM 0330 (NR_112195. The strain is a Gram-positive filamentous bacterium with rugose spore surface which exhibited a wide range of antimicrobial activity against Gram-positive bacteria including methicillin resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA, Gram-negative bacteria and yeasts. Optimization for the growth and antimicrobial metabolite production of the strain PB-52 was carried out in batch culture under shaking condition. The optimum growth and the antimicrobial metabolite production by the strain PB-52 was recorded in GLM medium at 28ºC, initial pH 7.4 of the medium and incubation period of eight days. Based on polyketide synthases (PKS and nonribosomal peptide synthetases (NRPS gene-targeted PCR amplification, the occurrence of both of these biosynthetic pathways was detected which might be involved in the production of antimicrobial metabolite in PB-52. Extract of the fermented broth culture of PB-52 was prepared with organic solvent extraction method using ethyl acetate. The ethyl acetate extract of PB-52 (EA-PB-52 showed lowest minimum inhibitory concentration (MIC against Staphylococcus aureus MTCC 96 (0.975 μg/ml whereas highest was recorded against Klebsiella pneumoniae ATCC 13883 (62.5 μg/ml. Scanning electron microscopy (SEM revealed that treatment of the test microorganisms with EA-PB-52 destroyed the targeted cells with prominent loss of cell shape and integrity. In order to determine the constituents responsible for its antimicrobial activity, EA-PB-52 was subjected to chemical analysis using gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (GC-MS. GC-MS analysis showed the presence of twelve different chemical constituents in the extract, some of which are reported to possess diverse biological activity. These results confirmed that the presence of bioactive constituents in EA-PB-52 could be a promising source for the development of potent antimicrobial agents effective against wide range of microbial pathogens including MRSA.

  6. Rational design of berberine-based FtsZ inhibitors with broad-spectrum antibacterial activity.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ning Sun

    Full Text Available Inhibition of the functional activity of Filamenting temperature-sensitive mutant Z (FtsZ protein, an essential and highly conserved bacterial cytokinesis protein, is a promising approach for the development of a new class of antibacterial agents. Berberine, a benzylisoquinoline alkaloid widely used in traditional Chinese and native American medicines for its antimicrobial properties, has been recently reported to inhibit FtsZ. Using a combination of in silico structure-based design and in vitro biological assays, 9-phenoxyalkyl berberine derivatives were identified as potent FtsZ inhibitors. Compared to the parent compound berberine, the derivatives showed a significant enhancement of antibacterial activity against clinically relevant bacteria, and an improved potency against the GTPase activity and polymerization of FtsZ. The most potent compound 2 strongly inhibited the proliferation of Gram-positive bacteria, including methicillin-resistant S. aureus and vancomycin-resistant E. faecium, with MIC values between 2 and 4 µg/mL, and was active against the Gram-negative E. coli and K. pneumoniae, with MIC values of 32 and 64 µg/mL respectively. The compound perturbed the formation of cytokinetic Z-ring in E. coli. Also, the compound interfered with in vitro polymerization of S. aureus FtsZ. Taken together, the chemical modification of berberine with 9-phenoxyalkyl substituent groups greatly improved the antibacterial activity via targeting FtsZ.

  7. Engineering of gadofluoroprobes: Broad-spectrum applications from cancer diagnosis to therapy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dutta, Ranu A., E-mail: ranu.dutta16@gmail.com [Nanotechnology Application Centre, University of Allahabad, Allahabad 211002 (India); NanoeRA medicare Private Limited, Uttar Pradesh (India); Sharma, Prashant K. [Nanotechnology Application Centre, University of Allahabad, Allahabad 211002 (India); Indian School of Mines, Dhanbad (India); Tiwari, Vandana [Department of Pathology, KGMU, Lucknow (India); Tiwari, Vivek; Patel, Anant B. [Centre for Cellular and Molecular Biology, Hyderabad (India); Pandey, Ravindra [Department of Physics, Michigan Technological University, Michigan 49931-1295 (United States); Pandey, Avinash C. [Nanotechnology Application Centre, University of Allahabad, Allahabad 211002 (India); NanoeRA medicare Private Limited, Uttar Pradesh (India); Bundelkhand University, Jhansi (India)

    2014-01-13

    The engineering of the Gadolinium based nanostructures have been demonstrated in this paper. Nanostructures of α-Gd{sub 2}S{sub 3} exhibit a unique transition between ferromagnetic state and paramagnetic state of the system. It was demonstrated that their properties could be tuned for a wide range of applications ranging from hyperthermia to Magnetic Resonance Imaging, owing to their magnetic moments and large relaxivities. Metallic Gd nanoparticles obtained by reduction method were employed for cancer imaging in mice. The Gd nanoparticles were coated with Curcumin and their biomedical implications in the field of simultaneous diagnosis and therapy of cancer and related diseases has been discussed.

  8. Inhibition of Polyamine Biosynthesis Is a Broad-Spectrum Strategy against RNA Viruses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mounce, Bryan C; Cesaro, Teresa; Moratorio, Gonzalo; Hooikaas, Peter Jan; Yakovleva, Anna; Werneke, Scott W; Smith, Everett Clinton; Poirier, Enzo Z; Simon-Loriere, Etienne; Prot, Matthieu; Tamietti, Carole; Vitry, Sandrine; Volle, Romain; Khou, Cécile; Frenkiel, Marie-Pascale; Sakuntabhai, Anavaj; Delpeyroux, Francis; Pardigon, Nathalie; Flamand, Marie; Barba-Spaeth, Giovanna; Lafon, Monique; Denison, Mark R; Albert, Matthew L; Vignuzzi, Marco

    2016-11-01

    RNA viruses present an extraordinary threat to human health, given their sudden and unpredictable appearance, the potential for rapid spread among the human population, and their ability to evolve resistance to antiviral therapies. The recent emergence of chikungunya virus, Zika virus, and Ebola virus highlights the struggles to contain outbreaks. A significant hurdle is the availability of antivirals to treat the infected or protect at-risk populations. While several compounds show promise in vitro and in vivo, these outbreaks underscore the need to accelerate drug discovery. The replication of several viruses has been described to rely on host polyamines, small and abundant positively charged molecules found in the cell. Here, we describe the antiviral effects of two molecules that alter polyamine levels: difluoromethylornithine (DFMO; also called eflornithine), which is a suicide inhibitor of ornithine decarboxylase 1 (ODC1), and diethylnorspermine (DENSpm), an activator of spermidine/spermine N(1)-acetyltransferase (SAT1). We show that reducing polyamine levels has a negative effect on diverse RNA viruses, including several viruses involved in recent outbreaks, in vitro and in vivo These findings highlight the importance of the polyamine biosynthetic pathway to viral replication, as well as its potential as a target in the development of further antivirals or currently available molecules, such as DFMO. RNA viruses present a significant hazard to human health, and combatting these viruses requires the exploration of new avenues for targeting viral replication. Polyamines, small positively charged molecules within the cell, have been demonstrated to facilitate infection for a few different viruses. Our study demonstrates that diverse RNA viruses rely on the polyamine pathway for replication and highlights polyamine biosynthesis as a promising drug target. Copyright © 2016, American Society for Microbiology. All Rights Reserved.

  9. Lipophosphonoxins II: Design, Synthesis, and Properties of Novel Broad Spectrum Antibacterial Agents

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Seydlová, G.; Pohl, Radek; Zborníková, Eva; Ehn, Marcel; Šimák, Ondřej; Panova, Natalya; Kolář, M.; Bogdanová, K.; Večeřová, R.; Fišer, R.; Šanderová, Hana; Vítovská, Dragana; Sudzinová, Petra; Pospíšil, Jiří; Benada, Oldřich; Křížek, T.; Sedlák, David; Bartůněk, Petr; Krásný, Libor; Rejman, Dominik

    2017-01-01

    Roč. 60, č. 14 (2017), s. 6098-6118 ISSN 0022-2623 R&D Projects: GA MŠk LO1220; GA MŠk LM2015063; GA ČR(CZ) GBP305/12/G034; GA MŠk(CZ) LM2015055; GA MZd(CZ) NV17-29680A Institutional support: RVO:61388963 ; RVO:61388971 ; RVO:68378050 Keywords : resistant Staphylococcus aureus * cationic steroid antibiotics * antimicrobial peptides Subject RIV: EE - Microbiology, Virology Impact factor: 6.259, year: 2016

  10. Snake Venom PLA2, a Promising Target for Broad-Spectrum Antivenom Drug Development

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Huixiang Xiao

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Snakebite envenomation is a neglected global health problem, causing substantial mortality, disability, and psychological morbidity, especially in rural tropical and subtropical zones. Antivenin is currently the only specific medicine for envenomation. However, it is restricted by cold storage, snakebite diagnosis, and high price. Snake venom phospholipase A2s (svPLA2s are found in all kinds of venomous snake families (e.g., Viperidae, Elapidae, and Colubridae. Along with their catalytic activity, svPLA2s elicit a wide variety of pharmacological effects that play a pivotal role in envenomation damage. Hence, neutralization of the svPLA2s could weaken or inhibit toxic damage. Here we overviewed the latest knowledge on the distribution, pathophysiological effects, and inhibitors of svPLA2s to elucidate the potential for a novel, wide spectrum antivenom drug targeting svPLA2s.

  11. Development of a broad-spectrum fluorescent heavy metal bacterial biosensor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gireesh-Babu, P; Chaudhari, Aparna

    2012-12-01

    Bacterial biosensors can measure pollution in terms of their actual toxicity to living organisms. A recombinant bacterial biosensor has been constructed that is known to respond to toxic levels of Zn(2+), Cd(2+) and Hg(2+). The zinc regulatory gene zntR and zntA promoter from znt operon of E. coli have been used to trigger the expression of GFP reporter protein at toxic levels of these ions. The sensor was induced with 3-800 ppm of Zn(2+), 0.005-4 ppm of Cd(2+) and 0.001-0.12 ppm of Hg(2+) ions. Induction studies were also performed in liquid media to quantify GFP fluorescence using fluorimeter. To determine the optimum culture conditions three different incubation periods (16, 20 and 24 h) were followed. Results showed an increased and consistent fluorescence in cells incubated for 16 h. Maximum induction for Zn(2+), Cd(2+) and Hg(2+) was observed at 20, 0.005 and 0.002 ppm, respectively. The pPROBE-zntR-zntA biosensor reported here can be employed as a primary screening technique for aquatic heavy metal pollution.

  12. Tenascin-C is an innate broad-spectrum, HIV-1-neutralizing protein in breast milk.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fouda, Genevieve G; Jaeger, Frederick H; Amos, Joshua D; Ho, Carrie; Kunz, Erika L; Anasti, Kara; Stamper, Lisa W; Liebl, Brooke E; Barbas, Kimberly H; Ohashi, Tomoo; Moseley, Martin Arthur; Liao, Hua-Xin; Erickson, Harold P; Alam, S Munir; Permar, Sallie R

    2013-11-05

    Achieving an AIDS-free generation will require elimination of postnatal transmission of HIV-1 while maintaining the nutritional and immunologic benefits of breastfeeding for infants in developing regions. Maternal/infant antiretroviral prophylaxis can reduce postnatal HIV-1 transmission, yet toxicities and the development of drug-resistant viral strains may limit the effectiveness of this strategy. Interestingly, in the absence of antiretroviral prophylaxis, greater than 90% of infants exposed to HIV-1 via breastfeeding remain uninfected, despite daily mucosal exposure to the virus for up to 2 y. Moreover, milk of uninfected women inherently neutralizes HIV-1 and prevents virus transmission in animal models, yet the factor(s) responsible for this anti-HIV activity is not well-defined. In this report, we identify a primary HIV-1-neutralizing protein in breast milk, Tenascin-C (TNC). TNC is an extracellular matrix protein important in fetal development and wound healing, yet its antimicrobial properties have not previously been established. Purified TNC captured and neutralized multiclade chronic and transmitted/founder HIV-1 variants, and depletion of TNC abolished the HIV-1-neutralizing activity of milk. TNC bound the HIV-1 Envelope protein at a site that is induced upon engagement of its primary receptor, CD4, and is blocked by V3 loop- (19B and F39F) and chemokine coreceptor binding site-directed (17B) monoclonal antibodies. Our results demonstrate the ability of an innate mucosal host protein found in milk to neutralize HIV-1 via binding to the chemokine coreceptor site, potentially explaining why the majority of HIV-1-exposed breastfed infants are protected against mucosal HIV-1 transmission.

  13. An Effective Method for Substance Detection Using the Broad Spectrum THz Signal: A "Terahertz Nose"

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vyacheslav A. Trofimov

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available We propose an effective method for the detection and identification of dangerous substances by using the broadband THz pulse. This pulse excites, for example, many vibrational or rotational energy levels of molecules simultaneously. By analyzing the time-dependent spectrum of the THz pulse transmitted through or reflected from a substance, we follow the average response spectrum dynamics. Comparing the absorption and emission spectrum dynamics of a substance under analysis with the corresponding data for a standard substance, one can detect and identify the substance under real conditions taking into account the influence of packing material, water vapor and substance surface. For quality assessment of the standard substance detection in the signal under analysis, we propose time-dependent integral correlation criteria. Restrictions of usually used detection and identification methods, based on a comparison between the absorption frequencies of a substance under analysis and a standard substance, are demonstrated using a physical experiment with paper napkins.

  14. Medicinal benefits of marine invertebrates: sources for discovering natural drug candidates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    De Zoysa, Mahanama

    2012-01-01

    Marine invertebrates are one of the major groups of organisms, which could be diversified under the major taxonomic groups of Porifera, Cnidaria, Mollusca, Arthropoda, Echinodermata, and many other minor phyla. To date, range of medicinal benefits and a significant number of marine natural products (MNPs) have been discovered from marine invertebrates. Seafood diet from edible marine invertebrates such as mollusks and crustaceans has been linked with various medicinal benefits to improve human health. Among marine invertebrates, spongers from phylum Porifera is the most dominant group responsible for discovering large number of MNPs, which have been used as template to develop therapeutic drugs. MNPs isolated from invertebrates have shown wide range of therapeutic properties including antimicrobial, antioxidant, antihypertensive, anticoagulant, anticancer, anti-inflammatory, wound healing and immune modulator, and other medicinal effects. Therefore, marine invertebrates are rich sources of chemical diversity and health benefits for developing drug candidates, cosmetics, nutritional supplements, and molecular probes that can be supported to increase the healthy life span of human. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  15. Spectroscopic Classifications with Magellan of 7 Supernovae Discovered by DES

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blanchard, P. K.; Challis, P.; Drout, M.; Kirshner, R.; Brown, P. J.; Krisciunas, K.; Suntzeff, N.; D'Andrea, C.; Nichol, R.; Papadopoulos, A.; Smith, M.; Sullivan, M.; Maartens, R.; Gupta, R.; Kovacs, E.; Kuhlmann, S.; Spinka, H.; Ahn, E.; Finley, D. A.; Frieman, J.; Marriner, J.; Wester, W.; Aldering, G.; Kim, A. G.; Thomas, R. C.; Barbary, K.; Bloom, J. S.; Goldstein, D.; Nugent, P.; Perlmutter, S.; Foley, R. J.; Castander, F. J.; Desai, S.; Paech, K.; Smith, R. C.; Schubnell, M.; Kessler, R.; Scolnic, D.; Covarrubias, R. A.; Brout, D. J.; Fischer, J. A.; Gladney, L.; March, M.; Sako, M.; Wolf, R. C.

    2015-01-01

    We report optical spectroscopy of supernova candidates discovered by the Dark Energy Survey. The spectra (425-945 nm) were obtained using IMACS on the 6.5m Baade telescope at the Las Campanas Observatory on Dec 19, 2014.

  16. Hidden Abilities Discovered Among Multiply Handicapped Blind Children

    Science.gov (United States)

    Klineman, Janet

    1975-01-01

    The effectiveness of an objective, systematic assessment and individualized programing approach for discovering new channels of learning is illustrated with case study evaluations of multiply handicapped visually impaired children with complex learning and behavioral problems. (SB)

  17. Gerekenariseerde loopbaanvoorligting : 'n evaluering van die DISCOVER-stelsel

    OpenAIRE

    2014-01-01

    D.Litt. et Phil. (Psychology) Career planning is a developmental process that can be facilitated by career development programmes. One of the recent developments in these programmes was the introduction of computerized career counselling which enables the user to explore career activities independently. An experimental investigation in which the DISCOVER computerized system was used, was conducted at two universities in an attempt to determine whether DISCOVER could be a useful aid for car...

  18. Therapeutic use exemption

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dvorak, J; Kirkendall, D; Vouillamoz, M

    2006-01-01

    Football players who have either physical symptoms or disease after injury may need to be treated with specific medicines that are on the list of prohibited substances. Therapeutic use exemption may be granted to such players, in accordance with strictly defined criteria—these are presented in this article. Procedures of how to request for an abbreviated or a standard therapeutic use exemption are explained, and data on therapeutic use exemptions (UEFA and FIFA, 2004 and 2005) are also presented. PMID:16799102

  19. Distribution and clinical impact of functional variants in 50,726 whole-exome sequences from the DiscovEHR study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dewey, Frederick E; Murray, Michael F; Overton, John D; Habegger, Lukas; Leader, Joseph B; Fetterolf, Samantha N; O'Dushlaine, Colm; Van Hout, Cristopher V; Staples, Jeffrey; Gonzaga-Jauregui, Claudia; Metpally, Raghu; Pendergrass, Sarah A; Giovanni, Monica A; Kirchner, H Lester; Balasubramanian, Suganthi; Abul-Husn, Noura S; Hartzel, Dustin N; Lavage, Daniel R; Kost, Korey A; Packer, Jonathan S; Lopez, Alexander E; Penn, John; Mukherjee, Semanti; Gosalia, Nehal; Kanagaraj, Manoj; Li, Alexander H; Mitnaul, Lyndon J; Adams, Lance J; Person, Thomas N; Praveen, Kavita; Marcketta, Anthony; Lebo, Matthew S; Austin-Tse, Christina A; Mason-Suares, Heather M; Bruse, Shannon; Mellis, Scott; Phillips, Robert; Stahl, Neil; Murphy, Andrew; Economides, Aris; Skelding, Kimberly A; Still, Christopher D; Elmore, James R; Borecki, Ingrid B; Yancopoulos, George D; Davis, F Daniel; Faucett, William A; Gottesman, Omri; Ritchie, Marylyn D; Shuldiner, Alan R; Reid, Jeffrey G; Ledbetter, David H; Baras, Aris; Carey, David J

    2016-12-23

    The DiscovEHR collaboration between the Regeneron Genetics Center and Geisinger Health System couples high-throughput sequencing to an integrated health care system using longitudinal electronic health records (EHRs). We sequenced the exomes of 50,726 adult participants in the DiscovEHR study to identify ~4.2 million rare single-nucleotide variants and insertion/deletion events, of which ~176,000 are predicted to result in a loss of gene function. Linking these data to EHR-derived clinical phenotypes, we find clinical associations supporting therapeutic targets, including genes encoding drug targets for lipid lowering, and identify previously unidentified rare alleles associated with lipid levels and other blood level traits. About 3.5% of individuals harbor deleterious variants in 76 clinically actionable genes. The DiscovEHR data set provides a blueprint for large-scale precision medicine initiatives and genomics-guided therapeutic discovery. Copyright © 2016, American Association for the Advancement of Science.

  20. Chicanoizing the Therapeutic Community

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aron, William S.; And Others

    1974-01-01

    Focusing on the drug addiction problem and its antecedent conditions in a Chicano population, the article examines several therapeutic interventions suggested by these conditions and indicates how they might be incorporated into a drug addiction Therapeutic Community treatment program designed to meet the needs of Chicano drug addicts. (Author/NQ)

  1. Therapeutic Crisis Intervention.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Holden, Martha J.; Powers, Jane Levine

    1993-01-01

    Describes Therapeutic Crisis Intervention (TCI) program as providing staff with skills, knowledge, and confidence to manage child in crisis to bring about a "maximum amount of lasting response." Contends that, by applying principles of TCI training, direct care worker can attain therapeutic control and maintain dignity of both adult and child…

  2. Trends in Therapeutic Recreation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, Ralph W.

    1995-01-01

    Discusses the implications of the rapid, dramatic changes taking place in therapeutic recreation for individuals with physical disabilities. The article notes the impact of changes in managed care, examines programming trends in therapeutic recreation (adventure/outdoor education, competitive sports, handcycling, health enhancement activities, and…

  3. Protocols for the analytical characterization of therapeutic monoclonal antibodies. I - Non-denaturing chromatographic techniques.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goyon, Alexandre; D'Atri, Valentina; Bobaly, Balazs; Wagner-Rousset, Elsa; Beck, Alain; Fekete, Szabolcs; Guillarme, Davy

    2017-07-15

    Size-, charge- and hydrophobicity-related variants of a biopharmaceutical product have to be deeply characterized for batch consistency and for the assessment of immunogenicity and safety effects. Size exclusion chromatography (SEC) and ion exchange chromatography (IEX) are considered as the gold standard for the analysis of high molecular weight species (HMWS) and charge-related variants, respectively. Hydrophobic interaction chromatography (HIC) has drawn renewed attention to monitor the small drug payload distribution in the cysteine-linked antibody-drug conjugates (ADC). These three chromatographic techniques, namely SEC, HIC and IEX, are historical, non-denaturing and robust approaches widely used for the characterization of biopharmaceutical proteins. Despite the broad spectrum of monoclonal antibodies (mAbs) structures, isoelectric points (pIs) and hydrophobicities, generic protocols can be applied to separate their size-, charge- and hydrophobicity-related variants, using the last generation of chromatographic columns and appropriate mobile phase conditions. Straightforward protocols are described in this manuscript with representative chromatograms of ten distinct Food and Drug Administration (FDA) and European Medicines Agency (EMA) approved therapeutic mAb products to illustrate the performance of the SEC, IEX and HIC methods. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  4. HIV Capsid is a Tractable Target for Small Molecule Therapeutic Intervention

    Science.gov (United States)

    Irving, Stephen L.; Brown, David G.; Anderson, Marie; Bazin, Richard; Cao, Joan; Ciaramella, Giuseppe; Isaacson, Jason; Jackson, Lynn; Hunt, Rachael; Kjerrstrom, Anne; Nieman, James A.; Patick, Amy K.; Perros, Manos; Scott, Andrew D.; Whitby, Kevin; Wu, Hua; Butler, Scott L.

    2010-01-01

    Despite a high current standard of care in antiretroviral therapy for HIV, multidrug-resistant strains continue to emerge, underscoring the need for additional novel mechanism inhibitors that will offer expanded therapeutic options in the clinic. We report a new class of small molecule antiretroviral compounds that directly target HIV-1 capsid (CA) via a novel mechanism of action. The compounds exhibit potent antiviral activity against HIV-1 laboratory strains, clinical isolates, and HIV-2, and inhibit both early and late events in the viral replication cycle. We present mechanistic studies indicating that these early and late activities result from the compound affecting viral uncoating and assembly, respectively. We show that amino acid substitutions in the N-terminal domain of HIV-1 CA are sufficient to confer resistance to this class of compounds, identifying CA as the target in infected cells. A high-resolution co-crystal structure of the compound bound to HIV-1 CA reveals a novel binding pocket in the N-terminal domain of the protein. Our data demonstrate that broad-spectrum antiviral activity can be achieved by targeting this new binding site and reveal HIV CA as a tractable drug target for HIV therapy. PMID:21170360

  5. Transferrin trojan horses as a rational approach for the biological delivery of therapeutic peptide domains.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ali, S A; Joao, H C; Hammerschmid, F; Eder, J; Steinkasserer, A

    1999-08-20

    One novel approach for the biological delivery of peptide drugs is to incorporate the sequence of the peptide into the structure of a natural transport protein, such as human serum transferrin. To examine whether this is feasible, a peptide sequence cleavable by the human immunodeficiency virus type 1 protease (VSQNYPIVL) was inserted into various regions of human serum transferrin, and the resultant proteins were tested for function. Experimentally, molecular modeling was used to identify five candidate insertion sites in surface exposed loops of human serum transferrin that were distant from biologically active domains. These insertions were cloned using polymerase chain reaction mutagenesis, and the proteins were expressed using a baculovirus expression vector system. Analysis of the mutant proteins provided a number of important findings: (a) they retained native human serum transferrin function, (b) the inserted peptide sequence was surface exposed, and most importantly, (c) two of these mutants could be cleaved by human immunodeficiency virus-1 protease. In conclusion, this investigation has validated the use of human serum transferrin as a carrier protein for functional peptide domains introduced into its structure using protein engineering. These findings will be useful for developing a novel class of therapeutic agents for a broad spectrum of diseases.

  6. Grave’s Disease with Severe Hepatic Dysfunction: A Diagnostic and Therapeutic Challenge

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ashok Krishna Bhuyan

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Hepatic dysfunction in a patient with thyrotoxicosis may result from hyperthyroidism per se, as a side effect of antithyroid drugs, and causes unrelated to hyperthyroidism which sometimes causes diagnostic and therapeutic difficulties. A young female patient was admitted to our hospital with symptoms of thyrotoxicosis, diffuse goiter and ophthalmopathy along with cholestatic pattern of jaundice, and proximal muscle weakness. She was treated with propylthiouracil with gradual recovery. She was continuing her antithyroid medication with regular follow-up. The patient was readmitted a few months later with worsening thyrotoxicosis, proximal muscle weakness, fever, and a hepatocellular pattern of jaundice with sepsis. Propylthiouracil was stopped and lithium along with steroid coverage was given to control her thyrotoxicosis which was later changed to methimazole. Broad spectrum antibiotic therapy was also started but without any response. During her hospital stay, the patient also developed a flaccid paraplegia resembling Guillain-Barre syndrome. IV steroid was started for the neuropathy but meanwhile the patient succumbed to her illness. So in centers where facility for radioiodine therapy is not readily available, some definite well-tested protocols should be formulated to address such common but complicated clinical situations.

  7. The challenge of Clostridium difficile infection: Overview of clinical manifestations, diagnostic tools and therapeutic options.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Postma, Nynke; Kiers, Dorien; Pickkers, Peter

    2015-12-01

    The most important infectious cause of antibiotic-associated diarrhoea and colitis is Clostridium difficile, which is a Gram-positive, anaerobic, spore-forming, toxin-producing bacillus. In this overview we will discuss the diagnostic and therapeutic management of patients presenting with suspected or proven C. difficile infection (CDI). The clinical spectrum varies from asymptomatic C. difficile carriers to fulminant colitis with multi-organ failure. The onset of symptoms is usually within 2 weeks after initiation of antibiotic treatment. Diagnosis is based on the combination of clinical symptoms and either a positive stool test for C. difficile toxins or endoscopic or histological findings of pseudomembranous colitis. There is no indication for treatment of asymptomatic carriers, but patients with proven CDI should be treated. Treatment consists of cessation of the provoking antibiotic treatment, secondary prevention by infection control strategies, and treatment with metronidazole or vancomycin. Treatment of recurring CDI, severe infection, the need for surgery, and novel alternative potential treatment strategies will be discussed. The concurrent increase in multiresistant colonisation and increasing numbers of asymptomatic carriers of C. difficile will lead to an increase of the situation in which patients with severe infections, treated with broad-spectrum antibiotics, will develop concurrent severe CDI. We will discuss possible therapy strategies for these patients. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. and the International Society of Chemotherapy. All rights reserved.

  8. Current state of a dual behaviour of antimicrobial peptides-Therapeutic agents and promising delivery vectors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Piotrowska, Urszula; Sobczak, Marcin; Oledzka, Ewa

    2017-12-01

    Micro-organism resistance is an important challenge in modern medicine due to the global uncontrolled use of antibiotics. Natural and synthetic antimicrobial peptides (AMPs) symbolize a new family of antibiotics, which have stimulated research and clinical interest as new therapeutic options for infections. They represent one of the most promising antimicrobial substances, due to their broad spectrum of biological activity, against bacteria, fungi, protozoa, viruses, yeast and even tumour cells. Besides, being antimicrobial, AMPs have been shown to bind and neutralize bacterial endotoxins, as well as possess immunomodulatory, anti-inflammatory, wound-healing, angiogenic and antitumour properties. In contrast to conventional antibiotics, which have very defined and specific molecular targets, host cationic peptides show varying, complex and very rapid mechanisms of actions that make it difficult to form an effective antimicrobial defence. Importantly, AMPs display their antimicrobial activity at micromolar concentrations or less. To do this, many peptide-based drugs are commercially available for the treatment of numerous diseases, such as hepatitis C, myeloma, skin infections and diabetes. Herein, we present an overview of the general mechanism of AMPs action, along with recent developments regarding carriers of AMPs and their potential applications in medical fields. © 2017 John Wiley & Sons A/S.

  9. Reporting therapeutic discourse in a therapeutic community.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chapman, G E

    1988-03-01

    Research in nurses' communications has concentrated on nurse to patient interactions. Those few studies which focus on nurse to nurse communications seem to be generated by a pragmatic and normative concern with effective information sharing. In this paper, which describes one aspect of a larger case study of a hospital-based therapeutic community, the description and analysis of nurses' reports flows not from a normative model of professional practice, but rather an exploration of how professional practice is articulated as discourse in nurses' written accounts. Foucault's ideas about therapeutic discourse inform the theoretical framework of the research. Ethnomethodological concerns with the importance of documentary analysis provide the methodological rationale for examining nurses' 24-hour report documents, as official discourse, reflecting therapeutic practice in this setting. A content analysis of nurses' reports, collected over a period of 4 months, demonstrated the importance of domesticity and ordinary everyday activities in nurses' accounts of hospital life. Disruption to the 'life as usual' domesticity in the community seemed to be associated with admission to and discharge from the hospital when interpersonal and interactional changes between patients occur. It is suggested that nurses in general hospital wards and more orthodox psychiatric settings might usefully consider the impact of admissions and discharges on the group of patients they manage, and make this a discursive focus of their work.

  10. Discovering Glaser: My Experience of Doing Grounded Theory

    OpenAIRE

    Lesley Margaret Piko

    2014-01-01

    For my investigation into how general practitioners (GPs) experience their medical careers, I used a grounded theory methodology based on the early work of Glaser and Strauss (1967) and Glaser’s subsequent work (Glaser, 1978, 1998). Glaser (1998) suggested you need to do grounded theory in order to understand the methodology. I found as I engaged in the process I began to understand the meaning of Glaser’s teachings and to discover Glaser. In this article, I share my experience of discovering...

  11. The Magic of Mathematics Discovering the Spell of Mathematics

    CERN Document Server

    Pappas, Theoni

    2011-01-01

    Delves into the world of ideas, explores the spell mathematics casts on our lives, and helps you discover mathematics where you least expect it. Be spellbound by the mathematical designs found in nature. Learn how knots may untie the mysteries of life. Be mesmerized by the computer revolution. Discover how the hidden forces of mathematics hold architectural structures together connect your telephone calls help airplanes get off the ground solve the mysteries of the living cell. See how some artists use a mathematical palette in their works and how many writers draw upon the wealth of its ideas

  12. Tapping into Salmonella typhimurium LT2 genome in a quest to explore its therapeutic arsenal: A metabolic network modeling approach.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mehla, Kusum; Ramana, Jayashree

    2017-02-01

    S. typhimurium, the classical broad-host-range serovar is a widely distributed cause of food-borne illness. Escalating antibiotic resistance and potential of conjugal transmission to other pathogens attributable to its broad spectrum host specificities have aided S. typhimurium to emerge as a global health threat. To keep pace with ever evolving bacterial defenses, there is dire need to restock the antibiotic pipeline. Genome scale metabolic reconstructions present immense possibilities to decipher physiological properties of an organism using constraint-based methods The systems-level approaches of genome scale metabolic networks interrogation open up new avenues of drug target identification against deadly infectious diseases. We performed flux balance analysis and minimization of metabolic adjustment studies of genome scale reconstruction model of S. typhimurium targeted at identifying large number of metabolites with a potential to be utilized as therapeutic drug targets. These constraint based approaches initially predict a set of genes indispensable to bacterial survival by performing gene knockout studies which are then prioritized through a multistep process. Metabolites involved in l-rhamnose biosynthesis, peptidoglycan biosynthesis, fatty acid biosynthesis, and folate biosynthesis pathways were prioritized as candidate drug targets. This study provides a general therapeutic approach which can be effectively applied to other pathogens as well. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  13. [PLURAL THERAPEUTIC ITINERARIES].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iorio, Silvia

    2015-01-01

    This article addresses the strategies employed by Nahua community of Mexixo to deal with health problems. Drawing on qualitative research, it discusses the choice of plural therapeutic itineraries, including the use of informal and formal healthcare.

  14. Discovering Theorems in Abstract Algebra Using the Software "GAP"

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blyth, Russell D.; Rainbolt, Julianne G.

    2010-01-01

    A traditional abstract algebra course typically consists of the professor stating and then proving a sequence of theorems. As an alternative to this classical structure, the students could be expected to discover some of the theorems even before they are motivated by classroom examples. This can be done by using a software system to explore a…

  15. Discovering How a Communicative Notion Is Expressed in English.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kennedy, Graeme D.

    A study to develop a methodology for discovering how one important notion or semantic category, "frequency of occurrence," is expressed in words, phrases, or other linguistic devices in academic English began with a search for devices expressing that notion, by analyzing text from a news magazine, a New Zealand geography textbook, and a…

  16. Bioinformatic analysis to discover putative drug targets against ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    /

    2012-01-26

    Jan 26, 2012 ... Bioinformatic analysis to discover putative drug targets against diarrheal causative agents. Muhammad Shakil Khan, Sana Zahra and Hamid Rashid*. Department of Bioinformatics, Mohammad Ali Jinnah University, Islamabad, Pakistan. Accepted 23 September, 2011. Availability of genome sequences of ...

  17. Levels of Glycosylated Haemoglobin in newly discovered Sudanese ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    ... random blood glucose, body mass index, hypertension, or the duration of symptoms. Conclusion: HbA1c levels in newly discovered diabetics was found to be elevated, with significant difference between diabetics of less than forty, and above forty years of age. Key wards: Diabetes, HbA1c, Ketoacidosis, Hypertension.

  18. Discover 4-H Clubs: The Essential Resource for 4-H

    Science.gov (United States)

    MacArthur, Stacey; Nelson, Cindy; Brower, Naomi; Memmott, Margie; Peterson, Gaelynn

    2016-01-01

    Obstacles facing new 4-H volunteers include time constraints and difficulty finding project-specific information, resources, and opportunities available for club members. As a solution to these obstacles and an aid for assisting volunteers in becoming confident in delivering information to youth, content experts produced Discover 4-H Clubs, a…

  19. The Spy VI child : A newly discovered Neandertal infant

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Crevecoeur, Isabelle; Bayle, Priscilla; Rougier, Helene; Maureille, Bruno; Higham, Thomas; van der Plicht, Johannes; De Clerck, Nora; Semal, Patrick

    2010-01-01

    Spy cave (Jemeppe-sur-Sambre Belgium) is reputed for the two adult Neandertal individuals discovered in situ in 1886 Recent reassessment of the Spy collections has allowed direct radiocarbon dating of these individuals The sorting of all of the faunal collections has also led to the discovery of the

  20. Re-Discovering Mendel: The Case of Carl Correns

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rheinberger, Hans-Jörg

    2015-01-01

    Carl Erich Correns (1864-1933) is remembered in the annals of science as one of the three botanists who re-discovered Mendel's laws. He can also, however, be regarded as one of the founding figures of classical genetics in Germany. Between 1894 and 1899 he carried out the crossing experiments with corn and peas that led to the re-statement of…

  1. US NSF: scientists discover planetary system similar to our own

    CERN Multimedia

    2003-01-01

    An international team of scientists has discovered a planet and star that may share the same relationship as Jupiter and our Sun, the closest comparison that researchers have found since they began their search for extra-solar planets nearly a decade ago (1 page).

  2. Scientists discover planetary system similar to our own

    CERN Multimedia

    2003-01-01

    'An international team of scientists has discovered a planet and star that may share the same relationship as Jupiter and our Sun, the closest comparison that researchers have found since they began their search for extra-solar planets nearly a decade ago' (1 page).

  3. How Einstein Discovered the Special Theory of Relativity

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Home; Journals; Resonance – Journal of Science Education; Volume 11; Issue 2. How Einstein Discovered the Special Theory of Relativity. Sriranjan Banerji. General Article Volume 11 Issue 2 February 2006 pp 27-42. Fulltext. Click here to view fulltext PDF. Permanent link:

  4. A new screening method for discovering antibacterial agents from ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    DR. NJ TONUKARI

    2012-04-26

    Apr 26, 2012 ... orchids that increased the isolation efficiency of previously uncultivable fungi. Given the appropriate culture conditions, the MAPC technique can be employed to discover novel antibiotics produced by common, rare and “uncultivable” species from different ecological niches of soil, water, plants, etc (Warcup ...

  5. Re-discovering indigenous knowledge – Ulwazi Lwemveli for ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Application of this knowledge in specific different areas continues to be part of practices in these communities, albeit with challenges imposed by systems of colonial education and religion, apartheid and the emerging global knowledge economy. Therefore, the imperative to re-discover and re-store IK cannot be ...

  6. New Pulsars Discovered in Arecibo Drift-Scan Searches

    OpenAIRE

    McLaughlin, M. A.; Lorimer, D. R.; Champion, D.J.; Xilouris, K.; Arzoumanian, Z.; Backer, D. C.; Cordes, J. M.; Lommen, A. N.; Fruchter, A. S.

    2003-01-01

    We report on new pulsars discovered in Arecibo drift-scan data. Processing of 2200 square degrees of data has resulted in the detection of 41 known and 12 new pulsars. New pulsars include two millisecond pulsars, one solitary and one binary recycled pulsar, and one pulsar with very unusual pulse profile morphology and complex drifting subpulse behavior.

  7. How did Cantor Discover Set Theory and Topology?

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Home; Journals; Resonance – Journal of Science Education; Volume 19; Issue 11. How did Cantor Discover Set Theory and Topology? S M Srivastava. General Article Volume 19 Issue 11 November 2014 pp 977-999 ... Author Affiliations. S M Srivastava1. Indian Statistical Institute 203 B T Road Kolkata 700108, India.

  8. A new screening method for discovering antibacterial agents from ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Since high-throughput screening (HTS) that selects antibacterial agents according to targets in vitro rather than whole-cell have not proven effective in the discovery of new antibiotics; new approaches for discovering the next generation of antibiotics are urgently needed. Filamentous fungi are an important source for many ...

  9. Multicomponent Therapeutics of Berberine Alkaloids

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jiaoyang Luo

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Although berberine alkaloids (BAs are reported to be with broad-spectrum antibacterial and antiviral activities, the interactions among BAs have not been elucidated. In the present study, methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA was chosen as a model organism, and modified broth microdilution was applied for the determination of the fluorescence absorption values to calculate the anti-MRSA activity of BAs. We have initiated four steps to seek the optimal combination of BAs that are (1 determining the anti-MRSA activity of single BA, (2 investigating the two-component combination to clarify the interactions among BAs by checkerboard assay, (3 investigating the multicomponent combination to determine the optimal ratio by quadratic rotation-orthogonal combination design, and (4 in vivo and in vitro validation of the optimal combination. The results showed that the interactions among BAs are related to their concentrations. The synergetic combinations included “berberine and epiberberine,” “jatrorrhizine and palmatine” and “jatrorrhizine and coptisine”; the antagonistic combinations included “coptisine and epiberberine”. The optimal combination was berberine : coptisine : jatrorrhizine : palmatine : epiberberine = 0.702 : 0.863 : 1 : 0.491 : 0.526, and the potency of the optimal combination on cyclophosphamide-immunocompromised mouse model was better than the natural combinations of herbs containing BAs.

  10. Annular pancreas intra operatively discovered: a case report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zeineb Mzoughi

    2011-10-01

    Full Text Available Annular pancreas is a rare congenital abnormality. This entity can rarely be symptomatic. Patients can present with gastrointestinal obstruction or acute pancreatitis. We report a case with a rich iconography, of an annular pancreas discovered intraoperatively. A 46- year-old woman was operated with the diagnosis of acute cholecystitis with common bile duct stones. At operation, a strip of pancreatic tissue (2 cm completely encircled the second duodenum. Open cholecytectomy with choledocotomy and stones extractionwas done. Postoperatively, she developed an acute pancreatitis. The post-operative cholangiography showed the annular duct surrounding the second duodenum. Annular pancreas is rare. Symptoms may occur in newborn children. In adults, annular pancreas discovering is radiological or intra operatively.

  11. Discovering Glaser: My Experience of Doing Grounded Theory

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lesley Margaret Piko

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available For my investigation into how general practitioners (GPs experience their medical careers, I used a grounded theory methodology based on the early work of Glaser and Strauss (1967 and Glaser’s subsequent work (Glaser, 1978, 1998. Glaser (1998 suggested you need to do grounded theory in order to understand the methodology. I found as I engaged in the process I began to understand the meaning of Glaser’s teachings and to discover Glaser. In this article, I share my experience of discovering my theory of optimising professional life. This theory explains how GPs develop their professional life in response to their need for sustainment—a need that encapsulates self-care to sustain wellbeing, work interest to sustain motivation and income to sustain lifestyle.

  12. Metagenomic approach for discovering new pathogens in infection disease outbreaks

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Emanuela Giombini

    2011-09-01

    Full Text Available Viruses represent the most abundant biological components on earth.They can be found in every environment, from deep layers of oceans to animal bodies.Although several viruses have been isolated and sequenced, in each environment there are millions of different types of viruses that have not been identified yet.The advent of nextgeneration sequencing technologies with their high throughput capabilities make possible to study in a single experiment all the community of microorganisms present in a particular sample “microbioma”.They made more feasible the application of the metagenomic approach, by which it is also possible to discover and identify new pathogens, that may pose a threat to public health.This paper summarizes the most recent applications of nextgeneration sequencing to discover new viral pathogens during the occurrence of infection disease outbreaks.

  13. Kant and therapeutic privilege.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brown, Chris

    2008-08-01

    Given Kant's exceptionless moral prohibition on lying, one might suspect that he is committed to a similar prohibition on withholding diagnostic and prognostic information from patients. I confirm this suspicion by adapting arguments against therapeutic privilege from his arguments against lying. However, I show that all these arguments are importantly flawed and submit that they should be rejected. A more compelling Kantian take on informed consent and therapeutic privilege is achievable, I argue, by focusing on Kant's duty of beneficence, which requires us to aim at furthering others' ends. But I show that there are some cases in which furthering a patient's ends requires withholding material medical information from her. Although I concede that these cases are probably quite rare, I conclude that the best Kantian thinking agrees with that of therapeutic privilege's advocates.

  14. A human in vitro whole blood assay to predict the systemic cytokine response to therapeutic oligonucleotides including siRNA.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Christoph Coch

    Full Text Available Therapeutic oligonucleotides including siRNA and immunostimulatory ligands of Toll-like receptors (TLR or RIG-I like helicases (RLH are a promising novel class of drugs. They are in clinical development for a broad spectrum of applications, e.g. as adjuvants in vaccines and for the immunotherapy of cancer. Species-specific immune activation leading to cytokine release is characteristic for therapeutic oligonucleotides either as an unwanted side effect or intended pharmacology. Reliable in vitro tests designed for therapeutic oligonucleotides are therefore urgently needed in order to predict clinical efficacy and to prevent unexpected harmful effects in clinical development. To serve this purpose, we here established a human whole blood assay (WBA that is fast and easy to perform. Its response to synthetic TLR ligands (R848: TLR7/8, LPS: TLR4 was on a comparable threshold to the more time consuming peripheral blood mononuclear cell (PBMC based assay. By contrast, the type I IFN profile provoked by intravenous CpG-DNA (TLR9 ligand in humans in vivo was more precisely replicated in the WBA than in stimulated PBMC. Since Heparin and EDTA, but not Hirudin, displaced oligonucleotides from their delivery agent, only Hirudin qualified as the anticoagulant to be used in the WBA. The Hirudin WBA exhibited a similar capacity as the PBMC assay to distinguish between TLR7-activating and modified non-stimulatory siRNA sequences. RNA-based immunoactivating TLR7/8- and RIG-I-ligands induced substantial amounts of IFN-α in the Hirudin-WBA dependent on delivery agent used. In conclusion, we present a human Hirudin WBA to determine therapeutic oligonucleotide-induced cytokine release during preclinical development that can readily be performed and offers a close reflection of human cytokine response in vivo.

  15. A human in vitro whole blood assay to predict the systemic cytokine response to therapeutic oligonucleotides including siRNA.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coch, Christoph; Lück, Christian; Schwickart, Anna; Putschli, Bastian; Renn, Marcel; Höller, Tobias; Barchet, Winfried; Hartmann, Gunther; Schlee, Martin

    2013-01-01

    Therapeutic oligonucleotides including siRNA and immunostimulatory ligands of Toll-like receptors (TLR) or RIG-I like helicases (RLH) are a promising novel class of drugs. They are in clinical development for a broad spectrum of applications, e.g. as adjuvants in vaccines and for the immunotherapy of cancer. Species-specific immune activation leading to cytokine release is characteristic for therapeutic oligonucleotides either as an unwanted side effect or intended pharmacology. Reliable in vitro tests designed for therapeutic oligonucleotides are therefore urgently needed in order to predict clinical efficacy and to prevent unexpected harmful effects in clinical development. To serve this purpose, we here established a human whole blood assay (WBA) that is fast and easy to perform. Its response to synthetic TLR ligands (R848: TLR7/8, LPS: TLR4) was on a comparable threshold to the more time consuming peripheral blood mononuclear cell (PBMC) based assay. By contrast, the type I IFN profile provoked by intravenous CpG-DNA (TLR9 ligand) in humans in vivo was more precisely replicated in the WBA than in stimulated PBMC. Since Heparin and EDTA, but not Hirudin, displaced oligonucleotides from their delivery agent, only Hirudin qualified as the anticoagulant to be used in the WBA. The Hirudin WBA exhibited a similar capacity as the PBMC assay to distinguish between TLR7-activating and modified non-stimulatory siRNA sequences. RNA-based immunoactivating TLR7/8- and RIG-I-ligands induced substantial amounts of IFN-α in the Hirudin-WBA dependent on delivery agent used. In conclusion, we present a human Hirudin WBA to determine therapeutic oligonucleotide-induced cytokine release during preclinical development that can readily be performed and offers a close reflection of human cytokine response in vivo.

  16. Therapeutic and cosmetic applications of Evodiamine and its derivatives--A patent review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gavaraskar, Kirti; Dhulap, Sivakami; Hirwani, R R

    2015-10-01

    Evodiamine, ((+)-(S)-8,13,13b,14-tetrahydro-14-methylindolo[2',3':3,4]pyrido[2,1-b]quinazolin-5(7H)-one) indoloquinazoline alkaloid, is the major component isolated from the fruits of Evodia rutaecarpa, family Rutaceae. Broad spectrum of pharmacological activities of Evodiamine suggests its imperative role in treating a variety of diseases influencing the function of diverse targets. A comprehensive search was carried out to collect patent information regarding Evodiamine and its derivatives using different patent databases covering priority years to till date. The patents claiming therapeutic as well as cosmetic applications of Evodiamine and its derivatives were analyzed in detail and were classified technically based on the its application such as treatment of metabolic disorders, cancer, neurological disorders, and cardiovascular disorders, etc. The analysis revealed that the use and the mode of actions of Evodiamine and its derivatives in weight management treatments are currently well established. For example the fat reducing property of this alkaloid is primarily due to its mode of actions such as prevention of muscle protein catabolism, enhancement of thermogenesis and lipid oxidation. Apart from its use for treating obesity, Evodiamine and its derivatives are also experimentally explored for their anti-cancer, anti-diabetic and anti-inflammatory properties. The possible mechanisms related to its anti-cancer activity as illustrated by different experimental studies include its potential action as modulator of specific receptors such as topoisomerase I, NF-kappa B and B-cell lymphoma 2 (Bcl2). The analysis hence highlights that, clinical studies pertaining to the anti-cancer, anti-diabetes as well as anti-inflammatory activities of the Evodiamine and its derivatives would possess important market potential for the development of Evodiamine based therapeutics. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  17. An integrative in-silico approach for therapeutic target identification in the human pathogen Corynebacterium diphtheriae.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Syed Babar Jamal

    Full Text Available Corynebacterium diphtheriae (Cd is a Gram-positive human pathogen responsible for diphtheria infection and once regarded for high mortalities worldwide. The fatality gradually decreased with improved living standards and further alleviated when many immunization programs were introduced. However, numerous drug-resistant strains emerged recently that consequently decreased the efficacy of current therapeutics and vaccines, thereby obliging the scientific community to start investigating new therapeutic targets in pathogenic microorganisms. In this study, our contributions include the prediction of modelome of 13 C. diphtheriae strains, using the MHOLline workflow. A set of 463 conserved proteins were identified by combining the results of pangenomics based core-genome and core-modelome analyses. Further, using subtractive proteomics and modelomics approaches for target identification, a set of 23 proteins was selected as essential for the bacteria. Considering human as a host, eight of these proteins (glpX, nusB, rpsH, hisE, smpB, bioB, DIP1084, and DIP0983 were considered as essential and non-host homologs, and have been subjected to virtual screening using four different compound libraries (extracted from the ZINC database, plant-derived natural compounds and Di-terpenoid Iso-steviol derivatives. The proposed ligand molecules showed favorable interactions, lowered energy values and high complementarity with the predicted targets. Our proposed approach expedites the selection of C. diphtheriae putative proteins for broad-spectrum development of novel drugs and vaccines, owing to the fact that some of these targets have already been identified and validated in other organisms.

  18. A new hard X-ray transient discovered by INTEGRAL

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gibaud, L.; Bazzano, A.; Bozzo, E.

    2011-01-01

    INTEGRAL discovered a new hard X-ray transient, IGR J17498-2921, during the observations performed from 2011-08-11 22:45 to 2011-08-12 05:54 UTC. The source is detected in the IBIS/ISGRI mosaic at a preliminary significance level of 11 and 9 sigma in the 20-40 keV and 40-80 keV energy bands, resp...

  19. Discovering patterns of activity in unstructured incident reports at scale

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-05-12

    problematic activity by a particular reporter. • Taken en masse, we use the tickets as as a statistical sample of observations to learn about the threat and...information • DHS informational website • MD5 • 3 phishing email addresses • Filename • File paths • IPs 12Discovering patterns of activity in incident... statistical patterns in indicators across tickets and reporters to estimate similarity metrics and indicator communities. • Communities can be more

  20. Inner solar system material discovered in the Oort cloud

    OpenAIRE

    Meech, Karen J.; Yang, Bin; Kleyna, Jan; Hainaut, Olivier R.; Berdyugina, Svetlana; Keane, Jacqueline V.; Micheli, Marco; Morbidelli, Alessandro; Wainscoat, Richard J.

    2016-01-01

    We have observed C/2014 S3 (PANSTARRS), a recently discovered object on a cometary orbit coming from the Oort cloud that is physically similar to an inner main belt rocky S-type asteroid. Recent dynamical models successfully reproduce the key characteristics of our current solar system; some of these models require significant migration of the giant planets, whereas others do not. These models provide different predictions on the presence of rocky material expelled from the inner solar system...

  1. Discovering the quantum universe the role of particle colliders

    CERN Document Server

    2006-01-01

    What does "Quantum Universe" mean? To discover what the universe is made of and how it works is the challenge of particle physics. "Quantum Universe" defines the quest to explain the universe in terms of quantum physics, which governs the behavior of the microscopic, subatomic world. It describes a revolution in particle physics and a quantum leap in our understanding of the mystery and beauty of the universe.

  2. Genetic Architect: Discovering Genomic Structure with Learned Neural Architectures

    OpenAIRE

    Deming, Laura; Targ, Sasha; Sauder, Nate; Almeida, Diogo; Ye, Chun Jimmie

    2016-01-01

    Each human genome is a 3 billion base pair set of encoding instructions. Decoding the genome using deep learning fundamentally differs from most tasks, as we do not know the full structure of the data and therefore cannot design architectures to suit it. As such, architectures that fit the structure of genomics should be learned not prescribed. Here, we develop a novel search algorithm, applicable across domains, that discovers an optimal architecture which simultaneously learns general genom...

  3. Discovering health topics in social media using topic models.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paul, Michael J; Dredze, Mark

    2014-01-01

    By aggregating self-reported health statuses across millions of users, we seek to characterize the variety of health information discussed in Twitter. We describe a topic modeling framework for discovering health topics in Twitter, a social media website. This is an exploratory approach with the goal of understanding what health topics are commonly discussed in social media. This paper describes in detail a statistical topic model created for this purpose, the Ailment Topic Aspect Model (ATAM), as well as our system for filtering general Twitter data based on health keywords and supervised classification. We show how ATAM and other topic models can automatically infer health topics in 144 million Twitter messages from 2011 to 2013. ATAM discovered 13 coherent clusters of Twitter messages, some of which correlate with seasonal influenza (r = 0.689) and allergies (r = 0.810) temporal surveillance data, as well as exercise (r =  .534) and obesity (r =  -.631) related geographic survey data in the United States. These results demonstrate that it is possible to automatically discover topics that attain statistically significant correlations with ground truth data, despite using minimal human supervision and no historical data to train the model, in contrast to prior work. Additionally, these results demonstrate that a single general-purpose model can identify many different health topics in social media.

  4. Discovering health topics in social media using topic models.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michael J Paul

    Full Text Available By aggregating self-reported health statuses across millions of users, we seek to characterize the variety of health information discussed in Twitter. We describe a topic modeling framework for discovering health topics in Twitter, a social media website. This is an exploratory approach with the goal of understanding what health topics are commonly discussed in social media. This paper describes in detail a statistical topic model created for this purpose, the Ailment Topic Aspect Model (ATAM, as well as our system for filtering general Twitter data based on health keywords and supervised classification. We show how ATAM and other topic models can automatically infer health topics in 144 million Twitter messages from 2011 to 2013. ATAM discovered 13 coherent clusters of Twitter messages, some of which correlate with seasonal influenza (r = 0.689 and allergies (r = 0.810 temporal surveillance data, as well as exercise (r =  .534 and obesity (r =  -.631 related geographic survey data in the United States. These results demonstrate that it is possible to automatically discover topics that attain statistically significant correlations with ground truth data, despite using minimal human supervision and no historical data to train the model, in contrast to prior work. Additionally, these results demonstrate that a single general-purpose model can identify many different health topics in social media.

  5. Discovering System Health Anomalies Using Data Mining Techniques

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sriastava, Ashok, N.

    2005-01-01

    We present a data mining framework for the analysis and discovery of anomalies in high-dimensional time series of sensor measurements that would be found in an Integrated System Health Monitoring system. We specifically treat the problem of discovering anomalous features in the time series that may be indicative of a system anomaly, or in the case of a manned system, an anomaly due to the human. Identification of these anomalies is crucial to building stable, reusable, and cost-efficient systems. The framework consists of an analysis platform and new algorithms that can scale to thousands of sensor streams to discovers temporal anomalies. We discuss the mathematical framework that underlies the system and also describe in detail how this framework is general enough to encompass both discrete and continuous sensor measurements. We also describe a new set of data mining algorithms based on kernel methods and hidden Markov models that allow for the rapid assimilation, analysis, and discovery of system anomalies. We then describe the performance of the system on a real-world problem in the aircraft domain where we analyze the cockpit data from aircraft as well as data from the aircraft propulsion, control, and guidance systems. These data are discrete and continuous sensor measurements and are dealt with seamlessly in order to discover anomalous flights. We conclude with recommendations that describe the tradeoffs in building an integrated scalable platform for robust anomaly detection in ISHM applications.

  6. UPLC-based metabonomic applications for discovering biomarkers of diseases in clinical chemistry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Ying-Yong; Cheng, Xian-Long; Vaziri, Nosratola D; Liu, Shuman; Lin, Rui-Chao

    2014-10-01

    Metabonomics is a powerful and promising analytic tool that allows assessment of global low-molecular-weight metabolites in biological systems. It has a great potential for identifying useful biomarkers for early diagnosis, prognosis and assessment of therapeutic interventions in clinical practice. The aim of this review is to provide a brief summary of the recent advances in UPLC-based metabonomic approach for biomarker discovery in a variety of diseases, and to discuss their significance in clinical chemistry. All the available information on UPLC-based metabonomic applications for discovering biomarkers of diseases were collected via a library and electronic search (using Web of Science, Pubmed, ScienceDirect, Springer, Google Scholar, etc.). Metabonomics has been used in clinical chemistry to identify and evaluate potential biomarkers and therapeutic targets in various diseases affecting the liver (hepatocarcinoma and liver cirrhosis), lung (lung cancer and pneumonia), gastrointestinal tract (colorectal cancer) and urogenital tract (prostate cancer, ovarian cancer and chronic kidney disease), as well as metabolic diseases (diabetes) and neuropsychiatric disorders (Alzheimer's disease and schizophrenia), etc. The information provided highlights the potential value of determination of endogenous low-molecular-weight metabolites and the advantages and potential drawbacks of the application of UPLC-based metabonomics in clinical setting. Copyright © 2014 The Canadian Society of Clinical Chemists. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  7. Lymphedema and Therapeutic Lymphangiogenesis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yukihiro Saito

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Lymphedema is a disorder of the lymphatic vascular system characterized by impaired lymphatic return and swelling of the extremities. Lymphedema is divided into primary and secondary forms based on the underlying etiology. Despite substantial advances in both surgical and conservative techniques, therapeutic options for the management of lymphedema are limited. Although rarely lethal, lymphedema is a disfiguring and disabling condition with an associated decrease in the quality of life. The recent impressive expansion of knowledge on the molecular mechanisms governing lymphangiogenesis provides new possibilities for the treatment of lymphedema. This review highlights the lymphatic biology, the pathophysiology of lymphedema, and the therapeutic lymphangiogenesis using hepatocyte growth factor.

  8. Therapeutic development in psoriasis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sobell, Jeffrey M; Leonardi, Craig L

    2014-06-01

    Advances in molecular biology have provided the basis for development of new therapeutic approaches to psoriasis. New, more effective therapies target specific molecules in the inflammatory cascade involved in the pathogenesis of psoriasis.The biologic era of psoriasis therapy began with inhibitors of T-cell activation, tumor necrosis factor-α, and interleukin (IL)-12/23. Continued investigation has led to therapies and therapeutic candidates that target IL-17, IL-23, phosphodiesterase-4, and isomers of Janus kinase. 2014 by Frontline Medical Communications Inc.

  9. Therapeutic HIV Peptide Vaccine

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Fomsgaard, Anders

    2015-01-01

    Therapeutic vaccines aim to control chronic HIV infection and eliminate the need for lifelong antiretroviral therapy (ART). Therapeutic HIV vaccine is being pursued as part of a functional cure for HIV/AIDS. We have outlined a basic protocol for inducing new T cell immunity during chronic HIV-1...... infection directed to subdominant conserved HIV-1 epitopes restricted to frequent HLA supertypes. The rationale for selecting HIV peptides and adjuvants are provided. Peptide subunit vaccines are regarded as safe due to the simplicity, quality, purity, and low toxicity. The caveat is reduced immunogenicity...

  10. 77 FR 27785 - Request for Information Regarding the NIH-Industry Program To Discover New Therapeutic Uses for...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-05-11

    ... the public sector has new ideas and the wherewithal to advance new applications, public-private... the most significant challenges for public-private partnerships that foster drug rescue between... carried out through collaborations between pharmaceutical companies and the biomedical research community...

  11. Therapeutic Recombinant Monoclonal Antibodies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bakhtiar, Ray

    2012-01-01

    During the last two decades, the rapid growth of biotechnology-derived techniques has led to a myriad of therapeutic recombinant monoclonal antibodies with significant clinical benefits. Recombinant monoclonal antibodies can be obtained from a number of natural sources such as animal cell cultures using recombinant DNA engineering. In contrast to…

  12. Therapeutic HPV DNA vaccines

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Ken; Roosinovich, Elena; Ma, Barbara; Hung, Chien-Fu

    2010-01-01

    It is now well established that most cervical cancers are causally associated with HPV infection. This realization has led to efforts to control HPV-associated malignancy through prevention or treatment of HPV infection. Currently, commercially available HPV vaccines are not designed to control established HPV infection and associated premalignant and malignant lesions. To treat and eradicate pre-existing HPV infections and associated lesions which remain prevalent in the U.S. and worldwide, effective therapeutic HPV vaccines are needed. DNA vaccination has emerged as a particularly promising form of therapeutic HPV vaccines due to its safety, stability and ability to induce antigen-specific immunity. This review focuses on improving the potency of therapeutic HPV vaccines through modification of dendritic cells (DCs) by [1] increasing the number of antigen-expressing/antigen-loaded DCs, [2] improving HPV antigen expression, processing and presentation in DCs, and [3] enhancing DC and T cell interaction. Continued improvement in therapeutic HPV DNA vaccines may ultimately lead to an effective DNA vaccine for the treatment of HPV-associated malignancies. PMID:20066511

  13. Personalized therapeutics for levofloxacin: a focus on pharmacokinetic concerns

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gao CH

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available Chu-Han Gao,1 Lu-Shan Yu,2 Su Zeng,2 Yu-Wen Huang,1 Quan Zhou11Department of Pharmacy, the Second Affiliated Hospital, School of Medicine, 2Department of Pharmaceutical Analysis and Drug Metabolism, College of Pharmaceutical Sciences, Zhejiang University, Hangzhou, Zhejiang Province, People's Republic of ChinaBackground: Personalized medicine should be encouraged because patients are complex, and this complexity results from biological, medical (eg, demographics, genetics, polypharmacy, and multimorbidities, socioeconomic, and cultural factors. Levofloxacin (LVX is a broad-spectrum fluoroquinolone antibiotic. Awareness of personalized therapeutics for LVX seems to be poor in clinical practice, and is reflected in prescribing patterns. Pharmacokinetic–pharmacodynamic studies have raised concerns about suboptimal patient outcomes with the use of LVX for some Gram-negative infections. Meanwhile, new findings in LVX therapeutics have only been sporadically reported in recent years. Therefore, an updated review on personalized LVX treatment with a focus on pharmacokinetic concerns is necessary.Methods: Relevant literature was identified by performing a PubMed search covering the period from January 1993 to December 2013. We included studies describing dosage adjustment and factors determining LVX pharmacokinetics, or pharmacokinetic–pharmacodynamic studies exploring how best to prevent the emergence of resistance to LVX. The full text of each included article was critically reviewed, and data interpretation was performed.Results: In addition to limiting the use of fluoroquinolones, measures such as reducing the breakpoints for antimicrobial susceptibility testing, choice of high-dose short-course of once-daily LVX regimen, and tailoring LVX dose in special patient populations help to achieve the validated pharmacokinetic–pharmacodynamic target and combat the increasing LVX resistance. Obese individuals with normal renal function cleared LVX

  14. Discovering Astronomy: An Astro 101 e-book

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shawl, Stephen J.; Byrd, Gene; Deustua, Susana E.; LoPresto, Michael C.

    2016-01-01

    Discovering Astronomy, now available in its 6th edition as an eText, has many advantages and features for your students. We have partnered with etextink.com and WebAssign.net to produce an affordable set of cost-saving options for your students. Also available is the Discovering Astronomy Activity Manual, which provides students with an active-learning experience.Our etext is device independent and thus accessible through any web browser. Americans with Disabilities Act compatibility provides access for all students. Hotlinks to outside sites provide further information for interested students. Lecture demonstration videos of important concepts, made specifically for this new edition, are embedded within the text as appropriate. Students can highlight text, take notes, and bookmark locations within the text. Important terms are linked to the glossary. Search capabilities allow students to easily find what they want.Instructors can interact with their students directly through the etext once the class roster has been provided. For example, instructors can embed assignments into their students' etext and add their own notes and updates, which are immediately visible to their students.Updates can be quickly made by us as new findings become available. For example, updates from New Horizons were added at the time of the closest approach to Pluto, and an update on the recent announcement of current water on Mars was added the day of the announcement.We will present results of our own experience with college and high school students' use of Discovering Astronomy in online courses.Details of the book, a sample chapter, and other information are available at discoveringastronomy.weebly.com.

  15. Sir Alexander Fleming: Scottish researcher who discovered penicillin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ligon, B Lee

    2004-01-01

    The discovery and development of penicillin changed the entire direction of approaches to treating infectious diseases and saved the lives of millions of people. Indeed, the development of penicillin was a watershed event in the battle against infectious diseases, and the individual who discovered it, Sir Alexander Fleming, remains a prominent individual in the annals of medical history. This article focuses primarily on the personal life of Alexander Fleming, an individual who had a remarkable diversity of interests and who made many contributions to science and medicine.

  16. An approach for discovering keywords from Spanish tweets using Wikipedia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Daniel AYALA

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available Most approaches to keywords discovery when analyzing microblogging messages (among them those from Twitter are based on statistical and lexical information about the words that compose the text. The lack of context in the short messages can be problematic due to the low co-occurrence of words. In this paper, we present a new approach for keywords discovering from Spanish tweets based on the addition of context information using Wikipedia as a knowledge base. We present four different ways to use Wikipedia and two ways to rank the new keywords. We have tested these strategies using more than 60000 Spanish tweets, measuring performance and analyzing particularities of each strategy.

  17. Discovering timing feature interactions with timed UML 2 interactions

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Störrle, Harald; Knapp, Alexander

    2016-01-01

    patterns of timing specifications and show how they can be translated into UML 2 interactions with time constraints. We define a semantics that allows us to define and check coherence and consistency conditions of timing specifications. RESULTS: We provide a systematic process for mapping timing...... requirements into timed UML interactions and algorithms for checking their coherence and consistency. CONCLUSIONS: With our approach, it becomes easier to check and validate timing specifications. It is not our ambition to achieve complete coverage, i.e., discovering all timing specification defects. Instead...

  18. Knots and surfaces a guide to discovering mathematics

    CERN Document Server

    Farmer, David W

    1995-01-01

    In most mathematics textbooks, the most exciting part of mathematics-the process of invention and discovery-is completely hidden from the reader. The aim of Knots and Surfaces is to change all that. By means of a series of carefully selected tasks, this book leads readers to discover some real mathematics. There are no formulas to memorize; no procedures to follow. The book is a guide: its job is to start you in the right direction and to bring you back if you stray too far. Discovery is left to you. Suitable for a one-semester course at the beginning undergraduate level, there are no prerequi

  19. Marquette Island: A Distinct Mafic Lithology Discovered by Opportunity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mittlefehldt, David W.; Gellert, R.; Herkenhoff, K. E.; Clark, B. C.; Cohen, B. A.; Fleischer, I.; Jolliff, B. L.; Klingelhoefer, G.; Ming, D. W.; Yingst, R. A.

    2010-01-01

    While rolling over the Meridiani Planum sedimentary terrane, the rover Opportunity has occasionally discovered large, > 10 cm erratics. Most of these have proven to be meteorites [1], but one - Bounce Rock - is a martian basaltic rock similar in composition to the meteorite EETA79001 lithology B [2]. Presently, Opportunity is intensively investigating an --30 cm tall rock named Marquette Island that may be a distinct type of martian mafic lithology. We report the results of its continuing investigation using the Microscopic Imager (MI); Mossbauer Spectrometer (MB) and Alpha Particle X-ray Spectrometer (APXS). A companion abstract discusses the results of Panoramic Camera (Pancam) imaging of the rock [3].

  20. Growing Self-Estemm and Discovering Intelligences through Oral Production

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ochoa Dora Liliana

    2002-08-01

    Full Text Available After having applied a needs analysis in an eleventh grade course of English, I could notice that there was a big lack of security and self-confidence in the students. They expressed in different data-gathering instruments their fear when speaking in front of the class. Also, they talked about their insecurity when pronouncing English and the need for more opportunities for developing speaking. Therefore, the implementation of an innovation in class was carried out in order to respond to the students¿ needs and make them discover their talents. The implementation was successful and students improved some areas of their communicative competence.

  1. Aplicación del modelo Discovering Hands en Argentina

    OpenAIRE

    Infante Rasch, Oriana; Urbina Hueso, Jhoan Sebastian

    2016-01-01

    Discovering Hands (DH) es un proyecto que nace en Alemania en el 2006, liderado por el doctor Frank Hoffmann. El programa se desarrolla pensando en el importante problema de salud pública en el cual se ha convertido en el cáncer de mama, pues según la Organización Mundial de la Salud es el mayor causal de muerte en mujeres, tanto en países desarrollados como en vía de desarrollo, y en Alemania esta enfermedad acaba con la vida de aproximadamente 18.000 mujeres cada año. (The Global Journal, ...

  2. Critical perspective: named reactions discovered and developed by women.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Olson, Julie A; Shea, Kevin M

    2011-05-17

    Named organic reactions. As chemists, we're all familiar with them: who can forget the Diels-Alder reaction? But how much do we know about the people behind the names? For example, can you identify a reaction named for a woman? How about a reaction discovered or developed by a woman but named for her male adviser? Our attempts to answer these simple questions started us on the journey that led to this Account. We introduce you to four reactions named for women and nine reactions discovered or developed by women. Using information obtained from the literature and, whenever possible, through interviews with the chemists themselves, their associates, and their advisers, we paint a more detailed picture of these remarkable women and their outstanding accomplishments. Some of the women you meet in this Account include Irma Goldberg, the only woman unambiguously recognized with her own named reaction. Gertrude Maud Robinson, the wife of Robert Robinson, who collaborated with him on several projects including the Piloty-Robinson pyrrole synthesis. Elizabeth Hardy, the Bryn Mawr graduate student who discovered the Cope rearrangement. Dorothee Felix, a critical member of Albert Eschenmoser's research lab for over forty years who helped develop both the Eschenmoser-Claisen rearrangement and the Eschenmoser-Tanabe fragmentation. Jennifer Loebach, the University of Illinois undergraduate who was part of the team in Eric Jacobsen's lab that discovered the Jacobsen-Katsuki epoxidation. Keiko Noda, a graduate student in Tsutomu Katsuki's lab who also played a key role in the development of the Jacobsen-Katsuki epoxidation. Lydia McKinstry, a postdoc in Andrew Myers's lab who helped develop the Myers asymmetric alkylation. Rosa Lockwood, a graduate student at Boston College whose sole publication is the discovery of the Nicholas reaction. Kaori Ando, a successful professor in Japan who helped develop the Roush asymmetric alkylation as a postdoc at MIT. Bianka Tchoubar, a

  3. Multistage vector (MSV) therapeutics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wolfram, Joy; Shen, Haifa; Ferrari, Mauro

    2015-01-01

    One of the greatest challenges in the field of medicine is obtaining controlled distribution of systemically administered therapeutic agents within the body. Indeed, biological barriers such as physical compartmentalization, pressure gradients, and excretion pathways adversely affect localized delivery of drugs to pathological tissue. The diverse nature of these barriers requires the use of multifunctional drug delivery vehicles that can overcome a wide range of sequential obstacles. In this review, we explore the role of multifunctionality in nanomedicine by primarily focusing on multistage vectors (MSVs). The MSV is an example of a promising therapeutic platform that incorporates several components, including a microparticle, nanoparticles, and small molecules. In particular, these components are activated in a sequential manner in order to successively address transport barriers. PMID:26264836

  4. Acylation of Therapeutic Peptides

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Trier, Sofie; Henriksen, Jonas Rosager; Jensen, Simon Bjerregaard

    Oral administration of therapeutic peptides could benefit millions of chronically ill people worldwide, through easier and less stigmatized therapy, and likely improve the long-term effects of currently widespread disease mismanagement. However, oral peptide delivery is a formidable task due......, but it is not widely studied in an oral context. As acylation furthermore increases interactions with the lipid membranes of mammalian cells, it offers several potential benefits for oral delivery of therapeutic peptides, and we hypothesize that tailoring the acylation may be used to optimize intestinal translocation...... to the harsh and selective gastrointestinal system, and development has lacked far behind injection therapy. Peptide acylation is a powerful tool to alter the pharmacokinetics, biophysical properties and chemical stability of injectable peptide drugs, primarily used to prolong blood circulation...

  5. Therapeutic use of cannabis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Vries, Kay; Green, Anita J

    Therapeutic cannabis use raises a number of dilemmas for nurses. This article examines the legal, political and ethical challenges raised by the use of cannabis by people with life-limiting or terminal illnesses in their own homes. (Throughout this paper, the term cannabis refers to illegal cannabis unless specified.) A literature review of databases from 1996 was conducted and internet material was also examined. Evidence on the therapeutic use of cannabis suggests it may produce improvements in quality of life, which has led to increased use among people with life-limiting illnesses. The cannabis used is usually obtained illegally, which can have consequences for both those who use it and nurses who provide treatment in the community.

  6. Leech Therapeutic Applications

    OpenAIRE

    Abdualkader, A. M.; A M Ghawi; Alaama, M.; M. Awang; A Merzouk

    2013-01-01

    Hematophagous animals including leeches have been known to possess biologically active compounds in their secretions, especially in their saliva. The blood-sucking annelids, leeches have been used for therapeutic purposes since the beginning of civilization. Ancient Egyptian, Indian, Greek and Arab physicians used leeches for a wide range of diseases starting from the conventional use for bleeding to systemic ailments, such as skin diseases, nervous system abnormalities, urinary and reproduct...

  7. High throughput techniques for discovering new glycine receptor modulators and their binding sites

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Daniel F Gilbert

    2009-10-01

    Full Text Available The inhibitory glycine receptor (GlyR is a member of the Cys-loop receptor family that mediates inhibitory neurotransmission in the central nervous system. These receptors are emerging as potential drug targets for inflammatory pain, immunomodulation, spasticity and epilepsy. Antagonists that specifically inhibit particular GlyR isoforms are also required as pharmacological probes for elucidating the roles of particular GlyR isoforms in health and disease. Although a substantial number of both positive and negative GlyR modulators have been identified, very few of these are specific for the GlyR over other receptor types. Thus, the potential of known compounds as either therapeutic leads or pharmacological probes is limited. It is therefore surprising that there have been few published studies describing attempts to discover novel GlyR isoform-specific compounds. The first aim of this review is to consider various methods for efficiently screening compounds against these receptors. We conclude that an anion sensitive yellow fluorescent protein is optimal for primary screening and that automated electrophysiology of cells stably expressing GlyRs is useful for confirming hits and quantitating the actions of identified compounds. The second aim of this review is to demonstrate how these techniques are used in our laboratory for the purpose of both discovering novel GlyR-active compounds and characterizing their binding sites. We also describe a reliable, cost effective method for transfecting HEK293 cells in single wells of a 384 well plate using nanogram quantities of cDNA.

  8. Discovering thiamine transporters as targets of chloroquine using a novel functional genomics strategy.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhiwei Huang

    Full Text Available Chloroquine (CQ and other quinoline-containing antimalarials are important drugs with many therapeutic benefits as well as adverse effects. However, the molecular targets underlying most such effects are largely unknown. By taking a novel functional genomics strategy, which employs a unique combination of genome-wide drug-gene synthetic lethality (DGSL, gene-gene synthetic lethality (GGSL, and dosage suppression (DS screens in the model organism Saccharomyces cerevisiae and is thus termed SL/DS for simplicity, we found that CQ inhibits the thiamine transporters Thi7, Nrt1, and Thi72 in yeast. We first discovered a thi3Δ mutant as hypersensitive to CQ using a genome-wide DGSL analysis. Using genome-wide GGSL and DS screens, we then found that a thi7Δ mutation confers severe growth defect in the thi3Δ mutant and that THI7 overexpression suppresses CQ-hypersensitivity of this mutant. We subsequently showed that CQ inhibits the functions of Thi7 and its homologues Nrt1 and Thi72. In particular, the transporter activity of wild-type Thi7 but not a CQ-resistant mutant (Thi7(T287N was completely inhibited by the drug. Similar effects were also observed with other quinoline-containing antimalarials. In addition, CQ completely inhibited a human thiamine transporter (SLC19A3 expressed in yeast and significantly inhibited thiamine uptake in cultured human cell lines. Therefore, inhibition of thiamine uptake is a conserved mechanism of action of CQ. This study also demonstrated SL/DS as a uniquely effective methodology for discovering drug targets.

  9. Learning Faster by Discovering and Exploiting Object Similarities

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tadej Janež

    2013-03-01

    Full Text Available In this paper we explore the question: “Is it possible to speed up the learning process of an autonomous agent by performing experiments in a more complex environment (i.e., an environment with a greater number of different objects?” To this end, we use a simple robotic domain, where the robot has to learn a qualitative model predicting the change in the robot's distance to an object. To quantify the environment's complexity, we defined cardinal complexity as the number of objects in the robot's world, and behavioural complexity as the number of objects' distinct behaviours. We propose Error reduction merging (ERM, a new learning method that automatically discovers similarities in the structure of the agent's environment. ERM identifies different types of objects solely from the data measured and merges the observations of objects that behave in the same or similar way in order to speed up the agent's learning. We performed a series of experiments in worlds of increasing complexity. The results in our simple domain indicate that ERM was capable of discovering structural similarities in the data which indeed made the learning faster, clearly superior to conventional learning. This observed trend occurred with various machine learning algorithms used inside the ERM method.

  10. Discovering Congested Routes Using Vehicle Trajectories in Road Networks

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kyoung Soo Bok

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available The popular route recommendation and traffic monitoring over the road networks have become important in the location-based services. The schemes to find out the congested routes were proposed by considering the number of vehicles in a road segment. However, the existing schemes do not consider the features of each road segment such as width, length, and direction in a road network. Furthermore, the existing schemes fail to consider the average moving speed of vehicles. Therefore, they can detect the incorrect density routes. To overcome such problems, we propose a new discovering scheme of congested routes through the analysis of vehicle trajectories in a road network. The proposed scheme divides each road into segments with different width and length in a road network. And then, the congested road segment is detected through the saturation degree of the road segment and the average moving speed of vehicles in the road segment. Finally, we compute the final congested routes by using a clustering scheme. The experimental results have shown that the proposed scheme can efficiently discover the congested routes in the different directions of the roads.

  11. Discovering the cosmos with small spacecraft the American explorer program

    CERN Document Server

    Harvey, Brian

    2018-01-01

    Explorer was the original American space program and Explorer 1 its first satellite, launched in 1958. Sixty years later, it is the longest continuously running space program in the world, demonstrating to the world how we can explore the cosmos with small spacecraft. Almost a hundred Explorers have already been launched.  Explorers have made some of the fundamental discoveries of the Space Age.Explorer 1 discovered Earth’s radiation belts. Later Explorers surveyed the Sun, the X-ray and ultraviolet universes, black holes, magnetars and gamma ray bursts. An Explorer found the remnant of the Big Bang. One Explorer chased and was the first to intercept a comet. The program went through a period of few launches during the crisis of funding for space science in the 1980s. However, with the era of ‘faster, cheaper, better,’ the program was reinvented, and new exiting missions began to take shape, like Swift and the asteroid hunter WISE.  Discovering the Cosmos with Small Spacecraft gives an account of ...

  12. Novel virophages discovered in a freshwater lake in China

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chaowen eGong

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Virophages are small double-stranded DNA viruses that are parasites of giant DNA viruses that infect unicellular eukaryotes. Here we identify a novel group of virophages, named Dishui Lake virophages (DSLVs that were discovered in Dishui Lake (DSL: an artificial freshwater lake in Shanghai, China. Based on PCR and metagenomic analysis, the complete genome of DSLV1 was found to be circular and 28,788 base pairs in length, with a G+C content 43.2%, and 28 predicted open reading frames (ORFs. Fifteen of the DSLV1 ORFs have sequence similarity to known virophages. Two DSLV1 ORFs exhibited sequence similarity to that of prasinoviruses (Phycodnaviridae and chloroviruses (Phycodnaviridae, respectively, suggesting horizontal gene transfer occurred between these large algal DNA viruses and DSLV1. 46 other virophages-related contigs were also obtained, including six homologous major capsid protein (MCP gene. Phylogenetic analysis of these MCPs showed that DSLVs are closely related to OLV (Organic Lake virophage and YSLVs (Yellowstone Lake virophages, especially to YSLV3, except for YSLV7. These results indicate that freshwater ecotopes are the hotbed for discovering novel virophages as well as understanding their diversity and properties.

  13. Ongoing therapeutic trials and outcome measures for Duchenne muscular dystrophy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Govoni, Alessandra; Magri, Francesca; Brajkovic, Simona; Zanetta, Chiara; Faravelli, Irene; Corti, Stefania; Bresolin, Nereo; Comi, Giacomo P

    2013-12-01

    Muscular dystrophy is a heterogeneous group of genetic disorders characterised by progressive muscle tissue degeneration. No effective treatment has been discovered for these diseases. Preclinical and clinical studies aimed at the development of new therapeutic approaches have been carried out, primarily in subjects affected with dystrophinopathies (Duchenne and Becker muscular dystrophy). In this review, we outline the current therapeutic approaches and past and ongoing clinical trials, highlighting both the advantages and limits of each one. The experimental designs of these trials were based on different rationales, including immunomodulation, readthrough strategies, exon skipping, gene therapy, and cell therapy. We also provide an overview of available outcome measures, focusing on their reliability in estimating meaningful clinical improvement in order to aid in the design of future trials. This perspective is extremely relevant to the field considering the recent development of novel therapeutic approaches that will result in an increasing number of clinical studies over the next few years.

  14. Personalized therapeutics for levofloxacin: a focus on pharmacokinetic concerns.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gao, Chu-Han; Yu, Lu-Shan; Zeng, Su; Huang, Yu-Wen; Zhou, Quan

    2014-01-01

    Personalized medicine should be encouraged because patients are complex, and this complexity results from biological, medical (eg, demographics, genetics, polypharmacy, and multimorbidities), socioeconomic, and cultural factors. Levofloxacin (LVX) is a broad-spectrum fluoroquinolone antibiotic. Awareness of personalized therapeutics for LVX seems to be poor in clinical practice, and is reflected in prescribing patterns. Pharmacokinetic-pharmacodynamic studies have raised concerns about suboptimal patient outcomes with the use of LVX for some Gram-negative infections. Meanwhile, new findings in LVX therapeutics have only been sporadically reported in recent years. Therefore, an updated review on personalized LVX treatment with a focus on pharmacokinetic concerns is necessary. Relevant literature was identified by performing a PubMed search covering the period from January 1993 to December 2013. We included studies describing dosage adjustment and factors determining LVX pharmacokinetics, or pharmacokinetic-pharmacodynamic studies exploring how best to prevent the emergence of resistance to LVX. The full text of each included article was critically reviewed, and data interpretation was performed. In addition to limiting the use of fluoroquinolones, measures such as reducing the breakpoints for antimicrobial susceptibility testing, choice of high-dose short-course of once-daily LVX regimen, and tailoring LVX dose in special patient populations help to achieve the validated pharmacokinetic-pharmacodynamic target and combat the increasing LVX resistance. Obese individuals with normal renal function cleared LVX more efficiently than normal-weight individuals. Compared with the scenario in healthy subjects, standard 2-hour spacing of calcium formulations and oral LVX was insufficient to prevent a chelation interaction in cystic fibrosis patients. Inconsistent conclusions were derived from studies of the influence of sex on the pharmacokinetics of LVX, which might be

  15. [Therapeutic measures in tardive dyskinesia].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tegeler, J; Wöller, W

    1983-06-01

    Studies on the treatments for neuroleptic-induced tardive dyskinesia published in the literature are reviewed. The great number of different treatments and the controversial results of most studies show that there is as yet no specific and safe treatment for tardive dyskinesia. Suggestions for well-designed treatment studies are given: Placebo-controlled double-blind design, larger patient populations, clear diagnostic and standard observing and rating conditions using different assessment methods and videotapes, withdrawal of neuroleptics and antiparkinsonian drugs to discover reversible tardive dyskinesia. If this procedure is not feasible, neuroleptics and other drugs should be maintained at a stable dose level. Longer term studies of some months are necessary to study the prolonged efficacy of different drugs. The effect of dopamine-antagonists such as neuroleptics and of dopamine-depleting agents such as reserpine and oxypertine is of limited duration. Dopamine-agonists such as L-Dopa, bromocriptine and amantadine help only few patients and may even aggravate the symptoms of tardive dyskinesia. In some double-blind studies cholinergic drugs such as lecithin and deanol have improved tardive dyskinesia, but further controlled studies are needed. Anticholinergic drugs such as antiparkinsonian agents should not be prescribed because they may aggravate tardive dyskinesia. Some patients respond to GABA-ergic agents such as baclofen, sodium valproate and the benzodiazepines, but further studies are needed before the value of GABA-ergic agents in the treatment of tardive dyskinesia can be properly assessed. After withdrawal of neuroleptics the average of remission rates within a year is 20%-30%. Elderly patients are more likely to have persistent dyskinesias. A progressive stepwise diminution of the neuroleptic dose and of the antiparkinsonian agents is recommended. When a patient's psychosis is exacerbated after withdrawal of the neuroleptics and tardive dyskinesia

  16. Discovering metric temporal constraint networks on temporal databases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Álvarez, Miguel R; Félix, Paulo; Cariñena, Purificación

    2013-07-01

    In this paper, we propose the ASTPminer algorithm for mining collections of time-stamped sequences to discover frequent temporal patterns, as represented in the simple temporal problem (STP) formalism: a representation of temporal knowledge as a set of event types and a set of metric temporal constraints among them. To focus the mining process, some initial knowledge can be provided by the user, also expressed as an STP, that acts as a seed pattern for the searching procedure. In this manner, the mining algorithm will search for those frequent temporal patterns consistent with the initial knowledge. Health organisations demand, for multiple areas of activity, new computational tools that will obtain new knowledge from huge collections of data. Temporal data mining has arisen as an active research field that provides new algorithms for discovering new temporal knowledge. An important point in defining different proposals is the expressiveness of the resulting temporal knowledge, which is commonly found in the bibliography in a qualitative form. ASTPminer develops an Apriori-like strategy in an iterative algorithm where, as a result of each iteration i, a set of frequent temporal patterns of size i is found that incorporates three distinctive mechanisms: (1) use of a clustering procedure over distributions of temporal distances between events to recognise similar occurrences as temporal patterns; (2) consistency checking of every combination of temporal patterns, which ensures the soundness of the resultant patterns; and (3) use of seed patterns to allow the user to drive the mining process. To validate our proposal, several experiments were conducted over a database of time-stamped sequences obtained from polysomnography tests in patients with sleep apnea-hypopnea syndrome. ASTPminer was able to extract well-known temporal patterns corresponding to different manifestations of the syndrome. Furthermore, the use of seed patterns resulted in a reduction in the size of

  17. Frankincense--therapeutic properties.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Al-Yasiry, Ali Ridha Mustafa; Kiczorowska, Bożena

    2016-01-04

    Recently, increasing interest in natural dietary and therapeutic preparations used as dietary supplements has been observed. One of them is frankincense. This traditional medicine of the East is believed to have anti-inflammatory, expectorant, antiseptic, and even anxiolytic and anti-neurotic effects. The present study aims to verify the reported therapeutic properties of Boswellia resin and describe its chemical composition based on available scientific studies. The main component of frankincense is oil (60%). It contains mono- (13%) and diterpenes (40%) as well as ethyl acetate (21.4%), octyl acetate (13.4%) and methylanisole (7.6%). The highest biological activity among terpenes is characteristic of 11-keto-ß-acetyl-beta-boswellic acid, acetyl-11-keto-ß-boswellic acid and acetyl-α-boswellic acid. Contemporary studies have shown that resin indeed has an analgesic, tranquilising and anti-bacterial effects. From the point of view of therapeutic properties, extracts from Boswellia serrata and Boswellia carterii are reported to be particularly useful. They reduce inflammatory conditions in the course of rheumatism by inhibiting leukocyte elastase and degrading glycosaminoglycans. Boswellia preparations inhibit 5-lipoxygenase and prevent the release of leukotrienes, thus having an anti-inflammatory effect in ulcerative colitis, irritable bowel syndrome, bronchitis and sinusitis. Inhalation and consumption of Boswellia olibanum reduces the risk of asthma. In addition, boswellic acids have an antiproliferative effect on tumours. They inhibit proliferation of tumour cells of the leukaemia and glioblastoma subset. They have an anti-tumour effect since they inhibit topoisomerase I and II-alpha and stimulate programmed cell death (apoptosis).

  18. Frankincense – therapeutic properties

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ali Ridha Mustafa Al-Yasiry

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Recently, increasing interest in natural dietary and therapeutic preparations used as dietary supplements has been observed. One of them is frankincense. This traditional medicine of the East is believed to have anti-inflammatory, expectorant, antiseptic, and even anxiolytic and anti-neurotic effects. The present study aims to verify the reported therapeutic properties of Boswellia resin and describe its chemical composition based on available scientific studies. The main component of frankincense is oil (60%. It contains mono- (13% and diterpenes (40% as well as ethyl acetate (21.4%, octyl acetate (13.4% and methylanisole (7.6%. The highest biological activity among terpenes is characteristic of 11-keto-ß-acetyl-beta-boswellic acid, acetyl-11-keto-ß-boswellic acid and acetyl-α-boswellic acid. Contemporary studies have shown that resin indeed has an analgesic, tranquilising and anti-bacterial effects. From the point of view of therapeutic properties, extracts from Boswellia serrata and Boswellia carterii are reported to be particularly useful. They reduce inflammatory conditions in the course of rheumatism by inhibiting leukocyte elastase and degrading glycosaminoglycans. Boswellia preparations inhibit 5-lipoxygenase and prevent the release of leukotrienes, thus having an anti-inflammatory effect in ulcerative colitis, irritable bowel syndrome, bronchitis and sinusitis. Inhalation and consumption of Boswellia olibanum reduces the risk of asthma. In addition, boswellic acids have an antiproliferative effect on tumours. They inhibit proliferation of tumour cells of the leukaemia and glioblastoma subset. They have an anti-tumour effect since they inhibit topoisomerase I and II-alpha and stimulate programmed cell death (apoptosis.

  19. Therapeutic nanomedicine surmounts the limitations of pharmacotherapy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Odiba Arome

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available Science always strives to find an improved way of doing things and nanoscience is one such approach. Nanomaterials are suitable for pharmaceutical applications mostly because of their size which facilitates absorption, distribution, metabolism and excretion of the nanoparticles. Whether labile or insoluble nanoparticles, their cytotoxic effect on malignant cells has moved the use of nanomedicine into focus. Since nanomedicine can be described as the science and technology of diagnosing, treating and preventing diseases towards ultimately improving human health, a lot of nanotechnology options have received approval by various regulatory agencies. Nanodrugs also have been discovered to be more precise in targeting the desired site, hence maximizing the therapeutic effects, while minimizing side-effects on the rest of the body. This unique property and more has made nanomedicine popular in therapeutic medicine employing nanotechnology in genetic therapy, drug encapsulation, enzyme manipulation and control, tissue engineering, target drug delivery, pharmacogenomics, stem cell and cloning, and even virus-based hybrids. This review highlights nanoproducts that are in development and have gained approval through one clinical trial stage or the other.

  20. [Therapeutic applications of digestive endoscopy].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ortega, J A; Pérez, L; Madureri, V

    1976-01-01

    Endoscopy has proven useful as a diagnostic tool and recently many useful therapeutic possibilities have been proposed. The authors discuss their experience with therapeutic endoscopic procedures and present new ones for treatment of Acalasia and small sliding hiatal hernia.

  1. Therapeutic approaches to cellulite.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Green, Jeremy B; Cohen, Joel L; Kaufman, Joely; Metelitsa, Andrei I; Kaminer, Michael S

    2015-09-01

    Cellulite is a condition that affects the vast majority of women. Although it is of no danger to one's overall health, cellulite can be psychosocially debilitating. Consequently, much research has been devoted to understanding cellulite and its etiopathogenesis. With additional insights into the underlying causes of its clinical presentation, therapeutic modalities have been developed that offer hope to cellulite sufferers. This review examines evidence for topical treatments, noninvasive energy-based devices, and recently developed minimally invasive interventions that may finally provide a solution. ©2015 Frontline Medical Communications.

  2. [Achievement of therapeutic objectives].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mantilla, Teresa

    2014-07-01

    Therapeutic objectives for patients with atherogenic dyslipidemia are achieved by improving patient compliance and adherence. Clinical practice guidelines address the importance of treatment compliance for achieving objectives. The combination of a fixed dose of pravastatin and fenofibrate increases the adherence by simplifying the drug regimen and reducing the number of daily doses. The good tolerance, the cost of the combination and the possibility of adjusting the administration to the patient's lifestyle helps achieve the objectives for these patients with high cardiovascular risk. Copyright © 2014 Sociedad Española de Arteriosclerosis y Elsevier España, S.L. All rights reserved.

  3. [Is therapeutic deadlock inevitable?].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vignat, Jean-Pierre

    2016-01-01

    Many long-term treatments appear to be an expression of therapeutic deadlock. The situation leads to a questioning of the concept of chronicity and the identification of the determining factors of situations which are apparently blocked, marked by the search for solutions taking a back seat to the taking of action. The interaction between patients' mental apparatus and the care apparatus lies at the heart of the question, interpreted from an institutional, collective and individual perspective, supported by the clinical and psychopathological approach, and the return to the prioritisation of the thought. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  4. Current approaches to discover marine antileishmanial natural products.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tempone, André G; Martins de Oliveira, Camila; Berlinck, Roberto G S

    2011-04-01

    Leishmaniasis is a neglected infectious disease caused by kinetoplastid protozoans. An urgent need for novel chemotherapeutics exists. The current approaches to discover new antileishmanial compounds present many drawbacks, including high-cost and time-consuming bioassays. Thus, advances in leishmaniasis treatment are limited, and the development of screening assays is hindered. The combination of multidisciplinary approaches using standardised methods and synchronous projects could be an alternative to develop novel drugs for leishmaniasis treatment. In this review, we discuss the current status of leishmaniasis occurrence and treatment. In addition, we address the advantages and limitations of in vitro leishmaniasis bioassays and discuss the findings of drug discovery research using natural products. Finally, we comprehensively review the marine natural products that are active against Leishmania spp., including their natural sources and bioactivity profile. © Georg Thieme Verlag KG Stuttgart · New York.

  5. [Recently discovered hormones with a role in energy homeostasis].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krykorková, I; Nedvídková, J

    2003-02-01

    Adipocytal hormones resistin and adiponectin and gastric peptide ghrelin are recently discovered hormones, which are considered to take part in energy metabolism regulation. Resistin is expressed in adipose tissue only and its increased levels could cause insulin resistance and thus link obesity with type 2 diabetes. Adiponectin, as well as resistin, are products of genes, expressed in adipose tissue. Adiponectin could prevent development of aterosclerosis and it could play a role in anti-inflammatory reactions. Ghrelin is produced mainly in the stomach. Beside its role in long-term regulation of energy metabolism, it is involved in the short-term regulation of feeding. Main roles of resistin, adiponectin and ghrelin are summarised in the presented overview.

  6. Communication Boot Camp: Discover the Speaker in You!

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zuraidah Binti Ali

    2013-07-01

    Full Text Available Learning can take place almost anywhere, and this is especially true for our undergraduates who wish to become public speakers. Besides university course and public speaking workshops on campus grounds, undergraduates are now looking for a different learning environment – communication boot camps!! This study presents a compilation of learners’ experience, fun-filled activities, insightful feedback and memorable boot camp moments as captured in camp photos and feedback surveys. It involves a total of thirty seven undergraduates who enrolled in a Communication Boot Camp at Janda Baik, Pahang. Results show that Communication Boot Camp is a successful strategy to groom public speakers with a positive correlation between camp success and camp objectives, particularly in reducing shyness, motivating participants to become public speakers and discovering their talent and skills. In short, the study adds to the promise of zest and delight in public speaking.

  7. Cassini discovers a kinematic spiral ring around Saturn.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Charnoz, S; Porco, C C; Déau, E; Brahic, A; Spitale, J N; Bacques, G; Baillie, K

    2005-11-25

    Since the time of the Voyager flybys of Saturn in 1980-1981, Saturn's eccentric F ring has been known to be accompanied on either side by faint strands of material. New Cassini observations show that these strands, initially interpreted as concentric ring segments, are in fact connected and form a single one-arm trailing spiral winding at least three times around Saturn. The spiral rotates around Saturn with the orbital motion of its constituent particles. This structure is likely the result of differential orbital motion stretching an initial cloud of particles scattered from the dense core of the F ring. Different scenarios of formation, implying ringlet-satellite interactions, are explored. A recently discovered moon candidate, S/2004 S6, is on an orbit that crosses the F-ring core at the intersection of the spiral with the ring, which suggests a dynamical connection between S/2004 S6 and the spiral.

  8. A systematic approach to discover and characterize natural plant biostimulants

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Giovanni ePovero

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available The use of natural plant biostimulants is proposed as an innovative solution to address the challenges to sustainable agriculture, to ensure optimal nutrient uptake, crop yield, quality, and tolerance to abiotic stress. However, the process of selection and characterization of plant biostimulant matrices is complex and involves a series of rigorous evaluations customized to the needs of the plant.Here, we propose a highly differentiated plant biostimulant development and production platform, which involves a combination of technology, processes, and know-how. Chemistry, biology and omic concepts are combined/integrated to investigate and understand the specific mode(s of action of bioactive ingredients. The proposed approach allows to predict and characterize the function of natural compounds as biostimulants. By managing and analyzing massive amounts of complex data, it is therefore possible to discover, evaluate and validate new product candidates, thus expanding the uses of existing products to meet the emerging needs of agriculture.

  9. A Systematic Approach to Discover and Characterize Natural Plant Biostimulants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Povero, Giovanni; Mejia, Juan F; Di Tommaso, Donata; Piaggesi, Alberto; Warrior, Prem

    2016-01-01

    The use of natural plant biostimulants is proposed as an innovative solution to address the challenges to sustainable agriculture, to ensure optimal nutrient uptake, crop yield, quality, and tolerance to abiotic stress. However, the process of selection and characterization of plant biostimulant matrices is complex and involves a series of rigorous evaluations customized to the needs of the plant. Here, we propose a highly differentiated plant biostimulant development and production platform, which involves a combination of technology, processes, and know-how. Chemistry, biology and omic concepts are combined/integrated to investigate and understand the specific mode(s) of action of bioactive ingredients. The proposed approach allows to predict and characterize the function of natural compounds as biostimulants. By managing and analyzing massive amounts of complex data, it is therefore possible to discover, evaluate and validate new product candidates, thus expanding the uses of existing products to meet the emerging needs of agriculture.

  10. Quantify spatial relations to discover handwritten graphical symbols

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Jinpeng; Mouchère, Harold; Viard-Gaudin, Christian

    2012-01-01

    To model a handwritten graphical language, spatial relations describe how the strokes are positioned in the 2-dimensional space. Most of existing handwriting recognition systems make use of some predefined spatial relations. However, considering a complex graphical language, it is hard to express manually all the spatial relations. Another possibility would be to use a clustering technique to discover the spatial relations. In this paper, we discuss how to create a relational graph between strokes (nodes) labeled with graphemes in a graphical language. Then we vectorize spatial relations (edges) for clustering and quantization. As the targeted application, we extract the repetitive sub-graphs (graphical symbols) composed of graphemes and learned spatial relations. On two handwriting databases, a simple mathematical expression database and a complex flowchart database, the unsupervised spatial relations outperform the predefined spatial relations. In addition, we visualize the frequent patterns on two text-lines containing Chinese characters.

  11. Discovering Related Clinical Concepts Using Large Amounts of Clinical Notes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kavita Ganesan

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available The ability to find highly related clinical concepts is essential for many applications such as for hypothesis generation, query expansion for medical literature search, search results filtering, ICD-10 code filtering and many other applications. While manually constructed medical terminologies such as SNOMED CT can surface certain related concepts, these terminologies are inadequate as they depend on expertise of several subject matter experts making the terminology curation process open to geographic and language bias. In addition, these terminologies also provide no quantifiable evidence on how related the concepts are. In this work, we explore an unsupervised graphical approach to mine related concepts by leveraging the volume within large amounts of clinical notes. Our evaluation shows that we are able to use a data driven approach to discovering highly related concepts for various search terms including medications, symptoms and diseases.

  12. Re-discovering Mendel: The Case of Carl Correns

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rheinberger, Hans-Jörg

    2015-01-01

    Carl Erich Correns (1864-1933) is remembered in the annals of science as one of the three botanists who re-discovered Mendel's laws. He can also, however, be regarded as one of the founding figures of classical genetics in Germany. Between 1894 and 1899 he carried out the crossing experiments with corn and peas that led to the re-statement of Gregor Mendel's (1822-1884) results. Between 1900 and 1910, he explored the complications of these laws, including the coupling of factors due to their chromosomal location and the inheritance of sex, in a great number of plant species. In later years Correns became interested in and experimented on phenomena of extra-nuclear inheritance.

  13. Discovering opinion leaders for medical topics using news articles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jonnalagadda, Siddhartha; Peeler, Ryan; Topham, Philip

    2012-03-15

    Rapid identification of subject experts for medical topics helps in improving the implementation of discoveries by speeding the time to market drugs and aiding in clinical trial recruitment, etc. Identifying such people who influence opinion through social network analysis is gaining prominence. In this work, we explore how to combine named entity recognition from unstructured news articles with social network analysis to discover opinion leaders for a given medical topic. We employed a Conditional Random Field algorithm to extract three categories of entities from health-related new articles: Person, Organization and Location. We used the latter two to disambiguate polysemy and synonymy for the person names, used simple rules to identify the subject experts, and then applied social network analysis techniques to discover the opinion leaders among them based on their media presence. A network was created by linking each pair of subject experts who are mentioned together in an article. The social network analysis metrics (including centrality metrics such as Betweenness, Closeness, Degree and Eigenvector) are used for ranking the subject experts based on their power in information flow. We extracted 734,204 person mentions from 147,528 news articles related to obesity from January 1, 2007 through July 22, 2010. Of these, 147,879 mentions have been marked as subject experts. The F-score of extracting person names is 88.5%. More than 80% of the subject experts who rank among top 20 in at least one of the metrics could be considered as opinion leaders in obesity. The analysis of the network of subject experts with media presence revealed that an opinion leader might have fewer mentions in the news articles, but a high network centrality measure and vice-versa. Betweenness, Closeness and Degree centrality measures were shown to supplement frequency counts in the task of finding subject experts. Further, opinion leaders missed in scientific publication network analysis

  14. Discovering the plates boundaries in the Mediterranean sea

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marinelli, Maurizio

    2017-04-01

    During the 8th class the students learn geology. We analyze the earth's layers, the earthquakes, the volcanoes and other natural phenomena like subduction and orogeny. We start with a global study but our goal is to focus on the crust to discover the plates boundaries, particularly the boundary between Eurasian and African Plate in the Mediterranean sea. It's very simple for the students to discover all the information using the Internet or the science book, but I want to make with them an exploration of earth science with the help of the natural phenomena we studied during the year. We connect with Istituto Nazionale di Geofisica e Vulcanologia ( http://www.ingv.it/en/ ) where we can find a map with the earthquakes happened in the last years in Italy and in the Mediterranean sea and the list of the main volcanoes. In this way we can draw a map of the mediterranean plates and we can talk about the past and the future of the Mediterranean sea, Europe and Africa based on our maps and on the Alps orogeny. Using youtube we can have a confirm of our hypothesis about the future of the Mediterranean sea (https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=uGcDed4xVD4 ). A good observation for the students is given by the fact that we live in Europe but actually we stay on the African plate. The boundary is 5 km north of our school and we can go and visit the place where it is possible to see the different height of the two plates.

  15. Risk of appendicitis in patients with incidentally discovered appendicoliths.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khan, Muhammad Sohaib; Chaudhry, Mustafa Belal Hafeez; Shahzad, Noman; Tariq, Marvi; Memon, Wasim Ahmed; Alvi, Abdul Rehman

    2018-01-01

    An appendicolith-related appendiceal obstruction leading to appendicitis is a commonly encountered surgical emergency that has clear evidence-based management plans. However, there is no consensus on management of asymptomatic patients when appendicoliths are found incidentally. The objective of this study was to determine the risk of appendicitis in patients with an incidental finding of the appendicolith. A retrospective matched cohort study of patients with appendicolith discovered incidentally on computed tomographic scan from January 2008 to December 2014 at our institution was completed. The size and position of the appendicolith were ascertained. The study group was matched by age and gender to a control group. Both groups were contacted and interviewed regarding development of appendicitis. In total, 111 patients with appendicolith were successfully contacted and included in the study. Mean age was found to be 38 ± 15 y with 36 (32%) of the study population being females. Mean length of appendix was 66 ± 16 mm, and mean width was 5.8 ± 0.9 mm. Mean size of the appendicolith was 3.6 ± 1.1 mm (1.4-7.8 mm). Fifty-eight percent of appendicoliths was located at the proximal end or whole of appendix, 31% at mid area, and 11% at the distal end of appendix. All patients of the study and control groups were contacted, and at a mean follow-up of 4.0 ± 1.7 y, there was no occurrence of acute appendicitis in either group. Patients with incidentally discovered appendicolith on radiological imaging did not develop appendicitis. Hence, the risk of developing acute appendicitis for these patients does not seem higher than the general population. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  16. Discovering Tradeoffs, Vulnerabilities, and Dependencies within Water Resources Systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reed, P. M.

    2015-12-01

    There is a growing recognition and interest in using emerging computational tools for discovering the tradeoffs that emerge across complex combinations infrastructure options, adaptive operations, and sign posts. As a field concerned with "deep uncertainties", it is logically consistent to include a more direct acknowledgement that our choices for dealing with computationally demanding simulations, advanced search algorithms, and sensitivity analysis tools are themselves subject to failures that could adversely bias our understanding of how systems' vulnerabilities change with proposed actions. Balancing simplicity versus complexity in our computational frameworks is nontrivial given that we are often exploring high impact irreversible decisions. It is not always clear that accepted models even encompass important failure modes. Moreover as they become more complex and computationally demanding the benefits and consequences of simplifications are often untested. This presentation discusses our efforts to address these challenges through our "many-objective robust decision making" (MORDM) framework for the design and management water resources systems. The MORDM framework has four core components: (1) elicited problem conception and formulation, (2) parallel many-objective search, (3) interactive visual analytics, and (4) negotiated selection of robust alternatives. Problem conception and formulation is the process of abstracting a practical design problem into a mathematical representation. We build on the emerging work in visual analytics to exploit interactive visualization of both the design space and the objective space in multiple heterogeneous linked views that permit exploration and discovery. Many-objective search produces tradeoff solutions from potentially competing problem formulations that can each consider up to ten conflicting objectives based on current computational search capabilities. Negotiated design selection uses interactive visualization

  17. Discovering opinion leaders for medical topics using news articles

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jonnalagadda Siddhartha

    2012-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Rapid identification of subject experts for medical topics helps in improving the implementation of discoveries by speeding the time to market drugs and aiding in clinical trial recruitment, etc. Identifying such people who influence opinion through social network analysis is gaining prominence. In this work, we explore how to combine named entity recognition from unstructured news articles with social network analysis to discover opinion leaders for a given medical topic. Methods We employed a Conditional Random Field algorithm to extract three categories of entities from health-related new articles: Person, Organization and Location. We used the latter two to disambiguate polysemy and synonymy for the person names, used simple rules to identify the subject experts, and then applied social network analysis techniques to discover the opinion leaders among them based on their media presence. A network was created by linking each pair of subject experts who are mentioned together in an article. The social network analysis metrics (including centrality metrics such as Betweenness, Closeness, Degree and Eigenvector are used for ranking the subject experts based on their power in information flow. Results We extracted 734,204 person mentions from 147,528 news articles related to obesity from January 1, 2007 through July 22, 2010. Of these, 147,879 mentions have been marked as subject experts. The F-score of extracting person names is 88.5%. More than 80% of the subject experts who rank among top 20 in at least one of the metrics could be considered as opinion leaders in obesity. Conclusion The analysis of the network of subject experts with media presence revealed that an opinion leader might have fewer mentions in the news articles, but a high network centrality measure and vice-versa. Betweenness, Closeness and Degree centrality measures were shown to supplement frequency counts in the task of finding subject experts. Further

  18. Therapeutic Drug Monitoring of Voriconazole in the Management of Invasive Fungal Infections: A Critical Review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Elewa, Hazem; El-Mekaty, Eman; El-Bardissy, Ahmed; Ensom, Mary H H; Wilby, Kyle John

    2015-12-01

    The broad-spectrum triazole antifungal agent voriconazole is highly efficacious against invasive fungal infections (IFIs) caused by Aspergillus spp. and Candida spp. IFIs are associated with high rates of mortality and morbidity, especially in vulnerable populations such as patients with hematopoietic stem cell transplant as well as other immunocompromised patients. Efficacy of voriconazole in these patients is critical to ensure positive outcomes and reduce mortality. However, a major limitation of voriconazole is the risk of adverse events such as hepatotoxicity and neurotoxicity. As such, therapeutic drug monitoring (TDM) has been suggested as a mechanism to optimize both efficacy and safety. The aim of this review was to summarize and evaluate evidence from the primary literature that assessed TDM outcomes for voriconazole as well as evaluate the association between CYP2C19 polymorphism and the clinical outcomes of voriconazole. Findings showed associations for both efficacy and safety outcomes with measurement of drug concentrations, yet exact targets or thresholds remain unclear. As such, TDM should be reserved for those patients not responding to therapy with voriconazole or those experiencing adverse drug reactions. Future studies should attempt to further define these populations within controlled settings. Studies that evaluated the effect of CYP2C19 genetic polymorphism on clinical outcomes found no significant relationship between CYP2C19 genotype and hepatotoxicity. These negative findings may be due to lack of power, use of phenotypes not well-defined, and the presence of other interacting factors that may impact voriconazole pharmacokinetics. Future well-designed studies are warranted to confirm these findings.

  19. Therapeutic Drug Monitoring of Posaconazole: a Monocentric Study with 54 Adults▿

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lebeaux, David; Lanternier, Fanny; Elie, Caroline; Suarez, Felipe; Buzyn, Agnès; Viard, Jean-Paul; Bougnoux, Marie-Elisabeth; Lecuit, Marc; Jullien, Vincent; Lortholary, Olivier

    2009-01-01

    Posaconazole is a potent broad-spectrum triazole antifungal. Little is known about the prevalence and risk factors for low plasma posaconazole concentrations (PPCs). We retrospectively reviewed all adult patients whose PPCs were measured after at least 5 days of treatment between April 2006 and July 2008 at the Hôpital Necker Enfants Malades. A low PPC was defined as a concentration lower than 500 ng/ml. Fifty-four patients were included: 36 receiving prophylactic (200 mg three times a day) and 18 receiving curative (400 mg twice a day) posaconazole therapy. The prevalence of low PPCs was 44% (16/36) in the prophylaxis group and 22% (4/18) in the curative-treatment group. In the prophylaxis group, low PPCs tended to be more frequent in cases of digestive disease (62.5% versus 30%; P = 0.051) and were significantly more frequent among patients with diarrhea (71.4% versus 27%; P = 0.009) or mucositis (100% versus 33%; P = 0.004). In the curative-treatment group, low PPCs were significantly more frequent in cases of diarrhea (75% versus 7%; P = 0.018). In the prophylaxis group, the only two patients who subsequently developed invasive fungal infections exhibited low PPCs. The only adverse event was hepatotoxicity for 2/54 patients (3.7%), which was not related to high plasma drug concentrations. In conclusion, low PPC is common, significantly more frequent in cases of diarrhea or mucositis, and potentially associated with subsequent invasive fungal infection. Therapeutic drug monitoring of posaconazole is therefore mandatory for immunosuppressed adults, at least for those with gastrointestinal disorders. PMID:19752284

  20. Mechanisms of Plasma Therapeutics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Graves, David

    2015-09-01

    In this talk, I address research directed towards biomedical applications of atmospheric pressure plasma such as sterilization, surgery, wound healing and anti-cancer therapy. The field has seen remarkable growth in the last 3-5 years, but the mechanisms responsible for the biomedical effects have remained mysterious. It is known that plasmas readily create reactive oxygen species (ROS) and reactive nitrogen species (RNS). ROS and RNS (or RONS), in addition to a suite of other radical and non-radical reactive species, are essential actors in an important sub-field of aerobic biology termed ``redox'' (or oxidation-reduction) biology. It is postulated that cold atmospheric plasma (CAP) can trigger a therapeutic shielding response in tissue in part by creating a time- and space-localized, burst-like form of oxy-nitrosative stress on near-surface exposed cells through the flux of plasma-generated RONS. RONS-exposed surface layers of cells communicate to the deeper levels of tissue via a form of the ``bystander effect,'' similar to responses to other forms of cell stress. In this proposed model of CAP therapeutics, the plasma stimulates a cellular survival mechanism through which aerobic organisms shield themselves from infection and other challenges.

  1. Therapeutic Uses of Exosomes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zacharias E. Suntres

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Exosomes are membrane vesicles with a diameter of 40–100 nm that are secreted by many cell types into the extracellular milieu. Exosomes are found in cell culture supernatants and in different biological fluids and are known to be secreted by most cell types under normal and pathological conditions. Considerable research is focusing on the exploitation of exosomes in biological fluids for biomarkers in the diagnosis of disease. More recently, exosomes are being exploited for their therapeutic potential. Exosomes derived from dendritic cells, tumor cells, and malignant effusions demonstrate immunomodulatory functions and are able to present antigens to T-cells and stimulate antigen-specific T-cell responses. Exosomes have also been examined for their therapeutic potential in the treatment of infections such as toxoplasmosis, diphtheria, tuberculosis and atypical severe acute respiratory syndrome as well as autoimmune diseases. Attempts to find practical applications for exosomes continue to expand with the role of exosomes as a drug delivery system for the treatment of autoimmune/inflammatory diseases and cancers.

  2. Engineering therapeutic protein disaggregases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shorter, James

    2016-05-15

    Therapeutic agents are urgently required to cure several common and fatal neurodegenerative disorders caused by protein misfolding and aggregation, including amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS), Parkinson's disease (PD), and Alzheimer's disease (AD). Protein disaggregases that reverse protein misfolding and restore proteins to native structure, function, and localization could mitigate neurodegeneration by simultaneously reversing 1) any toxic gain of function of the misfolded form and 2) any loss of function due to misfolding. Potentiated variants of Hsp104, a hexameric AAA+ ATPase and protein disaggregase from yeast, have been engineered to robustly disaggregate misfolded proteins connected with ALS (e.g., TDP-43 and FUS) and PD (e.g., α-synuclein). However, Hsp104 has no metazoan homologue. Metazoa possess protein disaggregase systems distinct from Hsp104, including Hsp110, Hsp70, and Hsp40, as well as HtrA1, which might be harnessed to reverse deleterious protein misfolding. Nevertheless, vicissitudes of aging, environment, or genetics conspire to negate these disaggregase systems in neurodegenerative disease. Thus, engineering potentiated human protein disaggregases or isolating small-molecule enhancers of their activity could yield transformative therapeutics for ALS, PD, and AD. © 2016 Shorter. This article is distributed by The American Society for Cell Biology under license from the author(s). Two months after publication it is available to the public under an Attribution–Noncommercial–Share Alike 3.0 Unported Creative Commons License (http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-sa/3.0).

  3. Necrosis Avidity: A Newly Discovered Feature of Hypericin and its Preclinical Applications in Necrosis Imaging

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jiang, Binghu; Wang, Jichen; Ni, Yicheng; Chen, Feng

    2013-01-01

    Hypericin has been widely studied as a potent photosensitizer for photodynamic therapy in both preclinical and clinical settings. Recently, hypericin has also been discovered to have a specific avidity for necrotic tissue. This affinity is also observed in a series of radiolabeled derivatives of hypericin, including [123I]iodohypericin, [124I]iodohypericin, and [131I]iodohypericin. Hypericin, along with other necrosis-avid contrast agents, has been investigated for use in noninvasively targeting necrotic tissues in numerous disorders. Potential clinical applications of hypericin include the identification of acute myocardial infarction, evaluation of tissue viability, assessment of therapeutic responses to treatments, and interventional procedures for solid tumors. The mechanisms of necrosis avidity in hypericin remain to be fully elucidated, although several hypotheses have been suggested. In particular, it has been proposed that the necrosis avidity of hypericin is compound specific; for instance, cholesterol, phosphatidylserine, or phosphatidylethanolamine components in the phospholipid bilayer of cellular membranes may be the major targets for its observed selectivity. Further investigations are needed to identify the specific binding moiety that is responsible for the necrosis avidity of hypericin. PMID:24052807

  4. Small molecule correctors of F508del-CFTR discovered by structure-based virtual screening

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kalid, Ori; Mense, Martin; Fischman, Sharon; Shitrit, Alina; Bihler, Hermann; Ben-Zeev, Efrat; Schutz, Nili; Pedemonte, Nicoletta; Thomas, Philip J.; Bridges, Robert J.; Wetmore, Diana R.; Marantz, Yael; Senderowitz, Hanoch

    2010-12-01

    Folding correctors of F508del-CFTR were discovered by in silico structure-based screening utilizing homology models of CFTR. The intracellular segment of CFTR was modeled and three cavities were identified at inter-domain interfaces: (1) Interface between the two Nucleotide Binding Domains (NBDs); (2) Interface between NBD1 and Intracellular Loop (ICL) 4, in the region of the F508 deletion; (3) multi-domain interface between NBD1:2:ICL1:2:4. We hypothesized that compounds binding at these interfaces may improve the stability of the protein, potentially affecting the folding yield or surface stability. In silico structure-based screening was performed at the putative binding-sites and a total of 496 candidate compounds from all three sites were tested in functional assays. A total of 15 compounds, representing diverse chemotypes, were identified as F508del folding correctors. This corresponds to a 3% hit rate, tenfold higher than hit rates obtained in corresponding high-throughput screening campaigns. The same binding sites also yielded potentiators and, most notably, compounds with a dual corrector-potentiator activity (dual-acting). Compounds harboring both activity types may prove to be better leads for the development of CF therapeutics than either pure correctors or pure potentiators. To the best of our knowledge this is the first report of structure-based discovery of CFTR modulators.

  5. Therapeutic and diagnostic nanomaterials

    CERN Document Server

    Devasena T

    2017-01-01

    This brief highlights nanoparticles used in the diagnosis and treatment of prominent diseases and toxic conditions. Ecofriendly methods which are ideal for the synthesis of medicinally valued nanoparticles are explained and the characteristic features of these particles projected. The role of these particles in the therapeutic field, and the induced biological changes in some diseases are discussed. The main focus is on inflammation, oxidative stress and cellular membrane integrity alterations. The effect of nanoparticles on these changes produced by various agents are highlighted using in vitro and in vivo models. The mechanism of nanoparticles in ameliorating the biological changes is supported by relevant images and data. Finally, the brief demonstrates recent developments on the use of nanoparticles in diagnosis or sensing of some biological materials and biologically hazardous environmental materials.

  6. Antibody Engineering and Therapeutics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Almagro, Juan Carlos; Gilliland, Gary L; Breden, Felix; Scott, Jamie K; Sok, Devin; Pauthner, Matthias; Reichert, Janice M; Helguera, Gustavo; Andrabi, Raiees; Mabry, Robert; Bléry, Mathieu; Voss, James E; Laurén, Juha; Abuqayyas, Lubna; Barghorn, Stefan; Ben-Jacob, Eshel; Crowe, James E; Huston, James S; Johnston, Stephen Albert; Krauland, Eric; Lund-Johansen, Fridtjof; Marasco, Wayne A; Parren, Paul WHI; Xu, Kai Y

    2014-01-01

    The 24th Antibody Engineering & Therapeutics meeting brought together a broad range of participants who were updated on the latest advances in antibody research and development. Organized by IBC Life Sciences, the gathering is the annual meeting of The Antibody Society, which serves as the scientific sponsor. Preconference workshops on 3D modeling and delineation of clonal lineages were featured, and the conference included sessions on a wide variety of topics relevant to researchers, including systems biology; antibody deep sequencing and repertoires; the effects of antibody gene variation and usage on antibody response; directed evolution; knowledge-based design; antibodies in a complex environment; polyreactive antibodies and polyspecificity; the interface between antibody therapy and cellular immunity in cancer; antibodies in cardiometabolic medicine; antibody pharmacokinetics, distribution and off-target toxicity; optimizing antibody formats for immunotherapy; polyclonals, oligoclonals and bispecifics; antibody discovery platforms; and antibody-drug conjugates. PMID:24589717

  7. Therapeutic applications of melatonin

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-01-01

    Melatonin is a methoxyindole synthesized within the pineal gland. The hormone is secreted during the night and appears to play multiple roles within the human organism. The hormone contributes to the regulation of biological rhythms, may induce sleep, has strong antioxidant action and appears to contribute to the protection of the organism from carcinogenesis and neurodegenerative disorders. At a therapeutic level as well as in prevention, melatonin is used for the management of sleep disorders and jet lag, for the resynchronization of circadian rhythms in situations such as blindness and shift work, for its preventive action in the development of cancer, as additive therapy in cancer and as therapy for preventing the progression of Alzheimer’s disease and other neurodegenerative disorders. PMID:23515203

  8. Microfabricated therapeutic actuators

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Abraham P.; Northrup, M. Allen; Ciarlo, Dino R.; Krulevitch, Peter A.; Benett, William J.

    1999-01-01

    Microfabricated therapeutic actuators are fabricated using a shape memory polymer (SMP), a polyurethane-based material that undergoes a phase transformation at a specified temperature (Tg). At a temperature above temperature Tg material is soft and can be easily reshaped into another configuration. As the temperature is lowered below temperature Tg the new shape is fixed and locked in as long as the material stays below temperature Tg. Upon reheating the material to a temperature above Tg, the material will return to its original shape. By the use of such SMP material, SMP microtubing can be used as a release actuator for the delivery of embolic coils through catheters into aneurysms, for example. The microtubing can be manufactured in various sizes and the phase change temperature Tg is determinate for an intended temperature target and intended use.

  9. Therapeutic effects of reading

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Agustín HIDALGO

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available Reading is an act that requires isolation and loneliness, which allows rewriting the narratives through the identification between the reader and the character, the involvement in the fact narrated and singular recreation by every single reader. The act of reading allows stepping aside from reality. The reading as well as the writing perform the therapeutic effect of helping to understand the illness and to know experiences of others patients that can be useful for the accompaniment, overcoming and/or making decisions. There is not a concrete literary that could be universally recommend to every patient, but all the genre can be useful to some patient. However, poetry, novel and autobiographies are frequently referred as the manuscripts that provide help and consolation.

  10. Antiviral Polymer Therapeutics

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Smith, Anton Allen Abbotsford

    2014-01-01

    polymerized in a controlled manner with carrier monomers of historically proven biocompatible polymers. The carrier polymers, the loading of ribavirin as well as the size of the polymer were varied systematically with the aid of an automated synthesis platform. These polymers were tested in a cellular assay...... of reversible-addition-fragmentation chain transfer polymerization, which not only controls the size of polymer, but also allows the introduction of a terminal amine on the polymer which can be used for further conjugation. This has allowed for not only fluorescent labeling of the polymer, but also protein......The field of drug delivery is in essence an exercise in engineered pharmacokinetics. Methods of doing so have been developed through the introduction of a vehicle carrying the drug, either by encapsulation or covalent attachment. The emergence of polymer therapeutics in anticancer therapy has...

  11. Discovering the first microRNA-targeted drug

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lindow, Morten; Kauppinen, Sakari

    2012-01-01

    MicroRNAs (miRNAs) are important post-transcriptional regulators of nearly every biological process in the cell and play key roles in the pathogenesis of human disease. As a result, there are many drug discovery programs that focus on developing miRNA-based therapeutics. The most advanced...... of these programs targets the liver-expressed miRNA-122 using the locked nucleic acid (LNA)–modified antisense oligonucleotide miravirsen. Here, we describe the discovery of miravirsen, which is currently in phase 2 clinical trials for treatment of hepatitis C virus (HCV) infection....

  12. Therapeutic Approaches in CLIPPERS.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Taieb, Guillaume; Allou, Thibaut; Labauge, Pierre

    2017-05-01

    CLIPPERS for chronic lymphocytic inflammation with pontine perivascular enhancement responsive to steroids, is a steroid-sensitive and steroid-dependent brainstem inflammatory disease of unknown origin. Since its first description in 2010, about 60 cases have been reported throughout the world. The mean age at onset is 50 years and men seem to be more frequently affected. In patients without chronic corticosteroid therapy or immunosuppressive agents, the disease had a relapsing remitting course, and the mean annualized relapse rate was 0.5. During attacks, although clinical and radiological improvement after high doses of corticosteroids was systematically observed, patients could display subsequent disability and hindbrain atrophy. Since no progressive course was observed, clinical and radiological sequelae were correlated with previous severe attacks. Therefore, maintaining the disease in remission may prevent the accumulation of disability. In the literature, no relapse occurred when chronic corticosteroid therapy was maintained above 20 mg per day. However, steroids side effects led to propose corticosteroid-sparing therapies. Unfortunately, no controlled therapy studies for CLIPPERS have been performed yet, and no therapeutic recommendations exist. Using the PubMed database, all articles having the following keywords "chronic lymphocytic inflammation with pontine perivascular enhancement responsive to steroids" and "CLIPPERS" have been analysed. Considering that the mean annual relapse rate was 0.5, and that no relapse occurred when corticosteroid therapy was maintained above 20 mg per day, the therapeutic efficiency of corticosteroid-sparing agents was considered as "probable" when patients had a relapse-free period ≥24 months, in the absence of concomitant corticosteroid therapy. Corticosteroid-sparing agents whose efficiency is "probable" are methotrexate in two cases, cyclophosphamide in one case and hydroxychloroquine in one case. Considering the

  13. Faint Carbon Stars Discovered by the Sloan Digital Sky Survey

    Science.gov (United States)

    Margon, B.; Anderson, S. F.; Deutsch, E. W.; Harris, H. C.; SDSS Collaboration

    1999-12-01

    Although faint high latitude carbon (FHLC) stars range in luminosity by up to factors of 105, both the high and low luminosity versions are interesting. The apparently faintest of the luminous giants are located at >100 kpc, and aside from raising issues of stellar evolution, are also excellent probes of the dynamics of the distant halo, at a distance which encompasses all of the dark matter. The intrinsically faint dwarf carbon stars constitute a class of objects just recognized a decade ago, yet now understood to be the numerical majority of all stars with C2 in their spectra. The faintest of the FHLC (R>16) have thus far been discovered either serendipitously, or in very small numbers by heterogeneous techniques. We have long hoped that the Sloan Digital Sky Survey (SDSS) might provide a large, homogeneously-selected sample of FHLCs via color-selection from the 5-color imaging data base, and followup fiber spectroscopy as an adjunct to other SDSS primary programs. However this is a challenging task, as these rare objects are expected to be only slightly separated from the 108 normal stars in SDSS photometry, even in 5-color space. In particular, most FHLCs are not terribly red. Here we report initial successful results on the search for FHLC stars in SDSS commissioning data. Two such objects have thus far been discovered in a very informal search of a small fraction of the data. The fainter object, at R 19, is one of the faintest FHLC yet known, boding well for the prospect of a respectable number (>102) of new objects in the entire Survey. The brighter object (R 17) is most certainly a dwarf: it displays proper motion of 0.24'' yr-1, one of the highest motions known for any dC star. Curiously, the faint object also shows evidence for a small but significant proper motion, and thus dwarf classification. It now appears likely that SDSS will fulfill long-standing hopes as a source of a large number of uniformly-selected and well-characterized FHLCs. In a metaphor

  14. Discovering vesicle traffic network constraints by model checking.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shukla, Ankit; Bhattacharyya, Arnab; Kuppusamy, Lakshmanan; Srivas, Mandayam; Thattai, Mukund

    2017-01-01

    A eukaryotic cell contains multiple membrane-bound compartments. Transport vesicles move cargo between these compartments, just as trucks move cargo between warehouses. These processes are regulated by specific molecular interactions, as summarized in the Rothman-Schekman-Sudhof model of vesicle traffic. The whole structure can be represented as a transport graph: each organelle is a node, and each vesicle route is a directed edge. What constraints must such a graph satisfy, if it is to represent a biologically realizable vesicle traffic network? Graph connectedness is an informative feature: 2-connectedness is necessary and sufficient for mass balance, but stronger conditions are required to ensure correct molecular specificity. Here we use Boolean satisfiability (SAT) and model checking as a framework to discover and verify graph constraints. The poor scalability of SAT model checkers often prevents their broad application. By exploiting the special structure of the problem, we scale our model checker to vesicle traffic systems with reasonably large numbers of molecules and compartments. This allows us to test a range of hypotheses about graph connectivity, which can later be proved in full generality by other methods.

  15. Cellular Metabolic Network Analysis: Discovering Important Reactions in Treponema pallidum

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Xueying; Zhao, Min; Qu, Hong

    2015-01-01

    T. pallidum, the syphilis-causing pathogen, performs very differently in metabolism compared with other bacterial pathogens. The desire for safe and effective vaccine of syphilis requests identification of important steps in T. pallidum's metabolism. Here, we apply Flux Balance Analysis to represent the reactions quantitatively. Thus, it is possible to cluster all reactions in T. pallidum. By calculating minimal cut sets and analyzing topological structure for the metabolic network of T. pallidum, critical reactions are identified. As a comparison, we also apply the analytical approaches to the metabolic network of H. pylori to find coregulated drug targets and unique drug targets for different microorganisms. Based on the clustering results, all reactions are further classified into various roles. Therefore, the general picture of their metabolic network is obtained and two types of reactions, both of which are involved in nucleic acid metabolism, are found to be essential for T. pallidum. It is also discovered that both hubs of reactions and the isolated reactions in purine and pyrimidine metabolisms play important roles in T. pallidum. These reactions could be potential drug targets for treating syphilis. PMID:26495292

  16. Cellular metabolic network analysis: discovering important reactions in Treponema pallidum.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Xueying; Zhao, Min; Qu, Hong

    2015-01-01

    T. pallidum, the syphilis-causing pathogen, performs very differently in metabolism compared with other bacterial pathogens. The desire for safe and effective vaccine of syphilis requests identification of important steps in T. pallidum's metabolism. Here, we apply Flux Balance Analysis to represent the reactions quantitatively. Thus, it is possible to cluster all reactions in T. pallidum. By calculating minimal cut sets and analyzing topological structure for the metabolic network of T. pallidum, critical reactions are identified. As a comparison, we also apply the analytical approaches to the metabolic network of H. pylori to find coregulated drug targets and unique drug targets for different microorganisms. Based on the clustering results, all reactions are further classified into various roles. Therefore, the general picture of their metabolic network is obtained and two types of reactions, both of which are involved in nucleic acid metabolism, are found to be essential for T. pallidum. It is also discovered that both hubs of reactions and the isolated reactions in purine and pyrimidine metabolisms play important roles in T. pallidum. These reactions could be potential drug targets for treating syphilis.

  17. Discovering geothermal supercritical fluids: a new frontier for seismic exploration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Piana Agostinetti, Nicola; Licciardi, Andrea; Piccinini, Davide; Mazzarini, Francesco; Musumeci, Giovanni; Saccorotti, Gilberto; Chiarabba, Claudio

    2017-11-06

    Exploiting supercritical geothermal resources represents a frontier for the next generation of geothermal electrical power plant, as the heat capacity of supercritical fluids (SCF),which directly impacts on energy production, is much higher than that of fluids at subcritical conditions. Reconnaissance and location of intensively permeable and productive horizons at depth is the present limit for the development of SCF geothermal plants. We use, for the first time, teleseismic converted waves (i.e. receiver function) for discovering those horizons in the crust. Thanks to the capability of receiver function to map buried anisotropic materials, the SCF-bearing horizon is seen as the 4km-depth abrupt termination of a shallow, thick, ultra-high (>30%) anisotropic rock volume, in the center of the Larderello geothermal field. The SCF-bearing horizon develops within the granites of the geothermal field, bounding at depth the vapor-filled heavily-fractured rock matrix that hosts the shallow steam-dominated geothermal reservoirs. The sharp termination at depth of the anisotropic behavior of granites, coinciding with a 2 km-thick stripe of seismicity and diffuse fracturing, points out the sudden change in compressibility of the fluid filling the fractures and is a key-evidence of deep fluids that locally traversed the supercritical conditions. The presence of SCF and fracture permeability in nominally ductile granitic rocks open new scenarios for the understanding of magmatic systems and for geothermal exploitation.

  18. Children's strategies for discovering cause-effect relationships

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rudnitsky, Alan N.; Hunt, Charles R.

    This study describes strategies children use to solve a complex problem. The problem asked children to figure out how to control a vehicle that they drove by pressing particular keys on a computer. The problem can be viewed as scientific in that variables must be identified and hypotheses formulated and tested to discover cause-effect relationships. Subjects were fifth and sixth graders sampled from public and private schools. The primary purpose of the study was to examine the transition between implicit, immature problem-solving strategies and explicit, mature theorizing characteristic of scientific problem solving. The study manipulated the problem perspective subjects were given and the number of cause-effect relationships in the problem. The study's description of children's problem solving highlights focusing, problem-solving behavior that is aimed at forming a mental representation, model, or theory about the problem, as a key link between mature and immature reasoning. Subject's school and school X perspective interaction was found to affect problem-solving performance.

  19. Timing of Five PALFA-discovered Millisecond Pulsars

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stovall, K.; Allen, B.; Bogdanov, S.; Brazier, A.; Camilo, F.; Cardoso, F.; Chatterjee, S.; Cordes, J. M.; Crawford, F.; Deneva, J. S.; Ferdman, R.; Freire, P. C. C.; Hessels, J. W. T.; Jenet, F.; Kaplan, D. L.; Karako-Argaman, C.; Kaspi, V. M.; Knispel, B.; Kotulla, R.; Lazarus, P.; Lee, K. J.; van Leeuwen, J.; Lynch, R.; Lyne, A. G.; Madsen, E.; McLaughlin, M. A.; Patel, C.; Ransom, S. M.; Scholz, P.; Siemens, X.; Stairs, I. H.; Stappers, B. W.; Swiggum, J.; Zhu, W. W.; Venkataraman, A.

    2016-12-01

    We report the discovery and timing results for five millisecond pulsars (MSPs) from the Arecibo PALFA survey: PSRs J1906+0055, J1914+0659, J1933+1726, J1938+2516, and J1957+2516. Timing observations of the five pulsars were conducted with the Arecibo and Lovell telescopes for time spans ranging from 1.5 to 3.3 years. All of the MSPs except one (PSR J1914+0659) are in binary systems with low eccentricities. PSR J1957+2516 is likely a redback pulsar, with a ˜ 0.1 {M}⊙ companion and possible eclipses that last ˜10% of the orbit. The position of PSR J1957+2516 is also coincident with a near-infrared source. All five MSPs are distant (\\gt 3.1 kpc) as determined from their dispersion measures, and none of them show evidence of γ-ray pulsations in a fold of Fermi Gamma-Ray Space Telescope data. These five MSPs bring the total number of MSPs discovered by the PALFA survey to 26 and further demonstrate the power of this survey in finding distant, highly dispersed MSPs deep in the Galactic plane.

  20. Inner solar system material discovered in the Oort cloud.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meech, Karen J; Yang, Bin; Kleyna, Jan; Hainaut, Olivier R; Berdyugina, Svetlana; Keane, Jacqueline V; Micheli, Marco; Morbidelli, Alessandro; Wainscoat, Richard J

    2016-04-01

    We have observed C/2014 S3 (PANSTARRS), a recently discovered object on a cometary orbit coming from the Oort cloud that is physically similar to an inner main belt rocky S-type asteroid. Recent dynamical models successfully reproduce the key characteristics of our current solar system; some of these models require significant migration of the giant planets, whereas others do not. These models provide different predictions on the presence of rocky material expelled from the inner solar system in the Oort cloud. C/2014 S3 could be the key to verifying these predictions of the migration-based dynamical models. Furthermore, this object displays a very faint, weak level of comet-like activity, five to six orders of magnitude less than that of typical ice-rich comets on similar Orbits coming from the Oort cloud. For the nearly tailless appearance, we are calling C/2014 S3 a Manx object. Various arguments convince us that this activity is produced by sublimation of volatile ice, that is, normal cometary activity. The activity implies that C/2014 S3 has retained a tiny fraction of the water that is expected to be present at its formation distance in the inner solar system. We may be looking at fresh inner solar system Earth-forming material that was ejected from the inner solar system and preserved for billions of years in the Oort cloud.