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Sample records for broad-energy germanium detector

  1. An experimental characterisation of a Broad Energy Germanium detector

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Harkness-Brennan, L.J., E-mail: ljh@ns.ph.liv.ac.uk [Oliver Lodge Laboratory, The University of Liverpool, Liverpool L69 7ZE (United Kingdom); Judson, D.S.; Boston, A.J.; Boston, H.C.; Colosimo, S.J.; Cresswell, J.R.; Nolan, P.J. [Oliver Lodge Laboratory, The University of Liverpool, Liverpool L69 7ZE (United Kingdom); Adekola, A.S.; Colaresi, J.; Cocks, J.F.C.; Mueller, W.F. [CANBERRA Industries Inc., 800 Research Parkway, Meriden, CT 06450 (United States)

    2014-10-01

    The spectroscopic and charge collection performance of a BE2825 Broad Energy Germanium (BEGe) detector has been experimentally investigated. The efficiency and energy resolution of the detector have been measured as a function of energy and the noise contributions to the preamplifier signal have been determined. Collimated gamma-ray sources mounted on an automated 3-axis scanning table have been used to study the variation in preamplifier signal shape with gamma-ray interaction position in the detector, so that the position-dependent charge collection process could be characterised. A suite of experimental measurements have also been undertaken to investigate the performance of the detector as a function of bias voltage and we report on anomalous behaviour observed when the detector was operating close to the depletion voltage.

  2. Characterization of a broad-energy germanium detector for its use in CJPL

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Zhi Zeng;Yu-Hao Mi;Ming Zeng;Hao Ma;Qian Yue;Jian-Ping Cheng;Jun-Li Li;Rui Qiu;Hui Zhang

    2017-01-01

    The broad-energy germanium (BEGe) detector,with the ability of background discrimination using pulseshape discrimination, is a competitive candidate for neutrinolessdouble beta decay (0mbb) experiments...

  3. Astroparticle physics with a customized low-background broad energy Germanium detector

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Aalseth, Craig E.; Amman, M.; Avignone, Frank T.; Back, Henning O.; Barabash, Alexander S.; Barbeau, P. S.; Bergevin, M.; Bertrand, F.; Boswell, M.; Brudanin, V.; Bugg, William; Burritt, Tom H.; Busch, Matthew; Capps, Greg L.; Chan, Yuen-Dat; Collar, J. I.; Cooper, R. J.; Creswick, R.; Detwiler, Jason A.; Diaz, J.; Doe, Peter J.; Efremenko, Yuri; Egorov, Viatcheslav; Ejiri, H.; Elliott, Steven R.; Ely, James H.; Esterline, James H.; Farach, H. A.; Fast, James E.; Fields, N.; Finnerty, P.; Fujikawa, Brian; Fuller, Erin S.; Gehman, Victor M.; Giovanetti, G. K.; Guiseppe, Vincente; Gusey, K.; Hallin, A. L.; Harper, Gregory; Hazama, R.; Henning, Reyco; Hime, Andrew; Hoppe, Eric W.; Hossbach, Todd W.; Howe, M. A.; Johnson, R. A.; Keeter, K.; Keillor, Martin E.; Keller, C.; Kephart, Jeremy D.; Kidd, Mary; Knecht, A.; Kochetov, Oleg; Konovalov, S.; Kouzes, Richard T.; Leviner, L.; Loach, J. C.; Luke, P.; MacMullin, S.; Marino, Michael G.; Martin, R. D.; Mei, Dong-Ming; Miley, Harry S.; Miller, M. L.; Mizouni, Leila; Myers, Allan W.; Nomachi, Masaharu; Orrell, John L.; Peterson, David; Phillips, D.; Poon, Alan; Prior, Gersende; Qian, J.; Radford, D. C.; Rielage, Keith; Robertson, R. G. H.; Rodriguez, Larry; Rykaczewski, Krzysztof P.; Salazar, Harold; Schubert, Alexis G.; Shima, T.; Shirchenko, M.; Steele, David; Strain, J.; Swift, Gary; Thomas, K.; Timkin, V.; Tornow, W.; Van Wechel, T. D.; Vanyushin, I.; Varner, R. L.; Vetter, Kai; Wilkerson, J. F.; Wolfe, B. A.; Xiang, W.; Yakushev, E.; Yaver, Harold; Young, A.; Yu, Chang-Hong; Yumatov, Vladimir; Zhang, C.; Zimmerman, S.

    2011-10-01

    The Majorana Collaboration is building the Majorana Demonstrator, a 60 kg array of high purity germanium detectors housed in an ultra-low background shield at the Sanford Underground Laboratory in Lead, SD. The Majorana Demonstrator will search for neutrinoless double-beta decay of 76Ge while demonstrating the feasibility of a tonne-scale experiment. It may also carry out a dark matter search in the 1-10 GeV/c² mass range. We have found that customized Broad Energy Germanium (BEGe) detectors produced by Canberra have several desirable features for a neutrinoless double-beta decay experiment, including low electronic noise, excellent pulse shape analysis capabilities, and simple fabrication. We have deployed a customized BEGe, the Majorana Low-Background BEGe at Kimballton (MALBEK), in a low-background cryostat and shield at the Kimballton Underground Research Facility in Virginia. This paper will focus on the detector characteristics and measurements that can be performed with such a radiation detector in a low-background environment.

  4. Application of the Broad Energy Germanium detector: A technique for elucidating β-decay schemes which involve daughter nuclei with very low energy excited states

    Science.gov (United States)

    Venhart, M.; Wood, J. L.; Boston, A. J.; Cocolios, T. E.; Harkness-Brennan, L. J.; Herzberg, R.-D.; Joss, D. T.; Judson, D. S.; Kliman, J.; Matoušek, V.; Motyčák, Š.; Page, R. D.; Patel, A.; Petrík, K.; Sedlák, M.; Veselský, M.

    2017-03-01

    A technique for elucidating β-decay schemes of isotopes with a large density of states at low excitation energy has been developed, in which a Broad Energy Germanium (BEGe) detector is used in conjunction with coaxial hyper-pure germanium detectors. The power of this technique is demonstrated using the example of 183Hg decay. Mass-separated samples of 183Hg were produced by a deposition of the low-energy radioactive-ion beam delivered by the ISOLDE facility at CERN. The excellent energy resolution of the BEGe detector allowed γ-ray energies to be determined with a precision of a few tens of eV, which was sufficient for the analysis of the Rydberg-Ritz combinations (in conjunction with γ-γ coincidences) in the level scheme. The timestamped structure of the data was used for unambiguous separation of γ rays arising from the decay of 183Hg from those due to the daughter decays.

  5. Application of the Broad Energy Germanium detector: A technique for elucidating β-decay schemes which involve daughter nuclei with very low energy excited states

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Venhart, M., E-mail: martin.venhart@savba.sk [Institute of Physics, Slovak Academy of Sciences, SK-84511 Bratislava (Slovakia); Wood, J.L. [Department of Physics, Georgia Institute of Technology, Atlanta GA 30332 (United States); Boston, A.J. [Institute of Physics, Slovak Academy of Sciences, SK-84511 Bratislava (Slovakia); Cocolios, T.E. [School of Physics and Astronomy, The University of Manchester, Manchester M13 9PL (United Kingdom); KU Leuven, Instituut voor Kern, en Stralingsfysica, B-3001 Leuven (Belgium); Harkness-Brennan, L.J.; Herzberg, R.-D.; Joss, D.T.; Judson, D.S. [Oliver Lodge Laboratory, University of Liverpool, Liverpool L69 7ZE (United Kingdom); Kliman, J.; Matoušek, V. [Institute of Physics, Slovak Academy of Sciences, SK-84511 Bratislava (Slovakia); Motyčák, Š. [Faculty of Electrical Engineering and Information Technology, Slovak University of Technology, SK-812 19 Bratislava (Slovakia); Page, R.D.; Patel, A. [Oliver Lodge Laboratory, University of Liverpool, Liverpool L69 7ZE (United Kingdom); Petrík, K.; Sedlák, M.; Veselský, M. [Institute of Physics, Slovak Academy of Sciences, SK-84511 Bratislava (Slovakia)

    2017-03-21

    A technique for elucidating β-decay schemes of isotopes with a large density of states at low excitation energy has been developed, in which a Broad Energy Germanium (BEGe) detector is used in conjunction with coaxial hyper-pure germanium detectors. The power of this technique is demonstrated using the example of {sup 183}Hg decay. Mass-separated samples of {sup 183}Hg were produced by a deposition of the low-energy radioactive-ion beam delivered by the ISOLDE facility at CERN. The excellent energy resolution of the BEGe detector allowed γ-ray energies to be determined with a precision of a few tens of eV, which was sufficient for the analysis of the Rydberg-Ritz combinations (in conjunction with γ-γ coincidences) in the level scheme. The timestamped structure of the data was used for unambiguous separation of γ rays arising from the decay of {sup 183}Hg from those due to the daughter decays.

  6. MAJORANA Collaboration's Experience with Germanium Detectors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mertens, S. [Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory (LBNL); Abgrall, N. [Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory (LBNL); Avignone, III, F. T. [University of South Carolina/Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL); Barabash, A.S. [Institute of Theoretical & Experimental Physics (ITEP), Moscow, Russia; Bertrand, F. E. [Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL); Efremenko, Yuri [University of Tennessee (UTK) and Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL); Galindo-Uribarri, A [Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL); Radford, D. C. [Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL); Romero-Romero, E. [UTK/ORNL; Varner, R. L. [Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL); White, B. R. [Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL); Wilkerson, J. F. [UNC/Triangle Univ. Nucl. Lab, Durham, NC/ORNL; Yu, C.-H. [Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL); Majorana, [MAJORANA Collaboration

    2015-01-01

    The goal of the Majorana Demonstrator project is to search for 0v beta beta decay in Ge-76. Of all candidate isotopes for 0v beta beta, Ge-76 has some of the most favorable characteristics. Germanium detectors are a well established technology, and in searches for 0v beta beta, the high purity germanium crystal acts simultaneously as source and detector. Furthermore, p-type germanium detectors provide excellent energy resolution and a specially designed point contact geometry allows for sensitive pulse shape discrimination. This paper will summarize the experiences the MAJORANA collaboration made with enriched germanium detectors manufactured by ORTEC (R)(R). The process from production, to characterization and integration in MAJORANA mounting structure will be described. A summary of the performance of all enriched germanium detectors will be given.

  7. Germanium detectors and natural radioactivity in food

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Garbini, Lucia [Max-Planck-Institut fuer Physik, Muenchen (Germany); Collaboration: GeDet-Collaboration

    2013-07-01

    Potassium is a very important mineral for many physiological processes, like fluid balance, protein synthesis and signal transmission in nerves. Many aliments like raisins, bananas or chocolate contain potassium. Natural potassium contains 0.012% of the radioactive isotope Potassium 40. This isotope decays via β{sup +} decay into a metastable state of Argon 40, which reaches its ground state emitting a gamma of 1460 keV. A commercially produced Germanium detector has been used to measure the energy spectra of different selected food samples. It was calibrated with KCl and potassium contents were extracted. Results verify the high potassium content of commonly recommended food samples. However, the measurement quantitatively differ from the expectations in several cases. One of the most interesting results concerns chocolate bars with different percentages of cacao.

  8. Pulse shapes and surface effects in segmented germanium detectors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lenz, Daniel

    2010-03-24

    It is well established that at least two neutrinos are massive. The absolute neutrino mass scale and the neutrino hierarchy are still unknown. In addition, it is not known whether the neutrino is a Dirac or a Majorana particle. The GERmanium Detector Array (GERDA) will be used to search for neutrinoless double beta decay of {sup 76}Ge. The discovery of this decay could help to answer the open questions. In the GERDA experiment, germanium detectors enriched in the isotope {sup 76}Ge are used as source and detector at the same time. The experiment is planned in two phases. In the first, phase existing detectors are deployed. In the second phase, additional detectors will be added. These detectors can be segmented. A low background index around the Q value of the decay is important to maximize the sensitivity of the experiment. This can be achieved through anti-coincidences between segments and through pulse shape analysis. The background index due to radioactive decays in the detector strings and the detectors themselves was estimated, using Monte Carlo simulations for a nominal GERDA Phase II array with 18-fold segmented germanium detectors. A pulse shape simulation package was developed for segmented high-purity germanium detectors. The pulse shape simulation was validated with data taken with an 19-fold segmented high-purity germanium detector. The main part of the detector is 18-fold segmented, 6-fold in the azimuthal angle and 3-fold in the height. A 19th segment of 5mm thickness was created on the top surface of the detector. The detector was characterized and events with energy deposited in the top segment were studied in detail. It was found that the metalization close to the end of the detector is very important with respect to the length of the of the pulses observed. In addition indications for n-type and p-type surface channels were found. (orig.)

  9. Germanium detector studies in the framework of the GERDA experiment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Budjas, Dusan

    2009-05-06

    The GERmanium Detector Array (GERDA) is an ultra-low background experiment under construction at Laboratori Nazionali del Gran Sasso. GERDA will search for {sup 76}Ge neutrinoless double beta decay with an aim for 100-fold reduction in background compared to predecessor experiments. This ambition necessitates innovative design approaches, strict selection of low-radioactivity materials, and novel techniques for active background suppression. The core feature of GERDA is its array of germanium detectors for ionizing radiation, which are enriched in {sup 76}Ge. Germanium detectors are the central theme of this dissertation. The first part describes the implementation, testing, and optimisation of Monte Carlo simulations of germanium spectrometers, intensively involved in the selection of low-radioactivity materials. The simulations are essential for evaluations of the gamma ray measurements. The second part concerns the development and validation of an active background suppression technique based on germanium detector signal shape analysis. This was performed for the first time using a BEGe-type detector, which features a small read-out electrode. As a result of this work, BEGe is now one of the two detector technologies included in research and development for the second phase of the GERDA experiment. A suppression of major GERDA backgrounds is demonstrated, with (0.93{+-}0.08)% survival probability for events from {sup 60}Co, (21{+-}3)% for {sup 226}Ra, and (40{+-}2)% for {sup 228}Th. The acceptance of {sup 228}Th double escape events, which are analogous to double beta decay, was kept at (89{+-}1)%. (orig.)

  10. Active noise canceling system for mechanically cooled germanium radiation detectors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nelson, Karl Einar; Burks, Morgan T

    2014-04-22

    A microphonics noise cancellation system and method for improving the energy resolution for mechanically cooled high-purity Germanium (HPGe) detector systems. A classical adaptive noise canceling digital processing system using an adaptive predictor is used in an MCA to attenuate the microphonics noise source making the system more deployable.

  11. Characterization of the sub-keV Germanium detector

    Science.gov (United States)

    Singh, M. K.; Singh, Manoj K.; Sharma, V.; Singh, L.; Singh, V.; Subrahmanyam, V. S.; Soma, A. K.; Kiran Kumar, G.; Wong, H. T.

    2017-10-01

    Germanium ionization detectors having sensitivities as low as 100 eV open new windows for the studies of neutrino and dark matter physics. This novel detector demands overcoming several challenges at both hardware and software levels. The amplitude of physics signals is comparable to those due to fluctuations of the pedestal electronic noise in low energy range. Therefore, it is important to study the low energy calibration properly. In this article, we focus on the optimization of the calibration scheme.

  12. Ultra-low noise mechanically cooled germanium detector

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Barton, P., E-mail: pjbarton@lbl.gov [Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory, University of California, Berkeley, CA 94720 (United States); Amman, M.; Martin, R. [Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory, University of California, Berkeley, CA 94720 (United States); Vetter, K. [Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory, University of California, Berkeley, CA 94720 (United States); Department of Nuclear Engineering, University of California, Berkeley, CA 94720 (United States)

    2016-03-11

    Low capacitance, large volume, high purity germanium (HPGe) radiation detectors have been successfully employed in low-background physics experiments. However, some physical processes may not be detectable with existing detectors whose energy thresholds are limited by electronic noise. In this paper, methods are presented which can lower the electronic noise of these detectors. Through ultra-low vibration mechanical cooling and wire bonding of a CMOS charge sensitive preamplifier to a sub-pF p-type point contact HPGe detector, we demonstrate electronic noise levels below 40 eV-FWHM.

  13. Characterisation of the SmartPET planar Germanium detectors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Boston, H.C. [Department of Physics, University of Liverpool, Oliver Lodge Laboratory, Liverpool L69 7ZE (United Kingdom)], E-mail: H.C.Boston@liverpool.ac.uk; Boston, A.J.; Cooper, R.J.; Cresswell, J.; Grint, A.N.; Mather, A.R.; Nolan, P.J.; Scraggs, D.P.; Turk, G. [Department of Physics, University of Liverpool, Oliver Lodge Laboratory, Liverpool L69 7ZE (United Kingdom); Hall, C.J.; Lazarus, I. [CCLRC Daresbury Laboratory, Warrington WA4 4AD (United Kingdom); Berry, A.; Beveridge, T.; Gillam, J.; Lewis, R. [School of Physics and Materials Engineering, Monash University, Melbourne (Australia)

    2007-08-21

    Small Animal Reconstruction PET (SmartPET) is a project funded by the UK medical research council (MRC) to demonstrate proof of principle that Germanium can be utilised in Positron Emission Tomography (PET). The SmartPET demonstrator consists of two orthogonal strip High Purity Germanium (HPGe) planar detectors manufactured by ORTEC. The aim of the project is to produce images of an internal source with sub mm{sup 3} spatial resolution. Before this image can be achieved the detectors have to be fully characterised to understand the response at any given location to a {gamma}-ray interaction. This has been achieved by probing the two detectors at a number of specified points with collimated sources of various energies and strengths. A 1 mm diameter collimated beam of photons was raster scanned in 1 mm steps across the detector. Digital pulse shape data were recorded from all the detector channels and the performance of the detector for energy and position determination has been assessed. Data will be presented for the first SmartPET detector.

  14. Sensitivity comparison of intrinsic germanium detectors with various efficiencies

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Buker, L.M.L.

    1990-12-01

    Scientists today are being asked to measure concentrations of radionuclides at increasingly lower levels. This creates a demand for better resolution detectors with larger efficiencies that can provide the necessary sensitivity to accurately determine low levels of radioactivity. This study has acquired a large volume of empirical data for a wide range of relative efficiency germanium detectors. The purpose was to determine the sensitivity of various efficiency high-purity (P-type) germanium detectors produced by a single manufacturer. Selecting efficiency as the only variable and essentially all other variables remaining constant narrowed the field of detectors to 30. This investigation compares the response for the lower limit of detection (LLD), figure-of-merit (FOM), and minimum detectable activity (MDA) versus efficiency. In addition to the efficiency, the resolution, background, peak-to-Compton (P/C), and crystal shape of a p-type detector are of particular importance when considering the parameters of a detectors performance. A concise summary of the results is that the detector of choice for low energy measurements would be a 25% detector with resolution better than 1.8 keV FWHM for the 1.332 keV energy of Co-60. The detector of choice for energy levels greater than 500 keV would be a high efficiency low background detector. If the entire energy range is of interest, then a 70% low background detector with a high P/C and a resolution better than 1.9 keV would yield the lowest MDA and assure the most efficient counting times. 9 refs., 25 figs., 6 tabs.

  15. Germanium blocked impurity band far infrared detectors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rossington, C.S.

    1988-04-01

    The infrared portion of the electromagnetic spectrum has been of interest to scientist since the eighteenth century when Sir William Herschel discovered the infrared as he measured temperatures in the sun's spectrum and found that there was energy beyond the red. In the late nineteenth century, Thomas Edison established himself as the first infrared astronomer to look beyond the solar system when he observed the star Arcturus in the infrared. Significant advances in infrared technology and physics, long since Edison's time, have resulted in many scientific developments, such as the Infrared Astronomy Satellite (IRAS) which was launched in 1983, semiconductor infrared detectors for materials characterization, military equipment such as night-vision goggles and infrared surveillance equipment. It is now planned that cooled semiconductor infrared detectors will play a major role in the ''Star Wars'' nuclear defense scheme proposed by the Reagan administration.

  16. The Future of Low Temperature Germanium as Dark Matter Detectors

    CERN Multimedia

    CERN. Geneva

    2009-01-01

    The Weakly Interactive Massive Particles (WIMPs) represent one of the most attractive candidates for the dark matter in the universe. With the combination of experiments attempting to detect WIMP scattering in the laboratory, of searches for their annihilation in the cosmos and of their potential production at the LHC, the next five years promise to be transformative. I will review the role played so far by low temperature germanium detectors in the direct detection of WIMPs. Because of its high signal to noise ratio, the simultaneous measurement of athermal phonons and ionization is so far the only demonstrated approach with zero-background. I will argue that this technology can be extrapolated to a target mass of the order of a tonne at reasonable cost and can keep playing a leading role, complementary to noble liquid technologies. I will describe in particular GEODM, the proposed Germanium Observatory for Dark Matter at the US Deep Underground Science and Engineering Laboratory (DUSEL).

  17. Gamma ray polarimetry using a position sensitive germanium detector

    CERN Document Server

    Kroeger, R A; Kurfess, J D; Phlips, B F

    1999-01-01

    Imaging gamma-ray detectors make sensitive polarimeters in the Compton energy regime by measuring the scatter direction of gamma rays. The principle is to capitalize on the angular dependence of the Compton scattering cross section to polarized gamma rays and measure the distribution of scatter directions within the detector. This technique is effective in a double-sided germanium detector between roughly 50 keV and 1 MeV. This paper reviews device characteristics important to the optimization of a Compton polarimeter, and summarizes measurements we have made using a device with a 5x5 cm active area, 1 cm thickness, and strip-electrodes on a 2 mm pitch.

  18. Evaluating a new segmented germanium detector contact technology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jackson, E. G.; Lister, C. J.; Chowdhury, P.; Hull, E.; Pehl, R.

    2012-10-01

    New technologies for making gamma ray detectors position sensitive have many applications in space science, medical imaging, homeland security, and in nuclear structure research. One promising approach uses high-purity germanium wafers with the planar surfaces segmented into orthogonal strip patterns forming a Double-Sided Strip Detector (DSSD). The combination of data from adjoining strips, or pixels, is physics-rich for Compton image formation and polarization studies. However, sensitivity to charge loss and various kinds of cross-talk [1] have limited the usefulness of first generation devices. We are investigating new contact technologies, developed by PhDs Co [2], based on amorphous-germanium and yttrium contacts RF sputter deposited to a thickness of ˜ 1000 å. New techniques allow both physical and photolithographic segmentation of the contacts with inter-strip gap widths of 0.25 mm. These modifications should improve all aspects of charge collection. The new detector technology employs the same material and fabrication technique for both the n- and p- contacts, thus removing artificial asymmetry in the data. Results from tests of cross-talk, charge collection, and scattering asymmetry will be presented and compared with older technologies. This mechanically cooled counter, NP-7, seems to represent a breakthrough.[4pt] [1] S. Gros et al., Nucl. Inst. Meth. A 602, 467 (2009).[0pt] [2] E. Hull et al Nucl Inst Meth A 626, 39 (2011)

  19. Automation of the Characterization of High Purity Germanium Detectors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dugger, Charles ``Chip''

    2014-09-01

    Neutrinoless double beta decay is a rare hypothesized process that may yield valuable insight into the fundamental properties of the neutrino. Currently there are several experiments trying to observe this process, including the Majorana DEMONSTRAOR experiment, which uses high purity germanium (HPGe) detectors to generate and search for these events. Because the event happens internally, it is essential to have the lowest background possible. This is done through passive detector shielding, as well as event discrimination techniques that distinguish between multi-site events characteristic of gamma-radiation, and single-site events characteristic of neutrinoless double beta decay. Before fielding such an experiment, the radiation response of the detectors must be characterized. A robotic arm is being tested for future calibration of HPGe detectors. The arm will hold a source at locations relative to the crystal while data is acquired. Several radioactive sources of varying energy levels will be used to determine the characteristics of the crystal. In this poster, I will present our work with the robot, as well as the characterization of data we took with an underground HPGe detector at the WIPP facility in Carlsbad, NM (2013). Neutrinoless double beta decay is a rare hypothesized process that may yield valuable insight into the fundamental properties of the neutrino. Currently there are several experiments trying to observe this process, including the Majorana DEMONSTRAOR experiment, which uses high purity germanium (HPGe) detectors to generate and search for these events. Because the event happens internally, it is essential to have the lowest background possible. This is done through passive detector shielding, as well as event discrimination techniques that distinguish between multi-site events characteristic of gamma-radiation, and single-site events characteristic of neutrinoless double beta decay. Before fielding such an experiment, the radiation response of

  20. On the photopeak efficiency of germanium gamma-ray detectors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jaeckel, B.; Westmeier, W.; Patzelt, P.

    1987-11-15

    An empirical equation describing the photopeak efficiency of Ge(Li) and high purity germanium (HPGe) photon detectors in the energy range from 60 keV to the onset of escape peak losses is presented. The functional parameters are fitted to calibration points obtained from long-lived commercially available standards (/sup 241/Am, /sup 109/Cd, /sup 57/Co, /sup 137/Cs, /sup 54/Mn, /sup 60/Co, /sup 22/Na). The fitted function is shown to describe 61 efficiency functions of 60 different detectors with an accuracy better than the quoted uncertainty of the calibration sources, including those energy regions where long-lived calibration standards are difficult to obtain. In contrast to other proposed functions, this equation has functional restrictions with respect to the general shape of the photopeak efficiency curve and, therefore, it is well suited to describe the photopeak efficiency, even when fitted only to a few calibration points.

  1. On the photopeak efficiency of germanium gamma-ray detectors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jäckel, B.; Westmeier, W.; Patzelt, P.

    1987-11-01

    An empirical equation describing the photopeak efficiency of Ge(Li) and high purity germanium (HPGe) photon detectors in the energy range from 60 keV to the onset of escape peak losses is presented. The functional parameters are fitted to calibration points obtained from long-lived commercially available standards ( 241Am, 109Cd, 57Co, 137Cs, 54Mn, 60Co, 22Na). The fitted function is shown to describe 61 efficiency functions of 60 different detectors with an accuracy better than the quoted uncertainty of the calibration sources, including those energy regions where long-lived calibration standards are difficult to obtain. In contrast to other proposed functions, this equation has functional restrictions with respect to the general shape of the photopeak efficiency curve and, therefore, it is well suited to describe the photopeak efficiency, even when fitted only to a few calibration points.

  2. Contribution of a germanium detector in mobile gamma-ray spectrometry. Spectral analysis and performance

    CERN Document Server

    Gutierrez, S; Bourgeois, C

    2002-01-01

    The sensitivity of the germanium semi-conductor detector is 30 times lower than that of the sodium iodide (NaI) detectors frequently used in airborne spectrometry. Its energy resolution however, is 20 times better, giving more accurate identification of radionuclides, especially when complex spectra are involved. The use of the germanium detector in mobile gamma-ray spectrometry provides a large amount of qualitative and quantitative information. In post-accident situations a germanium detector will be sufficient, and should therefore be used in preference to a NaI detector. An algorithm for detecting the total absorption peaks by studying the variations in the spectral profile of germanium gamma-ray spectra has been developed at the CEA. The use of digital filters that take into account the characteristics of the absorption peaks reduces the statistical fluctuations, making possible detection based on the analysis of the first and second derivatives. The absorption peak is then estimated by subtracting the b...

  3. An Implant-Passivated Blocked Impurity Band Germanium Detector for the Far Infrared Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — We propose to investigate the feasibility of fabricating a germanium blocked-impurity-band (BIB) detector using a novel process which will enable us to: 1- fabricate...

  4. An Implant-Passivated Blocked Impurity Band Germanium Detector for the Far Infrared Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — We propose to fabricate a germanium blocked-impurity-band (BIB) detector using a novel process which will enable us to: 1- fabricate a suitably-doped active layer...

  5. PREFACE: 2nd Workshop on Germanium Detectors and Technologies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abt, I.; Majorovits, B.; Keller, C.; Mei, D.; Wang, G.; Wei, W.

    2015-05-01

    The 2nd workshop on Germanium (Ge) detectors and technology was held at the University of South Dakota on September 14-17th 2014, with more than 113 participants from 8 countries, 22 institutions, 15 national laboratories, and 8 companies. The participants represented the following big projects: (1) GERDA and Majorana for the search of neutrinoless double-beta decay (0νββ) (2) SuperCDMS, EDELWEISS, CDEX, and CoGeNT for search of dark matter; (3) TEXONO for sub-keV neutrino physics; (4) AGATA and GRETINA for gamma tracking; (5) AARM and others for low background radiation counting; (5) as well as PNNL and LBNL for applications of Ge detectors in homeland security. All participants have expressed a strong desire on having better understanding of Ge detector performance and advancing Ge technology for large-scale applications. The purpose of this workshop was to leverage the unique aspects of the underground laboratories in the world and the germanium (Ge) crystal growing infrastructure at the University of South Dakota (USD) by brining researchers from several institutions taking part in the Experimental Program to Stimulate Competitive Research (EPSCoR) together with key leaders from international laboratories and prestigious universities, working on the forefront of the intensity to advance underground physics focusing on the searches for dark matter, neutrinoless double-beta decay (0νββ), and neutrino properties. The goal of the workshop was to develop opportunities for EPSCoR institutions to play key roles in the planned world-class research experiments. The workshop was to integrate individual talents and existing research capabilities, from multiple disciplines and multiple institutions, to develop research collaborations, which includes EPSCor institutions from South Dakota, North Dakota, Alabama, Iowa, and South Carolina to support multi-ton scale experiments for future. The topic areas covered in the workshop were: 1) science related to Ge

  6. Germanium detectors for nuclear spectroscopy: Current research and development activity at LNL

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Napoli, D. R., E-mail: daniel.r.napoli@lnl.infn.it [Istituto Nazionale di Fisica Nucleare, Laboratori Nazionali di Legnaro, Viale dell’Università 2, 35020 Legnaro, Padova (Italy); Maggioni, G., E-mail: maggioni@lnl.infn.it; Carturan, S.; Gelain, M. [Istituto Nazionale di Fisica Nucleare, Laboratori Nazionali di Legnaro, Viale dell’Università 2, 35020 Legnaro, Padova (Italy); Department of Physics and Astronomy “G. Galilei”, University of Padova, Via Marzolo 8, 35121 Padova (Italy); Eberth, J. [Institut für Kernphysik, Universität zu Köln, Zülpicher Straße 77, D-50937 Köln (Germany); Grimaldi, M. G.; Tatí, S. [Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of Catania (Italy); Riccetto, S. [University of Camerino and INFN of Perugia (Italy); Mea, G. Della [Istituto Nazionale di Fisica Nucleare, Laboratori Nazionali di Legnaro, Viale dell’Università 2, 35020 Legnaro, Padova (Italy); University of Trento (Italy)

    2016-07-07

    High-purity Germanium (HPGe) detectors have reached an unprecedented level of sophistication and are still the best solution for high-resolution gamma spectroscopy. In the present work, we will show the results of the characterization of new surface treatments for the production of these detectors, studied in the framework of our multidisciplinary research program in HPGe detector technologies.

  7. Overview of multi-element monolithic germanium detectors for XAFS experiments at diamond light source

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chatterji, S.; Dennis, G. J.; Dent, A.; Diaz-Moreno, S.; Cibin, G.; Tartoni, N. [Diamond Light Source Ltd, Oxfordshire (United Kingdom); Helsby, W. I. [STFC Daresbury Laboratory, Warrington (United Kingdom)

    2016-07-27

    An overview of multi-element monolithic germanium detectors being used at the X-ray absorption spectroscopy (XAS) beam lines at Diamond Light Source (DLS) is being reported. The hardware details and a summary of the performance of these detectors have also been provided. Recent updates about various ongoing projects being worked on to improve the performance of these detectors are summarized.

  8. Techniques to distinguish between electron and photon induced events using segmented germanium detectors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kroeninger, K.

    2007-06-05

    Two techniques to distinguish between electron and photon induced events in germanium detectors were studied: (1) anti-coincidence requirements between the segments of segmented germanium detectors and (2) the analysis of the time structure of the detector response. An 18-fold segmented germanium prototype detector for the GERDA neutrinoless double beta-decay experiment was characterized. The rejection of photon induced events was measured for the strongest lines in {sup 60}Co, {sup 152}Eu and {sup 228}Th. An accompanying Monte Carlo simulation was performed and the results were compared to data. An overall agreement with deviations of the order of 5-10% was obtained. The expected background index of the GERDA experiment was estimated. The sensitivity of the GERDA experiment was determined. Special statistical tools were developed to correctly treat the small number of events expected. The GERDA experiment uses a cryogenic liquid as the operational medium for the germanium detectors. It was shown that germanium detectors can be reliably operated through several cooling cycles. (orig.)

  9. P-Type Point Contact Germanium Detectors for Low-Level Counting

    Science.gov (United States)

    2008-09-01

    P-TYPE POINT CONTACT GERMANIUM DETECTORS FOR LOW-LEVEL COUNTING Ethan L. Hull1, Richard H. Pehl1, James R. Lathrop1, Peggy L. Mann1, Ronnie B...closed end were left square. Generally these corners are rounded off, beveled , or bulletized for coaxial detector fabrication to improve the charge

  10. Analysis of the dead layer of a detector of germanium with code ultrapure Monte Carlo SWORD-GEANT; Analisis del dead layer de un detector de germanio ultrapuro con el codigo de Monte Carlo SWORDS-GEANT

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gallardo, S.; Querol, A.; Ortiz, J.; Rodenas, J.; Verdu, G.

    2014-07-01

    In this paper the use of Monte Carlo code SWORD-GEANT is proposed to simulate an ultra pure germanium detector High Purity Germanium detector (HPGe) detector ORTEC specifically GMX40P4, coaxial geometry. (Author)

  11. Automated determination of segment positions in a high-purity 32-fold segmented germanium detector

    CERN Document Server

    Miller, K L; Campbell, C; Morris, L; Müller, W F; Strahler, E A

    2002-01-01

    An automated system for determining detector segment positions in a high-purity 32-fold segmented germanium detector has been developed. To determine segment positions as they would appear in an experiment, positions must be measured while the 32-fold segmented germanium crystal is kept at liquid nitrogen temperatures. A collimated sup 5 sup 7 Co gamma-ray source is moved around the surface of the detector cryostat, and the response of the germanium crystal is measured. Motion of the source is driven by two Slo-Syn motors and BEI incremental optical encoders, which are controlled through LabVIEW programming and a National Instruments PCStep board. The collected data is analyzed to determine the position of the center of each of the 32 segments.

  12. Recommendations for a Static Cosmic Ray Shield for Enriched Germanium Detectors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Aguayo Navarrete, Estanislao; Orrell, John L.; Ankney, Austin S.; Berguson, Timothy J.

    2011-09-21

    This document provides a detailed study of cost and materials that could be used to shield the detector material of the international Tonne-scale germanium neutrinoless double-beta decay experiment from hadronic particles from cosmic ray showers at the Earth's surface. This work was motivated by the need for a shield that minimizes activation of the enriched germanium during storage; in particular, when the detector material is being worked on at the detector manufacturer's facility. This work considers two options for shielding the detector material from cosmic ray particles. One option is to use a pre-existing structure already located near the detector manufacturer, such as Canberra Industries in Meriden, Connecticut. The other option is to build a shield onsite at a detector manufacturer's site. This paper presents a cost and efficiency analysis of such construction.

  13. Pulse shapes from electron and photon induced events in segmented high-purity germanium detectors

    CERN Document Server

    Abt, I; Kröninger, K; Liu, J; Liu, X; Majorovits, B

    2007-01-01

    Experiments built to search for neutrinoless double beta-decay are limited in their sensitivity not only by the exposure but also by the amount of background encountered. Radioactive isotopes in the surrounding of the detectors which emit gamma-radiation are expected to be a significant source of background in the GERmanium Detector Array, GERDA. Methods to select electron induced events and discriminate against photon induced events inside a germanium detector are presented in this paper. The methods are based on the analysis of the time structure of the detector response. Data were taken with a segmented GERDA prototype detector. It is shown that the analysis of the time response of the detector can be used to distinguish multiply scattered photons from electrons.

  14. Neutrino and dark matter physics with sub-keV germanium detectors

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    2014-11-04

    Nov 4, 2014 ... Germanium detectors with sub-keV sensitivities open a window to study neutrino physics to search for light weakly interacting massive particle (WIMP) dark matter. We summarize the recent results on spin-independent couplings of light WIMPs from the TEXONO experiment at the Kuo-Sheng Reactor ...

  15. Charge collection performance of a segmented planar high-purity germanium detector

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cooper, R.J. [Department of Physics, The University of Liverpool, Oliver Lodge Laboratory, Liverpool Merseyside L69 7ZE (United Kingdom)], E-mail: R.Cooper@liverpool.ac.uk; Boston, A.J.; Boston, H.C.; Cresswell, J.R.; Grint, A.N.; Harkness, L.J.; Nolan, P.J.; Oxley, D.C.; Scraggs, D.P. [Department of Physics, The University of Liverpool, Oliver Lodge Laboratory, Liverpool Merseyside L69 7ZE (United Kingdom); Lazarus, I.; Simpson, J. [STFC Daresbury Laboratory, Warrington, Cheshire WA4 4AD (United Kingdom); Dobson, J. [Rosemere Cancer Centre, Royal Preston Hospital, Preston PR2 9HT (United Kingdom)

    2008-10-01

    High-precision scans of a segmented planar high-purity germanium (HPGe) detector have been performed with a range of finely collimated gamma ray beams allowing the response as a function of gamma ray interaction position to be quantified. This has allowed the development of parametric pulse shape analysis (PSA) techniques and algorithms for the correction of imperfections in performance. In this paper we report on the performance of this detector, designed for use in a positron emission tomography (PET) development system.

  16. Development of segmented germanium detectors for neutrinoless double beta decay experiments

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Liu, Jing

    2009-06-09

    The results from neutrino oscillation experiments indicate that at least two neutrinos have mass. However, the value of the masses and whether neutrinos and anti-neutrinos are identical, i.e., Majorana particles, remain unknown. Neutrinoless double beta decay experiments can help to improve our understanding in both cases and are the only method currently possible to tackle the second question. The GERmanium Detector Array (GERDA) experiment, which will search for the neutrinoless double beta decay of {sup 76}Ge, is currently under construction in Hall A of the INFN Gran Sasso National Laboratory (LNGS), Italy. In order to achieve an extremely low background level, segmented germanium detectors are considered to be operated directly in liquid argon which serves simultaneously as cooling and shielding medium. Several test cryostats were built at the Max-Planck-Institut fuer Physik in Muenchen to operate segmented germanium detectors both in vacuum and submerged in cryogenic liquid. The performance and the background discrimination power of segmented germanium detectors were studied in detail. It was proven for the first time that segmented germanium detectors can be operated stably over long periods submerged in a cryogenic liquid. It was confirmed that the segmentation scheme employed does well in the identification of photon induced background and demonstrated for the first time that also neutron interactions can be identified. The C++ Monte Carlo framework, MaGe (Majorana-GERDA), is a joint development of the Majorana and GERDA collaborations. It is based on GEANT4, but tailored especially to simulate the response of ultra-low background detectors to ionizing radiation. The predictions of the simulation were veri ed to be accurate for a wide range of conditions. Some shortcomings were found and corrected. Pulse shape analysis is complementary to segmentation in identifying background events. Its efficiency can only be correctly determined using reliable pulse

  17. Germanium nitride and oxynitride films for surface passivation of Ge radiation detectors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Maggioni, G., E-mail: maggioni@lnl.infn.it [Dipartimento di Fisica e Astronomia G. Galilei, Università di Padova, Via Marzolo 8, I-35131 Padova (Italy); Laboratori Nazionali di Legnaro, Istituto Nazionale di Fisica Nucleare, Viale dell’Universita’2, I-35020 Legnaro, Padova (Italy); Carturan, S. [Dipartimento di Fisica e Astronomia G. Galilei, Università di Padova, Via Marzolo 8, I-35131 Padova (Italy); Laboratori Nazionali di Legnaro, Istituto Nazionale di Fisica Nucleare, Viale dell’Universita’2, I-35020 Legnaro, Padova (Italy); Fiorese, L. [Laboratori Nazionali di Legnaro, Istituto Nazionale di Fisica Nucleare, Viale dell’Universita’2, I-35020 Legnaro, Padova (Italy); Dipartimento di Ingegneria dei Materiali e delle Tecnologie Industriali, Università di Trento, Via Mesiano 77, I-38050 Povo, Trento (Italy); Pinto, N.; Caproli, F. [Scuola di Scienze e Tecnologie, Sezione di Fisica, Università di Camerino, Via Madonna delle Carceri 9, Camerino (Italy); INFN, Sezione di Perugia, Perugia (Italy); Napoli, D.R. [Laboratori Nazionali di Legnaro, Istituto Nazionale di Fisica Nucleare, Viale dell’Universita’2, I-35020 Legnaro, Padova (Italy); Giarola, M.; Mariotto, G. [Dipartimento di Informatica—Università di Verona, Strada le Grazie 15, I-37134 Verona (Italy)

    2017-01-30

    Highlights: • A surface passivation method for HPGe radiation detectors is proposed. • Highly insulating GeNx- and GeOxNy-based layers are deposited at room temperature. • Deposition parameters affect composition and electrical properties of the layers. • The improved performance of a GeNx-coated HPGe diode is assessed. - Abstract: This work reports a detailed investigation of the properties of germanium nitride and oxynitride films to be applied as passivation layers to Ge radiation detectors. All the samples were deposited at room temperature by reactive RF magnetron sputtering. A strong correlation was found between the deposition parameters, such as deposition rate, substrate bias and atmosphere composition, and the oxygen and nitrogen content in the film matrix. We found that all the films were very poorly crystallized, consisting of very small Ge nitride and oxynitride nanocrystallites, and electrically insulating, with the resistivity changing from three to six orders of magnitude as a function of temperature. A preliminary test of these films as passivation layers was successfully performed by depositing a germanium nitride film on the intrinsic surface of a high-purity germanium (HPGe) diode and measuring the improved performance, in terms of leakage current, with respect to a reference passivated diode. All these interesting results allow us to envisage the application of this coating technology to the surface passivation of germanium-based radiation detectors.

  18. Resonance-enhanced waveguide-coupled silicon-germanium detector

    CERN Document Server

    Alloatti, Luca

    2016-01-01

    A photodiode with 0.55$\\pm$0.1 A/W responsivity at a wavelength of 1176.9 nm has been fabricated in a 45 nm microelectronics silicon-on-insulator foundry process. The resonant waveguide photodetector exploits carrier generation in silicon-germanium (SiGe) within a microring which is compatible with high-performance electronics. A 3 dB bandwidth of 5 GHz at -4 V bias is obtained with a dark current of less than 20 pA.

  19. High-precision efficiency calibration of a high-purity co-axial germanium detector

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Blank, B., E-mail: blank@cenbg.in2p3.fr [Centre d' Etudes Nucléaires de Bordeaux Gradignan, UMR 5797, CNRS/IN2P3, Université de Bordeaux, Chemin du Solarium, BP 120, 33175 Gradignan Cedex (France); Souin, J.; Ascher, P.; Audirac, L.; Canchel, G.; Gerbaux, M.; Grévy, S.; Giovinazzo, J.; Guérin, H.; Nieto, T. Kurtukian; Matea, I. [Centre d' Etudes Nucléaires de Bordeaux Gradignan, UMR 5797, CNRS/IN2P3, Université de Bordeaux, Chemin du Solarium, BP 120, 33175 Gradignan Cedex (France); Bouzomita, H.; Delahaye, P.; Grinyer, G.F.; Thomas, J.C. [Grand Accélérateur National d' Ions Lourds, CEA/DSM, CNRS/IN2P3, Bvd Henri Becquerel, BP 55027, F-14076 CAEN Cedex 5 (France)

    2015-03-11

    A high-purity co-axial germanium detector has been calibrated in efficiency to a precision of about 0.15% over a wide energy range. High-precision scans of the detector crystal and γ-ray source measurements have been compared to Monte-Carlo simulations to adjust the dimensions of a detector model. For this purpose, standard calibration sources and short-lived online sources have been used. The resulting efficiency calibration reaches the precision needed e.g. for branching ratio measurements of super-allowed β decays for tests of the weak-interaction standard model.

  20. Majorana: An Ultra-Low Background Enriched-Germanium Detector Array for Fundamental Physics Measurements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miller, Michael

    2010-11-01

    The Majorana collaboration will search for neutrinoless double-beta decay (0νββ) by fielding an array of high-purity germanium (HPGe) detectors in ultra-clean electroformed-copper cryostats deep underground. Recent advances in HPGe detector technology, in particular P-type Point-Contact (PPC) detectors, present exciting new techniques for identifying and reducing backgrounds to the 0νββ. This should result in greatly improved sensitivity over previous generation experiments. The exceptionally low energy threshold attainable with PPC detectors also enables a broad physics program including searches for dark matter and axions. The Majorana Demonstrator is an R&D program that will field two ˜20 kg modules of PPC detectors at Sanford Underground Laboratory. Approximatly half of the detectors will be enriched to 86% in ^76Ge. Here, we will cover the motivation, design, recent progress and current status of this effort, with special attention to its physics reach.

  1. High Precision Modeling of Germanium Detector Waveforms Using Bayesian Machine Learning

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shanks, Benjamin E.

    The universe as we see it today is dominated by matter, but the Standard Model of particle physics cannot explain why so little antimatter remains. If the neutrino is its own antiparticle--a so-called Majorana particle--lepton number must be violated, which is a key component of theories that explain the observed matter-antimatter asymmetry. Neutrinoless double-beta decay (0nubetabeta), a hypothetical radioactive decay in certain nuclei, is the only experimentally accessible signature that can prove if neutrinos are Majorana in nature. But if it exists, 0nubetabeta must be exceedingly rare, with current half-life limits over 1025 years. Measuring a process with such a faint signal requires extraordinary efforts to eliminate backgrounds. The MAJORANA DEMONSTRATOR is a search for 0nubetabeta of germanium-76 in an array of germanium detectors, with the goal of "demonstrating'' backgrounds low enough to justify building a larger experiment with 1 tonne of isotope. Reducing backgrounds even further will be critical to the discovery potential of a tonne scale experiment. One powerful method to reject background is pulse shape discrimination, which uses the shape of measured detector signals to differentiate between background and candidate 0nubetabeta events. With a better understanding of pulse shapes from our detectors, we may be able to improve the discrimination efficiency. We have developed a detailed model of signal formation in germanium detectors, but the shape depends sensitively on characteristics specific to each individual detector crystal. To train the parameters for specific crystals in the DEMONSTRATOR, we have implemented a Bayesian machine learning algorithm which is able to infer detector characteristics using only standard calibration waveforms. This model is accurate to the level of parts per thousand of the signal amplitude, is able to discriminate against common background events, and has even shown some ability to estimate the position of origin

  2. Inter-electrode charge collection in high-purity germanium detectors with amorphous semiconductor contacts

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Looker, Q., E-mail: qlooker@lbl.gov [Ernest Orlando Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory, University of California, Berkeley, CA 94720 (United States); Department of Nuclear Engineering, University of California, Berkeley, CA 94720 (United States); Amman, M. [Ernest Orlando Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory, University of California, Berkeley, CA 94720 (United States); Vetter, K. [Ernest Orlando Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory, University of California, Berkeley, CA 94720 (United States); Department of Nuclear Engineering, University of California, Berkeley, CA 94720 (United States)

    2015-05-01

    High-purity germanium (HPGe) radiation detectors with segmented signal readout electrodes combine excellent energy resolution with fine spatial resolution, opening exciting possibilities in radiation imaging applications. Segmenting the electrodes provides the ability to determine the positions of radiation interactions in the detector, but it also brings potential challenges that can inhibit performance. A challenge unique to segmented electrode detectors is collection of charge carriers to the gap between adjacent electrodes rather than to the electrodes themselves, which gives a deficit in the summed energy. While amorphous semiconductor electrical contacts have enabled a simplified fabrication process capable of fine electrode segmentation, the amorphous semiconductor passivation layer between electrodes is prone to inter-electrode charge collection. This article presents a study of the impact of fabrication process parameters on the energy deficit due to inter-electrode charge collection for double-sided strip detectors. Eight double-sided strip HPGe detectors were fabricated with amorphous germanium (a-Ge) and amorphous silicon (a-Si) contacts formed by sputter deposition. Each detector was evaluated for inter-electrode charge collection performance, using as a metric the deficit in the summed signal of two adjacent electrodes. It is demonstrated that both a-Ge and a-Si contacts can be produced with nearly non-existent inter-electrode charge collection when the appropriate combination of sputter gas hydrogen content and gas pressure are selected.

  3. Methods to improve and understand the sensitivity of high purity germanium detectors for searches of rare events

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Volynets, Oleksandr

    2012-07-27

    Observation of neutrinoless double beta-decay could answer fundamental questions on the nature of neutrinos. High purity germanium detectors are well suited to search for this rare process in germanium. Successful operation of such experiments requires a good understanding of the detectors and the sources of background. Possible background sources not considered before in the presently running GERDA high purity germanium detector experiment were studied. Pulse shape analysis using artificial neural networks was used to distinguish between signal-like and background-like events. Pulse shape simulation was used to investigate systematic effects influencing the efficiency of the method. Possibilities to localize the origin of unwanted radiation using Compton back-tracking in a granular detector system were examined. Systematic effects in high purity germanium detectors influencing their performance have been further investigated using segmented detectors. The behavior of the detector response at different operational temperatures was studied. The anisotropy effects due to the crystallographic structure of germanium were facilitated in a novel way to determine the orientation of the crystallographic axes.

  4. Characterization of segmented large volume, high purity germanium detectors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bruyneel, B. [Koeln Univ. (Germany). Inst. fuer Kernphysik

    2006-07-01

    {gamma}-ray tracking in future HPGe arrays like AGATA will rely on pulse shape analysis (PSA) of multiple {gamma}-interactions. For this purpose, a simple and fast procedure was developed which enabled the first full characterization of a segmented large volume HPGe detector. An analytical model for the hole mobility in a Ge crystal lattice was developed to describe the hole drift anisotropy with experimental velocity values along the crystal axis as parameters. The new model is based on the drifted Maxwellian hole distribution in Ge. It is verified by reproducing successfully experimental longitudinal hole anisotropy data. A comparison between electron and hole mobility shows large differences for the longitudinal and tangential velocity anisotropy as a function of the electrical field orientation. Measurements on a 12 fold segmented, n-type, large volume, irregular shaped HPGe detector were performed in order to determine the parameters of anisotropic mobility for electrons and holes as charge carriers created by {gamma}-ray interactions. To characterize the electron mobility the complete outer detector surface was scanned in small steps employing photopeak interactions at 60 keV. A precise measurement of the hole drift anisotropy was performed with 356 keV rays. The drift velocity anisotropy and crystal geometry cause considerable rise time differences in pulse shapes depending on the position of the spatial charge carrier creation. Pulse shapes of direct and transient signals are reproduced by weighting potential calculations with high precision. The measured angular dependence of rise times is caused by the anisotropic mobility, crystal geometry, changing field strength and space charge effects. Preamplified signals were processed employing digital spectroscopy electronics. Response functions, crosstalk contributions and averaging procedures were taken into account implying novel methods due to the segmentation of the Ge-crystal and the digital electronics

  5. Automatic energy calibration of germanium detectors using fuzzy set theory

    CERN Document Server

    Stezowski, O; Prevost, A; Smith, A G; Wall, R

    2002-01-01

    With the advent of multi-detector arrays, many tasks that are usually performed by physicists, such as energy calibration, become very time consuming. There is therefore a need to develop more and more complex algorithms able to mimic human expertise. Fuzzy logic proposes a theoretical framework to build algorithms that are close to the human way of thinking. In this paper we apply fuzzy set theory in order to develop an automatic procedure for energy calibration. The algorithm, based on fuzzy concepts, has been tested on data taken with the EUROBALL IV gamma-ray array.

  6. Evaluation of Segmented Amorphous-Contact Planar Germanium Detectors for Heavy-Element Research

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jackson, Emily G.

    The challenge of improving our understanding of the very heaviest nuclei is at the forefront of contemporary low-energy nuclear physics. In the last two decades, "in-beam" spectroscopy experiments have advanced from Z=98 to Z=104, Rutherfordium, allowing insights into the dynamics of the fission barrier, high-order deformations, and pairing correlations. However, new detector technologies are needed to advance to even heavier nuclei. This dissertation is aimed at evaluating one promising new technology; large segmented planar germanium wafers for this area of research. The current frontier in gamma-ray spectroscopy involves large-volume (>9 cm thick) coaxial detectors that are position sensitive and employ gamma-ray "tracking". In contrast, the detectors assessed in this dissertation are relatively thin (~1 cm) segmented planar wafers with amorphous-germanium strip contacts that can tolerate extremely high gamma-ray count rates, and can accommodate hostile neutron fluxes. They may be the only path to heavier "in-beam" spectroscopy with production rates below 1 nanobarn. The resiliency of these detectors against neutron-induced damage is examined. Two detectors were deliberately subjected to a non-uniform neutron fluence leading to considerable degradation of performance. The neutrons were produced using the 7Li(p, n)7Be reaction at the UMass Lowell Van-de-Graaff accelerator with a 3.7-MeV proton beam incident on a natural Li target. The energy of the neutrons emitted at zero degrees was 2.0 MeV, close to the mean energy of the fission neutron spectrum, and each detector was exposed to a fluence >3.6 x109 n/cm2. A 3-D software "trap-corrector" gain-matching algorithm considerably restored the overall performance. Other neutron damage mitigation tactics were explored including over biasing the detector and flooding the detector with a high gamma-ray count rate. Various annealing processes to remove neutron damage were investigated. An array of very large diameter

  7. Germanium MOS technology for infra-red detectors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ruddell, Fred H. [Northern Ireland Semiconductor Research Centre, Queen' s University Belfast, Stranmillis Road, Belfast BT9 5AH (United Kingdom)]. E-mail: f.ruddell@qub.ac.uk; Montgomery, John H. [Northern Ireland Semiconductor Research Centre, Queen' s University Belfast, Stranmillis Road, Belfast BT9 5AH (United Kingdom); Gamble, Harold S. [Northern Ireland Semiconductor Research Centre, Queen' s University Belfast, Stranmillis Road, Belfast BT9 5AH (United Kingdom); Denvir, Donal [Andor Technology, 7 Millenium Way, Springvale Business Park, Belfast BT12 7AL (United Kingdom)

    2007-04-01

    Fabrication of an electrically stable dielectric is a key enabling technology in the production of a Ge detector with enhanced response in the near infra-red spectrum. This work investigates the physical and electrical properties of silicon dioxide (SiO{sub 2}) dielectrics deposited on Ge substrates. The deposited SiO{sub 2} (silox) layers have been densified at 600 and 800 deg. C. Significant Ge outdiffusion from the substrate into the densifying silox layer has been observed for the 800 deg. C process, and the diffusivity has been estimated as 1.5x10{sup -4} {mu}m{sup 2}/min. The C-V characteristics of Ge MOS capacitors incorporating this silox dielectric display the onset of 'low frequency' operation at a relatively high frequency of 100 kHz, and the capacitor C-t response suggests that Ge carrier lifetime is much shorter than that measured for Si MOS capacitors. These phenomena are shown to result from the narrow band gap of Ge, and this work therefore emphasises that increased cooling will be required to exploit the infra-red detector properties of a practical Ge device.

  8. Feasibility study for use of a germanium detector in the LOFT gamma-ray densitometer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Swierkowski, S. P.

    1976-04-27

    The primary aim of this study is to predict the performance of a gamma-ray densitometer system using computer modeling techniques. The system consists of a collimated /sup 137/Cs source, a pipe containing a variable amount of water absorber, and a shielded and collimated germanium detector system. The gamma-ray energy spectrum (number of photon counts as a function of energy) has been computed for several sources at the detector. The response for combined sourceconfigurations has been obtained by linear superposition. The signal essentially consists of the counts in an energy window centered on the /sup 137/Cs source at 662 keV that originate from this source. The noise is the background counts in the signal energy window that originate from /sup 16/N scatter radiation and direct and shield tank activation gammas. The detector signal has been computed for 0, 50, and 100 percent water in the pipe. (WHK)

  9. Fabrication process development for high-purity germanium radiation detectors with amorphous semiconductor contacts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Looker, Quinn

    High-purity germanium (HPGe) radiation detectors are well established as a valuable tool in nuclear science, astrophysics, and nuclear security applications. HPGe detectors excel in gamma-ray spectroscopy, offering excellent energy resolution with large detector sizes for high radiation detection efficiency. Although a robust fabrication process has been developed, improvement is needed, especially in developing electrical contact and surface passivation technology for position-sensitive detectors. A systematic study is needed to understand how the detector fabrication process impacts detector performance and reliability. In order to provide position sensitivity, the electrical contacts are segmented to form multiple electrodes. This segmentation creates new challenges in the fabrication process and warrants consideration of additional detector effects related to the segmentation. A key area of development is the creation of the electrical contacts in a way that enables reliable operation, provides low electronic noise, and allows fine segmentation of electrodes, giving position sensitivity for radiation interactions in the detector. Amorphous semiconductor contacts have great potential to facilitate new HPGe detector designs by providing a thin, high-resistivity surface coating that is the basis for electrical contacts that block both electrons and holes and can easily be finely segmented. Additionally, amorphous semiconductor coatings form a suitable passivation layer to protect the HPGe crystal surface from contamination. This versatility allows a simple fabrication process for fully passivated, finely segmented detectors. However, the fabrication process for detectors with amorphous semiconductors is not as highly developed as for conventional technologies. The amorphous semiconductor layer properties can vary widely based on how they are created and these can translate into varying performance of HPGe detectors with these contacts. Some key challenges include

  10. CDMS Detector Fabrication Improvements and Low Energy Nuclear Recoil Measurements in Germanium

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jastram, Andrew [Texas A & M Univ., College Station, TX (United States)

    2015-12-01

    As the CDMS (Cryogenic Dark Matter Search) experiment is scaled up to tackle new dark matter parameter spaces (lower masses and cross-sections), detector production efficiency and repeatability becomes ever more important. A dedicated facility has been commissioned for SuperCDMS detector fabrication at Texas A&M University (TAMU). The fabrication process has been carefully tuned using this facility and its equipment. Production of successfully tested detectors has been demonstrated. Significant improvements in detector performance have been made using new fabrication methods, equipment, and tuning of process parameters. This work has demonstrated the capability for production of next generation CDMS SNOLAB detectors. Additionally, as the dark matter parameter space is probed further, careful calibrations of detector response to nuclear recoil interactions must be performed in order to extract useful information (in relation to dark matter particle characterzations) from experimental results. A neutron beam of tunable energy is used in conjunction with a commercial radiation detector to characterize ionization energy losses in germanium during nuclear recoil events. Data indicates agreement with values predicted by the Lindhard equation, providing a best-t k-value of 0.146.

  11. Program LEP to addition of gamma spectra from germanium detectors; Programa LEPS para suma de espectros gammas de detectores de germanio

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Romero, L.

    1986-07-01

    The LEP program, written in FORTRAN IV, performs the addition of two spectra, collected with different detectors, from the same sample. This application, adds the two gamma spectra obtained from two opposite LEPS Germanium Detectors (Low Energy Photon Spectrometer), correcting the differences (channel/energy) between both two spectra, and fitting them before adding. The total-spectrum is recorded at the computer memory as a single spectrum. The necessary equipment, to run this program is: - Two opposite germanium detectors, with their associate electronics. - Multichannel analyzer (2048 memory channel minimum) - Computer on-line interfacing to multichannel analyzer. (Author) 4 refs.

  12. Measurement of gamma spectrum of radioactive waste and working environment by portable germanium detector

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sanada, Yukihisa; Akiyama, Kiyomitsu; Yoshizaki, Yuichi; Miyabe, Kenjiro [Japan Nuclear Cycle Development Inst., Tokai, Ibaraki (Japan). Tokai Works; Wakayama, Masaki [Inspection Development Co. Ltd. (Japan)

    2002-07-01

    Practical application of portable Ge detector was examined in radiation control at the reprocessing plant. Main purposes of the examination are, (1) estimation of radionuclides inventory by in-situ object counting system (ISOCS), and (2) acquisition of the gamma ray energy information which is necessary for dose estimation. At first waste box, analytical jug, filter and lead container were measured. Then gamma spectrum was measured around glove box in Pu conversion development facility (PCDF). As a result, some aspects concerned about detection limit, distribution of point source and self-absorption by low energy gamma ray were clarified. Information on the gamma ray energy were obtained. Radiation control will become advanced by measuring a gamma ray spectrum by portable germanium detector. (author)

  13. High Purity Germanium Detector as part of Health Canada's Mobile Nuclear Laboratory

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Stocki, Trevor J.; Bouchard, Claude; Rollings, John; Boudreau, Marc-Oliver; McCutcheon- Wickham, Rory; Bergman, Lauren [Radiation Protection Bureau, Health Canada, AL6302D, 775 Brookfield Road, Ottawa, K1A 0K9 (Canada)

    2014-07-01

    In the event of a nuclear emergency on Canadian soil, Health Canada has designed and equipped two Mobile Nuclear Labs (MNLs) which can be deployed near a radiological accident site to provide radiological measurement capabilities. These measurements would help public authorities to make informed decisions for radiation protection recommendations. One of the MNLs has been outfitted with a High Purity Germanium (HPGe) detector within a lead castle, which can be used for identification as well as quantification of gamma emitting radioisotopes in contaminated soil, water, and other samples. By spring 2014, Health Canada's second MNL will be equipped with a similar detector to increase sample analysis capacity and also provide redundancy if one of the detectors requires maintenance. The Mobile Nuclear Lab (MNL) with the HPGe detector has been successfully deployed in the field for various exercises. One of these field exercises was a dirty bomb scenario where an unknown radioisotope required identification. A second exercise was an inter-comparison between the measurements of spiked soil and water samples, by two field teams and a certified laboratory. A third exercise was the deployment of the MNL as part of a full scale nuclear exercise simulating an emergency at a Canadian nuclear power plant. The lessons learned from these experiences will be discussed. (authors)

  14. Demonstration of Surface Electron Rejection with Interleaved Germanium Detectors for Dark Matter Searches

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Agnese, R.; Anderson, A. J.; Balakishiyeva, D.; Basu Thakur, R.; Bauer, D. A.; Borgland, A.; Brandt, D.; Brink, P. L.; Bunker, R.; Cabrera, B.; Caldwell, D. O.; Cerdeno, D. G.; Chagani, H.; Cherry, M.; Cooley, J.; Cornell, B.; Crewdson, C. H.; Cushman, Priscilla B.; Daal, M.; Di Stefano, P. C.; Do Couto E Silva, E.; Doughty, T.; Esteban, L.; Fallows, S.; Figueroa-Feliciano, E.; Fox, J.; Fritts, M.; Godfrey, G. L.; Golwala, S. R.; Hall, Jeter C.; Harris, H. R.; Hasi, J.; Hertel, S. A.; Hines, B. A.; Hofer, T.; Holmgren, D.; Hsu, L.; Huber, M. E.; Jastram, A.; Kamaev, O.; Kara, B.; Kelsey, M. H.; Kenany, S.; Kennedy, A.; Kenney, C. J.; Kiveni, M.; Koch, K.; Loer, B.; Lopez Asamar, E.; Mahapatra, R.; Mandic, V.; Martinez, C.; McCarthy, K. A.; Mirabolfathi, N.; Moffatt, R. A.; Moore, D. C.; Nadeau, P.; Nelson, R. H.; Novak, L.; Page, K.; Partridge, R.; Pepin, M.; Phipps, A.; Prasad, K.; Pyle, M.; Qiu, H.; Radpour, R.; Rau, W.; Redl, P.; Reisetter, A.; Resch, R. W.; Ricci, Y.; Saab, T.; Sadoulet, B.; Sander, J.; Schmitt, R.; Schneck, K.; Schnee, Richard; Scorza, S.; Seitz, D.; Serfass, B.; Shank, B.; Speller, D.; Tomada, A.; Villano, A. N.; Welliver, B.; Wright, D. H.; Yellin, S.; Yen, J. J.; Young, B. A.; Zhang, J.

    2013-10-17

    The SuperCDMS experiment in the Soudan Underground Laboratory searches for dark matter with a 9-kg array of cryogenic germanium detectors. Symmetric sensors on opposite sides measure both charge and phonons from each particle interaction, providing excellent discrimination between electron and nuclear recoils, and between surface and interior events. Furthermore, surface event rejection capabilities were tested with two 210Pb sources producing ~130 beta decays/hr. We found that in ~800 live hours, no events leaked into the 8–115 keV signal region, giving upper limit leakage fraction 1.7 x 10-5 at 90% C.L., corresponding to<0.6 surface event background in the future 200-kg SuperCDMS SNOLAB experiment.

  15. Liquid phase epitaxial growth and characterization of germanium far infrared blocked impurity band detectors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bandaru, Jordana [Univ. of California, Berkeley, CA (United States)

    2001-01-01

    Germanium Blocked Impurity Band (BIB) detectors require a high purity blocking layer (< 1013 cm-3) approximately 1 mm thick grown on a heavily doped active layer (~ 1016cm-3) approximately 20 mm thick. Epilayers were grown using liquid phase epitaxy (LPE) of germanium out of lead solution. The effects of the crystallographic orientation of the germanium substrate on LPE growth modes were explored. Growth was studied on substrates oriented by Laue x-ray diffraction between 0.02° and 10° from the {111} toward the {100}. Terrace growth was observed, with increasing terrace height for larger misorientation angles. It was found that the purity of the blocking layer was limited by the presence of phosphorus in the lead solvent. Unintentionally doped Ge layers contained ~1015 cm-3 phosphorus as determined by Hall effect measurements and Photothermal Ionization Spectroscopy (PTIS). Lead purification by vacuum distillation and dilution reduced the phosphorus concentration in the layers to ~ 1014 cm-3 but further reduction was not observed with successive distillation runs. The graphite distillation and growth components as an additional phosphorus source cannot be ruled out. Antimony (~1016 cm-3) was used as a dopant for the active BIB layer. A reduction in the donor binding energy due to impurity banding was observed by variable temperature Hall effect measurements. A BIB detector fabricated from an Sb-doped Ge layer grown on a pure substrate showed a low energy photoconductive onset (~6 meV). Spreading resistance measurements on doped layers revealed a nonuniform dopant distribution with Sb pile-up at the layer surface, which must be removed by chemomechanical polishing. Sb diffusion into the pure substrate was observed by Secondary Ion Mass Spectroscopy (SIMS) for epilayers grown at 650 C. The Sb concentration at the interface dropped by an order of magnitude

  16. Performance and stability tests of bare high purity germanium detectors in liquid argon for the GERDA experiment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Barnabe Heider, Marik

    2009-05-27

    GERDA will search for neutrinoless double beta decay of {sup 76}Ge by using a novel approach of bare germanium detectors in liquid argon (LAr). Enriched germanium detectors from the previous Heidelberg-Moscow and IGEX experiments have been reprocessed and will be deployed in GERDA Phase-I. At the center of this thesis project is the study of the performance of bare germanium detectors in cryogenic liquids. Identical detector performance as in vacuum cryostats (2.2 keV FWHM at 1.3 MeV) was achieved in cryogenic liquids with a new low-mass detector assembly and contacts. One major result is the discovery of a radiation induced leakage current (LC) increase when operating bare detectors with standard passivation layers in LAr. Charge collection and build-up on the passivation layer were identified as the origin of the LC increase. It was found that diodes without passivation do not exhibit this feature. Three month-long stable operation in LAr at {proportional_to} 5 pA LC under periodic gamma irradiation demonstrated the suitability of the modi ed detector design. Based on these results, all Phase-I detectors were reprocessed without passivation layer and subsequently successfully characterized in LAr in the GERDA underground Detector Laboratory. The mass loss during the reprocessing was {proportional_to}300 g out of 17.9 kg and the exposure above ground {proportional_to} 5 days. This results in a negligible cosmogenic background increase of {proportional_to} 5.10{sup -4} cts/(keV.kg.y) at {sup 76}Ge Q{sub {beta}}{sub {beta}} for {sup 60}Co and {sup 68}Ge. (orig.)

  17. A prototype High Purity Germanium detector for high resolution gamma-ray spectroscopy at high count rates

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cooper, R.J., E-mail: rjcooper@lbl.gov [Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory, 1 Cyclotron Road, Berkeley, CA 94720 (United States); Amman, M.; Luke, P.N. [Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory, 1 Cyclotron Road, Berkeley, CA 94720 (United States); Vetter, K. [Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory, 1 Cyclotron Road, Berkeley, CA 94720 (United States); Department of Nuclear Engineering, University of California, Berkeley, CA 94720 (United States)

    2015-09-21

    Where energy resolution is paramount, High Purity Germanium (HPGe) detectors continue to provide the optimum solution for gamma-ray detection and spectroscopy. Conventional large-volume HPGe detectors are typically limited to count rates on the order of ten thousand counts per second, however, limiting their effectiveness for high count rate applications. To address this limitation, we have developed a novel prototype HPGe detector designed to be capable of achieving fine energy resolution and high event throughput at count rates in excess of one million counts per second. We report here on the concept, design, and initial performance of the first prototype device.

  18. Radial position of single-site gamma-ray interactions from a parametric pulse shape analysis of germanium detector signals

    CERN Document Server

    Orrell, J L; Cooper, M W; Kephart, J D; Seifert, C E; Orrell, John L.; Aalseth, Craig E.; Cooper, Matthew W.; Kephart, Jeremy D.; Seifert, Carolyn E.

    2007-01-01

    Pulse shape analysis of germanium gamma-ray spectrometer signals can yield information on the radial position of individual gamma-ray interactions within the germanium crystal. A parametric pulse shape analysis based on calculation of moments of the reconstructed current pulses from a closed-ended coaxial germanium detector is used to preferentially select single-site gamma-ray interactions. The double escape peak events from the 2614.5 keV gamma-ray of 208-Tl are used as a training set to optimize the single-site event selection region in the pulse shape parameter space. A collimated source of 320.1 keV gamma-rays from 51-Cr is used to scan different radial positions of the same semi-coaxial germanium detector. The previously trained single-site selection region is used to preferentially identify the single-site photoelectric absorption events from the 320.1 keV full-energy peak. From the identified events, a comparison of the pulse shape parameter space distributions between different scan positions allows ...

  19. Computational modeling of a high purity germanium (HPGe) detector using MCNPX code

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Correa, Guilherme J. de S.; Rebello, Wilson F.; Morales, Rudnei K., E-mail: guilhermeime@ime.eb.b, E-mail: rebelloime@ime.eb.b, E-mail: karam@ime.eb.b [Instituto Militar de Engenharia (IME), Rio de Janeiro, RJ (Brazil). Secao de Engenharia Nuclear; Cardoso, Domingos O.; Correa, Samanda C.A., E-mail: domin@cnen.gov.b, E-mail: scorrea@cnen.gov.b [Comissao Nacional de Energia Nuclear (CNEN), Rio de Janeiro, RJ (Brazil); Silva, Ademir X. da, E-mail: ademir@nuclear.ufrj.b [Universidade Federal do Rio de Janeiro (CT/UFRJ), RJ (Brazil). Centro de Tecnologia

    2011-07-01

    The efficiency of a detection system is crucial to determine the real activity of a radioactive source. When it's possible, the system's calibration should be performed using a standard source. Unfortunately, there are only a few cases that it can be done this way, considering the difficulty of obtaining appropriate standard sources for each type of measurement. In such cases, computer simulations can be performed to assist in calculating of the efficiency of the system with a similar configuration. This work aims to create, using the MCNPX code, a computer model of a high purity germanium (HPGe) detector belonged to the Radiometry Laboratory of Instituto Militar de Engenharia (IME), adapted for the calculation of the full-energy peak efficiency of {sup 137}Cs. The model was created representing in details an experimental arrangement assembled in IME considering the HPGe detector and measuring a {sup 137}Cs source. The calculated results are being compared with those obtained experimentally and the model is in process of validation. (author)

  20. Limits on Light WIMPs with a Germanium Detector at 172 eVee threshold at the China Jinping Underground Laboratory

    CERN Document Server

    Liu, S K; Kang, K J; Cheng, J P; Wong, H T; Li, Y J; Lin, S T; Chang, J P; Chen, N; Chen, Q H; Chen, Y H; Chuang, Y C; Deng, Z; Du, Q; Gong, H; Hao, X Q; He, H J; He, Q J; Huang, H X; Huang, T R; Jiang, H; Li, H B; Li, J M; Li, J; Li, X; Li, X Q; Li, X Y; Li, Y L; Liao, H Y; Lin, F K; Lü, L C; Ma, H; Mao, S J; Qin, J Q; Ren, J; Ruan, X C; Shen, M B; Singh, L; Singh, M K; Soma, A K; Su, J; Tang, C J; Tseng, C H; Wang, J M; Wang, L; Wang, Q; Wu, S Y; Wu, Y C; Xianyu, Z Z; Xiao, R Q; Xing, H Y; Xu, F Z; Xu, Y; Xu, X J; Xue, T; Yang, C W; Yang, L T; Yang, S W; Yi, N; Yu, C X; Yu, H; Yu, X Z; Zeng, X H; Zeng, Z; Zhang, L; Zhang, Y H; Zhao, M G; Zhao, W; Zhou, Z Y; Zhu, J J; Zhu, W B; Zhu, X Z; Zhu, Z H

    2014-01-01

    The China Dark Matter Experiment reports results on light WIMP dark matter searches at the China Jinping Underground Laboratory with a germanium detector array with a total mass of 20 g. The physics threshold achieved is 172 eVee at 50% signal efficiency. With 0.784 kg-days of data, exclusion region on spin-independent coupling with the nucleon is derived, improving over our earlier bounds at WIMP mass less than 4.6 GeV.

  1. Monte Carlo simulation of the X-ray response of a germanium microstrip detector with energy and position resolution

    CERN Document Server

    Rossi, G; Fajardo, P; Morse, J

    1999-01-01

    We present Monte Carlo computer simulations of the X-ray response of a micro-strip germanium detector over the energy range 30-100 keV. The detector consists of a linear array of lithographically defined 150 mu m wide strips on a high purity monolithic germanium crystal of 6 mm thickness. The simulation code is divided into two parts. We first consider a 10 mu m wide X-ray beam striking the detector surface at normal incidence and compute the interaction processes possible for each photon. Photon scattering and absorption inside the detector crystal are simulated using the EGS4 code with the LSCAT extension for low energies. A history of events is created of the deposited energies which is read by the second part of the code which computes the energy histogram for each detector strip. Appropriate algorithms are introduced to account for lateral charge spreading occurring during charge carrier drift to the detector surface, and Fano and preamplifier electronic noise contributions. Computed spectra for differen...

  2. A Search of Low-Mass WIMPs with p-type Point Contact Germanium Detector in the CDEX-1 Experiment

    CERN Document Server

    Zhao, W; Kang, K J; Cheng, J P; Li, Y J; Wong, H T; Lin, S T; Chang, J P; Chen, J H; Chen, Q H; Chen, Y H; Deng, Z; Du, Q; Gong, H; Hao, X Q; He, H J; He, Q J; Huang, H X; Huang, T R; Jiang, H; Li, H B; Li, J; Li, J M; Li, X; Li, X Y; Li, Y L; Lin, F K; Liu, S K; Lü, L C; Ma, H; Ma, J L; Mao, S J; Qin, J Q; Ren, J; Ruan, X C; Sharma, V; Shen, M B; Singh, L; Singh, M K; Soma, A K; Su, J; Tang, C J; Wang, J M; Wang, L; Wang, Q; Wu, S Y; Wu, Y C; Xianyu, Z Z; Xiao, R Q; Xing, H Y; Xu, F Z; Xu, Y; Xu, X J; Xue, T; Yang, L T; Yang, S W; Yi, N; Yu, C X; Yu, H; Yu, X Z; Zeng, M; Zeng, X H; Zeng, Z; Zhang, L; Zhang, Y H; Zhao, M G; Zhou, Z Y; Zhu, J J; Zhu, W B; Zhu, X Z; Zhu, Z H

    2016-01-01

    The CDEX-1 experiment conducted a search of low-mass (< 10 GeV/c2) Weakly Interacting Massive Particles (WIMPs) dark matter at the China Jinping Underground Laboratory using a p-type point-contact germanium detector with a fiducial mass of 915 g at a physics analysis threshold of 475 eVee. We report the hardware set-up, detector characterization, data acquisition and analysis procedures of this experiment. No excess of unidentified events are observed after subtraction of known background. Using 335.6 kg-days of data, exclusion constraints on the WIMP-nucleon spin-independent and spin-dependent couplings are derived.

  3. The 14N(p,gamma)15O reaction studied with a composite germanium detector

    CERN Document Server

    Marta, M; Bemmerer, D; Broggini, C; Caciolli, A; Corvisiero, P; Costantini, H; Elekes, Z; Fulop, Zs; Gervino, G; Guglielmetti, A; Gustavino, C; Gyurky, Gy; Imbriani, G; Junker, M; Lemut, A; Limata, B; Mazzocchi, C; Menegazzo, R; Prati, P; Roca, V; Rolfs, C; Alvarez, C Rossi; Somorjai, E; Straniero, O; Strieder, F; Terrasi, F; Trautvetter, H P; Vomiero, A

    2011-01-01

    The rate of the carbon-nitrogen-oxygen (CNO) cycle of hydrogen burning is controlled by the 14N(p,gamma)15O reaction. The reaction proceeds by capture to the ground states and several excited states in O-15. In order to obtain a reliable extrapolation of the excitation curve to astrophysical energy, fits in the R-matrix framework are needed. In an energy range that sensitively tests such fits, new cross section data are reported here for the four major transitions in the 14N(p,gamma)15O reaction. The experiment has been performed at the Laboratory for Underground Nuclear Astrophysics (LUNA) 400 kV accelerator placed deep underground in the Gran Sasso facility in Italy. Using a composite germanium detector, summing corrections have been considerably reduced with respect to previous studies. The cross sections for capture to the ground state and to the 5181, 6172, and 6792 keV excited states in O-15 have been determined at 359, 380, and 399 keV beam energy. In addition, the branching ratios for the decay of the...

  4. Majo-ra-na: An Ultra-Low Background Enriched-Germanium Detector Array for Fundamental Physics Measurements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gehman, Victor

    2010-02-01

    The Majo-ra-na collaboration will search for neutrinoless double-beta decay (0νββ) by fielding an array of high-purity germanium (HPGe) detectors in ultra-clean electroformed-copper cryostats deep underground. Recent advances in HPGe detector technology, in particular P-type Point-Contact (PPC) detectors, present exciting new techniques for identifying and reducing backgrounds to the 0νββ signal. This should result in greatly improved sensitivity over previous generation experiments. The very low energy threshold attainable with PPC detectors also provides for a broader physics program including searches for dark matter and axions. The Majo-ra-na De-mon-strat-or is an R&D program that will field three ˜20 kg modules of PPC detectors at Sanford Underground Laboratory. Half of the detectors will be enriched to 86% in ^76Ge. Here, we will cover the motivation, design, recent progress and current status of this effort, with special attention to its physics reach. )

  5. GIOVE: a new detector setup for high sensitivity germanium spectroscopy at shallow depth

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heusser, G.; Weber, M.; Hakenmüller, J.; Laubenstein, M.; Lindner, M.; Maneschg, W.; Simgen, H.; Stolzenburg, D.; Strecker, H.

    2015-11-01

    We report on the development and construction of the high-purity germanium spectrometer setup GIOVE (Germanium Inner Outer VEto), recently built and now operated at the shallow underground laboratory of the Max-Planck-Institut für Kernphysik, Heidelberg. Particular attention was paid to the design of a novel passive and active shield, aiming at efficient rejection of environmental and muon induced radiation backgrounds. The achieved sensitivity level of ≤ 100 \\upmu Bq kg^{-1} for primordial radionuclides from U and Th in typical γ ray sample screening measurements is unique among instruments located at comparably shallow depths and can compete with instruments at far deeper underground sites.

  6. Search for Pauli exclusion principle violating atomic transitions and electron decay with a p-type point contact germanium detector

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Abgrall, N.; Bradley, A.W.; Chan, Y.D.; Mertens, S.; Poon, A.W.P. [Nuclear Science Division, Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory, Berkeley, CA (United States); Arnquist, I.J.; Hoppe, E.W.; Kouzes, R.T.; LaFerriere, B.D.; Orrell, J.L. [Pacific Northwest National Laboratory, Richland, WA (United States); Avignone, F.T. [Oak Ridge National Laboratory, Oak Ridge, TN (United States); University of South Carolina, Department of Physics and Astronomy, Columbia, SC (United States); Barabash, A.S.; Konovalov, S.I.; Yumatov, V. [National Research Center ' ' Kurchatov Institute' ' Institute for Theoretical and Experimental Physics, Moscow (Russian Federation); Bertrand, F.E.; Galindo-Uribarri, A.; Radford, D.C.; Varner, R.L.; White, B.R.; Yu, C.H. [Oak Ridge National Laboratory, Oak Ridge, TN (United States); Brudanin, V.; Shirchenko, M.; Vasilyev, S.; Yakushev, E.; Zhitnikov, I. [Joint Institute for Nuclear Research, Dubna (Russian Federation); Busch, M. [Duke University, Department of Physics, Durham, NC (United States); Triangle Universities Nuclear Laboratory, Durham, NC (United States); Buuck, M.; Cuesta, C.; Detwiler, J.A.; Gruszko, J.; Guinn, I.S.; Leon, J.; Robertson, R.G.H. [University of Washington, Department of Physics, Center for Experimental Nuclear Physics and Astrophysics, Seattle, WA (United States); Caldwell, A.S.; Christofferson, C.D.; Dunagan, C.; Howard, S.; Suriano, A.M. [South Dakota School of Mines and Technology, Rapid City, SD (United States); Chu, P.H.; Elliott, S.R.; Goett, J.; Massarczyk, R.; Rielage, K. [Los Alamos National Laboratory, Los Alamos, NM (United States); Efremenko, Yu. [University of Tennessee, Department of Physics and Astronomy, Knoxville, TN (United States); Ejiri, H. [Osaka University, Research Center for Nuclear Physics, Ibaraki, Osaka (Japan); Finnerty, P.S.; Gilliss, T.; Giovanetti, G.K.; Henning, R.; Howe, M.A.; MacMullin, J.; Meijer, S.J.; O' Shaughnessy, C.; Rager, J.; Shanks, B.; Trimble, J.E.; Vorren, K.; Xu, W. [Triangle Universities Nuclear Laboratory, Durham, NC (United States); University of North Carolina, Department of Physics and Astronomy, Chapel Hill, NC (United States); Green, M.P. [North Carolina State University, Department of Physics, Raleigh, NC (United States); Oak Ridge National Laboratory, Oak Ridge, TN (United States); Triangle Universities Nuclear Laboratory, Durham, NC (United States); Guiseppe, V.E.; Tedeschi, D.; Wiseman, C. [University of South Carolina, Department of Physics and Astronomy, Columbia, SC (United States); Jasinski, B.R. [University of South Dakota, Department of Physics, Vermillion, SD (United States); Keeter, K.J. [Black Hills State University, Department of Physics, Spearfish, SD (United States); Kidd, M.F. [Tennessee Tech University, Cookeville, TN (United States); Martin, R.D. [Queen' s University, Department of Physics, Engineering Physics and Astronomy, Kingston, ON (Canada); Romero-Romero, E. [Oak Ridge National Laboratory, Oak Ridge, TN (United States); University of Tennessee, Department of Physics and Astronomy, Knoxville, TN (United States); Vetter, K. [Nuclear Science Division, Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory, Berkeley, CA (United States); University of California, Department of Nuclear Engineering, Berkeley, CA (United States); Wilkerson, J.F. [Oak Ridge National Laboratory, Oak Ridge, TN (United States); Triangle Universities Nuclear Laboratory, Durham, NC (United States); University of North Carolina, Department of Physics and Astronomy, Chapel Hill, NC (United States)

    2016-11-15

    A search for Pauli-exclusion-principle-violating K{sub α} electron transitions was performed using 89.5 kg-d of data collected with a p-type point contact high-purity germanium detector operated at the Kimballton Underground Research Facility. A lower limit on the transition lifetime of 5.8 x 10{sup 30} s at 90% C.L. was set by looking for a peak at 10.6 keV resulting from the X-ray and Auger electrons present following the transition. A similar analysis was done to look for the decay of atomic K-shell electrons into neutrinos, resulting in a lower limit of 6.8 x 10{sup 30} s at 90% C.L. It is estimated that the Majorana Demonstrator, a 44 kg array of p-type point contact detectors that will search for the neutrinoless double-beta decay of {sup 76}Ge, could improve upon these exclusion limits by an order of magnitude after three years of operation. (orig.)

  7. MSM-Metal Semiconductor Metal Photo-detector Using Black Silicon Germanium (SiGe) for Extended Wavelength Near Infrared Detection

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-09-01

    due to metal catalysis and wet etching. Using the blackened SiGe/Si, MSM photodiodes were fabricated and tested. The lowering of reflection using a...MSM- Metal Semiconductor Metal Photo-detector Using Black Silicon Germanium (SiGe) for Extended Wavelength Near Infrared Detection by Fred...Do not return it to the originator. Army Research Laboratory Adelphi, MD 20783-1197 ARL-TR-6176 September 2012 MSM- Metal

  8. Neutron Damage in Mechanically-Cooled High-Purity Germanium Detectors for Field-Portable Prompt Gamma Neutron Activation Analysis (PGNAA) Systems

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    E.H. Seabury; C.J. Wharton; A.J. Caffrey; J.B. McCabe; C. DeW. Van Siclen

    2013-10-01

    Prompt Gamma Neutron Activation (PGNAA) systems require the use of a gamma-ray spectrometer to record the gamma-ray spectrum of an object under test and allow the determination of the object’s composition. Field-portable systems, such as Idaho National Laboratory’s PINS system, have used standard liquid-nitrogen-cooled high-purity germanium (HPGe) detectors to perform this function. These detectors have performed very well in the past, but the requirement of liquid-nitrogen cooling limits their use to areas where liquid nitrogen is readily available or produced on-site. Also, having a relatively large volume of liquid nitrogen close to the detector can impact some assessments, possibly leading to a false detection of explosives or other nitrogen-containing chemical. Use of a mechanically-cooled HPGe detector is therefore very attractive for PGNAA applications where nitrogen detection is critical or where liquid-nitrogen logistics are problematic. Mechanically-cooled HPGe detectors constructed from p-type germanium, such as Ortec’s trans-SPEC, have been commercially available for several years. In order to assess whether these detectors would be suitable for use in a fielded PGNAA system, Idaho National Laboratory (INL) has been performing a number of tests of the resistance of mechanically-cooled HPGe detectors to neutron damage. These detectors have been standard commercially-available p-type HPGe detectors as well as prototype n-type HPGe detectors. These tests compare the performance of these different detector types as a function of crystal temperature and incident neutron fluence on the crystal.

  9. Advanced far infrared blocked impurity band detectors based on germanium liquid phase epitaxy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Olsen, Christopher Sean [Univ. of California, Berkeley, CA (United States)

    1998-05-01

    This research has shown that epilayers with residual impurity concentrations of 5 x 1013 cm-3 can be grown by producing the purest Pb available in the world. These epilayers have extremely low minority acceptor concentrations, which is ideal for fabrication of IR absorbing layers. The Pb LPE growth of Ge also has the advantageous property of gettering Cu from the epilayer and the substrate. Epilayers have been grown with intentional Sb doping for IR absorption on lightly doped substrates. This research has proven that properly working Ge BIB detectors can be fabricated from the liquid phase as long as pure enough solvents are available. The detectors have responded at proper wavelengths when reversed biased even though the response did not quite reach minimum wavenumbers. Optimization of the Sb doping concentration should further decrease the photoionization energy of these detectors. Ge BIB detectors have been fabricated that respond to 60 cm-1 with low responsivity. Through reduction of the minority residual impurities, detector performance has reached responsivities of 1 A/W. These detectors have exhibited quantum efficiency and NEP values that rival conventional photoconductors and are expected to provide a much more sensitive tool for new scientific discoveries in a number of fields, including solid state studies, astronomy, and cosmology.

  10. Leakage current in high-purity germanium detectors with amorphous semiconductor contacts

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Looker, Q., E-mail: qlooker@lbl.gov [Ernest Orlando Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory, University of California, Berkeley, California 94720 (United States); Department of Nuclear Engineering, University of California, Berkeley, California 94720 (United States); Amman, M. [Ernest Orlando Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory, University of California, Berkeley, California 94720 (United States); Vetter, K. [Ernest Orlando Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory, University of California, Berkeley, California 94720 (United States); Department of Nuclear Engineering, University of California, Berkeley, California 94720 (United States)

    2015-03-21

    Amorphous semiconductor electrical contacts on high-purity Ge radiation detectors have become a valuable technology because they are simple to fabricate, result in thin dead layers, block both electron and hole injection, and can readily be finely segmented as needed for applications requiring imaging or particle tracking. Though significant numbers of detectors have been successfully produced for a variety of applications using the amorphous semiconductor contact technology, there remains a need to better understand the dependence of performance characteristics, particularly leakage current, on the fabrication process parameters so that the performance can be better optimized. To this end, we have performed a systematic study of leakage current on RF-sputter-deposited amorphous-Ge (a-Ge) and amorphous-Si (a-Si) contacts as a function of process and operational parameters including sputter gas pressure and composition, number of detector temperature cycles, and time spent at room temperature. The study focused primarily on the current resulting from electron injection at the contact. Significant findings from the study include that a-Si produces lower electron injection than a-Ge, the time the detector spends at room temperature rather than the number of temperature cycles experienced by the detector is the primary factor associated with leakage current change when the detector is warmed, and the time stability of the a-Ge contact depends on the sputter gas pressure with a higher pressure producing more stable characteristics.

  11. Precision measurement of radioactivity in gamma-rays spectrometry using two HPGe detectors (BEGe-6530 and GC0818-7600SL models comparison techniques: Application to the soil measurement

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Guembou Shouop Cebastien Joel

    2017-01-01

    • Proved that the activity concentration determination in gamma spectrometry depended on the energy range emitted by a radionuclide. This study showed that the standard deviation measurement was less important to the result realized with BEGe-6530 HPGe model. Our findings were demonstrated that the results of the Broad Energy Germanium detector were more reliable.

  12. Modeled Performance of a Compton Telescope Based on Planar Germanium Detectors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Graham, Bradley L.

    A Monte Carlo technique for modeling the gamma-ray background spectra in space-based gamma-ray telescopes has been developed. The background spectrum is one of the key factors to the ultimate sensitivity that gamma-ray telescopes can achieve. The major sources of background are the diffuse cosmic gamma-ray flux, the Earth's atmospheric flux, and the decay of nuclei produced by spallation of cosmic rays, trapped protons and their secondary particles, the decay of nuclei produced by neutron capture and the de-excitation of excited states produced by inelastic scattering of neutrons. All of these sources are included in the model. The method for calculating the nuclear activation and decay component of the background combines the low Earth orbit primary proton and neutron flux, the production of secondary hadrons with GEANT, the spallation cross sections from Alice91 and YieldX, nuclear decay data from National Nuclear Data Center's (NNDC) Evaluated Nuclear Structure Data Files (ENSDF) database, and three-dimensional gamma-ray and beta particle transport with Electron Gamma-ray Shower version 4 (EGS4) using MORSE-CG. The background in the High Energy Astrophysics Observatory 3 (HEAO 3) gamma-ray instrument was modeled and compared to the measured background to validate the code. HEAO 3 is a space-based germanium spectrometer surrounded by active scintillators that provide shielding. Both the active and passive components of the HEAO 3 instrument are included in the simulation. The measured background from the HEAO 3 space instrument is compared with the simulation. This Monte Carlo code handles the following decay types: electron capture, beta-, beta+, meta-stable isotopes and short lived meta-stable decay products, and isotopes that have branchings to both beta- and beta+. The code follows a cascade of photons to the ground state of the decay product, and propagates these photons and appropriate accompanying beta simultaneously. This model was applied to the design

  13. Low background germanium detectors: From environmental laboratory to underground counting facility

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ceuppens, M. [Canberra Semiconductor N.V., Geel (Belgium)]|[Canberra Industries, Inc., Meriden (United States); Verplancke, J. [Canberra Semiconductor N.V., Geel (Belgium)]|[Canberra Industries, Inc., Meriden (United States); Tench, O. [Canberra Semiconductor N.V., Geel (Belgium)]|[Canberra Industries, Inc., Meriden (United States)

    1997-03-01

    Presentation and overview of different Low Level measuring systems ranging from the environmental lab to low-background detection systems and to the deep underground counting facility. Examples and performances for each of these will be given. Attention will be given to the standardised ultra low-background detectors and shields which provide excellent performance without the high cost in time and money associated with custom designed systems. (orig./DG)

  14. Development of ultra pure germanium epi layers for blocked impurity band far infrared detectors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lutz, M.P.

    1991-05-01

    The main goals of this paper are: (1) To develop a low-pressure CVD (LPCVD) process that allows epitaxial growth at lower temperatures. Lower temperatures will allow the achievement of a sharp dopant profile at the substrate/epi-layer interface. Less out-diffusion from the substrate would allow the use of thinner epitaxial layers, which would lead to a larger depletion width in the photoactive region. LPCVD also avoids, to a great extent, gas-phase nucleation, which would cause Ge particulates to fall onto the wafer surface during growth. (2) To reduce high levels of oxygen and copper present at the wafer interface, as observed by secondary ion mass spectroscopy (SIMS). In order to achieve high-quality epitaxial layers, it is imperative that the substrate surface be of excellent quality. (3) To make and test detectors, after satisfactory epitaxial layers have been made.

  15. Monte Carlo modelling of Germanium detectors for the measurement of low energy photons in internal dosimetry: Results of an international comparison

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gomez-Ros, J.M. [CIEMAT, Av. Complutense 22, E-28040 Madrid (Spain)], E-mail: jm.gomezros@ciemat.es; Carlan, L. de [CEA DRT/LIST/DETECS/LNHB/LMD, Bat 534, F-91191 Gif sur Yvette, Cedex (France); IRSN DRPH/SDI/LEDI, BP6, F-92262, Fontenay-aux-Roses, Cedex (France); Franck, D. [IRSN DRPH/SDI/LEDI, BP6, F-92262, Fontenay-aux-Roses, Cedex (France); Gualdrini, G. [ENEA ION-IRP, Via dei Colli 16, I-40136 Bologna (Italy); Lis, M.; Lopez, M.A.; Moraleda, M. [CIEMAT, Av. Complutense 22, E-28040 Madrid (Spain); Zankl, M. [GSF - National Research Center for Environment and Health, D-85764 Neuherberg (Germany); Badal, A. [Institut de Tecniques Energetiques, UPC, Diagonal 647, 08028 Barcelona (Spain); Capello, K. [Human Monitoring Laboratory (Canada); Cowan, P. [Serco Assurance, Bld. A32, Winfrith Tech. Centre Winfrith, Dorchester, Dorset DT2 8DH (United Kingdom); Ferrari, P. [ENEA ION-IRP, Via dei Colli 16, I-40136 Bologna (Italy); Heide, B. [Forschungszentrum Karlsruhe, Hermann-von-Helmholtz-Platz 1, 76344 Eggenstein-Leopoldshafen (Germany); Henniger, J. [Technical University of Dresden, 01062 Dresden (Germany); Hooley, V. [Serco Assurance, Bld. A32, Winfrith Tech. Centre Winfrith, Dorchester, Dorset DT2 8DH (United Kingdom); Hunt, J. [IRD, Av. Salvador Allende, s/n, Recreio, Rio de Janeiro (Brazil); Kinase, S. [Japan Atomic Energy Agency, Tokai-mura, Naka-gun, Ibaraki-ken 319-1195 (Japan); Kramer, G.H. [Human Monitoring Laboratory (Canada); Loehnert, D. [Technical University of Dresden, 01062 Dresden (Germany); Lucas, S. [LARN Laboratory, University of Namur, Rue de Bruxelles 61, B-5000 Namur (Belgium)] (and others)

    2008-02-15

    This communication summarizes the results concerning the Monte Carlo (MC) modelling of Germanium detectors for the measurement of low energy photons arising from the 'International comparison on MC modelling for in vivo measurement of Americium in a knee phantom' organized within the EU Coordination Action CONRAD (Coordinated Network for Radiation Dosimetry) as a joint initiative of EURADOS working groups 6 (computational dosimetry) and 7 (internal dosimetry). MC simulations proved to be an applicable way to obtain the calibration factor that needs to be used for in vivo measurements.

  16. Limits on light WIMPs from the CDEX-1 experiment with a p-type point-contact germanium detector at the China Jingping Underground Laboratory

    CERN Document Server

    Yue, Q; Kang, K J; Cheng, J P; Li, Y J; Lin, S T; Chang, J P; Chen, N; Chen, Q H; Chen, Y H; Chuang, Y C; Deng, Z; Du, Q; Gong, H; Hao, X Q; He, H J; He, Q J; Huang, H X; Huang, T R; Jiang, H; Li, H B; Li, J M; Li, J; Li, X; Li, X Y; Li, Y L; Liao, H Y; Lin, F K; Liu, S K; Lv, L C; Ma, H; Mao, S J; Qin, J Q; Ren, J; Ruan, X C; Shen, M B; Singh, L; Singh, M K; Soma, A K; Su, J; Tang, C J; Tseng, C H; Wang, J M; Wang, L; Wang, Q; Wong, H T; Wu, S Y; Wu, Y C; Xianyu, Z Z; Xiao, R Q; Xing, H Y; Xu, F Z; Xu, Y; Xu, X J; Xue, T; Yang, L T; Yang, S W; Yi, N; Yu, C X; Yu, H; Yu, X Z; Zeng, X H; Zeng, Z; Zhang, L; Zhang, Y H; Zhao, M G; Zhou, Z Y; Zhu, J J; Zhu, W B; Zhu, X Z; Zhu, Z H

    2014-01-01

    We report results of a search for light Dark Matter WIMPs with CDEX-1 experiment at the China Jingping Underground Laboratory, based on 53.9 kg-days of data from a p-type point-contact germanium detector enclosed by a NaI(Tl) crystal scintillator as anti-Compton detector. All events above the analysis threshold of 475 eVee can be quantitatively accounted for with the understood background channels, and there is no excess of residual events. An order of magnitude improvement in the sensitivities of spin-independent elastic cross-section over our previous results is achieved. Part of the allowed regions at WIMP mass of 6-20 GeV are probed and excluded.

  17. MINIBALL The first $\\gamma$-ray spectrometer using segmented, encapsulated germanium detectors for studies with radioactive beams

    CERN Document Server

    Warr, N; Pascovici, G; Thomas, H G; Weisshaar, D

    2004-01-01

    MINIBALL is a new spectrometer of position-sensitive Ge detectors designed for nuclear-structure studies at the REX-ISOLDE (D. Habs et al., Prog. Part. Nucl. Phys. 38, 111 (1997)) radioactive-beam facility at CERN. It combines high efficiency and high granularity, using pulse-shape analysis and 6-fold segmented Ge detectors. (5 refs).

  18. A search for particle dark matter using cryogenic germanium and silicon detectors in the one- and two- tower runs of CDMS-II at Soudan

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ogburn, IV, Reuben Walter [Stanford Univ., CA (United States)

    2008-06-01

    Images of the Bullet Cluster of galaxies in visible light, X-rays, and through gravitational lensing confirm that most of the matter in the universe is not composed of any known form of matter. The combined evidence from the dynamics of galaxies and clusters of galaxies, the cosmic microwave background, big bang nucleosynthesis, and other observations indicates that 80% of the universe's matter is dark, nearly collisionless, and cold. The identify of the dar, matter remains unknown, but weakly interacting massive particles (WIMPs) are a very good candidate. They are a natural part of many supersymmetric extensions to the standard model, and could be produced as a nonrelativistic, thermal relic in the early universe with about the right density to account for the missing mass. The dark matter of a galaxy should exist as a spherical or ellipsoidal cloud, called a 'halo' because it extends well past the edge of the visible galaxy. The Cryogenic Dark Matter Search (CDMS) seeks to directly detect interactions between WIMPs in the Milky Way's galactic dark matter halo using crystals of germanium and silicon. Our Z-sensitive ionization and phonon ('ZIP') detectors simultaneously measure both phonons and ionization produced by particle interactions. In order to find very rare, low-energy WIMP interactions, they must identify and reject background events caused by environmental radioactivity, radioactive contaminants on the detector,s and cosmic rays. In particular, sophisticated analysis of the timing of phonon signals is needed to eliminate signals caused by beta decays at the detector surfaces. This thesis presents the firs two dark matter data sets from the deep underground experimental site at the Soudan Underground Laboratory in Minnesota. These are known as 'Run 118', with six detectors (1 kg Ge, 65.2 live days before cuts) and 'Run 119', with twelve detectors (1.5 kg Ge, 74.5 live days before cuts). They have

  19. High-Purity Germanium Characterization

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weinandt, Nick; Sun, Yongchen; Mei, Dongming

    2010-11-01

    Underground germanium crystal growth is a main focus of the CUBED 2010 research in the state of South Dakota where the DUSEL will be hosted. High-purity germanium is essential to the construction of germanium detectors for neutrioless double-beta decay and dark matter experiments planned for DUSEL. The characterization of germanium ingots and crystals is an important part of the high-purity germanium crystal growth process. Through the characterization process, we can learn important information such as net impurity concentration and crystal structure. The information can be fed back to the zone refining and crystal growth processes. Resistivity measurements and Hall Effect experiments were used to understand the impurity concentration of the germanium bars. Both experiments were run at 77K to avoid thermal conductivity. When resistivity and Hall Effect experiments are coupled with future research into and Spectroscopies, we can begin to understand exactly what impurities are present in the sample. With resistivity, the Hall Effect, Photo-Thermal Ionization Spectroscopy, and Deep-Level Transit Spectroscopy, we can gain a more complete understanding of the characterization techniques and the growing of the crystal. At the conference I would be able to show the results obtained from our experiments

  20. Hard X-ray polarimetry with position sensitve germanium detectors. Studies of the recombination transitions into highly charged ions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tashenov, Stanislav

    2005-07-01

    In this work a first study of the photon polarization for the process of radiative recombination has been performed. This was done at the ESR storage ring at GSI for uranium ions colliding with N2 at various collision energies. For this measurement a high purity Ge Pixel Detector with a 4 x 4 segmentation matrix was applied. The investigation was performed at the Gas-jet target of the ESR. The detector was placed at 60 and 90 observation angles. The sensitivity of the Compton scattering effect to the linear polarization of the X-Ray radiation was employed for the polarization measurement. Detailed investigations of the scattering and geometrical effects inside the detector were performed in order to develop a method to interpret the experimental data and extract the degree of the linear polarization in the hard X-Ray regime with a high precision. A special emphasis was given to the geometry of the detector and it's influence on the measured pixel-to-pixel Compton scattering intensities. The developed method enabled to achieve a precision of the order of 10% with the Pixel Detector which is dominated by the statistical uncertainties. The obtained results show a good agreement with the theoretical values derived from the exact relativistic calculations. For the case of the linear polarization of the K-REC photons, the measured data con rm the theoretical prediction that strong depolarization effects occur for high projectile charges in the forward hemisphere. The latter is in disagreement with the nonrelativistic theory which predicts a 100 % polarization regardless of the emission angle. (orig.)

  1. Liquid argon as active shielding and coolant for bare germanium detectors. A novel background suppression method for the GERDA 0{nu}{beta}{beta} experiment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Peiffer, J.P.

    2007-07-25

    Two of the most important open questions in particle physics are whether neutrinos are their own anti-particles (Majorana particles) as required by most extensions of the StandardModel and the absolute values of the neutrino masses. The neutrinoless double beta (0{nu}{beta}{beta}) decay, which can be investigated using {sup 76}Ge (a double beta isotope), is the most sensitive probe for these properties. There is a claim for an evidence for the 0{nu}{beta}{beta} decay in the Heidelberg-Moscow (HdM) {sup 76}Ge experiment by a part of the HdM collaboration. The new {sup 76}Ge experiment Gerda aims to check this claim within one year with 15 kg.y of statistics in Phase I at a background level of {<=}10{sup -2} events/(kg.keV.y) and to go to higher sensitivity with 100 kg.y of statistics in Phase II at a background level of {<=}10{sup -3} events/(kg.keV.y). In Gerda bare germanium semiconductor detectors (enriched in {sup 76}Ge) will be operated in liquid argon (LAr). LAr serves as cryogenic coolant and as high purity shielding against external background. To reach the background level for Phase II, new methods are required to suppress the cosmogenic background of the diodes. The background from cosmogenically produced {sup 60}Co is expected to be {proportional_to}2.5.10{sup -3} events/(kg.keV.y). LAr scintillates in UV ({lambda}=128 nm) and a novel concept is to use this scintillation light as anti-coincidence signal for background suppression. In this work the efficiency of such a LAr scintillation veto was investigated for the first time. In a setup with 19 kg active LAr mass a suppression of a factor 3 has been achieved for {sup 60}Co and a factor 17 for {sup 232}Th around Q{sub {beta}}{sub {beta}} = 2039 keV. This suppression will further increase for a one ton active volume (factor O(100) for {sup 232}Th and {sup 60}Co). LAr scintillation can also be used as a powerful tool for background diagnostics. For this purpose a new, very stable and robust wavelength

  2. Characterization and first experimental application of space-resolving, energy-dispersive germanium detectors for the precision spectroscopy on heavy ions; Charakterisierung und erster experimenteller Einsatz von ortsaufloesenden, energiedispersiven Germanium-Detektoren zur Praezisionsspektroskopie an schweren Ionen

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Spillmann, Uwe

    2009-02-15

    First the actual status of the research for the 1s Lamb shift on heaviest systems as well as studies on the polarization of the radiative recombination radiation into the K shell of uranium are presented. On this base future precision experiments at storage rings are discussed. then follows a survey presentation of the GSI accelerator facility. Especially the experimental storage ring ESR is described, at which the experiments mentioned above were performed. Then an introduction to the fundamental understanding of the physical processes in the detection of X-radiation in semiconductor detectors is given. The following chapter discusses the detection technique of the Compton polarimetry and some experimental concepts for this. Then by means of a 4 x 4 pixel Ge(i) detector system, by which for the first time the K-REC radiation from uranium was measured at the ESR, an overview about the Monte-Carlo software EGS4 is given, which was applied to the efficiency correction in the evaluation phase and for the estimation of the detector behaviour during the planning phase of the new detectors. A presentation of the 1D and 2D microstrip detector system as well as the performed laboratory measurements follows. The results for the characterization of the 2D microstrip detector system at the synchrotron-radiation source ESRF in view of its application with the FOCAL spectrometer are thereafter described. The results of first test measurement on the Compton polarimetry, which were also performed at the ESRF, are then presented. Finally first experimental results, which wer obtained by the novel planar structured Ge(i) detectors, are shown.

  3. Performance of GERDA phase II BEGe detectors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wagner, Victoria [Max-Planck Institut fuer Kernphysik (Germany); Collaboration: GERDA-Collaboration

    2015-07-01

    The GERDA experiment searches for the lepton number violating neutrinoless double beta (0νββ) decay of {sup 76}Ge. GERDA uses HPGe detectors enriched in {sup 76}Ge as source and detection material. The experiment proceeds in two phases. In Phase I a background index of 10{sup -2} cts/(keV.kg.yr) was reached and a new lower limit on the half-life of the 0νββ decay of {sup 76}Ge was set to 2.1.10{sup 25} yr (at 95% C.L.). In Phase II the background index will be lowered by an order of magnitude and a sensitivity of 10{sup 26} yr will be reached. In order to achieve this goal 30 new custom-made broad energy germanium (BEGe) detectors and a liquid argon scintillation light veto will be deployed. Five BEGe detectors have been operated successfully in Phase I and demonstrated their improved energy resolution and enhanced pulse shape discrimination (PSD) against background events. Special designed electronics will further improve energy resolution and PSD performance. The first results from commissioning of the new BEGe detectors are presented in this talk.

  4. Germanium and indium

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shanks, W.C. Pat; Kimball, Bryn E.; Tolcin, Amy C.; Guberman, David E.; Schulz, Klaus J.; DeYoung, John H.; Seal, Robert R.; Bradley, Dwight C.

    2017-12-19

    Germanium and indium are two important elements used in electronics devices, flat-panel display screens, light-emitting diodes, night vision devices, optical fiber, optical lens systems, and solar power arrays. Germanium and indium are treated together in this chapter because they have similar technological uses and because both are recovered as byproducts, mainly from copper and zinc sulfides.The world’s total production of germanium in 2011 was estimated to be 118 metric tons. This total comprised germanium recovered from zinc concentrates, from fly ash residues from coal burning, and from recycled material. Worldwide, primary germanium was recovered in Canada from zinc concentrates shipped from the United States; in China from zinc residues and coal from multiple sources in China and elsewhere; in Finland from zinc concentrates from the Democratic Republic of the Congo; and in Russia from coal.World production of indium metal was estimated to be about 723 metric tons in 2011; more than one-half of the total was produced in China. Other leading producers included Belgium, Canada, Japan, and the Republic of Korea. These five countries accounted for nearly 95 percent of primary indium production.Deposit types that contain significant amounts of germanium include volcanogenic massive sulfide (VMS) deposits, sedimentary exhalative (SEDEX) deposits, Mississippi Valley-type (MVT) lead-zinc deposits (including Irish-type zinc-lead deposits), Kipushi-type zinc-lead-copper replacement bodies in carbonate rocks, and coal deposits.More than one-half of the byproduct indium in the world is produced in southern China from VMS and SEDEX deposits, and much of the remainder is produced from zinc concentrates from MVT deposits. The Laochang deposit in Yunnan Province, China, and the VMS deposits of the Murchison greenstone belt in Limpopo Province, South Africa, provide excellent examples of indium-enriched deposits. The SEDEX deposits at Bainiuchang, China (located in

  5. Hafnium germanium telluride

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jang, Gyung-Joo; Yun, Hoseop

    2008-01-01

    The title hafnium germanium telluride, HfGeTe4, has been synthesized by the use of a halide flux and structurally characterized by X-ray diffraction. HfGeTe4 is isostructural with stoichiometric ZrGeTe4 and the Hf site in this compound is also fully occupied. The crystal structure of HfGeTe4 adopts a two-dimensional layered structure, each layer being composed of two unique one-dimensional chains of face-sharing Hf-centered bicapped trigonal prisms and corner-sharing Ge-centered tetra­hedra. These layers stack on top of each other to complete the three-dimensional structure with undulating van der Waals gaps. PMID:21202163

  6. Hafnium germanium telluride

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hoseop Yun

    2008-05-01

    Full Text Available The title hafnium germanium telluride, HfGeTe4, has been synthesized by the use of a halide flux and structurally characterized by X-ray diffraction. HfGeTe4 is isostructural with stoichiometric ZrGeTe4 and the Hf site in this compound is also fully occupied. The crystal structure of HfGeTe4 adopts a two-dimensional layered structure, each layer being composed of two unique one-dimensional chains of face-sharing Hf-centered bicapped trigonal prisms and corner-sharing Ge-centered tetrahedra. These layers stack on top of each other to complete the three-dimensional structure with undulating van der Waals gaps.

  7. Long-term radiation damage to a spaceborne germanium spectrometer

    CERN Document Server

    Kurczynski, P; Hull, E L; Palmer, D; Harris, M J; Seifert, H; Teegarden, B J; Gehrels, N; Cline, T L; Ramaty, R; Sheppard, D; Madden, N W; Luke, P N; Cork, C P; Landis, D A; Malone, D F; Hurley, K

    1999-01-01

    The Transient Gamma-Ray Spectrometer aboard the Wind spacecraft in deep space has observed gamma-ray bursts and solar events for four years. The germanium detector in the instrument has gradually deteriorated from exposure to the approx 10 sup 8 p/cm sup 2 /yr(>100 MeV) cosmic-ray flux. Low-energy tailing and loss of efficiency, attributed to hole trapping and conversion of the germanium from n- to p-type as a result of crystal damage, were observed. Raising the detector bias voltage ameliorated both difficulties and restored the spectrometer to working operation. Together, these observations extend our understanding of the effects of radiation damage to include the previously unsuccessfully studied regime of long-term operation in space. (author)

  8. A review of the developments of radioxenon detectors for nuclear explosion monitoring

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sivels, Ciara B.; McIntyre, Justin I.; Bowyer, Theodore W.; Kalinowski, Martin B.; Pozzi, Sara A.

    2017-09-27

    Developments in radioxenon monitoring since the implementation of the International Monitoring System are reviewed with emphasis on the most current technologies to improve detector sensitivity and resolution. The nuclear detectors reviewed include combinations of plastic and NaI(Tl) detectors, high purity germanium detectors, silicon detectors, and phoswich detectors. The minimum detectable activity and calibration methods for the various detectors are also discussed.

  9. Measurements on a prototype segmented Clover detector

    CERN Document Server

    Shepherd, S L; Cullen, D M; Appelbe, D E; Simpson, J; Gerl, J; Kaspar, M; Kleinböhl, A; Peter, I; Rejmund, M; Schaffner, H; Schlegel, C; France, G D

    1999-01-01

    The performance of a segmented Clover germanium detector has been measured. The segmented Clover detector is a composite germanium detector, consisting of four individual germanium crystals in the configuration of a four-leaf Clover, housed in a single cryostat. Each crystal is electrically segmented on its outer surface into four quadrants, with separate energy read-outs from nine crystal zones. Signals are also taken from the inner contact of each crystal. This effectively produces a detector with 16 active elements. One of the purposes of this segmentation is to improve the overall spectral resolution when detecting gamma radiation emitted following a nuclear reaction, by minimising Doppler broadening caused by the opening angle subtended by each detector element. Results of the tests with sources and in beam will be presented. The improved granularity of the detector also leads to an improved isolated hit probability compared with an unsegmented Clover detector. (author)

  10. Surface Passivation of Germanium Nanowires

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Adhikari, Hemant; Sun, Shiyu; Pianetta, Piero; Chidsey, Chirstopher E.D.; McIntyre, Paul C.; /SLAC, SSRL

    2005-05-13

    The surface of single crystal, cold-wall CVD-grown germanium nanowires was studied by synchrotron radiation photoemission spectroscopy (SR-PES) and also by conventional XPS. The as-grown germanium nanowires seem to be hydrogen terminated. Exposure to laboratory atmosphere leads to germanium oxide growth with oxidation states of Ge{sup 1+}, Ge{sup 2+}, Ge{sup 3+}, while exposure to UV light leads to a predominance of the Ge{sup 4+} oxidation state. Most of the surface oxide could be removed readily by aqueous HF treatment which putatively leaves the nanowire surface hydrogen terminated with limited stability in air. Alternatively, chlorine termination could be achieved by aq. HCl treatment of the native oxide-coated nanowires. Chlorine termination was found to be relatively more stable than the HF-last hydrogen termination.

  11. Two-Dimensional Spatial Imaging of Charge Transport in Germanium Crystals at Cryogenic Temperatures

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Moffatt, Robert [Stanford Univ., CA (United States)

    2016-03-01

    In this dissertation, I describe a novel apparatus for studying the transport of charge in semiconductors at cryogenic temperatures. The motivation to conduct this experiment originated from an asymmetry observed between the behavior of electrons and holes in the germanium detector crystals used by the Cryogenic Dark Matter Search (CDMS). This asymmetry is a consequence of the anisotropic propagation of electrons in germanium at cryogenic temperatures. To better model our detectors, we incorporated this effect into our Monte Carlo simulations of charge transport. The purpose of the experiment described in this dissertation is to test those models in detail. Our measurements have allowed us to discover a shortcoming in our most recent Monte Carlo simulations of electrons in germanium. This discovery would not have been possible without the measurement of the full, two-dimensional charge distribution, which our experimental apparatus has allowed for the first time at cryogenic temperatures.

  12. Carrier multiplication in germanium nanocrystals

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Saeed, S.; de Weerd, C.; Stallinga, P.; Spoor, F.C.M.; Houtepen, A.J.; Siebbeles, L.D.A.; Gregorkiewicz, T.

    2015-01-01

    Carrier multiplication is demonstrated in a solid-state dispersion of germanium nanocrystals in a silicon-dioxide matrix. This is performed by comparing ultrafast photo-induced absorption transients at different pump photon energies below and above the threshold energy for this process. The average

  13. Germanium Nanocrystal Solar Cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Holman, Zachary Charles

    Greenhouse gas concentrations in the atmosphere are approaching historically unprecedented levels from burning fossil fuels to meet the ever-increasing world energy demand. A rapid transition to clean energy sources is necessary to avoid the potentially catastrophic consequences of global warming. The sun provides more than enough energy to power the world, and solar cells that convert sunlight to electricity are commercially available. However, the high cost and low efficiency of current solar cells prevent their widespread implementation, and grid parity is not anticipated to be reached for at least 15 years without breakthrough technologies. Semiconductor nanocrystals (NCs) show promise for cheap multi-junction photovoltaic devices. To compete with photovoltaic materials that are currently commercially available, NCs need to be inexpensively cast into dense thin films with bulk-like electrical mobilities and absorption spectra that can be tuned by altering the NC size. The Group II-VI and IV-VI NC communities have had some success in achieving this goal by drying and then chemically treating colloidal particles, but the more abundant and less toxic Group IV NCs have proven more challenging. This thesis reports thin films of plasma-synthesized Ge NCs deposited using three different techniques, and preliminary solar cells based on these films. Germanium tetrachloride is dissociated in the presence of hydrogen in a nonthermal plasma to nucleate Ge NCs. Transmission electron microscopy and X-ray diffraction indicate that the particles are nearly monodisperse (standard deviations of 10-15% the mean particle diameter) and the mean diameter can be tuned from 4-15 nm by changing the residence time of the Ge NCs in the plasma. In the first deposition scheme, a Ge NC colloid is formed by reacting nanocrystalline powder with 1-dodecene and dispersing the functionalized NCs in a solvent. Films are then formed on substrates by drop-casting the colloid and allowing it to dry

  14. Performance of the Ultra-High Rate Germanium (UHRGe) System

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fast, James E. [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Dion, Michael P. [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Rodriguez, Douglas C. [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); VanDevender, Brent A. [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Wood, Lynn S. [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Wright, Michael E. [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States)

    2013-12-01

    This report describes the final performance achieved with the detector system developed for the Ultra High Rate Germanium (UHRGe) project. The system performance has been evaluated at low, moderate and high rates and includes the performance of real-time analysis algorithms running in the FPGA of the data acquisition system. This performance is compared to that of offline analyses of streaming waveform data collected with the same data acquisition system the performance of a commercial Multi-Channel Analyzer designed for high-resolution spectroscopy applications, the Canberra LYNX.

  15. Hot Carrier Trapping in High-Purity and Doped Germanium Crystals at Millikelvin Temperatures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Piro, M.-C.; Broniatowski, A.; Marnieros, S.; Dumoulin, L.; Olivieri, E.

    2014-09-01

    A new set of experimental data is presented for the mean drift lengths and the drift velocities of hot electrons and holes as a function of the electric field in ultra-pure and in lightly doped (n- and p-type) germanium single crystals at mK temperatures. Measurements are made in the field range between 0.1 and 15 V/cm, typical for the operation of cryogenic germanium detectors for dark matter search. The analysis of the experimental data strongly suggests that the dominant trapping centers are the dopant species in the neutral state.

  16. Optimization of the Transport Shield for Neutrinoless Double Beta-decay Enriched Germanium

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Aguayo Navarrete, Estanislao; Kouzes, Richard T.; Orrell, John L.; Reid, Douglas J.; Fast, James E.

    2012-04-15

    This document presents results of an investigation of the material and geometry choice for the transport shield of germanium, the active detector material used in 76Ge neutrinoless double beta decay searches. The objective of this work is to select the optimal material and geometry to minimize cosmogenic production of radioactive isotopes in the germanium material. The design of such a shield is based on the calculation of the cosmogenic production rate of isotopes that are known to cause interfering backgrounds in 76Ge neutrinoless double beta decay searches.

  17. The Silicon Cube detector

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Matea, I.; Adimi, N. [Centre d' Etudes Nucleaires de Bordeaux Gradignan - Universite Bordeaux 1 - UMR 5797, CNRS/IN2P3, Chemin du Solarium, BP 120, F-33175 Gradignan Cedex (France); Blank, B. [Centre d' Etudes Nucleaires de Bordeaux Gradignan - Universite Bordeaux 1 - UMR 5797, CNRS/IN2P3, Chemin du Solarium, BP 120, F-33175 Gradignan Cedex (France)], E-mail: blank@cenbg.in2p3.fr; Canchel, G.; Giovinazzo, J. [Centre d' Etudes Nucleaires de Bordeaux Gradignan - Universite Bordeaux 1 - UMR 5797, CNRS/IN2P3, Chemin du Solarium, BP 120, F-33175 Gradignan Cedex (France); Borge, M.J.G.; Dominguez-Reyes, R.; Tengblad, O. [Insto. Estructura de la Materia, CSIC, Serrano 113bis, E-28006 Madrid (Spain); Thomas, J.-C. [GANIL, CEA/DSM - CNRS/IN2P3, BP 55027, F-14076 Caen Cedex 5 (France)

    2009-08-21

    A new experimental device, the Silicon Cube detector, consisting of six double-sided silicon strip detectors placed in a compact geometry was developed at CENBG. Having a very good angular coverage and high granularity, it allows simultaneous measurements of energy and angular distributions of charged particles emitted from unbound nuclear states. In addition, large-volume Germanium detectors can be placed close to the collection point of the radioactive species to be studied. The setup is ideally suited for isotope separation on-line (ISOL)-type experiments to study multi-particle emitters and was tested during an experiment at the low-energy beam line of SPIRAL at GANIL.

  18. Broad Energy Range Neutron Spectroscopy using a Liquid Scintillator and a Proportional Counter: Application to a Neutron Spectrum Similar to that from an Improvised Nuclear Device.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Yanping; Randers-Pehrson, Gerhard; Marino, Stephen A; Garty, Guy; Harken, Andrew; Brenner, David J

    2015-09-11

    A novel neutron irradiation facility at the Radiological Research Accelerator Facility (RARAF) has been developed to mimic the neutron radiation from an Improvised Nuclear Device (IND) at relevant distances (e.g. 1.5 km) from the epicenter. The neutron spectrum of this IND-like neutron irradiator was designed according to estimations of the Hiroshima neutron spectrum at 1.5 km. It is significantly different from a standard reactor fission spectrum, because the spectrum changes as the neutrons are transported through air, and it is dominated by neutron energies from 100 keV up to 9 MeV. To verify such wide energy range neutron spectrum, detailed here is the development of a combined spectroscopy system. Both a liquid scintillator detector and a gas proportional counter were used for the recoil spectra measurements, with the individual response functions estimated from a series of Monte Carlo simulations. These normalized individual response functions were formed into a single response matrix for the unfolding process. Several accelerator-based quasi-monoenergetic neutron source spectra were measured and unfolded to test this spectroscopy system. These reference neutrons were produced from two reactions: T(p,n)3He and D(d,n)3He, generating neutron energies in the range between 0.2 and 8 MeV. The unfolded quasi-monoenergetic neutron spectra indicated that the detection system can provide good neutron spectroscopy results in this energy range. A broad-energy neutron spectrum from the 9Be(d,n) reaction using a 5 MeV deuteron beam, measured at 60 degrees to the incident beam was measured and unfolded with the evaluated response matrix. The unfolded broad neutron spectrum is comparable with published time-of-flight results. Finally, the pair of detectors were used to measure the neutron spectrum generated at the RARAF IND-like neutron facility and a comparison is made to the neutron spectrum of Hiroshima.

  19. Germanium Lift-Off Masks for Thin Metal Film Patterning

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brown, Ari

    2012-01-01

    A technique has been developed for patterning thin metallic films that are, in turn, used to fabricate microelectronics circuitry and thin-film sensors. The technique uses germanium thin films as lift-off masks. This requires development of a technique to strip or undercut the germanium chemically without affecting the deposited metal. Unlike in the case of conventional polymeric lift-off masks, the substrate can be exposed to very high temperatures during processing (sputter deposition). The reason why polymeric liftoff masks cannot be exposed to very high temperatures (greater than 100 C) is because (a) they can become cross linked, making lift-off very difficult if not impossible, and (b) they can outgas nitrogen and oxygen, which then can react with the metal being deposited. Consequently, this innovation is expected to find use in the fabrication of transition edge sensors and microwave kinetic inductance detectors, which use thin superconducting films deposited at high temperature as their sensing elements. Transition edge sensors, microwave kinetic inductance detectors, and their circuitry are comprised of superconducting thin films, for example Nb and TiN. Reactive ion etching can be used to pattern these films; however, reactive ion etching also damages the underlying substrate, which is unwanted in many instances. Polymeric lift-off techniques permit thin-film patterning without any substrate damage, but they are difficult to remove and the polymer can outgas during thin-film deposition. The outgassed material can then react with the film with the consequence of altered and non-reproducible materials properties, which, in turn, is deleterious for sensors and their circuitry. The purpose of this innovation was to fabricate a germanium lift-off mask to be used for patterning thin metal films.

  20. L3 experiment's detector : BGO assembly hall

    CERN Multimedia

    CERN

    1987-01-01

    The detector is a multi-layered cylindrical set of different devices, each of them measuring physical quantities relevant to the reconstruction of the collision under study. The three main outer layers are the electro-magnetic calorimeter (also called BGO because it's made of Bismuth Germanium Oxide), the hadronic calorimeter (HCAL) and the muon detector.

  1. Compound Semiconductor Radiation Detectors

    CERN Document Server

    Owens, Alan

    2012-01-01

    Although elemental semiconductors such as silicon and germanium are standard for energy dispersive spectroscopy in the laboratory, their use for an increasing range of applications is becoming marginalized by their physical limitations, namely the need for ancillary cooling, their modest stopping powers, and radiation intolerance. Compound semiconductors, on the other hand, encompass such a wide range of physical and electronic properties that they have become viable competitors in a number of applications. Compound Semiconductor Radiation Detectors is a consolidated source of information on all aspects of the use of compound semiconductors for radiation detection and measurement. Serious Competitors to Germanium and Silicon Radiation Detectors Wide-gap compound semiconductors offer the ability to operate in a range of hostile thermal and radiation environments while still maintaining sub-keV spectral resolution at X-ray wavelengths. Narrow-gap materials offer the potential of exceeding the spectral resolutio...

  2. Materials technologies for IR detectors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Besson, J.

    1986-01-01

    This book presents the papers given at a conference which examined crystal growth methods for semiconductor materials used in infrared detectors. Topics considered at the conference included materials research, cadmium tellurides, electrochemistry, mercury tellurides, pressure effects, liquid phase epitaxy, annealing, germanium photoconductor materials, fundamental studies, materials characterization, magnetic fields, and basic properties of infrared materials.

  3. L3 detector: BGO assembly

    CERN Multimedia

    CERN

    1989-01-01

    Explanation and presentation of its construction ( Feb-March 1989). The detector is a multi-layered cylindrical set of different devices, each of them measuring physical quantities relevant to the reconstruction of the collision under study. The three main outer layers are the electro-magnetic calorimeter (also called BGO because it's made of Bismuth Germanium Oxide), the hadronic calorimeter (HCAL) and the muon detector.

  4. Measurements of gamma (γ)-emitting radionuclides with a high-purity germanium detector: the methods and reliability of our environmental assessments on the Fukushima 1 Nuclear Power Plant accident.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mimura, Tetsuro; Mimura, Mari; Komiyama, Chiyo; Miyamoto, Masaaki; Kitamura, Akira

    2014-01-01

    The severe accident of Fukushima 1 Nuclear Power Plant due to the Tohoku Region Pacific Coast Earthquake in 11 March 2011 caused wide contamination and pollution by radionuclides in Fukushima and surrounding prefectures. In the current JPR symposium, a group of plant scientists attempted to examine the impact of the radioactive contamination on wild and cultivated plants. Measurements of gamma (γ) radiation from radionuclides in "Fukushima samples", which we called and collected from natural and agricultural areas in Fukushima prefecture were mostly done with a high-purity Ge detector in the Graduate School of Maritime Sciences, Kobe University. In this technical note, we describe the methods of sample preparation and measurements of radioactivity of the samples and discuss the reliability of our data in regards to the International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA) Interlaboratory comparisons and proficiency test (IAEA proficiency test).

  5. Electrical and thermal spin accumulation in germanium

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jain, A.; Vergnaud, C.; Peiro, J.; Le Breton, J. C.; Prestat, E.; Louahadj, L.; Portemont, C.; Ducruet, C.; Baltz, V.; Marty, A.; Barski, A.; Bayle-Guillemaud, P.; Vila, L.; Attané, J.-P.; Augendre, E.; Jaffrès, H.; George, J.-M.; Jamet, M.

    2012-07-01

    In this letter, we first show electrical spin injection in the germanium conduction band at room temperature and modulate the spin signal by applying a gate voltage to the channel. The corresponding signal modulation agrees well with the predictions of spin diffusion models. Then, by setting a temperature gradient between germanium and the ferromagnet, we create a thermal spin accumulation in germanium without any charge current. We show that temperature gradients yield larger spin accumulations than electrical spin injection but, due to competing microscopic effects, the thermal spin accumulation remains surprisingly unchanged under the application of a gate voltage.

  6. Solution synthesis of germanium nanocrystals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gerung, Henry [Albuquerque, NM; Boyle, Timothy J [Kensington, MD; Bunge, Scott D [Cuyahoga Falls, OH

    2009-09-22

    A method for providing a route for the synthesis of a Ge(0) nanometer-sized material from. A Ge(II) precursor is dissolved in a ligand heated to a temperature, generally between approximately 100.degree. C. and 400.degree. C., sufficient to thermally reduce the Ge(II) to Ge(0), where the ligand is a compound that can bond to the surface of the germanium nanomaterials to subsequently prevent agglomeration of the nanomaterials. The ligand encapsulates the surface of the Ge(0) material to prevent agglomeration. The resulting solution is cooled for handling, with the cooling characteristics useful in controlling the size and size distribution of the Ge(0) materials. The characteristics of the Ge(II) precursor determine whether the Ge(0) materials that result will be nanocrystals or nanowires.

  7. High Efficiency Germanium Immersion Gratings

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kuzmenko, P J; Davis, P J; Little, S L; Little, L M; Bixler, J V

    2006-05-01

    We have fabricated several germanium immersion gratings by single crystal, single point diamond flycutting on an ultra-precision lathe. Use of a dead sharp tool produces groove corners less than 0.1 micron in radius and consequently high diffraction efficiency. We measured first order efficiencies in immersion of over 80% at 10.6 micron wavelength. Wavefront error was low averaging 0.06 wave rms (at 633 nm) across the full aperture. The grating spectral response was free of ghosts down to our detection limit of 1 part in 10{sup 4}. Scatter should be low based upon the surface roughness. Measurement of the spectral line profile of a CO{sub 2} laser sets an upper bound on total integrated scatter of 0.5%.

  8. Silicon Germanium Quantum Well Solar Cell Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — Quantum-well structures embodied on single crystal silicon germanium drastically enhanced carrier mobilities.  The cell-to-cell circuits of quantum-well PV...

  9. Metal induced crystallization of silicon germanium alloys

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gjukic, M.

    2007-05-15

    In the framework of this thesis the applicability of the aluminium-induced layer exchange on binary silicon germanium alloys was studied. It is here for the first time shown that polycrstalline silicon-germanium layers can be fabricated over the whole composition range by the aluminium-induced layer exchange. The experimental results prove thet the resulting material exhibits a polycrystalline character with typocal grain sizes of 10-100 {mu}m. Raman measurements confirm that the structural properties of the resulting layers are because of the large crystallites more comparable with monocrystalline than with nano- or microcrystalline silicon-germanium. The alloy ratio of the polycrystalline layer correspondes to the chemical composition of the amorphous starting layer. The polycrystalline silicon-germanium layers possess in the range of the interband transitions a reflection spectrum, as it is otherwise only known from monocrystalline reference layers. The improvement of the absorption in the photovoltaically relevant spectral range aimed by the application of silicon-germanium could be also proved by absorption measurments. Strongly correlated with the structural properties of the polycrystalline layers and the electronic band structure resulting from this are beside the optical properties also the electrical properties of the material, especially the charge-carrier mobility and the doping concentration. For binary silicon-germanium layers the hole concentration of about 2 x 10{sup 18} cm{sup -3} for pure silicon increrases to about 5 x 10{sup 20} cm{sub -3} for pure germanium. Temperature-resolved measurements were applied in order to detect doping levels respectively semiconductor-metal transitions. In the last part of the thesis the hydrogen passivation of polycrystalline thin silicon-germanium layers, which were fabricated by means of aluminium-induced layer exchange, is treated.

  10. A novel approach for modelling the cluster detector and the SPI ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    It consists of an array of 19 closely packed encapsulated high- purity germanium (HPGe) detectors surrounded by an active anticoincidence shield of bismuth germanate [1]. The cluster detector is a similar composite detector, which con- sists of seven closely packed encapsulated HPGe detectors inside the same cryostat.

  11. Chemical composition gratings in Germanium doped and Boron-Germanium co-doped fibers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barrera, D.; Finazzi, V.; Coviello, G.; Bueno, A.; Sales, S.; Pruneri, V.

    2010-04-01

    We have successfully created Chemical Composition Gratings (CCGs) into two different types of fiber: standard telecommunications Germanium doped fibers and photosensitive Germanium/Boron co-doped fibers. We will present results on the regeneration process, the sensing properties and also the high temperature decay and maximum operative temperature for the CCGs created in both types of fiber.

  12. Germanium content in Polish hard coals

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Makowska Dorota

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Due to the policy of the European Union, it is necessary to search for new sources of scarce raw materials. One of these materials is germanium, listed as a critical element. This semi-metal is widely used in the electronics industry, for example in the production of semiconductors, fibre optics and solar cells. Coal and fly ash from its combustion and gasification for a long time have been considered as a potential source of many critical elements, particularly germanium. The paper presents the results of germanium content determination in the Polish hard coal. 23 coal samples of various coal ranks were analysed. The samples were collected from 15 mines of the Upper Silesian Coal Basin and from one mine of the Lublin Coal Basin. The determination of germanium content was performed with the use of Atomic Absorption Spectrometry with Electrothermal Atomization (GFAAS. The investigation showed that germanium content in the analysed samples was at least twice lower than the average content of this element in the hard coals analysed so far and was in the range of 0.08 ÷ 1.28 mg/kg. Moreover, the content of Ge in the ashes from the studied coals does not exceed 15 mg/kg, which is lower than the average value of Ge content in the coal ashes. The highest content of this element characterizes coals of the Lublin Coal Basin and young coals type 31 from the Vistula region. The results indicate a low utility of the analysed coal ashes as a source of the recovery of germanium. On the basis of the analyses, the lack of the relationship between the content of the element and the ash content in the tested coals was noted. For coals of the Upper Silesian Coal Basin, the relationship between the content of germanium in the ashes and the depth of the seam was observed.

  13. Experimental Search for Solar Axions via Coherent Primakoff Conversion in a Germanium Spectrometer

    CERN Document Server

    Avignone, F T; Brodzinski, R; Collar, J I; Creswick, R J; Di Gregorio, D E; Farach, H A; Gattone, A O; Guérard, C K; Hasenbalg, F; Huck, H; Miley, H S; Morales, A; Morales, J; Nussinov, S; De Solorzano, A O; Reeves, J H; Villar, J; Zioutas, Konstantin

    1998-01-01

    Results are reported of an experimental search for the unique, rapidly varying temporal pattern of solar axions coherently converting into photons via the Primakoff effect in a single crystal germanium detector. This conversion is predicted when axions are incident at a Bragg angle with a crystalline plane. The analysis of approximately 1.94 kg.yr of data from the 1 kg DEMOS detector in Sierra Grande, Argentina, yields a new laboratory bound on axion-photon coupling of $g_{a\\gamma \\gamma} < 2.7\\cdot 10^{-9}$ GeV$^{-1}$, independent of axion mass up to ~ 1 keV.

  14. Germanium nanowires grown using different catalyst metals

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gouveia, R.C., E-mail: riama@ifsp.edu.br [Departamento de Física – NanO Lab, Universidade Federal de São Carlos, Rod. Washington Luís, Km 235 – SP 310, São Carlos, CEP 13565-905 (Brazil); Área de Ciências, Instituto Federal de Educação Ciência e Tecnologia de São Paulo, Rua Américo Ambrósio, 269, Jd. Canaã, Sertãozinho, CEP 14169-263 (Brazil); Kamimura, H.; Munhoz, R.; Rodrigues, A.D. [Departamento de Física – NanO Lab, Universidade Federal de São Carlos, Rod. Washington Luís, Km 235 – SP 310, São Carlos, CEP 13565-905 (Brazil); Leite, E.R. [Departamento de Química – LIEC, Universidade Federal de São Carlos, São Carlos, CEP 13565-905 (Brazil); Chiquito, A.J. [Departamento de Física – NanO Lab, Universidade Federal de São Carlos, Rod. Washington Luís, Km 235 – SP 310, São Carlos, CEP 13565-905 (Brazil)

    2016-11-01

    Germanium nanowires have been synthesized by the well known vapor-liquid-solid growth mechanism using gold, silver, cooper, indium and nickel as catalyst metals. The influence of metal seeds on nanowires structural and electronic transport properties was also investigated. Electron microscopy images demonstrated that, despite differences in diameters, all nanowires obtained presented single crystalline structures. X-ray patterns showed that all nanowires were composed by germanium with a small amount of germanium oxide, and the catalyst metal was restricted at the nanowires' tips. Raman spectroscopy evidenced the long range order in the crystalline structure of each sample. Electrical measurements indicated that variable range hopping was the dominant mechanism in carrier transport for all devices, with similar hopping distance, regardless the material used as catalyst. Then, in spite of the differences in synthesis temperatures and nanowires diameters, the catalyst metals have not affected the composition and crystalline quality of the germanium nanowires nor the carrier transport in the germanium nanowire network devices. - Highlights: • Ge nanowires were grown by VLS method using Au, Ag, Cu, In and Ni as catalysts. • All nanowires presented high single crystalline quality and long range order. • Devices showed semiconducting behavior having VRH as dominant transport mechanism. • The metal catalyst did not influence structural properties or the transport mechanism.

  15. Aerosol assisted chemical vapour deposition of germanium thin ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Diethyl germanium bis-picolinate, [Et2Ge(O2CC5H4N)2], and trimethyl germanium quinaldate, [Me3Ge(O2CC9H6N)], have been used as precursors for deposition of thin films of germanium by aerosol assisted chemical vapour deposition (AACVD). The thermogravimetric analysis revealed complete volatilization of ...

  16. Investigations on organogermanium compounds; IV. Transalkylation reactions between germanium compounds

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Rijkens, F.

    1966-01-01

    Transalkylation reactions between germanium derivatives, including substituted digermanes, have been investigated. These reactions, which usually need a catalyst, e.g. a germanium dihalide, are tentatively explained by an electrophilic attack on the carbon atom of a germanium-carbon bond of the

  17. electrocatalytic nitrate reduction on palladium based catalysts activated with germanium

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Gootzen, J.F.E.; Lefferts, Leonardus; van Veen, J.A.R.; van Veen, J.

    1999-01-01

    The electrocatalytic reduction of nitrate has been studied with electrochemical methods on palladium and palladium–platinum electrodes activated with germanium. The formation of a palladium–germanium alloy that occurs at germanium coverage above 0.2 has a strong enhancing effect on the rate of

  18. White luminescence emission from silicon implanted germanium

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hernández, Angélica Guadalupe; Escobosa-Echavarría, Arturo Escobosa; Kudriavtsev, Yuriy

    2018-01-01

    Germanium crystals were implanted with low-energy and high-dose silicon ions. The implantation led to amorphization of a near-surface layer due to the formation of many adatoms and vacancies. Adatoms can be absorbed in germanium by the amorphous matrix faster than vacancies. The excess of vacancies and their ability to cluster resulted in formation of a porous structure beneath the surface. Pores of different sizes and depths were observed experimentally. A subsequent thermal annealing was carried out at 973 K in order to repair the damage due to the implantation. The annealing resulted, among other things, in oxidation of the pores. Visible white luminescence was observed for the as-implanted samples at the 325 nm excitation wavelength; the photoluminescence intensity increased after the annealing. The optical properties were attributed to the combined effects of different defects and the formation of germanium oxides with oxygen deficiencies.

  19. Systematic Uncertainties in High-Rate Germanium Data

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gilbert, Andrew J.; Fast, James E.; Fulsom, Bryan G.; Pitts, William K.; VanDevender, Brent A.; Wood, Lynn S.

    2016-10-06

    For many nuclear material safeguards inspections, spectroscopic gamma detectors are required which can achieve high event rates (in excess of 10^6 s^-1) while maintaining very good energy resolution for discrimination of neighboring gamma signatures in complex backgrounds. Such spectra can be useful for non-destructive assay (NDA) of spent nuclear fuel with long cooling times, which contains many potentially useful low-rate gamma lines, e.g., Cs-134, in the presence of a few dominating gamma lines, such as Cs-137. Detectors in use typically sacrifice energy resolution for count rate, e.g., LaBr3, or visa versa, e.g., CdZnTe. In contrast, we anticipate that beginning with a detector with high energy resolution, e.g., high-purity germanium (HPGe), and adapting the data acquisition for high throughput will be able to achieve the goals of the ideal detector. In this work, we present quantification of Cs-134 and Cs-137 activities, useful for fuel burn-up quantification, in fuel that has been cooling for 22.3 years. A segmented, planar HPGe detector is used for this inspection, which has been adapted for a high-rate throughput in excess of 500k counts/s. Using a very-high-statistic spectrum of 2.4*10^11 counts, isotope activities can be determined with very low statistical uncertainty. However, it is determined that systematic uncertainties dominate in such a data set, e.g., the uncertainty in the pulse line shape. This spectrum offers a unique opportunity to quantify this uncertainty and subsequently determine required counting times for given precision on values of interest.

  20. Boron doping compensation of hydrogenated amorphous and polymorphous germanium thin films for infrared detection applications

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Moreno, M., E-mail: mmoreno@inaoep.mx [National Institute of Astrophysics, Optics and Electronics, INAOE, P.O. Box 51 and 216, Puebla, Z. P. 72840 Puebla (Mexico); Delgadillo, N. [Universidad Autónoma de Tlaxcala, Av. Universidad No. 1, Z. P. 90006 Tlaxcala (Mexico); Torres, A. [National Institute of Astrophysics, Optics and Electronics, INAOE, P.O. Box 51 and 216, Puebla, Z. P. 72840 Puebla (Mexico); Ambrosio, R. [Technology and Engineering Institute, Ciudad Juarez University UACJ, Av. Del Charro 450N, Z. P. 32310 Chihuahua (Mexico); Rosales, P.; Kosarev, A.; Reyes-Betanzo, C.; Hidalga-Wade, J. de la; Zuniga, C.; Calleja, W. [National Institute of Astrophysics, Optics and Electronics, INAOE, P.O. Box 51 and 216, Puebla, Z. P. 72840 Puebla (Mexico)

    2013-12-02

    In this work we have studied boron doping of hydrogenated amorphous germanium a-Ge:H and polymorphous germanium (pm-Ge:H) in low regimes, in order to compensate the material from n-type (due to oxygen contamination that commonly occurs during plasma deposition) to intrinsic, and in this manner improve the properties that are important for infrared (IR) detection, as activation energy (E{sub a}) and temperature coefficient of resistance (TCR). Electrical, structural and optical characterization was performed on the films produced. Measurements of the temperature dependence of conductivity, room temperature conductivity (σ{sub RT}), E{sub a} and current–voltage characteristics under IR radiation were performed in the compensated a-Ge:H and pm-Ge:H films. Our results demonstrate that, effectively, the values of E{sub a}, TCR and IR detection are improved on the a-Ge:H/pm-Ge:H films, using boron doping in low regimes, which results of interest for infrared detectors. - Highlights: • We reported boron doping compensation of amorphous and polymorphous germanium. • The films were deposited by plasma enhanced chemical vapor deposition. • The aim is to use the films as thermo-sensing elements in un-cooled microbolometers. • Those films have advantages over boron doped a-Si:H used in commercial detectors.

  1. The automatic liquid nitrogen filling system for GDA detectors

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    An indigenously developed automatic liquid nitrogen (LN2) filling system has been installed in gamma detector array (GDA) facility at Nuclear Science Centre. Electro-pneumatic valves are used for filling the liquid nitrogen into the high purity germanium detector cryostat. The temperature of the out-flowing gas/liquid from ...

  2. All-fiber power sensor based on silicon-germanium core fiber F-P cavity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Tengjiao; Chen, Na; Zhao, Ziwen; Pang, Fufei; Chen, Zhenyi; Wang, Tingyun

    2017-06-01

    An all-optical power sensor based on silicon-germanium (SiGe) core fiber Fabry-Perot (F-P) cavity is proposed. The F-P sensor was formed by fusion splicing SiGe core fiber with conventional single-mode fiber (SMF). The 980 nm laser can be absorbed efficiently by the silicon-germanium material, resulting in the temperature increase inside the cavity, which induces the drifts of the reflection spectrum. The injected power has a very good linear relationship with the drifts experimentally, and the power sensitivity is up to 1.7 nm/mW, which may have great potential for all-fiber power detector.

  3. Single-Crystal Germanium Core Optoelectronic Fibers

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ji, Xiaoyu [Department of Materials Science and Engineering, Materials Research Institute, Pennsylvania State University, University Park PA 16802 USA; Page, Ryan L. [Department of Materials Science and Engineering, Materials Research Institute, Pennsylvania State University, University Park PA 16802 USA; Chaudhuri, Subhasis [Department of Chemistry, Pennsylvania State University, University Park PA 16802 USA; Liu, Wenjun [Advanced Photon Source, Argonne National Laboratory, Argonne IL 60439 USA; Yu, Shih-Ying [Department of Materials Science and Engineering, Materials Research Institute, Pennsylvania State University, University Park PA 16802 USA; Mohney, Suzanne E. [Department of Materials Science and Engineering, Materials Research Institute, Pennsylvania State University, University Park PA 16802 USA; Badding, John V. [Department of Materials Science and Engineering, Materials Research Institute, Pennsylvania State University, University Park PA 16802 USA; Department of Chemistry, Pennsylvania State University, University Park PA 16802 USA; Department of Physics, Pennsylvania State University, University Park PA 16802 USA; Gopalan, Venkatraman [Department of Materials Science and Engineering, Materials Research Institute, Pennsylvania State University, University Park PA 16802 USA

    2016-09-19

    Synthesis and fabrication of high-quality, small-core single-crystal germanium fibers that are photosensitive at the near-infrared and have low optical losses ≈1 dB cm-1 at 2 μm are reported. These fibers have potential applications in fiber-based spectroscopic imaging, nonlinear optical devices, and photodetection at the telecommunication wavelengths.

  4. Characterization of nanocrystalline silicon germanium film and ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The nanocrystalline silicon-germanium films (Si/Ge) and Si/Ge nanotubes have low band gaps and high carrier mobility, thus offering appealing potential for absorbing gas molecules. Interaction between hydrogen molecules and bare as well as functionalized Si/Ge nanofilm and nanotube was investigated using Monte ...

  5. characterization of nanocrystalline silicon germanium film

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    a

    The nanocrystalline silicon-germanium films (Si/Ge) and Si/Ge nanotubes have low ... Si/Ge nanostructures are considered as candidates with high potential for ... more attractive material than PS for both fundamental research and industrial ...

  6. gamma-ray tracking in germanium the backtracking method

    CERN Document Server

    Marel, J V D

    2002-01-01

    In the framework of a European TMR network project the concept for a gamma-ray tracking array is being developed for nuclear physics spectroscopy in the energy range of approx 10 keV up to several MeV. The tracking array will consist of a large number of position-sensitive germanium detectors in a spherical geometry around a target. Due to the high segmentation, a Compton scattered gamma-ray will deposit energy in several different segments. A method has been developed to reconstruct the tracks of multiple coincident gamma-rays and to find their initial energies. By starting from the final point the track can be reconstructed backwards to the origin with the help of the photoelectric and Compton cross-sections and the Compton scatter formula. Every reconstructed track is given a figure of merit, thus allowing suppression of wrongly reconstructed tracks and gamma-rays that have scattered out of the detector system. This so-called backtracking method has been tested on simulated events in a shell-like geometry ...

  7. Non-local electrical spin injection and detection in germanium at room temperature

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rortais, F.; Vergnaud, C.; Marty, A.; Vila, L.; Attané, J.-P.; Widiez, J.; Zucchetti, C.; Bottegoni, F.; Jaffrès, H.; George, J.-M.; Jamet, M.

    2017-10-01

    Non-local carrier injection/detection schemes lie at the very foundation of information manipulation in integrated systems. This paradigm consists in controlling with an external signal the channel where charge carriers flow between a "source" and a well separated "drain." The next generation electronics may operate on the spin of carriers in addition to their charge and germanium appears as the best hosting material to develop such a platform for its compatibility with mainstream silicon technology and the predicted long electron spin lifetime at room temperature. In this letter, we demonstrate injection of pure spin currents (i.e., with no associated transport of electric charges) in germanium, combined with non-local spin detection at 10 K and room temperature. For this purpose, we used a lateral spin valve with epitaxially grown magnetic tunnel junctions as spin injector and spin detector. The non-local magnetoresistance signal is clearly visible and reaches ≈15 mΩ at room temperature. The electron spin lifetime and diffusion length are 500 ps and 1 μm, respectively, the spin injection efficiency being as high as 27%. This result paves the way for the realization of full germanium spintronic devices at room temperature.

  8. Technology CAD for germanium CMOS circuit

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Saha, A.R. [Department of Electronics and ECE, IIT Kharagpur, Kharagpur-721302 (India)]. E-mail: ars.iitkgp@gmail.com; Maiti, C.K. [Department of Electronics and ECE, IIT Kharagpur, Kharagpur-721302 (India)

    2006-12-15

    Process simulation for germanium MOSFETs (Ge-MOSFETs) has been performed in 2D SILVACO virtual wafer fabrication (VWF) suite towards the technology CAD for Ge-CMOS process development. Material parameters and mobility models for Germanium were incorporated in simulation via C-interpreter function. We also report on the device design issues along with the DC and RF characterization of the bulk Ge-MOSFETs, AC parameter extraction and circuit simulation of Ge-CMOS. Simulation results are compared with bulk-Si devices. Simulations predict a cut-off frequency, f {sub T} of about 175 GHz for Ge-MOSFETs compared to 70 GHz for a similar gate-length Si MOSFET. For a single stage Ge-CMOS inverter circuit, a GATE delay of 0.6 ns is predicted.

  9. Vacancy-indium clusters in implanted germanium

    KAUST Repository

    Chroneos, Alexander I.

    2010-04-01

    Secondary ion mass spectroscopy measurements of heavily indium doped germanium samples revealed that a significant proportion of the indium dose is immobile. Using electronic structure calculations we address the possibility of indium clustering with point defects by predicting the stability of indium-vacancy clusters, InnVm. We find that the formation of large clusters is energetically favorable, which can explain the immobility of the indium ions. © 2010 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  10. Crucible-free pulling of germanium crystals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wünscher, Michael; Lüdge, Anke; Riemann, Helge

    2011-03-01

    Commonly, germanium crystals are grown after the Czochralski (CZ) method. The crucible-free pedestal and floating zone (FZ) methods, which are widely used for silicon growth, are hardly known to be investigated for germanium. The germanium melt is more than twice as dense as liquid silicon, which could destabilize a floating zone. Additionally, the lower melting point and the related lower radiative heat loss is shown to reduce the stability especially of the FZ process with the consequence of a screw-like crystal growth. We found that the lower heat radiation of Ge can be compensated by the increased convective cooling of a helium atmosphere instead of the argon ambient. Under these conditions, the screw-like growth could be avoided. Unfortunately, the helium cooling deteriorates the melting behavior of the feed rod. Spikes appear along the open melt front, which touch on the induction coil. In order to improve the melting behavior, we used a lamp as a second energy source as well as a mixture of Ar and He. With this, we found a final solution for growing stable crystals from germanium by using both gases in different parts of the furnace. The experimental work is accompanied by the simulation of the stationary temperature field. The commercially available software FEMAG-FZ is used for axisymmetric calculations. Another tool for process development is the lateral photo-voltage scanning (LPS), which can determine the shape of the solid-liquid phase boundary by analyzing the growth striations in a lateral cut of a grown crystal. In addition to improvements of the process, these measurements can be compared with the calculated results and, hence, conduce to validate the calculation.

  11. Germanium films by polymer-assisted deposition

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jia, Quanxi; Burrell, Anthony K.; Bauer, Eve; Ronning, Filip; McCleskey, Thomas Mark; Zou, Guifu

    2013-01-15

    Highly ordered Ge films are prepared directly on single crystal Si substrates by applying an aqueous coating solution having Ge-bound polymer onto the substrate and then heating in a hydrogen-containing atmosphere. A coating solution was prepared by mixing water, a germanium compound, ethylenediaminetetraacetic acid, and polyethyleneimine to form a first aqueous solution and then subjecting the first aqueous solution to ultrafiltration.

  12. Silicon Germanium Cryogenic Low Noise Amplifiers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bardin, J. C.; Montazeri, S.; Chang, Su-Wei

    2017-05-01

    Silicon germanium heterojunction bipolar transistors have emerged in the last decade as an excellent option for use in cryogenic low noise amplifiers. This paper begins with a review of the critical developments that have led to today’s cryogenic low noise amplifiers. Next, recent work focused on minimizing the power consumption of SiGe cryogenic amplifiers is presented. Finally, open issues related to the cryogenic noise properties of SiGe HBTs are discussed.

  13. Theoretical investigation of twist boundaries in germanium

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Payne, M.C.; Bristowe, P.D.; Joannopoulos, J.D.

    1987-01-01

    Results of the first completely ab-initio investigation of the microscopic structure of a grain boundary in a semiconductor are presented. Using the molecular dynamics simulated annealing method for performing total energy calculations within the LDA and pseudopotential approximations, the ..sigma.. = 5(001) twist boundary in germanium is studied. A low energy structure is identified which exhibits a rigid body translation and a small contraction at the boundary.

  14. Formation of hexagonal-wurtzite germanium by pulsed laser ablation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Y.; Iqbal, Z.; Vijayalakshmi, S.; Qadri, S.; Grebel, H.

    2000-08-01

    A stable phase of relatively large hexagonal-wurtzite germanium (lonsdaleite) crystals (up to 10 μm) was formed when germanium was directly deposited at low pressure using pulsed ultraviolet laser ablation. Films were grown on various substrates at room temperature from a single crystal, cubic germanium target. Crystallites of the hexagonal-wurtzite phase of germanium were clearly identified using selected area electron diffraction. Further characterizations of the films were made using X-ray diffraction and confocal scanning micro-Raman spectroscopy.

  15. Synthesis and characterization of germanium nanowires and germanium/silicon radially heterostructured nanowires

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goldthorpe, Irene Anne

    Semiconductor nanowires offer new opportunities to study physical phenomena in low-dimensional nanostructures. They also possess technologically useful properties for applications in electronics, optics, sensing, and thermoelectrics. Germanium nanowires are of particular interest, because of germanium's compatibility with standard silicon integrated circuit fabrication processes, its high electronic carrier mobilities, and the low temperature required for germanium nanowire growth. In this work, epitaxially-aligned germanium nanowires are grown on silicon substrates by chemical vapor deposition through the vapor-liquid-solid mechanism. Uniform nanowire diameters between 5 and 50 nm are obtained through the use of monodisperse gold colloids as catalysts. The crystallographic orientation of the nanowires, their strain, and their heteroepitaxial relationship with the substrate are characterized with transmission electron microscopy (TEM) and x-ray diffraction (XRD). A process for removing the gold catalysts from the tips of the germanium nanowires is demonstrated. Silicon shells are then heteroepitaxially deposited around the wires to fabricate radial heterostructures. These shells passivate the germanium nanowire surface, create electronic band offsets to confine holes away the surface where they can scatter or recombine, and induce strain which could allow for the engineering of properties such as band gap and carrier mobilities. However, analogous to planar heteroepitaxy, surface roughening and misfit dislocations can relax this strain. The effects of coaxial dimensions on strain relaxation in these structures are analyzed quantitatively by TEM and synchrotron XRD, and these results are related to continuum elasticity models. Lessons learned generated two successful strategies for synthesizing coherent core-shell nanowires with large misfit strain: chlorine surface passivation and growth of nanowires with low-energy sidewall facets. Both approaches avoid the strain

  16. Nanoscale resonant-cavity-enhanced germanium photodetectors with lithographically defined spectral response for improved performance at telecommunications wavelengths.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Balram, Krishna C; Audet, Ross M; Miller, David A B

    2013-04-22

    We demonstrate the use of a subwavelength planar metal-dielectric resonant cavity to enhance the absorption of germanium photodetectors at wavelengths beyond the material's direct absorption edge, enabling high responsivity across the entire telecommunications C and L bands. The resonant wavelength of the detectors can be tuned linearly by varying the width of the Ge fin, allowing multiple detectors, each resonant at a different wavelength, to be fabricated in a single-step process. This approach is promising for the development of CMOS-compatible devices suitable for integrated, high-speed, and energy-efficient photodetection at telecommunications wavelengths.

  17. Ultraviolet-light-induced processes in germanium-doped silica

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kristensen, Martin

    2001-01-01

    A model is presented for the interaction of ultraviolet (UV) light with germanium-doped silica glass. It is assumed that germanium sites work as gates for transferring the excitation energy into the silica. In the material the excitation induces forbidden transitions to two different defect states...

  18. Biexciton in nanoheterostructures of germanium quantum dots

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pokutnyi, Sergey I.

    2017-06-01

    The theory of biexciton (formed from spatially separated electrons and holes) in a nanosystem consisting of double quantum dots (QDs) of germanium synthesized in a silicon matrix is presented. It is shown that the major contribution to the biexciton binding energy is made by the energy of the exchange interaction of electrons with holes and this contribution is much more substantial than the contribution of the energy of Coulomb interaction between the electrons and holes. The position of the biexciton state energy band depends both on the mean radius of the QDs and the distance between their surfaces, which enables one to purposefully control it by varying these parameters of the nanostructure.

  19. Tensile strain mapping in flat germanium membranes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rhead, S. D., E-mail: S.Rhead@warwick.ac.uk; Halpin, J. E.; Myronov, M.; Patchett, D. H.; Allred, P. S.; Wilson, N. R.; Leadley, D. R. [Department of Physics, University of Warwick, Coventry, CV4 7AL (United Kingdom); Shah, V. A. [Department of Physics, University of Warwick, Coventry, CV4 7AL (United Kingdom); Department of Engineering, University of Warwick, Coventry, CV4 7AL (United Kingdom); Kachkanov, V.; Dolbnya, I. P. [Diamond Light Source, Harwell Science and Innovation Campus, Didcot, Oxfordshire, OX11 0DE (United Kingdom); Reparaz, J. S. [ICN2 - Institut Catala de Nanociencia i Nanotecnologia, Campus UAB, 08193 Bellaterra (Barcelona) (Spain); Sotomayor Torres, C. M. [ICN2 - Institut Catala de Nanociencia i Nanotecnologia, Campus UAB, 08193 Bellaterra (Barcelona) (Spain)

    2014-04-28

    Scanning X-ray micro-diffraction has been used as a non-destructive probe of the local crystalline quality of a thin suspended germanium (Ge) membrane. A series of reciprocal space maps were obtained with ∼4 μm spatial resolution, from which detailed information on the strain distribution, thickness, and crystalline tilt of the membrane was obtained. We are able to detect a systematic strain variation across the membranes, but show that this is negligible in the context of using the membranes as platforms for further growth. In addition, we show evidence that the interface and surface quality is improved by suspending the Ge.

  20. Silicon germanium mask for deep silicon etching

    KAUST Repository

    Serry, Mohamed

    2014-07-29

    Polycrystalline silicon germanium (SiGe) can offer excellent etch selectivity to silicon during cryogenic deep reactive ion etching in an SF.sub.6/O.sub.2 plasma. Etch selectivity of over 800:1 (Si:SiGe) may be achieved at etch temperatures from -80 degrees Celsius to -140 degrees Celsius. High aspect ratio structures with high resolution may be patterned into Si substrates using SiGe as a hard mask layer for construction of microelectromechanical systems (MEMS) devices and semiconductor devices.

  1. Effect of prolonged annealing on the performance of coaxial Ge gamma-ray detectors

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Owens, A.; Brandenburg, S.; Buis, E. -J.; Kozorezov, A. G.; Kraft, S.; Ostendorf, R. W.; Quarati, F.

    The effects of prolonged annealing at elevated temperatures have been investigated in a 53 cm(3) closed-end coaxial high purity germanium detector in the reverse electrode configuration. The detector was multiply annealed at 100 degrees C in block periods of 7 days. After each anneal cycle it was

  2. Use of semiconductor detectors in high-energy physics

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Manfredi, P.F.

    1984-09-01

    Solid state detecting devices, like silicon and germanium active targets, telescopes of silicon detectors and microstrip position-sensing chambers are discussed in their more significant applications in elementary-particle physics. Special attention is devoted to the limitations in their performances arising from the electrical noise in the front-end circuitry.

  3. Radiation Hardening of Silicon Detectors

    CERN Multimedia

    Leroy, C; Glaser, M

    2002-01-01

    %RD48 %title\\\\ \\\\Silicon detectors will be widely used in experiments at the CERN Large Hadron Collider where high radiation levels will cause significant bulk damage. In addition to increased leakage current and charge collection losses worsening the signal to noise, the induced radiation damage changes the effective doping concentration and represents the limiting factor to long term operation of silicon detectors. The objectives are to develop radiation hard silicon detectors that can operate beyond the limits of the present devices and that ensure guaranteed operation for the whole lifetime of the LHC experimental programme. Radiation induced defect modelling and experimental results show that the silicon radiation hardness depends on the atomic impurities present in the initial monocrystalline material.\\\\ \\\\ Float zone (FZ) silicon materials with addition of oxygen, carbon, nitrogen, germanium and tin were produced as well as epitaxial silicon materials with epilayers up to 200 $\\mu$m thickness. Their im...

  4. Oxygen defect processes in silicon and silicon germanium

    KAUST Repository

    Chroneos, A.

    2015-06-18

    Silicon and silicon germanium are the archetypical elemental and alloy semiconductor materials for nanoelectronic, sensor, and photovoltaic applications. The investigation of radiation induced defects involving oxygen, carbon, and intrinsic defects is important for the improvement of devices as these defects can have a deleterious impact on the properties of silicon and silicon germanium. In the present review, we mainly focus on oxygen-related defects and the impact of isovalent doping on their properties in silicon and silicon germanium. The efficacy of the isovalent doping strategies to constrain the oxygen-related defects is discussed in view of recent infrared spectroscopy and density functional theory studies.

  5. Assessing CZT detector performance for environmental radioactivity investigations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rahman, Rubina; Plater, A J; Nolan, P J; Appleby, P G

    2013-05-01

    Cadmium zinc telluride (CdZnTe or CZT) is the leading semiconductor detector for gamma spectroscopy at room temperature. In the present study, a coplanar-grid CZT detector was used for gamma-ray measurements of environmental radioactivity on a contaminated saltmarsh sediment core in comparison with results from a coaxial high-purity germanium detector to assess their comparative performance. The findings reveal that the CZT performs well for both (241)Am and (137)Cs measurements over a broad range of activities, despite limited detector efficiency, and can be used to good effect in the study of environmental radioactivity in contaminated estuarine settings.

  6. Quantum ballistic transport in strained epitaxial germanium

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gul, Y.; Holmes, S. N.; Newton, P. J.; Ellis, D. J. P.; Morrison, C.; Pepper, M.; Barnes, C. H. W.; Myronov, M.

    2017-12-01

    Large scale fabrication using Complementary Metal Oxide Semiconductor compatible technology of semiconductor nanostructures that operate on the principles of quantum transport is an exciting possibility now due to the recent development of ultra-high mobility hole gases in epitaxial germanium grown on standard silicon substrates. We present here a ballistic transport study of patterned surface gates on strained Ge quantum wells with SiGe barriers, which confirms the quantum characteristics of the Ge heavy hole valence band structure in 1-dimension. Quantised conductance at multiples of 2e2/h is a universal feature of hole transport in Ge up to 10 × (2e2/h). The behaviour of ballistic plateaus with finite source-drain bias and applied magnetic field is elucidated. In addition, a reordering of the ground state is observed.

  7. Synthesis of silicon and germanium nanowires.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Clement, Teresa J. (Arizona State University); Hsu, Julia W. P.

    2007-11-01

    The vapor-liquid-solid growth process for synthesis of group-IV semiconducting nanowires using silane, germane, disilane and digermane precursor gases has been investigated. The nanowire growth process combines in situ gold seed formation by vapor deposition on atomically clean silicon (111) surfaces, in situ growth from the gaseous precursor(s), and real-time monitoring of nanowire growth as a function of temperature and pressure by a novel optical reflectometry technique. A significant dependence on precursor pressure and growth temperature for the synthesis of silicon and germanium nanowires is observed, depending on the stability of the specific precursor used. Also, the presence of a nucleation time for the onset of nanowire growth has been found using our new in situ optical reflectometry technique.

  8. Reduction of Defects in Germanium-Silicon

    Science.gov (United States)

    2003-01-01

    Crystals grown without contact with a container have far superior quality to otherwise similar crystals grown in direct contact with a container. In addition to float-zone processing, detached- Bridgman growth is a promising tool to improve crystal quality, without the limitations of float zoning or the defects introduced by normal Bridgman growth. Goals of this project include the development of the detached Bridgman process to be reproducible and well understood and to quantitatively compare the defect and impurity levels in crystals grown by these three methods. Germanium (Ge) and germanium-silicon (Ge-Si) alloys are being used. At MSFC, we are responsible for the detached Bridgman experiments intended to differentiate among proposed mechanisms of detachment, and to confirm or refine our understanding of detachment. Because the contact angle is critical to determining the conditions for detachment, the sessile drop method was used to measure the contact angles as a function of temperature and composition for a large number of substrates made of potential ampoule materials. Growth experiments have used pyrolytic boron nitride (pBN) and fused silica ampoules with the majority of the detached results occurring predictably in the pBN. Etch pit density (EPD) measurements of normal and detached Bridgman-grown Ge samples show a two order of magnitude improvement in the detached-grown samples. The nature and extent of detachment is determined by using profilometry in conjunction with optical and electron microscopy. The stability of detachment has been analyzed, and an empirical model for the conditions necessary to achieve sufficient stability to maintain detached growth for extended periods has been developed. We have investigated the effects on detachment of ampoule material, pressure difference above and below the melt, and Si concentration; samples that are nearly completely detached can be grown repeatedly in pBN. Current work is concentrated on developing a

  9. Synthesis and thermoluminescence of boron-doped germanium nanowires

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zahedifar, M., E-mail: zhdfr@kashanu.ac.i [Institute of Nanoscience and Nanotechnology, University of Kashan, Kashan (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Hosseinmardi, F.; Eshraghi, L.; Ganjipour, B. [Institute of Nanoscience and Nanotechnology, University of Kashan, Kashan (Iran, Islamic Republic of)

    2011-03-15

    Boron doped germanium nanowires were synthesized using chemical vapor deposition (CVD) with Au nanoparticles as nucleating centers, germanium tetrachloride as the source of germanium and B{sub 2}H{sub 6} gas as source of boron impurity. Au nanoparticles were deposited on Si using 3-aminopropyltriethylsilane (APTES). The single crystal Ge nanowires with diameters ranging from 19 to 200 nm were grown in a controllable manner. Effects of Au nanoparticle size, argon gas flow, temperature and duration of growth on diameter and length of nanowires were investigated. This is the first report on thermoluminescence (TL) properties of boron doped germanium nanowires. Glow curves were fitted using computerized glow curve deconvolution program and seven overlapped peaks were obtained. Further the response of synthesized nanowires to different dose levels of UV was studied and linear response regime was determined.

  10. Lattice site and thermal stability of transition metals in germanium

    CERN Document Server

    Augustyns, Valérie; Pereira, Lino

    Although the first transistor was based on germanium, current chip technology mainly uses silicon due to its larger abundance, a lower price and higher quality silicon-oxide. However, a very important goal in microelectronics is to obtain faster integrated circuits. The advantages of germanium compared to silicon (e.g. a higher mobility of the charge carriers) motivates further research on germanium based materials. Semiconductor doping (e.g. introducing impurities into silicon and germanium in order to alter - and control - their properties) can be done by ion implantation or by in situ doping, whereby the host material is doped during growth. This thesis focuses on introducing dopants by ion implantation. The implantation as well as the subsequent measurements were performed in ISOLDE (CERN) using the emission channeling technique. Although ion implantation generates undesired defects in the host material (e.g. vacancies), such damage can be reduced by performing the implantation at an elevated temperature....

  11. The hyperion particle-γ detector array

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hughes, R.O.; Burke, J.T.; Casperson, R.J.; Ota, S. [Nuclear and Chemical Sciences Division, Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory, Livermore, CA 94550 (United States); Fisher, S.; Parker, J. [Science, Technology and Engineering Division, Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory, Livermore, CA 94550 (United States); Beausang, C.W. [Department of Physics, University of Richmond, 28 Westhampton Way, Richmond, VA 23173 (United States); Dag, M. [Cyclotron Institute, Texas A& M University, College Station, TX 77840 (United States); Humby, P. [Department of Physics, University of Richmond, 28 Westhampton Way, Richmond, VA 23173 (United States); Department of Physics, University of Surrey, Surrey GU27XH (United Kingdom); Koglin, J. [Nuclear and Chemical Sciences Division, Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory, Livermore, CA 94550 (United States); McCleskey, E.; McIntosh, A.B.; Saastamoinen, A. [Cyclotron Institute, Texas A& M University, College Station, TX 77840 (United States); Tamashiro, A.S. [Department of Nuclear Science and Engineering, Oregon State University, Corvallis, OR 97331 (United States); Wilson, E. [Department of Physics, University of Richmond, 28 Westhampton Way, Richmond, VA 23173 (United States); Wu, T.C. [Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of Utah, Salt Lake City UT 84112-0830 (United States)

    2017-06-01

    Hyperion is a new high-efficiency charged-particle γ-ray detector array which consists of a segmented silicon telescope for charged-particle detection and up to fourteen high-purity germanium clover detectors for the detection of coincident γ rays. The array will be used in nuclear physics measurements and Stockpile Stewardship studies and replaces the STARLiTeR array. This article discusses the features of the array and presents data collected with the array in the commissioning experiment.

  12. Protective infrared antireflection coating based on sputtered germanium carbide

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gibson, Des; Waddell, Ewan; Placido, Frank

    2011-09-01

    This paper describes optical, durablility and environmental performance of a germanium carbide based durable antireflection coating. The coating has been demonstrated on germanium and zinc selenide infra-red material however is applicable to other materials such as zinc sulphide. The material is deposited using a novel reactive closed field magnetron sputtering technique, offering significant advantages over conventional evaporation processes for germanium carbide such as plasma enhanced chemical vapour deposition. The sputtering process is "cold", making it suitable for use on a wide range of substrates. Moreover, the drum format provide more efficient loading for high throughput production. The use of the closed field and unbalanced magnetrons creates a magnetic confinement that extends the electron mean free path leading to high ion current densities. The combination of high current densities with ion energies in the range ~30eV creates optimum thin film growth conditions. As a result the films are dense, spectrally stable, supersmooth and low stress. Films incorporate low hydrogen content resulting in minimal C-H absorption bands within critical infra-red passbands such as 3 to 5um and 8 to 12um. Tuning of germanium carbide (Ge(1-x)Cx) film refractive index from pure germanium (refractive index 4) to pure germanium carbide (refractive index 1.8) will be demonstrated. Use of film grading to achieve single and dual band anti-reflection performance will be shown. Environmental and durability levels are shown to be suitable for use in harsh external environments.

  13. Promoting cell proliferation using water dispersible germanium nanowires.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michael Bezuidenhout

    Full Text Available Group IV Nanowires have strong potential for several biomedical applications. However, to date their use remains limited because many are synthesised using heavy metal seeds and functionalised using organic ligands to make the materials water dispersible. This can result in unpredicted toxic side effects for mammalian cells cultured on the wires. Here, we describe an approach to make seedless and ligand free Germanium nanowires water dispersible using glutamic acid, a natural occurring amino acid that alleviates the environmental and health hazards associated with traditional functionalisation materials. We analysed the treated material extensively using Transmission electron microscopy (TEM, High resolution-TEM, and scanning electron microscope (SEM. Using a series of state of the art biochemical and morphological assays, together with a series of complimentary and synergistic cellular and molecular approaches, we show that the water dispersible germanium nanowires are non-toxic and are biocompatible. We monitored the behaviour of the cells growing on the treated germanium nanowires using a real time impedance based platform (xCELLigence which revealed that the treated germanium nanowires promote cell adhesion and cell proliferation which we believe is as a result of the presence of an etched surface giving rise to a collagen like structure and an oxide layer. Furthermore this study is the first to evaluate the associated effect of Germanium nanowires on mammalian cells. Our studies highlight the potential use of water dispersible Germanium Nanowires in biological platforms that encourage anchorage-dependent cell growth.

  14. Development of the mid-IR echelle high-dispersion spectrograph employing the germanium immersion grating

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hirahara, Yasuhiro; Hirao, Tsuyoshi; Tatamitani, Yoshio; Yonezu, Tomohisa; Ebizuka, Noboru; Kawaguchi, Kentaro; Tokoro, Hitoshi; Oka, Tomomichi N.

    2010-07-01

    We have developed a germanium immersion grating mid-infrared cryogenic spectrograph (GIGMICS) designed for the Nasmyth focus stage of NAOJ Subaru 8.2 m telescope, which operates at N-band (8-13 μm) in wavelength with the R ~ 50,000. A single crystal germanium immersion echelle grating (30 × 30 × 72 mm) for collimated beam size of Φ28 mm was fabricated by utilizing ultra precision micro-grinding method coupled with the ELID (ELectrolytic In-process Dressing) technique (Ohmori, H. 1992)1. All optical components are arranged on the 800 mm diameter cold optical base plate (~30 K) of the cryostat. By the Si:As IBC (Impurity Band Conductor) focal plane array (FPA) detector (412 × 512 pixels, unit pixel size 30 μm) operated at 5 K simultaneously acquires ~13 % wavelength coverage for N-band. The instrument has been assembled and is now tested for the application to the gas-phase IR high-resolution spectroscopy.

  15. Methods for deploying ultra-clean detectors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schubert, Alexis

    2008-04-01

    Next-generation underground experiments, such as searches for neutrinoless double-beta decay and dark matter experiments, will perform high-sensitivity measurements that require extremely low backgrounds. The Majo-ra-na Collaboration ootnotetextF.T. Avignone III (2007) arXiv:0711.4808v1 proposes such an experiment to search for neutrinoless double-beta decay using an array of germanium crystals enriched in ^76Ge. The design of the Majo-ra-na experiment must minimize backgrounds while meeting criteria for electrical signal quality, structural integrity, and thermal cooling characteristics. Recent work has addressed detector deployment in ultra low-background environments. Advances have been made in fabrication of radiologically pure copper parts. Prototype designs for detector support structures reduce backgrounds by minimizing component mass and making use of ultra-pure materials. This talk will describe the design and use of cryostat test-stands to investigate the performance of prototype designs for detector strings. While Majo-ra-na uses germanium detectors, the design considerations and progress made by the collaboration are applicable to other detector technologies and fields of research.

  16. Investigation of cosmic-ray induced background of Germanium gamma spectrometer using GEANT4 simulation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hung, Nguyen Quoc; Hai, Vo Hong; Nomachi, Masaharu

    2017-03-01

    In this article, a GEANT4 Monte Carlo simulation toolkit was used to study the response of the cosmic-ray induced background on a High-Purity Germanium (HPGe) gamma spectrometer in the wide energy range, up to 100MeV. The natural radiation background measurements of the spectrometer were carried out in the energy region from 0.04 to 50MeV. The simulated cosmic-ray induced background of the Ge detector was evaluated in comparison with the measured data. The contribution of various cosmic-ray components including muons, neutrons, protons, electrons, positrons and photons was investigated. We also analyzed secondary particle showers induced by the muonic component. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  17. Results from a Low-Energy Analysis of the CDMS II Germanium Data

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ahmed, Z.; /Caltech; Akerib, D.S.; /Case Western Reserve U.; Arrenberg, S.; /Zurich-Irchel U.; Bailey, C.N.; /Case Western Reserve U.; Balakishiyeva, D.; /Florida U.; Baudis, L.; /Zurich-Irchel U.; Bauer, D.A.; /Fermilab; Brink, P.L.; /SLAC; Bruch, T.; /Zurich-Irchel U.; Bunker, R.; /UC, Santa Barbara; Cabrera, B.; /Stanford U., Phys. Dept. /UC, Santa Barbara

    2010-11-01

    We report results from a reanalysis of data from the Cryogenic Dark Matter Search (CDMS II) experiment at the Soudan Underground Laboratory. Data taken between October 2006 and September 2008 using eight germanium detectors are reanalyzed with a lowered, 2 keV recoil-energy threshold, to give increased sensitivity to interactions from Weakly Interacting Massive Particles (WIMPs) with masses below {approx}10 GeV/c{sup 2}. This analysis provides stronger constraints than previous CDMS II results for WIMP masses below 9 GeV/c{sup 2} and excludes parameter space associated with possible low-mass WIMP signals from the DAMA/LIBRA and CoGeNT experiments.

  18. Monte Carlo modelling of germanium crystals that are tilted and have rounded front edges

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gasparro, Joel [EC-JRC-IRMM, Institute for Reference Materials and Measurements, Retieseweg 111, B-2440 Geel (Belgium); Hult, Mikael [EC-JRC-IRMM, Institute for Reference Materials and Measurements, Retieseweg 111, B-2440 Geel (Belgium)], E-mail: mikael.hult@ec.europa.eu; Johnston, Peter N. [Applied Physics, Royal Melbourne Institute of Technology, GPO Box 2476V, Melbourne 3001 (Australia); Tagziria, Hamid [EC-JRC-IPSC, Institute for the Protection and the Security of the Citizen, Via E. Fermi 1, I-21020 Ispra (Vatican City State, Holy See,) (Italy)

    2008-09-01

    Gamma-ray detection efficiencies and cascade summing effects in germanium detectors are often calculated using Monte Carlo codes based on a computer model of the detection system. Such a model can never fully replicate reality and it is important to understand how various parameters affect the results. This work concentrates on quantifying two issues, namely (i) the effect of having a Ge-crystal that is tilted inside the cryostat and (ii) the effect of having a model of a Ge-crystal with rounded edges (bulletization). The effect of the tilting is very small (in the order of per mille) when the tilting angles are within a realistic range. The effect of the rounded edges is, however, relatively large (5-10% or higher) particularly for gamma-ray energies below 100 keV.

  19. Germanium electrochemical study and its CMP application

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Li; Zhang, Baoguo; Pan, Baichen; Wang, Chenwei

    2017-11-01

    When the feature size of ultra-large scale integrated(ULSI) circuit shrinks to sub-10 nm, germanium(Ge) as a novel material with high hole mobility is needed for further development. Chemical mechanical polishing(CMP) is an important process for the integration of channel materials into silicon wafer. In this paper, starting with electrochemical studies of Ge, different types and concentrations of oxidants for Ge corrosion were investigated; then the effect of NaCl and Dodecylamine for Ge activation and inhibition were studied. After that, corresponding CMP experiments were conducted, which confirmed the results of electrochemical experiments. Moreover the polish selectivity of Ge/SiO2 in H2O2-based slurry was also investigated. Atomic force microscope(AFM) was used to test the surface morphology of wafers after polish. Finally the slurry with 5 wt% SiO2 abrasive and 1 vol.% H2O2 at pH 9 were chosen to polish Ge/SiO2 wafers, and it has a high polish selectivity of Ge to SiO2 while high Ge removal rate and good quality surface were obtained.

  20. Anisotropic Optical Properties of Layered Germanium Sulfide

    CERN Document Server

    Tan, Dezhi; Wang, Feijiu; Mohamed, Nur Baizura; Mouri, Shinichiro; Sandhaya, Koirala; Zhang, Wenjing; Miyauchi, Yuhei; Ohfuchi, Mari; Matsuda, Kazunari

    2016-01-01

    Two-dimensional (2D) layered materials, transition metal dichalcogenides and black phosphorus, have attracted much interest from the viewpoints of fundamental physics and device applications. The establishment of new functionalities in anisotropic layered 2D materials is a challenging but rewarding frontier, owing to their remarkable optical properties and prospects for new devices. Here, we report the anisotropic optical properties of layered 2D monochalcogenide of germanium sulfide (GeS). Three Raman scattering peaks corresponding to the B3g, A1g, and A2g modes with strong polarization dependence are demonstrated in the GeS flakes, which validates polarized Raman spectroscopy as an effective method for identifying the crystal orientation of anisotropic layered GeS. Photoluminescence (PL) is observed with a peak at around 1.66 eV that originates from the direct optical transition in GeS at room temperature. Moreover, determination of the polarization dependent characteristics of the PL and absorption reveals...

  1. A Low Noise 64x64 Germanium Array for Far IR Astronomy Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — We propose to develope a 64x64 far infrared germanium focal-plane array with the following key design features: 1- Four top-illuminated, 32x32 germanium sub-arrays...

  2. A focal plane detector design for a wide-band Laue-lens telescope

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Caroli, E.; Auricchio, N.; Amati, L.

    2005-01-01

    , and the detection of nuclear and annihilation lines. Recently the development of high energy Laue lenses with broad energy bandpasses from 60 to 600 keV have been proposed for a Hard X ray focusing Telescope (HAXTEL) in order to study the X-ray continuum of celestial sources. The required focal plane detector...

  3. A dual-PIXE tomography setup for reconstruction of Germanium in ICF target

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guo, N.; Lu, H. Y.; Wang, Q.; Meng, J.; Gao, D. Z.; Zhang, Y. J.; Liang, X. X.; Zhang, W.; Li, J.; Ma, X. J.; Shen, H.

    2017-08-01

    Inertial Confinement Fusion (ICF) is one type of fusion energy research which could initiate nuclear fusion reactions through heating and compressing thermonuclear fuel. Compared to a pure plastic target, Germanium doping into the CH ablator layer by Glow Discharge Polymer (GDP) technique can increase the ablation velocity and the standoff distance between the ablation front and laser-deposition region. During target fabrication process, quantitative doping of Ge should be accurately controlled. Particle Induced X-ray Emission Tomography (PIXE-T) can make not only quantification of the concentration, but also reconstruction of the spatial distribution of doped element. The Si (Li) detector for PIXE tomography technique had a disadvantage of low counting rate. To make up this deficiency, another detector of Si (Li) with the same configuration positioned at the opposite side with the same detective angle 135° have been implemented. Simultaneously acquired elemental maps of Ge obtained using two detectors may be different because of the X-ray absorption along the X-ray exit route in the target. In this paper, the X-ray detection efficiency is drastically improved by this dual-PIXE tomography system.

  4. CASCADES: An Ultra-Low-Background Germanium Crystal Array at Pacific Northwest National Laboratory

    Science.gov (United States)

    Keillor, M. E.; Aalseth, C. E.; Day, A. R.; Erikson, L. E.; Fast, J. E.; Glasgow, B. D.; Hoppe, E. W.; Hossbach, T. W.; Hyronimus, B. J.; Miley, H. S.; Myers, A. W.; Seifert, A.; Stavenger, T. J.

    2011-12-01

    State-of-the-art treaty verification techniques, environmental surveillance, and physics experiments require increased sensitivity for detecting and quantifying radionuclides of interest. This can be accomplished with new detector designs that establish high detection efficiency and reduced instrument backgrounds. Current research is producing an intrinsic germanium (HPGe) array designed for high detection efficiency, ultra-low-background performance, and sensitive γ—γ coincidence detection. The system design is optimized to accommodate filter paper samples, e.g. samples collected by the Radionuclide Aerosol Sampler/Analyzer. The system will provide high sensitivity for weak collections on atmospheric filter samples (e.g.fissions) as well as offering the potential to gather additional information from higher activity filters using gamma cascade coincidence detection. The first of two HPGe crystal arrays in ultra-low-background vacuum cryostats has been assembled, with the second in progress. Traditional methods for constructing ultra-low-background detectors were followed, including use of materials known to be low in radioactive contaminants, use of ultra-pure reagents, and clean room assembly. The cryostat is constructed mainly from copper electroformed into near-final geometry at Pacific Northwest National Laboratory. Details of the detector assembly and initial background and spectroscopic measurement results are presented; also a description of the custom analysis package used by this project is given.

  5. Ultra-Low Noise Germanium Neutrino Detection system (ULGeN).

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cabrera-Palmer, Belkis [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States); Barton, Paul [Lawrence Berkeley National Lab. (LBNL), Berkeley, CA (United States)

    2017-07-01

    Monitoring nuclear power plant operation by measuring the antineutrino flux has become an active research field for safeguards and non-proliferation. We describe various efforts to demonstrate the feasibility of reactor monitoring based on the detection of the Coherent Neutrino Nucleus Scattering (CNNS) process with High Purity Germanium (HPGe) technology. CNNS detection for reactor antineutrino energies requires lowering the electronic noise in low-capacitance kg-scale HPGe detectors below 100 eV as well as stringent reduction in other particle backgrounds. Existing state- of-the-art detectors are limited to an electronic noise of 95 eV-FWHM. In this work, we employed an ultra-low capacitance point-contact detector with a commercial integrated circuit preamplifier- on-a-chip in an ultra-low vibration mechanically cooled cryostat to achieve an electronic noise of 39 eV-FWHM at 43 K. We also present the results of a background measurement campaign at the Spallation Neutron Source to select the area with sufficient low background to allow a successful first-time measurement of the CNNS process.

  6. Enhancing the Detector for Advanced Neutron Capture Experiments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Couture, A.; Mosby, S.; Baramsai, B.; Bredeweg, T. A.; Jandel, M.; Macon, K.; O'Donnell, J. M.; Rusev, G.; Taddeucci, T. N.; Ullmann, J. L.; Walker, C. L.

    2015-05-01

    The Detector for Advanced Neutron Capture Experiments (DANCE) has been used for extensive studies of neutron capture, gamma decay, photon strength functions, and prompt and delayed fission-gamma emission. Despite these successes, the potential measurements have been limited by the data acquisition hardware. We report on a major upgrade of the DANCE data acquisition that simultaneously enables strait-forward coupling to auxiliary detectors, including high-resolution high-purity germanium detectors and neutron tagging array. The upgrade will enhance the time domain accessible for time-of-flight neutron measurements as well as improve the resolution in the DANCE barium fluoride crystals for photons.

  7. Enhancing the Detector for Advanced Neutron Capture Experiments

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Couture A.

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available The Detector for Advanced Neutron Capture Experiments (DANCE has been used for extensive studies of neutron capture, gamma decay, photon strength functions, and prompt and delayed fission-gamma emission. Despite these successes, the potential measurements have been limited by the data acquisition hardware. We report on a major upgrade of the DANCE data acquisition that simultaneously enables strait-forward coupling to auxiliary detectors, including high-resolution high-purity germanium detectors and neutron tagging array. The upgrade will enhance the time domain accessible for time-of-flight neutron measurements as well as improve the resolution in the DANCE barium fluoride crystals for photons.

  8. 40 CFR 421.180 - Applicability: Description of the primary and secondary germanium and gallium subcategory.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... primary and secondary germanium and gallium subcategory. 421.180 Section 421.180 Protection of Environment... POINT SOURCE CATEGORY Primary and Secondary Germanium and Gallium Subcategory § 421.180 Applicability: Description of the primary and secondary germanium and gallium subcategory. The provisions of this subpart are...

  9. Analytical product study of germanium-containing medicine by different ICP-MS applications

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Krystek, Petra; Ritsema, Rob

    2004-01-01

    For several years organo-germanium containing medicine has been used for special treatments of e.g. cancer and AIDS. The active substances contain germanium as beta-carboxyethylgermanium sesquioxide ((GeCH2CH 2COO-H)2O3/"Ge-132"), spirogermanium, germanium-lactate-citrate or unspecified forms. For

  10. Extremely dense arrays of germanium and silicon nanostructures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shklyaev, A. A.; Ichikawa, M.

    2008-02-01

    Results of investigations into surface processes of the formation of germanium and silicon nanostructures are analyzed. A mechanism of three-dimensional island nucleation and relaxation of strained two-dimensional layers in heteroepitaxy of germanium in silicon, which initiates spontaneous island growth, is considered. The oxidation of the silicon surface prior to germanium or silicon deposition drastically alters the growth mechanism, leading to the formation of islands with an extremely high areal density of 1012 - 1013 cm-2 and with sizes of less than 10 nm. The effects of spatial quantization determine their properties. Moreover, arrays of these islands form a unique surface for the growth of Si layers that are able to emit photons in the 1.5-1.6-μm wavelength range.

  11. Germanium based electrostatic quantum dots: design and characterization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mazzeo, Giovanni; Yablonovitch, Eli; Jiang, Hong-Wen

    2010-03-01

    While the less mature Germanium technology requires an extra effort for the realization of single electron quantum dots, unique properties of Germanium rich heterostructures together with spin coherence times comparable to Silicon, can justify the development of such new technology. We report our progresses on the formation of electrostatic quantum dots in Germanium. We employ an MOS-like structure with no modulation doping already successfully proven in Silicon devices. A two level gate stack is used: the top gate is positively biased to attract electrons while the lowers gates are negatively biased to form the quantum dot and attract holes in a transistor channel, used to detect the electrons in the adjacent quantum dot. Finite Element Method simulations are used to prove the concept of this hybrid holes-transistor/electron-QD device and estimate the sensitivity of the charge detection. Preliminary characterizations of quantum dot devices built with this structure are reported.

  12. A search for bremsstrahlung solar axions using the Majorana low-background BEGe detector at Kimballton (MALBEK)

    OpenAIRE

    Abgrall, N.; Aguayo, E.; Avignone III, F.T.; Barabash, A.S.; Bertrand, F. E.; Boswell, M; Brudanin, V.; Busch, M; Caldwell, A.S.; Chan, Y-D.; Christofferson, C. D.(South Dakota School of Mines and Technology, Rapid City, SD 57701, USA); Combs, D. C.; Cooper, R. J.; Creswick, R J; Detwiler, J.A.

    2014-01-01

    A low-background, high-purity germanium detector has been used to search for evidence of low-energy, bremsstrahlung-generated solar axions. An upper bound of $1.36\\times 10^{-11}$ $(95% CL)$ is placed on the direct coupling of DFSZ model axions to electrons. The prospects for the sensitivity of the Majorana Demonstrator array of point-contact germanium detectors to solar axions are discussed in the context of the model-independent annual modulation due to the seasonal variation of the earth-s...

  13. Aerosol assisted chemical vapour deposition of germanium thin ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    These films on oxidation under an oxygen atmosphere at 600◦C yield GeO2. Both Ge ... corrosive. To overcome these problems, research is directed to design and develop new organogermanium precursors for deposition of germanium films by CVD. Recently ... stat PGSTAT 20 (Echochimie, The Netherlands), was used.

  14. Composite germanium monochromators - results for the TriCS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schefer, J.; Fischer, S.; Boehm, M.; Keller, L.; Horisberger, M.; Medarde, M.; Fischer, P. [Paul Scherrer Inst. (PSI), Villigen (Switzerland)

    1997-09-01

    Composite germanium monochromators are in the beginning of their application in neutron diffraction. We show here the importance of the permanent quality control with neutrons on the example of the 311 wafers which will be used on the single crystal diffractometer TriCS at SINQ. (author) 2 figs., 3 refs.

  15. Discovery of Gallium, Germanium, Lutetium, and Hafnium Isotopes

    CERN Document Server

    Gross, J L

    2011-01-01

    Currently, twenty-eight gallium, thirty-one germanium, thirty-five lutetium, and thirty-six hafnium isotopes have been observed and the discovery of these isotopes is discussed here. For each isotope a brief synopsis of the first refereed publication, including the production and identification method, is presented.

  16. Noise and oscillations in gold-doped germanium photodiodes

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bolwijn, P.T.; Rijst, C. v. d.; Ast, W.G. van; Lam, T.

    Considerable noise effects in excess of shot noise and oscillations found in commercially available, gold-doped germanium photodiodes have been investigated. The noise and oscillation effects occur in the photocurrent of reversely biased diodes at temperatures below about 100°K. The dependence of

  17. A catalyst-free synthesis of germanium nanowires obtained by ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    A catalyst-free innovative synthesis, by combined X-ray chemical vapour deposition and lowtemperature thermal treatments, which has not been applied since so far to the growth of germanium nanowires (Ge-NWs), produced high yields of the nanoproducts with theGeH4 reactant gas. Nanowires were grown on both ...

  18. Direct observations of the vacancy and its annealing in germanium

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Slotte, J.; Kilpeläinen, S.; Tuomisto, F.

    2011-01-01

    Weakly n-type doped germanium has been irradiated with protons up to a fluence of 3×1014 cm-2 at 35 K and 100 K in a unique experimental setup. Positron annihilation measurements show a defect lifetime component of 272±4 ps at 35 K in in situ positron lifetime measurements after irradiation at 10...

  19. Effect of normal processes on thermal conductivity of germanium ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    The effect of normal scattering processes is considered to redistribute the phonon momentum in (a) the same phonon branch – KK-S model and (b) between different phonon branches – KK-H model. Simplified thermal conductivity relations are used to estimate the thermal conductivity of germanium, silicon and diamond ...

  20. Effect of normal processes on thermal conductivity of germanium ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Abstract. The effect of normal scattering processes is considered to redistribute the phonon momentum in (a) the same phonon branch – KK-S model and (b) between differ- ent phonon branches – KK-H model. Simplified thermal conductivity relations are used to estimate the thermal conductivity of germanium, silicon and ...

  1. Enhanced life ion source for germanium and carbon ion implantation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hsieh, Tseh-Jen; Colvin, Neil; Kondratenko, Serguei [Axcelis Technologies, Inc. 108 Cherry Hill Drive, Beverly, MA 01915 (United States)

    2012-11-06

    Germanium and carbon ions represent a significant portion of total ion implantation steps in the process flow. Very often ion source materials that used to produce ions are chemically aggressive, especially at higher temperatures, and result in fast ion source performance degradation and a very limited lifetime [B.S. Freer, et. al., 2002 14th Intl. Conf. on Ion Implantation Technology Proc, IEEE Conf. Proc., p. 420 (2003)]. GeF{sub 4} and CO{sub 2} are commonly used to generate germanium and carbon beams. In the case of GeF{sub 4} controlling the tungsten deposition due to the de-composition of WF{sub 6} (halogen cycle) is critical to ion source life. With CO{sub 2}, the materials oxidation and carbon deposition must be controlled as both will affect cathode thermionic emission and anti-cathode (repeller) efficiencies due to the formation of volatile metal oxides. The improved ion source design Extended Life Source 3 (Eterna ELS3) together with its proprietary co-gas material implementation has demonstrated >300 hours of stable continuous operation when using carbon and germanium ion beams. Optimizing cogas chemistries retard the cathode erosion rate for germanium and carbon minimizes the adverse effects of oxygen when reducing gas is introduced for carbon. The proprietary combination of hardware and co-gas has improved source stability and the results of the hardware and co-gas development are discussed.

  2. Synthesis and characterization of germanium monosulphide (GeS ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    This paper reports the growth of germanium monosulphide (GeS) single crystals by vapour phase technique using different transporting agents. The single crystallinity and composition of the grown crystals have been verified by transmission electron microscopy (TEM) and energy dispersive analysis of X-rays (EDAX) ...

  3. Radiation-enhanced self- and boron diffusion in germanium

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Schneider, S.; Bracht, H.; Klug, J.N.

    2013-01-01

    We report experiments on proton radiation-enhanced self- and boron (B) diffusion in germanium (Ge) for temperatures between 515 ∘ C and 720 ∘ C. Modeling of the experimental diffusion profiles measured by means of secondary ion mass spectrometry is achieved on the basis of the Frenkel pair reaction...

  4. Microwave Faraday effect in n-type germanium

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bouwknegt, A.; Volger, J.

    The Faraday rotation, ellipticity and the accompanying magneto-absorption were determined from measurements with the crossed wave guide coupler device, at room temperature, at 24.9 GHz. The complex conductivity tensor elements of n-type germanium were deduced from this complete Faraday effect, with

  5. Spectral response of multi-element silicon detectors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ludewigt, B.A.; Rossington, C.S.; Chapman, K. [Univ. of California, Berkeley, CA (United States)

    1997-04-01

    Multi-element silicon strip detectors, in conjunction with integrated circuit pulse-processing electronics, offer an attractive alternative to conventional lithium-drifted silicon Si(Li) and high purity germanium detectors (HPGe) for high count rate, low noise synchrotron x-ray fluorescence applications. One of the major differences between the segmented Si detectors and the commercially available single-element Si(Li) or HPGe detectors is that hundreds of elements can be fabricated on a single Si substrate using standard silicon processing technologies. The segmentation of the detector substrate into many small elements results in very low noise performance at or near, room temperature, and the count rate of the detector is increased many-fold due to the multiplication in the total number of detectors. Traditionally, a single channel of detector with electronics can handle {approximately}100 kHz count rates while maintaining good energy resolution; the segmented detectors can operate at greater than MHz count rates merely due to the multiplication in the number of channels. One of the most critical aspects in the development of the segmented detectors is characterizing the charge sharing and charge loss that occur between the individual detector strips, and determining how these affect the spectral response of the detectors.

  6. The Majorana Demonstrator: A search for neutrinoless double-beta decay of germanium-76

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Elliott, S. R.; Boswell, M.; Goett, J.; Rielage, K.; Ronquest, M. C.; Xu, W. [Los Alamos National Laboratory, Los Alamos, NM (United States); Abgrall, N.; Chan, Y-D.; Hegai, A.; Martin, R. D.; Mertens, S.; Poon, A. W. P. [Nuclear Science Division, Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory, Berkeley, CA (United States); Aguayo, E.; Fast, J. E.; Hoppe, E. W.; Kouzes, R. T.; LaFerriere, B. D.; Orrell, J. L.; Overman, N. R.; Soin, A. [Pacific Northwest National Laboratory, Richland, WA (United States); and others

    2013-12-30

    The MAJORANA collaboration is searching for neutrinoless double beta decay using {sup 76}Ge, which has been shown to have a number of advantages in terms of sensitivities and backgrounds. The observation of neutrinoless double-beta decay would show that lepton number is violated and that neutrinos are Majorana particles and would simultaneously provide information on neutrino mass. Attaining sensitivities for neutrino masses in the inverted hierarchy region, 15 - 50 meV, will require large, tonne-scale detectors with extremely low backgrounds, at the level of ∼1 count/t-y or lower in the region of the signal. The MAJORANA collaboration, with funding support from DOE Office of Nuclear Physics and NSF Particle Astrophysics, is constructing the DEMONSTRATOR, an array consisting of 40 kg of p-type point-contact high-purity germanium (HPGe) detectors, of which ∼30 kg will be enriched to 87% in {sup 76}Ge. The DEMONSTRATOR is being constructed in a clean room laboratory facility at the 4850' level (4300 m.w.e.) of the Sanford Underground Research Facility (SURF) in Lead, SD. It utilizes a compact graded shield approach with the inner portion consisting of ultra-clean Cu that is being electroformed and machined underground. The primary aim of the DEMONSTRATOR is to show the feasibility of a future tonne-scale measurement in terms of backgrounds and scalability.

  7. Experimental and simulated efficiency of a HPGe detector with point-like and extended sources

    CERN Document Server

    Karamanis, D; Andriamonje, Samuel A; Barreau, G; Petit, M

    2002-01-01

    The absolute efficiency of a high purity germanium (HPGe) detector was determined with a point-like calibrated sup 1 sup 5 sup 2 Eu source at two distances from the detector and three pure metallic thorium foils of different thicknesses. The experimental values are compared with the ones determined with the simulation codes MCNP4B and GEANT 3.21. A procedure for HPGe absolute efficiency calibration is proposed for gamma-ray energies higher than 200 keV.

  8. The influence of anisotropic electron drift velocity on the signal shapes of closed-end HPGe detectors

    CERN Document Server

    Mihailescu, L; Lieder, R M; Brands, H; Jaeger, H

    2000-01-01

    This study is concerned with the anisotropy of the electron drift velocity in germanium crystals at high electric fields and low temperature, and its influence on the charge collection process in n-type, high-purity germanium (HPGe) detectors of closed-end, coaxial geometry. The electron trajectories inside HPGe detectors are simulated using a phenomenological model to calculate the dependence of the drift velocity on the angle between the electric field and the crystal orientation. The resulting induced currents and pulse shapes for a given detector geometry and preamplifier bandwidth are compared to experiment. Experimentally, the dependence of the pulse shapes on the conductivity anisotropy in closed-end HPGe detectors was observed. The experimental data on pulse shapes were obtained by sampling preamplifier signals of an encapsulated, hexaconical EUROBALL detector, which was irradiated by collimated sup 2 sup 2 Na and sup 2 sup 4 sup 1 Am sources. The crystal orientation was measured by neutron reflection...

  9. Particle detectors

    CERN Multimedia

    CERN. Geneva

    1999-01-01

    Introduction, interaction of radiation with matter measurement of momentum of charged particles, of energy of e/gamma, hadrons, identification of particles. Design of HEP detectors. Principle of operation and performance of tracking sub-detectors, calorimeters and muon system.

  10. Detector Unit

    CERN Multimedia

    1960-01-01

    Original detector unit of the Instituut voor Kernfysisch Onderzoek (IKO) BOL project. This detector unit shows that silicon detectors for nuclear physics particle detection were already developed and in use in the 1960's in Amsterdam. Also the idea of putting 'strips' onto the silicon for high spatial resolution of a particle's impact on the detector were implemented in the BOL project which used 64 of these detector units. The IKO BOL project with its silicon particle detectors was designed, built and operated from 1965 to roughly 1977. Detector Unit of the BOL project: These detectors, notably the ‘checkerboard detector’, were developed during the years 1964-1968 in Amsterdam, The Netherlands, by the Natuurkundig Laboratorium of the N.V. Philips Gloeilampen Fabrieken. This was done in close collaboration with the Instituut voor Kernfysisch Onderzoek (IKO) where the read-out electronics for their use in the BOL Project was developed and produced.

  11. Semiconductor Radiation Detectors: Basic principles and some uses of a recent tool that has revolutionized nuclear physics are described.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goulding, F S; Stone, Y

    1970-10-16

    The past decade has seen the rapid development and exploitation of one of the most significant tools of nuclear physics, the semiconductor radiation detector. Applications of the device to the analysis of materials promises to be one of the major contributions of nuclear research to technology, and may even assist in some aspects of our environmental problems. In parallel with the development of these applications, further developments in detectors for nuclear research are taking place: the use of very thin detectors for heavyion identification, position-sensitive detectors for nuclear-reaction studies, and very pure germanium for making more satisfactory detectors for many applications suggest major future contributions to physics.

  12. Infrared detectors

    CERN Document Server

    Rogalski, Antonio

    2010-01-01

    This second edition is fully revised and reorganized, with new chapters concerning third generation and quantum dot detectors, THz detectors, cantilever and antenna coupled detectors, and information on radiometry and IR optics materials. Part IV concerning focal plane arrays is significantly expanded. This book, resembling an encyclopedia of IR detectors, is well illustrated and contains many original references … a really comprehensive book.-F. Sizov, Institute of Semiconductor Physics, National Academy of Sciences, Kiev, Ukraine

  13. Reduction of material mass of optical component in cryogenic camera by using high-order Fresnel lens on a thin germanium substrate.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grulois, Tatiana; Druart, Guillaume; Sauer, Hervé; Chambon, Mathieu; Guérineau, Nicolas; Magli, Serge; Lasfargues, Gillles; Chavel, Pierre

    2015-07-10

    We designed a compact infrared cryogenic camera using only one lens mounted inside the detector area. In the field of cooled infrared imaging systems, the maximal detector area is determined by the dewar. It is generally a sealed and cooled environment dedicated to the infrared quantum detector. By integrating an optical function inside it, we improve the compactness of the camera as well as its performances. The originality of our approach is to use a thin integrated optics which is a high quality Fresnel lens on a thin germanium substrate. The aim is to reduce the additional mass of the optical part integrated inside the dewar to obtain almost the same cool down time as a conventional dewar with no imaging function. A prototype has been made and its characterization has been carried out.

  14. Diffusion of n-type dopants in germanium

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chroneos, A., E-mail: alexander.chroneos@imperial.ac.uk [Engineering and Innovation, The Open University, Milton Keynes MK7 6AA (United Kingdom); Department of Materials, Imperial College, London SW7 2AZ (United Kingdom); Bracht, H., E-mail: bracht@uni-muenster.de [Institute of Materials Physics, University of Münster, Wilhelm-Klemm-Strasse 10, D-48149 Münster (Germany)

    2014-03-15

    Germanium is being actively considered by the semiconductor community as a mainstream material for nanoelectronic applications. Germanium has advantageous materials properties; however, its dopant-defect interactions are less understood as compared to the mainstream material, silicon. The understanding of self- and dopant diffusion is essential to form well defined doped regions. Although p-type dopants such as boron exhibit limited diffusion, n-type dopants such as phosphorous, arsenic, and antimony diffuse quickly via vacancy-mediated diffusion mechanisms. In the present review, we mainly focus on the impact of intrinsic defects on the diffusion mechanisms of donor atoms and point defect engineering strategies to restrain donor atom diffusion and to enhance their electrical activation.

  15. Acoustic absorption by the electron-hole liquid in germanium

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hansen, A.D.A.

    1977-11-01

    The absorption of ultrasonic acoustic waves by the electron-hole liquid that may be created in germanium at liquid helium temperatures by intense optical excitation was studied. This is a degenerate compensated Fermi liquid that exhibits the behavior of both classical dynamics in a force field, and quantum phenomena in a magnetic field. Results of theoretical and experimental studies of the interaction of the mobile liquid with a travelling acoustic wave force field, the attenuation of the wave due to energy-dissipative processes coupling the liquid to the crystal lattice, and the effect of a moderately strong magnetic field on the dynamic behavior of the system are presented. In unstrained germanium the electron-hole liquid (EHL) is known to be condensed into small droplets of radius approx. 5 ..mu..m; the creation of an EHL energy well by the application of an inhomogeneous stress causes the liquid to be aggregated into a macroscopically large volume.

  16. Synthesis and Gas Phase Thermochemistry of Germanium-Containing Compounds

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Classen, Nathan Robert [Iowa State Univ., Ames, IA (United States)

    2002-01-01

    The driving force behind much of the work in this dissertation was to gain further understanding of the unique olefin to carbene isomerization observed in the thermolysis of 1,1-dimethyl-2-methylenesilacyclobutane by finding new examples of it in other silicon and germanium compounds. This lead to the examination of a novel phenylmethylenesilacyclobut-2-ene, which did not undergo olefin to carbene rearrangement. A synthetic route to methylenegermacyclobutanes was developed, but the methylenegermacyclobutane system exhibited kinetic instability, making the study of the system difficult. In any case the germanium system decomposed through a complex mechanism which may not include olefin to carbene isomerization. However, this work lead to the study of the gas phase thermochemistry of a series of dialkylgermylene precursors in order to better understand the mechanism of the thermal decomposition of dialkylgermylenes. The resulting dialkylgermylenes were found to undergo a reversible intramolecular β C-H insertion mechanism.

  17. Germanium, Arsenic, and Selenium Abundances in Metal-poor Stars

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roederer, Ian U.

    2012-09-01

    The elements germanium (Ge, Z = 32), arsenic (As, Z = 33), and selenium (Se, Z = 34) span the transition from charged-particle or explosive synthesis of the iron-group elements to neutron-capture synthesis of heavier elements. Among these three elements, only the chemical evolution of germanium has been studied previously. Here we use archive observations made with the Space Telescope Imaging Spectrograph on board the Hubble Space Telescope and observations from several ground-based facilities to study the chemical enrichment histories of seven stars with metallicities -2.6 Administration. These data are associated with Programs H2aH, H6aH, and H39aH (PI: Boesgaard), N01H (PI: Latham), and U11H (PI: Prochaska).This paper includes data taken at The McDonald Observatory of The University of Texas at Austin.

  18. Gaseous Detectors: Charged Particle Detectors - Particle Detectors and Detector Systems

    CERN Document Server

    Hilke, H J

    2011-01-01

    Gaseous Detectors in 'Charged Particle Detectors - Particle Detectors and Detector Systems', part of 'Landolt-Börnstein - Group I Elementary Particles, Nuclei and Atoms: Numerical Data and Functional Relationships in Science and Technology, Volume 21B1: Detectors for Particles and Radiation. Part 1: Principles and Methods'. This document is part of Part 1 'Principles and Methods' of Subvolume B 'Detectors for Particles and Radiation' of Volume 21 'Elementary Particles' of Landolt-Börnstein - Group I 'Elementary Particles, Nuclei and Atoms'. It contains the Subsection '3.1.2 Gaseous Detectors' of Section '3.1 Charged Particle Detectors' of Chapter '3 Particle Detectors and Detector Systems' with the content: 3.1.2 Gaseous Detectors 3.1.2.1 Introduction 3.1.2.2 Basic Processes 3.1.2.2.1 Gas ionization by charged particles 3.1.2.2.1.1 Primary clusters 3.1.2.2.1.2 Cluster size distribution 3.1.2.2.1.3 Total number of ion pairs 3.1.2.2.1.4 Dependence of energy deposit on particle velocity 3.1.2.2.2 Transport of...

  19. Optical properties of silicon germanium waveguides at telecommunication wavelengths.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hammani, Kamal; Ettabib, Mohamed A; Bogris, Adonis; Kapsalis, Alexandros; Syvridis, Dimitris; Brun, Mickael; Labeye, Pierre; Nicoletti, Sergio; Richardson, David J; Petropoulos, Periklis

    2013-07-15

    We present a systematic experimental study of the linear and nonlinear optical properties of silicon-germanium (SiGe) waveguides, conducted on samples of varying cross-sectional dimensions and Ge concentrations. The evolution of the various optical properties for waveguide widths in the range 0.3 to 2 µm and Ge concentrations varying between 10 and 30% is considered. Finally, we comment on the comparative performance of the waveguides, when they are considered for nonlinear applications at telecommunications wavelengths.

  20. Strain-induced changes to the electronic structure of germanium

    KAUST Repository

    Tahini, H. A.

    2012-04-17

    Density functional theory calculations (DFT) are used to investigate the strain-induced changes to the electronic structure of biaxially strained (parallel to the (001), (110) and (111) planes) and uniaxially strained (along the [001], [110] and [111] directions) germanium (Ge). It is calculated that a moderate uniaxial strain parallel to the [111] direction can efficiently transform Ge to a direct bandgap material with a bandgap energy useful for technological applications. © 2012 IOP Publishing Ltd.

  1. Strain-induced changes to the electronic structure of germanium.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tahini, H; Chroneos, A; Grimes, R W; Schwingenschlögl, U; Dimoulas, A

    2012-05-16

    Density functional theory calculations (DFT) are used to investigate the strain-induced changes to the electronic structure of biaxially strained (parallel to the (001), (110) and (111) planes) and uniaxially strained (along the [001], [110] and [111] directions) germanium (Ge). It is calculated that a moderate uniaxial strain parallel to the [111] direction can efficiently transform Ge to a direct bandgap material with a bandgap energy useful for technological applications.

  2. Diffusion of tin in germanium: A GGA+U approach

    KAUST Repository

    Tahini, H. A.

    2011-10-18

    Density functional theory calculations are used to investigate the formation and diffusion of tin-vacancy pairs (SnV) in germanium(Ge). Depending upon the Fermi energy, SnV pairs can form in neutral, singly negative, or doubly negative charged states. The activation energies of diffusion, also as function of the Fermi energy, are calculated to lie between 2.48-3.65 eV, in agreement with and providing an interpretation of available experimental work.

  3. Photoluminescent polysaccharide-coated germanium(IV) oxide nanoparticles

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Lobaz, Volodymyr; Rabyk, Mariia; Pánek, Jiří; Doris, E.; Nallet, F.; Štěpánek, Petr; Hrubý, Martin

    2016-01-01

    Roč. 294, č. 7 (2016), s. 1225-1235 ISSN 0303-402X R&D Projects: GA MŠk(CZ) 7AMB14FR027; GA ČR(CZ) GA13-08336S; GA MZd(CZ) NV15-25781A Institutional support: RVO:61389013 Keywords : germanium oxide nanoparticles * polysaccharide coating * photoluminescent label Subject RIV: CD - Macromolecular Chemistry Impact factor: 1.723, year: 2016

  4. Electronic Structure of Germanium Nanocrystal Films Probed with Synchrotron Radiation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bostedt, C

    2002-05-01

    The fundamental structure--property relationship of semiconductor quantum dots has been investigated. For deposited germanium nanocrystals strong quantum confinement effects have been determined with synchrotron radiation based x-ray absorption and photoemission techniques. The nanocrystals are condensed out of the gas phase with a narrow size distribution and subsequently deposited in situ onto various substrates. The particles are crystalline in the cubic phase with a structurally disordered surface shell and the resulting film morphology depends strongly on the substrate material and condition. The disordered surface region has an impact on the overall electronic structure of the particles. In a size-dependent study, the conduction and valence band edge of germanium nanocrystals have been measured for the first time and compared to the bulk crystal. The band edges move to higher energies as the particle size is decreased, consistent with quantum confinement theory. To obtain a more accurate analysis of confinement effects in the empty states, a novel analysis method utilizing an effective particle size for the x-ray absorption experiment, which allows a deconvolution of absorption edge broadening effects, has been introduced. Comparison of the present study to earlier studies on silicon reveals that germanium exhibits stronger quantum confinement effects than silicon. Below a critical particle size of 2.3 {+-} 0.7 nm, the band gap of germanium becomes larger than that of silicon--even if it is the opposite for bulk materials. This result agrees phenomenologically with effective mass and tight binding theories but contradicts the findings of recent pseudopotential calculations. The discrepancy between theory and experiments is attributed to the differences in the theoretical models and experimental systems. The experimentally observed structural disorder of the particle surface has to be included in the theoretical models.

  5. Performance of an AGATA asymmetric detector

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Boston, A.J. [Department of Physics, University of Liverpool, Liverpool L69 7ZE (United Kingdom)], E-mail: ajboston@liv.ac.uk; Dimmock, M.R.; Unsworth, C.; Boston, H.C.; Cooper, R.J.; Grint, A.N.; Harkness, L.J. [Department of Physics, University of Liverpool, Liverpool L69 7ZE (United Kingdom); Lazarus, I.H. [STFC Daresbury Laboratory, Daresbury, Warrington WA4 4AD (United Kingdom); Jones, M.; Nolan, P.J.; Oxley, D.C. [Department of Physics, University of Liverpool, Liverpool L69 7ZE (United Kingdom); Simpson, J. [STFC Daresbury Laboratory, Daresbury, Warrington WA4 4AD (United Kingdom); Slee, M. [Department of Physics, University of Liverpool, Liverpool L69 7ZE (United Kingdom)

    2009-06-01

    High-resolution gamma-ray detectors based on high-purity germanium crystals (HPGe) are one of the key workhorses of experimental nuclear science. The technical development of such detector technology has been dramatic in recent years. Large volume, high-granularity, electrically segmented HPGe detectors have been realised and a methodology to improve position sensitivity using pulse-shape analysis coupled with the novel technique of gamma-ray tracking has been developed. Collaborations have been established in Europe (Advanced GAmma Tracking Array (AGATA)) [J. Simpson, Acta Phys. Pol. B 36 (2005) 1383] and the USA (GRETA/GRETINA) [C.W. Beausang, Nucl. Instr. and Meth. B 204 (2003)] to build gamma-ray tracking spectrometers. This paper discusses the performance of the first AGATA asymmetric detector that has been tested at the University of Liverpool. The use of a fully digital data acquisition system has allowed detector charge pulse shapes from a selection of well-defined photon interaction positions to be analysed, yielding important information on the position sensitivity of the detector.

  6. Performance of the GRETA prototype detectors

    CERN Document Server

    Vetter, K; Lee, I Y; Clark, R M; Cromaz, M; Deleplanque, M A; Diamond, R M; Fallon, P; Lane, G J; Macchiavelli, A O; Maier, M R; Stephens, F S; Svensson, C E; Yaver, H

    2000-01-01

    A working, two-dimensionally segmented Ge detector is one of the crucial elements in the development of GRETA - a next-generation 4 pi germanium detector array that uses three-dimensional positions and energies to of individual interactions of gamma rays in the detector to reconstruct the full energies and direction vectors of the individual gamma rays by employing tracking algorithms. The three-dimensional position and the energy of interactions will be determined by using a two-dimensionally segmented Ge detector along with pulse-shape analysis of the signals. The current prototype is a 36-fold segmented HP-Ge detector in a closed-ended coaxial geometry. Preamplifiers with a compact design, low noise, and very good response properties have been built and implemented. An integrated noise level of about 5 keV has been measured for the segment channels. The average energy resolution of this detector was measured to be 1.14 and 1.93 keV at 60 and 1332 keV, respectively. Using pulse-shape analysis, a three-dimen...

  7. The Material Properties of CsSnBr3 and CsBr:Sn-1% and Their Potential as Scintillator Detector Material

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-03-01

    finding equipment and nuclear instrumentation assistance. Thanks to the AFIT Model Fabrication Shop for timely custom fabrication work. Thanks to my...Germanium (HPGe) detector is seen behind the sample holder. The x-ray beam comes in from the left. The HPGe detector is multichannel and tuned for specific...from the left. The HPGe detector is multichannel and tuned for specific energies. cycle can typically take 60-90 minutes depending on the selected

  8. 3D microoptical elements formed in a photostructurable germanium silicate by direct laser writing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Malinauskas, M.; Žukauskas, A.; Purlys, V.; Gaidukevičiu¯tė, A.; Balevičius, Z.; Piskarskas, A.; Fotakis, C.; Pissadakis, S.; Gray, D.; Gadonas, R.; Vamvakaki, M.; Farsari, M.

    2012-12-01

    We present our investigations into the fabrication of three-dimensional microoptical elements by the direct femtosecond laser writing of a germanium-silicon photosensitive hybrid material. Germanium glass composites are very interesting for optical applications as they are photosensitive, and maintain high optical transparency in the visible and near-infrared bands of the spectrum. Here, we have used a germanium containing hybrid material to make nanophotonic structures and microoptical elements such as photonic crystal templates, prisms and spatial polarization plates, both on flat surfaces and fiber tips. Our results show that this germanium silicate composite is an excellent material for microoptics fabrication.

  9. Orthogonal strip HPGe planar SmartPET detectors in Compton configuration

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Boston, H.C. [Department of Physics, University of Liverpool, Oliver Lodge Laboratory, Liverpool, L69 7ZE (United Kingdom)], E-mail: H.C.Boston@liverpool.ac.uk; Gillam, J. [School of Physics and Materials Engineering, Monash University, Melbourne (Australia); Boston, A.J.; Cooper, R.J.; Cresswell, J.; Grint, A.N.; Mather, A.R.; Nolan, P.J.; Scraggs, D.P.; Turk, G. [Department of Physics, University of Liverpool, Oliver Lodge Laboratory, Liverpool, L69 7ZE (United Kingdom); Hall, C.J.; Lazarus, I. [STFC Daresbury Laboratory, Warrington, WA4 4AD (United Kingdom); Berry, A.; Beveridge, T.; Lewis, R. [School of Physics and Materials Engineering, Monash University, Melbourne (Australia)

    2007-10-01

    The evolution of Germanium detector technology over the last decade has lead to the possibility that they can be employed in medical and security imaging. The potential of excellent energy resolution coupled with good position information that Germanium affords removes the necessity for mechanical collimators that would be required in a conventional gamma camera system. By removing this constraint, the overall dose to the patient can be reduced or the throughput of the system can be increased. An additional benefit of excellent energy resolution is that tight gates can be placed on energies from either a multi-lined gamma source or from multi-nuclide sources increasing the number of sources that can be used in medical imaging. In terms of security imaging, segmented Germanium gives directionality and excellent spectroscopic information.

  10. Electrical Manipulation of Donor Spin Qubits in Silicon and Germanium

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sigillito, Anthony James

    Many proposals for quantum information devices rely on electronic or nuclear spins in semiconductors because of their long coherence times and compatibility with industrial fabrication processes. One of the most notable qubits is the electron spin bound to phosphorus donors in silicon, which offers coherence times exceeding seconds at low temperatures. These donors are naturally isolated from their environments to the extent that silicon has been coined a "semiconductor vacuum". While this makes for ultra-coherent qubits, it is difficult to couple two remote donors so quantum information proposals rely on high density arrays of qubits. Here, single qubit addressability becomes an issue. Ideally one would address individual qubits using electric fields which can be easily confined. Typically these schemes rely on tuning a donor spin qubit onto and off of resonance with a magnetic driving field. In this thesis, we measure the electrical tunability of phosphorus donors in silicon and use the extracted parameters to estimate the effects of electric-field noise on qubit coherence times. Our measurements show that donor ionization may set in before electron spins can be sufficiently tuned. We therefore explore two alternative options for qubit addressability. First, we demonstrate that nuclear spin qubits can be directly driven using electric fields instead of magnetic fields and show that this approach offers several advantages over magnetically driven spin resonance. In particular, spin transitions can occur at half the spin resonance frequency and double quantum transitions (magnetic-dipole forbidden) can occur. In a second approach to realizing tunable qubits in semiconductors, we explore the option of replacing silicon with germanium. We first measure the coherence and relaxation times for shallow donor spin qubits in natural and isotopically enriched germanium. We find that in isotopically enriched material, coherence times can exceed 1 ms and are limited by a

  11. Search for an annual modulation of dark-matter signals with a germanium spectrometer at the Sierra Grande Laboratory

    CERN Document Server

    Abriola, D.; Brodzinski, R.L.; Collar, J.I.; Di Gregorio, D.E.; Farach, H.A.; Garcia, E.; Gattone, A.O.; Guerard, C.K.; Hasenbalg, F.; Huck, H.; Miley, H.S.; Morales, A.; Morales, J.; Ortiz de Solorzano, A.; Puimedon, J.; Reeves, J.H.; Salinas, A.; Sarsa, M.L.; Villar, J.A.

    1999-01-01

    Data collected during three years with a germanium spectrometer at the Sierra Grande underground laboratory have been analyzed for distinctive features of annual modulation of the signal induced by WIMP dark matter candidates. The main motivation for this analysis was the recent suggestion by the DAMA/NaI Collaboration that a yearly modulation signal could not be rejected at the 90% confidence level when analyzing data obtained with a high-mass low-background scintillator detector. We performed two different analyses of the data: First, the statistical distribution of modulation-significance variables (expected from an experiment running under the conditions of Sierra Grande) was compared with the same variables obtained from the data. Second, the data were analyzed in energy bins as an independent check of the first result and to allow for the possibility of a crossover in the expected signal. In both cases no statistically significant deviation from the null result was found, which could support the hypothe...

  12. Results of substitution of the Nal by a Ge detector in a simple shadow shield whole body counter

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sahre, P.; Schoenmuth, T. [Nuclear Engineering and Analytics Inc. Rossendorf, Dresden (Germany); Thieme, K. [Amersham Buchler Ltd. und Co., Braunschweig (Germany)

    1997-12-01

    Since 1976 a whole body counter (WBC) has been used at the Rossendorf Research Centre for measuring the internal contamination of workers. The WBC with the Germanium detector is given schematically and visually. The WBC is a shadow shield type with a tilted chair having only one detector. Table 1 contains the parameters of the WBC. It can be seen that the WBC is a simple counter. Therefore, taking into account the experiences of McCurdy, a lot of improvements were expected form the simple substitution of a HP Germanium detector for a NaI (TI) detector, i.e. despite a decrease in the sensitive detection volume, an enhancement of all quantifiable results (e.g. lower limit of detection and time for analysis of the spectrum) and above all the reliability and automation of nuclide identification were expected. (orig./SR)

  13. Integrability detectors

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    2015-10-29

    Oct 29, 2015 ... Abstract. In this short review, we present some applications and historical facts about the integrability detectors: Painlevé analysis, singularity confinement and algebraic entropy.

  14. Ion-beam induced structure modifications in amorphous germanium; Ionenstrahlinduzierte Strukturmodifikationen in amorphem Germanium

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Steinbach, Tobias

    2012-05-03

    Object of the present thesis was the systematic study of ion-beam induced structure modifications in amorphous germanium (a-Ge) layers due to low- (LEI) and high-energetic (SHI) ion irradiation. The LEI irradiation of crystalline Ge (c-Ge) effects because the dominating nuclear scattering of the ions on the solid-state atoms the formation of a homogeneous a-Ge Layer. Directly on the surface for fluences of two orders of magnitude above the amorphization fluence the formation of stable cavities independently on the irradiation conditions was observed. For the first time for the ion-beam induced cavity formation respectively for the steady expansion of the porous layer forming with growing fluence a linear dependence on the energy {epsilon}{sub n} deposed in nuclear processes was detected. Furthermore the formation of buried cavities was observed, which shows a dependence on the type of ions. While in the c-Ge samples in the range of the high electronic energy deposition no radiation defects, cavities, or plastic deformations were observed, the high electronic energy transfer in the 3.1 {mu}m thick pre-amorphized a-Ge surface layers leads to the formation of randomly distributed cavities. Basing on the linear connection between cavity-induced vertical volume expansion and the fluence determined for different energy transfers for the first time a material-specific threshold value of {epsilon}{sub e}{sup HRF}=(10.5{+-}1.0) kev nm{sup -1} was determined, above which the ion-beam induced cavity formation in a-Ge sets on. The anisotropic plastic deformation of th a-Ge layer superposed at inclined SHI irradiation on the cavity formation was very well described by an equation derived from the viscoelastic Maxwell model, but modified under regardment of the experimental results. The positive deformation yields determined thereby exhibit above a threshold value for the ion-beam induced plastic deformation {epsilon}{sub e}{sup S{sub a}}=(12{+-}2) keV nm{sup -1} for the first

  15. Improved WIMP-search reach of the CDMS II germanium data

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Agnese, R.; Anderson, A. J.; Asai, M.; Balakishiyeva, D.; Barker, D.; Basu Thakur, R.; Bauer, D. A.; Billard, J.; Borgland, A.; Bowles, M. A.; Brandt, D.; Brink, P. L.; Bunker, R.; Cabrera, B.; Caldwell, D. O.; Calkins, R.; Cerdeno, D. G.; Chagani, H.; Chen, Y.; Cooley, J.; Cornell, B.; Crewdson, C. H.; Cushman, Priscilla B.; Daal, M.; Di Stefano, P. C.; Doughty, T.; Esteban, L.; Fallows, S.; Figueroa-Feliciano, E.; Godfrey, G. L.; Golwala, S. R.; Hall, Jeter C.; Harris, H. R.; Hertel, S. A.; Hofer, T.; Holmgren, D.; Hsu, L.; Huber, M. E.; Jardin, D. M.; Jastram, A.; Kamaev, O.; Kara, B.; Kelsey, M. H.; Kennedy, A.; Kiveni, M.; Koch, K.; Leder, A.; Loer, B.; Lopez Asamar, E.; Lukens, P.; Mahapatra, R.; Mandic, V.; McCarthy, K. A.; Mirabolfathi, N.; Moffatt, R. A.; Oser, S. M.; Page, K.; Page, W. A.; Partridge, R.; Pepin, M.; Phipps, A.; Prasad, K.; Pyle, M.; Qiu, H.; Rau, W.; Redl, P.; Reisetter, A.; Ricci, Y.; Rogers, H. E.; Saab, T.; Sadoulet, B.; Sander, J.; Schneck, K.; Schnee, R. W.; Scorza, S.; Serfass, B.; Shank, B.; Speller, D.; Toback, D.; Upadhyayula, S.; Villano, A. N.; Welliver, B.; Wilson, J. S.; Wright, D. H.; Yang, X.; Yellin, S.; Yen, J. J.; Young, B. A.; Zhang, J.

    2015-10-31

    CDMS II data from the five-tower runs at the Soudan Underground Laboratory were reprocessed with an improved charge-pulse fitting algorithm. Two new analysis techniques to reject surface-event backgrounds were applied to the 612 kg days germanium-detector weakly interacting massive particle (WIMP)-search exposure. An extended analysis was also completed by decreasing the 10 keV analysis threshold to ~5 keV, to increase sensitivity near a WIMP mass of 8 GeV/c2. After unblinding, there were zero candidate events above a deposited energy of 10 keV and six events in the lower-threshold analysis. This yielded minimum WIMP-nucleon spin-independent scattering cross-section limits of 1.8×10-44 and 1.18×10-41 at 90% confidence for 60 and 8.6 GeV/c2 WIMPs, respectively. This improves the previous CDMS II result by a factor of 2.4 (2.7) for 60 (8.6) GeV/c2 WIMPs.

  16. Measurements of thermal characteristics in silicon germanium un-cooled micro-bolometers

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Moreno, Mario; Torres, Alfonso; Kosarev, Andrey [National Institute for Astrophysics, Optics and Electronics, P.O. Box 51 and 216, Z.P. 7200 Puebla (Mexico); Ambrosio, Roberto; Mireles, Jose [Universidad Autonoma de Ciudad Juarez, Electrical Department, Av. Del Charro 450 N, Z.P. 32310, C. J., Chihuahua (Mexico); Garcia, Maria [Benemerita Universidad Autonoma de Puebla, Physics Department, Av. San Claudio S/N Z.P. 72570 Puebla (Mexico)

    2010-04-15

    We present a study of the thermal characteristics of an infrared detector (un-cooled micro-bolometer), based on an amorphous silicon germanium film (a-Si{sub x}Ge{sub y}:H), deposited by plasma at low temperature ({proportional_to} 300 C) and compatible with the standard CMOS technology. These films have been studied due to their high performance characteristics as high activation energy (E{sub a}{approx} 0.37 eV), high temperature coefficient of resistance (TCR{approx} -0.047 K{sup -1}) and moderate room temperature conductivity ({sigma}{sub RT}{approx} 2x10{sup -5}{omega} cm), which provides a moderate pixel resistance (R{sub cell}{approx}3.5x10{sup 8}{omega}). We have used two simple methods to calculate the thermal characteristics of the micro-bolometer. The thermal conductance (G{sub th}) has been obtained from the electrical I(U) characteristics in the range where self heating due to bias is not presented. The temperature dependence of the electrical resistance and as well the temperature dependence of the thermal resistance have been obtained by measuring the I(U) characteristics in the device at different temperature values. Finally the results of both methods have been compared. (copyright 2010 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH and Co. KGaA, Weinheim) (orig.)

  17. Optimal process parameters for phosphorus spin-on-doping of germanium

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Boldrini, Virginia [Dipartimento di Fisica e Astronomia, Università degli Studi di Padova, Via Marzolo 8, I-35131 Padova (Italy); INFN-LNL, Viale dell’Università 2, I-35020 Legnaro, Padova (Italy); Carturan, Sara Maria, E-mail: sara.carturan@lnl.infn.it [Dipartimento di Fisica e Astronomia, Università degli Studi di Padova, Via Marzolo 8, I-35131 Padova (Italy); INFN-LNL, Viale dell’Università 2, I-35020 Legnaro, Padova (Italy); Maggioni, Gianluigi; Napolitani, Enrico [Dipartimento di Fisica e Astronomia, Università degli Studi di Padova, Via Marzolo 8, I-35131 Padova (Italy); INFN-LNL, Viale dell’Università 2, I-35020 Legnaro, Padova (Italy); Napoli, Daniel Ricardo [INFN-LNL, Viale dell’Università 2, I-35020 Legnaro, Padova (Italy); Camattari, Riccardo [INFN Sezione di Ferrara, Dipartimento di Fisica, Università di Ferrara, Via Saragat 1, 44122, Ferrara (Italy); De Salvador, Davide [Dipartimento di Fisica e Astronomia, Università degli Studi di Padova, Via Marzolo 8, I-35131 Padova (Italy); INFN-LNL, Viale dell’Università 2, I-35020 Legnaro, Padova (Italy)

    2017-01-15

    Highlights: • Optimized protocol for the application of phosphorus spin-on-doping to Ge surface. • Homogeneous n-type Ge layers, fully electrically active, are obtained. • Crucial parameters for SOD curing are relative humidity, time and temperature. • Characterization of Ge loss from the surface into the SOD film by diffusion. • Spike annealing in standard tube chamber furnace are performed. - Abstract: The fabrication of homogeneously doped germanium layers characterized by total electrical activation is currently a hot topic in many fields, such as microelectronics, photovoltaics, optics and radiation detectors. Phosphorus spin-on-doping technique has been implemented on Ge wafers, by developing a protocol for the curing process and subsequent diffusion annealing for optimal doping. Parameters such as relative humidity and curing time turned out to affect the surface morphology, the degree of reticulation reached by the dopant source and the amount of dopant available for diffusion. After spike annealing in a conventional furnace, diffusion profiles and electrical properties have been measured. Ge loss from the surface during high-temperature annealing, due to diffusion into the source film, has been observed and quantified.

  18. Les alliages germanium-etain et silicium-germanium-etain: Croissance, proprietes structurales et stabilite thermique

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fournier-Lupien, Jean-Hughes

    Tin-containing group IV semiconductors present a rich playground for an independent control of bandgap and lattice parameter. The ability to grow these metastable alloys on silicon (Si) platform is a key step to achieve a new class of Si-compatible heterostructures and low dimensional systems relevant for applications in electronics and optoelectronics. With this perspective, this work focuses on understanding the structural properties of germanium-tin (GeSn) and silicon-germanium-tin (SiGeSn) alloys. Pseudomorphic layers (relaxed Ge virtual substrate in a reduced pressure chemical vapor deposition (RP-CVD) system. The precursors used during the growth are disilane (Si 2H6), digermane (Ge2H6) (10% diluted in H2), and tin tetrachloride (SnCl4) using N2 as carrier gas. Low temperature growth (between 350 and 475 °C) is used in order to prevent Sn segregation and clustering. Non-equilibrium growth allows Sn to crystallize into diamond cubic alpha-Sn structure and successfully be alloyed with group IV semiconductors leading to metastable alloys. The alloy composition range of SixGe1-x-ySn y and Ge1-zSnz sample is 0.04 ≤ x ≤ 0.19, 0.02 ≤ y ≤ 0.11 and 0.02 ≤ z ≤ 0.09. Post-growth structural analyses show that low growth temperature increases the incorporation of Sn in both binary and ternary alloys. Note that for the ternary alloy, increasing Sn composition leads a reduction in Si composition. This behavior is due to the fact that the cracking temperature of Si precursor is higher than that of Sn precursor. Raman spectroscopy has been used to characterize the as-grown layers and an empirical model has been established to quantify the composition and strain of the ternary alloy SiGeSn. Using three excitation wavelengths 532 nm, 633 nm and 785 nm, we found that 633 nm wavelength is the more appropriate to clearly identify all the vibrational modes in SiGeSn lattice. This wavelength allows us to correctly identify the six possible vibrational modes for the

  19. Optical Detectors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tabbert, Bernd; Goushcha, Alexander

    Optical detectors are applied in all fields of human activities from basic research to commercial applications in communication, automotive, medical imaging, homeland security, and other fields. The processes of light interaction with matter described in other chapters of this handbook form the basis for understanding the optical detectors physics and device properties.

  20. Vapor Detector

    Science.gov (United States)

    Waddell, H. M.; Garrard, G. C.; Houston, D. W.

    1982-01-01

    Detector eliminates need for removing covers to take samples. Detector is canister consisting of screw-in base and clear plastic tube that contains two colors of silica gel. Monoethylhydrazine and nitrogen tetroxide vapors are visually monitored with canister containing color-changing gels.

  1. Developments of position-sensitive X-ray detectors at SPring-8

    CERN Document Server

    Toyokawa, H; Hirota, K

    2003-01-01

    In order to efficiently perform diffraction and scattering experiments at the SPring-8 facility, three types of position sensitive detectors have been developed. A silicon pixel detector could detect X-rays above 6-keV in single counting mode, and an image accumulated could be read out within 5 msec. A 128-channel microstrip Germanium detector has made it possible for the users to efficiently investigate high resolution Compton scattering experiments. A high energy X-ray imager with a 128 x 128 matrix of YAP crystal has been developed for high energy X-ray diffraction experiments. (author)

  2. Bandgap-customizable germanium using lithographically determined biaxial tensile strain for silicon-compatible optoelectronics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sukhdeo, David S; Nam, Donguk; Kang, Ju-Hyung; Brongersma, Mark L; Saraswat, Krishna C

    2015-06-29

    Strain engineering has proven to be vital for germanium-based photonics, in particular light emission. However, applying a large permanent biaxial tensile strain to germanium has been a challenge. We present a simple, CMOS-compatible technique to conveniently induce a large, spatially homogenous strain in circular structures patterned within germanium nanomembranes. Our technique works by concentrating and amplifying a pre-existing small strain into a circular region. Biaxial tensile strains as large as 1.11% are observed by Raman spectroscopy and are further confirmed by photoluminescence measurements, which show enhanced and redshifted light emission from the strained germanium. Our technique allows the amount of biaxial strain to be customized lithographically, allowing the bandgaps of different germanium structures to be independently customized in a single mask process.

  3. Germanium CCDs for large-format SWIR and X-ray imaging

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leitz, C.; Rabe, S.; Prigozhin, I.; Burke, B.; Zhu, M.; Ryu, K.; Cooper, M.; Reich, R.; Johnson, K.; Hu, W. L.; Felton, B.; Cook, M.; Stull, C.; Suntharalingam, V.

    2017-05-01

    Germanium exhibits high sensitivity to short-wave infrared (SWIR) and X-ray radiation, making it an interesting candidate for imaging applications in these bands. Recent advances in germanium processing allow for high-quality charge-coupled devices (CCDs) to be realized in this material. In this article, we discuss our evaluation of germanium as an absorber material for CCDs via fabrication and analysis of discrete devices such as diodes, metal-insulator-semiconductor capacitors, and buried-channel metal-oxide-semiconductor field-effect transistors (MOSFETs). We then describe fabrication of our first imaging device on germanium, a 32 × 1 × 8.1 μm linear shift register. Based on this work, we find that germanium is a promising material for CCDs imaging in the SWIR and X-ray bands.

  4. Electonic properties of hydrogenated amorphous silicon-germanium alloys

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bullot, J.; Galin, M.; Gauthier, M. (Universite de Paris-Sud, Orsay (France)); Bourdon, B. (CIT-Alcatel Transmission, Marcoussis (France))

    1983-06-01

    The electronic properties of some binary hydrogenated amorphous silicon-germanium alloys a-Sisub(x)Gesub(1-x):H in the silicon rich region (x > 0.6) are investigated. Experimental evidence is presented of photo-induced effects similar to those described in Si:H (Staebler-Wronski effect). The electronic properties are then studied from the dual point of view of the germanium content dependence and of the photo and thermal histories of the films. The dark conductivity changes between the annealed state and the light-soaked state are interpreted in terms of the variation of the temperature coefficient of the Fermi level. The photoconductivity efficiency is shown to remain close to that of a-Si:H for 1 > x >= 0.9 and to strongly decrease when the germanium content is further increased: the photoresponse of the Sisub(0.62)Gesub(0.38) alloy is 10/sup 4/ times smaller than that of a-Si:H. This deterioration of the photoconductive properties is explained in terms of the increase of the density of gap states following Ge substitution. This conclusion is based on the study of the width of the exponential absorption edge and on the results of photoconductivity time response studies. The latter data are interpreted by means of the model of Rose of trapping and recombination kinetics and it is found that for x approximately 0.6 the density of states at 0.4-0.5 eV below the mobility edge is 7 x 10/sup 17/ eV/sup -1/ cm/sup -3/ as compared to 2.4 x 10/sup 16/ eV/sup -1/ cm/sup -3/ for x = 0.97.

  5. [Effect of coordinational germanium compounds on enzyme synthesis and activity].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seĭfullina, I I; Martsinko, E E; Batrakova, O A; Borzova, N V; Ivanko, E V; Varbanets, L D

    2002-01-01

    Germanium complexes (IV) with succinic (H2Suc), oxyethyliminodiacetic (H2Oeida) and iminodisuccinic (H4Ids) acids as well as homo- and heteroligand germanium complexes (IV)--products of interaction of triammonium salt of oxyethylidendiphosphonic acid ((NH4)3HL) and oxyacids: tartaric (H4Tart), citric (H4Citr), trioxyglutaric (H4Toglut) acids have been synthesized. Composition of the obtained complexes: [Ge(OH)2(NaSuc)2].2H2O (I); [Ge(OH) (Oeida).H2O].H2O (II); [Ge(OH)2(NaHIds)2] (III); [Ge(OH)2(NH4)3HL) (H2Tart)] (IV); [Ge(OH)2(NH4)3HL) (H2Citr)] (V); [Ge(OH)2(NH4)3HL) (H2Toglut)] (VI); [Ge(OH)2((NH4)2HL)2] (VII); [Ge (OH)2((NH4)2HL)2] (VII); [Ge(OH)2 (H2O)2(NH4) HL] (VIII) has been determined. The capability of the synthesized compounds has been studied to affect synthesis and activity of the following enzymes: collagenase, alpha-N-acetylgalactosaminidase (alpha-GalNAc-ase) and alpha-galactosidase (alpha-Gal-ase). It has been established that the complexes II-VIII activate biosynthesis of alpha-Gal-ase and alpha-GalNAc-ase, while germanium dioxide (IX) and complex I possess considerable inhibiting effect on synthesis of the above enzymes. It has been also established that all the compounds except for IV increased the activity of both alpha-Gal-ase and alpha-GalNAc-ase. All the considered complexes demonstrated similar reaction with respect to collagenase: they inhibited both synthesis and activity.

  6. Undoped strained germanium quantum wells towards spin qubits

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scappucci, Giordano; Sammak, Amir; Yeoh, Lareine; Sabbagh, Diego; Conesa-Boj, Sonia; Kolling, Sebastian; Zaumseil, Peter; Capellini, Giovanni

    Germanium is emerging as a promising material to implement spin qubits because of the key properties of high carrier mobility, strong spin-orbit coupling, long spin coherence times and compatibility with silicon technology. We report the deposition of undoped strained Ge/SiGe quantum wells of high structural quality in a reduced pressure chemical vapor deposition tool. Structural analysis of the Ge/SiGe heterostructures confirm sharp interfaces, full relaxation of the virtual substrate, and coherent deposition of the strained quantum well. Furthermore, we will discuss architectures towards the development of CMOS compatible spin qubits in laterally defined Ge quantum dots. .

  7. Point defect engineering strategies to retard phosphorous diffusion in germanium.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tahini, H A; Chroneos, A; Grimes, R W; Schwingenschlögl, U; Bracht, H

    2013-01-07

    The diffusion of phosphorous in germanium is very fast, requiring point defect engineering strategies to retard it in support of technological application. Density functional theory corroborated with hybrid density functional calculations are used to investigate the influence of the isovalent codopants tin and hafnium in the migration of phosphorous via the vacancy-mediated diffusion process. The migration energy barriers for phosphorous are increased significantly in the presence of oversized isovalent codopants. Therefore, it is proposed that tin and in particular hafnium codoping are efficient point defect engineering strategies to retard phosphorous migration.

  8. Point defect engineering strategies to retard phosphorous diffusion in germanium

    KAUST Repository

    Tahini, H. A.

    2013-01-01

    The diffusion of phosphorous in germanium is very fast, requiring point defect engineering strategies to retard it in support of technological application. Density functional theory corroborated with hybrid density functional calculations are used to investigate the influence of the isovalent codopants tin and hafnium in the migration of phosphorous via the vacancy-mediated diffusion process. The migration energy barriers for phosphorous are increased significantly in the presence of oversized isovalent codopants. Therefore, it is proposed that tin and in particular hafnium codoping are efficient point defect engineering strategies to retard phosphorous migration. © the Owner Societies 2013.

  9. Evidence for cubic phase in deposited germanium nanocrystals

    CERN Document Server

    Bostedt, C; Plitzko, J M; Möller, T; Terminello, L J

    2003-01-01

    Germanium nanocrystals with sizes ranging from 1 to 5 nm are condensed out of the gas phase in helium or argon buffer-gas atmospheres and subsequently deposited. The generated particle sizes are found to depend on the buffer gas, with helium yielding a narrower size distribution than argon and argon exhibiting a stronger pressure dependence of the produced particle sizes. Structural analysis of nanoparticles with average sizes around 5 nm reveals the bulklike cubic (diamond) phase - in contrast to recent experiments which suggest the tetragonal phase for similar-sized particles. These results are explained in terms of particle formation dynamics.

  10. Fabrication and characterization of a germanium nanowire light emitting diode

    Science.gov (United States)

    Greil, Johannes; Bertagnolli, Emmerich; Salem, Bassem; Baron, Thierry; Gentile, Pascal; Lugstein, Alois

    2017-12-01

    In this letter, we demonstrate the feasibility of a germanium nanowire light emitting diode as a reasonable approach for downscaling of CMOS compatible light sources. We show room-temperature direct bandgap electroluminescence from axial p-n junction nanowire devices. The electron population in the Γ valley, necessary for direct bandgap emission, is achieved by high injection current densities. Carrier temperature is consistently found to be higher than the lattice temperature, indicating inhibited carrier cooling in small diameter wires. Strong polarization of the emission parallel to the nanowire axis is observed and attributed to dielectric contrast phenomena.

  11. Effect of germanium dioxide on growth of Spirulina platensis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cao, Ji-Xiang

    1996-12-01

    This study on the effect of different concentrations of germanium dioxide (GeO2) on the specific growth rate (SGR), pigment contents, protein content and amino acid composition of Spirulina platensis showed that Ge was not the essential element of this alga; that GeO2 could speed up growth and raise protein content of S. platensis, and could possibly influence the photosynthesis system. The concentration range of GeO2 beneficial to growth of S. platensis is from 5 100mg/l. GeO2 is proposed to be utilized to remove contamination by Chlorella spp. usually occurring in the cultivation of Spirulina.

  12. Gaseous Detectors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Titov, Maxim

    Since long time, the compelling scientific goals of future high-energy physics experiments were a driving factor in the development of advanced detector technologies. A true innovation in detector instrumentation concepts came in 1968, with the development of a fully parallel readout for a large array of sensing elements - the Multi-Wire Proportional Chamber (MWPC), which earned Georges Charpak a Nobel prize in physics in 1992. Since that time radiation detection and imaging with fast gaseous detectors, capable of economically covering large detection volumes with low mass budget, have been playing an important role in many fields of physics. Advances in photolithography and microprocessing techniques in the chip industry during the past decade triggered a major transition in the field of gas detectors from wire structures to Micro-Pattern Gas Detector (MPGD) concepts, revolutionizing cell-size limitations for many gas detector applications. The high radiation resistance and excellent spatial and time resolution make them an invaluable tool to confront future detector challenges at the next generation of colliders. The design of the new micro-pattern devices appears suitable for industrial production. Novel structures where MPGDs are directly coupled to the CMOS pixel readout represent an exciting field allowing timing and charge measurements as well as precise spatial information in 3D. Originally developed for the high-energy physics, MPGD applications have expanded to nuclear physics, photon detection, astroparticle and neutrino physics, neutron detection, and medical imaging.

  13. Crystallization of Electrodeposited Germanium Thin Film on Silicon (100).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abidin, Mastura Shafinaz Zainal; Matsumura, Ryo; Anisuzzaman, Mohammad; Park, Jong-Hyeok; Muta, Shunpei; Mahmood, Mohamad Rusop; Sadoh, Taizoh; Hashim, Abdul Manaf

    2013-11-06

    We report the crystallization of electrodeposited germanium (Ge) thin films on n-silicon (Si) (100) by rapid melting process. The electrodeposition was carried out in germanium (IV) chloride: propylene glycol (GeCl₄:C₃H₈O₂) electrolyte with constant current of 50 mA for 30 min. The measured Raman spectra and electron backscattering diffraction (EBSD) images show that the as-deposited Ge thin film was amorphous. The crystallization of deposited Ge was achieved by rapid thermal annealing (RTA) at 980 °C for 1 s. The EBSD images confirm that the orientations of the annealed Ge are similar to that of the Si substrate. The highly intense peak of Raman spectra at 300 cm-1 corresponding to Ge-Ge vibration mode was observed, indicating good crystal quality of Ge. An additional sub peak near to 390 cm-1 corresponding to the Si-Ge vibration mode was also observed, indicating the Ge-Si mixing at Ge/Si interface. Auger electron spectroscopy (AES) reveals that the intermixing depth was around 60 nm. The calculated Si fraction from Raman spectra was found to be in good agreement with the value estimated from Ge-Si equilibrium phase diagram. The proposed technique is expected to be an effective way to crystallize Ge films for various device applications as well as to create strain at the Ge-Si interface for enhancement of mobility.

  14. Crystallization of Electrodeposited Germanium Thin Film on Silicon (100

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Abdul Manaf Hashim

    2013-11-01

    Full Text Available We report the crystallization of electrodeposited germanium (Ge thin films on n-silicon (Si (100 by rapid melting process. The electrodeposition was carried out in germanium (IV chloride: propylene glycol (GeCl4:C3H8O2 electrolyte with constant current of 50 mA for 30 min. The measured Raman spectra and electron backscattering diffraction (EBSD images show that the as-deposited Ge thin film was amorphous. The crystallization of deposited Ge was achieved by rapid thermal annealing (RTA at 980 °C for 1 s. The EBSD images confirm that the orientations of the annealed Ge are similar to that of the Si substrate. The highly intense peak of Raman spectra at 300 cm−1 corresponding to Ge-Ge vibration mode was observed, indicating good crystal quality of Ge. An additional sub peak near to 390 cm−1 corresponding to the Si-Ge vibration mode was also observed, indicating the Ge-Si mixing at Ge/Si interface. Auger electron spectroscopy (AES reveals that the intermixing depth was around 60 nm. The calculated Si fraction from Raman spectra was found to be in good agreement with the value estimated from Ge-Si equilibrium phase diagram. The proposed technique is expected to be an effective way to crystallize Ge films for various device applications as well as to create strain at the Ge-Si interface for enhancement of mobility.

  15. Investigation of adatom adsorption on single layer buckled germanium selenide

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Arkın, H., E-mail: holgar@eng.ankara.edu.tr [Department of Physics Engineering, Ankara University, Ankara (Turkey); Aktürk, E., E-mail: ethem.akturk@adu.edu.tr [Department of Physics, Adnan Menderes University, 09100 Aydın (Turkey); Nanotechnology Application and Research Center, Adnan Menderes University, 09100 Aydın (Turkey)

    2016-12-30

    Highlights: • Buckled GeSe (b-GeSe) has a stable honeycomb structure. • b-GeSe is a semiconductor with a indirect band gap of 2.29 eV. • In low coverage, b-GeSe attains half metallicity through the adsorption of Si, Ge, P and Br. - Abstract: A recent study of Hu et al. [1] predicted that 2D single layer of asymmetric washboard germanium selenide is found to be stable and display semiconducting properties. Motivating from this study, we have shown that another phase, which is 2D buckled honeycomb germanium selenide, is also stable. This phase exhibits semiconducting behavior with a band gap of 2.29 eV. Furthermore, on the basis of the first principles, spin-polarized density functional calculations, we investigate the effect of selected adatoms adsorption on the b-GeSe single layer. The adatoms Se, Ge, S, Si, C, Br and P are chemisorbed with significant binding energy where this effects modify the electronic structure of the single layer buckled GeSe locally by tuning the band gap. Net integer magnetic moment can be achieved and b-GeSe attains half metallicity through the adsorption of Si, Ge, P and Br.

  16. Materials and Fabrication Issues for Large Machined Germanium Immersion Gratings

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kuzmenko, P J; Davis, P J; Little, S L; Hale, L C

    2006-05-22

    LLNL has successfully fabricated small (1.5 cm{sup 2} area) germanium immersion gratings. We studied the feasibility of producing a large germanium immersion grating by means of single point diamond flycutting. Our baseline design is a 63.4o blaze echelle with a 6 cm beam diameter. Birefringence and refractive index inhomogeneity due to stresses produced by the crystal growth process are of concern. Careful selection of the grating blank and possibly additional annealing to relieve stress will be required. The Large Optics Diamond Turning Machine (LODTM) at LLNL is a good choice for the fabrication. It can handle parts up to 1.5 meter in diameter and 0.5 meter in length and is capable of a surface figure accuracy of better than 28 nm rms. We will describe the machine modifications and the machining process for a large grating. A next generation machine, the Precision Optical Grinder and Lathe (POGAL), currently under development has tighter specifications and could produce large gratings with higher precision.

  17. Search for an Annual Modulation in a p-Type Point Contact Germanium Dark Matter Detector

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Barbeau, P.S. [University of Chicago; Collar, J.I. [University of Chicago; Fields, N. [University of Chicago; Hossbach, T.W. [Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL); Aalseth, C.E. [Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL); Fast, James E. [Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL); Keillor, M. [Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL); Kephart, J.D. [Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL); Miley, H.S. [Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL); Orrell, John L. [Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL); Colaresi, James F. [Canberra Industries, Inc., Meriden, CT; Yocum, K. Michael [Canberra Industries, Inc., Meriden, CT; Leon, J. Diaz [University of Washington, Ctr Expt Nucle Phys & Astrophys; Knecht, A. [University of Washington, Ctr Expt Nucle Phys & Astrophys; Marino, M. G. [University of Washington, Ctr Expt Nucle Phys & Astrophys; Miller, M. L. [University of Washington, Ctr Expt Nucle Phys & Astrophys; Radford, David C [ORNL; Wilkerson, John F [University of North Carolina, Chapel Hill

    2011-01-01

    Fifteen months of cumulative CoGeNT data are examined for indications of an annual modulation, a predicted signature of weakly interacting massive particle (WIMP) interactions. Presently available data support the presence of a modulated component of unknown origin, with parameters prima facie compatible with a galactic halo composed of light-mass WIMPs. Unoptimized estimators yield a statistical significance for a modulation of {approx}2.8{sigma}, limited by the short exposure.

  18. Search for an Annual Modulation in a p-Type Point Contact Germanium Dark Matter Detector

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Aalseth, Craig E.; Barbeau, Phil; Colaresi, J.; Collar, J. I.; Diaz Leon, J.; Fast, James E.; Fields, N.; Hossbach, Todd W.; Keillor, Martin E.; Kephart, Jeremy D.; Knecht, A.; Marino, Michael G.; Miley, Harry S.; Miller, M. L.; Orrell, John L.; Radford, D. C.; Wilkerson, J.; Yocum, K. M.

    2011-09-01

    Fifteen months of cumulative CoGeNT data are examined for indications of an annual modulation, a predicted signature of Weakly Interacting Massive Particle (WIMP) interactions. Presently available data support the presence of a modulated component of unknown origin, with parameters prima facie compatible with a galactic halo composed of light-mass WIMPs.

  19. An assessment of radiation damage in space-based germanium detectors due to solar proton events

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Owens, Alan; Brandenburg, S.; Buis, E. -J.; Kliewiet, H.; Kraft, S.; Ostendorf, R. W.; Peacock, A.; Quarati, F.; Quirin, P.

    2007-01-01

    Radiation effects caused by solar proton events will be a common problem for many types of sensors on missions to the inner solar system because of the long cruise phases coupled with the inverse square scaling of solar particle events. As part of a study in support of the BepiColombo mission to

  20. Neutrino and dark matter physics with sub-keV germanium detectors

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    2014-11-04

    Nov 4, 2014 ... physics to search for light weakly interacting massive particle (WIMP) dark matter. We summarize the recent ... searches are conducted at the new China Jinping Underground Laboratory (CJPL) [4,6] officially ..... R&D programme is being pursued to produce advanced junction field-effect tran- sistor (JFET) ...

  1. DUMAND detector

    CERN Multimedia

    This object is one of the 256 other detectors of the DUMAND (Deep Underwater Muon And Neutrino Detection) experiment. The goal of the experiment was the construction of the first deep ocean high energy neutrino detector, to be placed at 4800 m depth in the Pacific Ocean off Keahole Point on the Big Island of Hawaii. A few years ago, a European conference with Cosmic experiments was organized at CERN as they were projects like DUMAND in Hawaii. Along with the conference, a temporary exhibition was organised as well. It was a collaboration of institutions from Germany, Japan, Switzerland and the U.S.A. CERN had borrowed equipment and objects from different institutes around the world, including this detector of the DUMAND experiment. Most of the equipment were sent back to the institutes, however this detector sphere was offered to a CERN member of the personnel.

  2. MS Detectors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Koppenaal, David W.; Barinaga, Charles J.; Denton, M Bonner B.; Sperline, Roger P.; Hieftje, Gary M.; Schilling, G. D.; Andrade, Francisco J.; Barnes IV., James H.

    2005-11-01

    Good eyesight is often taken for granted, a situation that everyone appreciates once vision begins to fade with age. New eyeglasses or contact lenses are traditional ways to improve vision, but recent new technology, i.e. LASIK laser eye surgery, provides a new and exciting means for marked vision restoration and improvement. In mass spectrometry, detectors are the 'eyes' of the MS instrument. These 'eyes' have also been taken for granted. New detectors and new technologies are likewise needed to correct, improve, and extend ion detection and hence, our 'chemical vision'. The purpose of this report is to review and assess current MS detector technology and to provide a glimpse towards future detector technologies. It is hoped that the report will also serve to motivate interest, prompt ideas, and inspire new visions for ion detection research.

  3. Germanium Isotopic Fractionation in Iron Meteorites : Comparison with Experimental Data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luais, B.; Toplis, M.; Tissandier, L.; Roskosz, M.

    2009-05-01

    Magmatic and non-magmatic iron meteorites are thought to be formed respectively by processes of metal- silicate segregation, and complex impacts on undifferentiated parent bodies. These processes are inferred from variations of siderophile element concentrations, such as Ge, Ni, Ir. Germanium is moderately siderophile, with metal-silicate partition coefficients which depend on oxygen fugacity. Germanium is also moderately volatile, and fractionation would be expected during high temperature processes. In order to investigate the extent of elemental and isotopic fractionation of germanium during metal-silicate equilibria and impact processes, we use a double approach including (1) Ge isotopic measurements of iron meteorites from non-magmatic and magmatic groups [1], and (2) experimental investigations of the isotopic fractionation associated with germanium transfer from an oxidized silicate liquid to a metallic phase under various fO2 conditions. Experiments were performed in a 1 atm vertical drop quench furnace, with starting materials corresponding to a glass of 1 bar An-Di euctectic composition doped with ˜ 4,000 ppm reference Ge standard, and pure Ni capsules as the metal phase. The assembly was heated at 1355°C for t =2 to 60 hrs over a range of fO2 from 4 log units below, to 2.5 log units above, the IW buffer. Metal and silicate phases were then mechanically separated. For isotopic measurements, the metal phase of these experiments and the selected iron meteorites were dissolved in high-purity dilute nitric acid. Chemical purification of Ge, and isotopic measurements using the Isoprobe MC-ICPMS follow Luais (2007). Germanium isotopic measurements of Fe-meteorites show that δ74Ge of magmatic irons are constant (δ74Ge=+1.77±0.22‰, 2σ), but heavier than non-magmatic irons (IAB : +1.15±0.2‰; IIE : -0.27 to +1.40±0.2‰). Time series experiments at the IW buffer show that there is a clear continuous increase in δ 74Ge in the metal as a function of time

  4. Emission detectors

    CERN Document Server

    Bolozdynya, Alexander I

    2010-01-01

    After decades of research and development, emission detectors have recently become the most successful instrumentation used in modern fundamental experiments searching for cold dark matter, and are also considered for neutrino coherent scattering and magnetic momentum neutrino measurement. This book is the first monograph exclusively dedicated to emission detectors. Properties of two-phase working media based on noble gases, saturated hydrocarbon, ion crystals and semiconductors are reviewed.

  5. Detectors course

    CERN Multimedia

    CERN. Geneva HR-RFA

    2006-01-01

    This lecture series on detectors, will give a general, although somewhat compressed, introduction to particle interaction with matter and magnetic fields. Tracking detectors and calorimeters will also be covered as well as particle identification systems. The lectures will start out with a short review of particle interaction with fields and then we will discuss particle detection. At the end some common composite detection systems will be described.

  6. Inelasticity and precipitation of germanium from a solid solution in Al-Ge binary alloys

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kardashev, B. K.; Korchunov, B. N.; Nikanorov, S. P.; Osipov, V. N.

    2015-08-01

    The influence of precipitation of germanium atoms in a solid solution on the dependence of the inelasticity characteristics on the germanium content in aluminum-germanium alloys prepared by directional crystallization has been studied. It has been shown that the Young's modulus defect, the amplitude-dependent decrement, and the microplastic flow stress at a specified cyclic strain amplitude have extreme values at the eutectic germanium content in the alloy. The eutectic composition of the alloy undergoes a ductilebrittle transition. It has been found that there is a correlation between the dependences of the Young's modulus defect, amplitude-dependent decrement, microplastic flow stress, and specific entropy of the exothermal process of germanium precipitation on the germanium content in the hypoeutectic alloy. The concentration dependences of the inelasticity characteristics and their changes after annealing have been explained by the change in the resistance to the motion of intragrain dislocations due to different structures of the Guinier-Preston zones formed during the precipitation of germanium atoms.

  7. Germanium CMOS potential from material and process perspectives: Be more positive about germanium

    Science.gov (United States)

    Toriumi, Akira; Nishimura, Tomonori

    2018-01-01

    CMOS miniaturization is now approaching the sub-10 nm level, and further downscaling is expected. This size scaling will end sooner or later, however, because the typical size is approaching the atomic distance level in crystalline Si. In addition, it is said that electron transport in FETs is ballistic or nearly ballistic, which means that the injection velocity at the virtual source is a physical parameter relevant for estimating the driving current. Channel-materials with higher carrier mobility than Si are nonetheless needed, and the carrier mobility in the channels is a parameter important with regard to increasing the injection velocity. Although the density of states in the channel has not been discussed often, it too is relevant for estimating the channel current. Both the mobility and the density of states are in principle related to the effective mass of the carrier. From this device physics viewpoint, we expect germanium (Ge) CMOS to be promising for scaling beyond the Si CMOS limit because the bulk mobility values of electrons and holes in Ge are much higher than those of electrons and holes in Si, and the electron effective mass in Ge is not much less than that in III–V compounds. There is a debate that Ge should be used for p-MOSFETs and III–V compounds for n-MOSFETs, but considering that the variability or nonuniformity of the FET performance in today’s CMOS LSIs is a big challenge, it seems that much more attention should be paid to the simplicity of the material design and of the processing steps. Nevertheless, Ge faces a number of challenges even in case that only the FET level is concerned. One of the big problems with Ge CMOS technology has been its poor performance in n-MOSFETs. While the hole mobility in p-FETs has been improved, the electron mobility in the inversion layer of Ge FETs remains a serious concern. If this is due to the inherent properties of Ge, only p-MOSFETs might be used for device applications. To make Ge CMOS devices

  8. Determining dose rate with a semiconductor detector - Monte Carlo calculations of the detector response

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nordenfors, C

    1999-02-01

    To determine dose rate in a gamma radiation field, based on measurements with a semiconductor detector, it is necessary to know how the detector effects the field. This work aims to describe this effect with Monte Carlo simulations and calculations, that is to identify the detector response function. This is done for a germanium gamma detector. The detector is normally used in the in-situ measurements that is carried out regularly at the department. After the response function is determined it is used to reconstruct a spectrum from an in-situ measurement, a so called unfolding. This is done to be able to calculate fluence rate and dose rate directly from a measured (and unfolded) spectrum. The Monte Carlo code used in this work is EGS4 developed mainly at Stanford Linear Accelerator Center. It is a widely used code package to simulate particle transport. The results of this work indicates that the method could be used as-is since the accuracy of this method compares to other methods already in use to measure dose rate. Bearing in mind that this method provides the nuclide specific dose it is useful, in radiation protection, since knowing what the relations between different nuclides are and how they change is very important when estimating the risks

  9. Synthesis and characterization of germanium nanoparticles for flexible thin-film photovoltaics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chiu, Hsiang Wei (Ivy)

    Photovoltaic cells based on low-cost polycrystalline and nanocrystalline materials are of great interest for both scientific and industrial purposes because of their intriguing properties found in semiconductor nanoparticles as well as the need to make high-energy conversion photovoltaics. The main theme of this dissertation is the synthesis of such nanoparticles of elemental germanium. Butyl-capped crystalline germanium nanoparticles were synthesized at room temperature in dimethoxymethane via the reduction of germanium tetrachloride with sodium naphthalide and the subsequent reaction with n-butyl Grignard. The nanoparticles were isolated in hexane and characterized by transmission electron microscopy, selected area electron diffraction, energy-dispersive X-ray spectroscopy, elemental analysis, X-ray powder diffraction, ultraviolet-visible spectroscopy, and photoluminescence spectroscopy. When heated under vacuum between 300--550°C, the as prepared nanoparticles become amorphous and grow in size. At 561°C, a phase change is observed which is associated with the change from the amorphous to crystalline. Numerous exothermic peaks were found in between 900--950°C under thermogravimetric analysis. Detailed studies of this reduction synthesis have been performed to optimize the synthetic route. The germanium nanoparticle nucleation is influenced by variations of reductant, concentration, temperature, and synthesis. Results indicate that the reduction route of germanium nanoparticles follows similar kinetics at room temperature, as does the related II-VI nanoparticle synthetic route. The reduction route was also found to produce a polymeric side product that can be removed at 300°C under vacuum. Under an in-situ heating experiment, this germanium containing polymer acts as a germanium source for the formation of small germanium nanoparticles at temperatures above 300°C. At temperatures above 400°C the polymer further acts to build germanium films. The metathesis

  10. A massive thermal detector for alpha and gamma spectroscopy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Alessandrello, A.; Brofferio, C.; Cremonesi, O.; Fiorini, E. E-mail: ettore.fiorini@mi.infn.it; Giuliani, A.; Nucciotti, A.; Pavan, M.; Pirro, S.; Pessina, G.; Parmeggiano, S.; Previtali, E.; Vanzini, M.; Zanotti, L.; Coccia, E.; Fafone, V.; Bucci, C.; Rotilio, A

    2000-02-01

    A massive bolometer with a 760 g TeO{sub 2} crystal as energy absorber, the largest employed underground, has been realized and operated in the Gran Sasso Underground Laboratory for {gamma}- and {alpha}-ray spectroscopy. A new system of mechanical suspensions was implemented to reduce vibration and thermal noise, and special care was put to the read-out electronics. As a consequence the FWHM resolution for high-energy {gamma}-rays became comparable to that of Germanium diodes. The 4.2 keV average FWHM resolution for the 5407 keV line is the best ever obtained for {alpha} particles with any type of detector.

  11. A massive thermal detector for alpha and gamma spectroscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alessandrello, A.; Brofferio, C.; Cremonesi, O.; Fiorini, E.; Giuliani, A.; Nucciotti, A.; Pavan, M.; Pirro, S.; Pessina, G.; Parmeggiano, S.; Previtali, E.; Vanzini, M.; Zanotti, L.; Coccia, E.; Fafone, V.; Bucci, C.; Rotilio, A.

    2000-02-01

    A massive bolometer with a 760 g TeO 2 crystal as energy absorber, the largest employed underground, has been realized and operated in the Gran Sasso Underground Laboratory for γ- and α-ray spectroscopy. A new system of mechanical suspensions was implemented to reduce vibration and thermal noise, and special care was put to the read-out electronics. As a consequence the FWHM resolution for high-energy γ-rays became comparable to that of Germanium diodes. The 4.2 keV average FWHM resolution for the 5407 keV line is the best ever obtained for α particles with any type of detector.

  12. Pixel detectors

    CERN Document Server

    Passmore, M S

    2001-01-01

    positions on the detector. The loss of secondary electrons follows the profile of the detector and increases with higher energy ions. studies of the spatial resolution predict a value of 5.3 lp/mm. The image noise in photon counting systems is investigated theoretically and experimentally and is shown to be given by Poisson statistics. The rate capability of the LAD1 was measured to be 250 kHz per pixel. Theoretical and experimental studies of the difference in contrast for ideal charge integrating and photon counting imaging systems were carried out. It is shown that the contrast differs and that for the conventional definition (contrast = (background - signal)/background) the photon counting device will, in some cases, always give a better contrast than the integrating system. Simulations in MEDICI are combined with analytical calculations to investigate charge collection efficiencies (CCE) in semiconductor detectors. Different pixel sizes and biasing conditions are considered. The results show charge shari...

  13. Oxygen-related point defects in silicon and germanium

    CERN Document Server

    Coutinho, J P A

    2001-01-01

    A modelling study of several oxygen related defects in silicon and germanium crystals is reported. These include radiation and thermally activated defects. The problem of thermal donor formation is revised in detail. Here we report the properties of the simple interstitial oxygen complexes, their diffusivity and clustering properties, culminating with a novel model for the thermal double donor defects (TDD). The model is also extended to the hydrogen-related shallow thermal donor family, STD(H). According to the model, electrons from over-coordinated oxygen atoms with a donor level lying above that of a stress-induced state, are transfered to the later. This picture is analogous to that of an externally doped quantum-dot.

  14. A pseudo-single-crystalline germanium film for flexible electronics

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Higashi, H.; Yamada, S.; Kanashima, T.; Hamaya, K., E-mail: hamaya@ee.es.osaka-u.ac.jp [Graduate School of Engineering Science, Osaka University, Toyonaka, Osaka 560-8531 (Japan); Kasahara, K.; Park, J.-H.; Miyao, M. [Department of Electronics, Kyushu University, 744 Motooka, Fukuoka 819-0395 (Japan); Kudo, K.; Okamoto, H.; Moto, K.; Tsunoda, I. [Kumamoto National College of Technology, 2659-2 Suya, Koshi, Kumamoto 861-1102 (Japan)

    2015-01-26

    We demonstrate large-area (∼600 μm), (111)-oriented, and high-crystallinity, i.e., pseudo-single-crystalline, germanium (Ge) films at 275 °C, where the temperature is lower than the softening temperature of a flexible substrate. A modulated gold-induced layer exchange crystallization method with an atomic-layer deposited Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} barrier and amorphous-Ge/Au multilayers is established. From the Raman measurements, we can judge that the crystallinity of the obtained Ge films is higher than those grown by aluminum-induced-crystallization methods. Even on a flexible substrate, the pseudo-single-crystalline Ge films for the circuit with thin-film transistor arrays can be achieved, leading to high-performance flexible electronics based on an inorganic-semiconductor channel.

  15. Structure and electron-ion correlation of liquid germanium

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kawakita, Y. [Faculty of Sciences, Kyushu University, 4-2-1 Ropponmatsu, Fukuoka 810-8560 (Japan)]. E-mail: kawakita@rc.kyushu-u.ac.jp; Fujita, S. [Graduate School of Sciences, Kyushu University, 4-2-1 Ropponmatsu, Fukuoka 810-8560 (Japan); Kohara, S. [Japan Synchrotron Radiation Research Institute, 1-1-1 Kouto Mikazuki-cho, Hyogo 679-5198 (Japan); Ohshima, K. [Graduate School of Sciences, Kyushu University, 4-2-1 Ropponmatsu, Fukuoka 810-8560 (Japan); Fujii, H. [Graduate School of Sciences, Kyushu University, 4-2-1 Ropponmatsu, Fukuoka 810-8560 (Japan); Yokota, Y. [Graduate School of Sciences, Kyushu University, 4-2-1 Ropponmatsu, Fukuoka 810-8560 (Japan); Takeda, S. [Faculty of Sciences, Kyushu University, 4-2-1 Ropponmatsu, Fukuoka 810-8560 (Japan)

    2005-08-15

    Structure factor of liquid germanium (Ge) has a shoulder at {theta} = 3.2 A{sup -1} in the high-momentum-transfer region of the first peak. To investigate the origin of such a non-simplicity in the structure, high energy X-ray diffraction measurements have been performed using 113.26 keV incident X-ray, at BL04B2 beamline of SPring-8. By a combination of the obtained structure factor with the reported neutron diffraction data, charge density function and electron-ion partial structure factor have been deduced. The peak position of the charge distribution is located at about 1 A, rather smaller r value than the half value of nearest neighbor distance ({approx}2.7 A), which suggests that valence electrons of liquid Ge play a role of screening electrons around a metallic ion rather than covalently bonding electrons.

  16. A Low Noise 64x64 Germanium Array for Far IR Astronomy Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — We propose to investigate the feasibility of developing a 64x64 far infrared germanium focal-plane array with the following key design features: 1- Four...

  17. Single-crystal germanium layers grown on silicon by nanowire seeding.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hu, Shu; Leu, Paul W; Marshall, Ann F; McIntyre, Paul C

    2009-10-01

    Three-dimensional integration and the combination of different material systems are central themes of electronics research. Recently, as-grown vertical one-dimensional structures have been integrated into high-density three-dimensional circuits. However, little attention has been paid to the unique structural properties of germanium nanowires obtained by epitaxial and heteroepitaxial growth on Ge(111) and Si(111) substrates, despite the fact that the integration of germanium on silicon is attractive for device applications. Here, we demonstrate the lateral growth of single crystal germanium islands tens of micrometres in diameter by seeding from germanium nanowires grown on a silicon substrate. Vertically aligned high-aspect-ratio nanowires can transfer the orientation and perfection of the substrate crystal to overlying layers a micrometre or more above the substrate surface. This technique can be repeated to build multiple active device layers, a key requirement for the fabrication of densely interconnected three-dimensional integrated circuits.

  18. Thermal recrystallization of physical vapor deposition based germanium thin films on bulk silicon (100)

    KAUST Repository

    Hussain, Aftab M.

    2013-08-16

    We demonstrate a simple, low-cost, and scalable process for obtaining uniform, smooth surfaced, high quality mono-crystalline germanium (100) thin films on silicon (100). The germanium thin films were deposited on a silicon substrate using plasma-assisted sputtering based physical vapor deposition. They were crystallized by annealing at various temperatures ranging from 700 °C to 1100 °C. We report that the best quality germanium thin films are obtained above the melting point of germanium (937 °C), thus offering a method for in-situ Czochralski process. We show well-behaved high-κ /metal gate metal-oxide-semiconductor capacitors (MOSCAPs) using this film. © 2013 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  19. High-frequency electromagnetic radiation of germanium crystals in magnetic fields

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    G.V. Milenin

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available The cyclotron radiation of plasma of thermal carriers of germanium crystals, which is not in the state of thermodynamic equilibrium with semiconductor, has been experimentally confirmed.

  20. An actively vetoed Clover gamma-detector for nuclear astrophysics at LUNA

    CERN Document Server

    Szucs, T; Broggini, C; Caciolli, A; Confortola, F; Corvisiero, P; Elekes, Z; Formicola, A; Fulop, Zs; Gervino, G; Guglielmetti, A; Gustavino, C; Gyurky, Gy; Imbriani, G; Junker, M; Lemut, A; Marta, M; Mazzocchi, C; Menegazzo, R; Prati, P; Roca, V; Rolfs, C; Alvarez, C Rossi; Somorjai, E; Straniero, O; Strieder, F; Terrasi, F; Trautvetter, H P

    2010-01-01

    An escape-suppressed, composite high-purity germanium detector of the Clover type has been installed at the Laboratory for Underground Nuclear Astrophysics (LUNA) facility, deep underground in the Gran Sasso Laboratory, Italy. The laboratory gamma-ray background of the Clover detector has been studied underground at LUNA and, for comparison, also in an overground laboratory. Spectra have been recorded both for the single segments and for the virtual detector formed by online addition of all four segments. The effect of the escape-suppression shield has been studied as well. Despite their generally higher intrinsic background, escape-suppressed detectors are found to be well suited for underground nuclear astrophysics studies. As an example for the advantage of using a composite detector deep underground, the weak ground state branching of the Ep = 223 keV resonance in the 24Mg(p,gamma)25Al reaction is determined with improved precision.

  1. Pulse Rise Time Characterization of a High Pressure Xenon Gamma Detector for use in Resolution Enhancement

    CERN Document Server

    Troyer, G L

    2000-01-01

    High pressure xenon ionization chamber detectors are possible alternatives to traditional thallium doped sodium iodide (NaI(Tl)) and hyperpure germanium as gamma spectrometers in certain applications. Xenon detectors incorporating a Frisch grid exhibit energy resolutions comparable to cadmium/zinc/telluride (CZT) (e.g. 2% (at) 662keV) but with far greater sensitive volumes. The Frisch grid reduces the position dependence of the anode pulse risetimes, but it also increases the detector vibration sensitivity, anode capacitance, voltage requirements and mechanical complexity. We have been investigating the possibility of eliminating the grid electrode in high-pressure xenon detectors and preserving the high energy resolution using electronic risetime compensation methods. A two-electrode cylindrical high pressure xenon gamma detector coupled to time-to-amplitude conversion electronics was used to characterize the pulse rise time of deposited gamma photons. Time discrimination was used to characterize the pulse r...

  2. Pixel Detectors

    CERN Document Server

    Wermes, Norbert

    2005-01-01

    Pixel detectors for precise particle tracking in high energy physics have been developed to a level of maturity during the past decade. Three of the LHC detectors will use vertex detectors close to the interaction point based on the hybrid pixel technology which can be considered the state of the art in this field of instrumentation. A development period of almost 10 years has resulted in pixel detector modules which can stand the extreme rate and timing requirements as well as the very harsh radiation environment at the LHC without severe compromises in performance. From these developments a number of different applications have spun off, most notably for biomedical imaging. Beyond hybrid pixels, a number of monolithic or semi-monolithic developments, which do not require complicated hybridization but come as single sensor/IC entities, have appeared and are currently developed to greater maturity. Most advanced in terms of maturity are so called CMOS active pixels and DEPFET pixels. The present state in the ...

  3. The Primary and Secondary Production of Germanium: A Life-Cycle Assessment of Different Process Alternatives

    Science.gov (United States)

    Robertz, Benedicte; Verhelle, Jensen; Schurmans, Maarten

    2015-02-01

    Germanium is a semiconducting metalloid element used in optical fibers, catalysis, infrared optics, solar cells, and light-emitting diodes. The need for Ge in these markets is considered to increase by a steady ~1% on a yearly basis. Its economic importance, coupled with the identified supply risks, has led to the classification of germanium as a critical raw material within Europe. Since the early 1950s, Umicore Electro-Optic Materials has supplied germanium-based materials solutions to its markets around the world. Umicore extracts germanium from a wide range of refining and recycling feeds. The main objectives of this study were to quantify the potential environmental impacts of the production of germanium from production scraps from the photovoltaic industry and to compare them with the potential impacts of the primary production of germanium from coal. The data related to the secondary production are Umicore-specific data. Environmental impact scores have been calculated for the impact categories recommended by the International reference life cycle data system. The comparison of the primary and secondary production highlights the benefit linked to the recycling of metals.

  4. Optical properties of Germanium nanoparticles synthesized by pulsed laser ablation in acetone

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Saikiran eVadavalli

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available Germanium (Ge nanoparticles (NPs are synthesized by means of pulsed laser ablation of bulk germanium target immersed in acetone with ns laser pulses at different pulse energies. The fabricated NPs are characterized by employing different techniques such as UV-visible absorption spectroscopy, photoluminescence, micro-Raman spectroscopy, transmission electron microscopy (TEM and field emission scanning electron microscopy (FESEM. The mean size of the Ge NPs is found to vary from few nm to 40 nm with the increase in laser pulse energy. Shift in the position of the absorption spectra is observed and also the photoluminescence peak shift is observed due to quantum confinement effects. High resolution TEM combined with micro-Raman spectroscopy confirms the crystalline nature of the generated germanium nanoparticles. The formation of various sizes of germanium NPs at different laser pulse energies is evident from the asymmetry in the Raman spectra and the shift in its peak position towards the lower wavenumber side. The FESEM micrographs confirm the formation of germanium micro/nanostructures at the laser ablated position of the bulk germanium. In particular, the measured NP sizes from the micro-Raman phonon quantum confinement model are found in good agreement with TEM measurements of Ge NPs.

  5. Neutron detector

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stephan, Andrew C [Knoxville, TN; Jardret,; Vincent, D [Powell, TN

    2011-04-05

    A neutron detector has a volume of neutron moderating material and a plurality of individual neutron sensing elements dispersed at selected locations throughout the moderator, and particularly arranged so that some of the detecting elements are closer to the surface of the moderator assembly and others are more deeply embedded. The arrangement captures some thermalized neutrons that might otherwise be scattered away from a single, centrally located detector element. Different geometrical arrangements may be used while preserving its fundamental characteristics. Different types of neutron sensing elements may be used, which may operate on any of a number of physical principles to perform the function of sensing a neutron, either by a capture or a scattering reaction, and converting that reaction to a detectable signal. High detection efficiency, an ability to acquire spectral information, and directional sensitivity may be obtained.

  6. Relative efficiency calculation of a HPGe detector using MCNPX code

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Medeiros, Marcos P.C.; Rebello, Wilson F., E-mail: eng.cavaliere@ime.eb.br, E-mail: rebello@ime.eb.br [Instituto Militar de Engenharia (IME), Rio de Janeiro, RJ (Brazil). Secao de Engenharia Nuclear; Lopes, Jose M.; Silva, Ademir X., E-mail: marqueslopez@yahoo.com.br, E-mail: ademir@nuclear.ufrj.br [Coordenacao dos Programas de Pos-Graduacao em Engenharia (COPPE/UFRJ), Rio de Janeiro, RJ (Brazil). Programa de Engenharia Nuclear

    2015-07-01

    High-purity germanium detectors (HPGe) are mandatory tools for spectrometry because of their excellent energy resolution. The efficiency of such detectors, quoted in the list of specifications by the manufacturer, frequently refers to the relative full-energy peak efficiency, related to the absolute full-energy peak efficiency of a 7.6 cm x 7.6 cm (diameter x height) NaI(Tl) crystal, based on the 1.33 MeV peak of a {sup 60}Co source positioned 25 cm from the detector. In this study, we used MCNPX code to simulate a HPGe detector (Canberra GC3020), from Real-Time Neutrongraphy Laboratory of UFRJ, to survey the spectrum of a {sup 60}Co source located 25 cm from the detector in order to calculate and confirm the efficiency declared by the manufacturer. Agreement between experimental and simulated data was achieved. The model under development will be used for calculating and comparison purposes with the detector calibration curve from software Genie2000™, also serving as a reference for future studies. (author)

  7. The influence of anisotropic electron drift velocity on the signal shapes of closed-end HPGe detectors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mihailescu, L. E-mail: l.mihailescu@fz-juelich.de; Gast, W.; Lieder, R.M.; Brands, H.; Jaeger, H

    2000-06-11

    This study is concerned with the anisotropy of the electron drift velocity in germanium crystals at high electric fields and low temperature, and its influence on the charge collection process in n-type, high-purity germanium (HPGe) detectors of closed-end, coaxial geometry. The electron trajectories inside HPGe detectors are simulated using a phenomenological model to calculate the dependence of the drift velocity on the angle between the electric field and the crystal orientation. The resulting induced currents and pulse shapes for a given detector geometry and preamplifier bandwidth are compared to experiment. Experimentally, the dependence of the pulse shapes on the conductivity anisotropy in closed-end HPGe detectors was observed. The experimental data on pulse shapes were obtained by sampling preamplifier signals of an encapsulated, hexaconical EUROBALL detector, which was irradiated by collimated {sup 22}Na and {sup 241}Am sources. The crystal orientation was measured by neutron reflection. Qualitative agreement between the simulated and experimental pulse shapes was found. A variation in the charge collection time of up to 50 ns was observed for different drift directions of the carriers relative to the crystal orientation. Furthermore, a deflection of the trajectories from a straight radial drift direction of about 20 deg. was predicted by the simulations. These two main effects of charge carrier drift velocity anisotropy in coaxial Ge detectors are expected to play an important role in the development of {gamma}-ray tracking detectors.

  8. Simulation and verification of the cosmogenic background at the shallow depth GIOVE detector

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hakenmüller, J.; Maneschg, W.; Heusser, G.

    2016-05-01

    The GIOVE (Germanium Inner Outer VEto) detector setup is a low level Germanium spectrometer for material screening with elaborated shield located at the shallow depth underground laboratory of the Max-Planck-Institut für Kernphysik in Heidelberg. It is equipped with a double active muon veto with a total muon rejection efficiency of ~99% and there are also passive layers to moderate and capture neutrons. With this setup an integral count rate is achieved comparable to detectors far deeper underground. The detector and shield geometry has been implemented into a Monte Carlo simulation, using the simulation framework MaGe based on Geant4. The Monte Carlo simulation is employed to determine sample efficiencies for γ ray screening measurements as well as to reproduce the remaining detector background from cosmic ray muon-induced secondaries. In terms of the background modeling of the unvetoed γ ray spectrum an excellent agreement better than 10% in the integral count rate in (40, 2700) keV as well as for the 511 keV line has been found. However, concerning the expected number of neutrons at the diode, the simulation outcome lays 40-80% below the measurement results. Being able to reproduce the detector background in the simulation, the simulation can be used to further optimize the shield design.

  9. Germanium Compounds Containing Ge═E Double Bonds (E = S, Se, Te) as Single-Source Precursors for Germanium Chalcogenide Materials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Hyo-Suk; Jung, Eun Ae; Han, Seong Ho; Han, Jeong Hwan; Park, Bo Keun; Kim, Chang Gyoun; Chung, Taek-Mo

    2017-04-03

    New germanium chalcogenide precursors, S═Ge(dmamp)2 (3), S═Ge(dmampS)2 (4), Se═Ge(dmamp)2 (5), Se═Ge(dmampS)2 (6), Te═Ge(dmamp)2 (7), and Te═Ge(dmampS)2 (8), were synthesized from Ge(dmamp)2 (1) and Ge(dmampS)2 (2) using sulfur, selenium, and tellurium powders (dmamp = 1-dimethylamino-2-methyl-2-propanolate, dmampS = 1-dimethylamino-2-methylpropane-2-thiolate). Complexes 1 and 2 were synthesized from metathesis reactions of GeCl2·dioxane with 2 equiv of aminoalkoxide or aminothiolate ligands. Thermogravimetric analysis of complex 1 displayed good thermal stability and volatility. The molecular structures of complexes 2-8 from X-ray single crystallography showed distorted trigonal bipyramidal geometry at the germanium centers. Germanium chalcogenide materials (GeSe and GeTe) were obtained from the thermal decomposition of complexes 5, 6, and 8 in hexadecane. X-ray diffraction patterns exhibited that GeSe and GeTe had orthorhombic and rhombohedral phases, respectively. This study affords a facile method to easily prepare germanium chalcogenide materials using well-designed and stable complexes by thermal decomposition of single-source precursors in solution.

  10. a Silicon Germanium Graded Junctionless Transistor with Low off Current

    Science.gov (United States)

    Surana, Neelam; Ghosh, Bahniman; Tripathy, Ball Mukund Mani; Salimath, Akshay Kumar

    2013-02-01

    We propose a Ge/Si graded junctionless transistor (JLT) which helps to reduce the band-to-band tunneling current in off-state for highly doped double gate junctionless transistor (DGJLT). In this paper, we show that there is large band-to-band tunneling (BTBT) current in off-state of silicon-channel and germanium-channel DGJLT, which causes increase in the off-state leakage current by several orders. With the help of band-gap engineering, we found that by using Ge/Si graded channel DGJLT off-state band-to-band tunneling current can be reduced. It is also observed that there is large deviation in the off-state leakage current with variation of drain voltage for Si and Ge body DGJLT, which reduces device stability. It is found that in Ge/Si graded DGJLT variation off-state leakage current with drain voltage is controlled. In Si and Ge, DGJLT electrons from the valence band of the channel tunnel to the conduction band of drain leaves holes which causes increased hole concentration in the channel creating parasitic 'BJT'.

  11. Thermal stability of simple tetragonal and hexagonal diamond germanium

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huston, L. Q.; Johnson, B. C.; Haberl, B.; Wong, S.; Williams, J. S.; Bradby, J. E.

    2017-11-01

    Exotic phases of germanium, that form under high pressure but persist under ambient conditions, are of technological interest due to their unique optical and electrical properties. The thermal evolution and stability of two of these exotic Ge phases, the simple tetragonal (st12) and hexagonal diamond (hd) phases, are investigated in detail. These metastable phases, formed by high pressure decompression in either a diamond anvil cell or by nanoindentation, are annealed at temperatures ranging from 280 to 320 °C for st12-Ge and 200 to 550 °C for hd-Ge. In both cases, the exotic phases originated from entirely pure Ge precursor materials. Raman microspectroscopy is used to monitor the phase changes ex situ following annealing. Our results show that hd-Ge synthesized via a pure form of a-Ge first undergoes a subtle change in structure and then an irreversible phase transformation to dc-Ge with an activation energy of (4.3 ± 0.2) eV at higher temperatures. St12-Ge was found to transform to dc-Ge with an activation energy of (1.44 ± 0.08) eV. Taken together with results from previous studies, this study allows for intriguing comparisons with silicon and suggests promising technological applications.

  12. Laser-initiated explosive electron emission from flat germanium crystals

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Porshyn, V., E-mail: porshyn@uni-wuppertal.de; Mingels, S.; Lützenkirchen-Hecht, D.; Müller, G. [Faculty of Mathematics and Natural Sciences, Physics Department, University of Wuppertal, Wuppertal 42119 (Germany)

    2016-07-28

    Flat Sb-doped germanium (100) crystals were investigated in the triode configuration under pulsed tunable laser illumination (pulse duration t{sub laser} = 3.5 ns and photon energy hν = 0.54–5.90 eV) and under DC voltages <10{sup 4} V. Large bunch charges up to ∼1 μC were extracted from the cathodes for laser pulses >1 MW/cm{sup 2} corresponding to a high quantum efficiency up to 3.3% and cathode currents up to 417 A. This laser-induced explosive electron emission (EEE) from Ge was characterized by its voltage-, laser power- and hν-sensitivity. The analysis of the macroscopic surface damage caused by the EEE is included as well. Moreover, we have carried out first direct measurements of electron energy distributions produced during the EEE from the Ge samples. The measured electron spectra hint for electron excitations to the vacuum level of the bulk and emission from the plasma plume with an average kinetic energy of ∼0.8 eV.

  13. Germanium Based Field-Effect Transistors: Challenges and Opportunities

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Patrick S. Goley

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available The performance of strained silicon (Si as the channel material for today’s metal-oxide-semiconductor field-effect transistors may be reaching a plateau. New channel materials with high carrier mobility are being investigated as alternatives and have the potential to unlock an era of ultra-low-power and high-speed microelectronic devices. Chief among these new materials is germanium (Ge. This work reviews the two major remaining challenges that Ge based devices must overcome if they are to replace Si as the channel material, namely, heterogeneous integration of Ge on Si substrates, and developing a suitable gate stack. Next, Ge is compared to compound III-V materials in terms of p-channel device performance to review how it became the first choice for PMOS devices. Different Ge device architectures, including surface channel and quantum well configurations, are reviewed. Finally, state-of-the-art Ge device results and future prospects are also discussed.

  14. Defect density characterization of detached-grown germanium crystals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schweizer, M.; Cobb, S. D.; Volz, M. P.; Szoke, J.; Szofran, F. R.

    2002-02-01

    Several (1 1 1)-oriented, Ga-doped germanium crystals were grown in pyrolytic boron nitride (pBN) containers by the Bridgman and the detached Bridgman growth techniques. Growth experiments in closed-bottom pBN containers resulted in nearly completely detached-grown crystals, because the gas pressure below the melt can build up to a higher pressure than above the melt. With open-bottom tubes the gas pressure above and below the melt is balanced during the experiment, and thus no additional force supports the detachment. In this case the crystals grew attached to the wall. Etch pit density (EPD) measurements along the axial growth direction indicated a strong improvement of the crystal quality of the detached-grown samples compared to the attached samples. Starting in the seed with an EPD of 6-8×10 3 cm -2 it decreased in the detached-grown crystals continuously to about 200-500 cm -2. No significant radial difference between the EPD on the edge and the middle of these crystals exists. In the attached grown samples the EPD increases up to a value of about 2-4×10 4 cm -2 (near the edge) and up to 1×10 4 cm -2 in the middle of the sample. Thus the difference between the detached- and the attached-grown crystals with respect to the EPD is approximately two orders of magnitude.

  15. Isotopic germanium targets for high beam current applications at GAMMASPHERE.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Greene, J. P.; Lauritsen, T.

    2000-11-29

    The creation of a specific heavy ion residue via heavy ion fusion can usually be achieved through a number of beam and target combinations. Sometimes it is necessary to choose combinations with rare beams and/or difficult targets in order to achieve the physics goals of an experiment. A case in point was a recent experiment to produce {sup 152}Dy at very high spins and low excitation energy with detection of the residue in a recoil mass analyzer. Both to create the nucleus cold and with a small recoil-cone so that the efficiency of the mass analyzer would be high, it was necessary to use the {sup 80}Se on {sup 76}Ge reaction rather than the standard {sup 48}Ca on {sup 108}Pd reaction. Because the recoil velocity of the {sup 152}Dy residues was very high using this symmetric reaction (5% v/c), it was furthermore necessary to use a stack of two thin targets to reduce the Doppler broadening. Germanium targets are fragile and do not withstand high beam currents, therefore the {sup 76}Ge target stacks were mounted on a rotating target wheel. A description of the {sup 76}Ge target stack preparation will be presented and the target performance described.

  16. Etching of germanium-tin using ammonia peroxide mixture

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dong, Yuan; Ong, Bin Leong; Wang, Wei; Gong, Xiao; Liang, Gengchiau; Yeo, Yee-Chia, E-mail: yeo@ieee.org [Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering, National University of Singapore, Singapore 117576 (Singapore); Zhang, Zheng; Pan, Jisheng [Institute of Material Research and Engineering, A*STAR (Agency for Science, Technology and Research), 2 Fusionopolis Way, #08-03, Innovis, Singapore 138634 (Singapore); Tok, Eng-Soon [Department of Physics, National University of Singapore, Singapore 117551 (Singapore)

    2015-12-28

    The wet etching of germanium-tin (Ge{sub 1-x}Sn{sub x}) alloys (4.2% < x < 16.0%) in ammonia peroxide mixture (APM) is investigated. Empirical fitting of the data points indicates that the etch depth of Ge{sub 1-x}Sn{sub x} is proportional to the square root of the etch time t and decreases exponentially with increasing x for a given t. In addition, X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy results show that increasing t increases the intensity of the Sn oxide peak, whereas no obvious change is observed for the Ge oxide peak. This indicates that an accumulation of Sn oxide on the Ge{sub 1-x}Sn{sub x} surface decreases the amount of Ge atoms exposed to the etchant, which accounts for the decrease in etch rate with increasing etch time. Atomic force microscopy was used to examine the surface morphologies of the Ge{sub 0.918}Sn{sub 0.082} samples. Both root-mean-square roughness and undulation periods of the Ge{sub 1-x}Sn{sub x} surface were observed to increase with increasing t. This work provides further understanding of the wet etching of Ge{sub 1-x}Sn{sub x} using APM and may be used for the fabrication of Ge{sub 1-x}Sn{sub x}-based electronic and photonic devices.

  17. Inverting polar domains via electrical pulsing in metallic germanium telluride

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nukala, Pavan; Ren, Mingliang; Agarwal, Rahul; Berger, Jacob; Liu, Gerui; Johnson, A. T. Charlie; Agarwal, Ritesh

    2017-04-01

    Germanium telluride (GeTe) is both polar and metallic, an unusual combination of properties in any material system. The large concentration of free-carriers in GeTe precludes the coupling of external electric field with internal polarization, rendering it ineffective for conventional ferroelectric applications and polarization switching. Here we investigate alternate ways of coupling the polar domains in GeTe to external electrical stimuli through optical second harmonic generation polarimetry and in situ TEM electrical testing on single-crystalline GeTe nanowires. We show that anti-phase boundaries, created from current pulses (heat shocks), invert the polarization of selective domains resulting in reorganization of certain 71o domain boundaries into 109o boundaries. These boundaries subsequently interact and evolve with the partial dislocations, which migrate from domain to domain with the carrier-wind force (electrical current). This work suggests that current pulses and carrier-wind force could be external stimuli for domain engineering in ferroelectrics with significant current leakage.

  18. A gamma-Ray spectrometer system for low energy photons by coupling two detectors; Un sistema de espectrometria gamma de fotones de baja energia mediante acoplamiento de dos detectores

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Martinez, A.; Palomares, J.; Romero, L.; Travesi, A.

    1986-07-01

    This report describes the study performed to obtain a composite (sun uma) spectrum from a Low Energy Gamma Spectrometry System by coupling two planar Germanium detectors. This disposition allows to obtain a high counting efficiency for the total system. It shows the improvement achieved by the synthetic spectrum which is obtained by adding the two original spectra through the LULEPS code. This code corrects the differences (channel/energy) between both two spectra before performing the addition. (Author) 6 refs.

  19. Biallelic and Genome Wide Association Mapping of Germanium Tolerant Loci in Rice (Oryza sativa L.).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Talukdar, Partha; Douglas, Alex; Price, Adam H; Norton, Gareth J

    2015-01-01

    Rice plants accumulate high concentrations of silicon. Silicon has been shown to be involved in plant growth, high yield, and mitigating biotic and abiotic stresses. However, it has been demonstrated that inorganic arsenic is taken up by rice through silicon transporters under anaerobic conditions, thus the ability to efficiently take up silicon may be considered either a positive or a negative trait in rice. Germanium is an analogue of silicon that produces brown lesions in shoots and leaves, and germanium toxicity has been used to identify mutants in silicon and arsenic transport. In this study, two different genetic mapping methods were performed to determine the loci involved in germanium sensitivity in rice. Genetic mapping in the biparental cross of Bala × Azucena (an F6 population) and a genome wide association (GWA) study with 350 accessions from the Rice Diversity Panel 1 were conducted using 15 μM of germanic acid. This identified a number of germanium sensitive loci: some co-localised with previously identified quantitative trait loci (QTL) for tissue silicon or arsenic concentration, none co-localised with Lsi1 or Lsi6, while one single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) was detected within 200 kb of Lsi2 (these are genes known to transport silicon, whose identity was discovered using germanium toxicity). However, examining candidate genes that are within the genomic region of the loci detected above reveals genes homologous to both Lsi1 and Lsi2, as well as a number of other candidate genes, which are discussed.

  20. Biallelic and Genome Wide Association Mapping of Germanium Tolerant Loci in Rice (Oryza sativa L..

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Partha Talukdar

    Full Text Available Rice plants accumulate high concentrations of silicon. Silicon has been shown to be involved in plant growth, high yield, and mitigating biotic and abiotic stresses. However, it has been demonstrated that inorganic arsenic is taken up by rice through silicon transporters under anaerobic conditions, thus the ability to efficiently take up silicon may be considered either a positive or a negative trait in rice. Germanium is an analogue of silicon that produces brown lesions in shoots and leaves, and germanium toxicity has been used to identify mutants in silicon and arsenic transport. In this study, two different genetic mapping methods were performed to determine the loci involved in germanium sensitivity in rice. Genetic mapping in the biparental cross of Bala × Azucena (an F6 population and a genome wide association (GWA study with 350 accessions from the Rice Diversity Panel 1 were conducted using 15 μM of germanic acid. This identified a number of germanium sensitive loci: some co-localised with previously identified quantitative trait loci (QTL for tissue silicon or arsenic concentration, none co-localised with Lsi1 or Lsi6, while one single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP was detected within 200 kb of Lsi2 (these are genes known to transport silicon, whose identity was discovered using germanium toxicity. However, examining candidate genes that are within the genomic region of the loci detected above reveals genes homologous to both Lsi1 and Lsi2, as well as a number of other candidate genes, which are discussed.

  1. Analysis of MCNP simulated gamma spectra of CdTe detectors for boron neutron capture therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Winkler, Alexander; Koivunoro, Hanna; Savolainen, Sauli

    2017-06-01

    The next step in the boron neutron capture therapy (BNCT) is the real time imaging of the boron concentration in healthy and tumor tissue. Monte Carlo simulations are employed to predict the detector response required to realize single-photon emission computed tomography in BNCT, but have failed to correctly resemble measured data for cadmium telluride detectors. In this study we have tested the gamma production cross-section data tables of commonly used libraries in the Monte Carlo code MCNP in comparison to measurements. The cross section data table TENDL-2008-ACE is reproducing measured data best, whilst the commonly used ENDL92 and other studied libraries do not include correct tables for the gamma production from the cadmium neutron capture reaction that is occurring inside the detector. Furthermore, we have discussed the size of the annihilation peaks of spectra obtained by cadmium telluride and germanium detectors. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  2. A simulation study on the focal plane detector of the LAUE project

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khalil, M.; Frontera, F.; Caroli, E.; Virgilli, E.; Valsan, V.

    2015-06-01

    The LAUE project, supported by the Italian Space Agency (ASI), is devoted to the development of a long focal length (even 20 m or longer) Laue lens for gamma ray astronomy between 80 and 600 keV. These lenses take advantage of Bragg diffraction to focus radiation onto a small spot drastically improving the signal to noise ratio as well as reducing the required size of the detector significantly. In this paper we present a Monte-Carlo simulation study with MEGALIB to optimize, for space applications, the detector size to achieve high detection efficiency, and to optimize the position resolution of the detector to reconstruct the Point Spread Function of the lens considered for the LAUE project. Then we will show simulations, using the SILVACO semiconductor simulation toolkit, on the optimized detector to estimate its capacitance per channel and depletion voltage. In all of the simulations, two materials were compared; a low density material (Silicon) and a high density material (Germanium).

  3. Impurity diffusion, point defect engineering, and surface/interface passivation in germanium

    KAUST Repository

    Chroneos, Alexander I.

    2012-01-26

    In recent years germanium has been emerging as a mainstream material that could have important applications in the microelectronics industry. The principle aim of this study is to review investigations of the diffusion of technologically important p- and n-type dopants as well as surface and interface passivation issues in germanium. The diffusion of impurities in germanium is interrelated to the formation of clusters whenever possible, and possibilities for point defect engineering are discussed in view of recent results. The importance of electrically active defects on the Ge surface and interfaces is addressed considering strategies to suppress them and to passivate the surfaces/interfaces, bearing in mind their importance for advanced devices. © 2012 by WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  4. Elasticity, anelasticity, and microplasticity of directionally crystallized aluminum-germanium alloys

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kardashev, B. K.; Korchunov, B. N.; Nikanorov, S. P.; Osipov, V. N.; Fedorov, V. Yu.

    2014-07-01

    The structure, Young's modulus defect, and internal friction in aluminum-germanium alloys have been studied under conditions of longitudinal elastic vibrations with a strain amplitude in the range of 10-6-3 × 10-4 at frequencies about 100 kHz. The ribbon-shaped samples of the alloys with the germanium content from 35 to 64 wt % have been produced by drawing from the melt by the Stepanov method at a rate of 0.1 mm/s. It has been shown that the dependences of the Young's modulus defect, logarithmic decrement, and vibration stress amplitude on the germanium content in the alloy at a constant strain amplitude have an extremum at 53 wt % Ge. This composition corresponds to the eutectic composition. The dependences of the Young's modulus defect, the decrement, and vibration stress amplitude at a constant microstrain amplitude have been explained by the vibrational displacements of dislocations, which depend on the alloy structure.

  5. Low-threshold optically pumped lasing in highly strained germanium nanowires.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bao, Shuyu; Kim, Daeik; Onwukaeme, Chibuzo; Gupta, Shashank; Saraswat, Krishna; Lee, Kwang Hong; Kim, Yeji; Min, Dabin; Jung, Yongduck; Qiu, Haodong; Wang, Hong; Fitzgerald, Eugene A; Tan, Chuan Seng; Nam, Donguk

    2017-11-29

    The integration of efficient, miniaturized group IV lasers into CMOS architecture holds the key to the realization of fully functional photonic-integrated circuits. Despite several years of progress, however, all group IV lasers reported to date exhibit impractically high thresholds owing to their unfavourable bandstructures. Highly strained germanium with its fundamentally altered bandstructure has emerged as a potential low-threshold gain medium, but there has yet to be a successful demonstration of lasing from this seemingly promising material system. Here we demonstrate a low-threshold, compact group IV laser that employs a germanium nanowire under a 1.6% uniaxial tensile strain as the gain medium. The amplified material gain in strained germanium can sufficiently overcome optical losses at 83 K, thus allowing the observation of multimode lasing with an optical pumping threshold density of ~3.0 kW cm-2. Our demonstration opens new possibilities for group IV lasers for photonic-integrated circuits.

  6. Silicon-germanium (Sige) nanostructures production, properties and applications in electronics

    CERN Document Server

    Usami, N

    2011-01-01

    Nanostructured silicon-germanium (SiGe) provides the prospect of novel and enhanced electronic device performance. This book reviews the materials science and technology of SiGe nanostructures, including crystal growth, fabrication of nanostructures, material properties and applications in electronics.$bNanostructured silicon-germanium (SiGe) opens up the prospects of novel and enhanced electronic device performance, especially for semiconductor devices. Silicon-germanium (SiGe) nanostructures reviews the materials science of nanostructures and their properties and applications in different electronic devices. The introductory part one covers the structural properties of SiGe nanostructures, with a further chapter discussing electronic band structures of SiGe alloys. Part two concentrates on the formation of SiGe nanostructures, with chapters on different methods of crystal growth such as molecular beam epitaxy and chemical vapour deposition. This part also includes chapters covering strain engineering and mo...

  7. Determination of Shear Deformation Potentials from the Free-Carrier Piezobirefringence in Germanium and Silicon

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Riskaer, Sven

    1966-01-01

    The present investigations of the free-carrier piezobirefringence phenomenon verify that in n-type germanium and silicon as well as in p-type silicon this effect can be ascribed to intraband transitions of the carriers. It is demonstrated how a combined investigation of the low-stress and high......-stress piezobirefringence in these materials provides a direct and independent method for determining deformation-potential constants. For n-type germanium we obtain Ξu=18.0±0.5 eV, for n-type silicon Ξu=8.5±0.4 eV; for p-type silicon a rather crude analytical approximation yields b=-3.1 eV and d=-8.3 eV. Finally......, experimental evidence is given to support the assumption, that in p-type germanium intraband transitions alone cannot account for the free-carrier piezobirefringence....

  8. Classification of 3-3 transitions in neonlike germanium in laser-produced plasma

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yuan, G. (Inst. of Laser Engineering, Osaka Univ., Osaka (Japan)); Kato, Y. (Inst. of Laser Engineering, Osaka Univ., Osaka (Japan)); Daido, H. (Inst. of Laser Engineering, Osaka Univ., Osaka (Japan)); Kodama, R. (Inst. of Laser Engineering, Osaka Univ., Osaka (Japan)); Murai, K. (Inst. of Laser Engineering, Osaka Univ., Osaka (Japan)); Nakai, S. (Inst. of Laser Engineering, Osaka Univ., Osaka (Japan))

    1994-11-01

    Classification of 3-3 transitions in neonlike germanium in laser-produced plasma has been made. The spectra have been observed in the range of 185-290 A using a high resolving power ([lambda]/[Delta][lambda][proportional to]13000) grazing-incidence spectrometer in XUV laser experiment. A total of 21 lines (including five lasing lines) have been classified as transitions between the 2s[sup 2] 2p[sup 5] 3s, 3p, 3d or 2s 2p[sup 6] 3p, 3d and sodiumlike germanium configurations. The identified transitions have been used to derive energy levels of 2s[sup 2] 2p[sup 5] 3l in neonlike germanium. The experimental results have been compared with theoretical predictions from Dirac-Fock (MCDF) calculations. (orig.)

  9. Radiation detector

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Taleyarkhan, Rusi P.

    2017-06-27

    Alpha particle detecting devices are disclosed that have a chamber that can hold a fluid in a tensioned metastable state. The chamber is tuned with a suitable fluid and tension such that alpha emitting materials such as radon and one or more of its decay products can be detected. The devices can be portable and can be placed in areas, such as rooms in dwellings or laboratories and used to measure radon in these areas, in situ and in real time. The disclosed detectors can detect radon at and below 4 pCi/L in air; also, at and below 4,000 pCi/L or 300 pCi/L in water.

  10. Feasibility of producing photodiode bases on a single crystal strip of germanium obtained by Stephanov's method

    CERN Document Server

    Menshikova, V A; Zatalovskii, L M; Chaikin, P M; Frimer, A I

    1972-01-01

    The single-crystal strip was obtained by Stepanov's method. involving the use of a fusing shaper and a flexible priming wire holder. The epitaxial growth of a gallium arsenide layer on this strip was then studied, and photodiodes were prepared from it. The surface properties of the strip were investigated microstructurally and deposition rates for gallium arsenide recorded at different temperatures. At each stage the figures were compared with results obtained with common germanium. The characteristics of photodiodes prepared from the single-crystal strip and common germanium were compared, and the former gave greater integral sensitivity. (3 refs).

  11. CLIC Detector Power Requirements

    CERN Document Server

    Gaddi, A

    2013-01-01

    An estimate for the CLIC detector power requirements is outlined starting from the available data on power consumptions of the four LHC experiments and considering the differences between a typical LHC Detector (CMS) and the CLIC baseline detector concept. In particular the impact of the power pulsing scheme for the CLIC Detector electronics on the overall detector consumption is considered. The document will be updated with the requirements of the sub-detector electronics once they are more defined.

  12. High spatial resolution fast-neutron imaging detectors for Pulsed Fast-Neutron Transmission Spectroscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mor, I.; Vartsky, D.; Bar, D.; Feldman, G.; Goldberg, M. B.; Katz, D.; Sayag, E.; Shmueli, I.; Cohen, Y.; Tal, A.; Vagish, Z.; Bromberger, B.; Dangendorf, V.; Mugai, D.; Tittelmeier, K.; Weierganz, M.

    2009-05-01

    Two generations of a novel detector for high-resolution transmission imaging and spectrometry of fast-neutrons are presented. These devices are based on a hydrogenous fiber scintillator screen and single- or multiple-gated intensified camera systems (ICCD). This detector is designed for energy-selective neutron radiography with nanosecond-pulsed broad-energy (1-10 MeV) neutron beams. Utilizing the Time-of-Flight (TOF) method, such a detector is capable of simultaneously capturing several images, each at a different neutron energy (TOF). In addition, a gamma-ray image can also be simultaneously registered, allowing combined neutron/gamma inspection of objects. This permits combining the sensitivity of the fast-neutron resonance method to low-Z elements with that of gamma radiography to high-Z materials.

  13. MUON DETECTOR

    CERN Multimedia

    F. Gasparini

    DT As announced in the previous Bulletin MU DT completed the installation of the vertical chambers of barrel wheels 0, +1 and +2. 242 DT and RPC stations are now installed in the negative barrel wheels. The missing 8 (4 in YB-1 and 4 in YB-2) chambers can be installed only after the lowering of the two wheels into the UX cavern, which is planned for the last quarter of the year. Cabling on the surface of the negative wheels was finished in May after some difficulties with RPC cables. The next step was to begin the final commissioning of the wheels with the final trigger and readout electronics. Priority was giv¬en to YB0 in order to check everything before the chambers were covered by cables and services of the inner detectors. Commissioning is not easy since it requires both activity on the central and positive wheels underground, as well as on the negative wheels still on the surface. The DT community is requested to commission the negative wheels on surface to cope with a possible lack of time a...

  14. Absolute measurement of anti. nu. /sub p/ for /sup 252/Cf using the ORNL large liquid scintillator neutron detector

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Spencer, R.R.; Gwin, R.; Ingle, R.

    1981-08-01

    The ORNL large liquid scintillator detector was used in a precise determination of anti ..nu../sub p/, the number of neutrons emitted promptly, for spontaneous fission of /sup 252/Cf. Measurements of the detector efficiency over a broad energy region were made by means of a proton-recoil technique employing the ORELA white neutron source. Monte Carlo calculation of the detector efficiency for a spectrum representative of /sup 252/Cf fission neutrons was calibrated with these elaborate measurements. The unusually flat response of the neutron detector resulted in elimination of several known sources of error. Experimental measurement was coupled with calculational methods to correct for other known errors. These measurements lead to an unusually small estimated uncertainty of 0.2% in the value obtained, anti ..nu../sub p/ = 3.773 +- 0.007.

  15. Spatial characterisation of a 36-fold segmented AGATA detector via a novel scanning system

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Goel, Namita

    2011-06-06

    The core principle of segmented gamma-tracking germanium detector arrays like AGATA and GRETA, that will be used in future for 4{pi} gamma detection, is the application of pulse shape analysis (PSA). The 3D position sensitivity of the HPGe detectors is based on differences in the shape of the charge pulses associated with different interaction points inside the whole volume. It is therefore necessary for this analysis to have a data base containing pulses for all the interaction points inside the detector volume. A full 3D scanning of the detectors, which experimentally determines pulse shapes for each position inside the active volume, is therefore needed. In this thesis, a novel scanning system is presented to determine the HPGe detector pulse shapes as a function of the {gamma}-ray interaction position inside the detector. The device is based on a pulse shape comparison scan (PSCS) and the positron annihilation correlation (PAC) method which makes it about 100 times faster than the conventional coincidence based scanners. The performance and efficiency of the system is superior because of using a position sensitive detector (PSD)/gamma camera. It consists of a LYSO scintillating crystal optically coupled to a position sensitive photomultiplier tube. The individual multianode readout (IMAR) approach is used to achieve a spatial resolution of {approx}1 mm and to optimize its field of view to {approx}28 cm{sup 2}. A Compton scattering imaging technique is implemented to perform an accurate position calibration of the gamma camera. The employment of PSD yields an added advantage of imaging capability which allows to study e.g. the details of the inner structure of HPGe detectors and electric field anisotropy effects. The position response of a planar HPGe detector is obtained using the apparatus and the risetime distribution plots are compared with those obtained via a conventional scanning system. However, to validate the aforementioned scanning principle, an AGATA

  16. Detector simulation needs for detector designers

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hanson, G.G.

    1987-11-01

    Computer simulation of the components of SSC detectors and of the complete detectors will be very important for the designs of the detectors. The ratio of events from interesting physics to events from background processes is very low, so detailed understanding of detector response to the backgrounds is needed. Any large detector for the SSC will be very complex and expensive and every effort must be made to design detectors which will have excellent performance and will not have to undergo major rebuilding. Some areas in which computer simulation is particularly needed are pattern recognition in tracking detectors and development of shower simulation code which can be trusted as an aid in the design and optimization of calorimeters, including their electron identification performance. Existing codes require too much computer time to be practical and need to be compared with test beam data at energies of several hundred GeV. Computer simulation of the processing of the data, including electronics response to the signals from the detector components, processing of the data by microprocessors on the detector, the trigger, and data acquisition will be required. In this report we discuss the detector simulation needs for detector designers.

  17. Germanium recovery from gasification fly ash: evaluation of end-products obtained by precipitation methods.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arroyo, Fátima; Font, Oriol; Fernández-Pereira, Constantino; Querol, Xavier; Juan, Roberto; Ruiz, Carmen; Coca, Pilar

    2009-08-15

    In this study the purity of the germanium end-products obtained by two different precipitation methods carried out on germanium-bearing solutions was evaluated as a last step of a hydrometallurgy process for the recovery of this valuable element from the Puertollano Integrated Gasification Combined Cycle (IGCC) fly ash. Since H(2)S is produced as a by-product in the gas cleaning system of the Puertollano IGCC plant, precipitation of germanium as GeS(2) was tested by sulfiding the Ge-bearing solutions. The technological and hazardous issues that surround H(2)S handling conducted to investigate a novel precipitation procedure: precipitation as an organic complex by adding 1,2-dihydroxy benzene pyrocatechol (CAT) and cetyltrimethylammonium bromide (CTAB) to the Ge-bearing solutions. Relatively high purity Ge end-products (90 and 93% hexagonal-GeO(2) purity, respectively) were obtained by precipitating Ge from enriched solutions, as GeS(2) sulfiding the solutions with H(2)S, or as organic complex with CAT/CTAB mixtures and subsequent roasting of the precipitates. Both methods showed high efficiency (>99%) to precipitate selectively Ge using a single precipitation stage from germanium-bearing solutions.

  18. Crystal Orientation Effect on the Subsurface Deformation of Monocrystalline Germanium in Nanometric Cutting

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lai, Min; Zhang, Xiaodong; Fang, Fengzhou

    2017-04-01

    Molecular dynamics simulations of nanometric cutting on monocrystalline germanium are conducted to investigate the subsurface deformation during and after nanometric cutting. The continuous random network model of amorphous germanium is established by molecular dynamics simulation, and its characteristic parameters are extracted to compare with those of the machined deformed layer. The coordination number distribution and radial distribution function (RDF) show that the machined surface presents the similar amorphous state. The anisotropic subsurface deformation is studied by nanometric cutting on the (010), (101), and (111) crystal planes of germanium, respectively. The deformed structures are prone to extend along the 110 slip system, which leads to the difference in the shape and thickness of the deformed layer on various directions and crystal planes. On machined surface, the greater thickness of subsurface deformed layer induces the greater surface recovery height. In order to get the critical thickness limit of deformed layer on machined surface of germanium, the optimized cutting direction on each crystal plane is suggested according to the relevance of the nanometric cutting to the nanoindentation.

  19. Reduced graphene oxide-germanium quantum dot nanocomposite: electronic, optical and magnetic properties

    Science.gov (United States)

    Amollo, Tabitha A.; Mola, Genene T.; Nyamori, Vincent O.

    2017-12-01

    Graphene provides numerous possibilities for structural modification and functionalization of its carbon backbone. Localized magnetic moments can, as well, be induced in graphene by the formation of structural defects which include vacancies, edges, and adatoms. In this work, graphene was functionalized using germanium atoms, we report the effect of the Ge ad atoms on the structural, electrical, optical and magnetic properties of graphene. Reduced graphene oxide (rGO)-germanium quantum dot nanocomposites of high crystalline quality were synthesized by the microwave-assisted solvothermal reaction. Highly crystalline spherical shaped germanium quantum dots, of diameter ranging between 1.6–9.0 nm, are anchored on the basal planes of rGO. The nanocomposites exhibit high electrical conductivity with a sheet resistance of up to 16 Ω sq‑1. The electrical conductivity is observed to increase with the increase in Ge content in the nanocomposites. High defect-induced magnetization is attained in the composites via germanium adatoms. The evolution of the magnetic moments in the nanocomposites and the coercivity showed marked dependence on the Ge quantum dots size and concentration. Quantum confinement effects is evidenced in the UV–vis absorbance spectra and photoluminescence emission spectra of the nanocomposites which show marked size-dependence. The composites manifest strong absorption in the UV region, strong luminescence in the near UV region, and a moderate luminescence in the visible region.

  20. A Silicon-Germanium Single Chip Receiver for S-band Phased Array Radars

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Heij, W. de; Boer, A. de; Hek, A.P. de; Vliet, F.E. van

    2011-01-01

    A Silicon-Germanium single chip receiver has been developed for S-band phased array radars with 2-D digital beamforming. The complete receiver chain from the S-band RF input up to the low-IF output has been integrated on a single SiGe chip. The only external components required to complete the

  1. Luminescence decay dynamics of self-assembled germanium islands in silicon

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Julsgaard, Brian; Balling, Peter; Hansen, John Lundsgaard

    2011-01-01

    The dynamics of the luminescence decay from self-assembled germanium islands embedded in crystalline silicon has been studied for temperatures varied between 16 K and room temperature. We separate the time scale for various dynamical processes by time-resolved emission spectroscopy and identify...

  2. Measurement of the free carrier Faraday effect in n-type germanium at microwave frequencies

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bouwknegt, A.; Volger, J.

    Measurements of the Faraday rotation and ellipticity on n-type (001) oriented germanium crystals at 24.9 GHz and at room temperature have been performed, using a crossed wave guide method. The influences of multiple reflections and of the surfaces on the Faraday effect have been analysed. These

  3. Influence of Uniaxial Stress on the Indirect Absorption Edge in Silicon and Germanium

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Balslev, I.

    1966-01-01

    The indirect optical absorption edge in silicon and germanium has been studied in the presence of shear strain. The splitting observed in the transmission spectrum is dependent on the direction and magnitude of the applied stress and on the polarization of the light with respect to the stress axis...

  4. Ultra Shallow Arsenic Junctions in Germanium Formed by Millisecond Laser Annealing

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hellings, G.; Rosseel, E.; Simoen, E.

    2011-01-01

    Millisecond laser annealing is used to fabricate ultra shallow arsenic junctions in preamorphized and crystalline germanium, with peak temperatures up to 900 degrees C. At this temperature, As indiffusion is observed while yielding an electrically active concentration up to 5.0 x 10(19) cm(-3...

  5. Heavily Germanium-Doped Silica Fiber With a Flat Normal Dispersion Profile

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wang, Chun-can; Wang, M. H.; Wu, J.

    2015-01-01

    A heavily germanium-doped (Ge-doped) silica fiber with a four-layer refractive index profile is proposed to obtain all normal flat dispersion property. The waveguide dispersion in the fiber can be modified by adjusting the fiber parameters, including the refractive indices and the core radiuses...

  6. Determination of Hot-Carrier Distribution Functions in Uniaxially Stressed p-Type Germanium

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Christensen, Ove

    1973-01-01

    This paper gives a description of an experimental determination of distribution functions in k→ space of hot holes in uniaxially compressed germanium. The hot-carrier studies were made at 85°K at fields up to 1000 V/cm and uniaxial stresses up to 11 800 kg/cm2. The field and stress were always...

  7. Crystal Orientation Effect on the Subsurface Deformation of Monocrystalline Germanium in Nanometric Cutting.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lai, Min; Zhang, Xiaodong; Fang, Fengzhou

    2017-12-01

    Molecular dynamics simulations of nanometric cutting on monocrystalline germanium are conducted to investigate the subsurface deformation during and after nanometric cutting. The continuous random network model of amorphous germanium is established by molecular dynamics simulation, and its characteristic parameters are extracted to compare with those of the machined deformed layer. The coordination number distribution and radial distribution function (RDF) show that the machined surface presents the similar amorphous state. The anisotropic subsurface deformation is studied by nanometric cutting on the (010), (101), and (111) crystal planes of germanium, respectively. The deformed structures are prone to extend along the 110 slip system, which leads to the difference in the shape and thickness of the deformed layer on various directions and crystal planes. On machined surface, the greater thickness of subsurface deformed layer induces the greater surface recovery height. In order to get the critical thickness limit of deformed layer on machined surface of germanium, the optimized cutting direction on each crystal plane is suggested according to the relevance of the nanometric cutting to the nanoindentation.

  8. Determination of the dead layer and full-energy peak efficiency of an HPGe detector using the MCNP code and experimental results

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M Moeinifar

    2017-02-01

    Full Text Available One important factor in using an High Purity Germanium (HPGe detector is its efficiency that highly depends on the geometry and absorption factors, so that when the configuration of source-detector geometry is changed, the detector efficiency must be re-measured. The best way of determining the efficiency of a detector is measuring the efficiency of standard sources. But considering the fact that standard sources are hardly available and it is time consuming to find them, determinig the efficiency by simulation which gives enough efficiency in less time, is important. In this study, the dead layer thickness and the full-energy peak efficiency of an HPGe detector was obtained by Monte Carlo simulation, using MCNPX code. For this, we first measured gamma–ray spectra for different sources placed at various distances from the detector and stored the measured spectra obtained. Then the obtained spectra were simulated under similar conditions in vitro.At first, the whole volume of germanium was regarded as active, and the obtaind spectra from calculation were compared with the corresponding experimental spectra. Comparison of the calculated spectra with the measured spectra showed considerable differences. By making small variations in the dead layer thickness of the detector (about a few hundredths of a millimeter in the simulation program, we tried to remove these differences and in this way a dead layer of 0.57 mm was obtained for the detector. By incorporating this value for the dead layer in the simulating program, the full-energy peak efficiency of the detector was then obtained both by experiment and by simulation, for various sources at various distances from the detector, and both methods showed good agreements. Then, using MCNP code and considering the exact measurement system, one can conclude that the efficiency of an HPGe detector for various source-detector geometries can be calculated with rather good accuracy by simulation method

  9. Cosmogenic production of tritium in dark matter detectors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Amaré, J.; Castel, J.; Cebrián, S.; Coarasa, I.; Cuesta, C.; Dafni, T.; Galán, J.; García, E.; Garza, J. G.; Iguaz, F. J.; Irastorza, I. G.; Luzón, G.; Martínez, M.; Mirallas, H.; Oliván, M. A.; Ortigoza, Y.; Ortiz de Solórzano, A.; Puimedón, J.; Ruiz-Chóliz, E.; Sarsa, M. L.; Villar, J. A.; Villar, P.

    2018-01-01

    The direct detection of dark matter particles requires ultra-low background conditions at energies below a few tens of keV. Radioactive isotopes are produced via cosmogenic activation in detectors and other materials and those isotopes constitute a background source which has to be under control. In particular, tritium is specially relevant due to its decay properties (very low endpoint energy and long half-life) when induced in the detector medium, and because it can be generated in any material as a spallation product. Quantification of cosmogenic production of tritium is not straightforward, neither experimentally nor by calculations. In this work, a method for the calculation of production rates at sea level has been developed and applied to some of the materials typically used as targets in dark matter detectors (germanium, sodium iodide, argon and neon); it is based on a selected description of tritium production cross sections over the entire energy range of cosmic nucleons. Results have been compared to available data in the literature, either based on other calculations or from measurements. The obtained tritium production rates, ranging from a few tens to a few hundreds of nuclei per kg and per day at sea level, point to a significant contribution to the background in dark matter experiments, requiring the application of specific protocols for target material purification, material storing underground and limiting the time the detector is on surface during the building process in order to minimize the exposure to the most dangerous cosmic ray components.

  10. Cadmium-zinc telluride detector arrays for synchrotron radiation applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kakuno, Edson M.; Camarda, Giuseppe S.; Siddons, D. P.

    2004-01-01

    We have begun a program to develop CZT-based detectors optimized for Synchrotron Radiation (SR) applications. SR provides high brightness beams of hard x-rays, typically in the range 5-100keV. Below 10keV, Peltier-cooled silicon detector arrays can provide high throughput with good spectroscopic resolution. At higher energies, only cryo-cooled germanium detectors or scintillation counters are available. Neither are easily available in large arrays, and scintillation counters lack energy resolution. CZT offers a solution to both these problems. Our development has focused on surface preparation and contact definition technologies which minimize device leakage currents while allowing high-definition contact patterns suitable for SR applications. We have used SR also for diagnostic purposes in these developments, both for detector testing and material characterization. X-ray diffraction, Infrared microscopy and photoemission are all relevant SR-based tools which we are using in our work. As an example, we have observed that bromine remains attached to the CZT surface after chemical etching, and is remarkably persistent in the face of surface cleaning and argon ion sputtering, as revealed by photoemission spectroscopy and x-ray absorption spectroscopy.

  11. Controlled Spalling in (100)-Oriented Germanium by Electroplating

    Science.gov (United States)

    Crouse, Dustin Ray

    This work investigates controlled spalling as a method to exfoliate thin films of various thickness from rigid, crystalline germanium (Ge) substrates and to enable substrate reuse for III-V single junction photovoltaic devices. Technological limitations impeding wide-spread adoption of flexible electronics and high-material-cost photovoltaic devices have motivated significant interest in a method to remove devices from their substrates. DC magnetron sputtering has been previously utilized to remove semiconductor devices of various thicknesses from Ge substrates, but this method is expensive and time-consuming. Controlled spalling via high-speed electrodeposition is a fast, inexpensive exfoliation method that utilizes a tensile-stressed metal layer deposited on a (100)-oriented Ge substrate and an external force to mechanically propagate a crack parallel to the surface at a desired depth in the substrate material. Suo and Hutchinson's quantitative models describe critical combinations of film thickness and strain mismatch between a film and substrate at which a stressed bilayer system spontaneously spalls; however, fine control over a wide steady-state spall depth range has been limited by the ability to experimentally tailor strain mismatch caused by residual stress within deposited stressor layers. This work investigates the effect of tuning electroplating current density and electrolyte chemistry on the residual stress in a nickel stressor film and their impact on the achievable spall depth range. Steady-state spall depth is found to increase with increasing stressor layer thickness and decrease with increasing residual stress. By tailoring residual stress through adjusting plating conditions and the electrolyte's phosphorous concentration, wide control over spall depth within Ge substrates from sub-micron to 76microm-thicknesses were achieved. To assess the viability of utilizing controlled spalling for substrate reuse, this dissertation demonstrates the first

  12. Sapphire scintillation tests for cryogenic detectors in the Edelweiss dark matter search

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Luca, M

    2007-07-15

    Identifying the matter in the universe is one of the main challenges of modern cosmology and astrophysics. An important part of this matter seems to be made of non-baryonic particles. Edelweiss is a direct dark matter search using cryogenic germanium bolometers in order to look for particles that interact very weakly with the ordinary matter, generically known as WIMPs (weakly interacting massive particles). An important challenge for Edelweiss is the radioactive background and one of the ways to identify it is to use a larger variety of target crystals. Sapphire is a light target which can be complementary to the germanium crystals already in use. Spectroscopic characterization studies have been performed using different sapphire samples in order to find the optimum doping concentration for good low temperature scintillation. Ti doped crystals with weak Ti concentrations have been used for systematic X ray excitation tests both at room temperature and down to 30 K. The tests have shown that the best Ti concentration for optimum room temperature scintillation is 100 ppm and 50 ppm at T = 45 K. All concentrations have been checked by optical absorption and fluorescence. After having shown that sapphire had interesting characteristics for building heat-scintillation detectors, we have tested if using a sapphire detector was feasible within a dark matter search. During the first commissioning tests of Edelweiss-II, we have proved the compatibility between a sapphire heat scintillation detector and the experimental setup. (author)

  13. Monitoring System for the Gold Target by Radiation Detectors in Hadron Experimental Facility at J-PARC

    Science.gov (United States)

    Muto, Ryotaro; Agari, Keizo; Aoki, Kazuya; Bessho, Kotaro; Hagiwara, Masayuki; Hirose, Erina; Ieiri, Masaharu; Iwasaki, Ruri; Katoh, Yohji; Kitagawa, Jun-ichi; Minakawa, Michifumi; Morino, Yuhei; Saito, Kiwamu; Sato, Yoshinori; Sawada, Shin'ya; Shirakabe, Yoshihisa; Suzuki, Yoshihiro; Takahashi, Hitoshi; Tanaka, Kazuhiro; Toyoda, Akihisa; Watanabe, Hiroaki; Yamanoi, Yutaka

    2017-09-01

    At the Hadron Experimental Facility in J-PARC, we inject a 30-GeV proton beam into a gold target to produce secondary particle beams required for various particle and nuclear physics experiments. The gold target is placed in a hermetic chamber, and helium gas is circulated in the chamber to monitor the soundness of the target. The radioactivity in helium gas is continuously monitored by gamma-ray detectors such as a germanium detector and a NaI(Tl) detector. Beam operations with those target-monitoring systems were successfully performed from April to June and October to December 2015, and from May to June 2016. In this paper, the details of the helium gas circulation system and gamma-ray detectors and the analysis results of the obtained gamma-ray spectra are reported.

  14. Accurate efficiency calibration of a low-energy HPGe detector using a monochromatic x-ray source

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Plagnard, Johann; Bobin, Christophe; Lepy, Marie-Christine [Commissariat a l' Energie Atomique, Laboratoire National Henri Becquerel, 91191 Gif-sur-Yvette Cedex (France)

    2007-05-15

    HPGe detector efficiency has been calibrated using complementary methods involving radioactive x-ray standards, reference synchrotron flux (Super ACO, LURE, France) and a monochromatic x-ray source (SOLEX), combined with Monte Carlo simulation. In the study described here, SOLEX was used to determine the thickness of detector components that create absorption sites in front of the active zone of the detector, by energy scanning in the vicinity of their K and L binding energies. The layers of aluminium (infrared shielding), nickel (electrical contact) and germanium (dead layer) have been measured. This approach ensures accurate determination of the thickness of each component and enables the detector efficiency calculation by Monte Carlo simulation. Differences between simulated data and experimental efficiency values are about 1-5% at energies above 1400 eV and reach 20% at lower energies. (authors)

  15. Electronic processes in uniaxially stressed p-type germanium

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dubon, Jr., Oscar Danilo [Univ. of California, Berkeley, CA (United States)

    1996-02-01

    Effect of uniaxial stress on acceptor-related electronic processes in Ge single crystals doped with Ga, Be, and Cu were studied by Hall and photo-Hall effect measurements in conjunction with infrared spectroscopy. Stress dependence of hole lifetime in p-type Ge single crystals is used as a test for competing models of non-radiative capture of holes by acceptors. Photo-Hall effect shows that hole lifetime in Ga- and Be-doped Ge increases by over one order of magnitude with uniaxial stress at liq. He temps. Photo-Hall of Ge:Be shows a stress-induced change in the temperature dependence of hole lifetime. This is consistent with observed increase of responsivity of Ge:Ga detectors with uniaxial stress. Electronic properties of Ge:Cu are shown to change dramatically with uniaxial stress; the results provide a first explanation for the performance of uniaxially stressed, Cu-diffused Ge:Ga detectors which display a high conductivity in absence of photon signal and therefore have poor sensitivity.

  16. Alpha-event and surface characterisation in segmented true-coaxial HPGe detectors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Abt, I.; Garbini, L., E-mail: luciagarbini86@gmail.com.mpg.de; Gooch, C.; Irlbeck, S.; Liu, X.; Palermo, M.; Schulz, O.

    2017-06-21

    A detailed study of alpha interactions on the passivation layer on the end-plate of a true-coaxial high-purity germanium detector is presented. The observation of alpha events on such a surface indicates an unexpectedly thin so-called “effective dead layer” of less than 20 µm thickness. In addition, the influence of the metalisation close to the end-plate on the time evolution of the output pulses is discussed. The results indicate that alpha contamination can result in events which could be mistaken as signals for neutrinoless double beta decay and provide some guidance on how to prevent this.

  17. Determining the Drift Time of Charge Carriers in P-Type Point-Contact HPGe Detectors

    CERN Document Server

    Martin, R D; Chan, Y D; Detwiler, J A; Loach, J C; Looker, Q; Luke, P N; Poon, A W P; Qian, J; Vetter, K; Yaver, H

    2011-01-01

    An algorithm to measure the drift time of charge carriers in p-type point contact (PPC) high-purity germanium (HPGe) detectors from the signals processed with a charge-sensitive preamplifier is introduced. It is demonstrated that the drift times can be used to estimate the distance of charge depositions from the point contact and to characterize losses due to charge trapping. A correction for charge trapping effects over a wide range of energies is implemented using the measured drift times and is shown to improve the energy resolution by up to 30%.

  18. Nonlinear optics in germanium mid-infrared fiber material: Detuning oscillations in femtosecond mid-infrared spectroscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ordu, M.; Guo, J.; Ng Pack, G.; Shah, P.; Ramachandran, S.; Hong, M. K.; Ziegler, L. D.; Basu, S. N.; Erramilli, S.

    2017-09-01

    Germanium optical fibers hold great promise in extending semiconductor photonics into the fundamentally important mid-infrared region of the electromagnetic spectrum. The demonstration of nonlinear response in fabricated Ge fiber samples is a key step in the development of mid-infrared fiber materials. Here we report the observation of detuning oscillations in a germanium fiber in the mid-infrared region using femtosecond dispersed pump-probe spectroscopy. Detuning oscillations are observed in the frequency-resolved response when mid-infrared pump and probe pulses are overlapped in a fiber segment. The oscillations arise from the nonlinear frequency resolved nonlinear (χ(3)) response in the germanium semiconductor. Our work represents the first observation of coherent oscillations in the emerging field of germanium mid-infrared fiber optics.

  19. Nonlinear optics in germanium mid-infrared fiber material: Detuning oscillations in femtosecond mid-infrared spectroscopy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Ordu

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available Germanium optical fibers hold great promise in extending semiconductor photonics into the fundamentally important mid-infrared region of the electromagnetic spectrum. The demonstration of nonlinear response in fabricated Ge fiber samples is a key step in the development of mid-infrared fiber materials. Here we report the observation of detuning oscillations in a germanium fiber in the mid-infrared region using femtosecond dispersed pump-probe spectroscopy. Detuning oscillations are observed in the frequency-resolved response when mid-infrared pump and probe pulses are overlapped in a fiber segment. The oscillations arise from the nonlinear frequency resolved nonlinear (χ(3 response in the germanium semiconductor. Our work represents the first observation of coherent oscillations in the emerging field of germanium mid-infrared fiber optics.

  20. Determination of relative efficiency of a detector using Monte Carlo method; Determinacao da eficiencia relativa de um detector usando metodo de Monte Carlo

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Medeiros, M.P.C.; Rebello, W.F., E-mail: eng.cavaliere@ime.eb.br, E-mail: rebello@ime.eb.br [Instituto Militar de Engenharia (IME), Rio de Janeiro, RJ (Brazil). Secao de Engenharia Nuclear; Lopes, J.M.; Silva, A.X., E-mail: marqueslopez@yahoo.com.br, E-mail: ademir@nuclear.ufrj.br [Coordenacao dos Programas de Pos-Graduacao em Engenharia (COPPE/UFRJ), Rio de Janeiro, RJ (Brazil). Programa de Engenharia Nuclear

    2015-07-01

    High-purity germanium detectors (HPGe) are mandatory tools for spectrometry because of their excellent energy resolution. The efficiency of such detectors, quoted in the list of specifications by the manufacturer, frequently refers to the relative full-energy peak efficiency, related to the absolute full-energy peak efficiency of a 7.6 cm x 7.6 cm (diameter x height) NaI(Tl) crystal, based on the 1.33 MeV peak of a {sup 60}Co source positioned 25 cm from the detector. In this study, we used MCNPX code to simulate an HPGe detector (Canberra GC3020), from Real-Time Neutrongraphy Laboratory of UFRJ, to survey the spectrum of a {sup 60}Co source located 25 cm from the detector in order to calculate and confirm the efficiency declared by the manufacturer. Agreement between experimental and simulated data was achieved. The model under development will be used for calculating and comparison purposes with the detector calibration curve from software Genie2000™, also serving as a reference for future studies. (author)

  1. GADRAS Detector Response Function.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mitchell, Dean J.; Harding, Lee; Thoreson, Gregory G; Horne, Steven M.

    2014-11-01

    The Gamma Detector Response and Analysis Software (GADRAS) applies a Detector Response Function (DRF) to compute the output of gamma-ray and neutron detectors when they are exposed to radiation sources. The DRF is fundamental to the ability to perform forward calculations (i.e., computation of the response of a detector to a known source), as well as the ability to analyze spectra to deduce the types and quantities of radioactive material to which the detectors are exposed. This document describes how gamma-ray spectra are computed and the significance of response function parameters that define characteristics of particular detectors.

  2. Nonlinear optics in germanium mid-infrared fiber material: Detuning oscillations in femtosecond mid-infrared spectroscopy

    OpenAIRE

    Ordu, M.; Guo, J.; G. Ng Pack; Shah, P.; S. Ramachandran; Hong, M K; Ziegler, L. D.; S. N. Basu; Erramilli, S

    2017-01-01

    Germanium optical fibers hold great promise in extending semiconductor photonics into the fundamentally important mid-infrared region of the electromagnetic spectrum. The demonstration of nonlinear response in fabricated Ge fiber samples is a key step in the development of mid-infrared fiber materials. Here we report the observation of detuning oscillations in a germanium fiber in the mid-infrared region using femtosecond dispersed pump-probe spectroscopy. Detuning oscillations are observed i...

  3. Resistor-less charge sensitive amplifier for semiconductor detectors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pelczar, K., E-mail: krzysztof.pelczar@doctoral.uj.edu.pl; Panas, K.; Zuzel, G.

    2016-11-01

    A new concept of a Charge Sensitive Amplifier without a high-value resistor in the feedback loop is presented. Basic spectroscopic parameters of the amplifier coupled to a coaxial High Purity Germanium detector (HPGe) are discussed. The amplifier signal input is realized with an n-channel J-FET transistor. The feedback capacitor is discharged continuously by the second, forward biased n-channel J-FET, driven by an RC low–pass filter. Both the analog—with a standard spectroscopy amplifier and a multi-channel analyzer—and the digital—by applying a Flash Analog to Digital Converter—signal readouts were tested. The achieved resolution in the analog and the digital readouts was 0.17% and 0.21%, respectively, at the Full Width at Half Maximum of the registered {sup 60}Co 1332.5 keV gamma line.

  4. Progress in the Development of CdTe and CdZnTe Semiconductor Radiation Detectors for Astrophysical and Medical Applications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sordo, Stefano Del; Abbene, Leonardo; Caroli, Ezio; Mancini, Anna Maria; Zappettini, Andrea; Ubertini, Pietro

    2009-01-01

    Over the last decade, cadmium telluride (CdTe) and cadmium zinc telluride (CdZnTe) wide band gap semiconductors have attracted increasing interest as X-ray and gamma ray detectors. Among the traditional high performance spectrometers based on silicon (Si) and germanium (Ge), CdTe and CdZnTe detectors show high detection efficiency and good room temperature performance and are well suited for the development of compact and reliable detection systems. In this paper, we review the current status of research in the development of CdTe and CdZnTe detectors by a comprehensive survey on the material properties, the device characteristics, the different techniques for improving the overall detector performance and some major applications. Astrophysical and medical applications are discussed, pointing out the ongoing Italian research activities on the development of these detectors.

  5. Progress in the Development of CdTe and CdZnTe Semiconductor Radiation Detectors for Astrophysical and Medical Applications

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anna Maria Mancini

    2009-05-01

    Full Text Available Over the last decade, cadmium telluride (CdTe and cadmium zinc telluride (CdZnTe wide band gap semiconductors have attracted increasing interest as X-ray and gamma ray detectors. Among the traditional high performance spectrometers based on silicon (Si and germanium (Ge, CdTe and CdZnTe detectors show high detection efficiency and good room temperature performance and are well suited for the development of compact and reliable detection systems. In this paper, we review the current status of research in the development of CdTe and CdZnTe detectors by a comprehensive survey on the material properties, the device characteristics, the different techniques for improving the overall detector performance and some major applications. Astrophysical and medical applications are discussed, pointing out the ongoing Italian research activities on the development of these detectors.

  6. Drift Chambers detectors; Detectores de deriva

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Duran, I.; Martinez laso, L.

    1989-07-01

    We present here a review of High Energy Physics detectors based on drift chambers. The ionization, drift diffusion, multiplication and detection principles are described. Most common drift media are analysed, and a classification of the detectors according to its geometry is done. Finally the standard read-out methods are displayed and the limits of the spatial resolution are discussed. (Author) 115 refs.

  7. Using an InGrid Detector to Search for Solar Chameleons with CAST

    CERN Document Server

    Desch, Klaus; Krieger, Christoph; Lupberger, Michael

    2015-01-01

    We report on the construction, operation experience, and preliminary background measurements of an InGrid detector, i.e. a MicroMegas detector with CMOS pixel readout. The detector was mounted in the focal plane of the Abrixas X-Ray telescope at the CAST experiment at CERN. The detector is sensitive to soft X-Rays in a broad energy range (0.3--10 keV) and thus enables the search for solar chameleons. Smooth detector operation during CAST data taking in autumn 2014 has been achieved. Preliminary analysis of background data indicates a background rate of $1-5\\times 10^{-5}\\,\\mathrm{keV}^{-1}\\mathrm{cm}^{-2}\\mathrm{s}^{-1}$ above 2 keV and $\\sim 3\\times 10^{-4}\\,\\mathrm{keV}^{-1}\\mathrm{cm}^{-2}\\mathrm{s}^{-1}$ around 1 keV. An expected limit of $\\beta_\\gamma \\lesssim 5\\times 10^{10}$ on the chameleon photon coupling is estimated in case of absence of an excess in solar tracking data. We also discuss the prospects for future operation of the detector.

  8. Preliminary Results from an Investigation into Nanostructured Nuclear Radiation Detectors for Non-Proliferation Applications

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    ,

    2012-10-01

    In recent years, the concept of embedding composite scintillators consisting of nanosized inorganic crystals in an organic matrix has been actively pursued. Nanocomposite detectors have the potential to meet many of the homeland security, non-proliferation, and border and cargo-screening needs of the nation and, by virtue of their superior nuclear identification capability over plastic, at roughly the same cost as plastic, have the potential to replace all plastic detectors. Nanocomposites clearly have the potential of being a gamma ray detection material that would be sensitive yet less expensive and easier to produce on a large scale than growing large, whole crystals of similar sensitivity. These detectors would have a broad energy range and a sufficient energy resolution to perform isotopic identification. The material can also be fabricated on an industrial scale, further reducing cost. This investigation focused on designing and fabricating prototype core/shell and quantum dot (QD) detectors. Fourteen core/shell and four QD detectors, all with the basic consistency of a mixture of nanoparticles in a polymer matrix with different densities of nanoparticles, were prepared. Nanoparticles with sizes <10 nm were fabricated, embedded in a polystyrene matrix, and the resultant scintillators’ radiation detector properties were characterized. This work also attempted to extend the gamma energy response on both low- and high-energy regimes by demonstrating the ability to detect low-energy and high-energy gamma rays. Preliminary results of this investigation are consistent with a significant response of these materials to nuclear radiation.

  9. Thermal kinetic inductance detector

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cecil, Thomas; Gades, Lisa; Miceli, Antonio; Quaranta, Orlando

    2016-12-20

    A microcalorimeter for radiation detection that uses superconducting kinetic inductance resonators as the thermometers. The detector is frequency-multiplexed which enables detector systems with a large number of pixels.

  10. The LDC detector concept

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    ), the large detector concept (LDC) is being developed. The main points of the LDC are a large volume gaseous tracking system, combined with high precision vertex detector and an extremely granular calorimeter. The main design force ...

  11. Numerical evaluation of Auger recombination coefficients in relaxed and strained germanium

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dominici, Stefano [Dipartimento di Elettronica e Telecomunicazioni, Politecnico di Torino, Corso Duca degli Abruzzi 24, 10129 Torino (Italy); Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering, Boston University, 8 Saint Mary' s Street, Boston, Massachusetts 02215 (United States); Wen, Hanqing; Bellotti, Enrico [Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering, Boston University, 8 Saint Mary' s Street, Boston, Massachusetts 02215 (United States); Bertazzi, Francesco; Goano, Michele [Dipartimento di Elettronica e Telecomunicazioni, Politecnico di Torino, Corso Duca degli Abruzzi 24, 10129 Torino (Italy); IEIIT-CNR, Politecnico di Torino, Corso Duca degli Abruzzi 24, 10129 Torino (Italy)

    2016-05-23

    The potential applications of germanium and its alloys in infrared silicon-based photonics have led to a renewed interest in their optical properties. In this letter, we report on the numerical determination of Auger coefficients at T = 300 K for relaxed and biaxially strained germanium. We use a Green's function based model that takes into account all relevant direct and phonon-assisted processes and perform calculations up to a strain level corresponding to the transition from indirect to direct energy gap. We have considered excess carrier concentrations ranging from 10{sup 16} cm{sup −3} to 5 × 10{sup 19} cm{sup −3}. For use in device level simulations, we also provide fitting formulas for the calculated electron and hole Auger coefficients as functions of carrier density.

  12. Numerical evaluation of Auger recombination coefficients in relaxed and strained germanium

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dominici, Stefano; Wen, Hanqing; Bertazzi, Francesco; Goano, Michele; Bellotti, Enrico

    2016-05-01

    The potential applications of germanium and its alloys in infrared silicon-based photonics have led to a renewed interest in their optical properties. In this letter, we report on the numerical determination of Auger coefficients at T = 300 K for relaxed and biaxially strained germanium. We use a Green's function based model that takes into account all relevant direct and phonon-assisted processes and perform calculations up to a strain level corresponding to the transition from indirect to direct energy gap. We have considered excess carrier concentrations ranging from 1016 cm-3 to 5 × 1019 cm-3. For use in device level simulations, we also provide fitting formulas for the calculated electron and hole Auger coefficients as functions of carrier density.

  13. Optical properties of highly n-doped germanium obtained by in situ doping and laser annealing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frigerio, J.; Ballabio, A.; Gallacher, K.; Gilberti, V.; Baldassarre, L.; Millar, R.; Milazzo, R.; Maiolo, L.; Minotti, A.; Bottegoni, F.; Biagioni, P.; Paul, D.; Ortolani, M.; Pecora, A.; Napolitani, E.; Isella, G.

    2017-11-01

    High n-type doping in germanium is essential for many electronic and optoelectronic applications especially for high performance Ohmic contacts, lasing and mid-infrared plasmonics. We report on the combination of in situ doping and excimer laser annealing to improve the activation of phosphorous in germanium. An activated n-doping concentration of 8.8  ×  1019 cm‑3 has been achieved starting from an incorporated phosphorous concentration of 1.1  ×  1020 cm‑3. Infrared reflectivity data fitted with a multi-layer Drude model indicate good uniformity over a 350 nm thick layer. Photoluminescence demonstrates clear bandgap narrowing and an increased ratio of direct to indirect bandgap emission confirming the high doping densities achieved.

  14. Analog Readout and Analysis Software for the Ultra-High Rate Germanium (UHRGe) Project

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fast, James E.; Aguayo Navarrete, Estanislao; Evans, Allan T.; VanDevender, Brent A.; Rodriguez, Douglas C.; Wood, Lynn S.

    2011-09-01

    High-resolution high-purity germanium (HPGe) spectrometers are needed for Safeguards applications such as spent fuel assay and uranium hexafluoride cylinder verification. In addition, these spectrometers would be applicable to other high-rate applications such as non-destructive assay of nuclear materials using nuclear resonance fluorescence. Count-rate limitations of today's HPGe technologies, however, lead to concessions in their use and reduction in their efficacy. Large-volume, very high-rate HPGe spectrometers are needed to enable a new generation of nondestructive assay systems. The Ultra-High Rate Germanium (UHRGe) project is developing HPGe spectrometer systems capable of operating at unprecedented rates, 10 to 100 times those available today. This report documents current status of developments in the analog electronics and analysis software.

  15. Dissolution chemistry and biocompatibility of silicon- and germanium-based semiconductors for transient electronics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kang, Seung-Kyun; Park, Gayoung; Kim, Kyungmin; Hwang, Suk-Won; Cheng, Huanyu; Shin, Jiho; Chung, Sangjin; Kim, Minjin; Yin, Lan; Lee, Jeong Chul; Lee, Kyung-Mi; Rogers, John A

    2015-05-06

    Semiconducting materials are central to the development of high-performance electronics that are capable of dissolving completely when immersed in aqueous solutions, groundwater, or biofluids, for applications in temporary biomedical implants, environmentally degradable sensors, and other systems. The results reported here include comprehensive studies of the dissolution by hydrolysis of polycrystalline silicon, amorphous silicon, silicon-germanium, and germanium in aqueous solutions of various pH values and temperatures. In vitro cellular toxicity evaluations demonstrate the biocompatibility of the materials and end products of dissolution, thereby supporting their potential for use in biodegradable electronics. A fully dissolvable thin-film solar cell illustrates the ability to integrate these semiconductors into functional systems.

  16. Electronic transport anisotropy of 2D carriers in biaxial compressive strained germanium

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morrison, C.; Myronov, M.

    2017-11-01

    The anisotropic nature of carrier mobility in simple cubic crystalline semiconductors, such as technologically important silicon and germanium, is well understood as a consequence of effective mass anisotropy arising from a change in band structure along non-identical surface crystal directions. In contrast to this, we show experimentally that this type of anisotropy is not the dominant contribution. Recent advances in epitaxial growth of high quality germanium enabled the appearance of high mobility 2D carriers suitable for such an experiment. A strong anisotropy of 2D carrier mobility, effective mass, quantum, and transport lifetime has been observed, through measurements of quantum phenomena at low temperatures, between the ⟨110⟩ and ⟨100⟩ in-plane crystallographic directions. These results have important consequences for electronic devices and sensor designs and suggest similar effects could be observed in technologically relevant and emerging materials such as SiGe, SiC, GeSn, GeSnSi, and C (Diamond).

  17. Effects of Germanium Tetrabromide Addition to Zinc Tetraphenyl Porphyrin / Fullerene Bulk Heterojunction Solar Cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Atsushi Suzuki

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available The effects of germanium tetrabromide addition to tetraphenyl porphyrin zinc (Zn-TPP/fullerene (C60 bulk heterojunction solar cells were characterized. The light-induced charge separation and charge transfer were investigated by current density and optical absorption. Addition of germanium tetrabromide inserted into active layer of Zn-TPP/C60 as bulk heterojunction had a positive effect on the photovoltaic and optical properties. The photovoltaic mechanism of the solar cells was discussed by experimental results. The photovoltaic performance was due to light-induced exciton promoted by insert of GeBr4 and charge transfer from HOMO of Zn-TPP to LUMO of C60 in the active layer.

  18. Volume reflection and channeling of ultrarelativistic protons in germanium bent single crystals

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. Bellucci

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available The paper is devoted to the investigation of volume reflection and channeling processes of ultrarelativistic positive charged particles moving in germanium single crystals. We demonstrate that the choice of atomic potential on the basis of the Hartree-Fock method and the correct choice of the Debye temperature allow us to describe the above mentioned processes in a good agreement with the recent experiments. Moreover, the universal form of equations for volume reflection presented in the paper gives a true description of the process at a wide range of particle energies. Standing on this study we make predictions for the mean angle reflection (as a function of the bending radius of positive and negative particles for germanium (110 and (111 crystallographic planes.

  19. State equations and properties of various polymorphous modifications of silicon and germanium

    Science.gov (United States)

    Magomedov, M. N.

    2017-06-01

    The state equations and the pressure dependences of the lattice properties have been obtained for various polymorphous modifications of silicon and germanium using the Mie-Lennard-Jones pair interatomic potential and the Einstein crystal model. It is shown that the elastic-type interatomic potential gives the best results for the semiconductor phase and the plastic-type interatomic potential for the metalized phases whose potential well depth is significantly smaller. The pressure dependences of the lattice properties are calculated along isotherm 300 K and the jumps of the properties during the phase transition from the diamond structure to the β-Sn phase are evaluated for both silicon and germanium. The calculated results agree well with the experimental data.

  20. Silicon and germanium nanoparticles with tailored surface chemistry as novel inorganic fiber brightening agents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deb-Choudhury, Santanu; Prabakar, Sujay; Krsinic, Gail; Dyer, Jolon M; Tilley, Richard D

    2013-07-31

    Low-molecular-weight organic molecules, such as coumarins and stilbenes, are used commercially as fluorescent whitening agents (FWAs) to mask photoyellowing and to brighten colors in fabrics. FWAs achieve this by radiating extra blue light, thus changing the hue and also adding to the brightness. However, organic FWAs can rapidly photodegrade in the presence of ultraviolet (UV) radiation, exacerbating the yellowing process through a reaction involving singlet oxygen species. Inorganic nanoparticles, on the other hand, can provide a similar brightening effect with the added advantage of photostability. We report a targeted approach in designing new inorganic silicon- and germanium-based nanoparticles, functionalized with hydrophilic (amine) surface terminations as novel inorganic FWAs. When applied on wool, by incorporation in a sol-gel Si matrix, the inorganic FWAs improved brightness properties, demonstrated enhanced photostability toward UV radiation, especially the germanium nanoparticles, and also generated considerably lower levels of reactive oxygen species compared to a commercial stilbene-based organic FWA, Uvitex NFW.

  1. Evaluation of radon measuring technique using passive detector activated carbon; Avaliacao da tecnica de medicao do radonio utilizando detector passivo com carvao ativado

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ferreira, Paulo Roberto Rocha; Lessa, Edmilson de Lima; Oliveira, Evaldo Paulo de, E-mail: epoliveira@aluno.ird.gov.br [Instituto de Radioprotecao e Dosimetria, (IRD/CNEN-RJ), Rio de Janeiro, RJ (Brazil). Div. de Radioprotecao Ambiental e Ocupacional

    2014-07-01

    This study aims to evaluate the efficiency of measuring the radioactive gas Radon ({sup 222} Rn) with passive detector activated carbon. Alpha Guard, exposure chamber, air sampler, default font Radio, calibrator flow, flow adjuster, ducts drivers: For this, various equipment to make the measurement system as were used. An assembly of such equipment, with specific sequence was used allowing for more efficient exposure of passive detectors Radon gas. Twenty samples were heated to remove moisture and then stored in desiccator until the experiment were made. The exhibition was held passive dosimeters being removed from the chamber, and one hour after, subjected to analysis by gamma spectrometry in germanium (HPGe) for an hour. Subsequently, other measurements were made at scheduled times and sequential for one hour. The results were presented in report form and spectra, measures and graphs generated by Alpha Guard were also extracted. Finally we calculated the efficiency of the passive meter activated carbon. (author)

  2. An improved matrix separation method for characterization of ultrapure germanium (8N).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reddy, M A; Shekhar, R; Jai Kumar, Sunil

    2016-10-01

    An improved matrix separation method has been described to characterize ultrapure germanium of 8N (99.999999%) purity. In this method, temperature of the reaction vessel in which in-situ generated chlorine gas reacts with germanium solid material directly is optimized to quantitatively remove Ge matrix from all its impurities. Optimized reaction temperature has been found to be 230±5°C. Recovery studies on more than 60 elements have been carried out at the optimized temperature. Recoveries of all the analytes except As, Se, Sn, Hg, Tl are found to be quantitative. The method has been examined for various amounts of Ge material and found to be suitable even for 10g of Ge sample and provides low parts per billion and trillion levels of process blanks. Determination of concentrations of impurities has been done by inductively coupled plasma quadrupole mass spectrometer (ICP-QMS) and high resolution continuum source graphite furnace atomic absorption spectrometer (HR-CS-GFAAS). In the absence of certified reference materials for ultrapure germanium, accuracy of the proposed method is established by spike recovery tests. Precision of this method is found to vary from 7% to 50% for concentrations between 4 and 0.004ngg(-1). Limits of detection (LOD) for the target analytes are found to be between 6 and 0.011ngmL(-1) or 1.8-0.003ngg(-1) for the proposed procedure. The method has been successfully applied for that characterization of ultrapure germanium material of 8N purity. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  3. Spatially resolved Raman spectroscopy on indium-catalyzed core-shell germanium nanowires: size effects

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Xiang, Y; Zardo, I; Garma, T; Heiss, M; Fontcuberta i Morral, A [Walter Schottky Institut, Physik Department, Technische Universitaet Muenchen, Am Coulombwall 3, D-85748 Garching (Germany); Cao, L Y; Brongersma, M L [Geballe Laboratory for Advanced Materials, 476 Lomita Mall, Stanford University, Stanford, CA 94305 (United States); Morante, J R; Arbiol, J [Departament d' Electronica, Universitat de Barcelona, 08028 Barcelona, CAT (Spain)

    2010-03-12

    The structure of indium-catalyzed germanium nanowires is investigated by atomic force microscopy, scanning confocal Raman spectroscopy and transmission electron microscopy. The nanowires are formed by a crystalline core and an amorphous shell. We find that the diameter of the crystalline core varies along the nanowire, down to few nanometers. Phonon confinement effects are observed in the regions where the crystalline region is the thinnest. The results are consistent with the thermally insulating behavior of the core-shell nanowires.

  4. High-capacity nanostructured germanium-containing materials and lithium alloys thereof

    Science.gov (United States)

    Graetz, Jason A.; Fultz, Brent T.; Ahn, Channing; Yazami, Rachid

    2010-08-24

    Electrodes comprising an alkali metal, for example, lithium, alloyed with nanostructured materials of formula Si.sub.zGe.sub.(z-1), where 0germanium exhibit a combination of improved capacities, cycle lives, and/or cycling rates compared with similar electrodes made from graphite. These electrodes are useful as anodes for secondary electrochemical cells, for example, batteries and electrochemical supercapacitors.

  5. Zero-bias 40Gbit/s germanium waveguide photodetector on silicon.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vivien, Laurent; Polzer, Andreas; Marris-Morini, Delphine; Osmond, Johann; Hartmann, Jean Michel; Crozat, Paul; Cassan, Eric; Kopp, Christophe; Zimmermann, Horst; Fédéli, Jean Marc

    2012-01-16

    We report on lateral pin germanium photodetectors selectively grown at the end of silicon waveguides. A very high optical bandwidth, estimated up to 120GHz, was evidenced in 10 µm long Ge photodetectors using three kinds of experimental set-ups. In addition, a responsivity of 0.8 A/W at 1550 nm was measured. An open eye diagrams at 40Gb/s were demonstrated under zero-bias at a wavelength of 1.55 µm.

  6. Nanorods of Silicon and Germanium with Well-Defined Shapes and Sizes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Slavi C. Sevov

    2012-05-03

    We have made number of important discoveries along the major goals of the project, namely i) electrodeposition of germanium thin films from clusters, ii) synthesis of cluster-based surfactants with long hydrocarbon chains and micelles made of them, iii) grafting of Ge{sub 9}-clusters onto self assembled films of siloxanes attached to glass substrates, iv) doping of Ge{sub 9}-clusters, and v) expanding the clusters to ten-atom cages of Ge{sub 10}{sup 2-}.

  7. Change in the crystal structure of germanium-containing lithiophosphate upon heating

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ksenofontov, D. A., E-mail: ksenofant@rambler.ru; Kabalov, Yu. K. [Moscow State University (Russian Federation); Dem' yanets, L. N. [Russian Academy of Sciences, Shubnikov Institute of Crystallography (Russian Federation)

    2010-03-15

    The crystal structure of lithiophosphate with phosphorus atoms partially replaced by germanium, Li{sub 3.17}(P{sub 0.69}Ge{sub 0.24}Mo{sub 0.07})O{sub 4}, at temperatures of 25, 150, 300, 450, and 600 deg. C has been refined by the Rietveld method using powder data. New additional Bragg reflections are observed at T = 600 deg. C, which indicate a change in the crystal structure of this compound.

  8. Change in the crystal structure of germanium-containing lithiophosphate upon heating

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ksenofontov, D. A.; Kabalov, Yu. K.; Dem'yanets, L. N.

    2010-03-01

    The crystal structure of lithiophosphate with phosphorus atoms partially replaced by germanium, Li3.17(P0.69Ge0.24Mo0.07)O4, at temperatures of 25, 150, 300, 450, and 600°C has been refined by the Rietveld method using powder data. New additional Bragg reflections are observed at T = 600°C, which indicate a change in the crystal structure of this compound.

  9. Novel epitaxial silicon interlayer for junction engineering in aggressively-scaled germanium photodetectors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andy Eu-Jin Lim

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available A new technique which uses an ultra-thin silicon interlayer in germanium photodetectors for junction engineering is demonstrated. A 5 nm epitaxially grown silicon layer was effective in preventing phosphorus diffusion into bulk Ge at 625 °C. Abrupt junction profile was achieved in thin 250 nm Ge PDs which led to improved bandwidth performance during low voltage operations (at 1V or less.

  10. Millimeter-Wave Receiver Concepts for 77 GHz Automotive Radar in Silicon-Germanium Technology

    CERN Document Server

    Kissinger, Dietmar

    2012-01-01

    The book presents the analysis and design of integrated automotive radar receivers in Silicon-Germanium technology, for use in complex multi-channel radar transceiver front-ends in the 77GHz frequency band. The main emphasis of the work is the realization of high-linearity and low-power modular receiver channels as well as the investigation of millimeter-wave integrated test concepts for the receiver front-end.

  11. 1-Dodecanethiol based highly stable self-assembled monolayers for germanium passivation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cai, Qi [State Key Laboratory of Transducer Technology, Shanghai Institute of Microsystem and Information Technology, Chinese Academy of Sciences, No. 865, Changning Road, Shanghai 200050 (China); University of Chinese Academy of Sciences, No. 19A, Yuquan Road, Beijing 100049 (China); Xu, Baojian, E-mail: xbj@mail.sim.ac.cn [State Key Laboratory of Transducer Technology, Shanghai Institute of Microsystem and Information Technology, Chinese Academy of Sciences, No. 865, Changning Road, Shanghai 200050 (China); Shanghai Internet of Things Co., LTD, No. 1455, Pingcheng Road, Shanghai 201899 (China); Ye, Lin [State Key Laboratory of Functional Materials for Informatics, Shanghai Institute of Microsystem and Information Technology, Chinese Academy of Sciences, No. 865, Changning Road, Shanghai 200050 (China); University of Chinese Academy of Sciences, No. 19A, Yuquan Road, Beijing 100049 (China); Di, Zengfeng [State Key Laboratory of Functional Materials for Informatics, Shanghai Institute of Microsystem and Information Technology, Chinese Academy of Sciences, No. 865, Changning Road, Shanghai 200050 (China); Huang, Shanluo; Du, Xiaowei [State Key Laboratory of Transducer Technology, Shanghai Institute of Microsystem and Information Technology, Chinese Academy of Sciences, No. 865, Changning Road, Shanghai 200050 (China); University of Chinese Academy of Sciences, No. 19A, Yuquan Road, Beijing 100049 (China); Zhang, Jishen; Jin, Qinghui [State Key Laboratory of Transducer Technology, Shanghai Institute of Microsystem and Information Technology, Chinese Academy of Sciences, No. 865, Changning Road, Shanghai 200050 (China); Zhao, Jianlong, E-mail: jlzhao@mail.sim.ac.cn [State Key Laboratory of Transducer Technology, Shanghai Institute of Microsystem and Information Technology, Chinese Academy of Sciences, No. 865, Changning Road, Shanghai 200050 (China)

    2015-10-30

    Highlights: • A simple and effective approach for higly stable germanium passivation. • 1-Dodecanethiol self-assembled monolayers for germanium oxidation resistance. • The influence factors of germanium passivation were systematically studied. • The stability of the passivated Ge was more than 10 days even in water conditions. - Abstract: As a typical semiconductor material, germanium has the potential to replace silicon for future-generation microelectronics, due to its better electrical properties. However, the lack of stable surface state has limited its extensive use for several decades. In this work, we demonstrated highly stable self-assembled monolayers (SAMs) on Ge surface to prevent oxidization for further applications. After the pretreatment in hydrochloric acid, the oxide-free and Cl-terminated Ge could be further coated with 1-dodecanethiol (NDM) SAMs. The influence factors including reaction time, solvent component and reaction temperature were optimized to obtain stable passivated monolayer for oxidation resistance. Contact angle analysis, atomic force microscopy, ellipsometer and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy were performed to characterize the functionalized Ge surface respectively. Meanwhile, the reaction mechanism and stability of thiols SAMs on Ge (1 1 1) surface were investigated. Finally, highly stable passivated NDM SAMs on Ge surface could be formed through immersing oxide-free Ge in mixture solvent (water/ethanol, v/v = 1:1) at appropriately elevated temperature (∼80 °C) for 24 h. And the corresponding optimized passivated Ge surface was stable for more than 10 days even in water condition, which was much longer than the data reported and paved the way for the future practical applications of Ge.

  12. Simple classical model for Fano statistics in radiation detectors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jordan, David V. [Pacific Northwest National Laboratory, National Security Division - Radiological and Chemical Sciences Group PO Box 999, Richland, WA 99352 (United States)], E-mail: David.Jordan@pnl.gov; Renholds, Andrea S.; Jaffe, John E.; Anderson, Kevin K.; Rene Corrales, L.; Peurrung, Anthony J. [Pacific Northwest National Laboratory, National Security Division - Radiological and Chemical Sciences Group PO Box 999, Richland, WA 99352 (United States)

    2008-02-01

    A simple classical model that captures the essential statistics of energy partitioning processes involved in the creation of information carriers (ICs) in radiation detectors is presented. The model pictures IC formation from a fixed amount of deposited energy in terms of the statistically analogous process of successively sampling water from a large, finite-volume container ('bathtub') with a small dipping implement ('shot or whiskey glass'). The model exhibits sub-Poisson variance in the distribution of the number of ICs generated (the 'Fano effect'). Elementary statistical analysis of the model clarifies the role of energy conservation in producing the Fano effect and yields Fano's prescription for computing the relative variance of the IC number distribution in terms of the mean and variance of the underlying, single-IC energy distribution. The partitioning model is applied to the development of the impact ionization cascade in semiconductor radiation detectors. It is shown that, in tandem with simple assumptions regarding the distribution of energies required to create an (electron, hole) pair, the model yields an energy-independent Fano factor of 0.083, in accord with the lower end of the range of literature values reported for silicon and high-purity germanium. The utility of this simple picture as a diagnostic tool for guiding or constraining more detailed, 'microscopic' physical models of detector material response to ionizing radiation is discussed.

  13. Synthesis and photoluminescent properties of size-controlled germanium nanocrystals from phenyl trichlorogermane-derived polymers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Henderson, Eric J; Hessel, Colin M; Veinot, Jonathan G C

    2008-03-19

    We report the preparation of luminescent oxide-embedded germanium nanocrystals (Ge-NC/GeO2) by the reductive thermal processing of polymers derived from phenyl trichlorogermane (PTG, C6H5GeCl3). Sol-gel processing of PTG yields air-stable polymers with a Ge:O ratio of 1:1.5, (C6H5GeO1.5)n, that thermally decompose to yield a germanium rich oxide (GRO) network. Thermal disproportionation of the GRO results in nucleation and initial growth of oxide-embedded Ge-NC, and subsequent reaction of the GeO2 matrix with the reducing atmosphere results in additional nanocrystal growth. This synthetic method affords quantitative yields of composite powders in large quantities and allows for Ge-NC size control through variations of the peak thermal processing temperature and reaction time. Freestanding germanium nanocrystals (FS-Ge-NC) are readily liberated from Ge-NC/GeO2 composite powders by straightfoward dissolution of the oxide matrix in warm water. Composites and FS-Ge-NC were characterized using thermogravimetric analysis (TGA), Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR), Raman spectroscopy, X-ray powder diffraction (XRD), X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS), transmission electron microscopy (TEM), selected area electron diffraction (SAED), energy dispersive X-ray spectroscopy (EDX), and photoluminescence (PL) spectroscopy.

  14. Novel germanium/polypyrrole composite for high power lithium-ion batteries.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gao, Xuanwen; Luo, Wenbin; Zhong, Chao; Wexler, David; Chou, Shu-Lei; Liu, Hua-Kun; Shi, Zhicong; Chen, Guohua; Ozawa, Kiyoshi; Wang, Jia-Zhao

    2014-08-29

    Nano-Germanium/polypyrrole composite has been synthesized by chemical reduction method in aqueous solution. The Ge nanoparticles were directly coated on the surface of the polypyrrole. The morphology and structural properties of samples were determined by X-ray diffraction, scanning electron microscopy and transmission electron microscopy. Thermogravimetric analysis was carried out to determine the polypyrrole content. The electrochemical properties of the samples have been investigated and their suitability as anode materials for the lithium-ion battery was examined. The discharge capacity of the Ge nanoparticles calculated in the Ge-polypyrrole composite is 1014 mAh g(-1) after 50 cycles at 0.2 C rate, which is much higher than that of pristine germanium (439 mAh g(-1)). The composite also demonstrates high specific discharge capacities at different current rates (1318, 1032, 661, and 460 mAh g(-1) at 0.5, 1.0, 2.0, and 4.0 C, respectively). The superior electrochemical performance of Ge-polypyrrole composite could be attributed to the polypyrrole core, which provides an efficient transport pathway for electrons. SEM images of the electrodes have demonstrated that polypyrrole can also act as a conductive binder and alleviate the pulverization of electrode caused by the huge volume changes of the nanosized germanium particles during Li(+) intercalation/de-intercalation.

  15. Combined in-beam gamma-ray and conversion electron spectroscopy with radioactive ion beams. Simulations of a silicon detector for the SPEDE spectrometer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Konki, J.; Papadakis, P.; Pakarinen, J.; Butler, P. A.; Davies, P.; Greenlees, P. T.; Herzberg, R. D.; Huyse, M.; Jenkins, D. G.; Julin, R.; O'Neill, G.; Page, R. D.; Rahkila, P.; Ranttila, K.; Thornhill, J.; Van Duppen, P.

    2013-12-01

    In-beam gamma-ray and electron spectroscopy have been widely used as tools to study the broad variety of phenomena in nuclear structure. The SPEDE spectrometer is a new device to be used in conjunction with the MINIBALL germanium detector array to enable the detection of internal conversion electrons in coincidence with gamma rays from de-exciting nuclei in radioactive ion beam experiments at the upcoming HIE-ISOLDE facility at CERN, Switzerland. Geant4 simulations were carried out in order to optimise the design and segmentation of the silicon detector to achieve good energy resolution and performance.

  16. Silicon detectors at the ILC

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Brau, James E. [University of Oregon, Eugene, OR 97405-1274 (United States)], E-mail: jimbrau@uoregon.edu; Breidenbach, Martin [Stanford Linear Accelerator Center, Menlo Park, CA 94025 (United States); Baltay, Charles [Yale University, New Haven, CT 06520-8120 (United States); Frey, Raymond E.; Strom, David M. [University of Oregon, Eugene, OR 97405-1274 (United States)

    2007-09-01

    Silicon detectors are being developed for several applications in ILC detectors. These include vertex detection, tracking, electromagnetic calorimetry, and forward detectors. The advantages of silicon detector technology have been incorporated into a full detector design, SiD (the Silicon Detector). A brief overview of this effort is presented.

  17. High-energy detector

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bolotnikov, Aleksey E [South Setauket, NY; Camarda, Giuseppe [Farmingville, NY; Cui, Yonggang [Upton, NY; James, Ralph B [Ridge, NY

    2011-11-22

    The preferred embodiments are directed to a high-energy detector that is electrically shielded using an anode, a cathode, and a conducting shield to substantially reduce or eliminate electrically unshielded area. The anode and the cathode are disposed at opposite ends of the detector and the conducting shield substantially surrounds at least a portion of the longitudinal surface of the detector. The conducting shield extends longitudinally to the anode end of the detector and substantially surrounds at least a portion of the detector. Signals read from one or more of the anode, cathode, and conducting shield can be used to determine the number of electrons that are liberated as a result of high-energy particles impinge on the detector. A correction technique can be implemented to correct for liberated electron that become trapped to improve the energy resolution of the high-energy detectors disclosed herein.

  18. Ionization Collection in Detectors of the Cryogenic Dark Matter Search

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Phipps, Arran T.J. [Univ. of California, Berkeley, CA (United States)

    2016-01-01

    Determining the composition of dark matter is at the forefront of modern scientific research. There is compelling evidence for the existence of vast quantities of dark matter throughout the universe, however it has so-far eluded all direct detection efforts and its identity remains a mystery. Weakly interacting massive particles (WIMPs) are a favored dark matter candidate and have been the primary focus of direct detection for several decades. The Cryogenic Dark Matter Search (CDMS) has developed the Z-dependent Ionization and Phonon (ZIP) detector to search for such particles. Typically made from germanium, these detectors are capable of distinguishing between electromagnetic background and a putative WIMP signal through the simultaneous measurement of ionization and phonons produced by scattering events. CDMS has operated several arrays of these detectors at the Soudan Underground Laboratory (Soudan, MN, USA) resulting in many competitive (often world-leading) WIMP exclusion limits. This dissertation focuses on ionization collection in these detectors under the sub-Kelvin, low electric field, and high crystal purity conditions unique to CDMS. The design and performance of a fully cryogenic HEMT-based amplifier capable of achieving the SuperCDMS SNOLAB ionization energy resolution goal of 100 eVee is presented. The experimental apparatus which has been used to record electron and hole properties under CDMS conditions is described. Measurements of charge transport, trapping, and impact ionization as a function of electric field in two CDMS detectors are shown, and the ionization collection efficiency is determined. The data is used to predict the error in the nuclear recoil energy scale under both CDMSlite and iZIP operating modes. A two species, two state model is developed to describe how ionization collection and space charge generation in CDMS detectors are controlled by the presence of “overcharged” D- donor and A+ acceptor impurity states. The thermal

  19. Detector Simulation and WIMP Search Analysis for the Cryogenic Dark Matter Search Experiment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    McCarthy, Kevin [Massachusetts Inst. of Technology (MIT), Cambridge, MA (United States)

    2013-06-01

    Astrophysical and cosmological measurements on the scales of galaxies, galaxy clusters, and the universe indicate that 85% of the matter in the universe is composed of dark matter, made up of non-baryonic particles that interact with cross-sections on the weak scale or lower. Hypothetical Weakly Interacting Massive Particles, or WIMPs, represent a potential solution to the dark matter problem, and naturally arise in certain Standard Model extensions. The Cryogenic Dark Matter Search (CDMS) collaboration aims to detect the scattering of WIMP particles from nuclei in terrestrial detectors. Germanium and silicon particle detectors are deployed in the Soudan Underground Laboratory in Minnesota. These detectors are instrumented with phonon and ionization sensors, which allows for discrimination against electromagnetic backgrounds, which strike the detector at rates orders of magnitude higher than the expected WIMP signal. This dissertation presents the development of numerical models of the physics of the CDMS detectors, implemented in a computational package collectively known as the CDMS Detector Monte Carlo (DMC). After substantial validation of the models against data, the DMC is used to investigate potential backgrounds to the next iteration of the CDMS experiment, known as SuperCDMS. Finally, an investigation of using the DMC in a reverse Monte Carlo analysis of WIMP search data is presented.

  20. Compton imaging with a highly-segmented, position-sensitive HPGe detector

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Steinbach, T.; Hirsch, R.; Reiter, P.; Birkenbach, B.; Bruyneel, B.; Eberth, J.; Hess, H.; Lewandowski, L. [Universitaet zu Koeln, Institut fuer Kernphysik, Koeln (Germany); Gernhaeuser, R.; Maier, L.; Schlarb, M.; Weiler, B.; Winkel, M. [Technische Universitaet Muenchen, Physik Department, Garching (Germany)

    2017-02-15

    A Compton camera based on a highly-segmented high-purity germanium (HPGe) detector and a double-sided silicon-strip detector (DSSD) was developed, tested, and put into operation; the origin of γ radiation was determined successfully. The Compton camera is operated in two different modes. Coincidences from Compton-scattered γ-ray events between DSSD and HPGe detector allow for best angular resolution; while the high-efficiency mode takes advantage of the position sensitivity of the highly-segmented HPGe detector. In this mode the setup is sensitive to the whole 4π solid angle. The interaction-point positions in the 36-fold segmented large-volume HPGe detector are determined by pulse-shape analysis (PSA) of all HPGe detector signals. Imaging algorithms were developed for each mode and successfully implemented. The angular resolution sensitively depends on parameters such as geometry, selected multiplicity and interaction-point distances. Best results were obtained taking into account the crosstalk properties, the time alignment of the signals and the distance metric for the PSA for both operation modes. An angular resolution between 13.8 {sup circle} and 19.1 {sup circle}, depending on the minimal interaction-point distance for the high-efficiency mode at an energy of 1275 keV, was achieved. In the coincidence mode, an increased angular resolution of 4.6 {sup circle} was determined for the same γ-ray energy. (orig.)

  1. Optimized high energy resolution in γ-ray spectroscopy with AGATA triple cluster detectors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wiens, Andreas

    2011-06-20

    The AGATA demonstrator consists of five AGATA Triple Cluster (ATC) detectors. Each triple cluster detector contains three asymmetric, 36-fold segmented, encapsulated high purity germanium detectors. The purpose of the demonstrator is to show the feasibility of position-dependent γ-ray detection by means of γ-ray tracking, which is based on pulse shape analysis. The thesis describes the first optimization procedure of the first triple cluster detectors. Here, a high signal quality is mandatory for the energy resolution and the pulse shape analysis. The signal quality was optimized and the energy resolution was improved through the modification of the electronic properties, of the grounding scheme of the detector in particular. The first part of the work was the successful installation of the first four triple cluster detectors at INFN (National Institute of Nuclear Physics) in Legnaro, Italy, in the demonstrator frame prior to the AGATA commissioning experiments and the first physics campaign. The four ATC detectors combine 444 high resolution spectroscopy channels. This number combined with a high density were achieved for the first time for in-beam γ-ray spectroscopy experiments. The high quality of the ATC detectors is characterized by the average energy resolutions achieved for the segments of each crystal in the range of 1.943 and 2.131 keV at a γ-ray energy of 1.33 MeV for the first 12 crystals. The crosstalk level between individual detectors in the ATC is negligible. The crosstalk within one crystal is at a level of 10{sup -3}. In the second part of the work new methods for enhanced energy resolution in highly segmented and position sensitive detectors were developed. The signal-to-noise ratio was improved through averaging of the core and the segment signals, which led to an improvement of the energy resolution of 21% for γ-energies of 60 keV to a FWHM of 870 eV. In combination with crosstalk correction, a clearly improved energy resolution was

  2. A fitting algorithm based on simulated annealing techniques for efficiency calibration of HPGe detectors using different mathematical functions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hurtado, S. [Servicio de Radioisotopos, Centro de Investigacion, Tecnologia e Innovacion (CITIUS), Universidad de Sevilla, Avda. Reina Mercedes s/n, 41012 Sevilla (Spain)], E-mail: shurtado@us.es; Garcia-Leon, M. [Departamento de Fisica Atomica, Molecular y Nuclear, Facultad de Fisica, Universidad de Sevilla, Aptd. 1065, 41080 Sevilla (Spain); Garcia-Tenorio, R. [Departamento de Fisica Aplicada II, E.T.S.A. Universidad de Sevilla, Avda, Reina Mercedes 2, 41012 Sevilla (Spain)

    2008-09-11

    In this work several mathematical functions are compared in order to perform the full-energy peak efficiency calibration of HPGe detectors using a 126cm{sup 3} HPGe coaxial detector and gamma-ray energies ranging from 36 to 1460 keV. Statistical tests and Monte Carlo simulations were used to study the performance of the fitting curve equations. Furthermore the fitting procedure of these complex functional forms to experimental data is a non-linear multi-parameter minimization problem. In gamma-ray spectrometry usually non-linear least-squares fitting algorithms (Levenberg-Marquardt method) provide a fast convergence while minimizing {chi}{sub R}{sup 2}, however, sometimes reaching only local minima. In order to overcome that shortcoming a hybrid algorithm based on simulated annealing (HSA) techniques is proposed. Additionally a new function is suggested that models the efficiency curve of germanium detectors in gamma-ray spectrometry.

  3. Ultrafast carrier thermalization and trapping in silicon-germanium alloy probed by extreme ultraviolet transient absorption spectroscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zürch, Michael; Chang, Hung-Tzu; Kraus, Peter M; Cushing, Scott K; Borja, Lauren J; Gandman, Andrey; Kaplan, Christopher J; Oh, Myoung Hwan; Prell, James S; Prendergast, David; Pemmaraju, Chaitanya D; Neumark, Daniel M; Leone, Stephen R

    2017-07-01

    Semiconductor alloys containing silicon and germanium are of growing importance for compact and highly efficient photonic devices due to their favorable properties for direct integration into silicon platforms and wide tunability of optical parameters. Here, we report the simultaneous direct and energy-resolved probing of ultrafast electron and hole dynamics in a silicon-germanium alloy with the stoichiometry Si0.25Ge0.75 by extreme ultraviolet transient absorption spectroscopy. Probing the photoinduced dynamics of charge carriers at the germanium M4,5-edge (∼30 eV) allows the germanium atoms to be used as reporter atoms for carrier dynamics in the alloy. The photoexcitation of electrons across the direct and indirect band gap into conduction band (CB) valleys and their subsequent hot carrier relaxation are observed and compared to pure germanium, where the Ge direct [Formula: see text] and Si0.25Ge0.75 indirect gaps ([Formula: see text]) are comparable in energy. In the alloy, comparable carrier lifetimes are observed for the X, L, and Γ valleys in the conduction band. A midgap feature associated with electrons accumulating in trap states near the CB edge following intraband thermalization is observed in the Si0.25Ge0.75 alloy. The successful implementation of the reporter atom concept for capturing the dynamics of the electronic bands by site-specific probing in solids opens a route to study carrier dynamics in more complex materials with femtosecond and sub-femtosecond temporal resolution.

  4. Low-background germanium radioassay for the MAJORANA Collaboration

    Science.gov (United States)

    Trimble, James E., Jr.

    The focus of the MAJORANA COLLABORATION is the search for nuclear neutrinoless double beta decay. If discovered, this process would prove that the neutrino is its own anti-particle, or a M AJORANA particle. Being constructed at the Sanford Underground Research Facility, the MAJORANA DEMONSTRATOR aims to show that a background rate of 3 counts per region of interest (ROI) per tonne per year in the 4 keV ROI surrounding the 2039-keV Q-value energy of 76Ge is achievable and to demonstrate the technological feasibility of building a tonne-scale Ge-based experiment. Because of the rare nature of this process, detectors in the system must be isolated from ionizing radiation backgrounds as much as possible. This involved building the system with materials containing very low levels of naturally- occurring and anthropogenic radioactive isotopes at a deep underground site. In order to measure the levels of radioactive contamination in some components, the Majorana Demonstrator uses a low background counting facility managed by the Experimental Nuclear and Astroparticle Physics (ENAP) group at UNC. The UNC low background counting (LBC) facility is located at the Kimballton Underground Research Facility (KURF) located in Ripplemead, VA. The facility was used for a neutron activation analysis of samples of polytetrafluoroethylene (PTFE) and fluorinated ethylene propylene (FEP) tubing intended for use in the Demonstrator. Calculated initial activity limits (90% C.L.) of 238U and 232Th in the 0.002-in PTFE samples were 7.6 ppt and 5.1 ppt, respectively. The same limits in the FEP tubing sample were 150 ppt and 45 ppt, respectively. The UNC LBC was also used to gamma-assay a modified stainless steel flange to be used as a vacuum feedthrough. Trace activities of both 238U and 232Th were found in the sample, but all were orders of magnitude below the acceptable threshold for the Majorana experiment. Also discussed is a proposed next generation ultra-low background system designed

  5. Precision Lifetime Measurements Using LaBr3 Detectors With Stable and Radioactive Beams

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Regan P.H.

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available A range of high resolution gamma-ray spectroscopy measurements have been carried out using arrays which include a number of Cerium-doped Lanthanum-Tribromide (LrBr3(Ce scintillation detectors used in conjunction with high-resolution hyper-pure germanium detectors. Examples of the spectral and temporal responses of such set-ups, using both standard point radioactive sources 152Eu and 56Co, and in-beam fusionevaporation reaction experiments for precision measurements of nuclear excited states in 34P and 138Ce are presented. The current and future use of such arrays at existing (EURICA at RIKEN and future (NUSTAR at FAIR secondary radioactive beam facilities for precision measurements of excited nuclear state lifetimes in the 10 ps to 10 ns regime are also discussed.

  6. A software package using a mesh-grid method for simulating HPGe detector efficiencies

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gritzo, Russell E [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Jackman, Kevin R [REMOTE SENSING LAB; Biegalski, Steven R [UT AUSTIN

    2009-01-01

    Traditional ways of determining the absolute full-energy peak efficiencies of high-purity germanium (HPGe) detectors are often time consuming, cost prohibitive, or not feasible. A software package, KMESS (Kevin's Mesh Efficiency Simulator Software), was developed to assist in predicting these efficiencies. It uses a semiempirical mesh-grid method and works for arbitrary source shapes and counting geometries. The model assumes that any gamma-ray source shape can be treated as a large enough collection of point sources. The code is readily adaptable, has a web-based graphical front-end. and could easily be coupled to a 3D scanner. As will be shown. this software can estimate absolute full-energy peak efficiencies with good accuracy in reasonable computation times. It has applications to the field of gamma-ray spectroscopy because it is a quick and accurate way to assist in performing quantitative analyses using HPGe detectors.

  7. Numerical simulations on efficiency and measurement of capabilities of BGO detectors for high energy gamma ray

    CERN Document Server

    Wen Wan Xin

    2002-01-01

    The energy resolution and time resolution of two phi 75 x 100 BGO detectors for high energy gamma ray newly made were measured with sup 1 sup 3 sup 7 Cs and sup 6 sup 0 Co resources. The two characteristic gamma rays of high energy emitted from the thermal neutron capture of germanium in BGO crystal were used for the energy calibration of gamma spectra. The intrinsic photopeak efficiency, single escape probability and double escape probabilities of BGO detectors in photon energy range of 4-30 MeV are numerically calculated with GEANT code. The real count response and count ratio of the uniformly distributed incident photons in energy range of 0-30 MeV are also calculated. The distortion of gamma spectra caused by the photon energy loss extension to lower energy in detection medium is discussed

  8. Noble Gas Detectors

    CERN Document Server

    Aprile, Elena; Bolozdynya, Alexander I; Doke, Tadayoshi

    2006-01-01

    This book discusses the physical properties of noble fluids, operational principles of detectors based on these media, and the best technical solutions to the design of these detectors. Essential attention is given to detector technology: purification methods and monitoring of purity, information readout methods, electronics, detection of hard ultra-violet light emission, selection of materials, cryogenics etc.The book is mostly addressed to physicists and graduate students involved in the preparation of fundamental next generation experiments, nuclear engineers developing instrumentation

  9. Study of accuracy in the position determination with SALSA, a γ-scanning system for the characterization of segmented HPGe detectors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hernandez-Prieto, A., E-mail: alvaro.prieto@usal.es [Laboratorio de Radiaciones Ionizantes, Departamento de Física Fundamental, Universidad de Salamanca, C /Espejo s/n, Salamanca (Spain); Quintana, B.; Martìn, S. [Laboratorio de Radiaciones Ionizantes, Departamento de Física Fundamental, Universidad de Salamanca, C /Espejo s/n, Salamanca (Spain); Domingo-Pardo, C. [Instituto de Física Corpuscular, C /Catedrático José Beltrán, 2, Paterna (Spain)

    2016-07-01

    Accurate characterization of the electric response of segmented high-purity germanium (HPGe) detectors as a function of the interaction position is one of the current goals of the Nuclear Physics community seeking to perform γ-ray tracking or even imaging with these detectors. For this purpose, scanning devices must be developed to achieve the signal-position association with the highest precision. With a view to studying the accuracy achieved with SALSA, the SAlamanca Lyso-based Scanning Array, here we report a detailed study on the uncertainty sources and their effect in the position determination inside the HPGe detector to be scanned. The optimization performed on the design of SALSA, aimed at minimizing the effect of the uncertainty sources, afforded an intrinsic uncertainty of ∼2 mm for large coaxial detectors and ∼1 mm for planar ones.

  10. The LHC detector challenge

    CERN Document Server

    Virdee, Tejinder S

    2004-01-01

    The Large Hadron Collider (LHC) from CERN, scheduled to come online in 2007, is a multi-TeV proton-proton collider with vast detectors. Two of the more significant detectors for LHC are ATLAS and CMS. Currently, both detectors are more than 65% complete in terms of financial commitment, and the experiments are being assembled at an increasing pace. ATLAS is being built directly in its underground cavern, whereas CMS is being assembled above ground. When completed, both detectors will aid researchers in determining what lies at the high-energy frontier, in particular the mechanism by which particles attain mass. (Edited abstract).

  11. ALFA Detector Control System

    CERN Document Server

    Oleiro Seabra, Luis Filipe; The ATLAS collaboration

    2015-01-01

    ALFA (Absolute Luminosity For ATLAS) is one of the sub-detectors of ATLAS/LHC. The ALFA system is composed by two stations installed in the LHC tunnel 240 m away from each side of the ATLAS interaction point. Each station has a vacuum and ventilation system, movement control and all the required electronic for signal processing. The Detector Control System (DCS) provides control and monitoring of several components and ensures the safe operation of the detector contributing to good Data Quality. This paper describes the ALFA DCS system including a detector overview, operation aspects and hardware control through a SCADA system, WinCC OA.

  12. LHCb Detector Performance

    CERN Document Server

    Aaij, Roel; Adinolfi, Marco; Affolder, Anthony; Ajaltouni, Ziad; Akar, Simon; Albrecht, Johannes; Alessio, Federico; Alexander, Michael; Ali, Suvayu; Alkhazov, Georgy; Alvarez Cartelle, Paula; Alves Jr, Antonio Augusto; Amato, Sandra; Amerio, Silvia; Amhis, Yasmine; An, Liupan; Anderlini, Lucio; Anderson, Jonathan; Andreassen, Rolf; Andreotti, Mirco; Andrews, Jason; Appleby, Robert; Aquines Gutierrez, Osvaldo; Archilli, Flavio; Artamonov, Alexander; Artuso, Marina; Aslanides, Elie; Auriemma, Giulio; Baalouch, Marouen; Bachmann, Sebastian; Back, John; Badalov, Alexey; Baesso, Clarissa; Baldini, Wander; Barlow, Roger; Barschel, Colin; Barsuk, Sergey; Barter, William; Batozskaya, Varvara; Battista, Vincenzo; Bay, Aurelio; Beaucourt, Leo; Beddow, John; Bedeschi, Franco; Bediaga, Ignacio; Belogurov, Sergey; Belous, Konstantin; Belyaev, Ivan; Ben-Haim, Eli; Bencivenni, Giovanni; Benson, Sean; Benton, Jack; Berezhnoy, Alexander; Bernet, Roland; Bettler, Marc-Olivier; van Beuzekom, Martinus; Bien, Alexander; Bifani, Simone; Bird, Thomas; Bizzeti, Andrea; Bjørnstad, Pål Marius; Blake, Thomas; Blanc, Frédéric; Blouw, Johan; Blusk, Steven; Bocci, Valerio; Bondar, Alexander; Bondar, Nikolay; Bonivento, Walter; Borghi, Silvia; Borgia, Alessandra; Borsato, Martino; Bowcock, Themistocles; Bowen, Espen Eie; Bozzi, Concezio; Brambach, Tobias; Bressieux, Joël; Brett, David; Britsch, Markward; Britton, Thomas; Brodzicka, Jolanta; Brook, Nicholas; Brown, Henry; Bursche, Albert; Buytaert, Jan; Cadeddu, Sandro; Calabrese, Roberto; Calvi, Marta; Calvo Gomez, Miriam; Campana, Pierluigi; Campora Perez, Daniel; Carbone, Angelo; Carboni, Giovanni; Cardinale, Roberta; Cardini, Alessandro; Carson, Laurence; Carvalho Akiba, Kazuyoshi; Casse, Gianluigi; Cassina, Lorenzo; Castillo Garcia, Lucia; Cattaneo, Marco; Cauet, Christophe; Cenci, Riccardo; Charles, Matthew; Charpentier, Philippe; Chefdeville, Maximilien; Chen, Shanzhen; Cheung, Shu-Faye; Chiapolini, Nicola; Chrzaszcz, Marcin; Ciba, Krzystof; Cid Vidal, Xabier; Ciezarek, Gregory; Clarke, Peter; Clemencic, Marco; Cliff, Harry; Closier, Joel; Coco, Victor; Cogan, Julien; Cogneras, Eric; Cogoni, Violetta; Cojocariu, Lucian; Collazuol, Gianmaria; Collins, Paula; Comerma-Montells, Albert; Contu, Andrea; Cook, Andrew; Coombes, Matthew; Coquereau, Samuel; Corti, Gloria; Corvo, Marco; Counts, Ian; Couturier, Benjamin; Cowan, Greig; Craik, Daniel Charles; Crocombe, Andrew; Cruz Torres, Melissa Maria; Cunliffe, Samuel; Currie, Robert; D'Ambrosio, Carmelo; Dalseno, Jeremy; David, Pascal; David, Pieter; Davis, Adam; De Bruyn, Kristof; De Capua, Stefano; De Cian, Michel; De Miranda, Jussara; De Paula, Leandro; De Silva, Weeraddana; De Simone, Patrizia; Decamp, Daniel; Deckenhoff, Mirko; Del Buono, Luigi; Déléage, Nicolas; Derkach, Denis; Deschamps, Olivier; Dettori, Francesco; Di Canto, Angelo; Dijkstra, Hans; Donleavy, Stephanie; Dordei, Francesca; Dorigo, Mirco; Dosil Suárez, Alvaro; Dossett, David; Dovbnya, Anatoliy; Dreimanis, Karlis; Dujany, Giulio; Dupertuis, Frederic; Durante, Paolo; Dzhelyadin, Rustem; Dziurda, Agnieszka; Dzyuba, Alexey; Easo, Sajan; Egede, Ulrik; Egorychev, Victor; Eidelman, Semen; Eisenhardt, Stephan; Eitschberger, Ulrich; Ekelhof, Robert; Eklund, Lars; El Rifai, Ibrahim; Elsasser, Christian; Ely, Scott; Esen, Sevda; Evans, Hannah Mary; Evans, Timothy; Falabella, Antonio; Färber, Christian; Farinelli, Chiara; Farley, Nathanael; Farry, Stephen; Fay, Robert; Ferguson, Dianne; Fernandez Albor, Victor; Ferreira Rodrigues, Fernando; Ferro-Luzzi, Massimiliano; Filippov, Sergey; Fiore, Marco; Fiorini, Massimiliano; Firlej, Miroslaw; Fitzpatrick, Conor; Fiutowski, Tomasz; Fol, Philip; Fontana, Marianna; Fontanelli, Flavio; Forty, Roger; Francisco, Oscar; Frank, Markus; Frei, Christoph; Frosini, Maddalena; Fu, Jinlin; Furfaro, Emiliano; Gallas Torreira, Abraham; Galli, Domenico; Gallorini, Stefano; Gambetta, Silvia; Gandelman, Miriam; Gandini, Paolo; Gao, Yuanning; García Pardiñas, Julián; Garofoli, Justin; Garra Tico, Jordi; Garrido, Lluis; Gascon, David; Gaspar, Clara; Gauld, Rhorry; Gavardi, Laura; Geraci, Angelo; Gersabeck, Evelina; Gersabeck, Marco; Gershon, Timothy; Ghez, Philippe; Gianelle, Alessio; Gianì, Sebastiana; Gibson, Valerie; Giubega, Lavinia-Helena; Gligorov, V.V.; Göbel, Carla; Golubkov, Dmitry; Golutvin, Andrey; Gomes, Alvaro; Gotti, Claudio; Grabalosa Gándara, Marc; Graciani Diaz, Ricardo; Granado Cardoso, Luis Alberto; Graugés, Eugeni; Graverini, Elena; Graziani, Giacomo; Grecu, Alexandru; Greening, Edward; Gregson, Sam; Griffith, Peter; Grillo, Lucia; Grünberg, Oliver; Gui, Bin; Gushchin, Evgeny; Guz, Yury; Gys, Thierry; Hadjivasiliou, Christos; Haefeli, Guido; Haen, Christophe; Haines, Susan; Hall, Samuel; Hamilton, Brian; Hampson, Thomas; Han, Xiaoxue; Hansmann-Menzemer, Stephanie; Harnew, Neville; Harnew, Samuel; Harrison, Jonathan; He, Jibo; Head, Timothy; Heijne, Veerle; Hennessy, Karol; Henrard, Pierre; Henry, Louis; Hernando Morata, Jose Angel; van Herwijnen, Eric; Heß, Miriam; Hicheur, Adlène; Hill, Donal; Hoballah, Mostafa; Hombach, Christoph; Hulsbergen, Wouter; Hunt, Philip; Hussain, Nazim; Hutchcroft, David; Hynds, Daniel; Idzik, Marek; Ilten, Philip; Jacobsson, Richard; Jaeger, Andreas; Jalocha, Pawel; Jans, Eddy; Jaton, Pierre; Jawahery, Abolhassan; Jing, Fanfan; John, Malcolm; Johnson, Daniel; Jones, Christopher; Joram, Christian; Jost, Beat; Jurik, Nathan; Kandybei, Sergii; Kanso, Walaa; Karacson, Matthias; Karbach, Moritz; Karodia, Sarah; Kelsey, Matthew; Kenyon, Ian; Ketel, Tjeerd; Khanji, Basem; Khurewathanakul, Chitsanu; Klaver, Suzanne; Klimaszewski, Konrad; Kochebina, Olga; Kolpin, Michael; Komarov, Ilya; Koopman, Rose; Koppenburg, Patrick; Korolev, Mikhail; Kozlinskiy, Alexandr; Kravchuk, Leonid; Kreplin, Katharina; Kreps, Michal; Krocker, Georg; Krokovny, Pavel; Kruse, Florian; Kucewicz, Wojciech; Kucharczyk, Marcin; Kudryavtsev, Vasily; Kurek, Krzysztof; Kvaratskheliya, Tengiz; La Thi, Viet Nga; Lacarrere, Daniel; Lafferty, George; Lai, Adriano; Lambert, Dean; Lambert, Robert W; Lanfranchi, Gaia; Langenbruch, Christoph; Langhans, Benedikt; Latham, Thomas; Lazzeroni, Cristina; Le Gac, Renaud; van Leerdam, Jeroen; Lees, Jean-Pierre; Lefèvre, Regis; Leflat, Alexander; Lefrançois, Jacques; Leo, Sabato; Leroy, Olivier; Lesiak, Tadeusz; Leverington, Blake; Li, Yiming; Likhomanenko, Tatiana; Liles, Myfanwy; Lindner, Rolf; Linn, Christian; Lionetto, Federica; Liu, Bo; Lohn, Stefan; Longstaff, Iain; Lopes, Jose; Lopez-March, Neus; Lowdon, Peter; Lucchesi, Donatella; Luo, Haofei; Lupato, Anna; Luppi, Eleonora; Lupton, Oliver; Machefert, Frederic; Machikhiliyan, Irina V; Maciuc, Florin; Maev, Oleg; Malde, Sneha; Malinin, Alexander; Manca, Giulia; Mancinelli, Giampiero; Mapelli, Alessandro; Maratas, Jan; Marchand, Jean François; Marconi, Umberto; Marin Benito, Carla; Marino, Pietro; Märki, Raphael; Marks, Jörg; Martellotti, Giuseppe; Martens, Aurelien; Martín Sánchez, Alexandra; Martinelli, Maurizio; Martinez Santos, Diego; Martinez Vidal, Fernando; Martins Tostes, Danielle; Massafferri, André; Matev, Rosen; Mathe, Zoltan; Matteuzzi, Clara; Mazurov, Alexander; McCann, Michael; McCarthy, James; McNab, Andrew; McNulty, Ronan; McSkelly, Ben; Meadows, Brian; Meier, Frank; Meissner, Marco; Merk, Marcel; Milanes, Diego Alejandro; Minard, Marie-Noelle; Moggi, Niccolò; Molina Rodriguez, Josue; Monteil, Stephane; Morandin, Mauro; Morawski, Piotr; Mordà, Alessandro; Morello, Michael Joseph; Moron, Jakub; Morris, Adam Benjamin; Mountain, Raymond; Muheim, Franz; Müller, Katharina; Mussini, Manuel; Muster, Bastien; Naik, Paras; Nakada, Tatsuya; Nandakumar, Raja; Nasteva, Irina; Needham, Matthew; Neri, Nicola; Neubert, Sebastian; Neufeld, Niko; Neuner, Max; Nguyen, Anh Duc; Nguyen, Thi-Dung; Nguyen-Mau, Chung; Nicol, Michelle; Niess, Valentin; Niet, Ramon; Nikitin, Nikolay; Nikodem, Thomas; Novoselov, Alexey; O'Hanlon, Daniel Patrick; Oblakowska-Mucha, Agnieszka; Obraztsov, Vladimir; Oggero, Serena; Ogilvy, Stephen; Okhrimenko, Oleksandr; Oldeman, Rudolf; Onderwater, Gerco; Orlandea, Marius; Otalora Goicochea, Juan Martin; Owen, Patrick; Oyanguren, Maria Arantza; Pal, Bilas Kanti; Palano, Antimo; Palombo, Fernando; Palutan, Matteo; Panman, Jacob; Papanestis, Antonios; Pappagallo, Marco; Pappalardo, Luciano; Parkes, Christopher; Parkinson, Christopher John; Passaleva, Giovanni; Patel, Girish; Patel, Mitesh; Patrignani, Claudia; Pearce, Alex; Pellegrino, Antonio; Penso, Gianni; Pepe Altarelli, Monica; Perazzini, Stefano; Perret, Pascal; Perrin-Terrin, Mathieu; Pescatore, Luca; Pesen, Erhan; Pessina, Gianluigi; Petridis, Konstantin; Petrolini, Alessandro; Picatoste Olloqui, Eduardo; Pietrzyk, Boleslaw; Pilař, Tomas; Pinci, Davide; Pistone, Alessandro; Playfer, Stephen; Plo Casasus, Maximo; Polci, Francesco; Poluektov, Anton; Polyakov, Ivan; Polycarpo, Erica; Popov, Alexander; Popov, Dmitry; Popovici, Bogdan; Potterat, Cédric; Price, Eugenia; Price, Joseph David; Prisciandaro, Jessica; Pritchard, Adrian; Prouve, Claire; Pugatch, Valery; Puig Navarro, Albert; Punzi, Giovanni; Qian, Wenbin; Rachwal, Bartolomiej; Rademacker, Jonas; Rakotomiaramanana, Barinjaka; Rama, Matteo; Rangel, Murilo; Raniuk, Iurii; Rauschmayr, Nathalie; Raven, Gerhard; Redi, Federico; Reichert, Stefanie; Reid, Matthew; dos Reis, Alberto; Ricciardi, Stefania; Richards, Sophie; Rihl, Mariana; Rinnert, Kurt; Rives Molina, Vincente; Robbe, Patrick; Rodrigues, Ana Barbara; Rodrigues, Eduardo; Rodriguez Perez, Pablo; Roiser, Stefan; Romanovsky, Vladimir; Romero Vidal, Antonio; Rotondo, Marcello; Rouvinet, Julien; Ruf, Thomas; Ruiz, Hugo; Ruiz Valls, Pablo; Saborido Silva, Juan Jose; Sagidova, Naylya; Sail, Paul; Saitta, Biagio; Salustino Guimaraes, Valdir; Sanchez Mayordomo, Carlos; Sanmartin Sedes, Brais; Santacesaria, Roberta; Santamarina Rios, Cibran; Santovetti, Emanuele; Sarti, Alessio; Satriano, Celestina; Satta, Alessia; Saunders, Daniel Martin; Savrina, Darya; Schiller, Manuel; Schindler, Heinrich; Schlupp, Maximilian; Schmelling, Michael; Schmidt, Burkhard; Schneider, Olivier; Schopper, Andreas; Schune, Marie Helene; Schwemmer, Rainer; Sciascia, Barbara; Sciubba, Adalberto; Semennikov, Alexander; Sepp, Indrek; Serra, Nicola; Serrano, Justine; Sestini, Lorenzo; Seyfert, Paul; Shapkin, Mikhail; Shapoval, Illya; Shcheglov, Yury; Shears, Tara; Shekhtman, Lev; Shevchenko, Vladimir; Shires, Alexander; Silva Coutinho, Rafael; Simi, Gabriele; Sirendi, Marek; Skidmore, Nicola; Skillicorn, Ian; Skwarnicki, Tomasz; Smith, Anthony; Smith, Edmund; Smith, Eluned; Smith, Jackson; Smith, Mark; Snoek, Hella; Sokoloff, Michael; Soler, Paul; Soomro, Fatima; Souza, Daniel; Souza De Paula, Bruno; Spaan, Bernhard; Sparkes, Ailsa; Spradlin, Patrick; Sridharan, Srikanth; Stagni, Federico; Stahl, Marian; Stahl, Sascha; Steinkamp, Olaf; Stenyakin, Oleg; Stevenson, Scott; Stoica, Sabin; Stone, Sheldon; Storaci, Barbara; Stracka, Simone; Straticiuc, Mihai; Straumann, Ulrich; Stroili, Roberto; Subbiah, Vijay Kartik; Sun, Liang; Sutcliffe, William; Swientek, Krzysztof; Swientek, Stefan; Syropoulos, Vasileios; Szczekowski, Marek; Szczypka, Paul; Szumlak, Tomasz; T'Jampens, Stephane; Teklishyn, Maksym; Tellarini, Giulia; Teubert, Frederic; Thomas, Christopher; Thomas, Eric; van Tilburg, Jeroen; Tisserand, Vincent; Tobin, Mark; Tolk, Siim; Tomassetti, Luca; Tonelli, Diego; Topp-Joergensen, Stig; Torr, Nicholas; Tournefier, Edwige; Tourneur, Stephane; Tran, Minh Tâm; Tresch, Marco; Tsaregorodtsev, Andrei; Tsopelas, Panagiotis; Tuning, Niels; Ubeda Garcia, Mario; Ukleja, Artur; Ustyuzhanin, Andrey; Uwer, Ulrich; Vacca, Claudia; Vagnoni, Vincenzo; Valenti, Giovanni; Vallier, Alexis; Vazquez Gomez, Ricardo; Vazquez Regueiro, Pablo; Vázquez Sierra, Carlos; Vecchi, Stefania; Velthuis, Jaap; Veltri, Michele; Veneziano, Giovanni; Vesterinen, Mika; Viaud, Benoit; Vieira, Daniel; Vieites Diaz, Maria; Vilasis-Cardona, Xavier; Vollhardt, Achim; Volyanskyy, Dmytro; Voong, David; Vorobyev, Alexey; Vorobyev, Vitaly; Voß, Christian; de Vries, Jacco; Waldi, Roland; Wallace, Charlotte; Wallace, Ronan; Walsh, John; Wandernoth, Sebastian; Wang, Jianchun; Ward, David; Watson, Nigel; Websdale, David; Whitehead, Mark; Wicht, Jean; Wiedner, Dirk; Wilkinson, Guy; Williams, Matthew; Williams, Mike; Wilschut, Hans; Wilson, Fergus; Wimberley, Jack; Wishahi, Julian; Wislicki, Wojciech; Witek, Mariusz; Wormser, Guy; Wotton, Stephen; Wright, Simon; Wyllie, Kenneth; Xie, Yuehong; Xing, Zhou; Xu, Zhirui; Yang, Zhenwei; Yuan, Xuhao; Yushchenko, Oleg; Zangoli, Maria; Zavertyaev, Mikhail; Zhang, Liming; Zhang, Wen Chao; Zhang, Yanxi; Zhelezov, Alexey; Zhokhov, Anatoly; Zhong, Liang; Zvyagin, Alexander

    2015-03-05

    The LHCb detector is a forward spectrometer at the Large Hadron Collider (LHC) at CERN. The experiment is designed for precision measurements of CP violation and rare decays of beauty and charm hadrons. In this paper the performance of the various LHCb sub-detectors and the trigger system are described, using data taken from 2010 to 2012. It is shown that the design criteria of the experiment have been met. The excellent performance of the detector has allowed the LHCb collaboration to publish a wide range of physics results, demonstrating LHCb's unique role, both as a heavy flavour experiment and as a general purpose detector in the forward region.

  13. ALFA Detector Control System

    CERN Document Server

    Oleiro Seabra, Luis Filipe; The ATLAS collaboration

    2015-01-01

    ALFA (Absolute Luminosity For ATLAS) is one of the sub-detectors of ATLAS (A Toroidal LHC Apparatus). The ALFA system is composed by four stations installed in the LHC tunnel 240 m away from the ATLAS interaction point. Each station has a vacuum and ventilation system, movement control and all the required electronics for signal processing. The Detector Control System (DCS) provides control and monitoring of several components and ensures the safe operation of the detector contributing to good Data Quality. This paper describes the ALFA DCS system including a detector overview, operation aspects and hardware control through a SCADA system, WinCC OA.

  14. Monte Carlo Comparisons to a Cryogenic Dark Matter Search Detector with Low Transition-Edge-Sensor Transition Temperature

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Leman, S.W.; McCarthy, K.A.; /MIT, MKI; Brink, P.L.; Cabrera, B.; Cherry, M.; /Stanford U., Phys. Dept.; Silva, E.Do Couto E; /SLAC; Figueroa-Feliciano, E.; /MIT, MKI; Kim, P.; /SLAC; Mirabolfathi, N.; /UC, Berkeley; Pyle, M.; /Stanford U., Phys. Dept.; Resch, R.; /SLAC; Sadoulet, B.; Serfass, B.; Sundqvist, K.M.; /UC, Berkeley; Tomada, A.; /Stanford U., Phys. Dept.; Young, B.A.; /Santa Clara U.

    2012-06-05

    We present results on phonon quasidiffusion and Transition Edge Sensor (TES) studies in a large, 3-inch diameter, 1-inch thick [100] high purity germanium crystal, cooled to 50 mK in the vacuum of a dilution refrigerator, and exposed with 59.5 keV gamma-rays from an Am-241 calibration source. We compare calibration data with results from a Monte Carlo which includes phonon quasidiffusion and the generation of phonons created by charge carriers as they are drifted across the detector by ionization readout channels. The phonon energy is then parsed into TES based phonon readout channels and input into a TES simulator.

  15. Background rejection of TEXONO experiment to explore the sub-keV energy region with HPGe detector

    Science.gov (United States)

    Singh, M. K.; Sharma, V.; Singh, L.; Chen, J. H.; Singh, V.; Subrahmanyam, V. S.; Soma, A. K.; Wong, H. T.

    2017-10-01

    To observe the neutrino-nucleus coherent scattering as well as for dark matter search, a detection system with ultra-low energy high purity germanium detector has been set up by the TEXONO Collaboration in Kuo-Sheng Nuclear Power Plant. Owing to the weak nature and small recoil energy of these rare events, understanding of background sources and their contribution to the energy spectrum are the key factors in this experiment. In this report, we will focus in detail on the different sources of backgrounds in the TEXONO experiment and the techniques used to reject/minimize them.

  16. Analysis of high-purity germanium dioxide by ETV-ICP-AES with preliminary concentration of trace elements.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Medvedev, Nickolay S; Shaverina, Anastasiya V; Tsygankova, Alphiya R; Saprykin, Anatoly I

    2016-08-01

    The paper presents a combined technique of germanium dioxide analysis by inductively coupled plasma atomic emission spectrometry (ICP-AES) with preconcentration of trace elements by distilling off matrix and electrothermal (ETV) introduction of the trace elements concentrate into the ICP. Evaluation of metrological characteristics of the developed technique of high-purity germanium dioxide analysis was performed. The limits of detection (LODs) for 25 trace elements ranged from 0.05 to 20ng/g. The accuracy of proposed technique is confirmed by "added-found" («or spiking») experiment and comparing the results of ETV-ICP-AES and ICP-AES analysis of high purity germanium dioxide samples. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  17. Co-doping with antimony to control phosphorous diffusion in germanium

    KAUST Repository

    Tahini, H. A.

    2013-02-15

    In germanium, phosphorous and antimony diffuse quickly and as such their transport must be controlled in order to design efficient n-typed doped regions. Here, density functional theory based calculations are used to predict the influence of double donor co-doping on the migration activation energies of vacancy-mediated diffusion processes. The migration energy barriers for phosphorous and antimony were found to be increased significantly when larger clusters involving two donor atoms and a vacancy were formed. These clusters are energetically stable and can lead to the formation of even larger clusters involving a number of donor atoms around a vacancy, thereby affecting the properties of devices.

  18. Broadband telecom to mid-infrared supercontinuum generation in a dispersion-engineered silicon germanium waveguide.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ettabib, Mohamed A; Xu, Lin; Bogris, Adonis; Kapsalis, Alexandros; Belal, Mohammad; Lorent, Emerick; Labeye, Pierre; Nicoletti, Sergio; Hammani, Kamal; Syvridis, Dimitris; Shepherd, David P; Price, Jonathan H V; Richardson, David J; Petropoulos, Periklis

    2015-09-01

    We demonstrate broadband supercontinuum generation (SCG) in a dispersion-engineered silicon-germanium waveguide. The 3 cm long waveguide is pumped by femtosecond pulses at 2.4 μm, and the generated supercontinuum extends from 1.45 to 2.79 μm (at the -30  dB point). The broadening is mainly driven by the generation of a dispersive wave in the 1.5-1.8 μm region and soliton fission. The SCG was modeled numerically, and excellent agreement with the experimental results was obtained.

  19. Effect of uniaxial stress on gallium, beryllium, and copper-doped germanium hole population inversion lasers

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chamberlin, Danielle Russell [Univ. of California, Berkeley, CA (United States)

    1998-05-01

    The effects of stress on germanium lasers doped with single, double, and triple acceptors have been investigated. The results can be explained quantitatively with theoretical calculations and can be attributed to specific changes in the energy levels of acceptors in germanium under stress. In contrast to previous measurements, gallium-doped Ge crystals show a decrease in lasing upon uniaxial stress. The decrease seen here is attributed to the decrease in heavy hole effective mass upon application of uniaxial stress, which results in a decreased population inversion. The discrepancy between this work and previous studies can be explained with the low compensation level of the material used here. Because the amount of ionized impurity scattering in low-compensated germanium lasers is small to begin with, the reduction in scattering with uniaxial stress does not play a significant role in changing the laser operation. Beryllium-doped germanium lasers operate based on a different mechanism of population inversion. In this material it is proposed that holes can transfer between bands by giving their energy to a neutral beryllium atom, raising the hole from the ground to a bound excited state. The free hole will then return to zero energy with some probability of entering the other band. The minimum and maximum E/B ratios for lasing change with uniaxial stress because of the change in effective mass and bound excited state energy. These limits have been calculated for the case of 300 bar [100] stress, and match very well with the observed data. This adds further credence to the proposed mechanism for population inversion in this material. In contrast to Be and Ga-doped lasers, copper-doped lasers under uniaxial stress show an increase in the range of E and B where lasing is seen. To understand this change the theoretical limits for population inversion based on both the optical phonon mechanism and the neutral acceptor mechanism have been calculated. The data are

  20. Diffusion of E centers in germanium predicted using GGA+U approach

    KAUST Repository

    Tahini, H. A.

    2011-08-17

    Density functional theory calculations (based on GGA+U approach) are used to investigate the formation and diffusion of donor-vacancy pairs (E centers) in germanium. We conclude that depending upon the Fermi energy,E centers that incorporate for phosphorous and arsenic can form in their neutral, singly negatively or doubly negatively charged states whereas with antimony only the neutral or doubly negatively charged states are predicted. The activation energies of diffusion are compared with recent experimental work and support the idea that smaller donor atoms exhibit higher diffusionactivation energies.

  1. Structural and optical properties of axial silicon-germanium nanowire heterojunctions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wang, X.; Tsybeskov, L., E-mail: tsybesko@njit.edu [ECE Department, New Jersey Institute of Technology, Newark, New Jersey 07102 (United States); Kamins, T. I. [Department of Electrical Engineering, Stanford University, Stanford, California 94305 (United States); Wu, X.; Lockwood, D. J. [National Research Council, Ottawa, Ontario K1A 0R6 (Canada)

    2015-12-21

    Detailed studies of the structural and optical properties of axial silicon-germanium nanowire heterojunctions show that despite the 4.2% lattice mismatch between Si and Ge they can be grown without a significant density of structural defects. The lattice mismatch induced strain is partially relieved due to spontaneous SiGe intermixing at the heterointerface during growth and lateral expansion of the Ge segment of the nanowire. The mismatch in Ge and Si coefficients of thermal expansion and low thermal conductivity of Si/Ge nanowire heterojunctions are proposed to be responsible for the thermally induced stress detected under intense laser radiation in photoluminescence and Raman scattering measurements.

  2. Ab initio study of new sp3 silicon and germanium allotropes predicted from the zeolite topologies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saleev, Vladimir A.; Shipilova, Alexandra V.; Proserpio, Davide M.; Fadda, Giuseppe

    2017-08-01

    We study the structural, elastic, vibrational, electronic, and optical properties of six new silicon and germanium allotropes using ab initio quantum mechanical methods. These allotropes have been found first for carbon by using topological methods on a large sample of zeolites; this is extended here to Si and Ge, given their chemical similarity with C and their importance for the semiconductor industry and for photovoltaics. Some Si allotropes show excellent absorbance of solar light, making them an interesting alternatives to amorphous Si, whereas an allotrope of Ge has a very small band gap, in agreement with the metallic nature of amorphous Ge.

  3. CdZnTe detector in mammographic x-ray spectroscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miyajima, Satoshi; Imagawa, Kotaro

    2002-11-21

    A CdZnTe (CZT) detector was utilized in mammographic x-ray spectroscopy under clinical conditions. First, the detector response was investigated using y-rays from 241Am. The escape of secondary (Compton scattered and K fluorescent) x-rays and tailing due to carrier trapping were minor in the mammographic energy range. In addition, the transmission of primary x-rays was minimal from the results calculated using the mass attenuation coefficients of CZT. Therefore, spectral distortion in this energy range was expected to be negligible. Secondly, x-ray spectroscopy was carried out with the CZT detector. The measured spectra were in good agreement with the spectra obtained with the Compton-scatter method with a high-purity germanium detector. Moreover, the half-value layers (HVLs) calculated from the CZT spectra were consistent with the HVLs measured with an ionization chamber. The results indicate that a CZT detector can be utilized in mammographic x-ray spectroscopy without any corrections.

  4. Metal-optic cavity for a high efficiency sub-fF germanium photodiode on a silicon waveguide.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Going, Ryan; Kim, Myung-Ki; Wu, Ming C

    2013-09-23

    We propose two designs of nanoscale sub-fF germanium photodiodes which are efficiently integrated with silicon waveguides. The metal-optic cavities are simulated with the finite difference time domain method and optimized using critical coupling concepts. One design is for a metal semiconductor metal photodiode with photodiode with <100 aF capacitance, 51% external quantum efficiency, and 0.804 (λ/n)³ cavity volume. Both designs make use of CMOS compatible materials germanium and aluminum metal for potential future monolithic integration with silicon photonics.

  5. 100-Gbps RZ Data Reception in 67-GHz Si-Contacted Germanium Waveguide p-i-n Photodetectors

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Chen, Hongtao; Galili, Michael; Verheyen, P.

    2017-01-01

    We demonstrate 100-Gbps silicon-contacted germanium waveguide p-i-n photodetectors integrated on imec's silicon photonics platform. The performance of 14 and 20 μm long devices is compared. The responsivity of the devices is 0.74 and 0.92 A/W at 1550 nm, respectively.......We demonstrate 100-Gbps silicon-contacted germanium waveguide p-i-n photodetectors integrated on imec's silicon photonics platform. The performance of 14 and 20 μm long devices is compared. The responsivity of the devices is 0.74 and 0.92 A/W at 1550 nm, respectively....

  6. ALICE Photon Multiplicity Detector

    CERN Multimedia

    Nayak, T

    2013-01-01

    Photon Multiplicity Detector (PMD) measures the multiplicity and spatial distribution of photons in the forward region of ALICE on a event-by-event basis. PMD is a pre-shower detector having fine granularity and full azimuthal coverage in the pseudo-rapidity region 2.3 < η < 3.9.

  7. ALICE Silicon Strip Detector

    CERN Multimedia

    Nooren, G

    2013-01-01

    The Silicon Strip Detector (SSD) constitutes the two outermost layers of the Inner Tracking System (ITS) of the ALICE Experiment. The SSD plays a crucial role in the tracking of the particles produced in the collisions connecting the tracks from the external detectors (Time Projection Chamber) to the ITS. The SSD also contributes to the particle identification through the measurement of their energy loss.

  8. Pixel detector readout chip

    CERN Multimedia

    1991-01-01

    Close-up of a pixel detector readout chip. The photograph shows an aera of 1 mm x 2 mm containing 12 separate readout channels. The entire chip contains 1000 readout channels (around 80 000 transistors) covering a sensitive area of 8 mm x 5 mm. The chip has been mounted on a silicon detector to detect high energy particles.

  9. Detector Systems at CLIC

    CERN Document Server

    Simon, Frank

    2011-01-01

    The Compact Linear Collider CLIC is designed to deliver e+e- collisions at a center of mass energy of up to 3 TeV. The detector systems at this collider have to provide highly efficient tracking and excellent jet energy resolution and hermeticity for multi-TeV final states with multiple jets and leptons. In addition, the detector systems have to be capable of distinguishing physics events from large beam-induced background at a crossing frequency of 2 GHz. Like for the detector concepts at the ILC, CLIC detectors are based on event reconstruction using particle flow algorithms. The two detector concepts for the ILC, ILD and SID, were adapted for CLIC using calorimeters with dense absorbers limiting leakage through increased compactness, as well as modified forward and vertex detector geometries and precise time stamping to cope with increased background levels. The overall detector concepts for CLIC are presented, with particular emphasis on the main detector and engineering challenges, such as: the ultra-thi...

  10. The LDC detector concept

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Abstract. In preparation of the experimental program at the international linear collider. (ILC), the large detector concept (LDC) is being developed. The main points of the LDC are a large volume gaseous tracking system, combined with high precision vertex detector and an extremely granular calorimeter. The main design ...

  11. CMS Detector Posters

    CERN Multimedia

    2016-01-01

    CMS Detector posters (produced in 2000): CMS installation CMS collaboration From the Big Bang to Stars LHC Magnetic Field Magnet System Trackering System Tracker Electronics Calorimetry Eletromagnetic Calorimeter Hadronic Calorimeter Muon System Muon Detectors Trigger and data aquisition (DAQ) ECAL posters (produced in 2010, FR & EN): CMS ECAL CMS ECAL-Supermodule cooling and mechatronics CMS ECAL-Supermodule assembly

  12. CHERENKOV RADIATION DETECTOR

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    ES Obe

    1981-03-01

    Mar 1, 1981 ... Most of Radiation detectors based on the Cherenkov Effect are essentially very bulky and expensive for schools and colleges. An inexpensive yet very compact radiation detector is designed, built and tested. It is used to measure the Cherenkov angles for natural radioactivity from sources as. Cs137.

  13. Using HPGe detector for a solar hidden-photons search

    CERN Document Server

    Horvat, R; Krcmar, M; Krecak, Z; Ljubicic, A

    2012-01-01

    In this paper we report on the results of our search for photons from a U(1) gauge factor in the hidden sector of the full theory, by observing the single spectrum in a HPGe detector arising as a result of the photoelectric-like absorption of hidden photons emitted from the Sun on germanium atoms inside the detector. The main ingredient of the theory used in our analysis, a severely constrained kinetic mixing from the two U(1) gauge factors and massive hidden photons, leads to both photon into hidden states oscillations and to a minuscule coupling of hidden photons to visible matter, of which the latter our experimental setup has been designed to observe. On a theoretical side, full account was taken of the effects of refraction and damping of photons while propagating in the Sun's interior. We exclude hidden photons with kinetic couplings chi > (1.5x10^{-6}-2.6x10^{-11}) for the mass region 1.7x10^{-4} eV < m_\\gamma' < 3.4 eV. Our constraints on the mixing parameter chi at sub-eV hidden-photon masses p...

  14. Testing and Characterization of SuperCDMS Dark Matter Detectors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shank, Benjamin [Stanford Univ., CA (United States)

    2014-05-01

    The Cryogenic Dark Matter Search (SuperCDMS) relies on collection of phonons and charge carriers in semiconductors held at tens of milliKelvin as handles for detection of Weakly Interacting Massive Particles (WIMPs). This thesis begins with a brief overview of the direct dark matter search (Chapter 1) and SuperCDMS detectors (Chapter 2). In Chapter 3, a 3He evaporative refrigerator facility is described. Results from experiments performed in-house at Stanford to measure carrier transport in high-purity germanium (HPGe) crystals operated at sub-Kelvin temperatures are presented in Chapter 4. Finally, in Chapter 5 a new numerical model and a time-domain optimal filtering technique are presented, both developed for use with superconducting Transition Edge Sensors (TESs), that provide excellent event reconstruction for single particle interactions in detectors read out with superconducting W-TESs coupled to energy-collecting films of Al. This thesis is not intended to be read straight through. For those new to CDMS or dark matter searches, the first two chapters are meant to be a gentle introduction for experimentalists. They are by no means exhaustive. The remaining chapters each stand alone, with different audiences.

  15. Superconducting detectors in astronomy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rahman, F.

    2006-08-01

    Radiation detectors based on superconducting phenomena are becoming increasingly important for observational astronomy. Recent developments in this important field, together with relevant background, are described here. After a general introduction to superconductivity and the field of superconductor-based radiation sensors, the main detector types are examined with regard to their physical form, operating principles and principal advantages. All major forms of superconducting detectors used in contemporary research such as tunnelling detectors, mixers, hot-electron bolometers and transition edge sensitive devices are discussed with an emphasis on how more recent developments are overcoming the shortcomings of the previous device generations. Also, discussed are new ideas in superconducting detector technology that may find applications in the coming years.

  16. Nanomechanical resonance detector

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grossman, Jeffrey C; Zettl, Alexander K

    2013-10-29

    An embodiment of a nanomechanical frequency detector includes a support structure and a plurality of elongated nanostructures coupled to the support structure. Each of the elongated nanostructures has a particular resonant frequency. The plurality of elongated nanostructures has a range of resonant frequencies. An embodiment of a method of identifying an object includes introducing the object to the nanomechanical resonance detector. A resonant response by at least one of the elongated nanostructures of the nanomechanical resonance detector indicates a vibrational mode of the object. An embodiment of a method of identifying a molecular species of the present invention includes introducing the molecular species to the nanomechanical resonance detector. A resonant response by at least one of the elongated nanostructures of the nanomechanical resonance detector indicates a vibrational mode of the molecular species.

  17. ATLAS ITk Pixel detector

    CERN Document Server

    Gemme, Claudia; The ATLAS collaboration

    2016-01-01

    The high luminosity upgrade of the LHC (HL-LHC) in 2026 will provide new challenge to the ATLAS tracker. The current inner detector will be replaced with a whole silicon tracker which will consist of a five barrel layer Pixel detector surrounded by a four barrel layer Strip detector. The expected high radiation level are requiring the development of upgraded silicon sensors as well as new a front-end chip. The dense tracking environment will require finer granularity detectors. The data rates will require new technologies for high bandwidth data transmission and handling. The current status of the HL-LHC ATLA Pixel detector developments as well as the various layout options will be reviewed.

  18. Semiconductor radiation detectors. Device physics

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lutz, G. [Max-Planck-Institut fuer Physik, Muenchen (Germany)]|[Max-Planck-Institut fuer Extraterrestrische Physik, Garching (Germany). Semiconductor Lab.

    1999-07-01

    The following topics were dealt with: semiconductor radiation detectors, basic semiconductor structures, semiconductors, energy measurement, radiation-level measurement, position measurement, electronics of the readout function, detectors with intrinsic amplification, detector technology, device stability, radiation hardness and device simulation.

  19. Experimental Investigation of Size Effects on the Thermal Conductivity of Silicon-Germanium Alloy Thin Films

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cheaito, Ramez; Duda, John C.; Beechem, Thomas E.; Hattar, Khalid; Ihlefeld, Jon F.; Medlin, Douglas L.; Rodriguez, Mark A.; Campion, Michael J.; Piekos, Edward S.; Hopkins, Patrick E.

    2012-11-01

    We experimentally investigate the role of size effects and boundary scattering on the thermal conductivity of silicon-germanium alloys. The thermal conductivities of a series of epitaxially grown Si1-xGex thin films with varying thicknesses and compositions were measured with time-domain thermoreflectance. The resulting conductivities are found to be 3 to 5 times less than bulk values and vary strongly with film thickness. By examining these measured thermal conductivities in the context of a previously established model, it is shown that long wavelength phonons, known to be the dominant heat carriers in alloy films, are strongly scattered by the film boundaries, thereby inducing the observed reductions in heat transport. These results are then generalized to silicon-germanium systems of various thicknesses and compositions; we find that the thermal conductivities of Si1-xGex superlattices are ultimately limited by finite size effects and sample size rather than periodicity or alloying. This demonstrates the strong influence of sample size in alloyed nanosystems. Therefore, if a comparison is to be made between the thermal conductivities of superlattices and alloys, the total sample thicknesses of each must be considered.

  20. Efficiency improvements of silicon solar cells by absorption enhancement with germanium

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Borne, E.; Boyeaux, J.P.; Laugier, A. [Inst. National des Sciences Appliquees, Villeurbanne (France). Lab. de Physique de la Matiere

    1994-12-31

    This paper presents a theoretical investigation of the germanium effect on the absorption coefficient in polycrystalline silicon alloys to improve solar cell efficiency. The underlying objective is to enhance the efficiency or reduce the cell thickness of the standard photovoltaic system for terrestrial application without sacrificing the benefits of the well known silicon cell technology. The study is based on the comparison of a standard polycrystalline Si cell (taken as reference) and the same cell with 8% atomic of germanium. The Si and SiGe material was processed by an extension of the POLIX method, and samples were characterized by infrared spectroscopy in the near infrared range. The authors find an optical absorption gain three times greater for Si{sub 0.92}Ge{sub 0.08} as compared to Si. Parameters of each cell are taken to be equal except for the absorption coefficient in the infrared range. The authors show, as a result of computer device modeling, that significant gains in cell efficiencies can be obtained. They have also studied the influence of the Si{sub 0.92}Ge{sub 0.08} cell thickness, and half the thickness shows an efficiency still greater than the reference Si cell.

  1. Catalytic conversion of carbohydrates into 5-hydroxymethylfurfural by germanium(IV) chloride in ionic liquids.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Zehui; Wang, Qian; Xie, Haibo; Liu, Wujun; Zhao, Zongbao Kent

    2011-01-17

    Direct conversion of carbohydrates into 5-hydroxymethylfurfural (HMF) catalyzed by germanium(IV) chloride in ionic liquids has been investigated in search of an efficient and environmentally friendly process. Monosaccharides D-fructose and D-glucose, disaccharides sucrose and maltose, and even the polysaccharide cellulose were successfully converted into HMF with good yields under mild conditions (yield up to 92 % in 5 min in the case of fructose). The structure of ionic liquids, catalyst loading, reaction temperature and water content had noticeable effects on this catalytic system. Addition of 5 Å molecular sieves during the dehydration of glucose resulted in an increase in HMF yield from 38.4 % to 48.4 %. A mechanism for glucose conversion to HMF catalyzed by germanium(IV) chloride was proposed according to ¹³C NMR spectra obtained in situ under different conditions using D-glucose-2-¹³C as the substrate. Copyright © 2011 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  2. Strategies for single-point diamond machining a large format germanium blazed immersion grating

    Science.gov (United States)

    Montesanti, R. C.; Little, S. L.; Kuzmenko, P. J.; Bixler, J. V.; Jackson, J. L.; Lown, J. G.; Priest, R. E.; Yoxall, B. E.

    2016-07-01

    A large format germanium immersion grating was flycut with a single-point diamond tool on the Precision Engineering Research Lathe (PERL) at the Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL) in November - December 2015. The grating, referred to as 002u, has an area of 59 mm x 67 mm (along-groove and cross-groove directions), line pitch of 88 line/mm, and blaze angle of 32 degree. Based on total groove length, the 002u grating is five times larger than the previous largest grating (ZnSe) cut on PERL, and forty-five times larger than the previous largest germanium grating cut on PERL. The key risks associated with cutting the 002u grating were tool wear and keeping the PERL machine running uninterrupted in a stable machining environment. This paper presents the strategies employed to mitigate these risks, introduces pre-machining of the as-etched grating substrate to produce a smooth, flat, damage-free surface into which the grooves are cut, and reports on trade-offs that drove decisions and experimental results.

  3. Chemical Bonding, Interfaces and Defects in Hafnium Oxide/Germanium Oxynitride Gate Stacks on Ge (100)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Oshima, Yasuhiro; /Stanford U., Materials Sci. Dept.; Sun, Yun; /SLAC, SSRL; Kuzum, Duygu; /Stanford U.; Sugawara, Takuya; Saraswat, Krishna C.; Pianetta, Piero; /SLAC, SSRL; McIntyre, Paul C.; /Stanford U., Materials Sci. Dept.

    2008-10-31

    Correlations among interface properties and chemical bonding characteristics in HfO{sub 2}/GeO{sub x}N{sub y}/Ge MIS stacks were investigated using in-situ remote nitridation of the Ge (100) surface prior to HfO{sub 2} atomic layer deposition (ALD). Ultra thin ({approx}1.1 nm), thermally stable and aqueous etch-resistant GeO{sub x}N{sub y} interfaces layers that exhibited Ge core level photoelectron spectra (PES) similar to stoichiometric Ge{sub 3}N{sub 4} were synthesized. To evaluate GeO{sub x}N{sub y}/Ge interface defects, the density of interface states (D{sub it}) was extracted by the conductance method across the band gap. Forming gas annealed (FGA) samples exhibited substantially lower D{sub it} ({approx} 1 x 10{sup 12} cm{sup -2} eV{sup -1}) than did high vacuum annealed (HVA) and inert gas anneal (IGA) samples ({approx} 1x 10{sup 13} cm{sup -2} eV{sup -1}). Germanium core level photoelectron spectra from similar FGA-treated samples detected out-diffusion of germanium oxide to the HfO{sub 2} film surface and apparent modification of chemical bonding at the GeO{sub x}N{sub y}/Ge interface, which is related to the reduced D{sub it}.

  4. Silicon and Germanium Nanostructures for Photovoltaic Applications: Ab-Initio Results

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pulci Olivia

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Actually, most of the electric energy is being produced by fossil fuels and great is the search for viable alternatives. The most appealing and promising technology is photovoltaics. It will become truly mainstream when its cost will be comparable to other energy sources. One way is to significantly enhance device efficiencies, for example by increasing the number of band gaps in multijunction solar cells or by favoring charge separation in the devices. This can be done by using cells based on nanostructured semiconductors. In this paper, we will present ab-initio results of the structural, electronic and optical properties of (1 silicon and germanium nanoparticles embedded in wide band gap materials and (2 mixed silicon-germanium nanowires. We show that theory can help in understanding the microscopic processes important for devices performances. In particular, we calculated for embedded Si and Ge nanoparticles the dependence of the absorption threshold on size and oxidation, the role of crystallinity and, in some cases, the recombination rates, and we demonstrated that in the case of mixed nanowires, those with a clear interface between Si and Ge show not only a reduced quantum confinement effect but display also a natural geometrical separation between electron and hole.

  5. Thermoluminescence study of aluminium oxide doped germanium prepared by combustion synthesis method

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Saharin Nurul Syazlin Binti

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available The present paper reports the optimum concentration of germanium (Ge dopant in aluminium oxide (AhO3 samples prepared by combustion synthesis (CS method for thermoluminescence (TL studies. The samples were prepared at various Ge concentration i.e. 1 to 5% mol. The phase formation of un-doped and Ge-doped Al2O3 samples was determined using X-ray Diffraction (XRD. The sharp peaks present in the XRD pattern confirms the crystallinity of the samples. The samples were then exposed to 50 Gy Cobalt-60 sources (Gamma cell 220. TL glow curves were measured and recorded using a Harshaw Model 3500 TLD reader. Comparison of TL peaks were observed to obtain the best composition of Ge dopants. A simple glow curves TL peak at around 175̊C for all composition samples was observed. It was also found that the composition of aluminium oxide doped with 3.0% of germanium exhibits the highest thermoluminescence (TL intensity which is 349747.04 (a.u.

  6. Comparative Study of Phase Transformation in Single-Crystal Germanium during Single and Cyclic Nanoindentation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Koji Kosai

    2017-11-01

    Full Text Available Single-crystal germanium is a semiconductor material which shows complicated phase transformation under high pressure. In this study, new insight into the phase transformation of diamond-cubic germanium (dc-Ge was attempted by controlled cyclic nanoindentation combined with Raman spectroscopic analysis. Phase transformation from dc-Ge to rhombohedral phase (r8-Ge was experimentally confirmed for both single and cyclic nanoindentation under high loading/unloading rates. However, compared to single indentation, double cyclic indentation with a low holding load between the cycles caused more frequent phase transformation events. Double cyclic indentation caused more stress in Ge than single indentation and increased the possibility of phase transformation. With increase in the holding load, the number of phase transformation events decreased and finally became less than that under single indentation. This phenomenon was possibly caused by defect nucleation and shear accumulation during the holding process, which were promoted by a high holding load. The defect nucleation suppressed the phase transformation from dc-Ge to r8-Ge, and shear accumulation led to another phase transformation pathway, respectively. A high holding load promoted these two phenomena, and thus decreased the possibility of phase transformation from dc-Ge to r8-Ge.

  7. Optical spectroscopic characterization of amorphous germanium carbide materials obtained by X-Ray Chemical Vapor Deposition

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Paola Antoniotti

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available Amorphous germanium carbides have been prepared by X-ray activated Chemical Vapor Deposition from germane/allene systems. The allene percentage and irradiation time (total dose were correlated to the composition, the structural features, and the optical coefficients of the films, as studied by IR and UV-VIS spectroscopic techniques. The materials composition is found to change depending on both the allene percentage in the mixture and the irradiation time. IR spectroscopy results indicate that the solids consist of randomly bound networks of carbon and germanium atoms with hydrogen atoms terminating all the dangling bonds. Moreover, the elemental analysis results, the absence of both unsaturated bonds and CH3 groups into the solids and the absence of allene autocondensation reactions products, indicate that polymerization reactions leading to mixed species, containing Ge-C bonds, are favored. Eopt values around 3.5 eV have been found in most of the cases, and are correlated with C sp3-bonding configuration. The B1/2 value, related to the order degree, has been found to be dependent on solid composition, atoms distribution in the material and hydrogenation degree of carbon atoms.

  8. Prompt directional detection of galactic supernova by combining large liquid scintillator neutrino detectors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fischer, V.; Chirac, T.; Lasserre, T., E-mail: vincent.fischer@cea.fr, E-mail: tchirac@gmail.fr, E-mail: thierry.lasserre@cea.fr [Commissariat a l' énergie atomique et aux énergies alternatives, Centre de Saclay, IRFU, 91191 Gif-sur-Yvette (France); and others

    2015-08-01

    Core-collapse supernovae produce an intense burst of electron antineutrinos in the few-tens-of-MeV range. Several Large Liquid Scintillator-based Detectors (LLSD) are currently operated worldwide, being very effective for low energy antineutrino detection through the Inverse Beta Decay (IBD) process. In this article, we develop a procedure for the prompt extraction of the supernova location by revisiting the details of IBD kinematics over the broad energy range of supernova neutrinos. Combining all current scintillator-based detector, we show that one can locate a canonical supernova at 10 kpc with an accuracy of 45 degrees (68% C.L.). After the addition of the next generation of scintillator-based detectors, the accuracy could reach 12 degrees (68% C.L.), therefore reaching the performances of the large water Čerenkov neutrino detectors. We also discuss a possible improvement of the SuperNova Early Warning System (SNEWS) inter-experiment network with the implementation of a directionality information in each experiment. Finally, we discuss the possibility to constrain the neutrino energy spectrum as well as the mass of the newly born neutron star with the LLSD data.

  9. The HERMES recoil detector

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Airapetian, A. [Giessen Univ. (Germany). Physikalisches Inst.; Michigan Univ., Ann Arbor, MI (United States). Randall Laboratory of Physics; Aschenauer, E.C. [DESY, Zeuthen (Germany); Belostotski, S. [B.P. Konstantinov Petersburg Nuclear Physics Insitute, Gatchina (Russian Federation)] [and others; Collaboration: HERMES Recoil Detector Group

    2013-02-15

    For the final running period of HERA, a recoil detector was installed at the HERMES experiment to improve measurements of hard exclusive processes in charged-lepton nucleon scattering. Here, deeply virtual Compton scattering is of particular interest as this process provides constraints on generalised parton distributions that give access to the total angular momenta of quarks within the nucleon. The HERMES recoil detector was designed to improve the selection of exclusive events by a direct measurement of the four-momentum of the recoiling particle. It consisted of three components: two layers of double-sided silicon strip sensors inside the HERA beam vacuum, a two-barrel scintillating fibre tracker, and a photon detector. All sub-detectors were located inside a solenoidal magnetic field with an integrated field strength of 1Tm. The recoil detector was installed in late 2005. After the commissioning of all components was finished in September 2006, it operated stably until the end of data taking at HERA end of June 2007. The present paper gives a brief overview of the physics processes of interest and the general detector design. The recoil detector components, their calibration, the momentum reconstruction of charged particles, and the event selection are described in detail. The paper closes with a summary of the performance of the detection system.

  10. The Belle II Detector

    Science.gov (United States)

    Piilonen, Leo; Belle Collaboration, II

    2017-01-01

    The Belle II detector is now under construction at the KEK laboratory in Japan. This project represents a substantial upgrade of the Belle detector (and the KEKB accelerator). The Belle II experiment will record 50 ab-1 of data, a factor of 50 more than that recorded by Belle. This large data set, combined with the low backgrounds and high trigger efficiencies characteristic of an e+e- experiment, should provide unprecedented sensitivity to new physics signatures in B and D meson decays, and in τ lepton decays. The detector comprises many forefront subsystems. The vertex detector consists of two inner layers of silicon DEPFET pixels and four outer layers of double-sided silicon strips. These layers surround a beryllium beam pipe having a radius of only 10 mm. Outside of the vertex detector is a large-radius, small-cell drift chamber, an ``imaging time-of-propagation'' detector based on Cerenkov radiation for particle identification, and scintillating fibers and resistive plate chambers used to identify muons. The detector will begin commissioning in 2017.

  11. ATLAS Detector Interface Group

    CERN Multimedia

    Mapelli, L

    Originally organised as a sub-system in the DAQ/EF-1 Prototype Project, the Detector Interface Group (DIG) was an information exchange channel between the Detector systems and the Data Acquisition to provide critical detector information for prototype design and detector integration. After the reorganisation of the Trigger/DAQ Project and of Technical Coordination, the necessity to provide an adequate context for integration of detectors with the Trigger and DAQ lead to organisation of the DIG as one of the activities of Technical Coordination. Such an organisation emphasises the ATLAS wide coordination of the Trigger and DAQ exploitation aspects, which go beyond the domain of the Trigger/DAQ project itself. As part of Technical Coordination, the DIG provides the natural environment for the common work of Trigger/DAQ and detector experts. A DIG forum for a wide discussion of all the detector and Trigger/DAQ integration issues. A more restricted DIG group for the practical organisation and implementation o...

  12. Smile detectors correlation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yuksel, Kivanc; Chang, Xin; Skarbek, Władysław

    2017-08-01

    The novel smile recognition algorithm is presented based on extraction of 68 facial salient points (fp68) using the ensemble of regression trees. The smile detector exploits the Support Vector Machine linear model. It is trained with few hundreds exemplar images by SVM algorithm working in 136 dimensional space. It is shown by the strict statistical data analysis that such geometric detector strongly depends on the geometry of mouth opening area, measured by triangulation of outer lip contour. To this goal two Bayesian detectors were developed and compared with SVM detector. The first uses the mouth area in 2D image, while the second refers to the mouth area in 3D animated face model. The 3D modeling is based on Candide-3 model and it is performed in real time along with three smile detectors and statistics estimators. The mouth area/Bayesian detectors exhibit high correlation with fp68/SVM detector in a range [0:8; 1:0], depending mainly on light conditions and individual features with advantage of 3D technique, especially in hard light conditions.

  13. The HERMES recoil detector

    Science.gov (United States)

    Airapetian, A.; Aschenauer, E. C.; Belostotski, S.; Borisenko, A.; Bowles, J.; Brodski, I.; Bryzgalov, V.; Burns, J.; Capitani, G. P.; Carassiti, V.; Ciullo, G.; Clarkson, A.; Contalbrigo, M.; De Leo, R.; De Sanctis, E.; Diefenthaler, M.; Di Nezza, P.; Düren, M.; Ehrenfried, M.; Guler, H.; Gregor, I. M.; Hartig, M.; Hill, G.; Hoek, M.; Holler, Y.; Hristova, I.; Jo, H. S.; Kaiser, R.; Keri, T.; Kisselev, A.; Krause, B.; Krauss, B.; Lagamba, L.; Lehmann, I.; Lenisa, P.; Lu, S.; Lu, X.-G.; Lumsden, S.; Mahon, D.; Martinez de la Ossa, A.; Murray, M.; Mussgiller, A.; Nowak, W.-D.; Naryshkin, Y.; Osborne, A.; Pappalardo, L. L.; Perez-Benito, R.; Petrov, A.; Pickert, N.; Prahl, V.; Protopopescu, D.; Reinecke, M.; Riedl, C.; Rith, K.; Rosner, G.; Rubacek, L.; Ryckbosch, D.; Salomatin, Y.; Schnell, G.; Seitz, B.; Shearer, C.; Shutov, V.; Statera, M.; Steijger, J. J. M.; Stenzel, H.; Stewart, J.; Stinzing, F.; Trzcinski, A.; Tytgat, M.; Vandenbroucke, A.; Van Haarlem, Y.; Van Hulse, C.; Varanda, M.; Veretennikov, D.; Vilardi, I.; Vikhrov, V.; Vogel, C.; Yaschenko, S.; Ye, Z.; Yu, W.; Zeiler, D.; Zihlmann, B.

    2013-05-01

    For the final running period of HERA, a recoil detector was installed at the HERMES experiment to improve measurements of hard exclusive processes in charged-lepton nucleon scattering. Here, deeply virtual Compton scattering is of particular interest as this process provides constraints on generalised parton distributions that give access to the total angular momenta of quarks within the nucleon. The HERMES recoil detector was designed to improve the selection of exclusive events by a direct measurement of the four-momentum of the recoiling particle. It consisted of three components: two layers of double-sided silicon strip sensors inside the HERA beam vacuum, a two-barrel scintillating fibre tracker, and a photon detector. All sub-detectors were located inside a solenoidal magnetic field with a field strength of 1T. The recoil detector was installed in late 2005. After the commissioning of all components was finished in September 2006, it operated stably until the end of data taking at HERA end of June 2007. The present paper gives a brief overview of the physics processes of interest and the general detector design. The recoil detector components, their calibration, the momentum reconstruction of charged particles, and the event selection are described in detail. The paper closes with a summary of the performance of the detection system.

  14. Microfluidic Scintillation Detectors

    CERN Multimedia

    Microfluidic scintillation detectors are devices of recent introduction for the detection of high energy particles, developed within the EP-DT group at CERN. Most of the interest for such technology comes from the use of liquid scintillators, which entails the possibility of changing the active material in the detector, leading to an increased radiation resistance. This feature, together with the high spatial resolution and low thickness deriving from the microfabrication techniques used to manufacture such devices, is desirable not only in instrumentation for high energy physics experiments but also in medical detectors such as beam monitors for hadron therapy.

  15. Directional radiation detectors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dowell, Jonathan L.

    2017-09-12

    Directional radiation detectors and systems, methods, and computer-readable media for using directional radiation detectors to locate a radiation source are provided herein. A directional radiation detector includes a radiation sensor. A radiation attenuator partially surrounds the radiation sensor and defines an aperture through which incident radiation is received by the radiation sensor. The aperture is positioned such that when incident radiation is received directly through the aperture and by the radiation sensor, a source of the incident radiation is located within a solid angle defined by the aperture. The radiation sensor senses at least one of alpha particles, beta particles, gamma particles, or neutrons.

  16. Layered semiconductor neutron detectors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mao, Samuel S; Perry, Dale L

    2013-12-10

    Room temperature operating solid state hand held neutron detectors integrate one or more relatively thin layers of a high neutron interaction cross-section element or materials with semiconductor detectors. The high neutron interaction cross-section element (e.g., Gd, B or Li) or materials comprising at least one high neutron interaction cross-section element can be in the form of unstructured layers or micro- or nano-structured arrays. Such architecture provides high efficiency neutron detector devices by capturing substantially more carriers produced from high energy .alpha.-particles or .gamma.-photons generated by neutron interaction.

  17. Ordering of germanium islands in the Si1-xGex/Si system pre-structured by misfit dislocations

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pedersen, Erik Vesterlund; Shiryaev, Sergey Y.; Jensen, Flemming

    1998-01-01

    We have investigated the ordering of germanium islands on a relaxed uniform Si0.84Ge0.16 buffer layer by atomic force microscopy and transmission electron microscopy. A pronounced ordering with the islands situated along dislocation slip band lines was observed. The resemblance of this ordering...

  18. The CLIC Detector Concept

    CERN Document Server

    Pitters, Florian Michael

    2016-01-01

    CLIC is a concept for a future linear collider that would provide e+e- collisions at up to 3 TeV. The physics aims require a detector system with excellent jet energy and track momentum resolution, highly efficient flavour-tagging and lepton identification capabilities, full geometrical coverage extending to low polar angles and timing information in the order of nanoseconds to reject beam-induced background. To deal with those requirements, an extensive R&D programme is in place to overcome current technological limits. The CLIC detector concept includes a low-mass all-silicon vertex and tracking detector system and fine-grained calorimeters designed for particle flow analysis techniques, surrounded by a 4 T solenoid magnet. An overview of the requirements and design optimisations for the CLIC detector concept is presented.

  19. Improved CO [lidar detector

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jacobson, P.L.; Busch, G.E.; Thompson, D.C.; Remelius, D.K.; Wells, F.D.

    1999-07-18

    A high sensitivity, CO{sub 2} lidar detector, based on recent advances in ultra-low noise, readout integrated circuits (ROIC), is being developed. This detector will combine a high speed, low noise focal plane array (FPA) with a dispersive grating spectrometer. The spectrometer will filter the large background flux, thereby reducing the limiting background photon shot noise. In order to achieve the desired low noise levels, the HgCdTe FPA will be cooled to {approximately}50K. High speed, short pulse operation of the lidar system should enable the detector to operate with the order of a few noise electrons in the combined detector/ ROIC output. Current receiver design concepts will be presented, along with their expected noise performance.

  20. Hybrid photon detectors

    CERN Document Server

    D'Ambrosio, C

    2003-01-01

    Hybrid photon detectors detect light via vacuum photocathodes and accelerate the emitted photoelectrons by an electric field towards inversely polarized silicon anodes, where they are absorbed, thus producing electron-hole pairs. These, in turn, are collected and generate electronic signals on their ohmic contacts. This review first describes the characteristic properties of the main components of hybrid photon detectors: light entrance windows, photocathodes, and silicon anodes. Then, essential relations describing the trajectories of photoelectrons in electric and magnetic fields and their backscattering from the silicon anodes are derived. Depending on their anode configurations, three families of hybrid photon detectors are presented: hybrid photomultiplier tubes with single anodes for photon counting with high sensitivity and for gamma spectroscopy; multi-anode photon detector tubes with anodes subdivided into square or hexagonal pads for position-sensitive photon detection; imaging silicon pixel array t...

  1. Infrared Detectors Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — The end goal of this project is to develop proof-of-concept infrared detectors which can be integrated in future infrared instruments engaged in remote...

  2. Europe plans megaton detector

    CERN Multimedia

    Cartlidge, Edwin

    2004-01-01

    A group of French and Italian particle physicists hopes to carry on the long tradition of building large underground detectors by constructing a device deep under the Alps containing a million tonnes of extremely pure water.

  3. ALICE Silicon Pixel Detector

    CERN Multimedia

    2003-01-01

    The Silicon Pixel Detector (SPD) is part of the Inner Tracking System (ITS) of the ALICE experiment : . SPD Structure . Bump Bonding . Test beam . ALICE1LHCb Readout Chip . Chip Tests . Data from the SPD

  4. ALICE Forward Multiplicity Detector

    CERN Multimedia

    Christensen, C

    2013-01-01

    The Forward Multiplicity Detector (FMD) extends the coverage for multiplicity of charge particles into the forward regions - giving ALICE the widest coverage of the 4 LHC experiments for these measurements.

  5. Detector Control System for the ATLAS Forward Proton detector

    CERN Document Server

    Czekierda, Sabina; The ATLAS collaboration

    2017-01-01

    The ATLAS Forward Proton (AFP) is a forward detector using a Roman Pot technique, recently installed in the LHC tunnel. It is aiming at registering protons that were diffractively or electromagnetically scattered in soft and hard processes. Infrastructure of the detector consists of hardware placed both in the tunnel and in the control room USA15 (about 330 meters from the Roman Pots). AFP detector, like the other detectors of the ATLAS experiment, uses the Detector Control System (DCS) to supervise the detector and to ensure its safe and coherent operation, since the incorrect detector performance may influence the physics results. The DCS continuously monitors the detector parameters, subset of which is stored in data bases. Crucial parameters are guarded by alarm system. A detector representation as a hierarchical tree-like structure of well-defined subsystems built with the use of the Finite State Machine (FSM) toolkit allows for overall detector operation and visualization. Every node in the hierarchy is...

  6. Fiber optic detector

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Partin, J.K.; Ward, T.E.; Grey, A.E.

    1990-12-31

    This invention is comprised of a portable fiber optic detector that senses the presence of specific target chemicals by exchanging the target chemical for a fluorescently-tagged antigen that is bound to an antibody which is in turn attached to an optical fiber. Replacing the fluorescently-tagged antigen reduces the fluorescence so that a photon sensing detector records the reduced light level and activates an appropriate alarm or indicator.

  7. Comparison of ultrasonic-assisted and regular leaching of germanium from by-product of zinc metallurgy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Libo; Guo, Wenqian; Peng, Jinhui; Li, Jing; Lin, Guo; Yu, Xia

    2016-07-01

    A major source of germanium recovery and also the source of this research is the by-product of lead and zinc metallurgical process. The primary purpose of the research is to investigate the effects of ultrasonic assisted and regular methods on the leaching yield of germanium from roasted slag containing germanium. In the study, the HCl-CaCl2 mixed solution is adopted as the reacting system and the Ca(ClO)2 used as the oxidant. Through six single factor (leaching time, temperature, amount of Ca(ClO)2, acid concentration, concentration of CaCl2 solution, ultrasonic power) experiments and the comparison of the two methods, it is found the optimum collective of germanium for ultrasonic-assisted method is obtained at temperature 80 °C for a leaching duration of 40 min. The optimum concentration for hydrochloric acid, CaCl2 and oxidizing agent are identified to be 3.5 mol/L, 150 g/L and 58.33 g/L, respectively. In addition, 700 W is the best ultrasonic power and an over-high power is adverse in the leaching process. Under the optimum condition, the recovery of germanium could reach up to 92.7%. While, the optimum leaching condition for regular leaching method is same to ultrasonic-assisted method, except regular method consume 100 min and the leaching rate of Ge 88.35% is lower about 4.35%. All in all, the experiment manifests that the leaching time can be reduced by as much as 60% and the leaching rate of Ge can be increased by 3-5% with the application of ultrasonic tool, which is mainly thanks to the mechanical action of ultrasonic. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  8. Study of the Location of Implanted Fluorine Atoms in Silicon and Germanium through Their Nuclear Quadrupole Interactions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nunes, Stacie S.; Sulaiman, S.; Sahoo, N.; Das, T. P.; Frank, M.; Kreische, W.; Nielsen, K. B.

    1996-06-01

    Time Differential Perturbed Angular Distribution (TDPAD) measurements of the nuclear quadrupole hyperfine parameters for 19F* implanted into amorphous, polycrystalline and crystalline silicon and germanium are reported and reviewed. Two signals are observed in the crystalline materials (≈ 35 and 23 MHz in silicon, ≈ 33 and 27 MHz in germanium) while only one is detected in the amorphous and polycrystalline samples (≈ 22 MHz in silicon, ≈ 27 in germanium). Impurity sites in these materials were modeled using a Hartree-Fock cluster procedure. The Intrabond, Antibond, and Substitutional sites in the bulk were studied in both silicon and germanium. The ATOP and Intrabond Surface sites were also studied in silicon and the results extended to germa-nium. Lattice relaxation effects were incorporated by employing a geometry optimization method to obtain minimum energy configurations for the clusters modelling each site. The electronic wave functions were obtained for each optimized cluster by applying Unresctricted Hartree-Fock theory, and these wave functions were used to calculate the nuclear quadrupole hyperfine parameters at the site of the fluorine nucleus. Comparison of the theoretical hyperfine parameters to the experimental values indicates that 19F* located in the Intrabond and Intrabond surface sites could readily explain the higher frequency signal that has been observed. 19F* in the Antibond and the surface ATOP sites yield hyperfine parameters consistent with the low frequency signal observed in the crystalline materials and the single signal observed in the amorphous (or polycrystalline) materials. Examina-tion of these two sites, in view of other available experimental evidence including the temperature dependence of the TDPAD signals, leads to the conclusion that the lower frequency signal is due to 19F* implants which have come to rest at the site of dangling bonds in the bulk. These dangling bonds are created as a result of damage generated in the

  9. Ultrafast carrier thermalization and trapping in silicon-germanium alloy probed by extreme ultraviolet transient absorption spectroscopy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michael Zürch

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available Semiconductor alloys containing silicon and germanium are of growing importance for compact and highly efficient photonic devices due to their favorable properties for direct integration into silicon platforms and wide tunability of optical parameters. Here, we report the simultaneous direct and energy-resolved probing of ultrafast electron and hole dynamics in a silicon-germanium alloy with the stoichiometry Si0.25Ge0.75 by extreme ultraviolet transient absorption spectroscopy. Probing the photoinduced dynamics of charge carriers at the germanium M4,5-edge (∼30 eV allows the germanium atoms to be used as reporter atoms for carrier dynamics in the alloy. The photoexcitation of electrons across the direct and indirect band gap into conduction band (CB valleys and their subsequent hot carrier relaxation are observed and compared to pure germanium, where the Ge direct ( Δ E gap , Ge , direct = 0.8   eV and Si0.25Ge0.75 indirect gaps ( Δ E gap , Si 0.25 Ge 0.75 , indirect = 0.95   eV are comparable in energy. In the alloy, comparable carrier lifetimes are observed for the X, L, and Γ valleys in the conduction band. A midgap feature associated with electrons accumulating in trap states near the CB edge following intraband thermalization is observed in the Si0.25Ge0.75 alloy. The successful implementation of the reporter atom concept for capturing the dynamics of the electronic bands by site-specific probing in solids opens a route to study carrier dynamics in more complex materials with femtosecond and sub-femtosecond temporal resolution.

  10. ATLAS Inner Detector (Pixel Detector and Silicon Tracker)

    CERN Multimedia

    ATLAS Outreach

    2006-01-01

    To raise awareness of the basic functions of the Pixel Detector and Silicon Tracker in the ATLAS detector on the LHC at CERN. This colorful 3D animation is an excerpt from the film "ATLAS-Episode II, The Particles Strike Back." Shot with a bug's eye view of the inside of the detector. The viewer is taken on a tour of the inner workings of the detector, seeing critical pieces of the detector and hearing short explanations of how each works.

  11. Gamma ray detector modules

    Science.gov (United States)

    Capote, M. Albert (Inventor); Lenos, Howard A. (Inventor)

    2009-01-01

    A radiation detector assembly has a semiconductor detector array substrate of CdZnTe or CdTe, having a plurality of detector cell pads on a first surface thereof, the pads having a contact metallization and a solder barrier metallization. An interposer card has planar dimensions no larger than planar dimensions of the semiconductor detector array substrate, a plurality of interconnect pads on a first surface thereof, at least one readout semiconductor chip and at least one connector on a second surface thereof, each having planar dimensions no larger than the planar dimensions of the interposer card. Solder columns extend from contacts on the interposer first surface to the plurality of pads on the semiconductor detector array substrate first surface, the solder columns having at least one solder having a melting point or liquidus less than 120 degrees C. An encapsulant is disposed between the interposer circuit card first surface and the semiconductor detector array substrate first surface, encapsulating the solder columns, the encapsulant curing at a temperature no greater than 120 degrees C.

  12. Modelling semiconductor pixel detectors

    CERN Document Server

    Mathieson, K

    2001-01-01

    expected after 200 ps in most cases. The effect of reducing the charge carrier lifetime and examining the charge collection efficiency has been utilised to explore how these detectors would respond in a harsh radiation environment. It is predicted that over critical carrier lifetimes (10 ps to 0.1 ns) an improvement of 40 % over conventional detectors can be expected. This also has positive implications for fabricating detectors, in this geometry, from materials which might otherwise be considered substandard. An analysis of charge transport in CdZnTe pixel detectors has been performed. The analysis starts with simulation studies into the formation of contacts and their influence on the internal electric field of planar detectors. The models include a number of well known defect states and these are balanced to give an agreement with a typical experimental I-V curve. The charge transport study extends to the development of a method for studying the effect of charge sharing in highly pixellated detectors. The ...

  13. The ALICE forward multiplicity detector

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Holm Christensen, Christian; Gulbrandsen, Kristjan; Sogaard, Carsten

    2007-01-01

    The ALICE Forward Multiplicity Detector (FMD) is a silicon strip detector with 51,200 strips arranged in 5 rings, covering the range $-3.4......The ALICE Forward Multiplicity Detector (FMD) is a silicon strip detector with 51,200 strips arranged in 5 rings, covering the range $-3.4...

  14. Detectors for scanning video imagers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Webb, Robert H.; Hughes, George W.

    1993-11-01

    In scanning video imagers, a single detector sees each pixel for only 100 ns, so the bandwidth of the detector needs to be about 10 MHz. How this fact influences the choice of detectors for scanning systems is described here. Some important parametric quantities obtained from manufacturer specifications are related and it is shown how to compare detectors when specified quantities differ.

  15. Novel atomic force microscope cantilevers and piezoresistance of carbon nanotubes and germanium nanowires

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grow, Randal James

    2005-11-01

    There has been great interest in recent years in nanometer-scale materials and tools for fabricating and characterizing them. One such tool is the atomic force microscope (AFM), which has developed rapidly since its invention in 1986. Imaging soft or fragile samples with AFM requires low-spring-constant cantilevers to minimize the force on the sample. Silicon nitride is well suited to making such soft cantilevers, but it is not ideal for making sharp tips. We combined a silicon nitride cantilever with a sharp silicon tip to achieve a hybrid with both a low spring constant and a sharp tip. Carbon nanotubes have received great attention for their remarkable mechanical and electrical properties. Their electromechanical properties are also interesting, as a few groups have determined by deforming suspended nanotubes. Their change in resistance under strain is stronger than that of silicon, which is commonly used in mechanical sensors. However, the fragility of suspended tubes makes them impractical for mass-produced sensors. Tubes on surfaces are more robust. We fabricated micromachined pressure sensors using a thin silicon nitride membrane with metal-contacted carbon nanotubes on the surface. Deforming the membrane with gas pressure stretched the nanotube, and we measured the resistance changes. They were stronger than those of suspended nanotubes, probably because of local deformations in the nanotube caused by interaction with the surface. Nanowires of semiconductors such as silicon and germanium have also evoked much interest for electronics and optics applications. The piezoresistive effect in nanowires should also be larger than that of the bulk material, which could be useful for increasing the sensitivity of mechanical sensors or for enhancing the performance of nanowire transistors. We have fabricated pressure sensors with germanium nanowires as the sensing elements, and we have found the piezoresistance to be much stronger than in the bulk. We understand this

  16. Efficiency calibration of an HPGe X-ray detector for quantitative PIXE analysis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mulware, Stephen J., E-mail: Stephenmulware@my.unt.edu; Baxley, Jacob D., E-mail: jacob.baxley351@topper.wku.edu; Rout, Bibhudutta, E-mail: bibhu@unt.edu; Reinert, Tilo, E-mail: tilo@unt.edu

    2014-08-01

    Particle Induced X-ray Emission (PIXE) is an analytical technique, which provides reliably and accurately quantitative results without the need of standards when the efficiency of the X-ray detection system is calibrated. The ion beam microprobe of the Ion Beam Modification and Analysis Laboratory at the University of North Texas is equipped with a 100 mm{sup 2} high purity germanium X-ray detector (Canberra GUL0110 Ultra-LEGe). In order to calibrate the efficiency of the detector for standard less PIXE analysis we have measured the X-ray yield of a set of commercially available X-ray fluorescence standards. The set contained elements from low atomic number Z = 11 (sodium) to higher atomic numbers to cover the X-ray energy region from 1.25 keV to about 20 keV where the detector is most efficient. The effective charge was obtained from the proton backscattering yield of a calibrated particle detector.

  17. A simulation study on the focal plane detector of the LAUE project

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Khalil, M., E-mail: mkhalil@in2p3.fr [APC Laboratory, 10 rue Alice Domon et Léonie Duquet, 75205 Paris Cedex 13 (France); Department of Physics and Earth Sciences, University of Ferrara, Via Saragat, 1, 44100 Ferrara (Italy); Frontera, F. [Department of Physics and Earth Sciences, University of Ferrara, Via Saragat, 1, 44100 Ferrara (Italy); INAF/IASF-Bologna, Via P. Gobetti 101, Bologna (Italy); Caroli, E. [INAF/IASF-Bologna, Via P. Gobetti 101, Bologna (Italy); Virgilli, E.; Valsan, V. [Department of Physics and Earth Sciences, University of Ferrara, Via Saragat, 1, 44100 Ferrara (Italy)

    2015-06-21

    The LAUE project, supported by the Italian Space Agency (ASI), is devoted to the development of a long focal length (even 20 m or longer) Laue lens for gamma ray astronomy between 80 and 600 keV. These lenses take advantage of Bragg diffraction to focus radiation onto a small spot drastically improving the signal to noise ratio as well as reducing the required size of the detector significantly. In this paper we present a Monte-Carlo simulation study with MEGALIB to optimize, for space applications, the detector size to achieve high detection efficiency, and to optimize the position resolution of the detector to reconstruct the Point Spread Function of the lens considered for the LAUE project. Then we will show simulations, using the SILVACO semiconductor simulation toolkit, on the optimized detector to estimate its capacitance per channel and depletion voltage. In all of the simulations, two materials were compared; a low density material (Silicon) and a high density material (Germanium). - Highlights: • The quantized Hall plateaus and Shubnikov de Haas oscillations in transition metal doped topological insulators are observed. • The evidence of a two-dimensional/layered transport of the bulk electrons is reported. • An obvious ferromagnetism in doped topological insulators is observed. • Care should be taken to pindown the transport of the topological SS in topological insulators.

  18. Detectors on the drawing board

    CERN Multimedia

    Katarina Anthony

    2011-01-01

    Linear collider detector developers inside and outside CERN are tackling the next generation of detector technology. While their focus has centred on high-energy linear collider detectors, their innovative concepts and designs will be applicable to any future detector.   A simulated event display in one of the new generation detectors. “While the LHC experiments remain the pinnacle of detector technology, you may be surprised to realise that the design and expertise behind them is well over 10 years old,” says Lucie Linssen, CERN’s Linear Collider Detector (LCD) project manager whose group is pushing the envelope of detector design. “The next generation of detectors will have to surpass the achievements of the LHC experiments. It’s not an easy task but, by observing detectors currently in operation and exploiting a decade’s worth of technological advancements, we’ve made meaningful progress.” The LCD team is curr...

  19. Measurement of nuclear activity with Ge detectors and its uncertainty; Medicion de actividad nuclear con detectores de Ge y su incertidumbre

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cortes P, C.A

    1999-07-01

    The objective of this work is to analyse the influence magnitudes which affect the activity measurement of gamma transmitter isolated radioactive sources. They prepared by means of the gravimetric method, as well as, determining the uncertainty of such measurement when this is carried out with a gamma spectrometer system with a germanium detector. This work is developed in five chapters: In the first one, named Basic principles it is made a brief description about the meaning of the word Measurement and its implications and the necessaries concepts are presented which are used in this work. In the second chapter it is exposed the gravimetric method used for the manufacture of the gamma transmitter isolated radioactive sources, it is tackled the problem to determine the main influence magnitudes which affect in the measurement of their activity and the respective correction factors and their uncertainties are deduced. The third chapter describes the gamma spectrometry system which is used in this work for the measurement of the activity of isolated sources and also its performance and experimental arrangement that it is used. In the fourth chapter are applied the three previous items with the object of determining the uncertainty which would be obtained in the measurement of an isolated radioactive source elaborated with the gravimetric method in the experimental conditions less favourable predicted above the obtained results from the chapter two. The conclusions are presented in the fifth chapter and they are applied to establish the optimum conditions for the measurement of the activity of a gamma transmitter isolated radioactive source with a spectrometer with germanium detector. (Author)

  20. Gamma-ray multiplicity measurement of the spontaneous fission of {sup 252}Cf in a segmented HPGe/BGO detector array

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bleuel, D.L., E-mail: bleuel1@llnl.go [Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory, Livermore, CA 94551 (United States); Bernstein, L.A.; Burke, J.T. [Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory, Livermore, CA 94551 (United States); Gibelin, J. [Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory, Berkeley, CA 94720 (United States); Heffner, M.D. [Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory, Livermore, CA 94551 (United States); Mintz, J. [Nuclear Engineering Department, University of California, Berkeley, CA 94720 (United States); Norman, E.B. [Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory, Livermore, CA 94551 (United States); Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory, Berkeley, CA 94720 (United States); Nuclear Engineering Department, University of California, Berkeley, CA 94720 (United States); Phair, L. [Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory, Berkeley, CA 94720 (United States); Scielzo, N.D.; Sheets, S.A.; Snyderman, N.J.; Stoyer, M.A. [Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory, Livermore, CA 94551 (United States); Wiedeking, M. [Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory, Livermore, CA 94551 (United States); Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory, Berkeley, CA 94720 (United States)

    2010-12-21

    Coincident {gamma} rays from a {sup 252}Cf source were measured using an array of six segmented high-purity germanium (HPGe) Clover detectors each enclosed by 16 bismuth-germanate (BGO) detectors. The detectors were arranged in a cubic pattern around a 1{mu}Ci{sup 252}Cf source to cover a large solid angle for {gamma}-ray measurement with a reasonable reconstruction of the multiplicity. Neutron multiplicity was determined in certain cases by identifying the prompt {gamma} rays from individual fission fragment pairs. Multiplicity distributions from previous experiments and theoretical models were convolved with the response function of the array and compared to the present results. These results suggest a {gamma}-ray multiplicity spectrum broader than previous measurements and models, and provide no evidence of correlation with neutron multiplicity.

  1. On the electron density localization in elemental cubic ceramic and FCC transition metals by means of a localized electrons detector.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aray, Yosslen; Paredes, Ricardo; Álvarez, Luis Javier; Martiz, Alejandro

    2017-06-14

    The electron density localization in insulator and semiconductor elemental cubic materials with diamond structure, carbon, silicon, germanium, and tin, and good metallic conductors with face centered cubic structure such as α-Co, Ni, Cu, Rh, Pd, Ag, Ir, Pt, and Au, was studied using a localized electrons detector defined in the local moment representation. Our results clearly show an opposite pattern of the electron density localization for the cubic ceramic and transition metal materials. It was found that, for the elemental ceramic materials, the zone of low electron localization is very small and is mainly localized on the atomic basin edges. On the contrary, for the transition metals, there are low-valued localized electrons detector isocontours defining a zone of highly delocalized electrons that extends throughout the material. We have found that the best conductors are those in which the electron density at this low-value zone is the lowest.

  2. Energy and efficiency calibration of an array of six Euroball Cluster detectors used for beta-decay studies

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hu, Z.; Collatz, R.; Grawe, H.; Roeckl, E.

    1998-07-01

    The use of an array of 6 euroball cluster detectors, i.e. 42 large-volume germanium detectors, for beta-decay studies is described. The solid angle with respect to a source placed in the center of the array amounts to 65% of 4{pi} sr. The total photo-peak efficiency for 1.33 MeV {gamma}-rays is 10.2(5)%, without ``adding back`` the Compton-scattered events. For this {gamma}-ray energy, the energy resolution of the entire setup is 2.8 keV. The performance of the array up to {gamma}-ray energies of 8 MeV is discussed, and alternative ways of determining the photo-peak efficiency are presented. (orig.) 13 refs.

  3. Field analyses of (238)U and (226)Ra in two uranium mill tailings piles from Niger using portable HPGe detector.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Déjeant, Adrien; Bourva, Ludovic; Sia, Radia; Galoisy, Laurence; Calas, Georges; Phrommavanh, Vannapha; Descostes, Michael

    2014-11-01

    The radioactivities of (238)U and (226)Ra in mill tailings from the U mines of COMINAK and SOMAÏR in Niger were measured and quantified using a portable High-Purity Germanium (HPGe) detector. The (238)U and (226)Ra activities were measured under field conditions on drilling cores with 600s measurements and without any sample preparation. Field results were compared with those obtained by Inductive Coupled Plasma Atomic Emission Spectroscopy (ICP-AES) and emanometry techniques. This comparison indicates that gamma-ray absorption by such geological samples does not cause significant deviations. This work shows the feasibility of using portable HPGe detector in the field as a preliminary method to observe variations of radionuclides concentration with the aim of identifying samples of interest. The HPGe is particularly useful for samples with strong secular disequilibrium such as mill tailings. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  4. Solvent Vapor Growth of Axial Heterostructure Nanowires with Multiple Alternating Segments of Silicon and Germanium.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Flynn, Grace; Ramasse, Quentin M; Ryan, Kevin M

    2016-01-13

    Herein, we report the formation of multisegment Si-Ge axial heterostructure nanowires in a wet chemical synthetic approach. These nanowires are grown by the liquid injection of the respective silicon and germanium precursors into the vapor phase of an organic solvent in which a tin-coated stainless steel substrate is placed. The Si-Ge transition is obtained by sequential injection with the more difficult Ge-Si transition enabled by inclusion of a quench sequence in the reaction. This approach allows for alternating between pure Si and pure Ge segments along the entire nanowire length with good control of the respective segment dimensions. The multisegment heterostructure nanowires presented are Ge-Si, Si-Ge-Si, Ge-Si-Ge, Si-Ge-Si-Ge, and Si-Ge-Si-Ge-Si-Ge. The interfacial abruptness of the Ge to Si interface is also determined through the use of aberration corrected scanning transmission electron microscopy and electron energy loss spectroscopy.

  5. Tin and germanium monochalcogenide IV-VI semiconductor nanocrystals for use in solar cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Antunez, Priscilla D; Buckley, Jannise J; Brutchey, Richard L

    2011-06-01

    The incorporation of colloidal semiconductor nanocrystals into the photoabsorbant material of photovoltaic devices may reduce the production costs of solar cells since nanocrystals can be readily synthesized on a large scale and are solution processable. While the lead chalcogenide IV-VI nanocrystals have been widely studied in a variety of photovoltaic devices, concerns over the toxicity of lead have motivated the exploration of less toxic materials. This has led to the exploration of tin and germanium monochalcogenide IV-VI semiconductors, both of which are made up of earth abundant elements and possess properties similar to the lead chalcogenides. This feature article highlights recent efforts made towards achieving synthetic control over nanocrystal size and morphology of the non-lead containing IV-VI monochalcogenides (i.e., SnS, SnSe, SnTe, GeS and GeSe) and their application toward photovoltaic devices.

  6. The isotope composition of inorganic germanium in seawater and deep sea sponges

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guillermic, Maxence; Lalonde, Stefan V.; Hendry, Katharine R.; Rouxel, Olivier J.

    2017-09-01

    Although dissolved concentrations of germanium (Ge) and silicon (Si) in modern seawater are tightly correlated, uncertainties still exist in the modern marine Ge cycle. Germanium stable isotope systematics in marine systems should provide additional constraints on marine Ge sources and sinks, however the low concentration of Ge in seawater presents an analytical challenge for isotopic measurement. Here, we present a new method of pre-concentration of inorganic Ge from seawater which was applied to measure three Ge isotope profiles in the Southern Ocean and deep seawater from the Atlantic and Pacific Oceans. Germanium isotopic measurements were performed on Ge amounts as low as 2.6 ng using a double-spike approach and a hydride generation system coupled to a MC-ICP-MS. Germanium was co-precipitated with iron hydroxide and then purified through anion-exchange chromatography. Results for the deep (i.e. >1000 m depth) Pacific Ocean off Hawaii (nearby Loihi Seamount) and the deep Atlantic off Bermuda (BATS station) showed nearly identical δ74/70Ge values at 3.19 ± 0.31‰ (2SD, n = 9) and 2.93 ± 0.10‰ (2SD, n = 2), respectively. Vertical distributions of Ge concentration and isotope composition in the deep Southern Ocean for water depth > 1300 m yielded an average δ74/70Ge = 3.13 ± 0.25‰ (2SD, n = 14) and Ge/Si = 0.80 ± 0.09 μmol/mol (2SD, n = 12). Significant variations in δ74/70Ge, from 2.62 to 3.71‰, were measured in the first 1000 m in one station of the Southern Ocean near Sars Seamount in the Drake Passage, with the heaviest values measured in surface waters. Isotope fractionation by diatoms during opal biomineralization may explain the enrichment in heavy isotopes for both Ge and Si in surface seawater. However, examination of both oceanographic parameters and δ74/70Ge values suggest also that water mass mixing and potential contribution of shelf-derived Ge also could contribute to the variations. Combining these results with new Ge isotope data

  7. Role of Surface Capping Molecule Polarity on the Optical Properties of Solution Synthesized Germanium Nanocrystals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McVey, B F P; O'Mara, P B; McGrath, A J; Faramus, A; Yasarapudi, V B; Gonçales, V R; Tan, V T G; Schmidt, T W; Gooding, J J; Tilley, R D

    2017-09-05

    The role surface capping molecules play in dictating the optical properties of semiconductor nanocrystals (NCs) is becoming increasingly evident. In this paper the role of surface capping molecule polarity on the optical properties of germanium NCs (Ge NCs) is explored. Capping molecules are split into two groups: nonpolar and polar. The NCs are fully characterized structurally and optically to establish the link between observed optical properties and surface capping molecules. Ge NC optical properties altered by surface capping molecule polarity include emission maximum, emission lifetime, quantum yield, and Stokes shift. For Ge NCs, this work also allows rational tuning of their optical properties through changes to surface capping molecule polarity, leading to improvements in emerging Ge based bioimaging and optoelectronic devices.

  8. Three-beam resonant X-ray diffraction in germanium - Laue transmission cases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thorkildsen, Gunnar; Larsen, Helge B; Weckert, Edgar; Mo, Frode; Mathiesen, Ragnvald H

    2005-07-01

    Perturbation of the two-beam diffracted power owing to the influence of a third lattice node has been examined for various three-beam cases in a small finite germanium crystal in the vicinity of the K-absorption edge. Although the crystal was slightly imperfect, the main parts of the experimental results are very well described within the framework of the fundamental theory of X-ray diffraction in conjunction with Cromer-Liberman calculations for the resonant scattering terms. Beam divergence and dynamical block size are treated as adjustable parameters in the analysis. Observed changes in the three-beam profile asymmetry are mainly attributed to size and not to resonance effects associated with the triplet phase sum of the involved reflections. Close to the absorption edge there is however some evidence indicating that f' values should be reduced in magnitude compared to the tabulated ones.

  9. Doping dependence of self-diffusion in germanium and the charge states of vacancies

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Südkamp, T.; Bracht, H.; Impellizzeri, G.

    2013-01-01

    Self-diffusion in boron-doped germanium has been studied at temperatures between 526 and 749 °C with secondary ion mass spectrometry. Self-diffusion under acceptor doping is retarded compared to intrinsic conditions. This demonstrates the contribution of charged vacancies in self-diffusion. Taking...... into account the dominance of doubly negatively charged vacancies under donor doping, the doping dependence of self-diffusion is best described with an inverse level ordering for singly and doubly negatively charged vacancies for all doping conditions. The level ordering explains the dominance of doubly...... charged vacancies under donor doping and their decreasing contribution with increasing acceptor doping until neutral vacancies mediate self-diffusion...

  10. Quantum Nonlinear Optics with a Germanium-Vacancy Color Center in a Nanoscale Diamond Waveguide

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bhaskar, M. K.; Sukachev, D. D.; Sipahigil, A.; Evans, R. E.; Burek, M. J.; Nguyen, C. T.; Rogers, L. J.; Siyushev, P.; Metsch, M. H.; Park, H.; Jelezko, F.; Lončar, M.; Lukin, M. D.

    2017-06-01

    We demonstrate a quantum nanophotonics platform based on germanium-vacancy (GeV) color centers in fiber-coupled diamond nanophotonic waveguides. We show that GeV optical transitions have a high quantum efficiency and are nearly lifetime broadened in such nanophotonic structures. These properties yield an efficient interface between waveguide photons and a single GeV center without the use of a cavity or slow-light waveguide. As a result, a single GeV center reduces waveguide transmission by 18 ±1 % on resonance in a single pass. We use a nanophotonic interferometer to perform homodyne detection of GeV resonance fluorescence. By probing the photon statistics of the output field, we demonstrate that the GeV-waveguide system is nonlinear at the single-photon level.

  11. Tunneling, Current Gain, and Transconductance in Silicon-Germanium Heterojunction Bipolar Transistors Operating at Millikelvin Temperatures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Davidović, D.; Ying, H.; Dark, J.; Wier, B. R.; Ge, L.; Lourenco, N. E.; Omprakash, A. P.; Mourigal, M.; Cressler, J. D.

    2017-08-01

    Quantum-transport measurements in advanced silicon-germanium heterojunction bipolar transistors (SiGe HBTs) are presented and analyzed, including tunneling spectroscopy of discrete impurity levels localized within the transistor and the dependence on an applied magnetic field. The collector current at millikelvin temperatures is well accounted for by ideal electron tunneling throughout the entire base. The amplification principle at millikelvin temperatures is fundamentally quantum mechanical in nature: an increase in base voltage, requiring a moderate base current, creates an equal and opposite decrease in the tunneling barrier seen by the electrons in the emitter, thereby increasing the collector current significantly more than the base current, producing current gain. Highly scaled SiGe HBTs operate predictably at millikelvin temperatures, thus opening the possibility of viable SiGe millikelvin circuitry.

  12. Quantum Nonlinear Optics with a Germanium-Vacancy Color Center in a Nanoscale Diamond Waveguide.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bhaskar, M K; Sukachev, D D; Sipahigil, A; Evans, R E; Burek, M J; Nguyen, C T; Rogers, L J; Siyushev, P; Metsch, M H; Park, H; Jelezko, F; Lončar, M; Lukin, M D

    2017-06-02

    We demonstrate a quantum nanophotonics platform based on germanium-vacancy (GeV) color centers in fiber-coupled diamond nanophotonic waveguides. We show that GeV optical transitions have a high quantum efficiency and are nearly lifetime broadened in such nanophotonic structures. These properties yield an efficient interface between waveguide photons and a single GeV center without the use of a cavity or slow-light waveguide. As a result, a single GeV center reduces waveguide transmission by 18±1% on resonance in a single pass. We use a nanophotonic interferometer to perform homodyne detection of GeV resonance fluorescence. By probing the photon statistics of the output field, we demonstrate that the GeV-waveguide system is nonlinear at the single-photon level.

  13. Separation of no-carrier-added arsenic-77 from neutron irradiated germanium

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bokhari, T.H. [Isotope Production Div., Pakistan Inst. of Nuclear Science and Technology, Islamabad (Pakistan); Dept. of Chemistry, Government Coll. Univ., Lahore (Pakistan); Mushtaq, A. [Isotope Production Div., Pakistan Inst. of Nuclear Science and Technology, Islamabad (Pakistan); Khan, I.U. [Dept. of Chemistry, Government Coll. Univ., Lahore (Pakistan)

    2009-09-15

    Arsenic-77 (T{sub 1/2} = 1.6 d) was produced by irradiating natural germanium in Pakistan Research Reactor-1. The nuclear reaction {sup 76}Ge(n, {gamma}{sup -}) produces {sup 77}Ge, which decays by emission of {beta} particles into {sup 77}As. The neutron irradiated target was dissolved in aqua regia, excess of acid was removed by evaporation and finally the solution in basic media was passed through hydrous zirconium oxide (HZO) column. The Ge was quantitatively retained on HZO, while {sup 77}As was present in the effluent. More than 90% {sup 77}As was recovered. The chemical impurity of Ge in {sup 77}As was < 0.01 {mu}g/mL. (orig.)

  14. Size Dependent Pore Formation in Germanium Nanowires Undergoing Reversible Delithiation Observed by In Situ TEM

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lu, Xiaotang; He, Yang; Mao, Scott X.; Wang, Chong-min; Korgel, Brian A.

    2016-12-22

    Germanium (Ge) nanowires coated with an amorphous silicon (Si) shell undergoing lithiation and delithiation were studied using in situ transmission electron microscopy (TEM). Delithiation creates pores in nanowires with diameters larger than ~25 nm, but not in smaller diameter nanowires. The formation of pores in Ge nanowires undergoing delithiation has been observed before in in situ TEM experiments, but there has been no indication that a critical diameter exists below which pores do not form. Pore formation occurs as a result of fast lithium diffusion compared to vacancy migration. We propose that a short diffusion path for vacancies to the nanowire surface plays a role in limiting pore formation even when lithium diffusion is fast.

  15. Properties of hydrogenated amorphous germanium nitrogen alloys prepared by reactive sputtering

    Science.gov (United States)

    Honma, I.; Kawai, H.; Komiyama, H.; Tanaka, K.

    1989-02-01

    Hydrogenated amorphous germanium-nitrogen alloys (a-GeNx:H) were synthesized as a new group of amorphous semiconductors by rf(13.56 MHz) reactive sputtering of a Ge target in a gas mixture of Ar+N2+H2 under a variety of deposition conditions such as gas ratio, rf-discharge power, and substrate temperature. Structural, optical, and electrical properties of those a-GeNx:H alloys were systematically measured and are discussed in relation to their preparation conditions. The optical band gap E04 of a-GeNx:H alloys could be continuously controlled in the range from 1.1 eV to 3.3 eV primarily depending on the atomic N/Ge ratio in the film. The role of hydrogen and nitrogen in the optical and electrical properties of the material is also crucially demonstrated.

  16. Strained silicon/silicon germanium heterojunction n-channel metal oxide semiconductor field effect transistors

    CERN Document Server

    Olsen, S H

    2002-01-01

    Investigations into the performance of strained silicon/silicon-germanium (Si/SiGe) n-channel metal-oxide-semiconductor field effect transistors (MOSFETs) have been carried out. Theoretical predictions suggest that use of a strained Si/SiGe material system with advanced material properties compared with conventional silicon allows enhanced MOSFET device performance. This study has therefore investigated the practical feasibility of obtaining superior electrical performance using a Si/SiGe material system. The MOSFET devices consisted of a strained Si surface channel and were fabricated on relaxed SiGe material using a reduced thermal budget process in order to preserve the strain. Two batches of strained Si/SiGe devices fabricated on material grown by differing methods have been analysed and both showed good transistor action. A correlation of electrical and physical device data established that the electrical device behaviour was closely related to the SiGe material quality, which differed depending on growt...

  17. Atomic-layer deposited thulium oxide as a passivation layer on germanium

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mitrovic, I. Z., E-mail: ivona@liverpool.ac.uk; Hall, S.; Weerakkody, A. D.; Sedghi, N. [Department of Electrical Engineering and Electronics, University of Liverpool, Brownlow Hill, Liverpool L69 3GJ (United Kingdom); Althobaiti, M.; Hesp, D.; Dhanak, V. R. [Department of Physics and Stephenson Institute for Renewable Energy, University of Liverpool, Liverpool L69 7ZF (United Kingdom); Santoni, A. [ENEA, Frascati Research Centre, via E. Fermi 45, 00044 Frascati (Italy); Chalker, P. R. [Department of Engineering, University of Liverpool, Brownlow Hill, Liverpool L69 3GH (United Kingdom); Henkel, C.; Dentoni Litta, E.; Hellström, P.-E.; Östling, M. [School of ICT, KTH Royal Institute of Technology, Isafjordsgatan 22, 164 40 Kista (Sweden); Tan, H.; Schamm-Chardon, S. [CEMES-CNRS and Université de Toulouse, nMat group, BP 94347, 31055 Toulouse Cedex 4 (France)

    2015-06-07

    A comprehensive study of atomic-layer deposited thulium oxide (Tm{sub 2}O{sub 3}) on germanium has been conducted using x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS), vacuum ultra-violet variable angle spectroscopic ellipsometry, high-resolution transmission electron microscopy (HRTEM), and electron energy-loss spectroscopy. The valence band offset is found to be 3.05 ± 0.2 eV for Tm{sub 2}O{sub 3}/p-Ge from the Tm 4d centroid and Ge 3p{sub 3/2} charge-corrected XPS core-level spectra taken at different sputtering times of a single bulk thulium oxide sample. A negligible downward band bending of ∼0.12 eV is observed during progressive differential charging of Tm 4d peaks. The optical band gap is estimated from the absorption edge and found to be 5.77 eV with an apparent Urbach tail signifying band gap tailing at ∼5.3 eV. The latter has been correlated to HRTEM and electron diffraction results corroborating the polycrystalline nature of the Tm{sub 2}O{sub 3} films. The Tm{sub 2}O{sub 3}/Ge interface is found to be rather atomically abrupt with sub-nanometer thickness. In addition, the band line-up of reference GeO{sub 2}/n-Ge stacks obtained by thermal oxidation has been discussed and derived. The observed low reactivity of thulium oxide on germanium as well as the high effective barriers for holes (∼3 eV) and electrons (∼2 eV) identify Tm{sub 2}O{sub 3} as a strong contender for interfacial layer engineering in future generations of scaled high-κ gate stacks on Ge.

  18. In-depth TEM characterization of block copolymer pattern transfer at germanium surfaces

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cummins, Cian; Collins, Timothy W.; Kelly, Roisin A.; McCarthy, Eoin K.; Morris, Michael A.

    2016-12-01

    Dry plasma etching for the pattern transfer of mask features is fundamental to semiconductor processing and the development of device and electrically conducting elements becomes more challenging as features reach the deep nanoscale regime. In this work, high resolution transmission electron microscopy (TEM) coupled with energy dispersive x-ray (EDX) characterization were used to analyze the pattern transfer of graphoepitaxially aligned block copolymer (BCP) features to germanium (Ge) substrates as a function of time. The BCP patterns were converted into metal oxide hardmasks in order to affect good aspect ratios of the transferred features. An unusual interface layer between metal oxide nanowires and the germanium-on-insulator substrate was observed. EDX analysis shows that the origin of this interface layer is a result of the presence of a negative tone e-beam resist material, HSQ (hydrogen silsesquioxane). HSQ was employed as a guiding material to align line-space features of poly(styrene)-block-poly(4-vinylpyridine) (PS-b-P4VP) BCP with 16 nm half-pitch topography. Additionally, the existence of a metal oxide layer (from the initial PS-b-P4VP film) is also shown through ex situ TEM and EDX characterization. Three dimensional modeling of features is also provided giving a unique insight into the arrangement and structure of BCP features prior to and after the pattern transfer process. The results presented in this article highlight the accuracy of high resolution electron microscopy and elemental mapping of BCP generated on-chip etch masks to observe and understand through-film features affecting pattern transfer.

  19. Electrical properties of germanium-based insulator-semiconductor structures with an insulating layer of polynucleotides, and their monomer components on the surface

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yafyasov, A. M., E-mail: yafyasov@bk.ru; Bakulev, V. M.; Konorov, P. P.; Bogevolnov, V. V. [St. Petersburg State University, Faculty of Physics (Russian Federation)

    2011-12-15

    It is shown that adsorption of nucleic acid molecules and their monomeric components, i.e., nitrogenous bases, from aqueous solutions results in the formation of an insulating layer on the germanium surface. Comparatively small values of the insulator charge and the surface-state density point to promising applications of nucleotides for both the formation of germanium-based insulator-semiconductor structures with nanoscale insulating layers and low surface-state densities at the phase interface, and for germanium surface passivation. Changes in the electronic properties of the space-charge region of germanium during nucleotide adsorption on its surface can be used as a method for determining the nucleotide molecule concentration in aqueous solutions.

  20. ATLAS muon detector

    CERN Multimedia

    Muon detectors from the outer layer of the ATLAS experiment at the Large Hadron Collider. Over a million individual detectors combine to make up the outer layer of ATLAS. All of this is exclusively to track the muons, the only detectable particles to make it out so far from the collision point. How the muon’s path curves in the magnetic field depends on how fast it is travelling. A fast muon curves only a very little, a slower one curves a lot. Together with the calorimeters, the muon detectors play an essential role in deciding which collisions to store and which to ignore. Certain signals from muons are a sure sign of exciting discoveries. To make sure the data from these collisions is not lost, some of the muon detectors react very quickly and trigger the electronics to record. The other detectors take a little longer, but are much more precise. Their job is to measure exactly where the muons have passed, calculating the curvature of their tracks in the magnetic field to the nearest five hundredths of a ...

  1. Detectors in Extreme Conditions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Blaj, G. [SLAC National Accelerator Lab., Menlo Park, CA (United States); Carini, G. [SLAC National Accelerator Lab., Menlo Park, CA (United States); Carron, S. [SLAC National Accelerator Lab., Menlo Park, CA (United States); Haller, G. [SLAC National Accelerator Lab., Menlo Park, CA (United States); Hart, P. [SLAC National Accelerator Lab., Menlo Park, CA (United States); Hasi, J. [SLAC National Accelerator Lab., Menlo Park, CA (United States); Herrmann, S. [SLAC National Accelerator Lab., Menlo Park, CA (United States); Kenney, C. [SLAC National Accelerator Lab., Menlo Park, CA (United States); Segal, J. [SLAC National Accelerator Lab., Menlo Park, CA (United States); Tomada, A. [SLAC National Accelerator Lab., Menlo Park, CA (United States)

    2015-08-06

    Free Electron Lasers opened a new window on imaging the motion of atoms and molecules. At SLAC, FEL experiments are performed at LCLS using 120Hz pulses with 1012 - 1013 photons in 10 femtoseconds (billions of times brighter than the most powerful synchrotrons). This extreme detection environment raises unique challenges, from obvious to surprising. Radiation damage is a constant threat due to accidental exposure to insufficiently attenuated beam, focused beam and formation of ice crystals reflecting the beam onto the detector. Often high power optical lasers are also used (e.g., 25TW), increasing the risk of damage or impeding data acquisition through electromagnetic pulses (EMP). The sample can contaminate the detector surface or even produce shrapnel damage. Some experiments require ultra high vacuum (UHV) with strict design, surface contamination and cooling requirements - also for detectors. The setup is often changed between or during experiments with short turnaround times, risking mechanical and ESD damage, requiring work planning, training of operators and sometimes continuous participation of the LCLS Detector Group in the experiments. The detectors used most often at LCLS are CSPAD cameras for hard x-rays and pnCCDs for soft x-rays.

  2. The AFP Detector Control System

    CERN Document Server

    Oleiro Seabra, Luis Filipe; The ATLAS collaboration

    2017-01-01

    The ATLAS Forward Proton (AFP) detector is one of the forward detectors of the ATLAS experiment at CERN aiming at measuring momenta and angles of diffractively scattered protons. Silicon Tracking and Time-of-Flight detectors are located inside Roman Pot stations inserted into beam pipe aperture. The AFP detector is composed of two stations on each side of the ATLAS interaction point and is under commissioning. The detector is provided with high and low voltage distribution systems. Each station has vacuum and cooling systems, movement control and all the required electronics for signal processing. Monitoring of environmental parameters, like temperature and radiation, is also available. The Detector Control System (DCS) provides control and monitoring of the detector hardware and ensures the safe and reliable operation of the detector, assuring good data quality. Comparing with DCS systems of other detectors, the AFP DCS main challenge is to cope with the large variety of AFP equipment. This paper describes t...

  3. Search for $2\\beta$ decay of $^{106}$Cd with enriched $^{106}$CdWO$_4$ crystal scintillator in coincidence with four HPGe detectors

    CERN Document Server

    Belli, P; Brudanin, V B; Cappella, F; Caracciolo, V; Cerulli, R; Chernyak, D M; Danevich, F A; d'Angelo, S; Di Marco, A; Incicchitti, A; Laubenstein, M; Mokina, V M; Poda, D V; Polischuk, O G; Tretyak, V I; Tupitsyna, I A

    2016-01-01

    A radiopure cadmium tungstate crystal scintillator, enriched in $^{106}$Cd to 66%, with mass of 216 g ($^{106}$CdWO$_4$), was used to search for double beta decay processes in $^{106}$Cd in coincidence with four ultra-low background high purity germanium detectors in a single cryostat. New improved limits on the double beta processes in $^{106}$Cd have been set on the level of $10^{20}- 10^{21}$ yr after 13085 h of data taking. In particular, the half-life limit on the two neutrino electron capture with positron emission, $T_{1/2}^{2\

  4. The LHCb Detector Upgrade

    CERN Document Server

    Schindler, H

    2013-01-01

    The LHCb collaboration presented a Letter of Intent (LOI) to the LHCC in March 2011 for a major upgrading of the detector during Long Shutdown 2 (2018) and intends to collect a data sample of 50/fb in the LHC and High-Luminosity-LHC eras. The aim is to operate the experiment at an instantaneous luminosity 2.5 times above the present operational luminosity, which has already been pushed to twice the design value. Reading out the detector at 40MHz allows to increase the trigger efficiencies especially for the hadronic decay modes. The physics case and the strategy for the upgrade have been endorsed by the LHCC. This paper presents briefly the physics motivations for the LHCb upgrade and the proposed changes to the detector and trigger.

  5. Cryogenic Tracking Detectors

    CERN Multimedia

    Luukka, P R; Tuominen, E M; Mikuz, M

    2002-01-01

    The recent advances in Si and diamond detector technology give hope of a simple solution to the radiation hardness problem for vertex trackers at the LHC. In particular, we have recently demonstrated that operating a heavily irradiated Si detector at liquid nitrogen (LN$_2$) temperature results in significant recovery of Charge Collection Efficiency (CCE). Among other potential benefits of operation at cryogenic temperatures are the use of large low-resistivity wafers, simple processing, higher and faster electrical signal because of higher mobility and drift velocity of carriers, and lower noise of the readout circuit. A substantial reduction in sensor cost could result The first goal of the approved extension of the RD39 program is to demonstrate that irradiation at low temperature in situ during operation does not affect the results obtained so far by cooling detectors which were irradiated at room temperature. In particular we shall concentrate on processes and materials that could significantly reduce th...

  6. Transition Radiation Detectors

    CERN Document Server

    Andronic, A

    2012-01-01

    We review the basic features of transition radiation and how they are used for the design of modern Transition Radiation Detectors (TRD). The discussion will include the various realizations of radiators as well as a discussion of the detection media and aspects of detector construction. With regard to particle identification we assess the different methods for efficient discrimination of different particles and outline the methods for the quantification of this property. Since a number of comprehensive reviews already exist, we predominantly focus on the detectors currently operated at the LHC. To a lesser extent we also cover some other TRDs, which are planned or are currently being operated in balloon or space-borne astro-particle physics experiments.

  7. Refining Radchem Detectors: Iridium

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arnold, C. W.; Bredeweg, T. A.; Vieira, D. J.; Bond, E. M.; Jandel, M.; Rusev, G.; Moody, W. A.; Ullmann, J. L.; Couture, A. J.; Mosby, S.; O'Donnell, J. M.; Haight, R. C.

    2013-10-01

    Accurate determination of neutron fluence is an important diagnostic of nuclear device performance, whether the device is a commercial reactor, a critical assembly or an explosive device. One important method for neutron fluence determination, generally referred to as dosimetry, is based on exploiting various threshold reactions of elements such as iridium. It is possible to infer details about the integrated neutron energy spectrum to which the dosimetry sample or ``radiochemical detector'' was exposed by measuring specific activation products post-irradiation. The ability of radchem detectors like iridium to give accurate neutron fluence measurements is limited by the precision of the cross-sections in the production/destruction network (189Ir-193Ir). The Detector for Advanced Neutron Capture Experiments (DANCE) located at LANSCE is ideal for refining neutron capture cross sections of iridium isotopes. Recent results from a measurement of neutron capture on 193-Ir are promising. Plans to measure other iridium isotopes are underway.

  8. JSATS Detector Field Manual

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Choi, Eric Y. [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Flory, Adam E. [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Lamarche, Brian L. [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Weiland, Mark A. [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States)

    2014-06-01

    The Juvenile Salmon Acoustic Telemetry System (JSATS) Detector is a software and hardware system that captures JSATS Acoustic Micro Transmitter (AMT) signals. The system uses hydrophones to capture acoustic signals in the water. This analog signal is then amplified and processed by the Analog to Digital Converter (ADC) and Digital Signal Processor (DSP) board in the computer. This board digitizes and processes the acoustic signal to determine if a possible JSATS tag is present. With this detection, the data will be saved to the computer for further analysis. This document details the features and functionality of the JSATS Detector software. The document covers how to install the software, setup and run the detector software. The document will also go over the raw binary waveform file format and CSV files containing RMS values

  9. Cost-effective scalable synthesis of mesoporous germanium particles via a redox-transmetalation reaction for high-performance energy storage devices.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Choi, Sinho; Kim, Jieun; Choi, Nam-Soon; Kim, Min Gyu; Park, Soojin

    2015-02-24

    Nanostructured germanium is a promising material for high-performance energy storage devices. However, synthesizing it in a cost-effective and simple manner on a large scale remains a significant challenge. Herein, we report a redox-transmetalation reaction-based route for the large-scale synthesis of mesoporous germanium particles from germanium oxide at temperatures of 420-600 °C. We could confirm that a unique redox-transmetalation reaction occurs between Zn(0) and Ge(4+) at approximately 420 °C using temperature-dependent in situ X-ray absorption fine structure analysis. This reaction has several advantages, which include (i) the successful synthesis of germanium particles at a low temperature (∼450 °C), (ii) the accommodation of large volume changes, owing to the mesoporous structure of the germanium particles, and (iii) the ability to synthesize the particles in a cost-effective and scalable manner, as inexpensive metal oxides are used as the starting materials. The optimized mesoporous germanium anode exhibits a reversible capacity of ∼1400 mA h g(-1) after 300 cycles at a rate of 0.5 C (corresponding to the capacity retention of 99.5%), as well as stable cycling in a full cell containing a LiCoO2 cathode with a high energy density (charge capacity = 286.62 mA h cm(-3)).

  10. ALICE Transition Radiation Detector

    CERN Multimedia

    Pachmayer, Y

    2013-01-01

    The Transition Radiation Detector (TRD) is the main electron detector in ALICE. In conduction with the TPC and the ITS, it provides the necessary electron identification capability to study: - Production of light and heavy vector mesons as well as the continuum in the di-electron channel, - Semi leptonic decays of hadrons with open charm and open beauty via the single-electron channel using the displaced vertex information provided by the ITS, - Correlated DD and BB pairs via coincidences of electrons in the central barrel and muons in the forward muon arm, - Jets with high Pτ tracks in one single TRD stack.

  11. Intelligent Detector Design

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Graf, N.; Cassell, R.; Johnson, T.; McCormick, J.; /SLAC; Magill, S.; Kuhlmann, S.; /Argonne

    2007-02-13

    At a future e+e- linear collider, precision measurements of jets will be required in order to understand physics at and beyond the electroweak scale. Calorimetry will be used with other detectors in an optimal way to reconstruct particle 4-vectors with unprecedented precision. This Particle Flow Algorithm (PFA) approach is seen as the best way to achieve particle mass resolutions from dijet measurements in the range of {approx} 30%/{radical}E, resulting in innovative methods for choosing the calorimeter technology and optimizing the detector design.

  12. Semiconductor neutron detector

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ianakiev, Kiril D [Los Alamos, NM; Littlewood, Peter B [Cambridge, GB; Blagoev, Krastan B [Arlington, VA; Swinhoe, Martyn T [Los Alamos, NM; Smith, James L [Los Alamos, NM; Sullivan, Clair J [Los Alamos, NM; Alexandrov, Boian S [Los Alamos, NM; Lashley, Jason Charles [Santa Fe, NM

    2011-03-08

    A neutron detector has a compound of lithium in a single crystal form as a neutron sensor element. The lithium compound, containing improved charge transport properties, is either lithium niobate or lithium tantalate. The sensor element is in direct contact with a monitor that detects an electric current. A signal proportional to the electric current is produced and is calibrated to indicate the neutrons sensed. The neutron detector is particularly useful for detecting neutrons in a radiation environment. Such radiation environment may, e.g. include gamma radiation and noise.

  13. Edgeless silicon pad detectors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Perea Solano, B. [CERN, CH-1211 Geneva 23 (Switzerland)]. E-mail: blanca.perea.solano@cern.ch; Abreu, M.C. [LIP and University of Algarve, 8000 Faro (Portugal); Avati, V. [CERN, CH-1211 Geneva 23 (Switzerland); Boccali, T. [INFN Sez. di Pisa and Scuola Normale Superiore, Pisa (Italy); Boccone, V. [INFN Sez. di Genova and Universita di Genova, Genoa (Italy); Bozzo, M. [INFN Sez. di Genova and Universita di Genova, Genoa (Italy); Capra, R. [INFN Sez. di Genova and Universita di Genova, Genoa (Italy); Casagrande, L. [INFN Sez. di Roma 2 and Universita di Roma 2, Rome (Italy); Chen, W. [Brookhaven National Laboratory, Upton, NY 11973-5000 (United States); Eggert, K. [CERN, CH-1211 Geneva 23 (Switzerland); Heijne, E. [CERN, CH-1211 Geneva 23 (Switzerland); Klauke, S. [CERN, CH-1211 Geneva 23 (Switzerland); Li, Z. [Brookhaven National Laboratory, Upton, NY 11973-5000 (United States); Maeki, T. [Helsinki Institute of Physics, Helsinki (Finland); Mirabito, L. [CERN, CH-1211 Geneva 23 (Switzerland); Morelli, A. [INFN Sez. di Genova and Universita di Genova, Genoa (Italy); Niinikoski, T.O. [CERN, CH-1211 Geneva 23 (Switzerland); Oljemark, F. [Helsinki Institute of Physics, Helsinki (Finland); Palmieri, V.G. [Helsinki Institute of Physics, Helsinki (Finland); Rato Mendes, P. [LIP and University of Algarve, 8000 Faro (Portugal); Rodrigues, S. [LIP and University of Algarve, 8000 Faro (Portugal); Siegrist, P. [CERN, CH-1211 Geneva 23 (Switzerland); Silvestris, L. [INFN Sez. Di Bari, Bari (Italy); Sousa, P. [LIP and University of Algarve, 8000 Faro (Portugal); Tapprogge, S. [Helsinki Institute of Physics, Helsinki (Finland); Trocme, B. [Institut de Physique Nucleaire, Villeurbanne (France)

    2006-05-01

    We report measurements in a high-energy pion beam of the sensitivity of the edge region in 'edgeless' planar silicon pad diode detectors diced through their contact implants. A large surface current on such an edge prevents the normal reverse biasing of the device, but the current can be sufficiently reduced by the use of a suitable cutting method, followed by edge treatment, and by operating the detector at low temperature. The depth of the dead layer at the diced edge is measured to be (12.5{+-}8{sub stat.}.{+-}6{sub syst.}) {mu}m.

  14. Edgeless silicon pad detectors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Perea Solano, B.; Abreu, M. C.; Avati, V.; Boccali, T.; Boccone, V.; Bozzo, M.; Capra, R.; Casagrande, L.; Chen, W.; Eggert, K.; Heijne, E.; Klauke, S.; Li, Z.; Mäki, T.; Mirabito, L.; Morelli, A.; Niinikoski, T. O.; Oljemark, F.; Palmieri, V. G.; Rato Mendes, P.; Rodrigues, S.; Siegrist, P.; Silvestris, L.; Sousa, P.; Tapprogge, S.; Trocmé, B.

    2006-05-01

    We report measurements in a high-energy pion beam of the sensitivity of the edge region in "edgeless" planar silicon pad diode detectors diced through their contact implants. A large surface current on such an edge prevents the normal reverse biasing of the device, but the current can be sufficiently reduced by the use of a suitable cutting method, followed by edge treatment, and by operating the detector at low temperature. The depth of the dead layer at the diced edge is measured to be (12.5±8 stat..±6 syst.) μm.

  15. The Upgraded D0 detector

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Abazov, V.M.; Abbott, B.; Abolins, M.; Acharya, B.S.; Adams, D.L.; Adams, M.; Adams, T.; Agelou, M.; Agram, J.-L.; Ahmed, S.N.; Ahn, S.H.; Ahsan, M.; Alexeev, G.D.; Alkhazov, G.; Alton, A.; Alverson, G.; Alves, G.A.; Anastasoaie, M.; Andeen, T.; Anderson, J.T.; Anderson, S.; /Buenos Aires U. /Rio de Janeiro, CBPF /Sao Paulo, IFT /Alberta U.

    2005-07-01

    The D0 experiment enjoyed a very successful data-collection run at the Fermilab Tevatron collider between 1992 and 1996. Since then, the detector has been upgraded to take advantage of improvements to the Tevatron and to enhance its physics capabilities. We describe the new elements of the detector, including the silicon microstrip tracker, central fiber tracker, solenoidal magnet, preshower detectors, forward muon detector, and forward proton detector. The uranium/liquid-argon calorimeters and central muon detector, remaining from Run I, are discussed briefly. We also present the associated electronics, triggering, and data acquisition systems, along with the design and implementation of software specific to D0.

  16. Spectrum correction algorithm for detectors in airborne radioactivity monitoring equipment NH-UAV based on a ratio processing method

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cao, Ye [Department of Nuclear Science and Engineering, Nanjing University of Aeronautics and Astronautics, Nanjing 210016 (China); Tang, Xiao-Bin, E-mail: tangxiaobin@nuaa.edu.cn [Department of Nuclear Science and Engineering, Nanjing University of Aeronautics and Astronautics, Nanjing 210016 (China); Jiangsu Key Laboratory of Nuclear Energy Equipment Materials Engineering, Nanjing University of Aeronautics and Astronautics, Nanjing 210016 (China); Wang, Peng; Meng, Jia; Huang, Xi; Wen, Liang-Sheng [Department of Nuclear Science and Engineering, Nanjing University of Aeronautics and Astronautics, Nanjing 210016 (China); Chen, Da [Department of Nuclear Science and Engineering, Nanjing University of Aeronautics and Astronautics, Nanjing 210016 (China); Jiangsu Key Laboratory of Nuclear Energy Equipment Materials Engineering, Nanjing University of Aeronautics and Astronautics, Nanjing 210016 (China)

    2015-10-11

    The unmanned aerial vehicle (UAV) radiation monitoring method plays an important role in nuclear accidents emergency. In this research, a spectrum correction algorithm about the UAV airborne radioactivity monitoring equipment NH-UAV was studied to measure the radioactive nuclides within a small area in real time and in a fixed place. The simulation spectra of the high-purity germanium (HPGe) detector and the lanthanum bromide (LaBr{sub 3}) detector in the equipment were obtained using the Monte Carlo technique. Spectrum correction coefficients were calculated after performing ratio processing techniques about the net peak areas between the double detectors on the detection spectrum of the LaBr{sub 3} detector according to the accuracy of the detection spectrum of the HPGe detector. The relationship between the spectrum correction coefficient and the size of the source term was also investigated. A good linear relation exists between the spectrum correction coefficient and the corresponding energy (R{sup 2}=0.9765). The maximum relative deviation from the real condition reduced from 1.65 to 0.035. The spectrum correction method was verified as feasible. - Highlights: • An airborne radioactivity monitoring equipment NH-UAV was developed to measure radionuclide after a nuclear accident. • A spectrum correction algorithm was proposed to obtain precise information on the detected radioactivity within a small area. • The spectrum correction method was verified as feasible. • The corresponding spectrum correction coefficients increase first and then stay constant.

  17. A Dark Matter Search with MALBEK

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Giovanetti, G. K.; Abgrall, N.; Aguayo, Estanislao; Avignone, Frank T.; Barabash, Alexander S.; Bertrand, F.; Boswell, M.; Brudanin, V.; Busch, Matthew; Byram, D.; Caldwell, A. S.; Chan, Yuen-Dat; Christofferson, Cabot-Ann; Combs, Dustin C.; Cuesta, C.; Detwiler, Jason A.; Doe, Peter J.; Efremenko, Yuri; Egorov, Viatcheslav; Ejiri, H.; Elliott, S. R.; Fast, James E.; Finnerty, P.; Fraenkle, Florian; Galindo-Uribarri, A.; Goett, J.; Green, M. P.; Gruszko, J.; Guiseppe, Vincente; Gusev, K.; Hallin, A. L.; Hazama, R.; Hegai, A.; Henning, Reyco; Hoppe, Eric W.; Howard, Stanley; Howe, M. A.; Keeter, K.; Kidd, M. F.; Kochetov, Oleg; Konovalov, S.; Kouzes, Richard T.; Laferriere, Brian D.; Leon, Jonathan D.; Leviner, L.; Loach, J. C.; MacMullin, J.; MacMullin, S.; Martin, R. D.; Meijer, S. J.; Mertens, S.; Nomachi, Masaharu; Orrell, John L.; O' Shaughnessy, C.; Overman, Nicole R.; Phillips, D.; Poon, Alan; Pushkin, K.; Radford, D. C.; Rager, J.; Rielage, Keith; Robertson, R. G. H.; Romero-Romero, E.; Ronquest, M. C.; Schubert, Alexis G.; Shanks, B.; Shima, T.; Shirchenko, M.; Snavely, Kyle J.; Snyder, N.; Suriano, Anne-Marie; Thompson, J.; Timkin, V.; Tornow, W.; Trimble, J. E.; Varner, R. L.; Vasilyev, Sergey; Vetter, Kai; Vorren, Kris R.; White, Brandon R.; Wilkerson, J. F.; Wiseman, C.; Xu, W.; Yakushev, E.; Young, A.; Yu, Chang-Hong; Yumatov, Vladimir

    2015-06-01

    The Majorana Demonstrator is an array of natural and enriched high purity germanium detectors that will search for the neutrinoless double-beta decay of 76Ge and perform a search for weakly interacting massive particles (WIMPs) with masses below 10 GeV. As part of the Majorana research and development efforts, we have deployed a modified, low-background broad energy germanium detector at the Kimballton Underground Research Facility. With its sub-keV energy threshold, this detector is potentially sensitive to non-Standard Model physics, including interactions with WIMPs. We discuss the backgrounds present in the WIMP region of interest and present results from a WIMP search with 221.49 live days of data from this detector.

  18. Band offsets for biaxially and uniaxially stressed silicon-germanium layers with arbitrary substrate and channel orientations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Eneman, Geert; Roussel, Philippe; Brunco, David Paul; Collaert, Nadine; Mocuta, Anda; Thean, Aaron [Imec, Kapeldreef 75, 3001 Heverlee (Belgium)

    2016-08-07

    The conduction and valence band offsets between a strained silicon-germanium layer and a silicon-germanium substrate are reported for arbitrary substrate and channel crystal orientations. The offsets are calculated both for the case of biaxial stress, corresponding approximately to the stress state of a thin strained channel in a planar field-effect transistor (FET), and for uniaxial stress, which is the approximate stress state for strained channels in a FinFET configuration. Significant orientation dependence is found for the conduction band offset, overall leading to the strongest electron quantum confinement in biaxial-tensile stressed channels on {100}-oriented substrates, and uniaxial-tensile stressed channels in the 〈100〉 and 〈110〉 directions. For biaxially stressed layers on {111} substrates, the conduction band offset is significantly smaller than for {100} or {110} directions. For the valence band offset, the dependence on crystal orientation is found to be small.

  19. Water soluble nano-scale transient material germanium oxide for zero toxic waste based environmentally benign nano-manufacturing

    KAUST Repository

    Almuslem, A. S.

    2017-02-14

    In the recent past, with the advent of transient electronics for mostly implantable and secured electronic applications, the whole field effect transistor structure has been dissolved in a variety of chemicals. Here, we show simple water soluble nano-scale (sub-10 nm) germanium oxide (GeO) as the dissolvable component to remove the functional structures of metal oxide semiconductor devices and then reuse the expensive germanium substrate again for functional device fabrication. This way, in addition to transiency, we also show an environmentally friendly manufacturing process for a complementary metal oxide semiconductor (CMOS) technology. Every year, trillions of complementary metal oxide semiconductor (CMOS) electronics are manufactured and billions are disposed, which extend the harmful impact to our environment. Therefore, this is a key study to show a pragmatic approach for water soluble high performance electronics for environmentally friendly manufacturing and bioresorbable electronic applications.

  20. Characterization of nanocrystalline silicon germanium film and nanotube in adsorption gas by Monte Carlo and Langevin dynamic simulation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Monajjemi

    2008-08-01

    Full Text Available The nanocrystalline silicon-germanium films (Si/Ge and Si/Ge nanotubes have low band gaps and high carrier mobility, thus offering appealing potential for absorbing gas molecules. Interaction between hydrogen molecules and bare as well as functionalized Si/Ge nanofilm and nanotube was investigated using Monte Carlo (MC and Langevin dynamic (LD simulation methods. It was found that the binding energy of the H2 on the Si/Ge surface is weak, and be enhanced by increasing curvature of surface to tube form and increasing temperature. The structural, total energy and energy band gaps of H2 absorbed nanocrystalline silicon germanium film (Si/Ge and as it passes through Si/Ge nanotube was also studied. They are computed with MC and LD simulation the methods at different temperatures. All the calculations were carried out using HyperChem 7.0 program package.

  1. Water soluble nano-scale transient material germanium oxide for zero toxic waste based environmentally benign nano-manufacturing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Almuslem, A. S.; Hanna, A. N.; Yapici, T.; Wehbe, N.; Diallo, E. M.; Kutbee, A. T.; Bahabry, R. R.; Hussain, M. M.

    2017-02-01

    In the recent past, with the advent of transient electronics for mostly implantable and secured electronic applications, the whole field effect transistor structure has been dissolved in a variety of chemicals. Here, we show simple water soluble nano-scale (sub-10 nm) germanium oxide (GeO2) as the dissolvable component to remove the functional structures of metal oxide semiconductor devices and then reuse the expensive germanium substrate again for functional device fabrication. This way, in addition to transiency, we also show an environmentally friendly manufacturing process for a complementary metal oxide semiconductor (CMOS) technology. Every year, trillions of complementary metal oxide semiconductor (CMOS) electronics are manufactured and billions are disposed, which extend the harmful impact to our environment. Therefore, this is a key study to show a pragmatic approach for water soluble high performance electronics for environmentally friendly manufacturing and bioresorbable electronic applications.

  2. Quantitative spectrographic determination of traces of germanium in lignite; Determinacion Espectrografica Cuantitativa de trazas de Germanio en Lignitos

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Martin, M.; Roca, M.

    1972-07-01

    A burning technique in a d.c. arc at 10 amp has been employed. The standards have been prepared from a natural lignite with a low germanium content. In order to enhance sensitivity, AgCl, K{sub 2}SO{sub 4}, CuF{sub 2}, Sb{sub 2}S{sub 3} and Bi{sub 2}S{sub 3} have been tested as sweeping materials. Using 2% CuF{sub 2} a detection limit of 1 ppm germanium is attainable. Bi, Cu, Sb and Sn have been studied as internal standards: the former leads to the, highest precision (1 6%). Results show good agreement with those obtained by the addition method. (Author) 6 refs.

  3. Photovoltaic radiation detector element

    Science.gov (United States)

    Agouridis, D.C.

    1980-12-17

    A radiation detector element is formed of a body of semiconductor material, a coating on the body which forms a photovoltaic junction therewith, and a current collector consisting of narrow metallic strips, the aforesaid coating having an opening therein in the edge of which closely approaches but is spaced from the current collector strips.

  4. Electromagnetic radiation detector

    Science.gov (United States)

    Benson, Jay L.; Hansen, Gordon J.

    1976-01-01

    An electromagnetic radiation detector including a collimating window, a cathode member having a photoelectric emissive material surface angularly disposed to said window whereby radiation is impinged thereon at acute angles, an anode, separated from the cathode member by an evacuated space, for collecting photoelectrons emitted from the emissive cathode surface, and a negatively biased, high transmissive grid disposed between the cathode member and anode.

  5. MUON DETECTORS: RPC

    CERN Multimedia

    P. Paolucci

    2012-01-01

    The RPC system is operating with a very high uptime, an average chamber efficiency of about 95% and an average cluster size around 1.8. The average number of active channels is 97.7%. Eight chambers are disconnected and forty are working in single-gap mode due to high-voltage problems. The total luminosity lost due to RPCs in 2012 is 88.46 pb–1. One of the main goals of 2012 was to improve the stability of the endcap trigger that is strongly correlated to the performances of the detector, due to the 3-out-3 trigger logic. At beginning of 2011 the instability of the detector efficiency was about 10%. Detailed studies found that this was mainly due to the strong correlation between the performance of the detector and the atmospheric pressure (P). Figure XXY shows the linear correlation between the average cluster size of the endcap chamber versus P. This effect is expected for gaseous detectors and can be reduced by correcting the applied high-voltage working point (HVapp) according to the followi...

  6. Performance of GLD detector

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Most of the important physics processes to be studied in the international linear collider (ILC) experiment have multi-jets in the final state. In order to achieve better jet energy resolution, the so-called particle flow algorithm (PFA) will be employed and there is a general consensus that PFA derives overall ILC detector design.

  7. Directional gamma detector

    Science.gov (United States)

    LeVert, Francis E.; Cox, Samson A.

    1981-01-01

    An improved directional gamma radiation detector has a collector sandwiched etween two layers of insulation of varying thicknesses. The collector and insulation layers are contained within an evacuated casing, or emitter, which releases electrons upon exposure to gamma radiation. Delayed electrons and electrons entering the collector at oblique angles are attenuated as they pass through the insulation layers on route to the collector.

  8. Ionic smoke detectors

    CERN Document Server

    2002-01-01

    Ionic smoke detectors are products incorporating radioactive material. This article summarises the process for their commercialization and marketing, and how the activity is controlled, according to regulations establishing strict design and production requisites to guarantee the absence of radiological risk associated both with their use and their final handling as conventional waste. (Author)

  9. Choosing a Motion Detector.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ballard, David M.

    1990-01-01

    Examines the characteristics of three types of motion detectors: Doppler radar, infrared, and ultrasonic wave, and how they are used on school buses to prevent students from being killed by their own school bus. Other safety devices cited are bus crossing arms and a camera monitor system. (MLF)

  10. ALICE Silicon Pixel Detector

    CERN Multimedia

    Manzari, V

    2013-01-01

    The Silicon Pixel Detector (SPD) forms the innermost two layers of the 6-layer barrel Inner Tracking System (ITS). The SPD plays a key role in the determination of the position of the primary collision and in the reconstruction of the secondary vertices from particle decays.

  11. Superconducting Single Photon Detectors

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Dorenbos, S.N.

    2011-01-01

    This thesis is about the development of a detector for single photons, particles of light. New techniques are being developed that require high performance single photon detection, such as quantum cryptography, single molecule detection, optical radar, ballistic imaging, circuit testing and

  12. The BABAR Detector

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Luth, Vera G

    2001-05-18

    BABAR, the detector for the SLAC PEP-II asymmetric e{sup +}e{sup -} B Factory operating at the {Upsilon}(4S) resonance, was designed to allow comprehensive studies of CP-violation in B-meson decays. Charged particle tracks are measured in a multi-layer silicon vertex tracker surrounded by a cylindrical wire drift chamber. Electromagentic showers from electrons and photons are detected in an array of CsI crystals located just inside the solenoidal coil of a superconducting magnet. Muons and neutral hadrons are identified by arrays of resistive plate chambers inserted into gaps in the steel flux return of the magnet. Charged hadrons are identified by dE/dx measurements in the tracking detectors and in a ring-imaging Cherenkov detector surrounding the drift chamber. The trigger, data acquisition and data-monitoring systems, VME- and network-based, are controlled by custom-designed online software. Details of the layout and performance of the detector components and their associated electronics and software are presented.

  13. Gaseous wire detectors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Va' vra, J.

    1997-08-01

    This article represents a series of three lectures describing topics needed to understand the design of typical gaseous wire detectors used in large high energy physics experiments; including the electrostatic design, drift of electrons in the electric and magnetic field, the avalanche, signal creation, limits on the position accuracy as well as some problems one encounters in practical operations.

  14. Pixel detector insertion

    CERN Multimedia

    CMS

    2015-01-01

    Insertion of the Pixel Tracker, the 66-million-channel device used to pinpoint the vertex of each colliding proton pair, located at the heart of the detector. The geometry of CMS is a cylinder lying on its side (22 meters long and 15 meters high in dia

  15. First ALICE detectors installed!

    CERN Multimedia

    2006-01-01

    Detectors to track down penetrating muon particles are the first to be placed in their final position in the ALICE cavern. The Alice muon spectrometer: in the foreground the trigger chamber is positioned in front of the muon wall, with the dipole magnet in the background. After the impressive transport of its dipole magnet, ALICE has begun to fill the spectrometer with detectors. In mid-July, the ALICE muon spectrometer team achieved important milestones with the installation of the trigger and the tracking chambers of the muon spectrometer. They are the first detectors to be installed in their final position in the cavern. All of the eight half planes of the RPCs (resistive plate chambers) have been installed in their final position behind the muon filter. The role of the trigger detector is to select events containing a muon pair coming, for instance, from the decay of J/ or Y resonances. The selection is made on the transverse momentum of the two individual muons. The internal parts of the RPCs, made o...

  16. The LUCID-2 Detector

    CERN Document Server

    Pinfold, James; The ATLAS collaboration

    2017-01-01

    The LUCID-2 detector is the main online and offline luminosity provider of the ATLAS experiment. It provides over 100 different luminosity measurements from different algorithms for each of the 2808/3546 filled/total LHC bunches. LUCID was entirely redesigned in preparation for LHC Run 2: both the detector and the electronics were upgraded in order to cope with the challenging conditions expected at the LHC center of mass energy of 13 TeV with only 25 ns bunch-spacing. While LUCID-1 used gas as a Cherenkov medium, the LUCID-2 detector is in a new unique way using the quartz windows of small photomultipliers as the Cherenkov medium. The main challenge for a luminometer is to keep the efficiency constant during years of data-taking. LUCID-2 is using an innovative calibration system based on radioactive 207 Bi sources deposited on the quartz window of the readout photomultipliers. This makes it possible to accurately monitor and control the gain of the photomultipliers so that the detector efficiency can be kept...

  17. The LUCID-2 Detector

    CERN Document Server

    Soluk, Richard; The ATLAS collaboration

    2017-01-01

    The LUCID-2 detector is the main online and offline luminosity provider of the ATLAS experiment. It provides over 100 different luminosity measurements from different algorithms for each of the 2808 LHC bunches. LUCID was entirely redesigned in preparation for LHC Run 2: both the detector and the electronics were upgraded in order to cope with the challenging conditions expected at the LHC center of mass energy of 13 TeV with only 25 ns bunch-spacing. While LUCID-1 used gas as a Cherenkov medium, the LUCID-2 detector is in a new unique way using the quartz windows of small photomultipliers as the Cherenkov medium. The main challenge for a luminometer is to keep the efficiency constant during years of data-taking. LUCID-2 is using an innovative calibration system based on radioactive 207 Bi sources deposited on the quartz window of the readout photomultipliers. This makes it possible to accurately monitor and control the gain of the photomultipliers so that the detector efficiency can be kept stable at a perce...

  18. The CLIC Vertex Detector

    CERN Document Server

    Dannheim, D

    2015-01-01

    The precision physics needs at TeV-scale linear electron-positron colliders (ILC and CLIC) require a vertex-detector system with excellent flavour-tagging capabilities through a meas- urement of displaced vertices. This is essential, for example, for an explicit measurement of the Higgs decays to pairs of b-quarks, c-quarks and gluons. Efficient identification of top quarks in the decay t → W b will give access to the ttH-coupling measurement. In addition to those requirements driven by physics arguments, the CLIC bunch structure calls for hit tim- ing at the few-ns level. As a result, the CLIC vertex-detector system needs to have excellent spatial resolution, full geometrical coverage extending to low polar angles, extremely low material budget, low occupancy facilitated by time-tagging, and sufficient heat removal from sensors and readout. These considerations challenge current technological limits. A detector concept based on hybrid pixel-detector technology is under development for the CLIC ver- tex det...

  19. Thickness, Doping Accuracy, and Roughness Control in Graded Germanium Doped Ch{sub x} Micro-shells for Lmj

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Legay, G.; Theobald, M.; Barnouin, J.; Peche, E.; Bednarczyk, S.; Hermerel, C. [CEA Valduc, Dept Rech Mat Nucl, Serv Microcibles, 21 - Is-sur-Tille (France)

    2009-05-15

    In the Commissariat a l'Energie Atomique Laser Megajoule (LMJ) facility, amorphous hydrogenated carbon (a-C: H or CH{sub x}) is the nominal ablator used to achieve inertial confinement fusion experiments. These targets are filled with of fusible mixture of deuterium-tritium in order to perform ignition. The a-C: H shell is deposited on a poly-alpha-methylstyrene (PAMS) mandrel by glow discharge polymerization with trans-2-butene, hydrogen, and helium. Graded germanium doped CH{sub x} micro-shells are supposed to be more stable regarding hydrodynamic instabilities. The shells are composed of four layers for a total thickness of 180 {mu}m. The germanium gradient is obtained by doping the different a-C: H layers with the addition of tetra-methylgermanium in the gas mixture. As the achievement of ignition greatly depends on the physical properties of the shell, the thicknesses, doping concentration, and roughness must be precisely controlled. Quartz microbalances were used to perform an in situ and real-time measurement of the thickness in order to reduce the variations and so our fabrication tolerances on each layer thickness. Ex situ control of the thickness of each layer was carried out, with both optical coherent tomography and interferometry, (wall-mapper). High-quality, PAMS and a rolling system have been used to lower the low-mode roughness [root-mean-square (rms) (mode 2) {<=} 70 nm]. High modes were clearly, reduced by, coating the pan containing the shells with polyvinyl alcohol + CH{sub x} instead of polystyrene + CH{sub x} resulting in an rms ({>=}mode 10) {<=} 20 nm, which can be {<=}15 nm for the best micro-shells. The germanium concentration (0. 4 and 0. 75 at. %) in the a-CH layer is obtained by regulating the tetramethyl-germanium flow. Low range mass flow controllers have been used to improve the doping accuracy. (authors)

  20. Fire Emulator/Detector Evaluator

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Laboratory Consortium — Description:The fire emulator/detector evaluator (FE/DE) is a computer-controlled flow tunnel used to re-create the environments surrounding detectors in the early...