WorldWideScience

Sample records for broad anthropological perspective

  1. Religious architecture: anthropological perspectives

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Verkaaik, O.

    2013-01-01

    Religious Architecture: Anthropological Perspectives develops an anthropological perspective on modern religious architecture, including mosques, churches and synagogues. Borrowing from a range of theoretical perspectives on space-making and material religion, this volume looks at how religious

  2. Beauty and health: anthropological perspectives

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Edmonds, A.

    2008-01-01

    This essay, written as a 'teaser' for an up-coming symposium, reflects on how human beauty can be understood from an anthropological and medical anthropological perspective. First, it considers how aesthetic and healing rationales can conflict or merge in a variety of medical technologies and health

  3. New perspectives in forensic anthropology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dirkmaat, Dennis C; Cabo, Luis L; Ousley, Stephen D; Symes, Steven A

    2008-01-01

    A critical review of the conceptual and practical evolution of forensic anthropology during the last two decades serves to identify two key external factors and four tightly inter-related internal methodological advances that have significantly affected the discipline. These key developments have not only altered the current practice of forensic anthropology, but also its goals, objectives, scope, and definition. The development of DNA analysis techniques served to undermine the classic role of forensic anthropology as a field almost exclusively focused on victim identification. The introduction of the Daubert criteria in the courtroom presentation of scientific testimony accompanied the development of new human comparative samples and tools for data analysis and sharing, resulting in a vastly enhanced role for quantitative methods in human skeletal analysis. Additionally, new questions asked of forensic anthropologists, beyond identity, required sound scientific bases and expanded the scope of the field. This environment favored the incipient development of the interrelated fields of forensic taphonomy, forensic archaeology, and forensic trauma analysis, fields concerned with the reconstruction of events surrounding death. Far from representing the mere addition of new methodological techniques, these disciplines (especially, forensic taphonomy) provide forensic anthropology with a new conceptual framework, which is broader, deeper, and more solidly entrenched in the natural sciences. It is argued that this new framework represents a true paradigm shift, as it modifies not only the way in which classic forensic anthropological questions are answered, but also the goals and tasks of forensic anthropologists, and their perception of what can be considered a legitimate question or problem to be answered within the field.

  4. Exploring Cognitive Diversity: Anthropological Perspectives on Cognition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beller, Sieghard; Bender, Andrea

    2015-10-01

    Anthropology and the other cognitive sciences currently maintain a troubled relationship (Beller, Bender, & Medin, ). What could rapprochement look like, and how could it be achieved? The seven main articles of this topic present anthropological or anthropologically inspired cross-cultural research on a diverse set of cognitive domains. They serve as an existence proof that not only do synergies abound across anthropology and the other cognitive sciences, but that they are worth achieving. Copyright © 2015 Cognitive Science Society, Inc.

  5. Forensic archaeology and anthropology : An Australian perspective.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oakley, Kate

    2005-09-01

    Forensic archaeology is an extremely powerful investigative discipline and, in combination with forensic anthropology, can provide a wealth of evidentiary information to police investigators and the forensic community. The re-emergence of forensic archaeology and anthropology within Australia relies on its diversification and cooperation with established forensic medical organizations, law enforcement forensic service divisions, and national forensic boards. This presents a unique opportunity to develop a new multidisciplinary approach to forensic archaeology/anthropology within Australia as we hold a unique set of environmental, social, and cultural conditions that diverge from overseas models and require different methodological approaches. In the current world political climate, more forensic techniques are being applied at scenes of mass disasters, genocide, and terrorism. This provides Australian forensic archaeology/anthropology with a unique opportunity to develop multidisciplinary models with contributions from psychological profiling, ballistics, sociopolitics, cultural anthropology, mortuary technicians, post-blast analysis, fire analysis, and other disciplines from the world of forensic science.

  6. An Anthropological Perspective: Another Dimension to Modern Dental Wear Concepts

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    John A. Kaidonis

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available For many years, research on tooth wear by dental academics has been diametrically opposite to that of anthropological research, with each discipline having a different understanding as to the nature of the wear processes. Dental focus revolved around preventive and restorative considerations while the anthropological focus was a biological understanding related to human evolution, diet, environment, form, and function and included all the craniofacial structures. Introducing the anthropological perspective into modern dentistry gives an insight into the “bigger picture” of the nature and extent of tooth wear. By combining anthropological evidence with clinical knowledge and experience, it is most likely to provide the best-informed and biologically based approach to the management of tooth wear in modern societies.

  7. Death: clinical and forensic anthropological perspectives

    OpenAIRE

    Etty Indriati, Etty Indriati

    2015-01-01

    All biological living beings inevitably die, and the ways to die vary although in essence death is a manifestation of the absence of Oxygen in the brain. After death, biological remains undertake proteolysis and decomposition. The aim of this article is to discuss clinical death, cerebral or medicolegal death, social death, phases of cerebral death, and biological process after death—which is important for forensic medicine and forensic anthropology. How long a person die, if the time elaps...

  8. Anthropology of music: Paradigms and perspectives

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    Rašić Miloš

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Music represents a relational category, in the sense that people write meaning into it, and later by the means of the same music they write the meaning into other people. Therefore, I regard music as a cultural construct. Music does not possess universal meanings, but it forms its numerous meanings in different cultural environments, as well as in different individual perceptions. In anthropology, music is not studied in relation to its musical characteristics or aesthetical values. Anthropologists study its role in a wider social system, and strive to understand, by analysing the role of music in a society, the social and cultural system it belongs to - musical structure is less important here. The goal of the paper is to give an overview of the paradigms in ethnology and anthropology which have been used in studying music. In addition, a hypothetical-theoretical framework for studying music in institutions is set. Although the theory of hubs, which is presented here as a potential framework for studying music in institutions, is exemplified by traditional music, it can be applied to any genre of music. The basic theoretical framework offered by the authors Nadia Kiwan and Hanna Mainhof has been supplemented by certain parts which the author thought appropriate for studying music in institutions, both in ethnological and anthropological discourse.

  9. Reconsidering the Placebo Response from a Broad Anthropological Perspective

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    Thompson, Jennifer Jo; Ritenbaugh, Cheryl; Nichter, Mark

    2009-01-01

    This paper considers how the full range of human experience may catalyze a placebo response. The placebo effect has been characterized as something to control in clinical research, something to cultivate in clinical practice, and something present in all healing encounters. We examine domains in which the term ‘placebo’ is used in discourse: clinical research, clinical practice, media representations of treatment efficacy, and lay interpretations of placebo—an under-researched topic. We briefly review major theoretical frameworks proposed to explain the placebo effect: classical conditioning, expectancy, the therapeutic relationship, and sociocultural ‘meaning.’ As a corrective to what we see as an over-emphasis on conscious cognitive approaches to understanding placebo, we reorient the discussion to argue that direct embodied experience may take precedence over meaning-making in the healing encounter. As an example, we examine the neurobiology of rehearsing or visualizing wellness as a mode of directly (performatively) producing an outcome often dismissed as a ‘placebo response.’ Given body/mind/emotional resonance, we suggest that the placebo response is an evolutionarily adaptive trait and part of healing mechanisms operating across many levels—from genetic and cellular to social and cultural. PMID:19107582

  10. Efficiency and education in mechanical engineering.; Cultural anthropological perspective

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ushijima, F. [Kyushu Women`s Univ., Kitakyushu (Japan). Faculty of Literature

    1996-01-05

    Regarding cultural anthropology, interviews with and observations on a targeted social group are used as its central techniques and an ethnography is created using what has been obtained by its techniques as material. In the process of its description, culture and society are never separated for investigation. When mechanical technique is contained in this culture, it must be depicted vividly as a social creation. The author of this article points out that there has been a measure similar to efficiency as a criterion for comparing its merits and demerits, since the inception of mechanical technique, but as an industrial society progresses, that measure has been applied to a man. It was in 1920`s that efficiency improvement and aptitude tests were gradually adopted in Japan, but the essence of mechanization is not the introduction of mechanical power, but is the mechanization of a man and a person must be reborn to be a manhood capable for being measured by a measure called efficiency. Also the agricultural changes in Northern Kyushu are shown by its examination in a cultural anthropological perspective. 1 ref.

  11. An Anthropological Perspective: Another Dimension to Modern Dental Wear Concepts

    OpenAIRE

    Kaidonis, John A.; Sarbin Ranjitkar; Dimitra Lekkas; Townsend, Grant C.

    2012-01-01

    For many years, research on tooth wear by dental academics has been diametrically opposite to that of anthropological research, with each discipline having a different understanding as to the nature of the wear processes. Dental focus revolved around preventive and restorative considerations while the anthropological focus was a biological understanding related to human evolution, diet, environment, form, and function and included all the craniofacial structures. Introducing the anthropologic...

  12. Functional dental occlusion: an anthropological perspective and implications for practice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaidonis, J A; Ranjitkar, S; Lekkas, D; Brook, A H; Townsend, G C

    2014-06-01

    Physiologic changes occur in dental occlusion throughout life, resulting from the interplay between functional demands and reciprocating adaptive responses. These changes have been reported in the anthropological literature and they reflect evolutionary changes in the human stomatognathic system during the Paleolithic, hunter-gatherer period. Specific occlusal changes occur in response to different environments, leading to extensive variation within and between extinct and extant human populations. For example, functional demands can cause occlusal and interproximal tooth wear, resulting in shortening of the dental arch, continual tooth eruption and changes in masticatory patterns. Since the advent of farming through to our current industrialized culture, functional demands on the human masticatory system, and its adaptive responses to these demands, have been reduced considerably. Indeed, it is only occasionally that functional demands are severe enough to lead to obvious pathology in the modern human dentition. In contrast to normal masticatory activity, 'modern-day conditions' such as dental caries, periodontal disease and erosion, can lead to significant changes in dental occlusion that are pathological and need to be treated. The masticatory system is a dynamic, functional unit that displays considerable change over a lifetime. In this concept paper, it is proposed that modern human populations living in industrialized environments display dental occlusions that can be considered to be 'neotenous'; that is, our dentitions tend to reflect an unworn stage of our ancestors that was only seen in infants, juveniles and young adults. Clinicians can draw on both phylogenetic and ontogenetic perspectives of 'functional dental occlusion' to differentiate continual physiological changes occurring over time that require ongoing review, from pathological responses that require intervention. © 2014 Australian Dental Association.

  13. Searching for Meaning: Visual Culture from an Anthropological Perspective

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    Stokrocki, Mary

    2006-01-01

    In this article, the author discusses the importance of Viktor Lowenfeld's influence on her research, describes visual anthropology, gives examples of her research, and examines the implications of this type of research for teachers. The author regards Lowenfeld's (1952/1939) early work with children in Austria as a form of participant observation…

  14. Reticulate evolution and the human past: an anthropological perspective.

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    Winder, Isabelle C; Winder, Nick P

    2014-01-01

    The evidence is mounting that reticulate (web-like) evolution has shaped the biological histories of many macroscopic plants and animals, including non-human primates closely related to Homo sapiens, but the implications of this non-hierarchical evolution for anthropological enquiry are not yet fully understood. When they are understood, the result may be a paradigm shift in evolutionary anthropology. This paper reviews the evidence for reticulated evolution in the non-human primates and human lineage. Then it makes the case for extrapolating this sort of patterning to Homo sapiens and other hominins and explores the implications this would have for research design, method and understandings of evolution in anthropology. Reticulation was significant in human evolutionary history and continues to influence societies today. Anthropologists and human scientists-whether working on ancient or modern populations-thus need to consider the implications of non-hierarchic evolution, particularly where molecular clocks, mathematical models and simplifying assumptions about evolutionary processes are used. This is not just a problem for palaeoanthropology. The simple fact of different mating systems among modern human groups, for example, may demand that more attention is paid to the potential for complexity in human genetic and cultural histories.

  15. Recent trend and perspectives in forensic anthropology: a bibliometric analysis.

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    Gualdi-Russo, Emanuela; Fonti, Giulia

    2013-06-01

    This paper evaluates research in Forensic Anthropology (FA) in order to report on the state of this field of science. In particular, we carried out a review of all PubMed-listed scientific studies in the past decades using "forensic anthropology" as the keyword. In our "meta-analysis", we observed variation in the number of publications per 2-year interval throughout the study period. In total, 1589 studies were found in the database and 1292 of them were published in the period 2000-2009. There was a significant positive correlation between the number of published articles and time (subdivided into 2-year intervals). The rate of increase was lower in the last decade. Based on the observed trend, we expect that the phenomenon will continue in the near future, reaching a number close to 400 FA publications in PubMed in the biennium 2012-13. We also carried out a specific content analysis of all FA papers published in the journal Forensic Science International in the last decade. During this period, the majority of FA papers concerned skeletal biology, although there was a positive shift toward virtual anthropological studies.

  16. Los Angeles School Desegregation: Legal, Administrative, Community and Anthropological Perspectives. A Symposium Report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guskin, Judith T.; Alexander-Minter, Rae

    This report presents an anthropological perspective on the legal, demographic and community issues involved in school desegregation in Los Angeles. Views on the desegregation process expressed by lawyers, school administrators, community members, educators, and anthropologists who attended a 1978 symposium are summarized. An historical and legal…

  17. The Sanctity of human life. A perspective from New Testament anthropology

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    H C. van Zyl

    1993-08-01

    Full Text Available The article deals with sanctity of life issues such as abortion, euthanasia, treatment of the disabled, war, and capital punishment. These matters are not treated individually but collectively from the perspective of New Testament anthropology. Having taken care of a few methodological considerations, the main focus falls on a discussion of man as sinner, man in Christ, and the category of the least.

  18. Space and Anthropology of Limit: A Philosophical Perspective

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    Alberto Pirni

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available In no other living species does technology (or more precisely the need for technological development play such an important role as it does in the human species. Almost every animal species is able to implement techniques in order to improve its living conditions, that is to produce tools or structures capable of enhancing its ability to procure food and defend itself. No animal, however, to the same extent as the human being, seems unable to do without the constant innovation of its own capacities and their outcomes. This is a constant factor, which unequivocally connotes our being human. It is a constant that we can say is expression of an essentially dual nature: fear of inadequacy, on the one hand, anxiety for perfection, on the other.This rationale remains surely a matter of fact regarding the traditional or common condition of the man, understood as a being living on the Earth with a specific biological structure. However, any possible understanding of the same issue requires new efforts if and as far we try to maintain it open in a totally different context: the space, namely, a not-specific place outside Earth in which the man is trying to give shape to a new path of its own surviving (§ 1.Here rises what we would like to call the anthropology of limit. In order to grasp a provisional content for such expression, we must proceed analytically, first, by reconsidering briefly the two conceptual sides implied in that expression, namely What is a man? and What do we mean with limit? (§ 2.Secondly, we should try to reconsider the twofold results under a synthetical or comprehensive point of view, trying to gather a common area of questioning that opens up if and as far we shift and reconsider both conceptual sides of that expression within the space-context (§ 3.

  19. An overview of age estimation in forensic anthropology: perspectives and practical considerations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Márquez-Grant, Nicholas

    2015-01-01

    Information on methods of age estimation in physical anthropology, in particular with regard to age-at-death from human skeletal remains, is widely available in the literature. However, the practicalities and real challenges faced in forensic casework are not always highlighted. To provide a practitioner's perspective, regarding age estimation in forensic anthropology (both in the living as well as the dead), with an emphasis on the types of cases, the value of such work and its challenges and limitations. The paper reviews the current literature on age estimation with a focus on forensic anthropology, but it also brings the author's personal perspective derived from a number of forensic cases. Although much is known about what methods to use, but not always how to apply them, little attention has been given in the literature to the real practicalities faced by forensic anthropologists, for example: the challenges in different types of scenarios; how to report age estimations; responsibilities; and ethical concerns. This paper gathers some of these aspects into one overview which includes the value of such work and the practical challenges, not necessarily with the methods themselves, but also with regard to how these are applied in the different cases where age estimation is required.

  20. Anthropological Theory: A Modular Approach. Cultural Anthropology.

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    Kassebaum, Peter

    Designed for use as supplementary instructional material in a cultural anthropology course, this learning module introduces the student to various theoretical perspectives, terms, and influential figures within the field of anthropology. The following historical and conceptual influences on anthropological theory are discussed: (1) the Greek…

  1. Ubuntu and the body: A perspective from theological anthropology as embodied sensing

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    Jacob J.S. Meiring

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available The author asks whether the notion of ubuntu truly exists within contemporary South African society and how the experiencing of South Africans� embodiment can be connected to ubuntu � especially amongst black people. The notion of ubuntu is briefly explored within law and theology. The author has recently proposed a model for a contemporary theological anthropology as �embodied sensing� which functions within the intimate relationship of the lived body, experiencing in a concrete life-world, language, and the �more than�. It is from this perspective that the notion of ubuntu is explored.

  2. Anthropology and the study of menopause: evolutionary, developmental, and comparative perspectives.

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    Sievert, Lynnette Leidy

    2014-10-01

    This work aims to consider how the discipline of anthropology contributes to the study of menopause through evolutionary, developmental, and comparative perspectives. This study was a review of skeletal and ethnographic evidence for menopause and postreproductive life in humans' distant past, hypotheses for the evolution of menopause and long postreproductive life, variation in age at menopause with focus on childhood environments, and the study of variation in symptom experience across populations. Longevity, rather than capacity for menopause, sets humans apart from other primates. Skeletal evidence demonstrates that some Neanderthals and archaic Homo sapiens lived to the age at menopause and that at least one third of women in traditional foraging populations live beyond menopause. The evolutionary reasons for why women experience a long postreproductive life continue to be debated. A developmental perspective suggests that early childhood may be a critical time for the environment to irreversibly influence the number of oocytes or rate of follicular atresia and, ultimately, age at menopause. A comparative perspective examines symptom experience at midlife through participant observation, qualitative interviews, and quantitative instruments to gain a holistic understanding of the meaning, experience, and sociocultural context of menopause. An evolutionary perspective suggests that menopause is not a recent phenomenon among humans. A developmental perspective focuses on the influence of early childhood on ovarian function. A comparative perspective expands clinical norms and provides knowledge about the range of human variations.

  3. Bayes in biological anthropology.

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    Konigsberg, Lyle W; Frankenberg, Susan R

    2013-12-01

    In this article, we both contend and illustrate that biological anthropologists, particularly in the Americas, often think like Bayesians but act like frequentists when it comes to analyzing a wide variety of data. In other words, while our research goals and perspectives are rooted in probabilistic thinking and rest on prior knowledge, we often proceed to use statistical hypothesis tests and confidence interval methods unrelated (or tenuously related) to the research questions of interest. We advocate for applying Bayesian analyses to a number of different bioanthropological questions, especially since many of the programming and computational challenges to doing so have been overcome in the past two decades. To facilitate such applications, this article explains Bayesian principles and concepts, and provides concrete examples of Bayesian computer simulations and statistics that address questions relevant to biological anthropology, focusing particularly on bioarchaeology and forensic anthropology. It also simultaneously reviews the use of Bayesian methods and inference within the discipline to date. This article is intended to act as primer to Bayesian methods and inference in biological anthropology, explaining the relationships of various methods to likelihoods or probabilities and to classical statistical models. Our contention is not that traditional frequentist statistics should be rejected outright, but that there are many situations where biological anthropology is better served by taking a Bayesian approach. To this end it is hoped that the examples provided in this article will assist researchers in choosing from among the broad array of statistical methods currently available. Copyright © 2013 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  4. Anthropological perspectives on money management: considerations for the design and implementation of interventions for substance abuse.

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    Carpenter-Song, Elizabeth

    2012-01-01

    There remains a long-standing argument regarding the need for money management strategies to control poor spending habits among people with substance use disorders. The objective was to review issues relevant to the design and implementation of money-management-based interventions for substance abuse. Using a comparative, cross-cultural framework of anthropology, this manuscript examines three challenges for the design and implementation of money management interventions for substance abuse: (i) clients may not trust mental health centers to manage their money, (ii) clients may have different economic perspectives from clinicians and researchers, and (iii) clients may obtain substances through informal networks of exchange. This article clarifies the inherently complex symbolic and social dimensions of money and addiction and illustrates the need for researchers and clinicians to be mindful of the cultural assumptions that underlie money management interventions for substance abuse. Using an anthropological approach toward understanding the issues surrounding money management for individuals struggling with addiction and mental illness has the potential to strengthen the design and implementation of money-management-based interventions in a manner that is acceptable and meaningful for this target population.

  5. Some issues of shaping thanatology as a discipline: Ethnological and anthropological perspectives

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    Pavićević Aleksandra

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Development of death studies, choice of topics and aspects of their interpretations were influenced by many factors, both global and local. The former were related to universal processes of medicalization, bureaucratization and professionalization of death and dying, as well as to processes of general secularization of society and culture. The latter were connected with specific and dominant local social and cultural praxes, politics and academic traditions. In this paper we will point out specificities of death studies development in different academic communities. We will also open the question and offer some answers on disciplinary identity of thanatology and, at the end, we will consider possibilities and needs for introducing the discipline in curriculum at different education levels. The aim of the paper is to settle preliminary frames for future investigation; the emphasis is placed on ethnological and anthropological perspective and on English and Serbian language bibliography. [Projekat Ministarstva nauke Republike Srbije, br. 177028

  6. Anthropological Perspectives on Participation in CBPR: Insights From the Water Project, Maras, Peru.

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    Cartwright, Elizabeth; Schow, Diana

    2016-01-01

    In this article, we anthropologically explore one part of the process of Community-Based Participatory Research (CBPR): participation. Participation in CBPR is usually conceptualized as whether, and the degree to which, community members are involved in the research process. Our focus regarding participation is less on quantity and more on quality of the interaction between community members and researchers; within this context, we elaborate the concept of "bridging" as it is understood in CBPR. Using data from our ongoing "Water Project" in the Peruvian Andes, we explore how interaction, as a participative act of the research interview, creates the space for participating and imagining. Out of this interaction come data that are elaborated, contextualized, and, ultimately, from a CBPR perspective, made useful for meaningful engagement and community action. © The Author(s) 2015.

  7. The Geger Banten of 1888: An Anthropological Perspective of 19th Century Millenarianism in Indonesia

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    Dadi Darmadi

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available This paper tries to analyse the millenarian response of the Bantenese to the Western colonization from an anthropological perspective. The his­tory of Banten at the end of the 19th and beginning of the 20th century was marked by various indigenous unrest, rebellion, and resistance against the colonial power. In 1888, several religious leaders of Sufi brotherhoods and community leaders in Cilegon, Banten led a revolt against the Dutch colonial government. This uprising was provoked by the Dutch’s trade regulation, a new economic system, and was fuelled by enduring religious sentiments against the Dutch. While most schol­ars frame the event as a religious or social political movement, this study focuses on to what some of the Bantenese Muslims perceived as “unjust” social situations of the colonized world: poverty, inequality, religious restriction, social and political marginalization.

  8. Anthropology and the humanization of space

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    Finney, Ben R.

    Because of its broad evolutionary perspective, and its focus on both technology and culture, anthropology offers a unique perspective on why we are going into space and what leaving Earth will mean for humanity. In addition, anthropology could help in the humanization of space through: (1) overcoming socio-cultural barriers to working and living in space; (2) designing societies appropriate for permanent space settlement; (3) promoting understanding among differentiated branches of humankind scattered through space; (4) deciphering the cultural systems of any extraterrestrial civilizations contacted.

  9. Psychological Anthropology: A Modular Approach. Cultural Anthropology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kassebaum, Peter

    Designed for use as supplementary instructional material in a cultural anthropology course, this learning module traces the history of psychological anthropology, introducing various schools and perspectives within the field of psychology. First, a discussion is provided of biological determinism, examining its historical development and the…

  10. Ecological restoration of southwestern ponderosa pine ecosystems: A broad perspective

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    Allen, Craig D.; Savage, Melissa; Falk, Donald A.; Suckling, Kieran F.; Swetnam, Thomas W.; Schulke, Todd; Stacey, Peter B.; Morgan, Penelope; Hoffman, Martos; Klingel, Jon T.

    2002-01-01

    The purpose of this paper is to promote a broad and flexible perspective on ecological restoration of Southwestern (U.S.) ponderosa pine forests. Ponderosa pine forests in the region have been radically altered by Euro-American land uses, including livestock grazing, fire suppression, and logging. Dense thickets of young trees now abound, old-growth and biodiversity have declined, and human and ecological communities are increasingly vulnerable to destructive crown fires. A consensus has emerged that it is urgent to restore more natural conditions to these forests. Efforts to restore Southwestern forests will require extensive projects employing varying combinations of young-tree thinning and reintroduction of low-intensity fires. Treatments must be flexible enough to recognize and accommodate: high levels of natural heterogeneity; dynamic ecosystems; wildlife and other biodiversity considerations; scientific uncertainty; and the challenges of on-the-ground implementation. Ecological restoration should reset ecosystem trends toward an envelope of “natural variability,” including the reestablishment of natural processes. Reconstructed historic reference conditions are best used as general guides rather than rigid restoration prescriptions. In the long term, the best way to align forest conditions to track ongoing climate changes is to restore fire, which naturally correlates with current climate. Some stands need substantial structural manipulation (thinning) before fire can safely be reintroduced. In other areas, such as large wilderness and roadless areas, fire alone may suffice as the main tool of ecological restoration, recreating the natural interaction of structure and process. Impatience, overreaction to crown fire risks, extractive economics, or hubris could lead to widespread application of highly intrusive treatments that may further damage forest ecosystems. Investments in research and monitoring of restoration treatments are essential to refine

  11. The development of dental research in Argentinean biological anthropology: current state and future perspectives.

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    Bernal, V; Luna, L H

    2011-10-01

    The aim of this paper is to conduct a historical analysis of the research-oriented studies related to dental anthropology in Argentina, evaluate its current state and discuss future expectations and perspectives. In this country, anthropological studies based on analysis of dentition have been scarce and even temporarily discontinued, since they began in the late nineteenth century, simply following the course of the predominant theoretical and methodological approaches over time. Early papers, guided mainly by evolutionary ideas, were oriented towards establishing the taxonomic position of humans through the description and comparison of morphological and morphometric aspects of the dental crown and root. Later studies mainly described types of intentional modifications (i.e. dental mutilations) and tooth wear in the context of Historic-Cultural School. However, they failed to constitute valid lines of research over time. In recent years, there has been a significant change in dental studies, mainly as a result of the interest in evaluating the adaptive aspects of human populations within biocultural settings. One of the most relevant lines of studies has been the bioarchaeological analysis of health and stress indicators, such as enamel hypoplasia, caries and tooth wear in hunter-gatherer and farmer societies. More recently, the study of discrete and metric dental traits began, with a goal to contribute to the study of evolution and inter-populational biological relations among South American groups. Since teeth contain valuable information not only about the environment in which the individual lived, but also about the action of neutral and non-neutral factors on human groups, the consolidation of ongoing studies will contribute to knowledge of various aspects of the adaptation and evolution of native American populations. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier GmbH. All rights reserved.

  12. Review: Martine Guichard, Tilo Grätz, and Youssouf Diallo (eds, Friendship, Descent and Alliance in Africa: Anthropological Perspectives (2014

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    Astrid Bochow

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Review of the edited volume: Martine Guichard, Tilo Grätz, and Youssouf Diallo (eds, Friendship, Descent and Alliance in Africa: Anthropological Perspectives, Oxford: Berghahn, 2014, ISBN 9781782382867, 220 pages

  13. Medicine, religion and ayahuasca in Catalonia. Considering ayahuasca networks from a medical anthropology perspective.

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    Apud, Ismael; Romaní, Oriol

    2017-01-01

    Ayahuasca is a psychoactive beverage from the Amazon, traditionally used by indigenous and mestizo populations in the region. Widespread international use of the beverage began in the 1990s in both secular contexts and religious/spiritual networks. This article offers an analysis of these networks as health care systems in general and for the case of Spain and specifically Catalonia, describing the emergence and characteristics of their groups, and the therapeutic itineraries of some participants. The medical anthropology perspective we take enables us to reflect on the relationship between medicine and religion, and problematize the tensions between medicalization and medical pluralism. Closely linked to the process of medicalization, we also analyze prohibitionist drug policies and their tensions and conflicts with the use of ayahuasca in ritual and 'health care' contexts. The paper ends with a reflection on the problem of ayahuasca as 'medicine', since the connection between religion and medicine is a very difficult one to separate. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  14. Water insecurity in 3 dimensions: an anthropological perspective on water and women's psychosocial distress in Ethiopia.

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    Stevenson, Edward G J; Greene, Leslie E; Maes, Kenneth C; Ambelu, Argaw; Tesfaye, Yihenew Alemu; Rheingans, Richard; Hadley, Craig

    2012-07-01

    Water insecurity is a primary underlying determinant of global health disparities. While public health research on water insecurity has focused mainly on two dimensions, water access and adequacy, an anthropological perspective highlights the cultural or lifestyle dimension of water insecurity, and its implications for access/adequacy and for the phenomenology of water insecurity. Recent work in Bolivia has shown that scores on a water insecurity scale derived from ethnographic observations are associated with emotional distress. We extend this line of research by assessing the utility of a locally developed water insecurity scale, compared with standard measures of water access and adequacy, in predicting women's psychosocial distress in Ethiopia. In 2009-2010 we conducted two phases of research. Phase I was mainly qualitative and designed to identify locally relevant experiences of water insecurity, and Phase II used a quantitative survey to test the association between women's reported water insecurity and the Falk Self-Reporting Questionnaire (SRQ-F), a measure of psychosocial distress. In multiple regression models controlling for food insecurity and reported quantity of water used, women's water insecurity scores were significantly associated with psychosocial distress. Including controls for time required to collect water and whether water sources were protected did not further predict psychosocial distress. This approach highlights the social dimension of water insecurity, and may be useful for informing and evaluating interventions to improve water supplies. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  15. Cultural Models of Domestic Violence: Perspectives of Social Work and Anthropology Students

    Science.gov (United States)

    Collins, Cyleste C.; Dressler, William W.

    2008-01-01

    This study employed a unique theoretical approach and a series of participant-based ethnographic interviewing techniques that are traditionally used in cognitive anthropology to examine and compare social work and anthropology students' cultural models of the causes of domestic violence. The study findings indicate that although social work…

  16. Children and trauma : a broad perspective on exposure and recovery

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Alisic, E.

    2011-01-01

    The purpose of this dissertation was to generate a broad overview of children’s exposure to and recovery from trauma in order to promote theory building and the design of prevention and intervention activities. First, a general population study was conducted in 1770 primary school children. They

  17. TAWA IN MINANGKABAU TRADITIONAL THERAPY IN THE PERSPECTIVE OF ANTHROPOLOGIC LINGUISTICS STUDIES

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fajri Usman

    2012-11-01

    Full Text Available The research on Tawa in Minangkabau Traditional Therapy: in the Perspective ofAnthropologic Linguistics is a research that is focused on the study of linguistic forms,functions of meaning, and the values contained in it. Qualitative approach was employedin this study. Such an approach was based on the naturalistic and interpretative paradigmwith the principles that the data were natural and interpretative in nature. To investigatethe linguistic forms, the functions, the meaning and the values, the methods employedwere “listen, get involved and talk” (simak libat cakap = SLC, “listen, not get involvedand talk” (simak bebas libat cakap = SBLC and “talk face to face” (cakap semuka =CS. That was done by recording and taking down the narrative of tawa uttered by thedukun (healer. In order to obtain such a narration, the method of talk not face to face(cakap tak semuka = CTS, which was done by seeking for information from theinformants, was employed.The results of the thematic and schematic structure analysis show that the themeof TPTM (Tawa dalam Pengobatan Traditional Minangkabau = Tawa in MinangkabauTraditional Therapy is related to the history of invisible creatures, the history of humanbeings, the history of animals, the history of plants, and the history of diseases. Theschematic structure of TPTM consists of introduction, content and closing. The linguistic(phonological, morphological, syntactical and semantic forms of TPTM are related tothe use of the prosodic elements (stress, intonation and length. The morphologicalaspects of repetitions in TPTM are found in the beginning, in the beginning and centre, inthe end, and in the beginning and end of the sentences. The verbs in TPTM can be stateverbs and action verbs to which affixes are added, without and with the markers(conjunction and preposition. In syntactical level, the sentence structure in TPTM is notgenerally the same as that in Minangfkabau language. Statements, imperatives

  18. Ontology and anthropology of interanimality: Merleau-Ponty from Tim ingold's perspective

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ana Cristina Ramírez Barreto

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available This essay explores Tim Ingold’s anthropological theory following his references to Merleau-Ponty and the concept of interanimality/interagentivity. It poses some ideas of Ingold’s “poetics of dwelling”, which he highlights from ethnographies of hunter-gatherer peoples, and how these ideas are linked to an ontological consideration which does not dissociate body and person, body and mind, nature and culture, animality and humanity. The paper reviews animal literature in Merleau-Ponty’s philosophy, and Ingold’s critique of “Anthropology of the senses”. It also gives critical clues for the ethical and political implications of this ontology.

  19. Projects of scale-making: new perspectives for the anthropology of tourism1

    OpenAIRE

    Neveling, Patrick; Wergin, Carsten

    2013-01-01

    Scale has recently entered social anthropology as both a unit of analysis and a heuristic tool. This paper highlights the applicability to the anthropology of tourism of what has been identified as “projects of scale-making” by Tsing (2000) and respective “modes of incorporation” by Glick Schiller, Caglar and Guldbrandsen (2006). Because tourism is one of the central industries ­shaping present-day understandings of what is global and what is local, scale as a theoretical and methodological t...

  20. BOOK REVIEW: JACK D. ELLER, FROM CULTURE, TO ETHNICITY, TO CONFLICT: AN ANTHROPOLOGICAL PERSPECTIVE ON INTERNATIONAL ETHNIC CONFLICTS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Patty Zakaria

    2011-03-01

    Full Text Available From Culture, to Ethnicity, to Conflict: An Anthropological Perspective on International Ethnic Conflicts, Eller illustrates that the characteristics used to define ethnicity cannot be freely applied to all groups since group perception of what their ethnicity encompasses vary significantly. Further, Eller points out that once a group becomes self-conscious of their difference within society, this realization leads to the initiation of group mobilization, from this viewpoint a group is then considered a nationalistic group as opposed to a mere ethnic group within society. This was evident in Sir Lanka when both the Sinhalese and the Tamils were aware of their differences and had established their own nationalistic group, wherein each nationalistic group seeks to control the island. Taken as a whole, Eller’s From Culture, to Ethnicity, to Conflict: An Anthropological Perspective on International Ethnic Conflicts, offers an insightful and extensive understanding of ethnicity and conflict, by arguing that ethnicity and conflict have developed out of modern social condition and circumstances, as opposed to primordial dynamics. The move away from primordial understanding sheds light into why once dormant groups become politically active as in the cases presented by Eller.

  1. Anthropological theory of the didactic: A new research perspective on didactic mathematics in Indonesia

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Putra, Zetra Hainul; Witri, Gustimal

    2017-01-01

    Théorie Anthropologique du Didactique/Anthropological Theory of the Didactic (ATD) is a new theory on didactic mathematics that was introduced by a French mathematician, Chevellard, in 1991. The ATD is an epistemological model of mathematical knowledge that can be applied to investigate human mat...

  2. Inclusion without Assimilation: Science Education from an Anthropological and Metacognitive Perspective.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hodson, Derek

    2001-01-01

    Addresses some of the problems inherent both in traditional didactic science teaching and in approaches based on theories of conceptual change. Argues for helping students to acquire a better understanding of science (through an anthropological approach) and a better understanding of themselves as learners and science initiates. (Author/MM)

  3. Anthropology and social theory

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Thomassen, Bjørn

    2013-01-01

    This article argues that anthropology may represent untapped perspectives of relevance to social theory. The article starts by critically reviewing how anthropology has come to serve as the ‘Other’ in various branches of social theory, from Marx and Durkheim to Parsons to Habermas, engaged...... in a hopeless project of positing ‘primitive’ or ‘traditional’ society as the opposite of modernity. In contemporary debates, it is becoming increasingly recognized that social theory needs history, back to the axial age and beyond. The possible role of anthropology in theorizing modernity receives far less...

  4. Anthropological theory of the didactic: A new research perspective on didactic mathematics in Indonesia

    OpenAIRE

    Putra, Zetra Hainul; Witri, Gustimal

    2017-01-01

    Théorie Anthropologique du Didactique/Anthropological Theory of the Didactic (ATD) is a new theory on didactic mathematics that was introduced by a French mathematician, Chevellard, in 1991. The ATD is an epistemological model of mathematical knowledge that can be applied to investigate human mathematical activities. Chevallard (1992) identified two aspects of a human mathematical activity that are a practical block and a knowledge block. Both are the main component of praxeologies. The pract...

  5. Social housing, multi-ethnic environments and the training of social educators: combined anthropological and educational perspectives

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Flavia Virgilio

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available The paper presents part of a broader project that explores the role played by informal citizenship learning in social housing urban environments (SHe and the related educational challenges for social educators, NGO practitioners and also researchers. In this article, in particular, I focus on issues related with social educators’ and NGO practitioners’ professional training. The aim of the paper, in this perspective, is to offer some introductory theoretical and methodological remarks for the training of NGO practitioners working in SHe. The basis for this reflection is the idea of informal learning (Schugurensky, 2000, the concepts of learning for reflexive citizenship and learning for active citizenship (Johnston, 2005 and anthropology of citizenship (Ong, 1999, 2003. In the research process, we have intersected instruments and methodologies coming from the different fields of anthropology and educational sciences. Our hypothesis consists in considering the possibility that exploring the professional field of social educators in SHe with an ethnographic approach could contribute to improve reflexive attitudes of social educators and shape their educational attitudes.

  6. Whose landscape? - An anthropological perspective on landscape perception in reindeer tending (In Swedish with Summary in English

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anna Järpe

    2005-04-01

    Full Text Available When we talk publicly about landscape and land use, both in legal and in popular contexts, the evaluation of our natural environment is usually based on an industrial concept of land and landscape. "Nature" is seen as a resource to be used or managed in different ways. My research originates in a questioning of this assumption: can we take for granted that the same perceptions and evaluations are shared by all concerned parties? In this article, I will use an ecologic anthropological perspective to consider the livelihood of reindeer tending and suggest an alternative to what can be called a scientific understanding of the world. I maintain that the relations that people have with their environment, and the values that they ascribe to it, are perceptions that are shaped and affected in our interactions with the surrounding world, and that these perceptions vary between different groups of people. Land use, land rights, access to fishing waters, and who gets to hunt what; these are not only questions about how we should manage the landscape, but also about whose landscape we are managing. Arguing that the reindeer tenders' landscape is a shifting mosaic of varying conditions that they must relate to rather than an object to be used and controlled by human interests, I want to show how anthropological research can provide an insight into the different perspectives and modes of understanding that we need to consider in the formulation of future policies and laws. At least if we want to resolve land use conflicts in contested areas fairly and on a sustainable long-term basis.

  7. Design Anthropology

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gunn, Wendy

    Design anthropology is a call for a different way of involving anthropology and participatory observation within practices of designing technologies, services, policies and infrastructure that does not aim towards changing human behavior. Here design is considered the process and not the object...... with the future orientated imaginative praxis of design skill and collaborative design processes, anthropology and design could learn from each other. I conclude by referring to what theories, methods, and approaches are in use by practitioners of design anthropology....... of inquiry. The paper presents a short history of design anthropology, its theoretical underpinnings and methodologies. Theoretically, the emerging field is influenced by processual, critical and action orientated approaches in anthropology. I argue that by combining anthropological methodology and knowledge...

  8. What do bones tell us? The study of human skeletons from the perspective of forensic anthropology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Corrieri, Brigida; Márquez-Grant, Nicholas

    2015-01-01

    Human remains are present in a number of contexts. Some of these are archaeological burial sites, which can comprise individual or mass graves burials. Human remains are usually found buried (or cremated), but they can also be found in museums and in universities, as part of their anatomical collections. Human remains can be found in churches as relics, in ossuaries, and as part of objects. Hence human remains refer to not just a complete skeleton, but also apart of a bone or tooth, hair and mummified remains. In more recent forensic, police or medico-legal cases, human skeletal remains can be found in a number of contexts, such as fire scenes, natural disasters, clandestine graves, or on the surface in open areas (e.g. a woodland). One aspect ofphysical anthropology is that which studies human skeletal remains in order to reconstruct the past, understand human variation, and provide information about the deceased individuals, such as their age at death, sex, ancestry, stature, pathological conditions or traumatic injuries; the remains from medico-legal or police cases fall under the branch offorensic anthropology.

  9. Space migrations: Anthropology and the humanization of space

    Science.gov (United States)

    Finney, Ben R.

    1992-01-01

    Because of its broad evolutionary perspective and its focus on both technology and culture, anthropology offers a unique view of why we are going into space and what leaving Earth will mean for humanity. In addition, anthropology could help in the humanization of space through (1) overcoming socioculture barriers to working and living in space, (2) designing societies appropriate for permanent space settlement, (3) promoting understanding among differentiated branches of humankind scattered through space, (4) deciphering the cultural systems of any extraterrestrial civilizations contacted.

  10. Virtual anthropology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weber, Gerhard W

    2015-02-01

    Comparative morphology, dealing with the diversity of form and shape, and functional morphology, the study of the relationship between the structure and the function of an organism's parts, are both important subdisciplines in biological research. Virtual anthropology (VA) contributes to comparative morphology by taking advantage of technological innovations, and it also offers new opportunities for functional analyses. It exploits digital technologies and pools experts from different domains such as anthropology, primatology, medicine, paleontology, mathematics, statistics, computer science, and engineering. VA as a technical term was coined in the late 1990s from the perspective of anthropologists with the intent of being mostly applied to biological questions concerning recent and fossil hominoids. More generally, however, there are advanced methods to study shape and size or to manipulate data digitally suitable for application to all kinds of primates, mammals, other vertebrates, and invertebrates or to issues regarding plants, tools, or other objects. In this sense, we could also call the field "virtual morphology." The approach yields permanently available virtual copies of specimens and data that comprehensively quantify geometry, including previously neglected anatomical regions. It applies advanced statistical methods, supports the reconstruction of specimens based on reproducible manipulations, and promotes the acquisition of larger samples by data sharing via electronic archives. Finally, it can help identify new, hidden traits, which is particularly important in paleoanthropology, where the scarcity of material demands extracting information from fragmentary remains. This contribution presents a current view of the six main work steps of VA: digitize, expose, compare, reconstruct, materialize, and share. The VA machinery has also been successfully used in biomechanical studies which simulate the stress and strains appearing in structures. Although

  11. [Socio-anthropological perspective of the under nutrition care of cancer patients].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fontas, Marine; Poulain, Jean-Pierre; Souquet, Pierre-Jean; Laville, Martine; Giboreau, Agnès; Bensafi, Moustafa; Mazières, Julien

    2014-03-01

    The diet of the cancer patient is a major focus of prevention and treatment strategy of the recent plans that fight against cancer. It is sometimes reduced to a rapid series of more or less general advice, often interfered by other sources of information, more or less conventional. In this pathological situation where the nutritional status of the patient is paramount, it seems crucial to understand the different modalities of how the food behavior is implemented. This article describes the construction modalities of the cancer eater decisions. The goal of the socio-anthropological analysis proposed in this article is to initiate a reflection on the under nutrition problem by focusing on the approach of the eater diagnosed with cancer. The aim is to help identify ways of action to fight against under nutrition and improve the quality of life of the patient.

  12. Sex, Ancestral, and pattern type variation of fingerprint minutiae: A forensic perspective on anthropological dermatoglyphics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fournier, Nichole A; Ross, Ann H

    2016-08-01

    The majority of anthropological studies on dermatoglyphics examine the heritability and inter-population variation of Level 1 detail (e.g., pattern type, total ridge count), while forensic scientists concentrate on individual uniqueness of Level 2 and 3 detail (e.g., minutiae and pores, respectively) used for positive identification. The present study bridges the gap between researcher-practitioner by examining sex, ancestral, and pattern type variation of Level 2 detail (e.g., minutiae). Bifurcations, ending ridges, short ridges, dots, and enclosures on the right index finger of 243 individuals (n = 61 African American ♀; n = 61 African American ♂; n = 61 European American ♀; n = 60 European American ♂) were analyzed. The overall effect of sex, ancestry, and pattern type on minutiae variation was assessed using a MANCOVA. ANOVA was used to identify Level 2 detail variables responsible for the variation. Logistic regression was used to classify individuals into groups. The effect of sex is insignificant. Ancestry is significant (Wilks' λ = 0.053 F value = 2.98, DF = 4,224, P value = 0.02), as is pattern type (Wilks' λ = 0.874 F value = 2.57, DF = 12,592.94, P value = 0.003). The ANOVA reveals that bifurcations are responsible for the variation between ancestral groups, while bifurcations and ending ridges vary between patterns. Logistic regression results suggest that total bifurcations can predict the ancestry of an individual (ChiSq = 6.55, df = 1, Prob > ChiSq = 0.01). Significant minutiae variation between ancestral groups yields information that is valuable in both a forensic and anthropological setting. Am J Phys Anthropol 160:625-632, 2016. © 2015 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. © 2015 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  13. Current status and perspectives of the development of dental research in biological anthropology of Argentina: introduction and conclusions of the symposium.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luna, Leandro H; Bernal, Valeria

    2011-10-01

    This paper describes and discusses the research in the field of dental anthropology in Argentina. It has been presented at the symposium entitled "The development of dental research in Argentine Biological Anthropology: current status and perspectives", coordinated by the authors at the IX National Meeting of Biological Anthropology of Argentina, Puerto Madryn, 20th-23rd October 2009. The aim of the symposium was to present new results and future prospects of this discipline in the country and to create a forum for discussion of current research within this field. Six contributions that focused on the study of teeth from different perspectives and analysed bioarchaeological samples from different areas of Argentina (Central Highlands, Pampa and Patagonia) were presented. After the presentations, a discussion about the state of the art of dental research in the country was generated, in which the need for the generation of methodological consensus on the criteria for the evaluation of the variables considered was stated, so that research conducted in different areas can be compared. In short, the contributions of this symposium provide insights into the diversity of dental anthropology in contemporary Argentina and the potential of these types of studies to gain important information about biological and cultural aspects of the native populations in the country. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier GmbH. All rights reserved.

  14. Architectural Anthropology

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Stender, Marie

    anthropology. On the one hand, there are obviously good reasons for developing architecture based on anthropological insights in local contexts and anthropologically inspired techniques for ‘collaborative formation of issues’. Houses and built environments are huge investments, their life expectancy......-anthropology. Within the field of architecture, however, there has not yet been quite the same eagerness to include anthropological approaches in design processes. This paper discusses why this is so and how and whether architectural anthropology has different conditions and objectives than other types of design...... and other spaces that architects are preoccupied with. On the other hand, the distinction between architecture and design is not merely one of scale. Design and architecture represent – at least in Denmark – also quite different disciplinary traditions and methods. Where designers develop prototypes...

  15. Philosophical Anthropology

    OpenAIRE

    Padilla Galvez, Jesus

    2013-01-01

    If we read Ludwig Wittgenstein?s works and take his scientific formation in mathematical logic into account, it comes as a surprise that he ever developed a particular interest in anthropological questions. The following questions immediately arise: What role does anthropology play in Wittgenstein?s work? How do problems concerning mankind as a whole relate to his philosophy? How does his approach relate to philosophical anthropology? How does he view classical issues about Man?s affairs and ...

  16. Architectural Anthropology

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Stender, Marie

    , while recent material and spatial turns in anthropology have also brought an increasing interest in design, architecture and the built environment. Understanding the relationship between the social and the physical is at the heart of both disciplines, and they can obviously benefit from further...... collaboration: How can qualitative anthropological approaches contribute to contemporary architecture? And just as importantly: What can anthropologists learn from architects’ understanding of spatial and material surroundings? Recent theoretical developments in anthropology stress the role of materials...... and maybe also contribute to architectural design and the shaping of built environments? Through various empirical examples this paper explores the challenges and potentials of architectural anthropology....

  17. Tracing Behçet's disease origins along the Silk Road: an anthropological evolutionary genetics perspective.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sazzini, Marco; Garagnani, Paolo; Sarno, Stefania; De Fanti, Sara; Lazzano, Teresa; Yang Yao, Daniele; Boattini, Alessio; Pazzola, Giulia; Maramotti, Sally; Boiardi, Luigi; Franceschi, Claudio; Salvarani, Carlo; Luiselli, Donata

    2015-01-01

    Behçet's disease is a multifactorial vasculitis that shows its highest prevalence in geographical areas historically involved in the Silk Road, suggesting that it might have originated somewhere along these ancient trade routes. This study aims to provide a first clue towards genetic evidence for this hypothesis by testing it via an anthropological evolutionary genetics approach. Behçet's disease variation at ancestry informative mitochondrial DNA control region and haplogroup diagnostic sites was characterised in 185 disease subjects of Italian descent and set into the Eurasian mitochondrial landscape by comparison with nearly 9,000 sequences representative of diversity observable in Italy and along the main Silk Road routes. Dissection of the actual genetic ancestry of disease individuals by means of population structure, spatial autocorrelation and haplogroup analyses revealed their closer relationships with some Middle Eastern and Central Asian groups settled along the Silk Road than with healthy Italians. These findings support the hypothesis that the Behçet's disease genetic risk has migrated to western Eurasia in parallel with ancestry components typical of Silk Road-related groups. This provided new insights that are useful to improve the understanding of disease origins and diffusion, as well as to inform future association studies aimed at properly accounting for the actual genetic ancestry of the examined Behçet's disease samples in order to minimise the detection of spurious associations and to improve the identification of genetic variants with actual clinical relevance.

  18. Wellness Centres on Costa Crociere Cruises: Body, Space, and Representation from an Anthropological and Linguistic perspective

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mariangela Albano

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available Many tourist services are connected to the care of the body. The tourist industry proposes different vacation opportunities where the body is the main focus of the experience. This kind of tourism implies specific services that show a particular universe of representation and particular languages. In this context, cruise tourism is an interesting case to analyze because a part of its services gives a central role to the body which, on-board, organizes and is organized within dedicated spaces and times. Cruise ships provide spaces for the wellness of the passengers such as swimming pools, gyms, spas or beauty centres. The analysis proposed in this work is based, on one hand, on a recent anthropological fieldwork on a Costa Crociere cruise in the Mediterranean Sea. On cruises people use a limited space, the ship, in different ways. This use also reflects a particular conception of the body, built through an interaction of different systems of representation. So, the ship can become a space for social aggregation or separation. On the other hand, this study considers different textual advertisements from the Costa Web site where the company presents specific services for the body to future passengers . This paper analyzes them using a joint approach: both semiotic and linguistic. Through texts and pictures Costa Crociere creates a “synthesis” of the wellness spaces which prefiguresthe behaviour of the passengers on the cruise. More particularly, in order to analyze advertisements, a cognitive linguistics approach is suitable to show the authors’ linguistic choices and the paratextual elements used to promote the cruise. .

  19. Paying for performance and the social relations of health care provision: an anthropological perspective.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Magrath, Priscilla; Nichter, Mark

    2012-11-01

    Over the past decade, the use of financial incentive schemes has become a popular form of intervention to boost performance in the health sector. Often termed "paying for performance" or P4P, they involve "…the transfer of money or material goods conditional upon taking a measurable action or achieving a predetermined performance target" (Eldridge & Palmer, 2009, p.160). P4P appear to bring about rapid improvements in some measured indicators of provider performance, at least over the short term. However, evidence for the impact of these schemes on the wider health system remains limited, and even where evaluations have been positive, unintended effects have been identified. These have included: "gaming" the system; crowding out of "intrinsic motivation"; a drop in morale where schemes are viewed as unfair; and the undermining of social relations and teamwork through competition, envy or ill feeling. Less information is available concerning how these processes occur, and how they vary across social and cultural contexts. While recognizing the potential of P4P, the authors argue for greater care in adapting schemes to particular local contexts. We suggest that insights from social science theory coupled with the focused ethnographic methods of anthropology can contribute to the critical assessment of P4P schemes and to their adaptation to particular social environments and reward systems. We highlight the need for monitoring P4P schemes in relation to worker motivation and the quality of social relations, since these have implications both for health sector performance over the long term and for the success and sustainability of a P4P scheme. Suggestions are made for ethnographies, undertaken in collaboration with local stakeholders, to assess readiness for P4P; package rewards in ways that minimize perverse responses; identify process variables for monitoring and evaluation; and build sustainability into program design through linkage with complementary reforms

  20. Combating Racial Health Disparities Through Medical Education: The Need for Anthropological and Genetic Perspectives in Medical Training.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bolnick, Deborah A

    2015-10-01

    Despite major public health initiatives, significant disparities persist among racially and ethnically defined groups in the prevalence of disease, access to medical care, quality of medical care, and health outcomes for common causes of morbidity and mortality in the United States. It is critical that we develop new and creative strategies to address such inequities; mitigate the social, environmental, institutional, and genetic determinants of poor health; and combat the persistence of racial profiling in clinical contexts that further exacerbates racial/ethnic health disparities. This article argues that medical education is a prime target for intervention and that anthropologists and human population geneticists should play a role in efforts to reform US medical curricula. Medical education would benefit greatly by incorporating anthropological and genetic perspectives on the complexities of race, human genetic variation, epigenetics, and the causes of racial/ethnic disparities. Medical students and practicing physicians should also receive training on how to use this knowledge to improve clinical practice, diagnosis, and treatment for racially diverse populations.

  1. An anthropological analysis of the perspectives of Somali women in the West and their obstetric care providers on caesarean birth.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Essén, Birgitta; Binder, Pauline; Johnsdotter, Sara

    2011-03-01

    We explored the perceptions of 39 Somali women and 62 obstetric care providers in London in relation to caesarean birth, as borne out of a paradox we recognised from evidence-based information about the Somali group. Socio-cultural factors potentially leading to adverse obstetric outcome were identified using in-depth and focus group interviews with semi-structured, open-ended questions. A cultural anthropology model, the emic/etic model, was used for analysis. Somali women expressed fear and anxiety throughout the pregnancy and identified strategies to avoid caesarean section (CS). There was widespread, yet anecdotal, awareness among obstetric care providers about negative Somali attitudes. Caesarean avoidance and refusal were expressed as being highly stressful among providers, but also as being the responsibility of the women and families. For women, avoiding or refusing caesarean was based on a rational choice to avoid death and coping with adverse outcome relied on fatalistic attitudes. Motivation for the development of preventive actions among both groups was not described, which lends weight to the vast distinction and lack of correspondence in identified perspectives between Somali women and UK obstetric providers. Early booking and identification of women likely to avoid caesarean is proposed, as is the development of preventive strategies to address CS avoidance.

  2. The culture of special care units: an anthropological perspective on ethnographic research in nursing home settings.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Henderson, J N

    1994-01-01

    Examining SCUs from an organizational cultural perspective requires an intraorganizational taxonomy of care settings, each with its own specific cultural framework for staff and resident behavior. Recognition of SCU cultural specifics allows for development of the best training curriculum for staff, means to maintain routine unit patterns, and a rationale for unit-specific distinctive features.

  3. Design Anthropology

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    This edited volume provides an introduction to the emerging field of design anthropology from the point of view of anthropologists engaging in its development. Contributors include young anthropologists with experience in the field and leading theoreticians, who combine to articulate the specific...... style of knowing involved in doing design anthropology. So far design anthropology has been developed mostly in the practice of industry and the public sector, in particular in Scandinavia and the US, and the sustained academic reflection to support this practice is still in its early stages. This book...... will contribute to this theoretical reflection and provide a reference for practitioners, teachers and students of anthropology, as well as design and innovation....

  4. [Forensic anthropology].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lynnerup, Niels

    2009-09-07

    Forensic anthropology is the application of biological or physical anthropology in the service of justice. One main area is the analysis of human remains. Such analyses involve person identification by assessment of age and sex of the deceased, and comparison with ante-mortem data. Another major area is the analysis of surveillance pictures and videos. Such analyses may comprise facial and bodily morphological comparisons, multi-angle photogrammetry and gait analysis. We also perform studies of human remains for archaeologists.

  5. Techno Anthropology

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, Torben Elgaard

    2013-01-01

    Inaugural lecture, Ph.D Torben Elgaard Jensen, professor with special responsibilities in techno anthropology and science and technology studies. The lecture addresses three questions: First, what is the unique approach that STS developed in the late 1970’s and early 1980’s? Second, what is the s......Inaugural lecture, Ph.D Torben Elgaard Jensen, professor with special responsibilities in techno anthropology and science and technology studies. The lecture addresses three questions: First, what is the unique approach that STS developed in the late 1970’s and early 1980’s? Second, what...... is the significance of the enormous growth of STS scholarship that took place in the following 2-3 decades? And third, what are the challenges today for an STS field that has come of age? Finally, the lecture offers reflections on the promises of the new techno anthropology study programme....

  6. Business Anthropology

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Moeran, Brian

    2015-01-01

    This essay outlines the overall scope and location of business anthropology within the overall field of the discipline. It outlines its foundations as an applied form of anthropology in early developments in the United States (in particular, in Western Electric’s Hawthorne Project and the Human...... Relations School at Harvard University), as well as in the United Kingdom and elsewhere, before turning to five areas of research and practice: academic ethnographies of business practices, regional studies, case studies developed by practitioners, theoretical applications, and methods. The essay then asks...... what a future program for business anthropology might look like and suggests four areas for theoretical development against a background of education, engagement, and comparative work. These are an examination of structures of power in, between, and dependent on business organizations of all kinds...

  7. Dissemination of psychosocial treatments for anxiety: the importance of taking a broad perspective.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Taylor, Steven; Abramowitz, Jonathan S

    2013-12-01

    Dissemination methods are used to increase the likelihood that a given treatment or form of clinical practice is implemented by clinicians in the community. Therapist training in treatment methods is an important component of dissemination. Successful dissemination also requires that roadblocks to treatment implementation are identified and circumvented, such as misconceptions that clinicians might hold about a given treatment. The present article offers a commentary on the papers included in the special issue on treatment dissemination for anxiety disorders. Most papers focus on issues concerning the training and education of clinicians with regard to exposure therapy. Training and education is an important step but should be part of a broad, multifaceted approach. There are several other important methods of treatment dissemination, including methods developed and implemented with success by the pharmaceutical industry, might also be used to disseminate psychosocial therapies. Optimal dissemination likely requires a broad perspective in which multiple dissemination methods are considered for implementation. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  8. Applying evolutionary anthropology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gibson, Mhairi A; Lawson, David W

    2015-01-01

    Evolutionary anthropology provides a powerful theoretical framework for understanding how both current environments and legacies of past selection shape human behavioral diversity. This integrative and pluralistic field, combining ethnographic, demographic, and sociological methods, has provided new insights into the ultimate forces and proximate pathways that guide human adaptation and variation. Here, we present the argument that evolutionary anthropological studies of human behavior also hold great, largely untapped, potential to guide the design, implementation, and evaluation of social and public health policy. Focusing on the key anthropological themes of reproduction, production, and distribution we highlight classic and recent research demonstrating the value of an evolutionary perspective to improving human well-being. The challenge now comes in transforming relevance into action and, for that, evolutionary behavioral anthropologists will need to forge deeper connections with other applied social scientists and policy-makers. We are hopeful that these developments are underway and that, with the current tide of enthusiasm for evidence-based approaches to policy, evolutionary anthropology is well positioned to make a strong contribution. © 2015 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  9. Anthropology & Philosophy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    The present book is no ordinary anthology, but rather a workroom in which anthropologists and philosophers initiate a dialogue on trust and hope, two important topics for both fields of study. The book combines work between scholars from different universities in the U.S. and Denmark. Thus, besid......, therefore, also inspire others to work in the productive intersection between anthropology and philosophy....

  10. Agricultural anthropology

    OpenAIRE

    Rhoades, Robert E.

    2005-01-01

    Metadata only record This book chapter describes the evolution of agricultural anthropology over the latter half of the twentieth century. The author draws upon research experiences in a number of areas and provides specific examples related to sustainable agriculture and natural resource management research in the Andes to illustrate the merit of the discipline. BA-2 (SANREM-Andes Research)

  11. Water as Life, Death, and Power: Building an Integrated Interdisciplinary Course Combining Perspectives from Anthropology, Biology, and Chemistry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Willermet, Cathy; Mueller, Anja; Juris, Stephen J.; Drake, Eron; Upadhaya, Samik; Chhetri, Pratik

    2013-01-01

    In response to a request from a campus student organization, faculty from three fields came together to develop and teach an integrated interdisciplinary course on water issues and social activism. This course, "Water as Life, Death, and Power", brought together topics from the fields of anthropology, biology and chemistry to explore…

  12. Perspectives in Business Anthropology

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Moeran, Brian

    2011-01-01

    This paper draws on extensive fieldwork in a wide range of creative industries to argue that creativity itself is under-theorized, and should be considered as both enabled and inhibited by numerous constraints guiding the choices made by creative personnel during the course of their work. Six set...

  13. Medical anthropology as an antidote for ethnocentrism in Jesus research? Putting the illness–disease distinction into perspective

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pieter F. Craffert

    2011-04-01

    Full Text Available Medicine often has side-effects or unintended consequences that are more harmful than the original disease. Medical anthropology in general and the illness–disease distinction in particular has been introduced into historical Jesus research with the intent to protect it from medicocentrism and thus to offer ways of comprehending sickness and healing in the world of Jesus and his first followers without distorting these phenomena by imposing the biomedical framework onto the texts. In particular the illness–disease distinction is used for making sense of healing accounts whilst claiming to cross the cultural gap. Based on an analysis of the illness–disease distinction in medical anthropology and its use in historical Jesus research this article suggests that instead of protecting from ethnocentrism this distinction actually increases the risk of ethnocentrism and consequently distorts in many instances the healing accounts of the New Testament.

  14. Medical anthropology as an antidote for ethnocentrism in Jesus research? Putting the illness–disease distinction into perspective

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pieter F. Craffert

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available Medicine often has side-effects or unintended consequences that are more harmful than the original disease. Medical anthropology in general and the illness–disease distinction in particular has been introduced into historical Jesus research with the intent to protect it from medicocentrism and thus to offer ways of comprehending sickness and healing in the world of Jesus and his first followers without distorting these phenomena by imposing the biomedical framework onto the texts. In particular the illness–disease distinction is used for making sense of healing accounts whilst claiming to cross the cultural gap. Based on an analysis of the illness–disease distinction in medical anthropology and its use in historical Jesus research this article suggests that instead of protecting from ethnocentrism this distinction actually increases the risk of ethnocentrism and consequently distorts in many instances the healing accounts of the New Testament.

  15. [Violence and impunity in check: problems and perspectives under the optics of the forensic anthropology in Brazil].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lessa, Andrea

    2009-01-01

    Forensic anthropology is playing an increasingly important role facing violence and impunity in many countries. A research performed at police stations of Civil Police and Forensic Institutes of six Brazilian capitals demonstrated that the practice of recover and positive identification of human remains has been neglected in different levels. The main problem is the lack of specific training of the professionals that accomplish the expertise in field and laboratory, but also the fact that no anthropological database of disappeared people is available. As a result of this situation, an expressive number of human remains leave the forensic institutes without positive identification, and criminal inquiries of homicides stay without resolution, contributing to the aggravation of the violence and impunity scenery that devastates the country.

  16. [Narratives in the study of mental health care practices: contributions of the perspectives of Paul Ricoeur, Walter Benjamin and of medical anthropology].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Onocko-Campos, Rosana Teresa; Palombini, Analice de Lima; Leal, Erotildes; de Serpa, Octavio Domont; Baccari, Ivana Oliveira Preto; Ferrer, Ana Luiza; Diaz, Alberto Giovanello; Xavier, Maria Angélica Zamora

    2013-10-01

    Narratives are ever more frequent in qualitative studies seeking to interpret experiences and the different viewpoints of individuals in a given context. Starting from this concept, the tradition that addresses narrative is reexamined, including the philosophy of Paul Ricoeur, the historical perspective of Walter Benjamin and the field of medical anthropology grounded in phenomenology. In Ricoeur, with hermeneutics as a variation derived from phenomenology, narrative is linked to temporality. In Benjamin, narrative comprised of bits and pieces, always inconclusive, emerges in spite of the official stories. If Ricoeur retrieves tradition from Gadamer as a fundamental component for the construction of the world of a text that makes imitation of life possible, Benjamin, faced with the collapse of tradition, suggests the invention of narrative forms outside the traditional canons, making it possible to hark to the past in order to change the present. Assumptions of medical anthropology are also presented, as they consider narrative a dimension of life and not its abstraction, namely an embodied and situated narrative. Lastly, three distinct research projects in mental health that use narrative linked to the theoretical concepts cited with their differences and similarities are presented.

  17. The Anthropological Study of Education.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Calhoun, Craig J., Ed.; Ianni, Francis A. J., Ed.

    The book presents 21 essays representative of current international anthropological research in education. The categories of this rather broad range of studies are noninstitutional education, institutional education in society, the organization of educational institutions, and language and education. The two essays in the first section examine…

  18. Changing Anthropology, Changing Society

    Science.gov (United States)

    Varughese, Heather

    2009-01-01

    Fifty years after the founding of the field of medical anthropology, the Society for Medical Anthropology of the American Anthropological Association held its first independent meeting on September 24-27, 2009, at Yale University. PMID:20027281

  19. Demographic anthropology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Howell, N

    1986-01-01

    In this review of the literature, the author focuses on the changes in demographic anthropology, generally since 1970, with greater emphasis on the literature since 1980. 20 years ago the literature on population in the field of anthropology was sparse, inconsistent, and frequently full of factual and logical errors. Part of the problem was that anthropologists did not apply demographic techniques to their research. In the 1980s, communication between anthropology and demography has increased significantly. Methodological advances in demography have helped anthropologists overcome problems in describing and estimating parameters of populations. New techniques include estimations of demographic parameters from the close study of kinship, computer simulations, model life tables, and techniques in paleodemography. The author discusses microanalysis and includes examples of some of the best known and most detailed quantitative studies of small populations from the 1970s and 1980s. The author then reviews macrostudies where attention is directed to the problems of boundedness of small populations and their rates of change and influence from outside over time, including 1) basic research on concepts; 2) primate population and social organization; 3) paleodemography; 4) population problems in huter-gatherer studies; 5) population problems in archeology; 6) the origin of agriculture; and 7) diet and population. Next the author discusses theoretical overviews of 3 areas of demography: 1) population and demography, 2) population and social structure, and 3) population and cultural evolution. Implications for future research include 1) creating a standard methodology for studying populations; 2) creating a clear vocabulary; 3) publishing in high quality journals; 4) establishing a data bank to encourage secondary analysis of materials and their use in comparative studies; 5) reconsidering and republishing previous research; 6) saving raw data, producing descriptive tables

  20. Medicolegal anthropology in France.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Işcan, M Y; Quatrehomme, G

    1999-03-15

    Medicolegal anthropology has a very long history in France. Basic studies on human skeletal remains started as early as the 18th century. The 19th century produced many medical theses and research papers on age, sex, as well as stature estimation. The research proliferated in the first 60 years of the 20th century, much of which is still in use in France and abroad. The later half of the 20th century, however, was dormant in research on human skeletal biology at a time when forensic anthropology was becoming an active field worldwide. In the last decade, medicolegal anthropology took a different perspective, independent of its traditional roots. Research and practice have both been in the professional domain of forensic physicians unlike the situation in many other countries. Population based studies requiring large databases or skeletal collections have diminished considerably. Thus, most research has been on factors of individualization such as trauma, time since death, crime scene investigation, and facial reconstruction. It is suggested that there is a need for cooperation between the forensic physician and anthropologist to further research. This also encourages anthropologists to carry out research and practice that can fulfill the needs of the medicolegal system of the country.

  1. Anthropology of sexual exploitation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lalić Velibor

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available In this paper, the authors observe sexual exploitation from an anthropological perspective. They analyze the rational, ethical, emotional and mythological dimensions of human sexuality. Consequently, after setting the phenomenon in a social and historical context, sexual exploitation is closely observed in the contemporary age. Based on thoughts of relevant thinkers, they make the conclusion that the elimination of sexual exploitation is not an utterly legal issue, but political and economical issues as well. Namely, legal norms are not sufficient to overcome sexual exploitation, but, political and economical relationships in contemporary societies, which will be based on sincere equal opportunities must be established.

  2. Going beyond representational anthropology

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Winther, Ida Wentzel

    Going beyond representational anthropology: Re-presenting bodily, emotional and virtual practices in everyday life. Separated youngsters and families in Greenland Greenland is a huge island, with a total of four high-schools. Many youngsters (age 16-18) move far away from home in order to get...... transformation work into the young people and their families. In this presentation I want to screen two sequences from the film, in order to show and clarify how mobility and transformation are made and dealt with both from the youngsters’ and their parents’ perspectives, but in asynchronous loups. I want...

  3. Why all anthropology should be called techno-anthropology

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Birkbak, Andreas

    2013-01-01

    as an invitation to think in ambitious terms about what techno- anthropology might be(come). The main contribution of the chapter is to introduce Bruno Latour and John Dewey as techno-anthropologists. While these two thinkers are known for many other engagements, and wrote in different times, they share...... turn to Dewey’s understanding of technology as inquiry, a concept that deliberately ignores the physical/psychological dichotomy. The chapter concludes with a couple of empirical examples of how the pragmatist perspective might guide techno-anthropological analysis....

  4. A theoretical reconstruction of the civic integration plan of the city of Parla from an anthropological perspective

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Néstor Nuño Martínez

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available Throughout a detailed revision of the citizen integration plan of the city of Parla (Madrid, we discover the complexity of the local social reality is oversimplified, leading to the appearance of preconceptions and assumptions regarding to different significant concepts. This paper seeks to develop a theoretical analysis of three of these terms (integration, identity and culture to expose and claim the importance of employing anthropological and sociological gazes in the active design, development and assessment of public policies for integration. 

  5. Deep Mapping and Spatial Anthropology

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Les Roberts

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper provides an introduction to the Humanities Special Issue on “Deep Mapping”. It sets out the rationale for the collection and explores the broad-ranging nature of perspectives and practices that fall within the “undisciplined” interdisciplinary domain of spatial humanities. Sketching a cross-current of ideas that have begun to coalesce around the concept of “deep mapping”, the paper argues that rather than attempting to outline a set of defining characteristics and “deep” cartographic features, a more instructive approach is to pay closer attention to the multivalent ways deep mapping is performatively put to work. Casting a critical and reflexive gaze over the developing discourse of deep mapping, it is argued that what deep mapping “is” cannot be reduced to the otherwise a-spatial and a-temporal fixity of the “deep map”. In this respect, as an undisciplined survey of this increasing expansive field of study and practice, the paper explores the ways in which deep mapping can engage broader discussion around questions of spatial anthropology.

  6. [Man's place and anthropology in bioethics].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tomar Romero, Francisca

    2013-01-01

    From the analysis of its epistemological status, the article focuses on the philosophical fundament of bioethics, stressing the need for an authentic anthropology as a reference or starting point. Being an applied ethics, the first fundament of bioethics is in ethics. It shows how only personalistic ethics, which takes as reference the nature or essence of man, can offer objective and universal criteria. Philosophical anthropology studies man as a whole, in an integral manner, from the perspective of its nature or fundamental aspects of his being. It analyzes the distinction and relationship between the philosophical anthropology and the positive anthropologies, as well as with the physical, human and social sciences. Finally, it reflects on the current anthropological crisis and its ethical consequences.

  7. A multi-disciplinary approach to the origins of music: perspectives from anthropology, archaeology, cognition and behaviour.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morley, Iain

    2014-01-01

    Archaeological evidence for musical activities pre-dates even the earliest-known cave art and it remains the case that no human culture has yet been encountered that does not practise some recognisably musical activity. Yet the human abilities to make and appreciate music have been described as "amongst the most mysterious with which [we are] endowed" (Charles Darwin, 1872) and music itself as "the supreme mystery of the science of man" (Claude Levi-Strauss, 1970). Like language, music has been the subject of keen investigation across a great diversity of fields, from neuroscience and psychology, to ethnography, to studies of its structures in its own dedicated field, musicology; unlike the evolution of human language abilities, it is only recently that the origins of musical capacities have begun to receive dedicated attention. It is increasingly clear that human musical abilities are fundamentally related to other important human abilities, yet much remains mysterious about this ubiquitous human phenomenon, not least its prehistoric origins. It is evident that no single field of investigation can address the wide range of issues relevant to answering the question of music's origins. This review brings together evidence from a wide range of anthropological and human sciences, including palaeoanthropology, archaeology, neuroscience, primatology and developmental psychology, in an attempt to elucidate the nature of the foundations of music, how they have evolved, and how they are related to capabilities underlying other important human behaviours. It is proposed that at their most fundamental level musical behaviours (including both vocalisation and dance) are forms of deliberate metrically-organised gesture, and constitute a specialised use of systems dedicated to the expression and comprehension of social and emotional information between individuals. The abilities underlying these behaviours are selectively advantageous themselves; in addition, various mechanisms

  8. Participant observation and change of perspectives: medical anthropology and the encounter with socially marginalised groups. First experiences with a new teaching concept.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mohr, Berit; Hovermann, Peter; Roelcke, Volker

    2012-01-01

    This paper examines the new teaching concept "Providing medical care on the fringe of society: Participant observation and change in perspectives" in the context of the interdisciplinary field of Querschnittsbereich 2/Q 2 (the transdisciplinary section under AOÄ, the German Regulations for licensed physicians) that explores the history, theory and ethics of medicine. The disciplinary approach usually adopted in Q 2 is supplemented with concepts from medical anthropology; in addition students will be exposed to people in extreme social situations. The aim is to make students aware of and invite them to reflect upon: the importance of participant observation in the specific on-site setting of medical thinking and acting; the importance of the subjectivity of all those involved in doctor/patient interaction; and the fact that key medical terms (such as the "need" as seen by the physician vs. the need as seen by the patient) are essentially context-dependent in their interpretation. At a more general level students will learn how to put themselves in the position of different protagonists in a range of medical settings, and practice the skill of reflecting critically upon putative conceptual/theoretical and normative-ethical assumptions in medicine.

  9. THE ONENESS OF GOD BEHIND THE LOCAL TRADITION OF NUSANTARA ISLAM: THEO-ANTHROPOLOGICAL PERSPECTIVE WITH INTERPRETIVE PARADIGM ON NUSANTARA ISLAM SASAK LOMBOK

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohamad Iwan Fitriani

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available This study aims to elucidate Nusantara Islam and finds the concept of oneness of God within the Sasak Muslim traditions as analytical tool to understand Nusantara Islam in the local context of Lombok. God is only one, but ways of finding “The One” vary. Islamic teachings manifest in local traditions are termed Nusantara Islam. In this study, Nusantara Islam is analyzed theoretically and practically regarding Sasak Muslim traditions. This study uses a qualitative approach and employs the interpretive paradigm and Theo-anthropological perspective. This study shows that Nusantara Islam in Lombok can be observed through various religious concepts, practices and rituals, such as mulut (the celebration of Prophet’s birthday, maleman (last ten days of fasting Ramadan month and rowah (sending prayer to the dead. Tawḥīd or the notion of One God lies behind these traditions. Tawḥīd is more than just the notion of oneness of God; it is a worldview manifesting not only in spiritual domains but also in socio-cultural spheres.

  10. Organizational culture, Anthropology of

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Krause-Jensen, Jakob; Wright, Susan

    2015-01-01

    cultures’ into transnational corporations and organizations concerned with international governance. In such organizations, anthropology graduates are increasingly employed as ‘cultural experts.’ We track the anthropological research on organizational culture and argue that the sensibilities and analytical...... skills acquired and the concepts developed through the ethnographic encounter gives anthropology a unique voice in the study of cultural matters in organizations....

  11. Hidden Broad-line Regions in Seyfert 2 Galaxies: From the Spectropolarimetric Perspective

    Science.gov (United States)

    Du, Pu; Wang, Jian-Min; Zhang, Zhi-Xiang

    2017-05-01

    The hidden broad-line regions (BLRs) in Seyfert 2 galaxies, which display broad emission lines (BELs) in their polarized spectra, are a key piece of evidence in support of the unified model for active galactic nuclei (AGNs). However, the detailed kinematics and geometry of hidden BLRs are still not fully understood. The virial factor obtained from reverberation mapping of type 1 AGNs may be a useful diagnostic of the nature of hidden BLRs in type 2 objects. In order to understand the hidden BLRs, we compile six type 2 objects from the literature with polarized BELs and dynamical measurements of black hole masses. All of them contain pseudobulges. We estimate their virial factors, and find the average value is 0.60 and the standard deviation is 0.69, which agree well with the value of type 1 AGNs with pseudobulges. This study demonstrates that (1) the geometry and kinematics of BLR are similar in type 1 and type 2 AGNs of the same bulge type (pseudobulges), and (2) the small values of virial factors in Seyfert 2 galaxies suggest that, similar to type 1 AGNs, BLRs tend to be very thick disks in type 2 objects.

  12. Ensuring a broad and inclusive approach: a provincial perspective on pandemic preparedness.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kort, Rodney; Stuart, Allison J; Bontovics, Erika

    2005-01-01

    The SARS crisis revealed critical gaps in Ontario's health emergency response capacity, and identified, in the starkest terms possible, the need for improved emergency response planning. This article reviews the development of the Ontario Health Plan for an Influenza Pandemic (OHPIP), released in June 2005. Some key points arising from the provincial planning process include the necessity to: ensure a broad and inclusive development process; ensure the pandemic plan identifies: 1) clear roles and responsibilities of federal, provincial/territorial and municipal levels of government, 2) the approach to occupational health and safety issues and ethical decision-making, 3) a communications strategy linking all affected sectors and levels of government and health sector; 4) any commitments to antiviral stockpiling, vaccine and antiviral allocation and use, and an approach for drug delivery from provincial stockpiles to local public health units; 5) health human resource management and supplementation; and 6) key programs/services to be scaled back to maximize surge capacity; address best practices (e.g., involve all sectors of the health care system at the outset, acquire strategic expertise, coordinate/advocate with broader emergency response system, etc); and, outline future stages that include strengthening the delivery of clinical care to influenza cases; clarifying the role of primary care practitioners during a pandemic; leveraging Ontario's significant e-Health investments.

  13. The Hypnotic Induction in the Broad Scheme of Hypnosis: A Sociocognitive Perspective.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lynn, Steven Jay; Maxwell, Reed; Green, Joseph P

    2017-04-01

    Researchers and clinicians typically divide hypnosis into two distinct parts: the induction and the suggestions that follow. We suggest that this distinction is arbitrary and artificial. Different definitions of hypnosis ascribe different roles to the hypnotic induction, yet none clearly specifies the mechanisms that mediate or moderate subjective and behavioral responses to hypnotic suggestions. Researchers have identified few if any differences in responding across diverse hypnotic inductions, and surprisingly little research has focused on the specific ingredients that optimize responsiveness. From a sociocognitive perspective, we consider the role of inductions in the broader scheme of hypnosis and suggest that there is no clear line of demarcation between prehypnotic information, the induction, suggestions, and other constituents of the hypnotic context. We describe research efforts to maximize responses to hypnotic suggestions, which encompass the induction and other aspects of the broader hypnotic framework, and conclude with a call for more research on inductions and suggestions to better understand their role within hypnotic interventions in research and clinical contexts.

  14. Anthropology and demography

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bošković Aleksandar

    2013-01-01

    little more information we would know a great deal more such as household and family composition, economic organization, social problems, and something of the political structure. It we knew the schedules for populations in general and could correlate the schedules with the causes, genetic or environmental, that produce them, we would know a great deal about the possible range of human social structure" (Howell, 1986: 219. In the second part of the paper, the author discusses several examples of interplay between anthropology and demography. One of them is Patrick Heady′s study of the shift in ritual patterns, which combines elements of some "classical" anthropological topics (Mauss’s theory of gift exchange and Lévi-Strauss′s concept of kinship with his own field research in the Carnian Alps. "By marrying and raising children, parents participate in a system of gift-exchange in which the gifts in question are human lives, and the parties to the exchange are the kinship groups recognized in the society concerned. Fertility reflects the attitudes of prospective parents to their place in the existing system of reproductive exchange, and the relationships of cooperation and authority which it implies - as well as their confidence in the system’s continuing viability. It is shown that this view is compatible with earlier ideas about self-regulating population systems - and that changing economic circumstances are an important source of discrepancy between existing exchange systems and the attitudes and expectations of prospective parents" (Heady, 2007: 465. The paper concludes with the discussion of the directions in which relationship between these two disciplines can proceed. Some of the epistemological issues are mentioned, as well as a need to apply different theoretical perspectives to better understand demographic behavior (especially in Europe and to better understand certain cultural components that shape this behavior. In order to achieve this, most of the

  15. Should anthropology be part of cognitive science?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beller, Sieghard; Bender, Andrea; Medin, Douglas L

    2012-07-01

    Anthropology and the other cognitive science (CS) subdisciplines currently maintain a troubled relationship. With a debate in topiCS we aim at exploring the prospects for improving this relationship, and our introduction is intended as a catalyst for this debate. In order to encourage a frank sharing of perspectives, our comments will be deliberately provocative. Several challenges for a successful rapprochement are identified, encompassing the diverging paths that CS and anthropology have taken in the past, the degree of compatibility between (1) CS and (2) anthropology with regard to methodology and (3) research strategies, (4) the importance of anthropology for CS, and (5) the need for disciplinary diversity. Given this set of challenges, a reconciliation seems unlikely to follow on the heels of good intentions alone. Copyright © 2012 Cognitive Science Society, Inc.

  16. Methods in Social Anthropology: New Directions and Old Problems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thompson, Richard W.; Roper, Roy E.

    1980-01-01

    Discusses major methodological advances of the past 20 years within social anthropology. The advances fall into three broad areas: comparative studies and large-scale multicultural and holocultural investigations; cognitive anthropology, encompassing formal analysis and decision processes; and studies of intracultural diversity. (Author/KC)

  17. Is there really such a thing as "one health"? Thinking about a more than human world from the perspective of cultural anthropology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wolf, Meike

    2015-03-01

    Today's era of globalization is characterized by intensified interspecies encounters, growing ecological concerns and the (re-)emergence of infectious diseases, manifesting themselves in the interplay of medical and biological, but also social, cultural and political processes. One health approaches - which combine multidisciplinary efforts to stimulate collaborations between different health professionals such as veterinarians, medical practitioners, biologists, and public health professionals - can be understood as a response to this complex interconnectedness. Integrating a social science perspective might prove beneficial to this endeavor. This essay locates the one health discussion on disease ecologies in a more than human world within recent developments in cultural and medical anthropology that focus on the entanglements between health and a multitude of animals, plants or microbes, as they are characteristic of a globalized modernity. The paper aims to examine the social dimensions of human-animal-disease-interactions, claiming that disease is a biocultural phenomenon and that social factors generally play a crucial role in the emergence, spread and management of (infectious) disease. Consequently, it will be argued that there is a need to rethink our objects of inquiry and any given assumptions of human health, the human body or the constitution of "the global" as such. Incorporating the social sciences into one health approaches can help address topics such as consumption patterns, human-animal behavior or environmental conflicts in a novel way and on a grander scale than ever before. Yet, a greater sensitivity to context may entail some skepticism about the idea of one health - not in spite of the complex entanglements between humans, environments, animals and pathogens, but precisely because of them. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  18. [Psychoanalysis and social anthropology].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thisted, Jens A

    2012-01-01

    In this article we explore some subjects originated in the work of psychoanalysts and social anthropologists that generated an interesting discussion about the transmission of cultural trends along generations, as well as psychological family features from one generation to the other: we refer to the Oedipus complex model, as it was introduced by S. Freud, and to Malinowski's work on children's sexuality and incest. This text examines the emergency of fieldwork methodology (ethnography), that is, living in the place in which the research is conducted, sharing native languages and listening to the meanings attributed by the people to aspects of their lives. We also show another perspective, in which the researchers share place, language and customs but study for their own sake in order to justify a theoretical concept: resilience. This is one of the results of the transdisciplinary works -carried out by the UBA anthropology and education teams- to which we refer, together with the discussion about the category "educability" and some issues related to the diagnosis of Attention Deficit Disorders and Hyperactivity. This article proposes a critical approach on the ontological premises of racionalism, idealism and empiricism that preceded the researches mentioned. Finally it presents a perspective in which the imaginary institution of society and the emergency of psychism in singular subjects merge.

  19. The anthropological demography of Europe

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bernardi, Laura; Hutter, Inge

    2007-01-01

    This paper introduces a collection of related research studies on the anthropological demography of Europe. Anthropological demography is a specialty within demography that uses anthropological theory and methods to provide a better understanding of demographic phenomena in current and past

  20. Some anthropological aspects of globalization

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Đurić Jelena B.

    2002-01-01

    Full Text Available Awareness about the role of anthropological perspective places each anthropological research within the context of globalization, pointing at the need for making the difference between concepts of globalization as the description and as the political project. This differentiation represents a frame of the research of globalization phenomena in order to understand their influence on concrete people in a concrete situation. The importance of the role of concepts in ubiquitous transformation of human lives is also confirmed in the paper. This is the way the influence of one culture unfolds through the dominant concepts, the culture which symbolically and normatively imposes itself as 'global' in spite of the fact that it is 'local' not only (and/or not any more in territorial sense but in its materialistic approach to the values. Hence, horizontal communication (globally available via the internet could serve to the communication of values as crucial spiritual points. It could contribute not only to the widening of cultural circles, but to the evolution of consciousness about the generalization of values up to the universal. This requires transcending of particular interests, which prevent effective conceptualization of the global anthropological meaning.

  1. Anthropological contributions to historical ecology: 50 questions, infinite prospects

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Armstrong, Chelsey Geralda; Shoemaker, Anna C; McKechnie, Iain; Ekblom, Anneli; Szabó, Péter; Lane, Paul J; McAlvay, Alex C; Boles, Oliver J; Walshaw, Sarah; Petek, Nik; Gibbons, Kevin S; Quintana Morales, Erendira; Anderson, Eugene N; Ibragimow, Aleksandra; Podruczny, Grzegorz; Vamosi, Jana C; Marks-Block, Tony; LeCompte, Joyce K; Awâsis, Sākihitowin; Nabess, Carly; Sinclair, Paul; Crumley, Carole L

    2017-01-01

    ...s (in Sweden and Canada) over the course of two years and online discussions were peer facilitated to define specific key questions for historical ecology from anthropological and archaeological perspectives...

  2. Anthropological Materials Available from the Smithsonian Institution.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smithsonian Institution, Washington, DC. Museum of Natural History.

    This bulletin is a detailed list of source materials and resource packets for teachers, covering specific topics from the perspectives of anthropology, archaeology, and ethnography. All materials listed are available through the Smithsonian Institution. Pricing information is given with each item, and many materials are free of charge. Materials…

  3. Applying evolutionary anthropology

    OpenAIRE

    Gibson, Mhairi A; Lawson, David W

    2015-01-01

    Evolutionary anthropology provides a powerful theoretical framework for understanding how both current environments and legacies of past selection shape human behavioral diversity. This integrative and pluralistic field, combining ethnographic, demographic, and sociological methods, has provided new insights into the ultimate forces and proximate pathways that guide human adaptation and variation. Here, we present the argument that evolutionary anthropological studies of human behavior also h...

  4. What is Business Anthropology?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Albu, Oana Brindusa; Larsen, Frederik; Sigurdarson, Hallur

    2013-01-01

    place at the Copenhagen Business School in 2012 under the title of ‘The Business of Ethnography’. The purpose of the workshop was to create a forum in which to discuss business anthropology as an emerging field or sub-discipline of anthropology. The paper considers three conditions (reflexivity...

  5. Medical design anthropology

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ventura, Jonathan; Gunn, Wendy

    Barnard and Spencer define medical anthropology in the Encyclopedia of Social and Cultural Anthropology as "Medical anthropology is, as the phrase implies, unavoidably concerned with the paradigm of modern Western medicine, whether implicitly or explicitly" (2002: 541). Recently there is a new...... focus in medical sociology and anthropology, which is patient's practices and influence on wider global health environment (see for example vol. 36(2) of Sociology of Health & Illness). While various social science theoreticians have written about agentic abilities of objects, there is a gap...... in literature concerning various levels of socio-cultural influence of the medical environment through medical products. In our research we have outlined the importance of medical design anthropology (MDA) to the practice and theory of design (Ventura and Gunn, 2016). In this paper, we study the ways in which...

  6. Disciplining anthropological demography

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sara Randall

    2007-06-01

    Full Text Available This study furthers the epistemological development of anthropological demography, and its role in understanding the demography of Europe. Firstly we situate anthropological demography against the context of an evolving world of research in which boundaries between academic disciplines have become much more permeable. This is achieved via an overview of recent theoretical debates about the role and nature of disciplinarity, including interdisciplinarity, multidisciplinarity and transdisciplinarity. Secondly, in order to understand the current state of the art, we sketch out the evolution of anthropological demography, paying particular attention to the different knowledge claims of anthropology and demography. Finally, we flesh out some of the epistemological and theoretical debates about anthropological demography by sketching out the formative research process of our own work on low fertility in the UK.

  7. Cyber anthropology or anthropology in cyberspace.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Svilicić, Niksa

    2012-03-01

    As a variety of anthropology, cyber anthropology is considered to be the fastest growing sub branch in the science. It is based on synergic effects of multimedia systems and hypermedia, using their comparative advantages. One of the least researched fields of cyber anthropology is the relationship of individuals and social groups with a multimedia document in terms of their perception of such subject. This is because the foundation of social-informatics perception in the society is created based on the evidence of a real life, whereas here the perception is established at the level of virtual, i.e. online life. The rhetorical question here is whether an identical content causes the same or different user reactions, depending on whether it was perceived offline or online, i.e. to what extend does the medium (and not the information content) dictate the user perception. In this respect the research titled "Perception of online museum content creators and actual habits of Croatian online museum visitors" can be a "case study" for the impact of "cyber potential" on the classic anthropological paradigm.

  8. Engaged anthropology and corporate volunteering

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Natália Blahová

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this paper is to present engaged anthropology and its methodological tools with a specific perspective of the research field and the position of the researcher with regard to research subjects. The study focuses on corporate volunteering as one of the forms of collaboration between the non-profit and the private sectors seeking solutions to social problems and community development. Volunteering projects contribute to the interlinking of the knowledge, skills, experience and resources of corporate employees and the representatives of the non-profit or the public sector. It is a part of the philanthropic strategy of companies which are willing to present themselves as entities responsible towards the environment in which they run their business, and towards their employees, partners and customers. Engaged anthropology can bring, through its methodological tools, a new perspective of corporate volunteering. Community-based participatory research on the process of knowledge creation includes all partners on an equal basis and identifies their unique contribution to problem solution and community development.

  9. Anthropology of fear

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fina Antón Hurtado

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available The topic related to emotions has been approached by the studies of Social Anthropology. However the cultural input resulting from the emotions and their effect on the meaning of life is undeniable. This article starts with an analysis on the influence that positivist, evolutionist and rationalist criteria have had on the study of emotions. Then it continues with an approach to the anthropological studies of emotions analyzing its contribution and conclusions to this topic. The investigation ends up with an anthropological analysis of the feeling of fear as a cultural universal.

  10. Molecular anthropology in the genomic era.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Destro-Bisol, Giovanni; Jobling, Mark A; Rocha, Jorge; Novembre, John; Richards, Martin B; Mulligan, Connie; Batini, Chiara; Manni, Franz

    2010-01-01

    Molecular Anthropology is a relatively young field of research. In fact, less than 50 years have passed since the symposium "Classification and Human Evolution" (1962, Burg Wartenstein, Austria), where the term was formally introduced by Emil Zuckerkandl. In this time, Molecular Anthropology has developed both methodologically and theoretically and extended its applications, so covering key aspects of human evolution such as the reconstruction of the history of human populations and peopling processes, the characterization of DNA in extinct humans and the role of adaptive processes in shaping the genetic diversity of our species. In the current scientific panorama, molecular anthropologists have to face a double challenge. As members of the anthropological community, we are strongly committed to the integration of biological findings and other lines of evidence (e.g. linguistic and archaeological), while keeping in line with methodological innovations which are moving the approach from the genetic to the genomic level. In this framework, the meeting "DNA Polymorphisms in Human Populations: Molecular Anthropology in the Genomic Era" (Rome, December 3-5, 2009) offered an opportunity for discussion among scholars from different disciplines, while paying attention to the impact of recent methodological innovations. Here we present an overview of the meeting and discuss perspectives and prospects of Molecular Anthropology in the genomic era.

  11. Teaching Anthropology through Folklore.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bonney, Rachel A.

    1985-01-01

    Describes three uses of folklore in teaching college-level anthropology courses: (1) collecting folklore through interviewing; (2) analyzing folklore themes; and (3) using folklore in puppetry and plays. (KH)

  12. Education, anthropology, ontologies

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Taddei, Renzo; Gamboggi, Ana Laura

    The goal of this paper is to analyze the relation between anthropology and education, and the relation of both with the experience of life, in a context of debates in which epistemological concerns...

  13. Social anthropology in INCAP.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adams, Richard N

    2010-03-01

    Social anthropology at INCAP evolved through a series of stages. The initial work in the 1950s was concerned with finding ways to make INCAP nutritional research more effective. In a second phase, emerging in the 1960s, anthropology examined the nutrition process in the population, especially as it was manifested in child care and feeding, lactation, and population growth and in the relation of economic process to nutritional progress. In the 1970s, anthropology once more became an adjunct of nutritional research. Anthropological awareness was introduced into project planning, and field studies were undertaken by way of shaping the research process to work in accord with local realities. In the 1980s and 1990s, there was a shift away from more descriptive research to research directed to supporting and facilitating specific nutrition and health behavior change.

  14. Anthropology in cognitive science.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bender, Andrea; Hutchins, Edwin; Medin, Douglas

    2010-07-01

    This paper reviews the uneven history of the relationship between Anthropology and Cognitive Science over the past 30 years, from its promising beginnings, followed by a period of disaffection, on up to the current context, which may lay the groundwork for reconsidering what Anthropology and (the rest of) Cognitive Science have to offer each other. We think that this history has important lessons to teach and has implications for contemporary efforts to restore Anthropology to its proper place within Cognitive Science. The recent upsurge of interest in the ways that thought may shape and be shaped by action, gesture, cultural experience, and language sets the stage for, but so far has not fully accomplished, the inclusion of Anthropology as an equal partner. Copyright © 2010 Cognitive Science Society, Inc.

  15. On Teaching Anthropology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Poyer, Lin

    1983-01-01

    An anthropology professor discusses the three major educational objectives of her introductory college course. She wants her students to understand cultural relativism, the meaning of race, and the reality of evolution. (RM)

  16. Anthropology of fear

    OpenAIRE

    Fina Antón Hurtado

    2015-01-01

    The topic related to emotions has been approached by the studies of Social Anthropology. However the cultural input resulting from the emotions and their effect on the meaning of life is undeniable. This article starts with an analysis on the influence that positivist, evolutionist and rationalist criteria have had on the study of emotions. Then it continues with an approach to the anthropological studies of emotions analyzing its contribution and conclusions to this topic. The investigation ...

  17. New Serbian Anthropology - Foreword

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Editorial Board

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available The "New Serbian anthropology" project has a dual purpose. One is to represent the development and constitution of Serbian anthropology, and the other is, through the choice of papers which represent it, to display it to a wider audience. The initiators of the project, prof. dr Ivan Kova!evi and his associates (Dragana Antonijević, Ana Banić, Marija Brujić, Ildiko Erdei, Ljiljana Gavrilović, Vladimira Ilić, Ljubica Milosavljević, Marija Ristivojević, Danijel Sinani, Mladen Stajić and Bojan Žikić, have envisioned two modes of presentation of new Serbian anthropology.  The first type will be the editing of thematic volumes of articles published over the course of the last four decades and comprise the basis of the transformed discipline. These volumes will be presented electronically on the website www.anthroserbia.org.  The other type will be the publishing of reviews which would give the wider reading public an insight into the development of certain subgenres of anthropology.With this in mind, Issues in Ethnology and Anthropology has created a special section titled "New Serbian Anthropology" in which, in the coming issues, such reviews will be published.

  18. On Not Liking What One Sees: Anthropology and the Visual Arts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stanley, Nick

    1986-01-01

    Maintains that an anthropological perspective offers exciting possibilities for developing intercultural understanding in the visual arts. Examines the problems encountered when applying this perspective to the visual art of radically different cultures. (JDH)

  19. Tracking Porters: Learning the Craft of Techno-Anthropology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bruun, Maja Hojer; Krause-Jensen, Jakob; Saltofte, Margit

    2015-01-01

    Anthropology attempts to gain insight into people's experiential life-worlds through long-term fieldwork. The quality of anthropological knowledge production, however, does not depend solely on the duration of the stay in the field, but also on a particular way of seeing social situations. The anthropological perspective is grounded in socio-cultural theory and forged by a distinct relativist or contextualist epistemological stance. The point is to understand events, concepts and phenomena from the insiders' point of view and to show how this view relates to the particular social and cultural context. In this chapter, we argue that although anthropology has its specific methodology - including a myriad of ethnographic data-gathering tools, techniques, analytical approaches and theories - it must first and foremost be understood as a craft. Anthropology as craft requires a specific 'anthropological sensibility' that differs from the standardized procedures of normal science. To establish our points we use an example of problem-based project work conducted by a group of Techno-Anthropology students at Aalborg University, we focus on key aspects of this craft and how the students began to learn it: For two weeks the students followed the work of a group of porters. Drawing on anthropological concepts and research strategies the students gained crucial insights about the potential effects of using tracking technologies in the hospital.

  20. Critical Proximity as a Methodological Move in Techno-Anthropology

    OpenAIRE

    Birkbak, Andreas; Petersen, Morten Krogh; Elgaard Jensen, Torben

    2015-01-01

    echno-Anthropology is a new field, operating with a broad range of methodologies and approaches. This gives rise to the question: What does it mean for Techno-Anthropological research to be critical? In this paper, we discuss this question by developing and specifying the notion of ‘critical proximity.’ Critical proximity offers an alternative to critical distance, especially with respect to avoiding premature references to abstract panoramas such as democratization and capitalist exploitatio...

  1. International Journal of Modern Anthropology: Editorial Policies

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    It concentrates on topics, which need syntheses of multidisciplinary data from different specialties of Biological and Cultural Anthropology: - Human origins and evolution - Genetic Anthropology - Forensic anthropology - Paleoanthropology - Medical Anthropology - Health and Population Sciences - Human Biology

  2. Towards an Architectural Anthropology

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Stender, Marie

    2017-01-01

    Architecture and anthropology have always had overlapping interests regarding issues such as spatial organisation, forms of human dwellings, and the interplay between social life and physical surroundings. Recent developments in both disciplines make it even more relevant to explore and evolve...... their overlaps and collaboration. However, there are also challenging differences to take into account regarding disciplinary traditions of, for example, communication, temporality, and normativity. This article explores the potentials and challenges of architectural anthropology as a distinct sub......-discipline and outlines its possible theoretical, methodological, and applied contributions. It is proposed that the ambition to understand people in a different way than they understand themselves is key in both disciplines, and that architectural anthropology is consequently not only relevant in studies of vernacular...

  3. Subdisciplines of Anthropology: A Modular Approach. Cultural Anthropology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kassebaum, Peter

    Designed for use as supplementary instructional material in a cultural anthropology course, this learning module introduces the idea that anthropology is composed of a number of subdisciplines and that cultural anthropology has numerous subfields which are the specialty areas for many practicing anthropologists. Beginning with a general discussion…

  4. Historical Trends in Graduate Research and Training of Diplomates of the American Board of Forensic Anthropology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bethard, Jonathan D

    2017-01-01

    The history of forensic anthropology has been documented by numerous scholars. These contributions have described the work of early pioneers in the field and have described important milestones, such as the founding of the Physical Anthropology Section of the American Academy of Forensic Sciences (AAFS) in 1972 and the American Board of Forensic Anthropology (ABFA) in 1977. This paper contributes to the growing literature on the history of forensic anthropology by documenting the academic training of all individuals who have been granted diplomate status by the ABFA (n = 115). Doctoral dissertation titles were queried to discern broad patterns of research foci. A total of 39 doctoral granting institutions have trained diplomates and 77.3% of board-certified forensic anthropologists wrote dissertations involving skeletal biology, bioarchaeology, or forensic anthropology. Board-certified forensic anthropologists are a broadly trained group of professionals with far-reaching anthropological interests and expertise. © 2016 American Academy of Forensic Sciences.

  5. Anthropology and inclusive development

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bakker, L.; Nooteboom, G.

    Although the term inclusive development is still rare in anthropological texts, it is a key element of anthropology’s relation to development. Concerns of in/exclusion, unequal power relations and (lack of) voice are central here. Anthropology’s encounter with development primarily focuses on a

  6. Culture, Education, Anthropology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Varenne, Herve

    2008-01-01

    This article argues that the anthropology of education must focus on what people do to educate themselves outside the constraints constituting the problematics of schooling. Anthropologists must do this precisely to fulfill their public role as legitimate participants in the conversations about understanding and transforming schooling. When…

  7. Educational Anthropology: An Overview.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Modiano, Nancy

    This paper attempts to summarize the state of the field of educational anthropology, as it relates to studies of educational institutions and processes. Major research done by anthropologists in three areas--school ethnographies, school-community contacts with ethnic minorities, and cognitive and linguistic development--is reviewed. Topics covered…

  8. Neuroanthropology or simply Anthropology?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Roepstorff, Andreas; Frith, Chris D

    2012-01-01

    Neuroanthropology is a new kid on the academic block. It seems to offer a methodological and conceptual synthesis, which bridges current fault lines within anthropology, both as discipline and as departments. We are not convinced that it will deliver on these grounds. However, it has the potential...

  9. Applied Anthropology in Broadcasting

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eiselein, E. B.

    1976-01-01

    Three different applied media anthropology projects are described. These projects stem from the broadcasters' legal need to know about the community (community ascertainment), the broadcasters' need to know about the station audience (audience profile), and the broadcasters' desire to change a community (action projects). (Author)

  10. Ethical, psychosocial and anthropological

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Ethical, psychosocial and anthropological. 1020 December 2013, Vol. 103, No. 12 (Suppl 1) SAMJ ... data, and even help with the analysis. Some groups raise money to support both basic and clinical ... ways, LPA is a particularly good model for how special interest patient support groups function. I gained additional insight ...

  11. English Language Publishing in Chemical Engineering Journals from an Indian Academic's Point of View--A Broad Scientific Perspective

    Science.gov (United States)

    Palit, Sukanchan

    2016-01-01

    Scientific vision and scientific understanding in today's world are in the path of new glory. Chemical Engineering science is witnessing drastic and rapid changes. The metamorphosis of human civilization in this century is faced with vicious challenges. Progress of Chemical Engineering science, the vision of technology and the broad chemical…

  12. Projects of scale-making: new perspectives for the anthropology of tourism Projectos de configuração de escala: novas perspectivas para a antropologia do turismo

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Patrick Neveling

    2009-11-01

    Full Text Available Scale has recently entered social anthropology as both a unit of analysis and a heuristic tool. This paper highlights the applicability to the anthropology of tourism of what has been identified as “projects of scale-making” by Tsing (2000 and respective “modes of incorporation” by Glick Schiller, Caglar and Guldbrandsen (2006. Because tourism is one of the central industries shaping present-day understandings of what is global and what is local, scale as a theoretical and methodological tool is ideally suited to study this field. Central concerns of anthropological research on tourism, such as the industry’s political economy, its influence on the perception of landscapes and culture as well as the problematic notion of authenticity, are reconsidered. We argue that central shortcomings of the globalisation debate, such as a teleologically-minded futurism, euphemistic notions of economic circulation and conflations of mundane and scientific debates, shape both the tourism industry and too many anthropological studies on tourism. In light of the contributions collected in this dossier this paper instead develops an analytical framework that highlights the hidden relations of production in tourism economies and the impacts of projects of scale-making on the construction of landscapes and culture.A escala foi recentemente incorporada na antropologia social como unidade de análise e ferramenta heurística. Este artigo centra-se naquilo que Tsing (2000 definiu como “projectos de configuração de escala” e nos respectivos “modos de incorporação” tal como explorados por Glick Schiller, Caglar e Guldbrandsen (2006, destacando a sua aplicabilidade à antropologia do turismo. Na medida em que o turismo é uma das indústrias centrais para a configuração das ideias actuais acerca do que é global e do que é local, a escala, enquanto instrumento teórico e metodológico, adequa-se de forma ideal ao estudo deste campo. Aspectos

  13. Cannibalism, kuru and anthropology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lindenbaum, Shirley

    2009-01-01

    This essay discusses the image and practice of cannibalism in a wide range of studies. It also presents the anthropological research on kuru which led to the proposal that cannibalism had enabled transmission of the infectious agent, as well as doubts about the hypothesis, and the assertion by some that cannibalism as a socially approved custom did not exist. The figure of the cannibal as an icon of primitivism took form in the encounter between Europe and the Americas. Cannibalism was to become the prime signifier of "barbarism" for a language of essentialized difference that would harden into the negative racism of the nineteenth century. Anthropological and medical research now challenge the derogatory image of the cannibal as we learn more about the many past consumers of human flesh, including ourselves.

  14. Post-truth anthropology

    OpenAIRE

    Mair, Jonathan

    2017-01-01

    Countless commentators have announced the advent of the post-truth era, but while everyone seems to be talking about it, there is little agreement about what it really means. This article argues that anthropology can make an important and distinctive contribution to understanding post-truth by treating it ethnographically. Commonly proposed explanations for post-truth include changes in political culture, in the structure of information in the digital age and universal cognitive weaknesses th...

  15. Virtual reality and anthropology

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Recheis, Wolfgang E-mail: wolfgang.recheis@uibk.ac.at; Weber, Gerhard W.; Schaefer, Katrin; Knapp, Rudolf; Seidler, Horst; Zur Nedden, Dieter

    1999-08-01

    Since the discovery of the Tyrolean Iceman in 1991 advanced imaging and post processing techniques were successfully applied in anthropology. Specific techniques include spiral computed tomography and 3-dimensional reconstructions including stereolithographic and fused deposition modeling of volume data sets. The Iceman's skull was the first to be reproduced using stereolithography, before this method was successfully applied in preoperative planning. With the advent of high-end graphics workstations and biomedical image processing software packages, 3-dimensional reconstructions were established as a routine tool for analyzing volume data sets. These techniques opened totally new insights in the field of physical anthropology. Computed tomography became the ideal research tool to access the internal structures of various precious fossils without damaging or even touching them. Many of the most precious specimens from the species Autralopithecus (1.8-3.5 Myears), Homo heidelbergensis (200-600 kyears) or Homo neanderthalensis (40-100 kyears) were scanned during the last 5 years. Often the fossils are filled with a stone matrix or other materials. During the postprocessing routines highly advanced algorithms were used to remove virtually these incrustations. Thus it was possible to visualize the morphological structures that lie beneath the matrix. Some specimens were partially destroyed, so the missing parts were reconstructed on computer screen in order to get estimations of the brain volume and endocranial morphology, both major fields of interest in physical anthropology. Moreover the computerized form of the data allows new descriptions of morphologic structures by the means of 'geometric morphometrics'. Some of the results may change aspects and interpretations in human evolution. The introduction of new imaging and post processing techniques created a new field of research: Virtual Anthropology.

  16. Fatherlessness in first-century Mediterranean culture: The historical Jesus seen from the perspective of cross-cuitural anthropology and cultural psychology

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andries van Aarde

    1999-01-01

    Full Text Available In the peasant sociey of Jesus' world the family revolved around the father. The father and the mother were the source of the family, not only in the biological sense, but because their interaction with their child rencreated the structures of society. In first-century Mediterranean culture, fatherlessness led to marginalization. Seen against the background of the patriarchal mind set of Israelites in the Second Temple period, a fatherless son would have been without social identiy. He would have been debarred from being called child of Abraham (that is child of God and from the privilege of being given a daughter in marriage. He would be denied access to the court of the Israelites in the Temple. In this article, with the help of cross-cultural anthropology and cultural psychology, the life of the historical Jesus is explained in social-scientiic terms against the background of the mariage regulations determined by the Temple. The historical Jesus is seen as someone who sufered the stigma of being fatherless but who trusted God as father.

  17. Annual Review of Anthropology, Volume 6, 1977.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Siegel, Bernard J., Ed.; And Others

    The book contains 20 essays which provide an overview of the state of the art in various areas of anthropology, including applied anthropology, archaeology, physical anthropology, ethnology, linguistics, and social anthropology. Most of the authors are professors and researchers from departments of anthropology or linguistics in United States…

  18. Medical anthropology: toward a third moment in social science?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dressler, W W

    2001-12-01

    This article about medical anthropology was inspired by the work of Pierre Bourdieu, specifically, his efforts to reconcile the antinomy of a "social structuralist" and a "cultural constructivist" perspective. These perspectives are often opposed in the literature, but, in Bourdieu's view, human life cannot be studied without taking into account both how individuals are situated within and constrained by social structures and how those individuals construct an understanding of and impose meaning on the world around them. I argue that the special subject matter of medical anthropology--human health--demands that a synthetic approach be taken in our theory and research. I illustrate this argument with examples from my own research on social and cultural factors associated with blood pressure, and I point to other examples of this synthesis in medical anthropology. The results of this research hold promise for the continuing refinement of culture theory.

  19. Council on Anthropology and Education Newsletter. Volume III, Number 1.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Singleton, John Ed.

    General information on format, included, materials, broad concerns, objectives, and availability of the newsletter are described in Volume I, ED 048 049. This issue focuses on ethnology, offering two papers presented at the American Anthropological Association symposiums. The lead paper presents a psycho-cultural developmental approach to the…

  20. Transforming Life: A Broad View of the Developmental Origins of Health and Disease Concept from an Ecological Justice Perspective.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prescott, Susan L; Logan, Alan C

    2016-11-03

    The influential scientist Rene J. Dubos (1901-1982) conducted groundbreaking studies concerning early-life environmental exposures (e.g., diet, social interactions, commensal microbiota, housing conditions) and adult disease. However, Dubos looked beyond the scientific focus on disease, arguing that " mere survival is not enough ". He defined mental health as fulfilling human potential, and expressed concerns about urbanization occurring in tandem with disappearing access to natural environments (and elements found within them); thus modernity could interfere with health via "missing exposures". With the advantage of emerging research involving green space, the microbiome, biodiversity and positive psychology, we discuss ecological justice in the dysbiosphere and the forces-financial inequity, voids in public policy, marketing and otherwise-that interfere with the fundamental rights of children to thrive in a healthy urban ecosystem and learn respect for the natural environment. We emphasize health within the developmental origins of health and disease (DOHaD) rubric and suggest that greater focus on positive exposures might uncover mechanisms of resiliency that contribute to maximizing human potential. We will entrain our perspective to socioeconomic disadvantage in developed nations and what we have described as "grey space"; this is a mental as much as a physical environment, a space that serves to insidiously reinforce unhealthy behavior, compromise positive psychological outlook and, ultimately, trans-generational health. It is a dwelling place that cannot be fixed with encephalobiotics or the drug-class known as psychobiotics.

  1. Transforming Life: A Broad View of the Developmental Origins of Health and Disease Concept from an Ecological Justice Perspective

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Susan L. Prescott

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available The influential scientist Rene J. Dubos (1901–1982 conducted groundbreaking studies concerning early-life environmental exposures (e.g., diet, social interactions, commensal microbiota, housing conditions and adult disease. However, Dubos looked beyond the scientific focus on disease, arguing that “mere survival is not enough”. He defined mental health as fulfilling human potential, and expressed concerns about urbanization occurring in tandem with disappearing access to natural environments (and elements found within them; thus modernity could interfere with health via “missing exposures”. With the advantage of emerging research involving green space, the microbiome, biodiversity and positive psychology, we discuss ecological justice in the dysbiosphere and the forces—financial inequity, voids in public policy, marketing and otherwise—that interfere with the fundamental rights of children to thrive in a healthy urban ecosystem and learn respect for the natural environment. We emphasize health within the developmental origins of health and disease (DOHaD rubric and suggest that greater focus on positive exposures might uncover mechanisms of resiliency that contribute to maximizing human potential. We will entrain our perspective to socioeconomic disadvantage in developed nations and what we have described as “grey space”; this is a mental as much as a physical environment, a space that serves to insidiously reinforce unhealthy behavior, compromise positive psychological outlook and, ultimately, trans-generational health. It is a dwelling place that cannot be fixed with encephalobiotics or the drug-class known as psychobiotics.

  2. The Anthropology of Nepotism

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kragh, Simon Ulrik

    2012-01-01

    Nepotism is widespread in organizations in developing countries but has so far received scant attention in cross-cultural management research. The paper seeks to contribute to the underdeveloped research topic suggesting an anthropological explanation of nepotism. It is argued that nepotism...... reflects the presence of tribal and peasant social morals in organizations where they replace norms and principles typical of industrial society. Examples from African and Latin American organizations show how nepotism works, and drawing on quantitative data it is suggested that nepotism is relatively...

  3. Anthropology that counts

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Vaaben, Nana Katrine

    Politicians request clear answers, big data is becoming a big thing, and whole industries have emerged around the ambition of “summing up what we know” in systematic reviews (James and Harden 2008). In this political climate, research funding has in Denmark been given to University Colleges...... professional practices in schools, hospitals, and other welfare institutions that has to “apply research”, or could it also be the political levels, that were subject to “applications”? In any case, anthropology becomes extremely political, and has to find a position between different ideological knowledge...

  4. Visual Culture and the anthropological insight

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ricardo Campos

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available With this paper we intend to reflect on the possibilities of a closer relationship between the discipline of Anthropology and the interdisciplinary field of Visual Culture. If it is true that, although residual, the presence of the visual sphere has always been a crucial feature in the history of anthropology, it also seems clear that the connection between image and this scientific discipline has been essentially constructed on the basis of a practical use of the visual technologies (photography, cinema, video. Thus the importance granted to the visual methodologies in fieldwork and the consequent production of visual documents (ethnographic films, photoessays, etc.. Currently the field of Visual Culture, forged at the crossroads of multiple disciplinary interests and assets, suggests that the visual dimension in human culture is highly complex, making way to new approaches informed by different perspectives and theoretical and methodological frameworks. In this context, we believe that anthropology, with its prime methodological practice - ethnography – has something to say. It can contribute to thicken the debates around human visuality, regarding essentially the social processes of visual production, sharing and consumption.

  5. International Journal of Modern Anthropology

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Some recent rigorous studies in anthropological research begin to provide new conclusions against some classic questionable considerations and /or show increasing tendency to do some syntheses of multidisciplinary data. The revelation of these two events marks the birth of a modern anthropology. The principal aim of ...

  6. Anthropology: Guide to Reference Sources.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mason, Mary G., Ed.

    More than 80 anthropology source materials concentrating on cultural and social anthropology are cited in this annotated bibliography. Materials, located in the McLennan Library at McGill University (Montreal), are listed according to type of material. Library of Congress call numbers are presented; dates of publication range from 1950 to 1985.…

  7. The Archaeological Record Speaks: Bridging Anthropology and Linguistics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Balari, Sergio; Benítez-Burraco, Antonio; Camps, Marta; Longa, Víctor M.; Lorenzo, Guillermo; Uriagereka, Juan

    2011-01-01

    This paper examines the origins of language, as treated within Evolutionary Anthropology, under the light offered by a biolinguistic approach. This perspective is presented first. Next we discuss how genetic, anatomical, and archaeological data, which are traditionally taken as evidence for the presence of language, are circumstantial as such from this perspective. We conclude by discussing ways in which to address these central issues, in an attempt to develop a collaborative approach to them. PMID:21716806

  8. Anthropological contributions to historical ecology: 50 questions, infinite prospects

    Science.gov (United States)

    McKechnie, Iain; Ekblom, Anneli; Szabó, Péter; Lane, Paul J.; McAlvay, Alex C.; Boles, Oliver J.; Walshaw, Sarah; Petek, Nik; Gibbons, Kevin S.; Quintana Morales, Erendira; Anderson, Eugene N.; Ibragimow, Aleksandra; Podruczny, Grzegorz; Vamosi, Jana C.; Marks-Block, Tony; LeCompte, Joyce K.; Awâsis, Sākihitowin; Nabess, Carly; Sinclair, Paul; Crumley, Carole L.

    2017-01-01

    This paper presents the results of a consensus-driven process identifying 50 priority research questions for historical ecology obtained through crowdsourcing, literature reviews, and in-person workshopping. A deliberative approach was designed to maximize discussion and debate with defined outcomes. Two in-person workshops (in Sweden and Canada) over the course of two years and online discussions were peer facilitated to define specific key questions for historical ecology from anthropological and archaeological perspectives. The aim of this research is to showcase the variety of questions that reflect the broad scope for historical-ecological research trajectories across scientific disciplines. Historical ecology encompasses research concerned with decadal, centennial, and millennial human-environmental interactions, and the consequences that those relationships have in the formation of contemporary landscapes. Six interrelated themes arose from our consensus-building workshop model: (1) climate and environmental change and variability; (2) multi-scalar, multi-disciplinary; (3) biodiversity and community ecology; (4) resource and environmental management and governance; (5) methods and applications; and (6) communication and policy. The 50 questions represented by these themes highlight meaningful trends in historical ecology that distill the field down to three explicit findings. First, historical ecology is fundamentally an applied research program. Second, this program seeks to understand long-term human-environment interactions with a focus on avoiding, mitigating, and reversing adverse ecological effects. Third, historical ecology is part of convergent trends toward transdisciplinary research science, which erodes scientific boundaries between the cultural and natural. PMID:28235093

  9. Anthropological contributions to historical ecology: 50 questions, infinite prospects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Armstrong, Chelsey Geralda; Shoemaker, Anna C; McKechnie, Iain; Ekblom, Anneli; Szabó, Péter; Lane, Paul J; McAlvay, Alex C; Boles, Oliver J; Walshaw, Sarah; Petek, Nik; Gibbons, Kevin S; Quintana Morales, Erendira; Anderson, Eugene N; Ibragimow, Aleksandra; Podruczny, Grzegorz; Vamosi, Jana C; Marks-Block, Tony; LeCompte, Joyce K; Awâsis, Sākihitowin; Nabess, Carly; Sinclair, Paul; Crumley, Carole L

    2017-01-01

    This paper presents the results of a consensus-driven process identifying 50 priority research questions for historical ecology obtained through crowdsourcing, literature reviews, and in-person workshopping. A deliberative approach was designed to maximize discussion and debate with defined outcomes. Two in-person workshops (in Sweden and Canada) over the course of two years and online discussions were peer facilitated to define specific key questions for historical ecology from anthropological and archaeological perspectives. The aim of this research is to showcase the variety of questions that reflect the broad scope for historical-ecological research trajectories across scientific disciplines. Historical ecology encompasses research concerned with decadal, centennial, and millennial human-environmental interactions, and the consequences that those relationships have in the formation of contemporary landscapes. Six interrelated themes arose from our consensus-building workshop model: (1) climate and environmental change and variability; (2) multi-scalar, multi-disciplinary; (3) biodiversity and community ecology; (4) resource and environmental management and governance; (5) methods and applications; and (6) communication and policy. The 50 questions represented by these themes highlight meaningful trends in historical ecology that distill the field down to three explicit findings. First, historical ecology is fundamentally an applied research program. Second, this program seeks to understand long-term human-environment interactions with a focus on avoiding, mitigating, and reversing adverse ecological effects. Third, historical ecology is part of convergent trends toward transdisciplinary research science, which erodes scientific boundaries between the cultural and natural.

  10. Critical Proximity as a Methodological Move in Techno-Anthropology

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Birkbak, Andreas; Petersen, Morten Krogh; Elgaard Jensen, Torben

    2015-01-01

    echno-Anthropology is a new field, operating with a broad range of methodologies and approaches. This gives rise to the question: What does it mean for Techno-Anthropological research to be critical? In this paper, we discuss this question by developing and specifying the notion of ‘critical...... work through two cases—one on the involvement of users in innovation projects and another on commercial web technologies for tracing issues—to show how critical proximity may be practiced. We sum up the lessons derived in four methodological guidelines for doing research with critical proximity....

  11. Contribution of anthropology to the study of climate change

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barnes, Jessica; Dove, Michael; Lahsen, Myanna; Mathews, Andrew; McElwee, Pamela; McIntosh, Roderick; Moore, Frances; O'Reilly, Jessica; Orlove, Ben; Puri, Rajindra; Weiss, Harvey; Yager, Karina

    2013-06-01

    Understanding the challenge that climate change poses and crafting appropriate adaptation and mitigation mechanisms requires input from the breadth of the natural and social sciences. Anthropology's in-depth fieldwork methodology, long engagement in questions of society-environment interactions and broad, holistic view of society yields valuable insights into the science, impacts and policy of climate change. Yet the discipline's voice in climate change debates has remained a relatively marginal one until now. Here, we identify three key ways that anthropological research can enrich and deepen contemporary understandings of climate change.

  12. Reduction and representation: the function(s of understanding and comparison in, and between, Anthropology and Literature

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sean O’ Dubhghaill

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available This article addresses the manner in which the anthropological and literary subjects are fashioned, imagined and transmitted to their audience, being mindful of the manner in which misunderstandings occur in this delicate transposition. It starts by reviewing the longstanding tension in anthropology between modish theoretical strains, which ethnography incorporates, and anthropological purists who believe that the input from extraneous disciplines cheapens the discipline and renders trivial studies conducted by previous generations of anthropologists. This work adopts a comparative stance borrowing from ethnographies, novels and conventional philosophical work, but the main focus relies on their fundamental comparability to anthropology, as well as the opposite. To close, some in-roads concerning the possibility of synthesising both perspectives are outlined whose special relevance to understanding anthropology is more contingent upon a shift in perspectives and disciplines which renders anthropology both a subject which seeks to understand as well as an understanding subject.

  13. Nonsecular Medical Anthropology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Whitmarsh, Ian; Roberts, Elizabeth F S

    2016-01-01

    A nonsecular medical anthropology insists on the ways medicine and science have constituted 'the secular' itself through the 'secular self'-how medical knowing has been used to craft the secular political subject. As James Boon noted, too often in social theory, "religion gets safely tucked away-restricted theoretically to 'meaning' rather than power" (1998:245). The authors of the six articles in this special issue 'untuck' religiosity from within the norms and numbers of medicine itself, and examine how 'secular' medicine has relied on religious traditions to produce political secularity. These articles demonstrate that 'secular' medicine relies on religious others whose exclusion bespeaks latent religious commitments of citizenship in the modern political realm of health.

  14. Anthropology and Multiple Modernities

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Thomassen, Bjørn

    to be unpacked and left behind. The debate was an essential part of a disciplininary reflexivity reconsidering anthropology’s epistemological and political roots in that very modernity. From the mid 1990s modernity was, somewhat surprisingly, reintroduced as a useful if not necessary conceptual tool......, as the concept was pluralized into a variety of forms: multiple modernities, parallel modernities, manifold modernities, alternative modernities, competing modernities, reflexive modernities, early modernities, other modernities – the list still unfolding. By reviewing various attempts to conceptualise...... as a discipline, and has important roots in Max Weber’s comparative sociology, elaborated for example by Shmul Eisenstadt. If anthropology, as Arjun Appadurai argues in Modernity at Large, wishes to contribute to a new social theory of modernity, it would need to tackle the theoretical luggage that the modernity...

  15. The anthropology of storytelling and the storytelling of anthropology

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rodolfo Maggio

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available These research notes concern what anthropologists currently do, and can do, with stories. Although pleas for narrative have become increasingly widespread in contemporary anthropology, an anthropologist of storytelling cannot but recognise that all anthropological production is to a certain extent a story. A question ensues: what kind of story is an ethnography? These research notes propose an answer by providing, first, a working definition of story tailored to this specific purpose. Secondly, they propound a brief illustration of the three main thematic interests of the anthropology of storytelling: the relational dynamics between the people involved in the storytelling situation; the content of the story, and the storytelling techniques. Thirdly, these aspects are examined in order to claim that an anthropology of storytelling among contemporary anthropologists is a necessary condition to respond concretely to the above-mentioned plea for narrative.

  16. Participant observation, anthropology methodology and design anthropology research inquiry

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gunn, Wendy; Buch Løgstrup, Louise

    2014-01-01

    Within the design studio, and across multiple field sites, the authors compare involvement of research tools and materials during collaborative processes of designing. Their aim is to trace temporal dimensions (shifts/ movements) of where and when learning takes place along different sites...... of practice. They do so by combining participant observation, anthropology methodology and design anthropology research inquiry engaging with practice based explorations to understand if methods and methodologies, understood as being central to anthropological inquiry, can be taught to interaction design...... engineering students studying in an engineering faculty and engineers working in an energy company. They ask how do you generate anthropological capacities with interaction design engineering students engaged in engineering design processes and employees of an energy company setting out to reframe...

  17. Annual Review of Anthropology. Volume 8, 1979.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Siegel, Bernard J., Ed.; And Others

    This book contains 23 essays which provide an overview of the state of the art in the discipline of anthropology, including applied anthropology, archaeology, ethnology, social anthropology, and linguistics. Most of the authors are professors and researchers from departments of anthropology in United States colleges and universities. Topics of the…

  18. Techno-Anthropology for Design

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Christensen, Lars Rune

    2013-01-01

    This chapter presents the principles of anthropology-driven design, explaining and examining the ideas and motivations behind basing technology design on ethnography and user participation. That is, anthropology-driven design is presented as a design process where analytical findings derived from...... ethnographic field studies are used in combination with participatory design techniques in order to promote democratic participation as well as mobilize the users knowledge as a resource in the design process. This ‘new move’ may be said to create new types of significant proximity between Anthropology......, Science and Technology Studies (STS), Moral Philosophy, Computer Supported Cooperative Work (CSCW), Participatory Design (PD) and a range of technical disciplines....

  19. TOWARDS AN ANTHROPOLOGICAL PSYCHIATRY

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Mooij, A.W.M.

    The situation of present day psychiatry is described as being dominated by an empiricist perspective. The limitations of this perspective are analyzed and a rough sketch of the hermeneutical approach in psychiatry is offered. It is argued that a fully developed hermeneutical psychiatry implies a

  20. Anthropological reading of science fiction

    OpenAIRE

    Ljiljana Gavrilović; Ivan Kovačević

    2016-01-01

    The paper gives an overview of the prevalence of the analysis of science fiction literature and science fiction in other segments of popular culture in Serbian anthropology. This overview is preceded by a consideration of science fiction as a genre while keeping in mind the fluidity of the genre and the interweaving of subgenres as well as the transformations which science fiction is undergoing in certain media (books, films, TV shows and video games). In Serbian anthropology research on scie...

  1. Design Anthropology in Participatory Design

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Smith, Rachel Charlotte; Gislev Kjærsgaard, Mette

    2014-01-01

    In this workshop we explore the opportunities of ethnography and design anthropology in Participatory Design (PD) as an approach to design in an increasingly global and digital world. Traditionally, ethnography has been used in PD to research real-life contexts and challenges, and as ways...... opportunities of using design anthropology as a holistic and critical approach to societal challenges, and a way for anthropologists and designers to engage in design that extends beyond the empirical....

  2. Thinking About Religious Texts Anthropologically

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Joel S. Kahn

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper addresses the conference themes by asking what contribution anthropology can make to the study of religious literature and heritage. In particular I will discuss ways in which anthropologists engage with religious texts. The paper begins with an assessment of what is probably the dominant approach to religious texts in mainstream anthropology and sociology, namely avoiding them and focussing instead on the religious ‘practices’ of ‘ordinary believers’. Arguing that this tendency to neglect the study of texts is ill-advised, the paper looks at the reasons why anthropologists need to engage with contemporary religious texts, particularly in their studies of/in the modern Muslim world. Drawing on the insights of anthropologist of religion Joel Robbins into what he called the “awkward relationship” between anthropology and theology, the paper proposes three possible ways in which anthropology might engage with religious literature. Based on a reading of three rather different modern texts on or about Islam, the strengths and weaknesses of each of the three modes of anthropological engagement is assessed and a case is made for Robbins’s third approach on the grounds that it offers a way out of the impasse in which mainstream anthropology of religion finds itself, caught as it is between the ‘emic’ and the ‘etic’, i.e. between ontologically different worlds.

  3. The significance of Calvin' s anthropology for preaching on ethical themes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    L. O.K. Lategan

    1998-01-01

    Full Text Available In this article the author highlights Calvin's anthropology. A main feature of this anthropology is his dualistic view on man. Calvin was very much influenced by the ancient Greek philosophy, which argued that man had two parts: a superior soul and an inferior body. The author argues that this perception is at odds with a Biblical image of man. According to the Bible no part of man is inferior or superior to any other part of his personhood. The article indicates that a Biblical perspective on anthropology will draw different conclusions in ethics compared to a dualistic perception of the nature of man. A correct appreciation of the anthropology of man is therefore needed to guide decisions in ethics, where the focus is constantly anthropological.

  4. An Anthropology of Luminosity

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bille, Mikkel; Sørensen, Tim Flohr

    2007-01-01

    This article addresses the relationship between light, material culture and social experiences. It argues that understanding light as a powerful social agent, in its relationship with people, things, colours, shininess and places, may facilitate an appreciation of the active social role...... of luminosity in the practice of day-to-day activities. The article surveys an array of past conceptions of light within philosophy, natural science and more recent approaches to light in the fields of anthropology and material culture studies. A number of implications are discussed, and by way of three case...... studies it is argued that light may be used as a tool for exercising social intimacy and inclusion, of shaping moral spaces and hospitality, and orchestrating movement, while working as a metaphor as well as a material agent in these social negotiations. The social comprehension of light is a means...

  5. Virtual anthropology meets biomechanics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weber, Gerhard W; Bookstein, Fred L; Strait, David S

    2011-05-17

    A meeting in Vienna in October 2010 brought together researchers using Virtual Anthropology (VA) and Finite Element Analysis (FEA) in order to explore the benefits and problems facing a collaboration between the two fields. FEA is used to test mechanical hypotheses in functional anatomy and VA complements and augments this process by virtue of its tools for acquiring data, for segmenting and preparing virtual specimens, and for generating reconstructions and artificial forms. This represents a critical methodological advance because geometry is one of the crucial inputs of FEA and is often the variable of interest in functional anatomy. However, we currently lack tools that quantitatively relate differences in geometry to differences in stress and strain, or that evaluate the impact on FEA of variation within and between biological samples. Thus, when comparing models of different geometry, we do not currently obtain sufficiently informative answers to questions such as "How different are these models, and in what manner are they different? Are they different in some anatomical regions but not others?" New methodologies must be developed in order to maximize the potential of FEA to address questions in comparative and evolutionary biology. In this paper we review these and other important issues that were raised during our Vienna meeting. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  6. Between art of movement and science of body: Short history of anthropology of dance

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Njaradi Dunja

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available The paper charts the development of dance anthropology from the beginner’s fascination with body techniques through the first scientific explanations of dance. The paper highlights the fact that the development of this branch of anthropology has been burdened with epistemological uncertainties and dilemmas. Hence, we could hardly talk about a consistent sub-discipline when looking at the approaches to dance in anthropology, but we always talk about mushrooming and interconnected traditions. Finaly, the paper will introduce two current and conflicting approaches to dance, textual and kinaesthetic, which open up old questions and dilemmas but which offer fresh perspectives as well.

  7. Contemporary Food Uses and Meanings from the Anthropology of Food in Latin-America and Spain

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Julián López García

    2017-02-01

    Full Text Available In this article we propose a review of the anthropology of food in Spain and Latin America from a recent historical perspective. The article analyzes the origin of the anthropology of food in Spain and in Latin America and the difficulties for the establishment of this specialty in the context of the sociocultural anthropology to the present day, and includes an overview of current and emerging subjects. The article is organized mainly around three axes that group the subjects and trends of professionals who have worked in this field: food heritage between locality and globalization; hunger and food deficiencies; and food symbolism and meaning.

  8. Globalización, salud y cultura: aspectos emergentes. Propuestas para el análisis desde la antropología social Globalisation, health and culture: emerging issues. Proposals for an analysis from a social anthropology perspective

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    José Palacios Ramírez

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available El propósito central de este artículo es presentar algunas reflexiones de carácter crítico sobre las relaciones entre las transformaciones en el campo de la salud y los procesos de globalización. Para ello partimos de los aportes de nuestra disciplina de origen, la Antropología social, pero también ocupan un papel central las teorías del filosofo francés M. Foucault. La idea es que estas reflexiones puedan abrir un espacio de debate con otros profesionales del campo socio-sanitario. En la primera parte el texto plantea el reto que supone pensar acerca de los nuevos procesos sociales ligados a la salud, debido a la aparición de modelos explicativos y de intervención en los cuales determinados aspectos que podríamos denominar "culturales" parecen haber pasado a ocupar un lugar central. Después pasa a sugerir, desde una perspectiva procesual las dinámicas emergentes que podrían estar tomando los procesos ahora globales de medicalización de la vida, tratando de apuntar sus paradojas, como el desbordamiento de los límites tradicionales de los saberes sanitarios y el ensamblaje de nuevas practicas que parecen traducir al campo medico realidades hasta ahora fuera de su alcance.The core proposal of this article is to present a series of reflections of a critical nature on the links between changes in the field of health care and processes of globalisation. A lot of our work is founded on our discipline of social anthropology; however, the theories of the French philosopher M. Foucault also play a central role in this paper. Our intention is that these reflections may contribute to subsequent debate among professionals in the social-health arena. The first part of this article talks about the challenge that supposes to think about the new social processes related to the health, due to the appearance of explanatory and interventional models, in which some aspects that we could denominate "cultural" seem to occupy a central place. Later

  9. Education science and biological anthropology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krebs, Uwe

    2014-01-01

    This contribution states deficits and makes proposals in order to overcome them. First there is the question as to why the Biological Anthropology--despite all its diversifications--hardly ever deals with educational aspects of its subject. Second it is the question as to why Educational Science neglects or even ignores data of Biological Anthropology which are recognizably important for its subject. It is postulated that the stated deficits are caused by several adverse influences such as, the individual identity of each of the involved single sciences; aspects of the recent history of the German Anthropology; a lack of conceptual understanding of each other; methodological differences and, last but not least, the structure of the universities. The necessity to remedy this situation was deduced from two groups of facts. First, more recent data of the Biological Anthropology (e.g. brain functions and learning, sex specificity and education) are of substantial relevance for the Educational Science. Second, the epistemological requirements of complex subjects like education need interdisciplinary approaches. Finally, a few suggestions of concrete topics are given which are related to both, Educational Science and Biological Anthropology.

  10. A Design Anthropology Critique of Active Aging as Ageism

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Linda Tonolli

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available This paper proposes a design anthropology critique of active aging as ageism in the design of information technologies for seniors. With ageism we refer to narratives coalesced around the label “active aging” in European policies and system design that focus on seniors as a homogeneous group of people in need of help. We discuss the findings of two empirical participatory design projects we have been dealing with: 1 a bottom­-up senior organization in a small village in a mountain area and 2 a series of workshops organized with seniors in an urban area. In both cases, the relations between the anthropologist and the people involved, prompted reflexive moments that brought anthropological relocations of the designers' perspective. In conclusion, we stress how such relocations could benefit participatory designs through the concept of design by subtraction and the adoption of a feminist perspective.

  11. Anthropological Studies of Popular Culture

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bojan Žikić

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available One of the questions raised at the symposium "Our World, Other Worlds. Anthropology, Science Fiction and Cultural Identity", held in Belgrade in December 2009, is how anthropology is to study contemporary art forms: how research issues are to be defined and approached; how research is to be organized in a specific semantic area, which cannot always and with absolute certainty be said not to be an anthropological construction; whether the subject of research can be said to have the shared nature of cultural communication; whether the anthropologist is to interpret the author/artist’s intention, or that which is produced as a result of that intention, etc. The aim of this paper is to suggest some answers to these questions, from the point of view of a researcher focused on cultural communication.

  12. Digital Visualities and Materialities: paths for an anthropological walk

    OpenAIRE

    Elisenda Ardèvol; Débora Lanzeni

    2015-01-01

    This paper discusses digital technologies from an anthropological perspective, concentrating on ways in which cultural diversity, social inequality and the possibilities of change and social transformation have been discussed. We examine the ways in which the digital domain has been conceived, categories used to describe processes of change and continuity in everyday life, and the impact of digital technology on these. this approach leads us to question up how ethnographers have explored the ...

  13. Japanese historic “timescapes”: An anthropological approach

    OpenAIRE

    Steger, Brigitte

    2017-01-01

    In this article, I propose a methodology to investigate “timescapes” in Japanese history from an anthropological perspective by analyzing historical sources on social activities, more specifically on sleeping and napping. It provides the methodological basis for a research project on premodern Japanese “timescapes” at the University of Cambridge. Rather than studying the social use of the clock to investigate the extent to which various time structures have penetrated people’s private lives, ...

  14. An Anthropology of Learning in Epistemic Cultures

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hasse, Cathrine

    2015-01-01

    I connect Karin Knorr-Cetina's concept of ‘epistemic cultures’ with an anthropological conceptualization of practice-based learning. The theory of practice-based learning I explore departs from the cultural psychologist Lev Vygotsky’s notion of word-meaning which can be seen as a basic unit...... of analysis in cultural historical activity theory. However in relation to practice-based learning it is necessary further to explore how newcomers learn to perceive ‘epistemic objects’ in a complex process where learning concerns how material artefacts and meaning are connected in actual doing as well......)actions. Following the practice-based cultural learning process of physicists students it become clear that processes of (de) selecting students are behind epistemic cultures. In this perspective epistemic cultures are dynamic processes of in – and exclusions, attraction and expulsion of materials, words...

  15. International Journal of Modern Anthropology: Journal Sponsorship

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    International Journal of Modern Anthropology: Journal Sponsorship. Journal Home > About the Journal > International Journal of Modern Anthropology: Journal Sponsorship. Log in or Register to get access to full text downloads.

  16. Archives: International Journal of Modern Anthropology

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Items 1 - 10 of 10 ... Archives: International Journal of Modern Anthropology. Journal Home > Archives: International Journal of Modern Anthropology. Log in or Register to get access to full text downloads.

  17. Reflections on the future of anthropology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sosa, Richard

    2009-12-01

    In his plenary session entitled Five Questions on the Future, Harvard anthropologist Arthur Kleinman capitalized on the 2009 Society for Medical Anthropology Conference's theme of Medical Anthropology at the Intersections to speculate on the future of the discipline.

  18. CULTURAL ANTHROPOLOGY AND THE INFRASTRUCTURE OF PUBLISHING

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    ELFENBEIN, TIMOTHY W

    2014-01-01

    The transition of Cultural Anthropology to an open‐access publication required that the Society for Cultural Anthropology take on the publishing responsibilities formerly fulfilled by Wiley‐Blackwell...

  19. People Recognition: A Historical/Anthropological Perspective

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. Ardila

    1993-01-01

    Full Text Available Using current neurological and neuropsychological literature, and the analysis of different cultural and historical conditions, people recognition is analyzed. Different “subsystems” or “modules” could be involved in individuals' recognition: living versus non-living, own species versus other species, familiar versus non-familiar, males versus females, and individual identification versus emotional identification. Not only visual, but also auditory and even olfactory information may be involved in people recognition. Visual information involved in people recognition is proposed to include not only the perception of faces, but also the perception of whole body and gait, clothes, emotional expressions, and individual marks.

  20. Anthropological and Ethnographic Methods and Sources

    OpenAIRE

    Smith, Constance

    2018-01-01

    For scholars of African history, anthropology offers a number of valuable and invigorating methodological avenues, from engaging directly in ethnographic fieldwork to analyzing anthropological data compiled by others. Given the asymmetries of written documents and the biases of archival material for Africa, anthropological methods and sources offer a different type of access to those who, for various reasons, tend not to appear in other forms of documentary record. But using anthropology is a...

  1. Comparative dimension of the anthropology of law

    OpenAIRE

    Ledvinka, Tomáš

    2011-01-01

    This article examines three comparative dimensions which need to be examined by anthropology of law with due prudence: the dimension of jurisprudence and anthropology, the dimension of legal systems and their structure, and the dimension of justice. These dimensions are confronted with recent diversion from comparison within anthropology and the validity of critiques of the comparison is demonstrated with respect to the development of the anthropology of law.

  2. Four lectures on legal anthropology - 2008

    OpenAIRE

    Macfarlane, Alan

    2008-01-01

    The lectures were given by Alan Macfarlane to second and third year students in Cambridge university department of social anthropology doing a special paper on Legal Anthropology in February 2008 Four lectures on aspects of legal anthropology. The first on law and justice in Japan; the second on moral panics and terrorism; the third on foundations and history of legal anthropology (part one); the fourth on the same (part two)

  3. Lectures on special topics in legal anthropology

    OpenAIRE

    Macfarlane, Alan

    2008-01-01

    The lectures were given by Alan Macfarlane to second and third year students in Cambridge University department of social anthropology doing a special paper on Legal Anthropology in February 2008. Four lectures on aspects of legal anthropology. The first on law and justice in Japan; the second on moral panics and terrorism; the third on foundations and history of legal anthropology (part one); the fourth on the same (part two)

  4. Disciplining the Discipline: Anthropology and the Pursuit of Quality Education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gonzalez, Norma

    2004-01-01

    Disciplinary knowledge in anthropology occupies a unique position in relation to quality education: anthropology in education and the anthropology of education. This essay differentiates between anthropology as a field, as a repository of content and disciplinary knowledge (anthropology in education), and anthropology as a tool, as a theoretical…

  5. Utopian Education and Anti-Utopian Anthropology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Papastephanou, Marianna

    2013-01-01

    This article explores the connection of education, utopia and anthropology, aiming to tease out some educational implications of anti-utopian anthropological essentialism and to show why these should be staved off. It will be shown how an anthropology that tarnishes human nature operates and how it affects educational intervention in the shaping…

  6. The Teaching of Visual Anthropology at Temple.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ruby, Jay; Chalfen, Richard

    The exploration of nonverbal forms of culture and communication has led to the development of visual anthropology courses within the anthropology department at Temple University. Visual anthropology is conceptualized as the study of human nonlinguistic forms of communication involving film making for data collecting and analysis. Several areas of…

  7. Pre-collegiate Anthropology: Trends and Materials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dynneson, Thomas L.

    This book is directed to educators who would like to see anthropology assume a greater role in the elementary and secondary curricula. Chapter One traces the growth in the importance of anthropology as a part of the school curriculum from the second world war to the present. Chapter Two discusses the reasons for including anthropology in the…

  8. Anthropology: A Student's Guide to Reference Sources.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Slavin, Suzy M., Comp.

    The guide identifies approximately 100 anthropology source materials in the reference department of McLennan Library at McGill University. It was designd to help students doing anthropological research and to illustrate the variety of materials on social and cultural anthropology in the McLennan Library. Physical anthropolgy, linguistics, and…

  9. Of sacraments, sacramentals and anthropology: is anthropological explanation sacramental?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Naraindas, Harish

    2017-12-01

    This paper suggests that what is usually called a cultural misunderstanding of biomedical disease categories may be construed as a biomedical and anthropological misunderstanding of cultural categories. This is premised on the fact that anthropology often functions as an intimate double and handmaiden of biomedicine, in so far as it refuses to countenance the possibility of theurgic aetiologies in the realm of what is called 'mental illness'. Such a refusal displaces native explanations of divine or demonic agency to human agency. This is best elucidated by examining the unexamined religious beliefs of Anglo-European anthropology, which appears to be the terra firma of its emic explanatory categories. The paper attempts to demonstrate this by proposing that while native explanations are akin to the sacraments, anthropological explanations are akin to sacramentals (holy water, the cross, the scapular, verbal blessings). While the sacraments, like divine agency, operate ex opere operato, the sacramentals are dependent on the disposition of the recipient and on the good offices of the church, as they operate ex opere operantis ecclesiae (from the work of the working church), as well as ex opere operantis (from the work of the working one). If the sacraments are efficacious as it is work done by Christ alone, and akin to work done by the possessing agent, sacramentals are efficacious as they are also dependent on human agency. In other words, anthropological explanations are, at best, 'sacramental' as they replace emic theurgic explanations by etic ones, where human agency in the form of the priest, the institution of the church, and the lay person who is the recipient of divine dispensation, also have a role to play; or, as is often the case, the only role to play.

  10. Anthropological Contributions to the Search for Extraterrestrial Intelligence

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vakoch, D. A.

    2009-12-01

    Three recent annual conferences of the American Anthropological Association (AAA) have included symposia on the Search for Extraterrestrial Intelligence (SETI). This paper reviews these symposia, which dealt with themes associated with the overarching AAA conference themes for each year: in 2004, the SETI session addressed Anthropology, Archaeology, and Interstellar Communication: Science and the Knowledge of Distant Worlds; in 2005, it dealt with Historical Perspectives on Anthropology and SETI; and in 2006, the session examined Culture, Anthropology, and SETI. Among the topics considered in these symposia were analogues for contact with extraterrestrial intelligence (ETI), examining anthropologists’ experience in the field encountering other cultures-past and present. Similarly, the methodologies of archaeologists provide analogies for making contact with temporally distant civilizations, based on reconstructions from fragmentary information. Case studies helped make such analogies concrete in the symposia. The challenges of comprehending intelligences with different mental worlds was explored through a study of the meetings of Neanderthals and Homo sapiens, for example, while the decryption of Mayan hieroglyphics provided lessons on understanding others of own species.

  11. Anthropology. SSEC Publication No. 106.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bohannan, Paul

    The major concepts, structure, and methods of anthropology are presented for persons concerned with teaching or constructing new curriculum approaches. Man is a mammalian, social, and cultural animal, who has needs that are satisfied through social relationships. Because these relationships are repetitive, they form a structure. This social…

  12. Anthropological reading of science fiction

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ljiljana Gavrilović

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available The paper gives an overview of the prevalence of the analysis of science fiction literature and science fiction in other segments of popular culture in Serbian anthropology. This overview is preceded by a consideration of science fiction as a genre while keeping in mind the fluidity of the genre and the interweaving of subgenres as well as the transformations which science fiction is undergoing in certain media (books, films, TV shows and video games. In Serbian anthropology research on science fiction is more prevalent than the study of other phenomena, as the number of anthropologists whose work is represented in the paper is fairly large compared to the size of the anthropological community as a whole. The causes for this can primarily be found in a collective focus on questions such as: who are we and who the others are, what the basis of creating and building identity is or what the role of context in recognition of species is. Anthropology gives answers to these questions through the interpretation, explanation and understanding of the world around us, while science fiction does it through the literary considerations of these same questions.

  13. Joint Attention and Anthropological Difference

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Urban, Petr

    2014-01-01

    Roč. 11, č. 1 (2014), s. 59-70 ISSN 1718-0198 R&D Projects: GA ČR GAP401/10/1164 Institutional support: RVO:67985955 Keywords : joint attention * anthropological difference * phenomenology * great apes * shared intentionality Subject RIV: AA - Philosophy ; Religion

  14. Allostatic load and biological anthropology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Edes, Ashley N; Crews, Douglas E

    2017-01-01

    Multiple stressors affect developing and adult organisms, thereby partly structuring their phenotypes. Determining how stressors influence health, well-being, and longevity in human and nonhuman primate populations are major foci within biological anthropology. Although much effort has been devoted to examining responses to multiple environmental and sociocultural stressors, no holistic metric to measure stress-related physiological dysfunction has been widely applied within biological anthropology. Researchers from disciplines outside anthropology are using allostatic load indices (ALIs) to estimate such dysregulation and examine life-long outcomes of stressor exposures, including morbidity and mortality. Following allostasis theory, allostatic load represents accumulated physiological and somatic damage secondary to stressors and senescent processes experienced over the lifespan. ALIs estimate this wear-and-tear using a composite of biomarkers representing neuroendocrine, cardiovascular, metabolic, and immune systems. Across samples, ALIs are associated significantly with multiple individual characteristics (e.g., age, sex, education, DNA variation) of interest within biological anthropology. They also predict future outcomes, including aspects of life history variation (e.g., survival, lifespan), mental and physical health, morbidity and mortality, and likely health disparities between groups, by stressor exposures, ethnicity, occupations, and degree of departure from local indigenous life ways and integration into external and commodified ones. ALIs also may be applied to similar stress-related research areas among nonhuman primates. Given the reports from multiple research endeavors, here we propose ALIs may be useful for assessing stressors, stress responses, and stress-related dysfunction, current and long-term cognitive function, health and well-being, and risk of early mortality across many research programs within biological anthropology. © 2017 American

  15. Applying anthropology in the development of former colonies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vladimir Ribić

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available From the sixth to the eight decade of the twentieth century, horizontally integrated and sector approach intermingled, and the renewed interest for the influence of development on the poor in the second half of the seventies, brought about the larger than ever engagement of anthropologists in developmental projects. In the twenties “sustainable” became the credo for development, and for anthropologists, cultural ecologists and human rights representatives, sustainability meant the capability of the people to preserve and maintained their mode of life. The usual stance is that developmental anthropology as a profession is constituted upon the general anthropology, and that one of its perspectives in relation to the development planning arises from the understanding of the process of birocratic decision making and the use of profound knowledge of cultures, institutions and historical trends in a particular country, as well as from the insights obtained from comparative studies of comparable institutions in other countries. The objective is to arrive to an unambiguous and anticipatory assessment of decisions-consequences relating to the distribution of resources, and the foremost trait of such perspective is the focus on, in a cultural pattern based, perceptions, goals, interests, strategies and organizations of the planned clients and members of other groups, including the elite and the administrators, whose cooperation is a precondition of change. On the other hand, anthropologists who reject such understandings of developmental anthropology, rebuff an occidental view of development as a historical necessity.

  16. [The dialogues between anthropology and health: contributions to public policies].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Langdon, Esther Jean

    2014-04-01

    In order to examine the development of anthropological paradigms and their dialogue with medicine, I divide the discussion into two general, but non-exclusive, approaches: one that focuses on health and disease as social and cultural experience and construction, and another that examines health from an interactional and political perspective. For the first approach, I focus on North American and French theories that find resonance in the anthropological dialogue in Brazil. For the second political approach, the discussion originates in the dialogue among anthropologists in Latin America who have been developing models to contribute to an interdisciplinary approach necessary for health policies and intervention in health. The concepts of practices in self-care and intermedicality, among others, are explored due to their contribution in anthropology to public policies in health. These anthropologists have argued that health practices should be understood through the notions of autonomy, collectivity, agency and praxis, as opposed to the notions of the biomedical perspective characterized as being universalist, biological, individualist and a-historical.

  17. Questioning the Search for Illness Narratives in Medical Anthropology: Can we talk about actual pain experiences?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Tørring, Marie Louise

    BACKGROUND: This critique stems from a self-experienced frustration with the perspectives offered by current medical anthropology, when faced with informants in severe, acute pain. AIM: By shifting between discussing former and current academic approaches to pain in anthropology and examining...... ethnographic data material, the aim of this paper is to re-evaluate our approach to people in pain. METHODS: The study is founded partly on seven months of ethnographic fieldwork conducted at postoperative pain units and surgical wards in Danish and Italian hospitals in 2003-2004, partly on a perusal...... of the anthropological literature on pain from the 1950's up to today. RESULTS: The anthropological focus on pain has changed considerably during the last century from exotic tales of cultural codes of pain behaviour to illness narratives of pain experience. This shift in focus not only mirrors changes in our profession...

  18. Forensic anthropology in Latin America.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Işcan, M Y; Olivera, H E

    2000-03-13

    Forensic anthropology has been one of the fastest growing medico-legal disciplines both in its contribution to the practical needs of the legal system and research accomplishments. New anthropological standards were developed to apply to a specific population of a region. The purpose of this paper is to analyze a large sample of anthropological forensic cases and to review pertinent literature that deals with anthropological standards developed for the population of the continent of Central and South America. Using Uruguay as an example, there was not a single office or anthropologist assigned to analyze human skeletal remains in Uruguay. In 1991 the Laboratorio de Antropología Forense at the Morgue Judicial of Montevideo was created. A total of 189 forensic anthropological cases (276 individuals) were analyzed since this date. Twenty six percent of cases involving human remains were positively identified. The majority came from the Departamento de Montevideo, the largest population district of the country. Most of the cases fell into the 60 to 69 years old age range (35%). Females represented 32% of the total. Since the establishment of the laboratory, the number of forensic cases increased considerably from 20 in 1991 to 40 in 1997. The case studies were accompanied with skull-photo superimposition and facial reconstruction when no other evidence for positive identification was available. This service provided by the laboratory was quickly known to coroners, law enforcement agencies, and other legal authorities and thus utilized not only in Uruguay but also in several other countries in the continent. Because of the obvious need for an anthropologist, there are now university programs to provide forensic anthropological education. Yet, research has lagged behind considerably. Deficiencies are obvious in basic osteological standards of estimating age, calculating stature, determining sex and assessing race that can be applied to populations of the continent

  19. Digital Visualities and Materialities: paths for an anthropological walk

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Elisenda Ardèvol

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper discusses digital technologies from an anthropological perspective, concentrating on ways in which cultural diversity, social inequality and the possibilities of change and social transformation have been discussed. We examine the ways in which the digital domain has been conceived, categories used to describe processes of change and continuity in everyday life, and the impact of digital technology on these. this approach leads us to question up how ethnographers have explored the relationships among local practices, global transits and digital technologies, and the material and visual aspects of the digital in cultural production and media communication. Finally, we discuss how to incorporate digital technologies in ethnographic practice and anthropological knowledge.

  20. Epistemological and Anthropological Thoughts About Neurophilosophy: An Initial Framework

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sonia París Albert

    2013-04-01

    Full Text Available Normal 0 21 false false false ES X-NONE X-NONE At the dawn of the twenty-first century, neurophilosophy appears as a branch of neurosciences. The aim of this article is to review critically some of the epistemological and anthropological debates which neurophilosophy is putting on question again. In this sense the philosophical research conducted by the UNESCO Chair of Philosophy for Peace will be used as the main thread of the analysis. To accomplish this critical review, the article has been organized into two parts: the first is of epistemological nature, and the second has an anthropological perspective. This analysis will lead us to question the significance of the contributions of neurophilosophy to a better understanding of the human being.

  1. Evidentiary standards for forensic anthropology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Christensen, Angi M; Crowder, Christian M

    2009-11-01

    As issues of professional standards and error rates continue to be addressed in the courts, forensic anthropologists should be proactive by developing and adhering to professional standards of best practice. There has been recent increased awareness and interest in critically assessing some of the techniques used by forensic anthropologists, but issues such as validation, error rates, and professional standards have seldom been addressed. Here we explore the legal impetus for this trend and identify areas where we can improve regarding these issues. We also discuss the recent formation of a Scientific Working Group for Forensic Anthropology (SWGANTH), which was created with the purposes of encouraging discourse among anthropologists and developing and disseminating consensus guidelines for the practice of forensic anthropology. We believe it is possible and advisable for anthropologists to seek and espouse research and methodological techniques that meet higher standards to ensure quality and consistency in our field.

  2. Design Anthropology in Participatory Design

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Smith, Rachel Charlotte; Kjærsgaard, Mette Gislev

    2015-01-01

    This focus section explores the opportunities of design anthropology in participatory design as an approach to research and design in an increasingly global and digital world. Traditionally, ethnography has been used in Participatory design to research real-life contexts and challenges, and as ways...... to involve people in defining user-needs and design opportunities. As the boundaries between diverse – material, digital and networked – spaces and experiences become increasingly blurred, so do the conventional distinctions between research and design. The papers presented in this focus section explore...... opportunities of using design anthropology as a holistic and critical approach to addressing societal challenges and change, and a way for anthropologists and designers to engage in participatory research and design that extend beyond the empirical....

  3. Design Anthropology in Participatory Design

    OpenAIRE

    Smith, Rachel Charlotte; Kjærsgaard, Mette Gislev

    2015-01-01

    This focus section explores the opportunities of design anthropology in participatory design as an approach to research and design in an increasingly global and digital world. Traditionally, ethnography has been used in Participatory design to research real-life contexts and challenges, and as ways to involve people in defining user-needs and design opportunities. As the boundaries between diverse – material, digital and networked – spaces and experiences become increasingly blurred, so do th...

  4. New Technologies—Old Anthropologies?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Levi Checketts

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available Eighty years ago, Nicholas Berdyaev cautioned that new technological problems needed to be addressed with a new philosophical anthropology. Today, the transhumanist goal of mind uploading is perceived by many theologians and philosophers to be dangerous due to its violation of the human person. I contrast transhumanist “patternist” views of the person with Brent Waters’s Augustinian view of the technological pilgrim, Celia Deane-Drummond’s evolutionary Thomistic view of humanity, and Francis Fukuyama’s insistence on the inviolability of “Factor X”. These latter three thinkers all disagree with the patternist position, but their views are also discordant with each other. This disagreement constitutes a challenge for people of faith confronting transhumanism—which view is to be taken right? I contend that Science, Technology and Society (STS studies can enrich our understanding of the debates by highlighting the transmutation of philosophical view into scientific theory and the intermingled nature of our forms of knowledge. Furthermore, I contend that STS helps Christians understand the evolution of their own anthropologies and suggests some prospects for future theological anthropology.

  5. Anthropological Component of Descartes’ Ontology

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    Anatolii M. Malivskyi

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available The purpose of the article is to outline and comprehend the Descartes’ theory about anthropological component of ontology as the most important part of his philosophy. The accomplishment of this purpose covers the successive solution of the following tasks: 1 review of the research literature concerning the problem of human’s presence and the individual nature of truth; 2 emphasize the ambivalence of the basic intention of his legacy; 3 justify the thesis about constitutivity of human’s presence and comprehend passions as the form of disclosure of ontology’s anthropological component. Methodology. The use of the euristic potential of phenomenology, postpositivism and postmodernism makes it possible to emphasize the multiple-layer and multiple-meaning classical philosophy works, to comprehend the limitation and scarcity of the naïve-enlightening vision of human nature and to look for a new reception of European classics that provides the overcoming of established nihilism and pessimism concerning the interpretation of human nature. Scientific novelty. It is the first time that anthropological component of Descartes’ ontology became an object of particular attention. It previously lacked attention because of following main reasons: 1 traditional underestimating of the fact of Descartes’ legacy incompleteness as an unrealized anthropological project and 2 lack of proper attention to the individual nature of truth. The premise for its constructive overcoming is the attention to ambivalence of the basic intention and the significance of ethics in the philosopher’s legacy. His texts and research literature allow confirming the constitutive nature of human’s presence and passions as the key form of disclosure of the ontology anthropological component. Conclusions. The established tradition of interpretation the Descartes’ philosophizing nature as the filiation process of impersonal knowledge loses its cogency these days. The

  6. ANTHROPOLOGICAL COMPONENT OF DESCARTES’ ONTOLOGY

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anatolii M. Malivskyi

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available The purpose of the article is to outline and comprehend the Descartes’ theory about anthropological component of ontology as the most important part of his philosophy. The accomplishment of this purpose covers the successive solution of the following tasks: 1 review of the research literature concerning the problem of human’s presence and the individual nature of truth; 2 emphasize the ambivalence of the basic intention of his legacy; 3 justify the thesis about constitutivity of human’s presence and comprehend passions as the form of disclosure of ontology’s anthropological component. Methodology. The use of the euristic potential of phenomenology, postpositivism and postmodernism makes it possible to emphasize the multiple-layer and multiple-meaning classical philosophy works, to comprehend the limitation and scarcity of the naïve-enlightening vision of human nature and to look for a new reception of European classics that provides the overcoming of established nihilism and pessimism concerning the interpretation of human nature. Scientific novelty. It is the first time that anthropological component of Descartes’ ontology became an object of particular attention. It previously lacked attention because of following main reasons: 1 traditional underestimating of the fact of Descartes’ legacy incompleteness as an unrealized anthropological project and 2 lack of proper attention to the individual nature of truth. The premise for its constructive overcoming is the attention to ambivalence of the basic intention and the significance of ethics in the philosopher’s legacy. His texts and research literature allow confirming the constitutive nature of human’s presence and passions as the key form of disclosure of the ontology anthropological component. Conclusions. The established tradition of interpretation the Descartes’ philosophizing nature as the filiation process of impersonal knowledge loses its cogency these days. The

  7. The aesthetic imaginary as an anthropological locus. Thinking an Anthropology based on Imaginary.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Patricia María Calvo

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available The process by which man is capable of creating beauty not only gives us a fruitive experience but also knowledge of our human nature. Therefore we intend to understand what epistemological possibilities a work of art opens and, ultimately, what we know of man through it and why. Out of an interdisciplinary and dialogical perspective, projected by authors as Adolphe Gesché and Hans-Georg Gadamer, among others, we propose that the imaginary world opened and established by art becomes a privileged locus for human knowledge. The imagery is the symbolic area built by the artists and the community, which influences and affects every member of it, and where the community builds its identity known.Key Words: Imaginary, aesthetics, poiésis, anthropology.

  8. Medical anthropology and the physician assistant profession.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Henry, Lisa R

    2015-01-01

    Medical anthropology is a subfield of anthropology that investigates how culture influences people's ideas and behaviors regarding health and illness. Medical anthropology contributes to the understanding of how and why health systems operate the way they do, how different people understand and interact with these systems and cultural practices, and what assets people use and challenges they may encounter when constructing perceptions of their own health conditions. The goal of this article is to highlight the methodological tools and analytical insights that medical anthropology offers to the study of physician assistants (PAs). The article discusses the field of medical anthropology; the advantages of ethnographic and qualitative research; and how medical anthropology can explain how PAs fit into improved health delivery services by exploring three studies of PAs by medical anthropologists.

  9. Controlled Vocabulary Standards for Anthropological Datasets

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Celia Emmelhainz

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available This article seeks to outline the use of controlled vocabulary standards for qualitative datasets in cultural anthropology, which are increasingly held in researcher-accessible government repositories and online digital libraries. As a humanistic science that can address almost any aspect of life with meaning to humans, cultural anthropology has proven difficult for librarians and archivists to effectively organize. Yet as anthropology moves onto the web, the challenge of organizing and curating information within the field only grows. In considering the subject classification of digital information in anthropology, I ask how we might best use controlled vocabularies for indexing digital anthropological data. After a brief discussion of likely concerns, I outline thesauri which may potentially be used for vocabulary control in metadata fields for language, location, culture, researcher, and subject. The article concludes with recommendations for those existing thesauri most suitable to provide a controlled vocabulary for describing digital objects in the anthropological world.

  10. [Cultural anthropology of traditional Chinese medicine].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wan, Xia; Liu, Jian-ping; Ai, Yan-ke; Li, Liu-ji

    2008-07-01

    Biological, psychological and sociological model of medicine substantializes the old model lacking the social humane attributes. The new medical model makes people take medical anthropology into research and highly evaluate traditional medical system. Cultural anthropology of traditional Chinese medicine (TCM) is part of medical anthropology with three major characteristics: wide research scope, specificity, and integration. It has developed its own research methods, such as field investigation, comprehensive inspection and comparison study. Cultural anthropology provides an efficient research method for TCM, and its application would further develop TCM theory and form comprehensive evaluation on TCM effects.

  11. Anthropological District. Notes for an anthropological study of the industrial districts

    OpenAIRE

    Michele Fontefrancesco

    2012-01-01

    The article discusses industrial district theory as objects of anthropological enquiry. Providing a review of the history of studies in industrial anthropology and industrial district theory, the articles explores extended case method and in the multi-sited ethnography as viable methodologies to make industrial district an object of anthropological research practice and epistemology.

  12. Misrepresentation of Science and Expertise: Reflecting on Half a Century of Indonesian Anthropology

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Irwan Abdullah

    2018-02-01

    Full Text Available Indonesian anthropology was founded in 1957 and developed since then in various universities. After more than fifty years of inhabiting these lecture halls, anthropology’s orientation as a science has transformed from a discipline that bestows on graduates the ability to think into one in which graduates are prepared for a career of conductingfield research ordered by others. This article reflects on the shifts that have occurred in anthropology, focusing on three of the field’s central figures in Indonesia: Koentjaraningrat, Masri Singarimbun, and Parsudi Suparlan. During the lives of these three pioneers, anthropology playeda central role in critically evaluating humanitarian projects, and as such anthropologists frequently served to protect the weak and marginal. Anthropologists were on the frontlines of every discussion regarding the future of the nation, enabling anthropological perspectives to be accommodated in policy. Today, anthropologists seem locked into their own academic spaces. The results of anthropological field research are often said to provide unique and interesting—but irrelevant—stories. This article recommends a fundamental transformation in the curriculum, allowing the politics of science to be reconsidered and reformulated to ensure anthropology maintains a central role in resolving future humanitarian problems.

  13. Rethinking Anthropologies in Central Europe for Global Imaginaries

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Červinková, Hana; Uherek, Zdeněk

    2014-01-01

    Roč. 12, 1/2 (2014), s. 89-90 ISSN 1212-4923 Institutional support: RVO:68378076 Keywords : rethinking anthropology * European anthropology * Prague * ethnography Subject RIV: AC - Archeology, Anthropology, Ethnology

  14. Influenza, anthropology, and global uncertainties.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Atlani-Duault, Laëtitia; Kendall, Carl

    2009-07-01

    The response to the novel H1N1 influenza (swine flu) pandemic has been overwhelmingly biological and epidemiological in scope. While plans are moving forward on a vaccine, few of the social effects of a truly massive global catastrophe-or the issues of communication, responding to predictable inappropriate reactions, preparation of populations for these effects, or using local population resources in the epidemic-have been well considered. Anthropology can play an important and underutilized role in planning and responding to influenza and other global emergencies. This editorial discusses these issues and makes some preliminary recommendations.

  15. Mitochondria in anthropology and forensic medicine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grzybowski, Tomasz; Rogalla, Urszula

    2012-01-01

    Mitochondria's role in crucial metabolic pathways is probably the first answer which comes to our minds for the question: what do these tiny organelles serve for? However, specific features of their DNA made them extremely useful also in the field of anthropology and forensics. MtDNA analyses became a milestone in the complex task of unraveling earliest human migrations. Evidence provided by these experiments left no doubts on modern humans origins pointing to Africa being our cradle. It also contributed to interpretation of putative ways of our dispersal around Asia and Americas thousands years ago. On the other hand, analysis of mtDNA is well established and valuable tool in forensic genetics. When other definitely more popular markers give no answer on identity, it is the time to employ information carried by mitochondria. This chapter summarizes not only current reports on the role of mitochondria in forensics and reconstruction of modern humans phylogeny, but also calls one's attention to a broad range of difficulties and constraints associated with mtDNA analyses.

  16. Anthropological rabbits” and “positivistic ducks”: An experiential ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    New Testament scholar from the University of South Africa) has made in his book on the historical Jesus, The life of a Galilean shaman: Jesus of Nazareth in anthropological-historical perspective (2008). In the book traits of the “shamanic ...

  17. Anthropological Approaches to the Study of Housing Areas: Lessons from Oaxaca City, Mexico.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Murphy, Arthur D.

    The anthropological study of the city's role in the evolution of human systems requires the use of both macro and micro levels of analysis. From the macro perspective, the city is viewed as part of a wider complex society, while from the micro point of view, the city provides the context for understanding specific human institutions or processes…

  18. An Anthropological View of Educational Communications and Technology: Beliefs and Behaviors in Research and Theory.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yeaman, Andrew R. J.

    1990-01-01

    Examines the paradigmatic status of educational communications and technology from a cultural anthropology perspective. Kuhn's model is described, cultural evolution is discussed, emic and etic operations are described, and the schism between researchers and practitioners in educational communications and technology is considered. (32 references)…

  19. Identity and dignity within the human rights discourse: An anthropological and praxis approach

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Daniel J. Louw

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available The theological discourse mostly focuses on the moral and ethical framework for human rights and human dignity. In order to give theological justification to the value and dignity of human beings, most theologians point to the imago Dei as theological starting point for the design of an anthropology on human dignity. Within the paradigmatic framework of democracy, human dignity and human rights have become interchangeable concepts. This article aimed to focus not on ethics but on aesthetics: man as homo aestheticus, as well as the praxis question regarding the quality of human dignity within the network of human relationships. It was argued that human dignity is more fundamental than human rights. Dignity as an anthropological construct should not reside in the first place in the imago Dei and its relationship to Christology and incarnation theology. Human dignity, human rights and human identity are embedded in the basic human quest for meaning (teleology. As such, human dignity should, in a practical theological approach to anthropology, be dealt with from the aesthetic perspective of charisma, thus the option for inhabitational theology. As an anthropological category, human dignity should be viewed from the perspective of pneumatology within the networking framework of a �spiritual humanism�. In this regard, the theology of the Dutch theologian A.A. van Ruler, and especially his seminal 1968 work Ik geloof, should be revisited by a pneumatic anthropology within the parameters of practical theology.

  20. Teaching Anthropology Is a Good Way to Teach Writing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, Douglas Bradley

    1977-01-01

    Suggests that an undergraduate writing course which focuses on the literature of anthropology and intercultural communication can effectively teach anthropology, writing, and the philosophy of rhetoric. (DD)

  1. THE DEMAND FOR A NEW CONCEPT OF ANTHROPOLOGY IN THE EARLY MODERN AGE: THE DOCTRINE OF HUME

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. M. Malivskyi

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available Purpose. The purpose of the investigation is to outline the main points of Hume’s interpretation of the basic anthropological project of the era based on radical cultural transformations of the early modern age; to represent a modern vision of Hume's anthropology as a response to the demand of the era and necessity to complete its basic project. Methodology. The research was based on phenomenological and hermeneutic approaches. Originality. Contemporary understanding of the position of anthropological project in Hume's philosophy is regarded as unsatisfactory by the author. Development of the basic project as anthropological is rooted in scientific revolution and needs to be continued and completed. Contemporary prevalence of deanthropogical versions of Hume's philosophy is the result of underestimated significance of the concept of nature in the broad sense. According to the philosopher's texts, heuristic potential of Hume's position is emphasized by the author. The modern version of the basic project in the early modern age is criticized and demands significant changes to become anthropological. Findings. Modern perception of Hume’s philosophy as an anthropological project is unsatisfactory in terms of historical and philosophical science and needs detailed analysis. In order to understand the conditions of anthropological project significance, it is advisable to focus on: a scientific revolution and the necessity to complete it; b determine the role of the concept of nature in its broad sense. Nowadays the way of Hume's rethinking of the basic project of modern philosophy as insufficiently anthropological is quite heuristic. Empiricism, dogmatism, superstition and skepticism are the manifestations of the latter. For Hume, the era was as an incomplete anthropological project and its legacy as the most complete form of explication. Today the interest in the phenomenon of a human provides a reasonable basis to define that modern period is

  2. International Journal of Modern Anthropology: Submissions

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    ... which provide only the first information of discoveries in Biological Anthropology and in all aspects of basic Human Biology or in Medical Anthropology such as discoveries expanded from popular traditional medicine. Thus, authors could publish the corresponding detailed results in a second original article or in a patent.

  3. Engaging the World of the Supernatural: Anthropology ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    ... becomes less clear-cut, with the ambiguous status of positivism in the social sciences making scientific rationalism more of a shaky foundation than a pillar of social science. The weaknesses inherent in scientific rationalism are most exposed within the context of anthropology, and particularly in the anthropological study ...

  4. Anthropology, Phenomenology and the Limitations of Scientific

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    denise

    making scientific rationalism more of a shaky foundation than a pillar of social science. The weaknesses inherent in scientific rationalism are most exposed within the context of anthropology, and particularly in the anthropological study of the supernatural, or supernatural beliefs. This paper will attempt to point out some of ...

  5. Integrating Anthropology in Elementary Social Studies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zachlod, Michelle

    2000-01-01

    Discusses how anthropology can be integrated into the social studies classroom focusing on second and fifth grade levels. Demonstrates how different subject areas can be integrated with anthropology, such as history, geography, science, mathematics, and art. Covers topics such as foods, American Indian folklore, moonsticks, and myths and legends.…

  6. Bibliography of Methods in Cultural Anthropology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dow, James, Comp.

    Over 300 resources on methods in cultural anthropology are listed under the following headings: archaeological methods; visual methods, tape recordings, and technical aids; cognitive anthropology and emic methods; community studies and complex societies; cross-cultural and hologeistic methods; ethnohistory; field work techniques and participant…

  7. ANTH1010 - Cultural Anthropology, Fall 2004

    OpenAIRE

    Crapo, Richley

    2004-01-01

    This course covers the basic areas of anthropology including biological evolution, the prehistoric evolution of early civilizations, language, culture and social life, and the analyses of the nature and variability of human institutions. However, the components that deal with cultural anthropology are heavily emphasized.

  8. Three Bibliometric Analyses of Anthropology Literature.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hider, Philip M.

    1996-01-01

    Describes three bibliometric analyses of articles in the United Kingdom anthropology journal, "Man," focusing on forms of materials cited; relative age of cited publications; and presentation history of articles. Discusses the applicability of bibliometric studies to anthropology librarianship, outlining problems and benefits. (AEF)

  9. INFORMATIZATION: PHILOSOPHICAL AND ANTHROPOLOGICAL PROBLEMS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. A. Kosolapov

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available Purpose.Computerization and informatization in recent decades gave the mankind automated electronic document management systems, automated process of production, Internet and network information resources WWW, expanded the communications capabilities and led to the globalization of the information society. At the same time gives rise to a number of processes of informatization philosophical and anthropological problems, that has become an existential character. It is necessary to identify and understanding of these issues on the basis of the gnoseological model of the evolution informatization paradigms and determine their main characteristics. Methodology. The system-activity approach was used; it allowed identifying and analyzing the impact of the main components of information and communication technologies (ICT for educational activities. And further to present them as a unified system of human activity in conditions computerization/informatization. The philosophical principles: a comprehensive review of the subject, the unity of the logical and historical, ascending from the abstract to the concrete was used. The general scientific principles: unity and development of the system, the decomposition hierarchy, individualization and cooperation, diversity and taxonomy were applied. Findings.The three-stage gnoseological model of the paradigms computerization/informatization evolution was proposed by the author. It is based on three information system characteristics: speed, interface and data access. The seven-bar anthrop-centric model, which is called the architecture of information systems (AIS, which describes the changes in their types of procuring, was proposed for each paradigm. The philosophical-anthropological problems that affect negatively its progress were formulated for each stage of modern information society transformation. Originality. The gnoseological model of development processes of informatization in the form of three

  10. ANTHROPOLOGICAL TEACHINGS: The possibility of apprehension of the Other in Journalism

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cláudia Lago

    2010-06-01

    Full Text Available This paper intends to deepen the comprehension regarding theapprehension of the Other in the journalistic field, based on reflections on Anthropology, its specificity and field work. It results from the presupposition that Journalism plays a determining role in the structure and extension of democracy and citizenship and that its social responsibility, commonplace within the values of the field (LAGO, 2003 can only be fulfilled with the incorporation of otherness as a reference. Based on the comparison of how these different fields position themselves with relation to the Other, it seeks to perceive how to incorporate into Journalism elements of the anthropological perspective.

  11. ANTHROPOLOGICAL TEACHINGS: The possibility of apprehension of the “Other” in Journalism

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cláudia Lago

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available This paper intends to deepen the comprehension regarding the apprehension of the Other in the journalistic field, based on reflections on Anthropology, its specificity and field work. It results from the presupposition that Journalism plays a determining role in the structure and extension of democracy and citizenship and that its social responsibility, commonplace within the values of the field (LAGO, 2003 can only be fulfilled with the incorporation of otherness as a reference. Based on the comparison of how these different fields position themselves with relation to the Other, it seeks to perceive how to incorporate into Journalism elements of the anthropological perspective.

  12. Anthropological teachings: the possibility of apprehension of the “Other” in Journalism

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cláudia Lago

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available This paper intends to deepen the comprehension regarding the apprehension of the Other in the journalistic field, based on reflections on Anthropology, its specificity and field work. It results from the presupposition that Journalism plays a determining role in the structure and extension of democracy and citizenship and that its social responsibility, commonplace within the values of the field (LAGO, 2003 can only be fulfilled with the incorporation of otherness as a reference. Based on the comparison of how these different fields position themselves with relation to the Other, it seeks to perceive how to incorporate into Journalism elements of the anthropological perspective.

  13. History and future of visual anthropology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Svilicić, Niksa

    2011-03-01

    Visual recording of communication processes between communities or individuals by means of filming of photographing is of significant importance in anthropology, as it documents on site the specific features of various social communities in their encounter with the researcher. In terms of film industry, it is a sort of ethno-documentary pursuing originality and objectivity in recording the given subject, thus fulfilling the research mission. However, the potential of visual anthropology significantly exceeds the mere audiovisual recording of ethnologic realities. Modern methods of analysing and evaluating the role of visual anthropology suggest that it is a technical research service aimed at documenting the status quo. If the direction of proactive approach were taken, then the term ,visual anthropology' could be changed to ,anthropology of the visual,. This apparently cosmetic change of name is actually significantly more accurate, suggesting the denoted proactive swift in perceiving visual anthropology, where visual methods are employed to ,provokeanthropology of the visual, is promoted to a new scientific sub-anthropological discipline.

  14. Cultural Relevance and Educational Issues: Readings in Anthropology and Education.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ianni, Francis A. J., Ed.; Storey, Edward, Ed.

    The recent activity of anthropologists whose primary interest are in education and of educators whose orientation is anthropological suggests this division of labor: The first division, "anthropology and education," is the most expansive and the least specific. A second, "anthropology in education," concerns the anthropological presence, whether…

  15. Digital-Visual-Sensory-Design Anthropology: Ethnography, Imagination and Intervention

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pink, Sarah

    2014-01-01

    In this article I outline how a digital-visual-sensory approach to anthropological ethnography might participate in the making of relationship between design and anthropology. While design anthropology is itself coming of age, the potential of its relationship with applied visual anthropology methodology and theory has not been considered in the…

  16. Violência e impunidade em pauta: problemas e perspectivas sob a ótica da antropologia forense no Brasil Violence and impunity in check: problems and perspectives under the optics of the forensic anthropology in Brazil

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andrea Lessa

    2009-12-01

    Full Text Available A antropologia forense tem desempenhado um importante papel no combate à violência e à impunidade em muitos países do mundo. Apesar da sua reconhecida competência para lidar com restos humanos esqueletonizados, uma pesquisa realizada em delegacias de Polícia Civil e em institutos médico-legais de seis capitais brasileiras demonstrou o quanto a sua prática tem sido negligenciada. Os principais problemas apontados pela pesquisa são a falta de capacitação específica entre os profissionais que realizam as perícias em campo e laboratório, além da necessidade de implementação de um banco de dados de pessoas desaparecidas com informações de interesse antropológico. Como resultado desta situação, um número expressivo de cadáveres sai das instituições periciais sem identificação positiva e inquéritos policiais sobre homicídios permanecem sem resolução, contribuindo para o agravamento do quadro de impunidade e violência que assola o país.Forensic anthropology is playing an increasingly important role facing violence and impunity in many countries. A research performed at police stations of Civil Police and Forensic Institutes of six Brazilian capitals demonstrated that the practice of recover and positive identification of human remains has been neglected in different levels. The main problem is the lack of specific training of the professionals that accomplish the expertise in field and laboratory, but also the fact that no anthropological database of disappeared people is available. As a result of this situation, an expressive number of human remains leave the forensic institutes without positive identification, and criminal inquiries of homicides stay without resolution, contributing to the aggravation of the violence and impunity scenery that devastates the country.

  17. Architectural anthropology – potentials and pitfalls of mixing disciplines

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Stender, Marie

    approaches to e.g. understand and involve users, clients and citizens. Several other disciplines currently also approach and embrace anthropological methods, and new sub-disciplines such as design anthropology, architectural anthropology, business anthropology and techno-anthropology have emerged...... these cross-disciplinary and applied settings, and how it may contribute to anthropology in general. Based on research and teaching in the field of architectural anthropology, the paper discuss the potentials and pitfalls of mixing approaches from the two disciplines using examples of architects’ approaches...

  18. Theology in the flesh – a model for theological anthropology as embodied sensing

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jacob Meiring

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available The author proposes a model for theological anthropology as embodied sensing that is based on an interdisciplinary exploration of the corporeal turn from a southern African perspective. The work of James B. Nelson is acknowledged, stating that body theology starts with the concrete, the bodily expressions of life and not with doctrines about God and humanity. The theological anthropology of David H. Kelsey is evaluated as a theological anthropology with a sentiment of the flesh. Based on clearings in the work of David Kelsey and an interdisciplinary research, the author proposes a model for theological anthropology as embodied sensing which functions within the intricate and complex connection of the living body, language and experiencing in a concrete lifeworld with an openness to the ‘more than’. The author considers the use of bodymapping within narrative therapy as a way in which to uncover the intimate and intricate connection between the living body, experience and language, and implementing insights from theological anthropology as embodied sensing.

  19. Theology in the flesh – a model for theological anthropology as embodied sensing

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jacob Meiring

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available The author proposes a model for theological anthropology as embodied sensing that is based on an interdisciplinary exploration of the corporeal turn from a southern African perspective. The work of James B. Nelson is acknowledged, stating that body theology starts with the concrete, the bodily expressions of life and not with doctrines about God and humanity. The theological anthropology of David H. Kelsey is evaluated as a theological anthropology with a sentiment of the flesh. Based on clearings in the work of David Kelsey and an interdisciplinary research, the author proposes a model for theological anthropology as embodied sensing which functions within the intricate and complex connection of the living body, language and experiencing in a concrete lifeworld with an openness to the ‘more than’. The author considers the use of bodymapping within narrative therapy as a way in which to uncover the intimate and intricate connection between the living body, experience and language, and implementing insights from theological anthropology as embodied sensing.

  20. [Contribution of Stein's Anthropology to Personalistic Bioethics].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Robles Morejón, Jeannette Beatriz

    2016-01-01

    Dr. Juan Manuel Burgos proposes ″a challenge″ to whom aims to consolidate the dignity of the human person as the center of a thought structure. Burgos presents a well-founded trilogy, citing Wojtyla, Sgreccia and he himself, as a perfect combination to support personalist bioethics. However, the possibility of giving a solid anthropological support to this bioethics remains open provided that a substantial list of personalistic authors is revised. This research seeks to collate Stein's anthropological proposal to personalist bioethics needs expressed by Burgos. The study aims to prove how Stein's anthropology can be assembled to the characteristics of personalism, and thus infer that more specific levels of the personalist bioethics can be based on this anthropology.

  1. Medical anthropology enters the 21st century.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Young, Allan; Rees, Tobias

    2011-08-01

    Medical anthropology is the smallest and perhaps least understood of the social and behavioral sciences of medicine. In this article, we indicate what makes the field distinctive and describe significant developments during the past two decades.

  2. Staging as a Methodological Tool for Anthropology

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Miren Urquijo

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available My theatrical background has conditioned my approach to anthropology. This dramaturgical focus in the study of social life has encouraged the articulation of my theatrical and anthropological experience in staging. This paper explains how and why this is a valid tool for anthropology and for the performative study of the gender system, the assessment of the role of normativity and social structure in its representation. I have experimented with and expressed the process of constructing a dramaturgical and anthropological logic as an autobiographical exercise. The social theories which have influenced me include dynamic situationism, dynamic interactionism and constructivist theories which address the body as social fiction. With all of this, I have elaborated an interpretative strategy for the description, analysis and perception of reality. Publishing it means sharing it and submitting it to evaluation.

  3. Between Design and Anthropology: Improvising Embodied Interaction

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Halse, Joachim

    2013-01-01

    pillars Segno, Mythus and Techne. Anthropological design research is trans-disciplinary, developing in the connexion between Visual Culture (signal, in/visibility, image/void, imagination, representation), Doing Culture (act, cooperation, relation, fabrication, exchange), Material Culture (object......D.A.» represents a cultural science handbook of «Design Anthropology», providing an epistemology, phenomenology and survey of the varieties of the extended concept of design. Here the design concept is placed at the centre of the nexus of meaning of cultural production that rests on the three......). It is only against this background that the complex anthropological dimension of Design Culture can be understood, extending far beyond the horizon of a design science concept of design, industry-near design thinking and marketing, or a product-oriented concept of manufacture. «Design Anthropology...

  4. Anthropology and addiction: an historical review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Singer, Merrill

    2012-10-01

    This paper reviews the world anthropology of drugs and alcohol use literature, identifying key issues addressed by anthropologists, methods and theoretical models in use, trends in focus over time and future directions. Papers and books that comprise the literature were identified through computer search using the keywords: ethnography of drug use (and variants, e.g. drug ethnography, qualitative approaches in drug research), ethnography of drinking, anthropology and drug use, and anthropology and drinking. Search engines included Google Scholar, EBSCOHost, AnthroSource and PubMed. Identified sources were read and integrated into the review. The literature search identified a rich and growing literature on the anthropology of drinking and drug use. The research and published literature on the anthropology of drug use has grown and diversified since the 1970s, found acceptance in the wider multi-disciplinary domain of alcohol and drug studies and developed beyond the socio-cultural model to include life-style, critical medical anthropology and experiential explanatory models. Anthropological research has helped to shape the field of addiction science, e.g. ethnographic studies show that the lived worlds and self-identities of drug users have cultural order and socially constructed purpose and meaning, and experiential research shows that some addictions or aspects of addictions can be affirmative, creative and sustainable, at least at the individual level. The human immunodeficiency virus/acquired immune deficiency syndrome pandemic has significantly increased anthropological research on drug-related issues world-wide. © 2012 The Author, Addiction © 2012 Society for the Study of Addiction.

  5. [Anthropology at the heart of medicine].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vidal, Laurent

    2008-10-01

    Anthropology and medicine share many concerns, but have had trouble collaborating in the past. The anthropologist has had to plead both with his colleagues and physicians to move beyond a vision that would confine him to the study of traditional or alternative medicines and representations of populations and the sick. The anthropologist's approach perceived as intrusive has also raised fears in the medical world. These reciprocal misunderstandings and stereotypes need to be overcome by an anthropology that studies the practices and knowledge of modern medicine as they are elaborated daily. Anthropology will dialogue with medicine without judging it. In its turn, medicine will open its sites of healing and teaching to the anthropologist. Anthropology at the heart of medicine is organized around the idea that the paths and expectations of health professionals reflect the specicifities of the local system of health. The individual dimensions of practices cannot be divorced from the functioning of structures of health and decision. Finally, like any other kind of anthropology, medical anthropology must scrutinize its own methods and ethics in a critical way.

  6. Techno-Anthropological Sensibilities in Health Informatics

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bossen, Claus

    2015-01-01

    What kind of knowledges, skills and competences may be required by Techno-Anthropology engaging with health informatics? If we understand Techno-Anthropology to mean conducting anthropological analyses of the interwoven and mutually shaping relationship between organizing, technologies and actors....... The chapter points at three issues that seem to be central foundations for appropriate and quality-driven research and interventions of the ‘quick and proper’ kind: Modes of engagement; characteristics of the healthcare sector; and medical informatics and work.......What kind of knowledges, skills and competences may be required by Techno-Anthropology engaging with health informatics? If we understand Techno-Anthropology to mean conducting anthropological analyses of the interwoven and mutually shaping relationship between organizing, technologies and actors...... and determine social development, whereas detailed studies reveal that determinants and causes are both technical and social. The challenges include the one of making one's knowledge and skills legitimate and relevant to health informatics. Having a degree from arts or social sciences is not necessarily...

  7. Medical practice and anthropological bias.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bolton, J

    1995-06-01

    The purpose of this article is twofold: to describe some of the biases common to anthropological investigations of healing, particularly Biomedical healing; and to suggest that the physician-anthropologist is uniquely positioned to avoid some of these biases and to make valid contributions to the understanding of the practice of healing. Biases described are methodological (the tendency to formal-symbolic analyses rather than practical-instrumental understanding of behavior, transference and the observer effect), ontological (due to the estrangement of the anthropologist from his culture, other disciplines and his subjects, romanticization of the Other and celebration of the exotic over the mundane), and conventional or stylistic (the minimal importance given to emotional or psychological aspects of behavior, the emphasis on visual and linguistic understanding over other forms of investigation, unsophisticated use of medical texts as an indicator of clinical practice, a characteristic mode of reductionism, and the failure to elicit the responses of the subjects to interpretations made by anthropologists). As native-ethnographer, the M.D./Ph.D. physician-anthropologist may avoid some of these biases and offer complementary interpretations of healing.

  8. Techno-Anthropological Sensibilities in Health Informatics: Opportunities and challenges.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bossen, Claus

    2015-01-01

    What kind of knowledges, skills and competences may be required by Techno-Anthropology engaging with health informatics? If we understand Techno-Anthropology to mean conducting anthropological analyses of the interwoven and mutually shaping relationship between organizing, technologies and actors in healthcare, such engagements and interventions can take many forms: Short-term consultancy work dedicated to achieving specific goals, long-term studies of broad changes in healthcare; management support within hospitals and public healthcare administration; or technology development with vendors of healthcare IT. The opportunities would seem to be manifold. Since the healthcare sector is a heterogeneous mix of interests, political agendas, professions et cetera, there is great merit in having people knowledgeable about this heterogeneity; able to facilitate meetings and processes between the various professions and organizations; and skilled in generating analyses and proposing new solutions. Also, people with insight into how action, technologies and organizing are interwoven and redistribute competences, responsibilities and risks are invaluable: Look at from afar, technologies seem to cause and determine social development, whereas detailed studies reveal that determinants and causes are both technical and social. The challenges include the one of making one's knowledge and skills legitimate and relevant to health informatics. Having a degree from arts or social sciences is not necessarily impressive for people with similar degrees in medicine, computer science, and business administration. Another challenge is to design an engagement with health informatics that will generate insights which often requires time, while also providing quick results for project sponsors or collaborators. The chapter points at three issues that seem to be central foundations for appropriate and quality-driven research and interventions of the 'quick and proper' kind: Modes of engagement

  9. Physiologie du risque face à l’Histoire, or, Health, Culture and Society: The possibilities of anthropology and policy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bernard Jouanjean

    2011-10-01

    Full Text Available This review of published research (Health, Culture and Society – Rawat Publications, India, 2000 seeks to introduce the reader to the driving themes of a work establishing the link between human physiological functions and social represetations. In doing so the author articulates the topic of prevention within a broad and complex social, historical and anthropological framework.

  10. The 2010 Broad Prize

    Science.gov (United States)

    Education Digest: Essential Readings Condensed for Quick Review, 2011

    2011-01-01

    A new data analysis, based on data collected as part of The Broad Prize process, provides insights into which large urban school districts in the United States are doing the best job of educating traditionally disadvantaged groups: African-American, Hispanics, and low-income students. Since 2002, The Eli and Edythe Broad Foundation has awarded The…

  11. Broad ligament ectopic pregnancy

    OpenAIRE

    Rama C; Lepakshi G; Raju SN

    2015-01-01

    Pregnancy in the broad ligament is a rare form of ectopic pregnancy with a high risk of maternal mortality. Ultrasonography may help in the early diagnosis but mostly the diagnosis is established during surgery. We report the case of a patient with broad ligament ectopic pregnancy diagnosed intraoperatively. The patient had uneventful postoperative recovery.

  12. Business Anthropology, Family Ideology and Japan

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Moeran, Brian

    2012-01-01

    Like those of business and management studies, methodological and theoretical contributions of anthropology to the study of family business cannot be ignored. This article elucidates three interconnected themes relating to the development and practices of business anthropology and family ideology...... in Japan. It also looks at how the family ideology in Japanese business first described and explained by anthropologists has been taken up by those with an interest in the Japanese industrial system, but working in field of management and business studies without any particular specialization in "things...... Japanese." Their research often relies on second than first-hand knowledge, and can therefore be misleading. The author points to the perceived connections between the traditional household system, not just family ideology, and modern economic relations. He reminds us that what distinguishes anthropology...

  13. Croatian anthropological terminology--challenges and dilemmas.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lah, Josip; Orlić, Olga; Simicić, Lucija; Iveković-Martinis, Anja; Sujoldzić, Anita

    2013-09-01

    This paper describes the project ANTRONA aimed at constructing basic anthropological terminology that covers the entire range of anthropology as a science. It is a part of national language planning oriented terminology management for the Croatian language, and as such it is focused solely at the production of a terminographic database. The major difficulties encountered during the procedural stages of the project are outlined, such as the wide range of the interdisciplinary field of anthropology, including concepts and terms from natural and social sciences and humanities, as well as polysemy and fuzzy boundaries between the lexicon of the general language and specialized language. On the basis of several examples, we argue that terminography should be dealt with primarily by keeping in mind the range of its subsequent applications the aim of which is not only ontological, but also communicative in nature, and that functional pragmatic approach offers a more flexible framework for dealing with the demands of terminology in such an interdisciplinary field.

  14. AN ANTHROPOLOGY OF THINGS: ETHNOGRAPHY AND METHOD

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    messias basques

    2010-06-01

    Full Text Available This bibliographic essay is based on the book that resulted from a series of discussions promoted by a group of doctoral students in the Department of Social Anthropology at Cambridge University in late 1990s. Despite the diversity of ethnographic contexts, all authors share the challenge of recasting the relationship between anthropological theory and ethnographic method in relation to the study of what is conventionally called material culture. Hence the title Thinking Through Things, besides denoting an anthropological question about what informants do, and how the authors could develop versions on the ways from which they perceive and conceive of things also includes the main character of the meetings that led to the writing of this book.

  15. Notes towards an Anthropology of Political Revolutions

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Thomassen, Bjørn

    2012-01-01

    While resistance and rebellion have remained core themes in anthropology at least since the 1960s, anthropologists have paid much less attention to the study of political revolutions as real historical events. Yet there are compelling real-world reasons why they should orient their analytical...... apparatus and ethnographic efforts towards revolutionary events. This article advances a series of reasons why anthropology can enrich and supplement existing political science and history traditions in the study of political revolutions. Anthropology can do so via key concepts developed by Victor Turner......: “liminality,” “social drama,” “communitas,” “frame,” and “play.” Turner's ritual approach gains further relevance when linked to another series of concepts developed by Marcel Mauss, Gabriel Tarde, Georg Simmel, and Gregory Bateson, such as “imitation,” “trickster,” “schismogenesis,” and “crowd behavior...

  16. Social Anthropology and Social Science History.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kertzer, David I

    2009-01-01

    In the 1970s, when the social science history movement emerged in the United States, leading to the founding of the Social Science History Association, a simultaneous movement arose in which historians looked to cultural anthropology for inspiration. Although both movements involved historians turning to social sciences for theory and method, they reflected very different views of the nature of the historical enterprise. Cultural anthropology, most notably as preached by Clifford Geertz, became a means by which historians could find a theoretical basis in the social sciences for rejecting a scientific paradigm. This article examines this development while also exploring the complex ways cultural anthropology has embraced-and shunned-history in recent years.

  17. Social Anthropology and Social Science History

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-01-01

    In the 1970s, when the social science history movement emerged in the United States, leading to the founding of the Social Science History Association, a simultaneous movement arose in which historians looked to cultural anthropology for inspiration. Although both movements involved historians turning to social sciences for theory and method, they reflected very different views of the nature of the historical enterprise. Cultural anthropology, most notably as preached by Clifford Geertz, became a means by which historians could find a theoretical basis in the social sciences for rejecting a scientific paradigm. This article examines this development while also exploring the complex ways cultural anthropology has embraced—and shunned—history in recent years. PMID:26549914

  18. Cultural psychology as a bridge between anthropology and cognitive science.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fryberg, Stephanie A

    2012-07-01

    The theory and methods of cultural psychology begin with the assumption that psychological processes are socioculturally and historically grounded. As such, they offer a new approach for understanding the diversity of human functioning because they (a) question the presumed neutrality of the majority group perspective; (b) take the target's point-of-view (i.e., what it means to be a person in a particular context); (c) assume that there is more than one viable way of being a competent or effective person; and (d) provide a road map for understanding and reducing social inequities. As illustrated in this essay, a cultural psychological approach provides a bridge between anthropology and the cognitive sciences, and in so doing it offers an alternative set of explanations and interventions for group differences. Copyright © 2012 Cognitive Science Society, Inc.

  19. Forensic anthropology and mortuary archaeology in Lithuania.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jankauskas, Rimantas

    2009-12-01

    Forensic anthropology (in Lithuania, as everywhere in Eastern Europe, traditionally considered as a narrower field--forensic osteology) has a long history, experience being gained both during exhumations of mass killings during the Second World War and the subsequent totalitarian regime, investigations of historical mass graves, identification of historical personalities and routine forensic work. Experts of this field (usually a branch of forensic medicine) routinely are solving "technical" questions of crime investigation, particularly identification of (usually dead) individuals. Practical implementation of the mission of forensic anthropology is not an easy task due to interdisciplinary character of the field. On one hand, physical anthropology has in its disposition numerous scientifically tested methods, however, their practical value in particular legal processes is limited. Reasons for these discrepancies can be related both to insufficient understanding of possibilities and limitations of forensic anthropology and archaeology by officials representing legal institutions that perform investigations, and sometimes too "academic" research, that is conducted at anthropological laboratories, when methods developed are not completely relevant to practical needs. Besides of answering to direct questions (number of individuals, sex, age, stature, population affinity, individual traits, evidence of violence), important humanitarian aspects--the individual's right for identity, the right of the relatives to know the fate of their beloved ones--should not be neglected. Practical use of other identification methods faces difficulties of their own (e.g., odontology--lack of regular dental registration system and compatible database). Two examples of forensic anthropological work of mass graves, even when the results were much influenced by the questions raised by investigators, can serve as an illustration of the above-mentioned issues.

  20. Rediscovering Papa Franz: Teaching Anthropology and modern life

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Holly Swyers

    2016-01-01

      When confronted with the task of choosing texts for an undergraduate four-field course in a joint sociology/anthropology department, I elected to teach with Franz Boas' 1928 text, Anthropology and modern life...

  1. Short cuts: Anthropological study of contemporary comercials

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ivan Kovačević

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available The anthropological study of commercials is based on the meaning of the entire content of the commercial, in order to contextualize the time and space in which the commercial is made and used. On the basis of this analytical step it can be determined which values the commercial contains and what its relationship to the value system in its surroundings is. The analytical steps of the semiology of commercials, as the most important methodological approach in the anthropological analysis of commercials, is generated from the general semiological approach but can also be “borrowed” from the semiology of visual images, especially the semiology of film.

  2. Physical anthropology and the description of the 'savage' in the Brazilian Anthropological Exhibition of 1882.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sánchez Arteaga, Juanma; Niño El-Hani, Charbel

    2010-06-01

    This paper discusses attempts to popularize scientific knowledge about anthropology through exhibitions of natives in the United States and Brazil from the nineteenth century to the beginnings of the twentieth century. In the First Brazilian Anthropological Exposition (Rio de Janeiro, 1882), a group of Botocudos was characterized in a manner that can be related to the reification of the myth of the savage, an important part of the European culture that played a significant role in the construction of anthropological knowledge in the nineteenth century. From the analyses of such exhibitions, we derive implications for science popularization and education, concerning the ideological undertones of scientific knowledge.

  3. Anthropology of Education and the Understanding of Cultural Diversity

    OpenAIRE

    Drozdowicz, Jarema

    2016-01-01

    Anthropology of education is regarded as a relatively new sub discipline combining theory and methods of anthropological and ethnographic studies with those of pedagogy and educational studies. This paper deals with the problem how the anthropology of education and also anthropology in general might be applied towards the issue of cultural diversity and the category of cultural difference. It is important to NATO that those problems gain a new meaning and seem to be crucial in the context of ...

  4. ASPECTS OF BIOLOGICAL NEWS IN ANTHROPOLOGY OF EUROPE

    OpenAIRE

    Klaus-Peter Herm

    2012-01-01

    The 9th International Congress of the “Gesellschaft of Anthropology” (GfA) has been held in Gottorf during September 2011.The content of lectures and posters were Palaeoanthropology, Archaeology, Pre-historic Anthropology, Humanethology, Forensic Anthropology, Prevention and Clinical Anthropology, Gender studies, Ergonomics, Pedagogic, Mathematics and patent law.

  5. Anthropology in Agricultural Health and Safety Research and Intervention.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arcury, Thomas

    2017-01-01

    Agriculture remains a dangerous industry, even as agricultural science and technology continue to advance. Research that goes beyond technological changes to address safety culture and policy are needed to improve health and safety in agriculture. In this commentary, I consider the potential for anthropology to contribute to agricultural health and safety research by addressing three aims: (1) I briefly consider what the articles in this issue of the Journal of Agromedicine say about anthropologists in agricultural health and safety; (2) I discuss what anthropologists can add to agricultural health and safety research; and (3) I examine ways in which anthropologists can participate in agricultural health and safety research. In using their traditions of rigorous field research to understand how those working in agriculture perceive and interpret factors affecting occupational health and safety (their "emic" perspective), and translating this perspective to improve the understanding of occupational health professionals and policy makers (an "etic" perspective), anthropologists can expose myths that limit improvements in agricultural health and safety. Addressing significant questions, working with the most vulnerable agricultural communities, and being outside establishment agriculture provide anthropologists with the opportunity to improve health and safety policy and regulation in agriculture.

  6. Critical Medical Anthropology – a voice for just and equitable healthcare

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anna Witeska-Młynarczyk

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available The article presents a paradigm current in contemporary medical anthropology – Critical Medical Anthropology (CMA, which merges political-economic approaches with a culturally sensitive analysis of human behaviour grounded in anthropological methods. It is characterized by a strongly applied orientation and a devotion to improving population health and promoting health equity. The beginning of CMA dates back to the 1970s when the interdisciplinary movement called [i]the political economy of health [/i]was developed. Today, CMA has grown into one of three major perspectives used in anthropological research devoted to health, illness and wellbeing. The author discusses the origins, key concepts and CMA’s usefulness for social research, and its significance for the design of effective policies in the realm of public health. Examplary interventions and ethnographic researches are introduced and wider usage is advocated of such works and methods by bureaucrats and medical staff for understanding the patients’ behavior, and the influence of social, economic and political factors on the workings of particular health systems.

  7. Critical Medical Anthropology--a voice for just and equitable healthcare.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Witeska-Młynarczyk, Anna

    2015-01-01

    The article presents a paradigm current in contemporary medical anthropology - Critical Medical Anthropology (CMA), which merges political-economic approaches with a culturally sensitive analysis of human behaviour grounded in anthropological methods. It is characterized by a strongly applied orientation and a devotion to improving population health and promoting health equity. The beginning of CMA dates back to the 1970s when the interdisciplinary movement called the political economy of health was developed. Today, CMA has grown into one of three major perspectives used in anthropological research devoted to health, illness and wellbeing. The author discusses the origins, key concepts and CMA's usefulness for social research, and its significance for the design of effective policies in the realm of public health. Examplary interventions and ethnographic researches are introduced and wider usage is advocated of such works and methods by bureaucrats and medical staff for understanding the patients' behavior, and the influence of social, economic and political factors on the workings of particular health systems.

  8. Anthropology and Sexual an Gender Diversity in Spain. Towards the Construction of a Disciplinary Speciality

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jose Antonio Langarita Adiego

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available The study of sexuality from a social and cultural standpoint has acquired great importance in the social and human sciences in recent decades. This is reflected in a growing number of ethnographies and anthropological analyses that provide a new understanding of sexual and gender diversity that goes beyond clinical and biomedical interpretations. This article is the product of an exhaustive review of the literature aimed at analysing the paths taken, the transformations effected and the areas of interest relating to work on sexual and gender diversity in Spanish anthropology from 1980 to 2017. Currently, this specialised discipline comprises a wide variety of subjects since, in addition to studies on homosexuality, there has been a rapid expansion in new areas of interest, such as trans and intersex studies. The aim of this work is to contribute to the construction of the history of anthropology of sexual and gender diversity in Spain from a situated perspective. This article demonstrates that despite the indisputable international influence on the development of this specialty in Spain, there have also been specific local developments heavily influenced by the socio-historical context and feminist anthropology in the country.

  9. Working with a fractional object: enactments of appetite in interdisciplinary work in anthropology and biomedicine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Christensen, Bodil Just; Hillersdal, Line; Holm, Lotte

    2017-08-01

    This paper explores the productive tensions occurring in an interdisciplinary research project on weight loss after obesity surgery. The study was a bio-medical/anthropological collaboration investigating to what extent eating patterns, the subjective experience of hunger and physiological mechanisms are involved in appetite regulation that might determine good or poor response to the surgery. Linking biomedical and anthropological categories and definitions of central concepts about the body turned out to be a major challenge in the collaborative analysis. Notably, the conception of what constitutes 'appetite' was a key concern, as each discipline has its particular definition and operationalization of the term. In response, a material-semiotic approach was chosen which allowed for a reconceptualization of appetite as a 'fractional object', engaged in multiple relations and enacted differently in each instance. This perspective produced creative contrasts and offered alternative explorations of both scientific knowledge production and anthropological practices. The paper thereby explores the interfaces between anthropology and medical science by attending to the challenges and opportunities that result from destabilising an assumed fixed and well-defined concept associated with the body.

  10. Towards a doubly reflexive ethnography: A proposal from the anthropology of interculturality

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gunther Dietz

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Starting from the contemporary debate on ethnographic methodology in anthropology, this paper analyses how new methodological options arise throughout processes of educational interculturality and how these can nourish, rejuvenate and decolonize classica anthropological ethnography. The contrast between a postmodern anthropology and activist ethnography reveals possibilities for fruitfully complement social and political en gagement with the classical canon of ethnography, which is here illustrated for the sphere of Intercultural Studies and the emerging field of what may be called an anthropology of interculturality. The resulting, “doubly reflexive ethnography” completes the contrast of emic and etic approaches through a emic-etic dialectical, structure-oriented perspective, which is particularly suitable for studying institutions and organizations whose actors co-reflect on the same research process as the anthropologist her/himself. This proposal is finally summed up in a three-dimensional heuristic research model, which combines semantic, pragmatic and syntactic dimensions of ethnography and which is particularly suited for “inter-cultural”, “inter-lingual” and “inter-actor” diversity contexts.

  11. Anthropology Becoming … ? The 2010 Sociocultural Anthropology Year in Review

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Hamilton, Jennifer A; Placas, Aimee J

    2011-01-01

    ABSTRACT  In this article, we seek to outline some of the key impulses, both substantive and methodological, in cultural anthropology in 2010 as represented in the four main peer‐reviewed journals...

  12. Teaching and Researching Anthropology in Tertiary Institutions

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    daouda.thiam

    2010-05-14

    May 14, 2010 ... brand of anthropology was an adoption of a British model which gauged other cultures in relation to that .... pological literature in both journals and books, such knowledge produc- tion hardly affects the teaching ..... mainly from the colonial identity of the discipline and the structural underdevelopment of the ...

  13. Anthropology, Ethnology and Ethnic and Racial Prejudice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bromley, Yu. V.

    1987-01-01

    Reviews anthropological thinking on ethnic and racial prejudice. Provides examples of discrimination and cites the major theorists who have played a part in developing anti-racist views of society. Concludes that racism has no scientific or legal justification, that racism is a crime against humanity, and that it is the enemy of peace, culture,…

  14. Engaging the World of the Supernatural: Anthropology ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    denise

    world of science. The question is whether or not this is possible. The answer to this question lies partly in recognising the undertones in anthropology of a movement that, in my view, .... the role of observer, many anthropologists may feel that relativism is .... while other aspects require more of an interpretation, or a search for ...

  15. Linking anthropological analysis and epidemiological evidence ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    of Pierre Bourdieu is “violence which is exercised upon a social agent with his or her complicity”. (Bourdieu & Wacquant 2004, p. 272). Bourdieu. Journal of Social Aspects of HIV/AIDS. VOL. 4 NO. 2 AUGUST 2007. 594. ORIGINAL ARTICLE. Linking anthropological analysis and epidemiological evidence: Formulating a ...

  16. Music: Anthropology | Coplan | South African Music Studies

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Originally presented as a keynote address to the 2003 Congress of the Musicological Society of Southern Africa, this paper surveys the field of interactions between music and anthropology. The historical problematics of an institutional location for the discipline of ethnomusicology are linked to changing theoretical ...

  17. Performance Studies as New Anthropology of Events

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sanja Simonović Alifirević

    2017-04-01

    Full Text Available The question of relations between performance studies and new anthropology of events within the open cultural field directly points to the internal interventionist practice of performance and event as the agent of generative and constitutive roles in terms of initiating social processes and situations. An analysis of Turner’s dramaturgical patterns in the development and solution of social crisis, as well as Goffman’s social roles, in direct relation with performance studies, indicate that there is an original connection of these two theoretical platforms and point to their integral importance in terms of actualization and critical thinking related to current social situations. The basic theoretical and social transformations, connected to globalism and interculturalism, led to a redefinition of the aims and range of anthropological knowledge. Global anthropology of the contemporary in current, mediatized society is connected to the question of event, i.e. the event as performance, including different aspects of presence and behavior in a wide spectrum of human activities, along with their consequences.   Article received: December 14, 2016; Article accepted: January 27, 2017; Published online: April 20, 2017 Original scholarly paper How to cite this article: Simonović Alifirević, Sanja, and Đorđe Alifirević. "Performance Studies as New Anthropology of Events." AM Journal of Art and Media Studies 12 (2017: 149-157. doi: 10.25038/am.v0i12.174

  18. Anthropology in Kant\\'s Thought

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    m Rohani Ravari

    2012-03-01

    Therefore, anthropology can be defined, from Kant’s point of view, as a global empirical science and practical philosophy which would like to recognize, by prudential reason and observation method, human nature with pragmatic approach. In addition, this philosophy wants to educate persons who can not only acquire speculative knowledge but also be considered as a citizen of the world.

  19. Political Anthropology and Modern World System

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ivana Gačanović

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available Review of a book by Vladimir Ribić, Politička antropologija i moderni svetski sistem. [Political Anthropology and Modern World System]. 2011. Beograd: Srpski genealoški centar i Odeljenje za etnologiju i antropologiju Filozofskog fakulteta Univerziteta u Beogradu, Etnološka biblioteka 54, pp. 250.

  20. Cognitive anthropology is a cognitive science.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boster, James S

    2012-07-01

    Cognitive anthropology contributes to cognitive science as a complement to cognitive psychology. The chief threat to its survival has not been rejection by other cognitive scientists but by other cultural anthropologists. It will remain a part of cognitive science as long as cognitive anthropologists research, teach, and publish. Copyright © 2012 Cognitive Science Society, Inc.

  1. Feminist Research and Paradigm Shift in Anthropology

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Terence Rajivan Edward

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available In her paper ‘An Awkward Relationship: the Case of Feminism and Anthropology’, Marilyn Strathern argues that feminist research cannot produce a paradigm shift in social anthropology. I present an argument for thinking that, on the relevant understanding of paradigm shift, it is possible for this to happen. I then object to Strathern’s arguments against the possibility.

  2. Anthropology with Activism: Settling Its Value

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hull, Glynda A.

    2014-01-01

    This response to Katherine Schultz's Presidential Address to the Council on Anthropology and Education explores the themes of temporality and reflexivity in activist scholarship, with Schultz's research as prime example. The need to take action to address a crisis, juxtaposed to the counter need to take time for scholarly reflection and…

  3. Electronic Demonstration Portfolios for Visual Anthropology Majors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chalfen, Richard

    2004-01-01

    The paper suggests a model for linking the realisation and the articulation of both knowledge and accumulation of skills by fourth year students who have majored in visual anthropology. One central component is the integration of student-generated intellectual autobiographies into electronic demonstration portfolios, a formula and strategy that…

  4. SOCIAL SCIENCE EDUCATION CONSORTIUM. PUBLICATION 106, ANTHROPOLOGY.

    Science.gov (United States)

    BOHANNAN, PAUL

    A CURRICULUM GUIDE OUTLINES THE MAJOR CONCEPTS, STRUCTURE, AND METHODS OF ANTHROPOLOGY FOR GRADES K-6. THE FOLLOWING UNIT AREAS ARE INCLUDED--(1) NEEDS AND NEED SATISFACTION, (2) HUMAN PERSONALITY, (3) SOCIAL GROUPS, (4) SOCIAL NETWORKS, (5) HUMAN CULTURE, (6) CHANGE AND EVOLUTION, AND (7) CURRENT CULTURAL CHANGES. A SUMMARY CHART PRESENTS A FLOW…

  5. Agriculture: A Modular Approach. Cultural Anthropology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kassebaum, Peter

    Designed for use as supplementary instructional material in a cultural anthropology course this learning module introduces the student to some of the major trends associated with agriculture and its impact upon cultural evolution and complexity. The first section of the module describes major innovations such as animal power, irrigation and the…

  6. Mobilising indigenous resources for anthropologically designed HIV ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Mobilising indigenous resources for anthropologically designed HIV-prevention and behaviour-change interventions in southern Africa. ... with traditional leaders and 'ritual specialists' to better understand cultural patterns and ways of working with, rather than against, culture and traditional leaders in HIV-prevention efforts.

  7. Teaching and Unteaching with Legal Anthropology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Greenhouse, Carol J.

    1981-01-01

    This essay summarizes the differences between the anthropological view and the folk (cultural) view of the law. The anthropologist focuses on individual relationships while the lawyer emphasizes institutional arrangements. The author argues that these distinct underlying assumptions lead to divergent conceptions of the role of law and the…

  8. Anthropology: Smithsonian Institution Teacher's Resource Packet.

    Science.gov (United States)

    National Museum of Natural History, Washington, DC.

    This teacher's research guide for the National Museum of Natural History (Smithsonian Institution) is designed for junior and senior high school teachers to integrate anthropology into their social studies and science classes. The information in this packet consists of a list of books for teachers and students, classroom activities, and other…

  9. Economic Systems: A Modular Approach. Cultural Anthropology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kassebaum, Peter

    Designed for use as supplementary instructional material in a cultural anthropology course, this learning module uses a systems approach to allow students to see the connections and similarities which most cultural groups share on the basis of the type of economic organization that they exhibit. The module begins with a general discussion of…

  10. Patient Centred Systems: Techno-Anthropological reflections on the challenges of 'meaningfully engaging' patients within health informatics research.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wong, Ming-Chao; Almond, Helen; Cummings, Elizabeth; Roehrer, Erin; Showell, Chris; Turner, Paul

    2015-01-01

    This chapter explores how Techno-Anthropology can contribute to more explicitly professional and ethically responsible reflections on the socio-technical practices involved in meaningfully engaging patients in health informatics research. The chapter draws on insights from health informatics research projects focused on chronic disease and self-management conducted in Tasmania during the last 10 years. Through these projects the paper explores three topics of relevance to 'meaningful engagement' with patients: (i) Patient Self-Management and Chronic Disease (ii) Patients as Users in Health Informatics research, and, (iii) Evaluations of outcomes in Health and Health Informatics Interventions. Techno-Anthropological reflections are then discussed through the concepts of liminality, polyphony and power. This chapter argues that beyond its contribution to methodology, an important role for Techno-Anthropology in patient centred health informatics research may be its capacity to support new ways of conceptualising and critically reflecting on the construction and mediation of patients' needs, values and perspectives.

  11. Disciplinary Perspectives on Archaeoastronomy

    Science.gov (United States)

    McCluskey, Stephen C.

    This chapter examines the contributions of major academic disciplines to archaeoastronomy, beginning with a consideration of several indicators of the participation of scholars from various fields. We then consider examples of research from astronomy and the physical sciences; anthropology, archaeology, and the social sciences; and the historical disciplines to see how they reflect their disciplinary perspectives. The questions drawn from these varied disciplinary perspectives stimulate different strands of research, enriching the study of astronomies in cultures.

  12. Reframing bioethics education for non-professionals: lessons from cognitive anthropology and education theory.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Emmerich, Nathan

    2014-01-01

    It is increasingly common for universities to provide cross-curricular education in bioethics as part of contemporary attempts to produce 'global citizens.' In this article I examine three perspectives drawn from research into pedagogy that has been conducted from the perspective of cognitive anthropology and consider its relevance to bioethics education. I focus on: two metaphors of learning, participation and acquisition, identified by Sfard; the psychological notion of moral development; and the distinction between socialization and enculturation. Two of these perspectives have been particularly fruitful in understanding the processes of teaching and learning in a variety of domains. The third perspective has been developed in relation to the formal ethical education of medical students. I examine their relevance for 'non-professional' bioethics education suggesting that if we take seriously the idea that it is part of 'educating for citizenship' then the distinction between 'ethics' and 'politics' is blurred as such programmes aim at the development of student's political subjectivity.

  13. Anthropology and decision making about chronic technological disasters: Mixed waste remediation on the Oak Ridge Reservation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wolfe, A.K.; Schweitzer, M.

    1996-12-31

    This paper discusses two related case studies of decision making about the remediation of mixed (hazardous and radioactive) wastes on the Oak Ridge Reservation in Tennessee. The three goals of the paper are to (1) place current decision-making efforts in the varied and evolving social, political, regulatory, economic, and technological contexts in which they occur; (2) present definitions and attributes of {open_quotes}successful{close_quotes} environmental decision making from the perspectives of key constituency groups that participate in decision making; and (3) discuss the role of anthropology in addressing environmental decision making. Environmental decision making about remediation is extraordinarily complex, involving human health and ecological risks; uncertainties about risks, technological ability to clean up, the financial costs of clean up; multiple and sometimes conflicting regulations; social equity and justice considerations; and decreasing budgets. Anthropological theories and methods can contribute to better understanding and, potentially, to better decision making.

  14. Perspectives

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Unknown

    regards scientific funding4. He never had a big institute in the modern sense and did not dispose of large funds or large numbers of people5. Conflict between Bernal and. Perspectives ... The problems of being a “polytropic scientist” have increased enormously. ... as ever for managing populations. People with power are.

  15. Perspectives

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tarone, Elaine

    2013-01-01

    The topic of this "Perspectives" column is "Requiring a Proficiency Level as a Requirement for U.S. K-12 Teacher Licensure." In 1998, the American Council of Teachers of Foreign Languages (ACTFL) began to work with the National Council for Accreditation of Teacher Education (NCATE), which accredits teacher education programs…

  16. Perspective

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kussmann, Martin; Morine, Melissa J; Hager, Jörg

    2013-01-01

    We review here the status of human type 2 diabetes studies from a genetic, epidemiological, and clinical (intervention) perspective. Most studies limit analyses to one or a few omic technologies providing data of components of physiological processes. Since all chronic diseases are multifactorial...

  17. Perspective

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Tamara Shefer

    maintaining safe school environments. This perspective paper outlines the NSSF's approach to preventing school violence. Keywords: national school safety framework, violence prevention, South African schools, school safety. INTRODUCTION. Schools should be safe places for teaching and learning, free of violence and ...

  18. Value Formation of Basic Anthropological Connectivities

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bertelsen, Preben

    2009-01-01

    Abstract. Human beings live and thrive in surroundings based on the human condition of certain basic anthropological connectivities. Amongst the vital political life tasks can be mentioned the ones of establishing, maintaining and critically/conformably developing these basic conditions and their......Abstract. Human beings live and thrive in surroundings based on the human condition of certain basic anthropological connectivities. Amongst the vital political life tasks can be mentioned the ones of establishing, maintaining and critically/conformably developing these basic conditions...... and their political value formations. In this regard, the interdisciplinary contribution of Psychology is to explore how humans as active participants can and will participate in handling such value tasks. The article presents a general, theoretical, political-psychological model, which unites precisely these two...

  19. Creative Cultural Anthropology as a Methodology Principle

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. Z. Gontcharov

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available The paper looks at the essence and prospects of creative cultural anthropology in the context of education, economy, labor and social wealth. The anthropology in question can become the methodology principle for a new historical social model arrangement as it originates from the universal abilities of the human race, developed on the moral basis of joint existence; productive creative force of man’s integral subjectivity; and technological power reasonably combining the goals, means of production and creative forces of nature. The author outlines the prospective development ways for cultural anthropology guiding the educational system - the anthropological society basis - with the aim of developing a cultured, moral, socially and professionally competent personality; enforcing individual creative potentials; guaranteeing high status of teachers; and providing social communication forms giving place to self-activity of individuals and groups, and intellectual and cultural work. The author confirms the need for higher education available for everyone; otherwise, education, limited by the empirical level and primary vocational training, results in the rising portion of common labor in the national economy. The consequences lead to growing intellectual heterogeneity in the structure of aggregate activity; functional discord between the common and complex levels of labor; suspension of innovative technology implementation in production and management; aggravation of socio-cultural differences to the level of hostile opposition; abating competitiveness of Russia. The author makes the conclusion that, for the beneficial scenario of society development, the main emphasize should be on the socio-cultural expanded reproduction of man; the educational sphere should receive the A- group status, leaving the B-group status to material production. 

  20. The Conception of Anthropological Complementarism. An Introduction

    OpenAIRE

    Hoche, Prof. em. Dr. Hans-Ulrich

    2008-01-01

    The aims of 'Anthropological Complementarism' in a nutshell(sect. 1). Against a watered-down conception of psychophysical complementarity (sect. 2). Linguistic and logical problems of identity and non-identity (sect. 3). A 'noematic' approach to consciousness (sect. 4). A plea for a pure noematics (sect. 5). My own consciousness as experienced by myself is not a part of nature (sect. 6). The major ontological tenets of mine (sect. 7). Complementarism proper (sect. 8). Suitable and unsuitable ...

  1. [Interests of applied anthropology to oncology].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Soum-Pouyalet, Fanny; Hubert, Annie; Dilhuydy, Jean-Marie

    2008-01-01

    From now on the introduction of social and human sciences studies in the field of oncology has not always been conclusive. This article aims to analyze the bounds that border the meeting and the understanding between physicians, patients and anthropologists. It also treats the problems due to the introduction of applied anthropology in the field of oncology and points up the interests and practical contributions that this disciplinary bring and could bring.

  2. History and Future of Visual Anthropology

    OpenAIRE

    Sviličić, Nikša

    2011-01-01

    Visual recording of communication processes between communities or individuals by means of filming of photographing is of significant importance in anthropology, as it documents on site the specific features of various social communities in their encounter with the researcher. In terms of film industry, it is a sort of ethno-documentary pursuing originality and objectivity in recording the given subject, thus fulfilling the research mission. However, the potential of visual anthro...

  3. Creative Cultural Anthropology as a Methodology Principle

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. Z. Gontcharov

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available The paper looks at the essence and prospects of creative cultural anthropology in the context of education, economy, labor and social wealth. The anthropology in question can become the methodology principle for a new historical social model arrangement as it originates from the universal abilities of the human race, developed on the moral basis of joint existence; productive creative force of man’s integral subjectivity; and technological power reasonably combining the goals, means of production and creative forces of nature. The author outlines the prospective development ways for cultural anthropology guiding the educational system - the anthropological society basis - with the aim of developing a cultured, moral, socially and professionally competent personality; enforcing individual creative potentials; guaranteeing high status of teachers; and providing social communication forms giving place to self-activity of individuals and groups, and intellectual and cultural work. The author confirms the need for higher education available for everyone; otherwise, education, limited by the empirical level and primary vocational training, results in the rising portion of common labor in the national economy. The consequences lead to growing intellectual heterogeneity in the structure of aggregate activity; functional discord between the common and complex levels of labor; suspension of innovative technology implementation in production and management; aggravation of socio-cultural differences to the level of hostile opposition; abating competitiveness of Russia. The author makes the conclusion that, for the beneficial scenario of society development, the main emphasize should be on the socio-cultural expanded reproduction of man; the educational sphere should receive the A- group status, leaving the B-group status to material production. 

  4. Towards Gonzo Anthropology : Ethnography as Cultural Performance

    OpenAIRE

    Fedorowicz Steven C

    2013-01-01

    This essay provides an" ethnography of ethnography" through investigating and advocating certain research methodologies referred to as "Gonzo Anthropology." Ethnography is viewed as a process entailing both actual research, especially participant observation, and discourse, i.e. some form of cultural representation. In this way the ethnographic process can be seen as a form of cultural performance; the ethnographer is an actor, director, recorder of events, writer, artist and audience all in ...

  5. Teaching in crisis: Anthropology under structural adjustment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Susana Narotzky

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available In this paper I want to address the pressure of structural adjustment policies on teaching and learning anthropology. I will base my thoughts on the Spanish case but the reflexion is applicable to many other countries in Europe. The decline in public funding and the increase in fees have transformed the meaning of higher education. Increasingly, productivity criteria and ranking measures become the guides to university investments and social valorisation of competing disciplines in the public eye.

  6. Itineraries and specificities of Italian medical anthropology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seppilli, Tullio

    2012-04-01

    This paper describes the birth (or rebirth) of Italian medical anthropology around the middle of the 1950s, and its subsequent complex development up to the present. During this fairly long process, the author played a role that was probably of some importance, that of both a direct witness and active participant. Here these developments are briefly reviewed, in an attempt to single out some of the stimuli and the most significant occasions that have happened, their theoretical and methodological reference points, the main lines of research that have been tackled along the way, as well as the 'social demand' and the 'social use' that have integrated and oriented the practice of the new discipline within the horizon of some of the more general problems of Italian society. In outlining here the profile of and the various events in Italian medical anthropology, this paper takes into account the fact that, although a medical anthropology with that name and the disciplinary set-up that are now internationally attributed to it began in Italy only in the mid-1950s, important lines of research to which we would today attach that name had been undertaken long ago.

  7. Integrating forensic anthropology into Disaster Victim Identification.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mundorff, Amy Z

    2012-06-01

    This paper will provide mass fatality emergency planners, police, medical examiners, coroners and other Disaster Victim Identification (DVI) personnel ways to integrate forensic anthropologists into DVI operations and demonstrate how anthropological contributions have improved DVI projects. In mass disaster situations, anthropologists have traditionally been limited to developing biological profiles from skeletal remains. Over the past decade, however, anthropologists' involvement in DVI has extended well beyond this traditional role as they have taken on increasingly diverse tasks and responsibilities. Anthropological involvement in DVI operations is often dictated by an incident's specific characteristics, particularly events involving extensive fragmentation, commingling, or other forms of compromised remains. This paper will provide examples from recent DVI incidents to illustrate the operational utility of anthropologists in the DVI context. The points where it is most beneficial to integrate anthropologists into the DVI process include: (1) during recovery at the disaster scene; (2) at the triage station as remains are brought into the mortuary; and (3) in conducting the reconciliation process. Particular attention will be paid to quality control and quality assurance measures anthropologists have developed and implemented for DVI projects. Overall, this paper will explain how anthropological expertise can be used to increase accuracy in DVI while reducing the project's cost and duration.

  8. Teacher Training for Teaching Anthropology in Brazil and Argentina

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Amurabi Oliveira

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available Anthropology became systematized as a science in the nineteenth century, and its first teachers were self-taught, and it was initially only taught at a university level, although some countries had limited experiences with Anthropology in basic education. This article analyzes the education of anthropology teachers in Brazil and Argentina, considering the various institutional and academic settings in both countries. While Argentina has fewer courses than Brazil, these courses are more specific, and focused on the education of anthropology teachers. In Brazil anthropology is offered within social science courses in basic education, and specifically within sociology classes. This paper analyzes how teacher courses in Anthropology education in these two countries deal with the challenges in their different institutional and academic contexts.

  9. The Perils of Public Anthropology? Quiescent Anthropology in Neo-Nationalist Scandinavia

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hervik, Peter

    2015-01-01

    Nordic anthropologists were remarkably absent from the news media in Scandinavia during the Muhammad Cartoon issue of 2005/6. This chapter discusses perils of public anthropology as seen in the research engagement with the lopsided and simplified representation of ethnic and religious minorities...... in the Scandinavia countries during the last decade. Public anthropology, it is argued, is not an obligation that is to be confused with publicity of research findings but to engage seriously as individuals and departments through research projects and investing expertise in public issues, for instance, to combat...

  10. The guide from Omelas: Action anthropology with miracle icing

    OpenAIRE

    Ljiljana Gavrilović

    2016-01-01

    Literary piece by Ursula Le Guin, a science fiction author, is linked with theoretical, as well as practical anthropology, in several ways. Her life, education, prose production and reception of her work create a whole, which is in many ways related with anthropology on the one, and the changes in the modern world on the other side. Her work has, owing to its great popularity, contributed to a great extent to the adoption of some primarily anthropological thesis with the broadest population (...

  11. Gods, Germs, and Petri Dishes: Toward a Nonsecular Medical Anthropology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roberts, Elizabeth F S

    2016-01-01

    This commentary calls on medical anthropology to become programmatically non-secular. Despite recent anthropological critiques of secularity, within and outside of anthropology, most contemporary medical anthropologists continue to leave deities and religiosity out of their examinations of healing practices, especially in their accounts of biomedicine. Through a critical, relational constructionist lens, which traces how all entities are both constructed and real, a non-secular medical anthropology would insist that when deities are part of medical practice, they are integral to analysis. Importantly then, within the symmetrical nature of this same constructionist lens, biomedical entities like germs and petri dishes need to be accounted for just as much as deities.

  12. Unearthing Truth: Forensic Anthropology, Translocal Memory, and "Provention" in Guatemala

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Colette G Mazzucelli; Dylan Heyden

    2015-01-01

    .... Excavations of mass gravesites and the painstaking exhumation processes carried out by professional forensic anthropology teams continue to allow families to locate lost relatives--reclaiming truth...

  13. Virtual anthropology and forensic identification using multidetector CT

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Dedouit, F; Savall, F; Mokrane, F-Z; Rousseau, H; Crubézy, E; Rougé, D; Telmon, N

    2014-01-01

    Virtual anthropology is made possible by modern cross-sectional imaging. Multislice CT (MSCT) can be used for comparative bone and dental identification, reconstructive identification and lesion identification...

  14. "Eschatological" debate on the future of anthropology. Concept of crisis of anthropology in proceedings “The End of Anthropology”

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Suzana Ignjatović

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available The paper deals with the current concept of “anthropology in crisis”, based on the collection ofpapers “The End of Anthropology”, dedicated to this particular issue. The positions presented in this book are used as a starting point for further discussion about the crisis discourse in anthropology. The paper critically examines the identified sources of crisis (interdisciplinarity, professionalization, etc but also refers to other aspects of crisis that should be further discussed (relativism, applied anthropology, political aspects of anthropology.

  15. 76 FR 14058 - Notice of Inventory Completion: University of Wyoming, Anthropology Department, Human Remains...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-03-15

    ... National Park Service Notice of Inventory Completion: University of Wyoming, Anthropology Department, Human... University of Wyoming Anthropology Department, Human Remains Repository, Laramie, WY. The human remains were..., Anthropology Department, Human Remains Repository, professional staff in consultation with representatives of...

  16. 76 FR 14057 - Notice of Inventory Completion: University of Wyoming, Anthropology Department, Human Remains...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-03-15

    ... National Park Service Notice of Inventory Completion: University of Wyoming, Anthropology Department, Human... possession and control of the University of Wyoming Anthropology Department, Human Remains Repository... of Wyoming, Anthropology Department, Human Remains Repository, professional staff in consultation...

  17. Globalization, differentiation and drinking cultures, an anthropological perspective

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Thomas Wilson

    2004-12-01

    Full Text Available L’alcool et sa consommation ne renvoient pas simplement au domaine économique. L’alcool est devenu aujourd’hui une partie intégrale des relations sociales dans différentes cultures au point où son importance globale est souvent sous-estimée par ses plus ardents critiques. En dépit de ses conséquences directes sur la santé, sa consommation a pris une certaine ampleur dans le monde industriel développé. Certainement son rôle central dans la construction des identités individuelles explique sa position clé au sein des sociétés. Que nous dit le saké à propos du Japon ou le vin de Bourgogne sur la France? Que nous dit la consommation ou l’abstinence d’alcool sur les questions d’identité individuelle, d’ethnicité, de classe et de culture? Quelle place tient l’alcool dans la définition de soi et dans la notion de résistance? Répondre à ces questions et à d’autres est le but essentiel de cet article qui examine la consommation d’alcool à travers différentes cultures et ce que boire signifie pour ceux qui choisissent de consommer ou de s’abstenir. De l’Irlande à Hong-Kong, Mexico à l’Allemagne, l’alcool occupe un certain nombre de fonctions sociales, religieuses, politiques et familiales. Les cultures du boire définissent ces consommations dans le cadre plus large des pratiques sociales et montrent comment classes sociales, ethnicité et nationalisme peuvent s’exprimer à travers cette commodité. En partant d’approches de terrain, les contributeurs analysent l’interface entre culture et pouvoir dans les bars et pubs, la signification des images publicitaires, le rôle de ces boissons dans la vie quotidienne. Le résultat est la première publication comparative sur les questions de l’impact que la consommation d’alcool a sur l’identité nationale dans le monde aujourd’hui.Alcohol is not only big business, it has become an essential part of social relations in so many cultures that its global importance may be outdistancing its critics. Despite grim health warnings, its consumption is at an all-time high in many parts of the developed world. Perhaps because drinking has always played a key role in identity, its uses and meanings show no signs of abating. What does sake tell us about Japan or burgundy about France? How does the act of consuming or indeed abstaining from alcohol tie in with self-presentation, ethnicity, class and culture? How important is alcohol to feelings of belonging and notions of resistance? Answering these intriguing questions and many more, this article looks at alcohol consumption across cultures and what drinking means to the people who consume or, equally tellingly, refuse to consume. From Ireland to Hong Kong, Mexico to Germany, alcohol plays a key role in a wide range of functions religious, familial, social, even political. Drinking Cultures situates its consumption within the context of these wider cultural practices and reveals how class, ethnicity and nationalism are all expressed through this very popular commodity. Drawing on original fieldwork, contributors look at the interplay of culture and power in bars and pubs, the significance of advertising symbols, the role of drink in day-to-day rituals and much more. The result is the first sustained, cross-cultural study of the profound impact alcohol has on national identity throughout the world today.

  18. From Art to Anthropology and Architecture

    OpenAIRE

    Vayssière, Bruno

    2012-01-01

    Three “avant-garde” books about life, from art to anthropology and architecture. Piero Gilardi’s Not For Sale actually only approaches architecture by way of experiments hailing from Italian Arte Povera of the 1960s. After Gerhard Richter in 1999, then Otto Muehl, Marc Décimo and Öyvind Fahlström, what do we glean from this fifth publication of basic texts by Les Presses du réel, billed to be “an opportunity to make a few adjustments” in relation to contemporary art (dixit Xavier Douroux, of ...

  19. [Reflections on the health-illness-disease-care: a socio-anthropological view].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moreno-Altamirano, Laura

    2007-01-01

    Current reflections on the health-disease-care process are due to a complex and ancient legacy where diverse attempts at understanding it have their roots. This work consists of a brief overview of some approaches that have been used to interpret this process throughout history. The social and anthropological approaches are specially emphasized; the role of symbolical efficiency and the anthropological concept of "word-healing" are also mentioned. As a central point, the ontological, dynamical, and social models proposed by Canguilhem to interpret these processes are reviewed. Afterwards, the decades central to the 19st century are discussed, when positivism and the scientific basis for medicine were fully established. The insufficiency of the single-cause model and other explanations for factors involved in generating disease are described. In addition, the socio-political situation as a factor for disease is considered, as is the way in which the sociological concept became widely held. Finally, contemporary trends are described based on the interpretative perspective of medical anthropology, with special emphasis on the development of the concepts of disease, illness, and sickness.

  20. ['Biomedicine' in anthropological literature. The career of a concept between analysis and polemics].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bruchhausen, Walter

    2010-01-01

    During its career in North American social sciences and anthropology since the late 1960s the concept of 'biomedicine' acquired a large variety of meanings, sometimes even contradictory ones. Originating in research on biological and medical phenomena in technical areas like nuclear weapons, space flight, informatics or engineering, the term 'biomedical' entered politics and the social sciences, especially medical anthropology. Here it could mean medical research methods derived from biology as opposed to behavioural research or social sciences in general, the complex of Western health care n non-Western countries and the reductionism and alleged Cartesian dualism of its approach - the opposite of traditional, religious, holistic and psychic views and treatment of illness. Oscillating between the levels of anthropological research or analysis and of practical health care delivery, intra- and cross-cultural perspectives and affirmative and critical attitudes the term has to be carefully considered in any reading of past and recent literature. The rather ate German reception included replacing the term Schulmedizin born of older controversies on naturopathy, as well as naming the more somatic part of illness and medicine-as opposed to psychic or social aspects-and serving as the criticised object of many feminist and post-colonial studies on health.

  1. Transforming Cognitive and Emotional Dissonance for Physiotherapy Students Learning Medical Anthropology

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    H. Macdonald

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available Since the 1980s physiotherapy has shifted concerns towardscultural, economic, philosophical, political and social questions, and moreflexible ways of speaking about and practicing physiotherapy. In response to bothglobal shifts and local demands, the Physiotherapy Division at the University ofCape Town (UC T approached their Social Anthropology colleagues to teacha broader range of perspectives to their physiotherapy students. The objectiveof this research was to explore the changes experienced by UC T physiotherapystudents exposed to a cross-disciplinary teaching environment, and discuss thepossible role of the course in affecting their experience. A qualitative researchdesign drew data from multiple sources and was analysed using an interpretivecontent analysis method. Using an anthropological model of transformation,the changes experienced by students were categorised into three sub-categories of ‘separation’, ‘transition’ and ‘incorporation’.Emotional and cognitive changes were attributable to the course material. By attending to their emotional discomfort, physiotherapystudents not only successfully incorporated anthropological concepts to healthcare but also improved their professional identitiesand personal self-worth.

  2. From forest fires to fisheries management: anthropology, conservation biology, and historical ecology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Braje, Todd J; Rick, Torben C

    2013-01-01

    Human-environmental relationships have long been of interest to a variety of scientists, including ecologists, biologists, anthropologists, and many others. In anthropology, this interest was especially prevalent among cultural ecologists of the 1970s and earlier, who tended to explain culture as the result of techno-environmental constraints. More recently researchers have used historical ecology, an approach that focuses on the long-term dialectical relationship between humans and their environments, as well as long-term prehuman ecological datasets. An important contribution of anthropology to historical ecology is that anthropological datasets dealing with ethnohistory, traditional ecological knowledge, and human skeletal analysis, as well as archeological datasets on faunal and floral remains, artifacts, geochemistry, and stratigraphic analysis, provide a deep time perspective (across decades, centuries, and millennia) on the evolution of ecosystems and the place of people in those larger systems. Historical ecological data also have an applied component that can provide important information on the relative abundances of flora and fauna, changes in biogeography, alternations in food webs, landscape evolution, and much more. Copyright © 2013 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  3. Toward a critical anthropology on the impact of global warming on health and human societies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baer, Hans A

    2008-01-01

    This op-ed essay urges medical anthropologists to join a growing number of public health scholars to examine the impact of global warming on health. Adopting a critical medical anthropology perspective, I argue that global warming is yet another manifestation of the contradictions of the capitalist world system. Ultimately, an serious effort to mitigate the impact of global warming not only on health but also settlement patterns and subsistence will require the creation of a new global political economy based upon social parity, democratic processes, and environmental sustainability.

  4. Visual Anthropology in post-colonial worlds: "What has gone wrong?"

    OpenAIRE

    Mendonça,João Martinho Braga de

    2012-01-01

    This article provides a re-evaluation of various texts written by Margaret Mead on the use of the camera in anthropology. Its main aim is to trace the development of her ideas over the years in order to gain a clearer idea of the extent of her contributions in this field. Four texts published between 1956 and 1975 provide the primary source material for the reflections, which also include contemporary perspectives informed by the digital age. The text thus discusses issues linked to ethics, i...

  5. Euthanasia, assisted suicide, and the philosophical anthropology of Karol Wojtyla.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fernandes, Ashley K

    2001-12-01

    The lack of consensus in American society regarding the permissibility of assisted suicide and euthanasia is due in large part to a failure to address the nature of the human person involved in the ethical act itself. For Karol Wojtyla, philosopher and Pope, ethical action finds meaning only in an authentic understanding of the person; but it is through acting (actus humanus) alone that the human person reveals himself. Knowing what the person ought to be cannot be divorced from what he ought to do; for Wojtyla, the structure of the ethical "do"--the act itself--comes first. The current paper will focus on four arguments used to justify assisted suicide and euthanasia: (1) the argument from autonomy, (2) the argument from compassion, (3) the argument from the evil of suffering, and (4) the argument from the loss of dignity. It will seek to answer each claim from the perspective of Karol Wojtyla's philosophical anthropology. Much of this will come from his defining work in pure philosophy, The Acting Person (1969). The final part of the paper will suggest some positive solutions to the stalemate over the euthanasia debate, again drawn from Wojtyla's idea of human fufillment through participation with the other, and with the community itself.

  6. A half century of high-altitude studies in anthropology: introduction to the plenary session.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Little, Michael A; Thomas, R Brooke; Garruto, Ralph M

    2013-01-01

    Until 50 years ago, high-altitude terrestrial research was conducted largely within the realm of environmental physiology, where interests were focused on physiological mechanisms and mountain exploration. Scientists from the United States, Europe, and Peru had developed sophisticated physiological models of adaptation and acclimatization to the hypoxia of high altitude, but very little research had been conducted on permanent residents, particularly natives of high altitude in the two major regions of the world-the Andes and the Himalayas. In 1962, Raul T. Baker initiated a project at the Pennsylvania State University to explore the responses of indigenous Peruvians to the major stresses at altitude: hypoxia and cold. Approaches to this early research were anthropological in perspective and centered on population-level studies with an evolutionary approach. Studies were conducted by applying a combination of physiological experimental methods, simulated field experiments, and extended anthropological field observations. Early hypotheses at this time were that heredity played a major role in the adaptive complexes in native high-altitude residents. These early hypotheses were later modified to incorporate or replace the genetic hypotheses with developmental adaptation models. A half century of research within anthropology and research in other fields has presented a vastly more complex and integrated picture of high-altitude adaptation in native residents. Recent studies incorporate physiology and oxygen transport, population and molecular genetics, reproduction, growth, and development. The history and current status of high-altitude research and its anthropological applications are treated in papers from this plenary symposium. Copyright © 2013 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  7. Anthropology at the University of Yaounde I: A Historical Overview ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The teaching of anthropology at the University of Yaoundé I dates back to the very birth of the university, even though, the word anthropology was not used explicitly. The rapid growth of the discipline was enhanced by the 1993/94 university reforms which offered a window of opportunity to the discipline to redefine itself and ...

  8. Material of Geographic Import in the National Anthropological Archives.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Glenn, James R.

    Presenting specific examples of the manuscripts, cartographic materials, and pictorial materials found in the National Anthropological Archives, this paper describes Archive holdings (in such areas as archeology, linguistics, physical anthropology, and various branches of ethnology) which are dated from 1850 to the present and are representative…

  9. Contributions of Anthropology to the Study of Adolescence

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schlegel, Alice; Hewlett, Bonnie L.

    2011-01-01

    Adolescence researchers can turn to anthropology to learn the methods of ethnography and cultural comparisons, and they can mine its large database of information on cultures worldwide. But anthropology's single most important contribution is the concept of culture, the mosaic of a group's learned and shared, or at least understood, beliefs,…

  10. Anthropology and Educational Research: A Report on Federal Agency Programs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ianni, Francis A. J.

    1976-01-01

    Summarizes and discusses a set of interviews with program specialists and managers conducted early in the spring of 1974 in several federal government agencies. These interviews attempted to determine the status of anthropology in educational research programs, to identify issues and problems concerning anthropology's role in educational research,…

  11. Ontological And Anthropological Aspects of the Concept of Human Nature

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    R. Asha Nimali Fernando

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available Anthropology is the study of the origin of the man. It is basically concern with the concept of Homo sapiens, and it is scientifically questioning what are human physical traits as well how do men behave and the variation among different groups of  human with his social and cultural dimensions. Ontology is a subfield in traditional philosophy which is mainly focuses on the nature of being, existence or reality as such. There are some similarities and differences among these two areas. However when we deeply study the philosophical basis of the anthropology it is proof that it was derived from ontology.Anthropology discusses the social and cultural world or the physical entity of human nature. Ontology focuses the invisible aspect of human nature along with the ultimate reality. Therefore, it has a metaphysical aspect of human being; this philosophical notion has in fact, contributed to the development of the subject of anthropology. The present modern day has given very little attention to this philosophical combination of  ontolog y to anthropology, rendering further investigation into the philosophical roots of anthropology.This research paper seeks to evaluate the relationship between ontology and anthropology by paying attention to the ontological arguments about the concept of man and human nature within Greek and modern western thoughts, in comparing with modern anthropological arguments.

  12. Compatibility of the holy Qur'an with sciences: anthropological ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Thus Allah has encouraged us since more than 14 centuries; to study the past of beings included that of humans and, therefore to found the two other anthropological specialities: the Archaeology and the Paleoanthropology. In other verses Allah designates other important anthropological concepts compatible with the most ...

  13. Anthropology - Ecology. [Project ECOLogy ELE Pak, Skidmore Pak].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Skidmore, Margaret

    This is one of a series of units for environmental education developed by the Highline Public Schools. The unit may be used as an introduction to the study of anthropology, the influence of ecology on the study of anthropology, and an introduction to the physical school environment. For best results, it should be used at the beginning of the…

  14. New trends in the anthropology of Southeast Asia

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kleinen, J.

    2013-01-01

    This article addresses the question, is there such an entity as a separate field of the anthropology of Southeast Asia? Has the crisis in anthropology in the 1970s and ‘the literary turn’ of the 1980s led to a renewed interest in area studies? A number of topics that originally belonged to the field

  15. Public Anthropology as Public Pedagogy: An Autobiographical Account

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beck, Sam

    2011-01-01

    This autobiographical account provides a historical map of landmarks in the author's personal and professional life that led him to his present understanding of public anthropology as public pedagogy and vice versa. He indicates that his experiences led him to study sociocultural anthropology to investigate learning from experience, a foundational…

  16. Course File for "Documentary Film, Visual Anthropology, and Visual Sociology."

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tomaselli, Keyan G.; Shepperson, Arnold

    1997-01-01

    Describes a course that addresses and relocates questions of representation and reconstruction in the context of reflexive explanations for ethnographic films. Examines questions of power/power relations; anthropological and media construction of the Other; and trends in visual anthropology. Contextualizes the course within the human experience of…

  17. Portraits of Benvenuto Cellini and Anthropological Methods of Their Identification

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nasobin, Oleg

    2016-01-01

    Modern methods of biometric identification are increasingly applied in order to attribute works of art. They are based on developments in the 19th century anthropological methods. So, this article describes how the successional anthropological methods were applied for the identification of Benvenuto Cellini's portraits. Objective comparison of…

  18. A Program for High School Social Studies: Anthropology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haviland, Pam

    GRADES OR AGES: High School. SUBJECT MATTER: Anthropology. ORGANIZATION AND PHYSICAL APPEARANCE: The guide covers three units: 1) "The Study of Man"; 2) "Introduction to Physical Anthropology," including the process of evolution, descent and change in time, chronology of events, dawn of man, fossil man, race, and definitions of race; and 3)…

  19. [A anthropological critique of the ethic of care].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bertrand, Aliénor

    2011-03-01

    This article is a critique of the anthropology of vulnerability and of the needs on which the ethics of care are based. Firstly, this critique confronts the universal postulate of the anthropology of vulnerability to the history of the anthropology of illness. The latter manages to build up a specific disciplinary field in refusing the supervision of the medical sciences and the implicit principle to consider illness as an universal fact. The paper refers to the anthropology of nature and Philippe Descola's work in order to develop a comparative study of the systems of representations, including the naturalism of biomedicine as a model among others. It then presents the descriptions of the representations of vulnerability and the needs which are linked to the four main ontologies defined by anthropology of nature, animism, totemism, analogy and naturalism, and gives a new light to the anthropology on which the ethics of care rest. That anthropology of vulnerability could be an involuntary factor in order to make societies conform to an hygienic constraint. The ethics of care would therefore benefit greatly in freeing themselves from anthropology of vulnerability and focus on their original contextualism; in particular, they would benefit of the knowledge of the limits of naturalism at their basis. It will also allow them to provide a new tool for engineering social transformations in a time, the beginning of XXI century, when cultures happen to mix.

  20. Toward a Cultural Anthropology of Disability and Rehabilitation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hershenson, David B.

    2000-01-01

    Investigates the degree to which cultural anthropology's concepts, theories, and methods have been applied to the understanding and conceptualization of disability and rehabilitation as a cultural phenomenon. Reviews the literature of anthropology and the literature of disability and rehabilitation. Results revealed that a lot of anthropologists'…

  1. Medical anthropology: essays and reflections from an Amsterdam graduate programme

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van der Geest, S.; Gerrits, T.; Challinor, J.

    2014-01-01

    This volume is a collection of twenty articles by graduates of the Amsterdam Master’s in Medical Anthropology (AMMA) at the University of Amsterdam. The university is known for outstanding and innovative work in the field of medical anthropology and teaching combines a strong ethnographic basis with

  2. Design Anthropology, Emerging Technologies and Alternative Computational Futures

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Smith, Rachel Charlotte

    Emerging technologies are providing a new field for design anthropological inquiry that unite experiences, imaginaries and materialities in complex way and demands new approaches to developing sustainable computational futures.......Emerging technologies are providing a new field for design anthropological inquiry that unite experiences, imaginaries and materialities in complex way and demands new approaches to developing sustainable computational futures....

  3. An Evaluation of the Sequential Anthropology Curriculum Project.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wash, James A., Jr.

    An evaluation of materials in the sequential anthropology curriculum project with regard to student learning and teacher training is presented. The project sample consisted of 2,183 students in grades 1, 2, 4, and 5. Two forms of the anthropology achievement test were administered as pretest and posttest measures to experimental and control groups…

  4. Geostatistics and spatial analysis in biological anthropology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Relethford, John H

    2008-05-01

    A variety of methods have been used to make evolutionary inferences based on the spatial distribution of biological data, including reconstructing population history and detection of the geographic pattern of natural selection. This article provides an examination of geostatistical analysis, a method used widely in geology but which has not often been applied in biological anthropology. Geostatistical analysis begins with the examination of a variogram, a plot showing the relationship between a biological distance measure and the geographic distance between data points and which provides information on the extent and pattern of spatial correlation. The results of variogram analysis are used for interpolating values of unknown data points in order to construct a contour map, a process known as kriging. The methods of geostatistical analysis and discussion of potential problems are applied to a large data set of anthropometric measures for 197 populations in Ireland. The geostatistical analysis reveals two major sources of spatial variation. One pattern, seen for overall body and craniofacial size, shows an east-west cline most likely reflecting the combined effects of past population dispersal and settlement. The second pattern is seen for craniofacial height and shows an isolation by distance pattern reflecting rapid spatial changes in the midlands region of Ireland, perhaps attributable to the genetic impact of the Vikings. The correspondence of these results with other analyses of these data and the additional insights generated from variogram analysis and kriging illustrate the potential utility of geostatistical analysis in biological anthropology. (c) 2008 Wiley-Liss, Inc.

  5. ONTHOLOGICAL AND ANTHROPOLOGICAL CONSIDERATIONS ON THE RESPONSIBILITY TO PROTECT

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    WALTER WALKER JANZEN

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available Thisarticle,refers to ontological and anthropological obligations that “responsibility of protection” carries along with it, that is, the essential duty of sovereign states have in ontological and anthropological terms to intervene and protect severely repressed populations, massive civilian assassinations, systematic human rights violations and starvation because of its governments, concept formalized in the year 2000 by the ISSIC, Canada. The article also suggests that the anthropological essence of the matter is open to the responsibility of protection (and therefore to the responsibility of prevention and whenever protection exists it does it, to protect somebody and for some purpose, and as a consequence, the practice of protection demands an anthropology. Finally, this article proposes that either ontological and anthropological treatments must be the foundations of the “responsibility of protection” where the focus of protection must be centered on the preservation of mankind.

  6. ANTHROPOLOGICAL DESCARTES’ RATIONALISM AND IT'S HUSSERL’S RECEPTION

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anatolii M. Malivskyi

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available Purpose. The article is aimed to figure out the features of Husserl's reception of anthropological Descartes rationalism. Its implementation requires a consistent solution of the following tasks: 1 schematically express a modern vision of the basic intentions of philosophizing as an anthropological rationalism; 2 highlight the main points of the Husserl's reception of Descartes’ rationalism as the deanthropologizing and analyze radicalization of its basic design as the reanthropologizing. Conclusions. When clarifying the question of the method of reception and completion of the philosophical Descartes’ project in the doctrine of Edmund Husserl, the author finds that the originality of his reception of anthropological Descartes’ rationalism appears as the paradoxical union of denying the existence of anthropology in the base project and the rediscovery of its key role in the radicalization of Descartes. Thinking of its way, he comes to the rediscovery some of the key ideas of the French philosopher, rooted in his anthropological rationalism. Among them is the basic intention of the ambivalence, the rejection of Descartes’ ideas of panrationalism, recognition irreducibility of philosophical method to the mathematical, constitutive of human presence in the new rationalism. Prospects for further research in understanding the author sees a meaningful relationship and continuity of the two great thinkers - namely, the personal nature of philosophizing and the ethical focus of their searching. Originality. Appeal to the reception of Husserl's Cartesian project confirms the thesis of an essential importance for the basic anthropological project of Descartes. The presented version of Husserl reception base project Descartes is a reproduction of the surface age stereotypes, which link the quest of the philosopher with the natural sciences and neglected anthropological measurements. The proposed version of the radicalization of Descartes’ project

  7. Multidisciplinary Perspectives on Literacy Research.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beach, Richard, Ed.; And Others

    This collection of conference papers explores the application of a range of different disciplinary perspectives to studying literacy, drawing not only on newer linguistic and cognitive psychological orientations, but also on cultural anthropology, sociolinguistics, reader-response theory, critical theory, and poststructuralist theory. The…

  8. Towards non-reductionistic medical anthropology, medical education and practitioner-patient-interaction: the example of Anthroposophic Medicine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heusser, Peter; Scheffer, Christian; Neumann, Melanie; Tauschel, Diethart; Edelhäuser, Friedrich

    2012-12-01

    To develop the hypothesis that reductionism in medical anthropology, professional education and health care influences empathy development, communication and patient satisfaction. We identified relevant literature and reviewed the material in a structured essay. We reflected our hypothesis by applying it to Anthroposophic Medicine (AM), an example of holistic theory and practice. Reductionism in medical anthropology such as in conventional medicine seems to lead to a less empathetic and less communicative health care culture than holism such as in CAM disciplines. However, reductionism can be transformed into a systemic, multi-perspective holistic view, when the emergent properties of the physical, living, psychic, spiritual and social levels of human existence and the causal relations between them are more carefully accounted for in epistemology, medical anthropology and professional education. This is shown by the example of AM and its possible benefits for communication with and satisfaction of patients. A non-reductionistic understanding of the human being may improve communication with patients and enhance patient benefit and satisfaction. Interdisciplinary qualitative and quantitative studies are warranted to test this hypothesis and to understand the complex relations between epistemology, medical anthropology, education, health care delivery and benefit for patients. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  9. The urgency of outer territories anthropology

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Miloš Milenković

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available In the context of transforming a part of Serbian anthropology into social theoretic management of identity, I suggest both comparative historiographic and ethnographic learning from societies with similar post-colonial experience, with the aim to include the discipline into an urgent defense of Serbia and Belgrade from further ethno-profiteering interests of elites in/from outer territories, left over on the ruins of our ill judged, resource incompatible, exaggerated or immoral twentieth century adventures. Serbian anthropology, written by anthropologists to whom Serbia and Belgrade are "homeland" by origin or civilized choice, should play the key role in the defense of Serbian citizens from the interest of elites in/from the outer "homelands", particularly by revealing the processes for which it is, as a discipline, most expert at – the professionalization of ethnicity, interactive and hybrid nature of identity, instrumental nature of tradition and the identity politics in general. Having in mind the latest attempt, a particularly successful one, conducted by the end of the 20th and the beginning of the 21st century that the lives, health, well-being, dignity and future of persons born in and loyal to the interest of Serbia and Belgrade, in large scale, thoroughly and long term be sacrificed and dedicated to the interests of ethno-profiteering elites in/from outer territories, in this article I point to the possibility to, along with the comparative learning from the above mentioned post-colonial experiences, delicate experiences of urgent anthropology be applied as well as the rich tradition of collective research. This text analyzes the results of first such research, that represenst the initial, praiseworthy and a brave step in the wise striving to engage social sciences and humanities in a search of expert and not mythical/daily-political solutions of the key problem of the Serbian nation – that of how to settle the interests of the

  10. Once a mother : Relinquishment and adoption from the perspective of unmarried mothers in South India

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bos, P.

    2007-01-01

    This research is an anthropological investigation into the decision-making processes of unmarried mothers in Tamil Nadu with regard to the relinquishment or acceptance of their children. This anthropological investigation focuses on these decision-making processes from the mothers' perspectives and

  11. Once a mother : relinquishment and adoption from the perspective of unmarried mothers in South India

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bos, G.

    2008-01-01

    This research is an anthropological investigation into the decision-making processes of unmarried mothers in Tamil Nadu with regard to the relinquishment or acceptance of their children. This anthropological investigation focuses on these decision-making processes from the mothers' perspectives and

  12. Anthropology and the peasant class: the pertinence of the persistent. Anthropological reflections on peasant internationalism

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Raúl Hernán Contreras Román

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available The present article develops an initial discussion on the persistence of the peasant class in anthropology as an awkward object, which since it has become asubject for the discipline has  obliged anthropologists to re-examine their disciplinary identity and re-think their theoretical  bases. We start from the idea that both the emergence and the decline of peasant studies in the discipline have corresponded with localizable social, intellectual and political contexts. For this  reason we present the current struggle of peasant internationalism, represented by the international movement Vía Campesina, for food sovereignty and international recognition of the  rights of peasant men and women. These struggles are considered to constitute a politically novel space which has the potential to generate political opportunities for peasant claims in the face of  neoliberal despoliation. Finally, we reflect on how these struggles again present the peasant class as an awkward object for anthropology and demand anthropological discussion of the subject.

  13. The Anthropology of Potentiality in Biomedicine

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Taussig, Karen-Sue; Hoeyer, Klaus; Helmreich, Stefan

    2013-01-01

    At the beginning of the twenty-first century, potentiality serves as a central concept in the life sciences and in medical practices. This special issue of Current Anthropology explores how genes, cells, bodies, and populations as well as technologies, disciplines, and research areas become imbued...... of the ambiguity involved when dealing with that which does not (yet and may never) exist. We suggest that potentiality is both an analytic—one that has appeared explicitly and tacitly in the history of anthropology—as well as an object of study in need of further attention. To understand contemporary meanings...... and practices associated with potentiality, we must integrate an awareness of our own social scientific assumptions about potentiality with critical scrutiny of how the word and concept operate in the lives of the people we study....

  14. Critical Medical Anthropology in Midwifery Research

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Elizabeth C. Newnham

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available In this article, we discuss the use of critical medical anthropology (CMA as a theoretical framework for research in the maternity care setting. With reference to the doctoral research of the first author, we argue for the relevance of using CMA for research into the maternity care setting, particularly as it relates to midwifery. We then give an overview of an existing analytic model within CMA that we adapted for looking specifically at childbirth practices and which was then used in both analyzing the data and structuring the thesis. There is often no clear guide to the analysis or writing up of data in ethnographic research; we therefore offer this Critical analytic model of childbirth practices for other researchers conducting ethnographic research into childbirth or maternity care.

  15. Anthropology and cultural neuroscience: creating productive intersections in parallel fields.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brown, R A; Seligman, R

    2009-01-01

    Partly due to the failure of anthropology to productively engage the fields of psychology and neuroscience, investigations in cultural neuroscience have occurred largely without the active involvement of anthropologists or anthropological theory. Dramatic advances in the tools and findings of social neuroscience have emerged in parallel with significant advances in anthropology that connect social and political-economic processes with fine-grained descriptions of individual experience and behavior. We describe four domains of inquiry that follow from these recent developments, and provide suggestions for intersections between anthropological tools - such as social theory, ethnography, and quantitative modeling of cultural models - and cultural neuroscience. These domains are: the sociocultural construction of emotion, status and dominance, the embodiment of social information, and the dual social and biological nature of ritual. Anthropology can help locate unique or interesting populations and phenomena for cultural neuroscience research. Anthropological tools can also help "drill down" to investigate key socialization processes accountable for cross-group differences. Furthermore, anthropological research points at meaningful underlying complexity in assumed relationships between social forces and biological outcomes. Finally, ethnographic knowledge of cultural content can aid with the development of ecologically relevant stimuli for use in experimental protocols.

  16. Kant’s Anthropology as Klugheitslehre

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Holly L Wilson

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available In this essay I show that Kant intended his anthropology lectures and book, Anthropology from a Pragmatic Point of View, to be a Klugheitslehre (theory of prudence. The essay draws on many quotes from these sources to show that Kant wanted to develop a theory of how to use other people for one’s own ends. Although so much of the lectures and book are in conversation with Baumgarten’s empirical psychology, there are enough references to Klugheit (prudence and klug (clever action to support this thesis. Prudence is a skill that human beings should develop and hence is not excluded from human life even though it is not the basis of morality. The purpose of Klugheit is to achieve happiness but the means to that happiness involves using other people for one’s own ends. In order to use others as a means to one’s own ends, a person must in some way satisfy the inclinations of the other person so that they cooperate in one’s ends. However it is also possible to dominate another person and use them as well if they are dominated by a passion but this is not prudent since it does not achieve happiness except in the case of a husband and wife. Kant’s distinction between Weltklugheit and Privatklugheit also appears to be confirmed in that he advances the idea that sociable means of gaining the cooperation of others (Privatklugheit leads to the lasting happiness of a person and to the development of civilization.

  17. Social-ecological systems, social diversity, and power: insights from anthropology and political ecology

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michael Fabinyi

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available A social-ecological system (SES framework increasingly underpins the "resilience paradigm." As with all models, the SES comes with particular biases. We explore these key biases. We critically examine how the SES resilience literature has attempted to define and analyze the social arena. We argue that much SES literature defines people's interests and livelihoods as concerned primarily with the environment, and thereby underplays the role of other motivations and social institutions. We also highlight the SES resilience literature's focus on institutions and organized social units, which misses key aspects of social diversity and power. Our key premise is the importance of inter- and multi-disciplinary perspectives. To illustrate this, we draw attention to the critique of earlier ecological anthropology that remains relevant for current conceptualizations of SESs, focusing on the concepts of social diversity and power. And we discuss insights from social anthropology and political ecology that have responded to this critique to develop different ways of incorporating social diversity and power into human-environment relations. Finally, we discuss how these social science perspectives can help improve the understanding of the "social" in SES resilience research.

  18. 76 FR 48178 - Notice of Inventory Completion: Longyear Museum of Anthropology, Colgate University, Hamilton, NY

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-08-08

    ... National Park Service Notice of Inventory Completion: Longyear Museum of Anthropology, Colgate University... Anthropology has completed an inventory of a human remain, in consultation with the appropriate Indian tribes... Anthropology, Department of Sociology and Anthropology, Colgate University, 13 Oak Dr., Hamilton, NY 13346...

  19. 77 FR 23502 - Notice of Inventory Completion: University of Denver Department of Anthropology and Museum of...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-04-19

    ... National Park Service Notice of Inventory Completion: University of Denver Department of Anthropology and Museum of Anthropology, Denver, CO AGENCY: National Park Service, Interior. ACTION: Notice. SUMMARY: The University of Denver Department of Anthropology and Museum of Anthropology, Denver, CO, has completed an...

  20. 76 FR 80401 - Notice of Inventory Completion: University of Denver Department of Anthropology and Museum of...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-12-23

    ... Inventory Completion: University of Denver Department of Anthropology and Museum of Anthropology, Denver, CO... University of Denver Department of Anthropology and Museum of Anthropology, Denver, CO. The human remains and cultural items were removed from Maricopa County or Pinal County, AZ. This notice is published as part of...

  1. The guide from Omelas: Action anthropology with miracle icing

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ljiljana Gavrilović

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Literary piece by Ursula Le Guin, a science fiction author, is linked with theoretical, as well as practical anthropology, in several ways. Her life, education, prose production and reception of her work create a whole, which is in many ways related with anthropology on the one, and the changes in the modern world on the other side. Her work has, owing to its great popularity, contributed to a great extent to the adoption of some primarily anthropological thesis with the broadest population (not only among Americans and thus significantly influenced the change of the public discourse-the shaping of the contemporary ideal picture of the world.

  2. Anthropological Critique of the "Marriage by Wife Purchase" Thesis as a Contribution to the Rethinking of Interdisciplinarity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zorica Ivanović

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Anthropological research demonstrates that exchanges and transactions related to marriage alliances, regardless of their central organising principle and form, are not governed by the logic of the market but by the logic of gift exchange. Thus, the exchange of women for worthy material goods and valuables (bridewealth, which is (or has been a dominant form of marriage transactions in Africa and some parts of Asia and Oceania, cannot be understood as commodity exchange and "wife purchase". The "marriage by wife purchase" thesis, developed within a Victorian evolutionist paradigm, has been rejected in anthropology a long time ago. At the same time, some more recent research showed that the exchange of persons for goods as a principle of marriage exchanges and transactions does not entail only the practice of exchanging women for material goods. In some societies, marriage transactions are based on the principle of exchanging men for goods (groomwealth. This research called into question, once again, not only the "wife purchase" theory but also Levi-Strauss' fundamental assumption about the "exchange of women between groups of men". In response to the fact that the "marriage by wife purchase" thesis is still regarded as an adequate explanation not only in the popular discourse but also in the Serbian scientific literature, this article seeks to offer an anthropological critique of the thesis and to draw attention to some key interdisciplinary disagreements that emerge in the interpretation of this particular form of marriage transactions. The article also discusses theoretical and epistemological assumptions which underpin the "marriage by purchase" thesis, as well as the process of critical examination that led anthropology to discard the thesis. From a contemporary anthropological perspective, the article suggests a possibility to explore a cultural and political economy of the gift, since the logic of gift is different from but not diametrically

  3. Chronic conditions, fluid states: chronicity and the anthropology of illness

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Manderson, Lenore; Smith-Morris, Carolyn

    2010-01-01

    .... Breaking new ground in medical anthropology by challenging the chronic/acute divide in illness and disease, the editors, along with a group of rising scholars and some of the most influential minds...

  4. Homo religiosus : philosophical anthropology Viktor Emil Frankl 's .

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marcos Vinícius da Costa Meireles

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available This work, entitled The Homo religiosus: the philosophical anthropology of Viktor Emil Frankl, is rooted in the anthropology of Frankl and aims to understand Frankl’s anthropology and its spiritual dynamic in religious experience. Using theoretical-bibliographical research with these main works—The Ignored Presence of God (1948, The Unconditioned Man (1949, Patient Man (1950, and The Search for God and Questions about the Meaning of Life (1984—this work traverses through Frankl’s anthropology, the spiritual dimension, the search for meaning, and one’s relationship with God. The work is divided into three parts. The first part consists of contextualization and critique. The second part puts forward a proposal, and the third part discusses the experience of the Homo religiosus.

  5. Humans, brains, and their environment: marriage between neuroscience and anthropology?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Northoff, Georg

    2010-03-25

    How do we define ourselves as humans and interact with our various environments? Recently, neuroscience has extended into other disciplines in the humanities and social sciences, questioning the existence of distinct disciplines like anthropology, which describes the relationship between humans and their various environments. However, rather than being incorporated into neuroscience, anthropology may be considered complementary, and a marriage of the two disciplines can provide deep insight into these fundamental questions. (c) 2010 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  6. Before Franz Boas: Pioneering Women in American Anthropology

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    Monica Tarducci

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available One consequence of the impact of the feminist movement in anthropological theory and practice was the recovery of the life and work of women who, despite occupying a peripheral site, made significant contributions to the field. In this paper I focus on the trajectories of these pioneers who, in a time of fast socioeconomic changes (last decades or xix Century and the early xx Century and despite they were self taught, were fundamental to the professionalization of anthropology.

  7. 3. The Germanic Race and Norwegian Anthropology, 1880-1910

    OpenAIRE

    Kyllingstad, Jon Røyne

    2016-01-01

    The Parisian Society of Anthropology was founded in 1859, which was also the year that Darwin published On the Origin of Species. Soon after, similar institutions were established all over Europe. These institutions became important arenas for research and debate on the origin and evolution of the human species and gave rise to the new discipline of anthropology, which replaced ‘ethnology’ as the most important academic discipline for research on race and human variation. The main founding fa...

  8. Understanding kuru: the contribution of anthropology and medicine

    OpenAIRE

    Lindenbaum, Shirley

    2008-01-01

    To understand kuru and solve the problems of its cause and transmission required the integration of knowledge from both anthropological and medical research. Anthropological studies elucidated the origin and spread of kuru, the local mortuary practices of endocannibalism, the social effects of kuru, the life of women and child-rearing practices, the kinship system of the Fore and their willingness to incorporate outsiders into it, the myths, folklore and history of the Fore and their neighbou...

  9. Lesson in humanity: Anthropological inspirations from the work of Comenius

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jan Hábl

    2010-03-01

    Full Text Available This study deals with the issue of pedagogical humanization. The author identifies and analyses the causes of modern crisis of humanity as well as its pedagogical formation, which is based on anthropological reductionism and post-enlightenment restriction of the transcendental dimension of humanity. As an alternative to the problematic modern anthropology, the study presents Comenius’s view of humanity, which provides stimulating material for the humanisation efforts in contemporary pedagogy.

  10. Sherwood Washburn's New physical anthropology: rejecting the "religion of taxonomy".

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mikels-Carrasco, Jessica

    2012-01-01

    Many physical anthropologists and nearly all of those studying primatology today can trace their academic genealogy to Sherwood Larned Washburn. His New physical anthropology, fully articulated in a 1951 paper, proposed that the study of hominid evolution must link understandings of form, function, and behavior along with the environment in order most accurately to reconstruct the evolution of our ancestors. This shift of concentration from strictly analyzing fossil remains to what Washburn termed adaptive complexes challenged not only Washburn's predecessors, but also led Washburn to critique the very system of academia within which he worked. Collaboration across multiple disciplines, linking the four fields of anthropology in order to understand humans and application of our understandings of human evolution to the betterment of society, are the hallmarks of Washburnian anthropology. In this paper I will explore how Washburn's New physical anthropology led him to not only change the research direction in physical anthropology, but also to challenge the academia within which he worked. I will conclude by reflecting on the prospects of continuing to practice Washburnian Anthropology.

  11. Anthropology and the peasant class: the pertinence of the persistent. Anthropological reflections on peasant internationalism

    OpenAIRE

    Raúl Hernán Contreras Román

    2015-01-01

    The present article develops an initial discussion on the persistence of the peasant class in anthropology as an awkward object, which since it has become asubject for the discipline has  obliged anthropologists to re-examine their disciplinary identity and re-think their theoretical  bases. We start from the idea that both the emergence and the decline of peasant studies in the discipline have corresponded with localizable social, intellectual and political contexts. For this  reason we pres...

  12. Contemporary anthropological trends in the united Europe.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ks. Archimandryta Warsonofiusz (Doroszkiewicz

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available The term “anthropology” is from the Greek (gr. aνθρωπος, “man”. It is the academic study of humanity. It deals with all that is characteristic of the human experience, from physiology and the evolutionary origins to the social and cultural organization of human societies as well as individual and collective forms of human experience. The idea of modernism concerns the phenomena which appeared in the European culture and thought in the end of XIX and beginning of XX century. In the end of XX century emerged idea of postmodernism which critizes and questions existence of the objective truth and doubts all the systems of values as being arbitral and restraining human freedom. According to the theory of postmodernism even the moral and ethical rules must be of human choice. The hypothesis of postmodern anthropology attained the dominant function in the united Europe. Likewise the notion of postmodernism contains in itself such popular undercurrents as popular culture, lifestyle, secularization, consumption, tolerance, marketing and laicizations. They all have found its place in the modern European society and in evident sense try to fulfill spiritual vacuum which appeared whilst modern European men questioned and rejected an idea of the objective Truth it means rejected Christian values and Christian tradition so much rooted in the European history.

  13. Iberia: population genetics, anthropology, and linguistics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arnaiz-Villena, A; Martínez-Laso, J; Alonso-García, J

    1999-10-01

    Basques, Portuguese, Spaniards, and Algerians have been studied for HLA and mitochondrial DNA markers, and the data analysis suggests that pre-Neolithic gene flow into Iberia came from ancient white North Africans (Hamites). The Basque language has also been used to translate the Iberian-Tartesian language and also Etruscan and Minoan Linear A. Physical anthropometry of Iberian Mesolithic and Neolithic skeletons does not support the demic replacement in Iberia of preexisting Mesolithic people by Neolithic people bearing new farming technologies from Europe and the Middle East. Also, the presence of cardial impressed pottery in western Mediterranean Europe and across the Maghreb (North Africa) coasts at the beginning of the Neolithic provides good evidence of pre-Neolithic circum-Mediterranean contacts by sea. In addition, pre-dynastic Egyptian El-Badari culture (4,500 years ago) is similar to southern Iberian Neolithic settlements with regard to pottery and animal domestication. Taking the genetic, linguistic, anthropological, and archeological evidence together with the documented Saharan area desiccation starting about 10,000 years ago, we believe that it is possible that a genetic and cultural pre-Neolithic flow coming from southern Mediterranean coasts existed toward northern Mediterranean areas, including at least Iberia and some Mediterranean islands. This model would substitute for the demic diffusion model put forward to explain Neolithic innovations in Western Europe.

  14. The Influence of Nietzsche’s Anthropology on the Works of George Bernard Shaw

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Biljana Vlašković

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available This paper identifies the traces of Friedrich Nietzsche’s anthropological philosophy in the dramatic, sociological, anthropological, and philosophical writings of George Bernard Shaw. Apart from the obvious use of Nietzsche’s term “the Superman” (Übermensch to serve the purposes of his own philosophy, the analysis shows further similarities between the two writers, namely that Shaw modified Nietzsche’s expression “the will to power”, as well as Schopenhauer’s concept of will as the world’s essence, and termed it the “Life Force”, which will enable a “creative evolution” of humans into a higher being, an Overman, or a Superman. Also concerning this is the role that Shaw gives to women in this process of creative evolution, by making the female the dominant gender, and in so doing radically deconstructing the deeply rooted 19th century view of woman as a being whose natural habitat is the family home, and whose role in wooing is exclusively passive. Such an attitude led many critics to believe that Shaw was a misogynist of the same kind as Schopenhauer and Nietzsche. However, Shawian discourse as a whole exhibits а vehement support of the feminist struggles for the gender equality, which made the author a favorite in feminist circles. Different perspectives in Shaw’s anthropology mirror Nietzsche’s demand for the “transvaluation of all values”, and this alone is necessary to provide a constant change, which, according to both authors, is the only thing that is certain and constant in this world.

  15. The Tsimane Health and Life History Project: Integrating anthropology and biomedicine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gurven, Michael; Stieglitz, Jonathan; Trumble, Benjamin; Blackwell, Aaron D; Beheim, Bret; Davis, Helen; Hooper, Paul; Kaplan, Hillard

    2017-04-01

    The Tsimane Health and Life History Project, an integrated bio-behavioral study of the human life course, is designed to test competing hypotheses of human life-history evolution. One aim is to understand the bidirectional connections between life history and social behavior in a high-fertility, kin-based context lacking amenities of modern urban life (e.g. sanitation, banks, electricity). Another aim is to understand how a high pathogen burden influences health and well-being during development and adulthood. A third aim addresses how modernization shapes human life histories and sociality. Here we outline the project's goals, history, and main findings since its inception in 2002. We reflect on the implications of current findings and highlight the need for more coordinated ethnographic and biomedical study of contemporary nonindustrial populations to address broad questions that can situate evolutionary anthropology in a key position within the social and life sciences. © 2017 The Authors Evolutionary Anthropology: Issues, News, and Reviews Published by Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  16. Notes towards an anthropology of the internet

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Keith Hart

    2004-06-01

    Full Text Available What might an anthropology of the internet look like? It require a combination of introspection, personal judgment and world history to explore the universe of cyberspace. This world is not sufficient to itself, nor is it 'the world'. People bring their offline circumstances to behaviour online. The virtual and the real constitute a dialectic in which neither can be reduced to the other and 'virtual reality' is their temporary synthesis. Heidegger's metaphysics are drawn on to illuminate this dialectic. Before this, the internet is examines in the light of the history of communications, from speech and writing to books and the radio. The digital revolution of our time is marked by the convergence of telephones, television and computing. It is the third stage in a machine revolution lasting just 200 years. The paper analyses the political economy of the internet in terms of the original three classes controlling respectively increase in the environment (land, money (capital and human creativity (labour. It ends with a consideration of Kant's great example for a future anthropology capable of placing human subjectivity in world history.Como poderia ser uma antropologia da Internet? Uma tal antropologia exigiria uma combinação de introspecção, de opiniões pessoais e de história mundial para se explorar o universo do ciberespaço. Afinal, esse mundo não é um mundo auto-suficiente, nem mesmo esse é "um mundo". As pessoas carregam consigo suas circunstâncias off-line para junto do seu comportamento on-line. Constitui-se uma dialética do virtual e do real, na qual nenhuma das duas partes pode ser reduzida à outra e na qual a "realidade virtual" é a sua síntese temporária. A metafísica heideggeriana é aqui acionada para esclarecer melhor essa dialética. Antes disso, entretanto, a Internet é examinada sob a luz da história das comunicações, desde a fala e a escrita de livros até o rádio. A revolução digital de nosso tempo est

  17. Socioeconomic evaluation of broad-scale land management strategies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lisa K. Crone; Richard W. Haynes

    2001-01-01

    This paper examines the socioeconomic effects of alternative management strategies for Forest Service and Bureau of Land Management lands in the interior Columbia basin. From a broad-scale perspective, there is little impact or variation between alternatives in terms of changes in total economic activity or social conditions in the region. However, adopting a finer...

  18. Immunogenetics as a tool in anthropological studies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sanchez-Mazas, Alicia; Fernandez-Viña, Marcelo; Middleton, Derek; Hollenbach, Jill A; Buhler, Stéphane; Di, Da; Rajalingam, Raja; Dugoujon, Jean-Michel; Mack, Steven J; Thorsby, Erik

    2011-01-01

    The genes coding for the main molecules involved in the human immune system – immunoglobulins, human leucocyte antigen (HLA) molecules and killer-cell immunoglobulin-like receptors (KIR) – exhibit a very high level of polymorphism that reveals remarkable frequency variation in human populations. ‘Genetic marker’ (GM) allotypes located in the constant domains of IgG antibodies have been studied for over 40 years through serological typing, leading to the identification of a variety of GM haplotypes whose frequencies vary sharply from one geographic region to another. An impressive diversity of HLA alleles, which results in amino acid substitutions located in the antigen-binding region of HLA molecules, also varies greatly among populations. The KIR differ between individuals according to both gene content and allelic variation, and also display considerable population diversity. Whereas the molecular evolution of these polymorphisms has most likely been subject to natural selection, principally driven by host–pathogen interactions, their patterns of genetic variation worldwide show significant signals of human geographic expansion, demographic history and cultural diversification. As current developments in population genetic analysis and computer simulation improve our ability to discriminate among different – either stochastic or deterministic – forces acting on the genetic evolution of human populations, the study of these systems shows great promise for investigating both the peopling history of modern humans in the time since their common origin and human adaptation to past environmental (e.g. pathogenic) changes. Therefore, in addition to mitochondrial DNA, Y-chromosome, microsatellites, single nucleotide polymorphisms and other markers, immunogenetic polymorphisms represent essential and complementary tools for anthropological studies. PMID:21480890

  19. Unearthing Truth: Forensic Anthropology, Translocal Memory, and “Provention” in Guatemala

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Colette G. Mazzucelli

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available This article deliberately examines the search for truth after decades of conflict in Guatemala. Excavations of mass gravesites and the painstaking exhumation processes carried out by professional forensic anthropology teams continue to allow families to locate lost relatives—reclaiming truth and supporting calls for justice. For Guatemalans, the search for truth now transcends national borders, especially among migrant communities in the United States. The family remains the central unit through which the work of Guatemalan forensic anthropologists is undertaken. In an effort to engender deeper insights about these exhumation processes from a social science perspective, this analysis promotes the use of specific “tools” in Guatemalan forensic anthropology investigations. The first is an exhumations concept map, which yields important questions meant to stimulate meaningful analysis. The second, Story Maps, is a technology application with the potential to mediate digital access to the emerging Guatemalan translocal space. The research in this analysis suggests that these “tools” strengthen Burton’s notion of “provention” in Guatemala.

  20. Human Body as Subjectivity in Edith Stein. A Discussion on Anthropological Monism

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Diego I. Rosales Meana

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available This text aims to explain why «anthropological monism» is the most adequate perspective in order to understand human reality, and that this ‘monism’ must not be necessarily considered as materialist. I will divide my work in four sections. First, I will explain briefly the Cartesian paradigm and what I consider some of its ontological mistakes. Then, I will try to build a phenomenology of the self with Edith Stein’s anthropology as its base, in order to reunite the two realities separated by Descartes: body and subjectivity. Third, I will talk about the concept of ‘form’ as the inseparable vital principle of living beings and, finally, I will talk about empathy as the phenomenon by which we constitute the idea of ‘I’ and the notion of ‘human being’. This way, monism will be presented as the best option to explain human reality and its activity.

  1. HEIDEGGER ABOUT THE ANTHROPOLOGICAL INTENTION OF DESCARTES` PHILOSOPHIZING

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anatolii M. Malivskyi

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available The purpose of the article is to single out and comprehend the key points of Heidegger`s vision of the main ideas of Descartes` philosophy while searching «the other beginning» of philosophizing as anthropology. The implementation of the objective assumes the solution of the following tasks: justification of the Heidegger`s idea of the critical relation to the established stereotypes of technomorphism about the basic intention of Descartes` philosophy, the reconstruction of the context of Heidegger`s considering the understanding of the basic intention and main motives of Descartes` philosophizing, the authenticity analysis of the reception of Descartes` doctrine by Heidegger in modern literature. Methodology. The achievements of the anthropologically focused thought of the 20th century, namely existentialism, philosophical anthropology, personalism, communicative philosophy have the essential potential during the constructive judgment and theoretical reconstruction of anthropological intention of philosophizing. Heidegger's heritage takes on a special significance, especially his reflections about the ways of searching and finding a substantial alternative to the technicism in the form of «the other beginning» of philosophizing. Scientific novelty. The analysis of the scientific literature, devoted to the relationship of Heidegger – Descartes, testifies to the domination of the truncated understanding of Descartes`s philosophy deprived of an anthropological component, and, as a result, ignoration of the substantial succession of the Descartes` ideas by Heidegger. Considering Heidegger's corresponding texts devoted to the understanding of the deep transformations of the New time, we find out the anthropology as a cornerstone of science and technology. Understanding the basic part of anthropology in the culture of the New time makes Heidegger devote much attention to the destruction of the established ideas of self-sufficiency of science

  2. Linking anthropological analysis and epidemiological evidence ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Attempting to formulate a clearer narrative of HIV transmission in Acholiland, this paper jointly analyses the historical and political context of the Acholi people and the war, the epidemiologic evidence of HIV prevalence patterns, and the ethnographic perspectives of Acholi healthcare workers and patients living with ...

  3. The Centrality of Philosophical Anthropology to (a Future) Environmental Ethics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gare, Arran

    2016-01-01

    While environmental ethics has successfully established itself in philosophy, as presently conceived it is still largely irrelevant to grappling the global ecological crisis because, as Alasdair MacIntyre has argued, ethical philosophy itself is in grave disorder. MacIntyre's historically oriented recovery of virtue ethics is defended, but it is argued that even MacIntyre was too constrained by received assumptions to overcome this disorder. As he himself realized, his ideas need to be integrated and defended through philosophical anthropology. However, it is suggested that current defenders of philosophical anthropology have not done it justice. To appreciate its importance it is necessary accept that we are cultural beings in which the core of culture is the conception of what are humans. This is presupposed not only in thought but in social practices and forms of life. This was understood by Aristotle, but modernity has been straightjacketed by the Seventeenth Century scientific revolution and Hobbes' philosophical anthropology, identifying knowledge and with techno-science and eliminating any place for questioning this conception of humans. The only conception of humanity that could successfully challenge and replace Hobbes' philosophical anthropology, it is argued, is Hegel's philosophical anthropology reformulated and developed on naturalistic foundations. This involves subordinating science to a reconceived humanities with a fundamentally different role accorded to ethics, placing it at the center of social life, politics and economics and at the centre of the struggle to transform culture and society to create an ecologically sustainable civilization.

  4. [Molecular anthropology and the origin of modern human].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sheng, Gui-Lian; Lai, Xu-Long; Wang, Wei

    2004-09-01

    Since Watson & Crick put forward the double-helix model of DNA structure and hereditary mechanism in 1953, it is generally accepted that this event marks the birth of modern molecular biology. This new field of biology has experienced a flourishing development in the past 50 years. On one hand, the development of molecular biology has been deeply influencing many relative fields; on the other hand, its own proceeding pace has been accelerated by the reaction from the other fields. Anthropology is one of the fields most deeply impacted by the theory and method of molecular biology. Most importantly, molecular anthropology was born as a result of combination of molecular biology, anthropology as well as paleoanthropology. This new branch provides reliable method and vital direction for paleoanthropology. This paper systematically reviews the history, principle and method of molecular anthropology. Two hypotheses on the origin of modern human, which include "out-of-African theory" and "theory of multiregional evolution" are also discussed for the purpose of showing how molecular anthropology is applied in paleoanthropology.

  5. Theory and the scientific basis for forensic anthropology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boyd, Clifford; Boyd, Donna C

    2011-11-01

    Forensic anthropology has long been criticized for its lack of a strong theoretical and scientific foundation. This paper addresses this problem by examining the role of theory in forensic anthropology at different hierarchical levels (high-level, middle-range, and low-level) and the relevance of various theoretical concepts (taphonomic, agency, behavioral archaeology, nonlinear systems, and methodological theories) to the interpretation of forensic contexts. Application of these theories to a case study involving the search for the WWII Goettge Patrol illustrates the explanatory power these theories offer to the interpretation of forensic events as the end product of an often complex set of environmental constraints and behavioral interactions and choices. It also emphasizes the importance of case studies in theory building and hypothesis testing. A theoretical foundation does indeed currently exist in forensic anthropology; however, a recognition and broader implementation of anthropological (archaeological) theory is warranted and will further define forensic anthropology as a scientific endeavor. © 2011 American Academy of Forensic Sciences.

  6. History, research and practice of forensic anthropology in Thailand.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Traithepchanapai, Pongpon; Mahakkanukrauh, Pasuk; Kranioti, Elena F

    2016-04-01

    Forensic anthropology is an increasingly developing discipline born about a century ago in the United States with the objective to contribute the knowledge of bone biology and physical anthropology to the emerging needs of the court of law. The development of research in biological and forensic anthropology has made rapid progress worldwide in the past few years, however, in most countries--with the exception of the United States--forensic anthropology work is still considered within the duties of the forensic pathologist. This paper attempts to summarise the history and development of forensic anthropology in Thailand by providing information on past and current research and practice that can help forensic practitioners to apply existing methods in forensic cases and mass disasters. It is hoped that the lessons learned from the tsunami catastrophe and the emerging need for positive identification in medicolegal settings will lead to rapid advances in education, training and professional engagement of anthropologists from the forensic departments and the law enforcement agencies in Thailand. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  7. History in the gene: negotiations between molecular and organismal anthropology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sommer, Marianne

    2008-01-01

    In the advertising discourse of human genetic database projects, of genetic ancestry tracing companies, and in popular books on anthropological genetics, what I refer to as the anthropological gene and genome appear as documents of human history, by far surpassing the written record and oral history in scope and accuracy as archives of our past. How did macromolecules become "documents of human evolutionary history"? Historically, molecular anthropology, a term introduced by Emile Zuckerkandl in 1962 to characterize the study of primate phylogeny and human evolution on the molecular level, asserted its claim to the privilege of interpretation regarding hominoid, hominid, and human phylogeny and evolution vis-à-vis other historical sciences such as evolutionary biology, physical anthropology, and paleoanthropology. This process will be discussed on the basis of three key conferences on primate classification and evolution that brought together exponents of the respective fields and that were held in approximately ten-years intervals between the early 1960s and the 1980s. I show how the anthropological gene and genome gained their status as the most fundamental, clean, and direct records of historical information, and how the prioritizing of these epistemic objects was part of a complex involving the objectivity of numbers, logic, and mathematics, the objectivity of machines and instruments, and the objectivity seen to reside in the epistemic objects themselves.

  8. Psicopatologia, exotismo e diversidade: ensaio de antropologia da psicopatologia Psychopathology, exoticism and diversity: some remarks on the anthropology of psychopathology

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Adriano Holanda

    2001-12-01

    Full Text Available O texto se propõe a uma reflexão em torno de uma perspectiva antropológica da questão da psicopatologia. Partindo da análise antropológica de Tzvetan Todorov, perpassa o ensaio histórico de Theodore Zeldin, alcançando a crítica de Thomas Szasz e a abordagem histórico-antropológica de Michel Foucault, na tentativa de clarear a compreensão do fenômeno psicopatológico. Nesta perspectiva crítico-histórica, a psicopatologia é vista como um fenômeno contextualizado, inserido na construção das mentalidades específicas da cultura ocidental.The purpose of this paper is to reflect upon an anthropological approach of psychopathology. It intends to throw some light upon the phenomenon of the "psychopathologic". It begins with some remarks on the anthropological concept of Tzevan Todorov. It also analyses Theodore Zeldin’s historical essay, Thomas Szasz’s critical reflections and Michel Foucault’s historic-anthropological approach. In this historical perspective, "Psychopathology" is conceived as a rather contextualized phenomenon, part of the specific mentalities constructed by the Western culture.

  9. Eternal sunshine of the spotless mind? An anthropological-ethical framework for understanding and dealing with sexuality in dementia care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mahieu, Lieslot; Anckaert, Luc; Gastmans, Chris

    2014-08-01

    Contemporary bioethics pays considerable attention to the ethical aspects of dementia care. However, ethical issues of sexuality especially as experienced by institutionalized persons with dementia are often overlooked. The relevant existing ethics literature generally applies an implicit philosophical anthropology that favors the principle of respect for autonomy and the concomitant notion of informed consent. In this article we will illustrate how this way of handling the issue fails in its duty to people with dementia. Our thesis is that a more inclusive philosophical anthropology is needed that also heeds the fate of this growing population. Drawing on the tradition of phenomenology, we will chalk out an anthropological framework that rests on four fundamental characteristics of human existence: the decentered self, human embodiment, being-in-the-world and being-with-others. Our aim in this article is thus to tentatively put forward a broader perspective for looking at aged sexuality in institutionalized people with dementia. Hopefully the developed framework will mark the beginning of a new and refreshed ethical reflection on the topic at hand.

  10. Bruner's Search for Meaning: A Conversation between Psychology and Anthropology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mattingly, Cheryl; Lutkehaus, Nancy C.; Throop, C. Jason

    2010-01-01

    We introduce a special issue of Ethos devoted to the work of Jerome Bruner and his careerlong attempts to seek innovative ways to foster a dialogue between psychology and anthropology. The articles in this special issue situate Bruner's meaning-centered approach to psychology and his groundbreaking work on narrative in the broader context of the developmental trajectory of both of fields of inquiry. Bruner's work has been enormously influential in the subfields of cultural psychology and psychological anthropology, especially because of his important contributions to our understanding of the intimate relationship between culture and mind. We examine Bruner's past and ongoing engagement with such luminary figures as Lev Vygotsky, Jean Piaget, Alfred Kroeber, Claude Lévi-Strauss, and Clifford Geertz to highlight points of convergence and tension between his version of cultural psychology and contemporary theorizing and practice in psychological anthropology. We also review his practical and theoretical contributions to the fields of medicine, law, and education. PMID:20706551

  11. Contributions of pathological alterations to forensic anthropology interpretation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Douglas H. Ubelaker

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available Pathology plays a key role in various aspects of interpretation within forensic anthropology.  These contributions include observations of the effects of pathological conditions and using them to facilitate identification efforts.  In the context of the broader definition of pathology as “something abnormal” it forms the foundation of much of the logic, methodology and practice of forensic anthropology.  In fact, only unusual conditions not shared by many others can be utilized for positive identification.  Recovery efforts and evaluation of the evidence of foul play, as well as the estimation sex, age at death, ancestry, living stature, time since death and other important components depend upon recognition of normal and abnormal patterns.  The multifaceted contributions of pathology to the practice of forensic anthropology are firmly documented in casework applications

  12. Anthropology and the “imaginators” of future European universities

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wright, Susan

    2015-01-01

    This article focuses on the site where much anthropological work is conducted—universities—and anthropological approaches to studying their current transformations. Although I work comparatively on the imagining and enactment of universities in Denmark and Britain, here I focus on the recent...... in arts and social sciences, and transfer of public resources to commercial, for-profit higher education companies. I will briefly outline the problems that opponents to these moves are having in imagining an alternative future, let alone organizing themselves to contest current developments....... In conclusion, I will point to the changes in anthropology itself that are incurred when engaging in an ethnography of such a large policy field and when attempting to capture “what the present is producing” (Moore 1987: 727)....

  13. Bruner's Search for Meaning: A Conversation between Psychology and Anthropology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mattingly, Cheryl; Lutkehaus, Nancy C; Throop, C Jason

    2008-03-01

    We introduce a special issue of Ethos devoted to the work of Jerome Bruner and his careerlong attempts to seek innovative ways to foster a dialogue between psychology and anthropology. The articles in this special issue situate Bruner's meaning-centered approach to psychology and his groundbreaking work on narrative in the broader context of the developmental trajectory of both of fields of inquiry. Bruner's work has been enormously influential in the subfields of cultural psychology and psychological anthropology, especially because of his important contributions to our understanding of the intimate relationship between culture and mind. We examine Bruner's past and ongoing engagement with such luminary figures as Lev Vygotsky, Jean Piaget, Alfred Kroeber, Claude Lévi-Strauss, and Clifford Geertz to highlight points of convergence and tension between his version of cultural psychology and contemporary theorizing and practice in psychological anthropology. We also review his practical and theoretical contributions to the fields of medicine, law, and education.

  14. MORAL TECHNIQUES. FORENSIC ANTHROPOLOGY AND ITS ARTIFACTS FOR DOING GOOD

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    GABRIEL GATTI

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available In many of its applications forensic anthropology is a singular discipline, midway between a bare techno-scientific exercise and a militant involvement in overcoming situations marked by human rights violations. Today, riding on an intense and transnational wave of humanitarian sensitivity, forensic anthropology has acquired a significant scientific, moral and media status, and has become a front line scientific-technical practice in the human rights field at the planetary level. This text, which analyzes some of the artifacts with which forensic anthropology represents and works on its object, aims to understand this discipline through the concept of moral technique, which, in my understanding, captures the particular tensions of this form of working for good.

  15. [On two ends of minority politics: an anthropological analysis of hattatsu shōgai and hikikomori communities].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Teruyama, Junko; Horiguchi, Sachiko

    2012-01-01

    This paper provides a comparative analysis of two communities in Japan based on long-term anthropological fieldwork: one is the community of those with hattatsu shōgai (developmental disorder) and their families and the other is the community of those who have experienced hikikomori and their families. The purpose of this paper is to examine the similarities and differences between the two communities in terms of the ways in which medical diagnoses are understood, identities are formed and certain perspectives on society are shared. By doing so, we attempt to move beyond the clinical sphere to capture the sociocultural significance of "being" an individual with developmental disorder or hikikomori experience.

  16. The good, the ugly and the dirty harry's of conservation: Rethinking the anthropology of conservation NGOs

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Peter Bille Larsen

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available For the past decade, narrative portrayals of non-governmental organisations (NGOs growing big, 'ugly', and business-minded have become common in both social science and public discourse. At a time when both engagement within NGOs as well as critical analysis from the outside has blossomed, how are the social sciences and anthropology in particular responding? This article suggests that a set of meta-narratives characterise much of the literature analysing conservation NGOs. Such narratives respectively position NGOs as doing good, turning ugly or acting pragmatically through what I label 'Dirty Harry' characteristics. While the critique of conservation NGOs offers a much needed 'reality check', it is time to revisit dichotomies of the 'good' past and the ugly present. The article reviews trends in the literature and offers a case study from the Peruvian Amazon. The final synthesis emphasises the need for a less essentialist perspective tracing heterogeneity and change of NGO activity over time.

  17. [The semi-structured interview: at the border of public health and anthropology].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Imbert, Geneviève

    2010-09-01

    The interview is the tool for data collection the most used in the context of research conducted in health sciences, human sciences and social sciences. After completing some generalities about the different types of interviews, the focus is on semi-structured interview during its various stages including the processing and data analysis, this from the return of a lived experience of research in work on the border of the field of public health and that of anthropology. If this approach and contextualized the semistructured interview may a priori appear specific, the reader interested in the development of qualitative research in a humanistic perspective and the implementation of multidisciplinary strategies to ascertain its universal character.

  18. On the esthetics of pleasures: guidelines for a socio-anthropology of (homo)sexualities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mendès-Leite, R

    1993-01-01

    The goal of this article is to contribute to the elaboration of a socio-anthropology of the sexualities in an epistemological perspective by setting forward some theoretical guidelines I have been adopting in my present research project. I propose the notion of "culture of sexualities" like a system that focuses on the socio-cultural and historical construction of sexualities in relation with the global culture's internal logic in each given society. It includes biological sex, social sex, gender problematics, sexual identities, sexual roles, sexual orientations, and social stereotypes in its inter-relations and in connection with social and historical changing. I also give attention to the relations between the "sexual" and the "non sexual" sociabilities ("homosocial" or "heterosocial") and to the importance of sexualities' social imaginary in the elaboration of a relativist and constructivist approach.

  19. 77 FR 34987 - Notice of Inventory Completion: University of Pennsylvania Museum of Archaeology & Anthropology...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-06-12

    ... National Park Service Notice of Inventory Completion: University of Pennsylvania Museum of Archaeology...: Notice. SUMMARY: The University of Pennsylvania Museum of Archaeology & Anthropology has completed an...: Dr. Richard Hodges, Director, University of Pennsylvania Museum of Archaeology & Anthropology...

  20. 77 FR 5841 - Notice of Inventory Completion: Department of Anthropology, University of Massachusetts, Amherst, MA

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-02-06

    ... National Park Service Notice of Inventory Completion: Department of Anthropology, University of Massachusetts, Amherst, MA AGENCY: National Park Service, Interior. ACTION: Notice. SUMMARY: The University of Massachusetts Amherst, Department of Anthropology has completed an inventory of human remains, in consultation...

  1. 77 FR 74868 - Notice of Inventory Completion: Department of Anthropology, University of Massachusetts, Amherst, MA

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-12-18

    ... National Park Service Notice of Inventory Completion: Department of Anthropology, University of Massachusetts, Amherst, MA AGENCY: National Park Service, Interior. ACTION: Notice. SUMMARY: The University of Massachusetts Amherst, Department of Anthropology has completed an inventory of human remains, in consultation...

  2. 76 FR 28077 - Notice of Inventory Completion: Western Michigan University, Anthropology Department, Kalamazoo, MI

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-05-13

    ... National Park Service Notice of Inventory Completion: Western Michigan University, Anthropology Department, Kalamazoo, MI AGENCY: National Park Service, Interior. ACTION: Notice. SUMMARY: Western Michigan University, Department of Anthropology, has completed an inventory of human remains, in consultation with the appropriate...

  3. 76 FR 28078 - Notice of Inventory Completion: Western Michigan University, Anthropology Department, Kalamazoo, MI

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-05-13

    ... National Park Service Notice of Inventory Completion: Western Michigan University, Anthropology Department, Kalamazoo, MI AGENCY: National Park Service, Interior. ACTION: Notice. SUMMARY: Western Michigan University, Anthropology Department, has completed an inventory of human remains and associated funerary objects, in...

  4. ANTHROPOLOGICAL BASIS OF HUMAN DIMENSION IN SPORT AS THE IMPLEMENTATION OF A PERSON'S GENERIC ESSENCE

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    V. Ye. Bilogur

    2013-01-01

    ... formation of sports anthropology and philosophy of sport. Methodology. The understanding of human nature problems, human existence in the form of sports activity, the potential of anthropological picture of the sporting world...

  5. Issues in the global applications of methodology in forensic anthropology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ubelaker, Douglas H

    2008-05-01

    The project and research reported in this collection of articles follows a long-term historical pattern in forensic anthropology in which new case work and applications reveal methodological issues that need to be addressed. Forensic anthropological analysis in the area of the former Yugoslavia led to questions raised regarding the applicability of methods developed from samples in other regions. The subsequently organized project reveals that such differences exist and new methodology and data are presented to facilitate applications in the Balkan area. The effort illustrates how case applications and court testimony can stimulate research advances. The articles also serve as a model for the improvement of methodology available for global applications.

  6. An awkward relationship: the case of feminism and anthropology

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marilyn Strathern

    2009-12-01

    Full Text Available This article explores some of the problems - and reactions - that arise in the dialogue between disciplinary practices and feminist theory. Certainly anthropology has interests parallel to those of feminist scholarship, but the proximity makes anthropologists’ resistance more poignant. That dissonance is actually a product of feminists’ and anthropologists’ intellectual proximity – as neighbors in tension. Practitioners of both imagine they might be overthrowing existing paradigms, and one might, in turn, expect “radical” anthropology to draw on its feminist counterpart, what does not seem to have happened. Their resistance to one another will throw light on the difference between “feminism” and “anthropology” as such.

  7. [The biolaw anthropological basis. A philosofical reflection of biolaw].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chávez-Fernández Postigo, José

    2015-01-01

    From a basic terminological clarification, we seek to examine briefly what can be acknowledged as the two biggest attempts of foundation in the Biolaw contemporary area, that of the Kantian tradition and that of the anthropological and metaphysical realism. Through a critical examination of the first one, we attempt to show that only from a freedom or an autonomy assumed from the anthropological and metaphysical realism, is possible to hold a Biolaw as a true impervious limit against the technological power regarding human life and human procreation.

  8. In the Image of Love: Key Voices for Theological Anthropology

    OpenAIRE

    Meszaros, Julia; De Maeseneer, Yves

    2017-01-01

    Love lies at the very heart of the Christian faith and its conception of both God and the human being. Nevertheless, the growing field of theological anthropology has yet to fully avail itself of philosophy’s and theology’s renewed attention to the theme of love. The Introduction to this special issue proposes the phrase ‘in the image of Love’ as an invitation to examine the relation between theological anthropology and love throughout the history of Christian thought. Guided by this motif, t...

  9. The new biological anthropology: bringing Washburn's new physical anthropology into 2010 and beyond--the 2008 AAPA luncheon lecture.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fuentes, Agustin

    2010-01-01

    Nearly 60 years ago, Sherwood Washburn issued a call for a "New Physical Anthropology," a transition from measurement and classification toward a focus on the processes and mechanisms of evolutionary change. He advocated multidisciplinary and interdisciplinary approaches to the understanding of human behavior, biology, and history. Many interpret this as a call for a practice that is both biological and anthropological. Is this what we do? Are we biological anthropologists yet? In this essay, I explore what we, Physical Anthropologists, as a discipline are doing in the context of a New Physical Anthropology, where we might be headed, and why this discussion is crucial to our relevance. Copyright © 2010 Wiley-Liss, Inc.

  10. The Broad Superintendents Academy, 2007

    Science.gov (United States)

    Broad Foundation, 2007

    2007-01-01

    The Broad Superintendents Academy is an executive training program that identifies and prepares prominent leaders--executives with experience successfully leading large organizations and a passion for public service--then places them in urban school districts to dramatically improve the quality of education for America's students. This brochure…

  11. 76 FR 73664 - Notice of Inventory Completion: Washington State University, Museum of Anthropology, Pullman, WA

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-11-29

    ... National Park Service Notice of Inventory Completion: Washington State University, Museum of Anthropology... University, Museum of Anthropology (WSU) has completed an inventory of human remains and associated funerary... Collins, Director, Washington State University, Museum of Anthropology, Pullman, WA 99164-4910, telephone...

  12. Anthropology. CUNY Panel: Rethinking the Disciplines. Women in the Curriculum Series.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mencher, Joan P.; Nash, June; Francis-Okongwu, Anne; Susser, Ida.

    This collection of four essays examines the ways in which anthropology, as a discipline, reflects ongoing scholarship on gender, race, ethnicity, social class, and sexual orientation. In "The Impact of Gender Studies on Anthropology," Joan P. Mencher reviews the effects of gender studies on physical anthropology, archeology, and…

  13. 76 FR 14067 - Notice of Inventory Completion: University of Massachusetts, Department of Anthropology, Amherst...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-03-15

    ... Anthropology, Amherst, MA and Nantucket Historical Association, Nantucket, MA AGENCY: National Park Service... funerary object in the possession of the University of Massachusetts, Department of Anthropology, Amherst... human remains was made by University of Massachusetts, Department of Anthropology, professional staff in...

  14. 78 FR 64007 - Notice of Inventory Completion: University of Denver Department of Anthropology and Museum of...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-10-25

    ... National Park Service Notice of Inventory Completion: University of Denver Department of Anthropology and Museum of Anthropology, Denver, CO; Correction AGENCY: National Park Service, Interior. ACTION: Notice; correction. SUMMARY: The University of Denver Museum of Anthropology has corrected an inventory of human...

  15. 76 FR 28075 - Notice of Inventory Completion: Logan Museum of Anthropology, Beloit College, Beloit, WI

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-05-13

    ... National Park Service Notice of Inventory Completion: Logan Museum of Anthropology, Beloit College, Beloit... Museum of Anthropology, Beloit College, Beloit, WI. The human remains and associated funerary objects... Museum of Anthropology, Beloit College, professional staff in consultation with representatives of the...

  16. 76 FR 28073 - Notice of Inventory Completion: Logan Museum of Anthropology, Beloit College, Beloit, WI

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-05-13

    ... National Park Service Notice of Inventory Completion: Logan Museum of Anthropology, Beloit College, Beloit... of an inventory of human remains in the possession of the Logan Museum of Anthropology, Beloit... Logan Museum of Anthropology, Beloit College, professional staff in consultation with representatives of...

  17. Dealing with a Dilemma: Distinguishing Anthropology Materials from Other Pre-collegiate Social Studies Materials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dynneson, Thomas L.

    This paper is a lead-in to a book entitled "Pre-Collegiate Anthropology: Trends and Materials" (SO 008 751) published in 1975 by the Anthropology Curriculum Study Project (ACSP). Topics discussed include the processes and procedures which ACSP used to gather materials for the publication, the sources of the anthropology materials,…

  18. The Review of and Reaction to Selected Anthropology Projects by Professional Anthropologists.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dynneson, Thomas L.; Taylor, Bob L.

    The main concern of this paper is to determine the accuracy and representativeness of anthropology material from: Anthropology Curriculum Project (ACP); Education Development Center's Man A Course of Study (MACOS); Materials and Activities for Teachers and Children (MATCH); University of Minnesota's Project Social Studies; Anthropology Curriculum…

  19. Anthropology, Dance, and Education: Integrated Curriculum in Social Studies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, Karli; Kulinna, Pamela Hodges; Vissicaro, Pegge; Fredrickson, Lynda

    2016-01-01

    The integration of dance into K-12 curriculum can help students to learn better, encouraging deeper exploration and active engagement with content knowledge. The purpose of this intervention study was to determine how the integration of dance and social studies with an anthropological framework affects student learning of content knowledge in…

  20. Kantian anthropology and the feminine task of moralit

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Janyne Sattle

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available Despite Kant’s unfriendly descriptions about women in works such as Anthropology from a pragmatic point of view and Observations on the feeling of the beautiful and sublime, the characteristics attributed to them with regard to their “character” and dispositions could serve much more noblepurposes than the mere caprice of a “weak” sex which has no autonomy and is nearly amoral. One of these noble purposes would be related to the natural end of mankind towards its progress and perfection, especially with regard to the highest level of its “moralization”, yet far from being achieved.The characteristics of such womanlike functions are obviously connected with the preservation of human species but also with the development of culture and civilization of mankind in general; these very characteristics would be those of an anthropological (empirical discipline from a pragmaticpoint of view. In this sense, as well as philosophy and any other deep and hard study are appropriate for men, for they are rationally closer to moral understanding in a formal way, what is appropriate for women is the anthropological observation aimed to the application of what constitutes the practical part of pure ethics: the pragmatic anthropology, so as it is defined by Kant, is a feminine task par excellence

  1. Anthropology at the University of Yaounde I: A Historical Overview ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    daouda.thiam

    2010-05-14

    May 14, 2010 ... Before then, ethnology was being taught given that the founding fathers of Cameroon anthropology were trained in. France. The fundamental change in the late 1970s was largely deter- mined by the huge amount of literature coming out of the American tradition. For the past two decades, culture as a ...

  2. Cultural Difference and Human Rights : A Philosophical-Anthropological Approach

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    J. Kloeg (Julien)

    2014-01-01

    textabstractIn ‘Cultural Difference and Human Rights’, Julien Kloeg claims, with Pablo Gilabert, that theoretical attempts to justify human rights should move beyond the dichotomy of providing either a humanist or a political justification. Kloeg demonstrates how philosophical anthropology could

  3. [With reference to the body anthropology: a human being].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paluch, A

    1998-01-01

    What does a man consist of? - the query "as old as a world". Does he consist of soul and body being the separate independent entities, or is he a mixture of those elements constituting an inseparable whole? It is a question which scientists of various disciplines are still trying to answer. While belief that those two elements coexist separately was sufficient for dualists, the burden of constant search for the "liaison" between the spiritual and the corporeal lay on the monists. The intellectual change of modern and post-modern times inaugurated the change also in this respect. The anthropological controversy assumes different shapes now: man is seen monisticaly, as a whole, and new directions in seeing the world and cognition are being formed. Phenomenology as well as cultural anthropology has done a lot in this field. While studying human body it also studies a man as a whole (body - subject); human body changes as if inherently according to a biological order but it is also shaped by "history", i.e. events, society, learning, politics, culture. And in those contexts body is studied by anthropology - a new specialization emerges: anthropology of body.

  4. Dolphins Who Blow Bubbles: Anthropological Machines and Native Informants

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Lord, C.

    2011-01-01

    "Dolphins Who Blow Bubbles: Anthropological Machines and Native Informants" engages a reading between an Oscar winning and now ‘cult’ activist film The Cove (Louise Psihoyos 2009) and classical texts on the human-animal threshold. Giorgio Agamben’s The Open (2002) and Jacques Derrida’s "The Animal

  5. Modernization, Cultural Pluralism, and Identity: An Approach from Cultural Anthropology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sarkany, Mihaly

    1992-01-01

    Asserts that Erik Erickson's concept of identity gave a strong impetus to cultural anthropological research. Asserts that it is impossible for all 2,000 distinct ethnic groups to remain unchanged in today's world. Maintains that difficult choices of cultural traits selection will have to be made by peoples of all cultures. (CFR)

  6. Recovering the Philosophical Anthropology of Max Scheler for Leadership Studies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harter, Nathan

    2006-01-01

    During the first half of the twentieth century, a handful of German speaking scholars examined leadership through the lens of what came to be known as philosophical anthropology, a field of study inaugurated by Max Scheler. Not only do their contributions belong in the history of leadership studies, but the findings of philosophical anthropology…

  7. The field of medical anthropology in Social Science & Medicine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Panter-Brick, Catherine; Eggerman, Mark

    2018-01-01

    Conceptually and methodologically, medical anthropology is well-positioned to support a "big-tent" research agenda on health and society. It fosters approaches to social and structural models of health and wellbeing in ways that are critically reflective, cross-cultural, people-centered, and transdisciplinary. In this review article, we showcase these four main characteristics of the field, as featured in Social Science & Medicine over the last fifty years, highlighting their relevance for an international and interdisciplinary readership. First, the practice of critical inquiry in ethnographies of health offers a deep appreciation of sociocultural viewpoints when recording and interpreting lived experiences and contested social worlds. Second, medical anthropology champions cross-cultural breadth: it makes explicit local understandings of health experiences across different settings, using a fine-grained, comparative approach to develop a stronger global platform for the analysis of health-related concerns. Third, in offering people-centered views of the world, anthropology extends the reach of critical enquiry to the lived experiences of hard-to-reach population groups, their structural vulnerabilities, and social agency. Finally, in developing research at the nexus of cultures, societies, biologies, and health, medical anthropologists generate new, transdisciplinary conversations on the body, mind, person, community, environment, prevention, and therapy. As featured in this journal, scholarly contributions in medical anthropology seek to debate human health and wellbeing from many angles, pushing forward methodology, social theory, and health-related practice. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  8. The Role of Anthropology in Maintaining a Popular Stereotype

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morris, Martha Binford

    1977-01-01

    Student responses to a questionnaire indicate a popular hypothesis of human nature, derived from the works of Ardrey, Morris and others, which leads people to expect the worst from their fellows. To avoid negative consequences of this stereotype, these perceptions should be corrected in the introductory anthropology classroom. (Author/GC)

  9. A Business Anthropological Approach to the Study of Values

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Moeran, Brian

    2012-01-01

    This article describes and analyses preparations for the holding of an anthropologist potter's one-man show in a Japanese department store. It has two aims: first, to show the methodological and analytical strengths of business anthropology and second, to propose a sociological theory of multiple...

  10. Revitalizing Anthropology in East Africa: The Birth of EAAA ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    East Africa is known the world over for its extensive contribution to the history of humankind especially through the work of paleontologists and other archaeologists. Yet if one asked an average East African what anthropology is one is likely to be told that it is something to do with looking at old bones or one will have no clue ...

  11. Beyond critique: rethinking roles for the anthropology of mental health.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Whitley, Rob

    2014-09-01

    The current supremacy of the 'bio-bio-bio' model within the discipline of psychiatry has progressively marginalized social science approaches to mental health. This situation begs the question, what role is there for the anthropology of mental health? In this essay, I contend that there are three essential roles for the anthropology of mental health in an era of biological psychiatry. These roles are to (i) provide a meaningful critique of practices, beliefs, and movements within current psychiatry; (ii) illuminate the socio-cultural, clinical, and familial context of suffering and healing regarding emotional distress/mental illness; and (iii) act as a catalyst for positive change regarding healing, services and provisions for people with emotional distress/mental illness. My argument is unified by my contention that a credible anthropology of mental health intending to make a societal contribution should offer no opposition without proposition. In other words, any critique must be counter-balanced by the detailing of solutions and proposals for change. This will ensure that the anthropology of mental health continues to contribute critical knowledge to the understanding of mental suffering, distress, and healing. Such social and cultural approaches are becoming especially important given the widespread disenchantment with an increasingly dominant biological psychiatry.

  12. Embodiment, Meaning and the Anthropology of Religion | Pillay ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Embodiment, Meaning and the Anthropology of Religion. ... two eminent anthropologists of religion, Clifford Geertz and Talal Asad, in order to clarify the ... the modern political community. It questions the self-evident nature of this distinction by considering the historical genealogy of religion as a discrete domain of social life.

  13. Anthropology with an Agenda: Four Forgotten Dance Anthropologists

    Science.gov (United States)

    Richter, Katrina

    2010-01-01

    In response to postcolonial, feminist and subaltern critiques of anthropology, this article seeks to answer the question, "For whom should research be conducted, and by whom should it be used?" by examining the lives and works of four female dance anthropologists. Franziska Boas, Zora Neale Hurston, Katherine Dunham and Pearl Primus used…

  14. Transforming Conflict Resolution Education: Applying Anthropology alongside Your Students

    Science.gov (United States)

    Avruch, Kevin

    2009-01-01

    This article describes the role graduate students can play in transforming their education in the emergent field of Conflict Analysis and Resolution, as occurs at the Institute for Conflict Analysis and Resolution (ICAR), at George Mason University, Washington, DC. It also unpacks how anthropology plays a role in the education of these students at…

  15. Ecological anthropology of households in East Madura, Indonesia

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Smith, W.G.

    2011-01-01

      This dissertation is the result of diachronic and comparative anthropological study of rural households in Northeast Madura, Indonesia, carried out on eight separate visits between August 1985 and March 2009. The aim is to bring time-structured data to bear on key questions regarding the

  16. Guidelines for the structure of methodological processes in visual anthropology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Svilicić, Niksa

    2011-12-01

    Vast majority of visual anthropologists of the 20th century were more focused on general phenomenology of visual anthropology, i.e. the content aspect of their works and their impact on scientific knowledge, leaving behind style of directing and practical principles & processes of creating anthropological film. So far, judging by the available literature, there are no strict guidelines for directorial procedures, nor the precise definition of determining of the methodical processes in production of an anthropological film. Consequently, the goal of this study is to determine the structure and forms of methodical processes as well as to define the advantages and disadvantages of each of them. By using adequate guidelines, the researcher, i.e. the author of the anthropological film, can optimize the production and post-production processes as soon as in preparation (preproduction) period of working on the film, by the technical choice of the approach to the production (proactive/reactive/subjective/objective...) and by defining the style of directing. In other words, it ultimately means more relevant scientific research result with less time and resources.

  17. Why did Kant reject physiological explanations in his anthropology?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sturm, Thomas

    2008-12-01

    One of Kant's central tenets concerning the human sciences is the claim that one need not, and should not, use a physiological vocabulary if one studies human cognitions, feelings, desires, and actions from the point of view of his 'pragmatic' anthropology. The claim is well known, but the arguments Kant advances for it have not been closely discussed. I argue against misguided interpretations of the claim, and I present his actual reasons in favor of it. Contemporary critics of a 'physiological anthropology' reject physiological explanations of mental states as more or less epistemologically dubious. Kant does not favor such ignorance claims--and this is for the good, since none of these claims was sufficiently justified at that time. Instead, he develops an original irrelevance thesis concerning the empirical knowledge of the physiological basis of the mind. His arguments for this claim derive from his original and, up to now, little understood criticism of a certain conception of pragmatic history, related to his anthropological insights concerning our ability to create new rules of action, the social dynamics of human action, and the relative inconstancy of human nature. The irrelevance thesis also changes his views of the goal and methodology of anthropology. Kant thereby argues for a distinctive approach in quest for a general 'science of man'.

  18. ediomo-ubong e. nelson Department of Sociology/Anthropology ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    the sexual health of sex workers should grapple with the cultural realities of drug use as a risky behaviour in sex work. Key Words: Sex work, drug use, brothels, sexual health risks, Nigeria corresponding Author: Ediomo-Ubong E. Nelson, Department of Sociology/Anthropology, University of Uyo, P. O.. Box 923, Uyo, Nigeria ...

  19. A Man Caught Between Bad Anthropology and Good Theology?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pedersen, Else Marie Wiberg

    2010-01-01

    Martin Luther's view of women is as complex as his authorship is vast, encompassing a diversity of gneres and purposes. Luther seems ambivalent toward women like the tradition before and after him. In his reformation enterprise he appears as torn between his good theology and a bad anthropology...

  20. Access to Legal Anthropology: An Approach to Teaching Older Adults.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nicholson, M.E.R.

    1981-01-01

    This description of two courses of college level Legal Anthropology for senior citizens in continuing education shows how students with widely varying backgrounds examined legal dilemmas within their international cultural contexts using mystery stories and other fiction. The need for innovative teaching methods for adult learners is stressed. (AM)

  1. The origins of American physical anthropology in Philadelphia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mann, Alan

    2009-01-01

    With its location on a river with easy access to the sea, its central placement between the English speaking colonies to the north and south and its trading connections with the western frontier, there were many reasons Philadelphia became one of the most important towns of prerevolutionary America. In the early 1770s, it was the site of the first meeting organized to deal with the perceived inequities of the British government toward the colonies. It was where Thomas Jefferson wrote much of the Declaration of Independence, whose soaring statements reflecting the Age of Enlightenment spoke of the equality of all men. It was to this debate, centered on just who was included in this declaration that the origins of physical anthropology in America can be traced. Notable men in the early phases of this disputation included Samuel Stanhope Smith and especially Samuel George Morton, considered the founder of American physical anthropology. The American School of Anthropology, which argued for the polygenic origins of human races was substantially founded on Morton's work. Recent accusations that Morton manipulated data to support his racist views would appear unfounded. The publication of The Origin of Species in 1859 and the issuing of the Emancipation Proclamation in 1862-63 effectively ended the earlier debates. By the time of the American Civil War, 1861-65, physical anthropology was beginning to explore other topics including growth and development and anthropometry. Copyright 2009 Wiley-Liss, Inc.

  2. Review and Update: Pre-Collegiate Anthropology Materials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dynneson, Thomas

    1977-01-01

    In 1975 Dynneson summarized six major projects, five simulations and games, five texts and some supplementary materials which drew upon or reflected the discipline of anthropology. This article extends the 1975 Dynneson review and includes seven new items: two courses and units, one simulation, three texts, and one film strip. (Author/JM)

  3. Selective Bibliography in Anthropology and World History Resources.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vigliani, Alice

    The selective, annotated bibliography provides junior high and secondary social studies teachers with an overview of current materials and resources in anthropology and world history. There are five major sections. Basal Curriculum Materials contains references to 16 textbook and basal media programs covering the history and comparative life…

  4. METAPHYSICAL REVOLUTION OF DESCARTES AND TRANSFORMATION OF THE ANTHROPOLOGICAL PROJECT

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anatolii M. Malivskyi

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available The purpose is to reveal and comprehend forms of influence metaphysical' revolution for a way of interpretation of the anthropological project by Descartes on the basis of investigations of modern dekartes's researchers, that is the recognition of a fundamental role of metaphysics. Methodology. As methodological base modern investigations of dekartes's researchers accenting a fundamental role of metaphysics and expediency of unbiassed judgment of heritage of the great thinker are used. The scientific novelty. The transformation of the anthropological project is outlined as manifestation of metaphysical revolution. It is about a transcendencecy of naive anthropology (as an embodiment of reductive mindset, that is interpretations of human nature as its corporality and transition to metaphysical anthropology which consists in upholding of unconditional priority of human thinking as associated with God. As result of transition concentration of attention on intense human nature, that is at tension between sensuality and intelligence, aspiration to truth and tendency to delusion, between Life and Nothing, etc. Conclusions. The appeal to the incomplete anthropological project of Descartes on the basis of innovative researches allows proving the thesis about influence of metaphysical revolution on a way of its interpretation. The main forms of oriented to science ideals of naive anthropology, trust in evidence of the senses, atheism, interpretation of science as the main form of detection rationality of human nature, which Descartes tends constructively to overcome in the text of "meditation", are highlighted. During creation of metaphysical anthropology the attention of the thinker is drawn by the fact of impossibility of comprehension of human nature by means of natural-science rationality and expediency of the appeal to metaphysics. The subject of attention of the thinker is the tension between sensuality and intelligence, need

  5. Educational anthropology as a major approach for educational research: The beginnings and the evolution of educational anthropology, with an overview of its introduction in the Greek educational context

    OpenAIRE

    Ioannis Sideris

    2013-01-01

    This article is presenting and investigating the input of social and cultural anthropology in educational research. Moreover, the cultural focus is on Greece and Greek educational institutions. Socio-cultural anthropology offers a multiplicity of alternative pathways to the investigation of ‘who we are’ and why we behave the way we do through the study of cultures and institutions different from ours. The anthropology of education investigates a number of problems such as the socialization fu...

  6. THE RELATIONS BETWEEN ANTHROPOLOGICAL DIMENSIONS AND SWIMMING THE BREAST STROKE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Milomir Trivun

    2011-09-01

    Full Text Available at the Faculty of the Physical Education and Sport in East Sarajevo during 2009/10. Students were 22 years ± 6 months old. There was done the comparison in the following parameters: 11 variables of the anthropological status and one variable of the swimming the breast stroke at 50m. Predictable variables of the anthropological dimensions were: height, weight, shoulders’ breadth, hips’ breadth, skins’ folds of the back, skins’ folds of the upper arm, skins’ folds of the abdomen, the measurement of the upper arm, the measurement of the thigh, the measurement of the shank and the diameter of the knee’s joint. The criterion’s variable referred to the results’ success in swimming the breast stroke at 50m. The descriptive statistics was used in the research. The measures of central tendencies mean, minimum, maximum, standard deviation are expressed by descriptive statistics. For the correlation of the results of the anthropological status with the results at swimming the breast stroke at 50m the regressive analysis was used. The results of the group of 23 tested male students in 2009/10, which were shown in the measures of central tendencies, descriptive statistics and regressive analysis of the set of 11 predictable variables of anthropological students’ dimensions were compared with the results of the criterion’s variable shown by swimming the butterfly. During the regressive analysis, the list of the data which contains the information about the regression parameters and statistic values relevant for described testing procedures of the marked parameters were got. In this case the parameters were 11 variables of anthropological dimensions and the variables of the results‘ success in swimming the breast stroke at 50m.

  7. [Physical anthropology studies at Keijo Imperial University Medical School].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Ock-Joo

    2008-12-01

    Medical research during the Japanese Colonial Period became systematic and active after the Keijo Imperial University Medical School was established in 1926. Various kinds of research were conducted there including pharmacological, physiological, pathological and parasitological research. The Keijo Imperial University was give a mission to study about Korea. Urgent topics for medical research included control of infectious diseases, hygiene and environmental health that might have affected colonizing bodies of the Japanese as well as the colonized. The bodies of Koreans had been studied by Japanese even before the establishment of the University. The Keijo Imperial University research team, however, organized several field studies for physical anthropology and blood typing research at the national scale to get representative sampling of the people from its north to its south of the Korean peninsula. In the filed, they relied upon the local police and administrative power to gather reluctant women and men to measure them in a great detail. The physical anthropology and blood typing research by the Japanese researchers was related to their eagerness to place Korean people in the geography of the races in the world. Using racial index R.I.(= (A%+AB%)/(B%+AB%)), the Japanese researchers put Koreans as a race between the Mongolian and the Japanese. The preoccupation with constitution and race also pervasively affected the medical practice: race (Japanese, Korean, or Japanese living in Korea) must be written in every kind of medical chart as a default. After the breakout of Chinese-Japanese War in 1937, the Keijo Imperial University researchers extended its physical anthropology field study to Manchuria and China to get data on physics of the people in 1940. The Japanese government and research foundations financially well supported the Keijo Imperial University researchers and the field studies for physical anthropology in Korea, Manchuria and China. The physical

  8. Anthropology for the Schools: An Analysis of Selected Anthropology Curriculum Projects and Units with Content Ratings by Professional Anthropologists.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dynneson, Thomas L.

    This thesis examines anthropology teaching materials for public schools in light of their characteristics -- subject content, rationale and objectives, antecedent conditions, evaluation, background of materials development -- and the determination of their accuracy and representation. The study also serves as a guide to types of anthropology…

  9. The anthropology of death or the new anthropology and the religious complex connected to death

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ivan Kovačević

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available In this article the authors give a review of new anthropological work pertaining to dying, death and beliefs in life after death. Dying and the valorization of ways of dying are the subject of a paper by sociologist Todor Kuljić, while other relevant texts commented on by the authors are the results of the work done by anthropologists. Thus, the traditional belief in “prikoljiš” is analyzed in the text of Ivan Kovačević, while the folk belief in dying after death was analyzed by Dušan Bandić, and modern forms of grief in obituaries are analyzed by Ivan Čolović. The traditional belief in the vampire is the subject of analysis in papers by Dušan Bandić and Lidija Radulović, while the analysis of beliefs in immortality, present in a new religion, is the topic of a paper by Danijel Sinani.

  10. Millennial medical anthropology: from there to here and beyond, or the problem of global health.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gaines, Atwood D

    2011-03-01

    While much of Medical Anthropology was and is what we can call "Normal" (following Kuhn) Medical Anthropology, I coined the term Millennial Medical Anthropology for that branch of the discipline that, in the 1990s, was departing from the Normal research paradigms and was deserving of a distinct sobriquet. This paper considers the Strong Program in Medical Anthropology's Millennial Medical Anthropology and its key subdivisions, the Cultural Studies of Science and Cultural Bioethics. Specifically it considers Medical Anthropology's movement from the past into an ethical future wherein Normal Biomedicine, Bioethics and Global Health are problematized. This provides the basis for the construction of a truly anthropological global health (i.e., Global, Global Health or Global Health 2.0).

  11. Critical Anthropology of Global Health "takes a stand" statement: a critical medical anthropological approach to the U.S.'s Affordable Care Act.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Horton, Sarah; Abadía, Cesar; Mulligan, Jessica; Thompson, Jennifer Jo

    2014-03-01

    The Affordable Care Act (ACA) of 2010--the U.S.'s first major health care reform in over half a century-has sparked new debates in the United States about individual responsibility, the collective good, and the social contract. Although the ACA aims to reduce the number of the uninsured through the simultaneous expansion of the private insurance industry and government-funded Medicaid, critics charge it merely expands rather than reforms the existing fragmented and costly employer-based health care system. Focusing in particular on the ACA's individual mandate and its planned Medicaid expansion, this statement charts a course for ethnographic contributions to the on-the-ground impact of the ACA while showcasing ways critical medical anthropologists can join the debate. We conclude with ways that anthropologists may use critiques of the ACA as a platform from which to denaturalize assumptions of "cost" and "profit" that underpin the global spread of market-based medicine more broadly. © 2014 by the American Anthropological Association.

  12. Anthropology and Geosciences: Training and Collaboration Advancing Interdisciplinary Research of Human-environment Interaction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brondizio, E.; Moran, E.

    2005-05-01

    Over the past thirteen years the Anthropological Center for Training and Research on Global Environmental Change (ACT) at Indiana University has pioneered the use of anthropological and environmental research approaches to address issues of land use change, and population-environment interaction, particularly in the Amazon. Our research and training objectives focus on how particular local populations manage resources and how those activities may be studied by integrating time-tested ethnographic methods, survey instruments, ecological field studies, and the spatial and temporal perspectives of remote sensing and Geographical Information Systems. The globalization of the environment crisis bears the risk of the research and training at universities being purely global or large scale in nature. This would fail to take into account the highly variable local causes of human activities or to discover sustainable solutions to the use, conservation, and restoration of human ecosystems. Our approach combines institutional and international collaboration, formal and hands-on laboratory and field activities developed within an interdisciplinary environment, but based on the strength of disciplinary programs. Over the past years, we have particularly emphasized collaboration between American and Brazilian scholars and students and intense work with local farmers and communities both during data collection and field research, as well as in returning data and results using different formats. In this paper, we address our experience, the challenges and advantages of theoretical and methodological development for students approaching interdisciplinary problems, innovations in linking levels of analysis, and new opportunities for international and collaborative training and research on human-environment interaction.

  13. Conversations between anthropology and psychiatry: drawing out the best from interdisciplinarity in global mental health.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rosso Buckton, Amanda

    2015-12-01

    Conversations between anthropologists and psychiatrists have led to new theoretical trajectories, research agendas and clinical practices as social scientists and medical practitioners forged new understandings about the interaction of culture, personhood and illness. However, the demands of global mental health, coupled with health service provision requirements, mean that mental health interventions set up with the best intentions can fail to take into account the knowledge and expertise that social sciences can contribute to a programme's success. In this paper, I reflect on conversations between an anthropologist and mental health professionals in direct reference to data analysis of an AusAID mental health capacity-building programme undertaken in the Pacific region. Social and cultural perspectives embedded within programmes can provide richer, more contextualised interventions. In drawing on the combined expertise of anthropology and psychiatry, new taken-for-granted reference points embedding cultural approaches form the basis for delivery of global mental health programmes. These perspectives include: Locating mental health programmes within development critiques. Situating the subjects of development within contextualised settings, acknowledging and respecting local knowledge, understandings and practices. A focus on interdisciplinarity as the basis for future practice in global mental health projects. © The Royal Australian and New Zealand College of Psychiatrists 2015.

  14. Grounding meaning in experience: A broad perspective on embodied language.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Buccino, Giovanni; Colagè, Ivan; Gobbi, Nicola; Bonaccorso, Giorgio

    2016-10-01

    This work reviews key behavioural, neurophysiological and neuroimaging data on the neural substrates for processing the meaning of linguistic material, and tries to articulate the picture emerging from those findings with the notion of meaning coming from specific approaches in philosophy of language (the "internalist" view) and linguistics (words point at experiential clusters). The reviewed findings provide evidence in favour of a causal role of brain neural structures responsible for sensory, motor and even emotional experiences in attributing meaning to words expressing those experiences and, consequently, lend substantial support to an embodied and "internalist" conception of linguistic meaning. Key evidence concern verbs, nouns and adjectives with a concrete content, but the challenge that abstract domains pose to the embodied approach to language is also discussed. This work finally suggests that the most fundamental role of embodiment might be that of establishing commonalities among individual experiences of different members of a linguistic community, and that those experiences ground shared linguistic meanings. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  15. Babies' Self-Regulation: Taking a Broad Perspective

    Science.gov (United States)

    Elliot, Enid; Gonzalez-Mena, Janet

    2011-01-01

    Self-regulation is a complex process that involves coordinating various systems of the body and mind, including feelings. It's not only about emotions but also about cognition. Self-regulation has an impact on social development, influencing how babies and toddlers get along with others. Through self-regulation, babies and toddlers learn to pay…

  16. Alien macroalgae in Denmark - a broad-scale national perspective

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Thomsen, Mads S.; Wernberg, Thomas; Stæhr, Peter Anton

    2007-01-01

    Most studies documenting the importance of alien macroalgae relative to native species are based on smaller-scale sampling programmes. Between 1989 and 2003, a Danish monitoring programme collected data on the percentage cover of macroalgae at more than 600 locations throughout the country. We...... examined this data set to estimate the relative abundance of alien species in the algal flora on large spatiotemporal scales, i.e. across depth ranges, regions and years. Of the 10 alien macroalgal species known to inhabit Danish coastal waters, nine were found in the survey. Most of the alien species were...... only present in low quantities (alien species, Sargassum muticum and Bonnemaisonia hamifera, constituted 2-7% of the assemblages, depending on depth, region and year. Sargassum muticum was abundant from 0 to 5 m in the northwestern region...

  17. Transnational nurse migration: future directions for medical anthropological research.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prescott, Megan; Nichter, Mark

    2014-04-01

    Transnational nurse migration is a serious global health issue in which inequitably distributed shortages hinder health and development goals. This article selectively reviews the literature on nurse migration that has emerged from nursing, health planning, and the social sciences and offers productive directions for future anthropological research. The literature on global nurse migration has largely focused on push/pull economic logic and the concept of brain drain to understand the causes and effects of nurse migration. These concepts obscure political-economic, historical, and cultural factors that pattern nurse migration and influence the complex effects of nurse migration. Global nurse care chain analysis helps illuminate the numerous nodes in the production and migration of nurses, and management of this transnational process. Examples are provided from the Philippines and India to illustrate ways in which this analysis may be deepened, refined and rendered more critical by anthropological research. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  18. Towards an Anthropology of Infinitude: Badiou and the Political Subject

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nina Power

    2006-10-01

    Full Text Available In the English-language reception of Alain Badiou#39;s work, he has often been one-sidedly positioned as a direct heir to the antihumanist projects of Lacan, Althusser and Foucault. Whilst there is much to this claim, this paper argues that the retention of a notion of the #39;political subject#39; in Badiou#39;s work necessarily also depends upon a commitment to a much-underexamined notion of a minimal philosophical anthropology that puts Badiou in a tradition with thinkers such as Ludwig Feuerbach. It is further argued that Badiou#39;s minimal philosophical anthropology is opposed in essence to apparently similar phenomenological projects because it aligns humanity with infinity and not finitude.nbsp;

  19. [Female anthropology, physiology and disease in ancient Christian writers].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prinzivalli, Emanuela

    2011-01-01

    Ancient Christian sources are rich in reference to the anthropology and physiology of the female. Christianity in the first centuries had multiple positions as concerns the doctrinal thoughts as well as the social practices. Christian anthropological doctrine has been developed along two exegetical lines, hinging on Genesis 1-3: the first views the human being as a whole psycophysical entity and thereby highlights the protological inferiority of the woman; the second, spiritual and Platonic, emphasizes the inner self and thus, in theory, is more equalitarian. Ancient philosophical theories regarding human generation, in particular those ofAristotle and the Stoics, are used, along with medical notions, by Christian theologians to elaborate the dogma of incarnation. However, in certain cases, as with the post partum virginity of Maria, medical theories are totally put aside. The stories recounting the miracles offer the possibility of understanding medical practices offemale conditions and the emotive reactions of the women.

  20. Revisiting Psychological Mechanisms in the Anthropology of Altruism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hackman, Joseph; Munira, Shirajum; Jasmin, Khaleda; Hruschka, Daniel

    2017-03-01

    Anthropologists have long been interested in the reasons humans choose to help some individuals and not others. Early research considered psychological mediators, such as feelings of cohesion or closeness, but more recent work, largely in the tradition of human behavioral ecology, shifted attention away from psychological measures to clearer observables, such as past behavior, genetic relatedness, affinal ties, and geographic proximity. In this paper, we assess the value of reintegrating psychological measures-perceived social closeness-into the anthropological study of altruism. Specifically, analyzing social network data from four communities in rural Bangladesh (N = 516), we show that perceived closeness has a strong independent effect on helping, which cannot be accounted for by other factors. These results illustrate the potential value of reintegrating proximate psychological measures into anthropological studies of human cooperation.

  1. Evaluation of stature estimation from the database for forensic anthropology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wilson, Rebecca J; Herrmann, Nicholas P; Jantz, Lee Meadows

    2010-05-01

    Trotter and Gleser's (1-3) stature equations, conventionally used to estimate stature, are not appropriate to use in the modern forensic context. In this study, stature is assessed with a modern (birth years after 1944) American sample (N = 242) derived from the National Institute of Justice Database for Forensic Anthropology in the United States and the Forensic Anthropology Databank. New stature formulae have been calculated using forensic stature (FSTAT) and a combined dataset of forensic, cadaver, and measured statures referred to as Any Stature (ASTAT). The new FSTAT-based equations had an improved accuracy in Blacks with little improvement over Ousley's (4) equations for Whites. ASTAT-based equations performed equal to those of FSTAT equations and may be more appropriate, because they reflect both the variation in reported statures and in cadaver statures. It is essential to use not only equations based on forensic statures, but also equations based on modern samples.

  2. Virtual anthropology and forensic identification using multidetector CT.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dedouit, F; Savall, F; Mokrane, F-Z; Rousseau, H; Crubézy, E; Rougé, D; Telmon, N

    2014-04-01

    Virtual anthropology is made possible by modern cross-sectional imaging. Multislice CT (MSCT) can be used for comparative bone and dental identification, reconstructive identification and lesion identification. Comparative identification, the comparison of ante- and post-mortem imaging data, can be performed on both teeth and bones. Reconstructive identification, a considerable challenge for the radiologist, identifies the deceased by determining sex, geographical origin, stature and age at death. Lesion identification combines virtual autopsy and virtual anthropology. MSCT can be useful in palaeopathology, seeking arthropathy, infection, oral pathology, trauma, tumours, haematological disorders, stress indicators or occupational stress in bones and teeth. We examine some of the possibilities offered by this new radiological subspeciality that adds a new dimension to the work of the forensic radiologist. A multidisciplinary approach is crucial and involves communication and data exchange between radiologists, forensic pathologists, anthropologists and radiographers.

  3. Freedom and Klugheit in Kant’s Anthropology Lectures

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    Holly Wilson

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available Kant holds in his works on morality that prudence is not free, because only action under the moral law is free. He also holds that acting on prudent reasons is incompatible with the moral law. If one explores his lectures on anthropology, however, one has reason to believe that not only is prudent action free in some sense as freedom of choice, but it is also not incompatible with moral action, since it does not necessitate using other human beings as mere means, even though it is about using other human beings as ends to one’s happiness. This article will show how Kant holds these positions in his lectures on anthropology.

  4. Understanding kuru: the contribution of anthropology and medicine

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lindenbaum, Shirley

    2008-01-01

    To understand kuru and solve the problems of its cause and transmission required the integration of knowledge from both anthropological and medical research. Anthropological studies elucidated the origin and spread of kuru, the local mortuary practices of endocannibalism, the social effects of kuru, the life of women and child-rearing practices, the kinship system of the Fore and their willingness to incorporate outsiders into it, the myths, folklore and history of the Fore and their neighbours, sorcery as a powerful social phenomenon and way of explaining the causation of disease, and concepts of the treatment of disease. Many scientists from different disciplines, government officers and others have contributed to this chapter of medical history but it is the Fore people who have contributed the most, through their suffering, their cooperative and reliable witness to kuru, and their participation, in various ways, in the research process itself. PMID:18849287

  5. Review. Understanding kuru: the contribution of anthropology and medicine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lindenbaum, Shirley

    2008-11-27

    To understand kuru and solve the problems of its cause and transmission required the integration of knowledge from both anthropological and medical research. Anthropological studies elucidated the origin and spread of kuru, the local mortuary practices of endocannibalism, the social effects of kuru, the life of women and child-rearing practices, the kinship system of the Fore and their willingness to incorporate outsiders into it, the myths, folklore and history of the Fore and their neighbours, sorcery as a powerful social phenomenon and way of explaining the causation of disease, and concepts of the treatment of disease. Many scientists from different disciplines, government officers and others have contributed to this chapter of medical history but it is the Fore people who have contributed the most, through their suffering, their cooperative and reliable witness to kuru, and their participation, in various ways, in the research process itself.

  6. The Philosophical Anthropology of José Manzana

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    Rafael Gómez Miranda

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available The main focus and interest of José Manzana’s philosophical anthropology is centred on the human condition, the sense of man’s action, the possibility of knowledge… and all that refers to «vertical transcendence», towards the Absolute, which finally culminates in God. With his philosophical anthropology, Manzana aims to ground on a transcendental method of reflection the conditions of man and his different options as a human being. The objective of this author is to clarify human existence by identifying his moment of creation. The aforementioned reflection brings us to three main dimensions of the individual: the human being as an inquiring entity, his interpersonal dimension and his awakening to the Transcendental.

  7. New Challenges for Anthropological Instrumental in Identification of

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    Edward Mantoanelli Luz

    2008-08-01

    Full Text Available Positive changes in the Brazilian indigenist scene, since the end of the 1980’s, resulted in the increase of communities’ national movements, which took the Brazilian anthropological community by surprise, that immediately applied theoretical criteria proposed by the anthropologist Fredrick Barth, about the establishment of the ethnic borders of emerging groups. This paper is an alert for the danger of extremist interpretations and exclusivists uses of the Barthian theory, as the unique identity criteria. Taking as base the resulting experiences of the application of this theory in the case cocama in Alto Solimões area, this essay intends to reveal the fragility of this anthropological instrumental and the need of theoretical and practical elements for an equilibrated and impartial cases analysis of the emerging indigenous groups.

  8. Focus Section on Design Anthropology in Participatory Design

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    2015-01-01

    This focus section explores the opportunities of design anthropology in participatory design as an approach to research and design in an increasingly global and digital world. Traditionally, ethnography has been used in Participatory design to research real-life contexts and challenges, and as ways...... to involve people in defining user-needs and design opportunities. As the boundaries between diverse – material, digital and networked – spaces and experiences become increasingly blurred, so do the conventional distinctions between research and design. The papers presented in this focus section explore...... opportunities of using design anthropology as a holistic and critical approach to addressing societal challenges and change, and a way for anthropologists and designers to engage in participatory research and design that extend beyond the empirical....

  9. FREUD, JUNG AND BOAS: THE PSYCHOANALYTIC ENGAGEMENT WITH ANTHROPOLOGY REVISITED.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kenny, Robert

    2015-06-20

    Sigmund Freud's and C. G. Jung's turn to evolutionist anthropological material after 1909 is usually seen as a logical progression of their long-term interest in such material. It is also seen that they used this material ignorant of the significant challenges to the evolutionist paradigm underpinning such material, in particular the challenges led by Franz Boas. This paper argues otherwise: that both psychologists' turnings to such material was a new development, that neither had shown great interest in such material before 1909, and that their turnings to such material, far from being taken in ignorance of the challenges to evolutionist anthropology, were engagements with those challenges, because the evolutionist paradigm lay at the base of psychoanalysis. It argues that it is no coincidence that this engagement occurred after their return from America in 1909, where they had come into first-hand contact with the challenges of Franz Boas.

  10. Guide to the National Anthropological Archives: Smithsonian Institution, by James R. Glenn, National Anthropological Archives, National Museum of Natural History, Smithsonian Institution, Washington D.C. 1993

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Douglas R. Givens

    1993-05-01

    Full Text Available The historian of archaeological science will find this volume an indispensable source for culling research materials from the National Anthropological Archives. The Guide is "an overview of the documentation in the Department of Anthropology, National Museum of Natural History, concerning Native Americans and other cultural groups."

  11. Cultural anthropology as integrator of humanitarian education in higher school

    OpenAIRE

    POROZOV ROMAN YUR'EVICH

    2016-01-01

    The article deals with urgent problems of the modern humanities in the context of modernization of pedagogical education. Cultural anthropology is viewed upon as a multi-disciplinary integrator in the process of teaching the humanities. This discipline can be used in training students of humanitarian specialties and educational fields. The author specifies the fundamental principles developed by the classical humanities cultural relativism and anthropocentricism as the key advantages of cultu...

  12. Epistemological and Anthropological Thoughts About Neurophilosophy: An Initial Framework

    OpenAIRE

    Sonia París Albert; Irene Comins Mingol

    2013-01-01

    At the dawn of the twenty-first century, neurophilosophy appears as a branch of neurosciences. The aim of this article is to review critically some of the epistemological and anthropological debates which neurophilosophy is putting on question again. In this sense the philosophical research conducted by the UNESCO Chair of Philosophy for Peace will be used as the main thread of the analysis. To accomplish this critical review, the article has been organized into two parts: the first is of ep...

  13. The contribution of I. I. Tegako to anthropology of Belarus

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    Hurbo Tatyana

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available L.I. Tegako started her studies of anthropology in the middle of 1960s when she received her research degree. The scope of her scientific interest included odontology and dermatoglyphics. For more than 40 years L.I. Tegako was a permanent supervisor of the group and later of the Anthropology department. From the beginning of 1970s Belarusian anthropologists started conducting complex anthropologic studies of the adult population of the republic in various parts of the country (anthropometry, anthroposcopy, dermatoglyphics, blood group factor. Comprehensive approach became the basis for studies of anthropogenic variety of local population on the territory of Belarus. In 1998 the team of anthropologists supervised by L.I. Tegako won a State Prize of the Republic of Belarus for the scope of work on the topic 'Person and his biocultural adaptation'. In 2000s the scope of L.I. Tegako's scientific interest included the determination of intersystemic correlations between dermatoglyphical and psychosomatic characteristics. During her academic career, L.I. Tegako published 17 monographs, 6 study guides, 11 brochures and 209 research papers. Lidiya Ivanovna worked at leading universities in the country; she had 7 students who completed PhD thesis. Since 1999 she worked as a professor of biology. L.I. Tegako deserves a credit for the organization of anthropological conferences in Minsk. She devoted a lot of attention to the international cooperation. As a result, L.I. Tegako contributed to the establishment of stable scientific and friendly ties with Serbian colleagues: Institute of History of the NAS of Belarus and Matica Srpska made a partnership agreement. This includes exchange of experience, scientific works, and realization of joint projects.

  14. Exploring Anthropology’s Value to Military Strategy Since 2000

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-04-01

    anthropologists may play and what they should do if ethical conduct is not observed. The three categories break down as Military Anthropology1 ( MA1 ...HTS as an MA2 endeavor will undoubtedly continue, but anthropologists can realize as much effect through other programs. MA1 programs consist of...in the AAA code of ethics. The purpose of MA1 is to study and document the socio-cultural factors and behaviors of the various cultures in the

  15. Effect of Ramadan fasting on anthropological and physiological parameters

    OpenAIRE

    Shaista Saiyad; Mubassir Saiyad; Usha Patel; Anita Verma

    2014-01-01

    Introduction: All over the world Muslims, during Islamic month of Ramadan observe fast. The aim of this study is to evaluate and study different anthropological and physiological changes taking place in healthy subjects who fast during ramadan. If beneficial effects are found, modified Ramadan diet can be advised to patients to prevent risk of developing lifestyle diseases like coronary artery disease, hypertension, diabetes etc. Materials and methods: This is a pro...

  16. Religiously-anthropological intensions of Danilo Bratkovsky's Baroque prose

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    Bai Olena Serhiyivna

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available The article presents religious and anthropological intentions of Danilo Bratkovsky's writing whose poetry belongs to the late Baroque epoch. This refers to the church and morally-religious attributes, human's attitude to ethic and aesthetic values of earthy and transcendent measuring. By means of conceptual method the work represents antagonism of poetic characters, motives, morphemes, syntactic structures. More attention is paid to creative intension in Baroque system.

  17. The social representations theory and the anthropological research

    OpenAIRE

    Araujo, Marivânia Conceição; Departamento de Ciências Sociais do Centro de Ciências Humanas Letras e Artes da Universidade Estadual de Maringá (UEM), Paraná/PR - Brasil

    2009-01-01

    Although the classic methodology used in anthropological research during several decades has produced results of great importance to the understanding of human groups, the theory of social representations – elaborated by Serge Moscovici – is presented here as one more efficient methodological tool to the capture and analysis of data and have as the final objective the understanding of the social and cultural relations collectively established between the individuals. With this purpose, the ar...

  18. Anthropological Approach to the Study of Russian Legal Traditions

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    Marina V. Ignatieva

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available In this article author analyzes emergence of an anthropological approach to the study of legal traditions in Russia. It is shown that the first works belong to the 40-50-th years. XIX century. Characterized work KD Kavelin and MM Kovalevsky. For example, the works of MM Kovalevsky, dedicated to legal traditions and customs of the peoples of the Caucasus and, above all, Ossetians, shows their evolution.

  19. Focus Section on Design Anthropology in Participatory Design

    OpenAIRE

    2015-01-01

    This focus section explores the opportunities of design anthropology in participatorydesign as an approach to research and design in an increasingly global and digitalworld. Traditionally, ethnography has been used in Participatory design to research real-life contexts and challenges, and as ways to involve people in defining user-needs and design opportunities. As the boundaries between diverse – material, digital and networked – spaces and experiences become increasingly blurred, so do the ...

  20. Forensic anthropology casework-essential methodological considerations in stature estimation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krishan, Kewal; Kanchan, Tanuj; Menezes, Ritesh G; Ghosh, Abhik

    2012-03-01

    The examination of skeletal remains is a challenge to the medical examiner's/coroner's office and the forensic anthropologist conducting the investigation. One of the objectives of the medico-legal investigation is to estimate stature or height from various skeletal remains and body parts brought for examination. Various skeletal remains and body parts bear a positive and linear correlation with stature and have been successfully used for stature estimation. This concept is utilized in estimation of stature in forensic anthropology casework in mass disasters and other forensic examinations. Scientists have long been involved in standardizing the anthropological data with respect to various populations of the world. This review deals with some essential methodological issues that need to be addressed in research related to estimation of stature in forensic examinations. These issues have direct relevance in the identification of commingled or unknown remains and therefore it is essential that forensic nurses are familiar with the theories and techniques used in forensic anthropology. © 2012 International Association of Forensic Nurses.

  1. Significance of genome-wide association studies in molecular anthropology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gupta, Vipin; Khadgawat, Rajesh; Sachdeva, Mohinder Pal

    2009-12-01

    The successful advent of a genome-wide approach in association studies raises the hopes of human geneticists for solving a genetic maze of complex traits especially the disorders. This approach, which is replete with the application of cutting-edge technology and supported by big science projects (like Human Genome Project; and even more importantly the International HapMap Project) and various important databases (SNP database, CNV database, etc.), has had unprecedented success in rapidly uncovering many of the genetic determinants of complex disorders. The magnitude of this approach in the genetics of classical anthropological variables like height, skin color, eye color, and other genome diversity projects has certainly expanded the horizons of molecular anthropology. Therefore, in this article we have proposed a genome-wide association approach in molecular anthropological studies by providing lessons from the exemplary study of the Wellcome Trust Case Control Consortium. We have also highlighted the importance and uniqueness of Indian population groups in facilitating the design and finding optimum solutions for other genome-wide association-related challenges.

  2. Elliptical Fourier analysis: fundamentals, applications, and value for forensic anthropology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Caple, Jodi; Byrd, John; Stephan, Carl N

    2017-11-01

    The numerical description of skeletal morphology enables forensic anthropologists to conduct objective, reproducible, and structured tests, with the added capability of verifying morphoscopic-based analyses. One technique that permits comprehensive quantification of outline shape is elliptical Fourier analysis. This curve fitting technique allows a form's outline to be approximated via the sum of multiple sine and cosine waves, permitting the profile perimeter of an object to be described in a dense (continuous) manner at a user-defined level of precision. A large amount of shape information (the entire perimeter) can thereby be collected in contrast to other methods relying on sparsely located landmarks where information falling in between the landmarks fails to be acquired. First published in 1982, elliptical Fourier analysis employment in forensic anthropology from 2000 onwards reflects a slow uptake despite large computing power that makes its calculations easy to conduct. Without hurdles arising from calculation speed or quantity, the slow uptake may partly reside with the underlying mathematics that on first glance is extensive and potentially intimidating. In this paper, we aim to bridge this gap by pictorially illustrating how elliptical Fourier harmonics work in a simple step-by-step visual fashion to facilitate universal understanding and as geared towards increased use in forensic anthropology. We additionally provide a short review of the method's utility for osteology, a summary of past uses in forensic anthropology, and software options for calculations that largely save the user the trouble of coding customized routines.

  3. Modernizing Evolutionary Anthropology : Introduction to the Special Issue.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mattison, Siobhán M; Sear, Rebecca

    2016-12-01

    Evolutionary anthropology has traditionally focused on the study of small-scale, largely self-sufficient societies. The increasing rarity of these societies underscores the importance of such research yet also suggests the need to understand the processes by which such societies are being lost-what we call "modernization"-and the effects of these processes on human behavior and biology. In this article, we discuss recent efforts by evolutionary anthropologists to incorporate modernization into their research and the challenges and rewards that follow. Advantages include that these studies allow for explicit testing of hypotheses that explore how behavior and biology change in conjunction with changes in social, economic, and ecological factors. In addition, modernization often provides a source of "natural experiments" since it may proceed in a piecemeal fashion through a population. Challenges arise, however, in association with reduced variability in fitness proxies such as fertility, and with the increasing use of relatively novel methodologies in evolutionary anthropology, such as the analysis of secondary data. Confronting these challenges will require careful consideration but will lead to an improved understanding of humanity. We conclude that the study of modernization offers the prospect of developing a richer evolutionary anthropology, by encompassing ultimate and proximate explanations for behavior expressed across the full range of human societies.

  4. ANTHROPOLOGICAL STUDENTS’ STATUS AND THE RESULTS’ SUCCESS IN SWIMMING

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    Simo Vuković

    2010-09-01

    Full Text Available Introduction The sample consisted of 31 tested students in 2009/10 academic year and 43 tested students in 2008/09. all of them were the second year male students at Faculty of Physical Education and Sport at the University in East Sarajevo, the students were 22 years and± 6 months old, on this sample, there was done the results’ comparison in the following parameters: 11 variables of the anthropological statusand 2 variables of the swimming the crawl at 50m and swimming the backstroke. The predicting variable of the anthropological status consisted of: height, weight, shoulders width, hips width, the skin’s fold of the back, the skin’s fold of the upper arm, the skin’s fold of the abdomen, the volume of the upper arm, the volume of the thigh, the volume of the shank and the diameter of the joint of the knee, the measuring variables referred to the results’ success in swimming the crawl at 50m and swimming the backstroke. The method of the study Apart from the descriptive statistics by which the measures of central tendencies are expressed: mean, minimum, maximum, standard deviation, there was used regressive analysis, for the correlation of the results of the anthropological status with the results of the swimming the crawl at 50m and swimming the backstroke. The results of the research and the conclusions There was done the results’ comparison of one group of students consisting of 31 tested male students in 2009/10 and 43 tested students in 2008/09. the comparison was shown by the measures of central tendencies of the descriptive statistics and by the regressive analysis of the group of 11 predicting variables of the anthropological students’ status and by the results of 2 measuring variables shown by the swimming the crawl at 50m and swimming the backstroke. Applying the regressive analysis there was got the list of the data which contained the data about the parameters of the regression and statistical quantities relevant for

  5. Diabetes and stress: an anthropological review for study of modernizing populations in the US-Mexico border region.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ely, John J; Zavaskis, Tony; Wilson, Susan L

    2011-01-01

    Diabetes is a growing worldwide problem, characterized by considerable ethnic variation and being particularly common in modernizing populations. Modernization is accompanied by a variety of stressful sociocultural changes that are believed to increase the risk of diabetes. Unfortunately, there is little accurate knowledge about impact of stress on the risk of diabetes in the US-Mexico border area. Literature searches were performed in PubMed and Google Scholar to identify anthropological studies on stress and diabetes. Snowball and opportunistic sampling were used to expand the identified literature. In total, 30 anthropological studies were identified concerning the role of stress and modernization on diabetes among Indigenous peoples. This article reviews the available information regarding stress and diabetes in different populations from various anthropological perspectives. Four different concepts of stress were indentified: physiological, psychological, psychosocial and nutritional stress. Unlike physiological and nutritional theories of diabetes, psychological and psychosocial theories of stress and disease lack etiological specificity. No study addressed all four concepts of stress and few studies addressed more than two concepts. Most studies concerned nutritional stress and the developmental origins of diabetes. Most studies were conducted on the Pima Indians of Arizona and Mexico. All four stress concepts have some evidence as determinants of diabetes. These theoretical concepts and ethnographic results can provide the basis for developing comprehensive research protocols and public health intervention targeted at diabetes. A comprehensive view of stress can potentially explain the high prevalence of diabetes in developing countries and among Indigenous peoples. These results can be used to inform public health interventions aimed at reducing diabetes in the US-Mexico border region or similar areas, help identify at-risk individuals, and guide health

  6. Alien origins: xenophilia and the rise of medical anthropology in the Netherlands.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van der Geest, Sjaak

    2012-04-01

    The beginnings of medical anthropology in the Netherlands have a 'xenophile' character in two respects. First, those who started to call themselves medical anthropologists in the 1970s and 1980s were influenced and inspired not so much by anthropological colleagues, but by medical doctors working in tropical countries who had shown an interest in the role of culture during their medical work. Secondly, what was seen as medical anthropology in those early days almost always took place in 'foreign' countries and cultures. One can hardly overestimate the exoticist character of medical anthropology up to the 1980s. It was almost automatic for anthropologists to take an interest in medical issues occurring in another cultural setting, while overlooking the same issues at home. Medical anthropology 'at home' started only around 1990. At present, medical anthropology in the Netherlands is gradually overcoming its xenophile predilection.

  7. The Inter-twining of Modern Performance Studies and Current Trends in Anthropology

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marvin Carlson

    2011-05-01

    Full Text Available This paper discusses the relation between Performance, Theatre and Anthropology. We present the origins of the relations between performance and anthropology, listing the main ideas from North-American and French pioneers. We compare the connections between artists and anthropologists like Richard Schechner and Victor Turner, Eugenio Barba and Kirsten Hastrup. Finally, we discuss the movements and the different apprehensions of performance and the productive way in which the relation between performance and anthropology has been built in recent years.

  8. Perspective and Spatiality in the Modern Age

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fausto Fraisopi

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available the domain of Art critique and becoming a philosophical argument. How can we think of Perspective as symbolic Form? Is Perspective really a symbolic form? Why is Perspective so important? Because at the beginning of the Modern Age, Perspective as spiritual figure grounds many symbolic or even many scientific constructions. We could we say that perspective open the foundation of modern science as such. The “Geometrization” of Vision, beginning with perspective, will be for us the interpretative key in order to understand the Modern Age as a whole.  This understanding will allow us to understand the anthropologic dimension arising from the Modern Age, called „Perspectivism“. Assuming that perspective was neither only an invention of painting nor of geometry nor of philosophy, taken as singular fields of human inquiry, we will try to sketch the genesis of “perspective” from an interdisciplinary point of view. By doing so, we will also try to fix its deep significance for the anthropology of the Modern Age. Living and feeling in a perspectival world is the real invention of the Modern Age, one that overcame the closed Cosmos of the Middle Ages in order to reveal to mankind its own potential. Our interdisciplinary approach will proceed from many points of view (history of art, science, theology, anthropology and converge on the idea of a new kind of human experience. Such an interdisciplinary approach will open new questions about our present time. Are we justified in thinking of our experience today as perspectival? What does it mean today to think from perspectives in the manifold dimensions of our living and to face to the complexity of our times?

  9. Receptions of Human Dimension in the Context of Anthropological Discourse of Humanistic Management

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Valentina Voronkova 

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available The subject of research is the perception of human dimension as the anthropological aspect of humanistic management, based on the interrelations between man, government, society. The paper describes the evolution of views on man in the context of anthropological foundations of humanistic management;it is noted that the development trends of the philosophical and anthropological knowledge of humanistic management are based on human perception in the projection of anthropological dimensions of man, which is fundamental in European philosophy. The paper analyzes the essence of human dimension as anthropological paradigm of humanistic management, in which man is not only economic, or political, but also the spiritual and cultural member of society; gives the analysis of human dimension as anthropological paradigm of European philosophy that investigates the anthropological foundations of economic, political and social spheres, interprets conditions of creating a humane society, in which the imperatives of a just society should be implemented. Characteristics and features, as well as the conditions for achieving human dimension as the anthropological foundation of European humanistic management are disclosed. The acquired knowledge can be useful for solving anthropological problems of humanistic management.

  10. Anthropology from a Kantian point of view: toward a cosmopolitan conception of human nature.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Louden, Robert B

    2008-12-01

    Anthropology was a new field of study when Kant first began lecturing on it in 1772, and Kant himself was the first academic to teach regular courses in this area. As is well known, his own approach to anthropology is self-described as 'pragmatic', and Kant's pragmatic anthropology differs markedly from the anthropologies that other early contributors to the new discipline were advocating. In this essay I focus on a fundamental feature of Kant's anthropology that has been under-appreciated in previous discussions; namely, the particular conception of human nature that he believes anthropology, when pursued properly, leads to. I call this conception a cosmopolitan conception of human nature. In addition to establishing the central importance of this idea for Kant's project in anthropology, I also try in this essay to unravel some of its ambiguities and tensions as well as to highlight its underlying moral motives. The cosmopolitan conception of human nature that is central to Kant's anthropology is a further indication of the significance of his anthropology for ethics.

  11. Late Luther’s Anthropology: Disputatio de homine (1536

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    Rodion Savinov

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available The article analyzes the development of anthropological problems in Martin Luther’s theology, and reveals the transformation of this topic in the late period of the development of Luther’s theology. Main source for that investigation is Luther’s theses "Disputatio de homine"i.e. "Disputation concerning Man", 1536. Since anthropological problems are not represented as a special teaching in Luther’s doctrine, its included in the context of versatile theological searches. We proposed a model for reconstructing Luther’s ideas concerning man on the basis of difficult accents that he made in different periods of his life. In particular, early Luther in 1510-1520ss assert the impossibility to determine the nature of man because its radical destruction by sin. Salvation is carried out as a change of this sinfulness nature, "birth from above", liberating man from "slavery to the world" - it's main theme of his treatise "On Christian Freedom", - and change willfulness into an instrument of understanding will of God in treatise "The Bondage of the Will". Subsequently, late Luther in 1530s changes the approach to interpreting anthropological problems without abandoning the ideas expressed him earlier: he recognizes the possibility of knowing human nature, he connects the history of creation and the history of salvation in the concept of "tota creatura" and through this connection between creation and the Creator approaches the interpretation of the problem of predestination, not individual, but generic. This circumstance allows to consider the late period of Luther’s life which usually neglected, as an important stage in the development of his doctrine.

  12. The Role of "Anthropology" in Kant's moral system

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    Azam mohseni

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available stablishing an efficient moral discipline depend on the accurate and comprehensive recognition the human nature, as the morality subject, what we regard the human and his nature, is the necessary Precondition to found a moral system: knowing him a wicked creature by nature, or treating him as an existing belonging to both sensible and rational world, which an aspect of his nature appears in any areas. In the Kant's receiving, human is not a mono-dimension of being, but he is the citizen the both worlds: sensible and rational universes. The human is good as the basis his rational nature, and bad on the basis his sensible nature. So he emphasize, in the Groundwork of the metaphysics of moral: "Now because the world of understanding contains the ground of the world of sense and so too of its laws, we must suppose that in our capacity as members of the World of understanding, we give laws to ourselves as members of the World of sense. And this is what gives us obligations". The necessity of founding the morality on anthropology-which in Kant's viewpoint is an empirical science in methodology-on the one hand, and the possibility of establishing a pure moral philosophy which is quite free of any empirical element, on the other hand, causes some interpreters doubt whether Kant has really been able to found such a moral system. Therefore the present research intends to consider the anthropology regarding to morality in the Kant's philosophical discipline, in order to reveal the purity of his moral philosophy and also detect the way it bases on the anthropology.

  13. The GenoChip: A New Tool for Genetic Anthropology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Elhaik, Eran; Greenspan, Elliott; Staats, Sean; Krahn, Thomas; Tyler-Smith, Chris; Xue, Yali; Tofanelli, Sergio; Francalacci, Paolo; Cucca, Francesco; Pagani, Luca; Jin, Li; Li, Hui; Schurr, Theodore G.; Greenspan, Bennett; Spencer Wells, R.

    2013-01-01

    The Genographic Project is an international effort aimed at charting human migratory history. The project is nonprofit and nonmedical, and, through its Legacy Fund, supports locally led efforts to preserve indigenous and traditional cultures. Although the first phase of the project was focused on uniparentally inherited markers on the Y-chromosome and mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA), the current phase focuses on markers from across the entire genome to obtain a more complete understanding of human genetic variation. Although many commercial arrays exist for genome-wide single-nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) genotyping, they were designed for medical genetic studies and contain medically related markers that are inappropriate for global population genetic studies. GenoChip, the Genographic Project’s new genotyping array, was designed to resolve these issues and enable higher resolution research into outstanding questions in genetic anthropology. The GenoChip includes ancestry informative markers obtained for over 450 human populations, an ancient human (Saqqaq), and two archaic hominins (Neanderthal and Denisovan) and was designed to identify all known Y-chromosome and mtDNA haplogroups. The chip was carefully vetted to avoid inclusion of medically relevant markers. To demonstrate its capabilities, we compared the FST distributions of GenoChip SNPs to those of two commercial arrays. Although all arrays yielded similarly shaped (inverse J) FST distributions, the GenoChip autosomal and X-chromosomal distributions had the highest mean FST, attesting to its ability to discern subpopulations. The chip performances are illustrated in a principal component analysis for 14 worldwide populations. In summary, the GenoChip is a dedicated genotyping platform for genetic anthropology. With an unprecedented number of approximately 12,000 Y-chromosomal and approximately 3,300 mtDNA SNPs and over 130,000 autosomal and X-chromosomal SNPs without any known health, medical, or phenotypic

  14. THE BRAZILIAN INDIAN AND THE NATURAL MAN, AN ANTHROPOLOGICAL CRITIQUE

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    Rosa Virgínia Melo

    2008-06-01

    Full Text Available The concept of the noble savage from Rousseau, as interpreted in O Índio Brasileiro e a Revolução Francesa is a text that addresses the nature/culture dichotomy, valuable for anthropological scrutiny. With the objective of questioning Melo Franco's assertions regarding Brasil's place in intellectual history, I provoke a dialogue between Melo Franco and Roger Bartra. The reflection on the state of nature and culture, which since the XVI century has engaged Western literature, receives different analyses from both authors: methodological mistake or mythical reinvention.

  15. Religiosity and readiness for reconciliation: An anthropological view

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    Šantek Goran Pavel

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper is an anthropological study of processes that lead to the traumatization of a society, and of processes that result in forgiveness and reconciliation as chosen ways of dealing with post-conflict situations. The area on which the research is focused is Southeastern Europe, or more precisely Croatian and Serbian societies and relations. As cultural anthropology has not developed any special theory to deal with the causes of traumatic experiences in cultures and societies, this study uses the conceptions of closely related cultural sociology, formulated in Jeffrey Alexander's works. According to Alexander cultural trauma occurs when members of a collectivity feel they have been subjected to a horrendous event that leaves indelible marks upon their group consciousness, marking their memories forever and changing their future identity in fundamental and irrevocable ways. Insofar as they identify the cause of trauma, and thereby assume such moral responsibility, members of collectivities define their solidary relationships in ways that allow them to share the sufferings of others. In thinking that the suffering of others might also be our own societies expand the circle of the we. According to the same theory, when social groups refuse to recognize the existence of others' trauma and suffering, they not only diffuse their own responsibility for the suffering but often project the responsibility for their own suffering on these others. It is necessary then, for any process of reconciliation to be successful, that groups recognize suffering of others and their own responsibility. From the fact that social groups might refuse to participate in the process of trauma creation, it is obvious that trauma does not exist naturally, but that trauma is a social construction, a socially mediated attribution. This paper and research are also designed as an anthropological comparison with a huge sociological research of religiosity in Croatia done in

  16. The anthropology of Carl Jung: Implications for pastoral care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hunt-Meeks, S

    1983-09-01

    This article examines the basic tenets of Carl Jung's anthropology, including intrapsychic structure, relationships, society, and the process of individuation. It then turns to his ideas about God and religion. Jung builds his understanding of God from his work in psychology, and because of that method, there are several major problems with his theologizing. Nevertheless, his insights are extremely valuable to the field of pastoral care, and ministers would do very well to appreciate his contribution, though always with a critical eye to its limitation.

  17. Pathogens gone wild? Medical anthropology and the "swine flu" pandemic.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Singer, Merrill

    2009-07-01

    Beginning in April 2009, global attention began focusing on the emergence in Mexico of a potentially highly lethal new influenza strain of porcine origin that has successfully jumped species barriers and is now being transmitted around the world. Reported on extensively by the mass media, commented on by public health and government officials across the globe, and focused on with nervous attention by the general public, the so-called swine flu pandemic raises important questions, addressed here, concerning the capacity of medical anthropology to respond usefully to such disease outbreaks and their health and social consequences.

  18. Anthropology in the cognitive sciences: the value of diversity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Unsworth, Sara J

    2012-07-01

    Beller, Bender, and Medin (this issue) offer a provocative proposal outlining several reasons why anthropology and the rest of cognitive science might consider parting ways. Among those reasons, they suggest that separation might maintain the diversity needed to address larger problems facing humanity, and that the research strategies used across the disciplines are already so diverse as to be incommensurate. The present paper challenges the view that research strategies are incommensurate and offers a multimethod approach to cultural research that can help to establish common ground while maintaining diversity. Copyright © 2012 Cognitive Science Society, Inc.

  19. Geometric morphometrics and virtual anthropology: advances in human evolutionary studies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rein, Thomas R; Harvati, Katerina

    2014-01-01

    Geometric morphometric methods have been increasingly used in paleoanthropology in the last two decades, lending greater power to the analysis and interpretation of the human fossil record. More recently the advent of the wide use of computed tomography and surface scanning, implemented in combination with geometric morphometrics (GM), characterizes a new approach, termed Virtual Anthropology (VA). These methodological advances have led to a number of developments in human evolutionary studies. We present some recent examples of GM and VA related research in human evolution with an emphasis on work conducted at the University of Tübingen and other German research institutions.

  20. The Impact of Criminal Anthropology in Britain (1880-1918

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    Neil Davie

    2010-11-01

    Full Text Available Only one book devoted entirely to the theories of Cesare Lombroso was published in Britain in the period 1880-1918, and that is The Criminal, by Havelock Ellis. In his book, Ellis noted the paradox of the British reaction to criminal anthropology. While researching the book, he had canvassed opinion among criminal justice professionals on the subject, hoping to garner home-grown reactions to the impassioned criminological debates taking place at the time on the Continent. Ellis was familiar w...