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Sample records for brittle failure assessment

  1. Sequentially linear analysis for simulating brittle failure

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van de Graaf, A.V.

    2017-01-01

    The numerical simulation of brittle failure at structural level with nonlinear finite
    element analysis (NLFEA) remains a challenge due to robustness issues. We attribute these problems to the dimensions of real-world structures combined with softening behavior and negative tangent stiffness at

  2. Failure and fatigue life assessment of steel railway bridges with brittle material

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Maljaars, J.

    2014-01-01

    Some existing steel bridges have been constructed from steels with a toughness that does not fulfil the requirements in modern standards. In such a case, standards for bridges do not provide an alternative assessment route. Yet such bridges may still be fit for purpose. This paper presents an

  3. Nanowire failure: long = brittle and short = ductile.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Zhaoxuan; Zhang, Yong-Wei; Jhon, Mark H; Gao, Huajian; Srolovitz, David J

    2012-02-08

    Experimental studies of the tensile behavior of metallic nanowires show a wide range of failure modes, ranging from ductile necking to brittle/localized shear failure-often in the same diameter wires. We performed large-scale molecular dynamics simulations of copper nanowires with a range of nanowire lengths and provide unequivocal evidence for a transition in nanowire failure mode with change in nanowire length. Short nanowires fail via a ductile mode with serrated stress-strain curves, while long wires exhibit extreme shear localization and abrupt failure. We developed a simple model for predicting the critical nanowire length for this failure mode transition and showed that it is in excellent agreement with both the simulation results and the extant experimental data. The present results provide a new paradigm for the design of nanoscale mechanical systems that demarcates graceful and catastrophic failure. © 2012 American Chemical Society

  4. Permeability Evolution and Rock Brittle Failure

    OpenAIRE

    Sun Qiang; Xue Lei; Zhu Shuyun

    2015-01-01

    This paper reports an experimental study of the evolution of permeability during rock brittle failure and a theoretical analysis of rock critical stress level. It is assumed that the rock is a strain-softening medium whose strength can be described by Weibull’s distribution. Based on the two-dimensional renormalization group theory, it is found that the stress level λ c (the ratio of the stress at the critical point to the peak stress) depends mainly on the homogeneity index or shape paramete...

  5. The role of post-failure brittleness of soft rocks in the assessment of stability of intact masses: FDEM technique applications to ideal problems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lollino, Piernicola; Andriani, Gioacchino Francesco; Fazio, Nunzio Luciano; Perrotti, Michele

    2016-04-01

    Strain-softening under low confinement stress, i.e. the drop of strength that occurs in the post-failure stage, represents a key factor of the stress-strain behavior of rocks. However, this feature of the rock behavior is generally underestimated or even neglected in the assessment of boundary value problems of intact soft rock masses. This is typically the case when the stability of intact rock masses is treated by means of limit equilibrium or finite element analyses, for which rigid-plastic or elastic perfectly-plastic constitutive models, generally implementing peak strength conditions of the rock, are respectively used. In fact, the aforementioned numerical techniques are characterized by intrinsic limitations that do not allow to account for material brittleness, either for the method assumptions or due to numerical stability problems, as for the case of the finite element method, unless sophisticated regularization techniques are implemented. However, for those problems that concern the stability of intact soft rock masses at low stress levels, as for example the stability of shallow underground caves or that of rock slopes, the brittle stress-strain response of rock in the post-failure stage cannot be disregarded due to the risk of overestimation of the stability factor. This work is aimed at highlighting the role of post-peak brittleness of soft rocks in the analysis of specific ideal problems by means of the use of a hybrid finite-discrete element technique (FDEM) that allows for the simulation of the rock stress-strain brittle behavior in a proper way. In particular, the stability of two ideal cases, represented by a shallow underground rectangular cave and a vertical cliff, has been analyzed by implementing a post-peak brittle behavior of the rock and the comparison with a non-brittle response of the rock mass is also explored. To this purpose, the mechanical behavior of a soft calcarenite belonging to the Calcarenite di Gravina formation, extensively

  6. Modeling failure in brittle porous ceramics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Keles, Ozgur

    Brittle porous materials (BPMs) are used for battery, fuel cell, catalyst, membrane, filter, bone graft, and pharmacy applications due to the multi-functionality of their underlying porosity. However, in spite of its technological benefits the effects of porosity on BPM fracture strength and Weibull statistics are not fully understood--limiting a wider use. In this context, classical fracture mechanics was combined with two-dimensional finite element simulations not only to account for pore-pore stress interactions, but also to numerically quantify the relationship between the local pore volume fraction and fracture statistics. Simulations show that even the microstructures with the same porosity level and size of pores differ substantially in fracture strength. The maximum reliability of BPMs was shown to be limited by the underlying pore--pore interactions. Fracture strength of BMPs decreases at a faster rate under biaxial loading than under uniaxial loading. Three different types of deviation from classic Weibull behavior are identified: P-type corresponding to a positive lower tail deviation, N-type corresponding to a negative lower tail deviation, and S-type corresponding to both positive upper and lower tail deviations. Pore-pore interactions result in either P-type or N-type deviation in the limit of low porosity, whereas S-type behavior occurs when clusters of low and high fracture strengths coexist in a fracture data.

  7. Elastic Rock Heterogeneity Controls Brittle Rock Failure during Hydraulic Fracturing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Langenbruch, C.; Shapiro, S. A.

    2014-12-01

    For interpretation and inversion of microseismic data it is important to understand, which properties of the reservoir rock control the occurrence probability of brittle rock failure and associated seismicity during hydraulic stimulation. This is especially important, when inverting for key properties like permeability and fracture conductivity. Although it became accepted that seismic events are triggered by fluid flow and the resulting perturbation of the stress field in the reservoir rock, the magnitude of stress perturbations, capable of triggering failure in rocks, can be highly variable. The controlling physical mechanism of this variability is still under discussion. We compare the occurrence of microseismic events at the Cotton Valley gas field to elastic rock heterogeneity, obtained from measurements along the treatment wells. The heterogeneity is characterized by scale invariant fluctuations of elastic properties. We observe that the elastic heterogeneity of the rock formation controls the occurrence of brittle failure. In particular, we find that the density of events is increasing with the Brittleness Index (BI) of the rock, which is defined as a combination of Young's modulus and Poisson's ratio. We evaluate the physical meaning of the BI. By applying geomechanical investigations we characterize the influence of fluctuating elastic properties in rocks on the probability of brittle rock failure. Our analysis is based on the computation of stress fluctuations caused by elastic heterogeneity of rocks. We find that elastic rock heterogeneity causes stress fluctuations of significant magnitude. Moreover, the stress changes necessary to open and reactivate fractures in rocks are strongly related to fluctuations of elastic moduli. Our analysis gives a physical explanation to the observed relation between elastic heterogeneity of the rock formation and the occurrence of brittle failure during hydraulic reservoir stimulations. A crucial factor for understanding

  8. Intermittency and roughening in the failure of brittle heterogeneous materials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bonamy, Daniel

    2009-01-01

    Stress enhancement in the vicinity of brittle cracks makes the macro-scale failure properties extremely sensitive to the micro-scale material disorder. Therefore, (i) fracturing systems often display a jerky dynamics, so-called crackling noise, with seemingly random sudden energy release spanning over a broad range of scales, reminiscent of earthquakes; (ii) fracture surfaces exhibit roughness at scales much larger than that of material microstructure. Here, I provide a critical review of experiments and simulations performed in this context, highlighting the existence of universal scaling features, independent of both the material and the loading conditions, reminiscent of critical phenomena. I finally discuss recent stochastic descriptions of crack growth in brittle disordered media that seem to capture qualitatively-and sometimes quantitatively-these scaling features.

  9. Some elementary mechanics of explosive and brittle failure modes in prestressed containments

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Murray, D.W.

    1978-06-01

    Fundamental concepts related to pneumatic pressurization and explosive behaviour of containment structures are reviewed. It is shown that explosive behaviour occurs whenever a pressure equal to the ultimate capacity of the structure is attained. The energy associated with hydraulic pressurization is bounded and shown to be orders of magnitude less than that associated with pneumatic pressurization. It is also shown that structural behaviour prior to attaining the ultimate load capacity is independent of the pressurized medium. The phenomenon of brittle fracture, as it relates to prestressed concrete containments, is explored. A theoretical technique of proportioning cross sections is developed to eliminate the possibility of catastrophic brittle tensile fractures. The possibility of brittle fractures being triggered by failure of some type of 'detail' is also examined. An attempt is made to identify the types of failures for which the state of the art may be inadequate to assess behaviour under overpressure conditions. (author)

  10. On Failure in Polycrystalline and Amorphous Brittle Materials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bourne, N. K.

    2009-12-01

    The performance of behaviour of brittle materials depends upon discrete deformation mechanisms operating during the loading process. The critical mechanisms determining the behaviour of armour ceramics have not been isolated using traditional ballistics. It has recently become possible to measure strength histories in materials under shock. The data gained for the failed strength of the armour are shown to relate directly to the penetration measured into tiles. Further the material can be loaded and recovered for post-mortem examination. Failure is by micro-fracture that is a function of the defects and then cracking activated by plasticity mechanisms within the grains and failure at grain boundaries in the amorphous intergranular phase. Thus it is the shock-induced plastic yielding of grains at the impact face that determines the later time penetration through the tile.

  11. Brittle Creep Failure, Critical Behavior, and Time-to-Failure Prediction of Concrete under Uniaxial Compression

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yingchong Wang

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Understanding the time-dependent brittle deformation behavior of concrete as a main building material is fundamental for the lifetime prediction and engineering design. Herein, we present the experimental measures of brittle creep failure, critical behavior, and the dependence of time-to-failure, on the secondary creep rate of concrete under sustained uniaxial compression. A complete evolution process of creep failure is achieved. Three typical creep stages are observed, including the primary (decelerating, secondary (steady state creep regime, and tertiary creep (accelerating creep stages. The time-to-failure shows sample-specificity although all samples exhibit a similar creep process. All specimens exhibit a critical power-law behavior with an exponent of −0.51 ± 0.06, approximately equal to the theoretical value of −1/2. All samples have a long-term secondary stage characterized by a constant strain rate that dominates the lifetime of a sample. The average creep rate expressed by the total creep strain over the lifetime (tf-t0 for each specimen shows a power-law dependence on the secondary creep rate with an exponent of −1. This could provide a clue to the prediction of the time-to-failure of concrete, based on the monitoring of the creep behavior at the steady stage.

  12. Investigation into brittle failure of some starter bars

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hordijk, D.A.; Vliet, M.R.A. van

    2002-01-01

    This paper reports on an investigation into the cause and consequences of an observed brittle behaviour of some starter bars on a construction site in the Netherlands. A few bars suddenly failed when they were bent in order to align them. For the investigation firstly a batch of starter bars that

  13. Atomistic explanation of brittle failure of thermoelectric skutterudite CoSb3

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Li, Guodong; An, Qi; Goddard, William A.; Hanus, Riley; Zhai, Pengcheng; Zhang, Qingjie; Snyder, G. Jeffrey

    2016-01-01

    CoSb 3 based skutterudite thermoelectric material has superior thermoelectric properties, but the low fracture toughness prevents its widespread commercial application. To determine the origin of its brittle failure, we examined the response of shear deformation in CoSb 3 along the most plausible slip system (010)/<100>, using large-scale molecular dynamics simulations. We find that the brittle failure of CoSb 3 arises from the formation of shear bands due to the destruction of Sb4-rings and the slippage of Co-octahedraes. This leads to the breakage of Co-octahedraes and cavitation, resulting in the crack opening and mechanical failure.

  14. Prediction of Brittle Failure for TBM Tunnels in Anisotropic Rock: A Case Study from Northern Norway

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dammyr, Øyvind

    2016-06-01

    Prediction of spalling and rock burst is especially important for hard rock TBM tunneling, because failure can have larger impact than in a drill and blast tunnel and ultimately threaten excavation feasibility. The majority of research on brittle failure has focused on rock types with isotropic behavior. This paper gives a review of existing theory and its application before a 3.5-m-diameter TBM tunnel in foliated granitic gneiss is used as a case to study brittle failure characteristics of anisotropic rock. Important aspects that should be considered in order to predict brittle failure in anisotropic rock are highlighted. Foliation is responsible for considerable strength anisotropy and is believed to influence the preferred side of v-shaped notch development in the investigated tunnel. Prediction methods such as the semi- empirical criterion, the Hoek- Brown brittle parameters, and the non-linear damage initiation and spalling limit method give reliable results; but only as long as the angle between compression axis and foliation in uniaxial compressive tests is relevant, dependent on the relation between tunnel trend/plunge, strike/dip of foliation, and tunnel boundary stresses. It is further demonstrated that local in situ stress variations, for example, due to the presence of discontinuities, can have profound impact on failure predictions. Other carefully documented case studies into the brittle failure nature of rock, in particular anisotropic rock, are encouraged in order to expand the existing and relatively small database. This will be valuable for future TBM planning and construction stages in highly stressed brittle anisotropic rock.

  15. Improvement of methods to evaluate brittle failure resistance of the WWER reactor pressure vessels

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Popov, A A; Parshutin, E V [Engineering Center of Nuclear Equipment Strength, Research and Development Inst. of Power Engineering, Moscow (Russian Federation); Rogov, M F; Dragunov, U G [Experimenter` s and Designer` s Office ` ` Hydropress` ` (Russian Federation)

    1997-09-01

    At the next 10 years a number of Russian WWER nuclear power plants will complete its design lifetime. Normative methods to evaluate brittle failure resistance of the reactor pressure vessels used in Russia have been intended for design stage. The evaluation of reactor pressure vessel lifetime in operation stage demands to create new methods of calculation and new methods for experimental evaluation of brittle failure resistance degradation. The main objective of the study in this type of reactor is weldment number 4. In this report an analysis is made of methods to determine critical temperature of reactor materials including the results of instrumented Charpy testing. 12 figs.

  16. Defining the Brittle Failure Envelopes of Individual Reaction Zones Observed in CO2-Exposed Wellbore Cement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hangx, Suzanne J T; van der Linden, Arjan; Marcelis, Fons; Liteanu, Emilia

    2016-01-19

    To predict the behavior of the cement sheath after CO2 injection and the potential for leakage pathways, it is key to understand how the mechanical properties of the cement evolves with CO2 exposure time. We performed scratch-hardness tests on hardened samples of class G cement before and after CO2 exposure. The cement was exposed to CO2-rich fluid for one to six months at 65 °C and 8 MPa Ptotal. Detailed SEM-EDX analyses showed reaction zones similar to those previously reported in the literature: (1) an outer-reacted, porous silica-rich zone; (2) a dense, carbonated zone; and (3) a more porous, Ca-depleted inner zone. The quantitative mechanical data (brittle compressive strength and friction coefficient) obtained for each of the zones suggest that the heterogeneity of reacted cement leads to a wide range of brittle strength values in any of the reaction zones, with only a rough dependence on exposure time. However, the data can be used to guide numerical modeling efforts needed to assess the impact of reaction-induced mechanical failure of wellbore cement by coupling sensitivity analysis and mechanical predictions.

  17. Failure Mechanisms of Brittle Rocks under Uniaxial Compression

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Taoying; Cao, Ping

    2017-09-01

    The behaviour of a rock mass is determined not only by the properties of the rock matrix, but mostly by the presence and properties of discontinuities or fractures within the mass. The compression test on rock-like specimens with two prefabricated transfixion fissures, made by pulling out the embedded metal inserts in the pre-cured period was carried out on the servo control uniaxial loading tester. The influence of the geometry of pre-existing cracks on the cracking processes was analysed with reference to the experimental observation of crack initiation and propagation from pre-existing flaws. Based on the rock fracture mechanics and the stress-strain curves, the evolution failure mechanism of the fissure body was also analyzed on the basis of exploring the law of the compression-shear crack initiation, wing crack growth and rock bridge connection. Meanwhile, damage fracture mechanical models of a compression-shear rock mass are established when the rock bridge axial transfixion failure, tension-shear combined failure, or wing crack shear connection failure occurs on the specimen under axial compression. This research was of significance in studying the failure mechanism of fractured rock mass.

  18. A kinematic measurement for ductile and brittle failure of materials using digital image correlation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M.M. Reza Mousavi

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available This paper addresses some material level test which is done on quasi-brittle and ductile materials in the laboratory. The displacement control experimental program is composed of mortar cylinders under uniaxial compression shows quasi-brittle behavior and seemingly round-section aluminum specimens under uniaxial tension represents ductile behavior. Digital Image Correlation gives full field measurement of deformation in both aluminum and mortar specimens. Likewise, calculating the relative displacement of two points located on top and bottom of virtual LVDT, which is virtually placed on the surface of the specimen, gives us the classical measure of strain. However, the deformation distribution is not uniform all over the domain of specimens mainly due to imperfect nature of experiments and measurement devices. Displacement jumps in the fracture zone of mortar specimens and strain localization in the necking area for the aluminum specimen, which are reflecting different deformation values and deformation gradients, is compared to the other regions. Since the results are inherently scattered, it is usually non-trivial to smear out the stress of material as a function of a single strain value. To overcome this uncertainty, statistical analysis could bring a meaningful way to closely look at scattered results. A large number of virtual LVDTs are placed on the surface of specimens in order to collect statistical parameters of deformation and strain. Values of mean strain, standard deviation and coeffcient of variations for each material are calculated and correlated with the failure type of the corresponding material (either brittle or ductile. The main limiters for standard deviation and coeffcient of variations for brittle and ductile failure, in pre-peak and post-peak behavior are established and presented in this paper. These limiters help us determine whether failure is brittle or ductile without determining of stress level in the material.

  19. Multiaxial brittle failure of a 3D carbon-carbon composite

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Davy, Catherine

    2001-01-01

    Several industrial equipments, for example in aeronautics, civil or military nuclear applications, imply multi-axially loaded brittle materials for which reliable failure models are needed. In that context, our study focuses on a 3D carbon-carbon composite submitted in service to a triaxial strain state along its orthotropy axes. A failure criterion based on a bibliographical analysis is identified thanks to uniaxial tensile tests, and validated through an original multiaxial experiment. The scatter on its failure characteristics is also identified. (author) [fr

  20. Evaluation of strength and failure of brittle rock containing initial cracks under lithospheric conditions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Xiaozhao; Qi, Chengzhi; Shao, Zhushan; Ma, Chao

    2018-02-01

    Natural brittle rock contains numerous randomly distributed microcracks. Crack initiation, growth, and coalescence play a predominant role in evaluation for the strength and failure of brittle rocks. A new analytical method is proposed to predict the strength and failure of brittle rocks containing initial microcracks. The formulation of this method is based on an improved wing crack model and a suggested micro-macro relation. In this improved wing crack model, the parameter of crack angle is especially introduced as a variable, and the analytical stress-crack relation considering crack angle effect is obtained. Coupling the proposed stress-crack relation and the suggested micro-macro relation describing the relation between crack growth and axial strain, the stress-strain constitutive relation is obtained to predict the rock strength and failure. Considering different initial microcrack sizes, friction coefficients and confining pressures, effects of crack angle on tensile wedge force acting on initial crack interface are studied, and effects of crack angle on stress-strain constitutive relation of rocks are also analyzed. The strength and crack initiation stress under different crack angles are discussed, and the value of most disadvantaged angle triggering crack initiation and rock failure is founded. The analytical results are similar to the published study results. Rationality of this proposed analytical method is verified.

  1. Protecting against failure by brittle fracture in ferritic steel shipping containers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schwartz, M.W.; Langland, R.T.

    1983-01-01

    The possible use of ferritic steels for the containment structure of shipping casks has motivated the development of criteria for assuring the integrity of these casks under both normal and hypothetical accident conditions specified in Part 71 of the Code of Federal Regulations. The US Nuclear Regulatory Commission Regulation Guide 7.6 provides design criteria for preventing ductile failure steel shipping containers. The research described in this paper deals with criteria for preventing brittle fracture of ferritic steel shipping containers. Initially guidelines were developed for ferritic steel up to four inches thick (I). This was followed by an investigation of various criteria that might be used for monolithic thick walled casks greater than four inches thick (2). Three categories of safety are identified in the design of shipping containers. Category I, the highest level of safety, is appropriate for containment systems for spent nuclear fuel and high level waste transport packaging. In Category I, containers are designed to the highest level of safety and brittle fracture is essentially not possible. Categories II and III represent levels of safety commensurate with the consequences of release of lower levels of radioactivity. In these latter categories, consideration of factors contributing to brittle fracture, good engineering practice, and careful selection of material make brittle fracture unlikely under environmental conditions encountered during shipping. This paper will deal primarily with Category I containers. The guidelines for Category II and III containers are fully described elsewhere. 5 references, 10 figures, 3 tables

  2. A quasi-static algorithm that includes effects of characteristic time scales for simulating failures in brittle materials

    KAUST Repository

    Liu, Jinxing; El Sayed, Tamer S.

    2013-01-01

    When the brittle heterogeneous material is simulated via lattice models, the quasi-static failure depends on the relative magnitudes of Telem, the characteristic releasing time of the internal forces of the broken elements and Tlattice

  3. The failure of brittle materials under overall compression: Effects of loading rate and defect distribution

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paliwal, Bhasker

    The constitutive behaviors and failure processes of brittle materials under far-field compressive loading are studied in this work. Several approaches are used: experiments to study the compressive failure behavior of ceramics, design of experimental techniques by means of finite element simulations, and the development of micro-mechanical damage models to analyze and predict mechanical response of brittle materials under far-field compression. Experiments have been conducted on various ceramics, (primarily on a transparent polycrystalline ceramic, aluminum oxynitride or AlON) under loading rates ranging from quasi-static (˜ 5X10-6) to dynamic (˜ 200 MPa/mus), using a servo-controlled hydraulic test machine and a modified compression Kolsky bar (MKB) technique respectively. High-speed photography has also been used with exposure times as low as 20 ns to observe the dynamic activation, growth and coalescence of cracks and resulting damage zones in the specimen. The photographs were correlated in time with measurements of the stresses in the specimen. Further, by means of 3D finite element simulations, an experimental technique has been developed to impose a controlled, homogeneous, planar confinement in the specimen. The technique can be used in conjunction with a high-speed camera to study the in situ dynamic failure behavior of materials under confinement. AlON specimens are used for the study. The statically pre-compressed specimen is subjected to axial dynamic compressive loading using the MKB. Results suggest that confinement not only increases the load carrying capacity, it also results in a non-linear stress evolution in the material. High-speed photographs also suggest an inelastic deformation mechanism in AlON under confinement which evolves more slowly than the typical brittle-cracking type of damage in the unconfined case. Next, an interacting micro-crack damage model is developed that explicitly accounts for the interaction among the micro-cracks in

  4. Dynamic Response and Failure Mechanism of Brittle Rocks Under Combined Compression-Shear Loading Experiments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Yuan; Dai, Feng

    2018-03-01

    A novel method is developed for characterizing the mechanical response and failure mechanism of brittle rocks under dynamic compression-shear loading: an inclined cylinder specimen using a modified split Hopkinson pressure bar (SHPB) system. With the specimen axis inclining to the loading direction of SHPB, a shear component can be introduced into the specimen. Both static and dynamic experiments are conducted on sandstone specimens. Given carefully pulse shaping, the dynamic equilibrium of the inclined specimens can be satisfied, and thus the quasi-static data reduction is employed. The normal and shear stress-strain relationships of specimens are subsequently established. The progressive failure process of the specimen illustrated via high-speed photographs manifests a mixed failure mode accommodating both the shear-dominated failure and the localized tensile damage. The elastic and shear moduli exhibit certain loading-path dependence under quasi-static loading but loading-path insensitivity under high loading rates. Loading rate dependence is evidently demonstrated through the failure characteristics involving fragmentation, compression and shear strength and failure surfaces based on Drucker-Prager criterion. Our proposed method is convenient and reliable to study the dynamic response and failure mechanism of rocks under combined compression-shear loading.

  5. Micromechanical local approach to brittle failure in bainite high resolution polycrystals: A short presentation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    N'Guyen, C.N.; Osipov, N.; Cailletaud, G.; Barbe, F.; Marini, B.; Petry, C.

    2012-01-01

    The problem of determining the probability of failure in a brittle material from a micromechanical local approach has recently been addressed in few works, all related to bainite polycrystals at different temperatures and states of irradiation. They have separately paved the ground for a full-field modelling with high realism in terms of constitutive modelling and microstructural morphology. This work first contributes to enhance this realism by assembling the most pertinent/valuable characteristics (dislocation density based model, large deformation framework, fully controlled triaxiality conditions, explicit microstructure representation of grains and sub-grains,... ) and by accounting for a statistically representative Volume Element; this condition indeed must be fulfilled in order to capture rare events like brittle micro-fractures which, in the stress analysis, correspond to the tails of distribution curves. The second original contribution of this work concerns the methodology for determining fracture probabilities: rather than classically - and abruptly - considering a polycrystal as broken as soon as an elementary link (grain or sub-grain) has failed, the possibility of microcrack arrest at microstructural barriers is introduced, which enables to determine the probability of polycrystal failure according to different scenarios of multiple micro-fractures. (authors)

  6. Micromechanics of failure in brittle geomaterials. Final technical report (for 7/1/1994 - 8/31/2000)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wong, Teng-fong

    2000-01-01

    The overall objective was to provide a fundamental understanding of brittle failure processes in porous and compact geomaterials. This information is central to energy-related programs such as oil and gas exploration/production, reservoir engineering, drilling technology, geothermal energy recovery, nuclear waste isolation, and environmental remediation. The effects of key parameters such as grain boundary structure and cementation, damage state, and load path on the deformation and failure model of brittle geomaterials are still largely unknown. The research methodology emphasized the integration of experimental rock mechanical testing, quantitative microscopy, and detailed analysis using fracture mechanics, continuum plasticity theory, and numerical methods. Significant progress was made in elucidating the micromechanics of brittle failure in compact crystalline rocks, as well as high-porosity siliciclastic and carbonate rocks. Substantial effort was expended toward applying a new quantitative three-dimensional imaging technique to geomaterials and for developing enhanced image analysis capabilities. The research is presented under the following topics: technique for imaging the 3-D pore structure of geomaterials; mechanics of compressive failure in sandstone; effect of water on compressive failure of sandstone; micromechanics of compressive failure: observation and model; and the brittle-ductile transition in porous carbonate rocks

  7. Risk of shear failure and extensional failure around over-stressed excavations in brittle rock

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nick Barton

    2017-04-01

    Full Text Available The authors investigate the failure modes surrounding over-stressed tunnels in rock. Three lines of investigation are employed: failure in over-stressed three-dimensional (3D models of tunnels bored under 3D stress, failure modes in two-dimensional (2D numerical simulations of 1000 m and 2000 m deep tunnels using FRACOD, both in intact rock and in rock masses with one or two joint sets, and finally, observations in TBM (tunnel boring machine tunnels in hard and medium hard massive rocks. The reason for ‘stress-induced’ failure to initiate, when the assumed maximum tangential stress is approximately (0.4–0.5σc (UCS, uniaxial compressive strength in massive rock, is now known to be due to exceedance of a critical extensional strain which is generated by a Poisson's ratio effect. However, because similar ‘stress/strength’ failure limits are found in mining, nuclear waste research excavations, and deep road tunnels in Norway, one is easily misled into thinking of compressive stress induced failure. Because of this, the empirical SRF (stress reduction factor in the Q-system is set to accelerate as the estimated ratio σθmax/σc >> 0.4. In mining, similar ‘stress/strength’ ratios are used to suggest depth of break-out. The reality behind the fracture initiation stress/strength ratio of ‘0.4’ is actually because of combinations of familiar tensile and compressive strength ratios (such as 10 with Poisson's ratio (say 0.25. We exceed the extensional strain limits and start to see acoustic emission (AE when tangential stress σθ ≈ 0.4σc, due to simple arithmetic. The combination of 2D theoretical FRACOD models and actual tunnelling suggests frequent initiation of failure by ‘stable’ extensional strain fracturing, but propagation in ‘unstable’ and therefore dynamic shearing. In the case of very deep tunnels (and 3D physical simulations, compressive stresses may be too high for extensional strain fracturing, and

  8. FAILPROB-A Computer Program to Compute the Probability of Failure of a Brittle Component; TOPICAL

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    WELLMAN, GERALD W.

    2002-01-01

    FAILPROB is a computer program that applies the Weibull statistics characteristic of brittle failure of a material along with the stress field resulting from a finite element analysis to determine the probability of failure of a component. FAILPROB uses the statistical techniques for fast fracture prediction (but not the coding) from the N.A.S.A. - CARES/life ceramic reliability package. FAILPROB provides the analyst at Sandia with a more convenient tool than CARES/life because it is designed to behave in the tradition of structural analysis post-processing software such as ALGEBRA, in which the standard finite element database format EXODUS II is both read and written. This maintains compatibility with the entire SEACAS suite of post-processing software. A new technique to deal with the high local stresses computed for structures with singularities such as glass-to-metal seals and ceramic-to-metal braze joints is proposed and implemented. This technique provides failure probability computation that is insensitive to the finite element mesh employed in the underlying stress analysis. Included in this report are a brief discussion of the computational algorithms employed, user instructions, and example problems that both demonstrate the operation of FAILPROB and provide a starting point for verification and validation

  9. Failure processes in soft and quasi-brittle materials with nonhomogeneous microstructures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spring, Daniel W.

    Material failure pervades the fields of materials science and engineering; it occurs at various scales and in various contexts. Understanding the mechanisms by which a material fails can lead to advancements in the way we design and build the world around us. For example, in structural engineering, understanding the fracture of concrete and steel can lead to improved structural systems and safer designs; in geological engineering, understanding the fracture of rock can lead to increased efficiency in oil and gas extraction; and in biological engineering, understanding the fracture of bone can lead to improvements in the design of bio-composites and medical implants. In this thesis, we numerically investigate a wide spectrum of failure behavior; in soft and quasi-brittle materials with nonhomogeneous microstructures considering a statistical distribution of material properties. The first topic we investigate considers the influence of interfacial interactions on the macroscopic constitutive response of particle reinforced elastomers. When a particle is embedded into an elastomer, the polymer chains in the elastomer tend to adsorb (or anchor) onto the surface of the particle; creating a region in the vicinity of each particle (often referred to as an interphase) with distinct properties from those in the bulk elastomer. This interphasial region has been known to exist for many decades, but is primarily omitted in computational investigations of such composites. In this thesis, we present an investigation into the influence of interphases on the macroscopic constitutive response of particle filled elastomers undergoing large deformations. In addition, at large deformations, a localized region of failure tends to accumulate around inclusions. To capture this localized region of failure (often referred to as interfacial debonding), we use cohesive zone elements which follow the Park-Paulino-Roesler traction-separation relation. To account for friction, we present a new

  10. Cuttability Assessment of Selected Rocks Through Different Brittleness Values

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dursun, Arif Emre; Gokay, M. Kemal

    2016-04-01

    Prediction of cuttability is a critical issue for successful execution of tunnel or mining excavation projects. Rock cuttability is also used to determine specific energy, which is defined as the work done by the cutting force to excavate a unit volume of yield. Specific energy is a meaningful inverse measure of cutting efficiency, since it simply states how much energy must be expended to excavate a unit volume of rock. Brittleness is a fundamental rock property and applied in drilling and rock excavation. Brittleness is one of the most crucial rock features for rock excavation. For this reason, determination of relations between cuttability and brittleness will help rock engineers. This study aims to estimate the specific energy from different brittleness values of rocks by means of simple and multiple regression analyses. In this study, rock cutting, rock property, and brittleness index tests were carried out on 24 different rock samples with different strength values, including marble, travertine, and tuff, collected from sites around Konya Province, Turkey. Four previously used brittleness concepts were evaluated in this study, denoted as B 1 (ratio of compressive to tensile strength), B 2 (ratio of the difference between compressive and tensile strength to the sum of compressive and tensile strength), B 3 (area under the stress-strain line in relation to compressive and tensile strength), and B 9 = S 20, the percentage of fines (point load strengths of rocks using multiple regression analysis). The results suggest that the proposed simple regression-based prediction models including B 3, B 9, and B 9p outperform the other models including B 1 and B 2 and can be used for more accurate and reliable estimation of specific energy.

  11. Elastic geobarometry and the role of brittle failure on pressure release

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mazzucchelli, Mattia Luca; Angel, Ross John; Rustioni, Greta; Milani, Sula; Nimis, Paolo; Chiara Domeneghetti, Maria; Marone, Federica; Harris, Jeff W.; Nestola, Fabrizio; Alvaro, Matteo

    2016-04-01

    Mineral inclusions trapped in their hosts can provide fundamental information about geological processes. Recent developments in elastic geobarometry, for example, allow the retrieval of encapsulation pressures for host-inclusion pairs. In principle this method can be applied to any mineral-mineral pair so long as both the residual pressure on an inclusion (Pinc), and the equations of state for both host and inclusion are either known or determined (Angel et al., 2015). However, Angel et al. (2014) outlined some boundary conditions, one of which was that deformation in the host-inclusion pair has to be purely elastic. Thus this caveat would exclude from analysis all the inclusions that are surrounded by cracks, indicative of brittle deformation, which may result in partial or complete release of the Pinc. If however the effects of cracks surrounding trapped mineral inclusions could be quantitatively modelled, then the applicability of "elastic" geobarometry might be extended to a much larger number of inclusion-host pairs. We report the results of a pilot experiment in which the stress states (i.e. the residual pressure) have been determined for 10 olivine inclusions still entrapped in 5 diamonds. Inclusion pressures were determined from the unit-cell volumes of the olivines measured in-situ in the diamonds by X-ray diffraction. The olivine equations of state were determined from the olivine compositions by in-situ X-ray structure refinement. Values of Pinc range from 0.19 to 0.53 GPa. In order to quantify the degree of brittle failure surrounding the inclusions, the same set of samples were also investigated by synchrotron X-ray micro-tomography (SRXTM at TOMCAT, Swiss LightSource). Preliminary results showed that at the spatial resolution of our experiments (pixel size of 0.34μm), 90% of the inclusions trapped in our set of diamonds were surrounded by cracks. The volume of the cracks has been determined from 3D reconstruction with an accuracy of about 4%. Our

  12. Evaluation of fracture mechanics analyses used in RPV integrity assessment regarding brittle fracture

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Moinereau, D.; Faidy, C.; Valeta, M.P.; Bhandari, S.; Guichard, D.

    1997-01-01

    Electricite de France has conducted during these last years some experimental and numerical research programmes in order to evaluate fracture mechanics analyses used in nuclear reactor pressure vessels structural integrity assessment, regarding the risk of brittle fracture. These programmes included cleavage fracture tests on large scale cladded specimens containing subclad flaws with their interpretations by 2D and 3D numerical computations, and validation of finite element codes for pressurized thermal shocks analyses. Four cladded specimens made of ferritic steel A508 C13 with stainless steel cladding, and containing shallow subclad flaws, have been tested in four point bending at very low temperature in order to obtain cleavage failure. The specimen failure was obtained in each case in base metal by cleavage fracture. These tests have been interpreted by two-dimensional and three-dimensional finite element computations using different fracture mechanics approaches (elastic analysis with specific plasticity corrections, elastic-plastic analysis, local approach to cleavage fracture). The failure of specimens are conservatively predicted by different analyses. The comparison between the elastic analyses and elastic-plastic analyses shows the conservatism of specific plasticity corrections used in French RPV elastic analyses. Numerous finite element calculations have also been performed between EDF, CEA and Framatome in order to compare and validate several fracture mechanics post processors implemented in finite element programmes used in pressurized thermal shock analyses. This work includes two-dimensional numerical computations on specimens with different geometries and loadings. The comparisons show a rather good agreement on main results, allowing to validate the finite element codes and their post-processors. (author). 11 refs, 24 figs, 3 tabs

  13. Evaluation of fracture mechanics analyses used in RPV integrity assessment regarding brittle fracture

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Moinereau, D [Electricite de France, Dept. MTC, Moret-sur-Loing (France); Faidy, C [Electricite de France, SEPTEN, Villeurbanne (France); Valeta, M P [Commisariat a l` Energie Atomique, Dept. DMT, Gif-sur-Yvette (France); Bhandari, S; Guichard, D [Societe Franco-Americaine de Constructions Atomiques (FRAMATOME), 92 - Paris-La-Defense (France)

    1997-09-01

    Electricite de France has conducted during these last years some experimental and numerical research programmes in order to evaluate fracture mechanics analyses used in nuclear reactor pressure vessels structural integrity assessment, regarding the risk of brittle fracture. These programmes included cleavage fracture tests on large scale cladded specimens containing subclad flaws with their interpretations by 2D and 3D numerical computations, and validation of finite element codes for pressurized thermal shocks analyses. Four cladded specimens made of ferritic steel A508 C13 with stainless steel cladding, and containing shallow subclad flaws, have been tested in four point bending at very low temperature in order to obtain cleavage failure. The specimen failure was obtained in each case in base metal by cleavage fracture. These tests have been interpreted by two-dimensional and three-dimensional finite element computations using different fracture mechanics approaches (elastic analysis with specific plasticity corrections, elastic-plastic analysis, local approach to cleavage fracture). The failure of specimens are conservatively predicted by different analyses. The comparison between the elastic analyses and elastic-plastic analyses shows the conservatism of specific plasticity corrections used in French RPV elastic analyses. Numerous finite element calculations have also been performed between EDF, CEA and Framatome in order to compare and validate several fracture mechanics post processors implemented in finite element programmes used in pressurized thermal shock analyses. This work includes two-dimensional numerical computations on specimens with different geometries and loadings. The comparisons show a rather good agreement on main results, allowing to validate the finite element codes and their post-processors. (author). 11 refs, 24 figs, 3 tabs.

  14. Mesoscale analysis of failure in quasi-brittle materials: comparison between lattice model and acoustic emission data.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grégoire, David; Verdon, Laura; Lefort, Vincent; Grassl, Peter; Saliba, Jacqueline; Regoin, Jean-Pierre; Loukili, Ahmed; Pijaudier-Cabot, Gilles

    2015-10-25

    The purpose of this paper is to analyse the development and the evolution of the fracture process zone during fracture and damage in quasi-brittle materials. A model taking into account the material details at the mesoscale is used to describe the failure process at the scale of the heterogeneities. This model is used to compute histograms of the relative distances between damaged points. These numerical results are compared with experimental data, where the damage evolution is monitored using acoustic emissions. Histograms of the relative distances between damage events in the numerical calculations and acoustic events in the experiments exhibit good agreement. It is shown that the mesoscale model provides relevant information from the point of view of both global responses and the local failure process. © 2015 The Authors. International Journal for Numerical and Analytical Methods in Geomechanics published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  15. A new tablet brittleness index.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gong, Xingchu; Sun, Changquan Calvin

    2015-06-01

    Brittleness is one of the important material properties that influences the success or failure of powder compaction. We have discovered that the reciprocal of diametrical elastic strain at fracture is the most suitable tablet brittleness indices (TBIs) for quantifying brittleness of pharmaceutical tablets. The new strain based TBI is supported by both theoretical considerations and a systematic statistical analysis of friability data. It is sufficiently sensitive to changes in both tablet compositions and compaction parameters. For all tested materials, it correctly shows that tablet brittleness increases with increasing tablet porosity for the same powder. In addition, TBI increases with increasing content of a brittle excipient, lactose monohydrate, in the mixtures with a plastic excipient, microcrystalline cellulose. A probability map for achieving less than 1% tablet friability at various combinations of tablet tensile strength and TBI was constructed. Data from marketed tablets validate this probability map and a TBI value of 150 is recommended as the upper limit for pharmaceutical tablets. This TBI can be calculated from the data routinely obtained during tablet diametrical breaking test, which is commonly performed for assessing tablet mechanical strength. Therefore, it is ready for adoption for quantifying tablet brittleness to guide tablet formulation development since it does not require additional experimental work. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  16. A quasi-static algorithm that includes effects of characteristic time scales for simulating failures in brittle materials

    KAUST Repository

    Liu, Jinxing

    2013-04-24

    When the brittle heterogeneous material is simulated via lattice models, the quasi-static failure depends on the relative magnitudes of Telem, the characteristic releasing time of the internal forces of the broken elements and Tlattice, the characteristic relaxation time of the lattice, both of which are infinitesimal compared with Tload, the characteristic loading period. The load-unload (L-U) method is used for one extreme, Telem << Tlattice, whereas the force-release (F-R) method is used for the other, Telem T lattice. For cases between the above two extremes, we develop a new algorithm by combining the L-U and the F-R trial displacement fields to construct the new trial field. As a result, our algorithm includes both L-U and F-R failure characteristics, which allows us to observe the influence of the ratio of Telem to Tlattice by adjusting their contributions in the trial displacement field. Therefore, the material dependence of the snap-back instabilities is implemented by introducing one snap-back parameter γ. Although in principle catastrophic failures can hardly be predicted accurately without knowing all microstructural information, effects of γ can be captured by numerical simulations conducted on samples with exactly the same microstructure but different γs. Such a same-specimen-based study shows how the lattice behaves along with the changing ratio of the L-U and F-R components. © 2013 The Author(s).

  17. ADM guidance-Ceramics: guidance to the use of fractography in failure analysis of brittle materials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scherrer, Susanne S; Lohbauer, Ulrich; Della Bona, Alvaro; Vichi, Alessandro; Tholey, Michael J; Kelly, J Robert; van Noort, Richard; Cesar, Paulo Francisco

    2017-06-01

    To provide background information and guidance as to how to use fractography accurately, a powerful tool for failure analysis of dental ceramic structures. An extended palette of qualitative and quantitative fractography is provided, both for in vivo and in vitro fracture surface analyses. As visual support, this guidance document will provide micrographs of typical critical ceramic processing flaws, differentiating between pre- versus post sintering cracks, grinding damage related failures and occlusal contact wear origins and of failures due to surface degradation. The documentation emphasizes good labeling of crack features, precise indication of the direction of crack propagation (dcp), identification of the fracture origin, the use of fractographic photomontage of critical flaws or flaw labeling on strength data graphics. A compilation of recommendations for specific applications of fractography in Dentistry is also provided. This guidance document will contribute to a more accurate use of fractography and help researchers to better identify, describe and understand the causes of failure, for both clinical and laboratory-scale situations. If adequately performed at a large scale, fractography will assist in optimizing the methods of processing and designing of restorative materials and components. Clinical failures may be better understood and consequently reduced by sending out the correct message regarding the fracture origin in clinical trials. Copyright © 2017 The Academy of Dental Materials. All rights reserved.

  18. A continuous-discontinuous approach to simulate failure of quasi-brittle materials

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Moonen, P.; Sluys, L.J.; Carmeliet, J.

    2009-01-01

    A continuous-discontinuous approach to simulate failure is presented. The formulation covers both diffuse damage processes in the bulk material as well as the initiation and propagation of discrete cracks. Comparison with experimental data on layered sandstone shows that the modeling strategy

  19. Role of core support material in veneer failure of brittle layer structures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hermann, Ilja; Bhowmick, Sanjit; Lawn, Brian R

    2007-07-01

    A study is made of veneer failure by cracking in all-ceramic crown-like layer structures. Model trilayers consisting of a 1 mm thick external glass layer (veneer) joined to a 0.5 mm thick inner stiff and hard ceramic support layer (core) by epoxy bonding or by fusion are fabricated for testing. The resulting bilayers are then glued to a thick compliant polycarbonate slab to simulate a dentin base. The specimens are subjected to cyclic contact (occlusal) loading with spherical indenters in an aqueous environment. Video cameras are used to record the fracture evolution in the transparent glass layer in situ during testing. The dominant failure mode is cone cracking in the glass veneer by traditional outer (Hertzian) cone cracks at higher contact loads and by inner (hydraulically pumped) cone cracks at lower loads. Failure is deemed to occur when one of these cracks reaches the veneer/core interface. The advantages and disadvantages of the alumina and zirconia core materials are discussed in terms of mechanical properties-strength and toughness, as well as stiffness. Consideration is also given to the roles of interface strength and residual thermal expansion mismatch stresses in relation to the different joining methods. Copyright 2006 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  20. Investigation of Macroscopic Brittle Creep Failure Caused by Microcrack Growth Under Step Loading and Unloading in Rocks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Xiaozhao; Shao, Zhushan

    2016-07-01

    The growth of subcritical cracks plays an important role in the creep of brittle rock. The stress path has a great influence on creep properties. A micromechanics-based model is presented to study the effect of the stress path on creep properties. The microcrack model of Ashby and Sammis, Charles' Law, and a new micro-macro relation are employed in our model. This new micro-macro relation is proposed by using the correlation between the micromechanical and macroscopic definition of damage. A stress path function is also introduced by the relationship between stress and time. Theoretical expressions of the stress-strain relationship and creep behavior are derived. The effects of confining pressure on the stress-strain relationship are studied. Crack initiation stress and peak stress are achieved under different confining pressures. The applied constant stress that could cause creep behavior is predicted. Creep properties are studied under the step loading of axial stress or the unloading of confining pressure. Rationality of the micromechanics-based model is verified by the experimental results of Jinping marble. Furthermore, the effects of model parameters and the unloading rate of confining pressure on creep behavior are analyzed. The coupling effect of step axial stress and confining pressure on creep failure is also discussed. The results provide implications on the deformation behavior and time-delayed rockburst mechanism caused by microcrack growth on surrounding rocks during deep underground excavations.

  1. Atomistic Simulation of the Rate-Dependent Ductile-to-Brittle Failure Transition in Bicrystalline Metal Nanowires.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tao, Weiwei; Cao, Penghui; Park, Harold S

    2018-02-14

    The mechanical properties and plastic deformation mechanisms of metal nanowires have been studied intensely for many years. One of the important yet unresolved challenges in this field is to bridge the gap in properties and deformation mechanisms reported for slow strain rate experiments (∼10 -2 s -1 ), and high strain rate molecular dynamics (MD) simulations (∼10 8 s -1 ) such that a complete understanding of strain rate effects on mechanical deformation and plasticity can be obtained. In this work, we use long time scale atomistic modeling based on potential energy surface exploration to elucidate the atomistic mechanisms governing a strain-rate-dependent incipient plasticity and yielding transition for face centered cubic (FCC) copper and silver nanowires. The transition occurs for both metals with both pristine and rough surfaces for all computationally accessible diameters (ductile-to-brittle transition in failure mode similar to previous experimental studies on bicrystalline silver nanowires is observed, which is driven by differences in dislocation activity and grain boundary mobility as compared to the high strain rate case.

  2. A simple nanoindentation-based methodology to assess the strength of brittle thin films

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Borrero-Lopez, Oscar; Hoffman, Mark; Bendavid, Avi; Martin, Phil J.

    2008-01-01

    In this work, we report a simple methodology to assess the mechanical strength of sub-micron brittle films. Nanoindentation of as-deposited tetrahedral amorphous carbon (ta-C) and Ti-Si-N nanocomposite films on silicon substrates followed by cross-sectional examination of the damage with a focused ion beam (FIB) miller allows the occurrence of cracking to be assessed in comparison with discontinuities (pop-ins) in the load-displacement curves. Strength is determined from the critical loads at which first cracking occurs using the theory of plates on a soft foundation. This methodology enables Weibull plots to be readily obtained, avoiding complex freestanding-film machining processes. This is of great relevance, since the mechanical strength of thin films ultimately controls their reliable use in a broad range of functional uses such as tribological coatings, magnetic drives, MEMS and biomedical applications

  3. Probability of brittle failure

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, A.; Bosnyak, C. P.; Chudnovsky, A.

    1991-01-01

    A methodology was developed for collecting statistically representative data for crack initiation and arrest from small number of test specimens. An epoxy (based on bisphenol A diglycidyl ether and polyglycol extended diglycyl ether and cured with diethylene triamine) is selected as a model material. A compact tension specimen with displacement controlled loading is used to observe multiple crack initiation and arrests. The energy release rate at crack initiation is significantly higher than that at a crack arrest, as has been observed elsewhere. The difference between these energy release rates is found to depend on specimen size (scale effect), and is quantitatively related to the fracture surface morphology. The scale effect, similar to that in statistical strength theory, is usually attributed to the statistics of defects which control the fracture process. Triangular shaped ripples (deltoids) are formed on the fracture surface during the slow subcritical crack growth, prior to the smooth mirror-like surface characteristic of fast cracks. The deltoids are complementary on the two crack faces which excludes any inelastic deformation from consideration. Presence of defects is also suggested by the observed scale effect. However, there are no defects at the deltoid apexes detectable down to the 0.1 micron level.

  4. Applying micromechanic failure models for description of failure modes in the ductile-brittle transition region; Einsatz mikromechanischer Schaedigungsmodelle im sproed-duktilen Uebergangsbereich

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bernauer, G.

    1997-07-01

    The work reported was to examine whether the modified Gurson model and the Beremin model can be applied to the brittle-ductile transition region of a ferritic steel, and whether the material`s behaviour can be characterized with a failure model integrating the two models mentioned above into one. Any possible improvements of this approach were to be found. The report at first gives a brief list of terminology and formulas used. Chapter 3 explains the microscopic processes typically observed in the transition region in connection with the failure modes of ductile fracture and cleavage fracture, and shows possible approaches for modelling. Chapter 4 defines the specimens and materials, and chapter 5 explains the experiments as well as the microscopic analyses of the fracture surfaces. Chapter 6 presents subsequent calculations representing the processes observed. Based on the stress distributions thus derived, the Beremin model is re-examined for further development. Chapter 7 summarizes the results obtained. (orig./CB) [Deutsch] Ziel der Arbeit ist, zu untersuchen, ob das modifizierte Gurson-Modell und das Beremin-Modell im sproed-duktilen Uebergangsbereich eines ferritischen Stahls einsetzbar sind und ob das Werkstoffverhalten mit einem aus beiden Modellen kombinierten Schaedigungsmodell berechnet werden kann. Gegebenenfalls sind Verbesserungen herbeizufuehren. Die vorliegende Arbeit beginnt mit einer kurzen Einfuehrung der verwendeten Begriffe und Formalismen. In Kap. 3 werden die mikroskopischen Vorgaenge bei den im Uebergangsbereich typischerweise auftretenden Versagensarten duktiler Bruch und Spaltbruch vorgestellt und verschiedene Moeglichkeiten ihrer Modellierung aufgezeigt. Nach der Vorstellung des Probenwerkstoffs werden in Kap. 4 die Experimente beschrieben und die mikroskopischen Untersuchungen der Bruchflaechen in Kap. 5 dargestellt. Die Nachrechnungen der Experimente werden in Kap. 6 vorgestellt. Auf der Grundlage der dadurch bereitgestellten

  5. State Vector: A New Approach to Prediction of the Failure of Brittle Heterogeneous Media and Large Earthquakes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, Huai-Zhong; Yin, Xiang-Chu; Zhu, Qing-Yong; Yan, Yu-Ding

    2006-12-01

    The concept of state vector stems from statistical physics, where it is usually used to describe activity patterns of a physical field in its manner of coarsegrain. In this paper, we propose an approach by which the state vector was applied to describe quantitatively the damage evolution of the brittle heterogeneous systems, and some interesting results are presented, i.e., prior to the macro-fracture of rock specimens and occurrence of a strong earthquake, evolutions of the four relevant scalars time series derived from the state vectors changed anomalously. As retrospective studies, some prominent large earthquakes occurred in the Chinese Mainland (e.g., the M 7.4 Haicheng earthquake on February 4, 1975, and the M 7.8 Tangshan earthquake on July 28, 1976, etc) were investigated. Results show considerable promise that the time-dependent state vectors could serve as a kind of precursor to predict earthquakes.

  6. Assessment of Ductile, Brittle, and Fatigue Fractures of Metals Using Optical Coherence Tomography

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gheorghe Hutiu

    2018-02-01

    Full Text Available Some forensic in situ investigations, such as those needed in transportation (for aviation, maritime, road, or rail accidents or for parts working under harsh conditions (e.g., pipes or turbines would benefit from a method/technique that distinguishes ductile from brittle fractures of metals—as material defects are one of the potential causes of incidents. Nowadays, the gold standard in material studies is represented by scanning electron microscopy (SEM. However, SEM instruments are large, expensive, time-consuming, and lab-based; hence, in situ measurements are impossible. To tackle these issues, we propose as an alternative, lower-cost, sufficiently high-resolution technique, Optical Coherence Tomography (OCT to perform fracture analysis by obtaining the topography of metallic surfaces. Several metals have been considered in this study: low soft carbon steels, lamellar graphite cast iron, an antifriction alloy, high-quality rolled steel, stainless steel, and ductile cast iron. An in-house developed Swept Source (SS OCT system, Master-Slave (MS enhanced is used, and height profiles of the samples’ surfaces were generated. Two configurations were used: one where the dimension of the voxel was 1000 μm3 and a second one of 160 μm3—with a 10 μm and a 4 μm transversal resolution, respectively. These height profiles allowed for concluding that the carbon steel samples were subject to ductile fracture, while the cast iron and antifriction alloy samples were subjected to brittle fracture. The validation of OCT images has been made with SEM images obtained with a 4 nm resolution. Although the OCT images are of a much lower resolution than the SEM ones, we demonstrate that they are sufficiently good to obtain clear images of the grains of the metallic materials and thus to distinguish between ductile and brittle fractures—especially with the higher resolution MS/SS-OCT system. The investigation is finally extended to the most useful case of

  7. Fracture Mechanics Models for Brittle Failure of Bottom Rails due to Uplift in Timber Frame Shear Walls

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Joergen L. Jensen

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available In partially anchored timber frame shear walls, hold-down devices are not provided; hence the uplift forces are transferred by the fasteners of the sheathing-to-framing joints into the bottom rail and via anchor bolts from the bottom rail into the foundation. Since the force in the anchor bolts and the sheathing-to-framing joints do not act in the same vertical plane, the bottom rail is subjected to tensile stresses perpendicular to the grain and splitting of the bottom rail may occur. This paper presents simple analytical models based on fracture mechanics for the analysis of such bottom rails. An existing model is reviewed and several alternative models are derived and compared qualitatively and with experimental data. It is concluded that several of the fracture mechanics models lead to failure load predictions which seem in sufficiently good agreement with the experimental results to justify their application in practical design.

  8. Experimental assessment of welded joints brittle fracture on the crack arrest criterion for WWER-1000 RPV

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Blumin, A.A.; Timofeev, B.T.

    2000-01-01

    The crack arrest fracture toughness in a vessel steel used in WWER-1000 reactor, namely in steel 15Kh2NMFA and its submerged arc welded joints, produced with Sv-08KhGNMTA, Sv-12 Kh2NMFA welding wires and NF-18 M, FZ-16 A welding fluxes, is under study. Experimental studies are carried out using three heats with the chemical composition meeting the specifications. Weld specimens 100-200 mm thick are subjected to tempering according various regimes to induce the embrittlement and simulate mechanical properties (yield strength and ductile-brittle transition temperature) corresponding to those at the end of service life under neutron radiation effect. Base metal and weld properties are compared. The wide scatter is noted for experimental data on fracture toughness temperature dependences. A possibility to use the dependence of K Ia = f (T-T k ) for determining the crack arrest fracture toughness is discussed taking in account that K Ia is a stress intensity factor calculated within the frame of static fracture mechanics [ru

  9. Brittle diabetes: Psychopathology and personality.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pelizza, Lorenzo; Pupo, Simona

    The term "brittle" is used to describe an uncommon subgroup of patients with type I diabetes whose lives are disrupted by severe glycaemic instability with repeated and prolonged hospitalization. Psychosocial problems are the major perceived underlying causes of brittle diabetes. Aim of this study is a systematic psychopathological and personological assessment of patients with brittle diabetes in comparison with subjects without brittle diabetes, using specific parameters of general psychopathology and personality disorders following the multi-axial format of the current DSM-IV-TR (Diagnostic and Statistical manual of Mental Disorders - IV Edition - Text Revised) diagnostic criteria for mental disorders. Patients comprised 42 subjects with brittle diabetes and a case-control group of 42 subjects with stable diabetes, matched for age, gender, years of education, and diabetes duration. General psychopathology and the DSM-IV-TR personality disorders were assessed using the Symptom Checklist-90-Revised (SCL-90-R) and the Structured Clinical Interview for axis II personality Disorders (SCID-II). The comparison for SCL-90-R parameters revealed no differences in all primary symptom dimensions and in the three global distress indices between the two groups. However, patients with brittle diabetes showed higher percentages in borderline, histrionic, and narcissistic personality disorder. In this study, patients with brittle diabetes show no differences in terms of global severity of psychopathological distress and specific symptoms of axis I DSM-IV-TR psychiatric diagnoses in comparison with subjects without brittle diabetes. Differently, individuals with brittle diabetes are more frequently affected by specific DSM-IV-TR cluster B personality disorders. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  10. Assessment of compressive failure process of cortical bone materials using damage-based model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ng, Theng Pin; R Koloor, S S; Djuansjah, J R P; Abdul Kadir, M R

    2017-02-01

    The main failure factors of cortical bone are aging or osteoporosis, accident and high energy trauma or physiological activities. However, the mechanism of damage evolution coupled with yield criterion is considered as one of the unclear subjects in failure analysis of cortical bone materials. Therefore, this study attempts to assess the structural response and progressive failure process of cortical bone using a brittle damaged plasticity model. For this reason, several compressive tests are performed on cortical bone specimens made of bovine femur, in order to obtain the structural response and mechanical properties of the material. Complementary finite element (FE) model of the sample and test is prepared to simulate the elastic-to-damage behavior of the cortical bone using the brittle damaged plasticity model. The FE model is validated in a comparative method using the predicted and measured structural response as load-compressive displacement through simulation and experiment. FE results indicated that the compressive damage initiated and propagated at central region where maximum equivalent plastic strain is computed, which coincided with the degradation of structural compressive stiffness followed by a vast amount of strain energy dissipation. The parameter of compressive damage rate, which is a function dependent on damage parameter and the plastic strain is examined for different rates. Results show that considering a similar rate to the initial slope of the damage parameter in the experiment would give a better sense for prediction of compressive failure. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  11. Assessment of Nonorganic Failure To Thrive.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wooster, Donna M.

    1999-01-01

    This article describes basic assessment considerations for infants and toddlers exhibiting nonorganic failure to thrive. The evaluation process must examine feeding, maternal-child interactions, child temperament, and environmental risks and behaviors. Early identification and intervention are necessary to minimize the long-term developmental…

  12. Failure assessment techniques to ensure shipping container integrity

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    McConnell, P.

    1986-02-01

    This report discusses several methodologies which may be used to ensure the structural integrity of containment systems to be used for the transport and storage of high-level radioactive substances. For economic reasons, shipping containers constructed of ferritic materials are being considered for manufacture by vendors in the US and Europe. Ferritic show an inherent transition from a ductile, high energy failure mode to a brittle, low energy fracture mode with decreasing temperature. Therefore, formal consideration of means by which to avoid unstable brittle fracture is necessary prior to the licensing of ferritic casks. It is suggested that failure of a shipping container wall be defined as occurring when a flaw extends through the outer wall of the containment system. Crack initiation which may lead to unstable brittle crack growth should therefore be prevented. It is suggested that a fundamental linear elastic fracture mechanics (lefm) approach be adopted on a case-by-case basis, applied perhaps by means of appropriate modifications to ASMA Section III or Section XI. A lefm analysis requires information concerning service temperatures, loading rates, flaw sizes, and applied stresses. Tentative judgments regarding these parameters for typical shipping containers have been made

  13. Renal function assessment in heart failure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pérez Calvo, J I; Josa Laorden, C; Giménez López, I

    Renal function is one of the most consistent prognostic determinants in heart failure. The prognostic information it provides is independent of the ejection fraction and functional status. This article reviews the various renal function assessment measures, with special emphasis on the fact that the patient's clinical situation and response to the heart failure treatment should be considered for the correct interpretation of the results. Finally, we review the literature on the performance of tubular damage biomarkers. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier España, S.L.U. and Sociedad Española de Medicina Interna (SEMI). All rights reserved.

  14. Mode II brittle fracture: recent developments

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. Campagnolo

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available Fracture behaviour of V-notched specimens is assessed using two energy based criteria namely the averaged strain energy density (SED and Finite Fracture Mechanics (FFM. Two different formulations of FFM criterion are considered for fracture analysis. A new formulation for calculation of the control radius Rc under pure Mode II loading is presented and used for prediction of fracture behaviour. The critical Notch Stress Intensity Factor (NSIF at failure under Mode II loading condition can be expressed as a function of notch opening angle. Different formulations of NSIFs are derived using the three criteria and the results are compared in the case of sharp V-notched brittle components under in-plane shear loading, in order to investigate the ability of each method for the fracture assessment. For this purpose, a bulk of experimental data taken from the literature is employed for the comparison among the mentioned criteria

  15. Risk assessment of tailings facility dam failure

    OpenAIRE

    Hadzi-Nikolova, Marija; Mirakovski, Dejan; Stefanova, Violeta

    2011-01-01

    This paper presents the consequences of tailings facility dam failure and therefore the needs for its risk assessment. Tailings are fine-grained wastes of the mining industry, output as slurries, due to mixing with water during mineral processing. Tailings dams vary a lot as it is affected by: tailings characteristics and mill output, site characteristics as: topography, hydrology, geology, groundwater, seismicity and available material and disposal methods. The talings which accumulat...

  16. Assessing Risks of Mine Tailing Dam Failures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Concha Larrauri, P.; Lall, U.

    2017-12-01

    The consequences of tailings dam failures can be catastrophic for communities and ecosystems in the vicinity of the dams. The failure of the Fundão tailings dam at the Samarco mine in 2015 killed 19 people with severe consequences for the environment. The financial and legal consequences of a tailings dam failure can also be significant for the mining companies. For the Fundão tailings dam, the company had to pay 6 billion dollars in fines and twenty-one executives were charged with qualified murder. There are tenths of thousands of active, inactive, and abandoned tailings dams in the world and there is a need to better understand the hazards posed by these structures to downstream populations and ecosystems. A challenge to assess the risks of tailings dams in a large scale is that many of them are not registered in publicly available databases and there is little information about their current physical state. Additionally, hazard classifications of tailings dams - common in many countries- tend to be subjective, include vague parameter definitions, and are not always updated over time. Here we present a simple methodology to assess and rank the exposure to tailings dams using ArcGIS that removes subjective interpretations. The method uses basic information such as current dam height, storage volume, topography, population, land use, and hydrological data. A hazard rating risk was developed to compare the potential extent of the damage across dams. This assessment provides a general overview of what in the vicinity of the tailings dams could be affected in case of a failure and a way to rank tailings dams that is directly linked to the exposure at any given time. One hundred tailings dams in Minas Gerais, Brazil were used for the test case. This ranking approach could inform the risk management strategy of the tailings dams within a company, and when disclosed, it could enable shareholders and the communities to make decisions on the risks they are taking.

  17. High Speed Dynamics in Brittle Materials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hiermaier, Stefan

    2015-06-01

    Brittle Materials under High Speed and Shock loading provide a continuous challenge in experimental physics, analysis and numerical modelling, and consequently for engineering design. The dependence of damage and fracture processes on material-inherent length and time scales, the influence of defects, rate-dependent material properties and inertia effects on different scales make their understanding a true multi-scale problem. In addition, it is not uncommon that materials show a transition from ductile to brittle behavior when the loading rate is increased. A particular case is spallation, a brittle tensile failure induced by the interaction of stress waves leading to a sudden change from compressive to tensile loading states that can be invoked in various materials. This contribution highlights typical phenomena occurring when brittle materials are exposed to high loading rates in applications such as blast and impact on protective structures, or meteorite impact on geological materials. A short review on experimental methods that are used for dynamic characterization of brittle materials will be given. A close interaction of experimental analysis and numerical simulation has turned out to be very helpful in analyzing experimental results. For this purpose, adequate numerical methods are required. Cohesive zone models are one possible method for the analysis of brittle failure as long as some degree of tension is present. Their recent successful application for meso-mechanical simulations of concrete in Hopkinson-type spallation tests provides new insight into the dynamic failure process. Failure under compressive loading is a particular challenge for numerical simulations as it involves crushing of material which in turn influences stress states in other parts of a structure. On a continuum scale, it can be modeled using more or less complex plasticity models combined with failure surfaces, as will be demonstrated for ceramics. Models which take microstructural

  18. Failure detection system risk reduction assessment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aguilar, Robert B. (Inventor); Huang, Zhaofeng (Inventor)

    2012-01-01

    A process includes determining a probability of a failure mode of a system being analyzed reaching a failure limit as a function of time to failure limit, determining a probability of a mitigation of the failure mode as a function of a time to failure limit, and quantifying a risk reduction based on the probability of the failure mode reaching the failure limit and the probability of the mitigation.

  19. Structural and microstructural design in brittle materials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Evans, A.G.

    1979-12-01

    Structural design with brittle materials requires that the stress level in the component correspond to a material survival probability that exceeds the minimum survival probability permitted in that application. This can be achieved by developing failure models that fully account for the probability of fracture from defects within the material (including considerations of fracture statistics, fracture mechanics and stress analysis) coupled with non-destructive techniques that determine the size of the large extreme of critical defects. Approaches for obtaining the requisite information are described. The results provide implications for the microstructural design of failure resistant brittle materials by reducing the size of deleterious defects and enhancing the fracture toughness

  20. Disease assessment and prognosis of liver failure

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    ZHANG Jing

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available Liver failure has a high fatality rate and greatly threatens human health. Liver transplantation can effectively reduce the fatality rate. However, the problems such as donor shortage and allograft rejection limit the wide application of liver transplantation. An accurate early assessment helps to evaluate patients′ condition and optimize therapeutic strategies. At present, commonly used systems for prognostic evaluation include the King′s College Hospital, MELD, integrated MELD, Child-Pugh score, CLIF-SOFA, CLIF-C ACLFS, and D-MELD, and each system has its own advantages and disadvantages. Among these systems, the MELD scoring system is the most commonly used one, and the D-MELD scoring system is the most innovative one, which can be used for patients on the waiting list for liver transplantation. This article elaborates on the characteristics and predictive value of each scoring system in clinical practice.

  1. Dynamic loads during failure risk assessment of bridge crane structures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gorynin, A. D.; Antsev, V. Yu; Shaforost, A. N.

    2018-03-01

    The paper presents the method of failure risk assessment associated with a bridge crane metal structure at the design stage. It also justifies the necessity of taking into account dynamic loads with regard to the operational cycle of a bridge crane during failure risk assessment of its metal structure.

  2. Improving FMEA risk assessment through reprioritization of failures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ungureanu, A. L.; Stan, G.

    2016-08-01

    Most of the current methods used to assess the failure and to identify the industrial equipment defects are based on the determination of Risk Priority Number (RPN). Although conventional RPN calculation is easy to understand and use, the methodology presents some limitations, such as the large number of duplicates and the difficulty of assessing the RPN indices. In order to eliminate the afore-mentioned shortcomings, this paper puts forward an easy and efficient computing method, called Failure Developing Mode and Criticality Analysis (FDMCA), which takes into account the failures and the defect evolution in time, from failure appearance to a breakdown.

  3. Investigation of the Quasi-Brittle Failure of Alashan Granite Viewed from Laboratory Experiments and Grain-Based Discrete Element Modeling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Jian; Zhang, Luqing; Yang, Duoxing; Braun, Anika; Han, Zhenhua

    2017-07-21

    Granite is a typical crystalline material, often used as a building material, but also a candidate host rock for the repository of high-level radioactive waste. The petrographic texture-including mineral constituents, grain shape, size, and distribution-controls the fracture initiation, propagation, and coalescence within granitic rocks. In this paper, experimental laboratory tests and numerical simulations of a grain-based approach in two-dimensional Particle Flow Code (PFC2D) were conducted on the mechanical strength and failure behavior of Alashan granite, in which the grain-like structure of granitic rock was considered. The microparameters for simulating Alashan granite were calibrated based on real laboratory strength values and strain-stress curves. The unconfined uniaxial compressive test and Brazilian indirect tensile test were performed using a grain-based approach to examine and discuss the influence of mineral grain size and distribution on the strength and patterns of microcracks in granitic rocks. The results show it is possible to reproduce the uniaxial compressive strength (UCS) and uniaxial tensile strength (UTS) of Alashan granite using the grain-based approach in PFC2D, and the average mineral size has a positive relationship with the UCS and UTS. During the modeling, most of the generated microcracks were tensile cracks. Moreover, the ratio of the different types of generated microcracks is related to the average grain size. When the average grain size in numerical models is increased, the ratio of the number of intragrain tensile cracks to the number of intergrain tensile cracks increases, and the UCS of rock samples also increases with this ratio. However, the variation in grain size distribution does not have a significant influence on the likelihood of generated microcracks.

  4. Reliability assessment of slender concrete columns at the stability failure

    Science.gov (United States)

    Valašík, Adrián; Benko, Vladimír; Strauss, Alfred; Täubling, Benjamin

    2018-01-01

    The European Standard for designing concrete columns within the use of non-linear methods shows deficiencies in terms of global reliability, in case that the concrete columns fail by the loss of stability. The buckling failure is a brittle failure which occurs without warning and the probability of its formation depends on the columns slenderness. Experiments with slender concrete columns were carried out in cooperation with STRABAG Bratislava LTD in Central Laboratory of Faculty of Civil Engineering SUT in Bratislava. The following article aims to compare the global reliability of slender concrete columns with slenderness of 90 and higher. The columns were designed according to methods offered by EN 1992-1-1 [1]. The mentioned experiments were used as basis for deterministic nonlinear modelling of the columns and subsequent the probabilistic evaluation of structural response variability. Final results may be utilized as thresholds for loading of produced structural elements and they aim to present probabilistic design as less conservative compared to classic partial safety factor based design and alternative ECOV method.

  5. A big data analysis approach for rail failure risk assessment

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Jamshidi, A.; Faghih Roohi, S.; Hajizadeh, S.; Nunez Vicencio, Alfredo; Babuska, R.; Dollevoet, R.P.B.J.; Li, Z.; De Schutter, B.H.K.

    2017-01-01

    Railway infrastructure monitoring is a vital task to ensure rail transportation safety. A rail failure could result in not only a considerable impact on train delays and maintenance costs, but also on safety of passengers. In this article, the aim is to assess the risk of a rail failure by

  6. Common-Cause Failure Analysis in Event Assessment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rasmuson, D.M.; Kelly, D.L.

    2008-01-01

    This paper reviews the basic concepts of modeling common-cause failures (CCFs) in reliability and risk studies and then applies these concepts to the treatment of CCF in event assessment. The cases of a failed component (with and without shared CCF potential) and a component being unavailable due to preventive maintenance or testing are addressed. The treatment of two related failure modes (e.g. failure to start and failure to run) is a new feature of this paper, as is the treatment of asymmetry within a common-cause component group

  7. Critical crack path assessments in failure investigations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Robert D. Caligiuri

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available This paper presents a case study in which identification of the controlling crack path was critical to identifying the root cause of the failure. The case involves the rupture of a 30-inch (0.76 m natural gas pipeline in 2010 that tragically led to the destruction of a number of homes and the loss of life. The segment of the pipeline that ruptured was installed in 1956. The longitudinal seam of the segment that ruptured was supposed to have been fabricated by double submerged arc welding. Unfortunately, portions of the segment only received a single submerged arc weld on the outside, leaving unwelded areas on the inside diameter. Post-failure examination of the segment revealed that the rupture originated at one of these unwelded areas. Examination also revealed three additional crack paths or zones emanating from the unwelded area: a zone of ductile tearing, a zone of fatigue, and a zone of cleavage fracture, in that sequence. Initial investigators ignored the ductile tear, assumed the critical crack path was the fatigue component, and (incorrectly concluded that the root cause of the incident was the failure of the operator to hydrotest the segment after it was installed in 1956. However, as discussed in this paper, the critical path or mechanism was the ductile tear. Furthermore, it was determined that the ductile tear was created during the hydrotest at installation by a mechanism known as pressure reversal. Thus the correct root cause of the rupture was the hydrotest the operator subjected the segment to at installation, helping to increase the awareness of operators and regulators about the potential problems associated with hydrotesting.

  8. A Zebrafish Heart Failure Model for Assessing Therapeutic Agents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, Xiao-Yu; Wu, Si-Qi; Guo, Sheng-Ya; Yang, Hua; Xia, Bo; Li, Ping; Li, Chun-Qi

    2018-03-20

    Heart failure is a leading cause of death and the development of effective and safe therapeutic agents for heart failure has been proven challenging. In this study, taking advantage of larval zebrafish, we developed a zebrafish heart failure model for drug screening and efficacy assessment. Zebrafish at 2 dpf (days postfertilization) were treated with verapamil at a concentration of 200 μM for 30 min, which were determined as optimum conditions for model development. Tested drugs were administered into zebrafish either by direct soaking or circulation microinjection. After treatment, zebrafish were randomly selected and subjected to either visual observation and image acquisition or record videos under a Zebralab Blood Flow System. The therapeutic effects of drugs on zebrafish heart failure were quantified by calculating the efficiency of heart dilatation, venous congestion, cardiac output, and blood flow dynamics. All 8 human heart failure therapeutic drugs (LCZ696, digoxin, irbesartan, metoprolol, qiliqiangxin capsule, enalapril, shenmai injection, and hydrochlorothiazide) showed significant preventive and therapeutic effects on zebrafish heart failure (p failure model developed and validated in this study could be used for in vivo heart failure studies and for rapid screening and efficacy assessment of preventive and therapeutic drugs.

  9. Assessment of brittleness and empirical correlations between physical and mechanical parameters of the Asmari limestone in Khersan 2 dam site, in southwest of Iran

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lashkaripour, Gholam Reza; Rastegarnia, Ahmad; Ghafoori, Mohammad

    2018-02-01

    The determination of brittleness and geomechanical parameters, especially uniaxial compressive strength (UCS) and Young's modulus (ES) of rocks are needed for the design of different rock engineering applications. Evaluation of these parameters are time-consuming processes, tedious, expensive and require well-prepared rock cores. Therefore, compressional wave velocity (Vp) and index parameters such as point load index and porosity are often used to predict the properties of rocks. In this paper, brittleness and other properties, physical and mechanical in type, of 56 Asmari limestones in dry and saturated conditions were analyzed. The rock samples were collected from Khersan 2 dam site. This dam with the height of 240 m is being constructed and located in the Zagros Mountain, in the southwest of Iran. The bedrock and abutments of the dam site consist of Asemari and Gachsaran Formations. In this paper, a practical relation for predicting brittleness and some relations between mechanical and index parameters of the Asmari limestone were established. The presented equation for predicting brittleness based on UCS, Brazilian tensile strength and Vp had high accuracy. Moreover, results showed that the brittleness estimation based on B3 concept (the ratio of multiply compressive strength in tensile strength divided 2) had more accuracy as compared to the B2 (the ratio of compressive strength minus tensile strength to compressive strength plus tensile strength) and B1 (the ratio of compressive strength to tensile strength) concepts.

  10. Failure assessment of pressure vessels under yielding conditions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Harrison, R.P.; Darlaston, B.J.L.; Townley, C.H.A.

    1977-01-01

    The paper summarizes the work carried out to establish the behavior of structures containing defects and outlines a failure assessment route which can be used to assess the integrity of a structure containing a defect. The basis for this failure assessment route is the two-criteria approach of Dowling and Townley, which can be applied to structures containing defects irrespective of whether they are in the linear elastic fracture mechanics regime, the fully plastic regime, or in an intermediate regime. The extension of this concept to include crack growth by stable tearing is dealt with in the paper

  11. Assessing the Impacts of Multiple Breadbasket Failures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Casellas Connors, J. P.; Janetos, A.

    2016-12-01

    A relatively small area of the world accounts for a large proportion of total global cereal production, with most of the area devoted to the production of the world's three major cereal crops, rice, wheat and maize. An extensive literature of the sensitivity of agricultural productivity of these crops, and many others, has arisen over the past 25 years, with a general consensus that continued change in the physical climate system will very likely increase the difficulty of agricultural production in areas of the world that are already marginal with respect to production. But what this research only rarely does is assess the influence of extreme events in shocking agricultural production, and how the rest of the agricultural system reacts, in terms of prices, food insecurity, subsequent land-use change, and terrestrial carbon emissions, among many other possible responses. Because the agricultural system is interlinked with energy systems, food distribution and transportation systems, and economic systems, models that focus only on agricultural productivity can only provide a unidimensional view of the magnitude of potential impacts. We know such impacts can occur as a consequence of extreme climatic events, because they have - the impact of the severe regional drought and heat wave on the Russian and Ukrainian wheat harvests in 2010 had global consequences for food prices, just as one example. In this paper, we use an Integrated Assessment Model, the Global Change Assessment Model (GCAM), to investigate the potential outcomes of both moderate and severe shocks to agricultural productivity in the major breadbaskets of the world - both singly and in combination. The results demonstrate clearly that there are likely to be multidimensional consequences from the kinds of shocks that are possible from a rapidly changing climate system, especially when combined with other demographic and economic trends in the coming decades. These results are only one aspect of

  12. Semiconductor failure threshold estimation problem in electromagnetic assessment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Enlow, E.W.; Wunsch, D.C.

    1984-01-01

    Present semiconductor failure models to predict the one-microsecond square-wave power failure level for use with system electromagnetic (EM) assessments and hardening design are incomplete. This is because for a majority of device types there is insufficient data readily available in a composite data source to quantify the model parameters and the inaccuracy of the models cause complications in definition of adequate hardness margins and quantification of EM performance. This paper presents new semiconductor failure models which use a generic approach that are an integration and simplification of many present models. This generic approach uses two categorical models: one for diodes and transistors, and one for integrated circuits. The models were constructed from a large database of semiconductor failure data. The approach used for constructing diode and transistor failure level models is based on device rated power and are simple to use and universally applicable. The model predicts the value of the 1 μ second failure power to be used in the power failure models P = Kt /SUP -1/2/ or P = K 1 t -1 + K 2 t /SUP -1/2/ + K 3

  13. A Big Data Analysis Approach for Rail Failure Risk Assessment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jamshidi, Ali; Faghih-Roohi, Shahrzad; Hajizadeh, Siamak; Núñez, Alfredo; Babuska, Robert; Dollevoet, Rolf; Li, Zili; De Schutter, Bart

    2017-08-01

    Railway infrastructure monitoring is a vital task to ensure rail transportation safety. A rail failure could result in not only a considerable impact on train delays and maintenance costs, but also on safety of passengers. In this article, the aim is to assess the risk of a rail failure by analyzing a type of rail surface defect called squats that are detected automatically among the huge number of records from video cameras. We propose an image processing approach for automatic detection of squats, especially severe types that are prone to rail breaks. We measure the visual length of the squats and use them to model the failure risk. For the assessment of the rail failure risk, we estimate the probability of rail failure based on the growth of squats. Moreover, we perform severity and crack growth analyses to consider the impact of rail traffic loads on defects in three different growth scenarios. The failure risk estimations are provided for several samples of squats with different crack growth lengths on a busy rail track of the Dutch railway network. The results illustrate the practicality and efficiency of the proposed approach. © 2017 The Authors Risk Analysis published by Wiley Periodicals, Inc. on behalf of Society for Risk Analysis.

  14. Analysis of dependent failures in risk assessment and reliability evaluation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fleming, K.N.; Mosleh, A.; Kelley, A.P. Jr.; Gas-Cooled Reactors Associates, La Jolla, CA)

    1983-01-01

    The ability to estimate the risk of potential reactor accidents is largely determined by the ability to analyze statistically dependent multiple failures. The importance of dependent failures has been indicated in recent probabilistic risk assessment (PRA) studies as well as in reports of reactor operating experiences. This article highlights the importance of several different types of dependent failures from the perspective of the risk and reliability analyst and provides references to the methods and data available for their analysis. In addition to describing the current state of the art, some recent advances, pitfalls, misconceptions, and limitations of some approaches to dependent failure analysis are addressed. A summary is included of the discourse on this subject, which is presented in the Institute of Electrical and Electronics Engineers/American Nuclear Society PRA Procedures Guide

  15. Failure rate data for fusion safety and risk assessment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cadwallader, L.C.

    1993-01-01

    The Fusion Safety Program (FSP) at the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory (INEL) conducts safety research in materials, chemical reactions, safety analysis, risk assessment, and in component research and development to support existing magnetic fusion experiments and also to promote safety in the design of future experiments. One of the areas of safety research is applying probabilistic risk assessment (PRA) methods to fusion experiments. To apply PRA, we need a fusion-relevant radiological dose code and a component failure rate data base. This paper describes the FSP effort to develop a failure rate data base for fusion-specific components

  16. Consequences assessment for fuel channel failure with consequential moderator drain

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wahba, N.N.; Bayoumi, M.H.

    2002-01-01

    This paper documents the consequences of spontaneous pressure tube/consequential calandria tube rupture followed by the ejection of end fittings (as a result of guillotine failure of pressure tube) leading to the drain of the moderator. The event is postulated to occur in conjunction with an independent failure of Emergency Coolant Injection System (ECIS). The results of the detailed consequence assessments are used to propose a course of action to mitigate the consequences of such an event. A methodology based on a lumped-parameter model was developed to assess the consequences of the postulated event. (author)

  17. Experimental Assessment of Tensile Failure Characteristic for Advanced Composite Laminates

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, Myoung Keon [Agency for Defense Development, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of); Lee, Jeong Won; Yoon, Dong Hyun; Kim, Jae Hoon [Chungnam Nat’l Univ., Daejeon (Korea, Republic of)

    2017-10-15

    In recent years, major airplane manufacturers have been using the laminate failure theory to estimate the strain of composite structures for airplanes. The laminate failure theory uses the failure strain of the laminate to analyze composite structures. This paper describes a procedure for the experimental assessment of laminate tensile failure characteristics. Regression analysis was used as the experimental assessment method. The regression analysis was performed with the response variable being the laminate failure strain and with the regressor variables being two-ply orientation (0° and ±45°) variables. The composite material in this study is a carbon/epoxy unidirectional (UD) tape that was cured as a pre-preg at 177°C(350°F). A total of 149 tension tests were conducted on specimens from 14 distinct laminates that were laid up at standard angle layers (0°, 45°, -45°, and 90°). The ASTM-D-3039 standard was used as the test method.

  18. Preventing blood transfusion failures: FMEA, an effective assessment method.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Najafpour, Zhila; Hasoumi, Mojtaba; Behzadi, Faranak; Mohamadi, Efat; Jafary, Mohamadreza; Saeedi, Morteza

    2017-06-30

    Failure Mode and Effect Analysis (FMEA) is a method used to assess the risk of failures and harms to patients during the medical process and to identify the associated clinical issues. The aim of this study was to conduct an assessment of blood transfusion process in a teaching general hospital, using FMEA as the method. A structured FMEA was recruited in our study performed in 2014, and corrective actions were implemented and re-evaluated after 6 months. Sixteen 2-h sessions were held to perform FMEA in the blood transfusion process, including five steps: establishing the context, selecting team members, analysis of the processes, hazard analysis, and developing a risk reduction protocol for blood transfusion. Failure modes with the highest risk priority numbers (RPNs) were identified. The overall RPN scores ranged from 5 to 100 among which, four failure modes were associated with RPNs over 75. The data analysis indicated that failures with the highest RPNs were: labelling (RPN: 100), transfusion of blood or the component (RPN: 100), patient identification (RPN: 80) and sampling (RPN: 75). The results demonstrated that mis-transfusion of blood or blood component is the most important error, which can lead to serious morbidity or mortality. Provision of training to the personnel on blood transfusion, knowledge raising on hazards and appropriate preventative measures, as well as developing standard safety guidelines are essential, and must be implemented during all steps of blood and blood component transfusion.

  19. Experimental Assessment of Tensile Failure Characteristic for Advanced Composite Laminates

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lee, Myoung Keon; Lee, Jeong Won; Yoon, Dong Hyun; Kim, Jae Hoon

    2017-01-01

    In recent years, major airplane manufacturers have been using the laminate failure theory to estimate the strain of composite structures for airplanes. The laminate failure theory uses the failure strain of the laminate to analyze composite structures. This paper describes a procedure for the experimental assessment of laminate tensile failure characteristics. Regression analysis was used as the experimental assessment method. The regression analysis was performed with the response variable being the laminate failure strain and with the regressor variables being two-ply orientation (0° and ±45°) variables. The composite material in this study is a carbon/epoxy unidirectional (UD) tape that was cured as a pre-preg at 177°C(350°F). A total of 149 tension tests were conducted on specimens from 14 distinct laminates that were laid up at standard angle layers (0°, 45°, -45°, and 90°). The ASTM-D-3039 standard was used as the test method.

  20. Damage-resistant brittle coatings

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lawn, B.R.; Lee, K.S. [National Inst. of Stand. and Technol., Gaithersburg, MD (United States). Mater. Sci. and Eng. Lab.; Chai, H. [Tel Aviv Univ. (Israel). Faculty of Engineering; Pajares, A. [Universidad de Extremadura, Badajoz (Spain). Dept. de Fisica; Kim, D.K. [Korea Advanced Inst. of Science and Technolgy, Taejon (Korea). Dept. of Materials Science and Engineering; Wuttiphan, S. [National Metal and Materials Technology Center, Bangkok (Thailand); Peterson, I.M. [Corning Inc., NY (United States); Hu Xiaozhi [Western Australia Univ., Nedlands, WA (Australia). Dept. of Mechanical and Materials Engineering

    2000-11-01

    Laminate structures consisting of hard, brittle coatings and soft, tough substrates are important in a wide variety of engineering applications, biological structures, and traditional pottery. In this study the authors introduce a new approach to the design of damage-resistant brittle coatings, based on a combination of new and existing relations for crack initiation in well-defined contact-induced stress fields. (orig.)

  1. An enriched cohesive zone model for delamination in brittle interfaces

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Samimi, M.; Dommelen, van J.A.W.; Geers, M.G.D.

    2009-01-01

    Application of standard cohesive zone models in a finite element framework to simulate delamination in brittle interfaces may trigger non-smooth load-displacement responses that lead to the failure of iterative solution procedures. This non-smoothness is an artifact of the discretization; and hence

  2. Role of Brittle Behaviour of Soft Calcarenites Under Low Confinement: Laboratory Observations and Numerical Investigation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lollino, Piernicola; Andriani, Gioacchino Francesco

    2017-07-01

    The strength decay that occurs in the post-peak stage, under low confinement stress, represents a key factor of the stress-strain behaviour of rocks. However, for soft rocks this issue is generally underestimated or even neglected in the solution of boundary value problems, as for example those concerning the stability of underground cavities or rocky cliffs. In these cases, the constitutive models frequently used in limit equilibrium analyses or more sophisticated numerical calculations are, respectively, rigid-plastic or elastic-perfectly plastic. In particular, most of commercial continuum-based numerical codes propose a variety of constitutive models, including elasticity, elasto-plasticity, strain-softening and elasto-viscoplasticity, which are not exhaustive in simulating the progressive failure mechanisms affecting brittle rock materials, these being characterized by material detachment and crack opening and propagation. As a consequence, a numerical coupling with mechanical joint propagation is needed to cope with fracture mechanics. Therefore, continuum-based applications that treat the simulation of the failure processes of intact rock masses at low stress levels may need the adoption of numerical techniques capable of implementing fracture mechanics and rock brittleness concepts, as it is shown in this paper. This work is aimed at highlighting, for some applications of rock mechanics, the essential role of post-peak brittleness of soft rocks by means of the application of a hybrid finite-discrete element method. This method allows for a proper simulation of the brittle rock behaviour and the related mechanism of fracture propagation. In particular, the paper presents two ideal problems, represented by a shallow underground cave and a vertical cliff, for which the evolution of the stability conditions is investigated by comparing the solutions obtained implementing different brittle material responses with those resulting from the assumption of perfectly

  3. A unified approach to failure assessment of engineering structures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Harrison, R.P.

    1977-01-01

    A codified procedure for the failure assessment of engineering structures is presented which has as its basis the two criteria approach of Dowling and Townley (Int. J. Press. Vessels and Piping; 3:77 (1975)) and the Bilby, Cottrell and Swinden (Proc. R. Soc.; A272:304 (1963)) and Dugdale (J. Mech. Phys. Sol.; 8:100 (1960)) model of yielding ahead of a crack tip. The procedure consists of independently assessing the risk of failure (a) under linear elastic conditions only and (b) under plastic collapse conditions only. These two limiting criteria are then plotted as a co-ordinate point on a Failure Assessment Diagram. From this a measure of the degree of safety of the structure can be obtained. As examples, several of the HSST vessel tests are used to indicate the simplicity and versatility of the procedure. It is shown how maximum allowable pressures or defect sizes can be obtained and how safety factors can be readily incorporated on any of the parameters used in the assessment. It is also demonstrated how helpful the procedure is in designing not only working structures, but also structures that are to be used for testing. (author)

  4. The shape of a strain-based failure assessment diagram

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Budden, P.J.; Ainsworth, R.A.

    2012-01-01

    There have been a number of recent developments of strain-based fracture assessment approaches, including proposals by Budden [Engng Frac Mech 2006;73:537–52] for a strain-based failure assessment diagram (FAD) related to the conventional stress-based FAD. However, recent comparisons with finite element (FE) data have shown that this proposed strain-based FAD can be non-conservative in some cases, particularly for deeper cracks and materials with little strain-hardening capacity. Therefore, this paper re-examines the shape of the strain-based FAD, guided by these FE analyses and some theoretical analysis. On this basis, modified proposals for the shape of the strain-based FAD are given, including simplified and more detailed options in line with the options available for stress-based FADs in existing fitness-for-service procedures. The proposals are then illustrated by a worked example and by comparison with FE data, which demonstrate that the new proposals are generally conservative. - Highlights: ► The strain-based failure assessment diagram approach to fracture is developed. ► The new approach modifies earlier proposals by Budden. ► A new generic Option 1 strain-based failure assessment diagram is proposed. ► Validation based on finite element J data for plates and cylinders is presented. ► The new approach is generally conservative compared with the finite element data.

  5. Brittle and ductile friction and the physics of tectonic tremor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Daub, Eric G.; Shelly, David R.; Guyer, Robert A.; Johnson, P.A.

    2011-01-01

    Observations of nonvolcanic tremor provide a unique window into the mechanisms of deformation and failure in the lower crust. At increasing depths, rock deformation gradually transitions from brittle, where earthquakes occur, to ductile, with tremor occurring in the transitional region. The physics of deformation in the transition region remain poorly constrained, limiting our basic understanding of tremor and its relation to earthquakes. We combine field and laboratory observations with a physical friction model comprised of brittle and ductile components, and use the model to provide constraints on the friction and stress state in the lower crust. A phase diagram is constructed that characterizes under what conditions all faulting behaviors occur, including earthquakes, tremor, silent transient slip, and steady sliding. Our results show that tremor occurs over a range of ductile and brittle frictional strengths, and advances our understanding of the physical conditions at which tremor and earthquakes take place.

  6. Study of brittle crack jump rate using acoustic emission method

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yasnij, P.V.; Pokrovskij, V.V.; Strizhalo, V.A.; Dobrovol'skij, Yu.V.

    1987-01-01

    A new peocedure is elaborated to detect brittle jumps of small length (0.1...5mm) occuring both inside the specimen and along the crack front under static and cyclic loading using the phenomena of acoustic emission (AE). Recording of the crack start and stop moments with an AE sensor as well as evaluation of the brittle crack jump length by the after-failure specimen fracture make it possible to find the mean crack propagation rate. Experimental dependences are obtained for the crack propagation rate with a brittle crack jump in steel 15Kh2MFA (σ B =1157 MPa, σ 0.2 =100 MPa) at 293 K and under cyclic loading as a function of the jump length and also as a function of the critical stress intensity factor K jc i corresponding to the crack jump

  7. Assessment of congestive heart failure in chest radiographs

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Henriksson, L.; Sundin, A.; Smedby, Oe.; Albrektsson, P.

    1990-01-01

    The effect of observer variations and film-screen quality on the diagnosis of congestive heart failure based on chest radiographs was studied in 27 patients. For each patient, two films were exposed, one with the Kodak Lanex Medium system and one with the Agfa MR 400 system. The films were presented to three observers who assessed the presence of congestive heart failure on a three-graded scale. The results showed no significant difference between the two systems but large systematic differences between the observers. There were also differences between the two ratings by the same observer that could not be explained by the film-screen factor. It is concluded that the choice between these two systems is of little importance in view of the interobserver and intraobserver variability that can exist within the same department. (orig.)

  8. Formulation and computational aspects of plasticity and damage models with application to quasi-brittle materials

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chen, Z.; Schreyer, H.L. [New Mexico Engineering Research Institute, Albuquerque, NM (United States)

    1995-09-01

    The response of underground structures and transportation facilities under various external loadings and environments is critical for human safety as well as environmental protection. Since quasi-brittle materials such as concrete and rock are commonly used for underground construction, the constitutive modeling of these engineering materials, including post-limit behaviors, is one of the most important aspects in safety assessment. From experimental, theoretical, and computational points of view, this report considers the constitutive modeling of quasi-brittle materials in general and concentrates on concrete in particular. Based on the internal variable theory of thermodynamics, the general formulations of plasticity and damage models are given to simulate two distinct modes of microstructural changes, inelastic flow and degradation of material strength and stiffness, that identify the phenomenological nonlinear behaviors of quasi-brittle materials. The computational aspects of plasticity and damage models are explored with respect to their effects on structural analyses. Specific constitutive models are then developed in a systematic manner according to the degree of completeness. A comprehensive literature survey is made to provide the up-to-date information on prediction of structural failures, which can serve as a reference for future research.

  9. Identification of a Suitable 3D Printing Material for Mimicking Brittle and Hard Rocks and Its Brittleness Enhancements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, T.; Zhu, J. B.

    2018-03-01

    Three-dimensional printing (3DP) is a computer-controlled additive manufacturing technique which is able to repeatedly and accurately fabricate objects with complicated geometry and internal structures. After 30 years of fast development, 3DP has become a mainstream manufacturing process in various fields. This study focuses on identifying the most suitable 3DP material from five targeted available 3DP materials, i.e. ceramics, gypsum, PMMA (poly(methyl methacrylate)), SR20 (acrylic copolymer) and resin (Accura® 60), to simulate brittle and hard rocks. Firstly, uniaxial compression tests were performed to determine the mechanical properties and failure patterns of the 3DP samples fabricated by those five materials. Experimental results indicate that among current 3DP techniques, the resin produced via stereolithography (SLA) is the most suitable 3DP material for mimicking brittle and hard rocks, although its brittleness needs to be improved. Subsequently, three methods including freezing, incorporation of internal macro-crack and addition of micro-defects were adopted to enhance the brittleness of the 3DP resin, followed by uniaxial compression tests on the treated samples. Experimental results reveal that 3DP resin samples with the suggested treatments exhibited brittle properties and behaved similarly to natural rocks. Finally, some prospective improvements which can be used to facilitate the application of 3DP techniques to rock mechanics were also discussed. The findings of this paper could contribute to promoting the application of 3DP technique in rock mechanics.

  10. The elastic-plastic failure assessment diagram of surface cracked structure

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ning, J.; Gao, Q.

    1987-01-01

    The simplified NLSM is able to calculate the EPFM parameters and failure assessment curve for the surface cracked structure correctly and conveniently. The elastic-plastic failure assessment curve of surface crack is relevant to crack geometry, loading form and material deformation behaviour. It is necessary to construct the EPFM failure assessment curve of the surface crack for the failure assessment of surface cracked structure. (orig./HP)

  11. Brittle-to-Ductile Transition in Metallic Glass Nanowires.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Şopu, D; Foroughi, A; Stoica, M; Eckert, J

    2016-07-13

    When reducing the size of metallic glass samples down to the nanoscale regime, experimental studies on the plasticity under uniaxial tension show a wide range of failure modes ranging from brittle to ductile ones. Simulations on the deformation behavior of nanoscaled metallic glasses report an unusual extended strain softening and are not able to reproduce the brittle-like fracture deformation as found in experiments. Using large-scale molecular dynamics simulations we provide an atomistic understanding of the deformation mechanisms of metallic glass nanowires and differentiate the extrinsic size effects and aspect ratio contribution to plasticity. A model for predicting the critical nanowire aspect ratio for the ductile-to-brittle transition is developed. Furthermore, the structure of brittle nanowires can be tuned to a softer phase characterized by a defective short-range order and an excess free volume upon systematic structural rejuvenation, leading to enhanced tensile ductility. The presented results shed light on the fundamental deformation mechanisms of nanoscaled metallic glasses and demarcate ductile and catastrophic failure.

  12. Selected component failure rate values from fusion safety assessment tasks

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cadwallader, L.C.

    1998-01-01

    This report is a compilation of component failure rate and repair rate values that can be used in magnetic fusion safety assessment tasks. Several safety systems are examined, such as gas cleanup systems and plasma shutdown systems. Vacuum system component reliability values, including large vacuum chambers, have been reviewed. Values for water cooling system components have also been reported here. The report concludes with the examination of some equipment important to personnel safety, atmospheres, combustible gases, and airborne releases of radioactivity. These data should be useful to system designers to calculate scoping values for the availability and repair intervals for their systems, and for probabilistic safety or risk analysts to assess fusion systems for safety of the public and the workers

  13. Selected component failure rate values from fusion safety assessment tasks

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cadwallader, L.C.

    1998-09-01

    This report is a compilation of component failure rate and repair rate values that can be used in magnetic fusion safety assessment tasks. Several safety systems are examined, such as gas cleanup systems and plasma shutdown systems. Vacuum system component reliability values, including large vacuum chambers, have been reviewed. Values for water cooling system components have also been reported here. The report concludes with the examination of some equipment important to personnel safety, atmospheres, combustible gases, and airborne releases of radioactivity. These data should be useful to system designers to calculate scoping values for the availability and repair intervals for their systems, and for probabilistic safety or risk analysts to assess fusion systems for safety of the public and the workers.

  14. Selected Component Failure Rate Values from Fusion Safety Assessment Tasks

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cadwallader, Lee Charles

    1998-09-01

    This report is a compilation of component failure rate and repair rate values that can be used in magnetic fusion safety assessment tasks. Several safety systems are examined, such as gas cleanup systems and plasma shutdown systems. Vacuum system component reliability values, including large vacuum chambers, have been reviewed. Values for water cooling system components have also been reported here. The report concludes with the examination of some equipment important to personnel safety, atmospheres, combustible gases, and airborne releases of radioactivity. These data should be useful to system designers to calculate scoping values for the availability and repair intervals for their systems, and for probabilistic safety or risk analysts to assess fusion systems for safety of the public and the workers.

  15. Fuel failure assessments based on radiochemistry. Experience feedback and challenges

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Petit, C.; Ziabletsev, D.; Zeh, P.

    2015-01-01

    Significant improvements have been observed in LWR nuclear fuel reliability over the past years. As a result, the number of fuel failures in PWRs and BWRs has recently dramatically decreased. Nevertheless, a few remaining challenges still exist. One of them is that the industry has recently started seeing a relatively new type of fuel failure, so-called 'weak leak failures', which could be characterized by a very small release of gaseous fission products and essentially almost zero release of iodines or any other soluble fission products in the reactor coolant. Correspondingly, the behavior of these weak leakers does not follow typical behavior of a conventional leaker characterized by a proportionality of the amount of released Xe 133 related to the failed rod power. Instead, for a weak leaker, the activity of Xe 133 is directly correlated to the size of the cladding defects of the leaker. The presence of undetected weak leaker in the core may lead to carryover of a leaker into the subsequent cycle. Even if the presence of weak leaker in the core is suspected, it typically requires more effort to identify the leaker which could result in extended duration of the outage and ultimately to economic losses to the utility operating the reactor. To effectively deal with this issue the industry has been facing, several changes have been recently realized, which are different from the methodology of dealing with conventional leaker. These changes include new assessment methods, the need for improved sipping techniques to better identify low release leakers, and correspondingly better equipment to be able to locate small clad defects associated with weak leaker, such as sensitive localization device of failed rods, sensitive eddy current coil for the failed rod, ultra high definition cameras for the failed rod examination and experienced fuel reliability engineers performing cause of failure and rood cause research and analyses. Ultimately, the destructive

  16. Assessing patient preferences in heart failure using conjoint methodology

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pisa G

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available Giovanni Pisa,1 Florian Eichmann,1 Stephan Hupfer21Kantar Health GmbH, Munich, Germany; 2Novartis Pharma GmbH, Nuernberg, GermanyAim: The course of heart failure (HF is characterized by frequent hospitalizations, a high mortality rate, as well as a severely impaired health-related quality of life (HRQoL. To optimize disease management, understanding of patient preferences is crucial. We aimed to assess patient preferences using conjoint methodology and HRQoL in patients with HF.Methods: Two modules were applied: an initial qualitative module, consisting of in-depth interviews with 12 HF patients, and the main quantitative module in 300 HF patients from across Germany. Patients were stratified according to the time of their last HF hospitalization. Each patient was presented with ten different scenarios during the conjoint exercise. Additionally, patients completed the generic HRQoL instrument, EuroQol health questionnaire (EQ-5D™.Results: The attribute with the highest relative importance was dyspnea (44%, followed by physical capacity (18%. Of similar importance were exhaustion during mental activities (13%, fear due to HF (13%, and autonomy (12%. The most affected HRQoL dimensions according to the EQ-5D questionnaire were anxiety/depression (23% with severe problems, pain/discomfort (19%, and usual activities (15%. Overall average EQ-5D score was 0.39 with stable, chronic patients (never hospitalized having a significantly better health state vs the rest of the cohort.Conclusion: This paper analyzed patient preference in HF using a conjoint methodology. The preference weights resulting from the conjoint analysis could be used in future to design HRQoL questionnaires which could better assess patient preferences in HF care.Keywords: heart failure, quality of life, conjoint analysis, utility, patient preference

  17. Dislocation dynamics modelling of the ductile-brittle-transition

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hennecke, Thomas; Haehner, Peter

    2009-01-01

    Many materials like silicon, tungsten or ferritic steels show a transition between high temperature ductile fracture with stable crack grow and high deformation energy absorption and low temperature brittle fracture in an unstable and low deformation mode, the ductile-brittle-transition. Especially in steels, the temperature transition is accompanied by a strong increase of the measured fracture toughness over a certain temperature range and strong scatter in the toughness data in this transition regime. The change in fracture modes is affected by dynamic interactions between dislocations and the inhomogeneous stress fields of notches and small cracks. In the present work a dislocation dynamics model for the ductile-brittle-transition is proposed, which takes those interactions into account. The model can explain an increase with temperature of apparent toughness in the quasi-brittle regime and different levels of scatter in the different temperature regimes. Furthermore it can predict changing failure sites in materials with heterogeneous microstructure. Based on the model, the effects of crack tip blunting, stress state, external strain rate and irradiation-induced changes in the plastic flow properties can be discussed.

  18. Safety of light-water reactor pressure vessels against brittle fracture

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Brumovsky, M.

    1979-01-01

    The results are surveyed of research by SKODA Trust into brittle failure resistance of materials for WWER type reactor pressure vessels and into pressure vessel operating safety. Conditions are discussed in detail decisive for initiation, propagation and arrest of brittle fracture. The tests on the Cr-Mo-V type steel showed high resistance of the steel to the formation and the propagation of brittle fracture. They also confirmed the high operating reliability and the required service life of the steel. (B.S.)

  19. Sequential decision reliability concept and failure rate assessment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ciftcioglu, O.

    1990-11-01

    Conventionally, a reliability concept is considered together with both each basic unit and their integration in a complicated large scale system such as a nuclear power plant (NPP). Basically, as the plant's operational status is determined by the information obtained from various sensors, the plant's reliability and the risk assessment is closely related to the reliability of the sensory information and hence the sensor components. However, considering the relevant information-processing systems, e.g. fault detection processors, there exists a further question about the reliability of such systems, specifically the reliability of the systems' decision-based outcomes by means of which the further actions are performed. To this end, a general sequential decision reliability concept and the failure rate assessment methodology is introduced. The implications of the methodology are investigated and the importance of the decision reliability concept in system operation is demonstrated by means of sensory signals in real-time from the Borssele NPP in the Netherlands. (author). 21 refs.; 8 figs

  20. Continuous intraperitoneal insulin infusion in patients with 'brittle' diabetes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    DeVries, J H; Eskes, S A; Snoek, Frank J

    2002-01-01

    AIMS: To evaluate the effects of continuous intraperitoneal insulin infusion (CIPII) using implantable pumps on glycaemic control and duration of hospital stay in poorly controlled 'brittle' Dutch diabetes patients, and to assess their current quality of life. METHODS: Thirty-three patients were...

  1. Testing Bonds Between Brittle And Ductile Films

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wheeler, Donald R.; Ohsaki, Hiroyuki

    1989-01-01

    Simple uniaxial strain test devised to measure intrinsic shear strength. Brittle film deposited on ductile stubstrate film, and combination stretched until brittle film cracks, then separates from substrate. Dimensions of cracked segments related in known way to tensile strength of brittle film and shear strength of bond between two films. Despite approximations and limitations of technique, tests show it yields semiquantitative measures of bond strengths, independent of mechanical properties of substrates, with results reproducible with plus or minus 6 percent.

  2. Microstructural Modeling of Brittle Materials for Enhanced Performance and Reliability.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Teague, Melissa Christine [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States); Teague, Melissa Christine [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States); Rodgers, Theron [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States); Rodgers, Theron [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States); Grutzik, Scott Joseph [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States); Grutzik, Scott Joseph [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States); Meserole, Stephen [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States); Meserole, Stephen [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States)

    2017-08-01

    Brittle failure is often influenced by difficult to measure and variable microstructure-scale stresses. Recent advances in photoluminescence spectroscopy (PLS), including improved confocal laser measurement and rapid spectroscopic data collection have established the potential to map stresses with microscale spatial resolution (%3C2 microns). Advanced PLS was successfully used to investigate both residual and externally applied stresses in polycrystalline alumina at the microstructure scale. The measured average stresses matched those estimated from beam theory to within one standard deviation, validating the technique. Modeling the residual stresses within the microstructure produced general agreement in comparison with the experimentally measured results. Microstructure scale modeling is primed to take advantage of advanced PLS to enable its refinement and validation, eventually enabling microstructure modeling to become a predictive tool for brittle materials.

  3. Fractal statistics of brittle fragmentation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Davydova

    2013-04-01

    Full Text Available The study of fragmentation statistics of brittle materials that includes four types of experiments is presented. Data processing of the fragmentation of glass plates under quasi-static loading and the fragmentation of quartz cylindrical rods under dynamic loading shows that the size distribution of fragments (spatial quantity is fractal and can be described by a power law. The original experimental technique allows us to measure, apart from the spatial quantity, the temporal quantity - the size of time interval between the impulses of the light reflected from the newly created surfaces. The analysis of distributions of spatial (fragment size and temporal (time interval quantities provides evidence of obeying scaling laws, which suggests the possibility of self-organized criticality in fragmentation.

  4. Frailty Assessment in Heart Failure: an Overview of the Multi-domain Approach.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McDonagh, Julee; Ferguson, Caleb; Newton, Phillip J

    2018-02-01

    The study aims (1) to provide a contemporary description of frailty assessment in heart failure and (2) to provide an overview of multi-domain frailty assessment in heart failure. Frailty assessment is an important predictive measure for mortality and hospitalisation in individuals with heart failure. To date, there are no frailty assessment instruments validated for use in heart failure. This has resulted in significant heterogeneity between studies regarding the assessment of frailty. The most common frailty assessment instrument used in heart failure is the Frailty Phenotype which focuses on five physical domains of frailty; the appropriateness a purely physical measure of frailty in individuals with heart failure who frequently experience decreased exercise tolerance and shortness of breath is yet to be determined. A limited number of studies have approached frailty assessment using a multi-domain view which may be more clinically relevant in heart failure. There remains a lack of consensus regarding frailty assessment and an absence of a validated instrument in heart failure. Despite this, frailty continues to be assessed frequently, primarily for research purposes, using predominantly physical frailty measures. A more multidimensional view of frailty assessment using a multi-domain approach will likely be more sensitive to identifying at risk patients.

  5. Analysis of leak and break behavior in a failure assessment diagram for carbon steel pipes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kanno, Satoshi; Hasegawa, Kunio; Shimizu, Tasuku; Saitoh, Takashi; Gotoh, Nobuho

    1992-01-01

    The leak and break behavior of a cracked coolant pipe subjected to an internal pressure and a bending moment was analyzed with a failure assessment diagram using the R6 approach. This paper examines the conditions of the detectable coolant leakage without breakage. A leakage assessment curve, a locus of assessment point for detectable coolant leakage, was defined in the failure assessment diagram. The region between the leak assessment and failure assessment curves satisfies the condition of detectable leakage without breakage. In this region, a crack can be safely inspected by a coolant leak detector. (orig.)

  6. A method to assign failure rates for piping reliability assessments

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gamble, R.M.; Tagart, S.W. Jr.

    1991-01-01

    This paper reports on a simplified method that has been developed to assign failure rates that can be used in reliability and risk studies of piping. The method can be applied on a line-by-line basis by identifying line and location specific attributes that can lead to piping unreliability from in-service degradation mechanisms and random events. A survey of service experience for nuclear piping reliability also was performed. The data from this survey provides a basis for identifying in-service failure attributes and assigning failure rates for risk and reliability studies

  7. Service reliability assessment using failure mode and effect analysis ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    user

    Statistical Process Control Teng and Ho (1996) .... are still remaining left on modelling the interaction between impact of internal service failure and ..... Design error proofing: development of automated error-proofing information systems, Proceedings of.

  8. Failures of chain systems

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    James, A

    1997-03-01

    Full Text Available ?C and intermittent exposure at 400--450 ?C. Unlike structural steels, which become softer and more ductile when reheated in service, manga- nese steels become brittle when reheated sufficiently to induce carbide... to form a roughly oval shaped crack until the link section could no longer withstand the applied loading experienced during normal dragline operations, and this resulted in final fast brittle failure. The general...

  9. Fracture statistics of brittle materials with intergranular cracks

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Batdorf, S.B.

    1975-01-01

    When brittle materials are used for structural purposes, the initial design must take their relatively large dispersion in fracture stress properly into account. This is difficult when failure probabilities must be extremely low, because empirically based statistical theories of fracture, such as that of Weibull, cannot reliably predict the stresses corresponding to failure probabilities much lower than n -1 , where n is the number of specimens tested. Recently McClintock proposed a rational method of predicting the size distribution of intergranular cracks. The method assumed that large cracks are random aggregations of cracked grain boundaries. The present paper employs this method to find the size distribution of penny-shaped cracks, and also P(f), the probability of failure of a specimen of volume V subjected to a tensile stress sigma. The present paper is a pioneering effort, which should be applicable to ceramics and related materials

  10. ASSESSMENT OF BUILDING FAILURES IN NIGERIA: LAGOS AND ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Common failures seen on buildings were wall cracking, wall spalling, foundation settlement, column buckling, etc. Proper assurance of competent professionals and strict enforcement of ethical standards by the Nigerian Society of Engineers, the Nigerian Institute of Building, and the Nigerian Institute of Architects would ...

  11. Correlation model to analyze dependent failures for probabilistic risk assessment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dezfuli, H.

    1985-01-01

    A methodology is formulated to study the dependent (correlated) failures of various abnormal events in nuclear power plants. This methodology uses correlation analysis is a means for predicting and quantifying the dependent failures. Appropriate techniques are also developed to incorporate the dependent failure in quantifying fault trees and accident sequences. The uncertainty associated with each estimation in all of the developed techniques is addressed and quantified. To identify the relative importance of the degree of dependency (correlation) among events and to incorporate these dependencies in the quantification phase of PRA, the interdependency between a pair of events in expressed with the aid of the correlation coefficient. For the purpose of demonstrating the methodology, the data base used in the Accident Sequence Precursor Study (ASP) was adopted and simulated to obtain distributions for the correlation coefficients. A computer program entitled Correlation Coefficient Generator (CCG) was developed to generate a distribution for each correlation coefficient. The method of bootstrap technique was employed in the CCG computer code to determine confidence limits of the estimated correlation coefficients. A second computer program designated CORRELATE was also developed to obtain probability intervals for both fault trees and accident sequences with statistically correlated failure data

  12. Failure assessment diagrams for circular hollow section X- and K-joints

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Qian, Xudong

    2013-01-01

    This paper reports the failure assessment curves for semi-elliptical surface cracks located at hot-spot positions in the circular hollow section X- and K-joints. The failure assessment curves derive from the square root of the ratio between the linear–elastic and the elastic–plastic energy release rates, computed from the domain-integral approach. This study examines both the material and geometric dependence of the failure assessment curves. The area reduction factor, used in defining the strength of the cracked joints, imposes a significant effect on the computed failure assessment curve. The failure assessment curves indicate negligible variations with respect to the crack-front locations and the material yield strength. The crack depth ratio exerts a stronger effect on the computed failure assessment curve than does the crack aspect ratio. This study proposes a parametric expression for the failure assessment curves based on the geometric parameters for surface cracks in circular hollow section X- and K-joints. -- Highlights: ► This study proposes geometric dependent expressions of FADs for tubular joints. ► We examine the geometric and material dependence of the FADs for X- and K-joints. ► The proposed FAD is independent of yield strength and is a lower-bound for typical hardening

  13. Behavior of Brittle Materials Under Dynamic Loading

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Kanel, G

    2000-01-01

    Dynamic loading of brittle materials is related to many applications, including explosive excavation of rocks, design of ceramic armor, meteor impact on spacecraft windows, particle damage to turbine blades, etc...

  14. Local approach to brittle fracture under residual stress field. Assessment of pre-loading effect; Local approach no tekiyo ni yoru zanryu oryoku wo motsu buzai no zeisei hakai kyodo hyoka. Yokaju no eikyo no hyoka

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yamashita, Y.; Sakano, K.; Onozuka, M. [Ishikawajima-Harima Heavy Industries Co. Ltd., Tokyo (Japan); Minami, F. [Osaka University, Osaka (Japan)

    2000-01-01

    The effect of residual stresses on brittle fracture was investigated on the basis of the Local Approach. Compressive residual stress was introduced by pre-loading and the subsequent fracture test conducted with a 780 MPa class steel. Preloading apparently increased the critical load and critical CTOD at the onset of brittle fracture initiation. The Weibull stress criterion was used to evaluate the brittle fracture resistance of the pre-loaded specimen. The critical Weibull stress is a material property independent of test conditions with and without pre-loading. Using the Weibull stress criterion, the critical CTOD of the pre-loaded specimen can be predicted from test results of the specimen without pre-loading. (author)

  15. Reactive-brittle dynamics in peridotite alteration

    Science.gov (United States)

    Evans, O.; Spiegelman, M. W.; Kelemen, P. B.

    2017-12-01

    The interactions between reactive fluids and brittle solids are critical in Earth dynamics. Implications of such processes are wide-ranging: from earthquake physics to geologic carbon sequestration and the cycling of fluids and volatiles through subduction zones. Peridotite alteration is a common feature in many of these processes, which - despite its obvious importance - is relatively poorly understood from a geodynamical perspective. In particular, alteration reactions are thought to be self-limiting in nature, contradicting observations of rocks that have undergone 100% hydration/carbonation. One potential explanation of this observation is the mechanism of "reaction-driven cracking": that volume changes associated with these reactions are large enough to fracture the surrounding rock, leading to a positive feedback where new reactive surfaces are exposed and fluid pathways are created. The purpose of this study is to investigate the relative roles of reaction, elastic stresses and surface tension in alteration reactions. In this regard we derive a system of equations describing reactive fluid flow in an elastically deformable porous media, and explore them via a combination of analytic and numerical solutions. Using this model we show that the final stress state of a dry peridotite that has undergone reaction depends strongly on the rates of reaction versus fluid transport: significant fluid flow driven by pressure and/or surface tension gradients implies higher fractions of serpentinization, leaving behind a highly stressed residuum of partially reacted material. Using a model set-up that mimics a cylindrical triaxial apparatus we predict that the resulting stresses would lead to tensile failure and the generation of radially oriented cracks.

  16. Strength evaluation code STEP for brittle materials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ishihara, Masahiro; Futakawa, Masatoshi.

    1997-12-01

    In a structural design using brittle materials such as graphite and/or ceramics it is necessary to evaluate the strength of component under complex stress condition. The strength of ceramic materials is said to be influenced by the stress distribution. However, in the structural design criteria simplified stress limits had been adopted without taking account of the strength change with the stress distribution. It is, therefore, important to evaluate the strength of component on the basis of the fracture model for brittle material. Consequently, the strength evaluation program, STEP, on a brittle fracture of ceramic materials based on the competing risk theory had been developed. Two different brittle fracture modes, a surface layer fracture mode dominated by surface flaws and an internal fracture mode by internal flaws, are treated in the STEP code in order to evaluate the strength of brittle fracture. The STEP code uses stress calculation results including complex shape of structures analyzed by the generalized FEM stress analysis code, ABAQUS, so as to be possible to evaluate the strength of brittle fracture for the structures having complicate shapes. This code is, therefore, useful to evaluate the structural integrity of arbitrary shapes of components such as core graphite components in the HTTR, heat exchanger components made of ceramics materials etc. This paper describes the basic equations applying to the STEP code, code system with a combination of the STEP and the ABAQUS codes and the result of the verification analysis. (author)

  17. Brittle fracture tests at low temperature for transport cask materials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kosaki, Akio; Ito, Chihiro; Arai, Taku; Saegusa, Toshiari

    1993-01-01

    The IAEA Regulations for the Safe Transport of Radioactive Material were revised in 1985, and brittle fracture assessment at low temperature for transport packages are now required. This report discusses the applicability of the actual method for brittle fracture assessment of type-B transport cask materials used in JAPAN. The necessity of brittle fracture assessment at low temperature was estimated for each material of type-B transport casks used in Japan and the applicability was investigated. Dynamic fracture toughness values, K Id (J Id ), and RT NDT values of Low-Mn Carbon Steels, that are SA 350 Gr.LF1 Modify and SA 516 Gr.70 material which used in type-B transport cask body, were also obtained to check whether or not an easier and conventional test method, that prescribed in ASME CODE SECTION III, can be substituted for the dynamic fracture test method. And for bolt materials, which include 1.8Ni-0.8Cr-0.3Mo Carbon Steel and type 630 H Stainless Steel, toughness data were obtained for reference. (J.P.N.)

  18. Deterministic and stochastic analysis of size effects and damage evolution in quasi-brittle materials

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Gutiérrez, M.A.; Borst, R. de

    1999-01-01

    This study presents some recent results on damage evolution in quasi-brittle materials including stochastic imperfections. The material strength is described as a random field and coupled to the response. The most probable configurations of imperfections leading to failure are sought by means of an

  19. Clinical use of nuclear cardiology in the assessment of heart failure

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Han Lei; Shi Hongcheng

    2011-01-01

    Nuclear cardiology is the most commonly performed non-invasive cardiac imaging test in patients with heart failure, and it plays an important role in their assessment and management. Quantitative gated single positron emission computed tomography is used to assess quantitatively cardiac volume, left ventricular ejection fraction, stroke volume, and cardiac diastolic function. Resting and stress myocardial perfusion imaging can not only identify nonischemic heart failure and ischemic heart failure, but also demonstrate myocardial viability. Diastolic heart failure also termed as heart failure with a preserved left ventricular ejection fraction is readily identified by nuclear cardiology techniques and can accurately be estimated by peak filling rate and time to peak filling rate. With newer techniques such as three-dimensional, quantitative gated single positron emission computed tomography can assess movement of the left ventricle, and wall thickening evaluation aids its assessment. Myocardial perfusion imaging is also commonly used to identify candidates for implantable cardiac defibrillator and cardiac resynchronization therapies. Neurotransmitter imaging using 123 I-metaiodobenzylguanidine offers prognostic information in patients with heart failure. Metabolism and function in the heart are closely related, and energy substrate metabolism is a potential target of medical therapies to improve cardiac function in patients with heart failure. Cardiac metabolic imaging using 123 I-15-(p-iodophenyl) 3-R, S-methylpentadecacoic acid is a commonly used tracer in clinical studies to diagnose metabolic heart failure. Nuclear cardiology tests, including neurotransmitter imaging and metabolic imaging, are now easily preformed with new tracers to improve heart failure diagnosis. Nuclear cardiology techniques contribute significantly to identifying patients with heart failure and to guiding their management decisions. (authors)

  20. Assessment of electronic component failure rates on the basis of experimental data

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nitsch, R.

    1991-01-01

    Assessment and prediction of failure rates of electronic systems are made using experimental data derived from laboratory-scale tests or from the practice, as for instance from component failure rate statistics or component repair statistics. Some problems and uncertainties encountered in an evaluation of such field data are discussed in the paper. In order to establish a sound basis for comparative assessment of data from various sources, the items of comparison and the procedure in case of doubt have to be defined. The paper explains two standard methods proposed for practical failure rate definition. (orig.) [de

  1. Sequential Organ Failure Assessment Score for Evaluating Organ Failure and Outcome of Severe Maternal Morbidity in Obstetric Intensive Care

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Antonio Oliveira-Neto

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Objective. To evaluate the performance of Sequential Organ Failure Assessment (SOFA score in cases of severe maternal morbidity (SMM. Design. Retrospective study of diagnostic validation. Setting. An obstetric intensive care unit (ICU in Brazil. Population. 673 women with SMM. Main Outcome Measures. mortality and SOFA score. Methods. Organ failure was evaluated according to maximum score for each one of its six components. The total maximum SOFA score was calculated using the poorest result of each component, reflecting the maximum degree of alteration in systemic organ function. Results. highest total maximum SOFA score was associated with mortality, 12.06 ± 5.47 for women who died and 1.87 ± 2.56 for survivors. There was also a significant correlation between the number of failing organs and maternal mortality, ranging from 0.2% (no failure to 85.7% (≥3 organs. Analysis of the area under the receiver operating characteristic (ROC curve (AUC confirmed the excellent performance of total maximum SOFA score for cases of SMM (AUC = 0.958. Conclusions. Total maximum SOFA score proved to be an effective tool for evaluating severity and estimating prognosis in cases of SMM. Maximum SOFA score may be used to conceptually define and stratify the degree of severity in cases of SMM.

  2. Reliability-based failure cause assessment of collapsed bridge during construction

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Choi, Hyun-Ho; Lee, Sang-Yoon; Choi, Il-Yoon; Cho, Hyo-Nam; Mahadevan, Sankaran

    2006-01-01

    Until now, in many forensic reports, the failure cause assessments are usually carried out by a deterministic approach so far. However, it may be possible for the forensic investigation to lead to unreasonable results far from the real collapse scenario, because the deterministic approach does not systematically take into account any information on the uncertainties involved in the failures of structures. Reliability-based failure cause assessment (reliability-based forensic engineering) methodology is developed which can incorporate the uncertainties involved in structural failures and structures, and to apply them to the collapsed bridge in order to identify the most critical failure scenario and find the cause that triggered the bridge collapse. Moreover, to save the time and cost of evaluation, an algorithm of automated event tree analysis (ETA) is proposed and possible to automatically calculate the failure probabilities of the failure events and the occurrence probabilities of failure scenarios. Also, for reliability analysis, uncertainties are estimated more reasonably by using the Bayesian approach based on the experimental laboratory testing data in the forensic report. For the applicability, the proposed approach is applied to the Hang-ju Grand Bridge, which collapsed during construction, and compared with deterministic approach

  3. Omnibus risk assessment via accelerated failure time kernel machine modeling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sinnott, Jennifer A; Cai, Tianxi

    2013-12-01

    Integrating genomic information with traditional clinical risk factors to improve the prediction of disease outcomes could profoundly change the practice of medicine. However, the large number of potential markers and possible complexity of the relationship between markers and disease make it difficult to construct accurate risk prediction models. Standard approaches for identifying important markers often rely on marginal associations or linearity assumptions and may not capture non-linear or interactive effects. In recent years, much work has been done to group genes into pathways and networks. Integrating such biological knowledge into statistical learning could potentially improve model interpretability and reliability. One effective approach is to employ a kernel machine (KM) framework, which can capture nonlinear effects if nonlinear kernels are used (Scholkopf and Smola, 2002; Liu et al., 2007, 2008). For survival outcomes, KM regression modeling and testing procedures have been derived under a proportional hazards (PH) assumption (Li and Luan, 2003; Cai, Tonini, and Lin, 2011). In this article, we derive testing and prediction methods for KM regression under the accelerated failure time (AFT) model, a useful alternative to the PH model. We approximate the null distribution of our test statistic using resampling procedures. When multiple kernels are of potential interest, it may be unclear in advance which kernel to use for testing and estimation. We propose a robust Omnibus Test that combines information across kernels, and an approach for selecting the best kernel for estimation. The methods are illustrated with an application in breast cancer. © 2013, The International Biometric Society.

  4. SU-F-T-246: Evaluation of Healthcare Failure Mode And Effect Analysis For Risk Assessment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Harry, T; Manger, R; Cervino, L; Pawlicki, T

    2016-01-01

    Purpose: To evaluate the differences between the Veteran Affairs Healthcare Failure Modes and Effect Analysis (HFMEA) and the AAPM Task Group 100 Failure and Effect Analysis (FMEA) risk assessment techniques in the setting of a stereotactic radiosurgery (SRS) procedure were compared respectively. Understanding the differences in the techniques methodologies and outcomes will provide further insight into the applicability and utility of risk assessments exercises in radiation therapy. Methods: HFMEA risk assessment analysis was performed on a stereotactic radiosurgery procedure. A previous study from our institution completed a FMEA of our SRS procedure and the process map generated from this work was used for the HFMEA. The process of performing the HFMEA scoring was analyzed, and the results from both analyses were compared. Results: The key differences between the two risk assessments are the scoring criteria for failure modes and identifying critical failure modes for potential hazards. The general consensus among the team performing the analyses was that scoring for the HFMEA was simpler and more intuitive then the FMEA. The FMEA identified 25 critical failure modes while the HFMEA identified 39. Seven of the FMEA critical failure modes were not identified by the HFMEA and 21 of the HFMEA critical failure modes were not identified by the FMEA. HFMEA as described by the Veteran Affairs provides guidelines on which failure modes to address first. Conclusion: HFMEA is a more efficient model for identifying gross risks in a process than FMEA. Clinics with minimal staff, time and resources can benefit from this type of risk assessment to eliminate or mitigate high risk hazards with nominal effort. FMEA can provide more in depth details but at the cost of elevated effort.

  5. SU-F-T-246: Evaluation of Healthcare Failure Mode And Effect Analysis For Risk Assessment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Harry, T [Oregon State University, Corvallis, OR (United States); University of California, San Diego, La Jolla, CA (United States); Manger, R; Cervino, L; Pawlicki, T [University of California, San Diego, La Jolla, CA (United States)

    2016-06-15

    Purpose: To evaluate the differences between the Veteran Affairs Healthcare Failure Modes and Effect Analysis (HFMEA) and the AAPM Task Group 100 Failure and Effect Analysis (FMEA) risk assessment techniques in the setting of a stereotactic radiosurgery (SRS) procedure were compared respectively. Understanding the differences in the techniques methodologies and outcomes will provide further insight into the applicability and utility of risk assessments exercises in radiation therapy. Methods: HFMEA risk assessment analysis was performed on a stereotactic radiosurgery procedure. A previous study from our institution completed a FMEA of our SRS procedure and the process map generated from this work was used for the HFMEA. The process of performing the HFMEA scoring was analyzed, and the results from both analyses were compared. Results: The key differences between the two risk assessments are the scoring criteria for failure modes and identifying critical failure modes for potential hazards. The general consensus among the team performing the analyses was that scoring for the HFMEA was simpler and more intuitive then the FMEA. The FMEA identified 25 critical failure modes while the HFMEA identified 39. Seven of the FMEA critical failure modes were not identified by the HFMEA and 21 of the HFMEA critical failure modes were not identified by the FMEA. HFMEA as described by the Veteran Affairs provides guidelines on which failure modes to address first. Conclusion: HFMEA is a more efficient model for identifying gross risks in a process than FMEA. Clinics with minimal staff, time and resources can benefit from this type of risk assessment to eliminate or mitigate high risk hazards with nominal effort. FMEA can provide more in depth details but at the cost of elevated effort.

  6. Intermittent single point machining of brittle materials

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Marsh, E

    1999-12-07

    A series of tests were undertaken to explore diamond tool wear in the intermittent cutting of brittle materials, specifically silicon. The tests were carried out on a plain way No. 3 Moore machine base equipped as a flycutter with a motorized Professional Instruments 4R air bearing spindle. The diamond tools were made by Edge Technologies with known crystal orientation and composition and sharpened with either an abrasive or chemical process, depending on the individual test. The flycutting machine configuration allowed precise control over the angle at which the tool engages the anisotropic silicon workpiece. In contrast, the crystallographic orientation of the silicon workpiece changes continuously during on-axis turning. As a result, it is possible to flycut a workpiece in cutting directions that are known to be easy or hard. All cuts were run in the 100 plane of the silicon, with a slight angle deliberately introduced to ensure that the 100 plane is engaged in ''up-cutting'' which lengthens the tool life. A Kistler 9256 dynamometer was used to measure the cutting forces in order to gain insight into the material removal process and tool wear during testing. The dynamometer provides high bandwidth force measurement with milli-Newton resolution and good thermal stability. After many successive passes over the workpiece, it was observed that the cutting forces grow at a rate that is roughly proportional to the degradation of the workpiece surface finish. The exact relationship between cutting force growth and surface finish degradation was not quantified because of the problems associated with measuring surface finish in situ. However, a series of witness marks were made during testing in an aluminum sample that clearly show the development of wear flats on the tool nose profile as the forces grow and the surface finish worsens. The test results show that workpieces requiring on the order of two miles of track length can be made with low tool

  7. Fracture mechanisms in multilayer phosphorene assemblies: from brittle to ductile.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Ning; Hong, Jiawang; Zeng, Xiaowei; Pidaparti, Ramana; Wang, Xianqiao

    2017-05-24

    The outstanding mechanical performance of nacre has stimulated numerous studies on the design of artificial nacres. Phosphorene, a new two-dimensional (2D) material, has a crystalline in-plane structure and non-bonded interaction between adjacent flakes. Therefore, multi-layer phosphorene assemblies (MLPs), in which phosphorene flakes are piled up in a staggered manner, may exhibit outstanding mechanical performance, especially exceptional toughness. Therefore, molecular dynamics simulations are performed to study the dependence of the mechanical properties on the overlap distance between adjacent phosphorene layers and the number of phosphorene flakes per layer. The results indicate that when the flake number is equal to 1, a transition of fracture patterns is observed by increasing the overlap distance, from a ductile failure controlled by interfacial friction to a brittle failure dominated by the breakage of covalent bonds inside phosphorene flakes. Moreover, the failure pattern can be tuned by changing the number of flakes in each phosphorene layer. The results imply that the ultimate strength follows a power law with the exponent -0.5 in terms of the flake number, which is in good agreement with our analytical model. Furthermore, the flake number in each phosphorene layer is optimized as 2 when the temperature is 1 K in order to potentially achieve both high toughness and strength. Moreover, our results regarding the relations between mechanical performance and overlap distance can be explained well using a shear-lag model. However, it should be pointed out that increasing the temperature of MLPs could cause the transition of fracture patterns from ductile to brittle. Therefore, the optimal flake number depends heavily on temperature to achieve both its outstanding strength and toughness. Overall, our findings unveil the fundamental mechanism at the nanoscale for MLPs as well as provide a method to design phosphorene-based structures with targeted properties

  8. Effect of low fatigue on the ductile-brittle transition of molybdenum

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Furuya, K.; Nagata, N.; Watanabe, R.; Yoshida, H.

    1982-01-01

    An explicit ductile-brittle transition of molybdenum occurring in both tensile and low cycle fatigue tests was investigated. Tests were performed on several sorts of molybdenum and its alloy TZM, and effects of heat treatment, fabrication method and alloying on the transition behavior and fracture mode are described in detail. All the materials exhibited a brittle failure with degraded fatigue behavior at room temperature, while they became ductile as temperature increased up to 573 K. The tendency of fatigue results was qualitatively in accordance with that of reduction of area in tensile tests. Differences among the materials were minor on the ductile-brittle transition temperature (DBTT), but major on the fatigue life for the embrittled materials. (orig.)

  9. A Micromechanics-Based Elastoplastic Damage Model for Rocks with a Brittle-Ductile Transition in Mechanical Response

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hu, Kun; Zhu, Qi-zhi; Chen, Liang; Shao, Jian-fu; Liu, Jian

    2018-06-01

    As confining pressure increases, crystalline rocks of moderate porosity usually undergo a transition in failure mode from localized brittle fracture to diffused damage and ductile failure. This transition has been widely reported experimentally for several decades; however, satisfactory modeling is still lacking. The present paper aims at modeling the brittle-ductile transition process of rocks under conventional triaxial compression. Based on quantitative analyses of experimental results, it is found that there is a quite satisfactory linearity between the axial inelastic strain at failure and the confining pressure prescribed. A micromechanics-based frictional damage model is then formulated using an associated plastic flow rule and a strain energy release rate-based damage criterion. The analytical solution to the strong plasticity-damage coupling problem is provided and applied to simulate the nonlinear mechanical behaviors of Tennessee marble, Indiana limestone and Jinping marble, each presenting a brittle-ductile transition in stress-strain curves.

  10. Correlation of radiological assessment of congestive heart failure with left ventricular end-diastolic pressure

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Herman, P.G.; Kahn, A.; Kallman, C.E.; Rojas, K.A.; Bodenheimer, M.M.

    1988-01-01

    Left ventricular end-diastolic pressure (LVEDP) has been considered a reliable indicator of left ventricular function. The purpose of this study was to correlate the radiologic assessment of congestive heart failure with LVEDP. The population of the study consisted of 85 consecutive cases in four ranges of LVEDP ( 24). The PA chest radiographs obtained 1 day prior to cardiac catherization were assessed for radiological evidence of congestive heart failure and were graded from normal to abnormal (0-3). The results will be summarized in the authors' presentation. The discordance of radiological assessment of congestive heart failure in patients with elevated LVEDP will be discussed in light of recent advances in pathophysiologic understanding of left ventricular function and the impact of new classes of drugs in the management of these patients

  11. Physics of Failure as a Basis for Solder Elements Reliability Assessment in Wind Turbines

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kostandyan, Erik; Sørensen, John Dalsgaard

    2012-01-01

    description of the reliability. A physics of failure approach is applied. A SnAg solder component used in power electronics is used as an example. Crack propagation in the SnAg solder is modeled and a model to assess the accumulated plastic strain is proposed based on a physics of failure approach. Based...... on the proposed model it is described how to find the accumulated linear damage and reliability levels for a given temperature loading profile. Using structural reliability methods the reliability levels of the electrical components are assessed by introducing scale factors for stresses....

  12. A review on ductile mode cutting of brittle materials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Antwi, Elijah Kwabena; Liu, Kui; Wang, Hao

    2018-06-01

    Brittle materials have been widely employed for industrial applications due to their excellent mechanical, optical, physical and chemical properties. But obtaining smooth and damage-free surface on brittle materials by traditional machining methods like grinding, lapping and polishing is very costly and extremely time consuming. Ductile mode cutting is a very promising way to achieve high quality and crack-free surfaces of brittle materials. Thus the study of ductile mode cutting of brittle materials has been attracting more and more efforts. This paper provides an overview of ductile mode cutting of brittle materials including ductile nature and plasticity of brittle materials, cutting mechanism, cutting characteristics, molecular dynamic simulation, critical undeformed chip thickness, brittle-ductile transition, subsurface damage, as well as a detailed discussion of ductile mode cutting enhancement. It is believed that ductile mode cutting of brittle materials could be achieved when both crack-free and no subsurface damage are obtained simultaneously.

  13. Multidisciplinary approach for in-deep assessment of joint prosthesis failure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tessarolo, F; Caola, I; Piccoli, F; Dorigotti, P; Demattè, E; Molinari, M; Malavolta, M; Barbareschi, M; Caciagli, P; Nollo, G

    2009-01-01

    In spite of advancement in biomaterials and biomechanics, in development of new osteo-integrative materials and coatings, and in macro- micro- component design, a non negligible fraction of the implanted prosthesis fails before the expected lifetime. A prospective observational clinical study has been conducted to define and apply a set of experimental techniques to in-deep assess the failure of joint prosthesis. Microbiological, histological and micro-structural techniques were implemented to specifically address phenomena occurring at the tissue-implant interface. Results obtained from 27 cases of prosthetic joint failure are discussed in terms of sensitivity and specificity. A procedural flow-chart is finally proposed for the assessment of joint prosthesis failure.

  14. Chronic renal failure and sexual functioning: clinical status versus objectively assessed sexual response

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Toorians, A. W.; Janssen, E.; Laan, E.; Gooren, L. J.; Giltay, E. J.; Oe, P. L.; Donker, A. J.; Everaerd, W.

    1997-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Sexual dysfunctions are common among patients with chronic renal failure. The prevalence was assessed in a population of 281 patients (20-60 years), and it was attempted to determine whether their mode of treatment (haemodialysis, peritoneal dialysis, or kidney transplantation), or

  15. Nonorganic Failure to Thrive: Developmental Outcomes and Psychosocial Assessment and Intervention Issues.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heffer, Robert W.; Kelley, Mary L.

    1994-01-01

    This review describes Nonorganic Failure to Thrive, presents developmental outcomes, and discusses psychosocial assessment and intervention issues relevant to this developmental disability of early childhood, focusing on child-specific variables, situational and family variables, parent-child interaction variables, and biopsychosocial formulation…

  16. Assessment of characteristic failure envelopes for intact rock using results from triaxial tests

    OpenAIRE

    Muralha, J.; Lamas, L.

    2014-01-01

    The paper presents contributions to the statistical study of the parameters of the Mohr-Coulomb and Hoek-Brown strength criteria, in order to assess the characteristic failure envelopes for intact rock, based on the results of several sets of triaxial tests performed by LNEC. 10p DBB/NMMR

  17. Electrical impedance tomography in the assessment of extravascular lung water in noncardiogenic acute respiratory failure

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kunst, P. W.; Vonk Noordegraaf, A.; Raaijmakers, E.; Bakker, J.; Groeneveld, A. B.; Postmus, P. E.; de Vries, P. M.

    1999-01-01

    STUDY OBJECTIVES: To establish the value of electrical impedance tomography (EIT) in assessing pulmonary edema in noncardiogenic acute respiratory failure (ARF), as compared to the thermal dye double indicator dilution technique (TDD). DESIGN: Prospective clinical study. SETTING: ICU of a general

  18. Assessment of ALWR passive safety system reliability. Phase 1: Methodology development and component failure quantification

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hake, T.M.; Heger, A.S.

    1995-04-01

    Many advanced light water reactor (ALWR) concepts proposed for the next generation of nuclear power plants rely on passive systems to perform safety functions, rather than active systems as in current reactor designs. These passive systems depend to a great extent on physical processes such as natural circulation for their driving force, and not on active components, such as pumps. An NRC-sponsored study was begun at Sandia National Laboratories to develop and implement a methodology for evaluating ALWR passive system reliability in the context of probabilistic risk assessment (PRA). This report documents the first of three phases of this study, including methodology development, system-level qualitative analysis, and sequence-level component failure quantification. The methodology developed addresses both the component (e.g. valve) failure aspect of passive system failure, and uncertainties in system success criteria arising from uncertainties in the system's underlying physical processes. Traditional PRA methods, such as fault and event tree modeling, are applied to the component failure aspect. Thermal-hydraulic calculations are incorporated into a formal expert judgment process to address uncertainties in selected natural processes and success criteria. The first phase of the program has emphasized the component failure element of passive system reliability, rather than the natural process uncertainties. Although cursory evaluation of the natural processes has been performed as part of Phase 1, detailed assessment of these processes will take place during Phases 2 and 3 of the program

  19. Porosity evolution at the brittle-ductile transition in the continental crust: Implications for deep hydro-geothermal circulation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Violay, M; Heap, M J; Acosta, M; Madonna, C

    2017-08-09

    Recently, projects have been proposed to engineer deep geothermal reservoirs in the ductile crust. To examine their feasibility, we performed high-temperature (up to 1000 °C), high-pressure (130 MPa) triaxial experiments on granite (initially-intact and shock-cooled samples) in which we measured the evolution of porosity during deformation. Mechanical data and post-mortem microstuctural characterisation (X-ray computed tomography and scanning electron microscopy) indicate that (1) the failure mode was brittle up to 900 °C (shear fracture formation) but ductile at 1000 °C (no strain localisation); (2) only deformation up to 800 °C was dilatant; (3) deformation at 900 °C was brittle but associated with net compaction due to an increase in the efficiency of crystal plastic processes; (4) ductile deformation at 1000 °C was compactant; (5) thermally-shocking the granite did not influence strength or failure mode. Our data show that, while brittle behaviour increases porosity, porosity loss is associated with both ductile behaviour and transitional behaviour as the failure mode evolves from brittle to ductile. Extrapolating our data to geological strain rates suggests that the brittle-ductile transition occurs at a temperature of 400 ± 100 °C, and is associated with the limit of fluid circulation in the deep continental crust.

  20. Validation of self assessment patient knowledge questionnaire for heart failure patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lainscak, Mitja; Keber, Irena

    2005-12-01

    Several studies showed insufficient knowledge and poor compliance to non-pharmacological management in heart failure patients. Only a limited number of validated tools are available to assess their knowledge. The aim of the study was to test our 10-item Patient knowledge questionnaire. The Patient knowledge questionnaire was administered to 42 heart failure patients from Heart failure clinic and to 40 heart failure patients receiving usual care. Construct validity (Pearson correlation coefficient), internal consistency (Cronbach alpha), reproducibility (Wilcoxon signed rank test), and reliability (chi-square test and Student's t-test for independent samples) were assessed. Overall score of the Patient knowledge questionnaire had the strongest correlation to the question about regular weighing (r=0.69) and the weakest to the question about presence of heart disease (r=0.33). There was a strong correlation between question about fluid retention and questions assessing regular weighing, (r=0.86), weight of one litre of water (r=0.86), and salt restriction (r=0.57). The Cronbach alpha was 0.74 and could be improved by exclusion of questions about clear explanation (Chronbach alpha 0.75), importance of fruit, soup, and vegetables (Chronbach alpha 0.75), and self adjustment of diuretic (Chronbach alpha 0.81). During reproducibility testing 91% to 98% of questions were answered equally. Patients from Heart failure clinic scored significantly better than patients receiving usual care (7.9 (1.3) vs. 5.7 (2.2), p<0.001). Patient knowledge questionnaire is a valid and reliable tool to measure knowledge of heart failure patients.

  1. Impact fragmentation of a brittle metal compact

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tang, Megan; Hooper, Joseph P.

    2018-05-01

    The fragmentation behavior of a metal powder compact which is ductile in compression but brittle in tension is studied via impact experiments and analytical models. Consolidated metal compacts were prepared via cold-isostatic pressing of powder at 380 MPa followed by moderate annealing at 365 °C. The resulting zinc material is ductile and strain-hardening in high-rate uniaxial compression like a traditional metal, but is elastic-brittle in tension with a fracture toughness comparable to a ceramic. Cylindrical samples were launched up to 800 m/s in a gas gun into thin aluminum perforation targets, subjecting the projectile to a complex multiaxial and time-dependent stress state that leads to catastrophic fracture. A soft-catch mechanism using low-density artificial snow was developed to recover the impact debris, and collected fragments were analyzed to determine their size distribution down to 30 μm. Though brittle fracture occurs along original particle boundaries, no power-law fragmentation behavior was observed as is seen in other low-toughness materials. An analytical theory is developed to predict the characteristic fragment size accounting for both the sharp onset of fragmentation and the effect of increasing impact velocity.

  2. Nickel brittling by hydrogen. Temperature effect

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lapitz, P.A; Fernandez, S; Alvarez, M.G

    2006-01-01

    The results of a study on the effect of different variables on the susceptibility to brittling by hydrogen and the velocity of propagation of fissures in nickel wire (99.7% purity) are described. The hydrogen load was carried out by cathodic polarization in H 2 SO 4 0.5m solution. The susceptibility to brittling by hydrogen was determined with traction tests at slow deformation speed and constant cathodic potential, and the later observation of the fracture surface by scanning electron microscopy. The variables studied were: applied cathodic overpower, speed of initial deformation and temperature. The results showed that the speed of fissure propagation in the nickel by brittleness from hydrogen is a function of the applied potential and the speed of deformation used. Without tension, the hydrogen load by cathodic polarization at room temperature leads to the formation of cavities similar to those observed when the hydrogenation is performed in the presence of gaseous hydrogen at high pressure and temperature (CW)

  3. Fabrication of brittle materials -- current status

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Scattergood, R.O.

    1988-12-01

    The research initiatives in the area of precision fabrication will be continued in the upcoming year. Three students, T. Bifano (PhD), P. Blake (PhD) and E. Smith (MS), finished their research programs in the last year. Sections 13 and 14 will summarize the essential results from the work of the Materials Engineering students Blake and Smith. Further details will be presented in forthcoming publications that are now in preparation. The results from Bifano`s thesis have been published in adequate detail and need not be summarized further. Three new students, S. Blackley (MS), H. Paul (PhD), and S. Smith (PhD) have joined the program and will continue the research efforts in precision fabrication. The programs for these students will be outlined in Sections 15 and 16. Because of the success of the earlier work in establishing new process models and experimental techniques for the study of diamond turning and diamond grinding, the new programs will, in part, build upon the earlier work. This is especially true for investigations concerned with brittle materials. The basic understanding of material response of nominally brittle materials during machining or grinding operations remains as a challenge. The precision fabrication of brittle materials will continue as an area of emphasis for the Precision Engineering Center.

  4. Brittle fracture in structural steels: perspectives at different size-scales.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Knott, John

    2015-03-28

    This paper describes characteristics of transgranular cleavage fracture in structural steel, viewed at different size-scales. Initially, consideration is given to structures and the service duty to which they are exposed at the macroscale, highlighting failure by plastic collapse and failure by brittle fracture. This is followed by sections describing the use of fracture mechanics and materials testing in carrying-out assessments of structural integrity. Attention then focuses on the microscale, explaining how values of the local fracture stress in notched bars or of fracture toughness in pre-cracked test-pieces are related to features of the microstructure: carbide thicknesses in wrought material; the sizes of oxide/silicate inclusions in weld metals. Effects of a microstructure that is 'heterogeneous' at the mesoscale are treated briefly, with respect to the extraction of test-pieces from thick sections and to extrapolations of data to low failure probabilities. The values of local fracture stress may be used to infer a local 'work-of-fracture' that is found experimentally to be a few times greater than that of two free surfaces. Reasons for this are discussed in the conclusion section on nano-scale events. It is suggested that, ahead of a sharp crack, it is necessary to increase the compliance by a cooperative movement of atoms (involving extra work) to allow the crack-tip bond to displace sufficiently for the energy of attraction between the atoms to reduce to zero. © 2015 The Author(s) Published by the Royal Society. All rights reserved.

  5. Assessment of current structural design methodology for high-temperature reactors based on failure tests

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Corum, J.M.; Sartory, W.K.

    1985-01-01

    A mature design methodology, consisting of inelastic analysis methods, provided in Department of Energy guidelines, and failure criteria, contained in ASME Code Case N-47, exists in the United States for high-temperature reactor components. The objective of this paper is to assess the adequacy of this overall methodology by comparing predicted inelastic deformations and lifetimes with observed results from structural failure tests and from an actual service failure. Comparisons are presented for three types of structural situations: (1) nozzle-to-spherical shell specimens, where stresses at structural discontinuities lead to cracking, (2) welded structures, where metallurgical discontinuities play a key role in failures, and (3) thermal shock loadings of cylinders and pipes, where thermal discontinuities can lead to failure. The comparison between predicted and measured inelastic responses are generally reasonalbly good; quantities are sometimes overpredicted somewhat, and, sometimes underpredicted. However, even seemingly small discrepancies can have a significant effect on structural life, and lifetimes are not always as closely predicted. For a few cases, the lifetimes are substantially overpredicted, which raises questions regarding the adequacy of existing design margins

  6. [Assessment of medical management of heart failure at National Hospital Blaise COMPAORE].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kambiré, Y; Konaté, L; Diallo, I; Millogo, G R C; Kologo, K J; Tougouma, J B; Samadoulougou, A K; Zabsonré, P

    2018-05-09

    The aim of this study was to assess the quality of medical management of heart failure at the National Hospital Blaise Compaoré according to the international guidelines. A retrospective study was performed including consecutive patients admitted for heart failure documented sonographically from October 2012 to March 2015 in the Medicine and Medical Specialties Department of National Hospital Blaise Compaore with a minimum follow-up of six weeks. Data analysis was made by the SPSS 20.0 software. Eighty-four patients, mean age of 57.61±18.24 years, were included. It was an acute heart failure in 84.5% of patients with systolic left ventricular function impaired (77.4%). The rate of prescription of different drugs in heart failure any type was 88.1% for loop diuretics; 77.1% for angiotensin-converting enzyme inhibitors/angiotensin receptor blockers and 65.5% for betablockers. In patients with systolic dysfunction, 84.62% of patients were received the combination of angiotensin-converting enzyme inhibitors/angiotensin receptor blockers and 75.38% for betablockers. Exercise rehabilitation was undergoing in 10.7% of patients. The death rate was 16.7% and hospital readmission rate of 16.7%. The prescription rate of major heart failure drugs is satisfactory. Cardiac rehabilitation should be developed. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  7. Application of failure assessment diagram methods to cracked straight pipes and elbows

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ainsworth, R.A.; Gintalas, M.; Sahu, M.K.; Chattopadhyay, J.; Dutta, B.K.

    2016-01-01

    This paper reports fracture assessments of large-scale straight pipes and elbows of various pipe diameters and crack sizes. The assessments estimate the load for ductile fracture initiation using the failure assessment diagram method. Recent solutions in the literature for stress intensity factor and limit load provide the analysis inputs. An assessment of constraint effects is also performed using recent solutions for elastic T-stress. It is found that predictions of initiation load are close to the experimental values for straight pipes under pure bending. For elbows, there is generally increased conservatism in the sense that the experimental loads are greater than those predicted. The effects of constraint are found not to be a major contributor to the initiation fracture assessments but may have some influence on the ductile crack extension. - Highlights: • This paper presents assessments of the loads for ductile fracture initiation in 21 large-scale piping tests. • Modern stress intensity factor and limit load solutions were used for standard failure assessment diagram methods. • This leads to generally accurate assessments of the loads for ductile crack initiation. • The effects of constraint are found not to be a major contributor to the initiation fracture assessments.

  8. Influence of the static strain ageing on the ductile-to-brittle transition in C-Mn steel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Marais, A.

    2012-01-01

    Ferritic steels for industrial structures have a brittle-ductile transition toughness and impact energy with temperature. Their resistance to the brittle fracture plays an essential role in the safety certification of industrial structures. Nowadays, the performance and the durability are key issues for major players such as EDF. In these approaches ductile-to-brittle transition toughness and impact energy, toughness is predicted from resilience. Several previous studies have shown that the probability of cleavage fracture can be adequately described in brittle plateau by a local approach to fracture. However, these studies assume that the material does not undergo strain aging, which is rarely relevant for low carbon steels and low calmed down. The work consisted firstly to characterize the behavior and secondly to propose a robust and explicit modeling of the observed phenomena. Characterization consisted of performing tensile tests between -150 C and 20 C for several strain rates. A model able to simulate the static aging is identified by implementing an appropriate and systematic strategy. Impact resistance test allows us to build the curve of ductile-to-brittle transition of the material for different conditions to understand and observe the influence of static strain aging on the failure. Finally, the modeling of the brittle fracture has been described for all experimental conditions tested using the model developed and identified in the previous section to predict the transition for different material conditions. (author)

  9. How to interpret safety critical failures in risk and reliability assessments

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Selvik, Jon Tømmerås; Signoret, Jean-Pierre

    2017-01-01

    Management of safety systems often receives high attention due to the potential for industrial accidents. In risk and reliability literature concerning such systems, and particularly concerning safety-instrumented systems, one frequently comes across the term ‘safety critical failure’. It is a term associated with the term ‘critical failure’, and it is often deduced that a safety critical failure refers to a failure occurring in a safety critical system. Although this is correct in some situations, it is not matching with for example the mathematical definition given in ISO/TR 12489:2013 on reliability modeling, where a clear distinction is made between ‘safe failures’ and ‘dangerous failures’. In this article, we show that different interpretations of the term ‘safety critical failure’ exist, and there is room for misinterpretations and misunderstandings regarding risk and reliability assessments where failure information linked to safety systems are used, and which could influence decision-making. The article gives some examples from the oil and gas industry, showing different possible interpretations of the term. In particular we discuss the link between criticality and failure. The article points in general to the importance of adequate risk communication when using the term, and gives some clarification on interpretation in risk and reliability assessments.

  10. Assessing rockfall susceptibility in steep and overhanging slopes using three-dimensional analysis of failure mechanisms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matasci, Battista; Stock, Greg M.; Jaboyedoff, Michael; Carrea, Dario; Collins, Brian D.; Guérin, Antoine; Matasci, G.; Ravanel, L.

    2018-01-01

    Rockfalls strongly influence the evolution of steep rocky landscapes and represent a significant hazard in mountainous areas. Defining the most probable future rockfall source areas is of primary importance for both geomorphological investigations and hazard assessment. Thus, a need exists to understand which areas of a steep cliff are more likely to be affected by a rockfall. An important analytical gap exists between regional rockfall susceptibility studies and block-specific geomechanical calculations. Here we present methods for quantifying rockfall susceptibility at the cliff scale, which is suitable for sub-regional hazard assessment (hundreds to thousands of square meters). Our methods use three-dimensional point clouds acquired by terrestrial laser scanning to quantify the fracture patterns and compute failure mechanisms for planar, wedge, and toppling failures on vertical and overhanging rock walls. As a part of this work, we developed a rockfall susceptibility index for each type of failure mechanism according to the interaction between the discontinuities and the local cliff orientation. The susceptibility for slope parallel exfoliation-type failures, which are generally hard to identify, is partly captured by planar and toppling susceptibility indexes. We tested the methods for detecting the most susceptible rockfall source areas on two famously steep landscapes, Yosemite Valley (California, USA) and the Drus in the Mont-Blanc massif (France). Our rockfall susceptibility models show good correspondence with active rockfall sources. The methods offer new tools for investigating rockfall hazard and improving our understanding of rockfall processes.

  11. Assessment of importance of elements for systems that condition depends on the sequence of elements failures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Povyakalo, A.A.

    1996-01-01

    This paper proposes new general formulas for calculation of indices of elements importance for systems whose condition depends on sequence of elements failures. These systems have been called as systems with memory of failures (M-systems). Techniques existing for assessment of importance of elements are based on the Bool's models of system reliability, for which it is significant to suggest, that in every period of time system state depends only on a combination of states of elements at that very moment of time. These systems have been called as combinational systems (C-systems). Reliability of M-systems at any moment of operating time is a functional having distributions of elements time before failure as its arguments. Bool's models and methods of assessment of element importance, based on these models, are not appropriate for these systems. Pereguda and Povyakalo proposed the new techniques for assessment of elements importance for PO-SS systems that includes Protection Object (PO) and Safety System (PO). PO-SS system is an example of M-system. That technique is used at this paper as a basis for more general consideration. It has been shown that technique proposed for assessment of elements importance for M-systems has well-known Birnbaum's method as its particular case. Also the system with double protection is considered as an example

  12. Assessment of SPACE code for multiple failure accident: 1% Cold Leg Break LOCA with HPSI failure at ATLAS Test Facility

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, Jong Hyuk; Lee, Seung Wook; Kim, Kyung-Doo [Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of)

    2016-10-15

    Design extension conditions (DECs) is a popular key issue after the Fukushima accident. In a viewpoint of the reinforcement of the defense in depth concept, a high-risk multiple failure accident should be reconsidered. The target scenario of ATLAS A5.1 test was LSTF (Large Scale Test Facility) SB-CL-32 test, a 1% SBLOCA with total failure of high pressure safety injection (HPSI) system of emergency core cooling system (ECCS) and secondary side depressurization as the accident management (AM) action, as a counterpart test. As the needs to prepare the DEC accident because of a multiple failure of the present NPPs are emphasized, the capability of SPACE code, just like other system analysis code, is required to expand the DEC area. The objectives of this study is to validate the capability of SPACE code for a DEC scenario, which represents multiple failure accident like as a SBLOCA with HPSI fail. Therefore, the ATLAS A5.1 test scenario was chosen. As the needs to prepare the DEC accident because of a multiple failure of operating NPPs are emphasized, the capability of SPACE code is needed to expand the DEC area. So the capability of SPACE code was validated for one of a DEC scenario. The target scenario was selected as the ATLAS A5.1 test, which is a 1% SBLOCA with total failure of HPSI system of ECCS and secondary side depressurization. Through the sensitivity study on discharge coefficient of break flow, the best fit of integrated mass was found. Using the coefficient, the ATLAS A5.1 test was analyzed using the SPACE code. The major thermal hydraulic parameters such as the system pressure, temperatures were compared with the test and have a good agreement. Through the simulation, it was concluded that the SPACE code can effectively simulate one of multiple failure accidents like as SBLOCA with HPSI failure accident.

  13. Failure Assessment for the High-Strength Pipelines with Constant-Depth Circumferential Surface Cracks

    OpenAIRE

    X. Liu; Z. X. Lu; Y. Chen; Y. L. Sui; L. H. Dai

    2018-01-01

    In the oil and gas transportation system over long distance, application of high-strength pipeline steels can efficiently reduce construction and operation cost by increasing operational pressure and reducing the pipe wall thickness. Failure assessment is an important issue in the design, construction, and maintenance of the pipelines. The small circumferential surface cracks with constant depth in the welded pipelines are of practical interest. This work provides an engineering estimation pr...

  14. The costs of failure: A preliminary assessment of major energy accidents, 1907-2007

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sovacool, Benjamin K.

    2008-01-01

    A combination of technical complexity, tight coupling, speed, and human fallibility contribute to the unexpected failure of large-scale energy technologies. This study offers a preliminary assessment of the social and economic costs of major energy accidents from 1907 to 2007. It documents 279 incidents that have been responsible for $41 billion in property damage and 182,156 deaths. Such disasters highlight an often-ignored negative externality to energy production and use, and emphasize the need for further research

  15. Current Understanding of the Pathophysiology of Myocardial Fibrosis and Its Quantitative Assessment in Heart Failure

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tong Liu

    2017-04-01

    Full Text Available Myocardial fibrosis is an important part of cardiac remodeling that leads to heart failure and death. Myocardial fibrosis results from increased myofibroblast activity and excessive extracellular matrix deposition. Various cells and molecules are involved in this process, providing targets for potential drug therapies. Currently, the main detection methods of myocardial fibrosis rely on serum markers, cardiac magnetic resonance imaging, and endomyocardial biopsy. This review summarizes our current knowledge regarding the pathophysiology, quantitative assessment, and novel therapeutic strategies of myocardial fibrosis.

  16. Metallurgical viewpoints on the brittleness of beryllium

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lagerberg, G

    1960-02-15

    At present the development and use of beryllium metal for structural applications is severely hampered by its brittleness. Reasons for this lack of ductility are reviewed in discussing the deformation behaviour of beryllium in relation to other hexagonal metals. The ease of fracturing in beryllium is assumed to be a consequence of a limited number of deformation modes in combination with high deformation resistance. Models for the nucleation of fracture are suggested. The relation of ductility to elastic constants as well as to grain size, texture and alloying additions is discussed.

  17. Metallurgical viewpoints on the brittleness of beryllium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lagerberg, G.

    1960-02-01

    At present the development and use of beryllium metal for structural applications is severely hampered by its brittleness. Reasons for this lack of ductility are reviewed in discussing the deformation behaviour of beryllium in relation to other hexagonal metals. The ease of fracturing in beryllium is assumed to be a consequence of a limited number of deformation modes in combination with high deformation resistance. Models for the nucleation of fracture are suggested. The relation of ductility to elastic constants as well as to grain size, texture and alloying additions is discussed

  18. Usage of Failure Mode & EffectAnalysis Method (FMEA forsafety assessment in a drug manufacture

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Y Nazari

    2006-04-01

    Full Text Available Background and Aims: This study was hold in purpose of recognizing and controlling workplacehazards in production units of a drag ManufactureMethod:So for recognition and assessment of hazards, FMEA Method was used. FMEASystematically investigates the effects of equipment and system failures leading often toequipment design improvements. At first the level of the study defined as system. Then accordingto observations, accident statistic, and interview with managers, supervisory, and workers highrisk system were determiner. So the boundaries of the system established and informationregarding the relevant Components, their function and interactions gathered. To preventConfusion between Similar pieces of equipment, a unique system identifier developed. After thatall failure modes and their causes for each equipment or system listed, the immediate effects ofeach failure mode and interactive effect on other equipment or system was described too. Riskpriority number was determined according to global and local criteriaResults: After all some actions and solution proposed to reduce the likelihood and severity offailures and raise their delectability.Conclusion :This study illustrated that although of the first step drug manufacture may seem safe,but there are still many hazardous condition that could cause serious accidents, The result proposedit is necessary: (1 to develop comprehensive manual for periodical and regular inspection ofinstruments of workplaces in purpose of recognize unknown failures and their causes, (2 developa comprehensive program for systems maintenance and repair, and (3 conduct worker training.

  19. VALIDATING A COMPUTER-BASED TECHNIQUE FOR ASSESSING STABILITY TO FAILURE STRESS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    I. F. Arshava

    2013-03-01

    Full Text Available An upsurge of interest in the implicit personality assessment, currently observed both in personality psycho-diagnostics and in experimental studies of social attitudes and prejudices, signals the shifting of researchers’ attention from de?ning between-person personality taxonomy to specifying comprehensive within-person processes, the dynamics of which can be captured at the level of an individual case. This research examines the possibility of the implicit assessment of the individual’s stability vs. susceptibility to failure stress by comparing the degrees of ef?cacy in the voluntary self-regulation of a computer-simulated information-processing activity under different conditions (patent of Ukraine № 91842, issued in 2010. By exposing two groups of participants (university undergraduates to processing the information, the scope of which exceeds the human short-term memory capacity at one of the stages of the modeled activity an unexpected and unavoidable failure is elicited. The participants who retain stability of their self-regulation behavior after having been exposed to failure, i.e. who keep processing information as effectively as they did prior to failure, are claimed to retain homeostasis and thus possess emotional stability. Those, who loose homeostasis after failure and display lower standards of self-regulation behavior, are considered to be susceptible to stress. The validity of the suggested type of the implicit diagnostics was empirically tested by clustering (K-means algorithm two samples of the participants on the  properties of their self-regulation behavior and testing between-cluster differences by a set of the explicitly assessed variables: Action control ef?cacy (Kuhl, 2001, preferred strategies of Coping with Stressful Situations (Endler, Parker, 1990,  Purpose-in-Life orientation (a Russian version of the test by Crumbaugh and Maholick, modi?ed by D.Leontiev, 1992, Psychological Well-being (Ryff, 1989

  20. Brittle superconducting magnets: an equivilent strain model

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Barzi, E.; Danuso, M.

    2010-01-01

    To exceed fields of 10 T in accelerator magnets, brittle superconductors like A15 Nb 3 Sn and Nb 3 Al or ceramic High Temperature Superconductors have to be used. For such brittle superconductors it is not their maximum tensile yield stress that limits their structural resistance as much as strain values that provoke deformations in their delicate lattice, which in turn affect their superconducting properties. Work on the sensitivity of Nb 3 Sn cables to strain has been conducted in a number of stress states, including uniaxial and multi-axial, producing usually different results. This has made the need of a constituent design criterion imperative for magnet builders. In conventional structural problems an equivalent stress model is typically used to verify mechanical soundness. In the superconducting community a simple scalar equivalent strain to be used in place of an equivalent stress would be an extremely useful tool. As is well known in fundamental mechanics, there is not one single way to reduce a multiaxial strain state as represented by a 2nd order tensor to a scalar. The conceptual experiment proposed here will help determine the best scalar representation to use in the identification of an equivalent strain model.

  1. From brittle to ductile fracture in disordered materials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Picallo, Clara B; López, Juan M; Zapperi, Stefano; Alava, Mikko J

    2010-10-08

    We introduce a lattice model able to describe damage and yielding in heterogeneous materials ranging from brittle to ductile ones. Ductile fracture surfaces, obtained when the system breaks once the strain is completely localized, are shown to correspond to minimum energy surfaces. The similarity of the resulting fracture paths to the limits of brittle fracture or minimum energy surfaces is quantified. The model exhibits a smooth transition from brittleness to ductility. The dynamics of yielding exhibits avalanches with a power-law distribution.

  2. Bridging micro to macroscale fracture properties in highly heterogeneous brittle solids: weak pinning versus fingering

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vasoya, Manish; Lazarus, Véronique; Ponson, Laurent

    2016-10-01

    The effect of strong toughness heterogeneities on the macroscopic failure properties of brittle solids is investigated in the context of planar crack propagation. The basic mechanism at play is that the crack is locally slowed down or even trapped when encountering tougher material. The induced front deformation results in a selection of local toughness values that reflect at larger scale on the material resistance. To unravel this complexity and bridge micro to macroscale in failure of strongly heterogeneous media, we propose a homogenization procedure based on the introduction of two complementary macroscopic properties: An apparent toughness defined from the loading required to make the crack propagate and an effective fracture energy defined from the rate of energy released by unit area of crack advance. The relationship between these homogenized properties and the features of the local toughness map is computed using an iterative perturbation method. This approach is applied to a circular crack pinned by a periodic array of obstacles invariant in the radial direction, which gives rise to two distinct propagation regimes: A weak pinning regime where the crack maintains a stationary shape after reaching an equilibrium position and a fingering regime characterized by the continuous growth of localized regions of the fronts while the other parts remain trapped. Our approach successfully bridges micro to macroscopic failure properties in both cases and illustrates how small scale heterogeneities can drastically affect the overall failure response of brittle solids. On a broader perspective, we believe that our approach can be used as a powerful tool for the rational design of heterogeneous brittle solids and interfaces with tailored failure properties.

  3. Impact of support system failure limitations on probabilistic safety assessment and in regulatory decision making

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bickel, J.H.

    1990-01-01

    When used as a tool for safety decision making, Probabilistic Safety Assessment (PSA) is as effective as it realistically characterizes the overall frequency and consequences of various types of system and component failures. If significant support system failure events are omitted from consideration, the PSA process omits the characterization of possible unique contributors to core damage risk, possibly underestimates the frequency of core damage, and reduces the future utility of the PSA as a decision making tool for the omitted support system. This paper is based on a review of several recent US PSA studies and the author's participation in several International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA) sponsored peer reviews. 21 refs., 2 figs., 1 tab

  4. Noninvasive radiographic assessment of cardiovascular function in acute and chronic respiratory failure

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Berger, H.J.; Matthay, R.A.

    1981-01-01

    Noninvasive radiographic techniques have provided a means of studying the natural history and pathogenesis of cardiovascular performance in acute and chronic respiratory failure. Chest radiography, radionuclide angiocardiography and thallium-201 imaging, and M mode and cross-sectional echocardiography have been employed. Each of these techniques has specific uses, attributes and limitations. For example, measurement of descending pulmonary arterial diameters on the plain chest radiograph allows determination of the presence or absence of pulmonary arterial hypertension. Right and left ventricular performance can be evaluated at rest and during exercise using radionuclide angiocardiography. The biventricular response to exercise and to therapeutic interventions also can be assessed with this approach. Evaluation of the pulmonary valve echogram and echocardiographic right ventricular dimensions have been shown to reflect right ventricular hemodynamics and size. Each of these noninvasive techniques has been applied to the study of patients with respiratory failure and has provided important physiologic data

  5. Stress localization in BCC polycrystals and its implications on the probability of brittle fracture

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vincent, Ludovic [CEA, DEN, SRMA, 91191 Gif sur Yvette Cedex (France); Gelebart, Lionel, E-mail: lionel.gelebart@cea.fr [CEA, DEN, SRMA, 91191 Gif sur Yvette Cedex (France); Dakhlaoui, Rim; Marini, Bernard [CEA, DEN, SRMA, 91191 Gif sur Yvette Cedex (France)

    2011-07-15

    Highlights: {yields} Intergranular stress distributions in a bainitic steel. {yields} Comparison of local mean stress field with neutron diffraction results. {yields} Application of the local stress distribution in a brittle fracture model. - Abstract: The evaluation of the reliability of pressure vessels in nuclear plants relies on the evaluation of failure probability models. Micromechanical approaches are of great interest to refine their description, to better understand the underlying mechanisms leading to failure, and finally to improve the prediction of these models. The main purpose of this paper is to introduce the stress heterogeneities arising within the polycrystal in a probabilistic modeling of brittle fracture. Stress heterogeneities are evaluated from Finite-Element simulations performed on a large number of Statistical Volume Elements. Results are validated both on the measured averaged behavior and on the averaged stresses measured by neutron diffraction in five specific orientations. A probabilistic model for brittle fracture is then presented accounting for the carbide distribution and the stress distribution evaluated previously inside an elementary volume V{sub 0}. Results are compared to a 'Beremin type' approach, assuming a homogeneous stress state inside V{sub 0}.

  6. Failure probability assessment of wall-thinned nuclear pipes using probabilistic fracture mechanics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lee, Sang-Min; Chang, Yoon-Suk; Choi, Jae-Boong; Kim, Young-Jin

    2006-01-01

    The integrity of nuclear piping system has to be maintained during operation. In order to maintain the integrity, reliable assessment procedures including fracture mechanics analysis, etc., are required. Up to now, this has been performed using conventional deterministic approaches even though there are many uncertainties to hinder a rational evaluation. In this respect, probabilistic approaches are considered as an appropriate method for piping system evaluation. The objectives of this paper are to estimate the failure probabilities of wall-thinned pipes in nuclear secondary systems and to propose limited operating conditions under different types of loadings. To do this, a probabilistic assessment program using reliability index and simulation techniques was developed and applied to evaluate failure probabilities of wall-thinned pipes subjected to internal pressure, bending moment and combined loading of them. The sensitivity analysis results as well as prototypal integrity assessment results showed a promising applicability of the probabilistic assessment program, necessity of practical evaluation reflecting combined loading condition and operation considering limited condition

  7. Brittle-to-ductile transition of lithiated silicon electrodes: Crazing to stable nanopore growth

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wang, Haoran; Chew, Huck Beng; Wang, Xueju; Xia, Shuman

    2015-01-01

    Using first principle calculations, we uncover the underlying mechanisms explaining the brittle-to-ductile transition of Li x Si electrodes in lithium ion batteries with increasing Li content. We show that plasticity initiates at x = ∼ 0.5 with the formation of a craze-like network of nanopores separated by Si–Si bonds, while subsequent failure is still brittle-like with the breaking of Si–Si bonds. Transition to ductile behavior occurs at x ⩾ 1 due to the increased density of highly stretchable Li–Li bonds, which delays nanopore formation and stabilizes nanopore growth. Collapse of the nanopores during unloading of the Li x Si alloys leads to significant strain recovery

  8. Brittle-to-ductile transition of lithiated silicon electrodes: Crazing to stable nanopore growth

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wang, Haoran; Chew, Huck Beng, E-mail: hbchew@illinois.edu [Department of Aerospace Engineering, University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign, Urbana, Illinois 61801 (United States); Wang, Xueju; Xia, Shuman [Woodruff School of Mechanical Engineering, Georgia Institute of Technology, Atlanta, Georgia 30332 (United States)

    2015-09-14

    Using first principle calculations, we uncover the underlying mechanisms explaining the brittle-to-ductile transition of Li{sub x}Si electrodes in lithium ion batteries with increasing Li content. We show that plasticity initiates at x = ∼ 0.5 with the formation of a craze-like network of nanopores separated by Si–Si bonds, while subsequent failure is still brittle-like with the breaking of Si–Si bonds. Transition to ductile behavior occurs at x ⩾ 1 due to the increased density of highly stretchable Li–Li bonds, which delays nanopore formation and stabilizes nanopore growth. Collapse of the nanopores during unloading of the Li{sub x}Si alloys leads to significant strain recovery.

  9. Brittle-to-ductile transition of lithiated silicon electrodes: Crazing to stable nanopore growth.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Haoran; Wang, Xueju; Xia, Shuman; Chew, Huck Beng

    2015-09-14

    Using first principle calculations, we uncover the underlying mechanisms explaining the brittle-to-ductile transition of LixSi electrodes in lithium ion batteries with increasing Li content. We show that plasticity initiates at x = ∼ 0.5 with the formation of a craze-like network of nanopores separated by Si-Si bonds, while subsequent failure is still brittle-like with the breaking of Si-Si bonds. Transition to ductile behavior occurs at x ⩾ 1 due to the increased density of highly stretchable Li-Li bonds, which delays nanopore formation and stabilizes nanopore growth. Collapse of the nanopores during unloading of the LixSi alloys leads to significant strain recovery.

  10. A probabilistic model of brittle crack formation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chudnovsky, A.; Kunin, B.

    1987-01-01

    Probability of a brittle crack formation in an elastic solid with fluctuating strength is considered. A set Omega of all possible crack trajectories reflecting the fluctuation of the strength field is introduced. The probability P(X) that crack penetration depth exceeds X is expressed as a functional integral over Omega of a conditional probability of the same event taking place along a particular path. Various techniques are considered to evaluate the integral. Under rather nonrestrictive assumptions, the integral is reduced to solving a diffusion-type equation. A new characteristic of fracture process, 'crack diffusion coefficient', is introduced. An illustrative example is then considered where the integration is reduced to solving an ordinary differential equation. The effect of the crack diffusion coefficient and of the magnitude of strength fluctuations on probability density of crack penetration depth is presented. Practical implications of the proposed model are discussed.

  11. Towards an energetic theory of brittle fracture

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Francfort, G.; Marigo, J.J.

    2002-01-01

    The drawbacks of the classical theory of brittle fracture, based on Griffith's criterion, - a notion of critical energy release rate -, and a fracture toughness k, are numerous (think for instance the issue of crack initiation) and penalize its validity as a good model. Are all attempts at building a macroscopic theory of fracture doomed? The variety and complexity of micro-mechanical phenomena would suggest that this is indeed the case. We believe however that structural effects still preside over fracture and consequently propose to modify slightly Griffith theory without altering its fundamental components so that it becomes amenable to the widest range of situations. The examples presented here will demonstrate that a revisited energetic framework is a sound basis for a theory which can be used at the engineering level and which reconciles seemingly contradictory viewpoints. (authors)

  12. Ductile-brittle transition of thoriated chromium.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wilcox, B. A.; Veigel, N. D.; Clauer, A. H.

    1972-01-01

    Unalloyed chromium and chromium containing approximately 3 wt % ThO2 were prepared from powder produced by a chemical vapor deposition process. When rolled to sheet and tested in tension, it was found that the thoriated material had a lower ductile-to-brittle transition temperature (DBTT) than unalloyed chromium. This ductilizing was evident both in the as-rolled condition and after the materials had been annealed for 1 hour at 1200 C. The improved ductility in thoriated chromium may be associated with several possible mechanisms: (1) particles may disperse slip, such that critical stress or strain concentrations for crack nucleation are more difficult to achieve; (2) particles may act as dislocation sources, thus providing mobile dislocations in this normally source-poor material, in a manner similar to prestraining; and (3) particles in grain boundaries may help to transmit slip across the boundaries, thus relieving stress concentrations and inhibiting crack nucleation.

  13. Time-dependent dilatancy for brittle rocks

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jie Li

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available This paper presents a theoretical study on time-dependent dilatancy behaviors for brittle rocks. The theory employs a well-accepted postulation that macroscopically observed dilatancy originates from the expansion of microcracks. The mechanism and dynamic process that microcracks initiate from local stress concentration and grow due to localized tensile stress are analyzed. Then, by generalizing the results from the analysis of single cracks, a parameter and associated equations for its evolution are developed to describe the behaviors of the microcracks. In this circumstance, the relationship between microcracking and dilatancy can be established, and the theoretical equations for characterizing the process of rock dilatancy behaviors are derived. Triaxial compression and creep tests are conducted to validate the developed theory. With properly chosen model parameters, the theory yields a satisfactory accuracy in comparison with the experimental results.

  14. Viscoplasticity and the dynamics of brittle fracture

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Langer, J. S.

    2000-01-01

    I propose a model of fracture in which the curvature of the crack tip is a relevant dynamical variable and crack advance is governed solely by plastic deformation of the material near the tip. This model is based on a rate-and-state theory of plasticity introduced in earlier papers by Falk, Lobkovsky, and myself. In the approximate analysis developed here, fracture is brittle whenever the plastic yield stress is nonzero. The tip curvature finds a stable steady-state value at all loading strengths, and the tip stress remains at or near the plastic yield stress. The crack speed grows linearly with the square of the effective stress intensity factor above a threshold that depends on the surface tension. This result provides a possible answer to the fundamental question of how breaking stresses are transmitted through plastic zones near crack tips. (c) 2000 The American Physical Society

  15. Estimating the mechanical properties of the brittle deformation zones at Olkiluoto

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hudson, J.A.; Cosgrove, J.W.; Johansson, E.

    2008-09-01

    In rock mechanics modelling to support repository design and safety assessment for the Olkiluoto site, it is necessary to obtain the relevant rock mechanics parameters, these being an essential pre-requisite for the modelling. The parameters include the rock stress state, the properties of the intact rock and the rock mass, and the properties of the brittle deformation zones which represent major discontinuities in the rock mass continuum. However, because of the size and irregularity of the brittle deformation zones, it is not easy to estimate their mechanical properties, i.e. their deformation and strength properties. Following Section 1 explaining the motivation for the work and the objective of the Report, in Sections 2 and 3, the types of fractures and brittle deformation zones that can be encountered are described with an indication of the mechanisms that lead to complex structures. The geology at Olkiluoto is then summarized in Section 4 within the context of this Report. The practical aspects of encountering the brittle deformation zones in outcrops, drillholes and excavations are described in Sections 5 and 6 with illustrative examples of drillhole core intersections in Section 7. The various theoretical, numerical and practical methods for estimating the mechanical properties of the brittle deformation zones are described in Section 8, together with a Table summarizing each method's advantages, disadvantages and utility in estimating the mechanical properties of the zones. We emphasise that the optimal approach to estimating the mechanical properties of the brittle deformation zones cannot be determined without a good knowledge, not only of each estimation method's capabilities and idiosyncrasies, but also of the structural geology background and the specific nature of the brittle deformation zones being characterized. Finally, in Section 9, a Table is presented outlining each method's applicability to the Olkiluoto site. A flowchart is included to

  16. Semi-brittle flow of granitoid fault rocks in experiments

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Pec, Matej; Stünitz, Holger; Heilbronner, Renée; Drury, Martyn

    Field studies and seismic data show that semi-brittle flow of fault rocks probably is the dominant deformation mechanism at the base of the seismogenic zone at the so-called frictional-viscous transition. To understand the physical and chemical processes accommodating semi-brittle flow, we have

  17. National conference on brittle fracture of materials and structures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1990-12-01

    The proceedings contain full texts of 28 contributions, out of which 10 fall within the INIS subject scope. These deal particularly with the effect of neutron radiation on the brittle fracture properties of structural steels used in nuclear facilities and with theoretical problems of brittle fracture of such steels in cyclic stress conditions. (Z.M.)

  18. A human reliability analysis (HRA) method for identifying and assessing the error of commission (EOC) from a diagnosis failure

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Jae Whan; Jung, Won Dea; Park, Jin Yun; Kang, Dae Il

    2005-01-01

    The study deals with a method for systematically identifying and assessing the EOC events that might be caused from a diagnosis failure or misdiagnosis of the expected events in accident scenarios of nuclear power plants. The method for EOC identification and assessment consists of three steps: analysis of the potential for a diagnosis failure (or misdiagnosis), identification of the EOC events from the diagnosis failure, quantitative assessment of the identified EOC events. As a tool for analysing a diagnosis failure, the MisDiagnosis Tree Analysis (MDTA) technique is proposed with the taxonomy of misdiagnosis causes. Also, the guidance on the identification of EOC events and the classification system and data are given for quantitiative assessment. As an applicaton of the proposed method, the EOCs identification and assessment for Younggwang 3 and 4 plants and their impact on the plant risk were performed. As the result, six events or event sequences were considered for diagnosis failures and about 20 new Human Failure Events (HFEs) involving EOCs were identified. According to the assessment of the risk impact of the identified HFEs, they increase the CDF by 11.4 % of the current CDF value, which corresponds to 10.2 % of the new CDF. The small loss of coolant accident (SLOCA) turned out to be a major contributor to the increase of CDF resulting in 9.2 % increaseof the current CDF.

  19. Assessing responsiveness of generic and specific health related quality of life measures in heart failure

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Johnson Jeffrey A

    2006-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Responsiveness, or sensitivity to clinical change, is an important consideration in selection of a health-related quality of life (HRQL measure for trials or clinical applications. Many approaches can be used to assess responsiveness, which may affect the interpretation of study results. We compared the relative responsiveness of generic and heart failure specific HRQL instruments, as measured both by common psychometric indices and by external clinical criteria. Methods We analyzed data collected at baseline and 6-weeks in 298 subjects with heart failure on the following HRQL measures: EQ-5D (US, UK, and VAS Scoring, Kansas City Cardiomyopathy Questionnaire (KCCQ (Clinical and Overall Summary Score, and RAND12 (Physical and Mental Component Summaries. Three external indicators of clinical change were used to classify subjects as improved, deteriorated, or unchanged: 6-minute walk test, New York Heart Association (NYHA class, and physician global rating of change. Four responsiveness statistics (T-test, effect size, Guyatt's responsiveness statistic, and standardized response mean were used to evaluate the responsiveness of the select measures. The median rank of each HRQL measure across responsiveness indices and clinical criteria was then determined. Results Average age of subjects was 60 years, 75 percent were male, and had moderate to severe heart failure symptoms. Overall, the KCCQ Summary Scores had the highest relative ranking, irrespective of the responsiveness index or external criterion used. Importantly, we observed that the relative ranking of responsiveness of the generic measures (i.e. EQ-5D, RAND12 was influenced by both the responsive indices and external criterion used. Conclusion The disease specific KCCQ was the most responsive HRQL measure assessing change over a 6-week period, although generic measures provide information for which the KCCQ is not suitable. The responsiveness of generic HRQL measures may

  20. Assessing the impact of heart failure specialist services on patient populations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lyratzopoulos Georgios

    2004-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The assessment of the impact of healthcare interventions may help commissioners of healthcare services to make optimal decisions. This can be particularly the case if the impact assessment relates to specific patient populations and uses timely local data. We examined the potential impact on readmissions and mortality of specialist heart failure services capable of delivering treatments such as b-blockers and Nurse-Led Educational Intervention (N-LEI. Methods Statistical modelling of prevented or postponed events among previously hospitalised patients, using estimates of: treatment uptake and contraindications (based on local audit data; treatment effectiveness and intolerance (based on literature; and annual number of hospitalization per patient and annual risk of death (based on routine data. Results Optimal treatment uptake among eligible but untreated patients would over one year prevent or postpone 11% of all expected readmissions and 18% of all expected deaths for spironolactone, 13% of all expected readmisisons and 22% of all expected deaths for b-blockers (carvedilol and 20% of all expected readmissions and an uncertain number of deaths for N-LEI. Optimal combined treatment uptake for all three interventions during one year among all eligible but untreated patients would prevent or postpone 37% of all expected readmissions and a minimum of 36% of all expected deaths. Conclusion In a population of previously hospitalised patients with low previous uptake of b-blockers and no uptake of N-LEI, optimal combined uptake of interventions through specialist heart failure services can potentially help prevent or postpone approximately four times as many readmissions and a minimum of twice as many deaths compared with simply optimising uptake of spironolactone (not necessarily requiring specialist services. Examination of the impact of different heart failure interventions can inform rational planning of relevant healthcare

  1. Assessing the impact of heart failure specialist services on patient populations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lyratzopoulos, Georgios; Cook, Gary A; McElduff, Patrick; Havely, Daniel; Edwards, Richard; Heller, Richard F

    2004-05-24

    The assessment of the impact of healthcare interventions may help commissioners of healthcare services to make optimal decisions. This can be particularly the case if the impact assessment relates to specific patient populations and uses timely local data. We examined the potential impact on readmissions and mortality of specialist heart failure services capable of delivering treatments such as b-blockers and Nurse-Led Educational Intervention (N-LEI). Statistical modelling of prevented or postponed events among previously hospitalised patients, using estimates of: treatment uptake and contraindications (based on local audit data); treatment effectiveness and intolerance (based on literature); and annual number of hospitalization per patient and annual risk of death (based on routine data). Optimal treatment uptake among eligible but untreated patients would over one year prevent or postpone 11% of all expected readmissions and 18% of all expected deaths for spironolactone, 13% of all expected readmisisons and 22% of all expected deaths for b-blockers (carvedilol) and 20% of all expected readmissions and an uncertain number of deaths for N-LEI. Optimal combined treatment uptake for all three interventions during one year among all eligible but untreated patients would prevent or postpone 37% of all expected readmissions and a minimum of 36% of all expected deaths. In a population of previously hospitalised patients with low previous uptake of b-blockers and no uptake of N-LEI, optimal combined uptake of interventions through specialist heart failure services can potentially help prevent or postpone approximately four times as many readmissions and a minimum of twice as many deaths compared with simply optimising uptake of spironolactone (not necessarily requiring specialist services). Examination of the impact of different heart failure interventions can inform rational planning of relevant healthcare services.

  2. [Implantable sensors for outpatient assessment of ventricular filling pressure in advanced heart failure : Which telemonitoring design is optimal?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Herrmann, E; Fichtlscherer, S; Hohnloser, S H; Zeiher, A M; Aßmus, B

    2016-12-01

    Patients with advanced heart failure suffer from frequent hospitalizations. Non-invasive hemodynamic telemonitoring for assessment of ventricular filling pressure has been shown to reduce hospitalizations. We report on the right ventricular (RVP), the pulmonary artery (PAP) and the left atrial pressure (LAP) sensor for non-invasive assessment of the ventricular filling pressure. A literature search concerning the available implantable pressure sensors for noninvasive haemodynamic telemonitoring in patients with advanced heart failure was performed. Until now, only implantation of the PAP-sensor was able to reduce hospitalizations for cardiac decompensation and to improve quality of life. The right ventricular pressure sensor missed the primary endpoint of a significant reduction of hospitalizations, clinical data using the left atrial pressure sensor are still pending. The implantation of a pressure sensor for assessment of pulmonary artery filling pressure is suitable for reducing hospitalizations for heart failure and for improving quality of life in patients with advanced heart failure.

  3. Assessment of the causes of failures of roto-dynamic equipment in Cirus

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rao, K.N.; Singh, S.; Ganeshan, P.

    1994-01-01

    As a part of Cirus reactor life extension program study, a service life evaluation of critical roto-dynamic equipment in Cirus such as primary coolant pumps, and their concrete foundation structures, pressurised water loop pumps, main air compressors and supply and exhaust fans, was performed. An assessment of the causes of failures of roto-dynamic equipment in Cirus was done. Based on assessment of the degradation mitigating features and comparison to similar roto-dynamic equipment and their concrete foundation structures, it was concluded that life extension of these roto-dynamic equipment and their structures is feasible. To support this conclusion a program involving: a) non-destructive testing, b) surveillance and monitoring and, c) preventive maintenance is recommended. (author). 4 refs

  4. Strategic environmental assessment can help solve environmental impact assessment failures in developing countries

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Alshuwaikhat, Habib M.

    2005-01-01

    The current trend of industrialization and urbanization in developing nations has a huge impact on anthropogenic and natural ecosystems. Pollution sources increase with the expansion of cities and cause contamination of water, air and soil. The absence of urban environmental planning and management strategies has resulted in greater concern for future urban development. This paper advocates the adoption of strategic environmental assessment (SEA) as a means to achieve sustainable development in developing countries. It investigates project-level environmental impact assessment (EIA) and its limitations. The exploration of SEA and its features are addressed. The effective implementation of SEA can create a roadmap for sustainable development. In many developing countries, the lack of transparency and accountability and ineffective public participation in the development of the policy, plan and program (PPP) would be mitigated by the SEA process. Moreover, the proactive and broadly based characteristics of SEA would benefit the institutional development of the PPP process, which is rarely experienced in many developing countries. The paper also explores the prospects for SEA and its guiding principles in developing countries. Finally, the paper calls for a coordinated effort between all government, nongovernment and international organizations involved with PPPs to enable developing countries to pursue a path of sustainable development through the development and application of strategic environmental assessment

  5. Evaluation of flaws in ferritic piping: ASME Code Appendix J, Deformation Plasticity Failure Assessment Diagram (DPFAD)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bloom, J.M.

    1991-08-01

    This report summarizes the methods and bases used by an ASME Code procedure for the evaluation of flaws in ferritic piping. The procedure is currently under consideration by the ASME Boiler and Pressure Vessel Code Committee of Section 11. The procedure was initially proposed in 1985 for the evaluation of the acceptability of flaws detected in piping during in-service inspection for certain materials, identified in Article IWB-3640 of the ASME Boiler and Pressure Vessel Code Section 11 ''Rules for In-service Inspection of Nuclear Power Plant Components.'' for which the fracture toughness is not sufficiently high to justify acceptance based solely on the plastic limit load evaluation methodology of Appendix C and IWB-3641. The procedure, referred to as Appendix J, originally included two approaches: a J-integral based tearing instability (J-T) analysis and the deformation plasticity failure assessment diagram (DPFAD) methodology. In Appendix J, a general DPFAD approach was simplified for application to part-through wall flows in ferritic piping through the use of a single DPFAD curve for circumferential flaws. Axial flaws are handled using two DPFAD curves where the ratio of flaw depth to wall thickness is used to determine the appropriate DPFAD curve. Flaws are evaluated in Appendix J by comparing the actual pipe applied stress with the allowable stress with the appropriate safety factors for the flaw size at the end of the evaluation period. Assessment points for circumferential and axial flaws are plotted on the appropriate failure assessment diagram. In addition, this report summarizes the experimental test predictions of the results of the Battelle Columbus Laboratory experiments, the Eiber experiments, and the JAERI tests using the Appendix J DPFAD methodology. Lastly, this report also provides guidelines for handling residual stresses in the evaluation procedure. 22 refs., 13 figs., 5 tabs

  6. Brittle and ductile friction modeling of triggered tremor in Guerrero, Mexico

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Y.; Daub, E. G.; Wu, C.

    2017-12-01

    Low frequency earthquakes (LFEs), which make up the highest amplitude portions of non-volcanic tremor, are mostly found along subduction zones at a depth of 30-40km which is typically within the brittle-ductile transition zone. Previous studies in Guerrero, Mexico demonstrated a relationship between the bursts of LFEs and the contact states of fault interfaces, and LFEs that triggered by different mechanisms were observed along different parts of the subduction zone. To better understand the physics of fault interfaces at depth, especially the influence of contact states of these asperities, we use a brittle-ductile friction model to simulate the occurrence of LFE families from a model of frictional failure and slip. This model takes the stress state, slip rate, perturbation force, fault area, and brittle-ductile frictional contact characteristics and simulates the times and amplitudes of LFE occurrence for a single family. We examine both spontaneous and triggered tremor occurrence by including stresses due to external seismic waves, such as the 2010 Maule Earthquake, which triggered tremor and slow slip on the Guerrero section of the subduction zone. By comparing our model output with detailed observations of LFE occurrence, we can determine valuable constraints on the frictional properties of subduction zones at depth.

  7. Strain Rate Dependent Ductile-to-Brittle Transition of Graphite Platelet Reinforced Vinyl Ester Nanocomposites

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Brahmananda Pramanik

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available In previous research, the fractal dimensions of fractured surfaces of vinyl ester based nanocomposites were estimated applying classical method on 3D digital microscopic images. The fracture energy and fracture toughness were obtained from fractal dimensions. A noteworthy observation, the strain rate dependent ductile-to-brittle transition of vinyl ester based nanocomposites, is reinvestigated in the current study. The candidate materials of xGnP (exfoliated graphite nanoplatelets reinforced and with additional CTBN (Carboxyl Terminated Butadiene Nitrile toughened vinyl ester based nanocomposites that are subjected to both quasi-static and high strain rate indirect tensile load using the traditional Brazilian test method. High-strain rate indirect tensile testing is performed with a modified Split-Hopkinson Pressure Bar (SHPB. Pristine vinyl ester shows ductile deformation under quasi-static loading and brittle failure when subjected to high-strain rate loading. This observation reconfirms the previous research findings on strain rate dependent ductile-to-brittle transition of this material system. Investigation of both quasi-static and dynamic indirect tensile test responses show the strain rate effect on the tensile strength and energy absorbing capacity of the candidate materials. Contribution of nanoreinforcement to the tensile properties is reported in this paper.

  8. THE VISCOUS TO BRITTLE TRANSITION IN CRYSTAL- AND BUBBLE-BEARING MAGMAS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mattia ePistone

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available The transition from viscous to brittle behaviour in magmas plays a decisive role in determining the style of volcanic eruptions. While this transition has been determined for one- or two-phase systems, it remains poorly constrained for natural magmas containing silicic melt, crystals, and gas bubbles. Here we present new experimental results on shear-induced fracturing of three-phase magmas obtained at high-temperature (673-1023 K and high-pressure (200 MPa conditions over a wide range of strain-rates (5·10-6 s-1 to 4·10-3 s-1. During the experiments bubbles are deformed (i.e. capillary number are in excess of 1 enough to coalesce and generate a porous network that potentially leads to outgassing. A physical relationship is proposed that quantifies the critical stress required for magmas to fail as a function of both crystal (0.24 to 0.65 and bubble volume fractions (0.09 to 0.12. The presented results demonstrate efficient outgassing for low crystal fraction ( 0.44 promote gas bubble entrapment and inhibit outgassing. The failure of bubble-free, crystal-bearing systems is enhanced by the presence of bubbles that lower the critical failure stress in a regime of efficient outgassing, while the failure stress is increased if bubbles remain trapped within the crystal framework. These contrasting behaviours have direct impact on the style of volcanic eruptions. During magma ascent, efficient outgassing reduces the potential for an explosive eruption and favours brittle behaviour, contributing to maintain low overpressures in an active volcanic system resulting in effusion or rheological flow blockage of magma at depth. Conversely, magmas with high crystallinity experience limited loss of exsolved gas, permitting the achievement of larger overpressures prior to a potential sudden transition to brittle behaviour, which could result in an explosive volcanic eruption.

  9. Two viewpoints for software failures and their relation in probabilistic safety assessment of digital instrumentation and control systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, Man Cheol

    2015-01-01

    As the use of digital systems in nuclear power plants increases, the reliability of the software becomes one of the important issues in probabilistic safety assessment. In this paper, two viewpoints for a software failure during the operation of a digital system or a statistical software test are identified, and the relation between them is provided. In conventional software reliability analysis, a failure is mainly viewed with respect to the system operation. A new viewpoint with respect to the system input is suggested. The failure probability density functions for the two viewpoints are defined, and the relation between the two failure probability density functions is derived. Each failure probability density function can be derived from the other failure probability density function by applying the derived relation between the two failure probability density functions. The usefulness of the derived relation is demonstrated by applying it to the failure data obtained from the software testing of a real system. The two viewpoints and their relation, as identified in this paper, are expected to help us extend our understanding of the reliability of safety-critical software. (author)

  10. Assessment selection in human-automation interaction studies: The Failure-GAM2E and review of assessment methods for highly automated driving.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grane, Camilla

    2018-01-01

    Highly automated driving will change driver's behavioural patterns. Traditional methods used for assessing manual driving will only be applicable for the parts of human-automation interaction where the driver intervenes such as in hand-over and take-over situations. Therefore, driver behaviour assessment will need to adapt to the new driving scenarios. This paper aims at simplifying the process of selecting appropriate assessment methods. Thirty-five papers were reviewed to examine potential and relevant methods. The review showed that many studies still relies on traditional driving assessment methods. A new method, the Failure-GAM 2 E model, with purpose to aid assessment selection when planning a study, is proposed and exemplified in the paper. Failure-GAM 2 E includes a systematic step-by-step procedure defining the situation, failures (Failure), goals (G), actions (A), subjective methods (M), objective methods (M) and equipment (E). The use of Failure-GAM 2 E in a study example resulted in a well-reasoned assessment plan, a new way of measuring trust through feet movements and a proposed Optimal Risk Management Model. Failure-GAM 2 E and the Optimal Risk Management Model are believed to support the planning process for research studies in the field of human-automation interaction. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  11. Brittle-to-ductile transition in a fiber bundle with strong heterogeneity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kovács, Kornél; Hidalgo, Raul Cruz; Pagonabarraga, Ignacio; Kun, Ferenc

    2013-04-01

    We analyze the failure process of a two-component system with widely different fracture strength in the framework of a fiber bundle model with localized load sharing. A fraction 0≤α≤1 of the bundle is strong and it is represented by unbreakable fibers, while fibers of the weak component have randomly distributed failure strength. Computer simulations revealed that there exists a critical composition α(c) which separates two qualitatively different behaviors: Below the critical point, the failure of the bundle is brittle, characterized by an abrupt damage growth within the breakable part of the system. Above α(c), however, the macroscopic response becomes ductile, providing stability during the entire breaking process. The transition occurs at an astonishingly low fraction of strong fibers which can have importance for applications. We show that in the ductile phase, the size distribution of breaking bursts has a power law functional form with an exponent μ=2 followed by an exponential cutoff. In the brittle phase, the power law also prevails but with a higher exponent μ=9/2. The transition between the two phases shows analogies to continuous phase transitions. Analyzing the microstructure of the damage, it was found that at the beginning of the fracture process cracks nucleate randomly, while later on growth and coalescence of cracks dominate, which give rise to power law distributed crack sizes.

  12. Dilatancy induced ductile-brittle transition of shear band in metallic glasses

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zeng, F.; Jiang, M. Q.; Dai, L. H.

    2018-04-01

    Dilatancy-generated structural disordering, an inherent feature of metallic glasses (MGs), has been widely accepted as the physical mechanism for the primary origin and structural evolution of shear banding, as well as the resultant shear failure. However, it remains a great challenge to determine, to what degree of dilatation, a shear banding will evolve into a runaway shear failure. In this work, using in situ acoustic emission monitoring, we probe the dilatancy evolution at the different stages of individual shear band in MGs that underwent severely plastic deformation by the controlled cutting technology. A scaling law is revealed that the dilatancy in a shear band is linearly related to its evolution degree. A transition from ductile-to-brittle shear bands is observed, where the formers dominate stable serrated flow, and the latter lead to a runaway instability (catastrophe failure) of serrated flow. To uncover the underlying mechanics, we develop a theoretical model of shear-band evolution dynamics taking into account an atomic-scale deformation process. Our theoretical results agree with the experimental observations, and demonstrate that the atomic-scale volume expansion arises from an intrinsic shear-band evolution dynamics. Importantly, the onset of the ductile-brittle transition of shear banding is controlled by a critical dilatation.

  13. Failure Monitoring and Condition Assessment of Steel-Concrete Adhesive Connection Using Ultrasonic Waves

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Magdalena Rucka

    2018-02-01

    Full Text Available Adhesive bonding is increasingly being incorporated into civil engineering applications. Recently, the use of structural adhesives in steel-concrete composite systems is of particular interest. The aim of the study is an experimental investigation of the damage assessment of the connection between steel and concrete during mechanical degradation. Nine specimens consisted of a concrete cube and two adhesively bonded steel plates were examined. The inspection was based on the ultrasound monitoring during push-out tests. Ultrasonic waves were excited and registered by means of piezoelectric transducers every two seconds until the specimen failure. To determine the slip between the steel and concrete a photogrammetric method was applied. The procedure of damage evaluation is based on the monitoring of the changes in the amplitude and phase shift of signals measured during subsequent phases of degradation. To quantify discrepancies between the reference signal and other registered signals, the Sprague and Gears metric was applied. The results showed the possibilities and limitations of the proposed approach in diagnostics of adhesive connections between steel and concrete depending on the failure modes.

  14. Assessment of surge arrester failure rate and application studies in Hellenic high voltage transmission lines

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Christodoulou, C.A.; Fotis, G.P.; Gonos, I.F.; Stathopulos, I.A. [National Technical University of Athens, School of Electrical and Computer Engineering, High Voltage Laboratory, 9 Iroon Politechniou St., Zografou Campus, 157 80 Athens (Greece); Ekonomou, L. [A.S.PE.T.E. - School of Pedagogical and Technological Education, Department of Electrical Engineering Educators, N. Heraklion, 141 21 Athens (Greece)

    2010-02-15

    The use of transmission line surge arresters to improve the lightning performance of transmission lines is becoming more common. Especially in areas with high soil resistivity and ground flash density, surge arresters constitute the most effective protection mean. In this paper a methodology for assessing the surge arrester failure rate based on the electrogeometrical model is presented. Critical currents that exceed arresters rated energy stress were estimated by the use of a simulation tool. The methodology is applied on operating Hellenic transmission lines of 150 kV. Several case studies are analyzed by installing surge arresters on different intervals, in relation to the region's tower footing resistance and the ground flash density. The obtained results are compared with real records of outage rate showing the effectiveness of the surge arresters in the reduction of the recorded failure rate. The presented methodology can be proved valuable to the studies of electric power systems designers intending in a more effective lightning protection, reducing the operational costs and providing continuity of service. (author)

  15. Readability Assessment of Online Patient Education Material on Congestive Heart Failure

    Science.gov (United States)

    2017-01-01

    Background Online health information is being used more ubiquitously by the general population. However, this information typically favors only a small percentage of readers, which can result in suboptimal medical outcomes for patients. Objective The readability of online patient education materials regarding the topic of congestive heart failure was assessed through six readability assessment tools. Methods The search phrase “congestive heart failure” was employed into the search engine Google. Out of the first 100 websites, only 70 were included attending to compliance with selection and exclusion criteria. These were then assessed through six readability assessment tools. Results Only 5 out of 70 websites were within the limits of the recommended sixth-grade readability level. The mean readability scores were as follows: the Flesch-Kincaid Grade Level (9.79), Gunning-Fog Score (11.95), Coleman-Liau Index (15.17), Simple Measure of Gobbledygook (SMOG) index (11.39), and the Flesch Reading Ease (48.87). Conclusion Most of the analyzed websites were found to be above the sixth-grade readability level recommendations. Efforts need to be made to better tailor online patient education materials to the general population. PMID:28656111

  16. Extended drop testing with precracked DCI-casks and evaluations on safety against brittle fracture

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wieser, K.E.; Frenz, H.; Gogolin, B.

    1993-01-01

    This paper is a summary of a research study as part of comparable efforts in Japan, France and the USA aimed at developing principles, procedures and material data for the brittle fracture safe design of thickwalled shipping containers made from ductile cast iron (DCI) and other material susceptible - in principle - to nonductile failure. Furthermore, the application of fracture mechanics was to be qualified as an alternative method, relative to the experimental approach applied in previous licensing procedures in Germany and to be demonstrated by subjecting a full-size precracked prototype to drop tests. (J.P.N.)

  17. Fibre failure assessment in carbon fibre reinforced polymers under fatigue loading by synchrotron X-ray computed tomography

    OpenAIRE

    Garcea, Serafina; Sinclair, Ian; Spearing, Simon

    2016-01-01

    In situ fatigue experiments using synchrotron X-ray computed tomography (SRCT) are used to assess the underpinning micromechanisms of fibre failure in double notch carbon/epoxy coupons. Observations showed fibre breaks along the 0º ply splits, associated with the presence and failure of bridging fibres, as well as fibres failed in the bulk composite within the 0º plies. A tendency for cluster formation, with multiple adjacent breaks in the bulk composite was observed when higher peak loads we...

  18. Modeling of Electrical Cable Failure in a Dynamic Assessment of Fire Risk

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bucknor, Matthew D.

    complexity to existing cable failure techniques and tuned to empirical data can better approximate the temperature response of a cables located in tightly packed cable bundles. The new models also provide a way to determine the conditions insides a cable bundle which allows for separate treatment of cables on the interior of the bundle from cables on the exterior of the bundle. The results from the DET analysis show that the overall assessed probability of cable failure can be significantly reduced by more realistically accounting for the influence that the fire brigade has on a fire progression scenario. The shielding analysis results demonstrate a significant reduction in the temperature response of a shielded versus a non-shielded cable bundle; however the computational cost of using a fire progression model that can capture these effects may be prohibitive for performing DET analyses with currently available computational fluid dynamics models and computational resources.

  19. Hormonal and cardiovascular reflex assessment in a female patient with pure autonomic failure

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Heno Ferreira Lopes

    2000-09-01

    Full Text Available We report the case of a 72-year-old female with pure autonomic failure, a rare entity, whose diagnosis of autonomic dysfunction was determined with a series of complementary tests. For approximately 2 years, the patient has been experiencing dizziness and a tendency to fall, a significant weight loss, generalized weakness, dysphagia, intestinal constipation, blurred vision, dry mouth, and changes in her voice. She underwent clinical assessment and laboratory tests (biochemical tests, chest X-ray, digestive endoscopy, colonoscopy, chest computed tomography, abdomen and pelvis computed tomography, abdominal ultrasound, and ambulatory blood pressure monitoring. Measurements of catecholamine and plasmatic renin activity were performed at rest and after physical exercise. Finally the patient underwent physiological and pharmacological autonomic tests that better diagnosed dysautonomia.

  20. Procedures for conducting common cause failure analysis in probabilistic safety assessment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1992-05-01

    The principal objective of this report is to supplement the procedure developed in Mosleh et al. (1988, 1989) by providing more explicit guidance for a practical approach to common cause failures (CCF) analysis. The detailed CCF analysis following that procedure would be very labour intensive and time consuming. This document identifies a number of options for performing the more labour intensive parts of the analysis in an attempt to achieve a balance between the need for detail, the purpose of the analysis and the resources available. The document is intended to be compatible with the Agency's Procedures for Conducting Probabilistic Safety Assessments for Nuclear Power Plants (IAEA, 1992), but can be regarded as a stand-alone report to be used in conjunction with NUREG/CR-4780 (Mosleh et al., 1988, 1989) to provide additional detail, and discussion of key technical issues

  1. The constant failure rate model for fault tree evaluation as a tool for unit protection reliability assessment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vichev, S.; Bogdanov, D.

    2000-01-01

    The purpose of this paper is to introduce the fault tree analysis method as a tool for unit protection reliability estimation. The constant failure rate model applies for making reliability assessment, and especially availability assessment. For that purpose an example for unit primary equipment structure and fault tree example for simplified unit protection system is presented (author)

  2. Using the discrete element method to simulate brittle fracture in the indentation of a silica glass with a blunt indenter

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Andre, Damien; Iordanoff, Ivan; Charles, Jean-luc; Jebahi, Mohamed; Neauport, Jerome

    2013-01-01

    The mechanical behavior of materials is usually simulated by a continuous mechanics approach. However, non-continuous phenomena such as multi-fracturing cannot be accurately simulated using a continuous description. The discrete element method (DEM) naturally accounts for discontinuities and is therefore a good alternative to the continuum approach. This work uses a discrete element model based on interaction given by 3D beam model. This model has proved to correctly simulate the elastic properties at the macroscopic scale. The simulation of brittle cracks is now tackled. This goal is attained by computing a failure criterion based on an equivalent hydrostatic stress. This microscopic criterion is then calibrated to fit experimental values of the macroscopic failure stress. Then, the simulation results are compared to experimental results of indentation tests in which a spherical indenter is used to load a silica glass, which is considered to be a perfectly brittle elastic material. (authors)

  3. Canagliflozin and Heart Failure in Type 2 Diabetes Mellitus: Results From the CANVAS Program (Canagliflozin Cardiovascular Assessment Study).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rådholm, Karin; Figtree, Gemma; Perkovic, Vlado; Solomon, Scott D; Mahaffey, Kenneth W; de Zeeuw, Dick; Fulcher, Greg; Barrett, Terrance D; Shaw, Wayne; Desai, Mehul; Matthews, David R; Neal, Bruce

    2018-03-11

    BACKGROUND : Canagliflozin is a sodium glucose cotransporter 2 inhibitor that reduces the risk of cardiovascular events. We report the effects on heart failure and cardiovascular death overall, in those with and without a baseline history of heart failure, and in other participant subgroups. METHODS : The CANVAS Program (Canagliflozin Cardiovascular Assessment Study) enrolled 10 142 participants with type 2 diabetes mellitus and high cardiovascular risk. Participants were randomly assigned to canagliflozin or placebo and followed for a mean of 188 weeks. The primary end point for these analyses was adjudicated cardiovascular death or hospitalized heart failure. RESULTS : Participants with a history of heart failure at baseline (14.4%) were more frequently women, white, and hypertensive and had a history of prior cardiovascular disease (all P failure was reduced in those treated with canagliflozin compared with placebo (16.3 versus 20.8 per 1000 patient-years; hazard ratio [HR], 0.78; 95% confidence interval [CI], 0.67-0.91), as was fatal or hospitalized heart failure (HR, 0.70; 95% CI, 0.55-0.89) and hospitalized heart failure alone (HR, 0.67; 95% CI, 0.52-0.87). The benefit on cardiovascular death or hospitalized heart failure may be greater in patients with a prior history of heart failure (HR, 0.61; 95% CI, 0.46-0.80) compared with those without heart failure at baseline (HR, 0.87; 95% CI, 0.72-1.06; P interaction =0.021). The effects of canagliflozin compared with placebo on other cardiovascular outcomes and key safety outcomes were similar in participants with and without heart failure at baseline (all interaction P values >0.130), except for a possibly reduced absolute rate of events attributable to osmotic diuresis among those with a prior history of heart failure ( P =0.03). CONCLUSIONS : In patients with type 2 diabetes mellitus and an elevated risk of cardiovascular disease, canagliflozin reduced the risk of cardiovascular death or hospitalized heart

  4. Candidate materials to prevent brittle fracture - (186)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chanzy, Y.; Roland, V.

    2004-01-01

    For heavy transport or dual purpose casks, selecting the appropriate materials for the body is a key decision. To get a Type B(U) approval, it is necessary to demonstrate that the mechanical strength of the material is good enough at temperature as low as -40 C so as to prevent the cask from any risk of brittle fracture in regulatory accident conditions. Different methods are available to provide such a demonstration and can lead to different choices. It should be noted also that the material compositions given by national or international standards display relatively wide tolerances and therefore are not necessarily sufficient to guarantee a required toughness. It is therefore necessary to specify to the fabricator the minimum value for toughness, and to verify it. This paper gives an overview of the different methods and materials that are used in several countries. Although the safety is strongly linked to the choice of the material, it is shown that many other parameters are important, such as the design, the fabrication process (multi layer, cast or forged body), the welding material and process, the ability to detect flaws, and the measured and/or calculated stress level, including stress concentration, in particular when bolts are used. The paper will show that relying exclusively on high toughness at low temperature does not necessarily deliver the maximum safety as compared with other choices. It follows that differences in approaches to licensing by different competent authorities may bias the choice of material depending on the country of application, even though B(U) licenses are meant to guarantee unilaterally a uniform minimum level of safety

  5. Reversible temper brittleness on tensile tests at room temperature

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Quadros, N.F. de; Cabral, U.Q.

    1976-01-01

    Tensile tests were carried out on unnotched test pieces at room temperature and three strain rates: 2,5x10 -4 , 2,5x10 -3 and 1,0x10 -2 s -1 in a low alloy No-Cr-Mo steel to observe the variation in its mechanical properties with the occurrence of reversible temper brittleness. The brittle samples showed a sensitivity of 50 0 C in a 48 hour heat treatment at 500 0 C. The tests showed that at the strain rate of 2,5x10 -4 s -1 there are statistically significant differences between the elongations of the material in the brittle and the nonbrittle and regenerated states. A short review of reversible temper brittleness is given and a theory suggested for the mechanism [pt

  6. A study of unstable rock failures using finite difference and discrete element methods

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garvey, Ryan J.

    Case histories in mining have long described pillars or faces of rock failing violently with an accompanying rapid ejection of debris and broken material into the working areas of the mine. These unstable failures have resulted in large losses of life and collapses of entire mine panels. Modern mining operations take significant steps to reduce the likelihood of unstable failure, however eliminating their occurrence is difficult in practice. Researchers over several decades have supplemented studies of unstable failures through the application of various numerical methods. The direction of the current research is to extend these methods and to develop improved numerical tools with which to study unstable failures in underground mining layouts. An extensive study is first conducted on the expression of unstable failure in discrete element and finite difference methods. Simulated uniaxial compressive strength tests are run on brittle rock specimens. Stable or unstable loading conditions are applied onto the brittle specimens by a pair of elastic platens with ranging stiffnesses. Determinations of instability are established through stress and strain histories taken for the specimen and the system. Additional numerical tools are then developed for the finite difference method to analyze unstable failure in larger mine models. Instability identifiers are established for assessing the locations and relative magnitudes of unstable failure through measures of rapid dynamic motion. An energy balance is developed which calculates the excess energy released as a result of unstable equilibria in rock systems. These tools are validated through uniaxial and triaxial compressive strength tests and are extended to models of coal pillars and a simplified mining layout. The results of the finite difference simulations reveal that the instability identifiers and excess energy calculations provide a generalized methodology for assessing unstable failures within potentially complex

  7. Failure mode effects and criticality analysis: innovative risk assessment to identify critical areas for improvement in emergency department sepsis resuscitation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Powell, Emilie S; O'Connor, Lanty M; Nannicelli, Anna P; Barker, Lisa T; Khare, Rahul K; Seivert, Nicholas P; Holl, Jane L; Vozenilek, John A

    2014-06-01

    Sepsis is an increasing problem in the practice of emergency medicine as the prevalence is increasing and optimal care to reduce mortality requires significant resources and time. Evidence-based septic shock resuscitation strategies exist, and rely on appropriate recognition and diagnosis, but variation in adherence to the recommendations and therefore outcomes remains. Our objective was to perform a multi-institutional prospective risk-assessment, using failure mode effects and criticality analysis (FMECA), to identify high-risk failures in ED sepsis resuscitation. We conducted a FMECA, which prospectively identifies critical areas for improvement in systems and processes of care, across three diverse hospitals. A multidisciplinary group of participants described the process of emergency department (ED) sepsis resuscitation to then create a comprehensive map and table listing all process steps and identified process failures. High-risk failures in sepsis resuscitation from each of the institutions were compiled to identify common high-risk failures. Common high-risk failures included limited availability of equipment to place the central venous catheter and conduct invasive monitoring, and cognitive overload leading to errors in decision-making. Additionally, we identified great variability in care processes across institutions. Several common high-risk failures in sepsis care exist: a disparity in resources available across hospitals, a lack of adherence to the invasive components of care, and cognitive barriers that affect expert clinicians' decision-making capabilities. Future work may concentrate on dissemination of non-invasive alternatives and overcoming cognitive barriers in diagnosis and knowledge translation.

  8. Towards a whole-network risk assessment for railway bridge failures caused by scour during flood events

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lamb Rob

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Localised erosion (scour during flood flow conditions can lead to costly damage or catastrophic failure of bridges, and in some cases loss of life or significant disruption to transport networks. Here, we take a broad scale view to assess risk associated with bridge scour during flood events over an entire infrastructure network, illustrating the analysis with data from the British railways. There have been 54 recorded events since 1846 in which scour led to the failure of railway bridges in Britain. These events tended to occur during periods of extremely high river flow, although there is uncertainty about the precise conditions under which failures occur, which motivates a probabilistic analysis of the failure events. We show how data from the historical bridge failures, combined with hydrological analysis, have been used to construct fragility curves that quantify the conditional probability of bridge failure as a function of river flow, accompanied by estimates of the associated uncertainty. The new fragility analysis is tested using flood events simulated from a national, spatial joint probability model for extremes in river flows. The combined models appear robust in comparison with historical observations of the expected number of bridge failures in a flood event, and provide an empirical basis for further broad-scale network risk analysis.

  9. Assessment of Core Failure Limits for Light Water Reactor Fuel under Reactivity Initiated Accidents

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jernkvist, Lars Olof; Massih, Ali R.

    2004-12-01

    Core failure limits for high-burnup light water reactor UO 2 fuel rods, subjected to postulated reactivity initiated accidents (RIAs), are here assessed by use of best-estimate computational methods. The considered RIAs are the hot zero power rod ejection accident (HZP REA) in pressurized water reactors and the cold zero power control rod drop accident (CZP CRDA) in boiling water reactors. Burnup dependent core failure limits for these events are established by calculating the fuel radial average enthalpy connected with incipient fuel pellet melting for fuel burnups in the range of 30 to 70 MWd/kgU. The postulated HZP REA and CZP CRDA result in lower enthalpies for pellet melting than RIAs that take place at rated power. Consequently, the enthalpy thresholds presented here are lower bounds to RIAs at rated power. The calculations are performed with best-estimate models, which are applied in the FRAPCON-3.2 and SCANAIR-3.2 computer codes. Based on the results of three-dimensional core kinetics analyses, the considered power transients are simulated by a Gaussian pulse shape, with a fixed width of either 25 ms (REA) or 45 ms (CRDA). Notwithstanding the differences in postulated accident scenarios between the REA and the CRDA, the calculated core failure limits for these two events are similar. The calculated enthalpy thresholds for fuel pellet melting decrease gradually with fuel burnup, from approximately 960 J/gUO 2 at 30 MWd/kgU to 810 J/gUO 2 at 70 MWd/kgU. The decline is due to depression of the UO 2 melting temperature with increasing burnup, in combination with burnup related changes to the radial power distribution within the fuel pellets. The presented fuel enthalpy thresholds for incipient UO 2 melting provide best-estimate core failure limits for low- and intermediate-burnup fuel. However, pulse reactor tests on high-burnup fuel rods indicate that the accumulation of gaseous fission products within the pellets may lead to fuel dispersal into the coolant at

  10. Assessment of the impact of fueling machine failure on the safety of the CANDU-PHWR

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Al-Kusayer, T.A.

    1982-01-01

    A survey of possible LOCA (Loss-of-Coolant Accident) initiating events that might take place for CANDU-PHWRs (Canadian Deuterium Uranium-Pressurized Heavy Water Reactors) has been conducted covering both direct and indirect initiators. Among the 22 initiating events that were surveyed in this study, four direct initiators have been selected and analyzed briefly. Those selected were a pump suction piping break, an isolation valve piping break, a bleed valve failure, and a fueling machine interface failure. These were selected as examples of failures that could take place in the inlet side, outlet side, or PHTS (Primary Heat Transport System) interfaces. The Pickering NGS (Unit-A) was used for this case study. Double failure (failure of the protective devices to operate when the process equipment fault occurs) and a triple failure (failure of the protective devices and the ECCS as well as the process equipment) were found to be highly improbable

  11. Fluidized breccias: A record of brittle transitions during ductile deformation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Murphy, F. C.

    1984-05-01

    Unusual breccias, of Caledonian age, are described in relation to the tectonic and metamorphic history of their greywacke sandstone and siltstone parent rocks. The variety of field and textural relationships displayed by the breccias indicate a combination of dilational and non-dilational components in a fluidized system of breccia development. The velocity of the escaping fluid phase and the viscosity of the fluidized suspension are strongly influenced by competency controls. Due to their finer grained nature, the pelite-based breccias allow a greater mobility of the fluid phase and locally record a turbulent expanded bed stage of the fluidized system. However the sandstone-based breccias, lacking the intricate flow patterns, retain a replacive non-dilational fracture network. The breccias occur in a zone of intense D 2 deformation. The age relationships of the breccias indicate a repeated pattern of brecciation with syntectonic temporal and partly genetic affinities to the S 2 cleavage development. The syntectonic dilational elements, involving boudinage and hydraulic fracture, are coupled with intense pressure solution and conjugate cleavage development. Metamorphism to lower greenschist facies is synchronous with deformation and brecciation. A focussing of the metamorphic fluid phase within the breccia zones is indicated, contributing the non-dilational components of the brecciation process. A simple shear model of the D 2 deformation within this zone is proposed. The orientation of the breccia zones suggests that their localization is determined by tensional components within the overall D 2 stress field. The cyclical pattern of the brecciation during the D 2 deformation is considered to represent rapid brittle transitions during the ductile deformation. Stratigraphie controls on the generation of the increased fluid pressures are identified. The presence of an impermeable barrier facilitating the necessary conditions for the excess fluid pressures to

  12. Increase in cellular concrete resistance to brittle fracture

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chernyshov, E.M.; Krokhin, A.M.

    1979-01-01

    Considered are theoretical premises of decrease in cellular concrete resistance to brittle fracture at the expense of dispersed reinforcement. It is stated experimentally that the introduction of 3% asbestos fibers permits to increase the ultimate extensibility and strength during cellular concrete tension by 15-30% and to increase in unit rupture work 1.4-1.6 time more and therefore to decrease its brittleness

  13. Probing the Statistical Validity of the Ductile-to-Brittle Transition in Metallic Nanowires Using GPU Computing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    French, William R; Pervaje, Amulya K; Santos, Andrew P; Iacovella, Christopher R; Cummings, Peter T

    2013-12-10

    We perform a large-scale statistical analysis (>2000 independent simulations) of the elongation and rupture of gold nanowires, probing the validity and scope of the recently proposed ductile-to-brittle transition that occurs with increasing nanowire length [Wu et al. Nano Lett. 2012, 12, 910-914]. To facilitate a high-throughput simulation approach, we implement the second-moment approximation to the tight-binding (TB-SMA) potential within HOOMD-Blue, a molecular dynamics package which runs on massively parallel graphics processing units (GPUs). In a statistical sense, we find that the nanowires obey the ductile-to-brittle model quite well; however, we observe several unexpected features from the simulations that build on our understanding of the ductile-to-brittle transition. First, occasional failure behavior is observed that qualitatively differs from that predicted by the model prediction; this is attributed to stochastic thermal motion of the Au atoms and occurs at temperatures as low as 10 K. In addition, we also find that the ductile-to-brittle model, which was developed using classical dislocation theory, holds for nanowires as small as 3 nm in diameter. Finally, we demonstrate that the nanowire critical length is higher at 298 K relative to 10 K, a result that is not predicted by the ductile-to-brittle model. These results offer practical design strategies for adjusting nanowire failure and structure and also demonstrate that GPU computing is an excellent tool for studies requiring a large number of independent trajectories in order to fully characterize a system's behavior.

  14. Mechanical Behavior of Low Porosity Carbonate Rock: From Brittle Creep to Ductile Creep.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nicolas, A.; Fortin, J.; Gueguen, Y.

    2014-12-01

    Mechanical compaction and associated porosity reduction play an important role in the diagenesis of porous rocks. They may also affect reservoir rocks during hydrocarbon production, as the pore pressure field is modified. This inelastic compaction can lead to subsidence, cause casing failure, trigger earthquake, or change the fluid transport properties. In addition, inelastic deformation can be time - dependent. In particular, brittle creep phenomena have been deeply investigated since the 90s, especially in sandstones. However knowledge of carbonates behavior is still insufficient. In this study, we focus on the mechanical behavior of a 14.7% porosity white Tavel (France) carbonate rock (>98% calcite). The samples were deformed in a triaxial cell at effective confining pressures ranging from 0 MPa to 85 MPa at room temperature and 70°C. Experiments were carried under dry and water saturated conditions in order to explore the role played by the pore fluids. Two types of experiments have been carried out: (1) a first series in order to investigate the rupture envelopes, and (2) a second series with creep experiments. During the experiments, elastic wave velocities (P and S) were measured to infer crack density evolution. Permeability was also measured during creep experiments. Our results show two different mechanical behaviors: (1) brittle behavior is observed at low confining pressures, whereas (2) ductile behavior is observed at higher confining pressures. During creep experiments, these two behaviors have a different signature in term of elastic wave velocities and permeability changes, due to two different mechanisms: development of micro-cracks at low confining pressures and competition between cracks and microplasticity at high confining pressure. The attached figure is a summary of 20 triaxial experiments performed on Tavel limestone under different conditions. Stress states C',C* and C*' and brittle strength are shown in the P-Q space: (a) 20°C and dry

  15. Failure Assessment for the High-Strength Pipelines with Constant-Depth Circumferential Surface Cracks

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    X. Liu

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available In the oil and gas transportation system over long distance, application of high-strength pipeline steels can efficiently reduce construction and operation cost by increasing operational pressure and reducing the pipe wall thickness. Failure assessment is an important issue in the design, construction, and maintenance of the pipelines. The small circumferential surface cracks with constant depth in the welded pipelines are of practical interest. This work provides an engineering estimation procedure based upon the GE/EPRI method to determine the J-integral for the thin-walled pipelines with small constant-depth circumferential surface cracks subject to tension and bending loads. The values of elastic influence functions for stress intensity factor and plastic influence functions for fully plastic J-integral estimation are derived in tabulated forms through a series of three-dimensional finite element calculations for different crack geometries and material properties. To check confidence of the J-estimation solution in practical application, J-integral values obtained from detailed finite element (FE analyses are compared with those estimated from the new influence functions. Excellent agreement of FE results with the proposed J-estimation solutions for both tension and bending loads indicates that the new solutions can be applied for accurate structural integrity assessment of high-strength pipelines with constant-depth circumferential surface cracks.

  16. Elastic-Brittle-Plastic Behaviour of Shale Reservoirs and Its Implications on Fracture Permeability Variation: An Analytical Approach

    Science.gov (United States)

    Masoudian, Mohsen S.; Hashemi, Mir Amid; Tasalloti, Ali; Marshall, Alec M.

    2018-05-01

    Shale gas has recently gained significant attention as one of the most important unconventional gas resources. Shales are fine-grained rocks formed from the compaction of silt- and clay-sized particles and are characterised by their fissured texture and very low permeability. Gas exists in an adsorbed state on the surface of the organic content of the rock and is freely available within the primary and secondary porosity. Geomechanical studies have indicated that, depending on the clay content of the rock, shales can exhibit a brittle failure mechanism. Brittle failure leads to the reduced strength of the plastic zone around a wellbore, which can potentially result in wellbore instability problems. Desorption of gas during production can cause shrinkage of the organic content of the rock. This becomes more important when considering the use of shales for CO2 sequestration purposes, where CO2 adsorption-induced swelling can play an important role. These phenomena lead to changes in the stress state within the rock mass, which then influence the permeability of the reservoir. Thus, rigorous simulation of material failure within coupled hydro-mechanical analyses is needed to achieve a more systematic and accurate representation of the wellbore. Despite numerous modelling efforts related to permeability, an adequate representation of the geomechanical behaviour of shale and its impact on permeability and gas production has not been achieved. In order to achieve this aim, novel coupled poro-elastoplastic analytical solutions are developed in this paper which take into account the sorption-induced swelling and the brittle failure mechanism. These models employ linear elasticity and a Mohr-Coulomb failure criterion in a plane-strain condition with boundary conditions corresponding to both open-hole and cased-hole completions. The post-failure brittle behaviour of the rock is defined using residual strength parameters and a non-associated flow rule. Swelling and shrinkage

  17. The results of questionnaire on quantitative assessment of 123I-metaiodobenzylguanidine myocardial scintigraphy in heart failure

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nishimura, Tsunehiko; Sugishita, Yasurou; Sasaki, Yasuhito.

    1997-01-01

    This study was done by working group under the cooperation between Japanese Society of Nuclear Medicine and Japanese Circulation Society. We evaluated the usefulness of quantitative assessment of 123 I-metaiodobenzylguanidine (MIBG) myocardial scintigraphy in heart failure by the results of questionnaire. Forty-nine (72.1%) of 68 selected institutions participated in this study. The incidence of MIBG myocardial scintigraphy used in heart failure was 41.1%. The imaging protocol was mostly done by both planar and SPECT at 15 min and 3.6 hr after intravenous injection of 111 MBq of MIBG. The quantitative assessment was mostly done by heart/mediastinum (H/M) ratio and washout rate analysis based on planar imaging. The mean normal value of H/M ratio were 2.34±0.36, and 2.49±0.40, at early and delayed images, respectively. The normal value of washout rate was 27.74±5.34%. On the other hand, those of H/M ratio in heart failure were 1.87±0.27, and 1.75±0.24, at early and delayed images, respectively. That of washout rate was 42.30±6.75%. These parameters were very useful for the evaluation of heart failure. In conclusion, MIBG myocardial scintigraphy was widely used for not only early detection and severity assessment, but also indication for therapy and prognosis evaluation in heart failure patients. (author)

  18. The results of questionnaire on quantitative assessment of {sup 123}I-metaiodobenzylguanidine myocardial scintigraphy in heart failure

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nishimura, Tsunehiko [Osaka Univ., Suita (Japan). Medical school; Sugishita, Yasurou; Sasaki, Yasuhito

    1997-12-01

    This study was done by working group under the cooperation between Japanese Society of Nuclear Medicine and Japanese Circulation Society. We evaluated the usefulness of quantitative assessment of {sup 123}I-metaiodobenzylguanidine (MIBG) myocardial scintigraphy in heart failure by the results of questionnaire. Forty-nine (72.1%) of 68 selected institutions participated in this study. The incidence of MIBG myocardial scintigraphy used in heart failure was 41.1%. The imaging protocol was mostly done by both planar and SPECT at 15 min and 3.6 hr after intravenous injection of 111 MBq of MIBG. The quantitative assessment was mostly done by heart/mediastinum (H/M) ratio and washout rate analysis based on planar imaging. The mean normal value of H/M ratio were 2.34{+-}0.36, and 2.49{+-}0.40, at early and delayed images, respectively. The normal value of washout rate was 27.74{+-}5.34%. On the other hand, those of H/M ratio in heart failure were 1.87{+-}0.27, and 1.75{+-}0.24, at early and delayed images, respectively. That of washout rate was 42.30{+-}6.75%. These parameters were very useful for the evaluation of heart failure. In conclusion, MIBG myocardial scintigraphy was widely used for not only early detection and severity assessment, but also indication for therapy and prognosis evaluation in heart failure patients. (author)

  19. Brittle and Ductile Behavior in Deep-Seated Landslides: Learning from the Vajont Experience

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paronuzzi, Paolo; Bolla, Alberto; Rigo, Elia

    2016-06-01

    This paper analyzes the mechanical behavior of the unstable Mt. Toc slope before the 1963 catastrophic collapse, considering both the measured data (surface displacements and microseismicity) and the updated geological model of the prehistoric rockslide. From February 1960 up to 9 October 1963, the unstable mass behaved as a brittle-ductile `mechanical system,' characterized by remarkable microseismicity as well as by considerable surface displacements (up to 4-5 m). Recorded microshocks were the result of progressive rock fracturing of distinct resisting stiff parts made up of intact rock (indentations, undulations, and rock bridges). The main resisting stiff part was a large rock indentation located at the NE extremity of the unstable mass that acted as a mechanical constraint during the whole 1960-1963 period, inducing a progressive rototranslation toward the NE. This large constraint failed in autumn 1960, when an overall slope failure took place, as emphasized by the occurrence of the large perimetrical crack in the upper slope. In this circumstance, the collapse was inhibited by a reblocking phenomenon of the unstable mass that had been previously destabilized by the first reservoir filling. Progressive failure of localized intact rock parts progressively propagated westwards as a consequence of the two further filling-drawdown cycles of the reservoir (1962 and 1963). The characteristic brittle-ductile behavior of the Vajont landslide was made possible by the presence of a very thick (40-50 m) and highly deformable shear zone underlying the upper rigid rock mass (100-120 m thick).

  20. Using Probablilistic Risk Assessment to Model Medication System Failures in Long-Term Care Facilities

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Comden, Sharon C; Marx, David; Murphy-Carley, Margaret; Hale, Misti

    2005-01-01

    .... Discussion: The models provide contextual maps of the errors and behaviors that lead to medication delivery system failures, including unanticipated risks associated with regulatory practices and common...

  1. Serial Sonographic Assessment of Pulmonary Edema in Patients With Hypertensive Acute Heart Failure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martindale, Jennifer L; Secko, Michael; Kilpatrick, John F; deSouza, Ian S; Paladino, Lorenzo; Aherne, Andrew; Mehta, Ninfa; Conigiliaro, Alyssa; Sinert, Richard

    2018-02-01

    Objective measures of clinical improvement in patients with acute heart failure (AHF) are lacking. The aim of this study was to determine whether repeated lung sonography could semiquantitatively capture changes in pulmonary edema (B-lines) in patients with hypertensive AHF early in the course of treatment. We conducted a feasibility study in a cohort of adults with acute onset of dyspnea, severe hypertension in the field or at triage (systolic blood pressure ≥ 180 mm Hg), and a presumptive diagnosis of AHF. Patients underwent repeated dyspnea and lung sonographic assessments using a 10-cm visual analog scale (VAS) and an 8-zone scanning protocol. Lung sonographic assessments were performed at the time of triage, initial VAS improvement, and disposition from the emergency department. Sonographic pulmonary edema was independently scored offline in a randomized and blinded fashion by using a scoring method that accounted for both the sum of discrete B-lines and degree of B-line fusion. Sonographic pulmonary edema scores decreased significantly from initial to final sonographic assessments (P < .001). The median percentage decrease among the 20 included patient encounters was 81% (interquartile range, 55%-91%). Although sonographic pulmonary edema scores correlated with VAS scores (ρ = 0.64; P < .001), the magnitude of the change in these scores did not correlate with each other (ρ = -0.04; P = .89). Changes in sonographic pulmonary edema can be semiquantitatively measured by serial 8-zone lung sonography using a scoring method that accounts for B-line fusion. Sonographic pulmonary edema improves in patients with hypertensive AHF during the initial hours of treatment. © 2017 by the American Institute of Ultrasound in Medicine.

  2. Failure Modes Taxonomy for Reliability Assessment of Digital Instrumentation and Control Systems for Probabilistic Risk Analysis - Failure modes taxonomy for reliability assessment of digital I and C systems for PRA

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Amri, A.; Blundell, N.; ); Authen, S.; Betancourt, L.; Coyne, K.; Halverson, D.; Li, M.; Taylor, G.; Bjoerkman, K.; Brinkman, H.; Postma, W.; Bruneliere, H.; Chirila, M.; Gheorge, R.; Chu, L.; Yue, M.; Delache, J.; Georgescu, G.; Deleuze, G.; Quatrain, R.; Thuy, N.; Holmberg, J.-E.; Kim, M.C.; Kondo, K.; Mancini, F.; Piljugin, E.; Stiller, J.; Sedlak, J.; Smidts, C.; Sopira, V.

    2015-01-01

    Digital protection and control systems appear as upgrades in older nuclear power plants (NPP), and are commonplace in new NPPs. To assess the risk of NPP operation and to determine the risk impact of digital systems, there is a need to quantitatively assess the reliability of the digital systems in a justifiable manner. Due to the many unique attributes of digital systems (e.g., functions are implemented by software, units of the system interact in a communication network, faults can be identified and handled online), a number of modelling and data collection challenges exist, and international consensus on the reliability modelling has not yet been reached. The objective of the task group called DIGREL has been to develop a taxonomy of failure modes of digital components for the purposes of probabilistic risk analysis (PRA). An activity focused on the development of a common taxonomy of failure modes is seen as an important step towards standardised digital instrumentation and control (I and C) reliability assessment techniques for PRA. Needs from PRA has guided the work, meaning, e.g., that the I and C system and its failures are studied from the point of view of their functional significance point of view. The taxonomy will be the basis of future modelling and quantification efforts. It will also help to define a structure for data collection and to review PRA studies. The proposed failure modes taxonomy has been developed by first collecting examples of taxonomies provided by the task group organisations. This material showed some variety in the handling of I and C hardware failure modes, depending on the context where the failure modes have been defined. Regarding the software part of I and C, failure modes defined in NPP PRAs have been simple - typically a software CCF failing identical processing units. The DIGREL task group has defined a new failure modes taxonomy based on a hierarchical definition of five levels of abstraction: 1. system level (complete

  3. Application of a few orthogonal polynomials to the assessment of the fracture failure probability of a spherical tank

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cao Tianjie; Zhou Zegong

    1993-01-01

    This paper presents some methods to assess the fracture failure probability of a spherical tank. These methods convert the assessment of the fracture failure probability into the calculation of the moment of cracks and a one-dimensional integral. In the paper, we first derive series' formulae to calculation the moments of cracks on the occasion of the crack fatigue growth and the moments of crack opening displacements according to JWES-2805 code. We then use the first n moments of crack opening displacements and a few orthogonal polynomials to compose the probability density function of the crack opening displacement. Lastly, the fracture failure probability is obtained according to the interference theory. An example proves that these methods are simpler, quicker, and more accurate. At the same time, these methods avoid the disadvantage of Edgeworth's series method. (author)

  4. Assessment of a Business-to-Consumer (B2C) model for Telemonitoring patients with Chronic Heart Failure (CHF)

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    A.S. Grustam (Andrija); Vrijhoef, H.J.M. (Hubertus J. M.); R. Koymans (Ron); Hukal, P. (Philipp); J.L. Severens (Hans)

    2017-01-01

    textabstractBackground: The purpose of this study is to assess the Business-to-Consumer (B2C) model for telemonitoring patients with Chronic Heart Failure (CHF) by analysing the value it creates, both for organizations or ventures that provide telemonitoring services based on it, and for society.

  5. Assessing the Value-Added by the Environmental Testing Process with the Aide of Physics/Engineering of Failure Evaluations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cornford, S.; Gibbel, M.

    1997-01-01

    NASA's Code QT Test Effectiveness Program is funding a series of applied research activities focused on utilizing the principles of physics and engineering of failure and those of engineering economics to assess and improve the value-added by the various validation and verification activities to organizations.

  6. Pertussis toxin treatment of whole blood. A novel approach to assess G protein function in congestive heart failure

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Maisel, A. S.; Michel, M. C.; Insel, P. A.; Ennis, C.; Ziegler, M. G.; Phillips, C.

    1990-01-01

    This study was designed to assess G protein function in mononuclear leukocytes (MNL) of patients with congestive heart failure (CHF). MNL membranes were ADP-ribosylated in vitro in the presence of pertussis or cholera toxin. The amount of pertussis toxin substrates did not differ significantly

  7. Traditional and new composite endpoints in heart failure clinical trials : facilitating comprehensive efficacy assessments and improving trial efficiency

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Anker, Stefan D. t; Schroeder, Stefan; Atar, Dan; Bax, Jeroen J.; Ceconi, Claudio; Cowie, Martin R.; AdamCrisp,; Dominjon, Fabienne; Ford, Ian; Ghofrani, Hossein-Ardeschir; Gropper, Savion; Hindricks, Gerhard; Hlatky, Mark A.; Holcomb, Richard; Honarpour, Narimon; Jukema, J. Wouter; Kim, Albert M.; Kunz, Michael; Lefkowitz, Martin; Le Floch, Chantal; Landmesser, Ulf; McDonagh, Theresa A.; McMurray, John J.; Merkely, Bela; Packer, Milton; Prasad, Krishna; Revkin, James; Rosano, Giuseppe M. C.; Somaratne, Ransi; Stough, Wendy Gattis; Voors, Adriaan A.; Ruschitzka, Frank

    Composite endpoints are commonly used as the primary measure of efficacy in heart failure clinical trials to assess the overall treatment effect and to increase the efficiency of trials. Clinical trials still must enrol large numbers of patients to accrue a sufficient number of outcome events and

  8. The prehospital intravenous access assessment: a prospective study on intravenous access failure and access delay in prehospital emergency medicine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prottengeier, Johannes; Albermann, Matthias; Heinrich, Sebastian; Birkholz, Torsten; Gall, Christine; Schmidt, Joachim

    2016-12-01

    Intravenous access in prehospital emergency care allows for early administration of medication and extended measures such as anaesthesia. Cannulation may, however, be difficult, and failure and resulting delay in treatment and transport may have negative effects on the patient. Therefore, our study aims to perform a concise assessment of the difficulties of prehospital venous cannulation. We analysed 23 candidate predictor variables on peripheral venous cannulations in terms of cannulation failure and exceedance of a 2 min time threshold. Multivariate logistic regression models were fitted for variables of predictive value (P0.6) of their respective receiver operating characteristic curve. A total of 762 intravenous cannulations were enroled. In all, 22% of punctures failed on the first attempt and 13% of punctures exceeded 2 min. Model selection yielded a three-factor model (vein visibility without tourniquet, vein palpability with tourniquet and insufficient ambient lighting) of fair accuracy for the prediction of puncture failure (AUC=0.76) and a structurally congruent model of four factors (failure model factors plus vein visibility with tourniquet) for the exceedance of the 2 min threshold (AUC=0.80). Our study offers a simple assessment to identify cases of difficult intravenous access in prehospital emergency care. Of the numerous factors subjectively perceived as possibly exerting influences on cannulation, only the universal - not exclusive to emergency care - factors of lighting, vein visibility and palpability proved to be valid predictors of cannulation failure and exceedance of a 2 min threshold.

  9. Clinical evaluation of new methods for the assessment of heart failure

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    J.A.M. Wijbenga (Anke)

    1999-01-01

    textabstractAlthough every physician seems to know the term "heart failure", there is no general agreement on its definition. Due to the complex nature of heart failure and the changing Insights into its pathophysiology over time, many different definitions exist. l.' Some focus on clinical

  10. Direct and indirect assessment of skeletal muscle blood flow in chronic congestive heart failure

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    LeJemtel, T.H.; Scortichini, D.; Katz, S.

    1988-01-01

    In patients with chronic congestive heart failure (CHF), skeletal muscle blood flow can be measured directly by the continuous thermodilution technique and by the xenon-133 clearance method. The continuous thermodilution technique requires retrograde catheterization of the femoral vein and, thus, cannot be repeated conveniently in patients during evaluation of pharmacologic interventions. The xenon-133 clearance, which requires only an intramuscular injection, allows repeated determination of skeletal muscle blood flow. In patients with severe CHF, a fixed capacity of the skeletal muscle vasculature to dilate appears to limit maximal exercise performance. Moreover, the changes in peak skeletal muscle blood flow noted during long-term administration of captopril, an angiotensin-converting enzyme inhibitor, appears to correlate with the changes in aerobic capacity. In patients with CHF, resting supine deep femoral vein oxygen content can be used as an indirect measurement of resting skeletal muscle blood flow. The absence of a steady state complicates the determination of peak skeletal muscle blood flow reached during graded bicycle or treadmill exercise in patients with chronic CHF. Indirect assessments of skeletal muscle blood flow and metabolism during exercise performed at submaximal work loads are currently developed in patients with chronic CHF

  11. On the major ductile fracture methodologies for failure assessment of nuclear reactor components

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cruz, Julio R.B.; Andrade, Arnaldo H.P. de; Landes, John D.

    1996-01-01

    In structures like nuclear reactor components there is a special concern with the loads that may occur under postulated accident conditions. These loads can cause the stresses to go well beyond the linear elastic limits, requiring the use of ductile fracture mechanics methods to the prediction of the structure behavior. Since the use of numerical methods to apply EPFM concepts is expensive and time consuming, the existence of analytical engineering procedures are of great relevance. The lack of precision in detail, as compared with numerical nonlinear analyses, is compensated by the possibility of quick failure assessments. This is a determinant factor in situations where a systematic evaluation of a large range of geometries and loading conditions is necessary, like in thr application of the Leak-Before-Break (LBB) concept on nuclear piping. This paper outlines four ductile fracture analytical methods, pointing out positive and negative aspects of each one. The objective is to take advantage of this critical review to conceive a new methodology, one that would gather strong points of the major existent methods and would try to eliminate some of their drawbacks. (author)

  12. Performance of Noninvasive Assessment in the Diagnosis of Right Heart Failure After Left Ventricular Assist Device.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Joly, Joanna M; El-Dabh, Ashraf; Marshell, Ramey; Chatterjee, Arka; Smith, Michelle G; Tresler, Margaret; Kirklin, James K; Acharya, Deepak; Rajapreyar, Indranee N; Tallaj, José A; Pamboukian, Salpy V

    2018-06-01

    Right heart failure (RHF) after left ventricular assist device (LVAD) is associated with poor outcomes. Interagency Registry for Mechanically Assisted Circulatory Support (INTERMACS) defines RHF as elevated right atrial pressure (RAP) plus venous congestion. The purpose of this study was to examine the diagnostic performance of the noninvasive INTERMACS criteria using RAP as the gold standard. We analyzed 108 patients with LVAD who underwent 341 right heart catheterizations (RHC) between January 1, 2006, and December 31, 2013. Physical exam, echocardiography, and laboratory data at the time of RHC were collected. Conventional two-by-two tables were used and missing data were excluded. The noninvasive INTERMACS definition of RHF is 32% sensitive (95% CI, 0.21-0.44) and 97% specific (95% CI, 0.95-0.99) for identifying elevated RAP. Clinical assessment failed to identify two-thirds of LVAD patients with RAP > 16 mm Hg. More than half of patients with elevated RAP did not have venous congestion, which may represent a physiologic opportunity to mitigate the progression of disease before end-organ damage occurs. One-quarter of patients who met the noninvasive definition of RHF did not actually have elevated RAP, potentially exposing patients to unnecessary therapies. In practice, if any component of the INTERMACS definition is present or equivocal, our data suggest RHC is warranted to establish the diagnosis.

  13. Analysis of multiple failure accident scenarios for development of probabilistic safety assessment model for KALIMER-600

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, T.W.; Suk, S.D.; Chang, W.P.; Kwon, Y.M.; Jeong, H.Y.; Lee, Y.B.; Ha, K.S.; Kim, S.J.

    2009-01-01

    A sodium-cooled fast reactor (SFR), KALIMER-600, is under development at KAERI. Its fuel is the metal fuel of U-TRU-Zr and it uses sodium as coolant. Its advantages are found in the aspects of an excellent uranium resource utilization, inherent safety features, and nonproliferation. The probabilistic safety assessment (PSA) will be one of the initiating subjects for designing it from the aspects of a risk informed design (RID) as well as a technology-neutral licensing (TNL). The core damage is defined as coolant voiding, fuel melting, or cladding damage. Accident scenarios which lead to the core damage should be identified for the development of a Level-1 PSA model. The SSC-K computer code is used to identify the conditions which lead to core damage. KALIMER-600 has passive safety features such as passive shutdown functions, passive pump coast-down features, and passive decay heat removal systems. It has inherent reactivity feedback effects such as Doppler, sodium void, core axial expansion, control rod axial expansion, core radial expansion, etc. The accidents which are analyzed are the multiple failure accidents such as an unprotected transient overpower, a loss of flow, and a loss of heat sink events with degraded safety systems or functions. The safety functions to be considered here are a reactor trip, inherent reactivity feedback features, the pump coast-down, and the passive decay heat removal. (author)

  14. Brittle Materials Design, High Temperature Gas Turbine

    Science.gov (United States)

    1977-08-01

    Radiation Pyrometer Mounting in the Hot Spin Rig 47 Showing Tempeiature Measurement Locations on a Test Rotor Figure 3.23 Stainless Steel Insulator...analysis in hot pressed Si3N4 (3,4,6). • Acoustic emission was applied for the detection of crack propagation and the onset of catastrophic failure in...scanning with acoustic emission (4). • X-ray radiography was applied for the detection of internal defects in turbine ceramic components (2,3.4,5)1

  15. Compressive failure with interacting cracks

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yang Guoping; Liu Xila

    1993-01-01

    The failure processes in concrete and other brittle materials are just the results of the propagation, coalescence and interaction of many preexisting microcracks or voids. To understand the real behaviour of the brittle materials, it is necessary to bridge the gap from the relatively matured one crack behaviour to the stochastically distributed imperfections, that is, to concern the crack propagation and interaction of microscopic mechanism with macroscopic parameters of brittle materials. Brittle failure in compression has been studied theoretically by Horii and Nemat-Nasser (1986), in which a closed solution was obtained for a preexisting flaw or some special regular flaws. Zaitsev and Wittmann (1981) published a paper on crack propagation in compression, which is so-called numerical concrete, but they did not take account of the interaction among the microcracks. As for the modelling of the influence of crack interaction on fracture parameters, many studies have also been reported. Up till now, some researcher are working on crack interaction considering the ratios of SIFs with and without consideration of the interaction influences, there exist amplifying or shielding effects of crack interaction which are depending on the relative positions of these microcracks. The present paper attempts to simulate the whole failure process of brittle specimen in compression, which includes the complicated coupling effects between the interaction and propagation of randomly distributed or other typical microcrack configurations step by step. The lengths, orientations and positions of microcracks are all taken as random variables. The crack interaction among many preexisting random microcracks is evaluated with the help of a simple interaction matrix (Yang and Liu, 1991). For the subcritically stable propagation of microcracks in mixed mode fracture, fairly known maximum hoop stress criterion is adopted to compute branching lengths and directions at each tip of the crack

  16. Athermal brittle-to-ductile transition in amorphous solids.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dauchot, Olivier; Karmakar, Smarajit; Procaccia, Itamar; Zylberg, Jacques

    2011-10-01

    Brittle materials exhibit sharp dynamical fractures when meeting Griffith's criterion, whereas ductile materials blunt a sharp crack by plastic responses. Upon continuous pulling, ductile materials exhibit a necking instability that is dominated by a plastic flow. Usually one discusses the brittle to ductile transition as a function of increasing temperature. We introduce an athermal brittle to ductile transition as a function of the cutoff length of the interparticle potential. On the basis of extensive numerical simulations of the response to pulling the material boundaries at a constant speed we offer an explanation of the onset of ductility via the increase in the density of plastic modes as a function of the potential cutoff length. Finally we can resolve an old riddle: In experiments brittle materials can be strained under grip boundary conditions and exhibit a dynamic crack when cut with a sufficiently long initial slot. Mysteriously, in molecular dynamics simulations it appeared that cracks refused to propagate dynamically under grip boundary conditions, and continuous pulling was necessary to achieve fracture. We argue that this mystery is removed when one understands the distinction between brittle and ductile athermal amorphous materials.

  17. Serviceability Assessment for Cascading Failures in Water Distribution Network under Seismic Scenario

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Qing Shuang

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available The stability of water service is a hot point in industrial production, public safety, and academic research. The paper establishes a service evaluation model for the water distribution network (WDN. The serviceability is measured in three aspects: (1 the functionality of structural components under disaster environment; (2 the recognition of cascading failure process; and (3 the calculation of system reliability. The node and edge failures in WDN are interrelated under seismic excitations. The cascading failure process is provided with the balance of water supply and demand. The matrix-based system reliability (MSR method is used to represent the system events and calculate the nonfailure probability. An example is used to illustrate the proposed method. The cascading failure processes with different node failures are simulated. The serviceability is analyzed. The critical node can be identified. The result shows that the aged network has a greater influence on the system service under seismic scenario. The maintenance could improve the antidisaster ability of WDN. Priority should be given to controlling the time between the initial failure and the first secondary failure, for taking postdisaster emergency measures within this time period can largely cut down the spread of cascade effect in the whole WDN.

  18. Fuzzy-logic assessment of failure hazard in pipelines due to mining activity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. A. Malinowska

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available The present research is aimed at a critical analysis of a method presently used for evaluating failure hazard in linear objects in mining areas. A fuzzy model of failure hazard of a linear object was created on the basis of the experience gathered so far. The rules of Mamdani fuzzy model have been used in the analyses. Finally the scaled model was integrated with a Geographic Information System (GIS, which was used to evaluate failure hazard in a water pipeline in a mining area.

  19. Assessment of cardiac sympathetic nerve activity in children with chronic heart failure using quantitative iodine-123 metaiodobenzylguanidine imaging

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Karasawa, Kensuke; Ayusawa, Mamoru; Noto, Nobutaka; Sumitomo, Naokata; Okada, Tomoo; Harada, Kensuke

    2000-01-01

    Cardiac sympathetic nerve activity in children with chronic heart failure was examined by quantitative iodine-123 metaiodobenzylguanidine (MIBG) myocardial imaging in 33 patients aged 7.5±6.1 years (range 0-18 years), including 8 with cardiomyopathy, 15 with congenital heart disease, 3 with anthracycrine cardiotoxicity, 3 with myocarditis, 3 with primary pulmonary hypertension and 1 with Pompe's disease. Anterior planar images were obtained 15 min and 3 hr after the injection of iodine-123 MIBG. The cardiac iodine-123 MIBG uptake was assessed as the heart to upper mediastinum uptake activity ratio of the delayed image (H/M) and the cardiac percentage washout rate (%WR). The severity of chronic heart failure was class I (no medication) in 8 patients, class II (no symptom with medication) in 9, class III (symptom even with medication) in 10 and class IV (late cardiac death) in 6. H/M was 2.33±0.22 in chronic heart failure class I, 2.50±0.34 in class II, 1.95±0.61 in class III, and 1.39±0.29 in class IV (p<0.05). %WR was 24.8±12.8% in chronic heart failure class I, 23.3±10.2% in class II, 49.2±24.5% in class III, and 66.3±26.5% in class IV (p<0.05). The low H/M and high %WR were proportionate to the severity of chronic heart failure. Cardiac iodine-123 MIBG showed cardiac adrenergic neuronal dysfunction in children with severe chronic heart failure. Quantitative iodine-123 MIBG myocardial imaging is clinically useful as a predictor of therapeutic outcome and mortality in children with chronic heart failure. (author)

  20. Assessment of cardiac sympathetic nerve activity in children with chronic heart failure using quantitative iodine-123 metaiodobenzylguanidine imaging

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Karasawa, Kensuke; Ayusawa, Mamoru; Noto, Nobutaka; Sumitomo, Naokata; Okada, Tomoo; Harada, Kensuke [Nihon Univ., Tokyo (Japan). School of Medicine

    2000-12-01

    Cardiac sympathetic nerve activity in children with chronic heart failure was examined by quantitative iodine-123 metaiodobenzylguanidine (MIBG) myocardial imaging in 33 patients aged 7.5{+-}6.1 years (range 0-18 years), including 8 with cardiomyopathy, 15 with congenital heart disease, 3 with anthracycrine cardiotoxicity, 3 with myocarditis, 3 with primary pulmonary hypertension and 1 with Pompe's disease. Anterior planar images were obtained 15 min and 3 hr after the injection of iodine-123 MIBG. The cardiac iodine-123 MIBG uptake was assessed as the heart to upper mediastinum uptake activity ratio of the delayed image (H/M) and the cardiac percentage washout rate (%WR). The severity of chronic heart failure was class I (no medication) in 8 patients, class II (no symptom with medication) in 9, class III (symptom even with medication) in 10 and class IV (late cardiac death) in 6. H/M was 2.33{+-}0.22 in chronic heart failure class I, 2.50{+-}0.34 in class II, 1.95{+-}0.61 in class III, and 1.39{+-}0.29 in class IV (p<0.05). %WR was 24.8{+-}12.8% in chronic heart failure class I, 23.3{+-}10.2% in class II, 49.2{+-}24.5% in class III, and 66.3{+-}26.5% in class IV (p<0.05). The low H/M and high %WR were proportionate to the severity of chronic heart failure. Cardiac iodine-123 MIBG showed cardiac adrenergic neuronal dysfunction in children with severe chronic heart failure. Quantitative iodine-123 MIBG myocardial imaging is clinically useful as a predictor of therapeutic outcome and mortality in children with chronic heart failure. (author)

  1. Temporary brittle bone disease: fractures in medical care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paterson, Colin R

    2009-12-01

    Temporary brittle bone disease is the name given to a syndrome first reported in 1990, in which fractures occur in infants in the first year of life. The fractures include rib fractures and metaphyseal fractures which are mostly asymptomatic. The radiological features of this disorder mimic those often ascribed to typical non-accidental injury. The subject has been controversial, some authors suggesting that the disorder does not exist. This study reports five infants with typical features of temporary brittle bone disease in whom all or most of the fractures took place while in hospital. A non-accidental cause can be eliminated with some confidence, and these cases provide evidence in support of the existence of temporary brittle bone disease.

  2. Forced tearing of ductile and brittle thin sheets.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tallinen, T; Mahadevan, L

    2011-12-09

    Tearing a thin sheet by forcing a rigid object through it leads to complex crack morphologies; a single oscillatory crack arises when a tool is driven laterally through a brittle sheet, while two diverging cracks and a series of concertinalike folds forms when a tool is forced laterally through a ductile sheet. On the other hand, forcing an object perpendicularly through the sheet leads to radial petallike tears in both ductile and brittle materials. To understand these different regimes we use a combination of experiments, simulations, and simple theories. In particular, we describe the transition from brittle oscillatory tearing via a single crack to ductile concertina tearing with two tears by deriving laws that describe the crack paths and wavelength of the concertina folds and provide a simple phase diagram for the morphologies in terms of the material properties of the sheet and the relative size of the tool.

  3. The nature of temper brittleness of high-chromium ferrite

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sarrak, V.I.; Suvorova, S.O.; Golovin, I.S.; Mishin, V.M.; Kislyuk, I.V. [Central Scientific-Research Institute for Ferrous Metallurgy, Moscow (Russian Federation)

    1995-03-01

    The reasons for development of {open_quotes}475{degrees}C brittleness{close_quotes} of high-chromium ferritic steels are considered from the standpoint of fracture mechanics. It is shown that the general rise in the curve of temperature-dependent local flow stress has the decisive influence on the position of the ductile-to-brittle transformation temperature and the increase in it as the result of a hold at temperatures of development of brittleness. The established effect is related to the change in the parameters determining dislocation mobility, that is, the activation energy of dislocation movement in high-chromium ferrite and the resistance to microplastic deformation, both caused by processes of separation into layers of high-chromium ferrite and decomposition of the interstitial solid solution.

  4. Rockfall failure mechanisms in Yosemite Valley, California (USA)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matasci, Battista; Guerin, Antoine; Carrea, Dario; Stock, Greg M.; Jaboyedoff, Michel; Collins, Brian

    2014-05-01

    Rockfall hazard is especially high in Yosemite Valley, with tens of rockfalls inventoried every year. A rockfall on 5 October 2013 from Ahwiyah Point consisted of a volume of 740 cubic meters and occurred within the perimeter of a larger event on 28 March 2009 that released 25'400 cubic meters of rock (Zimmer et al., 2012). In both events (2009 and 2013), the initial rockfall volumes dislodged a second one approximately equivalent in size by impacting the cliff below the source area during the fall. Rock fragments of up to several cubic meters were deposited on the talus slope, damaging a heavily used and recently reconstructed hiking path. We performed extensive mapping of structural features for several cliffs of Yosemite Valley to improve the assessment of the most susceptible rockfall areas. In particular we mapped and characterized the main brittle structures, the exfoliation joints and the failure mechanisms of the past rockfalls. Several failure mechanisms exist in Yosemite including the propagation of brittle structures that may lead to tensile, planar sliding, wedge sliding or toppling failures. Frequently, topographically-parallel exfoliation joints and topographically-oblique discontinuities coexist, resulting in complex failures. We also developed a methodology to examine how the distribution of joints within the cliff faces of Yosemite Valley affects overall stability with respect to the identified failure mechanisms. For these analyses, we used terrestrial laser scanning (TLS) to collect high resolution point clouds of the vertical and overhanging rock faces throughout the Valley. This provided the necessary 3D data to identify the main joint sets, perform spacing and trace length measurements, and calculate volumes of previous and potential rockfalls. We integrated this information with stability calculations to identify the likely failure mechanisms for each area of cliff and to obtain the number of potential failures per square meter of cliff face

  5. Multinational Assessment of Accuracy of Equations for Predicting Risk of Kidney Failure: A Meta-analysis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Tangri, N.; Grams, M.E.; Levey, A.S.; Coresh, J.; Appel, L.J.; Astor, B.C.; Chodick, G.; Collins, A.J.; Djurdjev, O.; Elley, C.R.; Evans, M.; Garg, A.X.; Hallan, S.I.; Inker, L.A.; Ito, S.; Jee, S.H.; Kovesdy, C.P.; Kronenberg, F.; Heerspink, H.J.; Marks, A.; Nadkarni, G.N.; Navaneethan, S.D.; Nelson, R.G.; Titze, S.; Sarnak, M.J.; Stengel, B.; Woodward, M.; Iseki, K.; Wetzels, J.F.M.; et al.,

    2016-01-01

    IMPORTANCE: Identifying patients at risk of chronic kidney disease (CKD) progression may facilitate more optimal nephrology care. Kidney failure risk equations, including such factors as age, sex, estimated glomerular filtration rate, and calcium and phosphate concentrations, were previously

  6. Cohesive laws for assessment of materials failure:Theory, experimental methods and application

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sørensen, Bent F.

    -directional laminates that are bonded together by adhesive joints, since thermosetting polymers, unlike metals, cannot be welded together. The structure can therefore fail by: - delamination (cracking along interfaces between layers inside the laminates) - adhesive joint failure (cracking along the laminate...

  7. Methodology for failure assessment of SMART SG tube with once-through helical-coiled type

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, Young Jin; Choi, Shin Beom; Cho, Doo Ho; Chang, Yoon Suk

    2010-09-01

    In this research project, existing integrity evaluation method for SMART steam generator tube with crack-like flaw was reviewed to determine subject analysis model and investigate possibility of failure under crack closure behavior. Furthermore, failure pressure estimation was proposed for SMART steam generator tubes containing wear-type defects. For each subject, the following issues are addressed: 1. Determination of subject analysis model for SMART SG tube contaning crack-like flaw 2. Applicability review on existing integrity evaluation method and investigation of failure possibility for SMART SG tube containing crack-like flaw 3. Development of failure pressure estimation model for SMART SG tube with wear type defect It is anticipated that if the technologies developed in this study are applied, structural integrity can be estimated accurately

  8. Iterative User Interface Design for Automated Sequential Organ Failure Assessment Score Calculator in Sepsis Detection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aakre, Christopher Ansel; Kitson, Jaben E; Li, Man; Herasevich, Vitaly

    2017-05-18

    The new sepsis definition has increased the need for frequent sequential organ failure assessment (SOFA) score recalculation and the clerical burden of information retrieval makes this score ideal for automated calculation. The aim of this study was to (1) estimate the clerical workload of manual SOFA score calculation through a time-motion analysis and (2) describe a user-centered design process for an electronic medical record (EMR) integrated, automated SOFA score calculator with subsequent usability evaluation study. First, we performed a time-motion analysis by recording time-to-task-completion for the manual calculation of 35 baseline and 35 current SOFA scores by 14 internal medicine residents over a 2-month period. Next, we used an agile development process to create a user interface for a previously developed automated SOFA score calculator. The final user interface usability was evaluated by clinician end users with the Computer Systems Usability Questionnaire. The overall mean (standard deviation, SD) time-to-complete manual SOFA score calculation time was 61.6 s (33). Among the 24% (12/50) usability survey respondents, our user-centered user interface design process resulted in >75% favorability of survey items in the domains of system usability, information quality, and interface quality. Early stakeholder engagement in our agile design process resulted in a user interface for an automated SOFA score calculator that reduced clinician workload and met clinicians' needs at the point of care. Emerging interoperable platforms may facilitate dissemination of similarly useful clinical score calculators and decision support algorithms as "apps." A user-centered design process and usability evaluation should be considered during creation of these tools. ©Christopher Ansel Aakre, Jaben E Kitson, Man Li, Vitaly Herasevich. Originally published in JMIR Human Factors (http://humanfactors.jmir.org), 18.05.2017.

  9. Using the Human Activity Profile to Assess Functional Performance in Heart Failure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ribeiro-Samora, Giane Amorim; Pereira, Danielle Aparecida Gomes; Vieira, Otávia Alves; de Alencar, Maria Clara Noman; Rodrigues, Roseane Santo; Carvalho, Maria Luiza Vieira; Montemezzo, Dayane; Britto, Raquel Rodrigues

    2016-01-01

    To investigate (1) the validity of using the Human Activity Profile (HAP) in patients with heart failure (HF) to estimate functional capacity; (2) the association between the HAP and 6-Minute Walk Test (6MWT) distance; and (3) the ability of the HAP to differentiate between New York Heart Association (NYHA) functional classes. In a cross-sectional study, we evaluated 62 clinically stable patients with HF (mean age, 47.98 years; NYHA class I-III). Variables included maximal functional capacity as measured by peak oxygen uptake ((Equation is included in full-text article.)O2) using a cardiopulmonary exercise test (CPET), peak (Equation is included in full-text article.)O2 as estimated by the HAP, and exercise capacity as measured by the 6MWT. The difference between the measured (CPET) and estimated (HAP) peak (Equation is included in full-text article.)O2 against the average values showed a bias of 2.18 mL/kg/min (P = .007). No agreement was seen between these measures when applying the Bland-Altman method. Peak (Equation is included in full-text article.)O2 in the HAP showed a moderate association with the 6MWT distance (r = 0.62; P < .0001). Peak (Equation is included in full-text article.)O2 in the HAP was able to statistically differentiate NYHA functional classes I, II, and III (P < .05). The estimated peak (Equation is included in full-text article.)O2 using the HAP was not concordant with the gold standard CPET measure. On the contrary, the HAP was able to differentiate NYHA functional class associated with the 6MWT distance; therefore, the HAP is a useful tool for assessing functional performance in patients with HF.

  10. An assessment of underground and aboveground steam system failures in the SRS waste tank farms

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hsu, T.C.; Shurrab, M.S.; Wiersma, B.J.

    1997-01-01

    Underground steam system failures in waste tank farms at the Savannah River Site (SRS) increased significantly in the 3--4 year period prior to 1995. The primary safety issues created by the failures were the formation of sub-surface voids in soil and the loss of steam jet transfer and waste evaporation capability, and the loss of heating and ventilation to the tanks. The average annual cost for excavation and repair of the underground steam system was estimated to be several million dollars. These factors prompted engineering personnel to re-consider long-term solutions to the problem. The primary cause of these failures was the inadequate thermal insulation utilized for steam lines associated with older tanks. The failure mechanisms were either pitting or localized general corrosion on the exterior of the pipe beneath the thermal insulation. The most realistic and practical solution is to replace the underground lines by installing aboveground steam systems, although this option will incur significant initial capital costs. Steam system components, installed aboveground in other areas of the tank farms have experienced few failures, while in continuous use. As a result, piecewise installation of temporary aboveground steam systems have been implemented in F-area whenever opportunities, i.e., failures, present themselves

  11. Transition from a strong-yet-brittle to a stronger-and-ductile state by size reduction of metallic glasses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jang, Dongchan; Greer, Julia R

    2010-03-01

    Amorphous metallic alloys, or metallic glasses, are lucrative engineering materials owing to their superior mechanical properties such as high strength and large elastic strain. However, their main drawback is their propensity for highly catastrophic failure through rapid shear banding, significantly undercutting their structural applications. Here, we show that when reduced to 100 nm, Zr-based metallic glass nanopillars attain ceramic-like strengths (2.25 GPa) and metal-like ductility (25%) simultaneously. We report separate and distinct critical sizes for maximum strength and for the brittle-to-ductile transition, thereby demonstrating that strength and ability to carry plasticity are decoupled at the nanoscale. A phenomenological model for size dependence and brittle-to-homogeneous deformation is provided.

  12. Failure assessments of corroded pipelines with axial defects using stress-based criteria: Numerical studies and verification analyses

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chiodo, Mario S.G.; Ruggieri, Claudio

    2009-01-01

    Conventional procedures used to assess the integrity of corroded piping systems with axial defects generally employ simplified failure criteria based upon a plastic collapse failure mechanism incorporating the tensile properties of the pipe material. These methods establish acceptance criteria for defects based on limited experimental data for low strength structural steels which do not necessarily address specific requirements for the high grade steels currently used. For these cases, failure assessments may be overly conservative or provide significant scatter in their predictions, which lead to unnecessary repair or replacement of in-service pipelines. Motivated by these observations, this study examines the applicability of a stress-based criterion based upon plastic instability analysis to predict the failure pressure of corroded pipelines with axial defects. A central focus is to gain additional insight into effects of defect geometry and material properties on the attainment of a local limit load to support the development of stress-based burst strength criteria. The work provides an extensive body of results which lend further support to adopt failure criteria for corroded pipelines based upon ligament instability analyses. A verification study conducted on burst testing of large-diameter pipe specimens with different defect length shows the effectiveness of a stress-based criterion using local ligament instability in burst pressure predictions, even though the adopted burst criterion exhibits a potential dependence on defect geometry and possibly on material's strain hardening capacity. Overall, the results presented here suggests that use of stress-based criteria based upon plastic instability analysis of the defect ligament is a valid engineering tool for integrity assessments of pipelines with axial corroded defects

  13. Failure assessments of corroded pipelines with axial defects using stress-based criteria: Numerical studies and verification analyses

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chiodo, Mario S.G. [Department of Naval Architecture and Ocean Engineering, University of Sao Paulo, Av. Prof. Mello Moraes, 2231 (PNV-EPUSP), Sao Paulo, SP 05508-030 (Brazil); Ruggieri, Claudio [Department of Naval Architecture and Ocean Engineering, University of Sao Paulo, Av. Prof. Mello Moraes, 2231 (PNV-EPUSP), Sao Paulo, SP 05508-030 (Brazil)], E-mail: claudio.ruggieri@poli.usp.br

    2009-02-15

    Conventional procedures used to assess the integrity of corroded piping systems with axial defects generally employ simplified failure criteria based upon a plastic collapse failure mechanism incorporating the tensile properties of the pipe material. These methods establish acceptance criteria for defects based on limited experimental data for low strength structural steels which do not necessarily address specific requirements for the high grade steels currently used. For these cases, failure assessments may be overly conservative or provide significant scatter in their predictions, which lead to unnecessary repair or replacement of in-service pipelines. Motivated by these observations, this study examines the applicability of a stress-based criterion based upon plastic instability analysis to predict the failure pressure of corroded pipelines with axial defects. A central focus is to gain additional insight into effects of defect geometry and material properties on the attainment of a local limit load to support the development of stress-based burst strength criteria. The work provides an extensive body of results which lend further support to adopt failure criteria for corroded pipelines based upon ligament instability analyses. A verification study conducted on burst testing of large-diameter pipe specimens with different defect length shows the effectiveness of a stress-based criterion using local ligament instability in burst pressure predictions, even though the adopted burst criterion exhibits a potential dependence on defect geometry and possibly on material's strain hardening capacity. Overall, the results presented here suggests that use of stress-based criteria based upon plastic instability analysis of the defect ligament is a valid engineering tool for integrity assessments of pipelines with axial corroded defects.

  14. The role of minimum supply and social vulnerability assessment for governing critical infrastructure failure: current gaps and future agenda

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Garschagen

    2018-04-01

    Full Text Available Increased attention has lately been given to the resilience of critical infrastructure in the context of natural hazards and disasters. The major focus therein is on the sensitivity of critical infrastructure technologies and their management contingencies. However, strikingly little attention has been given to assessing and mitigating social vulnerabilities towards the failure of critical infrastructure and to the development, design and implementation of minimum supply standards in situations of major infrastructure failure. Addressing this gap and contributing to a more integrative perspective on critical infrastructure resilience is the objective of this paper. It asks which role social vulnerability assessments and minimum supply considerations can, should and do – or do not – play for the management and governance of critical infrastructure failure. In its first part, the paper provides a structured review on achievements and remaining gaps in the management of critical infrastructure and the understanding of social vulnerabilities towards disaster-related infrastructure failures. Special attention is given to the current state of minimum supply concepts with a regional focus on policies in Germany and the EU. In its second part, the paper then responds to the identified gaps by developing a heuristic model on the linkages of critical infrastructure management, social vulnerability and minimum supply. This framework helps to inform a vision of a future research agenda, which is presented in the paper's third part. Overall, the analysis suggests that the assessment of socially differentiated vulnerabilities towards critical infrastructure failure needs to be undertaken more stringently to inform the scientifically and politically difficult debate about minimum supply standards and the shared responsibilities for securing them.

  15. The role of minimum supply and social vulnerability assessment for governing critical infrastructure failure: current gaps and future agenda

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garschagen, Matthias; Sandholz, Simone

    2018-04-01

    Increased attention has lately been given to the resilience of critical infrastructure in the context of natural hazards and disasters. The major focus therein is on the sensitivity of critical infrastructure technologies and their management contingencies. However, strikingly little attention has been given to assessing and mitigating social vulnerabilities towards the failure of critical infrastructure and to the development, design and implementation of minimum supply standards in situations of major infrastructure failure. Addressing this gap and contributing to a more integrative perspective on critical infrastructure resilience is the objective of this paper. It asks which role social vulnerability assessments and minimum supply considerations can, should and do - or do not - play for the management and governance of critical infrastructure failure. In its first part, the paper provides a structured review on achievements and remaining gaps in the management of critical infrastructure and the understanding of social vulnerabilities towards disaster-related infrastructure failures. Special attention is given to the current state of minimum supply concepts with a regional focus on policies in Germany and the EU. In its second part, the paper then responds to the identified gaps by developing a heuristic model on the linkages of critical infrastructure management, social vulnerability and minimum supply. This framework helps to inform a vision of a future research agenda, which is presented in the paper's third part. Overall, the analysis suggests that the assessment of socially differentiated vulnerabilities towards critical infrastructure failure needs to be undertaken more stringently to inform the scientifically and politically difficult debate about minimum supply standards and the shared responsibilities for securing them.

  16. Risk assessment of the emergency processes: Healthcare failure mode and effect analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Taleghani, Yasamin Molavi; Rezaei, Fatemeh; Sheikhbardsiri, Hojat

    2016-01-01

    Ensuring about the patient's safety is the first vital step in improving the quality of care and the emergency ward is known as a high-risk area in treatment health care. The present study was conducted to evaluate the selected risk processes of emergency surgery department of a treatment-educational Qaem center in Mashhad by using analysis method of the conditions and failure effects in health care. In this study, in combination (qualitative action research and quantitative cross-sectional), failure modes and effects of 5 high-risk procedures of the emergency surgery department were identified and analyzed according to Healthcare Failure Mode and Effects Analysis (HFMEA). To classify the failure modes from the "nursing errors in clinical management model (NECM)", the classification of the effective causes of error from "Eindhoven model" and determination of the strategies to improve from the "theory of solving problem by an inventive method" were used. To analyze the quantitative data of descriptive statistics (total points) and to analyze the qualitative data, content analysis and agreement of comments of the members were used. In 5 selected processes by "voting method using rating", 23 steps, 61 sub-processes and 217 potential failure modes were identified by HFMEA. 25 (11.5%) failure modes as the high risk errors were detected and transferred to the decision tree. The most and the least failure modes were placed in the categories of care errors (54.7%) and knowledge and skill (9.5%), respectively. Also, 29.4% of preventive measures were in the category of human resource management strategy. "Revision and re-engineering of processes", "continuous monitoring of the works", "preparation and revision of operating procedures and policies", "developing the criteria for evaluating the performance of the personnel", "designing a suitable educational content for needs of employee", "training patients", "reducing the workload and power shortage", "improving team

  17. Fracture criterion for brittle materials based on statistical cells of finite volume

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cords, H.; Kleist, G.; Zimmermann, R.

    1986-06-01

    An analytical consideration of the Weibull Statistical Analysis of brittle materials established the necessity of including one additional material constant for a more comprehensive description of the failure behaviour. The Weibull analysis is restricted to infinitesimal volume elements in consequence of the differential calculus applied. It was found that infinitesimally small elements are in conflict with the basic statistical assumption and that the differential calculus is not needed in fact since nowadays most of the stress analyses are based on finite element calculations, and these are most suitable for a subsequent statistical analysis of strength. The size of a finite statistical cell has been introduced as the third material parameter. It should represent the minimum volume containing all statistical features of the material such as distribution of pores, flaws and grains. The new approach also contains a unique treatment of failure under multiaxial stresses. The quantity responsible for failure under multiaxial stresses is introduced as a modified strain energy. Sixteen different tensile specimens including CT-specimens have been investigated experimentally and analyzed with the probabilistic fracture criterion. As a result it can be stated that the failure rates of all types of specimens made from three different grades of graphite are predictable. The accuracy of the prediction is one standard deviation. (orig.) [de

  18. Earthquake rupture below the brittle-ductile transition in continental lithospheric mantle.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prieto, Germán A; Froment, Bérénice; Yu, Chunquan; Poli, Piero; Abercrombie, Rachel

    2017-03-01

    Earthquakes deep in the continental lithosphere are rare and hard to interpret in our current understanding of temperature control on brittle failure. The recent lithospheric mantle earthquake with a moment magnitude of 4.8 at a depth of ~75 km in the Wyoming Craton was exceptionally well recorded and thus enabled us to probe the cause of these unusual earthquakes. On the basis of complete earthquake energy balance estimates using broadband waveforms and temperature estimates using surface heat flow and shear wave velocities, we argue that this earthquake occurred in response to ductile deformation at temperatures above 750°C. The high stress drop, low rupture velocity, and low radiation efficiency are all consistent with a dissipative mechanism. Our results imply that earthquake nucleation in the lithospheric mantle is not exclusively limited to the brittle regime; weakening mechanisms in the ductile regime can allow earthquakes to initiate and propagate. This finding has significant implications for understanding deep earthquake rupture mechanics and rheology of the continental lithosphere.

  19. Crack deflection in brittle media with heterogeneous interfaces and its application in shale fracking

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zeng, Xiaguang; Wei, Yujie

    Driven by the rapid progress in exploiting unconventional energy resources such as shale gas, there is growing interest in hydraulic fracture of brittle yet heterogeneous shales. In particular, how hydraulic cracks interact with natural weak zones in sedimentary rocks to form permeable cracking networks is of significance in engineering practice. Such a process is typically influenced by crack deflection, material anisotropy, crack-surface friction, crustal stresses, and so on. In this work, we extend the He-Hutchinson theory (He and Hutchinson, 1989) to give the closed-form formulae of the strain energy release rate of a hydraulic crack with arbitrary angles with respect to the crustal stress. The critical conditions in which the hydraulic crack deflects into weak interfaces and exhibits a dependence on crack-surface friction and crustal stress anisotropy are given in explicit formulae. We reveal analytically that, with increasing pressure, hydraulic fracture in shales may sequentially undergo friction locking, mode II fracture, and mixed mode fracture. Mode II fracture dominates the hydraulic fracturing process and the impinging angle between the hydraulic crack and the weak interface is the determining factor that accounts for crack deflection; the lower friction coefficient between cracked planes and the greater crustal stress difference favor hydraulic fracturing. In addition to shale fracking, the analytical solution of crack deflection could be used in failure analysis of other brittle media.

  20. Failure Criteria for Reinforced Materials

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rathkjen, Arne

    Failure of materials is often characterized as ductile yielding, brittle fracture, creep rupture, etc., and different criteria given in terms of different parameters have been used to describe different types of failure. Only criteria expressing failure in terms of stress are considered in what...... place until the matrix, the continuous component of the composite, fails. When an isotropic matrix is reinforced as described above, the result is an anisotropic composite material. Even if the material is anisotropic, it usually exhibits a rather high degree of symmetry and such symmetries place...... certain restrictions on the form of the failure criteria for anisotropic materials. In section 2, some failure criteria for homogenous materials are reviewed. Both isotropic and anisotropic materials are described, and in particular the constraints imposed on the criteria from the symmetries orthotropy...

  1. Micro-structural reliability design of brittle materials

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Strnadel, B.; Byczanski, Petr

    2007-01-01

    Roč. 74, č. 11 (2007), s. 1825-1836 ISSN 0013-7944 R&D Projects: GA ČR(CZ) GA106/06/0646 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z30860518 Keywords : Cleavage strength * Brittle fracture * Fracture toughness Subject RIV: JJ - Other Materials Impact factor: 1.227, year: 2007 www.elsevier.com/locate/engfracmech

  2. Polarization Raman spectroscopy to explain rodent models of brittle bone

    Science.gov (United States)

    Makowski, Alexander J.; Nyman, Jeffry S.; Mahadevan-Jansen, Anita

    2013-03-01

    Activation Transcription Factor 4 (Atf-4) is essential for osteoblast maturation and proper collagen synthesis. We recently found that these bones demonstrate a rare brittleness phenotype, which is independent of bone strength. We utilized a confocal Renishaw Raman microscope (50x objective; NA=.75) to evaluate embedded, polished cross-sections of mouse tibia from both wild-type and knockout mice at 8 weeks of age (24 mice, nmineral and collagen; however, compositional changes did not fully encompass biomechanical differences. To investigate the impact of material organization, we acquired colocalized spectra aligning the polarization angle parallel and perpendicular to the long bone axis from wet intact femurs. To validate our results, we used MMP9-/- mice, which have a brittleness phenotype that is not explained by compositional Raman measures. Polarization angle difference spectra show marked significant changes in orientation of these compositional differences when comparing wild type to knockout bones. Relative to wild-type, Atf4 -/- and MMP9 -/- bones show significant differences (t-test; pbones. Such findings could have alternate interpretations about net collagen orientation or the angular distribution of collagen molecules. Use of polarization specific Raman measurements has implicated a structural profile that furthers our understanding of models of bone brittleness. Polarization content of Raman spectra may prove significant in future studies of brittle fracture and human fracture risk.

  3. Fracture mechanics applied to the machining of brittle materials

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hiatt, G.D.; Strenkowski, J.S.

    1988-12-01

    Research has begun on incorporating fracture mechanics into a model of the orthogonal cutting of brittle materials. Residual stresses are calculated for the machined material by a combination of Eulerian and Lagrangian finite element models and then used in the calculation of stress intensity factors by the Green`s Function Method.

  4. Finite element modelling of fibre-reinforced brittle materials

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kullaa, J.

    1997-01-01

    The tensile constitutive behaviour of fibre-reinforced brittle materials can be extended to two or three dimensions by using the finite element method with crack models. The three approaches in this study include the smeared and discrete crack concepts and a multi-surface plasticity model. The

  5. Hugoniot elastic limits and compression parameters for brittle materials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gust, W.H.

    1979-01-01

    The physical properties of brittle materials are of interest because of the rapidly expanding use of these material in high-pressure and shock wave techology, e.g., geophysics and explosive compaction as well as military applications. These materials are characterized by unusually high sonic velocities, have large dynamic impedances and exhibit large dynamic yield strengths

  6. Brittle Materials Design, High Temperature Gas Turbine

    Science.gov (United States)

    1975-10-01

    10oF/sec. The 3 to 5 minute hold at 2500oF will permit data acquisition, vane viewing and/or photography through the horoscope . Cool down...assessed. Several radii appear as flats rather than true radii. The first airfoil with the profiled, torroidal shaped tenon ends was received

  7. Assessment of insulin, lectin and vitamin C in chronic renal failure patients before and after haemodialysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ahmed, A.M.; El-Yamani, N.A.; Youssif, Z.A.; Abdel-Razik, D.E.

    2006-01-01

    The present study was carried out to investigate the relative interaction between insulin, leptin and vitamin C in male patients with chronic renal failure and undergo regular haemodialysis (3 times/week). The study was carried out on 20 healthy volunteers as control (group I) and 20 with chronic renal failure (group II) which were studied before dialysis (A) and after dialysis (B). The serum results showed significant increases in creatinine, insulin and leptin levels in patient groups as compared to the control. On the other hand, significant decreases in the levels of glucose and vitamin C were recorded

  8. An assessment of the linear damage summation method for creep-fatigue failure with reference to a cast of type 316 stainless steel tested at 570 deg. C

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wareing, J.; Bretherton, I.

    This paper presents preliminary results from the programme for hold period tests on a cast BQ of type 316 stainless steel at 570 deg. C. The results of tensile hold period tests on a relatively low ductility cast of type 316 stainless steel have indicated that the failure mechanism changes from a creep-fatigue interaction failure to a creep dominated failure at low strain levels. An assessment of the linear damage summation approach for failure prediction indicates that it is inappropriate for creep-fatigue interaction failures. For creep dominated fracture, failure occurs when the accumulation relaxation strain exhausts the material ductility i.e. Nsub(f epsilon R)=D. The failure criterion based on a creep summation in terms of time to fracture underestimates life

  9. An assessment of consumers’ subconscious responses to frontline employees’ attractiveness in a service failure and recovery situation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Christo Boshoff

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available Background: Initial analyses of the impact of physical attractiveness in a business context have supported the ‘what is beautiful is good’ contention. However, in circumstances characterised by negative emotions, duress and stress, very little is known about how human beings respond at the subconscious level to the attractiveness of frontline service providers. Aim: The purpose of this study was to assess whether consumers who complain to a frontline service provider about a service failure respond differently at the subconscious level when the service provider involved in the service encounter is attractive compared with one who is less attractive. Method: Forty respondents were exposed to a video clip of a service failure and service recovery situation. While viewing the hypothetical scenario, two neuro-physiological measurements were used to collect data at the subconscious level, namely galvanic skin response (GSR and electroencephalography (EEG. Results: The results suggest that, at the subconscious level, customers respond differently to the service recovery efforts depending on the attractiveness of the frontline service provider who attempts to rectify the service failure. Conclusion: The results seem to suggest that the physical attractiveness of a frontline service provider moderates (or softens the negative emotions that a complaining customer might experience during a service failure and complaint situation – consistent with the ‘what is beautiful is good’ contention.

  10. An application of failure mode and effect analysis (FMEA to assess risks in petrochemical industry in Iran

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mehdi Kangavari

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available Petrochemical industries have a high rate of accidents. Failure mode and effect analysis (FMEA is a systematic method and thus is capable of analyzing the risks of systems from concept phase to system disposal, detecting the failures in design stage, and determining the control measures and corrective actions for failures to reduce their impacts. The objectives of this research were to perform FMEA to identify risks in an Iranian petrochemical industry and determine the decrease of the risk priority number (RPN after implementation of intervention programs. This interventional study was performed at one petrochemical plant in Tehran, Iran in 2014. Relevant information about job categories and plant process was gathered using brainstorming techniques, fishbone diagram, and group decision making. The data were collected through interviews, observation, and documents investigations and was recorded in FMEA worksheets. The necessary corrective measures were performed on the basis of the results of initial FMEA. Forty eight failures were identified in welding unit by application of FMEA to assess risks. Welding processes especially working at height got the highest RPN. Obtained RPN for working at height before performing the corrective actions was 120 and the score was reduced to 96 after performing corrective measures. Calculated RPN for all processes was significantly reduced (p≤0.001 by implementing the corrective actions. Scores of RPN in all studied processes effectively decreased after performing corrective actions in a petrochemical industry. FMEA method is a useful tool for identifying risk intervention priorities and effectiveness in a studied petrochemical industry.

  11. Using impedance cardiography to assess left ventricular systolic function via postural change in patients with heart failure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    DeMarzo, Arthur P; Calvin, James E; Kelly, Russell F; Stamos, Thomas D

    2005-01-01

    For the diagnosis and management of heart failure, it would be useful to have a simple point-of-care test for assessing ventricular function that could be performed by a nurse. An impedance cardiography (ICG) parameter called systolic amplitude (SA) can serve as an indicator of left ventricular systolic function (LVSF). This study tested the hypothesis that patients with normal LVSF should have a significant increase in SA in response to an increase in end-diastolic volume caused by postural change from sitting upright to supine, while patients with depressed LVSF associated with heart failure should have a minimal increase or a decrease in SA from upright to supine. ICG data were obtained in 12 patients without heart disease and with normal LVSF and 18 patients with clinically diagnosed heart failure. Consistent with the hypothesis, patients with normal LVSF had a significant increase in SA from upright to supine, whereas heart failure patients had a minimal increase or a decrease in SA from upright to supine. This ICG procedure may be useful for monitoring the trend of patient response to titration of beta blockers and other medications. ICG potentially could be used to detect worsening LVSF and provide a means of measurement for adjusting treatment.

  12. Research Article. Characteristics of Sleep Apnea Assessed Before Discharge in Patients Hospitalized with Acute Heart Failure

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kocsis Ildikó

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available Objectives. Evaluation of the characteristics of sleep apnea (SA in patients hospitalized with acute heart failure, considering that undiagnosed SA could contribute to early rehospitalization. Methods. 56 consecutive patients (13 women, 43 men, mean age 63.12 years with acute heart failure, in stable condition, underwent nocturnal polygraphy before hospital discharge. The type and severity of SA was determined. Besides descriptive statistics, correlations between the severity of SA and clinical and paraclinical characteristics were also analyzed (t-test, chi-square test, significancy at alpha 30/h. The apnea was predominantly obstructive (32 cases vs. 12 with central SA. Comparing the patients with mild or no SA with those with severe SA, we did not find statistically significant correlations (p>0.05 between the severity of SA and the majority of main clinical and paraclinical characteristics - age, sex, BMI, cardiac substrates of heart failure, comorbidities. Paradoxically, arterial hypertension (p=0.028 and atrial fibrillation (p=0.041 were significantly more prevalent in the group with mild or no SA. Conclusions. Before discharge, in the majority of patients hospitalized with acute heart failure moderate and severe SA is present, and is not related to the majority of patient related factors. Finding of significant SA in this setting is important, because its therapy could play an important role in preventing readmissions and improving prognosis.

  13. Multinational Assessment of Accuracy of Equations for Predicting Risk of Kidney Failure : A Meta-analysis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Tangri, Navdeep; Grams, Morgan E.; Levey, Andrew S.; Coresh, Josef; Appel, Lawrence J.; Astor, Brad C.; Chodick, Gabriel; Collins, Allan J.; Djurdjev, Ognjenka; Elley, Raina; Evans, Marie; Garg, Amit X.; Hallan, Stein I.; Nicer, Lesley A.; Ito, Sadayoshi; Jee, Sun Ha; Kovesdy, Csaba P.; Kronenberg, Florian; Heerspink, Hiddo J. Lambers; Marks, Angharad; Nadkarni, Girish N.; Navaneethan, Sankar D.; Nelson, Robert G.; Titze, Stephanie; Sarnak, Mark J.; Stengel, Benedicte; Woodward, Mark; Iseki, Kunitoshi

    2016-01-01

    IMPORTANCE Identifying patients at risk of chronic kidney disease (CKD) progression may facilitate more optimal nephrology care. Kidney failure risk equations were previously developed and validated in 2 Canadian cohorts. Validation in other regions and in CKD populations not under the care of a

  14. Assessment of the de Hirsch Predictive Index Tests of Reading Failure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Askov, Warren; And Others

    The predictive validity and the general usability of a battery of 10 tests reported by de Hirsch, Jansky, and Langford, the de Hirsch Predictive Index Tests of reading failure, were examined. The de Hirsch battery was administered to 433 kindergarten children in six public schools. When the pupils entered first grade, the Metropolitan Readiness…

  15. Risk Assessment Planning for Airborne Systems: An Information Assurance Failure Mode, Effects and Criticality Analysis Methodology

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-06-01

    Visa Investigate Data Breach March 30, 2012 Visa and MasterCard are investigating whether a data security breach at one of the main companies that...30). MasterCard and Visa Investigate Data Breach . New York Times . Stamatis, D. (2003). Failure Mode Effect Analysis: FMEA from Theory to Execution

  16. Assessing changes in failure probability of dams in a changing climate

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mallakpour, I.; AghaKouchak, A.; Moftakhari, H.; Ragno, E.

    2017-12-01

    Dams are crucial infrastructures and provide resilience against hydrometeorological extremes (e.g., droughts and floods). In 2017, California experienced series of flooding events terminating a 5-year drought, and leading to incidents such as structural failure of Oroville Dam's spillway. Because of large socioeconomic repercussions of such incidents, it is of paramount importance to evaluate dam failure risks associated with projected shifts in the streamflow regime. This becomes even more important as the current procedures for design of hydraulic structures (e.g., dams, bridges, spillways) are based on the so-called stationary assumption. Yet, changes in climate are anticipated to result in changes in statistics of river flow (e.g., more extreme floods) and possibly increasing the failure probability of already aging dams. Here, we examine changes in discharge under two representative concentration pathways (RCPs): RCP4.5 and RCP8.5. In this study, we used routed daily streamflow data from ten global climate models (GCMs) in order to investigate possible climate-induced changes in streamflow in northern California. Our results show that while the average flow does not show a significant change, extreme floods are projected to increase in the future. Using the extreme value theory, we estimate changes in the return periods of 50-year and 100-year floods in the current and future climates. Finally, we use the historical and future return periods to quantify changes in failure probability of dams in a warming climate.

  17. Numerical analysis of creep brittle rupture by the finite element method

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Goncalves, O.J.A.; Owen, D.R.J.

    1983-01-01

    In this work an implicit algorithm is proposed for the numerical analysis of creep brittle rupture problems by the finite element method. This kind of structural failure, typical in components operating at high temperatures for long periods of time, is modelled using either a three dimensional generalization of the Kachanov-Rabotnov equations due to Leckie and Hayhurst or the Monkman-Grant fracture criterion together with the Linear Life Fraction Rule. The finite element equations are derived by the displacement method and isoparametric elements are used for the spatial discretization. Geometric nonlinear effects (large displacements) are accounted for by an updated Lagrangian formulation. Attention is also focussed on the solution of the highly stiff differential equations that govern damage growth. Finally the numerical results of a three-dimensional analysis of a pressurized thin cylinder containing oxidised pits in its external wall are discussed. (orig.)

  18. Aggregations of brittle stars can perform similar ecological roles as mussel reefs

    KAUST Repository

    Geraldi, NR; Bertolini, C; Emmerson, MC; Roberts, D; Sigwart, JD; O’ Connor, NE

    2016-01-01

    considered. We quantified the abundance of sessile horse mussels Modiolus modiolus and aggregating brittle stars Ophiothrix fragilis and tested for correlations between the density of mussels (live and dead) and brittle stars each with (1) abundance, biomass

  19. Failure Impact Assessment for Large-Scale Landslides Located Near Human Settlement: Case Study in Southern Taiwan

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ming-Chien Chung

    2018-05-01

    Full Text Available In 2009, Typhoon Morakot caused over 680 deaths and more than 20,000 landslides in Taiwan. From 2010 to 2015, the Central Geological Survey of the Ministry of Economic Affairs identified 1047 potential large-scale landslides in Taiwan, of which 103 may have affected human settlements. This paper presents an analytical procedure that can be applied to assess the possible impact of a landslide collapse on nearby settlements. In this paper, existing technologies, including interpretation of remote sensing images, hydrogeological investigation, and numerical analysis, are integrated to evaluate potential failure scenarios and the landslide scale of a specific case: the Xinzhuang landslide. GeoStudio and RAMMS analysis modes and hazard classification produced the following results: (1 evaluation of the failure mechanisms and the influence zones of large-scale landslides; (2 assessment of the migration and accumulation of the landslide mass after failure; and (3 a landslide hazard and evacuation map. The results of the case study show that this analytical procedure can quantitatively estimate potential threats to human settlements. Furthermore, it can be applied to other villages and used as a reference in disaster prevention and evacuation planning.

  20. Assessment of obstructive sleep apnoea treatment success or failure after maxillomandibular advancement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Ruiter, M H T; Apperloo, R C; Milstein, D M J; de Lange, J

    2017-11-01

    Maxillomandibular advancement (MMA) is an alternative therapeutic option that is highly effective for treating obstructive sleep apnoea (OSA). MMA provides a solution for OSA patients that have difficulty accepting lifelong treatments with continuous positive airway pressure or mandibular advancement devices. The goal of this study was to investigate the different characteristics that determine OSA treatment success/failure after MMA. The apnoea-hypopnoea index (AHI) was used to determine the success or failure of OSA treatment after MMA. Sixty-two patients underwent MMA for moderate and severe OSA. A 71% success rate was observed with a mean AHI reduction of 69%. A statistically significant larger neck circumference was measured in patients with failed OSA treatments following MMA (P=0.008), and older patients had failed OSA treatments with MMA: 58 vs. 53 years respectively (P=0.037). Cephalometric analysis revealed no differences between successful and failed OSA treatment outcomes. There was no difference in maxillary and mandibular advancements between success and failed MMA-treated OSA patients. The complications most frequently reported following MMA were sensory disturbances in the inferior alveolar nerve (60%) and malocclusion (24%). The results suggest that age and neck girth may be important factors that could predict susceptibility to OSA treatment failures by MMA. Copyright © 2017 International Association of Oral and Maxillofacial Surgeons. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  1. Insensitivity to Flaws Leads to Damage Tolerance in Brittle Architected Meta-Materials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Montemayor, L. C.; Wong, W. H.; Zhang, Y.-W.; Greer, J. R.

    2016-02-01

    Cellular solids are instrumental in creating lightweight, strong, and damage-tolerant engineering materials. By extending feature size down to the nanoscale, we simultaneously exploit the architecture and material size effects to substantially enhance structural integrity of architected meta-materials. We discovered that hollow-tube alumina nanolattices with 3D kagome geometry that contained pre-fabricated flaws always failed at the same load as the pristine specimens when the ratio of notch length (a) to sample width (w) is no greater than 1/3, with no correlation between failure occurring at or away from the notch. Samples with (a/w) > 0.3, and notch length-to-unit cell size ratios of (a/l) > 5.2, failed at a lower peak loads because of the higher sample compliance when fewer unit cells span the intact region. Finite element simulations show that the failure is governed by purely tensile loading for (a/w) meta-materials may give rise to their damage tolerance and insensitivity of failure to the presence of flaws even when made entirely of intrinsically brittle materials.

  2. Prospective assessment of the occurrence of anemia in patients with heart failure: results from the Study of Anemia in a Heart Failure Population (STAMINA-HFP) Registry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adams, Kirkwood F; Patterson, James H; Patterson, John H; Oren, Ron M; Mehra, Mandeep R; O'Connor, Christopher M; Piña, Ileana L; Miller, Alan B; Chiong, Jun R; Dunlap, Stephanie H; Cotts, William G; Felker, Gary M; Schocken, Douglas D; Schwartz, Todd A; Ghali, Jalal K

    2009-05-01

    Although a potentially important pathophysiologic factor in heart failure, the prevalence and predictors of anemia have not been well studied in unselected patients with heart failure. The Study of Anemia in a Heart Failure Population (STAMINA-HFP) Registry prospectively studied the prevalence of anemia and the relationship of hemoglobin to health-related quality of life and outcomes among patients with heart failure. A random selection algorithm was used to reduce bias during enrollment of patients seen in specialty clinics or clinics of community cardiologists with experience in heart failure. In this initial report, data on prevalence and correlates of anemia were analyzed in 1,076 of the 1,082 registry patients who had clinical characteristics and hemoglobin determined by finger-stick at baseline. Overall (n = 1,082), the registry patients were 41% female and 73% white with a mean age (+/-SD) of 64 +/- 14 years (68 +/- 13 years in community and 57 +/- 14 years in specialty sites, P 70 years affected. Initial results from the STAMINA-HFP Registry suggest that anemia is a common comorbidity in unselected outpatients with heart failure. Given the strong association of anemia with adverse outcomes in heart failure, this study supports further investigation concerning the importance of anemia as a therapeutic target in this condition.

  3. Brittle to ductile transition in densified silica glass.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yuan, Fenglin; Huang, Liping

    2014-05-22

    Current understanding of the brittleness of glass is limited by our poor understanding and control over the microscopic structure. In this study, we used a pressure quenching route to tune the structure of silica glass in a controllable manner, and observed a systematic increase in ductility in samples quenched under increasingly higher pressure. The brittle to ductile transition in densified silica glass can be attributed to the critical role of 5-fold Si coordination defects (bonded to 5 O neighbors) in facilitating shear deformation and in dissipating energy by converting back to the 4-fold coordination state during deformation. As an archetypal glass former and one of the most abundant minerals in the Earth's crest, a fundamental understanding of the microscopic structure underpinning the ductility of silica glass will not only pave the way toward rational design of strong glasses, but also advance our knowledge of the geological processes in the Earth's interior.

  4. Fundamental aspects of brittle damage processes -- discrete systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Krajcinovic, D.; Lubarda, V.

    1993-01-01

    The analysis of cooperative brittle processes are performed on simple discrete models admitting closed form solutions. A connection between the damage and fracture mechanics is derived and utilized to illustrate the relation between two theories. The performed analyses suggest that the stress concentrations (direct interaction between defects) represent a second order effect during the hardening part of the response in the case of disordered solids

  5. Assessment of various failure theories for weight and cost optimized laminated composites using genetic algorithm

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Goyal, T. [Indian Institute of Technology Kanpur. Dept. of Aerospace Engineering, UP (India); Gupta, R. [Infotech Enterprises Ltd., Hyderabad (India)

    2012-07-01

    In this work, minimum weight-cost design for laminated composites is presented. A genetic algorithm has been developed for the optimization process. Maximum-Stress, Tsai-Wu and Tsai-Hill failure criteria have been used along with buckling analysis parameter for the margin of safety calculations. The design variables include three materials; namely Carbon-Epoxy, Glass-Epoxy, Kevlar-Epoxy; number of plies; ply orientation angles, varying from -75 deg. to 90 deg. in the intervals of 15 deg. and ply thicknesses which depend on the material in use. The total cost is a sum of material cost and layup cost. Layup cost is a function of the ply angle. Validation studies for solution convergence and weight-cost inverse proportionality are carried out. One set of results for shear loading are also validated from literature for a particular case. A Pareto-Optimal solution set is demonstrated for biaxial loading conditions. It is then extended to applied moments. It is found that global optimum for a given loading condition is a function of the failure criteria for shear loading, with Maximum Stress criteria giving the lightest-cheapest and Tsai-Wu criteria giving the heaviest-costliest optimized laminates. Optimized weight results are plotted from the three criteria to do a comparative study. This work gives a global optimized laminated composite and also a set of other local optimum laminates for a given set of loading conditions. The current algorithm also provides with adequate data to supplement the use of different failure criteria for varying loadings. This work can find use in the industry and/or academia considering the increased use of laminated composites in modern wind blades. (Author)

  6. Brittle to Semibrittle Transition in Quartz Sandstone: Energetics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kanaya, Taka; Hirth, Greg

    2018-01-01

    Triaxial compression experiments were conducted on a quartz sandstone at effective pressures up to 175 MPa and temperatures up to 900°C. Our experiments show a transition from brittle faulting to semibrittle faulting with an increase in both pressure and temperature. The yield behavior of samples deformed in the semibrittle regime follows a compactant elliptical cap at low strain, but evolves to a dilatant Mohr-Coulomb relationship with continued compaction. Optical microscopy indicates that semibrittle deformation involves cataclastic flow through shear-enhanced compaction and grain crushing; however, transmission electron microscopy shows evidence for dislocation glide in limited portions of samples. To constrain the relative contribution of brittle and crystal plastic mechanisms, we estimate the partitioning of the inelastic work into the dissipation energy for microcracking, intergranular frictional slip, and dislocation glide. We conclude that semibrittle deformation is accommodated primarily by cataclastic mechanisms, with only a limited contribution from crystal plasticity. Mechanical data, acoustic emission records, and analysis of surface energy all indicate the activation of subcritical cracking at elevated temperature. Hence, we infer that the enhancement of subcritical cracking is responsible for the transition to semibrittle flow through promoting distributed grain-scale fractures and millimeter-scale shear bands. Subcritical cracking promotes the nucleation of microfractures at lower stresses, and the resulting decrease in flow stress retards the propagation of transgranular microfractures. Our study illuminates the important role of temperature on the micromechanics of the transition from brittle faulting to cataclastic flow in the Earth.

  7. Displacement-length scaling of brittle faults in ductile shear.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grasemann, Bernhard; Exner, Ulrike; Tschegg, Cornelius

    2011-11-01

    Within a low-grade ductile shear zone, we investigated exceptionally well exposed brittle faults, which accumulated antithetic slip and rotated into the shearing direction. The foliation planes of the mylonitic host rock intersect the faults approximately at their centre and exhibit ductile reverse drag. Three types of brittle faults can be distinguished: (i) Faults developing on pre-existing K-feldspar/mica veins that are oblique to the shear direction. These faults have triclinic flanking structures. (ii) Wing cracks opening as mode I fractures at the tips of the triclinic flanking structures, perpendicular to the shear direction. These cracks are reactivated as faults with antithetic shear, extend from the parent K-feldspar/mica veins and form a complex linked flanking structure system. (iii) Joints forming perpendicular to the shearing direction are deformed to form monoclinic flanking structures. Triclinic and monoclinic flanking structures record elliptical displacement-distance profiles with steep displacement gradients at the fault tips by ductile flow in the host rocks, resulting in reverse drag of the foliation planes. These structures record one of the greatest maximum displacement/length ratios reported from natural fault structures. These exceptionally high ratios can be explained by localized antithetic displacement along brittle slip surfaces, which did not propagate during their rotation during surrounding ductile flow.

  8. Displacement–length scaling of brittle faults in ductile shear

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grasemann, Bernhard; Exner, Ulrike; Tschegg, Cornelius

    2011-01-01

    Within a low-grade ductile shear zone, we investigated exceptionally well exposed brittle faults, which accumulated antithetic slip and rotated into the shearing direction. The foliation planes of the mylonitic host rock intersect the faults approximately at their centre and exhibit ductile reverse drag. Three types of brittle faults can be distinguished: (i) Faults developing on pre-existing K-feldspar/mica veins that are oblique to the shear direction. These faults have triclinic flanking structures. (ii) Wing cracks opening as mode I fractures at the tips of the triclinic flanking structures, perpendicular to the shear direction. These cracks are reactivated as faults with antithetic shear, extend from the parent K-feldspar/mica veins and form a complex linked flanking structure system. (iii) Joints forming perpendicular to the shearing direction are deformed to form monoclinic flanking structures. Triclinic and monoclinic flanking structures record elliptical displacement–distance profiles with steep displacement gradients at the fault tips by ductile flow in the host rocks, resulting in reverse drag of the foliation planes. These structures record one of the greatest maximum displacement/length ratios reported from natural fault structures. These exceptionally high ratios can be explained by localized antithetic displacement along brittle slip surfaces, which did not propagate during their rotation during surrounding ductile flow. PMID:26806996

  9. Guidelines for safe design of shipping packages against brittle fracture

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1993-08-01

    In 1992, the ninth meeting of the Standing Advisory Group on the Safe Transport of Radioactive Materials recommended the publication of this TECDOC in an effort to promote the widest debate on the criteria for the brittle fracture safe design of transport packages. The published IAEA advice on the influence of brittle fracture on material integrity is contained in Appendix IX of the Advisory Material for the IAEA Regulations for the Safety Transport of Radioactive Material (1985 Edition, as amended 1990), Safety Series No. 37. This guidance is limited in scope, dealing only with ferritic steels in general terms. It is becoming more common for designers to specify materials other than austenitic stainless steel for packaging components. The data on ferritic steels cannot be assumed to apply to other metals, hence the need for further guidance on the development of relationships describing material properties at low temperatures. The methods described in this TECDOC will be considered by the Revision Panel for inclusion in the 1996 Edition of the IAEA Regulations for the Safe Transport of Radioactive Material and the supporting documents. If accepted by the Revision Panel, this advice will be a candidate for upgrading to a Safety Practice. In the interim period, this TECDOC offers provisional advice on brittle fracture evaluation. It is acknowledged that, at this stage, the views expressed do not necessarily reflect those of the governments of Member States or organizations under whose auspices this manuscript was produced. Refs and figs

  10. Ionic Liquids as a New Platform for Fiber Brittleness Removal

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhili Zhang

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available In the present study, three ionic liquids, 1-butyl-3-methylimidazolium chloride ([BMIM]Cl, 1-allyl-3-methylimidazolium ([AMIM]Cl, and 1-ethyl-3-methylimidazolium chloride dimethyphosphate ([EMIM]DMP, were used to eliminate the brittleness of recycled fibers. The results showed that the pretreatments with ionic liquids were able to modify and improve the properties of recycled fibers even at high moisture contents. [EMIM]DMP gave better performance compared to [BMIM]Cl and [AMIM]Cl, which can tolerate higher moisture contents. The optimal conditions of EMIM]DMP pretreatment were moisture content of 65%, [EMIM]DMP dosage of 20 wt-%, 80 °C, and 60 min, for which a higher brittleness removal was obtained. The tensile index, bursting index, and tearing index of handsheets were increased by 32.4%, 57.0%, and 46.5%, respectively. Fiber quality was improved as demonstrated by fiber length, lowered fines content, and increased swellability. Such results imply that ionic liquids pretreatment can promote the swelling of recycled fibers and remove their brittleness.

  11. Modeling multiscale evolution of numerous voids in shocked brittle material.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, Yin; Wang, Wenqiang; He, Hongliang; Lu, Tiecheng

    2014-04-01

    The influence of the evolution of numerous voids on macroscopic properties of materials is a multiscale problem that challenges computational research. A shock-wave compression model for brittle material, which can obtain both microscopic evolution and macroscopic shock properties, was developed using discrete element methods (lattice model). Using a model interaction-parameter-mapping procedure, qualitative features, as well as trends in the calculated shock-wave profiles, are shown to agree with experimental results. The shock wave splits into an elastic wave and a deformation wave in porous brittle materials, indicating significant shock plasticity. Void collapses in the deformation wave were the natural reason for volume shrinkage and deformation. However, media slippage and rotation deformations indicated by complex vortex patterns composed of relative velocity vectors were also confirmed as an important source of shock plasticity. With increasing pressure, the contribution from slippage deformation to the final plastic strain increased. Porosity was found to determine the amplitude of the elastic wave; porosity and shock stress together determine propagation speed of the deformation wave, as well as stress and strain on the final equilibrium state. Thus, shock behaviors of porous brittle material can be systematically designed for specific applications.

  12. Mechanical Properties and Brittle Behavior of Silica Aerogels

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Thierry Woignier

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Sets of silica gels: aerogels, xerogels and sintered aerogels, have been studied in the objective to understand the mechanical behavior of these highly porous solids. The mechanical behaviour of gels is described in terms of elastic and brittle materials, like glasses or ceramics. The magnitude of the elastic and rupture modulus is several orders of magnitude lower compared to dense glass. The mechanical behaviours (elastic and brittle are related to the same kinds of gel characteristics: pore volume, silanol content and pore size. Elastic modulus depends strongly on the volume fraction of pores and on the condensation reaction between silanols. Concerning the brittleness features: rupture modulus and toughness, it is shown that pores size plays an important role. Pores can be considered as flaws in the terms of fracture mechanics and the flaw size is related to the pore size. Weibull’s theory is used to show the statistical nature of flaw. Moreover, stress corrosion behaviour is studied as a function of environmental conditions (water and alcoholic atmosphere and temperature.

  13. Assessment of inotropic and vasodilating effects of milrinone lactate in patients with dilated cardiomyopathy and severe heart failure

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Edson Antonio Bregagnollo

    1999-02-01

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVE: To assess the hemodynamic and vasodilating effects of milrinone lactate (ML in patients with dilated cardiomyopathy (DCM and New York Heart Association (NYHA class III and IV heart failure. METHODS: Twenty patients with DCM and NYHA class III and IV heart failure were studied. The hemodynamic and vasodilating effects of ML, administered intravenously, were evaluated. The following variables were compared before and during drug infusion: cardiac output (CO and cardiac index (CI; pulmonary capillary wedge pressure (PCWP; mean aortic pressure (MAP; mean pulmonary artery pressure (MPAP; mean right atrial pressure (MRAP; left ventricular systolic and end-diastolic pressures (LVSP and LVEDP, respectively; peak rate of left ventricular pressure rise (dP/dt; systemic vascular resistance (SVR; pulmonary vascular resistance (PVR; and heart rate (HR. RESULTS: All patients showed a significant improvement of the analysed parameters of cardiac performance with an increase of CO and CI; a significant improvement in myocardial contractility (dP/dt and reduction of the LVEDP; PCWP; PAP; MAP; MRAP; SVR; PVR. Were observed no significant increase in HR occurred. CONCLUSION: Milrinone lactate is an inotropic dilating drug that, when administered intravenously, has beneficial effects on cardiac performance and myocardial contractility. It also promotes reduction of SVR and PVR in patients with DCM and NYHA class III and IV of heart failure.

  14. Trial application of the candidate root cause categorization scheme and preliminary assessment of selected data bases for the root causes of component failures program

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bruske, S.Z.; Cadwallader, L.C.; Stepina, P.L.

    1985-04-01

    The objective of the Nuclear Regulatory Commission's (NRC) Root Causes of Component Failures Program is to develop and apply a categorization scheme for identifying root causes of failures for components that comprise safety and safety support systems of nuclear power plants. Results from this program will provide valuable input in the areas of probabilistic risk assessment, reliability assurance, and application of risk assessments in the inspection program. This report presents the trial application and assessment of the candidate root cause categorization scheme to three failure data bases: the In-Plant Reliability Data System (IPRDS), the Licensee Event Report (LER) data base, and the Nuclear Plant Reliability Data System (NPRDS). Results of the trial application/assessment show that significant root cause information can be obtained from these failure data bases

  15. Controller recovery from equipment failures in air traffic control: A framework for the quantitative assessment of the recovery context

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Subotic, Branka; Schuster, Wolfgang; Majumdar, Arnab; Ochieng, Washington

    2014-01-01

    Air Traffic Control (ATC) involves a complex interaction of human operators (primarily air traffic controllers), equipment and procedures. On the rare occasions when equipment malfunctions, controllers play a crucial role in the recovery process of the ATC system for continued safe operation. Research on human performance in other safety critical industries using human reliability assessment techniques has shown that the context in which recovery from failures takes place has a significant influence on the outcome of the process. This paper investigates the importance of context in which air traffic controller recovery from equipment failures takes place, defining it in terms of 20 Recovery Influencing Factors (RIFs). The RIFs are used to develop a novel approach for the quantitative assessment of the recovery context based on a metric referred to as the Recovery Context Indicator (RCI). The method is validated by a series of simulation exercises conducted at a specific ATC Centre. The proposed method is useful to assess recovery enhancement approaches within ATC centres

  16. Assessment of the coronary venous system in heart failure patients by blood pool agent enhanced whole-heart MRI

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Manzke, Robert [University Hospital of Ulm, Department of Internal Medicine II, Ulm (Germany); Philips Research Europe, Clinical Sites Research, Hamburg (Germany); Binner, Ludwig; Bornstedt, Axel; Merkle, Nico; Lutz, Anja; Gradinger, Robert [University Hospital of Ulm, Department of Internal Medicine II, Ulm (Germany); Rasche, Volker [University Hospital of Ulm, Department of Internal Medicine II, Ulm (Germany); Experimental Cardiovascular Imaging, Internal Medicine II, Ulm (Germany)

    2011-04-15

    To investigate the feasibility of MRI for non-invasive assessment of the coronary sinus (CS) and the number and course of its major tributaries in heart failure patients. Fourteen non-ischaemic heart failure patients scheduled for cardiac resynchronisation therapy (CRT) underwent additional whole-heart coronary venography. MRI was performed 1 day before device implantation. The visibility, location and dimensions of the CS and its major tributaries were assessed and the number of potential implantation sites identified. The MRI results were validated by X-ray venography conventionally acquired during the device implantation procedure. The right atrium (RA), CS and mid-cardiac vein (MCV) could be visualised in all patients. 36% of the identified candidate branches were located posterolaterally, 48% laterally and 16% anterolaterally. The average diameter of the CS was quantified as 9.8 mm, the posterior interventricular vein (PIV) 4.6 mm, posterolateral segments 3.3 mm, lateral 2.9 mm and anterolateral 2.9 mm. Concordance with X-ray in terms of number and location of candidate branches was given in most cases. Contrast-enhanced MRI venography appears feasible for non-invasive pre-interventional assessment of the course of the CS and its major tributaries. (orig.)

  17. Assessment of the coronary venous system in heart failure patients by blood pool agent enhanced whole-heart MRI

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Manzke, Robert; Binner, Ludwig; Bornstedt, Axel; Merkle, Nico; Lutz, Anja; Gradinger, Robert; Rasche, Volker

    2011-01-01

    To investigate the feasibility of MRI for non-invasive assessment of the coronary sinus (CS) and the number and course of its major tributaries in heart failure patients. Fourteen non-ischaemic heart failure patients scheduled for cardiac resynchronisation therapy (CRT) underwent additional whole-heart coronary venography. MRI was performed 1 day before device implantation. The visibility, location and dimensions of the CS and its major tributaries were assessed and the number of potential implantation sites identified. The MRI results were validated by X-ray venography conventionally acquired during the device implantation procedure. The right atrium (RA), CS and mid-cardiac vein (MCV) could be visualised in all patients. 36% of the identified candidate branches were located posterolaterally, 48% laterally and 16% anterolaterally. The average diameter of the CS was quantified as 9.8 mm, the posterior interventricular vein (PIV) 4.6 mm, posterolateral segments 3.3 mm, lateral 2.9 mm and anterolateral 2.9 mm. Concordance with X-ray in terms of number and location of candidate branches was given in most cases. Contrast-enhanced MRI venography appears feasible for non-invasive pre-interventional assessment of the course of the CS and its major tributaries. (orig.)

  18. Fracture assessment of Savannah River Reactor carbon steel piping

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mertz, G.E.; Stoner, K.J.; Caskey, G.R.; Begley, J.A.

    1991-01-01

    The Savannah River Site (SRS) production reactors have been in operation since the mid-1950's. One postulated failure mechanism for the reactor piping is brittle fracture of the original A285 and A53 carbon steel piping. Material testing of archival piping determined (1) the static and dynamic tensile properties; (2) Charpy impact toughness; and (3) the static and dynamic compact tension fracture toughness properties. The nil-ductility transition temperature (NDTT), determined by Charpy impact test, is above the minimum operating temperature for some of the piping materials. A fracture assessment was performed to demonstrate that potential flaws are stable under upset loading conditions and minimum operating temperatures. A review of potential degradation mechanisms and plant operating history identified weld defects as the most likely crack initiation site for brittle fracture. Piping weld defects, as characterized by radiographic and metallographic examination, and low fracture toughness material properties were postulated at high stress locations in the piping. Normal operating loads, upset loads, and residual stresses were assumed to act on the postulated flaws. Calculated allowable flaw lengths exceed the size of observed weld defects, indicating adequate margins of safety against brittle fracture. Thus, a detailed fracture assessment was able to demonstrate that the piping systems will not fail by brittle fracture, even though the NDTT for some of the piping is above the minimum system operating temperature

  19. Failures in risk assessment and risk management for cosmetic preservatives in Europe and the impact on public health

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Schwensen, Jakob F; White, Ian R; Thyssen, Jacob P

    2015-01-01

    BACKGROUND: In view of the current and unprecedented increase in contact allergy to methylisothiazolinone (MI), we characterized and evaluated two recent epidemics of contact allergy to preservatives used in cosmetic products to address failures in risk assessment and risk management. OBJECTIVE......: To evaluate temporal trends of preservative contact allergy. METHODS: The study population included consecutive patch tested eczema patients seen at a university hospital between 1985 and 2013. A total of 23 138 patients were investigated for a contact allergy. RESULTS: The overall prevalence of contact...... the proportion of patients with current clinical disease attributable to methyldibromo glutaronitrile contact allergy decreased significantly following the ban on its use in cosmetic products (p

  20. A procedure to identify and to assess risk parameters in a SCR (Steel Catenary Riser) due to the fatigue failure

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Stefane, Wania [Universidade Estadual de Campinas (UNICAMP), Campinas, SP (Brazil). Faculdade de Engenharia Mecanica; Morooka, Celso K. [Universidade Estadual de Campinas (UNICAMP), Campinas, SP (Brazil). Dept. de Engenharia de Petroleo. Centro de Estudos de Petroleo; Pezzi Filho, Mario [PETROBRAS S.A., Rio de Janeiro, RJ (Brazil). E and P. ENGP/IPMI/ES; Matt, Cyntia G.C.; Franciss, Ricardo [PETROBRAS S.A., Rio de Janeiro, RJ (Brazil). Centro de Pesquisas (CENPES)

    2009-12-19

    The discovery of offshore fields in ultra deep water and the presence of reservoirs located in great depths below the seabed requires innovative solutions for offshore oil production systems. Many riser configurations have emerged as economically viable technological solutions for these scenarios. Therefore the study and the development of methodologies applied to riser design and procedures to calculate and to dimension production risers, taken into account the effects of mete ocean conditions, such as waves, current and platform motion in the fatigue failure is fundamental. The random nature of these conditions as well as the mechanical characteristics of the riser components are critical to a probabilistic treatment to ensure the greatest reliability for risers and minimum risks associated to different aspects of the operation like the safety of the installation, economical concerns and the environment. The current work presents a procedure of the identification and the assessment of main parameters of risk when considering fatigue failure. Static and dynamic behavior of Steel Catenary Riser (SCR) under the effects of mete ocean conditions and uncertainties related to total cumulative damage (Miner-Palmgren's rule) are taken into account. The methodology adopted is probabilistic and the approach is analytical. The procedure is based on the First Order Reliability Method (FORM) which usually presents low computational effort and acceptable accuracy. The procedure suggested is applied for two practical cases, one using data available from the literature and the second with data collected from an actual Brazilian offshore field operation. For both cases, results of the probability of failure due to fatigue were obtained for different locations along the SCR length connected to a semi-submersible platform. From these results, the sensitivity of the probability of failure due to fatigue for a SCR could be verified, and the most effective parameter could also be

  1. Failure of Grass Covered Flood Defences with Roads on Top Due to Wave Overtopping: A Probabilistic Assessment Method

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Juan P. Aguilar-López

    2018-06-01

    Full Text Available Hard structures, i.e., roads, are commonly found over flood defences, such as dikes, in order to ensure access and connectivity between flood protected areas. Several climate change future scenario studies have concluded that flood defences will be required to withstand more severe storms than the ones used for their original design. Therefore, this paper presents a probabilistic methodology to assess the effect of a road on top of a dike: it gives the failure probability of the grass cover due to wave overtopping over a wide range of design storms. The methodology was developed by building two different dike configurations in computational fluid dynamics Navier–Stokes solution software; one with a road on top and one without a road. Both models were validated with experimental data collected from field-scale experiments. Later, both models were used to produce data sets for training simpler and faster emulators. These emulators were coupled to a simplified erosion model which allowed testing storm scenarios which resulted in local scouring conditioned statistical failure probabilities. From these results it was estimated that the dike with a road has higher probabilities (5 × 10−5 > Pf >1 × 10−4 of failure than a dike without a road (Pf < 1 × 10−6 if realistic grass quality spatial distributions were assumed. The coupled emulator-erosion model was able to yield realistic probabilities, given all the uncertainties in the modelling process and it seems to be a promising tool for quantifying grass cover erosion failure.

  2. A discussion about simplified methodologies for failure assessment of nuclear reactor components

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cruz, J.R.B.; Andrade, A.H.P. de; Landes, J.D.

    1996-01-01

    Failure of nuclear reactor components like pressure vessels and piping must be avoided for all phases of reactor operation. Especially severe loading conditions come from postulated accident scenarios during which the integrity of the component is required. The use of Fracture Mechanics concepts to investigate the mechanical behavior of flawed structures in the non-linear regime is a complex subject due to the fact that the crack driving force (expressed in terms of J or CTOD) is not /only a function of the cracked geometry, but depends also on the plastic flow properties of the material. Since the numerical solutions by the finite element method are expensive and time consuming, the existence of simplified engineering procedures is of great relevance. These allow a ready identification of the main parameters affecting the crack driving force, and permit a fast and simple evaluation of the structural integrity of the cracked component. This paper presents an overview of the major simplified ductile fracture methodologies that have been proposed in the literature trying to point out their similarities, strong points and negative aspects. Once the best characteristics of each method are identified, they could then be combined to develop a single methodology, one that would be both easy to use and capable of making accurate failure predictions

  3. An investigation of the mineral in ductile and brittle cortical mouse bone.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rodriguez-Florez, Naiara; Garcia-Tunon, Esther; Mukadam, Quresh; Saiz, Eduardo; Oldknow, Karla J; Farquharson, Colin; Millán, José Luis; Boyde, Alan; Shefelbine, Sandra J

    2015-05-01

    Bone is a strong and tough material composed of apatite mineral, organic matter, and water. Changes in composition and organization of these building blocks affect bone's mechanical integrity. Skeletal disorders often affect bone's mineral phase, either by variations in the collagen or directly altering mineralization. The aim of the current study was to explore the differences in the mineral of brittle and ductile cortical bone at the mineral (nm) and tissue (µm) levels using two mouse phenotypes. Osteogenesis imperfecta model, oim(-/-) , mice have a defect in the collagen, which leads to brittle bone; PHOSPHO1 mutants, Phospho1(-/-) , have ductile bone resulting from altered mineralization. Oim(-/-) and Phospho1(-/-) were compared with their respective wild-type controls. Femora were defatted and ground to powder to measure average mineral crystal size using X-ray diffraction (XRD) and to monitor the bulk mineral to matrix ratio via thermogravimetric analysis (TGA). XRD scans were run after TGA for phase identification to assess the fractions of hydroxyapatite and β-tricalcium phosphate. Tibiae were embedded to measure elastic properties with nanoindentation and the extent of mineralization with backscattered electron microscopy (BSE SEM). Results revealed that although both pathology models had extremely different whole-bone mechanics, they both had smaller apatite crystals, lower bulk mineral to matrix ratio, and showed more thermal conversion to β-tricalcium phosphate than their wild types, indicating deviations from stoichiometric hydroxyapatite in the original mineral. In contrast, the degree of mineralization of bone matrix was different for each strain: brittle oim(-/-) were hypermineralized, whereas ductile Phospho1(-/-) were hypomineralized. Despite differences in the mineralization, nanoscale alterations in the mineral were associated with reduced tissue elastic moduli in both pathologies. Results indicated that alterations from normal crystal size

  4. Methodology for probability of failure assessment of offshore pipelines; Metodologia qualitativa de avaliacao da probabilidade de falha de dutos rigidos submarinos estaticos

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pezzi Filho, Mario [PETROBRAS, Rio de Janeiro, RJ (Brazil)

    2005-07-01

    In this study it is presented a methodology for assessing the likelihood of failure for every failure mechanism defined for carbon steel static offshore pipelines. This methodology is aimed to comply with the Integrity Management policy established by the Company. Decision trees are used for the development of the methodology and the evaluation of the extent and the significance of these failure mechanisms. Decision trees enable also the visualization of the logical structure of algorithms which eventually will be used in risk assessment software. The benefits of the proposed methodology are presented and it is recommended that it be tested on static offshore pipelines installed in different assets for validation. (author)

  5. Mechanics of Failure Mechanisms in Structures

    CERN Document Server

    Carlson, R L; Craig, J I

    2012-01-01

    This book focuses on the mechanisms and underlying mechanics of failure in various classes of materials such as metallic, ceramic, polymeric, composite and bio-material.  Topics include tensile and compressive fracture, crack initiation and growth, fatigue and creep rupture in metallic materials, matrix cracking and delamination and environmental degradation in polymeric composites, failure of bio-materials such as prosthetic heart valves and prosthetic hip joints, failure of ceramics and ceramic matrix composites, failure of metallic matrix composites, static and dynamic buckling failure, dynamic excitations and creep buckling failure in structural systems. Chapters are devoted to failure mechanisms that are characteristic of each of the materials.  The work also provides the basic elements of fracture mechanics and studies in detail several niche topics such as the effects of toughness gradients, variable amplitude loading effects in fatigue, small fatigue cracks, and creep induced brittleness. Furthe...

  6. BRITTLE CULM16 (BRITTLE NODE) is required for the formation of secondary cell walls in rice nodes

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    WANG Ying; WANG Jiu-lin; GUO Xiu-ping; ZHANG Xin; LEI Cai-lin; CHENG Zhi-jun; WAN Jian-min; REN Yu-long; CHEN Sai-hua; XU Yang; ZHOU Kun-neng; ZHANG Long; MING Ming; WU Fu-qing; LIN Qi-bing

    2017-01-01

    Plant cell walls constitute the skeletal structures of plant bodies, and thus confer lodging resistance for grain crops. While the basic cell wall synthesis machinery is relatively well established now, our understanding of how the process is regulated remains limited and fragmented. In this study, we report the identification and characterization of the novel rice (Oryza sativa L.) brittle culm16 (brittle node; bc16) mutant. The brittle node phenotype of the bc16 mutant appears exclusively at nodes, and resembles the previously reported bc5 mutant. Combined histochemical staining and electron microscopy assays revealed that in the bc16 mutant, the secondary cell wall formation and thickening of node sclerenchyma tissues are seriously affected after heading. Furthermore, cell wall composition assays revealed that the bc16 mutation led to a significant reduction in cellulose and lignin contents. Using a map-based cloning approach, the bc16 locus is mapped to an approximately 1.7-Mb region of chromosome 4. Together, our findings strengthen evidence for discretely spatial differences in the secondary cell wall formation within plant bodies.

  7. Assessment of Intralaminar Progressive Damage and Failure Analysis Using an Efficient Evaluation Framework

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hyder, Imran; Schaefer, Joseph; Justusson, Brian; Wanthal, Steve; Leone, Frank; Rose, Cheryl

    2017-01-01

    Reducing the timeline for development and certification for composite structures has been a long standing objective of the aerospace industry. This timeline can be further exacerbated when attempting to integrate new fiber-reinforced composite materials due to the large number of testing required at every level of design. computational progressive damage and failure analysis (PDFA) attempts to mitigate this effect; however, new PDFA methods have been slow to be adopted in industry since material model evaluation techniques have not been fully defined. This study presents an efficient evaluation framework which uses a piecewise verification and validation (V&V) approach for PDFA methods. Specifically, the framework is applied to evaluate PDFA research codes within the context of intralaminar damage. Methods are incrementally taken through various V&V exercises specifically tailored to study PDFA intralaminar damage modeling capability. Finally, methods are evaluated against a defined set of success criteria to highlight successes and limitations.

  8. Assessing cell fusion and cytokinesis failure as mechanisms of clone 9 hepatocyte multinucleation in vitro.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Simic, Damir; Euler, Catherine; Thurby, Christina; Peden, Mike; Tannehill-Gregg, Sarah; Bunch, Todd; Sanderson, Thomas; Van Vleet, Terry

    2012-08-01

    In this in vitro model of hepatocyte multinucleation, separate cultures of rat Clone 9 cells are labeled with either red or green cell tracker dyes (Red Cell Tracker CMPTX or Vybrant CFDA SE Cell Tracer), plated together in mixed-color colonies, and treated with positive or negative control agents for 4 days. The fluorescent dyes become cell-impermeant after entering cells and are not transferred to adjacent cells in a population, but are inherited by daughter cells after fusion. The mixed-color cultures are then evaluated microscopically for multinucleation and analysis of the underlying mechanism (cell fusion/cytokinesis). Multinucleated cells containing only one dye have undergone cytokinesis failure, whereas dual-labeled multinucleated cells have resulted from fusion. © 2012 by John Wiley & Sons, Inc.

  9. An automated assessment method for the potential loss related to a dam failure

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Marche, C.; McNeil, E.; Boyer, R.

    1994-01-01

    The overall risk associated with a dam or dam group failure is a measure of the probability and severity of its effects to people, properties and the environment. A methodology for flooding impacts studies based on deterministic analysis of water depth and velocity is proposed. The methodology can be used for flooding impacts studies on entities for which the geographical position is either a unique point (such as a buildings), a series of linked points (e.g. roads) or a polygon (e.g. crop field). Software implementation of the methodology is based on numerical cartograpy, including terrain numerical modelling, free surface flow modelling and dual kriging. The software delineates the flood contours, identifies entities located in the flooding area, estimates flow conditions at the site locations of each affected entity and evaluates the corresponding impacts in these entities. 4 refs., 7 figs

  10. Assessment of leptin and some Antioxidants in Blood of Chronic Renal Failure Patients

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ahmed, A.M.

    2004-01-01

    The aim of the present work is to study the effect of haemodialysis on the state of the antioxidants glutathione peroxidase (GPx) and vitamin C and the role of leptin hormone on the redox homeostasis in patients with chronic renal failure (CRF). This study was carried out on 25 patients (15 females and 10 males) with CRF,aged 19-55 years, in addition to 25 healthy control (10 females and 15 males). Patients were subjected to regular haemodialysis for 4 hours three times weekly and blood samples were collected before haemodialysis. In this study, plasma leptin was significantly increased in CRF group than normal control. Vitamin C and GPx were decreased significantly in CRF group in comparison with normal control. There was non-significant difference in serum leptin level between males and females in both control and patient groups. Patients showed significant lower body mass index (BMI) and albumin and higher cholesterol. In the control group, serum leptin levels showed significant positive correlation with BMI, while CRF group had significant negative correlation. In CRF group, serum leptin showed significant negative correlation with serum albumin and non-significant negative correlation with both creatinine and cholesterol. This is probably due to malnutrition status commonly occurs in renal failure. Serum leptin levels showed non-significant negative correlation between both GPx and Vitamin C in control group while in patient group, leptin showed significant positive correlation with GPx and vitamin C. In conclusion leptin acts on energy metabolism and plays a role in the modulation of cellular redox balance while the oxidative stress plays a role in many disease states. These diseases had increased incidence in uremia and particularly in haemodialysis

  11. An assessment of BWR [boiling water reactor] Mark-II containment challenges, failure modes, and potential improvements in performance

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kelly, D.L.; Jones, K.R.; Dallman, R.J.; Wagner, K.C.

    1990-07-01

    This report assesses challenges to BWR Mark II containment integrity that could potentially arise from severe accidents. Also assessed are some potential improvements that could prevent core damage or containment failure, or could mitigate the consequences of such failure by reducing the release of fission products to the environment. These challenges and improvements are analyzed via a limited quantitative risk/benefit analysis of a generic BWR/4 reactor with Mark II containment. Point estimate frequencies of the dominant core damage sequences are obtained and simple containment event trees are constructed to evaluate the response of the containment to these severe accident sequences. The resulting containment release modes are then binned into source term release categories, which provide inputs to the consequence analysis. The output of the consequences analysis is used to construct an overall base case risk profile. Potential improvements and sensitivities are evaluated by modifying the event tree spilt fractions, thus generating a revised risk profile. Several important sensitivity cases are examined to evaluate the impact of phenomenological uncertainties on the final results. 75 refs., 25 figs., 65 tabs

  12. Three-Dimensional Dynamic Rupture in Brittle Solids and the Volumetric Strain Criterion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Uenishi, K.; Yamachi, H.

    2017-12-01

    As pointed out by Uenishi (2016 AGU Fall Meeting), source dynamics of ordinary earthquakes is often studied in the framework of 3D rupture in brittle solids but our knowledge of mechanics of actual 3D rupture is limited. Typically, criteria derived from 1D frictional observations of sliding materials or post-failure behavior of solids are applied in seismic simulations, and although mode-I cracks are frequently encountered in earthquake-induced ground failures, rupture in tension is in most cases ignored. Even when it is included in analyses, the classical maximum principal tensile stress rupture criterion is repeatedly used. Our recent basic experiments of dynamic rupture of spherical or cylindrical monolithic brittle solids by applying high-voltage electric discharge impulses or impact loads have indicated generation of surprisingly simple and often flat rupture surfaces in 3D specimens even without the initial existence of planes of weakness. However, at the same time, the snapshots taken by a high-speed digital video camera have shown rather complicated histories of rupture development in these 3D solid materials, which seem to be difficult to be explained by, for example, the maximum principal stress criterion. Instead, a (tensile) volumetric strain criterion where the volumetric strain (dilatation or the first invariant of the strain tensor) is a decisive parameter for rupture seems more effective in computationally reproducing the multi-directionally propagating waves and rupture. In this study, we try to show the connection between this volumetric strain criterion and other classical rupture criteria or physical parameters employed in continuum mechanics, and indicate that the criterion has, to some degree, physical meanings. First, we mathematically illustrate that the criterion is equivalent to a criterion based on the mean normal stress, a crucial parameter in plasticity. Then, we mention the relation between the volumetric strain criterion and the

  13. Validation of a New Elastoplastic Constitutive Model Dedicated to the Cyclic Behaviour of Brittle Rock Materials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cerfontaine, B.; Charlier, R.; Collin, F.; Taiebat, M.

    2017-10-01

    Old mines or caverns may be used as reservoirs for fuel/gas storage or in the context of large-scale energy storage. In the first case, oil or gas is stored on annual basis. In the second case pressure due to water or compressed air varies on a daily basis or even faster. In both cases a cyclic loading on the cavern's/mine's walls must be considered for the design. The complexity of rockwork geometries or coupling with water flow requires finite element modelling and then a suitable constitutive law for the rock behaviour modelling. This paper presents and validates the formulation of a new constitutive law able to represent the inherently cyclic behaviour of rocks at low confinement. The main features of the behaviour evidenced by experiments in the literature depict a progressive degradation and strain of the material with the number of cycles. A constitutive law based on a boundary surface concept is developed. It represents the brittle failure of the material as well as its progressive degradation. Kinematic hardening of the yield surface allows the modelling of cycles. Isotropic softening on the cohesion variable leads to the progressive degradation of the rock strength. A limit surface is introduced and has a lower opening than the bounding surface. This surface describes the peak strength of the material and allows the modelling of a brittle behaviour. In addition a fatigue limit is introduced such that no cohesion degradation occurs if the stress state lies inside this surface. The model is validated against three different rock materials and types of experiments. Parameters of the constitutive laws are calibrated against uniaxial tests on Lorano marble, triaxial test on a sandstone and damage-controlled test on Lac du Bonnet granite. The model is shown to reproduce correctly experimental results, especially the evolution of strain with number of cycles.

  14. Assessment of a Business-to-Consumer (B2C) model for Telemonitoring patients with Chronic Heart Failure (CHF).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grustam, Andrija S; Vrijhoef, Hubertus J M; Koymans, Ron; Hukal, Philipp; Severens, Johan L

    2017-10-11

    The purpose of this study is to assess the Business-to-Consumer (B2C) model for telemonitoring patients with Chronic Heart Failure (CHF) by analysing the value it creates, both for organizations or ventures that provide telemonitoring services based on it, and for society. The business model assessment was based on the following categories: caveats, venture type, six-factor alignment, strategic market assessment, financial viability, valuation analysis, sustainability, societal impact, and technology assessment. The venture valuation was performed for three jurisdictions (countries) - Singapore, the Netherlands and the United States - in order to show the opportunities in a small, medium-sized, and large country (i.e. population). The business model assessment revealed that B2C telemonitoring is viable and profitable in the Innovating in Healthcare Framework. Analysis of the ecosystem revealed an average-to-excellent fit with the six factors. The structure and financing fit was average, public policy and technology alignment was good, while consumer alignment and accountability fit was deemed excellent. The financial prognosis revealed that the venture is viable and profitable in Singapore and the Netherlands but not in the United States due to relatively high salary inputs. The B2C model in telemonitoring CHF potentially creates value for patients, shareholders of the service provider, and society. However, the validity of the results could be improved, for instance by using a peer-reviewed framework, a systematic literature search, case-based cost/efficiency inputs, and varied scenario inputs.

  15. High Strain Rate Tensile Testing of Silver Nanowires: Rate-Dependent Brittle-to-Ductile Transition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ramachandramoorthy, Rajaprakash; Gao, Wei; Bernal, Rodrigo; Espinosa, Horacio

    2016-01-13

    The characterization of nanomaterials under high strain rates is critical to understand their suitability for dynamic applications such as nanoresonators and nanoswitches. It is also of great theoretical importance to explore nanomechanics with dynamic and rate effects. Here, we report in situ scanning electron microscope (SEM) tensile testing of bicrystalline silver nanowires at strain rates up to 2/s, which is 2 orders of magnitude higher than previously reported in the literature. The experiments are enabled by a microelectromechanical system (MEMS) with fast response time. It was identified that the nanowire plastic deformation has a small activation volume (ductile failure mode transition was observed at a threshold strain rate of 0.2/s. Transmission electron microscopy (TEM) revealed that along the nanowire, dislocation density and spatial distribution of plastic regions increase with increasing strain rate. Furthermore, molecular dynamic (MD) simulations show that deformation mechanisms such as grain boundary migration and dislocation interactions are responsible for such ductility. Finally, the MD and experimental results were interpreted using dislocation nucleation theory. The predicted yield stress values are in agreement with the experimental results for strain rates above 0.2/s when ductility is pronounced. At low strain rates, random imperfections on the nanowire surface trigger localized plasticity, leading to a brittle-like failure.

  16. Analytical and numerical analysis of frictional damage in quasi brittle materials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, Q. Z.; Zhao, L. Y.; Shao, J. F.

    2016-07-01

    Frictional sliding and crack growth are two main dissipation processes in quasi brittle materials. The frictional sliding along closed cracks is the origin of macroscopic plastic deformation while the crack growth induces a material damage. The main difficulty of modeling is to consider the inherent coupling between these two processes. Various models and associated numerical algorithms have been proposed. But there are so far no analytical solutions even for simple loading paths for the validation of such algorithms. In this paper, we first present a micro-mechanical model taking into account the damage-friction coupling for a large class of quasi brittle materials. The model is formulated by combining a linear homogenization procedure with the Mori-Tanaka scheme and the irreversible thermodynamics framework. As an original contribution, a series of analytical solutions of stress-strain relations are developed for various loading paths. Based on the micro-mechanical model, two numerical integration algorithms are exploited. The first one involves a coupled friction/damage correction scheme, which is consistent with the coupling nature of the constitutive model. The second one contains a friction/damage decoupling scheme with two consecutive steps: the friction correction followed by the damage correction. With the analytical solutions as reference results, the two algorithms are assessed through a series of numerical tests. It is found that the decoupling correction scheme is efficient to guarantee a systematic numerical convergence.

  17. The Assessing of the Failure Behavior of Glass/Polyester Composites Subject to Quasi Static Stresses

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stanciu, M. D.; Savin, A.; Teodorescu-Drăghicescu, H.

    2017-06-01

    Using glass fabric reinforced composites for structure of wind turbine blades requires high mechanical strengths especially to cyclic stresses. Studies have shown that approximately 50% of composite material failure occurs because of fatigue. Composites behavior to cyclic stresses involves three stages regarding to stiffness variation: the first stage is characterized by the accelerated decline of stiffness with micro-cracks, the second stage - a slight decrease of stiffness characterized by the occurrence of delamination and third stage characterized by higher decreases of resistance and occurrence of fracture thereof. The aim of the paper is to analyzed the behavior of composites reinforced with glass fibers fabric type RT500 and polyester resin subjected to tensile cyclic loading with pulsating quasi-static regime with asymmetry coefficient R = 0. The samples were tested with the universal tensile machine LS100 Lloyd Instruments Plus, with a load capacity of 100 kN. The load was applied with different speeds of 1 mm/min, 10 mm/min and 20 mm/min. After tests, it was observed that the greatest permanent strains were recorded in the first load cycles when the total energy storage by material was lost due to internal friction. With increasing number of cycles, the glass/polyester composites ability to store energy of deformation decreases, the flow phenomenon characterized by large displacements to smaller loading forces appearing.

  18. Experimental analysis and application of the effect of stress on continental shale reservoir brittleness

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yin, Shuai; Lv, Dawei; Jin, Lin; Ding, Wenlong

    2018-04-01

    Hydraulic fracturing is an effective measure of reservoir modification for the development of shale gas. The evaluation of rock brittleness can provide a basis for the optimization of fracturing. In this paper, the effect of stress on the brittleness of shale is systematically analyzed by designing triaxial mechanics tests. The strain analysis method was used to evaluate the shale brittleness. The research indicates that, with the increase of effective confining pressure, the value of the brittleness index (B 1) decreases. There is a linear and positive correlation between the average reduction ratio of B 1 and the buried depth. The stress has a significant effect on the shale brittleness. Therefore, the rock brittleness can be overestimated without considering the influence of the buried depth or the stress of formation when using the mineral composition method. Being affected by the stress, when the brittle mineral content of the shale reservoir is 70%, 65%, 60%, and 55%, the lower limit depth of the shale gas development is 5000 m, 4400 m, 3000 m, and 1800 m, respectively. However, when the brittle mineral content of the shale is less than 50%, the brittleness index is less than 50% in all of the buried depths. In this case, the shale will not have any commercial development potential. The logging interpretation results of the brittleness index conducted with stress correction are more consistent with the real situation, and thus, this method can be better used to help the optimization of the fracturing intervals of shale gas.

  19. Nonlocal effects on dynamic damage accumulation in brittle solids

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chen, E.P.

    1995-12-01

    This paper presents a nonlocal analysis of the dynamic damage accumulation processes in brittle solids. A nonlocal formulation of a microcrack based continuum damage model is developed and implemented into a transient dynamic finite element computer code. The code is then applied to the study of the damage accumulation process in a concrete plate with a central hole and subjected to the action of a step tensile pulse applied at opposite edges of the plate. Several finite element discretizations are used to examine the mesh size effect. Comparisons between calculated results based on local and nonlocal formulations are made and nonlocal effects are discussed.

  20. Risk assessment of failure modes of gas diffuser liner of V94.2 siemens gas turbine by FMEA method

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mirzaei Rafsanjani, H.; Rezaei Nasab, A.

    2012-05-01

    Failure of welding connection of gas diffuser liner and exhaust casing is one of the failure modes of V94.2 gas turbines which are happened in some power plants. This defect is one of the uncertainties of customers when they want to accept the final commissioning of this product. According to this, the risk priority of this failure evaluated by failure modes and effect analysis (FMEA) method to find out whether this failure is catastrophic for turbine performance and is harmful for humans. By using history of 110 gas turbines of this model which are used in some power plants, the severity number, occurrence number and detection number of failure determined and consequently the Risk Priority Number (RPN) of failure determined. Finally, critically matrix of potential failures is created and illustrated that failure modes are located in safe zone.

  1. Risk Assessment of Total Coliform in X WTP’s Water Production Using Failure Mode And Effect Analysis Method

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bella Apriliani Amanda

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available The greatest risk of drinking water supply is a failure to provide safe drinking water for communities. Based on IPA Kedunguling testing report on March 2016 noted that sample exceeding the quality standart of Peraturan Menteri Kesehatan RI No 492/2010 for the total coliform quality standart. The presence of total coliforms indicating water contamination by pathogen means the water is not safe to consume. The disinfection process has an importance rule in pathogen inactivation. Disinfectant performance is influenced by temperature, pH, turbidity, and the presence of organic materials. One way to control the quality of water produced by using a risk management approach Failure Modes and Effect Analysis (FMEA methods. The potential risks should be measured to determine causes of the problems and find the appropriate risk reduction. The risk assessment is using Risk Priority Number (RPN scale as a basis prioritization of remedial action on issues. Based on identification and risk analysis using FMEA known that the greatest risk of failure is the stipulation of chlorine dose and organic substances (category of high risk level; residual chlorine (category of moderate risk level; turbidity and pH (very low risk level category. Improvement proposal that can be done to reduce total coliforms presence in IPA Kedunguling is by increasing residual chlorine to 0.6 mg/l, set a daily chlorine level, controlling DBPs forming by lowering the concentration of organic precursor using granular activated carbon (GAC or aeration, by lowering the dose of disinfectant, set aside DBPs after the compound is formed using granular activated carbon (GAC, turbidity and pH monitoring, and regularly washing the filters

  2. Ultrasound of Jugular Veins for Assessment of Acute Dyspnea in Emergency Departments and for the Assessment of Acute Heart Failure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tzadok, Batsheva; Shapira, Shay; Tal-Or, Eran

    2018-05-01

    When a patient arrives at the emergency department (ED) presenting with symptoms of acute decompensated heart failure (ADHF), it is possible to reach a definitive diagnosis through many different venues, including medical history, physical examination, echocardiography, chest X-ray, and B-type natriuretic peptide (BNP) levels. Point-of-care ultrasound (POCUS) has become a mainstream tool for diagnosis and treatment in the field of emergency medicine, as well as in various other departments in the hospital setting. Currently, the main methods of diagnosis of ADHF using POCUS are pleural B-lines and inferior vena cava (IVC) width and respiratory variation. To examine the potential use and benefits of bedside ultrasound of the jugular veins in the evaluation of dyspneic patients for identification of ADHF. A blood BNP level was drawn from each participant at time of recruitment. The area and size of the internal jugular vein (IJV) during inspiration and expiration were examined. Our results showed that the respiratory area change of the IJVs had a specificity and sensitivity of nearly 70% accuracy rate in indentifying ADHF in our ED. Ultrasound of the IJV may be a useful tool for the diagnosis of ADHF because it is easy to measure and requires little skill. It is also not affected by patient body habitus.

  3. Failure to use routine prevention of disability (POD assessment resulting In permanent disability

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Erika Zoulba

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available Disability is one of problems in leprosy or Morbus Hansen (MH, which can cause the patient loose his autonomy and may affect his social relationship with family and community. Disability occurs due to neurological inflammation that can manifest as silent neuritis (which develops without any pain. Silent neuritis can be recognized early with a routine prevention of disability (POD assessment. A 19-year-old male patient was referred from a District General Hospital with a history of numbness and stiffness of his 4th and 5th fingers of his left hand since 1 month before admittance. The patient was refered by Community Health Center (CHC or PUSKESMAS after a one year treatment and RFT. During his treatment at the CHC, no assessment of peripheral nerve or POD had ever been performed. The POD assessment at our hospital demonstrated sensory deficit at some points of assessment on both palms and reduced muscle strength of the first and 5th fingers in both hands. Nerve conduction velocity (NCV performed at the outpatient of Neurology Department, showed multiple mononeuropathy MH with irreversible damage. Nerve damage is still considered reversible when it occurs less than 6 months. In this case, the silent neuritis was not detected early and there was delayed treatment; as showed by NCV which revealed a manifestation of irreversible nerve damage. Routine POD assessment may detect the condition and appropriate treatment may overcome the nerve damage.

  4. MYOCARDIAL PERFUSION ASSESSMENT IN FORECASTING EFFECT OF CORONARY ANGIOPLASTY IN PATIENTS WITH ISCHEMIC CHRONIC HEART FAILURE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. B. Mironkov

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Aim. To define influence of the left ventricle (LV perfusion defects on the clinical status dynamics after coronary angioplasty in patients with the expressed myocardium dysfunction of ischemic etiology. Materials and methods. Examined 86 patients (81 men and 5 women aged from 46 to 73 years before and in 2–3 days after percutaneous coronary intervention with diagnosis: CAD, CHF with NYHA class III–IV, echocardiography parameters of LV: ejection fraction less than 40%, end-diastolic volume is more than 200 ml. Perfusion defects of myocardium estimated with use of ECG-gated single photon emission computed tomography. Predictors were defined: perfusion defects on LV apex (in score, perfusion defects in the area of LAD, LCx and RCA (%, the LV global perfusion defects (in score and %. Results. In 42% of cases 6-minute walk test increased to 3 times; The NYHA class decreased by 2 classes (group 1. In 28 cases 6-minute walk test increased to 2 times and the NYHA class decreased on 1 class. In 22 patients 6-minute walk test increased less than 50% of reference values and there was no dynamics NYHA class (50 patients of the group 2. Initial extent of LV global perfusion defects in group 1 – 41,2 ± 4,0%, in group 2 – 58,3 ± 2,4% (р = 0,0004. Similar values are received for perfusion indicators in the area of LAD and the LV apex. Prevalence of myocardial perfusion defects at rest reflects prevalence of a cardiosclerosis in a cardiac muscle. Conclusion. Degree of LV myocardial perfusion defects in patients with the expressed heart failure of ischemic etiology is the key indicator influencing clinical efficiency of coronary angioplasty. Critical size for definition of the favorable forecast of revascularization are 60% and more perfusion defects testifying that in a cardiac muscle the focal cardiosclerosis prevails over the functioning myocardium. 

  5. Liver failure after hepatectomy: A risk assessment using the pre-hepatectomy shear wave elastography technique

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Han, Hong, E-mail: han.hong@zs-hospital.sh.cn [Department of Ultrasound, Zhongshan Hospital, Fudan University, No. 180 Fenglin Road, Xuhui District, Shanghai 200032 (China); Hu, Hao; Xu, Ya Dan [Zhongshan Hospital, Fudan University, Shanghai Institute of Medical Imaging, No. 180 Fenglin Road, Xuhui District, Shanghai 200032 (China); Wang, Wen Ping, E-mail: puguang61@126.com [Department of Ultrasound, Zhongshan Hospital, Fudan University, No. 180 Fenglin Road, Xuhui District, Shanghai 200032 (China); Ding, Hong; Lu, Qing [Department of Ultrasound, Zhongshan Hospital, Fudan University, No. 180 Fenglin Road, Xuhui District, Shanghai 200032 (China)

    2017-01-15

    Objective: To determine the efficacy of liver stiffness (LS) measurements utilizing the Shear Wave Elastography (SWE) technique for predicting post-hepatectomy liver failure (PHLF) among patients with hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC). Methods: Data from eighty consecutive patients who were undergoing hepatectomy for HCC were prospectively identified and evaluated with preoperative SWE. The SWE was measured with advanced ultrasound equipment (Philips EPIQ7; Philips Healthcare, Seattle, WA, USA). PHLF classification was defined according to the International Study Group of Liver Surgery Recommendations (ISGLS). Results: SWE was successfully performed in 77 patients. According to the ISGLS criteria, PHLF occurred in 35.1% of patients (27 patients), including 2/25 patients with Grade A/B, respectively. Elevated SWE values (P = 0.002) and histological cirrhosis (P = 0.003) were independent predictors of PHLF according to the multivariate analysis. Patients with SWE values higher than or equal to 6.9 kPa were identified at higher risk of PHLF (area under the curve: 0.843, sensitivity: 77.8% and specificity: 78.0%). Postoperative dynamic course of the median the Model For End-stage Liver Disease (MELD) score showed irregular changes among patients with an SWE >6.9 kPa. Patients with an SWE <6.9 kPa, postoperative dynamic course of the median MELD score gradually decreased. Conclusion: LS measured with SWE is a valid and reliable method for the prediction of PHLF grade A/B among patients with HCC. SWE could become a routine examination for the preoperative evaluation of PHLF.

  6. The effect of defects on structural failure: A two-criteria approach

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dowling, A.R.; Townley, C.H.A.

    1976-01-01

    The two-criteria approach to the study of defects in structures assumes that failure occurs when the applied load reaches the lower of either a load to cause brittle failure in accordance with the theories of linear elastic fracture mechanics or a collapse load dependent on the ultimate stress of the material and the structural geometry. This simple approach is described and compared with previously published experimental results for various geometries and materials. The simplicity of this method of defect analysis lies in the fact that each criterion is sufficiently well understood to permit scaling and geometry changes to be accommodated readily. It becomes apparent that a sizeable transition region exists between the two criteria but this can be described in an expression relating the criteria. This expression adequately predicts the behaviour of cracked structures of both simple and complex geometry. A design curve for defect assessment is proposed for which it is unnecessary to consider the transition region. (author)

  7. Validation of BS7910:2005 failure assessment diagrams for cracked square hollow section T-, Y- and K-joints

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lie, S.T.; Yang, Z.M.; Gho, W.M.

    2009-01-01

    This paper describes the usage of finite element (FE) analyses results to validate the standard BS7910 assessment procedure for the safe design of cracked square hollow section (SHS) T-, Y- and K-joints. In the study, the actual 3D surface cracks obtained from previous fatigue tests have been included in the FE models. An automatic mesh generation program is then developed and used to produce the failure assessment diagram (FAD) through the J-integral method. The ultimate strength of uncracked SHS joints with reduced load bearing areas have been referenced to derive the plastic collapse loads of cracked SHS joints for the development of FAD. These loads have been validated against the previous experimental results. In comparison with the existing standard BS7910 Level 2A/3A FAD curve and the proposed assessment procedure for circular hollow section joints, it is found that a plastic collapse load with a penalty factor of 1.05 will be sufficient for the safe assessment of cracked SHS T, Y, and K-joints under brace end axial loading

  8. Defining the brittle failure envelopes of individual reaction zones observed in CO2-exposed wellbore cement

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hangx, S.; Marcelis, Fons; van der Linden, Arjan; Liteanu, Emilia

    2016-01-01

    In order to predict the behaviour of the cement sheath after CO2 injection and the potential for leakage pathways, it is key to understand how the mechanical properties of the cement evolves with CO2-exposure time. We performed scratch hardness tests on hardened samples of class G cement before and

  9. Small Data, Online Learning and Assessment Practices in Higher Education: A Case Study of Failure?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Watson, Cate; Wilson, Anna; Drew, Valerie; Thompson, Terrie Lynn

    2017-01-01

    In this paper, we present an in-depth case study of a single student who failed an online module which formed part of a master's programme in Professional Education and Leadership. We use this case study to examine assessment practices in higher education in the online environment. In taking this approach, we go against the current predilection…

  10. Challenges in the Japan Beyond-Brittle Project (JBBP) for EGS development beyond the brittle-ductile transition

    Science.gov (United States)

    Asanuma, H.; Muraoka, H.; Tsuchiya, N.; Ito, H.

    2013-12-01

    Development using Engineered Geothermal System (EGS) technologies is considered to be the best solution to the problems of the localized distribution of geothermal resources. However, it is considered that a number of problems, including low water recovery rate, difficulty in design of the reservoir, and induced earthquake, would appear in Japanese EGS. These problems in the development of EGS reservoirs cannot be readily solved in Japan because they are intrinsically related to the physical characteristics and tectonic setting of the brittle rock mass. Therefore, we have initiated the Japan Beyond-Brittle Project (JBBP), which will take a multidisciplinary scientific approach, including geology, geochemistry, geophysics, water-rock interactions, rock mechanics, seismology, drilling technology, well-logging technology, and reservoir engineering. The science and technology required for the creation and control of geothermal reservoirs in superheated rocks in the ductile zone is at the frontier of modern research in most of the related disciplines. Solutions to the associated problems will not easily be found without international collaboration among researchers and engineers. For this reason, in March, 2013 we held a five-day ICDP-supported workshop in Japan to review and discuss various scientific and technological issues related to the JBBP. Throughout the discussions at the workshop on characteristics of the beyond-brittle rock mass and creation and control of EGS reservoirs in the ductile zone, it has concluded that there are two end-member reservoir models that should be considered (Fig. 1). The JBBP reservoir type-1 would be created near the top of the brittle-ductile transition (BDT) and connected to pre-existing hydrothermal systems, which would increase productivity and provide sustainability. The JBBP reservoir type-2 would be hydraulically or thermally created beyond the BDT, where pre-existing fractures are less permeable, and would be hydraulically

  11. Dynamic Initiation and Propagation of Multiple Cracks in Brittle Materials

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xiaodan Ren

    2013-07-01

    Full Text Available Brittle materials such as rock and ceramic usually exhibit apparent increases of strength and toughness when subjected to dynamic loading. The reasons for this phenomenon are not yet well understood, although a number of hypotheses have been proposed. Based on dynamic fracture mechanics, the present work offers an alternate insight into the dynamic behaviors of brittle materials. Firstly, a single crack subjected to stress wave excitations is investigated to obtain the dynamic crack-tip stress field and the dynamic stress intensity factor. Second, based on the analysis of dynamic stress intensity factor, the fracture initiation sizes and crack size distribution under different loading rates are obtained, and the power law with the exponent of −2/3 is derived to describe the fracture initiation size. Third, with the help of the energy balance concept, the dynamic increase of material strength is directly derived based on the proposed multiple crack evolving criterion. Finally, the model prediction is compared with the dynamic impact experiments, and the model results agree well with the experimentally measured dynamic increasing factor (DIF.

  12. Brittle-fracture potential of irradiated Zircaloy-2 pressure tubes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, F. H.

    1993-12-01

    Neutron irradiation can degrade the fracture toughness of Zircaloy-2 and may cause highly irradiated reactor components of this material to fail in a brittle manner. The effects of radiation embrittlement on the structural integrity of N Reactor pressure tubes are studied by performing KIc and JIc fracture toughness testing on samples cut from the Zircaloy-2 tubes periodically removed from the reactor. A fluence of 6 × 10 25n/ m2 ( E > 1 MeV) reduced the fracture toughness of the material by 40 to 50%. The fracture toughness values appear to saturate at 260°C with fluences above 3 × 10 25n/ m2 ( E > 1 MeV), but continue to decline with increasing fluence at temperatures below 177°C. Present and previous results obtained from irradiated pressure tubes indicate that the brittle-fracture potential of Zircaloy-2 increases with decreasing temperature and increasing fluence. Fractographic examinations of the fracture surfaces of irradiated samples reveal that circumferential hydride formation significantly influenced fracture morphology by providing sites for easy crack nucleation and leaving deep cracks. However, the deep cracks created at the hydride platelets in specimens containing less than 220 ppm hydrogen are not believed to be the major cause of degradation in postirradiation fracture toughness.

  13. Acoustic emission during the compaction of brittle UO2 particles

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hegron, Lise

    2014-01-01

    One of the options considered for recycling minor actinides is to incorporate about 10% to UO 2 matrix. The presence of open pores interconnected within this fuel should allow the evacuation of helium and fission gases to prevent swelling of the pellet and ultimately its interaction with the fuel clad surrounding it. Implementation of minor actinides requires working in shielded cell, reducing their retention and outlawing additions of organic products. The use of fragmentable particles of several hundred micrometers seems a good solution to control the microstructure of the green compacts and thus control the open porosity after sintering. The goal of this study is to monitor the compaction of brittle UO 2 particles by acoustic emission and to link the particle characteristics to the open porosity obtained after the compact sintering. The signals acquired during tensile strength tests on individual granules and compacts show that the acoustic emission allows the detection of the mechanism of fragmentation and enables identification of a characteristic waveform of this fragmentation. The influences of compaction stress, of the initial particle size distribution and of the internal cohesion of the granules, on the mechanical strength of the compact and on the microstructure and open porosity of the sintered pellets, are analyzed. By its ability to identify the range of fragmentation of the granules during compaction, acoustic emission appears as a promising technique for monitoring the compaction of brittle particles in the manufacture of a controlled porosity fuel. (author) [fr

  14. Self-repair of cracks in brittle material systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dry, Carolyn M.

    2016-04-01

    One of the most effective uses for self repair is in material systems that crack because the cracks can allow the repair chemical to flow into the crack damage sites in all three dimensions. In order for the repair chemical to stay in the damage site and flow along to all the crack and repair there must be enough chemical to fill the entire crack. The repair chemical must be designed appropriately for the particular crack size and total volume of cracks. In each of the three examples of self repair in crackable brittle systems, the viscosity and chemical makeup and volume of the repair chemicals used is different for each system. Further the chemical delivery system has to be designed for each application also. Test results from self repair of three brittle systems are discussed. In "Self Repair of Concrete Bridges and Infrastructure" two chemicals were used due to different placements in bridges to repair different types of cracks- surface shrinkage and shear cracks, In "Airplane Wings and Fuselage, in Graphite" the composite has very different properties than the concrete bridges. In the graphite for airplane components the chemical also had to survive the high processing temperatures. In this composite the cracks were so definite and deep and thin that the repair chemical could flow easily and repair in all layers of the composite. In "Ceramic/Composite Demonstrating Self Repair" the self repair system not only repaired the broken ceramic but also rebounded the composite to the ceramic layer

  15. Coexistence of ductile and brittle fracture in metals

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ohr, S.M.; Chang, S.J.; Park, C.G.; Thomson, R.

    1985-01-01

    It is well known that semibrittle body-centered cubic (bcc) metals fail at low temperatures by cleavage that is preceded by crack tip deformation. Sinclair and Finnis proposed a mechanism by which crack tip deformation may be combined with brittle crack extension. In this model, edge dislocations are emitted from a crack tip on an inclined plane under pure mode I loading conditions. The authors propose a new mechanism of brittle fracture of semibrittle metals preceded by crack tip deformation by extending the model of Sinclair and Finnis and by incorporating experimental evidence on mixed mode crack propagation observed by transmission electron microscopy (TEM). They have shown experimentally that, even when the orientation of the dislocations in the plastic zone indicated pure mode III crack tip deformation, the crack opening displacement determined from the relative displacement of the crack flanks showed the presence of an additional mode I component. They have also shown that zigzag crack propagation observed in many metals can occur only if mode I cleavage is superimposed to mode II crack tip deformation

  16. Fission product release assessment for end fitting failure in Candu reactor loaded with CANFLEX-NU fuel bundles

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Oh, Dirk Joo; Jeong, Chang Joon; Lee, Kang Moon; Suk, Ho Chun [Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute, Taejon (Korea, Republic of)

    1997-12-31

    Fission product release (FPR) assessment for End Fitting Failure (EFF) in CANDU reactor loaded with CANFLEX-natural uranium (NU) fuel bundles has been performed. The predicted results are compared with those for the reactor loaded with standard 37-element bundles. The total channel I-131 release at the end of transient for EFF accident is calculated to be 380.8 TBq and 602.9 TBq for the CANFLEX bundle and standard bundle channel cases, respectively. They are 4.9% and 7.9% of total inventory, respectively. The lower total releases of the CANFLEX bundle O6 channel are attributed to the lower initial fuel temperatures caused by the lower linear element power of the CANFLEX bundle compared with the standard bundle. 4 refs., 1 fig., 4 tabs. (Author)

  17. On the need for revising healthcare failure mode and effect analysis for assessing potential for patient harm in healthcare processes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Abrahamsen, Håkon Bjorheim; Abrahamsen, Eirik Bjorheim; Høyland, Sindre

    2016-01-01

    Healthcare Failure Mode and Effect Analysis is a proactive, systematic method adapted from safety-critical industries increasingly used to assess the potential for patient harm in high-risk healthcare processes. In this paper we review and discuss this method. We point to some weaknesses and finally argue for two adjustments. One adjustment is regarding the way in which risk is evaluated, and the other is to adopt a broader evaluation of barrier performance. Examples are given from prehospital critical care and from the operating room environment within hospitals to illustrate these ideas. - Highlights: • This article discusses the appropriateness of using HFMEA in healthcare processes. • We conclude that HFMEA has an important role to play in such contexts. • We argue for two adjustments in the traditional HFMEA. • One is regarding the way risk is evaluated. • The other is to adopt a broader evaluation of barrier performance.

  18. Fission product release assessment for end fitting failure in Candu reactor loaded with CANFLEX-NU fuel bundles

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Oh, Dirk Joo; Jeong, Chang Joon; Lee, Kang Moon; Suk, Ho Chun [Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute, Taejon (Korea, Republic of)

    1998-12-31

    Fission product release (FPR) assessment for End Fitting Failure (EFF) in CANDU reactor loaded with CANFLEX-natural uranium (NU) fuel bundles has been performed. The predicted results are compared with those for the reactor loaded with standard 37-element bundles. The total channel I-131 release at the end of transient for EFF accident is calculated to be 380.8 TBq and 602.9 TBq for the CANFLEX bundle and standard bundle channel cases, respectively. They are 4.9% and 7.9% of total inventory, respectively. The lower total releases of the CANFLEX bundle O6 channel are attributed to the lower initial fuel temperatures caused by the lower linear element power of the CANFLEX bundle compared with the standard bundle. 4 refs., 1 fig., 4 tabs. (Author)

  19. The Role of Device Diagnostic Algorithms in the Assessment and Management of Patients with Systolic Heart Failure: A Review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andrew C. T. Ha

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Hospitalization due to heart failure (HF exacerbation represents a major burden in health care and portends a poor long-term prognosis for patients. As a result, there is considerable interest to develop novel tools and strategies to better detect onset of volume overload, as HF hospitalizations may be reduced if appropriate interventions can be promptly delivered. One such innovation is the use of device-based diagnostic parameters in HF patients with implantable cardioverter defibrillators (ICD and/or cardiac resynchronization therapy (CRT devices. These diagnostic algorithms can effectively monitor and detect changes in patients' HF status, as well as predict one's risk of HF hospitalization. This paper will review the role of these device diagnostics parameters in the assessment and management of HF patients in ambulatory settings. In addition, the integration of these novel algorithms in existing HF disease management models will be discussed.

  20. Australia's pesticide environmental risk assessment failure: the case of diuron and sugarcane.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Holmes, Glen

    2014-11-15

    In November 2012, the Australian Pesticide and Veterinary Medicines Authority (APVMA) concluded a 12 year review of the PSII herbicide diuron. One of the primary concerns raised during the review was the potential impact on aquatic ecosystems, particularly in the catchments draining to the Great Barrier Reef. The environmental risk assessment process used by the APVMA utilised a runoff risk model developed and validated under European farming conditions. However, the farming conditions in the sugarcane regions of the Great Barrier Reef catchments have environmental parameters beyond the currently validated bounds of the model. The use of the model to assess environmental risk in these regions is therefore highly inappropriate, demonstrating the pitfalls of a one size fits all approach. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  1. Point-of-Care Ultrasonography to Assess Portal Vein Pulsatility and the Effect of Inhaled Milrinone and Epoprostenol in Severe Right Ventricular Failure: A Report of 2 Cases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tremblay, Jan-Alexis; Beaubien-Souligny, William; Elmi-Sarabi, Mahsa; Desjardins, Georges; Denault, André Y

    2017-10-15

    This article describes 2 patients with severe acute right ventricular failure causing circulatory shock. Portal vein pulsatility assessed by bedside ultrasonography suggested clinically relevant venous congestion. Management included cardiac preload reduction and combined inhalation of milrinone and epoprostenol to reduce right ventricular afterload. Portal vein ultrasonography may be useful in assessing right ventricular function in the acutely ill patient.

  2. Engineering failure assessment methods applied to pressurized components; Bruchmechanische Bewertung druckfuehrender Komponenten mittels ingenieurmaessiger Bewertungsverfahren

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zerbst, U.; Beeck, F.; Scheider, I.; Brocks, W. [GKSS-Forschungszentrum Geesthacht GmbH (Germany). Inst. fuer Werkstofforschung

    1998-11-01

    Under the roof of SINTAP (Structural Integrity Assessment Procedures for European Industry), a European BRITE-EURAM project, a study is being carried out into the possibility of establishing on the basis of existing models a standard European flaw assessment method. The R6 Routine and the ETM are important, existing examples in this context. The paper presents the two methods, explaining their advantages and shortcomes as well as common features. Their applicability is shown by experiments with two pressure vessels subject to internal pressure and flawed by a surface crack or a through-wall crack, respectively. Both the R6 Routine and the ETM results have been compared with results of component tests carried out in the 1980s at TWI and are found to yield acceptable conservative, i.e. sufficiently safe, lifetime predictions, as they do not give lifetime assessments which unduly underestimate the effects of flaws under operational loads. (orig./CB) [Deutsch] Gegenwaertig wird im Rahmen von SINTAP (Structural Integrity Assessment Procedures for European Industries), einem europaeischen BRITE-EURAM-Projekt geprueft, inwieweit auf der Grundlage vorhandener Modelle eine einheitliche europaeische Fehlerbewertungsmethode erstellt werden kann. Eine zentrale Stellung kommt dabei Verfahren wie der R6-Routine und dem ETM zu. In der vorliegenden Arbeit wurden beide Methoden vorgestellt, wobei ihre Vor- und Nachteile, aber auch ihre Gemeinsamkeiten herausgearbeitet wurden. Die Anwendung wurde an zwei innendruckbelasteten Behaeltern mit Oberflaechen- bzw. wanddurchdringendem Riss demonstriert. Sowohl R6-Routine als auch ETM ergaben im Vergleich mit am TWI zu Beginn der 80er Jahre durchgefuehrten Bauteilexperimenten eine vertretbare konservative Vorhersage, d.h. eine nicht allzu grosse Unterschaetzung der ertragbaren Last der Bauteile. (orig.)

  3. Incorporating cumulative effects into environmental assessments of mariculture: Limitations and failures of current siting methods

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    King, Sarah C.; Pushchak, Ronald

    2008-01-01

    Assessing and evaluating the cumulative impacts of multiple marine aquaculture facilities has proved difficult in environmental assessment. A retrospective review of 23 existing mariculture farms in southwestern New Brunswick was conducted to determine whether cumulative interactions would have justified site approvals. Based on current scientific evidence of cumulative effects, six new criteria were added to a set of far-field impacts and other existing criteria were expanded to include regional and cumulative environmental impacts in Hargrave's [Hargrave BT. A traffic light decision system for marine finfish aquaculture siting. Ocean Coast Manag 2002; 45:215-35.] Traffic Light Decision Support System (DSS) presently used in Canadian aquaculture environmental assessments. Before mitigation, 19 of the 23 sites failed the amended set of criteria and after considering mitigation, 8 sites failed. Site and ecosystem indices yielded varying site acceptability scores; however, many sites would not have been approved if siting decisions had been made within a regional management framework and cumulative impact criteria were considered in the site evaluation process

  4. Scaling strength distributions in quasi-brittle materials from micro-to macro-scales: A computational approach to modeling Nature-inspired structural ceramics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Genet, Martin; Couegnat, Guillaume; Tomsia, Antoni P.; Ritchie, Robert O.

    2014-01-01

    This paper presents an approach to predict the strength distribution of quasi-brittle materials across multiple length-scales, with emphasis on Nature-inspired ceramic structures. It permits the computation of the failure probability of any structure under any mechanical load, solely based on considerations of the microstructure and its failure properties by naturally incorporating the statistical and size-dependent aspects of failure. We overcome the intrinsic limitations of single periodic unit-based approaches by computing the successive failures of the material components and associated stress redistributions on arbitrary numbers of periodic units. For large size samples, the microscopic cells are replaced by a homogenized continuum with equivalent stochastic and damaged constitutive behavior. After establishing the predictive capabilities of the method, and illustrating its potential relevance to several engineering problems, we employ it in the study of the shape and scaling of strength distributions across differing length-scales for a particular quasi-brittle system. We find that the strength distributions display a Weibull form for samples of size approaching the periodic unit; however, these distributions become closer to normal with further increase in sample size before finally reverting to a Weibull form for macroscopic sized samples. In terms of scaling, we find that the weakest link scaling applies only to microscopic, and not macroscopic scale, samples. These findings are discussed in relation to failure patterns computed at different size-scales. (authors)

  5. Risk assessment of Giardia from a full scale MBR sewage treatment plant caused by membrane integrity failure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Yu; Chen, Zhimin; An, Wei; Xiao, Shumin; Yuan, Hongying; Zhang, Dongqing; Yang, Min

    2015-04-01

    Membrane bioreactors (MBR) are highly efficient at intercepting particles and microbes and have become an important technology for wastewater reclamation. However, many pathogens can accumulate in activated sludge due to the long residence time usually adopted in MBR, and thus may pose health risks when membrane integrity problems occur. This study presents data from a survey on the occurrence of water-borne Giardia pathogens in reclaimed water from a full-scale wastewater treatment plant with MBR experiencing membrane integrity failure, and assessed the associated risk for green space irrigation. Due to membrane integrity failure, the MBR effluent turbidity varied between 0.23 and 1.90 NTU over a period of eight months. Though this turbidity level still met reclaimed water quality standards (≤5 NTU), Giardia were detected at concentrations of 0.3 to 95 cysts/10 L, with a close correlation between effluent turbidity and Giardia concentration. All β-giardin gene sequences of Giardia in the WWTP influents were genotyped as Assemblages A and B, both of which are known to infect humans. An exponential dose-response model was applied to assess the risk of infection by Giardia. The risk in the MBR effluent with chlorination was 9.83×10(-3), higher than the acceptable annual risk of 1.0×10(-4). This study suggested that membrane integrity is very important for keeping a low pathogen level, and multiple barriers are needed to ensure the biological safety of MBR effluent. Copyright © 2015. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  6. Sample Size Induced Brittle-to-Ductile Transition of Single-Crystal Aluminum Nitride

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-08-01

    ARL-RP-0528 ● AUG 2015 US Army Research Laboratory Sample Size Induced Brittle-to- Ductile Transition of Single-Crystal Aluminum...originator. ARL-RP-0528 ● AUG 2015 US Army Research Laboratory Sample Size Induced Brittle-to- Ductile Transition of Single-Crystal...Sample Size Induced Brittle-to- Ductile Transition of Single-Crystal Aluminum Nitride 5a. CONTRACT NUMBER 5b. GRANT NUMBER 5c. PROGRAM ELEMENT

  7. Simulation of seismic waves in the brittle-ductile transition (BDT) using a Burgers model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Poletto, Flavio; Farina, Biancamaria; Carcione, José Maria

    2014-05-01

    (Violay et al. 2012), with steep velocity gradient, and assuming deep basaltic rock with low content of glass. The analysis shows the importance of the assessment of the Arrhenius parameters for the characterization and definition of the rheological models in the simulation of wave propagation in geothermal areas. References Carcione JM. Wave fields in real media: Wave propagation in anisotropic, anelastic, porous and electromagnetic media. Handbook of Geophysical Exploration, vol. 38, Elsevier (2nd edition, revised and extended), 2007. Carcione JM, Poletto F. Seismic rheological model and reflection coefficients of the brittle-ductile transition. Pure and Applied Geophysics, DOI 10.1007/s00024-013-0643-4, 2013. Carcione JM, Poletto F., Farina B., Craglietto, A. Simulation of seismic waves at the Earth crust (brittle-ductile transition) based on the Burgers model. Submitted to Solid Earth , 2013. Violay M, Gibert B, Mainprice D, Evans B, Dautria JM, Azais P, Pezard PA. An experimental study of the brittle-ductile transition of basalt at oceanic crust pressure and temperature conditions. Geophys. Res. 117:1-23, 2012.

  8. Analysis of non simultaneous common mode failures. Application to the reliability assessment of the decay heat removal of the RNR 1500 project

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Natta, M.; Bloch, M.

    1991-01-01

    The experience with the LMFBR PHENIX has shown many cases of failures on identical and redundant components, which were close in time but not simultaneous and due to the same causes such as a design error, an unappropriate material, corrosion, ... Since the decay heat removal (DHR) must be assured for a long period after shutdown of the reactor, the overall reliability of the DHR system depends much on this type of successive failures by common mode causes, for which the usual β factor methods are not appropriate since they imply that the several failures are simultaneous. In this communication, two methods will be presented. The first one was used to assess the reliability of the DHR system of the RNR 1500 project. In this method, one modelize the occurrence of successive failures on n identical files by a sudden jump of the failure rate from the value λ attributed to the first failure to the value λ' attributed to the (n-1) still available files. This method leads to a quite natural quantification of the interest of diversity for highly redundant systems. For the RNR 1500 project where, in case of the loss of normal DHR path through the steam generators, the decay heat is removed by four separated sodium loops of 26 MW unit capacity in forced convection, the probabilistic assessment shows that it is necessary to diversify the sodium-sodium heat exchanger in order to fullfil the upper limit of 10 -7 /year for the probability of failure of DHR. A separate assessment for the main sequence leading to DHR loss was performed using a different method in which the successive failures are interpreted as a premature end of life, the lifetimes being directly used as random variables. This Monte-Carlo type method, which can be applied to any type of lifetime distribution, leads to results consistent to those obtained with the first one

  9. Acute renal failure requiring renal replacement therapy in the intensive care unit: impact on prognostic assessment for shared decision making.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnson, Robert F; Gustin, Jillian

    2011-07-01

    A 69-year-old female was receiving renal replacement therapy (RRT) for acute renal failure (ARF) in an intensive care unit (ICU). Consultation was requested from the palliative medicine service to facilitate a shared decision-making process regarding goals of care. Clinician responsibility in shared decision making includes the formulation and expression of a prognostic assessment providing the necessary perspective for a spokesperson to match patient values with treatment options. For this patient, ARF requiring RRT in the ICU was used as a focal point for preparing a prognostic assessment. A prognostic assessment should include the outcomes of most importance to a discussion of goals of care: mortality risk and survivor functional status, in this case including renal recovery. A systematic review of the literature was conducted to document published data regarding these outcomes for adult patients receiving RRT for ARF in the ICU. Forty-one studies met the inclusion criteria. The combined mean values for short-term mortality, long-term mortality, renal-function recovery of short-term survivors, and renal-function recovery of long-term survivors were 51.7%, 68.6%, 82.0%, and 88.4%, respectively. This case example illustrates a process for formulating and expressing a prognostic assessment for an ICU patient requiring RRT for ARF. Data from the literature review provide baseline information that requires adjustment to reflect specific patient circumstances. The nature of the acute primary process, comorbidities, and severity of illness are key modifiers. Finally, the prognostic assessment is expressed during a family meeting using recommended principles of communication.

  10. Novel risk stratification with time course assessment of in-hospital mortality in patients with acute heart failure.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Takeshi Yagyu

    Full Text Available Patients with acute heart failure (AHF show various clinical courses during hospitalization. We aimed to identify time course predictors of in-hospital mortality and to establish a sequentially assessable risk model.We enrolled 1,035 consecutive AHF patients into derivation (n = 597 and validation (n = 438 cohorts. For risk assessments at admission, we utilized Get With the Guidelines-Heart Failure (GWTG-HF risk scores. We examined significant predictors of in-hospital mortality from 11 variables obtained during hospitalization and developed a risk stratification model using multiple logistic regression analysis. Across both cohorts, 86 patients (8.3% died during hospitalization. Using backward stepwise selection, we identified five time-course predictors: catecholamine administration, minimum platelet concentration, maximum blood urea nitrogen, total bilirubin, and C-reactive protein levels; and established a time course risk score that could sequentially assess a patient's risk status. The addition of a time course risk score improved the discriminative ability of the GWTG-HF risk score (c-statistics in derivation and validation cohorts: 0.776 to 0.888 [p = 0.002] and 0.806 to 0.902 [p<0.001], respectively. A calibration plot revealed a good relationship between observed and predicted in-hospital mortalities in both cohorts (Hosmer-Lemeshow chi-square statistics: 6.049 [p = 0.642] and 5.993 [p = 0.648], respectively. In each group of initial low-intermediate risk (GWTG-HF risk score <47 and initial high risk (GWTG-HF risk score ≥47, in-hospital mortality was about 6- to 9-fold higher in the high time course risk score group than in the low-intermediate time course risk score group (initial low-intermediate risk group: 20.3% versus 2.2% [p<0.001], initial high risk group: 57.6% versus 8.5% [p<0.001].A time course assessment related to in-hospital mortality during the hospitalization of AHF patients can clearly categorize a patient's on

  11. The role of chemical processes and brittle deformation during shear zone formation and its potential geophysical implications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goncalves, Philippe; Leydier, Thomas; Mahan, Kevin; Albaric, Julie; Trap, Pierre; Marquer, Didier

    2017-04-01

    Ductile shear zones in the middle and lower continental crust are the locus of interactions between mechanical and chemical processes. Chemical processes encompass metamorphic reactions, fluid-rock interactions, fluid flow and chemical mass-transfer. Studying these processes at the grain scale, and even the atom scale, on exposed inactive shear zones can give insights into large-scale geodynamics phenomena (e.g. crustal growth and mountain building through the reconstruction of P-T-t-D-Ɛ evolutionary paths. However, other major issues in earth sciences can be tackled through these studies as well. For instance, the mechanism of fluid flow and mass transfer in the deep crust where permeability should be small and transient is still largely debated. Studying exhumed inactive shear zones can also help to interpret several new geophysical observations like (1) the origin of tremor and very low frequency earthquakes observed in the ductile middle and lower crust, (2) mechanisms for generating slow slip events and (3) the physical origin of puzzling crustal anisotropy observed in major active crustal shear zones. In this contribution, we present a collection of data (deformation, petrology, geochemistry, microtexture) obtained on various shear zones from the Alps that were active within the viscous regime (T > 450°C). Our observations show that the development of a shear zone, from its nucleation to its growth and propagation, is not only governed by ductile deformation coeval with reactions but also involves brittle deformation. Although brittle deformation is a very short-lived phenomenon, our petrological and textural observations show that brittle failure is also associated with fluid flow, mass transfer, metasomatic reactions and recrystallization. We speculate that the fluids and the associated mineralogical changes involved during this brittle failure in the ductile crust might play a role in earthquake / tremor triggering below the brittle - ductile transition

  12. Older driver failures of attention at intersections: using change blindness methods to assess turn decision accuracy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Caird, Jeff K; Edwards, Christopher J; Creaser, Janet I; Horrey, William J

    2005-01-01

    A modified version of the flicker technique to induce change blindness was used to examine the effects of time constraints on decision-making accuracy at intersections on a total of 62 young (18-25 years), middle-aged (26-64 years), young-old (65-73 years), and old-old (74+ years) drivers. Thirty-six intersection photographs were manipulated so that one object (i.e., pedestrian, vehicle, sign, or traffic control device) in the scene would change when the images were alternated for either 5 or 8 s using the modified flicker method. Young and middle-aged drivers made significantly more correct decisions than did young-old and old-old drivers. Logistic regression analysis of the data indicated that age and/or time were significant predictors of decision performance in 14 of the 36 intersections. Actual or potential applications of this research include driving assessment and crash investigation.

  13. Tsunami-hazard assessment based on subaquatic slope-failure susceptibility and tsunami-inundation modeling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anselmetti, Flavio; Hilbe, Michael; Strupler, Michael; Baumgartner, Christoph; Bolz, Markus; Braschler, Urs; Eberli, Josef; Liniger, Markus; Scheiwiller, Peter; Strasser, Michael

    2015-04-01

    Due to their smaller dimensions and confined bathymetry, lakes act as model oceans that may be used as analogues for the much larger oceans and their margins. Numerous studies in the perialpine lakes of Central Europe have shown that their shores were repeatedly struck by several-meters-high tsunami waves, which were caused by subaquatic slides usually triggered by earthquake shaking. A profound knowledge of these hazards, their intensities and recurrence rates is needed in order to perform thorough tsunami-hazard assessment for the usually densely populated lake shores. In this context, we present results of a study combining i) basinwide slope-stability analysis of subaquatic sediment-charged slopes with ii) identification of scenarios for subaquatic slides triggered by seismic shaking, iii) forward modeling of resulting tsunami waves and iv) mapping of intensity of onshore inundation in populated areas. Sedimentological, stratigraphical and geotechnical knowledge of the potentially unstable sediment drape on the slopes is required for slope-stability assessment. Together with critical ground accelerations calculated from already failed slopes and paleoseismic recurrence rates, scenarios for subaquatic sediment slides are established. Following a previously used approach, the slides are modeled as a Bingham plastic on a 2D grid. The effect on the water column and wave propagation are simulated using the shallow-water equations (GeoClaw code), which also provide data for tsunami inundation, including flow depth, flow velocity and momentum as key variables. Combining these parameters leads to so called «intensity maps» for flooding that provide a link to the established hazard mapping framework, which so far does not include these phenomena. The current versions of these maps consider a 'worst case' deterministic earthquake scenario, however, similar maps can be calculated using probabilistic earthquake recurrence rates, which are expressed in variable amounts of

  14. On the re-characterisation of defects in structural integrity assessments due to snap-through

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Burdekin, F.M.; Sherry, A.H.

    2006-01-01

    TAGSI was asked by HSE/NII to comment on the effectiveness of the R6 procedure which permits a surface defect failing an initial assessment to be re-assessed as a through thickness defect of increased length. If the defect passes the re-assessment it may then be considered acceptable. In TAGSI's view re-characterisation needs to be considered separately for contained plastic collapse and ductile or brittle fracture of the remaining ligament. For plastic collapse and ductile tearing of the remaining ligament the R6 rules for re-characterisation appear generally satisfactory. For brittle failure of the ligament in many cases the R6 recommendations will be found satisfactory but for cases of large difference between static and dynamic toughness it is recommended that scoping calculations should be carried out for the defect geometry, loading and material properties of concern

  15. Expected dose for the early failure scenario classes in the 2008 performance assessment for the proposed high-level radioactive waste repository at Yucca Mountain, Nevada

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Helton, J.C.; Hansen, C.W.; Sallaberry, C.J.

    2014-01-01

    Extensive work has been carried out by the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) in the development of a proposed geologic repository at Yucca Mountain (YM), Nevada, for the disposal of high-level radioactive waste. In support of this development and an associated license application to the U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC), the DOE completed an extensive performance assessment (PA) for the proposed YM repository in 2008. This presentation describes the determination of expected dose to the reasonably maximally exposed individual (RMEI) specified in the NRC regulations for the YM repository for the early waste package (WP) failure scenario class and the early drip shield (DS) failure scenario class in the 2008 YM PA. The following topics are addressed: (i) properties of the early failure scenario classes and the determination of dose and expected dose the RMEI, (ii) expected dose and uncertainty in expected dose to the RMEI from the early WP failure scenario class, (iii) expected dose and uncertainty in expected dose to the RMEI from the early DS failure scenario class, (iv) expected dose and uncertainty in expected dose to the RMEI from the combined early WP and early DS failure scenario class with and without the inclusion of failures resulting from nominal processes, and (v) uncertainty in the occurrence of early failure scenario classes. The present article is part of a special issue of Reliability Engineering and System Safety devoted to the 2008 YM PA; additional articles in the issue describe other aspects of the 2008 YM PA. - Highlights: • Extensive work has been carried out by the U.S. DOE in the development of a proposed geologic repository at Yucca Mountain (YM), Nevada, for the disposal of high-level radioactive waste. • Properties of the early failure scenario classes (i.e. early waste package failure and early drip shield failure) in the 2008 YM performance assessment are described. • Determination of dose, expected dose and expected (mean

  16. Sequential Oxygenation Index and Organ Dysfunction Assessment within the First 3 Days of Mechanical Ventilation Predict the Outcome of Adult Patients with Severe Acute Respiratory Failure

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hsu-Ching Kao

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Objective. To determine early predictors of outcomes of adult patients with severe acute respiratory failure. Method. 100 consecutive adult patients with severe acute respiratory failure were evaluated in this retrospective study. Data including comorbidities, Sequential Organ Failure Assessment (SOFA score, Acute Physiological Assessment and Chronic Health Evaluation II (APACHE II score, PaO2, FiO2, PaO2/FiO2, PEEP, mean airway pressure (mPaw, and oxygenation index (OI on the 1st and the 3rd day of mechanical ventilation, and change in OI within 3 days were recorded. Primary outcome was hospital mortality; secondary outcome measure was ventilator weaning failure. Results. 38 out of 100 (38% patients died within the study period. 48 patients (48% failed to wean from ventilator. Multivariate analysis showed day 3 OI ( and SOFA ( score were independent predictors of hospital mortality. Preexisting cerebrovascular accident (CVA ( was the predictor of weaning failure. Results from Kaplan-Meier method demonstrated that higher day 3 OI was associated with shorter survival time (log-Rank test, . Conclusion. Early OI (within 3 days and SOFA score were predictors of mortality in severe acute respiratory failure. In the future, prospective studies measuring serial OIs in a larger scale of study cohort is required to further consolidate our findings.

  17. Experimental investigation of incipient shear failure in foliated rock

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ikari, Matt J.; Niemeijer, André R.; Marone, Chris

    It has long been known that rock fabric plays a key role in dictating rock strength and rheology throughout Earth's crust; however the processes and conditions under which rock fabric impacts brittle failure and frictional strength are still under investigation. Here, we report on laboratory

  18. Failure behavior of single sand grains: theory versus experiment

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Brzesowsky, R.H.; Spiers, C.J.; Peach, C.J.; Hangx, S.J.T.

    2011-01-01

    Grain‐scale brittle fracture and grain rearrangement play an important role in controlling the compaction behavior of reservoir rocks during the early stages of burial. Therefore, the understanding of single‐grain failure is important. We performed constant displacement rate crushing tests

  19. Risk assessment of component failure modes and human errors using a new FMECA approach: application in the safety analysis of HDR brachytherapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Giardina, M; Castiglia, F; Tomarchio, E

    2014-01-01

    Failure mode, effects and criticality analysis (FMECA) is a safety technique extensively used in many different industrial fields to identify and prevent potential failures. In the application of traditional FMECA, the risk priority number (RPN) is determined to rank the failure modes; however, the method has been criticised for having several weaknesses. Moreover, it is unable to adequately deal with human errors or negligence. In this paper, a new versatile fuzzy rule-based assessment model is proposed to evaluate the RPN index to rank both component failure and human error. The proposed methodology is applied to potential radiological over-exposure of patients during high-dose-rate brachytherapy treatments. The critical analysis of the results can provide recommendations and suggestions regarding safety provisions for the equipment and procedures required to reduce the occurrence of accidental events. (paper)

  20. 2-D Electrical Resistivity Tomography (ERT) Assessment of Ground Failure in Urban Area

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nordiana, M. M.; Bery, A. A.; Taqiuddin, Z. M.; Jinmin, M.; Abir, I. A.

    2018-04-01

    This study was carried out to assess the foundation defects around an urban area in Selangor, Malaysia using 2-D electrical resistivity tomography (ERT). The affected structure is a three storey houses and having severe foundation-based cracks. Six 2-D ERT survey lines with 5 m minimum electrode spacing using Pole-dipole array were executed parallel to building’s wall. Four boreholes were conducted to identify the depth to competent layer to verify the 2-D ERT results. Inversion model of 2-D resistivity show that the study area consists of two main zones. The first zone is a low resistivity value (resistivity values of 100-1000 Ωm at 20-70 m depth. The second zone is the granite bedrock of more than 3500 Ωm with depth greater than 70 m. These results were complimented and confirmed by borehole records. The ERT and borehole record suggest that the clay, sand, saturated zone, highly weathered zone and boulders at foundation depths may lead to ground movements which affected the stability of the building.

  1. The China Patient-centered Evaluative Assessment of Cardiac Events (China PEACE) retrospective heart failure study design.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, Yuan; Zhang, Hongzhao; Li, Xi; Lu, Yuan; Masoudi, Frederick A; Krumholz, Harlan M; Li, Jing

    2018-05-10

    Heart failure (HF) is a leading cause of hospitalisation in China, which is experiencing a rapid increase in cardiovascular disease prevalence. Yet, little is known about current burden of disease, quality of care and treatment outcomes of HF in China. The objective of this paper is to describe the study methodology, data collection and abstraction, and progress to date of the China Patient-centered Evaluative Assessment of Cardiac Events 5 Retrospective Heart Failure Study (China PEACE 5r-HF). The China PEACE 5r-HF Study will examine a nationally representative sample of more than 10 000 patient records hospitalised for HF in 2015 in China. The study is a retrospective cohort study. Patients have been selected using a two-stage sampling design stratified by economic-geographical regions. We will collect patient characteristics, diagnostic testing, treatments and in-hospital outcomes, including death and complications, and charges of hospitalisation. Data quality will be monitored by a central coordinating centre and will address case ascertainment, data abstraction and data management. As of October 2017, we have sampled 15 538 medical records from 189 hospitals, and have received 15 057 (96.9%) of these for data collection, and completed data abstraction and quality control on 7971. The Central Ethics Committee at the Chinese National Center for Cardiovascular Diseases approved the study. All collaborating hospitals accepted central ethics committee approval with the exception of 15 hospitals, which obtained local approval by internal ethics committees. Findings will be disseminated in future peer-reviewed papers and will serve as a foundation for improving the care for HF in China. NCT02877914. © Article author(s) (or their employer(s) unless otherwise stated in the text of the article) 2018. All rights reserved. No commercial use is permitted unless otherwise expressly granted.

  2. Mapping basin-wide subaquatic slope failure susceptibility as a tool to assess regional seismic and tsunami hazards

    Science.gov (United States)

    Strasser, Michael; Hilbe, Michael; Anselmetti, Flavio S.

    2010-05-01

    occurred. Comparison of reconstructed critical stability conditions with the known distribution of landslide deposits reveals minimum and maximum threshold conditions for slopes that failed or remained stable, respectively. The resulting correlations reveal good agreements and suggest that the slope stability model generally succeeds in reproducing past events. The basin-wide mapping of subaquatic slope failure susceptibility through time thus can also be considered as a promising paleoseismologic tool that allows quantification of past earthquake ground shaking intensities. Furthermore, it can be used to assess the present-day slope failure susceptibility allowing for identification of location and estimation of size of future, potentially tsunamigenic subaquatic landslides. The new approach presented in our comprehensive lake study and resulting conceptual ideas can be vital to improve our understanding of larger marine slope instabilities and related seismic and oceanic geohazards along formerly glaciated ocean margins and closed basins worldwide.

  3. Environmental risk assessment of low density polyethylene unit using the method of failure mode and effect analysis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Salati Parinaz

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available The ninth olefin plan of Arya Sasol Petrochemical Company (A.S.P.C. is regarded the largest gas Olefin Unit located on Pars Special Economic Energy Zone (P.S.E.E.Z. Considering the importance of the petrochemical unit, its environmental assessment seems necessary to identify and reduce potential hazards. For this purpose, after determining the scope of the study area, identification and measurement of the environmental parameters, environmental risk assessment of the unit was carried out using Environment Failure Mode and Effect Analysis (EFMEA. Using the noted method, sources causing environmental risks were identified, rated and prioritized. Beside, the impacts of the environmental aspects derived from the unit activities as well as their consequences were also analyzed. Furthermore, the identified impacts were prioritized based on Risk Priority Number (RPN and severity level of the consequences imposed on the affected environment. After performing statistical calculations, it was found that the environmental aspects owing the risk priority number higher than 15 have a high level of risk. Results obtained from Low Density Polyethylene Unit revealed that the highest risk belongs to the emergency vent system with risk priority number equal to 48. It is occurred due to imperfect performance of the reactor safety system leading to the emissions of ethylene gas, particles, and radioactive steam as well as air and noise pollutions. Results derived from secondary assessment of the environmental aspects, through difference in calculated RPN and activities risk levels showed that employing modern methods and risk assessment are have remarkably reduced the severity of risk and consequently detracted the damages and losses incurred on the environment.

  4. A phenomenological molecular model for yielding and brittle-ductile transition of polymer glasses

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Shi-Qing; Cheng, Shiwang; Lin, Panpan; Li, Xiaoxiao

    2014-09-01

    This work formulates, at a molecular level, a phenomenological theoretical description of the brittle-ductile transition (BDT) in tensile extension, exhibited by all polymeric glasses of high molecular weight (MW). The starting point is our perception of a polymer glass (under large deformation) as a structural hybrid, consisting of a primary structure due to the van der Waals bonding and a chain network whose junctions are made of pairs of hairpins and function like chemical crosslinks due to the intermolecular uncrossability. During extension, load-bearing strands (LBSs) emerge between the junctions in the affinely strained chain network. Above the BDT, i.e., at "warmer" temperatures where the glass is less vitreous, the influence of the chain network reaches out everywhere by activating all segments populated transversely between LBSs, starting from those adjacent to LBSs. It is the chain network that drives the primary structure to undergo yielding and plastic flow. Below the BDT, the glassy state is too vitreous to yield before the chain network suffers a structural breakdown. Thus, brittle failure becomes inevitable. For any given polymer glass of high MW, there is one temperature TBD or a very narrow range of temperature where the yielding of the glass barely takes place as the chain network also reaches the point of a structural failure. This is the point of the BDT. A theoretical analysis of the available experimental data reveals that (a) chain pullout occurs at the BDT when the chain tension builds up to reach a critical value fcp during tensile extension; (b) the limiting value of fcp, extrapolated to far below the glass transition temperature Tg, is of a universal magnitude around 0.2-0.3 nN, for all eight polymers examined in this work; (c) pressurization, which is known [K. Matsushige, S. V. Radcliffe, and E. Baer, J. Appl. Polym. Sci. 20, 1853 (1976)] to make brittle polystyrene (PS) and poly(methyl methacrylate) (PMMA) ductile at room temperature

  5. A phenomenological molecular model for yielding and brittle-ductile transition of polymer glasses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Shi-Qing; Cheng, Shiwang; Lin, Panpan; Li, Xiaoxiao

    2014-09-07

    This work formulates, at a molecular level, a phenomenological theoretical description of the brittle-ductile transition (BDT) in tensile extension, exhibited by all polymeric glasses of high molecular weight (MW). The starting point is our perception of a polymer glass (under large deformation) as a structural hybrid, consisting of a primary structure due to the van der Waals bonding and a chain network whose junctions are made of pairs of hairpins and function like chemical crosslinks due to the intermolecular uncrossability. During extension, load-bearing strands (LBSs) emerge between the junctions in the affinely strained chain network. Above the BDT, i.e., at "warmer" temperatures where the glass is less vitreous, the influence of the chain network reaches out everywhere by activating all segments populated transversely between LBSs, starting from those adjacent to LBSs. It is the chain network that drives the primary structure to undergo yielding and plastic flow. Below the BDT, the glassy state is too vitreous to yield before the chain network suffers a structural breakdown. Thus, brittle failure becomes inevitable. For any given polymer glass of high MW, there is one temperature TBD or a very narrow range of temperature where the yielding of the glass barely takes place as the chain network also reaches the point of a structural failure. This is the point of the BDT. A theoretical analysis of the available experimental data reveals that (a) chain pullout occurs at the BDT when the chain tension builds up to reach a critical value f(cp) during tensile extension; (b) the limiting value of f(cp), extrapolated to far below the glass transition temperature T(g), is of a universal magnitude around 0.2-0.3 nN, for all eight polymers examined in this work; (c) pressurization, which is known [K. Matsushige, S. V. Radcliffe, and E. Baer, J. Appl. Polym. Sci. 20, 1853 (1976)] to make brittle polystyrene (PS) and poly(methyl methacrylate) (PMMA) ductile at room

  6. Effects of cardiac energy efficiency in diastolic heart failure. Assessment with positron emission tomography with 11C-acetate

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hasegawa, Shinji; Yamamoto, Kazuhiro; Sakata, Yasushi; Takeda, Yasuharu; Kajimoto, Katsufumi; Kanai, Yasukazu; Hori, Masatsugu; Hatazawa, Jun

    2008-01-01

    Diastolic heart failure (DHF) has become a high social burden, and its major underlying cardiovascular disease is hypertensive heart disease. However, the pathogenesis of DHF remains to be clarified. This study aimed to assess the effects of cardiac energy efficiency in DHF patients. 11 C-Acetate positron emission tomography and echocardiography were conducted in 11 DHF Japanese patients and 10 normal volunteers. The myocardial clearance rate of radiolabeled 11 C-acetate was measured to calculate the work metabolic index (WMI), an index of cardiac efficiency. The ratio of peak mitral E wave velocity to peak early diastolic septal myocardial velocity (E/e') was calculated to assess left ventricular (LV) filling pressure. The LV mass index was greater and the mean age was higher in the DHF patients than in the normal volunteers. There was no difference in WMI between the two groups. However, WMI varied widely among the DHF patients and was inversely correlated with E/e' (r=-0.699, p=0.017). In contrast, there was no correlation in the normal volunteers. In conclusion, the inefficiency of energy utilization is not a primary cause of diastolic dysfunction or DHF, and cardiac efficiency may not affect diastolic function in normal hearts. However, the energy-wasting state may induce the elevation of LV filling pressure in DHF patients, which was considered to principally result from the progressive diastolic dysfunction. (author)

  7. Nuclear Computerized Library for Assessing Reactor Reliability (NUCLARR): Data manual. Part 3: Hardware component failure data; Volume 5, Revision 4

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Reece, W.J.; Gilbert, B.G.; Richards, R.E.

    1994-09-01

    This data manual contains a hard copy of the information in the Nuclear Computerized Library for Assessing Reactor Reliability (NUCLARR) Version 3.5 database, which is sponsored by the US Nuclear Regulatory Commission. NUCLARR was designed as a tool for risk analysis. Many of the nuclear reactors in the US and several outside the US are represented in the NUCLARR database. NUCLARR includes both human error probability estimates for workers at the plants and hardware failure data for nuclear reactor equipment. Aggregations of these data yield valuable reliability estimates for probabilistic risk assessments and human reliability analyses. The data manual is organized to permit manual searches of the information if the computerized version is not available. Originally, the manual was published in three parts. In this revision the introductory material located in the original Part 1 has been incorporated into the text of Parts 2 and 3. The user can now find introductory material either in the original Part 1, or in Parts 2 and 3 as revised. Part 2 contains the human error probability data, and Part 3, the hardware component reliability data

  8. Failure mode taxonomy for assessing the reliability of Field Programmable Gate Array based Instrumentation and Control systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    McNelles, Phillip; Zeng, Zhao Chang; Renganathan, Guna; Chirila, Marius; Lu, Lixuan

    2017-01-01

    Highlights: • The use FPGAs in I&C systems in Nuclear Power Plants is an important issue (IAEA). • OECD-NEA published a failure mode taxonomy for software-based digital I&C systems. • This paper extends the OECD-NEA taxonomy to model FPGA-based systems. • FPGA failure modes, failure effects, uncovering methods are categorized/described. • Provides an example of modelling an FPGA-Based RTS/ESFAS using the FPGA taxonomy. - Abstract: Field Programmable Gate Arrays (FPGAs) are a form of programmable digital hardware configured to perform digital logic functions. This configuration (programming) is performed using Hardware Description Language (HDL), making FPGAs a form of HDL Programmed Device (HPD). In the nuclear field, FPGAs have seen use in upgrades and replacements of obsolete Instrumentation and Control (I&C) systems. This paper expands upon previous work that resulted in extensive FPGA failure mode data, to allow for the application of the OECD-NEA failure modes taxonomy. The OECD-NEA taxonomy presented a method to model digital (software-based) I&C systems, based on the hardware and software failure modes, failure uncovering effects and levels of abstraction, using a Reactor Trip System/Engineering Safety Feature Actuation System (RTS/ESFAS) as an example system. To create the FPGA taxonomy, this paper presents an additional “sub-component” level of abstraction, to demonstrate the effect of the FPGA failure modes and failure categories on an FPGA-based system. The proposed FPGA taxonomy is based on the FPGA failure modes, failure categories, failure effects and uncovering situations. The FPGA taxonomy is applied to the RTS/ESFAS test system, to demonstrate the effects of the anticipated FPGA failure modes on a digital I&C system, and to provide a modelling example for this proposed taxonomy.

  9. Micromechanical modelling of quasi-brittle materials behavior

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Li, V.C.

    1992-01-01

    This special issues on Micromechanical modelling of quasi-brittle materials behavior represents an outgrowth of presentations given at a symposium of the same title held at the 1991 ASME Applied Mechanics and Biomechanics Summer Conference at the Ohio State University. The symposium was organized to promote communication between researchers in three materials groups: rock, cementitious materials, ceramics and related composites. The enthusiastic response of both speakers and attendants at the ASME symposium convinced the organizer that it would be useful to put together a coherent volume which can reach a larger audience. It was decided that the papers individually and as a volume ought to provide a broader view, so that as much as possible, the work contained in each paper would be accessible to readers working in any of the three materials groups. Applied Mechanics Reviews presents an appropriate platform for achieving these objectives

  10. Influence of crackpath roughness on crackresistance in brittle materials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tzschichholz, F.; Pfuff, M.

    1991-01-01

    Using Griffith's criterion for brittle fracture we analyze the effect of an enhanced crack resistance due to scaleinvariant fracture topology. To this end a relation between crack resistance, resp. fracture toughness, and fractal dimension of the fracture surface is derived on the basis of a scaling ansatz for the 'true' crack length. It turns out that this relation depends on the extension of the surface scaling range, the resistance of an ideal smooth crack in the same material, and remaining non-scaling features of the crack morphology. In general, there is no simple exponential dependency of toughness on fractal dimension for different materials. The theoretical predictions of the paper are discussed on the background of experimental results given in the literature. (orig.) With 2 figs [de

  11. Simulations of ductile flow in brittle material processing

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Luh, M.H.; Strenkowski, J.S.

    1988-12-01

    Research is continuing on the effects of thermal properties of the cutting tool and workpiece on the overall temperature distribution. Using an Eulerian finite element model, diamond and steel tools cutting aluminum have been simulated at various, speeds, and depths of cut. The relative magnitude of the thermal conductivity of the tool and the workpiece is believed to be a primary factor in the resulting temperature distribution in the workpiece. This effect is demonstrated in the change of maximum surface temperatures for diamond on aluminum vs. steel on aluminum. As a preliminary step toward the study of ductile flow in brittle materials, the relative thermal conductivities of diamond on polycarbonate is simulated. In this case, the maximum temperature shifts from the rake face of the tool to the surface of the machined workpiece, thus promoting ductile flow in the workpiece surface.

  12. Enclosed mechanical seal face design for brittle materials copyright

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Marsi, J.A.

    1994-01-01

    Metal carbides are widely used as seal face material due to their hardness and wear resistance. Silicon carbide (SiC) has excellent performance as a seal face material, but it is relatively brittle and may break due to accidental overloads outside the boundary of normal operating conditions. In mechanical seals for nuclear primary coolant pumps, the shattered SiC pieces can get into the reactor system and cause serious damage. The conventional method of containing an SiC seal face is to shrink-fit it in a holder, which may lead the seal designer to contend with unwanted seal face deflections. This paper presents a successful, tested design which does not rely on shrink-fits. 5 refs., 9 figs., 4 tabs

  13. Photon emission induced by brittle fracture of borosilicate glasses

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shiota, Tadashi, E-mail: tshiota@ceram.titech.ac.jp [Department of Metallurgy and Ceramic Science, Tokyo Institute of Technology, 2-12-1 Ookayama, Meguro-ku, Tokyo 152-8550 (Japan); Sato, Yoshitaka [Department of Metallurgy and Ceramic Science, Tokyo Institute of Technology, 2-12-1 Ookayama, Meguro-ku, Tokyo 152-8550 (Japan); Kishi, Tetsuo [Department of Chemistry and Materials Science, Tokyo Institute of Technology, 2-12-1 Ookayama, Meguro-ku, Tokyo 152-8550 (Japan); Yasuda, Kouichi [Department of Metallurgy and Ceramic Science, Tokyo Institute of Technology, 2-12-1 Ookayama, Meguro-ku, Tokyo 152-8550 (Japan)

    2016-05-15

    Photon emission (PE) at wavelength ranges of 430–490 nm (B-PE), 500–600 nm (G-PE) and 610–680 nm (R-PE) caused by brittle fracture was simultaneously measured in the nanosecond-to-microsecond and millisecond time domains for two types of borosilicate glasses: Pyrex-type Tempax glass and BK7 glass. The results were compared to those for silica and soda lime glasses. The time dependence of the PE of Tempax glass was similar to that of silica glass, while the PE intensity was lower. Because Tempax glass contains both silica-rich and borate-rich amorphous phases, the PE must be mainly produced by the fracture of the silica-rich phase. Moreover, the proportion of B-PE of Tempax glass was higher than that of silica glass. This suggests that the measured B-PE might also include very weak PE caused by the fracture of the borate-rich phase. The PE time dependence of BK7 glass was similar to that of soda lime glass, which was different from the case for Tempax glass. The PE intensity of BK7 glass was slightly higher than that of soda lime glass, but much lower than that of Tempax glass. The result indicates that non-bridging oxygen in the glasses affects crack propagation behavior and reduces the PE. - Highlights: • Photon emission (PE) upon brittle fracture of borosilicate glasses was measured. • Pyrex-type Tempax and BK7 glasses showed different PE characteristics. • The rupture of Si–O bonds produces much stronger PE than that of B–O bonds. • Non-bridging oxygen in glass affects crack propagation behavior and reduces the PE.

  14. Computer-aided analysis of cutting processes for brittle materials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ogorodnikov, A. I.; Tikhonov, I. N.

    2017-12-01

    This paper is focused on 3D computer simulation of cutting processes for brittle materials and silicon wafers. Computer-aided analysis of wafer scribing and dicing is carried out with the use of the ANSYS CAE (computer-aided engineering) software, and a parametric model of the processes is created by means of the internal ANSYS APDL programming language. Different types of tool tip geometry are analyzed to obtain internal stresses, such as a four-sided pyramid with an included angle of 120° and a tool inclination angle to the normal axis of 15°. The quality of the workpieces after cutting is studied by optical microscopy to verify the FE (finite-element) model. The disruption of the material structure during scribing occurs near the scratch and propagates into the wafer or over its surface at a short range. The deformation area along the scratch looks like a ragged band, but the stress width is rather low. The theory of cutting brittle semiconductor and optical materials is developed on the basis of the advanced theory of metal turning. The fall of stress intensity along the normal on the way from the tip point to the scribe line can be predicted using the developed theory and with the verified FE model. The crystal quality and dimensions of defects are determined by the mechanics of scratching, which depends on the shape of the diamond tip, the scratching direction, the velocity of the cutting tool and applied force loads. The disunity is a rate-sensitive process, and it depends on the cutting thickness. The application of numerical techniques, such as FE analysis, to cutting problems enhances understanding and promotes the further development of existing machining technologies.

  15. AN INVESTIGATION OF THE MINERAL IN DUCTILE AND BRITTLE CORTICAL MOUSE BONE

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rodriguez-Florez, Naiara; Garcia-Tunon, Esther; Mukadam, Quresh; Saiz, Eduardo; Oldknow, Karla J.; Farquharson, Colin; Millán, José Luis; Boyde, Alan; Shefelbine, Sandra J.

    2015-01-01

    Bone is a strong and tough material composed of apatite mineral, organic matter and water. Changes in composition and organization of these building blocks affect bone’s mechanical integrity. Skeletal disorders often affect bone’s mineral phase, either by variations in the collagen or directly altering mineralization. The aim of the current study was to explore the differences in the mineral of brittle and ductile cortical bone at the mineral (nm) and tissue (µm) levels using two mouse phenotypes. Osteogenesis imperfecta murine (oim−/−) mice were used to model brittle bone; PHOSPHO1 mutants (Phospho1−/−) had ductile bone. They were compared to their respective wild-type controls. Femora were defatted and ground to powder to measure average mineral crystal size using X-ray diffraction (XRD), and to monitor the bulk mineral to matrix ratio via thermogravimetric analysis (TGA). XRD scans were run after TGA for phase identification, to assess the fractions of hydroxyapatite and β-tricalcium phosphate. Tibiae were embedded to measure elastic properties with nanoindentation and the extent of mineralization with backscattered electron microscopy (qbSEM). Interestingly, the mineral of brittle oim−/− and ductile Phospho1−/− bones had many similar characteristics. Both pathology models had smaller apatite crystals, lower mineral to matrix ratio, and showed more thermal conversion to β-tricalcium phosphate than their wild-types, indicating deviations from stoichiometric hydroxyapatite in the original mineral. The degree of mineralization of the bone matrix was different for each strain: oim−/− were hypermineralized, while Phospho1−/− were hypomineralized. However, alterations in the mineral were associated with reduced tissue elastic moduli in both pathologies. Results revealed that despite having extremely different whole bone mechanics, the mineral of oim−/− and Phospho1−/− has several similar trends at smaller length scales. This

  16. On the ductile-to-brittle transition behavior of martensitic alloys neutron irradiated to 26 dpa

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hu, W.L.; Gelles, D.S.

    1987-01-01

    Charpy impact tests were conducted on specimens made of HT-9 and 9Cr-1Mo in various heat treatment conditions which were irradiated in EBR-II to 26 dpa at 390 to 500 0 C. The results are compared with previous results on specimens irradiated to 13 dpa. HT-9 base metal irradiated at low temperatures showed a small additional increase in ductile brittle transition temperature and a decrease in upper shelf energy from 13 to 26 dpa. No fluence effect was observed in 9Cr-1Mo base metal. The 9Cr-1Mo weldment showed degraded DBTT but improved USE response compared to base metal, contrary to previous findings on HT-9. Significant differences were observed in HT-9 base metal between mill annealed material and normalized and tempered material. The highest DBTT for HT-9 alloys was 50 0 C higher than for the worst case in 9Cr-1Mo alloys. Fractography and hardness measurements were also obtained. Significant differences in fracture appearance were observed in different product forms, although no dependence on fluence was observed. Failure was controlled by the preirradiation microstructure

  17. Detection of Cracking Levels in Brittle Rocks by Parametric Analysis of the Acoustic Emission Signals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moradian, Zabihallah; Einstein, Herbert H.; Ballivy, Gerard

    2016-03-01

    Determination of the cracking levels during the crack propagation is one of the key challenges in the field of fracture mechanics of rocks. Acoustic emission (AE) is a technique that has been used to detect cracks as they occur across the specimen. Parametric analysis of AE signals and correlating these parameters (e.g., hits and energy) to stress-strain plots of rocks let us detect cracking levels properly. The number of AE hits is related to the number of cracks, and the AE energy is related to magnitude of the cracking event. For a full understanding of the fracture process in brittle rocks, prismatic specimens of granite containing pre-existing flaws have been tested in uniaxial compression tests, and their cracking process was monitored with both AE and high-speed video imaging. In this paper, the characteristics of the AE parameters and the evolution of cracking sequences are analyzed for every cracking level. Based on micro- and macro-crack damage, a classification of cracking levels is introduced. This classification contains eight stages (1) crack closure, (2) linear elastic deformation, (3) micro-crack initiation (white patch initiation), (4) micro-crack growth (stable crack growth), (5) micro-crack coalescence (macro-crack initiation), (6) macro-crack growth (unstable crack growth), (7) macro-crack coalescence and (8) failure.

  18. From brittle to ductile: a structure dependent ductility of diamond nanothread.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhan, Haifei; Zhang, Gang; Tan, Vincent B C; Cheng, Yuan; Bell, John M; Zhang, Yong-Wei; Gu, Yuantong

    2016-06-07

    As a potential building block for the next generation of devices/multifunctional materials that are spreading in almost every technology sector, one-dimensional (1D) carbon nanomaterial has received intensive research interests. Recently, a new ultra-thin diamond nanothread (DNT) has joined this palette, which is a 1D structure with poly-benzene sections connected by Stone-Wales (SW) transformation defects. Using large-scale molecular dynamics simulations, we found that this sp(3) bonded DNT can transition from brittle to ductile behaviour by varying the length of the poly-benzene sections, suggesting that DNT possesses entirely different mechanical responses than other 1D carbon allotropes. Analogously, the SW defects behave like a grain boundary that interrupts the consistency of the poly-benzene sections. For a DNT with a fixed length, the yield strength fluctuates in the vicinity of a certain value and is independent of the "grain size". On the other hand, both yield strength and yield strain show a clear dependence on the total length of DNT, which is due to the fact that the failure of the DNT is dominated by the SW defects. Its highly tunable ductility together with its ultra-light density and high Young's modulus makes diamond nanothread ideal for the creation of extremely strong three-dimensional nano-architectures.

  19. Influence of the residual stresses on crack initiation in brittle materials and structures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Henninger, C.

    2007-11-01

    Many material assemblies subjected to thermo-mechanical loadings develop thermal residual stresses which modify crack onset conditions. Besides if one of the components has a plastic behaviour, plastic residual deformations may also have a contribution. One of the issues in brittle fracture mechanics is to predict crack onset without any pre-existing defect. Leguillon proposed an onset criterion based on both a Griffth-like energetic condition and a maximum stress criterion. The analysis uses matched asymptotics and the theory of singularity. The good fit between the model and experimental measurements led on homogeneous isotropic materials under pure mechanical loading incited us to take into account residual stresses in the criterion. The comparison between the modified criterion and the experimental measurements carried out on an aluminum/epoxy assembly proves to be satisfying concerning the prediction of failure of the interface between the two components. Besides, it allows, through inversion, identifying the fracture properties of this interface. The modified criterion is also applied to the delamination of the tile/structure interface in the plasma facing components of the Tore Supra tokamak. Indeed thermal and plastic residual stresses appear in the metallic part of these coating tiles. (author)

  20. Visual assessment of brain magnetic resonance imaging detects injury to cognitive regulatory sites in patients with heart failure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pan, Alan; Kumar, Rajesh; Macey, Paul M; Fonarow, Gregg C; Harper, Ronald M; Woo, Mary A

    2013-02-01

    Heart failure (HF) patients exhibit depression and executive function impairments that contribute to HF mortality. Using specialized magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) analysis procedures, brain changes appear in areas regulating these functions (mammillary bodies, hippocampi, and frontal cortex). However, specialized MRI procedures are not part of standard clinical assessment for HF (which is usually a visual evaluation), and it is unclear whether visual MRI examination can detect changes in these structures. Using brain MRI, we visually examined the mammillary bodies and frontal cortex for global and hippocampi for global and regional tissue changes in 17 HF and 50 control subjects. Significantly global changes emerged in the right mammillary body (HF 1.18 ± 1.13 vs control 0.52 ± 0.74; P = .024), right hippocampus (HF 1.53 ± 0.94 vs control 0.80 ± 0.86; P = .005), and left frontal cortex (HF 1.76 ± 1.03 vs control 1.24 ± 0.77; P = .034). Comparison of the visual method with specialized MRI techniques corroborates right hippocampal and left frontal cortical, but not mammillary body, tissue changes. Visual examination of brain MRI can detect damage in HF in areas regulating depression and executive function, including the right hippocampus and left frontal cortex. Visual MRI assessment in HF may facilitate evaluation of injury to these structures and the assessment of the impact of potential treatments for this damage. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  1. The strength and failure of silica optical fibers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yan, C; Bai, R X; Yu, H; Canning, J; Law, S

    2010-01-01

    The mechanical strength and failure behavior of conventional and microstructured silica optical fibers was investigated using a tensile test and fracture mechanics and numerical analyses. The effect of polymer coating on failure behavior was also studied. The results indicate that all these fibers fail in a brittle manner and failure normally starts from fiber surfaces. The failure loads observed in coated fibers are higher than those in bare fibers. The introduction of air holes reduces fiber strength and their geometrical arrangements have a remarkable effect on stress distribution in the longitudinal direction. These results are potentially useful for the design, fabrication and evaluation of optical fibers for a wide range of applications.

  2. Sepsis patients in the emergency department : stratification using the Clinical Impression Score, Predisposition, Infection, Response and Organ dysfunction score or quick Sequential Organ Failure Assessment score?

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Quinten, Vincent M.; van Meurs, Matijs; Wolffensperger, Anna E.; ter Maaten, Jan C.; Ligtenberg, Jack J M

    2017-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: The aim of this study was to compare the stratification of sepsis patients in the emergency department (ED) for ICU admission and mortality using the Predisposition, Infection, Response and Organ dysfunction (PIRO) and quick Sequential Organ Failure Assessment (qSOFA) scores with clinical

  3. The sequential organ failure assessment (SOFA) score is an effective triage marker following staggered paracetamol (acetaminophen) overdose.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Craig, D G; Zafar, S; Reid, T W D J; Martin, K G; Davidson, J S; Hayes, P C; Simpson, K J

    2012-06-01

    The sequential organ failure assessment (SOFA) score is an effective triage marker following single time point paracetamol (acetaminophen) overdose, but has not been evaluated following staggered (multiple supratherapeutic doses over >8 h, resulting in cumulative dose of >4 g/day) overdoses. To evaluate the prognostic accuracy of the SOFA score following staggered paracetamol overdose. Time-course analysis of 50 staggered paracetamol overdoses admitted to a tertiary liver centre. Individual timed laboratory samples were correlated with corresponding clinical parameters and the daily SOFA scores were calculated. A total of 39/50 (78%) patients developed hepatic encephalopathy. The area under the SOFA receiver operator characteristic for death/liver transplantation was 87.4 (95% CI 73.2-95.7), 94.3 (95% CI 82.5-99.1), and 98.4 (95% CI 84.3-100.0) at 0, 24 and 48 h, respectively, postadmission. A SOFA score of paracetamol overdose, is associated with a good prognosis. Both the SOFA and APACHE II scores could improve triage of high-risk staggered paracetamol overdose patients. © 2012 Blackwell Publishing Ltd.

  4. A risk assessment methodology to evaluate the risk failure of managed aquifer recharge in the Mediterranean Basin

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rodríguez-Escales, Paula; Canelles, Arnau; Sanchez-Vila, Xavier; Folch, Albert; Kurtzman, Daniel; Rossetto, Rudy; Fernández-Escalante, Enrique; Lobo-Ferreira, João-Paulo; Sapiano, Manuel; San-Sebastián, Jon; Schüth, Christoph

    2018-06-01

    Managed aquifer recharge (MAR) can be affected by many risks. Those risks are related to different technical and non-technical aspects of recharge, like water availability, water quality, legislation, social issues, etc. Many other works have acknowledged risks of this nature theoretically; however, their quantification and definition has not been developed. In this study, the risk definition and quantification has been performed by means of fault trees and probabilistic risk assessment (PRA). We defined a fault tree with 65 basic events applicable to the operation phase. After that, we have applied this methodology to six different managed aquifer recharge sites located in the Mediterranean Basin (Portugal, Spain, Italy, Malta, and Israel). The probabilities of the basic events were defined by expert criteria, based on the knowledge of the different managers of the facilities. From that, we conclude that in all sites, the perception of the expert criteria of the non-technical aspects were as much or even more important than the technical aspects. Regarding the risk results, we observe that the total risk in three of the six sites was equal to or above 0.90. That would mean that the MAR facilities have a risk of failure equal to or higher than 90 % in the period of 2-6 years. The other three sites presented lower risks (75, 29, and 18 % for Malta, Menashe, and Serchio, respectively).

  5. Echo and BNP serial assessment in ambulatory heart failure care: Data on loop diuretic use and renal function

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Frank Lloyd Dini

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available We compared the follow-up data on loop diuretic use and renal function, as assessed by serum creatinine levels, and the estimated glomerular filtration rate (eGFR, of two groups of consecutive ambulatory HF patients: 1 the clinically-guided group, in which management was clinically driven based on the institutional protocol of the HF Unit of the Cardiovascular and Thoracic Department of Pisa (standard of care and 2 the echo and B-type natriuretic peptide (BNP guided group (patients conforming to the protocol of the Network Labs Ultrasound (NEBULA in HF Study Group: Pisa, Perugia, Pavia; Verona, Auckland, and Veruno, in which therapy was delivered according to the serial assessment of BNP and echocardiography. Patients whose follow-up was based on standard of care had a significant higher prevalence of worsening renal function, that was likely related to higher diuretic dosages, whilst, a better management of renal function was observed in the echo-BNP-guided group. The data is related to “Echo and natriuretic peptide guided therapy improves outcome and reduces worsening renal function in systolic heart failure: An observational study of 1137 outpatients” (A. Simioniuc, E. Carluccio, S. Ghio, A. Rossi, P. Biagioli, G. Reboldi, G.G. Galeotti, F. Lu, C. Zara, G. Whalley, P.G. Temporelli, F.L. Dini, 2016; K.J. Harjai, H.K. Dinshaw, E. Nunez, M. Shah, H. Thompson, T. Turgut, H.O. Ventura, 1999; A. Ahmed, A. Husain, T.E. Love, G. Gambassi, L.J. Dell׳Italia, G.S. Francis, M. Gheorghiade, R.M. Allman, S. Meleth, R.C. Bourge, 2006 [1–3].

  6. Echo and BNP serial assessment in ambulatory heart failure care: Data on loop diuretic use and renal function.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dini, Frank Lloyd; Simioniuc, Anca; Carluccio, Erberto; Ghio, Stefano; Rossi, Andrea; Biagioli, Paolo; Reboldi, Gianpaolo; Galeotti, Gian Giacomo; Lu, Fei; Zara, Cornelia; Whalley, Gillian; Temporelli, Pier Luigi

    2016-12-01

    We compared the follow-up data on loop diuretic use and renal function, as assessed by serum creatinine levels, and the estimated glomerular filtration rate (eGFR), of two groups of consecutive ambulatory HF patients: 1) the clinically-guided group, in which management was clinically driven based on the institutional protocol of the HF Unit of the Cardiovascular and Thoracic Department of Pisa (standard of care) and 2) the echo and B-type natriuretic peptide (BNP) guided group (patients conforming to the protocol of the Network Labs Ultrasound (NEBULA) in HF Study Group: Pisa, Perugia, Pavia; Verona, Auckland, and Veruno), in which therapy was delivered according to the serial assessment of BNP and echocardiography. Patients whose follow-up was based on standard of care had a significant higher prevalence of worsening renal function, that was likely related to higher diuretic dosages, whilst, a better management of renal function was observed in the echo-BNP-guided group. The data is related to "Echo and natriuretic peptide guided therapy improves outcome and reduces worsening renal function in systolic heart failure: An observational study of 1137 outpatients" (A. Simioniuc, E. Carluccio, S. Ghio, A. Rossi, P. Biagioli, G. Reboldi, G.G. Galeotti, F. Lu, C. Zara, G. Whalley, P.G. Temporelli, F.L. Dini, 2016; K.J. Harjai, H.K. Dinshaw, E. Nunez, M. Shah, H. Thompson, T. Turgut, H.O. Ventura, 1999; A. Ahmed, A. Husain, T.E. Love, G. Gambassi, L.J. Dell׳Italia, G.S. Francis, M. Gheorghiade, R.M. Allman, S. Meleth, R.C. Bourge, 2006) [1], [2], [3].

  7. Failure of Passive Immune Transfer in Calves: A Meta-Analysis on the Consequences and Assessment of the Economic Impact.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Didier Raboisson

    Full Text Available Low colostrum intake at birth results in the failure of passive transfer (FPT due to the inadequate ingestion of colostral immunoglobulins (Ig. FPT is associated with an increased risk of mortality and decreased health and longevity. Despite the known management practices associated with low FPT, it remains an important issue in the field. Neither a quantitative analysis of FPT consequences nor an assessment of its total cost are available. To address this point, a meta-analysis on the adjusted associations between FPT and its outcomes was first performed. Then, the total costs of FPT in European systems were calculated using a stochastic method with adjusted values as the input parameters. The adjusted risks (and 95% confidence intervals for mortality, bovine respiratory disease, diarrhoea and overall morbidity in the case of FPT were 2.12 (1.43-3.13, 1.75 (1.50-2.03, 1.51 (1.05-2.17 and 1.91 (1.63-2.24, respectively. The mean (and 95% prediction interval total costs per calf with FPT were estimated to be €60 (€10-109 and €80 (€20-139 for dairy and beef, respectively. As a result of the double-step stochastic method, the proposed economic estimation constitutes the first estimate available for FPT. The results are presented in a way that facilitates their use in the field and, with limited effort, combines the cost of each contributor to increase the applicability of the economic assessment to the situations farm-advisors may face. The present economic estimates are also an important tool to evaluate the profitability of measures that aim to improve colostrum intake and FPT prevention.

  8. Modeling of brittle-viscous flow using discrete particles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thordén Haug, Øystein; Barabasch, Jessica; Virgo, Simon; Souche, Alban; Galland, Olivier; Mair, Karen; Abe, Steffen; Urai, Janos L.

    2017-04-01

    Many geological processes involve both viscous flow and brittle fractures, e.g. boudinage, folding and magmatic intrusions. Numerical modeling of such viscous-brittle materials poses challenges: one has to account for the discrete fracturing, the continuous viscous flow, the coupling between them, and potential pressure dependence of the flow. The Discrete Element Method (DEM) is a numerical technique, widely used for studying fracture of geomaterials. However, the implementation of viscous fluid flow in discrete element models is not trivial. In this study, we model quasi-viscous fluid flow behavior using Esys-Particle software (Abe et al., 2004). We build on the methodology of Abe and Urai (2012) where a combination of elastic repulsion and dashpot interactions between the discrete particles is implemented. Several benchmarks are presented to illustrate the material properties. Here, we present extensive, systematic material tests to characterize the rheology of quasi-viscous DEM particle packing. We present two tests: a simple shear test and a channel flow test, both in 2D and 3D. In the simple shear tests, simulations were performed in a box, where the upper wall is moved with a constant velocity in the x-direction, causing shear deformation of the particle assemblage. Here, the boundary conditions are periodic on the sides, with constant forces on the upper and lower walls. In the channel flow tests, a piston pushes a sample through a channel by Poisseuille flow. For both setups, we present the resulting stress-strain relationships over a range of material parameters, confining stress and strain rate. Results show power-law dependence between stress and strain rate, with a non-linear dependence on confining force. The material is strain softening under some conditions (which). Additionally, volumetric strain can be dilatant or compactant, depending on porosity, confining pressure and strain rate. Constitutive relations are implemented in a way that limits the

  9. An analytical model for interactive failures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sun Yong; Ma Lin; Mathew, Joseph; Zhang Sheng

    2006-01-01

    In some systems, failures of certain components can interact with each other, and accelerate the failure rates of these components. These failures are defined as interactive failure. Interactive failure is a prevalent cause of failure associated with complex systems, particularly in mechanical systems. The failure risk of an asset will be underestimated if the interactive effect is ignored. When failure risk is assessed, interactive failures of an asset need to be considered. However, the literature is silent on previous research work in this field. This paper introduces the concepts of interactive failure, develops an analytical model to analyse this type of failure quantitatively, and verifies the model using case studies and experiments

  10. SAFOD Brittle Microstructure and Mechanics Knowledge Base (BM2KB)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Babaie, Hassan A.; Broda Cindi, M.; Hadizadeh, Jafar; Kumar, Anuj

    2013-07-01

    Scientific drilling near Parkfield, California has established the San Andreas Fault Observatory at Depth (SAFOD), which provides the solid earth community with short range geophysical and fault zone material data. The BM2KB ontology was developed in order to formalize the knowledge about brittle microstructures in the fault rocks sampled from the SAFOD cores. A knowledge base, instantiated from this domain ontology, stores and presents the observed microstructural and analytical data with respect to implications for brittle deformation and mechanics of faulting. These data can be searched on the knowledge base‧s Web interface by selecting a set of terms (classes, properties) from different drop-down lists that are dynamically populated from the ontology. In addition to this general search, a query can also be conducted to view data contributed by a specific investigator. A search by sample is done using the EarthScope SAFOD Core Viewer that allows a user to locate samples on high resolution images of core sections belonging to different runs and holes. The class hierarchy of the BM2KB ontology was initially designed using the Unified Modeling Language (UML), which was used as a visual guide to develop the ontology in OWL applying the Protégé ontology editor. Various Semantic Web technologies such as the RDF, RDFS, and OWL ontology languages, SPARQL query language, and Pellet reasoning engine, were used to develop the ontology. An interactive Web application interface was developed through Jena, a java based framework, with AJAX technology, jsp pages, and java servlets, and deployed via an Apache tomcat server. The interface allows the registered user to submit data related to their research on a sample of the SAFOD core. The submitted data, after initial review by the knowledge base administrator, are added to the extensible knowledge base and become available in subsequent queries to all types of users. The interface facilitates inference capabilities in the

  11. Semi-brittle flow of granitoid fault rocks in experiments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pec, Matej; Stünitz, Holger; Heilbronner, Renée.; Drury, Martyn

    2016-03-01

    Field studies and seismic data show that semi-brittle flow of fault rocks probably is the dominant deformation mechanism at the base of the seismogenic zone at the so-called frictional-viscous transition. To understand the physical and chemical processes accommodating semi-brittle flow, we have performed an experimental study on synthetic granitoid fault rocks exploring a broad parameter space (temperature, T = 300, 400, 500, and 600°C, confining pressure, Pc ≈ 300, 500, 1000, and 1500 MPa, shear strain rate, γṡ ≈ 10-3, 10-4, 10-5, and 10-6 s-1, to finite shear strains, γ = 0-5). The experiments have been carried out using a granular material with grain size smaller than 200 µm with a little H2O added (0.2 wt %). Only two experiments (performed at the fastest strain rates and lowest temperatures) have failed abruptly right after reaching peak strength (τ ~ 1400 MPa). All other samples reach high shear stresses (τ ~ 570-1600 MPa) then weaken slightly (by Δτ ~ 10-190 MPa) and continue to deform at a more or less steady state stress level. Clear temperature dependence and a weak strain rate dependence of the peak as well as steady state stress levels are observed. In order to express this relationship, the strain rate-stress sensitivity has been fit with a stress exponent, assuming γ˙ ∝ τn and yields high stress exponents (n ≈ 10-140), which decrease with increasing temperature. The microstructures show widespread comminution, strain partitioning, and localization into slip zones. The slip zones contain at first nanocrystalline and partly amorphous material. Later, during continued deformation, fully amorphous material develops in some of the slip zones. Despite the mechanical steady state conditions, the fabrics in the slip zones and outside continue to evolve and do not reach a steady state microstructure below γ = 5. Within the slip zones, the fault rock material progressively transforms from a crystalline solid to an amorphous material. We

  12. Assessment of the risk of failure of high voltage substations due to environmental conditions and pollution on insulators.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Castillo Sierra, Rafael; Oviedo-Trespalacios, Oscar; Candelo, John E; Soto, Jose D

    2015-07-01

    Pollution on electrical insulators is one of the greatest causes of failure of substations subjected to high levels of salinity and environmental pollution. Considering leakage current as the main indicator of pollution on insulators, this paper focuses on establishing the effect of the environmental conditions on the risk of failure due to pollution on insulators and determining the significant change in the magnitude of the pollution on the insulators during dry and humid periods. Hierarchical segmentation analysis was used to establish the effect of environmental conditions on the risk of failure due to pollution on insulators. The Kruskal-Wallis test was utilized to determine the significant changes in the magnitude of the pollution due to climate periods. An important result was the discovery that leakage current was more common on insulators during dry periods than humid ones. There was also a higher risk of failure due to pollution during dry periods. During the humid period, various temperatures and wind directions produced a small change in the risk of failure. As a technical result, operators of electrical substations can now identify the cause of an increase in risk of failure due to pollution in the area. The research provides a contribution towards the behaviour of the leakage current under conditions similar to those of the Colombian Caribbean coast and how they affect the risk of failure of the substation due to pollution.

  13. Generic component failure data base

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Eide, S.A.; Calley, M.B.

    1992-01-01

    This report discusses comprehensive component generic failure data base which has been developed for light water reactor probabilistic risk assessments. The Nuclear Computerized Library for Assessing Reactor Reliability (NUCLARR) was used to generate component failure rates. Using this approach, most of the failure rates are based on actual plant data rather then existing estimates

  14. First principles characterisation of brittle transgranular fracture of titanium hydrides

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Olsson, Pär A.T.; Mrovec, Matous; Kroon, Martin

    2016-01-01

    In this work we have studied transgranular cleavage and the fracture toughness of titanium hydrides by means of quantum mechanical calculations based on density functional theory. The calculations show that the surface energy decreases and the unstable stacking fault energy increases with increasing hydrogen content. This is consistent with experimental findings of brittle behaviour of titanium hydrides at low temperatures. Based on Griffith-Irwin theory we estimate the fracture toughness of the hydrides to be of the order of 1 MPa⋅m"1"/"2, which concurs well with experimental data. To investigate the cleavage energetics, we analyse the decohesion at various crystallographic planes and determine the traction-separation laws based on the Rose's extended universal binding energy relation. The calculations predict that the peak stresses do not depend on the hydrogen content of the phases, but it is rather dependent on the crystallographic cleavage direction. However, it is found that the work of fracture decreases with increasing hydrogen content, which is an indication of hydrogen induced bond weakening in the material.

  15. A Maxwell elasto-brittle rheology for sea ice modelling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dansereau, Véronique; Weiss, Jérôme; Saramito, Pierre; Lattes, Philippe

    2016-07-01

    A new rheological model is developed that builds on an elasto-brittle (EB) framework used for sea ice and rock mechanics, with the intent of representing both the small elastic deformations associated with fracturing processes and the larger deformations occurring along the faults/leads once the material is highly damaged and fragmented. A viscous-like relaxation term is added to the linear-elastic constitutive law together with an effective viscosity that evolves according to the local level of damage of the material, like its elastic modulus. The coupling between the level of damage and both mechanical parameters is such that within an undamaged ice cover the viscosity is infinitely large and deformations are strictly elastic, while along highly damaged zones the elastic modulus vanishes and most of the stress is dissipated through permanent deformations. A healing mechanism is also introduced, counterbalancing the effects of damaging over large timescales. In this new model, named Maxwell-EB after the Maxwell rheology, the irreversible and reversible deformations are solved for simultaneously; hence drift velocities are defined naturally. First idealized simulations without advection show that the model reproduces the main characteristics of sea ice mechanics and deformation: strain localization, anisotropy, intermittency and associated scaling laws.

  16. A numerical analysis of crack growth in brittle microcracking composites

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Biner, S.B.

    1993-01-01

    A set of numerical analyses of crack growth was performed to elucidate the mechanism of microcracking on the observed fracture behavior of brittle solids and composites. The random nucleation, orientation and size effects of discrete microcracks and resulting interactions are fully accounted for in a hybrid finite element model. The results indicate that the energy expenditure due the microcrack nucleation seems not to contribute significantly to the resistance to crack growth. The main controlling parameter appears to be elastic interaction of the microcracks with the main crack in the absence of a reinforcing phase; therefore, the microcrack density plays an important role. In the case of the composites, the interaction of the main crack with the stress fields of the reinforcing phase, rather than interaction of microcracks, is the controlling parameter for the resistance to the crack growth even in the presence of a large population of microcracks. It will be also shown that the crack branching and crack kinking can readily develop as a result of microcracking

  17. Comparison of ductile-to-brittle transition curve fitting approaches

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cao, L.W.; Wu, S.J.; Flewitt, P.E.J.

    2012-01-01

    Ductile-to-brittle transition (DBT) curve fitting approaches are compared over the transition temperature range for reactor pressure vessel steels with different kinds of data, including Charpy-V notch impact energy data and fracture toughness data. Three DBT curve fitting methods have been frequently used in the past, including the Burr S-Weibull and tanh distributions. In general there is greater scatter associated with test data obtained within the transition region. Therefore these methods give results with different accuracies, especially when fitting to small quantities of data. The comparison shows that the Burr distribution and tanh distribution can almost equally fit well distributed and large data sets extending across the test temperature range to include the upper and lower shelves. The S-Weibull distribution fit is poor for the lower shelf of the DBT curve. Overall for both large and small quantities of measured data the Burr distribution provides the best description. - Highlights: ► Burr distribution offers a better fit than that of a S-Weibull and tanh fit. ► Burr and tanh methods show similar fitting ability for a large data set. ► Burr method can fit sparse data well distributed across the test temperature. ► S-Weibull method cannot fit the lower shelf well and show poor fitting quality.

  18. Aggregations of brittle stars can perform similar ecological roles as mussel reefs

    KAUST Repository

    Geraldi, NR

    2016-11-29

    Biogenic habitats, such as coral reefs, facilitate diverse communities. In aquatic systems, aggregations of mobile benthic species may play a similar ecological role to that of typically sessile biogenic habitats; however, this has rarely been considered. We quantified the abundance of sessile horse mussels Modiolus modiolus and aggregating brittle stars Ophiothrix fragilis and tested for correlations between the density of mussels (live and dead) and brittle stars each with (1) abundance, biomass, diversity, and assemblage structure of associated benthic macrofauna; and (2) percent organic matter of the sediment. We found that the abundance of live M. modiolus was positively associated with the abundance and biomass of macrofauna. The positive association between M. modiolus and macrofaunal abundance was further amplified with an increase in brittle stars and a decrease in dead mussel shells. Macrofaunal biomass was lower with a higher percentage of dead mussel shells, and macrofaunal diversity increased with greater abundances of live M. modiolus and brittle stars. Sediment organic matter was positively related to brittle star density, but not to the abundance of live or dead mussels. The positive relationship between brittle stars and sediment organic matter suggests that brittle stars could enhance rates of benthic- pelagic coupling. Given the importance of understanding the functional role of threatened habitats, it is essential that the underlying community patterns be understood through robust observational studies to then derive testable hypotheses to determine drivers. These findings provide novel insight into the ecological role of aggregations of mobile species, which is essential to prioritize conservation and restoration strategies.

  19. Hemodynamic changes during weaning: can we assess and predict cardiac-related weaning failure by transthoracic echocardiography?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Voga, Gorazd

    2010-01-01

    Cardiac-related failure of weaning from mechanical ventilation is an important reason for prolonged mechanical ventilation, intensive care unit treatment, and increased morbidity and mortality. When transthoracic echocardiography (TTE) is routinely performed before a weaning trial, patients at high risk of cardiac-related failure can be detected by low left ventricular (LV) ejection fraction, diastolic dysfunction, and elevated LV filling pressure. During the weaning trial, a further increase of LV filling pressure and progression of diastolic failure can be observed by repeated TTE. Owing to certain limitations concerning patients and methodology, TTE cannot be employed in every patient and invasive hemodynamic monitoring is still mandatory in selected patients with repetitive weaning failure.

  20. FEM Modeling of In-Plane Stress Distribution in Thick Brittle Coatings/Films on Ductile Substrates Subjected to Tensile Stress to Determine Interfacial Strength

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kaishi Wang

    2018-03-01

    Full Text Available The ceramic-metal interface is present in various material structures and devices that are vulnerable to failures, like cracking, which are typically due to their incompatible properties, e.g., thermal expansion mismatch. In failure of these multilayer systems, interfacial shear strength is a good measure of the robustness of interfaces, especially for planar films. There is a widely-used shear lag model and method by Agrawal and Raj to analyse and measure the interfacial shear strength of thin brittle film on ductile substrates. The use of this classical model for a type of polymer derived ceramic coatings (thickness ~18 μm on steel substrate leads to high values of interfacial shear strength. Here, we present finite element simulations for such a coating system when it is subjected to in-plane tension. Results show that the in-plane stresses in the coating are non-uniform, i.e., varying across the thickness of the film. Therefore, they do not meet one of the basic assumptions of the classical model: uniform in-plane stress. Furthermore, effects of three significant parameters, film thickness, crack spacing, and Young’s modulus, on the in-plane stress distribution have also been investigated. ‘Thickness-averaged In-plane Stress’ (TIS, a new failure criterion, is proposed for estimating the interfacial shear strength, which leads to a more realistic estimation of the tensile strength and interfacial shear strength of thick brittle films/coatings on ductile substrates.

  1. FEM Modeling of In-Plane Stress Distribution in Thick Brittle Coatings/Films on Ductile Substrates Subjected to Tensile Stress to Determine Interfacial Strength.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Kaishi; Zhang, Fangzhou; Bordia, Rajendra K

    2018-03-27

    The ceramic-metal interface is present in various material structures and devices that are vulnerable to failures, like cracking, which are typically due to their incompatible properties, e.g., thermal expansion mismatch. In failure of these multilayer systems, interfacial shear strength is a good measure of the robustness of interfaces, especially for planar films. There is a widely-used shear lag model and method by Agrawal and Raj to analyse and measure the interfacial shear strength of thin brittle film on ductile substrates. The use of this classical model for a type of polymer derived ceramic coatings (thickness ~18 μm) on steel substrate leads to high values of interfacial shear strength. Here, we present finite element simulations for such a coating system when it is subjected to in-plane tension. Results show that the in-plane stresses in the coating are non-uniform, i.e., varying across the thickness of the film. Therefore, they do not meet one of the basic assumptions of the classical model: uniform in-plane stress. Furthermore, effects of three significant parameters, film thickness, crack spacing, and Young's modulus, on the in-plane stress distribution have also been investigated. 'Thickness-averaged In-plane Stress' (TIS), a new failure criterion, is proposed for estimating the interfacial shear strength, which leads to a more realistic estimation of the tensile strength and interfacial shear strength of thick brittle films/coatings on ductile substrates.

  2. A Critical Review of Landslide Failure Mechanisms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stead, D.; Wolter, A.; Clague, J. J.

    2011-12-01

    During the last ten years several comprehensive geotechnical studies have been completed on major historic landslides including Randa in Switzerland, Frank in Canada, Aknes in Norway, La Clapiere in France and Vaiont in Italy. In addition, numerous researchers have documented deep-seated gravitational deformations and a wide variety of large prehistoric rock slope failures. The information provided by these studies is evidence of the significant advances made in our ability to map, monitor and model landslides. Over the same period, the mining industry has developed large open pits with slope heights exceeding 1000 m that provide important analogues to high mountain slopes. In this paper we analyse data from the literature to illustrate the importance of brittle fracture, 3D controls, anisotropy, overburden stress, geomorphic processes, groundwater and temperature in major landslides and provide some indicators as to the research required to further understand the complexity of rock slope failure mechanisms. The nature of the landslide failure surface has received inadequate attention in the past, with failure surfaces typically considered in 2D and simulated as discrete, smooth and often planar features. Current work shows that failure surfaces are inherently three-dimensional and have much structural variability across the area of the landslide scarp, reflecting complex structural histories. Such anisotropy and variations may result in multiple events or distinct blocks that move at different rates. Just as most failure surfaces vary spatially, they may also change with depth and thus should more realistically be considered failure zones rather than discrete surfaces. The increasing recognition of the importance of step-path failures, internal dilation and brittle fracture are indicative of the complexity in slope failure surfaces. Related to the variation in failure surface characteristics is the importance of 3D rotational displacements and both the

  3. An improved method for predicting brittleness of rocks via well logs in tight oil reservoirs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Zhenlin; Sun, Ting; Feng, Cheng; Wang, Wei; Han, Chuang

    2018-06-01

    There can be no industrial oil production in tight oil reservoirs until fracturing is undertaken. Under such conditions, the brittleness of the rocks is a very important factor. However, it has so far been difficult to predict. In this paper, the selected study area is the tight oil reservoirs in Lucaogou formation, Permian, Jimusaer sag, Junggar basin. According to the transformation of dynamic and static rock mechanics parameters and the correction of confining pressure, an improved method is proposed for quantitatively predicting the brittleness of rocks via well logs in tight oil reservoirs. First, 19 typical tight oil core samples are selected in the study area. Their static Young’s modulus, static Poisson’s ratio and petrophysical parameters are measured. In addition, the static brittleness indices of four other tight oil cores are measured under different confining pressure conditions. Second, the dynamic Young’s modulus, Poisson’s ratio and brittleness index are calculated using the compressional and shear wave velocity. With combination of the measured and calculated results, the transformation model of dynamic and static brittleness index is built based on the influence of porosity and clay content. The comparison of the predicted brittleness indices and measured results shows that the model has high accuracy. Third, on the basis of the experimental data under different confining pressure conditions, the amplifying factor of brittleness index is proposed to correct for the influence of confining pressure on the brittleness index. Finally, the above improved models are applied to formation evaluation via well logs. Compared with the results before correction, the results of the improved models agree better with the experimental data, which indicates that the improved models have better application effects. The brittleness index prediction method of tight oil reservoirs is improved in this research. It is of great importance in the optimization of

  4. Respiratory Failure

    Science.gov (United States)

    Respiratory failure happens when not enough oxygen passes from your lungs into your blood. Your body's organs, ... brain, need oxygen-rich blood to work well. Respiratory failure also can happen if your lungs can' ...

  5. Assessment of cerebral microbleeds by susceptibility-weighted imaging at 3T in patients with end-stage organ failure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sparacia, Gianvincenzo; Cannella, Roberto; Lo Re, Vincenzina; Gambino, Angelo; Mamone, Giuseppe; Miraglia, Roberto

    2018-02-17

    Cerebral microbleeds (CMBs) are small rounded lesions representing cerebral hemosiderin deposits surrounded by macrophages that results from previous microhemorrhages. The aim of this study was to review the distribution of cerebral microbleeds in patients with end-stage organ failure and their association with specific end-stage organ failure risk factors. Between August 2015 and June 2017, we evaluated 15 patients, 9 males, and 6 females, (mean age 65.5 years). Patients population was subdivided into three groups according to the organ failure: (a) chronic kidney failure (n = 8), (b) restrictive cardiomyopathy undergoing heart transplantation (n = 1), and (c) end-stage liver failure undergoing liver transplantation (n = 6). The MR exams were performed on a 3T MR unit and the SWI sequence was used for the detection of CMBs. CMBs were subdivided in supratentorial lobar distributed, supratentorial non-lobar distributed, and infratentorial distributed. A total of 91 microbleeds were observed in 15 patients. Fifty-nine CMBs lesions (64.8%) had supratentorial lobar distribution, 17 CMBs lesions (18.8%) had supratentorial non-lobar distribution and the remaining 15 CMBs lesions (16.4%) were infratentorial distributed. An overall predominance of supratentorial multiple lobar localizations was found in all types of end-stage organ failure. The presence of CMBs was significantly correlated with age, hypertension, and specific end-stage organ failure risk factors (p failure. The improved detection of CMBs with SWI sequences may contribute to a more accurate identification of patients with cerebral risk factors to prevent complications during or after the organ transplantation.

  6. A Global Assessment of Circulating Prolysyl Oxidase in Nonischemic Patients With Garden-variety Heart Failure With Preserved Ejection Fraction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Muñoz Calvo, Benjamín; Villa Martínez, Ana; López Orgil, Susana; López Andrés, Natalia; Román García, Feliciano; Víctor Palomares, Virginia; de la Calle de la Villa, Esther; Nadador Patiño, Verónica; Arribas-Gómez, Ignacio

    2018-05-25

    Lysyl oxidase is overexpressed in the myocardium of patients with hypertensive cardiomyopathy. We aimed to explore whether patients with hypertensive-metabolic heart failure with preserved ejection fraction (HM-HFpEF) also have increased concentrations of circulating prolysyl oxidase (cpLOX) and its possible consequences. We quantified cpLOX concentrations in 85 nonischemic patients with stage C, HM-HFpEF, and compared them with those of 51 healthy controls. We also assessed the correlations of cpLOX with myocardial stiffness parameters, collagen turnover products and fibrogenic cytokines, as well as the predictive value of plasma proenzyme levels at 1-year of follow-up. We detected raised cpLOX values and found that they correlated with calculated E/E' ratios and stiffness constants. The subgroup of patients with type I diastolic dysfunction showed a single negative correlation between cpLOX and B-type natriuretic peptide whereas patients with a restrictive diastolic pattern showed a strong correlation between cpLOX and galectin-3. Kaplan-Meier analysis revealed that cpLOX > 52.20 ng/mL slightly increased the risk of a fatal outcome (log-rank = 4.45; P = .034). When Cox regression was used, cpLOX was found to be a significant independent predictor of cardiovascular death or hospitalization due to the decompensation of HM-HFpEF (HR, 1.360; 95%CI, 1.126-1.638; P = .046). Patients with symptomatic HM-HFpEF show high cpLOX serum levels associated with restrictive diastolic filling indices. These levels represent a moderate risk factor for poor clinical outcome. Throughout the natural history of HM-HFpEF, we observed that cpLOX concentrations were initially negatively correlated with B-type natriuretic peptide but positively correlated with galectin-3 as advanced diastolic dysfunction developed. Copyright © 2018. Published by Elsevier España, S.L.U.

  7. Failure assessment and evaluation of critical crack length for a fresh Zr-2 pressure tube of an Indian PHWR

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Krishnan, Suresh; Bhasin, Vivek; Kushwaha, H.S.; Mahajan, S.C.; Kakodkar, A.

    1996-01-01

    Fracture analysis of Zr-2 pressure tubes having through wall axial crack was done using finite element method. The analysis was done for tubes in as received condition. During reactor operation the mechanical properties of Zr-2 undergo changes. The analysis is valid for pressure tubes of newly commissioned reactors. The main aim of the study was to determine critical crack length of pressure tubes in normal operating conditions. Elastic plastic fracture analysis was done for different crack lengths to determine applied J-integral values. Tearing modulus instability concept was used to evaluate critical crack length. One of the important parameter studied was, the effect of crack face pressure, which leaking fluid exert on the crack faces/lips of through wall axial crack. Its effect was found to be significant for pressure tubes. It increases the applied J-integral values. Approximate analytical solutions which takes into account the plasticity ahead of crack tip, are available and widely used. These formulae do not take into account the crack face pressure. Since, for the present situation the effect of crack face pressure is significant hence, detailed finite analysis was necessary. Detailed 3D finite element analysis gives an insight into the variation of J-integral values over the thickness of pressure tube. It was found that J values are maximum at the middle layer of the tube. A peak factor on J values was defined and evaluated as ratio of maximum J to average J across the thickness, crack opening area for each length was also evaluated. The knowledge of crack opening area is useful for leak before break studies. The failure assessment was also done using Central Electricity Generating Board (CEGB) R-6 method considering the ductile tearing. The reserve factors (or safety margins) for different crack lengths was evaluated using R-6 method. (author). 30 refs., 21 figs., 34 tabs

  8. Effect of High-Temperature Thermomechanical Treatment on the Brittle Fracture of Low-Carbon Steel

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smirnov, M. A.; Pyshmintsev, I. Yu.; Varnak, O. V.; Mal'tseva, A. N.

    2018-02-01

    The effect of high-temperature thermomechanical treatment (HTMT) on the brittleness connected with deformation-induced aging and on the reversible temper brittleness of a low-carbon tube steel with a ferrite-bainite structure has been studied. When conducting an HTMT of a low-alloy steel, changes should be taken into account in the amount of ferrite in its structure and relationships between the volume fractions of the lath and the acicular bainite. It has been established that steel subjected to HTMT undergoes transcrystalline embrittlement upon deformation aging. At the same time, HTMT, which suppresses intercrystalline fracture, leads to a weakening of the development of reversible temper brittleness.

  9. Comparative studies on constitutive models for cohesive interface cracks of quasi-brittle materials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shen Xinpu; Shen Guoxiao; Zhou Lin

    2005-01-01

    In this paper, Concerning on the modelling of quasi-brittle fracture process zone at interface crack of quasi-brittle materials and structures, typical constitutive models of interface cracks were compared. Numerical calculations of the constitutive behaviours of selected models were carried out at local level. Aiming at the simulation of quasi-brittle fracture of concrete-like materials and structures, the emphases of the qualitative comparisons of selected cohesive models are focused on: (1) the fundamental mode I and mode II behaviours of selected models; (2) dilatancy properties of the selected models under mixed mode fracture loading conditions. (authors)

  10. Heart Failure

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heart failure is a condition in which the heart can't pump enough blood to meet the body's needs. Heart failure does not mean that your heart has stopped ... and shortness of breath Common causes of heart failure are coronary artery disease, high blood pressure and ...

  11. Theoretical effects of fully ductile versus fully brittle behaviors of bone tissue on the strength of the human proximal femur and vertebral body.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nawathe, Shashank; Yang, Haisheng; Fields, Aaron J; Bouxsein, Mary L; Keaveny, Tony M

    2015-05-01

    The influence of the ductility of bone tissue on whole-bone strength represents a fundamental issue of multi-scale biomechanics. To gain insight, we performed a computational study of 16 human proximal femurs and 12 T9 vertebral bodies, comparing the whole-bone strength for the two hypothetical bounding cases of fully brittle versus fully ductile tissue-level failure behaviors, all other factors, including tissue-level elastic modulus and yield stress, held fixed. For each bone, a finite element model was generated (60-82 μm element size; up to 120 million elements) and was virtually loaded in habitual (stance for femur, compression for vertebra) and non-habitual (sideways fall, only for femur) loading modes. Using a geometrically and materially non-linear model, the tissue was assumed to be either fully brittle or fully ductile. We found that, under habitual loading, changing the tissue behavior from fully ductile to fully brittle reduced whole-bone strength by 38.3±2.4% (mean±SD) and 39.4±1.9% for the femur and vertebra, respectively (p=0.39 for site difference). These reductions were remarkably uniform across bones, but (for the femur) were greater for non-habitual (57.1±4.7%) than habitual loading (pductile cases. These theoretical results suggest that the whole-bone strength of the proximal femur and vertebra can vary substantially between fully brittle and fully ductile tissue-level behaviors, an effect that is relatively insensitive to bone morphology but greater for non-habitual loading. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  12. Definition of containment failure

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cybulskis, P.

    1982-01-01

    Core meltdown accidents of the types considered in probabilistic risk assessments (PRA's) have been predicted to lead to pressures that will challenge the integrity of containment structures. Review of a number of PRA's indicates considerable variation in the predicted probability of containment failure as a function of pressure. Since the results of PRA's are sensitive to the prediction of the occurrence and the timing of containment failure, better understanding of realistic containment capabilities and a more consistent approach to the definition of containment failure pressures are required. Additionally, since the size and location of the failure can also significantly influence the prediction of reactor accident risk, further understanding of likely failure modes is required. The thresholds and modes of containment failure may not be independent

  13. Crack propagation of brittle rock under high geostress

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Ning; Chu, Weijiang; Chen, Pingzhi

    2018-03-01

    Based on fracture mechanics and numerical methods, the characteristics and failure criterions of wall rock cracks including initiation, propagation, and coalescence are analyzed systematically under different conditions. In order to consider the interaction among cracks, adopt the sliding model of multi-cracks to simulate the splitting failure of rock in axial compress. The reinforcement of bolts and shotcrete supporting to rock mass can control the cracks propagation well. Adopt both theory analysis and simulation method to study the mechanism of controlling the propagation. The best fixed angle of bolts is calculated. Then use ansys to simulate the crack arrest function of bolt to crack. Analyze the influence of different factors on stress intensity factor. The method offer more scientific and rational criterion to evaluate the splitting failure of underground engineering under high geostress.

  14. Failure to Fail

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Samuel Vriezen

    2013-07-01

    Full Text Available Between pessimism and optimism, Samuel Vriezen attempts to intuit a third way through an assessment of failure and negativity in the consonances and tensions between the prosody of Irish playwright Samuel Becekett and American poet Gertrude Stein.

  15. Acute kidney failure

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Renal failure - acute; ARF; Kidney injury - acute Images Kidney anatomy References Devarajan P. Biomarkers for assessment of renal function during acute kidney injury. In: Alpern RJ, Moe OW, Caplan M, ...

  16. Enamel: From brittle to ductile like tribological response.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guidoni, G; Swain, M; Jäger, I

    2008-10-01

    To identify the intrinsic nano-scale wear mechanisms of enamel by comparing it with that of highly brittle glass, and highly ductile copper and silver monocrystals. A sharp cube corner indenter tip (20-50 nm radius) was used to abrade glass, enamel as well as copper and silver monocrystals. Square abraded areas (5 microm x 5 microm, 10 microm x 10 microm) were generated with loads of 50 microN for enamel and 100 microN for the remaining materials (2D abrasion). The normal load and displacement data were utilized in a complementary manner to support the comparison. In addition normal and lateral forces were simultaneously measured along 10 microm single scratched lines (1D abrasion). Scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and atomic force microscopy (AFM) were also used to characterise the worn areas and debris. The sharp tip cuts into and ploughs the specimens creating a wedge or ridge of material ahead of itself which eventually detaches, for the ductile materials and at high loads in enamel. For glass and enamel at low loads, the indenter tip ploughs into the material and the removed material is redistributed and pressed back into the abraded area. The wear behaviour of enamel at the nano-level resembles that obtained with glass at low loads (50 microN) and that obtained with metal mono-crystals at high load (100 microN). The role of the microstructural heterogeneity in the wear behaviour of enamel is considered in the discussion. The relevance to clinical wear of enamel is also considered.

  17. Assessment of heart rate, acidosis, consciousness, oxygenation, and respiratory rate to predict noninvasive ventilation failure in hypoxemic patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Duan, Jun; Han, Xiaoli; Bai, Linfu; Zhou, Lintong; Huang, Shicong

    2017-02-01

    To develop and validate a scale using variables easily obtained at the bedside for prediction of failure of noninvasive ventilation (NIV) in hypoxemic patients. The test cohort comprised 449 patients with hypoxemia who were receiving NIV. This cohort was used to develop a scale that considers heart rate, acidosis, consciousness, oxygenation, and respiratory rate (referred to as the HACOR scale) to predict NIV failure, defined as need for intubation after NIV intervention. The highest possible score was 25 points. To validate the scale, a separate group of 358 hypoxemic patients were enrolled in the validation cohort. The failure rate of NIV was 47.8 and 39.4% in the test and validation cohorts, respectively. In the test cohort, patients with NIV failure had higher HACOR scores at initiation and after 1, 12, 24, and 48 h of NIV than those with successful NIV. At 1 h of NIV the area under the receiver operating characteristic curve was 0.88, showing good predictive power for NIV failure. Using 5 points as the cutoff value, the sensitivity, specificity, positive predictive value, negative predictive value, and diagnostic accuracy for NIV failure were 72.6, 90.2, 87.2, 78.1, and 81.8%, respectively. These results were confirmed in the validation cohort. Moreover, the diagnostic accuracy for NIV failure exceeded 80% in subgroups classified by diagnosis, age, or disease severity and also at 1, 12, 24, and 48 h of NIV. Among patients with NIV failure with a HACOR score of >5 at 1 h of NIV, hospital mortality was lower in those who received intubation at ≤12 h of NIV than in those intubated later [58/88 (66%) vs. 138/175 (79%); p = 0.03). The HACOR scale variables are easily obtained at the bedside. The scale appears to be an effective way of predicting NIV failure in hypoxemic patients. Early intubation in high-risk patients may reduce hospital mortality.

  18. Failure mode and effects analysis based risk profile assessment for stereotactic radiosurgery programs at three cancer centers in Brazil

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Teixeira, Flavia C., E-mail: flavitiz@gmail.com [CNEN—Comissao Nacional de Energia Nuclear, Rio de Janeiro, RJ 22290-901, Brazil and LCR/UERJ—Laboratorio de Ciencias Radiologicas/Universidade do Estado do Rio de Janeiro, Rio de Janeiro, RJ 20550-013 (Brazil); Almeida, Carlos E. de [LCR/UERJ—Laboratorio de Ciencias Radiologicas/Universidade do Estado do Rio de Janeiro, Rio de Janeiro, RJ 20550-013 (Brazil); Saiful Huq, M. [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Pittsburgh Cancer Institute and UPMC Cancer Center, Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania 15232 (United States)

    2016-01-15

    Purpose: The goal of this study was to evaluate the safety and quality management program for stereotactic radiosurgery (SRS) treatment processes at three radiotherapy centers in Brazil by using three industrial engineering tools (1) process mapping, (2) failure modes and effects analysis (FMEA), and (3) fault tree analysis. Methods: The recommendations of Task Group 100 of American Association of Physicists in Medicine were followed to apply the three tools described above to create a process tree for SRS procedure for each radiotherapy center and then FMEA was performed. Failure modes were identified for all process steps and values of risk priority number (RPN) were calculated from O, S, and D (RPN = O × S × D) values assigned by a professional team responsible for patient care. Results: The subprocess treatment planning was presented with the highest number of failure modes for all centers. The total number of failure modes were 135, 104, and 131 for centers I, II, and III, respectively. The highest RPN value for each center is as follows: center I (204), center II (372), and center III (370). Failure modes with RPN ≥ 100: center I (22), center II (115), and center III (110). Failure modes characterized by S ≥ 7, represented 68% of the failure modes for center III, 62% for center II, and 45% for center I. Failure modes with RPNs values ≥100 and S ≥ 7, D ≥ 5, and O ≥ 5 were considered as high priority in this study. Conclusions: The results of the present study show that the safety risk profiles for the same stereotactic radiotherapy process are different at three radiotherapy centers in Brazil. Although this is the same treatment process, this present study showed that the risk priority is different and it will lead to implementation of different safety interventions among the centers. Therefore, the current practice of applying universal device-centric QA is not adequate to address all possible failures in clinical processes at different

  19. Failure mode and effects analysis based risk profile assessment for stereotactic radiosurgery programs at three cancer centers in Brazil

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Teixeira, Flavia C.; Almeida, Carlos E. de; Saiful Huq, M.

    2016-01-01

    Purpose: The goal of this study was to evaluate the safety and quality management program for stereotactic radiosurgery (SRS) treatment processes at three radiotherapy centers in Brazil by using three industrial engineering tools (1) process mapping, (2) failure modes and effects analysis (FMEA), and (3) fault tree analysis. Methods: The recommendations of Task Group 100 of American Association of Physicists in Medicine were followed to apply the three tools described above to create a process tree for SRS procedure for each radiotherapy center and then FMEA was performed. Failure modes were identified for all process steps and values of risk priority number (RPN) were calculated from O, S, and D (RPN = O × S × D) values assigned by a professional team responsible for patient care. Results: The subprocess treatment planning was presented with the highest number of failure modes for all centers. The total number of failure modes were 135, 104, and 131 for centers I, II, and III, respectively. The highest RPN value for each center is as follows: center I (204), center II (372), and center III (370). Failure modes with RPN ≥ 100: center I (22), center II (115), and center III (110). Failure modes characterized by S ≥ 7, represented 68% of the failure modes for center III, 62% for center II, and 45% for center I. Failure modes with RPNs values ≥100 and S ≥ 7, D ≥ 5, and O ≥ 5 were considered as high priority in this study. Conclusions: The results of the present study show that the safety risk profiles for the same stereotactic radiotherapy process are different at three radiotherapy centers in Brazil. Although this is the same treatment process, this present study showed that the risk priority is different and it will lead to implementation of different safety interventions among the centers. Therefore, the current practice of applying universal device-centric QA is not adequate to address all possible failures in clinical processes at different

  20. Application of a Brittle Damage Model to Normal Plate-on-Plate Impact

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Raftenberg, Martin N

    2005-01-01

    A brittle damage model presented by Grinfeld and Wright of the U.S. Army Research Laboratory was implemented in the LS-DYNA finite element code and applied to the simulation of normal plate-on-plate impact...

  1. Preventing and Treating Brittle Bones and Osteoporosis | NIH MedlinePlus the Magazine

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Javascript on. Feature: Osteoporosis Preventing and Treating Brittle Bones and Osteoporosis Past Issues / Winter 2011 Table of ... at high risk due to low bone mass. Bone and Bone Loss Bone is living, growing tissue. ...

  2. Brittle versus ductile behaviour of nanotwinned copper: A molecular dynamics study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pei, Linqing; Lu, Cheng; Zhao, Xing; Zhang, Liang; Cheng, Kuiyu; Michal, Guillaume; Tieu, Kiet

    2015-01-01

    Nanotwinned copper (Cu) exhibits an unusual combination of ultra-high yield strength and high ductility. A brittle-to-ductile transition was previously experimentally observed in nanotwinned Cu despite Cu being an intrinsically ductile metal. However, the atomic mechanisms responsible for brittle fracture and ductile fracture in nanotwinned Cu are still not clear. In this study, molecular dynamics (MD) simulations at different temperatures have been performed to investigate the fracture behaviour of a nanotwinned Cu specimen with a single-edge-notched crack whose surface coincides with a twin boundary. Three temperature ranges are identified, indicative of distinct fracture regimes, under tensile straining perpendicular to the twin boundary. Below 1.1 K, the crack propagates in a brittle fashion. Between 2 K and 30 K a dynamic brittle-to-ductile transition is observed. Above 40 K the crack propagates in a ductile mode. A detailed analysis has been carried out to understand the atomic fracture mechanism in each fracture regime

  3. Numerical Simulation of Hydraulic Fracturing in Low-/High-Permeability, Quasi-Brittle and Heterogeneous Rocks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pakzad, R.; Wang, S. Y.; Sloan, S. W.

    2018-04-01

    In this study, an elastic-brittle-damage constitutive model was incorporated into the coupled fluid/solid analysis of ABAQUS to iteratively calculate the equilibrium effective stress of Biot's theory of consolidation. The Young's modulus, strength and permeability parameter of the material were randomly assigned to the representative volume elements of finite element models following the Weibull distribution function. The hydraulic conductivity of elements was associated with their hydrostatic effective stress and damage level. The steady-state permeability test results for sandstone specimens under different triaxial loading conditions were reproduced by employing the same set of material parameters in coupled transient flow/stress analyses of plane-strain models, thereby indicating the reliability of the numerical model. The influence of heterogeneity on the failure response and the absolute permeability was investigated, and the post-peak permeability was found to decrease with the heterogeneity level in the coupled analysis with transient flow. The proposed model was applied to the plane-strain simulation of the fluid pressurization of a cavity within a large-scale block under different conditions. Regardless of the heterogeneity level, the hydraulically driven fractures propagated perpendicular to the minimum principal far-field stress direction for high-permeability models under anisotropic far-field stress conditions. Scattered damage elements appeared in the models with higher degrees of heterogeneity. The partially saturated areas around propagating fractures were simulated by relating the saturation degree to the negative pore pressure in low-permeability blocks under high pressure. By replicating previously reported trends in the fracture initiation and breakdown pressure for different pressurization rates and hydraulic conductivities, the results showed that the proposed model for hydraulic fracture problems is reliable for a wide range of

  4. Effect of fiber extensibility on the fracture toughness of short fiber or brittle matrix composites

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jain, L.K.; Wetherhold, R.C.

    1992-01-01

    A micromechanical model based on probabilistic principles is proposed to determine the effective fracture toughness increment and the bridging stress-crack opening displacement relationship for brittle matrix composites reinforced with short, poorly bonded fibers. Emphasis is placed on studying the effect of fiber extensibility on the bridging stress and the bridging fracture energy, and to determine its importance in cementitious matrix composites. Since the fibers may not be in an ideal aligned or random state, the analysis is placed in sufficiently general terms to consider any prescribable fiber orientation distribution. The model incorporates the snubbing effect observed during pull-out of fibers inclined at an angle to the crack face normal. In addition, the model allows the fibers to break; any fiber whose load meets or exceeds a single-valued failure stress will fracture rather than pull out. The crack bridging results may be expressed as the sum of results for inextensible fibers and an additional term due to fiber extensibility. An exact analysis is given which gives the steady-state bridging toughness G directly, but presents a non-linear problem for the bridging stress-crack opening (σ b -γ) relationship. An approximate analysis is then presented which gives both G and σ b -γ directly. To illustrate the effect extensibility on bridging stress and fracture energy increment due to bridging fibers, a comparison with the inextensible fiber case is provided. It is found that effect of extensibility on fracture energy is negligible for common materials systems. However extensibility may have a significant effect on the bridging stress-crack opening relationship. The effect of other physical and material parameters such as fiber length, fiber orientation and snubbing friction coefficient is also studied. 28 refs., 9 figs., 1 tab

  5. Comparison of linear-elastic-plastic, and fully plastic failure models in the assessment of piping integrity

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Streit, R.D.

    1981-01-01

    The failure evaluation of Pressurized Water Reactor (PWR) primary coolant loop pipe is often based on a plastic limit load criterion; i.e., failure occurs when the stress on the pipe section exceeds the material flow stress. However, in addition the piping system must be safe against crack propagation at stresses less than those leading to plastic instability. In this paper, elastic, elastic-plastic, and fully-plastic failure models are evaluated, and the requirements for piping integrity based on these models are compared. The model yielding the 'more' critical criteria for the given geometry and loading conditions defines the appropriate failure criterion. The pipe geometry and loading used in this study was choosen based on an evaluation of a guillotine break in a PWR primary coolant loop. It is assumed that the piping may contain cracks. Since a deep circumferential crack, can lead to a guillotine pipe break without prior leaking and thus without warning it is the focus of the failure model comparison study. The hot leg pipe, a 29 in. I.D. by 2.5 in. wall thickness stainless pipe, was modeled in this investigation. Cracks up to 90% through the wall were considered. The loads considered in this evaluation result from the internal pressure, dead weight, and seismic stresses. For the case considered, the internal pressure contributes the most to the failure loading. The maximum moment stress due to the dead weight and seismic moments are simply added to the pressure stress. Thus, with the circumferential crack geometry and uniform pressure stress, the problem is axisymmetric. It is analyzed using NIKE2D--an implicit, finite deformation, finite element code for analyzing two-dimensional elastic-plastic problems. (orig./GL)

  6. Correlation between the electric and acoustic signals emitted during compression of brittle materials

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ermioni D. Pasiou

    2017-04-01

    Full Text Available An experimental protocol is described including a series of uni¬axial compression tests of three brittle materials (marble, mortar and glass. The Acoustic Emission (AE technique and the Pressure Stimulated Currents (PSC one are used since the recordings of both techniques are strongly related to the formation of cracking in brittle materials. In the present paper, the correlation of these techniques is investigated, which is finally proven to be very satisfactory.

  7. Development of a brittle fracture acceptance criterion for the International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sorenson, K.B.; Salzbrenner, R.; Nickell, R.E.

    1992-01-01

    An effort has been undertaken to develop a brittle fracture acceptance criterion for structural components of nuclear material transportation casks. The need for such a criterion was twofold. First, new generation cask designs have proposed the use of ferritic steels and other materials to replace the austenitic stainless steel commonly used for structural components in transport casks. Unlike austenitic stainless steel which fails in a high-energy absorbing, ductile tearing mode, it is possible for these candidate materials to fail via brittle fracture when subjected to certain combinations of elevated loading rates and low temperatures. Second, there is no established brittle fracture criterion accepted by the regulatory community that covers a broad range of structural materials. Although the existing IAEA Safety Series number-sign 37 addressed brittle fracture, its the guidance was dated and pertained only to ferritic steels. Consultant's Services Meetings held under the auspices of the IAEA have resulted in a recommended brittle fracture criterion. The brittle fracture criterion is based on linear elastic fracture mechanics, and is the result of a consensus of experts from six participating IAEA-member countries. The brittle fracture criterion allows three approaches to determine the fracture toughness of the structural material. The three approaches present the opportunity to balance material testing requirements and the conservatism of the material's fracture toughness which must be used to demonstrate resistance to brittle fracture. This work has resulted in a revised Appendix IX to Safety Series number-sign 37 which will be released as an IAEA Technical Document within the coming year

  8. Experimental Evaluation of the Failure of a Seismic Design Category - B Precast Concrete Beam-Column Connection System

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-12-01

    Precast Concrete Beam - Column Connection ...ERDC TR-14-12 December 2014 Experimental Evaluation of the Failure of a Seismic Design Category – B Precast Concrete Beam - Column Connection ...systems in order to develop a methodology and obtain basic insight for predicting the brittle failure of precast beam - column connections under

  9. ASSESSING THE NON-FINANCIAL PREDICTORS OF THE SUCCESS AND FAILURE OF YOUNG FIRMS IN THE NETHERLANDS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Philip VERGAUWEN

    2005-01-01

    Full Text Available In this study, the Lussier (1995 success and failure prediction model is improved and tested on asample of Dutch firms. Besides clearly defining a specific business plan, work experience is added asa variable, and contrary to previous researches, the discrete variables are dealt with appropriate thistime. The results of this improved model show that product/service timing, planning, managementexperience, knowledge of marketing, economic timing, professional advice, and having a businesspartner are predictors of success and failure for young firms in the Netherlands.

  10. An assessment of BWR [boiling water reactor] Mark III containment challenges, failure modes, and potential improvements in performance

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schroeder, J.A.; Pafford, D.J.; Kelly, D.L.; Jones, K.R.; Dallman, F.J.

    1991-01-01

    This report describes risk-significant challenges posed to Mark III containment systems by severe accidents as identified for Grand Gulf. Design similarities and differences between the Mark III plants that are important to containment performance are summarized. The accident sequences responsible for the challenges and the postulated containment failure modes associated with each challenge are identified and described. Improvements are discussed that have the potential either to prevent or delay containment failure, or to mitigate the offsite consequences of a fission product release. For each of these potential improvements, a qualitative analysis is provided. A limited quantitative risk analysis is provided for selected potential improvements. 21 refs., 5 figs., 46 tabs

  11. Brittle materials at high-loading rates: an open area of research

    Science.gov (United States)

    2017-01-01

    Brittle materials are extensively used in many civil and military applications involving high-strain-rate loadings such as: blasting or percussive drilling of rocks, ballistic impact against ceramic armour or transparent windshields, plastic explosives used to damage or destroy concrete structures, soft or hard impacts against concrete structures and so on. With all of these applications, brittle materials are subjected to intense loadings characterized by medium to extremely high strain rates (few tens to several tens of thousands per second) leading to extreme and/or specific damage modes such as multiple fragmentation, dynamic cracking, pore collapse, shearing, mode II fracturing and/or microplasticity mechanisms in the material. Additionally, brittle materials exhibit complex features such as a strong strain-rate sensitivity and confining pressure sensitivity that justify expending greater research efforts to understand these complex features. Currently, the most popular dynamic testing techniques used for this are based on the use of split Hopkinson pressure bar methodologies and/or plate-impact testing methods. However, these methods do have some critical limitations and drawbacks when used to investigate the behaviour of brittle materials at high loading rates. The present theme issue of Philosophical Transactions A provides an overview of the latest experimental methods and numerical tools that are currently being developed to investigate the behaviour of brittle materials at high loading rates. This article is part of the themed issue ‘Experimental testing and modelling of brittle materials at high strain rates’. PMID:27956517

  12. Brittle materials at high-loading rates: an open area of research

    Science.gov (United States)

    Forquin, Pascal

    2017-01-01

    Brittle materials are extensively used in many civil and military applications involving high-strain-rate loadings such as: blasting or percussive drilling of rocks, ballistic impact against ceramic armour or transparent windshields, plastic explosives used to damage or destroy concrete structures, soft or hard impacts against concrete structures and so on. With all of these applications, brittle materials are subjected to intense loadings characterized by medium to extremely high strain rates (few tens to several tens of thousands per second) leading to extreme and/or specific damage modes such as multiple fragmentation, dynamic cracking, pore collapse, shearing, mode II fracturing and/or microplasticity mechanisms in the material. Additionally, brittle materials exhibit complex features such as a strong strain-rate sensitivity and confining pressure sensitivity that justify expending greater research efforts to understand these complex features. Currently, the most popular dynamic testing techniques used for this are based on the use of split Hopkinson pressure bar methodologies and/or plate-impact testing methods. However, these methods do have some critical limitations and drawbacks when used to investigate the behaviour of brittle materials at high loading rates. The present theme issue of Philosophical Transactions A provides an overview of the latest experimental methods and numerical tools that are currently being developed to investigate the behaviour of brittle materials at high loading rates. This article is part of the themed issue 'Experimental testing and modelling of brittle materials at high strain rates'.

  13. Brittleness and Packing Density Effects on Blast-hole Cuttings Yield of Selected Rocks

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    B. Adebayo

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available This paper evaluates brittleness and packing density to analysis their effects on blast-hole cutting yield for three selected rocks in Nigeria. Brittleness test (S20 was carried out in accordance with Norwegian Soil and Rock Engineering and the Brittleness Index (BI for the selected rocks were estimated. The packing density determined from the photomicrograph of the rock samples. The grain size of 45 blast-holes drill cuttings collected from three selected while drilling of these rocks were determined using standard method of America Society for Testing and Materials (ASTM D 2487. The brittleness values are 50%, 44% and 42% for micro granite, porphyritic granite and medium biotite granite respectively. The result of BI varied from 10.32 – 11.59 and they are rated as moderately brittle rocks. The values of packing density varied from 92.20 – 94.55%, 91.00 -92.96% and 92.92 – 94.96% for all the rocks. The maximum weights of blast-hole particle size retained at 75 µm are 106.00g, 103.28 g and 99.76 g for medium biotite granite, micro granite and porhyritic granite respectively. Packing density values have correlation to some extent with (S20 values hence, this influence the yield of blast-hole cuttings as drilling progresses. The minimum weight of blast-hole cuttings particle size retained at 150 µm agrees with brittleness index classification for micro granite.

  14. Fracturing and Transformation Into Veins Beneath the Crustal Scale Brittle Ductile Transition - a Record of Co-seismic Loading and Post-seismic Relaxation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nüchter, J. A.; Stöckhert, B.

    2005-12-01

    Metamorphic rocks approaching the crustal scale brittle-ductile transition (BDT) during exhumation are expected to become increasingly affected by short term stress fluctuations related to seismic activity in the overlying seismogenic layer (schizosphere), while still residing in a long-term viscous environment (plastosphere). The structural and microstructural record of quartz veins in low grade - high pressure metamorphic rocks from southern Evia, Greece, yields insight into the processes and conditions just beneath the long-term BDT at temperatures of about 300 to 350°C, which switches between brittle failure and viscous flow as a function of imposed stress or strain rate. The following features are characteristic: (1) The veins have formed from tensile fractures, with a typical length on the order of 10-1 to 101 m; (2) The veins are discordant with respect to foliation and all pre-existing structures, with a uniform orientation over more than 500 km2; (3) The veins show a low aspect ratio of about 10 to 100 and an irregular or characteristic flame shape, which requires distributed ductile deformation of the host rock; (4) Fabrics of the sealing vein quartz indicate that - at a time - the veins were wide open cavities; (5) The sealing quartz crystals reveal a broad spectrum of microstructural features indicative of crystal plastic deformation at high stress and temperatures of about 300 to 350°C. These features indicate that opening and sealing of the fractures commenced immediately after brittle failure, controlled by ductile deformation of the host rock. Vein-parallel shortening was generally less than about 2%. Crystals formed early during sealing were plastically deformed upon progressive deformation and opening of the vein. The structural and microstructural record is interpreted as follows: Brittle failure is proposed to be a consequence of short term co-seismic loading. Subsequent opening of the fracture and sealing to become a vein is interpreted to

  15. A self-controlled case series to assess the effectiveness of beta blockers for heart failure in reducing hospitalisations in the elderly

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pratt Nicole L

    2011-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background To determine the suitability of using the self-controlled case series design to assess improvements in health outcomes using the effectiveness of beta blockers for heart failure in reducing hospitalisations as the example. Methods The Australian Government Department of Veterans' Affairs administrative claims database was used to undertake a self-controlled case-series in elderly patients aged 65 years or over to compare the risk of a heart failure hospitalisation during periods of being exposed and unexposed to a beta blocker. Two studies, the first using a one year period and the second using a four year period were undertaken to determine if the estimates varied due to changes in severity of heart failure over time. Results In the one year period, 3,450 patients and in the four year period, 12, 682 patients had at least one hospitalisation for heart failure. The one year period showed a non-significant decrease in hospitalisations for heart failure 4-8 months after starting beta-blockers, (RR, 0.76; 95% CI (0.57-1.02 and a significant decrease in the 8-12 months post-initiation of a beta blocker for heart failure (RR, 0.62; 95% CI (0.39, 0.99. For the four year study there was an increased risk of hospitalisation less than eight months post-initiation and significant but smaller decrease in the 8-12 month window (RR, 0.90; 95% CI (0.82, 0.98. Conclusions The results of the one year observation period are similar to those observed in randomised clinical trials indicating that the self-controlled case-series method can be successfully applied to assess health outcomes. However, the result appears sensitive to the study periods used and further research to understand the appropriate applications of this method in pharmacoepidemiology is still required. The results also illustrate the benefits of extending beta blocker utilisation to the older age group of heart failure patients in which their use is common but the evidence is

  16. Increased crop failure due to climate change: assessing adaptation options using models and socio-economic data for wheat in China

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Challinor, Andrew J [Institute for Climate and Atmospheric Science, School of Earth and Environment, University of Leeds, Leeds LS2 9JT (United Kingdom); Simelton, Elisabeth S; Fraser, Evan D G [Sustainability Research Institute, School of Earth and Environment, University of Leeds, Leeds LS2 9JT (United Kingdom); Hemming, Debbie; Collins, Mathew, E-mail: a.j.challinor@leeds.ac.uk [Met Office Hadley Centre, FitzRoy Road, Exeter EX1 3PB (United Kingdom)

    2010-07-15

    Tools for projecting crop productivity under a range of conditions, and assessing adaptation options, are an important part of the endeavour to prioritize investment in adaptation. We present ensemble projections of crop productivity that account for biophysical processes, inherent uncertainty and adaptation, using spring wheat in Northeast China as a case study. A parallel 'vulnerability index' approach uses quantitative socio-economic data to account for autonomous farmer adaptation. The simulations show crop failure rates increasing under climate change, due to increasing extremes of both heat and water stress. Crop failure rates increase with mean temperature, with increases in maximum failure rates being greater than those in median failure rates. The results suggest that significant adaptation is possible through either socio-economic measures such as greater investment, or biophysical measures such as drought or heat tolerance in crops. The results also show that adaptation becomes increasingly necessitated as mean temperature and the associated number of extremes rise. The results, and the limitations of this study, also suggest directions for research for linking climate and crop models, socio-economic analyses and crop variety trial data in order to prioritize options such as capacity building, plant breeding and biotechnology.

  17. Contraceptive failure

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rasch, Vibeke

    2002-01-01

    Most studies focusing on contraceptive failure in relation to pregnancy have focused on contraceptive failure among women having induced abortions, thereby neglecting those women who, despite contraceptive failure, accept the pregnancy and intend to carry the fetus to term. To get a more complete...... picture of the problem of contraceptive failure, this study focuses on contraceptive failure among women with diverse pregnancy outcomes. In all, 3520 pregnant women attending Odense University Hospital were included: 373 had induced abortions, 435 had spontaneous abortions, 97 had ectopic pregnancies......, and 2614 received antenatal care. The variables studied comprise age, partner relationship, number of births, occupational and economical situation, and contraceptive use.Contraceptive failure, defined as contraceptive use (condom, diaphragm, IUD, oral contraception, or another modern method...

  18. Assessing Preservice Teachers' Mathematics Cognitive Failures as Related to Mathematics Anxiety and Performance in Undergraduate Calculus

    Science.gov (United States)

    Awofala, Adeneye O. A.; Odogwu, Helen N.

    2017-01-01

    The study investigated mathematics cognitive failures as related to mathematics anxiety, gender and performance in calculus among 450 preservice teachers from four public universities in the South West geo-political zone of Nigeria using the quantitative research method within the blueprint of the descriptive survey design. Data collected were…

  19. Analytical and computational methodology to assess the over pressures generated by a potential catastrophic failure of a cryogenic pressure vessel

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zamora, I.; Fradera, J.; Jaskiewicz, F.; Lopez, D.; Hermosa, B.; Aleman, A.; Izquierdo, J.; Buskop, J.

    2014-07-01

    Idom has participated in the risk evaluation of Safety Important Class (SIC) structures due to over pressures generated by a catastrophic failure of a cryogenic pressure vessel at ITER plant site. The evaluation implements both analytical and computational methodologies achieving consistent and robust results. (Author)

  20. Analytical and computational methodology to assess the over pressures generated by a potential catastrophic failure of a cryogenic pressure vessel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zamora, I.; Fradera, J.; Jaskiewicz, F.; Lopez, D.; Hermosa, B.; Aleman, A.; Izquierdo, J.; Buskop, J.

    2014-01-01

    Idom has participated in the risk evaluation of Safety Important Class (SIC) structures due to over pressures generated by a catastrophic failure of a cryogenic pressure vessel at ITER plant site. The evaluation implements both analytical and computational methodologies achieving consistent and robust results. (Author)

  1. The evolutionary fate of phenotypic plasticity and functional traits under domestication in manioc: changes in stem biomechanics and the appearance of stem brittleness.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ménard, Léa; McKey, Doyle; Mühlen, Gilda S; Clair, Bruno; Rowe, Nick P

    2013-01-01

    Domestication can influence many functional traits in plants, from overall life-history and growth form to wood density and cell wall ultrastructure. Such changes can increase fitness of the domesticate in agricultural environments but may negatively affect survival in the wild. We studied effects of domestication on stem biomechanics in manioc by comparing domesticated and ancestral wild taxa from two different regions of greater Amazonia. We compared mechanical properties, tissue organisation and wood characteristics including microfibril angles in both wild and domesticated plants, each growing in two different habitats (forest or savannah) and varying in growth form (shrub or liana). Wild taxa grew as shrubs in open savannah but as lianas in overgrown and forested habitats. Growth form plasticity was retained in domesticated manioc. However, stems of the domesticate showed brittle failure. Wild plants differed in mechanical architecture between shrub and liana phenotypes, a difference that diminished between shrubs and lianas of the domesticate. Stems of wild plants were generally stiffer, failed at higher bending stresses and were less prone to brittle fracture compared with shrub and liana phenotypes of the domesticate. Biomechanical differences between stems of wild and domesticated plants were mainly due to changes in wood density and cellulose microfibril angle rather than changes in secondary growth or tissue geometry. Domestication did not significantly modify "large-scale" trait development or growth form plasticity, since both wild and domesticated manioc can develop as shrubs or lianas. However, "finer-scale" developmental traits crucial to mechanical stability and thus ecological success of the plant were significantly modified. This profoundly influenced the likelihood of brittle failure, particularly in long climbing stems, thereby also influencing the survival of the domesticate in natural situations vulnerable to mechanical perturbation. We

  2. The evolutionary fate of phenotypic plasticity and functional traits under domestication in manioc: changes in stem biomechanics and the appearance of stem brittleness.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Léa Ménard

    Full Text Available Domestication can influence many functional traits in plants, from overall life-history and growth form to wood density and cell wall ultrastructure. Such changes can increase fitness of the domesticate in agricultural environments but may negatively affect survival in the wild. We studied effects of domestication on stem biomechanics in manioc by comparing domesticated and ancestral wild taxa from two different regions of greater Amazonia. We compared mechanical properties, tissue organisation and wood characteristics including microfibril angles in both wild and domesticated plants, each growing in two different habitats (forest or savannah and varying in growth form (shrub or liana. Wild taxa grew as shrubs in open savannah but as lianas in overgrown and forested habitats. Growth form plasticity was retained in domesticated manioc. However, stems of the domesticate showed brittle failure. Wild plants differed in mechanical architecture between shrub and liana phenotypes, a difference that diminished between shrubs and lianas of the domesticate. Stems of wild plants were generally stiffer, failed at higher bending stresses and were less prone to brittle fracture compared with shrub and liana phenotypes of the domesticate. Biomechanical differences between stems of wild and domesticated plants were mainly due to changes in wood density and cellulose microfibril angle rather than changes in secondary growth or tissue geometry. Domestication did not significantly modify "large-scale" trait development or growth form plasticity, since both wild and domesticated manioc can develop as shrubs or lianas. However, "finer-scale" developmental traits crucial to mechanical stability and thus ecological success of the plant were significantly modified. This profoundly influenced the likelihood of brittle failure, particularly in long climbing stems, thereby also influencing the survival of the domesticate in natural situations vulnerable to mechanical

  3. Heart Failure

    OpenAIRE

    McMurray, John; Ponikowski, Piotr

    2011-01-01

    Heart failure occurs in 3% to 4% of adults aged over 65 years, usually as a consequence of coronary artery disease or hypertension, and causes breathlessness, effort intolerance, fluid retention, and increased mortality. The 5-year mortality in people with systolic heart failure ranges from 25% to 75%, often owing to sudden death following ventricular arrhythmia. Risks of cardiovascular events are increased in people with left ventricular systolic dysfunction (LVSD) or heart failure.

  4. Prediction of brittle fracture of epoxy-aluminum flanging

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Korbel J.

    2010-07-01

    Full Text Available This paper presents a fracture mechanical approach for estimation of critical bending load of different types of aluminum-epoxy flanging and comparison with experimental measurements. For this purpose, several designs of the flanges were investigated. The flanges were glued to the epoxy bars and adhesive-epoxy interface was considered as a bi-material notch. Prediction of the failure is based on generalized stress intensity factor and generalized fracture toughness.

  5. Prediction of non-brittle fracture in the welded joint of C-Mn steel in the brittle-ductile transition domain

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nguyen, Thai Ha

    2009-11-01

    This work concerns the nuclear safety, specifically the secondary circuit integrity of pressurized water reactors (PWR). The problem is that of the fracture of a thin tubular structure in ferritic steel with many welded joints. The ferritic steel and weld present a brittle/ductile tenacity transition. Moreover, the welds present geometry propitious to the appearance of fatigue cracks, due to vibrations and expansions. These cracks may cause the complete fracture of the structure. The objectives of this work are to establish a criterion of non-fracture by cleavage of thin welded structures in ferritic steel, applicable to actual structures. Therefore, the present study focuses on the fracture behaviour of welded thin structures in brittle/ductile transition. It aims at developing the threshold stress model initially proposed by Chapuliot, to predict the non-brittle-fracture of this welded structure. The model is identified for the welded joint in C-Mn steel for nuclear construction, specifically in the upper part of the transition. A threshold stress, below which the cleavage cannot take place, is identified using tensile tests at low temperature on axis-symmetrical notched specimens taken in welded joint. This threshold stress is used to define the threshold volume where the maximum principal stress exceeds the threshold stress during the test. The analysis by SEM of specimen fracture surfaces shows that the gross solidification molten zone in the weld is the most likely to cleave. The relation between the brittle fracture probability and the threshold volume in the gross solidification molten zone is established via a sensitivity function, using multi-materials simulations. The model thus identified is tested for the prediction of non-brittle-fracture of SENT specimens taken in the welded joint and tested in tension. The results obtained are encouraging with regards to the transferability of the model to the actual structure. (author)

  6. Overview of input parameters for calculation of the probability of a brittle fracture of the reactor pressure vessel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Horacek, L.

    1994-12-01

    The parameters are summarized for a calculation of the probability of brittle fracture of the WWER-440 reactor pressure vessel (RPV). The parameters were selected for 2 basic approaches, viz., one based on the Monte Carlo method and the other on the FORM and SORM methods (First and Second Order Reliability Methods). The approaches were represented by US computer codes VISA-II and OCA-P and by the German ZERBERUS code. The philosophy of the deterministic and probabilistic aspects of the VISA-II code is outlined, and the differences between the US and Czech PWR's are discussed in this context. Briefly described is the partial approach to the evaluation of the WWER type RPV's based on the assessment of their resistance to brittle fracture by fracture mechanics tools and by using the FORM and SORM methods. Attention is paid to the input data for the WWER modification of the VISA-II code. The data are categorized with respect to randomness, i.e. to the stochastic or deterministic nature of their behavior. 18 tabs., 14 refs

  7. Failure data specialization in quantitative risk assessments of process plants; Especializacao de dados de falha em analise quantitativa de riscos de plantas de processo

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ribeiro, Antonio C.O. [Bayer S.A., Sao Paulo, SP (Brazil); Melo, P.F. Frutuoso e [Universidade Federal, Rio de Janeiro, RJ (Brazil). Coordenacao dos Programas de Pos-graduacao de Engenharia

    2005-07-01

    The aim of this paper is to show the Bayesian inference in reliability studies, which are used to failures rates updating in safety analyses. It is developed the impact of its using in quantitative risks assessments for industrial process plants. With this approach we find a structured and auditable way of showing the difference between an industrial installation with a good project and maintenance structure from another one that shows a low level of quality in these areas. In general the evidence from failures rates and as follow the frequency of occurrence from scenarios, which the risks taken in account in ERA, are taken from generics data banks, instead of, the installation in analysis. When using the plant data we need special effort to develop a data bank, that is, a maintenance managing system, which allows the data insertion as for example the SAP{sup R} and its PM module. (author)

  8. Experimental demonstration of a semi-brittle origin for crustal strain transients

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reber, J. E.; Lavier, L. L.; Hayman, N. W.

    2015-12-01

    Tectonic motions that give rise to destructive earthquakes and enigmatic transient slip events are commonly explained by friction laws that describe slip on fault surfaces and gouge-filled zones. Friction laws with the added effects of pore fluid pressure, shear heating, and chemical reactions as currently applied do not take into account that over a wide range of pressure and temperature conditions rocks deform following a complex mixed brittle-ductile rheology. In semi-brittle materials, such as polymineralic rocks, elasto-plastic and visco-elastic defamation can be observed simultaneously in different phases of the material. Field observations of such semi-brittle rocks at the mesoscale have shown that for a given range of composition, temperature, and pressure, the formation of fluid-filled brittle fractures and veins can precede and accompany the development of localized ductile flow. We propose that the coexistence of brittle and viscous behavior controls some of the physical characteristics of strain transients and slow slip events. Here we present results from shear experiments on semi-brittle rock analogues investigating the effect of yield stress on fracture propagation and connection, and how this can lead to reoccurring strain transients. During the experiments we monitor the evolution of fractures and flow as well as the force development in the system. We show that the nature of localized slip and flow in semi-brittle materials depends on the initiation and formation of mode I and II fractures and does not involve frictional behavior, supporting an alternative mechanism for the development of tectonic strain transients.

  9. Two brittle ductile transitions in subduction wedges, as revealed by topography

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thissen, C.; Brandon, M. T.

    2013-12-01

    Subduction wedges contain two brittle ductile transitions. One transition occurs within the wedge interior, and a second transition occurs along the decollement. The decollement typically has faster strain rates, which suggests that the brittle ductile transition along the decollement will be more rearward (deeper) than the transition within the interior. However, the presence of distinct rheologies or other factors such as pore fluid pressure along the decollement may reverse the order of the brittle-ductile transitions. We adopt a solution by Williams et al., (1994) to invert for these brittle ductile transitions using the wedge surface topography. At present, this model does not include an s point or sediment loading atop the wedge. The Hellenic wedge, however, as exposed in Crete presents an ideal setting to test these ideas. We find that the broad high of the Mediterranean ridge represents the coulomb frictional part of the Hellenic wedge. The rollover in topography north of the ridge results from curvature of the down going plate, creating a negative alpha depression in the vicinity of the Strabo, Pliny, and Ionian 'troughs' south of Crete. A steep topographic rise out of these troughs and subsequent flattening reflects the brittle ductile transition at depth in both the decollement and the wedge interior. Crete exposes the high-pressure viscous core of the wedge, and pressure solution textures provide additional evidence for viscous deformation in the rearward part of the wedge. The location of the decollement brittle ductile transition has been previously poorly constrained, and Crete has never experienced a subduction zone earthquake in recorded history. Williams, C. A., et al., (1994). Effect of the brittle ductile transition on the topography of compressive mountain belts on Earth and Venus. Journal of Geophysical Research Solid Earth

  10. Predictive Performance of the Simplified Acute Physiology Score (SAPS) II and the Initial Sequential Organ Failure Assessment (SOFA) Score in Acutely Ill Intensive Care Patients

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Granholm, Anders; Møller, Morten Hylander; Kragh, Mette

    2016-01-01

    PURPOSE: Severity scores including the Simplified Acute Physiology Score (SAPS) II and the Sequential Organ Failure Assessment (SOFA) score are used in intensive care units (ICUs) to assess disease severity, predict mortality and in research. We aimed to assess the predictive performance of SAPS II...... compared the discrimination of SAPS II and initial SOFA scores, compared the discrimination of SAPS II in our cohort with the original cohort, assessed the calibration of SAPS II customised to our cohort, and compared the discrimination for 90-day mortality vs. in-hospital mortality for both scores....... Discrimination was evaluated using areas under the receiver operating characteristics curves (AUROC). Calibration was evaluated using Hosmer-Lemeshow's goodness-of-fit Ĉ-statistic. RESULTS: AUROC for in-hospital mortality was 0.80 (95% confidence interval (CI) 0.77-0.83) for SAPS II and 0.73 (95% CI 0...

  11. The influence of the epoxy interlayer on the assessment of failure conditions of push-out test specimens

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Klusák, Jan; Helincks, P.; Seitl, Stanislav; De Corte, W.; Boel, V.; De Schutter, G.

    525-526, č. 1 (2013), s. 61-64 ISSN 1013-9826 R&D Projects: GA ČR GAP108/10/2049; GA ČR(CZ) GAP105/11/1551 Institutional support: RVO:68081723 Keywords : push-out test * generalized fracture mechanics * failure initiation * steel-concrete joint * epoxy adhesive layer Subject RIV: JL - Materials Fatigue, Friction Mechanics

  12. Key indicator tools for shallow slope failure assessment using soil chemical property signatures and soil colour variables.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Othman, Rashidi; Hasni, Shah Irani; Baharuddin, Zainul Mukrim; Hashim, Khairusy Syakirin Has-Yun; Mahamod, Lukman Hakim

    2017-10-01

    Slope failure has become a major concern in Malaysia due to the rapid development and urbanisation in the country. It poses severe threats to any highway construction industry, residential areas, natural resources and tourism activities. The extent of damages that resulted from this catastrophe can be lessened if a long-term early warning system to predict landslide prone areas is implemented. Thus, this study aims to characterise the relationship between Oxisols properties and soil colour variables to be manipulated as key indicators to forecast shallow slope failure. The concentration of each soil property in slope soil was evaluated from two different localities that consist of 120 soil samples from stable and unstable slopes located along the North-South Highway (PLUS) and East-West Highway (LPT). Analysis of variance established highly significant difference (P shallow slope failure were high value of L*(62), low values of c* (20) and h* (66), low concentration of iron (53 mg kg -1 ) and aluminium oxide (37 mg kg -1 ), low soil TOC (0.5%), low CEC (3.6 cmol/kg), slightly acidic soil pH (4.9), high amount of sand fraction (68%) and low amount of clay fraction (20%).

  13. Failure Identification of Hacksaw Machine REMOR 400

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Paidjo; Abdul Hafid; Sagino

    2007-01-01

    REMOR 400 Hack sawing machine is one of machines type has been old age. For arrange of cutting pressure and repeat lifting load after cutting process by using the hydraulic system. Beside of worn-out of hacksaw blade, failure cutting earn also because of leakage from the hydraulic system of machine. Leakage of hydraulic system occurs because of over load factor using or aging. Base on inspection result, hacksaw machine REMOR 400 fault on hydraulic system in the 2006 year. This matter will be seen from its seal brittle from the machine. For activate to return machine so much replacement repeat the seals used by machine. (author)

  14. Failure Forecasting in Triaxially Stressed Sandstones

    Science.gov (United States)

    Crippen, A.; Bell, A. F.; Curtis, A.; Main, I. G.

    2017-12-01

    Precursory signals to fracturing events have been observed to follow power-law accelerations in spatial, temporal, and size distributions leading up to catastrophic failure. In previous studies this behavior was modeled using Voight's relation of a geophysical precursor in order to perform `hindcasts' by solving for failure onset time. However, performing this analysis in retrospect creates a bias, as we know an event happened, when it happened, and we can search data for precursors accordingly. We aim to remove this retrospective bias, thereby allowing us to make failure forecasts in real-time in a rock deformation laboratory. We triaxially compressed water-saturated 100 mm sandstone cores (Pc= 25MPa, Pp = 5MPa, σ = 1.0E-5 s-1) to the point of failure while monitoring strain rate, differential stress, AEs, and continuous waveform data. Here we compare the current `hindcast` methods on synthetic and our real laboratory data. We then apply these techniques to increasing fractions of the data sets to observe the evolution of the failure forecast time with precursory data. We discuss these results as well as our plan to mitigate false positives and minimize errors for real-time application. Real-time failure forecasting could revolutionize the field of hazard mitigation of brittle failure processes by allowing non-invasive monitoring of civil structures, volcanoes, and possibly fault zones.

  15. Strain Rockbursts Simulated by Low-Strength Brittle Equivalent Materials

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lang Li

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper presents experimental study on rockbursts that occur in deep underground excavations. To begin with, the boundary conditions for excavation in deep underground engineering were analysed and elastic adaptive boundary is an effective way to minimize the boundary effect of geomechanical model test. Then, in order to simulate an elastic adaptive loading boundary, Belleville springs were used to establish this loading boundary. With the aforementioned experimental set-ups and fabrication of similarity models for test, the phenomena of strain mode rockbursts were satisfactorily reproduced in laboratory. The internal stress, strain, and convergences of the openings of the model were instrumented by subtly preembedded sensors and transducers. Test results showed that, with an initial state of high stress from both upper layers’ gravitational effects and in situ stress due to tectonic movements, the excavation brings a dramatic rise in the hoop stress and sharp drop in radial stress, which leads to the splitting failure of rock mass. Finally a rockburst occurred associated with the release of strain energy stored in highly stressed rock mass. In addition, the failure of the surrounding rock demonstrated an obvious hysteresis effect which supplies valuable guide and reference for tunnel support. Not only do these results provide a basis for further comprehensive experiments, but also the data can offer assisting aids for further theoretical study of rockbursts.

  16. Brittle fracture of T91 steel in liquid lead–bismuth eutectic alloy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ye, Changqing, E-mail: Changqing.ye@ed.univ-lille1.fr; Vogt, Jean-Bernard, E-mail: jean-bernard.vogt@univ-lille1.fr; Proriol-Serre, Ingrid, E-mail: ingrid.proriol-serre@univ-lille1.fr

    2014-12-15

    Highlights: • Tempering temperature is important for LBE embrittlement occurrence. • Brittle behaviour in LBE evidenced by small punch test and fatigue test. • Brittle behaviour in low oxygen LBE observed for low loading rate. - Abstract: The mechanical behaviour of the T91 martensitic steel has been studied in liquid lead–bismuth eutectic (LBE) and in inert atmosphere. Several conditions were considered to point out the most sensitive embrittling factors. Smooth and notched specimens were employed for respectively monotonic and cyclic loadings. The present investigation showed that T91 appeared in general as a ductile material, and became brittle in the considered conditions only if at least tests were performed in LBE. It turns out that the loading rate appeared as a critical parameter for the occurrence of liquid metal embrittlement of T91 in LBE. For the standard heat treatment condition, loading monotonically the T91 very slowly instead of rapidly in LBE resulted in brittle fracture. Also, under cyclic loading, the crack propagated in a brittle manner in LBE.

  17. Ductile and brittle transition behavior of titanium alloys in ultra-precision machining.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yip, W S; To, S

    2018-03-02

    Titanium alloys are extensively applied in biomedical industries due to their excellent material properties. However, they are recognized as difficult to cut materials due to their low thermal conductivity, which induces a complexity to their deformation mechanisms and restricts precise productions. This paper presents a new observation about the removal regime of titanium alloys. The experimental results, including the chip formation, thrust force signal and surface profile, showed that there was a critical cutting distance to achieve better surface integrity of machined surface. The machined areas with better surface roughness were located before the clear transition point, defining as the ductile to brittle transition. The machined area at the brittle region displayed the fracture deformation which showed cracks on the surface edge. The relationship between depth of cut and the ductile to brittle transaction behavior of titanium alloys in ultra-precision machining(UPM) was also revealed in this study, it showed that the ductile to brittle transaction behavior of titanium alloys occurred mainly at relatively small depth of cut. The study firstly defines the ductile to brittle transition behavior of titanium alloys in UPM, contributing the information of ductile machining as an optimal machining condition for precise productions of titanium alloys.

  18. The anti-proliferative and anti-angiogenic effect of the methanol extract from brittle star.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baharara, Javad; Amini, Elaheh; Mousavi, Marzieh

    2015-04-01

    Anti-angiogenic therapy is a crucial step in cancer treatment. The discovery of new anti-angiogenic compounds from marine organisms has become an attractive concept in anti-cancer therapy. Because little data correlated to the pro- and anti-angiogenic efficacies of Ophiuroidea, which include brittle star, the current study was designed to explore the anti-angiogenic potential of brittle star methanol extract in vitro and in vivo. The anti-proliferative effect of brittle star extract on A2780cp cells was examined by MTT assays, and transcriptional expression of VEGF and b-FGF was evaluated by RT-PCR. In an in vivo model, 40 fertilized Ross eggs were divided into control and three experimental groups. The experimental groups were incubated with brittle star extract at concentrations of 25, 50 and 100 µg/ml, and photographed by photo-stereomicroscopy. Ultimately, numbers and lengths of vessels were measured by Image J software. Data were analyzed with SPSS software (pstar extract exerted a dose- and time-dependent anti-proliferative effect on A2780cp cancer cells. In addition, VEGF and b-FGF expression decreased with brittle star methanol extract treatment. Macroscopic evaluations revealed significant changes in the second and third experimental group compared to controls (pstar methanol extract in vitro and in vivo confer novel insight into the application of natural marine products in angiogenesis-related pathologies.

  19. Detecting failure events in buildings: a numerical and experimental analysis

    OpenAIRE

    Heckman, V. M.; Kohler, M. D.; Heaton, T. H.

    2010-01-01

    A numerical method is used to investigate an approach for detecting the brittle fracture of welds associated with beam -column connections in instrumented buildings in real time through the use of time-reversed Green’s functions and wave propagation reciprocity. The approach makes use of a prerecorded catalog of Green’s functions for an instrumented building to detect failure events in the building during a later seismic event by screening continuous data for the presence of wavef...

  20. A practical approach to assess leg muscle oxygenation during ramp-incremental cycle ergometry in heart failure

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A.C. Barroco

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available Heart failure is characterized by the inability of the cardiovascular system to maintain oxygen (O2 delivery (i.e., muscle blood flow in non-hypoxemic patients to meet O2 demands. The resulting increase in fractional O2 extraction can be non-invasively tracked by deoxygenated hemoglobin concentration (deoxi-Hb as measured by near-infrared spectroscopy (NIRS. We aimed to establish a simplified approach to extract deoxi-Hb-based indices of impaired muscle O2 delivery during rapidly-incrementing exercise in heart failure. We continuously probed the right vastus lateralis muscle with continuous-wave NIRS during a ramp-incremental cardiopulmonary exercise test in 10 patients (left ventricular ejection fraction <35% and 10 age-matched healthy males. Deoxi-Hb is reported as % of total response (onset to peak exercise in relation to work rate. Patients showed lower maximum exercise capacity and O2 uptake-work rate than controls (P<0.05. The deoxi-Hb response profile as a function of work rate was S-shaped in all subjects, i.e., it presented three distinct phases. Increased muscle deoxygenation in patients compared to controls was demonstrated by: i a steeper mid-exercise deoxi-Hb-work rate slope (2.2±1.3 vs 1.0±0.3% peak/W, respectively; P<0.05, and ii late-exercise increase in deoxi-Hb, which contrasted with stable or decreasing deoxi-Hb in all controls. Steeper deoxi-Hb-work rate slope was associated with lower peak work rate in patients (r=–0.73; P=0.01. This simplified approach to deoxi-Hb interpretation might prove useful in clinical settings to quantify impairments in O2 delivery by NIRS during ramp-incremental exercise in individual heart failure patients.

  1. Proposal on How To Conduct a Biopharmaceutical Process Failure Mode and Effect Analysis (FMEA) as a Risk Assessment Tool.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zimmermann, Hartmut F; Hentschel, Norbert

    2011-01-01

    With the publication of the quality guideline ICH Q9 "Quality Risk Management" by the International Conference on Harmonization, risk management has already become a standard requirement during the life cycle of a pharmaceutical product. Failure mode and effect analysis (FMEA) is a powerful risk analysis tool that has been used for decades in mechanical and electrical industries. However, the adaptation of the FMEA methodology to biopharmaceutical processes brings about some difficulties. The proposal presented here is intended to serve as a brief but nevertheless comprehensive and detailed guideline on how to conduct a biopharmaceutical process FMEA. It includes a detailed 1-to-10-scale FMEA rating table for occurrence, severity, and detectability of failures that has been especially designed for typical biopharmaceutical processes. The application for such a biopharmaceutical process FMEA is widespread. It can be useful whenever a biopharmaceutical manufacturing process is developed or scaled-up, or when it is transferred to a different manufacturing site. It may also be conducted during substantial optimization of an existing process or the development of a second-generation process. According to their resulting risk ratings, process parameters can be ranked for importance and important variables for process development, characterization, or validation can be identified. Health authorities around the world ask pharmaceutical companies to manage risk during development and manufacturing of pharmaceuticals. The so-called failure mode and effect analysis (FMEA) is an established risk analysis tool that has been used for decades in mechanical and electrical industries. However, the adaptation of the FMEA methodology to pharmaceutical processes that use modern biotechnology (biopharmaceutical processes) brings about some difficulties, because those biopharmaceutical processes differ from processes in mechanical and electrical industries. The proposal presented here

  2. Application of ISO22000, failure mode, and effect analysis (FMEA) cause and effect diagrams and pareto in conjunction with HACCP and risk assessment for processing of pastry products.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Varzakas, Theodoros H

    2011-09-01

    The Failure Mode and Effect Analysis (FMEA) model has been applied for the risk assessment of pastry processing. A tentative approach of FMEA application to the pastry industry was attempted in conjunction with ISO22000. Preliminary Hazard Analysis was used to analyze and predict the occurring failure modes in a food chain system (pastry processing plant), based on the functions, characteristics, and/or interactions of the ingredients or the processes, upon which the system depends. Critical Control points have been identified and implemented in the cause and effect diagram (also known as Ishikawa, tree diagram, and fishbone diagram). In this work a comparison of ISO22000 analysis with HACCP is carried out over pastry processing and packaging. However, the main emphasis was put on the quantification of risk assessment by determining the Risk Priority Number (RPN) per identified processing hazard. Storage of raw materials and storage of final products at -18°C followed by freezing were the processes identified as the ones with the highest RPN (225, 225, and 144 respectively) and corrective actions were undertaken. Following the application of corrective actions, a second calculation of RPN values was carried out leading to considerably lower values (below the upper acceptable limit of 130). It is noteworthy that the application of Ishikawa (Cause and Effect or Tree diagram) led to converging results thus corroborating the validity of conclusions derived from risk assessment and FMEA. Therefore, the incorporation of FMEA analysis within the ISO22000 system of a pastry processing industry is considered imperative.

  3. Heart Failure

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Other diseases. Chronic diseases — such as diabetes, HIV, hyperthyroidism, hypothyroidism, or a buildup of iron (hemochromatosis) or ... transplantation or support with a ventricular assist device. Prevention The key to preventing heart failure is to ...

  4. Alternative modelling of brittle structures in a sub-area of the SKB candidate area at Forsmark, eastern Sweden

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Askling, Per; Tiren, Sven A.; Beckholmen, Monica; Straeng, Thomas

    2008-11-01

    compared with the structural character of the adjacent rock. The resolution in the cluster analysis is less than half a metre. The classified fracture data, results from the cluster analysis and borehole deviation data comprise the input data in the structural modelling performed in a fully three-dimensional space. PFL logs (hydrological data) were used to test the model. The constructed model (EW oriented: 900 by 550m and 850m deep) contains seventy-six brittle deformation zones: sixteen from correlated data in three to five boreholes, sixteen structures from correlated data in two boreholes and forty-four are indicated in one borehole. The alternative model agrees with the SKB site descriptive model. However, the structures in the SKB model are relatively wide compared with the structures in the alternative model and the SKB model may disregard finer structures, especially if they intersect the SKB structures. Deviations in the models are the frequency of NS/vertical structures and a sub-horizontal structure in the deeper part of the model. Some general observation related to safety assessment issues are that relatively thin structures may have a minimum extension of several hundreds of metres, which may question the assumption of a correlation of structure width to extent and might also be of importance for the choice of canister positions. Further, the pattern of connected fractures has changed during the geological history and the characterization of the disturbed/transitional zone around regional structures with a long geologic history may be intricate. The geometrical configuration of boreholes gives a borehole orientation bias and also gives space for structures, e.g. parallel the dominant regional structures, to pass unnoticed between the boreholes. Finally, indicated existence of gently inclined brittle deformation zones at depth may affect the layout of a repository

  5. Alternative modelling of brittle structures in a sub-area of the SKB candidate area at Forsmark, eastern Sweden.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Askling, Per; Tiren, Sven A.; Beckholmen, Monica; Straeng, Thomas (Geosigma AB, Uppsala (Sweden))

    2008-11-15

    density of fractures) and compared with the structural character of the adjacent rock. The resolution in the cluster analysis is less than half a metre. The classified fracture data, results from the cluster analysis and borehole deviation data comprise the input data in the structural modelling performed in a fully three-dimensional space. PFL logs (hydrological data) were used to test the model. The constructed model (EW oriented: 900 by 550m and 850m deep) contains seventy-six brittle deformation zones: sixteen from correlated data in three to five boreholes, sixteen structures from correlated data in two boreholes and forty-four are indicated in one borehole. The alternative model agrees with the SKB site descriptive model. However, the structures in the SKB model are relatively wide compared with the structures in the alternative model and the SKB model may disregard finer structures, especially if they intersect the SKB structures. Deviations in the models are the frequency of NS/vertical structures and a sub-horizontal structure in the deeper part of the model. Some general observation related to safety assessment issues are that relatively thin structures may have a minimum extension of several hundreds of metres, which may question the assumption of a correlation of structure width to extent and might also be of importance for the choice of canister positions. Further, the pattern of connected fractures has changed during the geological history and the characterization of the disturbed/transitional zone around regional structures with a long geologic history may be intricate. The geometrical configuration of boreholes gives a borehole orientation bias and also gives space for structures, e.g. parallel the dominant regional structures, to pass unnoticed between the boreholes. Finally, indicated existence of gently inclined brittle deformation zones at depth may affect the layout of a repository

  6. The five-point Likert scale for dyspnea can properly assess the degree of pulmonary congestion and predict adverse events in heart failure outpatients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cristina K. Weber

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVES: Proper assessment of dyspnea is important in patients with heart failure. Our aim was to evaluate the use of the 5-point Likert scale for dyspnea to assess the degree of pulmonary congestion and to determine the prognostic value of this scale for predicting adverse events in heart failure outpatients. METHODS: We undertook a prospective study of outpatients with moderate to severe heart failure. The 5-point Likert scale was applied during regular outpatient visits, along with clinical assessments. Lung ultrasound with ≥15 B-lines and an amino-terminal portion of pro-B-type natriuretic peptide (NT-proBNP level >1000 pg/mL were used as a reference for pulmonary congestion. The patients were then assessed every 30 days during follow-up to identify adverse clinical outcomes. RESULTS: We included 58 patients (65.5% male, age 43.5±11 years with a mean left ventricular ejection fraction of 27±6%. In total, 29.3% of these patients had heart failure with ischemic etiology. Additionally, pulmonary congestion, as diagnosed by lung ultrasound, was present in 58% of patients. A higher degree of dyspnea (3 or 4 points on the 5-point Likert scale was significantly correlated with a higher number of B-lines (p = 0.016. Patients stratified into Likert = 3-4 were at increased risk of admission compared with those in class 1-2 after adjusting for age, left ventricular ejection fraction, New York Heart Association functional class and levels of NT-proBNP >1000 pg/mL (HR = 4.9, 95% CI 1.33-18.64, p = 0.017. CONCLUSION: In our series, higher baseline scores on the 5-point Likert scale were related to pulmonary congestion and were independently associated with adverse events during follow-up. This simple clinical tool can help to identify patients who are more likely to decompensate and whose treatment should be intensified.

  7. Investigation of post-svecofennian brittle structures in Satakunta. Field report 2009

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pajunen, M.; Wennerstroem, M.

    2010-09-01

    This report describes the field work in the summer 2009. The task is a part of research entity in which the development of brittle structures in bedrock are acquired. In focus have been the post-Svecofennian rocks of the Satakunta area: rapakivi, sandstone and olivine diabase. We describe the observation methods and the research methods using three target examples: olivine diabase in Pori, Kallo, sandstone in Nakkila, Leistilaenjaervi and rapakivi in the centre of Lappi. We have concentrated on geometry and kinematics of joints in bedrock. Concerning every target we describe the joints and the faults, their orientations and properties, joint fabrics and jointing structures. Our aim is to define orientations of palaeostresses and evolution of brittle structures exploiting joint properties. The study will be continued in Satakunta based on the data collected in the summer 2009 and in a few earlier years. The results can be benefitted also in studies of the Svecofennian brittle structures. (orig.)

  8. Determination techniques of characteristics of brittle fracture for materials on the CMEA 1-35 problem

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Makhutov, N.A.; Tananov, A.I.; Koshelev, P.F.; Zatsarinnyj, V.V.

    1981-01-01

    The problems concerning the development and improvement of the investigation techniques and the evaluation of the resistance to brittle fracture of a wide class of materials (the reactor ones, in particular) under different conditions of loading using modern test means are considered in the review. It is reflected in the plan of works on the theme 1-35.3 ''Development of the methods of determination of resistance to brittle fracture of the materials and elements of construct Specialists from CMEA member-countries took an active part in its implementation. The development of the 1-35.3 theme presupposes the creation of scientific bases of calculation methods of the details of machines and elements of constructions according to the criteria of resistance to brittle fracture. The results obtained when using the methods of fracture mechanics are of significant importance in the substantiation of strength and admissible defectiveness of large-size constructions operating under the extremum conditions [ru

  9. Extra-electron induced covalent strengthening and generalization of intrinsic ductile-to-brittle criterion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Niu, Haiyang; Chen, Xing-Qiu; Liu, Peitao; Xing, Weiwei; Cheng, Xiyue; Li, Dianzhong; Li, Yiyi

    2012-01-01

    Traditional strengthening ways, such as strain, precipitation, and solid-solution, come into effect by pinning the motion of dislocation. Here, through first-principles calculations we report on an extra-electron induced covalent strengthening mechanism, which alters chemical bonding upon the introduction of extra-valence electrons in the matrix of parent materials. It is responsible for the brittle and high-strength properties of Al(12)W-type compounds featured by the typical fivefold icosahedral cages, which are common for quasicrystals and bulk metallic glasses (BMGs). In combination with this mechanism, we generalize ductile-to-brittle criterion in a universal hyperbolic form by integrating the classical Pettifor's Cauchy pressure with Pugh's modulus ratio for a wide variety of materials with cubic lattices. This study provides compelling evidence to correlate Pugh's modulus ratio with hardness of materials and may have implication for understanding the intrinsic brittleness of quasicrystals and BMGs.

  10. Analysis of a brittle-culm mutant of rice (Oryza sativa) induced bay gamma rays

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Doat, Jacqueline; Marie, R.

    1977-01-01

    An unexpected ''brittle-culm'' mutant has been screened in the progeny of the rice cultivar ''Balilla 28'' after a seed treatment by gamma rays from a Cobalt-60 source. This property proved hereditable and true-breeding. It does not affect the high resistance to lodging of rice plants. Important difference were pointed out between control and mutant lines in cellulose content and 1 p. cent NaOH extracts: ''brittle-culm'' straw contains less cellulose and shows a degradation of glucid coupounds. The brittleness of plant tissues appears to be correlated with a partial depolymerization of cellulose, associated with a possible transformation from alpha- to beta- or gamma-cellulose [fr

  11. Protective Effect of the Persian Gulf brittle star Ophiocoma Erinaceus extract on carbon tetrachloride (CCl4 induced liver damage in adult male Wistar rats

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aida Soheili

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Background and Aim:  Brittle star possess  bioactive compounds which confer the wound healing capacity and regenerative potency of damaged  arms and organisms to this creature. The aim of the current study was to assess the   protective  effect  of  the  star extract on liver damages induced by carbon tetrachloride in adult male Wistar rats. Materials and Methods: In this experimental study, 32 adult male rats were randomly divided into 4 equal groups: control, Sham exposed, experimental 1 (treated with %25 extract and experimental 2 (treated with %50 extract of star Ophiocoma Erinaceus. The control group received no treatment. The sham exposed groups received carbon tetrachloride .(50% in olive oil .0.5 ml/kg for 7 days. The experimental groups firstly received carbon tetrachloride, then received %25, %50 brittle star extract as intragastric for 7 days. Finally, the animals were sacrificed, and their bodies and livers were weighed. Then, the livers sections were prepared and were examined by means of light microscope. Finally, the obtained  quantitative data was analyzed using SPSS (V; 20, Mini Tab software, ANOVA, and Tukey. at the significant level of P<0.001. Results: Carbon tetrachloride significantly decreased the rats’ body weight, but it increased their livers weight (P<0.001. Histopathological evaluations showed .extensive liver damage. On the other hand, treatment with brittle star extract .ncreased liver weight, reduced. body weight and significantly altered other induced changes by carbon tetrachloride on liver structure such as hepatocytes number, Kupffer cells, and arteritis, which indicated  the improvement of damaged liver tissue (P<0.001. Conclusion: It was found that brittle star extract can exert protective effects on  liver damages induced by carbon tetrachloride on male Wistar rat.

  12. Noninvasive Assessment of Preload Reserve Enhances Risk Stratification of Patients With Heart Failure With Reduced Ejection Fraction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matsumoto, Kensuke; Onishi, Akira; Yamada, Hirotsugu; Kusunose, Kenya; Suto, Makiko; Hatani, Yutaka; Matsuzoe, Hiroki; Tatsumi, Kazuhiro; Tanaka, Hidekazu; Hirata, Ken-Ichi

    2018-05-01

    The leg-positive pressure maneuver can safely and noninvasively apply preload stress without increase in total body fluid volume. The purpose of this study was to determine whether preload stress could be useful for risk stratification of patients with heart failure with reduced ejection fraction. For this study, 120 consecutive patients with heart failure with reduced ejection fraction were prospectively recruited. The stroke work index was estimated as product of stroke volume index and mean blood pressure, and the E/e' ratio was calculated to estimate ventricular filling pressure. The echocardiographic parameters were obtained both at rest and during leg-positive pressure stress. During the median follow-up period of 20 months, 30 patients developed adverse cardiovascular events. During preload stress, stroke work index increased significantly (from 3280±1371 to 3857±1581 mm Hg·mL/m 2 ; P <0.001) along with minimal changes in ventricular filling pressure (E/e', from 16±10 to 17±9; P <0.05) in patients without cardiovascular events. However, patients with cardiovascular events showed impairment of Frank-Starling mechanism (stroke work index, from 2863±969 to 2903±1084 mm Hg·mL/m 2 ; P =0.70) and a serious increase in E/e' ratio (from 19±11 to 25±14; P <0.001). Both the patients without contractile reserve and those without diastolic reserve exhibited worse event-free survival than the others ( P <0.001). In a Cox proportional-hazards analysis, the changes in stroke work index (hazard ratio: 0.44 per 500 mm Hg·mL/m 2 increase; P =0.001) and in E/e' (hazard ratio: 2.58 per 5-U increase; P <0.001) were predictors of cardiovascular events. Contractile reserve and diastolic reserve during leg-positive pressure stress are important determinants of cardiovascular outcomes for patients with heart failure with reduced ejection fraction. © 2018 American Heart Association, Inc.

  13. Testing smooth and notched samples for identification of brittle material fracture mechanism

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Barinov, S.M.; Ivanov, V.S.

    1987-01-01

    Mechanical tests of cermet made of LaCrO 3 and Cr powder mixture in 3:2 mass ratio were conducted in LaCrO 3 -Cr system. Powder mixtures were exposed to static pressing and sintering (sintered cermets) or to high-speed pressing with following thermal treatment (high-speed pressing cermets). It is shown, that nonlinear deformation strength at deformation of brittle material smooth and notched samples allows to evaluate properly correlation of microplasticity and microcracking at brittle powder materials fracture

  14. Estimation of possibility of brittle fracture in high pressure boiler drums

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Grin', E.A.

    2005-01-01

    Paper presents the results of analysis of the problem to ensure brittle strength of high pressure boiler drums made with application of the present-day methods of linear and nonlinear fracture mechanics. The charts of the temperature boundaries of brittle fracture and of the critical factors of stress intensity plotted depending on the actual properties of the material and on dimensions of flaws are presented for standard size drums made of 22K and 16GNM steels. In the paper there are some examples of the practical application of the given charts [ru

  15. Micro- and macroapproaches in fracture mechanics for interpreting brittle fracture and fatigue crack growth

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ekobori, T.; Konosu, S.; Ekobori, A.

    1980-01-01

    Classified are models of the crack growth mechanism, and in the framework of the fracture mechanics suggested are combined micro- and macroapproaches to interpreting the criterion of the brittle fracture and fatigue crack growth as fracture typical examples, when temporal processes are important or unimportant. Under the brittle fracture conditions the crack propagation criterion is shown to be brought with the high accuracy to a form analogous to one of the crack propagation in a linear fracture mechanics although it is expressed with micro- and macrostructures. Obtained is a good agreement between theoretical and experimental data

  16. SU-F-T-250: What Does It Take to Correctly Assess the High Failure Modes of an Advanced Radiotherapy Procedure Such as Stereotactic Body Radiation Therapy?

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Han, D; Vile, D; Rosu, M; Palta, J

    2016-01-01

    Purpose: Assess the correct implementation of risk-based methodology of TG 100 to optimize quality management and patient safety procedures for Stereotactic Body Radiation Therapy. Methods: A detailed process map of SBRT treatment procedure was generated by a team of three physicists with varying clinical experience at our institution to assess the potential high-risk failure modes. The probabilities of occurrence (O), severity (S) and detectability (D) for potential failure mode in each step of the process map were assigned by these individuals independently on the scale from1 to 10. The risk priority numbers (RPN) were computed and analyzed. The highest 30 potential modes from each physicist’s analysis were then compared. Results: The RPN values assessed by the three physicists ranged from 30 to 300. The magnitudes of the RPN values from each physicist were different, and there was no concordance in the highest RPN values recorded by three physicists independently. The 10 highest RPN values belonged to sub steps of CT simulation, contouring and delivery in the SBRT process map. For these 10 highest RPN values, at least two physicists, irrespective of their length of experience had concordance but no general conclusions emerged. Conclusion: This study clearly shows that the risk-based assessment of a clinical process map requires great deal of preparation, group discussions, and participation by all stakeholders. One group albeit physicists cannot effectively implement risk-based methodology proposed by TG100. It should be a team effort in which the physicists can certainly play the leading role. This also corroborates TG100 recommendation that risk-based assessment of clinical processes is a multidisciplinary team effort.

  17. SU-F-T-250: What Does It Take to Correctly Assess the High Failure Modes of an Advanced Radiotherapy Procedure Such as Stereotactic Body Radiation Therapy?

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Han, D; Vile, D; Rosu, M; Palta, J [Virginia Commonwealth University, Richmond, VA (United States)

    2016-06-15

    Purpose: Assess the correct implementation of risk-based methodology of TG 100 to optimize quality management and patient safety procedures for Stereotactic Body Radiation Therapy. Methods: A detailed process map of SBRT treatment procedure was generated by a team of three physicists with varying clinical experience at our institution to assess the potential high-risk failure modes. The probabilities of occurrence (O), severity (S) and detectability (D) for potential failure mode in each step of the process map were assigned by these individuals independently on the scale from1 to 10. The risk priority numbers (RPN) were computed and analyzed. The highest 30 potential modes from each physicist’s analysis were then compared. Results: The RPN values assessed by the three physicists ranged from 30 to 300. The magnitudes of the RPN values from each physicist were different, and there was no concordance in the highest RPN values recorded by three physicists independently. The 10 highest RPN values belonged to sub steps of CT simulation, contouring and delivery in the SBRT process map. For these 10 highest RPN values, at least two physicists, irrespective of their length of experience had concordance but no general conclusions emerged. Conclusion: This study clearly shows that the risk-based assessment of a clinical process map requires great deal of preparation, group discussions, and participation by all stakeholders. One group albeit physicists cannot effectively implement risk-based methodology proposed by TG100. It should be a team effort in which the physicists can certainly play the leading role. This also corroborates TG100 recommendation that risk-based assessment of clinical processes is a multidisciplinary team effort.

  18. Role of scanning electron microscope )SEM) in metal failure analysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shaiful Rizam Shamsudin; Hafizal Yazid; Mohd Harun; Siti Selina Abd Hamid; Nadira Kamarudin; Zaiton Selamat; Mohd Shariff Sattar; Muhamad Jalil

    2005-01-01

    Scanning electron microscope (SEM) is a scientific instrument that uses a beam of highly energetic electrons to examine the surface and phase distribution of specimens on a micro scale through the live imaging of secondary electrons (SE) and back-scattered electrons (BSE) images. One of the main activities of SEM Laboratory at MINT is for failure analysis on metal part and components. The capability of SEM is excellent for determining the root cause of metal failures such as ductility or brittleness, stress corrosion, fatigue and other types of failures. Most of our customers that request for failure analysis are from local petrochemical plants, manufacturers of automotive components, pipeline maintenance personnel and engineers who involved in the development of metal parts and component. This paper intends to discuss some of the technical concepts in failure analysis associated with SEM. (Author)

  19. Safety assessment for electricity generation failure accident of gas cooled nuclear power plant using system dynamics (SD) method

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Woo, Tae Ho [Seoul National Univ. (Korea, Republic of). Dept. of Nuclear Engineering

    2013-04-15

    The power production failure happens in the loss of coolant of the nuclear power plants (NPPs). The air ingress is a serious accident in gas cooled NPPs. The quantification of the study performed by the system dynamics (SD) method which is processed by the feedback algorithms. The Vensim software package is used for the simulation, which is performed by the Monte-Carlo method. Two kinds of considerations as the economic and safety properties are important in NPPs. The result shows the stability of the operation when the power can be decided. The maximum value of risk is the 11.77 in 43rd and the minimum value is 0.0 in several years. So, the success of the circulation of coolant is simulated by the dynamical values. (orig.)

  20. Assessment of myocardial washout of Tc-99m-sestamibi in patients with chronic heart failure. Comparison with normal control

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kumita, Shin-ichiro; Seino, Yoshihiko; Cho, Keiichi; Nakajo, Hidenobu; Toba, Masahiro; Fukushima, Yoshimitsu; Takano, Teruo; Kumazaki, Tatsuo [Nippon Medical School, Tokyo (Japan); Okamoto, Noriake [Bristol-Myers Squibb K.K., Tokyo (Japan)

    2002-06-01

    In contrast to {sup 201}TlCl, {sup 99m}Tc-sestamibi shows very slow myocardial clearance after its initial myocardial uptake. In the present study, myocardial washout of {sup 99m}Tc-sestamibi was calculated in patients with non-ischemic chronic heart failure (CHF) and compared with biventricular parameters obtained from first-pass and ECG-gated myocardial perfusion SPECT data. After administration of {sup 99m}Tc-sestamibi, 25 patients with CHF and 8 normal controls (NC) were examined by ECG-gated myocardial perfusion SPECT and planar data acquisition in the early and delayed (interval of 3 hours) phase. Left ventricular ejection fraction (LVEF, %), peak filling rate (PFR, sec{sup -1}), end-diastolic volume (LVEDV, ml) and end-systolic volume (LVESV, ml) were automatically calculated from the ECG-gated SPECT data. Myocardial washout rates over 3 hours were calculated from the early and delayed planar images. Myocardial washout rates in the CHF group (39.6{+-}5.2%) were significantly higher than those in the NC group (31.2{+-}5.5%, p<0.01). The myocardial washout rates for the 33 subjects showed significant correlations with LVEF (r=-0.61, p<0.001), PFR (r=-0.47, p<0.01), LVEDV (r=0.45, p<0.01) and LVESV (r=0.48, p<0.01). The myocardial washout rate of {sup 99m}Tc-sestamibi is considered to be a novel marker for the diagnosis of myocardial damage in patients with chronic heart failure. (author)

  1. Clinical significance of power spectral analysis of heart rate variability and {sup 123}I-metaiodobenzylguanidine (MIBG) myocardial imaging for assessing the severity of heart failure

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ishida, Yoshio; Fukuoka, Shuji; Shimotsu, Yoriko; Sasaki, Tatsuya; Kamakura, Shiro; Yasumura, Yoshio; Miyatake, Kunio; Shimomura, Katsuro [National Cardiovascular Center, Suita, Osaka (Japan); Tani, Akihiro

    1997-04-01

    The significance of power spectral analysis of heart rate variability and of MIBG myocardial imaging to see the sympathetic nervous function was evaluated in patients with congestive heart failure due to dilated cardiomyopathy. Subjects were 10 normal volunteers and 8 patients with severity NYHA II; 10 normals and 25 patients with NYHA II and III; and 17 patients treated with a beta-blocker (metoprolol 5-40 mg). ECG was recorded with a portable ECG recorder for measuring RR intervals for 24 hr, which were applied for power spectral analysis. Early and delayed imagings with 111 MBq of {sup 123}I-MIBG were performed at 15 min and 4 hr, respectively, after its intravenous administration for acquisition of anterior planar and SPECT images. Myocardial blood flow SPECT was also done with 111 MBq of {sup 201}Tl given intravenously, and difference of total defect scores between MIBG and Tl images was computed. MIBG myocardial sympathetic nerve imaging in those patients was found useful to assess the severity of heart failure, to predict the risk patients for beta-blocker treatment and to assess the risk in complicated ventricular tachycardia. (K.H.)

  2. Unified nano-mechanics based probabilistic theory of quasibrittle and brittle structures: I. Strength, static crack growth, lifetime and scaling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Le, Jia-Liang; Bažant, Zdeněk P.; Bazant, Martin Z.

    2011-07-01

    Engineering structures must be designed for an extremely low failure probability such as 10 -6, which is beyond the means of direct verification by histogram testing. This is not a problem for brittle or ductile materials because the type of probability distribution of structural strength is fixed and known, making it possible to predict the tail probabilities from the mean and variance. It is a problem, though, for quasibrittle materials for which the type of strength distribution transitions from Gaussian to Weibullian as the structure size increases. These are heterogeneous materials with brittle constituents, characterized by material inhomogeneities that are not negligible compared to the structure size. Examples include concrete, fiber composites, coarse-grained or toughened ceramics, rocks, sea ice, rigid foams and bone, as well as many materials used in nano- and microscale devices. This study presents a unified theory of strength and lifetime for such materials, based on activation energy controlled random jumps of the nano-crack front, and on the nano-macro multiscale transition of tail probabilities. Part I of this study deals with the case of monotonic and sustained (or creep) loading, and Part II with fatigue (or cyclic) loading. On the scale of the representative volume element of material, the probability distribution of strength has a Gaussian core onto which a remote Weibull tail is grafted at failure probability of the order of 10 -3. With increasing structure size, the Weibull tail penetrates into the Gaussian core. The probability distribution of static (creep) lifetime is related to the strength distribution by the power law for the static crack growth rate, for which a physical justification is given. The present theory yields a simple relation between the exponent of this law and the Weibull moduli for strength and lifetime. The benefit is that the lifetime distribution can be predicted from short-time tests of the mean size effect on

  3. Sandia National Laboratories cask drop test programme: a demonstration of fracture mechanics principles for the prevention of brittle fracture

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    McConnell, P.; Sorenson, K.B.

    1995-01-01

    Sandia National Laboratories recently completed a cask drop test programme. The aims of the programme were (1) to demonstrate the applicability of a fracture mechanics-based methodology for ensuring cask integrity, and (2) to assess the viability of using a ferritic materials for cask containment. The programme consisted of four phases: (i) materials characterisation; (ii) non-destructive examination of the cask; (iii) finite element analyses of the drop events; and (iv) a series of drop tests of a ductile iron cask. The first three phases of the programme provided information for fracture mechanics analyses and predictions for the drop test phase. The drop tests were nominally based upon the IAEA 9 m drop height hypothetical accident scenario although one drop test was from 18 m. All tests were performed in the side drop orientation at a temperature of -29 o C. A circumferential, mid-axis flaw was introduced into the cask body for each drop test. Flaw depth ranged from 19 to 76 mm. Steel saddles were welded to the side wall of the cask to enhance the stresses imposed upon the cask in the region of the introduced flaw. The programme demonstrated the applicability of a fracture mechanics methodology for predicting the conditions under which brittle fracture may occur and thereby the utility of fracture mechanics design for ensuring cask structural integrity by ensuring an appropriate margin of safety. Positive assessments of ductile iron for cask containment and the quality of the casting process for producing ductile iron casks were made. The results of this programme have provided data to support IAEA efforts to develop brittle fracture acceptance criteria for cask containment. (author)

  4. Nuclear Computerized Library for Assessing Reactor Reliability (NUCLARR): Guide to data processing and revision: Part 3, Hardware component failure data entry and revision procedures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gilmore, W.E.; Gertman, D.I.; Gilbert, B.G.; Reece, W.J.

    1988-11-01

    The Nuclear Computerized Library for Assessing Reactor Reliability (NUCLARR) is an automated data base management system for processing and storing human error probability (HEP) and hardware component failure data (HCFD). The NUCLARR system software resides on an IBM (or compatible) personal micro-computer. Users can perform data base searches to furnish HEP estimates and HCFD rates. In this manner, the NUCLARR system can be used to support a variety of risk assessment activities. This volume, Volume 3 of a 5-volume series, presents the procedures used to process HEP and HCFD for entry in NUCLARR and describes how to modify the existing NUCLARR taxonomy in order to add equipment types of action verbs. Volume 3 also specifies the various roles of the administrative staff on assignment to the NUCLARR Clearinghouse who are tasked with maintaining the data base, dealing with user requests, and processing NUCLARR data

  5. Coupled Large Scale Hydro-mechanical Modelling for cap-rock Failure Risk Assessment of CO2 Storage in Deep Saline Aquifers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rohmer, J.; Seyedi, D.M.

    2010-01-01

    This work presents a numerical strategy of large scale hydro-mechanical simulations to assess the risk of damage in cap-rock formations during a CO 2 injection process. The proposed methodology is based on the development of a sequential coupling between a multiphase fluid flow (TOUGH2) and a hydro-mechanical calculation code (Code-Aster) that enables us to perform coupled hydro-mechanical simulation at a regional scale. The likelihood of different cap-rock damage mechanisms can then be evaluated based on the results of the coupled simulations. A scenario based approach is proposed to take into account the effect of the uncertainty of model parameters on damage likelihood. The developed methodology is applied for the cap-rock failure analysis of deep aquifer of the Dogger formation in the context of the Paris basin multilayered geological system as a demonstration example. The simulation is carried out at a regional scale (100 km) considering an industrial mass injection rate of CO 2 of 10 Mt/y. The assessment of the stress state after 10 years of injection is conducted through the developed sequential coupling. Two failure mechanisms have been taken into account, namely the tensile fracturing and the shear slip reactivation of pre-existing fractures. To deal with the large uncertainties due to sparse data on the layer formations, a scenario based strategy is undertaken. It consists in defining a first reference modelling scenario considering the mean values of the hydro-mechanical properties for each layer. A sensitivity analysis is then carried out and shows the importance of both the initial stress state and the reservoir hydraulic properties on the cap-rock failure tendency. On this basis, a second scenario denoted 'critical' is defined so that the most influential model parameters are taken in their worst configuration. None of these failure criteria is activated for the considered conditions. At a phenomenological level, this study points out three key

  6. Prediction of the brittle fracture toughness value of a RPV steel from the analysis of a limited set of Charpy results

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Forget, P.; Marini, B.; Verdiere, N.

    2001-01-01

    Our objective is to establish a method to be able to determine fracture toughness of a reactor pressure vessel (RPV) by using the small number of Charpy specimens used in the reactor surveillance program. Previous studies have shown that it is possible to determine fracture toughness from Charpy tests. Another point is to determine if statistical effects are compatible with a restricted number of specimens, this paper deals with this point and presents a methodology that is applicable to the case of irradiated materials from the surveillance program. Several conclusions can be drawn from this study: -) When determining failure parameters, we gain most accuracy by increasing the number of samples from 3 to about 6; -) it is possible to evaluate brittle fracture toughness using local approach, either by using Beremin or Renevey model; -) The effect of using a small number of Charpy specimens to determine fracture toughness in brittle fracture is evaluated. The error in the evaluation of fracture toughness is much smaller than the experimental dispersion itself. (A.C.)

  7. The effect of crack instability/stability on fracture toughness of brittle materials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Baratta, F.I.

    1997-01-01

    This paper summarizes three recent experimental works coauthored by the present author regarding the effect of crack instability/stability on fracture toughness, and also includes the necessary formulae for predicting stability. Two recent works have shown that unstable crack extension resulted in apparent increases in fracture toughness compared to that determined during stable crack growth. In the first investigation a quasi-brittle polymer, polymethylmethacrylate, was examined. In the second, a more brittle metallic material, tungsten, was tested. In both cases the transition from unstable to stable behavior was predicted based on stability analyses. The third investigation was conducted on a truly brittle ceramic material, hot pressed silicon nitride. These three papers showed that fracture toughness test results conducted on brittle materials vary according to whether the material fractures in an unstable or stable manner. Suggestions for achieving this important yet difficult phenomenon of stable crack growth, which is necessary when determining the fracture toughness variation occurring during unstable/stable crack advance, are presented, as well as recommendations for further research

  8. Permeability and seismic velocity anisotropy across a ductile-brittle fault zone in crystalline rock

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wenning, Quinn C.; Madonna, Claudio; de Haller, Antoine; Burg, Jean-Pierre

    2018-05-01

    This study characterizes the elastic and fluid flow properties systematically across a ductile-brittle fault zone in crystalline rock at the Grimsel Test Site underground research laboratory. Anisotropic seismic velocities and permeability measured every 0.1 m in the 0.7 m across the transition zone from the host Grimsel granodiorite to the mylonitic core show that foliation-parallel P- and S-wave velocities systematically increase from the host rock towards the mylonitic core, while permeability is reduced nearest to the mylonitic core. The results suggest that although brittle deformation has persisted in the recent evolution, antecedent ductile fabric continues to control the matrix elastic and fluid flow properties outside the mylonitic core. The juxtaposition of the ductile strain zone next to the brittle zone, which is bounded inside the two mylonitic cores, causes a significant elastic, mechanical, and fluid flow heterogeneity, which has important implications for crustal deformation and fluid flow and for the exploitation and use of geothermal energy and geologic waste storage. The results illustrate how physical characteristics of faults in crystalline rocks change in fault zones during the ductile to brittle transitions.

  9. A fracture-controlled path-following technique for phase-field modeling of brittle fracture

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Singh, N.; Verhoosel, C.V.; De Borst, R.; Van Brummelen, E.H.

    2016-01-01

    In the phase-field description of brittle fracture, the fracture-surface area can be expressed as a functional of the phase field (or damage field). In this work we study the applicability of this explicit expression as a (non-linear) path-following constraint to robustly track the equilibrium path

  10. Long-term follow-up of children thought to have temporary brittle bone disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Paterson CR

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available Colin R Paterson1, Elizabeth A Monk21Department of Medicine (retired, 2School of Accounting and Finance, University of Dundee, Dundee, ScotlandBackground: In addition to nonaccidental injury, a variety of bone disorders may underlie the finding of unexplained fractures in young children. One controversial postulated cause is temporary brittle bone disease, first described in 1990.Methods: Eighty-five patients with fractures showing clinical and radiological features of temporary brittle bone disease were the subject of judicial hearings to determine whether it was appropriate for them to return home. Sixty-three patients did, and follow-up information was available for 61 of these. The mean follow-up period was 6.9 years (range 1–17, median 6.Results: We found that none of the children had sustained any further injuries that were thought to represent nonaccidental injury; no child was re-removed from home. Three children had fractures. In each case there was general agreement that the fractures were accidental. Had the original fractures in these children been the result of nonaccidental injury, it would have been severe and repeated; the average number of fractures was 9.1.Conclusion: The fact that no subsequent suspicious injuries took place after return home is consistent with the view that the fractures were unlikely to have been caused by nonaccidental injury, and that temporary brittle bone disease is a distinctive and identifiable disorder.Keywords: fractures, osteogenesis imperfecta, temporary brittle bone disease, nonaccidental injury

  11. Brittle-ductile gliding shear zone and its dynamic metallization in uranium deposit No. 3110

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fang Shiyi.

    1990-01-01

    A preliminary study on the macroscopic geological structure, microstructures of plastic deformation rotary strain, structural geochemistry and zoning regularity of a brittle-ductile gliding shear zone in uranium deposit No. 3110 is made. Structural dynamic metallization of uranium caused by the strong shearing stress is discussed. It is pointed out that great attention must be paid to in further exploration

  12. Measurement of the ductile to brittle transition temperature for waste tank cooling coils

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wiersma, B.J.

    1992-09-01

    Charpy impact tests were conducted on ASTM A106 carbon steel archived from SRS waste tanks to determine the susceptibility of the cooling coils to brittle fracture during a seismic event. The highest ductile to brittle transition temperature measured was -5 degree F and, with the addition of a 30 degree F safety factor, the minimum safe operating temperature was determined to be 25 degree F. Calculations also showed that a pre-existing circumferential flaw that is 2.2in. long would be necessary to initiate brittle fracture of the pipe. These results demonstrate that the pipes will not be susceptible to brittle fracture if the cooling water inlet temperature is lowered to 50 degree F. Visual observation of the inner and outer walls of the pipe showed no localized attack or significant wall thinning. A 100--200 micron zinc coating is probably the reason for the lack of corrosion. A build-up of zinc slag occurred at pipe fittings where the weld had burned through. Although no attack was observed, the slag created several crevices which have the potential to trap the chromated water and initiate localized attack

  13. Nano finish grinding of brittle materials using electrolytic in-process ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    2016-08-26

    Aug 26, 2016 ... Recent developments in grinding have opened up new avenues for finishing of hard and brittle materials with nano-surface finish, high tolerance and accuracy. Grinding with superabrasive wheels is an excellent way to produce ultraprecision surface finish. However, superabrasive diamond grits need ...

  14. A brittle-fracture methodology for three-dimensional visualization of ductile deformation micromechanisms

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Tasan, C.C.; Hoefnagels, J.P.M.; Geers, M.G.D.

    2009-01-01

    An improved experimental methodology is developed and successfully evaluated to visualize deformation-induced microevents in ductile sheet metal. This easy-to-use methodology consists in a well-controlled brittle separation of samples previously deformed in a ductile manner, whereby a

  15. The Influence of Brittle Daniels System Characteristics on the Value of Load Monitoring Information

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Thöns, Sebastian; Schneider, Ronald

    This paper addresses the influence of deteriorating brittle Daniels system characteristics on the value of structural health monitoring (SHM). The value of SHM is quantified as the difference between the life cycle benefits with and without SHM. A value of SHM analysis is performed within...

  16. Qualitative evaluation of various models for mechanical analysis of nuclear wastes storage in brittle rocks