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Sample records for british army surgeons

  1. Major Harvey Cushing's difficulties with the British and American armies during World War I.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carey, Michael E

    2014-08-01

    This historical review explores Harvey Cushing's difficulties with both the British and American armies during his World War I service to definitively examine the rumor of his possible court martial. It also provides a further understanding of Cushing the man. While in France during World War I, Cushing was initially assigned to British hospital units. This service began in May 1917 and ended abruptly in May 1918 when the British cashiered him for repeated censorship violations. Returning to American command, he feared court martial. The army file on this matter (retrieved from the United States National Archives) indicates that US Army authorities recommended that Cushing be reprimanded and returned to the US for his violations. The army carried out neither recommendation, and no evidence exists that a court martial was considered. Cushing's army career and possible future academic life were protected by the actions of his surgical peers and Merritte Ireland, Chief Surgeon of the US Army in France. After this censorship episode, Cushing was made a neurosurgical consultant but was also sternly warned that further rule violations would not be tolerated by the US Army. Thereafter, despite the onset of a severe peripheral neuropathy, probably Guillian Barré's syndrome, Cushing was indefatigable in ministering to neurosurgical needs in the US sector in France. Cushing's repeated defying of censorship regulations reveals poor judgment plus an initial inability to be a "team player." The explanations he offered for his censorship violations showed an ability to bend the truth. Cushing's war journal is unclear as to exactly what transpired between him and the British and US armies. It also shows no recognition of the help he received from others who were instrumental in preventing his ignominious removal from service in France. Had that happened, his academic future and ability to train future neurosurgical leaders may have been seriously threatened. Cushing's foibles

  2. Identifying British Army infantry recruit population characteristics using biographical data.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kiernan, M D; Arthur, A; Repper, J; Mukhuty, S; Fear, N T

    2016-04-01

    The infantry accounts for more than a quarter of the British Army but there is a lack of data about the social and educational background of its recruits. To provide an insight into British Army infantry recruits' personal, social and educational background prior to enlistment. The study sample consisted of infantry recruits who enlisted into the British Army School of Infantry. Each recruit completed a 95-item biographical questionnaire. Descriptive statistics were used to describe the sample in terms of demographic, physical, personal, social and educational attributes. The study sample consisted of 1000 male recruits. Over half of the recruits were consuming alcohol at a hazardous or harmful level prior to enlistment and 60% of recruits had used cannabis prior to joining the Army. Academic attainment was low, with the majority of recruits achieving GCSE grade C and below in most subjects, with 15% not taking any examinations. Over half the recruits had been in trouble with the police and either been suspended or expelled from school. Substance misuse and poor behaviour are highly prevalent among recruits prior to enlistment. Taken alongside existing evidence that some of these problems are commonplace among personnel in regular service, the assumption that the British Army infantry is, in itself, a cause of these behaviours should be questioned. © The Author 2015. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the Society of Occupational Medicine. All rights reserved. For Permissions, please email: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  3. British army commisions by purchase | Usher | Scientia Militaria ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Scientia Militaria: South African Journal of Military Studies. Journal Home · ABOUT THIS JOURNAL · Advanced Search · Current Issue · Archives · Journal Home > Vol 8, No 4 (1978) >. Log in or Register to get access to full text downloads. Username, Password, Remember me, or Register. British army commisions by ...

  4. The presentation of depression in the British Army.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Finnegan, Alan; Finnegan, Sara; Thomas, Mike; Deahl, Martin; Simpson, Robin G; Ashford, Robert

    2014-01-01

    The British Army is predominately composed of young men, often from disadvantaged backgrounds, in which Depression is a common mental health disorder. To construct a predictive model detailing the presentation of depression in the army that could be utilised as an educational and clinical guideline for Army clinical personnel. Utilising a Constructivist Grounded Theory, phase 1 consisted of 19 interviews with experienced Army mental health clinicians. Phase 2 was a validation exercise conducted with 3 general practitioners. Depression in the Army correlates poorly with civilian definitions, and has a unique interpretation. Young soldiers presented with symptoms not in the International Classification of Disorders and older soldiers who feared being medically downgraded, sought help outside the Army Medical Services. Women found it easier to seek support, but many were inappropriately labelled as depressed. Implications include a need to address the poor understanding of military stressors; their relationships to depressive symptoms and raise higher awareness of gender imbalances with regard to access and treatment. The results have international implications for other Armed forces, and those employed in Young Men's Mental Health. The results are presented as a simple predictive model and aide memoire that can be utilised as an educational and clinical guideline. There is scope to adapt this model to international civilian healthcare practice. Crown Copyright © 2013. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  5. Standing the Test of Time: Revising the British Army's Counterinsurgency Doctrine

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    O'Herlihy, Simon

    2008-01-01

    The recent experiences in Iraq and Afghanistan confirm the fundamental validity of the British Army's counterinsurgency doctrine, but offer lessons which should be incorporated into a doctrinal review...

  6. Barossa Night: cohesion in the British Army officer corps.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bury, Patrick

    2017-06-01

    Contrasting the classical explanation of military group cohesion as sustained by interpersonal bonds, recent scholars have highlighted the importance of ritualized communication, training and drills in explaining effective military performance in professional armies. While this has offered a welcome addition to the cohesion literature and a novel micro-sociological method of examining cohesion, its primary evidential base has been combat groups. Indeed, despite their prominent role in directing operations over the past decade, the British Army's officer corps has received relatively little attention from sociologists during this period. No attempt has been made to explain cohesion in the officer corps. Using a similar method to recent cohesion scholars, this paper seeks to address this imbalance by undertaking a micro-sociology of one ritual in particular: 'Barossa Night' in the Royal Irish Regiment. Firstly, it draws on the work of Durkheim to examine how cohesion amongst the officer corps is created and sustained through a dense array of practises during formal social rituals. It provides evidence that the use of rituals highlights that social solidarity is central to understanding officer cohesion. Secondly, following Hockey's work on how private soldiers negotiate order, the paper shows how this solidarity in the officer corps is based on a degree of negotiated order and the need to release organizational tensions inherent in a strictly hierarchical rank structure. It highlights how the awarding of gallantry medals can threaten this negotiated order and fuel deviancy. In examining this behaviour, the paper shows that even amongst an officer class traditionally viewed as the elite upholders of organizational discipline, the negotiation of rank and hierarchy can be fluid. How deviant behaviour is later accepted and normalized by senior officers indicates that negotiated order is as important to understanding cohesion in the British Army's officer corps as it is

  7. The Effects of British Army Footwear on Ground Reaction Force and Temporal Parameters of British Army Foot-Drill.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rawcliffe, Alex J; Graham, Scott M; Simpson, Richard J; Moir, Gavin L; Martindale, Russell Jj; Psycharakis, Stelios G; Connaboy, Chris

    2017-08-09

    High rates of occupational training-related lower-limb musculoskeletal [MSK] overuse injuries are reported for British Army recruits during basic training. Foot-drill is a repetitive impact loading occupational activity and involves striking the ground violently with an extended-knee [straight-leg] landing. Foot-drill produces vertical ground reaction forces [vGRF] equal to and/or greater than those reported for high-level plyometric exercises/activities. Shock absorbing footwear aid in the attenuation of the magnitude of vGRF, resulting in a reduced risk of lower-limb MSK overuse injury when running. The potential shock absorbing characteristics of standard issue British Army footwear on the magnitude of vGRF and temporal parameters of foot-drill are scant. Therefore, this study sought to determine the magnitude of, and examine changes in vGRF and temporal parameters of foot-drill across three types of British Army footwear. Sampled at 1000hz, the mean of eight-trials from fifteen recreationally active males were collected from four foot-drills; stand-at-ease [SaE], stand-at-attention [SaA], quick-march [QM] and halt. Analysis of a normal walk was included to act as a comparison with quick-march. Significant main effects [P<0.05] were observed between footwear and foot-drill. The training shoe demonstrated significantly greater shock absorbing capabilities when compared with the combat boot and ammunition boot. Foot-drill produced peak vGRF and peak vertical rate of force development in excess of 5bw, and 350bw/sec, respectively. Time to peak vGRF ranged from 0.016- 0.036ms across foot-drills, indicating that passive vGRF may not be under neuromuscular control. The marginal reductions in the magnitude of vGRF and temporal parameters in foot-drill associated with the training shoe may act to reduce the accumulative impact loading forces experienced by recruits, subsequently minimising the severity and rates of lower-limb MSK overuse injuries and recruit medical

  8. Materials handling ability of regular and reserve British Army soldiers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Williams, Alun G; Evans, Paul

    2007-02-01

    The main objective of this research was to compare the materials handling ability, aerobic power, and body composition of fully trained Reserve and Regular male British Army soldiers (approximately 6-7 years of military experience). Twenty-one Reserve soldiers and 15 Regular soldiers completed fitness tests, including a maximal box lift to 1.45 m and a repetitive 22-kg box lift-and-carry test. There were no statistically significant differences (p > 0.05) between the two groups in any parameter measured. The performance levels observed in these fully trained soldiers (maximal box lift approximately 63 kg, repetitive lift and carry approximately 34 repetitions) were broadly comparable to those reported previously for new recruits. The physical training performed by the Regular soldiers (both within and beyond their military service) and the Reserve soldiers (predominantly outside their military duties) seems to be of sufficient volume and intensity to maintain performance levels comparable with each other and equivalent new army recruits.

  9. Privatizing Our Schools: Lessons from the British Army and World War II.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lovoy, Thomas A.

    1996-01-01

    Notes how the British Army's Officer Corps, based on elitism and financial standing, brought the British Empire to its knees. Argues that privatization--a for-profit market system to ration out education--would have a similar effect. Suggests that charter schools (with considerable autonomy but still held accountable by the chain of command) are…

  10. The Relationship between Basic Skills and Operational Effectiveness in the British Army

    Science.gov (United States)

    Swain, Jon

    2015-01-01

    This paper draws on data that formed part of a major three-year longitudinal study (2008-2011), which set out to investigate basic skills (BS) provision and needs in the British army and its relationship to operational effectiveness. Using mixed methods, the findings draw on qualitative data from 60 semi-structured interviews with 26 young…

  11. Cooperation and conflict – the British Army, the Natal government ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    very different. The large number of Afrikaners resident in the Cape Colony acted as a magnet for the Republican forces and as a result, large numbers of Afrikaners took up arms against Britain. From their side, the British authorities acted with a vengeance towards the Cape rebels, executing and imprisoning large numbers.

  12. The incidence and prevention of foot problems among male Phase One British Army recruits at an Army Training Regiment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kelly, Rhonda Alice

    2015-12-01

    Studies have demonstrated that there is an excessive number of foot problems among personnel entering the military, which leads to disruption to training resulting in an increase in both costs and wastage. Days are lost in training due to foot problems, most commonly blisters, causing a loss of working/training days with a resultant low morale and a financial loss to the army. A cohort of Phase One British Army recruits completed a questionnaire in week 3 of training to identify previous and current foot problems and assess what education on the topic they received during their training. Also, 43 foot risk assessment tools were used by the medical staff to identify incidence, severity and working days lost. Questionnaires were completed by 31 instructors to gain data on prevention and management of foot problems. Focus groups were conducted among instructors to investigate their knowledge of prevention and management, and problems identified among recruits. A lack of formal training on foot care exists among recruits and instructors. Blisters were reported to be the main foot problem, and army-issue boots were reported to be the main cause of problems. Sizing of boots was inconsistent, and manufacturers can vary in their sizings. There were no policies available, and only one lesson on foot care was given. Currently, no policies exist on foot care at the Army Training Regiment (ATR). Foot clinics were available daily, and blisters and foot problems were already present; therefore, foot education is required in the early stages of training. The field craft exercise resulted in half of the recruits reporting blisters. Poor foot hygiene remained a problem when recruits arrived at the ATR for their training. Foot care instruction included in the training would reduce days and hours lost in training. Published by the BMJ Publishing Group Limited. For permission to use (where not already granted under a licence) please go to http://www.bmj.com/company/products-services/rights-and-licensing/

  13. Does general surgery residency prepare surgeons for community practice in British Columbia?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hwang, Hamish

    2009-01-01

    Background Preparing surgeons for clinical practice is a challenging task for postgraduate training programs across Canada. The purpose of this study was to examine whether a single surgeon entering practice was adequately prepared by comparing the type and volume of surgical procedures experienced in the last 3 years of training with that in the first year of clinical practice. Methods During the last 3 years of general surgery training, I logged all procedures. In practice, the Medical Services Plan (MSP) of British Columbia tracks all procedures. Using MSP remittance reports, I compiled the procedures performed in my first year of practice. I totaled the number of procedures and broke them down into categories (general, colorectal, laparoscopic, endoscopic, hepatobiliary, oncologic, pediatric, thoracic, vascular and other). I then compared residency training with community practice. Results I logged a total of 1170 procedures in the last 3 years of residency. Of these, 452 were performed during community rotations. The procedures during residency could be broken down as follows: 392 general, 18 colorectal, 242 laparoscopic, 103 endoscopic, 85 hepatobiliary, 142 oncologic, 1 pediatric, 78 thoracic, 92 vascular and 17 other. I performed a total of 1440 procedures in the first year of practice. In practice the break down was 398 general, 15 colorectal, 101 laparoscopic, 654 endoscopic, 2 hepatobiliary, 77 oncologic, 10 pediatric, 0 thoracic, 70 vascular and 113 other. Conclusion On the whole, residency provided excellent preparation for clinical practice based on my experience. Areas of potential improvement included endoscopy, pediatric surgery and “other,” which comprised mostly hand surgery. PMID:19503663

  14. Screening for cardiac disease in potential recruits to the British Army.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cox, Andrew T; Cameron-Smith, M; Folkes, F; Sharma, S; Boos, C

    2015-09-01

    The British Army screens potential recruits for disease, including cardiovascular disease, at the pre-employment medical assessment in the Army Selection Centres. The epidemiology of cardiovascular disease in the Armed Forces coupled with the high physical demand placed on the cardiovascular system, often in remote locations make screening desirable. This is particularly pertinent as servicemen and women die from cardiovascular disease each year. To evaluate this particular screening system it is essential to understand the aim of the system, how it is designed and how screening systems in general are evaluated. The efficacy of a screening test is quantified using the measurements of sensitivity, specificity and likelihood ratios. These measurements are defined and the pitfalls associated with evaluating a screening system are described. The different screening tests used to identify cardiac disease and their individual strengths and weaknesses, are illustrated. Finally the article reviews the previous British Army recruit cardiac screening system, that used a stereotyped history and physical examination and the newer system that replaced it, which includes the incorporation of the 12-lead ECG and on site echocardiography in individuals revealing abnormalities on history, examination or ECG. Published by the BMJ Publishing Group Limited. For permission to use (where not already granted under a licence) please go to http://group.bmj.com/group/rights-licensing/permissions.

  15. Family Functioning Differences Across the Deployment Cycle in British Army Families: The Perceptions of Wives and Children.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pye, Rachel E; Simpson, Leanne K

    2017-09-01

    Military deployment can have an adverse effect on a soldier's family, though little research has looked at these effects in a British sample. We investigated wives' of U.K.-serving soldiers perceptions of marital and family functioning, across three stages of the deployment cycle: currently deployed, postdeployment and predeployed, plus a nonmilitary comparison group. Uniquely, young (aged 3.5-11 years) children's perceptions of their family were also investigated, using the parent-child alliance (PCA) coding scheme of drawings of the family. Two hundred and twenty British military families of regular service personnel from the British Army's Royal Armoured Corps, were sent survey packs distributed with a monthly welfare office newsletter. Wives were asked to complete a series of self-report items, and the youngest child in the family between the ages of 3.5 and 11 years was asked to draw a picture of their family. Complete data were available for 78 military families, and an additional 34 nonmilitary families were recruited via opportunity sampling. Results indicated wives of currently deployed and recently returned personnel were less satisfied with their family and its communication, and children's pictures indicated higher levels of dysfunctional parent-child alliance, whereas predeployed families responded similarly to nonmilitary families. Marital satisfaction was similar across all groups except predeployed families who were significantly more satisfied. Nonmilitary and predeployed families showed balanced family functioning, and currently and recently deployed families demonstrated poor family functioning. In comparison to nonmilitary families, predeployed families showed a large "spike" in the rigidity subscale of the Family Adaptability and Cohesion Evaluation Scale IV. Wives' perceptions of family functioning, but not marital satisfaction, differed between the deployment groups. The results from the coded children's drawings correlated with the self

  16. The Development of a Coalition Operational Architecture: A British and US Army Approach

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Galvin, K. E; Madigan, J. C

    2000-01-01

    ... (COA) to support a US Corps operating as a Combined Joint Task Force (CJTF) Headquarters with up to a UK Division as an integral part of its ORBAT would be investigated by staff from both countries' Army Operational Architecture (AOA) teams...

  17. An invading army without a spirit of adventure: Media representations of the British in France

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michelle Lawson

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available This paper forms part of a wider study of migrant identity within the context of British lifestyle migration to south-west France. Using an integrated methodology of corpus linguistics and discourse analysis (Appraisal, the research is situated within its wider social context by examining how British migration to France is represented within the UK media. The analysis reveals common keywords and patterns of language use that carry negative evaluation with respect to the British, their settlement patterns and behaviour. Lifestyle migration is presented on different levels, with writers distinguishing between a recent and more generalised phenomenon of migration and more established migrants who are represented as having more cultural capital. Readers are positioned to make sociocultural conditioned inferences about the behaviour of the more recent migrants, which also offers a resource for writers to self-identify against such stereotypes.

  18. American British Canadian, Australian Armies Standardization Program Catalog of War Games

    Science.gov (United States)

    1991-05-21

    Corporation, Rockwell International, U. S. Army Tank Automotive Command, U. S. Natick Research Development and Engineering Center, General Dynamics...hours per day per air and ground ambulance required for MEDEVAC were recorded by type air/ground ambulance for each level (CP, BAS, BSA , etc.). These...the item level. VGCUFS offers a means of assessing the effect a vehicle’s automotive performance, or changes in vehicle parameters such as engine

  19. Sex differences in neuromuscular fatigability in response to load carriage in the field in British Army recruits.

    Science.gov (United States)

    O'Leary, Thomas J; Saunders, Samantha C; McGuire, Stephen J; Izard, Rachel M

    2017-10-23

    Women are resistant to neuromuscular fatigue compared to men in response to a range of exercise tasks. The sex differences in the neuromuscular responses to load carriage have yet to be investigated. Prospective cohort study. Twenty-three male and 19 female British Army recruits completed a 9.7km loaded march within 90min, with the weight carried dependent on military trade (16±2kg for men and 15±1kg for women). Isometric maximal voluntary contraction (MVC) force of the knee extensors and vertical jump (VJ) height were examined pre- and post-loaded march to examine neuromuscular fatigue. Heart rate (HR) was recorded throughout and ratings of perceived exertion (RPE) was recorded following the march. HR was higher for women (173±9bmin -1 , 83±6% heart rate reserve) than men (158±8bmin -1 , 72±6% heart rate reserve) (p≤0.001). RPE following the march was also higher for women than men (6±2 vs 4±2, respectively, ploss in MVC force was greater for men than women (-12±9% vs -9±13%, respectively, p=0.031), however VJ height was impaired to a similar extent (-5±11% vs -5±6%, respectively, p=0.582). The greater physiological stress during load carriage for women compared to men did not translate to a greater severity of knee extensor muscle fatigue, with women demonstrating fatigue resistance. Copyright © 2017. Published by Elsevier Ltd.

  20. Low fitness, low body mass and prior injury predict injury risk during military recruit training: a prospective cohort study in the British Army.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Robinson, Mark; Siddall, Andrew; Bilzon, James; Thompson, Dylan; Greeves, Julie; Izard, Rachel; Stokes, Keith

    2016-01-01

    Injuries sustained by military recruits during initial training impede training progression and military readiness while increasing financial costs. This study investigated training-related injuries and injury risk factors among British Army infantry recruits. Recruits starting infantry training at the British Army Infantry Training Centre between September 2008 and March 2010 were eligible to take part. Information regarding lifestyle behaviours and injury history was collected using the Military Pre-training Questionnaire. Sociodemographic, anthropometric, physical fitness and injury (lower limb and lower back) data were obtained from Army databases. Univariable and multivariable Cox regression models were used to explore the association between time to first training injury and potential risk factors. 58% (95% CI 55% to 60%) of 1810 recruits sustained at least 1 injury during training. Overuse injuries were more common than traumatic injuries (65% and 35%, respectively). The lower leg accounted for 81% of all injuries, and non-specific soft tissue damage was the leading diagnosis (55% of all injuries). Injuries resulted in 122 (118 to 126) training days lost per 1000 person-days. Slower 2.4 km run time, low body mass, past injury and shin pain were independently associated with higher risk of any injury. There was a high incidence of overuse injuries in British Army recruits undertaking infantry training. Recruits with lower pretraining fitness levels, low body mass and past injuries were at higher risk. Faster 2.4 km run time performance and minimal body mass standards should be considered for physical entry criteria.

  1. A survey of consultant members of the British Association of Oral and Maxillofacial Surgeons regarding bisphosphonate-induced osteonecrosis of the jaws.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rogers, S N; Hung, J; Barber, A J; Lowe, D

    2009-12-01

    The aims of this survey of consultants in the British Association of Oral and Maxillofacial Surgeons were threefold. Firstly, to estimate the number of patients screened for oral health before starting intravenous bisphosphonate medication, secondly, to indicate the use of antibiotics in patients on bisphosphonates who need routine extraction of a lower first molar tooth, and finally to estimate the number of new and currently managed cases of bisphosphonate-induced osteonecrosis of the jaw (BONJ) in the last year, and approximately how many of those currently being managed had healed. A questionnaire was mailed to 322 consultants working at 154 hospitals in the summer of 2008. There were responses from 184 consultants (57%) and from 111 hospitals (72%). Screening patients before starting intravenous bisphosphonates was uncommon (15%). Almost all consultants would prescribe antibiotics for molar extraction and in about two-thirds this was both before and after extraction. Relatively few would stop bisphosphonates. Nearly two-thirds of consultants had seen new cases of BONJ from intravenous treatment in the last year, and a quarter had seen three or more. A similar proportion had patients on intravenous bisphosphonates under review for BONJ, and it was estimated that in a fifth of patients the lesion had healed. This survey indicates current practice among oral and maxillofacial surgeons in the UK. A national project for the registration of new patients will provide a stronger evidence base with respect to incidence, risk factors, and management of BONJ.

  2. Open radical cystectomy in England: the current standard of care - an analysis of the British Association of Urological Surgeons (BAUS) cystectomy audit and Hospital Episodes Statistics (HES) data.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jefferies, Edward R; Cresswell, Joanne; McGrath, John S; Miller, Catherine; Hounsome, Luke; Fowler, Sarah; Rowe, Edward W

    2018-01-23

    To establish the current standard for open radical cystectomy (ORC) in England, as data entry by surgeons performing RC to the British Association of Urological Surgeons (BAUS) database was mandated in 2013 and combining this with Hospital Episodes Statistics (HES) data has allowed comprehensive outcome analysis for the first time. All patients were included in this analysis if they were uploaded to the BAUS data registry and reported to have been performed in the 2 years between 1 January 2014 and 31 December 2015 in England (from mandate onwards) and had been documented as being performed in an open fashion (not laparoscopic, robot assisted or the technique field left blank). The HES data were accessed via the HES website. Office of Population Censuses and Surveys Classification of Surgical Operations and Procedures version 4 (OPCS-4) Code M34 was searched during the same 2-year time frame (not including M34.4 for simple cystectomy or with additional minimal access codes Y75.1-9 documenting a laparoscopic or robotic approach was used) to assess data capture. A total of 2 537 ORCs were recorded in the BAUS registry and 3 043 in the HES data. This indicates a capture rate of 83.4% of all cases. The median operative time was 5 h, harvesting a median of 11-20 lymph nodes, with a median blood loss of 500-1 000 mL, and a transfusion rate of 21.8%. The median length of stay was 11 days, with a 30-day mortality rate of 1.58%. This is the largest, contemporary cohort of ORCs in England, encompassing >80% of all performed operations. We now know the current standard for ORC in England. This provides the basis for individual surgeons and units to compare their outcomes and a standard with which future techniques and modifications can be compared. © 2018 The Authors BJU International © 2018 BJU International Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  3. Resistance training and the enhancement of the gains in material-handling ability and physical fitness of British Army recruits during basic training.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Williams, A G; Rayson, M P; Jones, D A

    2002-03-15

    The aim was to evaluate the efficacy of a modified British Army basic training that included resistance training in improving material-handling performance and physical fitness, and to compare the modified training directly with the normal basic training. Forty-three males [19.2 (2.6) years of age, 1764 (72) mm in height, 73.0 (10.6) kg in mass] and nine females [19.1 (2.2) years, 1641 (67) mm, 62.0 (7.2) kg] performed the modified basic training. Testing occurred in the week before and in the final week of the 11-week basic training. Improvements with the modified training were observed for all six material-handling tests, including 8-12% for maximal box lifting, 15-19% for repetitive lifting and carrying and 9-17% for loaded marching (all p material-handling ability and other aspects of physical fitness brought about in recruits by British Army basic training can be enhanced by the use of a physical training programme that includes a carefully designed resistance training element. Of particular note are the improvements shown in performance on material-handling tasks that require muscular strength, as these represent many of the tasks that soldiers encounter in their military careers.

  4. Quality standards in upper gastrointestinal endoscopy: a position statement of the British Society of Gastroenterology (BSG) and Association of Upper Gastrointestinal Surgeons of Great Britain and Ireland (AUGIS).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beg, Sabina; Ragunath, Krish; Wyman, Andrew; Banks, Matthew; Trudgill, Nigel; Pritchard, D Mark; Riley, Stuart; Anderson, John; Griffiths, Helen; Bhandari, Pradeep; Kaye, Phillip; Veitch, Andrew

    2017-11-01

    This document represents the first position statement produced by the British Society of Gastroenterology and Association of Upper Gastrointestinal Surgeons of Great Britain and Ireland, setting out the minimum expected standards in diagnostic upper gastrointestinal endoscopy. The need for this statement has arisen from the recognition that while technical competence can be rapidly acquired, in practice the performance of a high-quality examination is variable, with an unacceptably high rate of failure to diagnose cancer at endoscopy. The importance of detecting early neoplasia has taken on greater significance in this era of minimally invasive, organ-preserving endoscopic therapy. In this position statement we describe 38 recommendations to improve diagnostic endoscopy quality. Our goal is to emphasise practices that encourage mucosal inspection and lesion recognition, with the aim of optimising the early diagnosis of upper gastrointestinal disease and improving patient outcomes. © Article author(s) (or their employer(s) unless otherwise stated in the text of the article) 2017. All rights reserved. No commercial use is permitted unless otherwise expressly granted.

  5. The configuration of clinics and the use of biopsy and photography in oral premalignancy: a survey of consultants of the British Association of Oral and Maxillofacial Surgeons.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kanatas, A N; Fisher, S E; Lowe, D; Ong, T K; Mitchell, D A; Rogers, S N

    2011-03-01

    Oral dysplastic lesions may have an increased chance of becoming oral squamous cell carcinoma, but to date their management remains controversial. The aim of this survey was to explore the current practical aspects of the management of patients with dysplasia by oral and maxillofacial consultants in the UK. In the survey we asked consultants about the numbers of patients they see with oral premalignant lesions, the frequency and specialty of designated hospital clinics, their use of photographs and biopsy, factors that influence their decision whether to biopsy a lesion at the first appointment, the procedure for treatment and follow-up and their use (if any) of chemopreventive agents. We found a wide variation in the practical aspects of managing patients with dysplasia, and the lack of consistency among clinicians supports the idea of an initiative to establish more robust national guidelines to use as a gold standard in the future. Copyright © 2010 The British Association of Oral and Maxillofacial Surgeons. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  6. The evolution of casualty evacuation in the British Army in the 20th century (Part 3)--1945 to present.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bricknell, M C M

    2003-03-01

    This is the third in a series of papers describing the evolution of the British casualty evacuation chain during the 20th century. This period was dominated by the threat of war between NATO and the Warsaw Pact in Central Europe. The Suez Crisis in 1956, the Falklands War in 1982, the GulfWar in 1991 and events in the Balkans during the 1990s demonstrated the requirement for a flexible system for medical support to the UK Armed Forces.

  7. Comparative analysis of field ration for military personnel of the ukrainian army and armies of other countries worldwide

    OpenAIRE

    M. Mardar; M. Hkrupalo; M. Stateva

    2017-01-01

    For the purpose of improvement of the Ukrainian nutritional standards this Article provides comparative analysis of field rations of different countries worldwide to make a proposal on improvement of food-stuff assortment in food ration for military personnel in the Armed Forces of Ukraine, Army of USA, the British Army, Army of Germany, Army of Italy, Army of Canada, Army of France, Army of Belarus, Army of Armenia. In accordance with the comparative analysis it was established that ration c...

  8. “There is discrimination in the Russian army against religious minorities” - Interview with Abdurashid Saidov, surgeon, writer and Moscow correspondent for Dagestanskaia Pravda, Moscow, 7 October 2008

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Elisabeth Sieca-Kozlowski

    2009-12-01

    Full Text Available PIPSS.ORG – What is it like for Dagestani conscripts? How do the officers relate to them? Are they able to fulfill all their religious duties? Do Dagestanis have the ability to rise to the officer ranks?Abdurashid Saidov: In Moscow, there are more than 10 million residents; in Dagestan, there are 2 million. In each conscription, however, Dagestan offers up many times more young men to the army than Moscow. Speaking of attitudes towards Muslims, it is possible to say with confidence that in th...

  9. The Requirement for and Subsequent Development of a Training Scheme for the Officers and Staff of the British Army 1799-1858

    Science.gov (United States)

    1990-06-01

    the demand for pensions from the state. The result was that the country got a substantial army at virtually no cost to the tax-payer - an altogether...devoted at the end of the second year to "independent study preparatory to the final examination’, asisted by the professors of the College. The

  10. British dental surgery and the First World War: the treatment of facial and jaw injuries from the battlefield to the home front.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hussey, K D

    2014-11-01

    When Britain went to war in 1914, the British Expeditionary Force was deployed without a single dentist. Initially considered combatants, the only dental professionals who could serve at the Front were medically qualified dental surgeons in the Royal Army Medical Corps. In treating the traumatic facial and jaw injuries caused by trench warfare, the dental surgeons of this era earned their place on specialist surgical teams and established the principles of oral and maxillofacial surgery. This article will examine the contribution of specialist dental surgeons to the management of facial and jaw wounds in the First World War along the chain of evacuation from the battlefield to the home front, using illustrative examples from the Hunterian Museum at the Royal College of Surgeons of England.

  11. Back to the Future: The British Southern Campaign, 1780-1781

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Brinkley, William

    1998-01-01

    .... The British campaign's complex environment displays marked similarities with several U.S. Army operations conducted since 1990, particularly operations in Panama, Haiti, Northern Iraq and Somalia...

  12. The Army Wants More Family Physicians.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1988-03-23

    Pfieffer , U.S. Office of the Surgeon General of the Army, Washington D.C., 8 February 1988. 3. American Medical Association, The Directory of...unit surgeon did not prepare him for the myriad skin deseases, diarrheal syndromes , fevers, and other problems. Despite the excellent efforts in the

  13. Did Senior British Officers Effectively Lead Change?

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-12-12

    must create a vision, devise a strategy, and implement it. They require buy -in from the wider Army but this support is not guaranteed. Indeed, many...investigate. However, there is a compulsion element to any change in the British Army. Orders are orders after all. How much room there is to...support for change evident throughout? Whether Senior Leaders had any power to influence change is important due to the compulsion aspect of the

  14. Should there be an Australian Army Association?

    Science.gov (United States)

    2006-12-15

    of the United States Army BAFF British Armed Forces Federation BCOF British Commonwealth Occupation Forces CAD Canadian Dollars CDA Conference of...Federation ( BAFF ) 7. The Canadian Infantry Association 23 8. The Royal Canadian Armoured Corps Association 9. The Canadian Association of Veterans in...surprising that these associations and the focus of their objects have high degrees of similarity.2 The British Armed Forces Federation ( BAFF ) is a

  15. Preparing the British Army for Future Warfare

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-12-16

    concepts described the “Clash of Civilizations”3 and theories on how “scarcity, crime, overpopulation , tribalism, and disease are rapidly destroying the...like the United Kingdom, are faced with a clash of interests. Of more direct military relevance is a multinational and multi-organizational solution to...Perspective 49 from their current unilateral ownership of the task. This multilateral solution could quite possibly call upon the United Kingdom to

  16. [Social responsibility of surgeons].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gu, Jin

    2012-01-01

    Surgeon is sacred career. To cure patients by surgery is the surgeon's work, while the social responsibility is the surgeon's soul. To strengthen and promote the social responsibility is a demand of our age; thus, every surgeon should adhere to the supremacy of the patients' interests in clinical practice.

  17. British passports

    CERN Multimedia

    IT Department

    2008-01-01

    Please note that from 01/01/2009, the passport section of the British Consulate will move from Geneva to Paris. This change is part of a global initiative to rationalize passport services and reduce administrative costs while ensuring that the quality of the service remains high. The aim is to issue new passports within 10 working days of receiving applications (excluding transit time). From 1st January 2009 passport applications should be sent by courier or registered post directly to: British Consulate General BP111-08 75363 Paris CEDEX 08 France For further information please refer to: http://ukinswitzerland.fco.gov.uk/en/passports/passport-move/

  18. Book Review: "Indigenous Peoples of the British Dominions and the ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Book Review: "Indigenous Peoples of the British Dominions and the First World War"by Timothy C. Winegard. ... Timothy Winegard saw active duty in the Canadian Reserve Force from 2001 to 2010 and served on detachment duty to the British Army for a two-year period. He obtained various academic degrees from 1999 ...

  19. Surgeon's vigilance in the operating room.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zheng, Bin; Tien, Geoffrey; Atkins, Stella M; Swindells, Colin; Tanin, Homa; Meneghetti, Adam; Qayumi, Karim A; Neely, O; Panton, M

    2011-05-01

    Surgeons' vigilance regarding patient condition was assessed using eye-tracking techniques during a simulated laparoscopic procedure. Surgeons were required to perform a partial cholecystectomy in a virtual reality trainer (SurgicalSim; METI Inc, Sarasota, FL) while wearing a lightweight head-mounted eye-tracker (Locarna systems Inc, Victoria, British Columbia, Canada). Half of the patients were preprogrammed to present a mildly unstable cardiac condition during the procedure. Surgical performance (evaluated by task time, instrument trajectory, and errors), mental workload (by the National Aeronautics and Space Administration Task Load Index), and eye movement were recorded and compared between 13 experienced and 10 novice surgeons. Experienced surgeons took longer to complete the task and also made more errors. The overall workload reported by surgeons was similar, but expert surgeons reported a higher level of frustration and a lower level of physical demands. Surgeon workload was greater when operating on the unstable patient than on the stable patient. Novices performed faster but focused more of their attention on the surgical task. In contrast, experts glanced more frequently at the anesthetic monitor. This study shows the usefulness of using eye-tracking technology to measure a surgeon's vigilance during an operation. Eye-tracking observations can lead to inferences about a surgeon's behavior for patient safety. The unsatisfactory performance of expert surgeons on the VR simulator suggests that the fidelity of the virtual simulator needs to improve to enable surgeons to transfer their clinical skills. This, in turn, suggests using caution when having clinical experts as instructors to teach skills with virtual simulators. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  20. Building the Old Contemptibles: British Military Transformation and Tactical Development from the Boer War to the Great War, 1899-1914

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Risio, Andrew J

    2005-01-01

    Impressed with the tactical lessons of the Boer War, the British Army reformed its doctrine and training from 1899 to 1914, deploying a combat ready force, the "Old Contemptibles" of the British Expeditionary Force (BEF) in 1914...

  1. Surgeon Major Thomas Heazle Parke (1857-1893): Irish doctor, soldier and explorer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parke, Andrew

    2017-08-08

    Surgeon Major Thomas Heazle Parke (1857-1893) was a doctor from Drumsna, County Roscommon, who after completing his education at the Royal College of Surgeons in Ireland joined the British army as a medical officer. After several years of serving in Ireland and Egypt, he volunteered to be medical officer of the Emin Pasha Relief Expedition of 1887-1889. This was to become Henry Morton Stanley's largest, longest and most controversial African expedition. The epic journey saw Stanley, his eight European officers and 800 African porters take almost 3 years to cross the African continent from West to East via the Congo River, Southern Sudan and Uganda. During this time, Parke had to single-handedly deal with the myriad diseases and injuries that beset the expedition's members. Barely 200 of the Zanzibari, Sudanese and Somali porters survived, and two British officers also perished. In completing the expedition, Parke became the first Irishman to cross Africa, and he had also become the first European to lay eyes on the ' Mountains of the Moon ' or ' Ruwenzori '. He returned home to great acclaim, and was bestowed copious honours and fellowships. His account of the expedition, My Experiences in Equatorial Africa , was a bestseller. However, his own health never recovered from the hardships of his time in Africa, and he died suddenly in 1893. His statue stands outside the Natural History Museum in Dublin. © Article author(s) (or their employer(s) unless otherwise stated in the text of the article) 2017. All rights reserved. No commercial use is permitted unless otherwise expressly granted.

  2. Australia's female military surgeons of World War I.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Neuhaus, Susan J

    2013-10-01

    The war service of Lilian Violet Cooper, the first female surgeon of the Royal Australasian College of Surgeons, is well recognized. Not so well known however, are the other pioneering female doctors who also undertook work as military surgeons during World War I. At least four of the 14 Australian female doctors that undertook overseas war service during World War I were engaged as surgeons and treated Australian, British and Allied casualties. These women operated in London, in Egypt and on the frontlines of the Macedonian campaign. While none of these other women became Fellows of the Royal Australasian College of Surgeons, their war efforts deserve recognition. © 2013 Royal Australasian College of Surgeons.

  3. Find a Dermatologic Surgeon

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... for Every Season How to Choose the Best Skin Care Products In This Section Dermatologic Surgery What is dermatologic ... for Every Season How to Choose the Best Skin Care Products Find a Dermatologic Surgeon Please select the following ...

  4. Civil Surgeon Info

    Data.gov (United States)

    Department of Homeland Security — USCIS designates certain doctors (also known as civil surgeons) to perform the medical exam required for most Green Card applicants. This data set represents the...

  5. Society of Reproductive Surgeons

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... About Officers Mission Statement Fellowship The Role of Reproductive Surgeons Bylaws Membership Benefits FAQ Registry Discussion Directory Publications Fertility and Sterility Journal of Assisted Reproduction and Genetics (JARG) Newsletters Participate Post a Message ...

  6. Congress of Neurological Surgeons

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Neurosurgeon Young Neurosurgeons Directory Education Essential Papers in Neurosurgery, Volume 1: Neuro-oncology Membership Active Membership Active ... Neurosurgical Meetings Request to Add a Meeting Publications ... Neurosurgery The Surgeon's Armamentarium Congress Quarterly Clinical ...

  7. Society of Laparoendoscopic Surgeons

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... a career in minimally invasive surgery. SLS Virtual Business Hall Issues and answers specific to surgeons and ... to operate in the advanced laparoscopic environment. Laparoscopy Today Laparoscopy Today features articles from leading experts on ...

  8. Spinal Pain and Occupational Disability: A Cohort Study of British Apache AH Mk1 Pilots

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-09-01

    physiotherapy including acupuncture (3 sessions total) Remedial massage Xray/ pain killers Pain relief/anti inflammatory medication followed by pysio...Change of address Organizations receiving reports from the U.S. Army Aeromedical Research Laboratory (USAARL) on automatic mailing lists should...supported by the United States Army Aeromedical Research Laboratory (USAARL), Fort Rucker, Alabama; the Ministry of Defence, British Army Air Corps, United

  9. The British Southern Campaign in the Revolutionary War: Implications for Contemporary Counter Insurgency

    Science.gov (United States)

    2006-03-10

    Iberian Peninsula, some twenty-five years later, suggesting perhaps that at least some officers in the British Army did absorb key lessons from 20 the...lived 1723-1786. A career British officer he was wounded serving in 60th Foot under Wolfe at Quebec. He was promoted Colonel in September 1775

  10. Surgeons' vision rewarded.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baillie, Jonathan

    2010-08-01

    Surgeons and clinical staff, theatre circulation and scrub personnel, and anaesthetists, as well as the estates and facilities team at Kent's Maidstone Hospital, have worked with specialist supplier of integrated audio, video, and instrumentation systems for the operating room, Olympus Medical, to develop what is claimed is among the UK's most advanced operating theatres yet built for laparoscopic and endoscopic surgery. HEJ editor Jonathan Baillie discussed the project with Amir Nisar, the surgeon who championed efforts to get the facility built, and Olympus Medical national sales manager, systems integration, James Watts.

  11. British Sign Name Customs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Day, Linda; Sutton-Spence, Rachel

    2010-01-01

    Research presented here describes the sign names and the customs of name allocation within the British Deaf community. While some aspects of British Sign Language sign names and British Deaf naming customs differ from those in most Western societies, there are many similarities. There are also similarities with other societies outside the more…

  12. Society of Thoracic Surgeons

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Society of Thoracic Surgeons Facebook Twitter LinkedIn YouTube Instagram Flickr About STS Governance and Leadership Bylaws Policies ... Tweets by @STS_CTsurgery Facebook Twitter LinkedIn YouTube Instagram Flickr Footer menu Home Contact Us CT Surgery ...

  13. Business knowledge in surgeons.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Satiani, Bhagwan

    2004-07-01

    Surgeons and residents in training receive little, if any, formal education in the economic side of clinical practice during medical school or residency. As medical professionals face shrinking reimbursement, loss of control over health care decisions, and limited resources, surgical specialties must reevaluate the need to teach their members business survival skills. Before designing business related-teaching modules, educators must know the exact gaps in knowledge that exist among surgeons. This article reports a survey of 133 surgeons in the Midwest who were asked to rate their knowledge base in 11 business topics relevant to the practice of medicine. The survey showed that the average surgeon perceives himself or herself to be poorly equipped to understand basic financial accounting principles, financial markets, economics of health care, tools for evaluating purchases, marketing, budgets, antitrust and fraud and abuse regulations, and risk and return on investments. Armed with this data, teaching faculty, health care systems, and medical specialty societies should design business education seminars to better position surgical specialists and trainees to communicate with insurers, hospital administrators, health care organizations, and their own personal financial advisors.

  14. Managers as social surgeons.

    Science.gov (United States)

    MacLachlan, M

    1992-01-01

    Deals with the Health Service manager's problems of pruning staff in NHS Trust applications. Compares handling staff with a surgeon handling patients pre-, during and post-operations. Concludes that the Health Service manager must consider the key issues of communication, involvement, unambiguity and encouraging the free expression of dissent.

  15. Army Medical Imaging System - ARMIS

    Science.gov (United States)

    1992-08-08

    Melvin P. Siedband Frank C. Grenzow Craig A. Heilman James R. Gray Huilian Zhang A ... NTtS CFA?•I " U ; J C l A t j. University of Wisconsin _. I e...Medical Imaging System - ARMIS Contract # 6.AUTHOR(S) Melvin P. Siedband James R. Gray DAMDI7-88C-8058 Frank C. Grenzow Huilian Zhang 63807A Craig A...its use is inconsistent to the people who must manage it. The consistency of the Macin- tosh operating system permits easier staff training as imaging

  16. Administration: Army Congressional Fellowship Program

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    2000-01-01

    This printing publishes a new Army Regulation. This regulation presents the policies and procedures under which the Army manages the Army Congressional Fellowship Program and supplements applicable Department...

  17. Army medical imaging system: ARMIS

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Siedband, M.P.; Kramp, D.C.

    1987-01-01

    Recent advances of stimulable phosphor screens, data cards using optical storage means, and new personal computers with image processing capability have made possible the design of economical filmless medical imaging systems. The addition of communication links means that remote interpretation of images is also possible. The Army Medical Imaging System uses stimulable phosphor screens, digital readout, a small computer, an optical digital data card device, and a DIN/PACS link. Up to 200 images can be stored in the computer hard disk for rapid recall and reading by the radiologist. The computer permits image processing, annotation, insertion of text, and control of the system. Each device contains an image storage RAM and communicates with the computer via the small computer systems interface. Data compression is used to reduce the required storage capacity and transmission times of the 1-mB images. The credit card-size optical data cards replace film and can store 12 or more images. The data cards can be read on an independent viewer. The research is supported by the U.S. Army Biomedical Research and Development Laboratory

  18. Comparative analysis of field ration for military personnel of the ukrainian army and armies of other countries worldwide

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Mardar

    2017-04-01

    Full Text Available For the purpose of improvement of the Ukrainian nutritional standards this Article provides comparative analysis of field rations of different countries worldwide to make a proposal on improvement of food-stuff assortment in food ration for military personnel in the Armed Forces of Ukraine, Army of USA, the British Army, Army of Germany, Army of Italy, Army of Canada, Army of France, Army of Belarus, Army of Armenia. In accordance with the comparative analysis it was established that ration composition used for the Armed Forces of Ukraine military personnel lags behind developed countries of the world both in nutrition arrangement and in nutrient composition, especially in relation to assortment and variety of ration food-stuff. Moreover, a field ration is strictly unified and doesn’t consider individual needs of military personnel in calories, proteins, fats, carbohydrates, food fibers. Selection of individual field ration takes to account only age of military personnel, i. e. individual needs related to nutrition composition such as physical abilities, level of physical activity, gender, type of occupation before military conscription and etc. are not consideredThe obtained results confirms practicability of assortment products assortment included to field rations for the purpose to correct nutrition rations towards optimal balance for military efficiency of army, adaptation of military personnel to physical and psychological loads.

  19. Gender Disparities Within US Army Orthopedic Surgery: A Preliminary Report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Daniels, Christopher M; Dworak, Theodora C; Anderson, Ashley B; Brelin, Alaina M; Nesti, Leon J; McKay, Patricia L; Gwinn, David E

    2018-01-01

    Women account for approximately 15% of the active duty US Army, and studies show that women may be at an increased risk of musculoskeletal injury during sport and military training. Nationally, the field of orthopedic surgery comprises 14% women, lagging behind other surgical fields. Demographics for US Military orthopedic surgeons are not readily available. Similarly, demographic data of graduating medical students entering Military Medicine are not reported. We hypothesize that a gender disparity within military orthopedics will be apparent. We will compare the demographic profile of providers to our patients and hypothesize that the two groups are dissimilar. Secondarily, we examine the demographics of military medical students potentially entering orthopedics from the Uniformed Services University of the Health Sciences (USUHS) or the Health Professions Scholarship Program. A census was formed of all US Army active duty orthopedic surgeons to include staff surgeons and residents, as well as US Army medical student graduates and orthopedic patients. There are 252 Army orthopedic surgeons and trainees; 26 (10.3%) are women and 226 (89.7%) are men. There were no significant demographic differences between residents and staff. Between 2014 and 2017, the 672 members of the USUHS graduating classes included 246 Army graduates. Of those, 62 (25%) were female. Army Health Professions Scholarship Program graduated 1,072 medical students, with women comprising 300 (28%) of the group. No statistical trends were seen over the 4 yr at USUHS or in Health Professions Scholarship Program. In total, 2,993 orthopedic clinic visits during the study period were by Army service members, 23.6% were women. There exists a gender disparity among US Army orthopedic surgeons, similar to that seen in civilian orthopedics. Gender equity is also lacking among medical students who feed into Army graduate medical education programs. The gender profile of our patient population is not

  20. The world's best-known surgeon.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Walt, A J

    1983-10-01

    Henry Norman Bethune was born in Ontario in 1890 and was to become the best-known physician in the world. Bethune, a thoracic surgeon, spent his professional life in Detroit and Montreal, with these periods separated by a year spent as a patient in a tuberculosis sanatorium. This was where his interest in pulmonary disease was stimulated. Pioneer thoracic surgeon, councillor to the American Association for Thoracic Surgery, artist, poet, polemist, conservative-turned-communist, iconoclast, and soldier, Bethune was a highly complex individual. Diverting his energies from surgery to social issues during the depression, Bethune participated in the Spanish Civil War, at which time he designed the world's first mobile blood transfusion unit. Eight months later, Bethune joined Mao Tse-tung's Eight Route Army in China. In 1939 he died of septicemia acquired from a sliver of infected bone while he was operating on a wounded Chinese patient. Bethune's fame today derives principally from the popularization of his accomplishments by Mao, whom he met once and who subsequently decreed that all in China should learn about him. Bethune's posthumous influence played an important role in the reopening of relations between China and the West.

  1. NICKEL ALLERGY: Surgeons Beware.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Axe, Jeremie M; Sinz, Nathan J; Axe, Michael J

    2015-06-01

    When performing an orthopaedic device implantation, it should be routine practice for the surgeon to ask the patient if he or she has a metal allergy, and more specifically a nickel allergy. Ask the patient about costume jewelry or button reactions. If it is an elective surgery, obtain a confirmatory test with the aid of a dermatologist or allergist. It is recommended to use a non-nickel implant if the surgery is urgent, the patient has a confirmed allergy, or the patient does not want to undergo testing, as these implants are readily available in 2015. Finally, if the patient has a painful joint arthroplasty and all other causes have been ruled out, order a metal allergy test to aid in diagnosis.

  2. Surgeon-performed ultrasonography

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Todsen, Tobias

    2017-01-01

    Surgeons are increasingly using ultrasonography (US) in their clinical management of patients. However, US is a very user-dependent imaging modality and proper skills of the US operator are needed to ensure quality in patient care. This thesis explores the validity evidence for assessment...... of competence in abdominal and head & neck ultrasonography using the Objective Structured Assessment of Ultrasound Skills (OSAUS) scale. With the use of Messick's unitary framework of validity, five sources of validity evidence were explored: test content, response processes, inter-nal structure, relations...... to other variables, and consequences. Research paper I examined validity evidence for the use of the OSAUS scale to assess physicians' abdominal point-of-care US competence in an experimental setting using patient cases with and without pathological conditions. The RESULTS provided validity evidence...

  3. Strategic Analysis and Associated Management Products Supporting the Reengineering of Bayne-Jones Army Community Hospital: Consultative Products and Findings

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Fulton, Larry

    1998-01-01

    .... ̂Product 2 - "Bayne-Jones Army Community Hospital Web Site," a strategic Internet web site for marketing health and wellness, the TRICARE medical network, the Joint Readiness Training Center Surgeon's...

  4. For British eyes only?

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rothstein, L.

    1993-01-01

    Americans are learning about the history of their own nuclear weapons program from British documents released under the 30-year rule. In January, the British government released papers related to the 1958-61 U.S.-Soviet moratorium on nuclear testing and the resumption of U.S. testing in 1962. According to Solly Zuckerman, chief scientific advisor to the British Defense Ministry at the time, the United Kingdom had not appreciated that the nuclear weapons experts of the U.S. and U.S.S.R. used the two-and-a-half-year moratorium to plan the largest program of tests these countries carried out

  5. Surgeon-performed ultrasonography.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Todsen, Tobias

    2017-11-01

    Surgeons are increasingly using ultrasonography (US) in their clinical management of patients. However, US is a very user-dependent imaging modality and proper skills of the US operator are needed to ensure quality in patient care. This thesis explores the validity evidence for assessment of competence in abdominal and head & neck ultrasonography using the Objective Structured Assessment of Ultrasound Skills (OSAUS) scale. With the use of Messick's unitary framework of validity, five sources of validity evidence were explored: test content, response processes, inter-nal structure, relations to other variables, and consequences. Research paper I examined validity evidence for the use of the OSAUS scale to assess physicians' abdominal point-of-care US competence in an experimental setting using patient cases with and without pathological conditions. The RESULTS provided validity evidence of the internal structure of the OSAUS scale and a deci-sion study predicted that four cases and two raters or five cases and one rater could ensure sufficient reliability in future test setups. The relation to other variables was supported by a signifi-cant difference in scores between US experience levels, and by a strong correlation between the OSAUS score and diagnostic accuracy. Research paper II explored the transfer of learning from formal point-of-care US training to performance on patients in a randomized controlled study. The RESULTS supported validity evi-dence regarding OSAUS scores' relation to other variables by demonstrating a significant discrimination in the progress of training-a more refined validity evidence than the relation to difference experience levels. The RESULTS showed that physicians could transfer the skills learned on an ultrasonography course to improved US performance and diagnostic accuracy on patients. However, the RESULTS also indicated that following an initial course, additional training is needed for physicians to achieve competence in US

  6. British army commisions by purchase | Usher | Scientia Militaria ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Scientia Militaria: South African Journal of Military Studies. Journal Home · ABOUT THIS JOURNAL · Advanced Search · Current Issue · Archives · Journal Home > Vol 8, No 4 (1978) >. Log in or Register to get access to full text downloads. Username, Password, Remember me, or Register · Download this PDF file. The PDF ...

  7. Russian perceptions of the Boer and British Armies: An introduction ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Scientia Militaria: South African Journal of Military Studies. Journal Home · ABOUT · Advanced Search · Current Issue · Archives · Journal Home > Vol 30, No 1 (2000) >. Log in or Register to get access to full text downloads.

  8. Society and the British Army: Implications for Fighting Spirit

    Science.gov (United States)

    2017-05-25

    equality , attitudes towards gender , sexuality, race, and class appear antiquated by today’s standards. Large numbers of the public had experienced some...Promises of Gender Equality (London: IPPR, 2013), 14-15, accessed November 27, 2016, http://www.ippr.org/files/images/media/files/publication/2013/04...following the 2016 Brexit vote indicates there is some way still to go.53 This is also the case in gender equality where, in 2016, Lanning et al. warned

  9. Russian perceptions of the Boer and British Armies: An introduction ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Republics', the Russian Military agent with the Boer forces, Lieutenant-Colonel. Romeiko-Gurko, was sent to Transvaal on 10 December .... sheet of the Cabinet and [tsar's] Estates. The sum accumulated there was as great as L 50 ..... know their real price because employ them to secure communication lines in the rear only.

  10. [Viktor Borisovich von Gyubbenet--a military physician, a surgeon and a social activist].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ishutin, O S

    2015-02-01

    The current article is dedicated to a talented surgeon, an organizer of military health care, an extraordinary personality and a public figure--Doctor of Medicine, a privy councilor Victor Borisovich von Guebbenet. A talent of von Gyubbenea as a doctor-surgeon and an organizer of the surgical help on theater of war was especially brightly shown during two big military conflicts of the beginning of the XX century--the Russo-Japanese War (1904-1905) and the First World War I (1914-1918). In the first case doctor von Gyubbenet, being a surgeon of the 3rd Siberian corps successfully manage the activity of military-medical divisions and establishments of Port Arthur garrison. In the second military conflict Victor Borisovich as a doctor and an organizer headed sanitary part of armies of the Western front and successfully directed a medical support of armies of the front since 1915 and until the end of war.

  11. "Odds and Sods": Minorities in the British Empire's Campaign for Palestine, 1916-1919

    OpenAIRE

    Saltman, Julian

    2013-01-01

    This dissertation examines the role of minority soldiers in Britain's Army during the campaign for Palestine in the First World War. It compares the experiences of two distinct, yet parallel, groups--three battalions of black, British West Indians (the British West Indies Regiment) and three battalions of Jewish soldiers (the "Jewish Legion"). Past scholarship has mostly ignored the history of these men, and what does exist has tended to conflate or subsume the specific experiences of the men...

  12. [The chief surgeon Claude Louis Sommé (1772-1855) French military physician, surgeon of Antwerp hospital].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tricot, Jean-pierre

    2015-01-01

    Claude Louis Sommé was born in Paris in 1772. After surgical studies between 1790 and 1792, he successfully embraced a military career in the armies of Napoleon at different fronts and in several hospitals. In 1806 he submitted his doctoral thesis at the Special Medical School of Strasburg, Dissertation upon Pain. The same year he presented his dismissal from he imperial armies and became chief-surgeon at the St Elisabeth hospital of Antwerp where he stayed on duty until his death in 1855. Sommé wrote a lot of medical books: surgical, anatomical and physiological. After the battle of Waterloo one third of the injured soldiers were transferred to Antwerp and were attended in his department. He also played an important role as a professor at the Primary Medical School of Antwerp. Sommé also created the botanical garden of Antwerp, close to the hospital.

  13. British-Zionist Military Cooperation in Palestine, 1917-1939

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohsen M. Saleh

    2003-12-01

    Full Text Available The essence of the British military and security formula in Palestine was the smooth establishment of the Jewish national home with minimum costs of lives and money. However, this British pro-Zionist policy created a continuous security problem, and opened the door to all possibilities of Palestinian revolts and uprisings of both national and religious nature. The British were very active in disarming the Arabs and adopted stringent measures to crush their uprisings and revolts. But, they turned a blind eye to the Jewish arms smuggling and Jewish military organizations, especially, the Hagana, which later became the backbone of the Israeli Army. During Palestinian uprisings of 1920, 1921 and 1929 against the Zionists, most of the Palestinian casualties were inflicted by the British forces despite the fact that the Palestinians avoided attacking the British. The British-Zionist cooperation reached its peak during the Palestinian revolt of 1936-1939, and took different forms, including allowing the Jews to establish a military force of twenty two thousand men under the pretext of protecting the Jewish community.

  14. Complexity and Army Transformation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Calhoun, Mark T.

    On 12 Octther 1999, the U.S. Army began a journey down a new path to innovation, when General Eric Shinseki presented his vision of Army Transformation at the 45th annual meeting of the Association of the United States Army. In this speech, General Shinseki described the Army as an organization consisting of heavy forces with excellent staying power but poor strategic responsiveness, light forces with excellent responsiveness but poor staying power, and a logistics system with an excessively large footprint. His proposed solution, a comprehensive change of the Army resulting in full-spectrum dominance and strategic responsiveness, would occur so quickly as to "be unnerving to some." [Shinseki. 1999] While this prediction has turned out in some ways to be true, it is not necessarily the speed of change that is unnerving to many of the people studying Army Transformation.

  15. Thomas Vicary, barber-surgeon.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thomas, Duncan P

    2006-05-01

    An Act of Parliament in 1540 uniting the barbers and surgeons to form the Barber-Surgeons' Company represented an important foundation stone towards better surgery in England. Thomas Vicary, who played a pivotal role in promoting this union, was a leading surgeon in London in the middle of the 16th century. While Vicary made no direct contribution to surgical knowledge, he should be remembered primarily as one who contributed much towards the early organization and teaching of surgery and to the consequent benefits that flowed from this improvement.

  16. Discovering the Army's Core Competencies

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Rudesheim, Frederick

    2001-01-01

    This paper seeks to answer the question, "Has the Army correctly identified its core competencies to ensure the Army can adequately respond to the national military strategy?" FM 1, The Army (Prototype Draft...

  17. Army Maintenance System Transformation

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Gilbertson, Frank V

    2006-01-01

    .... Used in conjunction with pertinent historical data and developed with Army transformation goals in mind, General Systems thinking can provide the framework for guiding maintenance transformation...

  18. What Is a Pediatric Heart Surgeon?

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Text Size Email Print Share What is a Pediatric Heart Surgeon? Page Content Article Body If your ... require heart surgery. What Kind of Training Do Pediatric Heart Surgeons Have? Pediatric heart surgeons are medical ...

  19. What Is a Foot and Ankle Surgeon?

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... A A | Print | Share What is a Foot & Ankle Surgeon? Foot and ankle surgeons are the surgical ... every age. What education has a foot and ankle surgeon received? After completing undergraduate education, the foot ...

  20. Indigenous peoples of the British Dominions and the First World War ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    abel

    Timothy Winegard saw active duty in the Canadian Reserve Force from. 2001 to 2010 and served on detachment duty to the British Army for a two-year period. He obtained various academic degrees from 1999 onwards, among others a. BA Hons degree in History and an MA in War Studies. The book under discussion.

  1. Chronocentrism and British criminology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rock, Paul

    2005-09-01

    Criminologists display a largely unexamined propensity to ignore writings that are more than fifteen or so years old, with evident consequences for the public presentation and validation of expert knowledge. A citation study was combined with detailed observations from British criminologists to ascertain quite how that disavowal of the past was accomplished.

  2. Love British books 2012

    OpenAIRE

    Wood, Philippa

    2012-01-01

    Armenia is celebrating the 500th anniversary of the first printed Armenian book and the declaration of Yerevan as World Book Capital 2012 by UNESCO. Within the framework of festive events, the House of Artists Union hosted the exhibition 'Love British books' otrgnaised by the RA Ministry of Culture, together with the University of Northampton (UK).

  3. Mentoring the Afghan Army at the Officer Academy in Kabul

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mynster Christensen, Maya

    Capacity building of host nation militaries is a central component of current multinational military operations, which is likely to become increasingly vital to future military interventions in conflict settings. Focusing on the mentoring of the Afghan National Army at the British-led officer...... academy in Kabul, this policy brief stresses the urgency with which Western militaries should improve military capacity building efforts. Based on qualitative data collected at the British Royal Military Academy Sandhurst and the Afghan National Army Officer Academy, the brief outlines five clusters...... of military-specific recommendations on ‘measurements of success’, ‘local ownership’, ‘mentoring’, ‘coalition cultures’ and ‘Afghan values and visions’, which may be helpful in generating sustainable security solutions in Afghanistan and beyond....

  4. Dr John Thomson (1847-1909). Pioneer surgeon, military surgeon and a founder of St John Ambulance in Australia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pearn, J; Wales, M

    Surgeon John Thomson (1847-1909), a Scot who made his life's work in Queensland, was a pioneer surgeon, radiologist and bacteriologist, and one of the founders of the St John Ambulance movement in Australia and the Railway Ambulance Corps. He was variously President of the British Medical Association (Queensland Branch), the Medical Board of Queensland, the Medico-Ethical Association, and the Intercolonial Medical Congress, which was held in Brisbane in 1899. A pioneer military surgeon in this country, he was the foundation Principal Medical Officer (as Surgeon-Major) of the Queensland Ambulance Corps within the Queensland Defence Force. His advocacy for a university north of Sydney was one of the factors which led to the foundation of the University of Queensland, a body which honoured him by the establishment of the John Thomson Lectureship, which for half a century was its most prestigious public oration. The life and times of this singular doctor exemplify one small class of pre-Federation medical pioneers whose professional outreach established a number of voluntary organisations which have blossomed in Australian society to the present day.

  5. A Case Study: The Effects of the British Army against the Irish Republican Army

    Science.gov (United States)

    1989-09-01

    the northeast coast of the Republic of Ireland near the town of Mullaghmore (13:28; 57:30). Although Mullaghmore is in the Republic ef Ireland, it is...Ireland’s Endless Strife," -U. S. New "s and-ri. World RePort, 7j: 41-2 (July 3 1, .1972) 2. Aadc-rson, Harry, Tony Clif ton and Donna Foote. "’The Iron

  6. Army Logistician. Volume 38, Issue 4, July-August 2006

    Science.gov (United States)

    2006-08-01

    stockage list and nonstockage list items. The SSA routing identifier code was not on the Standard Army Retail Supply System (SARSS) search matrix, so...A “BTU” is a “British thermal unit” and equals the amount of heat required to raise the temperature of 1 pound of water by 1 degree Fahren- heit...wool to aramid will increase comfort while maintaining the thermal protection provided by 100-percent aramid fabric. The blend will also cost

  7. Limiting Regret: Building the Army We Will Need

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-08-18

    Assistant Secretary of the Army for Financial Management & Comptroller, 2015 Washington-ASMC National Capital Region PDI, Honorable Robert M. Speer, 3...the 1st Marine Division and the British 1st (UK) Armoured Division – which would imply a lower support-to-division ratio. On the other hand, the...missions like WMD consequence management and other homeland defense missions. Comparing the Demand and Supply of Ground Forces The total ground

  8. A quantification of the physiological demands of the army emergency responder in the Australian army.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tofari, Paul J; Laing Treloar, Alison K; Silk, Aaron J

    2013-05-01

    The Australian Defence Force is reviewing the physical demands of all employment categories in the Australian Army to establish valid and legally defensible assessments. The current assessments, performed in physical training attire, are not specific to job demands. Moreover, the fitness standards decrease based on age and are lower for females, and as job requirements are constant, these assessments are counterintuitive. With regard to the Army Emergency Responder employment category, tasks of physical demand in the present study were selected through consultation with subject-matter experts. Participants consisted of 10 qualified Army Emergency Responder soldiers and three noncareer firefighters under instruction. Real-life firefighting scenarios were witnessed by researchers and helped form task simulations allowing measurement of heart rate and oxygen consumption. Peak oxygen consumption ranged from 21.8 ± 3.8 to 40.0 ± 3.4 mL kg(-1) min(-1) during cutting activities and a search and rescue task, respectively, representing values similar to or higher than the current entry standards. Manual handling tasks were also assessed, with the heaviest measured being two soldiers lifting a 37.7-kg Utility Trunk to 150 cm. The findings provide a quantitative assessment of the physiological demands of Army Emergency Responders, and highlight the need for change in current fitness assessments. Reprint & Copyright © 2013 Association of Military Surgeons of the U.S.

  9. Do plastic surgeons have cosmetic surgery?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gurunluoglu, Raffi; Gurunluoglu, Aslin

    2009-12-01

    Thoughts and attitudes of plastic surgeons about having cosmetic surgery on themselves remain obscure for the most part and pose an attractive subject to study. A survey was distributed to a random sample of 2635 American Society of Plastic Surgeons member and candidate member surgeons to determine plastic surgeons' interest in both minimally invasive cosmetic procedures and cosmetic surgical procedures, selection of facility type, selection of surgeon, and their satisfaction level. There were 276 responses. Sixty-two percent of the plastic surgeons had undergone at least one type of minimally invasive cosmetic procedure. Female plastic surgeons had significantly more minimally invasive cosmetic procedures compared with male plastic surgeons (84.9 versus 57 percent; p cosmetic surgery. The most common cosmetic surgical procedure was liposuction of the trunk and/or extremity (18.6 percent). Male plastic surgeons were more likely to have a procedure than men in the general population, and female plastic surgeons were less likely to have breast augmentation than the general population. The percentage of operations conducted by a plastic surgeon was 88.2 percent. The percentage performed by a nationally known surgeon was 45.3 percent; 75.9 percent of plastic surgeons selected a surgeon who was certified by the American Board of Plastic Surgery. The satisfaction rate was 90 percent. The survey provides insight on the stance of American Society of Plastic Surgeons member and candidate member surgeons on the subject. To the authors' knowledge, this is the first survey designed for this purpose.

  10. British Museum paintings

    OpenAIRE

    Edmonds, Frances

    2011-01-01

    Frances Edmonds is one of a group of artists selected for the show ‘Territories’ taking place at Galerie Windkracht 13 in Den Helder, Holland this July 2012. This exhibition is curated by Sharon Beavan and Gethin Evans. The artists represented work across the boundaries of two and three-dimensional and time based form. The brief – to interrogate and explore the notion of territories. Frances will be showing several paintings from the British Museum series, based on imagery collected ...

  11. Surgeons' perceptions on industry relations: A survey of 822 surgeons.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Altieri, Maria S; Yang, Jie; Wang, Lily; Yin, Donglei; Talamini, Mark; Pryor, Aurora D

    2017-07-01

    The relationships between industry and medical professionals are controversial. The purpose of our study was to evaluate surgeons' current opinions regarding the industry-surgery partnership, in addition to self-reported industry ties. After institutional review board approval, a survey was sent via RedCap to 3,782 surgeons across the United States. Univariate and multivariable regression analyses were performed to evaluate the responses. The response rate was 23%. From the 822 responders, 226 (27%) reported at least one current relationship with industry, while 297 (36.1%) had at least one such relationship within the past 3 years. There was no difference between general surgery versus other surgical specialties (P = .5). Among the general surgery subspecialties, respondents in minimally invasive surgery/foregut had greater ties to industry compared to other subspecialties (P = .001). In addition, midcareer surgeons, male sex, and being on a reviewer/editorial board were associated with having industry ties (P industry are important for innovation. Our study showed that relationships between surgeons and industry are common, because more than a quarter of our responders reported at least one current relationship. Industry relations are perceived as necessary for operative innovation. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  12. Highlights in the History of U.S. Army Dentistry

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-01-01

    oriented care for Soldiers over twenty-five. The emphasis in this age group was prevention of periodontal disease. In October 1974 the two phases of the...AOHMP were combined into a single program with no age-specific distinction in treatment goals. 1 December 1971 COL Edwin H. Smith, Jr., was...Army Surgeon General’s ad hoc committee on dental services, General Bhaskar set about planning and implementing the Installation Dental Service

  13. Army flight medic performance of paramedic level procedures: indicated vs. performed.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bier, Scott A; Hermstad, Erik; Trollman, Christopher; Holt, Melinda

    2013-05-01

    There is great disparity in the education, experience, and staffing requirements for civilian and Army aeromedical transports (AMT). This study sought to determine if medical skills beyond the standard training for Army flight medics were indicated and being performed on Army AMT missions. As a secondary measure, the percentage of indicated interventions performed by basic Emergency Medical Technician (EMT-B) and paramedic (EMT-P) flight medics were compared. This was a retrospective review of Army AMT charts including patients transported by an EMT-B-staffed unit in Iraq and an EMT-P-staffed unit in Afghanistan from July 2008 to June 2009. Charts were reviewed independently by two Emergency Medicine board-certified Army flight surgeons. Of 984 interventions found to be indicated on the 406 charts that met inclusion criteria, 36% were rated as EMT-P level. Seventeen percent were indicated but not performed. EMT-Bs failed to perform indicated procedures 35% of the time vs. 3% in the EMT-P group (p Army flight medic training being required for Army AMT missions. It seems that when advance interventions are indicated, those trained to the EMT-P level perform them significantly more often than those trained to Army standard. Based on the findings of this study, the authors suggest the Army consider adopting the standards required for civilian AMT. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  14. The Army Selected Reserve Dental Readiness System: overview, assessment, and recommendations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Honey, James R

    2013-06-01

    The Army Selected Reserve Dental Readiness System (ASDRS) is a key dental program directed by the Assistant Secretary of the Army (Manpower & Reserve Affairs) starting in fiscal year 09. The Army National Guard and Army Reserve have steadily implemented ASDRS over the past 3 years as a means to improve the historically abysmal dental readiness of the Army Reserve Component (RC). Dental readiness is essential for sustaining an Army RC Operational Force. ASDRS is a tool for RC commanders to provide contract dental readiness care in support of over 558 thousand nonmobilized Selected Reserve Citizen-Soldiers dispersed throughout the 54 states and U.S. territories, at home station before alert, and if necessary after alert (throughout the Army force generation cycle). This article examines the status of ASDRS implementation, assesses its effectiveness in improving Army RC Dental Readiness, and provides Army leadership recommendations regarding the following focus areas: (1) command emphasis, (2) program execution, and (3) synergy with the Military Health System and Department of Veterans Affairs. Reprint & Copyright © 2013 Association of Military Surgeons of the U.S.

  15. Mapping discussion of canine obesity between veterinary surgeons and dog owners: a provisional study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cairns-Haylor, Theodora; Fordyce, Peter

    2017-02-11

    This study maps communication between veterinary surgeons and dog owners on obesity management in four first-opinion practices in the UK. A total of 74 dog owners who met the study's inclusion criteria and 24 veterinary surgeons were interviewed using oral questionnaires between November 2013 and May 2014. The dog owner questionnaire was based on potential discussion areas that could influence an owner's intention to act (initiate a weight loss regime) based on Ajzen's Theory of Planned Behaviour. The veterinary surgeons' questionnaires assessed perception of canine obesity, their personal communication strategies and current practice-level interventions. The findings identify opportunities for more proactive approaches to obesity management by veterinary surgeons and their practices. British Veterinary Association.

  16. Kant and the cosmetic surgeon.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carey, J S

    1989-07-01

    Philosophers know that modern philosophy owes a great debt to the intellectual contributions of the 18th century philosopher Immanuel Kant. This essay attempts to show how cosmetic surgeons, and all surgeons at that, could learn much from his work. Not only did Kant write about the structure of human reasoning and how it relates to appearances but he also wrote about the nature of duties and other obligations. His work has strongly influenced medical ethics. In a more particular way, Kant wrote the most important work on aesthetics. His theory still influences how philosophers understand the meaning of the beautiful and how it pertains to the human figure. This essay presents an exercise in trying to apply Kantian philosophy to aesthetic plastic surgery. Its intention is to show cosmetic surgeons some of the implicit and explicit philosophical principles and potential arguments undergirding their potential surgical evaluations. It is meant to challenge the surgeon to reconsider how decisions are made using philosophical reasoning instead of some of the more usual justifications based on psychology or sociology.

  17. Toward Army Maneuver Transformation

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    O'Brien, Charles B

    2006-01-01

    ..., can be satisfied to form the nucleus of land domain Force Application formations. This branch will be responsive to the needs of the joint force in Unified Action by adjusting the institutional inputs to force development of Army Maneuver Forces...

  18. Army Public Service Advertising.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1982-12-01

    publicists who are ever searching for economical forums through which to communicate Army viewpoints. The majority of interview and information programs...Guard to obtain public service time on stations which normally 48 reject regular Army requests. There is evidence that National Guard publicists have... Audiovisual Agency at Norton Air Force Base where it is dubbed on a C-type audio cassette and mailed directly to eighty-four radio stations. The cost of

  19. Irish Sea: British radioactivity

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Collins, Aongus

    1985-01-01

    British Nuclear Fuels Ltd. (BNFL) have recently taken the decision to invest several hundred million pounds in reducing the discharges from the Sellafield reprocessing plant into the Irish Sea. This report outlines the history of the plant and its operation up to the present day and its plans for the future. The attitude of the Irish regulatory authorities and of the public to the radioactive discharges is presented and the incidence of Downs Syndrome and certain specific cancer types on both sides of the Irish Sea is discussed

  20. The Institutional Army, FY1975-FY2002

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Brinkerhoff, John

    2002-01-01

    This report examines the Army's mission and functions to determine a useful way to report and analyze the Institutional Army-that part of the Army that supports the Title 10 responsibilities of the Army...

  1. Index to Army Times 1992.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1993-02-01

    shortages. Army Times; June 1, 1992; 52("): p. 22. CHEMICAL WARFARE--CLOTHING Overprotective . Army Times; July 27, 1992; 52(53): p. 49. CHEMICAL WARFARE...Army Times; Nov. 30, 1992; 53(18): p. 26. CHILD ABUSE Allowance would help keep victimized families afloat. Army Times; May 18, 1992; 52(42): p. 11... CHILD ABUSE--COMPENSATION Benefits for abuse victims OK’d. Army Times; Oct. 19, 1992; 53(12): p. 26. CHILD ABUSE--GERMANY Germany: More child abuse? Army

  2. Revolting Soldiers: The Origins of Education in the Armies of the Empire in World War I.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boshier, Roger

    1985-01-01

    Explores the circumstances surrounding the creation of education schemes in the armies of the British Empire. Discusses attitudes toward war and toward the soldier's role in the early 1900s, attitudes of the soldiers toward war, the University of Vimy Ridge, the Canadian Khaki University, the Oatlands program, and education for the New Zealand…

  3. Army aeromedical crash rates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    De Lorenzo, R A; Freid, R L; Villarin, A R

    1999-02-01

    Safety is a principal concern for everyone in aviation, including those in military and civilian aeromedical programs. The U.S. Army flies thousands of helicopter missions each year, including many aeromedical flights. The comparison between Army general and aeromedical aviation crash data provides a benchmark for establishing patterns in aeromedical safety and may be useful for similar programs examining safety profiles. To determine the crash rates of Army aeromedical rotary-wing (helicopter) programs and compare them with crash rates in Army general aviation. Retrospective review of safety data from 1987 to 1995. Crashes or mishaps are categorized into three classes: A, B, and C. Class A reflects the most serious mishap and involves loss of life or aircraft destruction, whereas classes B and C represent lesser but still significant mishaps. Crash rates are compared on a year-by-year basis and are reported as events per 100,000 flight hours. Statistical analysis was performed by the z test with Yates' correction, with significance set at p crash rate was 1.86 compared with the aeromedical rate of 2.02. The mean general class A to C crash rate was 7.37 compared with the aeromedical rate of 7.44. Between 1992 and 1995, there were 3 years when the Army aeromedical program suffered no class A mishaps. Differences between study groups are statistically significant, but they are interpreted conservatively given the very low incidence of mishaps in both groups. Both rates are comparable with published civilian mishap rates. There is a very low overall incidence of crashes in both groups. There may be no practical difference between Army general and aeromedical aviation mishap rates. Furthermore, Army crash rates are comparable with published civilian mishap rates.

  4. Musculoskeletal Pain in Gynecologic Surgeons

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adams, Sonia R.; Hacker, Michele R.; McKinney, Jessica L.; Elkadry, Eman A.; Rosenblatt, Peter L.

    2013-01-01

    Objective To describe the prevalence of musculoskeletal pain and symptoms in gynecologic surgeons. Design Prospective cross-sectional survey study (Canadian Task Force classification II-2). Setting Virtual. All study participants were contacted and participated via electronic means. Participants Gynecologic surgeons. Interventions An anonymous, web-based survey was distributed to gynecologic surgeons via electronic newsletters and direct E-mail. Measurements and Main Results There were 495 respondents with complete data. When respondents were queried about their musculoskeletal symptoms in the past 12 months, they reported a high prevalence of lower back (75.6%) and neck (72.9%) pain and a slightly lower prevalence of shoulder (66.6%), upper back (61.6%), and wrist/hand (60.9%) pain. Many respondents believed that performing surgery caused or worsened the pain, ranging from 76.3% to 82.7% in these five anatomic regions. Women are at an approximately twofold risk of pain, with adjusted odds ratios (OR) of 1.88 (95% confidence interval [CI], 1.1–3.2; p 5 .02) in the lower back region, OR 2.6 (95% CI, 1.4–4.8; p 5 .002) in the upper back, and OR 2.9 (95% CI, 1.8–4.6; p 5 .001) in the wrist/hand region. Conclusion Musculoskeletal symptoms are highly prevalent among gynecologic surgeons. Female sex is associated with approximately twofold risk of reported pain in commonly assessed anatomic regions. Journal of Minimally Invasive Gynecology (2013) 20, 656-660 PMID:23796512

  5. Social media and the surgeon.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Margolin, David A

    2013-03-01

    As the Internet has matured, social media has developed and become a part of our everyday life. Whether it is Facebook, YouTube, or LinkedIn, we now communicate with each other and the world in a very different manner. As physicians, and specifically colon and rectal surgeons, it is important that we understand this new technology, learn its limitations, and utilize it to foster growth of our practice, trade, and potentially result in better patient care.

  6. Hand dominance in orthopaedic surgeons.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Lui, Darren F

    2012-08-01

    Handedness is perhaps the most studied human asymmetry. Laterality is the preference shown for one side and it has been studied in many aspects of medicine. Studies have shown that some orthopaedic procedures had poorer outcomes and identified laterality as a contributing factor. We developed a questionnaire to assess laterality in orthopaedic surgery and compared this to an established scoring system. Sixty-two orthopaedic surgeons surveyed with the validated Waterloo Handedness Questionnaire (WHQ) were compared with the self developed Orthopaedic Handedness Questionnaire (OHQ). Fifty-eight were found to be right hand dominant (RHD) and 4 left hand dominant (LHD). In RHD surgeons, the average WHQ score was 44.9% and OHQ 15%. For LHD surgeons the WHQ score was 30.2% and OHQ 9.4%. This represents a significant amount of time using the non dominant hand but does not necessarily determine satisfactory or successful dexterity transferable to the operating room. Training may be required for the non dominant side.

  7. [Improving the surgeon's image: introduction].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tajima, Tomoo

    2004-05-01

    The number of medical students who aspire to become surgeons has been decreasing in recent years. With a vicious spiral in the decreasing number and the growing deterioration of surgeons' working conditions, there is fear of deterioration of surgical care and subsequent disintegration of overall health care in Japan. The purpose of this issue is to devise a strategy for improving surgeons' image and their working conditions to attract future medical students. However, we cannot expect a quick cure for the problem of the decreasing number of applicants for surgery since this issue is deeply related to many fundamental problems in the health care system in Japan. The challenge for surgical educators in coming years will be to solve the problem of chronic sleep deprivation and overwork of surgery residents and to develop an efficient program to meet the critical educational needs of surgical residents. To solve this problem it is necessary to ensure well-motivated surgical residents and to develop an integrated research program. No discussion of these issues would be complete without attention to the allocation of scarce medical resources, especially in relation to financial incentives for young surgeons. The authors, who are conscientious representatives of this society, would like to highlight these critical problems and issues that are particularly relevant to our modern surgical practice, and it is our sincere hope that all members of this society fully recognize these critical issues in the Japanese health care system to take leadership in improving the system. With the demonstration of withholding unnecessary medical conducts we may be able to initiate a renewal of the system and eventually to fulfill our dreams of Japan becoming a nation that can attract many patients from all over the world. Furthermore, verification of discipline with quality control and effective surgical treatment is needed to avoid criticism by other disciplines for being a self

  8. Transformation of the Romanian Army

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Rus, Cristian

    2006-01-01

    .... By employing the Army Force Management and the Universal Joint Task List the study examines the development of the Romanian Army's current and programmed capabilities and identifies capability gaps...

  9. The Army's Occupational Analysis Program

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    1996-01-01

    .... The OA Program is to be the Army's center of excellence for job analysis and design. The program is in a transition period, adapting its procedures and methods to meet the needs of today's fast-paced Army...

  10. Conference Proceedings: Photography and Britishness

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sean Willcock

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available The video-recordings presented here were made at the conference Photography and Britishness, held at the Yale Center for British Art on November 4 – 5, 2016. The conference was the result of a collaboration between the Yale Center for British Art, New Haven, the Paul Mellon Centre for Studies in British Art, London, and the Huntington Library, Art Collections, and Botanical Gardens in San Marino—three research institutions that have a converging interest in British art. The conference sought to investigate the various ways in which notions of “Britishness” have been communicated, inflected, and contested through the photographic image. It was not a conference about the history of photography in Britain, or about British photography. Rather, it sought to consider the nature of the relationship between photography and Britishness: the notion that photography can capture images of Britishness, at the same time that our sense of what Britishness constitutes is produced by the photographic image. A key question for the conference was whether Britishness can have a photographic referent—or whether it is itself an effect of representation. Speakers at the conference approached these questions from a wide range of perspectives and focusing on a diverse number of photographic materials—from family albums and studio portraits to advertisements, reportage, and aerial photography—which demonstrated the complexities and instabilities not only of the term Britishness, but also of the medium of photography. The conference was opened with an introduction by John Tagg. The videos included here are presented in the order they were delivered.

  11. 21 CFR 878.4460 - Surgeon's glove.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Surgeon's glove. 878.4460 Section 878.4460 Food... DEVICES GENERAL AND PLASTIC SURGERY DEVICES Surgical Devices § 878.4460 Surgeon's glove. (a) Identification. A surgeon's glove is a device made of natural or synthetic rubber intended to be worn by...

  12. ARE LEFT HANDED SURGEONS LEFT OUT?

    OpenAIRE

    SriKamkshi Kothandaraman; Balasubramanian Thiagarajan

    2012-01-01

    Being a left-handed surgeon, more specifically a left-handed ENT surgeon, presents a unique pattern of difficulties.This article is an overview of left-handedness and a personal account of the specific difficulties a left-handed ENT surgeon faces.

  13. The Nonwhite Woman Surgeon: A Rare Species.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frohman, Heather A; Nguyen, Thu-Hoai C; Co, Franka; Rosemurgy, Alexander S; Ross, Sharona B

    2015-01-01

    As of 2012, 39% of medical student graduates were nonwhite, yet very few nonwhite women graduates chose to become surgeons. To better understand issues regarding nonwhite women in surgery, an online survey was sent to surgeons across the United States. Results are based on self-reported data. Mean data are reported. A total of 194 surgeons (42% women) completed the survey; only 12% of responders were nonwhite. Overall, 56% of nonwhite women felt they earned less than what men surgeons earn for equal work. Nonwhite women surgeons earned less than what men surgeons ($224,000 vs. 351,000, p < 0.00002) and white women surgeons ($285,000, p = 0.02) earned. Overall, 96% of nonwhite surgeons believed that racial discrimination currently exists among surgeons. The few nonwhite women surgeons in the United States recognize that they are paid significantly less than what other surgeons are paid. Inequitable remuneration and a discriminatory work environment encountered by nonwhite women surgeons must be addressed. Copyright © 2015 Association of Program Directors in Surgery. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  14. Index to Army Times 1989

    Science.gov (United States)

    1992-08-01

    COMPETITIONS Those winning Golden Knights. Army Times; Sept. 4, 1989; 50(4): p. 2. GOVERNMENT RENTAL HOUSING PROGRAM ( GRHP ) New housing scheme. Army...Army Times; Apr. 3, 1989; 49(34): p. 17. GRHP SEE GOVERNMENT RENTAL HOUSING PROGRAM ( GRHP ) GUIDED MISSILES Countries try to keep Leaks from going

  15. [Hospitals and surgeons: Madrid 1940].

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Quevedo, Francisco Vázquez

    2007-01-01

    The history of the hospitals and general surgeons that best represent the centres in Madrid are here in reviewed, comprising the period between 1940 and the closure of the Hospital Clinico (1957) as well as the Hospital General (General Hospital) (1967), both in Atocha. Other hospitals which are reviewed and highlighted are: the H. de la Princesa (the Princess Hospital), the H. del Nifio Jesus (Hospital of the Child Jesus), the H. Militar (Military Hospital) and the Cruz Roja (Red Cross). Data is provided on the permanent surgeons in the following centres: H. General: J. Goyanes, J. Die, J. de la Villa, T. Rodriguez, E. Diaz, G. Bueno e H. Huerta; H. Clinico: L. de la Peña, L. Cardenal, L. Olivares, R. Argüelles, J. Estella y M. F. Zumel; H. Militar: M. G. Ulla, M. Bastos, M. G. Durán, J. S. Galindo, y A. G. Durán; Hospital de la Cruz Roja: V. M. Noguera, L. Serrada, F. Luque y L. L. Durán; H. de la Princesa: P. Cifuentes, P. G. Duarte, L. Estella y R. Aiguabella; H. del Niño Jesús: J. Garrido Lestache; H. Clinico, last time, Atocha: F. M. Lagos, R. Vara y A. de la Fuente.

  16. Army Sustainability Report 2010

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-09-01

    Antonio. The buffer objectives are to protect endangered species, primarily the Golden Cheeked Warbler , through off-site mitigation, and to acquire...water projects, including solar powered and standalone water filtration systems. In 2009, the Army worked with East African Community partner nations

  17. 1998 Army Modernization Plan

    Science.gov (United States)

    1998-01-01

    System (APKWS) guided munition (to complement the Hydra -70 family of rockets and supplement HELLFIRE) to provide a lower cost, more capable means of...and confirmation of biological and chemical warfare agents and toxins . Veterinary Services The Army Veterinary Corps is the DoD executive agent for

  18. Developing the Army Pentathlete

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    McElroy, Kevin

    2007-01-01

    .... How will they do it, and where will they find the personnel to fill the job?. The Army is forced to deal with insurgency in Iraq, a type of engagement they have not dedicated training to since the end of Vietnam...

  19. British Nuclear Fuels (Warrington)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hoyle, D.; Cryer, B.; Bellotti, D.

    1992-01-01

    This adjournment debate is about British Nuclear Fuels plc and the 750 redundancies due to take place by the mid-1990s at BNFL, Risley. The debate was instigated by the Member of Parliament for Warrington, the constituency in which BNFL, Risley is situated. Other members pointed out that other industries, such as the textile industry are also suffering job losses due to the recession. However the MP for Warrington argued that the recent restructuring of BNFL restricted the financial flexibility of BNFL so that the benefits of contracts won for THORP at Sellafield could not help BNFL, Risley. The debate became more generally about training, apprentices and employment opportunities. The Parliamentary Under-Secretary of State for Energy explained the position as he saw it and said BNFL may be able to offer more help to its apprentices. Long- term employment prospects at BNFL are dependent on the future of the nuclear industry in general. The debate lasted about half an hour and is reported verbatim. (U.K)

  20. 1970 British Cohort Study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Matt Brown

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available The 1970 British Cohort Study (BCS70 is one of Britain’s world famous national longitudinal birth cohort studies, three of which are run by the Centre for Longitudinal Studies at the Institute of Education, University of London.  BCS70 follows the lives of more than 17,000 people born in England, Scotland and Wales in a single week of 1970. Over the course of cohort members lives, the BCS70 has collected information on health, physical, educational and social development, and economic circumstances among other factors. Since the birth survey in 1970, there have been nine ‘sweeps’ of all cohort members at ages 5, 10, 16, 26, 30, 34, 38 and most recently at 42. Data has been collected from a number of different sources (the midwife present at birth, parents of the cohort members, head and class teachers, school health service personnel and the cohort members themselves. The data has been collected in a variety of ways including via paper and electronic questionnaires, clinical records, medical examinations, physical measurements, tests of ability, educational assessments and diaries. The majority of BCS70 survey data can be accessed by bona fide researchers through the UK Data Service at the University of Essex.

  1. War of the British Worlds

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mercau, Ezequiel

    2016-01-01

    The 1982 Falklands War was shrouded in symbolism, bringing to the fore divergent conceptions of Britishness, kinship, and belonging. This article casts light on the persistent purchase of the idea of Greater Britain long after the end of empire, addressing a case that would normally be deemed...... outside its spatial and temporal boundaries. By highlighting the inherent contradictions of this transnational bond, the South Atlantic conflict had a profound effect on an underexposed British community with a lingering attachment to a “British world”: the Anglo-Argentines. As they found themselves...... wedged between two irreconcilable identities, divisions threatened to derail this already enfeebled grouping. Yet leaders of the community, presuming a common Britishness with the Falkland Islanders and Britons in the United Kingdom, sought to intervene in the conflict by reaching out to both...

  2. What is in a name? Oral and maxillofacial surgeon versus oral surgeon.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guerrero, Andre V; Altamirano, Alessandra; Brown, Eric; Shin, Christina J; Tajik, Katayoun; Fu, Emily; Dean, Jeffrey; Herford, Alan

    2014-01-01

    In 1975, the American Society of Oral Surgeons officially changed its name to the American Association of Oral and Maxillofacial Surgeons. This change was intended to address the specialty's expanding surgical scope. However, today, many health care professionals continue to use the term oral surgeon. This study was undertaken to determine if students' perception of the oral and maxillofacial surgeon's (OMS) surgical scope would change when oral and maxillofacial surgeon was used instead of oral surgeon. This cross-sectional study surveyed undergraduate and dental students' choice of specialist to treat 21 different conditions. The independent variable was the specialty term (oral and maxillofacial surgeon vs oral surgeon). The dependent variables were specialists chosen for the procedure (ear, nose, and throat surgeon; plastic surgeon; OMS or oral surgeon; periodontist; other). The test of proportions (z test) with the Yates correction was performed for data analysis. Of the 280 senior dental students who were surveyed, 258 surveys were included in the study. Dental students' perception of the OMS's surgical scope increased significantly from 51% to 55% when oral and maxillofacial surgeon was used instead of oral surgeon. Of the 530 undergraduate upper division science students who were surveyed, 488 surveys were included in the study. Undergraduate upper division science students' perception of the OMS's surgical scope increased significantly from 23% to 31% when oral and maxillofacial surgeon was used as an option instead of oral surgeon. The use of oral and maxillofacial surgeon increased students' perception of the OMS's surgical scope. This study also suggested that students were not fully aware of the magnitude of the OMS's scope of practice. The current dichotomy and inconsistent use of the specialty's official term adds to the confusion and to misunderstanding. Therefore, OMSs should universally refer to themselves as oral and maxillofacial surgeons and

  3. Army Programs: Army Finance and Accounting Quality Assurance Program

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    1988-01-01

    This regulation discusses the primary responsibilities of commanders and staff officers at installation and higher levels for execution of the Army Finance and Accounting Quality Assurance (QA) Program...

  4. Do Orthopaedic Surgeons Acknowledge Uncertainty?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Teunis, Teun; Janssen, Stein; Guitton, Thierry G; Ring, David; Parisien, Robert

    2016-06-01

    Much of the decision-making in orthopaedics rests on uncertain evidence. Uncertainty is therefore part of our normal daily practice, and yet physician uncertainty regarding treatment could diminish patients' health. It is not known if physician uncertainty is a function of the evidence alone or if other factors are involved. With added experience, uncertainty could be expected to diminish, but perhaps more influential are things like physician confidence, belief in the veracity of what is published, and even one's religious beliefs. In addition, it is plausible that the kind of practice a physician works in can affect the experience of uncertainty. Practicing physicians may not be immediately aware of these effects on how uncertainty is experienced in their clinical decision-making. We asked: (1) Does uncertainty and overconfidence bias decrease with years of practice? (2) What sociodemographic factors are independently associated with less recognition of uncertainty, in particular belief in God or other deity or deities, and how is atheism associated with recognition of uncertainty? (3) Do confidence bias (confidence that one's skill is greater than it actually is), degree of trust in the orthopaedic evidence, and degree of statistical sophistication correlate independently with recognition of uncertainty? We created a survey to establish an overall recognition of uncertainty score (four questions), trust in the orthopaedic evidence base (four questions), confidence bias (three questions), and statistical understanding (six questions). Seven hundred six members of the Science of Variation Group, a collaboration that aims to study variation in the definition and treatment of human illness, were approached to complete our survey. This group represents mainly orthopaedic surgeons specializing in trauma or hand and wrist surgery, practicing in Europe and North America, of whom the majority is involved in teaching. Approximately half of the group has more than 10 years

  5. Army Efficiency Initiatives

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-04-28

    Service College Fellows. The views expressed in this student academic research paper are those of the author and do not reflect the official policy...this student academic research paper are those of the author and do not reflect the official policy or position of the Department of the Army...for procrastination . Nothing worries rational human beings more than the great unknown or even an element of uncertainty regarding the future. To

  6. Army Equipment Modernization Plan

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-01-01

    Vehicle (LEMV). Provides sustainment to LEMV Airship 1 operations achieving Initial Operating Capability and fully mission capable status in OEF and...builds additional airships and configurable ISR / communications payloads. • Funded $163M in FY12 for 350 of the Gen3 Electronic Control Units for...Intelligence Package High Altitude Long Endurance ( airship ) High Band COMINT Table of Contents 59 www.g8.army.mil HBCT HCCC HEMTT HEMTT-LHS HET HF HIIDE

  7. Irish (Republic) versus British (North West) orthopaedic trainees: what are the differences?

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Banks, L N

    2012-02-01

    British Trainees have gradually had their working week curtained over the last 8 years. The Republic of Ireland Trainees have not been subjected to the European Working Time Directive prior to 2009 and have therefore worked on average, more hours than their British counterparts. We wanted to see if the differing schemes had an impact on recruiting and training orthopaedic surgeons. We surveyed Republic of Ireland orthopaedic specialist registrars (SpRs) and North West (NW) British SpRs\\/specialist trainees (ST3 and above) to see if there were any discernable differences in working patterns and subsequent training exposure. A standard proforma was given to Irish Trainees and to NW SpRs\\/STs at their National or regional teaching (January\\/February 2009). 62% of Irish and 47% of British NW Trainees responded. Irish trainees were more likely to have obtained a post-graduate degree (p = 0.03). The Irish worked more hours per week (p < 0.001) doing more trauma operative lists (p = 0.003) and more total cases per 6 months than the NW British (p = 0.003). This study suggests that more hours worked, equals more operative exposure, without detriment to the academic side of training. Obviously it is not possible to say whether fewer operations make for a poorer surgeon, but the evidence suggests that it may be true.

  8. The Army Profession: A Narrative

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-05-23

    profile cases of alleged misconduct” were symptomatic of “a much larger issue affecting the armed forces.”9 In the Associated Press, Lolita Baldor ...of-misconduct-among-high-level-military-leaders?lite (accessed January 02, 2013). 10Lolita C. Baldor , "US Army Brigadier General Jeffrey Sinclair to...Science: An Academic Discipline." Army Magazine, no. 5 (May 2005): 14-15. Baldor , Lolita C. and Michael Biesecker. "US Army Brigadier General

  9. Burnout and career satisfaction among American surgeons.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shanafelt, Tait D; Balch, Charles M; Bechamps, Gerald J; Russell, Thomas; Dyrbye, Lotte; Satele, Daniel; Collicott, Paul; Novotny, Paul J; Sloan, Jeff; Freischlag, Julie A

    2009-09-01

    To determine the incidence of burnout among American surgeons and evaluate personal and professional characteristics associated with surgeon burnout. : Burnout is a syndrome of emotional exhaustion and depersonalization that leads to decreased effectiveness at work. A limited amount of information exists about the relationship between specific demographic and practice characteristics with burnout among American surgeons. Members of the American College of Surgeons (ACS) were sent an anonymous, cross-sectional survey in June 2008. The survey evaluated demographic variables, practice characteristics, career satisfaction, burnout, and quality of life (QOL). Burnout and QOL were measured using validated instruments. Of the approximately 24,922 surgeons sampled, 7905 (32%) returned surveys. Responders had been in practice 18 years, worked 60 hours per week, and were on call 2 nights/wk (median values). Overall, 40% of responding surgeons were burned out, 30% screened positive for symptoms of depression, and 28% had a mental QOL score >1/2 standard deviation below the population norm. Factors independently associated with burnout included younger age, having children, area of specialization, number of nights on call per week, hours worked per week, and having compensation determined entirely based on billing. Only 36% of surgeons felt their work schedule left enough time for personal/family life and only 51% would recommend their children pursue a career as a physician/surgeon. Burnout is common among American surgeons and is the single greatest predictor of surgeons' satisfaction with career and specialty choice. Additional research is needed to identify individual, organizational, and societal interventions that preserve and promote the mental health of American surgeons.

  10. Index to Army Times, 1993

    Science.gov (United States)

    1994-02-01

    13): p. 37. AH-64 (HELICOPTER)--COCKPIT CANOPY Plastic covers to shield Apaches. Army Times; Aug. 16, 1993; 54(3): p. 35. AH-64 (HELICOPTER...prepares for radical surgery . Army Times; Jan. 4, 1993; 53(23): p. 26. Reform could sound death knell for CHAMPUS. Army Times; Aug. 2, 1993; 54(1): p...p. 6. FEDERAL TORT CLAIMS ACT Court upholds malpractice ban. Army Times; Mar. 8, 1993; 53(32): p. 17. FERES DOCTRINE Court upholds malpractice ban

  11. Index to Army Times 1988

    Science.gov (United States)

    1992-08-01

    p. 7. Teams will strike at child abuse problems . Army Times; Mar. 21, 1988; 48(31): p. 27. CHILD CARE CENTERS SEE DAY CARE CENTERS CHILD MOLESTING ...COMPUTER PROGRAM LANGUAGE) Ada works well in hellfire tests. Army Times; Ju 6󈨜 48(43): p. 34. ADATS SEE AIR DEFENSE ANTITANK SYSTEM (ADATS) O3 ADOPT ...A-SCHOOL PROGRAM Adopt -a-school. Army Times; May 9, 1988; 48(39): p. 27. ADOPTION AID PROGRAM Adoption reimbursement under way. Army Times; Aug. 8

  12. What Name Best Represents Our Specialty? Oral and Maxillofacial Surgeon Versus Oral and Facial Surgeon.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guerrero, Andre V; Elo, Jeffrey A; Sun, Ho-Hyun Brian; Herford, Alan S

    2017-01-01

    To determine whether changing "oral and maxillofacial surgeon" (OMS) to "oral and facial surgeon" improves the perception and awareness of the OMS's role and surgical scope of practice in undergraduate biomedical and dental students. This cross-sectional study requested undergraduate and dental students to select 1 of 5 specialists to treat 21 conditions. Two different surveys were presented: 1 designating specialists as "oral and maxillofacial surgeons" and 1 designating specialists as "oral and facial surgeons." The independent variable was the specialist "oral and maxillofacial surgeon" or "oral and facial surgeon." The dependent variables included specialists chosen for the procedure (ear, nose, and throat surgeon; OMS vs oral and facial surgeon; plastic surgeon; periodontist; and "other"). The test of proportions (z test) with the Yates correction was performed. The sample was composed of 1,671 undergraduate upper division science students and 568 senior dental students. Results showed that undergraduate students' perception of an OMS's surgical scope increased significantly from 28 to 33% when "oral and facial surgeon" was used instead of "oral and maxillofacial surgeon." Dental students' perception of an OMS's surgical scope remained the same whether "oral and maxillofacial surgeon" or "oral and facial surgeon" was used. The results of this study suggest that using "oral and facial surgeon" instead of "oral and maxillofacial surgeon" increases awareness of an OMS's surgical scope of practice in undergraduate upper division science students, which could be an important step toward increasing the recognition of the profession by the general public and other non-dental medical colleagues. Copyright © 2016 American Association of Oral and Maxillofacial Surgeons. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  13. AN AUDIT OF NEPHRECTOMY BY GENERAL SURGEONS

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Mungadi

    If practice makes perfect ,then it is very hard for a surgeon with a nephrectomy volume of less than. 1 per year to be an expert in that operation. Nephrectomy volume in several Nigerian centers is very low8-10, most general surgeons in this environment are therefore not expected to be performing several nephrectomies per ...

  14. [Michel Latarjet (1913-1999), surgeon explorer!].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Awada, T; Liverneaux, P

    2010-05-01

    In 1954, Michel Latarjet, anatomist and surgeon of Lyon, developed an original surgical technique to treat the unstable shoulder . This technique since kept his name: "Latarjet". He was a character in 1000 facets: highly skilled anatomist, skillful surgeon, talented sportsman, accomplished musician, big traveler, and many others... An eclectic life, symbol of an abundant XXth century. Copyright 2010 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  15. Characteristics of highly successful orthopedic surgeons: a survey of orthopedic chairs and editors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Klein, Guy; Hussain, Nasir; Sprague, Sheila; Mehlman, Charles T.; Dogbey, Godwin; Bhandari, Mohit

    2013-01-01

    Background Highly successful orthopedic surgeons are a small group of individuals who exert a large influence on the orthopedic field. However, the characteristics of these leaders have not been well-described or studied. Methods Orthopedic surgeons who are departmental chairs, journal editors, editorial board members of the Journal of Bone and Joint Surgery (British edition), or current or past presidents of major orthopedic associations were invited to complete a survey designed to provide insight into their motivations, academic backgrounds and accomplishments, emotional and physical health, and job satisfaction. Results In all, 152 surgeons completed the questionnaire. We identified several characteristics of highly successful surgeons. Many have contributed prolific numbers of publications and book chapters and obtained considerable funding for research. They were often motivated by a “desire for personal development (interesting challenge, new opportunities),” whereas “relocating to a new institution, financial gain, or lack of alternative candidates” played little to no role in their decisions to take positions of leadership. Most respondents were happy with their specialty choice despite long hours and high levels of stress. Despite challenges to their time, successful orthopedic surgeons made a strong effort to maintain their health; compared with other physicians, they exercise more, are more likely to have a primary care physician and feel better physically. Conclusion Departmental chairs, journal editors and presidents of orthopedic associations cope with considerable demands of clinical, administrative, educational and research duties while maintaining a high level of health, happiness and job satisfaction. PMID:23706848

  16. Danish surgeons' views on minimally invasive surgery

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Edwards, Hellen; Jørgensen, Lars Nannestad

    2014-01-01

    and distributed electronically via e-mail to a total of 1253 members of The Danish Society of Surgeons and The Danish Society of Young Surgeons. RESULTS: In total, 352 (approximately 30%) surgeons completed the questionnaire, 54.4% were over 50 years of age, and 76.6% were men. When choosing surgery, the most...... important factors taken into consideration were the risk of complication and short convalescence, whereas the least important factors were cosmesis and option of local anaesthesia. If the surgeons themselves were to undergo cholecystectomy, 35.5% would choose SILS, and 14.5% would choose NOTES provided...... become standard techniques for cholecystectomy within 6 years. CONCLUSIONS: The importance of risk of complications has not surprisingly a high priority among surgeons in this questionnaire. Why this is has to be investigated further before implementing SILS and NOTES as standard of care....

  17. Cultural Frictions: Mentoring the Afghan Army at 'Sandhurst in the Sand'

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mynster Christensen, Maya

    2015-01-01

    The Afghan National Army Officer Academy (ANAOA) is a significant indicator of the success of the NATO-led mission in Afghanistan. This success relies on the local ownership and sustainability of an academy modelled on the British Royal Military Academy Sandhurst. Based on qualitative research...... conducted amongst the coalition forces deployed as mentors to the ANAOA, Christensen and Jakobsen discuss how the relationship between the promotion of British military values and Afghan ownership is communicated, practised and negotiated through the exercise of mentoring. Cultural frictions between mentors...

  18. The Future of Plastic Surgery: Surgeon's Perspective.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ozturk, Sinan; Karagoz, Huseyin; Zor, Fatih

    2015-11-01

    Since the days of Sushruta, innovation has shaped the history of plastic surgery. Plastic surgeons have always been known as innovators or close followers of innovations. With this descriptive international survey study, the authors aimed to evaluate the future of plastic surgeons by analyzing how plastic surgery and plastic surgeons will be affected by new trends in medicine. Aesthetic surgery is the main subclass of plastic surgery thought to be the one that will change the most in the future. Stem cell therapy is considered by plastic surgeons to be the most likely "game changer." Along with changes in surgery, plastic surgeons also expect changes in plastic surgery education. The most approved assumption for the future of plastic surgery is, "The number of cosmetic nonsurgical procedures will increase in the future." If surgeons want to have better outcomes in their practice, they must at least be open minded for innovations if they do not become innovators themselves. Besides the individual effort of each surgeon, international and local plastic surgery associations should develop new strategies to adopt these innovations in surgical practice and education.

  19. Challenges training left-handed surgeons.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anderson, Maia; Carballo, Erica; Hughes, David; Behrer, Christopher; Reddy, Rishindra M

    2017-09-01

    Being left-handed (LH) is considered a disadvantage in surgical training. We sought to understand the perspectives of LH trainees and surgical educators on the challenges and modifications in training LH surgeons. A survey was distributed to surgeons, surgical residents, and medical students about challenges teaching and learning surgical technique. 25 LH surgeons, 65 right-handed (RH) surgeons, and 39 LH trainees completed the survey. Compared to LH surgeons, RH surgeons reported more difficulty (46% vs 16%, p = 0.003) and less comfort teaching LH trainees (28% vs 4%, p = 0.002), and 10 (15%) reported that LH trainees have less technical ability. RH surgeons identified challenges translating technique to LH trainees and physical limitations of an environment optimized for right-handed mechanics. The disadvantage LH surgical trainees face is due to barriers in training rather than inherent lesser ability. Nonetheless, minimal modifications are made to overcome these barriers. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  20. Retention of Mohs surgeons in academic dermatology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Shali; Mina, Mary Alice; Brown, Marc D; Zwald, Fiona O

    2015-08-01

    Retention of academic Mohs surgeons is important for the growth of this specialty and teaching of residents and students. To examine factors that influence retention of Mohs surgeons in academics and to better understand reasons for their departure. A survey was electronically distributed to academic Mohs surgeons in the American College of Mohs Surgery, asking them to rate the importance of several variables on their decision to remain in academia. Private practice Mohs surgeons who had left academics were also surveyed. Two hundred thirty-six dermatologic surgeons completed the survey. Twenty-nine percent work full time in academics, and approximately 7% work part time. The top reasons for practicing in the academic setting are intellectual stimulation, teaching opportunities, and collaboration with other university physicians and researchers. Seventy-one percent of respondents reported they would stay in academics, 7% indicated they would not, and 22% were unsure. Unfair compensation, inadequate support staff, poor leadership, increased bureaucracy, and decreased autonomy were top reasons that may compel a Mohs surgeon to leave. Opportunities for intellectual stimulation, collaboration, and teaching remain the main draw for academic Mohs surgeons. A supportive environment, strong leadership, and establishing fair compensation are imperative in ensuring their stay.

  1. Surgeon Participation in Early Accountable Care Organizations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Resnick, Matthew J; Graves, Amy J; Buntin, Melinda B; Richards, Michael R; Penson, David F

    2018-03-01

    We aimed to characterize the landscape of surgeon participation in early accountable care organizations (ACOs) and to identify specialty-, organization-, and market-specific factors associated with ACO participation. Despite rapid deployment of alternative payment models (APMs), little is known about the prevalence of surgeon participation, and key drivers behind surgeon participation in APMs. Using data from SK&A, a research firm, we evaluated the near universe of US practices to characterize ACO participation among 125,425 US surgeons in 2015. We fit multivariable logistic regression models to characterize key drivers of ACO participation, and more specifically, the interaction between ACO affiliation and organizational structure. Of 125,425 US surgeons, 27,956 (22.3%) participated in at least 1 ACO program in 2015. We observed heterogeneity in participation by subspecialty, with trauma and transplant reporting the highest rate of ACO enrollment (36% for both) and plastic surgeons reporting the lowest (12.9%) followed by ophthalmology (16.0%) and hand (18.6%). Surgeons in group practices and integrated systems were more likely to participate relative to those practicing independently (aOR 1.57, 95% CI 1.50, 1.64; aOR 4.87, 95% CI 4.68, 5.07, respectively). We observed a statistically significant interaction (P organization. Model-derived predicted probabilities revealed that, within each specialty, surgeons in integrated health systems had the highest predicted probabilities of ACO and those practicing independently generally had the lowest. We observed considerable variation in ACO enrollment among US surgeons, mediated at least in part by differences in practice organization. These data underscore the need for development of frameworks to characterize the strategic advantages and disadvantages associated with APM participation.

  2. Digital Footprint of Neurological Surgeons.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Christopher; Gupta, Raghav; Shah, Aakash; Madill, Evan; Prabhu, Arpan V; Agarwal, Nitin

    2018-02-07

    Patients are increasingly turning to online resources to inquire about individual physicians and to gather health information. However, little research exists studying the online presence of neurosurgeons across the country. This study aimed to characterize these online profiles and assess the scope of neurosurgeons' digital identities. Medicare-participating neurologic surgeons from the United States and Puerto Rico were identified using the Centers for Medicare and Medicaid Services (CMS) Physician Comparable Downloadable File. Each physician was characterized by his or her medical education, graduation year, city of practice, gender, and affiliation with an academic institution. Using a Google-based custom search tool, the top 10 search results for each physician were extracted and categorized as 1 of the following: 1) physician, hospital, or healthcare system controlled, 2) third-party or government controlled, 3) social media-based, 4) primary journal article, or 5) other. Among the physicians within the CMS database, 4751 self-identified as being neurosurgeons, yielding a total of 45,875 uniform resource locator search results pertinent to these physicians. Of the 4751 neurosurgeons, 2317 (48.8%) and 2434 (51.2%) were classified as academic and nonacademic neurosurgeons, respectively. At least 1 search result was obtained for every physician. Hospital, healthcare system, or physician-controlled websites (18,206; 39.7%) and third-party websites (17,122; 37.3%) were the 2 most commonly observed domain types. Websites belonging to social media platforms accounted for 4843 (10.6%) search results, and websites belonging to peer-reviewed academic journals accounted for 1888 (4.1%) search results. The frequency with which a third-party domain appeared as the first search result was higher for nonacademic neurosurgeons than for academic neurosurgeons. In general, neurosurgeons lacked a controllable online presence within their first page of Google Search results

  3. Surgeons' musculoskeletal pain in minimally invasive surgery

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Dalager, Tina; Søgaard, Karen; Bech, Katrine Tholstrup

    in surgeons performing MIS is high and derives mainly from static postures. Positioning of monitor, adjustment of table height and instrument design also contribute substantially. Robotic assisted laparoscopy seems less physically demanding for the surgeon compared with conventional laparoscopy. However, some......Background: A large proportion of surgeons performing minimally invasive surgery (MIS) experience musculoskeletal pain in the upper body possibly due to awkward and long-term static positions. This can be detrimental for workability and health. The objective of the present review is to sum up...

  4. Young British Art / Hanno Soans

    Index Scriptorium Estoniae

    Soans, Hanno, 1974-

    2001-01-01

    1990ndate kunsti muutumisest. Inglise kunstniku Peter Daviese maalist "Kuum esimene sada" (1996), Gavin Turki vahakujuna valminud autoportreest "Pop". "Young British Art'i" uuskunstist ja Jasper Zoova installatsioonist "F1". Eri analüüsivõimalusi pakkuvatest töödest (Marko Laimre & Ene-Liis Semperi 2000. a. novembri ühisnäituse osa töid).

  5. Nuclear power in British politics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pocock, R.F.

    1987-01-01

    The paper concerns the subject of nuclear power in British politics in 1986. The policies of the major political parties towards nuclear power are briefly outlined, along with public attitudes to nuclear energy, Chernobyl, and the rise of the anti-nuclear campaigners. (UK)

  6. British Columbia : an alternative design

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ostergaard, P.

    2003-01-01

    This PowerPoint presentation outlined the British Columbia Ministry of Energy and Mines' approach to the electricity market. A brief overview of the electric system in the province was provided, examining capacity (primarily hydro based) and the utility sector with its public ownership. In British Columbia, 80 per cent of the electricity is generated by British Columbia Hydro (BC Hydro). The rates are based on cost of service. British Columbia's market is western North America. A comparison of monthly bills for several large cities, both Canadian and American, was displayed. The market reviews conducted in 1995, 1998, and 2002 were reviewed and the major recommendations discussed. The author identified the opportunities in the province, discussing natural gas and coal for electricity production, resource potential, demand, and private sector capacity. The challenges facing the province are: cost effective development of resources to meet energy demand; aging infrastructure, high reliability requirements and economic growth; evolving electricity market structure in the United States; and, monopoly. The transmission system was reviewed with reference to trade with the Pacific Northwest, flexibility and storage. The energy plan objectives for the future were presented, including low rates and public ownership, secure and reliable supply, more private sector opportunities, and environmental responsibility. The alternative market structure includes regulated market characteristics, access to trade, and customer focus. figs

  7. 76 FR 66282 - Army Educational Advisory Committee

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-10-26

    ... Committee: U.S. Army War College Subcommittee of the Army Education Advisory Committee. Dates of Meeting: November 15, 2011. Place of Meeting: U.S. Army War College, 122 Forbes Avenue, Carlisle, PA, Command... issues and matters related to the continued growth and development of the United States Army War College...

  8. 76 FR 72914 - Army Educational Advisory Committee

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-11-28

    ...: U.S. Army War College Subcommittee of the Army Education Advisory Committee. Dates of Meeting: December 14, 2011. Place of Meeting: U.S. Army War College, 122 Forbes Avenue, Carlisle, PA, Command... issues and matters related to the continued growth and development of the United States Army War College...

  9. Resource utilization for non-operative cervical radiculopathy: Management by surgeons versus non-surgeons.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chung, Sophie H; Bohl, Daniel D; Paul, Jonathan T; Rihn, Jeffrey A; Harrop, James S; Ghogawala, Zoher; Hilibrand, Alan S; Grauer, Jonathan N

    2017-07-01

    To compare the estimated resource utilization for non-operative treatment of cervical radiculopathy if managed by surgeons versus non-surgeons. A Cervical Spine Research Society-sponsored survey was administered at a national spine surgery conference to surgeons and non-surgeons, as classified above. The survey asked questions regarding resource utilization and perceived costs for the "average patient" with cervical radiculopathy managed non-operatively. Resource utilization and perceived costs were compared between surgeon and non-surgeon participants, and between private practice and academic and/or hybrid groups that combine academic and private practices. In total, 101 of the 125 conference attendees participated in the survey (return rate 80.8%, of which 60% were surgeons). Surgeon and non-surgeon estimates for duration of non-operative care did not differ (3.3 versus 4.2 months, p=0.071). Estimates also did not differ for estimated number of physical therapy visits (10.5 versus 10.5, p=0.983), cervical injections (1.4 versus 1.7, p=0.272), chiropractic visits (3.1 versus 3.7, p=0.583), or perceived days off from work (14.9 versus 16.3, p=0.816). The only difference identified was that surgeon estimates of the number of physician visits while providing non-operative care were lower than non-surgeon estimates (3.2 versus 4.0, p=0.018). In terms of estimated costs, surgeon and non-surgeon were mostly similar (only difference being that surgeon estimates for the total cost of physician visits per patient were lower than non-surgeon estimates ($382 versus $579, p=0.007). Surgeon estimates for the percent of their patients that go on to receive surgery within 6 months were higher than non-surgeon estimates (28.6% versus 18.8%, p=0.018). Similarly, surgeon estimates for the percent of their patients to go on to receive surgery within 2 years were higher than non-surgeon estimates (37.8% versus 24.8%, p=0.013). Academic/hybrid and private practice group resource

  10. Help From Above: Air Force Close Air Support of the Army. 1946-1973

    Science.gov (United States)

    2003-01-01

    2d ed. London: Putnam , 1970. Greenfield, Kent Robert. American Strategy in World War II: A Reconsideration. Westport, Conn.: Greenwood Press, 1963... Putnam , 1969. ———. British Aviation, The Ominous Skies, 1935–1939. London: Her Majesty’s Stationery Office, 1980. Pershing, John J. My Experiences in the...Operations. Washington, D.C.: Office of the Chief of Army History, 1954. Richards, Denis, and Hilary St.George Saunders. The Royal Air Force, 1939–45

  11. Surgeon-patient communication during awake procedures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, Claire S; Guyton, Kristina; Pariser, Joseph J; Siegler, Mark; Schindler, Nancy; Langerman, Alexander

    2017-06-01

    Surgeons are increasingly performing procedures on awake patients. Communication during such procedures is complex and underexplored in the literature. Surgeons were recruited from the faculty of 2 hospitals to participate in an interview regarding their approaches to communication during awake procedures. Three researchers used the constant comparative method to transcribe, code, and review interviews until saturation was reached. Twenty-three surgeons described the advantages and disadvantages of awake procedures, their communication with the awake patient, their interactions with staff and with trainees, the environment of awake procedures, and how communication in this context is taught and learned. Surgeons recognized communication during awake procedures as important and reported varied strategies for ensuring patient comfort in this context. However, they also acknowledged challenges with multiparty communication during awake procedures, especially in balancing commitments to teaching with their duty to comfort the patient. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  12. Online Patient Ratings of Hand Surgeons.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Trehan, Samir K; DeFrancesco, Christopher J; Nguyen, Joseph T; Charalel, Resmi A; Daluiski, Aaron

    2016-01-01

    To evaluate factors associated with positive online patient ratings and written comments regarding hand surgeons. We randomly selected 250 hand surgeons from the American Society for Surgery of the Hand member directory. Surgeon demographic and rating data were collected from 3 physician review Web sites (www.HealthGrades.com, www.Vitals.com, and www.RateMDs.com). Written comments were categorized as being related to professional competence, communication, cost, overall recommendation, staff, and office practice. Online presence was defined by 5 criteria: professional Web site, Facebook page, Twitter page, and personal profiles on www.Healthgrades.com and/or www.Vitals.com. A total of 245 hand surgeons (98%) had at least one rating among the 3 Web sites. Mean number of ratings for each surgeon was 13.4, 8.3, and 1.9, respectively, and mean overall ratings were 4.0 out of 5, 3.3 out of 4, and 3.8 out of 5 stars on www.HealthGrades.com, www.Vitals.com, and www.RateMDs.com, respectively. Positive overall ratings were associated with a higher number of ratings, Castle Connolly status, and increased online presence. No consistent correlations were observed among online ratings and surgeon age, sex, years in practice, practice type (ie, private practice vs academics), and/or geographic region. Finally, positive written comments were more often related to factors dependent on perceived surgeon competence, whereas negative comments were related to factors independent of perceived competence. Physician review Web sites featured prominently on Google, and 98% of hand surgeons were rated online. This study characterized hand surgeon online patient ratings as well as identified factors associated with positive ratings and comments. In addition, these findings highlight how patients assess care quality. Understanding hand surgeon online ratings and identifying factors associated with positive ratings are important for both patients and surgeons because of the recent growth in

  13. Prepositions in American and British English.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mindt, Dieter; Weber, Christel

    1989-01-01

    Compares the distribution of prepositions in American and British English. Two machine-readable one million word Corpora, the Brown Corpus of American English and the Lob Corpus of British are used as a basis of comparison. (Author/OD)

  14. The Army Lawyer

    Science.gov (United States)

    2007-07-01

    Constitution. American armed forces took seventeen years to pacify the Philippines. British armed forces took twelve years to subdue Malaysian communist...I have served. The population as a whole possessed a lot of weaponry, with at least two weapons in most households . In addition, the tribes...USAREUR Administrative Law CLE 15 – 19 Sep 08 5F-F26E 2007 USAREUR Claims Course 15 – 19 Oct 07 5F-F28 2007 Income Tax Law Course 10 – 14 Dec

  15. 76 FR 56406 - Science and Technology Reinvention Laboratory Demonstration Project; Department of the Army; Army...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-09-13

    ... DEPARTMENT OF DEFENSE Office of the Secretary Science and Technology Reinvention Laboratory Demonstration Project; Department of the Army; Army Research, Development and Engineering Command; Tank... Berry, U. S. Army Tank Automotive Research, Development and Engineering Center (TARDEC), 6501 East 11...

  16. Dental anxiety levels in British servicemen and women.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grimshaw, G P; Boyle, C A; Newton, T

    2012-09-01

    The objectives of the study were to determine: 1, the level of dental anxiety in British Service personnel; 2 whether there was a difference in dental anxiety levels across the three Services; and, 3, the relationship between number of operational tours and level of dental anxiety. Cross sectional questionnaire survey of individuals attending 3 Armed Services dental treatment centres in the UK. The questionnaires were completed between February 2008 and April 2009. 50 patients each from the Royal Navy, Army and Royal Air Force, selected consecutively from those attending the centres for treatment. There was a 100% response rate. Dental fear as assessed by the Dental Fear Survey (DFS) and scores on a scale of fear of dental injections. 27% of the Armed Services experienced severe dental anxiety: a level similar to that found in the general population. There was no difference in the level of dental anxiety or fear of dental injections across the three Armed Services. There was no relationship between number of operational tours undertaken and level of dental anxiety. Dental anxiety is found amongst members of the British Armed Services at levels similar to that in the general population. This represents a challenge for service provision, particularly in operational settings.

  17. A cross-sectional study of the presence of United Kingdom (UK) plastic surgeons on social media.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mabvuure, Nigel Tapiwa; Rodrigues, Jeremy; Klimach, Stefan; Nduka, Charles

    2014-03-01

    To determine the uptake and usage of websites and social media (SM) by UK consultant (attending) plastic surgeons. Professional profiles of full BAPRAS members were searched on Facebook, Twitter, LinkedIn, RealSelf, YouTube, ResearchGate in May 2013. Additional surgeons were identified from the follower lists of @BAPRASvoice and @BAAPSMedia. Website ownership was determined on Google. Searches were repeated three times. Dual BAAPS-BAPRAS members were identified from www.baaps.org.uk. There were 156 (48.3%) dual BAAPS-BAPRAS members and 36 BAPRAS-only members. Fifty seven (18%) surgeons had no account on any platform whereas 266 (82%) were on at least one platform. One hundred and sixty four (51%) had personal websites whilst 37 (11%) had profiles on partnership websites. One hundred and sixteen (36%) had no website presence whilst 2% had websites under construction. The platform most surgeons use is LinkedIn (52%) whilst smaller proportions used Facebook (4%) and Twitter (22%). Surgeons had a mean of 126 (range: 0-3270) Twitter followers and 368 (range: 7-3786) fans/'likes' of their Facebook profiles. Time spent in postgraduate practice was not predictive of website ownership or SM use. However, dual BAAPS-BAPRAS members were significantly more likely to own a personal website, Twitter, RealSelf and YouTube accounts. There has been an increase in the uptake of social media by UK plastic surgeons, especially in those with aesthetic surgery interests. However, very few surgeons have optimised their web presence. Continued education and appropriate usage guidance may promote uptake, particularly by reconstructive surgeons. Copyright © 2013 British Association of Plastic, Reconstructive and Aesthetic Surgeons. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  18. Time out for surgeons: when is the attending surgeon too tired?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schoem, Scott R; Finck, Christine

    2012-03-01

    Pediatric surgical subspecialty workforce shortages are here to stay without any expected solution for the short-term. Individual surgeons, hospital administrators, risk management and patient-safety teams need to recognize that patient safety must take precedence over clinical productivity and financial "bottom lines." Pushing attending surgeon work hours beyond the limits of exhaustion impairs patient safety. Just as resident surgeon work hours have been appropriately curtailed in the name of patient safety, so must attending surgeon work hours. This issue needs to be addressed by hospital patient safety committees, professional societies, and by state and national regulating authorities.

  19. Christian Contributions to Army Values

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    D'Emma, Gregory

    2000-01-01

    .... The Army trains the soldier's body through physical training and combining arms training events designed to build physical strength and endurance so that the soldier will be physically capable...

  20. Social Structures Affecting Army Performance

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Segal, David R

    2007-01-01

    The Center for Research on Military Organization undertook a multi-year research program on the impact of social change on the performance of Army units and of Soldiers after the end of the Cold War...

  1. Lessons from Army System Developments

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Lucas, William A; Rhoades, Richard G

    2007-01-01

    This paper documents the results of a multi-year Army Materiel Command-sponsored research project which employed a structured case study approach to examine the history and processes that had resulted...

  2. Racial Extremism in the Army

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Hudson, Walter M

    1998-01-01

    ... modem phenomenon of "skinheads." I then discuss the history of white supremacist extremism in the Army, culminating in the December, 1995 murders of two black civilians by soldiers assigned to the 82d Airborne Division at Fort Bragg, North Carolina...

  3. Transforming the Army Sustaining Base

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Nobles, Danny

    2000-01-01

    The Army has embarked on its transformation venture. The goal is to provide an agile, but lethal force that is capable of rapid deployment to any area of the world where America's interests are threatened...

  4. The Army's Distribution of Labor: New Force Structure and Missions for the Army National Guard

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Roberson, Melvin

    1997-01-01

    This Strategy Research Project recommends a new Army National Guard (ARNG) force structure which will successfully accomplish current missions and serve the Total Army's requirements for the future...

  5. How to Build Democratic Armies

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-12-01

    influence is also considerable in the postcolonial and post–civil war settings, but in the others the project of building demo- cratic armies is usually...Germany, yemen, South Africa table. external influence is considerable in postcolonial and post–civil war settings, but in the others building...Most often, postcolonial armies are not built from scratch but are built on the foundations of the armed forces left behind by the colonial power

  6. The U.S. Army Occupational and Environmental Medicine Residency at Aberdeen Proving Ground, Maryland: 1960-1996.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gaydos, Joel C; Mallon, Timothy M; Rice, William A

    2016-11-01

    Reorganization of the Army and critical assessment of Army Graduate Medical Education programs prompted the Occupational and Environmental Medicine (OEM) Consultant to the Army Surgeon General to initiate a review of current Army OEM residency training. Available information indicated the Army OEM residency at Aberdeen Proving Ground, MD, was the first and longest operating Army OEM residency. Describing this residency was identified as the first step in the review, with the objectives of determining why the residency was started and sustained and its relevance to the needs of the Army. Records possibly related to the residency were reviewed, starting with 1954 since certification of physicians as Occupation Medicine specialists began in 1955. Interviews were conducted with selected physicians who had strong affiliations with the Army residency and the practice of Army OEM. The Army OEM residency began in 1960 and closed in 1996 with the transfer of Army OEM residency training to the Uniformed Services University of the Health Sciences, Bethesda, MD. Over 36 years, 47 uniformed residency graduates were identified; 44 were from the Army. Forty graduated between 1982 and 1996. The OEM residency was part of a dynamic cycle. Uniformed OEM leaders identified the knowledge and skills required of military OEM physicians and where these people should be stationed in the global Army. Rotations at military sites to acquire the needed knowledge and skills were integrated into the residency. Residency graduates were assigned to positions where they were needed. Having uniformed residents and preceptors facilitated the development of trust with military leaders and access to areas where OEM physician skills and knowledge could have a positive impact. Early reports indicated the residency was important in recruiting and retaining OEM physicians, with emphasis placed on supporting the Army industrial base. The late 1970s into the 1990s was a more dynamic period. There was

  7. Designing a leadership development program for surgeons.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jaffe, Gregory A; Pradarelli, Jason C; Lemak, Christy Harris; Mulholland, Michael W; Dimick, Justin B

    2016-01-01

    Although numerous leadership development programs (LDPs) exist in health care, no programs have been specifically designed to meet the needs of surgeons. This study aimed to elicit practicing surgeons' motivations and desired goals for leadership training to design an evidence-based LDP in surgery. At a large academic health center, we conducted semistructured interviews with 24 surgical faculty members who voluntarily applied and were selected for participation in a newly created LDP. Transcriptions of the interviews were analyzed using analyst triangulation and thematic coding to extract major themes regarding surgeons' motivations and perceived needs for leadership knowledge and skills. Themes from interview responses were then used to design the program curriculum specifically to meet the leadership needs of surgical faculty. Three major themes emerged regarding surgeons' motivations for seeking leadership training: (1) Recognizing key gaps in their formal preparation for leadership roles; (2) Exhibiting an appetite for personal self-improvement; and (3) Seeking leadership guidance for career advancement. Participants' interviews revealed four specific domains of knowledge and skills that they indicated as desired takeaways from a LDP: (1) leadership and communication; (2) team building; (3) business acumen/finance; and (4) greater understanding of the health care context. Interviews with surgical faculty members identified gaps in prior leadership training and demonstrated concrete motivations and specific goals for participating in a formal leadership program. A LDP that is specifically tailored to address the needs of surgical faculty may benefit surgeons at a personal and institutional level. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  8. Risk Factors for Rhabdomyolysis in the U.S. Army.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hill, Owen T; Scofield, Dennis E; Usedom, Jenna; Bulathsinhala, Lakmini; McKinnon, Craig; Kwon, Paul; Haley, Timothy; Carter, Robert

    2017-07-01

    The standardized mortality rate of rhabdomyolysis (RM) in Active Duty U.S. Army Soldiers is considerably higher than in the civilian population. RM occurs when large amounts of intracellular contents from damaged skeletal muscle escape into circulation, leading to serious sequelae (e.g., acute renal failure, hyperkalemia, compartment syndrome). Extended physical exertion, especially in hot environments, and trauma can precipitate RM. The aim of this study was to identify RM risk factors among U.S. Active Duty Army (ADA) Soldiers. This nested case-control study used data from the Total Army Injury and Health Outcomes Database (years 2004-2006) to examine RM among ADA male Soldiers. Demographic and occupational variables were identified as potential risk factors. Each RM case was age and date-matched to 4 controls. Adjusted odds ratios (OR) were computed using conditional logistic regression analyses. From years 2004 to 2006, 1,086 Soldiers (0.19%) met the study criteria for clinically diagnosed RM. Three variables were found to increase the odds of acquiring RM: (1) prior heat stroke, OR 4.95 (95% confidence interval [CI] 1.1-21.7); (2) self-reported Black race, OR 2.56 (95% CI 2.2-3.0); and (3) length of service (0-90 days), OR 2.05 (95% CI 1.6-2.7). There is a substantially greater likelihood for male U.S. Army Soldiers to develop RM who: (1) have had a prior heat injury, (2) self-report in the Black racial category, and (3) who are within the initial 90 days of service. Greater awareness of the risk factors associated with RM may improve force health protection and readiness through targeted mitigation strategies. Reprint & Copyright © 2017 Association of Military Surgeons of the U.S.

  9. Talk to the Hand: U.S. Army Biophysical Testing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Santee, William R; Potter, Adam W; Friedl, Karl E

    2017-07-01

    Many people are unaware of the science underlying the biophysical properties of Soldier clothing and personal protective equipment, yet there is a well-refined biomedical methodology initiated by Army physiologists in World War II. This involves a methodical progression of systematic material testing technologies, computer modeling, and human testing that enables more efficient development and rapid evaluation of new concepts for Soldier health and performance. Sophisticated manikins that sweat and move are a central part of this testing continuum. This report briefly summarizes the evolution and use of one specialized form of the manikin technologies, the thermal hand model, and its use in research on Soldier hand-wear items that sustain dexterity and protect the hand in extreme environments. Thermal manikin testing methodologies were developed to provide an efficient and consistent analytical tool for the rapid evaluation of new clothing concepts. These methods have been upgraded since the original World War II and Korean War eras to include articulation and sweating capabilities, as characterized and illustrated in this article. The earlier "retired" versions of thermal hand models have now been transferred to the National Museum of Health and Science. The biophysical values from manikin testing are critical inputs to the U.S. Army Research Institute of Environmental Medicine mathematical models that provide predictions of soldier comfort, duration of exposure before loss of manual dexterity, and time to significant risk of freezing (skin temperature Army has been on the forefront of the biophysical analysis of clothing including gloves since environmental research was established at the Armored Medical Research Laboratory and Climatic Research Laboratory during World War II. U.S. Army Research Institute of Environmental Medicine does not make the equipment but works with their Natick Soldier Research, Development, and Engineering Center partners to make the

  10. The Surgeons' Leadership Inventory (SLI): a taxonomy and rating system for surgeons' intraoperative leadership skills.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Henrickson Parker, Sarah; Flin, Rhona; McKinley, Aileen; Yule, Steven

    2013-06-01

    Surgeons must demonstrate leadership to optimize performance and maximize patient safety in the operating room, but no behavior rating tool is available to measure leadership. Ten focus groups with members of the operating room team discussed surgeons' intraoperative leadership. Surgeons' leadership behaviors were extracted and used to finalize the Surgeons' Leadership Inventory (SLI), which was checked by surgeons (n = 6) for accuracy and face validity. The SLI was used to code video recordings (n = 5) of operations to test reliability. Eight elements of surgeons' leadership were included in the SLI: (1) maintaining standards, (2) managing resources, (3) making decisions, (4) directing, (5) training, (6) supporting others, (7) communicating, and (8) coping with pressure. Interrater reliability to code videos of surgeons' behaviors while operating using this tool was acceptable (κ = .70). The SLI is empirically grounded in focus group data and both the leadership and surgical literature. The interrater reliability of the system was acceptable. The inventory could be used for rating surgeons' leadership in the operating room for research or as a basis for postoperative feedback on performance. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  11. Surgeons' musculoskeletal pain in minimally invasive surgery

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Dalager, Tina; Søgaard, Karen; Bech (Katrine Tholstrup Pedersen), Katrine Tholstrup

    on the existing literature on musculoskeletal pain in surgeons. Methods: A systematic literature search was employed. In total, 1.849 titles were scrutinized and 24 articles were found relevant. Due to the diversity of data, a narrative synthesis method was applied. Results: The prevalence of musculoskeletal pain...... put the patients at a higher risk of complications, and on the longer term there is an increasing risk for the surgeon to develop chronic musculoskeletal pain that will disable him/her to perform his/her job. Therefore, surgeons’ musculoskeletal health is of vital importance and must be considered...... alongside patient safety. The present literature study supports the need for a randomized controlled trial evaluating the effect of an individually designed training program for surgeons performing MIS....

  12. Burn surgeons in South Africa: A rare species | Allorto | South ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Background. The high burden of burn injuries in South Africa (SA) requires surgeons skilled in burn care. However, there are few dedicated burn surgeons and properly equipped units or centres. Objectives. To quantify the involvement of surgeons in burn care in SA hospitals, identify factors that attract surgeons to pursue ...

  13. Do Surgeons Treat Their Patients Like They Would Treat Themselves?

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Janssen, Stein J.; Teunis, Teun; Guitton, Thierry G.; Ring, David; Spoor, Andy B.; Chauhan, Aakash; Shafritz, Adam B.; Wasterlain, Amy; Terrono, Andrew L.; Neviaser, Andrew S.; Schmidt, Andrew; Nelson, Andy; Miller, Anna N.; Kristan, Anze; Apard, Thomas; Berner, Arne; Ilyas, Asif; Jubel, Axel; Jost, Bernhard; Babis, George; Watkins, Barry; Kreis, Barbara; Nolan, Betsy M.; Crist, Brett D.; Cross, Brian J.; Wills, Brian P. D.; Barreto, Camilo Jose Romero; Ekholm, Carl; Swigart, Carrie; Spath, Catherine; Zalavras, Charalampos; Cassidy, Charles; Garnavos, Christos; Moreno-Serrano, Constanza L.; Rodner, Craig; Klostermann, Cyrus; Osei, Daniel A.; Rikli, Daniel A.; Haverkamp, Daniel; Polatsch, Daniel; Drosdowech, Darren; Edelstein, David M.; Eygendaal, Denise; McKee, Desirae M.; van Deurzen, Derek; Verbeek, Diederik O. F.; Patel, Minoo; Brilej, Drago; Walbeehm, Erik T.; Pemovska, Emilija Stojkovska; Hofmeister, Eric; Twiss, Eric L. L.; Hammerberg, Eric Mark; Schumer, Evan D.; Kaplan, F. Thomas D.; Suarez, Fabio; Fernandes, Carlos H.; Lopez-Gonzalez, Francisco; Walter, Frank L.; Seibert, Franz Josef; Frihagen, Frede; Kraan, Gerald; Gadbled, Guillaume; Huemer, Georg M.; Kohut, Georges; Porcellini, Giuseppe; Garrigues, Grant; Bayne, Grant J.; DeSilva, Gregory; Bamberger, H. Brent; Grunwald, H. W.; Goost, Hans; Broekhuyse, Henry; Durchholz, Holger; Routman, Howard D.; Kodde, F.; McGraw, Iain; Harris, Ian; Lin, Ines C.; Choueka, Jack; Kazanjian, Jack Elias; Gillespie, James A.; Biert, Jan; Greenberg, Jeffrey A.; Abrams, Jeffrey; Wint, Jeffrey; Giuffre, Jennifer L.; Wolf, Jennifer Moriatis; Overbeck, Joachim P.; Doornberg, Job N.; Scheer, Johan H.; Itamura, John; Erickson, John M.; McAuliffe, John; Capo, John T.; Taras, John; Braman, Jonathan; Rubio, Jorge; Filho, Jose Eduardo Grandi Ribeiro; Abboud, Joseph; Conflitti, Joseph M.; Abzug, Joshua M.; Roiz, Juan Miguel Rodriguez; Adams, Julie; Bishop, Julius; Kabir, Karoush; Zyto, Karol; Lee, Kendrick; Eng, Kevin; Rumball, Kevin M.; Erol, Konul; Dickson, Kyle; Jeray, Kyle; Bainbridge, Chris; Poelhekke, Lodewijk; van Minnen, Paul; Mica, Ladislav; Borris, Lars C.; Adolfsson, Lars E.; Weiss, Lawrence; Schulte, Leah M.; Lane, Lewis B.; Paz, Lior; Taitsman, Lisa; Guenter, Lob; Catalano, Louis; Campinhos, Luiz Aaugusto B.; Austin, Luke S.; Lygdas, Panagiotis; Waseem, Mohammad; Palmer, M. Jason; Krijnen, Matthijs R.; Abdel-Ghany, Mahmoud I.; Swiontkowski, Marc; Rizzo, Marco; Oidtmann, Marijke; Pirpiris, Marinis; Loebenberg, Mark I.; Boyer, Martin; Richardson, Martin; Mormino, Matt; Menon, Matthew; Calcagni, Maurizio; Beaumont-Courteau, Maxime; Soong, Maximillian; Wood, Megan M.; Meylaerts, Sven A.; Darowish, Michael; Nancollas, Michael; Prayson, Michael; Quinn, Michael; Grafe, Michael W.; Kessler, Michael W.; van den Bekerom, Michel P. J.; Ruiz-Suarez, Michell; Pirela-Cruz, Miguel A.; Mckee, Mike; Merchant, Milind; Tyllianakis, Minos; Shafi, Mohamed; Felipe, Naquira Escobar Luis; Parnes, Nata; Chen, Neal C.; Wilson, Neil; Elias, Nelson; Akabudike, Ngozi M.; Horangic, Nicholas J.; Shortt, Nicholas L.; Schep, Niels; Rossiter, Nigel; Kanakaris, Nikolaos K.; van Eerten, Percy V.; Paladini, Paolo; Melvanki, Parag; Althausen, Peter; Giannoudis, Peter; Hahn, Peter; Evans, Peter J.; Jebson, Peter; Kloen, Peter; Krause, Peter; Brink, Peter R. G.; Schandelmaier, Peter; Peters, Anil; Dantuluri, Phani; Blazar, Philip; Muhl, Philipp; Andreas, Platz; Choudhari, Pradeep; Inna, Prashanth; Gaston, R. Glenn; Haverlag, Robert; Ramli, Radzeli Mohd; Costanzo, Ralph M.; de Bedout, Ramon; Ranade, Ashish; Hauck, Randy; Smith, Raymond Malcolm; Babst, Reto H.; Jenkinson, Richard; Hutchison, Richard L.; GIlbert, Richard S.; Page, Richard S.; Wallensten, Richard; Papandrea, Rick; Zura, Robert D.; Slater, Robert R.; Gray, Robert R. L.; Wagenmakers, Robert; Pesantez, Rodrigo; Hackney, Roger G.; van Riet, Roger; Calfee, Ryan P.; Mehta, Samir; Bouaicha, Samy; Spruijt, Sander; Kakar, Sanjeev; Kaplan, Saul; Duncan, Scott F.; Kaar, Scott G.; Mitchell, Scott; Rowinski, Sergio; van Helden, Svenhjalmar; Jacoby, Sidney M.; Kennedy, Stephen A.; Westly, Stephen K.; Beldner, Steven; Morgan, Steven J.; Sulkers, George; Schepers, Tim; Baxamusa, Taizoon; Tosounidis, Theodoros; Wyrick, Theresa; Begue, Thierry; DeCoster, Thomas; Dienstknecht, Thomas; Varecka, Thomas F.; Higgins, Thomas; Fischer, Thomas J.; Mittlmeier, Thomas; Wright, Thomas; Chesser, Tim; Omara, Timothy; Siff, Todd; Havlifc, Tomo; Neuhaus, Valentin; Sabesan, Vani J.; Nikolaou, Vasileios S.; Verhofstad, Michael; Giordano, Vincenzo; Iyer, Vishwanath M.; Vochteloo, Anne; Batson, W. Arnnold; Hammert, Warren C.; Belangero, William Dias; Satora, Wojciech; Weil, Yoram; Balogh, Zsolt

    2015-01-01

    There is substantial unexplained geographical and surgeon-to-surgeon variation in rates of surgery. One would expect surgeons to treat patients and themselves similarly based on best evidence and accounting for patient preferences. (1) Are surgeons more likely to recommend surgery when choosing for

  14. The Great British Music Hall: Its Importance to British Culture and ‘The Trivial’

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Steven Gerrard

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available By 1960, Britain’s once-thriving Music Hall industry was virtually dead. Theatres with their faded notions of Empire gave way to Cinema and the threat of Television. Where thousands once linked arms singing popular songs, watch acrobatics, see feats of strength, and listen to risqué jokes, now the echoes of those acts lay as whispers amongst the stalls’ threadbare seats. The Halls flourished in the 19th Century, but had their origins in the taverns of the 16th and 17th Centuries. Minstrels plied their trade egged on by drunken crowds. As time passed, the notoriety of the Music Hall acts and camaraderie produced grew. Entrepreneurial businessman tapped into this commerciality and had purpose-built status symbol theatres to provide a ‘home’ for acts and punters. With names like The Apollo giving gravitas approaching Olympian ideals, so the owners basked in wealth and glory. The Music Hall became the mass populist entertainment for the population. Every town had one, where everyone could be entertained by variety acts showing off the performers’ skills. The acts varied from singers, joke-tellers, comics, acrobats, to dancers. They all aimed to entertain. They enabled audiences to share a symbiotic relationship with one another; became recruitment officers for the Army; inspired War Poets; showed short films; and they and the halls reflected both the ideals and foibles of their era. By using Raymond Williams’ structures of feeling as its cornerstone, the article will give a brief history of the halls, whilst providing analysis into how they grew into mass populist entertainment that represented British culture. Case studies of famous artistes are given, plus an insight into how Music Hall segued into radio, film and television.

  15. Diversity Issues in the Army as Perceived by Army Students at the United States Army War College

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Webster, Cecil

    1997-01-01

    ..., welfare, and other related programs. In recognizing this diversity, this paper identifies some diversity issues within the Army, analyzes the perception of those diversity issues by the resident Army students in the USAWC Class of 1997...

  16. Residents' Perceptions of Plastic Surgeons as Craniofacial Surgery Specialists.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Denadai, Rafael; Muraro, Carlos Alberto Salomão; Raposo-Amaral, Cassio Eduardo

    2015-11-01

    To assess residents' perceptions of plastic surgeons as craniofacial surgery specialists in Brazil. Brazilian residents were asked to choose 1 or 2 specialists that they perceived to be an expert for 14 craniofacial surgery-related scenarios. Both an overall analysis (all 14 scenarios) and subanalysis (each scenario separately) were performed. Response patterns were distributed as "plastic surgeons alone," "plastic surgeons combined with other specialists," or "without plastic surgeons." Overall, plastic surgeons were chosen more (all P plastic surgeons were chosen more (all P surgery-related scenarios and also demonstrated that "plastic surgeons alone" and "without plastic surgeons" were selected more (all P surgery residents and male residents chose more (all P plastic surgeons as experts than their peers. Residents' perceptions of plastic surgeons as craniofacial surgery specialists are limited in Brazil.

  17. Mortality surveillance in the U.S. Army, 2005-2011.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mancha, Brent E; Watkins, Eren Youmans; Nichols, Jerrica N; Seguin, Peter G; Bell, Amy Millikan

    2014-12-01

    Mortality rates in the U.S. Army from 2005 to 2011 were examined over time and compared to the U.S. general population. Cases were U.S. Army Soldiers (active duty or activated National Guard/Reserve) with dates of death between 2005 and 2011 and between 18 and 64 years of age in the Department of Defense Medical Mortality Registry. Age- and sex-adjusted annual mortality rates (AR) were calculated for each category of death and examined via linear regression. Proportions of underlying causes of death were also examined. The trend in AR in the U.S. Army significantly decreased for combat deaths, the average annual percent change (AAPC) = 15.2% decrease in the log of the rate (LAR); p = 0.04 and accident deaths, AAPC = 5.4% decrease in the LAR; p = 0.002 and significantly increased for suicides, AAPC = 10.6% increase in the LAR; p = 0.001. The trend in AR for suicides for the Army was significantly different compared to the U.S. general population, AAPC = 11.0% increase in the LAR; p Army suicide rate increased in comparison to the United States. 70% of accident deaths were transportation related. Almost 70% of suicides and homicides were firearm related. Reprint & Copyright © 2014 Association of Military Surgeons of the U.S.

  18. Improving operation notes to meet British Orthopaedic Association guidelines.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morgan, David; Fisher, Noel; Ahmad, Aman; Alam, Fazle

    2009-04-01

    Operation notes are an important part of medical records for clinical, academic and medicolegal reasons. This study audited the quality of operative note keeping for total knee replacements against the standards set by the British Orthopaedic Association (BOA). A prospective review of all patients undergoing total knee replacement at a district general hospital over 8 months. Data recorded were compared with those required by the BOA good-practice guidelines. Change in practice was implemented and the audit cycle completed. Data were statistically analysed. A total of 129 operation notes were reviewed. There was a significant improvement in the mean number of data points recorded from 9.6 to 13.1. The least well recorded data were diagnosis, description of findings, alignment and postoperative flexion range. All had a significant improvement except description of findings. The operating surgeon writing the note improved from 56% to 67%. Detailed postoperative instructions also improved in quality. Surgeon education and the use of a checklist produce better quality total knee replacement operation notes in line with BOA guidelines. Further improvements may be made by making the data points part of the operation note itself.

  19. British gas barrow onshore terminal

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Spicer, G.W.; Woodward, C.

    1991-01-01

    This paper reports on the Morecambe Bay Gas Field that was discovered in 1974 by Gas Council Exploration, a wholly owned subsidiary of British Gas plc. The Project to develop the Field commenced in January, 1980 against the background of escalating world oil prices. Production began on January 8, 1985, in time to help meet the peak winter demands. A maximum daily production rate of 1,587 million scfd was achieved on February 7, 1991. The PURASPEC H 2 S removal process was commissioned in May of 1989 to control export gas quality

  20. Science and the British Empire.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harrison, Mark

    2005-03-01

    The last few decades have witnessed a flowering of interest in the history of science in the British Empire. This essay aims to provide an overview of some of the most important work in this area, identifying interpretative shifts and emerging themes. In so doing, it raises some questions about the analytical framework in which colonial science has traditionally been viewed, highlighting interactions with indigenous scientific traditions and the use of network-based models to understand scientific relations within and beyond colonial contexts.

  1. Medical students' unique experience of army leadership training: a qualitative study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Earis, John; Garner, J; Haddock, D; Jenkins, J; Jha, V

    2017-10-01

    To assess the interactive experience of first year medical students attending the leadership and management course hosted by a British Army Reserve Field Hospital developed in partnership with Liverpool University. 244 students submitted a 1000-word structured reflective learning assignment about their reaction to, learning from and any behaviour and attitude changes as a result of, the training. The assignments were thematically analysed to identify how aspects of the training had impacted upon the students' understanding of leadership and teamwork. Their comments relating to the army were analysed to gain insight into their views and experience of the training. Students were surprised at how enjoyable and useful they found the course. Initially they expressed scepticism about what they could learn in an army-based environment. However, the training, particularly command and planning tasks, helped them appreciate and understand the different skills individuals can bring to a team environment, and the importance of everyone contributing. While some students were challenged by aspects of the course, with support and encouragement from team-mates and the army personnel, they learned they could achieve more together. Teaching leadership and management skills to medical students is a challenge which can be effectively addressed by adapting and developing army training resources. Students overcame initial scepticism about participating, and learned a lot about themselves and each other. In addition, the army developed a better understanding of the doctors of the future. The expertise of the army in delivering this training was crucial to its success as the medical school could not have provided this experience unsupported. Published by the BMJ Publishing Group Limited. For permission to use (where not already granted under a licence) please go to http://www.bmj.com/company/products-services/rights-and-licensing/.

  2. Give us back our field army! The Dutch army leadership and the operational planning during the interwar years

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Amersfoort, H.; Amersfoort, H.; Klinkert, W.

    2011-01-01

    The 1922 Army Reform Bill reduced the Dutch army to a militia. During the period between the two World Wars Dutch army leadership sought to rebuild an army that in several repects (organization, armement, doctrine) could be compared to the armies of great powers like France and Germany. The army

  3. Internal Controls over Army Selective Reenlistment Bonuses

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Granetto, Paul J; Marsh, Patricia; Neville, Douglas P; Powell, Joseph A; Penn, Lusk; Ward, Brett; Quimby, Donovan; Vega, Lisa; James, Jason; Matthews, Henry

    2008-01-01

    ...) is the Army's computerized retention system for enlisted personnel. It contains all the reenlistment data required to document the retention of Army Service members, including tracking selective reenlistment bonuses (SRBs...

  4. Army Forces for Operations Other Than War

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Sortor, Ronald

    1997-01-01

    ... contingencies influence the readiness and availability of Army forces to deploy to an MRC? We examine OOTW missions performed by the Army since 1975 and plans for possible future operations in order to define force requirements for OOTW...

  5. The nature of surgeon human capital depreciation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hockenberry, Jason M; Helmchen, Lorens A

    2014-09-01

    To test how practice interruptions affect worker productivity, we estimate how temporal breaks affect surgeons' performance of coronary artery bypass grafting (CABG). Examining 188 surgeons who performed 56,315 CABG surgeries in Pennsylvania between 2006 and 2010, we find that a surgeon's additional day away from the operating room raised patients' inpatient mortality by up to 0.067 percentage points (2.4% relative effect) but reduced total hospitalization costs by up to 0.59 percentage points. Among emergent patients treated by high-volume providers, where temporal distance is most plausibly exogenous, an additional day away raised mortality risk by 0.398 percentage points (11.4% relative effect) but reduced cost by up to 1.4 percentage points. This is consistent with the hypothesis that as temporal distance increases, surgeons are less likely to recognize and address life-threatening complications. Our estimates imply additional intraprocedural treatment intensity has a cost per life-year preserved of $7871-18,500, well within conventional cost-effectiveness cutoffs. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  6. Pediatric surgeon density in South Africa.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dell, Angela; Numanoglu, Alp; Arnold, Marion; Rode, Heinz

    2017-12-27

    There are limited data regarding the available pediatric surgical workforce in South Africa and their employment prospects on completion of their specialist training. This aim of this study was to quantify and analyze the pediatric surgical workforce in South Africa as well as to determine their geographic and sector distribution. This involved a quantitative descriptive analysis of all registered specialist as well as training pediatric surgeons in South Africa. The results showed 2.6 pediatric surgeons per one million population under 14 years. More than half (69%) were male and the median age was 46.8 years. There were however, more female surgical registrars currently in training. The majority of the pediatric surgical practitioners were found in Gauteng, followed by the Western Cape and Kwa-Zulu Natal. The majority of specialists reportedly worked in the public sector, however the number of public sector pediatric surgeons available to those without health insurance fell below those available to private patients. Interprovincial differences as well as intersectoral differences were marked indicating geographic and socioeconomic maldistribution of pediatric surgeons. Addressing this maldistribution requires concerted efforts to expand public sector specialist posts. Descriptive audit LEVEL OF EVIDENCE: IV. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  7. Leukaemia near british nuclear installations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hubert, D.

    1991-01-01

    An excess of childhood leukaemia has been seen near some British nuclear installations, especially near the Sellafield reprocessing plant. The same result was found in a more general study including a large number of nuclear sites. Similar studies made in USA, Canada and France have been negative. Moreover, epidemiological studies made in England have discovered other childhood leukaemia clusters in areas far from nuclear facilities, and especially near potential sites of nuclear installations. Several explanations are suggested but no definite conclusion is yet possible. Doses from radioactive releases seem to be too low to account for the additional deaths from leukaemia by environmental contamination. A virus activation, which might be associated with population influx into rural isolated areas, has been considered. The hypothesis of genetic mutation induced by ionising radiation in the fathers of children with leukaemia has been made because a higher risk of leukaemia was observed for children of fathers employed at Sellafield. No firm conclusion is possible considering the small number of observed cases and the lack of excess leukaemias in the offspring of Hiroshima and Nagasaki survivors. The possibility of internal contamination, chemicals or even radon is discussed as other causes. Studies in progress might allow to find an answer to the problem of leukaemia in the vicinity of British nuclear installations [fr

  8. British coal-down to the line

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anon.

    1993-01-01

    The long-running saga of British Coal's decline is in its final stages with virtually no change from last October when the British government announced plants to close 31 of the 50 remaining mines. That announcement produced a political outcry but having privatized the electricity industry in 1990 the government had effectively left itself up the creek without a paddle. It had no powers to force the generators to buy more coal. The status of the British coal industry is discussed

  9. 32 CFR 651.5 - Army policies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... defense. The Army is expected to manage those aspects of the environment affected by Army activities... important environmental resources, and the capacity of Army decisions to influence those effects in a... project planning and decision-making. Efficiency will be promoted through the following: (1) Awareness and...

  10. 76 FR 12087 - Army Educational Advisory Committee

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-03-04

    ...: U.S. Army War College Subcommittee of the Army Education Advisory Committee. Dates of Meeting: March 24, 2011. Place of Meeting: U.S. Army War College, 122 Forbes Avenue, Carlisle, PA, Command... faculty; table and examine online College issues; assess resident and distance education programs, self...

  11. 75 FR 7255 - Army Educational Advisory Committee

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-02-18

    ... Committee: U.S. Army War College Subcommittee of the Army Education Advisory Committee. Date of Meeting: March 11, 2010. Place of Meeting: U.S. Army War College, 122 Forbes Avenue, Carlisle, PA, Command...; table and examine online College issues; assess resident and distance education programs, self- study...

  12. Evaluating MEDEVAC Force Structure Requirements Using an Updated Army Scenario, Total Army Analysis Admission Data, Monte Carlo Simulation, and Theater Structure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fulton, Lawrence; Kerr, Bernie; Inglis, James M; Brooks, Matthew; Bastian, Nathaniel D

    2015-07-01

    In this study, we re-evaluate air ambulance requirements (rules of allocation) and planning considerations based on an Army-approved, Theater Army Analysis scenario. A previous study using workload only estimated a requirement of 0.4 to 0.6 aircraft per admission, a significant bolus over existence-based rules. In this updated study, we estimate requirements for Phase III (major combat operations) using a simulation grounded in previously published work and Phase IV (stability operations) based on four rules of allocation: unit existence rules, workload factors, theater structure (geography), and manual input. This study improves upon previous work by including the new air ambulance mission requirements of Department of Defense 51001.1, Roles and Functions of the Services, by expanding the analysis over two phases, and by considering unit rotation requirements known as Army Force Generation based on Department of Defense policy. The recommendations of this study are intended to inform future planning factors and already provided decision support to the Army Aviation Branch in determining force structure requirements. Reprint & Copyright © 2015 Association of Military Surgeons of the U.S.

  13. Choosing a Surgeon: An Exploratory Study of Factors Influencing Selection of a Gender Affirmation Surgeon

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ettner, Randi; Ettner, Frederic; White, Tonya

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Purpose: Selecting a healthcare provider is often a complicated process. Many factors appear to govern the decision as to how to select the provider in the patient–provider relationship. While the possibility of changing primary care physicians or specialists exists, decisions regarding surgeons are immutable once surgery has been performed. This study is an attempt to assess the importance attached to various factors involved in selecting a surgeon to perform gender affirmation surgery (GAS). It was hypothesized that owing to the intimate nature of the surgery, the expense typically involved, the emotional meaning attached to the surgery, and other variables, decisions regarding choice of surgeon for this procedure would involve factors other than those that inform more typical healthcare provider selection or surgeon selection for other plastic/reconstructive procedures. Methods: Questionnaires were distributed to individuals who had undergone GAS and individuals who had undergone elective plastic surgery to assess decision-making. Results: The results generally confirm previous findings regarding how patients select providers. Conclusion: Choosing a surgeon to perform gender-affirming surgery is a challenging process, but patients are quite rational in their decision-making. Unlike prior studies, we did not find a preference for gender-concordant surgeons, even though the surgery involves the genital area. Providing strategies and resources for surgical selection can improve patient satisfaction. PMID:29159303

  14. Junior plastic surgeon's confidence in aesthetic surgery practice: a comparison of two didactic systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sterodimas, Aris; Boriani, Filippo; Bogetti, Paolo; Radwanski, Henrique N; Bruschi, Stefano; Pitanguy, Ivo

    2010-08-01

    The importance of residents' training in aesthetic surgery and the need for acquiring confidence in performing cosmetic procedures is an established knowledge. A survey was done in two different training systems to evaluate the experience of junior plastic surgeons in performing four common aesthetic surgery procedures at the end of their residency. The first system guarantees a theoretical background and a certain number of aesthetic procedures to be performed by the trainee, in contrast to the second system where mainly theoretical knowledge in cosmetic surgery is warranted to residents. The residents' comfort in performing specific operations was quite varied between the two systems. The comparison showed that junior plastic surgeons reached a higher degree of self-confidence in aesthetic practice in system A when compared to system B. The similarities and differences between the two systems are analysed and discussed. The possibility of reforming residency programmes by following the structure and the philosophy of system A is proposed. Copyright 2009 British Association of Plastic, Reconstructive and Aesthetic Surgeons. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  15. The power of British Energy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hawley, R.

    1997-01-01

    When the power industry in Britain was privatized, British Energy plc (BE), whose head office is in Edingburgh, Scotland, was founded in July 1996. It is the only power utility in the world exclusively operating nuclear power stations. Operative business has remained the responsibility of the two regional supply companies, Nuclear Electric (NE) and Scottish Nuclear (SN) which, in addition to the modern PWR nuclear generating unit of Sizewell B, have included in the new holding company their advanced gas-cooled and gas-moderated reactor (AGR) units. The older gas-graphite reactor (GGR) plants were combined in the new Magnox Electric plc, Berkeley; at some later date, this company is to be merged with another nuclear power plant operator, British Nuclear Fuels plc (BNFL). Sizewell B, which was commissioned in 1995, is the last nuclear generating unit to be started up in the United Kingdom, for the time being. In times of low raw material prices and the need for a quick return on invested capital, BE is reluctant to run the risk associated with tying up capital for a long time. Instead, the company has backfitted its plants so that the production of electricity from nuclear power in Britain in 1996 of 92,476 GWh was increased by almost 10% over the 1995 level of 84,174 GWh. In addition to modernization and rationalization at home, BE together with Sizewell B vendor Westinghouse is engaged worldwide in the development and commercialization of future advanced reactors. This ensures that the know-how accumulated will be preserved and will be available for new nuclear power plants to be built in Britain in the next century. (orig.)

  16. Working night shifts affects surgeons' biological rhythm

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Amirian, Ilda; Andersen, Lærke T; Rosenberg, Jacob

    2015-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Chronic sleep deprivation combined with work during the night is known to affect performance and compromise residents' own safety. The aim of this study was to examine markers of circadian rhythm and the sleep-wake cycle in surgeons working night shifts. METHODS: Surgeons were monitored...... prospectively for 4 days: pre call, on call, post call day 1 (PC1), and post call day 2 (PC2). The urinary metabolite of melatonin and cortisol in saliva were measured to assess the circadian rhythm. Sleep and activity were measured by actigraphy. Subjective measures were assessed by the Karolinska Sleepiness...... Scale and Visual Analog Scale of fatigue, general well-being, and sleep quality. RESULTS: For both metabolite of melatonin and cortisol, a significant difference (P sleep time during the day on call...

  17. Smart apps for the smart plastic surgeon

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aniketh Venkataram

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Smartphones have the ability to benefit plastic surgeons in all aspects of patient care and education. With the sheer number of applications available and more being created everyday, it is easy to miss out on apps which could be of great relevance. Moreover, the range of android applications available has not been extensively discussed in the literature. To this end, we have compiled an exhaustive list of android smartphone applications, which we feel can help our day to day functioning. The apps have been extensively reviewed and neatly described along with all their potential uses. In addition, we have made an effort to highlight ′non-medical′ or efficiency apps which can improve departmental functioning. These apps have not been described in prior articles, and their functionality might not be known to all. We believe that the technology savvy plastic surgeon can make maximum use of these apps to his benefit.

  18. Occupational injuries among pediatric orthopedic surgeons

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alsiddiky, Abdulmonem M.; Alatassi, Raheef; Altamimi, Saad M.; Alqarni, Mahdi M.; Alfayez, Saud M.

    2017-01-01

    Abstract In this cross-sectional study, we surveyed all pediatric orthopedic surgeons in Saudi Arabia using an anonymous electronic questionnaire composed of 23 items to identify the rate of occupational injuries and obtain other relevant information. Thirty-nine participants completed the questionnaire (response rate: 83%). Participants who sustained occupational injuries throughout their careers represented 82.5%. The most injured areas were the hands, eyes, and back by 54.5%, 24.2%, and 15.2%, respectively. Approximately 11.1% were injured while operating on infected patients. Approximately 30.3% reported their injuries to their institution. We concluded that the rate of occupational injuries among pediatric orthopedic surgeons is very high and underreported. PMID:28640103

  19. The Contemporaneity of the British Survey.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dodson, Charles Brooks

    The seeming remoteness of material studied in a British literature survey course can be frustrating for the teacher. Students may find little relevance in the story of Beowulf or the descriptions of Gulliver's voyages. However, instructors can highlight the contemporaneity of British literary texts by drawing parallels to modern times. For…

  20. The Current Canon in British Romantics Studies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Linkin, Harriet Kramer

    1991-01-01

    Describes and reports on a survey of 164 U.S. universities to ascertain what is taught as the current canon of British Romantic literature. Asserts that the canon may now include Mary Shelley with the former standard six major male Romantic poets, indicating a significant emergence of a feminist perspective on British Romanticism in the classroom.…

  1. British Celtic influence on English phonology

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Laker, Stephen

    2010-01-01

    The dissertation assesses the influence of British Celtic on the phonological development of English during and shortly after the Anglo-Saxon settlement period, ca. AD 450–700. By reconstructing and then comparing the phonological systems of both British Celtic and English at the time of contact, an

  2. There's No Such Thing as British Art

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Richard Johns

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available “Conversation Piece” is a British Art Studies series that draws together a group of contributors to respond to an idea, provocation or question. The conversation will develop as more respondents enter the debate. Fifteen contributors respond to the provocation "There's No Such Thing as British Art".

  3. African Journals Online: Virgin Islands (British)

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    African Journals Online: Virgin Islands (British). Home > African Journals Online: Virgin Islands (British). Log in or Register to get access to full text downloads. Username, Password, Remember me, or Register · Browse By Category · Browse Alphabetically · Browse By Country · List All Titles · Free to read Titles This Journal ...

  4. The British Show in Australia, 1985

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anthony Bond

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available In 1984–85, The British Show, an exhibition largely made up of New British Sculpture, was curated for Australia and New Zealand. This essay discusses the context and effects of the exhibition on art in Australia. It also seeks to define the sources of originality and innovation of the artists included.

  5. Think small: nanotechnology for plastic surgeons.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nasir, Amir R; Brenner, Sara A

    2012-11-01

    The purpose of this article is to introduce the topic of nanotechnology to plastic surgeons and to discuss its relevance to medicine in general and plastic surgery in particular. Nanotechnology will be defined, and some important historical milestones discussed. Common applications of nanotechnology in various medical and surgical subspecialties will be reviewed. Future applications of nanotechnology to plastic surgery will be examined. Finally, the critical field of nanotoxicology and the safe use of nanotechnology in medicine and plastic surgery will be addressed.

  6. Diabetic heart and the cardiovascular surgeon.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yosefy, Chaim

    2008-06-01

    The importance of diabetes mellitus (diabetes) as a cause of mortality and morbidity is well known. The number of patients increases alongside aging of the population and increase in the prevalence of obesity and sedentary life style. Diabetes affects approximately 8% of the USA population. Type I (insulin-dependent) diabetes occurs in 20% of cases, and type II (insulin-independent or maturity onset) diabetes occurs in 80% of the diabetic population diabetes mellitus type II is preceded by longstanding asymptomatic hyperglycemia, which accounts for the development of long-term diabetic complications. The main macrovascular complications for which diabetes has been a well established risk factor throughout the cardiovascular system, are: coronary artery disease (CAD), peripheral vascular disease (PVD), increased intima-media thickness (IMT) and stroke. Considering the cardiovascular surgeon, diabetes is associated with an increased rate of early and late complications following coronary artery bypass grafting. Diabetic patients have also been known to have an increased incidence of complications after elective major vascular surgery such as carotid endarterectomy (CEA) and leg amputations due to PVD. Cardiovascular surgeons frequently treat diabetic patients either because diabetes is incidental to another disease requiring surgery, or due to diabetes-related complication such as occlusive vascular disease, neuropathy or infection. Approximately 50% of diabetics undergo one,or more operations during their lifetime. This paper reviews the relationship between diabetic patients and their cardiovascular surgeons. In order to understand this relationship, one must first examine the underlying mechanisms by which hyperglycemia causes hazardous pre and post operative consequences. Then, one must examine the existing evidence of how diabetes correlates with these cardiovascular consequences, followed by the need for multidisciplinary team work which helps the surgeon to

  7. The Army word recognition system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hadden, David R.; Haratz, David

    1977-01-01

    The application of speech recognition technology in the Army command and control area is presented. The problems associated with this program are described as well as as its relevance in terms of the man/machine interactions, voice inflexions, and the amount of training needed to interact with and utilize the automated system.

  8. The Army and Team Learning

    Science.gov (United States)

    2008-05-01

    synthesis of the knowledge, skills and experiences gained through the synergy of the three domains of the Army Leader...Inventory Article by MAJ 1 1 CPT Letter Response to Grant Log Art. 0 "Logistocrat" Article Asymetric Sustainment Article 1 1 Response Letter to Nov 02 Art

  9. Army Transformation to Expeditionary Formations

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Bryson, Jeff

    2008-01-01

    This thesis explores the path of transformation in the U.S. Army from its inception in the late 1990s by then Chief of Staff GEN Eric Shinseki to the Interim Brigade Combat Team and through Operations Enduring and Iraqi Freedom...

  10. Drug Abuse in the Army.

    Science.gov (United States)

    The essay discusses the growth of drug abuse in the Army, actions that have been taken to control the problem, and planned or proposed actions to...and supervisory personnel of the Drug Abuse Control Division in the Office of the Deputy Chief of Staff for Personnel, Headquarters, Department of

  11. Inverting the Army Intelligence Pyramid

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-05-19

    Counterinsurgency, Company Intelligence Support Team, COIST, HUMINT, SIGINT, MASINT, OSINT 16. SECURITY CLASSIFICATION OF: (U) 17. LIMITATION OF...intelligence ( OSINT ), signals intelligence (SIGINT), and technical intelligence (TECHINT).14 11...new ways to support the needs of commanders, especially company-level commanders. The slow-moving and complex framework of the Army acquisition system

  12. [The educational program for modern military surgeons].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Willy, C; Gutcke, A; Klein, B; Rauhut, F; Friemert, B; Kollig, E W; Weller, N; Lieber, A

    2010-02-01

    Casualties in military conflict produce patterns of injuries that are not seen in routine surgical practice at home. In an era of increasing surgical sub-specialization the deployed surgeon needs to acquire and maintain a wide range of skills from a variety of surgical specialties. Improvised explosive devices (IEDs) have become the modus operandi for terrorists and in the current global security situation these tactics can be equally employed against civilian targets. Therefore, knowledge and training in the management of these injuries are relevant to both military and civilian surgeons. To create this kind of military surgeon the so-called "DUO-plus" model for the training of surgical officers (specialization general surgery plus a second specialization either in visceral surgery or orthopedics/trauma surgery) has been developed in the Joint Medical Service of the German Bundeswehr. Other relevant skills, such as emergency neurotraumatology, battlefield surgery with integrated oral and craniomaxillofacial surgery and emergency gynecology, are integrated into this concept and will be taught in courses. Log books will be kept in accordance with the training curricula. On successful completion of the program medical officers will be officially appointed as Medical Officer "Einsatzchirurg" by their commanding officers for a maximum of 5 years and it will be necessary to renew it after this period. These refresher programs will require participation in visiting physicians programs in the complementary surgical disciplines in order to retain the essential specific skills.

  13. [The first woman surgeons in the Netherlands].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mulder, M; De Jong, E

    1997-01-01

    This article describes the position of woman surgeons in the Netherlands. In 1913 the first woman, Heleen Robert, was accepted as member of the Dutch Society of Surgery. Three others, Jeanne Knoop, Frieda van Hasselt and Rosalie Wijnberg, followed during the next ten years. The nomination of Rosalie Wijnberg caused a turbulent discussion as she was working as a gynaecologist and not as a surgeon. One can wonder about this argument as other members were gynaecologists too. It seems that the male attitudes towards women were changing as more women entered the male dominated field. Nevertheless, from 1931 on, the year in which the registration of specialists was created, a number of women succeeded in obtaining a registration in surgery. Four of them were interviewed: dr. D.A.E. Norel, A.G. Wiersum-de Kwaadsteniet, J. Leeksma-Lievense and A.A. Fierstra. The general opinion still is that surgery is not a female profession. At the moment there are some twenty women working as general surgeon compared to a seven hundred men.

  14. Review and Assessment of Reduced Emissions/Clean Burning Diesel Engines for Integration into the Army Inventory.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1983-05-12

    production performance; elimination of battery charging, associated equipment, and replacement batteries; and reduction of the number of different forklift...areas; and concentrations of combustion products and noise levels do not exceed the Army Surgeon General’s standards. The change would be implemented...Methyipropane Alkane Isooctane 2, 2, 4-Trimethylpentane Alkane 3Isopentane 2-Methylbutane Alkane #("soots")* Lampblack Amorphous Carbon Basic Element

  15. Comprehensive feedback on trainee surgeons' non-technical skills

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Spanager, Lene; Dieckmann, Peter; Beier-Holgersen, Randi

    2015-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: This study aimed to explore the content of conversations, feedback style, and perceived usefulness of feedback to trainee surgeons when conversations were stimulated by a tool for assessing surgeons' non-technical skills. METHODS: Trainee surgeons and their supervisors used the Non......-Technical Skills for Surgeons in Denmark tool to stimulate feedback conversations. Audio recordings of post-operation feedback conversations were collected. Trainees and supervisors provided questionnaire responses on the usefulness and comprehensiveness of the feedback. The feedback conversations were...

  16. 2012 Center for Army Leadership Annual Survey of Army Leadership (CASAL): Army Civilian Leaders

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-05-23

    PLEASE DO NOT RETURN YOUR FORM TO THE ABOVE ADDRESS. 1. REPORT DATE (DD-MM-YYYY) 23-05-2013 2. REPORT TYPE Technical Report 3. DATES COVERED...VDAS_ArmyPostureStatement/2011/information_p apers /PostedDocument.asp?id=210 United States Office of Personnel Management (2012). Federal employee viewpoint survey

  17. Is there a differential in the dental health of new recruits to the British Armed Forces? A pilot study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Elmer, T B; Langford, J; McCormick, R; Morris, A J

    2011-11-11

    Figures from the British Defence Dental Services reveal that serving personnel in the British Army have a persistently lower level of dental fitness than those in the Royal Navy or the Royal Air Force. No research had been undertaken to ascertain if this reflects the oral health of recruits joining each Service. This study aimed to pilot a process for collecting dental and sociodemographic data from new recruits to each Service and examine the null hypothesis that no differences in dental health existed. Diagnostic criteria were developed, a sample size calculated and data collected at the initial training establishments of each Service. Data for 432 participants were entered into the analysis. Recruits in the Army sample had a significantly greater prevalence of dental decay and greater treatment resource need than either of the other two Services. Army recruits had a mean number of 2.59 (2.08, 3.09) decayed teeth per recruit, compared to 1.93 (1.49, 2.39 p dental health between recruits to each Service does exist and is a likely to be a reflection of the sociodemographic background from which they are drawn.

  18. Perspectives of South African general surgeons regarding their ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Objectives. To canvass the perceptions of SA general surgeons regarding certain aspects of their training. Methods. An electronic postal survey was conducted. All general surgeons on the Association of Surgeons of South Africa database were requested to complete a structured questionnaire. Four Likert scale items were ...

  19. Patient Attitudes Toward Orthopedic Surgeon Ownership of Related Ancillary Businesses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yi, Paul H; Cross, Michael B; Johnson, Staci R; Rasinski, Kenneth A; Nunley, Ryan M; Della Valle, Craig J

    2016-08-01

    Physician ownership of businesses related to orthopedic surgery, such as surgery centers, has been criticized as potentially leading to misuse of health care resources. The purpose of this study was to determine patients' attitudes toward surgeon ownership of orthopedic-related businesses. We surveyed 280 consecutive patients at 2 centers regarding their attitudes toward surgeon ownership of orthopedic-related businesses using an anonymous questionnaire. Three surgeon ownership scenarios were presented: (1) owning a surgery center, (2) physical therapy (PT), and (3) imaging facilities (eg, Magnetic Resonance Imaging scanner). Two hundred fourteen patients (76%) completed the questionnaire. The majority agreed that it is ethical for a surgeon to own a surgery center (73%), PT practice (77%), or imaging facility (77%). Most (>67%) indicated that their surgeon owning such a business would have no effect on the trust they have in their surgeon. Although >70% agreed that a surgeon in all 3 scenarios would make the same treatment decisions, many agreed that such surgeons might perform more surgery (47%), refer more patients to PT (61%), or order more imaging (58%). Patients favored surgeon autonomy, however, believing that surgeons should be allowed to own such businesses (78%). Eighty-five percent agreed that patients should be informed if their surgeon owns an orthopedic-related business. Although patients express concern over and desire disclosure of surgeon ownership of orthopedic-related businesses, the majority believes that it is an ethical practice and feel comfortable receiving care at such a facility. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  20. 21 CFR 878.4470 - Surgeon's gloving cream.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Surgeon's gloving cream. 878.4470 Section 878.4470...) MEDICAL DEVICES GENERAL AND PLASTIC SURGERY DEVICES Surgical Devices § 878.4470 Surgeon's gloving cream. (a) Identification. Surgeon's gloving cream is an ointment intended to be used to lubricate the user...

  1. How surgeons make decisions when the evidence is inconclusive

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hageman, Michiel G. J. S.; Guitton, Thierry G.; Ring, David; Osterman, A. Lee; Spoor, A. B.; van der Zwan, A. L.; Shrivastava, Abhay; Wahegaonkar, Abhijeet L.; Aida, E. Garcia G.; Aita, M. A.; Castillo, Alberto Pérez; Marcus, Alexander; Ladd, Amy; Terrono, Andrew L.; Gutow, Andrew P.; Schmidt, Andrew; Wang, Angela A.; Eschler, Anica; Miller, Anna N.; Wikerøy, Annette K. B.; Barquet, Antonio; Armstrong, April D.; van Vugt, Arie B.; Bedi, Asheesh; Shyam, Ashok K.; Mazzocca, Augustus D.; Jubel, Axel; Babst, Reto H.; Nolan, Betsy M.; Arciero, Bob; Bremer, Vanden; Bamberger, Brent; Peterson, Bret C.; Crist, Brett D.; Cross, Brian J.; Badman, Brian L.; Henley, C. Noel; Ekholm, Carl; Swigart, Carrie; Manke, Chad; Zalavras, Charalampos; Goldfarb, Charles A.; Cassidy, Charles; Cornell, Charles; Getz, Charles L.; Metzger, Charles; Wilson, Chris; Heiss, Christian; Perrotto, Christian J.; Wall, Christopher J.; Walsh, Christopher J.; Garnavos, Christos; Jiang, Chunyan; Lomita, Craig; Torosian, Craig M.; Rikli, Daniel A.; Whelan, Daniel B.; Wascher, Daniel C.; Hernandez, Daniel; Polatsch, Daniel; Beingessner, Daphne; Drosdowech, Darren; Tate, David E.; Hak, David; Rowland, David J.; Kalainov, David M.; Nelson, David; Weiss, David; McKee, Desirae M.; van Deurzen, D. F. G.; Endrizzi, Donald; Erol, Konul; Overbeck, Joachim P.; Baer, Wolfgang; Schwab, Eckart; Maza, Edgardo Ramos; Harvey, Edward; Rodriguez, Edward K.; Preloggler, Elisabeth; Schemitsch, Emil H.; Shin, Eon K.; Hofmeister, Eric P.; Kaplan, Thomas D.; Beeres, F. J. P.; Suarez, Fabio; Fernandes, C. H.; Cayón, Fidel Ernesto Cayón; Dolatowski, Filip Celestyn; Martin, Fischmeister; Sierra, Francisco Javier Aguilar; Lopez-Gonzalez, Francisco; Walter, Frank; Seibert, Franz Josef; Baumgaertel, Fred; Frihagen, Frede; Fuchs, P. C.; Huemer, Georg M.; Kontakis, George; Athwal, George S.; Dyer, George S. M.; Thomas, George; Kohut, Georges; Williams, Gerald; Hernandez, German Ricardo; Caro, Gladys Cecilia Zambrano; Garrigues, Grant; Merrell, Greg; DeSilva, Gregory; Della Rocca, Gregory J.; Regazzi, Gustavo; de Azevedo, Gustavo Borges Laurindo; Ruggiero, Gustavo Mantovani; Helling, H. J.; MccUtchan, Hal; Goost, Hans; Kreder, Hans J.; Hasenboehler, Paula M.; Routman, Howard D.; van der Heide, Huub; Kleinlugtenbelt, I.; McGraw, Iain; Harris, Ian; Ibrahim, Ibrahim Mohammad; Lin, Ines C.; Iossifidis, A.; Andrew, J.; Trenholm, I.; Goslings, J. Carel; Wiater, J. Michael; Choueka, Jack; Ahn, Jaimo; Kellam, James; Biert, Jan; Pomerance, Jay; Johnson, Jeff W.; Greenberg, Jeffrey A.; Yao, Jeffrey; Watson, Jeffry T.; Giuffre, Jennifer L.; Hall, Jeremy; Park, Jin-Young; Fischer, Jochen; Murachovsky, Joel; Howlett, John; McAuliffe, John; Evans, John P.; Taras, John; Braman, Jonathan; Hobby, Jonathan L.; Rosenfeld, Jonathan; Boretto, Jorge; Orbay, Jorge; Rubio, Jorge; Ortiz, Jose A.; Abboud, Joseph; Conflitti, Joseph M.; Vroemen, Joseph P. A. M.; Adams, Julie; Clarke, J. V.; Kabir, K.; Chivers, Karel; Prommersberger, Karl-Josef; Segalman, Keith; Lee, Kendrick; Eng, Kevin; Chhor, Kimberlly S.; Ponsen, K. J.; Jeray, Kyle; Marsh, L.; Poelhekke, L. M. S. J.; Mica, Ladislav; Borris, Lars C.; Halperin, Lawrence; Weiss, Lawrence; Benson, Leon; Elmans, Leon; de Mendonca, Leonardo Alves; Rocha, Leonardo; Katolik, Leonid; Lattanza, Lisa; Taitsman, Lisa; Guenter, Lob; Catalano, Louis; Buendia, Luis Antonio; Austin, Luke S.; Palmer, M. Jason; de Vries, M. R.; Bronkhorst, Maarten W. G. A.; Abdel-Ghany, Mahmoud I.; van de Sande, M. A. J.; Swiontkowski, Marc; Rizzo, Marco; Lehnhardt, Marcus; Pirpiris, Marinis; Baratz, Mark; Lazarus, Mark D.; Boyer, Martin; Richardson, Martin; Kastelec, Matej; Mormino, Matt; Budge, Matthew D.; Turina, Matthias; Wood, Megan M.; Baskies, Michael; Baumgaertner, Michael; Behrman, Michael; Hausman, Michael; Jones, Michael; LeCroy, Michael; Moskal, Michael; Nancollas, Michael; Prayson, Michael; Grafe, Michael W.; Kessler, Michael W.; van den Bekerom, Michel P. J.; Mckee, Mike; Merchant, Milind; Tyllianakis, Minos; Felipe, Naquira Escobar Luis; Chen, Neal C.; Saran, Neil; Wilson, Neil; Shortt, Nicholas L.; Schep, Niels; Rossiter, Nigel; Lasanianos, N. G.; Kanakaris, Nikolaos; Weiss, Noah D.; Harvey, Norah M.; van Eerten, P. V.; Melvanki, Parag; McCulloch, Patrick T.; Martineau, Paul A.; Appleton, Paul; Guidera, Paul; Levin, Paul; Giannoudis, Peter; Evans, Peter J.; Jebson, Peter; Kloen, Peter; Krause, Peter; Brink, Peter R. G.; Peters, J. H.; Blazar, Philip; Streubel, Philipp N.; Inna, Prashanth; Prashanth, S.; Solanki, Punita V.; Wang, Qiugen; Quell, M.; Benafield, R. Bryan; Haverlag, R.; Peters, R. W.; Varma, Rajat; Nyszkiewicz, Ralf; Costanzo, Ralph M.; de Bedout, Ramon; Ranade, Ashish S.; Smith, Raymond Malcolm; Abrams, Reid; Fricker, Renato M.; Omid, Reza; Barth, Richard; Buckley, Richard; Jenkinson, Richard; GIlbert, Richard S.; Page, Richard S.; Wallensten, Richard; Zura, Robert D.; Feibel, Robert J.; Gray, Robert R. L.; Tashijan, Robert; Wagenmakers, Robert; Pesantez, Rodrigo; van Riet, Roger; Norlin, Rolf; Pfeifer, Roman; Liem, Ronald; Kulick, Roy G.; Poolman, Rudolf W.; Shatford, Russell; Klinefelter, Ryan; Calfee, Ryan P.; Moghtaderi, Sam; Sodha, Samir; Sprujt, Sander; Kakar, Sanjeev; Kaplan, Saul; Duncan, Scott; Kluge, Sebastian; Rodriguez-Elizalde, Sebastian; Checchia, Sergio L.; Rowinski, Sergio; Dodds, Seth; Hurwit, Shep; Sprengel, K.; van der Stappen, W. A. H.; Kronlage, Steve; Belded, Steven; Morgan, Steven J.; Rhemrev, Steven J.; Hilliard, Stuart; Gosens, Taco; Sasaki, Takashi; Taleb, C.; Pritsch, Tamir; Tosounidis, Theodoros; Wyrick, Theresa; DeCoster, Thomas; Dienstknecht, Thomas; Stackhouse, Thomas G.; Hughes, Thomas; Wright, Thomas; Ly, Thuan V.; Havenhill, Timothy G.; Omara, Timothy; Siff, Todd; McLaurin, Toni M.; Wanich, Tony; Rueger, Johannes M.; Vallim, Frederico C. M.; Sabesan, Vani J.; Nikolaou, Vasileios S.; Knoll, Victoria D.; Telang, Vidyadhar; Iyer, Vishwanath M.; Jokhi, Vispi; Batson, W. Arnnold; Willems, W. Jaap; Smith, Wade R.; Belangero, William Dias; Wolkenfelt, J.; Weil, Yoram

    2013-01-01

    To address the factors that surgeons use to decide between 2 options for treatment when the evidence is inconclusive. We tested the null hypothesis that the factors surgeons use do not vary by training, demographics, and practice. A total of 337 surgeons rated the importance of 7 factors when

  2. 77 FR 9633 - Army National Cemeteries Advisory Commission (ANCAC)

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-02-17

    ... DEPARTMENT OF DEFENSE Department of the Army Army National Cemeteries Advisory Commission (ANCAC) AGENCY: Department of the Army, DoD. ACTION: Notice of open committee meeting. SUMMARY: Pursuant to the...), the Department of the Army announces the following committee meeting: Name of Committee: Army National...

  3. A brief history of British military experiences with infectious and tropical diseases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bailey, Mark S

    2013-09-01

    Infectious and tropical diseases have been a problem for British expeditionary forces ever since the Crusades. Outbreaks were especially common on Navy ships from the 16th to 18th centuries due to poor living conditions and travel to the tropics. However, since these occurred in small, isolated and controlled environments it meant that naval medical practitioners were able to keep detailed records and develop empirical approaches for their prevention. The first Royal Naval Hospitals were established in response to these diseases and Royal Navy doctors made valuable early contributions towards understanding them. Even larger outbreaks of infectious and tropical diseases occurred in the Army during the Napoleonic, Crimean and Boer Wars and throughout the colonial era, which strongly influenced the formation of the Army Medical Services including provision for teaching and research. The establishment of germ theory led to a golden era of discovery regarding these diseases and British Army doctors made numerous important contributions. Subsequent improvements in prevention, diagnosis and treatment reduced the mortality from infectious and tropical diseases during the World Wars, but they remained a significant problem in the non-European campaigns and also the numerous 'small wars' that followed. Even in the 21st century some of these diseases still cause outbreaks with significant morbidity and impact on deployments, but the military clinical and academic resources to deal with them are now much reduced. Preventive measures such as hygiene, sanitation, infection control, vaccination and chemoprophylaxis are invaluable, but history shows that these can become neglected over time and disrupted or overwhelmed during the early or most intense stages of military operations. This is why military specialists in infectious diseases, tropical medicine, sexual health, medical microbiology and communicable diseases control are still required.

  4. Organizational learning capability and battlefield performance: The British Army in World War II

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Visser, M.

    2016-01-01

    - PURPOSE - While intended as a bridge between the concepts of learning organization and organizational learning, current conceptualizations of organizational learning capability still predominantly lean toward the learning organization side, specifically directed at profit firms. The purpose of

  5. An investigation into the development of mental toughness in the British Army

    OpenAIRE

    Newell, Adrian; Rayner, Charlotte Ann Louise

    2014-01-01

    This study examines the development of mental toughness through the experience of 'tough' environments and reward/punishment regimes. It has long been recognised that success on the battle field is dependent on the 'human element' as well as tactics and physical equipment superiority (ARTD, 2009). Screening, developing and testing for physical aptitude is relatively straight forward; however the measurement and development of mental robustness is less well understood (Jones, Hanton and Connau...

  6. the british army, the natal government and the prosecution of natal ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    hennie

    the military authorities the power to use extreme measures to maintain safety and security. To achieve this, movement ... of the Law Officers' Department at the Royal Courts of Justice. Their report echoed the ..... knowledge of African customs and habits, and that it was a negative reflection on the impartiality and capacity of ...

  7. Is the Culture of the British Army Conducive to the Successful Execution of Mission Command

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-06-10

    part of subordinate commanders to act to achieve the higher commander’s intent is not negotiable ,”312 and so it is of paramount importance that...lists, amongst other things, “an active military social life [and] residential messes organised by rank” as important contributing factors to the...five essential elements. Moreover, trust and mutual understanding are also fundamentally important for Mission Command enactment. Such requirements

  8. India’s British Army: the Honorable East India Company’s Lasting Military Impact

    Science.gov (United States)

    2017-06-09

    gaps which were as great or greater than that which American forces faced in 21st century Iraq and Afghanistan. Definitions and Terms The...between the Company’s model and that of American campaigns of the 21st century . While the employment of mercenaries was common during the Company’s era...18th, and 19th centuries by cultivating a privatized and indigenous military force there by way of the Honorable East India Company. In doing so

  9. Classifying U.S. Army Military Occupational Specialties using the Occupational Information Network.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gadermann, Anne M; Heeringa, Steven G; Stein, Murray B; Ursano, Robert J; Colpe, Lisa J; Fullerton, Carol S; Gilman, Stephen E; Gruber, Michael J; Nock, Matthew K; Rosellini, Anthony J; Sampson, Nancy A; Schoenbaum, Michael; Zaslavsky, Alan M; Kessler, Ronald C

    2014-07-01

    To derive job condition scales for future studies of the effects of job conditions on soldier health and job functioning across Army Military Occupation Specialties (MOSs) and Areas of Concentration (AOCs) using Department of Labor (DoL) Occupational Information Network (O*NET) ratings. A consolidated administrative dataset was created for the "Army Study to Assess Risk and Resilience in Servicemembers" (Army STARRS) containing all soldiers on active duty between 2004 and 2009. A crosswalk between civilian occupations and MOS/AOCs (created by DoL and the Defense Manpower Data Center) was augmented to assign scores on all 246 O*NET dimensions to each soldier in the dataset. Principal components analysis was used to summarize these dimensions. Three correlated components explained the majority of O*NET dimension variance: "physical demands" (20.9% of variance), "interpersonal complexity" (17.5%), and "substantive complexity" (15.0%). Although broadly consistent with civilian studies, several discrepancies were found with civilian results reflecting potentially important differences in the structure of job conditions in the Army versus the civilian labor force. Principal components scores for these scales provide a parsimonious characterization of key job conditions that can be used in future studies of the effects of MOS/AOC job conditions on diverse outcomes. Reprint & Copyright © 2014 Association of Military Surgeons of the U.S.

  10. Family Characteristics Associated With Child Maltreatment Across the Deployment Cycle of U.S. Army Soldiers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Strane, Douglas; Lynch, Kevin G; Griffis, Heather M; Taylor, Christine M; Harb, Gerlinde C; Mi, Lanyu; Song, Lihai; French, Benjamin; Rubin, David M

    2017-09-01

    Soldier deployment can create a stressful environment for U.S. Army families with young children. Prior research has identified elevated rates of child maltreatment in the 6 months immediately following a soldier's return home from deployment. In this study, we longitudinally examine how other child- and family-level characteristics influence the relationship of deployment to risk for maltreatment of dependent children of U.S. Army soldiers. We conducted a person-time analysis of substantiated reports and medical diagnoses of maltreatment among the 73,404 children of 56,087 U.S. Army soldiers with a single deployment between 2001 and 2007. Cox proportional hazard models estimated hazard rates of maltreatment across deployment periods and simultaneously considered main effects for other child- and family-level characteristics across periods. In adjusted models, maltreatment hazard was highest in the 6 months following deployment (hazard ratio [HR] = 1.63, p Army to better direct resources that prevent and address child maltreatment. Reprint & Copyright © 2017 Association of Military Surgeons of the U.S.

  11. Assessment of surgeon fatigue by surgical simulators

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tuwairqi K

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available Khaled Tuwairqi,1 Jessica H Selter,2 Shameema Sikder3 1College of Medicine, University of Utah, Salt Lake City, UT, 2Johns Hopkins School of Medicine, 3Wilmer Eye Institute, Johns Hopkins University, Baltimore, MD, USA Background: The impact of fatigue on surgical performance and its implications for patient care is a growing concern. While investigators have employed a number of different tools to measure the effect of fatigue on surgical performance, the use of the surgical simulator has been increasingly implemented for this purpose. The goal of this paper is to review the published literature to achieve a better understanding of evaluation of fatigue on performance as studied with surgical simulators. Methods: A PubMed and Cochrane search was conducted using the search terms “simulator”, “surgery”, and “fatigue”. In total, 50 papers were evaluated, and 20 studies were selected after application of exclusion criteria. Articles were excluded if they did not use the simulator to assess the impact of fatigue on surgeon performance. Systematic reviews and case reports were also excluded. Results: Surgeon fatigue led to a consistent decline in cognitive function in six studies. Technical skills were evaluated in 18 studies, and a detrimental impact was reported in nine studies, while the remaining nine studies showed either no change or positive results with regard to surgical skills after experience of fatigue. Two pharmacological intervention studies reversed the detrimental impact of fatigue on cognitive function, but no change or a worsening effect was recognized for technical skills. Conclusion: Simulators are increasingly being used to evaluate the impact of fatigue on the surgeon's performance. With regard to the impact of fatigue in this regard, studies have demonstrated a consistent decline in cognitive function and mixed outcomes for technical skills. Larger studies that relate the simulator's results to real surgical

  12. Surgeons' motivation for choice of workplace.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kähler, Lena; Kristiansen, Maria; Rudkjøbing, Andreas; Strandberg-Larsen, Martin

    2012-09-01

    To ensure qualified health care professionals at public hospitals in the future, it is important to understand which factors attract health care professionals to certain positions. The aim of this study was to explore motives for choosing employment at either public or private hospitals in a group of Danish surgeons, as well as to examine if organizational characteristics had an effect on motivation. Eight qualitative interviews were conducted with surgeons from both public and private hospitals sampled using the snowball method. The interviews were based on a semi-structured interview guide and analyzed by means of phenomenological theory. Motivational factors such as personal influence on the job, the opportunity to provide the best possible patient care, challenging work tasks colleagues, and ideological reasons were emphasized by the surgeons as important reasons for their choice of employment. Motivational factors appeared to be strongly connected to the structure of the organization; especially the size of the organization was perceived to be essential. It is worth noting that salary, in contrast to the general belief, was considered a secondary benefit rather than a primary motivational factor for employment. The study revealed that motivational factors are multidimensional and rooted in organizational structure; i.e. organizational size rather than whether the organization is public or private is crucial. There is a need for further research on the topic, but it seems clear that future health care planning may benefit from taking into account the implications that large organizational structures have for the staff working within these organizations. not relevant. not relevant.

  13. American Orthopaedic Surgeons in World War I.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Green, David P; DeLee, Jesse C

    2017-04-05

    On April 6, 1917, the United States declared war on Germany and entered what was then called the Great War. Among the first officers sent to Europe were 21 orthopaedic surgeons in the so-called First Goldthwait Unit. Prior to the war, orthopaedics had been a nonoperative "strap-and-buckle" specialty that dealt primarily with infections, congenital abnormalities, and posttraumatic deformity. The Great War changed all of that forever, creating a new surgical specialty with emphasis on acute treatment, prevention of deformity, restoration of function, and rehabilitation.

  14. What expects orthopedic surgeon from bone scan?

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sutter, B.; Cazenave, A.

    2003-01-01

    The isotope bone scan continues to be one of the 'lost widely performed nuclear medicine investigations. Beyond the common clinical indication like detection of skeletal metastases, bone scan use is increasing in benign orthopedic conditions, and after orthopedic surgery, despite development of new investigations modalities (US, MRI). Three (or two) phase bone scintigraphy, Single Photon Emission Computer Tomography have increased its value and provided new clinical roles. This review emphasizes through some practical clinical examples how to increase diagnostic value of the method and to offer an adapted response to the orthopedic surgeon's attempts. (author)

  15. Discordance between patient and surgeon satisfaction after total joint arthroplasty.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harris, Ian A; Harris, Anita M; Naylor, Justine M; Adie, Sam; Mittal, Rajat; Dao, Alan T

    2013-05-01

    We surveyed 331 patients undergoing total hip or knee arthroplasty pre-operatively, and patients and surgeons were both surveyed 6 and 12 months post-operatively. We identified variables (demographic factors, operative factors and patient expectations) as possible predictors for discordance in patient-surgeon satisfaction. At 12 months, 94.5% of surgeons and 90.3% of patients recorded satisfaction with the outcome. The discordance between patient and surgeon satisfaction was mainly due to patient dissatisfaction-surgeon satisfaction. In an adjusted analysis, the strongest predictors of discordance in patient-surgeon satisfaction were unmet patient expectations and the presence of complications. Advice to potential joint arthroplasty candidates regarding the decision to proceed with surgery should be informed by patient reported outcomes, rather than the surgeon's opinion of the likelihood of success. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  16. Armed Helicopters: How the Army Fought Its Way into Attack Aviation

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-04-01

    53 Coleman, 216. 54 “Aerial Rocket Artillery History,” www.aerial-rocket-artillery.org, 2012. 55 Moore , 49 . 56 Coleman, 217. 57 Dustan, 88-89...helicopter came in the form of the YR - 4B helicopter in a rescue mission of a downed British pilot in Burma on 21 April 1944.16 The demonstration of...known as the Howze Board.37 New Secretary of Defense Robert McNamara directed that the Army take a “bold new look” at mobility and directed that the

  17. Army Contract Writing System (ACWS)

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-03-01

    2016 Major Automated Information System Annual Report Army Contract Writing System (ACWS) Defense Acquisition Management Information Retrieval...Military Construction MS - Milestone N/A - Not Applicable O&S - Operating and Support OSD - Office of the Secretary of Defense PB - President’s...Budget RDT&E - Research, Development, Test, and Evaluation SAE - Service Acquisition Executive TBD - To Be Determined TY - Then Year U.S.C- United

  18. The Marketability of Army Officers

    Science.gov (United States)

    1992-04-14

    capital ( Nussbaum , 1988).I I I I 1 19 I Governmental measures at the state level which foster job training include the California Employment Training I...Plight. Business Month, 133 (1) : 50-51. Nussbaum , B. 1988. Needed: Human Capital. Business Week, 3070: 100-103. Novack, J. 1991. Back to civy street...The second son of Howell J. and Martha Malham, he graduated from Memorial High School, Houston, I Texas, in May 1976 and entered the United States Army

  19. 2011 Army Strategic Planning Guidance

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-03-25

    TESI ) of 22,000 Soldiers, the Army’s total force by the end of the mid-term period is programmed to be 520K (AC). We will achieve a more...dwell ratios, extending TESI authority to adequately man deploying units and sustain the All-Volunteer Force, right-sizing the generating force, and... TESI Temporary End-Strength Increase WMD Weapons of Mass Destruction 2011 ARMY STRATEGIC PLANNING GUIDANCE Page 19 2011

  20. Acquisition: Army Claims Service Military Interdepartmental Purchase Requests

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    2002-01-01

    .... The Army Claims Service supports the Army and the Judge Advocate General Corps by managing the Army claims system, which includes processing tort and personnel claims, and recovering funds owed...

  1. Issues and Insights from the Army Technology Seminar Game

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Darilek, Richard

    2001-01-01

    ...). The AAN goals were to link Army XXI to a long-term vision of the Army extending well into the 21st century and to ensure that this vision informed evolving Army research and development requirements...

  2. Controls Over Army Real Property Financial Reporting

    Science.gov (United States)

    2008-03-28

    Controls Over Army Real Property Financial Reporting Report No. D-2008-072 March 28, 2008 Report Documentation Page Form...COVERED 00-00-2008 to 00-00-2008 4. TITLE AND SUBTITLE Controls Over Army Real Property Financial Reporting 5a. CONTRACT NUMBER 5b. GRANT NUMBER...DIRECTOR, DEFENSE FINANCE AND ACCOUNTING SERVICE SUBJECT: Report on Controls Over Army Real Property Financial Reporting ( Report No. D-2008-072

  3. British women's attitudes to surrogacy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Poote, A E; van den Akker, O B A

    2009-01-01

    There has been little interest in the research literature on public opinions regarding assisted conception and surrogacy, particularly in European countries, despite the growing evidence showing that problems in adaptation and coping may be related to perceived normative values. This study investigated British women's attitudes to surrogacy using components of the theory of planned behaviour (TPB). Questionnaires on attitudes to surrogacy and reasons for parenthood were completed by 187 women from the general public. Significant socio-demographic differences were found between women who were possibly willing (n = 76) and those who were unwilling (n = 111) to become surrogate mothers. General attitudes to surrogacy also differed between groups (P = 0.000). This study supported the predictive utility of components of the TPB, and differentiated adequately between groups on attitudes to recruitment for surrogacy (P = 0.000), the consequences of surrogacy (P = 0.000), factors that induce people to become surrogates (P = 0.000), social support (P = 0.000), having personal control (P = 0.002) and reasons for parenthood (P = 0.000). Age (P = 0.000), attitudes to advertising (P = 0.02) and the consequences of surrogacy (P = 0.05) predicted (un)willingness to become a potential surrogate mother. Further research is needed with larger sample sizes of potential surrogates to determine whether the predictive attitudes reported here translate to actual behaviours. The larger group which was not interested in considering becoming a surrogate scored significantly more negatively on all attitudes towards surrogacy. The negative attitudes reported by the 'unwilling to consider being a surrogate' group may reflect attitudes held by the majority of the population and are likely to be influenced by reports of stigma associated with surrogacy.

  4. The British Empire and the English Curriculum.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thron, E. Michael

    1987-01-01

    Examines the recent call for English departments to recognize literature that falls outside the British and American tradition. Suggests that we recognize English as a world language and choose books to teach accordingly. (JC)

  5. British and American attitudes toward credit cards.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Bijou; James, Simon; Lester, David

    2006-04-01

    American university students owned more than twice as many credit cards as British university students. However, scores on a credit card attitude scale predicted the number of cards owned by respondents in both countries.

  6. Efficiency Studies in the British Universities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lockwood, Geoffrey

    1986-01-01

    The background, purposes, and methods of institutional efficiency studies conducted at selected British universities are discussed. The evaluations focused on financial management, purchasing, and building maintenance and space utilization. (MSE)

  7. Opportunities in Total Knee Arthroplasty: Worldwide Surgeons' Perspective.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dunbar, Michael; Newman, Jared M; Khlopas, Anton; Chughtai, Morad; Martinez, Nick; Bhowmik-Stoker, Manoshi; Mont, Michael A

    2017-07-25

    This study surveyed a group of US and international orthopaedic surgeons to prioritize areas of improvement in primary total knee arthroplasty (TKA). Specifically, we assessed surgeon responses regarding the top five areas of TKA needing improvement; which were stratified by: a) US surgeons, b) international surgeons, c) US surgeons' implant-brand-loyalty, and d) surgeons' years of experience and case volume. Four hundred and eighteen surgeons who were board-certified, in practice for at least two years, spent 60% of their time in clinical practice, and performed a minimum of 25 lower extremity joint arthroplasties per year were surveyed. They chose the top five areas (among 17) needing improvement for TKA. Results were stratified by surgeons' location (US and international), implant-brand-loyalty, years of experience, and case volume. Functional outcomes was the top identified area for improvement (US 63% and international 71%), followed by brand loyalty (Company I 68%, other brand 59%, and multi-brand/no loyalty 66%), years of experience (early-career 64%, mid-career 63%, and late-career 75%) and case volume (low-volume 69%, mid-volume 60%, and high-volume 71%). Following this was costs for US surgeons (47%) and implant survivorship for international surgeons (57%). While costs were the next highest area for specific Company-loyal surgeons (57%), implant survivorship was the next highest area for the other two cohorts. Implant survivorship was the second most important area of improvement regardless of years of experience and for low- and mid-volume surgeons. Surgeons identified functional outcomes as the most important area needing improvement. Cost of implants was more important for American as compared to international surgeons.

  8. 2013 CENTER FOR ARMY LEADERSHIP ANNUAL SURVEY OF ARMY LEADERSHIP (CASAL): MAIN FINDINGS

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-04-30

    Leadership Requirements Model and Leader Effectiveness Implicit leadership theory (Eden & Leviatan, 1975; Yukl, 2002) indicates followers’ perceptions...Department of the Army. Eden, D. & Leviatan, U. (1975). Implicit leadership theory as a determinant of the factor structure underlying supervisory...2013 CENTER FOR ARMY LEADERSHIP ANNUAL SURVEY OF ARMY LEADERSHIP (CASAL): MAIN FINDINGS TECHNICAL REPORT 2014-01 Ryan

  9. [Meaningful advanced training concepts for surgeons].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ansorg, J; Krüger, M; Vallböhmer, D

    2012-04-01

    A state of the art surgical training is crucial for the attraction of surgery as a medical profession. The German surgical community can only succeed in overcoming the shortage of young surgeons by the development of an attractive and professional training environment. Responsibility for surgical training has to be taken by the heads of department as well as by the surgical societies. Good surgical training should be deemed to be part of the corporate strategy of German hospitals and participation in external courses has to be properly funded by the hospital management. On the other hand residents are asked for commitment and flexibility and should keep records in logbooks and take part in assessment projects to gain continuing feedback on their learning progress. The surgical community is in charge of developing a structured but flexible training curriculum for each of the eight surgical training trunks. A perfect future curriculum has to reflect and cross-link local hospital training programs with a central training portfolio of a future Academy of German Surgeons, such as workshops, courses and e-learning projects. This challenge has to be dealt with in close cooperation by all surgical boards and societies. A common sense of surgery as a community in diversity is crucial for the success of this endeavour.

  10. Perspectives of being spouse, parent, and surgeon.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Murtha, Yvonne

    2013-10-01

    Achieving a balance between one's career and personal life is a never-ending challenge. As a surgeon, add-on cases and double-booked clinics can lead to long hours at work and make availability for family time unpredictable. It may seem like the threat of interruption because of patient needs always loom. Disruptions to family time extend beyond the long hours spent in surgery and clinics. Inattentiveness at home because of the technology tethers that keep one available for constant questions and patient care issues can also distract from time spent with family. Although the practice of an orthopaedic trauma surgeon can involve unpredictable schedules and patient care issues, there are means of mitigating the chaos that can envelop one's personal life as a result of a chosen career track. Clear priorities and expectations in both personal and professional arenas can improve the work-life balance. Flexible jobs that allow for more time with family do exist. Negotiating for this flexibility and self-assurance in holding fast to personal ideals are important in achieving a successful balance.

  11. Emergency surgeon-performed hepatobiliary ultrasonography.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Kell, M R

    2012-02-03

    BACKGROUND: Acute hepatobiliary pathology is a common general surgical emergency referral. Diagnosis requires imaging of the biliary tree by ultrasonography. The accuracy and impact of surgeon-performed ultrasonography (SUS) on the diagnosis of emergent hepatobiliary pathology was examined. METHODS: A prospective study, over a 6-month period, enrolled all patients with symptoms or signs of acute hepatobiliary pathology. Patients provided informed consent and underwent both SUS and standard radiology-performed ultrasonography (RUS). SUS was performed using a 2-5-MHz broadband portable ultrasound probe by two surgeons trained in ultrasonography, and RUS using a 2-5-MHz fixed unit. SUS results were correlated with those of RUS and pathological diagnoses. RESULTS: Fifty-three consecutive patients underwent 106 ultrasonographic investigations. SUS agreed with RUS in 50 (94.3 per cent) of 53 patients. SUS accurately detected cholelithiasis in all but two cases and no patient was inaccurately diagnosed as having cholelithiasis at SUS (95.2 per cent sensitivity and 100 per cent specificity). As an overall complementary diagnostic tool SUS provided the correct diagnosis in 96.2 per cent of patients. Time to scan was significantly shorter following SUS (3.1 versus 12.0 h, P < 0.05). CONCLUSION: SUS provides a rapid and accurate diagnosis of emergency hepatobiliary pathology and may contribute to the emergency management of hepatobiliary disease.

  12. Laparoscopy In Unexplained Abdominal Pain: Surgeon's Perspective.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abdullah, Muhammad Tariq; Waqar, Shahzad Hussain; Zahid, Muhammad Abdul

    2016-01-01

    Unexplained abdominal pain is a common but difficult presenting feature faced by the clinicians. Such patients can undergo a number of investigations with failure to reach any diagnosis. The objective of this study was to evaluate the use of laparoscopy in the diagnosis and management of patients with unexplained abdominal pain. This cross-sectional study was conducted at Pakistan Institute of Medical Sciences Islamabad from January 2009 to December 2013. This study included 91 patients of unexplained abdominal pain not diagnosed by routine clinical examination and investigations. These patients were subjected to diagnostic laparoscopy for evaluation of their conditions and to confirm the diagnosis. These patients presented 43% of patients undergoing investigations for abdominal pain. Patients diagnosed with gynaecological problems were excluded to see surgeon's perspective. The findings and the outcomes of the laparoscopy were recorded and data was analyzed. Unexplained abdominal pain is common in females than in males. The most common laparoscopic findings were abdominal tuberculosis followed by appendicitis. Ninety percent patients achieved pain relief after laparoscopic intervention. Laparoscopy is both beneficial and safe in majority of patients with unexplained abdominal pain. General surgeons should acquire training and experience in laparoscopic surgery to provide maximum benefit to these difficult patients.

  13. Priorities for professionalism: what do surgeons think?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hillis, David J; Gorton, Michael W; Barraclough, Bruce H; Beckett, David

    2015-05-04

    To gain an understanding of the relative importance of the nine surgical competencies and their 27 attributes defined by the Royal Australasian College of Surgeons (RACS), which together provide the curriculum framework for today's surgeons. Between 9 August and 30 September 2010, trainees and Fellows of the RACS across Australia and New Zealand actively involved in educational activities rated, via questionnaire, the importance of the RACS competencies (technical expertise, communication, professionalism, medical expertise, judgement and decision making, scholarship and teaching, collaboration and teamwork, management and leadership, and health advocacy) and associated attributes. Importance ranking of competencies and their attributes for surgical education and training. Of 3054 questionnaires distributed, 1834 (60%) were returned. We identified clear priorities in the perceived relative importance of the nine competencies and 27 attributes. The most important attributes were competence, insight, and recognising conditions amenable to surgery; least important were responding to community and cultural needs, supporting others, and maintaining personal health and wellbeing. Key differences were noted for the competency of collaboration and teamwork, which was ranked as more important by trainees than by Fellows. Female trainees and Fellows regarded all attributes as more important than did male trainees and Fellows. In a complex environment with multiple pressures, the priorities of the competencies are important. Trainees and Fellows had a very similar approach to the prioritisation of the attributes. Of concern is the lesser importance given to attributes beyond individual expertise.

  14. Some Differences Between British And American English

    OpenAIRE

    Tarigan, Ellemina

    2011-01-01

    Kertas karya ini berjudul “Some Differences Between British and American English”. Kertas karya ini memaparkan secara singkat tentang perbedaan antara British and American English baik dalam speling, grammar, maupun vocabulary sehingga akan diketahui secara jelas perbedaan diantara keduanya. Metode yang digunakan dalam penelitian ini adalah metode kepustakaan dengan membaca beberapa buku bahasa Inggris sebagai bahan referensi yang dapat mendukung topik. Dari pemaparan diatas ada beberapa hasi...

  15. Addressing Deficiencies in Army Civilian Leader Development

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Keller, Jonathan S

    2008-01-01

    .... A well managed, comparable, and integrated Army leader training, education, and development framework, designed to create shared and combined developmental experiences, is essential for growing...

  16. Institution of a Rubella Screening and Immunization Program at Tripler Army Medical Center

    Science.gov (United States)

    1979-06-01

    Office of the Surgeon General, "Rubella Immunizations of Females," Letter DASG- HCH -D, February 14, 1974. 3Department of the Army, Headquarters, United...their hands and feet or the knees" for a short period of time. - - In mid-1978, the Infection Control Committee at TAMC was given approval to "develop...suitability for duty because of il l ness,, ccordination wi l be achieved "\\i th the Occupati onal Heal th Cl inic. 72 .p / SELECTED BIBLIOGRAPHY SELECTED

  17. Brigadier General James Stevens Simmons (1890-1954), Medical Corps, United States Army: a career in preventive medicine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marble, Sanders

    2012-02-01

    James Simmons began his career in the US Army as a laboratory officer and his assignments progressed into tropical medicine research. His interests and work evolved into preventive medicine (PM, as the Army termed public health), and he took both a PhD and a Doctorate in Public Health. As the Army's leading PM officer he was appointed head of PM in 1940 and guided the Army's PM effort through World War II. His responsibility ran from gas masks through healthy nutrition and occupational health to an enormous variety of diseases; by the war's end, the breadth and importance of PM was reflected in the Preventive Medicine Division, having fully one-sixth of all military personnel at the Surgeon General's Office. Simmons used his strong professional credentials to tap into civilian medicine for expertise the Army lacked and he established organizations that survive to this day. After retirement, he sought to expand the field of public health and raise another generation of public health physicians.

  18. Influence of new military athletic footwear on the kinetics and kinematics of running in relation to army boots.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sinclair, Jonathan; Taylor, Paul J

    2014-10-01

    Musculoskeletal injuries in the lower extremities are common in military recruits. Army boots have frequently been cited as a potential mechanism behind these high injury rates. In response to this, the British Army introduced new footwear models, the PT-03 (cross-trainer) and PT1000 (running shoes), which are issued to each new recruit in an attempt to reduce the incidence of these injuries. The aim of the current investigation was to examine the kinetics and kinematic of the PT-03 and PT1000 footwear in relation to conventional army boots. Thirteen participants ran at 4.0 m·s in each footwear condition. Three-dimensional kinematics from the hip, knee, and ankle were measured using an 8-camera motion analysis system. In addition, simultaneous ground reaction forces were obtained. Kinetic parameters were obtained alongside joint kinematics and compared using repeated-measures analyses of variance. The kinetic analysis revealed that impact parameters were significantly greater when running in the army boot compared with the PT-03 and PT1000. The kinematic analysis indicated that, in comparison with the PT-03 and PT1000, running in army boots was associated with significantly greater eversion and tibial internal rotation. It was also found that when running in the PT-03 footwear, participants exhibited significantly greater hip adduction and knee abduction compared with the army boots and PT1000. The results of this study suggest that the army boots and PT-03 footwear are associated with kinetic and kinematic parameters that have been linked to the etiology of injury; thus, it is recommended that the PT1000 footwear be adopted for running exercises.

  19. Burnout in the Plastic Surgeon: Implications and Interventions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prendergast, Christina; Ketteler, Erika; Evans, Gregory

    2017-03-01

    A career as a plastic surgeon is both rewarding and challenging. The road to becoming a surgeon is a long arduous endeavor and can bring significant challenges not only to the surgeon but their family. A study by the American College of Surgeons (ACS) suggested that over 40% of surgeons experience burnout and a recent survey of American Society of Plastic Surgeons (ASPS) showed that more than one-fourth of plastic surgeons have signs of professional burnout. Burnout is a state of physical and mental exhaustion. The three main components of burnout are emotional exhaustion, depersonalization, and reduced personal accomplishment. Exhaustion occurs as a result of emotional demands. Depersonalization refers to a cynical, negative or a detached response to patient care. The reduced accomplishment refers to a belief that one can no longer work effectively. There has been a recent explosion in the literature characterizing burnout within the surgical profession. Reports of burnout, burnout victims, and burnout syndrome are filling the medical literature, books, blogs, and social media across all different specialties. Burnout in a plastic surgeon has negative and potentially fatal repercussions to the surgeon, their family, their patients, their staff, colleagues, coworkers, and their organization. To date, there are a limited number of publications addressing burnout in the plastic surgery community. The goals of this paper are to review the symptoms of burnout, its effect on plastic surgeons, and discuss potential solutions for burnout prevention and physician wellness.

  20. Sexual Assault: Better Resource Management Needed to Improve Prevention and Response in the Army National Guard and Army Reserve

    Science.gov (United States)

    2017-02-01

    the commanding officer of an accused servicemember. 21Army Regulation 600-20 defines sexual harassment as a form of gender discrimination that...SEXUAL ASSAULT Better Resource Management Needed to Improve Prevention and Response in the Army National Guard and Army...Resource Management Needed to Improve Prevention and Response in the Army National Guard and Army Reserve What GAO Found The Army National Guard

  1. Suicide Attempts in the United States Army

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ursano, Robert J.; Kessler, Ronald C.; Stein, Murray B.; Naifeh, James A.; Aliaga, Pablo A.; Fullerton, Carol S.; Sampson, Nancy A.; Kao, Tzu-Cheg; Colpe, Lisa J.; Schoenbaum, Michael; Cox, Kenneth L.; Heeringa, Steven G.

    2015-01-01

    Importance The U.S. Army suicide attempt rate increased sharply during the wars in Afghanistan and Iraq. Comprehensive research on this important health outcome has been hampered by a lack of integration among Army administrative data systems. Objective To identify risk factors for Regular Army suicide attempts during the years 2004–2009 using data from the Army Study to Assess Risk and Resilience in Servicemembers (Army STARRS). Design, Setting, and Participants There were 9,791 medically documented suicide attempts among Regular Army soldiers during the study period. Individual-level person-month records from Army and Department of Defense administrative data systems were analyzed to identify socio-demographic, service-related, and mental health risk factors distinguishing suicide attempt cases from an equal-probability control sample of 183,826 person-months. Main Outcome and Measures Suicide attempts were identified using Department of Defense Suicide Event Report records and ICD-9 E95x diagnostic codes. Predictor variables were constructed from Army personnel and medical records. Results Enlisted soldiers accounted for 98.6% of all suicide attempts, with an overall rate of 377/100,000 person-years, versus 27.9/100,000 person-years for officers. Significant multivariate predictors among enlisted soldiers included socio-demographic characteristics (female gender, older age at Army entry, younger current age, low education, non-hispanic white), short length of service, never or previously deployed, and the presence and recency of mental health diagnoses. Among officers, only socio-demographic characteristics (female gender, older age at Army entry, younger current age, and low education) and the presence and recency of mental health diagnoses were significant. Conclusions and Relevance Results represent the most comprehensive accounting of U.S. Army suicide attempts to date and reveal unique risk profiles for enlisted soldiers and officers, and highlighting the

  2. Drs. Smith Brothers: dental surgeons of Calcutta.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sanjeev, Kumar

    2014-01-01

    During the British raj, India attracted dental practitioners from all over the world who set up practices in the Presidency towns of Calcutta, Bombay, Madras and Bangalore. Lured by the abundant opportunity to make good money, these mercenary but courageous dentists counted Viceroys, Indian royalty and political leaders amongst their clients. Some, like the famous American Smith Brothers of Calcutta, were sought after even by the rulers of neighboring countries. Dr. Mark Smith's hazardous visit to the Amir of Afghanistan made worldwide headlines more than 100 years ago for the fabulous fee he was paid for the dental treatment. This paper briefly describes the exploits and experiences of the Smith brothers while in India.

  3. Medical Evaluation Board for Mental Health Condition: U.S. Army Officer Medical Evaluation Board Data by Branch and Component.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thomas, William A; Doane, Eric L; Gallavan, Robert H; Tavares, Spencer; Jones, Mark C

    2017-09-01

    A retrospective review of Medical Evaluation Board (MEB) data to determine the effect of career field or Army component on the relative risk for mental health (MH) related MEBs among Army Officers, may identify specific populations for enhanced screening before accession, or groups that may require targeted preventive resources during their careers. 4 years' of data available on Army Officers from the Department of the Army's Electronic Disability Evaluation System database, contained specific information on the officers' physical profiles, career fields, and service component. This information was compared with a dataset provided by the Defense Manpower Data Center (DMDC), reporting documented force strength by career field and service component for the corresponding years, allowing for calculation and comparison of MEB and MH-MEB rates between Army components and between career fields. Significant differences in MEB and MH-MEB rates were found between Army components, but database gaps make this assessment uncertain. When comparing MEB and MH-MEB rates between career fields (regardless of service component), 9 career fields had statistically significant higher risk rates of MEB and/or MH-MEB, whereas 13 career fields showed significantly lower rates of MEB and/or MH-MEB. Frequency of Army Officer MEBs and/or MH-MEBs were variable and career field dependent; the underlying causes of these variations warrant further research. The use of the Electronic Disability Evaluation System database for the Integrated Disability Evaluation System process is a rich source of data for in-depth analysis, but the program itself and the procedures for its use need to be improved to obtain more complete information. Reprint & Copyright © 2017 Association of Military Surgeons of the U.S.

  4. Should advertising by aesthetic surgeons be permitted?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Neeraj Nagpal

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Cosmetic, aesthetic and cutaneous surgical procedures require qualified specialists trained in the various procedures and competent to handle complications. However, it also requires huge investments in terms of infrastructure, trained staff and equipment. To be viable advertising is essential to any establishment which provides cosmetic and aesthetic procedures. Business men with deep pockets establish beauty chains which also provide these services and advertise heavily to sway public opinion in their favour. However, these saloons and spas lack basic medical facilities in terms of staff or equipment to handle any complication or medical emergency. To have a level playing field ethical advertising should be permitted to qualified aesthetic surgeons as is permitted in the US and UK by their respective organisations.

  5. Norman Bethune, Canadian surgeon: his Chinese connection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Summers, G V

    1983-07-01

    Norman Bethune, a Canadian thoracic surgeon who dabbled in painting, poetry, criticism, teaching and invention, was a member of the Communist Party of Canada. He became involved in two civil wars on opposite sides of the world and amassed both criticism and respect from colleagues and national leaders. The author describes Bethune's time in China, during which he developed front line field hospitals for Mao Tse-tung and his guerrillas in their struggle against the Japanese during 1938 and 1939. His efforts in China on behalf of the wounded brought him into contact with the primitive military medicine of the country and the poverty of its people; it earned for him a local reputation as saviour and benefactor and gave him an honoured place in Chinese military history.

  6. [Surgeon Josef Hohlbaum--life story].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stingl, J; Kästner, I; Mísková, A; Musil, V

    2009-03-01

    Professor Josef Hohlbaum (*Sept. 6, 1884 in Oberlindewiese, Northern Moravia) studied medicine in Graz, Austria. His main place of work was Leipzig, Germany, where he became an outstanding surgeon and a very good university teacher. Between 1941 and 1945, he was the last chairman of Surgery of the German University in Prague. On May 9, 1945, he was arrested by the Czech police and imprisoned in the internment camp in Klecany. At the end of June 1945, during farming work, his left leg was seriously injuried by an explosive, found by a Czech guard and thrown under Hohlbaums' foot. J. Hohlbaum received first wound treatment and was admitted to the Surgical Department of the Královské Vinohrady Hospital in Prague 10, where he spent 6 weeks. Thereafter, at his request, he was transferred to the German Military Hospital in Prague 5. During the autumn of 1945, he was transferred to Germany, his condition grew more and more worse, and, consequently, his left lower extremity had to be amputated in femore. On December 30, 1945, he died of sepsis in the Surgical department of the Hospital in Markkleeberg, near Leipzig. The authors could not find any evidence that Hohlbaums' professional contemporary, the Czech surgeon professor A. Jirásek, presented a non-ethical attitude to the injured J. Hohlbaum, and that Jirásek refused to treat him, as it has been repeatedly presented in German publications. On the contrary, it is evident from the documents found, that the care he got in Prague--with respect to the difficult circumstances--was lege artis. Hohlbaunt's life thus ended as a consequence of the situation at the end of WWII.

  7. Factitious disorders: potential litigation risks for plastic surgeons.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eisendrath, Stuart J; Telischak, Katherine S

    2008-01-01

    Patients with factitious physical disorders can present with a myriad of signs and symptoms. Common presentations include persistent wounds and abscesses that are often treated by plastic surgeons. Because these individuals are surreptitiously trying to maintain their illness, rather than recover, adverse outcomes are common, particularly when the plastic surgeon has not detected the factitious etiology. Well-meaning plastic surgeons trying to help difficult-to-treat patients may be at high risk for poor outcomes with factitious disorder patients. When these outcomes occur, these patients may focus their underlying anger or other feelings on their plastic surgeons and may initiate litigation. This article discusses 2 cases in which plastic surgeons were sued for malpractice by factitious disorder patients. We outline clues to the recognition of factitious disorders and steps the plastic surgeon can take to initiate appropriate treatment, which may reduce the risk of litigation.

  8. The Plastic Surgeon as Employee: A Pilot Survey of the California Society of Plastic Surgeons.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Patel, Nirav Bipin; Coombs, Demetrius M; Arsalai, Mena; Li, Chin-Shang; Liu, Yu; Stevenson, Thomas R; Pu, Lee L Q

    2017-05-01

    Plastic surgeons endure years of training yet remain poorly equipped to negotiate first employment contracts. Our aims were to evaluate typical plastic surgeon employment contracts and assess contract comprehensiveness. We sought elements that should be included to better preserve varied interests. A brief, anonymous, e-mailed survey was sent to California Society of Plastic Surgeons members and responses collected over 2 months. We collected information such as years in practice, geographic area, types of practices and number of surgeons within them, and legal standing of partnerships. We asked whether respondents sought legal assistance and specific elements were elaborated. We asked how content they were with their contracts while allowing commentary. Our survey generated 113 responses. 50.0% of respondents reported being in practice for at least 20 years; 2.68% had been in practice for up to 5 years. 62.5% reported being in private practice and 27.7% reported being in academia. In-state geographic distribution of respondents accounted for 85.6%, whereas 14.4% reported practicing out-of-state.Practice size was diverse, with 41.4% of respondents having worked in a group practice of 3 or more, 27.9% in partnership, and 23.4% in solo practice. For partnerships, 29.9% had made formal legal arrangements, whereas 20.6% had made informal arrangements. 74.5% of respondents did not seek legal assistance.Malpractice coverage varied from 51.6% with claims-made, to 21.7% with tail, to 33.0% with no coverage at all. 63.9% reported having no group disability policy. 26.4% reported annual income of less than US $100,000; 49.1% reported US $101,000 to US $200,000; 17.9% reported US $201,000 to US $300,000; 6.60% reported greater than US $300,000. Using a 5-point scale, 7.69% of respondents reported being "extremely dissatisfied" with their first employment contracts (score of 1), whereas 24.0% were "perfectly happy" (5).Eighty-two respondents offered advice. Common themes

  9. After the Spring: Reforming Arab Armies

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-09-01

    Arab region, and intercultural communication . She was previously assigned to the North Atlantic Treaty Organization (NATO) Defence College and the...and provides solutions to strategic Army issues affecting the national security community . The Peacekeeping and Stability Operations Institute...concern topics having strategic implications for the Army, the Department of Defense, and the larger national security community . In addition to its

  10. Army industrial, landscaping, and agricultural water use

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Stoughton, Kate McMordie [Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Loper, Susan A. [Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Boyd, Brian K. [Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States)

    2014-09-18

    The Pacific Northwest National Laboratory conducted a task for the Deputy Assistant Secretary of the Army to quantify the Army’s ILA water use and to help improve the data quality and installation water reporting in the Army Energy and Water Reporting System.

  11. 32 CFR 631.14 - Army policy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ...) Soldiers, military and/or Department of the Army Civilian (DAC) police performing off-installation... areas OCONUS. (b) Military and/or DAC police assigned to off-installation operations have the sole... under the command of, U.S. Army superiors. Military and DAC police may come to the aid of civilian law...

  12. British Teachers' Transnational Work within and beyond the British Empire after the Second World War

    Science.gov (United States)

    Whitehead, Kay

    2017-01-01

    Focusing on British graduates from Gipsy Hill Training College (GHTC) in London, this article illustrates transnational history's concerns with the reciprocal flows of people and ideas within and beyond the British Empire. GHTC's progressive curriculum and culture positioned women teachers as agents of change, and the article highlights the lives…

  13. Solving the surgeon ergonomic crisis with surgical exosuit.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Shanglei; Hemming, Daniel; Luo, Ran B; Reynolds, Jessica; Delong, Jonathan C; Sandler, Bryan J; Jacobsen, Garth R; Horgan, Santiago

    2018-01-01

    The widespread adoption of laparoscopic surgery has put new physical demands on the surgeon leading to increased musculoskeletal disorders and injuries. Shoulder, back, and neck pains are among the most common complaints experienced by laparoscopic surgeons. Here, we evaluate the feasibility and efficacy of a non-intrusive progressive arm support exosuit worn by surgeons under the sterile gown to reduce pain and fatigue during surgery. This is a prospective randomized crossover study approved by the Internal Review Board (IRB). The study involves three phases of testing. In each phase, general surgery residents or attendings were randomized to wearing the surgical exosuit at the beginning or at the crossover point. The first phase tests for surgeon manual dexterity wearing the device using the Minnesota Dexterity test, the Purdue Pegboard test, and the Fundamentals of Laparoscopic Surgery (FLS) modules. The second phase tests the effect of the device on shoulder pain and fatigue while operating the laparoscopic camera. The third phase rates surgeon experience in the operating room between case-matched operating days. Twenty subjects were recruited for this study. Surgeons had the similar dexterity scores and FLS times whether or not they wore the exosuit (p value ranges 0.15-0.84). All exosuit surgeons completed 15 min of holding laparoscopic camera compared to three non-exosuit surgeons (p < 0.02). Exosuit surgeons experienced significantly less fatigue at all time periods and arm pain (3.11 vs 5.88, p = 0.019) at 10 min. Surgeons wearing the exosuit during an operation experienced significant decrease in shoulder pain and 85% of surgeons reported some form of pain reduction at the end of the operative day. The progressive arm support exosuit can be a minimally intrusive device that laparoscopic surgeons wear to reduce pain and fatigue of surgery without significantly interfering with operative skills or manual dexterity.

  14. Among Musculoskeletal Surgeons, Job Dissatisfaction Is Associated With Burnout.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Wulfften Palthe, Olivier D R; Neuhaus, Valentin; Janssen, Stein J; Guitton, Thierry G; Ring, David

    2016-08-01

    Burnout is common in professions such as medicine in which employees have frequent and often stressful interpersonal interactions where empathy and emotional control are important. Burnout can lead to decreased effectiveness at work, negative health outcomes, and less job satisfaction. A relationship between burnout and job satisfaction is established for several types of physicians but is less studied among surgeons who treat musculoskeletal conditions. We asked: (1) For surgeons treating musculoskeletal conditions, what risk factors are associated with worse job dissatisfaction? (2) What risk factors are associated with burnout symptoms? Two hundred ten (52% of all active members of the Science of Variation Group [SOVG]) surgeons who treat musculoskeletal conditions (94% orthopaedic surgeons and 6% trauma surgeons; in Europe, general trauma surgeons do most of the fracture surgery) completed the Global Job Satisfaction instrument, Shirom-Malamed Burnout Measure, and provided practice and surgeon characteristics. Most surgeons were male (193 surgeons, 92%) and most were academically employed (186 surgeons, 89%). Factors independently associated with job satisfaction and burnout were identified with multivariable analysis. Greater symptoms of burnout (β, -7.13; standard error [SE], 0.75; 95% CI, -8.60 to -5.66; p job satisfaction. Having children (β, -0.45; SE, 0.0.21; 95% CI, -0.85 to -0.043; p = 0.030; adjusted R(2), 0.046) was the only factor independently associated with fewer symptoms of burnout. Among an active research group of largely academic surgeons treating musculoskeletal conditions, most are satisfied with their job. Efforts to limit burnout and job satisfaction by optimizing engagement in and deriving meaning from the work are effective in other settings and merit attention among surgeons. Level II, prognostic study.

  15. Postmastectomy Radiation Therapy: An Overview for the Practicing Surgeon

    OpenAIRE

    Jagsi, Reshma

    2013-01-01

    Locoregional control of breast cancer is the shared domain and responsibility of surgeons and radiation oncologists. Because surgeons are often the first providers to discuss locoregional control and recurrence risks with patients and because they serve in a key gatekeeping role as referring providers for radiation therapy, a sophisticated understanding of the evidence regarding radiotherapy in breast cancer management is essential for the practicing surgeon. This paper synthesizes the comple...

  16. Why the Combined Field Army?

    Science.gov (United States)

    1989-03-31

    COMBINED FIELD ARMY A September 1988 article in the Wall Street Journal points out the arenas of change underway on the Korean peninsula.16 Many important...with superior results. ENDNOTES 16. Susan Moffat, "Koreans Demanding Equality on Defense", The Wall Street Journal ., 28 September 1988,p20. 17. This...p46. 20. Roh Address, p6. 21. Susan Moffat, " In Korea, Reunification is a Family Matter", The Wall Street Journal , 23 January 1989, pAl0. 22. Bunge

  17. US Army blood program: 2025 and beyond.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gonzales, Richard; Taylor, Audra L; Atkinson, Andrew J; Malloy, Wilbur W; Macdonald, Victor W; Cap, Andrew P

    2016-03-01

    In preparing to support the Army in 2025 and beyond, the Army Blood Program remains actively engaged with the research and advanced development of blood products and medical technology to improve blood safety and efficacy in conjunction with the US Army Medical Research and Materiel Command. National and International Blood Bank authorities have noted that the US Army research and development efforts in providing new blood products and improving blood safety operate on the cutting edge of technology and are transformational for the global blood industry. Over the past 14 years, the Army has transformed how blood support is provided and improved the survival rate of casualties. Almost every product or process developed by or for the military has found an application in treating civilian patients. Conflicts have many unwanted consequences; however, in times of conflict, one positive aspect is the identification of novel solutions to improve the safety and efficacy of the blood supply. © 2015 AABB.

  18. Mentorship as Experienced by Women Surgeons in Japan.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yorozuya, Kyoko; Kawase, Kazumi; Akashi-Tanaka, Sadako; Kanbayashi, Chizuko; Nomura, Sachiyo; Tomizawa, Yasuko

    2016-01-01

    Women have accounted for over 30% of new medical students since 1995 in Japan. Establishing support systems for women surgeons to continue their work is a major issue in Japan. Mentorship can be one of the most effective means to help women surgeons to continue their work. The purpose of this study was to clarify the current status of mentorship among Japanese women surgeons and to discuss the role of mentors for women surgeons. Invitation letters were sent to all female members of the Japan Association of Women Surgeons in April 2011. An 84-item questionnaire survey was sent to those who agreed to participate in this study via the internet. Fifty-five surgeons participated in this study, a response rate of 48.7%. Sixty-seven percent of respondents found it difficult to continue in their job; 85% thought mentorship was necessary for women surgeons to progress in their careers; and 84% reported that they already had a mentor. Respondents thought that a mentor helped them to advance their clinical career, to stay in their job, and to provide moral support. However, mentors appeared to be less useful in helping them to advance their research career, to network, to increase their status, and to achieve a work-life balance. This study revealed areas where mentors appeared to be less helpful to women surgeons. The survey gave an indication of how to help improve and develop the career and personal life of women surgeons in Japan.

  19. Shark attack-related injuries: Epidemiology and implications for plastic surgeons.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ricci, Joseph A; Vargas, Christina R; Singhal, Dhruv; Lee, Bernard T

    2016-01-01

    The increased media attention to shark attacks has led to a heightened fear and public awareness. Although few sharks are considered dangerous, attacks on humans can result in large soft tissue defects necessitating the intervention of reconstructive surgeons. This study aims to evaluate and describe the characteristics of shark-related injuries in order to improve treatment. The Global Shark Accident File, maintained by the Shark Research Institute (Princeton, NJ, USA), is a compilation of all known worldwide shark attacks. Database records since the 1900s were reviewed to identify differences between fatal and nonfatal attacks, including: geography, injury pattern, shark species, and victim activity. Since the 1900s, there have been 5034 reported shark attacks, of which 1205 (22.7%) were fatal. Although the incidence of attacks per decade has increased, the percentage of fatalities has decreased. Characteristics of fatal attacks included swimming (p = 0.001), boating (p = 0.001), three or more bite sites (p = 0.03), limb loss (p = 0.001), or tiger shark attack (p = 0.002). The most common attacks were bites to the legs (41.8%) or arms (18.4%), with limb loss occurring in 7% of attacks. Geographically, the majority of attacks occurred in North America (36.7%) and Australia (26.5%). Most attacks in the USA occurred in Florida (49.1%) and California (13.6%). Although rare, shark attacks result in devastating injuries to patients. As these injuries often involve multiple sites and limb loss, this creates a significant challenge for reconstructive surgeons. Proper identification of the characteristics of the attack can aid in providing optimal care for those affected. Copyright © 2015 British Association of Plastic, Reconstructive and Aesthetic Surgeons. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  20. 9th Chapter of Surgeons' Lecture: the orthopaedic surgeon: historical perspective, ethical considerations and the future.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Balachandran, N

    1999-05-01

    From a fishing village with colonial surgeons from the East India Company, Singapore is now a medical and business hub servicing the region and beyond in trade and medical education. Orthopaedic Surgery is a young specialty and is the fastest growing sub-specialty in Surgery. Orthopaedic education in Singapore has a structured syllabus and training is coordinated with the Royal Colleges and the American Academy of Orthopaedic Surgeons. Part of the training as Fellows is in the United Kingdom and USA on an HMDP Fellowship. Ethics and Continuing Medical Education need further emphasis. Sub-specialisation in Orthopaedic Surgery is now well-established in Trauma, Adult Reconstructive Surgery, Sports Medicine, Spinal Surgery, Hand Surgery and Rehabilitation Medicine. Ageing in the next millennium with osteoporosis and hip fracture problems of gait and balance need more orthopaedic surgeons to be committed to rehabilitation medicine and voluntary service in the community. There is a need for good role models and knowledge on Quality Assurance, Clinical Pathways and Administration. Appropriate use of high technology and care for the aged in the community with dignity is fundamental to good ethical practice. Selfish, pecuniary interests will destroy the very soul and fabric of medicine.

  1. Coalbed gas : responsibility developed for British Columbians

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Coward, M. [British Columbia Ministry of Energy and Mines, Victoria, BC (Canada)

    2005-07-01

    This presentation provided a general background of coalbed gas (CBG) development opportunities in British Columbia. It included a review of the coal resource and geology; the regulatory process and other useful information for potential investors; geoscience and the environment; and community and First Nations issues. CBG activity in British Columbia is in the early stage of exploration. Fifty wells have been evaluated since 1999 and it is expected that CBG will play a large role in the province's future energy supplies. The common concerns that have been expressed by various communities throughout the province include responsible development and mitigating any impacts on land, air, water, wildlife and people. In response to public interest, the British Columbia Ministry of Energy and Mines has taken measures to regulate the environment and produced water. The government's approach to communities involves consultation with First Nations, which are key to resource development. tabs., figs.

  2. British firms mark progress off Viet Nam

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anon.

    1992-01-01

    British companies are making more inroads in exploring for oil and gas off Viet Nam. British Gas plc won a 25 year production sharing contract for a license off southern Viet Nam in the South China Sea. Meantime, London independent Lasmo plc started seismic surveys on the block adjoining the British Gas block. Separately, Thailand and Viet Nam have reached agreement to jointly explore for and develop oil and gas found in waters claimed by both countries. Plans call for the two countries to draw up joint development plans covering oil and gas resources in the southeastern fringe of the Gulf of Thailand. Bangkok officials say they would have preferred to delineate maritime boundaries with Hanoi, but opted for the joint development accord, noting that Thailand and Malaysia had taken 12 years to resolve a similar dispute

  3. Predictors of Army National Guard and Reserve members' use of Veteran Health Administration health care after demobilizing from OEF/OIF deployment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harris, Alex H S; Chen, Cheng; Mohr, Beth A; Adams, Rachel Sayko; Williams, Thomas V; Larson, Mary Jo

    2014-10-01

    This study described rates and predictors of Army National Guard and Army Reserve members' enrollment in and utilization of Veteran Health Administration (VHA) services in the 365 days following demobilization from an index deployment. We also explored regional and VHA facility variation in serving eligible members in their catchment areas. The sample included 125,434 Army National Guard and 48,423 Army Reserve members who demobilized after a deployment ending between FY 2008 and FY 2011. Demographic, geographic, deployment, and Military Health System eligibility were derived from Defense Enrollment Eligibility Reporting System and "Contingency Tracking System" data. The VHA National Patient Care Databases were used to ascertain VHA utilization and status (e.g., enrollee, TRICARE). Logistic regression models were used to evaluate predictors of VHA utilization as an enrollee in the year following demobilization. Of the study members demobilizing during the observation period, 56.9% of Army National Guard members and 45.7% of Army Reserve members utilized VHA as an enrollee within 12 months. Demographic, regional, health coverage, and deployment-related factors were associated with VHA enrollment and utilization, and significant variation by VHA facility was found. These findings can be useful in the design of specific outreach efforts to improve linkage from the Military Health System to the VHA. Reprint & Copyright © 2014 Association of Military Surgeons of the U.S.

  4. 77 FR 40030 - Army Science Board Summer Study Meeting

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-07-06

    ... studies: Strategic Direction for Army Science and Technology and Small Unit Data to Decisions. Proposed Agenda: Thursday 26 July 2012: 1530-1630--The study results for Strategic Direction for Army Science and... DEPARTMENT OF DEFENSE Department of the Army Army Science Board Summer Study Meeting AGENCY...

  5. 75 FR 19302 - Radiation Sources on Army Land

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-14

    ... DEPARTMENT OF DEFENSE Department of the Army 32 CFR Part 655 RIN 0702-AA58 [Docket No. USA-2008-0001] Radiation Sources on Army Land AGENCY: Department of the Army, DoD. ACTION: Proposed rule; request for comments. SUMMARY: The Department of the Army proposes to revise its regulations concerning...

  6. 76 FR 6692 - Radiation Sources on Army Land

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-02-08

    ... DEPARTMENT OF DEFENSE Department of the Army 32 CFR Part 655 [Docket No. USA-2008-0001] RIN 0702-AA58 Radiation Sources on Army Land AGENCY: Department of the Army, DoD. ACTION: Final rule. SUMMARY: The Department of the Army is finalizing revisions to its regulation concerning radiation sources on...

  7. 77 FR 4026 - Army Education Advisory Subcommittee Meeting Notice

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-01-26

    ... DEPARTMENT OF DEFENSE Department of the Army Army Education Advisory Subcommittee Meeting Notice... Visitors, U.S. Army War College Subcommittee. Date of Meeting: February 23, 2012. Place of Meeting: U.S. Army War College, 122 Forbes Avenue, Carlisle, PA, Command Conference Room, Root Hall, Carlisle...

  8. 77 FR 27209 - Army Education Advisory Subcommittee Meeting Notice

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-05-09

    ... DEPARTMENT OF DEFENSE Department of the Army Army Education Advisory Subcommittee Meeting Notice...: Board of Visitors, U.S. Army War College Subcommittee. Date of Meeting: May 31, 2012. Place of Meeting: U.S. Army War College, 122 Forbes Avenue, Carlisle, PA, Command Conference Room, Root Hall, Carlisle...

  9. 78 FR 23759 - Army Education Advisory Subcommittee Meeting Notice

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-04-22

    ... DEPARTMENT OF DEFENSE Department of the Army Army Education Advisory Subcommittee Meeting Notice... Visitors, U.S. Army War College Subcommittee. Dates of Meeting: May 16, 2013. Place of Meeting: U.S. Army War College, 122 Forbes Avenue, Carlisle, PA, Command Conference Room, Root Hall, Carlisle Barracks...

  10. The Glass Houses of Attending Surgeons: An Assessment of Unprofessional Behavior on Facebook Among Practicing Surgeons.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Langenfeld, Sean J; Sudbeck, Craig; Luers, Thomas; Adamson, Peter; Cook, Gates; Schenarts, Paul J

    2015-01-01

    Our recent publication demonstrated that unprofessional behavior on Facebook is common among surgical residents. In the formulation of standards and curricula to address this issue, it is important that surgical faculty lead by example. Our current study refocuses on the Facebook profiles of faculty surgeons involved in the education of general surgery residents. The American College of Surgeons (ACS) web site was used to identify general surgery residencies located in the Midwest. Departmental web sites were then searched to identify teaching faculty for the general surgery residency. Facebook was then searched to determine which faculty had profiles available for viewing by the general public. Profiles were then placed in 1 of the 3 following categories: professional, potentially unprofessional, or clearly unprofessional. A chi-square test was used to determine significance. In all, 57 residency programs were identified on the ACS web site, 100% of which provided an institutional web site listing the surgical faculty. A total of 758 general surgery faculty were identified (133 women and 625 men), of which 195 (25.7%) had identifiable Facebook accounts. In all, 165 faculty (84.6%) had no unprofessional content, 20 (10.3%) had potentially unprofessional content, and 10 (5.1%) had clearly unprofessional content. Inter-rater reliability was good (88.9% agreement, κ = 0.784). Clearly unprofessional behavior was found only in male surgeons. For male surgeons, clearly unprofessional behavior was more common among those in practice for less than 5 years (p = 0.031). Alcohol and politics were the most commonly found variables in the potentially unprofessional group. Inappropriate language and sexually suggestive material were the most commonly found variables in the clearly unprofessional group. Unprofessional behavior on Facebook is less common among surgical faculty compared with surgical residents. However, the rates remain unacceptably high, especially among men and

  11. UKTI's British Business Embassy Exhibition 2014

    OpenAIRE

    Swann, David

    2014-01-01

    UK Trade & Investment’s British Business Embassy on 9th June will launch the International Festival of Business (IFB) in Liverpool. \\ud \\ud Held at St George’s Hall, opposite Lime Street Station in the centre of Liverpool, the one day event will showcase the best of British, building on the success of the Great campaign. It will provide a platform for high level contacts from the global business community where influential corporate and policy makers will have the opportunity to network, meet...

  12. Four Centuries of British Economic Growth

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Madsen, Jakob B.; Ang, James B.; Banerjee, Rajabrata

    2010-01-01

    Using long historical data for Britain over the period 1620–2006, this paper seeks to explain the importance of innovative activity, population growth and other factors in inducing the transition from the Malthusian trap to the post-Malthusian growth regime. Furthermore, the paper tests the ability...... of two competing second-generation endogenous growth models to account for the British growth experience. The results suggest that innovative activity was an important force in shaping the Industrial Revolution and that the British growth experience is consistent with Schumpeterian growth theory....

  13. A critical history of British earthquakes

    OpenAIRE

    R. M. W. Musson

    2004-01-01

    This paper reviews the history of the study of historical British earthquakes. The publication of compendia of British earthquakes goes back as early as the late 16th Century. A boost to the study of earthquakes in Britain was given in the mid 18th Century as a result of two events occurring in London in 1750 (analogous to the general increase in earthquakes in Europe five years later after the 1755 Lisbon earthquake). The 19th Century saw a number of significant studies, culminating in th...

  14. The Infantry Brigade Combat Team: The U.S. Army’s Premier Phase IV and Irregular Warfare Force for the 21st Century

    Science.gov (United States)

    2007-04-01

    required. The vision of this new IBCT is not complex . When the Army is called upon to conduct conventional warfare, it will do so with its Airborne...Because of its complexity , IW conflicts tend to last many years; it took the British ten years to win the IW conflict in Malaya.23 In order for a...include two human intelligence (HUMINT) collectors. In the IBCT’s Military Intelligence Company ( MICO ), there is an abundance of trained intelligence

  15. [The surgeon Burghard Breitner. poet or healer?].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Daxecker, F

    2005-12-01

    Burghard Breitner, born on June 10, 1884 in Mattsee (Salzburg state) went to school in Salzburg. From autumn 1901 he studied medicine in Graz and Vienna, where he graduated on 1 (st) of June 1908. In the time of his studies he worked on literature and poetry. But finally he decided to become a surgeon. In World War I Breitner was a prisoner of war (POW) of Russia. During this period he used his medical expertise to help wounded soldiers and the local people. For this honourable gesture he was popularly known as "The Angel of Siberia". From 1932 he was Professor of Surgery in Innsbruck. Mainly he worked on the therapy of goiter. Breitner restructured the department of surgery because of scientific development. In 1951 he was a presidential candidate in Austria in an election, which he did not win. In autumn 1952 he became the Rector magnificus of the University of Innsbruck. Breitner died on 28 (th) of March 1956 in Innsbruck.

  16. Richard von Volkmann: surgeon and Renaissance man.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Willy, Christian; Schneider, Peter; Engelhardt, Michael; Hargens, Alan R; Mubarak, Scott J

    2008-02-01

    Richard von Volkmann (1830-1889), one of the most important surgeons of the 19(th) century, is regarded as one of the fathers of orthopaedic surgery. He was a contemporary of Langenbeck, Esmarch, Lister, Billroth, Kocher, and Trendelenburg. He was head of the Department of Surgery at the University of Halle, Germany (1867-1889). His popularity attracted doctors and patients from all over the world. He was the lead physician for the German military during two wars. From this experience, he compared the mortality of civilian and war injuries and investigated the general poor hygienic conditions in civilian hospitals. This led him to introduce the "antiseptic technique" to Germany that was developed by Lister. His powers of observation and creativity led him to findings and achievements that to this day bear his name: Volkmann's contracture and the Hueter-Volkmann law. Additionally, he was a gifted writer; he published not only scientific literature but also books of children's fairy tales and poems under the pen name of Richard Leander, assuring him a permanent place in the world of literature as well as orthopaedics.

  17. Mapping a surgeon's becoming with Deleuze.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cristancho, Sayra; Fenwick, Tara

    2015-12-01

    The process of 'becoming' shapes professionals' capability, confidence and identity. In contrast to notions of rugged individuals who achieve definitive status as experts, 'becoming' is a continuous emergent condition. It is often a process of struggle, and is always interminably linked to its environs and relationships. 'Becoming' is a way of understanding the tensions of everyday practice and knowledge of professionals. In this paper, we explore the notion of 'becoming' from the perspective of surgeons. We suggest that 'becoming', as theorised by Deleuze, offers a more nuanced understanding than is often represented using conventional vocabularies of competence, error, quality and improvement. We develop this conception by drawing from our Deleuze-inspired study of mapping experience in surgery. We argue for Deleuzian mapping as a method to research health professionals' practice and experience, and suggest the utility of this approach as a pedagogical tool for medical education. Published by the BMJ Publishing Group Limited. For permission to use (where not already granted under a licence) please go to http://www.bmj.com/company/products-services/rights-and-licensing/

  18. Dr. Norman Bethune as a surgeon.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rosen, I B

    1996-02-01

    Dr. Norman Bethune's recognition as a Canadian of renown resulted from his devoted work in China during the late 1930s. He had received a general surgical training, but his personal illness with tuberculosis led him to specialize in thoracic surgery. A surgical program at McGill University under Dr. Edward Archibald, a pioneer thoracic surgeon, was initially successful, but by the mid-1930s Bethune was rejected by McGill and Dr. Archibald. He became chief of thoracic surgery at the Hôpital du Sacré-Coeur outside Montreal. H developed thoracic surgical instruments and wrote numerous scientific papers. The outbreak of civil war in Spain in 1937 attracted Bethune to oppose what he viewed as fascist aggression. He went to Spain, where he established the value of mobile blood banking. On his return to Canada in 1937 he became aware of the escalating war between China and Japan. He joined the Chinese communist forces in northern China and spent 18 months doing Herculean mobile war surgery, while improving the state of medical services in primitive, depressing conditions. He died in 1939 at the age of 49 years of septicemia as a result of accidental laceration of his finger during surgery. The Chinese have venerated Norman Bethune and stimulated his memorialization in Canada. His surgical record can be viewed as mixed in quality, but overall his performance remains impressive for its achievement.

  19. Changing perceptions of beauty: a surgeon's perspective.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adamson, Peter A; Zavod, Matthew B

    2006-08-01

    Beauty is a mystery that has been with us for ages. Scholars and scientists have investigated its roots and effects, and its presence is ubiquitous. Has the construct of beauty changed over time? Is our sense of beauty learned or innate? What IS beauty, and can we quantify it? A substantial amount of work supports a Darwinian theory of selection, which predicts a survival advantage based on physical attractiveness. However, there is evidence that certain perceptions of beauty change with time. Indeed, the recent globalization of modern society has wrought changes in our perceptions of beauty. Are patients electing cosmetic surgery procuring a survival advantage, or are they bypassing genetics and setting a new standard for beauty? As facial plastic surgeons, we must be poised to respond to this metamorphosis and understand its roots. Although there is some equivocation and debate about this elusive subject, it is our duty to stay abreast of the current dynamic to make sound judgments that are in the best interests of our patients.

  20. Diathermy awareness among surgeons-An analysis in Ireland

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    P.M. McQuail

    2016-12-01

    Conclusion: Our results show a dearth of awareness among surgeons regarding diathermy. Given our findings, we urge a shift in attitude towards diathermy, with surgeons adopting a more cautious and safe approach to diathermy use. We recommend that formal training be introduced as a hospital based initiative.

  1. The anatomy lessons of the Amsterdam Guild of Surgeons

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    IJpma, F.F.A.

    2014-01-01

    Mandatory lessons in anatomy, taught by the praelector anatomiae (lecturer in anatomy) of the Amsterdam Guild of Surgeons, were an important part of the surgical training starting in the 16th century. We describe how surgeons were trained approximately 350 years ago at the Surgeons’ Guild. The role

  2. Imaging in anorectal malformations: What does the surgeon need to ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    In more complicated cases of cloacal malformation, advanced imaging in the form of MRI or 3D fluoroscopy is valuable. In the South African setting, 2D fluoroscopy with the surgeon present is adequate to help in planning for the surgical management. Communication between the radiologist and paediatric surgeon is ...

  3. A newly designed ergonomic body support for surgeons

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Albayrak, A.; Van Veelen, M.A.; Prins, J.F.; Snijders, C.J.; De Ridder, H.; Kazemier, G.

    2007-01-01

    Background: One of the main ergonomic problems during surgical procedures is the surgeon's awkward body posture, often accompanied by repetitive movements of the upper extremities, increased muscle activity, and prolonged static head and back postures. In addition, surgeons perform surgery so

  4. Review of CD Rom: The Virtual Surgeon: ACL Reconstruction ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    THE VIRTUAL SURGEON: ACL RECONSTRUCTION Professor George Bentley ChM FRCS, Russell E LVindsor MD, Mr Andrew Williams FRCS(0rth); 4150 + VAT(UK) The Virtual Surgeon - 3D Anatomy of the Knee 469 + VAT(UK). TVF Multimedia Ltd, 375 City Road, London, EClV lNB, UK ...

  5. HISTORICAL NOTE JOHN HUNTER (SURGEON) John Hunter FRS ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    his assistant in dissection (1748), and was soon running the practical classes on his own. It has recently been ... in his text were likely hers. After qualifying he became. Assistant Surgeon (house surgeon) at St. George's. Hospital ... Living in age when physicians frequently experimented on themselves, he inoculated himself ...

  6. Decreased heart rate variability in surgeons during night shifts

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Amirian, Ilda; Toftegård Andersen, Lærke; Rosenberg, Jacob

    2014-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Heart rate variability (HRV) has been used as a measure of stress and mental strain in surgeons. Low HRV has been associated with death and increased risk of cardiac events in the general population. The aim of this study was to clarify the effect of a 17-hour night shift on surgeons'...

  7. Role of Surgeons in Determining Outcome of Histopathology ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Conclusion: To ensure the quality of histopathological diagnosis with minimal turnaround time, the surgeon plays a vital role by ensuring adequate and prompt fixation of tissue biopsies, put in the right container and accompanied by well labeled request cards. Keywords: Formalin, fixative, outcome, pathologist, surgeon ...

  8. Hepatitis-B Vaccination Status Among Dental Surgeons in Benin ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Background: The development of success-oriented hepatitis-B vaccine uptake approach among dental surgeons is dependent on the availability of comprehensive baseline data. Objective: To determine the hepatitis-B vaccination status among dental surgeons in Benin City. Materials and Methods: This ...

  9. Burnout Syndrome among Orthopaedic Surgeons in Lagos, Nigeria ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Background: The burnout syndrome has been associated with decreased job performance and low career satisfaction. There are many studies on surgeon burnout and globally but none has been carried out in Nigeria to address the issue of burnout among orthopaedic surgeons. This study aimed at assessing the

  10. Can 360-Degree Reviews Help Surgeons? Evaluation of Multisource Feedback for Surgeons in a Multi-Institutional Quality Improvement Project.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nurudeen, Suliat M; Kwakye, Gifty; Berry, William R; Chaikof, Elliot L; Lillemoe, Keith D; Millham, Frederick; Rubin, Marc; Schwaitzberg, Steven; Shamberger, Robert C; Zinner, Michael J; Sato, Luke; Lipsitz, Stuart; Gawande, Atul A; Haynes, Alex B

    2015-10-01

    Medical organizations have increased interest in identifying and improving behaviors that threaten team performance and patient safety. Three hundred and sixty degree evaluations of surgeons were performed at 8 academically affiliated hospitals with a common Code of Excellence. We evaluate participant perceptions and make recommendations for future use. Three hundred and eighty-five surgeons in a variety of specialties underwent 360-degree evaluations, with a median of 29 reviewers each (interquartile range 23 to 36). Beginning 6 months after evaluation, surgeons, department heads, and reviewers completed follow-up surveys evaluating accuracy of feedback, willingness to participate in repeat evaluations, and behavior change. Survey response rate was 31% for surgeons (118 of 385), 59% for department heads (10 of 17), and 36% for reviewers (1,042 of 2,928). Eighty-seven percent of surgeons (95% CI, 75%-94%) agreed that reviewers provided accurate feedback. Similarly, 80% of department heads believed the feedback accurately reflected performance of surgeons within their department. Sixty percent of surgeon respondents (95% CI, 49%-75%) reported making changes to their practice based on feedback received. Seventy percent of reviewers (95% CI, 69%-74%) believed the evaluation process was valuable, with 82% (95% CI, 79%-84%) willing to participate in future 360-degree reviews. Thirty-two percent of reviewers (95% CI, 29%-35%) reported perceiving behavior change in surgeons. Three hundred and sixty degree evaluations can provide a practical, systematic, and subjectively accurate assessment of surgeon performance without undue reviewer burden. The process was found to result in beneficial behavior change, according to surgeons and their coworkers. Copyright © 2015 American College of Surgeons. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  11. Surgeon-industry conflict of interest: survey of opinions regarding industry-sponsored educational events and surgeon teaching: clinical article.

    Science.gov (United States)

    DiPaola, Christian P; Dea, Nicolas; Dvorak, Marcel F; Lee, Robert S; Hartig, Dennis; Fisher, Charles G

    2014-03-01

    Conflict of interest (COI) as it applies to medical education and training has become a source of considerable interest, debate, and regulation in the last decade. Companies often pay surgeons as faculty for educational events and often sponsor and give financial support to major professional society meetings. Professional medical societies, industry, and legislators have attempted to regulate potential COI without consideration for public opinion. The practice of evidence-based medicine requires the inclusion of patient opinion along with best available evidence and expert opinion. The primary goal of this study was to assess the opinion of the general population regarding surgeon-industry COI for education-related events. A Web-based survey was administered, with special emphasis on the surgeon's role in industry-sponsored education and support of professional societies. A survey was constructed to sample opinions on reimbursement, disclosure, and funding sources for educational events. There were 501 completed surveys available for analysis. More than 90% of respondents believed that industry funding for surgeons' tuition and travel for either industry-sponsored or professional society educational meetings would either not affect the quality of care delivered or would cause it to improve. Similar results were generated for opinions on surgeons being paid by industry to teach other surgeons. Moreover, the majority of respondents believed it was ethical or had no opinion if surgeons had such a relationship with industry. Respondents were also generally in favor of educational conferences for surgeons regardless of funding source. Disclosures of a surgeon-industry relationship, especially if it involves specific devices that may be used in their surgery, appears to be important to respondents. The vast majority of respondents in this study do not believe that the quality of their care will be diminished due to industry funding of educational events, for surgeon

  12. Real/Life: New British Art and the Reception of Contemporary British Art in Japan

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kajiya Kenji

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available This essay explores the ways in which the exhibition Real/Life: New British Art was conceived and received in Japan, where contemporary British art has been shown since the 1960s. Taking place at five museums in the country between 1998 and 1999, the exhibition aimed to showhow British artists in the 1990s struggled with realities, internal and external, but its response was not as satisfactory as was expected. The essay examines the exhibition as a turning point for the transformation of exhibition culture in Japan from nationally themed exhibitions to showcases of contemporary art in the global context.

  13. Army Hearing Program Talking Points Calendar Year 2016

    Science.gov (United States)

    2017-09-12

    provides summary information regarding the prevalence of hearing injury experienced by U.S. Army Soldiers in 2016. Soldiers who completed a DD Form...broken out by Service component and will be updated annually. TOTAL ARMY STATISTICS FOR CY16 24% of Soldiers have some degree of hearing...loss: 21% Active Duty 27% Army National Guard 28% Army Reserve 5% of Soldiers have a clinically significant hearing loss: 4% Active Duty 8% Army

  14. Army Hearing Program Status Report Quarter 2 Fiscal Year 2017

    Science.gov (United States)

    2017-07-01

    U.S. Army Publ ic Heal th Center Army Hearing Program Status Report Q2 FY17 Clinical Public Health and Epidemiology Directorate Army ...Hearing Division General Medical: 500A July 2017 Approved for public release; distribution unlimited Army Hearing Program Status Report, Q2FY17...56               INTRODUCTION The Army Hearing Program Status Report (AHPSR) is a component of the Public Health

  15. Toward late career transitioning: a proposal for academic surgeons.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Richards, Robin; McLeod, Robin; Latter, David; Keshavjee, Shaf; Rotstein, Ori; Fehlings, Michael G; Ahmed, Najma; Nathens, Avery; Rutka, James

    2017-09-01

    In the absence of a defined retirement age, academic surgeons need to develop plans for transition as they approach the end of their academic surgical careers. The development of a plan for late career transition represents an opportunity for departments of surgery across Canada to initiate a constructive process in cooperation with the key stakeholders in the hospital or institution. The goal of the process is to develop an individual plan for each faculty member that is agreeable to the academic surgeon; informs the surgical leadership; and allows the late career surgeon, the hospital, the division and the department to make plans for the future. In this commentary, the literature on the science of aging is reviewed as it pertains to surgeons, and guidelines for late career transition planning are shared. It is hoped that these guidelines will be of some value to academic programs and surgeons across the country as late career transition models are developed and adopted.

  16. Radiation Exposure and Health Risks for Orthopaedic Surgeons.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hayda, Roman A; Hsu, Raymond Y; DePasse, J Mason; Gil, Joseph A

    2018-03-22

    Orthopaedic surgeons are routinely exposed to intraoperative radiation and, therefore, follow the principle of "as low as reasonably achievable" with regard to occupational safety. However, standardized education on the long-term health effects of radiation and the basis for current radiation exposure limits is limited in the field of orthopaedics. Much of orthopaedic surgeons' understanding of radiation exposure limits is extrapolated from studies of survivors of the atomic bombings in Hiroshima and Nagasaki, Japan. Epidemiologic studies on cancer risk in surgeons and interventional proceduralists and dosimetry studies on true radiation exposure during trauma and spine surgery recently have been conducted. Orthopaedic surgeons should understand the basics and basis of radiation exposure limits, be familiar with the current literature on the incidence of solid tumors and cataracts in orthopaedic surgeons, and understand the evidence behind current intraoperative fluoroscopy safety recommendations.

  17. British Writers; Modules for Teacher Corps.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gilliard, Fred

    This booklet, containing eight instructional modules on works by major British writers, can be used either within a lower-level literature course for non-English majors or in a survey course for English majors. The first four modules focus on works from the early English period through the Elizabethan Age: "Beowulf,""Sir Gawain and the Green…

  18. British Nuclear Fuels - a dirty business

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bunyard, P.

    1983-01-01

    The radioactive discharges from British Nuclear Fuels Sellafield, Cumbria, reprocessing plant to the sea are discussed. Statements that have been made by various individuals and groups about the contamination of the sea, the coast and places inland, and the biological effects of plutonium and americium, are discussed in detail. Particular stress is placed on statements about increased incidence of cancers. (U.K.)

  19. Considerations for Education Reform in British Columbia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Santos, Ana

    2012-01-01

    Countries around the world refer to twenty-first century education as essential to maintaining personal and national economic advantage and draw on this discourse to advocate for and embark on educational reform. This paper examines issues around education reform, particularly in British Columbia. It argues that reformers should give careful…

  20. British Defense Policy: A New Approach?

    Science.gov (United States)

    1988-12-14

    by the 15th century. It was soon to be followed by the discovery of the New World, Newfoundland fishing areas, and sea routes to the Far East during... Zanzibar , Borneo, Tanganyika, 65 Uganda, Mauritus, Malaya and Korea. 13 Defense spending actually reflected the ambitious nature of the British pursuit of

  1. subordination across ghanaian and british newspaper editorials

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    this gap. It examines the use of subordinate clause-types in editorials across Ghanaian and British newspapers. The aim is ... analyze the situational background of the variety in question, the linguistic characteristics and the functional relationship ... careful reading for comprehension. Conversely, the limited time for spoken ...

  2. A Cultural History of British Euroscepticism

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Spiering, M.

    2015-01-01

    Britain is the cradle of Euroscepticism. The term is a British invention, reflecting the strong sentiments against continued membership of the European institutions. Instead of providing yet another overview of the politics of the troubled relationship, this book lays bare the root cause, which is

  3. Spitsbergen - Imperialists beyond the British Empire

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kruse, Frigga; Hacquebord, Louwrens

    2012-01-01

    This paper looks at the relationship between Spitsbergen in the European High Arctic and the global British Empire in the first quarter of the twentieth century. Spitsbergen was an uninhabited no man's land and comprised an unknown quantity of natural resources. The concepts of geopolitics and New

  4. Demand for wildlife hunting in British Columbia

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Sun, L.; Kooten, van G.C.; Voss, G.M.

    2005-01-01

    We present estimates of the demand for hunting licenses by residents and nonresidents in British Columbia for the period 19712000. We obtain estimates of both short-run and long-run price elasticities and discuss their revenue implications for future fee increases. We find the demand by nonresidents

  5. ARCTIC VECTOR OF BRITISH ENERGETIC STRATEGY

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Natalia Valerievna Eremina

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available The aim of the article is to reveal the forms, methods, content of British strategy in Arctic. Arctic is becoming the area of international cooperation among, first of all, Arctic states. Britain has ambitions to get the status of so-called “subarctic state” to prove its international leadership and acquire guarantees of energetic security. Now Britain has been elaborating the two strategies: military and scientific ones. The main instrument to solve the tasks for Britain is to participate in international structures, connected with Arctic. The article pays attention to the aspects that were not previously analyzed, such as: reasons of British interests in Arctic, bilateral and multilateral relationships between Britain and its partners, first of all, cooperation between Russia and Britain; British institutions; positive and negative aspects of British Arctic strategy; factors that have impact on its evolution, mainly EU and Scottish factors. The research allowed to make the conclusion that Britain does not have enough instruments to have a strong disposition in Arctic, though it plans to accelerate its participation in Arctic organizations. The article is based upon system and structural analysis.

  6. Stress Variation in British and American English.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berg, Thomas

    1999-01-01

    Presents a comprehensive analysis of lexical-stress variation in British and American English. A comparison of the pronunciations of all 75,000 entries in a dictionary by John Wells (1990) yields 932 stress-divergent words. The list of words is appended. (Author/VWL)

  7. Four former British mining settlements on Spitsbergen

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kruse, Frigga; Claughton, P.; Mills, C.

    2011-01-01

    The LASHIPA project participated in the recent International Polar Year to evaluate the large-scale historical exploitation of polar areas. This sub-project looks at the role of British actors in the economic and geopolitical development of the European High Arctic during the early twentieth

  8. British physics Newton's law of funding

    CERN Multimedia

    2007-01-01

    In Britain, fundamental physics is in a pickle ISAAC NEWTON, besides being the founder of modern physics, was also master of Britain's mint. That is a precedent which many British physicists must surely wish had become traditional. At the moment, money for physics is in short supply in Britain.

  9. Drivers of cousin marriage among British Pakistanis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shaw, Alison

    2014-01-01

    Why has the apparently high rate of cousin marriage among Bradford Pakistanis been sustained, 50 years since Pakistani migration to Britain began? A review of the anthropological literature on Pakistani migration and settlement, British Pakistani marriage patterns and the phenomenon of transnational marriage. British Pakistanis are diverse in regional origins and social class characteristics, with many Bradford Pakistanis originating from the Mirpur district and northern Punjab. British Pakistani marriages often involve a partner from Pakistan who joins a spouse in the UK. Transnational marriage of first cousins offers relatives in Pakistan opportunities for a 'better' life in the West and are important for British Pakistanis for economic, social, cultural and emotional reasons. These processes are also differentially influenced by region of origin and class characteristics in Pakistan as well as by education, employment and locality in Britain. The pattern observed in Bradford may not be applicable nationally. Further research examining marital decisions over several generations in families differing by social class, region of origin in Pakistan and locality in Britain is necessary to contextualise the findings from Bradford. © 2014 S. Karger AG, Basel

  10. Telephone Operators' Resistance to British Colonial Administration ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    This paper aims to write the history of yet another form of resistance to colonial rule in British Africa with a focus on telephone operators in the erstwhile Cameroons Province. The pith and kernel of the paper therefore is to show how telephone operators resisted the colonial administration. This typology of resistance is yet to ...

  11. Improving Army Basic Research: Report of an Expert Panel on the Future of Army Laboratories

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-01-01

    university-affiliated research center UCLA University of California, Los Angeles USACE U.S. Army Corps of Engineers VCSA Vice Chief of Staff of the Army WTC ...Capabilities Development, who provides recommendations to the one-star Warfighter Techni- cal Council ( WTC ). The WTC is co-chaired by the HQDA Director for...Service]-level members from Army laboratories, RDECs, and TRADOC Force Operating Capability leads. Results of both TD and WTC reviews are provided

  12. Atomic Army: the roles of the U.S. Army in America's nuclear endeavors

    OpenAIRE

    Womack, Seth M.

    2014-01-01

    Approved for public release; distribution is unlimited This thesis examines the roles of the U.S. Army in America’s nuclear undertakings. Since 1942, when the Army took responsibility for managing the Manhattan Project, the Army has made many important contributions to America’s nuclear endeavors. Its earliest nuclear roles included developing and employing America’s first nuclear weapons, executing nuclear counterproliferation missions, investigating the effects of nuclear weapons, and su...

  13. [Reasons why musicians consult hand surgeons].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nourissat, G; Chamagne, P; Dumontier, C

    2003-10-01

    Musicians occasionally consult orthopedic surgeons, particularly upper limb specialists. We wanted to learn more about the reasons why musicians attend orthopedic clinics. We analyzed retrospectively 227 case files of musicians who consulted our center between 1994 and 2001. We noted patient related factors (age, gender, musical experience, level of performance, daily practice schedule) and their reasons for consulting (pain, discomfort, advice). We studied the medical history of the patients and searched for predisposing or triggering elements. We also recorded therapeutic options proposed. Our series included 119 men (52%) and 108 women, mean age 35 years with 27 years of musical experience on the average. Instruments played were mainly the piano (41%), the violin (19%), and the guitar (15%). Patients playing wind instruments, who consult more often for ENT problems, were exceptional. On the average, the patients played their instrument 4 hours daily. One-third of the patients were high-level amateurs, one-third were professionals, and one-quarter were lower-level amateurs. There was a small proportion of soloists or professors. Two-thirds of the musicians presented disorders of the musculoskeletal system, particularly trauma sequelae. Signs of overuse were present in 18% of the patients, mainly women, signs of misuse due to inappropriate or defective technique in 8.8%, and dystonia in 5.7%. Psychological problems were noted in 4 patients. More than one half of the patients had obtained medical advice prior to consulting an orthopedic surgeon and the very large majority had been referred by specialized physical therapists. A surgical procedure was proposed for only 19% of the patients presenting an orthopedic disorder. This study presents a diversified panel of musicians consulting orthopedic surgery clinics. Practicing schedules varied in the study population from one to five hours daily. More than half the patients complained of pain but 18% consulted because

  14. Developing an Army Market Research Index in Support of Army Recruiting

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Morath, Ray

    2001-01-01

    .... Generating appropriate market research for the Army requires first cataloguing the existing market research databases and identifying the critical questions that are not answered by current research...

  15. Army Business Transformation: The Utility of Using Corporate Business Models within the Institutional Army

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Bailer, Jr., John J

    2007-01-01

    .... Through a survey of the literature of published corporate business plans and models, military reports, Army depot case studies, and comparative analysis of emerging computer software technology...

  16. The Core Competencies for General Orthopaedic Surgeons.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kellam, James F; Archibald, Douglas; Barber, James W; Christian, Eugene P; D'Ascoli, Richard J; Haynes, Richard J; Hecht, Suzanne S; Hurwitz, Shepard R; Kellam, James F; McLaren, Alexander C; Peabody, Terrance D; Southworth, Stephen R; Strauss, Robert W; Wadey, Veronica M R

    2017-01-18

    With the changing delivery of orthopaedic surgical care, there is a need to define the knowledge and competencies that are expected of an orthopaedist providing general and/or acute orthopaedic care. This article provides a proposal for the knowledge and competencies needed for an orthopaedist to practice general and/or acute care orthopaedic surgery. Using the modified Delphi method, the General Orthopaedic Competency Task Force consisting of stakeholders associated with general orthopaedic practice has proposed the core knowledge and competencies that should be maintained by orthopaedists who practice emergency and general orthopaedic surgery. For relevancy to clinical practice, 2 basic sets of competencies were established. The assessment competencies pertain to the general knowledge needed to evaluate, investigate, and determine an overall management plan. The management competencies are generally procedural in nature and are divided into 2 groups. For the Management 1 group, the orthopaedist should be competent to provide definitive care including assessment, investigation, initial or emergency care, operative or nonoperative care, and follow-up. For the Management 2 group, the orthopaedist should be competent to assess, investigate, and commence timely non-emergency or emergency care and then either transfer the patient to the appropriate subspecialist's care or provide definitive care based on the urgency of care, exceptional practice circumstance, or individual's higher training. This may include some higher-level procedures usually performed by a subspecialist, but are consistent with one's practice based on experience, practice environment, and/or specialty interest. These competencies are the first step in defining the practice of general orthopaedic surgery including acute orthopaedic care. Further validation and discussion among educators, general orthopaedic surgeons, and subspecialists will ensure that these are relevant to clinical practice. These

  17. Army's drinking water surveillance program

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sneeringer, P.V.; Belkin, F.; Straffon, N.; Costick, S.A.

    1977-01-01

    In 1976 a total of 827 water sources from Army installations throughout the world were sampled and analyzed for 53 chemical constituents and physical parameters. Medically significant contaminants included radiation measurements, heavy metals, fluoride, nitrate, and pesticides. Radiological activity appeared to vary with geographic location; a majority being from water sources in the western part of the U.S. No results for tritium were found to exceed the health-reference limit. Confirmatory analyses for radium-226 identified 3 groundwater sources as exceeding the limit; one was attributed to natural activity and the other sources are currently being investigated. Of the metals considered to be medically significant, mercury, chromium, lead, cadmium, silver, barium and arsenic were found in amounts within health level limits. Nitrate levels exceeding the health limit were confirmed for 2 drinking water sources

  18. Review of orthognathic surgery and related papers published in the British Journal of Oral and Maxillofacial Surgery 2011-2012.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goodson, Alexander M C; Payne, Karl F B; Tahim, Arpan; Colbert, Serryth; Brennan, Peter A

    2015-04-01

    This review summarises all orthognathic and related papers published between January 2011 and December 2012 in the British Journal of Oral and Maxillofacial Surgery (BJOMS). A total of 36 articles were published, a high proportion of which (78%) were full-length papers. The remainder consisted of short communications and technical notes. The topics included operative planning and postoperative outcomes, and there was a strong focus on distraction osteogenesis. There were fewer orthognathic articles published in BJOMS than articles on other subspecialties such as trauma or head and neck oncology. Only 8 (29%) of the full-length articles were prospective studies or randomised trials, which highlights a need for well-designed clinical studies in orthognathic research. Copyright © 2013 The British Association of Oral and Maxillofacial Surgeons. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  19. Operational Army Reserve Implications for Organizational Health

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Dahms, Jonathan A

    2007-01-01

    The Army Reserve has been in a constant state of mobilization since 1995 with the advent of the Bosnia crisis and the pace of mobilization increased exponentially after the terrorist attacks of September 11, 2001...

  20. Trust and Dialogue in the Army Profession

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Lewis, III, James M

    2008-01-01

    .... Trust binds the Army together as a cohesive unit. Unfortunately, in the Officer Corps there is the perception of a serious erosion of trust that may be reaching dangerously dysfunctional levels...

  1. US Army Cultural Obstacles to Transformational Leadership

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Combs, Peggy C

    2007-01-01

    ...." Although these words sound like a direct lift of the current 2007 Army Posture statement, which discusses the "pentathlete" leader, they were written by the 33rd CSA, General Dennis Reimer, in 1999...

  2. Characterizing Extreme Environments for Army Testing

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Harmon, R. S; King, W. C; Palka, Eugene J; Gilewitch, Daniel A

    2004-01-01

    Army Regulation (AR) 70-38 publishes standards for temperature and humidity in different environments, but there are other important environmental features such as general climate, terrain character, and biological...

  3. Evaluation of Sierra Army Depot Groundwater Contamination

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Granetto, Paul

    1997-01-01

    ...), September 28, 1996. The Congressional conferees were concerned about allegations from a group of investors that the Army precipitously and abruptly changed its position on permits and applications to develop water...

  4. Accelerated Logistics: Streamlining the Army's Supply Chain

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Wang, Mark

    2000-01-01

    ...) initiative, the Army has dramatically streamlined its supply chain, cutting order and ship times for repair parts by nearly two-thirds nationwide and over 75 percent at several of the major Forces Command (FORSCOM) installations...

  5. A Pilotless Army in the Megalopolis

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Wegner, Robert

    2004-01-01

    This monograph answers the question, "Can unmanned aerial vehicles (UAVs) supplant manned United States Army attack and reconnaissance helicopters in the conduct of future urban operations" and the answer is, "not completely...

  6. Transformation and the Army School System

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Shanley, Michael G; Crowley, James C; Lewis, Matthew W; Masi, Ralph; Straus, Susan G; Leuschner, Kristin J; Hartman, Steven; Stockly, Sue

    2005-01-01

    .... The study recommends that the Army adopt private-sector models in developing interactive media instruction, develop a more effective local school system to better meet future unit training needs...

  7. Surgeons and patients disagree on the potential consequences from hypoparathyroidism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cho, Nancy L; Moalem, Jacob; Chen, Lily; Lubitz, Carrie C; Moore, Francis D; Ruan, Daniel T

    2014-05-01

    To test the hypothesis that surgeons and their patients underestimate the potential negative impact that permanent hypoparathyroidism has on quality of life (QOL). We used a modified SF-36 assessment tool to compare the perceptions of patients with permanent hypoparathyroidism to the perceptions of control subjects who were given a standardized preoperative statement about the complications of hypoparathyroidism. We also elicited the perceptions of endocrine surgeons regarding the QOL impacts of hypoparathyroidism using a subset of questions from the modified SF-36. A total of 340 postsurgical patients with permanent hypoparathyroidism, 200 controls, and 102 surgeons participated in the study. Both surgeons and controls underestimated the negative impact of hypoparathyroidism on QOL when compared to patients living with permanent hypoparathyroidism. Forty-seven percent of hypoparathyroid patients believed that their health was "much worse" than before surgery, compared with 16% of surgeons (Phypoparathyroid patients also reported far more negative effects on QOL, from interference with social activities, paresthesias, muscle cramping, and medications than were anticipated by surgeons or controls (Phypoparathyroid patients reported a significantly lower mean score compared to the control group (Phypoparathyroidism on patient QOL is consistently and significantly underestimated by surgeons and subjects receiving surgical consultation.

  8. Current management of acute diverticulitis: a survey of Australasian surgeons.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jaung, Rebekah; Robertson, Jason; Rowbotham, David; Bissett, Ian

    2016-03-11

    To evaluate the current practice and degree of consensus amongst Australasian surgeons regarding non-surgical management of acute diverticulitis (AD) and to determine whether newer approaches to management are being translated into practice. An online survey was distributed to all Australasian colorectal surgeons and all general surgeons in the Auckland region. Responses were collected over two months and analysed to identify points of consensus and areas of significant difference in opinion between these groups. Responses were received from a total of 99 of 200 (49.5%) colorectal surgeons, and 19 of 36 (52.7%) general surgeons. The Hinchey Classification was the most commonly used measure of disease severity, used by 67 (95.7%) colorectal surgeons and 12 (92.3%) general surgeons. There was lack of consensus around important aspects of AD management, including antibiotic therapy, and use and modality of follow-up imaging. Selective antibiotic therapy and use of anti-inflammatory medication as adjuncts to treatment were practised by a minority of those surveyed. Newer approaches to management were being utilised by some respondents. The lack of consensus regarding management of AD may be a consequence of a paucity of high-level evidence to support specific management approaches, particularly in patients with uncomplicated AD.

  9. Discrepancies in the female pelvic medicine and reconstructive surgeon workforce.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Muffly, Tyler M; Weterings, Robbie; Barber, Mathew D; Steinberg, Adam C

    2015-01-01

    It is unclear whether the current distribution of surgeons practicing female pelvic medicine and reconstructive surgery in the United States is adequate to meet the needs of a growing and aging population. We assessed the geographic distribution of female pelvic surgeons as represented by members of the American Urogynecologic Society (AUGS) throughout the United States at the county, state, and American Congress of Obstetricians and Gynecologists district levels. County-level data from the AUGS, American Congress of Obstetricians and Gynecologists, and the United States Census were analyzed in this observational study. State and national patterns of female pelvic surgeon density were mapped graphically using ArcGIS software and 2010 US Census demographic data. In 2013, the 1058 AUGS practicing physicians represented 0.13% of the total physician workforce. There were 6.7 AUGS members available for every 1 million women and 20 AUGS members for every 1 million postreproductive-aged women in the United States. The density of female pelvic surgeons was highest in metropolitan areas. Overall, 88% of the counties in the United States lacked female pelvic surgeons. Nationwide, there was a mean of 1 AUGS member for every 31 practicing general obstetrician-gynecologists. These findings have implications for training, recruiting, and retaining female pelvic surgeons. The uneven distribution of female pelvic surgeons throughout the United States is likely to worsen as graduating female pelvic medicine and reconstructive surgery fellows continue to cluster in urban areas.

  10. Surgeons' Leadership Styles and Team Behavior in the Operating Room

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hu, Yue-Yung; Parker, Sarah Henrickson; Lipsitz, Stuart R; Arriaga, Alexander F; Peyre, Sarah E; Corso, Katherine A; Roth, Emilie M; Yule, Steven J; Greenberg, Caprice C

    2016-01-01

    Background The importance of leadership is recognized in surgery, but the specific impact of leadership style on team behavior is not well understood. In other industries, leadership is a well-characterized construct. One dominant theory proposes that transactional (task-focused) leaders achieve minimum standards, whereas transformational (team-oriented) leaders inspire performance beyond expectations. Study Design We video-recorded 5 surgeons performing complex operations. Each surgeon was scored on the Multifactor Leadership Questionnaire, a validated method for scoring transformational and transactional leadership style, by an organizational psychologist and a surgeon-researcher. Independent coders assessed surgeons' leadership behaviors according to the Surgical Leadership Inventory and team behaviors (information-sharing, cooperative, and voice behaviors). All coders were blinded. Leadership style (MLQ) was correlated with surgeon behavior (SLI) and team behavior using Poisson regression, controlling for time and the total number of behaviors, respectively. Results All surgeons scored similarly on transactional leadership (2.38-2.69), but varied more widely on transformational leadership (1.98-3.60). Each 1-point increase in transformational score corresponded to 3× more information-sharing behaviors (pleadership and its impact on team performance in the OR. As in other fields, our data suggest that transformational leadership is associated with improved team behavior. Surgeon leadership development therefore has the potential to improve the efficiency and safety of operative care. PMID:26481409

  11. The Utility of Ada for Army Modeling

    Science.gov (United States)

    1990-04-10

    34 Ada " for Ada Lovelace (1815-1851), a mathematician who worked with Charles Babbage on his difference and analytic engines.9 Later in 1979, the HOLWG...OF ADA FOR ARMY MODELING BY COLONEL MICHAEL L. YOCOM DISTRIBUTION STATEMENT A: Approved for publie releases distribution is unlimited. 1% LF-, EC TE...TITLE (ad Subtitle) a. TYPE OF REPORT & PERIOD COVERED The Utility of Ada for Army Modeling Individual Study Project 6 PERFORMING ORG. REPORT NUMBER

  12. Making Weapons for the Terracotta Army

    OpenAIRE

    Marcos Martinón-Torres; Xiuzhen Janice Li; Andrew Bevan; Yin Xia; Zhao Kun; Thilo Rehren

    2011-01-01

    The Terracotta Army of the First Emperor of China is one of the most emblematic archaeological sites in the world. Many questions remain about the logistics of technology, standardisation and labour organisation behind the creation of such a colossal construction in just a few decades over 2,000 years ago. An ongoing research project co-ordinated between the UCL Institute of Archaeology and the Emperor Qin Shihang's Terracotta Army Museum is beginning to address some of these questions. This ...

  13. Decisive Army Strategic and Expeditionary Maneuver

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-05-01

    Committee organized under the Federal Advisory Committee Act. The purpose of the study was to help update the Army’s strategy and doctrine around the...acquisition systems ( SCADA ), a new security paradigm will be needed for access control. To illustrate these points, in large commercial enterprise...Lift Update ,” PowerPoint Presentation, 5 December 2013. 6. Army Capabilities Integration Center (ARCIC), Unified Quest 2013: Deep Future Wargame

  14. Surgeons' Leadership Styles and Team Behavior in the Operating Room.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hu, Yue-Yung; Parker, Sarah Henrickson; Lipsitz, Stuart R; Arriaga, Alexander F; Peyre, Sarah E; Corso, Katherine A; Roth, Emilie M; Yule, Steven J; Greenberg, Caprice C

    2016-01-01

    The importance of leadership is recognized in surgery, but the specific impact of leadership style on team behavior is not well understood. In other industries, leadership is a well-characterized construct. One dominant theory proposes that transactional (task-focused) leaders achieve minimum standards and transformational (team-oriented) leaders inspire performance beyond expectations. We videorecorded 5 surgeons performing complex operations. Each surgeon was scored on the Multifactor Leadership Questionnaire, a validated method for scoring transformational and transactional leadership style, by an organizational psychologist and a surgeon researcher. Independent coders assessed surgeons' leadership behaviors according to the Surgical Leadership Inventory and team behaviors (information sharing, cooperative, and voice behaviors). All coders were blinded. Leadership style (Multifactor Leadership Questionnaire) was correlated with surgeon behavior (Surgical Leadership Inventory) and team behavior using Poisson regression, controlling for time and the total number of behaviors, respectively. All surgeons scored similarly on transactional leadership (range 2.38 to 2.69), but varied more widely on transformational leadership (range 1.98 to 3.60). Each 1-point increase in transformational score corresponded to 3 times more information-sharing behaviors (p < 0.0001) and 5.4 times more voice behaviors (p = 0.0005) among the team. With each 1-point increase in transformational score, leaders displayed 10 times more supportive behaviors (p < 0.0001) and displayed poor behaviors 12.5 times less frequently (p < 0.0001). Excerpts of representative dialogue are included for illustration. We provide a framework for evaluating surgeons' leadership and its impact on team performance in the operating room. As in other fields, our data suggest that transformational leadership is associated with improved team behavior. Surgeon leadership development, therefore, has the potential to

  15. An online review of plastic surgeons in southern California.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lewis, Priya; Kobayashi, Emily; Gupta, Subhas

    2015-05-01

    It has become commonplace for patients to access online reviews of physicians when making choices about health care, just as any consumer would in today's computer-dependent world. Previous studies have shown that online reviews of physicians are generally positive. However, 1 negative review has the potential to adversely affect business and reputations. To characterize the online presence of plastic surgeons in Southern California as portrayed by physician rating websites (PRWs). An extensive online database of board-certified plastic surgeons was used to generate a list of surgeons within a 50-mile radius of Pomona, CA. Ratings from the PRWs HealthGrades.com, Vitals.com, and UCompareHealthcare.com were cataloged by number of reviews and ratings. Two hundred sixty-three surgeons were evaluated with the most-represented cities being Beverly Hills (N=47), Los Angeles (N=31), and Newport Beach (N=27). Ninety-seven percent of the surgeons were rated on at least 1 of the 3 PRWs chosen. In general, surgeons were rated highly, with a mean rating of 85%, SD, 14% (Ponline ratings ranged from 0 to 222 per surgeon. The median number of total reviews was 25 and the mean rating for those surgeons above and below the median were equivocal, at 86% and 85%, respectively (P=0.284). In this study, we found that plastic surgeons in Southern California have an online presence that can be influenced by their patients; they should be aware of this and conscious of their online reputations. Overall, the ratings were high, regardless of the number of reviews.

  16. What surgical skills rural surgeons need to master.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Halverson, Amy L; Hughes, Tyler G; Borgstrom, David C; Sachdeva, Ajit K; DaRosa, Debra A; Hoyt, David B

    2013-11-01

    As new technology is developed and scientific evidence demonstrates strategies to improve the quality of care, it is essential that surgeons keep current with their skills. Rural surgeons need efficient and targeted continuing medical education that matches their broader scope of practice. Developing such a program begins with an assessment of the learning needs of the rural surgeon. The aim of this study was to assess the learning needs considered most important to surgeons practicing in rural areas. A needs assessment questionnaire was administered to surgeons practicing in rural areas. An additional gap analysis questionnaire was administered to registrants of a skills course for rural surgeons. Seventy-one needs assessment questionnaires were completed. The self-reported procedures most commonly performed included laparoscopic cholecystectomy (n = 44), hernia repair (n = 42), endoscopy (n = 43), breast surgery (n = 23), appendectomy (n = 20), and colon resection (n = 18). Respondents indicated that they would most like to learn more skills related to laparoscopic colon resection (n = 16), laparoscopic antireflux procedures (n = 6), laparoscopic common bile duct exploration/ERCP (n = 5), colonoscopy/advanced techniques and esophagogastroscopy (n = 4), and breast surgery (n = 4). Ultrasound, hand surgery, and leadership and communication were additional topics rated as useful by the respondents. Skills course participants indicated varying levels of experience and confidence with breast ultrasound, ultrasound for central line insertion, hand injury, and facial soft tissue injury. Our results demonstrated that surgeons practicing in rural areas have a strong interest in acquiring additional skills in a variety of general and subspecialty surgical procedures. The information obtained in this study may be used to guide curriculum development of further postgraduate skills courses targeted to rural surgeons. Copyright © 2013 American College of Surgeons. Published

  17. Plastic surgeons over 50: practice patterns, satisfaction, and retirement plans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rohrich, Rod J; McGrath, Mary H; Lawrence, Thomas W

    2008-04-01

    Approximately 56 percent of all currently active plastic surgeons in the United States are older than 50 years and are likely to retire in the next 10 to 20 years. The 2006 Survey of Plastic Surgeons Over the Age of 50 was designed to provide insight regarding the practice patterns, retirement plans, and issues of importance to plastic surgeons older than 50 to provide an indicator of future workforce needs for the specialty. The survey was part of a larger study of physicians older than 50 across all specialties conducted by the Association of American Medical Colleges Center for Workforce Studies, in collaboration with the American Society of Plastic Surgeons, the American Medical Association, the Council of Medical Specialty Societies, and seven additional medical specialty associations. Surveys were mailed to 1434 active and retired plastic surgeons aged 50 to 79 years; the response rate was 59.1 percent. Results were compared with responses from physicians of all specialties. Full-time reconstructive plastic surgeons older than 50 spend more hours per week practicing medicine (56.5 hours per week) than cosmetic plastic surgeons (49.7 hours per week) and all physicians (53.7 hours per week). Plastic surgeons retire slightly earlier than other physicians and cite rising malpractice costs, insufficient reimbursement, and increasing competition as important factors when considering retirement. There are significant differences in the practices, satisfaction, and factors influencing retirement plans for plastic surgeons that focus on cosmetic versus reconstructive surgery. Further study of these two components of plastic surgery may be warranted.

  18. Knowledge and opinions on oncoplastic surgery among breast and plastic surgeons

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Carstensen, Lena Felicia; Rose, Michael; Bentzon, Niels

    2015-01-01

    surgeons and 22 plastic surgeons; the response rate was 67%. All breast surgery units had an established cooperation with plastic surgeons. Most breast surgeons used unilateral displacement techniques; plastic surgeons also included breast reduction techniques and replacement with local flaps. Almost all...

  19. Department of the Army Installation Restoration Program

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anderson, A.W.

    1988-01-01

    The Army's Installation Restoration Program (IRP) was established in 1975 in response to regulatory action at several installations where past disposal practices had caused contamination of streams and groundwater. The need to decontaminate excess Army-owned real estate also was considered in early IRP activities. A variety of site types have been discovered on Army installations. The major site types evaluated to date include: contaminated soil areas, landfills, lagoons, buildings, burning grounds, sumps, pits, storage tanks, sewage treatment plants, storage pads, industrial wastewater treatment plants, and salvage yards. Twenty Army installations have been proposed for or listed on the National Priorities List (NPL). The need for taking action at hazardous waste sites, however, is based on threats they pose to human health, welfare or the environment. Sites do not have to be on the SPL in order to be cleaned up through IRP activities. All of the sites that caused Army installations to be proposed for the NPL are being evaluated and cleaned up. In addition, all Army properties have been or will be assessed and where needed they will be addressed by the IRP

  20. The West African currency board and economic integration of British ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    WACB) as an economic integration effort in British West Africa. Through a collaborative effort between this public institution and a private company, the Bank of British West Africa, British West African colonies were not only unified but also the way ...

  1. British International Schools: The Deployment and Training of Teaching Assistants

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tarry, Estelle

    2011-01-01

    This article reports on research carried out on behalf of the Council of British International Schools (COBIS) as to the role and deployment of British international school teaching assistants. Through questionnaires and a follow up open discussion with headteachers from British international schools it was found that, due to the differing…

  2. Increasing Responsiveness of the Army Rapid Acquisition Process: The Army Rapid Equipping Force

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-06-01

    74 Rodney Spann , REF Logistics Management Division Brief, 29 March 2010, Slide 2. 75 Dickson, U.S. Army Rapid Equipping Force 2002-2007 Booklet, 82...speech at the Sorbonne, Paris, April 23, 1910. Spann , Rodney, REF Logistics Management Division Brief, Slide 2, 29 March 2010. U.S. Army 20 th

  3. Atomic Army: The Roles of the U.S. Army in America’s Nuclear Endeavors

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-09-01

    ROAD Reorganization Objectives Army Division ROK Republic of Korea SACEUR Supreme Allied Commander, Europe SADM Special Atomic Demolition Munitions...been able to construct a nuclear bomb without the contributions of dedicated and ingenious civilian scientists, engineers, and technicians or the...Reorganization Objectives Army Division ( ROAD ).369 ROADs typically consisted of three brigades armed with both nuclear and conventional weapons, and they

  4. A Dutch mass army? Dutch liberal ideas and practices to enlarge the army, 1914-1922

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Klinkert, W.

    2011-01-01

    In August 1914, the Dutch government called up its citizens to enlist voluntarily in the army. This call-up failed. In 1915, the government tried to enlarge the army significantly by law. This attempt succeeded partially. At the end of the war, under threat of a leftwing revolution, the Netherlands

  5. 2014 Center for Army Leadership Annual Survey of Army Leadership (CASAL): Military Leader Findings

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-09-22

    quality of military leadership . Implicit leadership theory (Eden & Leviatan, 1975; Yukl, 7 The...Eden, D., & Leviatan, U. (1975). Implicit leadership theory as a determinant of the factor structure underlying supervisory behavior scales. Journal...2014 CENTER FOR ARMY LEADERSHIP ANNUAL SURVEY OF ARMY LEADERSHIP (CASAL): MILITARY LEADER FINDINGS TECHNICAL REPORT 2015-01

  6. Experiences within British Steel since 1989

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Harvey, D.S.

    1999-01-01

    The experience of British steel is that there is a serious and continuing threat of radioactive material being included in scrap delivered to steelworks. All scrap entering the steelworks is monitored for radioactivity. The scrap suppliers and the national authorities have recognized the difficulties caused by the presence of radioactivity in scrap, and are working to minimise the problem. Both domestic and imported scrap has been found to contain radioactivity, but the imported scrap is much more likely to contain radioactivity. If radioactivity is found the Environmental Agency is informed, and established procedures are used to minimise the hazard, and to isolate the radioactivity. Detecting, and isolating radioactive scrap, and preventing it being re-melted in the steelmaking process, is part of the overall commitment of British Steel to work safely, and to provide a safe, good quality, product (author)

  7. Flood Hazard Management: British and International Perspectives

    Science.gov (United States)

    James, L. Douglas

    This proceedings of an international workshop at the Flood Hazard Research Centre (Queensway, Enfield, Middlesex, U.K.) begins by noting how past British research on flood problems concentrated on refining techniques to implement established policy. In contrast, research covered in North American and Australian publications involved normative issues on policy alternatives and administrative implementation. The workshop's participants included 16 widely recognized scientists, whose origins were about equally divided between Britain and overseas; from this group the workshop's organizers expertly drew ideas for refining British urban riverine flood hazard management and for cultivating links among researchers everywhere. Such intellectual exchange should be of keen interest to flood hazard program managers around the world, to students of comparative institutional performance, to those who make policy on protecting people from hazards, and to hydrologists and other geophysicists who must communicate descriptive information for bureaucratic, political, and public decision- making.

  8. Provincial land use planning in British Columbia

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mitchell, W.

    1998-01-01

    The efforts being made to include Aboriginal communities in land use planning in British Columbia are discussed. British Columbia is in the midst of historic changes with respect to land and resource allocation, use and management. Historic trends in land use allocation and management are contrasted with land use planning and resource management of today. The impact of provincial government moves to double park space within the province, and the Protected Areas Strategy initiative will have on the natural gas and petroleum industry is discussed. New efforts being made to include First Nations directly in land use planning discussions in ways that do not prejudice treaty negotiations, are reviewed. Creation of a new Oil and Gas Commission in the Fort St. John area, is cited as the most recent example of the interconnections between First Nations communities and other public and industry stakeholders in land use planning in the province

  9. Self-Esteem: A Cross-Cultural Comparison of British-Chinese, White British and Hong Kong Chinese Children.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chan, Yiu Man

    2000-01-01

    Evaluates the self-esteem scores of 1303 children, including Chinese children from Britain and Hong Kong and white British children, using the Coopersmith Self-Esteem Inventory. Finds that British Chinese have significantly higher self-esteem than the Hong Kong children, but there is little difference among white British children. (CMK)

  10. Electricity trade: Generating benefits for British Columbians

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1994-01-01

    Electricity has been traded in British Columbia since the turn of the century. In 1988, the provincial government established the British Columbia Power Exchange Corporation (Powerex) to conduct electricity trade activities in order to make the most efficient use of the electrial system and generate benefits for British Columbians. The trade is made possible by an interconnected system linking producers and consumers in western Canada and the USA. Provincial participants in the trade include British Columbia Hydro, independent power producers, and cogenerators. Benefits of the electricity trade include generation of revenue from sale of surplus power, being able to buy electricity when the mainly hydroelectric provincial system is in a drought condition or when major shutdowns occur, and enabling postponement of development of new power projects. Powerex conducts its trade under provincial and federal permits and licenses. Different types of trade contracts are negotiated depending on the amount and availability of electricity and the kind of trade being conducted. Exchanges and coordination agreements allow transfer and return between utilities with no net export occurring, allowing balancing of loads between different reigons. Surplus electricity is bought or sold on a short- or long-term basis and on firm or non-firm terms. Electricity exports are not subsidized and are only allowed if the electricity is surplus to provincial needs and can be sold at a profit. A new provincial policy allows private industry to export long-term firm electricity; this involves construction of new private-sector generating facilities solely for the purpose of export. 1 fig

  11. British Engineers and Africa 1875-1914

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andersen, Casper

    the imperial diasporas, identities and networks that developed as the British engineering profession established connections on the African continent. Using a wide range of primary sources that include correspondence, diaries, technical reports, institutional minutes and periodicals, Andersen reconstructs...... the networks and activities of Britain's engineers while focusing on London as a centre of imperial expansion. By treating Britain and the empire as an interconnected zone heanalyses the ways in whichideas , people and technologies circulated during the critical period....

  12. LOW BACK PAINS –THE ORTHOPAEDIC SURGEON'S ENIGMA

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    outcome and success rates. The none surgical modalities available include medications, injections preolytic. LOW BACK PAINS –THE ORTHOPAEDIC SURGEON'S ENIGMA enzymes, laser therapy, radiofrequency denervation, intradiscal electro thermal therapy, percutaneous intradiscal radiofrequency thermoregulation ...

  13. Radiation dose to surgeons in theatre | van der Merwe | South ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Thermoluminescent dosimeter measurements of accumulated dose to specific anatomical regions of a neurosurgeon, gastroenterologist and orthopaedic surgeon performing fluoroscopy on 39 patients undergoing treatment for back pain, 7 for endoscopic retrograde cholangiopancreatography procedures, and 48 for ...

  14. Concussion in Sports: What Do Orthopaedic Surgeons Need to Know?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cahill, Patrick J; Refakis, Christian; Storey, Eileen; Warner, William C

    2016-12-01

    A concussion is a relatively common sports-related injury that affects athletes of all ages. Although orthopaedic surgeons are not expected to replace sports medicine physicians and neurologists with regard to the management of concussions, orthopaedic surgeons, particularly those who are fellowship-trained in sports medicine, must have a current knowledge base of what a concussion is, how a concussion is diagnosed, and how a concussion should be managed. Orthopaedic surgeons should understand the pathophysiology, assessment, and management of concussion so that they have a basic comprehension of this injury, which is at the forefront of the academic literature and North American media. This understanding will prepare orthopaedic surgeons to work in concert with and assist sports medicine physicians, athletic trainers, and physical therapists in providing comprehensive care for athletes with a concussion.

  15. British Columbia natural gas: Core market policy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1988-06-01

    The core market for natural gas in British Columbia is defined as all natural gas consumers in the residential, institutional, commercial, and industrial sectors not currently purchasing natural gas directly and not exempted from the core market by the British Columbia Utilities Commission (BCUC). The intent of the definition is to include all customers who must be protected by contracts which ensure long-term security of supply and stable prices. Core market customers are excluded from direct natural gas purchase and will be served by distribution utilities. A customer may apply to BCUC to leave the core market; such an application may be approved if it is demonstrated that the customer has adequate long-term natural gas supplies or alternative fuel supplies to protect him from supply interruptions. The non-core market is defined as all large industrial customers who elect to make their own natural gas supply arrangements and who can demonstrate to the BCUC sufficient long-term natural gas supply protection or alternative fuel capability to ensure security of the industry. Non-core market customers have full and open access to the competitive natural gas market. The British Columbia government will not apply its core market policy to other jurisdictions through Energy Removal Certificates

  16. Markets for British Columbia natural gas

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Maerz, D.H.; Coad, L.A.

    1990-11-01

    An evaluation is presented of the outlook for the British Columbia natural gas industry and the fundamentals underlying both the increase in activity and the longer-term outlook for the natural gas sector are examined. The basis for the analysis was the North American Regional Gas (NARG) model, to which a number of modifications were made. The level of natural gas resource assumed for northeastern British Columbia corresponds to an ultimate potential of 50 Tcf. Significant growth in production over the outlook period (1988-2007) is predicted. High rates of utilization on the Westcoast system underscore the need for significant capacity expansion if the production levels projected for the mid-1990s are to be achieved. Natural gas production is projected to be sustained at the 800 billion cubic foot level from the mid-1990s onwards, with the majority of the production growth occurring between 1992 and 1997. Significant growth in exports is projected, especially when capacity is available to move gas supplies directly into the California and Rocky Mountain regions in the US. These two transport corridors represent over half the increase in British Columbia production between 1992 and 1997. 53 refs., 15 figs., 26 tabs

  17. A critical history of British earthquakes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    R. M. W. Musson

    2004-06-01

    Full Text Available This paper reviews the history of the study of historical British earthquakes. The publication of compendia of British earthquakes goes back as early as the late 16th Century. A boost to the study of earthquakes in Britain was given in the mid 18th Century as a result of two events occurring in London in 1750 (analogous to the general increase in earthquakes in Europe five years later after the 1755 Lisbon earthquake. The 19th Century saw a number of significant studies, culminating in the work of Davison, whose book-length catalogue was published finally in 1924. After that appears a gap, until interest in the subject was renewed in the mid 1970s. The expansion of the U.K. nuclear programme in the 1980s led to a series of large-scale investigations of historical British earthquakes, all based almost completely on primary historical data and conducted to high standards. The catalogue published by BGS in 1994 is a synthesis of these studies, and presents a parametric catalogue in which historical earthquakes are assessed from intensity data points based on primary source material. Since 1994, revisions to parameters have been minor and new events discovered have been restricted to a few small events.

  18. Organization and Functions: Joint Field Operating Agencies of the Office of The Surgeon General of the Army

    Science.gov (United States)

    1988-08-16

    microscopic specimens in the fields of medicine, dentistry , and veterinary medicine. 2. Exhibits on specific health topics or specific medical, dental, and...r e n s i c S c i e n c e . A F I P a n d George Washington University offer a program leading to a Master of Science degree in Forensic Science or a...Master of Forensic Science degree. (3) Individual. Individual training to meet the applicant’s needs and qualifications is available at the AFIP in

  19. Association Between Surgeon Scorecard Use and Operating Room Costs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zygourakis, Corinna C; Valencia, Victoria; Moriates, Christopher; Boscardin, Christy K; Catschegn, Sereina; Rajkomar, Alvin; Bozic, Kevin J; Soo Hoo, Kent; Goldberg, Andrew N; Pitts, Lawrence; Lawton, Michael T; Dudley, R Adams; Gonzales, Ralph

    2017-03-01

    Despite the significant contribution of surgical spending to health care costs, most surgeons are unaware of their operating room costs. To examine the association between providing surgeons with individualized cost feedback and surgical supply costs in the operating room. The OR Surgical Cost Reduction (OR SCORE) project was a single-health system, multihospital, multidepartmental prospective controlled study in an urban academic setting. Intervention participants were attending surgeons in orthopedic surgery, otolaryngology-head and neck surgery, and neurological surgery (n = 63). Control participants were attending surgeons in cardiothoracic surgery, general surgery, vascular surgery, pediatric surgery, obstetrics/gynecology, ophthalmology, and urology (n = 186). From January 1 to December 31, 2015, each surgeon in the intervention group received standardized monthly scorecards showing the median surgical supply direct cost for each procedure type performed in the prior month compared with the surgeon's baseline (July 1, 2012, to November 30, 2014) and compared with all surgeons at the institution performing the same procedure at baseline. All surgical departments were eligible for a financial incentive if they met a 5% cost reduction goal. The primary outcome was each group's median surgical supply cost per case. Secondary outcome measures included total departmental surgical supply costs, case mix index-adjusted median surgical supply costs, patient outcomes (30-day readmission, 30-day mortality, and discharge status), and surgeon responses to a postintervention study-specific health care value survey. The median surgical supply direct costs per case decreased 6.54% in the intervention group, from $1398 (interquartile range [IQR], $316-$5181) (10 637 cases) in 2014 to $1307 (IQR, $319-$5037) (11 820 cases) in 2015. In contrast, the median surgical supply direct cost increased 7.42% in the control group, from $712 (IQR, $202-$1602) (16 441 cases

  20. The community general surgeon: a time for renaissance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Inglis, F G

    1995-04-01

    The practice of general surgery in smaller Canadian communities requires a broad scope of training, and recently the Royal College of Physicians and Surgeons of Canada introduced training requirements to meet the needs of these communities. The traditional role of physicians and surgeons in relation to the hospital boards is changing, with the development of regional health boards. Surgeons must be adaptable to these changes while striving to preserve the standards of surgical care in the new environment. The 1990 Canadian Medical Association manpower studies indicated that there will soon be a major shortage of general surgeons in Canada. In 1990, 48% of general surgeons in Canada were over 55 years of age. In communities with a population of 10,000 or less, there were relatively more general surgeons than other specialists, but, again, they were proportionately older. Recruitment to general surgery is a concern. A survey of 205 residents obtaining the Royal College fellowship in surgery between 1991 and 1993 revealed that 107 took post-fellowship training; of these, 46 developed academic careers, 17 became community surgeons and 44 were lost to surgical practice (they went into cardiac surgery or emigrated). Ninety-eight did not take further training; of these, 5 developed academic careers, 87 chose community practice and 6 emigrated. The role of the general practitioner in providing surgical services in remote areas was the topic of discussion between the Canadian Association of General Surgeons (CAGS), the Royal College and the College of Family Physicians of Canada. Guidelines were developed and approved by the CAGS.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS)

  1. How do Orthopedic Surgeons Address Psychological Aspects of Illness?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ana-Maria Vranceanu

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Orthopaedic surgeons have a pivotal role in transitioning the care of orthopedic patients from a biomedical to a biopsychosocial model. In an effort to foster this transition, we designed a study aimed to determine surgeons’ attitudes and practice of noticing, screening, discussing psychological illness with patients, as well as making referrals to address psychosocial issues in patients in need. Additionally, we asked surgeons to rank order potential barriers to and reasons for referrals to psychosocial treatment.   Methods: Orthopaedic surgeons members of the Science and Variation Group and Ankle Platform (N =350 completed demographics, and a 4-part survey assessing the degree to which surgeons notice, assess, screen and refer for psychological treatments, as well ranked ordered barriers to engaging in these processes. Results: As a group surgeons were neutral to referral for psychological treatment and formal screening of psychological factors, and somewhat likely to notice and discuss psychological factors. Surgeons were more likely to refer for psychological treatment if they engaged in research, or if they reside in South America as opposed to North America. The highest ranked barriers to screening, noticing, discussing and referring for psychological treatment were lack of time, stigma and feeling uncomfortable. Conclusion: Overall surgeons are likely to notice and discuss psychological factors, but less likely to formally screen or refer for psychological treatment. Transition to biopsychosocial models should focus on problem solving these barriers by teaching surgeons communication skills to increase comfort with discussing psychoemotional factors associated with orthopedic problems. The use of empathic communication can be very helpful in normalizing the difficulty of coping with an orthopedic condition, and may facilitate referral.

  2. [Andreas Vesalius, distinguished surgeon of the 16th century].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Van Hee, R

    1996-01-01

    The author gives here some considerations about A. Vesalius through his life and his works as a surgeon. He was the father of the anatomical revolution against Galen but was also an eminent clinician and surgeon. He was immediately able to adapt his surgical practice whenever the promising methodology was identified (see Consilia). The author concludes with a critical analysis of the Chirurgia magna in septem libros digesta attributed to A. Vesalius.

  3. Surgeons' Emotional Experience of Their Everyday Practice - A Qualitative Study.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Massimiliano Orri

    Full Text Available Physicians' emotions affect both patient care and personal well-being. Surgeons appear at particularly high risk, as evidenced by the high rate of burnout and the alarming consequences in both their personal lives and professional behavior. The aim of this qualitative study is to explore the emotional experiences of surgeons and their impact on their surgical practice.27 purposively selected liver and pancreatic surgeons from 10 teaching hospitals (23 men, 4 women participated. Inclusion took place until data saturation was reached. Data were collected through individual interviews and thematically analyzed independently by 3 researchers (a psychologist, a psychiatrist, and a surgeon. 7 themes emerged from the analysis, categorized in 3 main or superordinate themes, which described surgeons' emotional experience before, during, and after surgery. Burdensome emotions are present throughout all 3 periods (and invade life outside the hospital-surgeons' own emotions, their perception of patients' emotions, and their entwinement. The interviewees described the range of emotional situations they face (with patients, families, colleagues, the influence of the institutional framework (time pressure and fatigue, cultural pressure to satisfy the ideal image of a surgeon, as well as the emotions they feel (including especially anxiety, fear, distress, guilt, and accountability.Emotions are ubiquitous in surgeons' experience, and their exposure to stress is chronic rather than acute. Considering emotions only in terms of their relations to operative errors (as previous studies have done is limiting. Although complications are quite rare events, the concern for possible complications is an oppressive experience, regardless of whether or not they actually occur.

  4. Surgeons' Emotional Experience of Their Everyday Practice - A Qualitative Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Orri, Massimiliano; Revah-Lévy, Anne; Farges, Olivier

    2015-01-01

    Physicians' emotions affect both patient care and personal well-being. Surgeons appear at particularly high risk, as evidenced by the high rate of burnout and the alarming consequences in both their personal lives and professional behavior. The aim of this qualitative study is to explore the emotional experiences of surgeons and their impact on their surgical practice. 27 purposively selected liver and pancreatic surgeons from 10 teaching hospitals (23 men, 4 women) participated. Inclusion took place until data saturation was reached. Data were collected through individual interviews and thematically analyzed independently by 3 researchers (a psychologist, a psychiatrist, and a surgeon). 7 themes emerged from the analysis, categorized in 3 main or superordinate themes, which described surgeons' emotional experience before, during, and after surgery. Burdensome emotions are present throughout all 3 periods (and invade life outside the hospital)-surgeons' own emotions, their perception of patients' emotions, and their entwinement. The interviewees described the range of emotional situations they face (with patients, families, colleagues), the influence of the institutional framework (time pressure and fatigue, cultural pressure to satisfy the ideal image of a surgeon), as well as the emotions they feel (including especially anxiety, fear, distress, guilt, and accountability). Emotions are ubiquitous in surgeons' experience, and their exposure to stress is chronic rather than acute. Considering emotions only in terms of their relations to operative errors (as previous studies have done) is limiting. Although complications are quite rare events, the concern for possible complications is an oppressive experience, regardless of whether or not they actually occur.

  5. Meta-Analysis of Surgeon Burnout Syndrome and Specialty Differences.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bartholomew, Alex J; Houk, Anna K; Pulcrano, Marisa; Shara, Nawar M; Kwagyan, John; Jackson, Patrick G; Sosin, Michael

    2018-02-27

    Surgeon burnout compromises the quality of life of physicians and the delivery of care to patients. Burnout rates and interpretation of the Maslach Burnout Inventory (MBI) complicates the interpretation of surgeon burnout. The purpose of this study is to apply a standardized interpretation of severe surgeon burnout termed, "burnout syndrome" to analyze inherent variation within surgical specialties. A systematic literature search was performed using MEDLINE, PsycINFO, and EMBASE to identify studies reporting MBI data by surgical specialty. Data extraction was performed to isolate surgeon specific data. A meta-analysis was performed. A total of 16 cross-sectional studies were included in this meta-analysis, totaling 3581 subjects. A random effects model approximated burnout syndrome at 3.0% (95% CI: 2.0%-5.0%; I 2 = 78.1%). Subscale analysis of emotional exhaustion, depersonalization, and personal accomplishment indicated subscale burnout in 30.0% (CI: 25.0%-36.0%; I 2 = 93.2%), 34.0% (CI: 25.0%-43.0%; I 2 = 96.9%), and 25.0% (CI: 18.0%-32.0%; I 2 = 96.5%) of surgeons, respectively. Significant differences (p burnout termed "burnout syndrome," although surgeon burnout may occur in up to 34% of surgeons, characterized by high burnout in 1 of 3 subscales. Surgical specialties have significantly different rates of burnout subscales. Future burnout studies should target the specialty-specific level to understand inherent differences in an effort to better understand methods of improving surgeon burnout. Copyright © 2018 Association of Program Directors in Surgery. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  6. Ultrasound of the acute abdomen performed by surgeons in training

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Eiberg, J.P.; Grantcharov, T.P.; Eriksen, J.R.

    2008-01-01

    perform valid abdominal ultrasound examinations of patients referred with acute abdominal pain. METHODS: Patients referred with acute abdominal pain had an ultrasound examination by a surgeon in training as well as by an experienced consultant radiologist whose results served as the gold standard. All...... examinations. CONCLUSION: Surgeons in training without pre-existing ultrasound experience and only a minimum of formal ultrasound education can perform valid and reliable ultrasound examinations of the gallbladder in patients admitted with acute abdominal pain...

  7. Preventing infection in general surgery: improvements through education of surgeons by surgeons.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    McHugh, S M

    2011-08-01

    Surgical patients are at particular risk of healthcare-associated infection (HCAI) due to the presence of a surgical site leading to surgical site infection (SSI), and because of the need for intravascular access resulting in catheter-related bloodstream infection (CRBSI). A two-year initiative commenced with an initial audit of surgical practice; this was used to inform the development of a targeted educational initiative by surgeons specifically for surgical trainees. Parameters assessed during the initial audit and a further audit after the educational initiative were related to intra- and postoperative aspects of the prevention of SSIs, as well as care of peripheral venous catheters (PVCs) in surgical patients. The proportion of prophylactic antibiotics administered prior to incision across 360 operations increased from 30.0% to 59.1% (P<0.001). Surgical site dressings were observed in 234 patients, and a significant decrease was found in the percentage of dressings that were tampered with during the initial 48h after surgery (16.5% vs 6.2%, P=0.030). In total, 574 PVCs were assessed over the two-year period. Improvements were found in the proportion of unnecessary PVCs in situ (37.9% vs 24.4%, P<0.001), PVCs in situ for >72h (10.6% vs 3.1%, P<0.001) and PVCs covered with clean and intact dressings (87.3% vs 97.6%, P<0.001). Significant improvements in surgical practice were established for the prevention of SSI and CRBSI through a focused educational programme developed by and for surgeons. Potentially, other specific measures may also be warranted to achieve further improvements in infection prevention in surgical practice.

  8. Sources of information used in selection of surgeons.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carlin, Caroline S; Kralewski, John; Savage, Megan

    2013-08-01

    We explored the process of physician selection, focusing on selection of surgeons for knee and hip replacement to increase the probability of a new relationship, making cost and quality scorecard information more relevant. We collected data using a mailed survey sent to patients with knee or hip replacement surgery shortly after March 1, 2010. This time period followed a period of publicity about the new cost and quality scorecard. We used multivariate probit models to predict awareness of the scorecard and willingness to switch providers. Multinomial logit methods were used to predict the primary factor influencing the choice of surgeon (physician referral, family or friend referral, surgeon location, previous experience with the surgeon, or other). Internet access and higher neighborhood incomes are associated with an increased probability of being aware of the scorecards. Male patients and patients with Internet access or in highly educated neighborhoods are more likely to be willing to switch providers for a reduced copay. Urban residents are more likely to rely on physician referrals, and rural patients on family/friend referrals when selecting a surgeon; Internet access reduces importance of surgeon location. Additional research is needed to determine whether Internet access is causal in improved responsiveness to market information and incentives, or a proxy for other factors. In addition, we see evidence that efforts to improve healthcare quality and costs through market forces should be tailored to the patient's place of residence.

  9. Diathermy awareness among surgeons-An analysis in Ireland.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McQuail, P M; McCartney, B S; Baker, J F; Kenny, P

    2016-12-01

    Diathermy is an integral part of many modern surgical procedures. While diathermy is generally accepted as 'safe', electrosurgery-induced injuries are among the more common causes for malpractice litigation. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the awareness among surgeons of the principles, risks, precautions and appropriate use of diathermy. All surgeons employed from Senior House Officer (SHO) to Consultant grade in two teaching hospitals were surveyed. Sixty-three surgeons were asked to complete an anonymous questionnaire, which recorded level of training and addressed competence in principles, hazards, and precautions to be taken with diathermy. Eight Consultants, 5 Specialist Registrars, 19 Registrars and 13 SHO's responded (71% response). All but three subspecialties were represented. Eighty-two percent (37/45) had no formal diathermy training. Despite 89% (40/45) of surgeons regarding diathermy as a safe instrument, 56% felt they had inadequate understanding of the principles and failed to demonstrate an appropriate awareness of the potential risks. Fifty seven percent exhibited a dangerous lack of awareness in managing equipment not yielding the desired effect and 22% were unaware of any patient groups requiring special caution. Only 42% wanted formal training. Our results show a dearth of awareness among surgeons regarding diathermy. Given our findings, we urge a shift in attitude towards diathermy, with surgeons adopting a more cautious and safe approach to diathermy use. We recommend that formal training be introduced as a hospital based initiative.

  10. Ergonomics in the operating room: protecting the surgeon.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rosenblatt, Peter L; McKinney, Jessica; Adams, Sonia R

    2013-01-01

    To review elements of an ergonomic operating room environment and describe common ergonomic errors in surgeon posture during laparoscopic and robotic surgery. Descriptive video based on clinical experience and a review of the literature (Canadian Task Force classification III). Community teaching hospital affiliated with a major teaching hospital. Gynecologic surgeons. Demonstration of surgical ergonomic principles and common errors in surgical ergonomics by a physical therapist and surgeon. The physical nature of surgery necessitates awareness of ergonomic principles. The literature has identified ergonomic awareness to be grossly lacking among practicing surgeons, and video has not been documented as a teaching tool for this population. Taking this into account, we created a video that demonstrates proper positioning of monitors and equipment, and incorrect and correct ergonomic positions during surgery. Also presented are 3 common ergonomic errors in surgeon posture: forward head position, improper shoulder elevation, and pelvic girdle asymmetry. Postural reset and motion strategies are demonstrated to help the surgeon learn techniques to counterbalance the sustained and awkward positions common during surgery that lead to muscle fatigue, pain, and degenerative changes. Correct ergonomics is a learned and practiced behavior. We believe that video is a useful way to facilitate improvement in ergonomic behaviors. We suggest that consideration of operating room setup, proper posture, and practice of postural resets are necessary components for a longer, healthier, and pain-free surgical career. Copyright © 2013 AAGL. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  11. A Modular Laparoscopic Training Program for Pediatric Surgeons

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wasa, Masafumi; Takiguchi, Shuji; Taniguchi, Eiji; Soh, Hideki; Ohashi, Shuichi; Okada, Akira

    2003-01-01

    Objectives: A structured endoscopic training program for pediatric surgeons has not yet been established. This study was conducted to develop a modular training program (MTP) for pediatric surgeons and to evaluate its effectiveness for surgeons with and without previous experience in laparoscopic surgery. Methods: Nine pediatric surgeons participated in the study. They were divided into 2 groups: group A (n=4), surgeons who had experienced more than 10 cases of laparoscopic surgery prior to MTP; group B (n=5), those who had experienced fewer than 10 cases. They participated in a standardized MTP workshop, which consisted of 2 “see-through” and 3 “laparoscopic” tasks. Each participant's psychomotor skills were evaluated objectively before and after MTP with a computer-generated virtual simulator and were evaluated for precision, efficiency, and speed. Results: In participants, speed was significantly enhanced after MTP. In group A, no differences were observed after MTP, whereas significant improvements were noted in efficiency and speed after MTP in group B. Before MTP, efficiency was significantly higher in group A than in group B; however, no difference remained between the 2 groups after MTP. Conclusions: MTP is effective for nonlaparoscopic pediatric surgeons to become familiar with basic endoscopic skills. PMID:12722996

  12. The guild of surgeons as a tradition of moral enquiry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hall, Daniel E

    2011-04-01

    Alisdair MacIntyre argues that the virtues necessary for good work are everywhere and always embodied by particular communities of practice. As a general surgeon, MacIntyre's work has deeply influenced my own understanding of the practice of good surgery. The task of this essay is to describe how the guild of surgeons functions as a more-or-less coherent tradition of moral enquiry, embodying and transmitting the virtues necessary for the practice of good surgery. Beginning with an example of surgeons engaged in a process of moral discernment, I describe how the practice of surgery depends on the cultivation of a certain kind of practical wisdom (phronesis) that effectively orders the techniques of surgery toward particular notions of human flourishing within the limits of what is possible with the particular body on which the surgeon operates. I then argue that one reason why surgeons train in an apprenticeship model of "residency" is to cultivate not only the technical skill but also the practical wisdom to perform good surgery. I conclude by noting that the surgical profession is enduring necessary, but unprecedented, changes in the way it practices and transmits its art; and without deliberate and sustained attention to the character formation of surgeons, the profession runs the risk of creating excellent technicians who are nonetheless ill-equipped to practice wise and good surgery.

  13. Surgeon dependent variation in adenotonsillectomy costs in children.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meier, Jeremy D; Duval, Melanie; Wilkes, Jacob; Andrews, Seth; Korgenski, E Kent; Park, Albert H; Srivastava, Rajendu

    2014-05-01

    To (1) identify the major expenses for same-day adenotonsillectomy (T&A) and the costs for postoperative complication encounters in a children's hospital and (2) compare differences for variations in costs by surgeon. Observational cohort study. Tertiary children's hospital. A standardized activity-based hospital accounting system was used to determine total hospital costs per encounter (not including professional fees for surgeons or anesthetists) for T&A cases at a tertiary children's hospital from 2007 to 2012. Hospital costs were subdivided into categories, including operating room (OR), OR supplies, postanesthesia care unit (PACU), same-day services (SDS), anesthesia, pharmacy, and other. Costs for postoperative complication encounters were included to identify a mean total cost per case per surgeon. The study cohort included 4824 T&As performed by 14 different surgeons. The mean cost per T&A was $1506 (95% confidence interval, $1492-$1519, with a range of $1156-$1828 for the lowest and highest cost per case per surgeon; P expenses are due to OR and supply costs. Significant differences in costs between surgeons for outpatient T&A were identified. Studies to understand the reasons for this variation and the impact on outcomes are needed. If this variation does not affect patient outcomes, then reducing this variation may improve health care value by limiting waste.

  14. Inadequate access to surgeons: reason for disparate cancer care?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bradley, Cathy J; Dahman, Bassam; Given, Charles W

    2009-07-01

    To compare the likelihood of seeing a surgeon between elderly dually eligible non-small-cell lung cancer (NSCLC) and colon cancer patients and their Medicare counterparts. Surgery rates between dually eligible and Medicare patients who were evaluated by a surgeon were also assessed. We used statewide Medicaid and Medicare data merged with the Michigan Tumor Registry to extract a sample of patients with a first primary NSCLC (n = 1100) or colon cancer (n = 2086). The study period was from January 1, 1997 to December 31, 2000. We assessed the likelihood of a surgical evaluation using logistic models that included patient characteristics, tumor stage, and census tracts. Among patients evaluated by a surgeon, we used logistic regression to predict if a resection was performed. Dually eligible patients were nearly half as likely to be evaluated by a surgeon as Medicare patients (odds ratio [OR] = 0.49; 95% confidence interval = 0.32, 0.77 and odds ratio = 0.59; 95% confidence interval = 0.41, 0.86 for NSCLC and colon cancer patients, respectively). Among patients who were evaluated by a surgeon, the likelihood of resection was not statistically significantly different between dually eligible and Medicare patients. This study suggests that dually eligible patients, in spite of having Medicaid insurance, are less likely to be evaluated by a surgeon relative to their Medicare counterparts. Policies and interventions aimed toward increasing access to specialists and complete diagnostic work-ups (eg, colonoscopy, bronchoscopy) are needed.

  15. British Energy privatisation - 18 months on

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    McRoberts, Doug

    1998-01-01

    The TV advertisement which launched the privatisation of British Energy in the summer of 1996 - but just how successful has that privatisation been? And who has benefited - shareholders? The nuclear industry? Our own workforce? Last year, as reported to PIME 97 that the privatisation itself had been successfully completed - following the restructuring of the UK nuclear generation industry, and the creation of British Energy, a new name in the UK - and world energy scene. In simple terms, that privatisation has certainly succeeded - our share price since privatisation has more than doubled, from 2 pounds to well over 4 ponds. Over the last year, it has consistently outperformed the UK electricity sector - particularly over the last winter; it has also out-performed the FR Share Index over the same period, and in December British Energy became one of the UK top 100 listed companies, included in the FTSE 100 having started life at around number 130. This in turn has meant that a number of high quality institutions have taken a second look at British Energy and begun to invest in us as part of a portfolio of FTSE 100 companies. Our success as a private sector company could only be built on the solid foundation of successes as a nuclear utility. Over the five years from 1992 to 1997, our output went up by 64 as Sizewell B came on line and the AGRs achieved their design load factors at last. Safety remains our top priority, and while our profitability increased, so did our safety ratings - accident frequency rates came down by 60%, and collective radiation exposure to our workforce came down 58%. As a result of all this achievement, coupled with reduction in our total workforce, our productivity went up by over 100% - surely proof that nuclear can succeed in a competitive, deregulated electricity market. For future, it has been even more important to sustain that initial success to grow and develop British Energy as a company. The results are there for all to see. In the

  16. Assessing Army Professional Forums Metrics for Effectiveness and Impact

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Cianciolo, Anna T; Heiden, Charles G; Prevou, Michael I

    2006-01-01

    ... meet the challenges brought on by Army transformation. Army professional forums (APFs), powered by advances in collaborative toolsets and multimedia presentation software, provide a means for leader self-development and professional growth...

  17. The Impact of Artillery Precision Munitions on Army Strategic Objectives

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Kays, Michael J

    2006-01-01

    ... the past. The Army Strategic Planning Guidance, 2005, describes why and how the Army must change. It outlines the nature of future threats, with particular emphasis on the asymmetrical threats of today...

  18. An Identification of Interpersonal Skills for Building Army Civilian Leaders

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Elliott, Kari A; Erickson, Michael D; Fowler, Edward T; Gieseking, John K; Weiss, Mary P

    2006-01-01

    ... by Army civilian leaders. Thirty-eight (38) Army civilian managers from four leadership levels completed questionnaires and participated in face-to-face interviews describing the important interpersonal skills that were necessary...

  19. Nanotechnology Laboratory Collaborates with Army to Develop Botulism Vaccine | FNLCR

    Science.gov (United States)

    The Nanotechnology Characterization Laboratory (NCL) is collaborating with the Army to develop a candidate vaccine against botulism. Under a collaboration agreement between the National Cancer Institute and the U.S. Army Medical Research Institute of

  20. 2007 Posture Statement, Army Reserve: An Operational Force

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Stultz, Jack C

    2007-01-01

    The 2007 Army Reserve Posture Statement describes how the Army Reserve continues to transform from a strategic reserve to an operational force, meeting today's challenges as it better prepares for future uncertainties...

  1. Role Of The Army In Modern Pakistan

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vladislav Viktorovich Vorobiev

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available The article studies the political development of the country in the modern period. Special attention is paid to the position of the army and its role in the Pakistani society. The article explores in detail the processes of gradual distancing of the army from politics and strengthening of civil society institutions. It is the first time in the Pakistani history that the civilian government managed to complete its full five-year constitutional term. Meanwhile, the country has been advancing on the path to democracy even after the elections 2013: a new civilian government has been formed in Pakistan. As compared with the previous phases of the country's development, the status of the army has considerably changed, evolved from "guiding force" to "shadow" guarantee of democratic development. The process has been largely encouraged by popular among officers feeling of tiredness: many of them are not ready to take power into their own hands and committed to their strictly constitutional duties. Despite this recent positive trend, the army continues to enjoy great authority in the society, often brokers political crisis and helps civilian authorities in settling such pressing problems as, for example, fight against extremism. The military will exert influence on government unless civil authorities are able to resist the current challenges and settle the actual problems. The role of "power broker" fully serves the interests of the top army brass.

  2. ROLE OF THE ARMY IN MODERN PAKISTAN

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vladislav Viktorovich Vorobiev

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available The article studies the political development of the country in the modern period. Special attention is paid to the position of the army and its role in the Pakistani society. The article explores in detail the processes of gradual distancing of the army from politics and strengthening of civil society institutions. It is the first time in the Pakistani history that the civilian government managed to complete its full five-year constitutional term. Meanwhile, the country has been advancing on the path to democracy even after the elections 2013: a new civilian government has been formed in Pakistan. As compared with the previous phases of the country's development, the status of the army has considerably changed, evolved from "guiding force" to "shadow" guarantee of democratic development. The process has been largely encouraged by popular among officers feeling of tiredness: many of them are not ready to take power into their own hands and committed to their strictly constitutional duties. Despite this recent positive trend, the army continues to enjoy great authority in the society, often brokers political crisis and helps civilian authorities in settling such pressing problems as, for example, fight against extremism. The military will exert influence on government unless civil authorities are able to resist the current challenges and settle the actual problems. The role of "power broker" fully serves the interests of the top army brass.

  3. The Benefit of the Smartphone in Oral and Maxillofacial Surgery: Smartphone Use Among Maxillofacial Surgery Trainees and iPhone Apps for the Maxillofacial Surgeon.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carey, Elinor; Payne, Karl Frederick Braekkan; Ahmed, Nabeela; Goodson, Alexander

    2015-06-01

    The use of smartphones has soared among healthcare professionals in recent years, with estimated figures reporting that the majority of clinicians own and use smartphones in the workplace. Smartphones allow the clinician to carry textbooks in their pocket, write documents on the move and use email and internet to enhance productivity and clinical decision making. These advances in smartphone technology have enabled access to healthcare information for the clinician and transfer of data between team members, giving rise to the phenomenon of telemedicine. With the ability to instantly transfer clinical data to the off-site surgeon, combined with purpose-built medical apps, the smartphone is rapidly becoming an invaluable tool for the modern surgeon. Many studies have linked the benefits of smartphones and apps in other surgical specialities, but no article to date has highlighted the merits and full scope of this technology to the Oral and Maxillofacial Surgeon. We report that 94 % of British maxillofacial surgery trainees own a smartphone, with 61 % owning an iPhone. 89 % of trainees questioned had downloaded medical apps and used them regularly during clinical activities. We discuss the clinical application of the smartphone in the field of oral and maxillofacial surgery and review a list of useful and relevant apps for the modern maxillofacial surgeon using the iPhone as an example platform.

  4. Evaluation of the US Army fallout prediction model

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pernick, A.; Levanon, I.

    1987-01-01

    The US Army fallout prediction method was evaluated against an advanced fallout prediction model--SIMFIC (Simplified Fallout Interpretive Code). The danger zone areas of the US Army method were found to be significantly greater (up to a factor of 8) than the areas of corresponding radiation hazard as predicted by SIMFIC. Nonetheless, because the US Army's method predicts danger zone lengths that are commonly shorter than the corresponding hot line distances of SIMFIC, the US Army's method is not reliably conservative

  5. Predictors of suicide and accident death in the Army Study to Assess Risk and Resilience in Servicemembers (Army STARRS): results from the Army Study to Assess Risk and Resilience in Servicemembers (Army STARRS).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schoenbaum, Michael; Kessler, Ronald C; Gilman, Stephen E; Colpe, Lisa J; Heeringa, Steven G; Stein, Murray B; Ursano, Robert J; Cox, Kenneth L

    2014-05-01

    The Army Study to Assess Risk and Resilience in Servicemembers (Army STARRS) is a multicomponent study designed to generate actionable recommendations to reduce Army suicides and increase knowledge of risk and resilience factors for suicidality. To present data on prevalence, trends, and basic sociodemographic and Army experience correlates of suicides and accident deaths among active duty Regular Army soldiers between January 1, 2004, and December 31, 2009, and thereby establish a foundation for future Army STARRS investigations. Analysis of trends and predictors of suicide and accident deaths using Army and Department of Defense administrative data systems. Participants were all members of the US Regular Army serving at any time between 2004 and 2009. Death by suicide or accident during active Army service. The suicide rate rose between 2004 and 2009 among never deployed and currently and previously deployed Regular Army soldiers. The accident death rate fell sharply among currently deployed soldiers, remained constant among the previously deployed, and trended upward among the never deployed. Increased suicide risk was associated with being a man (or a woman during deployment), white race/ethnicity, junior enlisted rank, recent demotion, and current or previous deployment. Sociodemographic and Army experience predictors were generally similar for suicides and accident deaths. Time trends in these predictors and in the Army's increased use of accession waivers (which relaxed some qualifications for new soldiers) do not explain the rise in Army suicides. Predictors of Army suicides were largely similar to those reported elsewhere for civilians, although some predictors distinct to Army service emerged that deserve more in-depth analysis. The existence of a time trend in suicide risk among never-deployed soldiers argues indirectly against the view that exposure to combat-related trauma is the exclusive cause of the increase in Army suicides.

  6. 30 Brigade Combat Teams: Is the Army too Small

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-12-01

    the cost of inflation (Belasco 2015). Figure 1 depicts the impact of the BCA on the Army. The dark blue line shows funding...ABSTRACT (maximum 200 words) The purpose of this thesis is to determine the impact of a contingency operation on Army dwell time. The Department of... impact of a contingency operation on Army dwell time. The Department of Defense (DOD) goal for the active Army is for every one year a unit

  7. Human Capital Analytics to Manage the Army Officer Population

    Science.gov (United States)

    2017-06-09

    HUMAN CAPITAL ANALYTICS TO MANAGE THE ARMY OFFICER POPULATION A thesis presented to the Faculty of the U.S. Army Command and...From - To) AUG 2016 – JUNE 2017 4. TITLE AND SUBTITLE Human Capital Analytics to Manage the Army Officer Population 5a. CONTRACT NUMBER 5b...Analytics to manage the Army’s officer population . Human Capital Analytics has reduced the uncertanty associated with civilian sector HR polices and

  8. Medical student perceptions of plastic surgeons as hand surgery specialists.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Agarwal, Jayant P; Mendenhall, Shaun D; Hopkins, Paul N

    2014-01-01

    Plastic surgeons are often not perceived as hand surgery specialists. Better educating medical students about the plastic surgeon's role in hand surgery may improve the understanding of the field for future referring physicians. The purposes of this study were to assess medical students' understanding of hand surgery specialists and to analyze the impact of prior plastic, orthopedic, and general surgery clinical exposure on this understanding. An online survey including 8 hand-related clinical scenarios was administered to students at a large academic medical center. After indicating training level and prior clinical exposure to plastic surgery or other surgical subspecialties, students selected one or more appropriate surgical subspecialists for management of surgical hand conditions. A response rate of 56.4% was achieved. Prior clinical exposure to plastic, orthopedic, and general surgery was reported by 29%, 43%, and 90% of fourth year students, respectively. Students generally chose at least 1 acceptable specialty for management of hand conditions with improvement over the course of their training (P = 0.008). Overall, students perceived orthopedic surgeons as hand specialists more so than plastic and general surgeons. Clinical exposure to plastic surgery increased the selection of this specialty for nearly all scenarios (22%-46%, P = 0.025). Exposure to orthopedic and general surgery was associated with a decrease in selection of plastic surgery for treatment of carpal tunnel and hand burns, respectively. Medical students have a poor understanding of the plastic surgeon's role in hand surgery. If plastic surgeons want to continue to be recognized as hand surgeons, they should better educate medical students about their role in hand surgery. This can be achieved by providing a basic overview of plastic surgery to all medical students with emphasis placed on hand and peripheral nerve surgery.

  9. The Army Budget: FY 00/01 President's Budget. Assistant Secretary of the Army for Financial Management and Comptroller

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    1999-01-01

    ...) 697-6241, DSN 227- 6241. Its purpose is to provide the Army leadership, OSD and members of Congress and their staffs a reference to the Army's FY2000/2001 biennial Budget Request (President's Budget...

  10. U.S. Army Research Laboratory Annual Review 2011

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-12-01

    Specialty Dr. Jan W. Andzelm ...................................... Multiscale Modeling of Macromolecules and Polymers Dr. Howard E. Brandt ...Gurganus brief Maj. Gen. Nick Justice on ARL’s new experimental technique using DIC during the 2010 Army Science Conference. U.S. Army Research Laboratory 2800 Powder Mill Road • Adelphi, MD 20783-1197 www.arl.army.mil

  11. Prime Power: Filling the Army’s Electric Power Gap

    Science.gov (United States)

    1989-01-01

    standards throughout the world. 3-5 The Army’s prime power requirements of necessity include frequency conversion equipment, transformers, and...ManuaL l01-10-1, pp. 1-43. 2 Electric Load Data Seven U.S. Army Bases, Office of the Chief of Engineers, Department of Army Contract No. DACA -73-68-C

  12. Climate Assessment for Army Enterprise Planning Fact Sheet

    Science.gov (United States)

    2017-11-30

    or private organizations . Outcomes of DOD SERDP program climate change investments are being leveraged and adapted to Army enterprise process...Software Estimating Resistance and Resilience of Military Lands Using Vegetation Indices Tech report Climate Change Vulnerability of Army...TITLE: Climate Assessment for Army Enterprise Planning SUBMITTING ORGANIZATION : ERDC STO START YEAR / END YEAR: FY14-FY17 1. NARRATIVE

  13. Drug abuse control and the Salvation Army.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gauntlett, S L

    1991-01-01

    The Salvation Army has been involved in the control of drug abuse since it was founded over 120 years ago, when alcohol was the predominant concern. Today, alcohol is still the most commonly abused substance, but the Salvation Army is increasingly tackling other forms of substance abuse as well. High priority is given to prevention of all levels and by all means through a network of over 200 specialized rehabilitation centres throughout the world, in addition to programmes within hostels for the homeless, where there is a high proportion of alcohol and other substance abusers. The Salvation Army endeavours to help drug-dependent persons to abstain from using drugs and achieve a healthy and happy life. It is of the view that, as drug dependence is usually a manifestation of deeper needs, the spiritual component is vital in dealing with drug abuse of all types.

  14. Malaria in inter-war British India.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bynum, W F

    2000-06-01

    British India was an important site of much important malaria research. Although Ronald Ross left India in 1899, a number of malariologists continued the task of evaluating the incidence and distribution of malaria in the country. Implementing practical solutions was hampered by formidable social and economic problems. This paper examines the Indian situation in the late 1920s, through a retrospective selection of writings chosen by J.A. Sinton for reproduction in an early issue of 'The records of the malaria survey of India', and the analysis of the Indian malaria situation through a visit of the League of Nations Malaria Commission in 1929.

  15. Race, history, and black British jazz

    OpenAIRE

    Toynbee, Jason

    2013-01-01

    This article traces the history of black British jazz across five moments from 1920 to the present. It also makes a theoretical argument about the nature of race and its connection both with music and belonging to the nation. Race is indeed a musical-discursive construction, as has been argued in the literature about culture and ethnicity over the last thirty years or so. But it is a social structure too, and the contradictions that result are key to understanding the race-music relationship.

  16. Frisky and Bitchy: Unlikely British Olympic Heroes?

    OpenAIRE

    Williams, Jean

    2010-01-01

    This article begins with a brief biographical overview of the career of bridge player and writer Rixi Markus (1910–1992). To a lesser extent, it gives an account of her sometime partner Fritzi Gordon (1916–1992). Questions of Britishness are specifically informed by Markus’s 1988 memoir, A Vulnerable Game. In her twelfth and final book, Rixi details her experiences as a Jewish emigrant who escaped to London after the Austrian Anschluss in 1938. Assimilation, acculturation and a measure of ang...

  17. Army Energy and Water Reporting System Assessment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Deprez, Peggy C.; Giardinelli, Michael J.; Burke, John S.; Connell, Linda M.

    2011-09-01

    There are many areas of desired improvement for the Army Energy and Water Reporting System. The purpose of system is to serve as a data repository for collecting information from energy managers, which is then compiled into an annual energy report. This document summarizes reported shortcomings of the system and provides several alternative approaches for improving application usability and adding functionality. The U.S. Army has been using Army Energy and Water Reporting System (AEWRS) for many years to collect and compile energy data from installations for facilitating compliance with Federal and Department of Defense energy management program reporting requirements. In this analysis, staff from Pacific Northwest National Laboratory found that substantial opportunities exist to expand AEWRS functions to better assist the Army to effectively manage energy programs. Army leadership must decide if it wants to invest in expanding AEWRS capabilities as a web-based, enterprise-wide tool for improving the Army Energy and Water Management Program or simply maintaining a bottom-up reporting tool. This report looks at both improving system functionality from an operational perspective and increasing user-friendliness, but also as a tool for potential improvements to increase program effectiveness. The authors of this report recommend focusing on making the system easier for energy managers to input accurate data as the top priority for improving AEWRS. The next major focus of improvement would be improved reporting. The AEWRS user interface is dated and not user friendly, and a new system is recommended. While there are relatively minor improvements that could be made to the existing system to make it easier to use, significant improvements will be achieved with a user-friendly interface, new architecture, and a design that permits scalability and reliability. An expanded data set would naturally have need of additional requirements gathering and a focus on integrating

  18. Projections of Demand for Cardiovascular Surgery and Supply of Surgeons

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jung Jeung Lee

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available Background: While demand for cardiovascular surgery is expected to increase gradually along with the rapid increase in cardiovascular diseases with respect to the aging population, the supply of thoracic and cardiovascular surgeons has been continuously decreasing over the past 10 years. Consequently, this study aims to achieve guidance in establishing health care policy by analyzing the supply and demand for cardiovascular surgeries in the medical service area of Korea. Methods: After investigating the actual number of cardiovascular surgeries performed using the National Health Insurance claim data of the Health Insurance Review and Assessment Service, as well as drawing from national statistics concerning the elderly population aged 65 and over, this study estimated the number of future cardiovascular surgeries by using a cell-based model. To be able to analyze the supply and demand of surgeons, the recent status of new surgeons specializing in thoracic and cardiovascular surgeries and the ratio of their subspecialties in cardiovascular surgeries were investigated. Then, while taking three different scenarios into account, the number of cardiovascular surgeons expected be working in 5-year periods was projected. Results: The number of cardiovascular surgeries, which was recorded at 10,581 cases in 2014, is predicted to increase consistently to reach a demand of 15,501 cases in 2040—an increase of 46.5%. There was a total of 245 cardiovascular surgeons at work in 2014. Looking at 5 year spans in the future, the number of surgeons expected to be supplied in 2040 is 184, to retire is 249, and expected to be working is 309—an increase of -24.9%, 1.6%, and 26.1%, respectively compared to those in 2014. This forecasts a demand-supply imbalance in every scenario. Conclusion: Cardiovascular surgeons are the most central resource in the medical service of highly specialized cardiovascular surgeries, and fostering the surgeons requires much time

  19. Projections of Demand for Cardiovascular Surgery and Supply of Surgeons.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Jung Jeung; Park, Nam Hee; Lee, Kun Sei; Chee, Hyun Keun; Sim, Sung Bo; Kim, Myo Jeong; Choi, Ji Suk; Kim, Myunghwa; Park, Choon Seon

    2016-12-01

    While demand for cardiovascular surgery is expected to increase gradually along with the rapid increase in cardiovascular diseases with respect to the aging population, the supply of thoracic and cardiovascular surgeons has been continuously decreasing over the past 10 years. Consequently, this study aims to achieve guidance in establishing health care policy by analyzing the supply and demand for cardiovascular surgeries in the medical service area of Korea. After investigating the actual number of cardiovascular surgeries performed using the National Health Insurance claim data of the Health Insurance Review and Assessment Service, as well as drawing from national statistics concerning the elderly population aged 65 and over, this study estimated the number of future cardiovascular surgeries by using a cell-based model. To be able to analyze the supply and demand of surgeons, the recent status of new surgeons specializing in thoracic and cardiovascular surgeries and the ratio of their subspecialties in cardiovascular surgeries were investigated. Then, while taking three different scenarios into account, the number of cardiovascular surgeons expected be working in 5-year periods was projected. The number of cardiovascular surgeries, which was recorded at 10,581 cases in 2014, is predicted to increase consistently to reach a demand of 15,501 cases in 2040-an increase of 46.5%. There was a total of 245 cardiovascular surgeons at work in 2014. Looking at 5 year spans in the future, the number of surgeons expected to be supplied in 2040 is 184, to retire is 249, and expected to be working is 309-an increase of -24.9%, 1.6%, and 26.1%, respectively compared to those in 2014. This forecasts a demand-supply imbalance in every scenario. Cardiovascular surgeons are the most central resource in the medical service of highly specialized cardiovascular surgeries, and fostering the surgeons requires much time, effort, and resources; therefore, by analyzing the various factors

  20. [Physicians and surgeons during the inquisition in new Spain].

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Micheli-Serra, Alfredo

    2003-01-01

    The origins of New Spain Inquisition whose jurisdiction extended also to Philippine Islands, are related herein. Physicians and surgeons who worked as Inquisition officers are discussed, from the first Dr. Juan de la Fuente who was appointed on May 9, 1572, to Dr. Pedro del Castillo, appointed on September 24, 1644. Likewise, physicians and surgeons judged by the Holy Office are mentioned. During the XVI century, those judged were few and insignificant personages, the first was the Irish Protestant William Corniels a barber surgeon, who arrived with the John Hawkins' pirate fleet in 1568 and settled in Guatemala. Some physicians and surgeons were judged as "Judaizers" during the first half of the XVII century. Many physicians and surgeons were prosecuted in Mexico, as well as in the Philippine Islands, in the second half of the XVIII century because they were Freemasons or supporters of French Revolution ideology. Among those was the unfortunate Dr. Enrique Esteban Morel, who introduced into Mexico the method of antivariolar inoculation at the time of the great epidemic out-break of 1779. It should be a gesture of justice to build a memorial in the ancient Inquisition Palace to honor this Public Health's worthy physician.

  1. Treating Wisely: The Surgeon's Role in Antibiotic Stewardship.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leeds, Ira L; Fabrizio, Anne; Cosgrove, Sara E; Wick, Elizabeth C

    2017-05-01

    : Antibiotic resistance continues to receive national attention as a leading public health threat. In 2015, President Barack Obama proposed a National Action Plan to Combat Antibiotic-Resistant Bacteria to curb the rise of "superbugs," bacteria resistant to antibiotics of last resort. Whereas many antibiotics are prescribed appropriately to treat infections, there continue to be a large number of inappropriately prescribed antibiotics. Although much of the national attention with regards to stewardship has focused on primary care providers, there is a significant opportunity for surgeons to embrace this national imperative and improve our practices. Local quality improvement efforts suggest that antibiotic misuse for surgical disease is common. Opportunities exist as part of day-to-day surgical care as well as through surgeons' interactions with nonsurgeon colleagues and policy experts. This article discusses the scope of the antibiotic misuse in surgery for surgical patients, and provides immediate practice improvements and also advocacy efforts surgeons can take to address the threat. We believe that surgical antibiotic prescribing patterns frequently do not adhere to evidence-based practices; surgeons are in a position to mitigate their ill effects; and antibiotic stewardship should be a part of every surgeons' practice.

  2. Contemporary use of social media by consultant colorectal surgeons.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McDonald, J J; Bisset, C; Coleman, M G; Speake, D; Brady, R R W

    2015-02-01

    There is evidence of significant growth in the engagement of UK health-care professionals with 'open' social media platforms, such as Twitter and LinkedIn. Social media communication provides many opportunities and benefits for medical education and interaction with patients and colleagues. This study was undertaken to evaluate the uptake of public social media membership and the characteristics of use of such media channels amongst contemporary UK consultant colorectal surgeons. Colorectal surgeons were identified from the Association of Coloproctology of Great Britain and Ireland (ACPGBI) national registry of colorectal mortality outcomes and were cross-referenced with the General Medical Council (GMC) register. Individuals were identified by manual searching on a number of social media platforms. Matching accounts were then examined to confirm ownership and to evaluate key markers of use. Six-hundred and eighteen individual consultant colorectal surgeons from 142 health authorities were studied (79.5% were ACPGBI members and 90.8% were male). Two-hundred and twenty-nine (37.1%) had LinkedIn profiles (37.7% male surgeons, 29.8% female surgeons; P = 0.2530). LinkedIn membership was significantly higher in ACPGBI members (P social media than reported studies from other health-care professional groups. Further education and appropriate guidance on usage may encourage uptake and confidence, particularly in younger consultants. Colorectal Disease © 2014 The Association of Coloproctology of Great Britain and Ireland.

  3. Practice Patterns and Job Satisfaction of Mohs Surgeons.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kohli, Nita; Golda, Nicholas

    2018-01-01

    There is a paucity of data on Mohs surgery workforce patterns. To identify if gender differences exist in practice patterns of Mohs surgeons, factors that influence these differences, and factors influencing job satisfaction among Mohs surgeons. An electronic survey was distributed to dermatology organizations targeting members of the American College of Mohs Surgery (ACMS), from October 2015 to April 2016. Two hundred twenty-seven ACMS members responded; 37% were women. Twenty-five percent of women and 19% of men work part time. Thirty-seven percent of women practice in academia versus 22% of men. Forty-three percent of women and 23% of men identified children as a factor affecting their ability to work full time. Gender comparisons for current job satisfaction show 57% of women and 35% of women being very satisfied. Supervision/feedback/recognition adds to satisfaction at a higher rate for women (53%) than for men (29%). For both genders combined, work content, patient base, and autonomy had the highest average job satisfaction ratings. Gender differences exist in practice patterns and job satisfaction of Mohs surgeons. This study demonstrates factors that could influence job satisfaction among female Mohs surgeons-knowledge that is important to individuals who lead, mentor, or supervise female Mohs surgeons.

  4. Productivity change of surgeons in an academic year.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nakata, Yoshinori; Watanabe, Yuichi; Otake, Hiroshi; Nakamura, Toshihito; Oiso, Giichiro; Sawa, Tomohiro

    2015-01-01

    The goal of this study was to calculate total factor productivity of surgeons in an academic year and to evaluate the effect of surgical trainees on their productivity. We analyzed all the surgical procedures performed from April 1 through September 30, 2013 in the Teikyo University Hospital. The nonradial and nonoriented Malmquist model under the variable returns-to-scale assumptions was employed. A decision-making unit is defined as a surgeon with the highest academic rank in the surgery. Inputs were defined as the number of physicians who assisted in surgery, and the time of surgical operation from skin incision to skin closure. The output was defined as the surgical fee for each surgery. April is the beginning month of a new academic year in Japan, and we divided the study period into April to June and July to September 2013. We computed each surgeon's Malmquist index, efficiency change, and technical change. We analyzed 2789 surgical procedures that were performed by 105 surgeons. The Malmquist index of all surgeons was significantly greater than 1 (p = 0.0033). The technical change was significantly greater than 1 (p productive in the beginning months of a new academic year. The main factor of this productivity loss is considered to be surgical training. Copyright © 2014 Association of Program Directors in Surgery. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  5. US Army primary radiation standards complex

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rogers, S.C.

    1993-01-01

    This paper describes the U.S. Army Primary Radiation Standards Complex (PRSC) to be constructed at Redstone Arsenal, Alabama. The missions of the organizations to be located in the PRSC are described. The health physics review of the facility design is discussed. The radiation sources to be available in the PRSC and the resulting measurement capabilities of the Army Primary Standards Laboratory Nucleonics section are specified. Influence of the National Voluntary Laboratory Accrediation Program (NVLAP) accreditation criteria on facility design and source selection is illustrated

  6. The British Monarchy. On the Teaching of British Affairs at College and School Level

    Science.gov (United States)

    Campbell-Doherty, Julian

    1974-01-01

    Deals with "area study" aspects of the teaching of English in schools and colleges. Using as an example the British monarchy, it is shown how "area study" elements are handled in schoolbooks in use today. Suggestions relating to the subject are also offered. (IFS/WGA)

  7. Noch Einmal:American English - British English (Once More: American English -- British English).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Botts, M.

    1980-01-01

    Replies critically to the article by D. K. Stevenson and R. J. Brunt, "Living English: Seeing the Forest in Spite of the Trees -- On Differences between American English and British English," in this journal, issue 1979/2. A reply by Stevenson and Brunt continues the controversy. (IFS/WGA)

  8. The Ruins of the British Welfare State

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tahl Kaminer

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available The subjects of Owen Hatherley’s A Guide to the New Ruins of Great Britain are architecture and urban development. The book addresses also some broader cultural, political and economic references, as well as personal anecdotes and memories. It includes many encounters with the remnants of the British welfare state.As an extension to his blog postings and a sequel of sorts to his previous Militant Modernism, Hatherley’s antagonist here is the semi-official architecture of New Labour, which he terms ‘pseudomodernism’: an unimaginative, inferior, and, in its own specific way, also tacky architecture of white stucco, steel and glass. He attacks the Faustian bargain of Richard Rogers and his allies with neoliberalism, a pact that produces a modernism devoid of social content, reflected by the unimaginative, speculation-driven architectural design. While Hatherley produces the promised indictment of recent British architecture, the book is, at the end of the day, primarily a eulogy to the disappearing postwar architecture he so evidently loves.

  9. The British Geological Survey seismic monitoring system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ottemoller, L.; Baptie, B.; Luckett, R.

    2009-04-01

    The British Geological Survey (BGS) monitors the seismicity in and around the British Isles. The seismic network was started in the seventies and built up over the years to 146 short-period stations. An upgrade of this network started a few years ago and will result in a modern network with broadband seismometers, high dynamic range digitizers and real-time communication (Internet, ADSL, satellite). In total the network will comprise about 50 stations, with only few short-period stations remaining. Equipment is used from both Guralp and Nanometrics, and their respective software for data acquisition is used to bring the data to the centre in near real-time. The automated data processing is done through Earthworm. Event data are analysed using SEISAN. Continuous data are kept for all broadband stations and checked for quality and completeness. Real-time data is also exchanged with neighbouring networks. The data is used for routine monitoring, but also research. The main research objectives are to understand distribution of seismicity and relating earthquakes to tectonics, develop velocity and attenuation models and study the seismic hazard and earthquake effects.

  10. [How much business management does a surgeon need?].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bork, U; Koch, M; Büchler, M W; Weitz, J

    2010-08-01

    The present day healthcare system in Germany is rapidly changing, even more so after the introduction of diagnosis-related groups. The basic requirements for every surgeon remain manual skills, a profound clinical knowledge and the ability for clinical decision-making even in difficult situations. However, these key elements of surgical education no longer fulfill the requirements for today's leaders in surgery. New requirements, consisting of administrative duties, strategic decision-making and department management are too complex to be made only intuitively. Nowadays surgeons also need a profound education in management skills and knowledge of economic mechanisms in order to run an efficient, profitable, patient-oriented surgical department. Every surgeon who aims at obtaining a leadership position should acquire the necessary knowledge and skills.

  11. Peacekeeping and stability operations: a military surgeon's perspective.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Starnes, Benjamin W

    2006-06-01

    Military surgeons serve a unique role in peacekeeping and stability operations and in response to natural disasters. Military medical units are the best medical resource to respond early in times of cri-sis but are often less equipped for prolonged missions and subsequent management of the chronic health care needs of the masses. Because endemic and host-nation diseases often add complexity to the management of these cases, military surgeons must perform operations outside the scope of their usual civilian practice. The primary medical mission is to treat the peacekeeping force, but the reality lies in eventually treating the refugees and victims of hostile conflict, including women, small children, and the elderly. This article explores the unique features of a surgeon's role in the support of these missions.

  12. Warren McCulloch and the British cyberneticians

    OpenAIRE

    Husbands, Phil; Holland, Owen

    2012-01-01

    Warren McCulloch was a significant influence on a number of British cyberneticians, as some British pioneers in this area were on him. He interacted regularly with most of the main figures on the British cybernetics scene, forming close friendships and collaborations with several, as well as mentoring others. Many of these interactions stemmed from a 1949 visit to London during which he gave the opening talk at the inaugural meeting of the Ratio Club, a gathering of brilliant, mainly young, B...

  13. Factors predicting health behaviors among Army Reserve, active duty Army, and civilian hospital employees.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wynd, Christine A; Ryan-Wenger, Nancy A

    2004-12-01

    This study identified health-risk and health-promoting behaviors in military and civilian personnel employed in hospitals. Intrinsic self-motivation and extrinsic organizational workplace factors were examined as predictors of health behaviors. Because reservists represent a blend of military and civilian lifestyles, descriptive analyses focused on comparing Army Reserve personnel (n = 199) with active duty Army (n = 218) and civilian employees (n = 193), for a total sample of 610. Self-motivation and social support were significant factors contributing to the adoption of health-promoting behaviors; however, organizational workplace cultures were inconsistent predictors of health among the three groups. Only the active Army subgroup identified a hierarchical culture as having an influence on health promotion, possibly because of the Army's mandatory physical fitness and weight control standards. Social support and self-motivation are essential to promoting health among employees, thus hospital commanders and chief executive officers should encourage strategies that enhance and reward these behaviors.

  14. Army Business Transformation: The Utility of Using Corporate Business Models within the Institutional Army

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Bailer, Jr., John J

    2007-01-01

    .... This study finds that working corporate models, such as Lean Six Sigma (LSS), are available which are already enabling the transformation of a very specific aspect within the institutional Army...

  15. The Effect of Surgeon Empathy and Emotional Intelligence on Patient Satisfaction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weng, Hui-Ching; Steed, James F.; Yu, Shang-Won; Liu, Yi-Ten; Hsu, Chia-Chang; Yu, Tsan-Jung; Chen, Wency

    2011-01-01

    We investigated the associations of surgeons' emotional intelligence and surgeons' empathy with patient-surgeon relationships, patient perceptions of their health, and patient satisfaction before and after surgical procedures. We used multi-source approaches to survey 50 surgeons and their 549 outpatients during initial and follow-up visits.…

  16. Non-technical skills of surgical trainees and experienced surgeons.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gostlow, H; Marlow, N; Thomas, M J W; Hewett, P J; Kiermeier, A; Babidge, W; Altree, M; Pena, G; Maddern, G

    2017-05-01

    In addition to technical expertise, surgical competence requires effective non-technical skills to ensure patient safety and maintenance of standards. Recently the Royal Australasian College of Surgeons implemented a new Surgical Education and Training (SET) curriculum that incorporated non-technical skills considered essential for a competent surgeon. This study sought to compare the non-technical skills of experienced surgeons who completed their training before the introduction of SET with the non-technical skills of more recent trainees. Surgical trainees and experienced surgeons undertook a simulated scenario designed to challenge their non-technical skills. Scenarios were video recorded and participants were assessed using the Non-Technical Skills for Surgeons (NOTSS) scoring system. Participants were divided into subgroups according to years of experience and their NOTSS scores were compared. For most NOTSS elements, mean scores increased initially, peaking around the time of Fellowship, before decreasing roughly linearly over time. There was a significant downward trend in score with increasing years since being awarded Fellowship for six of the 12 NOTSS elements: considering options (score -0·015 units per year), implementing and reviewing decisions (-0·020 per year), establishing a shared understanding (-0·014 per year), setting and maintaining standards (-0·024 per year), supporting others (-0·031 per year) and coping with pressure (-0·015 per year). The drop in NOTSS score was unexpected and highlights that even experienced surgeons are not immune to deficiencies in non-technical skills. Consideration should be given to continuing professional development programmes focusing on non-technical skills, regardless of the level of professional experience. © 2017 BJS Society Ltd Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  17. Does sleep deprivation impair orthopaedic surgeons' cognitive and psychomotor performance?

    Science.gov (United States)

    O'Brien, Michael J; O'Toole, Robert V; Newell, Mary Zadnik; Lydecker, Alison D; Nascone, Jason; Sciadini, Marcus; Pollak, Andrew; Turen, Clifford; Eglseder, W Andrew

    2012-11-07

    Sleep deprivation may slow reaction time, cloud judgment, and impair the ability to think. Our purpose was to study the cognitive and psychomotor performances of orthopaedic trauma surgeons on the basis of the amount of sleep that they obtained. We prospectively studied the performances of thirty-two orthopaedic trauma surgeons (residents, fellows, and attending surgeons) over two four-week periods at an urban academic trauma center. Testing sessions used handheld computers to administer validated cognitive and psychomotor function tests. We conducted a multivariate analysis to examine the independent association between test performance and multiple covariates, including the amount of sleep the night before testing. Our analysis demonstrated that orthopaedic surgeons who had slept four hours or less the night before the test had 1.43 times the odds (95% confidence interval, 1.04 to 1.95; p = 0.03) of committing at least one error on an individual test compared with orthopaedic surgeons who had slept more than four hours the previous night. The Running Memory test, which assesses sustained attention, concentration, and working memory, was most sensitive to deterioration in performance in participants who had had four hours of sleep or less; when controlling for other covariates, the test demonstrated a 72% increase in the odds of making at least one error (odds ratio, 1.72 [95% confidence interval, 1.02 to 2.90]; p = 0.04). No significant decrease in performance with sleep deprivation was shown with the other three tests. Orthopaedic trauma surgeons showed deterioration in performance on a validated cognitive task when they had slept four hours or less the previous night. It is unknown how performance on this test relates to surgical performance.

  18. Searching corpora of Chinese and British writers for lexicalised language

    OpenAIRE

    Leedham, Maria

    2008-01-01

    In the U.K., Chinese students are now 'the largest single overseas student group' with more than 60,000 students studying there in 2006 (British Council, 2007). British universities are beginning to explore how they can meet the needs of this group (see, for example, Leedham et.al. 2004). The focus of this paper is on differences in assignment-writing and views of writing between Chinese and Brit-ish undergraduate level students within U.K. universities. Using the British Academic Written Eng...

  19. External Collaboration in Army Science and Technology: The Army’s Research Alliances

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-09-01

    to execute and link neuroscience based research from multiple levels to produce advances in fundamental science and technology, demonstrate and...network science, and cognitive neuroscience .”19 The ICT, first funded in 1999, was first established “with a multi-year contract from the U.S. Army...frontiers of knowledge. In 2011 the Army Research Office awarded eight MURIs. The topics included quantum science, biologics, nanotechnology and atomic

  20. Army Strong: Equipped, Trained and Ready. Final Report of the 2010 Army Acquisition Review

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-01-01

    Army, Executive Officer John R. Cason , Senior Acquisition Policy Advisor Hye Sun Miller, Executive Assistant The panel also received support...Panel Executive Officer • John Cason , Acquisition Policy Advisor, ASA(ALT) • Hye Sun Miller, Executive Assistant The Panel also received support...34Service Contracting," Office of the Assistant Secretary of the Army, Acquisition, Logistics and Technology, email to John R. Cason , 26 October 2010

  1. Evaluating Mobile Device Ownership and Usage in the U.S. Army: Implications for Army Training

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-07-01

    Mercado University of Central Florida Randall D. Spain U.S. Army Research Institute July 2014 United States Army...NUMBER 633007 6. AUTHOR(S) Joseph E. Mercado ; Randall D. Spain 5c. PROJECT NUMBER A792 5d. TASK NUMBER 5e...13. SUPPLEMENTARY NOTES Subject Matter POC and Subject Matter Expert: Joseph E. Mercado 14. ABSTRACT (Maximum 200 words): As the U.S

  2. Genitourinary Prosthetics: A Primer for the Non-urologic Surgeon.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lavien, Garjae; Zaid, Uwais; Peterson, Andrew C

    2016-06-01

    Genitourinary prosthetics are used for correction of functional deficits and to improve the quality of lives of affected patients. General surgeons must evaluate patients scheduled for nonurologic surgery with urologic devices that can impact their perioperative management. Lack of recognition of these prosthetics preoperatively can lead to unnecessary morbidity for the patient and have legal implications for the surgeon. Close consultation with a urologist may avoid common complications associated with these devices and allows for surgical assistance when operative misadventures do occur. This article reviews 3 common urologic prosthetics: testicular prosthesis, artificial urinary sphincter, and penile prosthesis. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  3. Cosmetic surgery in times of recession: macroeconomics for plastic surgeons.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krieger, Lloyd M

    2002-10-01

    Periods of economic downturn place special demands on the plastic surgeon whose practice involves a large amount of cosmetic surgery. When determining strategy during difficult economic times, it is useful to understand the macroeconomic background of these downturns and to draw lessons from businesses in other service industries. Business cycles and monetary policy determine the overall environment in which plastic surgery is practiced. Plastic surgeons can take both defensive and proactive steps to maintain their profits during recessions and to prepare for the inevitable upturn. Care should also be taken when selecting pricing strategy during economic slowdowns.

  4. Attitudes toward chiropractic: a survey of North American orthopedic surgeons.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Busse, Jason W; Jacobs, Craig; Ngo, Trung; Rodine, Robert; Torrance, David; Jim, Janey; Kulkarni, Abhaya V; Petrisor, Brad; Drew, Brian; Bhandari, Mohit

    2009-12-01

    Questionnaire survey. To elicit orthopedic surgeons' attitudes toward chiropractic. Orthopedic surgeons and chiropractors often attend to similar patient populations, but little is known about the attitudes of orthopedic surgeons toward chiropractic. We administered a 43-item cross-sectional survey to 1000 Canadian and American orthopedic surgeons that inquired about demographic variables and their knowledge and use of chiropractic. Imbedded in our survey was a 20-item chiropractic attitude questionnaire (CAQ). 487 surgeons completed the survey (response rate, 49%). North American orthopedic surgeons' attitudes toward chiropractic were diverse, with 44.5% endorsing a negative impression, 29.4% holding favorable views, and 26.1% being neutral. Approximately half of respondents referred patients for chiropractic care each year, mainly due to patient request.The majority of surgeons believed that chiropractors provide effective therapy for some musculoskeletal complaints (81.8%), and disagreed that chiropractors could provide effective relief for nonmusculoskeletal conditions (89.5%). The majority endorsed that chiropractors provide unnecessary treatment (72.7%), engage in overly-aggressive marketing (63.1%) and breed dependency in patients on short-term symptomatic relief (52.3%). In our adjusted generalized linear model, older age (-2.62 points on the CAQ for each 10 year increment; 95% confidence interval [CI] = -3.74 to -1.50), clinical interest in foot and ankle (-2.77; 95% CI = -5.43 to -0.10), and endorsement of the research literature (-4.20; 95% CI = -6.29 to -2.11), the media (-3.05; 95% CI = -5.92 to -0.19), medical school (-7.42; 95% CI = -10.60 to -4.25), or 'other' (-4.99; 95% CI = -8.81 to -1.17) as a source of information regarding chiropractic were associated with more negative attitudes; endorsing a relationship with a specific chiropractor (5.05; 95% CI = 3.00 to 7.10) or residency (3.79;95% CI = 0.17 to 7.41) as sources of information regarding

  5. Predictors of Suicide and Accident Death in the Army Study to Assess Risk and Resilience in Servicemembers (Army STARRS)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schoenbaum, Michael; Kessler, Ronald C.; Gilman, Stephen E.; Colpe, Lisa J.; Heeringa, Steven G.; Stein, Murray B.; Ursano, Robert J.; Cox, Kenneth L.

    2014-01-01

    IMPORTANCE The Army Study to Assess Risk and Resilience in Servicemembers (Army STARRS) is a multicomponent study designed to generate actionable recommendations to reduce Army suicides and increase knowledge of risk and resilience factors for suicidality. OBJECTIVES To present data on prevalence, trends, and basic sociodemographic and Army experience correlates of suicides and accident deaths among active duty Regular Army soldiers between January 1, 2004, and December 31, 2009, and thereby establish a foundation for future Army STARRS investigations. DESIGN, SETTING, AND PARTICIPANTS Analysis of trends and predictors of suicide and accident deaths using Army and Department of Defense administrative data systems. Participants were all members of the US Regular Army serving at any time between 2004 and 2009. MAIN OUTCOMES AND MEASURES Death by suicide or accident during active Army service. RESULTS The suicide rate rose between 2004 and 2009 among never deployed and currently and previously deployed Regular Army soldiers. The accident death rate fell sharply among currently deployed soldiers, remained constant among the previously deployed, and trended upward among the never deployed. Increased suicide risk was associated with being a man (or a woman during deployment), white race/ethnicity, junior enlisted rank, recent demotion, and current or previous deployment. Sociodemographic and Army experience predictors were generally similar for suicides and accident deaths. Time trends in these predictors and in the Army’s increased use of accession waivers (which relaxed some qualifications for new soldiers) do not explain the rise in Army suicides. CONCLUSIONS AND RELEVANCE Predictors of Army suicides were largely similar to those reported elsewhere for civilians, although some predictors distinct to Army service emerged that deserve more in-depth analysis. The existence of a time trend in suicide risk among never-deployed soldiers argues indirectly against the view

  6. Attitudes of U.K. breast and plastic surgeons to lipomodelling in breast surgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Skillman, Joanna; Hardwicke, Joseph; Whisker, Lisa; England, David

    2013-12-01

    Lipomodelling is increasingly popular in breast surgery. The aims of this study were to elucidate the prevalence and practice of lipomodelling by surgeons in the UK and explore their attitudes and reservations to the technique. A study specific questionnaire was circulated to Breast and Plastic Surgeons with an interest in breast reconstruction. 228 surgeons responded. Lipomodelling in breast surgery was performed by 48/70 (69%) plastic surgeons and 17/158 (11%) breast surgeons (p plastic surgeons who responded. Despite oncological, radiological and efficacy concerns, the majority of surgeons feel that the benefits of lipomodelling in the breast outweigh the risks. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  7. Design of the Army Study to Assess Risk and Resilience in Servicemembers (Army STARRS).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kessler, Ronald C; Colpe, Lisa J; Fullerton, Carol S; Gebler, Nancy; Naifeh, James A; Nock, Matthew K; Sampson, Nancy A; Schoenbaum, Michael; Zaslavsky, Alan M; Stein, Murray B; Ursano, Robert J; Heeringa, Steven G

    2013-12-01

    The Army Study to Assess Risk and Resilience in Servicemembers (Army STARRS) is a multi-component epidemiological and neurobiological study designed to generate actionable evidence-based recommendations to reduce US Army suicides and increase basic knowledge about the determinants of suicidality. This report presents an overview of the designs of the six components of the Army STARRS. These include: an integrated analysis of the Historical Administrative Data Study (HADS) designed to provide data on significant administrative predictors of suicides among the more than 1.6 million soldiers on active duty in 2004-2009; retrospective case-control studies of suicide attempts and fatalities; separate large-scale cross-sectional studies of new soldiers (i.e. those just beginning Basic Combat Training [BCT], who completed self-administered questionnaires [SAQs] and neurocognitive tests and provided blood samples) and soldiers exclusive of those in BCT (who completed SAQs); a pre-post deployment study of soldiers in three Brigade Combat Teams about to deploy to Afghanistan (who completed SAQs and provided blood samples) followed multiple times after returning from deployment; and a platform for following up Army STARRS participants who have returned to civilian life. Department of Defense/Army administrative data records are linked with SAQ data to examine prospective associations between self-reports and subsequent suicidality. The presentation closes with a discussion of the methodological advantages of cross-component coordination. Copyright © 2013 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  8. Field procedures in the Army Study to Assess Risk and Resilience in Servicemembers (Army STARRS).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heeringa, Steven G; Gebler, Nancy; Colpe, Lisa J; Fullerton, Carol S; Hwang, Irving; Kessler, Ronald C; Naifeh, James A; Nock, Matthew K; Sampson, Nancy A; Schoenbaum, Michael; Zaslavsky, Alan M; Stein, Murray B; Ursano, Robert J

    2013-12-01

    The Army Study to Assess Risk and Resilience in Servicemembers (Army STARRS) is a multi-component epidemiological and neurobiological study of unprecedented size and complexity designed to generate actionable evidence-based recommendations to reduce US Army suicides and increase basic knowledge about determinants of suicidality by carrying out coordinated component studies. A number of major logistical challenges were faced in implementing these studies. The current report presents an overview of the approaches taken to meet these challenges, with a special focus on the field procedures used to implement the component studies. As detailed in the paper, these challenges were addressed at the onset of the initiative by establishing an Executive Committee, a Data Coordination Center (the Survey Research Center [SRC] at the University of Michigan), and study-specific design and analysis teams that worked with staff on instrumentation and field procedures. SRC staff, in turn, worked with the Office of the Deputy Under Secretary of the Army (ODUSA) and local Army Points of Contact (POCs) to address logistical issues and facilitate data collection. These structures, coupled with careful fieldworker training, supervision, and piloting, contributed to the major Army STARRS data collection efforts having higher response rates than previous large-scale studies of comparable military samples. Copyright © 2013 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  9. Transforming the Army with Mission Command

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-06-12

    inevitable change that is the dominant factor in society today. No sensible decision can be made any longer without taking into account not only the...commitment that are hallmarks of an Army Professional. Build the comprehensive physical, mental, emotional , and spiritual resiliency of our Soldiers

  10. The all Volunteer Army: Impact on Readines

    Science.gov (United States)

    1979-06-08

    directing traffic at busy installations to flying UH-l helicopters. Of the 377 enlisted military occupational specialties in the Army today, about... childish and unimportant. Military sanitation reasons for shorter hair are the normal responses to the question of longer hair. Rarely, if ever, are the

  11. The Army Ethic-Inchoate but Sufficient

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-06-12

    Army really cares why a Soldier does the right thing and whether the decision came from compulsion or fear or by accident. An aspirational ethic must...its approach, Soldiers will respond negatively. It takes time to introduce, train, and see the profession buy in to something new, especially an

  12. The Army's Role in Nation Building

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Edmonds, Mark L

    2009-01-01

    ... should be and how to execute this task. The tasks associated with nation building are part of the Army's core competencies under the auspices of 'Stability Operations', and are now cited in doctrine in the recently published Field Manual 3-07...

  13. Reuse of Waste Oil at Army Installations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1982-09-01

    Thousands of gallons ot used crankcase oil are The Toxic Substance Control Act (PL 94-4,0) bulned each year ii Army boilers. Before an instal- regulates...ATTN: Chief. SwGAS-L ATTN: ATZLCA-SA ATTN: Chief. SWGCO-M Los Angeles 90053 Ft. Lee, VA 23801 ATTN: Chief. SPLED-E ATTN: DRXMC-U (2) San Francisco

  14. Public Reporting and a More Sustainable Army

    Science.gov (United States)

    2009-04-01

    CorporateRegister.com maintains on its website a global directory of corporate social responsibility (CSR), sustainability, and environmental reports. The...CSR corporate social responsibility CW Civil Works CWA Clean Water Act DA Department of the Army DLA Defense Logistics Agency DoD Department of

  15. United States Army Annual Financial Statement FY00. The Army in Transformation Responsive to the Needs of the Nation

    Science.gov (United States)

    2000-01-01

    United States Army Annual Financial Statement “The Army in Transformation—Responsive to the Needs of the Nation” The picture of the digitized soldier...mailing the postage paid comment card enclosed at the back of this report. “The Army in Transformation —Responsive to the Needs of the Nation” “The...Army in Transformation —Responsive to the Needs of the Nation” “The Army in Transformation—Responsive to the Needs of the Nation” Table of Contents FY00

  16. A national survey of oral and maxillofacial surgeons' attitudes towards the treatment and dental rehabilitation of oral cancer patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alani, A; Owens, J; Dewan, K; Summerwill, A

    2009-12-12

    To investigate the attitudes of maxillofacial surgeons in the treatment and dental rehabilitation of oral cancer patients in the UK. The survey was conducted by postal questionnaires with 17 close-ended questions. A total of 229 questionnaires were sent to members of the British Association of Oral and Maxillofacial Surgeons over a one week period. A follow-up was sent if a reply was not received within 12 weeks. These results were compared to a similar study that was carried out approximately 15 years ago. The response rate was 65.5% (150/229). Overall 62% of respondents (92/150) carried out maxillary resections, which represents a decline of 23% on the previous study. There has been an increase in surgeons reconstructing the maxillary defect from 38% in the 1995 study to 91% in the present study. Ninety-eight percent of respondents had their patients seen in a multidisciplinary team (MDT) clinic, but in only 30% of the cases was a restorative dentist present on these clinics. There has been an improvement in the accessibility of a restorative dentist for this patient cohort, from 65% to 90%. The use of implants for dental rehabilitation post-cancer surgery has increased from 43% to 93%. This study highlights the changes in the dental and oral rehabilitation of patients undergoing resective surgery for oral cancer and especially those undergoing a maxillectomy procedure. It illustrates the increased use of implants for post-surgery rehabilitation and shows the different trends in which these implants are placed. An important aspect of this study is the input of the dental team. Current national guidelines state that a consultant restorative dentist needs to be a member of the MDT; this survey shows that this was the case in only 30% of responses.

  17. Physical Training Outcome Predictions With Biomechanics, Part I: Army Physical Fitness Test Modeling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sih, Bryant L; Negus, Charles H

    2016-05-01

    The U.S. Army Basic Combat Training (BCT) is the first step in preparing soldier trainees for the physical demands of the military. Unfortunately, a substantial number of trainees fail BCT due to failure on the final Army Physical Fitness Test (also known as the "end of cycle" APFT). Current epidemiological studies have used statistics to identify several risk factors for poor APFT performance, but these studies have had limited utility for guiding regimen design to maximize APFT outcome. This is because such studies focus on intrinsic risks to APFT failure and do not utilize detailed BCT activity data to build models which offer guidance for optimizing the training regimen to improve graduation rates. In this study, a phenomenological run performance model that accounts for physiological changes in fitness and fatigue due to training was applied to recruits undergoing U.S. Army BCT using high resolution (minute-by-minute) activity data. The phenomenological model was better at predicting both the final as well as intermediate APFTs (R(2) range = 0.55-0.59) compared to linear regression models (LRMs) that used the same intrinsic input variables (R(2) range = 0.36-0.50). Unlike a statistical approach, a phenomenological model accounts for physiological changes and, therefore, has the potential to not only identify trainees at risk of failing BCT on novel training regimens, but offer guidance to regimen planners on how to change the regimen for maximizing physical performance. This paper is Part I of a 2-part series on physical training outcome predictions. Reprint & Copyright © 2016 Association of Military Surgeons of the U.S.

  18. Log Books and the Law of Storms: Maritime Meteorology and the British Admiralty in the Nineteenth Century.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Naylor, Simon

    2015-12-01

    This essay contributes to debates about the relationship between science and the military by examining the British Admiralty's participation in meteorological projects in the first half of the nineteenth century. It focuses on attempts to transform Royal Navy log books into standardized meteorological registers that would be of use to both science and the state. The essay begins with a discussion of Admiralty Hydrographer Francis Beaufort, who promoted the use of standardized systems for the observation of the weather at sea. It then examines the application of ships' logs to the science of storms. The essay focuses on the Army engineer William Reid, who studied hurricanes while stationed in Barbados and Bermuda. Reid was instrumental in persuading the Admiralty to implement a naval meteorological policy, something the Admiralty Hydrographer had struggled to achieve. The essay uses the reception and adoption of work on storms at sea to reflect on the means and ends of maritime meteorology in the mid-nineteenth century.

  19. Net metering in British Columbia : white paper

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Berry, T.

    2003-01-01

    Net metering was described as being the reverse registration of an electricity customer's revenue meter when interconnected with a utility's grid. It is a provincial policy designed to encourage small-distributed renewable power generation such as micro-hydro, solar energy, fuel cells, and larger-scale wind energy. It was noted that interconnection standards for small generation is an important issue that must be addressed. The British Columbia Utilities Commission has asked BC Hydro to prepare a report on the merits of net metering in order to support consultations on a potential net metering tariff application by the utility. This report provides information on net metering with reference to experience in other jurisdictions with net metering, and the possible costs and benefits associated with net metering from both a utility and consumer perspective. Some of the barriers and policy considerations for successful implementation of net metering were also discussed. refs., tabs., figs

  20. Women's and men's careers in British sociology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Platt, Jennifer

    2004-06-01

    The career experience of men and women in British university sociology since 1950 is compared, using published data for the whole group and fresh data from a sample of departments. It is shown that, when like is compared with like, the outcomes for men and for women have not been as different as is often suggested; family reasons were more salient in women's careers, but in the end have not made much difference to their destinations. But the proportions of women recruited have varied over time, and the experience of both sexes has been strongly influenced by historical factors affecting different periods. Within the constraints which those have imposed, individuals have not all made the same choices, and that too has affected the outcomes.

  1. Population Ecology of Caribou in British Columbia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    D.R. Seip

    1996-01-01

    Full Text Available The abundance and geographic range of woodland caribou (Rangifer tarandus caribou decreased in many areas of British Columbia during the 1900's. Recent studies have found that predation during the summer is the major cause of mortality and current population declines. Increased moose {Alecs alces populations may be related to past and current caribou declines by sustaining greater numbers of wolves (Canis lupus. Mortality rates were greater in areas where caribou calved in forested habitats, in close proximity to predators and moose. Caribou populations which had calving sites in alpine areas, islands, and rugged mountains experienced lower mortality and were generally stable or increasing. A predator-induced population decline in one area appeared to stabilize at low caribou densities, suggesting that the wolf predation rate may be density dependent.

  2. British American Tobacco's failure in Turkey.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lawrence, S

    2009-02-01

    Transnational tobacco companies (TTCs) considered Turkey an important, potential investment market because of its high consumption rates and domestic commitment to tobacco. This paper outlines how British American Tobacco (BAT) attempted to establish a joint venture with the government monopoly TEKEL, while waiting for privatisation and a private tender. Analysis of tobacco industry documents from the Guildford Depository and online tobacco document sources. BAT failed to establish a market share in Turkey until 2000 despite repeated attempts to form a joint venture with Turkey's tobacco monopoly, TEKEL, once the market liberalised in the mid 1980s. BAT's failure in the Turkish market was due to a misguided investment strategy focused solely on acquiring TEKEL and is contrasted with Philip Morris success in Turkey despite both TTCs working within Turkey's unstable and corrupt investing climate.

  3. Adenylosuccinate lyase deficiency--first British case.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marinaki, A M; Champion, M; Kurian, M A; Simmonds, H A; Marie, S; Vincent, M F; van den Berghe, G; Duley, J A; Fairbanks, L D

    2004-10-01

    A deficiency of adenylosuccinate lyase (ASDL) is characterised by the accumulation of SAICAriboside (SAICAr) and succinyladenosine (S-Ado) in body fluids. The severity of the clinical presentation correlates with a low S-Ado/SAICAr ratio in body fluids. We report the first British case of ADSL deficiency. The patient presented at 14 days with a progressive neonatal encephalopathy and seizures. There was marked axial and peripheral hypotonia. Brain MRI showed widespread white matter changes. She died at 4 weeks of age. Concentrations of SAICAr and SAdo were markedly elevated in urine, plasma and CSF and the SAdo/SAICAr ratio was low, consistent with the severe phenotype. The patient was compound heterozygous for 2 novel ADSL mutations; c.9 G>C (A3P) and c.572 C>T (R190X).

  4. Ocean energy sector in British Columbia

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2010-01-01

    British Columbia's significant wave, tidal, ocean and river current resources will help to provide a clean, renewable energy source to meet the growing demand for electricity in local and North American markets. Various sites in the province are now being investigated for their energy development potential. A demonstration project located in the Race Rocks ecological reserve is producing electricity from tidal currents, while 3 other sites have received provincial funding in order to demonstrate new wave and tidal energy technologies off the coast of Vancouver Island. This guide provided an outline of the province's emerging ocean energy sector, and described the principal companies involved in developing ocean resources in the region. Details of new ocean energy projects were also provided. 1 tab., 7 figs.

  5. Optimal Brain Surgeon on Artificial Neural Networks in

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Christiansen, Niels Hørbye; Job, Jonas Hultmann; Klyver, Katrine

    2012-01-01

    It is shown how the procedure know as optimal brain surgeon can be used to trim and optimize artificial neural networks in nonlinear structural dynamics. Beside optimizing the neural network, and thereby minimizing computational cost in simulation, the surgery procedure can also serve as a quick ...

  6. Perspectives of South African general surgeons regarding their ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Perspectives of South African general surgeons regarding their postgraduate training. MD Smith. Abstract. No Abstract. Full Text: EMAIL FREE FULL TEXT EMAIL FREE FULL TEXT · DOWNLOAD FULL TEXT DOWNLOAD FULL TEXT · AJOL African Journals Online. HOW TO USE AJOL... for Researchers · for Librarians ...

  7. Occupational Exposure to the Risk of HIV Infection Among Surgeons ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The majority (97%) incorrectly estimated the sero-conversion rate with exposure to a patient with HIV. The most popular recommendation was availability of surgical gloves followed by health education to raise the level of awareness of medical personnel. Conclusion: The high rate of needlestick injuries among surgeons in ...

  8. Perspectives of the surgeons, anaesthetists, and pharmacists on ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Post-operative pain is best managed by a multi-disciplinary team approach. An extensive review of the literature indicated that little is known about the roles of surgeons, anaesthetists, and pharmacists regarding post-operative pain management in Ghana. Therefore, this study was undertaken in order to fully understand ...

  9. Job Hazards Analysis Among A Group Of Surgeons At Zagazig ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    ... 75% respectively. Conclusion: Job hazards analysis model was effective in assessment, evaluation and management of occupational hazards concerning surgeons and should considered as part of hospital wide quality and safety program. Key Words: Job Hazard Analysis, Risk Management, occupational Health Safety.

  10. Age is highly associated with stereo blindness among surgeons

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Fergo, Charlotte; Burcharth, Jakob; Pommergaard, Hans-Christian

    2016-01-01

    surgeons in the field of general surgery, gynecology, and urology as these are potential users of 3D laparoscopy. METHODS: The study was conducted according to the STROBE guidelines for cross-sectional studies. Medical doctors from the department of general surgery, gynecology, and urology were recruited...

  11. The paediatric surgeon and his working conditions in Francophone ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Background: This study described the current conditions of work of paediatric surgeons in Francophone sub-Saharan Africa (FSSA) and set the debate at the level of the humanist thinking in medicine. Patients and Methods: This was a multicentre study from 1st May to 30th October 2008. The African Society of paediatric ...

  12. Fate of abstracts presented at Association of Paediatric Surgeons of ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Materials and Methods: All abstracts accepted for presentation at the Association of Paediatric Surgeons of Nigeria meetings from 2004 to 2009 were identified from literature, search engines and other online materials. Abstracts accepted for the meetings but not presented during the meetings were excluded. Results: A total ...

  13. National survey of surgeons\\' attitudes to laparoscopic surgical ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The perception exists that laparoscopic training in South Africa has been unplanned and under-resourced. This study set out to assess the opinions of surgeons and surgical trainees with regard to the various facets of laparoscopic surgical training. Methods. A national survey was conducted, using a questionnaire ...

  14. 52 Elective Abdominal Ultrasonography by Surgeons at MNH, Dar ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    user

    2006-04-01

    Apr 1, 2006 ... Conclusion: Pain is the most frequent reason for requesting abdominal ultrasound scanning but it has a low yield of sonographic findings. Scanning for abdominal swelling/mass gave the highest proportion of abnormal findings. USS of a surgical patient done by surgeons expedites diagnostic workup ...

  15. HIV-positive status among surgeons - an ethical dilemma

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    2006-08-11

    Aug 11, 2006 ... to discrimination, which has seemingly been influenced more ... chapter II Section 6(1), discrimination on the basis of HIV status ... transmission. This issue will be explored and addressed with regard to the HIV-positive surgeon. Virus transmission in the health care setting. The risk of virus transmission is a ...

  16. The Surgeon and Advocacy | Mwenda | Annals of African Surgery

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Annals of African Surgery. Journal Home · ABOUT · Advanced Search · Current Issue · Archives · Journal Home > Vol 12, No 1 (2015) >. Log in or Register to get access to full text downloads. Username, Password, Remember me, or Register. The Surgeon and Advocacy. AS Mwenda, MD Mwachiro. Abstract. No Abstract.

  17. Bloodborne pathogen exposure risks among South African surgeons

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Conclusions: Risks of blood exposure among South African surgeons are high. Wider adoption of safe techniques, devices and personal protective equipment could reduce the risks. Recommendations for injury prevention and safe practice that can protect the health and lives of the surgical team are offered.

  18. Blood and body fluid exposures among surgeons in Mulago hospital ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    ... and post exposure prophylaxis for human immunodeficiency virus was widely available to over 79% of respondents though used much less, only 24% of injured respondents with access to PEP. Half (50%) of Surgeons reported using hands free passing technique and 27% reported use of blunt suture needles. Non-fluid ...

  19. Safety of the surgeon: 'Double-gloving' during surgical procedures

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The surgeon and the first assistant double-gloved in all the 1 050 procedures performed between 2009 and 2013, and ... physician's hands.[1]. Recently, the protection of physicians and other medical personnel from the percutaneous transmission of HIV, hepatitis-B virus and other pathogens by direct contact with infected ...

  20. Comprehensive feedback on trainee surgeons' non-technical skills.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spanager, Lene; Dieckmann, Peter; Beier-Holgersen, Randi; Rosenberg, Jacob; Oestergaard, Doris

    2015-01-20

    This study aimed to explore the content of conversations, feedback style, and perceived usefulness of feedback to trainee surgeons when conversations were stimulated by a tool for assessing surgeons' non-technical skills. Trainee surgeons and their supervisors used the Non-Technical Skills for Surgeons in Denmark tool to stimulate feedback conversations. Audio recordings of post-operation feedback conversations were collected. Trainees and supervisors provided questionnaire responses on the usefulness and comprehensiveness of the feedback. The feedback conversations were qualitatively analyzed for content and feedback style. Usefulness was investigated using a scale from 1 to 5 and written comments were qualitatively analyzed. Six trainees and six supervisors participated in eight feedback conversations. Eighty questionnaires (response rate 83 percent) were collected from 13 trainees and 12 supervisors. Conversations lasted median eight (2-15) minutes. Supervisors used the elements and categories in the tool to structure the content of the conversations. Supervisors tended to talk about the trainees' actions and their own frames rather than attempting to understand the trainees' perceptions. Supervisors and trainees welcomed the feedback opportunity and agreed that the conversations were useful and comprehensive. The content of the feedback conversations reflected the contents of the tool and the feedback was considered useful and comprehensive. However, supervisors talked primarily about their own frames, so in order for the feedback to reach its full potential, supervisors may benefit from training techniques to stimulate a deeper reflection among trainees.

  1. PREVALENCE OF HEPATITIS B VIRUS MARKERS IN SURGEONS ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    hi-tech

    Objective: To determine the prevalence of hepatitis B virus (HBV) markers in surgeons in a major city in Nigeria. ... Interventions: Blood samples were taken from subjects and analysed for hepatitis B virus markers ( HBsAg, antiHBs and .... Lagos was comparable to those of Romieu et al (10) who found HBsAg seropositivity ...

  2. A taxonomy of surgeons' guiding behaviors in the operating room.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Xiaodong Phoenix; Williams, Reed G; Sanfey, Hilary A; Smink, Douglas S

    2015-01-01

    This study explores the nature and the intention of attending surgeons' guiding behaviors performed in the operating room (OR) in order to build taxonomy of OR guiding behavior. Nine attending surgeons and 8 surgical residents were invited to observe 8 prerecorded surgical cases from 4 common procedures and completed semistructured interviews. All video-based observations were videotaped. Thematic analysis was applied to identify surgeons' OR guiding behavior. Seven hundred eighty minutes of video-based observations with interviews were conducted. Sixteen types of OR guiding behaviors in 3 intention-based categories were identified: 3 of the 16 was "teaching" (18.75%), 8 of the 16 was "directing" (50%), and 5 of the 16 was "assisting" (31.25%). Surgeons' OR guiding behaviors were grounded in 3 behavioral intentions: teaching, directing, and assisting. This taxonomy of OR guiding behavior can be used as a basis for developing OR guiding strategy to improve residents' intraoperative competency, autonomy, and independence. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  3. Learning from our international colleagues: a US plastic surgeon's perspective.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pu, Lee L Q

    2013-04-01

    With growing contribution to plastic surgery by our international colleagues, one may be wondering about what US plastic surgeons have learned from them. The purpose of this study was to evaluate a single surgeon's experience to identify any specific areas of plastic surgery that one has learned substantially from our international colleagues. All plastic surgical procedures performed by a single US plastic surgeon at an academic medical center with an active plastic surgery residency training program during the past 10 years were reviewed. More frequently performed procedures by the author were identified. In each identified procedure, critical references used by the author were examined to find out whether these references were from domestic or international sources. More frequently performed procedures by the author were (1) free anterolateral thigh perforator flap and free-style free flap, (2) deep inferior epigastric perforator flap breast reconstruction, (3) implant-based breast reconstruction, (4) oncoplastic breast reduction or mastopexy for breast reconstruction, (5) vertical scar breast reduction, and (6) fat grafting for correction of contour deformity after breast reconstruction. Much more innovative procedures that the author had learned after his residency were published primarily by our international colleagues. The author has learned substantially from our international colleagues because many new procedures may be either first described by them or they have more extensive clinical experience. It is important to fully appreciate the significance of international scientific exchange in plastic surgery and its impact on a US plastic surgeon's clinical practice.

  4. Computer technology and the surgeon: what the resident needs to ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Though a compliment to the surgeon, it has its problems including overwhelming information requiring careful scrutiny; computer fraud, hacking and viruses; copyright laws; the 'threat' of a well-informed patient population; and the risk of over dependence. Surgery in Nigeria and most of African is yet to maximize its benefits.

  5. The Gap between Surgical Resident and Faculty Surgeons ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Background: In a continent like Africa where the number of surgeons is alarmingly few, training of a large number of residents is the way forward. However, sudden expansion in the number of trainees in an existing teaching environment may bring the quality of the most fundamental education i.e. operation room teaching ...

  6. Improving Recruitment of surgical trainees and Training of Surgeons ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    paper reports on how to improve recruitment of surgical trainees and training of surgeons in Uganda, focusing on perceptions of potential trainees, trainers, and medical administrators. Methods: This was cross sectional, descriptive study sampled at least 50% of each of the relevant category of interviewees.

  7. Leadership theory: implications for developing dental surgeons in primary care?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Willcocks, S

    2011-02-12

    The development of leadership in healthcare has been seen as important in recent years, particularly at the clinical level. There have been various specific initiatives focusing on the development of leadership for doctors, nurses and other health care professions: for example, a leadership competency framework for doctors, the LEO programme and the RCN clinical leadership programme for nurses. The NHS has set up a Leadership Council to coordinate further developments. However, there has not been the same focus in dentistry, although the recent review of NHS dental services (Steele review) has proposed a need for leadership initiatives in NHS dentistry as a medium-term action. Central to this will be a need to focus on the leadership role for dental surgeons. Leadership is all the more important in dentistry, given the change of government and the policy of retrenchment, major public sector reform, the emergence of new organisations such as new commissioning consortia, possible changes to the dental contract, new ways of working, and changes to the profession such as the requirements for the revalidation of dental surgeons. The question is: which leadership theory or approach is best for dental surgeons working in primary care? This paper builds on earlier work exploring this question in relation to doctors generally, and GPs, in particular, and planned work on nurses. It will seek to address this question in relation to dental surgeons working in primary care.

  8. Hepatitis-B Vaccination Status Among Dental Surgeons in Benin ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    hanumantp

    Hepatitis-B vaccination status among dental surgeons. 28. Annals of Medical and Health Sciences Research | Jan-Jun 2012 | Vol 2 | Issue 1 |. 18. Fasunloro A, Owotade FJ. Occupational hazards among clinical dental staff. J Contemp Dent Pract 2004;5:134-52. 19. Sofola OO, Savage KO. Assessment of the compliance of.

  9. A psychological profile of surgeons and surgical residents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Foster, Kevin N; Neidert, Gregory P M; Brubaker-Rimmer, Ruth; Artalejo, Diana; Caruso, Daniel M

    2010-01-01

    Approximately 20 percent of general surgery residents never complete their original residency programs. The psychological, programmatic, and financial costs for this attrition are substantial for both the residents, who spend valuable time and money pursuing incompatible career paths, and the residency programs, which also lose valuable time and money invested in these residents. There is a large amount of information in the field about the performance dimensions and skill sets of surgeons and surgical residents. To date, however, no research has been conducted on important process and content dimensions, which are critical in determining good person-job fit. A research team from the Department of Psychology at Arizona State University and Maricopa Medical Center conducted descriptive research to determine the work-related personality and interest variables of attending surgeons and surgical residents. Sixty-three surgical residents and 27 attending/teaching surgeons completed 2 sections (interests and personality scales) of the World of Work Inventory Online (WOWI Online). This multidimensional assessment was offered to all attending/teaching surgeons and surgical residents at Maricopa Medical Center. All members of the Department of Surgery participated in the trial. Based on the attending/teaching and high-performing resident profiles, a stable interest and personality profile emerged, which highlights the unique characteristics necessary to identify those who would be most satisfied with and suitable for work as surgeons. The profiles of the attending/teaching surgeons and the high-performing residents were similar. This contrasted with the interest and personality profiles of low-performing residents. The differences in the 2 groups' profiles provide insight into low performance and possible incompatibility with surgical residency, and possibly with general surgery as a profession choice. The WOWI Online assessment tool provides a stable profile of successful

  10. Comparing technical dexterity of sleep-deprived versus intoxicated surgeons.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mohtashami, Fariba; Thiele, Allison; Karreman, Erwin; Thiel, John

    2014-01-01

    The evidence on the effect of sleep deprivation on the cognitive and motor skills of physicians in training is sparse and conflicting, and the evidence is nonexistent on surgeons in practice. Work-hour limitations based on these data have contributed to challenges in the quality of surgical education under the apprentice model, and as a result there is an increasing focus on competency-based education. Whereas the effects of alcohol intoxication on psychometric performance are well studied in many professions, the effects on performance in surgery are not well documented. To study the effects of sleep deprivation on the surgical performance of surgeons, we compared simulated the laparoscopic skills of staff gynecologists "under 2 conditions": sleep deprivation and ethanol intoxication. We hypothesized that the performance of unconsciously competent surgeons does not deteriorate postcall as it does under the influence of alcohol. Nine experienced staff gynecologists performed 3 laparoscopic tasks in increasing order of difficulty (cup drop, rope passing, pegboard exchange) on a box trainer while sleep deprived (0.08 mg/mL blood alcohol concentration). Three expert laparoscopic surgeons scored the anonymous clips online using Global Objective Assessment of Laparoscopic Skills criteria: depth perception, bimanual dexterity, and efficiency. Data were analyzed by a mixed-design analysis of variance. There were large differences in mean performance between the tasks. With increasing task difficulty, mean scores became significantly (P sleep-deprived and intoxicated participants were similar for all variables except time. Surprisingly, participants took less time to complete the easy tasks when intoxicated. However, the most difficult task took less time but was performed significantly worse compared with being sleep deprived. Notably, the evaluators did not recognize a lack of competence for the easier tasks when intoxicated; incompetence surfaced only in the most

  11. Shakespearean Intertexts and European Identities in Contemporary Black British Fiction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Muñoz-Valdivieso, Sofía

    2012-01-01

    The article analyses the presence of William Shakespeare as intertext in three recent novels by black British writers which deploy the work of the Bard as they explore British and European identities. Caryl Phillips's "The Nature of Blood" recreates an Othello-like figure who in early Modern Venice struggles to come to terms with his…

  12. British and American Journal Evaluation: Divergence or Convergence?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Crewe, Ivor; Norris, Pippa

    1991-01-01

    Presents results of a survey comparing British and U.S. political scientists' familiarity with different journals, evaluations of journal quality, and measures of journal impact. Concludes that British and U.S. subjects agree about quality but read different sets of journals. Reports the two groups' familiarity with different literature,…

  13. Editorial. Themed issue of the British Journal of Pharmacology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Summers, R J

    2014-03-01

    This themed issue of the British Journal of Pharmacology stems from the 7th in the series of meetings on the Molecular Pharmacology of G Protein-Coupled Receptors (MPGPCR) held at the Monash Institute of Pharmaceutical Sciences in Melbourne Australia from the 6th-8th December 2012. © 2014 The British Pharmacological Society.

  14. integration and disintegration in british colonial west africa

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The constitutional evolution or the British West ,\\f"rican colonies \\\\·as usually attributed largely to the mood or the British public and parliament rather than to the pressure or local merchants. gon:rnors and /\\ f'ricans. Thus accounts of the territorial and governmental changes tended to.. ernplwsize the necessity for economical ...

  15. Southern Cameroons' financial contributions to British Second World ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The serious damage done to the British economy during World War II compelled the leaders of the British Government to look for ways of repairing the damage. Hence, they turned to the colonies for help. Inter alia, they needed financial assistance because of their inability to pay for imports from the United States. Imports of ...

  16. The Genesis of Public Relations in British Colonial Practice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smyth, Rosaleen

    2001-01-01

    Demonstrates how the British Colonial Office employed public relations strategies as they administered the British colony of Northern Rhodesia before, during, and after World War II. Demonstrates how civil servants in London and colonial officials implemented public relations policies, strategies, and tactics on an ad hoc basis, covering political…

  17. BCASP and the Evolution of School Psychology in British Columbia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Agar, Douglas J.

    2016-01-01

    Since 1992, the British Columbia Association of School Psychologists (BCASP) has been the professional body for school psychologists in British Columbia. In the intervening 24 years, BCASP has been very successful in performing the dual roles of a certifying body and a professional development organization for school psychologists in British…

  18. the relationship between british war correspondents in the field

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Lenovo

    This article chronicles the developing relationship between the press corps on the British side and British Military Intelligence during the Anglo-Boer War, particularly during the formal and non-guerrilla phase of the conflict. The article comments on the nature and composition of both the press corps and of the military.

  19. Problem Gambling Treatment within the British National Health Service

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rigbye, Jane; Griffiths, Mark D.

    2011-01-01

    According to the latest British Gambling Prevalence Survey, there are approximately 300,000 adult problem gamblers in Great Britain. In January 2007, the "British Medical Association" published a report recommending that those experiencing gambling problems should receive treatment via the National Health Service (NHS). This study…

  20. The Army Family Team Building Program: Facilitating a Transformative Learning Process--An Intrinsic Case Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gall, Joseph A.

    2009-01-01

    This study sought to understand how the Army Family Team Building program influences self-reliance and self-sufficiency in Army spouses as they integrate into the Army community. The purpose of the Army Family Team Building program is to empower Army spouses with knowledge and skills, which foster well-being and improve quality of life. The…