WorldWideScience

Sample records for bright solar-type stars

  1. Superflares on solar-type stars.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maehara, Hiroyuki; Shibayama, Takuya; Notsu, Shota; Notsu, Yuta; Nagao, Takashi; Kusaba, Satoshi; Honda, Satoshi; Nogami, Daisaku; Shibata, Kazunari

    2012-05-16

    Solar flares are caused by the sudden release of magnetic energy stored near sunspots. They release 10(29) to 10(32) ergs of energy on a timescale of hours. Similar flares have been observed on many stars, with larger 'superflares' seen on a variety of stars, some of which are rapidly rotating and some of which are of ordinary solar type. The small number of superflares observed on solar-type stars has hitherto precluded a detailed study of them. Here we report observations of 365 superflares, including some from slowly rotating solar-type stars, from about 83,000 stars observed over 120 days. Quasi-periodic brightness modulations observed in the solar-type stars suggest that they have much larger starspots than does the Sun. The maximum energy of the flare is not correlated with the stellar rotation period, but the data suggest that superflares occur more frequently on rapidly rotating stars. It has been proposed that hot Jupiters may be important in the generation of superflares on solar-type stars, but none have been discovered around the stars that we have studied, indicating that hot Jupiters associated with superflares are rare.

  2. Convection in Oblate Solar-Type Stars

    CERN Document Server

    Wang, Junfeng; Liang, Chunlei

    2016-01-01

    We present the first global 3D simulations of thermal convection in the oblate envelopes of rapidly-rotating solar-type stars. This has been achieved by exploiting the capabilities of the new Compressible High-ORder Unstructured Spectral difference (CHORUS) code. We consider rotation rates up to 85\\% of the critical (breakup) rotation rate, which yields an equatorial radius that is up to 17\\% larger than the polar radius. This substantial oblateness enhances the disparity between polar and equatorial modes of convection. We find that the convection redistributes the heat flux emitted from the outer surface, leading to an enhancement of the heat flux in the polar and equatorial regions. This finding implies that lower-mass stars with convective envelopes may not have darker equators as predicted by classical gravity darkening arguments. The vigorous high-latitude convection also establishes elongated axisymmetric circulation cells and zonal jets in the polar regions. Though the overall amplitude of the surface...

  3. Rotation Periods of Nine ROSAT Selected Solar-Type Stars

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2007-01-01

    We monitored 16 X-ray selected young solar-type stars for light variation and found appreciable periodic light variability with amplitudes of a few hundredths of a magnitude in nine of the objects. Using the method of Phase Dispersion Minimization (PDM) and Fourier analysis (software PERIOD04), the rotation periods of these stars were determined from the photometric data. The rotation periods of all nine stars are shorter than about 3 days.It is suggested that, as with the Pleiades cluster, small amplitude light variations are quite common among young solar-type stars with rotation periods around 3 days or less. This gives further evidence for the spin up of solar-type stars predicted by models of angular momentum evolution of pre-main sequence stars.

  4. A Bcool magnetic snapshot survey of solar-type stars

    CERN Document Server

    Marsden, S C; Jeffers, S V; Morin, J; Fares, R; Reiners, A; Nascimento, J D do; Auriere, M; Bouvier, J; Carter, B D; Catala, C; Dintrans, B; Donati, J -F; Gastine, T; Jardine, M; Konstantinova-Antova, R; Lanoux, J; Lignieres, F; Morgenthaler, A; Ramirez-Velez, J C; Theado, S; Van Grootel, V

    2013-01-01

    Stellar magnetic field measurements obtained from spectropolarimetry offer key data for activity and dynamo studies, and we present the results of a major high-resolution spectropolarimetric Bcool project magnetic snapshot survey of 170 solar-type stars from observations with the Telescope Bernard Lyot and the Canada-France-Hawaii Telescope. For each target star a high signal-to-noise circularly polarised Stokes V profile has been obtained using Least-Squares Deconvolution, and used to detect surface magnetic fields and measure the corresponding mean surface longitudinal magnetic field ($B_{l}$). Chromospheric activity indicators were also measured. Surface magnetic fields were detected for 67 stars, with 21 of these stars classified as mature solar-type stars, a result that increases by a factor of four the number of mature solar-type stars on which magnetic fields have been observed. In addition, a magnetic field was detected for 3 out of 18 of the subgiant stars surveyed. For the population of K-dwarfs the...

  5. Acoustic glitches in solar-type stars from Kepler

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mazumdar, A.; Monteiro, M. J. P. F. G.; Ballot, J;

    2012-01-01

    We report the measurement of the acoustic locations of layers of sharp variation in sound speed in the interiors of 19 solar-type stars observed by the Kepler mission. The oscillatory signal in the frequencies arising due to the acoustic glitches at the base of the convection zone and the second...

  6. Solar-Type Activity in Main-Sequence Stars

    CERN Document Server

    Gershberg, Roald E

    2005-01-01

    Solar-type activity over the whole range of the electromagnetic spectrum is a phenomenon inherent in the majority of low- and moderate-mass main sequence stars. In this monograph observational results are summarized in a systematic and comprehensive fashion. The analysis of the various manifestations of such stellar activity leads to the identification of these phenomena with macroscopic non-linear processes in a magnetized plasma. Comparative study of flare stars and the Sun has become increasingly fruitful and is presently an active field of research involving stellar and solar physicists, experts in plasma physics and high-energy astrophysicists. This book will provide them with both an introduction and overview of observational results from the first optical photometry and spectroscopy, from the satellite telescopes International Ultraviolet Explorer to Hubble Space Telescope, XMM-Newton and Chandra, as well as with the present physical interpretation of solar-type activity in main sequence stars. Gershbe...

  7. Metallicity calibration for solar type stars based on red spectra

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Jing-Kun Zhao; Gang Zhao; Yu-Qin Chen; A-Li Luo

    2011-01-01

    Based on a high resolution and high signal-to-noise ratio (S/N) spectral analysis of 90 solar-type stars, we have established several new metallicity calibrations in the Teff range [5600, 6500] K based on red spectra with the wavelength range of 560-880 nm. The new metallicity calibrations are applied to determine the metallicity of solar analogs selected from Sloan Digital Sky Survey (SDSS) spectra. There is a good consistent result with the adopted value presented in SDSS-DR7 and a small scatter of 0.26 dex for stars with S/N > 50 being obtained. This study provides a new reliable way to derive the metallicity for solar-like stars with low resolution spectra.In particular, our calibrations are useful for finding metal-rich stars, which are missing in the SEGUE Stellar Parameter Pipeline.

  8. Spin-down dynamics of magnetized solar-type stars

    CERN Document Server

    Oglethorpe, Rosie

    2014-01-01

    It has long been known that solar-type stars undergo significant spin-down, via magnetic braking, during their Main-Sequence lifetimes. However, magnetic braking only operates on the surface layers; it is not yet completely understood how angular momentum is transported within the star, and how rapidly the spin-down information is communicated to the deep interior. In this work, we use insight from recent progress in understanding internal solar dynamics to model the interior of other solar-type stars. We assume, following Gough and McIntyre (1998), that the bulk of the radiation zone of these stars is held in uniform rotation by the presence of an embedded large-scale primordial field, confined below a stably-stratified, magnetic-free tachocline by large-scale meridional flows downwelling from the convection zone. We derive simple equations to describe the response of this model interior to spin-down of the surface layers, that are identical to the two-zone model of MacGregor and Brenner (1991), with a coupl...

  9. The Age Related Properties of Solar Type Stars

    Science.gov (United States)

    Soderblom, David

    1999-01-01

    The studies of lithium in solar-type stars in clusters of a wide range of ages has provided critical information on a tracer of convective processes, especially among very young stars. Our most recent work has been on a pre-main sequence cluster (NGC 2264) that took place after this grant expired, but was founded on it. The spread seen in Li in Zero-Age Main Sequence clusters like the Pleiades is huge and possibly related to rotation. No clear spread in seen in NGC 2264, so it does not have its origins in the conditions of formation but is instead a result of processes occurring during PMS evolution. Our observations of M67 were particularly interesting because this cluster is the same age as the Sun, i.e.,very old. Clear evidence was seen for a spread in Li there too, indicating that the spread seen in very young stars perpetuates itself into old age.

  10. Asteroseismology of solar-type stars with K2

    CERN Document Server

    Chaplin, W J; Handberg, R; Basu, S; Buchhave, L A; Campante, T L; Davies, G R; Huber, D; Latham, D W; Latham, C A; Serenelli, A; Antia, H M; Appourchaux, T; Ball, W H; Benomar, O; Casagrande, L; Christensen-Dalsgaard, J; Coelho, H R; Creevey, O L; Elsworth, Y; Garc, R A; Gaulme, P; Hekker, S; Kallinger, T; Karoff, C; Kawaler, S D; Kjeldsen, H; Lundkvist, M S; Marcadon, F; Mathur, S; Miglio, A; Mosser, B; R, C; Roxburgh, I W; Aguirre, V Silva; Stello, D; Verma, K; White, T R; Bedding, T R; Barclay, T; Buzasi, D L; Deheuvels, S; Gizon, L; Houdek, G; Howell, S B; Salabert, D; Soderblom, D R

    2015-01-01

    We present the first detections by the NASA K2 Mission of oscillations in solar-type stars, using short-cadence data collected during K2 Campaign\\,1 (C1). We understand the asteroseismic detection thresholds for C1-like levels of photometric performance, and we can detect oscillations in subgiants having dominant oscillation frequencies around $1000\\,\\rm \\mu Hz$. Changes to the operation of the fine-guidance sensors are expected to give significant improvements in the high-frequency performance from C3 onwards. A reduction in the excess high-frequency noise by a factor of two-and-a-half in amplitude would bring main-sequence stars with dominant oscillation frequencies as high as ${\\simeq 2500}\\,\\rm \\mu Hz$ into play as potential asteroseismic targets for K2.

  11. Automated Asteroseismic Analysis of Solar-type Stars

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Karoff, Christoffer; Campante, T.L.; Chaplin, W.J.

    2010-01-01

    , radius, luminosity, effective temperature, surface gravity and age based on grid modeling. All the tools take into account the window function of the observations which means that they work equally well for space-based photometry observations from e.g. the NASA Kepler satellite and ground-based velocity......The rapidly increasing volume of asteroseismic observations on solar-type stars has revealed a need for automated analysis tools. The reason for this is not only that individual analyses of single stars are rather time consuming, but more importantly that these large volumes of observations open...... are calculated in a consistent way. Here we present a set of automated asterosesimic analysis tools. The main engine of these set of tools is an algorithm for modelling the autocovariance spectra of the stellar acoustic spectra allowing us to measure not only the frequency of maximum power and the large...

  12. Evolution of Cold Circumstellar Dust Around Solar-Type Stars

    CERN Document Server

    Carpenter, J M; Schreyer, K; Launhardt, R; Henning, T; Carpenter, John M.; Wolf, Sebastian; Schreyer, Katharina; Launhardt, Ralf; Henning, Th.

    2004-01-01

    We present submillimeter (CSO 350um) and millimeter (SEST 1.2 mm, OVRO 3 mm) photometry for 125 solar-type stars from the FEPS Spitzer Legacy program that have masses between ~0.5 and 2.0 Msun and ages from 3 Myr to 3 Gyr. Continuum emission was detected toward four stars with a signal to noise ratio >= 3$: the classical T Tauri stars RX J1842.9-3532, RX J1852.3-3700, and PDS 66 with SEST, and the debris disk system HD 107146 with OVRO. RXJ1842.9-3532 and RXJ1852.3-3700 are located in projection nearby the R CrA molecular cloud with estimated ages of ~10 Myr, while PDS66 is a probable member of the 20 Myr old Lower Centaurus-Crux subgroup of the Sco-Cen OB association. The continuum emission toward these three sources is unresolved at the 24'' SEST resolution and likely originates from circumstellar accretion disks, each with estimated dust masses of ~5x10**-5 Msun. Analysis of the visibility data toward HD107146 (age 80-200 Myr) indicates that the 3 mm continuum emission is centered on the star within the as...

  13. Dynamo Saturation in Rapidly Rotating Solar-Type Stars

    CERN Document Server

    Kitchatinov, L L

    2015-01-01

    The magnetic activity of solar-type stars generally increases with stellar rotation rate. The increase, however, saturates for fast rotation. The Babcock-Leighton mechanism of stellar dynamos saturates as well when the mean tilt-angle of active regions approaches ninety degrees. Saturation of magnetic activity may be a consequence of this property of the Babcock-Leighton mechanism. Stellar dynamo models with a tilt-angle proportional to the rotation rate are constructed to probe this idea. Two versions of the model - treating the tilt-angles globally and using Joy's law for its latitude dependence - are considered. Both models show a saturation of dynamo-generated magnetic flux at high rotation rates. The model with latitude-dependent tilt-angles shows also a change in dynamo regime in the saturation region. The new regime combines a cyclic dynamo at low latitudes with an (almost) steady polar dynamo.

  14. Dynamo saturation in rapidly rotating solar-type stars

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kitchatinov, Leonid L.; Olemskoy, Serge V.

    2015-11-01

    The magnetic activity of solar-type stars generally increases with stellar rotation rate. The increase, however, saturates for fast rotation. The Babcock-Leighton mechanism of stellar dynamos saturates as well when the mean tilt angle of active regions approaches ninety degrees. Saturation of magnetic activity may be a consequence of this property of the Babcock-Leighton mechanism. Stellar dynamo models with a tilt angle proportional to the rotation rate are constructed to probe this idea. Two versions of the model - treating the tilt angles globally and using Joy's law for its latitude dependence - are considered. Both models show a saturation of dynamo-generated magnetic flux at high rotation rates. The model with latitude-dependent tilt angles also shows a change in dynamo regime in the saturation region. The new regime combines a cyclic dynamo at low latitudes with an (almost) steady polar dynamo.

  15. Carbon-to-Oxygen Ratios in M dwarfs and Solar-type stars

    CERN Document Server

    Nakajima, Tadashi

    2016-01-01

    Initial C/O ratios of circumstellar disks have been obtained in solar-type stars by differential photospheric abundance analysis with respect to the Sun. We present C/O ratios of M dwarfs obtained by absolute abundance analysis derived from CO and H2O spectra in the K-band. We compare the distributions of C/O ratios in M dwarfs and solar-type stars using the Kolmogorov-Smirnov test. The C/O distribution of M dwarfs is consistent with low frequency of high C/O ratios in solar-type stars.

  16. Zeeman-Doppler imaging of active young solar type stars

    CERN Document Server

    Hackman, Thomas; Rosén, Lisa; Kochukhov, Oleg; Käpylä, Maarit J

    2015-01-01

    By studying young magnetically active late-type stars, i.e. analogues to the young Sun, one can draw conclusions on the evolution of the solar dynamo. We determine the topology of the surface magnetic field and study the relation between the magnetic field and cool photospheric spots in three young late-type stars. High-resolution spectropolarimetry of the targets were obtained with the HARPSpol instrument mounted at the ESO 3.6 m telescope. The signal-to-noise ratio of the Stokes IV measurements were boosted by combining the signal from a large number of spectroscopic absorption lines through the least squares deconvolution technique. Surface brightness and magnetic field maps were calculated using the Zeeman-Doppler imaging technique. All the three targets show clear signs of both magnetic fields and cool spots. Only one of the targets, namely V1358 Ori, shows evidence of the dominance of non-axisymmetric modes. In two of the targets, the poloidal field is significantly stronger than the toroidal one, indic...

  17. Rotating models of young solar-type stars : Exploring braking laws and angular momentum transport processes

    CERN Document Server

    Amard, Louis; Charbonnel, Corinne; Gallet, Florian; Bouvier, Jérôme

    2016-01-01

    We study the predicted rotational evolution of solar-type stars from the pre-main sequence to the solar age with 1D rotating evolutionary models including physical ingredients. We computed rotating evolution models of solar-type stars including an external stellar wind torque and internal transport of angular momentum following the method of Maeder and Zahn with the code STAREVOL. We explored different formalisms and prescriptions available from the literature. We tested the predictions of the models against recent rotational period data from extensive photometric surveys, lithium abundances of solar-mass stars in young clusters, and the helioseismic rotation profile of the Sun. We find a best-matching combination of prescriptions for both internal transport and surface extraction of angular momentum. This combination provides a very good fit to the observed evolution of rotational periods for solar-type stars from early evolution to the age of the Sun. Additionally, we show that fast rotators experience a st...

  18. Observations of non-solar-type dynamo processes in stars with shallow convective zones

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Jeffers, S.V.; Donati, J.F.; Alecian, E.; Marsden, S.C.

    2010-01-01

    The magnetic field topology and differential rotation are fundamental signatures of the dynamo processes that generate the magnetic activity observed in the Sun and solar-type stars. To investigate how these dynamo processes evolve in stars with shallow convective zones, we present high-resolution s

  19. Observations of Hierarchical Solar-Type Multiple Star Systems

    CERN Document Server

    Roberts,, Lewis C; Mason, Brian D; Hartkopf, William I; Riddle, Reed L

    2015-01-01

    Twenty multiple stellar systems with solar-type primaries were observed at high angular resolution using the PALM-3000 adaptive optics system at the 5 m Hale telescope. The goal was to complement the knowledge of hierarchical multiplicity in the solar neighborhood by confirming recent discoveries by the visible Robo-AO system with new near-infrared observations with PALM-3000. The physical status of most, but not all, of the new pairs is confirmed by photometry in the Ks band and new positional measurements. In addition, we resolved for the first time five close sub-systems: the known astrometric binary in HIP 17129AB, companions to the primaries of HIP 33555, and HIP 118213, and the companions to the secondaries in HIP 25300 and HIP 101430. We place the components on a color-magnitude diagram and discuss each multiple system individually.

  20. OBSERVATIONS OF HIERARCHICAL SOLAR-TYPE MULTIPLE STAR SYSTEMS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Roberts, Lewis C. Jr. [Jet Propulsion Laboratory, California Institute of Technology, 4800 Oak Grove Drive, Pasadena CA 91109 (United States); Tokovinin, Andrei [Cerro Tololo Inter-American Observatory, Casilla 603, La Serena (Chile); Mason, Brian D.; Hartkopf, William I. [U.S. Naval Observatory, 3450 Massachusetts Avenue, NW, Washington, DC 20392-5420 (United States); Riddle, Reed L., E-mail: lewis.c.roberts@jpl.nasa.gov [Division of Physics, Mathematics, and Astronomy, California Institute of Technology, Pasadena, CA 91125 (United States)

    2015-10-15

    Twenty multiple stellar systems with solar-type primaries were observed at high angular resolution using the PALM-3000 adaptive optics system at the 5 m Hale telescope. The goal was to complement the knowledge of hierarchical multiplicity in the solar neighborhood by confirming recent discoveries by the visible Robo-AO system with new near-infrared observations with PALM-3000. The physical status of most, but not all, of the new pairs is confirmed by photometry in the Ks band and new positional measurements. In addition, we resolved for the first time five close sub-systems: the known astrometric binary in HIP 17129AB, companions to the primaries of HIP 33555, and HIP 118213, and the companions to the secondaries in HIP 25300 and HIP 101430. We place the components on a color–magnitude diagram and discuss each multiple system individually.

  1. The asteroseismic potential of Kepler: first results for solar-type stars

    CERN Document Server

    Chaplin, W J; Elsworth, Y; Garcia, R A; Houdek, G; Karoff, C; Metcalfe, T S; Molenda-Zakowicz, J; Monteiro, M J P F G; Thompson, M J; Brown, T M; Christensen-Dalsgaard, J; Gilliland, R L; Kjeldsen, H; Borucki, W J; Koch, D; Jenkins, J M; Ballot, J; Basu, S; Bazot, M; Bedding, T R; Benomar, O; Bonanno, A; Brandao, I M; Bruntt, H; Campante, T L; Creevey, O L; Di Mauro, M P; Dogan, G; Dreizler, S; Eggenberger, P; Esch, L; Fletcher, S T; Frandsen, S; Gai, N; Gaulme, P; Handberg, R; Hekker, S; Howe, R; Huber, D; Korzennik, S G; Lebrun, J C; Leccia, S; Martic, M; Mathur, S; Mosser, B; New, R; Quirion, P -O; Regulo, C; Roxburgh, I W; Salabert, D; Schou, J; Sousa, S G; Stello, D; Verner, G A; Arentoft, T; Barban, C; Belkacem, K; Benatti, S; Biazzo, K; Boumier, P; Bradley, P A; Broomhall, A -M; Buzasi, D L; Claudi, R U; Cunha, M S; D'Antona, F; Deheuvels, S; Derekas, A; Hernandez, A Garcia; Giampapa, M S; Goupil, M J; Gruberbauer, M; Guzik, J A; Hale, S J; Ireland, M J; Kiss, L L; Kitiashvili, I N; Kolenberg, K; Korhonen, H; Kosovichev, A G; Kupka, F; Lebreton, Y; Leroy, B; Ludwig, H -G; Mathis, S; Michel, E; Miglio, A; Montalban, J; Moya, A; Noels, A; Noyes, R W; Palle, P L; Piau, L; Preston, H L; Cortes, T Roca; Roth, M; Sato, K H; Schmitt, J; Serenelli, A M; Aguirre, V Silva; Stevens, I R; Suarez, J C; Suran, M D; Trampedach, R; Turck-Chieze, S; Uytterhoeven, K; Ventura, R

    2010-01-01

    We present preliminary asteroseismic results from Kepler on three G-type stars. The observations, made at one-minute cadence during the first 33.5d of science operations, reveal high signal-to-noise solar-like oscillation spectra in all three stars: About 20 modes of oscillation may be clearly distinguished in each star. We discuss the appearance of the oscillation spectra, use the frequencies and frequency separations to provide first results on the radii, masses and ages of the stars, and comment in the light of these results on prospects for inference on other solar-type stars that Kepler will observe.

  2. Asteroseismology of solar-type stars with Kepler I: Data analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karoff, C.; Chaplin, W. J.; Appourchaux, T.; Elsworth, Y.; Garcia, R. A.; Houdek, G.; Metcalfe, T. S.; Molenda-Żakowicz, J.; Monteiro, M. J. P. F. G.; Thompson, M. J.; Christensen-Dalsgaard, J.; Gilliland, R. L.; Kjeldsen, H.; Basu, S.; Bedding, T. R.; Campante, T. L.; Eggenberger, P.; Fletcher, S. T.; Gaulme, P.; Handberg, R.; Hekker, S.; Martic, M.; Mathur, S.; Mosser, B.; Regulo, C.; Roxburgh, I. W.; Salabert, D.; Stello, D.; Verner, G. A.; Belkacem, K.; Biazzo, K.; Cunha, M. S.; Gruberbauer, M.; Guzik, J. A.; Kupka, F.; Leroy, B.; Ludwig, H.-G.; Mathis, S.; Noels, A.; Noyes, R. W.; Roca Cortes, T.; Roth, M.; Sato, K. H.; Schmitt, J.; Suran, M. D.; Trampedach, R.; Uytterhoeven, K.; Ventura, R.

    2010-12-01

    We report on the first asteroseismic analysis of solar-type stars observed by Kepler. Observations of three G-type stars, made at one-minute cadence during the first 33.5 days of science operations, reveal high signal-to-noise solar-like oscillation spectra in all three stars: About 20 modes of oscillation can clearly be distinguished in each star. We discuss the appearance of the oscillation spectra, including the presence of a possible signature of faculae, and the presence of mixed modes in one of the three stars.

  3. Asteroseismology of Solar-type Stars with Kepler I: Data Analysis

    CERN Document Server

    Karoff,; Chaplin,; J., W; Appourchaux,; T.,; Elsworth,; Y.,; Garcia,; A., R; Houdek,; G.,; Metcalfe,; S., T; Molenda-Zakowicz,; J.,; Monteiro,; G., M J P F; Thompson,; J., M; Christensen-Dalsgaard,; J.,; Gilliland,; L., R; Kjeldsen,; Basu,; S.,; Bedding,; R., T; Campante,; L., T; Eggenberger,; P.,; Fletcher,; T., S; Gaulme,; P.,; Handberg,; R.,; Hekker,; S.,; Martic,; M.,; Mathur,; S.,; Mosser,; B.,; Regulo,; C.,; Roxburgh,; W., I; Salabert,; D.,; Stello,; D.,; Verner,; A., G; Belkacem,; Biazzo,; K.,; Cunha,; S., M; Gruberbauer,; M.,; Guzik,; A., J; Kupka,; F.,; Leroy,; B.,; Ludwig,; -G., H; Mathis,; S.,; Noels,; A.,; Noyes,; W., R; Cortes, Roca; T.,; Roth,; M.,; Sato,; H., K; Schmitt,; J.,; Suran,; D., M; Trampedach,; R.,; Uytterhoeven,; K.,; Ventura,; R.,; Wilson,; A, P

    2010-01-01

    We report on the first asteroseismic analysis of solar-type stars observed by Kepler. Observations of three G-type stars, made at one-minute cadence during the first 33.5d of science operations, reveal high signal-to-noise solar-like oscillation spectra in all three stars: About 20 modes of oscillation can clearly be distinguished in each star. We discuss the appearance of the oscillation spectra, including the presence of a possible signature of faculae, and the presence of mixed modes in one of the three stars.

  4. Dusty Debris Around Solar-Type Stars Temporal Disk Evolution

    CERN Document Server

    Spangler, C; Silverstone, M D; Becklin, E E; Zuckerman, B

    2001-01-01

    Using ISO-ISOPHOT we carried out a survey of almost 150 stars to search for evidence of emission from dust orbiting young main sequence stars, both in clusters and isolated systems. Over half of the detections are new examples of dusty stellar systems, and demonstrate that such dust can be detected around numerous stars older than a few x 10^6 years. Fluxes at 60 microns and either 90 or 100 microns for the new excess sources together with improved fluxes for a number of IRAS-identified sources are presented. Analysis of the excess luminosity relative to the stellar photosphere shows a systematic decline of this excess with stellar age consistent with a power law index of -2.

  5. A spectroscopic atlas of bright stars

    CERN Document Server

    Martin, Jack

    2009-01-01

    Suitable for amateur astronomers interested in practical spectroscopy or spectrography, this reference book identifies more than 70 (northern hemisphere) bright stars that are suitable observational targets. It provides finder charts for locating these sometimes-familiar stars.

  6. Solar-type dynamo behaviour in fully convective stars without a tachocline.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wright, Nicholas J; Drake, Jeremy J

    2016-07-28

    In solar-type stars (with radiative cores and convective envelopes like our Sun), the magnetic field powers star spots, flares and other solar phenomena, as well as chromospheric and coronal emission at ultraviolet to X-ray wavelengths. The dynamo responsible for generating the field depends on the shearing of internal magnetic fields by differential rotation. The shearing has long been thought to take place in a boundary layer known as the tachocline between the radiative core and the convective envelope. Fully convective stars do not have a tachocline and their dynamo mechanism is expected to be very different, although its exact form and physical dependencies are not known. Here we report observations of four fully convective stars whose X-ray emission correlates with their rotation periods in the same way as in solar-type stars. As the X-ray activity-rotation relationship is a well-established proxy for the behaviour of the magnetic dynamo, these results imply that fully convective stars also operate a solar-type dynamo. The lack of a tachocline in fully convective stars therefore suggests that this is not a critical ingredient in the solar dynamo and supports models in which the dynamo originates throughout the convection zone. PMID:27466124

  7. Solar-type dynamo behaviour in fully convective stars without a tachocline

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wright, Nicholas J.; Drake, Jeremy J.

    2016-07-01

    In solar-type stars (with radiative cores and convective envelopes like our Sun), the magnetic field powers star spots, flares and other solar phenomena, as well as chromospheric and coronal emission at ultraviolet to X-ray wavelengths. The dynamo responsible for generating the field depends on the shearing of internal magnetic fields by differential rotation. The shearing has long been thought to take place in a boundary layer known as the tachocline between the radiative core and the convective envelope. Fully convective stars do not have a tachocline and their dynamo mechanism is expected to be very different, although its exact form and physical dependencies are not known. Here we report observations of four fully convective stars whose X-ray emission correlates with their rotation periods in the same way as in solar-type stars. As the X-ray activity-rotation relationship is a well-established proxy for the behaviour of the magnetic dynamo, these results imply that fully convective stars also operate a solar-type dynamo. The lack of a tachocline in fully convective stars therefore suggests that this is not a critical ingredient in the solar dynamo and supports models in which the dynamo originates throughout the convection zone.

  8. Solar-type dynamo behaviour in fully convective stars without a tachocline.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wright, Nicholas J; Drake, Jeremy J

    2016-07-27

    In solar-type stars (with radiative cores and convective envelopes like our Sun), the magnetic field powers star spots, flares and other solar phenomena, as well as chromospheric and coronal emission at ultraviolet to X-ray wavelengths. The dynamo responsible for generating the field depends on the shearing of internal magnetic fields by differential rotation. The shearing has long been thought to take place in a boundary layer known as the tachocline between the radiative core and the convective envelope. Fully convective stars do not have a tachocline and their dynamo mechanism is expected to be very different, although its exact form and physical dependencies are not known. Here we report observations of four fully convective stars whose X-ray emission correlates with their rotation periods in the same way as in solar-type stars. As the X-ray activity-rotation relationship is a well-established proxy for the behaviour of the magnetic dynamo, these results imply that fully convective stars also operate a solar-type dynamo. The lack of a tachocline in fully convective stars therefore suggests that this is not a critical ingredient in the solar dynamo and supports models in which the dynamo originates throughout the convection zone.

  9. Dynamical model for spindown of solar-type stars

    CERN Document Server

    Sood, Aditi; Hollerbach, Rainer

    2016-01-01

    Since their formation, stars slow down their rotation rates by the removal of angular momentum from their surfaces, e.g. via stellar winds. Despite the complexity of the processes involved, a traditional model, where the removal of angular momentum loss by magnetic fields is prescribed, has provided a useful framework to understand observational relations between stellar rotation and age and magnetic field strength. Here, a spindown model is proposed where loss of angular momentum by magnetic fields is evolved dynamically, instead of being kinematically prescribed. To this end, we evolve the stellar rotation and magnetic field simultaneously over stellar evolution time by extending our previous work on a dynamo model which incorporates the nonlinear feedback mechanisms on rotation and magnetic fields. Our extended model reproduces key observations and explains the presence of the two branches of (fast and slow rotating) stars which have different relations between rotation rate $\\Omega$ vs. time (age), magnet...

  10. Asteroseismic Fundamental Properties of Solar-type Stars Observed by the NASA Kepler Mission

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    W.J. Chaplin; S. Basu; D. Huber; A. Serenelli; L. Casagrande; V. Silva Aguirre; W.H. Ball; O.L. Creevey; L. Gizon; R. Handberg; C. Karoff; R. Lutz; J.P. Marques; A. Miglio; D. Stello; M.D. Suran; D. Pricopi; T.S. Metcalfe; M.J.P.F.G. Monteiro; J. Molenda-Żakowicz; T. Appourchaux; J. Christensen-Dalsgaard; Y. Elsworth; R.A. García; G. Houdek; H. Kjeldsen; A. Bonanno; T.L. Campante; E. Corsaro; P. Gaulme; S. Hekker; S. Mathur; B. Mosser; C. Régulo; D. Salabert

    2014-01-01

    We use asteroseismic data obtained by the NASA Kepler mission to estimate the fundamental properties of more than 500 main-sequence and sub-giant stars. Data obtained during the first 10 months of Kepler science operations were used for this work, when these solar-type targets were observed for one

  11. Asteroseismic Fundamental Properties of Solar-type Stars Observed by the NASA Kepler Mission

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    W.J. Chaplin; S. Basu; D. Huber; A. Serenelli; L. Casagrande; V. Silva Aguirre; W.H. Ball; O.L. Creevey; L. Gizon; R. Handberg; C. Karoff; R. Lutz; J.P. Marques; A. Miglio; D. Stello; M.D. Suran; D. Pricopi; T.S. Metcalfe; M.J.P.F.G. Monteiro; J. Molenda-Żakowicz; T. Appourchaux; J. Christensen-Dalsgaard; Y. Elsworth; R.A. García; G. Houdek; H. Kjeldsen; A. Bonanno; T.L. Campante; E. Corsaro; P. Gaulme; S. Hekker; S. Mathur; B. Mosser; C. Régulo; D. Salabert

    2013-01-01

    We use asteroseismic data obtained by the NASA Kepler mission to estimate the fundamental properties of more than 500 main-sequence and sub-giant stars. Data obtained during the first 10 months of Kepler science operations were used for this work, when these solar-type targets were observed for one

  12. Predicting the Detectability of Oscillations in Solar-type Stars Observed by Kepler

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Chaplin, William J.; Kjeldsen, Hans; Bedding, Timothy R.;

    2011-01-01

    Asteroseismology of solar-type stars has an important part to play in the exoplanet program of the NASA Kepler Mission. Precise and accurate inferences on the stellar properties that are made possible by the seismic data allow very tight constraints to be placed on the exoplanetary systems. Here,...

  13. Ensemble Asteroseismology of Solar-Type Stars with the NASA Kepler Mission

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Chaplin, William J.; Kjeldsen, Hans; Christensen-Dalsgaard, Jørgen;

    2011-01-01

    In addition to its search for extrasolar planets, the NASA Kepler mission provides exquisite data on stellar oscillations. We report the detections of oscillations in 500 solar-type stars in the Kepler field of view, an ensemble that is large enough to allow statistical studies of intrinsic stellar...

  14. Ensemble asteroseismology of solar-type stars with the NASA Kepler mission

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    W.J. Chaplin; H. Kjeldsen; J. Christensen-Dalsgaard; S. Basu; A. Miglio; T. Appourchaux; T.R. Bedding; Y. Elsworth; R.A. Garcia; R.L. Gilliland; L. Girardi; G. Houdek; C. Karoff; S.D. Kawaler; T.S. Metcalfe; J. Molenda-Zakowicz; M.J.P.F.G. Monteiro; M.J. Thompson; G.A. Verner; J. Ballot; A. Bonanno; I.M. Brandao; A.M. Broomhall; H. Bruntt; T.L. Campante; E. Corsaro; O.L. Creevey; L. Esch; N. Gai; P. Gaulme; S.J. Hale; R. Handberg; S. Hekker; D. Huber; A. Jimenez; S. Mathur; A. Mazumdar; B. Mosser; R. New; M.H. Pinsonneault; D. Pricopi; P.O. Quirion; C. Regulo; D. Salabert; A.M. Serenelli; V. Silva Aguirre; S.G. Sousa; D. Stello; I.R. Stevens; M.D. Suran; K. Uytterhoeven; T.R. White; W.J. Borucki; T.M. Brown; J.M. Jenkins; K. Kinemuchi; J. Van Cleve; T.C. Klaus

    2011-01-01

    In addition to its search for extrasolar planets, the NASA Kepler mission provides exquisite data on stellar oscillations. We report the detections of oscillations in 500 solar-type stars in the Kepler field of view, an ensemble that is large enough to allow statistical studies of intrinsic stellar

  15. Predicting the detectability of oscillations in solar-type stars observed by Kepler

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    W.J. Chaplin; H. Kjeldsen; T.R. Bedding; J. Christensen-Dalsgaard; R.L. Gilliland; S.D. Kawaler; T. Appourchaux; Y. Elsworth; R.A. Garcia; G. Houdek; C. Karoff; T.S. Metcalfe; J. Molenda-Zakowicz; M.J.P.F.G. Monteiro; M.J. Thompson; G.A. Verner; N. Batalha; W.J. Borucki; T.M. Brown; S.T. Bryson; J.L. Christiansen; B.D. Clarke; J.M. Jenkins; T.C. Klaus; D. Koch; D. An; J. Ballot; S. Basu; O. Benomar; A. Bonanno; A.M. Broomhall; T.L. Campante; E. Corsaro; O.L. Creevey; L. Esch; N. Gai; P. Gaulme; S.J. Hale; R. Handberg; S. Hekker; D. Huber; S. Mathur; B. Mosser; R. New; M.H. Pinsonneault; D. Pricopi; P.O. Quirion; C. Regulo; I.W. Roxburgh; D. Salabert; D. Stello; M.D. Suran

    2011-01-01

    Asteroseismology of solar-type stars has an important part to play in the exoplanet program of the NASA Kepler Mission. Precise and accurate inferences on the stellar properties that are made possible by the seismic data allow very tight constraints to be placed on the exoplanetary systems. Here, we

  16. Verification of the Kepler Input Catalog from asteroseismology of solar-type stars

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    G.A. Verner; W.J. Chaplin; S. Basu; T.M. Brown; S. Hekker; D. Huber; C. Karoff; S. Mathur; T.S. Metcalfe; B. Mosser; P.O. Quirion; T. Appourchaux; T.R. Bedding; H. Bruntt; T.L. Campante; Y. Elsworth; R.A. Garcia; R. Handberg; C. Regulo; I.W. Roxburgh; D. Stello; J. Christensen-Dalsgaard; R.L. Gilliland; S.D. Kawaler; H. Kjeldsen; C. Allen; B.D. Clarke; F.R. Girouard

    2011-01-01

    We calculate precise stellar radii and surface gravities from the asteroseismic analysis of over 500 solar-type pulsating stars observed by the Kepler space telescope. These physical stellar properties are compared with those given in the Kepler Input Catalog (KIC), determined from ground-based mult

  17. Dynamical model for spindown of solar-type stars

    OpenAIRE

    Sood, Aditi; Kim, Eun-Jin; Hollerbach, Rainer

    2016-01-01

    Since their formation, stars slow down their rotation rates by the removal of angular momentum from their surfaces, e.g. via stellar winds. Despite the complexity of the processes involved, a traditional model, where the removal of angular momentum loss by magnetic fields is prescribed, has provided a useful framework to understand observational relations between stellar rotation and age and magnetic field strength. Here, a spindown model is proposed where loss of angular momentum by magnetic...

  18. Asteroseismic modelling of the solar-type subgiant star β Hydri

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Brandão, I.M.; Dogan, Gülnur; Christensen-Dalsgaard, Jørgen;

    2011-01-01

    Context. Comparing models and data of pulsating stars is a powerful way to understand the stellar structure better. Moreover, such comparisons are necessary to make improvements to the physics of the stellar models, since they do not yet perfectly represent either the interior or especially...... the surface layers of stars. Because β Hydri is an evolved solar-type pulsator with mixed modes in its frequency spectrum, it is very interesting for asteroseismic studies. Aims: The goal of the present work is to search for a representative model of the solar-type star β Hydri, based on up-to-date non...... frequencies of β Hydri: (i) we assume that the best model is the one that reproduces the star's interior based on the radial oscillation frequencies alone, to which we have applied the correction for the near-surface effects; (ii) we assume that the best model is the one that produces the lowest value...

  19. A Bcool spectropolarimetric survey of over 150 solar-type stars

    OpenAIRE

    Marsden, Stephen; Petit, Pascal; Jeffers, Sandra; Nascimento, Jose-Dias do; Carter, Bradley; Brown, Carolyn

    2013-01-01

    As part of the Bcool project, over 150 solar-type stars chosen mainly from planet search databases have been observed between 2006 and 2013 using the NARVAL and ESPaDOnS spectropolarimeters on the Telescope Bernard Lyot (Pic du Midi, France) and the Canada France Hawaii Telescope (Mauna Kea, USA), respectively. These single 'snapshot' observations have been used to detect the presence of magnetic fields on 40% of our sample, with the highest detection rates occurring for the youngest stars. F...

  20. High Dispersion Spectroscopy of Solar-type Superflare Stars. III. Lithium Abundances

    CERN Document Server

    Honda, Satoshi; Maehara, Hiroyuki; Notsu, Shota; Shibayama, Takuya; Nogami, Daisaku; Shibata, Kazunari

    2015-01-01

    We report on the abundance analysis of Li in solar-type (G-type main sequence) superflare stars which were found by the analysis of Kepler photometric data. Li is a key element to understand the evolution of the stellar convection zone which reflects the age of solar-type stars. We performed the high dispersion spectroscopy of solar-type superflare stars with Subaru/HDS, and confirmed that 34 stars show no evidence of binarity in our previous study. In this study, we derived the Li abundances of these 34 objects. We investigate correlations of Li abundance with stellar atmospheric parameters, rotational velocity, and superflare activities to understand the nature of superflare stars and the possibility of the nucleosynthesis of Li by superflares. We confirm the large dispersion in the Li abundance, and the correlation with stellar parameters is not seen. As compared with the Li abundance in Hyades cluster which is younger than the Sun, it is suggested that half of the observed stars are younger than Hyades cl...

  1. On a stochastic model for the spin-down of solar type stars

    OpenAIRE

    Leprovost, Nicolas; Kim, Eun-Jin

    2009-01-01

    Modeling the rotation history of solar-type stars is still an unsolved problem in modern astrophysics. One of the main challenges is to explain the dispersion in the distribution of stellar rotation rate for young stars. Previous works have advocated dynamo saturation or magnetic field localization to explain the presence of fast rotators and star-disk coupling in pre-main sequence to account for the existence of slow rotators. Here, we present a new model that can account for the presence of...

  2. Measurement of acoustic glitches in solar-type stars from oscillation frequencies observed by Kepler

    CERN Document Server

    Mazumdar, A; Ballot, J; Antia, H M; Basu, S; Houdek, G; Mathur, S; Cunha, M S; Aguirre, V Silva; Garcia, R A; Salabert, D; Verner, G A; Christensen-Dalsgaard, J; Metcalfe, T S; Sanderfer, D T; Seader, S E; Smith, J C; Chaplin, W J

    2013-01-01

    For the very best and brightest asteroseismic solar-type targets observed by Kepler, the frequency precision is sufficient to determine the acoustic depths of the surface convective layer and the helium ionization zone. Such sharp features inside the acoustic cavity of the star, which we call acoustic glitches, create small oscillatory deviations from the uniform spacing of frequencies in a sequence of oscillation modes with the same spherical harmonic degree. We use these oscillatory signals to determine the acoustic locations of such features in 19 solar-type stars observed by the Kepler mission. Four independent groups of researchers utilized the oscillation frequencies themselves, the second differences of the frequencies and the ratio of the small and large separation to locate the base of the convection zone and the second helium ionization zone. Despite the significantly different methods of analysis, good agreement was found between the results of these four groups, barring a few cases. These results ...

  3. Condensate Nuclei and Magnetic Polarity Reversals in the Sun and Solar-type Stars

    CERN Document Server

    Mirza, Babur M

    2015-01-01

    Magnetic field generation in the Sun and solar-type stars is modeled here based on the formation of magnetically polarized condensates (B. M. Mirza, Mod. Phys. Lett. B 28 (2014) 1450148) under the high density and pressure conditions. The correct orders of magnitude for the time period and the energy loss in a solar cycle are deduced, as well as the enhancement in the energy emission observed during solar cycles. It is shown that this feedback magnetic field along with differential rotation is sufficient to generate the toroidal magnetic field in the solar exterior. The model is useful in determining magnetic polarity reversals, energy generation, and reversal times, in solar-type stars.

  4. Asteroseismic fundamental properties of solar-type stars observed by the NASA Kepler Mission

    OpenAIRE

    Chaplin, W. J.; Basu, S; Huber, D.(Institut für Experimentelle Kernphysik, Karlsruhe Institute of Technology (KIT), Hermann-von-Helmholtz-Platz 1, 76344 Eggenstein-Leopoldshafen, Germany); A. Serenelli; Casagrande, L.; Silva Aguirre, V.; Ball, W.H.; Creevey, O. L.; Gizon, L.; Handberg, R.; Karoff, C.; Lutz, R.; Marques, J.P.; Miglio, A.; Stello, D.

    2013-01-01

    We use asteroseismic data obtained by the NASA Kepler mission to estimate the fundamental properties of more than 500 main-sequence and sub-giant stars. Data obtained during the first 10 months of Kepler science operations were used for this work, when these solar-type targets were observed for one month each in survey mode. Stellar properties have been estimated using two global asteroseismic parameters and complementary photometric and spectroscopic data. Homogeneous sets of effective tempe...

  5. Predicting the detectability of oscillations in solar-type stars observed by Kepler

    CERN Document Server

    Chaplin, W J; Bedding, T R; Christensen-Dalsgaard, J; Gilliland, R L; Kawaler, S D; Appourchaux, T; Elsworth, Y; Garcia, R A; Houdek, G; Karoff, C; Metcalfe, T S; Molenda-Zakowicz, J; Monteiro, M J P F G; Thompson, M J; Verner, G A; Batalha, N; Borucki, W J; Brown, T M; Bryson, S T; Christiansen, J L; Clarke, B D; Jenkins, J M; Klaus, T C; Koch, D; An, D; Ballot, J; Basu, S; Benomar, O; Bonanno, A; Broomhall, A -M; Campante, T L; Corsaro, E; Creevey, O L; Esch, L; Gai, N; Gaulme, P; Hale, S J; Handberg, R; Hekker, S; Huber, D; Mathur, S; Mosser, B; New, R; Pinsonneault, M H; Pricopi, D; Quirion, P -O; Regulo, C; Roxburgh, I W; Salabert, D; Stello, D; Suran, M D

    2011-01-01

    Asteroseismology of solar-type stars has an important part to play in the exoplanet program of the NASA Kepler Mission. Precise and accurate inferences on the stellar properties that are made possible by the seismic data allow very tight constraints to be placed on the exoplanetary systems. Here, we outline how to make an estimate of the detectability of solar-like oscillations in any given Kepler target, using rough estimates of the temperature and radius, and the Kepler apparent magnitude.

  6. Solar-type dynamo behaviour in fully convective stars without a tachocline

    CERN Document Server

    Wright, Nicholas J

    2016-01-01

    In solar-type stars (with radiative cores and convective envelopes), the magnetic field powers star spots, flares and other solar phenomena, as well as chromospheric and coronal emission at ultraviolet to X-ray wavelengths. The dynamo responsible for generating the field depends on the shearing of internal magnetic fields by differential rotation. The shearing has long been thought to take place in a boundary layer known as the tachocline between the radiative core and the convective envelope. Fully convective stars do not have a tachocline and their dynamo mechanism is expected to be very different, although its exact form and physical dependencies are not known. Here we report observations of four fully convective stars whose X-ray emission correlates with their rotation periods in the same way as in Sun-like stars. As the X-ray activity - rotation relationship is a well-established proxy for the behaviour of the magnetic dynamo, these results imply that fully convective stars also operate a solar-type dyna...

  7. New visual companions of solar-type stars within 25 pc

    OpenAIRE

    Chini, R.; Fuhrmann, K.; Domínguez, A. Barr; Nuñez, F. Pozo; Westhues, C.; Hodapp, K.

    2013-01-01

    We report the discovery of faint common-proper-motion companions to the nearby southern solar-type stars HD43162, HD67199, HD114837, HD114853, HD129502, HD165185, HD197214, and HD212330 from near-infrared imaging and astrometry. We also confirm the previously identified tertiary components around HD165401 and HD188088. Since the majority of these stars were already known as binaries, they ascend now to higher-level systems. A particularly interesting case is the G6.5V BYDra-type variable HD43...

  8. Gravitational waves emitted by solar-type stars excited by orbiting planets

    CERN Document Server

    Berti, E; Berti, Emanuele; Ferrari, Valeria

    2001-01-01

    The possibility of exciting the g-modes of a solar-type star as a consequence of the gravitational interaction with a close companion (a planet or a brown dwarf) is studied by a perturbative approach. The amplitude of the emitted gravitational wave is computed and compared with the quadrupole emission of the system, showing that in some cases it can be considerably larger. The effects of radiation reaction are considered to evaluate the timescale of the emission process, and a Roche lobe analysis is used to establish the region where the companion can orbit without being disrupted by tidal interactions with the star.

  9. Search for bright stars with infrared excess

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bright stars, stars with visual magnitude smaller than 6.5, can be studied using small telescope. In general, if stars are assumed as black body radiator, then the color in infrared (IR) region is usually equal to zero. Infrared data from IRAS observations at 12 and 25μm (micron) with good flux quality are used to search for bright stars (from Bright Stars Catalogues) with infrared excess. In magnitude scale, stars with IR excess is defined as stars with IR color m12−m25>0; where m12−m25 = −2.5log(F12/F25)+1.56, where F12 and F25 are flux density in Jansky at 12 and 25μm, respectively. Stars with similar spectral type are expected to have similar color. The existence of infrared excess in the same spectral type indicates the existence of circum-stellar dust, the origin of which is probably due to the remnant of pre main-sequence evolution during star formation or post AGB evolution or due to physical process such as the rotation of those stars

  10. A Bcool spectropolarimetric survey of over 150 solar-type stars

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marsden, Stephen; Petit, Pascal; Jeffers, Sandra; do Nascimento, Jose-Dias; Carter, Bradley; Brown, Carolyn

    2014-08-01

    As part of the Bcool project, over 150 solar-type stars chosen mainly from planet search databases have been observed between 2006 and 2013 using the NARVAL and ESPaDOnS spectropolarimeters on the Telescope Bernard Lyot (Pic du Midi, France) and the Canada France Hawaii Telescope (Mauna Kea, USA), respectively. These single ``snapshot'' observations have been used to detect the presence of magnetic fields on 40% of our sample, with the highest detection rates occurring for the youngest stars. From our observations we have determined the mean surface longitudinal field (or an upper limit for stars without detections) and the chromospheric surface fluxes, and find that the upper envelope of the absolute value of the mean surface longitudinal field is directly correlated to the chromospheric emission from the star and increases with rotation rate and decreases with age.

  11. VizieR Online Data Catalog: Asteroseismic study of solar-type stars (Chaplin+, 2014)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chaplin, W. J.; Basu, S.; Huber, D.; Serenelli, A.; Casagrande, L.; Silva Aguirre, V.; Ball, W. H.; Creevey, O. L.; Gizon, L.; Handberg, R.; Karoff, C.; Lutz, R.; Marques, J. P.; Miglio, A.; Stello, D.; Suran, M. D.; Pricopi, D.; Metcalfe, T. S.; Monteiro, M. J. P. F. G.; Molenda-Zakowicz, J.; Appourchaux, T.; Christensen-Dalsgaard, J.; Elsworth, Y.; Garcia, R. A.; Houdek, G.; Kjeldsen, H.; Bonanno, A.; Campante, T. L.; Corsaro, E.; Gaulme, P.; Hekker, S.; Mathur, S.; Mosser, B.; Regulo, C.; Salabert, D.

    2014-01-01

    During the first 10 months of science operations more than 2000 solar-type stars were selected by the Kepler Asteroseismic Science Consortium (KASC) to be observed as part of an asteroseismic survey of the Sun-like population in the Kepler field of view. Solar-like oscillations were detected by Kepler in more than 500 stars (Chaplin et al. 2011Sci...332..213C), and from these data robust global or average asteroseismic parameters were determined for all targets in the sample. These asteroseismic parameters allow us to estimate fundamental properties of the stars. In this paper we present stellar properties - namely masses, radii, surface gravities, mean densities and ages - of this asteroseismic sample of main-sequence and subgiant stars. (5 data files).

  12. A Bcool spectropolarimetric survey of over 150 solar-type stars

    CERN Document Server

    Marsden, Stephen; Jeffers, Sandra; Nascimento, Jose-Dias do; Carter, Bradley; Brown, Carolyn

    2013-01-01

    As part of the Bcool project, over 150 solar-type stars chosen mainly from planet search databases have been observed between 2006 and 2013 using the NARVAL and ESPaDOnS spectropolarimeters on the Telescope Bernard Lyot (Pic du Midi, France) and the Canada France Hawaii Telescope (Mauna Kea, USA), respectively. These single 'snapshot' observations have been used to detect the presence of magnetic fields on 40% of our sample, with the highest detection rates occurring for the youngest stars. From our observations we have determined the mean surface longitudinal field (or an upper limit for stars without detections) and the chromospheric surface fluxes, and find that the upper envelope of the absolute value of the mean surface longitudinal field is directly correlated to the chromospheric emission from the star and increases with rotation rate and decreases with age.

  13. Verification of the Kepler Input Catalog from Asteroseismology of Solar-type Stars

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Verner, G.A.; Chaplin, W.J.; Basu, S.;

    2011-01-01

    We calculate precise stellar radii and surface gravities from the asteroseismic analysis of over 500 solar-type pulsating stars observed by the Kepler space telescope. These physical stellar properties are compared with those given in the Kepler Input Catalog (KIC), determined from ground......-based multi-color photometry. For the stars in our sample, we find general agreement but we detect an average overestimation bias of 0.23 dex in the KIC determination of log (g) for stars with log (g)KIC > 4.0 dex, and a resultant underestimation bias of up to 50% in the KIC radii estimates for stars with R...... KIC KIC with R ~ 1 R sun than is suggested by the physical properties in the KIC. Furthermore, if the radius estimates are taken...

  14. Measurement of acoustic glitches in solar-type stars from oscillation frequencies observed by Kepler

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mazumdar, A. [Homi Bhabha Centre for Science Education, TIFR, V. N. Purav Marg, Mankhurd, Mumbai 400088 (India); Monteiro, M. J. P. F. G.; Cunha, M. S. [Centro de Astrofísica da Universidade do Porto, Rua das Estrelas, 4150-762 Porto (Portugal); Ballot, J. [CNRS, Institut de Recherche en Astrophysique et Planétologie, 14 avenue Edouard Belin, F-31400 Toulouse (France); Antia, H. M. [Tata Institute of Fundamental Research, Homi Bhabha Road, Mumbai 400005 (India); Basu, S. [Astronomy Department, Yale University, P.O. Box 208101, New Haven, CT 065208101 (United States); Houdek, G.; Silva Aguirre, V.; Christensen-Dalsgaard, J.; Metcalfe, T. S. [Stellar Astrophysics Centre, Department of Physics and Astronomy, Aarhus University, Ny Munkegade 120, DK-8000 Aarhus C (Denmark); Mathur, S. [High Altitude Observatory, NCAR, P.O. Box 3000, Boulder, CO 80307 (United States); García, R. A. [Laboratoire AIM, CEA/DSM, CNRS, Université Paris Diderot, IRFU/SAp, Centre de Saclay, F-91191 Gif-sur-Yvette Cedex (France); Salabert, D. [Laboratoire Lagrange, UMR7293, Université de Nice Sophia-Antipolis, CNRS, Observatoire de la Côte d' Azur, F-06304 Nice (France); Verner, G. A.; Chaplin, W. J. [School of Physics and Astronomy, University of Birmingham, Edgbaston, Birmingham B15 2TT (United Kingdom); Sanderfer, D. T. [NASA Ames Research Center, Moffett Field, CA 94035 (United States); Seader, S. E.; Smith, J. C. [SETI Institute/NASA Ames Research Center, Moffett Field, CA 94035 (United States)

    2014-02-10

    For the very best and brightest asteroseismic solar-type targets observed by Kepler, the frequency precision is sufficient to determine the acoustic depths of the surface convective layer and the helium ionization zone. Such sharp features inside the acoustic cavity of the star, which we call acoustic glitches, create small oscillatory deviations from the uniform spacing of frequencies in a sequence of oscillation modes with the same spherical harmonic degree. We use these oscillatory signals to determine the acoustic locations of such features in 19 solar-type stars observed by the Kepler mission. Four independent groups of researchers utilized the oscillation frequencies themselves, the second differences of the frequencies and the ratio of the small and large separation to locate the base of the convection zone and the second helium ionization zone. Despite the significantly different methods of analysis, good agreement was found between the results of these four groups, barring a few cases. These results also agree reasonably well with the locations of these layers in representative models of the stars. These results firmly establish the presence of the oscillatory signals in the asteroseismic data and the viability of several techniques to determine the location of acoustic glitches inside stars.

  15. A uniform asteroseismic analysis of 22 solar-type stars observed by Kepler

    CERN Document Server

    Mathur, S; Woitaszek, M; Bruntt, H; Verner, G A; Christensen-Dalsgaard, J; Creevey, O L; Dogan, G; Basu, S; Karoff, C; Stello, D; Appourchaux, T; Campante, T L; Chaplin, W J; Garcia, R A; Bedding, T R; Benomar, O; Bonanno, A; Deheuvels, S; Elsworth, Y; Gaulme, P; Guzik, J A; Handberg, R; Hekker, S; Herzberg, W; Monteiro, M J P F G; Piau, L; Quirion, P -O; Regulo, C; Roth, M; Salabert, D; Serenelli, A; Thompson, M J; Trampedach, R; White, T R; Ballot, J; Brandao, I M; Molenda-Zakowicz, J; Kjeldsen, H; Twicken, J D; Uddin, K; Wohler, B

    2012-01-01

    Asteroseismology with the Kepler space telescope is providing not only an improved characterization of exoplanets and their host stars, but also a new window on stellar structure and evolution for the large sample of solar-type stars in the field. We perform a uniform analysis of 22 of the brightest asteroseismic targets with the highest signal-to-noise ratio observed for 1 month each during the first year of the mission, and we quantify the precision and relative accuracy of asteroseismic determinations of the stellar radius, mass, and age that are possible using various methods. We present the properties of each star in the sample derived from an automated analysis of the individual oscillation frequencies and other observational constraints using the Asteroseismic Modeling Portal (AMP), and we compare them to the results of model-grid-based methods that fit the global oscillation properties. We find that fitting the individual frequencies typically yields asteroseismic radii and masses to \\sim1% precision,...

  16. Asteroseismology of solar-type stars with Kepler: II. Stellar modeling

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Metcalfe , T.S.; Karoff, Christoffer

    2010-01-01

    Observations from the Kepler satellite were recently published for three bright G-type stars, which were monitored during the first 33.5 days of science operations. One of these stars, KIC 11026764, exhibits a characteristic pattern of oscillation frequencies suggesting that the star has evolved...... significantly. We have derived initial estimates of the properties of KIC 11026764 from the oscillation frequencies observed by Kepler, combined with ground-based spectroscopic data. We present preliminary results from detailed modeling of this star, employing a variety of independent codes and analyses...

  17. Statistical properties of superflares on solar-type stars with Kepler data

    CERN Document Server

    Notsu, Yuta; Shibayama, Takuya; Honda, Satoshi; Notsu, Shota; Namekata, Kosuke; Nogami, Daisaku; Shibata, Kazunari

    2016-01-01

    Superflares are flares that release total energy 10$\\sim$10$^{4}$ times greater than that of the biggest solar flares with energy of $\\sim$10$^{32}$ erg. We searched superflares on solar-type stars (G-type main sequence stars) using the Kepler 30-min (long) and 1-min (short) cadence data. We found more than 1500 superflares on 279 stars from 30-min cadence data (Q0-6) and 187 superflares on 23 stars from 1-min cadence data (Q0-17). The bolometric energy of detected superflares ranges from the order of 10$^{32}$ erg to 10$^{36}$ erg. Using these data, we found that the occurrence frequency ($dN/dE$) of superflares is expressed as a power-law function of flare energy ($E$) with the index of -1.5 for $10^{33}$ Most of the superflare stars show quasi-periodic light variations with the amplitude of a few percent, which can be explained by the rotation of the star with large starspots. The bolometric energy released by flares is consistent with the magnetic energy stored around such large starspots. Furthermore, ou...

  18. Verification of the Kepler Input Catalog from Asteroseismology of Solar-type Stars

    CERN Document Server

    Verner, G A; Basu, S; Brown, T M; Hekker, S; Huber, D; Karoff, C; Mathur, S; Metcalfe, T S; Mosser, B; Quirion, P -O; Appourchaux, T; Bedding, T R; Bruntt, H; Campante, T L; Elsworth, Y; García, R A; Handberg, R; Régulo, C; Roxburgh, I W; Stello, D; Christensen-Dalsgaard, J; Gilliland, R L; Kawaler, S D; Kjeldsen, H; Allen, C; Clarke, B D; Girouard, F R; 10.1088/2041-8205/738/2/L28

    2011-01-01

    We calculate precise stellar radii and surface gravities from the asteroseismic analysis of over 500 solar-type pulsating stars observed by the Kepler space telescope. These physical stellar properties are compared with those given in the Kepler Input Catalog (KIC), determined from ground-based multi-color photometry. For the stars in our sample, we find general agreement but we detect an average overestimation bias of 0.23 dex in the KIC determination of log (g) for stars with log (g)_KIC > 4.0 dex, and a resultant underestimation bias of up to 50% in the KIC radii estimates for stars with R_KIC < 2 R sun. Part of the difference may arise from selection bias in the asteroseismic sample; nevertheless, this result implies there may be fewer stars characterized in the KIC with R ~ 1 R sun than is suggested by the physical properties in the KIC. Furthermore, if the radius estimates are taken from the KIC for these affected stars and then used to calculate the size of transiting planets, a similar underestimat...

  19. Asteroseismic fundamental properties of solar-type stars observed by the NASA Kepler Mission

    CERN Document Server

    Chaplin, W J; Huber, D; Serenelli, A; Casagrande, L; Aguirre, V Silva; Ball, W H; Creevey, O L; Gizon, L; Handberg, R; Karoff, C; Lutz, R; Marques, J P; Miglio, A; Stello, D; Suran, M D; Pricopi, D; Metcalfe, T S; Monteiro, M J P F G; Molenda-Zakowicz, J; Appourchaux, T; Christensen-Dalsgaard, J; Elsworth, Y; Garcia, R A; Houdek, G; Kjeldsen, H; Bonanno, A; Campante, T L; Corsaro, E; Gaulme, P; Hekker, S; Mathur, S; Mosser, B; Regulo, C; Salabert, D

    2013-01-01

    We use asteroseismic data obtained by the NASA Kepler Mission to estimate the fundamental properties of more than 500 main-sequence and sub-giant stars. Data obtained during the first 10 months of Kepler science operations were used for this work, when these solar-type targets were observed for one month each in a survey mode. Stellar properties have been estimated using two global asteroseismic parameters and complementary photometric and spectroscopic data. Homogeneous sets of effective temperatures were available for the entire ensemble from complementary photometry; spectroscopic estimates of T_eff and [Fe/H] were available from a homogeneous analysis of ground-based data on a subset of 87 stars. [Abbreviated version... see paper for full abstract.

  20. Observing Faint Companions Close to Bright Stars

    Science.gov (United States)

    Serabyn, Eugene

    2012-04-01

    Progress in a number of technical areas is enabling imaging and interferometric observations at both smaller angular separations from bright stars and at deeper relative contrast levels. Here we discuss recent progress in several ongoing projects at the Jet Propulsion Laboratory. First, extreme adaptive optics wavefront correction has recently enabled the use of very short (i.e., blue) wavelengths to resolve close binaries. Second, phase-based coronagraphy has recently allowed observations of faint companions to within nearly one diffraction beam width of bright stars. Finally, rotating interferometers that can observe inside the diffraction beam of single aperture telescopes are being developed to detect close-in companions and bright exozodiacal dust. This paper presents a very brief summary of the techniques involved, along with some illustrative results.

  1. ASTEROSEISMIC FUNDAMENTAL PROPERTIES OF SOLAR-TYPE STARS OBSERVED BY THE NASA KEPLER MISSION

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We use asteroseismic data obtained by the NASA Kepler mission to estimate the fundamental properties of more than 500 main-sequence and sub-giant stars. Data obtained during the first 10 months of Kepler science operations were used for this work, when these solar-type targets were observed for one month each in survey mode. Stellar properties have been estimated using two global asteroseismic parameters and complementary photometric and spectroscopic data. Homogeneous sets of effective temperatures, T eff, were available for the entire ensemble from complementary photometry; spectroscopic estimates of T eff and [Fe/H] were available from a homogeneous analysis of ground-based data on a subset of 87 stars. We adopt a grid-based analysis, coupling six pipeline codes to 11 stellar evolutionary grids. Through use of these different grid-pipeline combinations we allow implicitly for the impact on the results of stellar model dependencies from commonly used grids, and differences in adopted pipeline methodologies. By using just two global parameters as the seismic inputs we are able to perform a homogenous analysis of all solar-type stars in the asteroseismic cohort, including many targets for which it would not be possible to provide robust estimates of individual oscillation frequencies (due to a combination of low signal-to-noise ratio and short dataset lengths). The median final quoted uncertainties from consolidation of the grid-based analyses are for the full ensemble (spectroscopic subset) approximately 10.8% (5.4%) in mass, 4.4% (2.2%) in radius, 0.017 dex (0.010 dex) in log g, and 4.3% (2.8%) in mean density. Around 36% (57%) of the stars have final age uncertainties smaller than 1 Gyr. These ages will be useful for ensemble studies, but should be treated carefully on a star-by-star basis. Future analyses using individual oscillation frequencies will offer significant improvements on up to 150 stars, in particular for estimates of the ages, where having the

  2. Oscillation frequencies for 35 \\Kepler solar-type planet-hosting stars using Bayesian techniques and machine learning

    CERN Document Server

    Davies, G R; Bedding, T R; Handberg, R; Lund, M N; Chaplin, W J; Huber, D; White, T R; Benomar, O; Hekker, S; Basu, S; Campante, T L; Christensen-Dalsgaard, J; Elsworth, Y; Karoff, C; Kjeldsen, H; Lundkvist, M S; Metcalfe, T S; Stello, D

    2015-01-01

    \\Kepler has revolutionised our understanding of both exoplanets and their host stars. Asteroseismology is a valuable tool in the characterisation of stars and \\Kepler is an excellent observing facility to perform asteroseismology. Here we select a sample of 35 \\Kepler solar-type stars which host transiting exoplanets (or planet candidates) with detected solar-like oscillations. Using available \\Kepler short cadence data up to Quarter 16 we create power spectra optimised for asteroseismology of solar-type stars. We identify modes of oscillation and estimate mode frequencies by ``peak bagging'' using a Bayesian MCMC framework. In addition, we expand the methodology of quality assurance using a Bayesian unsupervised machine learning approach. We report the measured frequencies of the modes of oscillation for all 35 stars and frequency ratios commonly used in detailed asteroseismic modelling. Due to the high correlations associated with frequency ratios we report the covariance matrix of all frequencies measured ...

  3. Angular Momentum Transport in Solar-type Stars: Testing the Timescale for Core-Envelope Coupling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Denissenkov, Pavel A.; Pinsonneault, Marc; Terndrup, Donald M.; Newsham, Grant

    2010-06-01

    We critically examine the constraints on internal angular momentum transport which can be inferred from the spin-down of open cluster stars. The rotation distribution inferred from rotation velocities and periods is consistent for larger and more recent samples, but smaller samples of rotation periods appear biased toward shorter periods relative to vsin i studies. We therefore focus on whether the rotation period distributions observed in star forming regions can be evolved into the observed ones in the Pleiades, NGC 2516, M 34, M 35, M 37, and M 50 with plausible assumptions about star-disk coupling and angular momentum loss from magnetized solar-like winds. Solid-body (SB) models are consistent with the data for low-mass fully convective stars but highly inconsistent for higher mass stars where the surface convection zone can decouple for angular momentum purposes from the radiative interior. The Tayler-Spruit magnetic angular momentum transport mechanism, commonly employed in models of high-mass stars, predicts SB rotation on extremely short timescales of less than 1 Myr and is therefore unlikely to operate in solar-type pre-main-sequence (pre-MS) and MS stars at the predicted rate. Models with core-envelope decoupling can explain the spin-down of 1.0 and 0.8 solar mass slow rotators with characteristic coupling timescales of 55 ± 25 Myr and 175 ± 25 Myr, respectively. The upper envelope of the rotation distribution is more strongly coupled than the lower envelope of the rotation distribution, in accord with theoretical predictions that the angular momentum transport timescale should be shorter for more rapidly rotating stars. Constraints imposed by the solar rotation curve are also discussed. We argue that neither hydrodynamic mechanisms nor our revised and less efficient prescription for the Tayler-Spruit dynamo can reproduce both spin-down and the internal solar rotation profile by themselves. It is likely that a successful model of angular momentum

  4. A STATISTICAL RECONSTRUCTION OF THE PLANET POPULATION AROUND KEPLER SOLAR-TYPE STARS

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Using the cumulative catalog of planets detected by the NASA Kepler mission, we reconstruct the intrinsic occurrence of Earth- to Neptune-size (1-4 R ⊕) planets and their distributions with radius and orbital period. We analyze 76,711 solar-type (0.8 < R */R ☉ < 1.2) stars with 430 planets on 20-200 day orbits, excluding close-in planets that may have been affected by the proximity to the host star. Our analysis considers errors in planet radii and includes an ''iterative simulation'' technique that does not bin the data. We find a radius distribution that peaks at 2-2.8 Earth radii, with lower numbers of smaller and larger planets. These planets are uniformly distributed with logarithmic period, and the mean number of such planets per star is 0.46 ± 0.03. The occurrence is ∼0.66 if planets interior to 20 days are included. We estimate the occurrence of Earth-size planets in the ''habitable zone'' (defined as 1-2 R ⊕, 0.99-1.7 AU for solar-twin stars) as 6.4−1.1+3.4%. Our results largely agree with those of Petigura et al., although we find a higher occurrence of 2.8-4 Earth-radii planets. The reasons for this excess are the inclusion of errors in planet radius, updated Huber et al. stellar parameters, and also the exclusion of planets that may have been affected by proximity to the host star

  5. A STATISTICAL RECONSTRUCTION OF THE PLANET POPULATION AROUND KEPLER SOLAR-TYPE STARS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Silburt, Ari; Wu, Yanqin [Department of Astronomy and Astrophysics, University of Toronto, Toronto, ON M5S 3H4 (Canada); Gaidos, Eric [Department of Geology and Geophysics, University of Hawai' i at Mānoa, Honolulu, HI 96822 (United States)

    2015-02-01

    Using the cumulative catalog of planets detected by the NASA Kepler mission, we reconstruct the intrinsic occurrence of Earth- to Neptune-size (1-4 R {sub ⊕}) planets and their distributions with radius and orbital period. We analyze 76,711 solar-type (0.8 < R {sub *}/R {sub ☉} < 1.2) stars with 430 planets on 20-200 day orbits, excluding close-in planets that may have been affected by the proximity to the host star. Our analysis considers errors in planet radii and includes an ''iterative simulation'' technique that does not bin the data. We find a radius distribution that peaks at 2-2.8 Earth radii, with lower numbers of smaller and larger planets. These planets are uniformly distributed with logarithmic period, and the mean number of such planets per star is 0.46 ± 0.03. The occurrence is ∼0.66 if planets interior to 20 days are included. We estimate the occurrence of Earth-size planets in the ''habitable zone'' (defined as 1-2 R {sub ⊕}, 0.99-1.7 AU for solar-twin stars) as 6.4{sub −1.1}{sup +3.4}%. Our results largely agree with those of Petigura et al., although we find a higher occurrence of 2.8-4 Earth-radii planets. The reasons for this excess are the inclusion of errors in planet radius, updated Huber et al. stellar parameters, and also the exclusion of planets that may have been affected by proximity to the host star.

  6. A UNIFORM ASTEROSEISMIC ANALYSIS OF 22 SOLAR-TYPE STARS OBSERVED BY KEPLER

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mathur, S.; Metcalfe, T. S.; Christensen-Dalsgaard, J.; Dogan, G. [High Altitude Observatory, NCAR, P.O. Box 3000, Boulder, CO 80307 (United States); Woitaszek, M. [Computational and Information Systems Laboratory, NCAR, P.O. Box 3000, Boulder, CO 80307 (United States); Bruntt, H.; Karoff, C.; Campante, T. L. [Department of Physics and Astronomy, Aarhus University, 8000 Aarhus C (Denmark); Verner, G. A.; Chaplin, W. J.; Elsworth, Y. [School of Physics and Astronomy, University of Birmingham, Edgbaston, Birmingham B15 2TT (United Kingdom); Creevey, O. L. [Laboratoire Lagrange, UMR7293, Universite de Nice Sophia-Antipolis, CNRS, Observatoire de la Cote d' Azur, BP 4229, 06304 Nice Cedex 4 (France); Basu, S.; Deheuvels, S. [Department of Astronomy, Yale University, P.O. Box 208101, New Haven, CT 06520-8101 (United States); Stello, D.; Bedding, T. R.; Benomar, O. [Sydney Institute for Astronomy, School of Physics, University of Sydney, NSW 2006 (Australia); Appourchaux, T. [Institut d' Astrophysique Spatiale, UMR8617, Universite Paris XI, Batiment 121, 91405 Orsay Cedex (France); Garcia, R. A. [Laboratoire AIM, CEA/DSM-CNRS-Universite Paris Diderot, 91191 Gif-sur-Yvette Cedex (France); Bonanno, A. [INAF Osservatorio Astrofisico di Catania, Via S. Sofia 78, 95123 Catania (Italy); and others

    2012-04-20

    Asteroseismology with the Kepler space telescope is providing not only an improved characterization of exoplanets and their host stars, but also a new window on stellar structure and evolution for the large sample of solar-type stars in the field. We perform a uniform analysis of 22 of the brightest asteroseismic targets with the highest signal-to-noise ratio observed for 1 month each during the first year of the mission, and we quantify the precision and relative accuracy of asteroseismic determinations of the stellar radius, mass, and age that are possible using various methods. We present the properties of each star in the sample derived from an automated analysis of the individual oscillation frequencies and other observational constraints using the Asteroseismic Modeling Portal (AMP), and we compare them to the results of model-grid-based methods that fit the global oscillation properties. We find that fitting the individual frequencies typically yields asteroseismic radii and masses to {approx}1% precision, and ages to {approx}2.5% precision (respectively, 2, 5, and 8 times better than fitting the global oscillation properties). The absolute level of agreement between the results from different approaches is also encouraging, with model-grid-based methods yielding slightly smaller estimates of the radius and mass and slightly older values for the stellar age relative to AMP, which computes a large number of dedicated models for each star. The sample of targets for which this type of analysis is possible will grow as longer data sets are obtained during the remainder of the mission.

  7. Time-dependent nonextensivity arising from the rotational evolution of solar-type stars

    CERN Document Server

    Silva, Jose R P; Soares, Braulio B; de Freitas, Daniel B

    2013-01-01

    The nonextensive formalism is a generalization of the Boltzmann-Gibbs Statistics. In this formalism the entropic index q is a quantity characterizing the degree of nonextensivity, and is interpreted as a parameter of long-memory or long-range interactions between the components of the system. Since its proposition in 1988, this formalism has been applied to investigate a wide spectrum of natural phenomena. In stellar astrophysics, theoretical distribution function based on nonextensive formalism (q-distributions) has been successfully applied to reproduce the distribution of stellar radial and rotational velocity data. In this paper, we investigate the time variation of the entropic index q obtained from the distribution of rotation, Vsini, for a sample of 254 rotational data for solar-type star from 11 open clusters aged between 35.5Myr and 2.6Gyr. As a result we have found an anti-correlation between the entropic index q and the age of clusters, and that the distribution of rotation Vsini for these stars be...

  8. Photospheric and chromospheric activity on the young solar-type star HD 171488

    CERN Document Server

    Frasca, A; Kovari, Zs; Marilli, E; Cakirli, O

    2010-01-01

    We present the results of contemporaneous spectroscopic and photometric monitoring of the young solar-type star HD171488 (Prot~1.337 d) aimed at studying surface inhomogeneities at photospheric/chromospheric levels. Echelle FOCES spectra (R~40000) and Johnson photometry have been performed in 2006. Spectral type, rotational velocity, metallicity, and gravity were determined using a code developed by us. The metallicity was measured from the analysis of iron lines. The spectral subtraction technique was applied to the most relevant chromospheric diagnostics included in the FOCES spectral range (CaII IRT, Halpha, HeI-D3, Hbeta, CaII H&K). A model with two large high-latitude spots is sufficient to reproduce the B/V light curves and the radial velocity modulation, if a temperature difference between photosphere and spots of 1500 K is used. A Doppler imaging analysis of photospheric lines confirms a similar spot distribution. With the help of an analogous geometric two-spot model, we are able to reproduce the...

  9. Phosphorus-bearing molecules in solar-type star forming regions: First PO detection

    CERN Document Server

    Lefloch, B; Viti, S; Jimenez-Serra, I; Codella, C; Podio, L; Ceccarelli, C; Mendoza, E; Lepine, J R D; Bachiller, R

    2016-01-01

    As part of the Large Program ASAI (Astrochemical Surveys At IRAM), we have used the IRAM 30m telescope to lead a systematic search for the emission of rotational transitions of P-bearing species between 80 and 350 GHz towards L1157-B1, a shock position in the solar-type star forming region L1157. We report the detection of several transitions of PN and, for the first time, of prebiotic molecule PO. None of these species are detected towards the driving protostar of the outflow L1157-mm. Analysis of the line profiles shows that PN arises from the outflow cavity, where SiO, a strong shock tracer, is produced. Radiative transfer analysis yields an abundance of 2.5e-9 and 0.9e-9 for PO and PN, respectively. These results imply a strong depletion (approx 100) of Phosphorus in the quiescent cloud gas. Shock modelling shows that atomic N plays a major role in the chemistry of PO and PN. The relative abundance of PO and PN brings constraints both on the duration of the pre-shock phase, which has to be about 1 Myr, an...

  10. Phosphorus-bearing molecules in solar-type star forming regions: First PO detection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lefloch, Bertrand; Vastel, C.; Viti, S.; Jimenez-Serra, I.; Codella, C.; Podio, L.; Ceccarelli, C.; Mendoza, E.; Lepine, J. R. D.; Bachiller, R.

    2016-08-01

    As part of the Large Program ASAI (Astrochemical Surveys At IRAM), we have used the IRAM 30m telescope to lead a systematic search for the emission of rotational transitions of P-bearing species between 80 and 350 GHz towards L1157-B1, a shock position in the solar-type star forming region L1157. We report the detection of several transitions of PN and, for the first time, of prebiotic molecule PO. None of these species are detected towards the driving protostar of the outflow L1157-mm. Analysis of the line profiles shows that PN arises from the outflow cavity, where SiO, a strong shock tracer, is produced. Radiative transfer analysis yields an abundance of 2.5 × 10-9 and 0.9 × 10-9 for PO and PN, respectively. These results imply a strong depletion (≈100) of Phosphorus in the quiescent cloud gas. Shock modelling shows that atomic N plays a major role in the chemistry of PO and PN. The relative abundance of PO and PN brings constraints both on the duration of the pre-shock phase, which has to be ˜ 106 yr, and on the shock parameters. The maximum temperature in the shock has to be larger than 4000 K, which implies a shock velocity of 40 km s-1.

  11. Planet Occurrence within 0.25 AU of Solar-type Stars from Kepler

    Science.gov (United States)

    Howard, Andrew W.; Marcy, Geoffrey W.; Bryson, Stephen T.; Jenkins, Jon M.; Rowe, Jason F.; Batalha, Natalie M.; Borucki, William J.; Koch, David G.; Dunham, Edward W.; Gautier, Thomas N., III; Van Cleve, Jeffrey; Cochran, William D.; Latham, David W.; Lissauer, Jack J.; Torres, Guillermo; Brown, Timothy M.; Gilliland, Ronald L.; Buchhave, Lars A.; Caldwell, Douglas A.; Christensen-Dalsgaard, Jørgen; Ciardi, David; Fressin, Francois; Haas, Michael R.; Howell, Steve B.; Kjeldsen, Hans; Seager, Sara; Rogers, Leslie; Sasselov, Dimitar D.; Steffen, Jason H.; Basri, Gibor S.; Charbonneau, David; Christiansen, Jessie; Clarke, Bruce; Dupree, Andrea; Fabrycky, Daniel C.; Fischer, Debra A.; Ford, Eric B.; Fortney, Jonathan J.; Tarter, Jill; Girouard, Forrest R.; Holman, Matthew J.; Johnson, John Asher; Klaus, Todd C.; Machalek, Pavel; Moorhead, Althea V.; Morehead, Robert C.; Ragozzine, Darin; Tenenbaum, Peter; Twicken, Joseph D.; Quinn, Samuel N.; Isaacson, Howard; Shporer, Avi; Lucas, Philip W.; Walkowicz, Lucianne M.; Welsh, William F.; Boss, Alan; Devore, Edna; Gould, Alan; Smith, Jeffrey C.; Morris, Robert L.; Prsa, Andrej; Morton, Timothy D.; Still, Martin; Thompson, Susan E.; Mullally, Fergal; Endl, Michael; MacQueen, Phillip J.

    2012-08-01

    We report the distribution of planets as a function of planet radius, orbital period, and stellar effective temperature for orbital periods less than 50 days around solar-type (GK) stars. These results are based on the 1235 planets (formally "planet candidates") from the Kepler mission that include a nearly complete set of detected planets as small as 2 R ⊕. For each of the 156,000 target stars, we assess the detectability of planets as a function of planet radius, R p, and orbital period, P, using a measure of the detection efficiency for each star. We also correct for the geometric probability of transit, R sstarf/a. We consider first Kepler target stars within the "solar subset" having T eff = 4100-6100 K, log g = 4.0-4.9, and Kepler magnitude Kp period plane and increases substantially down to the smallest radius (2 R ⊕) and out to the longest orbital period (50 days, ~0.25 AU) in our study. For P power law, df/dlog R = kRR α with kR = 2.9+0.5 - 0.4, α = -1.92 ± 0.11, and R ≡ R p/R ⊕. This rapid increase in planet occurrence with decreasing planet size agrees with the prediction of core-accretion formation but disagrees with population synthesis models that predict a desert at super-Earth and Neptune sizes for close-in orbits. Planets with orbital periods shorter than 2 days are extremely rare; for R p > 2 R ⊕ we measure an occurrence of less than 0.001 planets per star. For all planets with orbital periods less than 50 days, we measure occurrence of 0.130 ± 0.008, 0.023 ± 0.003, and 0.013 ± 0.002 planets per star for planets with radii 2-4, 4-8, and 8-32 R ⊕, in agreement with Doppler surveys. We fit occurrence as a function of P to a power-law model with an exponential cutoff below a critical period P 0. For smaller planets, P 0 has larger values, suggesting that the "parking distance" for migrating planets moves outward with decreasing planet size. We also measured planet occurrence over a broader stellar T eff range of 3600-7100 K

  12. WASP-50b: a hot Jupiter transiting a moderately active solar-type star

    CERN Document Server

    Gillon, M; Lendl, M; Maxted, P F L; Triaud, A H M J; Anderson, D R; Barros, S C C; Bento, J; Collier-Cameron, A; Enoch, B; Faedi, F; Hellier, C; Jehin, E; Magain, P; Montalban, J; Pepe, F; Pollacco, D; Queloz, D; Smalley, B; Segransan, D; Smith, A M S; Southworth, J; Udry, S; West, R G; Wheatley, P J

    2011-01-01

    We report the discovery by the WASP transit survey of a giant planet in a close orbit (0.0295+-0.0009 AU) around a moderately bright (V=11.6, K=10) G9 dwarf (0.89+-0.08 M_sun, 0.84+-0.03 R_sun) in the Southern constellation Eridanus. Thanks to high-precision follow-up photometry and spectroscopy obtained by the telescopes TRAPPIST and Euler, the mass and size of this planet, WASP-50b, are well constrained to 1.47+-0.09 M_jup and 1.15+-0.05 R_jup, respectively. The transit ephemeris is 2455558.6120 (+-0.0002) + N x 1.955096 (+-0.000005) HJD_UTC. The size of the planet is consistent with basic models of irradiated giant planets. The chromospheric activity (log R'_HK = -4.67) and rotational period (P_rot = 16.3+-0.5 days) of the host star suggest an age of 0.8+-0.4 Gy that is discrepant with a stellar-evolution estimate based on the measured stellar parameters (rho_star = 1.48+-0.10 rho_sun, Teff = 5400+-100 K, [Fe/H]= -0.12+-0.08) which favours an age of 7+-3.5 Gy. This discrepancy could be explained by the tid...

  13. Zeeman-Doppler imaging of active young solar-type stars

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hackman, T.; Lehtinen, J.; Rosén, L.; Kochukhov, O.; Käpylä, M. J.

    2016-03-01

    Context. By studying young magnetically active late-type stars, i.e. analogues to the young Sun, we can draw conclusions on the evolution of the solar dynamo. Aims: We determine the topology of the surface magnetic field and study the relation between the magnetic field and cool photospheric spots in three young late-type stars. Methods: High-resolution spectropolarimetry of the targets was obtained with the HARPSpol instrument mounted at the ESO 3.6 m telescope. The signal-to-noise ratios of the Stokes IV measurements were boosted by combining the signal from a large number of spectroscopic absorption lines through the least squares deconvolution technique. Surface brightness and magnetic field maps were calculated using the Zeeman-Doppler imaging technique. Results: All three targets show clear signs of magnetic fields and cool spots. Only one of the targets, V1358 Ori, shows evidence of the dominance of non-axisymmetric modes. In two of the targets, the poloidal field is significantly stronger than the toroidal one, indicative of an α2-type dynamo, in which convective turbulence effects dominate over the weak differential rotation. In two of the cases there is a slight anti-correlation between the cool spots and the strength of the radial magnetic field. However, even in these cases the correlation is much weaker than in the case of sunspots. Conclusions: The weak correlation between the measured radial magnetic field and cool spots may indicate a more complex magnetic field structure in the spots or spot groups involving mixed magnetic polarities. Comparison with a previously published magnetic field map shows that on one of the stars, HD 29615, the underlying magnetic field changed its polarity between 2009 and 2013. Based on observations made with the HARPSpol instrument on the ESO 3.6 m telescope at La Silla (Chile), under the program ID 091.D-0836.

  14. Variations on Debris Disks III. Collisional Cascades and Giant Impacts in the Terrestrial Zones of Solar-type Stars

    CERN Document Server

    Kenyon, Scott J

    2015-01-01

    We analyze two new sets of coagulation calculations for solid particles orbiting within the terrestrial zone of a solar-type star. In models of collisional cascades, numerical simulations demonstrate that the total mass, the mass in 1 mm and smaller particles, and the dust luminosity decline with time more rapidly than predicted by analytic models, $\\propto t^{-n}$ with $n \\approx$ 1.1-1.2 instead of 1. Size distributions derived from the numerical calculations follow analytic predictions at radii less than 0.1 km but are shallower than predicted at larger sizes. In simulations of planet formation, the dust luminosity declines more slowly than in pure collisional cascades, with $n \\approx$ 0.5-0.8 instead of 1.1-1.2. Throughout this decline, giant impacts produce large, observable spikes in dust luminosity which last roughly 0.01-0.1 Myr and recur every 1-10 Myr. If most solar-type stars have Earth mass planets with $a \\lesssim$ 1-2 AU, observations of debris around 1-100 Myr stars allow interesting tests of ...

  15. Spectroscopic Surface Brightness Fluctuations: Amplifying Bright Stars in Unresolved Stellar Populations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mitzkus, M.; Dreizler, S.; Roth, M. M.

    2015-08-01

    We report on our early-stage efforts to resolve the Surface Brightness Fluctuations (SBFs) in the spectral dimension. Combining the diagnostic power of SBFs with the physical information content of spectra seems a tempting possibility to gain new insights into the bright stars in unresolved stellar populations. The new VLT integral field spectrograph MUSE is the first instrument that enables spectroscopic SBFs observationally.

  16. A Brightness-Referenced Star Identification Algorithm for APS Star Trackers

    OpenAIRE

    Peng Zhang; Qile Zhao; Jingnan Liu; Ning Liu

    2014-01-01

    Star trackers are currently the most accurate spacecraft attitude sensors. As a result, they are widely used in remote sensing satellites. Since traditional charge-coupled device (CCD)-based star trackers have a limited sensitivity range and dynamic range, the matching process for a star tracker is typically not very sensitive to star brightness. For active pixel sensor (APS) star trackers, the intensity of an imaged star is valuable information that can be used in star identification process...

  17. A brightness-referenced star identification algorithm for APS star trackers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Peng; Zhao, Qile; Liu, Jingnan; Liu, Ning

    2014-01-01

    Star trackers are currently the most accurate spacecraft attitude sensors. As a result, they are widely used in remote sensing satellites. Since traditional charge-coupled device (CCD)-based star trackers have a limited sensitivity range and dynamic range, the matching process for a star tracker is typically not very sensitive to star brightness. For active pixel sensor (APS) star trackers, the intensity of an imaged star is valuable information that can be used in star identification process. In this paper an improved brightness referenced star identification algorithm is presented. This algorithm utilizes the k-vector search theory and adds imaged stars' intensities to narrow the search scope and therefore increase the efficiency of the matching process. Based on different imaging conditions (slew, bright bodies, etc.) the developed matching algorithm operates in one of two identification modes: a three-star mode, and a four-star mode. If the reference bright stars (the stars brighter than three magnitude) show up, the algorithm runs the three-star mode and efficiency is further improved. The proposed method was compared with other two distinctive methods the pyramid and geometric voting methods. All three methods were tested with simulation data and actual in orbit data from the APS star tracker of ZY-3. Using a catalog composed of 1500 stars, the results show that without false stars the efficiency of this new method is 4~5 times that of the pyramid method and 35~37 times that of the geometric method. PMID:25299950

  18. A Brightness-Referenced Star Identification Algorithm for APS Star Trackers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Peng Zhang

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available Star trackers are currently the most accurate spacecraft attitude sensors. As a result, they are widely used in remote sensing satellites. Since traditional charge-coupled device (CCD-based star trackers have a limited sensitivity range and dynamic range, the matching process for a star tracker is typically not very sensitive to star brightness. For active pixel sensor (APS star trackers, the intensity of an imaged star is valuable information that can be used in star identification process. In this paper an improved brightness referenced star identification algorithm is presented. This algorithm utilizes the k-vector search theory and adds imaged stars’ intensities to narrow the search scope and therefore increase the efficiency of the matching process. Based on different imaging conditions (slew, bright bodies, etc. the developed matching algorithm operates in one of two identification modes: a three-star mode, and a four-star mode. If the reference bright stars (the stars brighter than three magnitude show up, the algorithm runs the three-star mode and efficiency is further improved. The proposed method was compared with other two distinctive methods the pyramid and geometric voting methods. All three methods were tested with simulation data and actual in orbit data from the APS star tracker of ZY-3. Using a catalog composed of 1500 stars, the results show that without false stars the efficiency of this new method is 4~5 times that of the pyramid method and 35~37 times that of the geometric method.

  19. Age dependence of wind properties for solar type stars: a 3d study

    CERN Document Server

    Réville, Victor; Strugarek, Antoine; Brun, Allan Sacha

    2016-01-01

    Young and rapidly rotating stars are known for intense, dynamo generated magnetic fields. Spectropolarimetric observations of those stars in precisely aged clusters are key input for gyrochronology and magnetochronology. We use ZDI maps of several young K-type stars of similar mass and radius but with various ages and rotational periods, to perform 3D numerical MHD simulations of their coronae and follow the evolution of their magnetic properties with age. Those simulations yield the coronal structure as well as the instant torque exerted by the magnetized, rotating wind on the star. As stars get older, we find that the angular momentum loss decreases with $\\Omega^3$, which is the reason for the convergence on the Skumanich law. For the youngest stars of our sample, the angular momentum loss show signs of saturation around $8\\Omega_{\\odot}$, which is a common value used in spin evolution models for K-type stars. We compare these results to semi-analytical models and existing braking laws. We observe a complex...

  20. Angular Momentum Transport In Solar-Type Stars: Testing the Timescale For Core-Envelope Coupling

    CERN Document Server

    Denissenkov, Pavel A; Terndrup, Donald M; Newsham, Grant

    2009-01-01

    We critically examine the constraints on internal angular momentum transport which can be inferred from the spin down of open cluster stars. The rotation distribution inferred from rotation velocities and periods are consistent for larger and more recent samples, but smaller samples of rotation periods appear biased relative to vsini studies. We therefore focus on whether the rotation period distributions observed in star forming regions can be evolved into the observed ones in the Pleiades, NGC2516, M34, M35, M37, and M50 with plausible assumptions about star-disk coupling and angular momentum loss from magnetized solar-like winds. Solid body models are consistent with the data for low mass fully convective stars but highly inconsistent for higher mass stars where the surface convection zone can decouple for angular momentum purposes from the radiative interior. The Tayler-Spruit magnetic angular momentum transport mechanism, commonly employed in models of high mass stars, predicts solid-body rotation on ext...

  1. Accurate and homogeneous abundance patterns in solar-type stars of the solar neighbourhood: a chemo-chronological analysis

    CERN Document Server

    da Silva, R; Milone, A C; da Silva, L; Ribeiro, L S; Rocha-Pinto, H J

    2012-01-01

    We report the abundances of C, Na, Mg, Si, Ca, Sc, Ti, V, Cr, Mn, Fe, Co, Ni, Cu, Zn, Sr, Y, Zr, Ba, Ce, Nd, and Sm in 25 solar-type stars in the solar neighbourhood, and their correlations with ages, kinematics, and orbital parameters. The spectroscopic analysis, based high resolution and high S/N ratio data, was differential to the Sun and applied to atomic line EWs and to C and C2 spectral synthesis. We performed a statistical study using a tree clustering analysis, searching for groups of stars sharing similar abundance patterns. We derived Teff, log(g), and [Fe/H] with errors of 30 K, 0.13 dex, and 0.05 dex, respectively. The average error in [X/Fe] is 0.06 dex. Ages were derived from theoretical HR diagrams and memberships in kinematical moving groups. We identified four stellar groups: with over-solar abundances ( = +0.26 dex), under-solar abundances ( = -0.24 dex), and intermediate values ( = -0.06 and +0.06 dex) but with distinct chemical patterns. Stars sharing solar metallicity, age, and Galactic o...

  2. Larger Planet Radii Inferred from Stellar "Flicker" Brightness Variations of Bright Planet Host Stars

    CERN Document Server

    Bastien, Fabienne A; Pepper, Joshua

    2014-01-01

    Most extrasolar planets have been detected by their influence on their parent star, typically either gravitationally (the Doppler method) or by the small dip in brightness as the planet blocks a portion of the star (the transit method). Therefore, the accuracy with which we know the masses and radii of extrasolar planets depends directly on how well we know those of the stars, the latter usually determined from the measured stellar surface gravity, logg. Recent work has demonstrated that the short-timescale brightness variations ("flicker") of stars can be used to measure logg to a high accuracy of ~0.1-0.2 dex (Bastien et al. 2013). Here, we use flicker measurements of 289 bright (Kepmag<13) candidate planet-hosting stars with Teff=4500-6650 K to re-assess the stellar parameters and determine the resulting impact on derived planet properties. This re-assessment reveals that for the brightest planet-host stars, an astrophysical bias exists that contaminates the stellar sample with evolved stars: nearly 50%...

  3. On the metallicity dependance of the [Y/Mg] - age relation for solar type stars

    CERN Document Server

    Feltzing, S; McMillan, P J; Stonkute, E

    2016-01-01

    Several recent studies of Solar twins in the Solar neighbourhood have shown a tight correlation between various elemental abundances and age, in particular [Y/Mg]. If this relation is real and valid for other types of stars as well as elsewhere in the Galaxy it would provide a very powerful tool to derive ages of stars without the need to resort to determining their masses (evolutionary stage) very precisely. The method would also likely work if the stellar parameters have relatively large errors. The studies presented in the recent literature span a narrow range of [Fe/H]. By studying a larger sample of Solar neighbourhood dwarfs with a much larger range in [Fe/H], we find that the relation between [Y/Mg] and age depends on the [Fe/H] of the stars. Hence, it appears that the [Y/Mg] - age relation is unique to Solar analogues.

  4. Ensemble Asteroseismology of Solar-Type Stars with the NASA Kepler Mission

    CERN Document Server

    Chaplin, W J; Christensen-Dalsgaard, J; Basu, S; Miglio, A; Appourchaux, T; Bedding, T R; Elsworth, Y; García, R A; Gilliland, R L; Girardi, L; Houdek, G; Karoff, C; Kawaler, S D; Metcalfe, T S; Molenda-Zakowicz, J; Monteiro, M J P F G; Thompson, M J; Verner, G A; Ballot, J; Bonanno, A; Brandao, I M; Broomhall, A -M; Bruntt, H; Campante, T L; Corsaro, E; Creevey, O L; Dogan, G; Esch, L; Gai, N; Gaulme, P; Hale, S J; Handberg, R; Hekker, S; Huber, D; Jiménez, A; Mathur, S; Mazumdar, A; Mosser, B; New, R; Pinsonneault, M H; Pricopi, D; Quirion, P -O; Régulo, C; Salabert, D; Serenelli, A M; Aguirre, V Silva; Sousa, S G; Stello, D; Stevens, I R; Suran, M D; Uytterhoeven, K; White, T R; Borucki, W J; Brown, T M; Jenkins, J M; Kinemuchi, K; Van Cleve, J; Klaus, T C; 10.1126/science.1201827

    2011-01-01

    In addition to its search for extra-solar planets, the NASA Kepler Mission provides exquisite data on stellar oscillations. We report the detections of oscillations in 500 solartype stars in the Kepler field of view, an ensemble that is large enough to allow statistical studies of intrinsic stellar properties (such as mass, radius and age) and to test theories of stellar evolution. We find that the distribution of observed masses of these stars shows intriguing differences to predictions from models of synthetic stellar populations in the Galaxy.

  5. Asteroseismology of solar-type stars with Kepler: III. Ground-based data

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Karoff, Christoffer; Molenda-Żakowicz , J.

    2010-01-01

    We report on the ground-based follow-up program of spectroscopic and photometric observations of solar-like asteroseismic targets for the Kepler space mission. These stars constitute a large group of more than a thousand objects which are the subject of an intensive study by the Kepler Asteroseis......We report on the ground-based follow-up program of spectroscopic and photometric observations of solar-like asteroseismic targets for the Kepler space mission. These stars constitute a large group of more than a thousand objects which are the subject of an intensive study by the Kepler...

  6. Radius determination of solar-type stars using asteroseismology: What to expect from the Kepler mission

    CERN Document Server

    Stello, D; Bruntt, H; Creevey, O L; García-Hernández, A; Monteiro, M J P F G; Moya, A; Quirion, P -O; Sousa, S G; Suárez, J -C; Appourchaux, T; Arentoft, T; Ballot, J; Bedding, T R; Christensen-Dalsgaard, J; Elsworth, Y; Fletcher, S T; García, R A; Houdek, Günter; Jiménez-Reyes, S J; Kjeldsen, H; New, R; Régulo, C; Salabert, D; Toutain, T

    2009-01-01

    For distant stars, as observed by the NASA Kepler satellite, parallax information is currently of fairly low quality and is not complete. This limits the precision with which the absolute sizes of the stars and their potential transiting planets can be determined by traditional methods. Asteroseismology will be used to aid the radius determination of stars observed during NASA's Kepler mission. We report on the recent asteroFLAG hare-and-hounds Exercise#2, where a group of `hares' simulated data of F-K main-sequence stars that a group of `hounds' sought to analyze, aimed at determining the stellar radii. Based on the asteroseismic large frequency spacing, obtained from simulations of 4-year time series data from the Kepler mission, we demonstrate that the stellar radii can be correctly and precisely determined, when combined with traditional stellar parameters from the Kepler Input Catalogue. The radii found by the various methods used by each independent hound generally agree with the true values of the arti...

  7. BRITE-Constellation: Nanosatellites for precision photometry of bright stars

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weiss, W. W.; Moffat, A. F. J.; Schwarzenberg-Czerny, A.; Koudelka, O. F.; Grant, C. C.; Zee, R. E.; Kuschnig, R.; Mochnacki, St.; Rucinski, S. M.; Matthews, J. M.; Orleański, P.; Pamyatnykh, A. A.; Pigulski, A.; Alves, J.; Guedel, M.; Handler, G.; Wade, G. A.; Scholtz, A. L.; Scholtz

    2014-02-01

    BRITE-Constellation (where BRITE stands for BRIght Target Explorer) is an international nanosatellite mission to monitor photometrically, in two colours, brightness and temperature variations of stars brighter than V ~ 4, with precision and time coverage not possible from the ground. The current mission design consists of three pairs of 7 kg nanosats (hence ``Constellation'') from Austria, Canada and Poland carrying optical telescopes (3 cm aperture) and CCDs. One instrument in each pair is equipped with a blue filter; the other, a red filter. The first two nanosats (funded by Austria) are UniBRITE, designed and built by UTIAS-SFL (University of Toronto Institute for Aerospace Studies-Space Flight Laboratory) and its twin, BRITE-Austria, built by the Technical University Graz (TUG) with support of UTIAS-SFL. They were launched on 25 February 2013 by the Indian Space Agency, under contract to the Canadian Space Agency. Each BRITE instrument has a wide field of view (~ 24 degrees), so up to 15 bright stars can be observed simultaneously in 32 × 32 sub-rasters. Photometry (with reduced precision but thorough time sampling) of additional fainter targets will be possible through on-board data processing. A critical technical element of the BRITE mission is the three-axis attitude control system to stabilize a nanosat with very low inertia. The pointing stability is better than 1.5 arcminutes rms, a significant advance by UTIAS-SFL over any previous nanosatellite. BRITE-Constellation will primarily measure p- and g-mode pulsations to probe the interiors and ages of stars through asteroseismology. The BRITE sample of many of the brightest stars in the night sky is dominated by the most intrinsically luminous stars: massive stars seen at all evolutionary stages, and evolved medium-mass stars at the very end of their nuclear burning phases (cool giants and AGB stars). The Hertzsprung-Russell diagram for stars brighter than mag V=4 from which the BRITE-Constellation sample

  8. Discovery of peculiar periodic spectral modulations in a small fraction of solar type stars

    CERN Document Server

    Borra, E F

    2016-01-01

    A Fourier transform analysis of 2.5 million spectra in the Sloan Digital Sky Survey was carried out to detect periodic spectral modulations. Signals having the same period were found in only 234 stars overwhelmingly in the F2 to K1 spectral range. The signals cannot be caused by instrumental or data analysis effects because they are present in only a very small fraction of stars within a narrow spectral range and because signal to noise ratio considerations predict that the signal should mostly be detected in the brightest objects, while this is not the case. We consider several possibilities, such as rotational transitions in molecules, rapid pulsations, Fourier transform of spectral lines and signals generated by Extraterrestrial Intelligence (ETI). They cannot be generated by molecules or rapid pulsations. It is highly unlikely that they come from the Fourier transform of spectral lines because too many strong lines located at nearly periodic frequencies are needed. Finally we consider the possibility, pre...

  9. Discovery of Peculiar Periodic Spectral Modulations in a Small Fraction of Solar-type Stars

    Science.gov (United States)

    Borra, Ermanno F.; Trottier, Eric

    2016-11-01

    A Fourier transform analysis of 2.5 million spectra in the Sloan Digital Sky Survey was carried out to detect periodic spectral modulations. Signals having the same period were found in only 234 stars overwhelmingly in the F2 to K1 spectral range. The signals cannot be caused by instrumental or data analysis effects because they are present in only a very small fraction of stars within a narrow spectral range and because signal-to-noise ratio considerations predict that the signal should mostly be detected in the brightest objects, while this is not the case. We consider several possibilities, such as rotational transitions in molecules, rapid pulsations, Fourier transform of spectral lines, and signals generated by extraterrestrial intelligence (ETI). They cannot be generated by molecules or rapid pulsations. It is highly unlikely that they come from the Fourier transform of spectral lines because too many strong lines located at nearly periodic frequencies are needed. Finally, we consider the possibility, predicted in a previous published paper, that the signals are caused by light pulses generated by ETI to makes us aware of their existence. We find that the detected signals have exactly the shape of an ETI signal predicted in the previous publication and are therefore in agreement with this hypothesis. The fact that they are only found in a very small fraction of stars within a narrow spectral range centered near the spectral type of the Sun is also in agreement with the ETI hypothesis. However, at this stage, this hypothesis needs to be confirmed with further work. Although unlikely, there is also a possibility that the signals are due to highly peculiar chemical compositions in a small fraction of galactic halo stars.

  10. Revealing a universal planet-metallicity correlation for planets of different solar-type stars

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wang, Ji; Fischer, Debra A., E-mail: ji.wang@yale.edu [Department of Astronomy, Yale University, New Haven, CT 06511 (United States)

    2015-01-01

    The metallicity of exoplanet systems serves as a critical diagnostic of planet formation mechanisms. Previous studies have demonstrated the planet–metallicity correlation for large planets (R{sub P} ⩾ 4 R{sub E}); however, a correlation has not been found for smaller planets. With a sample of 406 Kepler objects of interest whose stellar properties are determined spectroscopically, we reveal a universal planet–metallicity correlation: not only gas-giant planets (3.9 R{sub E} stars. The planet occurrence rates of gas-giant planets, gas-dwarf planets, and terrestrial planets are 9.30{sub −3.04}{sup +5.62}, 2.03{sub −0.26}{sup +0.29}, and 1.72{sub −0.17}{sup +0.19} times higher for metal-rich stars than for metal-poor stars, respectively.

  11. Angular Momentum Evolution of Solar-type Stars and Implications for Gyrochronology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Terndrup, Donald M.; Somers, Garrett; Tayar, Jamie; Pinsonneault, Marc H.

    2016-01-01

    A detailed understanding of the assembly history and rate of chemical enrichment in the Milky Way requires accurate ages for vast numbers of stars. Standard age-dating techniques have significant degeneracies and other limitations, and in any case are mostly limited to the tiny minority of stars in bound clusters.Data from the Kepler and K2 surveys, along with ground-based studies, show that stellar rotation rates could potentially be exploited to determine ages of field stars since rotation declines with age; this method is called gyrochronology. Several groups have advocated a purely empirical gyrochronology, essentially fitting simple mathematical expressions to rotation/age data, but here we argue that the power of rotation studies lies in their use for calibrating (or rejecting) proposed physical mechanisms for internal angular momentum transport and angular momentum loss through magnetized winds.We will review the available data and discuss several important selection biases, and will present the results of a detailed Bayesian modeling exercise to show how well a gyrochronology might work in the most favorable cases. We will also discuss whether evidence for saturation of wind loss or of internal angular momentum transfer is properly justified in a statistical sense.

  12. Star Formation Rates in Low Surface Brightness Galaxies

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Pickering, T. E.; Impey, C. D.; van Gorkom, J.; Bothun, G. D.

    1994-01-01

    The low surface brightness (LSB) disk galaxies found in recent surveys (e.g.,\\ Schombert et al. 1992, AJ, 103, 1107) tend to be blue and gas rich. These properties along with their low mean surface luminosity and H i densities imply an inefficient mode of star formation. The Hα images that we presen

  13. The star-bright hour : [poems] / Betti Alver

    Index Scriptorium Estoniae

    Alver, Betti, 1906-1989

    2003-01-01

    Autori lühitutvustus lk. 231. Sisu: The star-bright hour ; The debt ; Not a dream ; Fog-bound ; Corals in an Ancient river ; Frou-frou 1-3. Orig.: Tähetund ; Vilepuhuja ; Võlg ; "Mitte viirastus, meelepett..." ; Udus ; Korallid Emajões ; Froufrou 1-3

  14. The star-bright hour : [luuletused] / Betti Alver

    Index Scriptorium Estoniae

    Alver, Betti, 1906-1989

    2006-01-01

    Sisu: The star-bright hour ; Not a dream ; The Piper ; Corals in an ancent river. Luuletused pärinevad kogumikust "Tuulelaeval valgusest on aerud = Windship with Oars of Light. (Tallinn : Huma, 2001). Orig.: Tähetund ; Mitte viirastus, meelepett ; Vilepuhuja ; Korallid Emajões

  15. A new procedure for defining a homogenous line-list for solar-type stars

    CERN Document Server

    Sousa, S G; Adibekyan, V; Delgado-Mena, E; Tabernero, H M; Hernández, J I González; Montes, D; Smiljanic, R; Korn, A J; Bergemann, M; Soubiran, C; Mikolatis, S

    2013-01-01

    Context. The homogenization of the stellar parameters is an important goal for large observational spectroscopic surveys, but it is very difficult to achieve it because of the diversity of the spectroscopic analysis methods used within a survey, such as spectrum synthesis and the equivalent width method. To solve this problem, constraints to the spectroscopic analysis can be set, such as the use of a common line-list. Aims. We present a procedure for selecting the best spectral lines from a given input line-list, which then allows us to derive accurate stellar parameters with the equivalent width method. Methods. To select the lines, we used four very well known benchmark stars, for which we have high-quality spectra. From an initial line-list, the equivalent width of each individual line was automatically measured for each benchmark star using ARES, then we performed a local thermodynamic equilibrium analysis with MOOG to compute individual abundances. The results allowed us to choose the best lines which gi...

  16. Planet Occurrence within 0.25 AU of Solar-type Stars from Kepler

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Howard, A.W.; Geoffrey, G.W.; Bryson, S.T.;

    2012-01-01

    radius (2 R ⊕) and out to the longest orbital period (50 days, ~0.25 AU) in our study. For P power law, df/dlog R = kRR α with kR = 2.9+0.5 – 0.4, α = –1.92 ± 0.11, and R ≡ R p/R ⊕. This rapid increase in planet occurrence with decreasing planet...... to a power-law model with an exponential cutoff below a critical period P 0. For smaller planets, P 0 has larger values, suggesting that the "parking distance" for migrating planets moves outward with decreasing planet size. We also measured planet occurrence over a broader stellar T eff range of 3600-7100 K...... than 0.001 planets per star. For all planets with orbital periods less than 50 days, we measure occurrence of 0.130 ± 0.008, 0.023 ± 0.003, and 0.013 ± 0.002 planets per star for planets with radii 2-4, 4-8, and 8-32 R ⊕, in agreement with Doppler surveys. We fit occurrence as a function of P...

  17. The Stability of F-star Brightness on Century Timescales

    CERN Document Server

    Lund, Michael B; Stassun, Keivan G; Hippke, Michael; Angerhausen, Daniel

    2016-01-01

    The century-long photometric record of the DASCH project provides a unique window into the variability of stars normally considered to be photometrically inactive. In this paper, we look for long-term trends in the brightness of F stars, with particular attention to KIC 8462852,an F3 main sequence star that has been identified as significant short-term variability according to Kepler observations. Although a simple search for variability suggests long-term dimming of a number of F stars, we find that such trends are artifacts of the 'Menzel Gap' in the DASCH data. That includes the behavior of KIC 8462852, which we believe is consistent with constant flux over the full duration of observations. We do, however, present a selection of F stars thatdo have significant photometric trends, even after systematics are taken into account.

  18. An icy Kuiper-Belt around the young solar-type star HD 181327

    CERN Document Server

    Lebreton, J; Thi, W -F; Roberge, A; Donaldson, J; Schneider, G; Maddison, S T; Ménard, F; Riviere-Marichalar, P; Mathews, G S; Kamp, I; Pinte, C; Dent, W R F; Barrado, D; Duchêne, G; Gonzalez, J -F; Grady, C A; Meeus, G; Pantin, E; Williams, J P; Woitke, P

    2011-01-01

    HD 181327 is a young F5/F6V star belonging to the Beta Pictoris moving group (12 Myr). It harbors an optically thin belt of circumstellar material at 90 AU. We aim to study the dust properties in the belt in details, and to constrain the gas-to-dust ratio. We obtained far-IR observations with the Herschel/PACS instrument, and 3.2 mm observations with the ATCA array. The geometry of the belt is constrained with newly reduced HST/NICMOS images that break the degeneracy between the disk geometry and the dust properties. We use the radiative transfer code GRaTer to compute a large grid of models, and we identify the grain models that best reproduce the Spectral Energy Distribution through a Bayesian analysis. We attempt to detect the [OI] and [CII] lines with PACS spectroscopy, providing observables to our photochemical code ProDiMo. The HST observations confirm that the dust is confined in a narrow belt. The continuum is detected in the far-IR with PACS and the disk is resolved with both PACS and ATCA. A medium ...

  19. Triggered Star Formation in the Orion Bright-Rimmed Clouds

    CERN Document Server

    Lee, H T; Zhang, Z W; Hu, J Y; Lee, Hsu-Tai; Zhang, Zhi-Wei; Hu, Jing-Yao

    2005-01-01

    We have developed an empirical and effective set of criteria, based on the 2MASS colors, to select candidate classical T Tauri stars (CTTS). This provides a useful tool to study the young stellar population in star-forming regions. Here we present our analysis of the bright-rimmed clouds (BRCs) B 35, B 30, IC 2118, LDN 1616, LDN 1634, and Orion East to show how massive stars interact with molecular clouds to trigger star formation. Our results support the radiation-driven implosion model in which the ionization fronts from OB stars compress a nearby cloud until the local density exceeds the critical value, thereby inducing the cloud to collapse to form stars. We find that only BRCs associated with strong IRAS 100 micron emission (tracer of high density) and H-alpha emission (tracer of ionization fronts) show signs of ongoing star formation. Relevant timescales, including the ages of O stars, expanding HII regions, and the ages of CTTS, are consistent with sequential star formation. We also find that CTTS are ...

  20. BRITE-Constellation: nanosatellites for precision photometry of bright stars

    CERN Document Server

    Weiss, W W; Moffat, A F J; Schwarzenberg-Czerny, A; Koudelka, O F; Grant, C C; Zee, R E; Kuschnig, R; Mochnacki, St; Matthews, J M; Orleanski, P; Pamyatnykh, A; Pigulski, A; Alves, J; Guedel, M; Handler, G; Wade, G A; Zwintz, K; CCD,

    2014-01-01

    BRITE-Constellation (where BRITE stands for BRIght Target Explorer) is an international nanosatellite mission to monitor photometrically, in two colours, the brightness and temperature variations of stars generally brighter than mag(V) ~ 4, with precision and time coverage not possible from the ground. The current mission design consists of six nanosats (hence Constellation): two from Austria, two from Canada, and two from Poland. Each 7 kg nanosat carries an optical telescope of aperture 3 cm feeding an uncooled CCD. One instrument in each pair is equipped with a blue filter, the other with a red filter. Each BRITE instrument has a wide field of view (~24 degrees), so up to about 15 bright stars can be observed simultaneously, sampled in 32 pixel x 32 pixel sub-rasters. Photometry of additional fainter targets, with reduced precision but thorough time sampling, will be possible through onboard data processing. The BRITE sample is dominated by the most intrinsically luminous stars: massive stars seen at all e...

  1. An Icy Kuiper Belt Around the Young Solar-type Star HD 181327

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lebreton, J.; Augereau, J.-C.; Thi, W.-F.; Roberge, A.; Donaldson, J; Schneider, G.; Maddison, S. T.; Menard, F.; Riviere-Marichalar, P.; Matthews, G. S.; Kamp, I.; Pinte, C.; Dent, W. R. F.; Barrado, D.; Duchene, G.; Gonzalez, J.-F.; Grady C. A.; Meeus,G.; Pantin, E.; Williams, J. P.; Woitke, P.

    2012-01-01

    Context. HD 181327 is a young main sequence F5/F6 V star belonging to the Beta Pictoris moving group (age approx.. 12 Myr). It harbors an optically thin belt of circumstellar material at radius approx.. 90 AU, presumed to result from collisions in a population of unseen planetesimals. Aims. We aim to study the dust properties in the belt in details, and to constrain the gas-to-dust ratio. Methods. We obtained far-infrared photometric observations of HD 181327 with the PACS instrument onboard the Herschel Space Observatory, complemented by new 3.2 mm observations carried with the ATCA array. The geometry of the belt is constrained with newly reduced HST/NICMOS scattered light images that allow the degeneracy between the disk geometry and the dust properties to be broken. We then use the radiative transfer code GRaTeR to compute a large grid of models, and we identify the grain models that best reproduce the spectral energy distribution (SED) through a Bayesian analysis. We attempt to detect the oxygen and ionized carbon fine-structure lines with Herschel/PACS spectroscopy, providing observables to our photochemical code ProDiMo. Results. The HST observations confirm that the dust is confined in a narrow belt. The continuum is detected with Herschel/PACS completing nicely the SED in the far-infrared. The disk is marginally resolved with both PACS and ATCA. A medium integration of the gas spectral lines only provides upper limits on the [OI] and [CII] line fluxes.We show that the HD 181327 dust disk consists of micron-sized grains of porous amorphous silicates and carbonaceous material surrounded by an important layer of ice, for a total dust mass of approx.. 0.05 Solar Mass (in grains up to 1 mm). We discuss evidences that the grains consists of fluffy aggregates. The upper limits on the gas atomic lines do not provide unambiguous constraints: only if the PAH abundance is high, the gas mass must be lower than approx. 17 Solar Mass. Conclusions. Despite the weak

  2. An Icy Kuiper-Belt Around the Young Solar-Type Star HD 181327

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lebreton, J.; Augereau, J.-C.; Thi, W.-F.; Roberge, A.; Donaldson, J.; Schneider, G.; Maddison, S. T.; Menard, F.; Riviere-Marichalar, P.; Mathews, G. S.; Kamp, I.; Pinte, C.; Dent, W. R. F.; Barrado, D.; Duchene, G.; Gonzalez, J.-F.; Grady, C. A.; Meeus, G.; Pantin, E.; Williams, J. P.; Woitke, P.

    2011-01-01

    HD 181327 is a young Main Sequence F5/F6 V star belonging to the Beta Pictoris moving group (age approx 12 Myr). It harbors an optically thin belt of circumstellar material at approx90 AU, presumed to result from collisions in a populat.ion of unseen planetesimals. Aims. We aim to study the dust properties in the belt in great details, and to constrain the gas-to-dust ratio. Methods. We obtained far-IR photometric observations of HD 181327 with the PACS instrument onboard the Herschel Space Observatory, complemented by new 3.2 nun observations carried with the ATCA array. The geometry of the belt is constrained with newly reduced HST /NICMOS scattered light images that break the degeneracy between the disk geometry and the dust properties. We then use the radiative transfer code GRaTer to compute a large grid of dust models, and we apply a Bayesian inference method to identify the grain models that best reproduce the SED. We attempt to detect the oxygen and ionized carbon fine-structure lines with Herschel/PACS spectroscopy, providing observables to our photochemical code ProDiMo. Results. The HST observations confirm that the dust is confined in a narrow belt. The continuum is detected with Herschel/PACS completing nicely the SED in the far-infrared. The disk is marginally resolved with both PACS and ATCA. A medium integration of the gas spectral lines only provides upper limits on the [OI] and [CII] line fluxes. We show that the HD 181327 dust disk consists of micron-sized grains of porous amorphous silicates and carbonaceous material surrounded by an import.ant layer of ice for a total dust mass of approx 0.05 stellar Mass. We discuss evidences that the grains consists of fluffy aggregates. The upper limits on the gas atomic lines do not provide unambiguous constraints: only if the PAH abundance is high, the gas mass must be lower than approx 17 Stellar Mass Conclusions. Despite the weak constraints on the gas disk, the age of HD 181327 and the properties of the

  3. CCD Photometry of bright stars using objective wire mesh

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Obtaining accurate photometry of bright stars from the ground remains problematic due to the danger of overexposing the target and/or the lack of suitable nearby comparison stars. The century-old method of using objective wire mesh to produce multiple stellar images seems promising for the precise CCD photometry of such stars. Furthermore, our tests on β Cep and its comparison star, differing by 5 mag, are very encouraging. Using a CCD camera and a 20 cm telescope with the objective covered by a plastic wire mesh, in poor weather conditions, we obtained differential photometry with a precision of 4.5 mmag per two minute exposure. Our technique is flexible and may be tuned to cover a range as big as 6-8 mag. We discuss the possibility of installing a wire mesh directly in the filter wheel.

  4. An Observational Study of Tidal Synchronization in Solar-Type Binary Stars in the Open Clusters M35 and M34

    OpenAIRE

    Meibom, Soren; Mathieu, Robert D.; Stassun, Keivan G.

    2006-01-01

    We present rotation periods for the solar-type primary stars in 13 close (a~< 5 AU) single-lined spectroscopic binaries with known orbital periods (P) and eccentricities (e). All binaries are members of the open clusters M35 (150Myr) and M34 (250Myr). The binary orbital parameters and the rotation periods of the primary stars were determined from time-series spectroscopy and time-series photometry, respectively. Knowledge of the ages, orbital periods, and eccentricities of these binaries comb...

  5. An Observational Study of Tidal Synchronization in Solar-Type Binary Stars in the Open Clusters M35 and M34

    CERN Document Server

    Meibom, S; Stassun, K G; Meibom, Soren; Mathieu, Robert D.; Stassun, Keivan G.

    2006-01-01

    We present rotation periods for the solar-type primary stars in 13 close (a \\~0) with the orbital motion. Of the six closest binaries two with circular orbits are not synchronized, one being subsynchronous and one being supersynchronous, and the primary stars in two binaries with eccentric orbits are rotating more slowly than pseudosynchronism. The remaining two binaries have reached the equilibrium state of both a circularized orbit and synchronized rotation. As a set, the six binaries present a challenging case study for tidal evolution theory, which in particular does not predict subsynchronous rotation in such close systems.

  6. EPIC210957318b and EPIC212110888b: two inflated hot-Jupiters around Solar-type stars

    CERN Document Server

    Lillo-Box, J; Santerne, A; Barros, S C C; Barrado, D; Hébrard, G; Osborn, H P; Armstrong, D J; Almenara, J -M; Boisse, I; Bouchy, F; Brown, D J A; Courcol, B; Deleuil, M; Mena, E Delgado; Díaz, R F; Kirk, J; Lam, K W F; McCormac, J; Pollacco, D; Rajpurohit, A; Rey, J; Santos, N C; Sousa, S G; Tsantaki, M; Wilson, P A

    2016-01-01

    We report the discovery of the two hot-Jupiters EPIC210957318b and EPIC212110888b (hereafter EPIC-318b and EPIC-888b, respectively). The two planets were detected transiting their main-sequence star with periods $\\sim$ 4.099 and $\\sim$ 2.996 days, in campaigns 4 and 5 of the extension of the Kepler mission, K2. Subsequent ground-based radial velocity follow-up with SOPHIE, HARPS-N and CAFE, established the planetary nature of the transiting objects. We analyzed the transit signal, radial velocity and spectral energy distributions of the two systems to characterize their properties. Both planets (EPIC-318b and EPIC-888b) are bloated hot-Jupiters (1.25 $R_{\\rm Jup}$ and 1.33 $R_{\\rm Jup}$) around relatively bright (V =13.5 and V=11.5), slow rotating main-sequence (G8 and F9) stars. Thus, these systems are good candidates for detecting the Rossiter-MacLaughlin effect to measure their obliquity and for atmospheric studies.

  7. K2-30 b and K2-34 b: Two inflated hot Jupiters around solar-type stars

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lillo-Box, J.; Demangeon, O.; Santerne, A.; Barros, S. C. C.; Barrado, D.; Hébrard, G.; Osborn, H. P.; Armstrong, D. J.; Almenara, J.-M.; Boisse, I.; Bouchy, F.; Brown, D. J. A.; Courcol, B.; Deleuil, M.; Delgado Mena, E.; Díaz, R. F.; Kirk, J.; Lam, K. W. F.; McCormac, J.; Pollacco, D.; Rajpurohit, A.; Rey, J.; Santos, N. C.; Sousa, S. G.; Tsantaki, M.; Wilson, P. A.

    2016-10-01

    We report the discovery of the two hot Jupiters K2-30 b and K2-34 b. The two planets were detected during campaigns 4 and 5 of the extension of the Kepler mission, K2; they transit their main-sequence stars with periods of ~4.099 and ~2.996 days. Subsequent ground-based radial velocity follow-up with SOPHIE, HARPS-N, and CAFE established the planetary nature of the transiting objects. We analyzed the transit signal, radial velocity, and spectral energy distributions of the two systems to characterize their properties. Both planets (K2-30 b and K2-34 b) are bloated hot Jupiters (1.20 RJup and 1.22 RJup) around relatively bright (V = 13.5 and V = 11.5) slow rotating main-sequence (G8 and F9) stars. Thus, these systems are good candidates for detecting the Rossiter-MacLaughlin effect in order to measure their obliquity and for atmospheric studies. Full Tables 1 and 2 are only available at the CDS via anonymous ftp to http://cdsarc.u-strasbg.fr (http://130.79.128.5) or via http://cdsarc.u-strasbg.fr/viz-bin/qcat?J/A+A/594/A50

  8. BRITE-Constellation: Nanosatellites for Precision Photometry of Bright Stars

    CERN Document Server

    Weiss, W W; Schwarzenberg-Czerny, A; Koudelka, O F; Grant, C C; Zee, R E; Kuschnig, R; Mochnacki, St; Rucinski, S M; Matthews, J M; Orleanski, P; Pamyatnykh, A; Pigulski, A; Alves, J; Guedel, M; Handler, G; Wade, G A; Scholtz, A L

    2013-01-01

    BRITE-Constellation (where BRITE stands for BRIght Target Explorer) is an international nanosatellite mission to monitor photometrically, in two colours, brightness and temperature variations of stars brighter than V = 4. The current mission design consists of three pairs of 7 kg nanosats from Austria, Canada and Poland carrying optical telescopes and CCDs. One instrument in each pair is equipped with a blue filter; the other, a red filter. The first two nanosats are UNIBRITE, designed and built by University of Toronto Institute for Aerospace Studies - Space Flight Laboratory and its twin, BRITE-Austria, built by the Technical University Graz with support of UTIAS-SFL. They were launched on 25 February 2013 by the Indian Space Agency under contract to the Canadian Space Agency into a low-Earth dusk-dawn polar orbit.

  9. Bright Transients from Black Hole - Neutron Star Mergers

    CERN Document Server

    D'Orazio, Daniel J; Murray, Norman W; Price, Larry

    2016-01-01

    Direct detection of black hole-neutron star (BHNS) pairs is anticipated with the advent of aLIGO. Electromagnetic counterparts may be crucial for a confident gravitational-wave detection as well as for extraction of astronomical information. Yet BHNS star pairs are notoriously dark and so inaccessible to telescopes. Contrary to this expectation, a bright electromagnetic transient can occur in the final moments before merger as long as the neutron star is highly magnetized. The orbital motion of the neutron star magnet creates a Faraday flux and corresponding power available for luminosity. A spectrum of curvature radiation ramps up until the rapid injection of energy ignites a fireball, which would appear as an energetic blackbody peaking in the X-ray to gamma-rays for neutron star field strengths ranging from $10^{12}$G to $10^{16}$G respectively and a $10M_{\\odot}$ black hole. The fireball event may last from a few milliseconds to a few seconds depending on the NS magnetic field strength, and may be observa...

  10. Improving sodium laser guide star brightness by polarization switching

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fan, Tingwei; Zhou, Tianhua; Feng, Yan

    2016-01-01

    Optical pumping with circularly polarized light has been used to enhance the brightness of sodium laser guide star. But the benefit is reduced substantially due to the precession of sodium atoms in geomagnetic field. Switching the laser between left and right circular polarization at the Larmor frequency is proposed to improve the return. With ESO’s laser guide star system at Paranal as example, numerical simulation shows that the return flux is increased when the angle between geomagnetic field and laser beam is larger than 60°, as much as 50% at 90°. The proposal is significant since most astronomical observation is at angle between 60° and 90° and it only requires a minor addition to the delivery optics of present laser system. PMID:26797503

  11. How bright planets became dim stars: planetary speculations in John Herschel's double star astronomy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Case, Stephen

    2014-03-01

    Previous research on the origins of double star astronomy in the early nineteenth century emphasized the role mathematical methods and instrumentation played in motivating early observations of these objects. The work of the British astronomer John Herschel, however, shows that questions regarding the physical nature of double stars were also important. In particular, an analysis of John Herschel's early work on double stars illustrates the way in which speculations regarding these objects were shaped by assumptions of the properties of stars themselves. For Herschel, a major consideration in double star astronomy was distinguishing between types of double stars. Optical doubles were useful in determining parallax while binary doubles were not. In practice, classification of a specific double star pair into one of these categories was based on the assumption that stars were of approximately the same luminosity and thus differences in relative brightness between stars were caused by difference in distances. Such assumptions, though ultimately abandoned, would lead Herschel in the 1830s to advance the possibility that the dim companion stars in certain double star pairs were not stars at all but in fact planets.

  12. LARGER PLANET RADII INFERRED FROM STELLAR ''FLICKER'' BRIGHTNESS VARIATIONS OF BRIGHT PLANET-HOST STARS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bastien, Fabienne A.; Stassun, Keivan G.; Pepper, Joshua [Physics and Astronomy Department, Vanderbilt University, 1807 Station B, Nashville, TN 37235 (United States)

    2014-06-10

    Most extrasolar planets have been detected by their influence on their parent star, typically either gravitationally (the Doppler method) or by the small dip in brightness as the planet blocks a portion of the star (the transit method). Therefore, the accuracy with which we know the masses and radii of extrasolar planets depends directly on how well we know those of the stars, the latter usually determined from the measured stellar surface gravity, log g. Recent work has demonstrated that the short-timescale brightness variations ({sup f}licker{sup )} of stars can be used to measure log g to a high accuracy of ∼0.1-0.2 dex. Here, we use flicker measurements of 289 bright (Kepmag < 13) candidate planet-hosting stars with T {sub eff} = 4500-6650 K to re-assess the stellar parameters and determine the resulting impact on derived planet properties. This re-assessment reveals that for the brightest planet-host stars, Malmquist bias contaminates the stellar sample with evolved stars: nearly 50% of the bright planet-host stars are subgiants. As a result, the stellar radii, and hence the radii of the planets orbiting these stars, are on average 20%-30% larger than previous measurements had suggested.

  13. Discovery of two new bright magnetic B stars: i Car and Atlas

    OpenAIRE

    Neiner, Coralie; Buysschaert, Bram; Oksala, Mary E.; Blazere, Aurore

    2015-01-01

    The BRITE (BRIght Target Explorer) constellation of nano-satellites performs seismology of bright stars via high precision photometry. In this context, we initiated a high resolution, high signal-to-noise, high sensitivity, spectropolarimetric survey of all stars brighter than V=4. The goal of this survey is to detect new bright magnetic stars and provide prime targets for both detailed magnetic studies and asteroseismology with BRITE. Circularly polarised spectra were acquired with Narval at...

  14. 类太阳恒星核聚变与脉动之间的关系%The Relationship Between Solar-Type Stars Nuclear Fusion and Pulsation

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    延三成

    2014-01-01

    Solar-type stars and the sun are the same evolution mechanism, nuclear fusion, nuclear fusion and pulsation relationships are the same. The article by solar nuclear fusion theory, having discussed solar -type stellar pulsation is that the intermittence leads to by it's nuclear fusion, the period of nuclear fusion is same as the pulsation cycle; solar -type stellar evolution to the present solar evolution period, its pulsation, nuclear fusion intermittent period should be about 5 minutes.%类太阳恒星与太阳演化相同,核聚变机制、核聚变与脉动关系也相同。文章由太阳核聚变理论出发,论述了类太阳恒星脉动是由其核聚变间歇导致的,以及核聚变间歇周期与脉动周期相同;如类太阳恒星演化到目前太阳演化的时段,其脉动、核聚变间歇周期应在5分钟左右。

  15. Bright Young Star Clusters in NGC5253 with LEGUS

    Science.gov (United States)

    Calzetti, Daniela; Johnson, Kelsey E.; Adamo, Angela; Gallagher, John S.; Andrews, Jennifer E.; Smith, Linda J.; Clayton, Geoffrey C.; Lee, Janice C.; Sabbi, Elena; Ubeda, Leonardo; Kim, Hwihyun; Ryon, Jenna E.; Thilker, David A.; Bright, Stacey N.; Zackrisson, Erik; Kennicutt, Robert; de Mink, Selma E.; Whitmore, Bradley C.; Aloisi, Alessandra; Chandar, Rupali; Cignoni, Michele; Cook, David; Dale, Daniel A.; Elmegreen, Bruce; Elmegreen, Debra M.; Evans, Aaron S.; Fumagalli, Michele; Gouliermis, Dimitrios; Grasha, Kathryn; Grebel, Eva; Krumholz, Mark R.; Walterbos, Rene A. M.; Wofford, Aida; Brown, Thomas M.; Christian, Carol A.; Dobbs, Claire; Herrero-Davo`, Artemio; Kahre, Lauren; Messa, Matteo; Nair, Preethi; Nota, Antonella; Östlin, Göran; Pellerin, Anne; Sacchi, Elena; Schaerer, Daniel; Tosi, Monica

    2016-01-01

    Using UV-to-H broad and narrow-band HST imaging, we derive the ages and masses of the 11 brightest star clusters in the dwarf galaxy NGC5253. This galaxy, located at ~3 Mpc, hosts an intense starburst, which includes a centrally-concentrated dusty region with strong thermal radio emission (the `radio nebula'). The HST imaging includes data from the Cycle 21 Treasury Program LEGUS (Legacy ExtraGalactic UV Survey), in addition to narrow--band H-alpha (6563 A), P-beta (12820 A), and P-alpha (18756 A). The bright clusters have ages ~1-15 Myr and masses ~1E4 - 2.5E5 Msun. Two of the 11 star clusters are located within the radio nebula, and suffer from significant dust attenuation. Both are extremely young, with a best-fit age around 1 Myr, and masses ~7.5E4 and ~2.5E5 Msun, respectively. The most massive of the two `radio nebula' clusters is 2-4 times less massive than previously estimated and is embedded within a cloud of dust with A_V~50 mag. The two clusters account for about half of the ionizing photon rate in the radio nebula, and will eventually supply about 2/3 of the mechanical energy in present-day shocks. Additional sources are required to supply the remaining ionizing radiation, and may include very massive stars.

  16. Discovery of two new bright magnetic B stars: i Car and Atlas

    Science.gov (United States)

    Neiner, Coralie; Buysschaert, Bram; Oksala, Mary E.; Blazère, Aurore

    2015-11-01

    The BRITE (BRIght Target Explorer) constellation of nanosatellites performs seismology of bright stars via high-precision photometry. In this context, we initiated a high-resolution, high signal-to-noise, high-sensitivity, spectropolarimetric survey of all stars brighter than V = 4. The goal of this survey is to detect new bright magnetic stars and provide prime targets for both detailed magnetic studies and asteroseismology with BRITE. Circularly polarized spectra were acquired with Narval at TBL (Bernard Lyot Telescope, France) and HARPSpol at ESO (European Southern Observatory) in La Silla (Chile). We discovered two new magnetic B stars: the B3V star i Car and the B8V component of the binary star Atlas. Each star was observed twice to confirm the magnetic detections and check for variability. These bright magnetic B stars are prime targets for asteroseismology and for flux-demanding techniques, such as interferometry.

  17. Discovery of two new bright magnetic B stars: i Car and Atlas

    CERN Document Server

    Neiner, Coralie; Oksala, Mary E; Blazere, Aurore

    2015-01-01

    The BRITE (BRIght Target Explorer) constellation of nano-satellites performs seismology of bright stars via high precision photometry. In this context, we initiated a high resolution, high signal-to-noise, high sensitivity, spectropolarimetric survey of all stars brighter than V=4. The goal of this survey is to detect new bright magnetic stars and provide prime targets for both detailed magnetic studies and asteroseismology with BRITE. Circularly polarised spectra were acquired with Narval at TBL (France) and HarpsPol at ESO in La Silla (Chile). We discovered two new magnetic B stars: the B3V star i Car and the B8V component of the binary star Atlas. Each star was observed twice to confirm the magnetic detections and check for variability. These bright magnetic B stars are prime targets for asteroseismology and for flux-demanding techniques, such as interferometry.

  18. Asteroseismic properties of solar-type stars observed with the NASA K2 mission: results from Campaigns 1-3 and prospects for future observations

    CERN Document Server

    Lund, Mikkel N; Casagrande, Luca; Aguirre, Víctor Silva; Basu, Sarbani; Bieryla, Allyson; Christensen-Dalsgaard, Jørgen; Latham, David W; White, Timothy R; Davies, Guy R; Huber, Daniel; Buchhave, Lars A; Handberg, Rasmus

    2016-01-01

    We present an asteroseismic analysis of 33 solar-type stars observed in short cadence during Campaigns (C) 1-3 of the NASA K2 mission. We were able to extract both average seismic parameters and individual mode frequencies for stars with dominant frequencies up to ~3300{\\mu}Hz, and we find that data for some targets are good enough to allow for a measurement of the rotational splitting. Modelling of the extracted parameters is performed by using grid-based methods using average parameters and individual frequencies together with spectroscopic parameters. For the target selection in C3, stars were chosen as in C1 and C2 to cover a wide range in parameter space to better understand the performance and noise characteristics. For C3 we still detected oscillations in 73% of the observed stars that we proposed. Future K2 campaigns hold great promise for the study of nearby clusters and the chemical evolution and age-metallicity relation of nearby field stars in the solar neighbourhood. We expect oscillations to be ...

  19. Surveying the Bright Stars by Optical Interferometry I: A Search for Multiplicity Among Stars of Spectral Types F - K

    CERN Document Server

    Hutter, Donald; Tycner, Christopher; Benson, James; Hummel, Christian; Sanborn, Jason; Franz, Otto G; Johnston, Kenneth

    2016-01-01

    We present the first results from an ongoing survey for multiplicity among the bright stars using the Navy Precision Optical Interferometer (NPOI). We first present a summary of NPOI observations of known multiple systems, including the first detection of the companion of $\\beta$ Scuti with precise relative astrometry, to illustrate the instrument's detection sensitivity for binaries at magnitude differences $\\Delta$$m$ $\\lessapprox$ 3 over the range of angular separation 3 - 860 milliarcseconds (mas). A limiting $\\Delta$$m_{700}$ $\\sim$ 3.5 is likely for binaries where the component spectral types differ by less than two. Model fits to these data show good agreement with published orbits, and we additionally present a new orbit solution for one of these stars, $\\sigma$ Her. We then discuss early results of the survey of bright stars at $\\delta$ $\\geq$ -20$\\deg$. This survey, which complements previous surveys of the bright stars by speckle interferometry, initially emphasizes bright stars of spectral types F...

  20. The Galactic O-Star Spectroscopic Survey (GOSSS). II. Bright Southern Stars

    CERN Document Server

    Sota, A; Morrell, N I; Barbá, R H; Walborn, N R; Gamen, R C; Arias, J I; Alfaro, E J

    2013-01-01

    We present the second installment of GOSSS, a massive spectroscopic survey of Galactic O stars, based on new homogeneous, high signal-to-noise ratio, R ~ 2500 digital observations from both hemispheres selected from the Galactic O-Star Catalog (GOSC). In this paper we include bright stars and other objects drawn mostly from the first version of GOSC, all of them south of delta = -20 degrees, for a total number of 258 O stars. We also revise the northern sample of paper I to provide the full list of spectroscopically classified Galactic O stars complete to B = 8, bringing the total number of published GOSSS stars to 448. Extensive sequences of exceptional objects are given, including the early Of/WN, O Iafpe, Ofc, ON/OC, Onfp, Of?p, and Oe types, as well as double/triple-lined spectroscopic binaries. The new spectral subtype O9.2 is also discussed. The magnitude and spatial distributions of the observed sample are analyzed. We also present new results from OWN, a multi-epoch high-resolution spectroscopic surve...

  1. Chandra's Darkest Bright Star: not so Dark after All?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ayres, Thomas R.

    2008-11-01

    The Chandra High Resolution camera (HRC) has obtained numerous short exposures of the ultraviolet (UV)-bright star Vega (α Lyrae; HD 172167: A0 V), to calibrate the response of the detector to out-of-band (non-X-ray) radiation. A new analysis uncovered a stronger "blue leak" in the imaging section (HRC-I) than reported in an earlier study of Vega based on a subset of the pointings. The higher count rate—a factor of nearly 2 above prelaunch estimates—raised the possibility that genuine coronal X-rays might lurk among the out-of-band events. Exploiting the broader point-spread function of the UV leak compared with soft X-rays identified an excess of counts centered on the target, technically at 3σ significance. A number of uncertainties, however, prevent a clear declaration of a Vegan corona. A more secure result would be within reach of a deep uninterrupted HRC-I pointing.

  2. The age-mass-metallicity-activity relation for solar-type stars: comparisons with asteroseismology and the NGC 188 open cluster

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lorenzo-Oliveira, D.; Porto de Mello, G. F.; Schiavon, R. P.

    2016-10-01

    Context. The Mount Wilson Ca ii index log(R'_HK) is the accepted standard metric of calibration for the chromospheric activity versus age relation for FGK stars. Recent results claim its inability to discern activity levels, and thus ages, for stars older than ~2 Gyr, which would severely hamper its application to date disk stars older than the Sun. Aims: We present a new activity-age calibration of the Mt. Wilson index that explicitly takes mass and [Fe/H] biases into account; these biases are implicit in samples of stars selected to have precise ages, which have so far not been appreciated. Methods: We show that these selection biases tend to blur the activity-age relation for large age ranges. We calibrate the Mt. Wilson index for a sample of field FGK stars with precise ages, covering a wide range of mass and [Fe/H] , augmented with data from the Pleiades, Hyades, M 67 clusters, and the Ursa Major moving group. Results: We further test the calibration with extensive new Gemini/GMOS log ()R'HK) data of the old, solar [Fe/H] clusters, M 67 and NGC 188. The observed NGC 188 activity level is clearly lower than M 67. We correctly recover the isochronal age of both clusters and establish the viability of deriving usable chromospheric ages for solar-type stars up to at least ~6 Gyr, where average errors are ~0.14 dex provided that we explicitly account for the mass and [Fe/H] dimensions. We test our calibration against asteroseismological ages, finding excellent correlation (ρ = + 0.89). We show that our calibration improves the chromospheric age determination for a wide range of ages, masses, and metallicities in comparison to previous age-activity relations.

  3. The Gaia-ESO Survey: chemical signatures of rocky accretion in a young solar-type star

    CERN Document Server

    Spina, L; Randich, S; Sacco, G G; Jeffries, R; Magrini, L; Franciosini, E; Meyer, M R; Tautvaišienė, G; Gilmore, G; Alfaro, E J; Prieto, C Allende; Bensby, T; Bragaglia, A; Flaccomio, E; Koposov, S E; Lanzafame, A C; Costado, M T; Hourihane, A; Lardo, C; Lewis, J; Monaco, L; Morbidelli, L; Sousa, S G; Worley, C C; Zaggia, S

    2015-01-01

    It is well known that newly formed planetary systems undergo processes of orbital reconfiguration and planetary migration. As a result, planets or protoplanetary objects may accrete onto the central star, being fused and mixed into its external layers. If the accreted mass is sufficiently high and the star has a sufficiently thin convective envelope, such events may result in a modification of the chemical composition of the stellar photosphere in an observable way, enhancing it with elements that were abundant in the accreted mass. The recent Gaia-ESO Survey observations of the 10-20 Myr old Gamma Velorum cluster have enabled identifying a star that is significantly enriched in iron with respect to other cluster members. In this Letter we further investigate the abundance pattern of this star, showing that its abundance anomaly is not limited to iron, but is also present in the refractory elements, whose overabundances are correlated with the condensation temperature. This finding strongly supports the hypot...

  4. Improving distances to nearby bright stars: Combining astrometric data from Hipparcos, Nano-JASMINE and Gaia

    CERN Document Server

    Michalik, Daniel; Hobbs, David; Lammers, Uwe; Yamada, Yoshiyuki

    2014-01-01

    Starting in 2013, Gaia will deliver highly accurate astrometric data, which eventually will supersede most other stellar catalogues in accuracy and completeness. It is, however, lim- ited to observations from magnitude 6 to 20 and will therefore not include the brightest stars. Nano-JASMINE, an ultrasmall Japanese astrometry satellite, will observe these bright stars, but with much lower accuracy. Hence, the Hipparcos catalogue from 1997 will likely remain the main source of accurate distances to bright nearby stars. We are investigating how this might be improved by optimally combining data from all three missions in a joint astrometric solu- tion. This would take advantage of the unique features of each mission: the historic bright-star measurements of Hipparcos, the updated bright-star observations of Nano-JASMINE, and the very accurate reference frame of Gaia. The long temporal baseline between the missions pro- vides additional benefits for the determination of proper motions and binary detection, which ...

  5. Spectroscopic parameters for solar-type stars with moderate/high rotation. New parameters for 10 planet-hosts

    CERN Document Server

    Tsantaki, M; Santos, N C; Montalto, M; Delgado-Mena, E; Mortier, A; Adibekyan, V; Israelian, G

    2014-01-01

    Planetary studies demand precise and accurate stellar parameters as input to infer the planetary properties. Different methods often provide different results that could lead to biases in the planetary parameters. In this work, we present a refinement of the spectral synthesis technique designed to treat better more rapidly rotating FGK stars. This method is used to derive precise stellar parameters, namely effective temperature, surface gravity, metallicitity and rotational velocity. This procedure is tested for samples of low and moderate/fast rotating FGK stars. The spectroscopic analysis is based on the spectral synthesis package Spectroscopy Made Easy (SME), assuming Kurucz model atmospheres in LTE. The line list where the synthesis is conducted, is comprised of iron lines and the atomic data are derived after solar calibration. The comparison of our stellar parameters shows good agreement with literature values, both for low and for higher rotating stars. In addition, our results are on the same scale w...

  6. Tests of the asymptotic large frequency separation of acoustic oscillations in solar-type and red-giant stars

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    S. Hekker; Y. Elsworth; S. Basu; A. Mazumdar; V. Silva Aguirre; W.J. Chaplin

    2013-01-01

    Asteroseismology, i.e. the study of the internal structures of stars via their global oscillations, is a valuable tool to obtain stellar parameters such as mass, radius, surface gravity and mean density. These parameters can be obtained using certain scaling relations which are based on an asymptoti

  7. Toward a Deterministic Model of Planetary Formation VI: Dynamical Interaction and Coagulation of Multiple Rocky Embryos and Super-Earth Systems around Solar Type Stars

    CERN Document Server

    Ida, S

    2010-01-01

    Radial velocity and transit surveys indicate that solar-type stars bear super-Earths, with mass and period up to ~ 20 M_E and a few months, are more common than those with Jupiter-mass gas giants. In many cases, these super-Earths are members of multiple-planet systems in which their mutual dynamical interaction has influenced their formation and evolution. In this paper, we modify an existing numerical population synthesis scheme to take into account protoplanetary embryos' interaction with their evolving natal gaseous disk, as well as their close scatterings and resonant interaction with each other. We show that it is possible for a group of compact embryos to emerge interior to the ice line, grow, migrate, and congregate into closely-packed convoys which stall in the proximity of their host stars. After the disk-gas depletion, they undergo orbit crossing, close scattering, and giant impacts to form multiple rocky Earths or super-Earths in non-resonant orbits around ~ 0.1AU with moderate eccentricities of ~...

  8. Spectroscopic parameters for solar-type stars with moderate-to-high rotation. New parameters for ten planet hosts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsantaki, M.; Sousa, S. G.; Santos, N. C.; Montalto, M.; Delgado-Mena, E.; Mortier, A.; Adibekyan, V.; Israelian, G.

    2014-10-01

    Context. Planetary studies demand precise and accurate stellar parameters as input for inferring the planetary properties. Different methods often provide different results that could lead to biases in the planetary parameters. Aims: In this work, we present a refinement of the spectral synthesis technique designed to treat fast rotating stars better. This method is used to derive precise stellar parameters, namely effective temperature, surface gravity, metallicity, and rotational velocity. The procedure is tested for FGK stars with low and moderate-to-high rotation rates. Methods: The spectroscopic analysis is based on the spectral synthesis package Spectroscopy Made Easy (SME), which assumes Kurucz model atmospheres in LTE. The line list where the synthesis is conducted is comprised of iron lines, and the atomic data are derived after solar calibration. Results: The comparison of our stellar parameters shows good agreement with literature values, both for slowly and for fast rotating stars. In addition, our results are on the same scale as the parameters derived from the iron ionization and excitation method presented in our previous works. We present new atmospheric parameters for 10 transiting planet hosts as an update to the SWEET-Cat catalog. We also re-analyze their transit light curves to derive new updated planetary properties. Based on observations collected at the La Silla Observatory, ESO (Chile) with the FEROS spectrograph at the 2.2 m telescope (ESO runs ID 089.C-0444(A), 088.C-0892(A)) and with the HARPS spectrograph at the 3.6 m telescope (ESO runs ID 072.C-0488(E), 079.C-0127(A)); at the Observatoire de Haute-Provence (OHP, CNRS/OAMP), France, with the SOPHIE spectrograph at the 1.93 m telescope and at the Observatoire Midi-Pyrénées (CNRS), France, with the NARVAL spectrograph at the 2 m Bernard Lyot Telescope (Run ID L131N11).Appendix A is available in electronic form at http://www.aanda.org

  9. A SURVEY OF THE HIGH ORDER MULTIPLICITY OF NEARBY SOLAR-TYPE BINARY STARS WITH Robo-AO

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Riddle, Reed L.; Bui, Khanh; Dekany, Richard G.; Kulkarni, Shrinivas; Tendulkar, Shriharsh P. [Division of Physics, Mathematics, and Astronomy, California Institute of Technology, Pasadena, CA 91125 (United States); Tokovinin, Andrei [Cerro Tololo Inter-American Observatory, Casilla 603, La Serena (Chile); Mason, Brian D.; Hartkopf, William I. [U.S. Naval Observatory, 3450 Massachusetts Avenue, Washington, DC 20392-5420 (United States); Roberts, Lewis C. Jr. [Jet Propulsion Laboratory, California Institute of Technology, 4800 Oak Grove Drive, Pasadena, CA 91109 (United States); Baranec, Christoph [Institute for Astronomy, University of Hawai" i at Mānoa, Hilo, HI 96720-2700 (United States); Law, Nicholas M. [Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill, Chapel Hill, NC 27599-3255 (United States); Burse, Mahesh P.; Das, H. K.; Punnadi, Sujit; Ramaprakash, A. N. [Inter-University Centre for Astronomy and Astrophysics, Ganeshkhind, Pune, 411007 (India)

    2015-01-20

    We conducted a survey of nearby binary systems composed of main sequence stars of spectral types F and G in order to improve our understanding of the hierarchical nature of multiple star systems. Using Robo-AO, the first robotic adaptive optics instrument, we collected high angular resolution images with deep and well-defined detection limits in the Sloan Digital Sky Survey i' band. A total of 695 components belonging to 595 systems were observed. We prioritized observations of faint secondary components with separations over 10'' to quantify the still poorly constrained frequency of their subsystems. Of the 214 secondaries observed, 39 contain such subsystems; 19 of those were discovered with Robo-AO. The selection-corrected frequency of secondary subsystems with periods from 10{sup 3.5} to 10{sup 5} days is 0.12 ± 0.03, the same as the frequency of such companions to the primary. Half of the secondary pairs belong to quadruple systems where the primary is also a close pair, showing that the presence of subsystems in both components of the outer binary is correlated. The relatively large abundance of 2+2 quadruple systems is a new finding, and will require more exploration of the formation mechanism of multiple star systems. We also targeted close binaries with periods less than 100 yr, searching for their distant tertiary components, and discovered 17 certain and 2 potential new triples. In a subsample of 241 close binaries, 71 have additional outer companions. The overall frequency of tertiary components is not enhanced, compared to all (non-binary) targets, but in the range of outer periods from 10{sup 6} to 10{sup 7.5} days (separations on the order of 500 AU), the frequency of tertiary components is 0.16 ± 0.03, exceeding the frequency of similar systems among all targets (0.09) by almost a factor of two. Measurements of binary stars with Robo-AO allowed us to compute first orbits for 9 pairs and to improve orbits of another 11 pairs.

  10. NEAT, An Astrometric Telescope To Probe Planetary Systems Down To The Earth Mass Around Nearby Solar-Type Stars

    CERN Document Server

    Malbet, F; Goullioud, R; Shao, M; Lagage, P -O; Cara, C; Durand, G; Feautrier, P; Jakobsson, B; Hinglais, E; Mercier, M

    2011-01-01

    The NEAT (Nearby Earth Astrometric Telescope) mission is a proposition submitted to ESA for its 2010 call for M-size mission. The main scientific goal is to detect and characterize planetary systems in an exhaustive way down to 1 Earth mass in the habitable zone and further away, around nearby stars for F, G, and K spectral types. This survey would provide the actual planetary masses, the full characterization of the orbits including their inclination, for all the components of the planetary system down to that mass limit. Extremely- high-precision astrometry, in space, can detect the dynamical effect due to even low mass orbiting planets on their central star, reaching those scientific goals. NEAT will continue the work performed by Hipparcos (1mas precision) and Gaia (7{\\mu}as aimed) by reaching a precision that is improved by two orders of magnitude (0.05{\\mu}as, 1{\\sigma} accuracy). The two modules of the payload, the telescope and the focal plane, must be placed 40m away leading to a formation flying opt...

  11. The Solar Twin Planet Search III. The [Y/Mg] clock: estimating stellar ages of solar-type stars

    CERN Document Server

    Maia, M Tucci; Meléndez, J; Bedell, M; Bean, J L; Asplund, M

    2016-01-01

    Solar twins are stars with similar stellar (surface) parameters to the Sun that can have a wide range of ages. This provide an opportunity to analyze the variation of their chemical abundances with age. Nissen (2015) recently suggested that the abundances of the s-process element Y and the $\\alpha$-element Mg could be used to estimate stellar ages. This paper aims to determine with high precision the Y, Mg, and Fe abundances for a sample of 88 solar twins that span a broad age range ($0.3-10.0$\\,Gyr) and investigate their use for estimating ages. We obtained high-quality Magellan Inamori Kyocera Echelle (MIKE) spectra and determined Y and Mg abundances using equivalent widths and a line-by-line differential method within a 1D LTE framework. Stellar parameters and iron abundances were measured in Paper I of this series for all stars, but a few (three) required a small revision. The [Y/Mg] ratio shows a strong correlation with age. It has a slope of -0.041$\\pm$0.001 dex/Gyr and a significance of 41 $\\sigma$. Th...

  12. Formation of Super-Earth Mass Planets at 125-250 AU from a Solar-type Star

    CERN Document Server

    Kenyon, S J

    2015-01-01

    We investigate pathways for the formation of icy super-Earth mass planets orbiting at 125-250 AU around a 1 solar mass star. An extensive suite of coagulation calculations demonstrates that swarms of 1 cm to 10 m planetesimals can form super-Earth mass planets on time scales of 1-3 Gyr. Collisional damping of 0.01-100 cm particles during oligarchic growth is a highlight of these simulations. In some situations, damping initiates a second runaway growth phase where 100-3000 km protoplanets grow to super-Earth sizes. Our results establish the initial conditions and physical processes required for in situ formation of super-Earth planets at large distances from the host star. For nearby dusty disks in HD 107146, HD 202628, and HD 207129, ongoing super-Earth formation at 80-150 AU could produce gaps and other structures in the debris. In the solar system, forming a putative planet X at a 1000 AU) requires a modest (very massive) protosolar nebula.

  13. Formation of Super-Earth Mass Planets at 125–250 AU from a Solar-type Star

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kenyon, Scott J.; Bromley, Benjamin C.

    2015-06-01

    We investigate pathways for the formation of icy super-Earth mass planets orbiting at 125–250 AU around a 1 {{M}ȯ } star. An extensive suite of coagulation calculations demonstrates that swarms of 1 cm–10 m planetesimals can form super-Earth mass planets on timescales of 1–3 Gyr. Collisional damping of 10‑2‑102 cm particles during oligarchic growth is a highlight of these simulations. In some situations, damping initiates a second runaway growth phase where 1000–3000 km protoplanets grow to super-Earth sizes. Our results establish the initial conditions and physical processes required for in situ formation of super-Earth planets at large distances from the host star. For nearby dusty disks in HD 107146, HD 202628, and HD 207129, ongoing super-Earth formation at 80–150 AU could produce gaps and other structures in the debris. In the solar system, forming a putative planet X at a≲ 300 AU (a≳ 1000 AU) requires a modest (very massive) protosolar nebula.

  14. No Time for Dead Time: Timing Analysis of Bright Black Hole Binaries with NuSTAR

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    M. Bachetti; F.A. Harrison; R. Cook; J. Tomsick; C. Schmid; B.W. Grefenstette; D. Barret; S.E. Boggs; F.E. Christensen; W.W. Craig; A.C. Fabian; F. Fürst; P. Gandhi; C.J. Hailey; E. Kara; T.J. Maccarone; J.M. Miller; K. Pottschmidt; D. Stern; P. Uttley; D.J. Walton; J. Wilms; W.W. Zhang

    2015-01-01

    Timing of high-count-rate sources with the NuSTAR Small Explorer Mission requires specialized analysis techniques. NuSTAR was primarily designed for spectroscopic observations of sources with relatively low count rates rather than for timing analysis of bright objects. The instrumental dead time per

  15. Chemical Abundances from Inversions of Stellar Spectra Analysis of Solar-Type Stars with Homogeneous and Static Model Atmospheres

    CERN Document Server

    Allende-Prieto, C; Asplund, M; Cobo, B R; Prieto, Carlos Allende; Barklem, Paul S.; Asplund, Martin; Cobo, Basilio Ruiz

    2001-01-01

    Spectra of late-type stars are usually analyzed with static model atmospheres in local thermodynamic equilibrium (LTE) and a homogeneous plane-parallel or spherically symmetric geometry. The energy balance requires particular attention, as two elements which are particularly difficult to model play an important role: line blanketing and convection. Inversion techniques are able to bypass the difficulties of a detailed description of the energy balance. Assuming that the atmosphere is in hydrostatic equilibrium and LTE, it is possible to constrain its structure from spectroscopic observations. Among the most serious approximations still implicit in the method is a static and homogeneous geometry. In this paper, we take advantage of a realistic three-dimensional radiative hydrodynamical simulation of the solar surface to check the systematic errors incurred by an inversion assuming a plane-parallel horizontally-homogeneous atmosphere. The thermal structure recovered resembles the spatial and time average of the...

  16. Tests of the asymptotic large frequency separation of acoustic oscillations in solar-type and red giant stars

    CERN Document Server

    Hekker, S; Basu, S; Mazumdar, A; Aguirre, V Silva; Chaplin, W J

    2013-01-01

    Asteroseismology, i.e. the study of the internal structures of stars via their global oscillations, is a valuable tool to obtain stellar parameters such as mass, radius, surface gravity and mean density. These parameters can be obtained using certain scaling relations which are based on an asymptotic approximation. Usually the observed oscillation parameters are assumed to follow these scaling relations. Recently, it has been questioned whether this is a valid approach, i.e., whether the order of the observed oscillation modes are high enough to be approximated with an asymptotic theory. In this work we use stellar models to investigate whether the differences between observable oscillation parameters and their asymptotic estimates are indeed significant. We compute the asymptotic values directly from the stellar models and derive the observable values from adiabatic pulsation calculations of the same models. We find that the extent to which the atmosphere is included in the models is a key parameter. Conside...

  17. Discovery of a companion at the brown dwarf limit to the solar-type star Gliese 29

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chini, R.; Fuhrmann, K.; Pozo Nuñez, F.; Ramolla, M.; Kaderhandt, L.; Niedworok, N.; Hodapp, K.-W.

    2016-07-01

    Gliese 29 is a 7 to 8 Gyr old, southern Population I turnoff star with a large proper motion of 1 arcsec/yr. Using recent direct imaging observations with the 0.8 m Infrared Imaging System (IRIS) of the Universitätssternwarte Bochum near Cerro Armazones in Chile, we demonstrate that the faint source 2MASS J00402651-5927168 at a projected angular separation ρ=6.35 arcsec is a common-proper-motion companion to Gl 29. Provided this source is not part of a further subsystem, the IRIS J- and K_s-band photometry either implies a spectral type of about L2, based on its absolute magnitude, or an approximate mass M_B ≃ 0.077 M⊙, suggesting that it may even be a brown dwarf. Assuming a face-on circular orbit this faint companion orbits Gl 29 in 1880 years.

  18. The Solar Twin Planet Search. III. The [Y/Mg] clock: estimating stellar ages of solar-type stars

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tucci Maia, M.; Ramírez, I.; Meléndez, J.; Bedell, M.; Bean, J. L.; Asplund, M.

    2016-05-01

    Context. Solar twins are stars with similar stellar (surface) parameters to the Sun that can have a wide range of ages. This provides an opportunity to analyze the variation of their chemical abundances with age. Nissen (2015, A&A, 579, A52) recently suggested that the abundances of the s-process element Y and the α-element Mg could be used to estimate stellar ages. Aims: This paper aims to determine with high precision the Y, Mg, and Fe abundances for a sample of 88 solar twins that span a broad age range (0.3-10.0 Gyr) and investigate their use for estimating ages. Methods: We obtained high-quality Magellan Inamori Kyocera Echelle (MIKE) spectra and determined Y and Mg abundances using equivalent widths and a line-by-line differential method within a 1D LTE framework. Stellar parameters and iron abundances were measured in Paper I of this series for all stars, but a few (three) required a small revision. Results: The [Y/Mg] ratio shows a strong correlation with age. It has a slope of -0.041 ± 0.001 dex/Gyr and a significance of 41σ. This is in excellent agreement with the relation first proposed by Nissen (2015). We found some outliers that turned out to be binaries where mass transfer may have enhanced the yttrium abundance. Given a precise measurement of [Y/Mg] with typical error of 0.02 dex in solar twins, our formula can be used to determine a stellar age with ~0.8 Gyr precision in the 0 to 10 Gyr range. Based on observations obtained at the Clay Magellan Telescopes at Las Campanas Observatory, Chile and at the 3.6 m Telescope at the La Silla ESO Observatory, Chile (program ID 188.C-0265).

  19. No time for dead time: timing analysis of bright black hole binaries with NuSTAR

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bachetti, Matteo; Harrison, Fiona A.; Cook, Rick;

    2015-01-01

    Timing of high-count-rate sources with the NuSTAR Small Explorer Mission requires specialized analysis techniques. NuSTAR was primarily designed for spectroscopic observations of sources with relatively low count rates rather than for timing analysis of bright objects. The instrumental dead time ...... techniques. We apply this technique to NuSTAR observations of the black hole binaries GX 339-4, Cyg X-1, and GRS 1915+105....

  20. Brightness Independent 4-Star Matching Algorithm for Lost-in-Space 3-Axis Attitude Acquisition

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    DONG Ying; XING Fei; YOU Zheng

    2006-01-01

    A star identification algorithm was developed for a charge-coupled device (CCD) or complementary metal-oxide-semiconductor (CMOS) autonomous star tracker to acquire 3-axis attitude information for a lost-in-space spacecraft. The algorithm took advantage of an efficient on-board database and an original "4-star matching" pattern recognition strategy to achieve fast and reliable star identification. The on-board database was composed of a brightness independent guide star catalog (mission catalog) and a K-vector star pair catalog. The star pattern recognition method involved direct location of star pair candidates and a simple array matching procedure. Tests of the algorithm with a CMOS active pixel sensor (APS) star tracker result in a 99.9% success rate for star identification for lost-in-space 3-axis attitude acquisition when the angular measurement accuracy of the star tracker is at least 0.01°. The brightness independent algorithm requires relatively higher measurement accuracy of the star apparent positions that can be easily achieved by CCD or CMOS sensors along with subpixel centroiding techniques.

  1. The linear polarisation of southern bright stars measured at the parts-per-million level

    CERN Document Server

    Cotton, Daniel V; Kedziora-Chudczer, Lucyna; Bott, Kimberly; Lucas, P W; Hough, J H; Marshall, Jonathan P

    2015-01-01

    We report observations of the linear polarisation of a sample of 50 nearby southern bright stars measured to a median sensitivity of $\\sim$4.4 $\\times 10^{-6}$. We find larger polarisations and more highly polarised stars than in the previous PlanetPol survey of northern bright stars. This is attributed to a dustier interstellar medium in the mid-plane of the Galaxy, together with a population containing more B-type stars leading to more intrinsically polarised stars, as well as using a wavelength more sensitive to intrinsic polarisation in late-type giants. Significant polarisation had been identified for only six stars in the survey group previously, whereas we are now able to deduce intrinsic polarigenic mechanisms for more than twenty. The four most highly polarised stars in the sample are the four classical Be stars ($\\alpha$ Eri, $\\alpha$ Col, $\\eta$ Cen and $\\alpha$ Ara). For the three of these objects resolved by interferometry, the position angles are consistent with the orientation of the circumstel...

  2. THE PANCHROMATIC HUBBLE ANDROMEDA TREASURY. I. BRIGHT UV STARS IN THE BULGE OF M31

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rosenfield, Philip; Johnson, L. Clifton; Dalcanton, Julianne J.; Williams, Benjamin F.; Gilbert, Karoline M. [Department of Astronomy, University of Washington, Box 351580, Seattle, WA 98195 (United States); Girardi, Leo [Osservatorio Astronomico di Padova-INAF, Vicolo dell' Osservatorio 5, I-35122 Padova (Italy); Bressan, Alessandro [SISSA, Via Bonomea 265, 34136 Trieste (Italy); Lang, Dustin [Department of Astrophysical Sciences, Princeton University, Princeton, NJ 08544 (United States); Guhathakurta, Puragra; Dorman, Claire E. [UCO/Lick Observatory and Department of Astronomy and Astrophysics, University of California, Santa Cruz, CA 95064 (United States); Howley, Kirsten M. [Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory, 7000 East Avenue, Livermore, CA 94550 (United States); Lauer, Tod R.; Olsen, Knut A. G. [National Optical Astronomy Observatory, 950 North Cherry Avenue, Tucson, AZ 85719 (United States); Bell, Eric F. [Department of Astronomy, University of Michigan, 500 Church St., Ann Arbor, MI 48109 (United States); Bianchi, Luciana [Department of Physics and Astronomy, Johns Hopkins University, Baltimore, MD 21218 (United States); Caldwell, Nelson [Harvard-Smithsonian Center for Astrophysics, 60 Garden Street Cambridge, MA 02138 (United States); Dolphin, Andrew [Raytheon Company, 1151 East Hermans Road, Tucson, AZ 85756 (United States); Kalirai, Jason [Space Telescope Science Institute, 3700 San Martin Drive, Baltimore, MD 21218 (United States); Larsen, Soren S. [Astronomical Institute, University of Utrecht, Princetonplein 5, 3584 CC Utrecht (Netherlands); Rix, Hans-Walter [Max Planck Institute for Astronomy, Koenigstuhl 17, D-69117 Heidelberg (Germany); and others

    2012-08-20

    As part of the Panchromatic Hubble Andromeda Treasury multi-cycle program, we observed a 12' Multiplication-Sign 6.'5 area of the bulge of M31 with the WFC3/UVIS filters F275W and F336W. From these data we have assembled a sample of {approx}4000 UV-bright, old stars, vastly larger than previously available. We use updated Padova stellar evolutionary tracks to classify these hot stars into three classes: Post-AGB stars (P-AGB), Post-Early AGB (PE-AGB) stars, and AGB-manque stars. P-AGB stars are the end result of the asymptotic giant branch (AGB) phase and are expected in a wide range of stellar populations, whereas PE-AGB and AGB-manque (together referred to as the hot post-horizontal branch; HP-HB) stars are the result of insufficient envelope masses to allow a full AGB phase, and are expected to be particularly prominent at high helium or {alpha} abundances when the mass loss on the red giant branch is high. Our data support previous claims that most UV-bright sources in the bulge are likely hot (extreme) horizontal branch (EHB) stars and their progeny. We construct the first radial profiles of these stellar populations and show that they are highly centrally concentrated, even more so than the integrated UV or optical light. However, we find that this UV-bright population does not dominate the total UV luminosity at any radius, as we are detecting only the progeny of the EHB stars that are the likely source of the UV excess. We calculate that only a few percent of main-sequence stars in the central bulge can have gone through the HP-HB phase and that this percentage decreases strongly with distance from the center. We also find that the surface density of hot UV-bright stars has the same radial variation as that of low-mass X-ray binaries. We discuss age, metallicity, and abundance variations as possible explanations for the observed radial variation in the UV-bright population.

  3. The distribution of star formation and metals in the low surface brightness galaxy UGC 628

    Science.gov (United States)

    Young, J. E.; Kuzio de Naray, Rachel; Wang, Sharon X.

    2015-09-01

    We introduce the MUSCEL Programme (MUltiwavelength observations of the Structure, Chemistry and Evolution of LSB galaxies), a project aimed at determining the star-formation histories of low surface brightness galaxies. MUSCEL utilizes ground-based optical spectra and space-based UV and IR photometry to fully constrain the star-formation histories of our targets with the aim of shedding light on the processes that led low surface brightness galaxies down a different evolutionary path from that followed by high surface brightness galaxies, such as our Milky Way. Here we present the spatially resolved optical spectra of UGC 628, observed with the VIRUS-P IFU at the 2.7-m Harlen J. Smith Telescope at the McDonald Observatory, and utilize emission-line diagnostics to determine the rate and distribution of star formation as well as the gas-phase metallicity and metallicity gradient. We find highly clustered star formation throughout UGC 628, excluding the core regions, and a log(O/H) metallicity around -4.2, with more metal-rich regions near the edges of the galactic disc. Based on the emission-line diagnostics alone, the current mode of star formation, slow and concentrated in the outer disc, appears to have dominated for quite some time, although there are clear signs of a much older stellar population formed in a more standard inside-out fashion.

  4. Surface Brightness Profiles and Star Formation Rates of Galaxies in NRGb054

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hansen, Ellen; Koopmann, Rebecca A.; Miller, Brendan; Durbala, Adriana; Fitzgerald, Garrett

    2016-01-01

    We present new optical R and H-alpha images of the galaxy group NRGb054, obtained with the WIYN 0.9m telescope at KPNO using the MOSAIC camera. This group was studied as part of the larger Undergraduate ALFALFA Team project investigating the effects of a group environment on star formation. The stacked H-alpha image was continuum subtracted by the removal of a scaled and stacked R image. Surface photometry was performed on R and continuum-subtracted H-alpha cutouts of 20 covered galaxies to determine the surface brightness as a function of radius. Integrating the continuum-subtracted H-alpha surface brightness profile provides the total star formation within that galaxy, while the shape of the profile illustrates how star formation is spread throughout the galaxy. We provide a catalog of surface brightness profiles and integrated star formation rates for NRGb054. We consider star formation as a function of galaxy-galaxy separation and galaxy location within the group, and discuss our findings in the context of the wider study. This work has been supported by NSF grant AST-1211005.

  5. The Panchromatic Hubble Andromeda Treasury I: Bright UV Stars in the Bulge of M31

    CERN Document Server

    Rosenfield, Philip; Girardi, Léo; Dalcanton, Julianne J; Bressan, Alessandro; Lang, Dustin; Williams, Benjamin F; Guhathakurta, Puragra; Howley, Kirsten M; Lauer, Tod R; Bell, Eric F; Bianchi, Luciana; Caldwell, Nelson; Dolphin, Andrew; Dorman, Claire E; Gilbert, Karoline M; Kalirai, Jason; Larsen, Søren S; Olsen, Knut A G; Rix, Hans-Walter; Seth, Anil C; Skillman, Evan D; Weisz, Daniel R

    2012-01-01

    As part of the Panchromatic Hubble Andromeda Treasury (PHAT) multi-cycle program, we observed a 12' \\times 6.5' area of the bulge of M31 with the WFC3/UVIS filters F275W and F336W. From these data we have assembled a sample of \\sim4000 UV-bright, old stars, vastly larger than previously available. We use updated Padova stellar evolutionary tracks to classify these hot stars into three classes: Post-AGB stars (P-AGB), Post-Early AGB (PE-AGB) stars and AGB-manqu\\'e stars. P-AGB stars are the end result of the asymptotic giant branch (AGB) phase and are expected in a wide range of stellar populations, whereas PE-AGB and AGB-manqu\\'e (together referred to as the hot post-horizontal branch; HP-HB) stars are the result of insufficient envelope masses to allow a full AGB phase, and are expected to be particularly prominent at high helium or {\\alpha} abundances when the mass loss on the RGB is high. Our data support previous claims that most UV-bright sources in the bulge are likely hot (extreme) horizontal branch st...

  6. Pseudomagnitudes and Differential Surface Brightness: Application to the apparent diameter of stars

    CERN Document Server

    Chelli, Alain; Bourgès, Laurent; Mella, Guillaume; Lafrasse, Sylvain; Bonneau, Daniel; Chesneau, Olivier

    2016-01-01

    The diameter of a star is a major observable that serves to test the validity of stellar structure theories. It is also a difficult observable that is mostly obtained with indirect methods since the stars are so remote. Today only ~600 apparent star diameters have been measured by direct methods: optical interferometry and lunar occultations. Accurate star diameters are now required in the new field of exoplanet studies, since they condition the planets' sizes in transit observations, and recent publications illustrate a visible renewal of interest in this topic. Our analysis is based on the modeling of the relationship between measured angular diameters and photometries. It makes use of two new reddening-free concepts: a distance indicator called pseudomagnitude, and a quasi-experimental observable that is independent of distance and specific to each star, called the differential surface brightness (DSB). The use of all the published measurements of apparent diameters that have been collected so far, and a c...

  7. WASP-20b and WASP-28b: a hot Saturn and a hot Jupiter in near-aligned orbits around solar-type stars

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anderson, D. R.; Collier Cameron, A.; Hellier, C.; Lendl, M.; Lister, T. A.; Maxted, P. F. L.; Queloz, D.; Smalley, B.; Smith, A. M. S.; Triaud, A. H. M. J.; Brown, D. J. A.; Gillon, M.; Neveu-VanMalle, M.; Pepe, F.; Pollacco, D.; Ségransan, D.; Udry, S.; West, R. G.; Wheatley, P. J.

    2015-03-01

    We report the discovery of the planets WASP-20b and WASP-28b along with measurements of their sky-projected orbital obliquities. WASP-20b is an inflated, Saturn-mass planet (0.31 MJup; 1.46 RJup) in a 4.9-day, near-aligned (λ = 12.7 ± 4.2°) orbit around CD-24 102 (V = 10.7; F9). Due to the low density of the planet and the apparent brightness of the host star, WASP-20 is a good target for atmospheric characterisation via transmission spectroscopy. WASP-28b is an inflated, Jupiter-mass planet (0.91 MJup; 1.21 RJup) in a 3.4-day, near-aligned (λ = 8 ± 18°) orbit around a V = 12, F8 star. As intermediate-mass planets in short orbits around aged, cool stars (7+ 2-1 Gyr and 6000 ± 100 K for WASP-20; 5+ 3-2 Gyr and 6100 ± 150 K for WASP-28), their orbital alignment is consistent with the hypothesis that close-in giant planets are scattered into eccentric orbits with random alignments, which are then circularised and aligned with their stars' spins via tidal dissipation. Based on observations made with: the WASP-South (South Africa) and SuperWASP-North (La Palma) photometric survey instruments; the C2 and EulerCam cameras and the CORALIE spectrograph, all mounted on the 1.2-m Euler-Swiss telescope (La Silla); the HARPS spectrograph on the ESO 3.6-m telescope (La Silla) under programs 072.C-0488, 082.C-0608, 084.C-0185, and 085.C-0393; and LCOGT's Faulkes Telescope North (Maui) and Faulkes Telescope South (Siding Spring).Full Tables 2 and 3 are only available at the CDS via anonymous ftp to http://cdsarc.u-strasbg.fr (ftp://130.79.128.5) or via http://cdsarc.u-strasbg.fr/viz-bin/qcat?J/A+A/575/A61

  8. Spitzer 24 um Excesses for Bright Galactic Stars in Bootes and First Look Survey Fields

    CERN Document Server

    Hovhannisyan, L R; Weedman, D W; Le Floc'h, E; Houck, J R; Soifer, B T; Brand, K; Dey, A; Jannuzi, B T

    2009-01-01

    Optically bright Galactic stars (V 1 mJy are identified in Spitzer mid-infrared surveys within 8.2 square degrees for the Bootes field of the NOAO Deep Wide-Field Survey and within 5.5 square degrees for the First Look Survey (FLS). 128 stars are identified in Bootes and 140 in the FLS, and their photometry is given. (K-[24]) colors are determined using K magnitudes from the 2MASS survey for all stars in order to search for excess 24 um luminosity compared to that arising from the stellar photosphere. Of the combined sample of 268 stars, 141 are of spectral types F, G, or K, and 17 of these 141 stars have 24 um excesses with (K-[24]) > 0.2 mag. Using limits on absolute magnitude derived from proper motions, at least 8 of the FGK stars with excesses are main sequence stars, and estimates derived from the distribution of apparent magnitudes indicate that all 17 are main sequence stars. These estimates lead to the conclusion that between 9% and 17% of the main sequence FGK field stars in these samples have 24 u...

  9. The Distribution of Star Formation and Metals in the Low Surface Brightness Galaxy UGC 628

    CERN Document Server

    Young, J E; Wang, Sharon X

    2015-01-01

    We introduce the MUSCEL Program (MUltiwavelength observations of the Structure, Chemistry and Evolution of LSB galaxies), a project aimed at determining the star-formation histories of low surface brightness galaxies. MUSCEL utilizes ground-based optical spectra and space-based UV and IR photometry to fully constrain the star-formation histories of our targets with the aim of shedding light on the processes that led low surface brightness galaxies down a different evolutionary path from that followed by high surface brightness galaxies, such as our Milky Way. Here we present the spatially-resolved optical spectra of UGC 628, observed with the VIRUS-P IFU at the 2.7-m Harlen J. Smith Telescope at the McDonald Observatory, and utilize emission-line diagnostics to determine the rate and distribution of star formation as well as the gas-phase metallicity and metallicity gradient. We find highly clustered star formation throughout UGC 628, excluding the core regions, and a log(O/H) metallicity around -4.2, with mo...

  10. Pseudomagnitudes and differential surface brightness: Application to the apparent diameter of stars

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chelli, Alain; Duvert, Gilles; Bourgès, Laurent; Mella, Guillaume; Lafrasse, Sylvain; Bonneau, Daniel; Chesneau, Olivier

    2016-05-01

    The diameter of a star is a major observable that serves to test the validity of stellar structure theories. It is also a difficult observable that is mostly obtained with indirect methods since the stars are so remote. Today only ~600 apparent star diameters have been measured by direct methods: optical interferometry and lunar occultations. Accurate star diameters are now required in the new field of exoplanet studies, since they condition the planets' sizes in transit observations, and recent publications illustrate a visible renewal of interest in this topic. Our analysis is based on the modeling of the relationship between measured angular diameters and photometries. It makes use of two new reddening-free concepts: a distance indicator called pseudomagnitude, and a quasi-experimental observable that is independent of distance and specific to each star, called the differential surface brightness (DSB). The use of all the published measurements of apparent diameters that have been collected so far, and a careful modeling of the DSB allow us to estimate star diameters with a median statistical error of 1.1%, knowing their spectral type and, in the present case, the VJHKs photometries. We introduce two catalogs, the JMMC Measured Diameters Catalog (JMDC), containing measured star diameters, and the second version of the JMMC Stellar Diameter Catalog (JSDC), augmented to about 453 000 star diameters. Finally, we provide simple formulas and a table of coefficients to quickly estimate stellar angular diameters and associated errors from (V, Ks) magnitudes and spectral types.

  11. Rapidly Rotating, X-ray Bright Stars in the Kepler Field

    CERN Document Server

    Howell, Steve B; Boyd, Padi; Smith, Krista Lynne; Gelino, Dawn

    2016-01-01

    We present Kepler light curves and optical spectroscopy of twenty X-ray bright stars located in the Kepler field of view. The stars, spectral type FK, show evidence for rapid rotation including chromospheric activity 100 times or more above the Sun at maximum and flaring behavior in their light curves. Eighteen of our objects appear to be (sub)giants and may belong to the class of FK Com variables, that is evolved rapidly spinning single stars with no excretion disk and high levels of chromospheric activity. Such stars are rare and are likely the result of W UMa binary mergers, a process believed to produce the FK Com class of variable and their descendants. The FK Com stage, including the presence of an excretion disk, is short-lived but leads to longer-lived stages consisting of single, rapidly rotating evolved (sub)giants with high levels of stellar activity.

  12. An atlas of bright star spectra in the near infrared from Cassini-VIMS

    CERN Document Server

    Stewart, Paul N; Nicholson, Philip D; Sloan, G C; Hedman, Matthew M

    2015-01-01

    We present the Cassini Atlas Of Stellar Spectra (CAOSS), comprised of near-infrared low-resolution spectra of bright stars recovered from space-based observations by the Cassini spacecraft. The 65 stellar targets in the atlas are predominately M, K and S giants. However it also contains spectra of other bright nearby stars including carbon stars and main sequence stars from A to F. The spectra presented are free of all spectral contamination caused by the Earth's atmosphere, including the detrimental telluric molecular bands which put parts of the near-infrared spectrum out of reach of terrestrial observations. With a single instrument, a spectro-photometric dataset is recovered that spans the near-infrared from 0.8 to 5.1 microns with spectral resolution ranging from R=53.5 to R=325. Spectra have been calibrated into absolute flux units after careful characterisation of the instrumental spectral efficiency. Spectral energy distributions for most stars match closely with literature values. All final data prod...

  13. AN ATLAS OF BRIGHT STAR SPECTRA IN THE NEAR-INFRARED FROM CASSINI-VIMS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Stewart, Paul N.; Tuthill, Peter G. [Sydney Institute for Astronomy, School of Physics, The University of Sydney, NSW 2006 (Australia); Nicholson, Philip D. [Department of Astronomy, Cornell University, Ithaca, NY 14853 (United States); Sloan, G. C. [Cornell Center for Astrophyics and Planetary Science, Cornell University, Ithaca, NY 14853 (United States); Hedman, Matthew M., E-mail: p.stewart@physics.usyd.edu.au [Department of Physics, University of Idaho, Moscow, ID 83844 (United States)

    2015-12-15

    We present the Cassini Atlas Of Stellar Spectra (CAOSS), comprised of near-infrared, low-resolution spectra of bright stars recovered from space-based observations by the Cassini spacecraft. The 65 stellar targets in the atlas are predominately M, K, and S giants. However, it also contains spectra of other bright nearby stars including carbon stars and main-sequence stars from A to F. The spectra presented are free of all spectral contamination caused by the Earth's atmosphere, including the detrimental telluric molecular bands which put parts of the near-infrared spectrum out of reach of terrestrial observations. With a single instrument, a spectro-photometric data set is recovered that spans the near-infrared from 0.8 to 5.1 μm with spectral resolution ranging from R = 53.5 to R = 325. Spectra have been calibrated into absolute flux units after careful characterization of the instrumental spectral efficiency. Spectral energy distributions for most stars match closely with literature values. All final data products have been made available online.

  14. Hubble Space Telescope Near-Ultraviolet Spectroscopy of Bright CEMP-s Stars

    OpenAIRE

    Placco, Vinicius M.; Beers, Timothy C.; Ivans, Inese I.; Filler, Dan; Imig, Julie A.; Roederer, Ian U.; Abate, Carlo; Hansen, Terese; Cowan, John J.; Frebel, Anna; Lawler, James E.; Schatz, Hendrik; Sneden, Christopher; Sobeck, Jennifer S.; Aoki, Wako

    2015-01-01

    We present an elemental-abundance analysis, in the near-ultraviolet (NUV) spectral range, for the bright carbon-enhanced metal-poor (CEMP) stars HD196944 (V = 8.40, [Fe/H] = -2.41) and HD201626 (V = 8.16, [Fe/H] = -1.51), based on data acquired with the Space Telescope Imaging Spectrograph (STIS) on the Hubble Space Telescope. Both of these stars belong to the sub-class CEMP-s, and exhibit clear over-abundances of heavy elements associated with production by the slow neutron-capture process. ...

  15. Tähetund = The star-bright hour : [luuletused] / Betti Alver

    Index Scriptorium Estoniae

    Alver, Betti, 1906-1989

    2001-01-01

    Tekst eesti ja inglise k. B. Alveri lühibiograafia eesti ja inglise k. lk. 31. Sisu: Tähetund = The star-bright hour ; Vilepuhuja = The piper ; Masin 1-2 = The Machine 1-2 ; Võlg = The debt ; Mitte viirastus, meelepett = Not a dream ; Udus = Fog-bound ; Korallid Emajões = Corals in an Ancient river ; Froufrou 1-3 = Frou-frou 1-3

  16. New bright optical spectrophotometric standards: A-type stars from the STIS Next Generation Spectral Library

    Science.gov (United States)

    Allende Prieto, C.; del Burgo, C.

    2016-02-01

    Exoplanets have sparked interest in extremely high signal-to-noise ratio spectroscopic observations of very bright stars, in a regime where flux calibrators, in particular DA white dwarfs, are not available. We argue that A-type stars offer a useful alternative and reliable space-based spectrophotometry is now available for a number of bright ones in the range 3 < V < 8 mag. By means of comparing observed spectrophotometry and model fluxes, we identify 18 new very bright trustworthy A-type flux standards for the optical range (400-800 nm), and provide scaled model fluxes for them. Our tests suggest that the absolute fluxes for these stars in the optical are reliable to within 3 per cent. We limit the spectral range to 400-800 nm, since our models have difficulties to reproduce the observed fluxes in the near-infrared and, especially, in the near-UV, where the discrepancies rise up to ˜10 per cent. Based on our model fits, we derive angular diameters with an estimated accuracy of about 1 per cent.

  17. New bright optical spectrophotometric standards: A-type stars from the STIS Next Generation Spectral Library

    CERN Document Server

    Prieto, Carlos Allende

    2015-01-01

    Exoplanets have sparked interest in extremely high signal-to-noise ratio spectroscopic observations of very bright stars, in a regime where flux calibrators, in particular DA white dwarfs, are not available. We argue that A-type stars offer a useful alternative and reliable space-based spectrophotometry is now available for a number of bright ones in the range 3bright trustworthy A-type flux standards for the optical range (400-800 nm), and provide scaled model fluxes for them. Our tests suggest that the absolute fluxes for these stars in the optical are reliable to within 3%. We limit the spectral range to 400-800 nm, since our models have difficulties to reproduce the observed fluxes in the near-infrared and, especially, in the near-UV, where the discrepancies rise up to ~ 10%. Based on our model fits, we derive angular diameters with an estimated accuracy of about 1%.

  18. Bright transients from strongly-magnetized neutron star-black hole mergers

    Science.gov (United States)

    D'Orazio, Daniel J.; Levin, Janna; Murray, Norman W.; Price, Larry

    2016-07-01

    Direct detection of black hole-neutron star pairs is anticipated with the advent of aLIGO. Electromagnetic counterparts may be crucial for a confident gravitational-wave detection as well as for extraction of astronomical information. Yet black hole-neutron star pairs are notoriously dark and so inaccessible to telescopes. Contrary to this expectation, a bright electromagnetic transient can occur in the final moments before merger as long as the neutron star is highly magnetized. The orbital motion of the neutron star magnet creates a Faraday flux and corresponding power available for luminosity. A spectrum of curvature radiation ramps up until the rapid injection of energy ignites a fireball, which would appear as an energetic blackbody peaking in the x ray to γ rays for neutron star field strengths ranging from 1012 to 1016 G respectively and a 10 M⊙ black hole. The fireball event may last from a few milliseconds to a few seconds depending on the neutron star magnetic-field strength, and may be observable with the Fermi Gamma-Ray Burst Monitor with a rate up to a few per year for neutron star field strengths ≳1014 G . We also discuss a possible decaying post-merger event which could accompany this signal. As an electromagnetic counterpart to these otherwise dark pairs, the black-hole battery should be of great value to the development of multi-messenger astronomy in the era of aLIGO.

  19. STELLAR POPULATIONS AND THE STAR FORMATION HISTORIES OF LOW SURFACE BRIGHTNESS GALAXIES. II. H II REGIONS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schombert, James [Department of Physics, University of Oregon, Eugene, OR 97403 (United States); McGaugh, Stacy [Department of Astronomy, Case Western Reserve University, Cleveland, OH 44106 (United States); Maciel, Tamela, E-mail: jschombe@uoregon.edu, E-mail: stacy.mcgaugh@case.edu, E-mail: tm419@cam.ac.uk [Department of Physics, Cambridge University, Cambridge (United Kingdom)

    2013-08-01

    The luminosities, colors, and H{alpha} emission for 429 H II regions in 54 low surface brightness (LSB) galaxies are presented. While the number of H II regions per galaxy is lower in LSB galaxies compared to star-forming irregulars and spirals, there is no indication that the size or luminosity function of H II regions differs from other galaxy types. The lower number of H II regions per galaxy is consistent with their lower total star formation rates. The fraction of the total L{sub H{alpha}} contributed by H II regions varies from 10% to 90% in LSB galaxies (the rest of the H{alpha} emission being associated with a diffuse component) with no correlation with galaxy stellar or gas mass. Bright H II regions have bluer colors, similar to the trend in spirals; their number and luminosities are consistent with the hypothesis that they are produced by the same H II luminosity function as spirals. Comparison with stellar population models indicates that the brightest H II regions in LSB galaxies range in cluster mass from a few 10{sup 3} M{sub Sun} (e.g., {rho} Oph) to globular-cluster-sized systems (e.g., 30 Dor) and that their ages are consistent with clusters from 2 to 15 Myr old. The faintest H II regions are comparable to those in the LMC powered by a single O or B star. Thus, star formation in LSB galaxies covers the full range of stellar cluster mass.

  20. The very first Pop III stars and their relation to bright z~6 quasars

    CERN Document Server

    Trenti, M

    2007-01-01

    We discuss the link between dark matter halos hosting the first PopIII stars formed at redshift z > 40 and the rare, massive, halos that are generally considered to host bright z~6 quasars. We show that within the typical volume occupied by one bright high-z QSO the remnants of the first several thousands PopIII stars formed do not end up in the most massive halos at z~6, but rather live in a large variety of environments. The black hole seeds planted by these very first PopIII stars can easily grow to M > 10^{9.5} Msun by z=6 assuming Eddington accretion with radiative efficiency epsilon~0.1. Therefore quenching of the accretion is crucial to avoid an overabundance of supermassive black holes. We implement a simple feedback model for the growth of the seeds planted by PopIII stars and obtain a z~6 BH mass function consistent with the observed QSO luminosity function.

  1. Optical Gravitational Lensing Experiment Population Effects on the Mean Brightness of the Red Clump Stars

    CERN Document Server

    Udalski, A

    1998-01-01

    We present an empirical test indicating that the mean I-band magnitude of the red clump stars, used as the standard candle in the recent distance determinations to the Magellanic Clouds and other objects, is age independent for intermediate age (2-10 Gyr) stars. Fifteen star clusters of age ~1.5-12 Gyr from the LMC and SMC (ESO121SC03, SL663, NGC2155, NGC2121, SL388, SL862, NGC121, L1, KRON3, NGC416, L113, NGC339, L11, NGC419, NGC411) were observed and their color-magnitude diagrams are presented. The mean I-band brightness of the red clump in these clusters is constant and its mean extinction-free magnitude is: I_0=17.88+/-0.05 mag and I_0=18.31+/-0.07 mag at the mean metallicity of -0.8 dex and -1.2 dex for the LMC and SMC clusters, respectively. For older objects (> 10 Gyr) the brightness of the red clump, which converts into the red part of the horizontal branch, fades by about 0.3-0.4 mag, setting an important limitation on the red clump stars method of distance determination. The red clump distance modu...

  2. Ground-Based Sub-Millimagnitude CCD Photometry of Bright Stars using Snapshot Observations

    CERN Document Server

    Mann, Andrew W; Aldering, Greg

    2011-01-01

    We demonstrate ground-based sub-millimagnitude (10^7 electrons) to be acquired in a single integration; (iii) pointing the telescope so that all stellar images fall on the same detector pixels; and (iv) using a region of the CCD detector that is free of non-linear or aberrant pixels. We describe semi-automated observations with the Supernova Integrated Field Spectrograph (SNIFS) on the University of Hawaii 2.2m telescope on Mauna Kea, with which we achieved photometric precision as good as 5.2x10^-4 (0.56 mmag) with a 5 minute cadence over a two hour interval. In one experiment, we monitored 8 stars, each separated by several degrees, and achieved sub-mmag precision with a cadence (per star) of ~17 min. Our snapshot technique is suitable for automated searches for planetary transits among multiple, bright-stars.

  3. Homogeneous spectroscopic parameters for bright planet host stars from the northern hemisphere

    CERN Document Server

    Sousa, S G; Mortier, A; Tsantaki, M; Adibekyan, V; Mena, E Delgado; Israelian, G; Rojas-Ayala, B; Neves, V

    2015-01-01

    Aims. In this work we derive new precise and homogeneous parameters for 37 stars with planets. For this purpose, we analyze high resolution spectra obtained by the NARVAL spectrograph for a sample composed of bright planet host stars in the northern hemisphere. The new parameters are included in the SWEET-Cat online catalogue. Methods. To ensure that the catalogue is homogeneous, we use our standard spectroscopic analysis procedure, ARES+MOOG, to derive effective temperatures, surface gravities, and metallicities. These spectroscopic stellar parameters are then used as input to compute the stellar mass and radius, which are fundamental for the derivation of the planetary mass and radius. Results. We show that the spectroscopic parameters, masses, and radii are generally in good agreement with the values available in online databases of exoplanets. There are some exceptions, especially for the evolved stars. These are analyzed in detail focusing on the effect of the stellar mass on the derived planetary mass. ...

  4. The VLT/NaCo large program to probe the occurrence of exoplanets and brown dwarfs at wide orbits. III. The frequency of brown dwarfs and giant planets as companions to solar-type stars

    CERN Document Server

    Reggiani, M; Chauvin, G; Vigan, A; Quanz, S P; Biller, B; Bonavita, M; Desidera, S; Delorme, P; Hagelberg, J; Maire, A -L; Boccaletti, A; Beuzit, J -L; Buenzli, E; Carson, J; Covino, E; Feldt, M; Girard, J; Gratton, R; Henning, T; Kasper, M; Lagrange, A -M; Mesa, D; Messina, S; Montagnier, G; Mordasini, C; Mouillet, D; Schlieder, J E; Segransan, D; Thalmann, C; Zurlo, A

    2015-01-01

    In recent years there have been many attempts to characterize the occurrence of stellar, BD and planetary-mass companions to solar-type stars, with the aim of constraining formation mechanisms. From RV observations a dearth of companions with masses between 10-40 MJup has been noticed at close separations, suggesting the possibility of a distinct formation mechanism for objects above and below this range. We present a model for the substellar companion mass function (CMF). It consists of the superposition of the planet and BD companion mass distributions, assuming that we can extrapolate the RV measured companion mass function for planets to larger separations and the stellar companion mass-ratio distribution over all separations into the BD mass regime. By using both the results of the VLT/NaCo large program and the complementary archive datasets that probe the occurrence of planets and BDs on wide orbits around solar-type stars, we place some constraints on the planet and BD distributions. We developed a MC...

  5. Invited Talk: Photometry of Bright Variable Stars with the BRITE Constellation Nano-Satellites: Opportunities for Amateur Astronomers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guinan, E. F.

    2014-06-01

    (Abstract only) The BRIght Target Explorer (BRITE) is a joint Austrian-Canadian-Polish Astronomy mission to carry out high precision photometry of bright (mv computers, and so on. The first two (of up to six) satellites were successfully launched during February 2013. After post-launch commissioning, science operations commenced during October 2013. The primary goals are to carry out continuous multi-color (currently blue and red filters) high-precision millimag (mmag) photometry in particular locations in the sky. Typically these pointings will last for two to four months and secure simultaneous blue/red photometry of bright variable stars within the field. The first science pointing is centered on the Orion region. Since most bright stars are intrinsically luminous, hot O/B stars, giants, and supergiants will be the most common targets. However, some bright eclipsing binaries (such as Algol, b Lyr, e Aur) and a few chromospherically-active RS CVn stars (such as Capella) may be eventually be monitored. The BRITE-Constellation program of high precision, two color photometry of bright stars offers a great opportunity to study a wide range of stellar astrophysical problems. Bright stars offer convenient laboratories to study many current and important problems in stellar astrophysics. These include probing stellar interiors and pulsation in pulsating stars, tests of stellar evolution and structure for Cepheids and other luminous stars. To scientifically enhance the BRITE science returns, the BRITE investigators are very interested in securing contemporaneous ground-based spectroscopy and standardized photometry of target stars. The BRITE Ground Based Observations Team is coordinating ground-based observing efforts for BRITE targets. The team helps coordinate collaborations with amateur and professional astronomer. The ground-based coordinators are: Thomas Eversberg (thomas.eversberg@dlr.de) and, for spectroscopy, Contanze Zwintz (konstanze@ster.kuleuven.be). Detailed

  6. The Visibility of Stars as a Function of Night Sky Brightness

    Science.gov (United States)

    Upgren, A. R.; Loth, A. L.; Stock, J.

    2001-12-01

    The number of stars visible to the naked eye at night varies widely, but is often reported as being near 2500 on a dark night. The true numbers vary widely, depending as they do on the faintest limiting magnitude visible to a particular eye, V', and the extinction coefficient of the sky as a function of haze and the reflection of aerosols in the lower atmosphere due to upward-shining light pollution. We limit our discussion to cloud free moonless nights with a true horizon uncluttered by trees and buildings. For simplicity, we assume a linear extinction coefficient, k, to represent the influence of sky brightness and light pollution. The input to the program consists of the entire Bright Star Catalogue of 9110 stars (essentially complete in photoelectric V magnitude to V > 6) and choices for observer latitude, local sidereal time, k, and V'. Here we present results for the latitude of Middletown, CT (41.5N) and three values of k, representing cases of observation at sea level; these are 0.3 for a clear night in the country far from lights, 0.5 for a typical suburban street, and 0.8 for a city center. It is assumed that no direct glare is present. The limiting magnitude of the faintest visible star, V', varies widely among observers from as faint as 8.0 for some with very keen eyesight, to perhaps 4.5 for elderly observers. Star counts can be derived for any set of input variables. This program allows great flexibility and can be used in a convincing manner to illustrate the damaging effects of light pollution. For the latitude of 41.5N and a local sidereal time of zero hours, we find for extinctions of 0.3, 0.5, and 0.8 magnitudes, about 2350, 1720, and 1100 visible stars, respectively, for the canonical limiting magnitude of 6.0 at the zenith, with little change over the range in sidereal time. Raising V' to 5.0, a more realistic limit for elderly eyes, lowers the counts to about 700, 500, and 320, respectively. These numbers suggest that aging eyes play a greater

  7. BRIGHT BROADBAND AFTERGLOWS OF GRAVITATIONAL WAVE BURSTS FROM MERGERS OF BINARY NEUTRON STARS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gao He; Ding Xuan; Wu Xuefeng [Purple Mountain Observatory, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Nanjing 210008 (China); Zhang Bing [Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of Nevada, Las Vegas, NV 89154 (United States); Dai Zigao, E-mail: xfwu@pmo.ac.cn, E-mail: zhang@physics.unlv.edu, E-mail: dzg@nju.edu.cn [School of Astronomy and Space Science, Nanjing University, Nanjing 210093 (China)

    2013-07-10

    If double neutron star mergers leave behind a massive magnetar rather than a black hole, then a bright early afterglow can follow the gravitational wave burst (GWB) even if there is no short gamma-ray burst (SGRB)-GWB association or if there is an association but the SGRB does not beam toward Earth. Besides directly dissipating the proto-magnetar wind, as suggested by Zhang, here we suggest that the magnetar wind could push the ejecta launched during the merger process and, under certain conditions, would reach a relativistic speed. Such a magnetar-powered ejecta, when interacting with the ambient medium, would develop a bright broadband afterglow due to synchrotron radiation. We study this physical scenario in detail and present the predicted X-ray, optical, and radio light curves for a range of magnetar and ejecta parameters. We show that the X-ray and optical light curves usually peak around the magnetar spin-down timescale ({approx}10{sup 3}-10{sup 5} s), reaching brightnesses readily detectable by wide-field X-ray and optical telescopes, and remain detectable for an extended period. The radio afterglow peaks later, but is much brighter than the case without a magnetar energy injection. Therefore, such bright broadband afterglows, if detected and combined with GWBs in the future, would be a probe of massive millisecond magnetars and stiff equations of state for nuclear matter.

  8. The KELT-North Transit Survey: Hot Planets around Hot, Bright Stars

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gaudi, B. Scott; Beatty, Thomas G.; Eastman, Jason D.; Lund, Michael; Penny, Matthew; Pepper, Joshua; Rodriguez, Joseph E.; Siverd, Robert; Stassun, Keivan; Stevens, Daniel J.; KELT-North Collaboration

    2015-01-01

    The KELT-North is a small-aperture, wide-angle automated telescope located in southern Arizona that has been surveying roughly 40% of the northern sky for transiting planets since 2006. By virtue of its small aperture and large field-of-view, KELT is most sensitive to hot Jupiters transiting relatively bright (V~8-10), and thus relatively hot stars. Roughly half of the over 200,000 dwarf stars targeted by KELT are hotter than 6250K; such stars pose novel challenges, but also provide unique opportunities. I will present the first transiting substellar companions discovered by KELT, focusing in detail on a few particularly interesting systems. I will discuss our plans for determining the frequency and demographics of short-period companions to hot stars from KELT; comparison with similar results for cooler stars may provide important constraints on theories of the emplacement and tidal evolution of low-mass stellar companions. Finally, I will speculate on how the lessons learned from KELT may inform the target selection and survey strategies for the TESS mission.This work was supported by NSF CAREER grant AST-1056524.

  9. Spectroscopy of Bright QUEST RR Lyrae Stars: Velocity Substructures toward Virgo

    CERN Document Server

    Vivas, A Katherina; Zinn, Robert; Winnick, Rebeccah; Duffau, Sonia; Mateu, Cecilia

    2008-01-01

    Using a sample of 43 bright (V<16.1, distance <13 kpc) RR Lyrae stars (RRLS) from the QUEST survey with spectroscopic radial velocities and metallicities, we find that several separate halo substructures contribute to the Virgo overdensity (VOD). While there is little evidence for halo substructure in the spatial distribution of these stars, their distribution in radial velocity reveals two moving groups. These results are reinforced when the sample is combined with a sample of blue horizontal branch stars that were identified in the SDSS, and the combined sample provides evidence for one additional moving group. These groups correspond to peaks in the radial velocity distribution of a sample of F type main-sequence stars that was recently observed in the same directon by SEGUE, although in one case the RRLS and F star groups may not lie at the same distance. One of the new substructures has a very narrow range in metallicity, which is more consistent with it being the debris from a destroyed globular c...

  10. Radii, masses, and ages of 18 bright stars using interferometry and new estimations of exoplanetary parameters

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ligi, R.; Creevey, O.; Mourard, D.; Crida, A.; Lagrange, A.-M.; Nardetto, N.; Perraut, K.; Schultheis, M.; Tallon-Bosc, I.; ten Brummelaar, T.

    2016-02-01

    Context. Accurate stellar parameters are needed in numerous domains of astrophysics. The position of stars on the Hertzsprung-Russell diagram is an important indication of their structure and evolution, and it helps improve stellar models. Furthermore, the age and mass of stars hosting planets are required elements for studying exoplanetary systems. Aims: We aim at determining accurate parameters of a set of 18 bright exoplanet host and potential host stars from interferometric measurements, photometry, and stellar models. Methods: Using the VEGA/CHARA interferometer operating in the visible domain, we measured the angular diameters of 18 stars, ten of which host exoplanets. We combined them with their distances to estimate their radii. We used photometry to derive their bolometric flux and, then, their effective temperature and luminosity to place them on the H-R diagram. We then used the PARSEC models to derive their best fit ages and masses, with error bars derived from Monte Carlo calculations. Results: Our interferometric measurements lead to an average of 1.9% uncertainty on angular diameters and 3% on stellar radii. There is good agreement between measured and indirect estimations of angular diameters (either from SED fitting or from surface brightness relations) for main sequence (MS) stars, but not as good for more evolved stars. For each star, we provide a likelihood map in the mass-age plane; typically, two distinct sets of solutions appear (an old and a young age). The errors on the ages and masses that we provide account for the metallicity uncertainties, which are often neglected by other works. From measurements of its radius and density, we also provide the mass of 55 Cnc independently of models. From the stellar masses, we provide new estimates of semi-major axes and minimum masses of exoplanets with reliable uncertainties. We also derive the radius, density, and mass of 55 Cnc e, a super-Earth that transits its stellar host. Our exoplanetary

  11. Near-IR Surface Brightness Fluctuations and Optical Colours of Magellanic Star Clusters

    CERN Document Server

    Gonzalez-Lopezlira, R A; Mouhcine, M; Liu, M C; Bruzual, G; De Batz, B; Gonzalez-Lopezlira, Rosa A.; Albarran, Marna Y.; Mouhcine, Mustapha; Liu, Michael C.; Bruzual, Gustavo; Batz, Bertrand de

    2005-01-01

    This work continues our efforts to calibrate model surface brightness luminosities for the study of unresolved stellar populations, through the comparison with data of Magellanic Cloud star clusters. We present here the relation between absolute K_s-band fluctuation magnitude and (V - I) integrated colour, using data from the 2MASS and DENIS surveys, and from the literature. We compare the star cluster sample with the sample of early-type galaxies and spiral bulges studied by Liu et al. (2002). We find that intermediate-age to old clusters lie along a linear correlation with the same slope, within the errors, of that defined by the galaxies in the barM_{K_s} vs. (V - I) diagram. While the calibration by Liu et al. was determined in the colour range 1.05 = barM_{K_s} >= -9, 0.3 <= (V - I) <= 1.25. This implies, according to Bruzual & Charlot (2003) and Mouhcine & Lancon (2003) models, that the star clusters and the latest star formation bursts in the galaxies and bulges constitute an age sequence...

  12. Radii, masses, and ages of 18 bright stars using interferometry. And new estimations of exoplanetary parameters

    CERN Document Server

    Ligi, Roxanne; Mourard, Denis; Crida, Aurélien; Lagrange, Anne-Marie; Nardetto, Nicolas; Perraut, Karine; Schultheis, Mathias

    2015-01-01

    Accurate stellar parameters are needed in numerous domains of astrophysics. The position of stars on the H-R diagram is an important indication of their structure and evolution, and it helps improve stellar models. Furthermore, the age and mass of stars hosting planets are required elements for studying exoplanetary systems. We aim at determining accurate parameters of a set of 18 bright exoplanet host and potential host stars from interferometric measurements, photometry, and stellar models. Using the VEGA/CHARA interferometer, we measured the angular diameters of 18 stars, ten of which host exoplanets. We combined them with their distances to estimate their radii. We used photometry to derive their bolometric flux and, then, their effective temperature and luminosity to place them on the H-R diagram. We then used the PARSEC models to derive their best fit ages and masses, with error bars derived from MC calculations. Our interferometric measurements lead to an average of 1.9% uncertainty on angular diameter...

  13. Evolution and constrains in the star formation histories of IR-bright star forming galaxies at high redshift

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sklias, Panos; Schaerer, Daniel; Elbaz, David

    2015-08-01

    Understanding and constraining the early cosmic star formation history of the Universe is a key question of galaxy evolution. A large fraction of star formation is dust obscured, so it is crucial to have access to the IR emission of galaxies to properly study them.Utilizing the multi-wavelength photometry from GOODS-Herschel, we perform SED fitting with different variable star formation histories (SFHs), which we constrain thanks to the observed IR luminosities, on a large sample of individually IR-detected sources from z~1 to 4. We explore how (and to which extent) constraining dust attenuation thanks to the IR luminosities allows to reduce the scatter (expected when using variable SFHs, in contrast to IR+UV standard calibrations) in physical properties and relations such as mass-SFR and the so-called star-forming Main Sequence (MS).Although limited at the high-z end, our analysis shows a change of trends in SFHs between low and high z, that follows the established cosmic SFR density, with galaxies found to prefer rising SFRs at z~3-4, and declining SFRs at z≤1. We show that a fraction of galaxies (~20%), mainly at z≤2, can have lower SFRs than IR-inferred, but still being compatible with the observations, indicative of being post-starbursts/undergoing quenching while bright in the IR, in agreement with theoretical work. The IR-constrained stellar population models we obtain also indicate that the two main modes of star formation - MS and starburst - evolve differently with time, with the former being mostly slow evolving and lying on the MS for long lasting periods, and the latter being very recent, rapidly increasing bursts (or on the decline, when belonging to the aforementioned "quenched" category). Finally, we illustrate how spectroscopic observation of nebular emission lines further enables as to constrain effectively the SFHs of galaxies.

  14. Joint Analysis of near-infrared properties and surface brightness fluctuations of LMC star clusters

    CERN Document Server

    Raimondo, G

    2009-01-01

    Surface brightness fluctuations have been proved to be a very powerful technique to determine the distance and characterize the stellar content in extragalactic systems. Nevertheless, before facing the problem of stellar content in distant galaxies, we need to calibrate the method onto nearby well-known systems. In this paper we analyze the properties at $J$ and $K_s$ bands of a sample of 19 star clusters in the Large Magellanic Cloud (LMC), for which accurate near-infrared (NIR) resolved star photometry, and integrated photometry are available. For the same sample, we derive the SBF measurements in $J$ and $K_s$-bands. We use the multi-purpose stellar population code \\emph{SPoT (Stellar POpulations Tools)} to simulate the color-magnitude diagram, stellar counts, integrated magnitudes, colors, and surface brightness fluctuations of each cluster. The present procedure allows us to estimate the age and metallicity of the clusters in a consistent way, and provides a new calibration of the empirical $s$-parameter...

  15. The Age-Mass-Metallicity-Activity relation of solar-type stars: Comparisons with asteroseismology and the NGC 188 open cluster

    CERN Document Server

    Lorenzo-Oliveira, Diego; Schiavon, Ricardo P

    2016-01-01

    The Mount Wilson Ca II index log$(R'_{\\rm HK})$ is the accepted standard metric of calibration for the chromospheric activity versus age relation of FGK stars. Recent results claim its inability to discern activity levels, and thus ages, for stars older than $\\sim$2 Gyr, which would severely hamper its application to date disk stars older than the Sun. We present a new activity-age calibration of the Mt. Wilson index explicitly taking into account mass and $[$Fe/H$]$ biases, implicit in samples of stars selected to have precise ages, that have so far gone unappreciated. We show that these selection biases tend to blur the activity-age relation for large age ranges. We calibrate the Mt. Wilson index for a sample of field FGK stars with precise ages, covering a wide range of mass and $[$Fe/H$]$, augmented with data from the Pleiades, Hyades, M67 clusters, and the Ursa Major moving group. We further test the calibration with extensive new Gemini/GMOS log$(R'_{\\rm HK})$ data of the old, solar $[$Fe/H$]$ clusters ...

  16. Hubble Space Telescope Near-Ultraviolet Spectroscopy of Bright CEMP-s Stars

    CERN Document Server

    Placco, Vinicius M; Ivans, Inese I; Filler, Dan; Imig, Julie A; Roederer, Ian U; Abate, Carlo; Hansen, Terese; Cowan, John J; Frebel, Anna; Lawler, James E; Schatz, Hendrik; Sneden, Christopher; Sobeck, Jennifer S; Aoki, Wako; Smith, Verne V; Bolte, Michael

    2015-01-01

    We present an elemental-abundance analysis, in the near-ultraviolet (NUV) spectral range, for the bright carbon-enhanced metal-poor (CEMP) stars HD196944 (V = 8.40, [Fe/H] = -2.41) and HD201626 (V = 8.16, [Fe/H] = -1.51), based on data acquired with the Space Telescope Imaging Spectrograph (STIS) on the Hubble Space Telescope. Both of these stars belong to the sub-class CEMP-s, and exhibit clear over-abundances of heavy elements associated with production by the slow neutron-capture process. HD196944 has been well-studied in the optical region, but we are able to add abundance results for six species (Ge, Nb, Mo, Lu, Pt, and Au) that are only accessible in the NUV. In addition, we provide the first determination of its orbital period, P=1325 days. HD201626 has only a limited number of abundance results based on previous optical work -- here we add five new species from the NUV, including Pb. We compare these results with models of binary-system evolution and s-process element production in stars on the asympt...

  17. KIC 4768731: a bright long-period roAp star in the Kepler Field

    CERN Document Server

    Smalley, B; Murphy, S J; Lehmann, H; Kurtz, D W; Holdsworth, D L; Cunha, M S; Balona, L A; Briquet, M; Bruntt, H; de Cat, P; Lampens, P; Thygesen, A O; Uytterhoeven, K

    2015-01-01

    We report the identification of 61.45 d^-1 (711.2 mu Hz) oscillations, with amplitudes of 62.6-mu mag, in KIC 4768731 (HD 225914) using Kepler photometry. This relatively bright (V=9.17) chemically peculiar star with spectral type A5 Vp SrCr(Eu) has previously been found to exhibit rotational modulation with a period of 5.21 d. Fourier analysis reveals a simple dipole pulsator with an amplitude that has remained stable over a 4-yr time span, but with a frequency that is variable. Analysis of high-resolution spectra yields stellar parameters of T_eff = 8100 +/- 200 K, log g = 4.0 +/- 0.2, [Fe/H] = +0.31 +/- 0.24 and v sin i = 14.8 +/- 1.6 km/s. Line profile variations caused by rotation are also evident. Lines of Sr, Cr, Eu, Mg and Si are strongest when the star is brightest, while Y and Ba vary in anti-phase with the other elements. The abundances of rare earth elements are only modestly enhanced compared to other roAp stars of similar T_eff and log g. Radial velocities in the literature suggest a significant...

  18. NO TIME FOR DEAD TIME: TIMING ANALYSIS OF BRIGHT BLACK HOLE BINARIES WITH NuSTAR

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bachetti, Matteo; Barret, Didier [Université de Toulouse, UPS-OMP, IRAP, Toulouse F-31400 (France); Harrison, Fiona A.; Cook, Rick; Grefenstette, Brian W.; Fürst, Felix [Cahill Center for Astronomy and Astrophysics, Caltech, Pasadena, CA 91125 (United States); Tomsick, John; Boggs, Steven E.; Craig, William W. [Space Sciences Laboratory, University of California, Berkeley, CA 94720 (United States); Schmid, Christian [Dr. Karl-Remeis-Sternwarte and ECAP, Sternwartstrasse 7, D-96049 Bamberg (Germany); Christensen, Finn E. [DTU Space, National Space Institute, Technical University of Denmark, Elektrovej 327, DK-2800 Lyngby (Denmark); Fabian, Andrew C.; Kara, Erin [Institute of Astronomy, University of Cambridge, Madingley Road, Cambridge CB3 0HA (United Kingdom); Gandhi, Poshak [Department of Physics, Durham University, South Road DH1 3LE (United Kingdom); Hailey, Charles J. [Columbia Astrophysics Laboratory, Columbia University, New York, NY 10027 (United States); Maccarone, Thomas J. [Department of Physics, Texas Tech University, Lubbock, TX 79409 (United States); Miller, Jon M. [Department of Astronomy, University of Michigan, 500 Church Street, Ann Arbor, MI 48109-1042 (United States); Pottschmidt, Katja [CRESST, UMBC, and NASA GSFC, Code 661, Greenbelt, MD 20771 (United States); Stern, Daniel [Jet Propulsion Laboratory, California Institute of Technology, Pasadena, CA 91109 (United States); Uttley, Phil, E-mail: matteo.bachetti@irap.omp.eu [Anton Pannekoek Institute, University of Amsterdam, Science Park 904, 1098 XH Amsterdam (Netherlands); and others

    2015-02-20

    Timing of high-count-rate sources with the NuSTAR Small Explorer Mission requires specialized analysis techniques. NuSTAR was primarily designed for spectroscopic observations of sources with relatively low count rates rather than for timing analysis of bright objects. The instrumental dead time per event is relatively long (∼2.5 msec) and varies event-to-event by a few percent. The most obvious effect is a distortion of the white noise level in the power density spectrum (PDS) that cannot be easily modeled with standard techniques due to the variable nature of the dead time. In this paper, we show that it is possible to exploit the presence of two completely independent focal planes and use the cospectrum, the real part of the cross PDS, to obtain a good proxy of the white-noise-subtracted PDS. Thereafter, one can use a Monte Carlo approach to estimate the remaining effects of dead time, namely, a frequency-dependent modulation of the variance and a frequency-independent drop of the sensitivity to variability. In this way, most of the standard timing analysis can be performed, albeit with a sacrifice in signal-to-noise ratio relative to what would be achieved using more standard techniques. We apply this technique to NuSTAR observations of the black hole binaries GX 339–4, Cyg X-1, and GRS 1915+105.

  19. The complex environment of the bright carbon star TX Psc as probed by spectro-astrometry

    CERN Document Server

    Hron, J; Aringer, B; Klotz, D; Lebzelter, T; Paladini, C; Wiedemann, G

    2015-01-01

    Context: Stars on the asymptotic giant branch (AGB) show broad evidence of inhomogeneous atmospheres and circumstellar envelopes. These have been studied by a variety of methods on various angular scales. In this paper we explore the envelope of the well-studied carbon star TX Psc by the technique of spectro-astrometry. Aims: We explore the potential of this method for detecting asymmetries around AGB stars. Methods:We obtained CRIRES observations of several CO $\\Delta$v=1 lines near 4.6 $\\mu$m and HCN lines near 3 $\\mu$m in 2010 and 2013. These were then searched for spectro-astrometric signatures. For the interpretation of the results, we used simple simulated observations. Results: Several lines show significant photocentre shifts with a clear dependence on position angle. In all cases, tilde-shaped signatures are found where the positive and negative shifts (at PA 0deg) are associated with blue and weaker red components of the lines. The shifts can be modelled with a bright blob 70 mas to 210 mas south of...

  20. VVV High proper motion stars I. The catalogue of bright Ks < 13.5 stars

    CERN Document Server

    Kurtev, R; Beamin, J C; Folkes, S L; Ramirez, K Pena; Ivanov, V D; Borissova, J; Villanueva, V; Minniti, D; Mendez, R; Lucas, P W; Smith, L C; Pinfield, D J; Kuhn, M A; Jones, H R A; Antonova, A; Yip, A K P

    2016-01-01

    Knowledge of the stellar content near the Sun is important for a broad range of topics ranging from the search for planets to the study of Milky Way structure. The most powerful method for identifying potentially nearby stars is proper motion (PM) surveys. All old optical surveys avoid, or are at least substantially incomplete, near the Galactic plane. The depth and breadth of the "Vista Variables in Via Lactea" (VVV) near-IR survey significantly improves this situation. Taking advantage of the VVV survey database, we have measured PMs in the densest regions of the MW bulge and southern plane in order to complete the census of nearby objects. We have developed a custom PM pipeline based on VVV catalogues from the Cambridge Astronomy Survey Unit (CASU), by comparing the first epoch of JHKs with the multi-epoch Ks-bands acquired later. Taking advantage of the large time baseline between the 2MASS and the VVV observations, we also obtained 2MASS-VVV PMs. We present a near-IR proper motion catalogue for the whole...

  1. The variability timescales and brightness temperatures of radio flares from stars to supermassive black holes

    CERN Document Server

    Pietka, M; Keane, E F

    2014-01-01

    In this paper we compile the analysis of ~ 200 synchrotron flare events from ~ 90 distinct objects/events for which the distance is well established, and hence the peak luminosity can be accurately estimated. For each event we measure this peak and compare it to the rise and decay timescales, as fit by exponential functions, which allows us in turn to estimate a minimum brightness temperature for all the events. The astrophysical objects from which the flares originate vary from flare stars to supermassive black holes in active galactic nuclei, and include both repeating phenomena and single cataclysmic events (such as supernovae and gamma ray burst afterglows). The measured timescales vary from minutes to longer than years, and the peak radio luminosities range over 22 orders of magnitude. Despite very different underlying phenomena, including relativistic and non-relativistic regimes, and highly collimated versus isotropic phenomena, we find a broad correlation between peak radio luminosity and rise/decay t...

  2. VVV High proper motion stars I. The catalogue of bright KS ≤ 13.5 stars

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kurtev, R.; Gromadzki, M.; Beamín, J. C.; Folkes, S. L.; Pena Ramirez, K.; Ivanov, V. D.; Borissova, J.; Villanueva, V.; Minniti, D.; Mendez, R.; Lucas, P. W.; Smith, L. C.; Pinfield, D. J.; Kuhn, M. A.; Jones, H. R. A.; Antonova, A.; Yip, A. K. P.

    2016-09-01

    Knowledge of the stellar content near the Sun is important for a broad range of topics ranging from the search for planets to the study of Milky Way structure. The most powerful method for identifying potentially nearby stars is proper motion (PM) surveys. All old optical surveys avoid, or are at least substantially incomplete, near the Galactic plane. The depth and breadth of the "Vista Variables in Vía Láctea" (VVV) near-IR survey significantly improves this situation. Taking advantage of the VVV survey database, we have measured PMs in the densest regions of the MW bulge and southern plane in order to complete the census of nearby objects. We have developed a custom PM pipeline based on VVV catalogues from the Cambridge Astronomy Survey Unit (CASU), by comparing the first epoch of JHKS with the multi-epoch KS-bands acquired later. Taking advantage of the large time baseline between the 2MASS and the VVV observations, we also obtained 2MASS-VVV PMs. We present a near-IR proper motion catalogue for the whole area of the VVV survey, which includes 3003 moving stellar sources. All of these have been visually inspected and are real PM objects. Our catalogue is in very good agreement with the proper motion data supplied in IR catalogues outside the densest zone of the MW. The majority of the PM objects in our catalogue are nearby M-dwarfs, as expected. This new database allow us to identify 57 common proper motion binary candidates, among which are two new systems within 30 pc of the Sun.

  3. WASP-20b and WASP-28b: a hot Saturn and a hot Jupiter in near-aligned orbits around solar-type stars

    CERN Document Server

    Anderson, D R; Hellier, C; Lendl, M; Lister, T A; Maxted, P F L; Queloz, D; Smalley, B; Smith, A M; Triaud, A H M J; Brown, D J A; Gillon, M; Neveu-VanMalle, M; Pepe, F; Pollacco, D; Segransan, D; Udry, S; West, R G; Wheatley, P J

    2014-01-01

    We report the discovery of the planets WASP-20b and WASP-28b along with measurements of their sky-projected orbital obliquities. WASP-20b is an inflated, Saturn-mass planet (0.31 $M_{\\rm Jup}$; 1.46 $R_{\\rm Jup}$) in a 4.9-day, near-aligned ($\\lambda = 8.1 \\pm 3.6^\\circ$) orbit around CD-24 102 ($V$=10.7; F9). WASP-28b is an inflated, Jupiter-mass planet (0.91 $M_{\\rm Jup}$; 1.21 $R_{\\rm Jup}$) in a 3.4-day, near-aligned ($\\lambda = 8 \\pm 18^\\circ$) orbit around a $V$=12, F8 star. As intermediate-mass planets in short orbits around aged, cool stars ($7^{+2}_{-1}$ Gyr for WASP-20 and $5^{+3}_{-2}$ Gyr for WASP-28; both with $T_{\\rm eff}$ < 6250 K), their orbital alignment is consistent with the hypothesis that close-in giant planets are scattered into eccentric orbits with random alignments, which are then circularised and aligned with their stars' spins via tidal dissipation.

  4. Keck Observations of the UV-Bright Star Barnard 29 in the Globular Cluster M13 (NGC 6205)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dixon, William Van Dyke; Chayer, Pierre; Reid, Iain N.

    2016-06-01

    In color-magnitude diagrams of globular clusters, stars brighter than the horizontal branch and bluer than the red-giant branch are known as UV-bright stars. Most are evolving from the asymptotic giant branch (AGB) to the tip of the white-dwarf cooling curve. To better understand this important phase of stellar evolution, we have analyzed a Keck HIRES echelle spectrum of the UV-bright star Barnard 29 in M13. We begin by fitting the star's H I (Hα, Hβ, and Hγ) and He I lines with a grid of synthetic spectra generated from non-LTE H-He models computed using the TLUSTY code. We find that the shape of the star's Hα profile is not well reproduced with these models. Upgrading from version 200 to version 204M of TLUSTY solves this problem: the Hα profile is now well reproduced. TLUSTY version 204 includes improved calculations for the Stark broadening of hydrogen line profiles. Using these models, we derive stellar parameters of Teff = 21,100 K, log g = 3.05, and log (He/H) = -0.87, values consistent with those of previous authors. The star's Keck spectrum shows photospheric absorption from N II, O II, Mg II, Al III, Si II, Si III, S II, Ar II, and Fe III. The abundances of these species are consistent with published values for the red-giant stars in M13, suggesting that the star's chemistry has changed little since it left the AGB.

  5. Brightness Variations of Sun-like Stars: The Mystery Deepens - Astronomers facing Socratic "ignorance"

    Science.gov (United States)

    2009-12-01

    An extensive study made with ESO's Very Large Telescope deepens a long-standing mystery in the study of stars similar to the Sun. Unusual year-long variations in the brightness of about one third of all Sun-like stars during the latter stages of their lives still remain unexplained. Over the past few decades, astronomers have offered many possible explanations, but the new, painstaking observations contradict them all and only deepen the mystery. The search for a suitable interpretation is on. "Astronomers are left in the dark, and for once, we do not enjoy it," says Christine Nicholls from Mount Stromlo Observatory, Australia, lead author of a paper reporting the study. "We have obtained the most comprehensive set of observations to date for this class of Sun-like stars, and they clearly show that all the possible explanations for their unusual behaviour just fail." The mystery investigated by the team dates back to the 1930s and affects about a third of Sun-like stars in our Milky Way and other galaxies. All stars with masses similar to our Sun become, towards the end of their lives, red, cool and extremely large, just before retiring as white dwarfs. Also known as red giants, these elderly stars exhibit very strong periodic variations in their luminosity over timescales up to a couple of years. "Such variations are thought to be caused by what we call 'stellar pulsations'," says Nicholls. "Roughly speaking, the giant star swells and shrinks, becoming brighter and dimmer in a regular pattern. However, one third of these stars show an unexplained additional periodic variation, on even longer timescales - up to five years." In order to find out the origin of this secondary feature, the astronomers monitored 58 stars in our galactic neighbour, the Large Magellanic Cloud, over two and a half years. They acquired spectra using the high resolution FLAMES/GIRAFFE spectrograph on ESO's Very Large Telescope and combined them with images from other telescopes [1

  6. No Time for Dead Time: Timing analysis of bright black hole binaries with NuSTAR

    CERN Document Server

    Bachetti, Matteo; Cook, Rick; Tomsick, John; Schmid, Christian; Grefenstette, Brian W; Barret, Didier; Boggs, Steven E; Christensen, Finn E; Craig, William W; Fabian, Andrew C; Fürst, Felix; Gandhi, Poshak; Hailey, Charles J; Kara, Erin; Maccarone, Thomas J; Miller, Jon M; Pottschmidt, Katja; Stern, Daniel; Uttley, Phil; Walton, Dominic J; Wilms, Jörn; Zhang, William W

    2014-01-01

    Timing of high-count rate sources with the NuSTAR Small Explorer Mission requires specialized analysis techniques. NuSTAR was primarily designed for spectroscopic observations of sources with relatively low count-rates rather than for timing analysis of bright objects. The instrumental dead time per event is relatively long (~2.5 msec), and varies by a few percent event-to-event. The most obvious effect is a distortion of the white noise level in the power density spectrum (PDS) that cannot be modeled easily with the standard techniques due to the variable nature of the dead time. In this paper, we show that it is possible to exploit the presence of two completely independent focal planes and use the cross power density spectrum to obtain a good proxy of the white noise-subtracted PDS. Thereafter, one can use a Monte Carlo approach to estimate the remaining effects of dead time, namely a frequency-dependent modulation of the variance and a frequency-independent drop of the sensitivity to variability. In this ...

  7. Using Raster Scans of Bright Stars to Measure the Relative Total Throughputs of Cherenkov Telescopes

    CERN Document Server

    Griffin, Sean

    2013-01-01

    Gamma-ray astronomy at energies in excess of 100 GeV is carried out using arrays of imaging Cherenkov telescopes. Each telescope comprises a large reflector, of order 10 m diameter, made of many mirror facets, and a camera consisting of a matrix of photomultiplier pixels. Differences in the total throughput between nominally identical telescopes, due to aging of the mirrors and PMTs and other effects, should be monitored to reduce possible systematic errors. One way to directly measure the throughput of such telescopes is to track bright stars and measure the photocurrents produced by their light falling on camera pixels. We have developed such a procedure using the four telescopes in the VERITAS array. We note the technique is general, however, and could be applied to other imaging Cherenkov experiments. For this measurement, a raster scan is performed on a single star such that its image is swept across the central pixels in the camera, thus providing a statistically robust set of measurements in a short pe...

  8. Transiting planets from WASP-South, Euler and TRAPPIST: WASP-68 b, WASP-73 b and WASP-88 b, three hot Jupiters transiting evolved solar-type stars

    CERN Document Server

    Delrez, L; Anderson, D R; Collier-Cameron, A; Doyle, A P; Fumel, A; Gillon, M; Hellier, C; Jehin, E; Lendl, M; Neveu-VanMalle, M; Maxted, P F L; Pepe, F; Pollacco, D; Queloz, D; Ségransan, D; Smalley, B; Smith, A M S; Southworth, J; Triaud, A H M J; Udry, S; West, R G

    2013-01-01

    We report the discovery by the WASP transit survey of three new hot Jupiters, WASP-68 b, WASP-73 b and WASP-88 b. WASP-68 b has a mass of 0.95+-0.03 M_Jup, a radius of 1.24-0.06+0.10 R_Jup, and orbits a V=10.7 G0-type star (1.24+-0.03 M_sun, 1.69-0.06+0.11 R_sun, T_eff=5911+-60 K) with a period of 5.084298+-0.000015 days. Its size is typical of hot Jupiters with similar masses. WASP-73 b is significantly more massive (1.88-0.06+0.07 M_Jup) and slightly larger (1.16-0.08+0.12 R_Jup) than Jupiter. It orbits a V=10.5 F9-type star (1.34-0.04+0.05 M_sun, 2.07-0.08+0.19 R_sun, T_eff=6036+-120 K) every 4.08722+-0.00022 days. Despite its high irradiation (2.3 10^9 erg s^-1 cm^-2), WASP-73 b has a high mean density (1.20-0.30+0.26 \\rho_Jup) that suggests an enrichment of the planet in heavy elements. WASP-88 b is a 0.56+-0.08 M_Jup planet orbiting a V=11.4 F6-type star (1.45+-0.05 M_sun, 2.08-0.06+0.12 R_sun, T_eff=6431+-130 K) with a period of 4.954000+-0.000019 days. With a radius of 1.70-0.07+0.13 R_Jup, it joins t...

  9. Fine structure of the age-chromospheric activity relation in solar-type stars I: The Ca II infrared triplet: Absolute flux calibration

    CERN Document Server

    Lorenzo-Oliveira, Diego; Dutra-Ferreira, Letícia; Ribas, Ignasi

    2016-01-01

    Strong spectral lines are useful indicators of stellar chromospheric activity. They are physically linked to the convection efficiency, differential rotation, and angular momentum evolution and are a potential indicator of age. However, for ages > 2 Gyr, the age-activity relationship remains poorly constrained thus hampering its full application. The Ca II infrared triplet (IRT lines) has been poorly studied compared to classical chromospheric indicators. We report in this paper absolute chromospheric fluxes in the three Ca II IRT lines, based on a new calibration tied to up-to-date model atmospheres. We obtain the Ca II IRT absolute fluxes for 113 FGK stars from high signal-to-noise ratio and high-resolution spectra covering an extensive domain of chromospheric activity levels. We perform an absolute continuum flux calibration for the Ca II IRT lines anchored in atmospheric models calculated as an explicit function of effective temperatures, metallicity, and gravities avoiding the degeneracy present in photo...

  10. Hubble Space Telescope Near-Ultraviolet Spectroscopy of Bright CEMP-s Stars

    Science.gov (United States)

    Placco, Vinicius M.; Beers, Timothy C.; Ivans, Inese I.; Filler, Dan; Imig, Julie A.; Roederer, Ian U.; Abate, Carlo; Hansen, Terese; Cowan, John J.; Frebel, Anna; Lawler, James E.; Schatz, Hendrik; Sneden, Christopher; Sobeck, Jennifer S.; Aoki, Wako; Smith, Verne V.; Bolte, Michael

    2015-10-01

    We present an elemental-abundance analysis, in the near-ultraviolet (NUV) spectral range, for the bright carbon-enhanced metal-poor (CEMP) stars HD 196944 (V=8.40, [Fe/H] = ‑2.41) and HD 201626 (V=8.16, [Fe/H] = ‑1.51), based on data acquired with the Space Telescope Imaging Spectrograph (STIS) on the Hubble Space Telescope. Both of these stars belong to the sub-class CEMP-s, and exhibit clear over-abundances of heavy elements associated with production by the slow neutron-capture process. HD 196944 has been well-studied in the optical region, but we add abundance results for six species (Ge, Nb, Mo, Lu, Pt, and Au) that are only accessible in the NUV. In addition, we provide the first determination of its orbital period, P = 1325 days. HD 201626 has only a limited number of abundance results based on previous optical work—here we add five new species from the NUV, including Pb. We compare these results with models of binary-system evolution and s-process element production in stars on the asymptotic giant branch, with the goal of explaining their origin and evolution. Our best-fitting models for HD 196944 ({M}1,i=0.9{M}ȯ , {M}2,i=0.86{M}ȯ , for [Fe/H] = -2.2), and HD 201626 ({M}1,i=0.9{M}ȯ , {M}2,i=0.76{M}ȯ , for [Fe/H] = -2.2; {M}1,i=1.6{M}ȯ , {M}2,i=0.59{M}ȯ , for [Fe/H] = -1.5) are consistent with the current accepted scenario for the formation of CEMP-s stars. The data presented herein were obtained with the (i) NASA/ESA Hubble Space Telescope, obtained at the Space Telescope Science Institute, which is operated by the Association of Universities for Research in Astronomy, Inc., under NASA contract NAS 5-26555. (These observations are associated with program GO-12554, data sets OBQ601010-30 and OBQ602010-30.); and (ii) W. M. Keck Observatory, which is operated as a scientific partnership among the California Institute of Technology, the University of California and the National Aeronautics and Space Administration. (The Observatory was made

  11. KELT-7b: A hot Jupiter transiting a bright V=8.54 rapidly rotating F-star

    CERN Document Server

    Bieryla, Allyson; Beatty, Thomas G; Eastman, Jason; Siverd, Robert J; Pepper, Joshua; Gaudi, B Scott; Stassun, Keivan G; Canas, Caleb; Latham, David W; Buchhave, Lars A; Sanchis-Ojeda, Roberto; Winn, Joshua N; Jensen, Eric L N; Kielkopf, John F; McLeod, Kim K; Gregorio, Joao; Colon, Knicole D; Street, Rachel; Ross, Rachel; Penny, Matthew; Mellon, Samuel N; Oberst, Thomas E; Fulton, Benjamin J; Wang, Ji; Berlind, Perry; Calkins, Michael L; Esquerdo, Gilbert A; DePoy, Darren L; Gould, Andrew; Marshall, Jennifer; Pogge, Richard; Trueblood, Mark; Trueblood, Patricia

    2015-01-01

    We report the discovery of KELT-7b, a transiting hot Jupiter with a mass of $1.28 \\pm 0.18$ MJ, radius of $1.53_{-0.047}^{+0.046}$ RJ, and an orbital period of $2.7347749 \\pm 0.0000039$ days. The bright host star (HD33643; KELT-7) is an F-star with $V=8.54$, Teff $=6789_{-49}^{+50}$ K, [Fe/H] $=0.139_{-0.081}^{+0.075}$, and $\\log{g}=4.149 \\pm 0.019$. It has a mass of $1.535_{-0.054}^{+0.066}$ Msun, a radius of $1.732_{-0.045}^{+0.043}$ Rsun, and is the fifth most massive, fifth hottest, and the ninth brightest star known to host a transiting planet. It is also the brightest star around which KELT has discovered a transiting planet. Thus, KELT-7b is an ideal target for detailed characterization given its relatively low surface gravity, high equilibrium temperature, and bright host star. The rapid rotation of the star ($73 \\pm 0.5$ km/s) results in a Rossiter-McLaughlin effect with an unusually large amplitude of several hundred m/s. We find that the orbit normal of the planet is likely to be well-aligned with ...

  12. Fine structure of the age-chromospheric activity relation in solar-type stars. I. The Ca II infrared triplet: Absolute flux calibration

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lorenzo-Oliveira, D.; Porto de Mello, G. F.; Dutra-Ferreira, L.; Ribas, I.

    2016-10-01

    Context. Strong spectral lines are useful indicators of stellar chromospheric activity. They are physically linked to the convection efficiency, differential rotation, and angular momentum evolution and are a potential indicator of age. However, for ages > 2 Gyr, the age-activity relationship remains poorly constrained thus hampering its full application. Aims: The Ca II infrared triplet (IRT lines, λλ 8498, 8542, and 8662) has been poorly studied compared to classical chromospheric indicators. We report in this paper absolute chromospheric fluxes in the three Ca II IRT lines, based on a new calibration tied to up-to-date model atmospheres. Methods: We obtain the Ca II IRT absolute fluxes for 113 FGK stars from high signal-to-noise ratio (S/N) and high-resolution spectra covering an extensive domain of chromospheric activity levels. We perform an absolute continuum flux calibration for the Ca II IRT lines anchored in atmospheric models calculated as an explicit function of effective temperatures (Teff), metallicity ([Fe/H]), and gravities (log g) avoiding the degeneracy usually present in photometric continuum calibrations based solely on color indices. Results: The internal uncertainties achieved for continuum absolute flux calculations are ≈2% of the solar chromospheric flux, one order of magnitude lower than for photometric calibrations. Using Monte Carlo simulations, we gauge the impact of observational errors on the final chromospheric fluxes due to the absolute continuum flux calibration and find that Teffuncertainties are properly mitigated by the photospheric correction leaving [Fe/H] as the dominating factor in the chromospheric flux uncertainty. Conclusions: Across the FGK spectral types, the Ca II IRT lines are sensitive to chromospheric activity. The reduced internal uncertainties reported here enable us to build a new chromospheric absolute flux scale and explore the age-activity relation from the active regime down to very low activity levels and

  13. A Limit on the Number of Isolated Neutron Stars Detected in the ROSAT Bright Source Catalog

    CERN Document Server

    Rutledge, R E; Bogosavljevic, M; Mahabal, A A; Rutledge, Robert E.; Fox, Derek W.; Bogosavljevic, Milan; Mahabal, Ashish

    2003-01-01

    The challenge in searching for non-radio-pulsing isolated neutron stars (INSs) is in excluding association with objects in the very large error boxes (~13", 1 sigma radius) typical of sources from the largest X-ray all-sky survey, the ROSAT All-Sky-Survey/Bright Source Catalog (RASS/BSC). We search for candidate INSs using statistical analysis of optical (USNO-A2), infrared (IRAS), and radio (NVSS) sources near the ROSAT X-ray localization, and show that this selection would find 20% of the INSs in the RASS/BSC. This selection finds 32 candidates at declinations greater than -39 deg, among which are two previously known INSs, seventeen sources which we show are not INSs, and thirteen the classification of which are as yet undetermined. These results require a limit of <67 INSs (90% confidence, full sky, assuming isotropy) in the RASS/BSC. This limit modestly constrains a naive and optimistic model for cooling NSs in the galaxy.

  14. THE AGN, STAR-FORMING, AND MORPHOLOGICAL PROPERTIES OF LUMINOUS IR-BRIGHT/OPTICALLY-FAINT GALAXIES

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We present the active galactic nucleus (AGN), star-forming, and morphological properties of a sample of 13 MIR-luminous (f 24 ∼> 700 μJy) IR-bright/optically-faint galaxies (IRBGs, f24/f R ∼> 1000). While these z ∼ 2 sources were drawn from deep Chandra fields with >200 ks X-ray coverage, only seven are formally detected in the X-ray and four lack X-ray emission at even the 2σ level. Spitzer InfraRed Spectrograph (IRS) spectra, however, confirm that all of the sources are AGN-dominated in the mid-IR, although half have detectable polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbon (PAH) emission responsible for ∼25% of their mid-infrared flux density. When combined with other samples, this indicates that at least 30%-40% of luminous IRBGs have star formation rates in the ultraluminous infrared galaxy (ULIRG) range (∼100-2000 Msun yr-1). X-ray hardness ratios and MIR to X-ray luminosity ratios indicate that all members of the sample contain heavily X-ray obscured AGNs, 80% of which are candidates to be Compton thick. Furthermore, the mean X-ray luminosity of the sample, log L2-10keV(erg s-1) ∼44.6, indicates that these IRBGs are Type 2 QSOs, at least from the X-ray perspective. While those sources most heavily obscured in the X-ray are also those most likely to display strong silicate absorption in the mid-IR, silicate absorption does not always accompany X-ray obscuration. Finally, ∼70% of the IRBGs are merger candidates, a rate consistent with that of sub-mm galaxies (SMGs), although SMGs appear to be physically larger than IRBGs. These characteristics are consistent with the proposal that these objects represent a later, AGN-dominated, and more relaxed evolutionary stage following soon after the star-formation-dominated one represented by the SMGs.

  15. A Large Number of Hα Emission Stars and Herbig-Haro Objects in and around Bright-Rimmed Clouds

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ogura, K.; Sugitani, K.

    We present the results of our Hα grism spectroscopy and narrow-band imaging observations of bright-rimmed clouds (BRCs) in search of candidate pre-main sequence stars of the T Tauri, Herbig Ae/Be and related types, and of Herbig-Haro (HH) objects. We have detected altogether 460 Hα emission stars down to about R = 20, around all but two of the 28 BRCs observed. The present study has, for the first time, reached down nearly to the faintest classical T Tauri stars in OB associations. Twelve new HH objects have also been found. Most are of small apparent size, emphasizing the need for deep searches at high spatial resolution. These stars and HH objects are concentrated near the tip of BRCs, thus supporting our hypothesis of ``small-scale sequential star formation''. The presence of such a large number of Hα emission stars around BRCs implies that second-generation formation of low-mass stars in HII regions is relatively extensive, and further supports the notion of cohabitation of high- and low-mass populations in OB associations.

  16. Identifying Bright Stars in Crowded Environments Using Velocity Dispersion Measurements, and an Application to the Center of M32

    Science.gov (United States)

    Davidge, T. J.; Beck, Tracy L.; McGregor, Peter J.

    2010-02-01

    The identification of individual stars in crowded environments using photometric information alone is confounded by source confusion. However, with the addition of spectroscopic information it is possible to distinguish between blends and areas where the light is dominated by a single star, using the widths of absorption features. We describe a procedure for identifying locations in kinematically hot environments where the light is dominated by a single star, and apply this method to spectra with 0.1'' angular resolution covering the 2.1-2.3 μm interval in the central regions of M32. Targets for detailed investigation are selected as areas of localized brightness enhancement. Three locations where at least 60% of the K-band light comes from a single bright star, and another with light that is dominated by two stars with very different velocities, are identified. The dominant stars are evolving near the tip of the asymptotic giant branch (AGB), and have M5 III spectral type. The lack of a dispersion in spectral type suggests that the upper AGB within the central arcsecond of M32 has a dispersion in J - K of only a few hundredths of a magnitude, in agreement with what is seen at larger radii. One star has weaker atomic absorption lines than the others, such that [M/H] is 0.2 dex lower. Such a difference in metallicity is consistent with the metallicity dispersion inferred from the photometric width of the AGB in M32. The use of line width to distinguish between blends involving many relatively faint stars, none of which dominate the light output, and areas that are dominated by a single intrinsically bright star could be extended to crowded environments in other nearby galaxies. Based on observations obtained at the Gemini Observatory, which is operated by the Association of Universities for Research in Astronomy, Inc., under a cooperative agreement with the NSF on behalf of the Gemini partnership: the National Science Foundation (US), the Science and Technology

  17. HD 147506b: A Supermassive Planet in an Eccentric Orbit Transiting a Bright Star

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bakos, G. Á.; Kovács, G.; Torres, G.; Fischer, D. A.; Latham, D. W.; Noyes, R. W.; Sasselov, D. D.; Mazeh, T.; Shporer, A.; Butler, R. P.; Stefanik, R. P.; Fernández, J. M.; Sozzetti, A.; Pál, A.; Johnson, J.; Marcy, G. W.; Winn, J. N.; Sipőcz, B.; Lázár, J.; Papp, I.; Sári, P.

    2007-11-01

    We report the discovery of a massive (Mp=9.04+/-0.50 MJ) planet transiting the bright (V=8.7) F8 star HD 147506, with an orbital period of 5.63341+/-0.00013 days and an eccentricity of e=0.520+/-0.010. From the transit light curve we determine that the radius of the planet is Rp=0.982+0.038-0.105 RJ. HD 147506b (also coined HAT-P-2b) has a mass about 9 times the average mass of previously known transiting exoplanets and a density of ρp~12 g cm-3, greater than that of rocky planets like the Earth. Its mass and radius are marginally consistent with theories of structure of massive giant planets composed of pure H and He, and accounting for them may require a large (>~100 M⊕) core. The high eccentricity causes a ninefold variation of insolation of the planet between peri- and apastron. Using follow-up photometry, we find that the center of transit is Tmid=2,454,212.8559+/-0.0007 (HJD) and the transit duration is 0.177+/-0.002 days. Some of the data presented herein were obtained at the W. M. Keck Observatory, which is operated as a scientific partnership among the California Institute of Technology, the University of California, and the National Aeronautics and Space Administration. The Observatory was made possible by the generous financial support of the W. M. Keck Foundation. The authors wish to recognize and acknowledge the very significant cultural role and reverence that the summit of Mauna Kea has always had within the indigenous Hawaiian community. We are most fortunate to have the opportunity to conduct observations from this mountain. Keck time has been in part granted by NASA.

  18. Detection of solar-like oscillations in the bright red giant stars $\\gamma$ Psc and $\\theta^1$ Tau from a 190-day high-precision spectroscopic multisite campaign

    CERN Document Server

    Beck, P G; Hillen, M; Corsaro, E; Van Winckel, H; Moravveji, E; De Ridder, J; Bloemen, S; Saesen, S; Mathias, P; Degroote, P; Kallinger, T; Verhoelst, T; Ando, H; Carrier, F; Acke, B; Oreiro, R; Miglio, A; Eggenberger, P; Sato, B; Zwintz, K; Pápics, P I; Marcos-Arenal, P; Fuentes, S A Sans; Schmid, V S; Waelkens, C; Østensen, R; Matthews, J M; Yoshida, M; Izumiura, H; Koyano, H; Nagayama, S; Shimizu, Y; Okada, N; Okita, K; Sakamoto, A; Yamamuro, T; Aerts, C

    2014-01-01

    Red giants are evolved stars which exhibit solar-like oscillations. Although a multitude of stars have been observed with space telescopes, only a handful of red-giant stars were targets of spectroscopic asteroseismic observing projects. We search for solar-like oscillations in the two bright red-giant stars $\\gamma$ Psc and $\\theta^1$ Tau from time series of ground-based spectroscopy and determine the frequency of the excess of oscillation power $\

  19. Abundances of UV bright stars in globular clusters 1 ROA 5701 in $\\omega$ Centauri and Barnard 29 in M 13

    CERN Document Server

    Möhler, S; Lemke, M; Napiwotzki, R

    1998-01-01

    Two UV brights stars in globular clusters, ROA 5701 (omega Cen) and Barnard 29 (M 13) are analysed from high-resolution UV and optical spectra. The main aim is the measurement of iron abundances from UV spectra obtained with the HST-GHRS. In addition atmospheric parameters and abundances for He, C, N, O, and Si are derived from optical spectra (ESO CASPEC) for ROA 5701 or taken from literature for Barnard 29. Both stars are found to be post-asymptotic giant branch stars. Surprisingly, their iron abundances lie significantly below the cluster abundance in both cases. Barnard 29 lies 0.5 dex below the iron abundance derived for giant stars in M 13 and the iron abundance of ROA 5701 is the lowest of any star in omega Cen analysed so far. Barnard 29 shows the same abundance pattern as the red giant stars in M 13, except for its stronger iron deficiency. The iron depletion could be explained by gas-dust separation in the AGB progenitor's atmosphere, if iron condensed into dust grains which were then removed from t...

  20. KELT-2Ab: A Hot Jupiter Transiting the Bright (V=8.77) Primary Star of a Binary System

    CERN Document Server

    Beatty, Thomas G; Siverd, Robert J; Eastman, Jason D; Bieryla, Allyson; Latham, David W; Buchhave, Lars A; Jensen, Eric L N; Manner, Mark; Stassun, Keivan G; Gaudi, B Scott; Berlind, Perry; Calkins, Michael L; Collins, Karen; DePoy, Darren L; Esquerdo, Gilbert A; Fulton, Benjamin J; Fűrész, Gábor; Geary, John C; Gould, Andrew; Hebb, Leslie; Kielkopf, John F; Marshall, Jennifer L; Pogge, Richard; Stanek, K Z; Stefanik, Robert P; Street, Rachel; Szentgyorgyi, Andrew H; Trueblood, Mark; Trueblood, Patricia; Stutz, Amelia M

    2012-01-01

    We report the discovery of KELT-2Ab, a hot Jupiter transiting the bright (V=8.77) primary star of the HD 42176 binary system. The host is a slightly evolved late F-star likely in the very short-lived "blue-hook" stage of evolution, with $\\teff=6151\\pm50{\\rm K}$, $\\log{g_*}=4.030_{-0.028}^{+0.013}$ and $\\feh=-0.018\\pm0.069$. The inferred stellar mass is $M_*=1.308_{-0.025}^{+0.028}$\\msun\\ and the star has a relatively large radius of $R_*=1.828_{-0.034}^{+0.070}$\\rsun. The planet is a typical hot Jupiter with period $4.113791\\pm0.00001$ days and a mass of $M_P=1.522\\pm0.078$\\mj\\ and radius of $R_P=1.286_{-0.047}^{+0.065}$\\rj. This is mildly inflated as compared to models of irradiated giant planets at the $\\sim$4 Gyr age of the system. KELT-2A is the third brightest star with a transiting planet identified by ground-based transit surveys, and the ninth brightest star overall with a transiting planet. KELT-2Ab's mass and radius are unique among the subset of planets with $V<9$ host stars, and therefore incre...

  1. Interferometric radii of bright Kepler stars with the CHARA Array: {\\theta} Cygni and 16 Cygni A and B

    CERN Document Server

    White, T R; Maestro, V; Bedding, T R; Ireland, M J; Baron, F; Boyajian, T S; Che, X; Monnier, J D; Pope, B J S; Roettenbacher, R M; Stello, D; Tuthill, P G; Farrington, C D; Goldfinger, P J; McAlister, H A; Schaefer, G H; Sturmann, J; Sturmann, L; Brummelaar, T A ten; Turner, N H

    2013-01-01

    We present the results of long-baseline optical interferometry observations using the Precision Astronomical Visual Observations (PAVO) beam combiner at the Center for High Angular Resolution Astronomy (CHARA) Array to measure the angular sizes of three bright Kepler stars: {\\theta} Cygni, and both components of the binary system 16 Cygni. Supporting infrared observations were made with the Michigan Infrared Combiner (MIRC) and Classic beam combiner, also at the CHARA Array. We find limb-darkened angular diameters of 0.753+/-0.009 mas for {\\theta} Cyg, 0.539+/-0.007 mas for 16 Cyg A and 0.490+/-0.006 mas for 16 Cyg B. The Kepler Mission has observed these stars with outstanding photometric precision, revealing the presence of solar-like oscillations. Due to the brightness of these stars the oscillations have exceptional signal-to-noise, allowing for detailed study through asteroseismology, and are well constrained by other observations. We have combined our interferometric diameters with Hipparcos parallaxes,...

  2. KELT-2Ab: A HOT JUPITER TRANSITING THE BRIGHT (V = 8.77) PRIMARY STAR OF A BINARY SYSTEM

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We report the discovery of KELT-2Ab, a hot Jupiter transiting the bright (V = 8.77) primary star of the HD 42176 binary system. The host is a slightly evolved late F-star likely in the very short-lived 'blue-hook' stage of evolution, with Teff = 6148 ± 48 K, log g = 4.030+0.015–0.026 and [Fe/H] = 0.034 ± 0.78. The inferred stellar mass is M* = 1.314+0.063–0.060 M☉ and the star has a relatively large radius of R* = 1.836+0.066–0.046 R☉. The planet is a typical hot Jupiter with period 4.1137913 ± 0.00001 days and a mass of MP = 1.524 ± 0.088 MJ and radius of RP = 1.290+0.064–0.050 RJ. This is mildly inflated as compared to models of irradiated giant planets at the ∼4 Gyr age of the system. KELT-2A is the third brightest star with a transiting planet identified by ground-based transit surveys, and the ninth brightest star overall with a transiting planet. KELT-2Ab's mass and radius are unique among the subset of planets with V –1.

  3. A Spitzer Transit of the Most Inflated Planet Known, Around an Extremely Bright Sub-giant Star

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beatty, Thomas; Collins, Karen; Colon, Knicole; James, David; Kriedberg, Laura; Pepper, Joshua; Rodriguez, Joseph; Siverd, Robert; Stassun, Keivan; Stevens, Daniel

    2015-10-01

    KELT-11b is a newly discovered transiting Saturn-mass planet (Mp~0.22MJ) that promises to become a unique benchmark. KELT-11b orbits HD 93396,the second brightest star in the near-IR (K=6.122) and the third brightest star in the optical (V=8.04) to host a transiting giant planet. This makes KELT-11 comparable to the well-studied benchmarks HD 189733 and HD 209458. But unlike these other bright systems, KELT-11b's host star is a sub-giant, with log(g)~3.7. Thus KELT-11b is the first transiting giant planet known around a sub-giant star bright enough for precise follow-up observations. Furthermore, KELT-11b is the most inflated planet known, with the lowest surface gravity (log[g]~2.5) of any transiting planet. This makes it an exciting target for atmospheric characterization and studying the effect of post main-sequence evolution of a host star on a hot Jupiter. But to correctly interpret any follow-up observations, we will first need to measure accurate stellar and planetary parameters for the system via a precise transit observation. Unfortunately, this is effectively impossible to do from the ground. Spitzer's ability to provide high precision continuous photometry provides the only current way in which we may precisely observe a complete transit of KELT-11b. We therefore propose for 15.5 hours, to observe a single transit KELT-11b at 3.6um. This would reduce the uncertainties on the transit depth and stellar density by at least a factor of twenty, and will improve the model-derived stellar mass by at least a factor of ten, compared to ground-based observations. This will serve two goals. First, it will be a valuable legacy to the community, by providing a precise set of system parameters that will enable future observation and interpretation of this unique, bright, system. Second, an observation of a transit will allow us to strongly constrain the mass of KELT-11, and thus help resolve the disagreement over the true masses of the 'retired A stars' radial

  4. CARMA Survey Toward Infrared-bright Nearby Galaxies (STING) II: Molecular Gas Star Formation Law and Depletion Time Across the Blue Sequence

    CERN Document Server

    Rahman, Nurur; Xue, Rui; Wong, Tony; Leroy, Adam K; Walter, Fabian; Bigiel, Frank; Rosolowsky, Erik; Fisher, David B; Vogel, Stuart N; Blitz, Leo; West, Andrew A; Ott, Juergen

    2011-01-01

    We present an analysis of the relationship between molecular gas and current star formation rate surface density at sub-kpc and kpc scales in a sample of 14 nearby star-forming galaxies. Measuring the relationship in the bright, high molecular gas surface density ($\\Shtwo\\gtrsim$20 \\msunpc) regions of the disks to minimize the contribution from diffuse extended emission, we find an approximately linear relation between molecular gas and star formation rate surface density, $\

  5. Theoretical impact of fast rotation on calibrating the surface brightness-color relation for early-type stars

    Science.gov (United States)

    Challouf, M.; Nardetto, N.; Domiciano de Souza, A.; Mourard, D.; Aroui, H.; Stee, P.; Delaa, O.; Graczyk, D.; Pietrzyński, G.; Gieren, W.

    2015-07-01

    Context. The eclipsing binary method for determining distance in the local group is based on the surface brightness-color relation (SBCR), and early-type stars are preferred targets because of their intrinsic brightness. However, this type of star exhibits wind, mass-loss, pulsation, and rotation, which may generate bias on the angular diameter determination. An accurate calibration of the SBCR relation thus requires careful analysis. Aims: In this paper we aim to quantify the impact of stellar rotation on the SBCR when the calibration of the relation is based on interferometric measurements of angular diameters. Methods: Six stars with V - K color indices ranging between -1 and 0.5 were modeled using the code for high angular resolution of rotating objects in nature (CHARRON) with various rotational velocities (0, 25, 50, 75, and 95% of the critical rotational velocity) and inclination (0, 25, 50, 75, and 90 degrees). All these models have their equatorial axis aligned in an east-west orientation in the sky. We then simulated interferometric observations of these theoretical stars using three representative sets of the CHARA baseline configurations. The simulated data were then interpreted as if the stars were non-rotating to determine an angular diameter and estimate the surface-brightness relation. The V - K color of the rotating star was calculated directly from the CHARRON code. This provides an estimate of the intrinsic dispersion of the SBCR relation when the rotation effects of flattening and gravity darkening are not considered in the analysis of interferometric data. Results: We find a clear relation between the rotational velocity and (1) the shift in zero point (Δa0) of the SBCR (compared to the static relation) and (2) its dispersion (σ). When considering stars rotating at less than 50% of their critical velocity, Δa0 and σ have about 0.01 mag, while these quantities can reach 0.08 and 0.04 mag, respectively, when the rotation is larger than 75% of

  6. The Dearth of UV-bright Stars in M32: Implications for Stellar Evolution Theory

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sweigart, Allen V.; Kimble, Randy A.; Bowers, Charles W.

    2008-01-01

    Using the Space Telescope Imaging Spectrograph on the Hubble Space Telescope, we have obtained deep far ultraviolet images of the compact elliptical galaxy M32. When combined with earlier near-ultraviolet images of the same field, these data enable the construction of an ultraviolet color-magnitude diagram of the hot horizontal branch (HB) population and other hot stars in late phases of stellar evolution. We find few post-asymptotic giant branch (PAGB) stars in the galaxy, implying that these stars either cross the HR diagram more rapidly than expected, and/or that they spend a significant fraction of their time enshrouded in circumstellar material. The predicted luminosity gap between the hot HB and its AGB-Manque (AGBM) progeny is less pronounced than expected, especially when compared to evolutionary tracks with enhanced helium abundances, implying that the presence of hot HB stars in this metal-rich population is not due to (Delta)Y/(Delta)Z greater than or approx. 4. Only a small fraction (approx. 2%) of the HB population is hot enough to produce significant UV emission, yet most of the W emission in this galaxy comes from the hot HB and AGBM stars, implying that PAGB stars are not a significant source of W emission even in those elliptical galaxies with a weak W excess. Subject headings: galaxies: evolution - galaxies: stellar content - galaxies: individual (M32) - stars: evolution - stars: horizontal branch

  7. Star formation in infrared bright and infrared faint starburst interacting galaxies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lamb, Susan A.; Bushouse, Howard A.; Towns, John W.

    1990-01-01

    Short wavelength IUE spectra of Arp 248b and UGC 8315N are combined with optical spectra and interpreted using a combination of spectrum synthesis and spectral diagnostics to place constraints on the massive star populations of the central regions of these galaxies and to deduce information about the star formation histories in the last 10(exp 8) years. The authors find that both galaxies have substantial fractions of their optical light coming from massive stars and that Arp 248b may be dominated in the UV by WR stars. The UV spectra are dominated by radiation from evolved massive stars and the authors place and age on the burst in Arp 248b of a few tens of millions of years.

  8. The VLT-FLAMES Tarantula survey XX. The nature of the X-ray bright emission line star VFTS 399

    CERN Document Server

    Clark, J S; Broos, P S; Townsley, L K; Taylor, W D; Walborn, N R; Bird, A J; Sana, H; de Mink, S E; Dufton, P L; Evans, C J; Langer, N; Apellániz, J Maíz; Schneider, F R N; Soszyński, I

    2015-01-01

    The stellar population of the 30 Doradus star-forming region in the Large Magellanic Cloud contains a subset of apparently single, rapidly rotating O-type stars. The physical processes leading to the formation of this cohort are currently uncertain. One member of this group, the late O-type star VFTS 399, is found to be unexpectedly X-ray bright for its bolometric luminosity - in this study we aim to determine its physical nature and the cause of this behaviour. We find VFTS 399 to be an aperiodic photometric variable with an apparent near-IR excess. Its optical spectrum demonstrates complex emission profiles in the lower Balmer series and select HeI lines - taken together these suggest an OeBe classification. The highly variable X-ray luminosity is too great to be produced by a single star, while the hard, non-thermal nature suggests the presence of an accreting relativistic companion. Finally, the detection of periodic modulation of the X-ray lightcurve is most naturally explained under the assumption that ...

  9. An inflated massive Hot Jupiter transiting a bright F star followed up with K2.0 observations

    CERN Document Server

    Huang, C X; Bakos, G Á; Penev, K; Bhatti, W; Bieryla, A; de Val-Borro, M; Latham, D W; Buchhave, L A; Csubry, Z; Kovács, G; Béky, B; Falco, E; Berlind, P; Calkins, M L; Esquerdo, G A; Lázár, J; Papp, I; Sári, P

    2015-01-01

    We report the discovery of HAT-P-56b by the HATNet survey, an inflated hot Jupiter transiting a bright F type star in Field 0 of NASA's K2 mission. We combine ground-based discovery and follow-up light curves with high precision photometry from K2, as well as ground-based radial velocities from TRES on the FLWO~1.5m telescope to determine the physical properties of this system. HAT-P-56b has a mass of $M_p \\approx 2.18 M_J$, radius of $R_p \\approx 1.47 R_J$, and transits its host star on a near-grazing orbit with a period of $P\\approx$ 2.7908 d. The radius of HAT-P-56b is among the largest known for a planet with $M_p > 2 M_J$. The host star has a V-band magnitude of 10.9, mass of 1.30 $M_\\odot$, and radius of 1.43 $R_\\odot$. The periodogram of the K2 light curve suggests the star is a $\\gamma$ Dor variable. HAT-P-56b is an example of a ground-based discovery of a transiting planet, where space-based observations greatly improve the confidence in the confirmation of its planetary nature, and also improve the ...

  10. Visual and ultraviolet flux variability of the bright CP star $\\theta$ Aur

    CERN Document Server

    Krticka, J; Luftinger, T; Jagelka, M

    2015-01-01

    Chemically peculiar stars of the upper part of the main sequence show periodical variability in line intensities and continua, modulated by the stellar rotation, which is attributed to the existence of chemical spots on the surface of these stars. The flux variability is caused by the changing redistribution rate of the radiative flux predominantly from the short-wavelength part of the spectra to the long-wavelength part, which is a result of abundance anomalies. We study the nature of the multi-spectral variability of one of the brightest chemically peculiar stars, $\\theta$ Aur. We predict the flux variability of $\\theta$ Aur from the emerging intensities calculated for individual surface elements of the star taking into account horizontal variation of chemical composition derived from Doppler abundance maps. The simulated optical variability in the Str\\"omgren photometric system and the ultraviolet flux variability agree well with observations. The IUE flux distribution is reproduced in great detail by our ...

  11. Star Counts in the Globular Cluster ω Centauri. I. Bright Stellar Components

    Science.gov (United States)

    Castellani, V.; Calamida, A.; Bono, G.; Stetson, P. B.; Freyhammer, L. M.; Degl'Innocenti, S.; Moroni, P. Prada; Monelli, M.; Corsi, C. E.; Nonino, M.; Buonanno, R.; Caputo, F.; Castellani, M.; Dall'Ora, M.; Del Principe, M.; Ferraro, I.; Iannicola, G.; Piersimoni, A. M.; Pulone, L.; Vuerli, C.

    2007-07-01

    We present a photometric investigation on HB, RGB, and MSTO stars in ω Cen=NGC 5139. The center of the cluster was covered with a mosaic of F435W, F625W, and F658N band data collected with HST ACS. The outer reaches were covered with a mosaic of U-, B-, V-, and I-band data collected with the 2.2 m ESO/MPI telescope. The final catalog includes ~1.7 million stars. We identified more than 3200 likely HB stars, the largest sample ever collected in a globular cluster. We found that the HB morphology changes with the radial distance from the cluster center. The relative number of extreme HB stars decreases from ~30% to ~21% when moving from the center toward the outer reaches of the cluster, while the fraction of less hot HB stars increases from ~62% to ~72%. The comparison between theory and observations indicates that the empirical star counts of HB stars are on average larger (30%-40%) than predicted by canonical evolutionary models. Moreover, the rate of HB stars is ~43% larger than the MSTO rate. We also compared theory and observations by assuming a mix of stellar populations made with 70% of canonical He (Y=0.23) stars and 30% of He-enhanced (Y=0.33, 0.42) stars. We found that the observed RG/MSTO ratio agrees with the predicted lifetimes of He-mixed stellar populations. The discrepancy between theory and observations decreases by a factor of 2 when compared with rates predicted by canonical He content models, but still 15%-25% (Y=0.42) and 15%-20% (Y=0.33) higher than observed. Furthermore, the ratios between HB and MSTO star counts are ~24% (Y=0.42) and 30% (Y=0.33) larger than predicted lifetime ratios. During the revision of this manuscript, Vittorio Castellani passed away on 2006 May 19. His suggestions, ideas, and personality will be greatly missed. Based on data obtained from the ESO Science Archive Facility and the Hubble Space Telescope Archive Facility.

  12. Low Surface Brightness Galaxies in the SDSS: the link between environment, star-forming properties and AGN

    CERN Document Server

    Galaz, Gaspar; Garcia-Lambas, Diego; Padilla, Nelson

    2010-01-01

    Using the Sloan Digital Sky Survey (SDSS) data release 4 (DR 4), we investigate the spatial distribution of low and high surface brightness galaxies (LSBs and HSBs, respectively). In particular, we focus our attention on the influence of interactions between galaxies on the star formation strength in the redshift range $0.01 < z < 0.1$. With cylinder counts and projected distance to the first and fifth-nearest neighbor as environment tracers, we found that LSBs tend to have a lack of companions compared to HSBs at small scales ($<2$ Mpc). Regarding the interactions, we have evidence that the fraction of LSBs with strong star formation activity increases when the neighbor is closer than $r_{p}/r_{90} \\sim 4$. The intensity of the effect of the interaction on the star formation strength, measured by the average value of the birthrate parameter $b$, seems to be stronger for HSBs than for LSBs. The analysis of our population of LSBs and HSBs hosting an AGN show that, regardless of the mass range, the fra...

  13. Kepler-21b: A 1.6REarth Planet Transiting the Bright Oscillating F Subgiant Star HD 179070

    CERN Document Server

    Howell, Steve B; Bryson, Stephen T; Quinn, Samuel N; Marcy, Geoffrey W; Isaacson, Howard; Ciardi, David R; Chaplin, William J; Metcalfe, Travis S; Monteiro, Mario J P F G; Appourchaux, Thierry; Basu, Sarbani; Creevey, Orlagh L; Gilliland, Ronald L; Quirion, Pierre-Olivier; Stello, Denis; Kjeldsen, Hans; Christensen-Dalsgaard, Jorgen; Elsworth, Yvonne; García, Rafael A; Houdek, Gunter; Karoff, Christoffer; Molenda-Żakowicz, Joanna; Thompson, Michael J; Verner, Graham A; Torres, Guillermo; Fressin, Francois; Crepp, Justin R; Adams, Elisabeth; Dupree, Andrea; Sasselov, Dimitar D; Dressing, Courtney D; Borucki, William J; Koch, David G; Lissauer, Jack J; Latham, David W; Gautier, Thomas N; Everett, Mark; Horch, Elliott; Batalha, Natalie M; Dunham, Edward W; Szkody, Paula; Silva, David R; Mighel, Ken; Holberg, Jay; Ballot, Jer^ome; Bedding, Timothy R; Bruntt, Hans; Campante, Tiago L; Handberg, Rasmus; Hekker, Saskia; Huber, Daniel; Mathur, Savita; Mosser, Benoit; Régulo, Clara; White, Timothy R; Christiansen, Jessie L; Middour, Christopher K; Haas, Michael R; Hall, Jennifer R; Jenkins, Jon M; McCaulif, Sean; Fanelli, Michael N; Kulesa, Craig; McCarthy, Don; Henze, Christopher E

    2011-01-01

    We present Kepler observations of the bright (V=8.3), oscillating star HD 179070. The observations show transit-like events which reveal that the star is orbited every 2.8 days by a small, 1.6 R_Earth object. Seismic studies of HD 179070 using short cadence Kepler observations show that HD 179070 has a frequencypower spectrum consistent with solar-like oscillations that are acoustic p-modes. Asteroseismic analysis provides robust values for the mass and radius of HD 179070, 1.34{\\pm}0.06 M{\\circ} and 1.86{\\pm}0.04 R{\\circ} respectively, as well as yielding an age of 2.84{\\pm}0.34 Gyr for this F5 subgiant. Together with ground-based follow-up observations, analysis of the Kepler light curves and image data, and blend scenario models, we conservatively show at the >99.7% confidence level (3{\\sigma}) that the transit event is caused by a 1.64{\\pm}0.04 R_Earth exoplanet in a 2.785755{\\pm}0.000032 day orbit. The exoplanet is only 0.04 AU away from the star and our spectroscopic observations provide an upper limit ...

  14. Discovery of a stripped red giant core in a bright eclipsing binary star

    CERN Document Server

    Maxted, P F L; Burleigh, M R; Collier-Cameron, A; Heber, U; Gänsicke, B T; Geier, S; Kupfer, T; Marsh, T R; Nelemans, G; O'Toole, S J; Østensen, R H; Smalley, B; West, R G; Bloemen, S

    2012-01-01

    We report the serendipitous discovery from WASP archive photometry of a binary star in which an apparently normal A-type star (J0247-25A) eclipses a smaller, hotter subdwarf star (J0247-25B). The kinematics of J0247-25A show that it is a blue-straggler member of the Galactic thick-disk. We present follow-up photometry and spectroscopy from which we derive approximate values for the mass, radius and luminosity for J0247-25B assuming that J0247-25A has the mass appropriate for a normal thick-disk star. We find that the properties of J0247-25B are well matched by models for a red giant stripped of its outer layers and currently in a shell hydrogen-burning stage. In this scenario, J0247-25B will go on to become a low mass white dwarf (M~0.25 solar masses) composed mostly of helium. J0247-25B can be studied in much greater detail than the handful of pre helium white dwarfs (pre-He-WD) identified to-date. These results have been published by Maxted et al., 2011. We also present a preliminary analysis of more recent...

  15. Homogeneous spectroscopic parameters for bright planet host stars from the northern hemisphere . The impact on stellar and planetary mass

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sousa, S. G.; Santos, N. C.; Mortier, A.; Tsantaki, M.; Adibekyan, V.; Delgado Mena, E.; Israelian, G.; Rojas-Ayala, B.; Neves, V.

    2015-04-01

    Aims: In this work we derive new precise and homogeneous parameters for 37 stars with planets. For this purpose, we analyze high resolution spectra obtained by the NARVAL spectrograph for a sample composed of bright planet host stars in the northern hemisphere. The new parameters are included in the SWEET-Cat online catalogue. Methods: To ensure that the catalogue is homogeneous, we use our standard spectroscopic analysis procedure, ARES+MOOG, to derive effective temperatures, surface gravities, and metallicities. These spectroscopic stellar parameters are then used as input to compute the stellar mass and radius, which are fundamental for the derivation of the planetary mass and radius. Results: We show that the spectroscopic parameters, masses, and radii are generally in good agreement with the values available in online databases of exoplanets. There are some exceptions, especially for the evolved stars. These are analyzed in detail focusing on the effect of the stellar mass on the derived planetary mass. Conclusions: We conclude that the stellar mass estimations for giant stars should be managed with extreme caution when using them to compute the planetary masses. We report examples within this sample where the differences in planetary mass can be as high as 100% in the most extreme cases. Based on observations obtained at the Telescope Bernard Lyot (USR5026) operated by the Observatoire Midi-Pyrénées and the Institut National des Science de l'Univers of the Centre National de la Recherche Scientifique of France (Run ID L131N11 - OPTICON_2013A_027).

  16. Confirming HD 23478 as a new magnetic B star hosting an Hα-bright centrifugal magnetosphere

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sikora, J.; Wade, G. A.; Bohlender, D. A.; Neiner, C.; Oksala, M. E.; Shultz, M.; Cohen, D. H.; ud-Doula, A.; Grunhut, J.; Monin, D.; Owocki, S.; Petit, V.; Rivinus, T.; Townsend, R. H. D.

    2015-08-01

    In this paper, we report 23 magnetic field measurements of the B3IV star HD 23478: 12 obtained from high-resolution Stokes V spectra using the ESPaDOnS (Canada-France-Hawaii Telescope) and Narval (Télescope Bernard Lyot) spectropolarimeters, and 11 from medium-resolution Stokes V spectra obtained with the DimaPol spectropolarimeter (Dominion Astronomical Observatory). HD 23478 was one of two rapidly rotating stars identified as potential `centrifugal magnetosphere' hosts based on IR observations from the Apache Point Observatory Galactic Evolution Experiment survey. We derive basic physical properties of this star including its mass (M=6.1^{+0.8}_{-0.7} M_{⊙), effective temperature (Teff = 20 ± 2 kK), radius (R=2.7^{+1.6}_{-0.9} R_{⊙}), and age (τ_age=3^{+37}_{-1} Myr). We repeatedly detect weakly variable Zeeman signatures in metal, He, and H lines in all our observations corresponding to a longitudinal magnetic field of ≈ -2.0 kG. The rotational period is inferred from Hipparcos photometry (Prot = 1.0498(4) d). Under the assumption of the Oblique Rotator Model, our observations yield a surface dipole magnetic field of strength Bd ≥ 9.5 kG that is approximately aligned with the stellar rotation axis. We confirm the presence of strong and broad Hα emission and gauge the volume of this star's centrifugal magnetosphere to be consistent with those of other Hα emitting centrifugal magnetosphere stars based on the large inferred Alfvén to Kepler radius ratio.

  17. A Limit on the Number of Isolated Neutron Stars Detected in the ROSAT All-Sky Survey Bright Source Catalog

    CERN Document Server

    Turner, Monica L; Letcavage, Ryan; Shevchuk, Andrew S H; Fox, Derek B

    2010-01-01

    Using new and archival observations made with the Swift satellite and other facilities, we examine 147 X-ray sources selected from the ROSAT All-Sky-Survey Bright Source Catalog (RASS/BSC) to produce a new limit on the number of isolated neutron stars (INSs) in the RASS/BSC, the most constraining such limit to-date. Independent of X-ray spectrum and variability, the number of INSs is <=48 (90% confidence). Restricting attention to soft (having an effective temperature of < 200 eV), non-variable X-ray sources -- as in a previous study -- yields an all-sky limit of <=31 INSs. In the course of our analysis, we identify five new high-quality INS candidates for targeted follow-up observations. A future all-sky X-ray survey with eROSITA, or another mission with similar capabilities, can be expected to increase the detected population of X-ray-discovered INSs from the 8 to 50 in the BSC, to (for a disk population) 240 to 1500, which will enable a more detailed study of neutron star population models.

  18. Star formation and the interstellar medium in low surface brightness galaxies III. Why they are blue, thin and poor in molecular gas

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Gerritsen, JPE; de Blok, WJG

    1999-01-01

    We present N-body simulations of Low Surface Brightness (LSB) galaxies and their Interstellar Medium to investigate the cause for their low star formation rates (SFR). Due to their massive halos, stellar disks of LSB galaxies are very stable and thin. Lack of dust makes the projected edge-on surface

  19. Bright Metal-Poor Stars from the Hamburg/ESO Survey. I. Selection and Follow-up Observations from 329 Fields

    CERN Document Server

    Frebel, A; Norris, J E; Beers, T C; Bessell, M S; Rhee, J; Fechner, C; Marsteller, B; Rossi, S; Thom, C; Wisotzki, L; Reimers, D

    2006-01-01

    We present a sample of 1777 bright (91.0) metal-poor ([Fe/H]20%) and higher values with increasing distance from the Galactic plane. Although the numbers of stars at low metallicity are falling rapidly at the lowest metallicities, there is evidence that the fraction of carbon-enhanced metal-poor stars is increasing rapidly as a function of declining metallicity. For ~60 objects, high-resolution data have already been obtained; one of these, HE 1327-2326, is the new record holder for the most iron-deficient star known.

  20. The VLT-FLAMES Tarantula survey. XX. The nature of the X-ray bright emission-line star VFTS 399

    OpenAIRE

    Clark, J. S.; Bartlett, E. S.; Broos, P. S.; Townsley, L. K.; Taylor, W.D.; N. R. Walborn; Bird, A. J.; Sana, H.; Mink, de, S.E.; Dufton, P. L.; Evans, C J; Langer, N.; Maíz Apellániz, J; Schneider, F.R.N.; Soszyński, I.

    2015-01-01

    Context. The stellar population of the 30 Doradus star-forming region in the Large Magellanic Cloud contains a subset of apparently single, rapidly rotating O-type stars. The physical processes leading to the formation of this cohort are currently uncertain. Aims. One member of this group, the late O-type star VFTS 399, is found to be unexpectedly X-ray bright for its bolometric luminosity − in this study we aim to determine its physical nature and the cause of this behaviour. Methods...

  1. Faint warm debris disks around nearby bright stars explored by AKARI and IRSF

    CERN Document Server

    Ishihara, Daisuke; Kobayashi, Hiroshi; Nagayama, Takahiro; Kaneda, Hidehiro; Inutsuka, Shu-ichiro; Fujiwara, Hideaki; Onaka, Takashi

    2016-01-01

    Context: Debris disks are important observational clues for understanding planetary-system formation process. In particular, faint warm debris disks may be related to late planet formation near 1 AU. A systematic search of faint warm debris disks is necessary to reveal terrestrial planet formation. Aims: Faint warm debris disks show excess emission that peaks at mid-IR wavelengths. Thus we explore debris disks using the AKARI mid-IR all-sky point source catalog (PSC), a product of the second generation unbiased IR all-sky survey. Methods : We investigate IR excess emission for 678 isolated main-sequence stars for which there are 18 micron detections in the AKARI mid-IR all-sky catalog by comparing their fluxes with the predicted fluxes of the photospheres based on optical to near-IR fluxes and model spectra. The near-IR fluxes are first taken from the 2MASS PSC. However, 286 stars with Ks<4.5 in our sample have large flux errors in the 2MASS photometry due to saturation. Thus we have measured accurate J, H...

  2. Extremely Bright Submillimeter Galaxies beyond the Lupus-I Star-forming Region

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tamura, Y.; Kawabe, R.; Shimajiri, Y.; Tsukagoshi, T.; Nakajima, Y.; Oasa, Y.; Wilner, D. J.; Chandler, C. J.; Saigo, K.; Tomida, K.; Yun, M. S.; Taniguchi, A.; Kohno, K.; Hatsukade, B.; Aretxaga, I.; Austermann, J. E.; Dickman, R.; Ezawa, H.; Goss, W. M.; Hayashi, M.; Hughes, D. H.; Hiramatsu, M.; Inutsuka, S.; Ogasawara, R.; Ohashi, N.; Oshima, T.; Scott, K. S.; Wilson, G. W.

    2015-08-01

    We report detections of two candidate distant submillimeter galaxies (SMGs), MM J154506.4‑344318 and MM J154132.7‑350320, which are discovered in the AzTEC/ASTE 1.1 mm survey toward the Lupus-I star-forming region. The two objects have 1.1 mm flux densities of 43.9 and 27.1 mJy, and have Herschel/SPIRE counterparts as well. The Submillimeter Array counterpart to the former SMG is identified at 890 μm and 1.3 mm. Photometric redshift estimates using all available data from the mid-infrared to the radio suggest that the redshifts of the two SMGs are {z}{photo}≃ 4–5 and 3, respectively. Near-infrared objects are found very close to the SMGs and they are consistent with low-z ellipticals, suggesting that the high apparent luminosities can be attributed to gravitational magnification. The cumulative number counts at {S}1.1{mm}≥slant 25 mJy, combined with the other two 1.1 mm brightest sources, are {0.70}-0.34+0.56 deg‑2, which is consistent with a model prediction that accounts for flux magnification due to strong gravitational lensing. Unexpectedly, a z\\gt 3 SMG and a Galactic dense starless core (e.g., a first hydrostatic core) could be similar in the mid-infrared to millimeter spectral energy distributions and spatial structures at least at ≳ 1\\prime\\prime . This indicates that it is necessary to distinguish the two possibilities by means of broadband photometry from the optical to centimeter and spectroscopy to determine the redshift, when a compact object is identified toward Galactic star-forming regions.

  3. Shocks and Star Formation in Stephan's Quintet. I. Gemini Spectroscopy of H{\\alpha}-bright knots

    CERN Document Server

    Konstantopoulos, I S; Guillard, P; Trancho, G; Cluver, M E; Bastian, N; Charlton, J C; Fedotov, K; Gallagher, S C; Smith, L J; Struck, C J

    2013-01-01

    We present a Gemini-GMOS spectroscopic study of HST-selected H{\\alpha}-emitting regions in Stephan's Quintet (HCG 92), a nearby compact galaxy group, with the aim of disentangling the processes of shock-induced heating and star formation in its intra-group medium. The $\\approx$40 sources are distributed across the system, but most densely concentrated in the $\\sim$kpc-long shock region. Their spectra neatly divide them into narrow- and and broad-line emitters, and we decompose the latter into three or more emission peaks corresponding to spatial elements discernible in HST imaging. The emission line ratios of the two populations of H{\\alpha}-emitters confirm their nature as H II regions (90% of the sample) or molecular gas heated by a shock-front propagating at $\\lesssim$300 km/s. Their redshift distribution reveals interesting three-dimensional structure with respect to gas-phase baryons, with no H II regions associated with shocked gas, no shocked regions in the intruder galaxy NGC 7318B, and a sharp bounda...

  4. Extremely-bright submillimeter galaxies beyond the Lupus-I star-forming region

    CERN Document Server

    Tamura, Y; Shimajiri, Y; Tsukagoshi, T; Nakajima, Y; Oasa, Y; Wilner, D J; Chandler, C J; Saigo, K; Tomida, K; Yun, M S; Taniguchi, A; Kohno, K; Hatsukade, B; Aretxaga, I; Austermann, J E; Dickman, R; Ezawa, H; Goss, W M; Hayashi, M; Hughes, D H; Hiramatsu, M; Inutsuka, S; Ogasawara, R; Ohashi, N; Oshima, T; Scott, K S; Wilson, G W

    2015-01-01

    We report detections of two candidate distant submillimeter galaxies (SMGs), MM J154506.4$-$344318 and MM J154132.7$-$350320, which are discovered in the AzTEC/ASTE 1.1 mm survey toward the Lupus-I star-forming region. The two objects have 1.1 mm flux densities of 43.9 and 27.1 mJy, and have Herschel/SPIRE counterparts as well. The Submillimeter Array counterpart to the former SMG is identified at 890 $\\mu$m and 1.3 mm. Photometric redshift estimates using all available data from the mid-infrared to the radio suggest that the redshifts of the two SMGs are $z_{\\rm photo} \\simeq$ 4-5 and 3, respectively. Near-infrared objects are found very close to the SMGs and they are consistent with low-$z$ ellipticals, suggesting that the high apparent luminosities can be attributed to gravitational magnification. The cumulative number counts at $S_{\\rm 1.1mm} \\ge 25$ mJy, combined with other two 1.1-mm brightest sources, are $0.70 ^{+0.56}_{-0.34}$ deg$^{-2}$, which is consistent with a model prediction that accounts for ...

  5. Solar-Type Activity: Epochs of Cycle Formation

    CERN Document Server

    Katsova, M M; Livshits, M A

    2015-01-01

    The diagram of indices of coronal and chromospheric activity allowed us to reveal stars where solar-type activity appears and regular cycles are forming. Using new consideration of a relation between coronal activity and the rotation rate, together with new data on the ages of open clusters, we estimate the age of the young Sun corresponding to the epoch of formation of its cycle. The properties of the activity of this young Sun, with an age slightly older than one billion years, are briefly discussed. An analysis of available data on the long-term regular variability of late-type stars leads to the conclusion that duration of a cycle associated with solar-type activity increases with the deceleration of the stellar rotation; i.e., with age. New data on the magnetic fields of comparatively young G stars and changes in the role of the large-scale and the local magnetic fields in the formation of the activity of the young Sun are discussed. Studies in this area aim to provide observational tests aimed at identi...

  6. Distribution of the very first PopIII stars and their relation to bright z~6 quasars

    CERN Document Server

    Trenti, M

    2007-01-01

    We discuss the link between dark matter halos hosting the first PopIII stars and the rare, massive, halos that are generally considered to host bright quasars at high redshift z~6. The main question that we intend to answer is whether the super-massive black holes powering these QSOs grew out from the seeds planted by the first intermediate massive black holes created in the universe. This question involves a dynamical range of 10^13 in mass and we address it by combining N-body simulations of structure formation to identify the most massive halos at z~6 with a Monte Carlo method based on linear theory to obtain the location and formation times of the first light halos within the whole simulation box. We show that the descendants of the first ~10^6 Msun virialized halos do not, on average, end up in the most massive halos at z~6, but rather live in a large variety of environments. The oldest PopIII progenitors of the most massive halos at z~6, form instead from density peaks that are on average one and a half...

  7. Star formation in bright-rimmed clouds and cluster associated with W5 E H{\\sc ii} region

    CERN Document Server

    Chauhan, Neelam; Ogura, K; Jose, J; Ojha, D K; Samal, M R; Mito, H

    2011-01-01

    The aim of this paper is to present the results of photometric investigations of the central cluster of the W5 E region as well as a follow-up study of the triggered star formation in and around bright-rimmed clouds (BRCs). We have carried out wide field $UBVI_c$ and deep $VI_c$ photometry of the W5 E H{\\sc ii} region. A distance of $\\sim$2.1 kpc and a mean age of $\\sim$1.3 Myr have been obtained for the central cluster. The young stellar objects (YSOs) associated with the region are identified on the basis of near-infrared and mid-infrared observations. We confirmed our earlier results that the average age of the YSOs lying on/inside the rim are younger than those lying outside the rim. The global distribution of the YSOs shows an aligned distribution from the ionising source to the BRCs. These facts indicate that a series of radiation driven implosion processes proceeded from near the central ionising source towards the periphery of the W5 E H{\\sc ii} region. We found that, in general, the age distributions...

  8. Astronomical Science with Laser Guide Star Adaptive Optics: A Brief Review, a Current Snapshot, and a Bright Future

    CERN Document Server

    Liu, M C

    2006-01-01

    We briefly discuss the past, present, and future state of astronomical science with laser guide star adaptive optics (LGS AO). We present a tabulation of refereed science papers from LGS AO, amounting to a total of 23 publications as of May 2006. The first decade of LGS AO science (1995-2004) was marked by modest science productivity (~1 paper/year), as LGS systems were being implemented and commissioned. The last two years have seen explosive science growth (~1 paper/month), largely due to the new LGS system on the Keck II 10-meter telescope, and point to an exciting new era for high angular resolution science. To illustrate the achievable on-sky performance, we present an extensive collection of Keck LGS performance measurements from the first year of our brown dwarf near-IR imaging survey. We summarize the current strengths and weaknesses of LGS compared to Hubble Space Telescope, offer a list of desired improvements, and look forward to a bright future for LGS given its wide-scale implementation on large ...

  9. Are LGRBs biased tracers of star formation? Clues from the host galaxies of the Swift/BAT6 complete sample of bright LGRBs. II: star formation rates and metallicities at z < 1

    CERN Document Server

    Japelj, J; Salvaterra, R; D'Avanzo, P; Mannucci, F; Fernandez-Soto, A; Boissier, S; Hunt, L K; Atek, H; Rodríguez-Muñoz, L; Scodeggio, M; Cristiani, S; Floc'h, E Le; Flores, H; Gallego, J; Ghirlanda, G; Gomboc, A; Hammer, F; Perley, D A; Pescalli, A; Petitjean, P; Puech, M; Rafelski, M; Tagliaferri, G

    2016-01-01

    Long gamma-ray bursts (LGRBs) are associated with the deaths of massive stars and could thus be a potentially powerful tool to trace cosmic star formation. However, especially at low redshifts (z < 1.5) LGRBs seem to prefer particular types of environment. Our aim is to study the host galaxies of a complete sample of bright LGRBs to investigate the impact of the environment on GRB formation. We study host galaxy spectra of the Swift/BAT6 complete sample of 14 z < 1 bright LGRBs. We use the detected nebular emission lines to measure the dust extinction, star formation rate (SFR) and nebular metallicity (Z) of the hosts and supplement the data set with previously measured stellar masses M$_{\\star}$. The distributions of the obtained properties and their interrelations (e.g. mass-metallicity and SFR-M$_{\\star}$ relations) are compared to samples of field star-forming galaxies.We find that LGRB hosts at z < 1 have on average lower SFRs than if they were direct star-formation tracers. By directly comparin...

  10. Magnetic fields and differential rotation on the pre-main sequence I: The early-G star HD 141943 - brightness and magnetic topologies

    CERN Document Server

    Marsden, S C; Vélez, J C Ramírez; Alecian, E; Brown, C J; Carter, B D; Donati, J F; Dunstone, N; Hart, R; Semel, M; Waite, I A

    2011-01-01

    Spectroscopic and spectropolarimetric observations of the pre-main sequence early-G star HD 141943 were obtained at four observing epochs (in 2006, 2007, 2009 and 2010). The observations were undertaken at the 3.9-m Anglo-Australian Telescope using the UCLES echelle spectrograph and the SEMPOL spectropolarimeter visitor instrument. Brightness and surface magnetic field topologies were reconstructed for the star using the technique of least-squares deconvolution to increase the signal-to-noise of the data. The reconstructed brightness maps show that HD 141943 had a weak polar spot and a significant amount of low latitude features, with little change in the latitude distribution of the spots over the 4 years of observations. The surface magnetic field was reconstructed at three of the epochs from a high order (l <= 30) spherical harmonic expansion of the spectropolarimetric observations. The reconstructed magnetic topologies show that in 2007 and 2010 the surface magnetic field was reasonably balanced betwee...

  11. Star formation and the interstellar medium in low surface brightness galaxies; 2, Deep CO observations of low surface brightness disk galaxies

    CERN Document Server

    De Blok, W J G

    1998-01-01

    We present deep, pointed $^{12}$CO($J=2-1$) observations of three late-type LSB galaxies. The beam-size was small enough that we could probe different environments (\\HI maximum, \\HI mininum, star forming region) in these galaxies. No CO was found at any of the positions observed. We argue that the implied lack of molecular gas is real and not caused by conversion factor effects. The virtual absence of a molecular phase may explain the very low star formation rates in these galaxies.

  12. Solar-type cycles in close binary systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Solar-type cycles in late-type secondary components of cataclysmic variables can produce cyclical variations of the quiescent luminosity, the time intervals between consecutive outbursts of dwarf-nova systems, and the orbital period. Analysis of the long-term light curves of several types of close binary systems suggests cyclical variations of the mass-transfer rate which can be ascribed to fractional changes of the radii of the late-type secondaries by Delta R/R in the range 0.00006-0.0003, as expected for a typical solar cycle. The probability density function of the periods of the cycles discovered in both CVs and single main-sequence stars are peaked around 6 yr. The periods of the cycles do not seem to be affected by the rotation regime of the star. A possible correlation between these cycles and the recurrence times of recurrent novae is suggested. 85 refs

  13. Operating an Improved HAT Network to Discover and Characterize Many Planets, from Super-Earths to Super-Jupiters, Transiting Bright Stars

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bakos, Gaspar

    OBJECTIVES The primary objective of this program is to discover many new extrasolar planets that transit stars bright enough to allow in-depth follow-up studies. This program will focus, in particular, on exploring the large, but poorly studied, populations of long period planets as well as Neptunes and super Earths transiting bright stars. We will also provide accurate initial characterization of the newly discovered exoplanets. METHODS We will accomplish these research objectives by continuing the operation of the highly efficient and successful HATNet project in the period of 2013-2016, exploiting its unique capabilities to discover long period as well as small transiting planets. We also propose to replace our inexpensive front-illuminated CCDs with high quality back-illuminated CCDs so as to achieve 1 millimagnitude photometry at 9 minute cadence over a wide field of view for the brightest stars, as demonstrated by a recent experiment. The CCD upgrade, new observing techniques, and highly optimized reduction of the data will increase HATNet's current efficiency towards finding Neptune-sized planets by a factor of 8. With 38 transiting planets published to date, including two of the five well-characterized Neptune-mass planets, and having received more than 750 citations to date, HATNet is one of the world leaders in their discovery. Without further funding HATNet operations will cease. Our team has established a very well working machinery (equipment, personnel, follow-up tools, and expertise) which represents a significant, and highly cost- efficient investment by NASA. The specific methods and techniques we will use are now fully developed, and include: automated monitoring of all bright stars in selected 8x8 degree star fields; identifying candidate transiting planets based on these observations; and conducting follow-up spectroscopic and photometric observations to confirm and characterize those candidates which are real transiting planets. SIGNIFICANCE

  14. What asteroseismology can do for exoplanets: Kepler-410A b is a Small Neptune around a bright star, in an eccentric orbit consistent with low obliquity

    CERN Document Server

    Van Eylen, Vincent; Aguirre, Victor Silva; Arentoft, Torben; Kjeldsen, Hans; Albrecht, Simon; Chaplin, William J; Isaacson, Howard; Pedersen, May G; Jessen-Hansen, Jens; Tingley, Brandon W; Christensen-Dalsgaard, Joergen; Aerts, Conny; Campante, Tiago L; Bryson, Stephen T

    2013-01-01

    We confirm the Kepler planet candidate Kepler-410b (KOI-42b) as a Neptune sized exoplanet on a 17.8 day, eccentric orbit around the bright (Kp = 9.4) star Kepler-410A. This is the third brightest confirmed planet host star in the Kepler field and one of the brightest hosts of all currently known transiting exoplanets. Kepler-410 consists of a blend between the fast rotating planet host star (Kepler-410A) and a fainter star (Kepler-410B), which has complicated the confirmation of the planetary candidate. Employing asteroseismology, using constraints from the transit light curve, adaptive optics and speckle images, and Spitzer transit observations, we demonstrate that the candidate can only be an exoplanet orbiting Kepler-410A. Via asteroseismology we determine the following stellar and planetary parameters with high precision; M$_\\star = 1.214 \\pm 0.033$ M$_\\odot$, R$_\\star = 1.352 \\pm 0.010$ R$_\\odot$, Age = $2.76 \\pm 0.54$ Gyr, planetary radius ($2.838 \\pm 0.054$ R$_\\oplus$), and orbital eccentricity ($0.17^...

  15. Lithium abundance/surface activity connections in solar-type Pleiades

    OpenAIRE

    Clarke, D.; MacDonald, E. C.; Owens, S.

    2004-01-01

    The relation between the lithium abundance, ALi, and photospheric activity of solar-type Pleiads is investigated for the first time via acquisition and analysis of B and V-band data. Predictions of activity levels of target stars were made according to the ALi/(B - V) relation and then compared with new CCD photometric measurements. Six sources behaved according to the predictions while one star (HII 676), with low predicted activity, exhibited the largest variability of the study; another st...

  16. EL CVn-type binaries - Discovery of 17 helium white dwarf precursors in bright eclipsing binary star systems

    CERN Document Server

    Maxted, P F L; Heber, U; Geier, S; Wheatley, P J; Marsh, T R; Breedt, E; Sebastian, D; Faillace, G; Owen, C; Pulley, D; Smith, D; Kolb, U; Haswell, C A; Southworth, J; Anderson, D R; Smalley, B; Cameron, A Collier; Hebb, L; Simpson, E K; West, R G; Bochinski, J; Busuttil, R; Hadigal, S

    2013-01-01

    The star 1SWASP J024743.37-251549.2 was recently discovered to be a binary star in which an A-type dwarf star eclipses the remnant of a disrupted red giant star (WASP0247-25B). The remnant is in a rarely-observed state evolving to higher effective temperatures at nearly constant luminosity prior to becoming a very low-mass white dwarf composed almost entirely of helium, i.e., it is a pre-He-WD. We have used the WASP photometric database to find 17 eclipsing binary stars with orbital periods P=0.7 to 2.2 days with similar lightcurves to 1SWASP J024743.37-251549.2. The only star in this group previously identified as a variable star is the brightest one, EL CVn, which we adopt as the prototype for this class of eclipsing binary star. The characteristic lightcurves of EL CVn-type stars show a total eclipse by an A-type dwarf star of a smaller, hotter star and a secondary eclipse of comparable depth to the primary eclipse. We have used new spectroscopic observations for 6 of these systems to confirm that the comp...

  17. The SW Sex-type star 2MASS J01074282+4845188: an unusual bright accretion disk with non-steady emission and a hot white dwarf

    CERN Document Server

    Khruzina, T; Kjurkchieva, D; 10.1051/0004-6361/201220385

    2013-01-01

    We present new photometric and spectral observations of the newly discovered nova-like eclipsing star 2MASS J01074282+4845188. To obtain a light curve solution we used model of a nova-like star whose emission sources are a white dwarf surrounded by an accretion disk, a secondary star filling its Roche lobe, a hot spot and a hot line. 2MASS J01074282+4845188 shows the deepest permanent eclipse among the known nova-like stars. It is reproduced by covering the very bright accretion disk by the secondary component. The luminosity of the disk is much bigger than that of the rest light sources. The determined high temperature of the disk is typical for that observed during the outbursts of CVs. The primary of 2MASS J01074282+4845188 is one of the hottest white dwarfs in CVs. The temperature of 5090 K of its secondary is also quite high and more appropriate for a long-period SW Sex star. It might be explained by the intense heating from the hot white dwarf and the hot accretion disk of the target. The high mass accr...

  18. A novel high-contrast imaging technique based on optical tunneling to search for faint companions around bright stars at the limit of diffraction

    CERN Document Server

    Derigs, Dominik; Ghosh, Dhriti Sundar; Abel-Tibérini, Laëtitia

    2016-01-01

    We present a novel application of optical tunneling in the context of high-angular resolution, high-contrast techniques with the aim of improving direct imaging capabilities of faint companions in the vicinity of bright stars. In contrast to existing techniques like coronagraphy, we apply well-established techniques from integrated optics to exclusively extinct a very narrow angular direction coming from the sky. This extinction is achieved in the pupil plane and does not suffer from diffraction pattern residuals. We give a comprehensive presentation of the underlying theory as well as first laboratory results.

  19. EPIC 204129699b, a grazing transiting hot Jupiter on an 1.26-day orbit around a bright solar like star

    CERN Document Server

    Grziwa, S; Csizmadia, Sz; Fridlund, M; Parviainen, H; Deeg, H J; Cabrera, J; Djupvik, A A; Albrecht, S; Palle, E B; Pätzold, M; Béjar, V J S; Arranz, J P; Eigmüller, P; Erikson, A; Fynbo, J P U; Guenther, E W; Hatzes, A P; Kiilerich, A; Korth, J; Kuutma, T; Montanés-Rodríguez, P; Nespral, D; Nowak, G; Rauer, H; Saario, J; Sebastian, D; Slumstrup, D

    2015-01-01

    We report the discovery of EPIC 204129699b, the first confirmed transiting hot Jupiter detected by the K2 space mission. We combined K2 photometry with FastCam lucky imaging and FIES and HARPS high-resolution spectroscopy to confirm the planetary nature of the transiting object and derived the system parameters. EPIC 204129699b is a 1.8-Jupiter-mass planet on an 1.26-day-orbit around a G7V star (M* = 0.91 Msun, R* = 0.78 Rsun). The planetary radius is poorly constrained (0.7 < Rp < 1.4 RJup ), owing to the grazing transit and the low sampling rate of the K2 photometry. The short orbital period and the brightness of the host star (V = 10.8 mag) make the system amenable to atmospheric characterization.

  20. CARMA SURVEY TOWARD INFRARED-BRIGHT NEARBY GALAXIES (STING). II. MOLECULAR GAS STAR FORMATION LAW AND DEPLETION TIME ACROSS THE BLUE SEQUENCE

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rahman, Nurur; Bolatto, Alberto D.; Fisher, David B.; Vogel, Stuart N. [Department of Astronomy, University of Maryland, College Park, MD (United States); Xue Rui; Wong, Tony [Department of Astronomy, University of Illinois, Urbana-Champaign, IL (United States); Leroy, Adam K. [National Radio Astronomy Observatory, Charlottesville, VA (United States); Walter, Fabian [Max-Planck-Institute fur Astronomie, Heidelberg (Germany); Bigiel, Frank [Institut fuer Theoretische Astrophysik, Universitaet Heidelberg, D-69120 Heidelberg (Germany); Rosolowsky, Erik [I. K. Barber School of the Arts and Science, University of British-Columbia, Kelowna, BC (Canada); Blitz, Leo [Department of Astronomy, University of California, Berkeley, CA (United States); West, Andrew A. [Department of Astronomy, Boston University, Boston, MA (United States); Ott, Juergen, E-mail: nurur@astro.umd.edu [National Radio Astronomy Observatory, Socorro, NM (United States)

    2012-02-01

    We present an analysis of the relationship between molecular gas and current star formation rate surface density at sub-kiloparsec and kiloparsec scales in a sample of 14 nearby star-forming galaxies. Measuring the relationship in the bright, high molecular gas surface density ({Sigma}{sub H{sub 2}}{approx}>20 M{sub Sun} pc{sup -2}) regions of the disks to minimize the contribution from diffuse extended emission, we find an approximately linear relation between molecular gas and star formation rate surface density, N{sub mol} {approx} 0.96 {+-} 0.16, with a molecular gas depletion time, {tau}{sup mol}{sub dep} {approx} 2.30 {+-} 1.32 Gyr. We show that in the molecular regions of our galaxies there are no clear correlations between {tau}{sup mol}{sub dep} and the free-fall and effective Jeans dynamical times throughout the sample. We do not find strong trends in the power-law index of the spatially resolved molecular gas star formation law or the molecular gas depletion time across the range of galactic stellar masses sampled (M{sub *} {approx} 10{sup 9.7}-10{sup 11.5} M{sub Sun }). There is a trend, however, in global measurements that is particularly marked for low-mass galaxies. We suggest that this trend is probably due to the low surface brightness CO J = 1-0, and it is likely associated with changes in CO-to-H{sub 2} conversion factor.

  1. KEPLER-21b: A 1.6 R{sub Earth} PLANET TRANSITING THE BRIGHT OSCILLATING F SUBGIANT STAR HD 179070

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Howell, Steve B. [National Optical Astronomy Observatory, Tucson, AZ 85719 (United States); Rowe, Jason F.; Bryson, Stephen T. [NASA Ames Research Center, Moffett Field, CA 94035 (United States); Quinn, Samuel N. [Harvard-Smithsonian Center for Astrophysics, Cambridge, MA 02138 (United States); Marcy, Geoffrey W.; Isaacson, Howard [Department of Astronomy, University of California, Berkeley, CA 94720 (United States); Ciardi, David R. [NASA Exoplanet Science Institute/Caltech, Pasadena, CA 91125 (United States); Chaplin, William J.; Elsworth, Yvonne [School of Physics and Astronomy, University of Birmingham, Edgbaston, Birmingham B15 2TT (United Kingdom); Metcalfe, Travis S. [High Altitude Observatory and Scientific Computing Division, National Center for Atmospheric Research, Boulder, CO 80307 (United States); Monteiro, Mario J. P. F. G. [Centro de Astrofisica, Universidade do Porto, Rua das Estrelas, 4150-762 Porto (Portugal); Appourchaux, Thierry [Institut d' Astrophysique Spatiale, Universite Paris XI-CNRS (UMR8617), Batiment 121, 91405 Orsay Cedex (France); Basu, Sarbani [Department of Astronomy, Yale University, New Haven, CT 06520-8101 (United States); Creevey, Orlagh L. [Departamento de Astrofisica, Universidad de La Laguna, E-38206 La Laguna, Tenerife (Spain); Gilliland, Ronald L. [Space Telescope Science Institute, Baltimore, MD 21218 (United States); Quirion, Pierre-Olivier [Canadian Space Agency, 6767 Boulevard de l' Aeroport, Saint-Hubert, QC, J3Y 8Y9 (Canada); Stello, Denis [Sydney Institute for Astronomy (SIfA), School of Physics, University of Sydney, NSW 2006 (Australia); Kjeldsen, Hans; Christensen-Dalsgaard, Joergen [Department of Physics and Astronomy, Aarhus University, DK-8000 Aarhus C (Denmark); Garcia, Rafael A. [Laboratoire AIM, CEA/DSM-CNRS-Universite Paris Diderot-IRFU/SAp, 91191 Gif-sur-Yvette Cedex (France); and others

    2012-02-20

    We present Kepler observations of the bright (V = 8.3), oscillating star HD 179070. The observations show transit-like events which reveal that the star is orbited every 2.8 days by a small, 1.6 R{sub Earth} object. Seismic studies of HD 179070 using short cadence Kepler observations show that HD 179070 has a frequency-power spectrum consistent with solar-like oscillations that are acoustic p-modes. Asteroseismic analysis provides robust values for the mass and radius of HD 179070, 1.34 {+-} 0.06 M{sub Sun} and 1.86 {+-} 0.04 R{sub Sun }, respectively, as well as yielding an age of 2.84 {+-} 0.34 Gyr for this F5 subgiant. Together with ground-based follow-up observations, analysis of the Kepler light curves and image data, and blend scenario models, we conservatively show at the >99.7% confidence level (3{sigma}) that the transit event is caused by a 1.64 {+-} 0.04 R{sub Earth} exoplanet in a 2.785755 {+-} 0.000032 day orbit. The exoplanet is only 0.04 AU away from the star and our spectroscopic observations provide an upper limit to its mass of {approx}10 M{sub Earth} (2{sigma}). HD 179070 is the brightest exoplanet host star yet discovered by Kepler.

  2. HAT-P-49b: A 1.7 $M_J$ Planet Transiting a Bright 1.5 $M_\\odot$ F-Star

    CERN Document Server

    Bieryla, A; Bakos, G A; Bhatti, W; Kovacs, G; Boisse, I; Latham, D W; Buchhave, L A; Csubry, Z; Penev, K; de Val-Borro, M; Beky, B; Falco, E; Torres, G; Noyes, R W; Berlind, P; Calkins, M C; Esquerdo, G A; Lazar, J; Papp, I; Sari, P

    2014-01-01

    We report the discovery of the transiting extrasolar planet HAT-P-49b. The planet transits the bright (V = 10.3) slightly evolved F-star HD 340099 with a mass of 1.54 M_S and a radius of 1.83 R_S. HAT-P-49b is orbiting one of the 25 brightest stars to host a transiting planet which makes this a favorable candidate for detailed follow-up. This system is an especially strong target for Rossiter-McLaughlin follow-up due to the fast rotation of the host star, 16 km/s. The planetary companion has a period of 2.6915 d, mass of 1.73 M_J and radius of 1.41 R_J. The planetary characteristics are consistent with that of a classical hot Jupiter but we note that this is the fourth most massive star to host a transiting planet with both M_p and R_p well determined.

  3. FUSE, STIS, and Keck spectroscopic analysis of the UV-bright star vZ 1128 in M3 (NGC 5272)

    CERN Document Server

    Chayer, Pierre; Fullerton, Alexander W; Ooghe-Tabanou, Benjamin; Reid, I Neill

    2015-01-01

    We present a spectral analysis of the UV-bright star vZ 1128 in M3 based on observations with the Far Ultraviolet Spectroscopic Explorer (FUSE), the Space Telescope Imaging Spectrograph (STIS), and the Keck HIRES echelle spectrograph. By fitting the H I, He I, and He II lines in the Keck spectrum with non-LTE H-He models, we obtain Teff = 36,600 K, log g = 3.95, and log N(He)/N(H) = -0.84. The star's FUSE and STIS spectra show photospheric absorption from C, N, O, Al, Si, P, S, Fe, and Ni. No stellar features from elements beyond the iron peak are observed. Both components of the N V 1240 doublet exhibit P~Cygni profiles, indicating a weak stellar wind, but no other wind features are seen. The star's photospheric abundances appear to have changed little since it left the red giant branch (RGB). Its C, N, O, Al, Si, Fe, and Ni abundances are consistent with published values for the red-giant stars in M3, and the relative abundances of C, N, and O follow the trends seen on the cluster RGB. In particular, its lo...

  4. HST/COS Observations of the UV-Bright Star Y453 in the Globular Cluster M4 (NGC 6121)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dixon, William V. D.; Chayer, Pierre; Benjamin, Robert A.

    2016-01-01

    Post-AGB stars represent a short-lived phase of stellar evolution during which stars cross the optical color-magnitude diagram from the cool, red tip of the assymptotic giant branch (AGB) to the hot, blue tip of the white-dwarf cooling curve. Their surface chemistry reflects the nuclear-shell burning, mixing, and mass-loss processes characteristic of AGB stars, and their high effective temperatures allow the detection of elements that are unobservable in cool giants. Post-AGB stars in globular clusters offer the additional advantages of known distance, age, and initial chemistry. To better understand the AGB evolution of low-mass stars, we have observed the post-AGB star Y453 in the globular cluster M4 (NGC 6121) with the Cosmic Origins Spectrograph (COS) on the Hubble Space Telescope. The star, which has an effective temperature of at least 60,000 K, shows absorption from He, C, N, O, Ne, Si, S, Ti, Cr, Mn, Fe, Co, Ni, and Ga. While the star's C and O abundances are consistent with those measured in a sample of nitrogen-poor RGB stars in M4, its N abundance is considerably enhanced. The star's low C abundance suggests that it left the AGB before the onset of third dredge-up.This work was supported by NASA grant HST-GO-13721.001-A to the University of Wisconsin, Whitewater. P.C. is supported by the Canadian Space Agency under a contract with NRC Herzberg Astronomy and Astrophysics.

  5. BRIGHT 'MERGER-NOVA' FROM THE REMNANT OF A NEUTRON STAR BINARY MERGER: A SIGNATURE OF A NEWLY BORN, MASSIVE, MILLISECOND MAGNETAR

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yu, Yun-Wei [Institute of Astrophysics, Central China Normal University, Wuhan 430079 (China); Zhang, Bing; Gao, He, E-mail: yuyw@mail.ccnu.edu.cn, E-mail: zhang@physics.unlv.edu [Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of Nevada, Las Vegas, NV 89154 (United States)

    2013-10-20

    A massive millisecond magnetar may survive the merger of a neutron star (NS) binary, which would continuously power the merger ejecta. We develop a generic dynamic model for the merger ejecta with energy injection from the central magnetar. The ejecta emission (the {sup m}erger-nova{sup )} powered by the magnetar peaks in the UV band and the peak of the light curve, progressively shifts to an earlier epoch with increasing frequency. A magnetar-powered merger-nova could have an optical peak brightness comparable to a supernova, which is a few tens or hundreds times brighter than the radioactive-powered merger-novae (the so-called macro-nova or kilo-nova). On the other hand, such a merger-nova would peak earlier and have a significantly shorter duration than that of a supernova. An early collapse of the magnetar could suppress the brightness of the optical emission and shorten its duration. Such millisecond-magnetar-powered merger-novae may be detected from NS-NS merger events without an observed short gamma-ray burst, and could be a bright electromagnetic counterpart for gravitational wave bursts due to NS-NS mergers. If detected, it suggests that the merger leaves behind a massive NS, which has important implications for the equation-of-state of nuclear matter.

  6. Confirming HD 23478 as a new magnetic B star hosting an H$\\alpha$-bright centrifugal magnetosphere

    OpenAIRE

    Sikora, James; Wade, Gregg; Bohlender, David; Neiner, Coralie; Oksala, Mary; Shultz, Matt; Cohen, David; ud-Doula, Asif; Grunhut, Jason; Monin, Dmitry; Owocki, Stan; Petit, Véronique; Rivinius, Thomas; Townsend, Richard

    2015-01-01

    In this paper we report 23 magnetic field measurements of the B3IV star HD 23478: 12 obtained from high resolution Stokes $V$ spectra using the ESPaDOnS (CFHT) and Narval (TBL) spectropolarimeters, and 11 from medium resolution Stokes $V$ spectra obtained with the DimaPol spectropolarimeter (DAO). HD 23478 was one of two rapidly rotating stars identified as potential "centrifugal magnetosphere" hosts based on IR observations from the Apache Point Observatory Galactic Evolution Experiment surv...

  7. Shocks and star formation in Stephan's Quintet. I. Gemini spectroscopy of Hα-bright knots

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We present a Gemini-GMOS spectroscopic study of Hubble Space Telescope (HST)-selected Hα-emitting regions in Stephan's Quintet (HCG 92), a nearby compact galaxy group, with the aim of disentangling the processes of shock-induced heating and star formation in its intra-group medium. The ≈40 sources are distributed across the system, but most densely concentrated in the ∼kiloparsec-long shock region. Their spectra neatly divide them into narrow- and broad-line emitters, and we decompose the latter into three or more emission peaks corresponding to spatial elements discernible in HST imaging. The emission-line ratios of the two populations of Hα-emitters confirm their nature as H II regions (90% of the sample) or molecular gas heated by a shock front propagating at ≲300 km s–1. Their redshift distribution reveals interesting three-dimensional structure with respect to gas-phase baryons, with no H II regions associated with shocked gas, no shocked regions in the intruder galaxy NGC 7318B, and a sharp boundary between shocks and star formation. We conclude that star formation is inhibited substantially, if not entirely, in the shock region. Attributing those H II regions projected against the shock to the intruder, we find a lopsided distribution of star formation in this galaxy, reminiscent of pileup regions in models of interacting galaxies. The Hα luminosities imply mass outputs, star formation rates, and efficiencies similar to nearby star-forming regions. Two large knots are an exception to this, being comparable in stellar output to the prolific 30 Doradus region. We also examine Stephan's Quintet in the context of compact galaxy group evolution, as a paradigm for intermittent star formation histories in the presence of a rich, X-ray-emitting intra-group medium. All spectra are provided as supplemental materials.

  8. Shocks and star formation in Stephan's Quintet. I. Gemini spectroscopy of Hα-bright knots

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Konstantopoulos, I. S.; Cluver, M. E. [Australian Astronomical Observatory, P.O. Box 915, North Ryde NSW 1670 (Australia); Appleton, P. N. [NASA Herschel Science Center (NHSC), California Institute of Technology, Pasadena, CA 91125 (United States); Guillard, P. [Institut d' Astrophysique Spatiale, Université Paris-Sud XI, F-91405 Orsay, Cedex (France); Trancho, G. [Giant Magellan Telescope Organisation, Pasadena, CA 91101 (United States); Bastian, N. [Astrophysics Research Institute, Liverpool John Moores University, Liverpool L3 5RF (United Kingdom); Charlton, J. C. [Department of Astronomy and Astrophysics, The Pennsylvania State University, University Park, PA 16802 (United States); Fedotov, K.; Gallagher, S. C. [Department of Physics and Astronomy, The University of Western Ontario, London, ON N6A 3K7 (Canada); Smith, L. J. [Space Telescope Science Institute and European Space Agency, Baltimore, MD 21218 (United States); Struck, C. J., E-mail: iraklis@aao.gov.au [Department of Physics and Astronomy, Iowa State University, Ames, IA 50011 (United States)

    2014-03-20

    We present a Gemini-GMOS spectroscopic study of Hubble Space Telescope (HST)-selected Hα-emitting regions in Stephan's Quintet (HCG 92), a nearby compact galaxy group, with the aim of disentangling the processes of shock-induced heating and star formation in its intra-group medium. The ≈40 sources are distributed across the system, but most densely concentrated in the ∼kiloparsec-long shock region. Their spectra neatly divide them into narrow- and broad-line emitters, and we decompose the latter into three or more emission peaks corresponding to spatial elements discernible in HST imaging. The emission-line ratios of the two populations of Hα-emitters confirm their nature as H II regions (90% of the sample) or molecular gas heated by a shock front propagating at ≲300 km s{sup –1}. Their redshift distribution reveals interesting three-dimensional structure with respect to gas-phase baryons, with no H II regions associated with shocked gas, no shocked regions in the intruder galaxy NGC 7318B, and a sharp boundary between shocks and star formation. We conclude that star formation is inhibited substantially, if not entirely, in the shock region. Attributing those H II regions projected against the shock to the intruder, we find a lopsided distribution of star formation in this galaxy, reminiscent of pileup regions in models of interacting galaxies. The Hα luminosities imply mass outputs, star formation rates, and efficiencies similar to nearby star-forming regions. Two large knots are an exception to this, being comparable in stellar output to the prolific 30 Doradus region. We also examine Stephan's Quintet in the context of compact galaxy group evolution, as a paradigm for intermittent star formation histories in the presence of a rich, X-ray-emitting intra-group medium. All spectra are provided as supplemental materials.

  9. A spectroscopic survey of the youngest field stars in the solar neighbourhood. I. The optically bright sample

    CERN Document Server

    Guillout, P; Frasca, A; Ferrero, R Freire; Marilli, E; Mignemi, G; Biazzo, K; Bouvier, J; Monier, R; Motch, C; Sterzik, M

    2009-01-01

    We present the first results of a ground-based programme conducted on 1-4m class telescopes. Our sample consists of 1097 active and presumably young stars, all of them being optical counterparts of RASS X-ray sources in the northern hemisphere. We concentrate on the 704 optically brightest (V_Ticho<=9.5 mag) candidates. We acquired high-res spectroscopy in the Halpha/Li spectral regions for 426 of such stars without relevant literature data. We describe the sample and the observations and we start to discuss its physical properties. We used a cross-correlation technique and other tools to derive accurate radial/rotational velocities and to perform a spectral classification for both single and SB2 stars. The spectral subtraction technique was used to derive chromospheric activity levels and Li abundances. We estimated the fraction of young single stars and multiple systems in stellar soft X-ray surveys and the contamination by more evolved systems, like RS CVn's. We classified stars on the basis of Li abund...

  10. SU Lyncis, a hard X-ray bright M giant: clues point to a large hidden population of symbiotic stars

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mukai, K.; Luna, G. J. M.; Cusumano, G.; Segreto, A.; Munari, U.; Sokoloski, J. L.; Lucy, A. B.; Nelson, T.; Nuñez, N. E.

    2016-09-01

    Symbiotic star surveys have traditionally relied almost exclusively on low resolution optical spectroscopy. However, we can obtain a more reliable estimate of their total Galactic population by using all available signatures of the symbiotic phenomenon. Here we report the discovery of a hard X-ray source, 4PBC J0642.9+5528, in the Swift hard X-ray all-sky survey, and identify it with a poorly studied red giant, SU Lyn, using pointed Swift observations and ground-based optical spectroscopy. The X-ray spectrum, the optical to UV spectrum, and the rapid UV variability of SU Lyn are all consistent with our interpretation that it is a symbiotic star containing an accreting white dwarf. The symbiotic nature of SU Lyn went unnoticed until now, because it does not exhibit emission lines strong enough to be obvious in low resolution spectra. We argue that symbiotic stars without shell-burning have weak emission lines, and that the current lists of symbiotic stars are biased in favour of shell-burning systems. We conclude that the true population of symbiotic stars has been underestimated, potentially by a large factor.

  11. Hubble Space Telescope Near-Ultraviolet Spectroscopy of the Bright CEMP-no Star BD+44 493

    CERN Document Server

    Placco, Vinicius; Roederer, Ian; Cowan, John; Frebel, Anna; Filler, Dan; Ivans, Inese I; Lawler, James E; Schatz, Hendrik; Sneden, Christopher; Sobeck, Jennifer; Aoki, Wako; Smith, Verne

    2014-01-01

    We present an elemental-abundance analysis, in the near-ultraviolet (NUV) spectral range, for the extremely metal-poor star BD+44 493, a 9th magnitude sub-giant with [Fe/H] = -3.8 and enhanced carbon, based on data acquired with the Space Telescope Imaging Spectrograph on the Hubble Space Telescope. This star is the brightest example of a class of objects that, unlike the great majority of carbon-enhanced metal-poor (CEMP) stars, does not exhibit over-abundances of heavy neutron-capture elements (CEMP-no). In this paper, we validate the abundance determinations for a number of species that were previously studied in the optical region, and obtain strong upper limits for beryllium and boron, as well as for neutron-capture elements from zirconium to platinum, many of which are not accessible from ground-based spectra. The boron upper limit we obtain for BD+44 493, logeps(B) < -0.70, the first such measurement for a CEMP star, is the lowest yet found for very and extremely metal-poor stars. In addition, we ob...

  12. Hα Surface Brightness Profiles of Star-Forming Galaxies and Dependence on Halo Mass Using the HAGGIS Survey

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kulkarni, S.; Wilman, D.; Erwin, P.; Koppenhöfer, J.; Gutierrez, L.; Beckman, J.; Saglia, R.; Bender, R.

    2014-03-01

    We present the first results from the Hα Galaxy Groups Imaging Survey (HAGGIS), a narrow-band imaging survey of SDSS groups at z Issac Newton Telescope (INT). In total, we observed 100 galaxy groups with a wide range of halo mass (1012 - 1014 M⊙) in pairs of narrow-band filters selected to get continuum subtracted rest-frame Hα images for each galaxy. The excellent data allows us to detect Hα down to the 10-18 ergs/s/cm2/arcsec2 level. Here, we examine the role played by halo mass and galaxy stellar mass in deciding the overall star formation activity in star forming disks by comparing stacked Hα profiles of galaxies in different halo mass and stellar mass bins. With this preliminary study, we have found that the star-formation activity in star-forming galaxies decreases in larger halos compared to the field galaxies. Using median equivalent width profiles, we can infer how environmental processes affect star-forming galaxies differently at different radii.

  13. Accurate parameters of 93 solar-type Kepler targets

    CERN Document Server

    Bruntt, H; Smalley, B; Chaplin, W J; Verner, G A; Bedding, T R; Catala, C; Gazzano, J -C; Molenda-Zakowicz, J; Thygesen, A O; Uytterhoeven, K; Hekker, S; Huber, D; Karoff, C; Mathur, S; Mosser, B; Appourchaux, T; Campante, T L; Elsworth, Y; Garcia, R A; Handberg, R; Metcalfe, T S; Quirion, P -O; Regulo, C; Roxburgh, I W; Stello, D; Christensen-Dalsgaard, J; Kawaler, S D; Kjeldsen, H; Morris, R L; Quintana, E V; Sanderfer, D T

    2012-01-01

    We present a detailed spectroscopic study of 93 solar-type stars that are targets of the NASA/Kepler mission and provide detailed chemical composition of each target. We find that the overall metallicity is well-represented by Fe lines. Relative abundances of light elements (CNO) and alpha-elements are generally higher for low-metallicity stars. Our spectroscopic analysis benefits from the accurately measured surface gravity from the asteroseismic analysis of the Kepler light curves. The log g parameter is known to better than 0.03 dex and is held fixed in the analysis. We compare our Teff determination with a recent colour calibration of V-K (TYCHO V magnitude minus 2MASS Ks magnitude) and find very good agreement and a scatter of only 80 K, showing that for other nearby Kepler targets this index can be used. The asteroseismic log g values agree very well with the classical determination using Fe1-Fe2 balance, although we find a small systematic offset of 0.08 dex (asteroseismic log g values are lower). The ...

  14. The VLT-FLAMES Tarantula survey. XX. The nature of the X-ray bright emission-line star VFTS 399

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clark, J. S.; Bartlett, E. S.; Broos, P. S.; Townsley, L. K.; Taylor, W. D.; Walborn, N. R.; Bird, A. J.; Sana, H.; de Mink, S. E.; Dufton, P. L.; Evans, C. J.; Langer, N.; Maíz Apellániz, J.; Schneider, F. R. N.; Soszyński, I.

    2015-07-01

    Context. The stellar population of the 30 Doradus star-forming region in the Large Magellanic Cloud contains a subset of apparently single, rapidly rotating O-type stars. The physical processes leading to the formation of this cohort are currently uncertain. Aims: One member of this group, the late O-type star VFTS 399, is found to be unexpectedly X-ray bright for its bolometric luminosity - in this study we aim to determine its physical nature and the cause of this behaviour. Methods: To accomplish this we performed a time-resolved analysis of optical, infrared and X-ray observations. Results: We found VFTS 399 to be an aperiodic photometric variable with an apparent near-IR excess. Its optical spectrum demonstrates complex emission profiles in the lower Balmer series and select He i lines - taken together these suggest an OeBe classification. The highly variable X-ray luminosity is too great to be produced by a single star, while the hard, non-thermal nature suggests the presence of an accreting relativistic companion. Finally, the detection of periodic modulation of the X-ray lightcurve is most naturally explained under the assumption that the accretor is a neutron star. Conclusions: VFTS 399 appears to be the first high-mass X-ray binary identified within 30 Dor, sharing many observational characteristics with classical Be X-ray binaries. Comparison of the current properties of VFTS 399 to binary-evolution models suggests a progenitor mass ≳25 M⊙ for the putative neutron star, which may host a magnetic field comparable in strength to those of magnetars. VFTS 399 is now the second member of the cohort of rapidly rotating "single" O-type stars in 30 Dor to show evidence of binary interaction resulting in spin-up, suggesting that this may be a viable evolutionary pathway for the formation of a subset of this stellar population. Based on observations collected at the European Southern Observatory under program ID 182.D-0222.

  15. Modelling the autocovariance of the power spectrum of a solar-type oscillator

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Campante , T.L.; Karoff, Christoffer

    2010-01-01

    originates from a radial or a dipolar oscillation mode. In order to overcome this problem, we present a procedure for modelling and fitting the autocovariance of the power spectrum which can be used to obtain global seismic parameters of solar-type stars, doing so in an automated fashion without the need......Asteroseismology is able to conduct studies on the interiors of solar-type stars from the analysis of stellar acoustic spectra. However, such an analysis process often has to rely upon subjective choices made throughout. A recurring problem is to determine whether a signal in the acoustic spectrum...... to make subjective choices. From the set of retrievable global seismic parameters we emphasize the mean small frequency separation and, depending on the intrinsic characteristics of the power spectrum, the mean rotational frequency splitting. Since this procedure is automated, it can serve as a useful...

  16. SU Lyncis, a hard X-ray bright M giant: Clues point to a large hidden population of symbiotic stars

    CERN Document Server

    Mukai, K; Cusumano, G; Segreto, A; Munari, U; Sokoloski, J L; Lucy, A B; Nelson, T; Nunez, N E

    2016-01-01

    Symbiotic star surveys have traditionally relied almost exclusively on low resolution optical spectroscopy. However, we can obtain a more reliable estimate of their total Galactic population by using all available signatures of the symbiotic phenomenon. Here we report the discovery of a hard X-ray source, 4PBC J0642.9+5528, in the Swift hard X-ray all-sky survey, and identify it with a poorly studied red giant, SU Lyn, using pointed Swift observations and ground-based optical spectroscopy. The X-ray spectrum, the optical to UV spectrum, and the rapid UV variability of SU Lyn are all consistent with our interpretation that it is a symbiotic star containing an accreting white dwarf. The symbiotic nature of SU Lyn went unnoticed until now, because it does not exhibit emission lines strong enough to be obvious in low resolution spectra. We argue that symbiotic stars without shell-burning have weak emission lines, and that the current lists of symbiotic stars are biased in favor of shell-burning systems. We conclu...

  17. The Galactic O-Star Spectroscopic Survey. I. Classification System and Bright Northern Stars in the Blue-Violet at R~2500

    CERN Document Server

    Sota, A; Walborn, N R; Alfaro, E J; Barbá, R H; Morrell, N I; Gamen, R C; Arias, J I

    2011-01-01

    We present the first installment of a massive spectroscopic survey of Galactic O stars, based on new, high signal-to-noise ratio, R~2500 digital observations from both hemispheres selected from the Galactic O-Star Catalog of Ma\\'iz Apell\\'aniz et al. (2004) and Sota et al. (2008). The spectral classification system is rediscussed and a new atlas is presented, which supersedes previous versions. Extensive sequences of exceptional objects are given, including types Ofc, ON/OC, Onfp, Of?p, Oe, and double-lined spectroscopic binaries. The remaining normal spectra bring this first sample to 184 stars, which is close to complete to B=8 and north of delta = -20 and includes all of the northern objects in Ma\\'iz Apell\\'aniz et al. (2004) that are still classified as O stars. The systematic and random accuracies of these classifications are substantially higher than previously attainable, because of the quality, quantity, and homogeneity of the data and analysis procedures. These results will enhance subsequent invest...

  18. Confirming HD 23478 as a new magnetic B star hosting an H$\\alpha$-bright centrifugal magnetosphere

    CERN Document Server

    Sikora, James; Bohlender, David; Neiner, Coralie; Oksala, Mary; Shultz, Matt; Cohen, David; ud-Doula, Asif; Grunhut, Jason; Monin, Dmitry; Owocki, Stan; Petit, Véronique; Rivinius, Thomas; Townsend, Richard

    2015-01-01

    In this paper we report 23 magnetic field measurements of the B3IV star HD 23478: 12 obtained from high resolution Stokes $V$ spectra using the ESPaDOnS (CFHT) and Narval (TBL) spectropolarimeters, and 11 from medium resolution Stokes $V$ spectra obtained with the DimaPol spectropolarimeter (DAO). HD 23478 was one of two rapidly rotating stars identified as potential "centrifugal magnetosphere" hosts based on IR observations from the Apache Point Observatory Galactic Evolution Experiment survey. We derive basic physical properties of this star including its mass ($M=6.1^{+0.8}_{-0.7}\\,M_\\odot$), effective temperature ($T_{\\rm eff}=20\\pm2\\,$kK), radius ($R=2.7^{+1.6}_{-0.9}\\,R_\\odot$), and age ($\\tau_{\\rm age}=3^{+37}_{-1}\\,$Myr). We repeatedly detect weakly-variable Zeeman signatures in metal, He and H lines in all our observations corresponding to a longitudinal magnetic field of $\\langle B_z\\rangle\\approx-2.0\\,$kG. The rotational period is inferred from Hipparcos photometry ($P_{\\rm rot}=1.0498(4)\\,$d). Und...

  19. Resonances in the Photoionization Cross Sections of Atomic Nitrogen Shape the Far-Ultraviolet Spectrum of the Bright Star in 47 Tucanae

    CERN Document Server

    Dixon, William V

    2013-01-01

    The far-ultraviolet (FUV) spectrum of the Bright Star (B8 III) in 47 Tuc (NGC 104) shows a remarkable pattern: it is well fit by LTE models at wavelengths longer than Lyman beta, but at shorter wavelengths it is fainter than the models by a factor of two. A spectrum of this star obtained with the Far Ultraviolet Spectroscopic Explorer (FUSE) shows broad absorption troughs with sharp edges at 995 and 1010 A and a deep absorption feature at 1072 A, none of which are predicted by the models. We find that these features are caused by resonances in the photoionization cross sections of the first and second excited states of atomic nitrogen (2s$^2$ 2p$^3$ $^2$D$^0$ and $^2$P$^0$). Using cross sections from the Opacity Project, we can reproduce these features, but only if we use the cross sections at their full resolution, rather than the resonance-averaged cross sections usually employed to model stellar atmospheres. These resonances are strongest in stellar atmospheres with enhanced nitrogen and depleted carbon ab...

  20. THE SPECTROSCOPIC ORBITS OF FIVE SOLAR-TYPE, SINGLE-LINED BINARIES

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fekel, Francis C.; Rajabi, Samira; Muterspaugh, Matthew W.; Williamson, Michael H., E-mail: fekel@evans.tsuniv.edu, E-mail: samira@coe.tsuniv.edu, E-mail: matthew1@coe.tsuniv.edu, E-mail: michael.h.williamson@gmail.com [Center of Excellence in Information Systems, Tennessee State University, 3500 John A. Merritt Boulevard, Box 9501, Nashville, TN 37209 (United States)

    2013-04-15

    We have determined spectroscopic orbits for five single-lined spectroscopic binaries, HD 100167, HD 135991, HD 140667, HD 158222, HD 217924. Their periods range from 60.6 to 2403 days and the eccentricities from 0.20 to 0.84. Our spectral classes for the stars confirm that they are of solar type, F9-G5, and all are dwarfs. Their [Fe/H] abundances, determined spectroscopically, are close to the solar value and on average are 0.12 greater than abundances from a photometric calibration. Four of the five stars are rotating faster than their predicted pseudosynchronous rotational velocities.

  1. Analysis of MOST light curves of five young stars in Taurus-Auriga and Lupus~3 Star Forming Regions

    CERN Document Server

    Siwak, Michal; Matthews, Jaymie M; Kuschnig, Rainer; Guenther, David B; Moffat, Anthony F J; Sasselov, Dimitar; Weiss, Werner W

    2011-01-01

    Continuous photometric observations of five young stars obtained by the MOST satellite in 2009 and 2010 in the Taurus and Lupus star formation regions are presented. Using light curve modelling under the assumption of internal invariability of spots, we obtained small values of the solar-type differential-rotation parameter (k=0.0005-0.009) for three spotted weak-line T Tau stars, V410 Tau, V987 Tau and Lupus 3-14; for another spotted WTTS, Lupus 3-48, the data are consistent with a rigidly rotating surface (k=0). Three flares of similar rise (4 min 30 sec) and decay (1 h 45 min) times were detected in the light curve of Lupus 3-14. The brightness of the classical T Tau star RY Tau continuously decreased over 3 weeks of its observations with a variable modulation not showing any obvious periodic signal.

  2. New Analyses of Star-to-Star Abundance Variations Among Bright Giants in the Mildly Metal-Poor Globular Cluster M5

    CERN Document Server

    Ivans, I I; Sneden, C; Smith, G H; Rich, R M; Shetrone, M; Ivans, Inese I.; Kraft, Robert P.; Sneden, Christopher; Smith, Graeme H.; Shetrone, Matthew

    2001-01-01

    We present a chemical composition analysis of 36 giant stars in the mildly metal-poor globular cluster M5 (NGC 5904). The analysis makes use of high resolution data acquired at the Keck I telescope as well as a re-analysis of high resolution spectra acquired for an earlier study at Lick Observatory. We employed two analysis techniques: one, adopting standard spectroscopic constraints, and two, adopting an analysis consistent with the non-LTE precepts as recently described by Thevenin & Idiart. The abundance ratios we derive for magnesium, silicon, calcium, scandium, titanium, vanadium, nickel, barium and europium in M5 show no significant abundance variations and the ratios are comparable to those of halo field stars. However, large variations are seen in the abundances of oxygen, sodium and aluminum, the elements that are sensitive to proton-capture nucleosynthesis. In comparing the abundances of M5 and M4 (NGC 6121), another mildly metal-poor globular cluster, we find that silicon, aluminum, barium and ...

  3. A Central Flash at an Occultation of a Bright Star by Pluto Soon Before New Horizons' Flyby

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pasachoff, Jay M.; Babcock, Bryce A.; Durst, Rebecca F.; Seeger, Christina H.; Levine, Stephen E.; Bosh, Amanda S.; Sickafoose, Amanda A.; Person, Michael J.; Abe, Fumio; Suzuki, Daisuke; Nagakane, Masayuki; Tristam, Paul J.

    2015-11-01

    From the Mt. John Observatory, New Zealand, we were so close to the center of the occultation path on 29 June 2015 UTC that we observed a modest central flash from the focusing of starlight from a 12th-magnitude star. The star was one of the brightest ever in our years of continual monitoring that started in 2002. At the time of Pluto's perihelion in 1989, it was feared from models that Pluto's atmosphere might collapse by now, a motivation for the timely launch of New Horizons; some models now allow Pluto to retain its atmosphere throughout its orbit.We used our frame-transfer CCD at 10 Hz with GPS timing on the 1-m McLellan telescope of Canterbury U. We also observed with a Lowell Obs. infrared camera on the "AAVSO" 0.6-m Optical Craftsman telescope; and obtained 3-color photometry at a slower cadence on a second 0.6-m telescope. We coordinated with the overflight of SOFIA and its 2.5-m telescope, which benefited from last-minute astrometry, and the Auckland Observatory's and other ground-based telescopes.Our light curves show a modest central flash; our tentative geometrical solution shows that we were only about 50 km from the occultation path's centerline. The flash is from rays lower than otherwise accessible in Pluto's atmosphere. Our light curves, at such high cadence that we see spikes caused by atmospheric effects that we had not seen so well since our 2002 Mauna Kea occultation observations, show that Pluto's atmosphere had not changed drastically since our previous year's observations. Our data provide a long-term context for New Horizon's highly-detailed observations of Pluto's atmosphere in addition to providing a chord for the geometrical solution that includes SOFIA's observations.Our observations were supported by NASA Planetary Astronomy grants NNX12AJ29G to Williams College, NNX15AJ82G to Lowell Observatory, and NNX10AB27G to MIT, and by the National Research Foundation of South Africa. We are grateful to Alan Gilmore, Pam Kilmartin, Robert Lucas

  4. WASP-38b: A 6.87 day period exoplanet transiting a bright F-type star

    CERN Document Server

    Barros, S C C; Cameron, A Collier; Lister, T A; McCormac, J; Pollacco, D; Simpson, E K; Smalley, B; Street, R A; Todd, I; Triaud, A H M J; Boisse, I; Bouchy, F; Hebrard, G; Moutou, C; Pepe, F; Queloz, D; Santerne, A; Segransan, D; Udry, S; Bento, J; Butters, O W; Enoch, B; Haswell, C A; Hellier, C; Keenan, F P; Miller, G R M; Moulds, V; Norton, A J; Parley, N; Skillen, I; Watson, C A; West, R G; Wheatley, P J

    2010-01-01

    We report the discovery of WASP-38b, a long period transiting planet in an eccentric $6.871815$ day orbit. The transit epoch is $2455335.92050 \\pm 0.00074$ (HJD) and the transit duration is $4.663$ hours. We performed a spectral analysis of the host star HD 146389/BD+10 2980 that yielded $T_{eff} = 6150 \\pm 80 $K, \\logg$=4.3 \\pm 0.1$, \\vsini=$8.6 \\pm 0.4 $\\kms, $M_*=1.16 \\pm 0.04$\\Msun\\ and $R_* =1.36 \\pm 0.05 $\\Rsun, consistent with a dwarf of spectral type F8. The radial velocity variations and the transit light curves were fitted simultaneously to estimate the orbital and planetary parameters. The planet has a mass of $2.71 \\pm 0.07 $ \\Mjup\\ and a radius of $1.08 \\pm 0.05\\, $\\Rjup\\, giving a density, $ \\rho_p = 2.2 \\pm 0.3 \\rho_J$. The high precision of the eccentricity $e=0.032 \\pm 0.0045$ is due to the relative transit timing from the light curves and the RV shape. The planet equilibrium temperature is estimated at $1311 \\pm 45$K. WASP-38b is the longest period planet found by WASP-North and with a brigh...

  5. VizieR Online Data Catalog: Spectroscopy of 341 bright A- and B-type stars (Gullikson+, 2016)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gullikson, K.; Kraus, A.; Dodson-Robinson, S.

    2016-09-01

    The sample is given in Table1. We use several high spectral resolution, cross-dispersed echelle spectrographs for this survey. We use the CHIRON spectrograph on the 1.5m telescope at Cerro Tololo Inter-American Observatory (CTIO) for most southern targets. This spectrograph is an R=λ/Δλ=80000 spectrograph with wavelength coverage from 450-850nm, and is fed by a 2.7'' optical fiber. For the northern targets, we use a combination of the High Resolution Spectrograph (HRS) on the Hobby-Eberly Telescope (HET), and the Tull coude spectrograph (TS23) and Immersion Grating Infrared Spectrograph (IGRINS), both on the 2.7m Harlan J. Smith Telescope. All three northern instruments are at McDonald Observatory. For the HRS, we use the R=60000 setting with a 2'' fiber, and with wavelength coverage from 410-780nm. For the TS23 spectrograph, we use a 1.2'' slit in combination with the E2 echelle grating (53 grooves/mm, blaze angle 65°), yielding a resolving power of R=60000 and a wavelength coverage from 375-1020nm. IGRINS has a single setting with R=40000. It has complete wavelength coverage from 1475-2480nm, except in the telluric water band from 1810-1930nm. We give the spectroscopic observation log in Table2. As part of the follow-up effort, we used the NIRI instrument behind the Altair adaptive optics system on the Gemini North Telescope. For each star listed in Table3, we obtained 25 images in five dithering positions. We used the K-continuum band centered on 2.2718μm and a variety of exposure times and dates (listed in Table3). We list the companion detections in Table4. (4 data files).

  6. Hotel clinic-based diarrheal and respiratory disease surveillance in U.S. service members participating in Operation Bright Star in Egypt, 2009.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sebeny, Peter J; Nakhla, Isabelle; Moustafa, Manal; Bruton, Jody A; Cline, Joanne; Hawk, Douglas; El-Mohammady, Hanan; Nada, Rania A; Ahmed, Salwa F; Pimentel, Guillermo; Young, Sylvia Y N

    2012-08-01

    We conducted clinic-based, influenza-like illness and diarrheal disease surveillance among U.S. service members participating in Operation Bright Star 2009. Epidemiologic data and samples were collected. Nasopharyngeal swab specimens were tested for viruses, and feces was tested for microbiologic, immunologic, and molecular diagnostics. A survey was used to collect self-reported data. From 1,529 surveys, 41% reported diarrheal disease and 25% reported respiratory illness (incidence rate = 62 of 100 versus 37 of 100 person-months; incidence rate ratio = 1.7, 95% confidence interval = 1.5-1.9). Enterotoxigenic Escherichia coli was identified in 74% (69 of 93) of fecal samples. In the influenza-like illness case series, 17% (9 of 52) were positive for influenza A; all were positive for pandemic (pH1N1) 2009 virus. Rates of decreased work performance reported by patients with diarrhea and influenza-like illness were similar (46% versus 48%; P = 0.8). Diarrheal diseases and respiratory illness remain common among deployed military personnel, with important operational impact. Despite an ongoing influenza pandemic, diarrheal disease incidence was higher than that of respiratory illness. PMID:22855764

  7. DETECTABILITY OF GLYCINE IN SOLAR-TYPE SYSTEM PRECURSORS

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Glycine (NH2CH2COOH) is the simplest amino acid relevant to life. Its detection in the interstellar medium is key to understanding the formation mechanisms of pre-biotic molecules and their subsequent delivery onto planetary systems. Glycine has been extensively searched for toward hot molecular cores, although these studies did not yield any firm detection. In contrast to hot cores, low-mass star forming regions, in particular their earliest stages represented by cold pre-stellar cores, may be better suited for the detection of glycine as well as more relevant to the study of pre-biotic chemistry in young solar system analogs. We present one-dimensional spherically symmetric radiative transfer calculations of the glycine emission expected to arise from the low-mass pre-stellar core L1544. Water vapor has recently been reported toward this core, indicating that a small fraction of the grain mantles in L1544 (∼0.5%) has been injected into the gas phase. Assuming that glycine is photo-desorbed together with water in L1544, and considering a solid abundance of glycine on ices of ∼10–4 with respect to water, our calculations reveal that several glycine lines between 67 GHz and 80 GHz have peak intensities larger than 10 mK. These results show for the first time that glycine could reach detectable levels in cold objects such as L1544. This opens up the possibility of detecting glycine, and other pre-biotic species, at the coldest and earliest stages in the formation of solar-type systems with near-future instrumentation such as the Band 2 receivers of ALMA

  8. First Photometric Investigation of the Solar-type Contact Binary GSC 1537-1557

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xiang, F.-Y.; Xiao, T.-Y.; Zhang, B.; Shi, X.-D.

    2015-07-01

    By analyzing Rc and Ic light curves of the short-period solar-type eclipsing binary GSC 1537-1557 we discovered that it is a shallow contact binary with a degree of contact factor of f=(8.10+/- 1.79)%. Photometric solutions reveal that GSC 1537-1557 is a W-type system with a mass ratio of q={M}2/{M}1=2.645 where the less massive component (the primary star) is about 110 K hotter than the more massive one (the secondary star). The asymmetry and variation of the light curves were explained as the activity of spots on the solar-type component stars. By investigating all of the available times of light minima, we found that the observed-calculated (O-C) curve shows a cyclic variation with a small amplitude of 0.00335 days and a period of 8.1 years. The small-amplitude cyclic change in the O-C curve was analyzed for the light-travel time effect via the presence of an extremely cool stellar companion. The mass of the third body was determined to be {M}3{sin}{i}\\prime =(0.19+/- 0.01) {M}⊙ when {M}1+{M}2=1.31 {M}⊙ is adopted for GSC 1537-1557. The semimajor axis of the outer obit is {a}\\prime {sin}{i}\\prime =(4.58+/- 0.33) AU.

  9. Low surface brightness galaxies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vanderhulst, J. M.; Deblok, W. J. G.; Mcgaugh, S. S.; Bothun, G. D.

    1993-01-01

    A program to investigate the properties of low surface brightness (LSB) galaxies involving surface photometry in U, B, V, R, I, and H-alpha, HI imaging with the Westerbork Synthesis Radio Telescope (WSRT) and the very large array (VLA) and spectrophotometry of H2 regions in LSB galaxies is underway. The goal is to verify the idea that LSB galaxies have low star formation rates because the local gas density falls below the critical density for star formation, and to study the stellar population and abundances in LSB galaxies. Such information should help understanding the evolutionary history of LSB galaxies. Some preliminary results are reported.

  10. The Solar-Type Contact Binary BX Pegasi Revisited

    CERN Document Server

    Lee, Jae Woo; Lee, Chung-Uk; Youn, Jae-Hyuck

    2009-01-01

    We present the results of new CCD photometry for the contact binary BX Peg, made during three successive months beginning on September 2008. As do historical light curves, our observations display an O'Connell effect and the November data by themselves indicate clear evidence for very short-time brightness disturbance. For these variations, model spots are applied separately to the two data set of Group I (Sep.--Oct.) and Group II (Nov.). The former is described by a single cool spot on the secondary photosphere and the latter by a two-spot model with a cool spot on the cool star and a hot one on either star. These are generalized manifestations of the magnetic activity of the binary system. Twenty light-curve timings calculated from Wilson-Devinney code were used for a period study, together with all other minimum epochs. The complex period changes of BX Peg can be sorted into a secular period decrease caused dominantly by angular momentum loss due to magnetic stellar wind braking, a light-travel-time (LTT) ...

  11. The Solar-Type Contact Binary BX Pegasi Revisited

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Jae Woo; Kim, Seung-Lee; Lee, Chung-Uk; Youn, Jae-Hyuck

    2009-12-01

    We present the results of new CCD photometry for the contact binary BX Peg, made during three successive months beginning on 2008 September. As do historical light curves, our observations display an O'Connell effect and the November data by themselves indicate clear evidence for very short-term brightness disturbance. For these variations, model spots are applied separately to the two data sets, Group I (Sep.-Oct.) and Group II (Nov.). The former is described by a single cool spot on the secondary photosphere and the latter by a two-spot model with a cool spot on the cool star and a hot one on either star. These are generalized manifestations of the magnetic activity of the binary system. Twenty light-curve timings calculated from Wilson-Devinney code were used for a period study, together with all other minimum epochs. The complex period changes of BX Peg can be sorted into a secular period decrease caused dominantly by angular momentum loss due to magnetic stellar wind braking, a light-travel time (LTT) effect due to the orbit of a low-mass third companion, and a previously unknown short-term oscillation. This last period modulation could be produced either by a second LTT orbit with a period of about 16 yr due to the existence of a fourth body, or by the effect of magnetic activity with a cycle length of about 12 yr.

  12. Dependence of Stellar Magnetic Activity Cycles on Rotational Period in a Nonlinear Solar-type Dynamo

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pipin, V. V.; Kosovichev, A. G.

    2016-06-01

    We study the turbulent generation of large-scale magnetic fields using nonlinear dynamo models for solar-type stars in the range of rotational periods from 14 to 30 days. Our models take into account nonlinear effects of dynamical quenching of magnetic helicity, and escape of magnetic field from the dynamo region due to magnetic buoyancy. The results show that the observed correlation between the period of rotation and the duration of activity cycles can be explained in the framework of a distributed dynamo model with a dynamical magnetic feedback acting on the turbulent generation from either magnetic buoyancy or magnetic helicity. We discuss implications of our findings for the understanding of dynamo processes operating in solar-like stars.

  13. Dependence of stellar magnetic activity cycles on rotational period in nonlinear solar-type dynamo

    CERN Document Server

    Pipin, Valery

    2016-01-01

    We study turbulent generation of large-scale magnetic fields using nonlinear dynamo models for solar-type stars in the range of rotational periods from 14 to 30 days. Our models take into account non-linear effects of dynamical quenching of magnetic helicity, and escape of magnetic field from the dynamo region due to magnetic buoyancy. The results show that the observed correlation between the period of rotation and the duration of activity cycles can be explained in the framework of a distributed dynamo model with a dynamical magnetic feedback acting on the turbulent generation either from magnetic buoyancy or magnetic helicity. We discuss implications of our findings for the understanding of dynamo processes operating in solar-like stars.

  14. Measure of the stars

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Henbest, N.

    1984-12-13

    The paper concerns the Hertzsprung-Russel (H-R) diagram, which is graph relating the brightness to the surface temperature of the stars. The diagram provides a deep insight into the fundamental properties of the stars. Evolution of the stars; the death of a star; distances; and dating star clusters, are all briefly discussed with reference to the H-R diagram.

  15. Bright Transients discovered by PSST

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, K. W.; Wright, D.; Smartt, S. J.; Young, D. R.; Huber, M.; Chambers, K. C.; Flewelling, H.; Willman, M.; Primak, N.; Schultz, A.; Gibson, B.; Magnier, E.; Waters, C.; Tonry, J.; Wainscoat, R. J.; Foley, R. J.; Jha, S. W.; Rest, A.; Scolnic, D.

    2016-08-01

    Six bright transients have been discovered as part of the Pan-STARRS Survey for Transients (PSST). Information on all objects discovered by the Pan-STARRS Survey for Transients is available at http://star.pst.qub.ac.uk/ps1threepi/ (see Huber et al. ATel #7153).

  16. Rotating Stars from Kepler Observed with Gaia DR1

    CERN Document Server

    Davenport, James R A

    2016-01-01

    Astrometric data from the recent Gaia Data Release 1 has been matched against the sample of stars from Kepler with known rotation periods. A total of 1,299 bright rotating stars were recovered from the subset of Gaia sources with good astrometric solutions, most with temperatures hotter than 5000 K. From these sources, 894 were selected as lying near the main sequence using their absolute G-band magnitudes. These main sequence stars show a bimodality in their rotation period distribution, centered roughly around a 600 Myr rotation-isochrone. This feature matches the bimodal period distribution found in cooler stars with Kepler, but was previously undetected for solar-type stars due to sample contamination by subgiants. A tenuous connection between the rotation period and total proper motion is found, suggesting the period bimodality is due to the age distribution of stars within ~300pc of the Sun, rather than a phase of rapid angular momentum loss. This work emphasizes the unique power for understanding stell...

  17. HAT-P-56b: A bright highly inflated massive Hot Jupiter around An F star in K2.0 field

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Xu; Bakos, Gaspar; Hartman, Joel

    2015-08-01

    We report the discovery of HAT-P-56b, a transiting high inflated hot-jupiter orbiting a F type star in the field 0 of the NASA K2 mission, by the HATNet survey. We combine ground-based photometric light curves with the highprecision photometry obervation by the K2 mission, as well as radial velocity to determine the physical properties of this system. HAT-P-56b has a mass around ~2.2 Mjunp, a radius of ~1.5 Rjup, and transits its host star with a period of 2.79d. The host star has a V band magnitude of 10.9, Mass of 1.29 Msun, and radius of 1.433 Rsun. The radius of HAT-P-56b is among one of the largest compare to planets with similar mass, making it an interesting target for following up atmospherical observations.

  18. K2-31B, a Grazing Transiting Hot Jupiter on a 1.26-day Orbit around a Bright G7V Star

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grziwa, Sascha; Gandolfi, Davide; Csizmadia, Szilard; Fridlund, Malcolm; Parviainen, Hannu; Deeg, Hans J.; Cabrera, Juan; Djupvik, Amanda A.; Albrecht, Simon; Palle, Enric B.; Pätzold, Martin; Béjar, Victor J. S.; Prieto-Arranz, Jorge; Eigmüller, Philipp; Erikson, Anders; Fynbo, Johan P. U.; Guenther, Eike W.; Hatzes, Artie P.; Kiilerich, Amanda; Korth, Judith; Kuutma, Teet; Montañés-Rodríguez, Pilar; Nespral, David; Nowak, Grzegorz; Rauer, Heike; Saario, Joonas; Sebastian, Daniel; Slumstrup, Ditte

    2016-11-01

    We report the discovery of K2-31b, the first confirmed transiting hot Jupiter detected by the K2 space mission. We combined K2 photometry with FastCam lucky imaging and FIES and HARPS high-resolution spectroscopy to confirm the planetary nature of the transiting object and derived the system parameters. K2-31b is a 1.8-Jupiter-mass planet on a 1.26-day orbit around a G7 V star ({M}\\star =0.91 M ⊙, {R}\\star =0.78 R ⊙). The planetary radius is poorly constrained (0.7 < R p < 1.4 R Jup),15 owing to the grazing transit and the low sampling rate of the K2 photometry.16

  19. Research on Records of the Brightness of Stars and Its Variations in Ancient China%中国古代恒星亮度及其变化记录之研究

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    王玉民

    2009-01-01

    在对古代典籍中关于恒星亮度、亮变记载全面整理的基础上,对恒星亮度梯度记录作了详细的分析,证明中国古代也有类似6等级的亮度分级方法;对古代所有提到"消失"光变描述的星官,作了现代变星的对比证认,证明这些记载描述的都是大气消光现象,而非古人注意到了星官中有变星存在;对全天三大变星--大陵五、造父一、蒭藁增二的古代光变描述的全面分析,证明中国古代对这三颗最著名的变星都没有明确的光变记载;经全面分析古代记录,得出中国最早的变星记录出自载洪武二十九年(1396年)井宿七的光变记录,其时代虽然较晚,仍然比西方最早的变星记录早了200年.%With a comprehensive study about records of the brightness of stsrs and its variations , this articles analyses the records of the bright gradient of stars and proves that there were also similarly 6-grade brightness classification in ancient China Contrasting the present variables with ancient asterisms that contains "vanished" records, the article concludes that what these descriptions refer to are not the discovery of variables, but all atmospheric extinction phenomena The article also analyses the records of ancient brightness of the three famous variables-β Per, δ Cep and o Cet, then proves there were no reliable bright variations records about them in ancient China The earliest record of variable in China is ζ Gem in 1396, from the book History of the Ming Dynasty, which was 200 years earlier than the earliest record of variable in the west.

  20. The asteroseismic potential of TESS: exoplanet-host stars

    CERN Document Server

    Campante, T L; Kuszlewicz, J S; Bouma, L; Chaplin, W J; Huber, D; Christensen-Dalsgaard, J; Kjeldsen, H; Bossini, D; North, T S H; Appourchaux, T; Latham, D W; Pepper, J; Ricker, G R; Stassun, K G; Vanderspek, R; Winn, J N

    2016-01-01

    New insights on stellar evolution and stellar interiors physics are being made possible by asteroseismology. Throughout the course of the Kepler mission, asteroseismology has also played an important role in the characterization of exoplanet-host stars and their planetary systems. The upcoming NASA Transiting Exoplanet Survey Satellite (TESS) will be performing a near all-sky survey for planets that transit bright nearby stars. In addition, its excellent photometric precision, combined with its fine time sampling and long intervals of uninterrupted observations, will enable asteroseismology of solar-type and red-giant stars. Here we develop a simple test to estimate the detectability of solar-like oscillations in TESS photometry of any given star. Based on an all-sky stellar and planetary synthetic population, we go on to predict the asteroseismic yield of the TESS mission, placing emphasis on the yield of exoplanet-host stars for which we expect to detect solar-like oscillations. This is done for both the ta...

  1. Studies of hot B subdwarfs. Part 2: Energy distributions of three bright sdB/sdOB stars in the 950-5500 angstrom range

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wesemael, F.; Holberg, J. B.; Veilleux, S.; Lamontagne, R.; Fontaine, G.

    1985-01-01

    Voyager ultraviolet spectrometer observations of the subdwarf B or OB stars HD 205805, UV 1758+36 and Feige 66 are presented. All three objects display the H I Layman series in absorption. These observations are combined with low dispersion IUE spectrophotometry and with Stroemgren photometry to construct virtually complete energy distributions, which extend over the range 950-5500 angstroms. Effective temperatures based on model atmosphere calculations for high gravity, hydrogen rich stars are determined. Our analyses yield T Sub e 28,200 + or - 1300 K for HD 205805, T sub e 31, 800 + or - 1100 K for UV 1758+36, and T sub e 35,700 + or - 1500 K for Feige 66. The importance of far ultraviolet observations below L sub alpha in reducing the uncertainties associated with the interstellar extinction and the degradation of the IUE sensitivity is emphasized.

  2. Observational constraints on the X-ray Bright supergiant B[e] stars LHA 115-S18 \\& LHA 120-S 134

    CERN Document Server

    Bartlett, Elizabeth S

    2016-01-01

    We present the preliminary results of an ongoing series of spectroscopic observations of the Small Magellanic Cloud star LHA 115-S 18 (S18), which has demonstrated extreme photospheric and spectroscopic variability that, in some respects, is reminiscent of Luminous Blue Variables (LBVs). In contrast to our previously published results, between 2012-2015 S18 remained in an spectral state intermediate between S18's "hot" and "cool" extremes. In conjunction with contemporaneous OGLE-IV photometric monitoring of S18, these data will be used to determine the characteristic timescale of the variability and search for periodicities, in particular binary modulated periodicity. We also present the results of a pilot study of the LMC star LHA 120-S 134.

  3. ELODIE metallicity-biased search for transiting Hot Jupiters II. A very hot Jupiter transiting the bright K star HD189733

    CERN Document Server

    Bouchy, F; Mayor, M; Moutou, C; Pont, F; Iribarne, N; Silva, R D; Ilovaisky, S A; Queloz, D; Santos, N; Ségransan, D; Zucker, S; Bouchy, Francois; Udry, Stephane; Mayor, Michel; Moutou, Claire; Pont, Frederic; Iribarne, Nicolas; Silva, Ronaldo Da; Ilovaisky, Sergio; Queloz, Didier; Santos, Nuno; Segransan, Damien; Zucker, Shay

    2005-01-01

    Among the 160 known exoplanets, mainly detected in large radial-velocity surveys, only 8 have a characterization of their actual mass and radius thanks to the two complementary methods of detection: radial velocities and photometric transit. We started in March 2004 an exoplanet-search programme biased toward high-metallicity stars which are more frequently host extra-solar planets. This survey aims to detect close-in giant planets, which are most likely to transit their host star. For this programme, high-precision radial velocities are measured with the ELODIE fiber-fed spectrograph on the 1.93-m telescope, and high-precision photometry is obtained with the CCD Camera on the 1.20-m telescope, both at the Haute-Provence Observatory. We report here the discovery of a new transiting hot Jupiter orbiting the star HD189733. The planetary nature of this object is confirmed by the observation of both the spectroscopic and photometric transits. The exoplanet HD189733b, with an orbital period of 2.219 days, has one ...

  4. HD 164492C: a rapidly-rotating, H$\\alpha$-bright, magnetic early B star associated with a 12.5d spectroscopic binary

    CERN Document Server

    Wade, G A; Sikora, J; Bernier, M -É; Rivinius, Th; Alecian, E; Petit, V; Grunhut, J H

    2016-01-01

    We employ high resolution spectroscopy and spectropolarimetry to derive the physical properties and magnetic characteristics of the multiple system HD 164492C, located in the young open cluster M20. The spectrum reveals evidence of 3 components: a broad-lined early B star (HD 164492C1), a narrow-lined early B star (HD 164492C2), and a late B star (HD 164492C3). Components C2 and C3 exhibit significant ($>100$ km/s) bulk radial velocity variations with a period of $12.5351(7)$ d that we attribute to eccentric binary motion around a common centre-of-mass. Component C1 exhibits no detectable radial velocity variations. Using constraints derived from modeling the orbit of the C2+C3 binary and from synthesis of the combined spectrum, we determine the approximate physical characteristics of the components. We conclude that a coherent evolutionary solution consistent with the published age of M20 implies a distance to the system of $0.9\\pm 0.2$ kpc, corresponding to the smallest published values. We confirm the dete...

  5. Testing planet formation theories with Giant stars

    OpenAIRE

    Pasquini, Luca; Doellinger, M. P.; Hatzes, A.; Setiawan, J.; Girardi, L.; Da Silva, L.; de Medeiros, J. R.

    2008-01-01

    Planet searches around evolved giant stars are bringing new insights to planet formation theories by virtue of the broader stellar mass range of the host stars compared to the solar-type stars that have been the subject of most current planet searches programs. These searches among giant stars are producing extremely interesting results. Contrary to main sequence stars planet-hosting giants do not show a tendency of being more metal rich. Even if limited, the statistics also suggest a higher ...

  6. HAT-P-57b: A Short-period Giant Planet Transiting a Bright Rapidly Rotating A8V Star Confirmed Via Doppler Tomography

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hartman, J. D.; Bakos, G. Á.; Buchhave, L. A.; Torres, G.; Latham, D. W.; Kovács, G.; Bhatti, W.; Csubry, Z.; de Val-Borro, M.; Penev, K.; Huang, C. X.; Béky, B.; Bieryla, A.; Quinn, S. N.; Howard, A. W.; Marcy, G. W.; Johnson, J. A.; Isaacson, H.; Fischer, D. A.; Noyes, R. W.; Falco, E.; Esquerdo, G. A.; Knox, R. P.; Hinz, P.; Lázár, J.; Papp, I.; Sári, P.

    2015-12-01

    We present the discovery of HAT-P-57b, a P = 2.4653 day transiting planet around a V=10.465+/- 0.029 mag, {T}{{eff}}=7500+/- 250 K main sequence A8V star with a projected rotation velocity of v{sin}i=102.1+/- 1.3 {km} {{{s}}}-1. We measure the radius of the planet to be R=1.413+/- 0.054 {R}{{J}} and, based on RV observations, place a 95% confidence upper limit on its mass of M\\lt 1.85 {M}{{J}}. Based on theoretical stellar evolution models, the host star has a mass and radius of 1.47+/- 0.12 {M}⊙ and 1.500+/- 0.050 {R}⊙ , respectively. Spectroscopic observations made with Keck-I/HIRES during a partial transit event show the Doppler shadow of HAT-P-57b moving across the average spectral line profile of HAT-P-57, confirming the object as a planetary system. We use these observations, together with analytic formulae that we derive for the line profile distortions, to determine the projected angle between the spin axis of HAT-P-57 and the orbital axis of HAT-P-57b. The data permit two possible solutions, with -16\\buildrel{\\circ}\\over{.} 7\\lt λ \\lt 3\\buildrel{\\circ}\\over{.} 3 or 27\\buildrel{\\circ}\\over{.} 6\\lt λ \\lt 57\\buildrel{\\circ}\\over{.} 4 at 95% confidence, and with relative probabilities for the two modes of 26% and 74%, respectively. Adaptive optics imaging with MMT/Clio2 reveals an object located 2\\buildrel{\\prime\\prime}\\over{.} 7 from HAT-P-57 consisting of two point sources separated in turn from each other by 0\\buildrel{\\prime\\prime}\\over{.} 22. The H- and {L}\\prime -band magnitudes of the companion stars are consistent with their being physically associated with HAT-P-57, in which case they are stars of mass 0.61+/- 0.10 {M}⊙ and 0.53+/- 0.08 {M}⊙ . HAT-P-57 is the most rapidly rotating star, and only the fourth main sequence A star, known to host a transiting planet. Based on observations obtained with the Hungarian-made Automated Telescope Network. Based in part on observations made with the Keck-I telescope at Mauna

  7. A near-infrared interferometric survey of debris-disc stars. III. First statistics based on 42 stars observed with CHARA/FLUOR

    Science.gov (United States)

    Absil, O.; Defrère, D.; Coudé du Foresto, V.; Di Folco, E.; Mérand, A.; Augereau, J.-C.; Ertel, S.; Hanot, C.; Kervella, P.; Mollier, B.; Scott, N.; Che, X.; Monnier, J. D.; Thureau, N.; Tuthill, P. G.; ten Brummelaar, T. A.; McAlister, H. A.; Sturmann, J.; Sturmann, L.; Turner, N.

    2013-07-01

    Context. Dust is expected to be ubiquitous in extrasolar planetary systems owing to the dynamical activity of minor bodies. Inner dust populations are, however, still poorly known because of the high contrast and small angular separation with respect to their host star, and yet, a proper characterisation of exozodiacal dust is mandatory for the design of future Earth-like planet imaging missions. Aims: We aim to determine the level of near-infrared exozodiacal dust emission around a sample of 42 nearby main sequence stars with spectral types ranging from A to K and to investigate its correlation with various stellar parameters and with the presence of cold dust belts. Methods: We use high-precision K-band visibilities obtained with the FLUOR interferometer on the shortest baseline of the CHARA array. The calibrated visibilities are compared with the expected visibility of the stellar photosphere to assess whether there is an additional, fully resolved circumstellar emission source. Results: Near-infrared circumstellar emission amounting to about 1% of the stellar flux is detected around 13 of our 42 target stars. Follow-up observations showed that one of them (eps Cep) is associated with a stellar companion, while another one was detected around what turned out to be a giant star (kap CrB). The remaining 11 excesses found around single main sequence stars are most probably associated with hot circumstellar dust, yielding an overall occurrence rate of 28+8-6 for our (biased) sample. We show that the occurrence rate of bright exozodiacal discs correlates with spectral type, K-band excesses being more frequent around A-type stars. It also correlates with the presence of detectable far-infrared excess emission in the case of solar-type stars. Conclusions: This study provides new insight into the phenomenon of bright exozodiacal discs, showing that hot dust populations are probably linked to outer dust reservoirs in the case of solar-type stars. For A-type stars, no

  8. HAT-P-57b: A Short-Period Giant Planet Transiting A Bright Rapidly Rotating A8V Star Confirmed Via Doppler Tomography

    CERN Document Server

    Hartman, J D; Buchhave, L A; Torres, G; Latham, D W; Kovács, G; Bhatti, W; Csubry, Z; de Val-Borro, M; Penev, K; Huang, C X; Béky, B; Bieryla, A; Quinn, S N; Howard, A W; Marcy, G W; Johnson, J A; Isaacson, H; Fischer, D A; Noyes, R W; Falco, E; Esquerdo, G A; Knox, R P; Hinz, P; Lázár, J; Papp, I; Sári, P

    2015-01-01

    We present the discovery of HAT-P-57b, a P = 2.4653 day transiting planet around a V = 10.465 +- 0.029 mag, Teff = 7500 +- 250 K main sequence A8V star with a projected rotation velocity of v sin i = 102.1 +- 1.3 km s^-1. We measure the radius of the planet to be R = 1.413 +- 0.054 R_J and, based on RV observations, place a 95% confidence upper limit on its mass of M < 1.85 M_J . Based on theoretical stellar evolution models, the host star has a mass and radius of 1.47 +- 0.12 M_sun, and 1.500 +- 0.050 R_sun, respectively. Spectroscopic observations made with Keck-I/HIRES during a partial transit event show the Doppler shadow of HAT-P-57b moving across the average spectral line profile of HAT-P- 57, confirming the object as a planetary system. We use these observations, together with analytic formulae that we derive for the line profile distortions, to determine the projected angle between the spin axis of HAT-P-57 and the orbital axis of HAT-P-57b. The data permit two possible solutions, with -16.7 deg &l...

  9. Are long gamma-ray bursts biased tracers of star formation? Clues from the host galaxies of the Swift/BAT6 complete sample of bright LGRBs. II. Star formation rates and metallicities at z < 1

    Science.gov (United States)

    Japelj, J.; Vergani, S. D.; Salvaterra, R.; D'Avanzo, P.; Mannucci, F.; Fernandez-Soto, A.; Boissier, S.; Hunt, L. K.; Atek, H.; Rodríguez-Muñoz, L.; Scodeggio, M.; Cristiani, S.; Le Floc'h, E.; Flores, H.; Gallego, J.; Ghirlanda, G.; Gomboc, A.; Hammer, F.; Perley, D. A.; Pescalli, A.; Petitjean, P.; Puech, M.; Rafelski, M.; Tagliaferri, G.

    2016-05-01

    Aims: Long gamma-ray bursts (LGRBs) are associated with the deaths of massive stars and might therefore be a potentially powerful tool for tracing cosmic star formation. However, especially at low redshifts (zextinction, star formation rate (SFR), and nebular metallicity (Z) of the hosts and supplemented the data set with previously measured stellar masses M⋆. The distributions of the obtained properties and their interrelations (e.g. mass-metallicity and SFR-M⋆ relations) are compared to samples of field star-forming galaxies. Results: We find that LGRB hosts at z< 1 have on average lower SFRs than if they were direct star formation tracers. By directly comparing metallicity distributions of LGRB hosts and star-forming galaxies, we find a good match between the two populations up to 12 +log ≤ft( frac{OHright)} 8.4-8.5, after which the paucity of metal-rich LGRB hosts becomes apparent. The LGRB host galaxies of our complete sample are consistent with the mass-metallicity relation at similar mean redshift and stellar masses. The cutoff against high metallicities (and high masses) can explain the low SFR values of LGRB hosts. We find a hint of an increased incidence of starburst galaxies in the Swift/BAT6 z< 1 sample with respect to that of a field star-forming population. Given that the SFRs are low on average, the latter is ascribed to low stellar masses. Nevertheless, the limits on the completeness and metallicity availability of current surveys, coupled with the limited number of LGRB host galaxies, prevents us from investigating more quantitatively whether the starburst incidence is such as expected after taking into account the high-metallicity aversion of LGRB host galaxies. Based on observations at ESO, Program IDs: 077.D-0425, 177.A-0591, 080.D-0526, 081.A-0856, 082.D-0276, 083.D-0069, 084.A-0303, 084.A-0260, 086.A-0644, 086.B-0954, 089.A-0868, 090.A-0760, 095.D-0560.The reduced spectra are available in the ESO archive as Phase 3 data products and in

  10. An all-sky catalog of solar-type dwarfs for exoplanetary transit surveys

    CERN Document Server

    Nascimbeni, V; Ortolani, S; Giuffrida, G; Marrese, P M; Magrin, D; Ragazzoni, R; Pagano, I; Rauer, H; Cabrera, J; Pollacco, D; Heras, A M; Deleuil, M; Gizon, L; Granata, V

    2016-01-01

    Most future surveys designed to discover transiting exoplanets, including TESS and PLATO, will target bright (V3.0 subgiants. The relatively low amount of contamination (defined as the fraction of false positives; <30%) also makes UCAC4-RPM a useful tool for the past and ongoing ground-based transit surveys, which need to discard candidate signals originating from early-type or giant stars. As an application, we show how UCAC4-RPM may support the preparation of the TESS (that will map almost the entire sky) input catalog and the input catalog of PLATO, planned to survey more than half of the whole sky with exquisite photometric precision.

  11. 1FGL J1417.7-4407: A gamma-ray bright binary with a massive neutron star and a giant secondary

    CERN Document Server

    Strader, Jay; Cheung, C C; Sand, David J; Donato, Davide; Corbet, Robin; Koeppe, Dana; Edwards, Philip G; Stevens, Jamie; Petrov, Leonid; Salinas, Ricardo; Peacock, Mark; Finzell, Thomas; Reichart, Daniel; Haislip, Joshua

    2015-01-01

    We present multiwavelength observations of the persistent Fermi-LAT unidentified gamma-ray source 1FGL J1417.7-4407, showing it is likely to be associated with a newly discovered X-ray binary containing a massive neutron star (nearly 2 M_sun) and a ~ 0.4 M_sun giant secondary with a 5.4 day period. SOAR optical spectroscopy at a range of orbital phases reveals variable double-peaked H-alpha emission, consistent with the presence of an accretion disk. The lack of radio emission and evidence for a disk suggests the gamma-ray emission is unlikely to originate in a pulsar magnetosphere, but could instead be associated with a pulsar wind, relativistic jet, or could be due to synchrotron self-Compton at the disk/magnetosphere boundary. Assuming a wind or jet, the high ratio of gamma-ray to X-ray luminosity (~ 20) suggests efficient production of gamma-rays, perhaps due to the giant companion. The system appears to be a low-mass X-ray binary that has not yet completed the pulsar recycling process. This system is a g...

  12. Heterogeneity in $^{12}$CO/$^{13}$CO Ratios Toward Solar-Type Young Stellar Objects

    CERN Document Server

    Smith, Rachel L; Young, Edward D; Morris, Mark R

    2015-01-01

    This study reports an unusual heterogeneity in [$^{12}$C$^{16}$O]/[$^{13}$C$^{16}$O] abundance ratios of carbon monoxide observed in the gas phase toward seven ~ solar-mass YSOs and three dense foreground clouds in the nearby star-forming regions, Ophiuchus, Corona Australis, Orion, Vela and an isolated core, L43. Robust isotope ratios were derived using infrared absorption spectroscopy of the 4.7 $\\mu$m fundamental and 2.3 $\\mu$m overtone rovibrational bands of CO at very high resolution ($\\lambda$/$\\Delta$$\\lambda\\approx 95,000$), observed with the CRIRES spectrograph on the Very Large Telescope. We find [$^{12}$C$^{16}$O]/[$^{13}$C$^{16}$O] values ranging from ~ 85 to 165, significantly higher than those of the local interstellar medium (~ 65 to 69). These observations are evidence for isotopic heterogeneity in carbon reservoirs in solar-type YSO environments, and encourage the need for refined Galactic chemical evolution models to explain the $^{12}$C/$^{13}$C discrepancy between the solar system and loca...

  13. PROPERTIES OF 42 SOLAR-TYPE KEPLER TARGETS FROM THE ASTEROSEISMIC MODELING PORTAL

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Metcalfe, T. S.; Mathur, S. [Space Science Institute, 4750 Walnut Street Suite 205, Boulder, CO 80301 (United States); Creevey, O. L. [Institut d' Astrophysique Spatiale, Université Paris XI, UMR 8617, CNRS, Batiment 121, F-91405 Orsay Cedex (France); Doğan, G.; Christensen-Dalsgaard, J.; Karoff, C.; Trampedach, R. [Stellar Astrophysics Centre, Department of Physics and Astronomy, Aarhus University, Ny Munkegade 120, DK-8000 Aarhus C (Denmark); Xu, H. [Computational and Information Systems Laboratory, NCAR, P.O. Box 3000, Boulder, CO 80307 (United States); Bedding, T. R.; Benomar, O. [Sydney Institute for Astronomy (SIfA), School of Physics, University of Sydney, NSW 2006 (Australia); Chaplin, W. J.; Campante, T. L.; Davies, G. R. [School of Physics and Astronomy, University of Birmingham, Birmingham B15 2TT (United Kingdom); Brown, B. P. [Department of Astronomy and Center for Magnetic Self Organization in Laboratory and Astrophysical Plasmas, University of Wisconsin, Madison, WI 53706 (United States); Buzasi, D. L. [Department of Chemistry and Physics, Florida Gulf Coast University, Fort Myers, FL 33965 (United States); Çelik, Z. [Ege University, Department of Astronomy and Space Sciences, Bornova, 35100, Izmir (Turkey); Cunha, M. S. [Centro de Astrofísica e Faculdade de Ciências, Universidade do Porto, Rua das Estrelas, 4150-762, Porto (Portugal); Deheuvels, S. [Université de Toulouse, UPS-OMP, IRAP, Toulouse (France); Derekas, A. [Konkoly Observatory, MTA CSFK, H-1121 Budapest, Konkoly Thege M. út 15-17 (Hungary); Mauro, M. P. Di [INAF-IAPS Istituto di Astrofisica e Planetologia Spaziali, Via del Fosso del Cavaliere 100, I-00133 Roma (Italy); and others

    2014-10-01

    Recently the number of main-sequence and subgiant stars exhibiting solar-like oscillations that are resolved into individual mode frequencies has increased dramatically. While only a few such data sets were available for detailed modeling just a decade ago, the Kepler mission has produced suitable observations for hundreds of new targets. This rapid expansion in observational capacity has been accompanied by a shift in analysis and modeling strategies to yield uniform sets of derived stellar properties more quickly and easily. We use previously published asteroseismic and spectroscopic data sets to provide a uniform analysis of 42 solar-type Kepler targets from the Asteroseismic Modeling Portal. We find that fitting the individual frequencies typically doubles the precision of the asteroseismic radius, mass, and age compared to grid-based modeling of the global oscillation properties, and improves the precision of the radius and mass by about a factor of three over empirical scaling relations. We demonstrate the utility of the derived properties with several applications.

  14. Detection of the simplest sugar, glycolaldehyde, in a solar-type protostar with ALMA

    CERN Document Server

    Jorgensen, Jes K; Bisschop, Suzanne E; Bourke, Tyler L; van Dishoeck, Ewine F; Schmalzl, Markus

    2012-01-01

    Glycolaldehyde (HCOCH2OH) is the simplest sugar and an important intermediate in the path toward forming more complex biologically relevant molecules. In this paper we present the first detection of 13 transitions of glycolaldehyde around a solar-type young star, through Atacama Large Millimeter Array (ALMA) observations of the Class 0 protostellar binary IRAS 16293-2422 at 220 GHz (6 transitions) and 690 GHz (7 transitions). The glycolaldehyde lines have their origin in warm (200-300 K) gas close to the individual components of the binary. Glycolaldehyde co-exists with its isomer, methyl formate (HCOOCH3), which is a factor 10-15 more abundant toward the two sources. The data also show a tentative detection of ethylene glycol, the reduced alcohol of glycolaldehyde. In the 690 GHz data, the seven transitions predicted to have the highest optical depths based on modeling of the 220 GHz lines all show red-shifted absorption profiles toward one of the components in the binary (IRAS16293B) indicative of infall an...

  15. Interplanetary density models as inferred from solar Type III bursts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oppeneiger, Lucas; Boudjada, Mohammed Y.; Lammer, Helmut; Lichtenegger, Herbert

    2016-04-01

    We report on the density models derived from spectral features of solar Type III bursts. They are generated by beams of electrons travelling outward from the Sun along open magnetic field lines. Electrons generate Langmuir waves at the plasma frequency along their ray paths through the corona and the interplanetary medium. A large frequency band is covered by the Type III bursts from several MHz down to few kHz. In this analysis, we consider the previous empirical density models proposed to describe the electron density in the interplanetary medium. We show that those models are mainly based on the analysis of Type III bursts generated in the interplanetary medium and observed by satellites (e.g. RAE, HELIOS, VOYAGER, ULYSSES,WIND). Those models are confronted to stereoscopic observations of Type III bursts recorded by WIND, ULYSSES and CASSINI spacecraft. We discuss the spatial evolution of the electron beam along the interplanetary medium where the trajectory is an Archimedean spiral. We show that the electron beams and the source locations are depending on the choose of the empirical density models.

  16. Evidence for Ubiquitous, High-EW Nebular Emission in z~7 Galaxies: Towards a Clean Measurement of the Specific Star Formation Rate using a Sample of Bright, Magnified Galaxies

    CERN Document Server

    Smit, R; Labbe, I; Zheng, W; Bradley, L; Donahue, M; Lemze, D; Moustakas, J; Umetsu, K; Zitrin, A; Coe, D; Postman, M; Gonzalez, V; Bartelmann, M; Benitez, N; Broadhurst, T; Ford, H; Grillo, C; Infante, L; Jimenez-Teja, Y; Jouvel, S; Kelson, D D; Lahav, O; Maoz, D; Medezinski, E; Melchior, P; Meneghetti, M; Merten, J; Molino, A; Moustakas, L; Nonino, M; Rosati, P; Seitz, S

    2013-01-01

    Growing observational evidence now indicates that nebular line emission has a significant impact on the rest-frame optical fluxes of z~5-7 galaxies observed with Spitzer. This line emission makes z~5-7 galaxies appear more massive, with lower specific star formation rates. However, corrections for this line emission have been very difficult to perform reliably due to huge uncertainties on the overall strength of such emission at z>~5.5. Here, we present the most direct observational evidence yet for ubiquitous high-EW [OIII]+Hbeta line emission in Lyman-break galaxies at z~7, while also presenting a strategy for an improved measurement of the sSFR at z~7. We accomplish this through the selection of bright galaxies in the narrow redshift window z~6.6-7.0 where the IRAC 4.5 micron flux provides a clean measurement of the stellar continuum light. Observed 4.5 micron fluxes in this window contrast with the 3.6 micron fluxes which are contaminated by the prominent [OIII]+Hbeta lines. To ensure a high S/N for our I...

  17. Constraints on Variability of Brightness and Surface Magnetism on Time Scales of Decades to Centuries in the Sun and Sun-Like Stars: A Source of Potential Terrestrial Climate Variability

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baliunas, Sallie L.; Sharber, James (Technical Monitor)

    2001-01-01

    These four points summarize our work to date. (1) Conciliation of solar and stellar photometric variability. Previous research by us and colleagues suggested that the Sun might at present be showing unusually low photometric variability compared to other sun-like stars. Those early results would question the suitability of the technique of using sun-like stars as proxies for solar irradiance change on time scales of decades to centuries. However, our results indicate the contrary: the Sun's observed short-term (seasonal) and longterm (year-to-year) brightness variations closely agree with observed brightness variations in stars of similar mass and age. (2) We have demonstrated an inverse correlation between the global temperature of the terrestrial lower troposphere, inferred from the NASA Microwave Sounding Unit (MSU) radiometers, and the total area of the Sun covered by coronal holes from January 1979 to present (up to May 2000). Variable fluxes of either solar charged particles or cosmic rays, or both, may influence the terrestrial tropospheric temperature. The geographical pattern of the correlation is consistent with our interpretation of an extra-terrestrial charged particle forcing. (3) Possible climate mechanism amplifying the impact of solar ultraviolet irradiance variations. The key points of our proposed climate hypersensitivity mechanism are: (a) The Sun is more variable in the UV (ultraviolet) than in the visible. However, the increased UV irradiance is mainly absorbed in the lower stratosphere/upper troposphere rather than at the surface. (b) Absorption in the stratosphere raises the temperature moderately around the vicinity of the tropopause, and tends to stabilize the atmosphere against vertical convective/diffusive transport, thus decreasing the flux of heat and moisture carried upward from surface. (c) The decrease in the upward convection of heat and moisture tends to raise the surface temperature because a drier upper atmosphere becomes less

  18. Radial velocity information in solar-type spectra

    Science.gov (United States)

    Merline, W. J.

    1985-01-01

    A criterion is developed for determining the amount of radial velocity information theoretically available at the earth's surface from a star as a function of wavelength and spectral resolution. A description of the study is provided. The wavelength dependence is examined as well as the dependence on resolution, frequency information, and the problem of time-dependent astrophysical phenomena.

  19. Probable Bright Supernova discovered by PSST

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, K. W.; Wright, D.; Smartt, S. J.; Young, D. R.; Huber, M.; Chambers, K. C.; Flewelling, H.; Willman, M.; Primak, N.; Schultz, A.; Gibson, B.; Magnier, E.; Waters, C.; Tonry, J.; Wainscoat, R. J.; Foley, R. J.; Jha, S. W.; Rest, A.; Scolnic, D.

    2016-09-01

    A bright transient, which is a probable supernova, has been discovered as part of the Pan-STARRS Survey for Transients (PSST). Information on all objects discovered by the Pan-STARRS Survey for Transients is available at http://star.pst.qub.ac.uk/ps1threepi/ (see Huber et al. ATel #7153).

  20. How Bright Can Supernovae Get?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kohler, Susanna

    2016-04-01

    Supernovae enormous explosions associated with the end of a stars life come in a variety of types with different origins. A new study has examined how the brightest supernovae in the Universe are produced, and what limits might be set on their brightness.Ultra-Luminous ObservationsRecent observations have revealed many ultra-luminous supernovae, which haveenergies that challenge our abilities to explain them usingcurrent supernova models. An especially extreme example is the 2015 discovery of the supernova ASASSN-15lh, which shone with a peak luminosity of ~2*1045 erg/s, nearly a trillion times brighter than the Sun. ASASSN-15lh radiated a whopping ~2*1052 erg in the first four months after its detection.How could a supernova that bright be produced? To explore the answer to that question, Tuguldur Sukhbold and Stan Woosley at University of California, Santa Cruz, have examined the different sources that could produce supernovae and calculated upper limits on the potential luminosities ofeach of these supernova varieties.Explosive ModelsSukhbold and Woosley explore multiple different models for core-collapse supernova explosions, including:Prompt explosionA stars core collapses and immediately explodes.Pair instabilityElectron/positron pair production at a massive stars center leads to core collapse. For high masses, radioactivity can contribute to delayed energy output.Colliding shellsPreviously expelled shells of material around a star collide after the initial explosion, providing additional energy release.MagnetarThe collapsing star forms a magnetar a rapidly rotating neutron star with an incredibly strong magnetic field at its core, which then dumps energy into the supernova ejecta, further brightening the explosion.They then apply these models to different types of stars.Setting the LimitThe authors show that the light curve of ASASSN-15lh (plotted in orange) can be described by a model (black curve) in which a magnetar with an initial spin period of 0.7 ms

  1. Triggered Star Formation by Massive Stars

    OpenAIRE

    Lee, Hsu-Tai; Chen, W. P.

    2005-01-01

    We present our diagnosis of the role that massive stars play in the formation of low- and intermediate-mass stars in OB associations (the Lambda Ori region, Ori OB1, and Lac OB1 associations). We find that the classical T Tauri stars and Herbig Ae/Be stars tend to line up between luminous O stars and bright-rimmed or comet-shaped clouds; the closer to a cloud the progressively younger they are. Our positional and chronological study lends support to the validity of the radiation-driven implos...

  2. Detection of the Simplest Sugar, Glycolaldehyde, in a Solar-type Protostar with ALMA

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jørgensen, Jes K.; Favre, Cécile; Bisschop, Suzanne E.; Bourke, Tyler L.; van Dishoeck, Ewine F.; Schmalzl, Markus

    2012-09-01

    Glycolaldehyde (HCOCH2OH) is the simplest sugar and an important intermediate in the path toward forming more complex biologically relevant molecules. In this Letter we present the first detection of 13 transitions of glycolaldehyde around a solar-type young star, through Atacama Large Millimeter Array (ALMA) observations of the Class 0 protostellar binary IRAS 16293-2422 at 220 GHz (6 transitions) and 690 GHz (7 transitions). The glycolaldehyde lines have their origin in warm (200-300 K) gas close to the individual components of the binary. Glycolaldehyde co-exists with its isomer, methyl formate (HCOOCH3), which is a factor 10-15 more abundant toward the two sources. The data also show a tentative detection of ethylene glycol, the reduced alcohol of glycolaldehyde. In the 690 GHz data, the seven transitions predicted to have the highest optical depths based on modeling of the 220 GHz lines all show redshifted absorption profiles toward one of the components in the binary (IRAS 16293B) indicative of infall and emission at the systemic velocity offset from this by about 0farcs2 (25 AU). We discuss the constraints on the chemical formation of glycolaldehyde and other organic species—in particular, in the context of laboratory experiments of photochemistry of methanol-containing ices. The relative abundances appear to be consistent with UV photochemistry of a CH3OH-CO mixed ice that has undergone mild heating. The order of magnitude increase in line density in these early ALMA data illustrates its huge potential to reveal the full chemical complexity associated with the formation of solar system analogs.

  3. Detection of glycolaldehyde toward the solar-type protostar NGC 1333 IRAS2A

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coutens, A.; Persson, M. V.; Jørgensen, J. K.; Wampfler, S. F.; Lykke, J. M.

    2015-04-01

    Glycolaldehyde is a key molecule in the formation of biologically relevant molecules such as ribose. We report its detection with the Plateau de Bure interferometer toward the Class 0 young stellar object NGC 1333 IRAS2A, which is only the second solar-type protostar for which this prebiotic molecule is detected. Local thermodynamic equilibrium analyses of glycolaldehyde, ethylene glycol (the reduced alcohol of glycolaldehyde), and methyl formate (the most abundant isomer of glycolaldehyde) were carried out. The relative abundance of ethylene glycol to glycolaldehyde is found to be ~5 - higher than in the Class 0 source IRAS 16293-2422 (~1), but similar to the lower limits derived in comets (≥3-6). The different ethylene glycol-to-glycolaldehyde ratios in the two protostars might be related to different CH3OH:CO compositions of the icy grain mantles. In particular, a more efficient hydrogenation on the grains in NGC 1333 IRAS2A would favor the formation of both methanol and ethylene glycol. In conclusion, it is possible that like NGC 1333 IRAS2A, other low-mass protostars show high ethylene glycol-to-glycolaldehyde abundance ratios. The cometary ratios might consequently be inherited from earlier stages of star formation if the young Sun experienced conditions similar to NGC 1333 IRAS2A. Based on observations carried out with the IRAM Plateau de Bure Interferometer. IRAM is supported by INSU/CNRS (France), MPG (Germany) and IGN (Spain).Figures 3-4 and Table 1 are available in electronic form at http://www.aanda.org

  4. Burkina Faso - BRIGHT II

    Data.gov (United States)

    Millenium Challenge Corporation — Millennium Challenge Corporation hired Mathematica Policy Research to conduct an independent evaluation of the BRIGHT II program. The three main research questions...

  5. H$_\\alpha$-activity and ages for stars in the SARG survey

    CERN Document Server

    Sissa, E; Desidera, S; Fiorenzano, A F Martinez; Bonfanti, A; Carolo, E; Vassallo, D; Claudi, R U; Endl, M; Cosentino, R

    2016-01-01

    Stellar activity influences radial velocity (RV) measurements and can also mimic the presence of orbiting planets. As part of the search for planets around the components of wide binaries performed with the SARG High Resolution Spectrograph at the TNG, it was discovered that HD 200466A shows strong variation in RV that is well correlated with the activity index based on H$_\\alpha$. We used SARG to study the H$_\\alpha$ line variations in each component of the binaries and a few bright stars to test the capability of the H$_\\alpha$ index of revealing the rotation period or activity cycle. We also analysed the relations between the average activity level and other physical properties of the stars. We finally tried to reveal signals in the RVs that are due to the activity. At least in some cases the variation in the observed RVs is due to the stellar activity. We confirm that H$_\\alpha$ can be used as an activity indicator for solar-type stars and as an age indicator for stars younger than 1.5 Gyr.

  6. KAPPA FORNACI, A TRIPLE RADIO STAR

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bright and nearby (22 pc) solar-type dwarf κ For (HIP 11072) is a triple system. The close pair of M-type dwarfs Ba,Bb with a tentative period of 3.7 days moves around the main component A on a 26 yr orbit. The mass of the 'dark companion' Ba+Bb is comparable to the mass of A, causing large motion of the photo-center. The combined spectro-interferometric orbit of AB is derived, and the relative photometry of the components A and B is given. A weak signature of Ba and Bb is detected in the high-resolution spectra by cross-correlation and by variable emission in the Balmer hydrogen lines. The activity of the M dwarfs, manifested by a previously detected radio flare, is likely maintained by synchronization with their tight orbit. We discuss the frequency of similar hidden triple systems, methods of their detection, and the implications for multiple-star statistics.

  7. Detectability of Glycine in Solar-type System Precursors

    CERN Document Server

    Jimenez-Serra, Izaskun; Caselli, Paola; Viti, Serena

    2014-01-01

    Glycine (NH2CH2COOH) is the simplest amino acid relevant for life. Its detection in the interstellar medium is key to understand the formation mechanisms of pre-biotic molecules and their subsequent delivery onto planetary systems. Glycine has extensively been searched for toward hot molecular cores, although these studies did not yield any firm detection. In contrast to hot cores, low-mass star forming regions, and in particular their earliest stages represented by cold pre-stellar cores, may be better suited for the detection of glycine as well as more relevant for the study of pre-biotic chemistry in young Solar System analogs. We present 1D spherically symmetric radiative transfer calculations of the glycine emission expected to arise from the low-mass pre-stellar core L1544. Water vapour has recently been reported toward this core, indicating that a small fraction of the grain mantles in L1544 (~0.5%) has been injected into the gas phase. Assuming that glycine is photo-desorbed together with water in L15...

  8. Sunspot Bright Points

    CERN Document Server

    Choudhary, Debi Prasad

    2010-01-01

    We used the flux calibrated images through the Broad Band Filter Imager and Stokes Polarimeter data obtained with the Solar Optical Telescope onboard the Hinode spacecraft to study the properties of bright points in and around the sunspots. The well isolated bright points were selected and classified as umbral dot, peripheral umbral dot, penumbral grains and G-band bright point depending on their location. Most of the bright points are smaller than about 150 km. The larger points are mostly associated with the penumbral features. The bright points are not uniformly distributed over the umbra but preferentially located around the penumbral boundary and in the fast decaying parts of umbra. The color temperature of the bright points, derived using the continuum irradiance, are in the range of 4600 K to 6600 K with cooler ones located in the umbra. The temperature increases as a function of distance from the center to outside. The G-band, CN-band and CaII H flux of the bright points as a function of their blue ba...

  9. X-rays from the youngest stars

    Science.gov (United States)

    Feigelson, Eric D.

    1994-01-01

    The X-ray properties of classical and weak-lined T Tauri stars are briefly reviewed, emphasizing recent results from the ROSAT satellite and prospects for ASCA. The interpretation of the high level of T Tauri X-rays as enhanced solar-type magnetic activity is discussed and criticized. The census of X-ray emitters is significantly increasing estimates of galactic star formation efficiency, and X-ray emission may be important for self-regulation of star formation. ASCA images will detect star formation regions out to several kiloparsecs and will study the magnetically heated plasma around T Tauri stars. However, images will often suffer from crowding effects.

  10. Exploring a Threat to Foreign Worlds: Detecting Coronal Mass Ejections on Nearby Stars

    Science.gov (United States)

    Villadsen, Jackie; Hallinan, Gregg; Bourke, Stephen

    2015-01-01

    Coronal mass ejections (CMEs) likely play a significant role in the mass loss and angular momentum evolution of active stars, and may significantly affect exoplanetary magnetospheres and atmospheres. It is difficult to quantitatively predict the magnitude of these effects because there have been no definitive detections of CMEs outside our own solar system. Dynamic radio spectroscopy of stellar flares offers the potential to make such detections. Broadband dynamic spectroscopy has long been used to study coherent radio emission associated with solar CMEs (known as Type II bursts), but such emission has not yet been detected from other stars. Type II bursts sweep downwards in frequency on timescales of tens of minutes, tracing the motion of a CME outwards through the stellar atmosphere into progressively lower plasma densities. I will present JVLA active M dwarf observations showing coherent stellar radio bursts that are extremely bright, comparable in luminosity to the brightest solar Type II bursts ever recorded. These stellar radio bursts are morphologically similar to solar Type II bursts except that the stellar bursts sweep upwards in frequency over time. We interpret these bursts as either bulk plasma motion downwards into the stellar atmosphere or polar auroral radiation modulated by rotation. I will also present progress on the Starburst program, a 3-year nightly observing program using two 27-meter telescopes at the Owens Valley Radio Observatory (the equivalent of a JVLA baseline). The Starburst program will survey stellar coherent radio bursts in order to characterize the rate and energetics of CMEs on nearby stars, combined with complementary observations to image and characterize the detected CMEs.

  11. The distribution of stars in space.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gilmore, G.

    Contents: 1. A didactic ramble. 2. Star counts and galactic structure. 3. Integrated surface-brightness measurements. 4. Specific tracers of galactic structure. 5. The analysis of star-count data. 6. The shape of the metal-poor halo.

  12. Surface Brightness Fluctuations as Stellar Population Indicators

    OpenAIRE

    Blakeslee, John P

    2009-01-01

    Surface Brightness Fluctuations (SBF) can provide useful information about the unresolved stellar content of early-type galaxies and spiral bulges. The absolute SBF magnitude Mbar in a given passband depends on the properties of the stellar population and can be predicted by population synthesis models. SBF measurements in different bandpasses are sensitive to different evolutionary stages within the galaxy stellar population. Near-IR SBF magnitudes are sensitive to the evolution of stars wit...

  13. Intelligent Star Tracker

    OpenAIRE

    Clark, Natalie; Furth, Paul; Horan, Steven

    2000-01-01

    We describe our Intelligent Star Tracker System. Our Intelligent Star Tracker System incorporates an adaptive optic catadioptric telescope in a silicon carbide housing. Leveraging off of our active optic technologies, the novel active pixel position sensors (APPS) enable wide dynamic range and allows simultaneous imagery of faint and bright stars in a single image. Moreover, the APPS, in conjunction with the adaptive optics technologies, offer unprecedented accuracy in altitude and navigation...

  14. Oscillation mode frequencies of 61 main-sequence and subgiant stars observed by Kepler

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Appourchaux, T.; Chaplin, W. J.; García, R. A.;

    2012-01-01

    Solar-like oscillations have been observed by Kepler and CoRoT in several solar-type stars, thereby providing a way to probe the stars using asteroseismology Aims. We provide the mode frequencies of the oscillations of various stars required to perform a comparison with those obtained from stella...

  15. Oscillation mode frequencies of 61 main-sequence and subgiant stars observed by Kepler

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    T. Appourchaux; W.J. Chaplin; R.A. García; M. Gruberbauer; G.A. Verner; H.M. Antia; O. Benomar; T.L. Campante; G.R. Davies; S. Deheuvels; R. Handberg; S. Hekker; R. Howe; C. Régulo; D. Salabert; T.R. Bedding; T.R. White; J. Ballot; S. Mathur; V. Silva Aguirre; Y.P. Elsworth; S. Basu; R.L. Gilliland; J. Christensen-Dalsgaard; H. Kjeldsen; K. Uddin; M.C. Stumpe; T. Barclay

    2012-01-01

    Context. Solar-like oscillations have been observed by Kepler and CoRoT in several solar-type stars, thereby providing a way to probe the stars using asteroseismology Aims. We provide the mode frequencies of the oscillations of various stars required to perform a comparison with those obtained from

  16. Helium in atmospheres of binary stars

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Leushin, V.V. (Rostovskij-na-Donu Gosudarstvennyj Univ. (USSR). Nauchno-Issledovatel' skij Inst. Fiziki)

    The helium abundances were obtained for 25 bright components of binary stars by model atmosphere analysis. The helium abundance for binary stars that lie on the main sequence are larger in the average than in single normal stars. The stars on the Hertzsppung - russel diagram lie at a larger distance from the zero age line than those with normal helium abundance.

  17. Trumpeting M Dwarfs with CONCH-SHELL: a Catalog of Nearby Cool Host-Stars for Habitable ExopLanets and Life

    CERN Document Server

    Gaidos, E; Lepine, S; Buccino, A; James, D; Ansdell, M; Petrucci, R; Mauas, P; Hilton, E J

    2014-01-01

    We present an all-sky catalog of 2970 nearby ($d \\lesssim 50$ pc), bright ($J< 9$) M- or late K-type dwarf stars, 86% of which have been confirmed by spectroscopy. This catalog will be useful for searches for Earth-size and possibly Earth-like planets by future space-based transit missions and ground-based infrared Doppler radial velocity surveys. Stars were selected from the SUPERBLINK proper motion catalog according to absolute magnitudes, spectra, or a combination of reduced proper motions and photometric colors. From our spectra we determined gravity-sensitive indices, and identified and removed 0.2% of these as interloping hotter or evolved stars. Thirteen percent of the stars exhibit H-alpha emission, an indication of stellar magnetic activity and possible youth. The mean metallicity is [Fe/H] = -0.07 with a standard deviation of 0.22 dex, similar to nearby solar-type stars. We determined stellar effective temperatures by least-squares fitting of spectra to model predictions calibrated by fits to sta...

  18. Dark Skies, Bright Kids Year 7

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bittle, Lauren E.; Johnson, Kelsey E.; Borish, H. Jacob; Burkhardt, Andrew; Firebaugh, Ariel; Hancock, Danielle; Rochford Hayes, Christian; Linden, Sean; Liss, Sandra; Matthews, Allison; Prager, Brian; Pryal, Matthew; Sokal, Kimberly R.; Troup, Nicholas William; Wenger, Trey

    2016-01-01

    We present updates from our seventh year of operation including new club content, continued assessments, and our fifth annual Star Party. Dark Skies, Bright Kids (DSBK) is an entirely volunteer-run outreach organization based out of the Department of Astronomy at the University of Virginia. Our core mission is to enhance elementary science education and literacy in Central Virginia through fun, hands-on activities that introduce basic Astronomy concepts. Our primary focus is hosting an 8-10 week after-school astronomy club at underserved elementary and middle schools. Each week, DSBK volunteers take the role of coaches to introduce astronomy-related concepts ranging from the Solar System to galaxies to astrobiology, and to lead students in interactive learning activities. Another hallmark of DSBK is hosting our Annual Central Virginia Star Party, a free event open to the community featuring star-gazing and planetarium shows.

  19. Differential rotation of cool active stars

    OpenAIRE

    Petit, P.; Donati, J.-F.; Cameron, A. Collier

    2004-01-01

    The surface differential rotation of active solar-type stars can be investigated by means of Doppler and Zeeman-Doppler Imaging, both techniques enabling one to estimate the short-term temporal evolution of photospheric structures (cools spots or magnetic regions). After describing the main modeling tools recently developed to guarantee a precise analysis of differential rotation in this framework, we detail the main results obtained for a small number of active G and K fast rotating stars. W...

  20. Detection of doubly-deuterated methanol in the solar-type protostar IRAS 16293-2422

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Parise, B; Ceccarelli, C; Tielens, AGGM; Herbst, E; Lefloch, B; Caux, E; Castets, A; Mukhopadhyay, [No Value; Pagani, L; Loinard, L

    2002-01-01

    We report the first detection of doubly-deuterated methanol (CHD(2)OH), as well as firm detections of the two singly-deuterated isotopomers of methanol (CH(2)DOH and CH(3)OD), towards the solar-type protostar IRAS 16293-2422. From the present multifrequency observations, we derive the following abun

  1. Characteristics of coronal shock waves and solar type 2 radio bursts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mann, G.; Classen, H.-T.

    1995-01-01

    In the solar corona shock waves generated by flares and/or coronal mass ejections can be observed by radio astronomical methods in terms of solar type 2 radio bursts. In dynamic radio spectra they appear as emission stripes slowly drifting from high to low frequencies. A sample of 25 solar type 2 radio bursts observed in the range of 40 - 170 MHz with a time resolution of 0.1 s by the new radiospectrograph of the Astrophvsikalisches Institut Potsdam in Tremsdorf is statistically investigated concerning their spectral features, i.e, drift rate, instantaneous bandwidth, and fundamental harmonic ratio. In-situ plasma wave measurements at interplanetary shocks provide the assumption that type 2 radio radiation is emitted in the vicinity of the transition region of shock waves. Thus, the instantaneous bandwidth of a solar type 2 radio burst would reflect the density jump across the associated shock wave. Comparing the inspection of the Rankine-Hugoniot relations of shock waves under coronal circumstances with those obtained from the observational study, solar type 2 radio bursts should be regarded to be generated by weak supercritical, quasi-parallel, fast magnetosonic shock waves in the corona.

  2. Detection of glycolaldehyde toward the solar-type protostar NGC 1333 IRAS2A

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Coutens, Audrey; Persson, M. V.; Jørgensen, J. K.;

    2015-01-01

    Glycolaldehyde is a key molecule in the formation of biologically relevant molecules such as ribose. We report its detection with the Plateau de Bure interferometer toward the Class 0 young stellar object NGC 1333 IRAS2A, which is only the second solar-type protostar for which this prebiotic mole...

  3. Three Temperate Neptunes Orbiting Nearby Stars

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fulton, Benjamin J.; Howard, Andrew W.; Weiss, Lauren M.; Sinukoff, Evan; Petigura, Erik A.; Isaacson, Howard; Hirsch, Lea; Marcy, Geoffrey W.; Henry, Gregory W.; Grunblatt, Samuel K.; Huber, Daniel; von Braun, Kaspar; Boyajian, Tabetha S.; Kane, Stephen R.; Wittrock, Justin; Horch, Elliott P.; Ciardi, David R.; Howell, Steve B.; Wright, Jason T.; Ford, Eric B.

    2016-10-01

    We present the discovery of three modestly irradiated, roughly Neptune-mass planets orbiting three nearby Solar-type stars. HD 42618 b has a minimum mass of 15.4 ± 2.4 {M}\\oplus , a semimajor axis of 0.55 au, an equilibrium temperature of 337 K, and is the first planet discovered to orbit the solar analogue host star, HD 42618. We also discover new planets orbiting the known exoplanet host stars HD 164922 and HD 143761 (ρ CrB). The new planet orbiting HD 164922 has a minimum mass of 12.9 ± 1.6 {M}\\oplus and orbits interior to the previously known Jovian mass planet orbiting at 2.1 au. HD 164922 c has a semimajor axis of 0.34 au and an equilibrium temperature of 418 K. HD 143761 c orbits with a semimajor axis of 0.44 au, has a minimum mass of 25 ± 2 {M}\\oplus , and is the warmest of the three new planets with an equilibrium temperature of 445 K. It orbits exterior to the previously known warm Jupiter in the system. A transit search using space-based CoRoT data and ground-based photometry from the Automated Photometric Telescopes (APTs) at Fairborn Observatory failed to detect any transits, but the precise, high-cadence APT photometry helped to disentangle planetary-reflex motion from stellar activity. These planets were discovered as part of an ongoing radial velocity survey of bright, nearby, chromospherically inactive stars using the Automated Planet Finder (APF) telescope at Lick Observatory. The high-cadence APF data combined with nearly two decades of radial velocity data from Keck Observatory and gives unprecedented sensitivity to both short-period low-mass, and long-period intermediate-mass planets. Based on observations obtained at the W. M. Keck Observatory, which is operated jointly by the University of California and the California Institute of Technology. Keck time was granted for this project by the University of Hawai‘i, the University of California, and NASA.

  4. The brightness of colour.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    David Corney

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: The perception of brightness depends on spatial context: the same stimulus can appear light or dark depending on what surrounds it. A less well-known but equally important contextual phenomenon is that the colour of a stimulus can also alter its brightness. Specifically, stimuli that are more saturated (i.e. purer in colour appear brighter than stimuli that are less saturated at the same luminance. Similarly, stimuli that are red or blue appear brighter than equiluminant yellow and green stimuli. This non-linear relationship between stimulus intensity and brightness, called the Helmholtz-Kohlrausch (HK effect, was first described in the nineteenth century but has never been explained. Here, we take advantage of the relative simplicity of this 'illusion' to explain it and contextual effects more generally, by using a simple Bayesian ideal observer model of the human visual ecology. We also use fMRI brain scans to identify the neural correlates of brightness without changing the spatial context of the stimulus, which has complicated the interpretation of related fMRI studies. RESULTS: Rather than modelling human vision directly, we use a Bayesian ideal observer to model human visual ecology. We show that the HK effect is a result of encoding the non-linear statistical relationship between retinal images and natural scenes that would have been experienced by the human visual system in the past. We further show that the complexity of this relationship is due to the response functions of the cone photoreceptors, which themselves are thought to represent an efficient solution to encoding the statistics of images. Finally, we show that the locus of the response to the relationship between images and scenes lies in the primary visual cortex (V1, if not earlier in the visual system, since the brightness of colours (as opposed to their luminance accords with activity in V1 as measured with fMRI. CONCLUSIONS: The data suggest that perceptions

  5. CA BrightStor

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2007-01-01

    CA推出的BrightStor系列存储管理解决方案已经成为企业电子商务体系架构管理战略中举足轻重的组成部分。BrightStor是一整套企业级的智能化存储管理解决方案,定位在存储硬件设备和上层应用之间,通过各种集成化的产品和工具为驻留在企业任何位置的数据提供全方位的、有效的存储管理和保护。

  6. Bright Economic Prospects

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Zhang Minqiu

    2004-01-01

    @@ India is expected to register an 8.2% growth rate for the 2003-04 fiscal year. The overall economic situation this year has been satisfactory despite the scaled down 6-6.5% growth rate for the new fiscal year due to oil price hikes, reduced monsoon volume and some 7% inflation. Judging from the following factors, bright prospects are in store for the country down the road.

  7. Solar type III radio bursts modulated by homochromous Alfvén waves

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Solar type III radio bursts and their production mechanisms have been intensively studied in both theory and observation and are believed to be the most important signatures of electron acceleration in active regions. Recently, Wu et al. proposed that the electron-cyclotron maser emission (ECME) driven by an energetic electron beam could be responsible for producing type III bursts and pointed out that turbulent Alfvén waves can greatly influence the basic process of ECME via the oscillation of these electrons in the wave fields. This paper investigates effects of homochromous Alfvén waves (HAWs) on ECME driven by electron beams. Our results show that the growth rate of the O-mode wave will be significantly modulated by HAWs. We also discuss possible application to the formation of fine structures in type III bursts, such as so-called solar type IIIb radio bursts.

  8. Evolution of bulgeless low surface brightness galaxies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shao, X.; Hammer, F.; Yang, Y. B.; Liang, Y. C.

    Based on the Sloan Digital Sky Survey DR 7, we investigate the environment, morphology, and stellar population of bulgeless low surface-brightness (LSB) galaxies in a volume-limited sample with redshift ranging from 0.024 to 0.04 and M r LSB galaxies have more young stars and are more metal-poor than regular LSB galaxies. These results suggest that the evolution of LSB galaxies may be driven by their dynamics, including mergers rather than by their large-scale environment.

  9. The HI dominated Low Surface Brightness Galaxy KKR17

    CERN Document Server

    Lam, Man I; Yang, Ming; Zhou, Zhi-Min; Du, Wei; Zhu, Yi-Nan

    2014-01-01

    We present new narrow-band (H$\\alpha$ and [OIII]) imagings and optical spectrophotometry of HII regions for a gas-rich low surface brightness irregular galaxy, KKR 17. The central surface brightness of the galaxy is $\\mu_0(B)$ = 24.15 $\\pm$0.03 mag~sec$^{-2}$. The galaxy was detected by \\emph{Arecibo Legacy Fast ALFA survey} (ALFALFA), and its mass is dominated by neutral hydrogen (HI) gas. In contrast, both the stellar masses of the bright HII and diffuse stellar regions are small. In addition, the fit to the spectral energy distribution to each region shows the stellar populations of HII and diffuse regions are different. The bright HII region contains a large fraction of O-type stars, revealing the recent strong star formation, whereas the diffuse region is dominated by median age stars, which has a typical age of $\\sim$ 600 Myrs. Using the McGaugh's abundance model, we found that the average metallicity of KKR 17 is 12 + (O/H) = 8.0 $\\pm$ 0.1. The star formation rate of KKR 17 is 0.21$\\pm$0.04 M$_{\\odot}$...

  10. The Spectroscopic Properties of Bright Extragalactic Planetary Nebulae

    CERN Document Server

    Richer, M G

    2006-01-01

    The properties of bright extragalactic planetary nebulae are reviewed based upon the results of low and high resolution spectroscopy. It is argued that bright extragalactic planetary nebulae from galaxies (or subsystems) with and without star formation have different distributions of central star temperature and ionization structure. As regards the chemical compositions, oxygen and neon are generally found to be unchanged as a result of the evolution of the stellar progenitors. Nitrogen enrichment may occur as a result of the evolution of the progenitors of bright planetary nebulae in all stellar populations, though this enrichment may be (more) random in old stellar populations. Helium abundances appear to be influenced by the chemical evolution of the host galaxy, with planetary nebulae in dwarf spheroidals having systematically elevated abundances. Neither the age nor the metallicity of the progenitor stellar population has a strong effect upon the kinematics observed for nebular shells. Both the range of ...

  11. Modelling Solar and Stellar Brightness Variabilities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yeo, K. L.; Shapiro, A. I.; Krivova, N. A.; Solanki, S. K.

    2016-04-01

    Total and spectral solar irradiance, TSI and SSI, have been measured from space since 1978. This is accompanied by the development of models aimed at replicating the observed variability by relating it to solar surface magnetism. Despite significant progress, there remains persisting controversy over the secular change and the wavelength-dependence of the variation with impact on our understanding of the Sun's influence on the Earth's climate. We highlight the recent progress in TSI and SSI modelling with SATIRE. Brightness variations have also been observed for Sun-like stars. Their analysis can profit from knowledge of the solar case and provide additional constraints for solar modelling. We discuss the recent effort to extend SATIRE to Sun-like stars.

  12. Testing planet formation theories with Giant stars

    CERN Document Server

    Pasquini, Luca; Hatzes, A; Setiawan, J; Girardi, L; da Silva, L; De Medeiros, J R

    2008-01-01

    Planet searches around evolved giant stars are bringing new insights to planet formation theories by virtue of the broader stellar mass range of the host stars compared to the solar-type stars that have been the subject of most current planet searches programs. These searches among giant stars are producing extremely interesting results. Contrary to main sequence stars planet-hosting giants do not show a tendency of being more metal rich. Even if limited, the statistics also suggest a higher frequency of giant planets (at least 10 %) that are more massive compared to solar-type main sequence stars. The interpretation of these results is not straightforward. We propose that the lack of a metallicity-planet connection among giant stars is due to pollution of the star while on the main sequence, followed by dilution during the giant phase. We also suggest that the higher mass and frequency of the planets are due to the higher stellar mass. Even if these results do not favor a specific formation scenario, they su...

  13. The Origin of Superflares on G-Type Dwarf Stars of Various Ages

    CERN Document Server

    Katsova, M M

    2015-01-01

    We analyze new observations of superflares on G-stars discovered in the optical and near IR ranges with the Kepler mission. An evolution of solar-type activity is discussed. We give an estimate of the maximal total energy, $E_{tot} = 10^{34}\\;\\mbox{erg}$ of a flare that can occur on the young Sun at its age of 1 Gyr when the cycle was formed. We believe that the main source of the flare optical continuum is a low-temperature condensation forming in the course of the response of the chromosphere to an impulsive heating. For a superflare on the young Sun, we adopt the accelerated electron flux, $F_e (E>\\mbox{20 keV}) = 3 \\times 10^{11} \\: \\mbox{erg} \\; \\mbox{cm}^{-2} \\; \\mbox{s}^{-1}$, that is limited by the return current, and obtain the area of the optical continuum source on a G star, $S \\approx 10^{19} \\:\\mbox{cm}^2$. This value is close to the area of the $H_\\alpha$-ribbons in the largest solar flares, while the area of bright patches of a white-light flare on the contemporary Sun is smaller by about two o...

  14. Are solar brightness variations faculae- or spot-dominated?

    CERN Document Server

    Shapiro, A I; Krivova, N A; Yeo, K L; Schmutz, W K

    2016-01-01

    Regular spaceborne measurements have revealed that solar brightness varies on multiple timescales, variations on timescales greater than a day being attributed to surface magnetic field. Independently, ground-based and spaceborne measurements suggest that Sun-like stars show a similar, but significantly broader pattern of photometric variability. To understand whether the broader pattern of stellar variations is consistent with the solar paradigm we assess relative contributions of faculae and spots to solar magnetically-driven brightness variability. We investigate how the solar brightness variability as well as its facular and spot contributions depend on the wavelength, timescale of variability, and position of the observer relative to the ecliptic plane. We perform calculations with the SATIRE model, which returns solar brightness with daily cadence from solar disc area coverages of various magnetic features. Moving the observer away from the ecliptic plane increases the amplitude of 11-year variability a...

  15. Operational Performance Improvements to BRIght Target Explorer Constellation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Choi, Seung Yun

    The BRIght Target Explorer (BRITE)-Constellation is composed of six nano-satellites funded by Austria, Canada, and Poland, and each of them is equipped with an optical telescope that observes stars with visual magnitude +3.5 or brighter. BRITE-Constellation has provided numerous images of bright stars from Low Earth Orbit, which will eventually lead to investigation of origin of the Universe. This thesis presents the contribution of the author to BRITE mission, especially in BRITE Operations. The author performed antenna steering experiments on UniBRITE and BRITE-Toronto, to improve data downlink. To improve scientific data collection from BRITE satellites, the author computed available observation time for multiple targets every orbit, which resulted in collection of twice the amount of scientific data. Also, the author increased the available observation time for each target from 32 minutes to 48 minutes by improving the performance of the star tracker on-board BRITE-Toronto.

  16. Oscillation mode linewidths of main-sequence and subgiant stars observed by Kepler

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Appourchaux, T.; Benomar, O.; Gruberbauer, M.;

    2012-01-01

    Solar-like oscillations have been observed by {{\\it Kepler}} and CoRoT in several solar-type stars. We study the variations of stellar p-mode linewidth as a function of effective temperature. Time series of 9 months of Kepler data have been used. The power spectra of 42 cool main-sequence stars a...

  17. Large scale simulations of solar type III radio bursts: flux density, drift rate, duration and bandwidth

    OpenAIRE

    Ratcliffe, H.; Kontar, E. P.; Reid, H. A. S.

    2014-01-01

    Non-thermal electrons accelerated in the solar corona can produce intense coherent radio emission, known as solar type III radio bursts. This intense radio emission is often observed from hundreds of MHz in the corona down to the tens of kHz range in interplanetary space. It involves a chain of physical processes from the generation of Langmuir waves to non-linear processes of wave-wave interaction. We develop a self-consistent model to calculate radio emission from a non-thermal electron pop...

  18. The RAVE Survey : Rich in Very Metal-poor Stars

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Fulbright, Jon P.; Wyse, Rosemary F. G.; Ruchti, Gregory R.; Gilmore, G. F.; Grebel, Eva; Bienaymé, O.; Binney, J.; Bland-Hawthorn, J.; Campbell, R.; Freeman, K. C.; Gibson, B. K.; Helmi, A.; Munari, U.; Navarro, J. F.; Parker, Q. A.; Reid, W.; Seabroke, G. M.; Siebert, A.; Siviero, A.; Steinmetz, M.; Watson, F. G.; Williams, M.; Zwitter, T.

    2010-01-01

    Very metal-poor stars are of obvious importance for many problems in chemical evolution, star formation, and galaxy evolution. Finding complete samples of such stars which are also bright enough to allow high-precision individual analyses is of considerable interest. We demonstrate here that stars w

  19. Water deuterium fractionation in the inner regions of two solar type protostars

    CERN Document Server

    Taquet, Vianney; Ceccarelli, Cecilia; Neri, Roberto; Kahane, Claudine; Coutens, Audrey; Vastel, Charlotte

    2013-01-01

    The [HDO]/[H2O] ratio is a crucial parameter for probing the history of water formation. So far, it has been measured for only three solar type protostars and yielded different results, possibly pointing to a substantially different history in their formation. In the present work, we report new interferometric observations of the HDO 4 2,2 - 4 2,3 line for two solar type protostars, IRAS2A and IRAS4A, located in the NGC1333 region. In both sources, the detected HDO emission originates from a central compact unresolved region. Comparison with previously published interferometric observations of the H218$O 3 1,3 - 2 2,0 line shows that the HDO and H$_2$O lines mostly come from the same region. A non-LTE LVG analysis of the HDO and H218$O line emissions, combined with published observations, provides a [HDO]/[H2O] ratio of 0.3 - 8 % in IRAS2A and 0.5 - 3 % in IRAS4A. First, the water fractionation is lower than that of other molecules such as formaldehyde and methanol in the same sources. Second, it is similar t...

  20. History of the solar-type protostar IRAS16293-2422 as told by the cyanopolyynes

    CERN Document Server

    Jaber, A A; Kahane, C; Viti, S; Balucani, N; Caux, E; Faure, A; Lefloch, B; Lique, F; Mendoza, E; Quenard, D; Wiesenfeld, L

    2016-01-01

    Cyanopolyynes are chains of carbon atoms with an atom of hydrogen and a CN group on either side. They are detected almost everywhere in the ISM, as well as in comets. In the past, they have been used to constrain the age of some molecular clouds, since their abundance is predicted to be a strong function of time. We present an extensive study of the cyanopolyynes distribution in the solar-type protostar IRAS16293-2422 based on TIMASSS IRAM-30m observations. The goals are (i) to obtain a census of the cyanopolyynes in this source and of their isotopologues; (ii) to derive how their abundance varies across the protostar envelope; and (iii) to obtain constraints on the history of IRAS16293-2422. We detect several lines from HC3N and HC5N, and report the first detection of DC3N, in a solar-type protostar. We found that the HC3N abundance is roughly constant (~1.3x10^(-11)) in the outer cold envelope of IRAS16293-2422, and it increases by about a factor 100 in the inner region where Tdust>80K. The HC5N has an abun...

  1. Brightness and color of the integrated starlight at celestial, ecliptic and galactic poles

    CERN Document Server

    Nawar, S; Mikhail, J S; Morcos, A B

    2010-01-01

    From photoelectric observations of night sky brightness carried out at Abu-Simbel, Asaad et al. (1979) have obtained values of integrated starlight brightness at different Galactic latitudes. These data have been used in the present work to obtain the brightness and color of the integrated starlight at North and South Celestial, Ecliptic and Galactic Poles. The present values of the brightness are expressed in S10 units and mag/arcsec2. Our results have been compared with that obtained by other investigators using photometric and star counts techniques. The B-V and B-R have been calculated and the results are compared with that obtained by other investigators.

  2. The census of complex organic molecules in the solar type protostar IRAS16293-2422

    CERN Document Server

    Jaber, Ali A; Kahane, C; Caux, E

    2014-01-01

    Complex Organic Molecules (COMs) are considered crucial molecules, since they are connected with organic chemistry, at the basis of the terrestrial life. More pragmatically, they are molecules in principle difficult to synthetize in the harsh interstellar environments and, therefore, a crucial test for astrochemical models. Current models assume that several COMs are synthesised on the lukewarm grain surfaces ($\\gtrsim$30-40 K), and released in the gas phase at dust temperatures $\\gtrsim$100 K. However, recent detections of COMs in $\\lesssim$20 K gas demonstrate that we still need important pieces to complete the puzzle of the COMs formation. We present here a complete census of the oxygen and nitrogen bearing COMs, previously detected in different ISM regions, towards the solar type protostar IRAS16293-2422. The census was obtained from the millimeter-submillimeter unbiased spectral survey TIMASSS. Six COMs, out of the 29 searched for, were detected: methyl cyanide, ketene, acetaldehyde, formamide, dimethyl ...

  3. SARA South Observations and Analysis of the Solar Type, Totally Eclipsing, Contact Binary, DD Indus

    Science.gov (United States)

    Samec, Ronald G.; Norris, Cody; Van Hamme, Walter V.; Faulkner, Danny R.

    2016-06-01

    DD Ind (NSVS5066754) is a Solar Type (T ~ 5850K) solar type eclipsing binary. It was observed in June to September, 2013 at Cerro Tololo in remote mode with the 0.6-m SARA South reflector. Five times of minimum light were calculated from our present observations, for three primary and two secondary eclipses: HJD Min I = 2456505.8085±0.0002, 2456533.73933±0.00003, 2456536.6378±0.0012HJD Min II = 2456503.8132±00.0014, 2456533.5583±0.0004In addition, two observations at minima were determined from archived All Sky Automated Survey Data:HJD Min II = 2452872.9104, 2452883.6097.The following quadratic ephemerides was determined from all available times of minimum light:JD Hel Min I=2456533.7394±0.0002d + 0.3627463±0.0000002 X E +0.00000000006 ± 0.00000000002 X E2A BVRcIc filtered simultaneous Wilson-Devinney Program (W-D) solution reveals that the system has a mass ratio of ~0.46, and a component temperature difference of ~200 K. Two weak (Tfact ~ 0.95, ~20 degree radius) cool spots were iterated on the secondary component in the WD Synthetic Light Curve Computations. They appeared in the Northern Hemisphere (colatitude 45 degrees) and near the equator (colatitude ~95 degrees), respectively.The Roche Lobe fill-out of the binary is ~13%. The inclination is ~84.8o. An eclipse duration of ~16 minutes was determined for the primary eclipse. Additional and more detailed information is given in the meeting report.

  4. Asteroseismology from multi-month Kepler photometry: the evolved Sun-like stars KIC 10273246 and KIC 10920273

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    T.L. Campante; R. Handberg; S. Mathur; T. Appourchaux; T.R. Bedding; W.J. Chaplin; B. Mosser; O. Benomar; A. Bonanno; E. Corsaro; S.T. Fletcher; P. Gaulme; S. Hekker; C. Karoff; D. Salabert; G.A. Verner; T.R. White; G. Houdek; I.M. Brandao; O.L. Creevey; G. Dogan; M. Bazot; J. Christensen-Dalsgaard; M.S. Cunha; Y. Elsworth; D. Huber; H. Kjeldsen; M. Lundkvist; J. Molenda-Zakowicz; M.J.P.F.G. Monteiro; D. Stello; B.D. Clarke; F.R. Girouard; J.R. Hall; R.A. Garcia; C. Regulo

    2011-01-01

    Context. The evolved main-sequence Sun-like stars KIC 10273246 (F-type) and KIC 10920273 (G-type) were observed with the NASA Kepler satellite for approximately ten months with a duty cycle in excess of 90%. Such continuous and long observations are unprecedented for solar-type stars other than the

  5. Distance Measurements and Stellar Population Properties via Surface Brightness Fluctuations

    OpenAIRE

    Fritz, Alexander

    2012-01-01

    Surface Brightness Fluctuations (SBFs) are one of the most powerful techniques to measure the distance and to constrain the unresolved stellar content of extragalactic systems. For a given bandpass, the absolute SBF magnitude \\bar{M} depends on the properties of the underlying stellar population. Multi-band SBFs allow scientists to probe different stages of the stellar evolution: UV and blue wavelength band SBFs are sensitive to the evolution of stars within the hot Horizontal Branch (HB) and...

  6. Observing Double Stars

    Science.gov (United States)

    Genet, Russell M.; Fulton, B. J.; Bianco, Federica B.; Martinez, John; Baxter, John; Brewer, Mark; Carro, Joseph; Collins, Sarah; Estrada, Chris; Johnson, Jolyon; Salam, Akash; Wallen, Vera; Warren, Naomi; Smith, Thomas C.; Armstrong, James D.; McGaughey, Steve; Pye, John; Mohanan, Kakkala; Church, Rebecca

    2012-05-01

    Double stars have been systematically observed since William Herschel initiated his program in 1779. In 1803 he reported that, to his surprise, many of the systems he had been observing for a quarter century were gravitationally bound binary stars. In 1830 the first binary orbital solution was obtained, leading eventually to the determination of stellar masses. Double star observations have been a prolific field, with observations and discoveries - often made by students and amateurs - routinely published in a number of specialized journals such as the Journal of Double Star Observations. All published double star observations from Herschel's to the present have been incorporated in the Washington Double Star Catalog. In addition to reviewing the history of visual double stars, we discuss four observational technologies and illustrate these with our own observational results from both California and Hawaii on telescopes ranging from small SCTs to the 2-meter Faulkes Telescope North on Haleakala. Two of these technologies are visual observations aimed primarily at published "hands-on" student science education, and CCD observations of both bright and very faint doubles. The other two are recent technologies that have launched a double star renaissance. These are lucky imaging and speckle interferometry, both of which can use electron-multiplying CCD cameras to allow short (30 ms or less) exposures that are read out at high speed with very low noise. Analysis of thousands of high speed exposures allows normal seeing limitations to be overcome so very close doubles can be accurately measured.

  7. Stars, Galaxies and Quasars

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Patrick Das Gupta

    2009-05-01

    Full Text Available This article provides a brief introduction to the basics of stars, galaxies and Quasi-stellar objects (QSOs. In stars, the central pressure and temperature must be high in order to halt the stellar gravitational collapse. High temperature leads to thermonuclear fusion in the stellar core, releasing thereby enormous amount of nuclear energy, making the star shine brilliantly. On the other hand, the QSOs are very bright nuclei lying in the centres of some galaxies. Many of these active galactic nuclei, which appear star-like when observed through a telescope and  whose power output are more than 1011 times that of the Sun, exhibit rapid time variability in their X-ray emissions.  Rapid variability along with the existence of a maximum speed limit, c, provide a strong argument in favour of a compact central engine model for QSOs in which a thick disc of hot gas going around a supermassive blackhole is what makes a QSO appear like a bright point source. Hence, unlike stars, QSOs are powered by gravitational potential energy.

  8. Astrobiologically Interesting Stars within 10 parsecs of the Sun

    CERN Document Server

    De Mello, G F P; Ghezzi, L

    2006-01-01

    The existence of life based on carbon chemistry and water oceans relies upon planetary properties, chiefly climate stability, and stellar properties, such as mass, age, metallicity and Galactic orbits. The latter can be well constrained with present knowledge. We present a detailed, up-to-date compilation of the atmospheric parameters, chemical composition, multiplicity and degree of chromospheric activity for the astrobiologically interesting solar-type stars within 10 parsecs of the Sun. We determine their state of evolution, masses, ages and space velocities, and produce an optimized list of candidates that merit serious scientific consideration by the future space-based interferometry probes aimed at directly detecting Earth-sized extrasolar planets and seeking spectroscopic infrared biomarkers as evidence of photosynthetic life. The initially selected stars number 33 solar-type within the population of 182 stars (excluding late M-dwarfs) closer than 10 pc. A comprehensive and detailed data compilation fo...

  9. Coronal Mass Ejections and Angular Momentum Loss in Young Stars

    CERN Document Server

    Aarnio, Alicia; Matt, Sean

    2014-01-01

    In our own solar system, the necessity of understanding space weather is readily evident. Fortunately for Earth, our nearest stellar neighbor is relatively quiet, exhibiting activity levels several orders of magnitude lower than young, solar-type stars. In protoplanetary systems, stellar magnetic phenomena observed are analogous to the solar case, but dramatically enhanced on all physical scales: bigger, more energetic, more frequent. While coronal mass ejections (CMEs) could play a signi?cant role in the evolution of protoplanets, they could also a?ffect the evolution of the central star itself. To assess the consequences of prominence eruption/CMEs, we have invoked the solar-stellar connection to estimate, for young, solar-type stars, how frequently stellar CMEs may occur and their attendant mass and angular momentum loss rates. We will demonstrate the necessary conditions under which CMEs could slow stellar rotation.

  10. On the lifetime of discs around late type stars

    CERN Document Server

    Ercolano, Barbara; Spezzi, Loredana; Owen, James

    2011-01-01

    We address the question of whether protoplanetary discs around low mass stars (e.g. M-dwarfs) may be longer lived than their solar-type counterparts. This question is particularly relevant to assess the planet-making potential of these lower mass discs. Given the uncertainties inherent to age-dating young stars, we propose an alternative approach that is to analyse the spatial distribution of disc-bearing low-mass stars and compare it to that of disc-bearing solar-type stars in the same cluster. A significant age difference between the two populations should be reflected in their average nearest neighbour distance (normalised to the number of sources), where the older population should appear more spread out. To this aim, we perform a Minimum Spanning Tree (MST) analysis on the spatial distribution of disc-bearing young stellar objects (YSOs) in six nearby low mass star forming regions. We find no evidence for significant age differences between the disc-bearing low-mass (later than M2) and 'solar-type' (earl...

  11. Dark Skies, Bright Kids Year 6

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liss, Sandra; Troup, Nicholas William; Johnson, Kelsey E.; Barcos-Munoz, Loreto D.; Beaton, Rachael; Bittle, Lauren; Borish, Henry J.; Burkhardt, Andrew; Corby, Joanna; Dean, Janice; Hancock, Danielle; King, Jennie; Prager, Brian; Romero, Charles; Sokal, Kimberly R.; Stierwalt, Sabrina; Wenger, Trey; Zucker, Catherine

    2015-01-01

    Now entering our sixth year of operation, Dark Skies, Bright Kids (DSBK) is an entirely volunteer-run outreach organization based out of the Department of Astronomy at the University of Virginia. Our core mission is to enhance elementary science education and literacy in central Virginia through fun, hands-on activities that introduce basic Astronomy concepts beyond Virginia's Standards of Learning. Our primary focus is hosting an 8-10 week after-school astronomy club at underserved elementary and middle schools. Each week, DSBK volunteers take the role of coaches to introduce astronomy-related concepts ranging from the Solar System to galaxies to astrobiology, and to lead students in interactive learning activities. Another hallmark of DSBK is hosting our Annual Central Virginia Star Party, a free event open to the community featuring star-gazing and planetarium shows.DSBK has amassed over 15,000 contact hours since 2009 and we continue to broaden our impact. One important step we have taken in the past year is to establish a graduate student led assessment program to identify and implement directed learning goals for DSBK outreach. The collection of student workbooks, observations, and volunteer surveys indicates broad scale success for the program both in terms of student learning and their perception of science. The data also reveal opportunities to improve our organizational and educational practices to maximize student achievement and overall volunteer satisfaction for DSBK's future clubs and outreach endeavors.

  12. Dark Skies, Bright Kids! Year 5

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prager, Brian; Johnson, K. E.; Barcos-Munoz, L. D.; Beaton, R.; Bittle, L.; Borish, H.; Burkhardt, A.; Corby, J.; Damke, G.; Dean, J.; Dorsey, G.; Graninger, D.; Lauck, T.; Liss, S.; Oza, A.; Peacock, S.; Romero, C.; Sokal, K. R.; Stierwalt, S.; Walker, L.; Wenger, T.; Zucker, C.

    2014-01-01

    Our public outreach group Dark Skies, Bright Kids! (DSBK) fosters science literacy in Virginia by bringing a hands-on approach to astronomy that engages children's natural excitement and curiosity. We are an entirely volunteer-run group based out of the Department of Astronomy at the University of Virginia and we enthusiastically utilize astronomy as a 'gateway science.' We create long-term relationships with students during an 8 to 10 week long, after-school astronomy club at under served elementary schools in neighboring counties, and we visited 3 different schools in 2013. Additionally, we organize and participate in science events throughout the community. The fifth year of DSBK was marked by surpassing 10,000 contact hours in Spring 2013 Semester and by ringing in the fall semester with our biggest, most successful star party to date. We hosted the Third Annual Central Virginia Star Party, free and open to the community to encourage families to enjoy astronomy together. Nearly four hundred people of all ages attended, double the number from previous years. Joining with local astronomical societies, we offered an enlightening and exciting night with resources rarely accessible to the public, such as an IR camera and a portable planetarium. With numerous telescopes pointed at the sky, and a beautifully clear night with views of the Milky Way, the International Space Station, and numerous meteors, the star party was a fantastic opportunity to introduce many of our guests to the natural wonders of our night sky and enjoy some of the darkest skies on the eastern seaboard.

  13. OO Aquilae: a solar-type contact binary with intrinsic light curve changes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Hua-Li; Wei, Jian-Yan; Yang, Yuan-Gui; Dai, Hai-Feng

    2016-01-01

    New multi-color photometry of the solar-type contact binary OO Aql was obtained in 2012 and 2013, using the 60 cm telescope at Xinglong Station of the National Astronomical Observatories, Chinese Academy of Sciences. From two sets of light curves LC1 and LC2, photometric models were performed by using the 2003 version of the Wilson-Devinney code. The overcontact factor of the binary system was determined to be f = 37.0(±0.5)%. The intrinsic variability of this binary occurs in light maxima and minima, which could result from a possible third component and magnetic activity of the late type components. Based on all available light minimum times, the orbital period may change in a complicated mode, i.e., sudden period jumps or continuous period variations. The period of OO Aql may possibly undergo a secular period decrease with a rate of dP/dt = -3.63(±0.30) × 10-8 d yr-1, superimposed by two possible cyclic variations in the O - C curve. The long-term period decrease may be interpreted as conserved mass transfer from the more massive component to the less massive one. The 21.5-yr oscillation may be attributed to cyclic magnetic activity, and the 69.3-yr one may result from the light-time effect of an unseen tertiary body.

  14. Phase Coupling Between Spectral Components of Collapsing Langmuir Solitons in Solar Type III Radio Bursts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thejappa, G.; MacDowall, R. J.; Bergamo, M.

    2012-01-01

    We present the high time resolution observations of one of the Langmuir wave packets obtained in the source region of a solar type III radio burst. This wave packet satisfies the threshold condition of the supersonic modulational instability, as well as the criterion of a collapsing Langmuir soliton, i.e., the spatial scale derived from its peak intensity is less than that derived from its short time scale. The spectrum of t his wave packet contains an intense spectral peak at local electron plasma frequency, f(sub pe) and relatively weaker peaks at 2f(sub pe) and 3f(sub pe). We apply the wavelet based bispectral analysis technique on this wave packet and compute the bicoherence between its spectral components. It is found that the bicoherence exhibits two peaks at (approximately f(sub pe), approximately f(sub pe)) and (approximately f(sub pe) approximately 2f(sub pe)), which strongly suggest that the spectral peak at 2f(sub pe) probably corresponds to the second harmonic radio emission, generated as a result of the merging of antiparallel propagating Langmuir waves trapped in the collapsing Langmuir soliton, and, the spectral peak at 3f(sub pe) probably corresponds to the third harmonic radio emission, generated as a result of merging of a trapped Langmuir wave and a second harmonic electromagnetic wave.

  15. Detection of glycolaldehyde towards the solar-type protostar NGC1333 IRAS2A

    CERN Document Server

    Coutens, Audrey; Jørgensen, Jes K; Wampfler, Susanne F; Lykke, Julie M

    2015-01-01

    Glycolaldehyde is a key molecule in the formation of biologically relevant molecules such as ribose. We report its detection with the Plateau de Bure interferometer towards the Class 0 young stellar object NGC1333 IRAS2A, which is only the second solar-type protostar for which this prebiotic molecule is detected. Local thermodynamic equilibrium analyses of glycolaldehyde, ethylene glycol (the reduced alcohol of glycolaldehyde) and methyl formate (the most abundant isomer of glycolaldehyde) were carried out. The relative abundance of ethylene glycol to glycolaldehyde is found to be ~5 -higher than in the Class 0 source IRAS 16293-2422 (~1), but comparable to the lower limits derived in comets ($\\geq$3-6). The different ethylene glycol-to-glycolaldehyde ratios in the two protostars could be related to different CH3OH:CO compositions of the icy grain mantles. In particular, a more efficient hydrogenation on the grains in NGC 1333 IRAS2A would favor the formation of both methanol and ethylene glycol. In conclusio...

  16. Asteroseismology of Exoplanet-Host Stars in the Kepler Era

    CERN Document Server

    Campante, Tiago L

    2015-01-01

    New insights on stellar evolution and stellar interior physics are being made possible by asteroseismology, the study of stars by the observation of their natural, resonant oscillations. Asteroseismology is making significant contributions to our understanding of solar-type stars, in great part due to the exquisite data that have been made available by NASA's Kepler space telescope. Of particular interest is the synergy between asteroseismology and exoplanetary science. Herein I will review recent contributions from asteroseismology to the determination of fundamental properties of Kepler exoplanet-host stars and stress its potential in constraining the spin-orbit alignment of exoplanet systems.

  17. Teradiode's high brightness semiconductor lasers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Robin K.; Chann, Bien; Burgess, James; Lochman, Bryan; Zhou, Wang; Cruz, Mike; Cook, Rob; Dugmore, Dan; Shattuck, Jeff; Tayebati, Parviz

    2016-03-01

    TeraDiode is manufacturing multi-kW-class ultra-high brightness fiber-coupled direct diode lasers for industrial applications. A fiber-coupled direct diode laser with a power level of 4,680 W from a 100 μm core diameter, lasers. The fiber-coupled output corresponds to a Beam Parameter Product (BPP) of 3.5 mm-mrad and is the lowest BPP multi-kW-class direct diode laser yet reported. This laser is suitable for industrial materials processing applications, including sheet metal cutting and welding. This 4-kW fiber-coupled direct diode laser has comparable brightness to that of industrial fiber lasers and CO2 lasers, and is over 10x brighter than state-of-the-art direct diode lasers. We have also demonstrated novel high peak power lasers and high brightness Mid-Infrared Lasers.

  18. Accretion, Outflows, and Winds of Magnetized Stars

    CERN Document Server

    Romanova, M M

    2016-01-01

    Many types of stars have strong magnetic fields that can dynamically influence the flow of circumstellar matter. In stars with accretion disks, the stellar magnetic field can truncate the inner disk and determine the paths that matter can take to flow onto the star. These paths are different in stars with different magnetospheres and periods of rotation. External field lines of the magnetosphere may inflate and produce favorable conditions for outflows from the disk-magnetosphere boundary. Outflows can be particularly strong in the propeller regime, wherein a star rotates more rapidly than the inner disk. Outflows may also form at the disk-magnetosphere boundary of slowly rotating stars, if the magnetosphere is compressed by the accreting matter. In isolated, strongly magnetized stars, the magnetic field can influence formation and/or propagation of stellar wind outflows. Winds from low-mass, solar-type stars may be either thermally or magnetically driven, while winds from massive, luminous O and B type stars...

  19. The EUVE bright source list

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stroozas, B.; Mcdonald, K.; Antia, B.; Mcdonald, J.; Wiercigroch, A.

    1993-01-01

    Initial results for bright extreme ultraviolet sources discovered during the EUVE all-sky and deep ecliptic surveys have been published as a Bright Source List (BSL) and released to the astronomical community with a recent NASA research announcement (NRA 93-OSS-02, Appendix F). This paper describes the data processing software, the EUVE survey data set, and the production of the BSL at the Center for EUV Astrophysics. The contents, format, and selection criteria for sources, the data processing strategy, some problems encountered, and a summary of the BSL results are presented.

  20. All things bright and beautiful

    OpenAIRE

    Brown, Chloe

    2012-01-01

    'All Things Bright and Beautiful' was exhibited in 20/21 Visual Arts Centre, Scunthorpe, which is sited in a 'redundant' church. The fundamental question that the exhibition explored concerned the role of 'the animal' within contemporary art and within secular society, which in turn hoped to prompt reflections on our understanding of the place of 'the human' in the world and in nature. If there is no divine order, as posited by the hymn 'All Things Bright and Beautiful', where does this leave...

  1. GIRAFFE Reaches towards the Stars

    Science.gov (United States)

    2002-07-01

    "First Light" of New Powerful Spectrograph at the VLT Summary The first observations of stellar spectra have just been performed with the new GIRAFFE multi-object spectrograph on the ESO Very Large Telescope (VLT) at the Paranal Observatory in Chile. This milestone event was achieved in the early morning of July 3, 2002. It signifies another important step towards the full implementation of the extremely powerful Fibre Large Array Multi-Element Spectrograph (FLAMES) , one of the main instruments for the ESO VLT. This project is co-ordinated by ESO and incorporates many complex components that have been constructed at various research institutions in Europe and Australia. The GIRAFFE spectrograph provides unique possibilities for detailed observations of the properties of individual stars located in our Milky Way galaxy ( PR 16b/02 ) as well as in other galaxies of the Local Group. PR Photo 16a/02 : A series of stellar spectra recorded by GIRAFFE during "First Light" . PR Photo 16b/02 : Details of some of these stellar spectra . FLAMES and GIRAFFE ESO PR Photo 16a/02 ESO PR Photo 16a/02 [Preview - JPEG: 756 x 400 pix - 363k] [Normal - JPEG: 1511 x 800 pix - 1.2M] ESO PR Photo 16b/02 ESO PR Photo 16b/02 [Preview - JPEG: 461 x 400 pix - 196k] [Normal - JPEG: 921 x 800 pix - 606k] Caption : PR Photo 16a/02 : "First Light" test observation with the GIRAFFE spectrograph of about 50 high-quality spectra (10 min exposure at spectral resolution 7,000) of stars in the Milky Way disk, in the early morning of July 3, 2002. The stars have magnitudes of 12 - 16 and are all of solar type. The photo shows part of the image recorded with a 2000 x 4000 pixel CCD detector at the focal plane of the spectrograph. Each stellar spectrum is seen as one vertical line - some of the absorption lines can be seen as dark horizontal features. PR Photo 16b/02 shows a small part of this image. The three strong absorption lines that are visible as horizontal, dark lines in the lower part of the

  2. Unveiling the nature of bright z ~ 7 galaxies with the Hubble Space Telescope

    CERN Document Server

    Bowler, R A A; McLure, R J; McLeod, D J

    2016-01-01

    We present new Hubble Space Telescope/Wide Field Camera 3 imaging of 25 extremely luminous (-23.2 600A). We find that irregular, multiple-component morphologies suggestive of clumpy or merging systems are common (f_multi > 0.4) in bright z ~ 7 galaxies, and ubiquitous at the very bright end (M_UV 1000 similarly bright galaxies at z ~ 7. Our new HST imaging suggests that the vast majority of these galaxies will be spatially resolved by Euclid, mitigating concerns over dwarf star contamination.

  3. Giant Low Surface Brightness Galaxies: Evolution in Isolation

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    M. Das

    2013-03-01

    Giant Low Surface Brightness (GLSB) galaxies are amongst the most massive spiral galaxies that we know of in our Universe. Although they fall in the class of late type spiral galaxies, their properties are far more extreme. They have very faint stellar disks that are extremely rich in neutral hydrogen gas but low in star formation and hence low in surface brightness. They often have bright bulges that are similar to those found in early type galaxies. The bulges can host low luminosity Active Galactic Nuclei (AGN) that have relatively low mass black holes. GLSB galaxies are usually isolated systems and are rarely found to be interacting with other galaxies. In fact many GLSB galaxies are found under dense regions close to the edges of voids. These galaxies have very massive dark matter halos that also contribute to their stability and lack of evolution. In this paper we briefly review the properties of this unique class of galaxies and conclude that both their isolation and their massive dark matter halos have led to the low star formation rates and the slower rate of evolution in these galaxies.

  4. The census of complex organic molecules in the solar-type protostar IRAS16293-2422

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Complex organic molecules (COMs) are considered to be crucial molecules, since they are connected with organic chemistry, at the basis of terrestrial life. More pragmatically, they are molecules which in principle are difficult to synthesize in harsh interstellar environments and, therefore, are a crucial test for astrochemical models. Current models assume that several COMs are synthesized on lukewarm grain surfaces (≳30-40 K) and released in the gas phase at dust temperatures of ≳100 K. However, recent detections of COMs in ≲20 K gas demonstrate that we still need important pieces to complete the puzzle of COMs formation. Here, we present a complete census of the oxygen- and nitrogen-bearing COMs, previously detected in different Interstellar Medium (ISM) regions, toward the solar-type protostar IRAS16293-2422. The census was obtained from the millimeter-submillimeter unbiased spectral survey TIMASSS. Of the 29 COMs searched for, 6 were detected: methyl cyanide, ketene, acetaldehyde, formamide, dimethyl ether, and methyl formate. Multifrequency analysis of the last five COMs provides clear evidence that they are present in the cold (≲30 K) envelope of IRAS16293-2422, with abundances of 0.03-2 × 10–10. Our data do not allow us to support the hypothesis that the COMs abundance increases with increasing dust temperature in the cold envelope, as expected if COMs were predominately formed on lukewarm grain surfaces. Finally, when also considering other ISM sources, we find a strong correlation over five orders of magnitude between methyl formate and dimethyl ether, and methyl formate and formamide abundances, which may point to a link between these two couples of species in cold and warm gas.

  5. The Census of Complex Organic Molecules in the Solar-type Protostar IRAS16293-2422

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jaber, Ali A.; Ceccarelli, C.; Kahane, C.; Caux, E.

    2014-08-01

    Complex organic molecules (COMs) are considered to be crucial molecules, since they are connected with organic chemistry, at the basis of terrestrial life. More pragmatically, they are molecules which in principle are difficult to synthesize in harsh interstellar environments and, therefore, are a crucial test for astrochemical models. Current models assume that several COMs are synthesized on lukewarm grain surfaces (gsim30-40 K) and released in the gas phase at dust temperatures of gsim100 K. However, recent detections of COMs in lsim20 K gas demonstrate that we still need important pieces to complete the puzzle of COMs formation. Here, we present a complete census of the oxygen- and nitrogen-bearing COMs, previously detected in different Interstellar Medium (ISM) regions, toward the solar-type protostar IRAS16293-2422. The census was obtained from the millimeter-submillimeter unbiased spectral survey TIMASSS. Of the 29 COMs searched for, 6 were detected: methyl cyanide, ketene, acetaldehyde, formamide, dimethyl ether, and methyl formate. Multifrequency analysis of the last five COMs provides clear evidence that they are present in the cold (lsim30 K) envelope of IRAS16293-2422, with abundances of 0.03-2 × 10-10. Our data do not allow us to support the hypothesis that the COMs abundance increases with increasing dust temperature in the cold envelope, as expected if COMs were predominately formed on lukewarm grain surfaces. Finally, when also considering other ISM sources, we find a strong correlation over five orders of magnitude between methyl formate and dimethyl ether, and methyl formate and formamide abundances, which may point to a link between these two couples of species in cold and warm gas.

  6. Three Kings and the Bright Star of Fame

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Emalyn J. Bullis

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available Many phenomena in music history as well as in American history have helped develop and shape the types of music listened to today, but none have been so fresh as looking back to twentieth-century popular music and the several key individuals that “ruled” in this area. These “rulers” were hailed as “kings” firstly as a media ploy, but the American public did nothing but encourage the titles. This is somewhat confusing considering American’s pride in their democratic political system but history shows that in several key American cultural changes the “Kings” crowned in the music sphere are representative of these changes. While not difficult to determine who these individuals are, as most of them were hailed and recognized as “Kings” to their respective audiences. Benny Goodman, the King of Swing, in the 1920’s and 30’s helped usher in and popularize the Swing movement. Elvis Presley, the King of Rock and Roll, capitalized (intentionally or not on the move towards combining African-American sounds such as blues and jazz with folk, gospel, and soul, thus creating a whole new and extremely popular sound. Michael Jackson, the King of Pop, was practically born into fame with his involvement with the ‘Jackson 5,’ but that did not stop him from rising up the ladder of fame in his solo career to change the face of pop music forever. There were also many artists that surrounded these “kings,” a court, if you will, that allowed their new styles to proliferate throughout American culture, and sometimes even surpassed them musically. However, as icons, these men stand on their own for their achievements in music and their ability to change and adapt to the culture around them. By looking at the three Kings of American pop culture’s past, it is possible to see the direction of America’s culture in general from the 1920’s on and perhaps see the trajectory of music of the USA today

  7. Three Kings and the Bright Star of Fame

    OpenAIRE

    Emalyn J. Bullis

    2013-01-01

    Many phenomena in music history as well as in American history have helped develop and shape the types of music listened to today, but none have been so fresh as looking back to twentieth-century popular music and the several key individuals that “ruled” in this area. These “rulers” were hailed as “kings” firstly as a media ploy, but the American public did nothing but encourage the titles. This is somewhat confusing considering American’s pride in their democratic political system but histor...

  8. Photometric indicators of visual night sky quality derived from all-sky brightness maps

    Science.gov (United States)

    Duriscoe, Dan M.

    2016-09-01

    Wide angle or fisheye cameras provide a high resolution record of artificial sky glow, which results from the scattering of escaped anthropogenic light by the atmosphere, over the sky vault in the moonless nocturnal environment. Analysis of this record yields important indicators of the extent and severity of light pollution. The following indicators were derived through numerical analysis of all-sky brightness maps: zenithal, average all-sky, median, brightest, and darkest sky brightness. In addition, horizontal and vertical illuminance, resulting from sky brightness were computed. A natural reference condition to which the anthropogenic component may be compared is proposed for each indicator, based upon an iterative analysis of a high resolution natural sky model. All-sky brightness data, calibrated in the V band by photometry of standard stars and converted to luminance, from 406 separate data sets were included in an exploratory analysis. Of these, six locations representing a wide range of severity of impact from artificial sky brightness were selected as examples and examined in detail. All-sky average brightness is the most unbiased indicator of impact to the environment, and is more sensitive and accurate in areas of slight to moderate light pollution impact than zenith brightness. Maximum vertical illuminance provides an excellent indicator of impacts to wilderness character, as does measures of the brightest portions of the sky. Zenith brightness, the workhorse of field campaigns, is compared to the other indicators and found to correlate well with horizontal illuminance, especially at relatively bright sites. The median sky brightness describes a brightness threshold for the upper half of the sky, of importance to telescopic optical astronomy. Numeric indicators, in concert with all-sky brightness maps, provide a complete assessment of visual sky quality at a site.

  9. EFFECTS OF ALFVÉN WAVES ON ELECTRON CYCLOTRON MASER EMISSION IN CORONAL LOOPS AND SOLAR TYPE I RADIO STORMS

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Solar type I radio storms are long-lived radio emissions from the solar atmosphere. It is believed that these type I storms are produced by energetic electrons trapped within a closed magnetic structure and are characterized by a high ordinary (O) mode polarization. However, the microphysical nature of these emissions is still an open problem. Recently, Wu et al. found that Alfvén waves (AWs) can significantly influence the basic physics of wave-particle interactions by modifying the resonant condition. Taking the effects of AWs into account, this work investigates electron cyclotron maser emission driven by power-law energetic electrons with a low-energy cutoff distribution, which are trapped in coronal loops by closed solar magnetic fields. The results show that the emission is dominated by the O mode. It is proposed that this O mode emission may possibly be responsible for solar type I radio storms.

  10. Magnetic cycles at different ages of stars

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oláh, K.; Kővári, Zs.; Petrovay, K.; Soon, W.; Baliunas, S.; Kolláth, Z.; Vida, K.

    2016-06-01

    Aims: We study the different patterns of interannual magnetic variability in stars on or near the lower main sequence, approximately solar-type (G-K dwarf) stars in time series of 36 yr from the Mount Wilson Observatory Ca ii H&K survey. Our main aim is to search for correlations between cycles, activity measures, and ages. Methods: Time-frequency analysis has been used to discern and reveal patterns and morphology of stellar activity cycles, including multiple and changing cycles, in the datasets. Both the results from short-term Fourier transform and its refinement using the Choi-Williams distribution, with better frequency resolution, are presented in this study. Rotational periods of the stars were derived using multifrequency Fourier analysis. Results: We found at least one activity cycle on 28 of the 29 stars we studied. Twelve stars, with longer rotational periods (39.7 ± 6.0 days), have simple smooth cycles, and the remaining stars, with much faster rotation (18.1 ± 12.2 days) on average, show complex and sometimes vigorously changing multiple cycles. The cycles are longer and quite uniform in the first group (9.7 ± 1.9 yr), while they are generally shorter and vary more strongly in the second group (7.6 ± 4.9). The clear age division between stars with smooth and complex cycles follows the known separation between the older and younger stars at around 2 to 3 Gyr of age.

  11. Dark Skies, Bright Kids! Year 3

    Science.gov (United States)

    Whelan, David G.; Johnson, K. E.; Barcos-Munoz, L. D.; Beaton, R. L.; Borish, J.; Corby, J. F.; Dorsey, G.; Gugliucci, N. E.; Prager, B. J.; Ries, P. A.; Romero, C. E.; Sokal, K. R.; Tang, X.; Walker, L. M.; Yang, A. J.; Zasowski, G.

    2012-01-01

    Dark Skies, Bright Kids! (DSBK) is a program that brings astronomy education to elementary schools throughout central Virginia. In a relaxed, out-of-classroom atmosphere, we are able to foster the innate curiosity that young students have about science and the world around them. We target schools that are under-served due to their rural locale or special needs students, demonstrating that science is a fun and creative process to a segment of the population that might not otherwise be exposed to astronomy. Families are included in the learning experience during semi-annual `star parties'. Since last January, we have expanded the breadth and depth of our educational capabilities. We have developed new programs for use in our digital planetarium. We held the first Central Virginia Star Party, providing an atmosphere where local children from multiple schools were able to share their love for astronomy. Local government and University officials were also invited so that they could experience our focused science outreach. Most recently, we have become part of Ivy Creek School's Club Day activities, bringing our program to a new segment of the elementary school system in Albemarle County: those that have `low-incidence' disabilities, requiring special attention. We continue to develop a curriculum for after-school programs that functions as either a series of one-time activities or several months of focused outreach at one school. Many of these activities are provided on our website, http://www.astro.virginia.edu/dsbk/, for the wider astronomical community, including the new planetarium work. We have extended our book project to include two bilingual astronomy books called `Snapshots of the Universe,' one in Spanish and English, the other in French and English. These books introduce young people to some of the many wonders of the Universe through art and captions developed by DSBK volunteers.

  12. Helmholtz bright and boundary solitons

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Christian, J M [Joule Physics Laboratory, School of Computing, Science and Engineering, Institute for Materials Research, University of Salford, Salford M5 4WT (United Kingdom); McDonald, G S [Joule Physics Laboratory, School of Computing, Science and Engineering, Institute for Materials Research, University of Salford, Salford M5 4WT (United Kingdom); Chamorro-Posada, P [Departmento de TeorIa de la Senal y Comunicaciones e IngenierIa Telematica, Universidad de Valladolid, ETSI Telecomunicacion, Campus Miguel Delibes s/n, 47011 Valladolid (Spain)

    2007-02-16

    We report, for the first time, exact analytical boundary solitons of a generalized cubic-quintic nonlinear Helmholtz (NLH) equation. These solutions have a linked-plateau topology that is distinct from conventional dark soliton solutions; their amplitude and intensity distributions are spatially delocalized and connect regions of finite and zero wave-field disturbances (suggesting also the classification as 'edge solitons'). Extensive numerical simulations compare the stability properties of recently derived Helmholtz bright solitons, for this type of polynomial nonlinearity, to those of the new boundary solitons. The latter are found to possess a remarkable stability characteristic, exhibiting robustness against perturbations that would otherwise lead to the destabilizing of their bright-soliton counterparts.

  13. Bright flares in supergiant fast X-ray transients

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shakura, N.; Postnov, K.; Sidoli, L.; Paizis, A.

    2014-08-01

    At steady low-luminosity states, supergiant fast X-ray transients (SFXTs) can be at the stage of quasi-spherical settling accretion on to slowly rotating magnetized neutron stars from the OB-companion winds. At this stage, a hot quasi-static shell is formed above the magnetosphere, the plasma entry rate into magnetosphere is controlled by (inefficient) radiative plasma cooling, and the accretion rate on to the neutron star is suppressed by a factor of ˜30 relative to the Bondi-Hoyle-Littleton value. Changes in the local wind velocity and density due to, e.g. clumps, can only slightly increase the mass accretion rate (a factor of ˜10) bringing the system into the Compton-cooling-dominated regime and led to the production of moderately bright flares (Lx ≲ 1036 erg s-1). To interpret the brightest flares (Lx > 1036 erg s-1) displayed by the SFXTs within the quasi-spherical settling accretion regimes, we propose that a larger increase in the mass accretion rate can be produced by sporadic capture of magnetized stellar wind plasma. At sufficiently low accretion rates, magnetic reconnection can enhance the magnetospheric plasma entry rate, resulting in copious production of X-ray photons, strong Compton cooling and ultimately in unstable accretion of the entire shell. A bright flare develops on the free-fall time-scale in the shell, and the typical energy released in an SFXT bright flare corresponds to the mass of the shell. This view is consistent with the energy released in SFXT bright flares (˜1038-1040 erg), their typical dynamic range (˜100) and with the observed dependence of these characteristics on the average unflaring X-ray luminosity of SFXTs. Thus, the flaring behaviour of SFXTs, as opposed to steady HMXBs, may be primarily related to their low X-ray luminosity allowing sporadic magnetic reconnection to occur during magnetized plasma entry into the magnetosphere.

  14. Evidence for four- and three-wave interactions in solar type III radio emissions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    G. Thejappa

    2013-08-01

    Full Text Available The high time resolution observations obtained by the STEREO/WAVES experiment show that in the source regions of solar type III radio bursts, Langmuir waves often occur as intense localized wave packets with short durations of only few ms. One of these wave packets shows that it is a three-dimensional field structure with WLneTe ~ 10−3, where WL is the peak energy density, and ne and Te are the electron density and temperature, respectively. For this wave packet, the conditions of the oscillating two-stream instability (OTSI and supersonic collapse are satisfied within the error range of determination of main parameters. The density cavity, observed during this wave packet indicates that its depth, width and temporal coincidence are consistent with those of a caviton, generated by the ponderomotive force of the collapsing wave packet. The spectrum of each of the parallel and perpendicular components of the wave packet contains a primary peak at fpe, two secondary peaks at fpe ± fS and a low-frequency enhancement below fS, which, as indicated by the frequency and wave number resonance conditions, and the fast Fourier transform (FFT-based tricoherence spectral peak at (fpe, fpe, fpe + fS, fpe − fS, are coupled to each other by the OTSI type of four-wave interaction (fpe is the local electron plasma frequency and fS is the frequency of ion sound waves. In addition to the primary peak at fpe, each of these spectra also contains a peak at 2fpe, which as indicated by the frequency and wave number resonance conditions, and the wavelet-based bicoherence spectral peak at (fpe, fpe, appears to correspond to the second harmonic electromagnetic waves generated as a result of coalescence of oppositely propagating sidebands excited by the OTSI. Thus, these observations for the first time provide combined evidence that (1 the OTSI and related strong turbulence processes play a significant role in the stabilization of the electron beam, (2 the coalescence

  15. GPM Intercalibrated Radiometer Brightness Temperatures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stocker, Erich Franz; Chou, Joyce

    2013-04-01

    One of the keys to consistent precipitation retrieval from passive microwave radiometer measurements (whether imagers or sounders) is accurate, long-term consistent brightness temperature retrievals. This becomes doubly important when there measurements are taken from radiometers on multiple platforms, from multiple agencies, with many different purposes. The Global Precipitation Measurement (GPM) mission addresses this issue directly with the production of intercalibrated brightness temperatures from all the partner satellites contributing to the GPM mission. These intercalibrated brightness temperatures are given the product designation: 1C within GPM. This paper will describe the GPM approach to intercalibration 1C products. The intercalibration and creation of the products uses a 5-step methodology: comparison of the partner standard products (either Tb or Ta) with the GPM reference standard; determination of adjustments that should be made to each product to create consistent brightness temperatures; re-orbitization of all orbits (in non-realtime) to be in the standard GPM south-south orbit; application of the adjustments to the partner provide 1B(or 1A) products; production of 1C products in HDF5 using a "standard" logical format for any radiometer regardless of its 1B format. This paper describes each of these steps and provides the background for them. It discusses in some detail the current 1C logical format and why this format facilitates use by downstream product algorithms and end-users. Most importantly it provides the analysis approach established by the GPM inter-calibration working group in establishing the adjustments to be made at the 1C level. Finally, using DMSP F16-18, it provides examples of the 1C products and discusses the adjustments that are made.

  16. Bright solitons from defocusing nonlinearities

    OpenAIRE

    Borovkova, Olga V.; Kartashov, Yaroslav; Torner Sabata, Lluís; Malomed, Boris A.

    2011-01-01

    We report that defocusing cubic media with spatially inhomogeneous nonlinearity, whose strength increases rapidly enough toward the periphery, can support stable bright localized modes. Such nonlinearity landscapes give rise to a variety of stable solitons in all three dimensions, including one-dimensional fundamental and multihump states, two-dimensional vortex solitons with arbitrarily high topological charges, and fundamental solitons in three dimensions. Solitons maintain their coherence ...

  17. Astrobiologically Interesting Stars within 10 parsecs of the Sun

    OpenAIRE

    de Mello, G. F. Porto; del Peloso, E. F.; Ghezzi, L.

    2005-01-01

    The existence of life based on carbon chemistry and water oceans relies upon planetary properties, chiefly climate stability, and stellar properties, such as mass, age, metallicity and Galactic orbits. The latter can be well constrained with present knowledge. We present a detailed, up-to-date compilation of the atmospheric parameters, chemical composition, multiplicity and degree of chromospheric activity for the astrobiologically interesting solar-type stars within 10 parsecs of the Sun. We...

  18. Evolution of Exoplanets and their Parent Stars

    CERN Document Server

    Guillot, Tristan; Morel, Pierre; Havel, Mathieu; Parmentier, Vivien

    2014-01-01

    Studying exoplanets with their parent stars is crucial to understand their population, formation and history. We review some of the key questions regarding their evolution with particular emphasis on giant gaseous exoplanets orbiting close to solar-type stars. For masses above that of Saturn, transiting exoplanets have large radii indicative of the presence of a massive hydrogen-helium envelope. Theoretical models show that this envelope progressively cools and contracts with a rate of energy loss inversely proportional to the planetary age. The combined measurement of planetary mass, radius and a constraint on the (stellar) age enables a global determination of the amount of heavy elements present in the planet interior. The comparison with stellar metallicity shows a correlation between the two, indicating that accretion played a crucial role in the formation of planets. The dynamical evolution of exoplanets also depends on the properties of the central star. We show that the lack of massive giant planets a...

  19. High brightness semiconductor lasers with reduced filamentation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    McInerney, John; O'Brien, Peter.; Skovgaard, Peter M. W.;

    1999-01-01

    High brightness semiconductor lasers have applications in spectroscopy, fiber lasers, manufacturing and materials processing, medicine and free space communication or energy transfer. The main difficulty associated with high brightness is that, because of COD, high power requires a large aperture...

  20. Time series analysis of bright galactic X-ray sources

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Priedhorsky, W. C.; Brandt, Søren; Lund, Niels

    1995-01-01

    We analyze 70 to 110 day data sets from eight bright galactic X-ray binaries observed by WATCH/Eureca, in search of periodic variations. We obtain new epochs for the orbital variation of Cyg X-3 and 4U 1700-37, and confirmation of a dip in Cyg X-1 at superior conjunction of the X-ray star. No evi...... evidence for variation at known and candidate periods is seen for Sco X-1, Cyg X-2, and GX 17+2. We set upper limits for variation at other frequencies in those three sources, GX 5-1, and GRS 1915+105....

  1. High-brightness rf linear accelerators

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jameson, R.A.

    1986-01-01

    The issue of high brightness and its ramifications in linacs driven by radio-frequency fields is discussed. A history of the RF linacs is reviewed briefly. Some current applications are then examined that are driving progress in RF linacs. The physics affecting the brightness of RF linacs is then discussed, followed by the economic feasibility of higher brightness machines. (LEW)

  2. Dark Stars: A Review

    CERN Document Server

    Freese, Katherine; Spolyar, Douglas; Valluri, Monica

    2015-01-01

    Dark Stars (DS) are stellar objects made (almost entirely) of ordinary atomic material but powered by the heat from Dark Matter (DM) annihilation (rather than by fusion). Weakly Interacting Massive Particles (WIMPs), among the best candidates for DM, can be their own antimatter and can accumulate inside the star, with their annihilation products thermalizing with and heating the DS. The resulting DSs are in hydrostatic and thermal equilibrium. The first phase of stellar evolution in the history of the Universe may have been dark stars. Though DM constituted only $10^6 M_\\odot$), very bright ($>10^9 L_\\odot$), and potentially detectable with the James Webb Space Telescope (JWST). Once the DM runs out and the dark star dies, it may collapse to a black hole; thus DSs can provide seeds for the supermassive black holes observed throughout the Universe and at early times. Other sites for dark star formation exist in the Universe today in regions of high dark matter density such as the centers of galaxies. The curre...

  3. The evolution of the stellar populations in low surface brightness galaxies

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van den Hoek, LB; de Blok, WJG; van der Hulst, JM; de Jong, T

    2000-01-01

    We investigate the star formation history and chemical evolution of low surface brightness (LSB) disk galaxies by modelling their observed spectro-photometric and chemical properties using a galactic chemical and photometric evolution model incorporating a detailed metallicity dependent set of stell

  4. The evolution of the stellar populations in low surface brightness galaxies

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Blok, W. J. G. de; Hulst, J. M. van der; Jong, T. de

    2000-01-01

    Abstract: We investigate the star formation history and chemical evolution of low surface brightness (LSB) disk galaxies by modelling their observed spectro-photometric and chemical properties using a galactic chemical and photometric evolution model incorporating a detailed metallicity depen dent s

  5. Seoul National University Bright Quasar Survey in Optical (SNUQSO) I: First Phase Observations and Results

    CERN Document Server

    Lee, Induk; Kim, Minjin; Kang, Eugene; Shim, Hyunjin; Richards, Gordon T; Edge, Alastair C; Lee, Myung Gyoon; Park, Changbom; Park, Myeong-Gu

    2008-01-01

    We present results from the first phase of the Seoul National University Bright Quasar Survey in Optical (SNUQSO) as well as its basic observational setup. Previous and current large-area surveys have been successful in identifying many quasars, but they could have missed bright quasars due to their survey design. In order to help complete the census of bright quasars, we have performed spectroscopic observations of new bright quasar candidates selected from various methods based on optical colors, near-infrared colors, radio, and X-ray data. In 2005/2006, we observed 55 bright quasar candidates using the Bohyunsan Optical Echelle Spectrograph (BOES) on the 1.8 m telescope at the Bohyunsan Optical Astronomy Observatory in Korea. We identify 14 quasars/Seyferts from our observation, including an optically bright quasar with i=14.98 mag at z=0.092 (SDSS J003236.59-091026.2). Non-quasar/Seyfert objects are found to be mostly stars, among which there are five M-type stars and one cataclysmic variable. Our result ...

  6. HETEROGENEITY in 12CO/13CO ABUNDANCE RATIOS TOWARD SOLAR-TYPE YOUNG STELLAR OBJECTS

    OpenAIRE

    Smith, RL; Pontoppidan, KM; Young, ED; Morris,, Andrew P

    2015-01-01

    © 2015. The American Astronomical Society. All rights reserved.. This study reports an unusual heterogeneity in [12C16O]/[13C16O] abundance ratios of carbon monoxide observed in the gas phase toward seven ∼solar-mass young stellar objects (YSOs) and three dense foreground clouds in the nearby star-forming regions, Ophiuchus, Corona Australis, Orion, and Vela, and an isolated core, L43. Robust isotope ratios were derived using infrared absorption spectroscopy of the 4.7 μm fundamental and 2.3 ...

  7. Heterogeneity in $^{12}$CO/$^{13}$CO Ratios Toward Solar-Type Young Stellar Objects

    OpenAIRE

    Smith, Rachel L.; Pontoppidan, Klaus M.; Young, Edward D.; Morris, Mark R.

    2015-01-01

    This study reports an unusual heterogeneity in [$^{12}$C$^{16}$O]/[$^{13}$C$^{16}$O] abundance ratios of carbon monoxide observed in the gas phase toward seven ~ solar-mass YSOs and three dense foreground clouds in the nearby star-forming regions, Ophiuchus, Corona Australis, Orion, Vela and an isolated core, L43. Robust isotope ratios were derived using infrared absorption spectroscopy of the 4.7 $\\mu$m fundamental and 2.3 $\\mu$m overtone rovibrational bands of CO at very high resolution ($\\...

  8. Do Baryons Alter the Halos of Low Surface Brightness Galaxies?

    CERN Document Server

    de Naray, Rachel Kuzio

    2011-01-01

    High-quality observations of dark matter-dominated low surface brightness (LSB) galaxies indicate that, in contrast to the triaxial, centrally-concentrated cuspy halos formed in collisionless simulations of halo assembly, these galaxies reside in round, roughly constant density cored halos. In order to reconcile these data with galaxy formation in the context of LCDM, processes that alter the shape and density structure of the inner halo are required. We compile observational properties of LSB galaxies to evaluate the plausibility that a previously higher baryonic mass content and feedback from star formation can modify the dark matter halos of these galaxies. We also compare the properties of bulgeless disk galaxies formed in recent simulations to the LSB galaxy sample. We find that observational constraints on LSB galaxy star formation histories, structure, and kinematics make it difficult for baryonic physics to sphericalize and decrease the central density of the dark matter halos of LSB galaxies.

  9. Superflare G and K Stars and the Lithium abundance

    CERN Document Server

    Katsova, M M; Mishenina, T V; Nizamov, B A

    2016-01-01

    We analyzed here the connection of superflares and the lithium abundance in G and K stars based on Li abundance determinations conducted with the echelle spectra of a full set of 280 stars obtained with the ELODIE spectrograph. For high-active stars we show a definite correlation between $\\log A(Li)$ and the chromosphere activity. We show that sets of stars with high Li abundance and having superflares possess common properties. It relates, firstly, to stars with activity saturation. We consider the X-ray data for G, K, and M stars separately, and show that transition from a saturation mode to solar-type activity takes place at values of rotation periods 1.1, 3.3, and 7.2 days for G2, K4 and M3 spectral types, respectively. We discuss bimodal distribution of a number of G and K main-sequence stars versus an axial rotation and location of superflare stars with respect to other Kepler stars. We conclude that superflare G and K stars are mainly fast rotating young objects, but some of them belong to stars with s...

  10. High-brightness electron injectors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Free-electron laser (FEL) oscillators and synchrotron light sources require pulse trains of high peak brightness and, in some applications, high-average power. Recent developments in the technology of photoemissive and thermionic electron sources in rf cavities for electron-linac injector applications offer promising advances over conventional electron injectors. Reduced emittance growth in high peak-current electron injectors may be achieved by using high field strengths and by linearizing the radial component of the cavity electric field at the expense of lower shunt impedance

  11. High brightness beams and applications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This paper describes the present research on attaining intense bright electron beams. Thermionic systems are briefly covered. Recent and past results from the photoinjector programs are given. The performance advantages and difficulties presently faced by researchers using photoinjectors is discussed. The progress that has been made in photocathode materials, both in lifetime and quantum efficiency, is covered. Finally, a discussion of emittance measurements of photoinjector systems and how the measurement is complicated by the non-thermal nature of the electron beam is presented

  12. CN and CH Bandstrengths in Bright Globular Cluster Red Giants

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martell, Sarah L.; Smith, G. H.

    2006-12-01

    We present preliminary results from a survey of CN and CH bandstrengths in bright red giant stars (MV -1.5) in Galactic globular clusters. Our cluster sample spans a wide metallicity range, from M92 ([Fe/H]=-2.28) to M71 ([Fe/H]=-0.73). The data were all taken using the Shane 120-inch telescope and the Kast spectrograph at Lick Observatory; the homogeneity of the sample makes it ideal for a comparative study of carbon depletion (and therefore deep mixing rate) as a function of stellar metallicity. Thus far we have measured molecular bandstrength indices for CH and CN, as well as indices for Ca and Mg lines; the task of converting the index measurements to carbon and nitrogen abundances will require comparisons with synthetic spectra. The molecular CN index behaves as expected from a study of the literature: within individual clusters, it varies significantly from star to star. The data also allow us to examine the dependence of the Ca and Mg indices on cluster metallicity at a given MV. The index MHK shows clear sensitivity to [Fe/H] across the full metallicity range of our sample. A similar study is also in progress involving analogous stars in the open clusters NGC 188, NGC 2158, NGC 6791, and NGC 7789 (-0.3 < [Fe/H] < +0.3).

  13. Stars and Star Myths.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eason, Oliver

    Myths and tales from around the world about constellations and facts about stars in the constellations are presented. Most of the stories are from Greek and Roman mythology; however, a few Chinese, Japanese, Polynesian, Arabian, Jewish, and American Indian tales are also included. Following an introduction, myths are presented for the following 32…

  14. The Bright New Financial System

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Associate Professor Adela Coman

    2009-05-01

    Full Text Available By the end of 2008, Mr. Paul Volcker gave financiers a devastating critique. “For all its talented participants, for all its rich rewards” he said, the “bright new financial system” has “failed the test of the marketplace”.In light of the events of recent weeks, it is hard to disagree. A financial system that ends up with the government taking over some of its biggest institutions in serial weekend rescues and which requires the promise of 700 billion dollars in public money to stave off catastrophe is not a trustworthy system. The disappearance of all five big American investment banks – either by bankruptcy or rebirth as commercial banks – is powerful evidence that Wall Street failed “the test of the marketplace”. Something went wrong.But what exactly and why? A more serious analysis needs to distinguish between three separate questions: what is Mr. Volcker’s “bright new financial system”? Second, how far was today’s mess created by instabilities that are inseparable from modern finance and how far was it fuelled by other errors and distortions? Third, to the extent that modern finance does bear the blame, what is the balance between its costs and its benefits and how can it be improved?

  15. Star Product and Star Exponential

    OpenAIRE

    Tomihisa, Toshio; Yoshioka, Akira

    2010-01-01

    Here we extend the star products by means of complex symmetric matrices. In this way we obtain a family of star products. Next we consider the star exponentials with respect to these star products, and finally we obtain several interesting identities.

  16. Discovery of a very weak magnetic field on the Am star Alhena

    OpenAIRE

    Blazère, Aurore; Neiner, Coralie; Petit, Pascal

    2016-01-01

    Alhena ($\\gamma$ Gem) was observed in the frame of the BRITE (BRIght Target Explorer) spectropolarimetric survey, which gathers high resolution, high signal-to-noise, high sensitivity, spectropolarimetric observations of all stars brighter than V=4 to combine seismic and spectropolarimetric studies of bright stars. We present here the discovery of a very weak magnetic field \\textbf{on} the Am star Alhena, thanks to very high signal-to-noise spectropolarimetric data obtained with Narval at T\\'...

  17. α Centauri A in the far infrared. First measurement of the temperature minimum of a star other than the Sun

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liseau, R.; Montesinos, B.; Olofsson, G.; Bryden, G.; Marshall, J. P.; Ardila, D.; Bayo Aran, A.; Danchi, W. C.; del Burgo, C.; Eiroa, C.; Ertel, S.; Fridlund, M. C. W.; Krivov, A. V.; Pilbratt, G. L.; Roberge, A.; Thébault, P.; Wiegert, J.; White, G. J.

    2013-01-01

    Context. Chromospheres and coronae are common phenomena on solar-type stars. Understanding the energy transfer to these heated atmospheric layers requires direct access to the relevant empirical data. Study of these structures has, by and large, been limited to the Sun thus far. Aims: The region of the temperature reversal can be directly observed only in the far infrared and submillimetre spectral regime. We aim at determining the characteristics of the atmosphere in the region of the temperature minimum of the solar sister star α Cen A. As a bonus this will also provide a detailed mapping of the spectral energy distribution, i.e. knowledge that is crucial when searching for faint, Kuiper belt-like dust emission around other stars. Methods: For the nearby binary system α Cen, stellar parameters are known with high accuracy from measurements. For the basic model parameters Teff, log g and [Fe/H], we interpolate stellar model atmospheres in the grid of Gaia/PHOENIX and compute the corresponding model for the G2 V star α Cen A. Comparison with photometric measurements shows excellent agreement between observed photospheric data in the optical and infrared. For longer wavelengths, the modelled spectral energy distribution is compared to Spitzer-MIPS, Herschel-PACS, Herschel-SPIRE, and APEX-LABOCA photometry. A specifically tailored Uppsala model based on the MARCS code and extending further in wavelength is used to gauge the emission characteristics of α Cen A in the far infared. Results: Similar to the Sun, the far infrared (FIR) emission of α Cen A originates in the minimum temperature region above the stellar photosphere in the visible. However, in comparison with the solar case, the FIR photosphere of α Cen A appears marginally cooler, Tmin ~ T160 μm = 3920 ± 375 K. Beyond the minimum near 160 μm, the brightness temperatures increase, and this radiation very likely originates in warmer regions of the chromosphere of α Cen A. Conclusions: To the best of

  18. Dark Skies, Bright Kids! Year 4

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sokal, Kimberly R.; Johnson, K. E.; Barcos-Munoz, L. D.; Beaton, R.; Borish, J.; Crawford, S. B.; Corby, J.; Damke, G.; Dean, J.; Dorsey, G.; Jackson, L.; Liss, S.; Oza, A.; Peacock, S.; Prager, B.; Romero, C.; Sivakoff, G. R.; Walker, L.; Whelan, D. G.; Zucker, C.

    2013-01-01

    Aiming to engage young children's natural excitement and curiosity, the outreach group Dark Skies, Bright Kids (DSBK) brings a hands-on approach to astronomy to elementary schools in Virginia. We hope to enhance children's view and understanding of science while exploring the Universe using fun activities. DSBK focuses on rural and underserved schools in Albemarle County and offers a semester-long astronomy club for third through fifth grade students. We believe regular interactions foster personal relationships between students and volunteers that encourage a life-long interest in science. In our fourth year of hosting clubs, we returned to Ivy Creek Elementary School, where we saw wonderful responses from a special group of students with `low-incidence' disabilities. DSBK has grown to realize a broader reach beyond local astronomy clubs; we hope to ignite a spark of interest in astronomy and science more widely- in more children, their families, and their teachers. We also hosted the Second Annual Central Virginia Star Party with an open invitation to the community to encourage families to enjoy astronomy together. Throughout the year, DSBK now holds 'one-off' programs (akin to astronomy field days) for elementary schools and children's groups throughout Virginia. Furthermore, we are in the final stages of a project to create two bilingual astronomy books called "Snapshots of the Universe", in Spanish and French with English translations. This art book will be made available online and we are working to get a copy in every elementary school in the state. DSBK has begun to reach out to elementary school teachers in order to provide them with useful and engaging classroom material. We have adapted our volunteer-created activities into useful and ready-to-use lessons, available online. After improvements based on research through interactions and feedback from teachers, we have explicitly identified the learning goals in terms of Virginia's Standards of Learning

  19. Advanced Spectral Library (ASTRAL): Cool stars edition

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ayres, T. R.

    2013-02-01

    ASTRAL is a project to create high-resolution, high-S/N UV (1150-3200 Å) atlases of bright stars utilizing {HST}/STIS. During Cycle 18 (2010-2011), eight cool star targets were observed, including key objects like Procyon and Betelgeuse, churning through 146 orbits in the process. The new spectral atlases are publically available through the project website. Data were obtained with the Hubble Space Telescope.

  20. Detection of a weak surface magnetic field on Sirius A: are all tepid stars magnetic ?

    OpenAIRE

    Petit, P.; Lignières, F.; Aurière, M.; Wade, G. A.; Alina, D.; Ballot, J.; Böhm, T.; Jouve, L.; Oza, A.; Paletou, F; Théado, S.

    2011-01-01

    We aim at a highly sensitive search for weak magnetic fields in main sequence stars of intermediate mass, by scanning classes of stars with no previously reported magnetic members. After detecting a weak magnetic field on the normal, rapidly rotating A-type star Vega, we concentrate here on the bright star Sirius A, taken as a prototypical, chemically peculiar, moderately rotating Am star. We employed the NARVAL and ESPaDOnS high-resolution spectropolarimeters to collect 442 circularly polari...

  1. [Bright light therapy for elderly].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Okawa, Masako

    2015-06-01

    Bright light therapy (BLT) holds considerable promise for sleep problems in the elderly. BLT for community-dwelling patients with Alzheimer's disease showed significant improvement in sleep parameters. In the institutional setting, BLT was effective in reducing daytime nap duration. Morning BLT was found to advance the peak circadian rhythm and increase activity level in daytime and melatonin level at night. Light therapy could be used in combination with other nonpharmacological methods such as social activities, outside walking, physical exercises, which showed greater effects than independent BLT on sleep and cognitive function. BLT treatment strategy was proposed in the present paper. We should pay more attentions to BLT in community setting for mental and physical well-being. PMID:26065132

  2. A Solar-type Stellar Companion to a Deep Contact Binary in a Quadruple System

    CERN Document Server

    Zhou, X; Zhang, J; Jiang, L -Q; Zhang, B; Kreiner, J

    2016-01-01

    The four-color ($B$ $V$ $R_c$ $I_c$) light curves of V776 Cas are presented and analyzed using the Wilson-Devinney (W-D) method. It is discovered that V776 Cas is an early F-type (F2V) overcontact binary with a very high contact degree ($ f=64.6\\,\\%$) and an extremely low mass ratio ($q=0.130$), which indicate that it is at the final evolutionary stage of cool short-period binaries. The mass of the primary and secondary stars are calculated to be $M_1 = 1.55(\\pm0.04)M_\\odot$, $M_2 = 0.20(\\pm0.01)M_\\odot$. V776 Cas is supposed to be formed from an initially detached binary system via the loss of angular momentum due to the magnetic wind. The initial mass of the present primary and secondary components are calculated to be $M_{1i} = 0.86(\\pm0.10)M_\\odot$ and $M_{2i} = 2.13(\\pm0.04)M_\\odot$. The observed-calculated ($O$-$C$) curve exhibits a cyclic period variation, which is due to the light-travel time effect (LTTE) caused by the presence of a third component with a period of 23.7 years. The mass of the third c...

  3. Quantum communication with macroscopically bright nonclassical states.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Usenko, Vladyslav C; Ruppert, Laszlo; Filip, Radim

    2015-11-30

    We analyze homodyne detection of macroscopically bright multimode nonclassical states of light and propose their application in quantum communication. We observe that the homodyne detection is sensitive to a mode-matching of the bright light to the highly intense local oscillator. Unmatched bright modes of light result in additional noise which technically limits detection of Gaussian entanglement at macroscopic level. When the mode-matching is sufficient, we show that multimode quantum key distribution with bright beams is feasible. It finally merges the quantum communication with classical optical technology of visible beams of light. PMID:26698776

  4. Wave Star

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kramer, Morten; Brorsen, Michael; Frigaard, Peter

    Denne rapport beskriver numeriske beregninger af forskellige flydergeometrier for bølgeenergianlæget Wave Star.......Denne rapport beskriver numeriske beregninger af forskellige flydergeometrier for bølgeenergianlæget Wave Star....

  5. A Solar-type Stellar Companion to a Deep Contact Binary in a Quadruple System

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, X.; Qian, S.-B.; Zhang, J.; Jiang, L.-Q.; Zhang, B.; Kreiner, J.

    2016-02-01

    The four-color (B, V, Rc, Ic) light curves of V776 Cas are presented and analyzed using the Wilson-Devinney method. It is discovered that V776 Cas is an early F-type (F2V) overcontact binary with a very high contact degree (f = 64.6%) and an extremely low-mass ratio (q = 0.130), which indicate that it is at the final evolutionary stage of cool short-period binaries. The mass of the primary and secondary stars are calculated to be M1 = 1.55(±0.04) M⊙, M2 = 0.20(±0.01) M⊙. V776 Cas is supposed to be formed from an initially detached binary system via the loss of angular momentum due to the magnetic wind. The initial masses of the present primary and secondary components are calculated to be M1i = 0.86(±0.10) M⊙ and M2i = 2.13(±0.04) M⊙. The observed-calculated curve exhibits a cyclic period variation, which is due to the light-travel time effect caused by the presence of a third component with a period of 23.7 years. The mass of the third component is estimated to be M3 = 1.04(±0.03) M⊙ and the orbital inclination of the third component is calculated to be i‧ = 33.°1. The distance of the binary system to the mass center of the triple system is calculated to be {a}12\\prime = 3.45 AU. The presence of the close-in tertiary component may play an important role in the formation and evolution of this binary system by drawing angular momentum from the central system.

  6. Massive Stars

    Science.gov (United States)

    Livio, Mario; Villaver, Eva

    2009-11-01

    Participants; Preface Mario Livio and Eva Villaver; 1. High-mass star formation by gravitational collapse of massive cores M. R. Krumholz; 2. Observations of massive star formation N. A. Patel; 3. Massive star formation in the Galactic center D. F. Figer; 4. An X-ray tour of massive star-forming regions with Chandra L. K. Townsley; 5. Massive stars: feedback effects in the local universe M. S. Oey and C. J. Clarke; 6. The initial mass function in clusters B. G. Elmegreen; 7. Massive stars and star clusters in the Antennae galaxies B. C. Whitmore; 8. On the binarity of Eta Carinae T. R. Gull; 9. Parameters and winds of hot massive stars R. P. Kudritzki and M. A. Urbaneja; 10. Unraveling the Galaxy to find the first stars J. Tumlinson; 11. Optically observable zero-age main-sequence O stars N. R. Walborn; 12. Metallicity-dependent Wolf-Raynet winds P. A. Crowther; 13. Eruptive mass loss in very massive stars and Population III stars N. Smith; 14. From progenitor to afterlife R. A. Chevalier; 15. Pair-production supernovae: theory and observation E. Scannapieco; 16. Cosmic infrared background and Population III: an overview A. Kashlinsky.

  7. XMM-Newton detects X-ray 'solar cycle' in distant star

    Science.gov (United States)

    2004-05-01

    other stars as well. A team of astronomers, led by Fabio Favata, from ESA's European Space Research and Technology Centre, The Netherlands, has monitored a small number of solar-type stars since the beginning of the XMM-Newton mission in 2000. The X-ray brightness of HD 81809, a star located 90 light years away in the constellation Hydra (the water snake), has varied by more than 10 times over the past two and a half years, reaching a well defined peak in mid 2002. The star has shown the characteristic X-ray modulation (brightening and dimming) typical of the solar cycle. "This is the first clear sign of a cyclic pattern in the X-ray emission of stars other than the Sun," said Favata. Furthermore, the data show that these variations are synchronised with the starspot cycle. If HD 81809 behaves like the Sun, its X-ray brightness can vary by a factor of one hundred over a few years. "We might well have caught HD 81809 at the beginning of an X-ray activity cycle," added Favata. The existence of starspot cycles on other stars had already been established long ago, thanks to observations that began in the 1950s. However, scientists did not know whether the X-ray radiation would also vary with the number of starspots. ESA's XMM-Newton has now shown that this is indeed the case and that this cyclic X-ray pattern is not typical of the Sun alone. "This suggests that our Sun's behaviour is probably nothing exceptional," said Favata. Besides its interest for scientists, the Sun's cyclical behaviour can have an influence on everyone on Earth. Our climate is known to be significantly affected by the high-energy radiation emitted by the Sun. For instance, a temporary disappearance of the solar cycle in the 18th century corresponded with an exceptionally cold period on Earth. Similarly, in the early phases of the lifetime of a planet, this high-energy radiation has a strong influence on the conditions of the atmosphere, and thus potentially on the development of life. Finding out

  8. Predicted Space Motions for Hypervelocity and Runaway Stars: Proper Motions and Radial Velocities for the GAIA Era

    CERN Document Server

    Kenyon, Scott J; Brown, Warren R; Geller, Margaret J

    2014-01-01

    We predict the distinctive three dimensional space motions of hypervelocity stars (HVSs) and runaway stars moving in a realistic Galactic potential. For nearby stars with distances less than 10~kpc, unbound stars are rare; however, proper motions isolate bound HVSs and runaways from indigenous halo stars. Towards the Galactic Center, high proper motion stars are a unique signature of HVSs or runaways. At larger distances of 20-100 kpc, unbound HVSs are much more common than runaways; radial velocities easily distinguish both from indigenous halo stars. Comparisons of the predictions with existing observations are encouraging. Although the models fail to match observations of solar-type HVS candidates from SEGUE, they agree well with data for B-type HVS and runaways from other surveys. Complete samples of g <= 20 stars with GAIA should provide clear tests of formation models for HVSs and runaways and will enable accurate probes of the shape of the Galactic potential.

  9. Completing the census of young stars near the Sun with the FunnelWeb spectroscopic survey

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lawson, Warrick; Murphy, Simon; Tinney, Christopher G.; Ireland, Michael; Bessell, Michael S.

    2016-06-01

    From late 2016, the Australian FunnelWeb survey will obtain medium-resolution (R~2000) spectra covering the full optical range for 2 million of the brightest stars (Ienvironments of young solar-type stars, how such stars move from their stellar nurseries to their adult lives in the field, and identifying thousands of high-priority targets for follow-up direct imaging (GPI, SPHERE), transit (including TESS) and radial velocity exoplanet studies. In this poster contribution we introduce the FunnelWeb survey, its science goals and input catalogue, as well as provide an update on the status of the fibre positioner and spectrograph commissioning at Siding Spring.

  10. GMRT HI study of giant low surface brightness galaxies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mishra, Alka; Kantharia, N. G.; Das, M.; Omar, A.; Srivastava, D. C.

    2016-10-01

    We present HI observations of four giant low surface brightness (GLSB) galaxies UGC 1378, UGC 1922, UGC 4422 and UM 163 using the Giant Meterwave Radio Telescope (GMRT). We include HI results on UGC 2936, UGC 6614 and Malin 2 from literature. HI is detected from all the galaxies and the extent is roughly twice the optical size; in UM 163, HI is detected along a broken disk encircling the optical galaxy. We combine our results with those in literature to further understand these systems. The main results are the following: (1) The peak HI surface densities in GLSB galaxies are several times 1021 cm-2. The HI mass is between 0.3 - 4 × 1010 M⊙, dynamical mass ranges from a few times 1011 M⊙ to a few times 1012 M⊙. (2) The rotation curves of GLSB galaxies are flat to the outermost measured point with rotation velocities of the seven GLSB galaxies being between 225 and 432 km s-1. (3) Recent star formation traced by near-ultraviolet emission in five GLSB galaxies in our sample appears to be located in rings around the galaxy centre. We suggest that this could be due to a stochastic burst of star formation at one location in the galaxy being propagated along a ring over a rotation period. (4) The HI is correlated with recent star formation in five of the seven GLSB galaxies.

  11. Variable stars magnitudes estimations exploiting the eye physiology

    CERN Document Server

    Sigismondi, Costantino

    2011-01-01

    The physiology of the dark adaption process of the eye is revisited from an astronomical point of view. A new method for the magnitude estimation of a star is presented. It is based upon the timing of the physiological cycle of the rhodopsin during the eye dark adaption process. The limits of the application of the method are discussed. This method is suitable for bright stars as Betelgeuse, Antares or Delta Scorpii or stars at the limiting magnitude observed with a telescope.

  12. Visual Distortions Near a Neutron Star and Black Hole

    OpenAIRE

    Nemiroff, Robert J.

    1993-01-01

    The visual distortion effects visible to an observer traveling around and descending to the surface of an extremely compact star are described. Specifically, trips to a ``normal" neutron star, a black hole, and an ultracompact neutron star with extremely high surface gravity, are described. Concepts such as multiple imaging, red- and blue-shifting, conservation of surface brightness, the photon sphere, and the existence of multiple Einstein rings are discussed in terms of what the viewer woul...

  13. Carbon Stars in the Satellites and Halo of M31

    OpenAIRE

    Hamren, Katherine; Beaton, Rachael L.; Guhathakurta, Puragra; Gilbert, Karoline M.; Tollerud, Erik J.; Boyer, Martha L.; Constance M. Rockosi; Smith, Graeme H.; Majewski, Steven R.; Howley, Kirsten

    2016-01-01

    We spectroscopically identify a sample of carbon stars in the satellites and halo of M31 using moderate-resolution optical spectroscopy from the Spectroscopic and Photometric Landscape of Andromeda's Stellar Halo survey. We present the photometric properties of our sample of 41 stars, including their brightness with respect to the tip of the red giant branch (TRGB) and their distributions in various color-color spaces. This analysis reveals a bluer population of carbon stars fainter than the ...

  14. The star formation efficiency in Stephan's Quintet intragroup regions

    CERN Document Server

    Natale, G; Xu, C K; Popescu, C C; Fischera, J; Lisenfeld, U; Lu, N; Appleton, P; Dopita, M; Duc, P -A; Gao, Y; Reach, W; Sulentic, J; Yun, M

    2012-01-01

    We investigated the star formation efficiency for all the dust emitting sources in Stephan's Quintet (SQ). We inferred star formation rates using Spitzer MIR/FIR and GALEX FUV data and combined them with gas column density measurements by various authors, in order to position each source in a Kennicutt-Schmidt diagram. Our results show that the bright IGM star formation regions in SQ present star formation efficiencies consistent with those observed within local galaxies. On the other hand, star formation in the intergalactic shock region seems to be rather inhibited.

  15. Pulsating Star Mystery Solved

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-11-01

    evolution of stars. This embarrassing discrepancy has been known since the 1960s. To resolve this mystery, astronomers needed to find a double star containing a Cepheid where the orbit happened to be seen edge-on from Earth. In these cases, known as eclipsing binaries, the brightness of the two stars dims as one component passes in front of the other, and again when it passes behind the other star. In such pairs astronomers can determine the masses of the stars to high accuracy [3]. Unfortunately neither Cepheids nor eclipsing binaries are common, so the chance of finding such an unusual pair seemed very low. None are known in the Milky Way. Wolfgang Gieren, another member of the team, takes up the story: "Very recently we actually found the double star system we had hoped for among the stars of the Large Magellanic Cloud. It contains a Cepheid variable star pulsating every 3.8 days. The other star is slightly bigger and cooler, and the two stars orbit each other in 310 days. The true binary nature of the object was immediately confirmed when we observed it with the HARPS spectrograph on La Silla." The observers carefully measured the brightness variations of this rare object, known as OGLE-LMC-CEP0227 [4], as the two stars orbited and passed in front of one another. They also used HARPS and other spectrographs to measure the motions of the stars towards and away from the Earth - both the orbital motion of both stars and the in-and-out motion of the surface of the Cepheid as it swelled and contracted. This very complete and detailed data allowed the observers to determine the orbital motion, sizes and masses of the two stars with very high accuracy - far surpassing what had been done before for a Cepheid. The mass of the Cepheid is now known to about 1% and agrees exactly with predictions from the theory of stellar pulsation. However, the larger mass predicted by stellar evolution theory was shown to be significantly in error. The much-improved mass estimate is only one

  16. Soliton fay identities: II. Bright soliton case

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We present a set of bilinear matrix identities that generalize the ones that have been used to construct the bright soliton solutions for various models. As an example of an application of these identities, we present a simple derivation of the N-bright soliton solutions for the Ablowitz–Ladik hierarchy. (paper)

  17. Spatial Brightness Perception of Trichromatic Stimuli

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Royer, Michael P.; Houser, Kevin W.

    2012-11-16

    An experiment was conducted to examine the effect of tuning optical radiation on brightness perception for younger (18-25 years of age) and older (50 years of age or older) observers. Participants made forced-choice evaluations of the brightness of a full factorial of stimulus pairs selected from two groups of four metameric stimuli. The large-field stimuli were created by systematically varying either the red or the blue primary of an RGB LED mixture. The results indicate that light stimuli of equal illuminance and chromaticity do not appear equally bright to either younger or older subjects. The rank-order of brightness is not predicted by any current model of human vision or theory of brightness perception including Scotopic to Photopic or Cirtopic to Photopic ratio theory, prime color theory, correlated color temperature, V(λ)-based photometry, color quality metrics, linear brightness models, or color appearance models. Age may affect brightness perception when short-wavelength primaries are used, especially those with a peak wavelength shorter than 450 nm. The results suggest further development of metrics to predict brightness perception is warranted, and that including age as a variable in predictive models may be valuable.

  18. SURFACE PHOTOMETRY OF LOW SURFACE BRIGHTNESS GALAXIES

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    DEBLOK, WJG; VANDERHULST, JM; BOTHUN, GD

    1995-01-01

    Low surface brightness (LSB) galaxies are galaxies dominated by an exponential disc whose central surface brightness is much fainter than the value of mu(B)(0) = 21.65 +/- 0.30 mag arcsec(-2) found by Freeman. In this paper we present broadband photometry of a sample of 21 late-type LSB galaxies. Th

  19. Brightness and darkness as perceptual dimensions

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Vladusich, T.; Lucassen, M.P.; Cornelissen, F.W.

    2007-01-01

    A common-sense assumption concerning visual perception states that brightness and darkness cannot coexist at a given spatial location. One corollary of this assumption is that achromatic colors, or perceived grey shades, are contained in a one-dimensional (1-D) space varying from bright to dark. The

  20. Incoherently coupled dark-bright photorefractive solitons

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Zhigang; Segev, Mordechai; Coskun, Tamer H.; Christodoulides, Demetrios N.; Kivshar, Yuri S.; Afanasjev, Vsevolod V.

    1996-11-01

    We report the observation of incoherently coupled dark-bright spatial soliton pairs in a biased bulk photorefractive crystal. When such a pair is decoupled, the dark component evolves into a triplet structure, whereas the bright one decays into a self-defocusing beam.

  1. A solar type II radio burst from coronal mass ejection-coronal ray interaction: Simultaneous radio and extreme ultraviolet imaging

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Simultaneous radio and extreme ultraviolet (EUV)/white-light imaging data are examined for a solar type II radio burst occurring on 2010 March 18 to deduce its source location. Using a bow-shock model, we reconstruct the three-dimensional EUV wave front (presumably the type-II-emitting shock) based on the imaging data of the two Solar TErrestrial RElations Observatory spacecraft. It is then combined with the Nançay radio imaging data to infer the three-dimensional position of the type II source. It is found that the type II source coincides with the interface between the coronal mass ejection (CME) EUV wave front and a nearby coronal ray structure, providing evidence that the type II emission is physically related to the CME-ray interaction. This result, consistent with those of previous studies, is based on simultaneous radio and EUV imaging data for the first time.

  2. Brightness Alteration with Interweaving Contours

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sergio Roncato

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available Chromatic induction is observed whenever the perceived colour of a target surface shifts towards the hue of a neighbouring surface. Some vivid manifestations may be seen in a white background where thin coloured lines have been drawn (assimilation or when lines of different colours are collinear (neon effect or adjacent (watercolour to each other. This study examines a particular colour induction that manifests in concomitance with an opposite effect of colour saturation (or anti-spread. The two phenomena can be observed when a repetitive pattern is drawn in which outline thin contours intercept wider contours or surfaces, colour spreading appear to fill the surface occupied by surfaces or thick lines whereas the background traversed by thin lines is seen as brighter or filled of a saturated white. These phenomena were first observed by Bozzi (1975 and Kanizsa (1979 in figural conditions that did not allow them to document their conjunction. Here we illustrate various manifestations of this twofold phenomenon and compare its effects with the known effects of brightness and colour induction. Some conjectures on the nature of these effects are discussed.

  3. Hadron star models. [neutron stars

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cohen, J. M.; Boerner, G.

    1974-01-01

    The properties of fully relativistic rotating hadron star models are discussed using models based on recently developed equations of state. All of these stable neutron star models are bound with binding energies as high as about 25%. During hadron star formation, much of this energy will be released. The consequences, resulting from the release of this energy, are examined.

  4. CNO behaviour in planet-harbouring stars. I. Nitrogen abundances in stars with planets

    Science.gov (United States)

    Suárez-Andrés, L.; Israelian, G.; González Hernández, J. I.; Adibekyan, V. Zh.; Delgado Mena, E.; Santos, N. C.; Sousa, S. G.

    2016-06-01

    Context. Carbon, nitrogen, and oxygen (CNO) are key elements in stellar formation and evolution, and their abundances should also have a significant impact on planetary formation and evolution. Aims: We present a detailed spectroscopic analysis of 74 solar-type stars, 42 of which are known to harbour planets. We determine the nitrogen abundances of these stars and investigate a possible connection between N and the presence of planetary companions. Methods: We used VLT/UVES to obtain high-resolution near-UV spectra of our targets. Spectral synthesis of the NH band at 3360 Å was performed with the spectral synthesis codes MOOG and FITTING. Results: We identify several spectral windows from which accurate N abundance can be obtained. Nitrogen distributions for stars with and without planets show that planet hosts are nitrogen-rich when compared to single stars. However, given the linear trend between [N/Fe] vs. [Fe/H], this fact can be explained as being due to the metal-rich nature of planet hosts. Conclusions: We conclude that reliable N abundances can be derived for metal-rich solar type stars from the near UV molecular band at 3360 Å. We confirm a linear trend between [N/Fe] and metallicity expected from standard models of Galactic chemical evolution. Based on observations collected with the UVES spectrograph at the 8-m Very Large Telescope (VLT) - program IDs: 074.C-0134(A), 075.D-0453(A), 086.D-0082(A), 093.D-0328(A), installed at the Cerro Paranal Observatory.

  5. Olivier Chesneau's work on massive stars

    CERN Document Server

    Millour, Florentin

    2016-01-01

    Olivier Chesneau challenged several fields of observational stellar astrophysics with bright ideas and an impressive amount of work to make them real in the span of his career, from his first paper on P Cygni in 2000, up to his last one on V838 Mon in 2014. He was using all the so-called high-angular resolution techniques since it helped his science to be made, namely study in details the inner structure of the environments around stars, be it small mass (AGBs), more massive (supergiant stars), or explosives (Novae). I will focus here on his work on massive stars.

  6. Five Planets Transiting a Ninth Magnitude Star

    OpenAIRE

    Vanderburg, Andrew; Becker, Juliette C.; Kristiansen, Martti H.; Bieryla, Allyson; Duev, Dmitry A.; Jensen-Clem, Rebecca; Morton, Timothy D.; Latham, David W.; Adams, Fred C.; Baranec, Christoph; Berlind, Perry; Calkins, Michael L.; Esquerdo, Gilbert A.; Kulkarni, Shrinivas; Law, Nicholas M.

    2016-01-01

    The Kepler mission has revealed a great diversity of planetary systems and architectures, but most of the planets discovered by Kepler orbit faint stars. Using new data from the K2 mission, we present the discovery of a five planet system transiting a bright (V = 8.9, K = 7.7) star called HIP 41378. HIP 41378 is a slightly metal-poor late F-type star with moderate rotation (v sin(i) = 7 km/s) and lies at a distance of 116 +/- 18 from Earth. We find that HIP 41378 hosts two sub-Neptune sized p...

  7. Olivier Chesneau's Work on Massive Stars

    Science.gov (United States)

    Millour, F.

    2015-12-01

    Olivier Chesneau challenged several fields of observational stellar astrophysics with bright ideas and an impressive amount of work to make them real in the span of his career, from his first paper on P Cygni in 2000, up to his last one on V838 Mon in 2014. He was using all the so-called high-angular resolution techniques since it helped his science to be made, namely study in details the inner structure of the environments around stars, be it small mass (AGBs), more massive (supergiant stars), or explosives (Novae). I will focus here on his work on massive stars.

  8. Five Planets Transiting a Ninth Magnitude Star

    OpenAIRE

    Vanderburg, Andrew; Becker, Juliette C.; Kristiansen, Martti H.; Bieryla, Allyson; Duev, Dmitry A.; Jensen-Clem, Rebecca; Morton, Timothy D.; Latham, David W.; Adams, Fred C.; Baranec, Christoph; Berlind, Perry; Calkins, Michael L.; Esquerdo, Gilbert A.; Kulkarni, Shrinivas; Law, Nicholas M.

    2016-01-01

    The Kepler mission has revealed a great diversity of planetary systems and architectures, but most of the planets discovered by Kepler orbit faint stars. Using new data from the K2 mission, we present the discovery of a five-planet system transiting a bright (V = 8.9, K = 7.7) star called HIP 41378. HIP 41378 is a slightly metal-poor late F-type star with moderate rotation (v sin i ≃7 km s^(-1)) and lies at a distance of 116 ± 18 pc from Earth. We find that HIP 41378 hosts two sub-Neptune-siz...

  9. Undercover Stars Among Exoplanet Candidates

    Science.gov (United States)

    2005-03-01

    Very Large Telescope Finds Planet-Sized Transiting Star Summary An international team of astronomers have accurately determined the radius and mass of the smallest core-burning star known until now. The observations were performed in March 2004 with the FLAMES multi-fibre spectrograph on the 8.2-m VLT Kueyen telescope at the ESO Paranal Observatory (Chile). They are part of a large programme aimed at measuring accurate radial velocities for sixty stars for which a temporary brightness "dip" has been detected during the OGLE survey. The astronomers find that the dip seen in the light curve of the star known as OGLE-TR-122 is caused by a very small stellar companion, eclipsing this solar-like star once every 7.3 days. This companion is 96 times heavier than planet Jupiter but only 16% larger. It is the first time that direct observations demonstrate that stars less massive than 1/10th of the solar mass are of nearly the same size as giant planets. This fact will obviously have to be taken into account during the current search for transiting exoplanets. In addition, the observations with the Very Large Telescope have led to the discovery of seven new eclipsing binaries, that harbour stars with masses below one-third the mass of the Sun, a real bonanza for the astronomers. PR Photo 06a/05: Brightness "Dip" and Velocity Variations of OGLE-TR-122. PR Photo 06b/05: Properties of Low-Mass Stars and Planets. PR Photo 06c/05: Comparison Between OGLE-TR-122b, Jupiter and the Sun. The OGLE Survey When a planet happens to pass in front of its parent star (as seen from the Earth), it blocks a small fraction of the star's light from our view [1]. These "planetary transits" are of great interest as they allow astronomers to measure in a unique way the mass and the radius of exoplanets. Several surveys are therefore underway which attempt to find these faint signatures of other worlds. One of these programmes is the OGLE survey which was originally devised to detect microlensing

  10. The world's biggest star catalogue

    Science.gov (United States)

    Villard, Ray

    1989-12-01

    The Hubble Space Telescope (HST) Guide Star Catalog (GSC), an enormous inventory of the sky, is introduced as the product of eight years of intensive effort by astronomers, computer programmers, and analysts at the Space Telescope Science Institute. For every star in the SAO Catalog the GSC has 60, thus containing almost 19 million entries. The GSC is organized into 9,537 regions, each with a few thousand objects. Each object carries a 10-digit identification number. The first five digits encode the catalog region, and the last five specify the star number within the region. Additional data in the catalog include each object's celestial coordinates, brightness in magnitudes, and classification (stellar or nonstellar).

  11. A New Method to Calibrate the Stellar Color/Surface-Brightness Relation

    CERN Document Server

    Gould, Andrew

    2014-01-01

    I show that the standard microlensing technique to measure the angular radius of a star using color/surface-brightness relations can be inverted, via late-time proper motion measurements, to calibrate these relations. The method is especially useful for very metal-rich stars because such stars are in short supply in the solar neighborhood where other methods are most effective, but very abundant in Galactic bulge microlensing fields. I provide a list of eight spectroscopically identified high-metallicity bulge stars with the requisite finite-source effects, seven of which will be suitable calibrators when the Giant Magellan Telescope comes on line. Many more such sources can be extracted from current and future microlensing surveys.

  12. Bright Sparks of Our Future!

    Science.gov (United States)

    Riordan, Naoimh

    2016-04-01

    My name is Naoimh Riordan and I am the Vice Principal of Rockboro Primary School in Cork City, South of Ireland. I am a full time class primary teacher and I teach 4th class, my students are aged between 9-10 years. My passion for education has developed over the years and grown towards STEM (Science, Technology, Engineering and Mathematics) subjects. I believe these subjects are the way forward for our future. My passion and beliefs are driven by the unique after school programme that I have developed. It is titled "Sparks" coming from the term Bright Sparks. "Sparks" is an after school programme with a difference where the STEM subjects are concentrated on through lessons such as Science, Veterinary Science Computer Animation /Coding, Eco engineering, Robotics, Magical Maths, Chess and Creative Writing. All these subjects are taught through activity based learning and are one-hour long each week for a ten-week term. "Sparks" is fully inclusive and non-selective which gives all students of any level of ability an opportunity to engage into these subjects. "Sparks" is open to all primary students in County Cork. The "Sparks" after school programme is taught by tutors from the different Universities and Colleges in Cork City. It works very well because the tutor brings their knowledge, skills and specialised equipment from their respective universities and in turn the tutor gains invaluable teaching practise, can trial a pilot programme in a chosen STEM subject and gain an insight into what works in the physical classroom.

  13. Designers predict a bright future

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    As power plant designers and builders, there is a bright future for the industry. The demand for electricity will continue to grow, and the need for new plants will increase accordingly. But companies that develop and supply these plants must adapt to new ways of doing business if they expect to see the dawn of this new age. Several factors will have a profound effect on the generation and use of electricity in future years. Instant communications now reach all corners of the globe, making people everywhere aspire to a higher standard of living. The economic surge needed to satisfy these appetites will, in turn, be fed by a network of suppliers who are themselves restructuring to serve global markets, unimpeded by past nationalistic barriers to trade. The strong correlation between economic progress and the growing demand for electricity is well recognized. A ready supply of affordable electricity is a necessary underpinning for any economic expansion. As economies advance and jobs increase, electric demand grows geometrically, fueled by an ever-improving quality of life. Coupled with increasing demand is the worldwide trend toward privatization of the generation industry. The reasons may vary in different parts of the world, but the effect is the same--companies are battling intensely for the right to build or purchase generating facilities. Those companies, like the industry they serve, are themselves in a period of transition. Once a closed, monopolistic group of owners in a predominantly services-based market, they are, thanks to competitive forces, being driven steadily toward a product-based structure

  14. Space Shuttle Star Tracker Challenges

    Science.gov (United States)

    Herrera, Linda M.

    2010-01-01

    The space shuttle fleet of avionics was originally designed in the 1970's. Many of the subsystems have been upgraded and replaced, however some original hardware continues to fly. Not only fly, but has proven to be the best design available to perform its designated task. The shuttle star tracker system is currently flying as a mixture of old and new designs, each with a unique purpose to fill for the mission. Orbiter missions have tackled many varied missions in space over the years. As the orbiters began flying to the International Space Station (ISS), new challenges were discovered and overcome as new trusses and modules were added. For the star tracker subsystem, the growing ISS posed an unusual problem, bright light. With two star trackers on board, the 1970's vintage image dissector tube (IDT) star trackers track the ISS, while the new solid state design is used for dim star tracking. This presentation focuses on the challenges and solutions used to ensure star trackers can complete the shuttle missions successfully. Topics include KSC team and industry partner methods used to correct pressurized case failures and track system performance.

  15. On-Orbit Performance of the Bright Target Explorer (BRITE) Nanosatellite Astronomy Constellation

    OpenAIRE

    Sarda, Karan; Grant, Cordell; Chaumont, Monica; Yun Choi, Seung; Johnston-Lemke, Bryan; Zee, Robert

    2014-01-01

    In 2013, the first three satellites of the BRITE-Constellation mission, believed to be the world’s first satellite constellation dedicated to astronomy, were placed into orbit on two separate launches. To be eventually composed of at least six cooperating nanosatellites, BRITE-Constellation’s mission is to perform a survey of the most luminous stars in the Earth’s sky. In the push to observe ever fainter objects, these apparently bright stars, despite being prominent members of our most famil...

  16. Northern dwarf and low surface brightness galaxies. IV - The large-scale space distribution

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thuan, Trinh X.; Alimi, Jean-Michel; Gott, J. Richard, III; Schneider, Stephen E.

    1991-01-01

    Results are reported from a statistical analysis of published observational data on a sample of 860 northern dwarf and low-surface-brightness (D/LSB) galaxies with delta = 0 deg or greater and b between -40 and 40 deg, selected from the Uppsala General Catalogue of Galaxies (Nilson et al., 1973). The results are presented in extensive redshift/space maps, histograms, graphs and tables and characterized in detail. It is shown that the distribution of D/LSB galaxies closely resembles that of bright galaxies, apparently ruling out biased-star-formation models predicting a uniform distribution of D/LSBs. Although bright galaxies outside clusters are somewhat more clustered than the H I-rich D/LSBs, the latters' pairwise peculiar velocity (460 + or - 50 km/sec) is similar to that of the former.

  17. The VLTI/PIONIER near-infrared interferometric survey of southern T Tauri stars. I. First results

    OpenAIRE

    Anthonioz, F.; Menard, F.; Pinte, C.; Le Bouquin, J. -B.; Benisty, M.; Thi, W. -F.; Absil, Olivier; Duchene, G.; Augereau, J.-C.; Berger, J. -P.; Casassus, S.; Duvert, G.; Lazareff, B.; Malbet, F.; Millan-Gabet, R.

    2015-01-01

    Context. The properties of the inner disks of bright Herbig AeBe stars have been studied with near-infrared (NIR) interferometry and high resolution spectroscopy. The continuum (dust) and a few molecular gas species have been studied close to the central star; however, sensitivity problems limit direct information about the inner disks of the fainter T Tauri stars. Aims: Our aim is to measure some of the properties (inner radius, brightness profile, shape) of the inner regions of circumstell...

  18. Observations of neutral carbon in the NGC 1977 bright rim

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wootten, A.; Phillips, T. G.; Beichman, C. A.; Frerking, M.

    1982-01-01

    Strong neutral carbon emission at 610 microns (492 GHz) has been detected from a bright-rimmed cloud abutting the H II region NGC 1977. The similarity of velocity and width between (C-13)O and C I lines suggests that both lines originate in the same region. A model for the density and temperature structure of the cloud, based on (C-13)O and (C-12)O observations, has been used to estimate the carbon abundance. The abundances of both C I and (C-13)O increase with depth into the cloud away from the rim. The carbon abundance reaches its peak value nearer the rim than does the (C-13)O abundance. This variation in the relative abundance distributions of CO and C I confirms the importance of photodissociation in the chemistry of molecular clouds, and of the C I line to studies of the interaction of hot stars with clouds.

  19. Bright boys the making of information technology

    CERN Document Server

    Green, Tom

    2010-01-01

    Everything has a beginning. None was more profound-and quite as unexpected-than Information Technology. Here for the first time is the untold story of how our new age came to be and the bright boys who made it happen. What began on the bare floor of an old laundry building eventually grew to rival in size the Manhattan Project. The unexpected consequence of that journey was huge---what we now know as Information Technology. For sixty years the bright boys have been totally anonymous while their achievements have become a way of life for all of us. "Bright Boys" brings them home. By 1950 they'd

  20. The structure of bright zinc coatings

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    MIODRAG STOJANOVIC

    2000-11-01

    Full Text Available The structures of bright zinc coatings obtained from acid sulfate solutions in the presence of dextrin/salicyl aldehyde mixture were examined. It was shown by the STM technique that the surfaces of bright zinc coatings are covered by hexagonal zinc crystals, the tops of planes of which are flat and mutually parallel and which exhibit smoothness on the atomic level. X-Ray diffraction (XRD analysis of the bright zinc coatings showed that the zinc crystallites are oriented in the (110 plane only.

  1. Limits on surface gravities of Kepler planet-candidate host stars from non-detection of solar-like oscillations

    CERN Document Server

    Campante, T L; Lund, M N; Huber, D; Hekker, S; García, R A; Corsaro, E; Handberg, R; Miglio, A; Arentoft, T; Basu, S; Bedding, T R; Christensen-Dalsgaard, J; Davies, G R; Elsworth, Y P; Gilliland, R L; Karoff, C; Kawaler, S D; Kjeldsen, H; Lundkvist, M; Metcalfe, T S; Aguirre, V Silva; Stello, D

    2014-01-01

    We present a novel method for estimating lower-limit surface gravities log g of Kepler targets whose data do not allow the detection of solar-like oscillations. The method is tested using an ensemble of solar-type stars observed in the context of the Kepler Asteroseismic Science Consortium. We then proceed to estimate lower-limit log g for a cohort of Kepler solar-type planet-candidate host stars with no detected oscillations. Limits on fundamental stellar properties, as provided by this work, are likely to be useful in the characterization of the corresponding candidate planetary systems. Furthermore, an important byproduct of the current work is the confirmation that amplitudes of solar-like oscillations are suppressed in stars with increased levels of surface magnetic activity.

  2. Limits on surface gravities of Kepler planet-candidate host stars from non-detection of solar-like oscillations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Campante, T. L.; Chaplin, W. J.; Handberg, R.; Miglio, A.; Davies, G. R.; Elsworth, Y. P. [School of Physics and Astronomy, University of Birmingham, Edgbaston, Birmingham B15 2TT (United Kingdom); Lund, M. N.; Arentoft, T.; Christensen-Dalsgaard, J.; Karoff, C.; Kjeldsen, H.; Lundkvist, M. [Stellar Astrophysics Centre (SAC), Department of Physics and Astronomy, Aarhus University, Ny Munkegade 120, DK-8000 Aarhus C (Denmark); Huber, D. [NASA Ames Research Center, MS 244-30, Moffett Field, CA 94035 (United States); Hekker, S. [Astronomical Institute, " Anton Pannekoek," University of Amsterdam, Amsterdam (Netherlands); García, R. A. [Laboratoire AIM, CEA/DSM-CNRS-Université Paris Diderot (France); IRFU/SAp, Centre de Saclay, F-91191 Gif-sur-Yvette Cedex (France); Corsaro, E. [Instituut voor Sterrenkunde, KU Leuven, Celestijnenlaan 200D, B-3001 Leuven (Belgium); Basu, S. [Department of Astronomy, Yale University, New Haven, CT 06520 (United States); Bedding, T. R. [Sydney Institute for Astronomy, School of Physics, University of Sydney, Sydney (Australia); Gilliland, R. L. [Center for Exoplanets and Habitable Worlds, The Pennsylvania State University, University Park, PA 16802 (United States); Kawaler, S. D., E-mail: campante@bison.ph.bham.ac.uk [Department of Physics and Astronomy, Iowa State University, Ames, IA 50011 (United States); and others

    2014-03-10

    We present a novel method for estimating lower-limit surface gravities (log g) of Kepler targets whose data do not allow the detection of solar-like oscillations. The method is tested using an ensemble of solar-type stars observed in the context of the Kepler Asteroseismic Science Consortium. We then proceed to estimate lower-limit log g for a cohort of Kepler solar-type planet-candidate host stars with no detected oscillations. Limits on fundamental stellar properties, as provided by this work, are likely to be useful in the characterization of the corresponding candidate planetary systems. Furthermore, an important byproduct of the current work is the confirmation that amplitudes of solar-like oscillations are suppressed in stars with increased levels of surface magnetic activity.

  3. Shooting stars

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Maurette, M.; Hammer, C.

    A shooting star passage -even a star shower- can be sometimes easily seen during moonless black night. They represent the partial volatilization in earth atmosphere of meteorites or micrometeorites reduced in cosmic dusts. Everywhere on earth, these star dusts are searched to be gathered. This research made one year ago on the Greenland ice-cap is the object of this article; orbit gathering projects are also presented.

  4. Modelling the spectro-photometric and chemical evolution of Low Surface Brightness spiral galaxies

    OpenAIRE

    Hoek, L. B. van den; de Blok, W J G

    1995-01-01

    We investigate the star formation history and chemical evolution of Low Surface Brightness (LSB) spiral galaxies by means of their observed spectro-photometric and chemical properties. We present preliminary results for Johnson-Cousins UBVRI magnitudes and stellar [O/H] abundance ratios using a galactic chemical evolution model incorporating a detailed metallicity dependent set of stellar input data covering all relevant stages of stellar evolution. Comparison of our model results with observ...

  5. Musings concerning the possible significance of surface brightness variations in disk galaxies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The implications of the surface-brightness (SB) distribution of observed disk galaxies are explored, reviewing the results of recent investigations. Topics addressed include the SBs of catalog galaxies, proper measurements of SB, searches for new low-SB objects, and the importance of low-SB galaxies rich in H I for theoretical models of star formation. Key theoretical questions are listed, and tentative answers are given along with recommendations for further observations. 30 references

  6. A new low proper motion catalogue of bright M-dwarfs

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pinfield David

    2013-04-01

    Full Text Available We present a new catalogue of 1336 bright (K < 9, low proper motion, M dwarfs from the PPMXL catalogue. These M dwarfs cover the entire sky but the galactic plane was excluded to avoid crowding and reddened stars. Spectra taken of a random sample of the targets and spectral estimations made using colours of the sample show a spectral range K8-M5.

  7. Properties of Galaxies in the Disc Central Surface Brightness Gap

    CERN Document Server

    Sorce, Jenny G; Libeskind, Noam I

    2015-01-01

    Intermediate surface brightness (ISB) galaxies are less numerous than their counterparts at high and low surface brightness (HSB and LSB). Investigating ISB characteristics from a sample from the S4G survey, complete down to M_B=-16, we find that they have intermediate stellar, gas and baryonic masses and on average as much gas as stars. They lie on the (baryonic) Tully-Fisher relation between HSBs and LSBs, although they present a higher scatter than the latter. Their stellar to baryonic mass ratios have intermediate values unlike their condensed baryonic fractions. By comparing their environments, as classified by the eigenvalues of the velocity shear tensor of local constrained simulations, ISBs have a 5-10% probability higher (smaller) to be in sheets (filaments) with respect to HSBs and LSBs. Additionally, for galaxies in filaments (with close neighbors), the mass and mu_0 are correlated at 2.5 (2) sigma more than for those in sheets. ISBs live in regions where the divergence of the velocity field is sma...

  8. Properties of galaxies in the disc central surface brightness gap

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sorce, Jenny G.; Creasey, Peter; Libeskind, Noam I.

    2016-01-01

    Intermediate surface brightness (ISB) galaxies are less numerous than their counterparts at high and low surface brightness (HSB and LSB). Investigating ISB characteristics from a sample from the Spitzer Survey of Stellar Structure in Galaxies survey, complete down to MB = -16, we find that they have intermediate stellar, gas and baryonic masses and on average as much gas as stars. They lie on the (baryonic) Tully-Fisher relation between HSBs and LSBs, although they present a higher scatter than the latter. Their stellar to baryonic mass ratios have intermediate values unlike their condensed baryonic fractions. By comparing their environments, as classified by the eigenvalues of the velocity shear tensor of local constrained simulations, ISBs have a 5-10 per cent probability higher (smaller) to be in sheets (filaments) with respect to HSBs and LSBs. Additionally, for galaxies in filaments (with close neighbours), the mass and μ0 are correlated at 2.5 (2)σ more than for those in sheets. ISBs live in regions where the divergence of the velocity field is smaller than where HSBs and LSBs live, a result at more than 50 per cent significance. ISBs may exist as an unstable transition state between LSBs and HSBs, the low flow activity environment maximally encouraging their formation. Interaction events altering the central baryon fraction could happen at a lower rate in these less dense environment, whilst in the higher density environments the LSBs are primarily satellite galaxies, whose accretion is sufficiently constrained that it fails to promote them to HSBs.

  9. Bright PanSTARRS Nuclear Transients – what are they?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Smartt S.

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available We present an initial analysis of 49 bright transients occurring in the nuclei of galaxies with no previous known Active Galactic Nucleus (AGN. They have been discovered as part of the PanSTARRs 3π survey, and followed up with the Liverpool Telescope. Based on colours, light curve shape, and a small number with optical spectra, these transients seem to fall into three groups. Red/fast transients are nuclear supernovae of various types. Some bright nuclear transients are blue and decay on a timescale of a few months; these may be candidates for tidal disruption events. However most of the events we have found are blue and are either still rising or decaying slowly, on a timescale of years; the few spectra we have show AGN at z ∼ 1. We argue that these transients are background AGN microlensed by stars in foreground galaxies by a factor 10–100. Monitoring such events gives us very promising prospects for measuring the structure of AGN and so testing current theories.

  10. The complex evolutionary paths of local infrared bright galaxies: a high angular resolution mid-infrared view

    CERN Document Server

    Alonso-Herrero, A; Roche, P F; Hernan-Caballero, A; Aretxaga, I; Martinez-Paredes, M; Almeida, C Ramos; Pereira-Santaella, M; Diaz-Santos, T; Levenson, N A; Packham, C; Colina, L; Esquej, P; Gonzalez-Martin, O; Ichikawa, K; Imanishi, M; Espinosa, J M Rodriguez; Telesco, C

    2016-01-01

    We investigate the evolutionary connection between local IR-bright galaxies ($\\log L_{\\rm IR}\\ge 11.4\\,L_\\odot$) and quasars. We use high angular resolution ($\\sim$ 0.3-0.4 arcsec $\\sim$ few hundred parsecs) $8-13\\,\\mu$m ground-based spectroscopy to disentangle the AGN mid-IR properties from those of star formation. The comparison between the nuclear $11.3\\,\\mu$m PAH feature emission and that measured with Spitzer/IRS indicates that the star formation is extended over a few kpc in the IR-bright galaxies. The AGN contribution to the total IR luminosity of IR-bright galaxies is lower than in quasars. Although the dust distribution is predicted to change as IR-bright galaxies evolve to IR-bright quasars and then to optical quasars, we show that the AGN mid-IR emission of all the quasars in our sample is not significantly different. In contrast, the nuclear emission of IR-bright galaxies with low AGN contributions appears more heavily embedded in dust although there is no clear trend with the interaction stage or...

  11. Brightness of synchrotron radiation from wigglers

    CERN Document Server

    Geloni, Gianluca; Saldin, Evgeni

    2014-01-01

    According to literature, while calculating the brightness of synchrotron radiation from wigglers, one needs to account for the so called `depth-of-field' effects. In fact, the particle beam cross section varies along the wiggler. It is usually stated that the effective photon source size increases accordingly, while the brightness is reduced. Here we claim that this is a misconception originating from an analysis of the wiggler source based on geometrical arguments, regarded as almost self-evident. According to electrodynamics, depth-of-field effects do not exist: we demonstrate this statement both theoretically and numerically, using a well-known first-principle computer code. This fact shows that under the usually accepted approximations, the description of the wiggler brightness turns out to be inconsistent even qualitatively. Therefore, there is a need for a well-defined procedure for computing the brightness from a wiggler source. We accomplish this task based on the use of a Wigner function formalism. I...

  12. The solar brightness temperature at millimeter wavelengths

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuseski, R. A.; Swanson, P. N.

    1976-01-01

    Measurements of the brightness temperature of the sun near 36 GHz and 93 GHz were made using the new moon as a calibration source. Provided the brightness temperature of the moon is known and all measurements are reduced to the same zenith angle, a simple expression can be used for the sun-to-new moon ratio which is independent of antenna gain, atmospheric absorption and reemission, and radiometer calibration constants. This ratio was measured near 36 GHz and at two frequencies near 93 GHz with a Dicke switched superheterodyne radiometer system and a 2.4 m Cassegrain antenna. The slopes of the solar brightness temperature spectrum based on these ratios were measured. The absolute solar brightness spectrum derived from all current available measurements supplemented by the present ones is also plotted and discussed.

  13. Development of a high brightness ion source

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The brightness and emittance of an ion beam can depend on the ion temperature, aberrations and scattering, as well as other factors. However, it is the ion temperature which determines the irreducible minimum value of the emittance and hence brightness, as the other components can be eliminated by careful design. An ion source design is presented which has attained this minimum value for the emittance; the dependence of the ion temperature on the plasma source parameters is discussed

  14. Observations and diagnostics in high brightness beams

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cianchi, A.; Anania, M. P.; Bisesto, F.; Castellano, M.; Chiadroni, E.; Pompili, R.; Shpakov, V.

    2016-09-01

    The brightness is a figure of merit largely used in the light sources, like FEL (Free Electron Lasers), but it is also fundamental in several other applications, as for instance Compton backscattering sources, beam driven plasma accelerators and THz sources. Advanced diagnostics are essential tools in the development of high brightness beams. 6D electron beam diagnostics will be reviewed with emphasis on emittance measurement.

  15. Star Caught Smoking

    Science.gov (United States)

    2007-08-01

    VLTI Snapshots Dusty Puff Around Variable Star Using ESO's Very Large Telescope Interferometer, astronomers from France and Brazil have detected a huge cloud of dust around a star. This observation is further evidence for the theory that such stellar puffs are the cause of the repeated extreme dimming of the star. ESO PR Photo 34a/07 ESO PR Photo 34a/07 Dust Cloud in a R CrB Star (Artist's Impression) R Coronae Borealis stars are supergiants exhibiting erratic variability. Named after the first star that showed such behaviour [1], they are more than 50 times larger than our Sun. R Coronae Borealis stars can see their apparent brightness unpredictably decline to a thousandth of their nominal value within a few weeks, with the return to normal light levels being much slower. It has been accepted for decades that such fading could be due to obscuration of the stellar surface by newly formed dusty clouds. This 'Dust Puff Theory' suggests that mass is lost from the R Coronae Borealis (or R CrB for short) star and then moves away until the temperature is low enough for carbon dust to form. If the newly formed dust cloud is located along our line-of-sight, it eclipses the star. As the dust is blown away by the star's strong light, the 'curtain' vanishes and the star reappears. RY Sagittarii is the brightest member in the southern hemisphere of this family of weird stars. Located about 6,000 light-years away towards the constellation of Sagittarius (The Archer), its peculiar nature was discovered in 1895 by famous Dutch astronomer Jacobus Cornelius Kapteyn. In 2004, near-infrared adaptive optics observations made with NACO on ESO's Very Large Telescope allowed astronomers Patrick de Laverny and Djamel Mékarnia to clearly detect the presence of clouds around RY Sagittarii. This was the first direct confirmation of the standard scenario explaining the light variations of R CrB stars by the presence of heterogeneities in their envelope surrounding the star. ESO PR Photo 32e

  16. Long-term magnetic field monitoring of the Sun-like star \\xi Bootis A

    OpenAIRE

    Morgenthaler, A.; Petit, P.; Saar, S.; Solanki, S. K.; Morin, J.; Marsden, S. C.; Auriere, M.; Dintrans, B.; Fares, R.; Gastine, T.; Lanoux, J.; Lignieres, F.; Paletou, F; Velez, J. C. Ramirez; Theado, S.

    2011-01-01

    Aims. We aim to investigate the long-term temporal evolution of the magnetic field of the solar-type star \\xi Bootis A, both from direct magnetic field measurements and from the simultaneous estimate of indirect activity indicators. Methods. We obtained seven epochs of high-resolution, circularly-polarized spectra from the NARVAL spectropolarimeter between 2007 and 2011, for a total of 76 spectra. Using approximately 6,100 photospheric spectral lines covering the visible domain, we employed a...

  17. Radio stars.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hjellming, R M; Wade, C M

    1971-09-17

    Up to the present time six classes of radio stars have been established. The signals are almost always very faint and drastically variable. Hence their discovery has owed as much to serendipity as to the highly sophisticated equipment and techniques that have been used. When the variations are regular, as with the pulsars, this characteristic can be exploited very successfully in the search for new objects as well as in the detailed study of those that are already known. The detection of the most erratically variable radio stars, the flare stars and the x-ray stars, is primarily a matter of luck and patience. In the case of the novas, one at least knows where and oughly when to look for radio emission. A very sensitive interferometer is clearly the best instrument to use in the initial detection of a radio star. The fact that weak background sources are frequently present makes it essential to prove that the position of a radio source agrees with that of a star to within a few arc seconds. The potential of radio astronomy for the study of radio stars will not be realized until more powerful instruments than those that are available today can be utilized. So far, we have been able to see only the most luminous of the radio stars. PMID:17836594

  18. Star Imager

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Madsen, Peter Buch; Jørgensen, John Leif; Thuesen, Gøsta;

    1997-01-01

    The version of the star imager developed for Astrid II is described. All functions and features are described as well as the operations and the software protocol.......The version of the star imager developed for Astrid II is described. All functions and features are described as well as the operations and the software protocol....

  19. Wave Star

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kramer, Morten; Brorsen, Michael; Frigaard, Peter

    Nærværende rapport beskriver numeriske beregninger af den hydrodynamiske interaktion mellem 5 flydere i bølgeenergianlægget Wave Star.......Nærværende rapport beskriver numeriske beregninger af den hydrodynamiske interaktion mellem 5 flydere i bølgeenergianlægget Wave Star....

  20. Success potential of automated star pattern recognition

    Science.gov (United States)

    Van Bezooijen, R. W. H.

    1986-01-01

    A quasi-analytical model is presented for calculating the success probability of automated star pattern recognition systems for attitude control of spacecraft. The star data is gathered by an imaging star tracker (STR) with a circular FOV capable of detecting 20 stars. The success potential is evaluated in terms of the equivalent diameters of the FOV and the target star area ('uniqueness area'). Recognition is carried out as a function of the position and brightness of selected stars in an area around each guide star. The success of the system is dependent on the resultant pointing error, and is calculated by generating a probability distribution of reaching a threshold probability of an unacceptable pointing error. The method yields data which are equivalent to data available with Monte Carlo simulatins. When applied to the recognition system intended for use on the Space IR Telescope Facility it is shown that acceptable pointing, to a level of nearly 100 percent certainty, can be obtained using a single star tracker and about 4000 guide stars.

  1. Energy-exchange collisions of dark-bright-bright vector solitons.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Radhakrishnan, R; Manikandan, N; Aravinthan, K

    2015-12-01

    We find a dark component guiding the practically interesting bright-bright vector one-soliton to two different parametric domains giving rise to different physical situations by constructing a more general form of three-component dark-bright-bright mixed vector one-soliton solution of the generalized Manakov model with nine free real parameters. Moreover our main investigation of the collision dynamics of such mixed vector solitons by constructing the multisoliton solution of the generalized Manakov model with the help of Hirota technique reveals that the dark-bright-bright vector two-soliton supports energy-exchange collision dynamics. In particular the dark component preserves its initial form and the energy-exchange collision property of the bright-bright vector two-soliton solution of the Manakov model during collision. In addition the interactions between bound state dark-bright-bright vector solitons reveal oscillations in their amplitudes. A similar kind of breathing effect was also experimentally observed in the Bose-Einstein condensates. Some possible ways are theoretically suggested not only to control this breathing effect but also to manage the beating, bouncing, jumping, and attraction effects in the collision dynamics of dark-bright-bright vector solitons. The role of multiple free parameters in our solution is examined to define polarization vector, envelope speed, envelope width, envelope amplitude, grayness, and complex modulation of our solution. It is interesting to note that the polarization vector of our mixed vector one-soliton evolves in sphere or hyperboloid depending upon the initial parametric choices. PMID:26764780

  2. Energy-exchange collisions of dark-bright-bright vector solitons

    Science.gov (United States)

    Radhakrishnan, R.; Manikandan, N.; Aravinthan, K.

    2015-12-01

    We find a dark component guiding the practically interesting bright-bright vector one-soliton to two different parametric domains giving rise to different physical situations by constructing a more general form of three-component dark-bright-bright mixed vector one-soliton solution of the generalized Manakov model with nine free real parameters. Moreover our main investigation of the collision dynamics of such mixed vector solitons by constructing the multisoliton solution of the generalized Manakov model with the help of Hirota technique reveals that the dark-bright-bright vector two-soliton supports energy-exchange collision dynamics. In particular the dark component preserves its initial form and the energy-exchange collision property of the bright-bright vector two-soliton solution of the Manakov model during collision. In addition the interactions between bound state dark-bright-bright vector solitons reveal oscillations in their amplitudes. A similar kind of breathing effect was also experimentally observed in the Bose-Einstein condensates. Some possible ways are theoretically suggested not only to control this breathing effect but also to manage the beating, bouncing, jumping, and attraction effects in the collision dynamics of dark-bright-bright vector solitons. The role of multiple free parameters in our solution is examined to define polarization vector, envelope speed, envelope width, envelope amplitude, grayness, and complex modulation of our solution. It is interesting to note that the polarization vector of our mixed vector one-soliton evolves in sphere or hyperboloid depending upon the initial parametric choices.

  3. A Sparkling Spray of Stars

    Science.gov (United States)

    2008-12-01

    The festive season has arrived for astronomers at the European Southern Observatory (ESO) in the form of this dramatic new image. It shows the swirling gas around the region known as NGC 2264 -- an area of sky that includes the sparkling blue baubles of the Christmas Tree star cluster. Omega Centauri ESO PR Photo 48/08 NGC 2264 and the Christmas Tree cluster NGC 2264 lies about 2600 light-years from Earth in the obscure constellation of Monoceros, the Unicorn, not far from the more familiar figure of Orion, the Hunter. The image shows a region of space about 30 light-years across. William Herschel discovered this fascinating object during his great sky surveys in the late 18th century. He first noticed the bright cluster in January 1784 and the brightest part of the visually more elusive smudge of the glowing gas clouds at Christmas nearly two years later. The cluster is very bright and can easily be seen with binoculars. With a small telescope (whose lenses will turn the view upside down) the stars resemble the glittering lights on a Christmas tree. The dazzling star at the top is even bright enough to be seen with the unaided eye. It is a massive multiple star system that only emerged from the dust and gas a few million years ago. As well as the cluster there are many interesting and curious structures in the gas and dust. At the bottom of the frame, the dark triangular feature is the evocative Cone Nebula, a region of molecular gas flooded by the harsh light of the brightest cluster members. The region to the right of the brightest star has a curious, fur-like texture that has led to the name Fox Fur Nebula. Much of the image appears red because the huge gas clouds are glowing under the intense ultra-violet light coming from the energetic hot young stars. The stars themselves appear blue as they are hotter, younger and more massive than our own Sun. Some of this blue light is scattered by dust, as can be seen occurring in the upper part of the image. This

  4. Hesiod's calendar and the star Spica

    CERN Document Server

    Antonello, Elio

    2013-01-01

    In Hesiod's calendar, circa 8th century BCE, the harvest times of cereals were indicated by the heliacal rising of Pleiades (harvest) and by that of Orion (thresh). We tried to verify which risings and settings of the brightest stars could have been used as indicators in the previous millennia, taking into account the precession and the dependence of the heliacal dates on the latitude. In the second half of the 9th millennium BCE there was essentially one bright star that could have been used both for the harvest (heliacal setting of the star) and for the thresh (heliacal rising of the star): Spica, i.e. ear (in Latin) of cereals. According to archaeologists, the domestication of barley and wheat occurred in Near East at the end of the 9th millennium BCE. Given the importance of the bright stars and asterisms for ancient farming activities, we have therefore proposed that the identification of the star alpha Virginis with an ear should date back to the beginning of Neolithic, possibly well before the identifi...

  5. Star formation in the S233 region

    CERN Document Server

    Ladeyschikov, D A; Parfenov, S Yu; Alexeeva, S A; Bieging, J H

    2015-01-01

    The main objective of this paper is to study the possibility of triggered star formation on the border of the HII region S233, which is formed by a B-star. Using high-resolution spectra we determine the spectral class of the ionizing star as B0.5 V and the radial velocity of the star to be -17.5(1.4) km/s. This value is consistent with the velocity of gas in a wide field across the S233 region, suggesting that the ionizing star was formed from a parent cloud belonging to the S233 region. By studying spatial-kinematic structure of the molecular cloud in the S233 region, we detected an isolated clump of gas producing CO emission red-shifted relative to the parent cloud. In the UKIDSS and WISE images, the clump of gas coincides with the infrared source containing a compact object and bright-rimmed structure. The bright-rimmed structure is perpendicular to the direction of the ionizing star. The compact source coincides in position with IRAS source 05351+3549. All these features indicate a possibility of triggeri...

  6. Phase Coupling in Langmuir Wave Packets: Evidence for Four Wave Interactions in Solar Type III Radio Bursts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thejappa, G.; MacDowall, R. J.; Bergamo, M.

    2012-01-01

    The four wave interaction process, known as the oscillating two stream instability (OTSI) is considered as one of the mechanisms responsible for stabilizing the electron beams associated with solar type III radio bursts. It has been reported that (1) an intense localized Langmuir wave packet associated with a type III burst contains the spectral characteristics of the OTSI: (a) a resonant peak at the local electron plasma frequency, f(sub pe), (b) a Stokes peak at a frequency slightly lower than f(sub pe), (c) anti-Stokes peak at a frequency slightly higher than f(sub pe), and (d) a low frequency enhancement below a few hundred Hz, (2) the frequencies and wave numbers of these spectral components satisfy the resonance conditions of the OTSI, and (3) the peak intensity of the wave packet is well above the thresholds for the OTSI as well as spatial collapse of envelope solitons. Here, for the first time, applying the trispectral analysis on this wave packet, we show that the tricoherence, which measures the degree of coherent four-wave coupling amongst the observed spectral components exhibits a peak. This provides an additional evidence for the OTSI and related spatial collapse of Langmuir envelope solitons in type III burst sources.

  7. A Scenario for the Fine Structures of Solar Type IIIb Radio Bursts Based on the Electron Cyclotron Maser Emission

    CERN Document Server

    Wang, C B

    2015-01-01

    A scenario based on the electron cyclotron maser emission is proposed for the fine structures of solar radio emission in the present discussion. It is suggested that under certain conditions modulation of the ratio between the plasma frequency and electron gyro-frequency by ultra low frequency waves, which is a key parameter for excitation of the electron cyclotron maser instability, may lead to the intermittent emission of radio waves. As an example, the explanation of the observed fine-structure components in the solar type IIIb burst is discussed in detail. Three primary issues of the type IIIb bursts are addressed: 1) what is the physical mechanism that results in the intermittent emission elements that form a chain in the dynamic spectrum of type IIIb bursts, 2) what causes the split pair (or double stria) and the triple stria, 3) why in the events of fundamental-harmonic pair emission there is only IIIb-III, but IIIb-IIIb or III-IIIb cases are very rarely observed.

  8. Photometry of some neglected bright cataclysmic variables and candidates

    CERN Document Server

    Bruch, Albert

    2016-01-01

    As part of an effort to better characterize bright cataclysmic variables (CVs) which have received little attention in the past light curves of four confirmed systems (CZ Aql, BO Cet, V380 Oph and EF Tuc) and one candidate (Lib 3) are analyzed. For none of these stars time resolved photometry has been published previously. While no variability was found in the case of Lib 3, which thus cannot be confirmed as a CV, the light curves of all other targets are dominated by strong flickering. Modulations on hourly time scales superimposed on the flickering can probably be related to orbital variations in BO Cet and V380 Oph, but not in CZ Aql and EF Tuc. Variations on the time scale of 10 minutes in CZ Aql, while not yet constituting convincing evidence, together with previous suspicions of a magnetically channeled accretion flow may point at an intermediate polar nature of this star. Some properties of the flickering are quantified in an effort to enlarge the data base for future comparative flickering studies in ...

  9. Distance Measurements and Stellar Population Properties via Surface Brightness Fluctuations

    CERN Document Server

    Fritz, Alexander

    2012-01-01

    Surface Brightness Fluctuations (SBFs) are one of the most powerful techniques to measure the distance and to constrain the unresolved stellar content of extragalactic systems. For a given bandpass, the absolute SBF magnitude \\bar{M} depends on the properties of the underlying stellar population. Multi-band SBFs allow scientists to probe different stages of the stellar evolution: UV and blue wavelength band SBFs are sensitive to the evolution of stars within the hot Horizontal Branch (HB) and post-Asymptotic Giant Branch (post-AGB) phase, whereas optical SBF magnitudes explore the stars within the Red Giant Branch (RGB) and HB regime. Near- and Far-infrared SBF luminosities probe the important stellar evolution stage within the AGB and Thermally-Pulsating Asymptotic Giant Branch (TP-AGB) phase. Since the first successful application by Tonry and Schneider, a multiplicity of works have used this method to expand the distance scale up to 150 Mpc and beyond. This article gives a historical background of distance...

  10. Stellar magnetic cycles in the solar-like stars Kepler-17 and Kepler-63

    CERN Document Server

    Estrela, Raissa

    2016-01-01

    The stellar magnetic field plays a crucial role in the star internal mechanisms, as in the interactions with its environment. The study of starspots provides information about the stellar magnetic field, and can characterise the cycle. Moreover, the analysis of solar-type stars is also useful to shed light onto the origin of the solar magnetic field. The objective of this work is to characterise the magnetic activity of stars. Here, we studied two solar-type stars Kepler-17 and Kepler-63 using two methods to estimate the magnetic cycle length. The first one characterises the spots (radius, intensity, and location) by fitting the small variations in the light curve of a star caused by the occultation of a spot during a planetary transit. This approach yields the number of spots present in the stellar surface and the flux deficit subtracted from the star by their presence during each transit. The second method estimates the activity from the excess in the residuals of the transit lightcurves. This excess is obt...

  11. Warm dust in the terrestrial planet zone of a Sun-like Pleiades star: Collisions between planetary embryos?

    OpenAIRE

    Rhee, Joseph H.; Song, Inseok; Zuckerman, B.

    2008-01-01

    Only a few solar-type main-sequence stars are known to be orbited by warm dust particles; the most extreme is the G0 field star BD +20 307 that emits ~4% of its energy at mid-infrared wavelengths. We report the identification of a similarly dusty star HD 23514, an F6-type member of the Pleiades. A strong mid-IR silicate emission feature indicates the presence of small warm dust particles, but with the primary flux density peak at the nonstandard wavelength of ~9 μm. The existence of so much d...

  12. Dynamo Processes in the T Tauri star V410 Tau

    OpenAIRE

    Skelly, M. B.; Donati, J.-F.; Bouvier, J; Grankin, K. N.; Unruh, Y. C.; Artemenko, S. A.; Petrov, P

    2009-01-01

    We present new brightness and magnetic images of the weak-line T Tauri star V410 Tau, made using data from the NARVAL spectropolarimeter at Telescope Bernard Lyot (TBL). The brightness image shows a large polar spot and significant spot coverage at lower latitudes. The magnetic maps show a field that is predominantly dipolar and non-axisymmetric with a strong azimuthal component. The field is 50% poloidal and 50% toroidal, and there is very little differential rotation apparent from the magne...

  13. Direct observation of magnetic cycles in Sun-like stars

    OpenAIRE

    Morgenthaler, A.; Petit, P.; Morin, J.; Auriere, M.; Dintrans, B.; Konstantinova-Antova, R.; Marsden, S.

    2011-01-01

    A sample of 19 solar-type stars, probing masses between 0.6 and 1.4 solar mass and rotation periods between 3.4 and 43 days, was regularly observed using the NARVAL spectropolarimeter at Telescope Bernard Lyot (Pic du Midi, France) between 2007 and 2011. The Zeeman-Doppler Imaging technique is employed to reconstruct the large-scale photospheric magnetic field structure of the targets and investigate its long-term temporal evolution. We present here the first results of this project with the ...

  14. An Eccentric Debris Ring Around the Nearby G Star HD 202628

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stapelfeldt, Karl R.

    2012-01-01

    A new debris disk has been imaged in visible light around the G2V star HD 202628 using the STIS coronagraph on the Hubble Space Telescope. The broad ring is inclined 61 deg from face-on and extends as far as 260 AU from the star. The star is noticeably displaced from the apparent ring center by 20 AU. The ring inner edge is sharp and well-described by an inclined ellipse with a= 158 AU, e= 0.18, and the star at one focus. These properties are similar to the Fomalhaut debris ring and likewise suggest ring sculpting by a planetary-mass companion with semi-major axis approx.> 100 AU. The presence of a planet so widely separated from a solar-type star poses a new challenge for planet formation theories.

  15. Active Longitudes and Flip-Flops in Binary Stars

    Science.gov (United States)

    Korhonen, Heidi; Järvinen, Silva P.

    2007-08-01

    In many active stars the spots concentrate on two permanent active longitudes which are 180 degrees apart. In some of these stars the dominant part of the spot activity changes the longitude every few years. This so-called flip-flop phenomenon was first reported in the early 1990's in the single, late type giant FK Com. Since then flip-flops have been reported also on binary stars, young solar type stars and the Sun itself. Even though this phenomenon has been detected on many different kinds of active stars, still less than ten stars are known to exhibit this effect. Therefore no statistically significant correlation between the stellar parameters and the flip-flop phenomenon can be carried out. Here we present results from investigation where we have studied the long-term photometry of several magnetically active RS CVn binaries to see whether or not they show permanent active longitudes and the flip-flop phenomenon. We find that it is very common for the active regions to occur on permanent active longitudes, and some of these stars also show clear flip-flop phenomenon.

  16. Environments of massive stars and the upper mass limit

    CERN Document Server

    Crowther, Paul A

    2012-01-01

    The locations of massive stars (> 8 Msun) within their host galaxies is reviewed. These range from distributed OB associations to dense star clusters within giant HII regions. A comparison between massive stars and the environments of core-collapse supernovae and long duration Gamma Ray Bursts is made, both at low and high redshift. We also address the question of the upper stellar mass limit, since very massive stars (VMS, Minit >> 100 Msun) may produce exceptionally bright core-collapse supernovae or pair instability supernovae.

  17. B- and A-Type Stars in the Taurus-Auriga Star Forming Region

    CERN Document Server

    Mooley, Kunal P; Rebull, Luisa M; Padgett, Deborah L; Knapp, Gillian R

    2013-01-01

    We describe the results of a search for early-type stars associated with the Taurus-Auriga molecular cloud complex, a diffuse nearby star-forming region noted as lacking young stars of intermediate and high mass. We investigate several sets of possible O, B and early A spectral class members. The first is a group of stars for which mid-infrared images show bright nebulae, all of which can be associated with stars of spectral type B. The second group consists of early-type stars compiled from (i) literature listings in SIMBAD; (ii) B stars with infrared excesses selected from the Spitzer Space Telescope survey of the Taurus cloud; (iii) magnitude- and color-selected point sources from the 2MASS; and (iv) spectroscopically identified early-type stars from the SDSS coverage of the Taurus region. We evaluated stars for membership in the Taurus-Auriga star formation region based on criteria involving: spectroscopic and parallactic distances, proper motions and radial velocities, and infrared excesses or line emiss...

  18. Search for bright nearby M dwarfs with virtual observatory tools

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Aberasturi, M.; Caballero, J. A.; Montesinos, B.; Gálvez-Ortiz, M. C.; Solano, E.; Martín, E. L. [Centro de Astrobiología (CSIC-INTA), Departamento de Astrofísica, P.O. Box 78, E-28691 Villanueva de la Cañada, Madrid (Spain)

    2014-08-01

    Using Virtual Observatory tools, we cross-matched the Carlsberg Meridian 14 and the 2MASS Point Source catalogs to select candidate nearby bright M dwarfs distributed over ∼25,000 deg{sup 2}. Here, we present reconnaissance low-resolution optical spectra for 27 candidates that were observed with the Intermediate Dispersion Spectrograph at the 2.5 m Isaac Newton Telescope (R≈ 1600). We derived spectral types from a new spectral index, R, which measures the ratio of fluxes at 7485-7015 Å and 7120-7150 Å. We also used VOSA, a Virtual Observatory tool for spectral energy distribution fitting, to derive effective temperatures and surface gravities for each candidate. The resulting 27 targets were M dwarfs brighter than J = 10.5 mag, 16 of which were completely new in the Northern hemisphere and 7 of which were located at less than 15 pc. For all of them, we also measured Hα and Na I pseudo-equivalent widths, determined photometric distances, and identified the most active stars. The targets with the weakest sodium absorption, namely, J0422+2439 (with X-ray and strong Hα emissions), J0435+2523, and J0439+2333, are new members in the young Taurus-Auriga star-forming region based on proper motion, spatial distribution, and location in the color-magnitude diagram, which reopens the discussion on the deficit of M2-4 Taurus stars. Finally, based on proper motion diagrams, we report on a new wide M dwarf binary system in the field, LSPM J0326+3929EW.

  19. Search for bright nearby M dwarfs with virtual observatory tools

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Using Virtual Observatory tools, we cross-matched the Carlsberg Meridian 14 and the 2MASS Point Source catalogs to select candidate nearby bright M dwarfs distributed over ∼25,000 deg2. Here, we present reconnaissance low-resolution optical spectra for 27 candidates that were observed with the Intermediate Dispersion Spectrograph at the 2.5 m Isaac Newton Telescope (R≈ 1600). We derived spectral types from a new spectral index, R, which measures the ratio of fluxes at 7485-7015 Å and 7120-7150 Å. We also used VOSA, a Virtual Observatory tool for spectral energy distribution fitting, to derive effective temperatures and surface gravities for each candidate. The resulting 27 targets were M dwarfs brighter than J = 10.5 mag, 16 of which were completely new in the Northern hemisphere and 7 of which were located at less than 15 pc. For all of them, we also measured Hα and Na I pseudo-equivalent widths, determined photometric distances, and identified the most active stars. The targets with the weakest sodium absorption, namely, J0422+2439 (with X-ray and strong Hα emissions), J0435+2523, and J0439+2333, are new members in the young Taurus-Auriga star-forming region based on proper motion, spatial distribution, and location in the color-magnitude diagram, which reopens the discussion on the deficit of M2-4 Taurus stars. Finally, based on proper motion diagrams, we report on a new wide M dwarf binary system in the field, LSPM J0326+3929EW.

  20. Search for Bright Nearby M Dwarfs with Virtual Observatory Tools

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aberasturi, M.; Caballero, J. A.; Montesinos, B.; Gálvez-Ortiz, M. C.; Solano, E.; Martín, E. L.

    2014-08-01

    Using Virtual Observatory tools, we cross-matched the Carlsberg Meridian 14 and the 2MASS Point Source catalogs to select candidate nearby bright M dwarfs distributed over ~25,000 deg2. Here, we present reconnaissance low-resolution optical spectra for 27 candidates that were observed with the Intermediate Dispersion Spectrograph at the 2.5 m Isaac Newton Telescope ( {R} \\approx 1600). We derived spectral types from a new spectral index, real, which measures the ratio of fluxes at 7485-7015 Å and 7120-7150 Å. We also used VOSA, a Virtual Observatory tool for spectral energy distribution fitting, to derive effective temperatures and surface gravities for each candidate. The resulting 27 targets were M dwarfs brighter than J = 10.5 mag, 16 of which were completely new in the Northern hemisphere and 7 of which were located at less than 15 pc. For all of them, we also measured Hα and Na I pseudo-equivalent widths, determined photometric distances, and identified the most active stars. The targets with the weakest sodium absorption, namely, J0422+2439 (with X-ray and strong Hα emissions), J0435+2523, and J0439+2333, are new members in the young Taurus-Auriga star-forming region based on proper motion, spatial distribution, and location in the color-magnitude diagram, which reopens the discussion on the deficit of M2-4 Taurus stars. Finally, based on proper motion diagrams, we report on a new wide M dwarf binary system in the field, LSPM J0326+3929EW.

  1. Laser Guide Star Adaptive Optics without Tip-tilt

    CERN Document Server

    Davies, R; Lidman, C; Louarn, M Le; Kasper, M; Förster-Schreiber, N M; Roccatagliata, V; Ageorges, N; Amico, P; Dumas, C; Mannucci, F

    2008-01-01

    Adaptive optics (AO) systems allow a telescope to reach its diffraction limit at near infrared wavelengths. But to achieve this, a bright natural guide star (NGS) is needed for the wavefront sensing, severely limiting the fraction of the sky over which AO can be used. To some extent this can be overcome with a laser guide star (LGS). While the laser can be pointed anywhere in the sky, one still needs to have a natural star, albeit fainter, reasonably close to correct the image motion (tip-tilt) to which laser guide stars are insensitive. There are in fact many astronomical targets without suitable tip-tilt stars, but for which the enhanced resolution obtained with the Laser Guide Star Facility (LGSF) would still be very beneficial. This article explores what adaptive optics performance one might expect if one dispenses with the tip-tilt star, and in what situations this mode of observing might be needed.

  2. Horndeski's Stars

    CERN Document Server

    Cisterna, Adolfo; Rinaldi, Massimiliano

    2015-01-01

    We consider the sector of Horndeski's gravity characterized by a coupling between the kinetic scalar field term and the Einstein tensor. Our goal is to find realistic neutron star configurations in this framework. We show that, in a certain limit, there exist solutions that are identical to the Schwarzschild metric outside the star but change considerably inside, where the scalar field is not trivial. We study numerically the equations and find the region of the parameter space where neutron stars exist. We determine their internal pressure and mass-radius relation, and we compare them with standard general relativity models.

  3. The Stars behind the Curtain

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-02-01

    ESO is releasing a magnificent VLT image of the giant stellar nursery surrounding NGC 3603, in which stars are continuously being born. Embedded in this scenic nebula is one of the most luminous and most compact clusters of young, massive stars in our Milky Way, which therefore serves as an excellent "local" analogue of very active star-forming regions in other galaxies. The cluster also hosts the most massive star to be "weighed" so far. NGC 3603 is a starburst region: a cosmic factory where stars form frantically from the nebula's extended clouds of gas and dust. Located 22 000 light-years away from the Sun, it is the closest region of this kind known in our galaxy, providing astronomers with a local test bed for studying intense star formation processes, very common in other galaxies, but hard to observe in detail because of their great distance from us. The nebula owes its shape to the intense light and winds coming from the young, massive stars which lift the curtains of gas and clouds revealing a multitude of glowing suns. The central cluster of stars inside NGC 3603 harbours thousands of stars of all sorts (eso9946): the majority have masses similar to or less than that of our Sun, but most spectacular are several of the very massive stars that are close to the end of their lives. Several blue supergiant stars crowd into a volume of less than a cubic light-year, along with three so-called Wolf-Rayet stars - extremely bright and massive stars that are ejecting vast amounts of material before finishing off in glorious explosions known as supernovae. Using another recent set of observations performed with the SINFONI instrument on ESO's Very Large Telescope (VLT), astronomers have confirmed that one of these stars is about 120 times more massive than our Sun, standing out as the most massive star known so far in the Milky Way [1]. The clouds of NGC 3603 provide us with a family picture of stars in different stages of their life, with gaseous structures that are

  4. VizieR Online Data Catalog: Young star groups in NGC 300 (Rodriguez+, 2016)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rodriguez, M. J.; Baume, G.; Feinstein, C.

    2016-08-01

    Fundamental characteristics of 1147 young star groups identified in 6 ACS/WFC fields of the galaxy NGC 300. For each group: field of the ACS/WFC, equatorial coordinates, radius, number of stars (the suffix bri indicates bright stars with F555W<25, the suffix dct indicate stars belonging to the decontaminated region, the suffixes blue and red refer to blue and red stars respectively), the magnitude of the brightest star in the group, PDMF slope with its error, and galactocentric distance. (1 data file).

  5. Dark Stars: Dark Matter in the First Stars leads to a New Phase of Stellar Evolution

    CERN Document Server

    Freese, Katherine; Aguirre, Anthony; Bodenheimer, Peter; Gondolo, Paolo; Sellwood, J A; Yoshida, Naoki

    2008-01-01

    The first phase of stellar evolution in the history of the universe may be Dark Stars, powered by dark matter heating rather than by fusion. Weakly interacting massive particles, which are their own antiparticles, can annihilate and provide an important heat source for the first stars in the the universe. This talk presents the story of these Dark Stars. We make predictions that the first stars are very massive ($\\sim 800 M_\\odot$), cool (6000 K), bright ($\\sim 10^6 L_\\odot$), long-lived ($\\sim 10^6$ years), and probable precursors to (otherwise unexplained) supermassive black holes. Later, once the initial DM fuel runs out and fusion sets in, DM annihilation can predominate again if the scattering cross section is strong enough, so that a Dark Star is born again.

  6. B- and A-Type Stars in the Taurus-Auriga Star-Forming Region

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mooley, Kunal; Hillenbrand, Lynne; Rebull, Luisa; Padgett, Deborah; Knapp, Gillian

    2013-01-01

    We describe the results of a search for early-type stars associated with the Taurus-Auriga molecular cloud complex, a diffuse nearby star-forming region noted as lacking young stars of intermediate and high mass. We investigate several sets of possible O, B, and early A spectral class members. The first is a group of stars for which mid-infrared images show bright nebulae, all of which can be associated with stars of spectral-type B. The second group consists of early-type stars compiled from (1) literature listings in SIMBAD, (2) B stars with infrared excesses selected from the Spitzer Space Telescope survey of the Taurus cloud, (3) magnitude- and color-selected point sources from the Two Micron All Sky Survey, and (4) spectroscopically identified early-type stars from the Sloan Digital Sky Survey coverage of the Taurus region. We evaluated stars for membership in the Taurus-Auriga star formation region based on criteria involving: spectroscopic and parallactic distances, proper motions and radial velocities, and infrared excesses or line emission indicative of stellar youth. For selected objects, we also model the scattered and emitted radiation from reflection nebulosity and compare the results with the observed spectral energy distributions to further test the plausibility of physical association of the B stars with the Taurus cloud. This investigation newly identifies as probable Taurus members three B-type stars: HR 1445 (HD 28929), t Tau (HD 29763), 72 Tau (HD 28149), and two A-type stars: HD 31305 and HD 26212, thus doubling the number of stars A5 or earlier associated with the Taurus clouds. Several additional early-type sources including HD 29659 and HD 283815 meet some, but not all, of the membership criteria and therefore are plausible, though not secure, members.

  7. The SDSS view of the Palomar-Green bright quasar survey

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jester, Sebastian; Schneider, Donald P.; Richards, Gordon T.; Green, Richard F.; Schmidt, Maarten; Hall, Patrick B.; Strauss, Michael A.; Vanden Berk, Daniel E.; Stoughton, Chris; Gunn, James E.; Brinkmann, Jon; Kent, Stephen M.; Smith, J.Allyn; Tucker, Douglas, L.; Yanny, Brian; /Fermilab /Penn State U., Astron. Astrophys. /Princeton U.

    2005-02-01

    The author investigates the extent to which the Palomar-Green (PG) Bright Quasar Survey (BQS) is complete and representative of the general quasar population by comparing with imaging and spectroscopy from the Sloan Digital Sky Survey. A comparison of SDSS and PG photometry of both stars and quasars reveals the need to apply a color and magnitude recalibration to the PG data. Using the SDSS photometric catalog, they define the PG's parent sample of objects that are not main-sequence stars and simulate the selection of objects from this parent sample using the PG photometric criteria and errors. This simulation shows that the effective U-B cut in the PG survey is U-B < -0.71, implying a color-related incompleteness. As the color distribution of bright quasars peaks near U-B = -0.7 and the 2-{sigma} error in U-B is comparable to the full width of the color distribution of quasars, the color incompleteness of the BQS is approximately 50% and essentially random with respect to U-B color for z < 0.5. There is however, a bias against bright quasars at 0.5 < z < 1, which is induced by the color-redshift relation of quasars (although quasars at z > 0.5 are inherently rare in bright surveys in any case). They find no evidence for any other systematic incompleteness when comparing the distributions in color, redshift, and FIRST radio properties of the BQS and a BQS-like subsample of the SDSS quasar sample. However, the application of a bright magnitude limit biases the BQS toward the inclusion of objects which are blue in g-i, in particular compared to the full range of g-i colors found among the i-band limited SDSS quasars, and even at i-band magnitudes comparable to those of the BQS objects.

  8. Star formation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Woodward, P.R.

    1978-09-27

    Theoretical models of star formation are discussed beginning with the earliest stages and ending in the formation of rotating, self-gravitating disks or rings. First a model of the implosion of very diffuse gas clouds is presented which relies upon a shock at the edge of a galactic spiral arm to drive the implosion. Second, models are presented for the formation of a second generation of massive stars in such a cloud once a first generation has formed. These models rely on the ionizing radiation from massive stars or on the supernova shocks produced when these stars explode. Finally, calculations of the gravitational collapse of rotating clouds are discussed with special focus on the question of whether rotating disks or rings are the result of such a collapse. 65 references.

  9. Star formation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Theoretical models of star formation are discussed beginning with the earliest stages and ending in the formation of rotating, self-gravitating disks or rings. First a model of the implosion of very diffuse gas clouds is presented which relies upon a shock at the edge of a galactic spiral arm to drive the implosion. Second, models are presented for the formation of a second generation of massive stars in such a cloud once a first generation has formed. These models rely on the ionizing radiation from massive stars or on the supernova shocks produced when these stars explode. Finally, calculations of the gravitational collapse of rotating clouds are discussed with special focus on the question of whether rotating disks or rings are the result of such a collapse. 65 references

  10. Carbon Stars

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    T. Lloyd Evans

    2010-12-01

    In this paper, the present state of knowledge of the carbon stars is discussed. Particular attention is given to issues of classification, evolution, variability, populations in our own and other galaxies, and circumstellar material.

  11. Rock Stars

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    张国平

    2000-01-01

    Around the world young people are spending unbelievable sums of money to listen to rock music. Forbes Magazine reports that at least fifty rock stars have incomes between two million and six million dollars per year.

  12. Wave Star

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kramer, Morten; Frigaard, Peter

    Nærværende rapport beskriver modelforsøg udført på Aalborg Universitet, Institut for Byggeri og Anlæg med bølgeenergianlæget Wave Star.......Nærværende rapport beskriver modelforsøg udført på Aalborg Universitet, Institut for Byggeri og Anlæg med bølgeenergianlæget Wave Star....

  13. Wave Star

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kramer, Morten; Andersen, Thomas Lykke

    Nærværende rapport beskriver modelforsøg udført på Aalborg Universitet, Institut for Vand, Jord og Miljøteknik med bølgeenergianlægget Wave Star.......Nærværende rapport beskriver modelforsøg udført på Aalborg Universitet, Institut for Vand, Jord og Miljøteknik med bølgeenergianlægget Wave Star....

  14. Increasing the brightness of light sources

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fu, Ling

    2006-11-16

    In this work the principle of light recycling is applied to artificial light sources in order to achieve brightness enhancement. Firstly, the feasibilities of increasing the brightness of light sources via light recycling are examined theoretically, based on the fundamental laws of thermodynamics including Kirchhoff's law on radiation, Planck's law, Lambert-Beer's law, the etendue conservation and the brightness theorem. From an experimental viewpoint, the radiation properties of three different kinds of light sources including short-arc lamps, incandescent lamps and LEDs characterized by their light-generating mechanisms are investigated. These three types of sources are used in light recycling experiments, for the purpose of 1. validating the intrinsic light recycling effect in light sources, e. g. the intrinsic light recycling effect in incandescent lamps stemming from the coiled filament structure. 2. acquiring the required parameters for establishing physical models, e.g. the emissivity/absorptivity of the short-arc lamps, the intrinsic reflectivity and the external quantum efficiency of LEDs. 3. laying the foundations for designing optics aimed at brightness enhancement according to the characteristics of the sources and applications. Based on the fundamental laws and experiments, two physical models for simulating the radiance distribution of light sources are established, one for thermal filament lamps, the other for luminescent sources, LEDs. As validation of the theoretical and experimental investigation of the light recycling effect, an optical device, the Carambola, is designed for achieving deterministic and multiple light recycling. The Carambola has the function of a concentrator. In order to achieve the maximum possible brightness enhancement with the Carambola, several combinations of sources and Carambolas are modelled in ray-tracing simulations. Sources with different light-emitting mechanisms and different radiation properties

  15. Jupiter analogues and planets of active stars

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Henning T.

    2013-04-01

    Full Text Available Combined results are now available from a 15 year long search for Jupiter analogues around solar-type stars using the ESO CAT + CES, ESO 3.6 m + CES, and ESO 3.6 m + HARPS instruments. They comprise planet (co-discoveries (ι Hor and HR 506 and confirmations (three planets in HR 3259 as well as non-confirmations of planets (HR 4523 and ɛ Eri announced elsewhere. A long-term trend in ɛ Ind found by our survey is probably attributable to a Jovian planet with a period >30 yr, but we cannot fully exclude stellar activity effects as the cause. A 3.8 year periodic variation in HR 8323 can be attributed to stellar activity.

  16. Determining neutron star masses with weak microlensing

    CERN Document Server

    Tian, Lanlan

    2012-01-01

    The masses of stars including stellar remnants are almost exclusively known from binary systems. In this work, we study gravitational microlensing of faint background galaxies by isolated neutron stars (pulsars). We show that the resulting surface brightness distortions can be used to determine the masses of neutron star. Due to different evolutionary histories, isolated neutron stars may have different masses from those in binary systems, and thus provide unique insight into their equation of states under extreme physical conditions. We search for existing pulsar catalogs and find one promising pair of a nearby pulsar and a background galaxy. This method will become more practical for the next generation optical and radio surveys and telescopes.

  17. The environment of Low Surface Brightness Galaxies

    OpenAIRE

    Rosenbaum, S. D.; Bomans, D. J.

    2004-01-01

    Using the Early Data Release of the Sloan Digital Sky Survey (SDSS) we investigated the clustering properties of Low Surface Brightness (LSB) galaxies in comparison to normal, High Surface Brightness (HSB) galaxies. We selected LSB galaxies and HSB galaxies with well measured redshifts from the SDSS data base and performed three-dimensional neighbour counting analysis within spheres of radii between 0.8 Mpc and 8.0 Mpc. As a second analysis method we used an N-th neighbour analysis with N var...

  18. The historical investigation of cometary brightness

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hughes, David W.

    1998-12-01

    The interpretation of the way in which the brightness of a comet varied as a function of both its heliocentric and geocentric distance was essentially started by Isaac Newton in his book Philosophiae Naturalis Principia Mathematica, published in 1687. Astronomers have argued about the form of this variability ever since, and for many years it was regarded as an important clue as to the physical nature of the cometary nucleus and its decay process. This paper reviews our understanding of the causes of cometary brightness variability between about 1680 and the 1950s.

  19. Stars Just Got Bigger - A 300 Solar Mass Star Uncovered

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    raises the challenge to theorists still further. "Either they were born so big or smaller stars merged together to produce them," explains Crowther. Stars between about 8 and 150 solar masses explode at the end of their short lives as supernovae, leaving behind exotic remnants, either neutron stars or black holes. Having now established the existence of stars weighing between 150 and 300 solar masses, the astronomers' findings raise the prospect of the existence of exceptionally bright, "pair instability supernovae" that completely blow themselves apart, failing to leave behind any remnant and dispersing up to ten solar masses of iron into their surroundings. A few candidates for such explosions have already been proposed in recent years. Not only is R136a1 the most massive star ever found, but it also has the highest luminosity too, close to 10 million times greater than the Sun. "Owing to the rarity of these monsters, I think it is unlikely that this new record will be broken any time soon," concludes Crowther. Notes [1] The star A1 in NGC 3603 is a double star, with an orbital period of 3.77 days. The two stars in the system have, respectively, 120 and 92 times the mass of the Sun, which means that they have formed as stars weighing, respectively, 148 and 106 solar masses. [2] The team used the SINFONI, ISAAC and MAD instruments, all attached to ESO's Very Large Telescope at Paranal, Chile. [3] (note added on 26 July 2010) The "bigger" in the title does not imply that these stars are the biggest observed. Such stars, called red supergiants, can have radii up to about a thousand solar radii, while R136a1, which is blue, is about 35 times as large as the Sun. However, R136a1 is the star with the greatest mass known to date. More information This work is presented in an article published in the Monthly Notices of the Royal Astronomical Society ("The R136 star cluster hosts several stars whose individual masses greatly exceed the accepted 150 Msun stellar mass limit", by

  20. The Unusual Photometric Variability of the PMS Star GM Cep

    Science.gov (United States)

    Semkov, E. H.; Ibryamov, S. I.; Peneva, S. P.; Milanov, T. R.; Stoyanov, K. A.; Stateva, I. K.; Kjurkchieva, D. P.; Dimitrov, D. P.; Radeva, V. S.

    2015-03-01

    Results from UBVRI photometric observations of the pre-main sequence star GM Cep obtained in the period 2011 April-2014 August are reported in the paper. Presented data are a continuation of our photometric monitoring of the star started in 2008. GM Cep is located in the field of the young open cluster Trumpler 37 and over the past years it has been an object of intense photometric and spectral studies. The star shows a strong photometric variability interpreted as a possible outburst from EXor type in previous studies. Our photometric data for a period of over six years show a large amplitude variability (ΔV ~ 2.3 mag) and several deep minimums in brightness are observed. The analysis of the collected multicolour photometric data show the typical of UX Ori variables a colour reversal during the minimums in brightness. The observed decreases in brightness have a different shape, and evidences of periodicity are not detected. At the same time, high amplitude rapid variations in brightness typical for the classical T Tauri stars also present on the light curve of GM Cep. The spectrum of GM Cep shows the typical of classical T Tauri stars wide Hα emission line and absorption lines of some metals. We calculate the outer radius of the Hα emitting region as 10.4 ± 0.5 R⊙ and the accretion rate as 1.8 × 10- 7 M⊙ yr- 1.