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Sample records for bright green-emitting fluorescent

  1. Brightly blue and green emitting Cu(I) dimers for singlet harvesting in OLEDs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leitl, Markus J; Küchle, Fritz-Robert; Mayer, Hermann A; Wesemann, Lars; Yersin, Hartmut

    2013-11-21

    an emission mechanism corresponds to a thermally activated delayed fluorescence (TADF). At ambient temperature, almost only a delayed fluorescence (∼98%) is observed. Compounds showing this mechanism are highly attractive for applications in OLEDs or LEECs as, in principle, it is possible to harvest all singlet and triplet excitons for the generation of light in the lowest excited singlet state. This effect represents the singlet harvesting mechanism.

  2. Preparation for a new green-emitting phosphor for cold cathode fluorescent lamp

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kang, K. [Key Laboratory of Luminescence and Optical Information, Ministry of Education, Institute of Optoelectronic Technology, Beijing Jiaotong University, Beijing 100044 (China); National Engineering Research Center for Rare Earth Materials, General Research Institute for Nonferrous Metals, and Grirem Advanced Materials Co., Ltd., Beijing 100088 (China); Huang, S.H. [Key Laboratory of Luminescence and Optical Information, Ministry of Education, Institute of Optoelectronic Technology, Beijing Jiaotong University, Beijing 100044 (China)]. E-mail: shhuang@center.njtu.edu.cn; Huang, X.W. [National Engineering Research Center for Rare Earth Materials, General Research Institute for Nonferrous Metals, and Grirem Advanced Materials Co., Ltd., Beijing 100088 (China); Zhuang, W.D. [National Engineering Research Center for Rare Earth Materials, General Research Institute for Nonferrous Metals, and Grirem Advanced Materials Co., Ltd., Beijing 100088 (China); You, F.T. [Key Laboratory of Luminescence and Optical Information, Ministry of Education, Institute of Optoelectronic Technology, Beijing Jiaotong University, Beijing 100044 (China); Zhang, S.S. [National Engineering Research Center for Rare Earth Materials, General Research Institute for Nonferrous Metals, and Grirem Advanced Materials Co., Ltd., Beijing 100088 (China); He, H.Q. [National Engineering Research Center for Rare Earth Materials, General Research Institute for Nonferrous Metals, and Grirem Advanced Materials Co., Ltd., Beijing 100088 (China)

    2007-01-15

    A new type of phosphor Ce{sub 0.67}Tb{sub 0.33}Mg{sub 1-} {sub x} Mn {sub x} Al{sub 11}O{sub 19} was obtained by substituting Mn for Mg of Ce{sub 0.67}Tb{sub 0.33}MgAl{sub 11}O{sub 19}. This new phosphor improved the green ratio dramatically, compared with the conventional phosphor. Besides Tb missions originating from {sup 5}D{sub 3,4}{sup {yields}}{sup 7}F {sub j} {sub =6,5,4,3,2}, a broad band at 518 nm was observed and that was the characteristic transition of Mn{sup 2+} ({sup 4}T{sub 1}(t{sup 4} {sub 2g}e{sup 1} {sub g}){sup {yields}}{sup 6}A{sub 1}(t{sup 3} {sub 2g}e{sup 2} {sub g})). It resolved the problem that green ratio of Ce{sub 0.67}Tb{sub 0.33}MgAl{sub 11}O{sub 19} was too low for thin-film-transistor liquid-crystal-display backlight. In addition, this paper also studied the influence of Mn{sup 2+} content from 0 to 50 at% on luminescence characteristics. The result showed that the brightness did not vary when content was in the range 0-18 at%; however, the green ratio increased from 0.46 to 0.76. A possible structure model was discussed for the possible location of Mn{sup 2+} ion in lattice at the end of the paper.

  3. Fluorescence Properties and Synthesis of Green-Emitting Tb3+-Activated Amorphous Calcium Silicate Phosphor by Ultraviolet Irradiation of 378 nm

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yoshiyuki Kojima

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available The excitation wavelength of conventional Tb3+-activated phosphor is near 270 nm. This study describes novel green-emitting Tb3+-activated amorphous calcium silicate by ultraviolet excitation at 378 nm. The Tb3+-activated amorphous calcium silicate was prepared by heating a sample of Tb3+-activated calcium silicate hydrate (CSH at 900°C for 30 minutes. The emission wavelength of the resulting phosphor was 544 nm. The optimum excitation wavelength within the range 300–400 nm was 378 nm. The Tb3+-activated amorphous calcium silicate emitted green by ultraviolet irradiation. The optimum initial Tb/Ca atomic ratio of this phosphor was about 0.5. A mechanism for the action of the phosphor is proposed, in which Tb3+ ions existing in the layer of the CSH lead to loss of water molecules and OH groups.

  4. Highly selective red- and green-emitting two-photon fluorescent probes for cysteine detection and their bio-imaging in living cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Zhiguang; Zhao, Ning; Sun, Yuming; Miao, Fang; Liu, Yong; Liu, Xin; Zhang, Yuanhong; Ai, Wentao; Song, Guofen; Shen, Xiaoyuan; Yu, Xiaoqiang; Sun, Jingzhi; Wong, Wai-Yeung

    2012-04-07

    Two highly selective two-photon fluorescent probes for cysteine over homocysteine, N-acetyl-L-cysteine, dithiothreitol, glutathione and other amino acids, and their fluorescent imaging in living cells have been shown. This journal is © The Royal Society of Chemistry 2012

  5. Quantitative Brightness Analysis of Fluorescence Intensity Fluctuations in E. Coli.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kwang-Ho Hur

    Full Text Available The brightness measured by fluorescence fluctuation spectroscopy specifies the average stoichiometry of a labeled protein in a sample. Here we extended brightness analysis, which has been mainly applied in eukaryotic cells, to prokaryotic cells with E. coli serving as a model system. The small size of the E. coli cell introduces unique challenges for applying brightness analysis that are addressed in this work. Photobleaching leads to a depletion of fluorophores and a reduction of the brightness of protein complexes. In addition, the E. coli cell and the point spread function of the instrument only partially overlap, which influences intensity fluctuations. To address these challenges we developed MSQ analysis, which is based on the mean Q-value of segmented photon count data, and combined it with the analysis of axial scans through the E. coli cell. The MSQ method recovers brightness, concentration, and diffusion time of soluble proteins in E. coli. We applied MSQ to measure the brightness of EGFP in E. coli and compared it to solution measurements. We further used MSQ analysis to determine the oligomeric state of nuclear transport factor 2 labeled with EGFP expressed in E. coli cells. The results obtained demonstrate the feasibility of quantifying the stoichiometry of proteins by brightness analysis in a prokaryotic cell.

  6. Confidence intervals for concentration and brightness from fluorescence fluctuation measurements.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pryse, Kenneth M; Rong, Xi; Whisler, Jordan A; McConnaughey, William B; Jiang, Yan-Fei; Melnykov, Artem V; Elson, Elliot L; Genin, Guy M

    2012-09-05

    The theory of photon count histogram (PCH) analysis describes the distribution of fluorescence fluctuation amplitudes due to populations of fluorophores diffusing through a focused laser beam and provides a rigorous framework through which the brightnesses and concentrations of the fluorophores can be determined. In practice, however, the brightnesses and concentrations of only a few components can be identified. Brightnesses and concentrations are determined by a nonlinear least-squares fit of a theoretical model to the experimental PCH derived from a record of fluorescence intensity fluctuations. The χ(2) hypersurface in the neighborhood of the optimum parameter set can have varying degrees of curvature, due to the intrinsic curvature of the model, the specific parameter values of the system under study, and the relative noise in the data. Because of this varying curvature, parameters estimated from the least-squares analysis have varying degrees of uncertainty associated with them. There are several methods for assigning confidence intervals to the parameters, but these methods have different efficacies for PCH data. Here, we evaluate several approaches to confidence interval estimation for PCH data, including asymptotic standard error, likelihood joint-confidence region, likelihood confidence intervals, skew-corrected and accelerated bootstrap (BCa), and Monte Carlo residual resampling methods. We study these with a model two-dimensional membrane system for simplicity, but the principles are applicable as well to fluorophores diffusing in three-dimensional solution. Using simulated fluorescence fluctuation data, we find the BCa method to be particularly well-suited for estimating confidence intervals in PCH analysis, and several other methods to be less so. Using the BCa method and additional simulated fluctuation data, we find that confidence intervals can be reduced dramatically for a specific non-Gaussian beam profile. Copyright © 2012 Biophysical Society

  7. mScarlet : a bright monomeric red fluorescent protein for cellular imaging

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bindels, D.S.; Haarbosch, L.; van Weeren, L.; Postma, M.; Wiese, K.E.; Mastop, M.; Aumonier, S.; Gotthard, G.; Royant, A.; Hink, M.A.; Gadella Jr, T.W.J.

    2017-01-01

    We report the engineering of mScarlet, a truly monomeric red fluorescent protein with record brightness, quantum yield (70%) and fluorescence lifetime (3.9 ns). We developed mScarlet starting with a consensus synthetic template and using improved spectroscopic screening techniques; mScarlet's

  8. Fluorescent monomers: "bricks" that make a molecularly imprinted polymer "bright".

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wan, Wei; Wagner, Sabine; Rurack, Knut

    2016-03-01

    Molecularly imprinted polymers (MIPs) are potent and established recognition phases in separation and enrichment applications. Because of their robustness, versatility and format adaptability, they also constitute very promising sensing phases, especially when the active sensing element is directly integrated into the MIP. Fluorescent MIPs incorporating fluorescent monomers are perhaps the best developed and most successful approach here. This article reviews the state of the art in this field, discussing the pros and cons of the use of fluorescent dye and probe derivatives as such monomers, the different molecular interaction forces for template complexation, signalling modes and a variety of related approaches that have been realized over the years, including Förster resonance energy transfer processes, covalent imprinting, postmodification attachment of fluorescent units and conjugated polymers as MIPs; other measurement schemes and sensing chemistries that use MIPs and fluorescence interrogation to solve analytical problems (fluorescent competitive assays, fluorescent analytes, etc.) are not covered here. Throughout the article, photophysical processes are discussed to facilitate understanding of the effects that can occur when one is planning for a fluorescence response to happen in a constrained polymer matrix. The article concludes with a concise assessment of the suitability of the different formats for sensor realization.

  9. Near UV-Blue Excitable Green-Emitting Nanocrystalline Oxide

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    C. E. Rodríguez-García

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Green-emitting Eu-activated powders were produced by a two-stage method consisting of pressure-assisted combustion synthesis and postannealing in ammonia. The as-synthesized powders exhibited a red photoluminescence (PL peak located at =616 nm when excited with =395 nm UV. This emission peak corresponds to the 5D0→7F2 transition in Eu3+. After annealing in ammonia, the PL emission changed to an intense broad-band peak centered at =500 nm, most likely produced by 4f65d1→4f7 electronic transitions in Eu2+. This green-emitting phosphor has excitation band in the near UV-blue region (=300–450 nm. X-ray diffraction analysis reveals mainly the orthorhombic EuAlO3 and Al2O3 phases. Transmission electron microscopy observations showed that the grains are formed by faceted nanocrystals (~4 nm of polygonal shape. The excellent excitation and emission properties make these powders very promising to be used as phosphors in UV solid-state diodes coupled to activate white-emitting lamps.

  10. Model for the brightness uniformity of fluorescence screen of image intensifier

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qiu, YaFeng; Chang, BenKang; Qian, YunSheng; Fu, RongGuo; Gao, Youtang; Si, Tian

    2007-01-01

    The three elements of photoelectrical cathode, microchannel plate and fluorescence screen are important parts to imaging quality of low light and ultraviolet Image intensifier. To do research and analysis work on the Fluorescence screen parameter testing have practical significance to the understanding of the performance of fluorescence screen and then can help to know where improvement should be made and then achieve a best performance entire tube, This article mainly introduce the testing theory of the brightness uniformity of fluorescence screen of Image Intensifier and how to build a mathematic model.

  11. Adaptive Evolution of Eel Fluorescent Proteins from Fatty Acid Binding Proteins Produces Bright Fluorescence in the Marine Environment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gruber, David F.; Gaffney, Jean P.; Mehr, Shaadi; DeSalle, Rob; Sparks, John S.; Platisa, Jelena; Pieribone, Vincent A.

    2015-01-01

    We report the identification and characterization of two new members of a family of bilirubin-inducible fluorescent proteins (FPs) from marine chlopsid eels and demonstrate a key region of the sequence that serves as an evolutionary switch from non-fluorescent to fluorescent fatty acid-binding proteins (FABPs). Using transcriptomic analysis of two species of brightly fluorescent Kaupichthys eels (Kaupichthys hyoproroides and Kaupichthys n. sp.), two new FPs were identified, cloned and characterized (Chlopsid FP I and Chlopsid FP II). We then performed phylogenetic analysis on 210 FABPs, spanning 16 vertebrate orders, and including 163 vertebrate taxa. We show that the fluorescent FPs diverged as a protein family and are the sister group to brain FABPs. Our results indicate that the evolution of this family involved at least three gene duplication events. We show that fluorescent FABPs possess a unique, conserved tripeptide Gly-Pro-Pro sequence motif, which is not found in non-fluorescent fatty acid binding proteins. This motif arose from a duplication event of the FABP brain isoforms and was under strong purifying selection, leading to the classification of this new FP family. Residues adjacent to the motif are under strong positive selection, suggesting a further refinement of the eel protein’s fluorescent properties. We present a phylogenetic reconstruction of this emerging FP family and describe additional fluorescent FABP members from groups of distantly related eels. The elucidation of this class of fish FPs with diverse properties provides new templates for the development of protein-based fluorescent tools. The evolutionary adaptation from fatty acid-binding proteins to fluorescent fatty acid-binding proteins raises intrigue as to the functional role of bright green fluorescence in this cryptic genus of reclusive eels that inhabit a blue, nearly monochromatic, marine environment. PMID:26561348

  12. Adaptive Evolution of Eel Fluorescent Proteins from Fatty Acid Binding Proteins Produces Bright Fluorescence in the Marine Environment.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    David F Gruber

    Full Text Available We report the identification and characterization of two new members of a family of bilirubin-inducible fluorescent proteins (FPs from marine chlopsid eels and demonstrate a key region of the sequence that serves as an evolutionary switch from non-fluorescent to fluorescent fatty acid-binding proteins (FABPs. Using transcriptomic analysis of two species of brightly fluorescent Kaupichthys eels (Kaupichthys hyoproroides and Kaupichthys n. sp., two new FPs were identified, cloned and characterized (Chlopsid FP I and Chlopsid FP II. We then performed phylogenetic analysis on 210 FABPs, spanning 16 vertebrate orders, and including 163 vertebrate taxa. We show that the fluorescent FPs diverged as a protein family and are the sister group to brain FABPs. Our results indicate that the evolution of this family involved at least three gene duplication events. We show that fluorescent FABPs possess a unique, conserved tripeptide Gly-Pro-Pro sequence motif, which is not found in non-fluorescent fatty acid binding proteins. This motif arose from a duplication event of the FABP brain isoforms and was under strong purifying selection, leading to the classification of this new FP family. Residues adjacent to the motif are under strong positive selection, suggesting a further refinement of the eel protein's fluorescent properties. We present a phylogenetic reconstruction of this emerging FP family and describe additional fluorescent FABP members from groups of distantly related eels. The elucidation of this class of fish FPs with diverse properties provides new templates for the development of protein-based fluorescent tools. The evolutionary adaptation from fatty acid-binding proteins to fluorescent fatty acid-binding proteins raises intrigue as to the functional role of bright green fluorescence in this cryptic genus of reclusive eels that inhabit a blue, nearly monochromatic, marine environment.

  13. Ambient light effect on the uniformity of image intensifier fluorescence screen brightness

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qiu, YaFeng; Chang, BenKang; Sun, LianJun; Zhang, JunJu; Gao, YouTang; Fu, RongGuo

    2008-02-01

    When testing the uniformity of Image intensifier fluorescence screen brightness, the million scale CCD brightness meter is used. Due to the distance between the meter and fluorescence screen, the effect of ambient light on the testing result is essential to the design of testing system. Test with super second generation tube, input a constant voltage to insure the fluorescence screen brightness to be constant. Collect the brightness of the same fluorescence screen in different ambient luminance environment of 1×102Lx, 1×101Lx, 1Lx, 1×10-1Lx, 1×10-2Lx, 1×10-3Lx. Study the results with software MATLAB. It is concluded as: In ambient luminance environment of 1×10-1Lx the CCD has the best result. The testing result in ambient luminance environment of above 1×103Lx show untrue image. The testing result in ambient luminance environment of below 1×10-3Lx shows its own noise image and is unbelievable either.

  14. Fluorescence intensity and bright spot analyses using a confocal microscope for photodynamic diagnosis of brain tumors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yoneyama, Takeshi; Watanabe, Tetsuyo; Kagawa, Hiroyuki; Hayashi, Yutaka; Nakada, Mitsutoshi

    2017-03-01

    In photodynamic diagnosis using 5-aminolevulinic acid (5-ALA), discrimination between the tumor and normal tissue is very important for a precise resection. However, it is difficult to distinguish between infiltrating tumor and normal regions in the boundary area. In this study, fluorescent intensity and bright spot analyses using a confocal microscope is proposed for the precise discrimination between infiltrating tumor and normal regions. From the 5-ALA-resected brain tumor tissue, the red fluorescent and marginal regions were sliced for observation under a confocal microscope. Hematoxylin and eosin (H&E) staining were performed on serial slices of the same tissue. According to the pathological inspection of the H&E slides, the tumor and infiltrating and normal regions on confocal microscopy images were investigated. From the fluorescent intensity of the image pixels, a histogram of pixel number with the same fluorescent intensity was obtained. The fluorescent bright spot sizes and total number were compared between the marginal and normal regions. The fluorescence intensity distribution and average intensity in the tumor were different from those in the normal region. The probability of a difference from the dark enhanced the difference between the tumor and the normal region. The bright spot size and number in the infiltrating tumor were different from those in the normal region. Fluorescence intensity analysis is useful to distinguish a tumor region, and a bright spot analysis is useful to distinguish between infiltrating tumor and normal regions. These methods will be important for the precise resection or photodynamic therapy of brain tumors. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  15. mScarlet: a bright monomeric red fluorescent protein for cellular imaging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bindels, Daphne S; Haarbosch, Lindsay; van Weeren, Laura; Postma, Marten; Wiese, Katrin E; Mastop, Marieke; Aumonier, Sylvain; Gotthard, Guillaume; Royant, Antoine; Hink, Mark A; Gadella, Theodorus W J

    2017-01-01

    We report the engineering of mScarlet, a truly monomeric red fluorescent protein with record brightness, quantum yield (70%) and fluorescence lifetime (3.9 ns). We developed mScarlet starting with a consensus synthetic template and using improved spectroscopic screening techniques; mScarlet's crystal structure reveals a planar and rigidified chromophore. mScarlet outperforms existing red fluorescent proteins as a fusion tag, and it is especially useful as a Förster resonance energy transfer (FRET) acceptor in ratiometric imaging.

  16. Very bright orange fluorescent plants: endoplasmic reticulum targeting of orange fluorescent proteins as visual reporters in transgenic plants

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mann David GJ

    2012-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The expression of fluorescent protein (FP genes as real-time visual markers, both transiently and stably, has revolutionized plant biotechnology. A palette of colors of FPs is now available for use, but the diversity has generally been underutilized in plant biotechnology. Because of the green and far-red autofluorescent properties of many plant tissues and the FPs themselves, red and orange FPs (RFPs, and OFPs, respectfully appear to be the colors with maximum utility in plant biotechnology. Within the color palette OFPs have emerged as the brightest FP markers in the visible spectra. This study compares several native, near-native and modified OFPs for their “brightness” and fluorescence, therefore, their usability as marker genes in transgenic plant tissues. Results The OFPs DsRed2, tdTomato, mOrange and pporRFP were all expressed under the control of the CaMV 35S promoter in agroinfiltration-mediated transient assays in Nicotiana benthamiana. Each of these, as well as endoplasmic reticulum (ER-targeted versions, were stably expressed in transgenic Nicotiana tabacum and Arabidopsis thaliana. Congruent results were observed between transient and stable assays. Our results demonstrated that there are several adequate OFP genes available for plant transformation, including the new pporRFP, an unaltered tetramer from the hard coral Porites porites. When the tandem dimer tdTomato and the monomeric mOrange were targeted to the ER, dramatic, ca. 3-fold, increase in plant fluorescence was observed. Conclusions From our empirical data, and a search of the literature, it appears that tdTomato-ER and mOrange-ER are the two highest fluorescing FPs available as reporters for transgenic plants. The pporRFP is a brightly fluorescing tetramer, but all tetramer FPs are far less bright than the ER-targeted monomers we report here.

  17. How to Increase Brightness of Near-Infrared Fluorescent Proteins in Mammalian Cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shemetov, Anton A; Oliinyk, Olena S; Verkhusha, Vladislav V

    2017-06-22

    Numerous near-infrared (NIR) fluorescent proteins (FPs) were recently engineered from bacterial photoreceptors but lack of their systematic comparison makes researcher's choice rather difficult. Here we evaluated side-by-side several modern NIR FPs, such as blue-shifted smURFP and miRFP670, and red-shifted mIFP and miRFP703. We found that among all NIR FPs, miRFP670 had the highest fluorescence intensity in various mammalian cells. For instance, in common HeLa cells miRFP703, mIFP, and smURFP were 2-, 9-, and 53-fold dimmer than miRFP670. Either co-expression of heme oxygenase or incubation of cells with heme precursor weakly affected NIR fluorescence, however, in the latter case elevated cellular autofluorescence. Exogenously added chromophore substantially increased smURFP brightness but only slightly enhanced brightness of other NIR FPs. mIFP showed intermediate, while monomeric miRFP670 and miRFP703 exhibited high binding efficiency of endogenous biliverdin chromophore. This feature makes them easy to use as GFP-like proteins for spectral multiplexing with FPs of visible range. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  18. Portable, Battery-Operated, Low-Cost, Bright Field and Fluorescence Microscope

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miller, Andrew R.; Davis, Gregory L.; Oden, Z. Maria; Razavi, Mohamad Reza; Fateh, Abolfazl; Ghazanfari, Morteza; Abdolrahimi, Farid; Poorazar, Shahin; Sakhaie, Fatemeh; Olsen, Randall J.; Bahrmand, Ahmad Reza; Pierce, Mark C.; Graviss, Edward A.; Richards-Kortum, Rebecca

    2010-01-01

    This study describes the design and evaluation of a portable bright-field and fluorescence microscope that can be manufactured for $240 USD. The microscope uses a battery-operated LED-based flashlight as the light source and achieves a resolution of 0.8 µm at 1000× magnification in fluorescence mode. We tested the diagnostic capability of this new instrument to identify infections caused by the human pathogen, Mycobacterium tuberculosis. Sixty-four direct, decontaminated, and serially diluted smears were prepared from sputa obtained from 19 patients suspected to have M. tuberculosis infection. Slides were stained with auramine orange and evaluated as being positive or negative for M. tuberculosis with both the new portable fluorescence microscope and a laboratory grade fluorescence microscope. Concordant results were obtained in 98.4% of cases. This highly portable, low cost, fluorescence microscope may be a useful diagnostic tool to expand the availability of M. tuberculosis testing at the point-of-care in low resource settings. PMID:20694194

  19. Portable, battery-operated, low-cost, bright field and fluorescence microscope.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miller, Andrew R; Davis, Gregory L; Oden, Z Maria; Razavi, Mohamad Reza; Fateh, Abolfazl; Ghazanfari, Morteza; Abdolrahimi, Farid; Poorazar, Shahin; Sakhaie, Fatemeh; Olsen, Randall J; Bahrmand, Ahmad Reza; Pierce, Mark C; Graviss, Edward A; Richards-Kortum, Rebecca

    2010-08-04

    This study describes the design and evaluation of a portable bright-field and fluorescence microscope that can be manufactured for $240 USD. The microscope uses a battery-operated LED-based flashlight as the light source and achieves a resolution of 0.8 microm at 1000x magnification in fluorescence mode. We tested the diagnostic capability of this new instrument to identify infections caused by the human pathogen, Mycobacterium tuberculosis. Sixty-four direct, decontaminated, and serially diluted smears were prepared from sputa obtained from 19 patients suspected to have M. tuberculosis infection. Slides were stained with auramine orange and evaluated as being positive or negative for M. tuberculosis with both the new portable fluorescence microscope and a laboratory grade fluorescence microscope. Concordant results were obtained in 98.4% of cases. This highly portable, low cost, fluorescence microscope may be a useful diagnostic tool to expand the availability of M. tuberculosis testing at the point-of-care in low resource settings.

  20. Ultra-fast bright field and fluorescence imaging of the dynamics of micrometer-sized objects

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Xucai; Wang, Jianjun; Versluis, Michel; de Jong, Nico; Villanueva, Flordeliza S.

    2013-06-01

    High speed imaging has application in a wide area of industry and scientific research. In medical research, high speed imaging has the potential to reveal insight into mechanisms of action of various therapeutic interventions. Examples include ultrasound assisted thrombolysis, drug delivery, and gene therapy. Visual observation of the ultrasound, microbubble, and biological cell interaction may help the understanding of the dynamic behavior of microbubbles and may eventually lead to better design of such delivery systems. We present the development of a high speed bright field and fluorescence imaging system that incorporates external mechanical waves such as ultrasound. Through collaborative design and contract manufacturing, a high speed imaging system has been successfully developed at the University of Pittsburgh Medical Center. We named the system "UPMC Cam," to refer to the integrated imaging system that includes the multi-frame camera and its unique software control, the customized modular microscope, the customized laser delivery system, its auxiliary ultrasound generator, and the combined ultrasound and optical imaging chamber for in vitro and in vivo observations. This system is capable of imaging microscopic bright field and fluorescence movies at 25 × 106 frames per second for 128 frames, with a frame size of 920 × 616 pixels. Example images of microbubble under ultrasound are shown to demonstrate the potential application of the system.

  1. Research on testing instrument and method for correction of the uniformity of image intensifier fluorescence screen brightness

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qiu, YaFeng; Chang, BenKang; Qian, YunSheng; Fu, RongGuo

    2011-09-01

    To test the parameters of image intensifier screen is the precondition for researching and developing the third generation image intensifier. The picture of brightness uniformity of tested fluorescence screen shows bright in middle and dark at edge. It is not so direct to evaluate the performance of fluorescence screen. We analyze the energy and density distribution of the electrons, After correction, the image in computer is very uniform. So the uniformity of fluorescence screen brightness can be judged directly. It also shows the correction method is reasonable and close to ideal image. When the uniformity of image intensifier fluorescence screen brightness is corrected, the testing instrument is developed. In a vacuum environment of better than 1×10-4Pa, area source electron gun emits electrons. Going through the electric field to be accelerated, the high speed electrons bombard the screen and the screen luminize. By using testing equipment such as imaging luminance meter, fast storage photometer, optical power meter, current meter and photosensitive detectors, the screen brightness, the uniformity, light-emitting efficiency and afterglow can be tested respectively. System performance are explained. Testing method is established; Test results are given.

  2. Structural analysis of the bright monomeric yellow-green fluorescent protein mNeonGreen obtained by directed evolution.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clavel, Damien; Gotthard, Guillaume; von Stetten, David; De Sanctis, Daniele; Pasquier, Hélène; Lambert, Gerard G; Shaner, Nathan C; Royant, Antoine

    2016-12-01

    Until recently, genes coding for homologues of the autofluorescent protein GFP had only been identified in marine organisms from the phyla Cnidaria and Arthropoda. New fluorescent-protein genes have now been found in the phylum Chordata, coding for particularly bright oligomeric fluorescent proteins such as the tetrameric yellow fluorescent protein lanYFP from Branchiostoma lanceolatum. A successful monomerization attempt led to the development of the bright yellow-green fluorescent protein mNeonGreen. The structures of lanYFP and mNeonGreen have been determined and compared in order to rationalize the directed evolution process leading from a bright, tetrameric to a still bright, monomeric fluorescent protein. An unusual discolouration of crystals of mNeonGreen was observed after X-ray data collection, which was investigated using a combination of X-ray crystallography and UV-visible absorption and Raman spectroscopies, revealing the effects of specific radiation damage in the chromophore cavity. It is shown that X-rays rapidly lead to the protonation of the phenolate O atom of the chromophore and to the loss of its planarity at the methylene bridge.

  3. Automated, portable, low-cost bright-field and fluorescence microscope with autofocus and autoscanning capabilities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schaefer, Samuel; Boehm, Stephen A; Chau, Kenneth J

    2012-05-10

    Optical microscopy is a simple, yet essential, imaging technology. Conventional laboratory-grade optical microscopes are bulky and costly, confining their use to within laboratory settings and restricting their accessibility in regions of limited resources. With the aim of overcoming these limitations, we have realized a portable, low-cost, and highly automated optical microscope that integrates mass-manufactured components, including light-emitting diodes, a web camera, optical disk drives, and a microcontroller. Our implementation is capable of bright-field and fluorescence imaging with micrometer-scale resolution and controlled mechanical actuation of both the lens and sample. We interface the lighting, image capture, and mechanical actuators of the microscope into a single software environment, enabling automation of common microscope operations, such as image focusing and large-area sample visualization. Combination of mechanical actuation and software automation into a compact, low-cost microscope system is an important initial step toward the goal of making optical microscopy universally accessible, portable, and easy to use.

  4. A Bright and Fast Red Fluorescent Protein Voltage Indicator That Reports Neuronal Activity in Organotypic Brain Slices

    OpenAIRE

    Abdelfattah, Ahmed S.; Farhi, Samouil L.; Zhao, Yongxin; Brinks, Daan; Zou, Peng; Ruangkittisakul, Araya; Platisa, Jelena; Pieribone, Vincent A.; Ballanyi, Klaus; Cohen, Adam E.; Campbell, Robert E.

    2016-01-01

    Optical imaging of voltage indicators based on green fluorescent proteins (FPs) or archaerhodopsin has emerged as a powerful approach for detecting the activity of many individual neurons with high spatial and temporal resolution. Relative to green FP-based voltage indicators, a bright red-shifted FP-based voltage indicator has the intrinsic advantages of lower phototoxicity, lower autofluorescent background, and compatibility with blue-light-excitable channelrhodopsins. Here, we report a bri...

  5. A Bright and Fast Red Fluorescent Protein Voltage Indicator That Reports Neuronal Activity in Organotypic Brain Slices.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abdelfattah, Ahmed S; Farhi, Samouil L; Zhao, Yongxin; Brinks, Daan; Zou, Peng; Ruangkittisakul, Araya; Platisa, Jelena; Pieribone, Vincent A; Ballanyi, Klaus; Cohen, Adam E; Campbell, Robert E

    2016-02-24

    Optical imaging of voltage indicators based on green fluorescent proteins (FPs) or archaerhodopsin has emerged as a powerful approach for detecting the activity of many individual neurons with high spatial and temporal resolution. Relative to green FP-based voltage indicators, a bright red-shifted FP-based voltage indicator has the intrinsic advantages of lower phototoxicity, lower autofluorescent background, and compatibility with blue-light-excitable channelrhodopsins. Here, we report a bright red fluorescent voltage indicator (fluorescent indicator for voltage imaging red; FlicR1) with properties that are comparable to the best available green indicators. To develop FlicR1, we used directed protein evolution and rational engineering to screen libraries of thousands of variants. FlicR1 faithfully reports single action potentials (∼3% ΔF/F) and tracks electrically driven voltage oscillations at 100 Hz in dissociated Sprague Dawley rat hippocampal neurons in single trial recordings. Furthermore, FlicR1 can be easily imaged with wide-field fluorescence microscopy. We demonstrate that FlicR1 can be used in conjunction with a blue-shifted channelrhodopsin for all-optical electrophysiology, although blue light photoactivation of the FlicR1 chromophore presents a challenge for applications that require spatially overlapping yellow and blue excitation. Copyright © 2016 the authors 0270-6474/16/362459-15$15.00/0.

  6. Bright fluorescence monitoring system utilizing Zoanthus sp. green fluorescent protein (ZsGreen) for human G-protein-coupled receptor signaling in microbial yeast cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nakamura, Yasuyuki; Ishii, Jun; Kondo, Akihiko

    2013-01-01

    G-protein-coupled receptors (GPCRs) are currently the most important pharmaceutical targets for drug discovery because they regulate a wide variety of physiological processes. Consequently, simple and convenient detection systems for ligands that regulate the function of GPCR have attracted attention as powerful tools for new drug development. We previously developed a yeast-based fluorescence reporter ligand detection system using flow cytometry. However, using this conventional detection system, fluorescence from a cell expressing GFP and responding to a ligand is weak, making detection of these cells by fluorescence microscopy difficult. We here report improvements to the conventional yeast fluorescence reporter assay system resulting in the development of a new highly-sensitive fluorescence reporter assay system with extremely bright fluorescence and high signal-to-noise (S/N) ratio. This new system allowed the easy detection of GPCR signaling in yeast using fluorescence microscopy. Somatostatin receptor and neurotensin receptor (implicated in Alzheimer's disease and Parkinson's disease, respectively) were chosen as human GPCR(s). The facile detection of binding to these receptors by cognate peptide ligands was demonstrated. In addition, we established a highly sensitive ligand detection system using yeast cell surface display technology that is applicable to peptide screening, and demonstrate that the display of various peptide analogs of neurotensin can activate signaling through the neurotensin receptor in yeast cells. Our system could be useful for identifying lead peptides with agonistic activity towards targeted human GPCR(s).

  7. Directed evolution of a monomeric, bright and photostable version of Clavularia cyan fluorescent protein: structural characterization and applications in fluorescence imaging

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Al, Hui-wang; Henderson, J. Nathan; Remington, S. James; Campbell, Robert E. (Alberta); (Oregon)

    2008-05-07

    The arsenal of engineered variants of the GFP [green FP (fluorescent protein)] from Aequorea jellyfish provides researchers with a powerful set of tools for use in biochemical and cell biology research. The recent discovery of diverse FPs in Anthozoa coral species has provided protein engineers with an abundance of alternative progenitor FPs from which improved variants that complement or supersede existing Aequorea GFP variants could be derived. Here, we report the engineering of the first monomeric version of the tetrameric CFP (cyan FP) cFP484 from Clavularia coral. Starting from a designed synthetic gene library with mammalian codon preferences, we identified dimeric cFP484 variants with fluorescent brightness significantly greater than the wild-type protein. Following incorporation of dimer-breaking mutations and extensive directed evolution with selection for blue-shifted emission, high fluorescent brightness and photostability, we arrived at an optimized variant that we have named mTFP1 [monomeric TFP1 (teal FP 1)]. The new mTFP1 is one of the brightest and most photostable FPs reported to date. In addition, the fluorescence is insensitive to physiologically relevant pH changes and the fluorescence lifetime decay is best fitted as a single exponential. The 1.19 {angstrom} crystal structure (1 {angstrom}=0.1 nm) of mTFP1 confirms the monomeric structure and reveals an unusually distorted chromophore conformation. As we experimentally demonstrate, the high quantum yield of mTFP1 (0.85) makes it particularly suitable as a replacement for ECFP (enhanced CFP) or Cerulean as a FRET (fluorescence resonance energy transfer) donor to either a yellow or orange FP acceptor.

  8. Bright blue-shifted fluorescent proteins with Cys in the GAF domain engineered from bacterial phytochromes: fluorescence mechanisms and excited-state dynamics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hontani, Yusaku; Shcherbakova, Daria M.; Baloban, Mikhail; Zhu, Jingyi; Verkhusha, Vladislav V.; Kennis, John T. M.

    2016-11-01

    Near-infrared fluorescent proteins (NIR FPs) engineered from bacterial phytochromes (BphPs) are of great interest for in vivo imaging. They utilize biliverdin (BV) as a chromophore, which is a heme degradation product, and therefore they are straightforward to use in mammalian tissues. Here, we report on fluorescence properties of NIR FPs with key alterations in their BV binding sites. BphP1-FP, iRFP670 and iRFP682 have Cys residues in both PAS and GAF domains, rather than in the PAS domain alone as in wild-type BphPs. We found that NIR FP variants with Cys in the GAF or with Cys in both PAS and GAF show blue-shifted emission with long fluorescence lifetimes. In contrast, mutants with Cys in the PAS only or no Cys residues at all exhibit red-shifted emission with shorter lifetimes. Combining these results with previous biochemical and BphP1-FP structural data, we conclude that BV adducts bound to Cys in the GAF are the origin of bright blue-shifted fluorescence. We propose that the long fluorescence lifetime follows from (i) a sterically more constrained thioether linkage, leaving less mobility for ring A than in canonical BphPs, and (ii) that π-electron conjugation does not extend on ring A, making excited-state deactivation less sensitive to ring A mobility.

  9. New fluorescent labels with tunable hydrophilicity for the rational design of bright optical probes for molecular imaging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pauli, Jutta; Licha, Kai; Berkemeyer, Janis; Grabolle, Markus; Spieles, Monika; Wegner, Nicole; Welker, Pia; Resch-Genger, Ute

    2013-07-17

    The rational design of bright optical probes and dye-biomolecule conjugates in the NIR-region requires fluorescent labels that retain their high fluorescence quantum yields when bound to a recognition unit or upon interaction with a target. Because hydrophilicity-controlled dye aggregation in conjunction with homo-FRET presents one of the major fluorescence deactivation pathways in dye-protein conjugates, fluorescent labels are required that enable higher labeling degrees with minimum dye aggregation. Aiming at a better understanding of the factors governing dye-dye interactions, we systematically studied the signal-relevant spectroscopic properties, hydrophilicity, and aggregation behavior of the novel xS-IDCC series of symmetric pentamethines equipped with two, four, and six sulfonic acid groups and selected conjugates of these dyes with IgG and the antibody cetuximab (ctx) directed against the cancer-related epidermal growth factor (EGF) receptor in comparison to the gold standard Cy5.5. With 6S-IDCC, which displays a molar absorption coefficient of 190 000 M(-1) cm(-1) and a fluorescence quantum yield (Φf) of 0.18 in aqueous media like PBS and nearly no aggregation, we could identify a fluorophore with a similarly good performance as Cy5.5. Bioconjugation of 6S-IDCC and Cy5.5 yielded highly emissive targeted probes with comparable Φf values of 0.29 for a dye-to-protein (D/P) ratio spectroscopy to predict the size of fluorescence signals resulting for other fluorescence techniques such as FACS.

  10. Characterization of Green-Emitting Translucent Zinc Oxide Ceramics Prepared Via Spark Plasma Sintering

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hong, Mei [University of California; DeVito, David M [ORNL; Howe, Jane Y [ORNL; Yang, Xiaocheng [West Virginia University; Giles, Nancy C. [Air Force Institute of Technology; Neal, John S [ORNL; Munir, Zuhair [University of California

    2011-01-01

    Translucent, green-emitting zinc oxide (ZnO) bodies, 19 mm in diameter and 0.72 mm in thickness, have been prepared via spark plasma sintering method. The consolidation of ZnO powders was investigated over the temperature range of 550-1050 C and the pressure range of 55-530 MPa. Samples sintered at temperatures >850 C and pressures of {approx}120 MPa were translucent and had densities of {approx}100%. Samples sintered at 950 C and 130 MPa showed a higher maximum transmittance than the samples sintered at higher or lower temperatures or pressures, with an excellent in-line transmission of 70% in the IR region around 2330 nm. The dense ZnO ceramics exhibited a strong green emission and a weak ultraviolet emission, and the relative intensity of the green emission increased with increasing sintering temperature.

  11. Determination of Equilibrium Constant and Relative Brightness in Fluorescence Correlation Spectroscopy by Considering Third-Order Correlations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Zhenqin; Bi, Huimin; Pan, Sichen; Meng, Lingyi; Zhao, Xin Sheng

    2016-11-17

    Fluorescence correlation spectroscopy (FCS) is a powerful tool to investigate molecular diffusion and relaxations, which may be utilized to study many problems such as molecular size and aggregation, chemical reaction, molecular transportation and motion, and various kinds of physical and chemical relaxations. This article focuses on a problem related to using the relaxation term to study a reaction. If two species with different fluorescence photon emission efficiencies are connected by a reaction, the kinetic and equilibrium properties will be manifested in the relaxation term of the FCS curve. However, the conventional FCS alone cannot simultaneously determine the equilibrium constant (K) and the relative fluorescence brightness (Q), both of which are indispensable in the extraction of thermodynamic and kinetic information from the experimental data. To circumvent the problem, an assumption of Q = 0 is often made for the weak fluorescent species, which may lead to numerous errors when the actual situation is not the case. We propose to combine the third-order FCS with the conventional second-order FCS to determine K and Q without invoking other resources. The strategy and formalism are verified by computer simulations and demonstrated in a classical example of the hairpin DNA-folding process.

  12. Overview of fluorescence glucose sensing: a technology with a bright future.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Klonoff, David C

    2012-11-01

    Fluorescence represents a promising alternative technology to electrochemistry and spectroscopy for accurate analysis of glucose in diabetes; however, no implanted fluorescence glucose assay is currently commercially available. The method depends on the principle of fluorescence, which is the emission of light by a substance after absorbing light. A fluorophore is a molecule that will absorb energy of a specific wavelength and reemit energy at a different wavelength. A fluorescence glucose-sensing molecule can be constructed to increase or decrease in fluorescence from baseline according to the ambient concentration of glucose. A quantum dot is a semiconductor crystal that can serve as a sensor by fluorescing at a desired wavelength or color, depending on the crystal size and materials used. If receptor molecules for glucose can be adsorbed to single-wall carbon nanotubules, then the resulting binding of glucose to these receptors will alter the nanotubes' fluorescence. Fluorescence glucose sensors can provide a continuous glucose reading by being embedded into removable wire-shaped subcutaneous or intravenous catheters as well as other types of implanted structures, such as capsules, microcapsules, microbeads, nano-optodes, or capillary tubes. Fluorescence glucose-sensing methods, which are under development, offer four potential advantages over commercially used continuous glucose monitoring technologies: (1) greater sensitivity to low concentrations of glucose, (2) the possibility of constructing sensors that operate most accurately in the hypoglycemic range by using binding proteins with disassociation constants in this range, (3) less need to recalibrate in response to local tissue reactions around the sensor, and (4) no need to implant either a transmitter or a power source for wireless communication of glucose data. Fluorescence glucose sensors also have four significant disadvantages compared with commercially used continuous glucose monitoring technologies

  13. Deep-red polymer dots with bright two-photon fluorescence and high biocompatibility for in vivo mouse brain imaging

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alifu, Nuernisha; Sun, Zezhou; Zebibula, Abudureheman; Zhu, Zhenggang; Zhao, Xinyuan; Wu, Changfeng; Wang, Yalun; Qian, Jun

    2017-09-01

    With high contrast and deep penetration, two-photon fluorescence (2PF) imaging has become one of the most promising in vivo fluorescence imaging techniques. To obtain good imaging contrast, fluorescent nanoprobes with good 2PF properties are highly needed. In this work, bright 2PF polymer dots (P dots) were applied for in vivo mouse brain imaging. Deep-red emissive P dots with PFBT as the donor and PFDBT5 as the acceptor were synthesized and used as a contrast agent. P dots were further encapsulated by poly(styrene-co-maleic anhydride) (PSMA) and grafted with poly(ethylene glycol) (PEG). The P dots-PEG exhibit large two-photon absorption (2PA) cross-sections (δ≥8500 g), good water dispersibility, and high biocompatibility. P dots-PEG was further utilized first time for in vivo vascular imaging of mouse ear and brain, under 690-900 nm femtosecond (fs) laser excitation. Due to the large 2PA cross-section and deep-red emission, a large imaging depth ( 720 μm) was achieved.

  14. High efficiency and brightness fluorescent organic light emitting diode by triplet-triplet fusion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Forrest, Stephen; Zhang, Yifan

    2015-02-10

    A first device is provided. The first device further comprises an organic light emitting device. The organic light emitting device further comprises an anode, a cathode, and an emissive layer disposed between the anode and the cathode. The emissive layer may include an organic host compound and at least one organic emitting compound capable of fluorescent emission at room temperature. Various configurations are described for providing a range of current densities in which T-T fusion dominates over S-T annihilation, leading to very high efficiency fluorescent OLEDs.

  15. Expression profiling of Plasmodium berghei HSP70 genes for generation of bright red fluorescent parasites.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marion Hliscs

    Full Text Available Live cell imaging of recombinant malarial parasites encoding fluorescent probes provides critical insights into parasite-host interactions and life cycle progression. In this study, we generated a red fluorescent line of the murine malarial parasite Plasmodium berghei. To allow constitutive and abundant expression of the mCherry protein we profiled expression of all members of the P. berghei heat shock protein 70 (HSP70 family. We identified PbHSP70/1, an invariant ortholog of Plasmodium falciparum HSP70-1, as the protein with the highest expression levels during Plasmodium blood, mosquito, and liver infection. Stable allelic insertion of a mCherry expression cassette into the PbHsp70/1 locus created constitutive red fluorescent P. berghei lines, termed Pbred. We show that these parasites can be used for live imaging of infected host cells and organs, including hepatocytes, erythrocytes, and whole Anopheles mosquitoes. Quantification of the fluorescence intensity of several Pbred parasite stages revealed significantly enhanced signal intensities in comparison to GFP expressed under the control of the constitutive EF1alpha promoter. We propose that systematic transcript profiling permits generation of reporter parasites, such as the Pbred lines described herein.

  16. Molecular-Based Fluorescent Nanoparticles Built from Dedicated Dipolar Thienothiophene Dyes as Ultra-Bright Green to NIR Nanoemitters

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cristiano Mastrodonato

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available Fluorescent Organic Nanoparticles (FONs, prepared by self-aggregation of dedicated dyes in water, represent a promising green alternative to the toxic quantum dots (QDs for bioimaging purposes. In the present paper, we describe the synthesis and photophysical properties of new dipolar push-pull derivatives built from thieno[3,2-b]thiophene as a π-conjugated bridge that connects a triphenylamine moiety bearing various bulky substituents as electron-releasing moiety to acceptor end-groups of increasing strength (i.e., aldehyde, dicyanovinyl and diethylthiobarbiturate. All dyes display fluorescence properties in chloroform, which shifts from the green to the NIR range depending on the molecular polarization (i.e., strength of the end-groups as well as a large two-photon absorption (TPA band response in the biological spectral window (700–1000 nm. The TPA bands show a bathochromic shift and hyperchromic effect with increasing polarization of the dyes with maximum TPA cross-section reaching 2000 GM for small size chromophore. All dyes are found to form stable and deeply colored nanoparticles (20–45 nm in diameter upon nanoprecipitation in water. Although their fluorescence is strongly reduced upon aggregation, all nanoparticles show large one-photon (up to 108 M−1·cm−1 in the visible region and two-photon (up to 106 GM in the NIR brightness. Interestingly, both linear and non-linear optical properties are significantly affected by interchromophoric interactions, which are promoted by the molecular confinement and modulated by both the dipolar strength and the presence of the bulky groups. Finally, we exploited the photophysical properties of the FONs to design optimized core-shell nanoparticles built from a pair of complementary dipolar dyes that promotes an efficient core-to-shell FRET process. The resulting molecular-based core-shell nanoparticles combine large two-photon absorption and enhanced emission both located in the NIR spectral

  17. A route to brightly fluorescent carbon nanotubes for near-infrared imaging in mice

    Science.gov (United States)

    Welsher, Kevin; Liu, Zhuang; Sherlock, Sarah P.; Robinson, Joshua Tucker; Chen, Zhuo; Daranciang, Dan; Dai, Hongjie

    2009-11-01

    The near-infrared photoluminescence intrinsic to semiconducting single-walled carbon nanotubes is ideal for biological imaging owing to the low autofluorescence and deep tissue penetration in the near-infrared region beyond 1 µm. However, biocompatible single-walled carbon nanotubes with high quantum yield have been elusive. Here, we show that sonicating single-walled carbon nanotubes with sodium cholate, followed by surfactant exchange to form phospholipid-polyethylene glycol coated nanotubes, produces in vivo imaging agents that are both bright and biocompatible. The exchange procedure is better than directly sonicating the tubes with the phospholipid-polyethylene glycol, because it results in less damage to the nanotubes and improves the quantum yield. We show whole-animal in vivo imaging using an InGaAs camera in the 1-1.7 µm spectral range by detecting the intrinsic near-infrared photoluminescence of the `exchange' single-walled carbon nanotubes at a low dose (17 mg l-1 injected dose). The deep tissue penetration and low autofluorescence background allowed high-resolution intravital microscopy imaging of tumour vessels beneath thick skin.

  18. A Novel Reporter Rat Strain That Conditionally Expresses the Bright Red Fluorescent Protein tdTomato.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hiroyuki Igarashi

    Full Text Available Despite the strength of the Cre/loxP recombination system in animal models, its application in rats trails that in mice because of the lack of relevant reporter strains. Here, we generated a floxed STOP tdTomato rat that conditionally expresses a red fluorescent protein variant (tdTomato in the presence of exogenous Cre recombinase. The tdTomato signal vividly visualizes neurons including their projection fibers and spines without any histological enhancement. In addition, a transgenic rat line (FLAME that ubiquitously expresses tdTomato was successfully established by injecting intracytoplasmic Cre mRNA into fertilized ova. Our rat reporter system will facilitate connectome studies as well as the visualization of the fine structures of genetically identified cells for long periods both in vivo and ex vivo. Furthermore, FLAME is an ideal model for organ transplantation research owing to improved traceability of cells/tissues.

  19. The Bright Fluorescent Protein mNeonGreen Facilitates Protein Expression Analysis In Vivo

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lola Hostettler

    2017-02-01

    Full Text Available The Green Fluorescent Protein (GFP has been tremendously useful in investigating cell architecture, protein localization, and protein function. Recent developments in transgenesis and genome editing methods now enable working with fewer transgene copies and, consequently, with physiological expression levels. However, lower signal intensity might become a limiting factor. The recently developed mNeonGreen protein is a brighter alternative to GFP in vitro. The goal of the present study was to determine how mNeonGreen performs in vivo in Caenorhabditis elegans—a model used extensively for fluorescence imaging in intact animals. We started with a side-by-side comparison between cytoplasmic forms of mNeonGreen and GFP expressed in the intestine, and in different neurons, of adult animals. While both proteins had similar photostability, mNeonGreen was systematically 3–5 times brighter than GFP. mNeonGreen was also used successfully to trace endogenous proteins, and label specific subcellular compartments such as the nucleus or the plasma membrane. To further demonstrate the utility of mNeonGreen, we tested transcriptional reporters for nine genes with unknown expression patterns. While mNeonGreen and GFP reporters gave overall similar expression patterns, low expression tissues were detected only with mNeonGreen. As a whole, our work establishes mNeonGreen as a brighter alternative to GFP for in vivo imaging in a multicellular organism. Furthermore, the present research illustrates the utility of mNeonGreen to tag proteins, mark subcellular regions, and describe new expression patterns, particularly in tissues with low expression.

  20. Effect of Composition and Impurities on the Phosphorescence of Green-Emitting Alkaline Earth Aluminate Phosphor.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Doory Kim

    Full Text Available Recent improvements to SrAl2O4:Eu2+, Dy3+ phosphors have enabled the use of luminescent hosts with a stable crystal structure and high physical and chemical stability, thus overcoming the bottleneck in the applicability of ZnS:Cu phosphors. However, enhancement of afterglow lifetime and brightness in SrAl2O4:Eu2+, Dy3+ phosphors remains a challenging task. Here, we have improved the afterglow characteristics in terms of persistence time and brightness by a systematic investigation of the composition of Eu-doped alkaline earth aluminate SrAl2O4:Eu2+, Dy3+ crystals. We found that a Dy3+/Eu2+ ratio of ~2.4 and ~0.935 mol Eu2+ (per mol of SrAl2O4 gave the brightest and longest emissions (11% and 9% increase for each. Doping with Si4+ also resulted in a slight increase in brightness up to ~15%. Doping with alkali metal or alkaline earth metal significantly enhanced the phosphorescence intensity. In particular, doping with 0.005 mol Li+ (per mol of SrAl2O4 alone boosted the phosphorescence intensity to 239% of the initial value, as compared to that observed for the non-doped crystal, while doping with 0.01 mol Mg2+ and 0.005 mol Li+ (per 1 mol SrAl2O4 boosted the phosphorescence intensity up to 313% of the initial value. The results of this investigation are expected to act as a guideline for the synthesis of bright and long persistent phosphors, and facilitate the development of persistent phosphors with afterglow characteristics superior to those of conventional phosphors.

  1. Fluorescence-guided surgery of retroperitoneal-implanted human fibrosarcoma in nude mice delays or eliminates tumor recurrence and increases survival compared to bright-light surgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Uehara, Fuminari; Hiroshima, Yukihiko; Miwa, Shinji; Tome, Yasunori; Yano, Shuya; Yamamoto, Mako; Matsumoto, Yasunori; Maehara, Hiroki; Tanaka, Kazuhiro; Bouvet, Michael; Kanaya, Fuminori; Hoffman, Robert M

    2015-01-01

    The aim of this study is to determine if fluorescence-guided surgery (FGS) can eradicate human fibrosarcoma growing in the retroperitoneum of nude mice. One week after retroperitoneal implantation of human HT1080 fibrosarcoma cells, expressing green fluorescent protein (GFP) (HT-1080-GFP), in nude mice, bright-light surgery (BLS) was performed on all tumor-bearing mice (n = 22). After BLS, mice were randomized into 2 treatment groups; BLS-only (n = 11) or the combination of BLS + FGS (n = 11). The residual tumors remaining after BLS were resected with FGS using a hand-held portable imaging system under fluorescence navigation. The average residual tumor area after BLS + FGS was significantly smaller than after BLS-only (0.4 ± 0.4 mm(2) and 10.5 ± 2.4 mm(2), respectively; p = 0.006). Five weeks after surgery, the fluorescent-tumor areas of BLS- and BLS + FGS-treated mice were 379 ± 147 mm(2) and 11.7 ± 6.9 mm(2), respectively, indicating that FGS greatly inhibited tumor recurrence compared to BLS. The combination of BLS + FGS significantly decreased fibrosarcoma recurrence compared to BLS-only treated mice (p fibrosarcoma volume after BLS and improved disease-free survival.

  2. Silole-Based Red Fluorescent Organic Dots for Bright Two-Photon Fluorescence In vitro Cell and In vivo Blood Vessel Imaging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Bin; Feng, Guangxue; He, Bairong; Goh, Chiching; Xu, Shidang; Ramos-Ortiz, Gabriel; Aparicio-Ixta, Laura; Zhou, Jian; Ng, Laiguan; Zhao, Zujin; Liu, Bin; Tang, Ben Zhong

    2016-02-10

    Robust luminescent dyes with efficient two-photon fluorescence are highly desirable for biological imaging applications, but those suitable for organic dots fabrication are still rare because of aggregation-caused quenching. In this work, a red fluorescent silole, 2,5-bis[5-(dimesitylboranyl)thiophen-2-yl]-1-methyl-1,3,4-triphenylsilole ((MesB)2 DTTPS), is synthesized and characterized. (MesB)2 DTTPS exhibits enhanced fluorescence efficiency in nanoaggregates, indicative of aggregation-enhanced emission (AEE). The organic dots fabricated by encapsulating (MesB)2 DTTPS within lipid-PEG show red fluorescence peaking at 598 nm and a high fluorescence quantum yield of 32%. Upon excitation at 820 nm, the dots show a large two-photon absorption cross section of 3.43 × 10(5) GM, which yields a two-photon action cross section of 1.09 × 10(5) GM. These (MesB)2 DTTPS dots show good biocompatibility and are successfully applied to one-photon and two-photon fluorescence imaging of MCF-7 cells and two-photon in vivo visualization of the blood vascular of mouse muscle in a high-contrast and noninvasive manner. Moreover, the 3D blood vasculature located at the mouse ear skin with a depth of over 100 μm can also be visualized clearly, providing the spatiotemporal information about the whole blood vascular network. © 2015 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  3. Bright blue-shifted fluorescent proteins with Cys in the GAF domain engineered from bacterial phytochromes: fluorescence mechanisms and excited-state dynamics

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hontani, Yusaku; Shcherbakova, Daria M.; Baloban, Mikhail; Zhu, Jingyi; Verkhusha, Vladislav V.; Kennis, John T. M.

    2016-01-01

    Near-infrared fluorescent proteins (NIR FPs) engineered from bacterial phytochromes (BphPs) are of great interest for in vivo imaging. They utilize biliverdin (BV) as a chromophore, which is a heme degradation product, and therefore they are straightforward to use in mammalian tissues. Here, we

  4. Fluorescence-guided surgery of retroperitoneal-implanted human fibrosarcoma in nude mice delays or eliminates tumor recurrence and increases survival compared to bright-light surgery.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fuminari Uehara

    Full Text Available The aim of this study is to determine if fluorescence-guided surgery (FGS can eradicate human fibrosarcoma growing in the retroperitoneum of nude mice. One week after retroperitoneal implantation of human HT1080 fibrosarcoma cells, expressing green fluorescent protein (GFP (HT-1080-GFP, in nude mice, bright-light surgery (BLS was performed on all tumor-bearing mice (n = 22. After BLS, mice were randomized into 2 treatment groups; BLS-only (n = 11 or the combination of BLS + FGS (n = 11. The residual tumors remaining after BLS were resected with FGS using a hand-held portable imaging system under fluorescence navigation. The average residual tumor area after BLS + FGS was significantly smaller than after BLS-only (0.4 ± 0.4 mm(2 and 10.5 ± 2.4 mm(2, respectively; p = 0.006. Five weeks after surgery, the fluorescent-tumor areas of BLS- and BLS + FGS-treated mice were 379 ± 147 mm(2 and 11.7 ± 6.9 mm(2, respectively, indicating that FGS greatly inhibited tumor recurrence compared to BLS. The combination of BLS + FGS significantly decreased fibrosarcoma recurrence compared to BLS-only treated mice (p < 0.001. Mice treated with BLS+FGS had a significantly higher disease-free survival rate than mice treated with BLS-only at five weeks after surgery. These results suggest that combination of BLS + FGS significantly reduced the residual fibrosarcoma volume after BLS and improved disease-free survival.

  5. Avaliação do método de triagem para análise de milho contaminado com aflatoxinas pela fluorescência amarelo-esverdeada brilhante (BGYF- Bright Greenish Yellow Fluorescence Evaluation of a screening method of aflatoxin in corn by Bright Greenish Yellow Fluorescence

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M.E.T. PALOMINO

    1998-01-01

    Full Text Available A técnica da fluorescência amarelo-esverdeada brilhante (BGYF como método de triagem na avaliação de milho eventualmente contaminado com aflatoxina, utilizada por uma indústria alimentícia do Estado de São Paulo em 61 amostras de milho, foi comparada com a técnica BGYF padronizada, aplicada em laboratório antes e após trituração dos grãos e, também, com a técnica da cromatografia em camada delgada (CCD. Os resultados da indústria geraram menor número de resultados falso-positivos do que a técnica BGYF padronizada. Por outro lado, apenas os resultados da indústria apresentaram amostras falso-negativas, ao contrário da BGYF padronizada, que não as apresentou. Conclui-se que existe uma inadequação do número de pontos fluorescentes adotados como critério de rejeição em ambas as técnicas, devendo-se proceder estudos, com maior número de amostras, para determinar o número adequado de pontos fluorescentes a ser adotado como critério além de outros fatores que possam influenciar a metodologia.The bright greenish yellow fluorescence technique (BGYF is a screening method for the evaluation of corn occasionally contaminated by aflatoxins, used by an industry of the State of São Paulo on sixty one samples, was compared with laboratory results of the BGYF standard technique, before and after crushing the grains, and also with thin layer chromatographic analysis. The industry showed results with a smaller number of false positives than the BGYF standard technique. However, the industry showed false negative results and the BGYF standard technique did not. It was concluded that the number of fluorescent points adopted, as a rejection criterion, in both techniques, was inadequate and studies should be developed with more samples to determine the adequate number of fluorescent points to be adopted as a rejection criterion and the influence of other factors.

  6. Improving brightness and photostability of green and red fluorescent proteins for live cell imaging and FRET reporting.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bajar, Bryce T; Wang, Emily S; Lam, Amy J; Kim, Bongjae B; Jacobs, Conor L; Howe, Elizabeth S; Davidson, Michael W; Lin, Michael Z; Chu, Jun

    2016-02-16

    Many genetically encoded biosensors use Förster resonance energy transfer (FRET) to dynamically report biomolecular activities. While pairs of cyan and yellow fluorescent proteins (FPs) are most commonly used as FRET partner fluorophores, respectively, green and red FPs offer distinct advantages for FRET, such as greater spectral separation, less phototoxicity, and lower autofluorescence. We previously developed the green-red FRET pair Clover and mRuby2, which improves responsiveness in intramolecular FRET reporters with different designs. Here we report the engineering of brighter and more photostable variants, mClover3 and mRuby3. mClover3 improves photostability by 60% and mRuby3 by 200% over the previous generation of fluorophores. Notably, mRuby3 is also 35% brighter than mRuby2, making it both the brightest and most photostable monomeric red FP yet characterized. Furthermore, we developed a standardized methodology for assessing FP performance in mammalian cells as stand-alone markers and as FRET partners. We found that mClover3 or mRuby3 expression in mammalian cells provides the highest fluorescence signals of all jellyfish GFP or coral RFP derivatives, respectively. Finally, using mClover3 and mRuby3, we engineered an improved version of the CaMKIIα reporter Camuiα with a larger response amplitude.

  7. A Bright Fluorescent Probe for H2S Enables Analyte-Responsive, 3D Imaging in Live Zebrafish Using Light Sheet Fluorescence Microscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hammers, Matthew D; Taormina, Michael J; Cerda, Matthew M; Montoya, Leticia A; Seidenkranz, Daniel T; Parthasarathy, Raghuveer; Pluth, Michael D

    2015-08-19

    Hydrogen sulfide (H2S) is a critical gaseous signaling molecule emerging at the center of a rich field of chemical and biological research. As our understanding of the complexity of physiological H2S in signaling pathways evolves, advanced chemical and technological investigative tools are required to make sense of this interconnectivity. Toward this goal, we have developed an azide-functionalized O-methylrhodol fluorophore, MeRho-Az, which exhibits a rapid >1000-fold fluorescence response when treated with H2S, is selective for H2S over other biological analytes, and has a detection limit of 86 nM. Additionally, the MeRho-Az scaffold is less susceptible to photoactivation than other commonly used azide-based systems, increasing its potential application in imaging experiments. To demonstrate the efficacy of this probe for H2S detection, we demonstrate the ability of MeRho-Az to detect differences in H2S levels in C6 cells and those treated with AOAA, a common inhibitor of enzymatic H2S synthesis. Expanding the use of MeRho-Az to complex and heterogeneous biological settings, we used MeRho-Az in combination with light sheet fluorescence microscopy (LSFM) to visualize H2S in the intestinal tract of live zebrafish. This application provides the first demonstration of analyte-responsive 3D imaging with LSFM, highlighting the utility of combining new probes and live imaging methods for investigating chemical signaling in complex multicellular systems.

  8. Femtosecond fluorescence upconversion spectroscopy of vapor-deposited tris(8-hydroxyquinoline) aluminum films.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Humbs, W.; Zhang, H.; Glasbeek, M.

    2000-01-01

    Abstract Vapor-deposited Alq3 is used as the green emitting layer in a class of organic light-emitting diodes. In this paper, the time dependence of the fluorescence from thin Alq3 films has been studied by means of the femtosecond fluorescence upconversion technique. From the temporally resolved

  9. Fast neuronal labeling in live tissue using a biocytin conjugated fluorescent probe

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Harsløf, Mads; Müller, Christoph Felix; Rohrberg, Julie

    2015-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Biocytin has found numerous uses as a neuronal tracer, since it shows both antero- and retrograde transport in neuronal tracts. The main advantage of biocytin lies in the comprehensive intracellular distribution of the molecule, and in effective detection using avidin-based reactions...... hours, which is substantially faster than other fluorescence-based tracers. The green emitting Atto 488 biotin is also taken up and transported retrogradely, but it is not compatible with standard green emitting calcium dyes. CONCLUSIONS: TMR biocytin is an attractive neuronal tracer. It labels neurons...

  10. Structure of the green fluorescent protein NowGFP with an anionic tryptophan-based chromophore.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pletnev, Vladimir Z; Pletneva, Nadya V; Sarkisyan, Karen S; Mishin, Alexander S; Lukyanov, Konstantin A; Goryacheva, Ekaterina A; Ziganshin, Rustam H; Dauter, Zbigniew; Pletnev, Sergei

    2015-08-01

    A green-emitting fluorescent variant, NowGFP, with a tryptophan-based chromophore (Thr65-Trp66-Gly67) was recently developed from the cyan mCerulean by introducing 18 point mutations. NowGFP is characterized by bright green fluorescence at physiological and higher pH and by weak cyan fluorescence at low pH. Illumination with blue light induces irreversible photoconversion of NowGFP from a green-emitting to a cyan-emitting form. Here, the X-ray structures of intact NowGFP at pH 9.0 and pH 4.8 and of its photoconverted variant, NowGFP_conv, are reported at 1.35, 1.18 and 2.5 Å resolution, respectively. The structure of NowGFP at pH 9.0 suggests the anionic state of Trp66 of the chromophore to be the primary cause of its green fluorescence. At both examined pH values Trp66 predominantly adopted a cis conformation; only ∼ 20% of the trans conformation was observed at pH 4.8. It was shown that Lys61, which adopts two distinct pH-dependent conformations, is a key residue playing a central role in chromophore ionization. At high pH the side chain of Lys61 forms two hydrogen bonds, one to the indole N atom of Trp66 and the other to the carboxyl group of the catalytic Glu222, enabling an indirect noncovalent connection between them that in turn promotes Trp66 deprotonation. At low pH, the side chain of Lys61 is directed away from Trp66 and forms a hydrogen bond to Gln207. It has been shown that photoconversion of NowGFP is accompanied by decomposition of Lys61, with a predominant cleavage of its side chain at the C(γ)-C(δ) bond. Lys61, Glu222, Thr203 and Ser205 form a local hydrogen-bond network connected to the indole ring of the chromophore Trp66; mutation of any of these residues dramatically affects the spectral properties of NowGFP. On the other hand, an Ala150Val replacement in the vicinity of the chromophore indole ring resulted in a new advanced variant with a 2.5-fold improved photostability.

  11. 1.8 Å bright-state structure of the reversibly switchable fluorescent protein Dronpa guides the generation of fast switching variants

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stiel, Andre C.; Trowitzsch, Simon; Weber, Gert; Andresen, Martin; Eggeling, Christian; Hell, Stefan W.; Jakobs, Stefan; Wahl, Markus C.

    2006-01-01

    RSFPs (reversibly switchable fluorescent proteins) may be repeatedly converted between a fluorescent and a non-fluorescent state by irradiation and have attracted widespread interest for many new applications. The RSFP Dronpa may be switched with blue light from a fluorescent state into a non-fluorescent state, and back again with UV light. To obtain insight into the underlying molecular mechanism of this switching, we have determined the crystal structure of the fluorescent equilibrium state of Dronpa. Its bicyclic chromophore is formed spontaneously from the Cys62–Tyr63–Gly64 tripeptide. In the fluorescent state, it adopts a slightly non-coplanar cis conformation within the interior of a typical GFP (green fluorescent protein) β-can fold. Dronpa shares some structural features with asFP595, another RSFP whose chromophore has previously been demonstrated to undergo a cis–trans isomerization upon photoswitching. Based on the structural comparison with asFP595, we have generated new Dronpa variants with an up to more than 1000-fold accelerated switching behaviour. The mutations which were introduced at position Val157 or Met159 apparently reduce the steric hindrance for a cis–trans isomerization of the chromophore, thus lowering the energy barrier for the blue light-driven on-to-off transition. The findings reported in the present study support the view that a cis–trans isomerization is one of the key events common to the switching mechanism in RSFPs. PMID:17117927

  12. 1.8 A bright-state structure of the reversibly switchable fluorescent protein Dronpa guides the generation of fast switching variants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stiel, Andre C; Trowitzsch, Simon; Weber, Gert; Andresen, Martin; Eggeling, Christian; Hell, Stefan W; Jakobs, Stefan; Wahl, Markus C

    2007-02-15

    RSFPs (reversibly switchable fluorescent proteins) may be repeatedly converted between a fluorescent and a non-fluorescent state by irradiation and have attracted widespread interest for many new applications. The RSFP Dronpa may be switched with blue light from a fluorescent state into a non-fluorescent state, and back again with UV light. To obtain insight into the underlying molecular mechanism of this switching, we have determined the crystal structure of the fluorescent equilibrium state of Dronpa. Its bicyclic chromophore is formed spontaneously from the Cys62-Tyr63-Gly64 tripeptide. In the fluorescent state, it adopts a slightly non-coplanar cis conformation within the interior of a typical GFP (green fluorescent protein) b-can fold. Dronpa shares some structural features with asFP595, another RSFP whose chromophore has previously been demonstrated to undergo a cis-trans isomerization upon photoswitching. Based on the structural comparison with asFP595, we have generated new Dronpa variants with an up to more than 1000-fold accelerated switching behaviour. The mutations which were introduced at position Val157 or Met159 apparently reduce the steric hindrance for a cis-trans isomerization of the chromophore, thus lowering the energy barrier for the blue light-driven on-to-off transition. The findings reported in the present study support the view that a cis-trans isomerization is one of the key events common to the switching mechanism in RSFPs.

  13. Fluorescent properties of a blue-to green-emitting Ce{sup 3+}, Tb{sup 3+} codoped amorphous calcium silicate phosphors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kojima, Yoshiyuki, E-mail: kojima.yoshiyuki@nihon-u.ac.jp [Department of Materials and Applied Chemistry, Faculty of Science and Engineering, Nihon University, 1-8, Kanda-Surugadai, Chiyoda-ku, Tokyo 101-8308 (Japan); Numazawa, Masaaki; Umegaki, Tetsuo [Department of Materials and Applied Chemistry, Faculty of Science and Engineering, Nihon University, 1-8, Kanda-Surugadai, Chiyoda-ku, Tokyo 101-8308 (Japan)

    2012-11-15

    Ce{sup 3+}, Tb{sup 3+} codoped amorphous calcium silicate phosphor was prepared by heating (830 Degree-Sign C for 30 min) Ce{sup 3+}, Tb{sup 3+} codoped calcium silicate hydrate phosphor formed by liquid-phase reaction. The excitation peak wavelength of the resulting phosphor was 330 nm and the emission peak wavelengths were at 544 nm, attributed to the {sup 5}D{sub 4}{yields}{sup 7}F{sub 5} transition of Tb{sup 3+}, and at 430-470 mm, attributed to Ce{sup 3+}. The intensity ratio of the two peaks could be freely controlled by varying the Tb/Ca atomic ratio of the Ce{sup 3+}, Tb{sup 3+} codoped amorphous calcium silicate phosphor, allowing light to be emitted over a wide range from blue to green. It was clarified that energy transfer exists from Ce{sup 3+} to Tb{sup 3+}. - Graphical abstract: Ce{sup 3+}, Tb{sup 3+} codoped calcium silicate hydrate phosphor was synthesized by liquid-phase reaction. This was heated at 830 Degree-Sign C to obtain a Ce{sup 3+}, Tb{sup 3+} codoped amorphous calcium silicate phosphor. Under 330 nm excitation, this phosphor showed emission peaks at 430-470 nm and 542 nm. The luminescent color could be continuously changed blue to green with increasing Tb/Ca atomic ratio. It was clarified that electron transfer from Ce{sup 3+} to Tb{sup 3+} is occurring.

  14. Synthesis and luminescent properties of a novel green-emitting Tb (Ⅲ) complex based on amino-modified fluorine silicone oil and isophorone diisocyanate

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hao, Haixia; Chu, Yang; Yu, Zhenjiang; Xie, Hongde; Seo, Hyo Jin

    2017-10-01

    The novel luminescent polymer-rare earth complexes, denoted as (PFSi-IPDI)-Tb(Ⅲ)-Phen, have been successfully synthesized and can be made into flexible films. Amino-modified fluorine silicone oil-isophorone diisocyanate (PFSi-IPDI) was used as the host macromolecular ligand, and 1, 10-Phenanthroline (Phen) as the secondary small-molecular co-ligand. The luminescent lanthanide complexes were characterized by fourier transform infrared (FITR), scanning electron microscope (SEM), thermogravimetric analysis (TGA). The luminescent properties were investigated through photoluminescence excitation (PLE) and emission (PL) spectroscopy. FTIR analysis verifies the successful preparation and integration of PFSi-IPDI to Tb3+. The comparatively uniform morphological structure can be observed in the images of SEM. The polymer-rare earth complexes display the typical luminescence emission peaks under the excitation wavelength of 330 nm. From the decay curve, the short lifetime (about 0.89 ms) is observed for (PFSi-IPDI)-Tb(Ⅲ)-Phen (0.6 mol/L). Moreover, these luminescent polymer-rare earth complexes possess superior thermal stability (T5 > 195 °C). All the interesting results suggest the potential application of the luminescent polymer-rare earth complexes in green-emitting luminescent materials under high temperature.

  15. Synthesis and Characterization of 8-O-Carboxymethylpyranine (CM-Pyranine as a Bright, Violet-Emitting, Fluid-Phase Fluorescent Marker in Cell Biology.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eric A Legenzov

    Full Text Available To avoid spectral interference with common fluorophores in multicolor fluorescence microscopy, a fluid-phase tracer with excitation and emission in the violet end of the visible spectrum is desirable. CM-pyranine is easily synthesized and purified. Its excitation and emission maxima at 401.5 nm and 428.5 nm, respectively, are well suited for excitation by 405-nm diode lasers now commonly available on laser-scanning microscopes. High fluorescence quantum efficiency (Q = 0.96 and strong light absorption (ε405 > 25,000 M-1cm-1 together make CM-pyranine the brightest violet aqueous tracer. The fluorescence spectrum of CM-pyranine is invariant above pH 4, which makes it a good fluid-phase marker in all cellular compartments. CM-pyranine is very photostable, is retained for long periods by cells, does not self-quench, and has negligible excimer emission. The sum of its properties make CM-pyranine an ideal fluorescent tracer. The use of CM-pyranine as a fluid-phase marker is demonstrated by multicolor confocal microscopy of cells that are also labeled with lipid and nuclear markers that have green and red fluorescence emission, respectively.

  16. BrightFocus Foundation

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... sooner. More science news Help us find a cure. Give to BrightFocus BrightFocus Updates BrightFocus Foundation Lauds Bill Gates Alzheimer’s Initiative “BrightFocus Foundation lauds today’s historic announcement by ...

  17. One-pot synthesis of water-dispersible Ag2S quantum dots with bright fluorescent emission in the second near-infrared window

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Hua-Yan; Zhao, Yu-Wei; Zhang, Zheng-Yong; Xiong, Huan-Ming; Yu, Shao-Ning

    2013-02-01

    The second near-infrared window (NIR-II, wavelength of 1.0-1.4 μm) is optimal for the bioimaging of live animals due to their low albedo and endogenous autofluorescence. Herein, we report a facile and one-pot biomimetic synthesis approach to prepare water-dispersible NIR-II-emitting ultrasmall Ag2S quantum dots (QDs). Photoluminescence spectra showed that the emission peaks could be tuned from 1294 to 1050 nm as the size of the Ag2S QDs varied from 6.8 to 1.6 nm. The x-ray diffraction patterns and x-ray photoelectron spectra confirmed that the products were monoclinic α-Ag2S. Fourier transform infrared spectrograph analysis indicated that the products were protein-conjugated Ag2S QDs. Examination of cytotoxicity and the hemolysis test showed that the obtained Ag2S QDs had good biocompatibility, indicating that such a nanomaterial could be a new kind of fluorescent label for in vivo imaging.

  18. In vitro photodynamic therapy based on magnetic-luminescent Gd2O3:Yb,Er nanoparticles with bright three-photon up-conversion fluorescence under near-infrared light.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Hao; Song, Shaoxin; Wang, Wei; Chen, Kezheng

    2015-09-28

    Yb(3+) and Er(3+) co-doped Gd2O3 nanoparticles were synthesized via a simple homogeneous precipitation method followed by subsequent heat treatment. Morphology characterization results showed that these nanoparticles were almost spherical in shape with diameters of 200-400 nm. The particles were further modified by polyethylene glycol (PEG) to improve their suspensibility in water. The sintering temperature was found to greatly influence the fluorescent properties of the products. After calcination at 700-1200 °C, the Gd2O3:Yb,Er nanoparticles could emit bright up-conversion fluorescence under 980 nm near-infrared (NIR) laser light excitation. The mechanism of up-conversion fluorescence was studied in detail and a three-photon process was observed for both green and red up-conversion fluorescence of the Gd2O3:Yb,Er nanoparticles. Different from many other Yb(3+),Er(3+) co-doped up-conversion materials, the prepared Gd2O3:Yb,Er nanoparticles emitted much stronger red light than green light. The reason was investigated and ascribed to the presence of abundant hydroxyl groups on the surface of the nanoparticles as a result of PEGylation. The nanoparticles could be taken up by the human cervical cancer (HeLa) cells and presented low toxicity. Well-selected photodynamic therapy (PDT) drugs, methylene blue (MB) with a UV/Vis absorption maximum (λmax) of 665 nm and 5-aminolevulinic acid (5ALA) which is a precursor of the natural photosensitizer photoporphyrin IX (PpIX) with a λmax of 635 nm, were loaded onto the nanoparticles respectively to obtain Gd2O3:Yb,Er-MB and Gd2O3:Yb,Er-5ALA nanoparticles. Being up-conversion nanoparticles (UCNPs), the taken up Gd2O3:Yb,Er nanoparticles exposed to 980 nm laser light emitted red fluorescence which activated the loaded MB and PpIX, and then killed the HeLa cells via a PDT mechanism. In vitro therapeutic investigation evidenced the prominent PDT effects of Gd2O3:Yb,Er-MB and Gd2O3:Yb,Er-5ALA upon NIR light irradiation. In

  19. Burkina Faso - BRIGHT II

    Data.gov (United States)

    Millennium Challenge Corporation — Millennium Challenge Corporation hired Mathematica Policy Research to conduct an independent evaluation of the BRIGHT II program. The three main research questions...

  20. Carbon nanoparticle-based fluorescent bioimaging probes

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Bhunia, Susanta Kumar; Saha, Arindam; Maity, Amit Ranjan; Ray, Sekhar C; Jana, Nikhil R

    2013-01-01

    Fluorescent nanoparticle-based imaging probes have advanced current labelling technology and are expected to generate new medical diagnostic tools based on their superior brightness and photostability...

  1. Synthesis and photoluminescent properties of cuboid-like Y2(C2O4)3:Tb3+ green-emitting phosphors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ye, Menglin; Zhou, Liqun; Hong, Fei; Li, Ling; Xia, Qinghua; Yang, Kunzhou; Xiong, Xing

    2015-09-01

    In this paper, the Tb3+-doped Y2(C2O4)3 phosphors were prepared using the hydrothermal method in the presence of surfactants. XRD, SEM and fluorescence spectroscopy were used to study the structure and luminescence properties of the material. The effects of surfactants and pH values on the morphologies and photoluminescent properties of Y2(C2O4)3:Tb3+ phosphors were investigated, respectively. When surfactant CA (Citric Acid) and pH 1.5 were employed, homogeneous cuboid-like structure phosphor was obtained, and it was composed of a small number of homogeneous particles with sizes of 2-4 μm and showed higher luminescent intensity than phosphors prepared with surfactants EDTA, Glycine and PEG. Under the 370 nm radiation excitation, Y2-x(C2O4)3:xTb3+ phosphors exhibit green emission (546 nm) corresponding to the 5D4 → 7F5 transition of Tb3+. The emission intensity of this phosphor can be influenced by Tb3+ doping concentration and the maximum intensity of luminescence is observed at the Tb3+ concentration around x = 1.4. The corresponding concentration quenching mechanism is verified as quadrupole-quadrupole interaction. The CIE chromaticity coordinates values of Y0.6 (C2O4)3:1.4Tb3+ almost locate in the green region.

  2. Rare Earth Fluorescent Nanomaterials for Enhanced Development of Latent Fingerprints.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Meng; Li, Ming; Yu, Aoyang; Wu, Jian; Mao, Chuanbin

    2015-12-30

    The most commonly found fingerprints at crime scenes are latent and, thus, an efficient method for detecting latent fingerprints is very important. However, traditional developing techniques have drawbacks such as low developing sensitivity, high background interference, complicated operation, and high toxicity. To tackle this challenge, we have synthesized two kinds of rare earth fluorescent nanomaterials, including the fluoresce red-emitting YVO4:Eu nanocrystals and green-emitting LaPO4:Ce,Tb nanobelts, and then used them as fluorescent labels for the development of latent fingerprints with high sensitivity, high contrast, high selectivity, high efficiency, and low background interference, on various substrates including noninfiltrating materials, semi-infiltrating materials, and infiltrating materials.

  3. One-step solvothermal synthesis, a worm-shaped morphology and luminescence properties of green-emitting Y2O2S:Tb3+ nanophosphors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Fan; Lian, Jingbao; Wu, Nianchu; He, Jiao; Zhang, Xue; Liu, Feng

    2018-02-01

    The worm-shaped Y2O2S:Tb3+ nanophosphors have been successfully prepared via one-step solvothermal synthesis, using ethanediamine as the main solvent and sublimed sulfur powder as the source of sulfur without adding additional structure-directing reagents. XRD, FT-IR, FESEM, PL and CIE chromaticity diagram were used to characterize the obtained products. XRD results demonstrate that all diffraction peaks of the sample can be well indexed to pure hexagonal phase of Y2O2S with optimal condition, i.e. the molar ration of S/Y3+m = 10, solvothermal temperature T = 220 °C and synthetic time t = 24 h. When t varies from 2 h to 24 h, the morphology of Y2O2S transforms from cauliflower-like structure to worm-shaped nanoparticles with the length of ∼80 nm. The formation mechanism depending on t has also been proposed. Upon 250 nm ultraviolet (UV) light excitation, the worm-shaped Y2O2S:Tb3+ nanophosphors exhibit green emissions, corresponding to the 5D4 → 7FJ (J = 6, 5, 4, 3) transitions of Tb3+ions. The quenching concentration is 7% and its corresponding lifetime is 1216 μs. The CIE chromaticity coordinates show the tuneable emission shifting from yellow green to yellowish green with increasing concentration of Tb3+ions from 1% to 7%. Those results suggest that the worm-shaped Y2O2S:Tb3+ nanophosphors may have potential applications in X-ray intensifying screens, fluorescence and biomedical fields.

  4. High Brightness OLED Lighting

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Spindler, Jeffrey [OLEDWorks LLC; Kondakova, Marina [OLEDWorks LLC; Boroson, Michael [OLEDWorks LLC; Hamer, John [OLEDWorks LLC

    2016-05-25

    In this work we describe the technology developments behind our current and future generations of high brightness OLED lighting panels. We have developed white and amber OLEDs with excellent performance based on the stacking approach. Current products achieve 40-60 lm/W, while future developments focus on achieving 80 lm/W or higher.

  5. Ultrabright and multicolorful fluorescence of amphiphilic polyethyleneimine polymer dots for efficiently combined imaging and therapy

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Sun, Yun; Cao, Weipeng; Li, Shengliang; Jin, Shubin; Hu, Kelei; Hu, Liming; Huang, Yuanyu; Gao, Xueyun; Wu, Yan; Liang, Xing-Jie

    2013-01-01

    .... The weak fluorescent polyethyleneimine (PEI) has been conjugated with hydrophobic polylactide as the amphiphilic PEI for construction of nanoparticles which showed bright and multicolor fluorescence...

  6. Fluorescent retroreflective signing of work zones : abstract

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Vos, A.P. de; Horst, A.R.A. van der; Alferdinck, J.W.A.M.; Kooi, F.L.

    1999-01-01

    Fluorescent retroreflective materials increase the brightness of traffic signs. In construction work zones a benefit is expected from the increased conspicuity of fluorescent retroreflective signs. Fluorescent material can be used instead of non-fluorescent materials both for the advance warning

  7. The brightness of colour.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    David Corney

    Full Text Available The perception of brightness depends on spatial context: the same stimulus can appear light or dark depending on what surrounds it. A less well-known but equally important contextual phenomenon is that the colour of a stimulus can also alter its brightness. Specifically, stimuli that are more saturated (i.e. purer in colour appear brighter than stimuli that are less saturated at the same luminance. Similarly, stimuli that are red or blue appear brighter than equiluminant yellow and green stimuli. This non-linear relationship between stimulus intensity and brightness, called the Helmholtz-Kohlrausch (HK effect, was first described in the nineteenth century but has never been explained. Here, we take advantage of the relative simplicity of this 'illusion' to explain it and contextual effects more generally, by using a simple Bayesian ideal observer model of the human visual ecology. We also use fMRI brain scans to identify the neural correlates of brightness without changing the spatial context of the stimulus, which has complicated the interpretation of related fMRI studies.Rather than modelling human vision directly, we use a Bayesian ideal observer to model human visual ecology. We show that the HK effect is a result of encoding the non-linear statistical relationship between retinal images and natural scenes that would have been experienced by the human visual system in the past. We further show that the complexity of this relationship is due to the response functions of the cone photoreceptors, which themselves are thought to represent an efficient solution to encoding the statistics of images. Finally, we show that the locus of the response to the relationship between images and scenes lies in the primary visual cortex (V1, if not earlier in the visual system, since the brightness of colours (as opposed to their luminance accords with activity in V1 as measured with fMRI.The data suggest that perceptions of brightness represent a robust

  8. Very High Brightness Quantum Dot Light-Emitting Devices via Enhanced Energy Transfer from a Phosphorescent Sensitizer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zamani Siboni, Hossein; Sadeghimakki, Bahareh; Sivoththaman, Siva; Aziz, Hany

    2015-11-25

    We demonstrate very efficient and bright quantum dot light-emitting devices (QDLEDs) with the use of a phosphorescent sensitizer and a thermal annealing step. Utilizing CdSe/CdS core/shell quantum dots with 560 nm emission peak, bis(4,6-difluorophenylpyridinatoN,C2) picolinatoiridium as a sensitizer, and thermal annealing at 50 °C for 30 min, green-emitting QDLEDs with a maximum current efficiency of 23.9 cd/A, a power efficiency of 31 lm/W, and a brightness of 65,000 cd/m(2) are demonstrated. The high efficiency and brightness are attributed to annealing-induced enhancements in both the Forster resonance energy transfer (FRET) process from the phosphorescent energy donor to the QD acceptor and hole transport across the device. The FRET enhancement is attributed to annealing-induced diffusion of the phosphorescent material molecules from the sensitizer layer into the QD layer, which results in a shorter donor-acceptor distance. We also find, quite interestingly, that FRET to a QD acceptor is strongly influenced by the QD size, and is generally less efficient to QDs with larger sizes despite their narrower bandgaps.

  9. HI Surface brightness mapping

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pen, Ue-Li; Staveley-Smith, Lister; Chang, Tzu-Ching; Peterson, Jeff; Bandura, Kevin

    2008-04-01

    We propose to scan the 2dF survey field with Parkes multibeam in driftscan mode to make a map to cross correlate with galaxy redshifts. This allows a statistical detection of HI large scale structure out to z=0.15. In this cross correlation, the HI in ALL galaxies contributes, not only the bright ones, which significantly boosts the sensitivity. The proposed 40 hours on the fields result in a forecasted 20 sigma detection. The survey volume is 10 million cubic megaparsec, which contain 10^15 solar masses of hydrogen.

  10. Lightness, brightness, and anchoring.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anderson, Barton L; Whitbread, Michael; de Silva, Chamila

    2014-08-07

    The majority of work in lightness perception has evaluated the perception of lightness using flat, matte, two-dimensional surfaces. In such contexts, the amount of light reaching the eye contains a conflated mixture of the illuminant and surface lightness. A fundamental puzzle of lightness perception is understanding how it is possible to experience achromatic surfaces as specific achromatic shades in the face of this ambiguity. It has been argued that the perception of lightness in such contexts implies that the visual system imposes an "anchoring rule" whereby a specific relative luminance (the highest) serves as a fixed point in the mapping of image luminance onto the lightness scale ("white"). We conducted a series of experiments to explicitly test this assertion in contexts where this mapping seemed most unlikely-namely, low-contrast images viewed in dim illumination. Our results provide evidence that the computational ambiguity in mapping luminance onto lightness is reflected in perceptual experience. The perception of the highest luminance in a two-dimensional Mondrian display varied monotonically with its brightness, ranging from midgray to white. Similar scaling occurred for the lowest luminance and, by implication, all other luminance values. We conclude that the conflation between brightness and lightness in two-dimensional Mondrian displays is reflected in perception and find no support for the claim that any specific relative luminance value acts as a fixed anchor point in this mapping function. © 2014 ARVO.

  11. A high brightness probe of polymer nanoparticles for biological imaging

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Sirong; Zhu, Jiarong; Li, Yaping; Feng, Liheng

    2018-03-01

    Conjugated polymer nanoparticles (CPNs) with high brightness in long wavelength region were prepared by the nano-precipitation method. Based on fluorescence resonance energy transfer (FRET) mechanism, the high brightness property of the CPNs was realized by four different emission polymers. Dynamic light scattering (DLS) and scanning electron microscopy (SEM) displayed that the CPNs possessed a spherical structure and an average diameter of 75 nm. Analysis assays showed that the CPNs had excellent biocompatibility, good photostability and low cytotoxicity. The CPNs were bio-modified with a cell penetrating peptide (Tat, a targeted element) through covalent link. Based on the entire wave fluorescence emission, the functionalized CPNs1-4 can meet multichannel and high throughput assays in cell and organ imaging. The contribution of the work lies in not only providing a new way to obtain a high brightness imaging probe in long wavelength region, but also using targeted cell and organ imaging.

  12. Bright photoluminescent hybrid mesostructured silica nanoparticles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miletto, Ivana; Bottinelli, Emanuela; Caputo, Giuseppe; Coluccia, Salvatore; Gianotti, Enrica

    2012-07-28

    Bright photoluminescent mesostructured silica nanoparticles were synthesized by the incorporation of fluorescent cyanine dyes into the channels of MCM-41 mesoporous silica. Cyanine molecules were introduced into MCM-41 nanoparticles by physical adsorption and covalent grafting. Several photoluminescent nanoparticles with different organic loadings have been synthesized and characterized by X-ray powder diffraction, high resolution transmission electron microscopy and nitrogen physisorption porosimetry. A detailed photoluminescence study with the analysis of fluorescence lifetimes was carried out to elucidate the cyanine molecules distribution within the pores of MCM-41 nanoparticles and the influence of the encapsulation on the photoemission properties of the guests. The results show that highly stable photoluminescent hybrid materials with interesting potential applications as photoluminescent probes for diagnostics and imaging can be prepared by both methods.

  13. Combined "dual" absorption and fluorescence smartphone spectrometers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arafat Hossain, Md; Canning, John; Ast, Sandra; Cook, Kevin; Rutledge, Peter J; Jamalipour, Abbas

    2015-04-15

    A combined "dual" absorption and fluorescence smartphone spectrometer is demonstrated. The optical sources used in the system are the white flash LED of the smartphone and an orthogonally positioned and interchangeable UV (λex=370  nm) and blue (λex=450  nm) LED. The dispersive element is a low-cost, nano-imprinted diffraction grating coated with Au. Detection over a 300 nm span with 0.42 nm/pixel resolution was carried out with the camera CMOS chip. By integrating the blue and UV excitation sources into the white LED circuitry, the entire system is self-contained within a 3D printed case and powered from the smartphone battery; the design can be scaled to add further excitation sources. Using a customized app, acquisition of absorption and fluorescence spectra are demonstrated using a blue-absorbing and green-emitting pH-sensitive amino-naphthalimide-based fluorescent probe and a UV-absorbing and blue-emitting Zn2+-sensitive fluoro-ionophore.

  14. Thermally stable green Ba(3)Y(PO(4))3:Ce(3+),Tb(3+) and red Ca(3)Y(AlO)(3)(BO(3))4:Eu(3+) phosphors for white-light fluorescent lamps.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Chien-Hao; Kuo, Te-Wen; Chen, Teng-Ming

    2011-01-03

    A class of thermal stable of green-emitting phosphors Ba(3)Y(PO(4))(3):Ce(3+),Tb(3+) (BYP:Ce(3+),Tb(3+)) and red-emitting phosphors Ca(3)Y(AlO)(3)(BO(3))(4):Eu(3+) (CYAB:Eu(3+)) for white-light fluorescent lamps were synthesized by high temperature solid-state reaction. We observed a decay of only 3% at 150 °C for BYP:0.25Ce3+,0.25Tb3+ (3% for LaPO4:Ce(3+),Tb(3+)), and a decay of 4% for CYAB:0.5Eu(3+) (7% for Y(2)O(3):Eu(3+), 24% for Y(2)O(2)S:Eu(3+)). The emission intensity of composition-optimized Ba(3)(Y(0.5)Ce(0.25)Tb(0.25))(PO(4))(3) is 70% of that of commercial LaPO(4):Ce(3+),Tb(3+) phosphors, and the CIE chromaticity coordinates are found to be (0.323, 0.534). The emission intensity of Ca(3)(Y(0.5)Eu(0.5))(AlO)(3)(BO(3))(4) is 70% and 83% of those of Y(2)O(3):Eu(3+) and Y(2)O(2)S:Eu(3+) phosphors, respectively, and the CIE chromaticity coordinates are redder (0.652, 0.342) than those of Y(2)O(3):Eu(3+) (0.645, 0.347) and Y(2)O(2)S:Eu(3+) (0.647, 0.343). A white-light fluorescent lamp is fabricated using composition-optimized Ba(3)(Y(0.5)Ce(0.25)Tb(0.25))(PO(4))(3) and Ca(3)(Y(0.5)Eu(0.5))(AlO)(3)(BO(3))(4) phosphors and matching blue-emitting phosphors. The results indicate that the quality of the brightness and color reproduction is suitable for application in shortwave UV fluorescent lamps. The white-light fluorescent lamp displays CIE chromaticity coordinates of x = 0.33, y = 0.35, a warm white light with a correlated color temperature of 5646 K, and a color-rendering index of Ra = 70.

  15. Malaria over-diagnosis in Cameroon: diagnostic accuracy of Fluorescence and Staining Technologies (FAST) Malaria Stain and LED microscopy versus Giemsa and bright field microscopy validated by polymerase chain reaction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parsel, Sean M; Gustafson, Steven A; Friedlander, Edward; Shnyra, Alexander A; Adegbulu, Aderosoye J; Liu, Ying; Parrish, Nicole M; Jamal, Syed A; Lofthus, Eve; Ayuk, Leo; Awasom, Charles; Henry, Carolyn J; McArthur, Carole P

    2017-04-04

    Malaria is a major world health issue and its continued burden is due, in part, to difficulties in the diagnosis of the illness. The World Health Organization recommends confirmatory testing using microscopy-based techniques or rapid diagnostic tests (RDT) for all cases of suspected malaria. In regions where Plasmodium species are indigenous, there are multiple etiologies of fever leading to misdiagnoses, especially in populations where HIV is prevalent and children. To determine the frequency of malaria infection in febrile patients over an 8-month period at the Regional Hospital in Bamenda, Cameroon, we evaluated the clinical efficacy of the Flourescence and Staining Technology (FAST) Malaria stain and ParaLens AdvanceTM microscopy system (FM) and compared it with conventional bright field microscopy and Giemsa stain (GS). Peripheral blood samples from 522 patients with a clinical diagnosis of "suspected malaria" were evaluated using GS and FM methods. A nested PCR assay was the gold standard to compare the two methods. PCR positivity, sensitivity, specificity, positive predictive value (PPV), and negative predictive value (NPV) were determined. Four hundred ninety nine samples were included in the final analysis. Of these, 30 were positive via PCR (6.01%) with a mean PPV of 19.62% and 27.99% for GS and FM, respectively. The mean NPV was 95.01% and 95.28% for GS and FM, respectively. Sensitivity was 26.67% in both groups and specificity was 92.78% and 96.21% for GS and FM, respectively. An increased level of diagnostic discrepancy was observed between technicians based upon skill level using GS, which was not seen with FM. The frequency of malarial infections confirmed via PCR among patients presenting with fever and other symptoms of malaria was dramatically lower than that anticipated based upon physicians' clinical suspicions. A correlation between technician skill and accuracy of malaria diagnosis using GS was observed that was less pronounced using FM

  16. Teradiode's high brightness semiconductor lasers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Robin K.; Chann, Bien; Burgess, James; Lochman, Bryan; Zhou, Wang; Cruz, Mike; Cook, Rob; Dugmore, Dan; Shattuck, Jeff; Tayebati, Parviz

    2016-03-01

    TeraDiode is manufacturing multi-kW-class ultra-high brightness fiber-coupled direct diode lasers for industrial applications. A fiber-coupled direct diode laser with a power level of 4,680 W from a 100 μm core diameter, world-record brightness levels for direct diode lasers. The fiber-coupled output corresponds to a Beam Parameter Product (BPP) of 3.5 mm-mrad and is the lowest BPP multi-kW-class direct diode laser yet reported. This laser is suitable for industrial materials processing applications, including sheet metal cutting and welding. This 4-kW fiber-coupled direct diode laser has comparable brightness to that of industrial fiber lasers and CO2 lasers, and is over 10x brighter than state-of-the-art direct diode lasers. We have also demonstrated novel high peak power lasers and high brightness Mid-Infrared Lasers.

  17. Lightness, brightness, and brightness contrast: 2. Reflectance variation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arend, L E; Spehar, B

    1993-10-01

    Changes of annulus luminance in traditional disk-and-annulus patterns can be perceived to be either reflectance or illuminance changes. In the present experiments, we examined the effect of varying annulus reflectance. In Experiment 1, we placed test and standard patch-and-surround patterns in identical Mondrian patchworks. Only the luminance of the test surround changed from trial to trial, appearing as reflectance variation under constant illumination. Lightness matches were identical to brightness matches, as expected. In Experiment 2, we used only the patch and surround (no Mondrian). Instructions said that the illumination would change from trial to trial. Lightness and brightness-contrast data were identical; illumination gradients were indistinguishable from reflectance gradients. In Experiment 3, the patterns were the same, but the instructions said that the shade of gray of the test surround would change from trial to trial. Lightness matches were identical to brightness matches, again confirming the ambiguity of disk-and-annulus patterns.

  18. Bright Light Treatment in Psychiatry

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pinar Guzel Ozdemir

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available Bright light treatment is a treatment modality that leads elevation of mood due to attenuation in depressive symptoms, regulation in circadian rhythm activity, increase the effect of antidepressants and amelioration in sleep quality. Bright light treatment is considered among the first-line treatments for seasonal affective disorder because of high response rates. Additionally, bright light treatment being extended to other conditions, including non-seasonal mood disorders, Alzheimer's disease, circadian rhythm sleep disorders, eating disorders, attention deficit hyperactivity disorder and other behavioral syndromes is likely to have a far reached use. Side effects are often temporary and can generally be overcome by reducing exposure time. The central focus on this paper is to review the action mechanisms, efficacy, usage areas, the ways of administration and side effects of the light treatment. [Psikiyatride Guncel Yaklasimlar - Current Approaches in Psychiatry 2017; 9(2.000: 177-188

  19. Network based sky Brightness Monitor

    Science.gov (United States)

    McKenna, Dan; Pulvermacher, R.; Davis, D. R.

    2009-01-01

    We have developed and are currently testing an autonomous 2 channel photometer designed to measure the night sky brightness in the visual wavelengths over a multi-year campaign. The photometer uses a robust silicon sensor filtered with Hoya CM500 glass. The Sky brightness is measured every minute at two elevation angles typically zenith and 20 degrees to monitor brightness and transparency. The Sky Brightness monitor consists of two units, the remote photometer and a network interface. Currently these devices use 2.4 Ghz transceivers with a free space range of 100 meters. The remote unit is battery powered with day time recharging using a solar panel. Data received by the network interface transmits data via standard POP Email protocol. A second version is under development for radio sensitive areas using an optical fiber for data transmission. We will present the current comparison with the National Park Service sky monitoring camera. We will also discuss the calibration methods used for standardization and temperature compensation. This system is expected to be deployed in the next year and be operated by the International Dark Sky Association SKYMONITOR project.

  20. Fluorescence fluctuation spectroscopy (FFS), part A

    CERN Document Server

    Tetin, Sergey

    2013-01-01

    This new volume of Methods in Enzymology continues the legacy of this premier serial by containing quality chapters authored by leaders in the field. This volume covers Fluorescence Fluctuation SpectroscopyContains chapters on such topics as Time-integrated fluorescence cumulant analysis, Pulsed Interleaved Excitation, and raster image correlation spectroscopy and number and brightness analysis.Continues the legacy of this premier serial with quality chapters authored by leaders in the fieldCovers fluorescence fluctuation spectroscopyContains chapte

  1. Fluorescent Flippers for Mechanosensitive Membrane Probes

    OpenAIRE

    Dal Molin, Marta; Verolet, Quentin; Colom Diego, Adai; Letrun, Romain; Derivery, Emmanuel; Gonzalez Gaitan, Marcos; Vauthey, Eric; Roux, Aurélien; Sakai, Naomi; Matile, Stefan

    2015-01-01

    In this report, ?fluorescent flippers? are introduced to create planarizable push?pull probes with the mechanosensitivity and fluorescence lifetime needed for practical use in biology. Twisted push?pull scaffolds with large and bright dithienothiophenes and their S,S-dioxides as the first ?fluorescent flippers? are shown to report on the lateral organization of lipid bilayers with quantum yields above 80% and lifetimes above 4 ns. Their planarization in liquid-ordered (Lo) and solid-ordered (...

  2. Fluorescent flippers for mechanosensitive membrane probes.

    OpenAIRE

    Dal Molin Marta; Verolet Quentin; Colom Adai; Letrun Romain; Derivery Emmanuel; Gonzalez-Gaitan Marcos; Vauthey Eric; Roux Aurélien; Sakai Naomi; Matile Stefan

    2015-01-01

    In this report "fluorescent flippers" are introduced to create planarizable push pull probes with the mechanosensitivity and fluorescence lifetime needed for practical use in biology. Twisted push pull scaffolds with large and bright dithienothiophenes and their SS dioxides as the first "fluorescent flippers" are shown to report on the lateral organization of lipid bilayers with quantum yields above 80 and lifetimes above 4 ns. Their planarization in liquid ordered (Lo) and solid ordered (So)...

  3. Helmholtz bright and boundary solitons

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Christian, J M [Joule Physics Laboratory, School of Computing, Science and Engineering, Institute for Materials Research, University of Salford, Salford M5 4WT (United Kingdom); McDonald, G S [Joule Physics Laboratory, School of Computing, Science and Engineering, Institute for Materials Research, University of Salford, Salford M5 4WT (United Kingdom); Chamorro-Posada, P [Departmento de TeorIa de la Senal y Comunicaciones e IngenierIa Telematica, Universidad de Valladolid, ETSI Telecomunicacion, Campus Miguel Delibes s/n, 47011 Valladolid (Spain)

    2007-02-16

    We report, for the first time, exact analytical boundary solitons of a generalized cubic-quintic nonlinear Helmholtz (NLH) equation. These solutions have a linked-plateau topology that is distinct from conventional dark soliton solutions; their amplitude and intensity distributions are spatially delocalized and connect regions of finite and zero wave-field disturbances (suggesting also the classification as 'edge solitons'). Extensive numerical simulations compare the stability properties of recently derived Helmholtz bright solitons, for this type of polynomial nonlinearity, to those of the new boundary solitons. The latter are found to possess a remarkable stability characteristic, exhibiting robustness against perturbations that would otherwise lead to the destabilizing of their bright-soliton counterparts.

  4. Iapetus Bright and Dark Terrains

    Science.gov (United States)

    1990-01-01

    Saturn's outermost large moon, Iapetus, has a bright, heavily cratered icy terrain and a dark terrain, as shown in this Voyager 2 image taken on August 22, 1981. Amazingly, the dark material covers precisely the side of Iapetus that leads in the direction of orbital motion around Saturn (except for the poles), whereas the bright material occurs on the trailing hemisphere and at the poles. The bright terrain is made of dirty ice, and the dark terrain is surfaced by carbonaceous molecules, according to measurements made with Earth-based telescopes. Iapetus' dark hemisphere has been likened to tar or asphalt and is so dark that no details within this terrain were visible to Voyager 2. The bright icy hemisphere, likened to dirty snow, shows many large impact craters. The closest approach by Voyager 2 to Iapetus was a relatively distant 600,000 miles, so that our best images, such as this, have a resolution of about 12 miles. The dark material is made of organic substances, probably including poisonous cyano compounds such as frozen hydrogen cyanide polymers. Though we know a little about the dark terrain's chemical nature, we do not understand its origin. Two theories have been developed, but neither is fully satisfactory--(1) the dark material may be organic dust knocked off the small neighboring satellite Phoebe and 'painted' onto the leading side of Iapetus as the dust spirals toward Saturn and Iapetus hurtles through the tenuous dust cloud, or (2) the dark material may be made of icy-cold carbonaceous 'cryovolcanic' lavas that were erupted from Iapetus' interior and then blackened by solar radiation, charged particles, and cosmic rays. A determination of the actual cause, as well as discovery of any other geologic features smaller than 12 miles across, awaits the Cassini Saturn orbiter to arrive in 2004.

  5. LSST Site: Sky Brightness Data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burke, Jamison; Claver, Charles

    2015-01-01

    The Large Synoptic Survey Telescope (LSST) is an upcoming robotic survey telescope. At the telescope site on Cerro Pachon in Chile there are currently three photodiodes and a Canon camera with a fisheye lens, and both the photodiodes and Canon monitor the night sky continuously. The NIST-calibrated photodiodes directly measure the flux from the sky, and the sky brightness can also be obtained from the Canon images via digital aperture photometry. Organizing and combining the two data sets gives nightly information of the development of sky brightness across a swath of the electromagnetic spectrum, from blue to near infrared light, and this is useful for accurately predicting the performance of the LSST. It also provides data for models of moonlight and twilight sky brightness. Code to accomplish this organization and combination was successfully written in Python, but due to the backlog of data not all of the nights were processed by the end of the summer.Burke was supported by the NOAO/KPNO Research Experiences for Undergraduates (REU) Program which is funded by the National Science Foundation Research Experiences for Undergraduates Program (AST-1262829).

  6. Lanthanide based dual-emission fluorescent probe for detection of mercury (II) in milk.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tan, Hongliang; Li, Qian; Ma, Chanjiao; Song, Yonghai; Xu, Fugang; Chen, Shouhui; Wang, Li

    2015-01-15

    It is highly desirable to develop a simple and sensitive method for Hg(2+) detection because of the dangerous nature of Hg(2+). In this work, we prepared a dual-emission fluorescent probe for Hg(2+) detection by combining two lanthanide chelates with different emission wavelengths. Green-emitting terbium (Tb(3+)) chelates as reference signals were embedded into SiO2 nanoparticles and red-emitting europium (Eu(3+)) chelates as response units were covalently linked to the surface of silica shell. Upon the addition of Hg(2+), the fluorescence of Eu(3+) chelates can be selectively quenched, while the fluorescence of Tb(3+) chelates remained unchanged. As a kind of Hg(2+) nanosensor, the dual-emission fluorescent probe exhibited excellent selectivity to Hg(2+) and high sensitivity up to 7.07 nM detection limit. The Hg(2+) levels in drinking water and milk samples were determined by using the dual-emission fluorescent probe with satisfied recovery. Additionally, our probe has a long enough fluorescence lifetime, which can avoid the interference from autofluorescence of the biological samples. We envision that the proposed probe could find great potential applications for ultrasensitive time-resolved fluorometric assays and biomedical imaging in the future. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  7. Fluorescent Europium Chelate Stain

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scaff, W. L.; Dyer, D. L.; Mori, K.

    1969-01-01

    The europium chelate of 4,4,4-trifluoro-1-(2-thienyl)-1,3-butanedione (thenoyl-trifluoroacetone; TTA) is firmly bound to microorganisms. It fluoresces brightly at 613 nm with activation at 340 nm. Cells may be stained with 10−3m chelate in 50% ethyl alcohol, followed by washing with 50% ethyl alcohol. Equal or better stains are produced with 10−3m aqueous europium salt, water wash, and 10−2m aqueous TTA. A noncomplexing buffer should be used to maintain the pH at 6.5 to 6.8. Images PMID:4181107

  8. How Bright Can Supernovae Get?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kohler, Susanna

    2016-04-01

    Supernovae enormous explosions associated with the end of a stars life come in a variety of types with different origins. A new study has examined how the brightest supernovae in the Universe are produced, and what limits might be set on their brightness.Ultra-Luminous ObservationsRecent observations have revealed many ultra-luminous supernovae, which haveenergies that challenge our abilities to explain them usingcurrent supernova models. An especially extreme example is the 2015 discovery of the supernova ASASSN-15lh, which shone with a peak luminosity of ~2*1045 erg/s, nearly a trillion times brighter than the Sun. ASASSN-15lh radiated a whopping ~2*1052 erg in the first four months after its detection.How could a supernova that bright be produced? To explore the answer to that question, Tuguldur Sukhbold and Stan Woosley at University of California, Santa Cruz, have examined the different sources that could produce supernovae and calculated upper limits on the potential luminosities ofeach of these supernova varieties.Explosive ModelsSukhbold and Woosley explore multiple different models for core-collapse supernova explosions, including:Prompt explosionA stars core collapses and immediately explodes.Pair instabilityElectron/positron pair production at a massive stars center leads to core collapse. For high masses, radioactivity can contribute to delayed energy output.Colliding shellsPreviously expelled shells of material around a star collide after the initial explosion, providing additional energy release.MagnetarThe collapsing star forms a magnetar a rapidly rotating neutron star with an incredibly strong magnetic field at its core, which then dumps energy into the supernova ejecta, further brightening the explosion.They then apply these models to different types of stars.Setting the LimitThe authors show that the light curve of ASASSN-15lh (plotted in orange) can be described by a model (black curve) in which a magnetar with an initial spin period of 0.7 ms

  9. A Zn-porphyrin complex contributes to bright red color in Parma ham.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wakamatsu, J; Nishimura, T; Hattori, A

    2004-05-01

    The Italian traditional dry-cured ham (Parma ham) shows a stable bright red color that is achieved without the use of nitrite and/or nitrate. In this study we examined the pigment spectroscopically, fluoroscopically and by using HPLC and ESI-HR-MASS analysis. Porphyrin derivative other than acid hematin were contained in the HCl-containing acetone extract from Parma ham. A strong fluorescence peak at 588 nm and a weak fluorescence peak at 641 nm were observed. By HPLC analysis the acetone extract of Parma ham was observed at the single peak, which eluted at the same time as Zn-protoporphyrin IX and emitted fluorescence. The results of ESI-HR-MS analysis showed both agreement with the molecular weight of Zn-protoporphyrin IX and the characteristic isotope pattern caused by Zn isotopes. These results suggest that the bright red color in Parma ham is caused by Zn-protoporphyrin IX.

  10. Fast neuronal labeling in live tissue using a biocytin conjugated fluorescent probe.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harsløf, Mads; Müller, Felix C; Rohrberg, Julie; Rekling, Jens C

    2015-09-30

    Biocytin has found numerous uses as a neuronal tracer, since it shows both antero- and retrograde transport in neuronal tracts. The main advantage of biocytin lies in the comprehensive intracellular distribution of the molecule, and in effective detection using avidin-based reactions. The main drawback is that biocytin cannot be visualized in live tissue. We demonstrate that TMR biocytin, a conjugate of biocytin and a rhodamine fluorophore, is an effective neuronal tracer in live tissue when applied by electroporation. The initial fiber transport velocity of TMR biocytin is high-5.4mm/h. TMR biocytin can be used in conjunction with AM calcium dyes to label neuronal somas from distances of several millimetres, and record calcium transients during the course of a few hours. Juxtacellular application of TMR biocytin leads to fast anterograde transport with labeling of local synapses within 10min. TMR biocytin is fixable, stable during methyl salicylate clearing, and can be visualized deep in nervous tissue. Retrograde labeling with TMR biocytin enables long-range neuronal visualization and concurrent calcium imaging after only a few hours, which is substantially faster than other fluorescence-based tracers. The green emitting Atto 488 biotin is also taken up and transported retrogradely, but it is not compatible with standard green emitting calcium dyes. TMR biocytin is an attractive neuronal tracer. It labels neurons fast over long distances, and it can be used in conjunction with calcium dyes to report on neuronal activity in retrogradely labeled live neurons. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  11. Brightness and darkness as perceptual dimensions

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Vladusich, T.; Lucassen, M.P.; Cornelissen, F.W.

    2007-01-01

    A common-sense assumption concerning visual perception states that brightness and darkness cannot coexist at a given spatial location. One corollary of this assumption is that achromatic colors, or perceived grey shades, are contained in a one-dimensional (1-D) space varying from bright to dark. The

  12. SURFACE PHOTOMETRY OF LOW SURFACE BRIGHTNESS GALAXIES

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    DEBLOK, WJG; VANDERHULST, JM; BOTHUN, GD

    1995-01-01

    Low surface brightness (LSB) galaxies are galaxies dominated by an exponential disc whose central surface brightness is much fainter than the value of mu(B)(0) = 21.65 +/- 0.30 mag arcsec(-2) found by Freeman. In this paper we present broadband photometry of a sample of 21 late-type LSB galaxies.

  13. Fluorescence spectroscopy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bagatolli, Luis

    2016-01-01

    Fluorescence spectroscopy is a powerful experimental tool used by scientists from many disciplines. During the last decades there have been important developments on distinct fluorescence methods, particularly those related to the study of biological phenomena. This chapter discusses...... the foundations of the fluorescence phenomenon, introduces some general methodologies and provides selected examples on applications focused to disentangle structural and dynamical aspects of biological processes....

  14. Brightness Alteration with Interweaving Contours

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sergio Roncato

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available Chromatic induction is observed whenever the perceived colour of a target surface shifts towards the hue of a neighbouring surface. Some vivid manifestations may be seen in a white background where thin coloured lines have been drawn (assimilation or when lines of different colours are collinear (neon effect or adjacent (watercolour to each other. This study examines a particular colour induction that manifests in concomitance with an opposite effect of colour saturation (or anti-spread. The two phenomena can be observed when a repetitive pattern is drawn in which outline thin contours intercept wider contours or surfaces, colour spreading appear to fill the surface occupied by surfaces or thick lines whereas the background traversed by thin lines is seen as brighter or filled of a saturated white. These phenomena were first observed by Bozzi (1975 and Kanizsa (1979 in figural conditions that did not allow them to document their conjunction. Here we illustrate various manifestations of this twofold phenomenon and compare its effects with the known effects of brightness and colour induction. Some conjectures on the nature of these effects are discussed.

  15. Bright Sparks of Our Future!

    Science.gov (United States)

    Riordan, Naoimh

    2016-04-01

    My name is Naoimh Riordan and I am the Vice Principal of Rockboro Primary School in Cork City, South of Ireland. I am a full time class primary teacher and I teach 4th class, my students are aged between 9-10 years. My passion for education has developed over the years and grown towards STEM (Science, Technology, Engineering and Mathematics) subjects. I believe these subjects are the way forward for our future. My passion and beliefs are driven by the unique after school programme that I have developed. It is titled "Sparks" coming from the term Bright Sparks. "Sparks" is an after school programme with a difference where the STEM subjects are concentrated on through lessons such as Science, Veterinary Science Computer Animation /Coding, Eco engineering, Robotics, Magical Maths, Chess and Creative Writing. All these subjects are taught through activity based learning and are one-hour long each week for a ten-week term. "Sparks" is fully inclusive and non-selective which gives all students of any level of ability an opportunity to engage into these subjects. "Sparks" is open to all primary students in County Cork. The "Sparks" after school programme is taught by tutors from the different Universities and Colleges in Cork City. It works very well because the tutor brings their knowledge, skills and specialised equipment from their respective universities and in turn the tutor gains invaluable teaching practise, can trial a pilot programme in a chosen STEM subject and gain an insight into what works in the physical classroom.

  16. Space Brightness Evaluation for a Daylit Room

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Takashi Maruyama

    2011-05-01

    Full Text Available One of the most important problems for lighting design is how to reduce an electric energy. One way to solve this problem is use of daylight, but little is known how to perceive a brightness of a room illuminated by daylight come in through a window and artificial light. Although the horizontal illuminance increases because of daylight, we would not perceive the room as bright as brightness estimated by the illuminance. The purpose of this study is to measure the space brightness for daylit room and to propose a evaluation method. The experiment was conducted with a couple of miniature office rooms, standard room and test room. Test room has several types of windows and standard room has no window. Subject was asked to evaluate the brightness of the test room relative to the standard room with method of magnitude estimation. It was found that brightness of daylit room did not increase simply with horizontal illuminance. Subject perceived a daylit room darker than a room illuminated only by the artificial light even if horizontal illuminance of these room was same. The effect of daylight on space brightness would vary with the window size and intensity of daylight or artificial light.

  17. Bright boys the making of information technology

    CERN Document Server

    Green, Tom

    2010-01-01

    Everything has a beginning. None was more profound-and quite as unexpected-than Information Technology. Here for the first time is the untold story of how our new age came to be and the bright boys who made it happen. What began on the bare floor of an old laundry building eventually grew to rival in size the Manhattan Project. The unexpected consequence of that journey was huge---what we now know as Information Technology. For sixty years the bright boys have been totally anonymous while their achievements have become a way of life for all of us. "Bright Boys" brings them home. By 1950 they'd

  18. A spectroscopic atlas of bright stars

    CERN Document Server

    Martin, Jack

    2009-01-01

    Suitable for amateur astronomers interested in practical spectroscopy or spectrography, this reference book identifies more than 70 (northern hemisphere) bright stars that are suitable observational targets. It provides finder charts for locating these sometimes-familiar stars.

  19. Nimbus-5 ESMR Polar Gridded Brightness Temperatures

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — The Nimbus-5 Electrically Scanning Microwave Radiometer (ESMR) data set consists of gridded brightness temperature arrays for the Arctic and Antarctic, spanning 11...

  20. Magnetic topological analysis of coronal bright points

    Science.gov (United States)

    Galsgaard, K.; Madjarska, M. S.; Moreno-Insertis, F.; Huang, Z.; Wiegelmann, T.

    2017-10-01

    Context. We report on the first of a series of studies on coronal bright points which investigate the physical mechanism that generates these phenomena. Aims: The aim of this paper is to understand the magnetic-field structure that hosts the bright points. Methods: We use longitudinal magnetograms taken by the Solar Optical Telescope with the Narrowband Filter Imager. For a single case, magnetograms from the Helioseismic and Magnetic Imager were added to the analysis. The longitudinal magnetic field component is used to derive the potential magnetic fields of the large regions around the bright points. A magneto-static field extrapolation method is tested to verify the accuracy of the potential field modelling. The three dimensional magnetic fields are investigated for the presence of magnetic null points and their influence on the local magnetic domain. Results: In nine out of ten cases the bright point resides in areas where the coronal magnetic field contains an opposite polarity intrusion defining a magnetic null point above it. We find that X-ray bright points reside, in these nine cases, in a limited part of the projected fan-dome area, either fully inside the dome or expanding over a limited area below which typically a dominant flux concentration resides. The tenth bright point is located in a bipolar loop system without an overlying null point. Conclusions: All bright points in coronal holes and two out of three bright points in quiet Sun regions are seen to reside in regions containing a magnetic null point. An as yet unidentified process(es) generates the brigh points in specific regions of the fan-dome structure. The movies are available at http://www.aanda.org

  1. Effect of Interior Chromaticness on Space Brightness

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hidenari Takada

    2011-05-01

    Full Text Available To design a lighting environment, horizontal illuminance is generally used as the brightness of a room. But it is reported that a subjective brightness does not always match the horizontal illuminance. For example, the room furnished with high saturated colored objects is perceived brighter than the room furnished with achromatic objects, even though the horizontal illuminance is the same. To investigate a effect of interior chromaticness on space brightness, we conducted the experiment in four miniature rooms that were different in terms of chromaticness of interior decorating surfaces, but kept lightness of surfaces constant. Subjects were asked to set the illuminance of reference room, that is furnished with achromatic objects, to equate the brightness of the test room, that is with chromatic objects. Four of seven subjects needed less illuminance to get the equality of space brightness if the test room had a saturated objects. The illuminance ratio of test to reference room was about 1.4. Other three subjects set the illuminance of reference room almost equal to test room. Thus, there are differences between individuals so further work would be needed to estimate the quantitative effect of interior chromaticness on space brightness.

  2. Energy-exchange collisions of dark-bright-bright vector solitons.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Radhakrishnan, R; Manikandan, N; Aravinthan, K

    2015-12-01

    We find a dark component guiding the practically interesting bright-bright vector one-soliton to two different parametric domains giving rise to different physical situations by constructing a more general form of three-component dark-bright-bright mixed vector one-soliton solution of the generalized Manakov model with nine free real parameters. Moreover our main investigation of the collision dynamics of such mixed vector solitons by constructing the multisoliton solution of the generalized Manakov model with the help of Hirota technique reveals that the dark-bright-bright vector two-soliton supports energy-exchange collision dynamics. In particular the dark component preserves its initial form and the energy-exchange collision property of the bright-bright vector two-soliton solution of the Manakov model during collision. In addition the interactions between bound state dark-bright-bright vector solitons reveal oscillations in their amplitudes. A similar kind of breathing effect was also experimentally observed in the Bose-Einstein condensates. Some possible ways are theoretically suggested not only to control this breathing effect but also to manage the beating, bouncing, jumping, and attraction effects in the collision dynamics of dark-bright-bright vector solitons. The role of multiple free parameters in our solution is examined to define polarization vector, envelope speed, envelope width, envelope amplitude, grayness, and complex modulation of our solution. It is interesting to note that the polarization vector of our mixed vector one-soliton evolves in sphere or hyperboloid depending upon the initial parametric choices.

  3. Bright perspectives for nuclear photonics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thirolf, P. G.; Habs, D.

    2014-05-01

    With the advent of new high-power, short-pulse laser facilities in combination with novel technologies for the production of highly brilliant, intense γ beams (like, e.g., Extreme Light Infrastructure - Nuclear Physics (ELI-NP) in Bucharest, MEGaRay in Livermore or a planned upgrade of the HIγS facility at Duke University), unprecedented perspectives will open up in the coming years for photonuclear physics both in basic sciences as in various fields of applications. Ultra-high sensitivity will be enabled by an envisaged increase of the γ-beam spectral density from the presently typical 102γ/eVs to about 104γ/eVs, thus enabling a new quality of nuclear photonics [1], assisted by new γ-optical elements [2]. Photonuclear reactions with highly brilliant γ beams will allow to produce radioisotopes for nuclear medicine with much higher specific activity and/or more economically than with conventional methods. This will open the door for completely new clinical applications of radioisotopes [3]. The isotopic, state-selective sensitivity of the well-established technique of nuclear resonance fluorescence (NRF) will be boosted by the drastically reduced energy bandwidth (management of nuclear materials, such as radioactive waste management, the detection of nuclear fissile material in the recycling process or the detection of clandestine fissile materials. Moreover, also secondary sources like low-energy, pulsed, polarized neutron beams of high intensity and high brilliance [4] or a new type of positron source with significantly increased brilliance, for the first time fully polarized [5], can be realized and lead to new applications in solid state physics or material sciences.

  4. A Zn-porphyrin complex contributes to bright red color in Parma ham

    OpenAIRE

    Wakamatsu, J.; Nishimura, T; Hattori, A.

    2004-01-01

    The Italian traditional dry-cured ham (Parma ham) shows a stable bright red color that is achieved without the use of nitrite and/or nitrate. In this study we examined the pigment spectroscopically, fluoroscopically and by using HPLC and ESI-HR-MASS analysis. Porphyrin derivative other than acid hematin were contained in the HCl-containing acetone extract from Parma ham. A strong fluorescence peak at 588 nm and a weak fluorescence peak at 641 nm were observed. By HPLC analysis the acetone ext...

  5. Characterization of flavin-based fluorescent proteins: an emerging class of fluorescent reporters.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mukherjee, Arnab; Walker, Joshua; Weyant, Kevin B; Schroeder, Charles M

    2013-01-01

    Fluorescent reporter proteins based on flavin-binding photosensors were recently developed as a new class of genetically encoded probes characterized by small size and oxygen-independent maturation of fluorescence. Flavin-based fluorescent proteins (FbFPs) address two major limitations associated with existing fluorescent reporters derived from the green fluorescent protein (GFP)-namely, the overall large size and oxygen-dependent maturation of fluorescence of GFP. However, FbFPs are at a nascent stage of development and have been utilized in only a handful of biological studies. Importantly, a full understanding of the performance and properties of FbFPs as a practical set of biological probes is lacking. In this work, we extensively characterize three FbFPs isolated from Pseudomonas putida, Bacillus subtilis, and Arabidopsis thaliana, using in vitro studies to assess probe brightness, oligomeric state, maturation time, fraction of fluorescent holoprotein, pH tolerance, redox sensitivity, and thermal stability. Furthermore, we validate FbFPs as stable molecular tags using in vivo studies by constructing a series of FbFP-based transcriptional constructs to probe promoter activity in Escherichia coli. Overall, FbFPs show key advantages as broad-spectrum biological reporters including robust pH tolerance (4-11), thermal stability (up to 60°C), and rapid maturation of fluorescence (fluorescence and slow kinetics of fluorescence maturation (10-40 minutes for half maximal fluorescence recovery). From this view, FbFPs represent a useful new addition to the fluorescent reporter protein palette, and our results constitute an important framework to enable researchers to implement and further engineer improved FbFP-based reporters with enhanced brightness and tighter flavin binding, which will maximize their potential benefits.

  6. A selective deficit in the appreciation and recognition of brightness: brightness agnosia?

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Nijboer, T.C.W.; Nys, G.M.S.; van der Smagt, M.J.; de Haan, E.H.F.

    2009-01-01

    We report a patient with extensive brain damage in the right hemisphere who demonstrated a severe impairment in the appreciation of brightness. Acuity, contrast sensitivity as well as luminance discrimination were normal, suggesting her brightness impairment is not a mere consequence of low-level

  7. A selective deficit in the appreciation and recognition of brightness: brightness agnosia?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nijboer, Tanja C W; Nys, Gudrun M S; van der Smagt, Maarten J; de Haan, Edward H F

    2009-01-01

    We report a patient with extensive brain damage in the right hemisphere who demonstrated a severe impairment in the appreciation of brightness. Acuity, contrast sensitivity as well as luminance discrimination were normal, suggesting her brightness impairment is not a mere consequence of low-level sensory impairments. The patient was not able to indicate the darker or the lighter of two grey squares, even though she was able to see that they differed. In addition, she could not indicate whether the lights in a room were switched on or off, nor was she able to differentiate between normal greyscale images and inverted greyscale images. As the patient recognised objects, colours, and shapes correctly, the impairment is specific for brightness. As low-level, sensory processing is normal, this specific deficit in the recognition and appreciation of brightness appears to be of a higher, cognitive level, the level of semantic knowledge. This appears to be the first report of 'brightness agnosia'.

  8. High brightness semiconductor lasers with reduced filamentation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    McInerney, John; O'Brien, Peter.; Skovgaard, Peter M. W.

    1999-01-01

    High brightness semiconductor lasers have applications in spectroscopy, fiber lasers, manufacturing and materials processing, medicine and free space communication or energy transfer. The main difficulty associated with high brightness is that, because of COD, high power requires a large aperture....... Large apertures result in high order transverse modes, filamentation and spatio-temporal instabilities, all of which degrade spatial coherence and therefore brightness. We shall describe a combined assault on three fronts: (1) minimise aperture size required for a given power by maximising the facet...... damage threshold, (2) for a given aperture, minimise self-focusing and filamentation by minimising the effective nonlinear coefficient (the alpha parameter), and (3) for a given aperture and nonlinear coefficient, develop optical cavities and propagation structures to suppress filamentation and high...

  9. On the Brightness of Supernova Ia

    CERN Document Server

    Zheng, Yijia

    2013-01-01

    Before 1998 the universe expansion was thought to be slowing down. After 1998 the universe expansion is thought to be accelerating up. The key evidence came from the observed brightness of high redshift supernovae Ia in 1998. Astronomers found that the observed brightness of high redshift supernovae Ia is fainter than expected. Astronomers believe this means that the universe expansion is accelerating up. In this paper it is argued that if the ionized gas in the universe space is taken into account, then the brightness of the high redshift supernova Ia should be fainter than expected. The universe expansion does not need to be accelerating up. The exotic form of energy (dark energy) does not need to be introduce

  10. Plasmonics Enhanced Smartphone Fluorescence Microscopy

    KAUST Repository

    Wei, Qingshan

    2017-05-12

    Smartphone fluorescence microscopy has various applications in point-of-care (POC) testing and diagnostics, ranging from e.g., quantification of immunoassays, detection of microorganisms, to sensing of viruses. An important need in smartphone-based microscopy and sensing techniques is to improve the detection sensitivity to enable quantification of extremely low concentrations of target molecules. Here, we demonstrate a general strategy to enhance the detection sensitivity of a smartphone-based fluorescence microscope by using surface-enhanced fluorescence (SEF) created by a thin metal-film. In this plasmonic design, the samples are placed on a silver-coated glass slide with a thin spacer, and excited by a laser-diode from the backside through a glass hemisphere, generating surface plasmon polaritons. We optimized this mobile SEF system by tuning the metal-film thickness, spacer distance, excitation angle and polarization, and achieved ~10-fold enhancement in fluorescence intensity compared to a bare glass substrate, which enabled us to image single fluorescent particles as small as 50 nm in diameter and single quantum-dots. Furthermore, we quantified the detection limit of this platform by using DNA origami-based brightness standards, demonstrating that ~80 fluorophores per diffraction-limited spot can be readily detected by our mobile microscope, which opens up new opportunities for POC diagnostics and sensing applications in resource-limited-settings.

  11. Plasmonics Enhanced Smartphone Fluorescence Microscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wei, Qingshan; Acuna, Guillermo; Kim, Seungkyeum; Vietz, Carolin; Tseng, Derek; Chae, Jongjae; Shir, Daniel; Luo, Wei; Tinnefeld, Philip; Ozcan, Aydogan

    2017-05-18

    Smartphone fluorescence microscopy has various applications in point-of-care (POC) testing and diagnostics, ranging from e.g., quantification of immunoassays, detection of microorganisms, to sensing of viruses. An important need in smartphone-based microscopy and sensing techniques is to improve the detection sensitivity to enable quantification of extremely low concentrations of target molecules. Here, we demonstrate a general strategy to enhance the detection sensitivity of a smartphone-based fluorescence microscope by using surface-enhanced fluorescence (SEF) created by a thin metal-film. In this plasmonic design, the samples are placed on a silver-coated glass slide with a thin spacer, and excited by a laser-diode from the backside through a glass hemisphere, generating surface plasmon polaritons. We optimized this mobile SEF system by tuning the metal-film thickness, spacer distance, excitation angle and polarization, and achieved ~10-fold enhancement in fluorescence intensity compared to a bare glass substrate, which enabled us to image single fluorescent particles as small as 50 nm in diameter and single quantum-dots. Furthermore, we quantified the detection limit of this platform by using DNA origami-based brightness standards, demonstrating that ~80 fluorophores per diffraction-limited spot can be readily detected by our mobile microscope, which opens up new opportunities for POC diagnostics and sensing applications in resource-limited-settings.

  12. Increasing the brightness of light sources

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fu, Ling

    2006-11-16

    In this work the principle of light recycling is applied to artificial light sources in order to achieve brightness enhancement. Firstly, the feasibilities of increasing the brightness of light sources via light recycling are examined theoretically, based on the fundamental laws of thermodynamics including Kirchhoff's law on radiation, Planck's law, Lambert-Beer's law, the etendue conservation and the brightness theorem. From an experimental viewpoint, the radiation properties of three different kinds of light sources including short-arc lamps, incandescent lamps and LEDs characterized by their light-generating mechanisms are investigated. These three types of sources are used in light recycling experiments, for the purpose of 1. validating the intrinsic light recycling effect in light sources, e. g. the intrinsic light recycling effect in incandescent lamps stemming from the coiled filament structure. 2. acquiring the required parameters for establishing physical models, e.g. the emissivity/absorptivity of the short-arc lamps, the intrinsic reflectivity and the external quantum efficiency of LEDs. 3. laying the foundations for designing optics aimed at brightness enhancement according to the characteristics of the sources and applications. Based on the fundamental laws and experiments, two physical models for simulating the radiance distribution of light sources are established, one for thermal filament lamps, the other for luminescent sources, LEDs. As validation of the theoretical and experimental investigation of the light recycling effect, an optical device, the Carambola, is designed for achieving deterministic and multiple light recycling. The Carambola has the function of a concentrator. In order to achieve the maximum possible brightness enhancement with the Carambola, several combinations of sources and Carambolas are modelled in ray-tracing simulations. Sources with different light-emitting mechanisms and different radiation properties

  13. Fabrication of an "ion-imprinting" dual-emission quantum dot nanohybrid for selective fluorescence turn-on and ratiometric detection of cadmium ions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Jing; Jiang, Chenxing; Wang, Xiaoqi; Wang, Ligeng; Chen, Aimin; Hu, Jun; Luo, Zhihui

    2016-10-21

    In this work, we have fabricated a new dual-emission quantum dot (QD) nanohybrid for fluorescence ratiometric determination of cadmium ions (Cd 2+ ) in water samples, where the "turn-on" model and "ion-imprinting" technique were incorporated simultaneously. The nanohybrid probe was composed of green-emitting CdSe QDs covalently linked onto the surface of silica nanoparticles embedded with red-emitting CdTe QDs. The chemical etching of ethylene diamine tetraacetic acid (EDTA) at the surface produced specific Cd 2+ recognition sites and quenched the green fluorescence of outer CdSe QDs. Upon exposure to different amounts of Cd 2+ , the green fluorescence was gradually restored, whereas the inner red fluorescence remained constant. As a consequence, an obviously distinguishable fluorescence color variation (from red to green) of the probe solution was observed. Under the optimized conditions, the developed ratiometric sensor displayed a linear response range from 0.1 to 9 μM with a detection limit of 25 nM (S/N = 3) for Cd 2+ , which could offer an alternative sensing approach for the highly sensitive and selective detection of heavy metal ions.

  14. Characteristics of green-blue fluorescence generated from the adaxial sides of leaves of tree species.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nakayama, Masayoshi; Iwashina, Tsukasa

    2017-03-01

    We discovered that some tree species have leaves whose adaxial sides show bright green-blue fluorescence upon exposure to ultraviolet irradiation. In total, 141 native Japanese species belonging to 47 families were analyzed, and the brightness of the leaf fluorescence, represented by the L* values (Lab color space) of the pictures, was evaluated. The species possessing the brightest fluorescent leaves, with L* > 50, were Camellia japonica, Camellia sasanqua, and Cleyera japonica of Theaceae, Osmanthus heterophyllus and Ligustrum japonicum of Oleaceae, Aucuba japonica of Garryaceae, and Trochodendron aralioides of Trochodendraceae. These species are propagated by pollination or seed dispersion by birds, except T. aralioides. The fluorescence was specifically observed in the cuticle tissues of the epidermal cells, indicating that the fluorescence is a signal to other organisms that can perceive the fluorescence under natural light. Species possessing the bright leaves represented 5% of the total species tested, while species possessing dark leaves, with L* ≤ 40, represented 88.6%. We deduce that the fluorescence enables the organisms to easily distinguish the minority species possessing bright leaves from the surrounding plants, which were mostly trees species with dark leaves. The structure of A. japonica var. borealis, in which dark leaves only surround its fruits while the rest of the tree is covered by bright leaves, may be useful to signal the presence of fruits to the organisms. We hypothesize that the fluorescence contributes to the propagation of the tree species by helping birds to distinguish these particular trees and/or locate the fruits.

  15. Spectral Diversity and Regulation of Coral Fluorescence in a Mesophotic Reef Habitat in the Red Sea

    OpenAIRE

    Gal Eyal; Jörg Wiedenmann; Mila Grinblat; Cecilia D'Angelo; Esti Kramarsky-Winter; Tali Treibitz; Or Ben-Zvi; Yonathan Shaked; Tyler B. Smith; Saki Harii; Vianney Denis; Tim Noyes; Raz Tamir; Yossi Loya

    2015-01-01

    The phenomenon of coral fluorescence in mesophotic reefs, although well described for shallow waters, remains largely unstudied. We found that representatives of many scleractinian species are brightly fluorescent at depths of 50-60 m at the Interuniversity Institute for Marine Sciences (IUI) reef in Eilat, Israel. Some of these fluorescent species have distribution maxima at mesophotic depths (40-100 m). Several individuals from these depths displayed yellow or orange-red fluorescence, the l...

  16. Microwave brightness temperature imaging and dielectric properties ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    material collected by former Soviet Union robots and Apollo astronauts. With the completion of the first round of lunar exploration by human beings, the study of lunar microwave brightness tempe- rature was completely forgotten. Accompanied by a new upcoming era of lunar exploration and the development of science and ...

  17. Dark matter in low surface brightness galaxies

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    de Blok, WJG; McGaugh, SS; Persic, M; Salucci, P

    1997-01-01

    Low Surface Brightness (LSB) galaxies form a large population of disc galaxies that extend the Hubble sequence towards extreme late-types. They are only slowly evolving, and still in an early evolutionary state. The Tully-Fisher relation and rotation curves of LSB galaxies both show that LSB

  18. Robust fitting of diurnal brightness temperature cycle

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Udahemuka, G

    2007-11-01

    Full Text Available for a pixel concerned. Robust fitting of observed Diurnal Temperature Cycle (DTC) taken over a day of a given pixel without cloud cover and other abnormally conditions such as fire can give a data based brightness temperature model for a given pixel...

  19. Simultaneous brightness contrast of foraging Papilio butterflies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kinoshita, Michiyo; Takahashi, Yuki; Arikawa, Kentaro

    2012-01-01

    This study focuses on the sense of brightness in the foraging Japanese yellow swallowtail butterfly, Papilio xuthus. We presented two red discs of different intensity on a grey background to butterflies, and trained them to select one of the discs. They were successfully trained to select either a high intensity or a low intensity disc. The trained butterflies were tested on their ability to perceive brightness in two different protocols: (i) two orange discs of different intensity presented on the same intensity grey background and (ii) two orange discs of the same intensity separately presented on a grey background that was either higher or lower in intensity than the training background. The butterflies trained to high intensity red selected the orange disc of high intensity in protocol 1, and the disc on the background of low intensity grey in protocol 2. We obtained similar results in another set of experiments with purple discs instead of orange discs. The choices of the butterflies trained to low intensity red were opposite to those just described. Taken together, we conclude that Papilio has the ability to learn brightness and darkness of targets independent of colour, and that they have the so-called simultaneous brightness contrast. PMID:22179808

  20. Microwave brightness temperature imaging and dielectric properties ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    In this paper,we give a rough analysis of the microwave brightness temperature images of the lunar disc observed using the NRAO 12 meter Telescope and Siberian Solar Radio Telescope.We also ... Center for Space Science and Applied Research, Chinese Academy of Sciences, P.O. Box 8701, Beijing 100 080, China.

  1. Dark Matter in Low Surface Brightness Galaxies

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Blok, W. J. G. de; McGaugh, S. S.

    1996-01-01

    Abstract: Low Surface Brightness (LSB) galaxies form a large population of disc galaxies that extend the Hubble sequence towards extreme late-types. They are only slowly evolving, and still in an early evolutionary state. The Tully-Fisher relation and rotation curves of LSB galaxies both show that

  2. Fluorescent nanoparticles based on AIE fluorogens for bioimaging

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yan, Lulin; Zhang, Yan; Xu, Bin; Tian, Wenjing

    2016-01-01

    Fluorescent nanoparticles (FNPs) have recently attracted increasing attention in the biomedical field because of their unique optical properties, easy fabrication and outstanding performance in imaging. Compared with conventional molecular probes including small organic dyes and fluorescent proteins, FNPs based on aggregation-induced emission (AIE) fluorogens have shown significant advantages in tunable emission and brightness, good biocompatibility, superb photo- and physical stability, potential biodegradability and facile surface functionalization. In this review, we summarize the latest advances in the development of fluorescent nanoparticles based on AIE fluorogens including polymer nanoparticles and silica nanoparticles over the past few years, and the various biomedical applications based on these fluorescent nanoparticles are also elaborated.

  3. The nature of solar brightness variations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shapiro, A. I.; Solanki, S. K.; Krivova, N. A.; Cameron, R. H.; Yeo, K. L.; Schmutz, W. K.

    2017-09-01

    Determining the sources of solar brightness variations1,2, often referred to as solar noise3, is important because solar noise limits the detection of solar oscillations3, is one of the drivers of the Earth's climate system4,5 and is a prototype of stellar variability6,7—an important limiting factor for the detection of extrasolar planets. Here, we model the magnetic contribution to solar brightness variability using high-cadence8,9 observations from the Solar Dynamics Observatory (SDO) and the Spectral And Total Irradiance REconstruction (SATIRE)10,11 model. The brightness variations caused by the constantly evolving cellular granulation pattern on the solar surface were computed with the Max Planck Institute for Solar System Research (MPS)/University of Chicago Radiative Magnetohydrodynamics (MURaM)12 code. We found that the surface magnetic field and granulation can together precisely explain solar noise (that is, solar variability excluding oscillations) on timescales from minutes to decades, accounting for all timescales that have so far been resolved or covered by irradiance measurements. We demonstrate that no other sources of variability are required to explain the data. Recent measurements of Sun-like stars by the COnvection ROtation and planetary Transits (CoRoT)13 and Kepler14 missions uncovered brightness variations similar to that of the Sun, but with a much wider variety of patterns15. Our finding that solar brightness variations can be replicated in detail with just two well-known sources will greatly simplify future modelling of existing CoRoT and Kepler as well as anticipated Transiting Exoplanet Survey Satellite16 and PLAnetary Transits and Oscillations of stars (PLATO)17 data.

  4. Fluorescence microscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sanderson, Michael J; Smith, Ian; Parker, Ian; Bootman, Martin D

    2014-10-01

    Fluorescence microscopy is a major tool with which to monitor cell physiology. Although the concepts of fluorescence and its optical separation using filters remain similar, microscope design varies with the aim of increasing image contrast and spatial resolution. The basics of wide-field microscopy are outlined to emphasize the selection, advantages, and correct use of laser scanning confocal microscopy, two-photon microscopy, scanning disk confocal microscopy, total internal reflection, and super-resolution microscopy. In addition, the principles of how these microscopes form images are reviewed to appreciate their capabilities, limitations, and constraints for operation. © 2014 Cold Spring Harbor Laboratory Press.

  5. Intermittent Episodes of Bright Light Suppress Myopia in the Chicken More than Continuous Bright Light

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lan, Weizhong; Feldkaemper, Marita; Schaeffel, Frank

    2014-01-01

    Purpose Bright light has been shown a powerful inhibitor of myopia development in animal models. We studied which temporal patterns of bright light are the most potent in suppressing deprivation myopia in chickens. Methods Eight-day-old chickens wore diffusers over one eye to induce deprivation myopia. A reference group (n = 8) was kept under office-like illuminance (500 lux) at a 10∶14 light∶dark cycle. Episodes of bright light (15 000 lux) were super-imposed on this background as follows. Paradigm I: exposure to constant bright light for either 1 hour (n = 5), 2 hours (n = 5), 5 hours (n = 4) or 10 hours (n = 4). Paradigm II: exposure to repeated cycles of bright light with 50% duty cycle and either 60 minutes (n = 7), 30 minutes (n = 8), 15 minutes (n = 6), 7 minutes (n = 7) or 1 minute (n = 7) periods, provided for 10 hours. Refraction and axial length were measured prior to and immediately after the 5-day experiment. Relative changes were analyzed by paired t-tests, and differences among groups were tested by one-way ANOVA. Results Compared with the reference group, exposure to continuous bright light for 1 or 2 hours every day had no significant protective effect against deprivation myopia. Inhibition of myopia became significant after 5 hours of bright light exposure but extending the duration to 10 hours did not offer an additional benefit. In comparison, repeated cycles of 1∶1 or 7∶7 minutes of bright light enhanced the protective effect against myopia and could fully suppress its development. Conclusions The protective effect of bright light depends on the exposure duration and, to the intermittent form, the frequency cycle. Compared to the saturation effect of continuous bright light, low frequency cycles of bright light (1∶1 min) provided the strongest inhibition effect. However, our quantitative results probably might not be directly translated into humans, but rather need further amendments in clinical

  6. Use of astronomy filters in fluorescence microscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Piper, Jörg

    2012-02-01

    Monochrome astronomy filters are well suited for use as excitation or suppression filters in fluorescence microscopy. Because of their particular optical design, such filters can be combined with standard halogen light sources for excitation in many fluorescent probes. In this "low energy excitation," photobleaching (fading) or other irritations of native specimens are avoided. Photomicrographs can be taken from living motile fluorescent specimens also with a flash so that fluorescence images can be created free from indistinctness caused by movement. Special filter cubes or dichroic mirrors are not needed for our method. By use of suitable astronomy filters, fluorescence microscopy can be carried out with standard laboratory microscopes equipped with condensers for bright-field (BF) and dark-field (DF) illumination in transmitted light. In BF excitation, the background brightness can be modulated in tiny steps up to dark or black. Moreover, standard industry microscopes fitted with a vertical illuminator for examinations of opaque probes in DF or BF illumination based on incident light (wafer inspections, for instance) can also be used for excitation in epi-illumination when adequate astronomy filters are inserted as excitatory and suppression filters in the illuminating and imaging light path. In all variants, transmission bands can be modulated by transmission shift.

  7. Circadian Phase-Shifting Effects of Bright Light, Exercise, and Bright Light + Exercise.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Youngstedt, Shawn D; Kline, Christopher E; Elliott, Jeffrey A; Zielinski, Mark R; Devlin, Tina M; Moore, Teresa A

    2016-02-26

    Limited research has compared the circadian phase-shifting effects of bright light and exercise and additive effects of these stimuli. The aim of this study was to compare the phase-delaying effects of late night bright light, late night exercise, and late evening bright light followed by early morning exercise. In a within-subjects, counterbalanced design, 6 young adults completed each of three 2.5-day protocols. Participants followed a 3-h ultra-short sleep-wake cycle, involving wakefulness in dim light for 2h, followed by attempted sleep in darkness for 1 h, repeated throughout each protocol. On night 2 of each protocol, participants received either (1) bright light alone (5,000 lux) from 2210-2340 h, (2) treadmill exercise alone from 2210-2340 h, or (3) bright light (2210-2340 h) followed by exercise from 0410-0540 h. Urine was collected every 90 min. Shifts in the 6-sulphatoxymelatonin (aMT6s) cosine acrophase from baseline to post-treatment were compared between treatments. Analyses revealed a significant additive phase-delaying effect of bright light + exercise (80.8 ± 11.6 [SD] min) compared with exercise alone (47.3 ± 21.6 min), and a similar phase delay following bright light alone (56.6 ± 15.2 min) and exercise alone administered for the same duration and at the same time of night. Thus, the data suggest that late night bright light followed by early morning exercise can have an additive circadian phase-shifting effect.

  8. Human CD56bright NK Cells

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Michel, Tatiana; Poli, Aurélie; Cuapio, Angelica

    2016-01-01

    Human NK cells can be subdivided into various subsets based on the relative expression of CD16 and CD56. In particular, CD56(bright)CD16(-/dim) NK cells are the focus of interest. They are considered efficient cytokine producers endowed with immunoregulatory properties, but they can also become...... cytotoxic upon appropriate activation. These cells were shown to play a role in different disease states, such as cancer, autoimmunity, neuroinflammation, and infection. Although their phenotype and functional properties are well known and have been extensively studied, their lineage relationship with other...... NK cell subsets is not fully defined, nor is their precise hematopoietic origin. In this article, we summarize recent studies about CD56(bright) NK cells in health and disease and briefly discuss the current controversies surrounding them....

  9. Companions of Bright Barred Shapley Ames Galaxies

    OpenAIRE

    Garcia-Barreto, J. Antonio; Carrillo, Rene; Vera-Villamizar, Nelson

    2003-01-01

    Companion galaxy environment for a subset of 78 bright and nearby barred galaxies from the Shapley Ames Catalog is presented. Among spiral barred galaxies there are Seyfert galaxies, galaxies with circumnuclear structures, galaxies not associated with any large scale galaxy cloud structure, galaxies with peculiar disk morphology (crooked arms) and galaxies with normal disk morphology; the list includes all Hubble types. The companion galaxy list includes number of companion galaxies within 20...

  10. Modular Zero Energy. BrightBuilt Home

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Aldrich, Robb [Steven Winter Associates, Inc., Norwalk, CT (United States); Butterfield, Karla [Steven Winter Associates, Inc., Norwalk, CT (United States)

    2016-03-01

    With funding from the Building America Program, part of the U.S. Department of Energy Building Technologies Office, the Consortium for Advanced Residential Buildings (CARB) worked with BrightBuilt Home (BBH) to evaluate and optimize building systems. CARB’s work focused on a home built by Black Bros. Builders in Lincolnville, Maine (International Energy Conservation Code Climate Zone 6). As with most BBH projects to date, modular boxes were built by Keiser Homes in Oxford, Maine.

  11. TC4 AMPR BRIGHTNESS TEMPERATURE (TB) V1

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — The TC4 AMPR Brightness Temperature (TB) dataset consists of brightness temperature data from July 19, 2007 through August 8, 2007. The Tropical Composition, Cloud...

  12. Brightness illusion in the guppy (Poecilia reticulata).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Agrillo, Christian; Miletto Petrazzini, Maria Elena; Bisazza, Angelo

    2016-02-01

    A long-standing debate surrounds the issue of whether human and nonhuman species share similar perceptual mechanisms. One experimental strategy to compare visual perception of vertebrates consists in assessing how animals react in the presence of visual illusions. To date, this methodological approach has been widely used with mammals and birds, while few studies have been reported in distantly related species, such as fish. In the present study we investigated whether fish perceive the brightness illusion, a well-known illusion occurring when 2 objects, identical in physical features, appear to be different in brightness. Twelve guppies (Poecilia reticulata) were initially trained to discriminate which rectangle was darker or lighter between 2 otherwise identical rectangles. Three different conditions were set up: neutral condition between rectangle and background (same background used for both darker and lighter rectangle); congruent condition (darker rectangle in a darker background and lighter rectangle in a lighter background); and incongruent condition (darker rectangle in a lighter background and lighter rectangle in a darker background). After reaching the learning criterion, guppies were presented with the illusory pattern: 2 identical rectangles inserted in 2 different backgrounds. Guppies previously trained to select the darker rectangle showed a significant choice of the rectangle that appears to be darker by human observers (and vice versa). The human-like performance exhibited in the presence of the illusory pattern suggests the existence of similar perceptual mechanisms between humans and fish to elaborate the brightness of objects. (c) 2016 APA, all rights reserved).

  13. Following protein association in vivo with fluorescence fluctuation spectroscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Muller, Joachim D.

    2003-07-01

    The combination of fluorescence correlation spectroscopy and two-photon excitation provides us with a powerful spectroscopic technique. Its submicron resolution and single molecule sensitivity make it an attractive technique for in vivo applications. Experiments have demonstrated that quantitative in vivo fluorescence fluctuation measurements are feasible, despite the presence of autofluorescence and the heterogeneity of the cellular environment. I will demonstrate that molecular brightness of proteins tagged with green fluorescent protein (GFP) is a useful and robust parameter for in vivo studies. Knowledge of photon statistics is crucial for the interpretation of fluorescence fluctuation experiments. I will describe photon counting histogram (PCH) analysis, which determines the molecular brightness and complements autocorrelation analysis. Non-ideal detector effects and their influence on the photon statistics will be discussed. The goal of in vivo fluorescence fluctuation experiments is to address functional properties of biomolecules. We will focus on retinoid X receptor (RXR), a nuclear receptor, which is crucial for the regulation of gene expression. The fluorescence brightness of RXR tagged with EGFP will be used to probe the oligomerization state of RXR.

  14. Probing protein interactions in cells by fluorescence fluctuation spectroscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mueller, Joachim

    2003-03-01

    The combination of fluorescence correlation spectroscopy and two-photon excitation provides us with a powerful spectroscopic technique. Its submicron resolution and single molecule sensitivity make it an attractive technique for in vivo applications. Experiments have demonstrated that quantitative in vivo fluorescence fluctuation measurements are feasible, despite the presence of autofluorescence and the heterogeneity of the cellular environment. I will demonstrate that molecular brightness of proteins tagged with green fluorescent protein (GFP) is a useful and robust parameter for in vivo studies. Knowledge of photon statistics is crucial for the interpretation of fluorescence fluctuation experiments. I will describe photon counting histogram (PCH) analysis, which determines the molecular brightness and complements autocorrelation analysis. Non-ideal detector effects and their influence on the photon statistics will be discussed. The goal of in vivo fluorescence fluctuation experiments is to address functional properties of biomolecules. We will focus on retinoid X receptor (RXR), a nuclear receptor, which is crucial for the regulation of gene expression. The fluorescence brightness of RXR tagged with EGFP will be used to probe the oligomerization state of RXR.

  15. Controlling excitons. Concepts for phosphorescent organic LEDs at high brightness

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Reineke, Sebastian

    2009-11-15

    This work focusses on the high brightness performance of phosphorescent organic light-emitting diodes (OLEDs). The use of phosphorescent emitter molecules in OLEDs is essential to realize internal electron-photon conversion efficiencies of 100 %. However, due to their molecular nature, the excited triplet states have orders of magnitude longer time constants compared to their fluorescent counterparts which, in turn, strongly increases the probability of bimolecular annihilation. As a consequence, the efficiencies of phosphorescent OLEDs decline at high brightness - an effect known as efficiency roll-off, for which it has been shown to be dominated by triplet-triplet annihilation (TTA). In this work, TTA of the archetype phosphorescent emitter Ir(ppy){sub 3} is investigated in time-resolved photoluminescence experiments. For the widely used mixed system CBP:Ir(ppy){sub 3}, host-guest TTA - an additional unwanted TTA channel - is experimentally observed at high excitation levels. By using matrix materials with higher triplet energies, this effect is efficiently suppressed, however further studies show that the efficiency roll-off of Ir(ppy)3 is much more pronounced than predicted by a model based on Foerster-type energy transfer, which marks the intrinsic limit for TTA. These results suggest that the emitter molecules show a strong tendency to form aggregates in the mixed film as the origin for enhanced TTA. Transmission electron microscopy images of Ir(ppy){sub 3} doped mixed films give direct proof of emitter aggregates. Based on these results, two concepts are developed that improve the high brightness performance of OLEDs. In a first approach, thin intrinsic matrix interlayers are incorporated in the emission layer leading to a one-dimensional exciton confinement that suppresses exciton migration and, consequently, TTA. The second concept reduces the efficiency roll-off by using an emitter molecule with slightly different chemical structure, i.e. Ir(ppy){sub 2

  16. Study of Three-Dimensional Image Brightness Loss in Stereoscopy

    OpenAIRE

    Hsing-Cheng Yu; Xie-Hong Tsai; An-Chun Luo; Ming Wu; Sei-Wang Chen

    2015-01-01

    When viewing three-dimensional (3D) images, whether in cinemas or on stereoscopic televisions, viewers experience the same problem of image brightness loss. This study aims to investigate image brightness loss in 3D displays, with the primary aim being to quantify the image brightness degradation in the 3D mode. A further aim is to determine the image brightness relationship to the corresponding two-dimensional (2D) images in order to adjust the 3D-image brightness values. In addition, the ph...

  17. Females are the brighter sex: Differences in external fluorescence across sexes and life stages of a crab spider.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Erin E Brandt

    Full Text Available Fluorescence is increasingly recognized to be widespread in nature. In particular, some arachnids fluoresce externally, and in spiders the hemolymph fluoresces. In this study, we examined the external fluorescence and the fluorophores of different sexes and life stages of the crab spider Misumena vatia (Clerk 1757, a sit-and-wait predator that feeds on insects as they visit flowers. We designed novel instrumentation to measure external fluorescence in whole specimens. We found that although males and females possess internal fluorophores with similar properties, the external expression of fluorescence varies across sexes and life stages. Spiders fluoresce brightly as immatures. Females maintain their brightness to adulthood, whereas males become increasingly dim as they mature. We suggest that external fluorescence likely contributes to visual signaling in these animals, and that it differs between the sexes as a result of differences in foraging ecology and behavior.

  18. Highly indistinguishable on-demand resonance fluorescence photons from a deterministic quantum dot micropillar device with 74% extraction efficiency

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gregersen, Niels

    2016-01-01

    device is a major challenge. Here, we report on the observation of bright single photon emission generated via pulsed, resonance fluorescence conditions from a single quantum dot (QD) deterministically centered in a micropillar cavity device via cryogenic optical lithography. The brightness of the QD...

  19. Investigating the Bright End of LSST Photometry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ojala, Elle; Pepper, Joshua; LSST Collaboration

    2018-01-01

    The Large Synoptic Survey Telescope (LSST) will begin operations in 2022, conducting a wide-field, synoptic multiband survey of the southern sky. Some fraction of objects at the bright end of the magnitude regime observed by LSST will overlap with other wide-sky surveys, allowing for calibration and cross-checking between surveys. The LSST is optimized for observations of very faint objects, so much of this data overlap will be comprised of saturated images. This project provides the first in-depth analysis of saturation in LSST images. Using the PhoSim package to create simulated LSST images, we evaluate saturation properties of several types of stars to determine the brightness limitations of LSST. We also collect metadata from many wide-field photometric surveys to provide cross-survey accounting and comparison. Additionally, we evaluate the accuracy of the PhoSim modeling parameters to determine the reliability of the software. These efforts will allow us to determine the expected useable data overlap between bright-end LSST images and faint-end images in other wide-sky surveys. Our next steps are developing methods to extract photometry from saturated images.This material is based upon work supported in part by the National Science Foundation through Cooperative Agreement 1258333 managed by the Association of Universities for Research in Astronomy (AURA), and the Department of Energy under Contract No. DE-AC02-76SF00515 with the SLAC National Accelerator Laboratory. Additional LSST funding comes from private donations, grants to universities, and in-kind support from LSSTC Institutional Members.Thanks to NSF grant PHY-135195 and the 2017 LSSTC Grant Award #2017-UG06 for making this project possible.

  20. Dark and Bright Ridges on Europa

    Science.gov (United States)

    1998-01-01

    This high-resolution image of Jupiter's moon Europa, taken by NASA's Galileo spacecraft camera, shows dark, relatively smooth region at the lower right hand corner of the image which may be a place where warm ice has welled up from below. The region is approximately 30 square kilometers in area. An isolated bright hill stands within it. The image also shows two prominent ridges which have different characteristics; youngest ridge runs from left to top right and is about 5 kilometers in width (about 3.1 miles). The ridge has two bright, raised rims and a central valley. The rims of the ridge are rough in texture. The inner and outer walls show bright and dark debris streaming downslope, some of it forming broad fans. This ridge overlies and therefore must be younger than a second ridge running from top to bottom on the left side of the image. This dark 2 km wide ridge is relatively flat, and has smaller-scale ridges and troughs along its length.North is to the top of the picture, and the sun illuminates the surface from the upper left. This image, centered at approximately 14 degrees south latitude and 194 degrees west longitude, covers an area approximately 15 kilometers by 20 kilometers (9 miles by 12 miles). The resolution is 26 meters (85 feet) per picture element. This image was taken on December 16, 1997 at a range of 1300 kilometers (800 miles) by Galileo's solid state imaging system.The Jet Propulsion Laboratory, Pasadena, CA manages the Galileo mission for NASA's Office of Space Science, Washington, DC. JPL is an operating division of California Institute of Technology (Caltech).This image and other images and data received from Galileo are posted on the World Wide Web, on the Galileo mission home page at URL http://www.jpl.nasa.gov/ galileo.

  1. An exceptionally bright, compact starburst nucleus

    Science.gov (United States)

    Margon, Bruce; Anderson, Scott F.; Mateo, Mario; Fich, Michel; Massey, Philip

    1988-01-01

    Observations are reported of a remarkably bright (V about 13) starburst nucleus, 0833 + 652, which has been detected at radio, infrared, optical, ultraviolet, and X-ray wavelengths. Despite an observed flux at each of these wavelengths which is comparable to that of NGC 7714, often considered the 'prototypical' example of the starburst phenomenon, 0833 + 652 appears to be a previously uncataloged object. Its ease of detectability throughout the electromagnetic spectrum should make it useful for a variety of problems in the study of compact emission-line galaxies.

  2. Broadband bright twin beams and their upconversion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chekhova, Maria V.; Germanskiy, Semen; Horoshko, Dmitri B.; Kitaeva, Galiya Kh.; Kolobov, Mikhail I.; Leuchs, Gerd; Phillips, Chris R.; Prudkovskii, Pavel A.

    2018-02-01

    We report on the observation of broadband (40 THz) bright twin beams through high-gain parametric down-conversion in an aperiodically poled lithium niobate crystal. The output photon number is shown to scale exponentially with the pump power and not with the pump amplitude, as in homogeneous crystals. Photon-number correlations and the number of frequency/temporal modes are assessed by spectral covariance measurements. By using sum-frequency generation on the surface of a non-phasematched crystal, we measure a cross-correlation peak with the temporal width 90 fs.

  3. Fluorescent polystyrene photonic crystals self-assembled with water-soluble conjugated polyrotaxanes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Francesco Di Stasio

    2013-10-01

    Full Text Available We demonstrate control of the photoluminescence spectra and decay rates of water-soluble green-emitting conjugated polyrotaxanes by incorporating them in polystyrene opals with a stop-band spectrally tuned on the rotaxane emission (405–650 nm. We observe a suppression of the luminescence within the photonic stop-band and a corresponding enhancement of the high-energy edge (405–447 nm. Time-resolved measurements reveal a wavelength-dependent modification of the emission lifetime, which is shortened at the high-energy edge (by ∼11%, in the range 405–447 nm, but elongated within the stop-band (by ∼13%, in the range 448–482 nm. We assign both effects to the modification of the density of photonic states induced by the photonic crystal band structure. We propose the growth of fluorescent composite photonic crystals from blends of “solvent-compatible” non-covalently bonded nanosphere-polymer systems as a general method for achieving a uniform distribution of polymeric dopants in three-dimensional self-assembling photonic structures.

  4. Brightness through Local Constraint-LNA-Enhanced FIT Hybridization Probes for In Vivo Ribonucleotide Particle Tracking

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hövelmann, Felix; Gaspar, Imre; Loibl, Simon

    2014-01-01

    Imaging the dynamics of RNA in living cells is usually performed by means of transgenic approaches that require modification of RNA targets and cells. Fluorogenic hybridization probes would also allow the analysis of wild-type organisms. We developed nuclease-resistant DNA forced intercalation (FIT...... acid (LNA) unit serves to introduce a local constraint. This closes fluorescence decay channels and thereby increases the brightness of the probe-target duplexes. As few as two probes were sufficient to enable the tracking of oskar mRNPs in wild-type living Drosophila melanogaster oocytes....

  5. Expression-Enhanced Fluorescent Proteins Based on Enhanced Green Fluorescent Protein for Super-resolution Microscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Duwé, Sam; De Zitter, Elke; Gielen, Vincent; Moeyaert, Benjamien; Vandenberg, Wim; Grotjohann, Tim; Clays, Koen; Jakobs, Stefan; Van Meervelt, Luc; Dedecker, Peter

    2015-10-27

    "Smart fluorophores", such as reversibly switchable fluorescent proteins, are crucial for advanced fluorescence imaging. However, only a limited number of such labels is available, and many display reduced biological performance compared to more classical variants. We present the development of robustly photoswitchable variants of enhanced green fluorescent protein (EGFP), named rsGreens, that display up to 30-fold higher fluorescence in E. coli colonies grown at 37 °C and more than 4-fold higher fluorescence when expressed in HEK293T cells compared to their ancestor protein rsEGFP. This enhancement is not due to an intrinsic increase in the fluorescence brightness of the probes, but rather due to enhanced expression levels that allow many more probe molecules to be functional at any given time. We developed rsGreens displaying a range of photoswitching kinetics and show how these can be used for multimodal diffraction-unlimited fluorescence imaging such as pcSOFI and RESOLFT, achieving a spatial resolution of ∼70 nm. By determining the first ever crystal structures of a negative reversibly switchable FP derived from Aequorea victoria in both the "on"- and "off"-conformation we were able to confirm the presence of a cis-trans isomerization and provide further insights into the mechanisms underlying the photochromism. Our work demonstrates that genetically encoded "smart fluorophores" can be readily optimized for biological performance and provides a practical strategy for developing maturation- and stability-enhanced photochromic fluorescent proteins.

  6. Coronal bright points associated with minifilament eruptions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hong, Junchao; Jiang, Yunchun; Yang, Jiayan; Bi, Yi; Li, Haidong [Yunnan Observatories, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Kunming 650011 (China); Yang, Bo; Yang, Dan, E-mail: hjcsolar@ynao.ac.cn [Also at Graduate School of Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing, China. (China)

    2014-12-01

    Coronal bright points (CBPs) are small-scale, long-lived coronal brightenings that always correspond to photospheric network magnetic features of opposite polarity. In this paper, we subjectively adopt 30 CBPs in a coronal hole to study their eruptive behavior using data from the Atmospheric Imaging Assembly (AIA) and the Helioseismic and Magnetic Imager (HMI) on board the Solar Dynamics Observatory. About one-quarter to one-third of the CBPs in the coronal hole go through one or more minifilament eruption(s) (MFE(s)) throughout their lifetimes. The MFEs occur in temporal association with the brightness maxima of CBPs and possibly result from the convergence and cancellation of underlying magnetic dipoles. Two examples of CBPs with MFEs are analyzed in detail, where minifilaments appear as dark features of a cool channel that divide the CBPs along the neutral lines of the dipoles beneath. The MFEs show the typical rising movements of filaments and mass ejections with brightenings at CBPs, similar to large-scale filament eruptions. Via differential emission measure analysis, it is found that CBPs are heated dramatically by their MFEs and the ejected plasmas in the MFEs have average temperatures close to the pre-eruption BP plasmas and electron densities typically near 10{sup 9} cm{sup –3}. These new observational results indicate that CBPs are more complex in dynamical evolution and magnetic structure than previously thought.

  7. Subpicosecond, high-brightness excimer laser systems

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Taylor, A.J.; Gosnell, T.R.; Roberts, J.P.; Lester, C.S.; Gibson, R.B.; Harper, S.E.; Tallman, C.R.

    1988-01-01

    Subpicosecond, high-brightness excimer laser systems are being used to explore the interaction of intense coherent ultraviolet radiation with matter. Applications of current systems include generation of picosecond x-ray pulses, investigation of possible x-ray laser pumping schemes, studies of multiphoton phenomena in atomic species, and time-resolved photochemistry. These systems, based on the amplification of subpicosecond pulses in small aperture (/approximately/1 cm/sup 2/) XeCl or KrF amplifiers, deliver focal spot intensities of /approximately/10/sup 17/ W/cm/sup 2/. Scaling to higher intensities, however, will require an additional large aperture amplifier which preserves near-diffraction-limited beam quality and subpicosecond pulse duration. We describe here both a small aperture KrF system which routinely provides intensities >10/sup 17/ W/cm/sup 2/ to several experiments, and a large aperture XeCl system designed to deliver /approximately/1 J subpicosecond pulses and yield intensities on target in excess of 10/sup 19/W/cm/sup 2/. We also discuss the effects of two-photon absorption on large-aperture, high-brightness excimer lasers. 4 refs., 2 figs.

  8. Optical Sky Brightness at Dome C, Antarctica

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kenyon, S.; Storey, J. W. V.; Burton, M. G.

    2006-08-01

    Dome C, Antarctica is a prime site for astronomical observations in terms of climate, wind speeds and turbulence. The infrared and terahertz sky backgrounds are the lowest of any inhabited place on Earth. However, at present little is known about the optical sky brightness and atmospheric extinction. Using a variety of modelling techniques together with data from the South Pole, we estimate the brightness of the night sky including the contributions from scattered sunlight, moonlight, aurorae, airglow, zodiacal light and artificial sources. We compare our results to another prime astronomical site, Mauna Kea. We find moonlight has significantly less effect at Dome C than at Mauna Kea. Aurorae are expected to have a minor impact at both sites, and zodiacal light is expected to be less at Dome C than at Mauna Kea. Airglow emissions at Dome C are expected to be similar to those at temperate sites. With proper planning, artificial sources of light pollution should be non-existent. The overall atmospheric extinction, or opacity, is expected to be the minimum possible. We conclude that Dome C is a very promising site not only for infrared and terahertz astronomy, but for optical astronomy as well..

  9. Sublimation in bright spots on (1) Ceres

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nathues, A.; Hoffmann, M.; Schaefer, M.; Le Corre, L.; Reddy, V.; Platz, T.; Cloutis, E. A.; Christensen, U.; Kneissl, T.; Li, J.-Y.; Mengel, K.; Schmedemann, N.; Schaefer, T.; Russell, C. T.; Applin, D. M.; Buczkowski, D. L.; Izawa, M. R. M.; Keller, H. U.; O'Brien, D. P.; Pieters, C. M.; Raymond, C. A.; Ripken, J.; Schenk, P. M.; Schmidt, B. E.; Sierks, H.; Sykes, M. V.; Thangjam, G. S.; Vincent, J.-B.

    2015-12-01

    The dwarf planet (1) Ceres, the largest object in the main asteroid belt with a mean diameter of about 950 kilometres, is located at a mean distance from the Sun of about 2.8 astronomical units (one astronomical unit is the Earth-Sun distance). Thermal evolution models suggest that it is a differentiated body with potential geological activity. Unlike on the icy satellites of Jupiter and Saturn, where tidal forces are responsible for spewing briny water into space, no tidal forces are acting on Ceres. In the absence of such forces, most objects in the main asteroid belt are expected to be geologically inert. The recent discovery of water vapour absorption near Ceres and previous detection of bound water and OH near and on Ceres (refs 5, 6, 7) have raised interest in the possible presence of surface ice. Here we report the presence of localized bright areas on Ceres from an orbiting imager. These unusual areas are consistent with hydrated magnesium sulfates mixed with dark background material, although other compositions are possible. Of particular interest is a bright pit on the floor of crater Occator that exhibits probable sublimation of water ice, producing haze clouds inside the crater that appear and disappear with a diurnal rhythm. Slow-moving condensed-ice or dust particles may explain this haze. We conclude that Ceres must have accreted material from beyond the ‘snow line’, which is the distance from the Sun at which water molecules condense.

  10. Intracellular cascade FRET for temperature imaging of living cells with polymeric ratiometric fluorescent thermometers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hu, Xianglong; Li, Yang; Liu, Tao; Zhang, Guoying; Liu, Shiyong

    2015-07-22

    Intracellular temperature plays a prominent role in cellular functions and biochemical activities inside living cells, but effective intracellular temperature sensing and imaging is still in its infancy. Herein, thermoresponsive double hydrophilic block copolymers (DHBCs)-based fluorescent thermometers were fabricated to investigate their application in intracellular temperature imaging. Blue-emitting coumarin monomer, CMA, green-emitting 7-nitro-2,1,3-benzoxadiazole (NBD) monomer, NBDAE, and red-emitting rhodamine B monomer, RhBEA, were copolymerized separately with N-isopropylacrylamide (NIPAM) to afford dye-labeled PEG-b-P(NIPAM-co-CMA), PEG-b-P(NIPAM-co-NBDAE), and PEG-b-P(NIPAM-co-RhBEA). Because of the favorable fluorescence resonance energy transfer (FRET) potentials between CMA and NBDAE, NBDAE and RhBEA, as well as the slight tendency between CMA and RhBEA fluorophore pairs, three polymeric thermometers based on traditional one-step FRET were fabricated by facile mixing two of these three fluorescent DHBCs, whereas exhibiting limited advantages. Thus, two-step cascade FRET among three polymeric fluorophores was further interrogated, in which NBD acted as a bridging dye by transferring energy from CMA to RhBEA. Through the delicate optimization of the molar contents of three polymeric components, a ∼8.4-fold ratio change occurred in the temperature range of 20-44 °C, and the detection sensitivity improved significantly, reached as low as ∼0.4 °C, which definitely outperformed other one-step FRET thermometers in the intracellular temperature imaging of living cells. To our knowledge, this work represents the first example of polymeric ratiometric thermometer employing thermoresponsive polymer-based cascade FRET mechanism.

  11. A FRET-based ratiometric fluorescent aptasensor for rapid and onsite visual detection of ochratoxin A.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qian, Jing; Wang, Kan; Wang, Chengquan; Hua, Mengjuan; Yang, Zhenting; Liu, Qian; Mao, Hanping; Wang, Kun

    2015-11-07

    A color change observable by the naked eye to indicate the content of an analyte is considered to be the most conceivable way of various sensing protocols. By taking advantage of the Förster resonance energy transfer (FRET) principles, we herein designed a dual-emission ratiometric fluorescent aptasensor for ochratoxin A (OTA) detection via a dual mode of fluorescent sensing and onsite visual screening. Amino group-modified OTA's aptamer was firstly labeled with the green-emitting CdTe quantum dots (gQDs) donor. The red-emitting CdTe QDs (rQDs) which were wrapped in the silica sphere could serve as the reference signal, while the gold nanoparticle (AuNP) acceptors were attached on the silica surface to bind with the thiolated complementary DNA (cDNA). The hybridization reaction between the aptamer and the cDNA brought gQD-AuNP pair close enough, thereby making the FRET occur in the aptasensor fabrication, while the subsequent fluorescence recovery induced by OTA was obtained in the detection procedure. Based on the red background of the wrapped rQDs, the aptasensor in response to increasing OTA displayed a distinguishable color change from red to yellow-green, which could be conveniently readout in solution even by the naked eye. Since the bioconjugations used as the aptasensor can be produced at large scale, this method can be used for in situ, rapid, or high-throughput OTA detection after only an incubation step in a homogeneous mode. We believe that this novel aptasensing strategy provides not only a promising method for OTA detection but also a universal model for detecting diverse targets by changing the corresponding aptamer.

  12. Facile consecutive solvothermal growth of highly fluorescent InP/ZnS core/shell quantum dots using a safer phosphorus source.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Byun, Ho-June; Song, Woo-Seuk; Yang, Heesun

    2011-06-10

    The work presents a facile, stepwise synthetic approach for the production of highly fluorescent InP/ZnS core/shell quantum dots (QDs) by using a safer phosphorus (P) precursor. First, InP quantum dots (QDs) were solvothermally prepared at 180 °C for 24 h by using a P source of P(N(CH(3))(2))(3). The as-grown InP QDs were consecutively placed in another solvothermal condition for ZnS shell overcoating. In contrast to the almost non-fluorescent InP QDs, due to their highly defective surface states, the ZnS-coated InP QDs were highly fluorescent as a result of effective surface passivation. After the shell growth, the resulting InP/ZnS core/shell QDs were subjected to a size-sorting processing, by which red- to green-emitting QDs with quantum yields (QYs) of 24-60% were produced. Solvothermal shell growth parameters such as the reaction time and Zn/In solution concentration ratio were varied and optimized toward the highest QYs of core/shell QDs.

  13. Base motif recognition and design of DNA templates for fluorescent silver clusters by machine learning.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Copp, Stacy M; Bogdanov, Petko; Debord, Mark; Singh, Ambuj; Gwinn, Elisabeth

    2014-09-03

    Discriminative base motifs within DNA templates for fluorescent silver clusters are identified using methods that combine large experimental data sets with machine learning tools for pattern recognition. Combining the discovery of certain multibase motifs important for determining fluorescence brightness with a generative algorithm, the probability of selecting DNA templates that stabilize fluorescent silver clusters is increased by a factor of >3. © 2014 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  14. Formation and microscopical application of a fluorescent 1,10-phenanthroline derivative of ruthenium red.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bertolesi, G E; de Cidre, L L; Stockert, J C

    1995-10-01

    In this work we describe the formation and microscopical application of a fluorescent derivative of Ruthenium Red (RR) obtained by heating the dye in the presence of 1,10-phenanthroline (OP). The RR-OP reaction product showed absorption maxima at 416 and 444 nm and intense fluorescence emission at 578 nm under 440 nm exciting light. Neither RR nor OP solutions alone were fluorescent when excited at 440 nm. Using fluorescence microscopy, chicken blood cell smears stained 5 min with the RR-OP derivative showed the chromatin of erythrocyte nuclei with a bright orange fluorescence under violet-blue (436 nm) exciting light.

  15. New Fluorescent Nanoparticles for Ultrasensitive Detection of Nucleic Acids by Optical Methods

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mulberg, Mads Westergaard; Taskova, Maria; Thomsen, Rasmus P.

    2017-01-01

    in the synthesis of new fluorescent nanoparticles. Here, the fluorescent nanoparticles were made by simple and inexpensive radical emulsion polymerization of butyl acrylate in the presence of fluorescent dyes and additional functionalization reagents. This provided ultra-bright macrofluorophores of 9-84nm mean...... diameter, modified with additional alkyne and amino groups for bioconjugation. By using click and NHS chemistries, the new nanoparticles were attached to target-specific DNA probes that were used in fluorimetry and fluorescence microscopy. Overall, these fluorescent nanoparticles and their oligonucleotide...

  16. New Distant Comet Headed for Bright Encounter

    Science.gov (United States)

    1995-08-01

    How Impressive Will Comet Hale-Bopp Become in 1997 ? A very unusual comet was discovered last month, on its way from the outer reaches of the solar system towards the Sun. Although it is still situated beyond the orbit of Jupiter, it is so bright that it can be observed in even small telescopes. It has been named `Hale-Bopp' after the discoverers and is already of great interest to cometary astronomers. No less than seven telescopes have been used at the ESO La Silla observatory for the first observations of the new object. Together with data gathered at other sites, their aim is to elucidate the nature of this comet and also to determine whether there is reason to hope that it will become a bright and beautiful object in the sky from late 1996 and well into 1997. Further observations are now being planned at ESO and elsewhere to monitor closely the behaviour of this celestial visitor during the coming months. Discovery circumstances The comet was discovered on 23 July 1995, nearly simultaneously by two American amateur astronomers, Alan Hale of Cloudcroft (New Mexico) and Thomas Bopp of Glendale (Arizona). Although the chronology is slightly uncertain, it appears that Hale first saw it some 10 - 20 minutes before Bopp, at 06:10 - 06:15 UT on that day. In any case, he informed the IAU Central Bureau for Astronomical Telegrams (CBAT) in Cambridge (Massachussetts) about his discovery by email already at 06:50 UT, while Bopp's message was filed more than 2 hours later, after he had driven back to his home, 140 km from where he had been observing. Upon receipt of these messages, Brian Marsden at the CBAT assigned the designation `1995 O1' (indicating that it is the first comet found in the second half of July 1995). After further sightings had been made by other observers, and according to the venerable astronomical tradition, the new object was named after the discoverers. The magnitude, reported as 10.5 by Hale, is not unusual for a comet that is discovered within

  17. Introduction to fluorescence microscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ghiran, Ionita C

    2011-01-01

    This chapter is an overview of basic principles of fluorescence microscopy, including a brief history on the invention of this type of microscopy. The chapter highlights important points related to properties of fluorochromes, resolution in fluorescence microscopy, phase contrast and fluorescence, fluorescence filters, construction of a fluorescence microscope, and tips on the correct use of this equipment.

  18. Characterization of flavin-based fluorescent proteins: an emerging class of fluorescent reporters.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Arnab Mukherjee

    Full Text Available Fluorescent reporter proteins based on flavin-binding photosensors were recently developed as a new class of genetically encoded probes characterized by small size and oxygen-independent maturation of fluorescence. Flavin-based fluorescent proteins (FbFPs address two major limitations associated with existing fluorescent reporters derived from the green fluorescent protein (GFP-namely, the overall large size and oxygen-dependent maturation of fluorescence of GFP. However, FbFPs are at a nascent stage of development and have been utilized in only a handful of biological studies. Importantly, a full understanding of the performance and properties of FbFPs as a practical set of biological probes is lacking. In this work, we extensively characterize three FbFPs isolated from Pseudomonas putida, Bacillus subtilis, and Arabidopsis thaliana, using in vitro studies to assess probe brightness, oligomeric state, maturation time, fraction of fluorescent holoprotein, pH tolerance, redox sensitivity, and thermal stability. Furthermore, we validate FbFPs as stable molecular tags using in vivo studies by constructing a series of FbFP-based transcriptional constructs to probe promoter activity in Escherichia coli. Overall, FbFPs show key advantages as broad-spectrum biological reporters including robust pH tolerance (4-11, thermal stability (up to 60°C, and rapid maturation of fluorescence (<3 min.. In addition, the FbFP derived from Arabidopsis thaliana (iLOV emerged as a stable and nonperturbative reporter of promoter activity in Escherichia coli. Our results demonstrate that FbFP-based reporters have the potential to address key limitations associated with the use of GFP, such as pH-sensitive fluorescence and slow kinetics of fluorescence maturation (10-40 minutes for half maximal fluorescence recovery. From this view, FbFPs represent a useful new addition to the fluorescent reporter protein palette, and our results constitute an important framework to

  19. Bright sneezes and dark coughs, loud sunlight and soft moonlight.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marks, L E

    1982-04-01

    Synesthetic metaphors (such as "the dawn comes up like thunder") are expressions in which words or phrases describing experiences proper to one sense modality transfer their meanings to another modality. In a series of four experiments, subjects used scales of loudness, pitch, and brightness to evaluate the meanings of a variety of synesthetic (auditory-visual) metaphors. Loudness and pitch expressed themselves metaphorically as greater brightness; in turn, brightness expressed itself as greater loudness and as higher pitch. Although loudness thus shared with brightness a metaphorical connection, pitch and brightness showed a connection that was closer and that applied more generally to different kinds of visual brightness. The ways that people evaluate synesthetic metaphors emulate the characteristics of synesthetic perception, thereby suggesting that synesthesia in perception and synesthesia in language both may emenate from the same source-from a phenomenological similarity in the makeup of sensory experiences of different modalities.

  20. Bioinspired bright noniridescent photonic melanin supraballs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xiao, Ming; Hu, Ziying; Wang, Zhao; Li, Yiwen; Tormo, Alejandro Diaz; Le Thomas, Nicolas; Wang, Boxiang; Gianneschi, Nathan C; Shawkey, Matthew D; Dhinojwala, Ali

    2017-09-01

    Structural colors enable the creation of a spectrum of nonfading colors without pigments, potentially replacing toxic metal oxides and conjugated organic pigments. However, significant challenges remain to achieve the contrast needed for a complete gamut of colors and a scalable process for industrial application. We demonstrate a feasible solution for producing structural colors inspired by bird feathers. We have designed core-shell nanoparticles using high-refractive index (RI) (~1.74) melanin cores and low-RI (~1.45) silica shells. The design of these nanoparticles was guided by finite-difference time-domain simulations. These nanoparticles were self-assembled using a one-pot reverse emulsion process, which resulted in bright and noniridescent supraballs. With the combination of only two ingredients, synthetic melanin and silica, we can generate a full spectrum of colors. These supraballs could be directly added to paints, plastics, and coatings and also used as ultraviolet-resistant inks or cosmetics.

  1. Enhanced single-particle brightness and photostability of semiconductor polymer dots by enzymatic oxygen scavenging system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Zhihe; Yang, Yingkun; Sun, Zezhou; Wu, Changfeng

    2016-12-01

    Semiconductor polymer dots (Pdots) are emerging as an excellent fluorescent probe in biology and medicine. However, the photostability of Pdots can't meet the requirements of long term single-particle imaging and tracking applications. Here we describe the enhanced single-particle brightness and photostability of Pdots by using an efficient enzymatic oxygen scavenging system (OSS). Pdots with particle diameters of 21 nm and 43 nm (PFBT21 and PFBT43) were prepared by a nanoprecipitation method. Single-particle imaging and photobleaching were performed to investigate the effect of OSS on the per-particle brightness and photostability of Pdots. Our results indicate that the single-particle brightness of the PFBT21 Pdots in OSS was enhanced nearly two times as compare to the PFBT21 Pdots in water. The photobleaching percentages of PFBT21 and PFBT43 in OSS were determined to be 29% and 33%, respectively. These values are decreased by 2-3 times as compared to those of the same Pdots in water, indicating the significantly improved photostability of Pdots by OSS. This study provides a promising approach for enhancing photostability of Pdots in long term single-particle tracking.

  2. Kappa-effect and brightness oscillations of stars

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhugzhda, Y. D.; Roth, M.; Herzberg, W.

    2012-12-01

    In this paper the theory of visibility and darkening functions for the brightness oscillations of stars is outlined. For this the non-grey approximation is used and the effect of opacity disturbances on stellar brightness oscillations is explored for different types of stars. An explanation of the Procyon paradox is proposed. Special features of the brightness oscillations are discussed. The effect of opacity fluctuations on the damping of p-mode oscillations is considered. Furthermore, the photospheric kappa-mechanism is discussed.

  3. Fluorescence detection: SPIE volume 743

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Menzel, E.R.

    1987-01-01

    This book contains proceedings arranged into four sessions. They are: Fluorescence spectroscopic techniques; Fluorescence in analysis and materials characterization; Fluorescence in medicine and biochemistry; and Fluorescence in criminalistics.

  4. Study of Three-Dimensional Image Brightness Loss in Stereoscopy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hsing-Cheng Yu

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available When viewing three-dimensional (3D images, whether in cinemas or on stereoscopic televisions, viewers experience the same problem of image brightness loss. This study aims to investigate image brightness loss in 3D displays, with the primary aim being to quantify the image brightness degradation in the 3D mode. A further aim is to determine the image brightness relationship to the corresponding two-dimensional (2D images in order to adjust the 3D-image brightness values. In addition, the photographic principle is used in this study to measure metering values by capturing 2D and 3D images on television screens. By analyzing these images with statistical product and service solutions (SPSS software, the image brightness values can be estimated using the statistical regression model, which can also indicate the impact of various environmental factors or hardware on the image brightness. In analysis of the experimental results, comparison of the image brightness between 2D and 3D images indicates 60.8% degradation in the 3D image brightness amplitude. The experimental values, from 52.4% to 69.2%, are within the 95% confidence interval

  5. The night sky brightness at McDonald Observatory

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kalinowski, J. K.; Roosen, R. G.; Brandt, J. C.

    1975-01-01

    Baseline observations of the night sky brightness in B and V are presented for McDonald Observatory. In agreement with earlier work by Elvey and Rudnick (1937) and Elvey (1943), significant night-to-night and same-night variations in sky brightness are found. Possible causes for these variations are discussed. The largest variation in sky brightness found during a single night is approximately a factor of two, a value which corresponds to a factor-of-four variation in airglow brightness. The data are used to comment on the accuracy of previously published surface photometry of M 81.

  6. Physically-based in silico light sheet microscopy for visualizing fluorescent brain models.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abdellah, Marwan; Bilgili, Ahmet; Eilemann, Stefan; Markram, Henry; Schürmann, Felix

    2015-01-01

    We present a physically-based computational model of the light sheet fluorescence microscope (LSFM). Based on Monte Carlo ray tracing and geometric optics, our method simulates the operational aspects and image formation process of the LSFM. This simulated, in silico LSFM creates synthetic images of digital fluorescent specimens that can resemble those generated by a real LSFM, as opposed to established visualization methods producing visually-plausible images. We also propose an accurate fluorescence rendering model which takes into account the intrinsic characteristics of fluorescent dyes to simulate the light interaction with fluorescent biological specimen. We demonstrate first results of our visualization pipeline to a simplified brain tissue model reconstructed from the somatosensory cortex of a young rat. The modeling aspects of the LSFM units are qualitatively analysed, and the results of the fluorescence model were quantitatively validated against the fluorescence brightness equation and characteristic emission spectra of different fluorescent dyes. Modelling and simulation.

  7. The use of fluorescence enhancement to improve the microscopic diagnosis of falciparum malaria

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Liu Paul

    2007-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Giemsa staining of thick blood smears remains the "gold standard" for detecting malaria. However, this method is not very good for diagnosing low-level infections. A method for the simultaneous staining of Plasmodium-parasitized culture and blood smears for both bright field and fluorescence was developed and its ability to improve detection efficiency tested. Methods A total of 22 nucleic acid-specific fluorescent dyes were tested for their ability to provide easily observable staining of Plasmodium falciparum-parasitized red blood cells following Giemsa staining. Results Of the 14 dyes that demonstrated intense fluorescence staining, only SYBR Green 1, YOYO-1 and ethidum homodimer-2 could be detected using fluorescent microscopy, when cells were first stained with Giemsa. Giemsa staining was not effective when applied after the fluorescent dyes. SYBR Green 1 provided the best staining in the presence of Giemsa, as a very high percentage of the parasitized cells were simultaneously stained. When blood films were screened using fluorescence microscopy the parasites were more readily detectable due to the sharp contrast between the dark background and the specific, bright fluorescence produced by the parasites. Conclusion The dual staining method reported here allows fluorescence staining, which enhances the reader's ability to detect parasites under low parasitaemia conditions, coupled with the ability to examine the same cell under bright field conditions to detect the characteristic morphology of Plasmodium species that is observed with Giemsa staining.

  8. A new self-made digital slide scanner and microscope for imaging and quantification of fluorescent microspheres

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Henning, William; Bjerglund Andersen, Julie; Højgaard, Liselotte

    2015-01-01

    was performed. A computer algorithm available for download was created to detect fluorescent microspheres in the brain tissue slides and to calculate regional cerebral blood flow (rCBF). The precision of the algorithm was tested by comparing with manual counting of the fluorescent microspheres. Finally, bright...

  9. A novel fluorescent assay for sucrose transporters

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gora Peter J

    2012-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background We have developed a novel assay based on the ability of type I sucrose uptake transporters (SUTs to transport the fluorescent coumarin β-glucoside, esculin. Budding yeast (Saccharomyces cerevisiae is routinely used for the heterologous expression of SUTs and does not take up esculin. Results When type I sucrose transporters StSUT1 from potato or AtSUC2 from Arabidopsis were expressed in yeast, the cells were able to take up esculin and became brightly fluorescent. We tested a variety of incubation times, esculin concentrations, and buffer pH values and found that for these transporters, a 1 hr incubation at 0.1 to 1 mM esculin at pH 4.0 produced fluorescent cells that were easily distinguished from vector controls. Esculin uptake was assayed by several methods including fluorescence microscopy, spectrofluorometry and fluorescence-activiated cell sorting (FACS. Expression of the type II sucrose transporter OsSUT1 from rice did not result in increased esculin uptake under any conditions tested. Results were reproduced successfully in two distinct yeast strains, SEY6210 (an invertase mutant and BY4742. Conclusions The esculin uptake assay is rapid and sensitive and should be generally useful for preliminary tests of sucrose transporter function by heterologous expression in yeast. This assay is also suitable for selection of yeast showing esculin uptake activity using FACS.

  10. Carbon "Quantum" Dots for Fluorescence Labeling of Cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Jia-Hui; Cao, Li; LeCroy, Gregory E; Wang, Ping; Meziani, Mohammed J; Dong, Yiyang; Liu, Yuanfang; Luo, Pengju G; Sun, Ya-Ping

    2015-09-02

    The specifically synthesized and selected carbon dots of relatively high fluorescence quantum yields were evaluated in their fluorescence labeling of cells. For the cancer cell lines, the cellular uptake of the carbon dots was generally efficient, resulting in the labeling of the cells with bright fluorescence emissions for both one- and two-photon excitations from predominantly the cell membrane and cytoplasm. In the exploration on labeling the live stem cells, the cellular uptake of the carbon dots was relatively less efficient, though fluorescence emissions could still be adequately detected in the labeled cells, with the emissions again predominantly from the cell membrane and cytoplasm. This combined with the observed more efficient internalization of the same carbon dots by the fixed stem cells might suggest some significant selectivity of the stem cells toward surface functionalities of the carbon dots. The needs and possible strategies for more systematic and comparative studies on the fluorescence labeling of different cells, including especially live stem cells, by carbon dots as a new class of brightly fluorescent probes are discussed.

  11. A new perspective on the infrared brightness temperature ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    And Johnson SB parameters are observed to be best in discriminating the Johnson SB distribution of infrared brightness temperatures of deep convective systems for each season. Due to these properties of Johnson SB function, it can be utilized in the modelling of the histogram of infrared brightness temperature of deep ...

  12. A new perspective on the infrared brightness temperature ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    It is observed that Johnson SB function is the best continuous distribution function in explaining the histogram of infrared brightness temperatures of the convective clouds. The best fit is confirmed by Kolmogorov–Smirnov statistic. Johnson SB's distribution of histogram of infrared brightness temperatures clearly ...

  13. Analysis of Bright Harvest Remote Analysis for Residential Solar Installations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nangle, John [National Renewable Energy Lab. (NREL), Golden, CO (United States); Simon, Joseph [National Renewable Energy Lab. (NREL), Golden, CO (United States)

    2015-06-17

    Bright Harvest provides remote shading analysis and design products for residential PV system installers. The National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL) through the NREL Commercialization Assistance Program, completed comparative assessments between on-site measurements and remotely calculated values to validate the accuracy of Bright Harvest’s remote shading and power generation.

  14. Edge integration and the perception of brightness and darkness

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Vladusich, T.; Lucassen, M.P.; Cornelissen, F.W.

    2006-01-01

    How do induced brightness and darkness signals from local and remote surfaces interact to determine the final achromatic color percept of a target surface? An emerging theory of achromatic color perception posits that brightness and darkness percepts are computed by weighting and summing the

  15. The ASAS-SN bright supernova catalogue - III. 2016

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Holoien, T. W. -S.; Brown, J. S.; Stanek, K. Z.

    2017-01-01

    This catalogue summarizes information for all supernovae discovered by the All-Sky Automated Survey for SuperNovae (ASAS-SN) and all other bright (m(peak)d......This catalogue summarizes information for all supernovae discovered by the All-Sky Automated Survey for SuperNovae (ASAS-SN) and all other bright (m(peak)d...

  16. Lamp spectrum and spatial brightness at photopic levels

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Fotios, Steve; Atli, Deniz; Cheal, Chris

    2015-01-01

    Light sources are available in a variety of spectral power distributions (SPDs) and this affects spatial brightness in a manner not predicted by quantities such as illuminance. Tuning light source SPD to better match the sensitivity of visual perception may allow the same spatial brightness...

  17. Brightness limitations of cold field emitters caused by Coulomb interactions

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Cook, B.J.; Verduin, T.; Hagen, C.W.; Kruit, P.

    2010-01-01

    Emission theory predicts that high brightness cold field emitters can enhance imaging in the electron microscope. This (neglecting chromatic aberration) is because of the large (coherent) probe current available from a high brightness source and is based on theoretically determined values of reduced

  18. Surface photometry of bulge dominated low surface brightness galaxies

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Beijersbergen, M; de Blok, WJG; van der Hulst, JM

    1999-01-01

    We present results of broad band BVRI observations of a sample of galaxies with a low surface brightness (LSB) disk and a bulge. These galaxies are well described as exponential disks and exponential bulges with no preferred value for either scale length or central surface brightness. The median B

  19. Spatial Model of Sky Brightness Magnitude in Langkawi Island, Malaysia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Redzuan Tahar, Mohammad; Kamarudin, Farahana; Umar, Roslan; Khairul Amri Kamarudin, Mohd; Sabri, Nor Hazmin; Ahmad, Karzaman; Rahim, Sobri Abdul; Sharul Aikal Baharim, Mohd

    2017-03-01

    Sky brightness is an essential topic in the field of astronomy, especially for optical astronomical observations that need very clear and dark sky conditions. This study presents the spatial model of sky brightness magnitude in Langkawi Island, Malaysia. Two types of Sky Quality Meter (SQM) manufactured by Unihedron are used to measure the sky brightness on a moonless night (or when the Moon is below the horizon), when the sky is cloudless and the locations are at least 100 m from the nearest light source. The selected locations are marked by their GPS coordinates. The sky brightness data obtained in this study were interpolated and analyzed using a Geographic Information System (GIS), thus producing a spatial model of sky brightness that clearly shows the dark and bright sky areas in Langkawi Island. Surprisingly, our results show the existence of a few dark sites nearby areas of high human activity. The sky brightness of 21.45 mag arcsec{}-2 in the Johnson-Cousins V-band, as the average of sky brightness equivalent to 2.8 × {10}-4{cd} {{{m}}}-2 over the entire island, is an indication that the island is, overall, still relatively dark. However, the amount of development taking place might reduce the number in the near future as the island is famous as a holiday destination.

  20. Tuning the Color Palette of Fluorescent Copper Sensors through Systematic Heteroatom Substitution at Rhodol Cores.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jia, Shang; Ramos-Torres, Karla M; Kolemen, Safacan; Ackerman, Cheri M; Chang, Christopher J

    2017-11-07

    Copper is an essential nutrient for sustaining life, and emerging data have expanded the roles of this metal in biology from its canonical functions as a static enzyme cofactor to dynamic functions as a transition metal signal. At the same time, loosely bound, labile copper pools can trigger oxidative stress and damaging events that are detrimental if misregulated. The signal/stress dichotomy of copper motivates the development of new chemical tools to study its spatial and temporal distributions in native biological contexts such as living cells. Here, we report a family of fluorescent copper sensors built upon carbon-, silicon-, and phosphorus-substituted rhodol dyes that enable systematic tuning of excitation/emission colors from orange to near-infrared. These probes can detect changes in labile copper levels in living cells upon copper supplementation and/or depletion. We demonstrate the ability of the carbon-rhodol based congener, Copper Carbo Fluor 1 (CCF1), to identify elevations in labile copper pools in the Atp7a-/- fibroblast cell model of the genetic copper disorder Menkes disease. Moreover, we showcase the utility of the red-emitting phosphorus-rhodol based dye Copper Phosphorus Fluor 1 (CPF1) in dual-color, dual-analyte imaging experiments with the green-emitting calcium indicator Calcium Green-1 to enable simultaneous detection of fluctuations in copper and calcium pools in living cells. The results provide a starting point for advancing tools to study the contributions of copper to health and disease and for exploiting the rapidly growing palette of heteroatom-substituted xanthene dyes to rationally tune the optical properties of fluorescent indicators for other biologically important analytes.

  1. Fluorescent hydroxyl emissions from Saturn's ring atmosphere.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hall, D T; Feldman, P D; Holberg, J B; McGrath, M A

    1996-04-26

    Just before earth passed through Saturn's ring plane on 10 August 1995, the Hubble Space Telescope Faint Object Spectrograph detected ultraviolet fluorescent emissions from a tenuous atmosphere of OH molecules enveloping the rings. Brightnesses decrease with increasing distance above the rings, implying a scale height of about 0.45 Saturn radii (Rs). A spatial scan 0.28Rs above the A and B rings indicates OH column densities of about 10(13) cm(-2) and number densities of up to 700 cm(-3). Saturn's rings must produce roughly 10(25) to 10(29) OH molecules per second to maintain the observed OH distribution.

  2. An isolated, bright cusp aurora at Saturn

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kinrade, J.; Badman, S. V.; Bunce, E. J.; Tao, C.; Provan, G.; Cowley, S. W. H.; Grocott, A.; Gray, R. L.; Grodent, D.; Kimura, T.; Nichols, J. D.; Arridge, C. S.; Radioti, A.; Clarke, J. T.; Crary, F. J.; Pryor, W. R.; Melin, H.; Baines, K. H.; Dougherty, M. K.

    2017-06-01

    Saturn's dayside aurora displays a number of morphological features poleward of the main emission region. We present an unusual morphology captured by the Hubble Space Telescope on 14 June 2014 (day 165), where for 2 h, Saturn's FUV aurora faded almost entirely, with the exception of a distinct emission spot at high latitude. The spot remained fixed in local time between 10 and 15 LT and moved poleward to a minimum colatitude of 4°. It was bright and persistent, displaying intensities of up to 49 kR over a lifetime of 2 h. Interestingly, the spot constituted the entirety of the northern auroral emission, with no emissions present at any other local time—including Saturn's characteristic dawn arc, the complete absence of which is rarely observed. Solar wind parameters from propagation models, together with a Cassini magnetopause crossing and solar wind encounter, indicate that Saturn's magnetosphere was likely to have been embedded in a rarefaction region, resulting in an expanded magnetosphere configuration during the interval. We infer that the spot was sustained by reconnection either poleward of the cusp or at low latitudes under a strong component of interplanetary magnetic field transverse to the solar wind flow. The subsequent poleward motion could then arise from either reconfiguration of successive open field lines across the polar cap or convection of newly opened field lines. We also consider the possible modulation of the feature by planetary period rotating current systems.

  3. Intercomparisons of Nine Sky Brightness Detectors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Henk Spoelstra

    2011-10-01

    Full Text Available Nine Sky Quality Meters (SQMs have been intercompared during a night time measurement campaign held in the Netherlands in April 2011. Since then the nine SQMs have been distributed across the Netherlands and form the Dutch network for monitoring night sky brightness. The goal of the intercomparison was to infer mutual calibration factors and obtain insight into the variability of the SQMs under different meteorological situations. An ensemble average is built from the individual measurements and used as a reference to infer the mutual calibration factors. Data required additional synchronization prior to the calibration determination, because the effect of moving clouds combined with small misalignments emerges as time jitter in the measurements. Initial scatter of the individual instruments lies between ±14%. Individual night time sums range from −16% to +20%. Intercalibration reduces this to 0.5%, and −7% to +9%, respectively. During the campaign the smallest luminance measured was 0.657 ± 0.003 mcd/m2 on 12 April, and the largest value was 5.94 ± 0.03 mcd/m2 on 2 April. During both occurrences interfering circumstances like snow cover or moonlight were absent.

  4. The Los Alamos high-brightness photoinjector

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    O' Shea, P.G.

    1991-01-01

    For a number of years Los Alamos National Laboratory has been developing photocathode RF guns for high-brightness electron beam applications such as free-electron lasers (FELs). Previously thermionic high-voltage guns have been the source of choice for the electron accelerators used to drive FELs. The performance of such FELs is severely limited by the emittance growth produced by the subharmonic bunching process and also by the low peak current of the source. In a photoinjector, a laser driven photocathode is placed directly in a high-gradient RF accelerating cavity. A photocathode allows unsurpassed control over the current, and the spatial and temporal profile of the beam. In addition the electrodeless emission'' avoids many of the difficulties associated with multi-electrode guns, i.e. the electrons are accelerated very rapidly to relativistic energies, and there are no electrodes to distort the accelerating fields. For the past two years we have been integrating a photocathode into our existing FEL facility by replacing our thermionic gun and subharmonic bunchers with a high-gradient 1.3 GHz photoinjector. The photoinjector, which is approximately 0.6 m in length, produces 6 MeV, 300 A, 15 ps linac, and accelerated to a final energy of 40 MeV. We have recently begun lasing at wavelengths near 3 {mu}m. 16 refs., 2 figs., 5 tabs.

  5. Dark Skies, Bright Kids Year 6

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liss, Sandra; Troup, Nicholas William; Johnson, Kelsey E.; Barcos-Munoz, Loreto D.; Beaton, Rachael; Bittle, Lauren; Borish, Henry J.; Burkhardt, Andrew; Corby, Joanna; Dean, Janice; Hancock, Danielle; King, Jennie; Prager, Brian; Romero, Charles; Sokal, Kimberly R.; Stierwalt, Sabrina; Wenger, Trey; Zucker, Catherine

    2015-01-01

    Now entering our sixth year of operation, Dark Skies, Bright Kids (DSBK) is an entirely volunteer-run outreach organization based out of the Department of Astronomy at the University of Virginia. Our core mission is to enhance elementary science education and literacy in central Virginia through fun, hands-on activities that introduce basic Astronomy concepts beyond Virginia's Standards of Learning. Our primary focus is hosting an 8-10 week after-school astronomy club at underserved elementary and middle schools. Each week, DSBK volunteers take the role of coaches to introduce astronomy-related concepts ranging from the Solar System to galaxies to astrobiology, and to lead students in interactive learning activities. Another hallmark of DSBK is hosting our Annual Central Virginia Star Party, a free event open to the community featuring star-gazing and planetarium shows.DSBK has amassed over 15,000 contact hours since 2009 and we continue to broaden our impact. One important step we have taken in the past year is to establish a graduate student led assessment program to identify and implement directed learning goals for DSBK outreach. The collection of student workbooks, observations, and volunteer surveys indicates broad scale success for the program both in terms of student learning and their perception of science. The data also reveal opportunities to improve our organizational and educational practices to maximize student achievement and overall volunteer satisfaction for DSBK's future clubs and outreach endeavors.

  6. Dark Skies, Bright Kids Year 9

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burkhardt, Andrew Michael; Mathews, Allison M.; Johnson, Kelsey E.; Avilez, Ian; Beale, Luca; Bittle, Lauren E.; Bordenave, David; Finn, Molly; Firebaugh, Ariel; Hancock, Danielle; Hughes, Paul; Rochford Hayes, Christian; Lewis, Hannah; Linden, Sean; Liss, Sandra; Liu, Mengyao; McNair, Shunlante; Murphy, Edward; Prager, Brian; Pryal, Matthew; Richardson, Whitney; Song, Yiqing; Troup, Nicholas; Villadsen, Jackie; Wenger, Trey V.; Wilson, Robert Forrest

    2018-01-01

    We present updates from the ninth year of operation of Dark Skies, Bright Kids (DSBK) including new club content, continued assessments, and our seventh annual Star Party. DSBK is an entirely volunteer-run outreach organization based out of the Department of Astronomy at the University of Virginia. Our core mission is to enhance elementary science education and literacy in Virginia through fun, hands-on activities that introduce basic Astronomy concepts. DSBK’s most fundamental program is an 8-10 week long after-school Astronomy camp at surrounding local elementary schools, where each week introduces new concepts through interactive hands-on activities. Over the past two summers, we have traveled to four rural Virginia locations to bring week-long Astronomy camps to otherwise overlooked elementary school districts. These programs aim to inspire a curiosity for science and include inquiry based activities in topics ranging from the electromagnetic spectrum to the classification and evolution of galaxies. We strive to be self-reflective in our mission to inspire scientific curiosity in the minds of underserved demographics. In this effort, we continually assess the effectiveness of each activity through feedback in student-kept journal pages and observed excitement levels. This self-reflection has initiated the development of new curriculum. In addition, differing from our normal collaboration with local elementary schools, we have found great success partnering with local youth organizations, who may better represent DSBK's target demographics and have infrastructure to support incoming outreach groups.

  7. Bright visible light emission from graphene.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Young Duck; Kim, Hakseong; Cho, Yujin; Ryoo, Ji Hoon; Park, Cheol-Hwan; Kim, Pilkwang; Kim, Yong Seung; Lee, Sunwoo; Li, Yilei; Park, Seung-Nam; Yoo, Yong Shim; Yoon, Duhee; Dorgan, Vincent E; Pop, Eric; Heinz, Tony F; Hone, James; Chun, Seung-Hyun; Cheong, Hyeonsik; Lee, Sang Wook; Bae, Myung-Ho; Park, Yun Daniel

    2015-08-01

    Graphene and related two-dimensional materials are promising candidates for atomically thin, flexible and transparent optoelectronics. In particular, the strong light-matter interaction in graphene has allowed for the development of state-of-the-art photodetectors, optical modulators and plasmonic devices. In addition, electrically biased graphene on SiO2 substrates can be used as a low-efficiency emitter in the mid-infrared range. However, emission in the visible range has remained elusive. Here, we report the observation of bright visible light emission from electrically biased suspended graphene devices. In these devices, heat transport is greatly reduced. Hot electrons (∼2,800 K) therefore become spatially localized at the centre of the graphene layer, resulting in a 1,000-fold enhancement in thermal radiation efficiency. Moreover, strong optical interference between the suspended graphene and substrate can be used to tune the emission spectrum. We also demonstrate the scalability of this technique by realizing arrays of chemical-vapour-deposited graphene light emitters. These results pave the way towards the realization of commercially viable large-scale, atomically thin, flexible and transparent light emitters and displays with low operation voltage and graphene-based on-chip ultrafast optical communications.

  8. Modular Zero Energy. BrightBuilt Home

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Aldrich, Robb [Consortium for Advanced Residential Buildings (CARB), Norwalk, CT (United States). Steven Winters Associates, Inc.; Butterfield, Karla [Consortium for Advanced Residential Buildings (CARB), Norwalk, CT (United States). Steven Winters Associates, Inc.

    2016-03-01

    Kaplan Thompson Architects (KTA) has specialized in sustainable, energy-efficient buildings, and they have designed several custom, zero-energy homes in New England. These zero-energy projects have generally been high-end, custom homes with budgets that could accommodate advanced energy systems. In an attempt to make zero energy homes more affordable and accessible to a larger demographic, KTA explored modular construction as way to provide high-quality homes at lower costs. In the mid-2013, KTA formalized this concept when they launched BrightBuilt Home (BBH). The BBH mission is to offer a line of architect-designed, high-performance homes that are priced to offer substantial savings off the lifetime cost of a typical home and can be delivered in less time. For the past two years, CARB has worked with BBH and Keiser Homes (the primary modular manufacturer for BBH) to discuss challenges related to wall systems, HVAC, and quality control. In Spring of 2014, CARB and BBH began looking in detail on a home to be built in Lincolnville, ME by Black Bros. Builders. This report details the solution package specified for this modular plan and the challenges that arose during the project.

  9. Intrinsic brightness temperatures of blazar jets at 15 GHz

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hovatta Talvikki

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available We have developed a new Bayesian Markov Chain Monte Carlo method to deconvolve light curves of blazars into individual flares, including proper estimation of the fit errors. We use the method to fit 15GHzlight curves obtained within the OVRO 40-m blazar monitoring program where a large number of AGN have been monitored since 2008 in support of the Fermi Gamma-Ray Space Telescope mission. The time scales obtained from the fitted models are used to calculate the variability brightness temperature of the sources. Additionally, we have calculated brightness temperatures of a sample of these objects using Very Long Baseline Array data from the MOJAVE survey. Combining these two data sets enables us to study the intrinsic brightness temperature distribution in these blazars at 15 GHz. Our preliminary results indicate that the mean intrinsic brightness temperature in a sample of 14 sources is near the equipartition brightness temperature of ~ 1011K.

  10. Measuring protein dynamics in live cells: protocols and practical considerations for fluorescence fluctuation microscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Youker, Robert T; Teng, Haibing

    2014-09-01

    Quantitative analysis of protein complex stoichiometries and mobilities are critical for elucidating the mechanisms that regulate cellular pathways. Fluorescence fluctuation spectroscopy (FFS) techniques can measure protein dynamics, such as diffusion coefficients and formation of complexes, with extraordinary precision and sensitivity. Complete calibration and characterization of the microscope instrument is necessary in order to avoid artifacts during data acquisition and to capitalize on the full capabilities of FFS techniques. We provide an overview of the theory behind FFS techniques, discuss calibration procedures, provide protocols, and give practical considerations for performing FFS experiments. One important parameter recovered from FFS measurements is the relative molecular brightness that can correlate with oligomerization. Three methods for measuring molecular brightness (fluorescence correlation spectroscopy, photon-counting histogram, and number and brightness analysis) recover similar values when measuring samples under ideal conditions in vitro. However, examples are given illustrating that these different methods used for calculating molecular brightness of fluorescent molecules in cells are not always equivalent. Methods relying on spot measurements are more prone to bleaching and movement artifacts that can lead to underestimation of brightness values. We advocate for the use of multiple FFS techniques to study molecular brightnesses to overcome and compliment limitations of individual techniques.

  11. Automated local bright feature image analysis of nuclear proteindistribution identifies changes in tissue phenotype

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Knowles, David; Sudar, Damir; Bator, Carol; Bissell, Mina

    2006-02-01

    The organization of nuclear proteins is linked to cell and tissue phenotypes. When cells arrest proliferation, undergo apoptosis, or differentiate, the distribution of nuclear proteins changes. Conversely, forced alteration of the distribution of nuclear proteins modifies cell phenotype. Immunostaining and fluorescence microscopy have been critical for such findings. However, there is an increasing need for quantitative analysis of nuclear protein distribution to decipher epigenetic relationships between nuclear structure and cell phenotype, and to unravel the mechanisms linking nuclear structure and function. We have developed imaging methods to quantify the distribution of fluorescently-stained nuclear protein NuMA in different mammary phenotypes obtained using three-dimensional cell culture. Automated image segmentation of DAPI-stained nuclei was generated to isolate thousands of nuclei from three-dimensional confocal images. Prominent features of fluorescently-stained NuMA were detected using a novel local bright feature analysis technique, and their normalized spatial density calculated as a function of the distance from the nuclear perimeter to its center. The results revealed marked changes in the distribution of the density of NuMA bright features as non-neoplastic cells underwent phenotypically normal acinar morphogenesis. In contrast, we did not detect any reorganization of NuMA during the formation of tumor nodules by malignant cells. Importantly, the analysis also discriminated proliferating non-neoplastic cells from proliferating malignant cells, suggesting that these imaging methods are capable of identifying alterations linked not only to the proliferation status but also to the malignant character of cells. We believe that this quantitative analysis will have additional applications for classifying normal and pathological tissues.

  12. Diversity and Ecological Correlates of Red Fluorescence in Marine Fishes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nils Anthes

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available Marine environments at depths below -10 to -25 m are almost devoid of ambient red sunlight because water quickly attenuates long wavelengths. This stenospectral light environment presents unique opportunities for organisms that can transform ambient blue-green light into red light by fluorescence. Numerous marine fish species display intricate patterns of fluorescence. Because color vision is a key component of fish sensory ecology, several putative visual functions of red fluorescence have been proposed but are difficult to test experimentally. Here, we follow a comparative approach to assess the consistency between the phylogenetic distribution of red fluorescence with its presumed functions. We collected and analyzed the largest data set of red fluorescence in fishes to date, consisting of confirmed cases in 272 primarily diurnal fish species from 49 out of 90 surveyed fish families and 12 out of 21 surveyed fish orders, contrasted to 393 fish species with confirmed absence of red fluorescence. Based on a priori hypotheses on adaptive function, we compare the prevalence of red fluorescence among pre-defined sets of species based on ecological or biological characteristics while controlling for shared ancestry. When comparing between species, we find no evidence that red fluorescence is more prevalent in deep-water species, contrasting with our recent finding that fluorescence brightness increases with depth within species. There is also no evidence for a role in group-driven communication. Phylogenetic patterns are consistent, however, with three other predictions. First, fluorescence with a rather patchy distribution across the body occurred significantly more often among sit-and-wait predators or otherwise sedentary fish than in more mobile species, consistent with background matching for camouflage. Second, small, predatory fishes tended to show red fluorescent irides disproportionally often consistent with a proposed function in prey

  13. Bright fluorescent Streptococcus pneumoniae for live cell imaging of host-pathogen interactions

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kjos, M.; Aprianto, R.; Fernandes, V.E.; Andrew, P.W.; Strijp, van J.A.G.; Nijland, R.; Veening, J.W.

    2015-01-01

    Streptococcus pneumoniae is a common nasopharyngeal resident in healthy people, but at the same time one of the major causes of infectious diseases such as pneumonia, meningitis and sepsis. The shift from commensal to pathogen and its interaction with host cells is poorly understood. One of the

  14. Bright Fluorescent Streptococcus pneumoniae for Live-Cell Imaging of Host-Pathogen Interactions

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kjos, Morten; Aprianto, Rieza; Fernandes, Vitor E.; Andrew, Peter W.; van Strijp, Jos A. G.|info:eu-repo/dai/nl/074307053; Nijland, Reindert; Veening, Jan-Willem

    Streptococcus pneumoniae is a common nasopharyngeal resident in healthy people but, at the same time, one of the major causes of infectious diseases such as pneumonia, meningitis, and sepsis. The shift from commensal to pathogen and its interaction with host cells are poorly understood. One of the

  15. Benchtop Fluorination of Fluorescent Nanodiamonds on a Preparative Scale: Toward Unusually Hydrophilic Bright Particles

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Havlík, Jan; Raabová, Helena; Gulka, Michal; Petráková, Vladimíra; Krečmarová, M.; Mašek, V.; Louša, Petr; Štursa, Jan; Boyen, H. G.; Nesládek, M.; Cígler, Petr

    2016-01-01

    Roč. 26, č. 23 (2016), s. 4134-4142 ISSN 1616-301X R&D Projects: GA MZd(CZ) NV15-33094A; GA MŠk(CZ) LM2011019; GA MŠk(CZ) LO1304; GA ČR(CZ) GA16-16336S Institutional support: RVO:61388963 ; RVO:68378271 ; RVO:61389005 Keywords : nitrogen-vacancy centers * catalyzed decarboxylative fluorination * surface modification Subject RIV: CC - Organic Chemistry Impact factor: 12.124, year: 2016

  16. A Bright Future for Precision Medicine: Advances in Fluorescent Chemical Probe Design and Their Clinical Application.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garland, Megan; Yim, Joshua J; Bogyo, Matthew

    2016-01-21

    The Precision Medicine Initiative aims to use advances in basic and clinical research to develop therapeutics that selectively target and kill cancer cells. Under the same doctrine of precision medicine, there is an equally important need to visualize these diseased cells to enable diagnosis, facilitate surgical resection, and monitor therapeutic response. Therefore, there is a great opportunity for chemists to develop chemically tractable probes that can image cancer in vivo. This review focuses on recent advances in the development of optical probes, as well as their current and future applications in the clinical management of cancer. The progress in probe development described here suggests that optical imaging is an important and rapidly developing field of study that encourages continued collaboration among chemists, biologists, and clinicians to further refine these tools for interventional surgical imaging, as well as for diagnostic and therapeutic applications. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  17. Onsite naked eye determination of cysteine and homocysteine using quencher displacement-induced fluorescence recovery of the dual-emission hybrid probes with desired intensity ratio.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Kan; Qian, Jing; Jiang, Ding; Yang, Zhengting; Du, Xiaojiao; Wang, Kun

    2015-03-15

    Simple, inexpensive, portable sensing strategies for those clinically relevant molecules have attained a significant positive impact on the health care system. Herein, we have prepared a dual-emission ratiometric fluorescence probe with desired intensity ratio and demonstrated its efficiency for onsite naked eye determination of cysteine (Cys) and homocysteine (Hcy). The hybrid probe has been designed by hybridizing two differently sized CdTe quantum dots (QDs), in which the red-emitting CdTe QDs (rQDs) entrapped in the silica sphere acting as the reference signal, and the green-emitting CdTe QDs (gQDs) covalently attached on the silica surface serving as the response signal. When 1,10-phenanthroline with strong coordination ability to Cd atoms in gQDs was introduced, the fluorescence of the gQDs was effectively quenched, while the fluorescence of the rQDs stayed constant. Upon exposure to different contents of Cys or Hcy, the fluorescence of gQDs can be recovered gradually due to the displacement of the quencher. Based on the background signal of rQDs, the variations of the sensing system display continuous fluorescence color changes from red to green, which can be easily observed by the naked eye. The assay requires ∼20min and has a detection limit of 2.5 and 1.7μM for Cys and Hcy, respectively. Furthermore, we demonstrate that this sensing scheme can be fully integrated in a filter paper-based assay, thus enabling a potential point-of-care application featuring easy operation, low power consumption, and low fabrication costs. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  18. Fabrication of l-cysteine-capped CdTe quantum dots based ratiometric fluorescence nanosensor for onsite visual determination of trace TNT explosive.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qian, Jing; Hua, Mengjuan; Wang, Chengquan; Wang, Kan; Liu, Qian; Hao, Nan; Wang, Kun

    2016-11-23

    New strategies for onsite determination of trace 2,4,6-trinitrotoluene (TNT) explosives have become a research hotspot for homeland security needs against terrorism and environmental concerns. Herein, we designed a ratiometric fluorescence nanohybrid comprising 3-mercaptopropionic acid-capped green-emitting CdTe quantum dots (gQDs) encapsulated into SiO2 sphere and l-cysteine (Lcys)-capped red-emitting CdTe QDs (rQDs) conjugated onto SiO2 surface. The surface Lcys can be used as not only the stabilizer of the rQDs but also the primary amine provider which can react with TNT to form Meisenheimer complexes. Without any additional surface modification procedure, the fluorescence of rQDs equipped with Lcys was selectively quenched by TNT because electrons of the rQDs transferred to TNT molecules due to the formation of Meisenheimer complexes. Meanwhile, the embedded gQDs always remained constant. Upon exposure to increasing amounts of TNT, the fluorescence of rQDs could be gradually quenched and consequently the logarithm of the dual emission intensity ratios exhibited a good linear negative correlation with TNT concentration over a range of 10 nM-8 μM with a low detection limit of 3.3 nM. One can perform onsite visual determination of TNT with high resolution because the ratiometric fluorescence nanosensing system exhibited obvious fluorescence color changes. This sensing strategy has been successfully applied in real samples and already integrated in a filter paper-based assay, which enables potential fields use application featuring easy handling and cost-effectiveness. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  19. Dark Skies, Bright Kids: Year 2

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carlberg, Joleen K.; Johnson, K.; Lynch, R.; Walker, L.; Beaton, R.; Corby, J.; de Messieres, G.; Drosback, M.; Gugliucci, N.; Jackson, L.; Kingery, A.; Layman, S.; Murphy, E.; Richardson, W.; Ries, P.; Romero, C.; Sivakoff, G.; Sokal, K.; Trammell, G.; Whelan, D.; Yang, A.; Zasowski, G.

    2011-01-01

    The Dark Skies, Bright Kids (DSBK) outreach program brings astronomy education into local elementary schools in central Virginia's Southern Albemarle County through an after-school club. Taking advantage of the unusually dark night skies in the rural countryside, DSBK targets economically disadvantaged schools that tend to be underserved due to their rural locale. The goals of DSBK are to foster children's natural curiosity, demonstrate that science is a fun and creative process, challenge students' conceptions of what a scientist is and does, and teach some basic astronomy. Furthermore, DSBK works to assimilate families into students' education by holding family observing nights at the school. Now in its third semester, DSBK has successfully run programs at two schools with very diverse student populations. Working with these students has helped us to revise our activities and to create new ones. A by-product of our work has been the development of lesson plans, complete with learning goals and detailed instructions, that we make publically available on our website. This year we are expanding our repertoire with our new planetarium, which allows us to visualize topics in novel ways and supplements family observing on cloudy nights. The DSBK volunteers have also created a bilingual astronomy artbook --- designed, written, and illustrated by UVa students --- that we will publish and distribute to elementary schools in Virginia. Our book debuted at the last AAS winter meeting, and since then it has been extensively revised and updated with input from many individuals, including parents, professional educators, and a children's book author. Because the club is currently limited to serving a few elementary schools, this book will be part of our efforts to broaden our impact by bringing astronomy to schools we cannot go to ourselves and reaching out to Spanish-speaking communities at the same time.

  20. Optical microvariability of bright type 2 quasars

    Science.gov (United States)

    Polednikova, Jana; Ederoclite, Alessandro; Cepa, Jordi; de Diego Onsurbe, José Antonio; González-Serrano, José Ignacio

    2014-07-01

    We present results from a project focused on searching optical microvariabilty (also known as ``intra-night'' variability) in type 2 - obscured - quasars. Optical microvariability can be described as very small changes in the flux, typically in the order of hundredths of magnitude, which can be observed on timescales of hours. Such studies have been so far conducted for samples of blazars and type 1, unobscured, AGNs, where the optical microvariability was detected with success. We have focused on obscured targets which would pose a challenge to the AGN standard model. In the present work, however, we have observed a sample of three bright (g mag < 17) type 2 quasar, based on the catalog of type 2 quasars from SDSS of Reyes et al. (2008). The observations were carried out with the 1.5 meter telescope at San Pedro Martir observatory in Mexico. The sample was observed during an observation period of four days in Johnsons V filter, resulting in at least two continuous intervals of observations per target during the observational run. We have obtained differential light curves for our sources as well as for the comparison stars. They were analyzed using one-way analysis of variance statistical test (ANOVA), which has been repeatedly used in the past for studies of unobscured targets. Based on the results from the statistical analysis, we show that at least two out of three observed targets appear to be variable on time scales of hours. So far, this is the first study which confirmed existence of optical microvariability in type 2 quasars.

  1. Fundamentals of fluorescence and fluorescence microscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wolf, David E

    2013-01-01

    This chapter discusses the fundamental physics of fluorescence. The application of fluorescence to microscopy represents an important transition in the development of microscopy, particularly as it applies to biology. It enables quantitating the amounts of specific molecules within a cell, determining whether molecules are complexing on a molecular level, measuring changes in ionic concentrations within cells and organelles, and measuring molecular dynamics. This chapter also discusses the issues important to quantitative measurement of fluorescence and focuses on four of quantitative measurements of fluorescence--boxcar-gated detection, streak cameras, photon correlation, and phase modulation. Although quantitative measurement presents many pitfalls to the beginner, it also presents significant opportunities to one skilled in the art. This chapter also examines how fluorescence is measured in the steady state and time domain and how fluorescence is applied in the modern epifluorescence microscope. Copyright © 2007 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  2. Visual features underlying perceived brightness as revealed by classification images.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ilmari Kurki

    Full Text Available Along with physical luminance, the perceived brightness is known to depend on the spatial structure of the stimulus. Often it is assumed that neural computation of the brightness is based on the analysis of luminance borders of the stimulus. However, this has not been tested directly. We introduce a new variant of the psychophysical reverse-correlation or classification image method to estimate and localize the physical features of the stimuli which correlate with the perceived brightness, using a brightness-matching task. We derive classification images for the illusory Craik-O'Brien-Cornsweet stimulus and a "real" uniform step stimulus. For both stimuli, classification images reveal a positive peak at the stimulus border, along with a negative peak at the background, but are flat at the center of the stimulus, suggesting that brightness is determined solely by the border information. Features in the perceptually completed area in the Craik-O'Brien-Cornsweet do not contribute to its brightness, nor could we see low-frequency boosting, which has been offered as an explanation for the illusion. Tuning of the classification image profiles changes remarkably little with stimulus size. This supports the idea that only certain spatial scales are used for computing the brightness of a surface.

  3. Characterization of a spectrally diverse set of fluorescent proteins as FRET acceptors for mTurquoise2

    OpenAIRE

    Mastop, Marieke; Bindels, Daphne S.; Shaner, Nathan C.; Postma, Marten; Gadella, Theodorus W.J.; Goedhart, Joachim

    2017-01-01

    The performance of Förster Resonance Energy Transfer (FRET) biosensors depends on brightness and photostability, which are dependent on the characteristics of the fluorescent proteins that are employed. Yellow fluorescent protein (YFP) is often used as an acceptor but YFP is prone to photobleaching and pH changes. In this study, we evaluated the properties of a diverse set of acceptor fluorescent proteins in combination with the optimized CFP variant mTurquoise2 as the donor. To determine the...

  4. High-speed CuBr brightness amplifier beam profile

    Science.gov (United States)

    Evtushenko, G. S.; Torgaev, S. N.; Trigub, M. V.; Shiyanov, D. V.; Evtushenko, T. G.; Kulagin, A. E.

    2017-01-01

    This paper addresses the experimental study of the beam profile of the CuBr brightness amplifier operating at a wide range of pulse repetition frequencies. The use of a medium-size gas discharge tube (2 cm) ensures the operation of the brightness amplifier both at typical PRFs (520 kHz) and at higher PRFs (up to 100 kHz), either with or without HBr additive. The effect of the active additive on the beam profile is demonstrated. The testing results on kinetic modeling of radial processes in the laser (brightness amplifier) plasma are also discussed.

  5. Reviews in fluorescence 2010

    CERN Document Server

    Geddes, Chris D

    2011-01-01

    ""Reviews in Fluorescence 2010"", the seventh volume of the book serial from Springer, serves as a comprehensive collection of current trends and emerging hot topics in the field of fluorescence and closely related disciplines. It summarizes the year's progress in fluorescence and its applications, with authoritative analytical reviews specialized enough to be attractive to professional researchers, yet also appealing to the wider audience of scientists in related disciplines of fluorescence. ""Reviews in Fluorescence"" offers an essential reference material for any lab working in the fluoresc

  6. Principles of fluorescence techniques

    CERN Document Server

    2016-01-01

    Fluorescence techniques are being used and applied increasingly in academics and industry. The Principles of Fluorescence Techniques course will outline the basic concepts of fluorescence techniques and the successful utilization of the currently available commercial instrumentation. The course is designed for students who utilize fluorescence techniques and instrumentation and for researchers and industrial scientists who wish to deepen their knowledge of fluorescence applications. Key scientists in the field will deliver theoretical lectures. The lectures will be complemented by the direct utilization of steady-state and lifetime fluorescence instrumentation and confocal microscopy for FLIM and FRET applications provided by leading companies.

  7. Rainbow Vectors for Broad-Range Bacterial Fluorescence Labeling.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mariette Barbier

    Full Text Available Since their discovery, fluorescent proteins have been widely used to study protein function, localization or interaction, promoter activity and regulation, drug discovery or for non-invasive imaging. They have been extensively modified to improve brightness, stability, and oligomerization state. However, only a few studies have focused on understanding the dynamics of fluorescent proteins expression in bacteria. In this work, we developed a set plasmids encoding 12 fluorescent proteins for bacterial labeling to facilitate the study of pathogen-host interactions. These broad-spectrum plasmids can be used with a wide variety of Gram-negative microorganisms including Escherichia coli, Pseudomonas aeruginosa, Burkholderia cepacia, Bordetella bronchiseptica, Shigella flexneri or Klebsiella pneumoniae. For comparison, fluorescent protein expression and physical characteristics in Escherichia coli were analyzed using fluorescence microscopy, flow cytometry and in vivo imaging. Fluorescent proteins derived from the Aequorea Victoria family showed high photobleaching, while proteins form the Discosoma sp. and the Fungia coccina family were more photostable for microscopy applications. Only E2-Crimson, mCherry and mKeima were successfully detected for in vivo applications. Overall, E2-Crimson was the fastest maturing protein tested in E. coli with the best overall performance in the study parameters. This study provides a unified comparison and comprehensive characterization of fluorescent protein photostability, maturation and toxicity, and offers general recommendations on the optimal fluorescent proteins for in vitro and in vivo applications.

  8. Enhanced yellow fluorescent protein photoconversion to a cyan fluorescent protein-like species is sensitive to thermal and diffusion conditions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Raarup, Merete K.; Fjorback, Anja W.; Jensen, Stig M. R.; Müller, Heidi K.; Kjærgaard, Maj M.; Poulsen, Hanne; Wiborg, Ove; Nyengaard, Jens R.

    2009-05-01

    Ongoing research efforts into fluorescent proteins continuously generates new mutation variants, some of which can become photoactivated or photoconverted to a red-shifted color upon intense UV or blue light illumination. We report a built-in propensity for enhanced yellow fluorescent protein (EYFP) to undergo irreversible photoconversion into a cyan fluorescent protein (CFP)-like species upon green-light illumination. The photoconversion is thermally activated, happens mainly in fixed, nonsealed cell samples, and may result in a very bright and relatively photostable CFP-like species. The photoconversion efficiency depends on the sample diffusivity and is much increased in dehydrated, oxygenated samples. Given the large variations in conversion efficiency observed among samples as well as within a sample, photoconversion cannot be appropriately accounted for in the analysis of acceptor photobleaching fluorescence resonance energy transfer (pbFRET) images and should rather be completely avoided. Thus, samples should always be checked and discarded if photoconversion is observed.

  9. Identifying Bright X-Ray Beasts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kohler, Susanna

    2017-10-01

    Ultraluminous X-ray sources (ULXs) are astronomical sources of X-rays that, while dimmer than active galactic nuclei, are nonetheless brighter than any known stellar process. What are these beasts and why do they shine so brightly?Exceeding the LimitFirst discovered in the 1980s, ULXs are rare sources that have nonetheless been found in all types of galaxies. Though the bright X-ray radiation seems likely to be coming from compact objects accreting gas, theres a problem with this theory: ULXs outshine the Eddington luminosity for stellar-mass compact objects. This means that a stellar-mass object couldnt emit this much radiation isotropically without blowing itself apart.There are two alternative explanations commonly proposed for ULXs:Rather than being accreting stellar-mass compact objects, they are accreting intermediate-mass black holes. A hypothetical black hole of 100 solar masses or more would have a much higher Eddington luminosity than a stellar-mass black hole, making the luminosities that we observe from ULXs feasible.An example of one of the common routes the authors find for a binary system to become a ULX. In this case, the binary begins as two main sequence stars. As one star evolves off the main sequence, the binary undergoes a common envelope phase and a stage of mass transfer. The star ends its life as a supernova, and the resulting neutron star then accretes matter from the main sequence star as a ULX. [Wiktorowicz et al. 2017]They are ordinary X-ray binaries (a stellar-mass compact object accreting matter from a companion star), but they are undergoing a short phase of extreme accretion. During this time, their emission is beamed into jets, making them appear brighter than the Eddington luminosity.Clues from a New DiscoveryA few years ago, a new discovery shed some light on ULXs: M82 X-2, a pulsing ULX. Two more pulsing ULXs have been discovered since then, demonstrating that at least some ULXs contain pulsars i.e., neutron stars as the

  10. Fluorescent flippers for mechanosensitive membrane probes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dal Molin, Marta; Verolet, Quentin; Colom, Adai; Letrun, Romain; Derivery, Emmanuel; Gonzalez-Gaitan, Marcos; Vauthey, Eric; Roux, Aurélien; Sakai, Naomi; Matile, Stefan

    2015-01-21

    In this report, "fluorescent flippers" are introduced to create planarizable push-pull probes with the mechanosensitivity and fluorescence lifetime needed for practical use in biology. Twisted push-pull scaffolds with large and bright dithienothiophenes and their S,S-dioxides as the first "fluorescent flippers" are shown to report on the lateral organization of lipid bilayers with quantum yields above 80% and lifetimes above 4 ns. Their planarization in liquid-ordered (Lo) and solid-ordered (So) membranes results in red shifts in excitation of up to +80 nm that can be transcribed into red shifts in emission of up to +140 nm by Förster resonance energy transfer (FRET). These unique properties are compatible with multidomain imaging in giant unilamellar vesicles (GUVs) and cells by confocal laser scanning or fluorescence lifetime imaging microscopy. Controls indicate that strong push-pull macrodipoles are important, operational probes do not relocate in response to lateral membrane reorganization, and two flippers are indeed needed to "really swim," i.e., achieve high mechanosensitivity.

  11. Millimeter-wave Imaging Radiometer Brightness Temperatures, Wakasa Bay, Japan

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — This data set includes calibrated brightness temperatures measured over Wakasa Bay in the Sea of Japan in January and February 2003. The MIR was carried on a...

  12. Nimbus-5 ESMR Polar Gridded Brightness Temperatures, Version 2

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — The Nimbus-5 Electrically Scanning Microwave Radiometer (ESMR) data set consists of gridded brightness temperature arrays for the Arctic and Antarctic, spanning 11...

  13. SMEX03 SSM/I Brightness Temperature Data, Alabama

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — This data set provides brightness temperature data acquired during the Soil Moisture Experiment 2003 (SMEX03) by the Special Sensor Microwave/Imager (SSM/I). The...

  14. Binocular Coordination in Reading When Changing Background Brightness

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Köpsel Anne

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available Contradicting results concerning binocular coordination in reading have been reported: Liversedge et al. (2006 reported a dominance of uncrossed fixations, whereas Nuthmann and Kliegl (2009 observed more crossed fixations in reading. Based on both earlier and continuing studies, we conducted a reading experiment involving varying brightness of background and font. Calibration was performed using Gabor patches presented on grey background. During the experimental session, text had to be read either on dark, bright, or grey background. The data corroborates former results that showed a predominance of uncrossed fixations when reading on dark background, as well as those showing a predominance of crossed fixations, when reading on bright background. Besides these systematic shifts, the new results show an increase in unsystematic variability when changing the overall brightness from calibration to test. The origins of the effects need to be clarified in future research.

  15. CLPX-Satellite: AVHRR/HRPT Brightness Temperatures and Reflectances

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — This data set includes AVHRR/HRPT (Advanced Very High Resolution Radiometer/High Resolution Picture Transmission) brightness temperatures and reflectances over the...

  16. SMEX03 SSM/I Brightness Temperature Data, Brazil

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — This data set provides brightness temperature data acquired during the Soil Moisture Experiment 2003 (SMEX03) by the Special Sensor Microwave/Imager (SSM/I). The...

  17. Ultra High Brightness/Low Cost Fiber Coupled Packaging Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — The focus of the proposed effort is maximizing the brightness of fiber coupled laser diode pump sources at a minimum cost. The specific innovation proposed is to...

  18. DMSP SSM/I-SSMIS Daily Polar Gridded Brightness Temperatures

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — NSIDC produces daily gridded brightness temperature data from orbital swath data generated by the Special Sensor Microwave/Imager (SSM/I) aboard the Defense...

  19. CLEMENTINE LWIR BRIGHTNESS TEMPERATURE V1.0

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — This volume contains the archive of Lunar brightness temperature data derived from images acquired by the Clementine Long Wavelength Infrared (LWIR) camera. The LWIR...

  20. SMEX02 SSM/I Brightness Temperature Data, Iowa

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — The Special Sensor Microwave/Imager (SSM/I) is a seven-channel, four-frequency, linearly polarized passive microwave radiometric system. Data are brightness...

  1. CLASIC07 PALS Brightness Temperature Data V001

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — This data set contains brightness temperature data obtained by the Passive Active L-band System (PALS) microwave aircraft radiometer instrument as part of the Cloud...

  2. Operational Bright-Band Snow Level Detection Using Doppler Radar

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — A method to detect the bright-band snow level from radar reflectivity and Doppler vertical velocity data collection with an atmospheric profiling Doppler radar. The...

  3. Visible Color and Photometry of Bright Materials on Vesta

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schroder, S. E.; Li, J. Y.; Mittlefehldt, D. W.; Pieters, C. M.; De Sanctis, M. C.; Hiesinger, H.; Blewett, D. T.; Russell, C. T.; Raymond, C. A.; Keller, H. U.

    2012-01-01

    The Dawn Framing Camera (FC) collected images of the surface of Vesta at a pixel scale of 70 m in the High Altitude Mapping Orbit (HAMO) phase through its clear and seven color filters spanning from 430 nm to 980 nm. The surface of Vesta displays a large diversity in its brightness and colors, evidently related to the diverse geology [1] and mineralogy [2]. Here we report a detailed investigation of the visible colors and photometric properties of the apparently bright materials on Vesta in order to study their origin. The global distribution and the spectroscopy of bright materials are discussed in companion papers [3, 4], and the synthesis results about the origin of Vestan bright materials are reported in [5].

  4. Fluorenyl benzothiadiazole and benzoselenadiazole near-IR fluorescent probes for two-photon fluorescence imaging (Conference Presentation)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Belfield, Kevin D.; Yao, Sheng; Kim, Bosung; Yue, Xiling

    2016-03-01

    Imaging biological samples with two-photon fluorescence (2PF) microscopy has the unique advantage of resulting high contrast 3D resolution subcellular image that can reach up to several millimeters depth. 2PF probes that absorb and emit at near IR region need to be developed. Two-photon excitation (2PE) wavelengths are less concerned as 2PE uses wavelengths doubles the absorption wavelength of the probe, which means 2PE wavelengths for probes even with absorption at visible wavelength will fall into NIR region. Therefore, probes that fluoresce at near IR region with high quantum yields are needed. A series of dyes based on 5-thienyl-2, 1, 3-benzothiadiazole and 5-thienyl-2, 1, 3-benzoselenadiazole core were synthesized as near infrared two-photon fluorophores. Fluorescence maxima wavelengths as long as 714 nm and fluorescence quantum yields as high as 0.67 were achieved. The fluorescence quantum yields of the dyes were nearly constant, regardless of solvents polarity. These diazoles exhibited large Stokes shift (fluorescence figure of merit (FM , 1.04×10-2 GM). Cells incubated on a 3D scaffold with one of the new probes (encapsulated in Pluronic micelles) exhibited bright fluorescence, enabling 3D two-photon fluorescence imaging to a depth of 100 µm.

  5. The Photometric Brightness Variation of Geostationary Orbit Satellite

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Haingja Seo

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available Photometric observation is one of the most effective techniques for determining the physical characteristics of unknown space objects and space debris. In this research, we examine the change in brightness of the Communication, Ocean, Meteorological Satellite-1 (COMS-1 Geostationary Orbit Satellite (GEO, and compare it to our estimate model. First, we calculate the maximum brightness time using our calculation method and then derive the light curve shape using our rendering model. The maximum brightness is then calculated using the induced equation from Pogson's formula. For a comparison with our estimation, we carried out photometric observation using an optical telescope. The variation in brightness and the shape of the light curve are similar to the calculations achieved using our model, but the maximum brightness shows a slightly different value from our calculation result depending on the input parameters. This paper examines the photometric phenomenon of the variation in brightness of a GEO satellite, and the implementation of our approach to understanding the characteristics of space objects.

  6. Global View of the Bright Material on Vesta

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zambon, F.; DeSanctis, C.; Schroeder, S.; Tosi, F.; Li, J.-Y.; Longobardo, A.; Ammannito, E.; Blewett, D. T.; Palomba, E.; Capaccioni, F.; hide

    2014-01-01

    At 525 km in mean diameter, Vesta is the second-most massive and one of the brightest asteroids of the main-belt. Here we give a global view of the bright material (BM) units on Vesta. We classified the BMs according to the normal visual albedo. The global albedo map of Vesta allows to be divided the surface into three principal types of terrains: bright regions, dark regions and intermediate regions. The distribution of bright regions is not uniform. The mid-southern latitudes contain the most bright areas, while the northern hemisphere is poor in bright regions. The analysis of the spectral parameters and the normal visual albedo show a dependence between albedo and the strength (depth) of ferrous iron absorption bands, strong bands correspond with high albedo units. Vesta's average albedo is 0.38, but there are bright material whose albedo can exceed 0.50. Only the E-Type asteroids have albedos comparable to those of the BMs on Vesta. The Dawn mission observed a large fraction of Vesta's surface at high spatial resolution, allowing a detailed study of the morphology and mineralogy of it. In particular, reflectance spectra provided by the Visible and InfraRed spectrometer (VIR), confirmed that Vesta's mineralogy is dominated by pyroxenes. All Vesta spectra show two strong absorption bands at approx 0.9 and 1.9 micron, typical of the pyroxenes and associated with the howardite, eucrite and diogenite (HED) meteorites.

  7. Synthesizing SMOS Zero-Baselines with Aquarius Brightness Temperature Simulator

    Science.gov (United States)

    Colliander, A.; Dinnat, E.; Le Vine, D.; Kainulainen, J.

    2012-01-01

    SMOS [1] and Aquarius [2] are ESA and NASA missions, respectively, to make L-band measurements from the Low Earth Orbit. SMOS makes passive measurements whereas Aquarius measures both passive and active. SMOS was launched in November 2009 and Aquarius in June 2011.The scientific objectives of the missions are overlapping: both missions aim at mapping the global Sea Surface Salinity (SSS). Additionally, SMOS mission produces soil moisture product (however, Aquarius data will eventually be used for retrieving soil moisture too). The consistency of the brightness temperature observations made by the two instruments is essential for long-term studies of SSS and soil moisture. For resolving the consistency, the calibration of the instruments is the key. The basis of the SMOS brightness temperature level is the measurements performed with the so-called zero-baselines [3]; SMOS employs an interferometric measurement technique which forms a brightness temperature image from several baselines constructed by combination of multiple receivers in an array; zero-length baseline defines the overall brightness temperature level. The basis of the Aquarius brightness temperature level is resolved from the brightness temperature simulator combined with ancillary data such as antenna patterns and environmental models [4]. Consistency between the SMOS zero-baseline measurements and the simulator output would provide a robust basis for establishing the overall comparability of the missions.

  8. Gd(iii)-doped carbon dots as a dual fluorescent-MRI probe

    KAUST Repository

    Bourlinos, Athanasios B.

    2012-01-01

    We describe the synthesis of Gd(iii)-doped carbon dots as dual fluorescence-MRI probes for biomedical applications. The derived Gd(iii)-doped carbon dots show uniform particle size (3-4 nm) and gadolinium distribution and form stable dispersions in water. More importantly, they exhibit bright fluorescence, strong T1-weighted MRI contrast and low cytotoxicity. © The Royal Society of Chemistry 2012.

  9. Retinal venous blood carbon monoxide response to bright light in male pigs: A preliminary study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oren, Dan A; Duda, Magdalena; Kozioł, Katarzyna; Romerowicz-Misielak, Maria; Koziorowska, Anna; Sołek, Przemysław; Nowak, Sławomir; Kulpa, Magdalena; Koziorowski, Marek

    2017-03-01

    The physical mechanism by which light is absorbed in the eye and has antidepressant and energizing effects in Seasonal Affective Disorder and other forms of psychiatric major depression is of scientific interest. This study was designed to explore one specific aspect of a proposed humoral phototransduction mechanism, namely that carbon monoxide (CO) levels increase in retinal venous blood in response to bright light. Eleven mature male pigs approximately six months of age were kept for 7days in darkness and fasted for 12h prior to surgery. Following mild sedation, anesthesia was induced. Silastic catheters were inserted into the dorsal nasal vein through the angular vein of the eye to reach the ophthalmic sinus, from which venous blood outflowing from the eye area was collected. The animals were exposed to 5000lx of fluorescent-generated white light. CO levels in the blood were analyzed by gas chromatography before and after 80min of light exposure. At baseline, mean CO levels in the retinal venous blood were 0.43±0.05(SE)nmol/ml. After bright light, mean CO levels increased to 0.54±0.06nmol/ml (two-tailed t-test pcarbon monoxide levels in ophthalmic venous blood. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  10. Bright-field Nanoscopy: Visualizing Nano-structures with Localized Optical Contrast Using a Conventional Microscope.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Suran, Swathi; Bharadwaj, Krishna; Raghavan, Srinivasan; Varma, Manoj M

    2016-04-26

    Most methods for optical visualization beyond the diffraction limit rely on fluorescence emission by molecular tags. Here, we report a method for visualization of nanostructures down to a few nanometers using a conventional bright-field microscope without requiring additional molecular tags such as fluorophores. The technique, Bright-field Nanoscopy, is based on the strong thickness dependent color of ultra-thin germanium on an optically thick gold film. We demonstrate the visualization of grain boundaries in chemical vapour deposited single layer graphene and the detection of single 40 nm Ag nanoparticles. We estimate a size detection limit of about 2 nm using this technique. In addition to visualizing nano-structures, this technique can be used to probe fluid phenomena at the nanoscale, such as transport through 2D membranes. We estimated the water transport rate through a 1 nm thick polymer film using this technique, as an illustration. Further, the technique can also be extended to study the transport of specific ions in the solution. It is anticipated that this technique will find use in applications ranging from single-nanoparticles resolved sensing to studying nanoscale fluid-solid interface phenomena.

  11. Determination of Equilibrium Constant and Relative Brightness in FRET-FCS by Including the Third-Order Correlations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meng, Lingyi; He, Shanshan; Zhao, Xin Sheng

    2017-12-21

    Fluorescence correlation spectroscopy (FCS) encodes the information on the equilibrium constant (K), the relative fluorescence brightness of fluorophore (Q), and the forward and backward reaction rate constants (k+ and k-) on a physical or chemical relaxation. However, it has been a long-standing problem to completely resolve the FCS data to get the thermodynamic and kinetic information. Recently, we have solved the problem for fluorescence autocorrelation spectroscopy (FACS). Here, we extend the method to fluorescence cross-correlation spectroscopy (FCCS), which appears when FCS is coupled with fluorescence resonance energy transfer (FRET). Among 12 total second-order and third-order pre-exponential factors in a relaxation process probed by the FRET-FCS technique, 3 are independent. We presented and discussed 3 sets of explicit solutions to use these pre-exponential factors to calculate K and Q. Together with the relaxation time, the acquired K will allow people to obtain k+ and k-, so that the goal of deciphering the FRET-FCS data will be fully reached. The theory is verified by extensive computer simulations and tested experimentally on a system of oligonucleotide hybridization.

  12. Fluorescent Lamp Replacement Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    2017-07-01

    C -1 D FLUORESCENT LAMP SPECIFICATION SHEETS . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . D -1 E LED WAVES’ LED ...friendly products, advances in efficiency, and lower production costs for lamps . The conversion of fluorescent bulbs to LED technology has many benefits...repeatedly turned on and off. (5) LEDs can be used in existing fluorescent lighting fixtures using LED retrofit kits or replacement lamps . (6

  13. Comparative assessment of fluorescent proteins for in vivo imaging in an animal model system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heppert, Jennifer K; Dickinson, Daniel J; Pani, Ariel M; Higgins, Christopher D; Steward, Annette; Ahringer, Julie; Kuhn, Jeffrey R; Goldstein, Bob

    2016-11-07

    Fluorescent protein tags are fundamental tools used to visualize gene products and analyze their dynamics in vivo. Recent advances in genome editing have expedited the precise insertion of fluorescent protein tags into the genomes of diverse organisms. These advances expand the potential of in vivo imaging experiments and facilitate experimentation with new, bright, photostable fluorescent proteins. Most quantitative comparisons of the brightness and photostability of different fluorescent proteins have been made in vitro, removed from biological variables that govern their performance in cells or organisms. To address the gap, we quantitatively assessed fluorescent protein properties in vivo in an animal model system. We generated transgenic Caenorhabditis elegans strains expressing green, yellow, or red fluorescent proteins in embryos and imaged embryos expressing different fluorescent proteins under the same conditions for direct comparison. We found that mNeonGreen was not as bright in vivo as predicted based on in vitro data but is a better tag than GFP for specific kinds of experiments, and we report on optimal red fluorescent proteins. These results identify ideal fluorescent proteins for imaging in vivo in C. elegans embryos and suggest good candidate fluorescent proteins to test in other animal model systems for in vivo imaging experiments. © 2016 Heppert et al. This article is distributed by The American Society for Cell Biology under license from the author(s). Two months after publication it is available to the public under an Attribution–Noncommercial–Share Alike 3.0 Unported Creative Commons License (http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-sa/3.0).

  14. Near infrared fluorescent biliproteins generated from bacteriophytochrome AphB of Nostoc sp. PCC 7120.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yuan, Che; Li, Hui-Zhen; Tang, Kun; Gärtner, Wolfgang; Scheer, Hugo; Zhou, Ming; Zhao, Kai-Hong

    2016-04-01

    The genome of the cyanobacterium Nostoc sp. PCC 7120 encodes a large number of putative bacteriophytochrome and cyanobacteriochrome photoreceptors that, due to their long-wavelength absorption and fluorescence emission, might serve as fluorescent tags in intracellular investigations. We show that the PAS-GAF domain of the bacteriophytochrome, AphB, binds biliverdin covalently and exhibits, besides its reversible photochemistry, a moderate fluorescence in the near infrared (NIR) spectral region. It was selected for further increasing the brightness while retaining the NIR fluorescence. In the first step, amino acids assumed to improve fluorescence were selectively mutated. The resulting variants were then subjected to several rounds of random mutagenesis and screened for enhanced fluorescence in the NIR. The brightness of optimized PAS-GAF variants increased more than threefold compared to that of wt AphB(1-321), with only insignificant spectral shifts (Amax around 695 nm, and Fmax around 720 nm). In general, the brightness increases with decreasing wavelengths, which allows for a selection of the fluorophore depending on the optical properties of the tissue. A spectral heterogeneity was observed when residue His260, located in close proximity to the chromophore, was mutated to Tyr, emphasizing the strong effects of the environment on the electronic properties of the bound biliverdin chromophore.

  15. Fluorescence properties of 6-aryl-2‧-deoxy-furanouridine and –pyrrolocytidine and their derivatives

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ro, Jong Jin; Go, Gui Han; Wilhelmsson, L. Marcus; Hyean Kim, Byeang

    2018-01-01

    2‧-deoxyfuranouridine derivatives presenting various aryl groups have been synthesized through Cu(I)-catalyzed intramolecular cyclizations. Moreover, corresponding pyrrolo-dC derivatives have been synthesized and both families of compounds thoroughly characterized using UV/vis and fluorescence spectroscopy as well as time-dependent density functional theory calculations. The photophysical characterization, show that our newly synthesized derivatives of the important pyrrolo-dC family have high fluorescence quantum yields (QYs) and brightness values. Pyrrolo-dC derivative, 3a, shows an environment sensitive QY of up to >60% and brightness of almost 3000, in low polarity solvents and excitation and emission maxima between 365–381 nm and 479–510 nm, respectively, in solvents of different polarities. Two other derivatives, 3b and 3c, show high QYs and brightness values of up to 3300 that are fairly insensitive to their microenvironment. These promising photophysical features suggest future applicability as fluorescent nucleobase analogs.

  16. PROFFIT: Analysis of X-ray surface-brightness profiles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eckert, Dominique

    2016-08-01

    PROFFIT analyzes X-ray surface-brightness profiles for data from any X-ray instrument. It can extract surface-brightness profiles in circular or elliptical annuli, using constant or logarithmic bin size, from the image centroid, the surface-brightness peak, or any user-given center, and provides surface-brightness profiles in any circular or elliptical sectors. It offers background map support to extract background profiles, can excise areas using SAO DS9-compatible (ascl:0003.002) region files to exclude point sources, provides fitting with a number of built-in models, including the popular beta model, double beta, cusp beta, power law, and projected broken power law, uses chi-squared or C statistic, and can fit on the surface-brightness or counts data. It has a command-line interface similar to HEASOFT’s XSPEC (ascl:9910.005) package, provides interactive help with a description of all the commands, and results can be saved in FITS, ROOT or TXT format.

  17. A neurodynamical model of brightness induction in v1.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Olivier Penacchio

    Full Text Available Brightness induction is the modulation of the perceived intensity of an area by the luminance of surrounding areas. Recent neurophysiological evidence suggests that brightness information might be explicitly represented in V1, in contrast to the more common assumption that the striate cortex is an area mostly responsive to sensory information. Here we investigate possible neural mechanisms that offer a plausible explanation for such phenomenon. To this end, a neurodynamical model which is based on neurophysiological evidence and focuses on the part of V1 responsible for contextual influences is presented. The proposed computational model successfully accounts for well known psychophysical effects for static contexts and also for brightness induction in dynamic contexts defined by modulating the luminance of surrounding areas. This work suggests that intra-cortical interactions in V1 could, at least partially, explain brightness induction effects and reveals how a common general architecture may account for several different fundamental processes, such as visual saliency and brightness induction, which emerge early in the visual processing pathway.

  18. Far-Field Fluorescence Nanoscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hell, Stefan

    2009-03-01

    The resolution of a far-field optical microscopy is usually limited to d=λ/ λ( 2,α ) . - ( 2,α ) > 200 nm, with nα denoting the numerical aperture of the lens and λ the wavelength of light. While the diffraction barrier has prompted the invention of electron, scanning probe, and x-ray microscopy, the 3D-imaging of the interior of (live) cells requires the use of focused visible light. I will discuss new developments of optical microscopy that I anticipate to have a lasting impact on our understanding of living matter. Emphasis will be placed on physical concepts that have overcome the diffraction barrier in far-field fluorescence microscopy. To set the scene for future directions, I will show that all these concepts share a common strategy: exploiting selected states and transitions of the fluorescent marker to neutralize the limiting role of diffraction. The first viable concept of this kind was Stimulated Emission Depletion (STED) microscopy where the spot diameter followsd λ/ λ( 2,α√1+I / I Is . - Is ) . - ( 2,α√1+I / I Is . - Is ); I / I Is . - Isis a measure of the strength with which the molecule is send from the fluorescent state to the dark ground state. For I / I Is . - Is->∞ it follows that d->0, meaning that the resolution that can, in principle, be molecular. The concept underlying STED microscopy can be expanded by employing other transitions that shuffle the molecule between a dark and a bright state, such as (i) shelving the fluorophore in a dark triplet state, and (ii) photoswitching between a `fluorescence activated' and a `fluorescence deactivated' conformational state. Examples for the latter include photochromic organic compounds, and fluorescent proteins which undergo a cis-trans photoisomerizations. Photoswitching provides ultrahigh resolution at ultralow light levels. Switching can be performed in an ensemble or individually in which case the image is assembled molecule by molecule at high resolution. By providing molecular

  19. Brightness and uniformity measurements of plastic scintillator tiles at the CERN H2 test beam

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chatrchyan, S.; et al.

    2017-09-25

    We study the light output, light collection efficiency and signal timing of a variety of organic scintillators that are being considered for the upgrade of the hadronic calorimeter of the CMS detector. The experimental data are collected at the H2 test-beam area at CERN, using a 150 GeV muon beam. In particular, we investigate the usage of over-doped and green-emitting plastic scintillator, two solutions that have not been extensively considered. We present a study of the energy distribution in plastic-scintillator tiles, the hit efficiency as a function of the hit position, and a study of the signal timing for blue and green scintillators.

  20. Practical and reliable FRET/FLIM pair of fluorescent proteins

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shemiakina Irina I

    2009-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background In spite of a great number of monomeric fluorescent proteins developed in the recent years, the reported fluorescent protein-based FRET pairs are still characterized by a number of disadvantageous features, complicating their use as reporters in cell biology and for high-throughput cell-based screenings. Results Here we screened some of the recently developed monomeric protein pairs to find the optimal combination, which would provide high dynamic range FRET changes, along with high pH- and photo-stability, fast maturation and bright fluorescence, and reliable detection in any fluorescent imaging system. Among generated FRET pairs, we have selected TagGFP-TagRFP, combining all the mentioned desirable characteristics. On the basis of this highly efficient FRET pair, we have generated a bright, high contrast, pH- and photo-stable apoptosis reporter, named CaspeR3 (Caspase 3 Reporter. Conclusion The combined advantages suggest that the TagGFP-TagRFP is one of the most efficient green/red couples available to date for FRET/FLIM analyses to monitor interaction of proteins of interest in living cells and to generate FRET-based sensors for various applications. CaspeR3 provides reliable detection of apoptosis, and should become a popular tool both for cell biology studies and high throughput screening assays.

  1. The effect of paraffin wax embedding procedures on the ability of the fluorescent antibody test to demonstrate bluetongue virus antigen in insect tissue.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jennings, M; Boorman, J P

    1984-11-01

    The effect of the reagents used in paraffin wax embedding procedures on the fluorescent antibody technique was investigated with a view to using this test for virus location studies on paraffin wax sections of bluetongue virus infected Culicoides variipennis. Experiments were carried out using tissue smears rather than prepared sections, enabling the effect of individual reagents to be evaluated. Infected smears treated with acetone alone showed bright specific fluorescence, while treatment of infected smears with all other reagents, including low melting point wax and acetone-soluble ester wax, prior to immunofluorescence testing reduced the brightness of specific fluorescence or rendered the test completely ineffective.

  2. Bright light therapy of subsyndromal seasonal affective disorder in the workplace: morning vs. afternoon exposure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Avery, D H; Kizer, D; Bolte, M A; Hellekson, C

    2001-04-01

    Bright light therapy in seasonal affective disorder (SAD) has been studied extensively. However, little attention has been given to subsyndromal seasonal affective disorder (SSAD) or the use of bright light in the workplace. Many patients using bright light boxes complain of the inconvenience of use. Much of this inconvenience involves the often-recommended early timing of the bright light therapy. Patients, who already have difficulty awakening, often have difficulty using the bright light therapy soon after awakening before going to work. If bright light could be used effectively in the workplace, the treatment would be more convenient; the improved convenience would probably improve compliance. In this study, we studied the effectiveness of bright light therapy in subjects with SSAD in the workplace, comparing morning bright light with afternoon bright light. Morning and afternoon bright light treatment (2500 lux) were compared in 30 subsyndromal seasonal affective disorder patients using the bright light therapy in the workplace. Hamilton Depression Ratings and subjective measures of mood, energy, alertness and productivity were assessed before and after 2 weeks of light therapy. Both morning and evening bright light significantly decreased the depression ratings and improved the subjective mood, energy, alertness and productivity scores. However, there were no significant differences between the two times of administration of the bright light treatment. Both bright light treatments were well tolerated. Bright light given in the workplace improves subjective ratings of mood, energy, alertness and productivity in SSAD subjects. Morning and afternoon bright lights resulted in similar levels of improvement.

  3. Bright and Not-So-Bright Prospects for Women in Physics in China-Beijing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Ling-An; Yang, Zhongqin; Ma, Wanyun

    2009-04-01

    Science in China-Beijing is enjoying a healthy increase in funding year by year, so the prospects for physicists are also bright. However, employment discrimination against women, formerly unthinkable, is becoming more and more explicit as the country evolves toward a market economy. Some recruitment notices bluntly state that only men will be considered, or impose restrictions upon potential female candidates. Female associate professors in many institutions are forced to retire at age 55, compared with 60 for men. This double-pinching discrimination against both younger and older women threatens to lead to a "pincer" effect, more serious than the "scissors" effect. Indeed, the ratio of senior-level women physicists in general has dropped significantly in recent years in China. Ironically, the number of female students applying for graduate studies is on the rise, as it is becoming increasingly difficult for them to compete with men in the job market with just an undergraduate degree. The Chinese Physical Society has made certain efforts to promote the image of women physicists, but it will take time and effort to reverse the trend.

  4. High-brightness ultra-cold metastable neon-beam

    CERN Document Server

    Shimizu, Fujio

    2015-01-01

    This paper presents detailed characteristics of an ultra-cold bright metastable neon atomic beam which we have been using for atom-interferometric applications. The basis of the device is an atomic beam released from a magneto-optical trap (MOT) which is operated with a high intensity trapping laser, high magnetic quadrupole field, and large laser detuining. Mainly due to the complex structure of three dimensional magnetic field and laser beams, a bright small spot of atoms is formed near the center of the quadrupole magnetic field under an appropriate operating condition. We obtained the minimum trap diameter of 50 micron meter, the atomic density nearly 10^{13}cm^{-3}, and the atomic temperature slightly less than the Doppler limited temperature of 200 micro-K. By releasing trapped atoms we obtained an bright cold atomic beam which is not far from the collision limited atomic density.

  5. Low dimensional neutron moderators for enhanced source brightness

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mezei, Ferenc; Zanini, Luca; Takibayev, Alan

    2014-01-01

    In a recent numerical optimization study we have found that liquid para-hydrogen coupled cold neutron moderators deliver 3–5 times higher cold neutron brightness at a spallation neutron source if they take the form of a flat, quasi 2-dimensional disc, in contrast to the conventional more voluminous...... for cold neutrons. This model leads to the conclusions that the optimal shape for high brightness para-hydrogen neutron moderators is the quasi 1-dimensional tube and these low dimensional moderators can also deliver much enhanced cold neutron brightness in fission reactor neutron sources, compared...... to the much more voluminous liquid D2 or H2 moderators currently used. Neutronic simulation calculations confirm both of these theoretical conclusions....

  6. On the relation between zenith sky brightness and horizontal illuminance

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kocifaj, M.; Posch, Th.; Solano Lamphar, H. A.

    2015-01-01

    The effects of artificial light at night are an emergent research topic for astronomers, physicists, engineers and biologists around the world. This leads to a need for measurements of the night sky brightness (= diffuse luminance of the night sky) and nocturnal illuminance. Currently, the most sensitive light meters measure the zenith sky brightness in magV/arcsec2 or - less frequently - in cd m-2. However, the horizontal illuminance resulting only from the night sky is an important source of information that is difficult to obtain with common instruments. Here we present a set of approximations to convert the zenith luminance into horizontal illuminance. Three different approximations are presented for three idealized atmospheric conditions: homogeneous sky brightness, an isotropically scattering atmosphere and a turbid atmosphere. We also apply the resulting conversion formulae to experimental data on night sky luminance, obtained during the past three years.

  7. Effects of Bright Light Treatment on Psychomotor Speed in Athletes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mikko Paavo Tulppo

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available Purpose: A recent study suggests that transcranial brain targeted light treatment via ear canals may have physiological effects on brain function studied by functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI techniques in humans. We tested the hypothesis that bright light treatment could improve psychomotor speed in professional ice hockey players. Methods: Psychomotor speed tests with audio and visual warning signals were administered to a Finnish National Ice Hockey League team before and after 24 days of transcranial bright light or sham treatment. The treatments were given during seasonal darkness in the Oulu region (latitude 65 degrees north when the strain on the players was also very high (10 matches during 24 days. A daily 12-min dose of bright light or sham (n = 11 for both treatment was given every morning between 8–12 am at home with a transcranial bright light device. Mean reaction time and motor time were analyzed separately for both psychomotor tests. Analysis of variance for repeated measures adjusted for age was performed. Results: Time x group interaction for motor time with a visual warning signal was p = 0.024 after adjustment for age. In Bonferroni post-hoc analysis, motor time with a visual warning signal decreased in the bright light treatment group from 127 ± 43 to 94 ± 26 ms (p = 0.024 but did not change significantly in the sham group 121 ± 23 vs. 110 ± 32 ms (p = 0.308. Reaction time with a visual signal did not change in either group. Reaction or motor time with an audio warning signal did not change in either the treatment or sham group. Conclusion: Psychomotor speed, particularly motor time with a visual warning signal, improves after transcranial bright light treatment in professional ice-hockey players during the competition season in the dark time of the year.

  8. Fluorescent lighting with aluminum nitride phosphors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cherepy, Nerine J.; Payne, Stephen A.; Seeley, Zachary M.; Srivastava, Alok M.

    2016-05-10

    A fluorescent lamp includes a glass envelope; at least two electrodes connected to the glass envelope; mercury vapor and an inert gas within the glass envelope; and a phosphor within the glass envelope, wherein the phosphor blend includes aluminum nitride. The phosphor may be a wurtzite (hexagonal) crystalline structure Al.sub.(1-x)M.sub.xN phosphor, where M may be drawn from beryllium, magnesium, calcium, strontium, barium, zinc, scandium, yttrium, lanthanum, cerium, praseodymium, europium, gadolinium, terbium, ytterbium, bismuth, manganese, silicon, germanium, tin, boron, or gallium is synthesized to include dopants to control its luminescence under ultraviolet excitation. The disclosed Al.sub.(1-x)M.sub.xN:Mn phosphor provides bright orange-red emission, comparable in efficiency and spectrum to that of the standard orange-red phosphor used in fluorescent lighting, Y.sub.2O.sub.3:Eu. Furthermore, it offers excellent lumen maintenance in a fluorescent lamp, and does not utilize "critical rare earths," minimizing sensitivity to fluctuating market prices for the rare earth elements.

  9. Bright solitons in non-equilibrium coherent quantum matter.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pinsker, F; Flayac, H

    2016-01-01

    We theoretically demonstrate a mechanism for bright soliton generation in spinor non-equilibrium Bose-Einstein condensates made of atoms or quasi-particles such as polaritons in semiconductor microcavities. We give analytical expressions for bright (half) solitons as minimizing functions of a generalized non-conservative Lagrangian elucidating the unique features of inter and intra-competition in non-equilibrium systems. The analytical results are supported by a detailed numerical analysis that further shows the rich soliton dynamics inferred by their instability and mutual cross-interactions.

  10. HSV Brightness Factor Matching for Gesture Recognition System

    OpenAIRE

    Mokhtar M. Hasan; Pramod K. Mishra

    2010-01-01

    The main goal of gesture recognition research is to establish a system which can identify specific human gestures and use these identified gestures to be carried out by the machine, In this paper, we introduce a new method for gesture recognition that based on computing the local brightness for each block of the gesture image, the gesture image is divided into 25x25 blocks each of 5x5 block size, and we calculated the local brightness of each block, so, each gesture produces 25x25 features va...

  11. Fluorescence microscopy for the characterization of structural integrity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Street, Kenneth W.; Leonhardt, Todd A.

    1991-01-01

    The absorption characteristics of light and the optical technique of fluorescence microscopy for enhancing metallographic interpretation are presented. Characterization of thermally sprayed coatings by optical microscopy suffers because of the tendency for misidentification of the microstructure produced by metallographic preparation. Gray scale, in bright field microscopy, is frequently the only means of differentiating the actual structural details of porosity, cracking, and debonding of coatings. Fluorescence microscopy is a technique that helps to distinguish the artifacts of metallographic preparation (pullout, cracking, debonding) from the microstructure of the specimen by color contrasting structural differences. Alternative instrumentation and the use of other dye systems are also discussed. The combination of epoxy vacuum infiltration with fluorescence microscopy to verify microstructural defects is an effective means to characterize advanced materials and to assess structural integrity.

  12. Soft fluorescent nanomaterials for biological and biomedical imaging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peng, Hong-Shang; Chiu, Daniel T

    2015-07-21

    Soft fluorescent nanomaterials have attracted recent attention as imaging agents for biological applications, because they provide the advantages of good biocompatibility, high brightness, and easy biofunctionalization. Here, we provide a survey of recent developments in fluorescent soft nano-sized biological imaging agents. Various soft fluorescent nanoparticles (NPs) (including dye-doped polymer NPs, semiconducting polymer NPs, small-molecule organic NPs, nanogels, micelles, vesicles, and biomaterial-based NPs) are summarized from the perspectives of preparation methods, structure, optical properties, and surface functionalization. Based on both optical and functional properties of the nano-sized imaging agents, their applications are then reviewed in terms of in vitro imaging, in vivo imaging, and cellular-process imaging, by means of specific or nonspecific targeting.

  13. Soft fluorescent nanomaterials for biological and biomedical imaging

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peng, Hong-Shang; Chiu, Daniel T.

    2015-01-01

    Soft fluorescent nanomaterials have attracted recent attention as imaging agents for biological applications, because they provide the advantages of good biocompatibility, high brightness, and easy biofunctionalization. Here, we provide a survey of recent developments in fluorescent soft nano-sized biological imaging agents. Various soft fluorescent nanoparticles (NPs) (including dye-doped polymer NPs, semiconducting polymer NPs, small-molecule organic NPs, nanogels, micelles, vesicles, and biomaterial-based NPs) are summarized from the perspectives of preparation method, structure, optical property, and surface functionalization. Based on both optical and functional properties of the nano-sized imaging agents, their applications are then reviewed in terms of in vitro imaging, in vivo imaging, and cellular-process imaging, by means of specific or nonspecific targeting. PMID:25531691

  14. Two-photon directed evolution of green fluorescent proteins

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stoltzfus, Caleb R.; Barnett, Lauren M.; Drobizhev, Mikhail; Wicks, Geoffrey; Mikhaylov, Alexander; Hughes, Thomas E.; Rebane, Aleksander

    2015-07-01

    Directed evolution has been used extensively to improve the properties of a variety of fluorescent proteins (FPs). Evolutionary strategies, however, have not yet been used to improve the two-photon absorption (2PA) properties of a fluorescent protein, properties that are important for two-photon imaging in living tissues, including the brain. Here we demonstrate a technique for quantitatively screening the two-photon excited fluorescence (2PEF) efficiency and 2PA cross section of tens of thousands of mutant FPs expressed in E. coli colonies. We use this procedure to move EGFP through three rounds of two-photon directed evolution leading to new variants showing up to a 50% enhancement in peak 2PA cross section and brightness within the near-IR tissue transparency wavelength range.

  15. Microwave heating of arginine yields highly fluorescent nanoparticles

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Philippidis, Aggelos [Foundation for Research and Technology-Hellas, Institute of Electronic Structure and Laser (Greece); Stefanakis, Dimitrios [University of Crete, Department of Chemistry (Greece); Anglos, Demetrios, E-mail: anglos@iesl.forth.gr [Foundation for Research and Technology-Hellas, Institute of Electronic Structure and Laser (Greece); Ghanotakis, Demetrios, E-mail: ghanotakis@chemistry.uoc.gr [University of Crete, Department of Chemistry (Greece)

    2013-01-15

    Brightly fluorescent nanoparticles were produced via a single-step, single-precursor procedure based on microwave heating of an aqueous solution of the amino acid arginine. Key structural and optical properties of the resulting Arg nanoparticles, Arg-dots, are reported and discussed with emphasis on the pH dependence of their fluorescence emission. The surface of the Arg-dots was functionalised through coupling to folic acid, opening up ways for connecting fluorescent nanoparticles to cancer cells. The generality and versatility of the microwave heating procedure was further demonstrated by the synthesis of different types of carbon nanoparticles, such as CE-dots, that were produced by use of citric acid and ethanolamine as precursors and compared to the Arg-dots.

  16. Fluorescence Live Cell Imaging

    OpenAIRE

    Ettinger, Andreas; Wittmann, Torsten

    2014-01-01

    Fluorescence microscopy of live cells has become an integral part of modern cell biology. Fluorescent protein (FP) tags, live cell dyes, and other methods to fluorescently label proteins of interest provide a range of tools to investigate virtually any cellular process under the microscope. The two main experimental challenges in collecting meaningful live cell microscopy data are to minimize photodamage while retaining a useful signal-to-noise ratio and to provide a suitable environment for ...

  17. Influence of Type of Electric Bright Light on the Attraction of the African Giant Water Bug, Lethocerus indicus (Hemiptera: Belostomatidae

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Luke Chinaru Nwosu

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available This study investigated the influence of type of electric bright light (produced by fluorescent light tube and incandescent light bulb on the attraction of the African giant water bug, Lethocerus indicus (Hemiptera: Belostomatidae. Four fluorescent light tubes of 15 watts each, producing white-coloured light and four incandescent light bulbs of 60 watts each, producing yellow-coloured light, but both producing the same amount of light, were varied and used for the experiments. Collections of bugs at experimental house were done at night between the hours of 8.30 pm and 12 mid-night on daily basis for a period of four months per experiment in the years 2008 and 2009. Lethocerus indicus whose presence in any environment has certain implications was the predominant belostomatid bug in the area. Use of incandescent light bulbs in 2009 significantly attracted more Lethocerus indicus 103 (74.6% than use of fluorescent light tubes 35 (25.41% in 2008 [4.92=0.0001]. However, bug’s attraction to light source was not found sex dependent [>0.05; (>0.18=0.4286 and >0.28=0.3897]. Therefore, this study recommends the use of fluorescent light by households, campgrounds, and other recreational centres that are potentially exposed to the nuisance of the giant water bugs. Otherwise, incandescent light bulbs should be used when it is desired to attract the presence of these aquatic bugs either for food or scientific studies.

  18. A green fluorescent protein with photoswitchable emission from the deep sea.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alexander Vogt

    Full Text Available A colorful variety of fluorescent proteins (FPs from marine invertebrates are utilized as genetically encoded markers for live cell imaging. The increased demand for advanced imaging techniques drives a continuous search for FPs with new and improved properties. Many useful FPs have been isolated from species adapted to sun-flooded habitats such as tropical coral reefs. It has yet remained unknown if species expressing green fluorescent protein (GFP-like proteins also exist in the darkness of the deep sea. Using a submarine-based and -operated fluorescence detection system in the Gulf of Mexico, we discovered ceriantharians emitting bright green fluorescence in depths between 500 and 600 m and identified a GFP, named cerFP505, with bright fluorescence emission peaking at 505 nm. Spectroscopic studies showed that approximately 15% of the protein bulk feature reversible ON/OFF photoswitching that can be induced by alternating irradiation with blue und near-UV light. Despite being derived from an animal adapted to essentially complete darkness and low temperatures, cerFP505 maturation in living mammalian cells at 37 degrees C, its brightness and photostability are comparable to those of EGFP and cmFP512 from shallow water species. Therefore, our findings disclose the deep sea as a potential source of GFP-like molecular marker proteins.

  19. Fish with red fluorescent eyes forage more efficiently under dim, blue-green light conditions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harant, Ulrike Katharina; Michiels, Nicolaas Karel

    2017-04-20

    Natural red fluorescence is particularly conspicuous in the eyes of some small, benthic, predatory fishes. Fluorescence also increases in relative efficiency with increasing depth, which has generated speculation about its possible function as a "light organ" to detect cryptic organisms under bluish light. Here we investigate whether foraging success is improved under ambient conditions that make red fluorescence stand out more, using the triplefin Tripterygion delaisi as a model system. We repeatedly presented 10 copepods to individual fish (n = 40) kept under a narrow blue-green spectrum and compared their performance with that under a broad spectrum with the same overall brightness. The experiment was repeated for two levels of brightness, a shaded one representing 0.4% of the light present at the surface and a heavily shaded one with about 0.01% of the surface brightness. Fish were 7% more successful at catching copepods under the narrow, fluorescence-friendly spectrum than under the broad spectrum. However, this effect was significant under the heavily shaded light treatment only. This outcome corroborates previous predictions that fluorescence may be an adaptation to blue-green, heavily shaded environments, which coincides with the opportunistic biology of this species that lives in the transition zone between exposed and heavily shaded microhabitats.

  20. Matter-wave bright solitons in effective bichromatic lattice potentials

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Keywords. Bose–Einstein condensate; optical lattices; inhomogeneous nonlinearity. Abstract. Matter-wave bright solitons in bichromatic lattice potentials are considered and their dynamics for different lattice environments are studied. Bichromatic potentials are created from superpositions of (i) two linear optical lattices and ...

  1. Compact collimators for high brightness blue LEDs using dielectric multilayers

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Cornelissen, H.J.; Ma, H.; Ho, C.; Li, M.; Mu, C.

    2011-01-01

    A novel method is presented to inject the light of millimeter-sized high-brightness blue LEDs into light guides of submillimeter thickness. Use is made of an interference filter that is designed to pass only those modes that will propagate in the light guide by total internal reflection. Other modes

  2. Bright and dark soliton solutions of the (3+ 1)-dimensional ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    In this paper, we obtain the 1-soliton solutions of the (3 + 1)-dimensional generalized Kadomtsev–Petviashvili (gKP) equation and the generalized Benjamin equation. By using two solitary wave ansatz in terms of sech p and tanh p functions, we obtain exact analytical bright and dark soliton solutions for the considered ...

  3. Brightness perception in low resolution images of 3d textures

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Spreeuwers, Lieuwe Jan; van der Heijden, Ferdinand; Siteur, J.

    1996-01-01

    A first step towards the analysis of the appearance of 3 dimensional textures is presented in this paper. It is assumed that the scale of the texture is small relative to the resolution of the camera. Therefore, the texture itself is not distinguishable.However, the perceived brightness of the

  4. Reducing Color/Brightness Interaction in Color Television

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marchman, Robert H.

    1987-01-01

    Proposed digitally sampled scan-conversion scheme for color television reduces unwanted interactions between chrominance and luminance signals. New scheme reduces luminance and chrominance bandwidth to increase frequency separation between signals. To avoid proportionally reducing horizontal brightness resolution and horizontal color resolution, horizontal interlace of luminance signal and two color-difference signals used.

  5. The bright optical afterglow of the long GRB 001007

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ceron, J.M.C.; Castro-Tirado, A.J.; Gorosabel, J.

    2002-01-01

    We present optical follow up observations of the long GRB 001007 between 6.14 hours and similar to468 days after the event. An unusually bright optical afterglow (OA) was seen to decline following a steep power law decay with index alpha = -2.03 +/- 0.11, possibly indicating a break in the light ...

  6. The star-bright hour : [luuletused] / Betti Alver

    Index Scriptorium Estoniae

    Alver, Betti, 1906-1989

    2006-01-01

    Sisu: The star-bright hour ; Not a dream ; The Piper ; Corals in an ancent river. Luuletused pärinevad kogumikust "Tuulelaeval valgusest on aerud = Windship with Oars of Light. (Tallinn : Huma, 2001). Orig.: Tähetund ; Mitte viirastus, meelepett ; Vilepuhuja ; Korallid Emajões

  7. Time series analysis of bright galactic X-ray sources

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Priedhorsky, W. C.; Brandt, Søren; Lund, Niels

    1995-01-01

    We analyze 70 to 110 day data sets from eight bright galactic X-ray binaries observed by WATCH/Eureca, in search of periodic variations. We obtain new epochs for the orbital variation of Cyg X-3 and 4U 1700-37, and confirmation of a dip in Cyg X-1 at superior conjunction of the X-ray star. No evi...

  8. Bright infrared LEDs based on colloidal quantum-dots

    KAUST Repository

    Sun, Liangfeng

    2013-01-01

    Record-brightness infrared LEDs based on colloidal quantum-dots have been achieved through control of the spacing between adjacent quantum-dots. By tuning the size of quantum-dots, the emission wavelengths can be tuned between 900nm and 1650nm. © 2013 Materials Research Society.

  9. Bright soliton trains of trapped Bose-Einstein condensates

    OpenAIRE

    Al Khawaja, U.; Stoof, H.T C; Hulet, R. G.; Strecker, K. E.; Patridge, G.B.

    2002-01-01

    We variationally determine the dynamics of bright soliton trains composed of harmonically trapped Bose-Einstein condensates with attractive interatomic interactions. In particular, we obtain the interaction potential between two solitons. We also discuss the formation of soliton trains due to the quantum mechanical phase fluctuations of a one-dimensional condensate.

  10. RESPONSES OF BRIGHT, NORMAL, AND RETARDED CHILDREN TO LEARNING TASKS.

    Science.gov (United States)

    CARRIER, NEIL A.; AND OTHERS

    THE RELATIONSHIPS AMONG THE VARIABLES OF INTELLIGENCE, LEARNING TASK PERFORMANCE, EMOTIONAL TENSION, AND TASK MOTIVATION WERE STUDIED. ABOUT 120 BRIGHT, NORMAL, AND RETARDED CHILDREN PERFORMED SIX TRIALS OF NUMBER LEARNING, CONCEPT FORMATION, PROBLEM SOLVING, PERCEPTUAL-MOTOR COORDINATION, AND VERBAL LEARNING TASKS. DURING THE LEARNING SESSIONS,…

  11. Spectral Index Changes with Brightness for -Ray Loud Blazars

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Theoretic relation of spectral index changes depending on -ray brightness is obtained. The correlations between the ratio of -ray flux densities and the differences of the -ray spectral indices are discussed for the three subclasses of HBL, LBL and FSRQs. Results show that the ratio is related with the differences for the ...

  12. Bright soliton trains of trapped Bose-Einstein condensates

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Al Khawaja, U.; Stoof, H.T.C.; Hulet, R.G.; Strecker, K.E.; Patridge, G.B.

    2002-01-01

    We variationally determine the dynamics of bright soliton trains composed of harmonically trapped Bose-Einstein condensates with attractive interatomic interactions. In particular, we obtain the interaction potential between two solitons. We also discuss the formation of soliton trains due to the

  13. Henrietta Leavitt - A Bright Star of Astronomy; Resonance June 2001

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    In fact, it was not known then that we live in a galaxy called the Milky Way, and that there were other galaxies in the universe like ours. This big handicap was elegantly removed by a momentous discovery by an American astronomer named Henrietta. Leavitt in 1912. She found a way to determine the actual brightness of a ...

  14. The star-bright hour : [poems] / Betti Alver

    Index Scriptorium Estoniae

    Alver, Betti, 1906-1989

    2003-01-01

    Autori lühitutvustus lk. 231. Sisu: The star-bright hour ; The debt ; Not a dream ; Fog-bound ; Corals in an Ancient river ; Frou-frou 1-3. Orig.: Tähetund ; Vilepuhuja ; Võlg ; "Mitte viirastus, meelepett..." ; Udus ; Korallid Emajões ; Froufrou 1-3

  15. Stability of bright solitons in some physical systems

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pelap, Francois B [Department of Physics, Faculty of Science, University of Dschang, P O Box 69, Dschang (Cameroon); Talla, Pierre K [Department of Physics, Faculty of Science, University of Dschang, P O Box 69, Dschang (Cameroon); Tchitnga, Robert [Department of Physics, Faculty of Science, University of Dschang, P O Box 69, Dschang (Cameroon); Faye, Mansour M [Departement de Physique, Faculte des Sciences et Techniques, Universite Cheikh Anta DIOP de Dakar, BP 5005, Dakar - Fann (Senegal)

    2007-02-15

    Dynamical systems described by the modified quintic complex Ginzburg Landau equation and its derivative forms are considered and the stability of their bright soliton solution is investigated numerically by means of the split-step Fourier method. Some discussions related to the way of ensuring the stability of this solution are presented.

  16. Does bright light have an anxiolytic effect? - an open trial

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kripke Daniel F

    2007-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The aim of this open trial was to examine the influence of acute bright light exposure on anxiety in older and young adults. Methods This study was ancillary to a complex 5-day laboratory experiment testing phase-responses to light at all times of the day. On 3 consecutive days, participants were exposed to bright light (3,000 lux for 3 hours. The Spielberger State-Trait Anxiety Inventory (Form Y1 was administered 5 minutes before and 20 minutes after each treatment. Mean state anxiety before and after treatment were analyzed by age, sex, and time ANOVA. To avoid floor effects, only participants with baseline STAI levels of ≥ 25 were included. Results A significant anxiolytic effect of bright light was found for the mean data, as well as for each of the three days. No significant main effect of age, sex, or interaction of these factors with STAI change were found. Conclusion The results show consistent and significant (albeit modest anxiolytic effects following acute bright light exposure in low anxiety adults. Further randomized, controlled trials in clinically anxious individuals are needed.

  17. Modeling laser brightness from cross porro prism resonators

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Forbes, A

    2006-07-01

    Full Text Available Laser brightness is a parameter often used to compare high power laser beam delivery from various sources, and incorporates both the power contained in the particular mode, as well as the propagation of that mode through the beam quality factor, M2...

  18. Giant Low Surface Brightness Galaxies: Evolution in Isolation M. Das

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Abstract. Giant Low Surface Brightness (GLSB) galaxies are amongst the most massive spiral galaxies that we know of in our Universe. Although they fall in the class of late type spiral galaxies, their properties are far more extreme. They have very faint stellar disks that are extremely rich in neutral hydrogen gas but low in ...

  19. Giant Low Surface Brightness Galaxies: Evolution in Isolation

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    2016-01-27

    Jan 27, 2016 ... Giant Low Surface Brightness (GLSB) galaxies are amongst the most massive spiral galaxies that we know of in our Universe. Although they fall in the class of late type spiral galaxies, their properties are far more extreme. They have very faint stellar disks that are extremely rich in neutral hydrogen gas but ...

  20. Evaluation of brightness temperature from a forward model of ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Ground-based microwave radiometers are getting great attention in recent years due to their capability to profile the temperature and humidity at high temporal and vertical resolution in the lower troposphere. The process of retrieving these parameters from the measurements of radiometric brightness temperature () ...

  1. Quadrature measurements of a bright squeezed state via sideband swapping

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Schneider, J.; Glockl, O.; Leuchs, G.

    2009-01-01

    The measurement of an arbitrary quadrature of a bright quantum state of light is a commonly requested action in many quantum information protocols, but it is experimentally challenging with previously proposed schemes. We suggest that the quadrature be measured at a specific sideband frequency of...

  2. The "Brightness Rules" Alternative Conception for Light Bulb Circuits

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bryan, Joel A.; Stuessy, Carol

    2006-01-01

    An alternative conception for the observed differences in light bulb brightness was revealed during an unguided inquiry investigation in which prospective elementary teachers placed identical bulbs in series, parallel, and combination direct current circuits. Classroom observations, document analyses, and video and audio transcriptions led to the…

  3. Protocol of networks using energy sharing collisions of bright solitons

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Soliton network; coupled nonlinear Schrödinger system; bright soliton; soliton collision. PACS Nos 42.65.Tg; 02.30. .... CNLS equations, we shall explore the dynamics of solitons in simple networks, i.e., PSG. In §4, the conclusion is ...... KS thank the Principal and management of Bishop Heber College for constant support.

  4. SKYMONITOR: A Global Network for Sky Brightness Measurements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Davis, Donald R.; Mckenna, D.; Pulvermacher, R.; Everett, M.

    2010-01-01

    We are implementing a global network to measure sky brightness at dark-sky critical sites with the goal of creating a multi-decade database. The heart of this project is the Night Sky Brightness Monitor (NSBM), an autonomous 2 channel photometer which measures night sky brightness in the visual wavelengths (Mckenna et al, AAS 2009). Sky brightness is measured every minute at two elevation angles typically zenith and 20 degrees to monitor brightness and transparency. The NSBM consists of two parts, a remote unit and a base station with an internet connection. Currently these devices use 2.4 Ghz transceivers with a range of 100 meters. The remote unit is battery powered with daytime recharging using a solar panel. Data received by the base unit is transmitted via email protocol to IDA offices in Tucson where it will be collected, archived and made available to the user community via a web interface. Two other versions of the NSBM are under development: one for radio sensitive areas using an optical fiber link and the second that reads data directly to a laptop for sites without internet access. NSBM units are currently undergoing field testing at two observatories. With support from the National Science Foundation, we will construct and install a total of 10 units at astronomical observatories. With additional funding, we will locate additional units at other sites such as National Parks, dark-sky preserves and other sites where dark sky preservation is crucial. We will present the current comparison with the National Park Service sky monitoring camera. We anticipate that the SKYMONITOR network will be functioning by the end of 2010.

  5. Experiments with Fluorescent Lamps

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kraftmakher, Yaakov

    2010-10-01

    The experiments described below show the irradiance and illuminance spectra of two fluorescent lamps in relation to their color temperatures, and the efficacy in comparison to that of an incandescent lamp. Spectra of "warm white" and "cool daylight" fluorescent lamps are demonstrated.

  6. LEDs for fluorescence microscopy

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Young, I.T.; Garini, Y.; Dietrich, H.R.C.; Van Oel, W.; Liqui Lung, G.

    2004-01-01

    Traditional light sources for fluorescence microscopy have been mercury lamps, xenon lamps, and lasers. These sources have been essential in the development of fluorescence microscopy but each can have serious disadvantages: lack of near monochromaticity, heat generation, cost, lifetime of the light

  7. Membranes and Fluorescence microscopy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bagatolli, Luis

    2009-01-01

    Fluorescence spectroscopy-based techniques using conventional fluorimeters have been extensively applied since the late 1960s to study different aspects of membrane-related phenomena, i.e., mainly relating to lipid-lipid and lipid-protein (peptide) interactions. Even though fluorescence...

  8. Synthesis and Characterization of Far-Red/NIR-Fluorescent BODIPY Dyes, Solid-State Fluorescence, and Application as Fluorescent Tags Attached to Carbon Nano-onions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bartelmess, Juergen; Baldrighi, Michele; Nardone, Valentina; Parisini, Emilio; Buck, David; Echegoyen, Luis; Giordani, Silvia

    2015-06-26

    A series of π-extended distyryl-substituted boron dipyrromethene (BODIPY) derivatives with intense far-red/near-infrared (NIR) fluorescence was synthesized and characterized, with a view to enhance the dye's performance for fluorescence labeling. An enhanced brightness was achieved by the introduction of two methyl substituents in the meso positions on the phenyl group of the BODIPY molecule; these substituents resulted in increased structural rigidity. Solid-state fluorescence was observed for one of the distyryl-substituted BODIPY derivatives. The introduction of a terminal bromo substituent allows for the subsequent immobilization of the BODIPY fluorophore on the surface of carbon nano-onions (CNOs), which leads to potential imaging agents for biological and biomedical applications. The far-red/NIR-fluorescent CNO nanoparticles were characterized by absorption, fluorescence, and Raman spectroscopies, as well as by thermogravimetric analysis, dynamic light scattering, high-resolution transmission electron microscopy, and confocal microscopy. © 2015 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  9. Multicolor, Fluorescent Supercapacitor Fiber.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liao, Meng; Sun, Hao; Zhang, Jing; Wu, Jingxia; Xie, Songlin; Fu, Xuemei; Sun, Xuemei; Wang, Bingjie; Peng, Huisheng

    2017-10-05

    Fiber-shaped supercapacitors have attracted broad attentions from both academic and industrial communities due to the demonstrated potentials as next-generation power modules. However, it is important while remains challenging to develop dark-environment identifiable supercapacitor fibers for enhancement on operation convenience and security in nighttime applications. Herein, a novel family of colorful fluorescent supercapacitor fibers has been produced from aligned multi-walled carbon nanotube sheets. Fluorescent dye particles are introduced and stably anchored on the surfaces of aligned multi-walled carbon nanotubes to prepare hybrid fiber electrodes with a broad range of colors from red to purple. The fluorescent component in the dye introduces fluorescent indication capability to the fiber, which is particularly promising for flexible and wearable devices applied in dark environment. In addition, the colorful fluorescent supercapacitor fibers also maintain high electrochemical performance under cyclic bending and charge-discharge processes. © 2017 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  10. Detection of Hg2+ in water environment by fluorescence spectroscopic methods

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Zhen; Zhang, Jinsong; Hu, Hong; Wan, Ruyi; Yao, Youwei

    2015-08-01

    Inorganic mercury (Hg2+) produces toxic effects even at very low concentration. High sensitive fluorescent probes for Hg2+ detection has been researched and synthesized. A fluorescence detection system is built for Hg2+ detection in water environment with fluorescent probes as the detection reagent. Fiber coupled LED with high brightness is developed and used as excitation light source. And the optimized excitation wavelength is about 520 nm. The measurements of fluorescence spectra is obtained by means of optical fiber spectroscopic techniques. Fluorescence detection experiments are carried out for a range of different concentrations of Hg2+ in aqueous solutions. The center wavelength of the fluorescence spectra is about 580 nm which is unchanged in the experiments. Relationship between Hg2+ concentrations and the fluorescence intensity is studied. A positive correlation exists between the intensity of fluorescence spectrum and the concentrations of Hg2+. The fluorescence intensity grows with increasing the concentration of Hg2+ for the same excitation light. When the concentration of Hg2+ is high enough, the fluorescence intensity increases slowly. And a numerical model is built for the concentration calculating. The detection limit is 0.005 μmol/L in the experiments. The Hg2+ detection system reported has many advantages such as small size, rapid response, high-sensitivity, and can be used for on-site testing of the water quality.

  11. Photo- and Bio-physical Studies of Lectin-Conjugated Fluorescent Nanoparticles: Reduced Sensitivity in High Density Assays

    OpenAIRE

    Wang, Yaqi; Gildersleeve, Jeffrey C.; Basu, Amit; Zimmt, Matthew B.

    2010-01-01

    Lectin conjugated, fluorescent silica nanoparticles (fNP) have been developed for carbohydrate based histopathology evaluations of epithelial tissue biopsies. The fNP platform was selected for its enhanced emissive brightness compared to direct dye labeling. Carbohydrate microarray studies were performed to compare the carbohydrate selectivity of the mannose recognizing lectin Concanavalin A (ConA) before and after conjugation to fluorescent silica nanoparticles (ConA-fNP). These studies reve...

  12. Dimerization-Dependent Green and Yellow Fluorescent Proteins

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alford, Spencer C.; Ding, Yidan; Simmen, Thomas; Campbell, Robert E.

    2012-01-01

    Dimerization-dependent fluorescent proteins (ddFP) are a recently introduced class of genetically encoded reporters that can be used for the detection of protein interactions in live cells. The progenitor of this class of tools was a red fluorescent ddFP (ddRFP) derived from a homodimeric variant of Discosoma red fluorescent protein. Here, we describe the engineering and application of an expanded palette of ddFPs, which includes green (ddGFP) and yellow (ddYFP) variants. These optimized variants offer several advantages relative to ddRFP including increased in vitro contrast and brightness for ddGFP and increased brightness and a lowered pKa for ddYFP. We demonstrate that both variants are useful as biosensors for protease activity in live cells. Using the ddGFP tool, we generated a highly effective indicator of endomembrane proximity that can be used to image the mitochondria-associated membrane (MAM) interface of endoplasmic reticulum (ER) and mitochondria. PMID:23656278

  13. Dimerization-dependent green and yellow fluorescent proteins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alford, Spencer C; Ding, Yidan; Simmen, Thomas; Campbell, Robert E

    2012-12-21

    Dimerization-dependent fluorescent proteins (ddFP) are a recently introduced class of genetically encoded reporters that can be used for the detection of protein interactions in live cells. The progenitor of this class of tools was a red fluorescent ddFP (ddRFP) derived from a homodimeric variant of Discosoma red fluorescent protein. Here, we describe the engineering and application of an expanded palette of ddFPs, which includes green (ddGFP) and yellow (ddYFP) variants. These optimized variants offer several advantages relative to ddRFP including increased in vitro contrast and brightness for ddGFP and increased brightness and a lowered pK a for ddYFP. We demonstrate that both variants are useful as biosensors for protease activity in live cells. Using the ddGFP tool, we generated a highly effective indicator of endomembrane proximity that can be used to image the mitochondria-associated membrane (MAM) interface of endoplasmic reticulum (ER) and mitochondria.

  14. Fluorescence and Spectral Imaging

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ralph S. DaCosta

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available Early identification of dysplasia remains a critical goal for diagnostic endoscopy since early discovery directly improves patient survival because it allows endoscopic or surgical intervention with disease localized without lymph node involvement. Clinical studies have successfully used tissue autofluorescence with conventional white light endoscopy and biopsy for detecting adenomatous colonic polyps, differentiating benign hyperplastic from adenomas with acceptable sensitivity and specificity. In Barrett's esophagus, the detection of dysplasia remains problematic because of background inflammation, whereas in the squamous esophagus, autofluorescence imaging appears to be more dependable. Point fluorescence spectroscopy, although playing a crucial role in the pioneering mechanistic development of fluorescence endoscopic imaging, does not seem to have a current function in endoscopy because of its nontargeted sampling and suboptimal sensitivity and specificity. Other point spectroscopic modalities, such as Raman spectroscopy and elastic light scattering, continue to be evaluated in clinical studies, but still suffer the significant disadvantages of being random and nonimaging. A recent addition to the fluorescence endoscopic imaging arsenal is the use of confocal fluorescence endomicroscopy, which provides real-time optical biopsy for the first time. To improve detection of dysplasia in the gastrointestinal tract, a new and exciting development has been the use of exogenous fluorescence contrast probes that specifically target a variety of disease-related cellular biomarkers using conventional fluorescent dyes and novel potent fluorescent nanocrystals (i.e., quantum dots. This is an area of great promise, but still in its infancy, and preclinical studies are currently under way.

  15. Highly thermostable fluorescent proteins

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bradbury, Andrew M [Santa Fe, NM; Waldo, Geoffrey S [Santa Fe, NM; Kiss, Csaba [Los Alamos, NM

    2012-05-01

    Thermostable fluorescent proteins (TSFPs), methods for generating these and other stability-enhanced proteins, polynucleotides encoding such proteins, and assays and method for using the TSFPs and TSFP-encoding nucleic acid molecules are provided. The TSFPs of the invention show extremely enhanced levels of stability and thermotolerance. In one case, for example, a TSFP of the invention is so stable it can be heated to 99.degree. C. for short periods of time without denaturing, and retains 85% of its fluorescence when heated to 80.degree. C. for several minutes. The invention also provides a method for generating stability-enhanced variants of a protein, including but not limited to fluorescent proteins.

  16. Fluorescent discharge lamp

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mukai, E.; Otsuka, H.; Nomi, K.; Honmo, I.

    1982-01-01

    A rapidly illuminating fluorescent lamp 1,200 mm long and 32.5 mm in diameter with an interior conducting strip which is compatible with conventional fixtures and ballasts is described. The fluorescent lamp is composed of a linear glass tube, electrodes sealed at both ends, mercury and raregas sealed in the glass tube, a fluorescent substance clad on the inner walls of the glass tube, and a clad conducting strip extending the entire length of the glass tube in the axial direction on the inner surface of the tube.

  17. Fluorescent discharge lamp

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mukai, E.; Otsuka, H.; Nomi, K.; Honmo, I.

    1982-07-01

    A rapidly illuminating fluorescent lamp 1,200 mm long and 32.5 mm in diameter with an interior conducting strip which is compatible with conventional fixtures and ballasts is described. The fluorescent lamp is composed of a linear glass tube, electrodes sealed at both ends, mercury and raregas sealed in the glass tube, a fluorescent substance clad on the inner walls of the glass tube, and a clad conducting strip extending the entire length of the glass tube in the axial direction on the inner surface of the tube.

  18. Highly thermostable fluorescent proteins

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bradbury, Andrew M [Santa Fe, NM; Waldo, Geoffrey S [Santa Fe, NM; Kiss, Csaba [Los Alamos, NM

    2011-03-22

    Thermostable fluorescent proteins (TSFPs), methods for generating these and other stability-enhanced proteins, polynucleotides encoding such proteins, and assays and method for using the TSFPs and TSFP-encoding nucleic acid molecules are provided. The TSFPs of the invention show extremely enhanced levels of stability and thermotolerance. In one case, for example, a TSFP of the invention is so stable it can be heated to 99.degree. C. for short periods of time without denaturing, and retains 85% of its fluorescence when heated to 80.degree. C. for several minutes. The invention also provides a method for generating stability-enhanced variants of a protein, including but not limited to fluorescent proteins.

  19. Extremely High Current, High-Brightness Energy Recovery Linac

    CERN Document Server

    Ben-Zvi, Ilan; Beavis, Dana; Blaskiewicz, Michael; Bluem, Hans; Brennan, Joseph M; Burger, Al; Burrill, Andrew; Calaga, Rama; Cameron, Peter; Chang, Xiangyun; Cole, Michael; Connolly, Roger; Delayen, Jean R; Favale, Anthony; Gassner, David M; Grimes, Jacob T; Hahn, Harald; Hershcovitch, Ady; Holmes, Douglas; Hseuh Hsiao Chaun; Johnson, Peter; Kayran, Dmitry; Kewisch, Jorg; Kneisel, Peter; Lambiase, Robert; Litvinenko, Vladimir N; McIntyre, Gary; Meng, Wuzheng; Nehring, Thomas; Nicoletti, Tony; Oerter, Brian; Pate, David; Phillips, Larry; Preble, Joseph P; Rank, Jim; Rao, Triveni; Rathke, John; Roser, Thomas; Russo, Thomas; Scaduto, Joseph; Schultheiss, Tom; Segalov, Zvi; Smith, Kevin T; Todd, Alan M M; Warren-Funk, L; Williams, Neville; Wu, Kuo-Chen; Yakimenko, Vitaly; Yip, Kin; Zaltsman, Alex; Zhao, Yongxiang

    2005-01-01

    Next generation ERL light-sources, high-energy electron coolers, high-power Free-Electron Lasers, powerful Compton X-ray sources and many other accelerators were made possible by the emerging technology of high-power, high-brightness electron beams. In order to get the anticipated performance level of ampere-class currents, many technological barriers are yet to be broken. BNL's Collider-Accelerator Department is pursuing some of these technologies for its electron cooling of RHIC application, as well as a possible future electron-hadron collider. We will describe work on CW, high-current and high-brightness electron beams. This will include a description of a superconducting, laser-photocathode RF gun and an accelerator cavity capable of producing low emittance (about 1 micron rms normalized) one nano-Coulomb bunches at currents of the order of one ampere average.

  20. Bright breathers in nonlinear left-handed metamaterial lattices

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koukouloyannis, V.; Kevrekidis, P. G.; Veldes, G. P.; Frantzeskakis, D. J.; DiMarzio, D.; Lan, X.; Radisic, V.

    2018-02-01

    In the present work, we examine a prototypical model for the formation of bright breathers in nonlinear left-handed metamaterial lattices. Utilizing the paradigm of nonlinear transmission lines, we build a relevant lattice and develop a quasi-continuum multiscale approximation that enables us to appreciate both the underlying linear dispersion relation and the potential for bifurcation of nonlinear states. We focus here, more specifically, on bright discrete breathers which bifurcate from the lower edge of the linear dispersion relation at wavenumber k=π . Guided by the multiscale analysis, we calculate numerically both the stable inter-site centered and the unstable site-centered members of the relevant family. We quantify the associated stability via Floquet analysis and the Peierls-Nabarro barrier of the energy difference between these branches. Finally, we explore the dynamical implications of these findings towards the potential mobility or lack thereof (pinning) of such breather solutions.

  1. Improvement in brightness of multicusp-plasma ion source

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ji, Q.; Jiang, X.; King, T-J.; Leung, K-N.; Standiford, K.; Wilde, S.B.

    2002-05-24

    The beam brightness of a multicusp-plasma ion source has been substantially improved by optimizing the source configuration and extractor geometry. The current density of a 2 keV He{sup +} beam extracted from a 7.5-cm-diameter source operating at 2.5 kW RF power is {approx}100 mA/cm{sup 2}, which is {approx}10 times larger than that of a beam extracted from a 5-cm-diameter source operating at 1 kW RF power. A smaller focused beam spot size is achieved with a counter-bored extractor instead of a conventional (''through-hole'') extractor, resulting another order of magnitude improvement in beam current density. Measured brightness can be as high as 440 A/cm{sup 2}Sr, which represents a 30 times improvement over prior work.

  2. The ASAS-SN bright supernova catalogue - III. 2016

    Science.gov (United States)

    Holoien, T. W.-S.; Brown, J. S.; Stanek, K. Z.; Kochanek, C. S.; Shappee, B. J.; Prieto, J. L.; Dong, Subo; Brimacombe, J.; Bishop, D. W.; Bose, S.; Beacom, J. F.; Bersier, D.; Chen, Ping; Chomiuk, L.; Falco, E.; Godoy-Rivera, D.; Morrell, N.; Pojmanski, G.; Shields, J. V.; Strader, J.; Stritzinger, M. D.; Thompson, Todd A.; Woźniak, P. R.; Bock, G.; Cacella, P.; Conseil, E.; Cruz, I.; Fernandez, J. M.; Kiyota, S.; Koff, R. A.; Krannich, G.; Marples, P.; Masi, G.; Monard, L. A. G.; Nicholls, B.; Nicolas, J.; Post, R. S.; Stone, G.; Wiethoff, W. S.

    2017-11-01

    This catalogue summarizes information for all supernovae discovered by the All-Sky Automated Survey for SuperNovae (ASAS-SN) and all other bright (mpeak ≤ 17), spectroscopically confirmed supernovae discovered in 2016. We then gather the near-infrared through ultraviolet magnitudes of all host galaxies and the offsets of the supernovae from the centres of their hosts from public data bases. We illustrate the results using a sample that now totals 668 supernovae discovered since 2014 May 1, including the supernovae from our previous catalogues, with type distributions closely matching those of the ideal magnitude limited sample from Li et al. This is the third of a series of yearly papers on bright supernovae and their hosts from the ASAS-SN team.

  3. Changes in the brightness of Jupiter's hemispheres again become periodic

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vidmachenko, A. P.

    2017-05-01

    Our analysis of data on relative brightness distribution along the central meridian of Jupiter showed that the ratio of brightness of northern and southern tropical zones Aj=BNTrZ/BSTrZ is a good index of activity of processes in Jovian atmosphere. In the years when the influence of solar activity is synchronized with the seasonal changes of irradiation of the northern and southern hemisphere, we note an increasing of the correlation of the activity index Aj with the periodic curve for change of distance to Sun at moving of planet on orbit. Analysis of Jupiter's images obtained in 2014-2017 showed, that if in 1998-2013 synchronization of change the Aj with the curve of change distance to the Sun when the planet moved on orbit, was somewhat disrupted; but in 2015-2017 such a correlation began to recover.

  4. Origin of low surface brightness galaxies: a dynamical study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garg, Prerak; Banerjee, Arunima

    2017-11-01

    Low Surface Brightness Galaxies (LSBs), inspite of being gas rich, have low star formation rates and are therefore low surface brightness in nature. We calculate QRW, the 2-component disc stability parameter as proposed by Romeo & Wiegert, as a function of galactocentric radius R for a sample of five LSBs, for which mass models, as obtained from HI 21cm radio-synthesis observations and R-band photometry, were available in the literature. We find that the median value of Q_{RW}^{min}, the minimum of QRW over R, lies between 2.6 and 3.1 for our sample LSBs, which is higher than the median value of 1.8 ± 0.3 for Q_{RW}^{min} for a sample of high surface brightness galaxies (HSBs) as obtained in earlier studies. This clearly shows that LSBs have more stable discs than HSBs, which could explain their low star formation rates and, possibly, their low surface brightness nature. Interestingly, the calculated values of QRW decrease only slightly (median Q_{RW}^{min} ˜ 2.3-3) if the discs were taken to respond to the gravitational potential of the dark matter halo only, but reduce by ˜ a factor of 2-3 (median Q_{RW}^{min} ˜ 0.7-1.5) if they respond to their self-gravity alone. This implies that the dark matter halo is crucial in regulating disc stability in LSBs, which may have important implications for models of galaxy formation and evolution.

  5. Snap-shot survey of compact, radio-bright SNRs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garmire, Gordon

    2008-09-01

    We propose to observe a set of radio-bright remnants (SNRs) previously unobserved in X-rays. The SNRs have flat, non-thermal spectra suggesting efficient particle acceleration at the shock front. We also expect to find new pulsars or neutron stars within these remnants. These makes the selected SNRs good candidates for future TeV and GeV detections. The selected SNRs are also compact enough to be imaged within the ACIS-I field of view.

  6. Facilitating the Transition from Bright to Dim Environments

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-03-04

    librarian or other person designated to request documents from DTIC. Change of Address Organizations receiving reports from the U.S. Army...USAARL Report No. 2016-17 Facilitating the Transition from Bright to Dim Environments By David Walsh1, Morris R. Lattimore1, David L. Still1... ORGANIZATION NAME(S) AND ADDRESS(ES) 8. PERFORMING ORGANIZATION REPORT NUMBER 9. SPONSORING/MONITORING AGENCY NAME(S) AND ADDRESS(ES) 10. SPONSOR/MONITOR’S

  7. Human Adolescent Phase Response Curves to Bright White Light.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Crowley, Stephanie J; Eastman, Charmane I

    2017-08-01

    Older adolescents are particularly vulnerable to circadian misalignment and sleep restriction, primarily due to early school start times. Light can shift the circadian system and could help attenuate circadian misalignment; however, a phase response curve (PRC) to determine the optimal time for receiving light and avoiding light is not available for adolescents. We constructed light PRCs for late pubertal to postpubertal adolescents aged 14 to 17 years. Participants completed 2 counterbalanced 5-day laboratory sessions after 8 or 9 days of scheduled sleep at home. Each session included phase assessments to measure the dim light melatonin onset (DLMO) before and after 3 days of free-running through an ultradian light-dark (wake-sleep) cycle (2 h dim [~20 lux] light, 2 h dark). In one session, intermittent bright white light (~5000 lux; four 20-min exposures) was alternated with 10 min of dim room light once per day for 3 consecutive days. The time of light varied among participants to cover the 24-h day. For each individual, the phase shift to bright light was corrected for the free-run derived from the other laboratory session with no bright light. One PRC showed phase shifts in response to light start time relative to the DLMO and another relative to home sleep. Phase delay shifts occurred around the hours corresponding to home bedtime. Phase advances occurred during the hours surrounding wake time and later in the afternoon. The transition from delays to advances occurred at the midpoint of home sleep. The adolescent PRCs presented here provide a valuable tool to time bright light in adolescents.

  8. Near-Real-Time DMSP SSM/I-SSMIS Daily Polar Gridded Brightness Temperatures

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — The Near-Real-Time DMSP SSM/I-SSMIS Daily Polar Gridded Brightness Temperature product provides near-real-time brightness temperatures for both the Northern and...

  9. Cell structure imaging with bright and homogeneous nanometric light source.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fukuta, Masahiro; Ono, Atsushi; Nawa, Yasunori; Inami, Wataru; Shen, Lin; Kawata, Yoshimasa; Terekawa, Susumu

    2017-04-01

    Label-free optical nano-imaging of dendritic structures and intracellular granules in biological cells is demonstrated using a bright and homogeneous nanometric light source. The optical nanometric light source is excited using a focused electron beam. A zinc oxide (ZnO) luminescent thin film was fabricated by atomic layer deposition (ALD) to produce the nanoscale light source. The ZnO film formed by ALD emitted the bright, homogeneous light, unlike that deposited by another method. The dendritic structures of label-free macrophage receptor with collagenous structure-expressing CHO cells were clearly visualized below the diffraction limit. The inner fiber structure was observed with 120 nm spatial resolution. Because the bright homogeneous emission from the ZnO film suppresses the background noise, the signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) for the imaging results was greater than 10. The ALD method helps achieve an electron beam excitation assisted microscope with high spatial resolution and high SNR. © 2017 Wiley-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  10. Death of Darkness: Artificial Sky Brightness in the Anthropocene

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zender, C. S.

    2016-12-01

    Many species (including ours) need darkness to survive and thrive yet light pollution in the anthropocene has received scant attention in Earth System Models (ESMs). Anthropogenic aerosols can brighten background sky brightness and reduce the contrast between skylight and starlight. These are both aesthetic and health-related issues due to their accompanying disruption of circadian rhythms. We quantify aerosol contributions to light pollution using a single-column night sky model, NiteLite, suitable for implementation in ESMs. NiteLite accounts for physiologcal (photopic and scotopic vision, retinal diameter/age), anthropogenic (light and aerosol pollution properties), and natural (surface albedo, trace gases) effects on background brightness and threshold visibility. We find that stratospheric aerosol injection contemplated as a stop-gap measure to counter global warming would increase night-sky brightness by about 25%, and thus eliminate last pristine dark sky areas on Earth. Our results suggest that ESMs incorporate light pollution so that associated societal impacts can be better quantified and included in policy deliberations.

  11. Bright Soil Churned by Spirit's Sol 1861 Drive

    Science.gov (United States)

    2009-01-01

    NASA's Mars Exploration Rover Spirit drove 22.7 meters (74 feet) toward the southwest on the 1,861st Martian day, or sol, of Spirit's mission on Mars (March 28, 2009). After the drive, the rover took this image with its front hazard-avoidance camera, looking back at the tracks from the drive. As usual since losing the use of its right-front wheel in 2006, Spirit drove backwards. The immobile right-front wheel churned up a long stripe of bright soil during this drive. Where Spirit has found such bright soil in the past, subsequent analysis of the composition found concentrations of sulfur or silica that testified to past action of water at the site. When members of the rover team saw the large quantity of bright soil exposed by the Sol 1861 drive, they quickly laid plans to investigate the composition with Spirit's alpha particle X-ray spectrometer. The Sol 1861 drive took the rover past the northwest corner of the low plateau called 'Home Plate,' making progress on a route around the western side of Home Plate. The edge of Home Plate forms the horizon on the right side of this image. Husband Hill is on the horizon on the left side. For scale, the parallel rover wheel tracks are about 1 meter (40 inches) apart. The rover's hazard-avoidance cameras take 'fisheye' wide-angle images.

  12. Achromatic form perception is based on luminance, not brightness.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shioiri, S; Cavanagh, P

    1992-10-01

    Two figures were examined, one a subjective disk and the other a cup whose shape was revealed by shadows. The figures were presented in a single color on a background of a different color, and the observers adjusted the radiance of one color until, in the first case, the vividness of the subjective contour reached a minimum (minimum subjective contour) or, in the second case, the impression of depth that is due to shadows disappeared (shadow disappearance). The results for these two tasks followed the data for minimum flicker matches (made with the same stimuli) much more closely than those for direct brightness matching. We therefore claim that achromatic form perception in general and subjective contour and shadow perception in particular are based on the intensity dimension measured by flicker photometry, not on that measured by brightness matching. Finally, in agreement with these findings, bleaching of short-wavelength sensitive cones did not affect settings for subjective contours, shadows, or flicker photometry but did affect brightness matching.

  13. SMOS brightness temperature assimilation into the Community Land Model

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    D. Rains

    2017-11-01

    Full Text Available SMOS (Soil Moisture and Ocean Salinity mission brightness temperatures at a single incident angle are assimilated into the Community Land Model (CLM across Australia to improve soil moisture simulations. Therefore, the data assimilation system DasPy is coupled to the local ensemble transform Kalman filter (LETKF as well as to the Community Microwave Emission Model (CMEM. Brightness temperature climatologies are precomputed to enable the assimilation of brightness temperature anomalies, making use of 6 years of SMOS data (2010–2015. Mean correlation R with in situ measurements increases moderately from 0.61 to 0.68 (11 % for upper soil layers if the root zone is included in the updates. A reduced improvement of 5 % is achieved if the assimilation is restricted to the upper soil layers. Root-zone simulations improve by 7 % when updating both the top layers and root zone, and by 4 % when only updating the top layers. Mean increments and increment standard deviations are compared for the experiments. The long-term assimilation impact is analysed by looking at a set of quantiles computed for soil moisture at each grid cell. Within hydrological monitoring systems, extreme dry or wet conditions are often defined via their relative occurrence, adding great importance to assimilation-induced quantile changes. Although still being limited now, longer L-band radiometer time series will become available and make model output improved by assimilating such data that are more usable for extreme event statistics.

  14. Fluorescent Polymer Nanoparticles Based on Dyes: Seeking Brighter Tools for Bioimaging

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reisch, Andreas; Klymchenko, Andrey S.

    2017-01-01

    Speed, resolution and sensitivity of today's fluorescence bioimaging can be drastically improved by fluorescent nanoparticles (NPs) that are many-fold brighter than organic dyes and fluorescent proteins. While the field is currently dominated by inorganic NPs, notably quantum dots (QDs), fluorescent polymer NPs encapsulating large quantities of dyes (dye-loaded NPs) have emerged recently as attractive alternative. These new nanomaterials, inspired from the fields of polymeric drug delivery vehicles and advanced fluorophores, can combine superior brightness with biodegradability and low toxicity. Here, we describe the strategies for synthesis of dye-loaded polymer NPs by emulsion polymerization and assembly of pre-formed polymers. Superior brightness requires strong dye loading without aggregation caused quenching (ACQ). Only recently several strategies of dye design were proposed to overcome ACQ in polymer NPs: aggregation induced emission (AIE), dye modification with bulky side groups and use of bulky hydrophobic counterions. The resulting NPs now surpass the brightness of QDs by ~10-fold for comparable size and start reaching the level of the brightest conjugated polymer NPs. Other properties, notably photostability, color, blinking as well as particle size and surface chemistry are also systematically analyzed. Finally, major and emerging applications of dye-loaded NPs for in vitro and in vivo imaging are reviewed. PMID:26901678

  15. Fluorescent Polymer Nanoparticles Based on Dyes: Seeking Brighter Tools for Bioimaging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reisch, Andreas; Klymchenko, Andrey S

    2016-04-01

    Speed, resolution and sensitivity of today's fluorescence bioimaging can be drastically improved by fluorescent nanoparticles (NPs) that are many-fold brighter than organic dyes and fluorescent proteins. While the field is currently dominated by inorganic NPs, notably quantum dots (QDs), fluorescent polymer NPs encapsulating large quantities of dyes (dye-loaded NPs) have emerged recently as an attractive alternative. These new nanomaterials, inspired from the fields of polymeric drug delivery vehicles and advanced fluorophores, can combine superior brightness with biodegradability and low toxicity. Here, we describe the strategies for synthesis of dye-loaded polymer NPs by emulsion polymerization and assembly of pre-formed polymers. Superior brightness requires strong dye loading without aggregation-caused quenching (ACQ). Only recently several strategies of dye design were proposed to overcome ACQ in polymer NPs: aggregation induced emission (AIE), dye modification with bulky side groups and use of bulky hydrophobic counterions. The resulting NPs now surpass the brightness of QDs by ≈10-fold for a comparable size, and have started reaching the level of the brightest conjugated polymer NPs. Other properties, notably photostability, color, blinking, as well as particle size and surface chemistry are also systematically analyzed. Finally, major and emerging applications of dye-loaded NPs for in vitro and in vivo imaging are reviewed. © 2016 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  16. Fluorescent radiation converter

    Science.gov (United States)

    Viehmann, W. (Inventor)

    1981-01-01

    A fluorescence radiation converter is described which includes a substantially undoped optically transparent substrate and a waveshifter coating deposited on at least one portion of the substrate for absorption of radiation and conversion of fluorescent radiation. The coating is formed to substantially 1000 g/liter of a solvent, 70 to 200 g/liter of an organic polymer, and 0.2 to 25 g/liter of at least one organic fluorescent dye. The incoming incident radiation impinges on the coating. Radiation is absorbed by the fluorescent dye and is re-emitted as a longer wavelength radiation. Radiation is trapped within the substrate and is totally internally reflected by the boundary surface. Emitted radiation leaves the substrate ends to be detected.

  17. Fluorescent filtered electrophosphorescence

    Science.gov (United States)

    Forrest, Stephen R [Princeton, NJ; Sun, Yiru [Princeton, NJ; Giebink, Noel [Princeton, NJ; Thompson, Mark E [Anaheim Hills, CA

    2009-01-06

    The present invention relates to organic light emitting devices (OLEDs), and more specifically to OLEDS that emit light using a combination of fluorescent emitters and phosphorescent emitters for the efficient utilization of all of the electrically generated excitons.

  18. Introduction to fluorescence

    CERN Document Server

    Jameson, David M

    2014-01-01

    "An essential contribution to educating scientists in the principles of fluorescence. It will also be an important addition to the libraries of practitioners applying the principles of molecular fluorescence."-Ken Jacobson, Kenan Distinguished Professor of Cell Biology and Physiology, University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill"An exquisite compendium of fluorescence and its applications in biochemistry enriched by a very exciting historical perspective. This book will become a standard text for graduate students and other scientists."-Drs. Zygmunt (Karol) Gryczynski and Ignacy Gryczynski, University of North Texas Health Science Center"… truly a masterwork, combining clarity, precision, and good humor. The reader, novice or expert, will be pleased with the text and will not stop reading. It is a formidable account of the fluorescence field, which has impacted the life sciences so considerably in the last 60 years."-Jerson L. Silva, M.D., Ph.D., Professor and Director, National Institute of Science and Tech...

  19. Long-lived bright red emitting azaoxa-triangulenium fluorophores.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Badri P Maliwal

    Full Text Available The fluorescence lifetimes of most red emitting organic probes are under 4 nanoseconds, which is a limiting factor in studying interactions and conformational dynamics of macromolecules. In addition, the nanosecond background autofluorescence is a significant interference during fluorescence measurements in cellular environment. Therefore, red fluorophores with longer lifetimes will be immensely helpful. Azaoxa-triangulenium fluorophores ADOTA and DAOTA are red emitting small organic molecules with high quantum yield, long fluorescence lifetime and high limiting anisotropy. In aqueous environment, ADOTA and DAOTA absorption and emission maxima are respectively 540 nm and 556 nm, and 556 nm and 589 nm. Their emission extends beyond 700 nm. Both probes have the limiting anisotropy between 0.36-0.38 at their absorption peak. In both protic and aprotic solvents, their lifetimes are around 20 ns, making them among the longest-lived red emitting organic fluorophores. Upon labeling of avidin, streptavidin and immunoglobulin their absorption and fluorescence are red-shifted. Unlike in free form, the protein-conjugated probes have heterogeneous fluorescence decays, with the presence of both significantly quenched and unquenched populations. Despite the presence of significant local motions due to a flexible trimethylene linker, we successfully measured both intermediate nanosecond intra-protein motions and slower rotational correlation times approaching 100 ns. Their long lifetimes are unaffected by the cell membrane (hexadecyl-ADOTA and the intra-cellular (DAOTA-Arginine localization. Their long lifetimes also enabled successful time-gating of the cellular autofluorescence resulting in background-free fluorescence lifetime based images. ADOTA and DAOTA retain a long fluorescence lifetime when free, as protein conjugate, in membranes and inside the cell. Our successful measurements of intermediate nanosecond internal motions and long correlations times

  20. Tumor-stem cells interactions by fluorescence imaging

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meleshina, Aleksandra V.; Cherkasova, Elena I.; Sergeeva, Ekaterina; Turchin, Ilya V.; Kiseleva, Ekaterina V.; Dashinimaev, Erdem B.; Shirmanova, Marina V.; Zagaynova, Elena V.

    2013-02-01

    Recently, great deal of interest is investigation the function of the stem cells (SC) in tumors. In this study, we studied «recipient-tumor- fluorescent stem cells » system using the methods of in vivo imaging and laser scanning microscopy (LSM). We used adipose-derived adult stem (ADAS) cells of human lentiviral transfected with the gene of fluorescent protein Turbo FP635. ADAS cells were administrated into nude mice with transplanted tumor HeLa Kyoto (human cervical carcinoma) at different stages of tumor growth (0-8 days) intravenously or into tumor. In vivo imaging was performed on the experimental setup for epi - luminescence bioimaging (IAP RAS, Nizhny Novgorod). The results of the imaging showed localization of fluorophore tagged stem cells in the spleen on day 5-9 after injection. The sensitivity of the technique may be improved by spectral separation autofluorescence and fluorescence of stem cells. We compared the results of in vivo imaging and confocal laser scanning microscopy (LSM 510 META, Carl Zeiss, Germany). Internal organs of the animals and tumor tissue were investigated. It was shown that with i.v. injection of ADAS, bright fluorescent structures with spectral characteristics corresponding to TurboFP635 protein are locally accumulated in the marrow, lungs and tumors of animals. These findings indicate that ADAS cells integrate in the animal body with transplanted tumor and can be identified by fluorescence bioimaging techniques in vivo and ex vivo.

  1. Testing the utility of fluorescent proteins in Mimulus lewisii by an Agrobacterium-mediated transient assay.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ding, Baoqing; Yuan, Yao-Wu

    2016-04-01

    The Agrobacterium -mediated transient expression assay by leaf infiltration in Mimulus lewisii is robust. Fluorescent proteins EGFP, EYFP and DsRed give bright fluorescence signals in the infiltrated tissue. Mimulus lewisii is an emerging developmental genetic model system. Recently developed genomic and genetic resources and a stable transformation protocol have greatly facilitated the identification and functional characterization of genes controlling the development of ecologically important floral traits using this species. To further expedite gene and protein function analyses in M. lewisii, we adopted and simplified the Agrobacterium-mediated transient gene expression method routinely used in tobacco plants. With the validated transient assay, we examined the performance of fluorescent proteins EGFP, EYFP and DsRed in M. lewisii. All three proteins gave bright fluorescence signals when transiently expressed in agroinfiltrated leaves. Furthermore, we demonstrated the utility of fluorescent proteins in M. lewisii by showing the nuclear localization of Reduced Carotenoid Pigmentation 1 (RCP1), a recently discovered R2R3-MYB transcription factor that regulates carotenoid pigmentation during flower development. Both the transient assay and the fluorescent proteins are valuable additions to the M. lewisii toolbox, making this emerging genetic and developmental model system even more powerful.

  2. Impact of indocyanine green fluorescent image-guided surgery for parapharyngeal space tumours.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yokoyama, Junkichi; Ooba, Shinichi; Fujimaki, Mitsuhisa; Anzai, Takashi; Yoshii, Ryota; Kojima, Masataka; Ikeda, Katsuhisa

    2014-09-01

    In parapharyngeal space dissection, significant complications such as dysphagia and carotid artery rupture have been reported. In order to resect tumours safely in narrow parapharyngeal space, we propose indocyanine green (ICG) florescence image for navigation surgery. To evaluate the usefulness of ICG fluorescent image-guided surgery for parapharyngeal space tumours. 0.5 mg/kg of ICG was injected via the cephalic vein. Observation of the fluorescent image was performed with HEMS (HyperEye Medical System) at 10-30 min after injection. At first, the position of the tumour was marked over pharyngeal mucosa according to ICG fluorescence imaging with HEMS. We also confirmed submucosal tumours hidden under fascia using HEMS imaging again and resected them. All tumours displayed bright fluorescence emissions which clearly contrasted with the normal structures. Even with the submucosal tumour covered with and obscured by fasciae, we could observe the tumour clearly under HEMS imaging. Tumours behind the carotid artery and lower cranial nerves also were displayed bright fluorescence emissions and were clearly detected. As a result, we could completely remove the tumour safely and noninvasively to preserve pharyngeal functions. ICG fluorescence imaging is effective for the detection and resection of the parapharyngeal space tumours with preserving functions. Copyright © 2013 European Association for Cranio-Maxillo-Facial Surgery. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  3. Fluorescent Staining of Tea Pathogenic Fungi in Tea Leaves Using Fluorescein-labeled Lectin

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yamada, Kengo; Yoshida, Katsuyuki; Sonoda, Ryoichi

    Fluorochrome-labeled lectin, fluorescein conjugated wheat germ agglutinin (F-WGA) was applied to stain tea pathogenic fungi in tea leaf tissue. Infected leaves were fixed and decolorized with a mixture of ethanol and acetic acid, and cleared with 10% KOH for whole mount before staining with F-WGA. Hyphae of Pestalotiopsis longiseta, Pseudocercospora ocellata, Botrytis cinerea and Colletotrichum theae-sinensis fluoresced brightly in whole mount and sectioned samples of infected leaf tissue. In browned tissue, hyphae did not fluoresce frequently in whole mount sample. Autofluorescence of leaf tissue was strong in browned tissue of sections, it was removed by 10% KOH treatment before staining. Penetration hyphae of C. theae-sinensis in cell wall of trichome and hyphae in basal part of trichome did not fluoresced frequently. In whole mount samples of tea leaf infected with Exobasidium vexans and E. reticulatum, hymenia appeared on leaf surface fluoresced, but hyphae in leaf tissue did not fluoresce. In sectioned samples, hyphae fluoresced brightly when sections were treated with 10% KOH before staining.

  4. Single fluorescent protein-based Ca2+ sensors with increased dynamic range

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Labas Yulii A

    2007-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Genetically encoded sensors developed on the basis of green fluorescent protein (GFP-like proteins are becoming more and more popular instruments for monitoring cellular analytes and enzyme activities in living cells and transgenic organisms. In particular, a number of Ca2+ sensors have been developed, either based on FRET (Fluorescence Resonance Energy Transfer changes between two GFP-mutants or on the change in fluorescence intensity of a single circularly permuted fluorescent protein (cpFP. Results Here we report significant progress on the development of the latter type of Ca2+ sensors. Derived from the knowledge of previously reported cpFP-based sensors, we generated a set of cpFP-based indicators with different spectral properties and fluorescent responses to changes in Ca2+ concentration. Two variants, named Case12 and Case16, were characterized by particular high brightness and superior dynamic range, up to 12-fold and 16.5-fold increase in green fluorescence between Ca2+-free and Ca2+-saturated forms. We demonstrated the high potential of these sensors on various examples, including monitoring of Ca2+ response to a prolonged glutamate treatment in cortical neurons. Conclusion We believe that expanded dynamic range, high brightness and relatively high pH-stability should make Case12 and Case16 popular research tools both in scientific studies and high throughput screening assays.

  5. Fluorescence (Multiwave) Confocal Microscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Welzel, J; Kästle, Raphaela; Sattler, Elke C

    2016-10-01

    In addition to reflectance confocal microscopy, multiwave confocal microscopes with different laser wavelengths in combination with exogenous fluorophores allow fluorescence mode confocal microscopy in vivo and ex vivo. Fluorescence mode confocal microscopy improves the contrast between the epithelium and the surrounding soft tissue and allows the depiction of certain structures, like epithelial tumors, nerves, and glands. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  6. Blue LEDs feasibility for tissue fluorescence analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dets, Sergiy M.; Denisov, Nikolay A.

    2000-04-01

    We considered the limited number of light-induced fluorescence applications for marketed ultra-bright blue LEDs where they can compete with versatile laser sources. Satisfactory optical output and miniature size as well as low power consumption of blue LEDs emitting at 470 nm allow to consider them as a promising alternatives to metal vapor or gas lasers used in many expires LIF applications. Available to authors LEDs form Hewlett-Packard, Micro Electronics Corp., Nichia Chemical Industries Ltd. and Toyoda Gosei Co. were tested to comply with demands to a tissue excitation source for portable spectroscopes. The optical performance of LEDs has shown that selected group of InGaN LEDs could be successfully used for that. The miniature illuminator that includes LED, focusing condenser, filter set and distal fiberoptic light concentrator was designed and tested in conjunction with portable CCD- equipped spectroscope. Operating in dark condition the proposed LED illuminator provides the level of fluorescence signal sufficient to detect spectral abnormalities in human Caucasian skin and excised gastrointestinal samples. All tissue autofluorescence data taken under LED illumination were compared with readings under He-Cd laser excitation and showed a good match. A new diagnostic designs based on LEDs were considered for clinical use.

  7. Bright and photostable push-pull pyrene dye visualizes lipid order variation between plasma and intracellular membranes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Niko, Yosuke; Didier, Pascal; Mely, Yves; Konishi, Gen-ichi; Klymchenko, Andrey S

    2016-01-11

    Imaging lipid organization in cell membranes requires advanced fluorescent probes. Here, we show that a recently synthesized push-pull pyrene (PA), similarly to popular probe Laurdan, changes the emission maximum as a function of lipid order, but outperforms it by spectroscopic properties. In addition to red-shifted absorption compatible with common 405 nm diode laser, PA shows higher brightness and much higher photostability than Laurdan in apolar membrane environments. Moreover, PA is compatible with two-photon excitation at wavelengths >800 nm, which was successfully used for ratiometric imaging of coexisting liquid ordered and disordered phases in giant unilamellar vesicles. Fluorescence confocal microscopy in Hela cells revealed that PA efficiently stains the plasma membrane and the intracellular membranes at >20-fold lower concentrations, as compared to Laurdan. Finally, ratiometric imaging using PA reveals variation of lipid order within different cellular compartments: plasma membranes are close to liquid ordered phase of model membranes composed of sphingomyelin and cholesterol, while intracellular membranes are much less ordered, matching well membranes composed of unsaturated phospholipids without cholesterol. These differences in the lipid order were confirmed by fluorescence lifetime imaging (FLIM) at the blue edge of PA emission band. PA probe constitutes thus a new powerful tool for biomembrane research.

  8. Fluorescence-based biosensors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Strianese, Maria; Staiano, Maria; Ruggiero, Giuseppe; Labella, Tullio; Pellecchia, Claudio; D'Auria, Sabato

    2012-01-01

    The field of optical sensors has been a growing research area over the last three decades. A wide range of books and review articles has been published by experts in the field who have highlighted the advantages of optical sensing over other transduction methods. Fluorescence is by far the method most often applied and comes in a variety of schemes. Nowadays, one of the most common approaches in the field of optical biosensors is to combine the high sensitivity of fluorescence detection in combination with the high selectivity provided by ligand-binding proteins. In this chapter we deal with reviewing our recent results on the implementation of fluorescence-based sensors for monitoring environmentally hazardous gas molecules (e.g. nitric oxide, hydrogen sulfide). Reflectivity-based sensors, fluorescence correlation spectroscopy-based (FCS) systems, and sensors relying on the enhanced fluorescence emission on silver island films (SIFs) coupled to the total internal reflection fluorescence mode (TIRF) for the detection of gliadin and other prolamines considered toxic for celiac patients are also discussed herein.

  9. Energy transfer (In3+ → Eu3+) based Polyvinyl Alcohol polymer composites for bright red luminescence

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kumar, K. Naveen; Vijayalakshmi, L.; Kim, Jong Su; Shim, Jaesool; Cho, Migyung; Kang, Misook; Gupta, Bipin Kumar

    2017-08-01

    A prominent sensitization effect of In3+ ions is observed in In3++Eu3+: PVA polymer composites under UV excitation. Consequently, it enhances the red emission performance of Eu3+ ions in PVA system. We have successfully synthesized Eu3+: PVA, In3+: PVA and In3++Eu3+: PVA polymer films by traditional solution casting method. The structural and ion-polymer interaction studies have been analyzed from XRD and FTIR spectral profiles. Eu3+ doped PVA polymer composites are exhibited a red emission at 619 nm (5D0→7F2) under 396 nm (7F0→5L6) of excitation. Upon co-doping with In3+ ions in different concentrations to the Eu3+: PVA polymer film, it exhibits predominant red emission than singly doped Eu3+: PVA under 396 nm of excitation due to energy migration from In3+ to Eu3+. Successful emission photons of In3+ ions are collectively absorbed by the Eu3+ ions which lead the improvement of red emission. Optimized sensitization concentration of the In3+ ions has been found to be 0.01 wt%. Possible energy migration phenomenon is elucidated by several fluorescent dynamics. The energy transfer process is substantiated by lifetime decay analysis and overlapped spectral studies. The Commission International de I-Eclairage chromaticity coordinates were calculated. The quantum efficiencies of the Eu3+ ions and In3+ ions in singly doped and co-doped polymer systems have been evaluated. From these results, these co-doped In3++Eu3+: PVA composite polymer films might be proposed as encouraging candidates for bright red fluorescent materials for several photonic applications.

  10. The Physics and Applications of High Brightness Beams: Working Group A Summary on High Brightness Beam Production

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schmerge, John

    2003-03-19

    Working group A was devoted to high brightness beam production and characterization. The presentations and discussions could be categorized as cathode physics, new photoinjector designs, computational modeling of high brightness beams, and new experimental methods and results. Several novel injector and cathode designs were presented. However, a standard 1.5 cell rf photoinjector is still the most common source for high brightness beams. New experimental results and techniques were presented and thoroughly discussed. The brightest beam produced in a rf photoinjector published at the time of the workshop is approximately 2 10{sup 14} A/(m-rad){sup 2} at Sumitomo Heavy Industries in Japan with 1 nC of charge, a 9 ps FWHM long laser pulse and a normalized transverse emittance of 1.2 pm. The emittance was achieved by utilizing a temporally flat laser pulse which decreased the emittance by an estimated factor of 2 from the beam produced with a Gaussian pulse shape with an identical pulse length.

  11. Development of the transgenic cyan fluorescent protein (CFP)-expressing nude mouse for "Technicolor" cancer imaging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tran Cao, Hop S; Reynoso, Jose; Yang, Meng; Kimura, Hiroaki; Kaushal, Sharmeela; Snyder, Cynthia S; Hoffman, Robert M; Bouvet, Michael

    2009-05-15

    A major goal for in vivo biology is to develop models which can express multiple colors of fluorescent proteins in order to image many processes simultaneously in real time. Towards this goal, the cyan fluorescent protein (CFP) nude mouse was developed by crossing non-transgenic nude mice with the transgenic CK/ECFP mouse in which the beta-actin promoter drives expression of CFP in almost all tissues. In crosses between nu/nu CFP male mice and nu/+ CFP female mice, approximately 50% of the embryos fluoresced blue. In the CFP nude mice, the pancreas and reproductive organs displayed the strongest fluorescent signals of all internal organs which vary in intensity. Orthotopic implantation of XPA-1 human pancreatic cancer cells expressing red fluorescent protein (RFP); or green fluorescent protein (GFP) in the nucleus and RFP in the cytoplasm, was performed in female nude CFP mice. Color-coded fluorescence imaging of these human pancreatic cancer cells implanted into the bright blue fluorescent pancreas of the CFP nude mouse afforded novel insight into the interaction of the pancreatic tumor and the normal pancreas, in particular the strong desmoplastic reaction of the tumor. The naturally enhanced blue fluorescence of the pancreas in the CFP mouse serves as an ideal background for color-coded imaging of the interaction of implanted cancer cells and the host. The CFP nude mouse will provide unique understanding of the critical interplay between the cancer cells and their microenvironment. 2009 Wiley-Liss, Inc.

  12. Spectral Diversity and Regulation of Coral Fluorescence in a Mesophotic Reef Habitat in the Red Sea.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gal Eyal

    Full Text Available The phenomenon of coral fluorescence in mesophotic reefs, although well described for shallow waters, remains largely unstudied. We found that representatives of many scleractinian species are brightly fluorescent at depths of 50-60 m at the Interuniversity Institute for Marine Sciences (IUI reef in Eilat, Israel. Some of these fluorescent species have distribution maxima at mesophotic depths (40-100 m. Several individuals from these depths displayed yellow or orange-red fluorescence, the latter being essentially absent in corals from the shallowest parts of this reef. We demonstrate experimentally that in some cases the production of fluorescent pigments is independent of the exposure to light; while in others, the fluorescence signature is altered or lost when the animals are kept in darkness. Furthermore, we show that green-to-red photoconversion of fluorescent pigments mediated by short-wavelength light can occur also at depths where ultraviolet wavelengths are absent from the underwater light field. Intraspecific colour polymorphisms regarding the colour of the tissue fluorescence, common among shallow water corals, were also observed for mesophotic species. Our results suggest that fluorescent pigments in mesophotic reefs fulfil a distinct biological function and offer promising application potential for coral-reef monitoring and biomedical imaging.

  13. Spectral Diversity and Regulation of Coral Fluorescence in a Mesophotic Reef Habitat in the Red Sea

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eyal, Gal; Wiedenmann, Jörg; Grinblat, Mila; D’Angelo, Cecilia; Kramarsky-Winter, Esti; Treibitz, Tali; Ben-Zvi, Or; Shaked, Yonathan; Smith, Tyler B.; Harii, Saki; Denis, Vianney; Noyes, Tim; Tamir, Raz; Loya, Yossi

    2015-01-01

    The phenomenon of coral fluorescence in mesophotic reefs, although well described for shallow waters, remains largely unstudied. We found that representatives of many scleractinian species are brightly fluorescent at depths of 50–60 m at the Interuniversity Institute for Marine Sciences (IUI) reef in Eilat, Israel. Some of these fluorescent species have distribution maxima at mesophotic depths (40–100 m). Several individuals from these depths displayed yellow or orange-red fluorescence, the latter being essentially absent in corals from the shallowest parts of this reef. We demonstrate experimentally that in some cases the production of fluorescent pigments is independent of the exposure to light; while in others, the fluorescence signature is altered or lost when the animals are kept in darkness. Furthermore, we show that green-to-red photoconversion of fluorescent pigments mediated by short-wavelength light can occur also at depths where ultraviolet wavelengths are absent from the underwater light field. Intraspecific colour polymorphisms regarding the colour of the tissue fluorescence, common among shallow water corals, were also observed for mesophotic species. Our results suggest that fluorescent pigments in mesophotic reefs fulfil a distinct biological function and offer promising application potential for coral-reef monitoring and biomedical imaging. PMID:26107282

  14. Spectral Diversity and Regulation of Coral Fluorescence in a Mesophotic Reef Habitat in the Red Sea.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eyal, Gal; Wiedenmann, Jörg; Grinblat, Mila; D'Angelo, Cecilia; Kramarsky-Winter, Esti; Treibitz, Tali; Ben-Zvi, Or; Shaked, Yonathan; Smith, Tyler B; Harii, Saki; Denis, Vianney; Noyes, Tim; Tamir, Raz; Loya, Yossi

    2015-01-01

    The phenomenon of coral fluorescence in mesophotic reefs, although well described for shallow waters, remains largely unstudied. We found that representatives of many scleractinian species are brightly fluorescent at depths of 50-60 m at the Interuniversity Institute for Marine Sciences (IUI) reef in Eilat, Israel. Some of these fluorescent species have distribution maxima at mesophotic depths (40-100 m). Several individuals from these depths displayed yellow or orange-red fluorescence, the latter being essentially absent in corals from the shallowest parts of this reef. We demonstrate experimentally that in some cases the production of fluorescent pigments is independent of the exposure to light; while in others, the fluorescence signature is altered or lost when the animals are kept in darkness. Furthermore, we show that green-to-red photoconversion of fluorescent pigments mediated by short-wavelength light can occur also at depths where ultraviolet wavelengths are absent from the underwater light field. Intraspecific colour polymorphisms regarding the colour of the tissue fluorescence, common among shallow water corals, were also observed for mesophotic species. Our results suggest that fluorescent pigments in mesophotic reefs fulfil a distinct biological function and offer promising application potential for coral-reef monitoring and biomedical imaging.

  15. Tb{sup 3+} doped Zinc Alumino Bismuth Borate glasses for green emitting luminescent devices

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Swapna, K.; Mahamuda, Sk. [Department of Physics, K L University, Green Fields, Vaddeswaram, Guntur (Dt), Andhra Pradesh 522502 (India); Rao, A. Srinivasa, E-mail: drsrallam@gmail.com [Department of Physics, K L University, Green Fields, Vaddeswaram, Guntur (Dt), Andhra Pradesh 522502 (India); Department of Applied Physics, Delhi Technological University, Bawana Road, New Delhi 110042 (India); Jayasimhadri, M. [Department of Applied Physics, Delhi Technological University, Bawana Road, New Delhi 110042 (India); Shakya, Suman; Prakash, G. Vijaya [Nanophotonics Laboratory, Department of Physics, Indian Institute of Technology-Delhi, Hauz Khas, New Delhi 110016 (India)

    2014-12-15

    Zinc Alumino Bismuth Borate (ZnAlBiB) glasses doped with terbium (Tb{sup 3+}) ions with a chemical composition 20ZnO–10Al{sub 2}O{sub 3}–(10−x)Bi{sub 2}O{sub 3}–60B{sub 2}O{sub 3}−xTb{sub 2}O{sub 3} (x=0.1, 0.5, 1.0, 1.5, 2.0, 2.5 and 3.0 mol%) were prepared by a conventional melt quenching method and studied their optical absorption, photoluminescence and decay spectral properties. The Judd–Ofelt (J–O) parameters evaluated from the experimental oscillator strengths were used to measure the radiative properties for the prominent luminescent transitions of Tb{sup 3+} ions such as {sup 5}D{sub 4}→{sup 7}F{sub 6}, {sup 7}F{sub 5}, {sup 7}F{sub 4} and {sup 7}F{sub 3.} The effect of Tb{sup 3+} ion concentration on the luminescence process observed in the visible region was discussed in detail. The emission spectra recorded for all the ZnAlBiB glasses doped with Tb{sup 3+} ions, show an intense peak in green region at 542 nm. The stimulated emission cross-section, branching ratios and quantum efficiency values evaluated for green emission ({sup 5}D{sub 4}→{sup 7}F{sub 5}) suggests the utility of these glasses for green luminescence applications. It was found that, within the concentration range investigated, 2.5 mol% of Tb{sup 3+} doped ZnAlBiB glass is most suitable for green luminescence applications at 542 nm in principle. - Highlights: • ZnAlBiB glasses doped with Tb{sup 3+} ions were prepared by a conventional melt quenching technique. • Judd–Ofelt and radiative properties are measured from the emission spectra. • Quantum efficiency of the ZnAlBiB glasses is measured by using radiative and measured lifetimes. • CIE Chromaticity co-ordinates are evaluated from emission spectra.

  16. Enhancing Lighting Performance of White LED Lamps by Green Emitting Ce,Tb Phosphor

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nguyen Doan Quoc Anh

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available With the development of high-efficiency and high-power Light-Emitting Diodes (LEDs, it has become possible to use LEDs in lighting and illumination. In last decades, developing a new method for improving lumen output and Angular Color Uniformity (ACU is the main direction in LED technology. In this paper, an innovative approach for enhancing lighting performance (lumen output and angular color uniformity of Multi-Chip White LED lamps (MCW-LEDs was proposed and demonstrated by mixing the green Ce0.67Tb0.33MgAl11O19: Ce,Tb (CeTb phosphor into their phosphor compounding. With varying CeTb concentration, ACU and lumen output with Conformal Phosphor Package (CPP and In-cup Phosphor Package (IPP are calculated, displayed and analyzed. The results show that the lumen output and the ACU of 7000 K and 8500 K MCW-LEDs increased remarkably in comparison with the older works. Using green CeTb is a prospective method for improving lighting performance of MCW-LEDs in future.

  17. Synthesis and characterization of a Noble metal Enhanced Optical Nanohybrid (NEON): a high brightness detection platform based on a dye-doped silica nanoparticle.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roy, Shibsekhar; Dixit, Chandra K; Woolley, Robert; O'Kennedy, Richard; McDonagh, Colette

    2012-05-29

    A highly bright and photostable, fluorescent nanohybrid particle is presented which consists of gold nanoparticles (GNPs) embedded in dye-doped silica in a core-shell configuration. The dye used is the near-infrared emitting 4,5-benzo-5'-(iodoacetaminomethyl)-1',3,3,3',3'-pentamethyl-1-(4-sulfobutyl) indodicarbo cyanine. The nanohybrid architecture comprises a GNP core which is separated from a layer of dye molecules by a 15 nm buffer layer and has an outer protective, undoped silica shell. Using this architecture, a brightness factor of 550 has been achieved compared to the free dye. This hybrid system, referred to as Noble metal Enhanced Optical Nanohybrid (NEON) in this paper, is the first nanohybrid construct to our knowledge which demonstrates such tunable fluorescence property. NEON has enhanced photostability compared to the free dye and compared to a control particle without GNPs. Furthermore, the NEON particle, when used as a fluorescent label in a model bioassay, shows improved performance over assays using a conventional single dye molecule label.

  18. Circular dichroism spectroscopy of fluorescent proteins

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Visser, N.V.; Hink, M.A.; Borst, J.W.; Krogt, van der G.N.M.; Visser, A.J.W.G.

    2002-01-01

    Circular dichroism (CD) spectra have been obtained from several variants of green fluorescent protein: blue fluorescent protein (BFP), enhanced cyan fluorescent protein (CFP), enhanced green fluorescent protein (GFP), enhanced yellow fluorescent protein (YFP), all from Aequorea victoria, and the red

  19. Two Distinct Fluorescence States of the Ligand-Induced Green Fluorescent Protein UnaG.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shitashima, Yoh; Shimozawa, Togo; Kumagai, Akiko; Miyawaki, Atsushi; Asahi, Toru

    2017-12-19

    UnaG is a recently discovered ligand-induced fluorescent protein that utilizes bound bilirubin (BR) as its fluorophore. The fluorescence of the UnaG-BR complex (holoUnaG) compares in quantum efficiency to that of enhanced green fluorescent protein, but it is superior in that the fluorophore formation is instantaneous and not dependent on oxygen; hence, much attention has been paid to UnaG as a new fluorescent probe. However, many important molecular properties of fluorescent probes remain unknown, such as the association/dissociation rates of BR, which determine the stability thereof, and the dispersibility of UnaG in aqueous solutions, which influence the functions of labeled proteins. In this study, we found, in the process of investigating the association rate, that the holoUnaG takes two distinct fluorescence states, which we named holoUnaG1 and holoUnaG2. The holoUnaG1 initially forms after binding BR and then changes to the brighter holoUnaG2 by a reversible intra-molecular reaction, thereby finally reaching an equilibrium between the two states. Spectroscopic analysis indicated that the intra-molecular reaction was associated not with a chemical change of BR but with a change in the environmental conditions surrounding BR. We also revealed that the molecular brightness ratio and equilibrium population ratio of the two states (holoUnaG1/holoUnaG2) were 1:3.9 and 6:4, respectively, using photon number counting analysis. From these results, we have suggested a novel schema, to our knowledge, for the formation of the UnaG and BR complex system and have determined the various rate constants associated therein. Additionally, using analytical ultracentrifugation, we established that UnaG in the apo-state (apoUnaG) and the holoUnaG are monomeric in aqueous solution. These findings provide not only key information for the practical use of UnaG as a fluorescent probe, but also the possibility for development of a brighter UnaG mutant by genetic engineering to

  20. A DNA Walker as a Fluorescence Signal Amplifier.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Dongfang; Vietz, Carolin; Schröder, Tim; Acuna, Guillermo; Lalkens, Birka; Tinnefeld, Philip

    2017-09-13

    Sensing nucleic acids typically involves the recognition of a specific sequence and reporting by, for example, a fluorogenic reaction yielding one activated dye molecule per detected nucleic acid. Here, we show that after binding to a DNA origami track a bound DNA target (a "DNA walker") can release the fluorescence of many molecules by acting as the catalyst of an enzymatic nicking reaction. As the walking kinetics sensitively depends on the walker sequence, the resulting brightness distribution of DNA origamis is a sequence fingerprint with single-nucleotide sensitivity. Using Monte Carlo simulations, we rationalize that the random self-avoiding walk is mainly terminated when steps to nearest neighbors are exhausted. Finally, we demonstrate that the DNA walker is also active in a plasmonic hotspot for fluorescence enhancement, indicating the potential of combining different amplification mechanisms enabled by the modularity of DNA nanotechnology.

  1. Novel fluorescent carbonic nanomaterials for sensing and imaging

    Science.gov (United States)

    Demchenko, Alexander P.; Dekaliuk, Mariia O.

    2013-12-01

    Small brightly fluorescent carbon nanoparticles have emerged as a new class of materials important for sensing and imaging applications. We analyze comparatively the properties of nanodiamonds, graphene and graphene oxide ‘dots’, of modified carbon nanotubes and of diverse carbon nanoparticles known as ‘C-dots’ obtained by different methods. The mechanisms of their light absorption and luminescence emission are still unresolved and the arguments are presented for their common origin. Regarding present and potential applications, we provide critical comparison with the other types of fluorescence reporters, such as organic dyes and semiconductor quantum dots. Their most prospective applications in sensing (based on the changes of intensity, FRET and lifetime) and in imaging technologies on the level of living cells and whole bodies are overviewed. The possibilities for design on their basis of multifunctional nanocomposites on a broader scale of theranostics are outlined.

  2. Limitations of the Oriented Difference of Gaussian Filter in Special Cases of Brightness Perception Illusions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bakshi, Ashish; Roy, Sourya; Mallick, Arijit; Ghosh, Kuntal

    2016-03-01

    The Oriented Difference of Gaussian (ODOG) filter of Blakeslee and McCourt has been successfully employed to explain several brightness perception illusions which include illusions of both brightness-contrast type, for example, Simultaneous Brightness Contrast and Grating Induction and the brightness-assimilation type, for example, the White effect and the shifted White effect. Here, we demonstrate some limitations of the ODOG filter in predicting perceived brightness by comparing the ODOG responses to various stimuli (generated by varying two parameters, namely, test patch length and spatial frequency) with experimental observations of the same. © The Author(s) 2015.

  3. Bright, highly water-soluble triazacyclononane europium complexes to detect ligand binding with time-resolved FRET microscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Delbianco, Martina; Sadovnikova, Victoria; Bourrier, Emmanuel; Mathis, Gérard; Lamarque, Laurent; Zwier, Jurriaan M; Parker, David

    2014-09-26

    Luminescent europium complexes are used in a broad range of applications as a result of their particular emissive properties. The synthesis and application of bright, highly water-soluble, and negatively charged sulfonic- or carboxylic acid derivatives of para-substituted aryl-alkynyl triazacyclononane complexes are described. Introduction of the charged solubilizing moieties suppresses cellular uptake or adsorption to living cells making them applicable for labeling and performing assays on membrane receptors. These europium complexes are applied to monitor fluorescent ligand binding on cell-surface proteins with time-resolved Förster resonance energy transfer (TR-FRET) assays in plate-based format and using TR-FRET microscopy. © 2014 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  4. Chip-scale fluorescence microscope based on a silo-filter complementary metal-oxide semiconductor image sensor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ah Lee, Seung; Ou, Xiaoze; Lee, J Eugene; Yang, Changhuei

    2013-06-01

    We demonstrate a silo-filter (SF) complementary metal-oxide semiconductor (CMOS) image sensor for a chip-scale fluorescence microscope. The extruded pixel design with metal walls between neighboring pixels guides fluorescence emission through the thick absorptive filter to the photodiode of a pixel. Our prototype device achieves 13 μm resolution over a wide field of view (4.8 mm × 4.4 mm). We demonstrate bright-field and fluorescence longitudinal imaging of living cells in a compact, low-cost configuration.

  5. Ultra-high resolution and high-brightness AMOLED

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wacyk, Ihor; Ghosh, Amal; Prache, Olivier; Draper, Russ; Fellowes, Dave

    2012-06-01

    As part of its continuing effort to improve both the resolution and optical performance of AMOLED microdisplays, eMagin has recently developed an SXGA (1280×3×1024) microdisplay under a US Army RDECOM CERDEC NVESD contract that combines the world's smallest OLED pixel pitch with an ultra-high brightness green OLED emitter. This development is aimed at next-generation HMD systems with "see-through" and daylight imaging requirements. The OLED pixel array is built on a 0.18-micron CMOS backplane and contains over 4 million individually addressable pixels with a pixel pitch of 2.7 × 8.1 microns, resulting in an active area of 0.52 inches diagonal. Using both spatial and temporal enhancement, the display can provide over 10-bits of gray-level control for high dynamic range applications. The new pixel design also enables the future implementation of a full-color QSXGA (2560 × RGB × 2048) microdisplay in an active area of only 1.05 inch diagonal. A low-power serialized low-voltage-differential-signaling (LVDS) interface is integrated into the display for use as a remote video link for tethered systems. The new SXGA backplane has been combined with the high-brightness green OLED device developed by eMagin under an NVESD contract. This OLED device has produced an output brightness of more than 8000fL with all pixels on; lifetime measurements are currently underway and will presented at the meeting. This paper will describe the operational features and first optical and electrical test results of the new SXGA demonstrator microdisplay.

  6. Flux and brightness calculations for various synchrotron radiation sources

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Weber, J.M.; Hulbert, S.L.

    1991-11-01

    Synchrotron radiation (SR) storage rings are powerful scientific and technological tools. The first generation of storage rings in the US., e.g., SURF (Washington, D.C.), Tantalus (Wisconsin), SSRL (Stanford), and CHESS (Cornell), revolutionized VUV, soft X-ray, and hard X-ray science. The second (present) generation of storage rings, e.g. the NSLS VUV and XRAY rings and Aladdin (Wisconsin), have sustained the revolution by providing higher stored currents and up to a factor of ten smaller electron beam sizes than the first generation sources. This has made possible a large number of experiments that could not performed using first generation sources. In addition, the NSLS XRAY ring design optimizes the performance of wigglers (high field periodic magnetic insertion devices). The third generation storage rings, e.g. ALS (Berkeley) and APS (Argonne), are being designed to optimize the performance of undulators (low field periodic magnetic insertion devices). These extremely high brightness sources will further revolutionize x-ray science by providing diffraction-limited x-ray beams. The output of undulators and wigglers is distinct from that of bending magnets in magnitude, spectral shape, and in spatial and angular size. Using published equations, we have developed computer programs to calculate the flux, central intensity, and brightness output bending magnets and selected wigglers and undulators of the NSLS VUV and XRAY rings, the Advanced Light Source (ALS), and the Advanced Photon Source (APS). Following is a summary of the equations used, the graphs and data produced, and the computer codes written. These codes, written in the C programming language, can be used to calculate the flux, central intensity, and brightness curves for bending magnets and insertion devices on any storage ring.

  7. Beyond pragmatism: defending the 'bright line' of birth.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burin, Achas K

    2014-01-01

    It is usually accepted by ethicists that birth does not alter moral status. Rather, it is thought that the rule according full legal rights at birth is pragmatic. Pragmatic reasoning is vulnerable to competing practical concerns and stronger moral principles. This 'bright line' has therefore been criticised both by those who believe personhood begins before birth and those who believe it begins afterward. In particular, a recent article by Giubilini and Minerva puts forward both pragmatic and moral arguments in favour of permitting infanticide, and the New South Wales Court of Criminal Appeal has suggested there is a strong case for abandoning the bright line (R v Iby (2005) 63 NSWLR 278). If we desire to defend current legal doctrine against such criticism, a medical and philosophical basis for the law should be articulated. This article suggests such a medical and philosophical basis. It argues that both the multiplicity of biological changes occurring in the neonate at birth and the extrauterine context (the world) provide a justification for the distinction drawn at law between abortion and infanticide. With reference to Robert Nozick's 'experience machine' thought-experiment and elements of phenomenological philosophy, it advances two propositions to explain the status-changing nature of the neonate's emergence out of the womb. First, that expressing sentience in the world is essential for the attainment of personhood. Second, that having become a person, the harm in killing is disruption of this engagement with the world and the reduction from personhood to non-existence. This is the distinction between a neonate's death and the termination of a foetus, underscoring the qualitative difference between the two sides of the bright line drawn in law. © The Author [2014]. Published by Oxford University Press; all rights reserved. For Permissions, please email: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  8. The new World Atlas of Artificial Sky Brightness

    Science.gov (United States)

    Falchi, Fabio; Cinzano, Pierantonio; Kyba, Christopher C. M.; Portnov, Boris A.

    2015-08-01

    I present the main steps toward the completion of the new World Atlas of Artificial Sky Brightness (WA II) and some results. The computational technique has been updated, in comparison to the first World Atlas, to take into account both sources and sites elevation. The elevation data are from USGS GTOPO30 global digital elevation model, with the same pixel size as the WA II maps. The upward emission function used to compute the Atlas is a three parameters function. The parameters can be constrained to the database of Earth based night sky brightness measurements. In this way we can use the better fitting upward function for the final map’s calibration. We maintained constant atmosphere parameters over the entire Earth, identical to those used for the first Atlas (Garstang atmospheric clarity coefficient k=1, equivalent to a vertical extinction at sea level of 0.33 magnitude in the V band). This was done in order to avoid introducing a local bias due to different conditions that may confound the light pollution propagation effects. The radiance data used are those from Visible Infrared Imaging Radiometer Suite (VIIRS) Day-Night Band (DNB) on board the Suomi NPP satellite. The use of this newly available radiance data allows for an increased real resolution, even while maintaining the same 30"x30" lat-lon pixel size. Anyway, a higher resolution is really appreciable only in the immediate proximity of sources of light pollution (e.g. inside a big city). The VIIRS DNB data used for the input data were chosen from the months ranging from May to September in order to avoid introducing bias from the variable snow coverage in mid to high northern latitudes. In the southern hemisphere this problem is far less pronounced. The WA II takes advantage of the now enormous database of Earth based sky brightness measurements obtained mainly with Sky Quality Meters, but also with CCD measurements.

  9. Variation reduction of brightness and pH of pulp sent to a paper mill

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Napassavong Rojanarowan

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available The variance of the brightness of pulp sent to the paper mill during the changing period of dry pulp grades affects the chemical control in the paper mill. This research aims to determine the mixing formula of pulp with different brightness from the EOP and D1 stages to handle this variation issue. This research uses response surface design with Central Composite Design type, regression technique and optimization technique to find the optimal setting of the mixing formula for each of the seven brightness levels to obtain the target brightness of 86% and the pH of 5.25. The mixing formulas are determined by the pulp mixing percentage and the sulfuric acid consumption. The experimental results reveal that when using higher EOP mixing ratio, the brightness decreases and the pH increases. Regarding the effect of the sulfuric acid, increasing the sulfuric acid makes the brightness and the pH decrease. After implementing the optimal formula in the production line, the mean of pulp brightness is closer to the target compared with the brightness before improvement and the brightness variation decreases without affecting the quality of other pulp grades, average of brightness decreased from 87.4% to 86.3% and standard deviation of brightness decreased from 1.09 to 0.46.

  10. Fabrication of L-cysteine-capped CdTe quantum dots based ratiometric fluorescence nanosensor for onsite visual determination of trace TNT explosive

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Qian, Jing; Hua, Mengjuan [School of Chemistry and Chemical Engineering, Jiangsu University, Zhenjiang 212013 (China); Wang, Chengquan [Changzhou College of Information Technology, Changzhou 213164 (China); Wang, Kan; Liu, Qian; Hao, Nan [School of Chemistry and Chemical Engineering, Jiangsu University, Zhenjiang 212013 (China); Wang, Kun, E-mail: wangkun@ujs.edu.cn [School of Chemistry and Chemical Engineering, Jiangsu University, Zhenjiang 212013 (China)

    2016-11-23

    New strategies for onsite determination of trace 2,4,6-trinitrotoluene (TNT) explosives have become a research hotspot for homeland security needs against terrorism and environmental concerns. Herein, we designed a ratiometric fluorescence nanohybrid comprising 3-mercaptopropionic acid-capped green-emitting CdTe quantum dots (gQDs) encapsulated into SiO{sub 2} sphere and L-cysteine (Lcys)-capped red-emitting CdTe QDs (rQDs) conjugated onto SiO{sub 2} surface. The surface Lcys can be used as not only the stabilizer of the rQDs but also the primary amine provider which can react with TNT to form Meisenheimer complexes. Without any additional surface modification procedure, the fluorescence of rQDs equipped with Lcys was selectively quenched by TNT because electrons of the rQDs transferred to TNT molecules due to the formation of Meisenheimer complexes. Meanwhile, the embedded gQDs always remained constant. Upon exposure to increasing amounts of TNT, the fluorescence of rQDs could be gradually quenched and consequently the logarithm of the dual emission intensity ratios exhibited a good linear negative correlation with TNT concentration over a range of 10 nM–8 μM with a low detection limit of 3.3 nM. One can perform onsite visual determination of TNT with high resolution because the ratiometric fluorescence nanosensing system exhibited obvious fluorescence color changes. This sensing strategy has been successfully applied in real samples and already integrated in a filter paper-based assay, which enables potential fields use application featuring easy handling and cost-effectiveness. - Highlights: • A facile strategy for preparing Lcys-capped rQDs based hybrid spheres was reported. • Lcys serves as the stabilizer of rQDs and primary amine provider to react with TNT. • One can perform onsite visual determination of TNT by using such probe. • The nanosensor exhibited a wide linear range and a low detection limit. • This sensing strategy can be fully

  11. Technological Challenges for High-Brightness Photo-Injectors

    CERN Multimedia

    Suberlucq, Guy

    2004-01-01

    Many applications, from linear colliders to free-electron lasers, passing through light sources and many other electron sources, require high brightness electron beams, usually produced by photo-injectors. Because certain parameters of these applications differ by several orders of magnitude, various solutions were implemented for the design and construction of the three main parts of the photo-injectors: lasers, photocathodes and guns. This paper summarizes the different requirements, how they lead to technological challenges and how R&D programs try to overcome these challenges. Some examples of state-of-the-art parts are presented.

  12. Aqueous origins of bright salt deposits on Ceres

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zolotov, Mikhail Yu.

    2017-11-01

    Bright materials have been reported in association with impact craters on Ceres. The abundant Na2CO3 and some ammonium salts, NH4HCO3 and/or NH4Cl, were detected in bright deposits within Occator crater with Dawn near infrared spectroscopy. The composition and appearance of the salts suggest their aqueous mobilization and emplacement after formation of the crater. Here we consider origins of the bright deposits through calculation of speciation in the H-C-N-O-Na-Cl water-salt type system constrained by the mass balance of observed salts. Calculations of chemical equilibria show that initial solutions had the pH of ∼10. The temperature and salinity of solutions could have not exceeded ∼273 K and ∼100 g per kg H2O, respectively. Freezing models reveal an early precipitation of Na2CO3·10H2O followed by minor NaHCO3. Ammonium salts precipitate near eutectic from brines enriched in NH4+, Cl- and Na+. A late-stage precipitation of NaCl·2H2O is modeled for solution compositions with added NaCl. Calculated eutectics are above 247 K. The apparently unabundant ammonium and chloride salts in Occator's deposits imply a rapid emplacement without a compositional evolution of solution. Salty ice grains could have deposited from post-impact ballistic plumes formed through low-pressure boiling of subsurface solutions. Hydrated and ammonium salts are unstable at maximum temperatures of Ceres' surface and could decompose through space weathering. Occator's ice-free salt deposits formed through a post-depositional sublimation of ice followed by dehydration of Na2CO3·10H2O and NaHCO3 to Na2CO3. In other regions, excavated and exposed bright materials could be salts initially deposited from plumes and accumulated at depth via post-impact boiling. The lack of detection of sulfates and an elevated carbonate/chloride ratio in Ceres' materials suggest an involvement of compounds abundant in the outer solar system.

  13. Bright X-ray transient in the LMC

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saxton, R.; Read, A. M.; Li, D. Y.

    2018-01-01

    We report a bright X-ray transient in the LMC from an XMM-Newton slew made on 5th January 2018. The source, XMMSL2 J053629.4-675940, had a soft X-ray (0.2-2 keV) count rate in the EPIC-pn detector, medium filter of 1.82+/-0.56 c/s, equivalent to a flux Fx=2.3+/-0.7E-12 ergs/s/cm2 for a nominal spectrum of a power-law of slope 2 absorbed by a column NH=3E20 cm^-2.

  14. Thin Sea-ice Thickness Retrievals from SMAP Brightness Temperatures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bayler, E. J.; Smith, R.

    2016-12-01

    The retrieval of thin sea-ice thicknesses has been developed for data from the European Space Agency's Soil Moisture - Ocean Salinity (SMOS) mission, employing the transition of observed surface emissivity from open water to thick sea ice. This technique is now applied to brightness temperature data from NASA's Soil Moisture Active-Passive (SMAP) mission, addressing the instrument differences between the SMOS Microwave Imaging Radiometer using Aperture Synthesis (MIRAS) and the SMAP scanning radiometer. This study demonstrates the utility of SMAP data for addressing a critical data gap for numerical prediction in polar regions, particularly as operational modeling advances toward coupled ocean-atmosphere-cryosphere modeling.

  15. Concentrators using fluorescent substances

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hayashibara, M.; Tsukamoto, M. (Hitachi Seisakusho K.K., Tokyo (Japan))

    1990-01-01

    In luminescent concentrators - plates of polymethylmethacrylate (PMMA) or other transparent material with a fluorescent compound dispersed within them - incident light is trapped and concentrated by internal reflection, and shifted to a longer wavelength, as it interacts with fluorescent particles. Experience with the use of luminescent concentrators for electricity generation in conjunction with solar cells, in solar heaters, in amplifiers for light intensity, in long-wave converters and in display panels is discussed. Solar energy conversion efficiencies of 4-5% have been obtained in generating systems combining concentrators containing Fluorol 555 or Rhodamin 6G with GaAs solar cells. (author).

  16. Smartphone fluorescence spectroscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, Hojoeng; Tan, Yafang; Cunningham, Brian T.

    2014-03-01

    We demonstrate the first use of smartphone spectrophotometry for readout of fluorescence-based biological assays. We evaluated the smartphone fluorimeter in the context of a fluorescent molecular beacon (MB) assay for detection of a specific nucleic acid sequences in a liquid test sample. The capability of distinguishing a one-point mismatch is also demonstrated by detecting single-base mutation in target nucleic acids. Our approach offers a route towards portable biomolecular assays for viral/bacterial pathogens, disease biomarkers, and toxins.

  17. Smartphone fluorescence spectroscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, Hojeong; Tan, Yafang; Cunningham, Brian T

    2014-09-02

    We demonstrate the first use of smartphone spectrophotometry for readout of fluorescence-based biological assays. We evaluated the smartphone fluorimeter in the context of a fluorescent molecular beacon (MB) assay for detection of specific nucleic acid sequences in a liquid test sample and compared performance against a conventional laboratory fluorimeter. The capability of distinguishing a one-point mismatch is also demonstrated by detecting single-base mutation in target nucleic acids. Our approach offers a route toward portable biomolecular assays for viral/bacterial pathogens, disease biomarkers, and toxins.

  18. Unveiling the Low Surface Brightness Stellar Peripheries of Galaxies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ferguson, Annette M. N.

    2018-01-01

    The low surface brightness peripheral regions of galaxies contain a gold mine of information about how minor mergers and accretions have influenced their evolution over cosmic time. Enormous stellar envelopes and copious amounts of faint tidal debris are natural outcomes of the hierarchical assembly process and the search for and study of these features, albeit highly challenging, offers the potential for unrivalled insight into the mechanisms of galaxy growth. Over the last two decades, there has been burgeoning interest in probing galaxy outskirts using resolved stellar populations. Wide-field surveys have uncovered vast tidal debris features and new populations of very remote globular clusters, while deep Hubble Space Telescope photometry has provided exquisite star formation histories back to the earliest epochs. I will highlight some recent results from studies within and beyond the Local Group and conclude by briefly discussing the great potential of future facilities, such as JWST, Euclid, LSST and WFIRST, for major breakthroughs in low surface brightness galaxy periphery science.

  19. Observations of Bright Massive Stars Using Small Size Telescopes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beradze, Sopia; Kochiashvili, Nino

    2017-11-01

    The size of a telescope determines goals and objects of observations. During the latest decades it becomes more and more difficult to get photometric data of bright stars because most of telescopes of small sizes do not operate already. But there are rather interesting questions connected to the properties and evolution ties between different types of massive stars. Multi-wavelength photometric data are needed for solution of some of them. We are presenting our observational plans of bright Massive X-ray binaries, WR and LBV stars using a small size telescope. All these stars, which are presented in the poster are observational targets of Sopia Beradze's future PhD thesis. We already have got very interesting results on the reddening and possible future eruption of the massive hypergiant star P Cygni. Therefore, we decided to choose some additional interesting massive stars of different type for future observations. All Massive stars play an important role in the chemical evolution of galaxies because of they have very high mass loss - up to 10-4M⊙/a year. Our targets are on different evolutionary stages and three of them are the members of massive binaries. We plan to do UBVRI photometric observations of these stars using the 48 cm Cassegrain telescope of the Abastumani Astrophisical Observatory.

  20. Lightness and brightness judgments of coplanar retinally noncontiguous surfaces.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schirillo, J A; Shevell, S K

    1993-12-01

    Several experiments reveal that judgments of lightness and brightness of an achromatic surface depend, in part, on the luminances of other surfaces perceived to share the same depth plane, even if the surfaces are well separated on the retina. Two Mondrians, simulated on a CRT, were viewed through a haploscope. The more highly illuminated Mondrian contained a comparison patch and appeared nearer than the more dimly illuminated Mondrian, which contained the test patch. By independently varying the disparity of the test patch, observers could make the test patch appear to be in the depth plane of either the dimly or the highly illuminated Mondrian. Observers set the luminance of the test patch to match that of the comparison patch. The test was set as high as 15% more luminous when it was perceived in the depth plane of the highly illuminated rather than the dimly illuminated Mondrian. Both brightness and lightness judgments were affected by the perceived depth of the test, although the lightness judgments of inexperienced observers sometimes were dominated by local-contrast matching.

  1. Bright Solitons in a PT-Symmetric Chain of Dimers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Omar B. Kirikchi

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available We study the existence and stability of fundamental bright discrete solitons in a parity-time- (PT- symmetric coupler composed by a chain of dimers that is modelled by linearly coupled discrete nonlinear Schrödinger equations with gain and loss terms. We use a perturbation theory for small coupling between the lattices to perform the analysis, which is then confirmed by numerical calculations. Such analysis is based on the concept of the so-called anticontinuum limit approach. We consider the fundamental onsite and intersite bright solitons. Each solution has symmetric and antisymmetric configurations between the arms. The stability of the solutions is then determined by solving the corresponding eigenvalue problem. We obtain that both symmetric and antisymmetric onsite mode can be stable for small coupling, in contrast to the reported continuum limit where the antisymmetric solutions are always unstable. The instability is either due to the internal modes crossing the origin or the appearance of a quartet of complex eigenvalues. In general, the gain-loss term can be considered parasitic as it reduces the stability region of the onsite solitons. Additionally, we analyse the dynamic behaviour of the onsite and intersite solitons when unstable, where typically it is either in the form of travelling solitons or soliton blow-ups.

  2. Bright PanSTARRS Nuclear Transients – what are they?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Smartt S.

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available We present an initial analysis of 49 bright transients occurring in the nuclei of galaxies with no previous known Active Galactic Nucleus (AGN. They have been discovered as part of the PanSTARRs 3π survey, and followed up with the Liverpool Telescope. Based on colours, light curve shape, and a small number with optical spectra, these transients seem to fall into three groups. Red/fast transients are nuclear supernovae of various types. Some bright nuclear transients are blue and decay on a timescale of a few months; these may be candidates for tidal disruption events. However most of the events we have found are blue and are either still rising or decaying slowly, on a timescale of years; the few spectra we have show AGN at z ∼ 1. We argue that these transients are background AGN microlensed by stars in foreground galaxies by a factor 10–100. Monitoring such events gives us very promising prospects for measuring the structure of AGN and so testing current theories.

  3. Fluorescence Images of DNA-Bound YOYO between Coupled Silver Particles

    OpenAIRE

    Zhang, Jian; Fu, Yi; Lakowicz, Joseph R.

    2007-01-01

    Oligonucleotide-bound silver particles were coupled through hybridization with target complementary oligonucleotides. YOYO molecules were intercalated into DNA duplexes bound between the coupled metal particles. Fluorescence images of YOYO molecules were monitored by scanning confocal microscopy. Relative to the free single YOYO, the emission brightness of the image was enhanced 80-fold after intercalating the fluorophores into the DNA duplexes between the coupled silver particles. Some image...

  4. Semisynthetic fluorescent pH sensors for imaging exocytosis and endocytosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martineau, Magalie; Somasundaram, Agila; Grimm, Jonathan B; Gruber, Todd D; Choquet, Daniel; Taraska, Justin W; Lavis, Luke D; Perrais, David

    2017-11-10

    The GFP-based superecliptic pHluorin (SEP) enables detection of exocytosis and endocytosis, but its performance has not been duplicated in red fluorescent protein scaffolds. Here we describe "semisynthetic" pH-sensitive protein conjugates with organic fluorophores, carbofluorescein, and Virginia Orange that match the properties of SEP. Conjugation to genetically encoded self-labeling tags or antibodies allows visualization of both exocytosis and endocytosis, constituting new bright sensors for these key steps of synaptic transmission.

  5. Semisynthetic fluorescent pH sensors for imaging exocytosis and endocytosis

    OpenAIRE

    Martineau, Magalie; Somasundaram, Agila; Grimm, Jonathan B.; Gruber, Todd D.; Choquet, Daniel; Taraska, Justin W.; Lavis, Luke D.; Perrais, David

    2017-01-01

    The GFP-based superecliptic pHluorin (SEP) enables detection of exocytosis and endocytosis, but its performance has not been duplicated in red fluorescent protein scaffolds. Here we describe “semisynthetic” pH-sensitive protein conjugates with organic fluorophores, carbofluorescein, and Virginia Orange that match the properties of SEP. Conjugation to genetically encoded self-labeling tags or antibodies allows visualization of both exocytosis and endocytosis, constituting new bright sensors fo...

  6. Improved blue, green, and red fluorescent protein tagging vectors for S. cerevisiae.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sidae Lee

    Full Text Available Fluorescent protein fusions are a powerful tool to monitor the localization and trafficking of proteins. Such studies are particularly easy to carry out in the budding yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae due to the ease with which tags can be introduced into the genome by homologous recombination. However, the available yeast tagging plasmids have not kept pace with the development of new and improved fluorescent proteins. Here, we have constructed yeast optimized versions of 19 different fluorescent proteins and tested them for use as fusion tags in yeast. These include two blue, seven green, and seven red fluorescent proteins, which we have assessed for brightness, photostability and perturbation of tagged proteins. We find that EGFP remains the best performing green fluorescent protein, that TagRFP-T and mRuby2 outperform mCherry as red fluorescent proteins, and that mTagBFP2 can be used as a blue fluorescent protein tag. Together, the new tagging vectors we have constructed provide improved blue and red fluorescent proteins for yeast tagging and three color imaging.

  7. Characterization of the Fluorescence Properties of 4-Dialkylaminochalcones and Investigation of the Cytotoxic Mechanism of Chalcones.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Bo; Jiang, Peixin; Lu, Junxuan; Xing, Chengguo

    2016-07-01

    Understanding the mechanisms responsible for the various biological activities of chalcones, particularly the direct cellular targets, presents an unmet challenge. Here, we prepared a series of fluorescent chalcone derivatives as chemical probes for their mechanistic investigation. Upon systematic physicochemical characterization, we explored their potential to elucidate the mode of action of chalcones' cytotoxicity. The fluorescence of the chalcones was found to be highly sensitive to structural and environmental factors. Structurally, a 4-dialkylamino group on the B ring, suitable electronic properties of the A ring substituents, and the planar conformation of the chalcone's core structure were essential for optimal fluorescence. Environmental factors influencing fluorescence included solvent polarity, pH, and the interactions of the chalcones with proteins and detergents. It was found that 18 chalcones showed a fluorescent brightness greater than 6000 M(-1)  cm(-1) in DMSO. However, water dramatically quenched the fluorescence, although it could be partially recovered in the presence of BSA or detergents. As expected, these fluorescent chalcones showed a sharp structure-activity relationship in their cellular cytotoxicity, leading to the identification of structurally similar cytotoxic and non-cytotoxic fluorescent chalcones as chemical probes. Confocal microscopy results revealed the co-localization of the cytotoxic probe C8 and tubulin in cells, supporting tubulin as the direct cellular target responsible for the cytotoxicity of chalcones. © 2016 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  8. Improved blue, green, and red fluorescent protein tagging vectors for S. cerevisiae.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Sidae; Lim, Wendell A; Thorn, Kurt S

    2013-01-01

    Fluorescent protein fusions are a powerful tool to monitor the localization and trafficking of proteins. Such studies are particularly easy to carry out in the budding yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae due to the ease with which tags can be introduced into the genome by homologous recombination. However, the available yeast tagging plasmids have not kept pace with the development of new and improved fluorescent proteins. Here, we have constructed yeast optimized versions of 19 different fluorescent proteins and tested them for use as fusion tags in yeast. These include two blue, seven green, and seven red fluorescent proteins, which we have assessed for brightness, photostability and perturbation of tagged proteins. We find that EGFP remains the best performing green fluorescent protein, that TagRFP-T and mRuby2 outperform mCherry as red fluorescent proteins, and that mTagBFP2 can be used as a blue fluorescent protein tag. Together, the new tagging vectors we have constructed provide improved blue and red fluorescent proteins for yeast tagging and three color imaging.

  9. Random copolyesters containing perylene bisimide: flexible films and fluorescent fibers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nisha, S Kumari; Asha, S K

    2014-08-13

    Random copolyesters of poly(l-lactic acid) (PLLA) and [poly(1,4-cyclohexylenedimethylene-1,4- cyclohexanedicarboxylate)] (PCCD) incorporating varying mol ratios of perylene bisimide (PBI) were developed via a high-temperature solution-blending approach. PCCD incorporating PBI was developed by melt polycondenzation followed by a polyester-polyester transesterification reaction between PCCD-PBI and PLLA. The polymers exhibited good solubility in common organic solvents and formed free-standing films, which showed bright red emission upon irradiation with ultraviolet radiation. A solid state fluorescence quantum yield of 10% was observed for this PBI based polyester, which was much higher than that reported in literature for PBI based polymers in the solid state (fluorescent nanofibers of these polymers were successfully constructed by electrospinning technique. A random copolyester incorporating donor based on oligo(p-pheneylenevinylene) (OPV) and PBI as acceptor chromophore was also synthesized and fluorescence microscopy images of the electrospun fibers of this polymer exhibited blue, green and red emission upon excitation at different wavelengths. The high temperature solution blending approach involving a high molecular weight polymer and a suitably functionalized π conjugated molecule described here is a unique method by which 1D nanostructures of a wide range of π-conjugated chromophores could be fabricated having strong fluorescence, with the scope of application in nanoscale optoelectronics, biological devices, as well as sensing.

  10. Fluorescence lifetime based bioassays

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meyer-Almes, Franz-Josef

    2017-12-01

    Fluorescence lifetime (FLT) is a robust intrinsic property and material constant of fluorescent matter. Measuring this important physical indicator has evolved from a laboratory curiosity to a powerful and established technique for a variety of applications in drug discovery, medical diagnostics and basic biological research. This distinct trend was mainly driven by improved and meanwhile affordable laser and detection instrumentation on the one hand, and the development of suitable FLT probes and biological assays on the other. In this process two essential working approaches emerged. The first one is primarily focused on high throughput applications employing biochemical in vitro assays with no requirement for high spatial resolution. The second even more dynamic trend is the significant expansion of assay methods combining highly time and spatially resolved fluorescence data by fluorescence lifetime imaging. The latter approach is currently pursued to enable not only the investigation of immortal tumor cell lines, but also specific tissues or even organs in living animals. This review tries to give an actual overview about the current status of FLT based bioassays and the wide range of application opportunities in biomedical and life science areas. In addition, future trends of FLT technologies will be discussed.

  11. Fluorescent polymers from non-fluorescent photoreactive monomers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mueller, Jan O; Voll, Dominik; Schmidt, Friedrich G; Delaittre, Guillaume; Barner-Kowollik, Christopher

    2014-12-25

    A facile, fast and ambient-temperature avenue towards highly fluorescent polymers is introduced via polymerizing non-fluorescent photoreactive monomers based on light-induced NITEC chemistry, providing a platform technology for fluorescent polymers. The resulting polypyrazolines were analyzed in depth and the photo-triggered step-growth process was monitored in a detailed kinetic study.

  12. Brightness and uniformity measurements of plastic scintillator tiles at the CERN H2 test beam arXiv

    CERN Document Server

    INSPIRE-00165402; Sirunyan, A.M.; Tumasyan, A.; Litomin, A.; Mossolov, V.; Shumeiko, N.; Van De Klundert, M.; Van Haevermaet, H.; Van Mechelen, P.; Van Spilbeeck, A.; Alves, G.A.; Aldá Júnior, W.L.; Hensel, C.; Carvalho, W.; Chinellato, J.; De Oliveira Martins, C.; Matos Figueiredo, D.; Mora Herrera, C.; Nogima, H.; Prado Da Silva, W.L.; Tonelli Manganote, E.J.; Vilela Pereira, A.; Finger, M.; Finger, M., Jr.; Kveton, A.; Tomsa, J.; Adamov, G.; Tsamalaidze, Z.; Behrens, U.; Borras, K.; Campbell, A.; Costanza, F.; Gunnellini, P.; Lobanov, A.; Melzer-Pellmann, I.-A.; Muhl, C.; Roland, B.; Sahin, M.; Saxena, P.; Hegde, V.; Kothekar, K.; Pandey, S.; Sharma, S.; Beri, S.B.; Bhawandeep, B.; Chawla, R.; Kalsi, A.; Kaur, A.; Kaur, M.; Walia, G.; Bhattacharya, S.; Ghosh, S.; Nandan, S.; Purohit, A.; Sharan, M.; Banerjee, S.; Bhattacharya, S.; Chatterjee, S.; Das, P.; Guchait, M.; Jain, S.; Kumar, S.; Maity, M.; Majumder, G.; Mazumdar, K.; Patil, M.; Sarkar, T.; Juodagalvis, A.; Afanasiev, S.; Bunin, P.; Ershov, Y.; Golutvin, I.; Malakhov, A.; Moisenz, P.; Smirnov, V.; Zarubin, A.; Chadeeva, M.; Chistov, R.; Danilov, M.; Popova, E.; Rusinov, V.; Andreev, Yu.; Dermenev, A.; Karneyeu, A.; Krasnikov, N.; Tlisov, D.; Toropin, A.; Epshteyn, V.; Gavrilov, V.; Lychkovskaya, N.; Popov, V.; Pozdnyakov, I.; Safronov, G.; Toms, M.; Zhokin, A.; Baskakov, A.; Belyaev, A.; Boos, E.; Dubinin, M.; Dudko, L.; Ershov, A.; Gribushin, A.; Kaminskiy, A.; Klyukhin, V.; Kodolova, O.; Lokhtin, I.; Miagkov, I.; Obraztsov, S.; Petrushanko, S.; Savrin, V.; Snigirev, A.; Andreev, V.; Azarkin, M.; Dremin, I.; Kirakosyan, M.; Leonidov, A.; Terkulov, A.; Bitioukov, S.; Elumakhov, D.; Kalinin, A.; Krychkine, V.; Mandrik, P.; Petrov, V.; Ryutin, R.; Sobol, A.; Troshin, S.; Volkov, A.; Sekmen, S.; Medvedeva, T.; Rumerio, P.; Adiguzel, A.; Bakirci, N.; Cerci, S.; Damarseckin, S.; Demiroglu, Z.S.; Dölek, F.; Dozen, C.; Dumanoglu, I.; Eskut, E.; Girgis, S.; Gokbulut, G.; Guler, Y.; Hos, I.; Kangal, E.E.; Kara, O.; Kayis Topaksu, A.; Işik, C.; Kiminsu, U.; Oglakci, M.; Onengut, G.; Ozdemir, K.; Ozturk, S.; Polatoz, A.; Sunar Cerci, D.; Tali, B.; Topakli, H.; Turkcapar, S.; Zorbakir, I.S.; Zorbilmez, C.; Bilin, B.; Isildak, B.; Karapinar, G.; Murat Guler, A.; Ocalan, K.; Yalvac, M.; Zeyrek, M.; Atakisi, I.O.; Gülmez, E.; Kaya, M.; Kaya, O.; Koseyan, O.K.; Ozcelik, O.; Ozkorucuklu, S.; Tekten, S.; Yetkin, E.A.; Yetkin, T.; Cankocak, K.; Sen, S.; Boyarintsev, A.; Grynyov, B.; Levchuk, L.; Popov, V.; Sorokin, P.; Flacher, H.; Borzou, A.; Call, K.; Dittmann, J.; Hatakeyama, K.; Liu, H.; Pastika, N.; Buccilli, A.; Cooper, S.I.; Henderson, C.; West, C.; Arcaro, D.; Gastler, D.; Hazen, E.; Rohlf, J.; Sulak, L.; Wu, S.; Zou, D.; Hakala, J.; Heintz, U.; Kwok, K.H.M.; Laird, E.; Landsberg, G.; Mao, Z.; Yu, D.R.; Gary, J.W.; Ghiasi Shirazi, S.M.; Lacroix, F.; Long, O.R.; Wei, H.; Bhandari, R.; Heller, R.; Stuart, D.; Yoo, J.H.; Chen, Y.; Duarte, J.; Lawhorn, J.M.; Nguyen, T.; Spiropulu, M.; Winn, D.; Abdullin, S.; Apresyan, A.; Apyan, A.; Banerjee, S.; Chlebana, F.; Freeman, J.; Green, D.; Hare, D.; Hirschauer, J.; Joshi, U.; Lincoln, D.; Los, S.; Pedro, K.; Spalding, W.J.; Strobbe, N.; Tkaczyk, S.; Whitbeck, A.; Linn, S.; Markowitz, P.; Martinez, G.; Bertoldi, M.; Hagopian, S.; Hagopian, V.; Kolberg, T.; Baarmand, M.M.; Noonan, D.; Roy, T.; Yumiceva, F.; Bilki, B.; Clarida, W.; Debbins, P.; Dilsiz, K.; Durgut, S.; Gandrajula, R.P.; Haytmyradov, M.; Khristenko, V.; Merlo, J.-P.; Mermerkaya, H.; Mestvirishvili, A.; Miller, M.; Moeller, A.; Nachtman, J.; Ogul, H.; Onel, Y.; Ozok, F.; Penzo, A.; Schmidt, I.; Snyder, C.; Southwick, D.; Tiras, E.; Yi, K.; Al-bataineh, A.; Bowen, J.; Castle, J.; McBrayer, W.; Murray, M.; Wang, Q.; Kaadze, K.; Maravin, Y.; Mohammadi, A.; Saini, L.K.; Baden, A.; Belloni, A.; Calderon, J.D.; Eno, S.C.; Feng, Y.B.; Ferraioli, C.; Grassi, T.; N.J.Hadley, G-Y Jeng; Kellogg, R.G.; Kunkle, J.; Mignerey, A.; Ricci-Tam, F.; Shin, Y.H.; Skuja, A.; Yang, Z.S.; Yao, Y.; Brandt, S.; D'Alfonso, M.; Hu, M.; Klute, M.; Niu, X.; Chatterjee, R.M.; Evans, A.; Frahm, E.; Kubota, Y.; Lesko, Z.; Mans, J.; Ruckstuhl, N.; Heering, A.; Karmgard, D.J.; Musienko, Y.; Ruchti, R.; Wayne, M.; Benaglia, A.D.; Mei, K.; Tully, C.; Bodek, A.; de Barbaro, P.; Galanti, M.; Garcia-Bellido, A.; Khukhunaishvili, A.; Lo, K.H.; Vishnevskiy, D.; Zielinski, M.; Agapitos, A.; Amouzegar, M.; Chou, J.P.; Hughes, E.; Saka, H.; Sheffield, D.; Akchurin, N.; Damgov, J.; De Guio, F.; Dudero, P.R.; Faulkner, J.; Gurpinar, E.; Kunori, S.; Lamichhane, K.; Lee, S.W.; Libeiro, T.; Mengke, T.; Muthumuni, S.; Undleeb, S.; Volobouev, I.; Wang, Z.; Goadhouse, S.; Hirosky, R.; Wang, Y.

    We study the light output, light collection efficiency and signal timing of a variety of organic scintillators that are being considered for the upgrade of the hadronic calorimeter of the CMS detector. The experimental data are collected at the H2 test-beam area at CERN, using a 150 GeV muon beam. In particular, we investigate the usage of over-doped and green-emitting plastic scintillator, two solutions that have not been extensively considered. We present a study of the energy distribution in plastic-scintillator tiles, the hit efficiency as a function of the hit position, and a study of the signal timing for blue and green scintillators.

  13. Fluorescence Microscopy of Single Molecules

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zimmermann, Jan; van Dorp, Arthur; Renn, Alois

    2004-01-01

    The investigation of photochemistry and photophysics of individual quantum systems is described with the help of a wide-field fluorescence microscopy approach. The fluorescence single molecules are observed in real time.

  14. Fluorescence spectroscopy in polymer science

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Raja, T.N.; Brouwer, A.M.; Demchenko, A.P.

    2011-01-01

    Polymer science is an interdisciplinary field, combining chemistry, physics, and in some cases biology. Structure, morphology, and dynamical phenomena in natural and synthetic polymers can be addressed using fluorescence spectroscopy. The most attractive aspect of fluorescent reporters is that their

  15. Who's who in fluorescence 2008

    CERN Document Server

    Geddes, Chris D

    2008-01-01

    The Journal of Fluorescence's sixth Who's Who directory publishes the names, contact details, specialty keywords, and a brief description of scientists employing fluorescence methodology and instrumentation in their working lives. This is a unique reference.

  16. Sputum direct fluorescent antibody (DFA)

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... ency/article/003553.htm Sputum direct fluorescent antibody (DFA) test To use the sharing features on this page, please enable JavaScript. Sputum direct fluorescent antibody (DFA) is a lab test that looks for micro- ...

  17. A fluorescence scanning electron microscope

    OpenAIRE

    Kanemaru, Takaaki; Hirata, Kazuho; Takasu, Shin-ichi; Isobe, Shin-Ichiro; Mizuki, Keiji; Mataka, Shuntaro; Nakamura, Kei-ichiro

    2010-01-01

    Fluorescence techniques are widely used in biological research to examine molecular localization, while electron microscopy can provide unique ultrastructural information. To date, correlative images from both fluorescence and electron microscopy have been obtained separately using two different instruments, i.e. a fluorescence microscope (FM) and an electron microscope (EM). In the current study, a scanning electron microscope (SEM) (JEOL JXA8600 M) was combined with a fluorescence digital c...

  18. Preparation and Characterization of Highly Fluorescent, Glutathione-coated Near Infrared Quantum Dots for in Vivo Fluorescence Imaging

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yoshichika Yoshioka

    2008-10-01

    Full Text Available Fluorescent probes that emit in the near-infrared (NIR, 700-1,300 nm region are suitable as optical contrast agents for in vivo fluorescence imaging because of low scattering and absorption of the NIR light in tissues. Recently, NIR quantum dots (QDs have become a new class of fluorescent materials that can be used for in vivo imaging. Compared with traditional organic fluorescent dyes, QDs have several unique advantages such as size- and composition-tunable emission, high brightness, narrow emission bands, large Stokes shifts, and high resistance to photobleaching. In this paper, we report a facile method for the preparation of highly fluorescent, water-soluble glutathione (GSH-coated NIR QDs for in vivo imaging. GSH-coated NIR QDs (GSH-QDs were prepared by surface modification of hydrophobic CdSeTe/CdS (core/shell QDs. The hydrophobic surface of the CdSeTe/CdS QDs was exchanged with GSH in tetrahydrofuran-water. The resulting GSH-QDs were monodisperse particles and stable in PBS (phosphate buffered saline, pH = 7.4. The GSH-QDs (800 nm emission were highly fluorescent in aqueous solutions (quantum yield = 22% in PBS buffer, and their hydrodynamic diameter was less than 10 nm, which is comparable to the size of proteins. The cellular uptake and viability for the GSH-QDs were examined using HeLa and HEK 293 cells. When the cells were incubated with aqueous solutions of the GSH-QDs (10 nM, the QDs were taken into the cells and distributed in the perinuclear region of both cells. After 12 hrs incubation of 4 nM of GSH-QDs, the viabilities of HeLa and HEK 293 cells were ca. 80 and 50%, respectively. As a biomedical utility of the GSH-QDs, in vivo NIRfluorescence imaging of a lymph node in a mouse is presented.

  19. Herschel SPIRE fourier transform spectrometer: calibration of its bright-source mode

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lu, Nanyao; Polehampton, Edward T.; Swinyard, Bruce M.; Benielli, Dominique; Fulton, Trevor; Hopwood, Rosalind; Imhof, Peter; Lim, Tanya; Marchili, Nicola; Naylor, David A.; Schulz, Bernhard; Sidher, Sunil; Valtchanov, Ivan

    2014-07-01

    The Fourier Transform Spectrometer (FTS) of the Spectral and Photometric Imaging REceiver (SPIRE) on board the ESA Herschel Space Observatory has two detector setting modes: (a) a nominal mode, which is optimized for observing moderately bright to faint astronomical targets, and (b) a bright-source mode recommended for sources significantly brighter than 500 Jy, within the SPIRE FTS bandwidth of 446.7-1544 GHz (or 194-671 microns in wavelength), which employs a reduced detector responsivity and out-of-phase analog signal amplifier/demodulator. We address in detail the calibration issues unique to the bright-source mode, describe the integration of the bright-mode data processing into the existing pipeline for the nominal mode, and show that the flux calibration accuracy of the bright-source mode is generally within 2 % of that of the nominal mode, and that the bright-source mode is 3 to 4 times less sensitive than the nominal mode.

  20. Who's who in fluorescence 2005

    CERN Document Server

    Geddes, Chris D

    2006-01-01

    The Journal of Fluorescence's third Who's Who directory publishes the names, contact details, specialty keywords, photographs, and a brief description of scientists employing fluorescence methodology and instrumentation in their working livesThe directory provides company contact details with a brief list of fluorescence-related products.

  1. Bright, water-soluble CeF{sub 3} photo-, cathodo-, and X-ray luminescent nanoparticles

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Clement, Sandhya; Deng, Wei; Drozdowicz-Tomsia, Krystyna; Liu, Deming [Macquarie University, Centre for Nanoscale BioPhotonics, Department of Physics and Astronomy (Australia); Zachreson, Cameron [University of Technology Sydney, School of Physics and Advanced Materials (Australia); Goldys, Ewa M., E-mail: ewa.goldys@mq.edu.au [Macquarie University, Centre for Nanoscale BioPhotonics, Department of Physics and Astronomy (Australia)

    2015-01-15

    Bright, water-soluble CeF{sub 3} nanoparticles with small size and narrow size distribution have been synthesized using a simple co-precipitation method without any ligands. Size control of nanoparticles from 13 ± 2 to 9 ± 2 nm was achieved by varying the reaction time. Colloidal properties have been found to vary with pH and, independently, with dilution. The photoluminescence of the as-synthesized nanoparticles shows a highly photostable UV/Visible fluorescence band due to allowed 5d–4f transitions, also observed in the X-ray luminescence spectrum. This band is suitable for X-ray excitation of a range of photosensitizers. The photoluminescence quantum yield of nanoparticles was also determined to be 31 %. Using the measured fluorescence decay time of 25 ns, the radiative lifetime of Ce in CeF{sub 3} was found to be 80.6 ns. Both photoluminescence and cathodoluminescence emission are affected by the reaction time and measurement temperature. Electron-beam-induced defect annealing is also observed.

  2. Three Millisecond Pulsars in Fermi LAT Unassociated Bright Sources

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ransom, S. M.; Ray, P. S.; Camilo, F.; Roberts, M. S. E.; Celik, O.; Wolff, M. T.; Cheung, C. C.; Kerr, M.; Pennucci, T.; DeCesar, M. E.; hide

    2010-01-01

    We searched for radio pulsars in 25 of the non-variable, unassociated sources in the Fermi LAT Bright Source List with the Green Bank Telescope at 820 MHz. We report the discovery of three radio and gamma-ray millisecond pulsar (MSPs) from a high Galactic latitude subset of these sources. All of the pulsars are in binary systems, which would have made them virtually impossible to detect in blind gamma-ray pulsation searches. They seem to be relatively normal, nearby (pulsars are power law in nature with exponential cutoffs at a few Ge V, as has been found with most other pulsars. The MSPs have all been detected as X-ray point sources. Their soft X-ray luminosities of approx 10(exp 30) - 10(exp 31) erg/s are typical of the rare radio MSPs seen in X-rays.

  3. Bright Spots in X-pinch Plasmas at 6 MA

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sinars, D. B.; Ampleford, D. J.; Yu, E. P.; Jennings, C. A.; Cuneo, M. E.; Wenger, D. F.; Pikuz, S. A.; Shelkovenko, T. A.; Bland, S. N.; Chittenden, J. P.

    2008-11-01

    Bright, ˜1 μm, 10-100 ps x-ray sources with extreme plasma parameters are routinely created using X-pinch plasmas driven by 0.2 MA. Modeling suggests that even more extreme plasma parameters might be possible at higher current. We present data from the first 6 MA X-pinch experiments on the SATURN facility at Sandia National Laboratories. The mass required to pinch near peak current was surprisingly low (˜14 mg/cm vs. ˜3 mg/cm at 1 MA) and the smallest x-ray source measured was ˜60 μm in size. Following up on recent work by Pikuz et al. at 1 MA, experiments in September will use nested-array X-pinch implosions to improve the symmetry.

  4. Types and Distribution of Bright Materials in 4 Vesta

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mittlefehldt, D. W.; Li, Jian-Yang; Pieters, C. M.; De Sanctis, M. C.; Schroder, S. E.; Hiesinger, H.; Blewett, D. T.; Russell, C. T.; Raymond, C. A.; Yingst, R. A.

    2012-01-01

    A strong case can be made that Vesta is the parent asteroid of the howardite, eucrite and diogenite (HED) meteorites [1]. As such, we have over a century of detailed sample analysis experience to call upon when formulating hypotheses regarding plausible lithologic diversity on Vesta. It thus came as a surprise when Dawn s Framing Camera (FC) first revealed distinctly localized materials of exceptionally low and high albedos, often closely associated. To understand the nature and origin of these materials, and how they inform us of the geological evolution of Vesta, task forces began their study. An initial step of the scientific endeavor is to develop a descriptive, non-genetic classification of objects to use as a basis for developing hypotheses and observational campaigns. Here we present a catalog of the types of light-toned deposits and their distribution across Vesta. A companion abstract [2] discusses possible origins of bright materials and the constraints they suggest for vestan geology.

  5. CCD Photometry of bright stars using objective wire mesh

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kamiński, Krzysztof; Zgórz, Marika [Astronomical Observatory Institute, Faculty of Physics, A. Mickiewicz University, Słoneczna 36, 60-286 Poznań (Poland); Schwarzenberg-Czerny, Aleksander, E-mail: chrisk@amu.edu.pl [Copernicus Astronomical Centre, ul. Bartycka 18, PL 00-716 Warsaw (Poland)

    2014-06-01

    Obtaining accurate photometry of bright stars from the ground remains problematic due to the danger of overexposing the target and/or the lack of suitable nearby comparison stars. The century-old method of using objective wire mesh to produce multiple stellar images seems promising for the precise CCD photometry of such stars. Furthermore, our tests on β Cep and its comparison star, differing by 5 mag, are very encouraging. Using a CCD camera and a 20 cm telescope with the objective covered by a plastic wire mesh, in poor weather conditions, we obtained differential photometry with a precision of 4.5 mmag per two minute exposure. Our technique is flexible and may be tuned to cover a range as big as 6-8 mag. We discuss the possibility of installing a wire mesh directly in the filter wheel.

  6. Broad band spectral energy distribution studies of Fermi bright blazars

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Monte, C., E-mail: claudia.monte@ba.infn.i [Istituto Nazionale di Fisica Nucleare, Sezione di Bari, I-70126 Bari (Italy); Dipartimento di Fisica ' M. Merlin' dell' Universita e del Politecnico, I-70126 Bari (Italy); Giommi, P.; Cavazzuti, E.; Gasparrini, D. [Agenzia Spaziale Italiana (ASI) Science Data Center I-00044 Frascati (Roma) (Italy); Raino, S. [Istituto Nazionale di Fisica Nucleare, Sezione di Bari, I-70126 Bari (Italy); Dipartimento di Fisica ' M. Merlin' dell' Universita e del Politecnico, I-70126 Bari (Italy); Fuhrmann, L.; Angelakis, E. [Max-Planck-Institut fuer Radioastronomie, Auf dem Huegel 69, D-53121 Bonn (Germany); Villata, M.; Raiteri, C.M. [INAF, Osservatorio Astronomico di Torino, I-10025 Pino Torinese (Italy); Perri, M. [Agenzia Spaziale Italiana (ASI) Science Data Center I-00044 Frascati (Roma) (Italy); Richards, J. [California Institute of Technology, Pasadena, CA (United States)

    2011-02-21

    The Fermi Gamma-ray Space Telescope was successfully launched on June 11, 2008 and has already opened a new era for gamma-ray astronomy. The Large Area Telescope (LAT), the main instrument on board Fermi, presents a significant improvement in sensitivity over its predecessor EGRET, due to its large field of view and effective area, combined with its excellent timing capabilities. The preliminary results of the Spectral Energy Distribution Analysis performed on a sample of bright blazars are presented. For this study, the data from the first three months of data collection of Fermi have been used. The analysis is extended down to radio, mm, near-IR, optical, UV and X-ray bands and up to TeV energies based on unprecedented sample of simultaneous multi-wavelength observations by GASP-WEBT.

  7. Broad band spectral energy distribution studies of Fermi bright blazars

    Science.gov (United States)

    Monte, C.; Giommi, P.; Cavazzuti, E.; Gasparrini, D.; Rainò, S.; Fuhrmann, L.; Angelakis, E.; Villata, M.; Raiteri, C. M.; Perri, M.; Richards, J.

    2011-02-01

    The Fermi Gamma-ray Space Telescope was successfully launched on June 11, 2008 and has already opened a new era for gamma-ray astronomy. The Large Area Telescope (LAT), the main instrument on board Fermi, presents a significant improvement in sensitivity over its predecessor EGRET, due to its large field of view and effective area, combined with its excellent timing capabilities. The preliminary results of the Spectral Energy Distribution Analysis performed on a sample of bright blazars are presented. For this study, the data from the first three months of data collection of Fermi have been used. The analysis is extended down to radio, mm, near-IR, optical, UV and X-ray bands and up to TeV energies based on unprecedented sample of simultaneous multi-wavelength observations by GASP-WEBT.

  8. A complete sample of long bright Swift gamma ray bursts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tagliaferri, Gianpiero; Salvaterra, Ruben; Campana, Sergio; Covino, Stefano; D'Avanzo, Paolo; Fugazza, Dino; Ghirlanda, Giancarlo; Ghisellini, Gabriele; Melandri, Andrea; Nava, Lara; Sbarufatti, Boris; Vergani, Susanna

    2013-06-13

    Complete samples are the basis of any population study. To this end, we selected a complete subsample of Swift long bright gamma ray bursts (GRBs). The sample, made up of 58 bursts, was selected by considering bursts with favourable observing conditions for ground-based follow-up observations and with the 15-150 keV 1 s peak flux above a flux threshold of 2.6 photons cm(-2) s(-1). This sample has a redshift completeness level higher than 90 per cent. Using this complete sample, we investigate the properties of long GRBs and their evolution with cosmic time, focusing in particular on the GRB luminosity function, the prompt emission spectral-energy correlations and the nature of dark bursts.

  9. Investigation of fundamental limits to beam brightness available from photoinjectors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bazarov, Ivan [Cornell Univ., Ithaca, NY (United States)

    2015-07-09

    The goal of this project was investigation of fundamental limits to beam brightness available from photoinjectors. This basic research in accelerator physics spanned over 5 years aiming to extend the fundamental understanding of high average current, low emittance sources of relativistic electrons based on photoemission guns, a necessary prerequisite for a new generation of coherent X-ray synchrotron radiation facilities based on continuous duty superconducting linacs. The program focused on two areas critical to making advances in the electron source performance: 1) the physics of photocathodes for the production of low emittance electrons and 2) control of space charge forces in the immediate vicinity to the cathode via 3D laser pulse shaping.

  10. Relationships between brightness of nighttime lights and population density

    Science.gov (United States)

    Naizhuo, Z.

    2012-12-01

    Brightness of nighttime lights has been proven to be a good proxy for socioeconomic and demographic statistics. Moreover, the satellite nighttime lights data have been used to spatially disaggregate amounts of gross domestic product (GDP), fossil fuel carbon dioxide emission, and electric power consumption (Ghosh et al., 2010; Oda and Maksyutov, 2011; Zhao et al., 2012). Spatial disaggregations were performed in these previous studies based on assumed linear relationships between digital number (DN) value of pixels in the nighttime light images and socioeconomic data. However, reliability of the linear relationships was never tested due to lack of relative high-spatial-resolution (equal to or finer than 1 km × 1 km) statistical data. With the similar assumption that brightness linearly correlates to population, Bharti et al. (2011) used nighttime light data as a proxy for population density and then developed a model about seasonal fluctuations of measles in West Africa. The Oak Ridge National Laboratory used sub-national census population data and high spatial resolution remotely-sensed-images to produce LandScan population raster datasets. The LandScan population datasets have 1 km × 1 km spatial resolution which is consistent with the spatial resolution of the nighttime light images. Therefore, in this study I selected 2008 LandScan population data as baseline reference data and the contiguous United State as study area. Relationships between DN value of pixels in the 2008 Defense Meteorological Satellite Program's Operational Linescan System (DMSP-OLS) stable light image and population density were established. Results showed that an exponential function can more accurately reflect the relationship between luminosity and population density than a linear function. Additionally, a certain number of saturated pixels with DN value of 63 exist in urban core areas. If directly using the exponential function to estimate the population density for the whole brightly

  11. Music for a Brighter World: Brightness Judgment Bias by Musical Emotion

    OpenAIRE

    Bhattacharya, Joydeep; Lindsen, Job P.

    2016-01-01

    A prevalent conceptual metaphor is the association of the concepts of good and evil with brightness and darkness, respectively. Music cognition, like metaphor, is possibly embodied, yet no study has addressed the question whether musical emotion can modulate brightness judgment in a metaphor consistent fashion. In three separate experiments, participants judged the brightness of a grey square that was presented after a short excerpt of emotional music. The results of Experiment 1 showed that ...

  12. Light Sheet Fluorescence Microscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Santi, Peter A.

    2011-01-01

    Light sheet fluorescence microscopy (LSFM) functions as a non-destructive microtome and microscope that uses a plane of light to optically section and view tissues with subcellular resolution. This method is well suited for imaging deep within transparent tissues or within whole organisms, and because tissues are exposed to only a thin plane of light, specimen photobleaching and phototoxicity are minimized compared to wide-field fluorescence, confocal, or multiphoton microscopy. LSFMs produce well-registered serial sections that are suitable for three-dimensional reconstruction of tissue structures. Because of a lack of a commercial LSFM microscope, numerous versions of light sheet microscopes have been constructed by different investigators. This review describes development of the technology, reviews existing devices, provides details of one LSFM device, and shows examples of images and three-dimensional reconstructions of tissues that were produced by LSFM. PMID:21339178

  13. Suomi NPP ATMS Level 1B Brightness Temperature V1 (SNPPATMSL1B) at GES DISC

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — The Advanced Technology Microwave Sounder (ATMS) Level 1B data files contain brightness temperature measurements along with ancillary spacecraft, instrument, and...

  14. Enhanced-Resolution SSM/I and AMSR-E Daily Polar Brightness Temperatures

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — This data set contains enhanced-resolution brightness temperatures produced using the Scatterometer Image Reconstruction (SIR) algorithm developed by the Microwave...

  15. CLPX-Satellite: AMSR-E Brightness Temperature Grids, Version 1

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — This data set includes Aqua Advanced Microwave Scanning Radiometer - Earth Observing System (AMSR-E) passive microwave brightness temperatures gridded to the...

  16. CD56bright NK cells exhibit potent antitumor responses following IL-15 priming.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wagner, Julia A; Rosario, Maximillian; Romee, Rizwan; Berrien-Elliott, Melissa M; Schneider, Stephanie E; Leong, Jeffrey W; Sullivan, Ryan P; Jewell, Brea A; Becker-Hapak, Michelle; Schappe, Timothy; Abdel-Latif, Sara; Ireland, Aaron R; Jaishankar, Devika; King, Justin A; Vij, Ravi; Clement, Dennis; Goodridge, Jodie; Malmberg, Karl-Johan; Wong, Hing C; Fehniger, Todd A

    2017-11-01

    NK cells, lymphocytes of the innate immune system, are important for defense against infectious pathogens and cancer. Classically, the CD56dim NK cell subset is thought to mediate antitumor responses, whereas the CD56bright subset is involved in immunomodulation. Here, we challenge this paradigm by demonstrating that brief priming with IL-15 markedly enhanced the antitumor response of CD56bright NK cells. Priming improved multiple CD56bright cell functions: degranulation, cytotoxicity, and cytokine production. Primed CD56bright cells from leukemia patients demonstrated enhanced responses to autologous blasts in vitro, and primed CD56bright cells controlled leukemia cells in vivo in a murine xenograft model. Primed CD56bright cells from multiple myeloma (MM) patients displayed superior responses to autologous myeloma targets, and furthermore, CD56bright NK cells from MM patients primed with the IL-15 receptor agonist ALT-803 in vivo displayed enhanced ex vivo functional responses to MM targets. Effector mechanisms contributing to IL-15-based priming included improved cytotoxic protein expression, target cell conjugation, and LFA-1-, CD2-, and NKG2D-dependent activation of NK cells. Finally, IL-15 robustly stimulated the PI3K/Akt/mTOR and MEK/ERK pathways in CD56bright compared with CD56dim NK cells, and blockade of these pathways attenuated antitumor responses. These findings identify CD56bright NK cells as potent antitumor effectors that warrant further investigation as a cancer immunotherapy.

  17. Enhanced-Resolution SSM/I and AMSR-E Daily Polar Brightness Temperatures, Version 1

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — This data set contains enhanced-resolution brightness temperatures produced using the Scatterometer Image Reconstruction (SIR) algorithm developed by the Microwave...

  18. Paper-based solid-phase multiplexed nucleic acid hybridization assay with tunable dynamic range using immobilized quantum dots as donors in fluorescence resonance energy transfer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Noor, M Omair; Krull, Ulrich J

    2013-08-06

    A multiplexed solid-phase nucleic acid hybridization assay on a paper-based platform is presented using multicolor immobilized quantum dots (QDs) as donors in fluorescence resonance energy transfer (FRET). The surface of paper was modified with imidazole groups to immobilize two types of QD-probe oligonucleotide conjugates that were assembled in solution. Green-emitting QDs (gQDs) and red-emitting QDs (rQDs) served as donors with Cy3 and Alexa Fluor 647 (A647) acceptors. The gQD/Cy3 FRET pair served as an internal standard, while the rQD/A647 FRET pair served as a detection channel, combining the control and analytical test zones in one physical location. Hybridization of dye-labeled oligonucleotide targets provided the proximity for FRET sensitized emission from the acceptor dyes, which served as an analytical signal. Hybridization assays in the multicolor format provided a limit of detection of 90 fmol and an upper limit of dynamic range of 3.5 pmol. The use of an array of detection zones was designed to provide improved analytical figures of merit compared to that which could be achieved on one type of array design in terms of relative concentration of multicolor QDs. The hybridization assays showed excellent resistance to nonspecific adsorption of oligonucleotides. Selectivity of the two-plex hybridization assay was demonstrated by single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) detection at a contrast ratio of 50:1. Additionally, it is shown that the use of preformed QD-probe oligonucleotide conjugates and consideration of the relative number density of the two types of QD-probe conjugates in the two-color assay format is advantageous to maximize assay sensitivity and the upper limit of dynamic range.

  19. Magnetic fluorescent lamp

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berman, S. M.; Richardson, R. W.

    1983-12-01

    The radiant emission of a mercury argon discharge in a fluorescent lamp assembly is enhanced by providing means for establishing a magnetic field with lines of force along the path of electron flow through the bulb of the lamp assembly, to provide zeeman splitting of the ultraviolet spectral line. Optimum results are obtained when the magnetic field strength causes a zeeman splitting of approximately 1.7 times the thermal line width.

  20. Delayed fluorescence in photosynthesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goltsev, Vasilij; Zaharieva, Ivelina; Chernev, Petko; Strasser, Reto J

    2009-01-01

    Photosynthesis is a very efficient photochemical process. Nevertheless, plants emit some of the absorbed energy as light quanta. This luminescence is emitted, predominantly, by excited chlorophyll a molecules in the light-harvesting antenna, associated with Photosystem II (PS II) reaction centers. The emission that occurs before the utilization of the excitation energy in the primary photochemical reaction is called prompt fluorescence. Light emission can also be observed from repopulated excited chlorophylls as a result of recombination of the charge pairs. In this case, some time-dependent redox reactions occur before the excitation of the chlorophyll. This delays the light emission and provides the name for this phenomenon-delayed fluorescence (DF), or delayed light emission (DLE). The DF intensity is a decreasing polyphasic function of the time after illumination, which reflects the kinetics of electron transport reactions both on the (electron) donor and the (electron) acceptor sides of PS II. Two main experimental approaches are used for DF measurements: (a) recording of the DF decay in the dark after a single turnover flash or after continuous light excitation and (b) recording of the DF intensity during light adaptation of the photosynthesizing samples (induction curves), following a period of darkness. In this paper we review historical data on DF research and recent advances in the understanding of the relation between the delayed fluorescence and specific reactions in PS II. An experimental method for simultaneous recording of the induction transients of prompt and delayed chlorophyll fluorescence and decay curves of DF in the millisecond time domain is discussed.

  1. Magnetic fluorescent lamp

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berman, S.M.; Richardson R.W.

    1983-12-29

    The radiant emission of a mercury-argon discharge in a fluorescent lamp assembly is enhanced by providing means for establishing a magnetic field with lines of force along the path of electron flow through the bulb of the lamp assembly, to provide Zeeman splitting of the ultraviolet spectral line. Optimum results are obtained when the magnetic field strength causes a Zeeman splitting of approximately 1.7 times the thermal line width.

  2. Fluorescent quantification of melanin

    OpenAIRE

    Fernandes, Bruno Pacheco; Matamá, Maria Teresa; Guimarães, Diana Isabel Pereira; Gomes, Andreia; Cavaco-Paulo, Artur

    2016-01-01

    Melanin quantification is reportedly performed by absorption spectroscopy, commonly at 405 nm. Here, we propose the implementation of fluorescence spectroscopy for melanin assessment. In a typical in vitro assay to assess melanin production in response to an external stimulus, absorption spectroscopy clearly overvalues melanin content. This method is also incapable of distinguishing non-melanotic/amelanotic control cells from those that are actually capable of performing melanogenesis. Theref...

  3. Fluorescent Lamp Replacement Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    2017-07-01

    recycling , and can be disposed safely in a landfill. (2) LEDs offer reduced maintenance costs and fewer bulb replacements, significantly reducing...housings, plastic grates, old wiring) and the new LED technology (cardboard packaging) were broken down and separated into the appropriate container for... recycling . Several fixtures, ballasts and energy efficient fluorescent bulbs that were determined to be in pristine condition were returned to ATC

  4. Photosynthetically supplemental lighting for vegetable crop production with super-bright laser diode

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hu, Yongguang; Li, Pingping; Shi, Jintong

    2007-02-01

    Although many artificial light sources like high-pressure sodium lamp, metal halide lamp, fluorescent lamp and so on are commonly used in horticulture, they are not widely applied because of the disadvantages of unreasonable spectra, high cost and complex control. Recently new light sources of light-emitting diode (LED) and laser diode (LD) are becoming more and more popular in the field of display and illumination with the improvement of material and manufacturing, long life-span and increasingly low cost. A new type of super-bright red LD (BL650, central wavelength is 650 nm) was selected to make up of the supplemental lighting panel, on which LDs were distributed with regular hexagon array. Drive circuit was designed to power it and adjust light intensity. System performance including temperature rise and light intensity distribution under different vertical/horizontal distances were tested. Photosynthesis of sweet pepper and eggplant leaf under LD was measured with LI-6400 to show the supplemental lighting effects. The results show that LD system can supply the maximum light intensity of 180 μmol/m2 •s at the distance of 50 mm below the panel and the temperature rise is little within 1 °C. Net photosynthetic rate became faster when LD system increased light intensity. Compared with sunlight and LED supplemental lighting system, LD's promotion on photosynthesis is in the middle. Thus it is feasible for LD light source to supplement light for vegetable crops. Further study would focus on the integration of LD and other artificial light sources.

  5. Fluorescence-Guided Surgery of Liver Metastasis in Orthotopic Nude-Mouse Models.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Takashi Murakami

    Full Text Available We report here the development of fluorescence-guided surgery of liver metastasis. HT29 human colon cancer cells expressing green fluorescent protein (GFP were initially injected in the spleen of nude mice. Three weeks later, established liver metastases were harvested and implanted on the left lobe of the liver in other nude mice in order to make an orthotopic liver metastasis model. Fourteen mice with a single liver metastasis were randomized into bright-light surgery (BLS or fluorescence-guided surgery (FGS groups. Seven mice were treated with BLS, seven were treated with FGS. Three weeks after implantation, the left lobe of the liver with a single metastasis was exposed through a median abdominal incision. BLS was performed under white light. FGS was performed using a hand-held portable fluorescence imaging system (Dino-Lite. Post-surgical residual tumor fluorescence was visualized with the OV100 Small Animal Imaging System. Residual tumor fluorescence after BLS was clearly visualized at high magnification with the OV100. In contrast, residual tumor fluorescence after FGS was not detected even at high magnification with the OV100. These results demonstrate the feasibility of FGS for liver metastasis.

  6. Creating infinite contrast in fluorescence microscopy by using lanthanide centered emission.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Miguel R Carro-Temboury

    Full Text Available The popularity of fluorescence microscopy arises from the inherent mode of action, where the fluorescence emission from probes is used to visualize selected features on a presumed dark background. However, the background is rarely truly dark, and image processing and analysis is needed to enhance the fluorescent signal that is ascribed to the selected feature. The image acquisition is facilitated by using considerable illumination, bright probes at a relatively high concentration in order to make the fluorescent signal significantly more intense than the background signal. Here, we present two methods for completely removing the background signal in spectrally resolved fluorescence microscopy. The methodology is applicable for all probes with narrow and well-defined emission bands (Full width half-maximum < 20 nm. Here, we use two lanthanide based probes exploiting the narrow emission lines of europium(III and terbium(III ions. We used a model system with zeolites doped with lanthanides immobilized in a polymer stained with several fluorescent dyes regularly used in bioimaging. After smoothing the spectral data recorded in each pixel, they are differentiated. Method I is based on the direct sum of the gradient, while method II resolves the fluorescent signal by subtracting a background calculated via the gradient. Both methods improve signal-to-background ratio significantly and we suggest that spectral imaging of lanthanide-centered emission can be used as a tool to obtain absolute contrast in bioimaging.

  7. Pathways for Fluorescence Quenching in 2-Aminopurine π-Stacked with Pyrimidine Nucleobases

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Liang, Jingxin; Matsika, Spiridoula

    2011-05-04

    Fluorescent analogues of nucleobases are very useful as probes to study DNA dynamics, because natural DNA does not fluoresce significantly. In many of these analogues, such as 2-aminopurine (2AP), the fluorescence is quenched when incorporated into DNA through processes that are not well understood. This work uses theoretical studies to examine fluorescence quenching pathways in 2AP-containing dimers. The singlet excited states of π-stacked dimer systems containing 2AP and a pyrimidine base, thymine or cytosine, have been studied using ab initio computational methods. Computed relaxation pathways along the excited-state surfaces reveal novel mechanisms that can lead to fluorescence quenching in the π-stacked dimers. The placement of 2AP on the 5’ or 3’ terminus of the dimers has different effects on the excitation energies and the relaxation pathways on the S₁ excited state. Conical intersections between the ground and first excited states exist when 2AP is placed at the 3’ side, whereas the placement of 2AP at the 5’ side leads to the switching of a bright state to a dark state. Both of these processes can lead to fluorescence quenching and may contribute to the fluorescence quenching observed in 2AP when incorporated in DNA.

  8. Development of Methods for the Real-Time and Rapid Identification and Detection of TSE in Living Animals Using Fluorescence Spectroscopy of the Eye

    Science.gov (United States)

    2006-07-01

    the eye, especially in the diseased eye. An increase in lipofuscin accumulation is known to occur in human Creutzfeldt-Jakob disease victims and in...retina is homogeneously weakly emmissive or whether it is heterogeneous, containing very bright regions of highly fluorescent material resulting from

  9. Blue fluorescent cGMP sensor for multiparameter fluorescence imaging.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yusuke Niino

    Full Text Available Cyclic GMP (cGMP regulates many physiological processes by cooperating with the other signaling molecules such as cyclic AMP (cAMP and Ca(2+. Genetically encoded sensors for cGMP have been developed based on fluorescence resonance energy transfer (FRET between fluorescent proteins. However, to analyze the dynamic relationship among these second messengers, combined use of existing sensors in a single cell is inadequate because of the significant spectral overlaps. A single wavelength indicator is an effective alternative to avoid this problem, but color variants of a single fluorescent protein-based biosensor are limited. In this study, to construct a new color fluorescent sensor, we converted the FRET-based sensor into a single wavelength indicator using a dark FRET acceptor. We developed a blue fluorescent cGMP biosensor, which is spectrally compatible with a FRET-based cAMP sensor using cyan and yellow fluorescent proteins (CFP/YFP. We cotransfected them and loaded a red fluorescent probe for Ca(2+ into cells, and accomplished triple-parameter fluorescence imaging of these cyclic nucleotides and Ca(2+, confirming the applicability of this combination to individually monitor their dynamics in a single cell. This blue fluorescent sensor and the approach using this FRET pair would be useful for multiparameter fluorescence imaging to understand complex signal transduction networks.

  10. Imaging Ca2+ with a Fluorescent Rhodol.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Contractor, Alisha A; Miller, Evan W

    2018-01-16

    Ca2+ mediates a host of biochemical and biophysical signaling processes in cells. The development of synthetic, Ca2+-sensitive fluorophores has played an instrumental role in our understanding of the temporal and spatial dynamics of Ca2+. Coupling Ca2+-selective ligands to fluorescent reporters has provided a wealth of excellent indicators that span the visible excitation and emission spectrum and possess Ca2+ affinities suited to a variety of cellular contexts. One underdeveloped area is the use of hybrid rhodamine/fluorescein fluorophores, or rhodols, in the context of Ca2+ sensing. Rhodols are bright and photostable and have good two-photon absorption cross sections (σTPA), making them excellent candidates for incorporation into Ca2+-sensing scaffolds. Here, we present the design, synthesis, and application of rhodol Ca2+ sensor 1 (RCS-1), a chlorinated pyrrolidine-based rhodol. RCS-1 possesses a Ca2+ binding constant of 240 nM and a 10-fold turn response to Ca2+. RCS-1 effectively absorbs infrared light and has a σTPA of 76 GM at 840 nm, 3-fold greater than that of its fluorescein-based counterpart. The acetoxy-methyl ester of RCS-1 stains the cytosol of live cells, enabling observation of Ca2+ fluctuations and cultured neurons using both one- and two-photon illumination. Together, these results demonstrate the utility of rhodol-based scaffolds for Ca2+ sensing using two-photon illumination in neurons.

  11. Mineralogical characterization and beneficiation study of kaolin from Equador (RN and Junco do Seridó (PB to increase the brightness index

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    V. M. J. S. Campos

    Full Text Available Abstract Kaolin is a rock composed mainly of kaolinite. It is used in many industrial segments, such as paper and ceramics. However, for these uses it is necessary to submit the ore to appropriate beneficiation, which generally involves magnetic separation and chemical bleaching, aiming to remove iron oxide and hydroxide, raising brightness index. This work reports the mineralogical characterization and analysis of the beneficiation of three samples of kaolin, two from Equador (Rio Grande do Norte - RN and the third from Junco do Seridó (Paraíba - PB. The samples were submitted to granulometric classification in sieve of 44 μm, magnetic separation in a magnetic induction of 14000 gauss, and chemical bleaching with sodium dithionite during 240 min. The processes were divided into two beneficiation routes. X-ray diffraction, chemical analysis by X-ray fluorescence and scanning electron microscopy were used for mineralogical characterization of the ore and measurement of the brightness index, while electron paramagnetic resonance was applied to study the variation of iron oxides and hydroxides during beneficiation. The results indicate that just 30 min of chemical bleaching without magnetic separation was sufficient to increase the brightness index from 78.2 to 90.2% and from 91.3 to 95.7% in the two samples from Equador (RN and from 86.9 to 90.4% in the sample from Junco do Seridó (PB. The magnetic separation, although causing a small increase in the brightness index, was inefficient for removal of iron oxides and hydroxides. The results indicated no need for using magnetic separation in plants for beneficiation of kaolin from these two locations, providing the reduction of production costs allowing better exploitation of the ore.

  12. Circular permutated red fluorescent proteins and calcium ion indicators based on mCherry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carlson, Haley J; Campbell, Robert E

    2013-12-01

    Red fluorescent indicators for calcium ion (Ca(2+)) are preferable, relative to blue-shifted alternatives, for biological imaging applications due to the lower phototoxicity, lower autofluorescent background and deeper tissue penetration associated with longer wavelength light. Accordingly, we undertook the development of a genetically encoded Ca(2+) indicator based on the popular and widely utilized Discosoma-derived red fluorescent protein, mCherry. Starting from a promising but dimly fluorescent circular permutated variant of mCherry, we first engineered a 13-fold brighter variant (cp196V1.2) through directed evolution. This bright cp196V1.2 was then used as the scaffold for creation of eight distinct libraries of potential Ca(2+) indicators via permutation at different sites within the 7th and 10th β-strands, and fusion of calmodulin and M13 to the new termini. Screening of these libraries led to the conclusion that, consistent with previous investigations of homologous fluorescent proteins, the 146-145 site in β-strand 7 is the most promising permutation site for construction of useful Ca(2+) indicators. Further rounds of directed evolution ultimately led to an indicator that exhibits a 250% change in intrinsic brightness in response to Ca(2+) and an exceptionally high affinity (Kd = 6 nM) for Ca(2+).

  13. The Spectral Energy Distribution of Fermi Bright Blazars

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abdo, A. A.; Ackermann, M.; Agudo, I.; Ajello, M.; Aller, H. D.; Aller, M. F.; Angelakis, E.; Arkharov, A. A.; Axelsson, M.; Bach, U.; Baldini, L.; Ballet, J.; Barbiellini, G.; Bastieri, D.; Baughman, B. M.; Bechtol, K.; Bellazzini, R.; Benitez, E.; Berdyugin, A.; Berenji, B.; Blandford, R. D.; Bloom, E. D.; Boettcher, M.; Bonamente, E.; Borgland, A. W.; Bregeon, J.; Brez, A.; Brigida, M.; Bruel, P.; Burnett, T. H.; Burrows, D.; Buson, S.; Caliandro, G. A.; Calzoletti, L.; Cameron, R. A.; Capalbi, M.; Caraveo, P. A.; Carosati, D.; Casandjian, J. M.; Cavazzuti, E.; Cecchi, C.; Çelik, Ö.; Charles, E.; Chaty, S.; Chekhtman, A.; Chen, W. P.; Chiang, J.; Chincarini, G.; Ciprini, S.; Claus, R.; Cohen-Tanugi, J.; Colafrancesco, S.; Cominsky, L. R.; Conrad, J.; Costamante, L.; Cutini, S.; D'ammando, F.; Deitrick, R.; D'Elia, V.; Dermer, C. D.; de Angelis, A.; de Palma, F.; Digel, S. W.; Donnarumma, I.; Silva, E. do Couto e.; Drell, P. S.; Dubois, R.; Dultzin, D.; Dumora, D.; Falcone, A.; Farnier, C.; Favuzzi, C.; Fegan, S. J.; Focke, W. B.; Forné, E.; Fortin, P.; Frailis, M.; Fuhrmann, L.; Fukazawa, Y.; Funk, S.; Fusco, P.; Gómez, J. L.; Gargano, F.; Gasparrini, D.; Gehrels, N.; Germani, S.; Giebels, B.; Giglietto, N.; Giommi, P.; Giordano, F.; Giuliani, A.; Glanzman, T.; Godfrey, G.; Grenier, I. A.; Gronwall, C.; Grove, J. E.; Guillemot, L.; Guiriec, S.; Gurwell, M. A.; Hadasch, D.; Hanabata, Y.; Harding, A. K.; Hayashida, M.; Hays, E.; Healey, S. E.; Heidt, J.; Hiriart, D.; Horan, D.; Hoversten, E. A.; Hughes, R. E.; Itoh, R.; Jackson, M. S.; Jóhannesson, G.; Johnson, A. S.; Johnson, W. N.; Jorstad, S. G.; Kadler, M.; Kamae, T.; Katagiri, H.; Kataoka, J.; Kawai, N.; Kennea, J.; Kerr, M.; Kimeridze, G.; Knödlseder, J.; Kocian, M. L.; Kopatskaya, E. N.; Koptelova, E.; Konstantinova, T. S.; Kovalev, Y. Y.; Kovalev, Yu. A.; Kurtanidze, O. M.; Kuss, M.; Lande, J.; Larionov, V. M.; Latronico, L.; Leto, P.; Lindfors, E.; Longo, F.; Loparco, F.; Lott, B.; Lovellette, M. N.; Lubrano, P.; Madejski, G. M.; Makeev, A.; Marchegiani, P.; Marscher, A. P.; Marshall, F.; Max-Moerbeck, W.; Mazziotta, M. N.; McConville, W.; McEnery, J. E.; Meurer, C.; Michelson, P. F.; Mitthumsiri, W.; Mizuno, T.; Moiseev, A. A.; Monte, C.; Monzani, M. E.; Morselli, A.; Moskalenko, I. V.; Murgia, S.; Nestoras, I.; Nilsson, K.; Nizhelsky, N. A.; Nolan, P. L.; Norris, J. P.; Nuss, E.; Ohsugi, T.; Ojha, R.; Omodei, N.; Orlando, E.; Ormes, J. F.; Osborne, J.; Ozaki, M.; Pacciani, L.; Padovani, P.; Pagani, C.; Page, K.; Paneque, D.; Panetta, J. H.; Parent, D.; Pasanen, M.; Pavlidou, V.; Pelassa, V.; Pepe, M.; Perri, M.; Pesce-Rollins, M.; Piranomonte, S.; Piron, F.; Pittori, C.; Porter, T. A.; Puccetti, S.; Rahoui, F.; Rainò, S.; Raiteri, C.; Rando, R.; Razzano, M.; Reimer, A.; Reimer, O.; Reposeur, T.; Richards, J. L.; Ritz, S.; Rochester, L. S.; Rodriguez, A. Y.; Romani, R. W.; Ros, J. A.; Roth, M.; Roustazadeh, P.; Ryde, F.; Sadrozinski, H. F.-W.; Sadun, A.; Sanchez, D.; Sander, A.; Saz Parkinson, P. M.; Scargle, J. D.; Sellerholm, A.; Sgrò, C.; Shaw, M. S.; Sigua, L. A.; Siskind, E. J.; Smith, D. A.; Smith, P. D.; Spandre, G.; Spinelli, P.; Starck, J.-L.; Stevenson, M.; Stratta, G.; Strickman, M. S.; Suson, D. J.; Tajima, H.; Takahashi, H.; Takahashi, T.; Takalo, L. O.; Tanaka, T.; Thayer, J. B.; Thayer, J. G.; Thompson, D. J.; Tibaldo, L.; Torres, D. F.; Tosti, G.; Tramacere, A.; Uchiyama, Y.; Usher, T. L.; Vasileiou, V.; Verrecchia, F.; Vilchez, N.; Villata, M.; Vitale, V.; Waite, A. P.; Wang, P.; Winer, B. L.; Wood, K. S.; Ylinen, T.; Zensus, J. A.; Zhekanis, G. V.; Ziegler, M.

    2010-06-01

    We have conducted a detailed investigation of the broadband spectral properties of the γ-ray selected blazars of the Fermi LAT Bright AGN Sample (LBAS). By combining our accurately estimated Fermi γ-ray spectra with Swift, radio, infra-red, optical, and other hard X-ray/γ-ray data, collected within 3 months of the LBAS data taking period, we were able to assemble high-quality and quasi-simultaneous spectral energy distributions (SED) for 48 LBAS blazars. The SED of these γ-ray sources is similar to that of blazars discovered at other wavelengths, clearly showing, in the usual log ν-log ν F ν representation, the typical broadband spectral signatures normally attributed to a combination of low-energy synchrotron radiation followed by inverse Compton emission of one or more components. We have used these SED to characterize the peak intensity of both the low- and the high-energy components. The results have been used to derive empirical relationships that estimate the position of the two peaks from the broadband colors (i.e., the radio to optical, αro, and optical to X-ray, αox, spectral slopes) and from the γ-ray spectral index. Our data show that the synchrotron peak frequency (ν S peak) is positioned between 1012.5 and 1014.5 Hz in broad-lined flat spectrum radio quasars (FSRQs) and between 1013 and 1017 Hz in featureless BL Lacertae objects. We find that the γ-ray spectral slope is strongly correlated with the synchrotron peak energy and with the X-ray spectral index, as expected at first order in synchrotron-inverse Compton scenarios. However, simple homogeneous, one-zone, synchrotron self-Compton (SSC) models cannot explain most of our SED, especially in the case of FSRQs and low energy peaked (LBL) BL Lacs. More complex models involving external Compton radiation or multiple SSC components are required to reproduce the overall SED and the observed spectral variability. While more than 50% of known radio bright high energy peaked (HBL) BL Lacs are

  14. Modelling of microcracks image treated with fluorescent dye

    Science.gov (United States)

    Glebov, Victor; Lashmanov, Oleg U.

    2015-06-01

    The main reasons of catastrophes and accidents are high level of wear of equipment and violation of the production technology. The methods of nondestructive testing are designed to find out defects timely and to prevent break down of aggregates. These methods allow determining compliance of object parameters with technical requirements without destroying it. This work will discuss dye penetrant inspection or liquid penetrant inspection (DPI or LPI) methods and computer model of microcracks image treated with fluorescent dye. Usually cracks on image look like broken extended lines with small width (about 1 to 10 pixels) and ragged edges. The used method of inspection allows to detect microcracks with depth about 10 or more micrometers. During the work the mathematical model of image of randomly located microcracks treated with fluorescent dye was created in MATLAB environment. Background noises and distortions introduced by the optical systems are considered in the model. The factors that have influence on the image are listed below: 1. Background noise. Background noise is caused by the bright light from external sources and it reduces contrast on the objects edges. 2. Noises on the image sensor. Digital noise manifests itself in the form of randomly located points that are differing in their brightness and color. 3. Distortions caused by aberrations of optical system. After passing through the real optical system the homocentricity of the bundle of rays is violated or homocentricity remains but rays intersect at the point that doesn't coincide with the point of the ideal image. The stronger the influence of the above-listed factors, the worse the image quality and therefore the analysis of the image for control of the item finds difficulty. The mathematical model is created using the following algorithm: at the beginning the number of cracks that will be modeled is entered from keyboard. Then the point with random position is choosing on the matrix whose size is

  15. Hi-C Observations of Penumbral Bright Dots

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alpert, S. E.; Tiwari, S. K.; Moore, R. L.; Savage, S. L.; Winebarger, A. R.

    2014-01-01

    We use high-quality data obtained by the High Resolution Coronal Imager (Hi-C) to examine bright dots (BDs) in a sunspot's penumbra. The sizes of these BDs are on the order of 1 arcsecond (1") and are therefore hard to identify using the Atmospheric Imaging Assembly's (AIA) 0.6" pixel(exp -1) resolution. These BD become readily apparent with Hi-C's 0.1" pixel(exp -1) resolution. Tian et al. (2014) found penumbral BDs in the transition region (TR) by using the Interface Region Imaging Spectrograph (IRIS). However, only a few of their dots could be associated with any enhanced brightness in AIA channels. In this work, we examine the characteristics of the penumbral BDs observed by Hi-C in a sunspot penumbra, including their sizes, lifetimes, speeds, and intensity. We also attempt to find any association of these BDs to the IRIS BDs. There are fewer Hi-C BDs in the penumbra than seen by IRIS, though different sunspots were studied. We use 193 Angstroms Hi-C data from July 11, 2012 which observed from approximately 18:52:00 UT- 18:56:00 UT and supplement it with data from AIA's 193 Angstrom passband to see the complete lifetime of the dots that were born before and/or lasted longer than Hi- C's 5-minute observation period. We use additional AIA passbands and compare the light curves of the BDs at different temperatures to test whether the Hi-C BDs are TR BDs. We find that most Hi-C BDs show clear movement, and of those that do, they move in a radial direction, toward or away from the sunspot umbra. Single BDs interact with other BDs, combining to fade away or brighten. The BDs that do not interact with other BDs tend to move less. Many of the properties of our BDs are similar to the extreme values of the IRIS BDs, e.g., they move slower on average and their sizes and lifetimes are on the higher end of the IRIS BDs. We infer that our penumbral BDs are the large-scale end of the distribution of BDs observed by IRIS.

  16. Testing the dark matter hypothesis with low surface brightness galaxies and other evidence

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    McGaugh, SS; de Blok, WJG

    1998-01-01

    The severity of the mass discrepancy in spiral galaxies is strongly correlated with the central surface brightness of their disks. Progressively lower surface brightness galaxies have ever larger mass discrepancies. No other parameter (luminosity, size, velocity, morphology) is so well correlated

  17. T1 bright appendix sign to exclude acute appendicitis in pregnant women.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shin, Ilah; An, Chansik; Lim, Joon Seok; Kim, Myeong-Jin; Chung, Yong Eun

    2017-08-01

    To evaluate the diagnostic value of the T1 bright appendix sign for the diagnosis of acute appendicitis in pregnant women. This retrospective study included 125 pregnant women with suspected appendicitis who underwent magnetic resonance (MR) imaging. The T1 bright appendix sign was defined as a high intensity signal filling more than half length of the appendix on T1-weighted imaging. Sensitivity, specificity, positive predictive value (PPV) and negative predictive value (NPV) of the T1 bright appendix sign for normal appendix identification were calculated in all patients and in those with borderline-sized appendices (6-7 mm). The T1 bright appendix sign was seen in 51% of patients with normal appendices, but only in 4.5% of patients with acute appendicitis. The overall sensitivity, specificity, PPV, and NPV of the T1 bright appendix sign for normal appendix diagnosis were 44.9%, 95.5%, 97.6%, and 30.0%, respectively. All four patients with borderline sized appendix with appendicitis showed negative T1 bright appendix sign. The T1 bright appendix sign is a specific finding for the diagnosis of a normal appendix in pregnant women with suspected acute appendicitis. • Magnetic resonance imaging is increasingly used in emergency settings. • Acute appendicitis is the most common cause of acute abdomen. • Magnetic resonance imaging is widely used in pregnant population. • T1 bright appendix sign can be a specific sign representing normal appendix.

  18. The dark and visible matter content of low surface brightness disc galaxies

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    deBlok, WJG; McGaugh, SS

    1997-01-01

    We present mass models of a sample of 19 low surface brightness (LSB) galaxies and compare the properties of their constituent mass components with those of a sample of high surface brightness (HSB) galaxies. We find that LSB galaxies are dark matter dominated, Their halo parameters are only

  19. HI observations of low surface brightness galaxies : Probing low-density galaxies

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    deBlok, WJG; McGaugh, SS; vanderHulst, JM

    1996-01-01

    We present Very Large Array (VLA) and Westerbork Synthesis Radio Telescope (WSRT) 21-cm HI observations of 19 late-type low surface brightness (LSB) galaxies. Our main findings are that these galaxies, as well as having low surface brightnesses, have low HI surface densities, about a factor of

  20. Functional magnetic resonance imaging of brightness induction in the human visual cortex

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Boucard, CC; van Es, JJ; Maguire, RP; Cornelissen, FW

    2005-01-01

    A grey surface on a bright background appears to be darker than the same surface on a dark background. We used functional magnetic resonance imaging to study this phenomenon called brightness induction. While being scanned, participants viewed centre-surround displays in which either centre or

  1. Bright morning light advances the human circadian system without affecting NREM sleep homeostasis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Dijk, Derk Jan; Beersma, Domien G.M.; Daan, Serge; Lewy, Alfred J.

    Eight male subjects were exposed to either bright light or dim light between 0600 and 0900 h for 3 consecutive days each. Relative to the dim light condition, the bright light treatment advanced the evening rise in plasma melatonin and the time of sleep termination (sleep onset was held constant)

  2. Reduction of human sleep duration after bright light exposure in the morning

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Dijk, D.J.; Visscher, C.A.; Bloem, G.M.; Beersma, D.G.M.; Daan, S.

    1987-01-01

    In 8 subjects the spontaneous termination of sleep was determined after repetitive exposure to either bright or dim light, between 6:00 and 9:00 h, on 3 days preceding sleep assessment. Sleep duration was significantly shorter following bright light than following dim light. During sleep the time

  3. Inter-comparison of SMAP, SMOS and Aquarius L-band brightness temperature observations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Verifying the calibration of the SMAP radiometer over land observations is an important mission requirement. Inter-comparison of L-band brightness temperature observations from different satellites (SMAP, SMOS and Aquarius) is a useful tool for radiometer calibration. Brightness temperatures observa...

  4. Fluorescent temperature sensor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baker, Gary A [Los Alamos, NM; Baker, Sheila N [Los Alamos, NM; McCleskey, T Mark [Los Alamos, NM

    2009-03-03

    The present invention is a fluorescent temperature sensor or optical thermometer. The sensor includes a solution of 1,3-bis(1-pyrenyl)propane within a 1-butyl-1-1-methylpyrrolidinium bis(trifluoromethylsulfonyl)imide ionic liquid solvent. The 1,3-bis(1-pyrenyl)propane remains unassociated when in the ground state while in solution. When subjected to UV light, an excited state is produced that exists in equilibrium with an excimer. The position of the equilibrium between the two excited states is temperature dependent.

  5. Compact fluorescent lamp phosphors in accidental radiation monitoring.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Murthy, K V R; Pallavi, S P; Ghildiyal, Rahul; Parmar, Manish C; Patel, Y S; Ravi Kumar, V; Sai Prasad, A S; Natarajan, V; Page, A G

    2006-01-01

    The application of lamp phosphors for accidental dosimetry is a new concept. Since the materials used in fluorescent lamps are good photo luminescent materials, if one can either use the inherent defects present in the phosphor or add suitable modifiers to induce thermoluminescence (TL) in these phosphors, then the device (fluorescent lamp) can be used as an accidental dosemeter. In continuation of our search for a suitable phosphor material, which can serve both as an efficient lamp phosphor and as a good radiation monitoring device, detailed examination has been carried out on cerium and terbium-doped lanthanum phosphate material. A (90)Sr beta source with 50 mCi strength (1.85 GBq) was used as the irradiation source for TL studies. The TL response as a function of dose received was examined for all phosphors used and it was observed that the intensity of the TL peak vs. dose received was a linear function in the dose range 0.1-200 Gy in each case. Incidentally LaPO(4): Ce,Tb is a component of the compact fluorescent lamp marketed recently as an energy bright light source. Besides having very good luminescence efficiency, good dosimetric properties of these phosphors render them useful for their use in accidental dosimetry also.

  6. High Brightness HDR Projection Using Dynamic Freeform Lensing

    KAUST Repository

    Damberg, Gerwin

    2016-05-03

    Cinema projectors need to compete with home theater displays in terms of image quality. High frame rate and spatial resolution as well as stereoscopic 3D are common features today, but even the most advanced cinema projectors lack in-scene contrast and, more important, high peak luminance, both of which are essential perceptual attributes of images appearing realistic. At the same time, HDR image statistics suggest that the average image intensity in a controlled ambient viewing environment such as the cinema can be as low as 1% for cinematic HDR content and not often higher than 18%, middle gray in photography. Traditional projection systems form images and colors by blocking the source light from a lamp, therefore attenuating between 99% and 82% of light, on average. This inefficient use of light poses significant challenges for achieving higher peak brightness levels. In this work, we propose a new projector architecture built around commercially available components, in which light can be steered to form images. The gain in system efficiency significantly reduces the total cost of ownership of a projector (fewer components and lower operating cost), and at the same time increases peak luminance and improves black level beyond what is practically achievable with incumbent projector technologies. At the heart of this computational display technology is a new projector hardware design using phase modulation in combination with a new optimization algorithm that is capable of on-the-fly computation of freeform lens surfaces. © 2016 ACM.

  7. Low Cost Lithography Tool for High Brightness LED Manufacturing

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Andrew Hawryluk; Emily True

    2012-06-30

    The objective of this activity was to address the need for improved manufacturing tools for LEDs. Improvements include lower cost (both capital equipment cost reductions and cost-ofownership reductions), better automation and better yields. To meet the DOE objective of $1- 2/kilolumen, it will be necessary to develop these highly automated manufacturing tools. Lithography is used extensively in the fabrication of high-brightness LEDs, but the tools used to date are not scalable to high-volume manufacturing. This activity addressed the LED lithography process. During R&D and low volume manufacturing, most LED companies use contact-printers. However, several industries have shown that these printers are incompatible with high volume manufacturing and the LED industry needs to evolve to projection steppers. The need for projection lithography tools for LED manufacturing is identified in the Solid State Lighting Manufacturing Roadmap Draft, June 2009. The Roadmap states that Projection tools are needed by 2011. This work will modify a stepper, originally designed for semiconductor manufacturing, for use in LED manufacturing. This work addresses improvements to yield, material handling, automation and throughput for LED manufacturing while reducing the capital equipment cost.

  8. Resistance to immunotherapy: clouds in a bright sky.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Milano, Gérard

    2017-10-01

    Two major challenges persist for an optimal management of immunotherapy: i) identifying those patients who will benefit from this type of therapy, and ii) determining the biological, cellular and molecular mechanisms that trigger disease progression while on therapy. There is a consensual view in favor of standardizing practices currently used to measure programmed death ligand 1 (PD-L1) expression that relates to innate resistance. The tumor mutation landscape has been widely explored as a potential predictor of treatment efficacy. In contrast, our knowledge is rather limited as concerns the mechanisms sustaining acquired resistance to checkpoint blockade immunotherapy in patients under treatment. Upregulation of T cell immunoglobulin mucin domain 3 (TIM-3) in CD8+ T-cells has been reported in patients developing acquired resistance to anti-PD-1 treatment. Resistance mechanisms are even more complex for combinatorial strategies linking immunotherapeutic agents and conventional therapies, an area that is expanding rapidly. However, with the arrival of advanced analytical methods such as mass cytometry, there is reason for optimism. These methods can identify cellular mechanisms governing response to therapy and resistance. The clinical use of inhibitors of tumor-microenvironment-modulated pathways, such as those targeting indoleamine 2, 3-dioxygenase (IDO), hold promise for resistance management. Graphical abstract Clouds in a bright sky - Joseph Mallord William Turner.

  9. The bright and the dark sides of motor simulation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Panasiti, Maria Serena; Porciello, Giuseppina; Aglioti, Salvatore Maria

    2017-10-01

    While the acquisition of knowledge about the sensory, emotional, and motor states of others has long been thought to derive from abstract inferential operations, recent theories based on neuroscientific and psychological models emphasize that motor simulation is essential to a variety of complex functions ranging from the monitoring of one's own performance to the understanding of others' actions, and matching self and others' states to optimize social interactions. In this review, we discuss evidence that simulating the actions of others has both bright and dark sides. On the one hand, we show that simulation can aid the anticipation and prediction of errors in the actions of others (e.g., in the case of competitive sports), as well as the establishment of social bonds (e.g., in the case of mimicry). On the other hand, based on findings from our and other research groups, we describe specific circumstances in which simulating the actions of others is detrimental to performance (e.g., when we automatically follow the gaze of a person who is actually trying to deceive us). Finally, we show how the presence of a shared goal between agents (such as in joint actions) maximizes the cost benefit of motor simulation, suggesting that the top-down modulation of this process is vital for adapting in a social environment. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  10. Bright Soil Near 'McCool': Salty Deja Vu?

    Science.gov (United States)

    2006-01-01

    While driving eastward toward the northwestern flank of 'McCool Hill,' the wheels of NASA's Mars Exploration Rover Spirit churned up the largest amount of bright soil discovered so far in the mission. This image from Spirit's navigation camera, taken on the rover's 787th Martian day, or sol, of exploration (March 21, 2006), shows the strikingly light tone and large extent of the deposit. A few days earlier, Spirit's wheels unearthed a small patch of light-toned material informally named 'Tyrone.' In images from Spirit's panoramic camera, 'Tyrone' strongly resembled both 'Arad' and 'Paso Robles,' two patches of light-toned soils discovered earlier in the mission. Spirit found 'Paso Robles' in 2005 while climbing 'Cumberland Ridge' on the western slope of 'Husband Hill.' In early January 2006, the rover discovered 'Arad' on the basin floor just south of 'Husband Hill.' Spirit's instruments confirmed that those soils had a salty chemistry dominated by iron-bearing sulfates. Spirit's miniature thermal emission spectrometer is analyzing this most recent discovery, and researchers will compare it with those other deposits. These discoveries indicate that light-toned soil deposits might be widely distributed on the flanks and valley floors of the 'Columbia Hills' region in Gusev Crater on Mars. The salts may record the past presence of water, as they are easily mobilized and concentrated in liquid solution.

  11. Half-brightness measurements of candidate radiation sensors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Williams, Stephen Alexander

    Ionizing radiation poses a significant challenge for human and robotic space missions. Practical luminescent sensors will depend heavily upon research investigating the resistance of these materials to ionizing radiation and the ability to anneal or self-heal the damage caused by such radiation. In 1951, Birks and Black experimentally showed that the luminescent efficiency of anthracene bombarded by alpha particles varies with total fluence. From 1990 to the present, we found that the Birks and Black relation describes the reduction in light emission yield for every tested luminescent material except lead phosphate glass due to proton irradiation. These results indicate that radiation produced quenching centers compete with emission for absorbed energy. The purpose of this thesis is to present new results from related luminescent materials by exposing them to a 1-3 MeV proton beam. Particular emphasis will be placed on recent measurements made with bright luminescent materials, such as zinc sulfide doped with manganese (ZnS:Mn), europium tetrakis dibenzoylmethide triethylammonium (EuD4TEA), an magnesium tetrakis dibenzoylmethide triethylammonium (MgD4TEA). This research can be used to help determine if luminescent materials can be used as a real-time sensor to detect ionizing radiation.

  12. Calibration of Surface Brightness Fluctuations for WFC3/IR

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blakeslee, John

    2009-07-01

    We aim to characterize galaxy surface brightness fluctuations {SBF}, and calibrate the SBF distance method, in the F110W and F160W filters of the Wide Field Camera 3 IR channel. Because of the very high throughput of F110W and the good match of F160W to the standard H band, we anticipate that both of these filters will be popular choices for galaxy observations with WFC3/IR. The SBF signal is typically an order of magnitude brighter in the near-IR than in the optical, and the characterisitics {sensitivity, FOV, cosmetics} of the WFC3/IR channel will be enormously more efficient for SBF measurements than previously available near-IR cameras. As a result, our proposed SBF calibration will allow accurate distance derivation whenever an early-type or bulge-dominated galaxy is observed out to a distance of 150 Mpc or more {i.e., out to the Hubble flow} in the calibrated passbands. For individual galaxy observations, an accurate distance is useful for establishing absolute luminosities, black hole masses, linear sizes, etc. Eventually, once a large number of galaxies have been observed across the sky with WFC3/IR, this SBF calibration will enable accurate mapping of the total mass density distribution in the local universe using the data available in the HST archive. The proposed observations will have additional important scientific value; in particular, we highlight their usefulness for understanding the nature of multimodal globular cluster color distributions in giant elliptical galaxies.

  13. Photometry of some more neglected bright cataclysmic variables and candidates

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bruch, Albert

    2018-01-01

    As part of an effort to better characterize bright cataclysmic variables (CVs) and related systems which have received little attention in the past light curves of four systems (V504 Cen, KT Eri, Ret 1 and CTCV 2056-3014) are analyzed. For some of these stars no time resolved photometry has been published previously. While flickering is observed in all systems except Ret 1, it is particularly strong in V504 Cen and CTCV 2056-3014. In the latter star, a previously observed 15.4 m period, leading to its tentative classification as an intermediate polar, is probably spurious. Variations on time scales of hundredths of days observed in the pre-outburst light curve of the classical nova KT Eri continue after the outburst but appear not to be strictly periodic. Furthermore, the long term post-outburst light curve exhibits modulations with quasi-periods of quite different length. Thus, these variations cannot be due to aspect related variations in a system with a giant component similar to some recurrent novae. Instead, the system possibly exhibits variations with a period of 0.1952 d which may be orbital. However, any such conclusion still requires confirmation. The absence of flickering in Ret 1 indicates that the system probably does not contain an accretion disk. Instead, the observation of slow variations supports a previous suspicion of low amplitude variability with a period >12 h.

  14. Chandra's Darkest Bright Star: not so Dark after All?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ayres, Thomas R.

    2008-11-01

    The Chandra High Resolution camera (HRC) has obtained numerous short exposures of the ultraviolet (UV)-bright star Vega (α Lyrae; HD 172167: A0 V), to calibrate the response of the detector to out-of-band (non-X-ray) radiation. A new analysis uncovered a stronger "blue leak" in the imaging section (HRC-I) than reported in an earlier study of Vega based on a subset of the pointings. The higher count rate—a factor of nearly 2 above prelaunch estimates—raised the possibility that genuine coronal X-rays might lurk among the out-of-band events. Exploiting the broader point-spread function of the UV leak compared with soft X-rays identified an excess of counts centered on the target, technically at 3σ significance. A number of uncertainties, however, prevent a clear declaration of a Vegan corona. A more secure result would be within reach of a deep uninterrupted HRC-I pointing.

  15. Non-Markovian Quantum Friction of Bright Solitons in Superfluids.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Efimkin, Dmitry K; Hofmann, Johannes; Galitski, Victor

    2016-06-03

    We explore the quantum dynamics of a bright matter-wave soliton in a quasi-one-dimensional bosonic superfluid with attractive interactions. Specifically, we focus on the dissipative forces experienced by the soliton due to its interaction with Bogoliubov excitations. Using the collective coordinate approach and the Keldysh formalism, a Langevin equation of motion for the soliton is derived from first principles. The equation contains a stochastic Langevin force (associated with quantum noise) and a nonlocal in time dissipative force, which appears due to inelastic scattering of Bogoliubov quasiparticles off of the moving soliton. It is shown that Ohmic friction (i.e., a term proportional to the soliton's velocity) is absent in the integrable setup. However, the Markovian approximation gives rise to the Abraham-Lorentz force (i.e., a term proportional to the derivative of the soliton's acceleration), which is known from classical electrodynamics of a charged particle interacting with its own radiation. These Abraham-Lorentz equations famously contain a fundamental causality paradox, where the soliton (particle) interacts with excitations (radiation) originating from future events. We show, however, that the causality paradox is an artifact of the Markovian approximation, and our exact non-Markovian dissipative equations give rise to physical trajectories. We argue that the quantum friction discussed here should be observable in current quantum gas experiments.

  16. Photometry of some neglected bright cataclysmic variables and candidates

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bruch, Albert

    2017-04-01

    As part of an effort to better characterize bright cataclysmic variables (CVs) which have received little attention in the past light curves of four confirmed systems (CZ Aql, BO Cet, V380 Oph and EF Tuc) and one candidate (Lib 3) are analyzed. For none of these stars time resolved photometry has been published previously. While no variability was found in the case of Lib 3, which thus cannot be confirmed as a CV, the light curves of all other targets are dominated by strong flickering. Modulations on hourly time scales superimposed on the flickering can probably be related to orbital variations in BO Cet and V380 Oph, but not in CZ Aql and EF Tuc. Variations on the time scale of 10 min in CZ Aql, while not yet constituting convincing evidence, together with previous suspicions of a magnetically channeled accretion flow may point at an intermediate polar nature of this star. Some properties of the flickering are quantified in an effort to enlarge the data base for future comparative flickering studies in CVs and to refine the classification of the target stars.

  17. Graphical Methods for Quantifying Macromolecules through Bright Field Imaging

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chang, Hang; DeFilippis, Rosa Anna; Tlsty, Thea D.; Parvin, Bahram

    2008-08-14

    Bright ?eld imaging of biological samples stained with antibodies and/or special stains provides a rapid protocol for visualizing various macromolecules. However, this method of sample staining and imaging is rarely employed for direct quantitative analysis due to variations in sample fixations, ambiguities introduced by color composition, and the limited dynamic range of imaging instruments. We demonstrate that, through the decomposition of color signals, staining can be scored on a cell-by-cell basis. We have applied our method to Flbroblasts grown from histologically normal breast tissue biopsies obtained from two distinct populations. Initially, nuclear regions are segmented through conversion of color images into gray scale, and detection of dark elliptic features. Subsequently, the strength of staining is quanti?ed by a color decomposition model that is optimized by a graph cut algorithm. In rare cases where nuclear signal is significantly altered as a result of samplepreparation, nuclear segmentation can be validated and corrected. Finally, segmented stained patterns are associated with each nuclear region following region-based tessellation. Compared to classical non-negative matrix factorization, proposed method (i) improves color decomposition, (ii) has a better noise immunity, (iii) is more invariant to initial conditions, and (iv) has a superior computing performance

  18. GMRT H I study of giant low surface brightness galaxies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mishra, A.; Kantharia, N. G.; Das, M.; Omar, A.; Srivastava, D. C.

    2017-01-01

    We present H I observations of four giant low surface brightness (GLSB) galaxies UGC 1378, UGC 1922, UGC 4422 and UM 163 using the Giant Meterwave Radio Telescope. We include H I results on UGC 2936, UGC 6614 and Malin 2 from literature. H I is detected from all the galaxies and the extent is roughly twice the optical size; in UM 163, H I is detected along a broken disc encircling the optical galaxy. We combine our results with those in literature to further understand these systems. The main results are the following: (1) the peak H I surface densities in GLSB galaxies are several times 1021 cm-2. The H I mass is between 0.3 and 4 × 1010 M⊙; dynamical mass ranges from a few times 1011 M⊙ to a few times 1012 M⊙. (2) The rotation curves of GLSB galaxies are flat to the outermost measured point with rotation velocities of the seven GLSB galaxies being between 225 and 432 km s-1. (3) Recent star formation traced by near-ultraviolet emission in five GLSB galaxies in our sample appears to be located in rings around the galaxy centre. We suggest that this could be due to a stochastic burst of star formation at one location in the galaxy being propagated along a ring over a rotation period. (4) The H I is correlated with recent star formation in five of the seven GLSB galaxies.

  19. Temporal intensity interferometry: photon bunching in three bright stars

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guerin, W.; Dussaux, A.; Fouché, M.; Labeyrie, G.; Rivet, J.-P.; Vernet, D.; Vakili, F.; Kaiser, R.

    2017-12-01

    We report the first intensity correlation measured with starlight since the historical experiments of Hanbury Brown and Twiss. The photon bunching g(2)(τ, r = 0), obtained in the photon-counting regime, was measured for three bright stars: α Boo, α CMi and β Gem. The light was collected at the focal plane of a 1-m optical telescope, transported by a multi-mode optical fibre, split into two avalanche photodiodes and correlated digitally in real time. For total exposure times of a few hours, we obtained contrast values around 2 × 10-3, in agreement with the expectation for chaotic sources, given the optical and electronic bandwidths of our set-up. Comparing our results with the measurement of Hanbury Brown et al. for α CMi, we argue for the timely opportunity to extend our experiments to measuring the spatial correlation function over existing and/or foreseen arrays of optical telescopes diluted over several kilometres. This would enable microarcsec long-baseline interferometry in the optical, especially in the visible wavelengths, with a limiting magnitude of 10.

  20. The new world atlas of artificial night sky brightness

    Science.gov (United States)

    Falchi, Fabio; Cinzano, Pierantonio; Duriscoe, Dan; Kyba, Christopher C. M.; Elvidge, Christopher D.; Baugh, Kimberly; Portnov, Boris A.; Rybnikova, Nataliya A.; Furgoni, Riccardo

    2016-01-01

    Artificial lights raise night sky luminance, creating the most visible effect of light pollution—artificial skyglow. Despite the increasing interest among scientists in fields such as ecology, astronomy, health care, and land-use planning, light pollution lacks a current quantification of its magnitude on a global scale. To overcome this, we present the world atlas of artificial sky luminance, computed with our light pollution propagation software using new high-resolution satellite data and new precision sky brightness measurements. This atlas shows that more than 80% of the world and more than 99% of the U.S. and European populations live under light-polluted skies. The Milky Way is hidden from more than one-third of humanity, including 60% of Europeans and nearly 80% of North Americans. Moreover, 23% of the world’s land surfaces between 75°N and 60°S, 88% of Europe, and almost half of the United States experience light-polluted nights. PMID:27386582

  1. Tolerance of brightness and contrast adjustments on chronic apical abscess and apical granuloma interpretation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Purnamasari, L.; Iskandar, H. H. B.; Makes, B. N.

    2017-08-01

    In digitized radiography techniques, adjusting the image enhancement can improve the subjective image quality by optimizing the brightness and contrast for diagnostic needs. To determine the value range of image enhancement (brightness and contrast) on chronic apical abscess and apical granuloma interpretation. 30 periapical radiographs that diagnosed chronic apical abscess and 30 that diagnosed apical granuloma were adjusted by changing brightness and contrast values. The value range of brightness and contrast adjustment that can be tolerated in radiographic interpretations of chronic apical abscess and apical granuloma spans from -10 to +10. Brightness and contrast adjustments on digital radiographs do not affect the radiographic interpretation of chronic apical abscess and apical granuloma if conducted within the value range.

  2. Tolerance of image enhancement brightness and contrast in lateral cephalometric digital radiography for Steiner analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rianti, R. A.; Priaminiarti, M.; Syahraini, S. I.

    2017-08-01

    Image enhancement brightness and contrast can be adjusted on lateral cephalometric digital radiographs to improve image quality and anatomic landmarks for measurement by Steiner analysis. To determine the limit value for adjustments of image enhancement brightness and contrast in lateral cephalometric digital radiography for Steiner analysis. Image enhancement brightness and contrast were adjusted on 100 lateral cephalometric radiography in 10-point increments (-30, -20, -10, 0, +10, +20, +30). Steiner analysis measurements were then performed by two observers. Reliabilities were tested by the Interclass Correlation Coefficient (ICC) and significance tested by ANOVA or the Kruskal Wallis test. No significant differences were detected in lateral cephalometric analysis measurements following adjustment of the image enhancement brightness and contrast. The limit value of adjustments of the image enhancement brightness and contrast associated with incremental 10-point changes (-30, -20, -10, 0, +10, +20, +30) does not affect the results of Steiner analysis.

  3. Novel fluorescent nanoparticles for ultrasensitive identification of nucleic acids by optical methods

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mulberg, Mads Westergaard; Taskova, Maria; Thomsen, Rasmus P.

    2017-01-01

    For decades, the detection of nucleic acids and their interactions at low abundances has been a challenging task. Present nucleic acid diagnostics are primarily based on enzymatic reactions including sequencing, polymerase-chain reaction and microarrays. However, the use of enzymatic amplification...... interferes with the initial biomolecular system, is limited to in vitro assays, often time consuming and rather expensive. Therefore, there is interest in new amplification-free detection methods. A tremendous progress has been made in fluorescence based optical detection of biomolecules. In this work, we...... aimed at developing efficient tools for amplification-free nucleic acid detection. The result of simple and inexpensive polymerization in the presence of fluorescent dyes and additional functionalization reagents was ultra-bright fluorescent nanoparticles modified with additional groups...

  4. Synthesis and characterisation of highly fluorescent core-shell nanoparticles based on Alexa dyes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Natte, Kishore; Behnke, Thomas; Orts-Gil, Guillermo, E-mail: guillermo.orts-gil@bam.de; Wuerth, Christian; Friedrich, Joerg F.; Oesterle, Werner; Resch-Genger, Ute, E-mail: ute.resch@bam.de [BAM Federal Institute for Materials Research and Testing (Germany)

    2012-02-15

    Current and future developments in the emerging field of nanobiotechnology are closely linked to the rational design of novel fluorescent nanomaterials, e.g. for biosensing and imaging applications. Here, the synthesis of bright near infrared (NIR)-emissive nanoparticles based on the grafting of silica nanoparticles (SNPs) with 3-aminopropyl triethoxysilane (APTES) followed by covalent attachment of Alexa dyes and their subsequent shielding by an additional silica shell are presented. These nanoparticles were investigated by dynamic light scattering (DLS), transmission electron microscopy (TEM) and fluorescence spectroscopy. TEM studies revealed the monodispersity of the initially prepared and fluorophore-labelled silica particles and the subsequent formation of raspberry-like structures after addition of a silica precursor. Measurements of absolute fluorescence quantum yields of these scattering particle suspensions with an integrating sphere setup demonstrated the influence of dye labelling density-dependent fluorophore aggregation on the signaling behaviour of such nanoparticles.

  5. Nanopatterned yttrium aluminum garnet phosphor incorporated film for high-brightness GaN-based white light emitting diodes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cho, Joong-yeon; Park, Sang-Jun [Department of Materials Science and Engineering, Korea University, Seoul 136-713 (Korea, Republic of); Ahn, Jinho, E-mail: jhahn@hanyang.ac.kr [Department of Material Science and Engineering, Hanyang University, Seoul 133-791 (Korea, Republic of); Lee, Heon, E-mail: heonlee@korea.ac.kr [Department of Materials Science and Engineering, Korea University, Seoul 136-713 (Korea, Republic of)

    2014-11-03

    In this study, we fabricated high-brightness white light emitting diodes (LEDs) by developing a nanopatterned yttrium aluminum garnet (YAG) phosphor-incorporated film. White light can be obtained by mixing blue light from a GaN-based LED and yellow light of the YAG phosphor-incorporated film. If white light sources can be fabricated by exciting proper yellow phosphor using blue light, then these sources can be used instead of the conventional fluorescent lamps with a UV source, for backlighting of displays. In this work, a moth-eye structure was formed on the YAG phosphor-incorporated film by direct spin-on glass (SOG) printing. The moth-eye structures have been investigated to improve light transmittance in various optoelectronic devices, including photovoltaic solar cells, light emitting diodes, and displays, because of their anti-reflection property. Direct SOG printing, which is a simple, easy, and relatively inexpensive process, can be used to fabricate nanoscale structures. After direct SOG printing, the moth-eye structure with a diameter of 220 nm was formed uniformly on the YAG phosphor-incorporated film. As a result of moth-eye patterning on the YAG phosphor-incorporated film, the light output power of a white LED with a patterned YAG phosphor-incorporated film increased to up to 13% higher than that of a white LED with a non-patterned film. - Highlights: • GaN-based high-brightness white LED was prepared using patterned YAG phosphor-incorporated films. • Direct hydrogen silsesquioxane printing was used to form moth-eye patterns on the YAG films. • The electroluminescence intensity of the white LED was enhanced by up to 14.9%.

  6. Development of a fluorescent cryocooler

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Edwards, B.C.; Buchwald, M.I.; Epstein, R.I.; Gosnell, T.R.; Mungan, C.E.

    1995-10-01

    Recent work at Los Alamos National Laboratory has demonstrated the physical principles for a new type of solid-state cryocooler based on anti-Stokes fluorescence. Design studies indicate that a vibration-free, low-mass ``fluorescent cryocooler`` could operate for years with efficiencies and cooling powers comparable to current commercial systems. This paper presents concepts for a fluorescent cryocooler, design considerations and expected performance.

  7. Diffraction phase and fluorescence microscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, Yongkeun; Popescu, Gabriel; Badizadegan, Kamran; Dasari, Ramachandra R; Feld, Michael S

    2006-09-04

    We have developed diffraction phase and fluorescence (DPF) microscopy as a new technique for simultaneous quantitative phase imaging and epi-fluorescence investigation of live cells. The DPF instrument consists of an interference microscope, which is incorporated into a conventional inverted fluorescence microscope. The quantitative phase images are characterized by sub-nanometer optical path-length stability over periods from milliseconds to a cell lifetime. The potential of the technique for quantifying rapid nanoscale motions in live cells is demonstrated by experiments on red blood cells, while the composite phase-fluorescence imaging mode is exemplified with mitotic kidney cells.

  8. Fluorescent nanodiamonds for ultrasensitive detection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kimball, Joseph; Shumilov, Dmytro; Maliwa, Badri; Zerda, T. W.; Rout, Bibhu; Fudala, Rafal; Raut, Sangram; Gryczynski, Ignacy; Simanek, Eric; Borejdo, Julian; Rich, Ryan; Akopova, Irina; Gryczynski, Zygmunt

    2014-03-01

    Fluorescent nanodiamonds (NDs) are new and emerging nanomaterials that have potential to be used as fluorescence imaging agents and also as a highly versatile platform for the controlled functionalization and delivery of a wide spectrum of therapeutic agents. We will utilize two experimental methods, TIRF, a relatively simple method based on total internal reflection fluorescence and SPRF, fluorescence enhanced by resonance coupling with surface plasmons. We estimate that the SPRF method will be 100 times sensitive than currently available similar detectors based on detectors. The ultimate goal of this research is to develop microarray platforms that could be used for sensitive, fast and inexpensive gene sequencing and protein detection.

  9. Analysis of Mass Profiles and Cooling Flows of Bright, Early-Type Galaxies AO2, AO3 and Surface Brightness Profiles and Energetics of Intracluster Gas in Cool Galaxy Clusters AO3

    Science.gov (United States)

    White, Raymond E., III

    1998-01-01

    This final report uses ROSAT observations to analyze two different studies. These studies are: Analysis of Mass Profiles and Cooling Flows of Bright, Early-Type Galaxies; and Surface Brightness Profiles and Energetics of Intracluster Gas in Cool Galaxy Clusters.

  10. Where to Find Young Bright Stars in Geosciences: GGD, NSU

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rakhmenkoulova, I. F.; Sharapov, V. N.

    2004-12-01

    Geology and Geophysics Department (GGD) of Novosibirsk State University (NSU) can be regarded as infant, because it was founded in 1962. On the other hand, if to judge by what have been done - it is not only full-fledged, but well-known department. The unique location and specific educational and scientific traditions make GGD a famous school not only in Siberia, but in Russia, and all over the world. What are the tips to prepare bright stars in geosciences? 1.NSU is located in Academgorodok (Novosibirsk scientific center), unique place in Siberia, where more than 20 scientific institutions are located. This makes the University different from other schools in Russia. Famous Russian scientists, including members of RAS, together with foreign professors give lectures and seminars for NSU students. 2.The bright star hunting starts far below the NSU level. Each year in April there is a special event in Academgorodok -`Geologic Olympiad', where children of all Russian regions, as well as ex-Soviet republics are gathered together to submit their papers, to discuss most interesting geoscience problems and to win prizes for their knowledge. The youngest stars happen to be only 6-7 years old. The event is sponsored by NSU, UIGGM, and the Ministry of Natural Resources. The brightest geostars are grown from `Geologic Olympiad' participants. 3.There is special physics-mathematical high school in Academgorodok. Each summer this school gathers young stars from farthest Siberian and Far East regions and gives classes and seminars in mathematics, physics, chemistry and geology. As the result the most talented children become the students of this school (for two years). The school in turn supplies GGD with the students. 4.NSU has the study curriculum different from other universities in Russia. That is why the entrance examinations are much more difficult as compared to other schools and are taken in July (a month earlier then at other universities). However the entrance

  11. Creation, Transport and Measurement of Bright Relativistic Electron Beams.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McKee, Chad Bennett

    This thesis deals with three topics relevant to linac-driven free electron lasers: the creation, transport and measurement of bright relativistic electron beams. Thermionic microwave electron guns produce bright electron beams that are well suited to drive free electron lasers, FELs. The rf fields in the gun cause some of the emitted electrons to reverse direction and strike the cathode. These back-bombarding electrons heat the cathode limiting both the pulse length and time averaged current. The cathode heating is reduced if a transverse magnetic field is applied across the gun cavity to deflect back-bombarding electrons. We improve the thermionic microwave electron gun by redesigning the deflection magnet to minimize the back-heating power. Computer simulations show that transverse magnetic fields with rapid axial falloffs reduce the back-heating power more than fields that are axially constant. Experiments verify these simulations. The deflection magnet presently installed on the Mark III gun has a slow axial falloff and reduces the back-heating power by 31%. Using the simulation results we design a new deflection magnet having a rapid axial falloff. This magnet has been installed on the NCCU gun and reduces the back-heating power by 63%. Improper transport of the electron beam through the beam line degrades the quality of the electron beam and lowers the performance of the FEL. We propose to improve the beam line commissioning and control procedures on linac -driven FELs by experimentally measuring the transfer matrix of each beam line section. The transfer matrix of a given section is measured by dithering the electron beam, measuring the beam vector before and after the section and inverting the subsequent data matrix. We minimize the beam line errors by minimizing the deviation between the experimentally measured transfer matrix and the design transfer matrix of each beam line section. While not experimentally verified, computer simulations show that this

  12. New Fluorescent Nanoparticles for Ultrasensitive Detection of Nucleic Acids by Optical Methods.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Westergaard Mulberg, Mads; Taskova, Maria; Thomsen, Rasmus P; Okholm, Anders H; Kjems, Jørgen; Astakhova, Kira

    2017-08-17

    For decades the detection of nucleic acids and their interactions at low abundances has been a challenging task that has thus far been solved by enzymatic target amplification. In this work we aimed at developing efficient tools for amplification-free nucleic acid detection, which resulted in the synthesis of new fluorescent nanoparticles. Here, the fluorescent nanoparticles were made by simple and inexpensive radical emulsion polymerization of butyl acrylate in the presence of fluorescent dyes and additional functionalization reagents. This provided ultra-bright macrofluorophores of 9-84 nm mean diameter, modified with additional alkyne and amino groups for bioconjugation. By using click and NHS chemistries, the new nanoparticles were attached to target-specific DNA probes that were used in fluorimetry and fluorescence microscopy. Overall, these fluorescent nanoparticles and their oligonucleotide derivatives have higher photostability, brighter fluorescence and hence dramatically lower limits of target detection than the individual organic dyes. These properties make them useful in approaches directed towards ultrasensitive detection of nucleic acids, in particular for imaging and in vitro diagnostics of DNA. © 2017 Wiley-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  13. Aggregation-enhanced fluorescence in PEGylated phospholipid nanomicelles for in vivo imaging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Dan; Qian, Jun; He, Sailing; Park, Jin Sun; Lee, Kwang-Sup; Han, Sihai; Mu, Ying

    2011-09-01

    We report polymeric nanomicelles doped with organic fluorophores (StCN, (Z)-2,3-bis[4-(N-4-(diphenylamino)styryl)phenyl]-acrylonitrile), which have the property of aggregation-enhanced fluorescence. The fluorescent nanomicelles have two unique features: (1) They give much brighter fluorescence emission than mono-fluorophores. (2) The nanomicelles with amphiphilic copolymers [e.g., phospholipids-PEG (polyethylene glycol)] make the encapsulated fluorophores more stable in various bio-environments and easy for further conjugation with bio-molecules. After chemical and optical characterization, these fluorescent nanomicelles are utilized as efficient optical probes for in vivo sentinel lymph node (SLN) mapping of mice. The StCN-encapsulated nanomicelles, as well as their bioconjugates with arginine-glycine-aspartic acid (RGD) peptides, are used to target subcutaneously xenografted tumors in mice, and in vivo fluorescence images demonstrate the potential to use PEGylated phospholipid nanomicelles with aggregation-enhanced fluorescence as bright nanoprobes for in vivo diagnosis of tumors. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  14. Green Synthesis of Fluorescent Carbon Dots for Selective Detection of Tartrazine in Food Samples.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Hua; Yang, Xiupei; Li, Gu; Zhao, Chuan; Liao, Xiangjun

    2015-08-05

    A simple, economical, and green method for the preparation of water-soluble, high-fluorescent carbon quantum dots (C-dots) has been developed via hydrothermal process using aloe as a carbon source. The synthesized C-dots were characterized by atomic force microscope (AFM), transmission electron microscopy (TEM), fluorescence spectrophotometer, UV-vis absorption spectra as well as Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR). The results reveal that the as-prepared C-dots were spherical shape with an average diameter of 5 nm and emit bright yellow photoluminescence (PL) with a quantum yield of approximately 10.37%. The surface of the C-dots was rich in hydroxyl groups and presented various merits including high fluorescent quantum yield, excellent photostability, low toxicity and satisfactory solubility. Additionally, we found that one of the widely used synthetic food colorants, tartrazine, could result in a strong fluorescence quenching of the C-dots through a static quenching process. The decrease of fluorescence intensity made it possible to determine tartrazine in the linear range extending from 0.25 to 32.50 μM, This observation was further successfully applied for the determination of tartrazine in food samples collected from local markets, suggesting its great potential toward food routine analysis. Results from our study may shed light on the production of fluorescent and biocompatible nanocarbons due to our simple and environmental benign strategy to synthesize C-dots in which aloe was used as a carbon source.

  15. Prognostic factors for acute encephalopathy with bright tree appearance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Azuma, Junji; Nabatame, Shin; Nakano, Sayaka; Iwatani, Yoshiko; Kitai, Yukihiro; Tominaga, Koji; Kagitani-Shimono, Kuriko; Okinaga, Takeshi; Yamamoto, Takehisa; Nagai, Toshisaburo; Ozono, Keiichi

    2015-02-01

    To determine the prognostic factors for encephalopathy with bright tree appearance (BTA) in the acute phase through retrospective case evaluation. We recruited 10 children with encephalopathy who presented with BTA and classified them into 2 groups. Six patients with evident regression and severe psychomotor developmental delay after encephalopathy were included in the severe group, while the remaining 4 patients with mild mental retardation were included in the mild group. We retrospectively analyzed their clinical symptoms, laboratory data, and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) and magnetic resonance spectroscopy (MRS) findings. Patients in the severe group developed subsequent complications such as epilepsy and severe motor impairment. Univariate analysis revealed that higher maximum lactate dehydrogenase (LDH) levels (p=0.055) were a weak predictor of poor outcome. Maximum creatinine levels were significantly higher (p<0.05) and minimal platelet counts were significantly lower (p<0.05) in the severe group than in the mild group. Acute renal failure was not observed in any patient throughout the study. MRS of the BTA lesion during the BTA period showed elevated lactate levels in 5 children in the severe group and 1 child in the mild group. MRI performed during the chronic phase revealed severe brain atrophy in all patients in the severe group. Higher creatinine and LDH levels and lower platelet counts in the acute phase correlated with poor prognosis. Increased lactate levels in the BTA lesion during the BTA period on MRS may predict severe physical and mental disability. Copyright © 2014 The Japanese Society of Child Neurology. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  16. A high-brightness thermionic microwave electron gun

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Borland, Michael [Stanford Univ., CA (United States)

    1991-02-01

    In a collaborative effort by SSRL, AET Associates, and Varian Associates, a high-brightness microwave electron gun using a thermionic cathode has been designed, built, tested, and installed for use with the SSRL 150 MeV linear accelerator. This thesis discusses the physics behind the design and operation of the gun and associated systems, presenting predictions and experimental tests of the gun`s performance. The microwave gun concept is of increasing interest due to its promise of providing higher-current, lower-emittance electron beams than possible from conventional, DC gun technology. In a DC guns, accelerating gradients are less than 8 MV/m, while those in a microwave gun can exceed 100 MV/m, providing much more rapid initial acceleration, thereby reducing the deleterious effects of space-charge. Microwave guns produce higher momentum beams than DC guns, thus lessening space-charge effects during subsequent beam transport. Typical DC guns produce kinetic energies of 80--400 KeV, compared to 2--3 MeV for the SSRL microwave gun. ``State-of-the-art`` microwave gun designs employ laser-driven photocathodes, providing excellent performance but with greater complexity and monetary costs. A thermionic microwave gun with a magnetic bunching system is comparable in cost and complexity to a conventional system, but provides performance that is orders of magnitude better. Simulations of the SSRL microwave gun predict a normalized RMS emittance at the gun exist of < 10 π • mec • μm for a beam consisting of approximately 50% of the particles emitted from the gun, and having a momentum spread ±10%. These emittances are for up to 5 x 109e- per bunch. Chromatic aberrations in the transport line between the gun and linear accelerator increase this to typically < 30 π • me • μm.

  17. High brightness diode lasers controlled by volume Bragg gratings

    Science.gov (United States)

    Glebov, Leonid

    2017-02-01

    Volume Bragg gratings (VBGs) recorded in photo-thermo-refractive (PTR) glass are holographic optical elements that are effective spectral and angular filters withstanding high power laser radiation. Reflecting VBGs are narrow-band spectral filters while transmitting VBGs are narrow-band angular filters. The use of these optical elements in external resonators of semiconductor lasers enables extremely resonant feedback that provides dramatic spectral and angular narrowing of laser diodes radiation without significant power and efficiency penalty. Spectral narrowing of laser diodes by reflecting VBGs demonstrated in wide spectral region from near UV to 3 μm. Commercially available VBGs have spectral width ranged from few nanometers to few tens of picometers. Efficient spectral locking was demonstrated for edge emitters (single diodes, bars, modules, and stacks), vertical cavity surface emitting lasers (VCSELs), grating coupled surface emitting lasers (GCSELs), and interband cascade lasers (ICLs). The use of multiplexed VBGs provides multiwavelength emission from a single emitter. Spectrally locked semiconductor lasers demonstrated CW power from milliwatts to a kilowatt. Angular narrowing by transmitting VBGs enables single transverse mode emission from wide aperture diode lasers having resonators with great Fresnel numbers. This feature provides close to diffraction limit divergence along a slow axis of wide stripe edge emitters. Radiation exchange between lasers by means of spatially profiled or multiplexed VBGs enables coherent combining of diode lasers. Sequence of VBGs or multiplexed VBGs enable spectral combining of spectrally narrowed diode lasers or laser modules. Thus the use of VBGs for diode lasers beam control provides dramatic increase of brightness.

  18. Search for bright nearby M dwarfs with virtual observatory tools

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Aberasturi, M.; Caballero, J. A.; Montesinos, B.; Gálvez-Ortiz, M. C.; Solano, E.; Martín, E. L. [Centro de Astrobiología (CSIC-INTA), Departamento de Astrofísica, P.O. Box 78, E-28691 Villanueva de la Cañada, Madrid (Spain)

    2014-08-01

    Using Virtual Observatory tools, we cross-matched the Carlsberg Meridian 14 and the 2MASS Point Source catalogs to select candidate nearby bright M dwarfs distributed over ∼25,000 deg{sup 2}. Here, we present reconnaissance low-resolution optical spectra for 27 candidates that were observed with the Intermediate Dispersion Spectrograph at the 2.5 m Isaac Newton Telescope (R≈ 1600). We derived spectral types from a new spectral index, R, which measures the ratio of fluxes at 7485-7015 Å and 7120-7150 Å. We also used VOSA, a Virtual Observatory tool for spectral energy distribution fitting, to derive effective temperatures and surface gravities for each candidate. The resulting 27 targets were M dwarfs brighter than J = 10.5 mag, 16 of which were completely new in the Northern hemisphere and 7 of which were located at less than 15 pc. For all of them, we also measured Hα and Na I pseudo-equivalent widths, determined photometric distances, and identified the most active stars. The targets with the weakest sodium absorption, namely, J0422+2439 (with X-ray and strong Hα emissions), J0435+2523, and J0439+2333, are new members in the young Taurus-Auriga star-forming region based on proper motion, spatial distribution, and location in the color-magnitude diagram, which reopens the discussion on the deficit of M2-4 Taurus stars. Finally, based on proper motion diagrams, we report on a new wide M dwarf binary system in the field, LSPM J0326+3929EW.

  19. Voltage-sensitive rhodol with enhanced two-photon brightness.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kulkarni, Rishikesh U; Kramer, Daniel J; Pourmandi, Narges; Karbasi, Kaveh; Bateup, Helen S; Miller, Evan W

    2017-03-14

    We have designed, synthesized, and applied a rhodol-based chromophore to a molecular wire-based platform for voltage sensing to achieve fast, sensitive, and bright voltage sensing using two-photon (2P) illumination. Rhodol VoltageFluor-5 (RVF5) is a voltage-sensitive dye with improved 2P cross-section for use in thick tissue or brain samples. RVF5 features a dichlororhodol core with pyrrolidyl substitution at the nitrogen center. In mammalian cells under one-photon (1P) illumination, RVF5 demonstrates high voltage sensitivity (28% ΔF/F per 100 mV) and improved photostability relative to first-generation voltage sensors. This photostability enables multisite optical recordings from neurons lacking tuberous sclerosis complex 1, Tsc1, in a mouse model of genetic epilepsy. Using RVF5, we show that Tsc1 KO neurons exhibit increased activity relative to wild-type neurons and additionally show that the proportion of active neurons in the network increases with the loss of Tsc1. The high photostability and voltage sensitivity of RVF5 is recapitulated under 2P illumination. Finally, the ability to chemically tune the 2P absorption profile through the use of rhodol scaffolds affords the unique opportunity to image neuronal voltage changes in acutely prepared mouse brain slices using 2P illumination. Stimulation of the mouse hippocampus evoked spiking activity that was readily discerned with bath-applied RVF5, demonstrating the utility of RVF5 and molecular wire-based voltage sensors with 2P-optimized fluorophores for imaging voltage in intact brain tissue.

  20. Velocity bunching of high-brightness electron beams

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. G. Anderson

    2005-01-01

    Full Text Available Velocity bunching has been recently proposed as a tool for compressing electron beam pulses in modern high brightness photoinjector sources. This tool is familiar from earlier schemes implemented for bunching dc electron sources, but presents peculiar challenges when applied to high current, low emittance beams from photoinjectors. The main difficulty foreseen is control of emittance oscillations in the beam in this scheme, which can be naturally considered as an extension of the emittance compensation process at moderate energies. This paper presents two scenarios in which velocity bunching, combined with emittance control, is to play a role in nascent projects. The first is termed ballistic bunching, where the changing of relative particle velocities and positions occur in distinct regions, a short high gradient linac, and a drift length. This scenario is discussed in the context of the proposed ORION photoinjector. Simulations are used to explore the relationship between the degree of bunching, and the emittance compensation process. Experimental measurements performed at the UCLA Neptune Laboratory of the surprisingly robust bunching process, as well as accompanying deleterious transverse effects, are presented. An unanticipated mechanism for emittance growth in bends for highly momentum chirped beam was identified and studied in these experiments. The second scenario may be designated as phase space rotation, and corresponds closely to the recent proposal of Ferrario and Serafini. Its implementation for the compression of the electron beam pulse length in the PLEIADES inverse Compton scattering (ICS experiment at LLNL is discussed. It is shown in simulations that optimum compression may be obtained by manipulation of the phases in low gradient traveling wave accelerator sections. Measurements of the bunching and emittance control achieved in such an implementation at PLEIADES, as well as aspects of the use of velocity-bunched beam directly

  1. VELOCITY BUNCHING OF HIGH-BRIGHTNESS ELECTRON BEAMS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Anderson, S G; Musumeci, P; Rosenzweig, J B; Brown, W J; England, R J; Ferrario, M; Jacob, J S; Thompson, M C; Travish, G; Tremaine, A M; Yoder, R

    2004-10-15

    Velocity bunching has been recently proposed as a tool for compressing electron beam pulses in modern high brightness photoinjector sources. This tool is familiar from earlier schemes implemented for bunching dc electron sources, but presents peculiar challenges when applied to high current, low emittance beams from photoinjectors. The main difficulty foreseen is control of emittance oscillations in the beam in this scheme, which can be naturally considered as an extension of the emittance compensation process at moderate energies. This paper presents two scenarios in which velocity bunching, combined with emittance control, is to play a role in nascent projects. The first is termed ballistic bunching, where the changing of relative particle velocities and positions occur in distinct regions, a short high gradient linac, and a drift length. This scenario is discussed in the context of the proposed ORION photoinjector. Simulations are used to explore the relationship between the degree of bunching, and the emittance compensation process. Experimental measurements performed at the UCLA Neptune Laboratory of the surprisingly robust bunching process, as well as accompanying deleterious transverse effects, are presented. An unanticipated mechanism for emittance growth in bends for highly momentum chirped beam was identified and studied in these experiments. The second scenario may be designated as phase space rotation, and corresponds closely to the recent proposal of Ferrario and Serafini. Its implementation for the compression of the electron beam pulse length in the PLEIADES inverse Compton scattering (ICS) experiment at LLNL is discussed. It is shown in simulations that optimum compression may be obtained by manipulation of the phases in low gradient traveling wave accelerator sections. Measurements of the bunching and emittance control achieved in such an implementation at PLEIADES, as well as aspects of the use of velocity-bunched beam directly in ICS experiments

  2. Quantitative approach of speleothems fluorescence

    Science.gov (United States)

    Quiers, Marine; Perrette, Yves; Poulenard, Jérôme; Chalmin, Emilie; Revol, Morgane

    2014-05-01

    In this study, we propose a framework to interpret quantitatively the fluorescence of speleothems organic matter (OM) by the way of a bank of water-extracted organic matter. Due to its efficiency to described dissolved organic matter (DOM) characteritics, fluorescence has been used to determined DOM signatures in natural systems, water circulations, OM transfer from soils, OM evolution in soils or recently, DOM changes in engineered treatment systems. Fluorescence has also been used in speleothems studies, mainly as a growth indicator. Only few studies interpret it as an environmental proxy. Indeed, the fluorescence of OM provides information on the type of organic molecules trapped in speleothems and their evolutions. But the most direct information given by fluorescence is the variation of OM quantities. Actually, increase of fluorescence intensity is generally related to an increase in OM quantity but may also be induced by calcite optical effect or qualitative change of OM. However, analytical technics used in water environments cannot be used for speleothem samples. In this study we propose to give a frame to interpret quantitatively the fluorescence signal of speleothems. 3 different samples of stalagmites from french northern Prealps were used. To allow the quantification of the fluorescence signal, we need to measure the fluorescence and the quantity of organic matter on the same sample. OM of speleothems was extracted by an acid digestion method and analysed with a spectrofluorimeter. However, it was not possible to quantify directly the OM, as the extract solvant was a high-concentrated acid. To solve this problem, a calibration using soil extracts was realised. Soils were chosen in order to represent the diversity of OM present in the environment above the caves. Attention was focused on soil and vegetation types, and landuse. Organic material was water extracted from soils and its fluorescence was also measured. Total organic carbon was performed on the

  3. Experimentally studied laser fluorescence method for remote sensing of plant stress situation induced by improper plants watering

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yu. V. Fedotov

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Stressful situations of plants can be caused by a lack of nutrients; mechanical damages; diseases; low or high temperatures; lack of illumination; insufficient or excess humidity of the soil; soil salinization; soil pollution by oil products or heavy metals; the increased acidity of the soil; use of pesticides, herbicides, insecticides, etc.At early stages it is often difficult to detect seemingly that the plants are in stressful situations caused by adverse external factors. However, the fluorescent analysis potentially allows detection of the stressful situations of plants by deformation of laser-induced fluorescence spectra. The paper conducts experimental investigations to learn the capabilities of the laser fluorescent method to monitor plant situations at 532nm wavelength of fluorescence excitation in the stressful situations induced by improper watering (at excess of moisture in the soil and at a lack of moisture.Researches of fluorescence spectra have been conducted using a created laboratory installation. As a source to excite fluorescence radiation the second harmonica of YAG:Nd laser is used. The subsystem to record fluorescence radiation is designed using a polychromator and a highly sensitive matrix detector with the amplifier of brightness.Experimental investigations have been conducted for fast-growing and unpretentious species of plants, namely different sorts of salad.Experimental studies of laser-induced fluorescence spectra of plants for 532nm excitement wavelength show that the impact of stressful factors on a plant due to the improper watering, significantly distorts a fluorescence spectrum of plants. Influence of a stressful factor can be shown as a changing profile of a fluorescence spectrum (an identifying factor, here, is a relationship of fluorescence intensities at two wavelengths, namely 685 nm and 740 nm or (and as a changing level of fluorescence that can be the basis for the laser method for monitoring the plant

  4. MRT letter: a fast and easy method for general fluorescent staining of cultured cells on transparent or opaque supports.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gayoso, Manuel J

    2012-07-01

    Development of cell-based therapy entails the use of different types of materials as support for cultured cells. Some of these materials are opaque. For a general microscope study of cell cultures prepared on transparent supports, Giemsa stain with bright field microscopy is useful. With opaque supports or scaffolds, epifluorescence microscopy is necessary. The method the authors describe uses eosin Y to stain cytoplasm and DAPI to stain nuclei under fluorescence microscopy. This method provides easy and fast fluorescent staining for a general morphological study of cultured cells on transparent or opaque supports. Copyright © 2012 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  5. Benzothiadiazole Derivatives as Fluorescence Imaging Probes: Beyond Classical Scaffolds.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Neto, Brenno A D; Carvalho, Pedro H P R; Correa, Jose R

    2015-06-16

    as pure solids, no fading even after long periods of irradiation, bright emissions with no blinking, good signal-to-noise ratios, efficiency to transpose the cell membrane, and irradiation preferentially in the visible-light region are just some features noted by using BTDs. As the pioneering group in the use of fluorescent small-molecule BTDs for bioimaging purposes, we feel pleased to share our experience, results, advances, and personal perspectives with the readers of this Account. The readers will clearly note the huge advantages of using fluorescent BTDs over classical scaffolds, and hopefully they will be inspired and motivated to further BTD technology in the fields of molecular and cellular biology.

  6. Preparation of Novel Fluorescent Nanocomposites Based on Au Nanoclusters and Their Application in Targeted Detection of Cancer Cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Xiaoyu; Xia, Junhan; Wang, Chun; Liu, Lu; Zhu, Shuxian; Feng, Wei; Li, Lidong

    2017-12-04

    Fluorescent gold nanoclusters (AuNCs) have drawn considerable research interests owing to their unique emission properties. However, the environment surrounding the nanocluster greatly influences its luminous behavior. In this work, a novel nanocomposite based on AuNCs with bright fluorescence and high biocompatibility was prepared. In the nanocomposite, mesoporous silica (mSiO2) nanospheres provided a mesoporous framework, which helped to template the formation of ultra-small AuNCs and also prevented their aggregation in different solutions. These nanocomposites emitted stable fluorescence even in complex biological environments. After self-assembly of folic acid-conjugated poly(L-lysine), the presence of folic acid on the nanocomposites guaranteed a good recognition in folate receptor (FR)-positive cells, improving detection selectivity. Cellular experiments demonstrated that the nanocomposites had good dispersity in physiological environment and could be internalized by FR-positive cancer cells, resulting in bright fluorescence. We believe that this research provides a simple approach to the fabrication of stable fluorescent AuNCs nanocomposite, which show good compatibility with complex biological systems and great potential for applications in biological imaging and cell detection.

  7. Music for a Brighter World: Brightness Judgment Bias by Musical Emotion.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Joydeep Bhattacharya

    Full Text Available A prevalent conceptual metaphor is the association of the concepts of good and evil with brightness and darkness, respectively. Music cognition, like metaphor, is possibly embodied, yet no study has addressed the question whether musical emotion can modulate brightness judgment in a metaphor consistent fashion. In three separate experiments, participants judged the brightness of a grey square that was presented after a short excerpt of emotional music. The results of Experiment 1 showed that short musical excerpts are effective emotional primes that cross-modally influence brightness judgment of visual stimuli. Grey squares were consistently judged as brighter after listening to music with a positive valence, as compared to music with a negative valence. The results of Experiment 2 revealed that the bias in brightness judgment does not require an active evaluation of the emotional content of the music. By applying a different experimental procedure in Experiment 3, we showed that this brightness judgment bias is indeed a robust effect. Altogether, our findings demonstrate a powerful role of musical emotion in biasing brightness judgment and that this bias is aligned with the metaphor viewpoint.

  8. Music for a Brighter World: Brightness Judgment Bias by Musical Emotion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bhattacharya, Joydeep; Lindsen, Job P

    2016-01-01

    A prevalent conceptual metaphor is the association of the concepts of good and evil with brightness and darkness, respectively. Music cognition, like metaphor, is possibly embodied, yet no study has addressed the question whether musical emotion can modulate brightness judgment in a metaphor consistent fashion. In three separate experiments, participants judged the brightness of a grey square that was presented after a short excerpt of emotional music. The results of Experiment 1 showed that short musical excerpts are effective emotional primes that cross-modally influence brightness judgment of visual stimuli. Grey squares were consistently judged as brighter after listening to music with a positive valence, as compared to music with a negative valence. The results of Experiment 2 revealed that the bias in brightness judgment does not require an active evaluation of the emotional content of the music. By applying a different experimental procedure in Experiment 3, we showed that this brightness judgment bias is indeed a robust effect. Altogether, our findings demonstrate a powerful role of musical emotion in biasing brightness judgment and that this bias is aligned with the metaphor viewpoint.

  9. T1 bright appendix sign to exclude acute appendicitis in pregnant women

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shin, Ilah; An, Chansik; Lim, Joon Seok; Kim, Myeong-Jin; Chung, Yong Eun [Yonsei University College of Medicine, Department of Radiology, Research Institute of Radiological Science, Severance Hospital, 50-1 Yonsei-ro, Seodaemun-gu, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2017-08-15

    To evaluate the diagnostic value of the T1 bright appendix sign for the diagnosis of acute appendicitis in pregnant women. This retrospective study included 125 pregnant women with suspected appendicitis who underwent magnetic resonance (MR) imaging. The T1 bright appendix sign was defined as a high intensity signal filling more than half length of the appendix on T1-weighted imaging. Sensitivity, specificity, positive predictive value (PPV) and negative predictive value (NPV) of the T1 bright appendix sign for normal appendix identification were calculated in all patients and in those with borderline-sized appendices (6-7 mm). The T1 bright appendix sign was seen in 51% of patients with normal appendices, but only in 4.5% of patients with acute appendicitis. The overall sensitivity, specificity, PPV, and NPV of the T1 bright appendix sign for normal appendix diagnosis were 44.9%, 95.5%, 97.6%, and 30.0%, respectively. All four patients with borderline sized appendix with appendicitis showed negative T1 bright appendix sign. The T1 bright appendix sign is a specific finding for the diagnosis of a normal appendix in pregnant women with suspected acute appendicitis. (orig.)

  10. Bright-Dark Mixed N-Soliton Solution of Two-Dimensional Multicomponent Maccari System

    Science.gov (United States)

    Han, Zhong; Chen, Yong

    2017-08-01

    Based on the KP hierarchy reduction method, we construct the general bright-dark mixed N-soliton solution of the two-dimensional (2D) (M+1)-component Maccari system comprised of M-component short waves (SWs) and one-component long wave (LW) with all possible combinations of nonlinearities. We firstly consider two types of mixed N-soliton solutions (two-bright-one-dark and one-bright-two-dark solitons in SW components) to the (3+1)-component Maccari system in detail. Then by extending our analysis to the (M+1)-component Maccari system, its general m-bright-(M-m)-dark mixed N-soliton solution is obtained. The formula obtained also contains the general all-bright and all-dark N-soliton solutions as special cases. For the two-bright-one-dark mixed soliton solution of the (3+1)-component Maccari system, it can be shown that solioff excitation and solioff interaction take place in the two SW components supporting bright solitons, whereas the SW component supporting dark solitons and the LW component possess V-type solitary and interaction.

  11. Proximal Bright Vessel Sign on Arterial Spin Labeling Magnetic Resonance Imaging in Acute Cardioembolic Cerebral Infarction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kato, Ayumi; Shinohara, Yuki; Kuya, Keita; Sakamoto, Makoto; Kowa, Hisanori; Ogawa, Toshihide

    2017-07-01

    The congestion of spin-labeled blood at large-vessel occlusion can present as hyperintense signals on perfusion magnetic resonance imaging with 3-dimensional pseudo-continuous arterial spin labeling (proximal bright vessel sign). The purpose of this study was to clarify the difference between proximal bright vessel sign and susceptibility vessel sign in acute cardioembolic cerebral infarction. Forty-two patients with cardioembolic cerebral infarction in the anterior circulation territory underwent magnetic resonance imaging including diffusion-weighted imaging, 3-dimensional pseudo-continuous arterial spin labeling perfusion magnetic resonance imaging, T2*-weighted imaging, and 3-dimensional time-of-flight magnetic resonance angiography using a 3-T magnetic resonance scanner. Visual assessments of proximal bright vessel sign and the susceptibility vessel sign were performed by consensus of 2 experienced neuroradiologists. The relationship between these signs and the occlusion site of magnetic resonance angiography was also investigated. Among 42 patients with cardioembolic cerebral infarction, 24 patients showed proximal bright vessel sign (57.1%) and 25 showed susceptibility vessel sign (59.5%). There were 19 cases of proximal bright vessel sign and susceptibility vessel sign-clear, 12 cases of proximal bright vessel sign and susceptibility vessel sign-unclear, and 11 mismatched cases. Four out of 6 patients with proximal bright vessel sign-unclear and susceptibility vessel sign-clear showed distal middle cerebral artery occlusion, and 2 out of 5 patients with proximal bright vessel sign-clear and susceptibility vessel sign-unclear showed no occlusion on magnetic resonance angiography. Proximal bright vessel sign is almost compatible with susceptibility vessel sign in patients with cardioembolic cerebral infarction. Copyright © 2017 National Stroke Association. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  12. Assessing Photosynthesis by Fluorescence Imaging

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saura, Pedro; Quiles, Maria Jose

    2011-01-01

    This practical paper describes a novel fluorescence imaging experiment to study the three processes of photochemistry, fluorescence and thermal energy dissipation, which compete during the dissipation of excitation energy in photosynthesis. The technique represents a non-invasive tool for revealing and understanding the spatial heterogeneity in…

  13. Visible fluorescent proteins for FRET

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kremers, G.J.; Goedhart, J.; Gadella, T.W.J.

    2009-01-01

    This chapter discusses the use of Visible fluorescent proteins (VFPs) for FRET studies, a comprehensive table with Förster radii of VFP pairs is presented and recommendations for choosing the right pairs are made. The chapter discusses VFPs that are used for studies that use fluorescence resonance

  14. Fluorescent Proteins for Flow Cytometry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hawley, Teresa S; Hawley, Robert G; Telford, William G

    2017-04-03

    Fluorescent proteins have become standard tools for cell and molecular biologists. The color palette of fluorescent proteins spans the ultraviolet, visible, and near-infrared spectrum. Utility of fluorescent proteins has been greatly facilitated by the availability of compact and affordable solid state lasers capable of providing various excitation wavelengths. In theory, the plethora of fluorescent proteins and lasers make it easy to detect multiple fluorescent proteins simultaneously. However, in practice, heavy spectral overlap due to broad excitation and emission spectra presents a challenge. In conventional flow cytometry, careful selection of excitation wavelengths and detection filters is necessary. Spectral flow cytometry, an emerging methodology that is not confined by the "one color, one detector" paradigm, shows promise in the facile detection of multiple fluorescent proteins. This chapter provides a synopsis of fluorescent protein development, a list of commonly used fluorescent proteins, some practical considerations and strategies for detection, and examples of applications. © 2017 by John Wiley & Sons, Inc. Copyright © 2017 John Wiley & Sons, Inc.

  15. Fluorescence Spectra of Highlighter Inks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Birriel, Jennifer J.; King, Damon

    2018-01-01

    Fluorescence spectra excited by laser pointers have been the subject of several papers in "TPT". These papers all describe a fluorescence phenomenon in which the reflected laser light undergoes a change in color: this color change results from the combination of some partially reflected laser light and additional colors generated by…

  16. Understanding laser beam brightness: a review and new prospective in material processing

    OpenAIRE

    Shukla, Pratik; Lawrence, Jonathan; Zhang,Yu

    2015-01-01

    This paper details the importance of brightness in relation to laser beams. The ‘brightness’ of lasers is a term that is generally not given much attention in laser applications or in published literature. With this said, it is theoretically and practically an important parameter in laser-material processing. This study is first of a kind which emphasizes in-depth, the concept of brightness of lasers by firstly reviewing the existing literature and the progress with high brightness laser-mate...

  17. Modulation of ICT probability in bi(polyarene)-based O-BODIPYs: towards the development of low-cost bright arene-BODIPY dyads.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gartzia-Rivero, Leire; Sánchez-Carnerero, Esther M; Jiménez, Josue; Bañuelos, Jorge; Moreno, Florencio; Maroto, Beatriz L; López-Arbeloa, Iñigo; de la Moya, Santiago

    2017-09-12

    We report the synthesis, and spectroscopic and electrochemical properties of a selected library of novel spiranic O-BODIPYs bearing a phenol-based bi(polyarene) unit tethered to the boron center through oxygen atoms. These dyes constitute an interesting family of arene-BODIPY dyads useful for the development of photonic applications due to their synthetic accessibility and tunable photonic properties. It is demonstrated that the electron-donor capability of the involved arene moiety switches on a non-emissive intramolecular charge transfer (ICT) state, which restricts the fluorescence efficiency of the dyad. Interestingly, the influence of this non-radiative deactivation channel can be efficiently modulated by the substitution pattern, either at the dipyrrin ligand or at the polyarene moiety. Thus, dyads featuring electron-rich dipyrrin and electron-poor polyarene show lower or almost negligible ICT probability, and hence display bright fluorescence upon dual excitation at far-away spectral regions. This synthetic approach has allowed the easy development of low-cost efficient ultraviolet-absorbing visible-emitting cassettes by selecting properly the substitution pattern of the involved key units, dipyrrin and bi(polyarene), to modulate not only absorption and emission wavelengths, but also fluorescence efficiencies.

  18. Fluorescence calibration method for single-particle aerosol fluorescence instruments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shipley Robinson, Ellis; Gao, Ru-Shan; Schwarz, Joshua P.; Fahey, David W.; Perring, Anne E.

    2017-05-01

    Real-time, single-particle fluorescence instruments used to detect atmospheric bioaerosol particles are increasingly common, yet no standard fluorescence calibration method exists for this technique. This gap limits the utility of these instruments as quantitative tools and complicates comparisons between different measurement campaigns. To address this need, we have developed a method to produce size-selected particles with a known mass of fluorophore, which we use to calibrate the fluorescence detection of a Wideband Integrated Bioaerosol Sensor (WIBS-4A). We use mixed tryptophan-ammonium sulfate particles to calibrate one detector (FL1; excitation = 280 nm, emission = 310-400 nm) and pure quinine particles to calibrate the other (FL2; excitation = 280 nm, emission = 420-650 nm). The relationship between fluorescence and mass for the mixed tryptophan-ammonium sulfate particles is linear, while that for the pure quinine particles is nonlinear, likely indicating that not all of the quinine mass contributes to the observed fluorescence. Nonetheless, both materials produce a repeatable response between observed fluorescence and particle mass. This procedure allows users to set the detector gains to achieve a known absolute response, calculate the limits of detection for a given instrument, improve the repeatability of the instrumental setup, and facilitate intercomparisons between different instruments. We recommend calibration of single-particle fluorescence instruments using these methods.

  19. Single Molecule Spectroscopy of Fluorescent Proteins

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Blum, Christian; Subramaniam, Vinod

    2009-01-01

    The discovery and use of fluorescent proteins has revolutionized cellular biology. Despite the widespread use of visible fluorescent proteins as reporters and sensors in cellular environments the versatile photophysics of fluorescent proteins is still subject to intense research. Understanding the

  20. Single-molecule spectroscopy of fluorescent proteins

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Blum, Christian; Subramaniam, Vinod

    The discovery and use of fluorescent proteins has revolutionized cellular biology. Despite the widespread use of visible fluorescent proteins as reporters and sensors in cellular environments the versatile photophysics of fluorescent proteins is still subject to intense research. Understanding the

  1. Detection of Charcot-Leyden crystals by fluorescence microscopy of Papanicolaou-stained smears of sputum, bronchoalveolar lavage fluid, and bronchial secretions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Küpper, T; Spies, S; Wehle, K; Pfitzer, P

    1994-10-01

    Fluorescence microscopy was used to examine Papanicolaou-stained smears of sputum and other secretions from the respiratory tract. Under these conditions Charcot-Leyden crystals (CLC) appear as bright yellow-green fluorescing needles. The study was performed to determine the value of this approach for the diagnosis of allergic lung diseases. The time taken to detect the crystals was recorded and the sensitivity of fluorescence microscopy for the detection of CLC was compared with light microscopy of the same samples. The data show that fluorescence microscopy is superior to light microscopy for the detection of CLC. The characteristic needle-shaped crystal can be recognized easily and fragments of crystals could be easily identified. In doubtful cases of allergic lung diseases, fluorescence microscopy may be used to supplement light microscopy for the detection of Charcot-Leyden crystals.

  2. P2A-Fluorophore Tagging of BRAF Tightly Links Expression to Fluorescence In Vivo.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J Edward van Veen

    Full Text Available The Braf proto-oncogene is a key component of the mitogen-activated protein kinase signaling cascade and is a critical regulator of both normal development and tumorigenesis in a variety of tissues. In order to elucidate BRAF's differing roles in varying cell types, it is important to understand both the pattern and timing of BRAF expression. Here we report the production of a mouse model that links the expression of Braf with the bright red fluorescent protein, tdTomato. We have utilized a P2A knock-in strategy, ensuring that BRAF and the fluorophore are expressed from the same endogenous promoter and from the same bicistronic mRNA transcript. This mouse model (BrafTOM shows bright red fluorescence in organs and cell types known to be sensitive to BRAF perturbation. We further show that on a cell-by-cell basis, fluorescence correlates with BRAF protein levels. Finally, we extend the utility of this mouse by demonstrating that the remnant P2A fragment attached to BRAF acts as a suitable epitope for immunoprecipitation and biochemical characterization of BRAF in vivo.

  3. THE BRIGHTNESS OF THE SKY IN THE VICINITY OF THE SUN

    Science.gov (United States)

    other particles. The study takes into ac count the diffusion of particles from a source of pollution, such as an industrial chimney, and sets limits for the pollution in terms of sky brightness immediately surrounding the sun .

  4. Three-dimensional vortex-bright solitons in a spin-orbit-coupled spin-1 condensate

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gautam, Sandeep; Adhikari, S. K.

    2018-01-01

    We demonstrate stable and metastable vortex-bright solitons in a three-dimensional spin-orbit-coupled three-component hyperfine spin-1 Bose-Einstein condensate (BEC) using numerical solution and variational approximation of a mean-field model. The spin-orbit coupling provides attraction to form vortex-bright solitons in both attractive and repulsive spinor BECs. The ground state of these vortex-bright solitons is axially symmetric for weak polar interaction. For a sufficiently strong ferromagnetic interaction, we observe the emergence of a fully asymmetric vortex-bright soliton as the ground state. We also numerically investigate moving solitons. The present mean-field model is not Galilean invariant, and we use a Galilean-transformed mean-field model for generating the moving solitons.

  5. VOYAGER 1&2 JUPITER BRIGHTNESS NORTH/SOUTH MAP SET V1.0

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — This data set contains Voyager 1 and 2 measurements of the brightness of Jupiter at H Lyman alpha and in the H2 Lyman and Werner bands shortward of H Lyman alpha....

  6. Detecting gradual visual changes in colour and brightness agnosia: a double dissociation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nijboer, Tanja C W; te Pas, Susan F; van der Smagt, Maarten J

    2011-03-09

    Two patients, one with colour agnosia and one with brightness agnosia, performed a task that required the detection of gradual temporal changes in colour and brightness. The results for these patients, who showed anaverage or an above-average performance on several tasks designed to test low-level colour and luminance (contrast) perception in the spatial domain, yielded a double dissociation; the brightness agnosic patient was within the normal range for the coloured stimuli, but much slower to detect brightness differences, whereas the colour agnosic patient was within the normal range for the achromatic stimuli, but much slower for the coloured stimuli. These results suggest that a modality-specific impairment in the detection of gradual temporal changes might be related to, if not underlie, the phenomenon of visual agnosia.

  7. Nimbus-5/THIR Level 1 Brightness Temperature at 6.7 microns V001

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — The Nimbus-5 Temperature-Humidity Infrared Radiometer (THIR) Level 1 Brightness Temperature at 6.7 microns data product contains radiances expressed in units of...

  8. Nimbus-5/THIR Level 1 Brightness Temperature at 11.5 microns V001

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — The Nimbus-5 Temperature-Humidity Infrared Radiometer (THIR) Level 1 Brightness Temperature at 11.5 microns data product contains radiances expressed in units of...

  9. CLPX-Satellite: SSM/I Brightness Temperature Grids, Version 1

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — This data set includes Defense Meteorological Satellite Program (DMSP) F-13 passive microwave brightness temperatures gridded to the geographic (lat/long) and UTM...

  10. CLPX-Satellite: AVHRR/HRPT Brightness Temperatures and Reflectances, Version 1

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — This data set includes AVHRR/HRPT (Advanced Very High Resolution Radiometer/High Resolution Picture Transmission) brightness temperatures and reflectances over the...

  11. GPM, AMSR2 GCOMW1 Level 1C Common Calibrated Brightness Temperature VV03A

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — 1CAMSR2 contains common calibrated brightness temperature from the AMSR2 passive microwave instrument flown on the GCOMW1 satellite. This products contains 6 swaths....

  12. NOAA Climate Data Record (CDR) of MSU Level 1c Brightness Temperature, Version 1.0

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — This dataset contains Level 1c inter-calibrated brightness temperatures from the Microwave Sounding Unit (MSU) sensors onboard nine polar orbiting satellites...

  13. Analytical brightness compensation algorithm for traditional polygon-based method in computer-generated holography.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pan, Yijie; Wang, Yongtian; Liu, Juan; Li, Xin; Jia, Jia; Zhang, Zhao

    2013-06-20

    In three-dimensional (3D) holographic display, current brightness compensation algorithm of the traditional polygon-based method experimentally obtains the compensation factor, which depends on the fabrication process. In this paper, we proposed an analytical brightness compensation method discarding the influence of the fabrication. The surface property function with the flat power spectral density and the compensation factor obtained from the simplified relationship between the original and the rotated frequencies are used to analytically compensate the radiant energy of the tilted polygon. The optical reconstruction results show the proposed method could effectively compensate the brightness and ensure the further shading process. The proposed method separates the brightness compensation from the fabrication process, which is important for deepening the investigation of the hologram fabrication and achieving realistic 3D reconstruction.

  14. SMAP L1B Radiometer Half-Orbit Time-Ordered Brightness Temperatures V003

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — Time ordered geolocated H-pol and V-pol brightness temperatures as well as 3rd and 4th Stokes parameters. Each product covers a half orbit with boundaries at the...

  15. DMSP SSM/I-SSMIS Pathfinder Daily EASE-Grid Brightness Temperatures

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — This Level-3 Equal-Area Scalable Earth-Grid (EASE-Grid) Brightness Temperature data set, collected since 09 July 1987, is a part of the NOAA/NASA Pathfinder Program....

  16. Nimbus-6/THIR Level 1 Brightness Temperature at 11.5 microns V001

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — The Nimbus-6 Temperature-Humidity Infrared Radiometer (THIR) Level 1 Brightness Temperature at 11.5 microns data product contains radiances expressed in units of...

  17. Aquarius L3 Polar-Gridded Weekly Brightness Temperature and Sea Surface Salinity V005

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — The data set consists of weekly gridded Level-3 products of Aquarius L-band radiometer brightness temperature (TB) observations and Sea Surface Salinity (SSS)...

  18. Evaluations of the new LiF-scintillator and optional brightness enhancement films for neutron imaging

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Iikura, H., E-mail: Iikura.hiroshi@jaea.go.jp [Japan Atomic Energy Agency, 2-4 Shirakata-shirane, Tokai-mura, Naka-gun, Ibaraki (Japan); Tsutsui, N. [Chichibu Fuji Co., Ltd., Ogano, Chichibu, Saitama 368-0193 (Japan); Nakamura, T.; Katagiri, M.; Kureta, M. [Japan Atomic Energy Agency, 2-4 Shirakata-shirane, Tokai-mura, Naka-gun, Ibaraki (Japan); Kubo, J. [Nissan Motor Co., Ltd., Atsugi, Kanagawa 243-0126 (Japan); Matsubayashi, M. [Japan Atomic Energy Agency, 2-4 Shirakata-shirane, Tokai-mura, Naka-gun, Ibaraki (Japan)

    2011-09-21

    Japan Atomic Energy Agency has developed the neutron scintillator jointly with Chichibu Fuji Co., Ltd. In this study, we evaluated the new ZnS(Ag):Al/{sup 6}Li scintillator developed for neutron imaging. It was confirmed that the brightness increased by about double while maintaining equal performance for the spatial resolution as compared with a conventional scintillator. High frame-rate imaging using a high-speed video camera system and this new scintillator made it possible to image beyond 10 000 frames per second while still having enough brightness. This technique allowed us to obtain a high-frame-rate visualization of oil flow in a running car engine. Furthermore, we devised a technique to increase the light intensity of reception for a camera by adding brightness enhancement films on the output surface of the scintillator. It was confirmed that the spatial resolution degraded more than double, but the brightness increased by about three times.

  19. Evaluations of the new LiF-scintillator and optional brightness enhancement films for neutron imaging

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iikura, H.; Tsutsui, N.; Nakamura, T.; Katagiri, M.; Kureta, M.; Kubo, J.; Matsubayashi, M.

    2011-09-01

    Japan Atomic Energy Agency has developed the neutron scintillator jointly with Chichibu Fuji Co., Ltd. In this study, we evaluated the new ZnS(Ag):Al/ 6Li scintillator developed for neutron imaging. It was confirmed that the brightness increased by about double while maintaining equal performance for the spatial resolution as compared with a conventional scintillator. High frame-rate imaging using a high-speed video camera system and this new scintillator made it possible to image beyond 10 000 frames per second while still having enough brightness. This technique allowed us to obtain a high-frame-rate visualization of oil flow in a running car engine. Furthermore, we devised a technique to increase the light intensity of reception for a camera by adding brightness enhancement films on the output surface of the scintillator. It was confirmed that the spatial resolution degraded more than double, but the brightness increased by about three times.

  20. VOYAGER 1&2 SATURN BRIGHTNESS NORTH/SOUTH MAP SET V1.0

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — This data set contains Voyager 1 and 2 measurements of the brightness of Saturn at H Lyman alpha and in the H2 Lyman and Werner bands shortward of H Lyman alpha....