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Sample records for brigham young university laboratory reactor

  1. God and Mammon: At Brigham Young University, at Wheaton College

    Science.gov (United States)

    Webb, LaVarr G.; Marema, Lenore

    1977-01-01

    Convinced that what the state touches it secularizes, a growing number of religious institutions are challenging the federal government and risking a reduction in federal funding. The cases of Wheaton College and Brigham Young University are described. (Editor/LBH)

  2. Bringing Online Learning to Campus: The Hybridization of Teaching and Learning at Brigham Young University

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gregory L. Waddoups

    2002-01-01

    Full Text Available The primary purpose of Brigham Young University (BYU is to provide students with a combination of sacred and secular education often described as the "BYU experience". Achieving this purpose is challenged by the rapid growth in Church membership and an enrollment cap of 30,000 students. To address these challenges, BYU sponsors the use of technology to bridge the gap between the increased Church membership and the number of students allowed under the enrollment caps. This institutional case study shows how these challenges have influenced the hybridization of teaching and learning for on campus (resident and off campus (distance students. It also describes how BYU has brought distance education to campus, and is beginning to bring campus-based educational practices to distance education.

  3. Distributed Computing with Centralized Support Works at Brigham Young.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McDonald, Kelly; Stone, Brad

    1992-01-01

    Brigham Young University (Utah) has addressed the need for maintenance and support of distributed computing systems on campus by implementing a program patterned after a national business franchise, providing the support and training of a centralized administration but allowing each unit to operate much as an independent small business.…

  4. Innovation and Global elearning: A Case Study at Brigham Young University--Idaho

    Science.gov (United States)

    Young, Alan L.

    2016-01-01

    This chapter provides a case study of innovation using eLearning in higher education. The case study shows how one university made system-wide organizational and procedural changes to create low-cost, open-access distance learning opportunities on a global level in response to student needs and opportunities.

  5. 75 FR 58433 - Notice of Inventory Completion: Brigham Young University, Museum of Peoples and Cultures, Provo, UT

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-09-24

    ... Cultures, Provo, UT AGENCY: National Park Service, Interior. ACTION: Notice. Notice is here given in... Young University, Museum of Peoples and Cultures, Provo, UT. The human remains and associated funerary... Peoples and Cultures, professional staff in consultation with representatives of the Hopi Tribe of...

  6. "Worlds Without End": The Cosmological Theodicy of Brigham Young

    OpenAIRE

    Kirkham, James Chase

    2012-01-01

    A striking characteristic of Brigham Young's theology was his inclusion of a cosmology in his teachings. In his speeches as President of the Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints, Young juxtaposed cosmological pronouncements with practical advice. Young regularly opined on such topics as the eternal nature of matter and light and the interaction of gods and humans with these substances. Dovetailed to his cosmic musings was down-to-earth advice on raising children, avoiding the evils of ...

  7. 大学开放教育资源项目能否实现资金的自给自足*--来自美国杨百翰大学自主学习项目的案例报告%The Open Education Resources Projects Can Achieve Financial Self-Sufficiency--A Case Report from the Brigham Young University Independent Study Project

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    李莹; 丁唯佳; 赵莹

    2014-01-01

    自2001年美国麻省理工学院(MIT)对国际社会宣布推行开放课件(OCW:Open Courseware)以来,越来越多的大学创建了开放教育资源(OER)项目,很多OER项目创立之初是受外来资金的支持,当项目周期临近或者结束的时候,大学OER是否具有长期的可持续性是很多项目也是开放教育资源运动本身发展面临的重要挑战。聚焦OER项目可持续性,主要是关注大学开放教育资源项目能否实现资金的自给自足和成本的自我补偿。美国杨百翰大学实证研究回答了三个问题:自主学习项目的课程转化为开放教育资源的成本如何?开放教育资源对付费学习项目产生怎样的影响?如果这种影响是积极的,是否足够支持在自主学习项目中维持一个开放教育资源项目?研究结果有力地说明,杨百翰大学自主学习项目转向开放共享模式后在财政上是可以实现自给的。杨百翰大学自主学习项目的OER试点课程提供了一个积极的结论,那就是开放教育资源提供机构可以实现自我的可持续发展,同时满足了向全社会免费开放课程、提供公共产品的目标。%Since the Massachusetts Institute of Technology (MIT) announced the launch of OpenCourseWare (OCW) in the international communities in 2001, more and more universities have stepped into the process of OER construction, financed by external supports in the early days. The sustainability has become serious and significant challenges when the OER program circle wound up. Focusing on the OER program sustainability is mainly concerned with whether the OER can realize self-compensation. The empirical results of Brigham Young University answer three questions, consisting of the conversion costs from independent study program to the OER, the impacts of the OER on paying learning, and if the impacts are positive whether it can maintain the OER within independent study. The

  8. Broad scope educational role of a midsize university reactor NAA laboratory

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Broad scope educational activities at the Neutron Activation Analysis Laboratory (NAAL) associated with the 100 kW University of Florida Training Reactor (UFTR) have been implemented to serve a deserve and multidisciplinary academic clientele to meet a wide spectrum of educational needs for students at all academic levels. Educational usage of the complementary laboratory facilities is described and the importance of such academic experimental experience is emphasized for developing and maintaining a cadre of professionals in the analytical applications of nuclear energy. The synergistic operation of the NAAL and the reactor at the University of Florida to serve as a model worthy of emulation for other similar facilities is emphasized. (author)

  9. University of Wisconsin Nuclear Reactor Laboratory annual report, fiscal year 1983-1984

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Operational activities for the reactor are described concerning nuclear engineering classes from the University of Wisconsin; reactor sharing program; utility personnel training; sample irradiations and neutron activation analysis services; and changes in personnel, facility, and procedures. Results of surveillance tests are presented for operating statistics and fuel exposure; emergency shutdowns and inadvertent scrams; maintenance; radioactive waste disposal; radiation exposures; environmental surveys; and publications and presentations on work based on reactor use

  10. 77 FR 52057 - Notice of Inventory Completion: Brigham Young University, Museum of Peoples and Cultures, Provo...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-08-28

    ... Inventory Completion in the Federal Register (75 FR 58433-58435, September 24, 2010). A recent re-inventory... remains from Iceberg Canyon near Lake Powell, San Juan County, UT. In the Federal Register (75 FR 58433... wood. In the Federal Register (75 FR 58433-58435, September 24, 2010), paragraph 23, sentences one...

  11. Brigham City Hydro Generation Project

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ammons, Tom B. [Energy Conservation Specialist, Port Ewen, NY (United States)

    2015-10-31

    Brigham City owns and operates its own municipal power system which currently includes several hydroelectric facilities. This project was to update the efficiency and capacity of current hydro production due to increased water flow demands that could pass through existing generation facilities. During 2006-2012, this project completed efficiency evaluation as it related to its main objective by completing a feasibility study, undergoing necessary City Council approvals and required federal environmental reviews. As a result of Phase 1 of the project, a feasibility study was conducted to determine feasibility of hydro and solar portions of the original proposal. The results indicated that the existing Hydro plant which was constructed in the 1960’s was running at approximately 77% efficiency or less. Brigham City proposes that the efficiency calculations be refined to determine the economic feasibility of improving or replacing the existing equipment with new high efficiency equipment design specifically for the site. Brigham City completed the Feasibility Assessment of this project, and determined that the Upper Hydro that supplies the main culinary water to the city was feasible to continue with. Brigham City Council provided their approval of feasibility assessment’s results. The Upper Hydro Project include removal of the existing powerhouse equipment and controls and demolition of a section of concrete encased penstock, replacement of penstock just upstream of the turbine inlet, turbine bypass, turbine shut-off and bypass valves, turbine and generator package, control equipment, assembly, start-up, commissioning, Supervisory Control And Data Acquisition (SCADA), and the replacement of a section of conductors to the step-up transformer. Brigham City increased the existing 575 KW turbine and generator with an 825 KW turbine and generator. Following the results of the feasibility assessment Brigham City pursued required environmental reviews with the DOE and

  12. Brigham City Hydro Generation Project

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ammons, Tom B. [Energy Conservation Specialist, Port Ewen, NY (United States)

    2015-10-31

    Brigham City owns and operates its own municipal power system which currently includes several hydroelectric facilities. This project was to update the efficiency and capacity of current hydro production due to increased water flow demands that could pass through existing generation facilities. During 2006-2012, this project completed efficiency evaluation as it related to its main objective by completing a feasibility study, undergoing necessary City Council approvals and required federal environmental reviews. As a result of Phase 1 of the project, a feasibility study was conducted to determine feasibility of hydro and solar portions of the original proposal. The results indicated that the existing Hydro plant which was constructed in the 1960’s was running at approximately 77% efficiency or less. Brigham City proposes that the efficiency calculations be refined to determine the economic feasibility of improving or replacing the existing equipment with new high efficiency equipment design specifically for the site. Brigham City completed the Feasibility Assessment of this project, and determined that the Upper Hydro that supplies the main culinary water to the city was feasible to continue with. Brigham City Council provided their approval of feasibility assessment’s results. The Upper Hydro Project include removal of the existing powerhouse equipment and controls and demolition of a section of concrete encased penstock, replacement of penstock just upstream of the turbine inlet, turbine bypass, turbine shut-off and bypass valves, turbine and generator package, control equipment, assembly, start-up, commissioning, Supervisory Control And Data Acquisition (SCADA), and the replacement of a section of conductors to the step-up transformer. Brigham City increased the existing 575 KW turbine and generator with an 825 KW turbine and generator. Following the results of the feasibility assessment Brigham City pursued required environmental reviews with the DOE and

  13. Status of Japanese university reactors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fujita, Yoshiaki [Research Reactor Institute, Kyoto Univ., Kumatori, Osaka (Japan)

    1999-08-01

    Status of Japanese university reactors, their role and value in research and education, and the spent fuel problem are presented. Some of the reactors are now faced by severe difficulties in continuing their operation services. The point of measures to solve the difficulties is suggested. (author)

  14. Nuclear Reactor Engineering Analysis Laboratory

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Carlos Chavez-Mercado; Jaime B. Morales-Sandoval; Benjamin E. Zayas-Perez

    1998-12-31

    The Nuclear Reactor Engineering Analysis Laboratory (NREAL) is a sophisticated computer system with state-of-the-art analytical tools and technology for analysis of light water reactors. Multiple application software tools can be activated to carry out different analyses and studies such as nuclear fuel reload evaluation, safety operation margin measurement, transient and severe accident analysis, nuclear reactor instability, operator training, normal and emergency procedures optimization, and human factors engineering studies. An advanced graphic interface, driven through touch-sensitive screens, provides the means to interact with specialized software and nuclear codes. The interface allows the visualization and control of all observable variables in a nuclear power plant (NPP), as well as a selected set of nonobservable or not directly controllable variables from conventional control panels.

  15. Oregon State University TRIGA Reactor annual report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Anderson, T.V.; Johnson, A.G.; Bennett, S.L.; Ringle, J.C.

    1979-08-31

    The use of the Oregon State University TRIGA Reactor during the year ending June 30, 1979, is summarized. Environmental and radiation protection data related to reactor operation and effluents are included.

  16. Oregon State University TRIGA Reactor annual report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The use of the Oregon State University TRIGA Reactor during the year ending June 30, 1979, is summarized. Environmental and radiation protection data related to reactor operation and effluents are included

  17. Universe Awareness For Young Children

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scorza, C.; Miley, G.; Ödman, C.; Madsen, C.

    2006-08-01

    Universe Awareness (UNAWE) is an international programme that will expose economically disadvantaged young children aged between 4 and 10 years to the inspirational aspects of modern astronomy. The programme is motivated by the premise that access to simple knowledge about the Universe is a basic birth right of everybody. These formative ages are crucial in the development of a human value system. This is also the age range in which children can learn to develop a 'feeling' for the vastness of the Universe. Exposing young children to such material is likely to broaden their minds and stimulate their world-view. The goals of Universe Awareness are in accordance with two of the United Nations Millennium goals, endorsed by all 191 UN member states, namely (i) the achievement of universal primary education and (ii) the promotion of gender equality in schools. We propose to commence Universe Awareness with a pilot project that will target disadvantaged regions in about 4 European countries (possibly Spain, France, Germany and The Netherlands) and several non-EU countries (possibly Chile, Colombia, India, Tunisia, South Africa and Venezuela). There will be two distinct elements in the development of the UNAWE program: (i) Creation and production of suitable UNAWE material and delivery techniques, (ii) Training of educators who will coordinate UNAWE in each of the target countries. In addition to the programme, an international network of astronomy outreach will be organised. We present the first results of a pilot project developed in Venezuela, where 670 children from different social environments, their teachers and members of an indigenous tribe called Ye´kuana from the Amazon region took part in a wonderful astronomical and cultural exchange that is now being promoted by the Venezuelan ministry of Education at the national level.

  18. Universe Awareness Among Young Poles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ratajczak, Milena

    Astronomy, the most accessible of all the sciences, grabs and holds the attention not only of the elders, but also that of the youngsters from all over the world. Sharing the same sky provides the unique opportunity to use it as a tool to inspire children, to encourage them to develop an interest in science and technology, but also to increase awareness of global citizenship and tolerance. We shall present a wide spectrum of educational activities dedicated to young children, especially those from less privileged backgrounds, carried out under the Universe Awareness (UNAWE) project in Poland. We will also introduce the way we follow to support teachers and educators in discovering our wonderful cosmos.

  19. Sandia National Laboratories Medical Isotope Reactor concept.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Coats, Richard Lee; Dahl, James J.; Parma, Edward J., Jr.

    2010-04-01

    This report describes the Sandia National Laboratories Medical Isotope Reactor and hot cell facility concepts. The reactor proposed is designed to be capable of producing 100% of the U.S. demand for the medical isotope {sup 99}Mo. The concept is novel in that the fuel for the reactor and the targets for the {sup 99}Mo production are the same. There is no driver core required. The fuel pins that are in the reactor core are processed on a 7 to 21 day irradiation cycle. The fuel is low enriched uranium oxide enriched to less than 20% {sup 235}U. The fuel pins are approximately 1 cm in diameter and 30 to 40 cm in height, clad with Zircaloy (zirconium alloy). Approximately 90 to 150 fuel pins are arranged in the core in a water pool {approx}30 ft deep. The reactor power level is 1 to 2 MW. The reactor concept is a simple design that is passively safe and maintains negative reactivity coefficients. The total radionuclide inventory in the reactor core is minimized since the fuel/target pins are removed and processed after 7 to 21 days. The fuel fabrication, reactor design and operation, and {sup 99}Mo production processing use well-developed technologies that minimize the technological and licensing risks. There are no impediments that prevent this type of reactor, along with its collocated hot cell facility, from being designed, fabricated, and licensed today.

  20. EURACOS II facility in the modified thermal column of the TRIGA Mark II reactor at the University of Pavia LENA Laboratory

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The EURACOS II (Enriched Uranium Converter Source) project foresees the installation of an U--Al alloy converter plate at the end of the thermal column in the Pavia University LENA reactor. The incident thermal flux on the 5 Kg of 235U generates a fast neutron source whose power is 0.4 kW. The fast flux near the center exceeds 109 neutrons/cm2-sec. The fission plate is cooled by a forced air flow of 500 m3/h; the use of air instead of water reduces to a minimum the initial spectrum deformation of source neutrons. An irradiation chamber of 3.75 x 1.5 x 1.8 m3 is placed in front of the source and contains the mock-up under investigation. The facility is principally intended for benchmark-and mock-up-experiments in the reactor shielding field, but irradiations to different types and materials not directly related to shielding can be extended. The modification of the TRIGA thermal column, the characteristics of the EURACOS II facility, and the experiments now in preparation are described. The source intensity allows the study of neutron attenuation factor of 105 for fast, and 108 for thermal neutrons. The neutron spectra are investigated with the sandwich technique in the epithermal range, and with threshold detectors, organic and telescopic spectrometers in the fast energy range. (U.S.)

  1. University Reactor Conversion Lessons Learned Workshop for the University of Florida

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Eric C. Woolstenhulme; Dana M. Meyer

    2007-04-01

    The Department of Energy’s (DOE) Idaho National Laboratory (INL), under its programmatic responsibility for managing the University Research Reactor Conversions, has completed the conversion of the reactor at the University of Florida. This project was successfully completed through an integrated and collaborative effort involving the INL, Argonne National Laboratory (ANL), DOE (Headquarters and Field Office), the Nuclear Regulatory Commission, the Universities, and contractors involved in analyses, fuel design and fabrication, and SNF shipping and disposition. With the work completed with these two universities, and in anticipation of other impending conversion projects, INL convened and engaged the project participants in a structured discussion to capture lessons learned. The objectives of this meeting were to capture the observations, insights, issues, concerns, and ideas of those involved in the reactor conversions so that future efforts can be conducted with greater effectiveness, efficiency, and with fewer challenges.

  2. 75 FR 54657 - University of Florida; University of Florida Training Reactor; Environmental Assessment and...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-09-08

    ... COMMISSION University of Florida; University of Florida Training Reactor; Environmental Assessment and... a significant environmental impact. I. Radiological Impact Environmental Effects of Reactor... licensee), which would authorize continued operation of the University of Florida Training Reactor...

  3. TRIGA reactor relocation at the University of Texas at Austin

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The University of Texas at Austin (UT) is in the process of relocating its TRIGA reactor facilities. This undertaking includes the construction of a new reactor building with laboratories and offices and the decommissioning of the existing facility. The main campus of The University of Texas at Austin is becoming congested, and several major research projects (mostly engineering) are moving to the Balcones Research Center ∼ 8 miles from the main campus. The process of constructing a new nuclear facility in today's regulatory environment can best be described as challenging. Fortunately, research reactor licensing is not as complicated as that for commercial power facilities, although many procedures are similar. Unfortunately, the university has its own challenging procedures for building construction. Considerable time has been expended coordinating the US Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) and UT licensing and construction activities. The paper summarizes the major steps and dates accomplished. The new reactor facility at the Balcones Research Center will enhance the universities ability to carry on teaching and research activities. The increased power level and the Mark II arrangement will allow us to perform new and additional projects. Considerable time and effort were devoted by the Nuclear Engineering Laboratory staff to ensure that the facility would provide educational and research flexibility over the next several years

  4. Pennsylvania State University Breazeale Nuclear Reactor. Thirtieth annual progress report, July 1, 1984-June 30, 1985

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This report is the thirtieth annual progress report of the Pennsylvania State University Breazeale Nuclear Reactor and covers such topics as: personnel; reactor facility; cobalt-60 facility; education and training; Radionuclear Application Laboratory; Low Level Radiation Monitoring Laboratory; and facility research utilization

  5. University of Florida training reactor. Annual progress report, September 1, 1984-August 31, 1985

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This annual progress report of the University of Florida Training Reactor discusses: reactor operation; personnel; modifications made to the reactors; reactor maintenance; and testing of reactor systems

  6. Final report. U.S. Department of Energy University Reactor Sharing Program

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bernard, John A

    2003-01-21

    Activities supported at the MIT Nuclear Reactor Laboratory under the U.S. DOE University Reactor Sharing Program are reported for Grant DE FG02-95NE38121 (September 16, 1995 through May 31, 2002). These activities fell under four subcategories: support for research at thesis and post-doctoral levels, support for college-level laboratory exercises, support for reactor tours/lectures on nuclear energy, and support for science fair participants.

  7. Final report. U.S. Department of Energy University Reactor Sharing Program

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Activities supported at the MIT Nuclear Reactor Laboratory under the U.S. DOE University Reactor Sharing Program are reported for Grant DE FG02-95NE38121 (September 16, 1995 through May 31, 2002). These activities fell under four subcategories: support for research at thesis and post-doctoral levels, support for college-level laboratory exercises, support for reactor tours/lectures on nuclear energy, and support for science fair participants

  8. Reactor physics education at Seoul National University

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The reactor physics education and research programs of Seoul National University (SNU), which focus on high fidelity and efficient reactor simulation and uncertainty evaluation, are presented. In order to foster the students to have proper knowledge and experience in both deterministic and probabilistic reactor analysis methods with clear understanding of the physical behaviors of nuclear reactors, the undergraduate and graduate courses cover various mathematical and numerical methods as well as the principles of nuclear characteristics and physical behaviors. The research areas span from the development of the methods and computer programs for direct whole core calculation involving the method of characteristics transport calculation to the Monte Carlo uncertainty analysis. Those covers cross section generation, resonance treatment, depletion method, advanced nodal methods, space-time kinetics method, Monte Carlo whole core calculation with thermal feedback and et cetera. The reactor physics curriculum, the contents of the relevant courses, and the cutting edge research topics and the achievements of SNU reactor physics education are detailed. (author)

  9. 77 FR 13376 - Notice of License Termination for the University of Arizona Research Reactor, License No. R-52

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-03-06

    ... COMMISSION Notice of License Termination for the University of Arizona Research Reactor, License No. R-52 The... No. R-52, for the University of Arizona Research Reactor (UARR). The NRC has terminated the license of the decommissioned UARR, at the Nuclear Reactor Laboratory (NRL) on the campus of the...

  10. Experiences with fast breeder reactor education in laboratory and short course settings

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The breeder reactor industry throughout the world has grown impressively over the last two decades. Despite the uncertainties in some national programs, breeder reactor technology is well established on a global scale. Given the magnitude of this technological undertaking, there has been surprisingly little emphasis on general breeder reactor education - either at the university or laboratory level. Many universities assume the topic too specialized for including appropriate courses in their curriculum - thus leaving students entering the breeder reactor industry to learn almost exclusively from on-the-job experience. The evaluation of four course presentations utilizing visual aids is presented

  11. Students' assessment of interactive distance experimentation in nuclear reactor physics laboratory education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Malkawi, Salaheddin; Al-Araidah, Omar

    2013-10-01

    Laboratory experiments develop students' skills in dealing with laboratory instruments and physical processes with the objective of reinforcing the understanding of the investigated subject. In nuclear engineering, where research reactors play a vital role in the practical education of students, the high cost and long construction time of research reactors limit their accessibility to few educational programmes around the world. The concept of the Internet Reactor Laboratory (IRL) was introduced earlier as a new approach that utilises distance education in nuclear reactor physics laboratory education. This paper presents an initial assessment of the implementation of the IRL between the PULSTAR research reactor at North Carolina State University in the USA and the Department of Nuclear Engineering at Jordan University of Science and Technology (JUST) in Jordan. The IRL was implemented in teaching the Nuclear Reactor laboratory course for two semesters. Feedback from surveyed students verifies that the outcomes attained from using IRL in experimentation are comparable to that attainable from other on-campus laboratories performed by the students.

  12. Education for university students, high school teachers and the general public using the Kinki University Reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Atomic Energy Research Institute of Kinki University is equipped with a nuclear reactor which is called UTR-KINKI. UTR is the abbreviation for University Teaching and Research Reactor. The reactor is the first one installed in Japanese universities. Though the reactor is owned and operated by Kinki University, its use is widely open to scientists and students from other universities and research institutions. The reactor is made the best of teaching instrument for the training of high school teachers. In addition, the reactor is utilized for general public education concerning atomic energy. (author)

  13. Present status of BNCT at Kyoto University Research Reactor Institute

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    At Kyoto University Research Reactor Institute, we have two facilities for BNCT such as a reactor-based and an accelerator-based neutron source. In this article, we will present the characteristics overview of both facilities. (author)

  14. Portuguese Universities Sharing Remote Laboratories

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maria Teresa Restivo

    2009-11-01

    Full Text Available This paper describes a pedagogical assignment based on a cooperative work involving teachers/students from two Portuguese universities. As it happens one is the oldest in the country – University of Coimbra (UC - and the other the largest - University of Porto (UP, about 120 km apart. The authors, believing in the relevance of Information and Communication Technologies (ITs in teaching/learning methodologies and in cooperative teaching methods worked together to plan this pedagogical experience and to run it in a one semester course. Students from UC have been introduced to the remote lab at UP and got the first contact with the remote experiments using easily available sound and image resources based on Skype and an IP camera for better image quality. This first contact has been conducted by the first author at UP with support of the second author at UC. The work will describe briefly the remote experiments used, their inclusion in the course at UC, the associated assessment criteria and, finally, student comments.

  15. University and national laboratory roles in nuclear engineering

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nuclear engineering education is being significantly challenged in the US. The decline in enrollment generally and the reduction of the number of nuclear engineering departments has been well documented. These declines parallel a lack of new construction for nuclear power plants and a decline in research and development to support new plant design. Precisely at a time when innovation is needed to deal with the many issues facing nuclear power, the number of qualified people to do so is being reduced. It is important that the university and national laboratory communities cooperate to address these issues. To be drawn into the technology, the best students must see a future, a need, and must identify challenges to meet. The university community can provide that vision with help from the national laboratories. It has been a major goal within the reactor development program at Argonne National Laboratory to establish the kind of program that can help accomplish this. The integral fast reactor (IFR) program represents opportunities for joint research in fuel technology, fuel reprocessing, and waste handling, reactor-plant design to emphasize passive response to upsets, development and testing of advanced diagnostic and control-system technology core designs to enhance breeding while minimizing sodium void effects and reducing the magnitude of reactivity changes with burnup, development of approaches to the probabilistic risk assessment that fully integrate passive responses, and many others. To involve students and faculty, they have established the IFR fellows program

  16. Accreditation in university environmental radioactivity laboratories

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Full text: The experimental work performed in university laboratories comes from many different fields and it is assumed to be of high quality. In general, the results are published in national or international journals or presented at conferences. Only a few laboratories have a clear understanding of the importance of implementing Quality Assurance Systems and the accreditation of their activities according to the international standards, such as ISO 17025. Today, few universities include this issue in the ir programmes. Most laboratories associate quality assurance with the fact that referees before publication have revised their works. Here the authors describe their experience in two university laboratories involved in environmental radioactivity control. Both laboratories have implanted a Quality Assurance System based on ISO 17025, the standard used for accreditation of the technical competence of laboratories. One of them (LARA-UPC) belongs to a research institute and the other (LRAUB) belongs to a university department with different logistic organisation. Both laboratories provide services to public and private institutions along side their teaching and research activities. The Quality Assurance Unit (UGQ-UB) is responsible for activities related to technical support in implementation and assessment in quality systems. In the case of these laboratories this UGQ performs internal audits. Accreditation is particularly important in environmental radioactivity analysis, where objective evidence of the quality of the data is required. Moreover, the results of radioactivity analysis are important: e.g. quality of water for human consumption (Directive 98/83/CE), environmental surveys (PVRA, Art. 35 of the Euratom Treaty for EU members), imports of agricultural products (Directive 99/1661/EC), export certificate required for agricultural products (2001/1621/EC), measurements in support of health and safety. It is important to assure the accuracy and precision of

  17. Radiation Laboratory, University of Notre Dame

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1990-10-16

    The Notre Dame Radiation Laboratory is a facility of the Department of Energy operated for DOE by the University of Notre Dame. The majority of the programs within the Laboratory are supported by the Office of Basic Energy Sciences of DOE and, unless otherwise noted in the following, support can be attributed to the Office of Basic Energy Sciences. Certain additional programs, so indicated, are supported by the Office of Standard Reference Data of the National Institute of Standards and Technology. Research programs conducted at the laboratory are briefly described.

  18. Innovations and Enhancements for a Consortium of Big-10 University Research and Training Reactors. Final Report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The Consortium of Big-10 University Research and Training Reactors was by design a strategic partnership of seven leading institutions. We received the support of both our industry and DOE laboratory partners. Investments in reactor, laboratory and program infrastructure, allowed us to lead the national effort to expand and improve the education of engineers in nuclear science and engineering, to provide outreach and education to pre-college educators and students and to become a key resource of ideas and trained personnel for our U.S. industrial and DOE laboratory collaborators.

  19. Update on the University of Missouri-Columbia Research Reactor Upgrade

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The University of Missouri-Columbia (MU) is in the process of upgrading the research and operational capabilities of the MU Research Reactor (MURR) and associated facilities. The plans include an expanded research building that will double the laboratory space, the addition of new research programs, instrumentation and equipment, a cold neutron source, and improved reactor systems. These enhancements, which are in various stages of completion, will greatly expand the present active multidisciplinary research programs at MURR

  20. 77 FR 60430 - Brigham Oil & Gas, L.P.; Notice for Temporary Waiver of Filing and Reporting Requirements

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-10-03

    ... Federal Energy Regulatory Commission Brigham Oil & Gas, L.P.; Notice for Temporary Waiver of Filing and... Rules of Practice and Procedure, 18 CFR 385.204 (2012), Brigham Oil & Gas, L.P., (Brigham Oil & Gas.... Brigham Oil & Gas requested review on an expedited basis and that a Commission order granting...

  1. University of Washington, Nuclear Physics Laboratory annual report, 1995

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1995-04-01

    The Nuclear Physics Laboratory of the University of Washington supports a broad program of experimental physics research. The current program includes in-house research using the local tandem Van de Graff and superconducting linac accelerators and non-accelerator research in double beta decay and gravitation as well as user-mode research at large accelerator and reactor facilities around the world. This book is divided into the following areas: nuclear astrophysics; neutrino physics; nucleus-nucleus reactions; fundamental symmetries and weak interactions; accelerator mass spectrometry; atomic and molecular clusters; ultra-relativistic heavy ion collisions; external users; electronics, computing, and detector infrastructure; Van de Graff, superconducting booster and ion sources; nuclear physics laboratory personnel; degrees granted for 1994--1995; and list of publications from 1994--1995.

  2. University of Washington, Nuclear Physics Laboratory annual report, 1995

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The Nuclear Physics Laboratory of the University of Washington supports a broad program of experimental physics research. The current program includes in-house research using the local tandem Van de Graff and superconducting linac accelerators and non-accelerator research in double beta decay and gravitation as well as user-mode research at large accelerator and reactor facilities around the world. This book is divided into the following areas: nuclear astrophysics; neutrino physics; nucleus-nucleus reactions; fundamental symmetries and weak interactions; accelerator mass spectrometry; atomic and molecular clusters; ultra-relativistic heavy ion collisions; external users; electronics, computing, and detector infrastructure; Van de Graff, superconducting booster and ion sources; nuclear physics laboratory personnel; degrees granted for 1994--1995; and list of publications from 1994--1995

  3. Wanna be in health physics? Try a university research reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ultimately, the key radiation protection issue is each individual's understanding - i.e., understanding of the technical aspects, the safety implications, and the need for their commitment to the overall program. University research reactors can offer a wide range of radiation protection experiences to develop this understanding for not only the health physicist but also any individual involved with nuclear science and technology applications. This paper discusses such topics as radiopharmaceutical research and development, nutritional studies, and reactor maintenance as activities associated with the University of Missouri - Columbia Research Reactor Center (MURR). 3 refs., 1 tab

  4. U.S. Department of Energy University Reactor Instrumentation Program Final Report for 1992-94 Grant for the University of Florida Training Reactor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vernetson, William G.

    1999-04-01

    Overall, the instrumentation obtained under the first year 1992-93 University Reactor Instrumentation Program grant assured that the goals of the program were well understood and met as well as possible at the level of support provided for the University of Florida Training Reactor facility. Though the initial grant support of $21,000 provided toward the purchase of $23,865 of proposed instrumentation certainly did not meet many of the facility's needs, the instrumentation items obtained and implemented did meet some critical needs and hence the goals of the Program to support modernization and improvement of reactor facilities such as the UFTR within the academic community. Similarly, the instrumentation obtained under the second year 1993-94 University Reactor Instrumentation Program grant again met some of the critical needs for instrumentation support at the UFTR facility. Again, though the grant support of $32,799 for proposed instrumentation at the same cost projection does not need all of the facility's needs, it does assure continued facility viability and improvement in operations. Certainly, reduction of forced unavailability of the reactor is the most obvious achievement of the University Reactor Instrumentation Program to date at the UFTR. Nevertheless, the ability to close out several expressed-inspection concerns of the Nuclear Regulatory Commission with acquisition of the low level survey meter and the area radiation monitoring system is also very important. Most importantly, with modest cost sharing the facility has been able to continue and even accelerate the improvement and modernization of a facility, especially in the Neutron Activation Analysis Laboratory, that is used by nearly every post-secondary school in the State of Florida and several in other states, by dozens of departments within the University of Florida, and by several dozen high schools around the State of Florida on a regular basis. Better, more reliable service to such

  5. Treatment of Laboratory Wastewater by Sequence Batch reactor technology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    These studies were conducted on the characterization and treatment of sewage mixed with waste -water of research and testing laboratory (PCSIR Laboratories Lahore). In this study all the parameters COD, BOD and TSS etc of influent (untreated waste-water) and effluent (treated waste-water) were characterized using the standard methods of examination for water and waste-water. All the results of the analyzed waste-water parameters were above the National Environmental Quality Standards (NEQS) set at National level. Treatment of waste-water was carried out by conventional sequencing batch reactor technique (SBR) using aeration and settling technique in the same treatment reactor at laboratory scale. The results of COD after treatment were reduced from (90-95 %), BOD (95-97 %) and TSS (96-99 %) and the reclaimed effluent quality was suitable for gardening purposes. (author)

  6. Nuclear Physics Laboratory, University of Washington annual report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The Nuclear Physics Laboratory at the University of Washington in Seattle pursues a broad program of nuclear physics. These activities are conducted locally and at remote sites. The current programs include in-house research using the local tandem Van de Graaff and superconducting linac accelerators and non-accelerator research in solar neutrino physics at the Sudbury Neutrino Observatory in Canada and at SAGE in Russia, and gravitation as well as user-mode research at large accelerators and reactor facilities around the world. Summaries of the individual research projects are included. Areas of research covered are: fundamental symmetries, weak interactions and nuclear astrophysics; neutrino physics; nucleus-nucleus reactions; ultra-relativistic heavy ions; and atomic and molecular clusters

  7. Nuclear Physics Laboratory, University of Washington annual report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1998-04-01

    The Nuclear Physics Laboratory at the University of Washington in Seattle pursues a broad program of nuclear physics. These activities are conducted locally and at remote sites. The current programs include in-house research using the local tandem Van de Graaff and superconducting linac accelerators and non-accelerator research in solar neutrino physics at the Sudbury Neutrino Observatory in Canada and at SAGE in Russia, and gravitation as well as user-mode research at large accelerators and reactor facilities around the world. Summaries of the individual research projects are included. Areas of research covered are: fundamental symmetries, weak interactions and nuclear astrophysics; neutrino physics; nucleus-nucleus reactions; ultra-relativistic heavy ions; and atomic and molecular clusters.

  8. Taking samples from the reactor components in preparation for dismantling the TRIGA reactor at the Medical University of Hannover

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    After shutting down the facility at the end of 1996 the spent TRIGA fuel elements from the research reactor at the Medical University of Hanover (MHH) were returned to the United States in the summer of 1999 and thus disposed of for the MHH. Consequently one of the main prerequisites for dismantling the TRIGA reactor as planned has been fulfilled. In preparation for dismantling the facility a number of samples were taken from the various reactor components in 2000. The aim of the samples being taken was to establish the radiological condition of the facility in more detail, in particular the condition of the activated components in the reactor tank and the biological shield in the core area. Up to now the calculated estimates for these components had been based mainly on the details provided in the facility documentation when operation started at the beginning of the 1970s, showing that the evaluation of the activity and dose rates was too high. This was confirmed in 1998 in the course of measuring contamination and dose rates when samples were taken from some reactor components before the fuel elements were removed. For example, drill samples were taken from the bottom part of a graphite blind element and from the central radiation beam tube in the core area and then analyzed by the U.R.A. Laboratory of the University of Regensburg. As it is planned to dismantle the reactor facility completely by hand, it is necessary to have realistic radiological data in order to prepare for the dismantling procedure. Furthermore, both the release of radioactive materials into the environment and the costs for external disposal of the radioactive waste from the dismantling of the reactor are to be kept to a minimum. (orig.)

  9. Current Reactor Physics Benchmark Activities at the Idaho National Laboratory

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    John D. Bess; Margaret A. Marshall; Mackenzie L. Gorham; Joseph Christensen; James C. Turnbull; Kim Clark

    2011-11-01

    The International Reactor Physics Experiment Evaluation Project (IRPhEP) [1] and the International Criticality Safety Benchmark Evaluation Project (ICSBEP) [2] were established to preserve integral reactor physics and criticality experiment data for present and future research. These valuable assets provide the basis for recording, developing, and validating our integral nuclear data, and experimental and computational methods. These projects are managed through the Idaho National Laboratory (INL) and the Organisation for Economic Co-operation and Development Nuclear Energy Agency (OECD-NEA). Staff and students at the Department of Energy - Idaho (DOE-ID) and INL are engaged in the development of benchmarks to support ongoing research activities. These benchmarks include reactors or assemblies that support Next Generation Nuclear Plant (NGNP) research, space nuclear Fission Surface Power System (FSPS) design validation, and currently operational facilities in Southeastern Idaho.

  10. Safeguards experience at the Sandia Laboratories reactor site

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sandia Laboratories has an extensive activity in the safeguards area with application to the Technical Area V reactors. The security, development, and operations groups are working together to establish systems which comply with the manual chapters as well as advanced safeguards systems. It appears that to bring an existing facility into compliance with current requirements may be expensive in terms of hardware, facility modifications, manpower, and loss of reactor operating time. The reactor operations and the security groups at Sandia are fortunate to the extent that we are reaping the benefit from DSS funding the work of the development group. The activities conducted thus far have had no measurable impact on the operational safety of the facility. However, we are currently at the midpoint of a five year program with many major modifications, systems development, and decisions yet to be made. Hopefully, the favorable experience will continue

  11. The need to address the larger universe of HEU-fueled reactors, including critical assemblies, pulsed reactors and propulsion reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Full text: The RERTR program has focused thus far primarily on ending shipments of HEU fuel to research reactors. This has resulted in giving highest priority to reactors with steady thermal powers of 1 megawatt or more, because they require regular refuelling. Critical facilities and pulsed reactors can also of serious concern, because some of them contain very large amounts of barely-irradiated HEU and plutonium. They could be costly to convert - and conversion to LEU may be impractical for fast-neutron critical assemblies. An assessment should be carried out first, therefore, as to which are still needed. Critical assemblies are required today primarily to benchmark Monte Carlo neutron-transport codes. Perhaps the world nuclear community could share a few instead of each reactor-design institute having its own. There is also a whole universe of HEU-fuelled pressurized-water reactors used to power submarines and other types of nuclear-powered ships. These reactors collectively require much more HEU fuel each year than research reactors. The risk of HEU diversion from their fuel cycles is not zero but it is difficult for outsiders to discuss conversion because of the fuel designs are classified. This makes the conversion of Russia's civilian icebreaker reactors of particular interest because issues of classified fuel design are less problematic and these reactors load annually fuel containing about 400 kg of U-235. Another reason for interest in developing LEU fuel for these reactors is that the KLT-40 icebreaker reactor is being adapted for a floating nuclear power plant. Finally, the research-reactor community is, in any case, faced with developing fuels that can operate at power-reactor-fuel temperatures because there are a few high-powered research reactors that operate in this temperature range. (author)

  12. Undergraduate Skills Laboratories at Sonoma State University

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gill, Amandeep; Zack, K.; Mills, H.; Cunningham, B.; Jackowski, S.

    2014-01-01

    Due to the current economic climate, funding sources for many laboratory courses have been cut from university budgets. However, it is still necessary for undergraduates to master laboratory skills to be prepared and competitive applicants when entering the professional world and/or graduate school. In this context, student-led programs may be able to compensate for this lack of formal instruction and reinforce concepts from lecture by applying research techniques to develop hands-on comprehension. The Sonoma State University Chapter of Society of Physics Students has established a peer-led skills lab to teach research techniques in the fields of astronomy and physics. The goal is to alleviate the pressures of both independently learning and efficiently applying techniques to junior and senior-level research projects. These skill labs are especially valuable for nontraditional students who, due to work or family duties, may not get a chance to fully commit to research projects. For example, a topic such as Arduino programming has a multitude of applications in both astronomy and physics, but is not taught in traditional university courses. Although some programming and electronics skills are taught in (separate) classes, they are usually not applied to actual research projects, which combined expertise is needed. For example, in astronomy, there are many situations involving programming telescopes and taking data with electronic cameras. Often students will carry out research using these tools but when something goes wrong, the students will not have the skills to trouble shoot and fix the system. Another astronomical topic to be taught in the skills labs is the analysis of astronomical data, including running remote telescopes, analyzing photometric variability, and understanding the concepts of star magnitudes, flat fields, and biases. These workshops provide a setting in which the student teacher may strengthen his or her understanding of the topic by presenting

  13. Positron beam facility at Kyoto University Research Reactor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Q.; Sato, K.; Yoshiie, T.; Sano, T.; Kawabe, H.; Nagai, Y.; Nagumo, K.; Inoue, K.; Toyama, T.; Oshima, N.; Kinomura, A.; Shirai, Y.

    2014-04-01

    A positron beam facility is presently under construction at the Kyoto University Research Reactor (KUR), which is a light-water moderated tank-type reactor operated at a rated thermal power of 5 MW. A cadmium (Cd) - tungsten (W) source similar to that used in NEPOMUC was chosen in the KUR because Cd is very efficient at producing γ-rays when exposed to thermal neutron flux, and W is a widely used in converter and moderator materials. High-energy positrons are moderated by a W moderator with a mesh structure. Electrical lenses and a solenoid magnetic field are used to extract the moderated positrons and guide them to a platform outside of the reactor, respectively. Since Japan is an earthquake-prone country, a special attention is paid for the design of the in-pile positron source so as not to damage the reactor in the severe earthquake.

  14. Capturing intraoperative deformations: research experience at Brigham and Women's Hospital.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Warfield, Simon K; Haker, Steven J; Talos, Ion-Florin; Kemper, Corey A; Weisenfeld, Neil; Mewes, Andrea U J; Goldberg-Zimring, Daniel; Zou, Kelly H; Westin, Carl-Fredrik; Wells, William M; Tempany, Clare M C; Golby, Alexandra; Black, Peter M; Jolesz, Ferenc A; Kikinis, Ron

    2005-04-01

    During neurosurgical procedures the objective of the neurosurgeon is to achieve the resection of as much diseased tissue as possible while achieving the preservation of healthy brain tissue. The restricted capacity of the conventional operating room to enable the surgeon to visualize critical healthy brain structures and tumor margin has lead, over the past decade, to the development of sophisticated intraoperative imaging techniques to enhance visualization. However, both rigid motion due to patient placement and nonrigid deformations occurring as a consequence of the surgical intervention disrupt the correspondence between preoperative data used to plan surgery and the intraoperative configuration of the patient's brain. Similar challenges are faced in other interventional therapies, such as in cryoablation of the liver, or biopsy of the prostate. We have developed algorithms to model the motion of key anatomical structures and system implementations that enable us to estimate the deformation of the critical anatomy from sequences of volumetric images and to prepare updated fused visualizations of preoperative and intraoperative images at a rate compatible with surgical decision making. This paper reviews the experience at Brigham and Women's Hospital through the process of developing and applying novel algorithms for capturing intraoperative deformations in support of image guided therapy. PMID:15721230

  15. Countercurrent multistage fluidized bed reactor for immobilized biocatalysts: II. Operation of a laboratory-scale reactor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vos, H J; Zomerdijk, M; Groen, D J; Luyben, K C

    1990-08-01

    In Part I of this series,(1) we derived a model and made simulations for a multistage fluidized bed reactor (MFBR). It was concluded that the MFBR can be an attractive alternative for a fixed bed reactor when operated with a deactivating biocatalyst. In Part II of this series, the design of a laboratory-scale MFBR and its evaluation to investigate the practical feasibility of this reactor type, will be described. Experiments with a duration as long as 10 days were carried out successfully using immobilized glucose isomerase as a model reaction system. The results predicted by the model are in good agreement with the measured glucose concentration and biocatalyst activity gradients, indicating perfect mixing of the particles in the reactor compartments.The diameters of the biocatalyst particles used in the experiments showed a large spread, with the largest being 1.7 times the smallest. Therefore, an additional check was carried out, to make sure that the particles were not segregating according to size. Particles withdrawn from the reactor compartments were investigated using an image analyzer. Histograms of particle size distribution do not indicate segregation and it is concluded that the particles used have been mixed completely within the compartments. As a result, transport of biocatalyst is nearly plug flow. PMID:18595091

  16. Oak Ridge National Laboratory Research Reactor Experimenters' Guide

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The Oak Ridge National Laboratory has three multipurpose research reactors which accommodate testing loops, target irradiations, and beam-type experiments. Since the experiments must share common or similar facilities and utilities, be designed and fabricated by the same groups, and meet the same safety criteria, certain standards for these have been developed. These standards deal only with those properties from which safety and economy of time and money can be maximized and do not relate to the intent of the experiment or quality of the data obtained. The necessity for, and the limitations of, the standards are discussed; and a compilation of general standards is included

  17. Coalescence kinetics of dispersed crude oil in a laboratory reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A study was conducted to examine the effects of salinity and mixing energy on the resurfacing and coalescence rates of chemically dispersed crude oil droplets. This kinetic study involved the use of mean shear rates to characterize the mixing energy in a laboratory reactor. Coagulation kinetics of dispersed crude oil were determined within a range of mean shear rates of 5, 10, 15, and 20 per second, and with salinity values of 10 and 30 per cent. Observed droplet distributions were fit to a transport-reaction model to estimate collision efficiency values and their dependence on salinity and mixing energy. Dispersant efficiencies were compared with those derived from other laboratory testing methods. Experimentally determined dispersant efficiencies were found to be 10 to 50 per cent lower than predicted using a non-interacting droplet model, but dispersant efficiencies were higher than those predicted using other testing methods. 24 refs., 1 tab., 3 figs

  18. Development of neutron beam projects at the University of Texas TRIGA Mark II Reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Recently, the UT-TRIGA research reactor was licensed and has become fully operational. This reactor, the first new US university reactor in 17 years, is the focus of a new reactor laboratory facility which is located on the Balcones Research Center at The University of Texas at Austin. The TRIGA Mark II reactor is licensed for 1.1 MW steady power operation, 3 dollar pulsing, and includes five beam ports. Various neutron beam-line projects have been assigned to each beam port. Neutron Depth Profiling (NDP) and the Texas Cold Neutron Source (TCNS) are close to completion and will be operational in the near future. The design of the NDP instrument has been completed, a target chamber has been built, and the thermal neutron collimator, detectors, data acquisition electronics, and data processing computers have been acquired. The target chamber accommodates wafers up to 12'' in diameter and provides remote positioning of these wafers. The design and construction of the TCNS has been completed. The TCNS consists of a moderator (mesitylene), a neon heat pipe, a cryogenic refrigerator, and neutron guide tubes. In addition, fission-fragment research (HIAWATHA), Neutron Capture Therapy, and Neutron Radiography are being pursued as projects for the other three beam ports. (author)

  19. The role of the Iowa State University research reactor in nuclear engineering education

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    On October 19, 1959, the Iowa State University Research Reactor (ISURR) was made critical for the first time. In the 29 yr since then, the reactor has been an integral part of the nuclear engineering program. Throughout its history, the major use of the ISURR has been as an educational tool. The reactor is currently used in both the undergraduate and graduate programs at ISU. The paper provides the reactor description and discusses reactor experiments for undergraduates and reactor use in graduate education

  20. MIT nuclear reactor laboratory high school teaching program

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    For the last 6 years, the Massachusetts Institute of Technology (MIT) Nuclear Reactor Laboratory's academic and scientific staffa have been conducting evening seminars for precollege science teachers, parents, and high school students from the New England area. These seminars, as outlined in this paper, are intended to give general information on nuclear technologies with specific emphasis on radiation physics, nuclear medicine, nuclear chemistry, and ongoing research activities at the MIT research reactor. The ultimate goal is to create interest or build on the already existing interest in science and technology by, for example, special student projects. Several small projects have already been completed ranging from environmental research to biological reactions with direct student involvement. Another outcome of these seminars was the change in attitudes of science teachers toward nuclear technology. Numerous letters have been received from the teachers and parents stating their previous lack of knowledge on the beneficial aspects of nuclear technologies and the subsequent inclusion of programs in their curriculum for educating students so that they may also develop a more positive attitude toward nuclear power

  1. Decommissioning Experience: University of Virginia Reactors, United States of America

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Full text: There were two research reactors at the University of Virginia. CAVALIER operated at a maximum power of 100 W from 1974 to 1988. The other reactor (generally referred to as the UVA reactor) operated at a maximum power of 1 MW or 2 MW from 1960 to 1998. The water contained in the pool was utilized to provide shielding during the segmenting and removal of highly contaminated components in the pool. This work was performed by divers using plasma arc cutting equipment. A cask liner was first placed in the reactor pool. The higher activity items were preferentially loaded nearest the centre of the cask, and the lower activity items loaded in the liner annulus to provide shielding. Because air sampling performed during segmentation proved that no airborne contamination was produced, no confinement structure was necessary. After shipment of the removed components, the remaining pool water was sampled and confirmed suitable for discharge to the sanitary sewer (through filters). Decontamination of the pool structures was performed using a water jet cutting process. Once the pool surfaces had been cleaned to bare concrete, surfaces were sampled for activation. The only activated concrete was detected radially around the beam tubes through the pool wall (author)

  2. Universe Awareness: Inspiring young children around the world

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ödman, Carolina J.

    2011-06-01

    Universe Awareness (UNAWE) has over three years of experience enthusing young children with the scale and beauty of the Universe. UNAWE is an outreach programme with a strong social vision aiming at broadening children's minds, awakening their curiosity in science and stimulating global citizenship. UNAWE uses the inspirational aspects of astronomy to instil a culture of peace and tolerance. We present the main principles of the programme, describe how it functions as a community-driven organisation and share some of the UNAWE experience. We describe projects and opportunities for IYA2009 and the future of the global programme.

  3. Technical basis in support of the conversion of the University of Missouri Research Reactor (MURR) core from highly-enriched to low-enriched uranium - core neutron physics

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Stillman, J. [Argonne National Lab. (ANL), Argonne, IL (United States); Feldman, E. [Univ. of Missouri, Columbia, MO (United States). Columbia Research Reactor; Foyto, L [Univ. of Missouri, Columbia, MO (United States). Columbia Research Reactor; Kutikkad, K [Univ. of Missouri, Columbia, MO (United States). Columbia Research Reactor; McKibben, J C [Univ. of Missouri, Columbia, MO (United States). Columbia Research Reactor; Peters, N. [Univ. of Missouri, Columbia, MO (United States). Columbia Research Reactor; Stevens, J. [Argonne National Lab. (ANL), Argonne, IL (United States)

    2012-09-01

    This report contains the results of reactor design and performance for conversion of the University of Missouri Research Reactor (MURR) from the use of highly-enriched uranium (HEU) fuel to the use of low-enriched uranium (LEU) fuel. The analyses were performed by staff members of the Global Threat Reduction Initiative (GTRI) Reactor Conversion Program at the Argonne National Laboratory (ANL) and the MURR Facility. The core conversion to LEU is being performed with financial support of the U. S. government.

  4. 75 FR 27372 - University of New Mexico; University of New Mexico AGN-201M Reactor; Environmental Assessment and...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-05-14

    ... reactor is housed in the Nuclear Energy Laboratory (NEL) located near the southwest corner of the..., dispersed in a polyethylene matrix. The reactor core consists of nine fuel discs that are separated at the...-tight aluminum cylindrical tank. The AGN-201M reactor has two safety rods, one coarse control rod,...

  5. Research on the reactor physics using the Kyoto University Critical Assembly (KUCA)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The Kyoto University Critical Assembly [KUCA] is a multi-core type critical assembly established in 1974, as a facility for the joint use study by researchers of all universities in Japan. Thereafter, many reactor physics experiments have been carried out using three cores (A-, B-, and C-cores) in the KUCA. In the A- and B-cores, solid moderator such as polyethylene or graphite is used, whereas light-water is utilized as moderator in the C-core. The A-core has been employed mainly in connection with the Cockcroft-Walton type accelerator installed in the KUCA, to measure (1) the subcriticality by the pulsed neutron technique for the critical safety research and (2) the neutron spectrum by the time-of-flight technique. Recently, a basic study on the tight lattice core has also launched using the A-core. The B-core has been employed for the research on the thorium fuel cycle ever since. The C-core has been employed (1) for the basic studies on the nuclear characteristics of light-water moderated high-flux research reactors, including coupled-cores, and (2) for a research related to reducing enrichment of uranium fuel used in research reactors. The C-core is being utilized in the reactor laboratory course experiment for students of ten universities in Japan. The data base of the KUCA critical experiments is generated so far on the basis of approximately 350 experimental reports accumulated in the KUCA. Besides, the assessed KUCA code system has been established through analyses on the various KUCA experiments. In addition to the KUCA itself, both of them are provided for the joint use study by researchers of all universities in Japan. (author)

  6. Annual Report 2002 of Warsaw University, Heavy Ion Laboratory

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The Annual Report of Warsaw University Heavy Ion Laboratory is the overview of the Laboratory and assembly of scientific activities of the team especially in the range of instrumental development, experiments and experimental set-ups and experiments using outside facilities of Warsaw Cyclotron

  7. Progress toward the Laboratory Simulation of Young Supernova Remnants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Progress in experiments to simulate the hydrodynamics of supernova remnants (SNRs) in the laboratory is reported. The experiment design involves shock heating of a dense material, which expands to become the ejecta that drive a blast wave through low-density foam. In the design, a variety of issues, such as radiative preheat of the unshocked matter, had to be addressed. A careful analysis of the scaling between hydrodynamic systems shows that the experiment is a good, scaled model of a local region in a young SNR. Measurements of the basic hydrodynamic behavior for two blast-wave velocities are nearly complete. Measurements of hydrodynamic instabilities at the contact surface between the ejecta and the low-density matter will commence in the near future. (c) 2000 The American Astronomical Society

  8. [Future roles of clinical laboratories and clinical laboratory technologists in university hospitals].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yokota, Hiromitsu; Yatomi, Yutaka

    2013-08-01

    Clinical laboratories in university hospitals should be operated with a good balance of medical practice, education, research, and management. The role of a clinical laboratory is to promptly provide highly reliable laboratory data to satisfy the needs of clinicians involved in medical practice and health maintenance of patients. Improvement and maintenance of the quality of the laboratory staff and environment are essential to achieve this goal. In order to implement these requirements efficiently, an appropriate quality management system should be introduced and established, and evaluated objectively by a third party (e.g. by obtaining ISO 15189 certification). ISO 15189 is an international standard regarding the quality and competence of clinical laboratories, and specifies a review of the efficient operational system and technical requirements such as competence in implementing practical tests and calibration. This means the results of laboratory tests reported by accredited laboratories withstand any international evaluation, which is very important to assure the future importance of the existence and management of clinical laboratories as well as internationalization of medical practice. "Education" and "research" have important implications in addition to "medical practice" and "management", as the roles that clinical laboratories should play in university hospitals. University hospital laboratories should be operated by keeping these four factors in good balance. Why are "education" and "research" required in addition to "medical practice" services? If individual clinical laboratory technologists can provide an appropriate response to this question, the importance of the existence of clinical laboratories would be reinforced, without being compromised. PMID:24218765

  9. Utilization of a university reactor for public acceptance

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    AGN-201K is a university reactor in Kyung Hee University (KHU) mainly used for student education as training short course as well as academic course for senior-level. After the Fukushima accident, public concern on radiation hazard has been increased beyond rational level at a neighboring country. It was found that AGN-201K be the perfect tool for interaction with general public. It is very safe to operate with general participants because it is adapted to the very low power. However, radiation level is reasonably high to detect and shield for practice. KHU has a Regional Radiation Monitoring Post where environmental radiation level at Suwon city is continuously measured. In this facility, radiation level at soil, rain, and local agricultural products were measured and reported to the national monitoring headquarter. A new mission of reactor research and education center of KHU has been tried from last summer. Facilities were opened for high school students and teachers for their science camps during summer and winter. A special public acceptance program named as experience camp for understanding the nuclear power and radiation was held 6 times for the last one-year period. Even though number of attendee was limited and small, feedback from participants was hot and positive enough to make professors be ready to sacrifice their personal time.

  10. Utilization of a university reactor for public acceptance

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Myung Hyun [Kyung Hee Univ., Gyeonggi-do (Korea, Republic of). Reactor Research and Education Center

    2015-06-15

    AGN-201K is a university reactor in Kyung Hee University (KHU) mainly used for student education as training short course as well as academic course for senior-level. After the Fukushima accident, public concern on radiation hazard has been increased beyond rational level at a neighboring country. It was found that AGN-201K be the perfect tool for interaction with general public. It is very safe to operate with general participants because it is adapted to the very low power. However, radiation level is reasonably high to detect and shield for practice. KHU has a Regional Radiation Monitoring Post where environmental radiation level at Suwon city is continuously measured. In this facility, radiation level at soil, rain, and local agricultural products were measured and reported to the national monitoring headquarter. A new mission of reactor research and education center of KHU has been tried from last summer. Facilities were opened for high school students and teachers for their science camps during summer and winter. A special public acceptance program named as experience camp for understanding the nuclear power and radiation was held 6 times for the last one-year period. Even though number of attendee was limited and small, feedback from participants was hot and positive enough to make professors be ready to sacrifice their personal time.

  11. University of Rochester, Laboratory for Laser Energetics

    Science.gov (United States)

    1987-01-01

    In FY86 the Laboratory has produced a list of accomplishments in which it takes pride. LLE has met every laser-fusion program milestone to date in a program of research for direct-drive ultraviolet laser fusion originally formulated in 1981. LLE scientists authored or co-authored 135 scientific papers during 1985 to 1986. The collaborative experiments with NRL, LANL, and LLNL have led to a number of important ICF results. The cryogenic target system developed by KMS Fusion for LLE will be used in future high-density experiments on OMEGA to demonstrate the compression of thermonuclear fuel to 100 to 200 times that of solid (20 to 40 g/cm) in a test of the direct-drive concept, as noted in the National Academy of Sciences' report. The excellence of the advanced technology efforts at LLE is illustrated by the establishment of the Ultrafast Science Center by the Department of Defense through the Air Force Office of Scientific Research. Research in the Center will concentrate on bridging the gap between high-speed electronics and ultrafast optics by providing education, research, and development in areas critical to future communications and high-speed computer systems. The Laboratory for Laser Energetics continues its pioneering work on the interaction of intense radiation with matter. This includes inertial-fusion and advanced optical and optical electronics research; training people in the technology and applications of high-power, short-pulse lasers; and interacting with the scientific community, business, industry, and government to promote the growth of laser technology.

  12. Combined Reactor and Microelectrode Measurements in Laboratory Grown Biofilms

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Larsen, Tove; Harremoës, Poul

    1994-01-01

    were carried out with aerobic glucose and starch degrading biofilms. The well described aerobic glucose degradation biofilm system was used to test the combined reactor set-up. Results predicted from known biofilm kinetics were obtained. In the starch degrading biofilm, basic assumptions were tested......A combined biofilm reactor-/microelectrode experimental set-up has been constructed, allowing for simultaneous reactor mass balances and measurements of concentration profiles within the biofilm. The system consists of an annular biofilm reactor equipped with an oxygen microelectrode. Experiments...

  13. A STUDY OF INDOOR AIR QUALITY IN UNIVERSITY LABORATORY BUILDINGS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    ADE ASMI

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available This paper is a study of Indoor Air Quality (IAQ of laboratory in university buildings at faculty of civil and environmental engineering, Universiti Tun Hussein Onn Malaysia (UTHM. This study assessed the existing indoor air quality in two selected laboratory buildings, which equipped with natural ventilation. The importantIAQ parameters considered in this study are temperature, relative humidity, air movement, and airborne particles. However, airborne particles were categorized based on its size characterization concentration of particles ≥ 0.3 μm and particles ≥ 5.0 μm. The measurements were carried out during the peak hours within these laboratories using Met One GT-521 particle counter and Anemometer. Ultimately, area, time of measurement conducted, the number of activities, ventilation, air movement, and materials, were found as the major contributors to the IAQ performance in these laboratories.

  14. Structural biology facilities at Brookhaven National Laboratory`s high flux beam reactor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Korszun, Z.R.; Saxena, A.M.; Schneider, D.K. [Brookhaven National Laboratory, Upton, NY (United States)

    1994-12-31

    The techniques for determining the structure of biological molecules and larger biological assemblies depend on the extent of order in the particular system. At the High Flux Beam Reactor at the Brookhaven National Laboratory, the Biology Department operates three beam lines dedicated to biological structure studies. These beam lines span the resolution range from approximately 700{Angstrom} to approximately 1.5{Angstrom} and are designed to perform structural studies on a wide range of biological systems. Beam line H3A is dedicated to single crystal diffraction studies of macromolecules, while beam line H3B is designed to study diffraction from partially ordered systems such as biological membranes. Beam line H9B is located on the cold source and is designed for small angle scattering experiments on oligomeric biological systems.

  15. Work as representation: the view of young university students

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sidinei Rocha de Oliveira

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available One period of particular importance in the relation of the individual to the world of work is the transition from youth to adulthood, when, among other modifications (biological, psychological and social, entry into the job market has a fundamental role, marking a new stage of life. Hence, this study seeks to analyse which social representations are present in the speech of young students of a Management course with regard their understanding of the “work”. For this purpose, 120 young university students attending the first semesters of an evening Management course at a university in the south of Brazil were consulted. The responses regarding “what is work” and “what is not work” were written by the informants themselves and later analysed in relation to the frequency with which they occur and their diversity. In general, it is noted that work continues to be understood as the central activity that structures the life of individuals and of society in general, a form of social integration, in which its image prevails as an element that inserts the individual in the environment, capable of leading to personal and professional fulfilment as well as to financial sustenance.

  16. Ten years of TRIGA reactor research at the University of Texas

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The 1 MW TRIGA Research Reactor at the Nuclear Engineering Teaching Laboratory is the second TRIGA at the University of Texas at Austin (UT). A small (10 kW-1963, 250 kW-1968) TRIGA Mark I was housed in the basement of the Engineering Building until is was shutdown and decommissioned in 1989. The new TRIGA Mark II with a licensed power of 1.1 MW reached initial criticality in 1992. Prior to 1990, reactor research at UT usually consisted of projects requiring neutron activation analysis (NAA) but the step up to a much larger reactor with neutron beam capability required additional personnel to build the neutron research program. The TCNS is currently used to perform Prompt Gamma Activation Analysis to determine hydrogen and boron concentrations of various composite materials. The early 1990s was a very active period for neutron beam projects at the NETL. In addition to the TCNS, a real-time neutron radiography facility (NIF) and a high-resolution neutron depth profiling facility (NDP) were installed in two separate beam ports. The NDP facility was most recently used to investigate alpha damage on stainless steel in support of the U.S. Nuclear Weapons Stewardship programs. In 1999, a sapphire beam filter was installed in the NDP system to reduce the fast neutron flux at the sample location. A collaborative effort was started in 1997 between UT-Austin and the University of Texas at Arlington to build a reactor-based, low-energy positron beam (TIPS). The limited success in obtaining funding has placed the project on hold. The Nuclear and Radiation Engineering Program has grown rapidly and effectively doubled in size over the past 5 years but years of low nuclear research funding, an overall stagnation in the U.S. nuclear power industry and a persuasive public distrust of nuclear energy has caused a precipitous decline in many programs. Recently, the U.S. DOE has encouraged University Research Reactors (URR) in the U.S. to collaborate closely together by forming URR

  17. DOE/NE University Program in robotics for advanced reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The US Department of Energy has provided support to four universities and the Oak Ridge National Laboratory in order to pursue research leading to the development and deployment of advanced robotic systems capable of performing tasks that are hazardous to humans, that generate significant occupational radiation exposure, and/or whose execution times can be reduced if performed by an automated system. The goal is to develop a generation of advanced robotic systems capable of economically performing surveillance, maintenance, and repair tasks in nuclear facilities and other hazardous environments. The approach to achieving the program objective is a transition from teleoperation to the capability of autonomous operation within three successive generations of robotic systems. The strategy adopted in order to achieve the program goals in an efficient and timely manner consists in utilizing, and advancing where required, state-of-the-art robotics technology through close interaction between the universities and the manufacturers and operators of nuclear power plants. There is a potentially broad range of applications for the robotic systems developed in the course of this project. Therefore, it is expected that efforts to obtain additional support from other agencies, e.g., DOD and NASA, will be successful. Areas of cooperation with other nations (e.g., Japan, France, Germany) are being explored. This Program features a unique teaming arrangement among the Universities of Florida, Michigan, Tennessee, Texas, and the Oak Ridge National Laboratory, and their industrial partners, Odetics, Gulf State Utilities, Florida Power and Light Company, Remotec, and Telerobotics International

  18. Request for Naval Reactors Comment on Proposed PROMETHEUS Space Flight Nuclear Reactor High Tier Reactor Safety Requirements and for Naval Reactors Approval to Transmit These Requirements to Jet Propulsion Laboratory

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The purpose of this letter is to request Naval Reactors comments on the nuclear reactor high tier requirements for the PROMETHEUS space flight reactor design, pre-launch operations, launch, ascent, operation, and disposal, and to request Naval Reactors approval to transmit these requirements to Jet Propulsion Laboratory to ensure consistency between the reactor safety requirements and the spacecraft safety requirements. The proposed PROMETHEUS nuclear reactor high tier safety requirements are consistent with the long standing safety culture of the Naval Reactors Program and its commitment to protecting the health and safety of the public and the environment. In addition, the philosophy on which these requirements are based is consistent with the Nuclear Safety Policy Working Group recommendations on space nuclear propulsion safety (Reference 1), DOE Nuclear Safety Criteria and Specifications for Space Nuclear Reactors (Reference 2), the Nuclear Space Power Safety and Facility Guidelines Study of the Applied Physics Laboratory

  19. Association Euratom - Risø National Laboratory, Technical University of Denmark - Annual Progress Report 2007

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Michelsen, Poul; Korsholm, Søren Bang; Juul Rasmussen, Jens

    with the plasma equilibrium and particles. The effort includes both first principles based modelling, and experimental observations of turbulence and of fast ion dynamics by collective Thomson scattering. The activities in technology on investigations of radiation damage of fusion reactor materials have been......The programme of the Research Unit of the Fusion Association Euratom - Risø National Laboratory, Technical University of Denmark, covers work in fusion plasma physics and in fusion technology. The fusion plasma physics research focuses on turbulence and transport, and its interaction...

  20. Hydraulics of laboratory and full-scale upflow anaerobic sludge blanket (UASB) reactors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Batstone, D J; Hernandez, J L A; Schmidt, J E

    2005-08-01

    Laboratory-scale upflow anaerobic sludge blanket (UASB) reactors are often used as test platforms to evaluate full-scale applications. However, for a given volume specific hydraulic loading rate and geometry, the gas and liquid flows increase proportionally with the cube root of volume. In this communication, we demonstrate that a laboratory-scale reactor had plug-flow hydraulics, while a full-scale reactor had mixed flow hydraulics. The laboratory-scale reactor could be modeled using an existing biochemical model, and parameters identified, but because of computational speed with plug-flow hydraulics, mixed systems are instead recommended for parameter identification studies. Because of the scaling issues identified, operational data should not be directly projected from laboratory-scale results to the full-scale design. PMID:15977253

  1. An Account of Oak Ridge National Laboratory's Thirteen Research Reactors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rosenthal, Murray Wilford [ORNL

    2009-08-01

    The Oak Ridge National Laboratory has built and operated 13 nuclear reactors in its 66-year history. The first was the graphite reactor, the world's first operational nuclear reactor, which served as a plutonium production pilot plant during World War II. It was followed by two aqueous-homogeneous reactors and two red-hot molten-salt reactors that were parts of power-reactor development programs and by eight others designed for research and radioisotope production. One of the eight was an all-metal fast burst reactor used for health physics studies. All of the others were light-water cooled and moderated, including the famous swimming-pool reactor that was copied dozens of times around the world. Two of the reactors were hoisted 200 feet into the air to study the shielding needs of proposed nuclear-powered aircraft. The final reactor, and the only one still operating today, is the High Flux Isotope Reactor (HFIR) that was built particularly for the production of californium and other heavy elements. With the world's highest flux and recent upgrades that include the addition of a cold neutron source, the 44-year-old HFIR continues to be a valuable tool for research and isotope production, attracting some 500 scientific visitors and guests to Oak Ridge each year. This report describes all of the reactors and their histories.

  2. Research on Catalysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bartholomew, Calvin H.; Hecker, William C.

    1984-01-01

    The objectives and philosophy of the Catalysis Laboratory at Brigham Young University are discussed. Also discusses recent and current research activities at the laboratory as well as educational opportunities, research facilities, and sources of research support. (JN)

  3. LOSS-OF-COOLANT ACIDENT SIMULATIONS IN THE NATIONAL RESEARCH UNIVERSAL REACTOR

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bennett, W D; Goodman, R L; Heaberlin, S W; Hesson, G M; Nealley, C; Kirg, L L; Marshall, R K; McNair, G W; Meitzler, W D; Neally, G W; Parchen, L J; Pilger, J P; Rausch, W N; Russcher, G E; Schreiber, R E; Wildung, N J

    1981-02-01

    Pressurized water reactor loss-of-coolant accident (LOCA) phenomena are being simulated with a series of experiments in the U-2 loop of the National Research Universal Reactor at Chalk River, Ontario, Canada. The first of these experiments includes up to 45 parametric thermal-hydraulic tests to establish the relationship among the reflood delay time of emergency coolant, the reflooding rate, and the resultant fuel rod cladding peak temperature. Subsequent experiments establish the fuel rod failure characteristics at selected peak cladding temperatures. Fuel rod cladding pressurization simulates high burnup fission gas pressure levels of modern PWRs. This document contains both an experiment overview of the LOCA simulation program and a review of the safety analyses performed by Pacific Northwest Laboratory (PNL) to define the expected operating conditions as well as to evaluate the worst case operating conditions. The primary intent of this document is to supply safety information required by the Chalk River Nuclear Laboratories (CRNL), to establish readiness to proceed from one test phase to the next and to establish the overall safety of the experiment. A hazards review summarizes safety issues, normal operation and three worst case accidents that have been addressed during the development of the experiment plan.

  4. Information and education programs at the Washington State University research reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tours of the Nuclear Radiation Center are a common activity throughout the year, conducted for University classes, organized tour groups from other universities, private tour groups, and individuals. Increased awareness of nuclear activity and the existence of a research reactor on-campus has led to a heightened interest in reactor operations. The information and education programs at Washington State University have been directed at the individual needs and requirements of diverse interests. (author)

  5. Heavy Ion Laboratory - Warsaw University - Annual Report 2003

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In the presented report the research activities of Heavy Ion Laboratory (HIL) of the Warsaw University in year of 2003 are described. The report is divided into four parts: Laboratory Overview, Experiments and Experimental Set-ups, Experiments using outside facilities and General information on HIL activities which contain the lists of personnel, seminars held at the HIL as well as external ones, the list of published papers and conference contributions. A summary of the (HIL) activities is briefly presented in ''Introduction'' written by HIL director prof. J. Jastrzebski

  6. Experience with an accrediated INAA service laboratory at a University - will research be next?

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Quality assurance, total quality management, and accreditation are the recognizable attributes of an attitude and consideration of a work process that is being introduced to industry, utilities, and (industrial) laboratories. International reference documents-the International Standard Organization (ISO)- IEC guides - have been developed to harmonize the ways of implementing and evaluating QA practices in connection with accreditation. The life-styles of working under quality practices and working at a university demonstrate a large contrast. Many of the basic principles of quality practices, such as full documentation, written procedures and instructions, and careful consideration of the conditions under which work will be performed, are characteristically absent at universities. Universities nowadays also have a mission to teach quality practices to the present and future generations of scientists. Within a few years, society may call for academics who are not only knowledgeable on the principles of quality practices but who also have been educated, trained, and practiced in such an environment. Conflicts will be avoided when such academics occupy leading positions in organizations that already use quality practices or when they become responsible for the introduction of quality practices. The neutron activation analysis (NAA) laboratory and associated analysis systems at the Interfaculty Reactor Institute (IRI) of the Delft University of Technology has been reorganized and brought into accord with the requirements of EN45001 and ISO guide 25. After an audit by the official accreditation body in the Netherlands, STERLAB, the laboratory received its accreditation in early 1993, making it the first accredited laboratory of both kinds (university and instrumental (INAA)) in the Netherlands and possibly in the world

  7. The University of Missouri Research Reactor facility can melter system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    At the University of Missouri Research Reactor (MURR), a waste compacting system for reducing the volume of radioactive aluminum cans has been designed, built and put into operation. In MURR's programs of producing radioisotopes and transmutation doping of silicon, a large volume of radioactive aluminum cans is generated. The Can Melter System (CMS) consists of a sorting station, a can masher, an electric furnace and a gas fired furnace. This system reduces the cans and other radioactive metal into barrels of solid metal close to theoretical density. The CMS has been in operation at the MURR now for over two years. Twelve hundred cu ft of cans and other metals have been reduced into 150 cu ft of shipable waste. The construction cost of the CMS was $4950.84 plus 1680 man hours of labor, and the operating cost of the CMS is $18/lb. The radiation exposure to the operator is 8.6 mR/cu ft. The yearly operating savings is $30,000. 20 figs., 10 tabs

  8. Preparation for shipment of spent TRIGA fuel elements from the research reactor of the Medical University of Hannover

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In the early seventies a research reactor of type TRIGA Mark I was installed in the Department of Nuclear Medicine at the Medical University of Hannover (MHH) for the production of isotopes with short decay times for medical use. Since new production methods have been developed, the reactor has become obsolete and the MHH decided to decommission it. Probably in the second quarter of 1999 all 76 spent TRIGA fuel elements will be shipped to Idaho National Engineering and Environmental Laboratory (INEEL), USA, in one cask of type GNS 16. Due to technical reasons within the MHH a special Mobile Transfer System, which is being developed by the company Noell-KRC, will be used for reloading the fuel elements and transferring them from the reactor to the cask GNS 16. A description of the main components of this system as well as the process for transferring the fuel elements follows. (author)

  9. Preparation for shipment of spent TRIGA fuel elements from the research reactor of the Medical University of Hannover

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hampel, Gabriele; Cordes, Harro [Medical University of Hannover, D-30625 Hannover (Germany); Ebbinghaus, Kurt; Haferkamp, Dirk [NOELL-KRC, D-97064 Wuerzburg (Germany)

    1998-07-01

    In the early seventies a research reactor of type TRIGA Mark I was installed in the Department of Nuclear Medicine at the Medical University of Hannover (MHH) for the production of isotopes with short decay times for medical use. Since new production methods have been developed, the reactor has become obsolete and the MHH decided to decommission it. Probably in the second quarter of 1999 all 76 spent TRIGA fuel elements will be shipped to Idaho National Engineering and Environmental Laboratory (INEEL), USA, in one cask of type GNS 16. Due to technical reasons within the MHH a special Mobile Transfer System, which is being developed by the company Noell-KRC, will be used for reloading the fuel elements and transferring them from the reactor to the cask GNS 16. A description of the main components of this system as well as the process for transferring the fuel elements follows. (author)

  10. Students' Assessment of Interactive Distance Experimentation in Nuclear Reactor Physics Laboratory Education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Malkawi, Salaheddin; Al-Araidah, Omar

    2013-01-01

    Laboratory experiments develop students' skills in dealing with laboratory instruments and physical processes with the objective of reinforcing the understanding of the investigated subject. In nuclear engineering, where research reactors play a vital role in the practical education of students, the high cost and long construction time of…

  11. Building a Laboratory: the Work of Global University Rankers

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lim, Miguel Antonio

    2015-01-01

    evaluation. I present some of the ways in which these leaders are part of the process from the lesser known point-of-view of the ranking organisations. I propose three questions: 1) Can the university ranker be thought of as a ‘laboratory’? 2) How does the university ranking laboratory produce its ‘science......’, data and facts? and 3) To what end does this laboratory work? Why does it experiment? To answer these questions, I draw upon an analysis of my participation in and observation of ranking events and ranking production over a two year period, from November 2013 until October 2015. Firstly, I suggest...... that the ranking organisation encompasses many different spaces and networks. Secondly, I argue that rankers produce their instruments through a process of experiments, gathering feedback, engaging with their audiences, and carrying out strategic work to legitimate their instruments. Rankers carry out all...

  12. The proposed Diagnostic Instrumentation and Analysis Laboratory, Mississippi State University

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1994-11-01

    The Department of Energy (DOE) proposes to authorize Mississippi State University (MSU) to proceed with the detailed design, construction and equipping of the proposed Diagnostic Instrumentation and Analysis Laboratory (DIAL). DOE grant funds are available to the University for the limited purpose of performing preliminary studies, including analysis necessary to conduct this environmental assessment. The proposed facility would be located in the Mississippi Research and Technology Park, adjacent to the Mississippi Agriculture and Forestry Experiment Station campus in Starkville, Mississippi. Total project cost is estimated at $7,953,600. This proposed laboratory would be designed to conduct research into combustion devices related to waste management and environmental restoration that is of importance to industry and government. The proposed facility`s role would be to develop diagnostic instrumentation capabilities in the area of combustion and related processes.

  13. An evaluation of alternative reactor vessel cutting technologies for the experimental boiling water reactor at Argonne National Laboratory

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Boing, L.E.; Henley, D.R. (Argonne National Lab., IL (USA)); Manion, W.J.; Gordon, J.W. (Nuclear Energy Services, Inc., Danbury, CT (USA))

    1989-12-01

    Metal cutting techniques that can be used to segment the reactor pressure vessel of the Experimental Boiling Water Reactor (EBWR) at Argonne National Laboratory (ANL) have been evaluated by Nuclear Energy Services. Twelve cutting technologies are described in terms of their ability to perform the required task, their performance characteristics, environmental and radiological impacts, and cost and schedule considerations. Specific recommendations regarding which technology should ultimately be used by ANL are included. The selection of a cutting method was the responsibility of the decommissioning staff at ANL, who included a relative weighting of the parameters described in this document in their evaluation process. 73 refs., 26 figs., 69 tabs.

  14. An evaluation of alternative reactor vessel cutting technologies for the experimental boiling water reactor at Argonne National Laboratory

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Metal cutting techniques that can be used to segment the reactor pressure vessel of the Experimental Boiling Water Reactor (EBWR) at Argonne National Laboratory (ANL) have been evaluated by Nuclear Energy Services. Twelve cutting technologies are described in terms of their ability to perform the required task, their performance characteristics, environmental and radiological impacts, and cost and schedule considerations. Specific recommendations regarding which technology should ultimately be used by ANL are included. The selection of a cutting method was the responsibility of the decommissioning staff at ANL, who included a relative weighting of the parameters described in this document in their evaluation process. 73 refs., 26 figs., 69 tabs

  15. DOE/NE University Program in robotics for advanced reactors research

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The document presents the bimonthly progress reports published during 1990 regarding the US Department of Energy/NE-sponsored research at the University of Tennessee Knoxville under the DOE Robitics for Advanced Reactors Research Grant. Significant accomplishments are noted in the following areas: development of edge-segment based stereo matching algorithm; vision system integration in the CESAR laboratory; evaluation of algorithms for surface characterization from range data; comparative study of data fusion techniques; development of architectural framework, software, and graphics environment for sensor-based robots; algorithms for acquiring tactile images from planer surfaces; investigations in geometric model-based robotic manipulation; investigations of non-deterministic approaches to sensor fusion; and evaluation of sensor calibration techniques. (MB)

  16. 76 FR 69296 - University of Utah, University of Utah TRIGA Nuclear Reactor, Notice of Issuance of Renewed...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-11-08

    ... published in the Federal Register on July 21, 2011 (76 FR 43733-43737). The NRC received no request for a..., 2011 (76 FR 60091-60094), and concluded that renewal of the facility operating license will not have a... COMMISSION University of Utah, University of Utah TRIGA Nuclear Reactor, Notice of Issuance of...

  17. Data base of reactor physics experimental results in Kyoto University critical assembly experimental facilities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The Kyoto University critical assembly experimental facilities belong to the Kyoto University Research Reactor Institute, and are the versatile critical assembly constructed for experimentally studying reactor physics and reactor engineering. The facilities are those for common utilization by universities in whole Japan. During more than ten years since the initial criticality in 1974, various experiments on reactor physics and reactor engineering have been carried out using many experimental facilities such as two solidmoderated cores, a light water-moderated core and a neutron generator. The kinds of the experiment carried out were diverse, and to find out the required data from them is very troublesome, accordingly it has become necessary to make a data base which can be processed by a computer with the data accumulated during the past more than ten years. The outline of the data base, the data base CAEX using personal computers, the data base supported by a large computer and so on are reported. (Kako, I.)

  18. The Los Alamos universe: Using multimedia to promote laboratory capabilities

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kindel, J.

    2000-03-01

    This project consists of a multimedia presentation that explains the technological capabilities of Los Alamos National Laboratory. It takes the form of a human-computer interface built around the metaphor of the universe. The project is intended promote Laboratory capabilities to a wide audience. Multimedia is simply a means of communicating information through a diverse set of tools--be they text, sound, animation, video, etc. Likewise, Los Alamos National Laboratory is a collection of diverse technologies, projects, and people. Given the ample material available at the Laboratory, there are tangible benefits to be gained by communicating across media. This paper consists of three parts. The first section provides some basic information about the Laboratory, its mission, and its needs. The second section introduces this multimedia presentation and the metaphor it is based on along with some basic concepts of color and user interaction used in the building of this project. The final section covers construction of the project, pitfalls, and future improvements.

  19. Introduction to the status of reactor physics education in Tsinghua University

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This paper introduces the general situation of reactor physics education in Tsinghua University, including its history, the course series of the undergraduates and graduates and the reactor physics experiment education. This paper also simply introduces the students studying in nuclear engineering field and other nuclear engineering related courses. (author)

  20. Verification of the MCNP model for the University of Texas TRIGA reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    An MCNP model of The University of Texas TRIGA reactor has been used for design calculations for the neutron collimator system in the through beam port. The TRIGA MCNP model was verified by comparing its results with experimentally determined values

  1. Final report for U.S. Department of Energy Grant DE-FG02-95NE38118-5 University Reactor Sharing Program [Purdue University

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bean, R.S.

    2001-06-01

    Under the Reactor Sharing Program, a total of 350 high school students participated in the neutron activation experiment and 484 high school and university students and members of the general public participated in reactor tours.

  2. URI Program Final Report FY 2001 Grant for the University of Florida Training Reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The purpose of the URI program is to upgrade and improve university nuclear research and training reactors and to contribute to strengthening the academic community's nuclear engineering infrastructure. It should be noted that the proposed UFTR facility instrumentation and equipment can generally be subdivided into three categories: (1) to improve reactor operations, (2) to improve existing facility/NAA Laboratory operations, and (3) to expand facility capability. All of these items were selected recognizing the objectives of the University Reactor Instrumentation Program to respond to the widespread needs in the academic reactor community for modernization and improvement of research and training reactor facilities, especially at large and diverse institutions such as the University of Florida. These needs have been particularly pressing at the UFTR which is the only such research and training reactor in the State of Florida which is undergoing rapid growth in a variety of technical areas. As indicated in Table 2, the first item is a security system control panel with associated wiring and detectors. The existing system is over 30 years old and has been the subject of repeated maintenance over the past 5 years. Some of its detection devices are no longer replaceable from stock. Modifications made many years ago make troubleshooting some parts of the system such as the backup battery charging subsystem essentially impossible, further increasing maintenance frequency to replace batteries. Currently, various parts of the system cable trays remain open for maintenance access further degrading facility appearance. In light of relicensing plans, this item is also a key consideration for housekeeping appearance considerations. The cost of a replacement ADEMCO Vista 20 security system including turnkey installation by a certified vendor was to be $2,206. Replacement of this system was expected to save up to 5 days of maintenance per year, decrease security alarm response

  3. Neutron Scattering Simulations at the University of Kentucky Accelerator Laboratory

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nguyen, Thienan; Jackson, Daniel; Hicks, S. F.; Rice, Ben; Vanhoy, J. R.

    2015-10-01

    The Monte-Carlo N-Particle Transport code (MCNP) has many applications ranging from radiography to reactor design. It has particle interaction capabilities, making it useful for simulating neutron collisions on surfaces of varying compositions. The neutron flux within the accelerator complex at the University of Kentucky was simulated using MCNP. With it, the complex's capabilities to contain and thermalize 7 MeV neutrons produced via 2H(d,n)3He source reaction to an acceptable level inside the neutron hall and adjoining rooms were analyzed. This will aid in confirming the safety of researchers who are working in the adjacent control room. Additionally, the neutron transport simulation was used to analyze the impact of the collimator copper shielding on various detectors located around the neutron scattering hall. The purpose of this was to attempt to explain any background neutrons that are observed at these detectors. The simulation shows that the complex performs very well with regards to neutron containment and thermalization. Also, the tracking information for the paths taken by the neutrons show that most of the neutrons' lives are spent inside the neutron hall. Finally, the neutron counts were analyzed at the positions of the neutron monitor detectors located at 90 and 45 degrees relative to the incident beam direction. This project was supported in part by the DOE NEUP Grant NU-12-KY-UK-0201-05 and the Donald A. Cowan Physics Institute at the University of Dallas.

  4. Conversion and standardization of university reactor fuels using low-enrichment uranium: Plans and schedules

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Young, H.H.; Brown, K.R.; Matos, J.E.

    1986-01-01

    The highly-enriched uranium (HEU) fuel used in twenty United States university reactors can be viewed as contributing to the risk of theft or diversion of weapons-useable material. To minimize this risk, the US Nuclear Regulatory Commission issued its final rule on ''Limiting the Use of Highly Enriched Uranium in Domestically Licensed Research and Test Reactors,'' in February 1986. This paper describes the plans and schedules developed by the US Department of Energy to coordinate an orderly transition from HEU to LEU fuel in most of these reactors. An important element in the planning process has been the desire to standardize the LEU fuels used in US university reactors and to enhance the performance and utilization of a number of these reactors. The program is estimated to cost about $10 million and to last about five years.

  5. Harmful Alcohol Use on Campus: Impact on Young People at University

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rickwood, Debra; George, Amanda; Parker, Rhian; Mikhailovich, Katja

    2011-01-01

    Young people at university are more likely to consume alcohol at harmful levels than their same-age peers who are not at university, and harmful alcohol use affects many aspects of campus life. This study aimed to investigate alcohol use and alcohol-related harms, both experienced and witnessed, among students at an Australian university. An…

  6. Accident Analyses for Conversion of the University of Missouri Research Reactor (MURR) from Highly-Enriched to Low-Enriched Uranium

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Stillman, J. A. [Argonne National Lab. (ANL), Argonne, IL (United States). Nuclear Engineering Div., Research and Test Reactor Dept.; Feldman, E. E. [Argonne National Lab. (ANL), Argonne, IL (United States). Nuclear Engineering Div., Research and Test Reactor Dept.; Wilson, E. H. [Argonne National Lab. (ANL), Argonne, IL (United States). Nuclear Engineering Div., Research and Test Reactor Dept.; Foyto, L. P. [Univ. of Missouri, Columbia, MO (United States). Research Reactor; Kutikkad, K. [Univ. of Missouri, Columbia, MO (United States). Research Reactor; McKibben, J. C. [Univ. of Missouri, Columbia, MO (United States). Research Reactor; Peters, N. J. [Univ. of Missouri, Columbia, MO (United States). Research Reactor; Cowherd, W. M. [Univ. of Missouri, Columbia, MO (United States). College of Engineering, Nuclear Engineering Program; Rickman, B. [Univ. of Missouri, Columbia, MO (United States). College of Engineering, Nuclear Engineering Program

    2014-12-01

    This report contains the results of reactor accident analyses for the University of Missouri Research Reactor (MURR). The calculations were performed as part of the conversion from the use of highly-enriched uranium (HEU) fuel to the use of low-enriched uranium (LEU) fuel. The analyses were performed by staff members of the Global Threat Reduction Initiative (GTRI) Reactor Conversion Program at the Argonne National Laboratory (ANL), the MURR Facility, and the Nuclear Engineering Program – College of Engineering, University of Missouri-Columbia. The core conversion to LEU is being performed with financial support from the U. S. government. This report contains the results of reactor accident analyses for the University of Missouri Research Reactor (MURR). The calculations were performed as part of the conversion from the use of highly-enriched uranium (HEU) fuel to the use of low-enriched uranium (LEU) fuel. The analyses were performed by staff members of the Global Threat Reduction Initiative (GTRI) Reactor Conversion Program at the Argonne National Laboratory (ANL), the MURR Facility, and the Nuclear Engineering Program – College of Engineering, University of Missouri-Columbia. The core conversion to LEU is being performed with financial support from the U. S. government. In the framework of non-proliferation policies, the international community presently aims to minimize the amount of nuclear material available that could be used for nuclear weapons. In this geopolitical context most research and test reactors, both domestic and international, have started a program of conversion to the use of LEU fuel. A new type of LEU fuel based on an alloy of uranium and molybdenum (U-Mo) is expected to allow the conversion of U.S. domestic high performance reactors like MURR. This report presents the results of a study of core behavior under a set of accident conditions for MURR cores fueled with HEU U-Alx dispersion fuel or LEU monolithic U-Mo alloy fuel with 10 wt% Mo

  7. Irradiated Hardware Characterization and Packaging During Decommissioning of the Ford Nuclear Reactor at University of Michigan

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Characterization of all irradiated hardware during decommissioning of experimental and research reactors always presents a host of challenges not normally associated with characterization of irradiated hardware from commercial nuclear reactors. The campaign to characterize all of the irradiated hardware from the Ford Nuclear Reactor at the University of Michigan was no exception. The Ford Nuclear Reactor was an MTR pool style reactor that was in continual use up to the point of decommissioning. Some of the unique challenges involved with experimental pool reactors are the lack of symmetry around the core for neutron activation analysis calculations, the large inventory of activated components, the high degree of variability within that inventory, and the packaging of the entire inventory into the most efficient liner combinations. The entire high activity inventory was successfully packaged into two (2) steel fuel pool liners and shipped in two (2) cask shipments. (authors)

  8. Annual report of Laboratory of Nuclear Studies, Osaka University, 1980

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This is the progress report of the research activities in the Laboratory of Nuclear Studies during the period from April, 1980, to March, 1981. The activities were carried out by the OULNS staffs and also by outsiders at the OULNS. In this period, the X-ray astrophysics group, the radiation physics group and the high energy physics group joined the OULNS. The main accelerators in the OULNS are a 110 cm variable energy cyclotron and a 4.7 MeV Van de Graaff machine. The detailed experimental studies on inbeam e-gamma spectroscopy and beta-decay were carried out at two accelerator laboratories. The radiochemistry facility and a mass spectrometer were fully used. The research activities extended to high energy physics by utilizing national facilities, such as a 230 cm cyclotron in the Research Center for Nuclear Physics and a proton synchrotron in the National Laboratory for High Energy Physics. The theoretical studies on elementary particles and nuclear physics were carried out also. It is important that the facilities in the OULNS were used by the outsiders in Osaka University, such as solid state physics group and particle-induced X-ray group. The activities of the divisions of cyclotron, Van de Graaff, high energy physics, accelerator development and nuclear instrumentation, mass spectroscopy, radioisotope, solid state and theoretical physics are reported. (Kako, I.)

  9. Decontamination and dismantlement of the JANUS Reactor at Argonne National Laboratory-East. Project final report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fellhauer, C.R.; Clark, F.R. [Argonne National Lab., IL (United States). Technology Development Div.; Garlock, G.A. [MOTA Corp., Cayce, SC (United States)

    1997-10-01

    The decontamination and dismantlement of the JANUS Reactor at Argonne National Laboratory-East (ANL-E) was completed in October 1997. Descriptions and evaluations of the activities performed and analyses of the results obtained during the JANUS D and D Project are provided in this Final Report. The following information is included: objective of the JANUS D and D Project; history of the JANUS Reactor facility; description of the ANL-E site and the JANUS Reactor facility; overview of the D and D activities performed; description of the project planning and engineering; description of the D and D operations; summary of the final status of the JANUS Reactor facility based upon the final survey results; description of the health and safety aspects of the project, including personnel exposure and OSHA reporting; summary of the waste minimization techniques utilized and total waste generated by the project; and summary of the final cost and schedule for the JANUS D and D Project.

  10. Reference site selection report for the advanced liquid metal reactor at the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sivill, R.L.

    1990-03-01

    This Reference Site Selection Report was prepared by EG G, Idaho Inc., for General Electric (GE) to provide information for use by the Department of Energy (DOE) in selecting a Safety Test Site for an Advanced Liquid Metal Reactor. Similar Evaluation studies are planned to be conducted at other potential DOE sites. The Power Reactor Innovative Small Module (PRISM) Concept was developed for ALMR by GE. A ALMR Safety Test is planned to be performed on a DOE site to demonstrate features and meet Nuclear Regulatory Commission Requirements. This study considered possible locations at the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory that met the ALMR Prototype Site Selection Methodology and Criteria. Four sites were identified, after further evaluation one site was eliminated. Each of the remaining three sites satisfied the criteria and was graded. The results were relatively close. Thus concluding that the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory is a suitable location for an Advanced Liquid Metal Reactor Safety Test. 23 refs., 13 figs., 9 tabs.

  11. Study of the catalyst deactivation in an industrial gasoil HDS reactor using a mini-scale laboratory reactor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    L.E. Kallinikos; G.D. Bellos; N.G. Papayannako [National Technical University of Athens, Athens (Greece). School of Chemical Engineering

    2008-09-15

    The activity of a hydrodesulphurization catalyst loaded in an industrial hydrotreater is studied at start up and end of run. Catalyst initial and final activity was determined by performing HDS experiments at industrial conditions in a laboratory mini-scale hydrotreater. The results show that the deactivation of the catalyst samples collected from three different places of the industrial reactor do not vary significantly, the maximum difference among the catalyst samples, being less than {+-}4%. The experimentally determined deactivation level of the catalyst samples is compared with the deactivation estimated for the same industrial reactor and the same load using a hybrid neural network model trained with operational data of the industrial and the results are in close agreement. Catalyst deactivation appears to be faster for hydrogen consumption reactions than for hydrodesulphurization reactions indicating a decreasing hydrogen consumption trend with time in operation for specific sulphur content in the product. 21 refs., 9 figs., 4 tabs.

  12. Report of the research results with University of Tokyo, Nuclear Engineering Research Laboratory's Facilities in fiscal 1986

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This book contains a large number of reports of studies made in 1986 through joint utilization of the nuclear reactor 'Yayoi' and electron beam type accelerator which are installed in the Nuclear engineering Research Laboratory, Faculty of Engineering, University of Tokyo. The reports presented deal with 'Behaviors of Neutrons in Fast Reactor Blanket Shield', 'Effect of Fast Neutron Radiation on Organic Materials', 'Production and Recovery of Tritium in Nuclear Fusion Reactor Blanket System', 'Bench Mark Experiment of Effect of Atmospheric Scattering of Neutron', 'Experimental Evaluation of Nuclear Heat Rate', 'Fast Neutron Shielding Experiment', 'Effect of Fast Neutron Radiation on Hot Water', 'Neutron Shielding Experiment', 'Biological and Medical Application of 'Yayoi' Neutron', 'Effect of Fission-Fusion Correlation Radiation on Semiconductors (Si, GaAs)', 'Application of Fast Neutron to Radiography Technology', 'Streaming in Offset Slit', 'Design and Evaluation of New Reactor', 'LET Effect on Organic Material', 'Handling, Separation and Recovery of Transuranium Elements', 'Reactor Operation Support System Using Knowledge Engineering Technique', 'Application of Shape Memory Alloys to Nuclear Reactor Devices', 'Numerical Simulation of Turbulent Hear Transfer', and many other studies. (Nogami, K.)

  13. Analyses in support of the Laboratory Microfusion Facility and ICF commercial reactor designs

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Our work on this contract was divided into two major categories; two thirds of the total effort was in support of the Laboratory Microfusion Facility (LMF), and one third of the effort was in support of Inertial Confinement Fusion (ICF) commercial reactors. This final report includes copies of the formal reports, memoranda, and viewgraph presentations that were completed under this contract

  14. Analyses in support of the Laboratory Microfusion Facility and ICF commercial reactor designs

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Meier, W.R.; Monsler, M.J.

    1988-12-28

    Our work on this contract was divided into two major categories; two thirds of the total effort was in support of the Laboratory Microfusion Facility (LMF), and one third of the effort was in support of Inertial Confinement Fusion (ICF) commercial reactors. This final report includes copies of the formal reports, memoranda, and viewgraph presentations that were completed under this contract.

  15. Modular Pebble-Bed Reactor Project: Laboratory-Directed Research and Development Program FY 2002 Annual Report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Petti, David Andrew; Dolan, Thomas James; Miller, Gregory Kent; Moore, Richard Leroy; Terry, William Knox; Ougouag, Abderrafi Mohammed-El-Ami; Oh, Chang H; Gougar, Hans D

    2002-11-01

    This report documents the results of our research in FY-02 on pebble-bed reactor technology under our Laboratory Directed Research and Development (LDRD) project entitled the Modular Pebble-Bed Reactor. The MPBR is an advanced reactor concept that can meet the energy and environmental needs of future generations under DOE’s Generation IV initiative. Our work is focused in three areas: neutronics, core design and fuel cycle; reactor safety and thermal hydraulics; and fuel performance.

  16. Sludge combustion in fluidized bed reactors at laboratory scale

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The combustion of a dried sewage sludge in laboratory scale fluidized bed has been studied in Naples by the Istituto di ricerche sulla combustione (Irc) in the framework of a National project named Thermal Process with Energy Recovery to be used in laboratory and pre-pilot scale apparatus. The attention has been focused on emissions of unreacted carbon as elutriated fines, on the emissions of pollutant gases and on the assessment of the inventory of fly- and bottom ashes. The combustion behaviour of sewage sludge has been compared with those of a market available Tyre Derived Fuel (TDF) and a biomass from Mediterranean area (Robinia Pseudoacacia) and with that of a South African bituminous coal. Stationary combustion tests were carried out at 8500 C by feeding particles in the size range 0-1 mm into a bed of silica sand without any sorbent addition. The fluidized bed combustor has been operated, at a superficial gas velocity of 0.4 m/s and different excesses of air ranging between 14 and 98%. Relatively high combustion efficiency, larger than 98.9% has been obtained in experiments carried out with sewage sludge and excess of air larger than 20%. These values, are comparable with those obtained in previously experimental activity carried out under similar operative conditions with a South Africa Bituminous coal (97-98%). It is larger than those obtained by using a Tyre Derived Fuel (89-90%) and the Robinia Pseudoacacia Biomass (93-93%). The relative importance of carbon fines elutriation, CO emissions and volatile bypassing the bed in determining the loss of combustion efficiency has been evaluated for the different fuels tested

  17. 76 FR 11291 - University of New Mexico AGN-201M Reactor Notice of Issuance of Renewed Facility Operating...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-03-01

    ... COMMISSION University of New Mexico AGN-201M Reactor Notice of Issuance of Renewed Facility Operating License... No. R-102, held by the University of New Mexico (the licensee), which authorizes continued operation of the University of New Mexico AGN-201M Reactor (UNMR), located in Albuquerque, Bernalillo...

  18. Monte Carlo analysis of the accelerator-driven system at Kyoto University Research Reactor Institute

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Won Kyeong; Lee, Deok Jung [Nuclear Engineering Division, Ulsan National Institute of Science and Technology, Ulsan (Korea, Republic of); Lee, Hyun Chul [VHTR Technology Development Division, Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of); Pyeon, Cheol Ho [Nuclear Engineering Science Division, Kyoto University Research Reactor Institute, Osaka (Japan); Shin, Ho Cheol [Core and Fuel Analysis Group, Korea Hydro and Nuclear Power Central Research Institute, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of)

    2016-04-15

    An accelerator-driven system consists of a subcritical reactor and a controllable external neutron source. The reactor in an accelerator-driven system can sustain fission reactions in a subcritical state using an external neutron source, which is an intrinsic safety feature of the system. The system can provide efficient transmutations of nuclear wastes such as minor actinides and long-lived fission products and generate electricity. Recently at Kyoto University Research Reactor Institute (KURRI; Kyoto, Japan), a series of reactor physics experiments was conducted with the Kyoto University Critical Assembly and a Cockcroft-Walton type accelerator, which generates the external neutron source by deuterium-tritium reactions. In this paper, neutronic analyses of a series of experiments have been re-estimated by using the latest Monte Carlo code and nuclear data libraries. This feasibility study is presented through the comparison of Monte Carlo simulation results with measurements.

  19. Educational laboratory based on a multifunctional analyzer of a reactor of a nuclear power plant with a water-moderated water-cooled reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Authors presents an educational laboratory Safety and Control of a Nuclear Power Facility established by the Department of Automation for students and specialists of the nuclear power industry in the field of control, protection, and safe exploitation of reactor facilities at operating, constructing, and designing nuclear power plants with water-moderated water-cooled reactors

  20. Energy Programs at the Johns Hopkins University Applied Physics Laboratory. Quarterly report, October-December 1979

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    None

    1979-12-01

    The Johns Hopkins University Applied Physics Laboratory, under contracts with several agencies of the federal government and an agency of the State of Maryland, is engaged in developing energy resources, utilization concepts, and storage methods. This Quarterly Report summarizes the work on the various tasks as of 31 December 1979. The Energy Quarterly Report is divided into five sections. The first, Geothermal Energy Development Planning and Technical Assistance, supported by the Department of Energy/Resource Applications (DOE/RA), contains reports on the progress of those geothermal-related tasks where effort was concentrated during the quarter. The second section, Operational Research, Hydroelectric Power Development, also supported by DOE/RA, contains reports on small-scale hydroelectric investigations in the southeastern states. The third section, Seismotectonic Studies, supported by the Reactor Safety Research Division of the Nuclear Regulatory Commission, reports on neotectonic investigations in Connecticut. The fourth section, Energy Conversion and Storage Techniques, contains two articles, the first on OTEC core unit testing supported by the Department of Energy, Division of Central Solar Technology (DOE/CST), and the second on recovery of landfill methane, supported by the Argonne National Laboratory. The fifth section, New Energy Technologies, reports on Laboratory studies of an unconventional gas source--Eastern Devonian shales.

  1. Design and Laboratory Evaluation of Future Elongation and Diameter Measurements at the Advanced Test Reactor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    K. L. Davis; D. L. Knudson; J. L. Rempe; J. C. Crepeau; S. Solstad

    2015-07-01

    New materials are being considered for fuel, cladding, and structures in next generation and existing nuclear reactors. Such materials can undergo significant dimensional and physical changes during high temperature irradiations. In order to accurately predict these changes, real-time data must be obtained under prototypic irradiation conditions for model development and validation. To provide such data, researchers at the Idaho National Laboratory (INL) High Temperature Test Laboratory (HTTL) are developing several instrumented test rigs to obtain data real-time from specimens irradiated in well-controlled pressurized water reactor (PWR) coolant conditions in the Advanced Test Reactor (ATR). This paper reports the status of INL efforts to develop and evaluate prototype test rigs that rely on Linear Variable Differential Transformers (LVDTs) in laboratory settings. Although similar LVDT-based test rigs have been deployed in lower flux Materials Testing Reactors (MTRs), this effort is unique because it relies on robust LVDTs that can withstand higher temperatures and higher fluxes than often found in other MTR irradiations. Specifically, the test rigs are designed for detecting changes in length and diameter of specimens irradiated in ATR PWR loops. Once implemented, these test rigs will provide ATR users with unique capabilities that are sorely needed to obtain measurements such as elongation caused by thermal expansion and/or creep loading and diameter changes associated with fuel and cladding swelling, pellet-clad interaction, and crud buildup.

  2. Development of a mono-energetic positron beam line at the Kyoto University Research Reactor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sato, K. [Research Reactor Institute, Kyoto University, Kumatori-cho, Osaka 590-0494 (Japan); Xu, Q., E-mail: xu@rri.kyoto-u.ac.jp [Research Reactor Institute, Kyoto University, Kumatori-cho, Osaka 590-0494 (Japan); Yoshiie, T.; Sano, T.; Kawabe, H. [Research Reactor Institute, Kyoto University, Kumatori-cho, Osaka 590-0494 (Japan); Nagai, Y.; Nagumo, K.; Inoue, K.; Toyama, T. [The Oarai Branch, Institute for Materials Research, Tohoku University, Ibaraki 311-1313 (Japan); Oshima, N.; Kinomura, A. [National Institute of Advanced Industrial Science and Technology, Ibaraki 305-8568 (Japan); Shirai, Y. [Department of Materials Science and Engineering, Graduate School of Engineering, Kyoto University, Kyoto 606-8501 (Japan)

    2015-01-01

    Positron beam facilities are widely used for solid state physics and material science studies. A positron beam facility has been constructed at the Kyoto University Research Reactor (KUR) in order to expand its application range. The KUR is a light-water-moderated tank-type reactor operated at a rated thermal power of 5 MW. A positron beam has been transported successfully from the reactor to the irradiation chamber. The total moderated positron rate was greater than 1.4 × 10{sup 6}/s while the reactor operated at a reduced power of 1 MW. Special attention was paid for the design of the in-pile position source to prevent possible damage of the reactor in case of severe earthquakes.

  3. Development of a mono-energetic positron beam line at the Kyoto University Research Reactor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sato, K.; Xu, Q.; Yoshiie, T.; Sano, T.; Kawabe, H.; Nagai, Y.; Nagumo, K.; Inoue, K.; Toyama, T.; Oshima, N.; Kinomura, A.; Shirai, Y.

    2015-01-01

    Positron beam facilities are widely used for solid state physics and material science studies. A positron beam facility has been constructed at the Kyoto University Research Reactor (KUR) in order to expand its application range. The KUR is a light-water-moderated tank-type reactor operated at a rated thermal power of 5 MW. A positron beam has been transported successfully from the reactor to the irradiation chamber. The total moderated positron rate was greater than 1.4 × 106/s while the reactor operated at a reduced power of 1 MW. Special attention was paid for the design of the in-pile position source to prevent possible damage of the reactor in case of severe earthquakes.

  4. Experience in operation and maintenance of the TRIGA Mark II reactor at the University of Pavia

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Experience in the operation and maintenance of the 250 kW steady state/250 MW pulsed TRIGA Mark II Reactor of the University of Pavia in the past two years is reported. Data for the reactor utilization and of Health Physics activity are also presented. Since the Second European Conference of TRIGA Reactor Users in 1972, reactor operation continued normally. No major troubles occurred during this time except for rotary specimen rack rotation. Maintenance of reactor facilities, including the substitution of the rotary specimen rack with a new one manufactured on-site is described. In June 1974 measurements of fluxes in the thermal column, with most of the graphite elements removed, were carried out in order to install a neutron converter in thermal column. Some results of fluxes and cadmium ratio values are reported. A description of the converter facility set up is given. (U.S.)

  5. A human reliability analysis of the University of New Mexico's AGN- 201M nuclear research reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    During 1990--1991, a probabilistic risk assessment was conducted on the University of New Mexico's AGN-201M nuclear research reactor to address the risk and consequence of a maximum hypothetical release accident. The assessment indicated a potential for consequential human error to precipitate Chis scenario. Subsequently, a human reliability analysis was performed to evaluate the significance of human interaction on the reactor's safety systems. This paper presents the results of that investigation

  6. University of Florida Training Reactor: Annual progress, September 1, 1985-August 31, 1986

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Information is presented concerning: University of Florida personnel associated with the reactor; Facility operation; Modifications to the operating characteristics or capabilities of the UFTR facility; Significant maintenance, tests and survelliances of UFTR reactor systems and facilities; Changes to technical specifications, standard operating prceedures and other documents; Radioactive releases and environmental surveillance; Education, research and training utilization; and Theses, publications, reports and oral presentations of work related to the use and operation of the UFTR

  7. Kyushu University Tandem Accelerator Laboratory report, 1988-1990

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ten years have elapsed since the first beam was obtained from the Kyushu University tandem accelerator. Although the laboratory has achieved successful scientific results, the performance of the accelerator has been on a decline mainly due to the aging. In the last two and a half years, the tandem accelerator has suffered from the fall of terminal voltage to around 8 MV. However, the experimental studies in the laboratory have been active. The utilization of the polarized beams of protons and deuterons to study the scattering of the p+d system, the use of heavy ion beam for the systematic search for the molecular resonance in relatively heavy systems and for the study on reaction mechanism, the use of both light and heavy ion beams for the studies on nuclear engineering, material science and geological science and so on were carried out. The gamma ray spectroscopic study on the state near yrast line was largely hampered by the accelerator troubles, instead, the collaboration with the Niels Bohr Institute provided a wonderful research ground for the studies. (K.I.)

  8. Job and Task Analysis project at Brookhaven National Laboratory's high flux beam reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The presenter discussed the Job and Task Analysis (JTA) project conducted at Brookhaven National Laboratory's High Flux Beam Reactor (HFBR). The project's goal was to provide JTA guidelines for use by DOE contractors, then, using the guidelines conduct a JTA for the reactor operator and supervisor positions at the HFBR. Details of the job analysis and job description preparation as well as details of the task selection and task analysis were given. Post JTA improvements to the HFBR training programs were covered. The presentation concluded with a listing of the costs and impacts of the project

  9. Los Alamos National Laboratory case studies on decommissioning of research reactors and a small nuclear facility

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Salazar, M.D.

    1998-12-01

    Approximately 200 contaminated surplus structures require decommissioning at Los Alamos National Laboratory. During the last 10 years, 50 of these structures have undergone decommissioning. These facilities vary from experimental research reactors to process/research facilities contaminated with plutonium-enriched uranium, tritium, and high explosives. Three case studies are presented: (1) a filter building contaminated with transuranic radionuclides; (2) a historical water boiler that operated with a uranyl-nitrate solution; and (3) the ultra-high-temperature reactor experiment, which used enriched uranium as fuel.

  10. Utilization Status and Development Layout of Research Reactors in Tsinghua University, China

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The Institute of Nuclear and New Energy Technology of Tsinghua University (INET), as the largest education institute of nuclear science in P.R. China, operates three research reactors. How to broaden the utilization of our RRs is the challenge we have to face. In this article, current utilization status of the swimming pool reactor will be introduced. The feasibility of developing the RRs into training center and the advantages of High Temperature Gas-Cooled Reactor (HTR-10) for nuclear hydrogen production will be put forward. (author)

  11. The molecular universe: from astronomy to laboratory astrophysics and back

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Dishoeck, Ewine

    2015-08-01

    Molecules are found in a wide range of astronomical environments, fromour Solar System to distant starburst galaxies at the highest redshifts. Thanks to the opening up of the infrared and (sub)millimeter wavelength regime, culminating with Herschel and ALMA, more than 180 different species have now been found throughout the various stages of stellar birth and death: diffuse and dense interstellar clouds, protostars and disks, the envelopes of evolved stars and planetary nebulae, and exo-planetary atmospheres. Molecules and solid-state features are now also routinely detected in the interstellar medium of external galaxies, near and far.There are many motivations for studying this molecular universe. From the chemical perspective, interstellar space provides a unique laboratory to study basic molecular processes under very different conditions from those normally found in a laboratory on Earth. For astronomers, molecules are unique probes of the many environments where they are found, providing information on density, temperature, dynamics, ionization fractions and magnetic fields. Molecules also play an important role in the cooling of clouds allowing them to collapse, including the formation of the very first stars and galaxies. Finally, the molecular composition is sensitive to the history of the material, and ultimately provides critical information on our origins.This talk will summarize a number of recent observational highlights and provide examples of cases where the availability of new laboratory data proved crucial in the analysis. This includes basic data such as spectroscopy and collisional rate coefficients, but also an improved understanding of photoprocesses in the gaseous and solid state. Much of the chemistry in star- and planet-forming regions is now thought to be driven by gas-grain chemistry rather than pure gas-phase chemistry, and a few examples of the close link between models and laboratory experiments will be given. In spite of lingering

  12. Utilization of research and training reactors in the study program of students at Slovak University of Technology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    technologies, but also to travel to perform practical exercises at foreign training or experimental reactors as: TRIGA II Reactor in Atomic Institute of the Austrian Universities, Vienna, Austria (3 practical exercises per study for about 10 students yearly since 1990); School Reactor of the Technical University of Budapest, Hungary (one week per study, about 10 students yearly since 1983); Training Reactor of the CVUT, Prague, Czech Republic (3 days per study, about 10 students yearly since 1998); Experimental reactor ASTRA in Austrian Research Center Seibersdorf (1999-2000) A 4 weeks' IAEA Regional Training Course 'Safety management and utilisation of research reactors' on Safety, Management and Utilization of Research Reactors was held in Bratislava (Slovakia) and Vienna (Austria) during March 05-30th 2001. IAEA in co-operation with the Department of Nuclear Physics and Technology of the Slovak University of Technology and the Atominstitut of Austrian Universities Vienna prepared and realized this training course with the aim to train junior staff from research reactors in various aspects of safety, management and utilization of research reactors. All participants had to have at least 4 years experiences in operation, management, utilization or regulation of research reactors. Lectures covered the topics in nuclear design and operation, neutron physics, reactor physics, health physics, dosimetry, reactor instrumentation, fuel management decontamination procedures, preparation of experiments at research reactors and others. Beside theoretical part of the course, the practical exercises at TRIGA II reactor in Vienna constituted an important part of training. ENEN - European Nuclear Education Network: Feasibility Study for Central-European Region. In frame of this project, prepared for the Central-European region, students participating in nuclear engineering education will visit participating institute to carry out laboratory practices and student as well as diploma work. We

  13. MYRRHA a fast reactor to be operated by the young generation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    MYRRHA, the Multi-purpose hybrid Research Reactor for High-tech Applications, is an innovative research facility that is able to carry out a wide variety of applications: 1) transmutation of minor actinides, 2) qualification of fuel for new reactors, 3) material testing for Gen IV and fusion reactors, 4) production of medical radio-isotopes and 5) silicon doping for renewable electrical power. By means of these applications MYRRHA is the successor of BR2, it will validate the ADS (Accelerator Driven System) full concept and the use of heavy metal coolants (particularly the lead-bismuth eutectic - LBE). The MYRRHA plant consists of 3 main parts being the primary systems, the accelerator and the balance of plant which groups all structures, systems and components that are not included in the first two items. The scientific and technological knowledge that will be acquired with MYRRHA will be the basis for new lead cooled reactors having a higher performance and for industrial transmutation facilities capable of significantly reducing the amount and the burden time of high-level waste produced in power plants. It is the responsibility of the young and next generations to operate these upcoming facilities but our duty to obtain the crucial data. To profit from nuclear applications in the coming decades, the safety of these systems obviously has to be guaranteed. The safety approach of MYRRHA is based on the defence-in-depth principle. Initiating events are grouped in probability classes in order to determine the number of lines of defence needed to mitigate their consequences. Initiating events are preferably prevented, certainly those with potentially severe consequences or difficult to mitigate. For the design of MYRRHA we consider events up to a probability of occurrence of 10-6/year. This article describes the present state of the MYRRHA design. The article is followed by the slides of the presentation

  14. Work as representation: the view of young university students

    OpenAIRE

    Sidinei Rocha de Oliveira; Valmiria Carolina Piccinini; Cássia da Silva Silveira

    2010-01-01

    One period of particular importance in the relation of the individual to the world of work is the transition from youth to adulthood, when, among other modifications (biological, psychological and social), entry into the job market has a fundamental role, marking a new stage of life. Hence, this study seeks to analyse which social representations are present in the speech of young students of a Management course with regard their understanding of the “work”. For this purpose, 120 ...

  15. Undergraduate reactor control experiment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A sequence of reactor and related experiments has been a central element of a senior-level laboratory course at Pennsylvania State University (Penn State) for more than 20 yr. A new experiment has been developed where the students program and operate a computer controller that manipulates the speed of a secondary control rod to regulate TRIGA reactor power. Elementary feedback control theory is introduced to explain the experiment, which emphasizes the nonlinear aspect of reactor control where power level changes are equivalent to a change in control loop gain. Digital control of nuclear reactors has become more visible at Penn State with the replacement of the original analog-based TRIGA reactor control console with a modern computer-based digital control console. Several TRIGA reactor dynamics experiments, which comprise half of the three-credit laboratory course, lead to the control experiment finale: (a) digital simulation, (b) control rod calibration, (c) reactor pulsing, (d) reactivity oscillator, and (e) reactor noise

  16. Open Science Grid: Linking Universities and Laboratories In National Cyberinfrastructure

    Science.gov (United States)

    Avery, Paul

    2011-10-01

    Open Science Grid is a consortium of researchers from universities and national laboratories that operates a national computing infrastructure serving large-scale scientific and engineering research. While OSG's scale has been primarily driven by the demands of the LHC experiments, it currently serves particle and nuclear physics, gravitational wave searches, digital astronomy, genomic science, weather forecasting, molecular modeling, structural biology and nanoscience. The OSG distributed computing facility links campus and regional computing resources and is a major component of the Worldwide LHC Computing Grid (WLCG) that handles the massive computing and storage needs of experiments at the Large Hadron Collider. This collaborative work has provided a wealth of results, including powerful new software tools and services; a uniform packaging scheme (the Virtual Data Toolkit) that simplifies software deployment across many sites in the US and Europe; integration of complex tools and services in large science applications; multiple education and outreach projects; and new approaches to integrating advanced network infrastructure in scientific computing applications. More importantly, OSG has provided unique collaborative opportunities between researchers in a variety of research disciplines.

  17. Planning and implementation of Istanbul Technical University TRIGA research reactor program

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The Istanbul Technical University TRIGA Research Reactor at the Institute for Nuclear Energy, which went critical on March 11, 1979 is basically a pulsing type TRIGA Mark - II reactor. Completion of the ITU-TRR contributed to broaden the role of the Institute for Nuclear Energy of the Technical University in Istanbul in the nuclear field by providing for the first time adequate on-campus experimental facilities for nuclear engineering studies to ITU students. The research program which is currently under planning at ITU-NEE encompasses: a) Neutron activation analysis studies by techniques and applications to chemistry, mining, materials research, archaeological and biomedical studies; b) applications of Radioisotopes; c) Radiography with reactor neutron beams; d) Radiation Pulsing

  18. 78 FR 5840 - Notice of License Termination for University of Illinois Advanced TRIGA Reactor, License No. R-115

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-01-28

    ... COMMISSION Notice of License Termination for University of Illinois Advanced TRIGA Reactor, License No. R-115... No. R-115, for the University of Illinois Advanced TRIGA Reactor (ATR). The NRC has terminated the..., Facility Operating License No. R-115 is terminated. The above referenced documents may be examined,...

  19. Sperm counts may have declined in young university students in Southern Spain

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mendiola, Jaime; Jørgensen, Niels; Mínguez-Alarcón, Lidia;

    2013-01-01

    to 2002 compared with young men from Northern Europe. The aim of this new study was to examine whether semen quality has changed among Spanish young men in the last decade. In this cross-sectional study, questionnaires and semen samples were collected from 215 healthy young university students from Murcia......, Body mass index (BMI), presence of varicocoele and prenatal exposure to tobacco) to look for a birth-cohort effect over the combined study period (2001-2011). Sperm concentration and total sperm count declined significantly with year of birth in the pooled analysis (β = -0.04 and β = -0...

  20. Safety evaluation report related to the renewal of the operating license for the research reactor at North Carolina State University

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1997-04-01

    This safety evaluation report (SER) summarizes the findings of a safety review conducted by the staff of the U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC), Office of Nuclear Reactor Regulation (NRR). The staff conducted this review in response to a timely application filed by North Carolina State University (the licensee or NCSU) for a 20-year renewal of Facility Operating License R-120 to continue to operate the NCSU PULSTAR research reactor. The facility is located in the Burlington Engineering Laboratory complex on the NCSU campus in Raleigh, North Carolina. In its safety review, the staff considered information submitted by the licensee (including past operating history recorded in the licensee`s annual reports to the NRC), as well as inspection reports prepared by NRC Region H personnel and first-hand observations. On the basis of this review, the staff concludes that NCSU can continue to operate the PULSTAR research reactor, in accordance with its application, without endangering the health and safety of the public. 16 refs., 31 figs., 7 tabs.

  1. Annual report of the Nuclear Physics Laboratory, University of Washington

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The Nuclear Physics Laboratory of the University of Washington has for over 40 years supported a broad program of experimental physics research. Some highlights of the research activities during the past year are given. Work continues at a rapid pace toward completion of the Sudbury Neutrino Observatory in January 1997. Following four years of planning and development, installation of the acrylic vessel began last July and is now 50% complete, with final completion scheduled for September. The Russian-American Gallium Experiment (SAGE) has completed a successful 51Cr neutrino source experiment. The first data from 8B decay have been taken in the Mass-8 CVC/Second Class Current study. The analysis of the measured barrier distributions for Ca-induced fission of prolate 192Os and oblate 194Pt has been completed. In a collaboration with a group from the Bhabha Atomic Research Centre they have shown that fission anisotropies at energies well above the barrier are not influenced by the mass asymmetry of the entrance channel relative to the Businaro-Gallone critical asymmetry. They also have preliminary evidence at higher bombarding energy that noncompound nucleus fission scales with the mean square angular momentum, in contrast to previous suggestions. The authors have measured proton and alpha particle emission spectra from the decay of A ∼ 200 compound nuclei at excitation energies of 50--100 MeV, and used these measurements to infer the nuclear temperature. The investigations of multiparticle Bose-Einstein interferometry have led to a new algorithm for putting Bose-Einstein and Coulomb correlations of up to 6th order into Monte Carlo simulations of ultra-relativistic collision events, and to a new fast algorithm for extracting event temperatures

  2. Annual report of the Nuclear Physics Laboratory, University of Washington

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Snover, K.; Fulton, B. [eds.

    1996-04-01

    The Nuclear Physics Laboratory of the University of Washington has for over 40 years supported a broad program of experimental physics research. Some highlights of the research activities during the past year are given. Work continues at a rapid pace toward completion of the Sudbury Neutrino Observatory in January 1997. Following four years of planning and development, installation of the acrylic vessel began last July and is now 50% complete, with final completion scheduled for September. The Russian-American Gallium Experiment (SAGE) has completed a successful {sup 51}Cr neutrino source experiment. The first data from {sup 8}B decay have been taken in the Mass-8 CVC/Second Class Current study. The analysis of the measured barrier distributions for Ca-induced fission of prolate {sup 192}Os and oblate {sup 194}Pt has been completed. In a collaboration with a group from the Bhabha Atomic Research Centre they have shown that fission anisotropies at energies well above the barrier are not influenced by the mass asymmetry of the entrance channel relative to the Businaro-Gallone critical asymmetry. They also have preliminary evidence at higher bombarding energy that noncompound nucleus fission scales with the mean square angular momentum, in contrast to previous suggestions. The authors have measured proton and alpha particle emission spectra from the decay of A {approximately} 200 compound nuclei at excitation energies of 50--100 MeV, and used these measurements to infer the nuclear temperature. The investigations of multiparticle Bose-Einstein interferometry have led to a new algorithm for putting Bose-Einstein and Coulomb correlations of up to 6th order into Monte Carlo simulations of ultra-relativistic collision events, and to a new fast algorithm for extracting event temperatures.

  3. Neutron activation analysis in an industrial laboratory using an off-site nuclear reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A multifunctional research laboratory, such as Procter and Gamble's Miami Valley Laboratories, requires elemental analyses on many materials. A general survey technique is important even if the information it provides is incomplete or is less precise than single element analyses. Procter and Gamble has developed neutron activation analysis (NAA) capabilities using a nuclear reactor several hundred miles away. The concentration of 40 to 50 elements can be determined in a variety of matrices. We have found NAA to be a powerful supplement to some of the more classical analytical techniques even without having an on-site neutron source. We have also found an automated data acquisition system to be essential for the successful application of NAA in an industrial laboratory

  4. Advanced liquid metal reactor development at Argonne National Laboratory during the 1980s

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Argonne National Laboratory's (ANL'S) effort to pursue the exploitation of liquid metal cooled reactor (LMR) characteristics has given rise to the Integral Fast Reactor (IFR) concept, and has produced substantial technical advancement in concept implementation which includes demonstration of high burnup capability of metallic fuel, demonstration of injection casting fabrication, integral demonstration of passive safety response, and technical feasibility of pyroprocessing. The first half decade of the 90's will host demonstration of the IFR closed fuel cycle technology at the prototype scale. The EBR-II reactor will be fueled with ternary alloy fuel in HT-9 cladding and ducts, and pyroprocessing and injection casting refabrication of EBR-II fuel will be conducted using near-commercial sized equipment at the Fuel cycle Facility (FCF) which is co-located adjacent to EBR-II. Demonstration will start in 1992. The demonstration of passive safety response achievable with the IFR design concept, (already done in EBR-II in 1986) will be repeated in the mid 90's using the IFR prototype recycle fuel from the FCF. The demonstration of scrubbing of the reprocessing fission product waste stream, with recycle of the transuranics to the reactor for consumption, will also occur in the mid 90's. 30 refs

  5. Modern design and safety analysis of the University of Florida Training Reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Highlights: • A new safety analysis of the University of Florida Training Reactor is presented. • This analysis uses modern codes and replaces the NRC approved analysis from 1982. • Reduction in engineering margin confirms that the UFTR is a negligible risk reactor. • Safety systems are not required to ensure that safety limits are not breached. • Negligible risk reactors are ideal for testing digital I&C equipment. - Abstract: A comprehensive series of neutronics and thermal hydraulics analyses were conducted to demonstrate the University of Florida Training Reactor (UFTR), an ARGONAUT type research reactor, as a negligible risk reactor that does not require safety-related systems or components to prevent breach of a safety limit. These analyses show that there is no credible UFTR accident that would result in major fuel damage or risk to public health and safety. The analysis was based on two limiting scenarios, whose extremity bound all other accidents of consequence: (1) the large step insertion of positive reactivity and (2) the release of fission products due to mechanical damage to a spent fuel plate. The maximum step insertion of positive reactivity was modeled using PARET/ANL software and shows a maximum peak fuel temperature of 283.2 °C, which is significantly below the failure limit of 530 °C. The exposure to the staff and general public was calculated for the worst-case fission product release scenario using the ORIGEN-S and COMPLY codes and was shown to be 6.5% of the annual limit. Impacts on reactor operations and an Instrumentation & Control System (I&C) upgrade are discussed

  6. Operational experience with the TRIGA reactor of the University of Pavia

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The TRIGA Mark II research reactor of the University of Pavia is in operation since 1965. The annual operational time at nominal power (250 kW) is in the range of 300 - 400 hours depending upon the time schedule of some experiments and research activities. The reactor is mainly used for NAA activities and BNCT research. Few tens of hours per year are dedicated also to electronic devices irradiation and student training courses. Few homemade upgrading of the reactor were realized in the past two years: components of the secondary/tertiary cooling circuit were substituted and a new radiation area monitoring system was installed. Also the Instrumentation and Control (I and C) system was almost completely refurbished. The presentation describes the major extraordinary maintenance activities implemented and the status of main reactor systems: - The I and C System: complete substitution, channel-by-channel without changing the operating and safety logics; - Tertiary and secondary water-cooling circuits: complete substitution of the tertiary water-cooling circuit and partial substitution of the components of the secondary water-cooling circuit; - Reactor Building Air Filtering and Ventilation System: installation of a computerized air filtering and ventilation system; - Radiation Area Monitoring System: new system based on a commercial micro-computer and an home-made software developed on Lab-View platform. The system is made of a network of different instruments coupled, trough a serial bus line RS232, with a data acquisition station; - Fuel Elements: at the moment, the core is made of 48 Aluminium clad and 34 SST clad TRIGA fuel elements controlled periodically for their elongation and/or bowing. All components and systems undergo ordinary maintenance according to the Technical Prescriptions and to the 'Good Practice Procedures'. In summary, the TRIGA reactor of the University of Pavia shows a very good technical state and, at the moment, there are no political or

  7. Review of Army Research Laboratory Programs for Historically Black Colleges and Universities and Minority Institutions

    Science.gov (United States)

    National Academies Press, 2014

    2014-01-01

    "Review of Army Research Laboratory Programs for Historically Black Colleges and Universities and Minority Institutions" examines the ways in which historically black colleges and universities and minority institutions have used the Army Research Laboratory (ARL) funds to enhance the science, technology, engineering, and mathematics…

  8. Princeton University Plasma Physics Laboratory, Princeton, New Jersey

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This report discusses the following topics: Principal parameters of experimental devices; Tokamak Fusion Test Reactor; Burning Plasma Experiment; Princeton Beta Experiment-Modification; Current Drive Experiment-Upgrade; International Thermonuclear Experimental Reactor; International Collaboration; X-Ray Laser Studies; Hyperthermal Atomic Beam Source; Pure Electron Plasma Experiments; Plasma Processing: Deposition and Etching of Thin Films; Theoretical Studies; Tokamak Modeling; Engineering Department; Environment, Safety, and Health and Quality Assurance; Technology Transfer; Office of Human Resources and Administration; PPPL Patent Invention Disclosures; Office of Resource Management; Graduate Education: Plasma Physics; Graduate Education: Program in Plasma Science and Technology; and Science Education Program

  9. Improvement of low-temperature irradiation facility at Kyoto University Reactor (KUR)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Okada, M.; Kanazawa, S.; Nozaki, T.; Nakagawa, M.; Atobe, K.; Kuramoto, E.; Matsumura, K.; Sano, T.

    2001-05-01

    The low-temperature irradiation facility at the Kyoto University Reactor (KUR) has been upgraded. Cryogenic power has been increased from 37 W to about 58 W at 10 K, and irradiation temperature has been reduced from 20 to 12 K at 5 MW reactor operating power. The maximum fast-neutron flux after these improvements is about 4.77×10 11 n/n cm -2 s -1. Therefore, the maximum fluence of fast-neutrons at the KUR facility is about 1.3×10 17 n cm -2 for the maximum operating time of 77 h per week.

  10. Fuel burnup analysis of the TRIGA Mark II Reactor at the University of Pavia

    OpenAIRE

    Chiesa, Davide; Clemenza, Massimiliano; Pozzi, Stefano; Previtali, Ezio; Sisti, Monica; Alloni, Daniele; Magrotti, Giovanni; Manera, Sergio; Prata, Michele; Salvini, Andrea; Cammi, Antonio; Zanetti, Matteo; Sartori, Alberto

    2015-01-01

    A time evolution model was developed to study fuel burnup for the TRIGA Mark II reactor at the University of Pavia. The results were used to predict the effects of a complete core reconfiguration and the accuracy of this prediction was tested experimentally. We used the Monte Carlo code MCNP5 to reproduce system neutronics in different operating conditions and to analyse neutron fluxes in the reactor core. The software that took care of time evolution, completely designed in-house, used the n...

  11. Environmental assessment for decontaminating and decommissioning the Westinghouse Advanced Reactors Division Plutonium Fuel Laboratories, Cheswick, PA

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1980-12-01

    The Department of Energy has prepared an environmental assessment on the proposed decontamination and decommissioning of the Westinghouse Advanced Reactors Division Plutonium Fuel Laboratories, Cheswick, Pennsylvania. Based on the environmental assessment, which is available to the public on request, the Department has determined that the proposed action does not constitute a major Federal action significantly affecting the quality of the human environment within the meaning of the National Environmental Policy Act of 1969, 42 USC 4321 et seq. Therefore, no environmental impact statement is required. The proposed action is to decontaminate and decommission the Westinghouse Advanced Reactors Division fuel fabrication facilities (the Plutonium Laboratory - Building 7, and the Advanced Fuels Laboratory - Building 8). Decontamination and decommissioning of the facilities would require removal of all process equipment, the associated service lines, and decontamination of the interior surfaces of the buildings so that the empty buildings could be released for unrestricted use. Radioactive waste generated during these activities would be transported in licensed containers by truck for disposal at the Department's facility at Hanford, Washington. Useable non-radioactive materials would be sold as excess material, and non-radioactive waste would be disposed of by burial as sanitary landfill at an approved site.

  12. Origins of the Lunar and Planetary Laboratory, University of Arizona

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cruikshank, Dale P.; Hartmann, William K.

    2014-11-01

    The roots of the Lunar and Planetary Laboratory (LPL) extend deep into the rich fabric of G. P. Kuiper’s view of the Earth as a planet and planetary systems as expected companions to most stars, as well as the post-war emergent technology of infrared detectors suitable for astronomy. These concepts and events began with Kuiper’s theoretical work at Yerkes Observatory on the origin of the Solar System, his discovery of two planetary satellites and observational work with his near-infrared spectrometer on the then-new McDonald 82-inch telescope in the mid- to late-1940s. A grant for the production of a photographic atlas of the Moon in the mid-1950s enabled him to assemble the best existing images of the Moon and acquire new photographs. This brought E. A. Whitaker and D. W. G. Arthur to Yerkes. Others who joined in the lunar work were geologist Carl S. Huzzen and grad student E. P. Moore, as well as undergrad summer students A. B. Binder and D. P. Cruikshank (both in 1958). The Atlas was published in 1959, and work began on an orthographic lunar atlas. Kuiper’s view of planetary science as an interdisciplinary enterprise encompassing astronomy, geology, and atmospheric physics inspired his vision of a research institution and an academic curriculum tuned to the combination of all the scientific disciplines embraced in a comprehensive study of the planets. Arrangements were made with the University of Arizona (UA) to establish LPL in affiliation with the widely recognized Inst. of Atmospheric Physics. Kuiper moved to the UA in late 1960, taking the lunar experts, graduate student T. C. Owen (planetary atmospheres), and associate B. M. Middlehurst along. G. van Biesbroeck also joined the migration to Tucson; Binder and Cruikshank followed along as new grad students. Astronomy grad student W. K. Hartmann came into the academic program at UA and the research group at LPL in 1961. Senior faculty affiliating with LPL in the earliest years were T. Gehrels, A. B

  13. The Relationships between University Students' Chemistry Laboratory Anxiety, Attitudes, and Self-Efficacy Beliefs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kurbanoglu, N. Izzet; Akin, Ahmet

    2010-01-01

    The aim of this study is to examine the relationships between chemistry laboratory anxiety, chemistry attitudes, and self-efficacy. Participants were 395 university students. Participants completed the Chemistry Laboratory Anxiety Scale, the Chemistry Attitudes Scale, and the Self-efficacy Scale. Results showed that chemistry laboratory anxiety…

  14. The Role of Computer-Based Educational Laboratories in Nuclear Engineering University Programmes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The specialized Educational and research laboratory 'Reactor physics, control and safe operation of WWER type NPP’ is based on the computer simulator of WWER -1000 and offers the real-time monitoring of data available to the WWER -1000 NPP control room operators, and provides a possibility to investigate reactor behavior in normal and abnormal situations. The laboratory supports interactive technologies and team-based activities that enable students to build their knowledge through required gateway courses and explore problems relevant to real life situations

  15. Decommissioning of an argonaut type reactor at the Technical University of Catalonia in Barcelona (Spain)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The reactor ARGOS is a training nuclear reactor that was active, from 1962 to 1976, at the Technical University of Catalonia (UPC) in Barcelona (Spain). It is an Argonaut type experimental Reactor with 10 kW of maximal thermal power, and was set up by the main Spanish Nuclear Research Centre, presently named CIEMAT, in the period 1958-1962. In 1977, the nuclear installation was halted for technical, economical and administrative reasons. The fuel burn-up of the reactor was 2.7 kWh. In 1992 the fuel was removed from the site and a dismantling project was launched by an academic team of the UPC Nuclear Energy Department. In 1998 the Spanish authorities approved the dismantling plan which was based on the IAEA document Planning and Management of the Decommissioning of Research and Other Small Nuclear Facilities, IAEA 1993. In this plan the University proposed to set up its own dismantling group mainly based on its own academic staff and experimental facilities

  16. University of Florida--US Department of Energy 1994-1995 reactor sharing program

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vernetson, W.G.

    1996-06-01

    The grant support of $24,250 (1994-95?) was well used by the University of Florida as host institution to support various educational institutions in the use of UFTR Reactor. All users and uses were screened to assure the usage was for educational institutions eligible for participation in the Reactor Sharing Program; where research activities were involved, care was taken to assure the research was not funded by grants for contract funding from outside sources. Over 12 years, the program has been a key catalyst for renewing utilization of UFTR both by external users around the State of Florida and the Southeast and by various faculty members within the University of Florida. Tables provide basic information about the 1994-95 program and utilization of UFTR.

  17. Ten-year utilization of the Oregon State University TRIGA Reactor (OSTR)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The Oregon State University TRIGA Reactor (OSTR) has been used heavily throughout the past ten years to accommodate exclusively university research, teaching, and training efforts. Averages for the past nine years show that the OSTR use time has been as follows: 14% for academic and special training courses; 44% for OSU research projects; 6% for non-OSU research projects; 2% for demonstrations for tours; and 34% for reactor maintenance, calibrations, inspections, etc. The OSTR has operated an average of 25.4 hours per week during this nine-year period. Each year, about 20 academic courses and 30 different research projects use the OSTR. Visitors to the facility average about 1,500 per year. No commercial radiations or services have been performed at the OSTR during this period. Special operator training courses are given at the OSTR at the rate of at least one per year. (author)

  18. University of Florida--US Department of Energy 1994-1995 reactor sharing program

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The grant support of $24,250 (1994-95?) was well used by the University of Florida as host institution to support various educational institutions in the use of UFTR Reactor. All users and uses were screened to assure the usage was for educational institutions eligible for participation in the Reactor Sharing Program; where research activities were involved, care was taken to assure the research was not funded by grants for contract funding from outside sources. Over 12 years, the program has been a key catalyst for renewing utilization of UFTR both by external users around the State of Florida and the Southeast and by various faculty members within the University of Florida. Tables provide basic information about the 1994-95 program and utilization of UFTR

  19. Scottish Universities Research and Reactor Centre, East Kilbride. Report on session 1982-1983

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The activities over the 1982-3 session are reviewed and all the research projects listed. These include reactor related activities (physics and radiochemistry, health physics and nuclear medicine and engineering), those of the isotope geology unit and NERC radiocarbon laboratory, the computing department and the teaching programme. The demand for irradiations, particularly for activation analysis has continued. There was no major maintenance shut-down in the year. (U.K.)

  20. Fuel burnup analysis of the TRIGA Mark II Reactor at the University of Pavia

    CERN Document Server

    Chiesa, Davide; Pozzi, Stefano; Previtali, Ezio; Sisti, Monica; Alloni, Daniele; Magrotti, Giovanni; Manera, Sergio; Prata, Michele; Salvini, Andrea; Cammi, Antonio; Zanetti, Matteo; Sartori, Alberto

    2015-01-01

    A time evolution model was developed to study fuel burnup for the TRIGA Mark II reactor at the University of Pavia. The results were used to predict the effects of a complete core reconfiguration and the accuracy of this prediction was tested experimentally. We used the Monte Carlo code MCNP5 to reproduce system neutronics in different operating conditions and to analyse neutron fluxes in the reactor core. The software that took care of time evolution, completely designed in-house, used the neutron fluxes obtained by MCNP5 to evaluate fuel consumption. This software was developed specifically to keep into account some features that differentiate experimental reactors from power ones, such as the daily ON/OFF cycle and the long fuel lifetime. These effects can not be neglected to properly account for neutron poison accumulation. We evaluated the effect of 48 years of reactor operation and predicted a possible new configuration for the reactor core: the objective was to remove some of the fuel elements from the...

  1. Young Researchers Focus on the Extreme Energy Universe

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pinfold, James L.

    2011-06-01

    A new dimension to cosmic-ray research opened in 1998 in Alberta when the first node of a new kind of sparse very-large-area network of cosmic-ray detectors began to take data. The innovative aspect of the Alberta Large-area Time-coincidence Array (ALTA) is that it is deployed in high schools, involving school children in the excitement of fundamental research. Independently, in 2000 the Cosmic Ray Observatory Project (CROP), centred at the University of Nebraska, set up five schools with cosmic ray detectors. Around the same time the Washington Large-area Time-coincidence Array (WALTA) installed its first detectors. I shall describe the development of "educational cosmic ray arrays" from 1998 and briefly discuss the physics issues that such arrays could address. Also, I will introduce the idea of using experimental cosmic ray physics as a means to involve developing countries in the global scientific culture. In conclusion I will attempt to elucidate future directions.

  2. Measurement and analysis of leakage neutron energy spectra around the Kinki University Reactor, UTR-KINKI

    CERN Document Server

    Ogawa, Y; Sagawa, H; Tsujimoto, T

    2002-01-01

    The highly sensitive cylindrical multi-moderator type neutron spectrometer was constructed for measurement of low level environmental neutrons. This neutron spectrometer was applied for the determination of leakage neutron energy spectra around the Kinki University Reactor. The analysis of the leakage neutron energy spectra was performed by MCNP Monte Carlo code. From the obtained results, the agreement between the MCNP predictions and the experimentally determined values is fairly good, which indicates the MCNP model is correctly simulating the UTR-KINKI.

  3. Using thermal balance model to determine optimal reactor volume and insulation material needed in a laboratory-scale composting reactor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Yongjiang; Pang, Li; Liu, Xinyu; Wang, Yuansheng; Zhou, Kexun; Luo, Fei

    2016-04-01

    A comprehensive model of thermal balance and degradation kinetics was developed to determine the optimal reactor volume and insulation material. Biological heat production and five channels of heat loss were considered in the thermal balance model for a representative reactor. Degradation kinetics was developed to make the model applicable to different types of substrates. Simulation of the model showed that the internal energy accumulation of compost was the significant heat loss channel, following by heat loss through reactor wall, and latent heat of water evaporation. Lower proportion of heat loss occurred through the reactor wall when the reactor volume was larger. Insulating materials with low densities and low conductive coefficients were more desirable for building small reactor systems. Model developed could be used to determine the optimal reactor volume and insulation material needed before the fabrication of a lab-scale composting system.

  4. 75 FR 56597 - University of Wisconsin; University of Wisconsin Nuclear Reactor Environmental Assessment and...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-09-16

    ...-ply, built-up surface roof. The Mechanical Engineering Building also contains classrooms, laboratories..., transportation, or military facilities that pose a threat to the UWNR. The UWNR is a heterogeneous...

  5. Energy Programs at the Johns Hopkins University Applied Physics Laboratory, Quarterly Report, October-December 1980

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    None

    1980-12-01

    The Johns Hopkins University Applied Physics Laboratory is engaged in developing energy resources, utilization concepts, and monitoring and storage methods. This Quarterly Report summarizes the work on the various tasks as of 31 December 1980. The Energy Quarterly Report is divided into five sections. The first, Geothermal Energy Development Planning and Technical Assistance, supported by the Department of Energy/Division of Geothermal Energy (DOE/DGE), contains reports on the progress of geothermal-related tasks on which effort was concentrated during the quarter. The second section, Operational Research, Hydroelectric Power Development, supported by the Department of Energy/Resource Applications (DOE/RA), contains a report on institutional problems for small-scale hydroelectric power development in the southeastern states and a list of documents published by APL in the hydroelectric program and in the geothermal program, above. The third section, Seismotectonic Investigations, contains an article on work on the geologic structure of the Danbury Quadrangle that is supported by the Reactor Safety Research Division of the Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) and an in-house supported study on a new method for assessing earthquakes in intraplate regions. The fourth section, Energy Conversion and Storage Techniques, contains four articles. The first is an evaluation of the Einstein refrigerator, supported by independent IR and D funds. The second concerns fly-wheel technology development at APL supported by the Department of Energy, Division of Energy Storage (DOE/STOR). The third is a report on APL energy conservation efforts at its own buildings, and the fourth is an article on liquefied natural gas (LNG) safety evaluation, supported by the National Academy of Sciences. The fifth section explores the value of establishing an Energy Research Institute at The Johns Hopkins University.

  6. The filter-press FM01-LC laboratory flow reactor and its applications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The FM01-LC is a laboratory-scale, electrochemical filter-press cell with a projected electrode area of 64 cm2 and a rectangular electrolyte flow channel which was originally based on the larger FM21-SP electrolyser of 2100 cm2 projected electrode area designed for the chlor-alkali industry then diversified to other applications. Many laboratories and industries have utilised this type of controlled flow reactor containing plane parallel electrodes in a rectangular channel for industrial and commercial applications. The diverse range of electrodes possible in such cells is emphasized with examples including 3-D metals and carbon, coated metal electrodes and nanostructured surfaces offering a high surface area. The experimental characterization and computational modelling of its reaction environment are concisely described discussed to appreciate the features of this type of electrochemical reactor. The cell construction and reaction environment are summarized, followed by an illustration of its use for a range of applications that include organic and inorganic electrosynthesis, metal ion removal, energy storage, environmental remediation (e.g., precious metal recycling or anodic destruction of organics) and drinking water treatment. Examples of the cell for energy conversion and storage (flow batteries and proton exchange membrane fuel cells) are briefly illustrated. The use of such a flow cell for the characterization of new electrochemical processes and to provide data enabling scale-up is considered

  7. Laboratory Scale Study of Activated Sludge Process in Jet Loop Reactor for Waste WaterTreatment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. S. Patil

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available The present study was undertaken to evaluate the feasibility of Activated Sludge Process (ASP for the treatment of synthetic wastewater and to develop a simple design criteria under local conditions.A laboratory scale Compact jet loop reactor model comprising of an aeration tank and final clarifier was used for this purpose.Settled synthetic wastewater was used as influent to the aeration tank. The Chemical Oxygen Demand (COD of the influent and effluent was measured to find process efficiency at various mixed liquorvolatile suspended solids (MLVSS and hydraulic retention time (θ. The results of the studydemonstrated that an efficiency of above 95% could be obtained for COD if the ASP is operated atan MLVSS concentration of 3000 mg/L keeping an aeration time of 1 hour.In the present investigation the preliminary studies were carried out in a lab scale Jet loop reactor made of glass. Synthetic waste water having a composition of 1000 mg/L mixed with other nutrients such as Urea, Primary and secondary Potassium phosphates, Magnesium sulfate, Iron chloriderequired for the bacteria was prepared in the laboratory and reduction in COD and the increase inSuspended Solids (SSand the Sludge Volume Index (SVI were determined.

  8. Validity of young children's self-reports of their emotion in response to structured laboratory tasks.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Durbin, C Emily

    2010-08-01

    Can young children report coherently on their emotions, and how do their reports contribute to our understanding of emotional development? Two-hundred six children ages 3 to 6 years participated in structured laboratory tasks designed to elicit a range of positive and negative emotions and indicated their emotional state following each task. Children's reports of their emotions meaningfully varied along with the nature of the different tasks during which they were collected (i.e., reports of negative and positive emotions differed across tasks designed to elicit those states). There were no sex differences on reports of any emotion and only small age differences. Multilevel modeling analyses demonstrated that children's self-reports of each emotion converged significantly with objective coding of expressions of those emotions across laboratory tasks; higher convergence for some emotions was associated with older age, higher verbal intelligence, and greater emotion-recognition abilities.

  9. Pacific Northwest Laboratory Monthly Activities Report APRIL 1966 on AEC Division of Reactor Development and Technology

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    S. L. Fawcett

    1966-05-01

    This report has the following sections: Summary of Activities; Civilian Power Reactors; Applied and Reactor Physics; Reactor Fuels and Materials; Engineering Development; Plutonium Recycle Program; Advanced Systems; and Nuclear Safety.

  10. University of Florida Training Reactor: Annual progress report, September 1, 1986-August 31, 1987

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The University of Florida Training Reactor's overall utilization for the past reporting year (September 1986 through August 1987) has returned to the increased levels of quality usage characteristic of the two years prior to the last reporting year when the maintenance outage to repair sticking control blades reduced availability for the year to near 50%. Indeed, the 91.5% availability factor for this reporting year is the highest in the last five years and probably in the 27 year history of the facility. As a final statement on the effectiveness of the corrective maintenance last year, the overall availability factor has been over 94% since returning to normal operations. The UFTR continues to experience a high rate of utilization in a broad spectrum of areas with total utilization continuing near the highest levels recorded in the early 1970's. This increase has been supported by a variety of usages ranging from research and educational utilization by users within the University of Florida as well as other researchers and educators around the state of Florida through the support of the DOE Reactor Sharing Program and several externally supported usages. Significant usage has also been devoted to facility enhancement where a key ingredient for this usage has been a stable management staff. Uses, reactor operation, maintenance, technical specifications, radioactive releases, and research programs are described in this report

  11. Management of nuclear knowledge on an international scale using a small university research reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Full text: The Atominstitut Vienna operates a 250 kW TRIGA Mark-II reactor since March 1962 used for nuclear education and training in the fields of neutron- and solid state physics, nuclear technology, reactor safety, radiochemistry, radiation protection, dosimetry, low temperature physics and fusion research. During the past 20 years about 640 students graduated with a diploma - or PhD degree from the Atominstitut attached to the University of Technology Vienna. To perform nuclear relevant academic studies the Atominstitut offers about 100 highly specialised theoretical lectures and about 10 practical courses where students have to perform experiments in small groups of four on subjects mentioned above. Although the TRIGA reactor is a rather low power research reactor it is very easy and cheap to operate and an excellent tool to transfer knowledge and experience to the younger generation. This reactor is therefore not only used by other European universities such as University of Manchester or Bratislava Technical University but also by nuclear institutions such as the GRS/Germany, NPP Bohunice and NPP Mochovce for nuclear training. On an international scale the Atominstitut co-operates closely with the nearby located IAEA in international research projects, coordinated research programs (CRP) and supplying expert services. Regular training courses are carried out for the IAEA for Safeguard Trainees, fellowship places are offered for scientists from developing countries and staff members carry out expert missions to research centres in Africa, Asia and South America. In the past 20 years more than 120 IAEA fellows from all over the world have been trained at the Atominstitut. The fellows spend between one to twelve month at the Atominstitut and are integrated in the respective work program. Experience showed that out of this fellowship a long-term relation between the institutes continues. The paper focuses especially on the transfer of knowledge between

  12. Why do young Arabs in Denmark choose to study their heritage language at the university?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Dhahir, Omar

    2016-01-01

    the job perspective. It also found that the informants speak their respective dialects of Arabic at a native-like level of proficiency. Moreover, the study found that the families have exerted an intensive and organized effort to motivate the informants to learn Arabic due to its extreme relevance......This article reports on a study of the phenomenon that an increasing number of young Arabs in Denmark are choosing to study their heritage language at the university. The study aimed at investigating three elements: the motivation behind choosing to study the heritage language at the university......; whether the informants had learned/maintained Arabic before starting at the university; and the role of the families in motivating the informants to learn and study Arabic. The informants are students just enrolled at the University of Southern Denmark in autumn 2012. A mixed method was used...

  13. KNOWLEDGE, ATTITUDES AND PRACTICE OF LABORATORY TECHNICIANS REGARDING UNIVERSAL WORK PRECAUTION

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jitendra Zaveri

    2012-02-01

    Full Text Available Objective: Objective of the present study is to determine the knowledge, attitude, and practice of universal work precautions amongst medical laboratory technicians in private hospitals. Methodology: Cross-sectional study of health care workers was conducted using a pretested self-administered questionnaire, which enquired about knowledge, attitude and practices of universal work precautions. The hepatitis B vaccination statuses were also asked. Results: 200 questionnaires were administered to laboratory technicians and 154 of them were returned giving a response rate of 77%. All the participants wear gloves during laboratory work but 81.2% wear a single pair. 17.5 % of the participants claimed to know what to do if exposed to infection. 45.6% of the participants eat in the laboratory, 47.0% of them store foods and water in the refrigerators, 31.5% of them put on cosmetics in the laboratory, 12.6% smoke in the laboratory, 10.0% cut their finger nails with teeth in the laboratory. 91.5% are not immunized against hepatitis B virus (HBV. 99.0% of them do not take shower immediately after laboratory work. 82.0% of the participants do not feel that the use of masks is necessary in laboratory. Conclusion: It is concluded that the knowledge, attitude, perception, and compliance with universal work precautions amongst laboratory technicians are poor. [National J of Med Res 2012; 2(1.000: 113-115

  14. Safety Re-evaluation of Kyoto University Research Reactor by reflecting the Accident of Fukushima Daiichi Nuclear Power Plant

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nakajima, K.; Yamamoto, T. [Kyoto Univ., Kyoto (Japan)

    2013-07-01

    Kyoto University Research Reactor (KUR) is a light-water moderated tank-type reactor operated at rated thermal power of 5MW. After the accident of Fukushima Daiichi nuclear power plant, we have settled a 40-ton water tank near the reactor room, and prepared a mobile fire pump and a mobile power generator as additional safety measures for beyond design basis accidents (BDBAs). We also have conducted the safety re-evaluation of KUR, and confirmed that the integrity of KUR fuels could be kept against the BDBA with the use of the additional safety measures when the several restrictions were imposed on the reactor operation.

  15. Nudging young Danish men to eat more vegetables:A food laboratory pilot experiment

    OpenAIRE

    Kongsbak, Ida; Skov, Laurits Rohden; Køpke Nielsen, Brit; Wichmann, Maria; Schaldemose, Hanna; Atkinson, Louise; Ahlmann, Fie Kathrine; Perez-Cueto, Armando

    2014-01-01

    Objective: This study assessed the combined effect of two choice archi- tectural nudges as a means to increase fruit and vegetable consumption among male university students.Methodology: This single one-day lunch meal study was conducted in a Food Scape Laboratory. A control group (n=32) and an intervention group (n=33) were recruited to attend an ad libitum self-serve buffet at two different timeslots. Two choice architectural nudges were applied in the intervention group; the fruit and vege...

  16. The job satisfaction gender gap among young recent university graduates: Evidence from Catalonia

    OpenAIRE

    Mora, Toni; Ferrer-i-Carbonell, Ada

    2009-01-01

    The present paper focuses on the gender differences in job satisfaction reported by recent university graduates in Catalonia (Spain). The data allows distinguishing five areas of job satisfaction: work content, promotion possibilities, earnings, applicability of acquired knowledge, and job security. Young and highly educated women in this study report a lower satisfaction with some aspects of their job. For two of the five job satisfaction domains, the lower reported level can be explained by...

  17. Operational Experience On Ageing Management At The TRIGA Research Reactor Of LENA (Laboratory of Applied Nuclear Energy) - Univ. of Pavia (Italy) -

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Magrotti, G.; Alloni, D.; Bellani, G.; Giordand, M.; Lana, F.; Manera, S.; Marchetti, F.; Prata, M.; Salvini, A.; Vinciguerra, G. [Univ. of Pavia, Pavia (Italy)

    2013-07-01

    The Laboratory of Applied Nuclear Energy ('LENA') of the University of Pavia operates, since 1965, a 250 kW TRIGA Mark II nuclear research reactor providing training and services to private enterprises and public institutions as well as being involved in several research projects carried out by the University and other research groups. Being an almost fifty years old facility, ageing, together with its potential premature failures, is a key point in the reactor safety. For these reason, in order to mitigate ageing effects, the facility has had to deal with several issues due to the time-dependent degradation of its structures, systems and components (SSCs). After an accurate assessment of SSCs conditions and the identification of ageing mechanisms, during the past years, several activities were successfully carried out. The paper will provide an overview of the above-mentioned topics and the forthcoming plans, together with lessons learned on ageing management in a small-sized reactor facility.

  18. Flexible System Integration and Advanced Hierarchical Control Architectures in the Microgrid Research Laboratory of Aalborg University

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Meng, Lexuan; Hernández, Adriana Carolina Luna; Diaz, Enrique Rodriguez;

    2016-01-01

    This paper presents the system integration and hierarchical control implementation in an inverter-based microgrid research laboratory (MGRL) in Aalborg University, Denmark. MGRL aims to provide a flexible experimental platform for comprehensive studies of microgrids. The structure of the laboratory...

  19. A Place for Materials Science: Laboratory Buildings and Interdisciplinary Research at the University of Pennsylvania

    Science.gov (United States)

    Choi, Hyungsub; Shields, Brit

    2015-01-01

    The Laboratory for Research on the Structure of Matter (LRSM), University of Pennsylvania, was built in 1965 as part of the Advanced Research Projects Agency's (ARPA) Interdisciplinary Laboratories (IDL) program intended to foster interdisciplinary research and training in materials science. The process that led to the construction of the…

  20. The research reactor TRIGA Mark II of the Johannes Gutenberg-University Mainz

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hampel, Gabriele; Eberhardt, Klaus [Mainz Univ. (Germany). Inst. of Nuclear Chemistry

    2012-10-15

    The TRIGA Mark II research reactor of the University of Mainz was built in the 1960ies on the initiative of Fritz Strassmann, co-discoverer of the fission, at that time the director of the Institute for Inorganic and Nuclear Chemistry. On August 3{sup rd}, 1965 the TRIGA Mainz reached first criticality with the insertion of the 57{sup th} fuel element in the reactor core. Two years later, in April 1967, the Nobel Prize laureate Otto Hahn initiated the first of now more than 18,000 pulses at the official inauguration. Since then, the TRIGA Mainz has operated without failure about 200 days per year. The TRIGA Mainz can be operated in the steady state mode at power levels ranging up to 100 kW{sub th}, depending on the requirements of the different experiments. Pulse-mode operation is also possible. (orig.)

  1. Annual progress report of the University of Florida Training Reactor, September 1, 1981-August 31, 1982

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The University of Florida Training Reactor's overall utilization for the past reporting year has decreased by about 50% compared to the previous year, approaching the low levels of utilization characteristic of the previous two reporting years ending in August 1979 and August 1980 respectively. The energy generation also continues to be far below average historical levels and represents a drop of nearly 50% from the improved level of the previous year. The UFTR continues to operate with an outstanding safety record and in full compliance with regulatory requirements. The reactor and associated facilities continue to maintain a high in-state visibility and strong industry relationship. It is hoped that more indirect industry training will be accomplished in the upcoming year

  2. Status of University of Cincinnati reactor-site nuclear engineering graduate programs

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The University of Cincinnati (UC) nuclear engineering program faculty has now had 12 yr of experience in delivering reactor-site educational programs to nuclear power plant technical personnel. Currently, with the sponsorship of the Toledo-Edison Company (TED), we are conducting a multiyear on-site graduate program with more than 30 participants at the Davis-Besse nuclear power plant. The program enables TED employees with the proper academic background to earn a master of science (MS) degree in nuclear engineering (mechanical engineering option). This paper presents a brief history of tile evolution of UC reactor-site educational programs together with a description of the progress of the current program

  3. The research reactor TRIGA Mark II of the Johannes Gutenberg-University Mainz

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The TRIGA Mark II research reactor of the University of Mainz was built in the 1960ies on the initiative of Fritz Strassmann, co-discoverer of the fission, at that time the director of the Institute for Inorganic and Nuclear Chemistry. On August 3rd, 1965 the TRIGA Mainz reached first criticality with the insertion of the 57th fuel element in the reactor core. Two years later, in April 1967, the Nobel Prize laureate Otto Hahn initiated the first of now more than 18,000 pulses at the official inauguration. Since then, the TRIGA Mainz has operated without failure about 200 days per year. The TRIGA Mainz can be operated in the steady state mode at power levels ranging up to 100 kWth, depending on the requirements of the different experiments. Pulse-mode operation is also possible. (orig.)

  4. Evidence of possible flooding of the reflector at the Oregon State University TRIGA reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    There is evidence to indicate that water may have flooded the void spaces inside the aluminum cladding which surrounds the graphite reflector at the Oregon State University TRIGA reactor (OSTR). This paper presents and discusses this evidence, as well as data from a number of experiments which were performed in an attempt to confirm whether or not flooding actually has occurred. The safety implications of a flooded reflector are presented and shown to be of little concern based in part on the OSTR's history of high water purity in the reactor tank. It is concluded that the sole concern is a reduction in the usefulness of certain beam ports. Proposed methods of surveillance to detect corrosion of the reflector cladding are also briefly discussed. (author)

  5. 3-Dimensional and Interactive Istanbul University Virtual Laboratory Based on Active Learning Methods

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ince, Elif; Kirbaslar, Fatma Gulay; Yolcu, Ergun; Aslan, Ayse Esra; Kayacan, Zeynep Cigdem; Alkan Olsson, Johanna; Akbasli, Ayse Ceylan; Aytekin, Mesut; Bauer, Thomas; Charalambis, Dimitris; Gunes, Zeliha Ozsoy; Kandemir, Ceyhan; Sari, Umit; Turkoglu, Suleyman; Yaman, Yavuz; Yolcu, Ozgu

    2014-01-01

    The purpose of this study is to develop a 3-dimensional interactive multi-user and multi-admin IUVIRLAB featuring active learning methods and techniques for university students and to introduce the Virtual Laboratory of Istanbul University and to show effects of IUVIRLAB on students' attitudes on communication skills and IUVIRLAB. Although…

  6. Summary of the 1st EuCAN Workshop "Universities meet laboratories (ULA2014)"

    CERN Document Server

    Aleksan, R; Appleby, R; Arduini, G; Assmann, R; Aulenbacher, K; Bambade, P; Barletta, W; Boine-Frankenheim, O; Burrows, P; Faus-Golfe, A; Guiducci, S; Herr, W; Pavlovič, M; Podlech, H; Rinolfi, L; Rivkin, L; Russenschuck, S; Schleiff, E; Seidel, M; Stoecker, H; Stroth, J; Valloni, A; Ziemann, V

    2014-01-01

    The 1st EuCAN workshop ULA2014 illuminated the interplay of universities and laboratories. The workshop took place at the Faculty of Applied Physics of the Goethe-University Frankfurt from 30 September to 1 October 2014. The 40 participants (see Fig. 1) mainly came from European countries.

  7. Princeton University, Plasma Physics Laboratory annual report, October 1, 1988--September 30, 1989

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This report contains discussions on the following topics: principal parameters achieved in experimental devices (FY89); tokamak fusion test reactor; compact ignition tokamak; princeton beta experiment- modification; current drive experiment; international collaboration; x-ray laser studies; spacecraft glow experiment; plasma deposition and etching of thin films; theoretical studies; tokamak modeling; international thermonuclear experimental reactor; engineering department; project planning and safety office; quality assurance and reliability; technology transfer; administrative operations; PPPL patent invention disclosures for (FY89); graduate education: plasma physics; graduate education: plasma science and technology; and Princeton Plasmas Physics Laboratory Reports (FY89)

  8. Princeton University, Plasma Physics Laboratory annual report, October 1, 1988--September 30, 1989

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1989-01-01

    This report contains discussions on the following topics: principal parameters achieved in experimental devices (FY89); tokamak fusion test reactor; compact ignition tokamak; princeton beta experiment- modification; current drive experiment; international collaboration; x-ray laser studies; spacecraft glow experiment; plasma deposition and etching of thin films; theoretical studies; tokamak modeling; international thermonuclear experimental reactor; engineering department; project planning and safety office; quality assurance and reliability; technology transfer; administrative operations; PPPL patent invention disclosures for (FY89); graduate education: plasma physics; graduate education: plasma science and technology; and Princeton Plasmas Physics Laboratory Reports (FY89).

  9. Princeton University, Plasma Physics Laboratory annual report, October 1, 1988--September 30, 1989

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1989-12-31

    This report contains discussions on the following topics: principal parameters achieved in experimental devices (FY89); tokamak fusion test reactor; compact ignition tokamak; princeton beta experiment- modification; current drive experiment; international collaboration; x-ray laser studies; spacecraft glow experiment; plasma deposition and etching of thin films; theoretical studies; tokamak modeling; international thermonuclear experimental reactor; engineering department; project planning and safety office; quality assurance and reliability; technology transfer; administrative operations; PPPL patent invention disclosures for (FY89); graduate education: plasma physics; graduate education: plasma science and technology; and Princeton Plasmas Physics Laboratory Reports (FY89).

  10. Laboratory-Scale Membrane Reactor for the Generation of Anhydrous Diazomethane.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dallinger, Doris; Pinho, Vagner D; Gutmann, Bernhard; Kappe, C Oliver

    2016-07-15

    A configurationally simple and robust semibatch apparatus for the in situ on-demand generation of anhydrous solutions of diazomethane (CH2N2) avoiding distillation methods is presented. Diazomethane is produced by base-mediated decomposition of commercially available Diazald within a semipermeable Teflon AF-2400 tubing and subsequently selectively separated from the tubing into a solvent- and substrate-filled flask (tube-in-flask reactor). Reactions with CH2N2 can therefore be performed directly in the flask without dangerous and labor-intensive purification operations or exposure of the operator to CH2N2. The reactor has been employed for the methylation of carboxylic acids, the synthesis of α-chloro ketones and pyrazoles, and palladium-catalyzed cyclopropanation reactions on laboratory scale. The implementation of in-line FTIR technology allowed monitoring of the CH2N2 generation and its consumption. In addition, larger scales (1.8 g diazomethane per hour) could be obtained via parallelization (numbering up) by simply wrapping several membrane tubings into the flask. PMID:27359257

  11. Development of Volumetric Methane Measurement Instrument for Laboratory Scale Anaerobic Reactors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Abdul Razaque Sahito

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available In the present study, a newly developed VMMI (Volumetric Methane-Measuring Instrument for laboratory scale anaerobic reactors is presented. The VMMI is a reliable, inexpensive, easy to construct, easy to use, corrosion resistant device that does not need maintenance, can measure a wide flow range of gas at varying pressure and temperature. As per the results of the error analysis, the accuracy of the VMMI is unilateral, i.e. -6.91%. The calibration of VMMI was investigated and a linear variation was found; hence, in situ calibration is recommended for this type of instrument. As per chromatographic analysis, it absorbs almost 100% of the carbon dioxide present in the biogas, results only the methane, and thus eliminates the need of cost intensive composition analysis of biogas through gas chromatograph

  12. Containment performance analyses for the Advanced Neutron Source Reactor at the Oak Ridge National Laboratory

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, S.H.; Taleyarkhan, R.P.; Georgevich, V.

    1992-10-01

    This paper discusses salient aspects of methodology, assumptions, and modeling of various features related to estimation of source terms from two conservatively scoped severe accident scenarios in the Advanced Neutron Source (ANS) reactor at the Oak Ridge National Laboratory. Various containment configurations are considered for steaming-pool-type accidents and an accident involving molten core-concrete interaction. Several design features (such as rupture disks) are examined to study containment response during postulated severe accidents. Also, thermal-hydraulic response of the containment and radionuclide transport and retention in the containment are studied. The results are described as transient variations of source terms for each scenario, which are to be used for studying off-site radiological consequences and health effects for these postulated severe accidents. Also highlighted will be a comparison of source terms estimated by two different versions of the MELCOR code.

  13. Annual review of Plasma Physics Laboratory, Kyoto University, July, 1981

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The construction of the Heliotron E was completed in June, 1980. After the preliminary examination for two months and the improvement of the power supply, the Joule heating experiment was carried out from September, 1980, to January, 1981. The experiment of electron cyclotron resonance heating was also carried out in January, 1981. Then, experiment was stopped to install the neutral beam injection apparatus. The results obtained by both experiments are reported. The target may be attained by producing high density plasma with low plasma current, and heating the plasma by NBI additionally. In the ECRH experiment, plasma was produced and heated successfully without Joule heating current, by the Gyrotron with 200 kW power output. The favorable results of the confinement experiment with current-free plasma indicate the possibility of a stationary fusion reactor of Heliotron type. The Heliotron magnetic field configuration was proposed in 1959, and since then, the experiments of Heliotron A, B, C, D and DM were carried out in succession. Now, the purpose of the experiment to prove the principle is being achieved with Heliotron E. Hope is placed on the NBI experiment in preparation. (Kako, I.)

  14. N Reactor

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Laboratory Consortium — The last of Hanfordqaodmasdkwaspemas7ajkqlsmdqpakldnzsdflss nine plutonium production reactors to be built was the N Reactor.This reactor was called a dual purpose...

  15. Radiochemistry at the University of Missouri-Columbia. A joint venture with chemistry, nuclear engineering, molecular biology, biochemistry, and the Missouri University Research Reactor (MURR)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Missouri University, a recipient of a U.S. Department of Energy Radiochemistry Education Award Program (REAP) grant in 1999, has significantly expanded its education and research mission in radiochemistry. While MU had a viable radiochemistry program through existing faculty expertise and the utilization of the Missouri University Research Reactor, the REAP award allowed MU to leverage its resources in significantly expanding capabilities in radiochemistry. Specifically, the grant enabled the: (1) hiring of a new faculty member in actinide radiochemistry (Dr. Paul Duval); (2) support of six graduate students in radiochemistry; (3) purchase of new radiochemistry laboratory equipment; (4) more extensive collaboration with DOE scientists through interactions with faculty and graduate students, and (5) revised radiochemical curriculum (joint courses across disciplines and new courses in actinide chemistry). The most significant impact of this award has been in encouraging interdisciplinary education and research. The proposal was initiated by a joint effort between Nuclear Engineering and Chemistry, but also included faculty in biochemistry, radiology, and molecular biology. Specific outcomes of the REAP grant thus far are: (1) increased educational and research capabilities in actinide chemistry (faculty hire and equipment acquisition); (2) increased integration of biochemistry and radiochemistry (e.g., radiochemical analysis of uranium speciation in biological systems); (3) stronger interdisciplinary integration of molecular biology and radiochemical sciences (alpha-emitters for treating cancer); (4) new and more extensive interactions with national laboratory facilities (e.g., student internships at LANL and LLBL, faculty and lab scientist exchange visits, analytical measurements and collaboration with the Advanced Photon Source), and (7) new research funding opportunities based on REAP partnership. (author)

  16. History of the 185-/189-D thermal hydraulics laboratory and its effects on reactor operations at the Hanford Site

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gerber, M.S.

    1994-09-01

    The 185-D deaeration building and the 189-D refrigeration building were constructed at Hanford during 1943 and 1944. Both buildings were constructed as part of the influent water cooling system for D reactor. The CMS studies eliminated the need for 185-D function. Early gains in knowledge ended the original function of the 189-D building mission. In 1951, 185-D and 189-D were converted to a thermal-hydraulic laboratory. The experiments held in the thermal-hydraulic lab lead to historic changes in Hanford reactor operations. In late 1951, the exponential physics experiments were moved to the 189-D building. In 1958, new production reactor experiments were begun in 185/189-D. In 1959, Plutonium Recycle Test Reactor experiments were added to the 185/189-D facility. By 1960, the 185/189-D thermal hydraulics laboratory was one of the few full service facilities of its type in the nation. During the years 1961--1963 tests continued in the facility in support of existing reactors, new production reactors, and the Plutonium Recycle Test Reactor. In 1969, Fast Flux Test Facility developmental testings began in the facility. Simulations in 185/189-D building aided in the N Reactor repairs in the 1980`s. In 1994 the facility was nominated to the National Register of Historic Places, because of its pioneering role over many years in thermal hydraulics, flow studies, heat transfer, and other reactor coolant support work. During 1994 and 1995 it was demolished in the largest decontamination and decommissioning project thus far in Hanford Site history.

  17. Report of the research results with University of Tokyo, Nuclear Engineering Research Laboratory's Facilities in fiscal 1982

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The results of the research carried out in fiscal 1982 commonly using the facilities in the Nuclear Engineering Research Laboratory, University of Tokyo, are summarized in this report. In the utilization of the nuclear reactor, the maximum output was limited to 500W, because it was necessary to examine the growth of the abnormal protrusion having arisen on fuel cladding. The linear accelerator was utilized almost perfectly. The total number of those who commonly utilized the facilities was 2,468, suggesting the importance of the role of common utilization. The summaries of the results of 12 on-pile researches, 11 off-pile researches and 18 researches using the linear accelerator are collected. The committee meetings held in fiscal 1982 are listed. The names of the members of various committees and the names of those in charge of various experiments are given. (Kako, I.)

  18. Interactive Virtual Reactor and Control Room for Education and Training at Universities and Nuclear Power Plants

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Satoh, Yoshinori; Li, Ye; Zhu, Xuefeng; Rizwan, Uddin [University of Illinois, Urbana (United States)

    2014-08-15

    Efficient and effective education and training of nuclear engineering students and nuclear workers are critical for the safe operation and maintenance of nuclear power plants. With an eye toward this need, we have focused on the development of 3D models of virtual labs for education, training as well as to conduct virtual experiments. These virtual labs, that are expected to supplement currently available resources, and have the potential to reduce the cost of education and training, are most easily developed on game-engine platforms. We report some recent extensions to the virtual model of the University of Illinois TRIGA reactor.

  19. University of Florida Training Reactor. Annual progress report, September 1, 1983-August 31, 1984

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The University of Florida Training Reactor's overall utilization for the past reporting year has increased dramatically compared to previous years, even exceeding the levels of utilization characteristic of the early 1970's in some areas such as energy generation. Indeed, the total energy generation (kWh) for this reporting year is at the highest level ever and represents an increase of over 300% over the 1982-1983 reporting year which itself had an increase of 50% over the 1981-1982 reporting year

  20. Twenty-ninth annual progress report of the Pennsylvania State University Breazeale Nuclear Reactor, July 1, 1983-June 30, 1984

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The twenty-ninth annual progress report of the operation of the Pennsylvania State University Breazeale Reactor is submitted in accordance with the requirements of Contract DE-AC02-76ER03409 with the United States Department of Energy. This report also provides the University administration with a summary of the operation of the facility for the past year

  1. Evaluation of the Young Children with Neurodevelopmental Disability: A Prospective Study at Hamadan University of Medical Sciences Clinics

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Afshin FAYYAZI

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available ObjectiveDevelopmental impairment is a common problem in children health that occurs in approximately 5–10% of the childhood population. The aim of this study was to determine the etiologic yield of subspecialists’ evaluation of young children with developmental disability.Materials & MethodsAll children aged between 2 months and 5 years referred over a 15-month period to Hamadan University of Medical Sciences subspecialty services for initial evaluation of a suspected developmental Disability, were enrolled in the present study. Diagnostic yield was determined after the completion of clinical assessments and laboratory tests requested by the evaluating physician.ResultsA total of 198 children (129 boys and 69 girls were eligible for our study.108 children had global developmental delay and 90 children had isolated developmental delay. Approximately ¼ of all patients did not have any specific etiology for developmental disability. Cerebral palsy (CP was the most common clinical syndrome in all patients (41.4%. Hypoxic ischemic encephalopathy (13.8%, brain dysgenesis (13%, genetic disorder (13%, and neurodegenerative diseases (11% were determined in more than one half of all children with global developmental disability. in our study, “developmental speech delay” was the common cause of isolated speech delay.ConclusionDetermination of an underlying etiology is an essential part of specialty evaluation of young children with developmental disability. The results of this study were similar closely to the results of other studies.

  2. Internet Addiction among Greek University Students: Demographic Associations with the Phenomenon, using the Greek version of Young's Internet Addiction Test

    OpenAIRE

    Christos C. Frangos; Frangos, Constantinos C; Kiohos, Apostolos P.

    2010-01-01

    Internet addiction (IA) is a new disorder described in 1996 by the psychologist Kimberly Young. The aim of this paper is to estimate the percentage of IA among Greek university students. Results of a sample survey among 1876 Greek university students, 18-27 years old, are presented. The questionnaire consisted of eight questions from Young's Diagnostic Test for Internet Addiction (YDTIA) as well as an inventory including demographic factors and questions about academic performance, computer a...

  3. Clinical and Laboratory evaluation of measleslike rash in children and young adults

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stewien Klaus Eberhard

    2000-01-01

    Full Text Available A clinical and laboratory evaluation of 11 children and young adults with measleslike rash was done during the measles outbreak in the Greater São Paulo Metropolitan area at the end of 1996 and spread over the country during 1997. Measles was laboratory confirmed in 07 patients by specific IgM detection in acute serum specimens using an IgM-capture EIA, by specific IgG seroconversion in serum pairs, and by reverse transcription PCR and virus isolation in peripheral blood lymphocytes. Clinical presentations were not always classic; one of the 07 cases had received measles vaccine and corresponded to modified clinical case of measles. The 4 remaining cases were negative for measles and were diagnosed as exanthem subitum (2 cases, scarlet fever and Kawasaki disease. The present study reinforces the view that clinical features alone are not sufficient for establishing an accurate diagnosis in the post-vaccine era, and a surveillance system based on sensitive laboratory results is needed so that it can confirm IgM-negative measles cases.

  4. The University of Birmingham, nuclear power, and start of UK reactor programme

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    As long ago as 1919 Sir Oliver Lodge, the first principal of The University of Birmingham presented a remarkable prescient account of the potential of nuclear power. However, he could not have predicted that a mere 20 years later, in that university, Peierls and Frisch would begin to lay the foundations with their calculation that the critical mass of 235U was only of the order of 1 kg. It is generally the case that work in the field of pure physics leads to the initiating discovery; metallurgy follows with the development of the resultant technology. In this paper, it is illustrated how the shortage of suitable materials (and facilities) forced the UK to follow a route which would lead to the development of gas cooled reactors. (author)

  5. Scottish Universities Research and Reactor Centre annual report 1987-1988

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The Scottish Universities Research and Reactor Centre (SURRC) provides facilities for research in isotopic, nuclear and earth sciences and collaborates with Scottish University departments on a wide range of research topics. One of its main areas of work is the Isotope Geology Unit. This has worked with the Nuclear Medicine Unit on the application of enriched stable isotope tracers in the biological and clinical sciences. The measurement of radioactive isomers is applied to quaternary geology, archaeology, nuclear medicine, health physics, oceanography, atomospheric sciences, environmental chemistry, nuclear waste disposal and mathematical modelling of the environment. There are also radiocarbon dating facilities. The facilities and the research undertaken at the Centre in the year 1987-1988, the Centre's twenty-fifth year are summarized in this report. (U.K.)

  6. Intermediate energy neutron beams from the MURR [University of Missouri Research Reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Several reactors in the US are potential candidates to deliver beams of intermediate energy neutrons for NCT. At this time, moderators, as compared to filters, appear to be the more effective means of tailoring the flux of these reactors. The objective is to sufficiently reduce the flux of fast neutrons while producing enough intermediate energy neutrons for treatments. At the University of Missouri Research Reactor (MURR), the code MCNP has recently been used to calculate doses in a phantom. First, ideal beams of 1, 35, and 1,000 eV neutrons were analyzed to determine doses and advantage depths in the phantom. Second, a high quality beam that had been designed to fit in the thermal column of the MURR, was reanalyzed. MCNP calculations of the dose in phantom in this beam confirmed previous calculations and showed that this beam would be a nearly ideal one with neutrons of the desired energy and also a high neutron current. However, installation of this beam will require a significant modification of the thermal column of the MURR. Therefore, a second beam that is less difficult to build and install, but of lower neutron current, has been designed to fit in MURR port F. This beam is designed using inexpensive Al, S, and Pb. The doses calculated in the phantom placed in this beam show that it will be satisfactory for sample tests, animal tests, and possible initial patient trials. Producing this beam will require only modest modifications of the existing tube

  7. Universal routine HPV vaccination for young girls in Uganda: a review of opportunities and potential obstacles

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Banura Cecily

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract This article reviews the existing realities in Uganda to identify opportunities and potential obstacles of providing universal routine HPV vaccination to young adolescent girls. Cervical cancer is a public health priority in Uganda where it contributes to about 50–60% of all female malignancies. It is associated with a dismal 5-year relative survival of approximately 20%. With adequate financial resources, primary prevention through vaccination is feasible using existing education and health infrastructure. Cost-effectiveness studies show that at a cost of US$2 per dose, the current vaccines would be cost effective. With optimal (≥70% coverage of the target population, the lifetime risk of cervical cancer could be reduced by >50%. Uganda fulfils 4 out of the 5 criteria set by the WHO for the introduction of routine HPV vaccination to young adolescent girls. The existing political commitment, community support for immunization and the favorable laws and policy environment all provide an opportunity that should not be missed to introduce this much needed vaccine to the young adolescent girls. However, sustainable financing by the government without external assistances remains a major obstacle. Also, the existing health delivery systems would require strengthening to cope with the delivery of HPV vaccine to a population that is normally not targeted for routine vaccination. Given the high incidence of cervical cancer and in the absence of a national screening program, universal HPV vaccination of Ugandan adolescent girls is critical for cervical cancer prevention.

  8. Associated Western Universities summer participant program at the Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory, Summer 1997

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Williams, B.

    1997-08-01

    The Associated Western Universities, Inc. (AWU) supports a student summer program at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL). This program is structured so that honors undergraduate students may participate in the Laboratory`s research program under direct supervision of senior Laboratory scientists. Included in this report is a list of the AWU participants for the summer of 1997. All students are required to submit original reports of their summer activities in a format of their own choosing. These unaltered student reports constitute the major portion of this report.

  9. United States Domestic Research Reactor Infrastructure TRIGA Reactor Fuel Support

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The purpose of this technical paper is to provide status of the United State domestic Research Reactor Infrastructure (RRI) Program at the Idaho National Laboratory. This paper states the purpose of the program, lists the universities operating TRIGA reactors that are supported by the program, identifies anticipated fresh fuel needs for the reactor facilities, discusses spent fuel activities associated with the program, and addresses successes and planned activities for the program. (author)

  10. Utilization of the High Flux Isotope Reactor at Oak Ridge National Laboratory

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Selby, Douglas L [ORNL; Bilheux, Hassina Z [ORNL; Meilleur, Flora [ORNL; Jones, Amy [ORNL; Bailey, William Barton [ORNL; Vandergriff, David H [ORNL

    2015-01-01

    This paper addresses several aspects of the scientific utilization of the Oak Ridge National Laboratory High Flux Isotope Reactor (HFIR). Topics to be covered will include: 1) HFIR neutron scattering instruments and the formal instrument user program; 2) Recent upgrades to the neutron scattering instrument stations at the reactor, and 3) eMod a new tool for addressing instrument modifications and providing configuration control and design process for scientific instruments at HFIR and the Spallation Neutron Source (SNS). There are 15 operating neutron instrument stations at HFIR with 12 of them organized into a formal user program. Since the last presentation on HFIR instruments at IGORR we have installed a Single Crystal Quasi-Laue Diffractometer instrument called IMAGINE; and we have made significant upgrades to HFIR neutron scattering instruments including the Cold Triple Axis Instrument, the Wide Angle Neutron Diffractometer, the Powder Diffractometer, and the Neutron Imaging station. In addition, we have initiated upgrades to the Thermal Triple Axis Instrument and the Bio-SANS cold neutron instrument detector system. All of these upgrades are tied to a continuous effort to maintain a high level neutron scattering user program at the HFIR. For the purpose of tracking modifications such as those mentioned and configuration control we have been developing an electronic system for entering instrument modification requests that follows a modification or instrument project through concept development, design, fabrication, installation, and commissioning. This system, which we call eMod, electronically leads the task leader through a series of questions and checklists that then identifies such things as ES&H and radiological issues and then automatically designates specific individuals for the activity review process. The system has been in use for less than a year and we are still working out some of the inefficiencies, but we believe that this will become a very

  11. Contribution to international safeguards and security by a small university research reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Full text: In recent years international safeguards and security of radioactive sources has become an increasing concern to countries, to the public and to international organisations. The main target of all international efforts is to prevent the spread and the illicit trafficking of special nuclear materials or radioactive sources. The development of highly specialised instruments being hand-held, portable or fixed installed is performed in cooperation with the IAEA mainly in the USA and in Europe. However even small research institutions such as the Atom institute in Vienna can contribute significantly to the improvement both of hardware and software as well as to the practical test in different radiation fields under laboratory conditions. The Atom institute belongs to the Technical University of Vienna and operates a 250 kW TRIGA type reactor mainly for education and training of students in the nuclear field. All relevant information can be found in the homepage www.ati.ac.at. One advantage of the Atom Institute is the proximity to the IAEA, in fact it is the closest nuclear facility to the IAEA headquarters. In the past years the Atom Institute co-operated very closely with several divisions in the IAEA to test soft- and hardware of newly developed nuclear instruments under variable environmental conditions. Following are some typical examples of recent research programmes: One field of research and investigations was the behaviour of various types of Cd-Zn-Te (CZT) detectors in different radiation fields. These types of detectors are room temperature semiconductor detectors with a resolution between HP Ge detectors and NaJ detectors. They have the advantage of being very small and rugged and therefore easy to be transported and applied in the field. However their resolution as a function of their geometric configuration has to be tested in mixed radiation fields, also the evaluation software has to be improved. Starting in 1996 two CZT detectors have been

  12. Completion summary for borehole USGS 136 near the Advanced Test Reactor Complex, Idaho National Laboratory, Idaho

    Science.gov (United States)

    Twining, Brian V.; Bartholomay, Roy C.; Hodges, Mary K.V.

    2012-01-01

    In 2011, the U.S. Geological Survey, in cooperation with the U.S. Department of Energy, cored and completed borehole USGS 136 for stratigraphic framework analyses and long-term groundwater monitoring of the eastern Snake River Plain aquifer at the Idaho National Laboratory. The borehole was initially cored to a depth of 1,048 feet (ft) below land surface (BLS) to collect core, open-borehole water samples, and geophysical data. After these data were collected, borehole USGS 136 was cemented and backfilled between 560 and 1,048 ft BLS. The final construction of borehole USGS 136 required that the borehole be reamed to allow for installation of 6-inch (in.) diameter carbon-steel casing and 5-in. diameter stainless-steel screen; the screened monitoring interval was completed between 500 and 551 ft BLS. A dedicated pump and water-level access line were placed to allow for aquifer testing, for collecting periodic water samples, and for measuring water levels. Geophysical and borehole video logs were collected after coring and after the completion of the monitor well. Geophysical logs were examined in conjunction with the borehole core to describe borehole lithology and to identify primary flow paths for groundwater, which occur in intervals of fractured and vesicular basalt. A single-well aquifer test was used to define hydraulic characteristics for borehole USGS 136 in the eastern Snake River Plain aquifer. Specific-capacity, transmissivity, and hydraulic conductivity from the aquifer test were at least 975 gallons per minute per foot, 1.4 × 105 feet squared per day (ft2/d), and 254 feet per day, respectively. The amount of measureable drawdown during the aquifer test was about 0.02 ft. The transmissivity for borehole USGS 136 was in the range of values determined from previous aquifer tests conducted in other wells near the Advanced Test Reactor Complex: 9.5 × 103 to 1.9 × 105 ft2/d. Water samples were analyzed for cations, anions, metals, nutrients, total organic

  13. University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign, Materials Research Laboratory progress report for FY 1991

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The Materials Research Laboratory at the University of Illinois is an interdisciplinary laboratory operated in the College of Engineering. Its focus is the science of materials and it supports research in the areas of condensed matter physics, solid state chemistry, and materials science. This report addresses topics such as: an MRL overview; budget; general programmatic and institutional issues; new programs; research summaries for metallurgy, ceramics, solid state physics, and materials chemistry

  14. University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign, Materials Research Laboratory progress report for FY 1991

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1991-10-01

    The Materials Research Laboratory at the University of Illinois is an interdisciplinary laboratory operated in the College of Engineering. Its focus is the science of materials and it supports research in the areas of condensed matter physics, solid state chemistry, and materials science. This report addresses topics such as: an MRL overview; budget; general programmatic and institutional issues; new programs; research summaries for metallurgy, ceramics, solid state physics, and materials chemistry.

  15. U.S. Department of Energy University Reactor Sharing Program at the University of Florida. Final report for period August 15, 2000 - May 31, 2001

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vernetson, William G.

    2002-01-01

    Department of Energy Grant Number DE-FG02-96NE38152 was supplied to the University of Florida Training Reactor (UFTR) facility through the U.S. Department of Energy's University Reactor Sharing Program. The renewal proposal submitted in January 2000 originally requested over $73,000 to support various external educational institutions using the UFTR facilities in academic year 2000-01. The actual Reactor Sharing Grant was only in the amount of $40,000, all of which has been well used by the University of Florida as host institution to support various educational institutions in the use of our reactor and associated facilities as indicated in the proposal. These various educational institutions are located primarily within the State of Florida. However, when the 600-mile distance from Pensacola to Miami is considered, it is obvious that this Grant provides access to reactor utilization for a broad geographical region and a diverse set of user institutions serving over fourteen million inhabitants throughout the State of Florida and still others throughout the Southeast.

  16. The Metaphysics of The Healing. Al-Šifā’: al-Ilāhiyyāt. A parallel English-Arabic text translated, introduced, and annotated by Michael E. Marmura, Provo, Utah, Brigham Young University - Islamic Translation Series, 2005, xxvii + 441 + 378 p. [ang

    OpenAIRE

    Landau, Justine

    2007-01-01

    Cette version de la Métaphysique d’Avicenne est la quatrième traduction intégrale de l’ouvrage dans une langue occidentale, après la traduction allemande de Max J.H. Horten (1907), la version française du Père Georges C. Anawati (1978-1985), et la récente édition trilingue arabe/latin/italien de Pasquale Porro et Olga Lizzini (Bompiani, 2002). Elle constitue aussi une nouvelle édition critique du texte arabe. L’éditeur s’est largement fondé sur l’édition du Caire (1960), en intégrant la plupa...

  17. Design of Mixed Batch Reactor and Column Studies at Oak Ridge National Laboratory

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wu, Weimin [Stanford Univ., CA (United States); Criddle, Craig S. [Stanford Univ., CA (United States)

    2015-11-16

    We (the Stanford research team) were invited as external collaborators to contribute expertise in environmental engineering and field research at the ORNL IFRC, Oak Ridge, TN, for projects carried out at the Argonne National Laboratory and funded by US DOE. Specifically, we assisted in the design of batch and column reactors using ORNL IFRC materials to ensure the experiments were relevant to field conditions. During the funded research period, we characterized ORNL IFRC groundwater and sediments in batch microcosm and column experiments conducted at ANL, and we communicated with ANL team members through email and conference calls and face-to-face meetings at the annual ERSP PI meeting and national meetings. Microcosm test results demonstrated that U(VI) in sediments was reduced to U(IV) when amended with ethanol. The reduced products were not uraninite but unknown U(IV) complexes associated with Fe. Fe(III) in solid phase was only partially reduced. Due to budget reductions at ANL, Stanford contributions ended in 2011.

  18. Design of Mixed Batch Reactor and Column Studies at Oak Ridge National Laboratory

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We (the Stanford research team) were invited as external collaborators to contribute expertise in environmental engineering and field research at the ORNL IFRC, Oak Ridge, TN, for projects carried out at the Argonne National Laboratory and funded by US DOE. Specifically, we assisted in the design of batch and column reactors using ORNL IFRC materials to ensure the experiments were relevant to field conditions. During the funded research period, we characterized ORNL IFRC groundwater and sediments in batch microcosm and column experiments conducted at ANL, and we communicated with ANL team members through email and conference calls and face-to-face meetings at the annual ERSP PI meeting and national meetings. Microcosm test results demonstrated that U(VI) in sediments was reduced to U(IV) when amended with ethanol. The reduced products were not uraninite but unknown U(IV) complexes associated with Fe. Fe(III) in solid phase was only partially reduced. Due to budget reductions at ANL, Stanford contributions ended in 2011.

  19. Clostridium bornimense sp. nov., isolated from a mesophilic, two-phase, laboratory-scale biogas reactor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hahnke, Sarah; Striesow, Jutta; Elvert, Marcus; Mollar, Xavier Prieto; Klocke, Michael

    2014-08-01

    A novel anaerobic, mesophilic, hydrogen-producing bacterium, designated strain M2/40(T), was isolated from a mesophilic, two-phase, laboratory-scale biogas reactor fed continuously with maize silage supplemented with 5% wheat straw. 16S rRNA gene sequence comparison revealed an affiliation to the genus Clostridium sensu stricto (cluster I of the clostridia), with Clostridium cellulovorans as the closest characterized species, showing 93.8% sequence similarity to the type strain. Cells of strain M2/40(T) were rods to elongated filamentous rods that showed variable Gram staining. Optimal growth occurred at 35 °C and at pH 7. Grown on glucose, the main fermentation products were H2, CO2, formate, lactate and propionate. The DNA G+C content was 29.6 mol%. The major fatty acids (>10 %) were C(16 : 0), summed feature 10 (C(18 : 1)ω11c/ω9t/ω6t and/or unknown ECL 17.834) and C(18 : 1)ω11c dimethylacetal. Based on phenotypic, chemotaxonomic and phylogenetic differences, strain M2/40(T) represents a novel species within the genus Clostridium, for which we propose the name Clostridium bornimense sp. nov. The type strain is M2/40(T) ( = DSM 25664(T) = CECT 8097(T)).

  20. Computational Fluid Dynamics Simulation of the Hydrogen Reduction of Magnetite Concentrate in a Laboratory Flash Reactor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fan, De-Qiu; Sohn, H. Y.; Mohassab, Yousef; Elzohiery, Mohamed

    2016-08-01

    A three-dimensional computational fluid dynamics (CFD) model was developed to study the hydrogen reduction of magnetite concentrate particles in a laboratory flash reactor representing a novel flash ironmaking process. The model was used to simulate the fluid flow, heat transfer, and chemical reactions involved. The governing equations for the gas phase were solved in the Eulerian frame of reference while the particles were tracked in the Lagrangian framework. The change in the particle mass was related to the chemical reaction and the particle temperature was calculated by taking into consideration the heat of reaction, convection, and radiation. The stochastic trajectory model was used to describe particle dispersion due to turbulence. Partial combustion of H2 by O2 injected through a non-premixed burner was also simulated in this study. The partial combustion mechanism used in this model consisted of seven chemical reactions involving six species. The temperature profiles and reduction degrees obtained from the simulations satisfactorily agreed with the experimental measurements.

  1. Assessment of the implications of conversion of university research and training reactors to low enrichment uranium fuel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The tasks associated with conversion of a research reactor from HEU to LEU fuel are: initial program planning; safety analysis and license amendment; core physics calculations; operating thermal-hydraulics analysis; plant engineering modifications; LEU fuel specifications, procurement of fuel, and calculational confirmation of design; training of staff personnel; HEU core physics measurements and fuel disposal; and experimental verification of reactor behavior with LEU fuel. LEU fuel conversion of the 25 NRC licensed, university-owned reactors considered in this study is based upon the reactor fuel cycle, the type of license modification, and fuel meat technology. Reactors that operate on routine refueling cycles could periodically replace depleted HEU elements with fresh LEU elements. Ultimate full core conversion would depend on the average element residence time in the core. Reactors with lifetime cores would convert by full core replacement as a one-time event. For some reactors, LEU conversion depends upon high density uranium fuel meat technology development. The majority should be able to convert using a direct substitution of current fuel meat technology though some fuel plate or rod internal modifications may be necessary for 16 of the reactors

  2. Academic Self-Concept and Motivation in Young Talents of a Private University in Tarapoto

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Renzo F. Carranza

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available The objective of this study was to determine the relationship between academic self-concept and academic motivation in young talents (Scholarship 18 at a Private University in Tarapoto city, Peru. The sample was obtained through a probabislitic sampling and there were 92 young talents, being 47,8% male and 52,2% female between 17 and 22 years old. I used a descriptive, correlational and non-experimental design. The sample was evaluated using the AF5 Self-concept Scale (García and Musitu academic section that consists of 6 items, and the Academic Motivation Scale that consists of 28 items. The psychometric properties of the instruments indicated that they are valid and reliable. Data were processed in SPSS (Statistical Package for the Social Sciences version 20.0. The results show that there is a direct and highly significant relationship between academic self-concept and academic motivation in young talents (r = .301**, p<.004, which indicates the higher the academic self-concept, the greater the academic motivation.

  3. Cancer risk assessment for Tehran research reactor and radioisotope laboratory with CAP88-PC code (Gaussian plume model)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Research highlights: → Impact of Tehran's reactor and radioisotope laboratory stacks has been studied. → Gaussian Plume Dispersion Model and laboratory analyses were used. → Glass-fiber filters were used in the exclusion area in different direction. → The released radionuclide concentration was calculated by the code and measurements. → Dose calculations best compared to procedures presented in the Regulatory Guide. - Abstract: The amount of released radionuclide from Tehran's research reactor and radioisotope laboratory stacks and their impact have been studied. The aim of this work is to determine the amount and type of radioactive materials and to estimate their risk once they are released into the environment. To perform the above two tasks, CAP88-PC computer code which simulates Gaussian dispersion air transport Plume Model and laboratory analysis of air samples around the site were used. Computer code input data are provided by the Safety Analysis Report and Reactor Annual Reports. Air samples were collected using the filter and sampling pumps and analyzed by gamma spectroscopy counter. Results of computer program showed that the risk of cancer death (lifetime risk) is below the regulatory limit. Results of analysis of available radionuclide in the air samples also showed that concentrations are close to the background and confirm the code results.

  4. The contribution of a small TRIGA university research reactor to nuclear research on an international level

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The paper focuses especially on the important results in neutron- and solid state physics and the co-operation between the low power TRIGA reactor with high flux neutron sources in Europe such as the Institute Laue-Langevin (ILL) in Grenoble, the Paul Scherrer Institut (PSI) in Villigen, the Rutherford Appleton Laboratory (RAL) in Didcot and the Research Center Juelich. Experiments are set up for test purposes at the TRIGA reactor and then transferred to the powerful neutron sources. Different new perfect silicon channel-cut and interferometer crystals are prepared and then tested at the Bonse-Hart camera, which is a double crystal (or triple axis) diffractometer and at the interferometer set-up. Historically, the first verification of neutron interferometry at a perfect crystal device has been achieved at the 250 kW TRIGA-reactor in Vienna in the year 1974. Also the co-operation with the PSI and the TU Munich in the field of neutron radiography and neutron tomography and VESTA, an experiment for storing cold neutrons with a wavelength of 6.27A, installed at the pulsed neutron source ISIS at RAL are mentioned. The second topic in this paper focuses on the co-operation in the field of safeguard. Several projects have been carried out during the past years in co-operation with the IAEA such as establishing a gamma spectrum reference catalogue for CdZnTe detectors and tests of safeguard video cameras under neutron irradiation. Further an integrated safeguard surveillance network composed of a video camera, a gamma monitor and a neutron monitor is under development

  5. The contribution of a small triga university research reactor to nuclear research on an international level

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The paper focuses especially on the important results in neutron- and solid state physics and the co-operation between the low power TRIGA reactor with high flux neutron sources in Europe such as the Institute Laue-Langevin (ILL) in Grenoble, the Paul Scherrer Institut (PSI) in Villigen, the Rutherford Appleton Laboratory (RAL) in Didcot and the Research Center Juelich. Experiments are set up for test purposes at the TRIGA reactor and then transferred to the powerful neutron sources. Different new perfect silicon channel-cut and interferometer crystals are prepared and then tested at the Bonse-Hart camera, which is a double crystal (or triple axis) diffractometer and at the interferometer set-up. Historically, the first verification of neutron interferometry at a perfect crystal device has been achieved at the 250 kW TRIGA-reactor in Vienna in the year 1974. Also the co-operation with the PSI and the TU Munich in the field of neutron radiography and neutron tomography and VESTA, an experiment for storing cold neutrons with a wavelength of 6.27 A, installed at the pulsed neutron source ISIS at RAL will be mentioned. The second topic treated in this paper shows the international co-operation in the field of superconductors. This research work is carried out under two European TMR-Network programs. The third topic in this paper focuses on the co-operation in the field of safeguard. Several projects have been carried out during the past years in co-operation with the IAEA such as establishing a gamma spectrum reference catalogue for CdZnTe detectors and tests of safeguard video cameras under neutron irradiation. Further an integrated safeguard surveillance network composed of a video camera, a gamma monitor and a neutron monitor is under development. (orig.)

  6. Accelerator Laboratory of the University and the Technical University of Munich. Annual report 1992

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This report contains extended abstracts about the work performed at the named laboratory together with a list of publications and reports. The abstracts concern experiments on nuclear reactions, nuclear spectroscopy, atomic physics, accelerator mass spectroscopy with heavy ions, and applications of nuclear techniques, theoretical work on nuclear reactions, nuclear structure, atomic physics, and astrophysics, developments of accelerators and radiation instrumentation, as well as data processing. (HSI)

  7. Sexual Education of Young University Students: Some Key Factors and Challenges

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    María Luisa Preinfalk-Fernández

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available In general terms, higher education institutions not only face the challenge of teaching some discipline to their students, but also of strengthening their life skills. Since university students are majorly young, the desire to provide them with comprehensive training is particularly relevant, since it is at this stage of life when they model their behavior for adulthood. In this training challenge, sex education plays a decisive role. This research paper aims to show that factors such as information gaps, unsafe sexual practices, myths, prejudices and stereotypes persist in the university student population and do not allow them to live sexuality safely and pleasurable. Moreover, these factors show Costa Rica’s need for higher education institutions to strengthen their actions in sex education. A brief tour is made from various angles through the sexual experiences of the university student population, namely: their perceptions about the training requirements they face, their main concerns, their unsafe sexual practices, their inability to negotiate sexual and reproductive health care, their knowledge and preventive practices in terms of sexual and reproductive health, the existence of forms of violence within university life, among others. The findings set out are part of a larger research, based on contributions from the theory of gender and social constructionism. Such data derives from the application of a questionnaire to a sample stratified by unequal conglomerates composed of 766 regular students of undergraduate courses, enrolled in the first cycle of 2011, at Universidad Nacional de Costa Rica. The margin of error is 1.5% and the confidence level, 95%. The data was tabulated using the software CSPRO and analyzed with software R. After obtaining the results of the instrument’s application, a focus group was created with the participation of professionals who teach sexuality courses in this university, and two other groups with

  8. Design study of multi-imaging plate system for BNCT irradiation field at Kyoto university reactor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tanaka, Kenichi; Sakurai, Yoshinori; Kajimoto, Tsuyoshi; Tanaka, Hiroki; Takata, Takushi; Endo, Satoru

    2016-09-01

    The converter configuration for a multi-imaging plate system was investigated for the application of quality assurance in the irradiation field profile for boron neutron capture therapy. This was performed by the simulation calculation using the PHITS code in the fields at the Heavy Water Neutron Irradiation Facility of Kyoto University Reactor. The converter constituents investigated were carbon for gamma rays, and polyethylene with and without LiF at varied (6)Li concentration for thermal, epithermal, and fast neutrons. Consequently, potential combinations of the converters were found for two components, gamma rays and thermal neutrons, for the standard thermal neutron mode and three components of gamma rays, epithermal neutrons, and thermal or fast neutrons, for the standard mixed or epithermal neutron modes, respectively. PMID:27423022

  9. Current Activities of Neutron Imaging Facilities in KUR (Kyoto University Research Reactor)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kawabata, Yuji; Saito, Yasushi

    Kyoto University research Reactor (KUR) restarted in Spring 2010 with low enriched fuel (20%) after 4 years tentative interruption for fuel conversion. There are two facilities for neutron imaging: 1) B4 port at supermirror neutron guide tube (5x107 n/cm2/s at 5 MW, 1 cmx7.5 cm), 2) E2 port (3x105 n/cm2/s at 5 MW, 15 cm dia.). As we have large experimental space at the end of the guide tube and need small shielding because the neutron flux of KUR is not high, we have very large flexibility in the experimental set up. Thus, experiments in B4 should be specialized in the measurements which require large and/or unconventional equipments to accommodate special sample conditions. The E2 port with the low neutron flux is used for experiments which need very long or frequent machine times.

  10. Laboratory test reactor for the investigation of liquid reducing agents in the selective catalytic reduction of NOx

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peitz, D.; Bernhard, A.; Elsener, M.; Kröcher, O.

    2011-08-01

    A test reactor was designed and built for investigating liquid reducing agents in the selective catalytic reduction (SCR) process in the laboratory. The design of the experimental setup is described in detail and its performance was evaluated. Using a glass nebulizer, liquid reducing agents were sprayed directly onto a catalyst positioned in a heated glass reactor with a length of 250 mm and an internal diameter of 20.4 mm or 40 mm. Model exhaust gases were mixed from individual gas components and were heated up to 450 °C in a heat exchanger before entering the reactor. The off-gas was analyzed using two complimentary techniques, a multi-component online FTIR gas analysis and a liquid quench gas absorption setup, to detect higher molecular compounds and aerosols. Due to the versatility of construction, processes not related to SCR, but involving three-phase reactions with gases, liquids and a catalyst, can also be investigated.

  11. Building a Low-Cost Gross Anatomy Laboratory: A Big Step for a Small University

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goldman, Evan

    2010-01-01

    This article illustrates details of the planning, building, and improvement phases of a cost-efficient, full-dissection gross anatomy laboratory on a campus of an historically design-centric university. Special considerations were given throughout the project to the nature of hosting cadavers in a building shared amongst all undergraduate majors.…

  12. Annual report of Radiation Laboratory Department of Nuclear Engineering Faculty of Engineering, Kyoto University

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This publication is the collection of the papers presented research activities of Radiation laboratory, Department of Nuclear Engineering, Kyoto University during the 1992 academic/fiscal year (April, 1992 - March, 1993). The 48 of the presented papers are indexed individually. (J.P.N.)

  13. The Perceptions, Views and Opinions of University Students about Physics Learning during Undergraduate Laboratory Work

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hanif, M.; Sneddon, P. H.; Al-Ahmadi, F. M.; Reid, N.

    2009-01-01

    The physics laboratory has long been a distinctive feature of physics education. It has been given a central role in the teaching and learning of physics at school and undergraduate levels in universities. The literature indicates that science educators have suggested that there are academically rich benefits in the learning and understanding of…

  14. Annual report of Radiation Laboratory Department of Nuclear Engineering Kyoto University for fiscal 1993

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This publication is the collection of the papers presented research activities of Radiation Laboratory, Department of Nuclear Engineering, Kyoto University during the 1993 academic/fiscal year (April, 1993 - March, 1994). The 47 of the presented papers are indexed individually. (J.P.N.)

  15. Completion Summary for Well NRF-16 near the Naval Reactors Facility, Idaho National Laboratory, Idaho

    Science.gov (United States)

    Twining, Brian V.; Fisher, Jason C.; Bartholomay, Roy C.

    2010-01-01

    In 2009, the U.S. Geological Survey in cooperation with the U.S. Department of Energy's Naval Reactors Laboratory Field Office, Idaho Branch Office cored and completed well NRF-16 for monitoring the eastern Snake River Plain (SRP) aquifer. The borehole was initially cored to a depth of 425 feet below land surface and water samples and geophysical data were collected and analyzed to determine if well NRF-16 would meet criteria requested by Naval Reactors Facility (NRF) for a new upgradient well. Final construction continued after initial water samples and geophysical data indicated that NRF-16 would produce chemical concentrations representative of upgradient aquifer water not influenced by NRF facility disposal, and that the well was capable of producing sustainable discharge for ongoing monitoring. The borehole was reamed and constructed as a Comprehensive Environmental Response Compensation and Liability Act monitoring well complete with screen and dedicated pump. Geophysical and borehole video logs were collected after coring and final completion of the monitoring well. Geophysical logs were examined in conjunction with the borehole core to identify primary flow paths for groundwater, which are believed to occur in the intervals of fractured and vesicular basalt and to describe borehole lithology in detail. Geophysical data also were examined to look for evidence of perched water and the extent of the annular seal after cement grouting the casing in place. Borehole videos were collected to confirm that no perched water was present and to examine the borehole before and after setting the screen in well NRF-16. Two consecutive single-well aquifer tests to define hydraulic characteristics for well NRF-16 were conducted in the eastern SRP aquifer. Transmissivity and hydraulic conductivity averaged from the aquifer tests were 4.8 x 103 ft2/d and 9.9 ft/d, respectively. The transmissivity for well NRF-16 was within the range of values determined from past aquifer

  16. Safety Evaluation Report related to the renewal of the operating license for the training and research reactor at the University of Michigan (Docket No. 50-2)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This Safety Evaluation Report for the application filed by the University of Michigan (UM) for renewal of the Ford Nuclear Reactor (FNR) operating license number R-28 to continue to operate its research reactor has been prepared by the Office of Nuclear Reactor Regulation of the US Nuclear Regulatory Commission. The facility is located on the North Campus of the University of Michigan in Ann Arbor, Michigan. The staff concludes that the reactor can continue to be operated by the University of Michigan without endangering the health and safety of the public

  17. Annual report 1991 of Munich University and Technical University Accelerator Laboratory

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The experimental work in the Accelerator Laboratory contains investigations of nuclear reactions and nuclear structure, studies of atom physics and the application of nuclear physics methods in physics and in interdisciplinary research. These applications are acceleration mass spectrometry to detect traces of radio-isotopes and material analysis with particle beams. The development of apparatus in the fields of accelereator construction, ion sources and targets are at the heart of the laboratory and help to establish its reputation. They are of the greatest importance for the education of students. The development stage for the superconducting post-accelerator TRITRON is complete and prototypes of the magnets and resonators were successfully tested and operated. The mass-production of all the components is under way or already finished. The standard injector for the tandem axxelerator and an injector for accelerator mass spectroscopy with stable isotopes are being newly designed. The experimental work is supplemented by the calculations of our theoretical collagues of core reaction mechanisms, core de-excitation and the Cerenkov radiation of core structures and transition strengths, by relativistic Hartree-Fock calculations and by star model calculations. (orig.)

  18. 2015 Annual Reuse Report for the Idaho National Laboratory Site’s Advanced Test Reactor Complex Cold Waste Ponds

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lewis, Michael George [Idaho National Lab. (INL), Idaho Falls, ID (United States)

    2016-02-01

    This report describes conditions and information, as required by the state of Idaho, Department of Environmental Quality Reuse Permit I-161-02, for the Advanced Test Reactor Complex Cold Waste Ponds located at Idaho National Laboratory from November 1, 2014–October 31, 2015. The effective date of Reuse Permit I-161-02 is November 20, 2014 with an expiration date of November 19, 2019.

  19. Monitoring Uranium Transformations Determined by the Evolution of Biogeochemical Processes: Design of Mixed Batch Reactor and Column Studies at Oak Ridge National Laboratory

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Criddle, Craig S.; Wu, Weimin

    2013-04-17

    With funds provided by the US DOE, Argonne National Laboratory subcontracted the design of batch and column studies to a Stanford University team with field experience at the ORNL IFRC, Oak Ridge, TN. The contribution of the Stanford group ended in 2011 due to budget reduction in ANL. Over the funded research period, the Stanford research team characterized ORNL IFRC groundwater and sediments and set up microcosm reactors and columns at ANL to ensure that experiments were relevant to field conditions at Oak Ridge. The results of microcosm testing demonstrated that U(VI) in sediments was reduced to U(IV) with the addition of ethanol. The reduced products were not uraninite but were instead U(IV) complexes associated with Fe. Fe(III) in solid phase was only partially reduced. The Stanford team communicated with the ANL team members through email and conference calls and face to face at the annual ERSP PI meeting and national meetings.

  20. The Contribution to International Safeguards and Security by a Small University Research Reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Due to the proximity of the Atominstitut der Osterreichischen Universitaeten to the IAEA, many research projects have been carried out and completed successfully during the past years, especially in the field of nuclear safeguards and security, some of them have just started recently. In the paper, a survey on selected cooperation projects is given to show how a small university institute can contribute significantly to international safeguards and security research. Small university laboratories have the advantage of low cost but highly qualified personnel who can concentrate on investigation and test series which would largely exceed the possibilities of international organizations and are, therefore, a typical example of successful outsourcing for the benefit of both partners. (author)

  1. Identification of a leaking TRIGA fuel element at the nuclear reactor facility of the University of Pavia

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    During a periodical activity of characterization of the ionic-exchange resins of the demineralizer of the primary cooling circuit of the TRIGA Mark-2 reactor of the University of Pavia a small but detectable amount of Cs137 contamination was measured. Since the reactor has been running for several hundreds of hours at full power without showing any anomaly in the radiometric and thermo-hydraulic parameters, the reactor was brought to the nominal power of 250 kW for one hour and a sample of water was collected from the reactor tank and analysed in a low-background gamma ray detector. As a result a small amount of fission products were detected in the reactor pool water (a few Bq/g) suggesting the existence of a possible clad defect in one or more fuel elements. Since no halogens such as iodine and bromine were detected in the sampled water, the more likely hypothesis, also supported by literature, seemed to be a micro-fissure in the neck of an instrumented fuel element. A dedicated apparatus for reactor pool water sampling and on-line spectroscopy measurements was realized. As expected, the fission product leakage was due to a micro-fissure of a fuel element that released noble gas only when the fuel element was heated up to a temperature around 90 Celsius degrees. The leaking fuel element was identified and removed from its position and the reactor was back in regular operation after 2 months from leakage detection. (authors)

  2. The relationship between alcohol consumption and related harm among young university students.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hart, Ellen; Burns, Sharyn

    2016-04-01

    Issue addressed Research has shown that Australian university students consume alcohol at a higher level than their peers from the general population and are therefore more likely to witness and experience alcohol-related harm. This study measured the prevalence of alcohol consumption among 18-24-year-old university students and the association between alcohol consumption and witnessed and experienced harms. Methods A random cross-sectional sample of university students aged 18-24 years (n=2466) was recruited via the University Survey Office and through random intercept at campus market day. All participants completed an online survey that included the Alcohol Use Disorders Identification Test, Alcohol Problems Scale and an additional scale measuring witnessed harm. Results Principal Components Analysis revealed three factors within the Alcohol Problems Scale; i.e. Criminal and Aggressive Behaviour, Health and Emotional Harms and Sexual Harms. Students who consume alcohol at high-risk levels were significantly more likely to score highly on each factor, 1.6 times more likely to experience harm and 1.1 times more likely to witness harm than students who consume alcohol at low-risk levels. Conclusions The positive association between alcohol consumption and alcohol-related harm supports previous findings. This study adds previous research through the categorisation of harm into factors. So what? Integrated and comprehensive interventions addressing alcohol consumption among young university students that are informed by evidence-based research can be tailored to ensure that they meet the needs of the target group. PMID:26827614

  3. TEMPERATURE MONITORING OPTIONS AVAILABLE AT THE IDAHO NATIONAL LABORATORY ADVANCED TEST REACTOR

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    J.E. Daw; J.L. Rempe; D.L. Knudson; T. Unruh; B.M. Chase; K.L Davis

    2012-03-01

    As part of the Advanced Test Reactor National Scientific User Facility (ATR NSUF) program, the Idaho National Laboratory (INL) has developed in-house capabilities to fabricate, test, and qualify new and enhanced sensors for irradiation testing. To meet recent customer requests, an array of temperature monitoring options is now available to ATR users. The method selected is determined by test requirements and budget. Melt wires are the simplest and least expensive option for monitoring temperature. INL has recently verified the melting temperature of a collection of materials with melt temperatures ranging from 100 to 1000 C with a differential scanning calorimeter installed at INL’s High Temperature Test Laboratory (HTTL). INL encapsulates these melt wires in quartz or metal tubes. In the case of quartz tubes, multiple wires can be encapsulated in a single 1.6 mm diameter tube. The second option available to ATR users is a silicon carbide temperature monitor. The benefit of this option is that a single small monitor (typically 1 mm x 1 mm x 10 mm or 1 mm diameter x 10 mm length) can be used to detect peak irradiation temperatures ranging from 200 to 800 C. Equipment has been installed at INL’s HTTL to complete post-irradiation resistivity measurements on SiC monitors, a technique that has been found to yield the most accurate temperatures from these monitors. For instrumented tests, thermocouples may be used. In addition to Type-K and Type-N thermocouples, a High Temperature Irradiation Resistant ThermoCouple (HTIR-TC) was developed at the HTTL that contains commercially-available doped molybdenum paired with a niobium alloy thermoelements. Long duration high temperature tests, in furnaces and in the ATR and other MTRs, demonstrate that the HTIR-TC is accurate up to 1800 C and insensitive to thermal neutron interactions. Thus, degradation observed at temperatures above 1100 C with Type K and N thermocouples and decalibration due to transmutation with tungsten

  4. Building an optomechatronics group in a young university in Western Romania

    Science.gov (United States)

    Duma, Virgil-Florin; Hutiu, Gheorghe; Cira, Octavian; Demian, Dorin; Mnerie, Corina; Kaposta, Iosif

    2014-07-01

    We present our experience regarding the establishing of an interdisciplinary group with Optics as one of its main topic at the Aurel Vlaicu University of Arad (UAVA) - linked with the improvement through research of our educational activities. The 3OM Group (in Opto-Mechatronics, Optical Metrology, and Optics and Mechanics) is described in its evolution from optomechanics to photonics, the latter with a focus on OCT (Optical Coherence Tomography) - with the national and the international collaborations established, with universities from Romania, Europe and USA. While the research directions of the 3OM Group are presented, they are linked with the educational components implemented in the various subjects we teach, for both undergraduate and graduate students, both in Mechanical and in Electrical Engineering. The main effort is to integrate education and research, to move teaching beyond the classical aspects to put the stress on hands-on-experiments, as well as on research-based activities - even with undergraduates. The main goals of this approach are to obtain an early orientation towards innovation and discovery, with a taste for novelties and with a clear focus on international standards. While this account is only one of many, it offers our experience in passing through the difficulties of developing both research and education in Optics in a young university in an emergent economy in Eastern Europe.

  5. Intrinsic religiousness and spirituality as predictors of mental health and positive psychological functioning in Latter-Day Saint adolescents and young adults.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sanders, Peter W; Allen, G E Kawika; Fischer, Lane; Richards, P Scott; Morgan, David T; Potts, Richard W

    2015-06-01

    We investigated the relationships between religiousness and spirituality and various indicators of mental health and positive psychosocial functioning in three separate samples of college students. A total of 898 students at Brigham Young University participated in the three studies. The students ranged in age from 17 to 26 years old, with the average age of 20.9 across all three samples. Our results indicate that intrinsic religiousness, spiritual maturity, and self-transcendence were significantly predictive of better mental health and positive functioning, including lower levels of depression, anxiety, and obsessive-compulsiveness, and higher levels of global self-esteem, identity integration, moral self-approval, and meaning in life. Intrinsic religiousness was not predictive of shame, perfectionism, and eating disorder symptoms. These findings are consistent with many prior studies that have found religiousness and spirituality to be positively associated with better mental health and positive psychosocial functioning in adolescents and young adults. PMID:25854319

  6. Evaluation of Solid Waste Management in the Chemistry Laboratories of Tehran Universities

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A.R Akbarzadeh Baghban

    2011-10-01

    Full Text Available Background and Objectives: Particular importance of hazardous wastes is due to having characteristics such as toxicity, flammability, corrosively and reactivity. Some of the chemical wastes due to having hazardous materials must be collected and managed in a proper manner, since they are potentially harmful to the environment. Owing to the fact that educational centers have important roles in developing countries, so the main objective of the present study was to investigate, hazardous waste management in chemistry laboratories of Ministry of Science universities, in Tehran, Iran.Materials and Methods: Study area of this research includes all chemistry laboratories in Tehran universities which were covered by Ministry of Science. To obtain the number of samples, based on Scientific Principles and identification formula, 64 samples were calculated. In addition, sampling was done by Stratified sampling. Validated checklists were used for data gathering. Data analysis were done by Descriptive statistics (mean, frequency and etc. and inferential statistics (kruskal- wallis test.Results: results obtained in this study indicate that Sharif University by obtaining the mean score of 60.5 and Tehran University by obtaining the mean score of 4.5-6 are placed in best and worst rank, respectively. Beheshty, Alzahra and Tarbiat Moallem univesities by acquiring the mean score of 20-28.5 have a same position in ranking table.  Conclusion: Results show that most of the studied laboratories do not have any collection program and only 26.5 percent of them have acceptable programs.The separation and storing program observed in about 12.5 percent . Hazardous wastes management in chemistry laboratory of Tehran Universities was not in good status. And from the standpoint of management, only 12.5 percent of studied cases are in good status, while 75 percent was in undesirable status.

  7. Measurement of fine particulate matter nonvolatile and semi-volatile organic material with the Sunset Laboratory Carbon Aerosol Monitor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grover, Brett D; Kleinman, Michael; Eatough, Norman L; Eatough, Delbert J; Cary, Robert A; Hopke, Philip K; Wilson, William E

    2008-01-01

    Semi-volatile organic material (SVOM) in fine particles is not reliably measured with conventional semicontinuous carbon monitors because SVOM is lost from the collection media during sample collection. We have modified a Sunset Laboratory Carbon Aerosol Monitor to allow for the determination of SVOM. In a conventional Sunset monitor, gas-phase organic compounds are removed in the sampled airstream by a diffusion denuder employing charcoal-impregnated cellulose filter (CIF) surfaces. Subsequently, particles are collected on a quartz filter and the instrument then determines both the organic carbon and elemental carbon fractions of the aerosol using a thermal/optical method. However, some of the SVOM is lost from the filter during collection, and therefore is not determined. Because the interfering gas-phase organic compounds are removed before aerosol collection, the SVOM can be determined by filtering the particles at the instrument inlet and then replacing the quartz filter in the monitor with a charcoal-impregnated glass fiber filter (CIG), which retains the SVOM lost from particles collected on the inlet filter. The resulting collected SVOM is then determined in the analysis step by measurement of the carbonaceous material thermally evolved from the CIG filter. This concept was tested during field studies in February 2003 in Lindon, UT, and in July 2003 in Rubidoux, CA. The results obtained were validated by comparison with Particle Concentrator-Brigham Young University Organic Sampling System (PC-BOSS) results. The sum of nonvolatile organic material determined with a conventional Sunset monitor and SVOM determined with the modified Sunset monitor agree with the PC-BOSS results. Linear regression analysis of total carbon concentrations determined by the PC-BOSS and the Sunset resulted in a zero-intercept slope of 0.99 +/- 0.02 (R2 = 0.92) and a precision of sigma = +/- 1.5 microg C/m3 (8%).

  8. Safety Evaluation Report related to the construction permit and operating license for the research reactor at the University of Texas (Docket No. 50-602)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This Safety Evaluation Report for the application filed by the University of Texas for a construction permit and operating license to construct and operate a TRIGA research reactor has been prepared by the Office of Nuclear Reactor Regulation of the US Nuclear Regulatory Commission. The facility is owned and operated by the University of Texas and is located at the university's Balcones Research Center, about 7 miles (11.6 km) north of the main campus in Austin, Texas. The staff concludes that the TRIGA reactor facility can be constructed and operated by the University of Texas without endangering the health and safety of the public

  9. Preliminary study: Formaldehyde exposure in laboratories of Sharjah university in UAE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hafiz Omer Ahmed

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Objectives : Laboratory technicians, students, and instructors are at high risk, because they deal with chemicals including formaldehyde. Thus, this preliminary study was conducted to measure the concentration of formaldehyde in the laboratories of the University of Sharjah in UAE. Materials and Methods: Thirty-two air samples were collected and analyzed for formaldehyde using National Institute for Occupational Safety and Health (NIOSH method 3500. In this method, formaldehyde reacts with chromotropic acid in the presence of sulfuric acid to form a colored solution. The absorbance of the colored solution is read in spectrophotometer at wavelength 580 nm and is proportional to the quantity of the formaldehyde in the solution. Results: For the anatomy laboratory and in the presence of the covered cadaver, the mean concentration of formaldehyde was found to be 0.100 ppm with a range of 0.095-0.105 ppm. Whereas for the other laboratories, the highest mean concentration of formaldehyde was 0.024 ppm in the general microbiology laboratory and the lowest mean concentration of formaldehyde was 0.001 ppm in the environmental health laboratory. The 8-hour (time-weighted average concentration of formaldehyde was found to be ranging between 0.0003 ppm in environmental health laboratory and 0.026 ppm in the anatomy laboratory. Conclusions: The highest level of concentration of formaldehyde in the presence of the covered cadaver in anatomy laboratory exceeded the recommended ceiling standard established by USA-NIOSH which is 0.1 ppm, but below the ceiling standard established by American Conference of Governmental Industrial Hygienists which is 0.3 ppm. Thus, it is recommended that formaldehyde levels should be measured periodically specially during the dissection in the anatomy laboratory, and local exhaust ventilation system should be installed and personal protective equipment such as safety glass and gloves should be available and be used to prevent

  10. Utilisation of research and training reactors in the study programme of students at the Slovak University of Technology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Preparing operating staff for the nuclear industry is and also will be one of the most serious education processes, mainly in the Central-European countries where about 40-50% of the electricity is produced in nuclear power plants. In the Central-European region there exists a very extensive and also effective international collaboration in nuclear industry and education. Similarly, the level of education in universities and technical high schools of this area is also good. Slovak University of Technology Bratislava has established contacts with many universities abroad for utilisation of research and training reactors. (author)

  11. Development and evaluation of a university campus-based food safety media campaign for young adults.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abbot, Jaclyn Maurer; Policastro, Peggy; Bruhn, Christine; Schaffner, Donald W; Byrd-Bredbenner, Carol

    2012-06-01

    Food safety information campaigns are more likely to be most effective if the messages are tailored to the needs of a specific audience. Designing effective campaigns involves careful study of the target population and working with them using a community-based participatory research model. Thus, the development of the campaign materials for a university campus-based food safety media campaign for young adults followed intense efforts of working with the target audience to gather the baseline data needed to characterize this audience, to identify the most salient messages for college students, and to create materials and events that would resonate with them. This campaign was implemented and evaluated on eight university campuses in the United States. The results indicate that the campaign significantly increased self-ratings of food safety knowledge and skill, actual food safety knowledge, food safety self-efficacy, stage of change for safe food handling, and reported hand washing behaviors of a geographically and racially diverse group of college students. The positive study outcomes support the value of engaging in these research and development efforts and reflect the usefulness of the audience-specific materials and activities developed for the campaign. The findings also demonstrate the versatility and utility of the materials on different campuses. Developing health media campaigns specifically for unique populations is key to ensuring health messages reach the target audience and, even more importantly, appeal to them. The detailed overview of the development of a food safety media campaign aimed at young adults presented in this article illustrates how health professionals can work with their target population to develop a focused, effective health promotion campaign.

  12. PERSONIFICATION OF WAY OF LIFE TYPES OF YOUNG MEN AND WOMEN – GRADUATES OF THE UNIVERSITY

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Svetlana Tigranovna Dzhaneryan

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available The article presents the results of a study aimed at research of the characteristics of personification as the substantive characteristic of each type of the way of life ideals (matrimonial, bohemian, health, career, community, social, social-protection, gnostic of young men and women – graduates of the university.Research methods: survey (questionnaire for study the way of life ideal, a content analysis of the open questions of the questionnaire, expert evaluation categories, methods of nonparametric statistics.Results. The article presents ideas about the way of life ideals, discloses its components and characteristics. In the article designated types of way of life ideals: matrimonial, bohemian, health, career, community, social-protection, gnostic. Established the features of personification of each type of boys and girl’s ideals (who are graduates of the university. The results show that all kinds of way of life ideals are personified; that there are attractive to young people personality traits of real people (or groups whose way of life influences on the construction of their own ideals of life. It is shown that the differentiation of male and female personification of ideals occurs on different parameters: for the ideals of «matrimonial life» and «career life» appears only in the parameter singularity / community; for the ideal of «social life» – in the parameters singularity / community, the psychological portrait, similarities; for the ideal of «health life» – in the parameters singularity / community, the psychological portrait, a means of implementing, similarities.Application of the results: psychological services in high schools and personnel services in different companies.

  13. Effects of Adolescent Universal Substance Misuse Preventive Interventions on Young Adult Depression Symptoms: Mediational Modeling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Trudeau, Linda; Spoth, Richard; Mason, W Alex; Randall, G Kevin; Redmond, Cleve; Schainker, Lisa

    2016-02-01

    Depression symptoms are associated with impairments in functioning and have substantial health and economic consequences. Universal substance misuse prevention programs have shown effects on non-targeted mental health-related symptoms, but long-term effects are understudied. This cluster randomized controlled trial examined effects of both the LifeSkills Training (LST) and Strengthening Families Program: For Parents and Youth 10-14 (SFP 10-14) interventions, delivered during seventh grade, on age 22 young adult depression symptoms. The study was conducted in US rural Midwestern communities with a randomly-selected sample from a larger study (N = 670). Experimental conditions were LST+SFP 10-14, LST-only, and a control condition. Effects on age 22 depression symptoms were hypothesized as mediated through effects on age 21 relationship problems and illicit use of substances. Structural equation modeling with manifest and latent variables was conducted to test hypotheses; the intervention conditions were combined and compared with the control condition because analyses indicated a comparable pattern of effects between intervention conditions. Significant indirect intervention effects were found on age 22 depression symptoms via effects on the mediating variables (indirect effect: β = -0.06, 95 % CI [-0.10, -0.01], p = 0.011). Effect sizes for the young adult variables were between d = 0.17 and 0.29, which can be considered small, but nontrivial, especially in the context of public health benefits. Results support scaled-up implementation of school-based and family-focused universal substance misuse preventive interventions. PMID:25795013

  14. License renewal and power upgrade of the Cornell University TRIGA reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The Cornell Mark II TRIGA reactor has been a principal facility for instruction and research in nuclear science and engineering at Cornell, and it has been extensively used by other departments at Cornell and by nearby universities and industries. Initially the fuel was low hydride, 8.5w/o 19%-enriched, aluminum clad; in 1974 it was changed to high-hydride, stainless-steel-clad. The maximum power has been 100 kW, with pulses to $2, and operation has been on a one-shift demand basis. Annual energy generation of 50 MWH has been typical. Standard features include a 4-inch tangential port and our 6-inch radial ports, a thermal column with hohlraum and vertical access, a central thimble, a 'rabbit', and a set of dry irradiation tubes, replacing the 'Lazy Susan'. The license was renewed and amended in November 1983; the new limits are 500 kW and $3 pulses. Physical changes to the facility included addition of a water-to-water heat exchanger and of a diffuser at the water outlet ∼ 60 cm above the core. The flow rate is 300 liters per minute in the primary (reactor) side of the heat exchanger. The temperature of the chilled water entering the secondary of the exchanger is ∼ 12?C; its flow rate is adjusted by a servo-controlled by-pass valve to maintain the desired range of pool water temperature. Steps taken to go to higher power included rearrangement of fuel elements to increase excess reactivity, recalibration of control rods, and power vs ion chamber current calibrations at successively higher power by comparing the rate of rise of pool temperature with a known rate using electrical heating elements. Steady-state operation has been done up to 480 kW (nominal) but pulsing at the newly allowed higher levels has not been tested as yet

  15. Aspects of Reactor Physics Research at the Victoria University of Manchester

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The Nuclear Engineering Department at Manchester University was established in 1959. Since that time post-graduate reactor physics studies have gradually enlarged and developed, starting virtually from scratch; experimental studies have concentrated on light-water systems and centred on the accelerator-driven, natural-uranium, light-water exponential. The paper contains a survey of the work to date, discussion of the results obtained, outlines of proposed future work, and, as they arise in the text, descriptions of various low-cost, labour-saving experimental techniques which have been adopted. The various divisions of the work are described below. The authors have studied neutron diffusion in light water using both pulsed source and steady source methods. In the former method they have particularly stressed full harmonic analysis to the extent of actually studying the higher modes as opposed to most former work which has tried only to eliminate them. In the study of steady source methods they have concentrated on eliminating all effects from finite source and detector size, resonance activation, flux perturbation and so on. The results of both are discussed and compared. A very careful measurement of absorption cross-sections by the pulsed technique, taking care to eliminate harmonic and other effects likely to lead to error is also in progress and is described. Thermal neutron spectra in ''poisoned'' light water are being measured as a means of investigating and developing integral detector techniques. This discussion includes some interesting time- and cost-saving examples. Large foil activation and counting techniques for measuring spatially averaged neutron densities, and hence a number of reactor parameters, have been studied. Some interesting points have arisen, particularly with regard to spectrum measurement. The method makes possible many reactor physics investigations with limited resources. A low-cost natural uranium, light-water exponential has been

  16. Handbook of materials testing reactors and ancillary hot laboratories in the European Community

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The purpose of this Handbook is to make available to those interested in 'in-pile' irradiation experiments important data on Materials Testing Reactors in operation in the European Community. Only thermal reactors having a power output of more than 5 MW(th) are taken into consideration. In particular, detailed technical information is given on the experimental irradiation facilities of the reactors, their specialized irradiation devices (loops and instrumented capsules), and the associated hot cell facilities for post-irradiation examination of samples

  17. Plan for fully decontaminating and decommissioning of the Westinghouse Advanced Reactors Division Fuel Laboratories at Cheswick, Revision 3

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1982-01-01

    The project scope of work included the complete decontamination and decommissioning (D and D) of the Westinghouse ARD Fuel Laboratories at the Cheswick Site in the shortest possible time. This has been accomplished in the following four phases: (1) preparation of documents and necessary paperwork; packaging and shipping of all special nuclear materials in an acceptable form to a reprocessing agency; (2) decontamination of all facilities, glove boxes and equipment; loading of generated waste into bins, barrels and strong wooden boxes; (3) shipping of all bins, barrels and boxes containing waste to the designated burial site; removal of all utility services from the laboratories; (4) final survey of remaining facilities and certification for nonrestricted use; preparation of final report. This volume contains the following 3 attachments: (1) Plan for Fully Decontamination and Decommissioning of the Westinghouse Advanced Reactors Division Fuel Laboratories at Cheswick; (2) Environmental Assessment for Decontamination and Decommissioning the Westinghouse Advanced Reactors Division Plutonium Fuel Laboratories, Cheswick, PA; and (3) WARD-386, Quality Assurance Program Description for Decontamination and Decommissioning Activities.

  18. Home-made refurbishment of the instrumentation and control system of the TRIGA reactor of the University of Pavia

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The Instrumentation and Control (I and C) System of the TRIGA reactor of the University of Pavia was dated and, in order to grant a safe and continuous reactor operation for the future, it became necessary to substitute or to upgrade the system. Since the substitution of the I and C system with a new-made one was very difficult to be performed due to long authorization procedures, an home-made refurbishment was planned. Using commercial components of high quality, almost a complete substitution, channel-by-channel, of the I and C system was realized without changing the operating and safety logics. The system includes: - the Reactor Linear Power Channel and Chart Recorder; - the Reactor Percent Power Safety Channel; - the High Voltage and Low Voltage Power Supply; - the Automatic Reactor Power Control; - the Fuel Elements and Cooling-Water Temperatures Measuring Channels; - the Water Conductivity Measuring Channel. The refurbished I and C system shows a very good operational behavior and reliability and will assure a continuous operation of the reactor for the future

  19. ATTITUDES OF MEDICAL LABORATORY TECHNOLOGY GRADUATES TOWARDS THE INTERNSHIP TRAINING PERIOD AT KING FAISAL UNIVERSITY

    OpenAIRE

    Bashawri, Layla A.M.; Ahmed, Mirghani A.; Bahnassy, Ahmed A.L.; Al-Salim, Jawaher A.

    2006-01-01

    Objectives: The objective of this present survey was to look into the attitudes of medical laboratory technology (MLT) graduates towards the internship training period of the MLT Department, College of Applied Medical Sciences, King Faisal University. Material and Methods: A self-administered questionnaire was designed and distributed for this purpose. The study period was from December 1st 2002 – 31st December 2004. Two-hundred questionnaires were distributed to recent graduates, and 115 wer...

  20. TRIGA research reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    TRIGA (Training, Research, Isotope production, General-Atomic) has become the most used research reactor in the world with 65 units operating in 24 countries. The original patent for TRIGA reactors was registered in 1958. The success of this reactor is due to its inherent level of safety that results from a prompt negative temperature coefficient. Most of the neutron moderation occurs in the nuclear fuel (UZrH) because of the presence of hydrogen atoms, so in case of an increase of fuel temperature, the neutron spectrum becomes harder and neutrons are less likely to fission uranium nuclei and as a consequence the power released decreases. This inherent level of safety has made this reactor fit for training tool in university laboratories. Some recent versions of TRIGA reactors have been designed for medicine and industrial isotope production, for neutron therapy of cancers and for providing a neutron source. (A.C.)

  1. Laboratory instruction for nuclear engineering application experiments

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This report contains several laboratory instruction texts for 'Nuclear Engineering Application Experiments', which has been offered to Graduate students of Graduate School of Engineering at Kyoto University from 1970's. These experiments have been carried out by using experimental facilities; a research reactor, a critical assembly, accelerators, and a hot laboratory at Kyoto University Research Institute. (author)

  2. The CT Scanner Facility at Stellenbosch University: An open access X-ray computed tomography laboratory

    Science.gov (United States)

    du Plessis, Anton; le Roux, Stephan Gerhard; Guelpa, Anina

    2016-10-01

    The Stellenbosch University CT Scanner Facility is an open access laboratory providing non-destructive X-ray computed tomography (CT) and a high performance image analysis services as part of the Central Analytical Facilities (CAF) of the university. Based in Stellenbosch, South Africa, this facility offers open access to the general user community, including local researchers, companies and also remote users (both local and international, via sample shipment and data transfer). The laboratory hosts two CT instruments, i.e. a micro-CT system, as well as a nano-CT system. A workstation-based Image Analysis Centre is equipped with numerous computers with data analysis software packages, which are to the disposal of the facility users, along with expert supervision, if required. All research disciplines are accommodated at the X-ray CT laboratory, provided that non-destructive analysis will be beneficial. During its first four years, the facility has accommodated more than 400 unique users (33 in 2012; 86 in 2013; 154 in 2014; 140 in 2015; 75 in first half of 2016), with diverse industrial and research applications using X-ray CT as means. This paper summarises the existence of the laboratory's first four years by way of selected examples, both from published and unpublished projects. In the process a detailed description of the capabilities and facilities available to users is presented.

  3. The study on the stability of the supporting ground on the construction site of High Flux Reactor building in Research Reactor Institute of Kyoto University

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This report provides the results of the study on the stability of the supporting gwound which has been carried out as a part of the seismic design of the High Flux Reactor building which is planned to be constructed by Kyoto University, Research Reactor Institute. In this work the finite element method is used. The stresses and displacements of the ground are calculated under the following conditions; (1) Stress-strain relationships for the individual elements are linear. (2) The problem is analyzed on two-dimensional plane strain distributions. (3) No-tension analysis is applied to the calculation for earthquake load. (4) The mechanical properties of the ground are obtained from the soil survey which has been performed at the construction site of High Flux Reactor building. The results are summarized as follows; (1) The settlement of the building is estimated to be about 2 -- 5 cm for long-time loading, including the result from elastic theory, while the relative settlement is about 0.3 cm at both ends of the building. (2) Safety factor is larger than 1.4 for long-time loading. (3) Maximum angle of the deformation of the building due to the earthquake load is estimated to be about 9.2 x 10-3 degree (1.6 x 10-4 rad). (4) Safety factor is larger than 1.2 -- 1.3 for earthquake load. Judging from these results described above, the ground at the construction site of the High Flux Reactor is appropriate for the supporting ground of the reactor building, and the mat foundation can be adopted for the foundation form. (author)

  4. TECHNICAL UNIVERSITY AS A MULTILEVEL EDUCATIONAL COMPLEX: FROM THE EXPERIENCE OF EDUCATION OF YOUNG STUDENTS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. V. Sergeeva

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available The purpose of the article is summarizing the experience and determination of the main vectors of educational work organization and implementation in a technical university as a multi-level educational complex (MEC.Methods. Theoretical methods such as the analysis of scientific literature, the synthesis of the main concepts and approaches to the problem under consideration, the generalization of experience are used.The results and scientific novelty. A long-term positive experience of educational system constructing in Penza State Technological University as a multi-level educational complex is presented. On its basis the main vectors of the educational work organization and implementation in a modern multi-level educational organization of a technical profile are determined: the formation of social competence of students, pedagogical support of their adaptation and professional selfdetermination, the student government development. The complex of the programs developed by the authors to educate young students in a technical university as a multi-level educational complex is characterized. Their realization involves a phased implementation of the initial diagnosis, constructive, transformative, evaluative and productive activities. The necessity of the organization and implementation of additional psychological and pedagogical training of teachers who do not have the basic pedagogical education as a condition for the effective implementation of the programs developed and put into educational practice in a multi-level educational organization of a technical profile is determined.Practical significance. The presented materials can be used in the educational practice of multi-level educational complexes of a technical profile as well as in other educational institutions of vocational education.

  5. Modified ADM1 for modelling an UASB reactor laboratory plant treating starch wastewater and synthetic substrate load tests.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hinken, L; Huber, M; Weichgrebe, D; Rosenwinkel, K-H

    2014-11-01

    A laboratory plant consisting of two UASB reactors was used for the treatment of industrial wastewater from the wheat starch industry. Several load tests were carried out with starch wastewater and the synthetic substrates glucose, acetate, cellulose, butyrate and propionate to observe the impact of changing loads on gas yield and effluent quality. The measurement data sets were used for calibration and validation of the Anaerobic Digestion Model No. 1 (ADM1). For a precise simulation of the detected glucose degradation during load tests with starch wastewater and glucose, it was necessary to incorporate the complete lactic acid fermentation into the ADM1, which contains the formation and degradation of lactate and a non-competitive inhibition function. The modelling results of both reactors based on the modified ADM1 confirm an accurate calculation of the produced gas and the effluent concentrations. Especially, the modelled lactate effluent concentrations for the load cases are similar to the measurements and justified by literature. PMID:25043796

  6. A Fully-reconstituted Safety Basis for the University of Florida Training Reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The University of Florida Training Reactor, (UFTR), is restructuring its licensing framework to help facilitate its upgrade to a digital controls system. The strategy focuses on creating an encompassing safety analysis to prove, unequivocally, that the UFTR represents a negligible risk to the health and safety of the public. This will allow a change in the Limiting Safety System Settings (LSSS) and for a reduction in the number of safety system and components (SSCs) that are defined as safety related by the Code of Federal Regulations. The safety analysis is predicated on two postulated events: a rapid insertion of a large amount of positive reactivity and the release of fission products caused by mechanical damage to a spent fuel plate. These have been selected as limiting scenarios, whose extremity bound all other accidents of consequence. The rapid insertion of positive reactivity was modeled using PARET/ANL software. Analysis shows that a reactivity insertion of $2.00 creates a maximum peak fuel temperature approximately 250 .deg. below the failure limit of 530C. The radioisotope inventory of the fission products is modeled using the ORIGEN-S module in SCALE6.1. The doses to the workers and members of the public are determined with COMPLY software and shows that the worstcase hypothetical exposures are approximately 6.5% of the annual regulatory limit

  7. Development and implementation of an automatic control algorithm for the University of Utah nuclear reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The emphasis of this work is the development and implementation of an automatic control philosophy which uses the classical operational philosophies as a foundation. Three control algorithms were derived based on various simplifying assumptions. Two of the algorithms were tested in computer simulations. After realizing the insensitivity of the system to the simplifications, the most reduced form of the algorithms was implemented on the computer control system at the University of Utah (UNEL). Since the operational philosophies have a higher priority than automatic control, they determine when automatic control may be utilized. Unlike the operational philosophies, automatic control is not concerned with component failures. The object of this philosophy is the movement of absorber rods to produce a requested power. When the current power level is compared to the requested power level, an error may be detected which will require the movement of a control rod to correct the error. The automatic control philosophy adds another dimension to the classical operational philosophies. Using this philosophy, normal operator interactions with the computer would be limited only to run parameters such as power, period, and run time. This eliminates subjective judgements, objective judgements under pressure, and distractions to the operator and insures the reactor will be operated in a safe and controlled manner as well as providing reproducible operations

  8. Assessment of released heavy metals from electrical and electronic equipment (EEE) existing in shipwrecks through laboratory-scale simulation reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Highlights: ► A laboratory-scale reactor was built to simulate the “Sea Diamond” shipwreck. ► EEE was thrown into the reactor for heavy metal release rate assessment. ► 15 seawater samples were taken and analyzed in a nine month experimental period. ► Zinc, mercury and copper were found in concentrations above the CMC criterion. ► Nickel and lead were found in concentrations higher than the CCC criterion. -- Abstract: In a passenger ship, the existence of EEE is obvious. In time, under shipwreck's conditions, all these materials will undergo an accelerated severe corrosion, due to salt water, releasing, consequently, heavy metals and other hazardous substances in the aquatic environment. In this study, a laboratory-scale reactor was manufactured in order to simulate the conditions under which the “Sea Diamond” shipwreck lies (14 bars of pressure and 16 °C of temperature) and remotely observe and assess any heavy metal release that would occur, from part of the EEE present in the ship, into the sea. Ten metals were examined and the results showed that zinc, mercury and copper were abundant in the water samples taken from the reactor and in significantly higher concentrations compared to the US EPA CMC (criterion maximum concentration) criterion. Moreover, nickel and lead were found in concentrations higher than the CCC (criterion constant concentration) criterion set by the US EPA for clean seawater. The rest of the elements were measured in concentrations within the permissible limits. It is therefore of environmental benefit to salvage the wreck and recycle all the WEEE found in it

  9. Policies and practices pertaining to the selection, qualification requirements, and training programs for nuclear-reactor operating personnel at the Oak Ridge National Laboratory

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This document describes the policies and practices of the Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) regarding the selection of and training requirements for reactor operating personnel at the Laboratory's nuclear-reactor facilities. The training programs, both for initial certification and for requalification, are described and provide the guidelines for ensuring that ORNL's research reactors are operated in a safe and reliable manner by qualified personnel. This document gives an overview of the reactor facilities and addresses the various qualifications, training, testing, and requalification requirements stipulated in DOE Order 5480.1A, Chapter VI (Safety of DOE-Owned Reactors); it is intended to be in compliance with this DOE Order, as applicable to ORNL facilities. Included also are examples of the documentation maintained amenable for audit

  10. Policies and practices pertaining to the selection, qualification requirements, and training programs for nuclear-reactor operating personnel at the Oak Ridge National Laboratory

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Culbert, W.H.

    1985-10-01

    This document describes the policies and practices of the Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) regarding the selection of and training requirements for reactor operating personnel at the Laboratory's nuclear-reactor facilities. The training programs, both for initial certification and for requalification, are described and provide the guidelines for ensuring that ORNL's research reactors are operated in a safe and reliable manner by qualified personnel. This document gives an overview of the reactor facilities and addresses the various qualifications, training, testing, and requalification requirements stipulated in DOE Order 5480.1A, Chapter VI (Safety of DOE-Owned Reactors); it is intended to be in compliance with this DOE Order, as applicable to ORNL facilities. Included also are examples of the documentation maintained amenable for audit.

  11. Safety Evaluation Report related to the renewal of the operating license for the TRIGA training and research reactor at the University of Arizona (Docket No. 50-113)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This Safety Evaluation Report for the application filed by the University of Arizona for the renewal of Operating License R-52 to continue operating its research reactor at an increased operating power level has been prepared by the Office of Nuclear Reactor Regulation of the US Nuclear Regulatory Commission. The facility is located on the University of Arizona campus in Tucson, Arizona. The staff concludes that the reactor can continue to be operated by the University of Arizona without endangering the health and safety of the public. 20 refs., 8 figs., 5 tabs

  12. Safety evaluation report related to the renewal of the operating license for the University of New Mexico Research Reactor (Docket No. 50-252)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This Safety Evaluation Report for the application filed by the University of New Mexico (UNM) for renewal of Operating License No. R-102 to continue to operate its research reactor has been prepared by the Office of Nuclear Reactor Regulation of the US Nuclear Regulatory Commission. The facility is located on the campus of the University of New Mexico in Albuquerque, New Mexico. The staff concludes that the reactor can continue to be operated by the University of New Mexico without endangering the health and safety of the public. 7 refs., 7 figs., 2 tabs

  13. Safety-evaluation report related to renewal of the operating license for the Texas A and M University Research Reactor. Docket No. 50-128, License R-83

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This Safety Evaluation Report for the application filed by the Texas A and M University (Texas A and M) for a renewal of operating license number R-83 to continue to operate a research reactor has been prepared by the Office of Nuclear Reactor Regulation of the US Nuclear Regulatory Commission. The facility is owned and operated by the Texas Engineering and Experiment Station of the Texas A and M University and is located on the campus in College Station, Brazos County, Texas. The staff concludes that the TRIGA reactor facility can continue to be operated by Texas A and M University without endangering the health and safety of the public

  14. Safety Evaluation Report related to the renewal of the operating license for the training and research reactor at the University of Lowell (Docket No. 50-223)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This Safety Evaluation Report for the application filed by the University of Lowell (UL) for renewal of operating license number R-125 to continue to operate its research reactor has been prepared by the Office of Nuclear Reactor Regulation of the US Nuclear Regulatory Commission. The facility is located on the North Campus of the University of Lowell in Lowell, Massachusetts. The staff concludes that the reactor can continue to be operated by the University of Lowell without endangering the health and safety of the public

  15. Safety Evaluation Report related to renewal of the operating license for the CAVALIER Training Reactor at the University of Virginia (Docket No. 50-396)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This Safety Evaluation Report for the application filed by the University of Virginia for a renewal of Operating License R-123 to continue to operate the CAVALIER (Cooperatively Assembled Virginia Low Intensity Educational Reactor) has been prepared by the Office of Nuclear Reactor Regulation of the US Nuclear Regulatory Commission. The facility is owned and operated by the University of Virginia and is located on the campus in Charlottesville, Virginia. Based on its technical review, the staff concludes that the reactor facility can continue to be operated by the university without endangering the health and safety of the public or the environment

  16. Safety evaluation report related to the renewal of the operating license for the University of Oklahoma Research Reactor (Docket No. 50-112)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This Safety Evaluation Report for the application filed by the University of Oklahoma for a renewal of Operating License R-53 to continue to operate a research reactor has been prepared by the Office of Nuclear Reactor Regulation of the US Nuclear Regulatory Commission. The facility is owned and operated by the University of Oklahoma and is located on the campus in Norman, Cleveland County, Oklahoma. The staff concludes that the Aerojet General Nucleonics (AGN) reactor facility can continue to be operated by University of Oklahoma without endangering the health and safety of the public

  17. Safety Evaluation Report related to the renewal of the operating license for the research reactor at Purdue University: Docket No. 50-182

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This Safety Evaluation Report for the application filed by Purdue University for a renewal of Operating License R-87 to continue to operate a research reactor has been prepared by the Office of Nuclear Reactor Regulation of the US Nuclear Regulatory Commission. The facility is owned by Purdue University and is located on the campus in West Lafayette, Indiana. On the basis of its technical review, the staff concludes that the reactor facility can continue to be operated by the university without endangering the health and safety of the public or the enviroment

  18. Safety Evaluation Report related to the renewal of the operating license for the research reactor at Michigan State University (Docket No. 50-294)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This Safety Evaluation Report for the application filed by the Michigan State University (MSU) for a renewal of operating license number R-114 to continue to operate the TRIGA Mark I research reactor has been prepared by the Office of Nuclear Reactor Regulation of the US Nuclear Regulatory Commission. The facility is owned and operated by the Michigan State University and is located on the campus of Michigan State University in East Lansing, Ingham County, Michigan. The staff concludes that the TRIGA reactor facility can continue to be operated by MSU without endangering the health and safety of the public

  19. Characterization of control rod worths and fuel rod power peaking factors in the university of Utah TRIGA Mark I reactor

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alroumi Fawaz

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Control rod reactivity (worths for the three control rods and fuel rod power peaking factors in the University of Utah research reactor (100 kW TRIGA Mark I are characterized using the AGENT code system and the results described in this paper. These values are compared to the MCNP6 and existing experimental measurements. In addition, the eigenvalue, neutron spatial flux distributions and reaction rates are analyzed and discussed. The AGENT code system is widely benchmarked for various reactor types and complexities in their geometric arrangements of the assemblies and reactor core material distributions. Thus, it is used as a base methodology to evaluate neutronics variables of the research reactor at the University of Utah. With its much shorter computation time than MCNP6, AGENT provides agreement with the MCNP6 within a 0.5 % difference for the eigenvalue and a maximum difference of 10% in the power peaking factor values. Differential and integral control rod worths obtained by AGENT show well agreement with MCNP6 and the theoretical model. However, regulating the control rod worth is somewhat overestimated by both MCNP6 and AGENT models when compared to the experimental/theoretical values. In comparison to MCNP6, the total control rod worths and shutdown margin obtained with AGENT show better agreement to the experimental values.

  20. Use of the TRIGA Reactor by the Radiochemistry Group of the Atominstitute of the Austrian Universities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The Radiochemistry Group of the Atominstitute of the Austrian Universities uses the TRIGA Mark II Reactor mainly for neutron activation analysis. Transport of samples to and from the irradiation positions in the reactor is performed by fast pneumatic transfer systems (transfer time 20 msec and 300 msec) and slow conventional transport facilities. Gamma-spectrometric instrumentation equipped with loss free counting systems is used to handle the high count rates up to 500 000 counts/sec. During the last years neutron activation analysis was applied to investigate environmental samples (soil, dust, incineration ash), geological samples (rocks, sediments, fossils, volcanic gases), biological materials (lichens, mushrooms and other plant materials, human diet, biological reference materials), raw materials (phosphate, coal) and archaeological materials (ancient glass). Lichen analysis was used for environmental monitoring. The content of some of the trace elements can be correlated with industrial activities, like manganese content with steel industry, the occurrence of vanadium and nickel with oil firing plants and stainless steel industry, selenium is found in lichen near coal firing plants. The amount of chlorine and sodium indicates the application of salt for road treatment during winter time, aluminum, scandium and hafnium content depends on the amount of dust in the environment. A further environmental application of neutron activation analysis is the determination of trace elements in volcanic gases. The halogens, arsenic, antimony, selenium, tellurium and mercury were determined and their daily output was calculated. The distribution of trace elements in fossils of known age gives us a geochemical key to condition and development of the paleo-environment. For this purpose we determined rare earth elements in 250 million years old microfossils (conodonts). Neutron activation analysis served also for some non scientific but nevertheless useful purposes: Organic

  1. Lessons Learned from Sandia National Laboratories' Operational Readiness Review of the Annular Core Research Reactor (ACRR)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The Sandia ACRR (a Hazard Category 2 Nuclear Reactor Facility) was defueled in June 1997 to modify the reactor core and control system to produce medical radioisotopes for the Department of Energy (DOE) Isotope Production Program. The DOE determined that an Operational Readiness Review (ORR) was required to confirm readiness to begin operations within the revised safety basis. This paper addresses the ORR Process, lessons learned from the Sandia and DOE ORRS of the ACRR, and the use of the ORR to confirm authorization basis implementation

  2. Sandia National Laboratories results for the 2010 criticality accident dosimetry exercise, at the CALIBAN reactor, CEA Valduc France.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ward, Dann C.

    2011-09-01

    This document describes the personal nuclear accident dosimeter (PNAD) used by Sandia National Laboratories (SNL) and presents PNAD dosimetry results obtained during the Nuclear Accident Dosimeter Intercomparison Study held 20-23 September, 2010, at CEA Valduc, France. SNL PNADs were exposed in two separate irradiations from the CALIBAN reactor. Biases for reported neutron doses ranged from -15% to +0.4% with an average bias of -7.7%. PNADs were also exposed on the back side of phantoms to assess orientation effects.

  3. Monitoring and Control Research Using a University Reactor and SBWR Test-Loop

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The existing hybrid simulation capability of the Penn State Breazeale nuclear reactor was expanded to conduct research for monitoring, operations and control. Hybrid simulation in this context refers to the use of the physical time response of the research reactor as an input signal to a real-time simulation of power-reactor thermal-hydraulics which in-turn provides a feedback signal to the reactor through positioning of an experimental changeable reactivity device. An ECRD is an aluminum tube containing an absorber material that is positioned in the central themble of the reactor kinetics were used to expand the hybrid reactor simulation (HRS) capability to include out-of-phase stability characteristics observed in operating BWRs

  4. Characterization of control rod worths and fuel rod power peaking factors in the university of Utah TRIGA Mark I reactor

    OpenAIRE

    Alroumi Fawaz; Kim Donghoon; Schow Ryan; Jevremovic Tatjana

    2016-01-01

    Control rod reactivity (worths) for the three control rods and fuel rod power peaking factors in the University of Utah research reactor (100 kW TRIGA Mark I) are characterized using the AGENT code system and the results described in this paper. These values are compared to the MCNP6 and existing experimental measurements. In addition, the eigenvalue, neutron spatial flux distributions and reaction rates are analyzed and discussed. The AGENT code system is ...

  5. Argon-41 production and evolution at the Oregon State University TRIGA Reactor (OSTR)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In this study, argon-41 concentrations were measured at various locations within the reactor facility to assess the accuracy of models used to predict argon-41 evolution from the reactor tank, and to determine the relationship between argon gas evolution from the tank and subsequent argon-41 concentrations throughout the reactor room. In particular, argon-41 was measured directly above the reactor tank with the reactor tank lids closed, at other accessible locations on the reactor top with the tank lids both closed and open, and at several locations on the first floor of the reactor room. These measured concentrations were then compared to values calculated using a modified argon-41 production and evolution model for TRIGA reactor tanks and ventilation values applicable to the OSTR facility. The modified model was based in part on earlier TRIGA models for argon-41 production and release, but added features which improved the agreement between predicted and measured values. The approximate dose equivalent rate due to the presence of argon-41 in reactor room air was calculated for several different locations inside the OSTR facility. These dose rates were determined using the argon-41 concentration measured at each specific location, and were subsequently converted to a predicted quarterly dose equivalent for each location based on the reactor's operating history. The predicted quarterly dose equivalent values were then compared to quarterly doses measured by film badges deployed as dose-integrating area radiation monitors at the locations of interest. The results indicate that the modified production and evolution model is able to predict argon-41 concentrations to within a factor of ten when compared to the measured data. Quarterly dose equivalents calculated from the measured argon-41 concentrations and the reactor's operating history seemed consistent with results obtained from the integrating area radiation monitors. Given the argon-41 concentrations measured

  6. [Laqueur and Organon. The university laboratory and the pharmaceutical industry in the Netherlands].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oudshoorn, N

    1999-01-01

    Since the 1970s cooperation between universities and pharmaceutical firms is business as usual. This has not always been the case. The first alliances between academic scientists and the pharmaceutical industry can be traced back to the 1920s. Compared to the U.S. and most other European countries, the creation of networks between the Dutch academy and industry shows a rather peculiar pattern that is illustrative in clarifying how the relationships between scientists and the pharmaceutical companies were built. Dutch scientists could not ally themselves with the pharmaceutical industry, simply because no Dutch pharmaceutical company specialized in organpreparations existed prior to the 1920s. This situation forced scientists to opt for the strongest form of alliance they could create, namely to take part in the founding of a pharmaceutical company. Ernst Laqueur, a professor in pharmacology at the University of Amsterdam, was one of the three founders of Organon, the Dutch pharmaceutical firm that was founded in 1923. Based on an analysis of the early history of sex endocrinology, this paper examines the creation of networks between Laqueur and Organon. The paper concludes that the university laboratory played a crucial role in the development of Organon. Organon was dependent on Laqueurs laboratory for the provision of the required biological essay techniques in order to manufacture standardized hormone products, Moreover, Laqueur mediated all the contacts between Organon and the clinic, required for the clinical testing of hormones and the provision of raw materials for the making of hormones into chemicals and drugs.

  7. United States Domestic Research Reactor Infrastructure TRIGA Reactor Fuel Support

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The United State Domestic Research Reactor Infrastructure Program at the Idaho National Laboratory manages and provides project management, technical, quality engineering, quality inspection and nuclear material support for the United States Department of Energy sponsored University Reactor Fuels Program. This program provides fresh, unirradiated nuclear fuel to Domestic University Research Reactor Facilities and is responsible for the return of the DOE-owned, irradiated nuclear fuel over the life of the program. This presentation will introduce the program management team, the universities supported by the program, the status of the program and focus on the return process of irradiated nuclear fuel for long term storage at DOE managed receipt facilities. It will include lessons learned from research reactor facilities that have successfully shipped spent fuel elements to DOE receipt facilities.

  8. Experimental and MCNP5 based evaluation of neutron and gamma flux in the irradiation ports of the University of Utah research reactor

    OpenAIRE

    Noble Brooklyn; Choe Dong-Ok; Jevremovic Tatjana

    2012-01-01

    Neutron and gamma flux environment of various irradiation ports in the University of Utah training, research, isotope production, general atomics reactor were experimentally assessed and fully modeled using the MCNP5 code. The experimental measurements were based on the cadmium ratio in the irradiation ports of the reactor, flux profiling using nickel wire, and gamma dose measurements using thermo luminescence dosimeter. Full 3-D MCNP5 reactor model was developed to obtain the neutron f...

  9. Pyrolysis of aseptic packages (tetrapak) in a laboratory screw type reactor and secondary thermal/catalytic tar decomposition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haydary, J; Susa, D; Dudáš, J

    2013-05-01

    Pyrolysis of aseptic packages (tetrapak cartons) in a laboratory apparatus using a flow screw type reactor and a secondary catalytic reactor for tar cracking was studied. The pyrolysis experiments were realized at temperatures ranging from 650 °C to 850 °C aimed at maximizing of the amount of the gas product and reducing its tar content. Distribution of tetrapak into the product yields at different conditions was obtained. The presence of H2, CO, CH4, CO2 and light hydrocarbons, HCx, in the gas product was observed. The Aluminum foil was easily separated from the solid product. The rest part of char was characterized by proximate and elemental analysis and calorimetric measurements. The total organic carbon in the tar product was estimated by elemental analysis of tars. Two types of catalysts (dolomite and red clay marked AFRC) were used for catalytic thermal tar decomposition. Three series of experiments (without catalyst in a secondary cracking reactor, with dolomite and with AFRC) at temperatures of 650, 700, 750, 800 and 850 °C were carried out. Both types of catalysts have significantly affected the content of tars and other components in pyrolytic gases. The effect of catalyst on the tetrapack distribution into the product yield on the composition of gas and on the total organic carbon in the tar product is presented in this work. PMID:23428565

  10. Deposition of hematite particles on alumina seal faceplates of nuclear reactor coolant pumps: Laboratory experiments and industrial feedback

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lefèvre Grégory

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available In the primary circuit of pressurized water reactors (PWR, the dynamic sealing system in reactor coolant pumps is ensured by mechanical seals whose ceramic parts are in contact with the cooling solution. During the stretch-out phase in reactor operation, characterized by low boric acid concentration, the leak-off flow has been observed to abnormally evolve in industrial plants. The deposition of hematite particles, originating from corrosion, on alumina seals of coolant pumps is suspected to be the cause. As better understanding of the adhesion mechanism is the key factor in the prevention of fouling and particle removal, an experimental study was carried out using a laboratory set-up. With model materials, hematite and sintered alumina, the adhesion rate and surface potentials of the interacting solids were measured under different chemical conditions (solution pH and composition in analogy with the PWR ones. The obtained results were in good agreement with the DLVO (Derjaguin-Landau-Verwey- Overbeek theory and used as such to interpret this industrial phenomenon.

  11. Integration of an academic medical center and a community hospital: the Brigham and Women's/Faulkner hospital experience.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sussman, Andrew J; Otten, Jeffrey R; Goldszer, Robert C; Hanson, Margaret; Trull, David J; Paulus, Kenneth; Brown, Monte; Dzau, Victor; Brennan, Troyen A

    2005-03-01

    Brigham and Women's Hospital (BWH), a major academic tertiary medical center, and Faulkner Hospital (Faulkner), a nearby community teaching hospital, both in the Boston, Massachusetts area, have established a close affiliation relationship under a common corporate parent that achieves a variety of synergistic benefits. Formed under the pressures of limited capacity at BWH and excess capacity at Faulkner, and the need for lower-cost clinical space in an era of provider risk-sharing, BWH and Faulkner entered into a comprehensive affiliation agreement. Over the past seven years, the relationship has enhanced overall volume, broadened training programs, lowered the cost of resources for secondary care, and improved financial performance for both institutions. The lessons of this relationship, both in terms of success factors and ongoing challenges for the hospitals, medical staffs, and a large multispecialty referring physician group, are reviewed. The key factors for success of the relationship have been integration of training programs and some clinical services, provision of complementary clinical capabilities, geographic proximity, clear role definition of each institution, commitment and flexibility of leadership and medical staff, active and responsive communication, and the support of a large referring physician group that embraced the affiliation concept. Principal challenges have been maintaining the community hospital's cost structure, addressing cultural differences, avoiding competition among professional staff, anticipating the pace of patient migration, choosing a name for the new affiliation, and adapting to a changing payer environment. PMID:15734807

  12. Validation of Accelerometer Thresholds and Inclinometry for Measurement of Sedentary Behavior in Young Adult University Students.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peterson, Neil E; Sirard, John R; Kulbok, Pamela A; DeBoer, Mark D; Erickson, Jeanne M

    2015-12-01

    Sedentary behavior (SB) is a major contributor to obesity and significant morbidity and mortality in adolescence and adulthood, yet measurement of SB is still evolving. The purpose of this study was to assess the degree of construct validity of the inclinometer function and single-axis and vector magnitude accelerometry metrics of the ActiGraph GT3X+ in objectively measuring SB and physical activity in 28 young adult university students who performed nine semi-structured activities, each for five minutes: lying, sitting, reading, seated video gaming, video watching, seated conversation, standing, stationary biking, and treadmill walking. Inclinometry and four output metrics from the ActiGraph were analyzed in comparison to direct observation by a researcher recorded each minute. For overall accuracy in measuring both SB and physical activity, all four accelerometer metrics (94.7-97.8%) outperformed the inclinometer function (70.9%). Vector magnitude accelerometry with a threshold of 150 counts per minute as the cut point for sedentary behavior was superior to other methods. While accelerometry was more accurate overall at detecting the behaviors tested, inclinometry had some advantages over accelerometry methods at detecting walking, biking, and standing. The findings support use of accelerometry as a valid objective measure of body movement, while use of inclinometry as a sole measure is not recommended. Additional research would be beneficial to improve the calibration of the inclinometer and explore ways of combining this with accelerometer data for objectively measuring SB and physical activity. PMID:26444969

  13. Prevalence of signs and symptoms of temporomandibular disorders and their association with young university students

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Renata Cunha Matheus Rodrigues Garcia

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available Objective: To verify the prevalence of signs and symptoms of temporomandibular disorder and their association with joint noise, joint hypermobility, occlusal interference, orthodontic treatment and bruxism in a specific population composed of young university students. Methods: One hundred and seventeen (117 volunteers (mean age of 22 years were selected from the undergraduate course in Dentistry at the School of Dentistry of the “Centro Universitário Hermínio Ometto” (Araras, São Paulo, Brazil. The volunteers answered a questionnaire and were submitted to clinical and electrovibratography exams. Afterwards, the volunteers were classified as either having temporomandibular disorder or not, considering the presence of painful sensitivity in the temporomandibular joint and/or presence of joint noise. The prevalenceof the studied factors was calculated together with the association between each factor, and the presence of temporomandibular disorderwas analyzed by the Chi-square test. Results: The prevalence of temporomandibular disorder in the evaluated sample was 42.9% and significant association was found between temporomandibular disorder and joint noise (p<0.05; and between temporomandibular disorder and bruxism (p<0.05. Conclusion: The results suggest that patients with presence of precisely diagnosed bruxism and joint noise should be monitored with regard to the appearance of signs and symptoms of temporomandibular disorder.

  14. Thermal-hydraulic modeling of the Pennsylvania State University Breazeale Nuclear Reactor (PSBR)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chang, Jong E.

    2005-11-01

    Earlier experiments determined that the Pennsylvania State University Breazeale Nuclear Reactor (PSBR) core is cooled, not by an axial flow, but rather by a strong cross flow due to the thermal expansion of the coolant. To further complicate the flow field, a nitrogen-16 (N-16) pump was installed above the PSBR core to mix the exiting core buoyant thermal plume in order to delay the rapid release of radioactive N-16 to the PSBR pool surface. Thus, the interaction between the N-16 jet flow and the buoyancy driven flow complicates the analysis of the flow distribution in the PSBR pool. The main objectives of this study is to model the thermal-hydraulic behavior of the PSBR core and pool. During this study four major things were performed including the Computational Fluid Dynamics (CFD) model for the PSBR pool, the stand-alone fuel rod model for a PSBR fuel rod, the velocity measurements in and around the PSBR core, and the temperature measurements in the PSBR pool. Once the flow field was predicted by the CFD model, the measurement devices were manufactured and calibrated based on the CFD results. The major contribution of this study is to understand and to explain the flow behavior in the PSBR subchannels and pool using the FLOW3D model. The stand-alone dynamic fuel rod model was developed to determine the temperature distribution inside a PSBR fuel rod. The stand-alone fuel rod model was coupled to the FLOW3D model and used to predict the temperature behavior during steady-state and pulsing. The heat transfer models in the stand-alone fuel rod code are used in order to overcome the disadvantage of the CFD code, which does not calculate the mechanical stress, the gap conductance, and the two phase heat transfer. (Abstract shortened by UMI.)

  15. Making Stuff Outreach at the Ames Laboratory and Iowa State University

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ament, Katherine; Karsjen, Steven; Leshem-Ackerman, Adah; King, Alexander

    2011-04-01

    The U. S. Department of Energy's Ames Laboratory in Ames, Iowa was a coalition partner for outreach activities connected with NOVA's Making Stuff television series on PBS. Volunteers affiliated with the Ames Laboratory and Iowa State University, with backgrounds in materials science, took part in activities including a science-themed Family Night at a local mall, Science Cafes at the Science Center of Iowa, teacher workshops, demonstrations at science nights in elementary and middle schools, and various other events. We describe a selection of the activities and present a summary of their outcomes and extent of their impact on Ames, Des Moines and the surrounding communities in Iowa. In Part 2, results of a volunteer attitude survey are presented, which shed some light on the volunteer experience and show how the volunteers participation in outreach activities has affected their views of materials education.

  16. Mainstream partial nitritation and anammox in a 200,000 m(3)/day activated sludge process in Singapore: scale-down by using laboratory fed-batch reactor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yeshi, Cao; Hong, Kwok Bee; van Loosdrecht, Mark C M; Daigger, Glen T; Yi, Png Hui; Wah, Yuen Long; Chye, Chua Seng; Ghani, Yahya Abd

    2016-01-01

    A laboratory fed-batch reactor has been used to study under controlled conditions the performance of partial nitritation/anammox for the 200,000 m(3)/day step-feed activated sludge process at the Changi Water Reclamation Plant, Singapore. The similarity of the concentrations of NH4, NO2, NO3, PO4, suspended chemical oxygen demand (sCOD), pH, and alkalinity (ALK) between the on-site process and laboratory reactor illustrates that the laboratory fed-batch reactor can be used to simulate the site performance. The performance of the reactor fed by primary effluent illustrated the existence of anammox and heterotrophic denitrification and apparent excessive biological phosphorus removal as observed from the site. The performance of the reactor fed by final effluent proved the presence of anammox process on site. Both the laboratory reactor and on-site process showed that higher influent 5-day biochemical oxygen demand/total nitrogen (BOD5/TN) (COD/TN) ratio increases the nitrogen removal efficiency of the process. PMID:27386982

  17. Mainstream partial nitritation and anammox in a 200,000 m3/day activated sludge process in Singapore: scale-down by using laboratory fed-batch reactor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yeshi, Cao; Hong, Kwok Bee; van Loosdrecht, Mark C M; Daigger, Glen T; Yi, Png Hui; Wah, Yuen Long; Chye, Chua Seng; Ghani, Yahya Abd

    2016-01-01

    A laboratory fed-batch reactor has been used to study under controlled conditions the performance of partial nitritation/anammox for the 200,000 m(3)/day step-feed activated sludge process at the Changi Water Reclamation Plant, Singapore. The similarity of the concentrations of NH(4), NO(2), NO(3), PO(4), suspended chemical oxygen demand (sCOD), pH, and alkalinity (ALK) between the on-site process and laboratory reactor illustrates that the laboratory fed-batch reactor can be used to simulate the site performance. The performance of the reactor fed by primary effluent illustrated the existence of anammox and heterotrophic denitrification and apparent excessive biological phosphorus removal as observed from the site. The performance of the reactor fed by final effluent proved the presence of anammox process on site. Both the laboratory reactor and on-site process showed that higher influent 5-day biochemical oxygen demand/total nitrogen (BOD(5)/TN) (COD/TN) ratio increases the nitrogen removal efficiency of the process.

  18. Publications and geothermal sample library facilities of the Earth Science Laboratory, University of Utah Research Institute

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wright, Phillip M.; Ruth, Kathryn A.; Langton, David R.; Bullett, Michael J.

    1990-03-30

    The Earth Science Laboratory of the University of Utah Research Institute has been involved in research in geothermal exploration and development for the past eleven years. Our work has resulted in the publication of nearly 500 reports, which are listed in this document. Over the years, we have collected drill chip and core samples from more than 180 drill holes in geothermal areas, and most of these samples are available to others for research, exploration and similar purposes. We hope that scientists and engineers involved in industrial geothermal development will find our technology transfer and service efforts helpful.

  19. Development of the University of Washington Biofuels and Biobased Chemicals Process Laboratory

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gustafson, Richard [University of Washington

    2014-02-04

    The funding from this research grant enabled us to design and build a bioconversion steam explosion reactor and ancillary equipment such as a high pressure boiler and a fermenter to support the bioconversion process research. This equipment has been in constant use since its installation in 2012. Following are research projects that it has supported: • Investigation of novel chip production method in biofuels production • Investigation of biomass refining following steam explosion • Several studies on use of different biomass feedstocks • Investigation of biomass moisture content on pretreatment efficacy. • Development of novel instruments for biorefinery process control Having this equipment was also instrumental in the University of Washington receiving a $40 million grant from the US Department of Agriculture for biofuels development as well as several other smaller grants. The research that is being done with the equipment from this grant will facilitate the establishment of a biofuels industry in the Pacific Northwest and enable the University of Washington to launch a substantial biofuels and bio-based product research program.

  20. Pyrolysis of biomass and refuse-derived fuel performance in laboratory scale batch reactor

    OpenAIRE

    Kluska Jacek; Klein Marek; Kazimierski Paweł; Kardaś Dariusz

    2014-01-01

    The results of pyrolysis of pine chips and refuse derived fuel fractions are presented. The experiments were carried out in a pilot pyrolysis reactor. The feedstock was analyzed by an elemental analyzer and the X-ray fluorescence spectrometer to determine the elemental composition. To find out optimum conditions for pyrolysis and mass loss as a function of temperature the thermogravimetric analysis was applied. Gases from the thermogravimetric analysis were directed to the infrared spectromet...

  1. Ohio State University Nuclear Reactor Laboratory HEU fuel shipment summary. Final

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In November 1988, OSURR converted from HEU fuel to LEU fuel. As a result they needed to get rid of their HEU fuel by shipping it to Savannah River. The players in the fuel shipping game are: OSURR as the keeper of the fuel; DOE as the owner of fuel and shipper of record; Tri-State Motor Transit Co. for transporting the cask; Muth Brothers as the rigger responsible for getting the cask on and off the truck and in and out of the building; Hoffman LaRoche/Cintichem as the owner of the cask; Savannah River as the receiver of the fuel; and the NRC for approval of the Security Plan, QA Plan, etc. This report gives a chronological history of the events from February 1989 to June 1, 1995, the actual day of shipment. The cask was received at Savannah River on June 2, 1995

  2. Feasibility study of the University of Utah TRIGA reactor power upgrade in respect to control rod system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cutic, Avdo

    The objectives of this thesis are twofold: to determine the highest achievable power levels of the current University of Utah TRIG Reactor (UUTR) core configuration with the existing three control rods, and to design the core for higher reactor power by optimizing the control rod worth. For the current core configuration, the maximum reactor power, eigenvalue keff, shutdown margin, and excess reactivity have been measured and calculated. These calculated estimates resulted from thermal power calibrations, and the control rod worth measurements at various power levels. The results were then used as a benchmark to verify the MCNP5 core simulations for the current core and then to design a core for higher reactor power. This study showed that the maximum achievable power with the current core configuration and control rod system is 150kW, which is 50kW higher than the licensed power of the UUTR. The maximum achievable UUTR core power with the existing fuel is determined by optimizing the core configuration and control rod worth, showing that a power upgrade of 500 kW is achievable. However, it requires a new control rod system consisting of a total of four control rods. The cost of such an upgrade is $115,000.

  3. Improving Pre-Service Elementary Teachers' Education via a Laboratory Course on Air Pollution: One University's Experience

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mandrikas, Achilleas; Parkosidis, Ioannis; Psomiadis, Ploutarchos; Stoumpa, Artemisia; Chalkidis, Anthimos; Mavrikaki, Evangelia; Skordoulis, Constantine

    2013-01-01

    This paper describes the structure of the "Air Pollution Course", an environmental science laboratory course developed at the Science Education Laboratory of the Faculty of Primary Education, University of Athens, as well as the findings resulting from its implementation by pre-service elementary teachers. The course proposed in this study deals…

  4. Astrochemistry Lecture and Laboratory Courses at the University of Illinois: Applied Spectroscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Woon, David E.; McCall, Benjamin J.

    2016-06-01

    The Department of Chemistry at the University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign offers two courses in astrochemistry, one lecture (Chem 450) and one laboratory (Chem 451). Both courses present the opportunity for advanced undergraduate and graduate students to learn about various spectroscopic concepts as they are applied toward an exotic subject, astrochemistry. In the lecture course, each student devotes a substantial fraction of the course work to one of the known astromolecules, building a wiki page for it during the semester, presenting a brief oral description about it in class, and then finally writing a paper about it. The course covers electronic, vibrational, and rotational spectroscopy, along with Einstein coefficients, line widths, and the interpretation of actual astronomical spectra. It also covers relevant reactions and reaction networks. Students learn to use pgopher for modeling rotational spectra. The lab course focuses on the methylidyne radical (CH). It begins with its chemistry and spectroscopy and then moves on to laboratory study of its electronic spectrum as observed in a butane flame and then collected with the university's 12" f/15 Brashear refracting telescope in the campus observatory built in 1896. Students learn to use IGOR to reduce CCD data.

  5. 75 FR 30427 - Notice of Intent to Repatriate Cultural Items: University of Idaho, Alfred W. Bowers Laboratory...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-06-01

    ... National Park Service Notice of Intent to Repatriate Cultural Items: University of Idaho, Alfred W. Bowers..., Alfred W. Bowers Laboratory of Anthropology, Moscow, ID, that meet the definitions of ``unassociated... whistle has been determined to be a sacred object. Officials from the University of Idaho Alfred W....

  6. Evaluation of the Young Children with Neurodevelopmental Disability: A Prospective Study at Hamadan University of Medical Sciences Clinics

    OpenAIRE

    FAYYAZI, Afshin; Leila KHEZRIAN; Zohreh KHERADMAND; DAMADI, Somayeh; Ali KHAJEH

    2013-01-01

    How to Cite This Article: Fayyazi A, Kheizrian L, Kheradmand Z, Damadi S, Khajeh A. Evaluation of the Young Children with Neurodevelopmental Disability: A Prospective Study at Hamadan University of Medical Sciences Clinics. Iran J Child Neurol. 2013 Winter; 7 (1):29-33. ObjectiveDevelopmental impairment is a common problem in children health that occurs in approximately 5–10% of the childhood population. The aim of this study was to determine the etiologic yield of subspecialists’ evaluation ...

  7. Evaluation of Tuberculosis Laboratory results in Çanakkale Onsekiz Mart University Research and Education Hospital for 2009-2011

    OpenAIRE

    Nilgun ÖZBEY; Alper AKÇALI; Tatman-Otkun, Müşerref

    2012-01-01

    Objective: Tuberculosis microbiological laboratorydiagnosis was firstly started in year 2009, in MicrobiologyLaboratory of Onsekiz Mart University Research andEducation Hospital in Çanakkale. We aimed at thisstudy to present our laboratory data and to evaluatethe methods which were used for the diagnosis ofmicobacteria.Method: Samples sent to our laboratory fortuberculosis culture were stained by Ehrlich-Ziehl-Neelsen (EZN) method and evaluated microscopically.After processing of samples, eac...

  8. Safety evaluation report related to the renewal of the operating license for the training and research reactor at the University of Maryland (Docket No. 50-166)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This Safety Evaluation Report for the application filed by the University of Maryland (UMD) for a renewal of operating license R-70 to continue to operate a training and research reactor facility has been prepared by the Office of Nuclear Reactor Regulation of the US Nuclear Regulatory Commission. The facility is owned and operated by the University of Maryland and is located at a site in College Park, Prince Georges County, Maryland. The staff concludes that this training reactor facility can continue to be operated by UMD without endangering the health and safety of the public

  9. Safety Evaluation Report related to the renewal of the operating license for the TRIGA training and research reactor at the University of Utah (Docket No. 50-407)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This Safety Evaluation Report for the application filed by the University of Utah (UU) for a renewal of operating license R-126 to continue to operate a training and research reactor facility has been prepared by the Office of Nuclear Reactor Regulation of the US Nuclear Regulatory Commission. The facility is owned and operated by the University of Utah and is located on its campus in Salt Lake City, Salt Lake County, Utah. The staff concludes that this training reactor facility can continue to be operated by UU without endangering the health and safety of the public

  10. Safety Evaluation Report related to the renewal of the operating license for the research reactor at the University of Kansas (Docket No. 50-148)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This Safety Evaluation Report for the application filed by the University of Kansas (KU) for a renewal of Operating License R-78 to continue to operate the KU 250-kW open-pool training reactor has been prepared by the Office of Nuclear Reactor Regulation of the US Nuclear Regulatory Commission. The facility is owned and operated by the University of Kansas and is located on the KU campus in Lawrence, Douglas County, Kansas. The staff concludes that the reactor facility can continue to be operated by KU without endangering the health and safety of the public. 17 references, 11 figures, 4 tables

  11. Safety evaluation report related to the renewal of the operating license for the research reactor at the University of Florida. Docket No. 50-83

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This Safety Evaluation Report for the application filed by the University of Florida (UF) for a renewal of Operating License R-56 to continue to operate its Argonaut-type research reactor has been prepared by the Office of Nuclear Reactor Regulation of the US Nuclear Regulatory Commission. The facility is owned and operated by the University of Florida and is located on the UF campus in Gainesville, Alachua County, Florida. The staff concludes that the reactor facility can continue to be operated by UF without endangering the health and safety of the public

  12. Safety Evaluation Report Related to the Renewal of the Operating License for the TRIGA Training and Research Reactor at the University of Utah

    OpenAIRE

    United States Nuclear Regulatory Commission, Office of Nuclear Reactor Regulations

    1985-01-01

    This Safety Evaluation Report for the application filed by the University of Utah (UU) for a renewal of operating license R-126 to continue to operate a training and research reactor facility has been prepared by the Office of Nuclear Reactor Regulation of the U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission. The facility is owned and operated by the University of Utah and is located on its campus in Salt Lake City, Salt Lake County, Utah. The staff concludes that this training reactor facility can conti...

  13. Evaluation of the Young Children with Neurodevelopmental Disability: A Prospective Study at Hamadan University of Medical Sciences Clinics

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Afshin FAYYAZI

    2013-02-01

    Full Text Available How to Cite This Article: Fayyazi A, Kheizrian L, Kheradmand Z, Damadi S, Khajeh A. Evaluation of the Young Children with Neurodevelopmental Disability: A Prospective Study at Hamadan University of Medical Sciences Clinics. Iran J Child Neurol. 2013 Winter; 7 (1:29-33. ObjectiveDevelopmental impairment is a common problem in children health that occurs in approximately 5–10% of the childhood population. The aim of this study was to determine the etiologic yield of subspecialists’ evaluation of young children with developmental disability.Materials & MethodsAll children aged between 2 months and 5 years referred over a 15-month period to Hamadan University of Medical Sciences subspecialty services for initial evaluation of a suspected developmental Disability, were enrolled in the present study. Diagnostic yield was determined after the completion of clinical assessments and laboratory tests requested by the evaluating physician.ResultsA total of 198 children (129 boys and 69 girls were eligible for our study.108 children had global developmental delay and 90 children had isolated developmental delay. Approximately ¼ of all patients did not have any specific etiology for developmental disability. Cerebral palsy (CP was the most common clinical syndrome in all patients (41.4%. Hypoxic ischemic encephalopathy (13.8%, brain dysgenesis (13%, genetic disorder (13%, and  neurodegenerative  diseases  (11%  were  determined  in  more  than one half of all children with global developmental disability. in our study, “developmental speech delay” was the common cause of isolated speech delay.ConclusionDetermination of an underlying etiology is an essential part of specialty evaluation of young children with developmental disability. The results of this study were similar closely to the results of other studies. ReferencesBernard LM. Current Management in Child Neurology. 3rd ed. London: BC Decker Inc; 2005. pp. 3-8 and 246-50.Cleary M A

  14. Description of a materials/coolant laboratory for support of the Breeder Reactor Technology Shipping Program

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A description of a facility devoted to evaluating the environmental compatibility and mechanical response of materials suitable for a breeder reactor spent-fuel shipping cask is given. The facility presently consists of a closed-loop servo-controlled hydraulic, horizontal test system coupled to an environmental chamber, generalized mechanical test equipment and high-rate mechanical behavior apparatus. Future plans include the procurement of real-time computer control equipment which will be used to assess the effects of complex load-time histories on spent-fuel shipping cask materials

  15. Safety-evaluation report related to the renewal of the operating license for the research reactor at the Iowa State University (Docket No. 50-116)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This Safety Evaluation Report for the application filed by the Iowa State University (ISU) for a renewal of the Class 104 Operating License R-59 to continue to operate its Argonaut-type research reactor has been prepared by the Office of Nuclear Reactor Regulation of the US Nuclear Regulatory Commission. The facility is owned and operated by the Iowa State University, and is located on the ISU campus in Ames, Story County, Iowa. The staff concludes that the reactor facility can continue to be operated by ISU without endangering the health and safety of the public. The principal matters reviewed are: design, testing, and performance of the reactor components and systems; the expected consequences of credible accidents; the licensee's management organization; the method used for the control of radiological effluents; the licensee's technical specifications; financial data and information; the physical protection program; procedures for training reactor operators; and emergency plans. 11 references, 15 figures, 13 tables

  16. Experimental and MCNP5 based evaluation of neutron and gamma flux in the irradiation ports of the University of Utah research reactor

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Noble Brooklyn

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Neutron and gamma flux environment of various irradiation ports in the University of Utah training, research, isotope production, general atomics reactor were experimentally assessed and fully modeled using the MCNP5 code. The experimental measurements were based on the cadmium ratio in the irradiation ports of the reactor, flux profiling using nickel wire, and gamma dose measurements using thermo luminescence dosimeter. Full 3-D MCNP5 reactor model was developed to obtain the neutron flux distributions of the entire reactor core and to compare it with the measured flux focusing at the irradiation ports. Integration of all these analysis provided the updated comprehensive neutron-gamma flux maps of the existing irradiation facilities of the University of Utah TRIGA reactor.

  17. QA experience at the University of Wisconsin accredited dosimetry calibration laboratory

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    DeWard, L.A.; Micka, J.A. [Univ. of Wisconsin, Madison, WI (United States)

    1993-12-31

    The University of Wisconsin Accredited Dosimetry Calibration Laboratory (UW ADCL) employs procedure manuals as part of its Quality Assurance (QA) program. One of these manuals covers the QA procedures and results for all of the UW ADCL measurement equipment. The QA procedures are divided into two main areas: QA for laboratory equipment and QA for external chambers sent for calibration. All internal laboratory equipment is checked and recalibrated on an annual basis, after establishing its consistency on a 6-month basis. QA for external instruments involves checking past calibration history as well as comparing to a range of calibration values for specific instrument models. Generally, the authors find that a chamber will have a variation of less than 0.5 % from previous Co-60 calibration factors, and falls within two standard deviations of previous calibrations. If x-ray calibrations are also performed, the energy response of the chamber is plotted and compared to previous instruments of the same model. These procedures give the authors confidence in the transfer of calibration values from National Institute of Standards and Technology (NIST).

  18. [Laboratory medicine in the post-genome era: experiences in Chiba University Hospital].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nomura, Fumio

    2008-12-01

    Since the completion of the human genome project, there is growing interest in the clinical application of genome sciences. For this purpose, particular attention toward identifying at-risk individuals and understanding the complexities of the testing process are essential. In this article, I describe the importance of clinical genetics and genetic counseling, and explain how and why the division of laboratory medicine is involved in these tasks in Chiba University Hospital. Our genetic counseling team consists of a clinical laboratory physician qualified as a clinical geneticist, medical technologist qualified as a genetic counselor, clinical psychologists, and a medical social worker. We treat more than 100 cases including late-onset, incurable neurological diseases, hereditary tumors, prenatal diagnosis, and chromosomal abnormalities. The sequencing of the human genome has paved the way for comprehensive transcriptome and proteome analyses. Since the detailed understanding of biological processes, both in healthy and pathological states, requires the direct study of relevant proteins, proteomics bridges the gap between the information coded in the genome sequence and cellular behavior. Therefore, proteomics is among the most promising technologies for the development of novel diagnostic tools. Recent advances in sophisticated technologies in proteomics should identify promising ways to discover novel markers in various fields of clinical medicine. In this presentation, I will give a definition of the proteome, and outline the basic methodologies for proteome analyses. I will also present our experiences in identifying novel biomarker candidates in hepatobiliary diseases, and discuss future perspectives of clinical proteomics in laboratory medicine. PMID:19175078

  19. Promoting the Health of Young Adults in Urban Public Universities: A Case Study from City University of New York

    Science.gov (United States)

    Freudenberg, Nicholas; Manzo, Luis; Mongiello, Lorraine; Jones, Hollie; Boeri, Natascia; Lamberson, Patricia

    2013-01-01

    Changing demographics of college students and new insights into the developmental trajectory of chronic diseases present universities with opportunities to improve population health and reduce health inequalities. The reciprocal relationships between better health and improved educational achievement also offer university health programs a chance…

  20. Laboratory Experiments and Modeling for Interpreting Field Studies of Secondary Organic Aerosol Formation Using an Oxidation Flow Reactor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jimenez, Jose-Luis [Univ. of Colorado, Boulder, CO (United States)

    2016-02-01

    This grant was originally funded for deployment of a suite of aerosol instrumentation by our group in collaboration with other research groups and DOE/ARM to the Ganges Valley in India (GVAX) to study aerosols sources and processing. Much of the first year of this grant was focused on preparations for GVAX. That campaign was cancelled due to political reasons and with the consultation with our program manager, the research of this grant was refocused to study the applications of oxidation flow reactors (OFRs) for investigating secondary organic aerosol (SOA) formation and organic aerosol (OA) processing in the field and laboratory through a series of laboratory and modeling studies. We developed a gas-phase photochemical model of an OFR which was used to 1) explore the sensitivities of key output variables (e.g., OH exposure, O3, HO2/OH) to controlling factors (e.g., water vapor, external reactivity, UV irradiation), 2) develop simplified OH exposure estimation equations, 3) investigate under what conditions non-OH chemistry may be important, and 4) help guide design of future experiments to avoid conditions with undesired chemistry for a wide range of conditions applicable to the ambient, laboratory, and source studies. Uncertainties in the model were quantified and modeled OH exposure was compared to tracer decay measurements of OH exposure in the lab and field. Laboratory studies using OFRs were conducted to explore aerosol yields and composition from anthropogenic and biogenic VOC as well as crude oil evaporates. Various aspects of the modeling and laboratory results and tools were applied to interpretation of ambient and source measurements using OFR. Additionally, novel measurement methods were used to study gas/particle partitioning. The research conducted was highly successful and details of the key results are summarized in this report through narrative text, figures, and a complete list of publications acknowledging this grant.

  1. The Tokamak Fusion Test Reactor decontamination and decommissioning project and the Tokamak Physics Experiment at the Princeton Plasma Physics Laboratory. Environmental Assessment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1994-05-27

    If the US is to meet the energy needs of the future, it is essential that new technologies emerge to compensate for dwindling supplies of fossil fuels and the eventual depletion of fissionable uranium used in present-day nuclear reactors. Fusion energy has the potential to become a major source of energy for the future. Power from fusion energy would provide a substantially reduced environmental impact as compared with other forms of energy generation. Since fusion utilizes no fossil fuels, there would be no release of chemical combustion products to the atmosphere. Additionally, there are no fission products formed to present handling and disposal problems, and runaway fuel reactions are impossible due to the small amounts of deuterium and tritium present. The purpose of the TPX Project is to support the development of the physics and technology to extend tokamak operation into the continuously operating (steady-state) regime, and to demonstrate advances in fundamental tokamak performance. The purpose of TFTR D&D is to ensure compliance with DOE Order 5820.2A ``Radioactive Waste Management`` and to remove environmental and health hazards posed by the TFTR in a non-operational mode. There are two proposed actions evaluated in this environmental assessment (EA). The actions are related because one must take place before the other can proceed. The proposed actions assessed in this EA are: the decontamination and decommissioning (D&D) of the Tokamak Fusion Test Reactor (TFTR); to be followed by the construction and operation of the Tokamak Physics Experiment (TPX). Both of these proposed actions would take place primarily within the TFTR Test Cell Complex at the Princeton Plasma Physics Laboratory (PPPL). The TFTR is located on ``D-site`` at the James Forrestal Campus of Princeton University in Plainsboro Township, Middlesex County, New Jersey, and is operated by PPPL under contract with the United States Department of Energy (DOE).

  2. 普通高校青年教师职业压力调查%Young University Teachers' Occupational Stress

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    王莉; 赵光珍

    2013-01-01

    目的 探讨普通高校青年教师职业压力的特点并分析原因.方法 采用前期研究所编制的《高校青年教师职业压力调查问卷》对3所普通高校的青年教师进行调查,并分析不同群体之间的差异.结果 ①高校青年教师的职业压力由大到小依次为:科研压力、教学压力、学生压力和人际压力;②在科研压力维度上,不同年龄段之间存在显著差异(t=-4.147,P<0.01);③不同职称高校青年教师在科研压力方面存在显著差异(F=4.119,P<0.01).结论 普通高校青年教师总体压力处于中度压力水平,科研压力相对较大.%Objective To explore features of young university teachers' occupational stress,and analyze the reasons. Methods The study investigated young university teachers from 3 universities with The Questionnaire of Young College Teachers Occupation Stress,and analyzed the differences among different groups. Results ①Young college teachers' occupation pressure from large to small in turn was:Scientific research,teaching,students' pressure and interpersonal stress.②In scientific research dimension,significant differences existed between different age(t= -4. 147,P<0. 01). ③Different titles of young college teachers occupation stress had the significant difference in scientific research pressure aspect(F = 4. 119,P<0. 01). Conclusion Young university teachers' overall pressure is at moderate pressure level,scientific research pressure is relatively large.

  3. Safety evaluation report related to the construction permit and operating license for the research reactor at the University of Texas (Docket No. 50-602)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The Office of Nuclear Reactor Regulation of the US Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) has prepared Supplement 1 to NUREG-1135, ''Safety Evaluation Report Related to the Construction Permit and Operating License for the Research Reactor at the University of Texas'' (SER) May 1985. The reactor facility is owned by The University of Texas at Austin (UT, the applicant) and is located at the University's Balcones Research Center in Austin, Texas. This supplement to the SER (SSER) describes the changes to the reactor facility design from the description in the SER. The SER and SSER together reflect the facility as built. The SSER also documents the reviews that the NRC has completed regarding the applicant's emergency plan, security plan, and technical specifications that were identified as open in the SER

  4. A review of research activities at the Research Reactor Institute of Kyoto University in view of research publication information

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A database of research publication was constructed for the purpose of grasping all of the research activities at the Research Reactor Institute, Kyoto University. The database named KURRIP collects all of the research publications of the Institute by not only its own staff but also visiting scientists. The publications are in the form of original papers, review papers, papers in proceedings, short notes and letters, synopses over 3 pages presented orally at scientific meeting, books and doctoral theses. At present, the KURRIP database contains the information on 6,210 items which have been published for 30 years since the Institute was established as an interuniversity research institute for joint use of a research reactor and other related large facilities in 1963. By utilizing the KURRIP database, the analyses have been done: (1) affiliation of the authors, (2) kind of publications, (3) classification of publishers, (4) research fields, and (5) experimental facilities. The KURRIP database is now stored in the Data Processing Center of Kyoto University and can be utilized through a computer center at one of the main national universities in Japan. (author)

  5. Annual report on operation, utilization and technical development of research reactors and hot laboratory, from April 1, 1985 to March 31, 1986

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Activities of the Department of Research Reactor Operation in fiscal year 1985 are described. The department is responsible for operation and maintenance of JRR-2, JRR-4, Research Reactor Development Division which performed upgraded JRR-3 and other R and D, and Hot Laboratory. In the above connection various other work has also been performed, such as technical management of fuel and coolant, radiation control, irradiation technique, etc. In Hot Laboratory, we have performed post-irradiation examinations of fuels and materials, and also development of examination procedures, too. (author)

  6. Transformation of pristine and citrate-functionalized CeO2 nanoparticles in a laboratory-scale activated sludge reactor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barton, Lauren E; Auffan, Melanie; Bertrand, Marie; Barakat, Mohamed; Santaella, Catherine; Masion, Armand; Borschneck, Daniel; Olivi, Luca; Roche, Nicolas; Wiesner, Mark R; Bottero, Jean-Yves

    2014-07-01

    Engineered nanomaterials (ENMs) are used to enhance the properties of many manufactured products and technologies. Increased use of ENMs will inevitably lead to their release into the environment. An important route of exposure is through the waste stream, where ENMs will enter wastewater treatment plants (WWTPs), undergo transformations, and be discharged with treated effluent or biosolids. To better understand the fate of a common ENM in WWTPs, experiments with laboratory-scale activated sludge reactors and pristine and citrate-functionalized CeO2 nanoparticles (NPs) were conducted. Greater than 90% of the CeO2 introduced was observed to associate with biosolids. This association was accompanied by reduction of the Ce(IV) NPs to Ce(III). After 5 weeks in the reactor, 44 ± 4% reduction was observed for the pristine NPs and 31 ± 3% for the citrate-functionalized NPs, illustrating surface functionality dependence. Thermodynamic arguments suggest that the likely Ce(III) phase generated would be Ce2S3. This study indicates that the majority of CeO2 NPs (>90% by mass) entering WWTPs will be associated with the solid phase, and a significant portion will be present as Ce(III). At maximum, 10% of the CeO2 will remain in the effluent and be discharged as a Ce(IV) phase, governed by cerianite (CeO2).

  7. The development and use of a laboratory scale reactor to study aspects of gasification in an air blown fluidised bed

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cousins, A.; Zhuo, Y.; Reed, G.P.; Paterson, N.; Dugwell, D.R.; Kandiyoti, R. [Imperial College London, London (United Kingdom). Dept of Chemical Engineering

    2006-07-01

    A laboratory scale reactor has been used to study aspects of air blown, spouted bed gasifiers. The effects of operating conditions on the release of fuel-N has been studied using both coal and sewage sludge. The work has clarified the reactions involved and shown that steam has an important effect on the formation of NH{sub 3} from both volatile-N and char-N. The HCN concentration depends strongly on the residence time at temperature and on the presence (and depth) of a char bed. Trace element results indicate that bed temperatures above 900{sup o}C enhanced depletion of Ba, Pb and Zn from the bed residue and their enrichment in the fines. Mercury and selenium were released and their subsequent capture required low temperature filters operating below 120{sup o}C. The reactor was modified to enable char samples to be prepared and collected under controlled conditions. Results show the decreasing reactivity of the char with increasing temperature, time, pressure and particle size. There appears to be an initial decrease in reactivity during pyrolysis and a further longer- term decrease caused by graphitisation. 10 refs., 8 figs., 6 tabs.

  8. The decontamination, decommissioning, and demolition of loss-of-fluid test reactor at the Idaho National Laboratory Site

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In October 2006, CH2M-WG Idaho completed the decontamination, decommissioning and demolition of the Loss-of-Fluid Test (LOFT) facility. The 30-year-old research reactor, located at the Idaho National Laboratory site, posed significant challenges involving regulations governing the demolition of a historical facility, as well as worker safety issues associated with the removal of the reactor's domed structure. The LOFT facility was located at the west end of Test Area North (TAN), built in the 1950's to support the government's aircraft nuclear propulsion program. When President Kennedy cancelled the nuclear propulsion program in 1961, TAN began to host various other activities. The LOFT reactor became part of the new mission. The LOFT facility, constructed between 1965 and 1975, was a scaled-down version of a commercial pressurized water reactor. Its design allowed engineers, scientists, and operators to create or re-create loss-of-fluid accidents (reactor fuel meltdowns) under controlled conditions. The LOFT dome provided containment for a relatively small, mobile test reactor that was moved into and out of the facility on a railroad car. The dome was roughly 21 meters (70 feet) in diameter and 30 meters (98 feet) in height. The Nuclear Regulatory Commission received the results from the accident tests and incorporated the data into commercial reactor operating codes. The facility conducted 38 experiments, including several small loss-of-coolant experiments designed to simulate events such as the accident that occurred at Three Mile Island in Pennsylvania, before the LOFT facility was closed. Through formal survey and research, the LOFT facility was determined to be a DOE Signature Property, as defined by the 'INEEL Cultural Resource Management Plan', and thus eligible for inclusion in the National Register of Historic Places. Decontamination and decommissioning (D and D) of the facility constituted an adverse effect on the historic property that required

  9. Quality assurance plan for the molten salt reactor experiment Remediation Project at Oak Ridge National Laboratory, Oak Ridge, Tennessee

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This Quality Assurance Plan (QAP) identifies and describes the systems utilized by Molten Salt Reactor Experiment (MSRE) Remediation Project personnel to implement the requirements and associated applicable guidance contained in the Quality Program Description, Y/QD-15 Rev. 2 (Martin Marietta Energy Systems, Inc., 1995) and Environmental Management and Enrichment Facilities Work Smart Standards. This QAP defines the quality assurance (QA) requirements applicable to all activities and operations in and directly pertinent to the MSRE Remediation Project. This QAP will be periodically reviewed, revised, and approved as necessary. This QAP identifies and describes the QA activities and procedures implemented by the various Oak Ridge National Laboratory support organizations and personnel to provide confidence that these activities meet the requirements of this project. Specific support organization (Division) quality requirements, including the degree of implementation of each, are contained in the appendixes of this plan

  10. Government-industry-uUniversity and rResearch lLaboratories cCoordination for new product development: Session 2. Government research laboratory perspective

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kuzay, T.M.

    1997-09-01

    This talk is the second in an expanded series of presentations on the Government-Industry-University and Research Laboratories Coordination for new product development, which is a timely and important public policy issue. Such interactions have become particularly timely in light of the present decline in funding for research and development (R&D) in the nation`s budget and in the private sector. These interactions, at least in principle, provide a means to maximize benefits for the greater good of the nation by pooling the diminishing resources. National laboratories, which traditionally interacted closely with the universities in educational training, now are able to also participate closely with industry in joint R&D thanks to a number of public laws legislated since the early 80s. A review of the experiences with such interactions at Argonne National Laboratory, which exemplifies the national laboratories, shows that, despite differences in their traditions and the missions, the national laboratory-industry-university triangle can work together.

  11. Government-industry-uUniversity and rResearch lLaboratories cCoordination for new product development: Session 2. Government research laboratory perspective

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This talk is the second in an expanded series of presentations on the Government-Industry-University and Research Laboratories Coordination for new product development, which is a timely and important public policy issue. Such interactions have become particularly timely in light of the present decline in funding for research and development (R ampersand D) in the nation''s budget and in the private sector. These interactions, at least in principle, provide a means to maximize benefits for the greater good of the nation by pooling the diminishing resources. National laboratories, which traditionally interacted closely with the universities in educational training, now are able to also participate closely with industry in joint R ampersand D thanks to a number of public laws legislated since the early 80s. A review of the experiences with such interactions at Argonne National Laboratory, which exemplifies the national laboratories, shows that, despite differences in their traditions and the missions, the national laboratory-industry-university triangle can work together

  12. Report of research by common utilization in Research Reactor Institute, Kyoto University, in latter half of fiscal 1980

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In the technical report, the data required for research and experiment, such as the result of functional test of various experimental facilities, the test results of the products manufactured for trial, the state of radiation control and waste treatment, and the reports of study meetings, or the remarkable results and new methods obtained in research and the discussion on other papers and reports in the Research Reactor Institute, Kyoto University, are summarized as prompt report. The subject, reporters and synopsis of 69 papers are reported in this publication. (Kako, I.)

  13. Report of research by common utilization in Research Reactor Institute, Kyoto University, in first half of fiscal 1980

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In the technical report, the data required for research and experiment, such as the result of functional test of various experimental facilities, the test results of the products manufactured for trial, the state of radiation control and waste treatment, and the reports of study meetings, or the remarkable results and new methods obtained in research, and the discussion on other papers and reports in the Research Reactor Institute, Kyoto University, are summarized as prompt report. The subject, reporters and synopsis of 54 papers are reported in this publication. (Kako, I.)

  14. Pyrolysis of biomass and refuse-derived fuel performance in laboratory scale batch reactor

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kluska Jacek

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available The results of pyrolysis of pine chips and refuse derived fuel fractions are presented. The experiments were carried out in a pilot pyrolysis reactor. The feedstock was analyzed by an elemental analyzer and the X-ray fluorescence spectrometer to determine the elemental composition. To find out optimum conditions for pyrolysis and mass loss as a function of temperature the thermogravimetric analysis was applied. Gases from the thermogravimetric analysis were directed to the infrared spectrometer using gas-flow cuvette to online analysis of gas composition. Chemical composition of the produced gas was measured using gas chromatography with a thermal conductivity detector and a flame ionization detector. The product analysis also took into account the mass balance of individual products.

  15. Pyrolysis of biomass and refuse-derived fuel performance in laboratory scale batch reactor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kluska, Jacek; Klein, Marek; Kazimierski, Paweł; Kardaś, Dariusz

    2014-03-01

    The results of pyrolysis of pine chips and refuse derived fuel fractions are presented. The experiments were carried out in a pilot pyrolysis reactor. The feedstock was analyzed by an elemental analyzer and the X-ray fluorescence spectrometer to determine the elemental composition. To find out optimum conditions for pyrolysis and mass loss as a function of temperature the thermogravimetric analysis was applied. Gases from the thermogravimetric analysis were directed to the infrared spectrometer using gas-flow cuvette to online analysis of gas composition. Chemical composition of the produced gas was measured using gas chromatography with a thermal conductivity detector and a flame ionization detector. The product analysis also took into account the mass balance of individual products.

  16. Reactor pressure vessel integrity research at the Oak Ridge National Laboratory

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Corwin, W.R.; Pennell, W.E.; Pace, J.V.

    1995-12-31

    Maintaining the integrity of the reactor pressure vessel (RPV) in a light-water-cooled nuclear power plant is crucial in preventing and controlling severe accidents that have the potential for major contamination release. The RPV is the only key safety-related component of the plant for which a duplicate or redundant backup system does not exist. It is therefore imperative to understand and be able to predict the integrity inherent in the RPV. For this reason, the U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission has established the related research programs at ORNL described herein to provide for the development and confirmation of the methods used for: (1) establishing the irradiation exposure conditions within the RPV in the Embrittlement Data Base and Dosimetry Evaluation Program, (2) assessing the effects of irradiation on the RPV materials in the Heavy-Section Steel Irradiation Program, and (3) developing overall structural and fracture analyses of RPVs in the Heavy-Section Steel Technology Program.

  17. Association Euratom - Risoe National Laboratory for Sustainable Energy, Technical University of Denmark. Annual progress report 2010

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The programme of the Research Unit of the Fusion Association Euratom - Risoe National Laboratory for Sustainable Energy, Technical University of Denmark, covers work in fusion plasma physics and in fusion technology. The fusion plasma physics research focuses on turbulence and transport, and its interaction with the plasma equilibrium and particles. The effort includes both first principles based modelling, and experimental observations of turbulence and of fast ion dynamics by collective Thomson scattering. Within fusion technology there are activities related to development of high temperature superconductors. Other activities are system analysis, initiative to involve Danish industry in ITER contracts and public information. A summary is presented of the results obtained in the Research Unit during 2010. (Author)

  18. Association Euratom - Risoe National Laboratory for Sustainable Energy, Technical University of Denmark. Annual progress report 2008

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Korsholm, S.B.; Michelsen, P.K.; Rasmussen, J.J.; Westergaard, C.M. (eds.)

    2009-04-15

    The programme of the Research Unit of the Fusion Association Euratom - Risoe National Laboratory for Sustainable Energy, Technical University of Denmark, covers work in fusion plasma physics and in fusion technology. The fusion plasma physics research focuses on turbulence and transport, and its interaction with the plasma equilibrium and particles. The effort includes both first principles based modelling, and experimental observations of turbulence and of fast ion dynamics by collective Thomson scattering. New activities in technology related to development of high temperature superconductors have been initiated in 2008. Minor activities are system analysis, initiative to involve Danish industry in ITER contracts and public information. A summary is presented of the results obtained in the Research Unit during 2008. (Author)

  19. [The Codex of the Laboratory of Pharmacognosy of the University of Athens, Part. I].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Philianos, Skevos; Skaltsa, Hélène

    2015-06-01

    This work concerns the first part of a manuscript written in the 18th century and stored in the Laboratory of Pharmacognosy of the University of Athens. This part includes an introduction based on the theories of Hippocrates and Galen concerning the four humors: blood, phlegm, yellow bile and black bile, which should be in balance. During the seasons and depending of the age, these humors are converted to each other. Blood increases in the spring and in children, phlegm is growing in winter and in old man, yellow bile in adulthood and black bile in the fall and the third age. The disease is due to the increase or decrease in these fluids. Many formulas with purgative and cholagogue effects are described for each humor. The chapter ends with advice on the necessary diet, hygiene and lifestyle to keep health care. PMID:26189314

  20. Radiation Laboratory, University of Notre Dame quarterly report, October 1--December 31, 1990

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1991-01-23

    This report, on research preformed at the Radiation Laboratory, University of Notre Dame, contain contributions on such topics as: formation of carbenium ions or yields from carbenes, photochemical oxidations and reductions, photoreactivity of molybdates, radiolysis of water, spin trapping kinetics, pulse radiolysis, photogenerated radical anions, photochemistry of Fe and Re complexes, hyperfine coupling calculations, electron energy loss in hydrocarbons, radiolysis of halophenols, conductivity in lipid monolayers, solitonsin polyacetylene, triplet-triplet annhilation, random walk problems, proton and electron impact on water luminescence quenching, raman spectrum of ozonide ion, time-resolved spectra of supercritical fluids, sequential biphotonic photochemistry, reduction of CO{sub 2} with Cu(I) macrocycles,and studies on photosensitizing dyes and on air-water interface problems. (CBS)

  1. Association Euratom - Risoe National Laboratory for Sustainable Energy, Technical University of Denmark. Annual progress report 2009

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The programme of the Research Unit of the Fusion Association Euratom - Risoe National Laboratory for Sustainable Energy, Technical University of Denmark, covers work in fusion plasma physics and in fusion technology. The fusion plasma physics research focuses on turbulence and transport, and its interaction with the plasma equilibrium and particles. The effort includes both first principles based modelling, and experimental observations of turbulence and of fast ion dynamics by collective Thomson scattering. Within fusion technology there are activities related to development of high temperature superconductors. Minor activities are system analysis, initiative to involve Danish industry in ITER contracts and public information. A summary is presented of the results obtained in the Research Unit during 2009. (Author)

  2. Association Euratom - Risoe National Laboratory for Sustainable Energy, Technical University of Denmark. Annual progress report 2008

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The programme of the Research Unit of the Fusion Association Euratom - Risoe National Laboratory for Sustainable Energy, Technical University of Denmark, covers work in fusion plasma physics and in fusion technology. The fusion plasma physics research focuses on turbulence and transport, and its interaction with the plasma equilibrium and particles. The effort includes both first principles based modelling, and experimental observations of turbulence and of fast ion dynamics by collective Thomson scattering. New activities in technology related to development of high temperature superconductors have been initiated in 2008. Minor activities are system analysis, initiative to involve Danish industry in ITER contracts and public information. A summary is presented of the results obtained in the Research Unit during 2008. (Author)

  3. Association Euratom - Risoe National Laboratory for Sustainable Energy, Technical University of Denmark. Annual progress report 2010

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Korsholm, S.B.; Michelsen, P.K.; Rasmussen, J.J.; Westergaard, C.M. (eds.)

    2011-04-15

    The programme of the Research Unit of the Fusion Association Euratom - Risoe National Laboratory for Sustainable Energy, Technical University of Denmark, covers work in fusion plasma physics and in fusion technology. The fusion plasma physics research focuses on turbulence and transport, and its interaction with the plasma equilibrium and particles. The effort includes both first principles based modelling, and experimental observations of turbulence and of fast ion dynamics by collective Thomson scattering. Within fusion technology there are activities related to development of high temperature superconductors. Other activities are system analysis, initiative to involve Danish industry in ITER contracts and public information. A summary is presented of the results obtained in the Research Unit during 2010. (Author)

  4. Association Euratom - Risoe National Laboratory for Sustainable Energy, Technical University of Denmark. Annual progress report 2009

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Korsholm, S.B.; Michelsen, P.K.; Rasmussen, J.J.; Westergaard, C.M. (eds.)

    2010-04-15

    The programme of the Research Unit of the Fusion Association Euratom - Risoe National Laboratory for Sustainable Energy, Technical University of Denmark, covers work in fusion plasma physics and in fusion technology. The fusion plasma physics research focuses on turbulence and transport, and its interaction with the plasma equilibrium and particles. The effort includes both first principles based modelling, and experimental observations of turbulence and of fast ion dynamics by collective Thomson scattering. Within fusion technology there are activities related to development of high temperature superconductors. Minor activities are system analysis, initiative to involve Danish industry in ITER contracts and public information. A summary is presented of the results obtained in the Research Unit during 2009. (Author)

  5. COMMIX-1C code estimation for the pool dynamics of Istanbul Technical University TRIGA MARK-II reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In this study, the COMMIX-1C code is used to investigate the pool dynamics of Istanbul Technical University (ITU)TRIGA MARK-II reactor by simulating the velocity, pressure and temperature distributions in the reactor pool as a function of core design parameters and pool configuration. COMMIX-1C is multi-purpose, three-dimensional. transient, single-phase, thermal-hydraulics computer code. For the mass, momentum and energy equations, it uses a porous-medium formulation, a finite-volume algorithm, a flow modulated skew-upwind discretization scheme to reduce numerical diffusion and k-ε two-equation turbulence model. Its implementation for the particular system requires geometric and physical modelling decisions. ITU TRIGA MARK-II reactor pool is considered partly as continuum and partly as porous medium. All the major pool components are explicitly modelled in the simulation. Shape of the pool structure and computational cells are accounted for using the concept of directional surface permeability, volume porosity, distributed resistance, and distributed heat source or sink. The results are compared to the results of the computer codes TRISTAN, TRIGATH and TRIGATH-R

  6. A gendered study of young adult contraceptive use at one university in KwaZulu-N atal

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    OA Oyedeji

    2006-09-01

    Full Text Available This study explores contraceptive use among young adult male and female students (aged 18-25 who visit the campus clinic at a university in KwaZulu-Natal. Both a descriptive survey and face to face interviews were used for data collection. In this study, it is affirmed that gender stratification, societal attitudes, and misconceptions about contraceptive use play an important role in the attitudes of young adults, male and female towards contraception and its use. Evidence of this is the high use of condoms amongst both male and female students’ compared with other available methods. Among female students this was highly attributed to personal convenience and comfort with condom use as an unmarried young woman. It was clear from the data collected that respondents themselves attached some stigma to being associated with the use of contraceptive pills or having to visit the clinic regularly for injections as young unmarried women. Male respondents affirmed the use of the condom, although this was hardly with the view of taking reproductive/contraceptive responsibility, but rather, it was attributed to the function of the condom as a safe sex method that offered protection against sexually transmitted diseases and infections. Also evident from the study was the fact that male respondents felt more comfortable with their sexual functioning than the female respondents. This was easily attributed to the role of societal gender stratification in an individual’s life.

  7. Paleomagnetic correlation and ages of basalt flow groups in coreholes at and near the Naval Reactors Facility, Idaho National Laboratory, Idaho

    Science.gov (United States)

    Champion, Duane E.; Davis, Linda C.; Hodges, Mary K.V.; Lanphere, Marvin A.

    2013-01-01

    Paleomagnetic inclination and polarity studies were conducted on subcore samples from eight coreholes located at and near the Naval Reactors Facility (NRF), Idaho National Laboratory (INL). These studies were used to characterize and to correlate successive stratigraphic basalt flow groups in each corehole to basalt flow groups with similar paleomagnetic inclinations in adjacent coreholes. Results were used to extend the subsurface geologic framework at the INL previously derived from paleomagnetic data for south INL coreholes. Geologic framework studies are used in conceptual and numerical models of groundwater flow and contaminant transport. Sample handling and demagnetization protocols are described, as well as the paleomagnetic data averaging process. Paleomagnetic inclination comparisons among NRF coreholes show comparable stratigraphic successions of mean inclination values over tens to hundreds of meters of depth. Corehole USGS 133 is more than 5 kilometers from the nearest NRF area corehole, and the mean inclination values of basalt flow groups in that corehole are somewhat less consistent than with NRF area basalt flow groups. Some basalt flow groups in USGS 133 are missing, additional basalt flow groups are present, or the basalt flow groups are at depths different from those of NRF area coreholes. Age experiments on young, low potassium olivine tholeiite basalts may yield inconclusive results; paleomagnetic and stratigraphic data were used to choose the most reasonable ages. Results of age experiments using conventional potassium argon and argon-40/argon-39 protocols indicate that the youngest and uppermost basalt flow group in the NRF area is 303 ± 30 ka and that the oldest and deepest basalt flow group analyzed is 884 ± 53 ka. A south to north line of cross-section drawn through the NRF coreholes shows corehole-to-corehole basalt flow group correlations derived from the paleomagnetic inclination data. From stratigraphic top to bottom, key results

  8. Charge distribution on plutonium-containing aerosols produced in mixed-oxide reactor fuel fabrication and the laboratory

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The inhalation toxicity of potentially toxic aerosols may be affected by the electrostatic charge on the particles. Charge may influence the deposition site during inhalation and therefore its subsequent clearance and dose patterns. The electrostatic charge distributions on plutonium-containing aerosols were measured with a miniature, parallel plate, aerosol electrical mobility spectrometer. Two aerosols were studied: a laboratory-produced 238PuO2 aerosol (15.8 Ci/g) and a plutonium mixed-oxide aerosol (PU-MOX, natural UO2 plus PuO2, 0.02 Ci/g) formed during industrial centerless grinding of mixed-oxide reactor fuel pellets. Plutonium-238 dioxide particles produced in the laboratory exhibited a small net positive charge within a few minutes after passing through a 85Kr discharger due to alpha particle emission removal of valence electrons. PU-MOX aerosols produced during centerless grinding showed a charge distribution essentially in Boltzmann equilibrium. The gross alpha aerosol concentrations (960-1200 nCi/l) within the glove box were sufficient to provide high ion concentrations capable of discharging the charge induced by mechanical and/or nuclear decay processes

  9. Report of researches by common utilization of facilities in Kyoto University Research Reactor Institute, latter half of fiscal year 1982

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The technical report of the Kyoto University Research Reactor Institute is published any time to immediately report on the results of the functional tests of various experimental facilities, the test results for the products made for trial, radiation control, the situation of waste treatment, the data required for research and experiment such as the reports of study meetings, the conspicuous results obtained amid researches, new processes, and the discussion on other papers and reports. In this report, the title, the names of reporters and the summary of 65 researches carried out by the common utilization of the facilities in the Kyoto University Research Reactor Institute are collected. The themes of the researches are such as Moessbauer spectroscopic study of ferrocene and its derivative iodides by I-129, decomposition of cadmium telluride during heat treatment, element distribution in resource living things and environmental substances produced in northern ocean, radioactivation analysis of trace elements in blood of tumor-bearing animals, radioactivation analysis of noble metal elements in geochemical samples, relaxation phenomena by gamma-gamma perturbation angle correlation, separation of components in Allende meteorite and their radioactivation analysis, measurement of cross section of Pa-231 (n, gamma) reaction and others. (Kako, I.)

  10. Pacific Northwest Laboratory report on fusion reactor technology, April 1976 - June 1976

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    None

    1976-07-01

    This quarterly report consists of progress summaries of research conducted by the staff of Pacific Northwest Laboratories (PNL). This reporting period includes progress made from April 1, 1976 through June 30, 1976. The summaries are presented in four major categories of: (1) fusion systems engineering, (2) material research and radiation environment simulation, (3) environmental effects of fusion concepts, and (4) manpower development. At the beginning of each section is a brief summary of the reports making up the section. The reports themselves have been kept relatively short and include preliminary results which ultimately are expected to be published elsewhere.

  11. Mission-Aware Payloads for Unmanned Platforms Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — Sentix and Brigham Young University propose the research and development of embedded payload intelligence for inflight optimization of surveillance, reconnaissance,...

  12. Undergraduates Prefer Federated Searching to Searching Databases Individually. A Review of: Belliston, C. Jeffrey, Jared L. Howland, & Brian C. Roberts. “Undergraduate Use of Federated Searching: A Survey of Preferences and Perceptions of Value-Added Functionality.” College & Research Libraries 68.6 (Nov. 2007): 472-86.

    OpenAIRE

    Genevieve Gore

    2008-01-01

    Objective – To determine whether use offederated searching by undergraduates saves time, meets their information needs, is preferred over searching databases individually, and provides results of higher quality. Design – Crossover study.Setting – Three American universities, all members of the Consortium of Church Libraries & Archives (CCLA): BYU (Brigham Young University, a large research university); BYUH (Brigham Young University – Hawaii, a small baccalaureate college); and BYUI (Brigham...

  13. Laboratory studies of shear/leach processing of zircaloy clad metallic uranium reactor fuel

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Swanson, J.L.; Bray, L.A.; Kjarmo, H.E.; Ryan, J.L.; Matsuzaki, C.L.; Pitman, S.G.; Haberman, J.H.

    1985-12-01

    The safety aspects addressed centered on understanding and explaining the undesirable reactions, ''fires,'' observed in a few instances during earlier processing of such fuel at the Nuclear Fuels Services (NFS) plant at West Valley, New York. Consideration of the dissolver fires that occurred at NFS leads to the conclusion that they resulted from rapid reactions with uranium metal, rather than with zirconium metal or with sensitized weld beads. The fires observed at NFS during hulls handling operations may have involved sensitized weld beads as suggested by earlier investigators, but current results suggest that these fires also could have been caused by reactions involving uranium metal. Very little pyrophoric activity was observed in leeached cladding hulls, indicating a very low probability for safety problems resulting from the U-Zr intermetallic zone in N-Reactor fuel. Consideration of the potential role of hydrides in the fires observed at NFS indicates that they were also not important factors. Consideration was also given to protective atmospheres to be used during shearing to prevent excessive reaction during that operation. A water deluge during shearing will likely provide adequate safety while meshing well with other process considerations. Studies on the dissolution of metallic uranium in nitric acid show an initial slower reaction followed by a faster reaction that proceeds at a sustained rate for a prolonged period of time. At solution concentrations typical of those encountered in practical uranium dissolver conditions, this sustained rate is governed by an equation such as: Dissolution rate = K (surface area) ((HNO3)+2(U))/sup 2.6/. Little difference was found in dissolution rates of as-fabricated and of irradiated fuel. The transuranic element content of leached cladding hulls was found to be approx. 400 nCi/g. This is too high to allow disposal as low-level waste.

  14. Laboratory studies of shear/leach processing of zircaloy clad metallic uranium reactor fuel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The safety aspects addressed centered on understanding and explaining the undesirable reactions, ''fires,'' observed in a few instances during earlier processing of such fuel at the Nuclear Fuels Services (NFS) plant at West Valley, New York. Consideration of the dissolver fires that occurred at NFS leads to the conclusion that they resulted from rapid reactions with uranium metal, rather than with zirconium metal or with sensitized weld beads. The fires observed at NFS during hulls handling operations may have involved sensitized weld beads as suggested by earlier investigators, but current results suggest that these fires also could have been caused by reactions involving uranium metal. Very little pyrophoric activity was observed in leeached cladding hulls, indicating a very low probability for safety problems resulting from the U-Zr intermetallic zone in N-Reactor fuel. Consideration of the potential role of hydrides in the fires observed at NFS indicates that they were also not important factors. Consideration was also given to protective atmospheres to be used during shearing to prevent excessive reaction during that operation. A water deluge during shearing will likely provide adequate safety while meshing well with other process considerations. Studies on the dissolution of metallic uranium in nitric acid show an initial slower reaction followed by a faster reaction that proceeds at a sustained rate for a prolonged period of time. At solution concentrations typical of those encountered in practical uranium dissolver conditions, this sustained rate is governed by an equation such as: Dissolution rate = K (surface area) ([HNO3]+2[U])/sup 2.6/. Little difference was found in dissolution rates of as-fabricated and of irradiated fuel. The transuranic element content of leached cladding hulls was found to be approx. 400 nCi/g. This is too high to allow disposal as low-level waste

  15. Proceedings of the school for young high energy physicists, September 1990 [held at the Rutherford Appleton Laboratory, Chilton (GB)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The 1990 School of Young High Energy Physicists took place in September and was attended by virtually all first year graduate students in experimental HEP at British Universities. The School consisted of two weeks of intensive lectures, written versions of which are published in this book. The four lecture courses; symmetries and gauge theories in Quantum Field Theory, Relativisitc quantum mechanics, QED and QeD; The Standard Model and Beyond and Selected Topics in Phenomenology of the Standard Model are all indexed separately. These were supplemented by problems and tutorials to give a thorough grounding in the Standard Model of elementary particle physics, putting understanding of the theory on a firm foundation for experimental investigations. (author)

  16. [Laboratory of Pharmacognosy of Faculty of Pharmacy, University of Coimbra (Portugal): teaching and et research (1902-1980)].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cabral, Célia; Lígia Salgueiro; Pita, João Rui

    2016-03-01

    In this article the authors present a brief history of the Laboratory of Pharmacognosy, Faculty of Pharmacy, University of Coimbra, Portugal (1902-1980). The authors refer the importance of pharmacognosy in the study plans, the scientific research and the scientific collection of pharmacognosy, Faculty of Pharmacy, University of Coimbra. This heritage consists of collection of drugs prepared in the laboratory of pharmacognosy, a collection Drogen-Lehrsammlung purchased to E. Merck and a collection of botanic-didactic models of the XIXth century of the famous German manufacturer R. Brendel. The authors study the relationship between research and teaching, highlighting the importance of the collections of drugs.

  17. Feasibility study of the university of Utah TRIGA reactor power upgrade - part II: Thermohydraulics and heat transfer study in respect to cooling system requirements and design

    OpenAIRE

    Babitz Philip; Choe Dongok; Jevremovic Tatjana

    2013-01-01

    The thermodynamic conditions of the University of Utah's TRIGA Reactor were simulated using SolidWorks Flow Simulation, Ansys, Fluent and PARET-ANL. The models are developed for the reactor's currently maximum operating power of 90 kW, and a few higher power levels to analyze thermohydraulics and heat transfer aspects in determining a design basis for higher power including the cost estimate. It was found that the natural convection current becomes much mor...

  18. Laboratory Automation and Intra-Laboratory Turnaround Time: Experience at the University Hospital Campus Bio-Medico of Rome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Angeletti, Silvia; De Cesaris, Marina; Hart, Jonathan George; Urbano, Michele; Vitali, Massimiliano Andrea; Fragliasso, Fulvio; Dicuonzo, Giordano

    2015-12-01

    Intra-laboratory turnaround time (TAT) is a key indicator of laboratory performance. Improving TAT is a complex task requiring staff education, equipment acquisition, and adequate TAT monitoring. The aim of the present study was to evaluate the intra-laboratory TAT after laboratory automation implementation (June 2013-June 2014) and to compare it to that in the preautomation period (July 2012-May 2013). Intra-laboratory TAT was evaluated both as the mean TAT registered and the percentage of outlier (OP) exams. The mean TAT was 36, 38, and 34 min during the study periods, respectively. These values respected the goal TAT established at 45 min. The OP, calculated at 45 min as well as at 60 min, decreased from 26 to 21 and from 11 to 5, respectively. From a focused analysis on blood count cell, troponin I, and prothrombin (PT) test, TAT improvement was more evident for tests requiring longer preanalytical process. The follow-up of TAT from June 2013 to June 2014 revealed the reduction of the mean TAT as well as of the OP exams after automation implementation and that automation more strongly affects the test in the preanalytical phase including centrifugation of the sample, such as troponin I and PT.

  19. Engineering Evaluation of Proposed Alternative Salt Transfer Method for the Molten Salt Reactor Experiement for the Oak Ridge National Laboratory

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Carlberg, Jon A.; Roberts, Kenneth T.; Kollie, Thomas G.; Little, Leslie E.; Brady, Sherman D.

    2009-09-30

    This evaluation was performed by Pro2Serve in accordance with the Technical Specification for an Engineering Evaluation of the Proposed Alternative Salt Transfer Method for the Molten Salt Reactor Experiment at the Oak Ridge National Laboratory (BJC 2009b). The evaluators reviewed the Engineering Evaluation Work Plan for Molten Salt Reactor Experiment Residual Salt Removal, Oak Ridge National Laboratory, Oak Ridge, Tennessee (DOE 2008). The Work Plan (DOE 2008) involves installing a salt transfer probe and new drain line into the Fuel Drain Tanks and Fuel Flush Tank and connecting them to the new salt transfer line at the drain tank cell shield. The probe is to be inserted through the tank ball valve and the molten salt to the bottom of the tank. The tank would then be pressurized through the Reactive Gas Removal System to force the salt into the salt canisters. The Evaluation Team reviewed the work plan, interviewed site personnel, reviewed numerous documents on the Molten Salt Reactor (Sects. 7 and 8), and inspected the probes planned to be used for the transfer. Based on several concerns identified during this review, the team recommends not proceeding with the salt transfer via the proposed alternate salt transfer method. The major concerns identified during this evaluation are: (1) Structural integrity of the tanks - The main concern is with the corrosion that occurred during the fluorination phase of the uranium removal process. This may also apply to the salt transfer line for the Fuel Flush Tank. Corrosion Associated with Fluorination in the Oak Ridge National Laboratory Fluoride Volatility Process (Litman 1961) shows that this problem is significant. (2) Continued generation of Fluorine - Although the generation of Fluorine will be at a lower rate than experienced before the uranium removal, it will continue to be generated. This needs to be taken into consideration regardless of what actions are taken with the salt. (3) More than one phase of material

  20. 9 CFR 75.4 - Interstate movement of equine infectious anemia reactors and approval of laboratories, diagnostic...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... natural death, slaughter, or until disposed of by euthanasia; or (3) The reactor is moved interstate to... farm until natural death, slaughter, or until disposed of by euthanasia; and (4) The reactor is...

  1. Production capabilities in US nuclear reactors for medical radioisotopes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mirzadeh, S.; Callahan, A.P.; Knapp, F.F. Jr. [Oak Ridge National Lab., TN (United States); Schenter, R.E. [Westinghouse Hanford Co., Richland, WA (United States)

    1992-11-01

    The availability of reactor-produced radioisotopes in the United States for use in medical research and nuclear medicine has traditionally depended on facilities which are an integral part of the US national laboratories and a few reactors at universities. One exception is the reactor in Sterling Forest, New York, originally operated as part of the Cintichem (Union Carbide) system, which is currently in the process of permanent shutdown. Since there are no industry-run reactors in the US, the national laboratories and universities thus play a critical role in providing reactor-produced radioisotopes for medical research and clinical use. The goal of this survey is to provide a comprehensive summary of these production capabilities. With the temporary shutdown of the Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) High Flux Isotope Reactor (HFIR) in November 1986, the radioisotopes required for DOE-supported radionuclide generators were made available at the Brookhaven National Laboratory (BNL) High Flux Beam Reactor (HFBR). In March 1988, however, the HFBR was temporarily shut down which forced investigators to look at other reactors for production of the radioisotopes. During this period the Missouri University Research Reactor (MURR) played an important role in providing these services. The HFIR resumed routine operation in July 1990 at 85 MW power, and the HFBR resumed operation in June 1991, at 30 MW power. At the time of the HFBR shutdown, there was no available comprehensive overview which could provide information on status of the reactors operating in the US and their capabilities for radioisotope production. The obvious need for a useful overview was thus the impetus for preparing this survey, which would provide an up-to-date summary of those reactors available in the US at both the DOE-funded national laboratories and at US universities where service irradiations are currently or expected to be conducted.

  2. Review of Transient Fuel Test Results at Sandia National Laboratories and the Potential for Future Fast Reactor Fuel Transient Testing in the Annular Core Research Reactor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wright, Steven A.; Pickard, Paul S.; Parma, Edward J.; Vernon, Milton E.; Kelly, John; Tikare, Veena [Sandia National Laboratories, Org 6872 MS-1146, PO Box 5800 Albuquerque, New Mexico 87185 (United States)

    2009-06-15

    Reactor driven transient tests of fast reactor fuels may be required to support the development and certification of new fuels for Fast Reactors. The results of the transient fuel tests will likely be needed to support licensing and to provide validation data to support the safety case for a variety of proposed fast fuel types and reactors. In general reactor driven transient tests are used to identify basic phenomenology during reactor transients and to determine the fuel performance limits and margins to failure during design basis accidents such as loss of flow, loss of heat sink, and reactivity insertion accidents. This paper provides a summary description of the previous Sandia Fuel Disruption and Transient Axial Relocation tests that were performed in the Annular Core Research Reactor (ACRR) for the U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission almost 25 years ago. These tests consisted of a number of capsule tests and flowing gas tests that used fission heating to disrupt fresh and irradiated MOX fuel. The behavior of the fuel disruption, the generation of aerosols and the melting and relocation of fuel and cladding was recorded on high speed cinematography. This paper will present videos of the fuel disruption that was observed in these tests which reveal stark differences in fuel behavior between fresh and irradiated fuel. Even though these tests were performed over 25 years ago, their results are still relevant to today's reactor designs. These types of transient tests are again being considered by the Advanced Fuel Cycle Initiative to support the Global Nuclear Energy Partnership because of the need to perform tests on metal fuels and transuranic fuels. Because the Annular Core Research Reactor is the only transient test facility available within the US, a brief summary of Sandia's continued capability to perform these tests in the ACRR will also be provided. (authors)

  3. Safety evaluation report related to the renewal of the operating license for the Zero-Power Reactor at Cornell University, Docket No. 50-97

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This Safety Evaluation Report for the application filed by Cornell University (CU) for a renewal of Operating License R-80 to continue to operate a zero-power reactor (ZPR) has been prepared by the Office of Nuclear Reactor Regulation of the US Nuclear Regulatory Commission. The facility is owned and operated by Cornell University and is located on the Cornell campus in Ithaca, New York. The staff concludes that the ZPR facility can continue to be operated by CU without endangering the health and safety of the public

  4. Fusion reactor materials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This is the fifteenth in a series of semiannual technical progress reports on fusion reactor materials. This report combines research and development activities which were previously reported separately in the following progress reports: Alloy Development for Irradiation Performance; Damage Analysis and Fundamental Studies; Special purpose Materials. These activities are concerned principally with the effects of the neutronic and chemical environment on the properties and performance of reactor materials; together they form one element of the overall materials programs being conducted in support of the Magnetic Fusion Energy Program of the U.S. Department of Energy. The Fusion Reactor Materials Program is a national effort involving several national laboratories, universities, and industries. The purpose of this series of reports is to provide a working technical record for the use of the program participants, and to provide a means of communicating the efforts of materials scientists to the rest of the fusion community, both nationally and worldwide

  5. Upgrade of a radiation measurement laboratory course at the University of Florida

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The open-quotes Nuclear Radiation Detection and Instrumentation Laboratoryclose quotes course at the University of Florida provides health physics students with virtually their only hands-on exposure to the radiation measurement equipment used in professional practice. To better prepare students for employment, the course is currently under revision, with implementation of the revised course scheduled for fall semester 1996. The primary goal is to improve student understanding of the inherent strengths and limitations of various gas-filled, scintillation, and semiconductor detectors. A secondary goal is to improve student writing skills. To devise lab exercises that meet these goals, a six-step method for systematic laboratory course improvement was developed and used to guide the revision process. First, course objectives were delineated. Second, obstacles to achieving these course objectives were candidly assessed. Third, the course objectives were prioritized to ensure that the most important ones were met within the given time and equipment constraints. Fourth, performance-based learning objectives were written for each exercise. Fifth, exercises were developed that enable students to achieve the learning objectives specified. Sixth, when the revised course is implemented, its teaching effectiveness will be measured and steps will be taken to improve further. Course revision is nearly complete, and the new exercises promise to significantly improve both student technical knowledge and communication skill

  6. Energy programs at the Johns Hopkins University Applied Physics Laboratory. Quarterly report, October--December 1978

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1979-01-01

    The Johns Hopkins University Applied Physics Laboratory, under contracts with the U.S. Department of Energy, the National Science Foundation, U.S. Maritime Administration, Maryland Department of Natural Resources, U.S. Department of Commerce, and U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service, is engaged in developing energy resources, utilization concepts, and storage methods. This report is divided into four sections. The first, Geothermal Energy Programs, contains reports on various geothermal investigations in the Atlantic Coastal Plain; a Geothermal Energy Market Survey and a development scenario for the Delmarva area of Maryland. The second, Small-Scale Hydroelectric Energy, contains the results of several major studies on dams and on the economic and institutional issues related to their redevelopment. The third section contains progress reports on two major tasks performed for the Ocean Thermal Energy Conversion (OTEC) Program, Ocean Engineering and Heat Exchangers for OTEC systems. The fourth section, Conservation and Mechanical Storage of Energy, contains reports on flywheels and a JHU-funded heat pump application to the physical plant at APL.

  7. Study of the comprehension of the scientific method by members of a university health research laboratory

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A.C. Burlamaque-Neto

    2012-02-01

    Full Text Available In Brazil, scientific research is carried out mainly at universities, where professors coordinate research projects with the active participation of undergraduate and graduate students. However, there is no formal program for the teaching/learning of the scientific method. The objective of the present study was to evaluate the comprehension of the scientific method by students of health sciences who participate in scientific projects in an academic research laboratory. An observational descriptive cross-sectional study was conducted using Edgar Morin complexity as theoretical reference. In a semi-structured interview, students were asked to solve an abstract logical puzzle - TanGram. The collected data were analyzed using the hermeneutic-dialectic analysis method proposed by Minayo and discussed in terms of the theoretical reference of complexity. The students’ concept of the scientific method is limited to participation in projects, stressing the execution of practical procedures as opposed to scientific thinking. The solving of the TanGram puzzle revealed that the students had difficulties in understanding questions and activities focused on subjects and their processes. Objective answers, even when dealing with personal issues, were also reflected on the students’ opinions about the characteristics of a successful researcher. Students’ difficulties concerning these issues may affect their scientific performance and result in poorly designed experiments. This is a preliminary study that should be extended to other centers of scientific research.

  8. Study of the comprehension of the scientific method by members of a university health research laboratory.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burlamaque-Neto, A C; Santos, G R; Lisbôa, L M; Goldim, J R; Machado, C L B; Matte, U; Giugliani, R

    2012-02-01

    In Brazil, scientific research is carried out mainly at universities, where professors coordinate research projects with the active participation of undergraduate and graduate students. However, there is no formal program for the teaching/learning of the scientific method. The objective of the present study was to evaluate the comprehension of the scientific method by students of health sciences who participate in scientific projects in an academic research laboratory. An observational descriptive cross-sectional study was conducted using Edgar Morin complexity as theoretical reference. In a semi-structured interview, students were asked to solve an abstract logical puzzle - TanGram. The collected data were analyzed using the hermeneutic-dialectic analysis method proposed by Minayo and discussed in terms of the theoretical reference of complexity. The students' concept of the scientific method is limited to participation in projects, stressing the execution of practical procedures as opposed to scientific thinking. The solving of the TanGram puzzle revealed that the students had difficulties in understanding questions and activities focused on subjects and their processes. Objective answers, even when dealing with personal issues, were also reflected on the students' opinions about the characteristics of a successful researcher. Students' difficulties concerning these issues may affect their scientific performance and result in poorly designed experiments. This is a preliminary study that should be extended to other centers of scientific research.

  9. Intestinal and hepatic parasites determined in a university hospital parasitology laboratory

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zeynep Taş Cengiz

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available Objective: The aim of this study is to present the prevalence of intestinal and hepatic parasites determined in Yüzüncü Yıl University Medical Faculty Parasitology Laboratory. Methods: The study was performed in 2008, and a total of 5985 stool samples were examined. Stool samples were examined with native-Lugol, sedimentation, flotation, trichrome staining and modified acid-fast staining methods. The stool samples of patient suspected to have Entamoeba histolytica/E.dispar infection were stained by trichrome staining method and evaluated by ELISA method for the antigen. ELISA method was used to confirm the results of Fasciola hepatica positive patients in stool examination. Results: In this study intestinal parasites were identified in 29.6% out of the 5985 people. In the study Giardia intestinalis (9.4%, plenty Blastocystis hominis (5.5%, Hymenolepis nana (1.7%, Ascaris lumbricoides (1.2%, Enterobius vermicularis (0.2%; in the stool examination, F.hepatica (0.1%, Cyclospora cayetanensis (0.1%, E.histolytica/E.dispar (0.06%, Taenia saginata (0.05%, Dicrocoelium dendriticum (0.05%, Trichuris trichiura (0.03% and Cryptosporidium spp. (0.02%, pathogenic parasites, were detected. Conclusion: In the study it is also understood that pathogenic intestinal parasites have still been reported at high rates and the problem of parasitosis continues in Van Province.

  10. Study of the comprehension of the scientific method by members of a university health research laboratory.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burlamaque-Neto, A C; Santos, G R; Lisbôa, L M; Goldim, J R; Machado, C L B; Matte, U; Giugliani, R

    2012-02-01

    In Brazil, scientific research is carried out mainly at universities, where professors coordinate research projects with the active participation of undergraduate and graduate students. However, there is no formal program for the teaching/learning of the scientific method. The objective of the present study was to evaluate the comprehension of the scientific method by students of health sciences who participate in scientific projects in an academic research laboratory. An observational descriptive cross-sectional study was conducted using Edgar Morin complexity as theoretical reference. In a semi-structured interview, students were asked to solve an abstract logical puzzle - TanGram. The collected data were analyzed using the hermeneutic-dialectic analysis method proposed by Minayo and discussed in terms of the theoretical reference of complexity. The students' concept of the scientific method is limited to participation in projects, stressing the execution of practical procedures as opposed to scientific thinking. The solving of the TanGram puzzle revealed that the students had difficulties in understanding questions and activities focused on subjects and their processes. Objective answers, even when dealing with personal issues, were also reflected on the students' opinions about the characteristics of a successful researcher. Students' difficulties concerning these issues may affect their scientific performance and result in poorly designed experiments. This is a preliminary study that should be extended to other centers of scientific research. PMID:22249427

  11. Studies of nuclear processes at the Triangle Universities Nuclear Laboratory. Progress report, 1 September 1994--31 August 1995

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The Triangle Universities Nuclear Laboratory (TUNL)--a collaboration of Duke University, North Carolina State University, and the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill--has had a very productive year. This report covers the second year of a three-year grant between the US Department of Energy and the three collaborating universities. The TUNL research program focuses on the following areas of nuclear physics: parity violation in neutron and charged-particle resonances--the mass and energy dependence of the weak interaction spreading width; chaotic behavior in 30P from studies of eigenvalue fluctuations in nuclear level schemes; studies of few-body systems; nuclear astrophysics; nuclear data evaluation for A = 3--20, for which TUNL is now the international center; high-spin spectroscopy and superdeformation in nuclei, involving collaborations at Argonne National Laboratory. Developments in technology and instrumentation have been vital to the research and training program. In this progress report the author describes: a proposed polarized γ-beam facility at the Duke Free Electron Laser Laboratory; cryogenic systems and microcalorimeter development; continuing development of the Low Energy Beam Facility. The research summaries presented in this progress report are preliminary

  12. Studies of nuclear processes at the Triangle Universities Nuclear Laboratory. Progress report, 1 September 1994--31 August 1995

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ludwig, E.J.

    1995-09-01

    The Triangle Universities Nuclear Laboratory (TUNL)--a collaboration of Duke University, North Carolina State University, and the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill--has had a very productive year. This report covers the second year of a three-year grant between the US Department of Energy and the three collaborating universities. The TUNL research program focuses on the following areas of nuclear physics: parity violation in neutron and charged-particle resonances--the mass and energy dependence of the weak interaction spreading width; chaotic behavior in {sup 30}P from studies of eigenvalue fluctuations in nuclear level schemes; studies of few-body systems; nuclear astrophysics; nuclear data evaluation for A = 3--20, for which TUNL is now the international center; high-spin spectroscopy and superdeformation in nuclei, involving collaborations at Argonne National Laboratory. Developments in technology and instrumentation have been vital to the research and training program. In this progress report the author describes: a proposed polarized {gamma}-beam facility at the Duke Free Electron Laser Laboratory; cryogenic systems and microcalorimeter development; continuing development of the Low Energy Beam Facility. The research summaries presented in this progress report are preliminary.

  13. Assessment of the National Research Universal Reactor Proposed New Stack Sampling Probe Location for Compliance with ANSI/HPS N13.1-1999

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Glissmeyer, John A. [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Antonio, Ernest J. [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Flaherty, Julia E. [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States)

    2016-02-29

    This document reports on a series of tests conducted to assess the proposed air sampling location for the National Research Universal reactor (NRU) complex exhaust stack, located in Chalk River, Ontario, Canada, with respect to the applicable criteria regarding the placement of an air sampling probe. Due to the age of the equipment in the existing monitoring system, and the increasing difficulty in acquiring replacement parts to maintain this equipment, a more up-to-date system is planned to replace the current effluent monitoring system, and a new monitoring location has been proposed. The new sampling probe should be located within the exhaust stack according to the criteria established by the American National Standards Institute/Health Physics Society (ANSI/HPS) N13.1-1999, Sampling and Monitoring Releases of Airborne Radioactive Substances from the Stack and Ducts of Nuclear Facilities. These criteria address the capability of the sampling probe to extract a sample that represents the effluent stream. The internal Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) project for this task was 65167, Atomic Energy Canada Ltd. Chalk River Effluent Duct Flow Qualification. The testing described in this document was guided by the Test Plan: Testing of the NRU Stack Air Sampling Position (TP-STMON-032).

  14. Health and safety plan for the Molten Salt Reactor Experiment remediation project at Oak Ridge National Laboratory, Oak Ridge, Tennessee

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The Lockheed Martin Energy Systems, Inc., (Energy Systems) policy is to provide a safe and healthful workplace for all employees and subcontractors. The accomplishment of the policy requires that operations at the Molten Salt Reactor Experiment (MSRE) facility at the Department of Energy (DOE) Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) are guided by an overall plan and consistent proactive approach to safety and health (S and H) issues. The policy and procedures in this plan apply to all MSRE operations. The provisions of this plan are to be carried out whenever activities are initiated at the MSRE that could be a threat to human health or the environment. This plan implements a policy and establishes criteria for the development of procedures for day-to-day operations to prevent or minimize any adverse impact to the environment and personnel safety and health and to meet standards that define acceptable management of hazardous and radioactive materials and wastes. The plan is written to utilize past experience and the best management practices to minimize hazards to human health or the environment from events such as fires, explosions, falls, mechanical hazards, or any unplanned release of hazardous or radioactive materials to the air

  15. Health and safety plan for the Molten Salt Reactor Experiment remediation project at Oak Ridge National Laboratory, Oak Ridge, Tennessee

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Burman, S.N.; Uziel, M.S.

    1995-12-01

    The Lockheed Martin Energy Systems, Inc., (Energy Systems) policy is to provide a safe and healthful workplace for all employees and subcontractors. The accomplishment of the policy requires that operations at the Molten Salt Reactor Experiment (MSRE) facility at the Department of Energy (DOE) Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) are guided by an overall plan and consistent proactive approach to safety and health (S and H) issues. The policy and procedures in this plan apply to all MSRE operations. The provisions of this plan are to be carried out whenever activities are initiated at the MSRE that could be a threat to human health or the environment. This plan implements a policy and establishes criteria for the development of procedures for day-to-day operations to prevent or minimize any adverse impact to the environment and personnel safety and health and to meet standards that define acceptable management of hazardous and radioactive materials and wastes. The plan is written to utilize past experience and the best management practices to minimize hazards to human health or the environment from events such as fires, explosions, falls, mechanical hazards, or any unplanned release of hazardous or radioactive materials to the air.

  16. United States Department of Energy commercial reactor spent fuel programs being conducted at the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In 1982, the Congress of the United States enacted the Nuclear Waste Policy Act (NWPA). This act stated that in exchange for one mil per kilowatt of electricity generated by nuclear power, the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) would take possession of the Utilities' nuclear spent fuel and provide for permanent disposal. The act also provided for establishment of the Office of Civilian Radioactive Waste Management (OCRWM) within the DOE to manage the NWPA programs. The Idaho National Engineering Laboratory participation in OCRWM programs includes the Spent Fuel Storage Cask Testing Program, Dry Rod Consolidation Technology Program, Prototypical Consolidation Demonstration Program, the Nuclear Fuel Services Project, and the Cask Systems Acquisition Program. The Dry Rod Consolidation Technology Program demonstrates dry consolidation of PWR fuel assemblies and develops and documents technology associated with the dry consolidation process. The Prototypical Consolidation Demonstration Program develops and demonstrates production-scale equipment for the dry consolidation and packaging of spent fuel rods contained in BWR and PWR spent fuel assemblies and reports the results of these activities. The Nuclear Fuel Services Project will demonstrate the feasibility of packaging, transporting, and storing commercial spent fuel in the same dry storage cask. The Cask System Acquistion Program will develop a complement of NRC certified prototype casks for shipment of spent PWR and BWR fuels and hardware from existing and proposed reactor facilities and solidified high-level waste to a repository or an MRS

  17. Initial test results of the Omron face cue entry system at the University of Missouri-Rolla Reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The University of Missouri-Rolla Reactor facility is testing, in collaboration with Omron Transaction Systems, Inc., the Omron Face Cue facial recognition system for access control to its restricted area. The installation of this system is the first of its kind at a security-relevant facility in the U.S. and within the research reactor community. The Face Cue is an on-demand device based on facial recognition and storage technology. The image processing methodology is as follows: (1) facial position detection, (2) background elimination, (3) facial features discrimination via application of a wavelet transform. The extracted facial feature values are compared to the data archived in its database and access is provided upon meeting the authorization criteria. The current test phase consisted of assessing the functionality of the Face Cue during daily use and in terms of its robustness (flexibility) as a function of the following physical parameters: (1) subject's distance away from the Face Cue, (2) ambient lighting conditions, (3) subject's facial orientation, (4) subject's facial expression and (5) peripheral facial features/modifications. The system has operated at nearly 100% reliability during several test intervals with approximately 7,000 entry attempts to date. (author)

  18. Using Monte Carlo transport to accurately predict isotope production and activation analysis rates at the University of Missouri research reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A detailed Monte Carlo N-Particle Transport Code (MCNP5) model of the University of Missouri research reactor (MURR) has been developed. The ability of the model to accurately predict isotope production rates was verified by comparing measured and calculated neutron- capture reaction rates for numerous isotopes. In addition to thermal (1/v) monitors, the benchmarking included a number of isotopes whose (n, γ) reaction rates are very sensitive to the epithermal portion of the neutron spectrum. Using the most recent neutron libraries (ENDF/ B-VII.0), the model was able to accurately predict the measured reaction rates in all cases. The model was then combined with ORIGEN 2.2, via MONTEBURNS 2.0, to calculate production of 99Mo from fission of low-enriched uranium foils. The model was used to investigate both annular and plate LEU foil targets in a variety of arrangements in a graphite irradiation wedge to optimize the production of 99Mo. (author)

  19. Chemical Reactors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kenney, C. N.

    1980-01-01

    Describes a course, including content, reading list, and presentation on chemical reactors at Cambridge University, England. A brief comparison of chemical engineering education between the United States and England is also given. (JN)

  20. US Department of Energy Nuclear Energy University program in robotics for advanced reactors: Program plan, FY 1987-1991

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The US Department of Energy has provided support to four universities and the Oak Ridge National Laboratory in order to pursue research leading to the development and deployment of an advanced robotic system capable of performing tasks that are hazardous to humans, that generate significant occupational radiation exposure, and/or whose execution times can be reduced if performed by an automated system. The goal is to develop a generation of advanced robotic systems capable of performing surveillance, maintenance, and repair tasks in nuclear facilities and other hazardous environments. This goal will be achieved through a team effort among the Universities of Florida, Michigan, Tennessee, Texas, and the Oak Ridge National Laboratory, and their industrial partners, Combustion Engineering, Martin Marietta Baltimore Aerospace, Odetics, Remotec, and Telerobotics International. Each of the universities and ORNL have ongoing activities and corresponding facilities in areas of R and D related to robotics. This program is designed to take full advantage of these existing resources at the participating institutions

  1. Results from Accelerator Driven TRIGA Reactor Experiments at The University of Texas at Austin

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Accelerator Driven Transmutation of High-Level Waste (ATW) is one possible solution to the fuel reprocessing back-end problem for the disposal of high level waste such as minor actinides (Am, Np or Cm) and long-lived fission products. International programs continue to support research towards the eventual construction and operation of a proton accelerator driven spallation neutron source coupled to a subcritical 'neutron amplifier' for more efficient HLW transmutation. This project was performed under DOE AFCI Reactor-Accelerator Coupling Experiments (RACE). A 20 MeV Electron Linac was installed in the BP no 5 cave placing neutron source adjacent to an offset reactor core to maximize neutron coupling with available systems. Asymmetric neutron injection 'wasted' neutrons due to high leakage but sufficient neutrons were available to raise reactor power to ∼100 watts. The Linac provided approximately 100 mA but only 50% reached target. The Linac cooling system could not prevent overheating at frequencies over 200 Hz. The Linac electron beam had harmonics of primary frequency and periodic low frequency pulse intensity changes. Neutron detection using fission chambers in current mode eliminated saturation dead time and produced better sensitivity. The Operation of 'dual shielded' fission chambers reduced electron noise from linac. Benchmark criticality calculation using start-up data showed that the MCNPX model overestimates reactivity. TRIGA core was loaded to just slightly supercritical by adding graphite elements and measuring reactivity of $0.037. MCNPX modeled TRIGA core with and without graphite to arrive at 'true' measured subcritical multiplication of 0.998733± 0.00069. Thus, Alpha for the UT-RACE TRIGA core was approximately 155.99 s-1. The Stochastic Feynman-Alpha Method (SFM) accuracy was evaluated during transients and reactivity changes. SFM was shown to be a potential real-time method of reactivity determination in future ADSS but requires stable

  2. Advanced Test Reactor National Scientific User Facility Partnerships

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Frances M. Marshall; Todd R. Allen; Jeff B. Benson; James I. Cole; Mary Catherine Thelen

    2012-03-01

    In 2007, the United States Department of Energy designated the Advanced Test Reactor (ATR), located at Idaho National Laboratory, as a National Scientific User Facility (NSUF). This designation made test space within the ATR and post-irradiation examination (PIE) equipment at INL available for use by researchers via a proposal and peer review process. The goal of the ATR NSUF is to provide researchers with the best ideas access to the most advanced test capability, regardless of the proposer's physical location. Since 2007, the ATR NSUF has expanded its available reactor test space, and obtained access to additional PIE equipment. Recognizing that INL may not have all the desired PIE equipment, or that some equipment may become oversubscribed, the ATR NSUF established a Partnership Program. This program enables and facilitates user access to several university and national laboratories. So far, seven universities and one national laboratory have been added to the ATR NSUF with capability that includes reactor-testing space, PIE equipment, and ion beam irradiation facilities. With the addition of these universities, irradiation can occur in multiple reactors and post-irradiation exams can be performed at multiple universities. In each case, the choice of facilities is based on the user's technical needs. Universities and laboratories included in the ATR NSUF partnership program are as follows: (1) Nuclear Services Laboratories at North Carolina State University; (2) PULSTAR Reactor Facility at North Carolina State University; (3) Michigan Ion Beam Laboratory (1.7 MV Tandetron accelerator) at the University of Michigan; (4) Irradiated Materials at the University of Michigan; (5) Harry Reid Center Radiochemistry Laboratories at University of Nevada, Las Vegas; (6) Characterization Laboratory for Irradiated Materials at the University of Wisconsin-Madison; (7) Tandem Accelerator Ion Beam. (1.7 MV terminal voltage tandem ion accelerator) at the University of

  3. University of New Mexico-Los Alamos National Laboratory Program in Volcanology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goff, F.; Fischer, T.; Baldridge, W.; Wohletz, K.; Smith, G.; Heiken, G.; Valentine, G.; Elston, W.

    2002-05-01

    The UNM-LANL Program in Volcanology was a vision of Wolf Elston in the late 1980s. Finally established in mid-1992, the program takes advantage of the extensive volcanic record preserved in northern New Mexico, and of the unique expertise and exceptional research facilities existing at the two institutions. Courses are directed toward upper division and graduate level students. The Los Alamos participants are adjunct professors and they take an active role in creating courses, advising thesis candidates, and providing research support. The curriculum is flexible but has a core upper division class in Physical Volcanology. Other classes offered in various years have included Volcanology and Human Affairs; Magmatic and Geothermal Systems; Tectonics and Magma Generation; Volcanoes of North America; Instrumentation for Volcanology; and Advanced Igneous Petrology. Perhaps the most renowned class in the program is the Volcanology Summer Field Course offered in even numbered years. This 3.5-week class is based in the Jemez Mountains volcanic field, which contains the famous Valles caldera (1.2 Ma to 50 ka). All types of calc-alkaline to alkalic domes, flows, tuffs, and intrusions, plus derivative sediments, mineralized zones, and thermal fluids are available for instructional purposes. Students are required to complete nine rigorous field exercises starting with basic instruction in pyroclastic fall, flow, and surge, then progressing towards hydrothermally altered, intracaldera resurgent dome and moat deposits in an active hot spring and fumarole system. The class is open to graduate students, advanced undergraduates, and private sector employees with special needs. Enrollment is competitive with limited financial support and limited space for 17 students. Evening lectures, study time, lodging, and meals are provided at the UNM-owned Young's Ranch built in the 1920s, nestled in a canyon flanked by orange cliffs of Bandelier Tuff. About 120 students from 12 countries have

  4. Automated three dimensional depletion capability for the Pennsylvania State University research reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This paper describes the new depletion calculation capability for the Pennsylvania State Univ. research reactor (PSBR). The calculation scheme employs the general purpose Monte Carlo code MCNP4C coupled with the versatile nuclear depletion code ORIGEN2.2 via the recently developed interface code, TRIGSIM. The main functions of the TRIGSIM code are automatic generation of MCNP and ORIGEN inputs from one TRIGSIM input and interfacing the data exchange between the two codes. The PSBR core loading 1, core loading 2 and core loading 3 were modeled using TRIGSIM code. The excess reactivity results from the core calculations have shown reasonable agreement compared to the measured excess reactivity from the operational log book. (authors)

  5. Nuclear Physics Laboratory, University of Colorado technical progress report, 1976 and proposal for continuation of contract

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1976-11-01

    This report summarizes the work carried out at the Nuclear Physics Laboratory of the University of Colorado during the period November 1, 1975 to November 1, 1976. The low energy nuclear physics section is dominated by light-ion reaction studies which span a wide range. These include both two-neutron and two-proton transfer reactions, charge exchange and inelastic scattering, as well as single nucleon transfer reactions. The nuclei studied vary widely in their mass and characteristics. These reaction studies have been aided by the multi-use scattering chamber which now allows the energy-loss-spectrometer beam preparation system (beam swinger) to shift from charged particle studies to neutron time-of-flight studies with a minimum loss of time. The intermediate energy section reflects the increase in activity accompanying the arrival of LAMPF data and the initiation of (p,d) studies at the Indiana separated-sector cyclotron. The nucleon removal results provided by the ..pi.. beam at EPICS previous to completion of the spectrometer have shown that nuclear effects dominate this process, so that the widely used free interaction picture is inadequate. The section entitled ''Other Activities'' reveals continuing activities in new applications of nuclear techniques to problems in medicine and biology. Reactions important to astrophysics continue to be investigated and our trace-element program remains at a high level of activity. The theoretical section reports new progress in understanding magnitudes of two-step reactions by inclusion of finite-range effects. A new finite-range program which is fast and economical has been completed. Intermediate energy results include calculations of ..pi..-..gamma.. angular correlations, low energy ..pi..-nucleus interactions, as well as (p,d) and nucleon scattering calculations for intermediate energies.

  6. From Secondary School To University: Attracting Young Students Towards A Career In Nuclear

    OpenAIRE

    Jimenez Varas, Gonzalo; A. Alvarez; Ortega, S.; Rubio, Rafael; M. Sánchez

    2011-01-01

    From its creation, Spanish Young Generation in Nuclear (Jóvenes Nucleares, JJNN), a non-profit organization that depends on the Spanish Nuclear Society (SNE), has as an important scope to help spread knowledge about nuclear energy, not only pointing out its advantages and its role in our society, but also trying to correct some of the ideas that are due to the biased information and to the lack of knowledge. To try to have success in that goal, some high school lectures were taught and it has...

  7. Post-remedial-action survey report for Kinetic Experiment Water Boiler Reactor Facility, Santa Susana Field Laboratories, Rockwell International, Ventura County, California

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rockwell International's Santa Susana Laboratories in Ventura County, California, have been the site of numerous federally-funded contracted projects involving the use of radioactive materials. Among these was the Kinetics Experiment Water Boiler (KEWB) Reactor which was operated under the auspices of the US Atomic Energy Commission (AEC). The KEWB Reactor was last operated in 1966. The facility was subsequently declared excess and decontamination and decommissioning operations were conducted during the first half of calendar year 1975. The facility was completely dismantled and the site graded to blend with the surrounding terrain. During October 1981, a post-remedial-action (certification) survey of the KEWB site was conducted on the behalf of the US Department of Energy by the Radiological Survey Group (RSG) of the Occupational Health and Safety Division's Health Physics Section (OHS/HP) of Argonne National Laboratory (ANL). The survey confirmed that the site was free from contamination and could be released for unrestricted use

  8. Young generation in Romanian nuclear system - Romanian nuclear organizations implication in nuclear knowledge management at University 'Politehnica' of Bucharest: Results and expectations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Full text: The knowledge management should be assumed by the major players within the nuclear community: government, industry and university. Starting from these problems this article gives an overview about Romanian nuclear knowledge management and the Young Generation implications. In Romania there are many government and non-government nuclear institutions such: CNCAN (Romanian Regulatory Body), ROMATOM (Romanian Atomic Forum), AREN (Romanian 'Nuclear Energy' Association), and companies: SNN ('Nuclearelectrica' SA National Company), CITON (Centre of Technology and Engineering for Nuclear Projects), SCN (Institute for Nuclear Research ), ROMAG - PROD ( Romanian Heavy Water Plant). All these institutes and companies are sustaining the national nuclear program and promoting the new technologies in the nuclear industry according with CNCAN and ROMATOM regulations. University 'POLITEHNICA' of Bucharest - Power Engineering Faculty - through Nuclear Power Plant Department is the promoter of nuclear knowledge management. It is implied in assuring and maintaining a high - quality training for young staff. Young Generation is implicated in nuclear knowledge management through University 'Politehnica' of Bucharest - Power Engineering Faculty - Nuclear Power Plant Department and AREN (Romanian 'Nuclear Energy' Association). Young Generation Department has special educational programs for attracting and supporting students. It provides adequate information and interacts with potential students. Moreover the article gives results about Romanian nuclear engineers since 1970 till now. An analysis of these data is done. Also it is discussed how University 'Politehnica' of Bucharest, the Romanian Government and the Industry work together to co-ordinate more effectively their efforts to encourage the young generation. (author)

  9. Princeton University Plasma Physics Laboratory, Princeton, New Jersey. Annual report, October 1, 1990--September 30, 1991

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1991-12-31

    This report discusses the following topics: Principal parameters of experimental devices; Tokamak Fusion Test Reactor; Burning Plasma Experiment; Princeton Beta Experiment-Modification; Current Drive Experiment-Upgrade; International Thermonuclear Experimental Reactor; International Collaboration; X-Ray Laser Studies; Hyperthermal Atomic Beam Source; Pure Electron Plasma Experiments; Plasma Processing: Deposition and Etching of Thin Films; Theoretical Studies; Tokamak Modeling; Engineering Department; Environment, Safety, and Health and Quality Assurance; Technology Transfer; Office of Human Resources and Administration; PPPL Patent Invention Disclosures; Office of Resource Management; Graduate Education: Plasma Physics; Graduate Education: Program in Plasma Science and Technology; and Science Education Program.

  10. The Attainability of University Degrees and Their Labour Market Benefits for Young Australians

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Jung-Sook

    2014-01-01

    I used data from the 1995 cohort of the Longitudinal Surveys of Australian Youth to investigate the factors associated with the attainment of Australian university degrees and estimate their domestic labour market benefits. I considered vertical and horizontal stratification in education and examined monetary and non-monetary benefits. The…

  11. Change of "Habitus": The Young People and the Free Public University in Northeast of Brazil

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bandeira de Melo, Patricia; Romani Campos, Luís Henrique; Zarias, Alexandre; Gonçalves Ferreira, Suzy Luna Nobre

    2016-01-01

    This paper explores the results of the research "A interiorização recente das Instituições públicas e gratuitas de ensino superior no Nordeste: efeitos e mudanças" [The recent implementation of new federal universities in the Northeast of Brazil: effects and changes], performed by the Joaquim Nabuco Foundation. One of its main mottos is…

  12. Metabolic Syndrome: Comparison of Prevalence in Young Adults at 3 Land-Grant Universities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morrell, Jesse Stabile; Byrd-Bredbenner, Carol; Quick, Virginia; Olfert, Melissa; Dent, Amanda; Carey, Gale B.

    2014-01-01

    Objective: The study examines metabolic syndrome (MetS) among college students at 3 geographically distinct US campuses. Participants: Undergraduates ("N" = 360; 68% women), 18 to 24 years of age, were recruited at each public university in January and February 2011. MetS prevalence was evaluated in 83% ("n" = 299)…

  13. Pornography consumption and non-marital sexual behaviour in a sample of young Indonesian university students

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hald, Gert Martin; Mulya, Teguh Wijaya

    2013-01-01

    Using a sample of Indonesian university students and a cross sectional design, this study investigated prevalence rates and patterns of pornography consumption in Indonesia, a religious, sexually conservative, Muslim-majority nation with strict anti-pornography laws. Further, the association...

  14. Source-term and building-wake consequence modeling for the GODIVA IV reactor at Los Alamos National Laboratory

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The objectives of this work were to evaluate the consequences of a postulated accident to on-site security personnel stationed near the facility during operations of the Godiva IV critical assembly and to identify controls needed to protest these personnel in case of an extreme criticality excursion equivalent to a design-basis accident (DBA). Godiva IV, one of several critical assemblies operated by Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL), is located within the Kiva III facility at the Technical Area 18 (TA-18) complex. The TA-18 area is located in a canyon surrounded by complex terrain features such as a steep adjacent hillside and tall stands of fir trees. This analysis was motivated by the need to evaluate the air concentrations and radiological exposure consequences to on-site personnel (guards) located within 40 to 100 m of the facility. GODIVA IV is a highly enriched 235U metal-fuel, fast-burst assembly. The DBA was defined to be a $1.40 critical pulse, which leads to an approximate burst yield of 1.3 x 1018 fissions (or ≅41.6 MJ). The DBA is postulated to lead to partial melt of the reactor assembly (approximately10% of the fuel), with subsequent release of fission products to the environment. The authors present the methodology and results of the source-term calculations, building ventilation rates, air concentrations, and consequence calculations that were performed using a multidisciplinary approach with several phenomenology models. Identification of controls needed to mitigate the consequences to near-field receptors is discussed

  15. University of Wisconsin Nuclear Laboratory, Madison, Wisconsin. Annual report, 1983-1984

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This report is divided into the following sections: summary of operations (instructional use, reactor sharing, activation, etc.), operating statistics and fuel exposure, emergency shutdowns and inadvertent scrams, maintenance, changes in facility or procedures, radioactive waste disposal, summary of radiation exposures, and environmental surveys

  16. Are Young Massive Star Clusters in the Local Universe Analogous to Globular Clusters Progenitors?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Charbonnel, Corinne

    2015-08-01

    Several models do compete to reproduce the present-day characteristics of globular clusters (GC) and to explain the origin of the multiple stellar populations these systems are hosting.In parallel, independent clues on GC early evolution may be derived from observations of young massive clusters (YMC) in the Local Group.But are these two populations of clusters related? In this talk, we discuss how and if GC and YMC data can be reconciled.We revisit in particular the impact of massive stars on the early evolution of massive star clusters, as well as the question of early gas expulsion.We propose several tests to probe whether the YMC we are observing today can be considered as the analogues of GC progenitors.

  17. A Model for Community-based Language Teaching to Young Learners: The Impact of University Outreach

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Martha Nyikos

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available A primary challenge given to university foreign language departments and Title VI National Resource Centers is to increase interest and participation in foreign language learning, with particular emphasis on less commonly taught languages (LCTLs. Given that many LCTLs in high demand by the US government, including Arabic, Chinese, Persian and Turkish, rarely find their way into the school curricula, this article offers a successful ongoing community-based model of how one university-town partnership addresses advocacy with programming for pre-K-grade 9. Non-native and heritage undergraduate language students who volunteered as community language teachers found the experience invaluable to their pedagogical development. Teacher education programs or language departments can employ this approach to community-based teaching, by providing free, sustained language teaching in existing community centers. This article offers guidance for how to start and expand such a program.

  18. Triangle Universities Nuclear Laboratory annual report - TUNL XXIV, 1 July 1984-31 August 1985

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Research programs of the Triangle Nuclear Laboratory are discussed. These studies are based on reactions induced by polarized beam, protons, deuterons and neutrons. Individual programs are cataloged separately

  19. University of Notre Dame Radiation Laboratory quarterly report, July 1--September 30, 1991

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1991-10-15

    Research carried out at the Notre Dame Radiation Laboratory is briefly described. Research involves areas of electron transfer photoprocesses, photochemistry, pulse radiolysis, and charge transfer reactions. 13 refs.

  20. The Design and Construction of a Cold Neutron Source for Use in the Cornell University Triga Reactor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Young, Lydia Jane

    A cold neutron source has been designed and constructed for insertion into the 6"-radial beam port of the Cornell University TRIGA reactor for use with a neutron guide tube system. The main differences between this cold source and other existing sources are the use of heat conduction as the method of cooling and the use of mesitylene (1,3,5 -trimethylbenzene; melting point, 228(DEGREES)K; boiling point, 437(DEGREES)K) as the moderating material. This thesis describes the design and construction details of the cold neutron source, discusses its safety aspects, and presents its cryogenic performance curves and also the results of a test of its neutron moderating ability. A closed-cycle helium gas refrigerator, located outside the reactor shielding, cools the 500 cm('3) moderator chamber and its surrounding heat shield by heat conduction through two meters of copper and rod tubing. Moderator temperatures of 23 (+OR-) 3(DEGREES)K have been achieved. Mesitylene, a hydrocarbon, is an effective cold moderator because even at low temperatures the weakly hindered rotational motions of its methyl groups enable the absorption of small amounts of energy ((LESSTHEQ) 0.005 eV) from neutrons. The use of mesitylene simplifies the cold source design because it is a liquid at room temperature and thus, the usual design safeguards required for sources using gaseous moderators are not necessary. Moreover, the flammability of mesitylene is much smaller than that of hydrogen and methane, which are the commonly used cold moderators. A method of transferring and handling the mesitylene, a carcinogen, was devised to ensure minimal contact with this substance. To test the neutron moderating ability of the cold neutron source, an out-of-reactor neutron transmission experiment was performed with the moderator chamber first at room temperature and then at about 23(DEGREES)K. The results indicate that the neutron energy spectrum is strongly shifted to lower energies when the chamber is cold

  1. Facility for a Low Power Research Reactor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chalker, R. G.

    1949-09-14

    Preliminary investigation indicates that a reactor facility with ample research provisions for use by University or other interested groups, featuring safety in design, can be economically constructed in the Los Angeles area. The complete installation, including an underground gas-tight reactor building, with associated storage and experiment assembly building, administration offices, two general laboratory buildings, hot latoratory and lodge, can be constructed for approxinately $1,500,000. This does not include the cost of the reactor itself or of its auxiliary equipment,

  2. Does the Beach-Spawning Grunion Eat Its Own Eggs? Eighth Graders Use Inquiry-Based Investigation to Collect Real Data in a University Laboratory

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cavanagh, J. William; Martinez, Kimberly M.; Higgins, Benjamin A.; Horn, Michael H.

    2014-01-01

    A collaborative effort between a junior high school and a nearby university allowed 40 eighth-grade honors students to engage in a scientific investigation within a university laboratory. These students, with their science teachers and university researchers, gathered data on egg cannibalism in a beach-spawning fish and thereby contributed to an…

  3. Decontamination and decommissioning of the Argonne Thermal Source Reactor at Argonne National Laboratory - East project final report.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fellhauer, C.; Garlock, G.; Mathiesen, J.

    1998-12-02

    The ATSR D&D Project was directed toward the following goals: (1) Removal of radioactive and hazardous materials associated with the ATSR Reactor facility; (2) Decontamination of the ATSR Reactor facility to unrestricted use levels; and (3)Documentation of all project activities affecting quality (i.e., waste packaging, instrument calibration, audit results, and personnel exposure). These goals had been set in order to eliminate the radiological and hazardous safety concerns inherent in the ATSR Reactor facility and to allow, upon completion of the project, unescorted and unmonitored access to the area. The reactor aluminum, reactor lead, graphite piles in room E-111, and the contaminated concrete in room E-102 were the primary areas of concern. NES, Incorporated (Danbury, CT) characterized the ATSR Reactor facility from January to March 1998. The characterization identified a total of thirteen radionuclides, with a total activity of 64.84 mCi (2.4 GBq). The primary radionuclides of concern were Co{sup 60}, Eu{sup 152}, Cs{sup 137}, and U{sup 238}. No additional radionuclides were identified during the D&D of the facility. The highest dose rates observed during the project were associated with the reactor tank and shield tank. Contact radiation levels of 30 mrem/hr (0.3 mSv/hr) were measured on reactor internals during dismantlement of the reactor. A level of 3 mrem/hr (0.03 mSv/hr) was observed in a small area (hot spot) in room E-102. DOE Order 5480.2A establishes the maximum whole body exposure for occupational workers at 5 rem/yr (50 mSv/yr); the administrative limit at ANL-E is 1 rem/yr (10 mSv/yr).

  4. Assessing the Use of Smartphone in the University General Physics Laboratory

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shi, Wei-Zhao; Sun, Jiajun; Xu, Chong; Huan, Weiliang

    2016-01-01

    In this study, smartphone was used to alter the traditional procedure by involving students in active learning experiences prior to the laboratory meeting. The researcher surveyed students' view on the effect of using smartphone to enhance learning in the general physics laboratory. The use of smartphone was evaluated by having 120 students who…

  5. Examining Student Outcomes in University Computer Laboratory Environments: Issues for Educational Management

    Science.gov (United States)

    Newby, Michael; Marcoulides, Laura D.

    2008-01-01

    Purpose: The purpose of this paper is to model the relationship between student performance, student attitudes, and computer laboratory environments. Design/methodology/approach: Data were collected from 234 college students enrolled in courses that involved the use of a computer to solve problems and provided the laboratory experience by means of…

  6. Validity, Reliability and Psychometric Evaluation of Persian Version of Young Internet Addiction Questionnaire For Tabriz University and Tabriz University of Medical Sciences Students

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Arash Mohagheghi

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: The concept of addiction has developed enough to be used outside of areas such as drugs and alcohol and is being generally applied to many other behaviors such as internet use. The aim of this study is to evaluate the validity and reliability of the Persian version of the Young Internet Addiction Questionnaire (YIAQ in university students in Tabriz. Methods: Initially, YIAQ was translated from English to Persian by someone with expert English skills, and then the Persian version was translated to English by another person. After that, a specialist in the field of psychiatry with acceptable skills in the field of English compared these two versions and suggested needed changes. In this methodological (mixed method study, the Delphi method was used in the qualitative part and a cross-sectional design was used in the quantitative part. The Persian version was evaluated using the Delphi method by ten specialists in the field of internet use and they mentioned changes needed to evaluate face and content validity. For the evaluation of the Cronbach’s alpha coefficient, 200 students with different majors at Tabriz University were selected randomly and filled out the Persian version of YIAQ. Reliability was confirmed by clinical interview. Results: The reliability of the questionnaire was acceptable for 20 questions with Cronbach’s alpha coefficient of 0.93. The face and content validity were determined by the Delphi method and application of opinions of specialists in the field of internet use. Conclusion: The Persian version of YIAQ is valid and reliable for the evaluation of internet addiction

  7. Laboratory-confirmed HIV and sexually transmitted infection seropositivity and risk behavior among sexually active transgender patients at an adolescent and young adult urban community health center

    OpenAIRE

    Reisner, Sari L.; Vetters, Ralph; White, Jaclyn M.; Cohen, Elijah L.; Leclerc, M; Zaslow, Shayne; Wolfrum, Sarah; Mimiaga, Matthew J.

    2015-01-01

    The sexual health of transgender adolescents and young adults who present for health care in urban community health centers is understudied. A retrospective review of electronic health record (EHR) data was conducted from 180 transgender patients aged 12–29 years seen for one or more health-care visits between 2001 and 2010 at an urban community health center serving youth in Boston, MA. Analyses were restricted to 145 sexually active transgender youth (87.3% of the sample). Laboratory-confir...

  8. Summary reports of activities under visiting research program in Research Reactor Institute, Kyoto University, first half of 1989

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This book contains 56 brief reports of studies carried out at the Research Reactor Institute of Kyoto University. These reports deal with 'Neutron Transmutation Doping on Compound Semiconductor', 'Study on the Influence of the Neutron Irradiation on the Low Temperature Strength of Various Welded Joint of Dissimilar Materials', 'Low Temperature Irradiation Effect on Iron-Alloys and Ceramics', 'Luminescent Phenomena from Some Kinds of Rock and Mineral Slices Accompanied with Gamma-irradiation', 'Study of Irradiation Effects on Simulated Waste Glass Irradiated Using 10B(n,γ)7Li Reaction', 'Neutron Spectrometry with CR-39 Track Detector', 'Performance Study on Superconducting Magnet Materials in Thermonuclear Fusion Conditions', 'Fast Neutron Radiography with KUR-Linac', 'Study of Photo-Excited Metastable State and Their Relaxation of Irradiation Defects in Silicon and Diamond by Using a SQUID Magnetometer', 'Moessbauer Study on Radiation Damage of Metals and Alloys', 'Radiation Damages in Super Ionic Conductors', 'Basic Study on 74As Production by (γ,n) Reaction', etc. (N.K.)

  9. Reactor Physics Training

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    University courses in nuclear reactor physics at the universities consist of a theoretical description of the physics and technology of nuclear reactors. In order to demonstrate the basic concepts in reactor physics, training exercises in nuclear reactor installations are also desirable. Since the number of reactor facilities is however strongly decreasing in Europe, it becomes difficult to offer to students a means for demonstrating the basic concepts in reactor physics by performing training exercises in nuclear installations. Universities do not generally possess the capabilities for performing training exercises. Therefore, SCK-CEN offers universities the possibility to perform (on a commercial basis) training exercises at its infrastructure consisting of two research reactors (BR1 and VENUS). Besides the organisation of training exercises in the framework of university courses, SCK-CEN also organizes theoretical courses in reactor physics for the education and training of nuclear reactor operators. It is indeed a very important subject to guarantee the safe operation of present and future nuclear reactors. In this framework, an understanding of the fundamental principles of nuclear reactor physics is also necessary for reactor operators. Therefore, the organisation of a basic Nuclear reactor physics course at the level of reactor operators in the initial and continuous training of reactor operators has proven to be indispensable. In most countries, such training also results from the direct request from the safety authorities to assure the high level of competence of the staff in nuclear reactors. The objectives this activity are: (1) to provide training and education activities in reactor physics for university students and (2) to organise courses in nuclear reactor physics for reactor operators

  10. Intelligent Design, A Young Universe, Astrology, UFO's, and More: Tackling Astronomical Pseudo-science

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fraknoi, A.

    2008-11-01

    During IYA educators and scientists will interact with the public in many ways. There will likely be public questions at IYA events about pseudo-scientific topics. While the particular pseudo-sciences that are in vogue change with time, these days popular astronomical pseudo-science includes creationism and intelligent design (and their denial of the age of the universe), astrology, UFO's as extra-terrestrial spaceships, selling star names, the ``face'' on Mars, the claim that the moon landings were a hoax, etc. We discuss some of the recent surveys of belief in pseudo-science and some ways to respond to questions about these topics. A separate resource guide to help answer questions about astronomical pseudoscience is also included in this volume.

  11. Health Physics Research Reactor (HPRR) operating experience and applications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The Health Physics Research Reactor (HPRR) is a small, unmoderated fast pulse reactor located at the Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL). The HPRR is the principle research tool of ORNL's Dosimetry Applications Research Group. The reactor is described, and its operating experience is presented. The HPRR is used by dosimeter vendors, government laboratories, nuclear power utilities, the military, and universities as well as by the ORNL staff for a wide variety of applications. These applications have been divided into six categories as follows: (1) biological effects studies, (2) criticality alarm testing, (3) dosimetry intercomparison studies, (4) neutron and gamma dose equivalent dosimeter development, (5) simulation of nuclear weapon spectra, and (6) training

  12. The Decline of Clinical Laboratory Science Programs in Colleges and Universities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Castillo, Janet Brown

    2000-01-01

    Enrollment in clinical laboratory science has declined over 50% since 1980. Reasons include lagging salaries, limited advancement opportunities, lack of doctoral-level faculty, and the expense of operating programs. Strategic organizational changes are needed to revive the field. (SK)

  13. Closed-loop biomass co-firing in a laboratory reactor and in a full-scale boiler.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jenkins, Bryan M. (University of California, Davis, CA); Williams, Robert B. (University of California, Davis, CA); Turn, Scott Q. (Hawaii Natural Energy Institute.); Jakeway, Lee A. (Hawaiian Commercial & Sugar Company); Blevins, Linda Gail

    2004-05-01

    Co-firing tests were conducted in a pilot-scale reactor at Sandia National Laboratories and in a boiler at the Hawaiian Commercial & Sugar factory at Puunene, Hawaii. Combustion tests were performed in the Sandia Multi-Fuel Combustor using Australian coal, whole fiber cane including tops and leaves processed at three different levels (milled only, milled and leached, and milled followed by leaching and subsequent milling), and fiber cane stripped of its tops and leaves and heavily processed through subsequent milling, leaching, and milling cycles. Testing was performed for pure fuels and for biomass co-firing with the coal at levels of 30% and 70% by mass. The laboratory tests revealed the following information: (1) The biomass fuels convert their native nitrogen into NO more efficiently than coal because of higher volatile content and more reactive nitrogen complexes. (2) Adding coal to whole fiber cane to reduce its tendency to form deposits should not adversely affect NO emissions. ( 3 ) Stripped cane does not offer a NO advantage over whole cane when co-fired with coal. During the field test, Sandia measured 0 2 , C02, CO, SO2, and NO concentrations in the stack and gas velocities near the superheater. Gas concentrations and velocities fluctuated more during biomass co-firing than during coal combustion. The mean 0 2 concentration was lower and the mean C02 concentration was higher during biomass co-firing than during coal combustion. When normalized to a constant exhaust 0 2 concentration, mean CO concentration was higher and mean NO concentration was lower for biomass co-firing than for coal. The SO2 concentration tracked the use of Bunker C fuel oil. When normalized by the amount of boiler energy input, the amounts of NO and SO2 formed were lower during biomass co-firing than during coal combustion. The difference between NOx trends in the lab and in the field are most likely a result of less effective heat and mass transfer in the boiler. Particles were

  14. How Can Universities Engage With Local Small Businesses? A Case Study of the Chemistry Innovation Laboratory

    OpenAIRE

    Jiang, Lijie

    2013-01-01

    In a fast moving environment university-industry collaborations play a critical role in developing a knowledge-based economy and a sustainable competitive advantage. Knowledge transfer from university to industry is supported by national governments as part of their innovation, national growth and competitiveness program. The aim of this project is to develop a strategy that will re-energise the continuing efforts of the BPU in engaging with local chemical-using SMEs through the Chemistry Inn...

  15. Studies of nuclear processes at the Triangle Universities Nuclear Laboratory. Progress report, 1 September 1995--31 August 1996

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ludwig, E.J.

    1996-09-01

    The Triangle Universities Nuclear Laboratory (TUNL)--a collaboration of Duke University, North Carolina State University, and the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill--has had a very productive year. This report covers parts of the second and third year of a three-year grant between the US Department of Energy and the three collaborating universities. The TUNL research program focuses on the following areas: precision test of parity-invariance violation in resonance neutron scattering at LANSCE/LANL; parity violation measurements using charged-particle resonances in A = 20--40 targets and the A = 4 system at TUNL; chaotic behavior in the nuclei {sup 30}P and {sup 34}Cl from studies of eigenvalue fluctuations in nuclear level schemes; search for anomalies in the level density (pairing phase transition) in 1f-2p shell nuclei using GEANIE at LANSCE/LANL; parity-conserving time-reversal noninvariance tests using {sup 166}Ho resonances at Geel, ORELA, or LANSCE/LANL; nuclear astrophysics; few-body nuclear systems; Nuclear Data evaluation for A = 3--20 for which TUNL is now the international center. Developments in technology and instrumentation are vital to the research and training program. Innovative work was continued in: polarized beam development; polarized target development; designing new cryogenic systems; designing new detectors; improving high-resolution beams for the KN and FN accelerators; development of an unpolarized Low-Energy Beam Facility for radiative capture studies of astrophysical interest. Preliminary research summaries are presented.

  16. Studies of nuclear processes at the Triangle Universities Nuclear Laboratory. Progress report, 1 September 1995--31 August 1996

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The Triangle Universities Nuclear Laboratory (TUNL)--a collaboration of Duke University, North Carolina State University, and the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill--has had a very productive year. This report covers parts of the second and third year of a three-year grant between the US Department of Energy and the three collaborating universities. The TUNL research program focuses on the following areas: precision test of parity-invariance violation in resonance neutron scattering at LANSCE/LANL; parity violation measurements using charged-particle resonances in A = 20--40 targets and the A = 4 system at TUNL; chaotic behavior in the nuclei 30P and 34Cl from studies of eigenvalue fluctuations in nuclear level schemes; search for anomalies in the level density (pairing phase transition) in 1f-2p shell nuclei using GEANIE at LANSCE/LANL; parity-conserving time-reversal noninvariance tests using 166Ho resonances at Geel, ORELA, or LANSCE/LANL; nuclear astrophysics; few-body nuclear systems; Nuclear Data evaluation for A = 3--20 for which TUNL is now the international center. Developments in technology and instrumentation are vital to the research and training program. Innovative work was continued in: polarized beam development; polarized target development; designing new cryogenic systems; designing new detectors; improving high-resolution beams for the KN and FN accelerators; development of an unpolarized Low-Energy Beam Facility for radiative capture studies of astrophysical interest. Preliminary research summaries are presented

  17. The transesterification of rapeseed and waste sunflower oils: Mass-transfer and kinetics in a laboratory batch reactor and in an industrial-scale reactor/separator setup.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Klofutar, B; Golob, J; Likozar, B; Klofutar, C; Zagar, E; Poljansek, I

    2010-05-01

    We have investigated the transesterification of rapeseed (RO) and waste sunflower (SO) oils with methanol in the presence of potassium hydroxide as a catalyst. The transesterification of tri-acylglycerols was first conducted in a batch reactor. The effect of the temperature on the reaction rates was studied at a constant molar ratio of the alcohol to tri-acylglycerols (6:1) and for a constant concentration of the catalyst (1.0wt%). Size-exclusion chromatography and (1)H NMR spectroscopy were used to quantitatively monitor the transesterification reaction. The mass-transfer coefficients of the tri-acylglycerols during the initial transesterification stage were found to be 0.2-1.2x10(-5)mmin(-1), depending on the type of oil and the temperature. Calculated activation energies implied that at higher temperatures the formation of mono-acylglycerols and glycerole was favored for the SO (93kJ/mol for the forward and 48kJ/mol for the backward reaction) and the RO (47kJ/mol for the forward and 36kJ/mol for the backward reaction), respectively. For the continuous industrial reactor/separator setup, the optimum methanol recycle ratio was established as 0.0550.

  18. High Flux Isotope Reactor (HFIR)

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Laboratory Consortium — The HFIR at Oak Ridge National Laboratory is a light-water cooled and moderated reactor that is the United States’ highest flux reactor-based neutron source. HFIR...

  19. Innovations and enhancements in neutronic analysis of the Big-10 university research and training reactors based on the AGENT code system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Introduction. This paper summarizes salient aspects of the 'virtual' reactor system developed at Purdue Univ. emphasizing efficient neutronic modeling through AGENT (Arbitrary Geometry Neutron Transport) a deterministic neutron transport code. DOE's Big-10 Innovations in Nuclear Infrastructure and Education (INIE) Consortium was launched in 2002 to enhance scholarship activities pertaining to university research and training reactors (URTRs). Existing and next generation URTRs are powerful campus tools for nuclear engineering as well as a number of disciplines that include, but are not limited to, medicine, biology, material science, and food science. Advancing new computational environments for the analysis and configuration of URTRs is an important Big-10 INIE aim. Specifically, Big-10 INIE has pursued development of a 'virtual' reactor, an advanced computational environment to serve as a platform on which to build operations, utilization (research and education), and systemic analysis of URTRs physics. The 'virtual' reactor computational system will integrate computational tools addressing the URTR core and near core physics (transport, dynamics, fuel management and fuel configuration); thermal-hydraulics; beam line, in-core and near-core experiments; instrumentation and controls; confinement/containment and security issues. Such integrated computational environment does not currently exist. The 'virtual' reactor is designed to allow researchers and educators to configure and analyze their systems to optimize experiments, fuel locations for flux shaping, as well as detector selection and configuration. (authors)

  20. Triangle Universities Nuclear Laboratory. Annual report, 1 September 1981-1 October 1982

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The varied research programs described reflect a decision by TUNL to devote its major resources to the study of the multiple facets of nuclear structure which can be probed through light ion induced nuclear reactions. Particular emphasis is placed on reactions induced by polarized protons, deuterons, and neutrons. We also continue a major commitment to the study of the statistical properties of nuclear structure revealed by elastic and inelastic scattering experiments using ultra high resolution beams. A third major laboratory commitment involves measurements of fast neutron cross sections required by the Department of Energy's program to produce controlled thermonuclear fusion. The major accelerator facilities of the laboratory include a model FN tandem Van de Graaff accelerator and a 15 MeV fixed energy negative ion cyclotron injector. The laboratory has two additional single ended Van de Graaff accelerators with terminal energies of 4 MV and 3 MV, respectively

  1. Advanced Computational Thermal Fluid Physics (CTFP) and Its Assessment for Light Water Reactors and Supercritical Reactors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    D.M. McEligot; K. G. Condie; G. E. McCreery; H. M. McIlroy; R. J. Pink; L.E. Hochreiter; J.D. Jackson; R.H. Pletcher; B.L. Smith; P. Vukoslavcevic; J.M. Wallace; J.Y. Yoo; J.S. Lee; S.T. Ro; S.O. Park

    2005-10-01

    Background: The ultimate goal of the study is the improvement of predictive methods for safety analyses and design of Generation IV reactor systems such as supercritical water reactors (SCWR) for higher efficiency, improved performance and operation, design simplification, enhanced safety and reduced waste and cost. The objective of this Korean / US / laboratory / university collaboration of coupled fundamental computational and experimental studies is to develop the supporting knowledge needed for improved predictive techniques for use in the technology development of Generation IV reactor concepts and their passive safety systems. The present study emphasizes SCWR concepts in the Generation IV program.

  2. Social and demographic characteristics of young and mature aged nursing students in Australian universities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wright, C M; Frew, T J; Hatcher, D

    1998-02-01

    This national study compares the social and demographic characteristics of direct and delay entry students in a control group of 1551 students in higher education programmes in 1987 and 1990 with the national study group of 2295 students sampled in 1995. Using a specially constructed socioeconomic variable for comparison the analyses demonstrated a significant difference in the socioeconomic level of the household for the younger aged group but not for the mature aged group. There was also a significant difference between males and females in their age of entry patterns. Furthermore, there was a significant difference in the location of school attended for most of their secondary education for the younger aged group but not for the mature aged group. For both groups there was a significant difference in the number of siblings, the level of education attained by the mother and the income received by the mother in the households of the control and study groups. Logit analysis revealed that there was a significant interaction between the household variables: socioeconomic status, number of siblings, and income received by the mother of the respondents in the control and study groups for the younger age group but not for the mature age group. This interaction for the younger age group, plus the finding that nursing students were more likely to delay their Higher Education Contribution Scheme (HECS) payment than other university students suggests that politicians need to take great care in any changes to current HECS payments as such changes could upset the delicate social balance that has been achieved in nursing recruitment in Australia. PMID:9592508

  3. Proceedings of the 18th technical meeting on nuclear reactor and radiation for KURRI engineers and the 9th technical official group section 5 meeting in Kyoto University

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This report is a summary of 18th Technical Meeting on Nuclear Reactor and Radiation for KURRI Engineers in Kyoto University. This was also the 9th meeting for technical official group section 5 (nuclear and radiation) in Kyoto University. In the workshop, three special lectures held were: (1) 'On Border Between Subcritical and Supercritical', (2) 'Memories of Nuclear Power Plant Management for 40 Years', and (3) 'Introduction of Technical Office in Faculty of Engineering, Kyoto University'. The technical presentations held were: (1) 'Radiation Background Study of Specialty Products in Senshu Region', (2) 'Introduction of Radioactivation Analysis at KUR', (3) 'Consideration of Critical Approach Method for KUR Low-Enrichment Fuel Reactor Core Using SRAC', (4) 'Evaluation of Temperature Coefficient of KUR Low-Enrichment Fuel Reactor Core Using SRAC'. As training for technical staffs in Technical Office, we visited the facility in Ashiu Research Forest. An introduction of this facility and the comments from the participants were included in this report. (S.K.)

  4. PROJECT-SPECIFIC TYPE A VERIFICATION FOR THE BROOKHAVEN GRAPHITE RESEARCH REACTOR ENGINEERED CAP, BROOKHAVEN NATIONAL LABORATORY UPTON, NEW YORK DCN 5098-SR-07-0

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Evan Harpenau

    2011-07-15

    The Oak Ridge Institute for Science and Education (ORISE) has reviewed the project documentation and data for the Brookhaven Graphite Research Reactor (BGRR) Engineered Cap at Brookhaven National Laboratory (BNL) in Upton, New York. The Brookhaven Science Associates (BSA) have completed removal of affected soils and performed as-left surveys by BSA associated with the BGRR Engineered Cap. Sample results have been submitted, as required, to demonstrate that remediation efforts comply with the cleanup goal of {approx}15 mrem/yr above background to a resident in 50 years (BNL 2011a).

  5. External-beam PIXE analysis of aerosol samples at GIC4117 Tandem Accelerator Laboratory of Beijing Normal University

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Full text: The external-beam facility at GIC4117 tandem accelerator laboratory of Beijing Normal University for PIXE analysis has been introduced, the influence of different aerosol sampling membrane filters on the beam current measurement with a homemade Faraday cup was studied by analysis of a Mn(44.0μg/cm2) MicroMatter standards sample with different filters behind it. Average and the lowest of the external-beam PIXE analysis compared with in-vacuum PIXE over about 360 aerosol samples. External-beam PIXE analysis results of PM2.5 aerosol fractions collected on Teflon filters on daily basis over 2010 at south campus of Beijing Normal University also were shown. (author)

  6. University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign, Materials Research Laboratory progress report for FY 1992

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1992-07-01

    This interdisciplinary laboratory in the College of Engineering support research in areas of condensed matter physics, solid state chemistry, and materials science. These research programs are developed with the assistance of faculty, students, and research associates in the departments of Physics, Materials Science and Engineering, chemistry, Chemical Engineering, Electrical Engineering, Mechanical Engineering, and Nuclear Engineering.

  7. Evaluating a College-Prep Laboratory Exercise for Teenaged Homeschool Students in a University Setting

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hercules, Daniel A.; Parrish, Cameron A.; Whitehead, Daniel C.

    2016-01-01

    We devised a half-day laboratory exercise for a group of 10th grade homeschooled students enrolled in an honors-level high school general chemistry course organized by a collective of homeschooling families associated with local Christian churches. Anecdotal evidence suggested that the students met the learning objectives of the exercise. The…

  8. The Universe on a Desktop: Observational Astronomy Simulations in the Instructional Laboratory

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marschall, Laurence A.

    2000-08-01

    Though the value of hands-on learning has long been recognised by educators, it is difficult to design laboratories in astronomy classes that present realistic astrophysical techniques to undergraduate students. Unlike most other sciences, astronomy is largely observational, not experimental, and making useful observations involves expensive equipment over time scales inconvenient for pedagogy. In recent years, however, astronomy has gone almost completely digital, and the advent of large on-line databases and fast personal computers has made it possible to realistically simulate the experience of research astrophysics in the laboratory. Since 1992, Project CLEA (Contemporary Laboratory Experiences in Astronomy) has been developing computer-based exercises aimed primarily at the introductory astronomy laboratory. These exercises simulate important techniques of astronomical research using digital data and Windows-based software. Each of the nine exercises developed to date consists of software, technical guides for teachers, and student manuals for the exercises. CLEA software is used at many institutions in all the United States and over 60 countries worldwide, in a variety of settings from middle school to upper-class astronomy classes. The current design philosophy and goals of Project CLEA are discussed along with plans for future development.

  9. Association Euratom - Risø National Laboratory for Sustainable Energy, Technical University of Denmark - Annual Progress Report 2008

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Korsholm, Søren Bang; Michelsen, Poul; Juul Rasmussen, Jens;

    interaction with the plasma equilibrium and particles. The effort includes both first principles based modelling, and experimental observations of turbulence and of fast ion dynamics by collective Thomson scattering. New activities in technology related to development of high temperature superconductors have......The programme of the Research Unit of the Fusion Association Euratom - Risø National Laboratory for Sustainable Energy, Technical University of Denmark, covers work in fusion plasma physics and in fusion technology. The fusion plasma physics research focuses on turbulence and transport, and its...

  10. Association Euratom - Risø National Laboratory for Sustainable Energy, Technical University of Denmark - Annual Progress Report 2010

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Korsholm, Søren Bang; Michelsen, Poul; Juul Rasmussen, Jens;

    interaction with the plasma equilibrium and particles. The effort includes both first principles based modelling, and experimental observations of turbulence and of fast ion dynamics by collective Thomson scattering. Within fusion technology there are activities related to development of high temperature......The programme of the Research Unit of the Fusion Association Euratom - Risø National Laboratory for Sustainable Energy, Technical University of Denmark, covers work in fusion plasma physics and in fusion technology. The fusion plasma physics research focuses on turbulence and transport, and its...

  11. Association Euratom - Risø National Laboratory for Sustainable Energy, Technical University of Denmark - Annual Progress Report 2009

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Korsholm, Søren Bang; Michelsen, Poul; Juul Rasmussen, Jens;

    interaction with the plasma equilibrium and particles. The effort includes both first principles based modelling, and experimental observations of turbulence and of fast ion dynamics by collective Thomson scattering. Within fusion technology there are activities related to development of high temperature......The programme of the Research Unit of the Fusion Association Euratom - Risø National Laboratory for Sustainable Energy, Technical University of Denmark, covers work in fusion plasma physics and in fusion technology. The fusion plasma physics research focuses on turbulence and transport, and its...

  12. Archive of Geosample Data and Information from the University of Rhode Island (URI) Graduate School of Oceanography (GSO), Marine Geological Samples Laboratory (MGSL)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — The Marine Geological Samples Laboratory (MGSL) of the Graduate School of Oceanography (GSO), University of Rhode Island is a partner in the Index to Marine and...

  13. Is it possible to create a universe in the laboratory by quantum tunneling?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Farhi, Edward; Guth, Alan H.; Guven, Jemal

    1990-01-01

    We explore the possibility that a new universe can be created by producing a small bubble of false vacuum. The initial bubble is small enough to be produced without an initial singularity, but classically it could not become a universe - instead it would reach a maximum radius and then collapse. We investigate the possibility that quantum effects allow the bubble to tunnel into a larger bubble, of the same mass, which would then classically evolve to become a new universe. The calculation of the tunneling amplitude is attempted, in lowest order semiclassical approximation (in the thin-wall limit), using both a canonical and a functional integral approach. The canonical approach is found to have flaws, attributable to our method of space-time slicing. The functional integral approach leads to a Euclidean interpolating solution that is not a manifold. To describe it, we define an object which we call a 'pseudomanifold', and give a prescription to define its action. We conjecture that the tunneling probability to produce a new universe can be approximated using this action, and we show that this leads to a plausible result.

  14. Investigation of the delay in pressure vessel embrittlement specimen analysis for the Oak Ridge National Laboratory High Flux Isotope Reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Analysis of the investigative data pertaining to this incident reveals the following conditions as key findings and probable causes: (1) The contractor failed to properly implement the surveillance program for monitoring reactor pressure vessel embrittlement. (2) Contractor and DOE organizations provided less than adequate oversight and independent overview, especially by not requiring operating organizations to provide documented evidence to substantiate claims that there was ''no problem'' with respect to embrittlement. (3) Although the temperature limitation for reactor pressurization identified in the Technical Specifications was never violated, the basis of this safety limitation was violated. (4) The basis for concluding that there would be no embrittlement of the pressure vessel steel over the expected life of the reactor is questionable. (5) The contractor and DOE failed to make the surveillance program visible by incorporating it in the Technical Specifications. (6) The Accident Analysis/Final Safety Analysis Report was never adequately reviewed and updated subsequent to its initial issuance. (7) Surveillance specimen analysis was incomplete and never transmitted to reactor operating personnel in a usable format prior to November 1986. (8) There was extensive delays (many years) in the testing, analysis, and reporting of surveillance program results

  15. The Effect of Initial Inoculum Source on the Microbial Community Structure and Dynamics in Laboratory-Scale Sequencing Batch Reactors

    KAUST Repository

    Hernandez, Susana

    2011-07-01

    Understanding the factors that shapes the microbial community assembly in activated sludge wastewater treatment processes provide a conceptual foundation for improving process performance. The aim of this study was to compare two major theories (deterministic theory and neutral theory) regarding the assembly of microorganisms in activated sludge: Six lab-scale activated sludge sequencing batch reactors were inoculated with activated sludge collected from three different sources (domestic, industrial, and sugar industry WWTP). Additionally, two reactors were seeded with equal proportion of sludge from the three WWTPs. Duplicate reactors were used for each sludge source (i.e. domestic, industrial, sugar and mix). Reactors were operated in parallel for 11 weeks under identical conditions. Bacterial diversity and community structure in the eight SBRs were assessed by 16S rRNA gene pyrosequencing. The 16S rRNA gene sequences were analyzed using taxonomic and clustering analysis and by measuring diversity indices (Shannon-weaver and Chao1 indices). Cluster analysis revealed that the microbial community structure was dynamic and that replicate reactors evolved differently. Also the microbial community structure in the SBRs seeded with a different sludge did not converge after 11 weeks of operation under identical conditions. These results suggest that history and distribution of taxa in the source inoculum were stronger regulating factors in shaping bacterial community structure than environmental factors. This supports the neutral theory which states that the assembly of the local microbial community from the metacommunity is random and is regulated by the size and diversity of the metacommunity. Furthermore, sludge performance, measured by COD and ammonia removal, confirmed that broad-scale functions (e.g. COD removal) are not influenced by dynamics in the microbial composition, while specific functions (e.g. nitrification) are more susceptible to these changes.

  16. Neutronics calculation of an heterogeneous compact and thermal core by means of deterministic and stochastic transport theory. Application to the experimental reactor of the University of Strasbourg

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The aim of this work is to create, validate theoretically and experimentally a calculation route for a thermal irradiation reactor. This is the research reactor of the University of Strasbourg, which presents all of characteristics of this reactor-type: compact and heterogeneous core, slab-type fuel with a high 235-uranium enrichment. This calculation route is based on the first use of the following two modern transport methods: the TDT method and the Monte Carlo method. The former, programmed within the APOLLO2 code, is a two dimensional collision probabilities method. The later, used by the TRIPOLI4 code, is a stochastic method. Both can be applied to complex geometries. After a few theoretical reminders about transport codes, a set of integral experiments is described which have been realized within the research reactor of the University of Strasbourg. One of them has been performed for this study. At the beginning of the theoretical part, significant errors are apparent due to the use of calculation route based on homogenization, condensation and the diffusion approximation. An extensive comparison between the discrete ordinates method and the TDT method carries out that the use of the TDT method is relevant for the studied reactor. The treatment of axial leakage with this method is the only disadvantage. Therefore, the use of the code TRIPOLI4 is recommended for a more accurate study of leakage within a reflector. By means of the experimental data, the ability of our calculation route is confirmed for essential neutronics questions such as the critical mass determination, the power distribution and the fuel management. (author)

  17. Safety and security management for radioactive sources at university's science laboratories

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Teaching and Research science laboratories handling low and highly active radioactive sources such as X-ray machines, Neutron sources, Gamma sources and hundreds of alpha and beta radio isotopes which pose a great concern to the faculty management on safety and security while transporting, handling and disposals. A comprehensive Safety and Security management system is proposed in line with IAEA and Singapore Governments guidelines. Implementation of such system will certainly be beneficial to the Faculty of Science which will provide a healthy academic environment, preserving resources and complying Singapore's radiation safety related regulations. The author reviewed the present situation and recommend the management to initiate real time indoor and outdoor exposure monitoring programs and find solution for security of the un-disposable radioactive sources by collaborating international body's to attain 'risk free' science laboratories. (author)

  18. Triangle Universities Nuclear Laboratory. Annual report - TUNL XXII, 1 September 1982-31 August 1983

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    At TUNL particular emphasis is placed on reactions induced by polarized protons, deuterons, and neutrons. We also continue a major commitment to the study of the statistical properties of nuclear structure revealed by elastic and inelastic scattering experiments using ultra high resolution beams. A third major laboratory commitment involves measurements of fast neutron cross sections required by the Department of Energy's program for the development of controlled thermonuclear fusion. The major accelerator facilities of the laboratory include a model FN tandem Van de Graaff accelerator and a 15 MeV fixed-energy negative ion cyclotron injector. These accelerators coupled together, constituted the world's first Cyclo-Graaff. The laboratory has two additional single ended Van de Graaff accelerators with terminal voltages of 4 MV. The ungraded K machine, with its associated equipment, provides intense beams of very high energy resolution. The older 4 MV accelerator is now enjoying renewed research usefulness in a program funded by the National Science Foundation for the study of plant processes utilizing 11C as a tracer. Research and development progress is detailed. Publications are listed

  19. Advanced Laboratory at Texas State University: Error Analysis, Experimental Design, and Research Experience for Undergraduates

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ventrice, Carl

    2009-04-01

    Physics is an experimental science. In other words, all physical laws are based on experimentally observable phenomena. Therefore, it is important that all physics students have an understanding of the limitations of certain experimental techniques and the associated errors associated with a particular measurement. The students in the Advanced Laboratory class at Texas State perform three detailed laboratory experiments during the semester and give an oral presentation at the end of the semester on a scientific topic of their choosing. The laboratory reports are written in the format of a ``Physical Review'' journal article. The experiments are chosen to give the students a detailed background in error analysis and experimental design. For instance, the first experiment performed in the spring 2009 semester is entitled Measurement of the local acceleration due to gravity in the RFM Technology and Physics Building. The goal of this experiment is to design and construct an instrument that is to be used to measure the local gravitational field in the Physics Building to an accuracy of ±0.005 m/s^2. In addition, at least one of the experiments chosen each semester involves the use of the research facilities within the physics department (e.g., microfabrication clean room, surface science lab, thin films lab, etc.), which gives the students experience working in a research environment.

  20. Transportation of radioactive materials from TRIGA reactors - operational considerations and regulatory problems: The situation at the Oregon State University TRIGA reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    General information regarding transportation of radioactive materials is presented with the idea that not everyone in our audience is fully conversant with the complexities and impact of current transportation requirements. Certain considerations and problems associated with OSU's program for the transportation of radioactive materials are briefly described. The roundtable discussion entitled: 'Transportation of Radioactive Materials from TRIGA Reactors - Operational Considerations and Regulatory Problems', at the Sixth TRIGA Owner's Conference, Corvallis, Oregon, February 27 to March 1, 1978 is attached

  1. The André E. Lalonde AMS Laboratory - The new accelerator mass spectrometry facility at the University of Ottawa

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kieser, W. E.; Zhao, X.-L.; Clark, I. D.; Cornett, R. J.; Litherland, A. E.; Klein, M.; Mous, D. J. W.; Alary, J.-F.

    2015-10-01

    The University of Ottawa, Canada, has installed a multi-element, 3 MV tandem AMS system as the cornerstone of their new Advanced Research Complex and the principal analytical instrument of the André E. Lalonde Accelerator Mass Spectrometry Laboratory. Manufactured by High Voltage Engineering Europa B.V., the Netherlands, it is equipped with a 200 sample ion source, a high resolution, 120° injection magnet, a 90° high energy analysis magnet (mass-energy product 350 MeV-AMU), a 65°, 1.7 m radius electric analyzer and a 2 channel gas ionization detector. It is designed to analyze isotopes ranging from tritium to the actinides and to accommodate the use of fluoride target materials. This system is being extended with a second injection line, consisting of selected components from the IsoTrace Laboratory, University of Toronto. This line will contain a pre-commercial version of the Isobar Separator for Anions, manufactured by Isobarex Corp., Bolton, Ontario, Canada. This instrument uses selective ion-gas reactions in a radio-frequency quadrupole cell to attenuate both atomic and molecular isobars. This paper discusses the specifications of the new AMS equipment, reports on the acceptance test results for 10Be, 14C, 26Al and 127I and presents typical spectra for 10Be and actinide analyses.

  2. Chemical constituents in water from wells in the vicinity of the Naval Reactors Facility, Idaho National Engineering Laboratory, Idaho, 1991--93

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The US Geological Survey, in response to a request from the US Department of Energy's Pittsburgh Naval Reactors Office, Idaho Branch Office, sampled 14 wells during 1991--93 as part of a long-term project to monitor water quality of the Snake River Plain aquifer in the vicinity of the Naval Reactors Facility, Idaho National Engineering Laboratory, Idaho. Water samples were analyzed for manmade contaminants and naturally occurring constituents. One hundred sixty-one samples were collected from 10 ground-water monitoring wells and 4 production wells. Twenty-one quality-assurance samples also were collected and analyzed; 2 were blank samples and 19 were replicate samples. The two blank samples contained concentrations of six inorganic constituents that were slightly greater than the laboratory reporting levels (the smallest measured concentration of a constituent that can be reported using a given analytical method). Concentrations of other constituents in the blank samples were less than their respective reporting levels. The 19 replicate samples and their respective primary samples generated 614 pairs of analytical results for a variety of chemical and radiochemical constituents. Of the 614 data pairs, 588 were statistically equivalent at the 95% confidence level; about 96% of the analytical results were in agreement. Two pairs of turbidity measurements were not evaluated because of insufficient information and one primary sample collected in January 1992 contained tentatively identified organic compounds when the replicate sample did not

  3. Chemical constituents in water from wells in the vicinity of the Naval Reactors Facility, Idaho National Engineering Laboratory, Idaho, 1991--93

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tucker, B.J.; Knobel, L.L.; Bartholomay, R.C.

    1995-11-01

    The US Geological Survey, in response to a request from the US Department of Energy`s Pittsburgh Naval Reactors Office, Idaho Branch Office, sampled 14 wells during 1991--93 as part of a long-term project to monitor water quality of the Snake River Plain aquifer in the vicinity of the Naval Reactors Facility, Idaho National Engineering Laboratory, Idaho. Water samples were analyzed for manmade contaminants and naturally occurring constituents. One hundred sixty-one samples were collected from 10 ground-water monitoring wells and 4 production wells. Twenty-one quality-assurance samples also were collected and analyzed; 2 were blank samples and 19 were replicate samples. The two blank samples contained concentrations of six inorganic constituents that were slightly greater than the laboratory reporting levels (the smallest measured concentration of a constituent that can be reported using a given analytical method). Concentrations of other constituents in the blank samples were less than their respective reporting levels. The 19 replicate samples and their respective primary samples generated 614 pairs of analytical results for a variety of chemical and radiochemical constituents. Of the 614 data pairs, 588 were statistically equivalent at the 95% confidence level; about 96% of the analytical results were in agreement. Two pairs of turbidity measurements were not evaluated because of insufficient information and one primary sample collected in January 1992 contained tentatively identified organic compounds when the replicate sample did not.

  4. Epidemiology of laboratory-confirmed respiratory syncytial virus infection in young children in England, 2010-2014: the importance of birth month.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reeves, R M; Hardelid, P; Gilbert, R; Ellis, J; Zhao, H; Donati, M; Pebody, R

    2016-07-01

    The epidemiology of laboratory-confirmed respiratory syncytial virus (RSV) infections in young children has not recently been described in England, and is an essential step in identifying optimal target groups for future licensed RSV vaccines. We used two laboratory surveillance systems to examine the total number and number of positive RSV tests in children aged <5 years in England from 2010 to 2014. We derived odds ratios (ORs) with 95% confidence intervals (CIs) comparing children by birth month, using multivariable logistic regression models adjusted for age, season and sex. Forty-seven percent of RSV tests (29 851/63 827) and 57% (7405/13 034) of positive results in children aged <5 years were in infants aged <6 months. Moreover, 38% (4982/13 034) of positive results were in infants aged <3 months. Infants born in September, October and November had the highest odds of a positive RSV test during their first year of life compared to infants born in January (OR 2·1, 95% CI 1·7-2·7; OR 2·4, 95% CI 2·1-2·8; and OR 2·4, 95% CI 2·1-2·7, respectively). Our results highlight the importance of young age and birth month near the beginning of the RSV season to the risk of laboratory-confirmed RSV infection. Future control measures should consider protection for these groups. PMID:26916807

  5. UniScan technology for innovative laboratory at a university for acquisition data from space in real-time

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gershenzon, V.; Gershenzon, O.; Sergeeva, M.; Ippolitov, V.; Targulyan, O.

    2012-04-01

    Keywords: Remote Sensing, UniScan ground station, Education, Monitoring. Remote Sensing Centers allowing real-time imagery acquisition from Earth observing satellites within the structure of Universities provides proper environment for innovative education. It delivers the efficient training for scientific and academic and teaching personnel, secure the role of the young professionals in science, education and hi-tech, and maintain the continuity of generations in science and education. Article is based on experience for creation such centers in more than 20 higher education institutions in Russia, Kazakhstan, and Spain on the base of UniScan ground station by R&D Center ScanEx. These stations serve as the basis for Earth monitoring from space providing the training and advanced training to produce the specialists having the state-of-the-art knowledge in Earth Remote Sensing and GIS, as well as the land-use monitoring and geo-data service for the economic operators in such diverse areas as the nature resource management, agriculture, land property management, disasters monitoring, etc. Currently our proposal of UniScan for universities all over the world allows to receive low resolution free of charge MODIS data from Terra and Aqua satellites, VIIRS from the NPP mission, and also high resolution optical images from EROS A and radar images from Radarsat-1 satellites, including the telemetry for the first year of operation, within the footprint of up to 2,500 kilometers in radius. Creation remote sensing centers at universities will lead to a new quality level for education and scientific studies and will enable to make education system in such innovation institutions open to modern research work and economy.

  6. Triangle Universities Nuclear Laboratory: Annual report, TUNL XXV, 1 September 1985-31 August 1986

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The varied research programs described in this report reflect a decision to devote major resources to the study of the multiple facets of nuclear structure which can be probed through light-ion and neutron induced nuclear reactions. Particular emphasis is placed on reactions induced by polarized protons, deuterons, and neutrons. A major commitment continues towards the study of the statistical properties of nuclear structure revealed by elastic and inelastic scattering experiments using ultra high resolution proton beams. A third major laboratory commitment involves measurements of fast neutron cross sections required by the Department of Energy's program for the development of controlled thermonuclear fusion

  7. Formaldehyde Concentration in the Air and in Cadavers at the Gross Anatomy Laboratory in Hiroshima University

    OpenAIRE

    Kurose, Tomoyuki; Kodera, Haruto; Aoyama, Hirohiko; Kawamata, Seiichi

    2004-01-01

    The formaldehyde concentration in the air and in various tissues of 35 human cadavers were measured during a gross anatomy course held at the Faculty of Medicine of Hiroshima University in the 2003 educational year. Atmospheric formaldehyde levels were 0.25-0.55 ppm and thus less than the upper limit of the guideline for formaldehyde exposure (0.5 ppm) set by the Japan Society for Occupational Health (1988) except for one out of 10 measurements. The formaldehyde concentrations in tissues were...

  8. Reservation System for machine time in the laboratories of the University of Information Sciences

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Omar Mar Cornelio

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available In organizations that many people have access to services of machine time, it requires proper planning and control. At the University of Computer Sciences, is done through pre-printed models which generates an inefficient management and poor quality service. In this paper we describe the solution of this problem from the computerization of the process for which was coded using a programming language such as PHP5 on Eclipse Integrated Development Environment with CodeIgniter framework, MySQL as a delivery system database. The system also has a set of reports that facilitate decision making to managers such as availability, location number reserved among others.

  9. Risk factors for visible lesions or positive laboratory tests in bovine tuberculosis reactor cattle in Northern Ireland.

    Science.gov (United States)

    O'Hagan, M J H; Courcier, E A; Drewe, J A; Gordon, A W; McNair, J; Abernethy, D A

    2015-07-01

    An observational case-control study was conducted to investigate risk factors for confirmed bovine tuberculosis (bTB) infection in cattle reacting positively to the single intradermal comparative cervical test (SICCT) in Northern Ireland in the years 1998, 2002 and 2006. Macroscopic lesions were detected at slaughter (positive visible lesion (VL) status) in 43.0% of reactor cattle, whilst 45.3% of those sampled were confirmed as bTB positive due to the presence of lesions or positive histopathology/mycobacterial culture (positive bTB status). In 97.5% of the reactors, the VL status and bTB status were either both negative or both positive. Generalized linear mixed model analyses were conducted on data of 24,923 reactor cattle with the variables herd identifier, local veterinary office (DVO) and abattoir being used as random effects within all the models generated at univariable and multivariable level. The other variables within the dataset were used as fixed effects. Significant risk factors associated with VL status and bTB status at multivariable level (pinjection site, epidemiological status of skin test, total number of reactors at the disclosure test, mean herd size and prior response to the skin test. These risk factors are likely related to the time since infection, the strength of the challenge of infection and the susceptibility of the animal. These findings are important as the detection of visible lesions and the confirmation of bTB are an integral part of the overall bTB control programme in Northern Ireland and the veterinary meat inspection and hygiene programme. The visible lesion status and bTB status of an animal can affect the way in which bTB breakdowns are managed, since failure to detect visible lesions and recovery of Mycobacterium bovis can lead to a less stringent follow-up after other risk factors have been taken into account. PMID:25957973

  10. Risk factors for visible lesions or positive laboratory tests in bovine tuberculosis reactor cattle in Northern Ireland.

    Science.gov (United States)

    O'Hagan, M J H; Courcier, E A; Drewe, J A; Gordon, A W; McNair, J; Abernethy, D A

    2015-07-01

    An observational case-control study was conducted to investigate risk factors for confirmed bovine tuberculosis (bTB) infection in cattle reacting positively to the single intradermal comparative cervical test (SICCT) in Northern Ireland in the years 1998, 2002 and 2006. Macroscopic lesions were detected at slaughter (positive visible lesion (VL) status) in 43.0% of reactor cattle, whilst 45.3% of those sampled were confirmed as bTB positive due to the presence of lesions or positive histopathology/mycobacterial culture (positive bTB status). In 97.5% of the reactors, the VL status and bTB status were either both negative or both positive. Generalized linear mixed model analyses were conducted on data of 24,923 reactor cattle with the variables herd identifier, local veterinary office (DVO) and abattoir being used as random effects within all the models generated at univariable and multivariable level. The other variables within the dataset were used as fixed effects. Significant risk factors associated with VL status and bTB status at multivariable level (pbovine tuberculin injection site, epidemiological status of skin test, total number of reactors at the disclosure test, mean herd size and prior response to the skin test. These risk factors are likely related to the time since infection, the strength of the challenge of infection and the susceptibility of the animal. These findings are important as the detection of visible lesions and the confirmation of bTB are an integral part of the overall bTB control programme in Northern Ireland and the veterinary meat inspection and hygiene programme. The visible lesion status and bTB status of an animal can affect the way in which bTB breakdowns are managed, since failure to detect visible lesions and recovery of Mycobacterium bovis can lead to a less stringent follow-up after other risk factors have been taken into account.

  11. KTM Tokamak is prototype of X XI century reactor. Future International laboratory of thermonuclear materials testing and power engineering

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In 29-31 May of 2000 the presentation of the joint Kazakhstan-Russian draft of Kazakhstan material-testing tokamak (KTM) was carried out. KTM tokamak is implementing by decision of the President and Government of Republic of Kazakhstan for supporting of the Kazakhstan participation in development of draft within framework of ITER fusion reactor construction. Scientific head of the project is Russian academician - Velikhov V. and Russian Research Center 'Kurchatovskij Institute' , General designers - Scientific Research Institute for Electrophysical Equipment after D. V. Efremov (Russian Federation) and Kazakh Research Inst. for Energy Industry (KazNIIEhnergoprom). Scientific part of the project is working out in National Nuclear Center of Republic of Kazakhstan and Scientific Research Institute of Experimental and Theoretical Physics. KTM tokamak is experimental fusion device for materials testing study, as well as for designing of methods for protection of the reactor first wall, in-chamber elements and divertor planes, high frequency heat of antennas in energetic load regimes close to both the ITER and the future fusion energy reactors. KTM by it design presents spheric tokamak, which successfully combining advantages of the spheromaks (compactness) and the tokamaks (high plasma density). Now in the world there are similar operating spheric tokamaks: NSTX (USA), MAST (Great Britain), GLOBUS-M (Russian Federation). Principal peculiarity of KTM tokamak is existence of moving divertor device, which with help of manipulator allows to changing of examining samples without high vacuum disruption. Values of the thermal loads and fluences in the KTM are equal or higher than loads in operating tokamaks and correspond with ITER reactor loads. KTM tokamak will be the only mega-ampere device in the world with the aspect ratio A=2

  12. Feasibility study of the university of Utah TRIGA reactor power upgrade - part II: Thermohydraulics and heat transfer study in respect to cooling system requirements and design

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Babitz Philip

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available The thermodynamic conditions of the University of Utah's TRIGA Reactor were simulated using SolidWorks Flow Simulation, Ansys, Fluent and PARET-ANL. The models are developed for the reactor's currently maximum operating power of 90 kW, and a few higher power levels to analyze thermohydraulics and heat transfer aspects in determining a design basis for higher power including the cost estimate. It was found that the natural convection current becomes much more pronounced at higher power levels with vortex shedding also occurring. A departure from nucleate boiling analysis showed that while nucleate boiling begins near 210 kW it remains in this state and does not approach the critical heat flux at powers up to 500 kW. Based on these studies, two upgrades are proposed for extended operation and possibly higher reactor power level. Together with the findings from Part I studies, we conclude that increase of the reactor power is highly feasible yet dependable on its purpose and associated investments.

  13. 81.114- University Reactor Infrastructure and Education Support / Prompt Gamma-ray Activation Analysis of Lithioum Ion Battery Cathodes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Manthiram, Arumugam; Landsberger, S.

    2006-11-11

    This project focuses on the use of the Prompt Gamma-ray Activation Analysis (PGAA) technique available at the Nuclear Engineering Teaching Laboratory of the University of Texas at Austin to precisely determine the hydrogen (proton) contents in layered oxide cathode samples obtained by chemical lithium extraction in order to obtain a better understanding of the factors limiting the practical capacities and overall performance of lithium ion battery cathodes. The project takes careful precautionary experimental measures to avoid proton contamination both from solvents used in chemical delithiation and from ambient moisture. The results obtained from PGAA are complemented by the data obtained from other techniques such as thermogravimetric analysis, redox titration, atomic absorption spectroscopy, X-ray diffraction, and mass spectroscopic analysis of the evolved gas on heating. The research results broaden our understanding of the structure-property-performance relationships of lithium ion battery cathodes and could aid the design and development of new better performing lithium ion batteries for consumer (portable and electric vehicles), military, and space applications.

  14. Triangle Universities Nuclear Laboratory annual report, TUNL XXIII, September 1, 1983-June 30, 1984

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The varied research programs described in this report reflect a decision by TUNL to devote its major resources to the study of the multiple facets of nuclear structure which can be probed through light-ion and neutron induced nuclear reactions. At TUNL particular emphasis is placed on reactions induced by polarized protons, deuterons, and neutrons. We also continue a major commitment to the study of the statistical properties of nuclear structure revealed by elastic and inelastic scattering experiments using ultra high resolution proton beams. A third major laboratory commitment involves measurements of fast neutron cross sections required by the Department of Energy's program for the development of controlled thermonuclear fusion. The major accelerator facilities of the laboratory include a model FN tandem Van de Graaff accelerator and a 15 MeV fixed-energy negative ion cyclotron injector. In addition to the broad experimental program which is described in detail in this report, TUNL continues to refine and improve existing experimental techniques and to add new capabilities to serve our faculty and to challenge our students. Current programs which are expected to have a significant impact on our physics program are: (1) to improve the low energy bunching system; (2) to improve the Lamb shift polarized ion source; (3) to develop an injector cyclotron bunching system; (4) to obtain a new intense polarized ion source; (5) to study long term polarized ion source improvements; and (6) to consider acceleration of polarized beams into the TUNL cyclotron

  15. Completion summary for boreholes USGS 140 and USGS 141 near the Advanced Test Reactor Complex, Idaho National Laboratory, Idaho

    Science.gov (United States)

    Twining, Brian V.; Bartholomay, Roy C.; Hodges, Mary K.V.

    2014-01-01

    In 2013, the U.S. Geological Survey, in cooperation with the U.S. Department of Energy, drilled and constructed boreholes USGS 140 and USGS 141 for stratigraphic framework analyses and long-term groundwater monitoring of the eastern Snake River Plain aquifer at the Idaho National Laboratory in southeast Idaho. Borehole USGS 140 initially was cored to collect continuous geologic data, and then re-drilled to complete construction as a monitor well. Borehole USGS 141 was drilled and constructed as a monitor well without coring. Boreholes USGS 140 and USGS 141 are separated by about 375 feet (ft) and have similar geologic layers and hydrologic characteristics based on geophysical and aquifer test data collected. The final construction for boreholes USGS 140 and USGS 141 required 6-inch (in.) diameter carbon-steel well casing and 5-in. diameter stainless-steel well screen; the screened monitoring interval was completed about 50 ft into the eastern Snake River Plain aquifer, between 496 and 546 ft below land surface (BLS) at both sites. Following construction and data collection, dedicated pumps and water-level access lines were placed to allow for aquifer testing, for collecting periodic water samples, and for measuring water levels. Borehole USGS 140 was cored continuously, starting from land surface to a depth of 543 ft BLS. Excluding surface sediment, recovery of basalt and sediment core at borehole USGS 140 was about 98 and 65 percent, respectively. Based on visual inspection of core and geophysical data, about 32 basalt flows and 4 sediment layers were collected from borehole USGS 140 between 34 and 543 ft BLS. Basalt texture for borehole USGS 140 generally was described as aphanitic, phaneritic, and porphyritic; rubble zones and flow mold structure also were described in recovered core material. Sediment layers, starting near 163 ft BLS, generally were composed of fine-grained sand and silt with a lesser amount of clay; however, between 223 and 228 ft BLS, silt

  16. Laboratory for Energy-Related Health Research (LEHR) University of California at Davis, California. Final report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This Annual Site Environmental Report for the Laboratory for Energy-Related Health Research (LEHR) Site (the Site) includes 1996 environmental monitoring data for Site air, soil, ground water, surface water, storm water and ambient radiation. DOE operation of LEHR as a functioning research location ceased in 1989, after the completion of three decades of research on the health effects of low-level radiation exposure (primarily strontium-90 and radium-226), using beagles to simulate effects on human health. During 1996, the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) conducted activities at the Site in support of Comprehensive Environmental Response, Compensation and Liability Act (CERCLA) Environmental remediation and the decontamination and decommissioning (D ampersand D) of Site buildings. Extensive environmental data were collected in 1996 to evaluate appropriate remedial actions for the Site

  17. Conversion and Evaluation of the University of Massachusetts Lowell Research Reactor From High-Enriched To Low-Enriched Uranium Fuel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The process for converting the University of Massachusetts Lowell Research Reactor (UMLRR) from high-enrichment uranium (HEU) fuel to low-enrichment uranium (LEU) fuel began in 1988. Several years of design reviews, computational modeling, and thermal hydraulic analyses resulted in a preliminary reference core design and configuration based on 20 standard, MTR-type, flat-plate, 19.75% enriched, uranium silicide (u3Si2) fuel elements. A final safety analysis for the fuel conversion was submitted to the Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) in 1993. The NRC made two additional requests for additional information and supplements were submitted in 1994 and 1997. The new UMLRR Reactor Supervisor initiated an effort to change the LEU reference core configuration to eliminate a complicated control rod modification needed for the smaller core

  18. University of Rochester, Laboratory for Laser Energetics: Annual report, 1 October 1985-30 September 1986

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In FY86 the Laboratory has produced a list of accomplishments in which it takes pride. LLE has met every laser-fusion program milestone to date in a program of research for direct-drive ultraviolet laser fusion originally formulated in 1981. LLE scientists authored or co-authored 135 scientific papers during 1985-86. The collaborative experiments with NRL, LANL, and LLNL have led to a number of important ICF results. The cryogenic target system developed by KMS Fusion for LLE will be used in future high-density experiments on OMEGA to demonstrate the compression of thermonuclear fuel to 100 to 200 times that of solid (20 to 40 g/cm3) in a test of the direct-drive concept, as noted in the National Academy of Sciences' report. The excellence of the advanced technology efforts at LLE is illustrated by the establishment of the Ultrafast Science Center by the Department of Defense through the Air Force Office of Scientific Research. Research in the Center will concentrate on bridging the gap between high-speed electronics and ultrafast optics by providing education, research, and development in areas critical to future communications and high-speed computer systems. The Laboratory for Laser Energetics continues its pioneering work on the interaction of intense radiation with matter. This includes inertial-fusion and advanced optical and optical electronics research; training people in the technology and applications of high-power, short-pulse lasers; and interacting with the scientific community, business, industry, and government to promote the growth of laser technology

  19. Preliminary Results of an On-Line, Multi-Spectrometer Fission Product Monitoring System to Support Advanced Gas Reactor Fuel Testing and Qualification in the Advanced Test Reactor at the Idaho National Laboratory

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dawn M. Scates; John K. Hartwell; John B. Walter; Mark W. Drigert

    2007-10-01

    The Advanced Gas Reactor -1 (AGR-1) experiment is the first experiment in a series of eight separate low enriched uranium (LEU) oxycarbide (UCO) tri-isotropic (TRISO) particle fuel (in compact form) experiments scheduled for placement in the Advanced Test Reactor (ATR) located at the Idaho National Laboratory (INL). The experiment began irradiation in the ATR with a cycle that reached full power on December 26, 2006 and will continue irradiation for about 2.5 years. During this time six separate capsules, will be irradiated in an inert sweep gas atmosphere with individual on-line fission product monitoring on its effluent to track performance of the fuel in each individual capsule during irradiation. The goals of the irradiation experiment is to provide irradiation performance data to support fuel process development, to qualify fuel for normal operating conditions, to support development and validation of fuel, and to provide irradiated fuel and materials for post irradiation examination (PIE) and safety testing. This paper presents the preliminary test details of the fuel performance, as measured by the control and acquisition software.

  20. Advanced Test Reactor National Scientific User Facility: Addressing advanced nuclear materials research

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    John Jackson; Todd Allen; Frances Marshall; Jim Cole

    2013-03-01

    with Particles and Components Testing (IMPACT) facility and the Pacific Northwest Nuclear Laboratory (PNNL) Radiochemistry Processing Laboratory (RPL) and PIE facilities were added. The ATR NSUF annually hosts a weeklong event called User’s Week in which students and faculty from universities as well as other interested parties from regulatory agencies or industry convene in Idaho Falls, Idaho to see presentations from ATR NSUF staff as well as select researchers from the materials research field. User’s week provides an overview of current materials research topics of interest and an opportunity for young researchers to understand the process of performing work through ATR NSUF. Additionally, to increase the number of researchers engaged in LWR materials issues, a series of workshops are in progress to introduce research staff to stress corrosion cracking, zirconium alloy degradation, and uranium dioxide degradation during in-reactor use.

  1. Energy Saving Separations Technologies for the Petroleum Industry: An Industry-University-National Laboratory Research Partnership

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dorgan, John R.; Stewart, Frederick F.; Way, J. Douglas

    2003-03-28

    This project works to develop technologies capable of replacing traditional energy-intensive distillations so that a 20% improvement in energy efficiency can be realized. Consistent with the DOE sponsored report, Technology Roadmap for the Petroleum Industry, the approach undertaken is to develop and implement entirely new technology to replace existing energy intensive practices. The project directly addresses the top priority issue of developing membranes for hydrocarbon separations. The project is organized to rapidly and effectively advance the state-of-the-art in membranes for hydrocarbon separations. The project team includes ChevronTexaco and BP, major industrial petroleum refiners, who will lead the effort by providing matching resources and real world management perspective. Academic expertise in separation sciences and polymer materials found in the Chemical Engineering and Petroleum Refining Department of the Colorado School of Mines is used to invent, develop, and test new membrane materials. Additional expertise and special facilities available at the Idaho National Engineering and Environmental Laboratory (INEEL) are also exploited in order to effectively meet the goals of the project. The proposed project is truly unique in terms of the strength of the team it brings to bear on the development and commercialization of the proposed technologies.

  2. Direct-Drive Inertial Fusion Research at the University of Rochester's Laboratory for Laser Energetics: A Review

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    McCrory, R.L.; Meyerhofer, D.D.; Loucks, S.J.; Skupsky, S.; Bahr, R.E.; Betti, R.; Boehly, T.R.; Craxton, R.S.; Collins, T.J.B.; Delettrez, J.A.; Donaldson, W.R.; Epstein, R.; Fletcher, K.A.; Freeman, C.; Frenje, J.A.; Glebov, V.Yu.; Goncharov, V.N.; Harding, D.R.; Jaanimagi, P.A.; Keck, R.L.; Kelly, J.H.; Kessler, T.J.; Kilkenny, J.D.; Knauer, J.P.; Li, C.K.; Lund, L.D.; Marozas, J.A.; McKenty, P.W.; Marshall, F.J.; Morse, S.F.B.; Padalino, S.; Petrasso, R.D.; Radha, P.B.; Regan, S.P.; Roberts, S.; Sangster, T.C.; Seguin, F.H.; Seka, W.; Smalyuk, V.A.; Soures, J.M.; Stoeckl, C.; Thorp, K.A.; Yaakobi, B.; Zuegel, J.D.

    2010-04-16

    This paper reviews the status of direct-drive inertial confinement fusion (ICF) research at the University of Rochester's Laboratory for Laser Energetics (LLE). LLE's goal is to demonstrate direct-drive ignition on the National Ignition Facility (NIF) by 2014. Baseline "all-DT" NIF direct-drive ignition target designs have been developed that have a predicted gain of 45 (1-D) at a NIF drive energy of ~1.6 MJ. Significantly higher gains are calculated for targets that include a DT-wicked foam ablator. This paper also reviews the results of both warm fuel and initial cryogenic-fuel spherical target implosion experiments carried out on the OMEGA UV laser. The results of these experiments and design calculations increase confidence that the NIF direct-drive ICF ignition goal will be achieved.

  3. The sky as a laboratory: an educational project of the Department of Astronomy of the University of Padova

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ciroi, S.; Di Mille, F.; Rafanelli, P.

    2011-06-01

    ``The Sky as a Laboratory'' is an educational project of the Department of Astronomy of the University of Padova aimed to give students a physical approach to astronomy and astrophysics. It is a regional program designed to improve science education in the last two grades of high school, by creating cooperation between scientists and teachers. Currently it is present in 30 high schools around all provinces of the region of Veneto in the North-East of Italy. The close involvement in the didactical activities of high schools teachers is without any doubt the winning strategy of the project. Their enthusiastic participation to teaching and organising activities attracts each year the attention for sciences of an increasing number of students and suggests new ideas for future educational activities.

  4. The role of the Oregon State University Endophyte Service Laboratory in diagnosing clinical cases of endophyte toxicoses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Craig, A Morrie; Blythe, Linda L; Duringer, Jennifer M

    2014-07-30

    The Oregon State University Colleges of Veterinary Medicine and Agricultural Sciences instituted the Endophyte Service Laboratory to aid in diagnosing toxicity problems associated with cool-season grasses in livestock. The endophyte (Neotyphodium coenophalum) present in tall fescue (Festuca arundinacea) produces ergopeptine alkaloids, of which ergovaline is the molecule used to determine exposure and toxicity thresholds for the vasoconstrictive conditions "fescue foot" and "summer slump". Another vasoconstrictive syndrome, "ergotism," is caused by a parasitic fungus, Claviceps purpurea, and its primary toxin, ergotamine. "Ryegrass staggers" is a neurological condition that affects livestock consuming endophyte (Neotyphodium lolii)-infected perennial ryegrass (Lolium perenne) with high levels of lolitrem B. HPLC-fluorescent analytical methods for these mycotoxins are described and were used to determine threshold levels of toxicity for ergovaline and lolitrem B in cattle, sheep, horses, and camels. In addition, six clinical cases in cattle are presented to illustrate diagnosis of these three diseases. PMID:25017309

  5. Universality

    OpenAIRE

    Marinchev, Emil

    2002-01-01

    This article is an attempt for a new vision of the basics of Physics, and of Relativity, in particular. A new generalized principle of inertia is proposed, as an universal principle, based on universality of the conservation laws, not depending on the metric geometry used. The second and the third principles of Newton's mechanics are interpreted as logical consequences. The generalization of the classical principle of relativity made by Einstein as the most basic postulate in the Relativity i...

  6. New flow through reactor installed in the ITU Hot Cell laboratory to investigate the dissolution rates of the irradiated fuels

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In order to study the dissolution rates for the different radionuclides, the effect of water radiolysis and to elucidate the dissolution mechanisms of the different radionuclides contained in the spent fuel matrix, irradiated spent fuel and UO2 was used. This study is performed as a part of the collaboration programme ENRESA-CIEMAT-ITU (EC DG/JRC) to provide a source term for use in a performance assessment calculation. For the determination of the dissolution rates a continuous flow through reactor specially designed for hot cell handling was built. This reactor allows the control in situ of different important parameters for leaching experiments such as, redox potential, pH and temperature. These leaching experiments reported the effects of four important parameters (redox potential, pH, carbonate concentration and temperature) on the dissolution kinetics of the spent fuel matrix phase. The kinetic of dissolution of irradiated UO2 fuel has been studied in synthetic granite groundwater under oxidizing conditions at room temperature. preliminary results indicate that for spent fuel, dissolution rate depends on the burnup, being the dissolution rate calculated for the UO2 LWR fuel with a burnup of 53 MWd/kg U of 2.66 10''-10 mol m''1 and of 6.77 10''11 mol m''2 s''-1 for the spent fuel of 29 MWd/kg U. (Author)

  7. Environmental Waste Management in a School Hospital and in a Laboratory of Human Anatomy of a University

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kira Lusa Manfredini

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available The scientific and professional activities developed in a Hospital School and a Laboratory of Human Anatomy of a university can generate parallel, chemical residues from various degrees of angerousness, which may require physical treatment and / or suitable chemical, before being sent to final destination. The General Hospital (GH generates monthly 10 L of xylenes and 50 L of glutaraldehyde to provide ass instance to their patients. Already the Laboratory of Human Anatomy of University de Caxias do Sul (AL-UCS uses more than 10,000 liters for preserving corpses in tanks. The present study aims to analyze the chemical waste management of the GH and the AL-UCS and propose techniques for recovery and reuse of chemicals formaldehyde, glutaraldehyde and xylenes, minimizing the impacts generated by the use, often indispensable and sometimes questionable, of such waste. So far two sets of samples were collected (in March and April 2013 of xylene, glutaraldehyde and formaldehyde in the GH and also at the AL-UCS and it is intended to repeat the collections with monthly periodicity, in the next two semesters. Partial results show that, comparing the relationship of area and the medium areas of the chromatographic (in µV.s of patterns with compounds of interest, an increase in the percentage of formaldehyde relative to the samples in standard formalin (121.84% may be due to contamination with organic compounds with a retention time close to the compound of interest, the xylene was little degradation in the samples, indicating that this compound can be reused in the common procedures of healthcare institutions, with respect to glutaraldehyde significant degradation was observed for the compound in samples represents only 61.88% of the chromatographic peak area of the standard, therefore the reuse of these compounds may require the use of purification methods such as simple distillation and fractional distillation

  8. Sodium fast reactor safety and licensing research plan. Volume II.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ludewig, H. (Brokhaven National Laboratory, Upton, NY); Powers, D. A.; Hewson, John C.; LaChance, Jeffrey L.; Wright, A. (Argonne National Laboratory, Argonne, IL); Phillips, J.; Zeyen, R. (Institute for Energy Petten, Saint-Paul-lez-Durance, France); Clement, B. (IRSN/DPAM.SEMIC Bt 702, Saint-Paul-lez-Durance, France); Garner, Frank (Radiation Effects Consulting, Richland, WA); Walters, Leon (Advanced Reactor Concepts, Los Alamos, NM); Wright, Steve; Ott, Larry J. (Oak Ridge National Laboratory, Oak Ridge, TN); Suo-Anttila, Ahti Jorma; Denning, Richard (Ohio State University, Columbus, OH); Ohshima, Hiroyuki (Japan Atomic Energy Agency, Ibaraki, Japan); Ohno, S. (Japan Atomic Energy Agency, Ibaraki, Japan); Miyhara, S. (Japan Atomic Energy Agency, Ibaraki, Japan); Yacout, Abdellatif (Argonne National Laboratory, Argonne, IL); Farmer, M. (Argonne National Laboratory, Argonne, IL); Wade, D. (Argonne National Laboratory, Argonne, IL); Grandy, C. (Argonne National Laboratory, Argonne, IL); Schmidt, R.; Cahalen, J. (Argonne National Laboratory, Argonne, IL); Olivier, Tara Jean; Budnitz, R. (Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory, Berkeley, CA); Tobita, Yoshiharu (Japan Atomic Energy Agency, Ibaraki, Japan); Serre, Frederic (Centre d' %C3%94etudes nucl%C3%94eaires de Cadarache, Cea, France); Natesan, Ken (Argonne National Laboratory, Argonne, IL); Carbajo, Juan J. (Oak Ridge National Laboratory, Oak Ridge, TN); Jeong, Hae-Yong (Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute, Daejeon, Korea); Wigeland, Roald (Idaho National Laboratory, Idaho Falls, ID); Corradini, Michael (University of Wisconsin-Madison, Madison, WI); Thomas, Justin (Argonne National Laboratory, Argonne, IL); Wei, Tom (Argonne National Laboratory, Argonne, IL); Sofu, Tanju (Argonne National Laboratory, Argonne, IL); Flanagan, George F. (Oak Ridge National Laboratory, Oak Ridge, TN); Bari, R. (Brokhaven National Laboratory, Upton, NY); Porter D. (Idaho National Laboratory, Idaho Falls, ID); Lambert, J. (Argonne National Laboratory, Argonne, IL); Hayes, S. (Idaho National Laboratory, Idaho Falls, ID); Sackett, J. (Idaho National Laboratory, Idaho Falls, ID); Denman, Matthew R.

    2012-05-01

    Expert panels comprised of subject matter experts identified at the U.S. National Laboratories (SNL, ANL, INL, ORNL, LBL, and BNL), universities (University of Wisconsin and Ohio State University), international agencies (IRSN, CEA, JAEA, KAERI, and JRC-IE) and private consultation companies (Radiation Effects Consulting) were assembled to perform a gap analysis for sodium fast reactor licensing. Expert-opinion elicitation was performed to qualitatively assess the current state of sodium fast reactor technologies. Five independent gap analyses were performed resulting in the following topical reports: (1) Accident Initiators and Sequences (i.e., Initiators/Sequences Technology Gap Analysis), (2) Sodium Technology Phenomena (i.e., Advanced Burner Reactor Sodium Technology Gap Analysis), (3) Fuels and Materials (i.e., Sodium Fast Reactor Fuels and Materials: Research Needs), (4) Source Term Characterization (i.e., Advanced Sodium Fast Reactor Accident Source Terms: Research Needs), and (5) Computer Codes and Models (i.e., Sodium Fast Reactor Gaps Analysis of Computer Codes and Models for Accident Analysis and Reactor Safety). Volume II of the Sodium Research Plan consolidates the five gap analysis reports produced by each expert panel, wherein the importance of the identified phenomena and necessities of further experimental research and code development were addressed. The findings from these five reports comprised the basis for the analysis in Sodium Fast Reactor Research Plan Volume I.

  9. Sodium fast reactor safety and licensing research plan - Volume II

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Expert panels comprised of subject matter experts identified at the U.S. National Laboratories (SNL, ANL, INL, ORNL, LBL, and BNL), universities (University of Wisconsin and Ohio State University), international agencies (IRSN, CEA, JAEA, KAERI, and JRC-IE) and private consultation companies (Radiation Effects Consulting) were assembled to perform a gap analysis for sodium fast reactor licensing. Expert-opinion elicitation was performed to qualitatively assess the current state of sodium fast reactor technologies. Five independent gap analyses were performed resulting in the following topical reports: (1) Accident Initiators and Sequences (i.e., Initiators/Sequences Technology Gap Analysis), (2) Sodium Technology Phenomena (i.e., Advanced Burner Reactor Sodium Technology Gap Analysis), (3) Fuels and Materials (i.e., Sodium Fast Reactor Fuels and Materials: Research Needs), (4) Source Term Characterization (i.e., Advanced Sodium Fast Reactor Accident Source Terms: Research Needs), and (5) Computer Codes and Models (i.e., Sodium Fast Reactor Gaps Analysis of Computer Codes and Models for Accident Analysis and Reactor Safety). Volume II of the Sodium Research Plan consolidates the five gap analysis reports produced by each expert panel, wherein the importance of the identified phenomena and necessities of further experimental research and code development were addressed. The findings from these five reports comprised the basis for the analysis in Sodium Fast Reactor Research Plan Volume I.

  10. The thermal column. A new irradiation position for fission-track dating in the University of Pavia Triga Mark II nuclear reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In the present paper a new irradiation position arranged for fission-track dating in the Triga Mark II reactor of the University of Pavia is described. Fluence values determined using the NIST glass standard SRM 962a for fission-track dating and the traditional metal foils are compared. Relatively high neutron thermalization (cadmium ratio of 85.3 for gold and 643 for cobalt) and lack of significant fluence spatial gradients are very favorable factors for fission-track dating. Finally, international age standards (or putative age standards) irradiated in this new position yielded results consistent with independent reference ages. (author). 9 refs., 2 figs., 4 tabs

  11. 1991 Summer research program for high school juniors at the University of Rochester's Laboratory for Laser Energetics

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Meyerhofer, David D.

    1991-09-01

    Ten students participated in the 1991 summer high school student research program at the University of Rochester's Laboratory for Laser Energetics (LLE). The participants spent 8 weeks working and learning at LLE. They spent most of their time working on individual research projects. Each student was assigned a project, upon which he/she worked under the direct supervision of one of the staff members of the laboratory. The students, their high schools, and their projects are listed in Table 1. The program culminated in oral and written reports describing their work. The oral reports were presented at a symposium on 23 August 1991, at which the student's parents and teachers and members of the LLE staff were present. The written reports are collected in this volume. The titles of the works are UV alignment table; neutron yields can be measured by using the relative gain of a photomultiplier tube; scattering in isotropic and anisotropic media; a better approximation of the diffusion equation; use of the SLAC code to produce a photoemissive electrostatic electron gun; spatial resolution deteriorates with increasing film exposure; analysis of refractive image distortion; making of pinholes for x-ray pinhole cameras; does perturbation theory accurately describe multiphoton ionization and wave front analysis using shearing interferometry.

  12. All things White Dwarf: The State of Stellar Forensics at the University of Texas and Sandia National Laboratories

    Science.gov (United States)

    Winget, Donald

    2011-10-01

    Astronomy has always been considered an observational science, in contrast with other experimental sciences like physics, chemistry, biology, and geology. This is because it has not been possible to perform experiments on the objects we observe. This situation has changed in a way that is transformational. We are now able to make macroscopic bits of star stuff in the lab: plasmas created under conditions that are the same as the plasmas in stars. Although laboratory astrophysics has long been an important part of astronomical research, what has changed is the ability to produce large enough chunks of a star that we can make measurements and perform experiments. In this way, astronomy joins her sister sciences in becoming an experimental science as well as an observational one. I will describe how this came about, the technology behind it, and the results of recent laboratory experiments. Most importantly, we will discuss how this will change our understanding of the universe and its contents. This work will shed new light on our recent discoveries involving McDonald Observatory: planets around white dwarf stars, massive carbon/oxygen variable white dwarf stars, and white dwarf-white dwarf binaries -- including one detached double eclipsing system with an orbital period of 12 minutes. We should measure the rate of change of the orbital period in this system within a year and we expect it to be the highest S/N source of gravitational radiation, easily detectable with LISA or similar approaches.

  13. University of Colorado, Nuclear Physics Laboratory technical progress report, November 1, 1978-October 31, 1979. Report NPL-845

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This report summarizes work carried out at the Nuclear Physics Laboratory of the University of Colorado from November 1, 1978 to October 31, 1979, under contract EY-76-C-02-0535.A003 between the University of Colorado and the United States Department of Energy. Experimental studies of light ion-induced reactions were performed with the AVF cyclotron, which continues each year to produce beams of yet higher quality. Charged-particle studies continued to emphasize use of the high-resolution spectrometer system, but some return to broad-range spectroscopic studies using solid state detectors also occurred. Neutron time-of-flight experiments used 9-meter and 30-meter flight paths. Neutron-gamma ray coincidence studies developed into a new and promising field. The new PDP 11/34 data acquisition system was of great value in allowing such multiparameter experiments. Smaller programs in nuclear astrophysics, plasma diagnostic development, and medical physics were also undertaken. Research activities based at other accelerators grew. Studies of future directions for light-ion accelerators, including work on intense pulsed ion sources, orbit dynamics, and storage rings, were greatly enlarged. 19 of the articles in this report were abstracted and indexed individually. Lists of publications and personnel conclude this report

  14. In the physics class: university physics students' enactment of class and gender in the context of laboratory work

    Science.gov (United States)

    Danielsson, Anna T.

    2014-06-01

    This article explores how the doing of social class and gender can intersect with the learning of science, through case studies of two male, working-class university students' constitutions of identities as physics students. In doing so, I challenge the taken-for-granted notion that male physics students have an unproblematic relation to their chosen discipline, and nuance the picture of how working-class students relate to higher education by the explicit focus on one disciplinary culture. Working from the perspective of situated learning theory, the interviews with the two male students were analysed for how they negotiated the practice of the physics student laboratory and their own classed and gendered participation in this practice. By drawing on the heterogeneity of the practice of physics the two students were able to use the practical and technological aspects of physics as a gateway into the discipline. However, this is not to say that their participation in physics was completely frictionless. The students were both engaged in a continuous negotiation of how skills they had learned to value in the background may or may not be compatible with the ones they perceived to be valued in the university physicist community.

  15. Influence of temperature and pretreatments on the anaerobic digestion of wastewater grown microalgae in a laboratory-scale accumulating-volume reactor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kinnunen, Viljami; Craggs, Rupert; Rintala, Jukka

    2014-06-15

    This laboratory-scale study investigated the performance of a low-cost anaerobic digester for microalgae. Low (∼2%) solids content wastewater-grown microalgal biomass (MB) was digested in an unmixed, accumulating-volume reactor (AVR) with solid and liquid separation that enabled a long solids retention time. AVRs (2 or 20 L) were operated at 20 °C, 37 °C or ambient temperature (8-21 °C), and the influence of two pretreatments - low-temperature thermal (50-57 °C) and freeze-thaw - on algal digestion were studied. The highest methane yield from untreated MB was in the 37 °C AVR with 225 L CH4 kg volatile solids (VS)(-1), compared with 180 L CH4 kg VS(-1)added in a conventional, 37 °C completely stirred tank reactor (CSTR), and 101 L CH4 kg VS(-1)added in the 20 °C AVR. Freeze-thaw and low-temperature thermal pretreatments promoted protein hydrolysis and increased methane yields by 32-50% at 20 °C, compared with untreated MB. Pretreatments also increased the mineralisation of nitrogen (41-57%) and phosphorus (76-84%) during digestion. MB digestion at ambient temperature was comparable with digestion at 20 °C, until temperature dropped below 16 °C.

  16. Chemical and radiochemical constituents in water from wells in the vicinity of the naval reactors facility, Idaho National Engineering and Environmental Laboratory, Idaho, 1997-98

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bartholomay, Roy C.; Knobel, LeRoy L.; Tucker, Betty J.; Twining, Brian V.

    2000-01-01

    The U.S. Geological Survey, in response to a request from the U.S. Department of Energy?s Phtsburgh Naval Reactors Ofilce, Idaho Branch Office, sampled water from 13 wells during 1997?98 as part of a long-term project to monitor water quality of the Snake River Plain aquifer in the vicinity of the Naval Reactors Facility, Idaho National Engineering and Environmental Laboratory, Idaho. Water samples were analyzed for naturally occurring constituents and man-made contaminants. A totalof91 samples were collected from the 13 monitoring wells. The routine samples contained detectable concentrations of total cations and dissolved anions, and nitrite plus nitrate as nitrogen. Most of the samples also had detectable concentrations of gross alpha- and gross beta-particle radioactivity and tritium. Fourteen qualityassurance samples also were collected and analyze~ seven were field-blank samples, and seven were replicate samples. Most of the field blank samples contained less than detectable concentrations of target constituents; however, some blank samples did contain detectable concentrations of calcium, magnesium, barium, copper, manganese, nickel, zinc, nitrite plus nitrate, total organic halogens, tritium, and selected volatile organic compounds.

  17. Development of laboratory scale fusion grade tungsten coatings for target and first wall components of fusion reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Magnetically confined fusion reaction (D-T) is considered as one of the most suitable way of generating clean environ-friendly energy for future needs. The tokamak concept is the most promising one with the on-going internationally funded ITER project, which is likely to demonstrate the feasibility of a DEMO fusion reactor. However, the plasma wall interaction problem and its complexities are still not resolved fully. This problem in particular requires development of suitable wall material in the fusion reactors that can withstand the steady state heat flux escaping from the core plasma. Several materials, composite materials, etc are being considered for the purpose but the cost effective solution and most widely adopted wall material is carbon such as graphite and carbon fibre composites (CFC). However, these materials suffer from number of drawback from the point of view of their usage in fusion reactor, such as, higher degree of sputtering; physical as well as chemical erosion and retention of the fusion fuel. Remedy is tungsten, which is being considered as the one of the most suitable candidate for the wall material because of its high melting point, fairly high re-crystallisation temperature, low sputtering yield and fuel retention capabilities. However, tungsten as a pure material cannot be used as the wall material because of high cost implications to the project, its brittleness and bulkiness leads to high structural weight. So, tungsten coatings on a lighter substrate are a viable solution that may very well serve the purpose. A project has been initiated at SVIT, Indore to develop tungsten coated graphite tiles using plasma assisted chemical vapour deposition (PACVD) in collaboration with the Institute for Plasma Research funded by BRFST, Govt. of India. The complete system for obtaining the coated tiles has been designed, fabricated and installed at SVITS, Indore. RF plasma is produced in the system using a 600 W, 13.56 MHz power supply in Argon. For

  18. Using Biotechnology in the Laboratory: Using an Immobilized-Laccase Reactor-System to Learn about Wastewater Treatment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Genc, Rukan; Rodriguez-Couto, Susana

    2009-01-01

    This article includes a practical guide, which was used to teach the phenomenon of immobilization of enzymes and their subsequent use for discoloration of dyes to under-graduate students of Biotechnology at the Rovira i Virgili University (Tarragona, Spain). Alginate was selected as a support for the immobilization of laccase. Remazol Brilliant…

  19. Program management plan for the Molten Salt Reactor Experiment Remediation Project at Oak Ridge National Laboratory, Oak Ridge, Tennessee

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1996-09-01

    The primary mission of the Molten Salt Reactor Experiment (MSRE) Remediation Project is to effectively implement the risk-reduction strategies and technical plans to stabilize and prevent further migration of uranium within the MSRE facility, remove the uranium and fuel salts from the system, and dispose of the fuel and flush salts by storage in appropriate depositories to bring the facility to a surveillance and maintenance condition before decontamination and decommissioning. This Project Management Plan (PMP) for the MSRE Remediation Project details project purpose; technical objectives, milestones, and cost objectives; work plan; work breakdown structure (WBS); schedule; management organization and responsibilities; project management performance measurement planning, and control; conduct of operations; configuration management; environmental, safety, and health compliance; quality assurance; operational readiness reviews; and training.

  20. Idaho National Laboratory Experimental Program to Measure the Flow Phenomena in a Scaled Model of a Prismatic Gas-Cooled Reactor Lower Plenum for Validation of CFD Codes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hugh M. McIlroy Jr.; Donald M. McEligot; Robert J. Pink

    2008-09-01

    The experimental program that is being conducted at the Matched Index-of-Refraction (MIR) Flow Facility at Idaho National Laboratory (INL) to obtain benchmark data on measurements of flow phenomena in a scaled model of a prismatic gas-cooled reactor lower plenum using 3-D Particle Image Velocimetry (PIV) is presented. A description of the scaling analysis, experimental facility, 3-D PIV system, measurement uncertainties and analysis, experimental procedures and samples of the data sets that have been obtained are included. Samples of the data set that will be presented include mean-velocity-field and turbulence data in an approximately 1:7 scale model of a region of the lower plenum of a typical prismatic gas-cooled reactor (GCR) similar to a General Atomics Gas-Turbine-Modular Helium Reactor (GTMHR) design. This experiment has been selected as the first Standard Problem endorsed by the Generation IV International Forum. The flow in the lower plenum consists of multiple jets injected into a confined cross flow - with obstructions. The model consists of a row of full circular posts along its centerline with half-posts on the two parallel walls to approximate flow scaled to that expected from the staggered parallel rows of posts in the reactor design. The model is fabricated from clear, fused quartz to match the refractive-index of the mineral oil working fluid. The benefit of the MIR technique is that it permits high-quality measurements to be obtained without locating intrusive transducers that disturb the flow field and without distortion of the optical paths. An advantage of the INL MIR system is its large size which allows improved spatial and temporal resolution compared to similar facilities at smaller scales. Results concentrate on the region of the lower plenum near its far reflector wall (away from the outlet duct). Inlet jet Reynolds numbers (based on the jet diameter and the time-mean average flow rate) are approximately 4,300 and 12,400. The measurements

  1. 高校金工实验室安全管理体系建设的探讨%Discussion on University Metalworking Laboratory Safety Management System Construction

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    卢孔宝

    2015-01-01

    Metalworking laboratory safety management is one of the basic content of laboratory management, good metalworking laboratory safety management, prevention of accidents, is increasingly becoming an important issue in colleges and universities metalworking laboratory safety management. This article on the importance of laboratory safety management colleges metalworking, metalworking problems in laboratory management and the main content metalworking laboratory safety management aspects of construction were discussed, with a view of the construction of university laboratory safety management system metalworking helpful.%金工实验室安全管理是实验室管理的基本内容之一,做好金工实验室的安全管理,预防安全事故的发生,越来越成为当前高校金工实验室安全管理工作的重要课题。就高校金工实验室安全管理的重要性,金工实验室管理中存在的问题以及金工实验室安全管理建设的主要内容方面进行了探讨,以期对高校金工实验室安全管理体系的建设有所帮助。

  2. Research Nuclear Reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Published in English and in French, this large report first proposes an overview of the use and history of research nuclear reactors. It discusses their definition, and presents the various types of research reactors which can be either related to nuclear power (critical mock-ups, material test reactors, safety test reactors, training reactors, prototypes), or to research (basic research, industry, health), or to specific particle physics phenomena (neutron diffraction, isotope production, neutron activation, neutron radiography, semiconductor doping). It reports the history of the French research reactors by distinguishing the first atomic pile (ZOE), and the activities and achievements during the fifties, the sixties and the seventies. It also addresses the development of instrumentation for research reactors (neutron, thermal, mechanical and fission gas release measurements). The other parts of the report concern the validation of neutronics calculations for different reactors (the EOLE water critical mock-up, the MASURCA air critical mock-up dedicated to fast neutron reactor study, the MINERVE water critical mock-up, the CALIBAN pulsed research reactor), the testing of materials under irradiation (OSIRIS reactor, laboratories associated with research reactors, the Jules Horowitz reactor and its experimental programs and related devices, irradiation of materials with ion beams), the investigation of accident situations (on the CABRI, Phebus, Silene and Jules Horowitz reactors). The last part proposes a worldwide overview of research reactors

  3. Nuclear Reactors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hogerton, John

    1964-01-01

    This pamphlet describes how reactors work; discusses reactor design; describes research, teaching, and materials testing reactors; production reactors; reactors for electric power generation; reactors for supply heat; reactors for propulsion; reactors for space; reactor safety; and reactors of tomorrow. The appendix discusses characteristics of U.S. civilian power reactor concepts and lists some of the U.S. reactor power projects, with location, type, capacity, owner, and startup date.

  4. Proceedings of the school for young high energy physicists, Rutherford Appleton Laboratory, September 8-20 1986

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Four lecture courses were presented to PhD graduate students in their first year of work at British Universities. The lecture courses were entitled: Introduction to Quantum Electrodynamics, Introduction to Quantum Chromodynamics, Quantum Field Theory, Symmetries and Gauge Theories, and Topics in Modern Phenomenology. The first three lecture courses were selected for INIS and indexed separately. (U.K.)

  5. Technical Information on the Carbonation of the EBR-II Reactor, Summary Report Part 1: Laboratory Experiments and Application to EBR-II Secondary Sodium System

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Steven R. Sherman

    2005-04-01

    Residual sodium is defined as sodium metal that remains behind in pipes, vessels, and tanks after the bulk sodium metal has been melted and drained from such components. The residual sodium has the same chemical properties as bulk sodium, and differs from bulk sodium only in the thickness of the sodium deposit. Typically, sodium is considered residual when the thickness of the deposit is less than 5-6 cm. This residual sodium must be removed or deactivated when a pipe, vessel, system, or entire reactor is permanently taken out of service, in order to make the component or system safer and/or to comply with decommissioning regulations. As an alternative to the established residual sodium deactivation techniques (steam-and-nitrogen, wet vapor nitrogen, etc.), a technique involving the use of moisture and carbon dioxide has been developed. With this technique, sodium metal is converted into sodium bicarbonate by reacting it with humid carbon dioxide. Hydrogen is emitted as a by-product. This technique was first developed in the laboratory by exposing sodium samples to humidified carbon dioxide under controlled conditions, and then demonstrated on a larger scale by treating residual sodium within the Experimental Breeder Reactor II (EBR-II) secondary cooling system, followed by the primary cooling system, respectively. The EBR-II facility is located at the Idaho National Laboratory (INL) in southeastern Idaho, U.S.A. This report is Part 1 of a two-part report. It is divided into three sections. The first section describes the chemistry of carbon dioxide-water-sodium reactions. The second section covers the laboratory experiments that were conducted in order to develop the residual sodium deactivation process. The third section discusses the application of the deactivation process to the treatment of residual sodium within the EBR-II secondary sodium cooling system. Part 2 of the report, under separate cover, describes the application of the technique to residual sodium

  6. Laboratorial analyses of fungal keratitis in a University Service Análise laboratorial de ceratites fúngicas em Serviço Universitário

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alfredo José Muniz de Andrade

    2000-02-01

    Full Text Available Purpose: To present the frequency and type of identified fungi from infectious keratitis. Methods: Retrospective survey of the cases of mycotic keratitis in the period from 1995 to 1998, at the Laboratory of Ocular Microbiology of the Department of Ophthalmology of the Federal University of São Paulo. Description of the fungal isolations, analysis of the causative factors and relation to the number of infectious keratitis in the same period. Results/Conclusion: Mycotic keratitis was diagnosed in 61 (5.48% of the 1,113 patients who presented ulcer of the cornea of infectious etiology, ranging from 3.4 to 9.25%, per year. Filamentous fungi were identified in 47 cases (77.04% and yeasts in 14 (22.95%. Fusarium was the most frequent genus (50.82%, followed by Candida (22.95% and Aspergillus (8.19%. Phaeosiaria sp, Phoma sp, Fonsecaea pedrosoi, Exserohilum rostratum, that are rare etiological fungal agents of keratitis, were also isolated.Objetivo: Apresentar a freqüência e o tipo de fungos identi-ficados de infecções corneanas. Métodos: Levantamento retrospectivo dos casos de ceratites micóticas, no Laboratório de Microbiologia Ocular do Departamento de Oftalmologia da Universidade Federal de São Paulo (UNIFESP no período entre 1995 a 1998. Descrição dos isolamentos de fungos, análise dos fatores desencadeantes e relação com o número de ceratites infecciosas no mesmo período. Resultados/Conclusão: Ceratites micóticas foram diagnos-ticadas em 61 (5,48% dos 1113 pacientes que apresentaram úlcera de córnea de etiologia infecciosa, com variação de 3,46-9,25%, ao ano. Fungos filamentosos foram identificados em 47 casos (77,04% e leveduras em 14 (22,95%. Fusarium foi o gênero mais freqüente (50,82%, seguido de Candida (22,95% e Aspergillus (8,19%. Foram também isolados fungos raros como agentes etiológicos de ceratites como: Phaeosiaria sp; Phoma sp; Fonsecaea pedrosoi e Exserohilum rostratum.

  7. Cooling and radiation features after modification of low temperature at the Kyoto University reactor (KUR-LTL)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    As KUR-LTL was carried out a renewal of helium gas freezer and compressor on 1974 fiscal year among 30 years since its construction on 1967 fiscal year, its irradiation duct (cryostat portion) has been continued to use at its first state. However, the duct mounted at proximity of the reactor core portion was formed some deterioration in its strength because of its laying under much amounts of neutron beam irradiation, especially even some phenomena such as deterioration of cooling feature, vacuum deterioration at heat insulation vacuum layer, and so forth. Then, a modification of the LTL was decided to carry out on 1998 fiscal year at a part of a fire years program on research reactor preparation of the Research Reactor Institute. Through this modification, it was planned to approach to users' needs as much as possible by making radiation temperature possible to cool nearly to 10 K from conventional about 20 K, and by upgrading high speed neutron flux to more than 1.3 times. Here were described on outlines of the modification and on cooling and radiation features after the modification. (G.K.)

  8. Sonochemical Reactors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gogate, Parag R; Patil, Pankaj N

    2016-10-01

    Sonochemical reactors are based on the generation of cavitational events using ultrasound and offer immense potential for the intensification of physical and chemical processing applications. The present work presents a critical analysis of the underlying mechanisms for intensification, available reactor configurations and overview of the different applications exploited successfully, though mostly at laboratory scales. Guidelines have also been presented for optimum selection of the important operating parameters (frequency and intensity of irradiation, temperature and liquid physicochemical properties) as well as the geometric parameters (type of reactor configuration and the number/position of the transducers) so as to maximize the process intensification benefits. The key areas for future work so as to transform the successful technique at laboratory/pilot scale into commercial technology have also been discussed. Overall, it has been established that there is immense potential for sonochemical reactors for process intensification leading to greener processing and economic benefits. Combined efforts from a wide range of disciplines such as material science, physics, chemistry and chemical engineers are required to harness the benefits at commercial scale operation.

  9. Investigation of cold nuclear fusion in condensed matter. Final report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jones, S.E.; Berrondo, M.; Czirr, J.B.; Decker, D.L.; Harrison, K.; Jensen, G.L.; Palmer, E.P.; Rees, L.B.; Shelton, D.S.; Taylor, S.; Vanfleet, H.B.; Wang, J.C.; Bennion, D.N.; Harb, J.N.; Pitt, W.G.; Thorne, J.M. [Brigham Young Univ., Provo, UT (United States); Anderson, A.N. [Idaho Research Software, Inc., Boise, ID (United States); McMurtry, G.; Murphy, N. [Hawaii Univ., Honolulu, HI (United States). Hawaii Inst. of Geophysics; Goff, F.E. [Los Alamos National Lab., NM (United States)

    1992-12-29

    Recent research has been directed towards finding means to produce neutron emissions at will, to demonstrate reproducibility, and to permit in-depth studies of the origin of neutron emissions. this goal has been pursued in the Kamiokande detector in Japan and has led to the development of a deep underground laboratory in a tunnel in the Wasatch mountains near Brigham Young University. New counters for low-level neutron emissions are being utilized. Calorimetric tools have also been developed.

  10. Investigation of cold nuclear fusion in condensed matter

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jones, S.E.; Berrondo, M.; Czirr, J.B.; Decker, D.L.; Harrison, K.; Jensen, G.L.; Palmer, E.P.; Rees, L.B.; Shelton, D.S.; Taylor, S.; Vanfleet, H.B.; Wang, J.C.; Bennion, D.N.; Harb, J.N.; Pitt, W.G.; Thorne, J.M. (Brigham Young Univ., Provo, UT (United States)); Anderson, A.N. (Idaho Research Software, Inc., Boise, ID (United States)); McMurtry, G.; Murphy, N. (Hawaii Univ., Honolulu, HI (United States). Hawai

    1992-12-29

    Recent research has been directed towards finding means to produce neutron emissions at will, to demonstrate reproducibility, and to permit in-depth studies of the origin of neutron emissions. this goal has been pursued in the Kamiokande detector in Japan and has led to the development of a deep underground laboratory in a tunnel in the Wasatch mountains near Brigham Young University. New counters for low-level neutron emissions are being utilized. Calorimetric tools have also been developed.

  11. Investigation of cold nuclear fusion in condensed matter

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Recent research has been directed towards finding means to produce neutron emissions at will, to demonstrate reproducibility, and to permit in-depth studies of the origin of neutron emissions. this goal has been pursued in the Kamiokande detector in Japan and has led to the development of a deep underground laboratory in a tunnel in the Wasatch mountains near Brigham Young University. New counters for low-level neutron emissions are being utilized. Calorimetric tools have also been developed

  12. Universe

    CERN Document Server

    2011-01-01

    Updated for 2011, the Universe, is one book in the Britannica Illustrated Science Library Series that covers today's most popular science topics, from digital TV to microchips to touchscreens and beyond. Perennial subjects in earth science, life science, and physical science are all explored in detail. Amazing graphics-more than 1,000 per title-combined with concise summaries help students understand complex subjects. Correlated to the science curriculum in grades 5-9, each title also contains a glossary with full definitions for vocabulary.

  13. Triangle Universities Nuclear Laboratory

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1991-01-01

    This report contains brief papers that discusses the following topics: Fundamental Symmetries in the Nucleus; Internucleon Interactions; Dynamics of Very Light Nuclei; Facets of the Nuclear Many-Body Problem; and Nuclear Instruments and Methods.

  14. Triangle Universities Nuclear Laboratory

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This report contains brief papers that discusses the following topics: Fundamental Symmetries in the Nucleus; Internucleon Interactions; Dynamics of Very Light Nuclei; Facets of the Nuclear Many-Body Problem; and Nuclear Instruments and Methods

  15. Activities on archaeology, art and cultural heritage conservation at the Applied Nuclear Physics Laboratory (LFNA), State University of Londrina (UEL)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Appoloni, Carlos R.; Parreira, Paulo S.; Lopes, Fabio [Universidade Estadual de Londrina (UEL), PR (Brazil). Dept. de Fisica. Lab. de Fisica Nuclear Aplicada]. E-mails: appoloni@uel.br; parreira@uel.br; bonn@uel.br

    2007-07-01

    The Laboratory of Applied Nuclear Physics from the State University of Londrina (LFNA/UEL) introduced Archaeometry and related issues pioneeringly among its main research lines in 1994. The current work aims at presenting an overview of the evolution of such activities and the development of human resources up to the present time. The activities related to Archaeology, Art and Cultural Heritage Conservation at the LFNA can be divided into five levels, as follows. (1) Study and implementation of experimental methodologies. (2) Related Basic Research - Physics issues involved in archaeometric applications have led to the need to conduct interesting specific basic research. (3) Works with specific materials - Among the several analysis conducted, the following should be mentioned: ceramics from the archaeological site Tupi Guarani Fazenda Sta. Dalmacia, PR; two archaeological sites in the Amazon Forest; objects from the MAE/USP collection; wall paintings in Imaculada Conceicao Church, SP; coins and other objects from the MHN/RJ; obsidians from Ecuador; etc. (4) Development of Human Resources. In this item there are two components: tutoring of scientific initiation students, Master's and Doctorate in atomic-nuclear methodologies applied to Archaeometry and a course of non-destructive nuclear techniques for the characterization of archaeological and art materials aimed at archaeologists and conservators, given since 1997. (5) Scientific collaborations - the construction of a common language between physicists and archeologists, conservators and other professionals involved in this area is an endeavor of mutual continuous learning and necessary conditions for the success of the projects. (author)

  16. Activities on archaeology, art and cultural heritage conservation at the Applied Nuclear Physics Laboratory (LFNA), State University of Londrina (UEL)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The Laboratory of Applied Nuclear Physics from the State University of Londrina (LFNA/UEL) introduced Archaeometry and related issues pioneeringly among its main research lines in 1994. The current work aims at presenting an overview of the evolution of such activities and the development of human resources up to the present time. The activities related to Archaeology, Art and Cultural Heritage Conservation at the LFNA can be divided into five levels, as follows. (1) Study and implementation of experimental methodologies. (2) Related Basic Research - Physics issues involved in archaeometric applications have led to the need to conduct interesting specific basic research. (3) Works with specific materials - Among the several analysis conducted, the following should be mentioned: ceramics from the archaeological site Tupi Guarani Fazenda Sta. Dalmacia, PR; two archaeological sites in the Amazon Forest; objects from the MAE/USP collection; wall paintings in Imaculada Conceicao Church, SP; coins and other objects from the MHN/RJ; obsidians from Ecuador; etc. (4) Development of Human Resources. In this item there are two components: tutoring of scientific initiation students, Master's and Doctorate in atomic-nuclear methodologies applied to Archaeometry and a course of non-destructive nuclear techniques for the characterization of archaeological and art materials aimed at archaeologists and conservators, given since 1997. (5) Scientific collaborations - the construction of a common language between physicists and archeologists, conservators and other professionals involved in this area is an endeavor of mutual continuous learning and necessary conditions for the success of the projects. (author)

  17. Pulsed and monoenergetic beams for neutron cross-section measurements using activation and scattering techniques at Triangle Universities Nuclear Laboratory

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hutcheson, A.; Angell, C. T.; Becker, J. A.; Boswell, M.; Crowell, A. S.; Dashdorj, D.; Fallin, B.; Fotiades, N.; Howell, C. R.; Karwowski, H. J.; Kelley, J. H.; Kiser, M.; Macri, R. A.; Nelson, R. O.; Pedroni, R. S.; Tonchev, A. P.; Tornow, W.; Vieira, D. J.; Weisel, G. J.; Wilhelmy, J. B.

    2007-08-01

    In support of the Stewardship Science Academic Alliances initiative, an experimental program has been developed at Triangle Universities Nuclear Laboratory (TUNL) to measure (n,xn) cross-sections with both in-beam and activation techniques with the goal of improving the partial cross-section database for the NNSA Stockpile Stewardship Program. First experimental efforts include excitation function measurements on 235,238U and 241Am using pulsed and monoenergetic neutron beams with En = 5-15 MeV. Neutron-induced partial cross-sections were measured by detecting prompt γ rays from the residual nuclei using various combinations of clover and planar HPGe detectors in the TUNL shielded neutron source area. Complimentary activation measurements using DC neutron beams have also been performed in open geometry in our second target area. The neutron-induced activities were measured in the TUNL low-background counting area. In this presentation, we include detailed information about the irradiation procedures and facilities and preliminary data on first measurements using this capability.

  18. Pulsed and monoenergetic beams for neutron cross-section measurements using activation and scattering techniques at Triangle Universities Nuclear Laboratory

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hutcheson, A. [Triangle Universities Nuclear Laboratory, P.O. Box 90308, Durham, NC 27708 (United States)]. E-mail: hutch@tunl.duke.edu; Angell, C.T. [Triangle Universities Nuclear Laboratory, P.O. Box 90308, Durham, NC 27708 (United States); Becker, J.A. [Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory, 7000 East Avenue, Livermore, CA 94550 (United States); Boswell, M. [Triangle Universities Nuclear Laboratory, P.O. Box 90308, Durham, NC 27708 (United States); Crowell, A.S. [Triangle Universities Nuclear Laboratory, P.O. Box 90308, Durham, NC 27708 (United States); Dashdorj, D. [Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory, 7000 East Avenue, Livermore, CA 94550 (United States); Fallin, B. [Triangle Universities Nuclear Laboratory, P.O. Box 90308, Durham, NC 27708 (United States); Fotiades, N. [Los Alamos National Laboratory, P.O. Box 1663, Los Alamos, NM 87545 (United States); Howell, C.R.; Karwowski, H.J.; Kelley, J.H.; Kiser, M. [Triangle Universities Nuclear Laboratory, P.O. Box 90308, Durham, NC 27708 (United States); Macri, R.A. [Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory, 7000 East Avenue, Livermore, CA 94550 (United States); Nelson, R.O. [Los Alamos National Laboratory, P.O. Box 1663, Los Alamos, NM 87545 (United States); Pedroni, R.S. [NC A and T State University, 1601 East Market Street, Greensboro, NC 27411 (United States); Tonchev, A.P.; Tornow, W. [Triangle Universities Nuclear Laboratory, P.O. Box 90308, Durham, NC 27708 (United States); Vieira, D.J. [Los Alamos National Laboratory, P.O. Box 1663, Los Alamos, NM 87545 (United States); Weisel, G.J. [Penn State Altoona, 3000 Ivyside Park, Altoona, PA 16601 (United States); Wilhelmy, J.B. [Los Alamos National Laboratory, P.O. Box 1663, Los Alamos, NM 87545 (United States)

    2007-08-15

    In support of the Stewardship Science Academic Alliances initiative, an experimental program has been developed at Triangle Universities Nuclear Laboratory (TUNL) to measure (n,xn) cross-sections with both in-beam and activation techniques with the goal of improving the partial cross-section database for the NNSA Stockpile Stewardship Program. First experimental efforts include excitation function measurements on {sup 235,238}U and {sup 241}Am using pulsed and monoenergetic neutron beams with E {sub n} = 5-15 MeV. Neutron-induced partial cross-sections were measured by detecting prompt {gamma} rays from the residual nuclei using various combinations of clover and planar HPGe detectors in the TUNL shielded neutron source area. Complimentary activation measurements using DC neutron beams have also been performed in open geometry in our second target area. The neutron-induced activities were measured in the TUNL low-background counting area. In this presentation, we include detailed information about the irradiation procedures and facilities and preliminary data on first measurements using this capability.

  19. Exploration on construction of GLP Laboratory in colleges and universities%综合性高校GLP实验室建设的探索

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    吴洪海; 李五一; 阮慧; 朱狄峰

    2013-01-01

    With the development of pharmaceutical science, medicine, life sciences, chemical industry, agriculture and other disciplines, colleges and universities are playing more important role in drug discovery. Non-clinical safety evaluation of novel drugs is obligated to be performed in GLP laboratory, therefore, the construction of GLP laboratory in colleges and universities will strongly promote the development of novel candidates. The successful experience of constructing GLP laboratory in Zhejiang University is documented, including the GLP systematic construction, the advantages, issues and solutions. This paper may provide valuable information for GLP laboratory application in other colleges and universities.%新药非临床安全性评价必须在GLP实验室进行,因此建立GLP实验平台将是推动高校新药研究的关键举措.该文结合GLP建设及认证过程取得的经验,探讨GLP的系统化建设、综合性高校GLP实验室建设的优势、可能遇到的问题及解决方案等问题,为国内其他综合性高校进行GLP实验室建设提供参考.

  20. The Role of Part-Time Employment among Young People with a Non-University Education in Spain

    Science.gov (United States)

    Corrales-Herrero, Helena; Rodríguez-Prado, Beatriz

    2016-01-01

    For some people, a part-time job is merely an intermediate state that serves as a "stepping stone" to further employment and makes labour market integration easier. Yet, part-time work also appears in highly unstable careers. The present research aims to determine the role of part-time employment for young people with non-university…