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Sample records for brigham young university laboratory reactor

  1. High Pressure Physics at Brigham Young University

    Science.gov (United States)

    Decker, Daniel

    2000-09-01

    I will discuss the high pressure research of Drs. J. Dean Barnett, Daniel L. Decker and Howard B. Vanfleet of the department of Physics and Astronomy at Brigham Young University and their many graduate students. I will begin by giving a brief history of the beginning of high pressure research at Brigham Young University when H. Tracy Hall came to the University from General Elecrtric Labs. and then follow the work as it progressed from high pressure x-ray diffraction experiments, melting curve measurements under pressure to pressure effects on tracer diffusion and Mossbauer effect spectra. This will be followed by showing the development of pressure calibration techniques from the Decker equation of state of NaCl to the ruby fluorescence spectroscopy and a short discussion of using a liquid cell for hydrostatic measurements and temperature control for precision high pressure measurements. Then I will conclude with a description of thermoelectric measuremnts, critical phenomena at the magnetic Curie point, and the tricritical point of BaTiO_3.

  2. Brigham young university: challenging the federal patron.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Walsh, J

    1976-01-16

    Brigham Young University is a coeducational institution of higher learning established to promote a closer union between the restored gospel and all branches of learning. In addition to high standards of scholarship, the University has always fostered the development of religious faith, high moral character, and responsible citizenship. Sponsored by The Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints [Mormon], it offers the student a unique blend of spiritual and secular learning.-From the BYU General Catalog, 1975-76. The purpose of this part is to effectuate Title IX of the Education Amendments of 1972 ... which is designed to eliminate ... discrimination on the basis of sex in any education program or activity receiving federal assistance.-From the introduction to federal regulations implementing Title IX.

  3. Bringing Online Learning to Campus: The Hybridization of Teaching and Learning at Brigham Young University

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gregory L. Waddoups

    2002-01-01

    Full Text Available The primary purpose of Brigham Young University (BYU is to provide students with a combination of sacred and secular education often described as the "BYU experience". Achieving this purpose is challenged by the rapid growth in Church membership and an enrollment cap of 30,000 students. To address these challenges, BYU sponsors the use of technology to bridge the gap between the increased Church membership and the number of students allowed under the enrollment caps. This institutional case study shows how these challenges have influenced the hybridization of teaching and learning for on campus (resident and off campus (distance students. It also describes how BYU has brought distance education to campus, and is beginning to bring campus-based educational practices to distance education.

  4. Distributed Computing with Centralized Support Works at Brigham Young.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McDonald, Kelly; Stone, Brad

    1992-01-01

    Brigham Young University (Utah) has addressed the need for maintenance and support of distributed computing systems on campus by implementing a program patterned after a national business franchise, providing the support and training of a centralized administration but allowing each unit to operate much as an independent small business.…

  5. Apologia of St. Ignatius Loyola's Cura Personalis: Brigham Young University's Positive Behavior Support Initiative Compared to the Syracuse Academy of Science Charter School's 7th and 8th Grade Literacy Program: A Qualitative Analysis (Abridgment)

    Science.gov (United States)

    McBath, Gabrielle L.

    2013-01-01

    The following is an abridged version of the author's original Master's thesis written in 2008 for LeMoyne College in Syracuse, New York. This qualitative, structural, comparison determined if twelve Character Education studies of Brigham Young University, specifically the Positive Behavioral Support Initiative, assessed the same literacy program…

  6. Reactor laboratory course for students majoring in nuclear engineering with the Kyoto University Critical Assembly (KUCA)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nishihara, H.; Shiroya, S.; Kanda, K.

    1996-01-01

    With the use of the Kyoto University Critical Assembly (KUCA), a joint reactor laboratory course of graduate level is offered every summer since 1975 by nine associated Japanese universities (Hokkaido University, Tohoku University, Tokyo Institute of Technology, Musashi Institute of Technology, Tokai University, Nagoya University, Osaka University, Kobe University of Mercantile Marine and Kyushu University) in addition to a reactor laboratory course of undergraduate level for Kyoto University. These courses are opened for three weeks (two weeks for the joint course and one week for the undergraduate course) to students majoring in nuclear engineering and a total of 1,360 students have taken the course in the last 21 years. The joint course has been institutionalized with the background that it is extremely difficult for a single university in Japan to have her own research or training reactor. By their effort, the united faculty team of the joint course have succeeded in giving an effective, unique one-week course, taking advantage of their collaboration. Last year, an enquete (questionnaire survey) was conducted to survey the needs for the educational experiments of graduate level and precious data have been obtained for promoting reactor laboratory courses. (author)

  7. Research reactor usage at the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory in support of university research and education

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Woodall, D.M.; Dolan, T.J.; Stephens, A.G.

    1990-01-01

    The Idaho National Engineering Laboratory is a US Department of Energy laboratory which has a substantial history of research and development in nuclear reactor technologies. There are a number of available nuclear reactor facilities which have been incorporated into the research and training needs of university nuclear engineering programs. This paper addresses the utilization of the Advanced Reactivity Measurement Facility (ARMF) and the Coupled Fast Reactivity Measurement Facility (CFRMF) for thesis and dissertation research in the PhD program in Nuclear Science and Engineering by the University of Idaho and Idaho State University. Other reactors at the INEL are also being used by various members of the academic community for thesis and dissertation research, as well as for research to advance the state of knowledge in innovative nuclear technologies, with the EBR-II facility playing an essential role in liquid metal breeder reactor research. 3 refs

  8. Broad scope educational role of a midsize university reactor NAA laboratory

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vernetson, W.G.

    2000-01-01

    Broad scope educational activities at the Neutron Activation Analysis Laboratory (NAAL) associated with the 100 kW University of Florida Training Reactor (UFTR) have been implemented to serve a deserve and multidisciplinary academic clientele to meet a wide spectrum of educational needs for students at all academic levels. Educational usage of the complementary laboratory facilities is described and the importance of such academic experimental experience is emphasized for developing and maintaining a cadre of professionals in the analytical applications of nuclear energy. The synergistic operation of the NAAL and the reactor at the University of Florida to serve as a model worthy of emulation for other similar facilities is emphasized. (author)

  9. Education and research at the Ohio State University nuclear reactor laboratory

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Miller, D.W.; Myser, R.D.; Talnagi, J.W.

    1989-01-01

    The educational and research activities at the Ohio State University Nuclear Reactor Laboratory (OSUNRL) are discussed in this paper. A brief description of an OSUNRL facility improvement program and its expected impact on research is presented. The overall long-term goal of the OSUNRL is to support the comprehensive education, research, and service mission of OSU

  10. Independent Confirmatory Survey Report for the University of Arizona Nuclear Reactor Laboratory, Tucson, Arizona DCN:2051-SR-01-0

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Altic, Nick A.

    2011-01-01

    The University of Arizona (University) research reactor is a TRIGA swimming pool type reactor designed by General Atomics and constructed at the University in 1958. The reactor first went into operation in December of 1958 under U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) license R-52 until final shut down on May 18, 2010. Initial site characterization activities were conducted in February 2009 during ongoing reactor operations to assess the radiological status of the Nuclear Reactor Laboratory (NRL) excluding the reactor tank, associated components, and operating systems. Additional post-shutdown characterization activities were performed to complete characterization activities as well as verify assumptions made in the Decommissioning Plan (DP) that were based on a separate activation analysis (ESI 2009 and WMG 2009). Final status survey (FSS) activities began shortly after the issuance of the FSS plan in May 2011. The contractor completed measurement and sampling activities during the week of August 29, 2011.

  11. University of Wisconsin, Nuclear Reactor Laboratory. Annual report, 1985-1986

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cashwell, R.J.

    1986-01-01

    Operational activities for the reactor are described concerning nuclear engineering classes from the University of Wisconsin; reactor sharing program; utility personnel training; sample irradiations and neutron activation analysis; and changes in personnel, facility, and procedures. Results of surveillance tests are presented for operating statistics and fuel exposure; emergency shutdowns and inadvertent scrams; maintenance; radioactive waste disposal; radiation exposures; environmental surveys; and publications and presentations on work based on reactor use

  12. University of Wisconsin Nuclear Reactor Laboratory, Madison, Wisconsin. Annual report, Fiscal Year 1982-1983

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cashwell, R.J.

    1983-01-01

    Three Nuclear Engineering Department classes make use of the reactor. Forty-eight students enrolled in NE 231 participated in a two-hour laboratory session introducing students to rector behavior characteristics. Twelve hours of reactor operating time were devoted to this session. NE 427 was offeed in the fall semester and had an enrollment of sixteen. Several NE 427 experiments use materials that are activated in the reactor. One experiment entitled Radiation Survey requires that students make measurements of radiation levels in and around the reactor laboratory. The irradiations in support of NE 427 and the radiation survey take place during normal isotope production runs, so no reactor time is specifically devoted to NE 427. The enrollment in NE 428 was twenty-four, as it was offered in both semesters

  13. University of Missouri research reactor exhaust ventilation/laboratory fume hood upgrade

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Edwards, C.B. Jr.; McKibben, J.C.; McCracken, C.B.

    1989-01-01

    The University of Missouri research reactor (MURR) facility is located in Research Park, 1 mile south of the Columbia campus. The reactor is a 10-MW pressurized loop, in-pool-type, light-water-moderated, beryllium-and-graphite-reflected core, serviced by six radial beam tubes for research, and has sample irradiation facilities in both a flux trap and in the graphite region. The reactor operates at full power 150 h/week, 52 week/yr, making it one of the best operating schedules and the most extensively used of any university research reactor. This extensive utilization includes many programs, such as radioisotope applications, neutron activation analysis, etc., that depend heavily on fume hoods, glove boxes, and hot cells that put a tremendous demand on the exhaust system. The exhaust system is required to be operable whenever the reactor is operating and must have the capability of being operated from an emergency electrical generator on loss of site electrical power. The originally installed exhaust ventilation system was below needed capacity and, with increased program requirements and system age, the necessity to upgrade the system was paramount. The challenge was to complete the upgrade construction while continuing to operate the reactor and maintain all the other ongoing programs, rather than take the easy way of an extended shutdown. This paper discusses how MURR met this challenge and solved these problems, problems that are similarly experienced by almost all research reactors to some degree when major work is required on critical systems

  14. Reactor laboratory course for Korean under-graduate students in Kyoto University Critical Assembly (KUGSiKUCA)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pyeon, Cheol Ho; Misawa, Tsuyoshi; Unesaki, Hironobu; Ichihara, Chihiro; Shiroya, Seiji; Whang, Joo Ho; Kim, Myung Hyun

    2005-01-01

    The Reactor Laboratory Course for Korean Under-Graduate Students has been carried out at Kyoto University Critical Assembly of Japan. This course has been launched from fiscal year 2003 and has been founded by Ministry of Science and Technology of Korean Government. Since then, the total number of 43 Korean under-graduate students, who have majored in nuclear engineering of 6 universities in all over the Korea, has been taken part in this course. The reactor physics experiments have been performed in this course, such as Approach to criticality, Control rod calibration, Measurement of neutron flux and power calibration, and Educational reactor operation. As technical tour of Japan, nuclear site tour has been taken during their stay in Japan, such as PWR, FBR, nuclear fuel company and some institutes

  15. Report on application results of the nuclear reactor in Atomic Energy Research Laboratory, Rikkyo University. April 1994 - March 1995

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1995-01-01

    This report is on researching action state, application state, management state, and others of 1994 fiscal year at the Atomic Energy Research Laboratory, Rikkyo University. The experimental reactor has been used for the studies such as application of neutron radioactivity analysis to multi fields, application of fission and alpha track method to age determination and metallurgy, hot atom chemistry, neutron radiation effect on semiconductors and others, nuclear data measurement, organism, materials and products using neutron radiography, and development and application to inspection of radiation detectors such as neutron detector. This report was a report shown as a shape of research results of actions of the researchers. And, another report of colaborate research results using the Rikkyo University reactor was also published from the Atomic Energy Center, the University of Tokyo begun since April, 1974. (G.K.)

  16. University of Wisconsin Nuclear Reactor Laboratory annual report, 1981-1982

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1982-01-01

    Information is presented concerning operations at the UWNR reactor; operating statistics and fuel exposure; emergency shutdowns and inadvertent scrams; maintenance operations; radioactive waste disposal; summary of radiation exposures; results of environmental studies; and publications and presentations on work based on reactor use

  17. Reducing Check-in Errors at Brigham Young University through Statistical Process Control

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spackman, N. Andrew

    2005-01-01

    The relationship between the library and its patrons is damaged and the library's reputation suffers when returned items are not checked in. An informal survey reveals librarians' concern for this problem and their efforts to combat it, although few libraries collect objective measurements of errors or the effects of improvement efforts. Brigham…

  18. Brigham City Hydro Generation Project

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ammons, Tom B. [Energy Conservation Specialist, Port Ewen, NY (United States)

    2015-10-31

    Brigham City owns and operates its own municipal power system which currently includes several hydroelectric facilities. This project was to update the efficiency and capacity of current hydro production due to increased water flow demands that could pass through existing generation facilities. During 2006-2012, this project completed efficiency evaluation as it related to its main objective by completing a feasibility study, undergoing necessary City Council approvals and required federal environmental reviews. As a result of Phase 1 of the project, a feasibility study was conducted to determine feasibility of hydro and solar portions of the original proposal. The results indicated that the existing Hydro plant which was constructed in the 1960’s was running at approximately 77% efficiency or less. Brigham City proposes that the efficiency calculations be refined to determine the economic feasibility of improving or replacing the existing equipment with new high efficiency equipment design specifically for the site. Brigham City completed the Feasibility Assessment of this project, and determined that the Upper Hydro that supplies the main culinary water to the city was feasible to continue with. Brigham City Council provided their approval of feasibility assessment’s results. The Upper Hydro Project include removal of the existing powerhouse equipment and controls and demolition of a section of concrete encased penstock, replacement of penstock just upstream of the turbine inlet, turbine bypass, turbine shut-off and bypass valves, turbine and generator package, control equipment, assembly, start-up, commissioning, Supervisory Control And Data Acquisition (SCADA), and the replacement of a section of conductors to the step-up transformer. Brigham City increased the existing 575 KW turbine and generator with an 825 KW turbine and generator. Following the results of the feasibility assessment Brigham City pursued required environmental reviews with the DOE and

  19. University Reactor Instrumentation Program

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vernetson, W.G.

    1992-11-01

    Recognizing that the University Reactor Instrumentation Program was developed in response to widespread needs in the academic community for modernization and improvement of research and training reactors at institutions such as the University of Florida, the items proposed to be supported by this grant over its two year period have been selected as those most likely to reduce foreed outages, to meet regulatory concerns that had been expressed in recent years by Nuclear Regulatory Commission inspectors or to correct other facility problems and limitations. Department of Energy Grant Number DE-FG07-90ER129969 was provided to the University of Florida Training Reactor(UFTR) facility through the US Department of Energy's University Reactor Instrumentation Program. The original proposal submitted in February, 1990 requested support for UFTR facility instrumentation and equipment upgrades for seven items in the amount of $107,530 with $13,800 of this amount to be the subject of cost sharing by the University of Florida and $93,730 requested as support from the Department of Energy. A breakdown of the items requested and total cost for the proposed UFTR facility instrumentation and equipment improvements is presented

  20. CAREM reactor thermohydraulic essays laboratory

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Horro, R.; Mazzi, R.; Rossini, A.

    1990-01-01

    The main characteristics, essays projected and the present state of the Thermohydraulic Essays Laboratory -under construction at present- prepared to meet the experimental needs resulting from a power reactor design of the CAREM type, are herein described. (Author) [es

  1. University Reactor Sharing Program

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Reese, W.D.

    2004-01-01

    Research projects supported by the program include items such as dating geological material and producing high current super conducting magnets. The funding continues to give small colleges and universities the valuable opportunity to use the NSC for teaching courses in nuclear processes; specifically neutron activation analysis and gamma spectroscopy. The Reactor Sharing Program has supported the construction of a Fast Neutron Flux Irradiator for users at New Mexico Institute of Mining and Technology and the University of Houston. This device has been characterized and has been found to have near optimum neutron fluxes for A39/Ar 40 dating. Institution final reports and publications resulting from the use of these funds are on file at the Nuclear Science Center

  2. Nuclear Reactor Engineering Analysis Laboratory

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Carlos Chavez-Mercado; Jaime B. Morales-Sandoval; Benjamin E. Zayas-Perez

    1998-01-01

    The Nuclear Reactor Engineering Analysis Laboratory (NREAL) is a sophisticated computer system with state-of-the-art analytical tools and technology for analysis of light water reactors. Multiple application software tools can be activated to carry out different analyses and studies such as nuclear fuel reload evaluation, safety operation margin measurement, transient and severe accident analysis, nuclear reactor instability, operator training, normal and emergency procedures optimization, and human factors engineering studies. An advanced graphic interface, driven through touch-sensitive screens, provides the means to interact with specialized software and nuclear codes. The interface allows the visualization and control of all observable variables in a nuclear power plant (NPP), as well as a selected set of nonobservable or not directly controllable variables from conventional control panels

  3. 75 FR 58433 - Notice of Inventory Completion: Brigham Young University, Museum of Peoples and Cultures, Provo, UT

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-09-24

    .... Charles Lang and Mr. Platte Lyman donated the human remains to the Deseret Museum, Salt Lake City, UT... Saints in Salt Lake City, UT. The collection became known as the Lang-Lyman Collection, and was acquired... of human hair, 1 mug, 1 leather pouch, 1 piece of buckskin, 1 gourd container, 60 feathers, 1 bone...

  4. Status of Japanese university reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fujita, Yoshiaki

    1999-01-01

    Status of Japanese university reactors, their role and value in research and education, and the spent fuel problem are presented. Some of the reactors are now faced by severe difficulties in continuing their operation services. The point of measures to solve the difficulties is suggested. (author)

  5. DOE/university reactor sharing

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Young, H.H.

    1985-01-01

    The objective of the US Department of Energy's program of reactor sharing is to strengthen nuclear science and engineering instruction and nuclear research opportunities in non-reactor-owning colleges and universities. The benefits of the program and need for the continuation of the program in the future are discussed

  6. Universities and National Laboratories

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    knowledge, etc. in the curriculum of the Institute of Technology at Kharagpur. The. University of ... Nothing can be farther from reality. If the powers that can ... have moved and mixed and have had my being in the student community. I claim that.

  7. DOE University Reactor Sharing Program. Renewal for 1994--1995

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chappas, W.J.; Adams, V.G.

    1994-01-01

    The Department of Energy University Reactor Sharing Program at University of Maryland, College Park (UMCP) has, once again, stimulated a broad use of the reactor facilities by undergraduate and graduate students, visitors, and professionals. Participants are exposed to topics such as nuclear engineering, radiation safety, and nuclear reactor operations. This information is presented through various means including tours, slide presentations, experiments, and discussions. Student research using the MUTR is also encouraged. In addition, the Reactor Sharing Program here at the University of Maryland does not limit itself to the confines of the TRIGA reactor facility. Incorporated in the program are the Maryland University Neutron Activation Analysis Laboratory, the Maryland University Radiation Effects Laboratory, and the UMCP 2x4 Thermal Hydraulic Loop. These facilities enhance and give an added dimension to the tours and experiments

  8. A new nuclear materials laboratory at Queen's University

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Holt, R.A.; Daymond, M.R.

    2015-01-01

    The Reactor Materials Testing Laboratory (RMTL) at Queen's University and the results of commissioning tests are described. RMTL uses energetic protons (up to 8MeV) to simulate fast neutron damage in materials for reactor components. The laboratory is also capable of He implantation (up to 12 MeV) to simulate the effects of transmutation He in reactor components. The $17.5M laboratory comprises a new building, a 4MV tandem accelerator, two electron microscopes, mechanical testing and specimen preparation equipment, and a radiation detection laboratory. RMTL focusses on studying dynamic effects of irradiation (irradiation creep, irradiation growth, irradiation induced swelling, fatigue under irradiation) in-situ. (author)

  9. Laboratory instrumentation modernization at the WPI Nuclear Reactor Facility

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1995-01-01

    With partial funding from the Department of Energy (DOE) University Reactor Instrumentation Program several laboratory instruments utilized by students and researchers at the WPI Nuclear Reactor Facility have been upgraded or replaced. Designed and built by General Electric in 1959, the open pool nuclear training reactor at WPI was one of the first such facilities in the nation located on a university campus. Devoted to undergraduate use, the reactor and its related facilities have been since used to train two generations of nuclear engineers and scientists for the nuclear industry. The low power output of the reactor and an ergonomic facility design make it an ideal tool for undergraduate nuclear engineering education and other training. The reactor, its control system, and the associate laboratory equipment are all located in the same room. Over the years, several important milestones have taken place at the WPI reactor. In 1969, the reactor power level was upgraded from 1 kW to 10 kW. The reactor's Nuclear Regulatory Commission operating license was renewed for 20 years in 1983. In 1988, under DOE Grant No. DE-FG07-86ER75271, the reactor was converted to low-enriched uranium fuel. In 1992, again with partial funding from DOE (Grant No. DE-FG02-90ER12982), the original control console was replaced

  10. Oregon State University TRIGA Reactor annual report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Anderson, T.V.; Johnson, A.G.; Bennett, S.L.; Ringle, J.C.

    1979-08-31

    The use of the Oregon State University TRIGA Reactor during the year ending June 30, 1979, is summarized. Environmental and radiation protection data related to reactor operation and effluents are included.

  11. Oregon State University TRIGA Reactor annual report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anderson, T.V.; Johnson, A.G.; Bennett, S.L.; Ringle, J.C.

    1979-01-01

    The use of the Oregon State University TRIGA Reactor during the year ending June 30, 1979, is summarized. Environmental and radiation protection data related to reactor operation and effluents are included

  12. Nuclear science and engineering education at a university research reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Loveland, W.

    1993-01-01

    The role of an on-site irradiation facility in nuclear science and engineering education is examined. Using the example of a university research reactor, the use of such devices in laboratory instruction, public outreach programs, special instructional programs, research, etc. is discussed. Examples from the Oregon State University curriculum in nuclear chemistry, nuclear engineering and radiation health are given. (author) 1 tab

  13. Joint reactor laboratory course for students in KUCA

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Misawa, Tsuyoshi; Unesaki, Hironobu; Ichihara, Chihiro; Pyeon Cheol Ho; Shiroya, Seiji

    2004-06-01

    This book is a revised version of Joint Reactor Laboratory Course for Students, which we have given over 30 years from 1975 at Kyoto University Critical Assembly (KUCA). The major objective of this course is to help the students for understanding the essence of nuclear reactor physics through the experiments carried out in KUCA C-core. At the same time, it is expected that by the end of the course the students will be able to obtain good and fruitful results by their efforts through this course. This textbook is composed of these following chapters; Introduction to Kyoto University Critical Assembly (KUCA). Chapter 1: Approach to Criticality. Chapter 2: Control Rod Calibration. Chapter 3: Measurement of Reaction Rate Distribution. Chapter 4: Neutron Correlation Experiment Feynman-α Method. Chapter 5: Measurement of Reactivity by the Pulsed Neutron Method. Chapter 6: Reactor Operation Training (Reactor Operation for Education). (author)

  14. Universe Awareness For Young Children

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scorza, C.; Miley, G.; Ödman, C.; Madsen, C.

    2006-08-01

    Universe Awareness (UNAWE) is an international programme that will expose economically disadvantaged young children aged between 4 and 10 years to the inspirational aspects of modern astronomy. The programme is motivated by the premise that access to simple knowledge about the Universe is a basic birth right of everybody. These formative ages are crucial in the development of a human value system. This is also the age range in which children can learn to develop a 'feeling' for the vastness of the Universe. Exposing young children to such material is likely to broaden their minds and stimulate their world-view. The goals of Universe Awareness are in accordance with two of the United Nations Millennium goals, endorsed by all 191 UN member states, namely (i) the achievement of universal primary education and (ii) the promotion of gender equality in schools. We propose to commence Universe Awareness with a pilot project that will target disadvantaged regions in about 4 European countries (possibly Spain, France, Germany and The Netherlands) and several non-EU countries (possibly Chile, Colombia, India, Tunisia, South Africa and Venezuela). There will be two distinct elements in the development of the UNAWE program: (i) Creation and production of suitable UNAWE material and delivery techniques, (ii) Training of educators who will coordinate UNAWE in each of the target countries. In addition to the programme, an international network of astronomy outreach will be organised. We present the first results of a pilot project developed in Venezuela, where 670 children from different social environments, their teachers and members of an indigenous tribe called Ye´kuana from the Amazon region took part in a wonderful astronomical and cultural exchange that is now being promoted by the Venezuelan ministry of Education at the national level.

  15. Arkansas Tech University TRIGA nuclear reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sankoorikal, J.; Culp, R.; Hamm, J.; Elliott, D.; Hodgson, L.; Apple, S.

    1990-01-01

    This paper describes the TRIGA nuclear reactor (ATUTR) proposed for construction on the campus of Arkansas Tech University in Russellville, Arkansas. The reactor will be part of the Center for Energy Studies located at Arkansas Tech University. The reactor has a steady state power level of 250 kW and can be pulsed with a maximum reactivity insertion of $2.0. Experience gained in dismantling and transporting some of the components from Michigan State University, and the storage of these components will be presented. The reactor will be used for education, training, and research. (author)

  16. The first university research reactor in India

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Murthy, G.S.

    1999-01-01

    At low power research reactor is being set up in Andhra University to cater to the needs of researchers and isotope users by the Department of Atomic Energy in collaboration with Andhra University. This reactor is expected to be commissioned by 2001-02. Departments like Chemistry, Earth Sciences, Physics, Life Sciences, Pharmacy, Medicine and Engineering would be the beneficiaries of the availability of this reactor. In this paper, details of the envisaged research programme and training activities are discussed. (author)

  17. University Reactor Matching Grants Program

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    John Valentine; Farzad Rahnema; Said Abdel-Khalik

    2003-01-01

    During the 2002 Fiscal year, funds from the DOE matching grant program, along with matching funds from the industrial sponsors, have been used to support research in the area of thermal-hydraulics. Both experimental and numerical research projects have been performed. Experimental research focused on two areas: (1) Identification of the root cause mechanism for axial offset anomaly in pressurized water reactors under prototypical reactor conditions, and (2) Fluid dynamic aspects of thin liquid film protection schemes for inertial fusion reactor chambers. Numerical research focused on two areas: (1) Multi-fluid modeling of both two-phase and two-component flows for steam conditioning and mist cooling applications, and (2) Modeling of bounded Rayleigh-Taylor instability with interfacial mass transfer and fluid injection through a porous wall simulating the ''wetted wall'' protection scheme in inertial fusion reactor chambers. Details of activities in these areas are given

  18. Radiation monitoring programme in a university hot laboratory

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tillander, M.; Heinonen, O.J.

    1979-01-01

    The Department of Radiochemistry in the University of Helsinki is the only institute teaching radiochemistry at the university level in Finland. The research programme of the Deparment must therefore include the uses of radiation and radionuclides in many branches of science. The students must receive adequate instruction in radiation protection for safe work in laboratories. This also has the educational benefit that the radiochemists will subsequently be able to observe the necessary safety precautions when employing ionizing radiation professionally. The Department of Radiochemistry consists of the following laboratories: a radiotracer laboratory, a neutron/electron and a gamma irradiation laboratory, an environmental low activity level laboratory, a whole-body counting laboratory, a reactor chemistry laboratory and a waste-treatment facility. The radiation protection organization of the Department is presented. Various methods of monitoring, including advantages and disadvantages are discussed. Emphasis is placed on the reactor chemistry laboratory where transuranic elements are utilized. These elements are highly radiotoxic and their monitoring in most cases requires destructive analysis. Different methods of determining external and internal doses are evaluated with regard to sensitivity and accuracy. Detection limits for radionuclides utilized in the laboratory are presented for different measurement systems, including non-destructive monitoring, spectrometry after chemical analysis, liquid scintillation counting and low-energy gamma spectrometry using a CsI-NaI scintillation detector. The guidelines laid down in the IAEA Safety Series Manuals are discussed in the light of practical experience. (author)

  19. Experience of joint reactor laboratory course with KUCA

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nishina, Kojiro

    1982-01-01

    A description is given of a joint reactor laboratory course of graduate level, which is offered every summer since 1975 by nine associated japanese universities with the use of Kyoto University Critical Assembly (KUCA). A total of 315 students have taken the course in the last seven years. The course has been institutionalized with the background that it is extremely difficult for any single university in this country to have her own research or training reactor. By their effort the united faculty team of the course have succeeded in giving an effective, unique one-week course, taking advantage of their collaboration. By the scrutiny of student's responses to the course, one norices that a reactor is distinctively different from ordinary educational apparatus, in that the students do not play a main part in the adjustment of the apparatus itself. The beginners therefore tend to feel the reactor as a remote existence. This difficulty must be circumvented if an effective educational process is to be designed. (author)

  20. Joint reactor laboratory course for students in KUCA

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Misawa, Tsuyoshi; Unesaki, Hironobu; Ichihara, Chihiro; Pyeon Cheol Ho; Shiroya, Seiji

    2004-04-01

    This book is based on Joint Reactor Laboratory Course for Students, which we have given over 30 years from 1975 at Kyoto University Critical Assembly (KUCA), and is one translated from Japanese into English. The major objective of this course is to help the students for understanding the essence of nuclear reactor physics through the experiments carried out in KUCA C-core. At the same time, it is expected that by the end of the course the students will be able to obtain good and fruitful results by their efforts through this course. This textbook is composed of these following chapters; Introduction to Kyoto University Critical Assembly (KUCA). Chapter 1: Approach to Criticality. Chapter 2: Control Rod Calibration. Chapter 3: Measurement of Reaction Rate Distribution. Chapter 4: Neutron Correlation Experiment Feynman-α Method. Chapter 5: Measurement of Reactivity by the Pulsed Neutron Method. (author)

  1. The first university research reactor in India

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Murty, G.S.

    1999-01-01

    As the first university research reactor in India, the low power, pool type with fixed core and low enriched uranium fuel research reactor is under construction in the Andhra university campus, Andhra Pradesh, India. The reactor is expected to be commissioned during 2001-2002. The mission of the reactor is to play the research center as a regional research facility catering to the needs of academic institutions and industrial organizations of this region of the country. Further, to encourage interdisplinary and multidisplinary research activities, to supply radioisotope and labelled compounds to the user institutions and to create awareness towards the peaceful uses of atomic energy. This report describes its objectives, status and future plans in brief. (H. Itami)

  2. The first university research reactor in India

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Murty, G.S. [Co-ordinator, Low Power Research Reactor, Andhra Univ., Visakapatnam (India)

    1999-08-01

    As the first university research reactor in India, the low power, pool type with fixed core and low enriched uranium fuel research reactor is under construction in the Andhra university campus, Andhra Pradesh, India. The reactor is expected to be commissioned during 2001-2002. The mission of the reactor is to play the research center as a regional research facility catering to the needs of academic institutions and industrial organizations of this region of the country. Further, to encourage interdisplinary and multidisplinary research activities, to supply radioisotope and labelled compounds to the user institutions and to create awareness towards the peaceful uses of atomic energy. This report describes its objectives, status and future plans in brief. (H. Itami)

  3. Pennsylvania State University Breazeale Nuclear Reactor. Thirtieth annual progress report, July 1, 1984-June 30, 1985

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Levine, S.H.; Totenbier, R.E.

    1985-08-01

    This report is the thirtieth annual progress report of the Pennsylvania State University Breazeale Nuclear Reactor and covers such topics as: personnel; reactor facility; cobalt-60 facility; education and training; Radionuclear Application Laboratory; Low Level Radiation Monitoring Laboratory; and facility research utilization

  4. A Case Study: Implementation of a Management System for the TRIGA Mark II Research Reactor at the Laboratory of Applied Nuclear Energy (LENA) of the University of Pavia, Italy. Annex I

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2013-01-01

    This annex provides an example for the implementation of a management system for operating organizations of research reactors, based on a case study in which the implementation of such a system has been completed. The case study relates the experience of the Applied Nuclear Energy Laboratory (hereafter referred to as LENA) of the University of Pavia, Italy. This example is used because of the recent completion of the implementation of an integrated management system, and also because of the specific characteristics of the organization (such as the limited number of staff, limited financial resources, etc.), which are often typical for organizations that operate smaller research reactors. Section I-1 gives a brief presentation of the organization, including the scope of work, the main activities performed, the organizational structure, the identification of interested parties and the applicable requirements and standards. Section I-2 describes the LENA Management System, the reasons for its implementation, the stages of its development and the processes involved. Some practical examples related to the development of the LENA Management System are discussed in Section I-3, indicating the choices made by the organization. In particular, Section I-3.12 shows the correlation between the LENA Management System processes and the processes considered in the main body of this publication.

  5. Portuguese Universities Sharing Remote Laboratories

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maria Teresa Restivo

    2009-11-01

    Full Text Available This paper describes a pedagogical assignment based on a cooperative work involving teachers/students from two Portuguese universities. As it happens one is the oldest in the country – University of Coimbra (UC - and the other the largest - University of Porto (UP, about 120 km apart. The authors, believing in the relevance of Information and Communication Technologies (ITs in teaching/learning methodologies and in cooperative teaching methods worked together to plan this pedagogical experience and to run it in a one semester course. Students from UC have been introduced to the remote lab at UP and got the first contact with the remote experiments using easily available sound and image resources based on Skype and an IP camera for better image quality. This first contact has been conducted by the first author at UP with support of the second author at UC. The work will describe briefly the remote experiments used, their inclusion in the course at UC, the associated assessment criteria and, finally, student comments.

  6. Operational safety and reactor life improvements of Kyoto University Reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Utsuro, M.; Fujita, Y.; Nishihara, H.

    1990-01-01

    Recent important experience in improving the operational safety and life of a reactor are described. The Kyoto University Reactor (KUR) is a 25-year-old 5 MW light water reactor provided with two thermal columns of graphite and heavy water as well as other kinds of experimental facilities. In the graphite thermal column, noticeable amounts of neutron irradiation effects had accumulated in the graphite blocks near the core. Before the possible release of the stored energy, all the graphite blocks in the column were successfully replaced with new blocks using the opportunity provided by the installation of a liquid deuterium cold neutron source in the column. At the same time, special seal mechanisms were provided for essential improvements to the problem of radioactive argon production in the column. In the heavy-water thermal column we have accomplished the successful repair of a slow leak of heavy water through a thin instrumentation tube failure. The repair work included the removal and reconstructions of the lead and graphite shielding layers and welding of the instrumentation tube under radiation fields. Several mechanical components in the reactor cooling system were also exchanged for new components with improved designs and materials. On-line data logging of almost all instrumentation signals is continuously performed with a high speed data analysis system to diagnose operational conditions of the reactor. Furthermore, through detailed investigations on critical components, operational safety during further extended reactor life will be supported by well scheduled maintenance programs

  7. Experiences with fast breeder reactor education in laboratory and short course settings

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Waltar, A.E.

    1983-01-01

    The breeder reactor industry throughout the world has grown impressively over the last two decades. Despite the uncertainties in some national programs, breeder reactor technology is well established on a global scale. Given the magnitude of this technological undertaking, there has been surprisingly little emphasis on general breeder reactor education - either at the university or laboratory level. Many universities assume the topic too specialized for including appropriate courses in their curriculum - thus leaving students entering the breeder reactor industry to learn almost exclusively from on-the-job experience. The evaluation of four course presentations utilizing visual aids is presented

  8. Final report. U.S. Department of Energy University Reactor Sharing Program

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bernard, John A

    2003-01-21

    Activities supported at the MIT Nuclear Reactor Laboratory under the U.S. DOE University Reactor Sharing Program are reported for Grant DE FG02-95NE38121 (September 16, 1995 through May 31, 2002). These activities fell under four subcategories: support for research at thesis and post-doctoral levels, support for college-level laboratory exercises, support for reactor tours/lectures on nuclear energy, and support for science fair participants.

  9. New training reactor at Dresden Technical University

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hansen, W.; Knorr, J.; Wolf, T.

    2006-01-01

    A total of 14 low-power (up to 10 W) training reactors have been operated at German universities, 9 of them officially classified as being operational in 2004, though for very different uses. This number is expected to drop sharply. The only comprehensive upgrading of a training reactor took place at Dresden Technical University: AKR-2, the most modern facility in Germany, started routine operation in April 2005, under a newly granted license pursuant to Sec. 7, Subsec. 1 of the German Atomic Energy Act, for training students in nuclear technology, for suitable research projects, and a a center of information about reactor technology and nuclear technology for the interested public. One special aspect of this refurbishment was the installation of digital safety I and C systems of the TELEPERM XS line, which are used also in other modern plants. This fact, plus the easy possibility to use the plant for many basic experiments in reactor physics and radiation protection, make the AKR-2 attractive also to other users (e.g. for training reactor personnel or other persons working in nuclear technology). (orig.)

  10. DOE University Reactor Sharing Program. Final technical report for 1996--1997

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chappas, W.J.; Adams, V.G.

    1998-01-01

    The Department of Energy University Reactor Sharing Program at University of Maryland, College Park (UMCP) has, once again, stimulated a broad use of the reactor and radiation facilities by undergraduate and graduate students, visitors, and professionals. Participants are exposed to topics such as nuclear engineering, radiation safety, and nuclear reactor operations. This information is presented through various means including tours, slide presentations, experiments, and discussions. Student research using the MUTR is also encouraged. In addition, the Reactor Sharing Program here at the University of Maryland does not limit itself to the confines of the TRIGA reactor facility. Incorporated in the program are the Maryland University Radiation Effects Laboratory, and the UMCP 2 x 4 Thermal Hydraulic Loop. These facilities enhance and give an added dimension to the tours and experiments. The Maryland University Training Reactor (MUTR) and the associated laboratories are made available to any interested institution six days a week on a scheduled basis. Most institutions are scheduled at the time of their first request--a reflection of their commitment to the Reactor Sharing Program. The success of the past years by no means guarantees future success. Therefore, the reactor staff is more aggressively pursuing its outreach program, especially with junior colleges and universities without reactor or radiation facilities; more aggressively developing demonstration and training programs for students interested in careers in nuclear power and radiation technology; and more aggressively up-grading the reactor facilities--not only to provide a better training facility but to prepare for relicensing in the year 2000

  11. Reactor D and D at Argonne National Laboratory - lessons learned

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fellhauer, C. R.

    1998-01-01

    This paper focuses on the lessons learned during the decontamination and decommissioning (D and D) of two reactors at Argonne National Laboratory-East (ANL-E). The Experimental Boiling Water Reactor (EBWR) was a 100 MW(t), 5 MSV(e) proof-of-concept facility. The Janus Reactor was a 200 kW(t) reactor located at the Biological Irradiation Facility and was used to study the effects of neutron radiation on animals

  12. A university hot laboratory for teaching and research

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Heinonen, O.; Miettinen, J.K.

    1976-01-01

    In small countries which have limited material and capital resources there is more need for studying and teaching reactor chemistry in universities than there is in countries with special nuclear research and training centres. A new 150-m 2 laboratory of reactor chemistry was added to the premises of the Department of Radiochemistry, University of Helsinki, in October 1975. It contains a hot area with low-pressure air-conditioning, a sanitary room, a low-activity area, and an office area. The main instrument is a mass-spectrometer MI-1309 equipped with an ion counter which is particularly useful for plutonium analysis. The laboratory can handle samples up-to 10Ci gamma-acitivity - which equals one pellet of a fuel rod - in a sealed lead cell which has an interchangeable box for alpha-active work. Pretreated samples are submitted to chemical separations in glove-boxes. Samples for alpha and mass spectroscopy are also prepared in glove-boxes. Also the laboratory is provided with fume hoods suitable for building lead shields. Radiation protection and special features typical to the university environment are discussed. Methods for verfication of contamination and protection against internal and external contamination are applied. These include air monitoring, analysis of excreta, and whole-body counting. (author)

  13. Annual report of Nuclear Reactor Laboratory, Kinki University. Vol 1. (1961). Studies on the radioactive contamination due to nuclear detonations I-VI

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nishiwaki, Yasushi [Nuclear Reactor Laboratory, Tokyo Institute of Technology, Tokyo (Japan); Nuclear Reactor Laboratoroy, Kinki University, Fuse City, Osaka Precture (Japan)

    1961-11-25

    An unusually large amount of strong radioactive ash was produced by the thermonuclear test conducted on March 1954 at the Bikini Atoll in the South Pacific by the United States Atomic Energy Commission. Under such circumstances, to meet the urgent needs of public health, the studies on the radioactivity of Bikini ash and the radioactive contamination of environment have been started, from the health physics standpoint, with the initiative of the author under close cooperation with the public health officers of local governments in Osaka district since the middle of March 4 1954, when the author was the head of the Department of Biophysics, Osaka City University, School of Medicine. The estimation of the probable dose of radiation the might have been received during their dosage and the accurate estimation of beta-ray energies and the detection of alpha-ray activity as well as the identification of various radioactive nuclides included in the Bikini ash were considered to be urgently needed items of information in estimating the possible hazard due to the internal as well as the external irradiation from the health physics point of view.

  14. Annual report of Nuclear Reactor Laboratory, Kinki University. Vol 1. (1961). Studies on the radioactive contamination due to nuclear detonations I-VI

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nishiwaki, Yasushi

    1961-01-01

    An unusually large amount of strong radioactive ash was produced by the thermonuclear test conducted on March 1954 at the Bikini Atoll in the South Pacific by the United States Atomic Energy Commission. Under such circumstances, to meet the urgent needs of public health, the studies on the radioactivity of Bikini ash and the radioactive contamination of environment have been started, from the health physics standpoint, with the initiative of the author under close cooperation with the public health officers of local governments in Osaka district since the middle of March 4 1954, when the author was the head of the Department of Biophysics, Osaka City University, School of Medicine. The estimation of the probable dose of radiation the might have been received during their dosage and the accurate estimation of beta-ray energies and the detection of alpha-ray activity as well as the identification of various radioactive nuclides included in the Bikini ash were considered to be urgently needed items of information in estimating the possible hazard due to the internal as well as the external irradiation from the health physics point of view

  15. Radiation protection in a university TRIGA reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tschurlovits, M. . Author

    2004-01-01

    Radiation protection in a university institute operating a research reactor and other installations has different constraints as a larger facility. This is because the legal requirements apply in full, but the potential of exposure is low, and accesses has to be made available for students, but also for temporary workers. Some of the problems in practical radiation protection are addressed and solutions are discussed. In addition, experience with national radiation protection legislation recently to be issued is addressed and discussed. (author)

  16. US DOE Idaho national laboratory reactor decommissioning

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Szilagyi, Andrew

    2012-01-01

    The United States Department of Energy (DOE) primary contractor, CH2M-WG Idaho was awarded the cleanup and deactivation and decommissioning contract in May 2005 for the Idaho National Lab (INL). The scope of this work included dispositioning over 200 Facilities and 3 Reactors Complexes (Engineering Test Reactor (ETR), Materials Test Reactor (MTR) and Power Burst Facility (PBF) Reactor). Two additional reactors were added to the scope of the contract during the period of performance. The Zero Power Physics Reactor (ZPPR) disposition was added under a separate subcontractor with the INL lab contractor and the Experimental Breeder Reactor II (EBR-II) disposition was added through American Recovery and Reinvestment Act (ARRA) Funding. All of the reactors have been removed and disposed of with the exception of EBR-II which is scheduled for disposition approximately March of 2012. A brief synopsis of the 5 reactors is provided. For the purpose of this paper the ZPPR reactor due to its unique design as compared to the other four reactors, and the fact that is was relatively lightly contaminated and irradiated will not be discussed with the other four reactors. The ZPPR reactor was readily accessible and was a relatively non-complex removal as compared to the other reactors. Additionally the EBR-II reactor is currently undergoing D and D and will have limited mention in this paper. Prior to decommissioning the reactors, a risk based closure model was applied. This model exercised through the Comprehensive Environmental Response, Compensation and Liability Act (CERCLA), Non-Time Critical Removal Action (NTCRA) Process which evaluated several options. The options included; No further action - maintain as is, long term stewardship and monitoring (mothball), entombment in place and reactor removal. Prior to commencing full scale D and D, hazardous constituents were removed including cadmium, beryllium, sodium (passivated and elemental), PCB oils and electrical components, lead

  17. Measuring the productivity of university research reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Voth, M.H.

    1989-01-01

    University Research Reactors (URRs) on 33 campuses in the United States provide valuable contributions to academic instruction and research programs. In most cases, there are no alternative diagnostic techniques to supplant the need for a reactor and associated facilities. Since URRs constitute a major financial commitment, it is important that they be operated in a productive manner. Productivity may be defined as the sum of new knowledge generated, existing knowledge transferred to others, and analytical services provided to assist in the generation of new knowledge; another definition of productivity is this sum expressed as a function of the cost incurred. In either case, a consistent measurement is difficult and more qualitative than quantitative. A uniform reporting system has been proposed that defines simplified categories through which meaningful comparisons can be performed

  18. A university contribution to reactor safety

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hall, W.B.

    1980-01-01

    The total UK university effort available for research specifically directed towards reactor safety is certainly small in comparison with that in industry. To be worth while, the work should complement that in the industry, and ways in which this can, and in some cases does, happen, will be discussed. There is, however, another reason for university involvement: the need for an informed body of opinion on matters of reactor safety outside the industry. Without this it is difficult for the public and its representatives to assure themselves that the depth and scope of safety analysis is commensurate with the seriousness of the problem, and that the best available data and techniques are being used. An independent inspectorate is an essential element in this philosophy, but in addition there is much to be said for exposing the arguments to scrutiny by the widest possible range of informed critics. Such people will be much more effective if they are themselves involved in real problems in the field. In a university, this involvement is probably best achieved through research; as mentioned above, the type of research should preferably complement that being carried out in the industry. The current situation, and the future, are discussed. (author)

  19. Decommissioning three nuclear reactors at Los Alamos National Laboratory

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Montoya, G.M.; Salazar, M.

    1992-01-01

    Three nuclear reactors, including the historic water boiler reactor, were decommissioned at Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL). The decommissioning of the facilities involved removing the reactors and their associated components. Planning for the decommissioning operation included characterizing the facilities, estimating the costs of decommissioning operations, preparing environmental documentation, establishing systems to track costs and work progress, and preplanning to correct health and safety concerns in each facility

  20. Chemical reactor development : from laboratory synthesis to industrial production

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Thoenes, D.

    1998-01-01

    Chemical Reactor Development is written primarily for chemists and chemical engineers who are concerned with the development of a chemical synthesis from the laboratory bench scale, where the first successful experiments are performed, to the design desk, where the first commercial reactor is

  1. Education for university students, high school teachers and the general public using the Kinki University Reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tsuruta, T.

    2007-01-01

    Atomic Energy Research Institute of Kinki University is equipped with a nuclear reactor which is called UTR-KINKI. UTR is the abbreviation for University Teaching and Research Reactor. The reactor is the first one installed in Japanese universities. Though the reactor is owned and operated by Kinki University, its use is widely open to scientists and students from other universities and research institutions. The reactor is made the best of teaching instrument for the training of high school teachers. In addition, the reactor is utilized for general public education concerning atomic energy. (author)

  2. University Reactor Sharing Program. Period covered: September 1, 1981-August 31, 1982

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hajek, B.K.; Myser, R.D.; Miller, D.W.

    1982-12-01

    During the period from September 1, 1981 to August 31, 1982, the Ohio State University Nuclear Reactor Laboratory participated in the Reactor Sharing Program by providing services to eight colleges and universities. A laboratory on Neutron Activation Analysis was developed for students in the program. A summary of services provided and a copy of the laboratory procedure are attached. Services provided in the last funded period were in three major areas. These were neutron activation analysis, nuclear engineering labs, and introductions to nuclear research. One group also performed radiation surveys and produced isotopes for calibration of their own analytical equipment

  3. An Account of Oak Ridge National Laboratory's Thirteen Research Reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rosenthal, Murray Wilford

    2009-01-01

    The Oak Ridge National Laboratory has built and operated 13 nuclear reactors in its 66-year history. The first was the graphite reactor, the world's first operational nuclear reactor, which served as a plutonium production pilot plant during World War II. It was followed by two aqueous-homogeneous reactors and two red-hot molten-salt reactors that were parts of power-reactor development programs and by eight others designed for research and radioisotope production. One of the eight was an all-metal fast burst reactor used for health physics studies. All of the others were light-water cooled and moderated, including the famous swimming-pool reactor that was copied dozens of times around the world. Two of the reactors were hoisted 200 feet into the air to study the shielding needs of proposed nuclear-powered aircraft. The final reactor, and the only one still operating today, is the High Flux Isotope Reactor (HFIR) that was built particularly for the production of californium and other heavy elements. With the world's highest flux and recent upgrades that include the addition of a cold neutron source, the 44-year-old HFIR continues to be a valuable tool for research and isotope production, attracting some 500 scientific visitors and guests to Oak Ridge each year. This report describes all of the reactors and their histories.

  4. Universities and national laboratory roles in nuclear engineering

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sackett, J.I.

    1991-01-01

    Nuclear Engineering Education is being significantly challenged in the United States. The decline in enrollment generally and the reduction of the number of nuclear engineering departments has been well documented. These declines parallel a lack of new construction for nuclear power plants and a decline in research and development to support new plant design. Precisely at a time when innovation is is needed to deal with many issues facing nuclear power, the number of qualified people to do so is being reduced. It is important that the University and National Laboratory Communities cooperate to address these issues. The Universities must increasingly identify challenges facing nuclear power that demand innovative solutions and pursue them. To be drawn into the technology the best students must see a future, a need and identify challenges that they can meet. The University community can provide that vision with help from the National Laboratories. It has been a major goal within the reactor development program at Argonne National Laboratory to establish the kind of program that can help accomplish this

  5. TIT reactor laboratory course using JAERI and PNC large experimental facilities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sekimoto, Hiroshi; Obara, Toru; Ohtani, Nobuo.

    1995-01-01

    This report is presented on a reactor laboratory course for graduate students using large facilities in national laboratories in Japan. A reactor laboratory course is offered every summer since 1990 for all graduate students in the Nuclear Engineering Course in Tokyo Institute of Technology (TIT), where the students can choose one of the experiments prepared at Japan Atomic Energy Research Institute (JAERI), Power Reactor and Nuclear Fuel Development Corporation (PNC) and Research Reactor Institute, Kyoto University (KUR). Both JAERI and PNC belong to Science and Technology Agency (STA). This is the first university curriculum of nuclear engineering using the facilities owned by the STA laboratories. This type of collaboration is promoted in the new Long-Term Program for Research, Development and Utilization of Nuclear Energy adopted by Atomic Energy Commission. Most students taking this course reported that they could learn so much about reactor physics and engineering in this course and the experiment done in large laboratory was a very good experience for them. (author)

  6. University of Washington, Nuclear Physics Laboratory annual report, 1995

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1995-04-01

    The Nuclear Physics Laboratory of the University of Washington supports a broad program of experimental physics research. The current program includes in-house research using the local tandem Van de Graff and superconducting linac accelerators and non-accelerator research in double beta decay and gravitation as well as user-mode research at large accelerator and reactor facilities around the world. This book is divided into the following areas: nuclear astrophysics; neutrino physics; nucleus-nucleus reactions; fundamental symmetries and weak interactions; accelerator mass spectrometry; atomic and molecular clusters; ultra-relativistic heavy ion collisions; external users; electronics, computing, and detector infrastructure; Van de Graff, superconducting booster and ion sources; nuclear physics laboratory personnel; degrees granted for 1994--1995; and list of publications from 1994--1995

  7. A TRIGA reactor in an industrial laboratory

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anders, Oswald U.

    1980-01-01

    The Dow TRIGA Reactor is a well established facility in its industrial environment. It is used extensively for internal Dow projects. The primary use of the TRIGA is as neutron source for NAA. It faces similar technical and organizational challenges as other TRIGA installations and over the years developed its own solutions

  8. Toward Theological Inclusivism: The Effects of a World Religions Course in a Mormon University

    Science.gov (United States)

    Properzi, Mauro

    2017-01-01

    Inclusivist, exclusivist, and pluralist attitudes toward other religions interact in complex ways within the Mormon faith. Hence, a course on the world's religions at LDS-sponsored Brigham Young University presents an interesting case study in this context. Through survey data and statistical analysis this article attempts to examine the effect of…

  9. Polarized targets at triangle universities nuclear laboratory

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Seely, M.L. [North Carolina State Univ., Raleigh, NC (United States); Gould, C.R. [North Carolina State Univ., Raleigh, NC (United States); Haase, D.G. [North Carolina State Univ., Raleigh, NC (United States); Huffman, P.R. [Triangle Universities Nuclear Laboratory, Durham, NC 27708 (United States); Keith, C.D. [North Carolina State Univ., Raleigh, NC (United States); Roberson, N.R. [Triangle Universities Nuclear Laboratory, Durham, NC 27708 (United States); Tornow, W. [Triangle Universities Nuclear Laboratory, Durham, NC 27708 (United States); Wilburn, W.S. [Triangle Universities Nuclear Laboratory, Durham, NC 27708 (United States)

    1995-03-01

    A summary of the polarized and aligned nuclear targets which have been constructed and used at the Triangle Universities Nuclear Laboratory is given. Statically polarized targets, typically operating at a temperature of 12 mK and a magnetic field of 7 T, have provided significant nuclear polarization in {sup 1}H, {sup 3}He, {sup 27}Al, {sup 93}Nb and {sup 165}Ho. A rotating, aligned {sup 165}Ho target is also in use. A {sup 3}He melting curve thermometer has been developed for use in statically polarized targets. A dynamically polarized proton target is under construction. ((orig.))

  10. The Colour of the Young Universe

    Science.gov (United States)

    2003-12-01

    VLT study gives insight on the evolution of the star formation rate Summary An international team of astronomers [1] has determined the colour of the Universe when it was very young. While the Universe is now kind of beige, it was much bluer in the distant past , at a time when it was only 2,500 million years old. This is the outcome of an extensive and thorough analysis of more than 300 galaxies seen within a small southern sky area, the so-called Hubble Deep Field South. The main goal of this advanced study was to understand how the stellar content of the Universe was assembled and has changed over time. Dutch astronomer Marijn Franx , a team member from the Leiden Observatory (The Netherlands), explains: "The blue colour of the early Universe is caused by the predominantly blue light from young stars in the galaxies. The redder colour of the Universe today is caused by the relatively larger number of older, redder stars." The team leader, Gregory Rudnick from the Max-Planck Institut für Astrophysics (Garching, Germany) adds: "Since the total amount of light in the Universe in the past was about the same as today and a young blue star emits much more light than an old red star, there must have been significantly fewer stars in the young Universe than there is now. Our new findings imply that the majority of stars in the Universe were formed comparatively late, not so long before our Sun was born, at a moment when the Universe was around 7,000 million years old." These new results are based on unique data collected during more than 100 hours of observations with the ISAAC multi-mode instrument at ESO's Very Large Telescope (VLT), as part of a major research project, the Faint InfraRed Extragalactic Survey (FIRES) . The distances to the galaxies were estimated from their brightness in different optical near-infrared wavelength bands. PR Photo 34/03 : The Evolving Colour of the Universe . Observing the early Universe It is now well known that the Sun was formed

  11. Educational use of research reactor (KUR) and critical assembly (KUCA) at Kyoto University

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Misawa, Tsuyoshi; Unesaki, Hironobu; Ichihara, Chihiro; Pyeon, Cheol Ho; Shiroya, Seiji

    2005-01-01

    At Kyoto University Research Reactor Institute, a research reactor of 5MW (KUR) and a critical assembly (KUCA) have been used for educational purpose to train undergraduate or graduate students. Using KUR, basic experiments for neutron applications have been carried out, and KUCA has been used for the education of nuclear engineering and technology. Especially, using KUCA, a joint reactor laboratory course of graduate level is offered every summer since 1975 by nine associated Japanese universities, and more than 2200 students attended this course

  12. Researches at the University of Tokyo fast neutron sources reactor, YAYOI

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Koshizuka, S.; Oka, Y.; Saito, I.

    1992-01-01

    The Fast neutron source reactor YAYOI was critical in 1971 at the Nuclear Engineering Research Laboratory, the Faculty of Engineering, the University of Tokyo (UTNL). The core is fueled with the enriched uranium surrounded by the depleted uranium. YAYOI is the first fast reactor in Japan. Many types of studies have been carried out by the researchers of the University of Tokyo in these 20 years. It also contributed to the Japan's national project of developing fast breeder reactors. The reactor is opened to the visiting researchers from universities and research institutes. YAYOI has also been utilized for education of undergraduate and graduate students of the Department of Nuclear Engineering of the University of Tokyo. The present paper briefly summerizes past and present researchers. (author)

  13. Innovations and Enhancements for a Consortium of Big-10 University Research and Training Reactors. Final Report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Brenizer, Jack

    2011-01-01

    The Consortium of Big-10 University Research and Training Reactors was by design a strategic partnership of seven leading institutions. We received the support of both our industry and DOE laboratory partners. Investments in reactor, laboratory and program infrastructure, allowed us to lead the national effort to expand and improve the education of engineers in nuclear science and engineering, to provide outreach and education to pre-college educators and students and to become a key resource of ideas and trained personnel for our U.S. industrial and DOE laboratory collaborators.

  14. Nuclear Physics Laboratory, University of Washington annual report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1998-04-01

    The Nuclear Physics Laboratory at the University of Washington in Seattle pursues a broad program of nuclear physics. These activities are conducted locally and at remote sites. The current programs include in-house research using the local tandem Van de Graaff and superconducting linac accelerators and non-accelerator research in solar neutrino physics at the Sudbury Neutrino Observatory in Canada and at SAGE in Russia, and gravitation as well as user-mode research at large accelerators and reactor facilities around the world. Summaries of the individual research projects are included. Areas of research covered are: fundamental symmetries, weak interactions and nuclear astrophysics; neutrino physics; nucleus-nucleus reactions; ultra-relativistic heavy ions; and atomic and molecular clusters

  15. Undergraduate Skills Laboratories at Sonoma State University

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gill, Amandeep; Zack, K.; Mills, H.; Cunningham, B.; Jackowski, S.

    2014-01-01

    Due to the current economic climate, funding sources for many laboratory courses have been cut from university budgets. However, it is still necessary for undergraduates to master laboratory skills to be prepared and competitive applicants when entering the professional world and/or graduate school. In this context, student-led programs may be able to compensate for this lack of formal instruction and reinforce concepts from lecture by applying research techniques to develop hands-on comprehension. The Sonoma State University Chapter of Society of Physics Students has established a peer-led skills lab to teach research techniques in the fields of astronomy and physics. The goal is to alleviate the pressures of both independently learning and efficiently applying techniques to junior and senior-level research projects. These skill labs are especially valuable for nontraditional students who, due to work or family duties, may not get a chance to fully commit to research projects. For example, a topic such as Arduino programming has a multitude of applications in both astronomy and physics, but is not taught in traditional university courses. Although some programming and electronics skills are taught in (separate) classes, they are usually not applied to actual research projects, which combined expertise is needed. For example, in astronomy, there are many situations involving programming telescopes and taking data with electronic cameras. Often students will carry out research using these tools but when something goes wrong, the students will not have the skills to trouble shoot and fix the system. Another astronomical topic to be taught in the skills labs is the analysis of astronomical data, including running remote telescopes, analyzing photometric variability, and understanding the concepts of star magnitudes, flat fields, and biases. These workshops provide a setting in which the student teacher may strengthen his or her understanding of the topic by presenting

  16. Update on the University of Missouri-Columbia Research Reactor Upgrade

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    McKibben, J C; Rhyne, J J [University of Missouri-Columbia (United States)

    1992-07-01

    The University of Missouri-Columbia (MU) is in the process of upgrading the research and operational capabilities of the MU Research Reactor (MURR) and associated facilities. The plans include an expanded research building that will double the laboratory space, the addition of new research programs, instrumentation and equipment, a cold neutron source, and improved reactor systems. These enhancements, which are in various stages of completion, will greatly expand the present active multidisciplinary research programs at MURR.

  17. Science and Service at a University Research Reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bode, Peter

    2013-01-01

    Experiences of the Laboratory for Instrumental Neutron Activation Analysis (INAA) of the Reactor Institute Delft at the Delft University of Technology are presented on basis of more than 30 years experience with INAA services to others. Recommendations are given to neutron activation analysis groups starting as a service provider, but also pitfalls are identified. The importance of fitness for intended purpose is emphasized, so that analysis protocols should be optimized to answer the customer’s basic question, rather than to yield the highest number of elements and best level of precision. The absence of automation and no return of revenues are identified as highest threats of becoming a successful and reliable partner for providing services. (author)

  18. A new nuclear materials laboratory at Queen's University

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Holt, R.A.; Daymond, M.R., E-mail: holt@queensu.ca, E-mail: daymond@queensu.ca [Queen' s University, Department of Mechanical and Materials Engineering, Kingston, ON (Canada)

    2015-07-01

    The Reactor Materials Testing Laboratory (RMTL) at Queen's University and the results of commissioning tests are described. RMTL uses energetic protons (up to 8MeV) to simulate fast neutron damage in materials for reactor components. The laboratory is also capable of He implantation (up to 12 MeV) to simulate the effects of transmutation He in reactor components. The $17.5M laboratory comprises a new building, a 4MV tandem accelerator, two electron microscopes, mechanical testing and specimen preparation equipment, and a radiation detection laboratory. RMTL focusses on studying dynamic effects of irradiation (irradiation creep, irradiation growth, irradiation induced swelling, fatigue under irradiation) in-situ. (author)

  19. Development of a new virtual nuclear reactor laboratory

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ahmad Abrishami; Ali Pazirandeh

    2009-01-01

    Full text: Nowadays the education industry benefits from computer programs and software in various ways as well as many other industries. Here the e-learning technology uses some forms of software platform to present its contents. Virtual laboratories are superior tools in this technology. A virtual laboratory is interactive graphical user interface software that is based on known scientific laws of its virtual elements, which responses to user acts as desired in the real case. There are some known commercial and non-commercial ones. There are also some simulation software in the field of nuclear industry that has some uses in operator learning and some other applications such as analyzing the effects of human mistakes on plant safety. In this paper we discuss more about the ways to develop a virtual nuclear reactor laboratory and propose our first release of such tool. Our target reactor is Tehran Research Reactor (TRR), which is a pool type reactor. We used WIMS and COSTANZA to develop the simulator kernel of virtual laboratory. (Author)

  20. Reactor console replacement at Washington State University

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lovas, Thomas A.

    1978-01-01

    A replacement reactor console was installed in 1977 at the W.S.U. 1 MW TRIGA-fueled reactor as the final step in an instrumentation upgrade program. The program was begun circa 1972 with the design, construction and installation of various systems and equipment. Major instruments were installed in the existing console and tested in the course of reactor operation. The culmination of the program was the installation of a cubicle designed and constructed to house the updated instrumentation. (author)

  1. Annual report of Nuclear Engineering Research Laboratory, University of Tokyo in fiscal 1989

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1990-01-01

    This report summerizes the research and educational activities at the Nuclear Engineering Research Laboratory, Faculty of Engineering, University of Tokyo. The Laboratory holds four main facilities, which are Yayoi reactor, an electron accelerator, fusion blanket research facility, and heavy ion irradiation research facility. And they are open to the researchers both inside and outside the University. The application of the facilities are described. The activities and achievements of the Laboratory staffs, and theses for graduate, master, and doctor degrees are also summerized. (J.P.N.)

  2. Constitutional Law--Procedural Due Process--Student Has Right to Have Attorney Present at University Disciplinary Hearing When Criminal Charges Are Pending.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vessels, Rodney Jay

    1978-01-01

    In the case of Gabrilowitz v Newman the court used the due process balancing test to conclude that a student has a right to have counsel present at a university disciplinary hearing where the conduct in question is the object of a pending criminal proceeding. Available from J. Reuben Clark Law School, Brigham Young U., Provo, UT 84602. (MSE)

  3. Treatment of Laboratory Wastewater by Sequence Batch reactor technology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Imtiaz, N.; Butt, M.; Khan, R.A.; Saeed, M.T.; Irfan, M.

    2012-01-01

    These studies were conducted on the characterization and treatment of sewage mixed with waste -water of research and testing laboratory (PCSIR Laboratories Lahore). In this study all the parameters COD, BOD and TSS etc of influent (untreated waste-water) and effluent (treated waste-water) were characterized using the standard methods of examination for water and waste-water. All the results of the analyzed waste-water parameters were above the National Environmental Quality Standards (NEQS) set at National level. Treatment of waste-water was carried out by conventional sequencing batch reactor technique (SBR) using aeration and settling technique in the same treatment reactor at laboratory scale. The results of COD after treatment were reduced from (90-95 %), BOD (95-97 %) and TSS (96-99 %) and the reclaimed effluent quality was suitable for gardening purposes. (author)

  4. University of Michigan workscope for 1991 DOE University program in robotics for advanced reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wehe, D.K.

    1990-01-01

    The University of Michigan (UM) is a member of a team of researchers, including the universities of Florida, Texas, and Tennessee, along with Oak Ridge National Laboratory, developing robotic for hazardous environments. The goal of this research is to develop the intelligent and capable robots which can perform useful functions in the new generation of nuclear reactors currently under development. By augmenting human capabilities through remote robotics, increased safety, functionality, and reliability can be achieved. In accordance with the established lines of research responsibilities, our primary efforts during 1991 will continue to focus on the following areas: radiation imaging; mobile robot navigation; three-dimensional vision capabilities for navigation; and machine-intelligence. This report discuss work that has been and will be done in these areas

  5. Operational Experience with the TRIGA Mark II Reactor of the University of Pavia

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tigliole, A. Borio Di; Alloni, D.; Cagnazzo, M.; Coniglio, M.; Lana, F.; Losi, A.; Magrotti, G.; Manera, S.; Marchetti, F.; Pappalardo, P.; Prata, M.; Provasi, M.C.; Salvini, A.; Scian, G.; Vinciguerra, G. [University of Pavia, Laboratory of Applied Nuclear Energy (L.E.N.A), Via Aselli 41, 27100 Pavia (Italy)

    2011-07-01

    The Laboratory of Applied Nuclear Energy (LENA) is an Interdepartmental Research Centre of the University of Pavia which operates a 250 kW TRIGA Mark II Research Nuclear Reactor, a Cyclotron for the production of radioisotopes and other irradiation facilities. The reactor is in operation since 1965 and many home-made upgrading were realized in the past years in order to assure a continuous operation of the reactor for the future. The annual reactor operational time at nominal power is in the range of 300 - 400 hours depending upon the time schedule of some experiments and research activities. The reactor is mainly used for NAA activities, BNCT research, samples irradiation and training. In specific, few tens of hours of reactor operation per year are dedicated to training courses for University students and for professionals. Besides, the LENA Centre hosts every year more than one thousand high school students in visit. Lately, LENA was certified ISO 9001:2008 for the ''operation and maintenance of the reactor'' and for the ''design and delivery of the irradiation service''. Nowadays the reactor shows a good technical state and, at the moment, there are no political or economical reason to consider the reactor shut-down. (author)

  6. Annual report of Nuclear Engineering Research Laboratory, Faculty of Engineering, University of Tokyo, fiscal year 1995

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1996-08-01

    This is an annual report prepared on research education action, operation state of research instruments and others in FY 1995 at Nuclear Engineering Research Laboratory, Faculty of Engineering, University of Tokyo. The laboratory has four large instruments such as high speed neutron source reactor, 'Yayoi', electron linac, fundamentally experimental equipment for blanket design of nuclear fusion reactor, and heavy radiation research equipment (HIT), of which former two are used for cooperative research with universities in Japan, and the next blanket and the last HIT are also presented for cooperative researches in Faculty of Engineering and in University of Tokyo, respectively. FY 1995 was the beginning year of earnest discussion on future planning of this facility with concentrated effort. These four large research instruments are all in their active use. And, their further improvement is under preparation. In this report, the progress in FY 1995 on operation and management of the four large instruments are described at first, and on next, research actions, contents of theses for degree and graduation of students as well as research results of laboratory stuffs are summarized. These researches are constituted mainly using these large instruments in the facility, aiming at development of advanced and new field of atomic energy engineering and relates to nuclear reactor first wall engineering, nuclear reactor fuel cycle engineering, electromagnetic structure engineering, thermal-liquid engineering, mathematical information engineering, quantum beam engineering, new type reactor design and so on. (G.K.)

  7. Annual report of Nuclear Engineering Research Laboratory, Faculty of Engineering, University of Tokyo, fiscal year 1995

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1996-08-01

    This is an annual report prepared on research education action, operation state of research instruments and others in FY 1995 at Nuclear Engineering Research Laboratory, Faculty of Engineering, University of Tokyo. The laboratory has four large instruments such as high speed neutron source reactor, `Yayoi`, electron linac, fundamentally experimental equipment for blanket design of nuclear fusion reactor, and heavy radiation research equipment (HIT), of which former two are used for cooperative research with universities in Japan, and the next blanket and the last HIT are also presented for cooperative researches in Faculty of Engineering and in University of Tokyo, respectively. FY 1995 was the beginning year of earnest discussion on future planning of this facility with concentrated effort. These four large research instruments are all in their active use. And, their further improvement is under preparation. In this report, the progress in FY 1995 on operation and management of the four large instruments are described at first, and on next, research actions, contents of theses for degree and graduation of students as well as research results of laboratory stuffs are summarized. These researches are constituted mainly using these large instruments in the facility, aiming at development of advanced and new field of atomic energy engineering and relates to nuclear reactor first wall engineering, nuclear reactor fuel cycle engineering, electromagnetic structure engineering, thermal-liquid engineering, mathematical information engineering, quantum beam engineering, new type reactor design and so on. (G.K.)

  8. The integral fast reactor fuels reprocessing laboratory at Argonne National Laboratory, Illinois

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wolson, R.D.; Tomczuk, Z.; Fischer, D.F.; Slawecki, M.A.; Miller, W.E.

    1986-09-01

    The processing of Integral Fast Reactor (IFR) metal fuel utilizes pyrochemical fuel reprocessing steps. These steps include separation of the fission products from uranium and plutonium by electrorefining in a fused salt, subsequent concentration of uranium and plutonium for reuse, removal, concentration, and packaging of the waste material. Approximately two years ago a facility became operational at Argonne National Laboratory-Illinois to establish the chemical feasibility of proposed reprocessing and consolidation processes. Sensitivity of the pyroprocessing melts to air oxidation necessitated operation in atmosphere-controlled enclosures. The Integral Fast Reactor Fuels Reprocessing Laboratory is described

  9. RELAP/SCDAPSIM Reactor System Simulator Development and Training for University and Reactor Applications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hohorst, J.K.; Allison, C.M.

    2010-01-01

    The RELAP/SCDAPSIM code, designed to predict the behaviour of reactor systems during normal and accident conditions, is being developed as part of an international nuclear technology development program called SDTP (SCDAP Development and Training Program). SDTP involves more than 60 organizations in 28 countries. One of the important applications of the code is for simulator training of university faculty and students, reactor analysts, and reactor operations and technical support staff. Examples of RELAP/SCDAPSIM-based system thermal hydraulic and severe accident simulator packages include the SAFSIM simulator developed by NECSA for the SAFARI research reactor in South Africa, university-developed simulators at the University of Mexico and Shanghai Jiao Tong University in China, and commercial VISA and RELSIM packages used for analyst and reactor operations staff training. This paper will briefly describe the different packages/facilities. (authors)

  10. RELAP/SCDAPSIM Reactor System Simulator Development and Training for University and Reactor Applications

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hohorst, J.K.; Allison, C.M. [Innovative Systems Software, 1242 South Woodruff Avenue, Idaho Falls, Idaho 83404 (United States)

    2010-07-01

    The RELAP/SCDAPSIM code, designed to predict the behaviour of reactor systems during normal and accident conditions, is being developed as part of an international nuclear technology development program called SDTP (SCDAP Development and Training Program). SDTP involves more than 60 organizations in 28 countries. One of the important applications of the code is for simulator training of university faculty and students, reactor analysts, and reactor operations and technical support staff. Examples of RELAP/SCDAPSIM-based system thermal hydraulic and severe accident simulator packages include the SAFSIM simulator developed by NECSA for the SAFARI research reactor in South Africa, university-developed simulators at the University of Mexico and Shanghai Jiao Tong University in China, and commercial VISA and RELSIM packages used for analyst and reactor operations staff training. This paper will briefly describe the different packages/facilities. (authors)

  11. Current Reactor Physics Benchmark Activities at the Idaho National Laboratory

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bess, John D.; Marshall, Margaret A.; Gorham, Mackenzie L.; Christensen, Joseph; Turnbull, James C.; Clark, Kim

    2011-01-01

    The International Reactor Physics Experiment Evaluation Project (IRPhEP) (1) and the International Criticality Safety Benchmark Evaluation Project (ICSBEP) (2) were established to preserve integral reactor physics and criticality experiment data for present and future research. These valuable assets provide the basis for recording, developing, and validating our integral nuclear data, and experimental and computational methods. These projects are managed through the Idaho National Laboratory (INL) and the Organisation for Economic Co-operation and Development Nuclear Energy Agency (OECD-NEA). Staff and students at the Department of Energy - Idaho (DOE-ID) and INL are engaged in the development of benchmarks to support ongoing research activities. These benchmarks include reactors or assemblies that support Next Generation Nuclear Plant (NGNP) research, space nuclear Fission Surface Power System (FSPS) design validation, and currently operational facilities in Southeastern Idaho.

  12. Reactor safety research and development in Chalk River Laboratories

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nitheanandan, T. [Atomic Energy of Canada Limited, Chalk River, ON (Canada)

    2014-07-01

    Atomic Energy of Canada Limited's Chalk River Laboratories provides three different services to stakeholders and customers. The first service provided by the laboratory is the implementation of Research and Development (R&D) programs to provide the underlying technological basis of safe nuclear power reactor designs. A significant portion of the Canadian R&D capability in reactor safety resides at Atomic Energy of Canada Limited's Chalk River Laboratories, and this capability was instrumental in providing the science and technology required to aid in the safety design of CANDU power reactors. The second role of the laboratory has been in supporting nuclear facility licensees to ensure the continued safe operation of nuclear facilities, and to develop safety cases to justify continued operation. The licensing of plant life extension is a key industry objective, requiring extensive research on degradation mechanisms, such that safety cases are based on the original safety design data and valid and realistic assumptions regarding the effect of ageing and management of plant life. Recently, Chalk River Laboratories has been engaged in a third role in research to provide the technical basis and improved understanding for decision making by regulatory bodies. The state-of-the-art test facilities in Chalk River Laboratories have been contributing to the R&D needs of all three roles, not only in Canada but also in the international community, thorough Canada's participation in cooperative programs lead by International Atomic Energy Agency and the OECD's Nuclear Energy Agency. (author)

  13. Leveraging Existing Laboratory Capacity towards Universal Health ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Adequately equipped clinical laboratories should provide early warning signals of health risks. The Assessment categorized the laboratories at three levels relating to the type of facility, these being hospital, health center and health post. This study used results from the SARA to determine the ability to make timely diagnosis ...

  14. U.S. Department of Energy University Reactor Instrumentation Program Final Report for 1992-94 Grant for the University of Florida Training Reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vernetson, William G.

    1999-01-01

    Overall, the instrumentation obtained under the first year 1992-93 University Reactor Instrumentation Program grant assured that the goals of the program were well understood and met as well as possible at the level of support provided for the University of Florida Training Reactor facility. Though the initial grant support of $21,000 provided toward the purchase of $23,865 of proposed instrumentation certainly did not meet many of the facility's needs, the instrumentation items obtained and implemented did meet some critical needs and hence the goals of the Program to support modernization and improvement of reactor facilities such as the UFTR within the academic community. Similarly, the instrumentation obtained under the second year 1993-94 University Reactor Instrumentation Program grant again met some of the critical needs for instrumentation support at the UFTR facility. Again, though the grant support of $32,799 for proposed instrumentation at the same cost projection does not need all of the facility's needs, it does assure continued facility viability and improvement in operations. Certainly, reduction of forced unavailability of the reactor is the most obvious achievement of the University Reactor Instrumentation Program to date at the UFTR. Nevertheless, the ability to close out several expressed-inspection concerns of the Nuclear Regulatory Commission with acquisition of the low level survey meter and the area radiation monitoring system is also very important. Most importantly, with modest cost sharing the facility has been able to continue and even accelerate the improvement and modernization of a facility, especially in the Neutron Activation Analysis Laboratory, that is used by nearly every post-secondary school in the State of Florida and several in other states, by dozens of departments within the University of Florida, and by several dozen high schools around the State of Florida on a regular basis. Better, more reliable service to such a broad

  15. Biennial activity report of Reactor Engineering Laboratory - 1983 and 1984

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Swaminathan, K.; Prahlad, B.

    1986-01-01

    This report summarises activities of the Reactor Engineering Laboratory for the period January 1983 to December 1984. The report consists of four sections dealing with development of reactor components, prototype tests in sodium, instrumentation development and measurement techniques and noise analysis techniques respectively. As is customary, the activities have been reported in brief but where detailed reports have been prepared the same are referred. The main thrust of the work of the laboratory was still in support of the FBTR which is in an advanced stage of construction and commissioning at Kalpakkam site. Purification of 100 tonnes of commercial grade sodium to reactor grade, pouring of the liquid metal seals and the construction and commissioning of a sodium loop for calibration of the hydrogen leak detector in all represented significant contribution towards FBTR. The section on development of reactor components describes efforts on construction of both electromagnetic and small mechanical sodium pumps. Sodium removal from the control rod drive mechanism by means of vacuum distillation technique has been a useful experience despite some difficulties faced due, possibly, to the presence of extraneous matter in the decontamination set-up. The section on instrumentation development and measurement techniques describes interesting development concerning ultrasonic imaging for under sodium viewing. The last section on noise analysis techniques describes some experience gained in the detection of cavitation in dummy fuel subassembly by means of acoustic technique. The developmental efforts on construction of high temperature acoustic sensors of both piezoelectric and magnetostrictive type have been encouraging. At the end of the report is included a list of technical publications of the laboratory. (author)

  16. Leveraging Existing Laboratory Capacity towards Universal Health ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Background: The provision of quality health care is influenced by ... Laboratory support is urgently needed to enhance service delivery in the ... Information generated through ... professionals using simple rapid technology have been adopted.

  17. The University as an Open Laboratory

    Science.gov (United States)

    Birx, Donald L.; Ford, Ralph M.; Payne, Carrie A.

    2013-01-01

    Colleges and universities are two of the most formidable resources a country has to reinvent and grow its economy. This is the second of two papers that outlines a process of building and strengthening research universities that enhances regional technology development and facilitates flexible networks of collaboration and resource sharing. In the…

  18. Future plans on the Kyoto University Research Reactor (KUR)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shibata, Seiichi

    2000-01-01

    The Research Reactor Institute (RRI), Kyoto University, for aiming at performing the 'Experiments using a reactor and its related research', was established in Showa 38 (1963) as a cooperative research institute for universities and so on in allover Japan. Operation using KUR of one of main facilities in RRI was started by 1 MW of its rated output in 1964, and converted to 5 MW in 1968, after which through development , addition and modification of various research apparatus it has been proposed to the cooperative application researches with universities and so on in allover Japan, hitherto. Among these periods, its research organization is improved to six departments containing twenty divisions and two attached research facilities to progress some investigations on future plans at RRI for response to new researching trends. Here were described on present state of research on use of low concentrated uranium fuels at research reactor, and future plans on neutron factory and hybrid reactor. The former aims at establishment of a new research facility capable of alternating to KUR for future academic research on research reactor containing high quality and high degree application of neutron field and safety management and feature upgrading of nuclear energy. And, the latter aims at development on an accelerator drive uncritical reactor combined an accelerator neutron source and an uncritical reactor. (G.K.)

  19. A view of technology maturity assessment to realize fusion reactor by Japanese young researchers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kasada, Ryuta; Goto, Takuya; Miyazawa, Junichi; Fujioka, Shinsuke; Hiwatari, Ryoji; Oyama, Naoyuki; Tanigawa, Hiroyasu

    2013-01-01

    Japanese young researchers who have interest in realizing fusion reactor have analyzed Technology Readiness Levels (TRL) in Young Scientists Special Interest Group on Fusion Reactor Realization. In this report, brief introduction to TRL assessment and a view of TRL assessment against fusion reactor projects conducting in Japan. (J.P.N.)

  20. Use of research reactors in multidisciplinary education at Cornell University

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Clark, D.D.

    1992-01-01

    Multidisciplinary aspects of nuclear science and technology form a large part of the research and teaching activities of the Nuclear Science and Engineering (NS and E) Program at Cornell, and the two reactors housed in Ward Laboratory - a 500-kW TRIGA and a 100-W critical facility [zero-power reactor (ZPR)]- play a central role in those activities. Several primarily educational and multidisciplinary features of the NS and E program are described in this paper

  1. Antimatter in the universe and laboratory

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dolgov A.D.

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Possible signatures which may indicate an existence of antimatter in the Galaxy and in the early universe are reviewed. A model which could give rise to abundant antimatter in the Galaxy is considered.

  2. Antimatter in the universe and laboratory

    OpenAIRE

    Dolgov, A. D.

    2014-01-01

    Possible signatures which may indicate an existence of antimatter in the Galaxy and in the early universe are reviewed. A model which could give rise to abundant antimatter in the Galaxy is considered.

  3. Universal Fast Breeder Reactor Subassembly Counter manual

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Menlove, H.O.; Eccleston, G.W.; Swansen, J.E.; Goris, P.; Abedin-Zadeh, R.; Ramalho, A.

    1984-08-01

    A neutron coincidence counter has been designed for the measurement of fast breeder reactor fuel assemblies. This assay system can accommodate the full range of geometries and masses found in fast breeder subassemblies under IAEA safeguards. The system's high-performance capability accommodates high plutonium loadings of up to 16 kg. This manual describes the system and its operation and gives performance and calibration parameters for typical applications

  4. Universal Fast Breeder Reactor Subassembly Counter manual

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Menlove, H.O.; Eccleston, G.W.; Swansen, J.E.; Goris, P.; Abedin-Zadeh, R.; Ramalho, A.

    1984-08-01

    A neutron coincidence counter has been designed for the measurement of fast breeder reactor fuel assemblies. This assay system can accommodate the full range of geometries and masses found in fast breeder subassemblies under IAEA safeguards. The system's high-performance capability accommodates high plutonium loadings of up to 16 kg. This manual describes the system and its operation and gives performance and calibration parameters for typical applications.

  5. The High Flux Beam Reactor at Brookhaven National Laboratory

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shapiro, S.M.

    1994-01-01

    Brookhaven National Laboratory's High Flux Beam Reactor (HFBR) was built because of the need of the scientist to always want 'more'. In the mid-50's the Brookhaven Graphite reactor was churning away producing a number of new results when the current generation of scientists, led by Donald Hughes, realized the need for a high flux reactor and started down the political, scientific and engineering path that led to the BFBR. The effort was joined by a number of engineers and scientists among them, Chemick, Hastings, Kouts, and Hendrie, who came up with the novel design of the HFBR. The two innovative features that have been incorporated in nearly all other research reactors built since are: (i) an under moderated core arrangement which enables the thermal flux to peak outside the core region where beam tubes can be placed, and (ii) beam tubes that are tangential to the core which decrease the fast neutron background without affecting the thermal beam intensity. Construction began in the fall of 1961 and four years later, at a cost of $12 Million, criticality was achieved on Halloween Night, 1965. Thus began 30 years of scientific accomplishments

  6. Bulletin of the Research Laboratory for Nuclear Reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Aritomi, Masanori

    2008-01-01

    The bulletin consists of two parts. The first part includes General Research Report. The Research Laboratory for Nuclear Reactors, Tokyo Institute of Technology has three engineering divisions such as Energy Engineering, Mass Transmutation Engineering, and System and Safety Engineering. In this part, 17 reports of Energy Engineering division, 8 reports of Mass transmutation Engineering division, 11 reports of System and Safety Engineering division are described as their activities. In addition, 3 reports of Cooperative Researches are also summarized. The second part is Special Issue about COE-INES RESEARCH REPORT 2007. In this part, 3 reports of Innovative Reactor Group, 2 reports of Innovative Nuclear Energy Utilization System Group, 3 reports of Innovative Transmutation/Separation Group, 2 reports of Relationship between Nuclear and Society Group, 1 report of RA Students in the COE-INES Captainship Educational Program are described as results to their researches. (J.P.N.)

  7. Education and training activities at North Carolina State University's PULSTAR reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mayo, C.W.

    1992-01-01

    Research reactor utilization has been an integral part of the North Carolina State University's (NCSU's) nuclear engineering program since its inception. The undergraduate curriculum has a strong teaching laboratory component. Graduate classes use the reactor for selected demonstrations, experiments, and projects. The reactor is also used for commercial power reactor operator training programs, neutron radiography, neutron activation analysis (NAA), and sample and tracer activation for industrial short courses and services as part of the university's land grant mission. The PULSTAR reactor is a 1-MW pool-type reactor that uses 4% enriched UO 2 pellet fuel in Zircaloy II cladding. Standard irradiation facilities include wet exposure ports, a graphite thermal column, and a pneumatic transfer system. In the near term, general facility upgrades include the installation of signal isolation and computer data acquisition and display functions to improve the teaching and research interface with the reactor. In the longer term, the authors foresee studies of new core designs and the development of beam experiment design tools. These would be used to study modifications that may be desired at the end of the current core life and to undertake the development of new research instruments

  8. Remote Laboratories: Bridging University to Secondary Schools

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Horácio Fernandes

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available e-lab is a remote laboratory infrastructure powered by a software framework that allows the operation and data retrieve from a remote apparatus. In this demonstration we will present the e-lab interface properties and its modus operandi, giving as well some topics of complimentary software use for data interpretation and analysis.

  9. Oak Ridge National Laboratory Research Reactor Experimenters' Guide

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cagle, C.D.

    1982-10-01

    The Oak Ridge National Laboratory has three multipurpose research reactors which accommodate testing loops, target irradiations, and beam-type experiments. Since the experiments must share common or similar facilities and utilities, be designed and fabricated by the same groups, and meet the same safety criteria, certain standards for these have been developed. These standards deal only with those properties from which safety and economy of time and money can be maximized and do not relate to the intent of the experiment or quality of the data obtained. The necessity for, and the limitations of, the standards are discussed; and a compilation of general standards is included

  10. University of Maryland MRSEC - Facilities: Keck Laboratory

    Science.gov (United States)

    operation. This site remains as a history of the center, but will not be actively maintained. University of . Crystals are made up of layers, or "planes" of atoms, perfectly stacked in an ordered pattern . Because this surface has been cut at a slight angle to the crystal planes, it appears "stepped"

  11. chemical safety in laboratories of african universities

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    unesco

    Universities in Africa are in need of chemical safety and security facilities, ... In March 2009, fifty one 4th year undergraduate students (graduating class) of .... manufacturing industries, and many of them are concerned primarily ... advancement of chemistry world wide to do their best both to push the African chemistry.

  12. Kansas State University accelerator laboratory upgrade

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Richard, P.

    1989-01-01

    The J.R. Macdonald Laboratory is undergoing a major upgrade of its facilities and capabilities. The laboratory is dedicated to the study of ion-atom collisions using highly charged ions from accelerators and/or ion sources. The mainstay of the laboratory over the last two decades has been a 6 MV tandem accelerator. It has been used to produce one- to a few-MeV/u highly charged ions for studying high energy atomic collisions, and to produce recoil ions from ocllisions with projectile ions for studying low energy atomic collisions. In order to enhance the capabilities of studying atomic collisions in these two energy regimes, we are constructing a superconducting LINAC booster to the tandem, and a stand-alone CRYEBIS source. The project, which is funded by the US Department of Energy, began in May 1985 with a May 1989 completion schedule. The upgrade includes a building addition, funded by the State of Kansas, to house the new facilities. The LINAC consists of a time-superbunching module, followed by three large cryostat modules each containing four superconducting resonators, and followed by an energy-rebunching module. The resonators are the split-ring superconducting Nb type designed and constructed at Argonne National Laboratory, and are presently being tested at KSU. The CRYEBIS source, which consists of a 1 m long 5 T superconducting solenoid with a high degree of straightness, is in the final stages of assembly. We have in operation a new computer network for data acquisition and analysis. A progress report on the status of the upgrade is presented. (orig.)

  13. University Reactor Instrumentation grant program. Final report, September 7, 1990--August 31, 1995

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Talnagi, J.W.

    1998-01-01

    The Ohio State University Nuclear Reactor Laboratory (OSU NRL) participated in the Department of Energy (DOE) grant program commonly denoted as the University Reactor Instrumentation (URI) program from the period September 1990 through August 1995, after which funding was terminated on a programmatic basis by DOE. This program provided funding support for acquisition of capital equipment targeted for facility upgrades and improvements, including modernizing reactor systems and instrumentation, improvements in research and instructional capabilities, and infrastructure enhancements. The staff of the OSU NRL submitted five grant applications during this period, all of which were funded either partially or in their entirety. This report will provide an overview of the activities carried out under these grants and assess their impact on the OSU NRL facilities

  14. Coalescence kinetics of dispersed crude oil in a laboratory reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sterling, M.C. Jr.; Ojo, T.; Autenrieth, R.L.; Bonner, J.S.; Page, C.A.; Ernst, A.N.S.

    2002-01-01

    A study was conducted to examine the effects of salinity and mixing energy on the resurfacing and coalescence rates of chemically dispersed crude oil droplets. This kinetic study involved the use of mean shear rates to characterize the mixing energy in a laboratory reactor. Coagulation kinetics of dispersed crude oil were determined within a range of mean shear rates of 5, 10, 15, and 20 per second, and with salinity values of 10 and 30 per cent. Observed droplet distributions were fit to a transport-reaction model to estimate collision efficiency values and their dependence on salinity and mixing energy. Dispersant efficiencies were compared with those derived from other laboratory testing methods. Experimentally determined dispersant efficiencies were found to be 10 to 50 per cent lower than predicted using a non-interacting droplet model, but dispersant efficiencies were higher than those predicted using other testing methods. 24 refs., 1 tab., 3 figs

  15. Annual report of Nuclear Engineering Research Laboratory, University of Tokyo in fiscal 1990

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1991-01-01

    In this annual report, the activities of research and education and the state of operation of the research facilities in this Laboratory in fiscal year 1990 are summarized. There are four large research facilities in this Laboratory, that is, the fast neutron source reactor 'Yayoi', the electron beam linear accelerator, the nuclear fusion reactor blanket experiment device and the heavy ion irradiation research facility. Those are used to execute research and education in the wide fields of atomic energy engineering, and put to the common utilization by universities in whole Japan. The results of the research with these facilities have been reported in the separate reports. The research aims at developing the most advanced and new fields in nuclear reactor engineering, and includes the engineering of the first wall and the fuel cycle for nuclear fusion reactors, electromagnetic structure engineering, AI and robotics, quantum beam engineering, the design of new type reactors, the basic process of radiochemistry and so on. The report on the course of the large scale facilities, research activities, the publication of research, education and the events in the Laboratory in the year are described. (K.I.)

  16. Annual report of Nuclear Engineering Research Laboratory, University of Tokyo in fiscal 1992

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1993-07-01

    In this annual report, the activities of education and research, the state of operation of research facilities and others in Nuclear Engineering Research Laboratory, University of Tokyo in fiscal year 1992 are summarized. In this Laboratory, there are four large research facilities, that are, the fast neutron source reactor 'Yayoi', the electron beam linac, the nuclear fusion reactor blanket experiment facility and the heavy irradiation research facility. Those are used for carrying out education and research in the wide fields of nuclear engineering, and are offered also for joint utilization. The results of research by using respective research facilities have been summarized in separate reports. The course of the management and operation of each research facility is described, and the research activities, the theses for doctorate and graduation these of teachers, personnel and graduate students in the Laboratory are summarized. (J.P.N.)

  17. Annual Report 2002 of Warsaw University, Heavy Ion Laboratory

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2003-01-01

    The Annual Report of Warsaw University Heavy Ion Laboratory is the overview of the Laboratory and assembly of scientific activities of the team especially in the range of instrumental development, experiments and experimental set-ups and experiments using outside facilities of Warsaw Cyclotron

  18. University of Rochester, Laboratory for Laser Energetics

    Science.gov (United States)

    1987-01-01

    In FY86 the Laboratory has produced a list of accomplishments in which it takes pride. LLE has met every laser-fusion program milestone to date in a program of research for direct-drive ultraviolet laser fusion originally formulated in 1981. LLE scientists authored or co-authored 135 scientific papers during 1985 to 1986. The collaborative experiments with NRL, LANL, and LLNL have led to a number of important ICF results. The cryogenic target system developed by KMS Fusion for LLE will be used in future high-density experiments on OMEGA to demonstrate the compression of thermonuclear fuel to 100 to 200 times that of solid (20 to 40 g/cm) in a test of the direct-drive concept, as noted in the National Academy of Sciences' report. The excellence of the advanced technology efforts at LLE is illustrated by the establishment of the Ultrafast Science Center by the Department of Defense through the Air Force Office of Scientific Research. Research in the Center will concentrate on bridging the gap between high-speed electronics and ultrafast optics by providing education, research, and development in areas critical to future communications and high-speed computer systems. The Laboratory for Laser Energetics continues its pioneering work on the interaction of intense radiation with matter. This includes inertial-fusion and advanced optical and optical electronics research; training people in the technology and applications of high-power, short-pulse lasers; and interacting with the scientific community, business, industry, and government to promote the growth of laser technology.

  19. Nuclear science and engineering education at a university research reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Loveland, W.

    1990-01-01

    The research and teaching operations of the Nuclear Chemistry Division of the Dept. of Chemistry and the Dept. of Nuclear Engineering are housed at the Oregon State University Radiation Center. This facility which includes a 1.1 MW TRIGA reactor was used for 53 classes from a number of different academic departments last year. About one-half of these classes used the reactor and ∼25% of the reactor's 45 hour week was devoted to teaching. Descriptions will be given of reactor-oriented instructional programs in nuclear engineering, radiation health and nuclear chemistry. In nuclear chemistry, classes in (a) nuclear chemistry for nuclear engineers, (b) radiotracer methods, (c) elementary and advanced activation analysis, and (d) advanced nuclear instrumentation will be described in detail. The use of the facility to promote general nuclear literacy among college students, high school and grade school students and the general population will also be covered

  20. [Future roles of clinical laboratories and clinical laboratory technologists in university hospitals].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yokota, Hiromitsu; Yatomi, Yutaka

    2013-08-01

    Clinical laboratories in university hospitals should be operated with a good balance of medical practice, education, research, and management. The role of a clinical laboratory is to promptly provide highly reliable laboratory data to satisfy the needs of clinicians involved in medical practice and health maintenance of patients. Improvement and maintenance of the quality of the laboratory staff and environment are essential to achieve this goal. In order to implement these requirements efficiently, an appropriate quality management system should be introduced and established, and evaluated objectively by a third party (e.g. by obtaining ISO 15189 certification). ISO 15189 is an international standard regarding the quality and competence of clinical laboratories, and specifies a review of the efficient operational system and technical requirements such as competence in implementing practical tests and calibration. This means the results of laboratory tests reported by accredited laboratories withstand any international evaluation, which is very important to assure the future importance of the existence and management of clinical laboratories as well as internationalization of medical practice. "Education" and "research" have important implications in addition to "medical practice" and "management", as the roles that clinical laboratories should play in university hospitals. University hospital laboratories should be operated by keeping these four factors in good balance. Why are "education" and "research" required in addition to "medical practice" services? If individual clinical laboratory technologists can provide an appropriate response to this question, the importance of the existence of clinical laboratories would be reinforced, without being compromised.

  1. The Mars Simulation Laboratory, University of Aarhus

    Science.gov (United States)

    Merrison, J. P.; Field, D.; Finster, K.; Lomstein, B. Aa.; Nørnberg, P.; Ramsing, N. B.; Uggerhøj, E.

    2001-08-01

    Present day Mars presents an extremely hostile environment to organic material. The average temperature is low (-50C), the atmospheric pressure is also low (7mbar) and there is little water over most of the planet. Chemically the surface is extremely oxidising and no signs of organic material have been detected. There is also a strong component of ultra violet radiation in the Martian sun light, lethal to most organisms. At Aarhus University we have constructed a Mars simulation environment which reproduces the physical, chemical and mineralogical conditions on Mars. It is hoped to set limits on where organic matter (or even life) might exist on Mars, for example at some depth under the surface, beneath the polar ice or within rocks. It is also possible to adjust the conditions in the simulation to investigate the most extreme environments in which organisms can be preserved or still function.

  2. International Conference for Young Scientists, Specialists, and Postgraduates on Nuclear Reactor Physics 2016 (ICNRP-2016)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2017-01-01

    We are pleased to introduce the Proceedings of the International research conference «International Conference for young scientists, specialists and post-graduates on Nuclear Reactor Physics 2016 (ICNRP-2016)» (5-9 September 2016, Health resort «Volga», Moscow, Russia) organized by the National Research Nuclear University MEPhI, with ROSATOM partnership. Representatives of research organizations and universities from twelve countries (Russia, Germany, Norway, Finland, Kazakhstan, Belarus, Italy, Slovakia etc.), delivered their presentations on various topics. The major topics are features of fast reactors, calculation for the needs of operation and design of nuclear reactors, computational reactor tests, codes and databases. Over a hundred people from 37 organizations attended the conference. More than 93 papers were presented. The received papers were reviewed according to the standards of the Journal of Physics: Conference Series and developed by the organizers’ scientific criteria. This volume of the journal includes 65 papers devoted to various branches of nuclear reactor physics and technology. During the conference, various sports activities were held, as well as a workshop on the problems of nuclear education in Russia. Most of the participants, according to the results of the survey were satisfied and expressed a desire to take part in the next conference in 2018. The organizing committee is very grateful to the: • Participants of the conference for their valuable contribution with the delivered presentations and interesting papers, • Conference program committee chairman Strikhanov M.N., rector of National Research Nuclear University MEPhI, • Program committee co-chairs: Caruso G., professor, Sapienza University of Rome, Hascik J., professor, Technical University of Bratislava, Janardhanan N.K., assistant professor, Jawaharlala Nehru University, Pershukov V.A., deputy director general, Rosatom, Tikhomirov G.V., dean of Physical

  3. Utilization of research reactors in universities and their medical applications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kanda, Keiji.

    1983-01-01

    In Japan, five research reactors and a critical assembly are operated by the universities. They are opened to all university researchers, the system of which is financially supported by the Ministry of Education, Culture and Science of the Japanese government. Usually KUR is operated eight cycles per year. One cycle consists of the following four week operation: 1. Mainly for researchers from other universities; 2. Mainly for researchers in the institute; 3. Mainly for beam experiment; 4. Sort time experiment. In the weeks of 1 ∼ 3 the KUR is operated continously from Tuesday morning to Friday evening. The experiment include studies on physics, chemistry, biology, medicine, engineering etc. Recently the medical application of research reactors has become popular in Japan. The new technique of the boron neutron capture thereby has been successfully applied to brain tumors and will be to melanoma (skin cancer) in near future. (author)

  4. Annual report of Nuclear Engineering Research Laboratory, University of Tokyo in fiscal 1991

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1992-07-01

    In this annual report, the activities of education and research, the state of operation of research facilities and others in Nuclear Engineering Research Laboratory, University of Tokyo in fiscal year 1991 are summarized. In this Laboratory, there are four large research facilities, that is, the fast neutron source reactor 'Yayoi', the electron beam linac, the nuclear fusion reactor blanket experiment facility and the heavy irradiation research facility. Those are used for carrying out education and research in the wide fields of nuclear engineering, and are offered also for joint utilization. The results of the research by using respective research facilities were summarized in separate reports. In this annual report, the course of the management and operation of respective research facilities is described, and the research activities, the theses for doctorate and graduation theses of the teachers, personnel and graduate students in the Laboratory are summarized. In the research, those on first wall engineering for fusion reactors, fuel cycle engineering, electromagnetic structure engineering, AI and robotics, quantum beam engineering, new type reactor design and so on are included. (K.I.)

  5. MIT nuclear reactor laboratory high school teaching program

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Olmez, I.

    1991-01-01

    For the last 6 years, the Massachusetts Institute of Technology (MIT) Nuclear Reactor Laboratory's academic and scientific staff a have been conducting evening seminars for precollege science teachers, parents, and high school students from the New England area. These seminars, as outlined in this paper, are intended to give general information on nuclear technologies with specific emphasis on radiation physics, nuclear medicine, nuclear chemistry, and ongoing research activities at the MIT research reactor. The ultimate goal is to create interest or build on the already existing interest in science and technology by, for example, special student projects. Several small projects have already been completed ranging from environmental research to biological reactions with direct student involvement. Another outcome of these seminars was the change in attitudes of science teachers toward nuclear technology. Numerous letters have been received from the teachers and parents stating their previous lack of knowledge on the beneficial aspects of nuclear technologies and the subsequent inclusion of programs in their curriculum for educating students so that they may also develop a more positive attitude toward nuclear power

  6. Use of university research reactors to teach control engineering

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bernard, J.A.

    1991-01-01

    University research reactors (URRs) have provided generations of students with the opportunity to receive instruction and do hands-on work in reactor dynamics, neutron scattering, health physics, and neutron activation analysis. Given that many URRs are currently converting to programmable control systems, the opportunity now exists to provide a similar learning experience to those studying systems control engineering. That possibility is examined here with emphasis on the need for the inclusion of experiment in control engineering curricula, the type of activities that could be performed, and safety considerations

  7. Research Reactor Utilization at the University of Utah for Nuclear Education, Training and Services

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jevremovic, T.; Choe, D.O.

    2013-01-01

    In the years of nuclear renaissance we all recognize a need for modernizing the approaches in fostering nuclear engineering and science knowledge, in strengthening disciplinary depth in students’ education for their preparation for workforce, and in helping them learn how to extend range of skills, develop habits of mind and subject matter knowledge. The education infrastructure at the University of Utah has been recently revised to incorporate the experiential learning using our research reactor as integral part of curriculum, helping therefore that all of our students build sufficient level of nuclear engineering literacy in order to be able to contribute productively to nuclear engineering work force or continue their education toward doctoral degrees. The University of Utah TRIGA Reactor built 35 years ago represents a university wide facility to promote research, education and training, as well as is used for various applications of nuclear engineering, radiation science and health physics. Our curriculum includes two consecutive classes for preparation of our students for research reactor operating license. Every year the US Nuclear Regulatory Commission’s representatives hold the final exam for our students. Our activities serve the academic community of the University of Utah, commercial and government entities, other universities and national laboratories as well. (author)

  8. Research Collaborations Between Universities and Department of Defense Laboratories

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-07-31

    Council – Resident Research Associateship (USAF/NRC-RRA) Program,” last accessed March 10, 2013, http://www.wpafb.af.mil/ library /factsheets...as CRAs and CTAs, could enable collaboration through university consortia designed to support DOD laboratory research. Such alliances would have the...university consortia , may be able to leverage partnerships that meet their collaborative research needs. 5. Increased Patent Filing Fees when Partnering

  9. Annual report of Nuclear Engineering Research Laboratory, Faculty of Engineering, University of Tokyo, fiscal year 1994

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1995-08-01

    This annual report is the summary of the research and education activities, the state of operating research facilities and others in fiscal year 1994 in this Research Laboratory. In this Research Laboratory, there are four main installations, namely the fast neutron source reactor 'Yayoi', the electron linear accelerator, the basic experiment facility for the design of nuclear fusion reactor blanket and the heavy irradiation research facility. The former two are put to the joint utilization by all Japanese universities, the blanket is to that within Faculty of Engineering, and the HIT is to that within this university. The fast neutron science research facility, the installation of which was approved in 1993 as the ancillary equipment of the Yayoi, has been put to the joint utilization for all Japan, and achieved good results. In this report, the management and operation of these main installations, research activities, the publication of research papers,graduation and degree theses, the publication of research papers, graduation and degree theses, the events in the Laboratory for one year, the list of the visitors to the Laboratory, the list of the records of official trips to foreign countries and others, and the list of UTNL reports are described. (K.I.)

  10. The value and cost of university research reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Harling, O.K.; Bernard, J.A.

    1989-01-01

    In this paper the authors provide a brief overview of the value and costs of U.S. university research reactors (URRs). More than three dozen URRs are currently operating in an approximately equal number of states. These URRs are an important part of the U.S. capabilities in nuclear science and technology. These multipurpose research facilities are located on the campuses of universities and colleges and therefore are easily accessible to university staff and students as well as to the high-technology industries, which often are located near universities. The close proximity, i.e., convenient location, to a diverse user base is a major reason for the multifaceted applications of URRs, including basic and applied science, technology, education, and industrial applications. The URRs have an extraordinarily broad range of applicability, including medicine and the life sciences, materials science, environmental sciences, earth and planetary sciences, and nuclear energy

  11. 75 FR 56597 - University of Wisconsin; University of Wisconsin Nuclear Reactor Environmental Assessment and...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-09-16

    ... dormitory is approximately 400 meters (1,300 feet) away. There are no nearby industrial, transportation, or... housed in the Reactor Laboratory, a 13 meter (43 feet) by 22 meter (70 feet) room of conventional... height is approximately 11 meters (36 feet) with a portion of the ceiling above the console area a height...

  12. Building a Laboratory: the Work of Global University Rankers

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lim, Miguel Antonio

    2015-01-01

    ’, and more relevant products. The metaphor allows us to understand the changeability of rankings and highlights that the process of making rankings can be influenced by the different audiences they are aimed at. University leaders are not passive players in the recognition of expertise in higher education...... evaluation. I present some of the ways in which these leaders are part of the process from the lesser known point-of-view of the ranking organisations. I propose three questions: 1) Can the university ranker be thought of as a ‘laboratory’? 2) How does the university ranking laboratory produce its ‘science...

  13. Accelerator facility in a small laboratory of a private university

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Washio, Masakazu

    2005-01-01

    Washio laboratory in Waseda University started the project team in 1999 and finished tests of all machines in 2000. High brilliant soft X-ray generation by inverse Compton scattering and the pico-second pulse radiolysis system were developed. The time profile of creation of hydrated electron was obtained by the system in 2003. Determination of accelerator spec and cooperation of University, and set up of accelerator, preparation of research group, cooperation with KEK, student training, beam experiments, experiments and future is stated. This system was constructed and operated by many students in his laboratory, and supported by many members of KEK-ATF, Waseda University, Sumitomo Heavy Industries, Ltd., High Technology Research Center Project of Ministry of Education, Culture, Sports, Science and Technology, and Grant-in-Aid for Scientific Research of Japan Society for the Promotion Science. (S.Y.)

  14. Major Refurbishment of the University of Florida Training Reactor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Joradn, Kelly; Berglund, Matthew; Shea, Brian [Univ., of Florida, Florida (United States)

    2013-07-01

    The research reactor fleet is aging with few replacements being built. At the same time the technology for refurbishment of the older reactors has advanced well beyond that of currently installed equipment. The disparity between new and old technology results in an inability to find simple replacements for the older, highly integrated components. The lack of comprehensive guidance for digital equipment adds to the technical problems of installing individual replacement parts. Up to this point, no U. S. facilities have attempted a complete modernization effort because of the time commitment, financial burden, and licensing required for a total upgrade. The University of Florida Training Reactor is tackling this problem with a replacement of nearly all of the major facility sub-systems, including electrical distribution, reactor controls, nuclear instrumentation, security, building management, and environmental controls. This approach offers increased flexibility over the piece-by-piece replacement method by leveraging modern control systems based on global standards and capable of good data interchange with higher levels of redundancy. The UFTR reviewed numerous technologies to arrive at the final system architecture and this 'clean-slate' installation methodology. It is this concept of total system replacement and strict use of modular, open-standards technology that has allowed for a facility design that will be easy to install, maintain, and build upon over time.

  15. Major Refurbishment of the University of Florida Training Reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Joradn, Kelly; Berglund, Matthew; Shea, Brian

    2013-01-01

    The research reactor fleet is aging with few replacements being built. At the same time the technology for refurbishment of the older reactors has advanced well beyond that of currently installed equipment. The disparity between new and old technology results in an inability to find simple replacements for the older, highly integrated components. The lack of comprehensive guidance for digital equipment adds to the technical problems of installing individual replacement parts. Up to this point, no U. S. facilities have attempted a complete modernization effort because of the time commitment, financial burden, and licensing required for a total upgrade. The University of Florida Training Reactor is tackling this problem with a replacement of nearly all of the major facility sub-systems, including electrical distribution, reactor controls, nuclear instrumentation, security, building management, and environmental controls. This approach offers increased flexibility over the piece-by-piece replacement method by leveraging modern control systems based on global standards and capable of good data interchange with higher levels of redundancy. The UFTR reviewed numerous technologies to arrive at the final system architecture and this 'clean-slate' installation methodology. It is this concept of total system replacement and strict use of modular, open-standards technology that has allowed for a facility design that will be easy to install, maintain, and build upon over time

  16. Structural biology facilities at Brookhaven National Laboratory`s high flux beam reactor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Korszun, Z.R.; Saxena, A.M.; Schneider, D.K. [Brookhaven National Laboratory, Upton, NY (United States)

    1994-12-31

    The techniques for determining the structure of biological molecules and larger biological assemblies depend on the extent of order in the particular system. At the High Flux Beam Reactor at the Brookhaven National Laboratory, the Biology Department operates three beam lines dedicated to biological structure studies. These beam lines span the resolution range from approximately 700{Angstrom} to approximately 1.5{Angstrom} and are designed to perform structural studies on a wide range of biological systems. Beam line H3A is dedicated to single crystal diffraction studies of macromolecules, while beam line H3B is designed to study diffraction from partially ordered systems such as biological membranes. Beam line H9B is located on the cold source and is designed for small angle scattering experiments on oligomeric biological systems.

  17. Annual report of Nuclear Engineering Research Laboratory, Faculty of Engineering, University of Tokyo, fiscal year 1996

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1997-08-01

    This report summarizes research and educational activities, operation status of the research facilities of the Nuclear Engineering Research Laboratory, Faculty of Engineering, University of Tokyo on fiscal year 1996. This facility has four major research facilities such as fast neutron source reactor 'Yayoi', electron Linac, fundamental experiment facility for nuclear fusion reactor blanket design and high fluence irradiation facility(HIT). Education and research activities are conducted in a wide fields of nuclear engineering using these facilities. The former two facilities are available for various studies by universities all over Japan, facility for nuclear fusion reactor blanket design is utilized for research within the Faculty of Engineering and HIT is used for the research within the University of Tokyo. The facility established a plan to reorganized into a nation wide research collaboration center in fiscal year 1995 and after further discussion of a future program it is decided to hold 'Nuclear energy symposium' periodically after fiscal year 1997 as a part of the activity for appealing the research results to the public. (G.K.)

  18. Heavy Ion Laboratory - Warsaw University - Annual Report 2003

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pienkowski, L.; Zielinska, M.

    2004-01-01

    In the presented report the research activities of Heavy Ion Laboratory (HIL) of the Warsaw University in year of 2003 are described. The report is divided into four parts: Laboratory Overview, Experiments and Experimental Set-ups, Experiments using outside facilities and General information on HIL activities which contain the lists of personnel, seminars held at the HIL as well as external ones, the list of published papers and conference contributions. A summary of the (HIL) activities is briefly presented in ''Introduction'' written by HIL director prof. J. Jastrzebski

  19. Present status of operation and utilization of Kyoto University Reactor, KUR

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kimura, Itsuro

    1988-01-01

    The Research Reactor Institute was established as an inter-university research institute in 1963. The main installation of the Institute is the KUR, a light water moderated, tank type reactor of 5,000 kW. In addition, a 46 MeV electron linear accelerator and a gamma ray irradiation facility with 10,000 Ci Co-60 are actively used for research. In 1974, Kyoto University Critical Assembly (KUCA) was constructed, and it has been used for research and education. The Reactor Utilization Center and the Fundamental Research Laboratory for Neutron Therapy were established in 1975 and 1976, respectively. Approximately 200 people work there, of them, some 80 do research and education, including 13 professors and 12 associate professors. All the experimental facilities of the Institute are available for the cooperative research projects of other universities and public research institutions in the fields of natural science and engineering, medical science, agriculture and forestry, fishery and stock-raising, environment science, cultural science and others. As a rule, the KUR is operated for about 70 hours from Tuesday morning to Friday evening every week. The annual examination by the government is carried out in spring. The total operation time was about 45,000 hours as of the end of 1987. The recent topics are reported. (Kako, I.)

  20. Technical basis in support of the conversion of the University of Missouri Research Reactor (MURR) core from highly-enriched to low-enriched uranium - core neutron physics

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Stillman, J. [Argonne National Lab. (ANL), Argonne, IL (United States); Feldman, E. [Univ. of Missouri, Columbia, MO (United States). Columbia Research Reactor; Foyto, L [Univ. of Missouri, Columbia, MO (United States). Columbia Research Reactor; Kutikkad, K [Univ. of Missouri, Columbia, MO (United States). Columbia Research Reactor; McKibben, J C [Univ. of Missouri, Columbia, MO (United States). Columbia Research Reactor; Peters, N. [Univ. of Missouri, Columbia, MO (United States). Columbia Research Reactor; Stevens, J. [Argonne National Lab. (ANL), Argonne, IL (United States)

    2012-09-01

    This report contains the results of reactor design and performance for conversion of the University of Missouri Research Reactor (MURR) from the use of highly-enriched uranium (HEU) fuel to the use of low-enriched uranium (LEU) fuel. The analyses were performed by staff members of the Global Threat Reduction Initiative (GTRI) Reactor Conversion Program at the Argonne National Laboratory (ANL) and the MURR Facility. The core conversion to LEU is being performed with financial support of the U. S. government.

  1. UCN-VCN facility and experiments in Kyoto University Reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kawabata, Yuji; Okumura, Kiyoshi; Utsuro, Masahiko

    1993-01-01

    An ultracold and very cold neutron facility was installed in Kyoto University Reactor (KUR). The facility consists of a very cold neutron (VCN) guide tube, a VCN bender, a supermirror neutron turbine and experimental equipments with ultracold neutrons (UCN). The properties of each equipments are presented. UCN is generated by a supermirror neutron turbine combined with the cold neutron source operated with liquid deuterium, and the UCN output spectrum was measured by the time-of-flight method. A gravity analyzer for high resolution spectroscopy and a neutron bottle for decay experiments are now developing as the UCN research in KUR. (author)

  2. Radiopharmaceuticals developed at the University of Missouri research reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ketring, A.R.; Ehrhardt, G.J.; Day, D.E.

    1997-01-01

    The University of Missouri Research Reactor (MURR) has put a great deal of effort in the last two decades into development of radiotherapeutic beta emitters as nuclear medicine radiotherapeutics for malignancies. This paper describes the development of two of these drugs, 153 Sm ethylenediaminetetra-methylene phosphonic acid (EDTMP) (Quadramet trademark) and 90 Y glass microspheres (TheraSphere trademark). Samarium-153 EDTMP is a palliative used to treat the pain of metastatic bone cancer without the side effects of narcotic pain killers. Yttrium-90 glass microspheres are delivered via hepatic artery catheter to embolize the capillaries of liver tumors and deliver a large radiation dose for symptom palliation and life prolonging purposes

  3. The proposed Diagnostic Instrumentation and Analysis Laboratory, Mississippi State University

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1994-11-01

    The Department of Energy (DOE) proposes to authorize Mississippi State University (MSU) to proceed with the detailed design, construction and equipping of the proposed Diagnostic Instrumentation and Analysis Laboratory (DIAL). DOE grant funds are available to the University for the limited purpose of performing preliminary studies, including analysis necessary to conduct this environmental assessment. The proposed facility would be located in the Mississippi Research and Technology Park, adjacent to the Mississippi Agriculture and Forestry Experiment Station campus in Starkville, Mississippi. Total project cost is estimated at $7,953,600. This proposed laboratory would be designed to conduct research into combustion devices related to waste management and environmental restoration that is of importance to industry and government. The proposed facility`s role would be to develop diagnostic instrumentation capabilities in the area of combustion and related processes.

  4. Research on the reactor physics using the Kyoto University Critical Assembly (KUCA)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1986-10-01

    The Kyoto University Critical Assembly [KUCA] is a multi-core type critical assembly established in 1974, as a facility for the joint use study by researchers of all universities in Japan. Thereafter, many reactor physics experiments have been carried out using three cores (A-, B-, and C-cores) in the KUCA. In the A- and B-cores, solid moderator such as polyethylene or graphite is used, whereas light-water is utilized as moderator in the C-core. The A-core has been employed mainly in connection with the Cockcroft-Walton type accelerator installed in the KUCA, to measure (1) the subcriticality by the pulsed neutron technique for the critical safety research and (2) the neutron spectrum by the time-of-flight technique. Recently, a basic study on the tight lattice core has also launched using the A-core. The B-core has been employed for the research on the thorium fuel cycle ever since. The C-core has been employed (1) for the basic studies on the nuclear characteristics of light-water moderated high-flux research reactors, including coupled-cores, and (2) for a research related to reducing enrichment of uranium fuel used in research reactors. The C-core is being utilized in the reactor laboratory course experiment for students of ten universities in Japan. The data base of the KUCA critical experiments is generated so far on the basis of approximately 350 experimental reports accumulated in the KUCA. Besides, the assessed KUCA code system has been established through analyses on the various KUCA experiments. In addition to the KUCA itself, both of them are provided for the joint use study by researchers of all universities in Japan. (author)

  5. Delignification of softwood kraft pulp by chlorine dioxide in a laboratory bleaching liquor displacement reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hamzeh, Y.; Izadyar, S.

    2008-01-01

    The chlorine dioxide delignification efficiency of softwood kraft pulp in the laboratory liquor displacement reactor (fixed bed reactor) was investigated and compared with conventional batch reactor. The comparison of two reactors was made based on the effective efficiency and overall efficiency of chlorine dioxide. Effective efficiency corresponds to the oxidizing capacity of chlorine dioxide which consumed by organic materials. Comparison of two reactors based on the effective efficiency showed that the selectivity of delignification significantly enhanced in the displacement reactor in which the primary reaction products are eliminated from reaction zone by displacing flow. On the other hand, the formation of high amounts of chlorate in the reaction zone of displacement reactor reduces the overall efficiency of chlorine dioxide delignification stage. Thus, in spite of significant decrease in useless secondary reactions, this type of reactor would not be cost effective in the industrial scale

  6. Nuclear Reactor Laboratory annual report, fiscal year 1981-1982

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cashwell, R.J.

    1982-01-01

    Information related to the use of the UWNR reactor is presented concerning instructional use by the Nuclear Engineering Department; reactor sharing program; utility personnel training; sample irradiations and neutron activation analysis services; changes in personnel, facility, and procedures; and results of surveillance tests

  7. Utilization of a university reactor for public acceptance

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Myung Hyun [Kyung Hee Univ., Gyeonggi-do (Korea, Republic of). Reactor Research and Education Center

    2015-06-15

    AGN-201K is a university reactor in Kyung Hee University (KHU) mainly used for student education as training short course as well as academic course for senior-level. After the Fukushima accident, public concern on radiation hazard has been increased beyond rational level at a neighboring country. It was found that AGN-201K be the perfect tool for interaction with general public. It is very safe to operate with general participants because it is adapted to the very low power. However, radiation level is reasonably high to detect and shield for practice. KHU has a Regional Radiation Monitoring Post where environmental radiation level at Suwon city is continuously measured. In this facility, radiation level at soil, rain, and local agricultural products were measured and reported to the national monitoring headquarter. A new mission of reactor research and education center of KHU has been tried from last summer. Facilities were opened for high school students and teachers for their science camps during summer and winter. A special public acceptance program named as experience camp for understanding the nuclear power and radiation was held 6 times for the last one-year period. Even though number of attendee was limited and small, feedback from participants was hot and positive enough to make professors be ready to sacrifice their personal time.

  8. Utilization of a university reactor for public acceptance

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, Myung Hyun

    2015-01-01

    AGN-201K is a university reactor in Kyung Hee University (KHU) mainly used for student education as training short course as well as academic course for senior-level. After the Fukushima accident, public concern on radiation hazard has been increased beyond rational level at a neighboring country. It was found that AGN-201K be the perfect tool for interaction with general public. It is very safe to operate with general participants because it is adapted to the very low power. However, radiation level is reasonably high to detect and shield for practice. KHU has a Regional Radiation Monitoring Post where environmental radiation level at Suwon city is continuously measured. In this facility, radiation level at soil, rain, and local agricultural products were measured and reported to the national monitoring headquarter. A new mission of reactor research and education center of KHU has been tried from last summer. Facilities were opened for high school students and teachers for their science camps during summer and winter. A special public acceptance program named as experience camp for understanding the nuclear power and radiation was held 6 times for the last one-year period. Even though number of attendee was limited and small, feedback from participants was hot and positive enough to make professors be ready to sacrifice their personal time.

  9. Reactor Physics Experiments by Korean Under-Graduate Students in Kyoto University Critical Assembly Program (KUGSiKUCA Program)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pyeon, Cheol Ho; Misawa, Tsuyoshi; Unesaki, Hironobu; Ichihara, Chihiro; Shiroya, Seiji; Whang, Joo Ho; Kim, Myung Hyun

    2006-01-01

    The Reactor Laboratory Course for Korean Under-Graduate Students in Kyoto University Critical Assembly (KUGSiKUCA) program has been launched from 2003, as one of international collaboration programs of Kyoto University Research Reactor Institute (KURRI). This program was suggested by Department of Nuclear Engineering, College of Advanced Technology, Kyunghee University (KHU), and was adopted by Ministry of Science and Technology of Korean Government as one of among Nuclear Human Resources Education and Training Programs. On the basis of her suggestion for KURRI, memorandum for academic corporation and exchange between KHU and KURRI was concluded on July 2003. The program has been based on the background that it is extremely difficult for any single university in Korea to have her own research or training reactor. Up to this 2006, total number of 61 Korean under-graduate school students, who have majored in nuclear engineering of Kyunghee University, Hanyang University, Seoul National University, Korea Advanced Institute of Science and Technology, Chosun University and Cheju National University in all over the Korea, has taken part in this program. In all the period, two professors and one teaching assistant on the Korean side led the students and helped their successful experiments, reports and discussions. Due to their effort, the program has succeeded in giving an effective and unique course, taking advantage of their collaboration

  10. Partial gasification of coal in a fluidized bed reactor: Comparison of a laboratory and pilot scale reactors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Xiao, R.; Shen, L.H.; Zhang, M.Y.; Jin, B.S.; Xiong, Y.Q.; Duan, Y.F.; Zhong, Z.P.; Zhou, H.C.; Chen, X.P.; Huang, Y.J. [Southeast University, Nanjing (China)

    2007-01-15

    A 0.1 MWth lab-scale and 2 MWth pilot-scale experimental rigs were constructed to demonstrate the technical feasibility of a new process. The aim of the lab-scale study is to optimize coal partial gasification reactions operating conditions, which were applied in the pilot-scale tests. A comparison between the laboratory and pilot scale experimental results is presented in this paper in order to provide valuable information for scaling-up of the PFB coal partial reactor to industrial applications. The results show that trends and phenomena obtained in the laboratory reactor are confirmed in a pilot plant operating at similar conditions. However, many differences are observed in the two reactors. The higher heat loss in the lab-scale reactor is responsible for higher equivalence ratio (ER) and lower gas heating value at the similar reactor temperature. With respect to the pilot-scale reactor, mass transfer limitation between bubbles and emulsion phase may become important. Hence, longer contact time is required to achieve the same conversions as in the lab-scale reactor. This difference is explained by a significant change of the hydrodynamic conditions due to the formation of larger bubbles.

  11. Experience with an accrediated INAA service laboratory at a University - will research be next?

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bode, P.

    1993-01-01

    Quality assurance, total quality management, and accreditation are the recognizable attributes of an attitude and consideration of a work process that is being introduced to industry, utilities, and (industrial) laboratories. International reference documents-the International Standard Organization (ISO)- IEC guides - have been developed to harmonize the ways of implementing and evaluating QA practices in connection with accreditation. The life-styles of working under quality practices and working at a university demonstrate a large contrast. Many of the basic principles of quality practices, such as full documentation, written procedures and instructions, and careful consideration of the conditions under which work will be performed, are characteristically absent at universities. Universities nowadays also have a mission to teach quality practices to the present and future generations of scientists. Within a few years, society may call for academics who are not only knowledgeable on the principles of quality practices but who also have been educated, trained, and practiced in such an environment. Conflicts will be avoided when such academics occupy leading positions in organizations that already use quality practices or when they become responsible for the introduction of quality practices. The neutron activation analysis (NAA) laboratory and associated analysis systems at the Interfaculty Reactor Institute (IRI) of the Delft University of Technology has been reorganized and brought into accord with the requirements of EN45001 and ISO guide 25. After an audit by the official accreditation body in the Netherlands, STERLAB, the laboratory received its accreditation in early 1993, making it the first accredited laboratory of both kinds (university and instrumental (INAA)) in the Netherlands and possibly in the world

  12. The Los Alamos universe: Using multimedia to promote laboratory capabilities

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kindel, J.

    2000-03-01

    This project consists of a multimedia presentation that explains the technological capabilities of Los Alamos National Laboratory. It takes the form of a human-computer interface built around the metaphor of the universe. The project is intended promote Laboratory capabilities to a wide audience. Multimedia is simply a means of communicating information through a diverse set of tools--be they text, sound, animation, video, etc. Likewise, Los Alamos National Laboratory is a collection of diverse technologies, projects, and people. Given the ample material available at the Laboratory, there are tangible benefits to be gained by communicating across media. This paper consists of three parts. The first section provides some basic information about the Laboratory, its mission, and its needs. The second section introduces this multimedia presentation and the metaphor it is based on along with some basic concepts of color and user interaction used in the building of this project. The final section covers construction of the project, pitfalls, and future improvements.

  13. Berkeley Nuclear Laboratories Reactor Physics Mk. III Experimental Programme. Description of facility and programme for 1971

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nunn, R M; Waterson, R H; Young, J D

    1971-01-15

    Reactor physics experiments have been carried out at Berkeley Nuclear Laboratories during the past few years in support of the Civil Advanced Gas-Cooled Reactors (Mk. II) the Generating Board is building. These experiments are part of an overall programme whose objective is to assess the accuracy of the calculational methods used in the design and operation of these reactors. This report provides a description of the facility for the Mk. III experimental programme and the planned programme for 1971.

  14. Experimental facility of innovative types as the laboratory analog of research reactor experimental device

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Androsenko, A.A.; Androsenko, P.A.; Zabud'ko, A.N.; Kremenetskij, A.K.; Nikolaev, A.N.; Trykov, L.A.

    1991-01-01

    The paper analyses capability of creating laboratory analogs of complex experimental facilities at research reactors utilizing power radionuclide neutron sources fabricated in industrial conditions. Some experimental and calculational investigations of neutron-physical characteristics are presented, which have been attained at the RIZ research reactor laboratory analog. Experimental results are supplemented by calculational investigations, fulfilled by means of the BRAND three-dimensional computational complex and the ROZ-6 one-dimensional program. 4 refs.; 3 figs

  15. Combined Reactor and Microelectrode Measurements in Laboratory Grown Biofilms

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Larsen, Tove; Harremoës, Poul

    1994-01-01

    A combined biofilm reactor-/microelectrode experimental set-up has been constructed, allowing for simultaneous reactor mass balances and measurements of concentration profiles within the biofilm. The system consists of an annular biofilm reactor equipped with an oxygen microelectrode. Experiments...... were carried out with aerobic glucose and starch degrading biofilms. The well described aerobic glucose degradation biofilm system was used to test the combined reactor set-up. Results predicted from known biofilm kinetics were obtained. In the starch degrading biofilm, basic assumptions were tested...... with the microelectrode measurements. It was established, that even with a high molecular weight, non-diffusible substrate, degradation took place in the depths of the biofilm. Intrinsic enzymatic hydrolysis was not limiting and the volumetric removal rate of oxygen was zero order....

  16. The University of New Mexico/Sandia National Laboratories small-angle scattering laboratory

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rieker, T.P.; Hubbard, P.F.

    1998-01-01

    The University of New Mexico/Sandia National Laboratories small-angle scattering laboratory provides a wide q-range, 3x10 -4 Angstrom -1 -1 , for the structural analysis of materials on length scales from a few angstrom to ∼0.1 μm. The wide q-range is accomplished by combining data from a Bonse-Hart spectrometer (3x10 -4 Angstrom -1 -2 Angstrom -1 ) and a 5 m pinhole (3x10 -3 Angstrom -1 -1 ) instrument. Automation of the data acquisition systems along with a variety of sample environments and sample changers yields flexible, high throughput instruments. copyright 1998 American Institute of Physics

  17. Inertial-fusion-reactor studies at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Monsler, M.J.; Meier, W.R.

    1982-08-01

    We present results of our reactor studies for inertial-fusion energy production. Design studies of liquid-metal wall chambers have led to reactors that are remarkably simple in design, and that promise long life and low cost. Variants of the same basic design, called HYLIFE, can be used for electricity production, as a fissile-fuel factory, a dedicated tritium breeder, or hybrids of each

  18. An Account of Oak Ridge National Laboratory's Thirteen Research Reactors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rosenthal, Murray Wilford [ORNL

    2009-08-01

    The Oak Ridge National Laboratory has built and operated 13 nuclear reactors in its 66-year history. The first was the graphite reactor, the world's first operational nuclear reactor, which served as a plutonium production pilot plant during World War II. It was followed by two aqueous-homogeneous reactors and two red-hot molten-salt reactors that were parts of power-reactor development programs and by eight others designed for research and radioisotope production. One of the eight was an all-metal fast burst reactor used for health physics studies. All of the others were light-water cooled and moderated, including the famous swimming-pool reactor that was copied dozens of times around the world. Two of the reactors were hoisted 200 feet into the air to study the shielding needs of proposed nuclear-powered aircraft. The final reactor, and the only one still operating today, is the High Flux Isotope Reactor (HFIR) that was built particularly for the production of californium and other heavy elements. With the world's highest flux and recent upgrades that include the addition of a cold neutron source, the 44-year-old HFIR continues to be a valuable tool for research and isotope production, attracting some 500 scientific visitors and guests to Oak Ridge each year. This report describes all of the reactors and their histories.

  19. Reactor-produced radionuclides at the University of Missouri Research Reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ketring, A.R.; Evans-Blumer, M.S.; Ehrhardt, G.J.

    1997-01-01

    Nuclear medicine has primarily been a diagnostic science for many years, but today is facing considerable challenges from other modalities in this area. However, these competing techniques (magnetic resonance imaging, ultrasound, and computer-assisted tomography) in general are not therapeutic. Although early nuclear medicine therapy was of limited efficacy, in recent years a revolution in radiotherapy has been developing base don more sophisticated targeting methods, including radioactive intra-arterial microspheres, chemically-guided bone agents, labelled monoclonal antibodies, and isotopically-tagged polypeptide receptor-binding agents. Although primarily used for malignancies, therapeutic nuclear medicine is also applicable to the treatment of rheumatoid arthritis and possibly coronary artery re closure following angioplasty. The isotopes of choice for these applications are reactor-produced beta emitters such as Sm-153, Re-186, Re-188, Ho-166, Lu-177, and Rh-105. Although alpha emitters possess greater cell toxicity due to their high LET, the greater range of beta emitters and the typically inhomogeneous deposition of radiotherapy agents in lesions leads to greater beta 'crossfire' and better overall results. The University of Missouri Research Reactor (MURR) has been in the forefront of research into means of preparing, handling and supplying these high-specific-activity isotopes in quantities appropriate not only for research, but also for patient trials in the US and around the world. Researchers at MURR in collaboration with others at the University of Missouri (MU) developed Sm-153 Quadramet TM , a drug recently approved in the US for palliation of bone tumor pain. In conjunction with researchers at the University of Missouri-Rolla, MURR also developed Y-90 TheraSphere TM , an agent for the treatment of liver cancer now approved in Canada. Considerable effort has been expended to develop techniques for irradiation, handling, and shipping isotopes

  20. Reactor-produced radionuclides at the University of Missouri Research Reactor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ketring, A.R.; Evans-Blumer, M.S.; Ehrhardt, G.J. [University of Missouri Research Reactor, Colombia (United States). Departments of Radiology, Chemistry and Nuclear Engineering

    1997-10-01

    Nuclear medicine has primarily been a diagnostic science for many years, but today is facing considerable challenges from other modalities in this area. However, these competing techniques (magnetic resonance imaging, ultrasound, and computer-assisted tomography) in general are not therapeutic. Although early nuclear medicine therapy was of limited efficacy, in recent years a revolution in radiotherapy has been developing base don more sophisticated targeting methods, including radioactive intra-arterial microspheres, chemically-guided bone agents, labelled monoclonal antibodies, and isotopically-tagged polypeptide receptor-binding agents. Although primarily used for malignancies, therapeutic nuclear medicine is also applicable to the treatment of rheumatoid arthritis and possibly coronary artery re closure following angioplasty. The isotopes of choice for these applications are reactor-produced beta emitters such as Sm-153, Re-186, Re-188, Ho-166, Lu-177, and Rh-105. Although alpha emitters possess greater cell toxicity due to their high LET, the greater range of beta emitters and the typically inhomogeneous deposition of radiotherapy agents in lesions leads to greater beta `crossfire` and better overall results. The University of Missouri Research Reactor (MURR) has been in the forefront of research into means of preparing, handling and supplying these high-specific-activity isotopes in quantities appropriate not only for research, but also for patient trials in the US and around the world. Researchers at MURR in collaboration with others at the University of Missouri (MU) developed Sm-153 Quadramet{sup TM}, a drug recently approved in the US for palliation of bone tumor pain. In conjunction with researchers at the University of Missouri-Rolla, MURR also developed Y-90 TheraSphere{sup TM}, an agent for the treatment of liver cancer now approved in Canada. Considerable effort has been expended to develop techniques for irradiation, handling, and shipping isotopes

  1. University Reactor Sharing Program. Final report, September 30, 1992--September 29, 1994

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wehring, B.W.

    1995-01-01

    Over the past 20 years, the number of nuclear reactors on university campuses in the US declined from more than 70 to less than 40. Contrary to this trend, The University of Texas at Austin constructed a new reactor facility at a cost of $5.8 million. The new reactor facility houses a new TRIGA Mark II reactor which replaces an in-ground TRIGA Mark I reactor located in a 50-year old building. The new reactor facility was constructed to strengthen the instruction and research opportunities in nuclear science and engineering for both undergraduate and graduate students at The University of Texas. On January 17, 1992, The University of Texas at Austin received a license for operation of the new reactor. Initial criticality was achieved on March 12, 1992, and full power operation, on March 25, 1992. The UT-TRIGA research reactor provides hands-on education, multidisciplinary research and unique service activities for academic, medical, industrial, and government groups. Support by the University Reactor Sharing Programs increases the availability of The University of Texas reactor facility for use by other educational institutions which do not have nuclear reactors

  2. Neutron radiography at the University of Michigan's Phoenix Memorial Laboratory

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lindsay, J.T.; Elam, S.; Koblish, T.; Lee, P.; McAuliffe, D.

    1990-01-01

    Real-time neutron radiography (RTNR) is rapidly becoming a valuable tool for nondestructive testing and basic research with a wide variety of applications. The Phoenix Memorial Laboratory (PML) at the University of Michigan has developed an RTNR facility and has been using this facility to study several phenomena of interest to researchers in many areas. These phenomena include imaging of the internal fluid flow in gas turbine engine nozzles and coking and debris deposition in several gas turbine nozzles. This paper presents a summary of the technique and facilities involved in these applications

  3. DOE/NE University Program in robotics for advanced reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sweeney, F.J.; Gonzalez, R.C.; Trivedi, M.M.; Wehe, D.K.

    1990-05-01

    The US Department of Energy has provided support to four universities and the Oak Ridge National Laboratory in order to pursue research leading to the development and deployment of advanced robotic systems capable of performing tasks that are hazardous to humans, that generate significant occupational radiation exposure, and/or whose execution times can be reduced if performed by an automated system. The goal is to develop a generation of advanced robotic systems capable of economically performing surveillance, maintenance, and repair tasks in nuclear facilities and other hazardous environments. The approach to achieving the program objective is a transition from teleoperation to the capability of autonomous operation within three successive generations of robotic systems. The strategy adopted in order to achieve the program goals in an efficient and timely manner consists in utilizing, and advancing where required, state-of-the-art robotics technology through close interaction between the universities and the manufacturers and operators of nuclear power plants. There is a potentially broad range of applications for the robotic systems developed in the course of this project. Therefore, it is expected that efforts to obtain additional support from other agencies, e.g., DOD and NASA, will be successful. Areas of cooperation with other nations (e.g., Japan, France, Germany) are being explored. This Program features a unique teaming arrangement among the Universities of Florida, Michigan, Tennessee, Texas, and the Oak Ridge National Laboratory, and their industrial partners, Odetics, Gulf State Utilities, Florida Power and Light Company, Remotec, and Telerobotics International

  4. The University of Missouri Research Reactor, its fuel and productivity

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Brugger, R.M.; Schlapper, G.A.; Alger, D.M.

    1993-01-01

    This paper describes the University of Missouri Research Reactor (MURR) and presents a summary of contributions to education, research, and service. These efforts have helped offset the impact on the U.S. economy of research from other countries. Special emphasis is placed on fuel design developments that have allowed MuRR to keep the cost megawatt day (MWD) of fuel essentially constant. Also noted is the fact that the United States has missed some research opportunities because of a hold-the-line attitude. The slipping position of U.S. research reactors is compared with the rest of the world. As will be further outlined in the text, the MURR cannot (with available technology) decrease its U-235 enrichment level and maintain present research capabilities and fuel cycle costs. Data is presented to show how MURR, if permitted to use advanced fuel technology, could reduce fuel fabrication costs and onsite U-235 inventory. In addition it is shown that MURR could increase its capabilities provided that arbitrary institutional limits are removed

  5. The University of Missouri Research Reactor, its fuel and productivity

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Brugger, Robert M.; Schlapper, Gerald A.; Alger, Don M.

    1993-01-01

    This paper describes the University of Missouri Research Reactor (MURR) and presents a summary of contributions to education, research, and service. These efforts have helped offset the impact on the U. S. economy of research from other countries. Special emphasis is placed on fuel design developments that have allowed MURR to keep the cost megawatt day (MWD) of fuel essentially constant. Also noted is the fact that the United States has missed some research opportunities because of a hold-the-line attitude. The slipping position of U.S. research reactors is compared with the rest of the world. As will be further outlined in the text, the MURR cannot (with available technology) decrease its U-235 enrichment level and maintain present research capabilities and fuel cycle costs. Data is presented to show how MURR if permitted to use advanced fuel technology, could reduce fuel fabrication costs and onsite U-235 inventory. In addition it is shown that MURR could increase its capabilities provided that arbitrary institutional limits are removed

  6. A new materials irradiation facility at the Kyoto university reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yoshiie, T.; Hayashi, Y.; Yanagita, S.; Xu, Q.; Satoh, Y.; Tsujimoto, H.; Kozuka, T.; Kamae, K.; Mishima, K.; Shiroya, S.; Kobayashi, K.; Utsuro, M.; Fujita, Y.

    2003-01-01

    A new materials irradiation facility with improved control capabilities has been installed at the Kyoto University Reactor (KUR). Several deficiencies of conventional fission neutron material irradiation systems have been corrected. The specimen temperature is controlled both by an electric heater and by the helium pressure in the irradiation tube without exposure to neutrons at temperatures different from the design test conditions. The neutron spectrum is varied by the irradiation position. Irradiation dose is changed by pulling the irradiation capsule up and down during irradiation. Several characteristics of the irradiation field were measured. The typical irradiation intensity is 9.4x10 12 n/cm 2 s (>0.1 MeV) and the irradiation temperature of specimens is controllable from 363 to 773 K with a precision of ±2 K

  7. Radiopharmaceuticals developed at the University of Missouri research reactor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ketring, A.R.; Ehrhardt, G.J. [Univ. of Missouri, Columbia, MO (United States); Day, D.E. [Univ. of Missouri, Rolla, MO (United States)

    1997-12-01

    The University of Missouri Research Reactor (MURR) has put a great deal of effort in the last two decades into development of radiotherapeutic beta emitters as nuclear medicine radiotherapeutics for malignancies. This paper describes the development of two of these drugs, {sup 153}Sm ethylenediaminetetra-methylene phosphonic acid (EDTMP) (Quadramet{trademark}) and {sup 90}Y glass microspheres (TheraSphere{trademark}). Samarium-153 EDTMP is a palliative used to treat the pain of metastatic bone cancer without the side effects of narcotic pain killers. Yttrium-90 glass microspheres are delivered via hepatic artery catheter to embolize the capillaries of liver tumors and deliver a large radiation dose for symptom palliation and life prolonging purposes.

  8. Annual report on operation, utilization and technical development of research reactors and hot laboratory

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1990-09-01

    This report describes the activities of the Department of Research Reactor Operation in fiscal year of 1989. It also presents some technical topics on the reactor operation and utilization in details. The Department is responsible for operation of the research reactors, JRR-2 and JRR-4, and the Hot Laboratory. The research reactor JRR-3 was reconstructed to enhance the performance for utilization. The first criticality was achieved on March 22, 1989, and it subsequently went into operation. In connection with the reactor operation, the various research and development activities in the area of fuel management, water chemistry, radiation monitoring and material irradiation have been made. In the Hot Laboratory, post-irradiation examinations of fuels and materials have been carried out along with the development of related techniques. (author)

  9. Gas-cooled reactor application for a university campus

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Colak, Ue.; Kadiroghlu, O.K.; Soekmen, C.N.; Schmitt, H.

    1991-01-01

    Large urban areas with unfavourable topographic and meteorological conditions suffer severe air pollution during the winter months. Use of low grade lignites, imported higher quality coal or imported fuel oil are the sources of air pollution in the form of sulphur dioxide, fly ash and soot. Large housing complexes or old and historical locations within the city are in need of pollution free centralized district heating systems. Natural gas imported from the Soviet Union is a solution for this problem. Lack of gas distribution network for high pressure gas within the city is the main bottle-neck for the heating systems utilizing natural gas. Concern of the safety of flammable high pressure gas circulating within the city is another drawback for the natural gas heating systems. Nuclear district heating is an environmentally viable option worth looking into it. Localized urban nuclear heating is an interesting solution for large urban areas with old and historical character. The results of a feasibility study on the HGR application for the Hacettepe University presented here, summarizes the concept of gas-cooled heating reactors specially designed for urban centers. The inherently safe characteristics of the pebble bed heating reactor makes localized urban nuclear heating a viable alternative to other heat sources. An economical analysis of various heat sources with equal power levels is done for the Beytepe campus of Hacettepe University in Ankara. Under special boundary conditions, the price for heat generation can be much lower for nuclear heating with GHR 20 than for hard coal or fuel oil. It is also possible that if the price escalation rate for natural gas exceeds 3%, then nuclear heating with GHR can be more competitive. It is concluded that the nuclear heating of Beytepe campus with a GHR 20 is feasible and economical. (author) 3 figs., 5 refs

  10. Request for Naval Reactors Comment on Proposed PROMETHEUS Space Flight Nuclear Reactor High Tier Reactor Safety Requirements and for Naval Reactors Approval to Transmit These Requirements to Jet Propulsion Laboratory

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    D. Kokkinos

    2005-01-01

    The purpose of this letter is to request Naval Reactors comments on the nuclear reactor high tier requirements for the PROMETHEUS space flight reactor design, pre-launch operations, launch, ascent, operation, and disposal, and to request Naval Reactors approval to transmit these requirements to Jet Propulsion Laboratory to ensure consistency between the reactor safety requirements and the spacecraft safety requirements. The proposed PROMETHEUS nuclear reactor high tier safety requirements are consistent with the long standing safety culture of the Naval Reactors Program and its commitment to protecting the health and safety of the public and the environment. In addition, the philosophy on which these requirements are based is consistent with the Nuclear Safety Policy Working Group recommendations on space nuclear propulsion safety (Reference 1), DOE Nuclear Safety Criteria and Specifications for Space Nuclear Reactors (Reference 2), the Nuclear Space Power Safety and Facility Guidelines Study of the Applied Physics Laboratory

  11. Ten years of TRIGA reactor research at the University of Texas

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    O'Kelly, Sean

    2002-01-01

    The 1 MW TRIGA Research Reactor at the Nuclear Engineering Teaching Laboratory is the second TRIGA at the University of Texas at Austin (UT). A small (10 kW-1963, 250 kW-1968) TRIGA Mark I was housed in the basement of the Engineering Building until is was shutdown and decommissioned in 1989. The new TRIGA Mark II with a licensed power of 1.1 MW reached initial criticality in 1992. Prior to 1990, reactor research at UT usually consisted of projects requiring neutron activation analysis (NAA) but the step up to a much larger reactor with neutron beam capability required additional personnel to build the neutron research program. The TCNS is currently used to perform Prompt Gamma Activation Analysis to determine hydrogen and boron concentrations of various composite materials. The early 1990s was a very active period for neutron beam projects at the NETL. In addition to the TCNS, a real-time neutron radiography facility (NIF) and a high-resolution neutron depth profiling facility (NDP) were installed in two separate beam ports. The NDP facility was most recently used to investigate alpha damage on stainless steel in support of the U.S. Nuclear Weapons Stewardship programs. In 1999, a sapphire beam filter was installed in the NDP system to reduce the fast neutron flux at the sample location. A collaborative effort was started in 1997 between UT-Austin and the University of Texas at Arlington to build a reactor-based, low-energy positron beam (TIPS). The limited success in obtaining funding has placed the project on hold. The Nuclear and Radiation Engineering Program has grown rapidly and effectively doubled in size over the past 5 years but years of low nuclear research funding, an overall stagnation in the U.S. nuclear power industry and a persuasive public distrust of nuclear energy has caused a precipitous decline in many programs. Recently, the U.S. DOE has encouraged University Research Reactors (URR) in the U.S. to collaborate closely together by forming URR

  12. University Reactor Instrumentation Grant. Final report 08/06/1998 - 08/13/1999

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bajorek, S. M.

    2000-01-01

    A noble gas air monitoring system was purchased through the University Reactor Instrumentation Grant Program. This monitor was installed in the Kansas State TRIGA reactor bay at a location near the top surface of the reactor pool according to recommendation by the supplier. This system is now functional and has been incorporated into the facility license

  13. Systems for aiding operators at university-owned research reactors in Japan

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nishihara, H.; Kimura, Y.; Shibata, T.

    1984-01-01

    University-owned research reactors are operated for various purposes, and small disturbances may arise from various experimental facilities. Also not uniform are the technical levels of operators who range from supervised-students to reactor physicists. Considerable efforts are therefore devoted to the preventive maintainance. With these boundary conditions imposed, systems for aiding operators are designed at these research reactor facilities. (author)

  14. Service to the Electric Utility Industry by the Ford Nuclear Reactor, University of Michigan

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Burn, R.R.; Simpson, P.A.; Cook, G.M.

    1993-01-01

    Since 1977, the staff of the University of Michigan's Ford Nuclear Reactor has been providing irradiation, testing, analytical, and training services to electric utilities and to suppliers of the nuclear electric utility industry. This paper discusses the reactor's irradiation facilities; reactor programs and utilization; materials testing programs; neutron activation analysis activities; and training programs conducted

  15. Los Alamos National Laboratory Omega West Reactor restart

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1993-01-01

    This report is a critical evaluation of the effort for the restart of the Omega West reactor. It is divided into the following areas: progress made; difficulties in restart effort; current needs; and suggested detailed steps for improvement. A brief discussion is given for each area of study

  16. Annual report of Laboratory of Nuclear Studies, Osaka University, 1980

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1981-01-01

    This is the progress report of the research activities in the Laboratory of Nuclear Studies during the period from April, 1980, to March, 1981. The activities were carried out by the OULNS staffs and also by outsiders at the OULNS. In this period, the X-ray astrophysics group, the radiation physics group and the high energy physics group joined the OULNS. The main accelerators in the OULNS are a 110 cm variable energy cyclotron and a 4.7 MeV Van de Graaff machine. The detailed experimental studies on inbeam e-gamma spectroscopy and beta-decay were carried out at two accelerator laboratories. The radiochemistry facility and a mass spectrometer were fully used. The research activities extended to high energy physics by utilizing national facilities, such as a 230 cm cyclotron in the Research Center for Nuclear Physics and a proton synchrotron in the National Laboratory for High Energy Physics. The theoretical studies on elementary particles and nuclear physics were carried out also. It is important that the facilities in the OULNS were used by the outsiders in Osaka University, such as solid state physics group and particle-induced X-ray group. The activities of the divisions of cyclotron, Van de Graaff, high energy physics, accelerator development and nuclear instrumentation, mass spectroscopy, radioisotope, solid state and theoretical physics are reported. (Kako, I.)

  17. Dose measurements in laboratory of Physics department, University of Khartoum

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hamid, Maria Mohammed

    1999-05-01

    Personal monitoring in University of Khartoum is being conducted using thermoluminescent dosimetry. The purpose of the study is to measure the dose of radiation in laboratory of Physics in physics department. TL phosphors LiF: Mg, Ti (card) and LiF Mg, Cu, P (GR-200) and mini-rad dosimeter are used to measure the dose in laboratory. The total dose for students form the laboratory bu using card, GR-200 and mini-rad dosimeter was found to be 2.2μ sv/year. 2.5 μ sv/year and 2.6 μ sv respectively, and for the teacher about 4.0 μ sv/year, 5.8 μ sv/year and 13.6 μ sv/year respectively, and for the dose near junk room about 3.9 μ sv/year, 2.9 μ sv/year and 2.8 μ sv/year by using card, GR-200 and mini-rad dosimeter respectively. There is just a background radiation in the main library and the applied nuclear.(Author)

  18. A Radiation Laboratory Curriculum Development at Western Kentucky University

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Barzilov, Alexander P.; Novikov, Ivan S.; Womble, Phil C.

    2009-01-01

    We present the latest developments for the radiation laboratory curriculum at the Department of Physics and Astronomy of Western Kentucky University. During the last decade, the Applied Physics Institute (API) at WKU accumulated various equipment for radiation experimentation. This includes various neutron sources (computer controlled d-t and d-d neutron generators, and isotopic 252 Cf and PuBe sources), the set of gamma sources with various intensities, gamma detectors with various energy resolutions (NaI, BGO, GSO, LaBr and HPGe) and the 2.5-MeV Van de Graaff particle accelerator. XRF and XRD apparatuses are also available for students and members at the API. This equipment is currently used in numerous scientific and teaching activities. Members of the API also developed a set of laboratory activities for undergraduate students taking classes from the physics curriculum (Nuclear Physics, Atomic Physics, and Radiation Biophysics). Our goal is to develop a set of radiation laboratories, which will strengthen the curriculum of physics, chemistry, geology, biology, and environmental science at WKU. The teaching and research activities are integrated into real-world projects and hands-on activities to engage students. The proposed experiments and their relevance to the modern status of physical science are discussed.

  19. Unique educational opportunities at the Missouri University research reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ketring, A.R.; Ross, F.K.; Spate, V.

    1997-01-01

    Since the Missouri University Research Reactor (MURR) went critical in 1966, it has been a center where students from many departments conduct their graduate research. In the past three decades, hundreds of graduate students from the MU departments of chemistry, physics, anthropology, nuclear engineering, etc., have received masters and doctoral degrees based on research using neutrons produced at MURR. More recently, the educational opportunities at MURR have been expanded to include undergraduate students and local high school students. Since 1989 MURR has participated in the National Science Foundation-funded Research Experience for Undergraduates (REU) program. As part of this program, undergraduate students from universities and colleges throughout the United States come to MURR and get hands-on research experience during the summer. Another program, started in 1994 by the Nuclear Analysis Program at MURR, allows students from a local high school to conduct a neutron activation analysis (NAA) experiment. We also conduct tours of the center, where we describe the research and educational programs at MURR to groups of elementary school children, high school science teachers, state legislators, professional organizations, and many other groups

  20. Examination in hot laboratories of irradiated fuels from fast reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Clottes, G.; Peray, R.; Ratier, J.L.

    1980-05-01

    Low irradiation rate examinations were carried out soon after the Rapsodie, Rapsodie Fortissimo and Phenix reactors were started up for the first time in order to check the level of maximum temperatures reached and the radial migration of oxygen and plutonium and to assess the movements of fuels inside the cladding. The other examinations were effected at a high specific burnup in order to defines the limit specific burnup securing the integrity of the fuel pin claddings (distortion, ruptures and possible consequences). The examinations carried out so far on fuel elements coming from Phenix or Rapsodie have allowed good fuel surveillance to be undertaken and the acquisition of a large number of data, thanks to which the fuel characteristics of future reactors of the system have been developed [fr

  1. An evaluation of alternative reactor vessel cutting technologies for the experimental boiling water reactor at Argonne National Laboratory

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Boing, L.E.; Henley, D.R.; Manion, W.J.; Gordon, J.W.

    1989-12-01

    Metal cutting techniques that can be used to segment the reactor pressure vessel of the Experimental Boiling Water Reactor (EBWR) at Argonne National Laboratory (ANL) have been evaluated by Nuclear Energy Services. Twelve cutting technologies are described in terms of their ability to perform the required task, their performance characteristics, environmental and radiological impacts, and cost and schedule considerations. Specific recommendations regarding which technology should ultimately be used by ANL are included. The selection of a cutting method was the responsibility of the decommissioning staff at ANL, who included a relative weighting of the parameters described in this document in their evaluation process. 73 refs., 26 figs., 69 tabs

  2. An evaluation of alternative reactor vessel cutting technologies for the experimental boiling water reactor at Argonne National Laboratory

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Boing, L.E.; Henley, D.R. (Argonne National Lab., IL (USA)); Manion, W.J.; Gordon, J.W. (Nuclear Energy Services, Inc., Danbury, CT (USA))

    1989-12-01

    Metal cutting techniques that can be used to segment the reactor pressure vessel of the Experimental Boiling Water Reactor (EBWR) at Argonne National Laboratory (ANL) have been evaluated by Nuclear Energy Services. Twelve cutting technologies are described in terms of their ability to perform the required task, their performance characteristics, environmental and radiological impacts, and cost and schedule considerations. Specific recommendations regarding which technology should ultimately be used by ANL are included. The selection of a cutting method was the responsibility of the decommissioning staff at ANL, who included a relative weighting of the parameters described in this document in their evaluation process. 73 refs., 26 figs., 69 tabs.

  3. Establishing Good Laboratory Practice at Small Colleges and Universities

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Susan Meryl Bornstein-Forst

    2017-05-01

    Full Text Available Good Laboratory Practice (GLP and Standard Operating Procedures (SOPs provide guidelines for proper operation of equipment, maintenance and sanitation, reporting structures, and related activities. These practices are routinely employed at large academic and research-based institutions. However, they are often overlooked or omitted at smaller colleges and universities where staff and resources are limited. Incorrect assumptions and presumed responsibilities can lead to safety hazards, damage to equipment, loss of infrastructure, and confusion regarding operations and oversight. This report addresses the development of the “who, what, when, how, and where” policies and SOPs that constitute GLP. Once established and utilized by all departmental members, these structures ensure that academic and research-related activities are conducted safely and efficiently.

  4. Effects of Students' Pre- and Post-Laboratory Concept Maps on Students' Attitudes toward Chemistry Laboratory in University General Chemistry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kilic, Ziya; Kaya, Osman Nafiz; Dogan, Alev

    2004-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to investigate the effects of scientific discussions based on student-constructed pre- and post-laboratory concept maps on students' attitudes toward chemistry laboratory in the university general chemistry. As part of instruction, during the first four laboratory sessions, students were taught how to construct and…

  5. Kyushu University Tandem Accelerator Laboratory report, 1988-1990

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sagara, Kenshi; Morinobu, Shunpei

    1991-03-01

    Ten years have elapsed since the first beam was obtained from the Kyushu University tandem accelerator. Although the laboratory has achieved successful scientific results, the performance of the accelerator has been on a decline mainly due to the aging. In the last two and a half years, the tandem accelerator has suffered from the fall of terminal voltage to around 8 MV. However, the experimental studies in the laboratory have been active. The utilization of the polarized beams of protons and deuterons to study the scattering of the p+d system, the use of heavy ion beam for the systematic search for the molecular resonance in relatively heavy systems and for the study on reaction mechanism, the use of both light and heavy ion beams for the studies on nuclear engineering, material science and geological science and so on were carried out. The gamma ray spectroscopic study on the state near yrast line was largely hampered by the accelerator troubles, instead, the collaboration with the Niels Bohr Institute provided a wonderful research ground for the studies. (K.I.)

  6. Science and production laboratories: integration between the industry and universities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anokhin, A.N.; Sivokon', V.P.; Rakitin, I.D.

    2010-01-01

    Industry laboratories provide students with an opportunity to resolve real serious tasks and be exposed to a wide range of professional activities. Staffing in the Russian nuclear industry is a serious concern. There is a shortage of experienced specialists, and it is impossible to train a replacement for them quickly. Creation of a true professional is a long and thorough process, whereby the amount of knowledge and experience very slowly transforms into quality of performance. The authors underline that the teacher of a modern technical university should not and must not act as a middle man between the textbook and the students. The teacher must instead become a holder of the latest technological knowledge, which he will pass to students during lessons. The authors report on the ERGOLAB, a problematic science and research laboratory for ergonomic research and development in the nuclear field. Ergonomic support is one of the more important factors in the prevention of human errors, maintenance of professional health and improvement of performance efficiency [ru

  7. Requalification of SPERT [Special Power Excursion Reactor Test] pins for use in university reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Snelgrove, J.L.; Domagala, R.F.; Dates, L.R.

    1986-12-01

    A series of nondestructive and destructive examinations have been performed on a representative sample of stainless steel-clad UO 2 fuel pins procured in the early-to-mid 1960s for the SPERT program. These examinations were undertaken in order to requalify the SPERT pins for use in converting university research reactors from the use of highly enriched uranium to the use of low-enriched uranium. The requalification program included visual and dimensional inspections of fuel pins and fuel pellets, radiographic inspections of welds, fill gas analyses, and chemical and spectrographic analyses of fuel and cladding materials. In general all attributes tested were within or very close to specified values, although some weld defects not covered by the original specifications were found. 1 ref., 4 figs., 11 tabs

  8. The search for sterile neutrinos at reactors and underground laboratories

    Science.gov (United States)

    Langford, Thomas

    2017-01-01

    From the initial discovery of neutrinos to the observation of neutrino oscillations, unexpected results have lead to deeper understanding of physics. However, as experiments and theoretical predictions have improved, new anomalies have surfaced that could point to beyond the Standard Model physics. Leading hypotheses invoke a new form of matter, sterile neutrinos, as a possible resolution of these outstanding questions. New experimental efforts are underway to probe short-baseline neutrino oscillations with reactors and radioactive sources. This talk will highlight developments in current and next generation experiments and present possible outcomes for the next few years.

  9. Dose measurements in controlled area and laboratory of TRIGA IPR-R1 reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Maretti Junior, Fausto; Alvarenga, Frederico Ladeia

    2005-01-01

    The workers doses in exposure areas to the radiation are so important for a Radioprotection Quality Program, as well as to guarantee the workers safety. For that it is necessary to raise the doses in the radiation areas, to obtain the accumulated dose in certain procedures for detailed studies. Several risings were accomplished to obtain the radiation levels in the areas where the workers are exposed due the operation of a research nuclear reactor and in the radioisotopes manipulation laboratories of a nuclear institute. The radiation levels and doses can be observed through graphs in the dependences of the Controlled Area 1 (AC-1) and the Reactor Laboratory. Those limits are in according of the CNEN-NE-3.01 work limits rules. The conclusion of the work allowed to demonstrate that the Laboratory of the Reactor and AC-1, have booth an effective radiological program with efficient operational practices that contributes with low doses to the workers. (author)

  10. BUSEFL: The Boston University Space Environment Forecast Laboratory

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Contos, A.R.; Sanchez, L.A.; Jorgensen, A.M.

    1996-01-01

    BUSEFL (Boston University Space Environment Forecast Laboratory) is a comprehensive, integrated project to address the issues and implications of space weather forecasting. An important goal of the BUSEFL mission is to serve as a testing ground for space weather algorithms and operational procedures. One such algorithm is the Magnetospheric Specification and Forecast Model (MSFM), which may be implemented in possible future space weather prediction centers. Boston University Student-satellite for Applications and Training (BUSAT), the satellite component of BUSEFL, will incorporate four experiments designed to measure (1) the earth close-quote s magnetic field, (2) distribution of energetic electrons trapped in the earth close-quote s radiation belts, (3) the mass and charge composition of the ion fluxes along the magnetic field lines and (4) the auroral forms at the foot of the field line in the auroral zones. Data from these experiments will be integrated into a ground system to evaluate space weather prediction codes. Data from the BUSEFL mission will be available to the scientific community and the public through media such as the World Wide Web (WWW). copyright 1996 American Institute of Physics

  11. Performance of small reactors at universities for teaching, research, training and service (TRTS): thirty five years' experience with the Dalhousie University SLOWPOKE-2 reactor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chatt, A., E-mail: a.chatt@dal.ca [Dalhousie Univ., Trace Analysis Research Centre, Dept. of Chemistry, Halifax, Nova Scotia (Canada)

    2013-07-01

    The Dalhousie University SLOWPOKE-2 Reactor (DUSR) facility, operated during 1976-2011, was the only research reactor in Atlantic Canada as well as the only one associated with a chemistry department in a Canadian university. The most outstanding features of the facility included: a rapid (100 ms) cyclic pneumatic sample transfer system, a permanently installed Cd-site, and a Compton-suppression gamma-ray spectrometer. The usage encompassed fundamental as well as applied studies in various fields using neutron activation analysis (NAA). The facility was used for training undergraduate/graduate students, postdoctoral fellows, technicians, and visiting scientists, and for cooperative projects with other universities, research organizations and industries. (author)

  12. The University of Missouri Research Reactor facility can melter system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Edwards, C.B. Jr.; Olson, O.L.; Stevens, R.; Brugger, R.M.

    1987-01-01

    At the University of Missouri Research Reactor (MURR), a waste compacting system for reducing the volume of radioactive aluminum cans has been designed, built and put into operation. In MURR's programs of producing radioisotopes and transmutation doping of silicon, a large volume of radioactive aluminum cans is generated. The Can Melter System (CMS) consists of a sorting station, a can masher, an electric furnace and a gas fired furnace. This system reduces the cans and other radioactive metal into barrels of solid metal close to theoretical density. The CMS has been in operation at the MURR now for over two years. Twelve hundred cu ft of cans and other metals have been reduced into 150 cu ft of shipable waste. The construction cost of the CMS was $4950.84 plus 1680 man hours of labor, and the operating cost of the CMS is $18/lb. The radiation exposure to the operator is 8.6 mR/cu ft. The yearly operating savings is $30,000. 20 figs., 10 tabs

  13. The molecular universe: from astronomy to laboratory astrophysics and back

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Dishoeck, Ewine

    2015-08-01

    Molecules are found in a wide range of astronomical environments, fromour Solar System to distant starburst galaxies at the highest redshifts. Thanks to the opening up of the infrared and (sub)millimeter wavelength regime, culminating with Herschel and ALMA, more than 180 different species have now been found throughout the various stages of stellar birth and death: diffuse and dense interstellar clouds, protostars and disks, the envelopes of evolved stars and planetary nebulae, and exo-planetary atmospheres. Molecules and solid-state features are now also routinely detected in the interstellar medium of external galaxies, near and far.There are many motivations for studying this molecular universe. From the chemical perspective, interstellar space provides a unique laboratory to study basic molecular processes under very different conditions from those normally found in a laboratory on Earth. For astronomers, molecules are unique probes of the many environments where they are found, providing information on density, temperature, dynamics, ionization fractions and magnetic fields. Molecules also play an important role in the cooling of clouds allowing them to collapse, including the formation of the very first stars and galaxies. Finally, the molecular composition is sensitive to the history of the material, and ultimately provides critical information on our origins.This talk will summarize a number of recent observational highlights and provide examples of cases where the availability of new laboratory data proved crucial in the analysis. This includes basic data such as spectroscopy and collisional rate coefficients, but also an improved understanding of photoprocesses in the gaseous and solid state. Much of the chemistry in star- and planet-forming regions is now thought to be driven by gas-grain chemistry rather than pure gas-phase chemistry, and a few examples of the close link between models and laboratory experiments will be given. In spite of lingering

  14. Evaluating laboratory key performance using quality indicators in Alexandria University Hospital Clinical Chemistry Laboratories.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rizk, Mostafa M; Zaki, Adel; Hossam, Nermine; Aboul-Ela, Yasmin

    2014-12-01

    The performance of clinical laboratories plays a fundamental role in the quality and effectiveness of healthcare. To evaluate the laboratory performance in Alexandria University Hospital Clinical Laboratories using key quality indicators and to compare the performance before and after an improvement plan based on ISO 15189 standards. The study was carried out on inpatient samples for a period of 7 months that was divided into three phases: phase I included data collection for evaluation of the existing process before improvement (March-May 2012); an intermediate phase, which included corrective, preventive action, quality initiative and steps for improvement (June 2012); and phase II, which included data collection for evaluation of the process after improvement (July 2012-September 2012). In terms of the preanalytical indicators, incomplete request forms in phase I showed that the total number of received requests were 31 944, with a percentage of defected request of 33.66%; whereas in phase II, there was a significant reduction in all defected request items (Plaboratories.

  15. DOE/NE University Program in robotics for advanced reactors research

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Trivedi, M.M.

    1990-01-01

    The document presents the bimonthly progress reports published during 1990 regarding the US Department of Energy/NE-sponsored research at the University of Tennessee Knoxville under the DOE Robitics for Advanced Reactors Research Grant. Significant accomplishments are noted in the following areas: development of edge-segment based stereo matching algorithm; vision system integration in the CESAR laboratory; evaluation of algorithms for surface characterization from range data; comparative study of data fusion techniques; development of architectural framework, software, and graphics environment for sensor-based robots; algorithms for acquiring tactile images from planer surfaces; investigations in geometric model-based robotic manipulation; investigations of non-deterministic approaches to sensor fusion; and evaluation of sensor calibration techniques. (MB)

  16. Preparation for shipment of spent TRIGA fuel elements from the research reactor of the Medical University of Hannover

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hampel, Gabriele; Cordes, Harro; Ebbinghaus, Kurt; Haferkamp, Dirk

    1998-01-01

    In the early seventies a research reactor of type TRIGA Mark I was installed in the Department of Nuclear Medicine at the Medical University of Hannover (MHH) for the production of isotopes with short decay times for medical use. Since new production methods have been developed, the reactor has become obsolete and the MHH decided to decommission it. Probably in the second quarter of 1999 all 76 spent TRIGA fuel elements will be shipped to Idaho National Engineering and Environmental Laboratory (INEEL), USA, in one cask of type GNS 16. Due to technical reasons within the MHH a special Mobile Transfer System, which is being developed by the company Noell-KRC, will be used for reloading the fuel elements and transferring them from the reactor to the cask GNS 16. A description of the main components of this system as well as the process for transferring the fuel elements follows. (author)

  17. Report of the research results with University of Tokyo, Nuclear Engineering Research Laboratory's Facilities in fiscal 1986

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1987-01-01

    This book contains a large number of reports of studies made in 1986 through joint utilization of the nuclear reactor 'Yayoi' and electron beam type accelerator which are installed in the Nuclear engineering Research Laboratory, Faculty of Engineering, University of Tokyo. The reports presented deal with 'Behaviors of Neutrons in Fast Reactor Blanket Shield', 'Effect of Fast Neutron Radiation on Organic Materials', 'Production and Recovery of Tritium in Nuclear Fusion Reactor Blanket System', 'Bench Mark Experiment of Effect of Atmospheric Scattering of Neutron', 'Experimental Evaluation of Nuclear Heat Rate', 'Fast Neutron Shielding Experiment', 'Effect of Fast Neutron Radiation on Hot Water', 'Neutron Shielding Experiment', 'Biological and Medical Application of 'Yayoi' Neutron', 'Effect of Fission-Fusion Correlation Radiation on Semiconductors (Si, GaAs)', 'Application of Fast Neutron to Radiography Technology', 'Streaming in Offset Slit', 'Design and Evaluation of New Reactor', 'LET Effect on Organic Material', 'Handling, Separation and Recovery of Transuranium Elements', 'Reactor Operation Support System Using Knowledge Engineering Technique', 'Application of Shape Memory Alloys to Nuclear Reactor Devices', 'Numerical Simulation of Turbulent Hear Transfer', and many other studies. (Nogami, K.)

  18. Characterization of reactor neutron environments at Sandia National Laboratories

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kelly, J.G.; Luera, T.F.; Griffin, P.J.; Vehar, D.W.

    1994-01-01

    To assure quality in the testing of electronic parts in neutron radiation environments, Sandia National Laboratories (SNL) has incorporated modern techniques and procedures, developed in the last two decades by the radiation effects community, into all of its experimental programs. Attention to the application of all of these methodologies, experiment designs, nuclear data, procedures and controls to the SNL radiation services has led to the much more accurate and reliable environment characterizations required to correlate the effects observed with the radiation delivered

  19. Decommissioning of the High Flux Beam Reactor at Brookhaven National Laboratory.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hu, Jih-Perng; Reciniello, Richard N; Holden, Norman E

    2012-08-01

    The High Flux Beam Reactor (HFBR) at the Brookhaven National Laboratory was a heavy-water cooled and moderated reactor that achieved criticality on 31 October 1965. It operated at a power level of 40 mega-watts. An equipment upgrade in 1982 allowed operations at 60 mega-watts. After a 1989 reactor shutdown to reanalyze safety impact of a hypothetical loss of coolant accident, the reactor was restarted in 1991 at 30 mega-watts. The HFBR was shut down in December 1996 for routine maintenance and refueling. At that time, a leak of tritiated water was identified by routine sampling of ground water from wells located adjacent to the reactor's spent fuel pool. The reactor remained shut down for almost 3 y for safety and environmental reviews. In November 1999, the United States Department of Energy decided to permanently shut down the HFBR. The decontamination and decommissioning of the HFBR complex, consisting of multiple structures and systems to operate and maintain the reactor, were complete in 2009 after removing and shipping off all the control rod blades. The emptied and cleaned HFBR dome, which still contains the irradiated reactor vessel is presently under 24/7 surveillance for safety. Details of the HFBR's cleanup performed during 1999-2009, to allow the BNL facilities to be re-accessed by the public, will be described in the paper.

  20. Retrospect over past 25 years at Research Laboratory for Nuclear Reactors, Tokyo Institute of Technology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Aoki, Shigebumi

    1983-01-01

    Research Laboratory for Nuclear Reactors, Tokyo Institute of Technology, was established on April 1, 1956, with the aims of the investigation on the peaceful use of nuclear energy and of the education of scientists and engineers in this field. This report reviews the history of the Laboratory during 25 years and traces the process of growth concerning research divisions, buildings, large-scale experimental facilities and the education in the graduate course for nuclear engineering. In addition, considering what the Laboratory has to be and what the future plan will be, it is mentioned that the research interest should be extended to the field of nuclear fusion reactor, especially the blanket engineering, as a long-term future project of the Research Laboratory. (author)

  1. Economic impact of university veterinary diagnostic laboratories: A case study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schulz, Lee L; Hayes, Dermot J; Holtkamp, Derald J; Swenson, David A

    2018-03-01

    Veterinary diagnostic laboratories (VDLs) play a significant role in the prevention and mitigation of endemic animal diseases and serve an important role in surveillance of, and the response to, outbreaks of transboundary and emerging animal diseases. They also allow for business continuity in livestock operations and help improve human health. Despite these critical societal roles, there is no academic literature on the economic impact of VDLs. We present a case study on the economic impact of the Iowa State University Veterinary Diagnostic Laboratory (ISUVDL). We use economic contribution analysis coupled with a stakeholder survey to estimate the impact. Results suggest that the ISUVDL is responsible for $2,162.46 million in direct output, $2,832.45 million in total output, $1,158.19 million in total value added, and $31.79 million in state taxes in normal years. In an animal health emergency this increases to $8,446.21 million in direct output, $11,063.06 million in total output, $4,523.70 million in total value added, and $124.15 million in state taxes. The ISUVDL receives $4 million annually as a direct state government appropriation for operating purposes. The $31.79 million in state taxes in normal years and the $124.15 million in state taxes in an animal health emergency equates to a 795% and 3104% return on investment, respectively. Estimates of the economic impact of the ISUVDL provide information to scientists, administrators, and policymakers regarding the efficacy and return on investment of VDLs. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  2. Report on operation utilization and technical development of research reactors and hot laboratory

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1982-03-01

    Activities of the Division of Research Reactor Operation in fiscal 1980 are described. The division is responsible for operation and maintenance of JRR-2, JRR-3, JRR-4 and Hot Laboratory. In the above connection, various other works are performed, including technical management of fuel and coolant, radiation control, irradiation technique, etc. In Hot Laboratory, postirradiation examinations of fuels and materials are made, and also development of examination methods. (author)

  3. Report on operation, utilization and technical development of research reactors and hot laboratory

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1980-03-01

    Activities of the Division of Research Reactor Operation in fiscal 1978 are described. The division is responsible for operation and maintenance of JRR-2, JRR-3, JRR-4 and Hot Laboratory. In the above connection, various other works are performed, including technical management of fuel and coolant, radiation control, irradiation technique, etc. In Hot Laboratory, postirradiation examinations of fuels and materials are made, and also development of examination methods. (author)

  4. Report on operation, utilization and technical development of Research Reactors and Hot Laboratory

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1984-10-01

    Activities of the Division of Research Reactor Operation in fiscal 1981 are described. The division is responsible for operation and maintenance of JRR-2, JRR-3, JRR-4 and Hot Laboratory. In the above connection, various other works are performed, including technical management of fuel and coolant, radiation control, irradiation technique, etc. In Hot Laboratory, postirradiation examinations of fuels and materials are made, and also development of examination methods. (author)

  5. Oak Ridge National Laboratory Support of Non-light Water Reactor Technologies: Capabilities Assessment for NRC Near-term Implementation Action Plans for Non-light Water Reactors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Belles, Randy [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States); Jain, Prashant K. [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States); Powers, Jeffrey J. [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States)

    2017-04-01

    The Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) has a rich history of support for light water reactor (LWR) and non-LWR technologies. The ORNL history involves operation of 13 reactors at ORNL including the graphite reactor dating back to World War II, two aqueous homogeneous reactors, two molten salt reactors (MSRs), a fast-burst health physics reactor, and seven LWRs. Operation of the High Flux Isotope Reactor (HFIR) has been ongoing since 1965. Expertise exists amongst the ORNL staff to provide non-LWR training; support evaluation of non-LWR licensing and safety issues; perform modeling and simulation using advanced computational tools; run laboratory experiments using equipment such as the liquid salt component test facility; and perform in-depth fuel performance and thermal-hydraulic technology reviews using a vast suite of computer codes and tools. Summaries of this expertise are included in this paper.

  6. Radiological survey support activities for the decommissioning of the Ames Laboratory Research Reactor Facility, Ames, Iowa

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wynveen, R.A.; Smith, W.H.; Sholeen, C.M.; Justus, A.L.; Flynn, K.F.

    1984-09-01

    At the request of the Engineering Support Division of the US Department of Energy-Chicago Operations Office and in accordance with the programmatic overview/certification responsibilities of the Department of Energy Environmental and Safety Engineering Division, the Argonne National Laboratory Radiological Survey Group conducted a series of radiological measurements and tests at the Ames Laboratory Research Reactor located in Ames, Iowa. These measurements and tests were conducted during 1980 and 1981 while the reactor building was being decontaminated and decommissioned for the purpose of returning the building to general use. The results of these evaluations are included in this report. Although the surface contamination within the reactor building could presumably be reduced to negligible levels, the potential for airborne contamination from tritiated water vapor remains. This vapor emmanates from contamination within the concrete of the building and should be monitored until such time as it is reduced to background levels. 2 references, 8 figures, 6 tables.

  7. Analyses in support of the Laboratory Microfusion Facility and ICF commercial reactor designs

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Meier, W.R.; Monsler, M.J.

    1988-01-01

    Our work on this contract was divided into two major categories; two thirds of the total effort was in support of the Laboratory Microfusion Facility (LMF), and one third of the effort was in support of Inertial Confinement Fusion (ICF) commercial reactors. This final report includes copies of the formal reports, memoranda, and viewgraph presentations that were completed under this contract

  8. Radiation chemistry in the nuclear power reactor environment: from laboratory study to practical application

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Stuart, C.R.

    1999-01-01

    This paper discusses the work carried out at the Chalk River Nuclear Laboratories in underlying and applied radiation chemical research performed to optimise the processes occurring in the four aqueous systems in and around the core. The aqueous systems subject to radiolysis in CANDU reactors are Heat Transport System, Moderator, Liquid Zone Controls and End Shields.

  9. 9 CFR 147.15 - Laboratory procedure recommended for the bacteriological examination of mycoplasma reactors. 11

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... Laboratory procedure recommended for the bacteriological examination of mycoplasma reactors. 11 11 Yoder, H. W., Jr., “Mycoplasmosis.” In: Isolation and Identification of Avian Pathogens. (Stephen B. Hitchner, Chairman, Charles H. Domermuth, H. Graham Purchase, James E. Williams.) 1980, pp. 40-42, Creative Printing...

  10. Decontamination and decommissioning of the JANUS reactor at the Argonne National Laboratory-East site

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fellhauer, C.R.; Garlock, G.A.

    1997-05-01

    Argonne National Laboratory has begun the decontamination and decommissioning (D ampersand D) of the JANUS Reactor Facility. The project is managed by the Technology Development Division's D ampersand D Program personnel. D ampersand D procedures are performed by sub-contractor personnel. Specific activities involving the removal, size reduction, and packaging of radioactive components and facilities are discussed

  11. Research opportunities in a reactor-based nuclear analytical laboratory

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Robinson, L.; Brown, D.H.

    1994-01-01

    Although considered by many to be a open-quotes matureclose quotes science, neutron activation analysis (NAA) continues to be a valuable elemental analysis tool. Examples of the applicability of NAA can be found in a variety of areas including archaeology, environmental science, epidemiology, forensic science, and materials science to name a few. The major components of neutron activation are sample preparation, irradiation, counting, and data analysis. Each one of these stages provides opportunities to share numerous practical and fundamental scientific principles with high school teachers. This paper presents an overview of these opportunities. In addition, a specific example of the collaboration with a high school teacher whose research involved the automation of a gamma-ray spectroscopy counting system using a laboratory robot is discussed

  12. Data base of reactor physics experimental results in Kyoto University critical assembly experimental facilities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ichihara, Chihiro; Fujine, Shigenori; Hayashi, Masatoshi

    1986-01-01

    The Kyoto University critical assembly experimental facilities belong to the Kyoto University Research Reactor Institute, and are the versatile critical assembly constructed for experimentally studying reactor physics and reactor engineering. The facilities are those for common utilization by universities in whole Japan. During more than ten years since the initial criticality in 1974, various experiments on reactor physics and reactor engineering have been carried out using many experimental facilities such as two solidmoderated cores, a light water-moderated core and a neutron generator. The kinds of the experiment carried out were diverse, and to find out the required data from them is very troublesome, accordingly it has become necessary to make a data base which can be processed by a computer with the data accumulated during the past more than ten years. The outline of the data base, the data base CAEX using personal computers, the data base supported by a large computer and so on are reported. (Kako, I.)

  13. Sludge combustion in fluidized bed reactors at laboratory scale

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chirone, R.; Cammarota, A.

    2001-01-01

    The combustion of a dried sewage sludge in laboratory scale fluidized bed has been studied in Naples by the Istituto di ricerche sulla combustione (Irc) in the framework of a National project named Thermal Process with Energy Recovery to be used in laboratory and pre-pilot scale apparatus. The attention has been focused on emissions of unreacted carbon as elutriated fines, on the emissions of pollutant gases and on the assessment of the inventory of fly- and bottom ashes. The combustion behaviour of sewage sludge has been compared with those of a market available Tyre Derived Fuel (TDF) and a biomass from Mediterranean area (Robinia Pseudoacacia) and with that of a South African bituminous coal. Stationary combustion tests were carried out at 850 0 C by feeding particles in the size range 0-1 mm into a bed of silica sand without any sorbent addition. The fluidized bed combustor has been operated, at a superficial gas velocity of 0.4 m/s and different excesses of air ranging between 14 and 98%. Relatively high combustion efficiency, larger than 98.9% has been obtained in experiments carried out with sewage sludge and excess of air larger than 20%. These values, are comparable with those obtained in previously experimental activity carried out under similar operative conditions with a South Africa Bituminous coal (97-98%). It is larger than those obtained by using a Tyre Derived Fuel (89-90%) and the Robinia Pseudoacacia Biomass (93-93%). The relative importance of carbon fines elutriation, CO emissions and volatile bypassing the bed in determining the loss of combustion efficiency has been evaluated for the different fuels tested [it

  14. Decontamination and dismantlement of the JANUS Reactor at Argonne National Laboratory-East. Project final report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fellhauer, C.R.; Clark, F.R.

    1997-10-01

    The decontamination and dismantlement of the JANUS Reactor at Argonne National Laboratory-East (ANL-E) was completed in October 1997. Descriptions and evaluations of the activities performed and analyses of the results obtained during the JANUS D and D Project are provided in this Final Report. The following information is included: objective of the JANUS D and D Project; history of the JANUS Reactor facility; description of the ANL-E site and the JANUS Reactor facility; overview of the D and D activities performed; description of the project planning and engineering; description of the D and D operations; summary of the final status of the JANUS Reactor facility based upon the final survey results; description of the health and safety aspects of the project, including personnel exposure and OSHA reporting; summary of the waste minimization techniques utilized and total waste generated by the project; and summary of the final cost and schedule for the JANUS D and D Project

  15. 9 CFR 75.4 - Interstate movement of equine infectious anemia reactors and approval of laboratories, diagnostic...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... infectious anemia reactors and approval of laboratories, diagnostic facilities, and research facilities. 75.4... IN HORSES, ASSES, PONIES, MULES, AND ZEBRAS Equine Infectious Anemia (swamp Fever) § 75.4 Interstate movement of equine infectious anemia reactors and approval of laboratories, diagnostic facilities, and...

  16. Educational utilization of the University of Missouri-Rolla Reactor Facility

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Freeman, D.W.; Bolon, A.E.

    1996-01-01

    The primary mission of the University of Missouri-Rolla (UMR) research reactor (UMRR) is to provide exceptional educational opportunities for UMR students and for students at regional college and precollege institutions. Our vision is to become the premier educational reactor in the nation. In order to realize this vision, the principles of self-assessment and continuous improvement are being implemented

  17. Management of radioactive liquid and solid wastes at the Research Reactor Institute, Kyoto University, (3)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tsutsui, Tenson; Shimoura, K.; Koyama, A.

    1977-11-01

    In this report, the management of radioactive liquid and solid wastes at the Research Reactor Institute, Kyoto University during past 6 years, from April in 1971 to March in 1977 are reviewed. (auth.)

  18. Mixed enrichment core design for the NC State University PULSTAR Reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mayo, C.W.; Verghese, K.; Huo, Y.G.

    1997-12-01

    The North Carolina State University PULSTAR Reactor license was renewed for an additional 20 years of operation on April 30, 1997. The relicensing period added additional years to the facility operating time through the end of the second license period, increasing the excess reactivity needs as projected in 1988. In 1995, the Nuclear Reactor Program developed a strategic plan that addressed the future maintenance, development, and utilization of the facility. Goals resulting from this plan included increased academic utilization of the facility in accordance with its role as a university research facility, and increased industrial service use in accordance with the mission of a land grant university. The strategic plan was accepted, and it is the intent of the College of Engineering to operate the PULSTAR Reactor as a going concern through at least the end of the current license period. In order to reach the next relicensing review without prejudice due to low excess reactivity, it is desired to maintain sufficient excess reactivity so that, if relicensed again, the facility could continue to operate without affecting users until new fuel assistance was provided. During the NC State University license renewal, the operation of the PULSTAR Reactor at the State University of New York at Buffalo (SUNY Buffalo) was terminated. At that time, the SUNY Buffalo facility had about 240 unused PULSTAR Reactor fuel pins with 6% enrichment. The objective of the work reported here was to develop a mixed enrichment core design for the NC State University PULSTAR reactor which would: (1) demonstrate that 6% enriched SUNY buffalo fuel could be used in the NC State University PULSTAR Reactor within the existing technical specification safety limits for core physics parameters; (2) show that use of this fuel could permit operating the NC State University PULSTAR Reactor to 2017 with increased utilization; and (3) assure that the decision whether or not to relicense the facility would

  19. Daytime Utilization of a University Observatory for Laboratory Instruction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mattox, J. R.

    2006-08-01

    Scheduling convenience provides a strong incentive to fully explore effective utilization of educational observatories during daylight hours. I present two compelling daytime student activities that I developed at the Observatory at Fayetteville State University. My Introductory Astronomy Laboratory classes pursue these as separate investigations. My Physical Science classes complete both in a single lab period of 110 minutes duration. Both of these activities are also appropriate for High School student investigators, and could be used as demonstrations for younger students. Daylight Observation of Venus. With a clear sky, and when its elongation exceeds ~20˚, Venus is readily apparent in the daytime sky once a telescope is pointed at it. This is accomplished either with a digital pointing system, or with setting circles on a polar-aligned mount using the Sun to initialize the RA circle. Using the telescope pointing as a reference, it is also possible under optimal circumstances for students to see Venus in the daytime sky with naked eyes. Students are asked to write about the circumstances that made it possible to see Venus. Educational utilization of daytime observations of the Moon, Jupiter, Saturn, and the brightest stars are also discussed. Using a CCD Camera to Determine the Temperature of a Sunspot. After my students view the Sun with Eclipse Glasses and in projection using a 3-inch refractor, they analyze a CCD image of a sunspot (which they obtain if possible) to determine the ratio of its surface intensity relative to the normal solar surface. They then use the Stefan-Boltzmann law (usually with some coaching) to determine the sunspot temperature given the nominal surface temperature of the Sun. Appropriate safety precautions are presented given the hazards of magnified sunlight. Mitigation of dome seeing during daylight hours is discussed.

  20. Annual report of the Nuclear Physics Laboratory, University of Washington

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Snover, K.; Fulton, B.

    1996-04-01

    The Nuclear Physics Laboratory of the University of Washington has for over 40 years supported a broad program of experimental physics research. Some highlights of the research activities during the past year are given. Work continues at a rapid pace toward completion of the Sudbury Neutrino Observatory in January 1997. Following four years of planning and development, installation of the acrylic vessel began last July and is now 50% complete, with final completion scheduled for September. The Russian-American Gallium Experiment (SAGE) has completed a successful 51 Cr neutrino source experiment. The first data from 8 B decay have been taken in the Mass-8 CVC/Second Class Current study. The analysis of the measured barrier distributions for Ca-induced fission of prolate 192 Os and oblate 194 Pt has been completed. In a collaboration with a group from the Bhabha Atomic Research Centre they have shown that fission anisotropies at energies well above the barrier are not influenced by the mass asymmetry of the entrance channel relative to the Businaro-Gallone critical asymmetry. They also have preliminary evidence at higher bombarding energy that noncompound nucleus fission scales with the mean square angular momentum, in contrast to previous suggestions. The authors have measured proton and alpha particle emission spectra from the decay of A ∼ 200 compound nuclei at excitation energies of 50--100 MeV, and used these measurements to infer the nuclear temperature. The investigations of multiparticle Bose-Einstein interferometry have led to a new algorithm for putting Bose-Einstein and Coulomb correlations of up to 6th order into Monte Carlo simulations of ultra-relativistic collision events, and to a new fast algorithm for extracting event temperatures

  1. URI Program Final Report FY 2001 Grant for the University of Florida Training Reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vernetson, W.G.

    2004-01-01

    The purpose of the URI program is to upgrade and improve university nuclear research and training reactors and to contribute to strengthening the academic community's nuclear engineering infrastructure. It should be noted that the proposed UFTR facility instrumentation and equipment can generally be subdivided into three categories: (1) to improve reactor operations, (2) to improve existing facility/NAA Laboratory operations, and (3) to expand facility capability. All of these items were selected recognizing the objectives of the University Reactor Instrumentation Program to respond to the widespread needs in the academic reactor community for modernization and improvement of research and training reactor facilities, especially at large and diverse institutions such as the University of Florida. These needs have been particularly pressing at the UFTR which is the only such research and training reactor in the State of Florida which is undergoing rapid growth in a variety of technical areas. As indicated in Table 2, the first item is a security system control panel with associated wiring and detectors. The existing system is over 30 years old and has been the subject of repeated maintenance over the past 5 years. Some of its detection devices are no longer replaceable from stock. Modifications made many years ago make troubleshooting some parts of the system such as the backup battery charging subsystem essentially impossible, further increasing maintenance frequency to replace batteries. Currently, various parts of the system cable trays remain open for maintenance access further degrading facility appearance. In light of relicensing plans, this item is also a key consideration for housekeeping appearance considerations. The cost of a replacement ADEMCO Vista 20 security system including turnkey installation by a certified vendor was to be $2,206. Replacement of this system was expected to save up to 5 days of maintenance per year, decrease security alarm response

  2. Stress corrosion cracking of zircaloy. The use of laboratory data to predict in-reactor behaviour

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Miller, A.K.; Ocken, H.

    1981-01-01

    Pellet-cladding interaction (PCI) can lead to failure of the Zircaloy tubing used as cladding in water-cooled reactors. Many investigations have shown that the mechanism directly responsible for such fuel rod failures is stress corrosion cracking (SCC) of Zircaloy tubing. Laboratory studies have yielded extensive data on the time-to-failure (tsub(f)) behaviour of Zircaloy tubing specimens as a function of such important variables as the applied hoop stress (σ sub(h)), the iodine concentration (I 2 ), the temperature (T) and the fluence (F). These data have been used to predict the response of Zircaloy tubing exposed in-reactor. A typical approach is to fit laboratory data to obtain an empirical equation for tsub(f) in terms of the variables identified above. The question can then be posed as to whether it is appropriate to use such an empirical expression for predicting in-reactor behaviour. This paper describes the approach which has been taken in modelling the SCC process. It first reviews the experimental observations upon which the model is based. A summary of the key features of the model is then presented. The model's capabilities, emphasizing those predictions that are independent of data used to evaluate empirical constants, are briefly discussed. Finally, it is shown how the model can be used to predict important differences between the response of tubing specimens exposed in the laboratory and the response of large quantities of tubing exposed in-reactor

  3. Los Alamos National Laboratory case studies on decommissioning of research reactors and a small nuclear facility

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Salazar, M.D.

    1998-01-01

    Approximately 200 contaminated surplus structures require decommissioning at Los Alamos National Laboratory. During the last 10 years, 50 of these structures have undergone decommissioning. These facilities vary from experimental research reactors to process/research facilities contaminated with plutonium-enriched uranium, tritium, and high explosives. Three case studies are presented: (1) a filter building contaminated with transuranic radionuclides; (2) a historical water boiler that operated with a uranyl-nitrate solution; and (3) the ultra-high-temperature reactor experiment, which used enriched uranium as fuel

  4. Los Alamos National Laboratory case studies on decommissioning of research reactors and a small nuclear facility

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Salazar, M.D.

    1998-12-01

    Approximately 200 contaminated surplus structures require decommissioning at Los Alamos National Laboratory. During the last 10 years, 50 of these structures have undergone decommissioning. These facilities vary from experimental research reactors to process/research facilities contaminated with plutonium-enriched uranium, tritium, and high explosives. Three case studies are presented: (1) a filter building contaminated with transuranic radionuclides; (2) a historical water boiler that operated with a uranyl-nitrate solution; and (3) the ultra-high-temperature reactor experiment, which used enriched uranium as fuel.

  5. Use of the Oregon State University TRIGA reactor for education and training

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dodd, B.

    1989-01-01

    This paper summarizes the recent use of the Oregon State University TRIGA Reactor (OSTR) for education and training. In particular, data covering the last 5 yr are presented, which cover education through formal university classes, theses, public information, and school programs. Training is covered by presenting data on domestic and foreign reactor operator training, health physics training, and neutron activation analysis training. While education and training only occupy ∼16% of the OSTR's total use time, nevertheless, this is an important mission of all nonpower reactors that cannot be performed effectively in any other way

  6. Princeton University Plasma Physics Laboratory, Princeton, New Jersey

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1991-01-01

    This report discusses the following topics: Principal parameters of experimental devices; Tokamak Fusion Test Reactor; Burning Plasma Experiment; Princeton Beta Experiment-Modification; Current Drive Experiment-Upgrade; International Thermonuclear Experimental Reactor; International Collaboration; X-Ray Laser Studies; Hyperthermal Atomic Beam Source; Pure Electron Plasma Experiments; Plasma Processing: Deposition and Etching of Thin Films; Theoretical Studies; Tokamak Modeling; Engineering Department; Environment, Safety, and Health and Quality Assurance; Technology Transfer; Office of Human Resources and Administration; PPPL Patent Invention Disclosures; Office of Resource Management; Graduate Education: Plasma Physics; Graduate Education: Program in Plasma Science and Technology; and Science Education Program

  7. Report of the research results with University of Tokyo, Nuclear Engineering Research laboratory's Facilities in fiscal 1992

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1993-01-01

    This publication summarizes the results of the joint utilization of the research 'Yayoi' and the electron beam accelerator in the Nuclear Engineering Research Laboratory, University of Tokyo, in the fiscal year 1992. The Yayoi was operated smoothly through the year, and the number of research themes, for which the reactor Yayoi was jointly utilized and the related themes reached 23 cases. The research themes of the linac count up to 17, after its reconstruction to be twin-linac. In this publication, in addition to the utilization reports, also the 16 reports of Yayoi Study Meetings held in fiscal year 1992 are collected. (J.P.N.)

  8. Accident Analyses for Conversion of the University of Missouri Research Reactor (MURR) from Highly-Enriched to Low-Enriched Uranium

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Stillman, J. A. [Argonne National Lab. (ANL), Argonne, IL (United States). Nuclear Engineering Div., Research and Test Reactor Dept.; Feldman, E. E. [Argonne National Lab. (ANL), Argonne, IL (United States). Nuclear Engineering Div., Research and Test Reactor Dept.; Wilson, E. H. [Argonne National Lab. (ANL), Argonne, IL (United States). Nuclear Engineering Div., Research and Test Reactor Dept.; Foyto, L. P. [Univ. of Missouri, Columbia, MO (United States). Research Reactor; Kutikkad, K. [Univ. of Missouri, Columbia, MO (United States). Research Reactor; McKibben, J. C. [Univ. of Missouri, Columbia, MO (United States). Research Reactor; Peters, N. J. [Univ. of Missouri, Columbia, MO (United States). Research Reactor; Cowherd, W. M. [Univ. of Missouri, Columbia, MO (United States). College of Engineering, Nuclear Engineering Program; Rickman, B. [Univ. of Missouri, Columbia, MO (United States). College of Engineering, Nuclear Engineering Program

    2014-12-01

    This report contains the results of reactor accident analyses for the University of Missouri Research Reactor (MURR). The calculations were performed as part of the conversion from the use of highly-enriched uranium (HEU) fuel to the use of low-enriched uranium (LEU) fuel. The analyses were performed by staff members of the Global Threat Reduction Initiative (GTRI) Reactor Conversion Program at the Argonne National Laboratory (ANL), the MURR Facility, and the Nuclear Engineering Program – College of Engineering, University of Missouri-Columbia. The core conversion to LEU is being performed with financial support from the U. S. government. This report contains the results of reactor accident analyses for the University of Missouri Research Reactor (MURR). The calculations were performed as part of the conversion from the use of highly-enriched uranium (HEU) fuel to the use of low-enriched uranium (LEU) fuel. The analyses were performed by staff members of the Global Threat Reduction Initiative (GTRI) Reactor Conversion Program at the Argonne National Laboratory (ANL), the MURR Facility, and the Nuclear Engineering Program – College of Engineering, University of Missouri-Columbia. The core conversion to LEU is being performed with financial support from the U. S. government. In the framework of non-proliferation policies, the international community presently aims to minimize the amount of nuclear material available that could be used for nuclear weapons. In this geopolitical context most research and test reactors, both domestic and international, have started a program of conversion to the use of LEU fuel. A new type of LEU fuel based on an alloy of uranium and molybdenum (U-Mo) is expected to allow the conversion of U.S. domestic high performance reactors like MURR. This report presents the results of a study of core behavior under a set of accident conditions for MURR cores fueled with HEU U-Alx dispersion fuel or LEU monolithic U-Mo alloy fuel with 10 wt% Mo

  9. Science Hall of Atomic Energy in Research Reactor Institute, Kyoto University

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hayashi, Takeo

    1979-01-01

    The Science Hall of Atomic Energy was built as a subsidiary facility of the Research Reactor Institute, Kyoto University. The purpose of this facility is to accept outside demands concerning the application of the research reactor. The building is a two story building, and has the floor area of 901.47 m 2 . There are an exhibition room, a library, and a big lecture room. In the exhibition room, models of the Kyoto University Research Reactor and the Kyoto University Critical Assembly are placed. Various pictures concerning the application of the reactor are on the wall. In the library, people from outside of the Institute can use various books on science. Books for boys and girls are also stocked and used for public use. At the lecture room, various kinds of meeting can be held. (Kato, T.)

  10. Origins of the Lunar and Planetary Laboratory, University of Arizona

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cruikshank, Dale P.; Hartmann, William K.

    2014-11-01

    The roots of the Lunar and Planetary Laboratory (LPL) extend deep into the rich fabric of G. P. Kuiper’s view of the Earth as a planet and planetary systems as expected companions to most stars, as well as the post-war emergent technology of infrared detectors suitable for astronomy. These concepts and events began with Kuiper’s theoretical work at Yerkes Observatory on the origin of the Solar System, his discovery of two planetary satellites and observational work with his near-infrared spectrometer on the then-new McDonald 82-inch telescope in the mid- to late-1940s. A grant for the production of a photographic atlas of the Moon in the mid-1950s enabled him to assemble the best existing images of the Moon and acquire new photographs. This brought E. A. Whitaker and D. W. G. Arthur to Yerkes. Others who joined in the lunar work were geologist Carl S. Huzzen and grad student E. P. Moore, as well as undergrad summer students A. B. Binder and D. P. Cruikshank (both in 1958). The Atlas was published in 1959, and work began on an orthographic lunar atlas. Kuiper’s view of planetary science as an interdisciplinary enterprise encompassing astronomy, geology, and atmospheric physics inspired his vision of a research institution and an academic curriculum tuned to the combination of all the scientific disciplines embraced in a comprehensive study of the planets. Arrangements were made with the University of Arizona (UA) to establish LPL in affiliation with the widely recognized Inst. of Atmospheric Physics. Kuiper moved to the UA in late 1960, taking the lunar experts, graduate student T. C. Owen (planetary atmospheres), and associate B. M. Middlehurst along. G. van Biesbroeck also joined the migration to Tucson; Binder and Cruikshank followed along as new grad students. Astronomy grad student W. K. Hartmann came into the academic program at UA and the research group at LPL in 1961. Senior faculty affiliating with LPL in the earliest years were T. Gehrels, A. B

  11. A universal open-source Electronic Laboratory Notebook.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Voegele, Catherine; Bouchereau, Baptiste; Robinot, Nivonirina; McKay, James; Damiecki, Philippe; Alteyrac, Lucile

    2013-07-01

    Laboratory notebooks remain crucial to the activities of research communities. With the increase in generation of electronic data within both wet and dry analytical laboratories and new technologies providing more efficient means of communication, Electronic Laboratory Notebooks (ELN) offer equivalent record keeping to paper-based laboratory notebooks (PLN). They additionally allow more efficient mechanisms for data sharing and retrieval, which explains the growing number of commercial ELNs available varying in size and scope but all are increasingly accepted and used by the scientific community. The International Agency for Research on Cancer (IARC) having already an LIMS and a Biobank Management System for respectively laboratory workflows and sample management, we have developed a free multidisciplinary ELN specifically dedicated to work notes that will be flexible enough to accommodate different types of data. Information for installation of our freeware ELN with source codes customizations are detailed in supplementary data. Supplementary data are available at Bioinformatics online.

  12. Report of the research results with University of Tokyo, Nuclear Engineering Research Laboratory's Facilities in fiscal 1991

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1992-01-01

    This publication summarizes the results of the joint utilization of the nuclear reactor 'Yayoi' and the electron beam accelerator in the Nuclear Engineering Research Laboratory, University of Tokyo, in fiscal year 1991. The Yayoi was operated smoothly throughout the year, and the number of research themes, for which the reactor Yayoi was jointly utilized, and the related themes reached 21 cases. After the linear accelerator was reconstructed as the twin linac, the joint utilization was resumed in October, 1989, and the number of research themes, was 15 cases. In this publication, in addition to the utilization reports, also the reports of 15 cases of Yayoi Study Meetings held in fiscal year 1991 are collected. (K.I.)

  13. Verification Survey of the Building 315 Zero Power Reactor-6 Facility, Argonne National Laboratory-East, Argonne, Illinois

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    W. C. Adams

    2007-01-01

    Oak Ridge Institute for Science and Education (ORISE) conducted independent verification radiological survey activities at Argonne National Laboratory's Building 315, Zero Power Reactor-6 facility in Argonne, Illinois. Independent verification survey activities included document and data reviews, alpha plus beta and gamma surface scans, alpha and beta surface activity measurements, and instrumentation comparisons. An interim letter report and a draft report, documenting the verification survey findings, were submitted to the DOE on November 8, 2006 and February 22, 2007, respectively (ORISE 2006b and 2007). Argonne National Laboratory-East (ANL-E) is owned by the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) and is operated under a contract with the University of Chicago. Fundamental and applied research in the physical, biomedical, and environmental sciences are conducted at ANL-E and the laboratory serves as a major center of energy research and development. Building 315, which was completed in 1962, contained two cells, Cells 5 and 4, for holding Zero Power Reactor (ZPR)-6 and ZPR-9, respectively. These reactors were built to increase the knowledge and understanding of fast reactor technology. ZPR-6 was also referred to as the Fast Critical Facility and focused on fast reactor studies for civilian power production. ZPR-9 was used for nuclear rocket and fast reactor studies. In 1967, the reactors were converted for plutonium use. The reactors operated from the mid-1960's until 1982 when they were both shut down. Low levels of radioactivity were expected to be present due to the operating power levels of the ZPR's being restricted to well below 1,000 watts. To evaluate the presence of radiological contamination, DOE characterized the ZPRs in 2001. Currently, the Melt Attack and Coolability Experiments (MACE) and Melt Coolability and Concrete Interaction (MCCI) Experiments are being conducted in Cell 4 where the ZPR-9 is located (ANL 2002 and 2006). ANL has performed final

  14. Using Cluster Analysis to Characterize Meaningful Learning in a First-Year University Chemistry Laboratory Course

    Science.gov (United States)

    Galloway, Kelli R.; Bretz, Stacey Lowery

    2015-01-01

    The Meaningful Learning in the Laboratory Instrument (MLLI) was designed to measure students' cognitive and affective learning in the university chemistry laboratory. The MLLI was administered at the beginning and the end of the first semester to first-year university chemistry students to measure their expectations and experiences for learning in…

  15. Project plan for the decontamination and decommissioning of the Argonne National Laboratory Experimental Boiling Water Reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Boing, L.E.

    1989-12-01

    In 1956, the Experimental Boiling Water Reactor (EBWR) Facility was first operated at Argonne National Laboratory (ANL) as a test reactor to demonstrate the feasibility of operating an integrated power plant using a direct cycle boiling water reactor as a heat source. In 1967, ANL permanently shut down the EBWR and placed it in dry lay-up. This project plan presents the schedule and organization for the decontamination and decommissioning of the EBWR Facility which will allow it to be reused by other ANL scientific research programs. The project total estimated cost is $14.3M and is projected to generate 22,000 cubic feet of low-level radioactive waste which will be disposed of at an approved DOE burial ground. 18 figs., 3 tabs

  16. Project plan for the decontamination and decommissioning of the Argonne National Laboratory Experimental Boiling Water Reactor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Boing, L.E.

    1989-12-01

    In 1956, the Experimental Boiling Water Reactor (EBWR) Facility was first operated at Argonne National Laboratory (ANL) as a test reactor to demonstrate the feasibility of operating an integrated power plant using a direct cycle boiling water reactor as a heat source. In 1967, ANL permanently shut down the EBWR and placed it in dry lay-up. This project plan presents the schedule and organization for the decontamination and decommissioning of the EBWR Facility which will allow it to be reused by other ANL scientific research programs. The project total estimated cost is $14.3M and is projected to generate 22,000 cubic feet of low-level radioactive waste which will be disposed of at an approved DOE burial ground. 18 figs., 3 tabs.

  17. Laboratory development and field testing of sentinel toys to assess environmental faecal exposure of young children in rural India.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Torondel, Belen; Gyekye-Aboagye, Yaw; Routray, Parimita; Boisson, Sophie; Schimdt, Wolf; Clasen, Thomas

    2015-06-01

    Sentinel toys are increasingly used as a method of assessing young children's exposure to faecal pathogens in households in low-income settings. However, there is no consensus on the suitability of different approaches. We evaluated three types of toy balls with different surfaces (plastic, rubber, urethane) in the laboratory to compare the uptake of faecal indicator bacteria (Escherichia coli) on their surface. We performed bacteria survival analysis under different environmental conditions and tested laboratory methods for bacteria removal and recovery. In a field study we distributed sterile urethane balls to children toys in sterile water, assayed for thermotolerant coliforms (TTC) and explored associations between the level of contamination and household characteristics. In the laboratory, urethane foam balls took up more indicator bacteria than the other balls. Bacteria recovery did not differ based on mechanic vs no agitation. Higher temperatures and moisture levels increased bacterial yield. In the field, the only factor associated with a decreased recovery of TTC from the balls was having a soil (unpaved) floor. Sentinel toys may be an effective tool for assessing young children's exposure to faecal pathogens. However, even using methods designed to increase bacterial recovery, limited sensitivity may require larger sample sizes. © The Author 2015. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of Royal Society of Tropical Medicine and Hygiene. All rights reserved. For permissions, please e-mail: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  18. Seismic hazard studies for the high flux beam reactor at Brookhaven National Laboratory

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Costantino, C.J.; Heymsfield, E.; Park, Y.J.; Hofmayer, C.H.

    1991-01-01

    This paper presents the results of a calculation to determine the site specific seismic hazard appropriate for the deep soil site at Brookhaven National Laboratory (BNL) which is to be used in the risk assessment studies being conducted for the High Flux Beam Reactor (HFBR). The calculations use as input the seismic hazard defined for the bedrock outcrop by a study conducted at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL). Variability in site soil properties were included in the calculations to obtain the seismic hazard at the ground surface and compare these results with those using the generic amplification factors from the LLNL study

  19. The Relationships between University Students' Chemistry Laboratory Anxiety, Attitudes, and Self-Efficacy Beliefs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kurbanoglu, N. Izzet; Akin, Ahmet

    2010-01-01

    The aim of this study is to examine the relationships between chemistry laboratory anxiety, chemistry attitudes, and self-efficacy. Participants were 395 university students. Participants completed the Chemistry Laboratory Anxiety Scale, the Chemistry Attitudes Scale, and the Self-efficacy Scale. Results showed that chemistry laboratory anxiety…

  20. Google+ as a Tool for Use in Cooperative Laboratory Activities between Universities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Puig-Ortiz, Joan; Pàmies-Vilà, Rosa; Martinez Miralles, Jordi Ramon

    2015-01-01

    The following is a proposal for collaboration between universities with the aim to improve curricula that require laboratory activities. A methodology is suggested to implement an innovative educational project involving the exchange of laboratory activities. The exchange of laboratory activities can be carried out on different levels of…

  1. Aerial radiological survey of the Industrial Reactor Laboratory and surrounding area Plainsboro, New Jersey

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1980-12-01

    An airborne radiological survey of a 6 km 2 area centered over the Industrial Reactor Laboratory was made 25-27 July 1979. Detected radioisotopes and their associated gamma ray exposure rates were consistent with that expected from normal background emitters, except at two locations described in this report. Count rates observed at 46 m altitude were converted to exposure rates at 1 m above the ground and are presented in the form of an isopleth map

  2. The Laboratory for School Science at the University of Oslo

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sjoberg, Svein

    1976-01-01

    Describes the purposes of the Center for Science Education at the University of Oslo as follows: to give help and advice to acting teachers; to make the staff at the university more aware of the needs and problems of the schools. Outlines the activities involved in fulfilling these purposes. (GS)

  3. Cold neutron PGAA facility developments at university research reactors in the USA

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Uenlue, K.; Rios-Martinez, C.

    2005-01-01

    The PGAA applications can be enhanced by using subthermal neutrons, cold neutrons at university research reactors. Only two cold neutron beam facilities were developed at the U.S. university research reactors, namely at Cornell University and the University of Texas at Austin. Both facilities used mesitylene moderator. The mesitylene moderator in the Cornell Cold Neutron Beam Facility (CNBF) was cooled by a helium cryorefrigerator via copper cold fingers to maintain the moderator below 30 K at full power reactor operation. Texas Cold Neutron Source (TCNS) also uses mesitylene moderator that is cooled by a cryorefrigerator via a neon thermosiphon. The operation of the TCNS is based on a helium cryorefrigerator, which liquefies neon gas in a 3-m long thermosiphon. The thermosiphon cools and maintains mesitylene moderator at about 30 K in a chamber. Neutrons streaming through the mesitylene chamber are moderated and thus reduce their energy to produce a cold neutron distribution. (author)

  4. Neutronics calculations for the Oak Ridge National Laboratory Tokamak Reactor Studies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Santoro, R.T.; Baker, V.C.; Barnes, J.M.

    1976-01-01

    Neutronics calculations have been carried out to analyze the nuclear performance of conceptual blanket and shield designs for the Tokamak Experimental Power Reactor (EPR) and the Tokamak Demonstration Reactor Plant (DRP) being considered at the Oak Ridge National Laboratory. These reactor designs represent a sequence in the commercialization of fusion-generated electrical power. All of the calculations were carried out using the one-dimensional discrete ordinates code ANISN and the latest available ENDF/B-IV coupled neutron-gamma-ray transport cross-section data, fluence-to-kerma conversion factors, and radiation damage cross-section data. The calculations include spatial and integral heating-rate estimates in the reactor with emphasis on the recovery of fusion neutron energy in the blanket and limiting the heat-deposition rate in the superconducting toroidal field coils. Radiation damage due to atomic displacements and gas production produced in the reactor structural material and in the toroidal field coil windings were also estimated. The tritium-breeding ratio when natural lithium is used as the fertile material in the DRP blanket and in the experimental breeding modules in the EPR is also given

  5. The Role of Computer-Based Educational Laboratories in Nuclear Engineering University Programmes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Korolev, S.A.; Kosilov, A.N.; Chernov, E.V.; Vygovskiy, S.B.

    2014-01-01

    The specialized Educational and research laboratory 'Reactor physics, control and safe operation of WWER type NPP’ is based on the computer simulator of WWER -1000 and offers the real-time monitoring of data available to the WWER -1000 NPP control room operators, and provides a possibility to investigate reactor behavior in normal and abnormal situations. The laboratory supports interactive technologies and team-based activities that enable students to build their knowledge through required gateway courses and explore problems relevant to real life situations

  6. The communication of laboratory investigations by university entrants

    Science.gov (United States)

    Campbell, Bob; Kaunda, Loveness; Allie, Saalih; Buffler, Andy; Lubben, Fred

    2000-10-01

    The purpose of the study reported here was to analyse the ways in which unversity entrant science students carry out and communicate experimental activities and to identify a model to explain characteristic communication practices. The study was prompted by a need to inform the development of an introductory laboratory course. The students studied shared an educational background characterised by a lack of experience with laboratory work and scientific writing. Seven groups of three students were studied. The investigative strategies of these groups were observed. Laboratory reports were used to identify the ways in which students communicated these strategies. Data are presented that show a discrepancy between the strategies used and those reported. The results suggest that: (i) students' perceptions of the purpose of a laboratory task influence their decisions on what to report; (ii) understandings of laboratory procedures greatly influence their decision on what to report and on how much detail to include in a report and; (iii) knowledge of discourse rules contributes to effective reporting. It is concluded that students' communication of an investigation results from the differential operation of various perceptual filters that determine both the procedural and discourse elements of their reports. It is recommended that the communication of science should be taught explicitly and alongside the procedures and concepts of science.

  7. Low temperature irradiation facility at Kyoto University Reactor (KUR)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Atobe, Kozo; Okada, Moritami; Yoshida, Hiroyuki; Kodaka, Hisao; Miyata, Kiyomi.

    1977-01-01

    A new refrigeration system has been substituted to the low temperature irradiation facility at KUR instead of the previous one, since April in 1975. The model 1204 CTi He liquifier was designed to be modified for the refrigerator with the capacity of 30 watts at 10 K. The refrigeration capacity of 38 watts at 10 K was defined using a special cryostat and transfer-tubes, and the lowest temperature of about 18 K was measured using the irradiation loop without reactor operation. The reconstructed facility enables us to hold the many specimens simultaneously in the sample chamber of the irradiation loop at about 25 K during reactor operation of 5 MW. The irradiation dose has been reached about 6.6 x 10 16 n sub(f)/cm 2 and 6.1 x 10 17 n sub(th)/cm 2 with the normal reactor operation cycle of up to 77 hours. The stable operation condition of the machine and the special safety system for the refrigeration system enable us to maintain easily the facility with a constant operation condition for such a long time irradiation. Many kinds of low temperature neutron irradiation experiments are carried out using the facility, which techniques are partially reported. (auth.)

  8. Willow Run Laboratories: Separating from the University of Michigan

    Science.gov (United States)

    Walsh, John

    1972-01-01

    Outlines the reasons for, and the problems involved in, separation of a research center from the University of Michigan in order to become an independent research organization contracting for private and military research. (AL)

  9. Fuel burnup analysis of the TRIGA Mark II reactor at the University of Pavia

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chiesa, Davide; Clemenza, Massimiliano; Pozzi, Stefano; Previtali, Ezio; Sisti, Monica; Alloni, Daniele; Magrotti, Giovanni; Manera, Sergio; Prata, Michele; Salvini, Andrea; Cammi, Antonio; Zanetti, Matteo; Sartori, Alberto

    2016-01-01

    Highlights: • A fuel evolution model for a TRIGA Mark II reactor has been developed. • Reproduction of nearly 50 years of reactor operation. • The model was used to predict the best reactor reconfiguration. • Reactor life was extended without adding fresh fuel elements. - Abstract: A time evolution model was developed to study fuel burnup for the TRIGA Mark II reactor at the University of Pavia. The results were used to predict the effects of a complete core reconfiguration and the accuracy of this prediction was tested experimentally. We used the Monte Carlo code MCNP5 to reproduce system neutronics in different operating conditions and to analyze neutron fluxes in the reactor core. The software that took care of time evolution, completely designed in-house, used the neutron fluxes obtained by MCNP5 to evaluate fuel consumption. This software was developed specifically to keep into account some features that differentiate low power experimental reactors from those used for power production, such as the daily ON/OFF cycle and the long fuel lifetime. These effects can not be neglected to properly account for neutron poison accumulation. We evaluated the effect of 48 years of reactor operation and predicted a possible new configuration for the reactor core: the objective was to remove some of the fuel elements from the core and to obtain a substantial increase in the Core Excess reactivity value. The evaluation of fuel burnup and the reconfiguration results are presented in this paper.

  10. Study of a new automatic reactor power control for the TRIGA Mark II reactor at University of Pavia

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Borio Di Tigliole, A.; Magrotti, G. [Laboratorio Energia Nucleare Applicata (L.E.N.A.), University of Pavia, Via Aselli 41, 27100 (Italy); Cammi, A.; Memoli, V. [Politecnico di Milano, Department of Energy, Nuclear Engineering Division (CeSNEF), Via Ponzio 34/3, 20133 Milano (Italy); Gadan, M. A. [Instrumentation and Control Department, National Atomic Energy Comission of Argentina, University of Pavia (Italy)

    2009-07-01

    The installation of a new Instrumentation and Control (IC) system for the TRIGA Mark-II reactor at University of Pavia has recently been completed in order to assure a safe and continuous reactor operation for the future. The intervention involved nearly the whole IC system and required a channel-by-channel component substitution. One of the most sensitive part of the intervention concerned the Automatic Reactor Power Controller (ARPC) which permits to keep the reactor at an operator-selected power level acting on the control rod devoted to the fine regulation of system reactivity. This controller installed can be set up using different control logics: currently the system is working in relay mode. The main goal of the work presented in this paper is to set up a Proportional-Integral-Derivative (PID) configuration of the new controller installed on the TRIGA reactor of Pavia so as to optimize the response to system perturbations. The analysis have shown that a continuous PID offers generally better results than the relay mode which causes power oscillations with an amplitude of 3% of the nominal power

  11. Monte Carlo Analysis of the Accelerator-Driven System at Kyoto University Research Reactor Institute

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wonkyeong Kim

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available An accelerator-driven system consists of a subcritical reactor and a controllable external neutron source. The reactor in an accelerator-driven system can sustain fission reactions in a subcritical state using an external neutron source, which is an intrinsic safety feature of the system. The system can provide efficient transmutations of nuclear wastes such as minor actinides and long-lived fission products and generate electricity. Recently at Kyoto University Research Reactor Institute (KURRI; Kyoto, Japan, a series of reactor physics experiments was conducted with the Kyoto University Critical Assembly and a Cockcroft–Walton type accelerator, which generates the external neutron source by deuterium–tritium reactions. In this paper, neutronic analyses of a series of experiments have been re-estimated by using the latest Monte Carlo code and nuclear data libraries. This feasibility study is presented through the comparison of Monte Carlo simulation results with measurements.

  12. Monte Carlo analysis of the accelerator-driven system at Kyoto University Research Reactor Institute

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Won Kyeong; Lee, Deok Jung [Nuclear Engineering Division, Ulsan National Institute of Science and Technology, Ulsan (Korea, Republic of); Lee, Hyun Chul [VHTR Technology Development Division, Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of); Pyeon, Cheol Ho [Nuclear Engineering Science Division, Kyoto University Research Reactor Institute, Osaka (Japan); Shin, Ho Cheol [Core and Fuel Analysis Group, Korea Hydro and Nuclear Power Central Research Institute, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of)

    2016-04-15

    An accelerator-driven system consists of a subcritical reactor and a controllable external neutron source. The reactor in an accelerator-driven system can sustain fission reactions in a subcritical state using an external neutron source, which is an intrinsic safety feature of the system. The system can provide efficient transmutations of nuclear wastes such as minor actinides and long-lived fission products and generate electricity. Recently at Kyoto University Research Reactor Institute (KURRI; Kyoto, Japan), a series of reactor physics experiments was conducted with the Kyoto University Critical Assembly and a Cockcroft-Walton type accelerator, which generates the external neutron source by deuterium-tritium reactions. In this paper, neutronic analyses of a series of experiments have been re-estimated by using the latest Monte Carlo code and nuclear data libraries. This feasibility study is presented through the comparison of Monte Carlo simulation results with measurements.

  13. University Reactor Instrumentation Program. Final report, September 30, 1993--March 31, 1996

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1997-01-01

    The University of Massachusetts Lowell Research Reactor has received a total of $115,723.00 from the Department of Energy (DOE) Instrumentation Program (DOE Grant No. DE-FG02-91ID13083) and $40,000 in matching funds from the University of Massachusetts Lowell administration. The University of Massachusetts Lowell Research Reactor has been serving the University and surrounding communities since it first achieved criticality in May 1974. The principle purpose of the facility is to provide a multidisciplinary research and training center for the University of Massachusetts Lowell and other New England academic institutions. The facility promotes student and industrial research, in addition to providing education and training for nuclear scientists, technicians, and engineers. The 1 MW thermal reactor contains a variety of experimental facilities which, along with a 0.4 megacurie cobalt source, effectively supports the research and educational programs of many university departments including Biology, Chemistry, Nuclear and Plastics Engineering, Radiological Sciences, Physics, and other campuses of the University of Massachusetts system. Although the main focus of the facility is on intra-university research, use by those outside the university is fully welcomed and highly encouraged

  14. University of Arizona TRIGA reactor. Annual utilization report, 1984-1985

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nelson, G.W.

    1986-01-01

    This is the annual report for the University of Arizona TRIGA Reactor under Contract No. DE-AC02-76ER02096 covering the period July 1, 1984 through June 30, 1985, including the 1984-85 Academic Year. The purpose of this report is to document the facility usage which is possible because of DOE support under the contract. The reactor is operated under License R-52 with the United States Nuclear Regulatory Commission

  15. A human reliability analysis of the University of New Mexico's AGN- 201M nuclear research reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Brumburgh, G.P.; Heger, A.S.

    1992-01-01

    During 1990--1991, a probabilistic risk assessment was conducted on the University of New Mexico's AGN-201M nuclear research reactor to address the risk and consequence of a maximum hypothetical release accident. The assessment indicated a potential for consequential human error to precipitate Chis scenario. Subsequently, a human reliability analysis was performed to evaluate the significance of human interaction on the reactor's safety systems. This paper presents the results of that investigation

  16. New control and safety rod unit for the training reactor of the Dresden Technical University

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Adam, E.; Schab, J.; Knorr, J.

    1983-01-01

    The extension of the experimental training of students at the training reactor AKR of the Dresden Technical University requires the reconstruction of the reactor with a new control and safety rod unit. The specific conditions at the AKR led to a new variant. Results of preliminary experiments, design and mode of operation of the first unit as well as hitherto gained operation experiences are presented. (author)

  17. From Cookbook to Collaborative: Transforming a University Biology Laboratory Course

    Science.gov (United States)

    Herron, Sherry S.

    2009-01-01

    As described in "How People Learn," "Developing Biological Literacy," and by the Commission on Undergraduate Education in the Biological Sciences during the 1960s and early 1970s, laboratories should promote guided-inquiries or investigations, and not simply consist of cookbook or verification activities. However, the only word that could describe…

  18. Energy Programs at the Johns Hopkins University Applied Physics Laboratory, Quarterly Report, July-September 1980

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    None

    1980-09-01

    The Johns Hopkins University Applied Physics Laboratory, under contracts with several agencies of the federal government, is engaged in developing energy resources, utilization concepts, and monitoring and storage methods. This Quarterly Report summarizes the work on the various tasks as of 31 September 1980. The Energy Quarterly Report is divided into four sections. The first, Geothermal Energy Development Planning and Technical Assistance, supported by the Department of Energy/Division of Geothermal Energy (DOE/DGE), contains reports on the progress of geothermal-related tasks on which effort was concentrated during the quarter. The second section, Operational Research, Hydroelectric Power Development, supported by the Department of Energy/Resource Applications (DOE/RA), contains reports on small-scale hydroelectric investigations in the southeastern states. The third section, Seismotectonic Investigations, supported by the Reactor Safety Research Division of the Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC), reports on neotectonic investigations of the Manhattan Prong. The fourth section, Energy Conversion and Storage Techniques, contains three articles. The first is an evaluation of the Einstein refrigerator, supported by independent IR&D funds. The second concerns OTEC pilot plant performance calculations, supported by the Department of Energy/Division of Central Solar Technology (DOE/CST). The third, describing a study of landfill methane recovery, is supported by the National Park Service.

  19. Energy Programs at the Johns Hopkins University Applied Physics Laboratory, Quarterly Report, January-March 1980

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Entingh, Daniel J.

    1980-03-01

    The Johns Hopkins University Applied Physics Laboratory, under contracts with several agencies of the federal government and an agency of the State of Maryland, is engaged in developing energy resources, utilization concepts, and monitoring and storage methods. This Quarterly Report summarizes the work on the various tasks as of 31 March 1980. The Energy Quarterly Report is divided into four sections. The first, Geothermal Energy Development Planning and Technical Assistance, supported by the Department of Energy/Division of Geothermal Energy (DOE/DGE), contains reports on the progress of geothermal-related tasks on which effort was concentrated during the quarter. The second section, Operational Research, Hydroelectric Power Development, supported by the Department of Energy/Resource Applications (DOE/DGE), contains reports on small-scale hydroelectric investigations in the southeastern states. The third section, Seismotectonic Investigation, supported by the Reactor Safety Research Division of the Nuclear Regulatory Commission, reports on a neotectonic investigation in Connecticut. The fourth section, Energy Conversion and Storage Techniques, contains two articles, the first on OTEC core unit testing supported by the Department of Energy/Division of Central Solar Technology (DOE/CST), and the second on an analysis of the Community Annual Storage Energy System at the U.S. Naval Air Station, Norfolk, Va. This work is supported by the Department of Energy and the Department of Defense, Naval Facilities Engineering Command/Atlantic Division.

  20. A history of effluent releases from the Texas A and M University reactor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bates, E F; Neff, R D; Sandel, P S; Schoenbucher, B [Texas A and M University (United States)

    1974-07-01

    Since 1966 records of radioactive effluents releases from the Texas A and M University Research Reactor have been compiled. These data include particulate activity, noble gases, and liquid effluent releases. Particulate activity releases with half-lives greater than eight days were negligible and are not included in this presentation. Conversion from an MTR plate reactor to a TRIGA fueled reactor was completed in August 1968. Records of effluent releases of Argon-4l and liquids for the past, five years are summarized, in this presentation. These release data are compared to the current limits specified: in 10 CPR 20 and the limits appearing in proposed Appendix.

  1. Conversion and standardization of university reactor fuels using low-enrichment uranium - Options and costs

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Harris, D.R.; Matos, J.E.; Young, H.H.

    1985-01-01

    The highly-enriched uranium (HEU) fuel used in twenty United States university reactors can be viewed as contributing to the risk of theft or diversion of weapons-useable material. The U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission has issued a policy statement expressing its concern and has published a proposed rule on limiting the use of HEU in NRC-licensed non-power reactors. The fuel options, functional impacts, licensing, and scheduling of conversion and standardization of these reactor fuels to use of low-enrichment uranium (LEU) have been assessed. The university reactors span a wide range in form and function, from medium-power intense neutron sources where HEU fuel may be required, to low-power training and research facilities where HEU fuel is unnecessary. Conversion provides an opportunity to standardize university reactor fuels and improve reactor utilization in some cases. The entire program is estimated to cost about $10 million and to last about five years. Planning for conversion and standardization is facilitated by the U.S. Department of Energy. (author)

  2. Conversion and standardization of university reactor fuels using low-enrichment uranium - options and costs

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Harris, D.R.; Matos, J.E.; Young, H.H.

    1985-01-01

    The highly-enriched uranium (HEU) fuel used in twenty United States university reactors can be viewed as contributing to the risk of theft or diversion of weapons-useable material. The US Nuclear Regulatory Commission has issued a policy statement expressing its concern and has published a proposed rule on limiting the use of HEU in NRC-licensed non-power reactors. The fuel options, functional impacts, licensing, and scheduling of conversion and standardization of these reactor fuels to use of low-enrichment uranium (LEU) have been assessed. The university reactors span a wide range in form and function, from medium-power intense neutron sources where HEU fuel may be required, to low-power training and research facilities where HEU fuel is unnecessary. Conversion provides an opportunity to standardize university reactor fuels and improve reactor utilization in some cases. The entire program is estimated to cost about $10 million and to last about five years. Planning for conversion and standardization is facilitated by the US Department of Energy. 20 refs., 1 tab

  3. Neutron activation analysis in an industrial laboratory using an off-site nuclear reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Osborn, T.W.; Broering, W.B.

    1977-01-01

    A multifunctional research laboratory, such as Procter and Gamble's Miami Valley Laboratories, requires elemental analyses on many materials. A general survey technique is important even if the information it provides is incomplete or is less precise than single element analyses. Procter and Gamble has developed neutron activation analysis (NAA) capabilities using a nuclear reactor several hundred miles away. The concentration of 40 to 50 elements can be determined in a variety of matrices. We have found NAA to be a powerful supplement to some of the more classical analytical techniques even without having an on-site neutron source. We have also found an automated data acquisition system to be essential for the successful application of NAA in an industrial laboratory

  4. Programs with societal benefits at the Cornell University TRIGA reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Clark, D.D.; Aderhold, H.C.; Hossain, T.Z.

    1993-01-01

    In its 30 yr of operation, the Cornell TRIGA reactor has been used for many educational and research programs that provide general benefits to society. In addition to supporting graduate-level education of nuclear scientists and engineers, it has been extensively used in undergraduate and graduate courses and research by nonspecialists and, through the medium of tours, in education of the general public. Some educational functions have been described previously. In this paper, examples are presented of research of societal interest in nonnuclear fields. The first two rely mainly on radiography, and the remaining five on neutron activation analysis (NAA)

  5. Tribal lands provide forest management laboratory for mainstream university students

    Science.gov (United States)

    Serra J. Hoagland; Ronald Miller; Kristen M. Waring; Orlando Carroll

    2017-01-01

    Northern Arizona University (NAU) faculty and Bureau of Indian Affairs (BIA) foresters initiated a partnership to expose NAU School of Forestry (SoF) graduate students to tribal forest management practices by incorporating field trips to the 1.68-million acre Fort Apache Indian Reservation as part of their silviculture curriculum. Tribal field trips were contrasted and...

  6. Accident Analyses for Conversion of the University of Missouri Research Reactor (MURR) from Highly-Enriched to Low-Enriched Uranium

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Stillman, J. A. [Argonne National Lab. (ANL), Argonne, IL (United States); Feldman, E. E. [Argonne National Lab. (ANL), Argonne, IL (United States); Jaluvka, D. [Argonne National Lab. (ANL), Argonne, IL (United States); Wilson, E. H. [Argonne National Lab. (ANL), Argonne, IL (United States); Foyto, L. P. [Univ. of Missouri, Columbia, MO (United States); Kutikkad, K. [Univ. of Missouri, Columbia, MO (United States); McKibben, J. C. [Univ. of Missouri, Columbia, MO (United States); Peters, N. J. [Univ. of Missouri, Columbia, MO (United States)

    2017-02-01

    This report contains the results of reactor accident analyses for the University of Missouri Research Reactor (MURR). The calculations were performed as part of the conversion from the use of highly-enriched uranium (HEU) fuel to the use of low-enriched uranium (LEU) fuel. The analyses were performed by staff members in the Research and Test Reactor Department at the Argonne National Laboratory (ANL) and the MURR Facility. MURR LEU conversion is part of an overall effort to develop and qualify high-density fuel within the U.S. High Performance Research Reactor Conversion (USHPRR) program conducted by the U.S. Department of Energy National Nuclear Security Administration’s Office of Material Management and Minimization (M3).

  7. Energy Programs at the Johns Hopkins University Applied Physics Laboratory, Quarterly Report, October-December 1980

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    None

    1980-12-01

    The Johns Hopkins University Applied Physics Laboratory is engaged in developing energy resources, utilization concepts, and monitoring and storage methods. This Quarterly Report summarizes the work on the various tasks as of 31 December 1980. The Energy Quarterly Report is divided into five sections. The first, Geothermal Energy Development Planning and Technical Assistance, supported by the Department of Energy/Division of Geothermal Energy (DOE/DGE), contains reports on the progress of geothermal-related tasks on which effort was concentrated during the quarter. The second section, Operational Research, Hydroelectric Power Development, supported by the Department of Energy/Resource Applications (DOE/RA), contains a report on institutional problems for small-scale hydroelectric power development in the southeastern states and a list of documents published by APL in the hydroelectric program and in the geothermal program, above. The third section, Seismotectonic Investigations, contains an article on work on the geologic structure of the Danbury Quadrangle that is supported by the Reactor Safety Research Division of the Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) and an in-house supported study on a new method for assessing earthquakes in intraplate regions. The fourth section, Energy Conversion and Storage Techniques, contains four articles. The first is an evaluation of the Einstein refrigerator, supported by independent IR and D funds. The second concerns fly-wheel technology development at APL supported by the Department of Energy, Division of Energy Storage (DOE/STOR). The third is a report on APL energy conservation efforts at its own buildings, and the fourth is an article on liquefied natural gas (LNG) safety evaluation, supported by the National Academy of Sciences. The fifth section explores the value of establishing an Energy Research Institute at The Johns Hopkins University.

  8. Advanced liquid metal reactor development at Argonne National Laboratory during the 1980s

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wade, D.C.

    1990-01-01

    Argonne National Laboratory's (ANL'S) effort to pursue the exploitation of liquid metal cooled reactor (LMR) characteristics has given rise to the Integral Fast Reactor (IFR) concept, and has produced substantial technical advancement in concept implementation which includes demonstration of high burnup capability of metallic fuel, demonstration of injection casting fabrication, integral demonstration of passive safety response, and technical feasibility of pyroprocessing. The first half decade of the 90's will host demonstration of the IFR closed fuel cycle technology at the prototype scale. The EBR-II reactor will be fueled with ternary alloy fuel in HT-9 cladding and ducts, and pyroprocessing and injection casting refabrication of EBR-II fuel will be conducted using near-commercial sized equipment at the Fuel cycle Facility (FCF) which is co-located adjacent to EBR-II. Demonstration will start in 1992. The demonstration of passive safety response achievable with the IFR design concept, (already done in EBR-II in 1986) will be repeated in the mid 90's using the IFR prototype recycle fuel from the FCF. The demonstration of scrubbing of the reprocessing fission product waste stream, with recycle of the transuranics to the reactor for consumption, will also occur in the mid 90's. 30 refs

  9. U.S. university reactors: What they are and what they do

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Young, H.H.

    1992-01-01

    One of the most underappreciated facts in the academic and industrial communities today is that there are 35 licensed university nuclear research and training reactors in operation on 33 campuses (two universities have two reactors each) in 25 states. These facilities, in conjunction with their respective nuclear engineering and science departments, provide the professional expertise and the backbone of our nation's human resources for exploiting the nuclear sciences and technology on which so much of society depends today. Areas of contribution and service include biomedical applications (therapy and diagnosis), radioisotope tracer applications, neutron activation analysis and detection, materials testing and enhancement, neutron radiography applications, and radioisotope production, to name just a few

  10. The University of Missouri Research Reactor HEU to LEU conversion project status

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    McKibben, James C; Kutikkad, Kiratadas; Foyto, Leslie P; Peters, Nickie J; Solbrekken, Gary L; Kennedy, John [University of Missouri Research Reactor, Missouri (United States); Stillman, John A; Feldman, Earl E; Tzanos, Constantine P; Stevens, John G [Argonne National Laboratory, Argonne, Illinois (United States)

    2012-03-15

    The University of Missouri Research Reactor (MURR) is one of five U.S. high performance research and test reactors that are actively collaborating with the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) to find a suitable low-enriched uranium (LEU) fuel replacement for the currently required highly-enriched uranium (HEU) fuel. A conversion feasibility study based on U-10Mo monolithic LEU fuel was completed in 2009. It was concluded that the proposed LEU fuel assembly design, in conjunction with an increase in power level from 10 to 12 MWth, will (1) maintain safety margins during operation, (2) allow operating fuel cycle lengths to be maintained for efficient and effective use of the facility, and (3) preserve an acceptable level and spectrum of key neutron fluxes to meet the scientific mission of the facility. The MURR and Argonne National Laboratory (ANL) team is continuing to work toward realization of the conversion. The 'Preliminary Safety Analysis Report Methodologies and Scenarios for LEU Conversion of MURR' was completed in June 2011. This report documents design parameter values critical to the Fuel Development (FD), Fuel Fabrication Capability (FFC) and Hydromechanical Fuel Test Facility (HMFTF) projects. The report also provides a preliminary evaluation of safety analysis techniques and data that will be needed to complete the fuel conversion Safety Analysis Report (SAR), especially those related to the U-10Mo monolithic LEU fuel. Specific studies are underway to validate the proposed path to an LEU fuel conversion. Coupled fluid-structure simulations and experiments are being conducted to understand the hydrodynamic plate deformation risk for 0.965 mm (38 mil) thick fuel plates. Methodologies that were recently developed to answer the U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) Request for Additional Information (RAI) regarding the MURR 2006 relicensing submittal will be used in the LEU conversion effort. Transition LEU fuel elements that will have a minimal impact on

  11. University research reactors in the United States: Their role and value

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1988-01-01

    This report is primarily addressed to the people who make decisions affecting the levels of future university reactor programs URR: university administrators, department heads, federal policy makers, state and local policy makers, those in industry and government who depend upon a supply of nuclear-trained personnel, and those who are concerned with the future of the many sciences that benefit from the unique capabilities of nuclear-based techniques as well as from the nuclear sciences themselves. The major thrust of this report is to illustrate the scientific and social benefits and contributions associated with well-managed and well-funded university reactor programs. The intent is to help a decision maker gain a perspective and appreciation of the scientific, academic, social, and technical values of URR programs. The report also examines the role of university-like reactors in Europe, where a productive community of researchers is apparently served in an exemplary manner. The committee, assesses the security and safeguard needs at small reactors in a university setting in order to help gain a perspective on the potential hazards and relative risks involved. The last chapter discusses the kind of commitment and support needed if a significant population of URRs is to remain productive. 83 refs., 11 figs., 2 tabs

  12. Research on neutron radiography in Research Reactor Institute, Kyoto University and activities related to it

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fujine, Shigenori; Yoneda, Kenji

    1994-01-01

    The research on neutron radiography in Research Reactor Institute, Kyoto University was begun in 1974 using the E-2 experimental hole which was designed for neutron irradiation. It was reconstructed for the excellent performance as neutron radiography facility by fixing aluminum plugs, a collimator and so on. The research activities thereafter are briefly described. In 1989, the cold neutron facility was installed in the graphite thermal neutron facility, and the experiment on cold neutron radiography became feasible. The reactor in Kyoto University is of the thermal output of 5 MW, and is put to the joint utilization by universities and research institutes in whole Japan. The experimental items carried out so far are enumerated. At present, the main subjects of research are the development of the standard for establishing image evaluation method, the analysis of gas-liquid two-phase flow, the construction of the data base for the literatures and images of neutron radiography, the application of cold neutron radiography, the development of the imaging method using fast neutrons and so on. The thermal neutron radiography and the cold neutron radiography facilities of Kyoto University research reactor are described. The research and activities at Kyoto University research reactor and the investigation of problems are reported. (K.I.) 56 refs

  13. Annual review of Plasma Physics Laboratory, Kyoto University, April, 1983

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1983-04-01

    The devices for additionally heating joul-heated plasma in the Heliotron E, such as electron cyclotron resonance heating and neutral beam injection, were in operation in 1982. In the ECRH experiment, the microwaves of 200 kW at 28 GHz were generated by a gyrotron, but the pulse width was extended from 10 ms to 40 ms this year. By this, a currentless plasma of Te-1 keV was achieved. In the NB1 experiment, the neutral beam of about 1.5 MW was injected into joule-heated plasma, and the plasma of Ti(O)-950 eV, Te(O)-800 eV and Ne = 3 x 10 19 /m 3 was attained. The first experiment to inject neutral beam into ECRH currentless plasma was carried out. By this method, the density of the plasma increased as well as the ion temperature and electron temperature. As to the theory, a critical beta was calculated by using stellarator expansion, which should be 3 to 7 % in the Heliotron E. Two gyrotrons of 200 kW at 53 GHz each and an ion cyclotron resonance heating equipment of 1.5 MW at 26.7 MHz are prepared. As to the reactor study, the design of Heliotron H in the first phase was completed. The location of impurity sources in NB1 ion sources and beam lines was found. (Kako, I.)

  14. Annual review of Plasma Physics Laboratory, Kyoto University, July, 1981

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1981-07-01

    The construction of the Heliotron E was completed in June, 1980. After the preliminary examination for two months and the improvement of the power supply, the Joule heating experiment was carried out from September, 1980, to January, 1981. The experiment of electron cyclotron resonance heating was also carried out in January, 1981. Then, experiment was stopped to install the neutral beam injection apparatus. The results obtained by both experiments are reported. The target may be attained by producing high density plasma with low plasma current, and heating the plasma by NBI additionally. In the ECRH experiment, plasma was produced and heated successfully without Joule heating current, by the Gyrotron with 200 kW power output. The favorable results of the confinement experiment with current-free plasma indicate the possibility of a stationary fusion reactor of Heliotron type. The Heliotron magnetic field configuration was proposed in 1959, and since then, the experiments of Heliotron A, B, C, D and DM were carried out in succession. Now, the purpose of the experiment to prove the principle is being achieved with Heliotron E. Hope is placed on the NBI experiment in preparation. (Kako, I.)

  15. Annual report of Nuclear Engineering Research Laboratory, University of Tokyo in fiscal 1993

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1994-08-01

    In this annual report, the activities of research and education, the state of operation of research facilities and others in fiscal year 1993 are summarized. Four main research facilities are the fast neutron source reactor 'Yayoi', the electron linear accelerator, the basic experiment facility for nuclear fusion reactor blanket design and the heavy irradiation research facility. The reactor and the accelerator are for the joint utilization by all universities in Japan, the blanket is used by the Faculty of Engineering, and the HIT is for the joint utilization in University of Tokyo. In fiscal year 1993, the installation of the fast neutron science research facility was approved. In this annual report, the management and operation of the above research facilities are described, and the research activities, the theses for doctorate and graduation theses of teachers, are summarized. (K.I.)

  16. Laboratory report on RF superconductivity at Peking University

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kui, Zhao; Baocheng, Zhang; Lifang, Wang; Jin, Yu; Rongli, Geng; Genfa, Wu; Tong, Wang; Jinhu, Song; Chia-erh, Chen

    1996-01-01

    The activities on RF superconductivity at Peking University in the past two years are reported. Two 1.5 GHz Nb cavities were successfully fabricated using Chinese Nb sheets in 1994. One of the cavities has been measured, and the results are given. A laser driven DC electron gun has been designed and constructed which is the pre-testing device of photo-electron gun using superconducting cavity. A series of experiments on the cathode and cavity will be performed in the near future. Two superconducting accelerating devices are being considered for two projects in China. (R.P.)

  17. New research facilities at the University of Missouri research reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    McKibben, J.C.; Rhyne, J.J.

    1992-01-01

    The University of Missouri-Columbia is investing its resources for a significant expansion of the research capabilities and utilization of MURR to provide it the opportunity to deliver on its obligation to become the nation's premier educational institution in nuclear-related fields and so that it can provide scientific personnel and a state-of-the-art research test bed to support the national need for highly trained graduates in nuclear science and engineering

  18. Evaporation Basin Test Reactor Area, Idaho National Engineering Laboratory: Environmental assessment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1991-12-01

    The Department of Energy (DOE) has prepared an environmental assessment (EA), DOE/EA-0501, on the construction and operation of the proposed Evaporation Basin at the Test Reactor Area (TRA) at the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory (INEL) near Idaho Falls, Idaho. Based on the analyses in the EA, DOE has determined that the proposed action is not a major Federal action significantly affecting the quality of the human environment, within the meaning of the National Environmental Policy Act (NEPA) of 1969. Therefore, the preparation of an environmental impact statement (EIS) is not required, and the Department is issuing this Finding of No Significant Impact

  19. A Place for Materials Science: Laboratory Buildings and Interdisciplinary Research at the University of Pennsylvania

    Science.gov (United States)

    Choi, Hyungsub; Shields, Brit

    2015-01-01

    The Laboratory for Research on the Structure of Matter (LRSM), University of Pennsylvania, was built in 1965 as part of the Advanced Research Projects Agency's (ARPA) Interdisciplinary Laboratories (IDL) program intended to foster interdisciplinary research and training in materials science. The process that led to the construction of the…

  20. University Physics Students' Ideas of Thermal Radiation Expressed in Open Laboratory Activities Using Infrared Cameras

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haglund, Jesper; Melander, Emil; Weiszflog, Matthias; Andersson, Staffan

    2017-01-01

    Background: University physics students were engaged in open-ended thermodynamics laboratory activities with a focus on understanding a chosen phenomenon or the principle of laboratory apparatus, such as thermal radiation and a heat pump. Students had access to handheld infrared (IR) cameras for their investigations. Purpose: The purpose of the…

  1. The Physics Multimedia Laboratory at Arkansas State University

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sustich, Andrew

    1997-11-01

    With the help of an NSF-ILI grant, we have revamped our introductory calculus-based sequence. The course now meets six hours per week entirely in the laboratory without traditional lectures. Multimedia computers together with MBL probes and software provide a hands-on interactive curriculum that actively engages students throughout the class period. An innovative web-based individualized homework service provides for a meaningful homework component to the course and gives students immediate feedback on their solutions. We discuss impementation of this new course and results from its first offering. We will also discuss some of the problems associated with faculty attitudes and plans for conversion of the algebra-based sequence to a similar format.

  2. Minority and female training programs at the Ford Nuclear Reactor, University of Michigan

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Burn, R.R.

    1992-01-01

    Nuclear power industry operations staffs are composed predominantly of white males because most of the personnel come from the nuclear submarine and surface branches of the U.S. Navy. The purpose of the minority and female training programs sponsored by the Ford Nuclear Reactor at the University of Michigan is to provide a path for minorities and women to enter the nuclear industry as operators, technicians, and, in the long term, as graduate engineers. The training programs are aimed at high school students, preferably juniors. While the training is directed toward operation of a nuclear reactor, it is equally applicable to careers in most other technical fields. It is hoped that some of the participants will remain at the Ford Nuclear Reactor as reactor operators, enter college, and obtain college degrees, after which they will enter the nuclear industry as graduate engineers

  3. Computer modeling of the dynamic processes in the Maryland University Training Reactor - (MUTR)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    White, Bernard H. IV; Ebert, David

    1988-01-01

    The simulator described in this paper models the behaviour of the Maryland University Training Reactor (MUTR). The reactor is a 250 kW, TRIGA reactor. The computer model is based on a system of five primary equations and eight auxiliary equations. The primary equations consist of the prompt jump approximation, a heat balance equation for the fuel and the moderator, and iodine and xenon buildup equations. For the comparison with the computer program, data from the reactor was acquired by using a personal computer (pc) which contained a Strawberry Tree data acquisition Card, connected to the reactor. The systems monitored by the pc were: two neutron detectors, fuel temperature, water temperature, three control rod positions and the period meter. The time differenced equations were programmed in the basic language. It has been shown by this paper, that the MUTR power rise from low power critical to high power, can be modelled by a relatively simple computer program. The program yields accurate agreement considering the simplicity of the program. The steady state error between the reactor and computer power is 4.4%. The difference in steady state temperatures, 112 deg. C and 117 deg. C, of the reactor and computer program, respectively, also yields a 4.5% error. Further fine tuning of the coefficients will yield higher accuracies

  4. Planning and implementation of Istanbul Technical University TRIGA research reactor program

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Aybers, N.; Yavuz, H.; Bayulken, A.

    1982-01-01

    The Istanbul Technical University TRIGA Research Reactor at the Institute for Nuclear Energy, which went critical on March 11, 1979 is basically a pulsing type TRIGA Mark - II reactor. Completion of the ITU-TRR contributed to broaden the role of the Institute for Nuclear Energy of the Technical University in Istanbul in the nuclear field by providing for the first time adequate on-campus experimental facilities for nuclear engineering studies to ITU students. The research program which is currently under planning at ITU-NEE encompasses: a) Neutron activation analysis studies by techniques and applications to chemistry, mining, materials research, archaeological and biomedical studies; b) applications of Radioisotopes; c) Radiography with reactor neutron beams; d) Radiation Pulsing

  5. Report of the research results with University of Tokyo, Nuclear Engineering Research Laboratory's Facilities in fiscal 1983

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1984-01-01

    Much achievement was obtained also in fiscal 1983 by the common utilization of the nuclear reactor ''Yayoi'' and the linear accelerator in the Nuclear Engineering Research Laboratory, University of Tokyo. These results were summarized, and this report is published. In the utilization of the reactor ''Yayoi'', the period of operation and the maximum output were limited very much, because long cooling period is necessary to prepare for the repair of fuel cladding in the next year. Also foreign research students commonly utilized the reactor ''Yayoi''. The common utilization of the linear accelerator was begun six years ago, and now it is carried out widely and smoothly. The total number of those who commonly utilized the facilities reached 3,179. The summaries of the results of 5 on-pile researches, 17 off-pile researches, and 16 researches using the linear accelerator are collected. The committee meetings and study meetings held in fiscal 1983 are listed. The names of the members of various committees and the names of those in charge of various experiments are given. (Kako, I.)

  6. 'Experience with decommissioning of research and test reactors at Argonne National Laboratory'

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bhattacharyya, S.K.; Yule, T.J.; Fellhauer, C.R.; Boing, L.E.

    2002-01-01

    A large number of research reactors around the world have reached the end of their useful operational life. Many of these are kept in a controlled storage mode awaiting decontamination and decommissioning (D and D). At Argonne National Laboratory located near Chicago in the United States of America, significant experience has been gained in the D and D of research and test reactors. These experiences span the entire range of activities in D and D - from planning and characterization of the facilities to the eventual disposition of all waste. A multifaceted D nd D program has been in progress at the Argonne National Laboratory - East site for nearly a decade. The program consists of three elements: - D and D of nuclear facilities on the site that have reached the end of their useful life; - Development and demonstrations of technologies that help in safe and cost effective D and D; - Presentation of training courses in D and D practices. Nuclear reactor facilities have been constructed and operated at the ANL-E site since the earliest days of nuclear power. As a result, a number of these early reactors reached end-of-life long before reactors on other sites and were ready for D and D earlier. They presented an excellent set of test beds on which D and D practices and technologies could be demonstrated in environments that were similar to commercial reactors, but considerably less hazardous. As shown, four reactor facilities, plutonium contaminated glove boxes and hot cells, a cyclotron facility and assorted other nuclear related facilities have been decommissioned in this program. The overall cost of the program has been modest relative to the cost of comparable projects undertaken both in the U.S. and abroad. The safety record throughout the program was excellent. Complementing the actual operations, a set of D and D technologies are being developed. These include robotic methods of tool handling and operation, chemical and laser decontamination techniques, sensors

  7. Princeton University, Plasma Physics Laboratory annual report, October 1, 1988--September 30, 1989

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1989-12-31

    This report contains discussions on the following topics: principal parameters achieved in experimental devices (FY89); tokamak fusion test reactor; compact ignition tokamak; princeton beta experiment- modification; current drive experiment; international collaboration; x-ray laser studies; spacecraft glow experiment; plasma deposition and etching of thin films; theoretical studies; tokamak modeling; international thermonuclear experimental reactor; engineering department; project planning and safety office; quality assurance and reliability; technology transfer; administrative operations; PPPL patent invention disclosures for (FY89); graduate education: plasma physics; graduate education: plasma science and technology; and Princeton Plasmas Physics Laboratory Reports (FY89).

  8. Princeton University, Plasma Physics Laboratory annual report, October 1, 1988--September 30, 1989

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1989-01-01

    This report contains discussions on the following topics: principal parameters achieved in experimental devices (FY89); tokamak fusion test reactor; compact ignition tokamak; princeton beta experiment- modification; current drive experiment; international collaboration; x-ray laser studies; spacecraft glow experiment; plasma deposition and etching of thin films; theoretical studies; tokamak modeling; international thermonuclear experimental reactor; engineering department; project planning and safety office; quality assurance and reliability; technology transfer; administrative operations; PPPL patent invention disclosures for (FY89); graduate education: plasma physics; graduate education: plasma science and technology; and Princeton Plasmas Physics Laboratory Reports (FY89).

  9. Princeton University, Plasma Physics Laboratory annual report, October 1, 1988--September 30, 1989

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1989-01-01

    This report contains discussions on the following topics: principal parameters achieved in experimental devices (FY89); tokamak fusion test reactor; compact ignition tokamak; princeton beta experiment- modification; current drive experiment; international collaboration; x-ray laser studies; spacecraft glow experiment; plasma deposition and etching of thin films; theoretical studies; tokamak modeling; international thermonuclear experimental reactor; engineering department; project planning and safety office; quality assurance and reliability; technology transfer; administrative operations; PPPL patent invention disclosures for (FY89); graduate education: plasma physics; graduate education: plasma science and technology; and Princeton Plasmas Physics Laboratory Reports (FY89)

  10. Investigations of the reactivity temperature coefficient of the Dresden Technical University training and research reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Adam, E.; Knorr, J.

    1982-01-01

    Approximate formulas are derived for determining the temperature coefficient of reactivity of the training and research reactor (AKR) of the Dresden Technical University. Values calculated on the basis of these approximations show good agreement with experimentally obtained results, thus confirming the applicability of the formulas to simple systems

  11. The reconstruction of the training reactor of the Budapest Technical University

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Viragh, E.

    1981-01-01

    The reconstruction of the training reactor between 1978 and 1981 did not hinder the education and training activities of the University. Dosimetric measurements during the test run revealed no additional hazard from the elevation of power from 10 to 100 kW. (author)

  12. Waste minimization value engineering workshop for the Los Alamos National Laboratory Omega West Reactor Decommissioning Project

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hartnett, S.; Seguin, N.; Burns, M.

    1995-01-01

    The Los Alamos National Laboratory Pollution Prevention Program Office sponsored a Value Engineering (VE) Workshop to evaluate recycling options and other pollution prevention and waste minimization (PP/WMin) practices to incorporate into the decommissioning of the Omega West Reactor (OWR) at the laboratory. The VE process is an organized, systematic approach for evaluating a process or design to identify cost saving opportunities, or in this application, waste reduction opportunities. This VE Workshop was a facilitated process that included a team of specialists in the areas of decontamination, decommissioning, PP/WMin, cost estimating, construction, waste management, recycling, Department of Energy representatives, and others. The uniqueness of this VE Workshop was that it used an interdisciplinary approach to focus on PP/WMin practices that could be included in the OWR Decommissioning Project Plans and specifications to provide waste reduction. This report discusses the VE workshop objectives, summarizes the OWR decommissioning project, and describes the VE workshop activities, results, and lessons learned

  13. Waste minimization value engineering workshop for the Los Alamos National Laboratory Omega West Reactor Decommissioning Project

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hartnett, S.; Seguin, N. [Benchmark Environmental Corp., Albuquerque, NM (United States); Burns, M. [Los Alamos National Lab., NM (United States)

    1995-12-31

    The Los Alamos National Laboratory Pollution Prevention Program Office sponsored a Value Engineering (VE) Workshop to evaluate recycling options and other pollution prevention and waste minimization (PP/WMin) practices to incorporate into the decommissioning of the Omega West Reactor (OWR) at the laboratory. The VE process is an organized, systematic approach for evaluating a process or design to identify cost saving opportunities, or in this application, waste reduction opportunities. This VE Workshop was a facilitated process that included a team of specialists in the areas of decontamination, decommissioning, PP/WMin, cost estimating, construction, waste management, recycling, Department of Energy representatives, and others. The uniqueness of this VE Workshop was that it used an interdisciplinary approach to focus on PP/WMin practices that could be included in the OWR Decommissioning Project Plans and specifications to provide waste reduction. This report discusses the VE workshop objectives, summarizes the OWR decommissioning project, and describes the VE workshop activities, results, and lessons learned.

  14. 3-Dimensional and Interactive Istanbul University Virtual Laboratory Based on Active Learning Methods

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ince, Elif; Kirbaslar, Fatma Gulay; Yolcu, Ergun; Aslan, Ayse Esra; Kayacan, Zeynep Cigdem; Alkan Olsson, Johanna; Akbasli, Ayse Ceylan; Aytekin, Mesut; Bauer, Thomas; Charalambis, Dimitris; Gunes, Zeliha Ozsoy; Kandemir, Ceyhan; Sari, Umit; Turkoglu, Suleyman; Yaman, Yavuz; Yolcu, Ozgu

    2014-01-01

    The purpose of this study is to develop a 3-dimensional interactive multi-user and multi-admin IUVIRLAB featuring active learning methods and techniques for university students and to introduce the Virtual Laboratory of Istanbul University and to show effects of IUVIRLAB on students' attitudes on communication skills and IUVIRLAB. Although there…

  15. Safety evaluation report related to the renewal of the operating license for the research reactor at North Carolina State University

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1997-04-01

    This safety evaluation report (SER) summarizes the findings of a safety review conducted by the staff of the U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC), Office of Nuclear Reactor Regulation (NRR). The staff conducted this review in response to a timely application filed by North Carolina State University (the licensee or NCSU) for a 20-year renewal of Facility Operating License R-120 to continue to operate the NCSU PULSTAR research reactor. The facility is located in the Burlington Engineering Laboratory complex on the NCSU campus in Raleigh, North Carolina. In its safety review, the staff considered information submitted by the licensee (including past operating history recorded in the licensee`s annual reports to the NRC), as well as inspection reports prepared by NRC Region H personnel and first-hand observations. On the basis of this review, the staff concludes that NCSU can continue to operate the PULSTAR research reactor, in accordance with its application, without endangering the health and safety of the public. 16 refs., 31 figs., 7 tabs.

  16. Safety evaluation report related to the renewal of the operating license for the research reactor at North Carolina State University

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1997-04-01

    This safety evaluation report (SER) summarizes the findings of a safety review conducted by the staff of the U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC), Office of Nuclear Reactor Regulation (NRR). The staff conducted this review in response to a timely application filed by North Carolina State University (the licensee or NCSU) for a 20-year renewal of Facility Operating License R-120 to continue to operate the NCSU PULSTAR research reactor. The facility is located in the Burlington Engineering Laboratory complex on the NCSU campus in Raleigh, North Carolina. In its safety review, the staff considered information submitted by the licensee (including past operating history recorded in the licensee's annual reports to the NRC), as well as inspection reports prepared by NRC Region H personnel and first-hand observations. On the basis of this review, the staff concludes that NCSU can continue to operate the PULSTAR research reactor, in accordance with its application, without endangering the health and safety of the public. 16 refs., 31 figs., 7 tabs

  17. University of South Carolina Aiken Biofuels Laboratory in Aiken, SC

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Smith, Garriet W. [Univ. of South Carolina, Aiken, SC (United States); Piskorska, Magdalena [Univ. of South Carolina, Aiken, SC (United States)

    2014-10-30

    Biological production of hydrogen has been investigated over the past 30 years with the ultimate goal of providing a clean, carbon-neutral fuel. However, based on an extensive literature search and the recommendations of several recent DOE- and DOD-sponsored expert review panels it is obvious that an important element of this research has been largely overlooked - the physiology and diversity of naturally occurring, H2-producing bacteria. The main objective of this project was to develop a technique to extensively screen nitrogen fixing bacteria isolated from unique environments suspected of H2 production. Those showing H2-producing activity were tested on latex based mats, which could provide active centers of fuel cells. Specific objectives of the project were to establish a biofuels laboratory at the Aiken County Center for Hydrogen Research, where the following activities were persued.1) Develop a semi-automated apparatus to screen hundreds of bacteria in a short time; 2) Identify bacteria capable of producing hydrogen at rates sufficiently high to power a fuel cell. 3) Embed specific bacteria with high hydrogen production potentials into latex mats that can be incorporated in fuel cells applicable to a variety of industrial settings. During this project we developed screening techniques which include colorimetric and gas chromatographic assays for hydrogen production by bacterial isolates. Isolates were characterized both metabolically and genetically and preserved for future use. Isolates found to produce significant amounts of hydrogen were screened for activity under various environments. Potential isolates were then embedded in latex coatings and assayed for hydrogen production under different environmental conditions

  18. University of South Carolina Aiken Biofuels Laboratory in Aiken, SC

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Smith, Garriet W. [Univ. of South Carolina, Aiken, SC (United States)

    2017-02-17

    Biological production of hydrogen has been investigated over the past 30 years with the ultimate goal of providing a clean, carbon-neutral fuel. However, based on an extensive literature search and the recommendations of several recent DOE- and DOD-sponsored expert review panels it is obvious that an important element of this research has been largely overlooked - the physiology and diversity of naturally occurring, H2-producing bacteria. The main objective of this project was to develop a technique to extensively screen nitrogen fixing bacteria isolated from unique environments suspected of H2 production. Those showing H2-producing activity were tested on latex based mats, which could provide active centers of fuel cells. Specific objectives of the project were to establish a biofuels laboratory at the Aiken County Center for Hydrogen Research, where the following activities were persued.1) Develop a semi-automated apparatus to screen hundreds of bacteria in a short time; 2) Identify bacteria capable of producing hydrogen at rates sufficiently high to power a fuel cell. 3) Embed specific bacteria with high hydrogen production potentials into latex mats that can be incorporated in fuel cells applicable to a variety of industrial settings. During this project we developed screening techniques which include colorimetric and gas chromatographic assays for hydrogen production by bacterial isolates. Isolates were characterized both metabolically and genetically and preserved for future use. Isolates found to produce significant amounts of hydrogen were screened for activity under various environments. Potential isolates were then embedded in latex coatings and assayed for hydrogen production under different environmental conditions

  19. Modelling and experimental investigation of waste tyre pyrolysis process in a laboratory reactor

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rudniak Leszek

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available A mathematical model of waste tyre pyrolysis process is developed in this work. Tyre material decomposition based on a simplified reaction mechanism leads to main product lumps: noncondensable (gas, condensable (pyrolytic oil and solid (char. The model takes into account kinetics of heat and mass transfer in the grain of the shredded rubber material as well as surrounding gas phase. The main reaction routes were modelled as the pseudo-first order reactions with a rate constant calculated from the Arrhenius type equation using literature values of activation energy determined for main tyre constituents based on TG/DTG measurements and tuned pre-exponential parameter values obtained by fitting theoretical predictions to the experimental results obtained in our laboratory reactor. The model was implemented within the CFD software (ANSYS Fluent. The results of numerical simulation of the pyrolysis process revealed non-uniformity of sample’s porosity and temperature. The simulation predictions were in satisfactory agreement with the experimentally measured mass loss of the tyre sample during pyrolysis process investigated in a laboratory reactor.

  20. The Design of Universal Soft Control for Advanced Power Reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ye, Song Hae; Shin, Yeong Cheol; Kang, Sung Kon; Lyou, Joon

    2011-01-01

    Highly-Integrated Control Room (HICR) has been adopted for APR+. APR+ is being developed as the evolutionary improvement of APR1400. In HICR, the traditional control panels, with their assorted gauges, indicating lights, control switches, annunciators, etc., are replaced by computer-driven consolidated operator workstations. Soft control plays a key role in consolidating control in the workstation. Universal Soft Control (USC) has the ability to control plant functions and components in multiple divisions of safety systems and non-safety systems from a single operator workstation. The USC further contribute to the level of consolidation in the workstation and provide better human machine interface with reduced operational burden. However, the implementation of USC poses challenges to the independence among safety divisions and between safety system and non-safety system. This paper presents design features and approach to prevent adverse affects of the safety systems and to minimize the potential for spurious actuations by USC

  1. The Design of Universal Soft Control for Advanced Power Reactor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ye, Song Hae; Shin, Yeong Cheol; Kang, Sung Kon [Korea Hydro and Nuclear Power Co., Daejeon (Korea, Republic of); Lyou, Joon [Chungnam National University, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of)

    2011-08-15

    Highly-Integrated Control Room (HICR) has been adopted for APR+. APR+ is being developed as the evolutionary improvement of APR1400. In HICR, the traditional control panels, with their assorted gauges, indicating lights, control switches, annunciators, etc., are replaced by computer-driven consolidated operator workstations. Soft control plays a key role in consolidating control in the workstation. Universal Soft Control (USC) has the ability to control plant functions and components in multiple divisions of safety systems and non-safety systems from a single operator workstation. The USC further contribute to the level of consolidation in the workstation and provide better human machine interface with reduced operational burden. However, the implementation of USC poses challenges to the independence among safety divisions and between safety system and non-safety system. This paper presents design features and approach to prevent adverse affects of the safety systems and to minimize the potential for spurious actuations by USC.

  2. 75 FR 54657 - University of Florida; University of Florida Training Reactor; Environmental Assessment and...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-09-08

    ... operation of the UFTR to routinely provide teaching, research, and services to numerous institutions for a... confinement. The Nuclear Reactor Building and its annex, the Nuclear Sciences Center, are located in an area... primary system consisting of a 200-gallon coolant storage tank, a heat removal system, and a processing...

  3. 75 FR 27372 - University of New Mexico; University of New Mexico AGN-201M Reactor; Environmental Assessment and...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-05-14

    ... is housed in the Nuclear Energy Laboratory (NEL) located near the southwest corner of the University.... Therefore, license renewal should not change the environmental impact of facility operation. Data from the... analysis of human health and environmental impacts presented in this environmental assessment, the proposed...

  4. Undergraduate reactor control experiment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Edwards, R.M.; Power, M.A.; Bryan, M.

    1992-01-01

    A sequence of reactor and related experiments has been a central element of a senior-level laboratory course at Pennsylvania State University (Penn State) for more than 20 yr. A new experiment has been developed where the students program and operate a computer controller that manipulates the speed of a secondary control rod to regulate TRIGA reactor power. Elementary feedback control theory is introduced to explain the experiment, which emphasizes the nonlinear aspect of reactor control where power level changes are equivalent to a change in control loop gain. Digital control of nuclear reactors has become more visible at Penn State with the replacement of the original analog-based TRIGA reactor control console with a modern computer-based digital control console. Several TRIGA reactor dynamics experiments, which comprise half of the three-credit laboratory course, lead to the control experiment finale: (a) digital simulation, (b) control rod calibration, (c) reactor pulsing, (d) reactivity oscillator, and (e) reactor noise

  5. CFD and FEM thermo-mechanical design of a recuperative-dissipative heat exchanger for a laboratory water gas shift reactor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Michele Vascellari; Stefano Sollai; Pier Francesco Orru; Giorgio Cau [University of Cagliari, Cagliari (Italy). Department of Mechanical Engineering

    2007-07-01

    A small scale test rig based on a two-stage reactor for testing water gas shift conversion processes has been set up at the Department of Mechanical Engineering at the University of Cagliari, chiefly for the purpose of supporting a pilot plant operation for high sulphur (Sulcis) coal gasification, gas cleaning and treatment, CO{sub 2} separation, hydrogen and electricity production. The laboratory test rig comprises two packed-bed reactors in series to be operated at different temperatures and has been designed for testing CO-shift conversion processes using a variety of catalysts for different syngas temperatures (up to 500{sup o}C) and compositions. One critical component of the system is a recuperative-dissipative heat exchanger placed between the two reactors. The heat exchanger, which preheats the syngas prior to entering the high temperature reactor and cools the shifted gas exiting there from, prior to its entering the low temperature reactor, is subjected to severe thermo-mechanical stress. Thus the design and analysis of this component, described herein, is a critical issue. A full 3D conjugate heat transfer CFD analysis of the tubular heat exchanger has been performed, considering different geometries. Based on the CFD results we were able to verify the preliminary design of the component, carried out using simple thermal correlations and to predict wall temperature distribution for the thermo-structural analysis. 10 refs., 10 figs., 2 tabs.

  6. Applied research and service activities at the University of Missouri Research Reactor Facility (MURR)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Alger, D.M.

    1987-01-01

    The University Of Missouri operates MURR to provide an intense source of neutron and gamma radiation for research and applications by experimenters from its four campuses and by experimenters from other universities, government and industry. The 10 MW reactor, which has been operating an average of 155 hours per week for the past eight years, produces thermal neutron fluxes up to 6-7x10 14 n/cm 2 -s in the central flux trap and beamport source fluxes of up to 1.2x10 14 n/cm 2 -s. The mission of the reactor facility, to promote research, education and service, is the same as the overall mission of the university and therefore, applied research and service supported by industrial firms have been welcomed. The university recognized after a few years of reactor operation that in order to build utilization, it would be necessary to develop in-house research programs including people, equipment and activity so that potential users could more easily and quickly obtain the results needed. Nine research areas have been developed to create a broadly based program to support the level of activity needed to justify the cost of operating the facility. Applied research and service generate financial support for about one-half of the annual budget. The applied and service programs provide strong motivation for university/industry association in addition to the income generated. (author)

  7. Laboratory determination of normal operating flow rates with enlarged outlet fittings -- BDF reactors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Waters, E.D.

    1960-02-02

    Experiments have been conducted in the Hydraulics Laboratory, at the request of IPD`s Mechanical Development-A Operation, to determine the energy losses of various enlarged outlet fitting combinations. These experiments were conducted an steady state runs and allow the determination of the normal operating point (flow rate) of a reactor process channel under selected conditions of front header pressure and fuel charge. No attempt is made to make a mechanical or economic evaluation of the particular fitting combinations, although observations were noted which might bear on this evaluation. It is very important for the reader to bear in mind that changing outlet fittings will definitely affect the reactor tube power limits and outlet vater temperature limits. The size of the outlet fittings largely determines the present outlet temperature limits of the old reactors. The flow characteristics of these present fittings cause some degree of pressurization to suppress boiling on the fuel charge and also cause dual Panellit trip protection for certain flow changes and for power surges. Enlargement of the outlet fittings may actually reduce the allowable outlet coolant temperature limits. Since these effects cannot be determined on the apparatus used in these experiments, a complete discussion of this point is not included in this report. However, the seriousness of these effects should be known and carefully analyzed before a final selection of enlarged outlet fittings in made. This report will be one of a series. New reports in the series will be issued as data are obtained for other such outlet fitting combinations or for new concepts of outlet fitting assemblies such as the new nozzle being developed by C. E. Trantz for use on F-reactor stuck gunbarrel tubes.

  8. Radioisotope research, production, and processing at the University of Missouri Research Reactor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ehrhardt, G.J.; Ketring, A.R.; Ja, Wei; Ma, D.; Zinn, K.; Lanigan, J.

    1995-12-31

    The University of Missouri Research Reactor (MURR) is a 10 MW, light-water-cooled and moderated research reactor which first achieved criticality in 1996 and is currently the highest powered university-owned research reactor in the U.S. For many years a major supplier of reactor-produced isotopes for research and commercial purposes, in the last 15 years MURR has concentrated on development of reactor-produced beta-particle emitters for experimental use in nuclear medicine therapy of cancer and rheumatoid arthritis. MURR has played a major role in the development of bone cancer pain palliation with the agents {sup 153}Sm EDTMP and {sup 186}Re/{sup 188}Re HEDP, as well as in the use of {sup 186}Re, {sup 177}Lu, {sup 166}Ho, and {sup 105}Rh for radioimmunotherapy and receptor-agent-guided radiotherapy. MURR is also responsible for the development of therapeutic, {sup 90}Y-labeled glass microspheres for the treatment of liver tumors, a product ({sup 90}Y Therasphere{trademark}) which is currently an approved drug in Canada. MURR has also pioneered the development of {sup 188}W/{sup 188}Re and {sup 99}Mo/{sup 99m}Tc gel generators, which make the use of low specific activity {sup 188}W and {sup 99}Mo practical for such isotope generators.

  9. An ultracold neutron source at the NC State University PULSTAR reactor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Korobkina, E.; Wehring, B. W.; Hawari, A. I.; Young, A. R.; Huffman, P. R.; Golub, R.; Xu, Y.; Palmquist, G.

    2007-08-01

    Research and development is being completed for an ultracold neutron (UCN) source to be installed at the PULSTAR reactor on the campus of North Carolina State University (NCSU). The objective is to establish a university-based UCN facility with sufficient UCN intensity to allow world-class fundamental and applied research with UCN. To maximize the UCN yield, a solid ortho-D 2 converter will be implemented coupled to two moderators, D 2O at room temperature, to thermalize reactor neutrons, and solid CH 4, to moderate the thermal neutrons to cold-neutron energies. The source assembly will be located in a tank of D 2O in the space previously occupied by the thermal column of the PULSTAR reactor. Neutrons leaving a bare face of the reactor core enter the D 2O tank through a 45×45 cm cross-sectional area void between the reactor core and the D 2O tank. Liquid He will cool the disk-shaped UCN converter to below 5 K. Independently, He gas will cool the cup-shaped CH 4 cold-neutron moderator to an optimum temperature between 20 and 40 K. The UCN will be transported from the converter to experiments by a guide with an inside diameter of 16 cm. Research areas being considered for the PULSTAR UCN source include time-reversal violation in neutron beta decay, neutron lifetime determination, support measurements for a neutron electric-dipole-moment search, and nanoscience applications.

  10. Radioisotope research, production, and processing at the University of Missouri Research Reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ehrhardt, G.J.; Ketring, A.R.; Ja, Wei; Ma, D.; Zinn, K.; Lanigan, J.

    1995-01-01

    The University of Missouri Research Reactor (MURR) is a 10 MW, light-water-cooled and moderated research reactor which first achieved criticality in 1996 and is currently the highest powered university-owned research reactor in the U.S. For many years a major supplier of reactor-produced isotopes for research and commercial purposes, in the last 15 years MURR has concentrated on development of reactor-produced beta-particle emitters for experimental use in nuclear medicine therapy of cancer and rheumatoid arthritis. MURR has played a major role in the development of bone cancer pain palliation with the agents 153 Sm EDTMP and 186 Re/ 188 Re HEDP, as well as in the use of 186 Re, 177 Lu, 166 Ho, and 105 Rh for radioimmunotherapy and receptor-agent-guided radiotherapy. MURR is also responsible for the development of therapeutic, 90 Y-labeled glass microspheres for the treatment of liver tumors, a product ( 90 Y Therasphere trademark) which is currently an approved drug in Canada. MURR has also pioneered the development of 188 W/ 188 Re and 99 Mo/ 99m Tc gel generators, which make the use of low specific activity 188 W and 99 Mo practical for such isotope generators

  11. Nuclear engineering laboratory self regulated power oscillation experiments at the Health Physics Research Reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Miller, L.F.; Mihalczo, J.T.; Bailiff, E.G.; Woody, N.D.; Gardner, G.D.

    1983-01-01

    Self regulated power oscillation experiments with a variety of initial conditions have been performed with the ORNL Health Physics Research Reactor (HPRR) by undergraduate nuclear engineering students from The University of Tennessee for several years. These experiments demonstrate the coupling between reactor kinetics and heat transfer and show how the temperature coefficient of reactivity affects reactor behavior. A model that consists of several coupled first order nonlinear differential equations is used to calculate the temperature of the core center and surface and power as a function of time which are compared with the experimental data; also, the model is also used to study the effects of various model parameters and initial conditions on the amplitude, frequency and damping of the power and temperature oscillations. A previous paper presented some limited experimental results and demonstrated the correspondence between a simple point model and the experimental data. This paper presents the results of experiments for: (1) the initial power fixed at 9 kW with central core temperatures of 300 0 F and 500 0 F, annd (2) the initial central core temperature fixed at 500 0 F with initial powers of 6 and 8 kW

  12. Associated Western Universities summer participant program at the Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory, Summer 1997

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Williams, B.

    1997-08-01

    The Associated Western Universities, Inc. (AWU) supports a student summer program at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL). This program is structured so that honors undergraduate students may participate in the Laboratory`s research program under direct supervision of senior Laboratory scientists. Included in this report is a list of the AWU participants for the summer of 1997. All students are required to submit original reports of their summer activities in a format of their own choosing. These unaltered student reports constitute the major portion of this report.

  13. Operational experience with the TRIGA reactor of the University of Pavia

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Borio di Tigliole, A.; Alloni, D.; Cagnazzo, M.; Coniglio, M.; Lana, F.; Losi, A.; Magrotti, G.; Manera, S.; Marchetti, F.; Pappalardo, P.; Prata, M.; Salvini, A.; Scian, G.; Vinciguerra, G.

    2008-01-01

    The TRIGA Mark II research reactor of the University of Pavia is in operation since 1965. The annual operational time at nominal power (250 kW) is in the range of 300 - 400 hours depending upon the time schedule of some experiments and research activities. The reactor is mainly used for NAA activities and BNCT research. Few tens of hours per year are dedicated also to electronic devices irradiation and student training courses. Few homemade upgrading of the reactor were realized in the past two years: components of the secondary/tertiary cooling circuit were substituted and a new radiation area monitoring system was installed. Also the Instrumentation and Control (I and C) system was almost completely refurbished. The presentation describes the major extraordinary maintenance activities implemented and the status of main reactor systems: - The I and C System: complete substitution, channel-by-channel without changing the operating and safety logics; - Tertiary and secondary water-cooling circuits: complete substitution of the tertiary water-cooling circuit and partial substitution of the components of the secondary water-cooling circuit; - Reactor Building Air Filtering and Ventilation System: installation of a computerized air filtering and ventilation system; - Radiation Area Monitoring System: new system based on a commercial micro-computer and an home-made software developed on Lab-View platform. The system is made of a network of different instruments coupled, trough a serial bus line RS232, with a data acquisition station; - Fuel Elements: at the moment, the core is made of 48 Aluminium clad and 34 SST clad TRIGA fuel elements controlled periodically for their elongation and/or bowing. All components and systems undergo ordinary maintenance according to the Technical Prescriptions and to the 'Good Practice Procedures'. In summary, the TRIGA reactor of the University of Pavia shows a very good technical state and, at the moment, there are no political or

  14. Modern design and safety analysis of the University of Florida Training Reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jordan, K.A.; Springfels, D.; Schubring, D.

    2015-01-01

    Highlights: • A new safety analysis of the University of Florida Training Reactor is presented. • This analysis uses modern codes and replaces the NRC approved analysis from 1982. • Reduction in engineering margin confirms that the UFTR is a negligible risk reactor. • Safety systems are not required to ensure that safety limits are not breached. • Negligible risk reactors are ideal for testing digital I&C equipment. - Abstract: A comprehensive series of neutronics and thermal hydraulics analyses were conducted to demonstrate the University of Florida Training Reactor (UFTR), an ARGONAUT type research reactor, as a negligible risk reactor that does not require safety-related systems or components to prevent breach of a safety limit. These analyses show that there is no credible UFTR accident that would result in major fuel damage or risk to public health and safety. The analysis was based on two limiting scenarios, whose extremity bound all other accidents of consequence: (1) the large step insertion of positive reactivity and (2) the release of fission products due to mechanical damage to a spent fuel plate. The maximum step insertion of positive reactivity was modeled using PARET/ANL software and shows a maximum peak fuel temperature of 283.2 °C, which is significantly below the failure limit of 530 °C. The exposure to the staff and general public was calculated for the worst-case fission product release scenario using the ORIGEN-S and COMPLY codes and was shown to be 6.5% of the annual limit. Impacts on reactor operations and an Instrumentation & Control System (I&C) upgrade are discussed

  15. Modern design and safety analysis of the University of Florida Training Reactor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jordan, K.A., E-mail: kjordan@ufl.edu [University of Florida, 106 UFTR Bldg., PO Box 116400, Gainesville, FL 32611-6400 (United States); Springfels, D., E-mail: dspringfels@ufl.edu [University of Florida, 106 UFTR Bldg., PO Box 116400, Gainesville, FL 32611-6400 (United States); Schubring, D., E-mail: dlschubring@ufl.edu [University of Florida, 202 Nuclear Science Building, PO Box 118300, Gainesville, FL 32611-8300 (United States)

    2015-05-15

    Highlights: • A new safety analysis of the University of Florida Training Reactor is presented. • This analysis uses modern codes and replaces the NRC approved analysis from 1982. • Reduction in engineering margin confirms that the UFTR is a negligible risk reactor. • Safety systems are not required to ensure that safety limits are not breached. • Negligible risk reactors are ideal for testing digital I&C equipment. - Abstract: A comprehensive series of neutronics and thermal hydraulics analyses were conducted to demonstrate the University of Florida Training Reactor (UFTR), an ARGONAUT type research reactor, as a negligible risk reactor that does not require safety-related systems or components to prevent breach of a safety limit. These analyses show that there is no credible UFTR accident that would result in major fuel damage or risk to public health and safety. The analysis was based on two limiting scenarios, whose extremity bound all other accidents of consequence: (1) the large step insertion of positive reactivity and (2) the release of fission products due to mechanical damage to a spent fuel plate. The maximum step insertion of positive reactivity was modeled using PARET/ANL software and shows a maximum peak fuel temperature of 283.2 °C, which is significantly below the failure limit of 530 °C. The exposure to the staff and general public was calculated for the worst-case fission product release scenario using the ORIGEN-S and COMPLY codes and was shown to be 6.5% of the annual limit. Impacts on reactor operations and an Instrumentation & Control System (I&C) upgrade are discussed.

  16. Safety Evaluation Report related to the renewal of the operating license for the research reactor at Pennsylvania State University

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1986-01-01

    This Safety Evaluation Report for the application filed by the Pennsylvania State University for a renewal of Operating License R-2 to continue to operate the Pennsylvania State University Breazeale Reactor (PSBR) has been prepared by the Office of Nuclear Reactor Regulation of the US Nuclear Regulatory Commission. The facility is located on the campus in University Park, Pennsylvania. On the basis of its technical review, the staff concludes that the reactor facility can continue to be operated by the university without endangering the health and safety of the public or the environment

  17. Status of the University of Missouri-Columbia Research Reactor upgrade

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    McKibben, J C; Edwards, Jr, C B; Meyer, Jr, W A [MU Research Reactor, Columbia, MO (United States); Kim, S S [Idaho Nuclear Engineering Laboratory, Idaho Falls, ID (United States)

    1990-05-01

    The University of Missouri-Columbia (MU) Research Reactor Facility staff is in the process of upgrading the operational and research capabilities of the reactor and associated facilities. The upgrades include an extended life aluminide fuel element, a power increase, improved instrumentation and control equipment, a cold neutron source, a building addition, and improved research instrumentation and equipment. These upgrades will greatly enhance the capabilities of the facility and the research programs. This paper discusses the parts of the upgrade and current status of implementation. (author)

  18. Status of the University of Missouri-Columbia Research Reactor upgrade

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    McKibben, J.C.; Edwards, C.B. Jr.; Meyer, W.A. Jr.; Kim, S.S.

    1990-01-01

    The University of Missouri-Columbia (MU) Research Reactor Facility staff is in the process of upgrading the operational and research capabilities of the reactor and associated facilities. The upgrades include an extended life aluminide fuel element, a power increase, improved instrumentation and control equipment, a cold neutron source, a building addition, and improved research instrumentation and equipment. These upgrades will greatly enhance the capabilities of the facility and the research programs. This paper discusses the parts of the upgrade and current status of implementation. (author)

  19. MYRRHA a fast reactor to be operated by the young generation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Engelen, J.; Ait Abderrahim, H.; Baeten, P.; De Bruyn, D.

    2015-01-01

    MYRRHA, the Multi-purpose hybrid Research Reactor for High-tech Applications, is an innovative research facility that is able to carry out a wide variety of applications: 1) transmutation of minor actinides, 2) qualification of fuel for new reactors, 3) material testing for Gen IV and fusion reactors, 4) production of medical radio-isotopes and 5) silicon doping for renewable electrical power. By means of these applications MYRRHA is the successor of BR2, it will validate the ADS (Accelerator Driven System) full concept and the use of heavy metal coolants (particularly the lead-bismuth eutectic - LBE). The MYRRHA plant consists of 3 main parts being the primary systems, the accelerator and the balance of plant which groups all structures, systems and components that are not included in the first two items. The scientific and technological knowledge that will be acquired with MYRRHA will be the basis for new lead cooled reactors having a higher performance and for industrial transmutation facilities capable of significantly reducing the amount and the burden time of high-level waste produced in power plants. It is the responsibility of the young and next generations to operate these upcoming facilities but our duty to obtain the crucial data. To profit from nuclear applications in the coming decades, the safety of these systems obviously has to be guaranteed. The safety approach of MYRRHA is based on the defence-in-depth principle. Initiating events are grouped in probability classes in order to determine the number of lines of defence needed to mitigate their consequences. Initiating events are preferably prevented, certainly those with potentially severe consequences or difficult to mitigate. For the design of MYRRHA we consider events up to a probability of occurrence of 10 -6 /year. This article describes the present state of the MYRRHA design. The article is followed by the slides of the presentation

  20. Scottish Universities Research and Reactor Centre, East Kilbride. Report on session 1982-1983

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wilson, H.W.

    1984-01-01

    The activities over the 1982-3 session are reviewed and all the research projects listed. These include reactor related activities (physics and radiochemistry, health physics and nuclear medicine and engineering), those of the isotope geology unit and NERC radiocarbon laboratory, the computing department and the teaching programme. The demand for irradiations, particularly for activation analysis has continued. There was no major maintenance shut-down in the year. (U.K.)

  1. Materials for advanced reactor facilities: development and application. Materials of School-Conference for young scientists and specialists

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2012-01-01

    In the collection of works there are the texts, summaries and presentations of lectures delivered by the leading specialists of the branch as well as the abstracts of the students of school-conference for young scientists and specialists Materials for advanced reactor facilities: development and application, which took place on October, 29 - November, 2, 2012 in Zvenigorod. In the materials presented different aspects of development and application of materials of reactor cores and vessels of advanced reactors, computerized simulation of properties of radiation-resistant materials and simulation investigations of material radiation hardness are considered [ru

  2. Young people's experiences of managing Type 1 diabetes at university: a national study of UK university students.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kellett, J; Sampson, M; Swords, F; Murphy, H R; Clark, A; Howe, A; Price, C; Datta, V; Myint, K S

    2018-04-23

    Little is known about the challenges of transitioning from school to university for young people with Type 1 diabetes. In a national survey, we investigated the impact of entering and attending university on diabetes self-care in students with Type 1 diabetes in all UK universities. Some 1865 current UK university students aged 18-24 years with Type 1 diabetes, were invited to complete a structured questionnaire. The association between demographic variables and diabetes variables was assessed using logistic regression models. In total, 584 (31%) students from 64 hospitals and 37 university medical practices completed the questionnaire. Some 62% had maintained routine diabetes care with their home team, whereas 32% moved to the university provider. Since starting university, 63% reported harder diabetes management and 44% reported higher HbA 1c levels than before university. At university, 52% had frequent hypoglycaemia, 9.6% reported one or more episodes of severe hypoglycaemia and 26% experienced diabetes-related hospital admissions. Female students and those who changed healthcare provider were approximately twice as likely to report poor glycaemic control, emergency hospital admissions and frequent hypoglycaemia. Females were more likely than males to report stress [odds ratio (OR) 4.78, 95% confidence interval (CI) 3.19-7.16], illness (OR 3.48, 95% CI 2.06-5.87) and weight management issues (OR 3.19, 95% CI 1.99-5.11) as barriers to self-care. Despite these difficulties, 91% of respondents never or rarely contacted university support services about their diabetes. The study quantifies the high level of risk experienced by students with Type 1 diabetes during the transition to university, in particular, female students and those moving to a new university healthcare provider. This article is protected by copyright. All rights reserved. This article is protected by copyright. All rights reserved.

  3. Manipulator and materials handling systems for reactor decommissioning -Cooperation between the university and the plant operator

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schreck, G.; Bach, F. W.; Haferkamp, H.

    1995-01-01

    Nuclear reactor dismantling requires suitable handling systems for tools and disassembled components, as well as qualified and reliable disassembly and cutting techniques. From the angle of radiation protection, remote-controlled handling techniques and underwater techniques are the methods of choice, the latter particularly in continuation of plant operating conditions, and this all the more the more disassembly work proceeds towards the reactor core. With the experience accumulated for 20 years now by the Institut fuer Werkstoffkunde (materials science) of Hannover University by basic research and application-oriented development work in the field of thermal cutting technology, especially plasma arc cutting techniques, as well as development work in the field of remote-controlled materials handling systems, the institute is the cut-out partner for disassembly tasks in reactor decommissioning. (Orig./DG) [de

  4. Universal immunogenicity validation and assessment during early biotherapeutic development to support a green laboratory.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bautista, Ami C; Zhou, Lei; Jawa, Vibha

    2013-10-01

    Immunogenicity support during nonclinical biotherapeutic development can be resource intensive if supported by conventional methodologies. A universal indirect species-specific immunoassay can eliminate the need for biotherapeutic-specific anti-drug antibody immunoassays without compromising quality. By implementing the R's of sustainability (reduce, reuse, rethink), conservation of resources and greener laboratory practices were achieved in this study. Statistical analysis across four biotherapeutics supported identification of consistent product performance standards (cut points, sensitivity and reference limits) and a streamlined universal anti-drug antibody immunoassay method implementation strategy. We propose an efficient, fit-for-purpose, scientifically and statistically supported nonclinical immunogenicity assessment strategy. Utilization of a universal method and streamlined validation, while retaining comparability to conventional immunoassays and meeting the industry recommended standards, provides environmental credits in the scientific laboratory. Collectively, individual reductions in critical material consumption, energy usage, waste and non-environment friendly consumables, such as plastic and paper, support a greener laboratory environment.

  5. Music for All: Including young people with intellectual disability in a university environment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rickson, Daphne; Warren, Penny

    2017-01-01

    We investigated a continuing education course in creative music making, initiated to promote the inclusion of young people with intellectual disability in a university setting. Despite organizers' attempts to foster diversity within the student cohort, enrolments were almost exclusively from students who had intellectual disability. Being in the university environment, and in a place of higher learning, seemed to be valued by some. However, students' main focus was on group musicking in a dedicated music room rather than interacting with the wider university community. Those who did not identify as disabled believed it was important to continue to address the barriers to wider inclusion. While acknowledging the risks around mediating the social interactions of young people with intellectual disability, we argue that future courses should include activities specifically designed to bring them to classes with typical students and to the wider activities of the university.

  6. Laboratory astrophysics with high energy and high power lasers: from radiative shocks to young star jets

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Diziere, A.

    2012-01-01

    Laboratory astrophysics are a rapidly developing domain of the High Energy Density Physics. It aims to recreate at smaller scales physical processes that astronomical telescopes have difficulties observing. We shall approach, in this thesis, three major subjects: 1) Jets ejected from young stars, characterized by an important collimation degree and ending with a bow shock; 2) Radiative shocks in which radiation emitted by the shock front itself plays a dominant role in its structure and 3) Accretion shocks in magnetic cataclysmic variables whose important cooling factor allows them to reach stationarity. From the conception to experimental realization, we shall attempt to reproduce in laboratory each of these processes by respecting the scaling laws linking both situations (experimental and astrophysical) established beforehand. The implementation of a large array of visible and X-ray diagnostics will finally allow to completely characterize them and calculate the dimensionless numbers that validate the astrophysical relevance. (author) [fr

  7. Perception of masculinity amongst young Malaysian men: a qualitative study of university students

    OpenAIRE

    Fazli Khalaf, Zahra; Low, Wah Yun; Ghorbani, Behzad; Merghati Khoei, Effat

    2013-01-01

    Background Perception of Masculinity plays an important role in men?s lifestyles and health behaviors. Although, the importance of masculinity has been widely discussed in men?s health literature, very little is known about the meanings of masculinity in the Malaysian setting. This research aimed to explore the meanings of masculinity among Malaysian university men. Methods This qualitative study utilized in-depth interviews with 34 young Malaysian university men, aged 20?30?years from three ...

  8. University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign, Materials Research Laboratory progress report for FY 1991

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1991-10-01

    The Materials Research Laboratory at the University of Illinois is an interdisciplinary laboratory operated in the College of Engineering. Its focus is the science of materials and it supports research in the areas of condensed matter physics, solid state chemistry, and materials science. This report addresses topics such as: an MRL overview; budget; general programmatic and institutional issues; new programs; research summaries for metallurgy, ceramics, solid state physics, and materials chemistry

  9. University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign, Materials Research Laboratory progress report for FY 1991

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1991-10-01

    The Materials Research Laboratory at the University of Illinois is an interdisciplinary laboratory operated in the College of Engineering. Its focus is the science of materials and it supports research in the areas of condensed matter physics, solid state chemistry, and materials science. This report addresses topics such as: an MRL overview; budget; general programmatic and institutional issues; new programs; research summaries for metallurgy, ceramics, solid state physics, and materials chemistry.

  10. Preliminary study: Formaldehyde exposure in laboratories of Sharjah university in UAE

    OpenAIRE

    Ahmed, Hafiz Omer

    2011-01-01

    Objectives : Laboratory technicians, students, and instructors are at high risk, because they deal with chemicals including formaldehyde. Thus, this preliminary study was conducted to measure the concentration of formaldehyde in the laboratories of the University of Sharjah in UAE. Materials and Methods: Thirty-two air samples were collected and analyzed for formaldehyde using National Institute for Occupational Safety and Health (NIOSH) method 3500. In this method, formaldehyde reacts with c...

  11. Development of volumetric methane measurement instrument for laboratory scale anaerobic reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sahito, A.R.

    2015-01-01

    In the present study, a newly developed VMMI (volumetric Methane-Measuring Instrument) for laboratory scale anaerobic reactors is presented. The VMMI is a reliable, inexpensive, easy to construct, easy to use, corrosion resistant device that does not need maintenance, can measure a wide flow range of gas at varying pressure and temperature. As per the results of the error analysis, the accuracy of the VMMI is unilateral, i.e. -6.91 %. The calibration of VMMI was investigated and a linear variation was found; hence, in situ calibration is recommended for this type of instrument. As per chromatographic analysis, it absorbs almost 100% of the carbon dioxide present in the biogas, results only the methane, and thus eliminates the need of cost intensive composition analysis of biogas through gas chromatograph. (author)

  12. Containment performance analyses for the Advanced Neutron Source Reactor at the Oak Ridge National Laboratory

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, S.H.; Taleyarkhan, R.P.; Georgevich, V.

    1992-10-01

    This paper discusses salient aspects of methodology, assumptions, and modeling of various features related to estimation of source terms from two conservatively scoped severe accident scenarios in the Advanced Neutron Source (ANS) reactor at the Oak Ridge National Laboratory. Various containment configurations are considered for steaming-pool-type accidents and an accident involving molten core-concrete interaction. Several design features (such as rupture disks) are examined to study containment response during postulated severe accidents. Also, thermal-hydraulic response of the containment and radionuclide transport and retention in the containment are studied. The results are described as transient variations of source terms for each scenario, which are to be used for studying off-site radiological consequences and health effects for these postulated severe accidents. Also highlighted will be a comparison of source terms estimated by two different versions of the MELCOR code

  13. Boiling water reactor containment modeling and analysis at the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Holcomb, E.E. III; Wilson, G.E.

    1984-01-01

    Under the auspices of the United States Nuclear Regulatory Commission, severe accidents are being studied at the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory. The boiling water reactor (BWR) studies have focused on postulated anticipated transients without scram (ATWS) accidents which might contribute to severe core damage or containment failure. A summary of the containment studies is presented in the context of the analytical tools (codes) used, typical transient simulation results and the need for prototypical containment data. All of these are related to current and future analytical capabilities. It is shown that torus temperatures during the ATWS depart from limiting conditions for BWR T-quencher operation, outside of which stable steam condensation has not been proven

  14. University of Florida--US Department of Energy 1994-1995 reactor sharing program

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vernetson, W.G.

    1996-06-01

    The grant support of $24,250 (1994-95?) was well used by the University of Florida as host institution to support various educational institutions in the use of UFTR Reactor. All users and uses were screened to assure the usage was for educational institutions eligible for participation in the Reactor Sharing Program; where research activities were involved, care was taken to assure the research was not funded by grants for contract funding from outside sources. Over 12 years, the program has been a key catalyst for renewing utilization of UFTR both by external users around the State of Florida and the Southeast and by various faculty members within the University of Florida. Tables provide basic information about the 1994-95 program and utilization of UFTR

  15. Safety considerations of new critical assembly for the Research Reactor Institute, Kyoto University

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Umeda, Iwao; Matsuoka, Naomi; Harada, Yoshihiko; Miyamoto, Keiji; Kanazawa, Takashi

    1975-01-01

    The new critical assembly type of nuclear reactor having three cores for the first time in the world was completed successfully at the Research Reactor Institute of Kyoto University in autumn of 1974. It is called KUCA (Kyoto University Critical Assembly). Safety of the critical assembly was considered sufficiently in consequence of discussions between the researchers of the institute and the design group of our company, and then many bright ideas were created through the discussions. This paper is described the new safety design of main equipments - oil pressure type center core drive mechanism, removable water overflow mechanism, core division mechanism, control rod drive mechansim, protection instrumentation system and interlock key system - for the critical assembly. (author)

  16. Analysis of kyoto university reactor physics critical experiments using NCNSRC calculation methodology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Amin, E.; Hathout, A.M.; Shouman, S.

    1997-01-01

    The kyoto university reactor physics experiments on the university critical assembly is used to benchmark validate the NCNSRC calculations methodology. This methodology has two lines, diffusion and Monte Carlo. The diffusion line includes the codes WIMSD4 for cell calculations and the two dimensional diffusion code DIXY2 for core calculations. The transport line uses the MULTIKENO-Code vax Version. Analysis is performed for the criticality, and the temperature coefficients of reactivity (TCR) for the light water moderated and reflected cores, of the different cores utilized in the experiments. The results of both Eigen value and TCR approximately reproduced the experimental and theoretical Kyoto results. However, some conclusions are drawn about the adequacy of the standard wimsd4 library. This paper is an extension of the NCNSRC efforts to assess and validate computer tools and methods for both Et-R R-1 and Et-MMpr-2 research reactors. 7 figs., 1 tab

  17. University of Virginia open-quotes virtualclose quotes reactor facility tours

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Krause, D.R.; Mulder, R.U.

    1995-01-01

    An electronic information and tour book has been constructed for the University of Virginia reactor (UVAR) facility. Utilizing the global Internet, the document resides on the University of Virginia World Wide Web (WWW or W) server within the UVAR Homepage at http://www.virginia. edu/∼reactor/. It is quickly accessible wherever an Internet connection exists. The UVAR Homepage files are accessed with the hypertext transfer protocol (http) prefix. The files are written in hypertext markup language (HTML), a very simple method of preparing ASCII text for W3 presentation. The HTML allows use of various hierarchies of headers, indentation, fonts, and the linking of words and/or pictures to other addresses-uniform resource locators. The linking of texts, pictures, sounds, and server addresses is known as hypermedia

  18. Ten-year utilization of the Oregon State University TRIGA Reactor (OSTR)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ringle, John C.; Anderson, Terrance V.; Johnson, Arthur G.

    1978-01-01

    The Oregon State University TRIGA Reactor (OSTR) has been used heavily throughout the past ten years to accommodate exclusively university research, teaching, and training efforts. Averages for the past nine years show that the OSTR use time has been as follows: 14% for academic and special training courses; 44% for OSU research projects; 6% for non-OSU research projects; 2% for demonstrations for tours; and 34% for reactor maintenance, calibrations, inspections, etc. The OSTR has operated an average of 25.4 hours per week during this nine-year period. Each year, about 20 academic courses and 30 different research projects use the OSTR. Visitors to the facility average about 1,500 per year. No commercial radiations or services have been performed at the OSTR during this period. Special operator training courses are given at the OSTR at the rate of at least one per year. (author)

  19. Applications of Oregon State University's TRIGA reactor in health physics education

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Higginbotham, J.F.

    1990-01-01

    The Oregon State University TRIGA reactor (OSTR) is used to support a broad range of traditional academic disciplines, including anthropology, oceanography, geology, physics, nuclear chemistry, and nuclear engineering. However, it also finds extensive application in the somewhat more unique area of health physics education and research. This paper summarizes these health physics applications and briefly describes how the OSTR makes important educational contributions to the field of health physics

  20. Study of the reduced enrichment fuel conversion at the University of Missouri-Rolla reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Straka, M.; Bolon, A.; Covington, L.

    1987-01-01

    The method used to analyze the low-enriched uranium core which has been proposed for the University of Missouri-Rolla Reactor is described. Results of calculations for the high-enriched uranium core have been compared with the measured data whenever possible in order to verify this method. For most of the cases that were analyzed the proposed method is adequate and the results obtained for the low-enriched uranium core can be used in revising the licensing documents. (Author)

  1. Measurement and analysis of leakage neutron energy spectra around the Kinki University Reactor, UTR-KINKI

    CERN Document Server

    Ogawa, Y; Sagawa, H; Tsujimoto, T

    2002-01-01

    The highly sensitive cylindrical multi-moderator type neutron spectrometer was constructed for measurement of low level environmental neutrons. This neutron spectrometer was applied for the determination of leakage neutron energy spectra around the Kinki University Reactor. The analysis of the leakage neutron energy spectra was performed by MCNP Monte Carlo code. From the obtained results, the agreement between the MCNP predictions and the experimentally determined values is fairly good, which indicates the MCNP model is correctly simulating the UTR-KINKI.

  2. Accelerator Laboratory of the University and the Technical University of Munich. Annual report 1992

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Korschinek, G.; Lutter, R.; Riess, F.

    1993-01-01

    This report contains extended abstracts about the work performed at the named laboratory together with a list of publications and reports. The abstracts concern experiments on nuclear reactions, nuclear spectroscopy, atomic physics, accelerator mass spectroscopy with heavy ions, and applications of nuclear techniques, theoretical work on nuclear reactions, nuclear structure, atomic physics, and astrophysics, developments of accelerators and radiation instrumentation, as well as data processing. (HSI)

  3. Isolated Learners: Young Mature-Age Students, University Culture, and Desire for Academic Sociality

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mallman, Mark; Lee, Helen

    2017-01-01

    The differentiated experiences of "young" mature-age students are under-researched and often unacknowledged in higher education literature and university policy. This article contends that, due to their age (early 20s to early 30s), many younger mature-age students feel "out of the loop" and "alienated" from…

  4. The Change of Attitude to the Profession of University Graduates and Young Specialists

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sarsenova, Assel Berikovna; Sadyrova, Mansya Sapargalievna; Montayev, Ardak Bazarbekovich; Imanbekova, Bibigul Iliyasovna

    2016-01-01

    The article studies the problem of attitude change towards the profession of university graduates and young specialists in Kazakhstan. The attitude to profession and professional motivation of students is considered as a form of human opportunities in the field of labor relations which is shaped only as a result of study in high education…

  5. AKR-1 nuclear training reactor of Dresden Technical University turns twenty-five

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hansen, W.

    2003-01-01

    Twenty-five years ago, in the night of July 27 to 28, 1978, the AKR-1 nuclear training reactor of the Dresden Technical University went critical for the first time and was commissioned. On the occasion of this anniversary, a colloquy was arranged with representatives from science, politics and industry, at which the reactor's history, the excellent achievements in research and training with the reactor, and the status and perspectives of this research facility were described. The AKR-1 had been built within the framework of the Nuclear Development Program of the then German Democratic Republic (GDR). The Nuclear Power Scientific Division of the Dresden Technical University had been entrusted with the responsibility, among other things, to train university personnel for the GDR Nuclear Power Program. The review by an expert group in 1996 of this plant had resulted in a recommendation in favor of long-term plant operation. A nuclear licensing procedure to this effect was initiated, and the necessary technical backfitting measures were implemented. The AKR-1 plant now equally serves for the specialized training of students and for research. (orig.) [de

  6. Opportunities for Laboratory Opacity Chemistry Studies to Facilitate Characterization of Young Giant Planets and Brown Dwarfs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marley, Mark; Freedman, Richard S.

    2015-01-01

    The thermal emission spectra of young giant planets is shaped by the opacity of atoms and molecules residing in their atmospheres. While great strides have been made in improving the opacities of important molecules, particularly NH3 and CH4, at high temperatures, much more work is needed to understand the opacity and chemistry of atomic Na and K. The highly pressure broadened fundamental band of Na and K in the optical stretches into the near-infrared, strongly influencing the shape of the Y and K spectral bands. Since young giant planets are bright in these bands it is important to understand the influences on the spectral shape. Discerning gravity and atmospheric composition is difficult, if not impossible, without both good atomic opacities as well as an excellent understanding of the relevant atmospheric chemistry. Since Na and K condense at temperatures near 500 to 600 K, the chemistry of the condensation process must be well understood as well, particularly any disequilibrium chemical pathways. Comparisons of the current generation of sophisticated atmospheric models and available data, however, reveal important shortcomings in the models. We will review the current state of observations and theory of young giant planets and will discuss these and other specific examples where improved laboratory measurements for alkali compounds have the potential of substantially improving our understanding of these atmospheres.

  7. History of the 185-/189-D thermal hydraulics laboratory and its effects on reactor operations at the Hanford Site

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gerber, M.S.

    1994-09-01

    The 185-D deaeration building and the 189-D refrigeration building were constructed at Hanford during 1943 and 1944. Both buildings were constructed as part of the influent water cooling system for D reactor. The CMS studies eliminated the need for 185-D function. Early gains in knowledge ended the original function of the 189-D building mission. In 1951, 185-D and 189-D were converted to a thermal-hydraulic laboratory. The experiments held in the thermal-hydraulic lab lead to historic changes in Hanford reactor operations. In late 1951, the exponential physics experiments were moved to the 189-D building. In 1958, new production reactor experiments were begun in 185/189-D. In 1959, Plutonium Recycle Test Reactor experiments were added to the 185/189-D facility. By 1960, the 185/189-D thermal hydraulics laboratory was one of the few full service facilities of its type in the nation. During the years 1961--1963 tests continued in the facility in support of existing reactors, new production reactors, and the Plutonium Recycle Test Reactor. In 1969, Fast Flux Test Facility developmental testings began in the facility. Simulations in 185/189-D building aided in the N Reactor repairs in the 1980's. In 1994 the facility was nominated to the National Register of Historic Places, because of its pioneering role over many years in thermal hydraulics, flow studies, heat transfer, and other reactor coolant support work. During 1994 and 1995 it was demolished in the largest decontamination and decommissioning project thus far in Hanford Site history

  8. North Carolina State University Nuclear Structure Research at the Triangle Universities Nuclear Laboratory. Progress report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Seagondollar, L.W.; Waltner, A.W.; Mitchell, G.E.; Tilley, D.R.; Gould, C.R.

    1975-01-01

    A summary is presented of nuclear structure research completed at the Triangle Universities Nuclear Lab for the period 9/1/74 to 8/31/75. Included are abstracts and titles for studies of electromagnetic transitions in low-medium mass nuclei, high resolution studies, accelerator induced x-ray investigations, and energy related neutron and charged particle cross section measurements. (U.S.)

  9. The reaction environment in a filter-press laboratory reactor: the FM01-LC flow cell

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rivera, Fernando F.; León, Carlos Ponce de; Walsh, Frank C.; Nava, José L.

    2015-01-01

    A parallel plate cell facilitating controlled flow in a rectangular channel and capable of incorporating a wide range of electrode materials is important in studies of electrode reactions prior to process development and scale-up. The FM01-LC, a versatile laboratory-scale, plane parallel filter-press type electrochemical cell (having a projected electrode area of 64 cm 2 ) which is based on the larger FM21-SP electrolyser (2100 cm 2 area). Many laboratories have used this type of reactor to quantify the importance of reaction environment in fundamental studies and to prepare for industrial applications. A number of papers have concerned the experimental characterization and computational modelling of its reaction environment but the experimental and computational data has become dispersed. The cell has been used in a diverse range of synthesis and processing applications which require controlled flow and known reaction environment. In a previous review, the cell construction and reaction environment was summarised followed by the illustration of its use for a range of applications that include organic and inorganic electrosynthesis, metal ion removal, energy storage, environmental remediation (e.g., metal recycling or anodic destruction of organics) and drinking water treatment. This complementary review considers the characteristics of the FM01-LC electrolyser as an example of a well-engineered flow cell facilitating cell scale-up and provides a rigorous analysis of its reaction environment. Particular aspects include the influence of electrolyte velocity on mass transport rates, flow dispersion and current distribution

  10. Heterosexual and nonheterosexual young university students' involvement in traditional and cyber forms of bullying.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wensley, Kate; Campbell, Marilyn

    2012-12-01

    Research has consistently found that school students who do not identify as self-declared completely heterosexual are at increased risk of victimization by bullying from peers. This study examined heterosexual and nonheterosexual university students' involvement in both traditional and cyber forms of bullying, as either bullies or victims. Five hundred twenty-eight first-year university students (M=19.52 years old) were surveyed about their sexual orientation and their bullying experiences over the previous 12 months. The results showed that nonheterosexual young people reported higher levels of involvement in traditional bullying, both as victims and perpetrators, in comparison to heterosexual students. In contrast, cyberbullying trends were generally found to be similar for heterosexual and nonheterosexual young people. Gender differences were also found. The implications of these results are discussed in terms of intervention and prevention of the victimization of nonheterosexual university students.

  11. Annual report 1991 of Munich University and Technical University Accelerator Laboratory

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1992-01-01

    The experimental work in the Accelerator Laboratory contains investigations of nuclear reactions and nuclear structure, studies of atom physics and the application of nuclear physics methods in physics and in interdisciplinary research. These applications are acceleration mass spectrometry to detect traces of radio-isotopes and material analysis with particle beams. The development of apparatus in the fields of accelereator construction, ion sources and targets are at the heart of the laboratory and help to establish its reputation. They are of the greatest importance for the education of students. The development stage for the superconducting post-accelerator TRITRON is complete and prototypes of the magnets and resonators were successfully tested and operated. The mass-production of all the components is under way or already finished. The standard injector for the tandem axxelerator and an injector for accelerator mass spectroscopy with stable isotopes are being newly designed. The experimental work is supplemented by the calculations of our theoretical collagues of core reaction mechanisms, core de-excitation and the Cerenkov radiation of core structures and transition strengths, by relativistic Hartree-Fock calculations and by star model calculations. (orig.) [de

  12. Safety leadership in the teaching laboratories of electrical and electronic engineering departments at Taiwanese Universities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Tsung-Chih

    2008-01-01

    Safety has always been one of the principal goals in teaching laboratories. Laboratories cannot serve their educational purpose when accidents occur. The leadership of department heads has a major impact on laboratory safety, so this study discusses the factors affecting safety leadership in teaching laboratories. This study uses a mail survey to explore the perceived safety leadership in electrical and electronic engineering departments at Taiwanese universities. An exploratory factor analysis shows that there are three main components of safety leadership, as measured on a safety leadership scale: safety controlling, safety coaching, and safety caring. The descriptive statistics also reveals that among faculty, the perception of department heads' safety leadership is in general positive. A two-way MANOVA shows that there are interaction effects on safety leadership between university size and instructor age; there are also interaction effects between presence of a safety committee and faculty gender and faculty age. It is therefore necessary to assess organizational factors when determining whether individual factors are the cause of differing perceptions among faculty members. The author also presents advice on improving safety leadership for department heads at small universities and at universities without safety committees.

  13. Risk assessment and quality improvement of liquid waste management in Taiwan University chemical laboratories.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ho, Chao-Chung; Chen, Ming-Shu

    2018-01-01

    The policy of establishing new universities across Taiwan has led to an increase in the number of universities, and many schools have constructed new laboratories to meet students' academic needs. In recent years, there has been an increase in the number of laboratory accidents from the liquid waste in universities. Therefore, how to build a safety system for laboratory liquid waste disposal has become an important issue in the environmental protection, safety, and hygiene of all universities. This study identifies the risk factors of liquid waste disposal and presents an agenda for practices to laboratory managers. An expert questionnaire is adopted to probe into the risk priority procedures of liquid waste disposal; then, the fuzzy theory-based FMEA method and the traditional FMEA method are employed to analyze and improve the procedures for liquid waste disposal. According to the research results, the fuzzy FMEA method is the most effective, and the top 10 potential disabling factors are prioritized for improvement according to the risk priority number (RNP), including "Unclear classification", "Gathering liquid waste without a funnel or a drain pan", "Lack of a clearance and transport contract", "Liquid waste spill during delivery", "Spill over", "Decentralized storage", "Calculating weight in the wrong way", "Compatibility between the container material and the liquid waste", "Lack of dumping and disposal tools", and "Lack of a clear labels for liquid waste containers". After tracking improvements, the overall improvement rate rose to 60.2%. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  14. Flexible System Integration and Advanced Hierarchical Control Architectures in the Microgrid Research Laboratory of Aalborg University

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Meng, Lexuan; Hernández, Adriana Carolina Luna; Diaz, Enrique Rodriguez

    2016-01-01

    This paper presents the system integration and hierarchical control implementation in an inverter-based microgrid research laboratory (MGRL) in Aalborg University, Denmark. MGRL aims to provide a flexible experimental platform for comprehensive studies of microgrids. The structure of the laborato...

  15. Annual report of Radiation Laboratory Department of Nuclear Engineering Kyoto University for fiscal 1993

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1994-07-01

    This publication is the collection of the papers presented research activities of Radiation Laboratory, Department of Nuclear Engineering, Kyoto University during the 1993 academic/fiscal year (April, 1993 - March, 1994). The 47 of the presented papers are indexed individually. (J.P.N.)

  16. Annual report of Radiation Laboratory Department of Nuclear Engineering Faculty of Engineering, Kyoto University

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1993-07-01

    This publication is the collection of the papers presented research activities of Radiation laboratory, Department of Nuclear Engineering, Kyoto University during the 1992 academic/fiscal year (April, 1992 - March, 1993). The 48 of the presented papers are indexed individually. (J.P.N.)

  17. Limiting the impact of recent outage experience in a midsize university reactor environment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vernetson, W.G.

    1996-01-01

    The University of Florida Training Reactor (UFTR) is a light-water-cooled, graphite- and light-water-moderated, modified Argonaut-type reactor licensed to operate at steady-state power levels up to 100 kW. The UFTR continues to utilize high-enriched materials test reactor-type fuel in a piping circuit type of system versus the more familiar pool reactor design. Though somewhat limited for research and service, the UFTR is a valuable educational facility. Despite its relatively low power level, the two-slab core configuration provides a peak thermal flux near 2 x 10 12 n/cm 2 · s; in addition, other modifications and experimental adaptations have been implemented in the 36-yr history of the facility to enhance the potential of the facility for diverse types of unique educational usage. Its small physical size in a loop configuration makes it a good teaching tool, but it can also be associated with unique maintenance problems, as in this case. The mission of the UFTR is to serve regional needs for access to quality reactor usage in a variety of areas to support educational and training needs as well as research and service, including public information about nuclear energy. As the only nonpower reactor in the state of Florida in affiliation with an established and diverse nuclear and radiological engineering department, it has a strong role to play in education, training, research, and service, especially the former. As a result of its unique position, the facility has been quite successful in its mission. With so much educational usage scheduled, sometimes for classes arriving from 100 miles away, it is important to avoid unexpected outages as well as unexpectedly lengthy outages. Such planning usually is successful and has allowed the RFTR to build a clientele of more than four dozen regular educational users, although events in 1995 could have undetermined this effort

  18. Promoting ergonomics in Algeria: activities of "the research and training laboratory" in the University of Oran.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mebarki, Bouhafs; El-Bachir, Tebboune Cheikh

    2012-01-01

    The growing need in Algeria to develop ergonomics knowledge and practice in industry was behind the initiative to develop a training and research project within the ergonomics laboratory at Oran University. Since 2005 the laboratory team is running an academic option master in work design and ergonomics. The evaluation of the academic master in 2010 revealed the acute need of the local industry for professional competences in ergonomic and work psychology. A professional training master program in "ergonomics & work psychology" was then developed in partnership with local industry, five European Universities and six Universities from three Maghreb countries. Research projects were initiated around the two training programs, in conjunction with a number of ergonomics dissemination and promotion activities. Preliminary results of the project are presented and discussed in relation to the local context, and in the light of similar cases in Industrially Developing Countries.

  19. Clinical and Laboratory evaluation of measleslike rash in children and young adults

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stewien Klaus Eberhard

    2000-01-01

    Full Text Available A clinical and laboratory evaluation of 11 children and young adults with measleslike rash was done during the measles outbreak in the Greater São Paulo Metropolitan area at the end of 1996 and spread over the country during 1997. Measles was laboratory confirmed in 07 patients by specific IgM detection in acute serum specimens using an IgM-capture EIA, by specific IgG seroconversion in serum pairs, and by reverse transcription PCR and virus isolation in peripheral blood lymphocytes. Clinical presentations were not always classic; one of the 07 cases had received measles vaccine and corresponded to modified clinical case of measles. The 4 remaining cases were negative for measles and were diagnosed as exanthem subitum (2 cases, scarlet fever and Kawasaki disease. The present study reinforces the view that clinical features alone are not sufficient for establishing an accurate diagnosis in the post-vaccine era, and a surveillance system based on sensitive laboratory results is needed so that it can confirm IgM-negative measles cases.

  20. Replication RCT of Early Universal Prevention Effects on Young Adult Substance Misuse

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spoth, Richard; Trudeau, Linda; Redmond, Cleve; Shin, Chungyeol

    2014-01-01

    Objective For many substances, more frequent and problematic use occurs in young adulthood; these types of use are predicted by the timing of initiation during adolescence. We replicated and extended an earlier study examining whether delayed substance initiation during adolescence, resulting from universal preventive interventions implemented in middle school, reduces problematic use in young adulthood. Method Participants were middle school students from 36 Iowa schools randomly assigned to the Strengthening Families Program plus Life Skills Training (SFP 10–14 + LST), LST-only, or a control condition. Self-report questionnaires were collected at 11 time points, including four during young adulthood. The intercept (average level) and rate of change (slope) in young adult frequency measures (drunkenness, alcohol-related problems, cigarettes, and illicit drugs) across ages 19–22 were modeled as outcomes influenced by growth factors describing substance initiation during adolescence. Analyses entailed testing a two-step hierarchical latent growth curve model; models included the effects of baseline risk, intervention condition assignment, and their interaction. Results Analyses showed significant indirect intervention effects on the average levels of all young adult outcomes, through effects on adolescent substance initiation growth factors, along with intervention by risk interaction effects favoring the higher-risk subsample. Additional direct effects on young adult use were observed in some cases. Relative reduction rates were larger for the higher-risk subsample at age 22, ranging from 5.8% to 36.4% on outcomes showing significant intervention effects. Conclusions Universal preventive interventions implemented during early adolescence have the potential to decrease the rates of substance use and associated problems, into young adulthood. PMID:24821095

  1. Reduced enrichment fuel and its reactivity effects in the University Training Reactor Moata

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wilson, D.J.

    1983-08-01

    Concern for nuclear proliferation is likely to preclude future supply of highly enriched uranium fuel for research reactors such as the University Training Reactor Moata. This study calculates the fuel densities necessary to maintain the reactivity per plate of the present high enrichment (90 per cent 235 U) fuel for a range of lower enrichments assuming that no geometry changes are allowed. The maximum uranium density for commercially available aluminium-type research reactor fuels is generally considered to be about 1.7 g cm -3 . With this density limitation, the minimum enrichment to maintain present reactivity per plate is about 35 per cent 235 U. For low enrichment (max. 20 per cent 235 U) fuel, the required U density is about 2.9 g cm -3 , which is beyond the expected range for UAl/sub x/-Al but within that projected for the longer term development and full qualification for U 3 O 8 -Al. Medium enrichment (nominally 45 per cent 235 U) Al/sub x/-Al would be entirely satisfactory as an immediate replacement fuel, requiring no modifications to the reactor and operating procedures, and minimal reappraisal of safety issues. Included in this study are calculations of the fuel coefficients at various enrichments, the effect of replacing standard fuel plates or complete elements with 45 per cent enriched fuel, and the reactivity to be gained by replacing 12-plate with 13-plate elements

  2. Radiochemistry at the University of Missouri-Columbia. A joint venture with chemistry, nuclear engineering, molecular biology, biochemistry, and the Missouri University Research Reactor (MURR)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Miller, W.H.; Duval, P.; Jurisson, S.S.; Robertson, J.D.; Wall, J.D.; Quinn, T.P.; Volkert, W.A.; Neumeyer, G.M.

    2005-01-01

    Missouri University, a recipient of a U.S. Department of Energy Radiochemistry Education Award Program (REAP) grant in 1999, has significantly expanded its education and research mission in radiochemistry. While MU had a viable radiochemistry program through existing faculty expertise and the utilization of the Missouri University Research Reactor, the REAP award allowed MU to leverage its resources in significantly expanding capabilities in radiochemistry. Specifically, the grant enabled the: (1) hiring of a new faculty member in actinide radiochemistry (Dr. Paul Duval); (2) support of six graduate students in radiochemistry; (3) purchase of new radiochemistry laboratory equipment; (4) more extensive collaboration with DOE scientists through interactions with faculty and graduate students, and (5) revised radiochemical curriculum (joint courses across disciplines and new courses in actinide chemistry). The most significant impact of this award has been in encouraging interdisciplinary education and research. The proposal was initiated by a joint effort between Nuclear Engineering and Chemistry, but also included faculty in biochemistry, radiology, and molecular biology. Specific outcomes of the REAP grant thus far are: (1) increased educational and research capabilities in actinide chemistry (faculty hire and equipment acquisition); (2) increased integration of biochemistry and radiochemistry (e.g., radiochemical analysis of uranium speciation in biological systems); (3) stronger interdisciplinary integration of molecular biology and radiochemical sciences (alpha-emitters for treating cancer); (4) new and more extensive interactions with national laboratory facilities (e.g., student internships at LANL and LLBL, faculty and lab scientist exchange visits, analytical measurements and collaboration with the Advanced Photon Source), and (7) new research funding opportunities based on REAP partnership. (author)

  3. University of Florida Training Reactor: Annual progress report, September 1, 1986-August 31, 1987

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vernetson, W.G.

    1987-11-01

    The University of Florida Training Reactor's overall utilization for the past reporting year (September 1986 through August 1987) has returned to the increased levels of quality usage characteristic of the two years prior to the last reporting year when the maintenance outage to repair sticking control blades reduced availability for the year to near 50%. Indeed, the 91.5% availability factor for this reporting year is the highest in the last five years and probably in the 27 year history of the facility. As a final statement on the effectiveness of the corrective maintenance last year, the overall availability factor has been over 94% since returning to normal operations. The UFTR continues to experience a high rate of utilization in a broad spectrum of areas with total utilization continuing near the highest levels recorded in the early 1970's. This increase has been supported by a variety of usages ranging from research and educational utilization by users within the University of Florida as well as other researchers and educators around the state of Florida through the support of the DOE Reactor Sharing Program and several externally supported usages. Significant usage has also been devoted to facility enhancement where a key ingredient for this usage has been a stable management staff. Uses, reactor operation, maintenance, technical specifications, radioactive releases, and research programs are described in this report

  4. DESIGN CHARACTERISTICS OF THE IDAHO NATIONAL LABORATORY HIGH-[TEMPERATURE GAS-COOLED TEST REACTOR

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sterbentz, James; Bayless, Paul; Strydom, Gerhard; Kumar, Akansha; Gougar, Hans

    2016-11-01

    A point design for a graphite-moderated, high-temperature, gas-cooled test reactor (HTG TR) has been developed by Idaho National Laboratory (INL) as part of a United States (U.S.) Department of Energy (DOE) initiative to explore and potentially expand the existing U.S. test reactor capabilities. This paper provides a summary of the design and its main attributes. The 200 MW HTG TR is a thermal-neutron spectrum reactor composed of hexagonal prismatic fuel and graphite reflector blocks. Twelve fuel columns (96 fuel blocks total and 6.34 m active core height) are arranged in two hexagonal rings to form a relatively compact, high-power density, annular core sandwiched between inner, outer, top, and bottom graphite reflectors. The HTG-TR is designed to operate at 7 MPa with a coolant inlet/outlet temperature of 325°C/650°C, and utilizes TRISO particle fuel from the DOE AGR Program with 425 ?m uranium oxycarbide (UCO) kernels and an enrichment of 15.5 wt% 235U. The primary mission of the HTG TR is material irradiation and therefore the core has been specifically designed and optimized to provide the highest possible thermal and fast neutron fluxes. The highest thermal neutron flux (3.90E+14 n/cm2s) occurs in the outer reflector, and the maximum fast flux levels (1.17E+14 n/cm2s) are produced in the central reflector column where most of the graphite has been removed. Due to high core temperatures under accident conditions, all the irradiation test facilities have been located in the inner and outer reflectors where fast flux levels decline. The core features a large number of irradiation positions with large test volumes and long test lengths, ideal for thermal neutron irradiation of large test articles. The total available test volume is more than 1100 liters. Up to four test loop facilities can be accommodated with pressure tube boundaries to isolate test articles and test fluids (e.g., liquid metal, liquid salt, light water) from the helium primary coolant system.

  5. Annual Report FY2011: Establishment of a Laboratory for Biofuels Research at the University of Kentucky

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Crocker, Mark [Univ. of Kentucky, Lexington, KY (United States). Center for Applied Energy Research; Crofcheck, Czarena [Univ. of Kentucky, Lexington, KY (United States). Center for Applied Energy Research; Andrews, Rodney [Univ. of Kentucky, Lexington, KY (United States). Center for Applied Energy Research

    2011-12-21

    This project is aimed at the development of the biofuels industry in Kentucky by establishing a laboratory to develop improved processes for biomass utilization. The facility is based at the University of Kentucky Center for Applied Energy Research and the Department of Biosystems and Agricultural Engineering, and constitutes an open laboratory, i.e., its equipment is available to other Kentucky researchers working in the area. The development of this biofuels facility represents a significant expansion of research infrastructure, and will provide a lasting resource for biobased research endeavors at the University of Kentucky. In order to enhance the laboratory's capabilities and contribute to on-going biofuels research at the University of Kentucky, initial research at the laboratory has focused on the following technical areas: (i) the identification of algae strains suitable for oil production, utilizing flue gas from coal-fired power plants as a source of CO2; (ii) the conversion of algae to biofuels; and (iii) thermochemical methods for the deconstruction of lignin. Highlights from these activities include a detailed study of bio-oil production from the fast pyrolysis of microalgae (Scenedesmus sp.) and the application of pyrolytic gas chromatography coupled with mass spectrometry (Py-GC-MS) to the characterization of high lignin biomass feedstocks.

  6. Establishment of a Laboratory for Biofuels Research at the University of Kentucky

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Crocker, Mark [Univ. of Kentucky, Lexington, KY (United States). Center for Applied Energy Research; Crofcheck, Czarena [Univ. of Kentucky, Lexington, KY (United States). Center for Applied Energy Research; Andrews, Rodney [Univ. of Kentucky, Lexington, KY (United States). Center for Applied Energy Research

    2013-03-29

    This project was aimed at the development of the biofuels industry in Kentucky by establishing a laboratory to develop improved processes for biomass utilization. The facility is based at the University of Kentucky Center for Applied Energy Research and the Department of Biosystems and Agricultural Engineering, and constitutes an “open” laboratory, i.e., its equipment is available to other Kentucky researchers working in the area. The development of this biofuels facility represents a significant expansion of research infrastructure, and will provide a lasting resource for biobased research endeavors at the University of Kentucky. In order to enhance the laboratory's capabilities and contribute to on-going biofuels research at the University of Kentucky, initial research at the laboratory has focused on the following technical areas: (i) the identification of algae strains suitable for oil production, utilizing flue gas from coal-fired power plants as a source of CO2; (ii) the conversion of algae to biofuels; and (iii) the development of methods for the analysis of lignin and its deconstruction products. Highlights from these activities include the development of catalysts for the upgrading of lipids to hydrocarbons by means of decarboxylation/decarbonylation (deCOx), a study of bio-oil production from the fast pyrolysis of algae (Scenedesmus), and the application of pyrolytic gas chromatography coupled with mass spectrometry (Py-GC-MS) to the characterization of high lignin biomass feedstocks.

  7. Annual progress report of the University of Florida Training Reactor, September 1, 1981-August 31, 1982

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Diaz, N.J.; Vernetson, W.G.

    1982-11-01

    The University of Florida Training Reactor's overall utilization for the past reporting year has decreased by about 50% compared to the previous year, approaching the low levels of utilization characteristic of the previous two reporting years ending in August 1979 and August 1980 respectively. The energy generation also continues to be far below average historical levels and represents a drop of nearly 50% from the improved level of the previous year. The UFTR continues to operate with an outstanding safety record and in full compliance with regulatory requirements. The reactor and associated facilities continue to maintain a high in-state visibility and strong industry relationship. It is hoped that more indirect industry training will be accomplished in the upcoming year

  8. Status of University of Cincinnati reactor-site nuclear engineering graduate programs

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anno, J.N.; Christenson, J.M.; Eckart, L.E.

    1993-01-01

    The University of Cincinnati (UC) nuclear engineering program faculty has now had 12 yr of experience in delivering reactor-site educational programs to nuclear power plant technical personnel. Currently, with the sponsorship of the Toledo-Edison Company (TED), we are conducting a multiyear on-site graduate program with more than 30 participants at the Davis-Besse nuclear power plant. The program enables TED employees with the proper academic background to earn a master of science (MS) degree in nuclear engineering (mechanical engineering option). This paper presents a brief history of tile evolution of UC reactor-site educational programs together with a description of the progress of the current program

  9. Radiation field studies at the training and research reactor AKR of the Dresden Technical University

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Leuschner, A.; Reiss, U.; Pretzsch, G.

    1983-01-01

    Results of radiation field studies in the experimental channels of the training and research reactor of the Technical University of Dresden are presented. The flux densities of thermal, intermediate and fast neutrons were determined by means of activation detectors., Gamma dose rates have been measured by thermoluminescent dosimeters. The measured results show symmetry with respect to the vertical axis of the reactor and allow to draw conclusions with regard to the efficiency of the individual layers of the shield. They are an essential basis of performing irradiation experiments in the experimental channels. The results of measurements were compared with those of shielding and design calculations. Taking into account the measuring errors and the approximations used in the computational models, no unexpected deviations have been observed. Hence, the measured and calculated results can be assessed to be in good agreement. (author)

  10. Essay of accelerator R and D in a small laboratory of an university. Head ion IH linac for fusion material. 1983-1985

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hattori, Toshiyuki

    2005-01-01

    The linear accelerator of Inter-Digital H type (IH linac) is known to have a high shunt impedance. Research Laboratory for Nuclear Reactors of Tokyo Institute of Technology introduced an IH linac for fusion materials irradiation test in 1983. The beam injector was a tandem electrostatic accelerator. The IH linac was designed and fabricated based on the developmental work at Institute for Nuclear Study of University of Tokyo. The processes of component alignment, cold test and start-up operation are described. Educational aspect of the project is also reviewed. (K.Y.)

  11. Transmutation research and fuel cycle (report on discussion at Research Reactor Institute, Kyoto University)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yamana, Hajimu

    1999-01-01

    A symposium was held on a topic of 'Transmutation Research' on Dec. 21 and 22, 1999 at Research Reactor Institute, Kyoto University. This meeting was held as a joint-meeting of KUR's specialist meeting and Tokyo University's activity supported by the Grant-in-Aid for Scientific Research of Ministry of Education, Sport and Culture of Japan. This paper describes the overview of the discussions of this joint-meeting, and interprets their significance. Major themes discussed are, needed discussions on the transmutation research, policy and concepts of the organizations doing transmutation researches, a view from university side, transmutation researches in the oversea countries, opinions from various standpoints of the nuclear fuel cycle, conclusive discussions. 'the meanings of the transmutation research should be discussed together with the geological disposal and fast reactor system', 'transmutation may be a cooperative option for the disposal, thus, they should not be in a independent relation', and Balance evaluation will be needed' are the examples of the conclusive remarks of this meeting. (author)

  12. Norman M. Dott, master of hypothalamic craniopharyngioma surgery: the decisive mentoring of Harvey Cushing and Percival Bailey at Peter Bent Brigham Hospital.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prieto, Ruth; Pascual, José M

    2017-10-01

    Norman McOmish Dott (1897-1973) developed surgical neurology in Edinburgh, Scotland, and was a scholar of worldwide renown. One of Dott's most notable contributions to neurosurgery was his understanding of hypothalamic physiology, mostly acquired through the comprehensive study of patients with lesions involving this region of the diencephalon, particularly craniopharyngiomas (CPs). Recognition of symptoms caused by hypothalamic disturbances allowed him to predict the accurate anatomical relationships between CPs and the hypothalamus, despite the rudimentary radiological methods available during the 1930s. His sophisticated knowledge permitted Dott to perform radical removals of CPs originating within the third ventricle floor with acceptable success. Between 1934 and 1937, he operated on 4 CP cases originating in the hypothalamus, achieving a satisfactory postoperative outcome in 3 of the 4 patients. Aware of the strong attachment of hypothalamic CPs to the infundibulo-tuberal area, Dott used a double transbasal and transventricular approach to these lesions, a strategy providing an optimal view and control of the tumor boundaries. The decisive mentorship of several legendary figures of physiology and neurosurgery greatly influenced Dott's surgical evolution. The experimental pituitary gland work he performed with Sir Edward Sharpey-Schäfer at the beginning of his career stirred Dott's curiosity about the issue of hypothalamus-pituitary relationships. As a result, he decided to move to Peter Bent Brigham Hospital (Boston, Massachusetts) in 1923, to train in neurosurgery and neuropathology under the guidance of the leaders in these fields, Harvey Williams Cushing (1869-1939) and Percival Sylvester Bailey (1892-1973). They inspired the young Dott and shared with him their clinical and pathological expertise, in addition to their surgical strategies for best approaching and removing these challenging tumors. In time, Dott would come to surpass his mentors. This

  13. Establishing a laboratory model of dental unit waterlines bacterial biofilms using a CDC biofilm reactor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yoon, Hye Young; Lee, Si Young

    2017-11-01

    In this study, a laboratory model to reproduce dental unit waterline (DUWL) biofilms was developed using a CDC biofilm reactor (CBR). Bacteria obtained from DUWLs were filtered and cultured in Reasoner's 2A (R2A) for 10 days, and were subsequently stored at -70°C. This stock was cultivated on R2A in batch mode. After culturing for five days, the bacteria were inoculated into the CBR. Biofilms were grown on polyurethane tubing for four days. Biofilm accumulation and thickness was 1.3 × 10 5  CFU cm -2 and 10-14 μm respectively, after four days. Bacteria in the biofilms included cocci and rods of short and medium lengths. In addition, 38 bacterial genera were detected in biofilms. In this study, the suitability and reproducibility of the CBR model for DUWL biofilm formation were demonstrated. The model provides a foundation for the development of bacterial control methods for DUWLs.

  14. Design of Mixed Batch Reactor and Column Studies at Oak Ridge National Laboratory

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wu, Weimin; Criddle, Craig S.

    2015-01-01

    We (the Stanford research team) were invited as external collaborators to contribute expertise in environmental engineering and field research at the ORNL IFRC, Oak Ridge, TN, for projects carried out at the Argonne National Laboratory and funded by US DOE. Specifically, we assisted in the design of batch and column reactors using ORNL IFRC materials to ensure the experiments were relevant to field conditions. During the funded research period, we characterized ORNL IFRC groundwater and sediments in batch microcosm and column experiments conducted at ANL, and we communicated with ANL team members through email and conference calls and face-to-face meetings at the annual ERSP PI meeting and national meetings. Microcosm test results demonstrated that U(VI) in sediments was reduced to U(IV) when amended with ethanol. The reduced products were not uraninite but unknown U(IV) complexes associated with Fe. Fe(III) in solid phase was only partially reduced. Due to budget reductions at ANL, Stanford contributions ended in 2011.

  15. Laboratory scale development of coating for improving characteristics of candidate materials for fusion reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Agarwala, R.P.

    1989-01-01

    Application of coatings of refractory low atomic number materials on to different components of Tokamak type controlled thermonuclear reactor are expected to provide a degree of design flexibility. The project envisages to deal with the challenging problem on laboratory scale. Coatings investigated include carbon, beryllium, boron, titanium carbide and alumina and substrates chosen have been 304, 316 stainless steels, monel-400, molybdenum, copper, graphite, etc. For their deposition, different techniques (e.g. evaporation, sputtering and their different variants) have been tried, appropriate ones chosen and their parameters optimized. The coating composition has been analyzed using X-ray diffraction (XRD), Auger electron spectroscopy (AES), X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS), Rutherford backscattering analysis (RBS) and secondary ions mass spectroscopy (SIMS). Surface morphology has been studied using scanning electron microscopy (SEM). Sebastian coating adherence tester has been used for adhesion measurement and Wilson's Tukon microhardness tester for their microhardness measurement. The coatings have been subjected to pulses from YAG laser to evaluate their thermal cycling behaviour. Deuterium ion bombardment (Energy: 20-120 keV; doses: 10 19 -9.3x10 20 ions/cm 2 ) behaviour has also been studied. In general, adherent and hard coatings capable of withstanding thermal cycling could be deposited. Out of the coatings studied, titanium carbide shows best results. The following pages are reprints and not mircrofiched: p. 25-32, 39-41, 57-81. Bibliographic description is on page 13

  16. Decontamination and decommissioning of the Experimental Boiling Water Reactor (EBWR): Project final report, Argonne National Laboratory

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fellhauer, C.R.; Boing, L.E.; Aldana, J.

    1997-03-01

    The Final Report for the Decontamination and Decommissioning (D ampersand D) of the Argonne National Laboratory - East (ANL-E) Experimental Boiling Water Reactor (EBWR) facility contains the descriptions and evaluations of the activities and the results of the EBWR D ampersand D project. It provides the following information: (1) An overall description of the ANL-E site and EBWR facility. (2) The history of the EBWR facility. (3) A description of the D ampersand D activities conducted during the EBWR project. (4) A summary of the final status of the facility, including the final and confirmation surveys. (5) A summary of the final cost, schedule, and personnel exposure associated with the project, including a summary of the total waste generated. This project report covers the entire EBWR D ampersand D project, from the initiation of Phase I activities to final project closeout. After the confirmation survey, the EBWR facility was released as a open-quotes Radiologically Controlled Area,close quotes noting residual elevated activity remains in inaccessible areas. However, exposure levels in accessible areas are at background levels. Personnel working in accessible areas do not need Radiation Work Permits, radiation monitors, or other radiological controls. Planned use for the containment structure is as an interim transuranic waste storage facility (after conversion)

  17. Design of Mixed Batch Reactor and Column Studies at Oak Ridge National Laboratory

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wu, Weimin [Stanford Univ., CA (United States); Criddle, Craig S. [Stanford Univ., CA (United States)

    2015-11-16

    We (the Stanford research team) were invited as external collaborators to contribute expertise in environmental engineering and field research at the ORNL IFRC, Oak Ridge, TN, for projects carried out at the Argonne National Laboratory and funded by US DOE. Specifically, we assisted in the design of batch and column reactors using ORNL IFRC materials to ensure the experiments were relevant to field conditions. During the funded research period, we characterized ORNL IFRC groundwater and sediments in batch microcosm and column experiments conducted at ANL, and we communicated with ANL team members through email and conference calls and face-to-face meetings at the annual ERSP PI meeting and national meetings. Microcosm test results demonstrated that U(VI) in sediments was reduced to U(IV) when amended with ethanol. The reduced products were not uraninite but unknown U(IV) complexes associated with Fe. Fe(III) in solid phase was only partially reduced. Due to budget reductions at ANL, Stanford contributions ended in 2011.

  18. Scientific upgrades at the high flux isotope reactor at Oak Ridge National Laboratory

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Selby, D.L.; Garrett, D.L.; Lucas, A.T.; Reeves, M.E.

    2001-01-01

    The United States Department of Energy is sponsoring a number of projects that will provide scientific upgrades to the neutron science facilities associated with the high flux isotope reactor (HFIR) located at Oak Ridge National Laboratory. Funding for the first upgrade project was initiated in 1996 and all presently identified upgrade projects are expected to be completed by the end of 2003. The upgrade projects include: 1) larger beam tubes, 2) a new monochromator drum for the HB-1 beam line, 3) a new HB-2 beam line system that includes one thermal guide and a new monochromator drum, 4) new instruments for the HB-2 beamline, 5) a new monochromator drum for the HB-3 beam line, 6) a supercritical hydrogen cold source system to be retrofitted into the HB-4 beam tube, 7) a 3.5 kW refrigeration system at 20 K to support the cold source and a new building to house it, 8) a new HB-4 beam line system composed of four cold neutron guides with various mirror coatings and associated shielding, 9) a number of new instruments for the cold beams including two new SANS instruments, and 10) construction of support buildings. This paper provides a short summary of these projects including their present status and schedule. (orig.)

  19. IS ENGLISH THERE?: INVESTIGATING LANGUAGE USE AMONG THE YOUNG ALGERIAN USERS OF INTERNET AT TLEMCEN UNIVERSITY

    OpenAIRE

    KRIM, Sihem

    2015-01-01

    This present work tries to investigate how language is used electronically among the young Algerian users of Internet, and if they use English or not. For doing this study, a case study was conducted at Tlemcen University: English Department relying on two main research instruments: students’ questionnaire and teachers’ interview. After collecting data from the respondents( 20 Master 1 students and 8 teachers), the results reveal that the majority of participants use English vi...

  20. Interactive Virtual Reactor and Control Room for Education and Training at Universities and Nuclear Power Plants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Satoh, Yoshinori; Li, Ye; Zhu, Xuefeng; Rizwan, Uddin

    2014-01-01

    Efficient and effective education and training of nuclear engineering students and nuclear workers are critical for the safe operation and maintenance of nuclear power plants. With an eye toward this need, we have focused on the development of 3D models of virtual labs for education, training as well as to conduct virtual experiments. These virtual labs, that are expected to supplement currently available resources, and have the potential to reduce the cost of education and training, are most easily developed on game-engine platforms. We report some recent extensions to the virtual model of the University of Illinois TRIGA reactor

  1. Interactive Virtual Reactor and Control Room for Education and Training at Universities and Nuclear Power Plants

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Satoh, Yoshinori; Li, Ye; Zhu, Xuefeng; Rizwan, Uddin [University of Illinois, Urbana (United States)

    2014-08-15

    Efficient and effective education and training of nuclear engineering students and nuclear workers are critical for the safe operation and maintenance of nuclear power plants. With an eye toward this need, we have focused on the development of 3D models of virtual labs for education, training as well as to conduct virtual experiments. These virtual labs, that are expected to supplement currently available resources, and have the potential to reduce the cost of education and training, are most easily developed on game-engine platforms. We report some recent extensions to the virtual model of the University of Illinois TRIGA reactor.

  2. A Cryogenic Detector Characterization Facility in the Shallow Underground Laboratory at the Technical University of Munich

    Science.gov (United States)

    Langenkämper, A.; Defay, X.; Ferreiro Iachellini, N.; Kinast, A.; Lanfranchi, J.-C.; Lindner, E.; Mancuso, M.; Mondragón, E.; Münster, A.; Ortmann, T.; Potzel, W.; Schönert, S.; Strauss, R.; Ulrich, A.; Wawoczny, S.; Willers, M.

    2018-04-01

    The Physics Department of the Technical University of Munich operates a shallow underground detector laboratory in Garching, Germany. It provides ˜ 160 {m^2} of laboratory space which is shielded from cosmic radiation by ˜ 6 m of gravel and soil, corresponding to a shielding of ˜ 15 {m.w.e.} . The laboratory also houses a cleanroom equipped with work- and wetbenches, a chemical fumehood as well as a spin-coater and a mask-aligner for photolithographic processing of semiconductor detectors. Furthermore, the shallow underground laboratory runs two high-purity germanium detector screening stations, a liquid argon cryostat and a ^3 He-^4 He dilution refrigerator with a base temperature of ≤ 12-14 mK . The infrastructure provided by the shallow laboratory is particularly relevant for the characterization of CaWO_4 target crystals for the CRESST-III experiment, detector fabrication and assembly for rare event searches. Future applications of the laboratory include detector development in the framework of coherent neutrino nucleus scattering experiments (ν -cleus) and studying its potential as a site to search for MeV-scale dark matter with gram-scale cryogenic detectors.

  3. Association Euratom - Risø National Laboratory, Technical University of Denmark - Annual Progress Report 2007

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Michelsen, Poul; Korsholm, Søren Bang; Juul Rasmussen, Jens

    The programme of the Research Unit of the Fusion Association Euratom - Risø National Laboratory, Technical University of Denmark, covers work in fusion plasma physics and in fusion technology. The fusion plasma physics research focuses on turbulence and transport, and its interaction with the pla......The programme of the Research Unit of the Fusion Association Euratom - Risø National Laboratory, Technical University of Denmark, covers work in fusion plasma physics and in fusion technology. The fusion plasma physics research focuses on turbulence and transport, and its interaction...... phased out during 2007. Minor activities are system analysis, initiative to involve Danish industry in ITER contracts and public information. A summary is presented of the results obtained in the Research Unit during 2007....

  4. Twenty-ninth annual progress report of the Pennsylvania State University Breazeale Nuclear Reactor, July 1, 1983-June 30, 1984

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Levine, S.H.; Totenbier, R.E.

    1984-07-01

    The twenty-ninth annual progress report of the operation of the Pennsylvania State University Breazeale Reactor is submitted in accordance with the requirements of Contract DE-AC02-76ER03409 with the United States Department of Energy. This report also provides the University administration with a summary of the operation of the facility for the past year

  5. 78 FR 5840 - Notice of License Termination for University of Illinois Advanced TRIGA Reactor, License No. R-115

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-01-28

    ... University of Illinois Advanced TRIGA Reactor, License No. R-115 The U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) is noticing the termination of Facility Operating License No. R-115, for the University of Illinois... Operating License No. R-115 is terminated. The above referenced documents may be examined, and/or copied for...

  6. Annual report of the research results with Rikkyo University's joint-use reactor etc. for fiscal 1974

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1975-01-01

    The results of research works by universities with Rikkyo University's joint-use reactor and RCNST's (Research Center for Nuclear Science and Technology) instruments for fiscal 1974 are described. Comprising the areas of activation analysis (in such as earth science, biology and environmental science), hot atom chemistry, etc., the results are presented in individual summaries. (Mori, K.)

  7. H Reactor

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Laboratory Consortium — The H Reactor was the first reactor to be built at Hanford after World War II.It became operational in October of 1949, and represented the fourth nuclear reactor on...

  8. The Intense Slow Positron Beam Facility at the NC State University PULSTAR Reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hawari, Ayman I.; Moxom, Jeremy; Hathaway, Alfred G.; Brown, Benjamin; Gidley, David W.; Vallery, Richard; Xu, Jun

    2009-01-01

    An intense slow positron beam is in its early stages of operation at the 1-MW open-pool PULSTAR research reactor at North Carolina State University. The positron beam line is installed in a beam port that has a 30-cmx30-cm cross sectional view of the core. The positrons are created in a tungsten converter/moderator by pair-production using gamma rays produced in the reactor core and by neutron capture reactions in cadmium cladding surrounding the tungsten. Upon moderation, slow (∼3 eV) positrons that are emitted from the moderator are electrostatically extracted, focused and magnetically guided until they exit the reactor biological shield with 1-keV energy, approximately 3-cm beam diameter and an intensity exceeding 6x10 8 positrons per second. A magnetic beam switch and transport system has been installed and tested that directs the beam into one of two spectrometers. The spectrometers are designed to implement state-of-the-art PALS and DBS techniques to perform positron and positronium annihilation studies of nanophases in matter.

  9. Reactivity worth measurement of the control blades of the University of Florida training reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Quintero-Leyva, Barbaro

    1997-01-01

    A series of experiments were carried out in order to measure the reactivity worth of the safety and regulating blades of the University of Florida Training Reactor (UFTR) using the Inverse Kinetics, the Inverse Kinetics-Rod Drop method and the Power Ratio. The reactor's own instrumentation (compensated ion chamber) and an independent counting system (fission chamber) were used. A very smooth exponential decay of the flux was observed after 6s of the beginning of the transients using the reading of the reactor detector. The results of the measurements of the reactivity using both detectors were consistent and in good agreement. The compensated ion chamber showed a very smooth exponential behavior; this suggests that if we could record the power for a small sample time, say 0.1 s from the beginning of the transient, several additional research projects could be accomplished. First, precise intercomparison of the methods could be achieved if the statistics level is acceptable. Second, a precise description of the bouncing of the blades and its effects on the reactivity could be achieved. Finally, the design of a reactivity-meter could be based on such study. (author)

  10. The CT Scanner Facility at Stellenbosch University: An open access X-ray computed tomography laboratory

    Science.gov (United States)

    du Plessis, Anton; le Roux, Stephan Gerhard; Guelpa, Anina

    2016-10-01

    The Stellenbosch University CT Scanner Facility is an open access laboratory providing non-destructive X-ray computed tomography (CT) and a high performance image analysis services as part of the Central Analytical Facilities (CAF) of the university. Based in Stellenbosch, South Africa, this facility offers open access to the general user community, including local researchers, companies and also remote users (both local and international, via sample shipment and data transfer). The laboratory hosts two CT instruments, i.e. a micro-CT system, as well as a nano-CT system. A workstation-based Image Analysis Centre is equipped with numerous computers with data analysis software packages, which are to the disposal of the facility users, along with expert supervision, if required. All research disciplines are accommodated at the X-ray CT laboratory, provided that non-destructive analysis will be beneficial. During its first four years, the facility has accommodated more than 400 unique users (33 in 2012; 86 in 2013; 154 in 2014; 140 in 2015; 75 in first half of 2016), with diverse industrial and research applications using X-ray CT as means. This paper summarises the existence of the laboratory's first four years by way of selected examples, both from published and unpublished projects. In the process a detailed description of the capabilities and facilities available to users is presented.

  11. Scottish Universities Research and Reactor Centre annual report 1987-1988

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Whitley, J.E.

    1988-01-01

    The Scottish Universities Research and Reactor Centre (SURRC) provides facilities for research in isotopic, nuclear and earth sciences and collaborates with Scottish University departments on a wide range of research topics. One of its main areas of work is the Isotope Geology Unit. This has worked with the Nuclear Medicine Unit on the application of enriched stable isotope tracers in the biological and clinical sciences. The measurement of radioactive isomers is applied to quaternary geology, archaeology, nuclear medicine, health physics, oceanography, atomospheric sciences, environmental chemistry, nuclear waste disposal and mathematical modelling of the environment. There are also radiocarbon dating facilities. The facilities and the research undertaken at the Centre in the year 1987-1988, the Centre's twenty-fifth year are summarized in this report. (U.K.)

  12. Interim report on construction of data base for atomic energy science documents (concerning Kyoto University Reactor)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Takeuchi, Takayuki

    1984-01-01

    The Kyoto University Research Reactor Institute was established in 1963 as a research institute for all universities in Japan utilizing the facilities in common. The construction of a document data base has been undertaken in commemoration of the 20th anniversary of the institute. The data base concerns the research works performed at the institute and also the publications and reports on the research made by the personnel belonging to the institute. Input data are gathered from concerned researchers. In this interim report, the structure and contents of this data base are shortly described. One of the features of this data base is that it handles data with both Japanese and English at the same time. (Aoki, K.)

  13. Completion Summary for Well NRF-16 near the Naval Reactors Facility, Idaho National Laboratory, Idaho

    Science.gov (United States)

    Twining, Brian V.; Fisher, Jason C.; Bartholomay, Roy C.

    2010-01-01

    In 2009, the U.S. Geological Survey in cooperation with the U.S. Department of Energy's Naval Reactors Laboratory Field Office, Idaho Branch Office cored and completed well NRF-16 for monitoring the eastern Snake River Plain (SRP) aquifer. The borehole was initially cored to a depth of 425 feet below land surface and water samples and geophysical data were collected and analyzed to determine if well NRF-16 would meet criteria requested by Naval Reactors Facility (NRF) for a new upgradient well. Final construction continued after initial water samples and geophysical data indicated that NRF-16 would produce chemical concentrations representative of upgradient aquifer water not influenced by NRF facility disposal, and that the well was capable of producing sustainable discharge for ongoing monitoring. The borehole was reamed and constructed as a Comprehensive Environmental Response Compensation and Liability Act monitoring well complete with screen and dedicated pump. Geophysical and borehole video logs were collected after coring and final completion of the monitoring well. Geophysical logs were examined in conjunction with the borehole core to identify primary flow paths for groundwater, which are believed to occur in the intervals of fractured and vesicular basalt and to describe borehole lithology in detail. Geophysical data also were examined to look for evidence of perched water and the extent of the annular seal after cement grouting the casing in place. Borehole videos were collected to confirm that no perched water was present and to examine the borehole before and after setting the screen in well NRF-16. Two consecutive single-well aquifer tests to define hydraulic characteristics for well NRF-16 were conducted in the eastern SRP aquifer. Transmissivity and hydraulic conductivity averaged from the aquifer tests were 4.8 x 103 ft2/d and 9.9 ft/d, respectively. The transmissivity for well NRF-16 was within the range of values determined from past aquifer

  14. Neutronics modeling of TRIGA reactor at the University of Utah using agent, KENO6 and MCNP5 codes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yang, X.; Xiao, S.; Choe, D.; Jevremovic, T.

    2010-01-01

    The TRIGA reactor at the University of Utah is modelled in 2D using the AGENT state-of-the-art methodology based on the Method of Characteristics (MOC) and R-function theory supporting detailed reactor analysis of reactor geometries of any type. The TRIGA reactor is also modelled using KENO6 and MCNP5 for comparison. The spatial flux and reaction rates distribution are visualized by AGENT graphics support. All methodologies are in use in to study the effect of different fuel configurations in developing practical educational exercises for students studying reactor physics. At the University of Utah we train graduate and undergraduate students in obtaining the Nuclear Regulatory Commission license in operating the TRIGA reactor. The computational models as developed are in support of these extensive training classes and in helping students visualize the reactor core characteristics in regard to neutron transport under various operational conditions. Additionally, the TRIGA reactor is under the consideration for power uprate; this fleet of computational tools once benchmarked against real measurements will provide us with validated 3D simulation models for simulating operating conditions of TRIGA. (author)

  15. High molecular gas fractions in normal massive star-forming galaxies in the young Universe.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tacconi, L J; Genzel, R; Neri, R; Cox, P; Cooper, M C; Shapiro, K; Bolatto, A; Bouché, N; Bournaud, F; Burkert, A; Combes, F; Comerford, J; Davis, M; Schreiber, N M Förster; Garcia-Burillo, S; Gracia-Carpio, J; Lutz, D; Naab, T; Omont, A; Shapley, A; Sternberg, A; Weiner, B

    2010-02-11

    Stars form from cold molecular interstellar gas. As this is relatively rare in the local Universe, galaxies like the Milky Way form only a few new stars per year. Typical massive galaxies in the distant Universe formed stars an order of magnitude more rapidly. Unless star formation was significantly more efficient, this difference suggests that young galaxies were much more molecular-gas rich. Molecular gas observations in the distant Universe have so far largely been restricted to very luminous, rare objects, including mergers and quasars, and accordingly we do not yet have a clear idea about the gas content of more normal (albeit massive) galaxies. Here we report the results of a survey of molecular gas in samples of typical massive-star-forming galaxies at mean redshifts of about 1.2 and 2.3, when the Universe was respectively 40% and 24% of its current age. Our measurements reveal that distant star forming galaxies were indeed gas rich, and that the star formation efficiency is not strongly dependent on cosmic epoch. The average fraction of cold gas relative to total galaxy baryonic mass at z = 2.3 and z = 1.2 is respectively about 44% and 34%, three to ten times higher than in today's massive spiral galaxies. The slow decrease between z approximately 2 and z approximately 1 probably requires a mechanism of semi-continuous replenishment of fresh gas to the young galaxies.

  16. 2015 Annual Reuse Report for the Idaho National Laboratory Site’s Advanced Test Reactor Complex Cold Waste Ponds

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lewis, Michael George [Idaho National Lab. (INL), Idaho Falls, ID (United States)

    2016-02-01

    This report describes conditions and information, as required by the state of Idaho, Department of Environmental Quality Reuse Permit I-161-02, for the Advanced Test Reactor Complex Cold Waste Ponds located at Idaho National Laboratory from November 1, 2014–October 31, 2015. The effective date of Reuse Permit I-161-02 is November 20, 2014 with an expiration date of November 19, 2019.

  17. 2015 Annual Reuse Report for the Idaho National Laboratory Site's Advanced Test Reactor Complex Cold Waste Ponds

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lewis, Michael George

    2016-01-01

    This report describes conditions and information, as required by the state of Idaho, Department of Environmental Quality Reuse Permit I-161-02, for the Advanced Test Reactor Complex Cold Waste Ponds located at Idaho National Laboratory from November 1, 2014-October 31, 2015. The effective date of Reuse Permit I-161-02 is November 20, 2014 with an expiration date of November 19, 2019.

  18. TEMPERATURE MONITORING OPTIONS AVAILABLE AT THE IDAHO NATIONAL LABORATORY ADVANCED TEST REACTOR

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    J.E. Daw; J.L. Rempe; D.L. Knudson; T. Unruh; B.M. Chase; K.L Davis

    2012-03-01

    As part of the Advanced Test Reactor National Scientific User Facility (ATR NSUF) program, the Idaho National Laboratory (INL) has developed in-house capabilities to fabricate, test, and qualify new and enhanced sensors for irradiation testing. To meet recent customer requests, an array of temperature monitoring options is now available to ATR users. The method selected is determined by test requirements and budget. Melt wires are the simplest and least expensive option for monitoring temperature. INL has recently verified the melting temperature of a collection of materials with melt temperatures ranging from 100 to 1000 C with a differential scanning calorimeter installed at INL’s High Temperature Test Laboratory (HTTL). INL encapsulates these melt wires in quartz or metal tubes. In the case of quartz tubes, multiple wires can be encapsulated in a single 1.6 mm diameter tube. The second option available to ATR users is a silicon carbide temperature monitor. The benefit of this option is that a single small monitor (typically 1 mm x 1 mm x 10 mm or 1 mm diameter x 10 mm length) can be used to detect peak irradiation temperatures ranging from 200 to 800 C. Equipment has been installed at INL’s HTTL to complete post-irradiation resistivity measurements on SiC monitors, a technique that has been found to yield the most accurate temperatures from these monitors. For instrumented tests, thermocouples may be used. In addition to Type-K and Type-N thermocouples, a High Temperature Irradiation Resistant ThermoCouple (HTIR-TC) was developed at the HTTL that contains commercially-available doped molybdenum paired with a niobium alloy thermoelements. Long duration high temperature tests, in furnaces and in the ATR and other MTRs, demonstrate that the HTIR-TC is accurate up to 1800 C and insensitive to thermal neutron interactions. Thus, degradation observed at temperatures above 1100 C with Type K and N thermocouples and decalibration due to transmutation with tungsten

  19. Knowledge, attitude and practice of aspects of laboratory safety in Pathology Laboratories at the University of Port Harcourt Teaching Hospital, Nigeria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ejilemele, A A; Ojule, A C

    2005-12-01

    To assess current knowledge, attitudes and practice of aspects of laboratory safety in pathology laboratories at the University of Port Harcourt Teaching Hospital in view of perceived inadequacies in safety practices in clinical laboratories in developing countries. Sixty (60) self- administered questionnaires were distributed to all cadres of staff in four (4) different laboratories (Chemical Pathology, Haematology, Blood bank and Medical Microbiology) at the Hospital. Gross deficiencies were found in the knowledge, attitudes and practice of laboratory safety by laboratory staff in areas of use of personal protective equipment, specimen collection and processing, centrifuge--related hazards, infective hazards waste disposal and provision and use of First Aid Kits. Issues pertaining to laboratory safety are not yet given adequate attention by both employers and employees in developing countries in this ear of resurgence of diseases such as HIV/AIDS and Hepatitis Band C, is emphasized.

  20. Reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Toyama, Masahiro; Kasai, Shigeo.

    1978-01-01

    Purpose: To provide a lmfbr type reactor wherein effusion of coolants through a loop contact portion is reduced even when fuel assemblies float up, and misloading of reactor core constituting elements is prevented thereby improving the reactor safety. Constitution: The reactor core constituents are secured in the reactor by utilizing the differential pressure between the high-pressure cooling chamber and low-pressure cooling chamber. A resistance port is formed at the upper part of a connecting pipe, and which is connect the low-pressure cooling chamber and the lower surface of the reactor core constituent. This resistance part is formed such that the internal sectional area of the connecting pipe is made larger stepwise toward the upper part, and the cylinder is formed larger so that it profiles the inner surface of the connecting pipe. (Aizawa, K.)

  1. Decontamination and decommissioning of the SPERT-I Reactor Building at the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory. Final report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dolenc, M.R.

    1986-02-01

    This final report documents the decontamination and decommissioning of the SPERT-I Reactor Building. This 20- by 40-ft galvanized steel building was dismantled; and the resultant contaminated sludge, liquid, and carbon steel were disposed of at the Radioactive Waste Management Complex of the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory. This report presents the results of the characterization, decision analysis, planning, and decommissioning of the facility. The total cost of these activities was $139,500. Of this total, $103,500 was required for decommissioning operations. (This latter figure represents a 20% savings over the estimated costs generated during the planning effort.) The objectives of decommissioning this facility were to stabilize the seepage pit area and remove the reactor building. The D and D work was divided into two parts; the seepage pit was decommissioned in 1984, and the reactor building in 1985. The entire area was backfilled with radiologically clean soil, graded, and seeded. Two markers were installed to identify the locations of the pit and reactor building. The only isotopes found in either decommissioning operation were cesium-137 and uranium-235 in very low concentrations. Decommissioning operations of the reactor building were carried out during August 1985. The project generate 297 ft 3 of radioactive waste. No personnel radiation exposure above background was received by D and D workers

  2. Perception of the university as an employer among young potential employees

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Baruk Agnieszka Izabela

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available The article is theoretical-empirical in character. It presents issues associated with the external image of the university as an employer. In the theoretical part the views of various researchers presented in literature on the subject, concerning among others the employer’s image and its determinants, are analysed. It is emphasized that up till now the aspects of image (including aspects associated with the external image in case of universities as one of key service providers serving an important function in the society haven’t been analysed too much. In the empirical part of the article based on the results of primary research the manner of perception of the university as an employer by one of the segments of potential employees, namely young people entering the labour market, is identified and analysed. 4 research hypotheses were subject to empirical verification. They were formulated with regard to associations of the respondents with a university as an employer. It turned out that universities are associated mainly with an employer guaranteeing opportunities for development and self-realization. At the same time associations with an employer guaranteeing high salary, feeling of stability, or high social prestige are comparably less significant. Thus, 3 research hypotheses haven’t been confirmed and one of them can be confirmed. This constitutes an important hint for universities as employers, making it easier for them to take coherent and complex image-related action.

  3. Comparison of microbiological diagnosis of urinary tract infection in young children by routine health service laboratories and a research laboratory: Diagnostic cohort study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Birnie, Kate; Hay, Alastair D.; Wootton, Mandy; Howe, Robin; MacGowan, Alasdair; Whiting, Penny; Lawton, Michael; Delaney, Brendan; Downing, Harriet; Dudley, Jan; Hollingworth, William; Lisles, Catherine; Little, Paul; O’Brien, Kathryn; Pickles, Timothy; Rumsby, Kate; Thomas-Jones, Emma; Van der Voort, Judith; Waldron, Cherry-Ann; Harman, Kim; Hood, Kerenza; Butler, Christopher C.; Sterne, Jonathan A. C.

    2017-01-01

    laboratories should consider adopting procedures used in the research laboratory for paediatric urine samples. Primary care clinicians should try to obtain clean catch samples, even in very young children. PMID:28199403

  4. Comparison of microbiological diagnosis of urinary tract infection in young children by routine health service laboratories and a research laboratory: Diagnostic cohort study.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kate Birnie

    in the research laboratory for paediatric urine samples. Primary care clinicians should try to obtain clean catch samples, even in very young children.

  5. Reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ikeda, Masaomi; Kashimura, Kazuo; Inoue, Kazuyuki; Nishioka, Kazuya.

    1979-01-01

    Purpose: To facilitate the construction of a reactor containment building, whereby the inspections of the outer wall of a reactor container after the completion of the construction of the reactor building can be easily carried out. Constitution: In a reactor accommodated in a container encircled by a building wall, a space is provided between the container and the building wall encircling the container, and a metal wall is provided in the space so that it is fitted in the building wall in an attachable or detatchable manner. (Aizawa, K.)

  6. From customer satisfaction survey to corrective actions in laboratory services in a university hospital.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oja, Paula I; Kouri, Timo T; Pakarinen, Arto J

    2006-12-01

    To find out the satisfaction of clinical units with laboratory services in a university hospital, to point out the most important problems and defects in services, to carry out corrective actions, and thereafter to identify the possible changes in satisfaction. and Senior physicians and nurses-in-charge of the clinical units at Oulu University Hospital, Finland. Customer satisfaction survey using a questionnaire was carried out in 2001, indicating the essential aspects of laboratory services. Customer-specific problems were clarified, corrective actions were performed, and the survey was repeated in 2004. In 2001, the highest dissatisfaction rates were recorded for computerized test requesting and reporting, turnaround times of tests, and the schedule of phlebotomy rounds. The old laboratory information system was not amenable to major improvements, and it was renewed in 2004-05. Several clinical units perceived turnaround times to be long, because the tests were ordered as routine despite emergency needs. Instructions about stat requesting were given to these units. However, no changes were evident in the satisfaction level in the 2004 survey. Following negotiations with the clinics, phlebotomy rounds were re-scheduled. This resulted in a distinct increase in satisfaction in 2004. Satisfaction survey is a screening tool that identifies topics of dissatisfaction. Without further clarifications, it is not possible to find out the specific problems of customers and to undertake targeted corrective actions. Customer-specific corrections are rarely seen as improvements in overall satisfaction rates.

  7. The CT Scanner Facility at Stellenbosch University: An open access X-ray computed tomography laboratory

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Plessis, Anton du, E-mail: anton2@sun.ac.za [CT Scanner Facility, Central Analytical Facilities, Stellenbosch University, Stellenbosch (South Africa); Physics Department, Stellenbosch University, Stellenbosch (South Africa); Roux, Stephan Gerhard le, E-mail: lerouxsg@sun.ac.za [CT Scanner Facility, Central Analytical Facilities, Stellenbosch University, Stellenbosch (South Africa); Guelpa, Anina, E-mail: aninag@sun.ac.za [CT Scanner Facility, Central Analytical Facilities, Stellenbosch University, Stellenbosch (South Africa)

    2016-10-01

    The Stellenbosch University CT Scanner Facility is an open access laboratory providing non-destructive X-ray computed tomography (CT) and a high performance image analysis services as part of the Central Analytical Facilities (CAF) of the university. Based in Stellenbosch, South Africa, this facility offers open access to the general user community, including local researchers, companies and also remote users (both local and international, via sample shipment and data transfer). The laboratory hosts two CT instruments, i.e. a micro-CT system, as well as a nano-CT system. A workstation-based Image Analysis Centre is equipped with numerous computers with data analysis software packages, which are to the disposal of the facility users, along with expert supervision, if required. All research disciplines are accommodated at the X-ray CT laboratory, provided that non-destructive analysis will be beneficial. During its first four years, the facility has accommodated more than 400 unique users (33 in 2012; 86 in 2013; 154 in 2014; 140 in 2015; 75 in first half of 2016), with diverse industrial and research applications using X-ray CT as means. This paper summarises the existence of the laboratory’s first four years by way of selected examples, both from published and unpublished projects. In the process a detailed description of the capabilities and facilities available to users is presented.

  8. Experimental study on the safety of Kyoto University Research Reactor at natural circulation cooling mode

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhang, Jian; Shen, Xiuzhong; Fujihara, Yasuyuki; Sano, Tadafumi; Yamamoto, Toshihiro; Nakajima, Ken

    2015-01-01

    Highlights: • The natural circulation cooling capacity of Kyoto University Research Reactor (KUR) was experimentally investigated. • The distributions of the outlet temperature of the fuel elements under natural circulation operations were measured. • The average temperature rise and the average natural circulation flow velocity in core were calculated. • The safety of KUR under all of the normal operations with natural circulation cooling mode has been analyzed. • The natural circulation flow after the reactor shutdown was confirmed. - Abstract: In this study, the natural circulation cooling capacity of Kyoto University Research Reactor (KUR) is experimentally investigated by measuring the inlet and outlet temperatures of the core under natural circulation operation at various thermal powers ranging from 10 kW to 100 kW and the shutdown state. In view of the uneven power distribution and the resultant inconsistent coolant outlet temperature in the core, eight measuring points located separately in the outlet of the fuel elements were chosen to investigate the distribution of the outlet temperature of the core. The natural circulation cooling capacity represented by the average natural circulation flow velocity in the core is calculated from the temperature difference between the outlet and inlet temperature of the core. The measured outlet temperature of the fuel elements shows a cross-sectional distribution agreeing with the distribution of the thermal output of the fuel elements in the core. Since the measured outlet temperatures decrease quickly in the flow direction in a small local region above the outlet of the core, the mixing of the hot water out of the core with the cold water around the core outlet is found to happen in the small region not more than 5 cm far from the core outlet. The natural circulation flow velocity in the core increases non-linearly with the thermal power. The safety of KUR has been analysed by conservatively estimating the

  9. U.S. Department of Energy University Reactor Sharing Program at the University of Florida. Final report for period August 15, 2000 - May 31, 2001

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vernetson, William G.

    2002-01-01

    Department of Energy Grant Number DE-FG02-96NE38152 was supplied to the University of Florida Training Reactor (UFTR) facility through the U.S. Department of Energy's University Reactor Sharing Program. The renewal proposal submitted in January 2000 originally requested over $73,000 to support various external educational institutions using the UFTR facilities in academic year 2000-01. The actual Reactor Sharing Grant was only in the amount of $40,000, all of which has been well used by the University of Florida as host institution to support various educational institutions in the use of our reactor and associated facilities as indicated in the proposal. These various educational institutions are located primarily within the State of Florida. However, when the 600-mile distance from Pensacola to Miami is considered, it is obvious that this Grant provides access to reactor utilization for a broad geographical region and a diverse set of user institutions serving over fourteen million inhabitants throughout the State of Florida and still others throughout the Southeast.

  10. Monitoring Uranium Transformations Determined by the Evolution of Biogeochemical Processes: Design of Mixed Batch Reactor and Column Studies at Oak Ridge National Laboratory

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Criddle, Craig S.; Wu, Weimin

    2013-04-17

    With funds provided by the US DOE, Argonne National Laboratory subcontracted the design of batch and column studies to a Stanford University team with field experience at the ORNL IFRC, Oak Ridge, TN. The contribution of the Stanford group ended in 2011 due to budget reduction in ANL. Over the funded research period, the Stanford research team characterized ORNL IFRC groundwater and sediments and set up microcosm reactors and columns at ANL to ensure that experiments were relevant to field conditions at Oak Ridge. The results of microcosm testing demonstrated that U(VI) in sediments was reduced to U(IV) with the addition of ethanol. The reduced products were not uraninite but were instead U(IV) complexes associated with Fe. Fe(III) in solid phase was only partially reduced. The Stanford team communicated with the ANL team members through email and conference calls and face to face at the annual ERSP PI meeting and national meetings.

  11. The contribution of a small TRIGA university research reactor to nuclear research on an international level

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Villa, M.; Bastuerk, M.; Boeck, H.

    2002-01-01

    The paper focuses especially on the important results in neutron- and solid state physics and the co-operation between the low power TRIGA reactor with high flux neutron sources in Europe such as the Institute Laue-Langevin (ILL) in Grenoble, the Paul Scherrer Institut (PSI) in Villigen, the Rutherford Appleton Laboratory (RAL) in Didcot and the Research Center Juelich. Experiments are set up for test purposes at the TRIGA reactor and then transferred to the powerful neutron sources. Different new perfect silicon channel-cut and interferometer crystals are prepared and then tested at the Bonse-Hart camera, which is a double crystal (or triple axis) diffractometer and at the interferometer set-up. Historically, the first verification of neutron interferometry at a perfect crystal device has been achieved at the 250 kW TRIGA-reactor in Vienna in the year 1974. Also the co-operation with the PSI and the TU Munich in the field of neutron radiography and neutron tomography and VESTA, an experiment for storing cold neutrons with a wavelength of 6.27A, installed at the pulsed neutron source ISIS at RAL are mentioned. The second topic in this paper focuses on the co-operation in the field of safeguard. Several projects have been carried out during the past years in co-operation with the IAEA such as establishing a gamma spectrum reference catalogue for CdZnTe detectors and tests of safeguard video cameras under neutron irradiation. Further an integrated safeguard surveillance network composed of a video camera, a gamma monitor and a neutron monitor is under development

  12. The contribution of a small triga university research reactor to nuclear research on an international level

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Villa, M.; Boeck, H.; Weber, H.W.

    2001-01-01

    The paper focuses especially on the important results in neutron- and solid state physics and the co-operation between the low power TRIGA reactor with high flux neutron sources in Europe such as the Institute Laue-Langevin (ILL) in Grenoble, the Paul Scherrer Institut (PSI) in Villigen, the Rutherford Appleton Laboratory (RAL) in Didcot and the Research Center Juelich. Experiments are set up for test purposes at the TRIGA reactor and then transferred to the powerful neutron sources. Different new perfect silicon channel-cut and interferometer crystals are prepared and then tested at the Bonse-Hart camera, which is a double crystal (or triple axis) diffractometer and at the interferometer set-up. Historically, the first verification of neutron interferometry at a perfect crystal device has been achieved at the 250 kW TRIGA-reactor in Vienna in the year 1974. Also the co-operation with the PSI and the TU Munich in the field of neutron radiography and neutron tomography and VESTA, an experiment for storing cold neutrons with a wavelength of 6.27 A, installed at the pulsed neutron source ISIS at RAL will be mentioned. The second topic treated in this paper shows the international co-operation in the field of superconductors. This research work is carried out under two European TMR-Network programs. The third topic in this paper focuses on the co-operation in the field of safeguard. Several projects have been carried out during the past years in co-operation with the IAEA such as establishing a gamma spectrum reference catalogue for CdZnTe detectors and tests of safeguard video cameras under neutron irradiation. Further an integrated safeguard surveillance network composed of a video camera, a gamma monitor and a neutron monitor is under development. (orig.)

  13. Aerosol in selected laboratories at Faculty of Mechanical Engineering, Opole University of Technology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Olszowski, Tomasz

    2017-10-01

    The paper contains the results of a study into mass concentration of the dispersed aerosol fraction with the aerodynamic diameter of up to 2.5 and 10 micrometers. The study was conducted during classes with students participating in them in two laboratories located at Faculty of Mechanical Engineering, Opole University of Technology as well as outdoor outside the building. It was demonstrated that the values of the mass concentration of PM2.5 and PM10 measured in the laboratories differ considerably from the levels measured in the ambient air in the outdoor areas surrounding the faculty building. It was concluded that the diversity of PM2.5/PM10 ratio was greater in the laboratories. Direct correlation was not established between the concentrations of the particular PM fractions in the two investigated environments. It was demonstrated that there is a statistically significant relation between the concentration of PM2.5 and PM10 and the number of people present in the laboratory. The conducted cluster analysis led to the detection of the existence of dominant structures determining air quality parameters. For the analyzed case, endogenic factors are responsible for the aerosanitary condition. The study demonstrated that the evaluation of air quality needs to be performed individually for the specific rooms.

  14. Plan for fully decontaminating and decommissioning of the Westinghouse Advanced Reactors Division Fuel Laboratories at Cheswick, Revision 3

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1982-01-01

    The project scope of work included the complete decontamination and decommissioning (D and D) of the Westinghouse ARD Fuel Laboratories at the Cheswick Site in the shortest possible time. This has been accomplished in the following four phases: (1) preparation of documents and necessary paperwork; packaging and shipping of all special nuclear materials in an acceptable form to a reprocessing agency; (2) decontamination of all facilities, glove boxes and equipment; loading of generated waste into bins, barrels and strong wooden boxes; (3) shipping of all bins, barrels and boxes containing waste to the designated burial site; removal of all utility services from the laboratories; (4) final survey of remaining facilities and certification for nonrestricted use; preparation of final report. This volume contains the following 3 attachments: (1) Plan for Fully Decontamination and Decommissioning of the Westinghouse Advanced Reactors Division Fuel Laboratories at Cheswick; (2) Environmental Assessment for Decontamination and Decommissioning the Westinghouse Advanced Reactors Division Plutonium Fuel Laboratories, Cheswick, PA; and (3) WARD-386, Quality Assurance Program Description for Decontamination and Decommissioning Activities

  15. The Australian Institute of Nuclear Science and Engineering - a model for university-national laboratory collaboration

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gammon, R.B.

    1994-01-01

    This paper describes the aims and activities of the Australian Institute of Nuclear Science and Engineering (AINSE), from its foundation in 1958 through to 1993. The philosophy, structure and funding of the Institute are briefly reviewed, followed by an account of the development of national research facilities at the Lucas Heights Research Laboratories, with particular emphasis on nuclear techniques of analyses using neutron scattering instruments and particle accelerators. AINSE's program of Grants, fellowships and studentships are explained with many examples given of projects having significance in the context of Australia's national goals. Conference and training programs are also included. The achievements during these years demonstrate that AINSE has been an efficient and cost-effective model for collaboration between universities and a major national laboratory. In recent years, industry, government organisations and the tertiary education system have undergone major re-structuring and rationalization. A new operational structure for AINSE has evolved in response to these changes and is described

  16. Making Stuff Outreach at the Ames Laboratory and Iowa State University

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ament, Katherine; Karsjen, Steven; Leshem-Ackerman, Adah; King, Alexander

    2011-04-01

    The U. S. Department of Energy's Ames Laboratory in Ames, Iowa was a coalition partner for outreach activities connected with NOVA's Making Stuff television series on PBS. Volunteers affiliated with the Ames Laboratory and Iowa State University, with backgrounds in materials science, took part in activities including a science-themed Family Night at a local mall, Science Cafes at the Science Center of Iowa, teacher workshops, demonstrations at science nights in elementary and middle schools, and various other events. We describe a selection of the activities and present a summary of their outcomes and extent of their impact on Ames, Des Moines and the surrounding communities in Iowa. In Part 2, results of a volunteer attitude survey are presented, which shed some light on the volunteer experience and show how the volunteers participation in outreach activities has affected their views of materials education.

  17. A DOE University-national laboratory waste-management education and research consortium (WERC)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bhada, R.K.; Morgan, J.D.; Townsend, J.S.

    1991-01-01

    This paper presents the results and current status of a consortium of three universities and two national laboratories working closely with industry for an Education and Research program on waste-management and environmental restoration. The program sponsored by the US Department of Energy has been in effect for 18 months and has achieved significant progress towards establishing: undergraduate, graduate and associate degree programs involving environmental management, interactive TV courses from the consortium members transmitted throughout the United States, Mexico ampersand Canada, a satellite TV network, a professional development teleconference series, research programs at the leading edge of technology training multi-disciplinary students, research laboratories for analyses, testing, and student training, technology transfer programs, including a TV series on research applications, outreach programs, including pre-college and minority education, community monitoring

  18. A new IBA-AMS laboratory at the Comenius University in Bratislava (Slovakia)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Povinec, Pavel P.; Masarik, Jozef; Kúš, Peter; Holý, Karol; Ješkovský, Miroslav; Breier, Robert; Staníček, Jaroslav; Šivo, Alexander; Richtáriková, Marta; Kováčik, Andrej; Szarka, Ján; Steier, Peter; Priller, Alfred

    2015-01-01

    A Centre for Nuclear and Accelerator Technologies (CENTA) has been established at the Comenius University in Bratislava comprising of a tandem laboratory designed for Ion Beam Analysis (IBA), Ion Beam Modification (IBM) of materials and Accelerator Mass Spectrometry (AMS). The main equipment of the laboratory, i.e. Alphatross and MC-SNICS ion sources, 3 MV Pelletron tandem accelerator, and analyzers of accelerated ions are described. Optimization of ion beam characteristics for different ion sources with gas and solid targets, for transmission of accelerated ions with different energy and charge state, for different parameters of the high-energy ion analyzers, as well as first AMS results are presented. The scientific program of the CENTA will be devoted mainly to nuclear, environmental, life and material sciences.

  19. Report of the research results with University of Tokyo Nuclear Engineering Research Laboratory's facilities in fiscal 1975

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1976-08-01

    Results of the research works by educational institutions using fast neutron source reactor 'Yayoi' etc. of Nuclear Engineering Research Laboratory in fiscal 1975 are reported in individual summaries. Fields of research are the following: shielding benchmark experiment, research on medical irradiation, irradiation experiments, experiments by small research groups, fast neutron streaming experiment, and so on. (Mori, K.)

  20. The relationship between alcohol consumption and related harm among young university students.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hart, Ellen; Burns, Sharyn

    2016-04-01

    Issue addressed Research has shown that Australian university students consume alcohol at a higher level than their peers from the general population and are therefore more likely to witness and experience alcohol-related harm. This study measured the prevalence of alcohol consumption among 18-24-year-old university students and the association between alcohol consumption and witnessed and experienced harms. Methods A random cross-sectional sample of university students aged 18-24 years (n=2466) was recruited via the University Survey Office and through random intercept at campus market day. All participants completed an online survey that included the Alcohol Use Disorders Identification Test, Alcohol Problems Scale and an additional scale measuring witnessed harm. Results Principal Components Analysis revealed three factors within the Alcohol Problems Scale; i.e. Criminal and Aggressive Behaviour, Health and Emotional Harms and Sexual Harms. Students who consume alcohol at high-risk levels were significantly more likely to score highly on each factor, 1.6 times more likely to experience harm and 1.1 times more likely to witness harm than students who consume alcohol at low-risk levels. Conclusions The positive association between alcohol consumption and alcohol-related harm supports previous findings. This study adds previous research through the categorisation of harm into factors. So what? Integrated and comprehensive interventions addressing alcohol consumption among young university students that are informed by evidence-based research can be tailored to ensure that they meet the needs of the target group.

  1. University faculty preparation of students in using natural environment practices with young children.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dunst, Carl J; Bruder, Mary Beth

    2005-02-01

    155 university faculty teaching students in physical therapy, occupational therapy, speech and language pathology, early childhood special education, or multidisciplinary studies programs were surveyed to assess how the students were taught how to use everyday family and community activities as natural learning opportunities for young children. Analysis showed that the faculty provided very little training in using community activity settings as contexts for children's learning and that physical therapy faculty provided less training in using natural environments as sources of children's learning opportunities than faculty in the other disciplines.

  2. Preparation of mandatory documentation before the start up of the RA-0 'zero power' nuclear reactor at Cordoba National University

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Martin, H.R.; Keil, W.M.; Pezzi, N.

    1991-01-01

    Before the start up of the RA-0 'zero power' nuclear reactor installed at Cordoba National University, it was necessary to send to the Regulatory Authority the mandatory documentation which is required in the licensing process. With the previous papers existing for the operation in the first years of the '70, a work program for the future operational training personnel was elaborated. Based on the Authority's applicable rules and the recommendations and with particular criteria originated in the working university conditions, the SAFETY report of RA-0 nuclear reactor was prepared. This paper describes the principal contents, items and documents involved in the safety report. (Author) [es

  3. Visual interaction: models, systems, prototypes. The Pictorial Computing Laboratory at the University of Rome La Sapienza.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bottoni, Paolo; Cinque, Luigi; De Marsico, Maria; Levialdi, Stefano; Panizzi, Emanuele

    2006-06-01

    This paper reports on the research activities performed by the Pictorial Computing Laboratory at the University of Rome, La Sapienza, during the last 5 years. Such work, essentially is based on the study of humancomputer interaction, spans from metamodels of interaction down to prototypes of interactive systems for both synchronous multimedia communication and groupwork, annotation systems for web pages, also encompassing theoretical and practical issues of visual languages and environments also including pattern recognition algorithms. Some applications are also considered like e-learning and collaborative work.

  4. Publications and geothermal sample library facilities of the Earth Science Laboratory, University of Utah Research Institute

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wright, Phillip M.; Ruth, Kathryn A.; Langton, David R.; Bullett, Michael J.

    1990-03-30

    The Earth Science Laboratory of the University of Utah Research Institute has been involved in research in geothermal exploration and development for the past eleven years. Our work has resulted in the publication of nearly 500 reports, which are listed in this document. Over the years, we have collected drill chip and core samples from more than 180 drill holes in geothermal areas, and most of these samples are available to others for research, exploration and similar purposes. We hope that scientists and engineers involved in industrial geothermal development will find our technology transfer and service efforts helpful.

  5. Recent developments at the high-field laboratory of Tohoku University

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Motokawa, M.; Watanabe, K.; Miura, S.; Awaji, S.; Nojiri, H.; Mogi, I.; Mitsudo, S.; Sakon, T.

    1998-01-01

    Recent developments and experiments performed at the high-field laboratory of Tohoku University are described. We have (1) hybrid magnets which produce high fields up to 31.1 T, (2) liquid-helium-free superconducting magnets up to 11 T which are available continuously for more than a year, (3) a 20 T superconducting magnet, (4) pulsed field magnets up to 40 T by a 100 kJ bank and (5) repeating pulsed field systems up to 25 T, synchronized with a pulsed neutron source

  6. Handbook of materials testing reactors and ancillary hot laboratories in the European Community

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1977-01-01

    The purpose of this Handbook is to make available to those interested in 'in-pile' irradiation experiments important data on Materials Testing Reactors in operation in the European Community. Only thermal reactors having a power output of more than 5 MW(th) are taken into consideration. In particular, detailed technical information is given on the experimental irradiation facilities of the reactors, their specialized irradiation devices (loops and instrumented capsules), and the associated hot cell facilities for post-irradiation examination of samples

  7. Astronomy Laboratory Exercise on Olbers’ Paradox and the Age of the Universe

    Science.gov (United States)

    Glazer, Kelsey Samantha; Edwards, Charlotte; Overduin, James; Storrs, Alex

    2018-01-01

    We describe the development of a new laboratory exercise for undergraduate introductory astronomy courses. Students begin by estimating the intensity of the extragalactic background light using a simple Newtonian cosmological model that agrees with recent measurements to within a factor of two. They then use the 0.5m Towson University telescope to image a dark patch of sky such as the Hubble Deep Field near or during new Moon, and compare the intensity actually observed with that predicted. This comparison leads to a new appreciation of foreground contributions such as light pollution, airglow, zodiacal light, starlight and others. Students pick up important skills in uncertainty analysis and astronomical unit conversion. But the most valuable aspect of the exercise in our view is that it enables students to draw a direct connection between the evidence of their own eyes and the age of the Universe.

  8. Qualitative assessment of the value of the Ohio State University TRIGA reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Binney, S.E.; Johnson, A.G.

    1989-01-01

    The Oregon State University (OSU) TRIGA Reactor (OSTR) is a major regional research, training, and service facility. The OSTR supports a wide variety of organizations at the local, state, regional, national, and international levels. Examples of usage of the OSTR are given in this paper to serve as a basis for assessing the value of the OSTR to its user organizations. It is difficult to assess the value of a facility such as the OSTR quantitatively, primarily because a dollar value cannot be assigned to many of the services that the OSTR performs, e.g., forensic analysis to assist police agencies in criminal cases. Significant qualitative statements can be made, however, to demonstrate the fact that the value of a research reactor facility such as the OSTR substantially outweighs the capital and operating costs of such a facility. Analysis of the data presented above clearly indicates that the value of the OSTR facility is overwhelmingly positive, i.e., the benefits associated with the services provided by the OSTR facility outweigh the cost of providing such services by perhaps as much as an order of magnitude

  9. Disposition of the fluoride fuel and flush salts from the Molten Salt Reactor experiment at Oak Ridge National Laboratory

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Peretz, F.J.

    1996-01-01

    The Molten Salt Reactor Experiment (MSRE) is an 8 MW reactor that was operated at Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) from 1965 through 1969. The reactor used a unique liquid salt fuel, composed of a mixture of LIF, BeF 2 , ZrF 4 , and UF 4 , and operated at temperatures above 600 degrees C. The primary fuel salt circulation system consisted of the reactor vessel, a single fuel salt pump, and a single primary heat exchanger. Heat was transferred from the fuel salt to a coolant salt circuit in the primary heat exchanger. The coolant salt was similar to the fuel salt, except that it contains only LiF (66%) and BeF, (34%). The coolant salt passed from the primary heat exchanger to an air-cooled radiator and a coolant salt pump, and then returned to the primary heat exchanger. Each of the salt loops was provided with drain tanks, located such that the salt could be drained out of either circuit by gravity. A single drain tank was provided for the non-radioactive coolant salt. Two drain tanks were provided for the fuel salt. Since the fuel salt contained radioactive fuel, fission products, and activation products, and since the reactor was designed such that the fuel salt could be drained immediately into the drain tanks in the event of a problem in the fuel salt loop, the fuel salt drain tanks were provided with a system to remove the heat generated by radioactive decay. A third drain tank connected to the fuel salt loop was provided for a batch of flush salt. This batch of salt, similar in composition to the coolant salt, was used to condition the fuel salt loop after it had been exposed to air and to flush the fuel salt loop of residual fuel salt prior to accessing the reactor circuit for maintenance or experimental activities. This report discusses the disposition of the fluoride fuel and flush salt

  10. Stabilization of fine fraction from landfill mining in anaerobic and aerobic laboratory leach bed reactors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mönkäre, Tiina J; Palmroth, Marja R T; Rintala, Jukka A

    2015-11-01

    Fine fraction (FF, mined landfill was stabilized in four laboratory-scale leach bed reactors (LBR) over 180 days. The aim was to study feasibility of biotechnological methods to treat FF and if further stabilization of FF is possible. Four different stabilization methods were compared and their effects upon quality of FF were evaluated. Also during the stabilization experiment, leachate quality as well as gas composition and quantity were analyzed. The methods studied included three anaerobic LBRs (one without water addition, one with water addition, and one with leachate recirculation) and one aerobic LBR (with water addition). During the experiment, the most methane was produced in anaerobic LBR without water addition (18.0 L CH4/kg VS), while water addition and leachate recirculation depressed methane production slightly, to 16.1 and 16.4 L CH4/kg VS, respectively. Organic matter was also removed via the leachate and was measured as chemical oxygen demand (COD). Calculated removal of organic matter in gas and leachate was highest in LBR with water addition (59 g COD/kg VS), compared with LBR without water addition or with leachate recirculation (51 g COD/kg VS). Concentrations of COD, ammonium nitrogen and anions in leachate decreased during the experiment, indicating washout mechanism caused by water additions. Aeration increased sulfate and nitrate concentrations in leachate due to oxidized sulfide and ammonium. Molecular weight distributions of leachates showed that all the size categories decreased, especially low molecular weight compounds, which were reduced the most. Aerobic stabilization resulted in the lowest final VS/TS (13.1%), lowest respiration activity (0.9-1.2 mg O2/g TS), and lowest methane production after treatment (0.0-0.8 L CH4/kg VS), with 29% of VS being removed from FF. Anaerobic stabilization methods also reduced organic matter by 9-20% compared with the initial amount. Stabilization reduced the quantity of soluble nitrogen in FF and did

  11. Nuclear characteristics evaluation for Kyoto University Research Reactor with low-enriched uranium core

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nakajima, Ken; Unesaki, Hironobu [Kyoto University Research Reactor Institute, Kumatori-cho Sennan-gun Osaka (Japan)

    2008-07-01

    A project to convert the fuel of Kyoto University Research Reactor (KUR) from highly enriched uranium (HEU) to low-enriched uranium (LEU) is in progress as a part of RERTR program. Prior to the operation of LEU core, the nuclear characteristics of the core have been evaluated to confirm the safety operation. In the evaluation, nuclear parameters, such as the excess reactivity, shut down margin control rod worth, reactivity coefficients, were calculated, and they were compared with the safety limits. The results of evaluation show that the LEU core is able to satisfy the safety requirements for operation, i.e. all the parameters satisfy the safety limits. Consequently, it was confirmed that the LEU fuel core has the proper nuclear characteristics for the safety operation. (authors)

  12. Neutronic design of a LEU [low enriched uranium] core for the Ohio State University research reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Seshadri, M.D.; Aybar, H.S.; Aldemir, T.

    1987-01-01

    The 10 kw HEU fuelled Ohio State University Reactor (OSURR) will be upgraded to operate at 500 kW with standardized 125 g 235 U LEU U 3 Si 2 fuel plates. An earlier scoping study based on two-dimensional diffusion calculations has identified the potential LEU core configurations for the conversion/upgrade of OSURR using the standardized plates in a 16-plate (+ 2 dummy plates) standard and 10-scoping study is improved for a more precise determination of the excess reactivities and safety rod worths for these potential configurations. Comparison of the results obtained by the improved model to experimental results and to the results of full-core Monte Carlo simulations shows excellent agreement. The results also indicate that the conversion/upgrade of OSURR can be realized with three possible LEU core configurations while maintaining a cold, clean shutdown margin of 1.57-1.91 % Δ k/k, depending on the configuration used. (Author)

  13. Biomedical irradiation system for boron neutron capture therapy at the Kyoto University Reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kobayashi, T.; Kanda, K.; Ujeno, Y.; Ishida, M.R.

    1990-01-01

    Physics studies related to radiation source, spectroscopy, beam quality, dosimetry, and biomedical applications using the Kyoto University Reactor Heavy Water Facility are described. Also, described are a Nickel Mirror Neutron Guide Tube and a Super Mirror Neutron Guide Tube that are used both for the measurement of boron concentration in phantom and living tissue and for precise measurements of neutron flux in phantom in the presence of both light and heavy water. Discussed are: (1) spectrum measurements using the time of flight technique, (2) the elimination of gamma rays and fast neutrons from a thermal neutron irradiation field, (3) neutron collimation without producing secondary gamma rays, (4) precise neutron flux measurements, dose estimation, and the measurement of boron concentration in tumor and its periphery using guide tubes, (5) the dose estimation of boron-10 for the first melanoma patient, and (6) special-purpose biological irradiation equipment. Other related subjects are also described

  14. Biomedical irradiation system for boron neutron capture therapy at the Kyoto University reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kobayashi, T.; Kanda, K.; Ujeno, Y.; Ishida, M.R.

    1990-01-01

    Physics studies related to radiation source, spectroscopy, beam quality, dosimetry, and biomedical applications using the Kyoto University Reactor Heavy Water Facility are described. Also, described are a Nickel Mirror Neutron Guide Tube and a Super Mirror Neutron Guide Tube that are used both for the measurement of boron concentration in phantom and living tissue and for precise measurements of neutron flux in phantom in the presence of both light and heavy water. Discussed are: (1) spectrum measurements using the time of flight technique, (2) the elimination of gamma rays and fast neutrons from a thermal neutron irradiation field, (3) neutron collimation without producing secondary gamma rays, (4) precise neutron flux measurements, dose estimation, and the measurement of boron concentration in tumor and its periphery using guide tubes, (5) the dose estimation of boron-10 for the first melanoma patient, and (6) special-purpose biological irradiation equipment. Other related subjects are also described

  15. DIissolution of low enriched uranium from the experimental breeder reactor-II fuel stored at the Idaho National Laboratory

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Daniel, G. [Savannah River Site (SRS), Aiken, SC (United States). Savannah River National Lab. (SRNL); Rudisill, T. [Savannah River Site (SRS), Aiken, SC (United States). Savannah River National Lab. (SRNL); Almond, P. [Savannah River Site (SRS), Aiken, SC (United States). Savannah River National Lab. (SRNL); O' Rourke, P. [Savannah River Site (SRS), Aiken, SC (United States). Savannah River National Lab. (SRNL)

    2017-06-28

    The Idaho National Laboratory (INL) is actively engaged in the development of electrochemical processing technology for the treatment of fast reactor fuels using irradiated fuel from the Experimental Breeder Reactor-II (EBR-II) as the primary test material. The research and development (R&D) activities generate a low enriched uranium (LEU) metal product from the electrorefining of the EBR-II fuel and the subsequent consolidation and removal of chloride salts by the cathode processor. The LEU metal ingots from past R&D activities are currently stored at INL awaiting disposition. One potential disposition pathway is the shipment of the ingots to the Savannah River Site (SRS) for dissolution in H-Canyon. Carbon steel cans containing the LEU metal would be loaded into reusable charging bundles in the H-Canyon Crane Maintenance Area and charged to the 6.4D or 6.1D dissolver. The LEU dissolution would be accomplished as the final charge in a dissolver batch (following the dissolution of multiple charges of spent nuclear fuel (SNF)). The solution would then be purified and the 235U enrichment downblended to allow use of the U in commercial reactor fuel. To support this potential disposition path, the Savannah River National Laboratory (SRNL) developed a dissolution flowsheet for the LEU using samples of the material received from INL.

  16. Tandem mirror reactor studies at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory, FY 1980

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Carlson, G.A.; Neef, W.S. Jr.

    1981-03-20

    The principles of tandem mirror operation with thermal barriers will be demonstrated in the upgrade of the Tandem Mirror Experiment (TMX-U) in 1981 and the tandem configuration of the Mirror Fusion Test Facility (MFTF-B) in 1984. Continued analysis and conceptual design over this period will evolve the optimal configuration and parameters for a power-producing reactor. In this article we describe the progress we have made in this reactor design study effort during 1980.

  17. Tandem mirror reactor studies at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory, FY 1980

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Carlson, G.A.; Neef, W.S. Jr.

    1981-01-01

    The principles of tandem mirror operation with thermal barriers will be demonstrated in the upgrade of the Tandem Mirror Experiment (TMX-U) in 1981 and the tandem configuration of the Mirror Fusion Test Facility (MFTF-B) in 1984. Continued analysis and conceptual design over this period will evolve the optimal configuration and parameters for a power-producing reactor. In this article we describe the progress we have made in this reactor design study effort during 1980

  18. [Laboratory medicine in the obligatory postgraduate clinical training system--common clinical training program in the department of laboratory medicine in our prefectural medical university hospital].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Okamoto, Yasuyuki

    2003-04-01

    I propose a postgraduate common clinical training program to be provided by the department of laboratory medicine in our prefectural medical university hospital. The program has three purposes: first, mastering basic laboratory tests; second, developing the skills necessary to accurately interpret laboratory data; third, learning specific techniques in the field of laboratory medicine. For the first purpose, it is important that medical trainees perform testing of their own patients at bedside or in the central clinical laboratory. When testing at the central clinical laboratory, instruction by expert laboratory technicians is helpful. The teaching doctors in the department of laboratory medicine are asked to advise the trainees on the interpretation of data. Consultation will be received via interview or e-mail. In addition, the trainees can participate in various conferences, seminars, and meetings held at the central clinical laboratory. Finally, in order to learn specific techniques in the field of laboratory medicine, several special courses lasting a few months will be prepared. I think this program should be closely linked to the training program in internal medicine.

  19. Wildlife, Snow, Coffee, and Video: The IPY Activities of the University of Alaska Young Researchers' Network

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pringle, D.; Alvarez-Aviles, L.; Carlson, D.; Harbeck, J.; Druckenmiller, M.; Newman, K.; Mueller, D.; Petrich, C.; Roberts, A.; Wang, Y.

    2007-12-01

    The University of Alaska International Polar Year (IPY) Young Researchers' Network is a group of graduate students and postdoctoral fellows. Our interdisciplinary group operates as a volunteer network to promote the International Polar Year through education and outreach aimed at the general public and Alaskan students of all ages. The Young Researchers' Network sponsors and organizes science talks or Science Cafés by guest speakers in public venues such as coffee shops and bookstores. We actively engage high school students in IPY research concerning the ionic concentrations and isotopic ratios of precipitation through Project Snowball. Our network provides hands-on science activities to encourage environmental awareness and initiate community wildlife monitoring programs such as Wildlife Day by Day. We mentor individual high school students pursuing their own research projects related to IPY through the Alaska High School Science Symposium. Our group also interacts with the general public at community events and festivals to share the excitement of IPY for example at the World Ice Art Championship and Alaska State Fair. The UA IPY Young Researchers' Network continues to explore new partnerships with educators and students in an effort to enhance science and education related to Alaska and the polar regions in general. For more information please visit: http://ipy-youth.uaf.edu or e-mail: ipy-youth@alaska.edu

  20. Academic Self-Concept and Motivation in Young Talents of a Private University in Tarapoto

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Renzo F. Carranza

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available The objective of this study was to determine the relationship between academic self-concept and academic motivation in young talents (Scholarship 18 at a Private University in Tarapoto city, Peru. The sample was obtained through a probabislitic sampling and there were 92 young talents, being 47,8% male and 52,2% female between 17 and 22 years old. I used a descriptive, correlational and non-experimental design. The sample was evaluated using the AF5 Self-concept Scale (García and Musitu academic section that consists of 6 items, and the Academic Motivation Scale that consists of 28 items. The psychometric properties of the instruments indicated that they are valid and reliable. Data were processed in SPSS (Statistical Package for the Social Sciences version 20.0. The results show that there is a direct and highly significant relationship between academic self-concept and academic motivation in young talents (r = .301**, p<.004, which indicates the higher the academic self-concept, the greater the academic motivation.

  1. Research reactor standards and their impact on the TRIGA reactor community

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Richards, W.J.

    1980-01-01

    The American Nuclear Society has established a standards committee devoted to writing standards for research reactors. This committee was formed in 1971 and has since that time written over 15 standards that cover all aspects of research reactor operation. The committee has representation from virtually every group concerned with research reactors and their operation. This organization includes University reactors, National laboratory reactors, Nuclear Regulatory commission, Department of Energy and private nuclear companies and insurers. Since its beginning the committee has developed standards in the following areas: Standard for the development of technical specifications for research reactors; Quality control for plate-type uranium-aluminium fuel elements; Records and reports for research reactors; Selection and training of personnel for research reactors; Review of experiments for research reactors; Research reactor site evaluation; Quality assurance program requirements for research reactors; Decommissioning of research reactors; Radiological control at research reactor facilities; Design objectives for and monitoring of systems controlling research reactor effluents; Physical security for research reactor facilities; Criteria for the reactor safety systems of research reactors; Emergency planning for research reactors; Fire protection program requirements for research reactors; Standard for administrative controls for research reactors. Besides writing the above standards, the committee is very active in using communications with the nuclear regulatory commission on proposed rules or positions which will affect the research reactor community

  2. Development of the University of Washington Biofuels and Biobased Chemicals Process Laboratory

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gustafson, Richard [University of Washington

    2014-02-04

    The funding from this research grant enabled us to design and build a bioconversion steam explosion reactor and ancillary equipment such as a high pressure boiler and a fermenter to support the bioconversion process research. This equipment has been in constant use since its installation in 2012. Following are research projects that it has supported: • Investigation of novel chip production method in biofuels production • Investigation of biomass refining following steam explosion • Several studies on use of different biomass feedstocks • Investigation of biomass moisture content on pretreatment efficacy. • Development of novel instruments for biorefinery process control Having this equipment was also instrumental in the University of Washington receiving a $40 million grant from the US Department of Agriculture for biofuels development as well as several other smaller grants. The research that is being done with the equipment from this grant will facilitate the establishment of a biofuels industry in the Pacific Northwest and enable the University of Washington to launch a substantial biofuels and bio-based product research program.

  3. Perception of masculinity amongst young Malaysian men: a qualitative study of university students

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-01-01

    Background Perception of Masculinity plays an important role in men’s lifestyles and health behaviors. Although, the importance of masculinity has been widely discussed in men’s health literature, very little is known about the meanings of masculinity in the Malaysian setting. This research aimed to explore the meanings of masculinity among Malaysian university men. Methods This qualitative study utilized in-depth interviews with 34 young Malaysian university men, aged 20–30 years from three main ethnic groups in Malaysia (Malay, Chinese and Indian). Thematic analysis approach was used to extract data. NVIVO v8 qualitative software was used for data management. Results From the data collected several concepts emerged that reflected the meanings of masculinity from the participants’ view points. These meanings were associated with a combination of traditional and non-traditional norms that generally benefit men who behave according to culturally dominant role expectations. These included: “Having a good body shape”, “being respected”, “having success with women”, “being a family man”, and “having financial independence”. Socio-cultural factors, such as family environment, religion, public media and popular life style patterns helped to shape and reinforce the meanings of masculinities among university men. Conclusions This study revealed that the university context provided a particular culture for construction and reinforcement of the meanings of masculinities, which should be considered by the educators to help in development of healthy masculinities. PMID:24215138

  4. Perception of masculinity amongst young Malaysian men: a qualitative study of university students.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fazli Khalaf, Zahra; Low, Wah Yun; Ghorbani, Behzad; Merghati Khoei, Effat

    2013-11-11

    Perception of Masculinity plays an important role in men's lifestyles and health behaviors. Although, the importance of masculinity has been widely discussed in men's health literature, very little is known about the meanings of masculinity in the Malaysian setting. This research aimed to explore the meanings of masculinity among Malaysian university men. This qualitative study utilized in-depth interviews with 34 young Malaysian university men, aged 20-30 years from three main ethnic groups in Malaysia (Malay, Chinese and Indian). Thematic analysis approach was used to extract data. NVIVO v8 qualitative software was used for data management. From the data collected several concepts emerged that reflected the meanings of masculinity from the participants' view points. These meanings were associated with a combination of traditional and non-traditional norms that generally benefit men who behave according to culturally dominant role expectations. These included: "Having a good body shape", "being respected", "having success with women", "being a family man", and "having financial independence". Socio-cultural factors, such as family environment, religion, public media and popular life style patterns helped to shape and reinforce the meanings of masculinities among university men. This study revealed that the university context provided a particular culture for construction and reinforcement of the meanings of masculinities, which should be considered by the educators to help in development of healthy masculinities.

  5. Continuous Photo-Oxidation in a Vortex Reactor: Efficient Operations Using Air Drawn from the Laboratory.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Darren S; Amara, Zacharias; Clark, Charlotte A; Xu, Zeyuan; Kakimpa, Bruce; Morvan, Herve P; Pickering, Stephen J; Poliakoff, Martyn; George, Michael W

    2017-07-21

    We report the construction and use of a vortex reactor which uses a rapidly rotating cylinder to generate Taylor vortices for continuous flow thermal and photochemical reactions. The reactor is designed to operate under conditions required for vortex generation. The flow pattern of the vortices has been represented using computational fluid dynamics, and the presence of the vortices can be easily visualized by observing streams of bubbles within the reactor. This approach presents certain advantages for reactions with added gases. For reactions with oxygen, the reactor offers an alternative to traditional setups as it efficiently draws in air from the lab without the need specifically to pressurize with oxygen. The rapid mixing generated by the vortices enables rapid mass transfer between the gas and the liquid phases allowing for a high efficiency dissolution of gases. The reactor has been applied to several photochemical reactions involving singlet oxygen ( 1 O 2 ) including the photo-oxidations of α-terpinene and furfuryl alcohol and the photodeborylation of phenyl boronic acid. The rotation speed of the cylinder proved to be key for reaction efficiency, and in the operation we found that the uptake of air was highest at 4000 rpm. The reactor has also been successfully applied to the synthesis of artemisinin, a potent antimalarial compound; and this three-step synthesis involving a Schenk-ene reaction with 1 O 2 , Hock cleavage with H + , and an oxidative cyclization cascade with triplet oxygen ( 3 O 2 ), from dihydroartemisinic acid was carried out as a single process in the vortex reactor.

  6. QA experience at the University of Wisconsin accredited dosimetry calibration laboratory

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    DeWard, L.A.; Micka, J.A. [Univ. of Wisconsin, Madison, WI (United States)

    1993-12-31

    The University of Wisconsin Accredited Dosimetry Calibration Laboratory (UW ADCL) employs procedure manuals as part of its Quality Assurance (QA) program. One of these manuals covers the QA procedures and results for all of the UW ADCL measurement equipment. The QA procedures are divided into two main areas: QA for laboratory equipment and QA for external chambers sent for calibration. All internal laboratory equipment is checked and recalibrated on an annual basis, after establishing its consistency on a 6-month basis. QA for external instruments involves checking past calibration history as well as comparing to a range of calibration values for specific instrument models. Generally, the authors find that a chamber will have a variation of less than 0.5 % from previous Co-60 calibration factors, and falls within two standard deviations of previous calibrations. If x-ray calibrations are also performed, the energy response of the chamber is plotted and compared to previous instruments of the same model. These procedures give the authors confidence in the transfer of calibration values from National Institute of Standards and Technology (NIST).

  7. QA experience at the University of Wisconsin accredited dosimetry calibration laboratory

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    DeWard, L.A.; Micka, J.A.

    1993-01-01

    The University of Wisconsin Accredited Dosimetry Calibration Laboratory (UW ADCL) employs procedure manuals as part of its Quality Assurance (QA) program. One of these manuals covers the QA procedures and results for all of the UW ADCL measurement equipment. The QA procedures are divided into two main areas: QA for laboratory equipment and QA for external chambers sent for calibration. All internal laboratory equipment is checked and recalibrated on an annual basis, after establishing its consistency on a 6-month basis. QA for external instruments involves checking past calibration history as well as comparing to a range of calibration values for specific instrument models. Generally, the authors find that a chamber will have a variation of less than 0.5 % from previous Co-60 calibration factors, and falls within two standard deviations of previous calibrations. If x-ray calibrations are also performed, the energy response of the chamber is plotted and compared to previous instruments of the same model. These procedures give the authors confidence in the transfer of calibration values from National Institute of Standards and Technology (NIST)

  8. Safety in Academic Chemistry Laboratories: Volume 1. Accident Prevention for College and University Students, 7th Edition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    American Chemical Society, Washington, DC.

    This book contains volume 1 of 2 and describes safety guidelines for academic chemistry laboratories to prevent accidents for college and university students. Contents include: (1) "Your Responsibility for Accident Prevention"; (2) "Guide to Chemical Hazards"; (3) "Recommended Laboratory Techniques"; and (4) "Safety Equipment and Emergency…

  9. The Importance of a Laboratory Section on Student Learning Outcomes in a University Introductory Earth Science Course

    Science.gov (United States)

    Forcino, Frank L.

    2013-01-01

    Laboratory sections of university Earth science courses provide hands-on, inquiry-based activities for students in support of lecture and discussion. Here, I compare student conceptual knowledge outcomes of laboratory sections by administering an independent concept inventory at the beginning and end of two courses: one that had a lecture and a…

  10. Improving Pre-Service Elementary Teachers' Education via a Laboratory Course on Air Pollution: One University's Experience

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mandrikas, Achilleas; Parkosidis, Ioannis; Psomiadis, Ploutarchos; Stoumpa, Artemisia; Chalkidis, Anthimos; Mavrikaki, Evangelia; Skordoulis, Constantine

    2013-01-01

    This paper describes the structure of the "Air Pollution Course", an environmental science laboratory course developed at the Science Education Laboratory of the Faculty of Primary Education, University of Athens, as well as the findings resulting from its implementation by pre-service elementary teachers. The course proposed in this…

  11. Sexual Education of Young University Students: Some Key Factors and Challenges

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    María Luisa Preinfalk-Fernández

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available In general terms, higher education institutions not only face the challenge of teaching some discipline to their students, but also of strengthening their life skills. Since university students are majorly young, the desire to provide them with comprehensive training is particularly relevant, since it is at this stage of life when they model their behavior for adulthood. In this training challenge, sex education plays a decisive role. This research paper aims to show that factors such as information gaps, unsafe sexual practices, myths, prejudices and stereotypes persist in the university student population and do not allow them to live sexuality safely and pleasurable. Moreover, these factors show Costa Rica’s need for higher education institutions to strengthen their actions in sex education. A brief tour is made from various angles through the sexual experiences of the university student population, namely: their perceptions about the training requirements they face, their main concerns, their unsafe sexual practices, their inability to negotiate sexual and reproductive health care, their knowledge and preventive practices in terms of sexual and reproductive health, the existence of forms of violence within university life, among others. The findings set out are part of a larger research, based on contributions from the theory of gender and social constructionism. Such data derives from the application of a questionnaire to a sample stratified by unequal conglomerates composed of 766 regular students of undergraduate courses, enrolled in the first cycle of 2011, at Universidad Nacional de Costa Rica. The margin of error is 1.5% and the confidence level, 95%. The data was tabulated using the software CSPRO and analyzed with software R. After obtaining the results of the instrument’s application, a focus group was created with the participation of professionals who teach sexuality courses in this university, and two other groups with

  12. Pyrolysis of aseptic packages (tetrapak) in a laboratory screw type reactor and secondary thermal/catalytic tar decomposition

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Haydary, J., E-mail: juma.haydary@stuba.sk [Institute of Chemical and Environmental Engineering, Faculty of Chemical and Food Technology, Slovak University of Technology, Radlinského 9, 812 37 Bratislava (Slovakia); Susa, D.; Dudáš, J. [Institute of Chemical and Environmental Engineering, Faculty of Chemical and Food Technology, Slovak University of Technology, Radlinského 9, 812 37 Bratislava (Slovakia)

    2013-05-15

    Highlights: ► Pyrolysis of aseptic packages was carried out in a laboratory flow reactor. ► Distribution of tetrapak into the product yields was obtained. ► Composition of the pyrolysis products was estimated. ► Secondary thermal and catalytic decomposition of tars was studied. ► Two types of catalysts (dolomite and red clay marked AFRC) were used. - Abstract: Pyrolysis of aseptic packages (tetrapak cartons) in a laboratory apparatus using a flow screw type reactor and a secondary catalytic reactor for tar cracking was studied. The pyrolysis experiments were realized at temperatures ranging from 650 °C to 850 °C aimed at maximizing of the amount of the gas product and reducing its tar content. Distribution of tetrapak into the product yields at different conditions was obtained. The presence of H{sub 2}, CO, CH{sub 4}, CO{sub 2} and light hydrocarbons, HCx, in the gas product was observed. The Aluminum foil was easily separated from the solid product. The rest part of char was characterized by proximate and elemental analysis and calorimetric measurements. The total organic carbon in the tar product was estimated by elemental analysis of tars. Two types of catalysts (dolomite and red clay marked AFRC) were used for catalytic thermal tar decomposition. Three series of experiments (without catalyst in a secondary cracking reactor, with dolomite and with AFRC) at temperatures of 650, 700, 750, 800 and 850 °C were carried out. Both types of catalysts have significantly affected the content of tars and other components in pyrolytic gases. The effect of catalyst on the tetrapack distribution into the product yield on the composition of gas and on the total organic carbon in the tar product is presented in this work.

  13. A cross sectional evaluation of an alcohol intervention targeting young university students.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burns, Sharyn; Jancey, Jonine; Crawford, Gemma; Hallett, Jonathan; Portsmouth, Linda; Longo, Janelle

    2016-07-20

    Hazardous drinking has been found to be higher among young university students compared to their non-university peers. Although young university students are exposed to new and exciting experiences, including greater availability and emphasis on social functions involving alcohol there are few multi strategy comprehensive interventions aimed at reducing alcohol-related harms. Random cross sectional online surveys were administered to 18-24 year old students studying at the main campus of a large metropolitan university in Perth, Western Australia. Prior to the completion of the second survey an alcohol intervention was implemented on campus. Completed surveys were received from 2465 (Baseline; T1) and 2422 (Post Year 1: T2) students. Students who consumed alcohol in the past 12 months were categorised as low risk or hazardous drinkers using the Alcohol Use Disorders Identification Test (AUDIT). Due to the cross sectional nature of the two samples two-tailed two-proportion z-test and two sample t-tests were employed to determine statistical significance between the two time periods for categorical and continuous variables respectively. At T1 and T2 89.1 % and 87.2 % of the total sample reported drinking alcohol in the past month respectively. Hazardous levels of alcohol consumption reduced slightly between T1 (39.7 %) and T2 (38 %). In both time periods hazardous drinkers reported significantly higher mean scores for experienced harm, second-hand harm and witnessed harm scores compared to low risk drinkers (p alcohol consumption and to report more positive alcohol expectations than low risk drinkers at both time periods (p students who report hazardous drinking are of concern and efforts should be made to ensure integrated and targeted strategies reach higher risk students and focus on specific issues such as driving while intoxicated and alcohol related unplanned sexual activity. However there is also a need for universal strategies targeting all students and

  14. Pacific Northwest Laboratory Monthly Activities Report for August 1966 AEC Division of Reactor Development and Technology Programs

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    SL Fawcett

    1966-08-01

    This report has the following sections: Summary; Civilian Power Reactors; Applied and Reactor Physics; Reactor Fuels and Materials; Engineering Development; Plutonium Recycle Program; and Nuclear Safety.

  15. Final report on the University of Florida U.S. Department of Energy 1995--96 Reactor Sharing Program

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vernetson, W.G.

    1996-11-01

    Grant support has been well used by the University of Florida as host institution to support various educational institutions in the use of the reactor and associated facilities as indicated in the proposal. These various educational institutions are located primarily within Florida. However, when the 600-mile distance from Pensacola to Miami is considered, it is obvious that this Grant provides access to reactor utilization for a broad geographical region and a diverse set of user institutions serving over twelve million inhabitants throughout the State of Florida and still others throughout the nation. All users and uses were carefully screened to assure the usage was for educational institutions eligible for participation in the Reactor Sharing Program; where research activities were involved, care was taken to assure the research activities were not funded by grants for contract funding from outside sources. In some cases external grant funding is limited or is used up, in which case the Reactor Sharing Grant and frequent cost sharing by the UFTR facility and the University of Florida provide the necessary support to complete a project or to provide more results to make a complete project even better. In some cases this latter usage has aided renewal of external funding. The role of the Reactor Sharing Program, though relatively small in dollars, has been the single most important occurrence in assuring the rebirth and continued high utilization of the UFTR in a time when many better equipped and better placed facilities have ceased operations. Through dedicated and effective advertising efforts, the UFTR has seen nearly every four-year college and university in Florida make substantive use of the facility under the Reactor Sharing Program with many now regular users. Some have even been able to support usage from outside grants where the Reactor Sharing Grant has served as seed money; still others have been assisted when external grants were depleted

  16. Experiences in the D ampersand D of the EBWR reactor complex at Argonne National Laboratory

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bhattacharyya, S.K.; Boing, L.E.; Fellhauer, C.R.

    1995-02-01

    EBWR went critical in Dec 1957 at 20 MW(t), was upgraded to 100 MW(t) operation. EBWR was shut down July 1967 and placed in dry lay-up. In 1986, the D ampersand D work was planned in 4 phases: final planning and preparations for D ampersand D, removal of reactor systems, removal of reactor vessel complex, and final decontamination and project closeout. Despite precautions, there was an uptake of 241 Am by D ampersand D workers following underwater plasma arc cutting within the pool; the cause was traced to an experimental 241 Pu foil (200 μg) that was lost in the mid-1960s in the reactor vessel. Several major lessons were learned from this episode, among which is the fact that research facilities often involve unusual experiments which may not be recorded. Safety analysis and review procedure for D ampersand D operations need to be carefully considered since they represent considerably different situations than reactor operations. EBWR is one of the very few cases of a prototypic reactor facility designed, operated, tested and now D ampersand D'd by one organization

  17. Report of the research results with University of Tokyo, Nuclear Engineering Research Laboratory's Facilities in fiscal 1989

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1990-01-01

    This is the report of the results of research carried out by the common utilization of the reactor 'Yayoi' and an electron accelerator in the Nuclear Engineering Research Laboratory in fiscal year 1989. In fiscal year 1989, the research themes using the reactor Yayoi or related to it were 15, and those using the linear accelerator reached 12, thus the common utilization attracted the strong interest of users. The Yayoi has been operated satisfactorily without trouble. The results of the research carried out by the common utilization of the Yayoi and a linac and the reports of 12 Yayoi research meetings in fiscal year 1989 are collected. (J.P.N.)

  18. Safety Evaluation Report related to the renewal of the operating license for the training and research reactor at the University of Michigan (Docket No. 50-2)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1985-07-01

    This Safety Evaluation Report for the application filed by the University of Michigan (UM) for renewal of the Ford Nuclear Reactor (FNR) operating license number R-28 to continue to operate its research reactor has been prepared by the Office of Nuclear Reactor Regulation of the US Nuclear Regulatory Commission. The facility is located on the North Campus of the University of Michigan in Ann Arbor, Michigan. The staff concludes that the reactor can continue to be operated by the University of Michigan without endangering the health and safety of the public

  19. Safety climate in university and college laboratories: impact of organizational and individual factors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Tsung-Chih; Liu, Chi-Wei; Lu, Mu-Chen

    2007-01-01

    Universities and colleges serve to be institutions of education excellence; however, problems in the areas of occupational safety may undermine such goals. Occupational safety must be the concern of every employee in the organization, regardless of job position. Safety climate surveys have been suggested as important tools for measuring the effectiveness and improvement direction of safety programs. Thus, this study aims to investigate the influence of organizational and individual factors on safety climate in university and college laboratories. Employees at 100 universities and colleges in Taiwan were mailed a self-administered questionnaire survey; the response rate was 78%. Multivariate analysis of variance revealed that organizational category of ownership, the presence of a safety manager and safety committee, gender, age, title, accident experience, and safety training significantly affected the climate. Among them, accident experience and safety training affected the climate with practical significance. The authors recommend that managers should address important factors affecting safety issues and then create a positive climate by enforcing continuous improvements.

  20. QCD phase transition in the laboratory and in the early universe

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sinha, Bikash

    1998-01-01

    It is expected that two nuclei colliding at ultra-relativistic energies (∼ 200 GeV/nucleon or more) may lead to hadronic matter go through a phase transition to its fundamental constituents, quarks and gluons, usually referred to as quark gluon plasma (QGP). Somewhat analogously, the universe, as per conventional wisdom should have consisted of quarks, gluons, leptons and photons, a microsecond after the Big Bang. The experience and wisdom, expected from nucleus-nucleus collisions in the laboratory and anticipated to facilitate our understanding of the quark-hadron phase transition. Indeed what possible footprints of that primordial epoch can be traced in today's cosmos is one of the interesting and intriguing questions. In this paper, the following areas will be focused: the issue of successive thermal and chemical equilibrium scenarios; a detailed study of hot hadronic matter and its implication on the thermal model; and finally, the surviving quark nuggets beyond a critical baryon content, and, nuggets being possible candidates for baryonic dark matter in the universe, a much more straightforward candidate than illusive actions or SUSY particles. It is our considered view that quark hadron phase transition in the microsecond universe is a thriving area of research and lot more can be understood and known from this primordial event. (author)

  1. Policies and practices pertaining to the selection, qualification requirements, and training programs for nuclear-reactor operating personnel at the Oak Ridge National Laboratory

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Culbert, W.H.

    1985-10-01

    This document describes the policies and practices of the Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) regarding the selection of and training requirements for reactor operating personnel at the Laboratory's nuclear-reactor facilities. The training programs, both for initial certification and for requalification, are described and provide the guidelines for ensuring that ORNL's research reactors are operated in a safe and reliable manner by qualified personnel. This document gives an overview of the reactor facilities and addresses the various qualifications, training, testing, and requalification requirements stipulated in DOE Order 5480.1A, Chapter VI (Safety of DOE-Owned Reactors); it is intended to be in compliance with this DOE Order, as applicable to ORNL facilities. Included also are examples of the documentation maintained amenable for audit.

  2. Policies and practices pertaining to the selection, qualification requirements, and training programs for nuclear-reactor operating personnel at the Oak Ridge National Laboratory

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Culbert, W.H.

    1985-10-01

    This document describes the policies and practices of the Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) regarding the selection of and training requirements for reactor operating personnel at the Laboratory's nuclear-reactor facilities. The training programs, both for initial certification and for requalification, are described and provide the guidelines for ensuring that ORNL's research reactors are operated in a safe and reliable manner by qualified personnel. This document gives an overview of the reactor facilities and addresses the various qualifications, training, testing, and requalification requirements stipulated in DOE Order 5480.1A, Chapter VI (Safety of DOE-Owned Reactors); it is intended to be in compliance with this DOE Order, as applicable to ORNL facilities. Included also are examples of the documentation maintained amenable for audit

  3. Intrinsic religiousness and spirituality as predictors of mental health and positive psychological functioning in Latter-Day Saint adolescents and young adults.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sanders, Peter W; Allen, G E Kawika; Fischer, Lane; Richards, P Scott; Morgan, David T; Potts, Richard W

    2015-06-01

    We investigated the relationships between religiousness and spirituality and various indicators of mental health and positive psychosocial functioning in three separate samples of college students. A total of 898 students at Brigham Young University participated in the three studies. The students ranged in age from 17 to 26 years old, with the average age of 20.9 across all three samples. Our results indicate that intrinsic religiousness, spiritual maturity, and self-transcendence were significantly predictive of better mental health and positive functioning, including lower levels of depression, anxiety, and obsessive-compulsiveness, and higher levels of global self-esteem, identity integration, moral self-approval, and meaning in life. Intrinsic religiousness was not predictive of shame, perfectionism, and eating disorder symptoms. These findings are consistent with many prior studies that have found religiousness and spirituality to be positively associated with better mental health and positive psychosocial functioning in adolescents and young adults.

  4. Sandia National Laboratories results for the 2010 criticality accident dosimetry exercise, at the CALIBAN reactor, CEA Valduc France.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ward, Dann C.

    2011-09-01

    This document describes the personal nuclear accident dosimeter (PNAD) used by Sandia National Laboratories (SNL) and presents PNAD dosimetry results obtained during the Nuclear Accident Dosimeter Intercomparison Study held 20-23 September, 2010, at CEA Valduc, France. SNL PNADs were exposed in two separate irradiations from the CALIBAN reactor. Biases for reported neutron doses ranged from -15% to +0.4% with an average bias of -7.7%. PNADs were also exposed on the back side of phantoms to assess orientation effects.

  5. Assessments of the probabilities of aircraft impact with the Sandia Pulsed Reactor and Building 836, Sandia Laboratories, Albuquerque

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Biringer, B.E.

    1976-11-01

    This report documents a study of the annual probabilities of aircraft impact with the Sandia Pulsed Reactor (SPR) and Bldg. 836 at Sandia Laboratories, Albuquerque. The probability of aircraft impact into each structure was estimated using total yearly operations, effective structure area, structure location relative to air activity, and accident rate per kilometer. The estimated probability for an aircraft impact with SPR is 1.1 x 10 -4 per year; the estimated probability for impact with Bldg. 836 is 1.0 x 10 -3 per year

  6. Sandia National Laboratories results for the 2010 criticality accident dosimetry exercise, at the CALIBAN reactor, CEA Valduc France

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ward, Dann C.

    2011-01-01

    This document describes the personal nuclear accident dosimeter (PNAD) used by Sandia National Laboratories (SNL) and presents PNAD dosimetry results obtained during the Nuclear Accident Dosimeter Intercomparison Study held 20-23 September, 2010, at CEA Valduc, France. SNL PNADs were exposed in two separate irradiations from the CALIBAN reactor. Biases for reported neutron doses ranged from -15% to +0.4% with an average bias of -7.7%. PNADs were also exposed on the back side of phantoms to assess orientation effects.

  7. Lessons Learned from Sandia National Laboratories' Operational Readiness Review of the Annular Core Research Reactor (ACRR)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bendure, Albert O.; Bryson, James W.

    1999-01-01

    The Sandia ACRR (a Hazard Category 2 Nuclear Reactor Facility) was defueled in June 1997 to modify the reactor core and control system to produce medical radioisotopes for the Department of Energy (DOE) Isotope Production Program. The DOE determined that an Operational Readiness Review (ORR) was required to confirm readiness to begin operations within the revised safety basis. This paper addresses the ORR Process, lessons learned from the Sandia and DOE ORRS of the ACRR, and the use of the ORR to confirm authorization basis implementation

  8. License renewal and power upgrade of the Cornell University TRIGA reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Aderhold, Howard C.

    1984-01-01

    The Cornell Mark II TRIGA reactor has been a principal facility for instruction and research in nuclear science and engineering at Cornell, and it has been extensively used by other departments at Cornell and by nearby universities and industries. Initially the fuel was low hydride, 8.5w/o 19%-enriched, aluminum clad; in 1974 it was changed to high-hydride, stainless-steel-clad. The maximum power has been 100 kW, with pulses to $2, and operation has been on a one-shift demand basis. Annual energy generation of 50 MWH has been typical. Standard features include a 4-inch tangential port and our 6-inch radial ports, a thermal column with hohlraum and vertical access, a central thimble, a 'rabbit', and a set of dry irradiation tubes, replacing the 'Lazy Susan'. The license was renewed and amended in November 1983; the new limits are 500 kW and $3 pulses. Physical changes to the facility included addition of a water-to-water heat exchanger and of a diffuser at the water outlet ∼ 60 cm above the core. The flow rate is 300 liters per minute in the primary (reactor) side of the heat exchanger. The temperature of the chilled water entering the secondary of the exchanger is ∼ 12?C; its flow rate is adjusted by a servo-controlled by-pass valve to maintain the desired range of pool water temperature. Steps taken to go to higher power included rearrangement of fuel elements to increase excess reactivity, recalibration of control rods, and power vs ion chamber current calibrations at successively higher power by comparing the rate of rise of pool temperature with a known rate using electrical heating elements. Steady-state operation has been done up to 480 kW (nominal) but pulsing at the newly allowed higher levels has not been tested as yet

  9. Severe transient analysis of the Penn State University Advanced Light Water Reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Borkowski, J.A.

    1988-08-01

    The Penn State University Advanced Light Water Reactor (PSU ALWR) incorporates various passive and active ultra-safe features, such as continuous online injection and letdown for pressure control, a raised-loop primary system for enhanced natural circulation, a dedicated primary reservoir for enhanced thermal hydraulic control, and a secondary shutdown turbine. Because of the conceptual design basis of the project, the dynamic system modeling was to be performed using a code with a high degree of flexibility. For this reason the modeling has been performed with the Modular Modeling System (MMS). The basic design and normal transients have been performed successfully with MMS. However, the true test of an inherently safe concept lies in its response to more brutal transients. Therefore, such a demonstrative transient is chosen for the PSU ALWR: a turbine trip and reactor scram, concurrent with total loss of offsite ac power. Diesel generators are likewise unavailable. This transient demonstrates the utility of the pressure control system, the shutdown turbine generator, and the enhanced natural circulation of the PSU ALWR. The low flow rates, low pressure drops, and large derivative states encountered in such a transient pose special problems for the modeler and for MMS. The results of the transient analyses indicate excellent performance by the PSU ALWR in terms of inherently safe operation. The primary coolant enters full natural circulation, and removes all decay heat through the steam generators. Further, the steam generators continually supply sufficient steam to the shutdown power system, despite the abrupt changeover to the auxiliary feedwater system. Finally, even with coincident failures in the pressurization system, the primary repressurizes to near-normal values, without overpressurization. No core boiling or uncovery is predicted, and consequently fuel damage is avoided. 17 refs., 19 figs., 4 tabs

  10. Government-industry-uUniversity and rResearch lLaboratories cCoordination for new product development: Session 2. Government research laboratory perspective

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kuzay, T.M.

    1997-01-01

    This talk is the second in an expanded series of presentations on the Government-Industry-University and Research Laboratories Coordination for new product development, which is a timely and important public policy issue. Such interactions have become particularly timely in light of the present decline in funding for research and development (R ampersand D) in the nation''s budget and in the private sector. These interactions, at least in principle, provide a means to maximize benefits for the greater good of the nation by pooling the diminishing resources. National laboratories, which traditionally interacted closely with the universities in educational training, now are able to also participate closely with industry in joint R ampersand D thanks to a number of public laws legislated since the early 80s. A review of the experiences with such interactions at Argonne National Laboratory, which exemplifies the national laboratories, shows that, despite differences in their traditions and the missions, the national laboratory-industry-university triangle can work together

  11. [ANALYSIS OF CARDIOVASCULAR RISK FACTORS IN YOUNG UNIVERSITY STUDENTS ACCORDING TO THEIR NUTRITIONAL STATUS].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Delgado Floody, Pedro; Alarcón Hormazábal, Manuel; Caamaño Navarrete, Felipe

    2015-10-01

    obesity is one of the most serious not transmissible illnesses and prevalent at present, it is considered a major risk factor for the cardiovascular disease and is associated with the development of insulin resistance, intolerance to the glucose, arterial hypertension and metabolic syndrome. the purpose of the study is to analyze the nutritional status in young university students and its association with cardiovascular risk factors. there were evaluated 153 university students, 51 men and 102 women between 17 and 33 years old. Anthropometric measurements were made by BMI and waist circumference, systolic and diastolic pressure, cholesterol, HDL cholesterol (HDL), LDL cholesterol (LDL), triglycerides and blood glucose. the variables HDL cholesterol (p = 0.000) and systolic pressure (p = 0.043) showed significant differences in comparison by gender. The 35.29% presented overweight or obesity. In the comparison by nutritional status; the contour waist, systolic and diastolic pressure showed significant differences (p university students; in addition it is associated with cardiovascular risk factors, being the obese students those who present major deterioration in all the evaluated variables. Copyright AULA MEDICA EDICIONES 2014. Published by AULA MEDICA. All rights reserved.

  12. Reactor Sharing Program

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tehan, Terry

    2002-01-01

    Support utilization of the RINSC reactor for student and faculty instructions and research. The Department of Energy award has provided financial assistance during the period 9/29/1995 to 5/31/2001 to support the utilization of the Rhode Island Nuclear Science Center (RINSC) reactor for student and faculty instruction and research by non-reactor owning educational institutions within approximately 300 miles of Narragansett, Rhode Island. Through the reactor sharing program, the RINSC (including the reactor and analytical laboratories) provided reactor services and laboratory space that were not available to the other universities and colleges in the region. As an example of services provided to the users: Counting equipment, laboratory space, pneumatic and in-pool irradiations, demonstrations of sample counting and analysis, reactor tours and lectures. Funding from the Reactor Sharing Program has provided the RINSC to expand student tours and demonstration programs that emphasized our long history of providing these types of services to the universities and colleges in the area. The funding have also helped defray the cost of the technical assistance that the staff has routinely provided to schools, individuals and researchers who have called on the RINSC for resolution of problems relating to nuclear science. The reactor has been featured in a Public Broadcasting System documentary on Pollution in the Arctic and how a University of Rhode Island Professor used Neutron Activation Analysis conducted at the RINSC to discover the sources of the ''Arctic Haze''. The RINSC was also featured by local television on Earth Day for its role in environmental monitoring

  13. N2O Catalytic Decomposition – from Laboratory Experiment to Industry Reactor

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Obalová, L.; Jirátová, Květa; Karásková, K.; Chromčáková, Ž.

    2012-01-01

    Roč. 191, č. 1 (2012), s. 116-120 ISSN 0920-5861 R&D Projects: GA TA ČR TA01020336 Institutional support: RVO:67985858 Keywords : N2O * catalytic decomposition * fixed bed reactor Subject RIV: CI - Industrial Chemistry, Chemical Engineering Impact factor: 2.980, year: 2012

  14. IAEA Activities supporting education and training at research reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Peld, N.D.; Ridikas, D.

    2013-01-01

    Full-text: Through the provision of neutrons for experiments and their historical association with universities, research reactors have played a prominent role in nuclear education and training of students, scientists and radiation workers. Today education and training remains the foremost application of research reactors, involving close to 160 facilities out of 246 operational. As part of its mandate to facilitate and expand the contribution of atomic energy to peace, health and prosperity throughout the world, the IAEA administers a number of activities intended to promote nuclear research and enable access to nuclear technology for peaceful purposes, one of which is the support of various education and training measures involving research reactors. In the last 5 years, education and training has formed one pillar for the creation of research reactor coalitions and networks to pool their resources and offer joint programmes, such as the on-going Group Fellowship Training Course. Conducted mainly through the Eastern European Research Reactor Initiative, this programme is a periodic sic week course for young scientists and engineers on nuclear techniques and administration jointly conducted at several member research reactor institutes. Organization of similar courses is under consideration in Latin America and the Asia-Pacific Region, also with support from the IAEA. Additionally, four research reactor institutes have begun offering practical education courses through virtual reactor experiments and operation known as the Internet Reactor Laboratory. Through little more than an internet connection and projection screens, university science departments can be connected regionally or bilaterally with the control room o a research reactor for various training activities. Finally, two publications are being prepared, namely Hands-On Training Courses Using Research Reactors and Accelerators, and Compendium on Education and training Based on Research Reactors. These

  15. IV Training program for the staff of the laboratory for the RA reactor exploitation; IV Programi obuke osoblja Laboratorije za eksploataciju reaktora RA

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1960-07-01

    All the staff members of the laboratory for RA reactor exploitation are obliged to learn the following: fundamental properties of the RA reactor, the role and functionality of the reactor components, basic and auxiliary reactor systems, basics of radioactivity, measures for preventing contamination. The personnel working in shifts must be acquainted with the regulations and instructions for reactor operation. Training programs for reactor operators, mechanics, electricians, instrumentators and dosimetrysts are described separately. Svi saradnici Laboratorije za eksploataciju reaktora RA moraju poznavati sledece oblasti: Osnovne karakeristike reaktora RA, princip rada, ulogu i funkcionisanje komponenti reaktora, osnovnih i pomocnih sistema reaktora; osnovne pojmove o radioaktivnom zracenju, mere za sprecavanje kontaminacije. Osoblje koje radi u smenama mora dodatno poznavati propise i uputstva za rad reaktora. Posebno je naveden program obuke operatora reaktora, mehanicara, electricara, instrumentatora, dozimetrista.

  16. Clinical and laboratory features of urinary tract infections in young infants

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Denise Swei Lo

    2018-04-01

    Full Text Available ABSTRACT Introduction: Urinary tract infection (UTI is the most common serious bacterial infection in young infants. Signs and symptoms are often nonspecific. Objectives: To describe clinical, demographic and laboratory features of UTI in infants ≤ 3 months old. Methods: Cross-sectional study of infants ≤ 3 months old with UTI diagnosed in a pediatric emergency department, for the period 2010-2012. UTI was defined as ≥ 50,000 colony-forming units per milliliter of a single uropathogen isolated from bladder catheterization. Paired urinalysis and urine culture from group culture-positive and group culture-negative were used to determine the sensitivity and specificity of pyuria and nitrite tests in detecting UTI. Results: Of 519 urine cultures collected, UTI was diagnosed in 65 cases (prevalence: 12.5%; with male predominance (77%. The most common etiologies were Escherichia coli (56.9%, Klebsiella pneumoniae (18.5% and Enterococcus faecalis (7.7%. Frequent clinical manifestations were fever (77.8%, irritability (41.4% and vomiting (25.4%. The median temperature was 38.7°C. The sensitivity of the nitrite test was 30.8% (95%CI:19.9-43.4%, specificity of 100% (95%CI:99.2-100%. Pyuria ≥ 10,000/mL had a sensitivity of 87.7% (95%CI:77.2-94.5%, specificity of 74.9% (95%CI:70.6 -78.8%. The median peripheral white blood cell count was 13,150/mm3; C-reactive protein levels were normal in 30.5% of cases. Conclusions: The male: female ratio for urinary tract infection was 3.3:1. Non-Escherichia coli etiologies should be considered in empirical treatment. Fever was the main symptom. Positive nitrite is highly suggestive of UTI but has low sensitivity; whereas pyuria ≥ 10,000/mL revealed good sensitivity, but low specificity. Peripheral white blood cell count and C-reactive protein concentration have limited usefulness to suggest UTI.

  17. Clinical and laboratory features of urinary tract infections in young infants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lo, Denise Swei; Rodrigues, Larissa; Koch, Vera Hermina Kalika; Gilio, Alfredo Elias

    2018-01-01

    Urinary tract infection (UTI) is the most common serious bacterial infection in young infants. Signs and symptoms are often nonspecific. To describe clinical, demographic and laboratory features of UTI in infants ≤ 3 months old. Cross-sectional study of infants ≤ 3 months old with UTI diagnosed in a pediatric emergency department, for the period 2010-2012. UTI was defined as ≥ 50,000 colony-forming units per milliliter of a single uropathogen isolated from bladder catheterization. Paired urinalysis and urine culture from group culture-positive and group culture-negative were used to determine the sensitivity and specificity of pyuria and nitrite tests in detecting UTI. Of 519 urine cultures collected, UTI was diagnosed in 65 cases (prevalence: 12.5%); with male predominance (77%). The most common etiologies were Escherichia coli (56.9%), Klebsiella pneumoniae (18.5%) and Enterococcus faecalis (7.7%). Frequent clinical manifestations were fever (77.8%), irritability (41.4%) and vomiting (25.4%). The median temperature was 38.7°C. The sensitivity of the nitrite test was 30.8% (95%CI:19.9-43.4%), specificity of 100% (95%CI:99.2-100%). Pyuria ≥ 10,000/mL had a sensitivity of 87.7% (95%CI:77.2-94.5%), specificity of 74.9% (95%CI:70.6 -78.8%). The median peripheral white blood cell count was 13,150/mm3; C-reactive protein levels were normal in 30.5% of cases. The male: female ratio for urinary tract infection was 3.3:1. Non-Escherichia coli etiologies should be considered in empirical treatment. Fever was the main symptom. Positive nitrite is highly suggestive of UTI but has low sensitivity; whereas pyuria ≥ 10,000/mL revealed good sensitivity, but low specificity. Peripheral white blood cell count and C-reactive protein concentration have limited usefulness to suggest UTI.

  18. Treatment of arsenic contaminated water in a laboratory scale up-flow bio-column reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mondal, P.; Majumder, C.B.; Mohanty, B.

    2008-01-01

    The present paper describes the observations on the treatment of arsenic contaminated synthetic industrial effluent in a bio-column reactor. Ralstonia eutropha MTCC 2487 has been immobilized on the granular activated carbon (GAC) bed in the column reactor. The synthetic water sample containing As(T) (As(III):As(V) = 1:1), Fe, Mn, Cu and Zn at the initial concentrations of 25, 10, 2, 5, 10 ppm, respectively, was used. Concentrations of all the elements have been found to be reduced below their permissible limits in the treated water. The significant effect of empty bed contact time (EBCT) and bed height on the arsenic removal was observed in the initial stage. However, after some time of operation (approximately 3-4 days) no such effect was observed. Removal of As(III) and As(V) was almost similar after ∼2 days of operation. However, at the initial stage As(V) removal was slightly more than that of As(III). In absence of washing, after ∼4-5 days of operation, the bio-column reactor was observed to act as a GAC column reactor based on physico-chemical adsorption. Like arsenic, the percent removals of Fe, Mn, Cu and Zn also attained minimum after ∼1 day and increased significantly to the optimum value within 3-4 days of operation. Dissolved oxygen (DO) has been found to decrease along with the increasing bed height from the bottom. The pH of the solution in the reactor has increased slightly and oxidation-reduction potential (ORP) has decreased with the time of operation

  19. Utilisation of research and training reactors in the study programme of students at the Slovak University of Technology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Slugen, V.; Lipka, J.; Hascik, J.; Miglierini, M.

    2004-01-01

    Preparing operating staff for the nuclear industry is and also will be one of the most serious education processes, mainly in the Central-European countries where about 40-50% of the electricity is produced in nuclear power plants. In the Central-European region there exists a very extensive and also effective international collaboration in nuclear industry and education. Similarly, the level of education in universities and technical high schools of this area is also good. Slovak University of Technology Bratislava has established contacts with many universities abroad for utilisation of research and training reactors. (author)

  20. Association Euratom - Risoe National Laboratory for Sustainable Energy, Technical University of Denmark. Annual progress report 2010

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Korsholm, S.B.; Michelsen, P.K.; Rasmussen, J.J.; Westergaard, C.M. (eds.)

    2011-04-15

    The programme of the Research Unit of the Fusion Association Euratom - Risoe National Laboratory for Sustainable Energy, Technical University of Denmark, covers work in fusion plasma physics and in fusion technology. The fusion plasma physics research focuses on turbulence and transport, and its interaction with the plasma equilibrium and particles. The effort includes both first principles based modelling, and experimental observations of turbulence and of fast ion dynamics by collective Thomson scattering. Within fusion technology there are activities related to development of high temperature superconductors. Other activities are system analysis, initiative to involve Danish industry in ITER contracts and public information. A summary is presented of the results obtained in the Research Unit during 2010. (Author)

  1. Association Euratom - Risoe National Laboratory for Sustainable Energy, Technical University of Denmark. Annual progress report 2009

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Korsholm, S.B.; Michelsen, P.K.; Rasmussen, J.J.; Westergaard, C.M.

    2010-04-01

    The programme of the Research Unit of the Fusion Association Euratom - Risoe National Laboratory for Sustainable Energy, Technical University of Denmark, covers work in fusion plasma physics and in fusion technology. The fusion plasma physics research focuses on turbulence and transport, and its interaction with the plasma equilibrium and particles. The effort includes both first principles based modelling, and experimental observations of turbulence and of fast ion dynamics by collective Thomson scattering. Within fusion technology there are activities related to development of high temperature superconductors. Minor activities are system analysis, initiative to involve Danish industry in ITER contracts and public information. A summary is presented of the results obtained in the Research Unit during 2009. (Author)

  2. Association Euratom - Risoe National Laboratory for Sustainable Energy, Technical University of Denmark. Annual progress report 2009

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Korsholm, S B; Michelsen, P K; Rasmussen, J J; Westergaard, C M [eds.

    2010-04-15

    The programme of the Research Unit of the Fusion Association Euratom - Risoe National Laboratory for Sustainable Energy, Technical University of Denmark, covers work in fusion plasma physics and in fusion technology. The fusion plasma physics research focuses on turbulence and transport, and its interaction with the plasma equilibrium and particles. The effort includes both first principles based modelling, and experimental observations of turbulence and of fast ion dynamics by collective Thomson scattering. Within fusion technology there are activities related to development of high temperature superconductors. Minor activities are system analysis, initiative to involve Danish industry in ITER contracts and public information. A summary is presented of the results obtained in the Research Unit during 2009. (Author)

  3. Association Euratom - Risoe National Laboratory for Sustainable Energy, Technical University of Denmark. Annual progress report 2008

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Korsholm, S.B.; Michelsen, P.K.; Rasmussen, J.J.; Westergaard, C.M. (eds.)

    2009-04-15

    The programme of the Research Unit of the Fusion Association Euratom - Risoe National Laboratory for Sustainable Energy, Technical University of Denmark, covers work in fusion plasma physics and in fusion technology. The fusion plasma physics research focuses on turbulence and transport, and its interaction with the plasma equilibrium and particles. The effort includes both first principles based modelling, and experimental observations of turbulence and of fast ion dynamics by collective Thomson scattering. New activities in technology related to development of high temperature superconductors have been initiated in 2008. Minor activities are system analysis, initiative to involve Danish industry in ITER contracts and public information. A summary is presented of the results obtained in the Research Unit during 2008. (Author)

  4. Association Euratom - Risoe National Laboratory for Sustainable Energy, Technical University of Denmark. Annual progress report 2008

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Korsholm, S.B.; Michelsen, P.K.; Rasmussen, J.J.; Westergaard, C.M.

    2009-04-01

    The programme of the Research Unit of the Fusion Association Euratom - Risoe National Laboratory for Sustainable Energy, Technical University of Denmark, covers work in fusion plasma physics and in fusion technology. The fusion plasma physics research focuses on turbulence and transport, and its interaction with the plasma equilibrium and particles. The effort includes both first principles based modelling, and experimental observations of turbulence and of fast ion dynamics by collective Thomson scattering. New activities in technology related to development of high temperature superconductors have been initiated in 2008. Minor activities are system analysis, initiative to involve Danish industry in ITER contracts and public information. A summary is presented of the results obtained in the Research Unit during 2008. (Author)

  5. Association Euratom - Risoe National Laboratory for Sustainable Energy, Technical University of Denmark. Annual progress report 2010

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Korsholm, S.B.; Michelsen, P.K.; Rasmussen, J.J.; Westergaard, C.M.

    2011-04-01

    The programme of the Research Unit of the Fusion Association Euratom - Risoe National Laboratory for Sustainable Energy, Technical University of Denmark, covers work in fusion plasma physics and in fusion technology. The fusion plasma physics research focuses on turbulence and transport, and its interaction with the plasma equilibrium and particles. The effort includes both first principles based modelling, and experimental observations of turbulence and of fast ion dynamics by collective Thomson scattering. Within fusion technology there are activities related to development of high temperature superconductors. Other activities are system analysis, initiative to involve Danish industry in ITER contracts and public information. A summary is presented of the results obtained in the Research Unit during 2010. (Author)

  6. Deposition of hematite particles on alumina seal faceplates of nuclear reactor coolant pumps: Laboratory experiments and industrial feedback

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lefèvre Grégory

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available In the primary circuit of pressurized water reactors (PWR, the dynamic sealing system in reactor coolant pumps is ensured by mechanical seals whose ceramic parts are in contact with the cooling solution. During the stretch-out phase in reactor operation, characterized by low boric acid concentration, the leak-off flow has been observed to abnormally evolve in industrial plants. The deposition of hematite particles, originating from corrosion, on alumina seals of coolant pumps is suspected to be the cause. As better understanding of the adhesion mechanism is the key factor in the prevention of fouling and particle removal, an experimental study was carried out using a laboratory set-up. With model materials, hematite and sintered alumina, the adhesion rate and surface potentials of the interacting solids were measured under different chemical conditions (solution pH and composition in analogy with the PWR ones. The obtained results were in good agreement with the DLVO (Derjaguin-Landau-Verwey- Overbeek theory and used as such to interpret this industrial phenomenon.

  7. QA Programme of the TLD laboratory of the University of Costa Rica: IEC 61066 testing

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mora, Patricia; Porras Chaverria, Mariela

    2008-01-01

    The Thermoluminescence Personal Dosimetry Laboratory of the University of Costa Rica provides dose measurements for around 90% of occupational radiation workers in the country. The assessment of doses to workers routinely exposed to external sources of radiation constitutes an integral part of any radiation protection programme and helps national authorities to ensure acceptably safe and satisfactory radiological conditions in workplaces. Harshaw Readers Model 4000 and 4500, dosimeter holders Type 8814 with TLD-100 in 0110 cards and loose TLD-100 chips are used to monitor personal dose equivalent, Hp(10) and Hp(0.07). In order to provide a reliable measurement of the operational quantities, a study was undertaken to verify the fulfillment of international requirements in our system (Model 4500 with cards) against the Thermoluminescence dosimetry systems for personal and environmental monitoring CEI IEC 61066 (1991 -2012). The type tests performed were nine in total: batch homogeneity, reproducibility, linearity, detection threshold, effect of climate conditions on reader, effect of light exposure on dosimeters, isotropy, transient voltage and dropping on dosimeters. A Cesium-137 source was used to irradiate the dosimeters and all procedures follow the indications given on the standard. Results showed that all IEC criteria were met by our Laboratory. Acceptable uncertainties were also studied under the ICRP recommendations; the analysis of the Trumpet Curve was done with satisfactory results (for doses above 0.5 mSv; quotient of measure to real dose less than 3%). For purposes of accreditation (ISO/IEC 17025:2005) and performance testing this work is very relevant since the University of Costa Rica wants to establish a solid individual monitoring programme for external radiation exposure that will provide users, registrants, licensees and regulatory bodies with information that can be used for the optimization of protection and dose limitation of Costa Rican workers

  8. Operating characteristic analysis of a 400 mH class HTS DC reactor in connection with a laboratory scale LCC type HVDC system

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Sung-Kyu, E-mail: power@changwon.ac.kr [Changwon National University, 55306 Sarim-dong, Changwon 641-773 (Korea, Republic of); Kim, Kwangmin; Park, Minwon [Changwon National University, 55306 Sarim-dong, Changwon 641-773 (Korea, Republic of); Yu, In-Keun, E-mail: yuik@changwon.ac.kr [Changwon National University, 55306 Sarim-dong, Changwon 641-773 (Korea, Republic of); Lee, Sangjin [Uiduk University, Gyeongju 780-713 (Korea, Republic of)

    2015-11-15

    Highlights: • A 400 mH class HTS DC reactor and a laboratory scale test-bed for line-commutated converter type HVDC transmission system. • The 400 mH class HTS DC reactor was connected to real power network via the HVDC system. • The DC current flowed in HTS DC reactor has several harmonic components and it was analyzed using FFT. - Abstract: High temperature superconducting (HTS) devices are being developed due to their advantages. Most line commutated converter based high voltage direct current (HVDC) transmission systems for long-distance transmission require large inductance of DC reactor; however, generally, copper-based reactors cause a lot of electrical losses during the system operation. This is driving researchers to develop a new type of DC reactor using HTS wire. The authors have developed a 400 mH class HTS DC reactor and a laboratory scale test-bed for line-commutated converter type HVDC system and applied the HTS DC reactor to the HVDC system to investigate their operating characteristics. The 400 mH class HTS DC reactor is designed using a toroid type magnet. The HVDC system is designed in the form of a mono-pole system with thyristor-based 12-pulse power converters. In this paper, the investigation results of the HTS DC reactor in connection with the HVDC system are described. The operating characteristics of the HTS DC reactor are analyzed under various operating conditions of the system. Through the results, applicability of an HTS DC reactor in an HVDC system is discussed in detail.

  9. Operating characteristic analysis of a 400 mH class HTS DC reactor in connection with a laboratory scale LCC type HVDC system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, Sung-Kyu; Kim, Kwangmin; Park, Minwon; Yu, In-Keun; Lee, Sangjin

    2015-01-01

    Highlights: • A 400 mH class HTS DC reactor and a laboratory scale test-bed for line-commutated converter type HVDC transmission system. • The 400 mH class HTS DC reactor was connected to real power network via the HVDC system. • The DC current flowed in HTS DC reactor has several harmonic components and it was analyzed using FFT. - Abstract: High temperature superconducting (HTS) devices are being developed due to their advantages. Most line commutated converter based high voltage direct current (HVDC) transmission systems for long-distance transmission require large inductance of DC reactor; however, generally, copper-based reactors cause a lot of electrical losses during the system operation. This is driving researchers to develop a new type of DC reactor using HTS wire. The authors have developed a 400 mH class HTS DC reactor and a laboratory scale test-bed for line-commutated converter type HVDC system and applied the HTS DC reactor to the HVDC system to investigate their operating characteristics. The 400 mH class HTS DC reactor is designed using a toroid type magnet. The HVDC system is designed in the form of a mono-pole system with thyristor-based 12-pulse power converters. In this paper, the investigation results of the HTS DC reactor in connection with the HVDC system are described. The operating characteristics of the HTS DC reactor are analyzed under various operating conditions of the system. Through the results, applicability of an HTS DC reactor in an HVDC system is discussed in detail.

  10. Safety Evaluation Report related to the construction permit and operating license for the research reactor at the University of Texas (Docket No. 50-602)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1985-05-01

    This Safety Evaluation Report for the application filed by the University of Texas for a construction permit and operating license to construct and operate a TRIGA research reactor has been prepared by the Office of Nuclear Reactor Regulation of the US Nuclear Regulatory Commission. The facility is owned and operated by the University of Texas and is located at the university's Balcones Research Center, about 7 miles (11.6 km) north of the main campus in Austin, Texas. The staff concludes that the TRIGA reactor facility can be constructed and operated by the University of Texas without endangering the health and safety of the public

  11. Ohio State University Nuclear Reactor Laboratory HEU fuel shipment summary. Final

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1997-01-01

    In November 1988, OSURR converted from HEU fuel to LEU fuel. As a result they needed to get rid of their HEU fuel by shipping it to Savannah River. The players in the fuel shipping game are: OSURR as the keeper of the fuel; DOE as the owner of fuel and shipper of record; Tri-State Motor Transit Co. for transporting the cask; Muth Brothers as the rigger responsible for getting the cask on and off the truck and in and out of the building; Hoffman LaRoche/Cintichem as the owner of the cask; Savannah River as the receiver of the fuel; and the NRC for approval of the Security Plan, QA Plan, etc. This report gives a chronological history of the events from February 1989 to June 1, 1995, the actual day of shipment. The cask was received at Savannah River on June 2, 1995

  12. Home-made refurbishment of the instrumentation and control system of the TRIGA reactor of the University of Pavia

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Borio di Tigliole, A.; Cagnazzo, M.; Magrotti, G.; Manera, S.; Salvini, A.; Musitelli, G.; Nardo, R.

    2008-01-01

    The Instrumentation and Control (I and C) System of the TRIGA reactor of the University of Pavia was dated and, in order to grant a safe and continuous reactor operation for the future, it became necessary to substitute or to upgrade the system. Since the substitution of the I and C system with a new-made one was very difficult to be performed due to long authorization procedures, an home-made refurbishment was planned. Using commercial components of high quality, almost a complete substitution, channel-by-channel, of the I and C system was realized without changing the operating and safety logics. The system includes: - the Reactor Linear Power Channel and Chart Recorder; - the Reactor Percent Power Safety Channel; - the High Voltage and Low Voltage Power Supply; - the Automatic Reactor Power Control; - the Fuel Elements and Cooling-Water Temperatures Measuring Channels; - the Water Conductivity Measuring Channel. The refurbished I and C system shows a very good operational behavior and reliability and will assure a continuous operation of the reactor for the future

  13. Health centres' view of the services provided by a university hospital laboratory: Use of satisfaction surveys

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oja, Paula; Kouri, Timo; Pakarinen, Arto

    2010-01-01

    Customer orientation has gained increasing attention in healthcare. A customer satisfaction survey is one way to raise areas and topics for quality improvement. However, it seems that customer satisfaction surveys have not resulted in quality improvement in healthcare. This article reports how the authors' university hospital laboratory has used customer satisfaction surveys targeted at the health centres in their hospital district. Closed-ended statements of the questionnaire were planned to cover the essential aspects of laboratory services. In addition, an open-ended question asked what was considered to be the most important problem in services. The questionnaires were sent to the medical directors of the health centres. The open-ended question proved to be very useful because the responses specified the main problems in service. Based on the responses, selected dissatisfied customers were contacted to specify their responses and possible corrective actions were taken. It is concluded that a satisfaction survey can be used as a screening tool to identify topics of dissatisfaction. In addition, further clarifications with selected customers are needed to specify the causes for their dissatisfaction and to undertake proper corrective actions. PMID:20205616

  14. Energy Programs at the Johns Hopkins University Applied Physics Laboratory, Quarterly Report, April-June 1980

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    None

    1980-06-01

    The Johns Hopkins University Applied Physics Laboratory, under contracts with several agencies of the federal government and an agency of the State of Maryland, is engaged in developing energy resources, utilization concepts, and monitoring and storage methods. This Quarterly Report summarizes the work on the various tasks as of 30 June 1980. The Energy Quarterly Report is divided into three sections. The first, Geothermal Energy Development Planning and Technical Assistance, supported by the Department of Energy/Division of Geothermal Energy (DOE/DGE), contains reports on the progress of geothermal-related tasks on which effort was concentrated during the quarter. The second section, Operational Research, Hydroelectric Power Development, supported by the Department of Energy/Resource Applications (DOE/RA), contains reports on small-scale hydroelectric investigations in the southeastern states. The third section, Energy Conversion and Storage Techniques, contains three articles. The first is on data analysis of OTEC core unit condenser tests, and is supported by the Department of Energy/Division of Central Solar Technology (DOE/CST). The second is on the current status of the Community Annual Storage Energy System at the U.S. Naval Air Station, Norfolk, Va., and is supported by the Department of Energy and the Department of Defense, Naval Facilities Engineering Command/Atlantic Division. The third is on utilization of landfill methane and is supported by Argonne National Laboratory.

  15. Implementation of a Program on Experiencing and Application of Research Reactor for University Students Majoring in Science and Technology

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Seo, K. W.; Han, K. W.; Won, J. Y.; Ju, Y. C.; Ji, Y. J.; Oh, S. Y

    2007-05-15

    This report was written as following contents, to develop a program for university students majoring in science and technology, which is intended to provide the students with opportunities to obtain hands on experience and knowledge on various nuclear technology, through experiments using HANARO and its facilities. Thus obtain experience and knowledge are expected to be a great help for their current study and for their selection of a specific future study area. The purpose of this research is as follows: - development of various curricula for specific research using HANARO and continuous operation of the developed curricula to provided university students with opportunities to use HANARO as part of their university study. - continuous operation of research reactor experimental programs for university students in nuclear field to make contribution to cultivating specialists. - development and operation of training programs of experiments using research reactor for university students majoring in nuclear engineering and also for university students majoring in diverse fields of science and technology such as physics, advanced metallurgy, mechanical engineering, energy engineering, radiological science, nanoscience, etc. to cultivate future potential users of HANARO as well as broadening the user group. As a whole, 263 students from 15 universities have completed the courses of the programs developed and offered by this project. Also, 5 textbooks have been developed to support the programs.

  16. Implementation of a Program on Experiencing and Application of Research Reactor for University Students Majoring in Science and Technology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Seo, K. W.; Han, K. W.; Won, J. Y.; Ju, Y. C.; Ji, Y. J.; Oh, S. Y.

    2007-05-01

    This report was written as following contents, to develop a program for university students majoring in science and technology, which is intended to provide the students with opportunities to obtain hands on experience and knowledge on various nuclear technology, through experiments using HANARO and its facilities. Thus obtain experience and knowledge are expected to be a great help for their current study and for their selection of a specific future study area. The purpose of this research is as follows: - development of various curricula for specific research using HANARO and continuous operation of the developed curricula to provided university students with opportunities to use HANARO as part of their university study. - continuous operation of research reactor experimental programs for university students in nuclear field to make contribution to cultivating specialists. - development and operation of training programs of experiments using research reactor for university students majoring in nuclear engineering and also for university students majoring in diverse fields of science and technology such as physics, advanced metallurgy, mechanical engineering, energy engineering, radiological science, nanoscience, etc. to cultivate future potential users of HANARO as well as broadening the user group. As a whole, 263 students from 15 universities have completed the courses of the programs developed and offered by this project. Also, 5 textbooks have been developed to support the programs

  17. Food Insecurity and Behavioral Characteristics for Academic Success in Young Adults Attending an Appalachian University.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hagedorn, Rebecca L; Olfert, Melissa D

    2018-03-16

    In order to investigate the impact of food insecurity on college students in a highly health disparate region we (1) assessed the prevalence of food insecurity among young adults at a large, rural university in Appalachia, and (2) investigated the relationship between food insecurity and behavioral characteristics including academic performance, coping strategies, and money expenditure. A cross-sectional design was used to capture a representative sample of young adults attending a large, central Appalachian university in Fall 2016. The United States Department of Agriculture (USDA) Adult Food Security Survey was used to measure food insecurity. Independent variables include money expenditure (MES), coping strategies (CSS), academic performance (APS), and demographic, health, economic and culinary variables. Participant responses ( n = 692) showed one third (36.6%) of respondents were food-insecure. Students with higher scores for MES and CSS had significantly higher odds of being food-insecure (odds ratio (OR) = 2.07; 95% confidence interval (CI) 1.81 to 2.38 and OR = 1.20; 95% CI 1.16 to 1.23, respectively). The odds of high APS scores (OR = 0.79; 95% CI 0.73 to 0.86) were inversely related to food insecurity. Results of the logistic regression showed MES, CSS, health, and school year remained a significant predictor of food insecurity in college students. These findings suggest behavioral differences in terms of coping strategies, money expenditure, and academic progress among food-insecure students and can be used to identify and target at-risk students to promote student food security and well-being.

  18. PERSONIFICATION OF WAY OF LIFE TYPES OF YOUNG MEN AND WOMEN – GRADUATES OF THE UNIVERSITY

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Svetlana Tigranovna Dzhaneryan

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available The article presents the results of a study aimed at research of the characteristics of personification as the substantive characteristic of each type of the way of life ideals (matrimonial, bohemian, health, career, community, social, social-protection, gnostic of young men and women – graduates of the university.Research methods: survey (questionnaire for study the way of life ideal, a content analysis of the open questions of the questionnaire, expert evaluation categories, methods of nonparametric statistics.Results. The article presents ideas about the way of life ideals, discloses its components and characteristics. In the article designated types of way of life ideals: matrimonial, bohemian, health, career, community, social-protection, gnostic. Established the features of personification of each type of boys and girl’s ideals (who are graduates of the university. The results show that all kinds of way of life ideals are personified; that there are attractive to young people personality traits of real people (or groups whose way of life influences on the construction of their own ideals of life. It is shown that the differentiation of male and female personification of ideals occurs on different parameters: for the ideals of «matrimonial life» and «career life» appears only in the parameter singularity / community; for the ideal of «social life» – in the parameters singularity / community, the psychological portrait, similarities; for the ideal of «health life» – in the parameters singularity / community, the psychological portrait, a means of implementing, similarities.Application of the results: psychological services in high schools and personnel services in different companies.

  19. Annual report of Laboratory of Nuclear Studies, Osaka University, for fiscal 1995

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1996-01-01

    This publication is the progress report of the research activities carried out by the members of the Osaka University Laboratory of Nuclear Studies (OULNS) in fiscal year 1995. Some groups carried out their experimental researches using the major research facilities at the OULNS, that include 4.75 MV Van de Graaff, a mass spectrograph, and an M360 Computer. Other groups intensively carried out all or part of their researches outside Osaka University including the facilities in foreign countries. In short the reader will enjoy a whole spectrum of research fields studied by nuclear and particle techniques. To expand and enrich the studies in the interdisciplinary region between nuclear physics and solid state physics investigated by use of nuclear technologies, especially by use of unstable nuclear beams, OULNS is now planning a small Radioactive-Nuclear-Beam Facility which consists of an AVF cyclotron of K = 30 with high intensity beams of light ions and a post accelerator, a radio-frequency-quadrupole accelerator (RFQ). (J.P.N.)

  20. Uncertainty Analysis of Resistance Tests in Ata Nutku Ship Model Testing Laboratory of Istanbul Technical University

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cihad DELEN

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available In this study, some systematical resistance tests, where were performed in Ata Nutku Ship Model Testing Laboratory of Istanbul Technical University (ITU, have been included in order to determine the uncertainties. Experiments which are conducted in the framework of mathematical and physical rules for the solution of engineering problems, measurements, calculations include uncertainty. To question the reliability of the obtained values, the existing uncertainties should be expressed as quantities. The uncertainty of a measurement system is not known if the results do not carry a universal value. On the other hand, resistance is one of the most important parameters that should be considered in the process of ship design. Ship resistance during the design phase of a ship cannot be determined precisely and reliably due to the uncertainty resources in determining the resistance value that are taken into account. This case may cause negative effects to provide the required specifications in the latter design steps. The uncertainty arising from the resistance test has been estimated and compared for a displacement type ship and high speed marine vehicles according to ITTC 2002 and ITTC 2014 regulations which are related to the uncertainty analysis methods. Also, the advantages and disadvantages of both ITTC uncertainty analysis methods have been discussed.