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Sample records for breath-hold cine imaging

  1. Usefulness of breath-hold cardiac cine MR imaging with a middle field MRI system

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Matsumura, Kentaro; Sato, Kiyoto; Aono, Masaki; Inoshita, Kenji; Utsumi, Naoko [Kagawa Inoshita Hospital, Ohnohara (Japan)

    1999-07-01

    To assess the accuracy of contrast-enhanced, single breath-hold cine MR imaging in calculating left ventricular volume and ejection fraction, we compared MR measurements with those obtained by using cine ventriculography in 60 patients. Fast cine MR images were acquired with a middle field MR system (0.5 T). A breath-hold single slice multi-phase fast gradient-echo (Fast Card) sequence was used to obtain fast cine MR images with the following parameters; TR of 16 ms, TE of 3 ms, flip angle of 30 degree, matrix elements of 256 x 128, view per segment of 6, field of view of 350 x 260 mm and one excitation. Left ventricular end-diastolic volume and ejection fraction obtained with contrast-enhanced Fast Card correlated well with those obtained with cine ventriculography (end-diastolic volume, y=1.00x+14.0, r=0.904, p<0.001; ejection fraction, y=0.961x+2.8, r=0.936, p<0.001). Our results show that contrast enhanced breath-hold cardiac cine MR imaging on horizontal long-axis view using a middle field MR system is an accurate method for evaluating left ventricular volume and ejection fraction. (author)

  2. Single breath-hold real-time cine MR imaging: improved temporal resolution using generalized autocalibrating partially parallel acquisition (GRAPPA) algorithm

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The purpose of this study was to test parallel imaging techniques for improvement of temporal resolution in multislice single breath-hold real-time cine steady-state free precession (SSFP) in comparison with standard segmented single-slice SSFP techniques. Eighteen subjects were examined on a 1.5-T scanner using a multislice real-time cine SSFP technique using the GRAPPA algorithm. Global left ventricular parameters (EDV, ESV, SV, EF) were evaluated and results compared with a standard segmented single-slice SSFP technique. Results for EDV (r=0.93), ESV (r=0.99), SV (r=0.83), and EF (r=0.99) of real-time multislice SSFP imaging showed a high correlation with results of segmented SSFP acquisitions. Systematic differences between both techniques were statistically non-significant. Single breath-hold multislice techniques using GRAPPA allow for improvement of temporal resolution and for accurate assessment of global left ventricular functional parameters. (orig.)

  3. Blood flow measurement of portal vein with fast cine phase contrast MR imaging under breath-holding

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Flow measurements of the right portal vein were performed in seven healthy volunteers with the segmented k-space fast gradient-echo phase-contrast (fcard-PC) sequence under breath-holding. The mean velocity and the flow rate of the right portal vein at maximal expiration, 14.3±4.4 cm/sec and 457±218 ml/min, were significantly greater (p<0.01) than those at maximal inspiration: 11.8±3.8 cm/sec (mean±SD) and 364±191 ml/min, respectively. Fcard-PC enabled flow measurements to be obtained under breath-holding. Using this technique, we demonstrated portal venous flow changes according to respiratory phase. (author)

  4. Blood flow measurement of portal vein with fast cine phase contrast MR imaging under breath-holding

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    Inaba, Fumitaka; Murakami, Takamichi; Sakurai, Kosuke; Tsuda, Kyo; Kim, Tonsoku; Tanaka, Hisashi; Kashiwagi, Nobuo; Nakamura, Hironobu [Osaka Univ. (Japan). Faculty of Medicine; Harada, Koshi

    1996-03-01

    Flow measurements of the right portal vein were performed in seven healthy volunteers with the segmented k-space fast gradient-echo phase-contrast (fcard-PC) sequence under breath-holding. The mean velocity and the flow rate of the right portal vein at maximal expiration, 14.3{+-}4.4 cm/sec and 457{+-}218 ml/min, were significantly greater (p<0.01) than those at maximal inspiration: 11.8{+-}3.8 cm/sec (mean{+-}SD) and 364{+-}191 ml/min, respectively. Fcard-PC enabled flow measurements to be obtained under breath-holding. Using this technique, we demonstrated portal venous flow changes according to respiratory phase. (author).

  5. Evaluation of left ventricular function with breath-hold MR imaging

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Objective: To investigate the value of breath-hold cine MR imaging in the evaluation of left ventricular function. Methods: Eighteen healthy volunteers and 36 patients with cardiac diseases were studied with breath-hold cine MR imaging, then left ventricular volumes and masses were measured, and the measurements were compared with those of conventional cine MR imaging and echocardiography. Results: (1) The measurements of end-diastolic volume (EDV), end-systolic volume (ESV), and ejection fraction (EF) with breath-hold cine MR imaging technique were closely correlated with those obtained by conventional cine MR imaging and echocardiography. There was no statistically significant difference among the measurements of the three methods (P > 0.05). The correlation coefficients were 0.52-0.96. (2) The correlation coefficient of left ventricular mass (EDM and ESM) among three methods were lower than those of left ventricular volume, and there was statistically significant difference in ESM between MRI and echocardiography (P < 0.05). Conclusion: Breath-hold cine MR imaging is an useful method for evaluating the left ventricular function because of non-ghosting artifacts and short imaging time

  6. Single breath hold 3D cardiac cine MRI using kat-ARC: preliminary results at 1.5T.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jeong, Daniel; Schiebler, Mark L; Lai, Peng; Wang, Kang; Vigen, Karl K; François, Christopher J

    2015-04-01

    Validation of a new single breath-hold, three-dimensional, cine balanced steady-state free precession (3D cine bSSFP) cardiac magnetic resonance (CMR) sequence for left ventricular function. CMR examinations were performed on fifteen patients and three healthy volunteers on a clinical 1.5T scanner using a two-dimensional (2D) cine balanced SSFP CMR sequence (2D cine bSSFP) followed by an investigational 3D cine bSSFP pulse sequence acquired within a single breath hold. Left ventricular end diastolic volume (LVEDV), end systolic volume (LVESV), ejection fraction (LVEF), and myocardial mass were independently segmented on a workstation by two experienced radiologists. Blood pool to myocardial contrast was evaluated in consensus using a Likert scale. Bland-Altman analysis was used to compare these quantitative and nominal measurements for the two sequences. The average acquisition time was significantly shorter for the 3D cine bSSFP than for 2D cine bSSFP (0.36 ± 0.03 vs. 8.5 ± 2.3 min) p = 0.0002. Bland-Altman analyses [bias and (limits of agreement)] of the data derived from these two methods revealed that the LVEF 0.9% (-4.7, 6.4), LVEDV 4.9 ml (-23.0, 32.8), LVESV -0.2 ml (-22.4, 21.9), and myocardial mass -0.4 g (-23.8, 23.0) were not significantly different. There was excellent intraclass correlation for intra-observer variability (0.981, 0.989, 0.997, 0.985) and inter-observer variability (0.903, 0.954, 0.970, 0.842) for LVEF, LVEDV, LVESV, and myocardial mass respectively. 3D cine bSSFP allows for accurate single breath-hold volumetric cine CMR which enables substantial improvements in scanner time efficiency without sacrificing diagnostic accuracy.

  7. BREATH-HOLD CINE-MRI DURING DIPYRIDAMOLE STRESS FOR IDENTIFICATION OF SEVERE CORONARY ARTERY STENOSIS:A PRELIMINARY REPORT

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    赵世华; DidierRevel; PierreCroisille; JeanP.Roux; MarcJanier; IsabelleMagnin

    1998-01-01

    Breath-hold cine MRI was employed for the identification of severe coronary artery stenoscs after 0.56mg/kg of dipyridamole was infused. Fourteen patients without myocardial infarction but with ≥70% diameter narrowing of 1. or 2 major coronary artaries were studied. Each patient tmderwent coronary angiography, MRI at rest and during stress. Segmental wall motion abnormalities were visually assessed in a cine loop, followed by quantitative analysis by calculation of percent systolic wall thickening(%SWth). The results showed that the sensitivities of 70% and 90% were present for the qualitative and quantitative analyses, respectively, in respect to the approximate specificities(82% & 86%). Further quantitative analysis showed that sensitivities and specifieities were 88% and 88% for 1-vessel disease versus 92% and 83% for 2-vessd disease; 86% and 100% for LAD, 100% and 70% for LCX, 89% and 100% for RCA. We concloded that quantitative analysis is significantly superior to qualitative analysis for the identification of severe coronary stenosis while dipyridamole-induced wall motion abnormalities were assessed by breath-hold cine MRI.

  8. Attenuation correction of emission PET images with average CT: Interpolation from breath-hold CT

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Misregistration resulting from the difference of temporal resolution in PET and CT scans occur frequently in PET/CT imaging, which causes distortion in tumor quantification in PET. Respiration cine average CT (CACT) for PET attenuation correction has been reported to improve the misalignment effectively by several papers. However, the radiation dose to the patient from a four-dimensional CT scan is relatively high. In this study, we propose a method to interpolate respiratory CT images over a respiratory cycle from inhalation and exhalation breath-hold CT images, and use the average CT from the generated CT set for PET attenuation correction. The radiation dose to the patient is reduced using this method. Six cancer patients of various lesion sites underwent routine free-breath helical CT (HCT), respiration CACT, interpolated average CT (IACT), and 18F-FDG PET. Deformable image registration was used to interpolate the middle phases of a respiratory cycle based on the end-inspiration and end-expiration breath-hold CT scans. The average CT image was calculated from the eight interpolated CT image sets of middle respiratory phases and the two original inspiration and expiration CT images. Then the PET images were reconstructed by these three methods for attenuation correction using HCT, CACT, and IACT. Misalignment of PET image using either CACT or IACT for attenuation correction in PET/CT was improved. The difference in standard uptake value (SUV) from tumor in PET images was most significant between the use of HCT and CACT, while the least significant between the use of CACT and IACT. Besides the similar improvement in tumor quantification compared to the use of CACT, using IACT for PET attenuation correction reduces the radiation dose to the patient.

  9. Attenuation correction of emission PET images with average CT: Interpolation from breath-hold CT

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Huang, Tzung-Chi [Department of Biomedical Imaging and Radiological Science, China Medical University, Taiwan (China); Zhang, Geoffrey [Department of Radiation Oncology, Moffitt Cancer Center, FL (United States); Chen, Chih-Hao [Department of Nuclear Medicine, Taipei Veterans General Hospital, Taiwan (China); Yang, Bang-Hung [Department of Nuclear Medicine, Taipei Veterans General Hospital, Taiwan (China); Department of Biomedical Imaging and Radiological Sciences, National Yang Ming University, Taiwan (China); Wu, Nien-Yun [Department of Nuclear Medicine, Taipei Veterans General Hospital, Taiwan (China); Wang, Shyh-Jen, E-mail: jwshyh@vghtpe.gov.tw [Department of Nuclear Medicine, Taipei Veterans General Hospital, Taiwan (China); Department of Biomedical Imaging and Radiological Sciences, National Yang Ming University, Taiwan (China); Wu, Tung-Hsin, E-mail: tung@ym.edu.tw [Department of Biomedical Imaging and Radiological Sciences, National Yang Ming University, Taiwan (China)

    2011-05-15

    Misregistration resulting from the difference of temporal resolution in PET and CT scans occur frequently in PET/CT imaging, which causes distortion in tumor quantification in PET. Respiration cine average CT (CACT) for PET attenuation correction has been reported to improve the misalignment effectively by several papers. However, the radiation dose to the patient from a four-dimensional CT scan is relatively high. In this study, we propose a method to interpolate respiratory CT images over a respiratory cycle from inhalation and exhalation breath-hold CT images, and use the average CT from the generated CT set for PET attenuation correction. The radiation dose to the patient is reduced using this method. Six cancer patients of various lesion sites underwent routine free-breath helical CT (HCT), respiration CACT, interpolated average CT (IACT), and 18F-FDG PET. Deformable image registration was used to interpolate the middle phases of a respiratory cycle based on the end-inspiration and end-expiration breath-hold CT scans. The average CT image was calculated from the eight interpolated CT image sets of middle respiratory phases and the two original inspiration and expiration CT images. Then the PET images were reconstructed by these three methods for attenuation correction using HCT, CACT, and IACT. Misalignment of PET image using either CACT or IACT for attenuation correction in PET/CT was improved. The difference in standard uptake value (SUV) from tumor in PET images was most significant between the use of HCT and CACT, while the least significant between the use of CACT and IACT. Besides the similar improvement in tumor quantification compared to the use of CACT, using IACT for PET attenuation correction reduces the radiation dose to the patient.

  10. Attenuation correction of emission PET images with average CT: Interpolation from breath-hold CT

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Tzung-Chi; Zhang, Geoffrey; Chen, Chih-Hao; Yang, Bang-Hung; Wu, Nien-Yun; Wang, Shyh-Jen; Wu, Tung-Hsin

    2011-05-01

    Misregistration resulting from the difference of temporal resolution in PET and CT scans occur frequently in PET/CT imaging, which causes distortion in tumor quantification in PET. Respiration cine average CT (CACT) for PET attenuation correction has been reported to improve the misalignment effectively by several papers. However, the radiation dose to the patient from a four-dimensional CT scan is relatively high. In this study, we propose a method to interpolate respiratory CT images over a respiratory cycle from inhalation and exhalation breath-hold CT images, and use the average CT from the generated CT set for PET attenuation correction. The radiation dose to the patient is reduced using this method. Six cancer patients of various lesion sites underwent routine free-breath helical CT (HCT), respiration CACT, interpolated average CT (IACT), and 18F-FDG PET. Deformable image registration was used to interpolate the middle phases of a respiratory cycle based on the end-inspiration and end-expiration breath-hold CT scans. The average CT image was calculated from the eight interpolated CT image sets of middle respiratory phases and the two original inspiration and expiration CT images. Then the PET images were reconstructed by these three methods for attenuation correction using HCT, CACT, and IACT. Misalignment of PET image using either CACT or IACT for attenuation correction in PET/CT was improved. The difference in standard uptake value (SUV) from tumor in PET images was most significant between the use of HCT and CACT, while the least significant between the use of CACT and IACT. Besides the similar improvement in tumor quantification compared to the use of CACT, using IACT for PET attenuation correction reduces the radiation dose to the patient.

  11. Effect of Breath Holding on Spleen Volume Measured by Magnetic Resonance Imaging

    OpenAIRE

    Inoue, Yusuke; Nakajima, Ai; Mizukami, Shinya; Hata, Hirofumi

    2013-01-01

    Objective Ultrasonographic studies have demonstrated transient reduction in spleen volume in relation to apnea diving. We measured spleen volume under various respiratory conditions by MR imaging to accurately determine the influence of ordinary breath holding on spleen volumetry. Materials and Methods Twelve healthy adult volunteers were examined. Contiguous MR images of the spleen were acquired during free breathing and during respiratory manipulations, including breath holding at the end o...

  12. Magnetic Resonance Imaging in Breath-Hold Divers with Cerebral Decompression Sickness

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ryu Matsuo

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available The mechanism of cerebral decompression sickness (DCS is still unclear. We report 2 cases of breath-hold divers with cerebral DCS in whom magnetic resonance imaging (MRI demonstrated distinctive characteristics. One case presented right hemiparesthesia, diplopia, and gait disturbance after breath-hold diving into the sea at a depth of 20 m. Brain MRI with fluid-attenuated inversion recovery (FLAIR sequence revealed multiple hyperintense lesions in the right frontal lobe, bilateral thalamus, pons, and right cerebellar hemisphere. The second case presented visual and gait disturbance after repetitive breath-hold diving into the sea. FLAIR imaging showed hyperintense areas in the bilateral occipito-parietal lobes. In both cases, diffusion-weighted imaging and apparent diffusion coefficient mapping revealed hyperintense areas in the lesions identified by FLAIR. Moreover, follow-up MRI showed attenuation of the FLAIR signal abnormalities. These findings are suggestive of transient hyperpermeability in the microvasculature as a possible cause of cerebral DCS.

  13. Whole-heart cine MRI in a single breath-hold. A compressed sensing accelerated 3D acquisition technique for assessment of cardiac function

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Purpose: The aim of this study was to perform functional MR imaging of the whole heart in a single breath-hold using an undersampled 3 D trajectory for data acquisition in combination with compressed sensing for image reconstruction. Materials and Methods: Measurements were performed using an SSFP sequence on a 3 T whole-body system equipped with a 32-channel body array coil. A 3 D radial stack-of-stars sampling scheme was utilized enabling efficient undersampling of the k-space and thereby accelerating data acquisition. Compressed sensing was applied for the reconstruction of the missing data. A validation study was performed based on a fully sampled dataset acquired by standard Cartesian cine imaging of 2 D slices on a healthy volunteer. The results were investigated with regard to systematic errors and resolution losses possibly introduced by the developed reconstruction. Subsequently, the proposed technique was applied for in-vivo functional cardiac imaging of the whole heart in a single breath-hold of 27 s. The developed technique was tested on three healthy volunteers to examine its reproducibility. Results: By means of the results of the simulation (temporal resolution: 47 ms, spatial resolution: 1.4 x 1.4 x 8 mm, 3 D image matrix: 208 x 208 x 10), an overall acceleration factor of 10 has been found where the compressed sensing reconstructed image series shows only very low systematic errors and a slight in-plane resolution loss of 15 %. The results of the in-vivo study (temporal resolution: 40.5 ms, spatial resolution: 2.1 x 2.1 x 8 mm, 3 D image matrix: 224 x 224 x 12) performed with an acceleration factor of 10.7 confirm the overall good image quality of the presented technique for undersampled acquisitions. Conclusion: The combination of 3 D radial data acquisition and model-based compressed sensing reconstruction allows high acceleration factors enabling cardiac functional imaging of the whole heart within only one breath-hold. The image quality in the

  14. Effect of Breath Holding on Spleen Volume Measured by Magnetic Resonance Imaging.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yusuke Inoue

    Full Text Available Ultrasonographic studies have demonstrated transient reduction in spleen volume in relation to apnea diving. We measured spleen volume under various respiratory conditions by MR imaging to accurately determine the influence of ordinary breath holding on spleen volumetry.Twelve healthy adult volunteers were examined. Contiguous MR images of the spleen were acquired during free breathing and during respiratory manipulations, including breath holding at the end of normal expiration, breath holding at deep inspiration, and the valsalva maneuver, and spleen volume was measured from each image set based on the sum-of-areas method. Acquisition during free breathing was performed with respiratory triggering. The duration of each respiratory manipulation was 30 s, and five sets of MR images were acquired serially during each manipulation.Baseline spleen volume before respiratory manipulation was 173.0 ± 79.7 mL, and the coefficient of variance for two baseline measures was 1.4% ± 1.6%, suggesting excellent repeatability. Spleen volume decreased significantly just after the commencement of respiratory manipulation, remained constant during the manipulation, and returned to the control value 2 min after the cessation of the manipulation, irrespective of manipulation type. The percentages of volume reduction were 10.2% ± 2.9%, 10.2% ± 3.5%, and 13.3% ± 5.7% during expiration breath holding, deep-inspiration breath holding, and the valsalva maneuver, respectively, and these values did not differ significantly.Spleen volume is reduced during short breath-hold apnea in healthy adults. Physiological responses of the spleen to respiratory manipulations should be considered in the measurement and interpretation of spleen volume.

  15. Breath-hold T2-weighted MR imaging of the liver

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    T2-weighted sequences are important for liver studies at high field strength; however, long imaging times prolong total study time and often cause image degradation from breathing artifacts and patients motion. This paper compares four techniques that create images with T2/T2* information with a breath hold. The following breath-hold sequences were compared: FLASH, PSIF, turbo-FLASH, and spin-echo (T2-weighted RASE with variable flip angle), with reference to the regular T2-weighted SE sequence in 10 healthy volunteers. Imaging was conducted at 1.0 and 1.5-T. Images were evaluated quantitatively for liver signal-to-noise ratios (S/Ns) and spleen-liver signal difference-to-noise ratios (SD/N) and qualitatively for the presence of artifacts and image quality

  16. Evaluation of left ventricular function in healthy volunteers with non breath-hold cine MRI%非屏气法电影MRI测量健康志愿者左心室功能

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    王荣品; 梁长虹; 黄美萍; 邓奇平; 刘辉; 徐莉

    2011-01-01

    Objectives:To study the values of non breath-hold multiphase acquisition cine MRI sequence during cardiac cycle in the evaluation of the left ventricular function.and to investigate the feasibility of this method in evaluating the cardiac function for patients with incompatible breath-hold. Methods:Fast imaging employing steady state acquisition (FIESTA) sequence of cine MRI with and without breath-hold were performed in 15 healthy volunteers. The results of the function parameters of left ventricle,including end-diastolic volume (EDV),end-systolic volume (ESV), ejection fraction (EF),mean myocardial mass (MM),cardiac output (CO) and the corresponding parameters standardized by body surface area with non breath-hold sequence were collected and calculated. Paired samples t test were performed to assess the significant differences of the two methods. Results:No statistical differences were found between the results of the function parameters of left ventricle measured with non breath-hold multiphase acquisition sequence and with breath-hold multiphase acquisition sequence (all P>0. 05). Conclusion:The function parameters of left ventricle were proved to be reliable with multi-phase acquisition cine MRI sequence without breath-hold. Therefore,it is feasible to evaluate the cardiac function by using this method for patients with incompatible breath-hold.%目的:评估非屏气多时相采集电影MRl测量左心室功能的价值,探讨非屏气法电影MRI用于不能配合屏气患者心功能检查的可行性。方法:采用非屏气法和多次屏气法快速稳态平衡进动(FIESTA)序列电影MRI对15例健康志愿者左心室功能进行测量分析,采用配对样本t检验分析两种方法测量的心功能指标的差异,包括舒张末期容积(EDV)、收缩末期容积(ESV)、射血分数(EF)、平均心肌质量(MM)、心输出量(CO)及相应的体表面积标准化指标。结果:非屏气法和多次屏气法电影MRI测量左心室各项

  17. SU-E-J-62: Breath Hold for Left-Sided Breast Cancer: Visually Monitored Deep Inspiration Breath Hold Amplitude Evaluated Using Real-Time Position Management

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Purpose: We used Real-Time Position Management (RPM) to evaluate breath hold amplitude and variability when gating with a visually monitored deep inspiration breath hold technique (VM-DIBH) with retrospective cine image chest wall position verification. Methods: Ten patients with left-sided breast cancer were treated using VM-DIBH. Respiratory motion was passively collected once weekly using RPM with the marker block positioned at the xiphoid process. Cine images on the tangent medial field were acquired on fractions with RPM monitoring for retrospective verification of chest wall position during breath hold. The amplitude and duration of all breath holds on which treatment beams were delivered were extracted from the RPM traces. Breath hold position coverage was evaluated for symmetric RPM gating windows from ± 1 to 5 mm centered on the average breath hold amplitude of the first measured fraction as a baseline. Results: The average (range) breath hold amplitude and duration was 18 mm (3–36 mm) and 19 s (7–34 s). The average (range) of amplitude standard deviation per patient over all breath holds was 2.7 mm (1.2–5.7 mm). With the largest allowable RPM gating window (± 5 mm), 4 of 10 VM-DIBH patients would have had ≥ 10% of their breath hold positions excluded by RPM. Cine verification of the chest wall position during the medial tangent field showed that the chest wall was greater than 5 mm from the baseline in only 1 out of 4 excluded patients. Cine images verify the chest wall/breast position only, whether this variation is acceptable in terms of heart sparing is a subject of future investigation. Conclusion: VM-DIBH allows for greater breath hold amplitude variability than using a 5 mm gating window with RPM, while maintaining chest wall positioning accuracy within 5 mm for the majority of patients

  18. SU-E-J-62: Breath Hold for Left-Sided Breast Cancer: Visually Monitored Deep Inspiration Breath Hold Amplitude Evaluated Using Real-Time Position Management

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Conroy, L; Quirk, S; Smith, WL [The University of Calgary, Calgary, AB (Canada); Tom Baker Cancer Centre, Calgary, AB (Canada); Yeung, R; Phan, T [The University of Calgary, Calgary, AB (Canada); Hudson, A [Tom Baker Cancer Centre, Calgary, AB (Canada)

    2015-06-15

    Purpose: We used Real-Time Position Management (RPM) to evaluate breath hold amplitude and variability when gating with a visually monitored deep inspiration breath hold technique (VM-DIBH) with retrospective cine image chest wall position verification. Methods: Ten patients with left-sided breast cancer were treated using VM-DIBH. Respiratory motion was passively collected once weekly using RPM with the marker block positioned at the xiphoid process. Cine images on the tangent medial field were acquired on fractions with RPM monitoring for retrospective verification of chest wall position during breath hold. The amplitude and duration of all breath holds on which treatment beams were delivered were extracted from the RPM traces. Breath hold position coverage was evaluated for symmetric RPM gating windows from ± 1 to 5 mm centered on the average breath hold amplitude of the first measured fraction as a baseline. Results: The average (range) breath hold amplitude and duration was 18 mm (3–36 mm) and 19 s (7–34 s). The average (range) of amplitude standard deviation per patient over all breath holds was 2.7 mm (1.2–5.7 mm). With the largest allowable RPM gating window (± 5 mm), 4 of 10 VM-DIBH patients would have had ≥ 10% of their breath hold positions excluded by RPM. Cine verification of the chest wall position during the medial tangent field showed that the chest wall was greater than 5 mm from the baseline in only 1 out of 4 excluded patients. Cine images verify the chest wall/breast position only, whether this variation is acceptable in terms of heart sparing is a subject of future investigation. Conclusion: VM-DIBH allows for greater breath hold amplitude variability than using a 5 mm gating window with RPM, while maintaining chest wall positioning accuracy within 5 mm for the majority of patients.

  19. Functional Mechanism of Lung Mosaic CT Attenuation: Assessment with Deep-Inspiration Breath-Hold Perfusion SPECT-CT Fusion Imaging and Non-Breath-Hold Technegas SPECT

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Background: The functional mechanism of lung mosaic computed tomography attenuation (MCA) in pulmonary vascular disease (PVD) and obstructive airway disease (OAD) has not yet been fully clarified. Purpose: To clarify the mechanism of MCA in these diseases by assessing the relationship between regional lung function and CT attenuation change at MCA sites with the use of automated deep-inspiratory breath-hold (DIBrH) perfusion single-photon emission computed tomography (SPECT)-CT fusion images and non-breath-hold Technegas SPECT. Material and Methods: Subjects were 42 PVD patients (31 pulmonary thromboembolism, four primary/two secondary pulmonary hypertension, and five Takayasu arteritis), 12 OAD patients (five acute asthma, four obliterative bronchiolitis, and three bronchiectasis), and 12 normal controls, all of whom had MCA on DIBrH CT. The relationship between regional lung function and CT attenuation change at the lung slices with MCA was assessed using DIBrH perfusion SPECT-CT fusion images and non-breath-hold Technegas SPECT. The severity of perfusion defects with or without MCA was quantified by regions-of-interest analysis. Results: On DIBrH CT and perfusion SPECT, in contrast to no noticeable CT attenuation abnormality and fairly uniform perfusion in controls, 60 MCA and 274 perfusion defects in PVD patients, and 18 MCA and 61 defects in OAD patients were identified, with a total of 77 ventilation defects on Technegas SPECT in all patients. SPECT-CT correlation showed that, throughout the 78 MCA sites of all patients, lung perfusion was persistently decreased at low CT attenuation and preserved at intervening high CT attenuation, while lung ventilation was poorly correlated with CT attenuation change. The radioactivity ratios of reduced perfusion and the intervening preserved perfusion at the 78 perfusion defects with MCA were significantly lower than those at the remaining 257 defects without MCA (P<0.0001). Conclusion: Although further validation is

  20. Functional Mechanism of Lung Mosaic CT Attenuation: Assessment with Deep-Inspiration Breath-Hold Perfusion SPECT-CT Fusion Imaging and Non-Breath-Hold Technegas SPECT

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Suga, K.; Yasuhiko, K. (Dept. of Radiology, St. Hill Hospital, Ube, Yamaguchi (Japan)); Iwanaga, H.; Tokuda, O.; Matsunaga, N. (Dept. of Radiology, Yamaguchi Univ. School of Medicine, Ube, Yamaguchi (Japan))

    2009-01-15

    Background: The functional mechanism of lung mosaic computed tomography attenuation (MCA) in pulmonary vascular disease (PVD) and obstructive airway disease (OAD) has not yet been fully clarified. Purpose: To clarify the mechanism of MCA in these diseases by assessing the relationship between regional lung function and CT attenuation change at MCA sites with the use of automated deep-inspiratory breath-hold (DIBrH) perfusion single-photon emission computed tomography (SPECT)-CT fusion images and non-breath-hold Technegas SPECT. Material and Methods: Subjects were 42 PVD patients (31 pulmonary thromboembolism, four primary/two secondary pulmonary hypertension, and five Takayasu arteritis), 12 OAD patients (five acute asthma, four obliterative bronchiolitis, and three bronchiectasis), and 12 normal controls, all of whom had MCA on DIBrH CT. The relationship between regional lung function and CT attenuation change at the lung slices with MCA was assessed using DIBrH perfusion SPECT-CT fusion images and non-breath-hold Technegas SPECT. The severity of perfusion defects with or without MCA was quantified by regions-of-interest analysis. Results: On DIBrH CT and perfusion SPECT, in contrast to no noticeable CT attenuation abnormality and fairly uniform perfusion in controls, 60 MCA and 274 perfusion defects in PVD patients, and 18 MCA and 61 defects in OAD patients were identified, with a total of 77 ventilation defects on Technegas SPECT in all patients. SPECT-CT correlation showed that, throughout the 78 MCA sites of all patients, lung perfusion was persistently decreased at low CT attenuation and preserved at intervening high CT attenuation, while lung ventilation was poorly correlated with CT attenuation change. The radioactivity ratios of reduced perfusion and the intervening preserved perfusion at the 78 perfusion defects with MCA were significantly lower than those at the remaining 257 defects without MCA (P<0.0001). Conclusion: Although further validation is

  1. Newly found pulmonary pathophysiology from automated breath-hold perfusion-SPECT-CT fusion image

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pulmonary perfusion single photon emission computed tomography (SPECT)-CT fusion image largely contributes to objective and detailed correlation between lung morphologic and perfusion impairment in various lung diseases. However, traditional perfusion SPECT obtained during rest breathing usually shows a significant mis-registration on fusion image with conventional CT obtained during deep-inspiratory phase. There are also other adverse effects caused by respiratory lung motion such as blurring or smearing of small perfusion defects. To resolve these disadvantages of traditional perfusion SPECT, an innovative method of deep-inspiratory breath-hold (DIBrH) SPECT scan is developed in the Nuclear Medicine Institute of Yamaguchi University Hospital. This review article briefly describes the new findings of pulmonary pathophysiology which has been reveled by detailed lung morphologic-perfusion correlation on automated reliable DIBrH perfusion SPECT-CT fusion image. (author)

  2. MR evaluation of coronary stents with navigator echo and breath-hold cine gradient-echo techniques

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The aim of this study was to evaluate coronary artery stents with MR. Thirty-eight patients underwent MR imaging 48.1±6.6 days (range 38-60 days) after placement of 47 coronary stents of 11 different types, using navigator echo (NE) and cine gradient-echo (GE) techniques. For both sequences the low signal artifact was used to localize the stent, whereas the flow-related high signal before and distal to the stent was considered as a patency sign. Exercise electrocardiographic test (EET) had been performed 1-7 days before MR. No adverse event with possible relation to the MR examination was observed. All the stents were recognized as signal void with GE, and all but one with NE. Of the 2 patients with positive EET, the first one, with a stent on the left anterior descending coronary artery, presented low signal distal to the stent at both MR sequences, suggesting dysfunction [60% stenosis at conventional coronary angiography (CCA)]; the second one, with two sequential stents on the right coronary artery, presented lack of signal distal to the stents at both MR sequences, suggesting occlusion (97% stenosis at CCA). For the 44 remaining stents in 36 patients with negative EET, MR high signal before and distal to the stent suggested patency at both sequences. MR seems to be a safe and promising technique for non-invasive evaluation of coronary stents. (orig.)

  3. Breath-hold MR cholangiopancreatography with three-dimensional, segmented, echo-planar imaging and volume rendering

    OpenAIRE

    Wielopolski, Piotr; Gaa, J; Wielopolski, D.R.; Oudkerk, Matthijs

    1999-01-01

    textabstractEnd-expiration, 21-second breath-hold, three-dimensional magnetic resonance (MR) cholangiopancreatography (MRCP) was developed with segmented echo-planar imaging. In 15 healthy subjects and 14 randomly selected patients undergoing liver studies, three-dimensional MRCP images were obtained and volume rendered. In 15 (100%) healthy subjects and 13 (93%) patients, clear depiction of biliary, hepatic, and pancreatic ducts (with lumen diameter of at least 2 mm) was possible with good s...

  4. Incorporating breath holding and image guidance in the adjuvant gastric cancer radiotherapy: a dosimetric study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The respiratory related target motion and setup error will lead to a large margin in the gastric radiotherapy. The purpose of this study is to investigate the dosimetric benefit and the possibility of incorporating the breath-hold (BH) technique with online image-guided radiotherapy in the adjuvant gastric cancer radiotherapy. Setup errors and target motions of 22 post-operative gastric cancer patients with surgical clips were analyzed. Clips movement was recorded using the digital fluoroscopics and the probability distribution functions (pdf) of the target motions were created for both the free breathing (FB) and BH treatment. For dosimetric comparisons, two intensity-modulated radiotherapy (IMRT) treatment plans, i.e. the free breathing treatment plan (IMRTFB) and the image-guided BH treatment plan (IMRTIGBH) using the same beam parameters were performed among 6 randomly selected patients. Different margins for FB and BH plans were derived. The plan dose map was convoluted with various pdfs of the setup errors and the target motions. Target coverage and dose to organs at risk were compared and the dose-escalation probability was assessed. The mean setup errors were 1.2 mm in the superior-inferior (SI), 0.0 mm in the left-right (LR), and 1.4 mm in the anterior-posterior (AP) directions. The mean target motion for the free breathing (vs. BH) was 11.1 mm (vs. 2.2 mm), 1.9 mm (vs. 1.1 mm), and 5.5 mm (vs. 1.7 mm) in the SI, LR, and AP direction, respectively. The target coverage was comparable for all the original plans. IMRTIGBH showed lower dose to the liver compared with IMRTFB (p = 0.01) but no significant difference in the kidneys. Convolved IMRTIGBH showed better sparing in kidneys (p < 0.01) and similar in liver (p = 0.08). Combining BH technique with online image guided IMRT can minimize the organ motion and improve the setup accuracy. The dosimetric comparison showed the dose could be escalated to 54 Gy without increasing the critical organs toxicities

  5. Single Breath-Hold Physiotherapy Technique: Effective tool for T2* magnetic resonance imaging in young patients with thalassaemia major

    OpenAIRE

    Mevada, Surekha T.; Najma Al-Mahruqi; Ismail El-Beshlawi; Mohamed El-Shinawy; Mathew Zachariah; Al-Rawas, Abdul H.; Shahina Daar; Yasser Wali

    2016-01-01

    Magnetic resonance imaging using T2* (MRI T2*) is a highly sensitive and non-invasive technique for the detection of tissue iron load. Although the single breath-hold multi-echo T2* technique has been available at the Sultan Qaboos University Hospital (SQUH), Muscat, Oman, since 2006, it could not be performed on younger patients due to their inability to hold their breath after expiration. This study was carried out between May 2007 and May 2015 and assessed 50 SQUH thalassaemic patients age...

  6. Clinical outcome of hypofractionated breath-hold image-guided SABR of primary lung tumors and lung metastases

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Stereotactic Ablative RadioTherapy (SABR) of lung tumors/metastases has been shown to be an effective treatment modality with low toxicity. Outcome and toxicity were retrospectively evaluated in a unique single-institution cohort treated with intensity-modulated image-guided breath-hold SABR (igSABR) without external immobilization. The dose–response relationship is analyzed based on Biologically Equivalent Dose (BED). 50 lesions in 43 patients with primary NSCLC (n = 27) or lung-metastases of various primaries (n = 16) were consecutively treated with igSABR with Active-Breathing-Coordinator (ABC®) and repeat-breath-hold cone-beam-CT. After an initial dose-finding/-escalation period, 5x12 Gy for peripheral lesions and single doses of 5 Gy to varying dose levels for central lesions were applied. Overall-survival (OS), progression-free-survival (PFS), progression pattern, local control (LC) and toxicity were analyzed. The median BED2 was 83 Gy. 12 lesions were treated with a BED2 of <80 Gy, and 38 lesions with a BED2 of >80 Gy. Median follow-up was 15 months. Actuarial 1- and 2-year OS were 67% and 43%; respectively. Cause of death was non-disease-related in 27%. Actuarial 1- and 2-year PFS was 42% and 28%. Progression site was predominantly distant. Actuarial 1- and 2 year LC was 90% and 85%. LC showed a trend for a correlation to BED2 (p = 0.1167). Pneumonitis requiring conservative treatment occurred in 23%. Intensity-modulated breath-hold igSABR results in high LC-rates and low toxicity in this unfavorable patient cohort with inoperable lung tumors or metastases. A BED2 of <80 Gy was associated with reduced local control

  7. Single Breath-Hold Physiotherapy Technique: Effective tool for T2* magnetic resonance imaging in young patients with thalassaemia major.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mevada, Surekha T; Al-Mahruqi, Najma; El-Beshlawi, Ismail; El-Shinawy, Mohamed; Zachariah, Mathew; Al-Rawas, Abdul H; Daar, Shahina; Wali, Yasser

    2016-02-01

    Magnetic resonance imaging using T2* (MRI T2*) is a highly sensitive and non-invasive technique for the detection of tissue iron load. Although the single breath-hold multi-echo T2* technique has been available at the Sultan Qaboos University Hospital (SQUH), Muscat, Oman, since 2006, it could not be performed on younger patients due to their inability to hold their breath after expiration. This study was carried out between May 2007 and May 2015 and assessed 50 SQUH thalassaemic patients aged 7-17 years old. Seven of these patients underwent baseline and one-year follow-up MRI T2* scans before receiving physiotherapy training. Subsequently, all patients were trained by a physiotherapist to hold their breath for approximately 15-20 seconds at the end of expiration before undergoing baseline and one-year follow-up MRI T2* scans. Failure rates for the pre- and post-training groups were 6.0% and 42.8%, respectively. These results indicate that the training of thalassaemic patients in breath-hold techniques is beneficial and increases rates of compliance for MRI T2* scans. PMID:26909218

  8. Retrospective Reconstruction of High Temporal Resolution Cine Images from Real-Time MRI using Iterative Motion Correction

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, Michael Schacht; Sørensen, Thomas Sangild; Arai, Andrew;

    2012-01-01

    Cardiac function has traditionally been evaluated using breath-hold cine acquisitions. However, there is a great need for free breathing techniques in patients who have difficulty in holding their breath. Real-time cardiac MRI is a valuable alternative to the traditional breath-hold imaging...... approach, but the real-time images are often inferior in spatial and temporal resolution. This article presents a general method for reconstruction of high spatial and temporal resolution cine images from a real-time acquisition acquired over multiple cardiac cycles. The method combines parallel imaging...... and motion correction based on nonrigid registration and can be applied to arbitrary k-space trajectories. The method is demonstrated with real-time Cartesian imaging and Golden Angle radial acquisitions, and the motion-corrected acquisitions are compared with raw real-time images and breath-hold cine...

  9. Accuracy Evaluation of a 3-Dimensional Surface Imaging System for Guidance in Deep-Inspiration Breath-Hold Radiation Therapy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Alderliesten, Tanja; Sonke, Jan-Jakob; Betgen, Anja; Honnef, Joeri; Vliet-Vroegindeweij, Corine van [Department of Radiation Oncology, The Netherlands Cancer Institute-Antoni van Leeuwenhoek Hospital, Amsterdam (Netherlands); Remeijer, Peter, E-mail: p.remeijer@nki.nl [Department of Radiation Oncology, The Netherlands Cancer Institute-Antoni van Leeuwenhoek Hospital, Amsterdam (Netherlands)

    2013-02-01

    Purpose: To investigate the applicability of 3-dimensional (3D) surface imaging for image guidance in deep-inspiration breath-hold radiation therapy (DIBH-RT) for patients with left-sided breast cancer. For this purpose, setup data based on captured 3D surfaces was compared with setup data based on cone beam computed tomography (CBCT). Methods and Materials: Twenty patients treated with DIBH-RT after breast-conserving surgery (BCS) were included. Before the start of treatment, each patient underwent a breath-hold CT scan for planning purposes. During treatment, dose delivery was preceded by setup verification using CBCT of the left breast. 3D surfaces were captured by a surface imaging system concurrently with the CBCT scan. Retrospectively, surface registrations were performed for CBCT to CT and for a captured 3D surface to CT. The resulting setup errors were compared with linear regression analysis. For the differences between setup errors, group mean, systematic error, random error, and 95% limits of agreement were calculated. Furthermore, receiver operating characteristic (ROC) analysis was performed. Results: Good correlation between setup errors was found: R{sup 2}=0.70, 0.90, 0.82 in left-right, craniocaudal, and anterior-posterior directions, respectively. Systematic errors were {<=}0.17 cm in all directions. Random errors were {<=}0.15 cm. The limits of agreement were -0.34-0.48, -0.42-0.39, and -0.52-0.23 cm in left-right, craniocaudal, and anterior-posterior directions, respectively. ROC analysis showed that a threshold between 0.4 and 0.8 cm corresponds to promising true positive rates (0.78-0.95) and false positive rates (0.12-0.28). Conclusions: The results support the application of 3D surface imaging for image guidance in DIBH-RT after BCS.

  10. Optimising diffusion-weighted MR imaging for demonstrating pancreatic cancer: a comparison of respiratory-triggered, free-breathing and breath-hold techniques

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    To compare respiratory-triggered, free-breathing, and breath-hold DWI techniques regarding (1) image quality, and (2) signal intensity (SI) and ADC measurements in pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma (PDAC). Fifteen patients with histopathologically proven PDAC underwent DWI prospectively at 1.5 T (b = 0, 50, 300, 600 and 1,000 s/mm2) with the three techniques. Two radiologists, independently and blindly, assigned total image quality scores [sum of rating diffusion images (lesion detection, anatomy, presence of artefacts) and ADC maps (lesion characterisation, overall image quality)] per technique and ranked them. The lesion SI, signal-to-noise ratio, mean ADC and coefficient of variation (CV) were compared. Total image quality scores for respiratory-triggered, free-breathing and breath-hold techniques were 17.9, 16.5 and 17.1 respectively (respiratory-triggered was significantly higher than free-breathing but not breath-hold). The respiratory-triggered technique had a significantly higher ranking. Lesion SI on all b-values and signal-to-noise ratio on b300 and b600 were significantly higher for the respiratory-triggered technique. For respiratory-triggered, free-breathing and breath-hold techniques the mean ADCs were 1.201, 1.132 and 1.253 x 10-3 mm2/s, and mean CVs were 8.9, 10.8 and 14.1 % respectively (respiratory-triggered and free-breathing techniques had a significantly lower mean CV than the breath-hold technique). In both analyses, respiratory-triggered DWI showed superiority and seems the optimal DWI technique for demonstrating PDAC. (orig.)

  11. Optimising diffusion-weighted MR imaging for demonstrating pancreatic cancer: a comparison of respiratory-triggered, free-breathing and breath-hold techniques

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kartalis, Nikolaos; Loizou, Louiza; Edsborg, Nick; Albiin, Nils [Karolinska University Hospital, Division of Medical Imaging and Technology, Department of Clinical Science, Intervention and Technology (CLINTEC), Karolinska Institutet, Stockholm (Sweden); Segersvaerd, Ralf [Karolinska University Hospital, Division of Surgery, Department of Clinical Science, Intervention and Technology (CLINTEC), Karolinska Institutet, Stockholm (Sweden)

    2012-10-15

    To compare respiratory-triggered, free-breathing, and breath-hold DWI techniques regarding (1) image quality, and (2) signal intensity (SI) and ADC measurements in pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma (PDAC). Fifteen patients with histopathologically proven PDAC underwent DWI prospectively at 1.5 T (b = 0, 50, 300, 600 and 1,000 s/mm{sup 2}) with the three techniques. Two radiologists, independently and blindly, assigned total image quality scores [sum of rating diffusion images (lesion detection, anatomy, presence of artefacts) and ADC maps (lesion characterisation, overall image quality)] per technique and ranked them. The lesion SI, signal-to-noise ratio, mean ADC and coefficient of variation (CV) were compared. Total image quality scores for respiratory-triggered, free-breathing and breath-hold techniques were 17.9, 16.5 and 17.1 respectively (respiratory-triggered was significantly higher than free-breathing but not breath-hold). The respiratory-triggered technique had a significantly higher ranking. Lesion SI on all b-values and signal-to-noise ratio on b300 and b600 were significantly higher for the respiratory-triggered technique. For respiratory-triggered, free-breathing and breath-hold techniques the mean ADCs were 1.201, 1.132 and 1.253 x 10{sup -3} mm{sup 2}/s, and mean CVs were 8.9, 10.8 and 14.1 % respectively (respiratory-triggered and free-breathing techniques had a significantly lower mean CV than the breath-hold technique). In both analyses, respiratory-triggered DWI showed superiority and seems the optimal DWI technique for demonstrating PDAC. (orig.)

  12. SU-E-J-223: A BOLD Contrast Imaging Sequence to Evaluate Oxygenation Changes Due to Breath Holding for Breast Radiotherapy: A Pilot Study

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Adamson, J; Chang, Z; Cai, J; Palta, M; Horton, J; Yin, F; Blitzblau, R [Duke University Medical Center, Durham, NC (United States)

    2015-06-15

    Purpose: To develop a robust MRI sequence to measure BOLD breath hold induced contrast in context of breast radiotherapy. Methods: Two sequences were selected from prior studies as candidates to measure BOLD contrast attributable to breath holding within the breast: (1) T2* based Gradient Echo EPI (TR/TE = 500/41ms, flip angle = 60°), and (2) T2 based Single Shot Fast Spin Echo (SSFSE) (TR/TE = 3000/60ms). We enrolled ten women post-lumpectomy for breast cancer who were undergoing treatment planning for whole breast radiotherapy. Each session utilized a 1.5T GE MRI and 4 channel breast coil with the subject immobilized prone on a custom board. For each sequence, 1–3 planes of the lumpectomy breast were imaged continuously during a background measurement (1min) and intermittent breath holds (20–40s per breath hold, 3–5 holds per sequence). BOLD contrast was quantified as correlation of changes in per-pixel intensity with the breath hold schedule convolved with a hemodynamic response function. Subtle motion was corrected using a deformable registration algorithm. Correlation with breath-holding was considered significant if p<0.001. Results: The percentage of the breast ROI with positive BOLD contrast measured by the two sequences were in agreement with a correlation coefficient of R=0.72 (p=0.02). While both sequences demonstrated areas with strong BOLD response, the response was more systematic throughout the breast for the SSFSE (T2) sequence (% breast with response in the same direction: 51.2%±0.7% for T2* vs. 68.1%±16% for T2). In addition, the T2 sequence was less prone to magnetic susceptibility artifacts, especially in presence of seroma, and provided a more robust image with little distortion or artifacts. Conclusion: A T2 SSFSE sequence shows promise for measuring BOLD contrast in the context of breast radiotherapy utilizing a breath hold technique. Further study in a larger patient cohort is warranted to better refine this novel technique.

  13. SU-E-J-223: A BOLD Contrast Imaging Sequence to Evaluate Oxygenation Changes Due to Breath Holding for Breast Radiotherapy: A Pilot Study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Purpose: To develop a robust MRI sequence to measure BOLD breath hold induced contrast in context of breast radiotherapy. Methods: Two sequences were selected from prior studies as candidates to measure BOLD contrast attributable to breath holding within the breast: (1) T2* based Gradient Echo EPI (TR/TE = 500/41ms, flip angle = 60°), and (2) T2 based Single Shot Fast Spin Echo (SSFSE) (TR/TE = 3000/60ms). We enrolled ten women post-lumpectomy for breast cancer who were undergoing treatment planning for whole breast radiotherapy. Each session utilized a 1.5T GE MRI and 4 channel breast coil with the subject immobilized prone on a custom board. For each sequence, 1–3 planes of the lumpectomy breast were imaged continuously during a background measurement (1min) and intermittent breath holds (20–40s per breath hold, 3–5 holds per sequence). BOLD contrast was quantified as correlation of changes in per-pixel intensity with the breath hold schedule convolved with a hemodynamic response function. Subtle motion was corrected using a deformable registration algorithm. Correlation with breath-holding was considered significant if p<0.001. Results: The percentage of the breast ROI with positive BOLD contrast measured by the two sequences were in agreement with a correlation coefficient of R=0.72 (p=0.02). While both sequences demonstrated areas with strong BOLD response, the response was more systematic throughout the breast for the SSFSE (T2) sequence (% breast with response in the same direction: 51.2%±0.7% for T2* vs. 68.1%±16% for T2). In addition, the T2 sequence was less prone to magnetic susceptibility artifacts, especially in presence of seroma, and provided a more robust image with little distortion or artifacts. Conclusion: A T2 SSFSE sequence shows promise for measuring BOLD contrast in the context of breast radiotherapy utilizing a breath hold technique. Further study in a larger patient cohort is warranted to better refine this novel technique

  14. Single Breath-Hold Physiotherapy Technique; Effective tool for T2* magnetic resonance imaging in young patients with thalassaemia major

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Surekha T. Mevada

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available Magnetic resonance imaging using T2* (MRI T2* is a highly sensitive and non-invasive technique for the detection of tissue iron load. Although the single breath-hold multi-echo T2* technique has been available at the Sultan Qaboos University Hospital (SQUH, Muscat, Oman, since 2006, it could not be performed on younger patients due to their inability to hold their breath after expiration. This study was carried out between May 2007 and May 2015 and assessed 50 SQUH thalassaemic patients aged 7‒17 years old. Seven of these patients underwent baseline and one-year follow-up MRI T2* scans before receiving physiotherapy training. Subsequently, all patients were trained by a physiotherapist to hold their breath for approximately 15‒20 seconds at the end of expiration before undergoing baseline and one-year follow-up MRI T2* scans. Failure rates for the pre- and post-training groups were 6.0% and 42.8%, respectively. These results indicate that the training of thalassaemic patients in breathhold techniques is beneficial and increases rates of compliance for MRI T2* scans.

  15. A Voluntary Breath-Hold Treatment Technique for the Left Breast With Unfavorable Cardiac Anatomy Using Surface Imaging

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Purpose: Breath-hold (BH) treatments can be used to reduce cardiac dose for patients with left-sided breast cancer and unfavorable cardiac anatomy. A surface imaging technique was developed for accurate patient setup and reproducible real-time BH positioning. Methods and Materials: Three-dimensional surface images were obtained for 20 patients. Surface imaging was used to correct the daily setup for each patient. Initial setup data were recorded for 443 fractions and were analyzed to assess random and systematic errors. Real time monitoring was used to verify surface placement during BH. The radiation beam was not turned on if the BH position difference was greater than 5 mm. Real-time surface data were analyzed for 2398 BHs and 363 treatment fractions. The mean and maximum differences were calculated. The percentage of BHs greater than tolerance was calculated. Results: The mean shifts for initial patient setup were 2.0 mm, 1.2 mm, and 0.3 mm in the vertical, longitudinal, and lateral directions, respectively. The mean 3-dimensional vector shift was 7.8 mm. Random and systematic errors were less than 4 mm. Real-time surface monitoring data indicated that 22% of the BHs were outside the 5-mm tolerance (range, 7%-41%), and there was a correlation with breast volume. The mean difference between the treated and reference BH positions was 2 mm in each direction. For out-of-tolerance BHs, the average difference in the BH position was 6.3 mm, and the average maximum difference was 8.8 mm. Conclusions: Daily real-time surface imaging ensures accurate and reproducible positioning for BH treatment of left-sided breast cancer patients with unfavorable cardiac anatomy.

  16. Reduction of respiratory effects on lung PET imaging with respiratory-gated acquisition associated with breath-hold CT

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Respiratory motion causes a spread of lesion uptake over a larger area in Positron Emission Tomography (PET) images for moving structures. When CT images are used for attenuation correction of emission data, this motion may alter the quantization of PET images. We present the clinical results of a respiratory-gated PET processing 'CT-based' method, which aims to improve PET-CT co registration by using an additional breath-hold CT (B.H.-CT). The CT-based protocol consisted in a 10-min List Mode respiratory-gated PET acquisition, followed by an end-expiration B.H.-CT acquisition. During these two examinations, the respiratory signal was recorded continuously. Eleven pulmonary lesions were studied. Patients underwent both a standard clinical PET protocol (free breathing) and the CT-based protocol. The respective performances of the CT-based and clinical PET methods were evaluated by comparing the distances between the lesions centroids on PET and CT images. SUVmax (Standardized Uptake Value) and volume variations were also investigated. The CT-based method showed a significant reduction (p = 0.049) of centroid distances (mean relative change versus standard method: 49%). We also noted a higher SUVmax (mean change: 39%). Lesion volumes were significantly lower (p = 0.026) in CT-based PET volumes (mean change: 43%) compared with standard ones. The CT-based method improves PET-CT co registration of pulmonary lesions. This protocol should lead to more accurate attenuation correction and thus improve S.U.V. measurement

  17. A Voluntary Breath-Hold Treatment Technique for the Left Breast With Unfavorable Cardiac Anatomy Using Surface Imaging

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gierga, David P., E-mail: dgierga@partners.org [Department of Radiation Oncology, Massachusetts General Hospital, Boston, Massachusetts (United States); Harvard Medical School, Boston, Massachusetts (United States); Turcotte, Julie C. [Department of Radiation Oncology, Massachusetts General Hospital, Boston, Massachusetts (United States); Sharp, Gregory C. [Department of Radiation Oncology, Massachusetts General Hospital, Boston, Massachusetts (United States); Harvard Medical School, Boston, Massachusetts (United States); Sedlacek, Daniel E.; Cotter, Christopher R. [Department of Radiation Oncology, Massachusetts General Hospital, Boston, Massachusetts (United States); Taghian, Alphonse G. [Department of Radiation Oncology, Massachusetts General Hospital, Boston, Massachusetts (United States); Harvard Medical School, Boston, Massachusetts (United States)

    2012-12-01

    Purpose: Breath-hold (BH) treatments can be used to reduce cardiac dose for patients with left-sided breast cancer and unfavorable cardiac anatomy. A surface imaging technique was developed for accurate patient setup and reproducible real-time BH positioning. Methods and Materials: Three-dimensional surface images were obtained for 20 patients. Surface imaging was used to correct the daily setup for each patient. Initial setup data were recorded for 443 fractions and were analyzed to assess random and systematic errors. Real time monitoring was used to verify surface placement during BH. The radiation beam was not turned on if the BH position difference was greater than 5 mm. Real-time surface data were analyzed for 2398 BHs and 363 treatment fractions. The mean and maximum differences were calculated. The percentage of BHs greater than tolerance was calculated. Results: The mean shifts for initial patient setup were 2.0 mm, 1.2 mm, and 0.3 mm in the vertical, longitudinal, and lateral directions, respectively. The mean 3-dimensional vector shift was 7.8 mm. Random and systematic errors were less than 4 mm. Real-time surface monitoring data indicated that 22% of the BHs were outside the 5-mm tolerance (range, 7%-41%), and there was a correlation with breast volume. The mean difference between the treated and reference BH positions was 2 mm in each direction. For out-of-tolerance BHs, the average difference in the BH position was 6.3 mm, and the average maximum difference was 8.8 mm. Conclusions: Daily real-time surface imaging ensures accurate and reproducible positioning for BH treatment of left-sided breast cancer patients with unfavorable cardiac anatomy.

  18. Volumetric modulated arc therapy and breath-hold in image-guided locoregional left-sided breast irradiation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Osman, S.O.; Hol, S.; Poortmans, P.M.P.; Essers, M.

    2014-01-01

    PURPOSE: To investigate the effects of using volumetric modulated arc therapy (VMAT) and/or voluntary moderate deep inspiration breath-hold (vmDIBH) in the radiation therapy (RT) of left-sided breast cancer including the regional lymph nodes. MATERIALS AND METHODS: For 13 patients, four treatment co

  19. Hilar cholangiocarcinoma: preoperative evaluation with a three dimensional volumetric interpolated breath-hold examination magnetic resonance imaging sequence

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    YIN Long-lin; SONG Bin; XU Juan; LI Ying-chun

    2007-01-01

    Background Early detection and accurate staging are crucial for planning treatment and improving survival rate of hilar cholangiocarcinomas. This study investigated the diagnostic value of a three dimensional, spoiled gradient echo,T1-weighted magnetic resonance (MR) imaging sequence (3D volumetric interpolated breath-hold examination, 3D-VIBE) in the preoperative evaluation of hilar cholangiocarcinoma.Methods Thirty-one patients with surgically and histologically confirmed hilar cholangiocarcinomas underwent preoperative MR imaging examination. Unenhanced two-dimensional T1- and T2-weighted images, 2D MR cholangiopancreatographs (MRCP), gadolinium enhanced 3D-VIBE images in the early arterial, late arterial and portal venous phases followed by 2D T1-weighted images in the equilibrium phase were acquired. Images from 3D-VIBE, 2D T1-weighted enhanced sequences and 2D MRCP were interpreted by two abdominal radiologists through consensus reading in blind manner, focussing on the assessment of the morphological type, the longitudinal extent of tumor infiltration in the bile ducts and the involvement of neighbouring blood vessels. The accuracy of 3D-VIBE and 2D T1-weighted enhanced sequences in assessing the tumor resectability was compared.Results All the 31 tumors were directly displayed and accurately classified on 3D-VIBE images whereas 8 periductal infiltrating tumors (8/31, 25.8%) were not depicted on 2D T1-weighted enhanced images. Using the Bismuth Corlette classification, 3D-VIBE was closer to MRCP in delineating the intraductal extent of tumor infiltration than 2D T1-weighted enhanced (28/31, 90.3%; 10/31,32.3%; χ2=22.0, P<0.05). Involvement of the hepatic artery, the portal venous trunk and their branches was shown more frequently on 3D VIBE than 2D T1-weighted enhanced images. The positive predictive value and accuracy of 3D-VIBE (84.2%; 90.3%) for assessing tumor resectability were higher than those of 2D T1-weighted enhanced images (64.0%; 71.0%, all P

  20. Hypofractionated image-guided breath-hold SABR (Stereotactic Ablative Body Radiotherapy of liver metastases – clinical results

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Boda-Heggemann Judit

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Purpose Stereotactic Ablative Body Radiotherapy (SABR is a non-invasive therapy option for inoperable liver oligometastases. Outcome and toxicity were retrospectively evaluated in a single-institution patient cohort who had undergone ultrasound-guided breath-hold SABR. Patients and methods 19 patients with liver metastases of various primary tumors consecutively treated with SABR (image-guidance with stereotactic ultrasound in combination with computer-controlled breath-hold were analysed regarding overall-survival (OS, progression-free-survival (PFS, progression pattern, local control (LC, acute and late toxicity. Results PTV (planning target volume-size was 108 ± 109cm3 (median 67.4 cm3. BED2 (Biologically effective dose in 2 Gy fraction was 83.3 ± 26.2 Gy (median 78 Gy. Median follow-up and median OS were 12 months. Actuarial 2-year-OS-rate was 31%. Median PFS was 4 months, actuarial 1-year-PFS-rate was 20%. Site of first progression was predominantly distant. Regression of irradiated lesions was observed in 84% (median time to detection of regression was 2 months. Actuarial 6-month-LC-rate was 92%, 1- and 2-years-LC-rate 57%, respectively. BED2 influenced LC. When a cut-off of BED2 = 78 Gy was used, the higher BED2 values resulted in improved local control with a statistical trend to significance (p = 0.0999. Larger PTV-sizes, inversely correlated with applied dose, resulted in lower local control, also with a trend to significance (p-value = 0.08 when a volume cut-off of 67 cm3 was used. No local relapse was observed at PTV-sizes 3 and BED2 > 78 Gy. No acute clinical toxicity > °2 was observed. Late toxicity was also ≤ °2 with the exception of one gastrointestinal bleeding-episode 1 year post-SABR. A statistically significant elevation in the acute phase was observed for alkaline-phosphatase; in the chronic phase for alkaline-phosphatase, bilirubine, cholinesterase and C

  1. [An Examination of Variable Image Positions in the Aortic Valve Blood Flow Using Phase Contrast MRI: Effect of Breath-holding Methods in Healthy Volunteers].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nakagawa, Kenichi; Morimoto, Noriyoshi; Fukushima, Sachi

    2015-12-01

    Phase contrast MRI (PC-MRI) is a useful tool for evaluating valvular pathology. In addition, PC-MRI can provide a noninvasive assessment of blood flow in an arbitrary cross section. However, the blood flow measurement with breath-hold or free breath PC-MRI may be different from each other because of intrathoracic pressure changing and variable image position. The aim of this study was to find both the optimal breath-hold technique and the image position. Quantitative flow images were acquired in four planes (ascending aorta: Ao, sino-tubular junction: STJ, valsalva sinus: valsalva, left ventricular outflow tract: LVOT), in healthy subjects (n=10). The study protocol was divided into two parts: (1) stroke volume (SV) measured in each slice positions by using inspiration, expiration, and navigation method during normal breathing and (2) SV measured at each breath-hold techniques in the Ao, STJ, valsalva, and LVOT. As a result, (1) SV of the respective measurement positions were not significant by using inspiration, expiration, and navigation method and (2) LVOT SV was significantly lower than Ao, STJ, and valsalva. PMID:26685835

  2. Evaluation of image quality and patient safety: paired inspiratory and expiratory MDCT assessment of tracheobronchomalacia in paediatric patients under general anaesthesia with breath-hold technique

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The purpose of our investigation was to evaluate image quality and patient safety in infants and young children who required general anaesthesia with breath-hold technique for paired inspiratory and expiratory multidetector CT (MDCT) assessment of tracheobronchomalacia (TBM). Our hospital's institutional review board approved the review of radiological and clinical data of a consecutive series of 20 paediatric patients who underwent MDCT under general anaesthesia with breath-hold technique for evaluation of TBM from May 2006 to December 2008. For each MDCT study, two fellowship-trained paediatric radiologists reviewed the inspiratory and expiratory MDCT images in an independent, randomised and blinded fashion for the presence of motion artefact at three anatomic levels (upper, middle and lower central airways). The clinical history and anaesthesia outcome, including the occurrence of any adverse events during or following the MDCT examinations until discharge, were also reviewed and recorded. The study population consisted of 20 infants and young children (13 boys/seven girls, mean age 1.7 ± 1.4 years, age range 11 days to 4 years). The imaging quality of all 20 MDCT studies was diagnostic with no motion artefact in 16 studies (80%) and minimal motion artefact in the remaining four studies (20%). Minor adverse events occurred in three patients (15%) that included one patient (5%) with a brief (<60 s) oxygen desaturation during MDCT study, which resolved with oxygen, and two patients (5%) with either a brief (<60 s) oxygen desaturation (n = 1, 5%) or cough (n = 1, 5%) during recovery period, which were completely resolved with oxygen and dexamethasone, respectively. Diagnostic quality paired inspiratory and expiratory MDCT imaging with breath-hold technique can be safely performed in infants and young children under general anaesthesia for evaluation of TBM.

  3. Evaluation of pancreatic cancer by multiple breath-hold dynamic contrast-enhanced magnetic resonance imaging at 3.0 T

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yao, Xiuzhong, E-mail: yao.xiuzhong@zs-hospital.sh.cn [Department of Radiology, Zhongshan Hospital of Fudan University and Department of Medical Image, Shanghai Medical College of Fudan University, No. 138, Fenglin Road, Xuhui District, Shanghai 200032 (China); Zeng, Mengsu, E-mail: zengmengsu@gmail.com [Department of Radiology, Zhongshan Hospital of Fudan University and Department of Medical Image, Shanghai Medical College of Fudan University, No. 138, Fenglin Road, Xuhui District, Shanghai 200032 (China); Wang, He, E-mail: herry258@hotmail.com [Global Applied Science Laboratory of GE Healthcare, No. 1, Huatuo Road, Zhangjiang Hi-tech Park, Pudong District, Shanghai 201203 (China); Sun, Fei, E-mail: fei.sun@med.ge.com [Global Applied Science Laboratory of GE Healthcare, No. 1, Huatuo Road, Zhangjiang Hi-tech Park, Pudong District, Shanghai 201203 (China); Rao, Shengxiang, E-mail: rao.shengxiang@zs-hospital.sh.cn [Department of Radiology, Zhongshan Hospital of Fudan University and Department of Medical Image, Shanghai Medical College of Fudan University, No. 138, Fenglin Road, Xuhui District, Shanghai 200032 (China); Ji, Yuan, E-mail: Ji.yuan@zs-hospital.sh.cn [Department of Pathology, Zhongshan Hospital of Fudan University, No. 138, Fenglin Road, Xuhui District, Shanghai 200032 (China)

    2012-08-15

    Objective: To investigate the microcirculation in pancreatic cancer by pharmacokinetic analysis of multiple breath-hold dynamic contrast-enhanced magnetic resonance imaging at 3.0 T. Materials and methods: Multiple breath-hold dynamic contrast-enhanced magnetic resonance imaging was performed in 40 healthy volunteers and 40 patients with pancreatic cancer proven by histopathology using an axial three-dimensions fat-saturated T1-weighted spoiled-gradient echo sequence at 3.0 T. A two compartment model with T1 correction was used to quantify the transfer constant, the rate constant of backflux from the extravascular extracellular space to the plasma and the extravascular extracellular space fractional volume in pancreatic cancer, obstructive pancreatitis distal to the malignant tumor, adjacent pancreatic tissue proximal to the tumor and normal pancreas. All parameters were statistically analyzed. Results: Statistical differences were noticed in both the transfer constant (p = 0.000075) and the rate constant of backflux (p = 0.006) among different tissues. Both the transfer constant and the rate constant of backflux in pancreatic cancer were statistically lower than those in normal pancreas and adjacent pancreatic tissue (p < 0.05). Both the transfer constant and the rate constant of backflux in obstructive pancreatitis were statistically lower than those in normal pancreas and adjacent pancreatic tissue (p < 0.05). The extravascular extracellular space fractional volume in pancreatic cancer was statistically lager than that in normal pancreas (p = 0.002). Conclusion: Multiple breath-hold dynamic contrast-enhanced magnetic resonance imaging offers a useful technique to evaluate the microenvironment in pancreatic cancer at 3.0 T. Compared to normal pancreas, pancreatic cancer has lower transfer constant, rate constant of backflux and larger extravascular extracellular space fractional volume.

  4. Evaluation of pancreatic cancer by multiple breath-hold dynamic contrast-enhanced magnetic resonance imaging at 3.0 T

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Objective: To investigate the microcirculation in pancreatic cancer by pharmacokinetic analysis of multiple breath-hold dynamic contrast-enhanced magnetic resonance imaging at 3.0 T. Materials and methods: Multiple breath-hold dynamic contrast-enhanced magnetic resonance imaging was performed in 40 healthy volunteers and 40 patients with pancreatic cancer proven by histopathology using an axial three-dimensions fat-saturated T1-weighted spoiled-gradient echo sequence at 3.0 T. A two compartment model with T1 correction was used to quantify the transfer constant, the rate constant of backflux from the extravascular extracellular space to the plasma and the extravascular extracellular space fractional volume in pancreatic cancer, obstructive pancreatitis distal to the malignant tumor, adjacent pancreatic tissue proximal to the tumor and normal pancreas. All parameters were statistically analyzed. Results: Statistical differences were noticed in both the transfer constant (p = 0.000075) and the rate constant of backflux (p = 0.006) among different tissues. Both the transfer constant and the rate constant of backflux in pancreatic cancer were statistically lower than those in normal pancreas and adjacent pancreatic tissue (p < 0.05). Both the transfer constant and the rate constant of backflux in obstructive pancreatitis were statistically lower than those in normal pancreas and adjacent pancreatic tissue (p < 0.05). The extravascular extracellular space fractional volume in pancreatic cancer was statistically lager than that in normal pancreas (p = 0.002). Conclusion: Multiple breath-hold dynamic contrast-enhanced magnetic resonance imaging offers a useful technique to evaluate the microenvironment in pancreatic cancer at 3.0 T. Compared to normal pancreas, pancreatic cancer has lower transfer constant, rate constant of backflux and larger extravascular extracellular space fractional volume.

  5. The Value of In-Phase and Opposed-Phase T1-Weighted Breath-Hold FLASH Sequences for Hepatic Imaging

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2000-01-01

    The value of the combined in-phase (IP) and opposed-phase (OP) T1-weighted (T1-W) breath-hold FLASH sequences for hepatic imaging, especially for fat content, was evaluated. Noncontrast-enhanced IP and OP T1-W GRE breath-hold images were obtained in 76 patients refereed for abdominal MRI at 1. 5T. 76 patients were divided into three groups for analysis: (1) liver without mass (n=8); (2) liver with hepatoma (n= 34); (3) liver with haemangioma or cyst (n= 34). Liver/spleen and liver/lesion signal-to-noise (SNR) and contrast-to-noise ratio (CNR) were assessed for lesion detection. Images between IP and OP sequences were compared quantitatively. The results showed that there was not statistically significant difference in liver/spleen and liver/lesion SNR between IP and OP sequences. In the patients with fatty infiltration, the OP sequences yielded substantially lower values for liver/spleen and liver/lesion SNR than those of the IP sequences. Furthermore, OP imaging showed fatty infiltration in 14 cases and demonstrated hyperintense peritumor rim in 4 cases. In 14 cases of fatty infiltration, many lesions were identified using IP images. The use of IP and OP GRE sequences provides complementary diagnostic information for hepatic lesions and fat content. Focal hepatic lesions may be obscured in the setting of fatty infiltration if only OP sequences are employed. A complete assessment of the liver with MR should include both IP and OP imaging.

  6. Single breath-hold assessment of cardiac function using an accelerated 3D single breath-hold acquisition technique - comparison of an intravascular and extravascular contrast agent

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Makowski Marcus R

    2012-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Cardiovascular magnetic resonance (CMR is the current gold standard for the assessment of left ventricular (LV function. Repeated breath-holds are needed for standard multi-slice 2D cine steady-state free precession sequences (M2D-SSFP. Accelerated single breath-hold techniques suffer from low contrast between blood pool and myocardium. In this study an intravascular contrast agent was prospectively compared to an extravascular contrast agent for the assessment of LV function using a single-breath-hold 3D-whole-heart cine SSFP sequence (3D-SSFP. Methods LV function was assessed in fourteen patients on a 1.5 T MR-scanner (Philips Healthcare using 32-channel coil technology. Patients were investigated twice using a 3D-SSFP sequence (acquisition time 18–25 s after Gadopentetate dimeglumine (GdD, day 1 and Gadofosveset trisodium (GdT, day 2 administration. Image acquisition was accelerated using sensitivity encoding in both phase encoding directions (4xSENSE. CNR and BMC were both measured between blood and myocardium. The CNR incorporated noise measurements, while the BMC represented the coeffiancy between the signal from blood and myocardium [1]. Contrast to noise ratio (CNR, blood to myocardium contrast (BMC, image quality, LV functional parameters and intra-/interobserver variability were compared. A M2D-SSFP sequence was used as a reference standard on both days. Results All 3D-SSFP sequences were successfully acquired within one breath-hold after GdD and GdT administration. CNR and BMC were significantly (p vs. 23.7 and regression analysis showed a stronger correlation to the reference standard (R2 = 0.92 vs. R2 = 0.71, compared to 3D-SSFP with GdD. Conclusions A single-breath-hold 3D-whole-heart cine SSFP sequence in combination with 32-channel technology and an intravascular contrast agent allows for the accurate and fast assessment of LV function. Trial registration The study was approved by the local

  7. Improved workflow for quantification of left ventricular volumes and mass using free-breathing motion corrected cine imaging

    OpenAIRE

    Cross, Russell; Olivieri, Laura; O’Brien, Kendall; Kellman, Peter; Xue, Hui; Hansen, Michael

    2016-01-01

    Background Traditional cine imaging for cardiac functional assessment requires breath-holding, which can be problematic in some situations. Free-breathing techniques have relied on multiple averages or real-time imaging, producing images that can be spatially and/or temporally blurred. To overcome this, methods have been developed to acquire real-time images over multiple cardiac cycles, which are subsequently motion corrected and reformatted to yield a single image series displaying one card...

  8. In vivo micro-CT imaging of the murine lung via a computer controlled intermittent iso-pressure breath hold (IIBH) technique

    Science.gov (United States)

    Namati, Eman; Chon, Deokiee; Thiesse, Jacqueline; McLennan, Geoffrey; Sieren, Jered; Ross, Alan; Hoffman, Eric A.

    2006-03-01

    Micro-CT, a technique for imaging small objects at high resolution using micro focused x-rays, is becoming widely available for small animal imaging. With the growing number of mouse models of pulmonary pathology, there is great interest in following disease progression and evaluating the alteration in longitudinal studies. Along with the high resolution associated with micro CT comes increased scanning times, and hence minimization of motion artifacts is required. We propose a new technique for imaging mouse lungs in vivo by inducing an intermittent iso-pressure breath hold (IIBH) with a fixed level of positive airway pressure during image acquisition, to decrease motion artifacts and increase image resolution and quality. Mechanical ventilation of the respiratory system for such a setup consists of three phases, 1) tidal breathing (hyperventilated), 2) a breath hold during a fixed level of applied positive airway pressure, 3) periodic deep sighs. Image acquisition is triggered over the stable segment of the IIBH period. Comparison of images acquired from the same mouse lung using three imaging techniques (normal breathing / no gating, normal breathing with gating at End Inspiration (EI) and finally the IIBH technique) demonstrated substantial improvements in resolution and quality when using the IIBH gating. Using IIBH triggering the total image acquisition time increased from 15 minutes to 35 minutes, although total x-ray exposure time and hence animal dosage remains the same. This technique is an important step in providing high quality lung imaging of the mouse in vivo, and will provide a good foundation for future longitudinal studies.

  9. Breath-hold CT attenuation correction for quantitative cardiac SPECT

    OpenAIRE

    Koshino, Kazuhiro; Fukushima, Kazuhito; Fukumoto, Masaji; Sasaki, Kazunari; Moriguchi, Tetsuaki; Hori, Yuki; Zeniya, Tsutomu; Nishimura, Yoshihiro; Kiso, Keisuke; Iida, Hidehiro

    2012-01-01

    Background Attenuation correction of a single photon emission computed tomography (SPECT) image is possible using computed tomography (CT)-based attenuation maps with hybrid SPECT/CT. CT attenuation maps acquired during breath holding can be misaligned with SPECT, generating artifacts in the reconstructed images. The purpose of this study was to investigate the effects of respiratory phase during breath-hold CT acquisition on attenuation correction of cardiac SPECT imaging. Methods A series o...

  10. MRCP using breath-hold HASTE sequence : comparison of maximum intensity projection image with single slice acquisition image

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    To compare the usefulness of single-slice acquisition imaging and conventional maximum intensity projection imaging, as employed in magnetic resonance cholangiopancreatography (MRCP) using the Half-Fourier Acquisition Single Shot Turbo Spin-Echo(HASTE) sequence. Five healthy volunteers underwent MRCP using the HASTE sequence on a 1.5T MR unit. Two data acquisition techniques were used:1) single slice acquisition, with 20mm slice thickness (imaging time, 2sec), 2) multi-slice acquisition, with 5mm slice thickness(imaging time, 19sec), followed by maximum intensity projection reconstruction. Two radiologists independently evaluated the MRCP images obtained using these two techniques;based on the depiction by each of ten anatomic structures, their quality was graded as excellent(3 points), good(2 points), fair(1 point) or poor(0). Mean scores were totalled, and to compare the quality of the two techniques, these scores were compared. Data was statistically analyzed using the paired student t-test. There was no difference in bile duct image quality between the two techniques. The pancreatic duct was more conspicuous on single-slice (mean score, 1.94) than on maximum intensity projection imaging (mean score, 0.7). The sum of the mean scores of single-slice imaging was 18.75, and that of maximum intensity projection imaging was 14.7 (p=0.42);the general difference between the two techniques was thus statistically insignificant. Compared with maximum intensity projection imaging, single-slice imaging had a distinct advantage:acquisition time was short (within 2sec), thus motion artifacts could be avoided, and there was no need for post-processing. There is a close and direct connection between the avoidance of motion artifact and short acquisition time, but lack of need for post-processing is independent. On single-slice images, the pancreatic duct was more conspicuous than on maximum intensity projection images. The former can therefore be used with patients who

  11. Highly accelerated real-time cardiac cine MRI using k-t SPARSE-SENSE.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Feng, Li; Srichai, Monvadi B; Lim, Ruth P; Harrison, Alexis; King, Wilson; Adluru, Ganesh; Dibella, Edward V R; Sodickson, Daniel K; Otazo, Ricardo; Kim, Daniel

    2013-07-01

    For patients with impaired breath-hold capacity and/or arrhythmias, real-time cine MRI may be more clinically useful than breath-hold cine MRI. However, commercially available real-time cine MRI methods using parallel imaging typically yield relatively poor spatio-temporal resolution due to their low image acquisition speed. We sought to achieve relatively high spatial resolution (∼2.5 × 2.5 mm(2)) and temporal resolution (∼40 ms), to produce high-quality real-time cine MR images that could be applied clinically for wall motion assessment and measurement of left ventricular function. In this work, we present an eightfold accelerated real-time cardiac cine MRI pulse sequence using a combination of compressed sensing and parallel imaging (k-t SPARSE-SENSE). Compared with reference, breath-hold cine MRI, our eightfold accelerated real-time cine MRI produced significantly worse qualitative grades (1-5 scale), but its image quality and temporal fidelity scores were above 3.0 (adequate) and artifacts and noise scores were below 3.0 (moderate), suggesting that acceptable diagnostic image quality can be achieved. Additionally, both eightfold accelerated real-time cine and breath-hold cine MRI yielded comparable left ventricular function measurements, with coefficient of variation cine MRI with k-t SPARSE-SENSE is a promising modality for rapid imaging of myocardial function.

  12. High resolution T2 weighted liver MR imaging using functional residual capacity breath-hold with a 1.0-Tesla scanner

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Purpose: During acquisition of rapid high resolution (HR) T2 weighted (T2W) liver magnetic resonance (MR) images using a 1.0-Tesla (T) scanner, the liver is segmented into odd and even sections that are acquired at two different times using the multi-breath-hold (MBH) strategy. Misalignment between the two breath-hold (B-H) images may result in the occurrence of a blind area and a decrease in diagnostic accuracy. Here, a functional residual capacity (FRC) B-H method was developed to overcome this problem. Material and methods: Twenty-five volunteers were enrolled. The sagittal images were reconstructed from whole liver transverse images. When the B-H phases are different, misalignment may occur in the craniocaudal and anterior-posterior (AP) directions. In this study, misalignments of the abdominal wall were measured in the AP direction. The misalignment was compared between four B-H phases, maximum inspiration (MI), maximum expiration (ME), voluntary expiration (VE) and FRC using one-way repeated measures ANOVA. Differences between groups were compared using the t-test for multi-group comparisons. In addition, qualitative analysis of misalignment was performed between VE and FRC in 52 clinical patients and the χ2 test was performed. Results: The misalignment widths of FRC, ME, MI and VE B-Hs were 2.7 ± 3.8, 6.4 ± 7.4, 9.1 ± 8.4 and 6.0 ± 6.7 mm, respectively. Misalignment of the liver position using FRC was significantly smaller than for the other B-H methods (p < 0.05). Significant differences between the VE B-H and FRC B-H were also observed in the qualitative analysis (p < 0.05). Conclusion: The liver positions obtained when using FRC B-H were significantly more reproducible than when using the other B-H methods. The FRC B-H method resulted in a reduction in the blind area and an extension of the diagnostic area to the whole liver.

  13. High resolution T2 weighted liver MR imaging using functional residual capacity breath-hold with a 1.0-Tesla scanner

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tabuchi, Akihiko [Graduate School of Health Sciences, Okayama University, Okayama (Japan); Kawasaki Medical School, Kawasaki Hospital, 2-1-80 Nakasange, Okayama City, Okayama 700-8505 (Japan)], E-mail: a-tab@po1.oninet.ne.jp; Katsuda, Toshizo [Faculty of Health Care Sciences, Himeji Dokkyo University, Hyogo (Japan); Gotanda, Rumi; Gotanda, Tatsuhiro [Graduate School of Health Sciences, Okayama University, Okayama (Japan); Mitani, Masahiko [Kawasaki Medical School, Kawasaki Hospital, 2-1-80 Nakasange, Okayama City, Okayama 700-8505 (Japan); Takeda, Yoshihiro [Graduate School of Health Sciences, Okayama University, Okayama (Japan)

    2009-11-15

    Purpose: During acquisition of rapid high resolution (HR) T2 weighted (T2W) liver magnetic resonance (MR) images using a 1.0-Tesla (T) scanner, the liver is segmented into odd and even sections that are acquired at two different times using the multi-breath-hold (MBH) strategy. Misalignment between the two breath-hold (B-H) images may result in the occurrence of a blind area and a decrease in diagnostic accuracy. Here, a functional residual capacity (FRC) B-H method was developed to overcome this problem. Material and methods: Twenty-five volunteers were enrolled. The sagittal images were reconstructed from whole liver transverse images. When the B-H phases are different, misalignment may occur in the craniocaudal and anterior-posterior (AP) directions. In this study, misalignments of the abdominal wall were measured in the AP direction. The misalignment was compared between four B-H phases, maximum inspiration (MI), maximum expiration (ME), voluntary expiration (VE) and FRC using one-way repeated measures ANOVA. Differences between groups were compared using the t-test for multi-group comparisons. In addition, qualitative analysis of misalignment was performed between VE and FRC in 52 clinical patients and the {chi}{sup 2} test was performed. Results: The misalignment widths of FRC, ME, MI and VE B-Hs were 2.7 {+-} 3.8, 6.4 {+-} 7.4, 9.1 {+-} 8.4 and 6.0 {+-} 6.7 mm, respectively. Misalignment of the liver position using FRC was significantly smaller than for the other B-H methods (p < 0.05). Significant differences between the VE B-H and FRC B-H were also observed in the qualitative analysis (p < 0.05). Conclusion: The liver positions obtained when using FRC B-H were significantly more reproducible than when using the other B-H methods. The FRC B-H method resulted in a reduction in the blind area and an extension of the diagnostic area to the whole liver.

  14. Evaluation of target and cardiac position during visually monitored deep inspiration breath-hold for breast radiotherapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Conroy, Leigh; Yeung, Rosanna; Watt, Elizabeth; Quirk, Sarah; Long, Karen; Hudson, Alana; Phan, Tien; Smith, Wendy L

    2016-01-01

    A low-resource visually monitored deep inspiration breath-hold (VM-DIBH) technique was successfully implemented in our clinic to reduce cardiac dose in left-sided breast radiotherapy. In this study, we retrospectively characterized the chest wall and heart positioning accuracy of VM-DIBH using cine portal images from 42 patients. Central chest wall position from field edge and in-field maximum heart distance (MHD) were manually measured on cine images and compared to the planned positions based on the digitally reconstructed radiographs (DRRs). An in-house program was designed to measure left anterior descending artery (LAD) and chest wall separation on the planning DIBH CT scan with respect to breath-hold level (BHL) during simulation to determine a minimum BHL for VM-DIBH eligibility. Systematic and random setup uncertainties of 3.0 mm and 2.6 mm, respectively, were found for VM-DIBH treatment from the chest wall measurements. Intrabeam breath-hold stability was found to be good, with over 96% of delivered fields within 3 mm. Average treatment MHD was significantly larger for those patients where some of the heart was planned in the field compared to patients whose heart was completely shielded in the plan (p < 0.001). No evidence for a minimum BHL was found, suggesting that all patients who can tolerate DIBH may yield a benefit from it. PMID:27455494

  15. SU-E-J-55: End-To-End Effectiveness Analysis of 3D Surface Image Guided Voluntary Breath-Holding Radiotherapy for Left Breast

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Purpose To evaluate the effectiveness of using 3D-surface-image to guide breath-holding (BH) left-side breast treatment. Methods Two 3D surface image guided BH procedures were implemented and evaluated: normal-BH, taking BH at a comfortable level, and deep-inspiration-breath-holding (DIBH). A total of 20 patients (10 Normal-BH and 10 DIBH) were recruited. Patients received a BH evaluation using a commercialized 3D-surface- tracking-system (VisionRT, London, UK) to quantify the reproducibility of BH positions prior to CT scan. Tangential 3D/IMRT plans were conducted. Patients were initially setup under free-breathing (FB) condition using the FB surface obtained from the untaged CT to ensure a correct patient position. Patients were then guided to reach the planned BH position using the BH surface obtained from the BH CT. Action-levels were set at each phase of treatment process based on the information provided by the 3D-surface-tracking-system for proper interventions (eliminate/re-setup/ re-coaching). We reviewed the frequency of interventions to evaluate its effectiveness. The FB-CBCT and port-film were utilized to evaluate the accuracy of 3D-surface-guided setups. Results 25% of BH candidates with BH positioning uncertainty > 2mm are eliminated prior to CT scan. For >90% of fractions, based on the setup deltas from3D-surface-trackingsystem, adjustments of patient setup are needed after the initial-setup using laser. 3D-surface-guided-setup accuracy is comparable as CBCT. For the BH guidance, frequency of interventions (a re-coaching/re-setup) is 40%(Normal-BH)/91%(DIBH) of treatments for the first 5-fractions and then drops to 16%(Normal-BH)/46%(DIBH). The necessity of re-setup is highly patient-specific for Normal-BH but highly random among patients for DIBH. Overall, a −0.8±2.4 mm accuracy of the anterior pericardial shadow position was achieved. Conclusion 3D-surface-image technology provides effective intervention to the treatment process and ensures

  16. SU-E-J-55: End-To-End Effectiveness Analysis of 3D Surface Image Guided Voluntary Breath-Holding Radiotherapy for Left Breast

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lin, M; Feigenberg, S [University of Maryland School of Medicine, Baltimore, MD (United States)

    2015-06-15

    Purpose To evaluate the effectiveness of using 3D-surface-image to guide breath-holding (BH) left-side breast treatment. Methods Two 3D surface image guided BH procedures were implemented and evaluated: normal-BH, taking BH at a comfortable level, and deep-inspiration-breath-holding (DIBH). A total of 20 patients (10 Normal-BH and 10 DIBH) were recruited. Patients received a BH evaluation using a commercialized 3D-surface- tracking-system (VisionRT, London, UK) to quantify the reproducibility of BH positions prior to CT scan. Tangential 3D/IMRT plans were conducted. Patients were initially setup under free-breathing (FB) condition using the FB surface obtained from the untaged CT to ensure a correct patient position. Patients were then guided to reach the planned BH position using the BH surface obtained from the BH CT. Action-levels were set at each phase of treatment process based on the information provided by the 3D-surface-tracking-system for proper interventions (eliminate/re-setup/ re-coaching). We reviewed the frequency of interventions to evaluate its effectiveness. The FB-CBCT and port-film were utilized to evaluate the accuracy of 3D-surface-guided setups. Results 25% of BH candidates with BH positioning uncertainty > 2mm are eliminated prior to CT scan. For >90% of fractions, based on the setup deltas from3D-surface-trackingsystem, adjustments of patient setup are needed after the initial-setup using laser. 3D-surface-guided-setup accuracy is comparable as CBCT. For the BH guidance, frequency of interventions (a re-coaching/re-setup) is 40%(Normal-BH)/91%(DIBH) of treatments for the first 5-fractions and then drops to 16%(Normal-BH)/46%(DIBH). The necessity of re-setup is highly patient-specific for Normal-BH but highly random among patients for DIBH. Overall, a −0.8±2.4 mm accuracy of the anterior pericardial shadow position was achieved. Conclusion 3D-surface-image technology provides effective intervention to the treatment process and ensures

  17. T2-weighted MR imaging of liver lesions: a prospective evaluation comparing turbo spin-echo, breath-hold turbo spin-echo and half-Fourier turbo spin-echo (HASTE) sequences

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    To compare turbo spin-echo (TSE), breath-hold TSE and half-Fourier acquisition single-shot turbo spin-echo (HASTE) sequences quantitatively and qualitatively in T2-weighted images of liver lesions. The authors evaluated prospectively 89 liver lesions in 73 patients using a 1.0-T magnetic resonance system to compare TSE, breath-hold TSE and HASTE sequences. The quantitative parameters were: lesion-to-liver contrast and lesion-to-liver contrast-to-noise ratio. The qualitative analysis was performed by two observers in consensus who examined four parameters: respiratory artifacts, lesion edge definition, intrahepatic vessel definition and image quality. Repeated measures analysis of variance was utilized to compare the quantitative variables and Friedman's nonparametric test for the qualitative parameters. In quantitative terms, the lesion-to-liver contrast was similar in TSE and breath-hold TSE sequences (2.45±1.44 versus 2.60±1.66), both of which were significantly better than the HASTE sequence (1.12±0.72; p<0.001). The lesion-to-liver contrast-to-noise ratio was significantly higher in the TSE sequence (62.60±46.40 versus 40.22±25.35 versus 50.90±32.10 for TSE, breath-hold TSE and HASTE sequences, respectively; p<0.001). In the qualitative comparisons, the HASTE sequence was significantly better than the TSE and breath-hold TSE sequences (p<0.001) in terms of artifacts and definition of lesion edge and intrahepatic vessels. Image quality was also significantly greater in the HASTE sequence (p<0.001). In quantitative terms, the TSE sequence is better than the breath-hold TSE and HASTE sequences, but there are no movement artifacts in the HASTE sequence, which is also significantly superior to TSE and breath-hold TSE sequences in qualitative terms and, thus, can be employed for T2-weighted images in liver studies. (Author) 17 refs

  18. Three-dimensional dynamic MR imaging with a volumetric interpolated breath-hold examination for solitary pulmonary lesions. Correlation of contrast enhancement pattern with pathological features

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate the clinical feasibility of dynamic MR imaging of solitary pulmonary lesions (SPLs) using a fat-suppressed three-dimensional gradient-echo technique with a volumetric interpolated breath-hold examination (VIBE). Correlation between the enhancement pattern and the histological characteristics of the nodules was also assessed. Dynamic 3D-VIBE was performed in 16 patients with pathologically proven SPLs. Each lesion was analyzed for its internal enhancement pattern, dynamic enhancement pattern, and peripheral enhancement (PE). A heterogeneous pattern of internal enhancement was well correlated with histological observation of necrosis, cystic changes, and variously sized air spaces. The washout pattern was seen in the medullary parts of the nodules with little fibrous stroma. The progressive pattern was seen at foci of collapse in the alveolar structure, central scars, and prominent fibrosis. PE was also seen in 6 malignant lesions (43%), and was well correlated with the medullary growth of adenocarcinoma and marginal fibrosis with lymphocytic infiltration of squamous cell carcinoma. The presence of PE was statistically significantly related with tumor size (p<0.05). Dynamic 3D-VIBE allows assessment of the histological characteristics of SPLs. It is also thought that this technique may be a promising method for differentiation between benign and malignant lesions. (author)

  19. Using surface imaging and visual coaching to improve the reproducibility and stability of deep-inspiration breath hold for left-breast-cancer radiotherapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Late cardiac complications may arise after left-breast radiation therapy. Deep-inspiration breath hold (DIBH) allows reduction of the irradiated heart volume at the same time as it reduces tumor bed motion and increases lung sparing. In the present study, we have evaluated the improvement in reproducibility and stability of the DIBH for left-breast-cancer treatment when visual coaching is provided with the aid of 3D video surface imaging and video goggles. Five left-breast-cancer patients and fifteen healthy volunteers were asked to perform a series of DIBHs without and with visual coaching. Reproducibility and stability of DIBH were measured for each individual with and without visual coaching. The average reproducibility and stability changed from 2.1 mm and 1.5 mm, respectively, without visual feedback to 0.5 mm and 0.7 mm with visual feedback, showing a significant statistical difference (p 2 mm) in reproducibility and stability were observed in 35% and 15% of the subjects, respectively. The average chest wall excursion of the DIBH with respect to the free breathing preceding the DIBH was found to be 11.3 mm. The reproducibility and stability of the DIBH improve significantly from the visual coaching provided to the patient, especially in those patients with poor reproducibility and stability.

  20. Using surface imaging and visual coaching to improve the reproducibility and stability of deep-inspiration breath hold for left-breast-cancer radiotherapy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cerviño, Laura I.; Gupta, Sonia; Rose, Mary A.; Yashar, Catheryn; Jiang, Steve B.

    2009-11-01

    Late cardiac complications may arise after left-breast radiation therapy. Deep-inspiration breath hold (DIBH) allows reduction of the irradiated heart volume at the same time as it reduces tumor bed motion and increases lung sparing. In the present study, we have evaluated the improvement in reproducibility and stability of the DIBH for left-breast-cancer treatment when visual coaching is provided with the aid of 3D video surface imaging and video goggles. Five left-breast-cancer patients and fifteen healthy volunteers were asked to perform a series of DIBHs without and with visual coaching. Reproducibility and stability of DIBH were measured for each individual with and without visual coaching. The average reproducibility and stability changed from 2.1 mm and 1.5 mm, respectively, without visual feedback to 0.5 mm and 0.7 mm with visual feedback, showing a significant statistical difference (p 2 mm) in reproducibility and stability were observed in 35% and 15% of the subjects, respectively. The average chest wall excursion of the DIBH with respect to the free breathing preceding the DIBH was found to be 11.3 mm. The reproducibility and stability of the DIBH improve significantly from the visual coaching provided to the patient, especially in those patients with poor reproducibility and stability.

  1. Contrast-enhanced three-dimensional MR imaging using a volumetric interpolated breath-hold examination (VIBE): clinical utility in the evaluation of renal tumors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    To compare, in terms of technical feasibility, image quality and clinical efficacy, contrast-enhanced three-dimensional (3D) MR imaging using volumetric interpolated breath-hold examination (VIBE) with two-dimensional gradient-echo MR imaging for the evaluation of renal messes. Twenty-three patients with 25 renal masses underwent dynamic MR imaging using a 1.5-T MR system and the 3D VIBE, 2D fast low angle shot (FLASH), and combined fat saturation techniques after the injection of 20 ml of Gd-DTPA. We compared postcontrast 2D FLASH and 3D VIBE images with precontrast 2D FLASH images. For quantitative analysis, the signal-to-noise and lesion to kidney contrast-to-noise ratio of the images were calculated using the three different techniques. For qualitative analysis, two experienced radiologists analyzed the images in terms of artifacts, lesion conspicuity and delineation, and general image quality. Delineation of the anatomy of renal vasculature and pelvocalyceal systems on reconstructed 3D VIBE MIP images was also assessed. Quantitative analysis showed that the SNR of a renal mass was slightly higher at postcontrast 2D FLASG than at 3D VIBE imaging, and the SNR of renal cortex was higher at 3D VIBE than at postcontrast 2D FLASF imaging. The differences were, though, statistically insignificant (p>0.05). The CNR of al renal mass was, however, significantly higher at 3D VIBE than at 2D FLASH imaging (p<0.05). Qualitative analysis showed that general image quality was best at postcontrast 3D VIBE, followed by 2D FLASH and precontrast 2D FLASH imaging, and image artifacts were worst at post-contrast 2D FLASH image (p<0.05). In terms of lesion conspicuity and delineation, 3D VIBE gave the best results and postcontrast images were better than precontrast (p<0.05). Reconstructed angiographic and urographic images using the VIBE technique provided information about the anatomy of the renal vasculature and pelvocalyceal system. 3D VIBE MR imaging offers comparable or

  2. Contrast-enhanced three-dimensional MR imaging using a volumetric interpolated breath-hold examination (VIBE): clinical utility in the evaluation of renal tumors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    To compare, in terms of technical feasibility, image quality and clinical efficacy, contrast-enhanced three-dimensional (3D) MR imaging using volumetric interpolated breath-hold examination (VIBE) with two-dimensional gradient-echo MR imaging for the evaluation of renal masses. Twenty-three patients with 25 renal masses underwent dynamic MR imaging using a 1.5-T MR system and the 3D VIBE, 2D fast low angle shot (FLASH), and combined fat saturation techniques after the injection of 20 ml of Gd-DTPA. We compared postcontrast 2D FLASH and 3D VIBE images with precontrast 2D FLASH images. For quantitative analysis, the signal-to-noise and lesion to kidney contrast-to-noise ratio of the images were calculated using the three different techniques. For qualitative analysis, two experienced radiologists analyzed the images in terms of artifacts, lesion conspicuity and delineation, and general image quality. Delineation of the anatomy of renal vasculature and pelvocalyceal system on reconstructed 3D VIBE MIP images was also assessed. Quantitative analysis showed that the SNR of a renal mass was slightly higher at postcontrast 2D FLASH than at 3D VIBE imaging, and the SNR of renal cortex was higher at 3D VIBE than at postcontrast 2D FLASH imaging. The differences were, though, statistically insignificant (p>0.05). The CNR of a renal mass was, however, significantly higher at 3D VIBE than at 2D FLASH imaging (p<0.05). Qualitative analysis showed that general image quality was best at postcontrast 3D VIBE, followed by 2D FLASH and precontrast 2D FLASH imaging, and image artifacts were worst at post-contrast 2D FLASH image (p<0.05). In terms of lesion conspicuity and delineation, 3D VIBE gave the best results and postcontrast images were better than precontrast (p<0.05). Reconstructed angiographic and urographic images using the VIBE technique provided information about the anatomy of the renal vasculature and pelvocalyceal system. 3D VIBE MR imaging offers comparable or

  3. Assessment of anatomic relation between pulmonary perfusion and morphology in pulmonary emphysema with breath-hold SPECT-CT fusion images

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anatomic relation between pulmonary perfusion and morphology in pulmonary emphysema was assessed on deep-inspiratory breath-hold (DIBrH) perfusion single-photon emission computed tomography (SPECT)-CT fusion images. Subjects were 38 patients with pulmonary emphysema and 11 non-smoker controls, who successfully underwent DIBrH and non-BrH perfusion SPECT using a dual-headed SPECT system during the period between January 2004 and June 2006. DIBrH SPECT was three-dimensionally co-registered with DIBrH CT to comprehend the relationship between lung perfusion defects and CT low attenuation areas (LAA). By comparing the appearance of lung perfusion on DIBrH with non-BrH SPECT, the correlation with the rate constant for the alveolar-capillary transfer of carbon monoxide (DLCO/VA) was compared between perfusion abnormalities on these SPECTs and LAA on CT. DIBrH SPECT provided fairly uniform perfusion in controls, but significantly enhanced perfusion heterogeneity when compared with non-BrH SPECT in pulmonary emphysema patients (P<0.001). The reliable DIBrH SPECT-CT fusion images confirmed more extended perfusion defects than LAA on CT in majority (73%) of patients. Perfusion abnormalities on DIBrH SPECT were more closely correlated with DLCO/VA than LAA on CT (P<0.05). DIBrH SPECT identifies affected lungs with perfusion abnormality better than does non-BrH SPECT in pulmonary emphysema. DIBrH SPECT-CT fusion images are useful for more accurately localizing affected lungs than morphologic CT alone in this disease. (author)

  4. Accuracy of accelerated cine MR imaging at 3 Tesla in longitudinal follow-up of cardiac function

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sandner, Torleif A.; Huber, Armin M.; Theisen, Daniel; Reiser, Maximilian F.; Wintersperger, Bernd J. [Ludwig-Maximilians-University, Department of Clinical Radiology, University Hospitals - Campus Grosshadern, Munich (Germany); Houck, Philip [Texas A and M University Health Science Center, Department of Cardiology, Scott and White Clinic and Hospital, Temple, TX (United States); Runge, Val M.; Sincleair, Spencer [Texas A and M University Health Science Center, Department of Radiology, Scott and White Clinic and Hospital, Temple, TX (United States)

    2008-10-15

    The ability of fast, parallel-imaging-based cine magnetic resonance (MR) to monitor global cardiac function in longitudinal exams at 3 Tesla was evaluated. Seventeen patients with chronic cardiac disease underwent serial cine MR imaging exams (n=3) at 3 Tesla. Data were acquired in short-axis orientation using cine steady-state free precession (SSFP) with a spatial resolution of 2.5 x 1.9 mm{sup 2} at 45 ms temporal resolution. Multislice imaging (three slices/breath-hold) was performed using TSENSE acceleration (R=3) and standard single-slice cine (non-TSENSE) was performed at identical locations in consecutive breath-holds. End-diastolic volume (EDV), end-systolic volume (ESV), ejection fraction (EF) and myocardial mass (MM) of both cine approaches were compared for individual time-points as well as for longitudinal comparison. TSENSE-cine did not show significant differences for EDV (2.6 ml; P=.79), ESV (2.2 ml; P=0.81), EF (-0.3%; P=0.95) and MM (2.4 g; P=0.72) in comparison with non-TSENSE. Longitudinal ANOVA analysis did not reveal significant differences for any parameter, neither for non-TSENSE data (all P>0.7) nor for TSENSE data (all P>0.9). Multifactorial ANOVA showed non-significant differences (all P>0.7) at comparable data variances. Data acquisition was significantly shortened using TSENSE. Threefold accelerated multislice cine at 3 Tesla allows accurate assessment of volumetric LV data and accurate longitudinal monitoring of global LV function at a substantially shorter overall examination time. (orig.)

  5. Preliminary Investigation of Respiratory Self-Gating for Free-Breathing Segmented Cine MRI

    OpenAIRE

    Larson, Andrew C.; Kellman, Peter; Arai, Andrew; Hirsch, Glenn A.; Mcveigh, Elliot,; Li, Debiao; Simonetti, Orlando P.

    2005-01-01

    Segmented cine MRI generally requires breath-holding, which can be problematic for many patients. Navigator echo techniques, particularly successful for free-breathing coronary MRA, are incompatible with the acquisition strategies and SSFP pulse sequences commonly used for cine MRI. The purpose of this work is to introduce a new self-gating technique deriving respiratory gating information directly from the raw imaging data acquired for segmented cine MRI. The respiratory self-gating techniqu...

  6. Advantage of using deep inspiration breath hold with active breathing control and image-guided radiation therapy for patients treated with lung cancers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    KR Muralidhar

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Purpose: The aim of this study was to evaluate the irradiated volume and doses to the target, heart, left lung, right lung and spinal cord, the number of segments and treatment time by using moderated deep inspiration breath hold (mDIBH with active breathing control (ABC and image-guided radiotherapy (IGRT for patients treated with lung cancers.Methods: The suitability of this technique for lung patient treated with ABC was investigated and the solutions to achieve better treatments were discussed. Eleven lung cancer patients (3 left-sided and 8 right sided lesions with stages I-III underwent standard free breath (FB and ABC computed tomography (CT scans in the treatment supine position. This can be achieved by applying respiratory manoeuvres, such as mDIBH, during which the threshold volume utilized is defined as 75-80% of the maximum aspiratory capacity. Five to seven, 6-MV photon beams with optimized gantry angles were designed according to the tumor location to conform to the PTV while sparing as much heart, spinal cord, and contra lateral lung as possible. For eleven patients, treatment planning using mDIBH CT data with intensity modulated radiation therapy (IMRT was then reoptimized on the free breathing data set for comparison. The studied parameters of the plans for each patient were evaluated based on the average of the minimum, mean, and maximum difference in dose, the range of difference, and the p-value using two-tailed paired t test assuming equal variance.Results: The average volume of the planning target volume (PTV in 11 patients increased to 1.32% in ABC compared to FB. The average volume of heart in 11 patients decreased to 2.9% in ABC compared to free breathing IMRT. In the case of lungs, the volume increased to 27.5% and 25.85% for left and right lungs, respectively. The range of mean difference in dose to the PTV in 11 patients was -54 cGy to 230 cGy with ABC technique when compared with free breathing. The range of mean

  7. Evaluation of LV global function of CHD patients with breath-hold cine-MRI%屏气磁共振电影成像对冠心病患者左心室整体功能的评价

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    盛复庚; 高元桂; 安宁豫; 程流泉; 蔡幼铨; 孙玮; 李功杰

    2008-01-01

    目的 探讨屏气磁共振电影成像(Cine-MRI)对冠心病患者左心室整体功能的评价.方法 对34例获得冠状动脉导管造影(CCA)结果 的冠心病患者行Cine-MRI获得短轴位和垂直长轴位电影图像,测量左心室整体功能参数.以CCA判断的冠状动脉狭窄程度为金标准,对各项整体功能参数行统计学评价.结果 冠心病患者表现为心肌质量和心室容积增加,前者具有相对较高的灵敏度、特异度、准确度,舒张期的改变较收缩期敏感;EF和SV下降,具有较高的特异度.结论 屏气Cine-MRI能够较好地评价左心室整体功能,客观反映冠心病患者左心室整体功能的收缩、舒张状态.

  8. Qualitative assessment of contrast-enhanced magnetic resonance angiography using breath-hold and non-breath-hold techniques in the portal venous system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goo, Eun-Hoe; Kim, Sun-Ju; Dong, Kyung-Rae; Kim, Kwang-Choul; Chung, Woon-Kwan

    2016-09-01

    The purpose of this study is to evaluate the image quality in delineation of the portal venous systems with two different methods, breath-hold and non-breath-hold by using the 3D FLASH sequence. We used a 1.5 T system to obtain magnetic resonance(MR)images. Arterial and portal phase 3D FLASH images were obtained with breath-hold after a bolus injection of GD-DOTA. The detection of PVS on the MR angiograms was classified into three grades. First, the angiograms of the breath-hold method showed well the portal vein, the splenic vein and the superior mesenteric vein systems in 13 of 15 patients (86%) and the inferior mesenteric vein system in 6 of 15 patients (40%), Second, MR angiograms of the non-breath-hold method demonstrated the PVS and the SMV in 12 of 15 patients (80%) and the IMV in 5 of 15 patients (33%). Our study showed contrast-enhanced 3D FLASH MR angiography, together with the breath-hold technique, may provide reliable and accurate information on the portal venous system.

  9. Automatically gated image-guided breath-hold IMRT is a fast, precise, and dosimetrically robust treatment for lung cancer patients

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    High-dose radiotherapy of lung cancer is challenging. Tumors may move by up to 2 cm in craniocaudal and anteroposterior directions as a function of breathing cycle. Tumor displacement increases with treatment time, which consequentially increases the treatment uncertainty. This study analyzed whether automatically gated cone-beam-CT (CBCT)-controlled intensity modulated fast deep inspiration breath hold (DIBH) stereotactic body radiation therapy (SBRT) in flattening filter free (FFF) technique and normofractionated lung DIBH intensity-modulated radiotherapy (IMRT)/volumetric-modulated arc therapy (VMAT) treatments delivered with a flattening filter can be applied with sufficient accuracy within a clinically acceptable timeslot. Plans of 34 patients with lung tumors were analyzed. Of these patients, 17 received computer-controlled fast DIBH SBRT with a dose of 60 Gy (5 fractions of 12 Gy or 12 fractions of 5 Gy) in an FFF VMAT technique (FFF-SBRT) every other day and 17 received conventional VMAT with a flattening filter (conv-VMAT) and 2-Gy daily fractional doses (cumulative dose 50-70 Gy). FFF-SBRT plans required more monitor units (MU) than conv-VMAT plans (2956.6 ± 885.3 MU for 12 Gy/fraction and 1148.7 ± 289.2 MU for 5 Gy/fraction vs. 608.4 ± 157.5 MU for 2 Gy/fraction). Total treatment and net beam-on times were shorter for FFF-SBRT plans than conv-VMAT plans (268.0 ± 74.4 s vs. 330.2 ± 93.6 s and 85.8 ± 25.3 s vs. 117.2 ± 29.6 s, respectively). Total slot time was 13.0 min for FFF-SBRT and 14.0 min for conv-VMAT. All modalities could be delivered accurately despite multiple beam-on/-off cycles and were robust against multiple interruptions. Automatically gated CBCT-controlled fast DIBH SBRT in VMAT FFF technique and normofractionated lung DIBH VMAT can be applied with a low number of breath-holds in a short timeslot, with excellent dosimetric accuracy. In clinical routine, these approaches combine optimally reduced lung tissue irradiation with maximal

  10. Portal venous blood flow while breath-holding after inspiration or expiration and during normal respiration in controls and cirrhotics

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sugano, Shigeo; Yamamoto, Kunihiro; Sasao, Ken-ichiro; Watanabe, Manabu [Saiseikai Wakakusa Hospital, Yakohama (Japan)

    1999-07-01

    In this study, we used magnetic resonance (MR) imaging to measure portal blood flow in 12 healthy controls and 17 cirrhotics while they were breath-holding after inspiration and after expiration. We then compared the results with measurements made during normal respiration in the healthy controls and cirrhotics. Blood flow in the main portal vein under basal fasting conditions was quantitated using the cine phase-contrast MR velocity mapping method. Three measurements were made on one occasion, as follows: throughout the cardiac cycle during normal respiration, with the subject breath-holding after maximal inspiration, and with the subject breath-holding after maximal expiration. During normal respiration, portal blood flow was 1.3{+-}0.2 l/min in controls vs 1.0{+-}0.1 l/min in cirrhotics (P<0.0001); while subjects were breath-holding after inspiration, portal blood flow was 1.0{+-}0.2 l/min in controls vs 0.9{+-}0.1 l/min in cirrhotics; and while subjects were breath-holding after expiration, portal blood flow was 1.5{+-}0.2 l/min in controls vs 1.1{+-}0.2 l/min in cirrhotics (P<0.0001). The differences were primarily due to changes in flow velocity. When the magnitude of these hemodynamic changes in the three respiratory conditions was compared in controls and cirrhotics, analysis of variance (ANOVA) showed a significant difference (P<0.0001). In controls, portal blood flow decreased during maximal inspiration relative to flow during normal respiration (-24.6{+-}8.3%). Changes in portal blood flow in controls were greater than in cirrhotics (-13.5{+-}4.5%) (P<0.0001); however, the difference in blood flow increase associated with maximal expiration between the two groups (+11.8{+-}9.4% vs +5.9{+-}11.5%) was not significant. We found that the respiration-induced hemodynamic variation in portal blood flow was less in cirrhotics than in the healthy controls. Portal blood flow measurements made during normal respiration using MR imaging closely reflect nearly

  11. Portal venous blood flow while breath-holding after inspiration or expiration and during normal respiration in controls and cirrhotics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In this study, we used magnetic resonance (MR) imaging to measure portal blood flow in 12 healthy controls and 17 cirrhotics while they were breath-holding after inspiration and after expiration. We then compared the results with measurements made during normal respiration in the healthy controls and cirrhotics. Blood flow in the main portal vein under basal fasting conditions was quantitated using the cine phase-contrast MR velocity mapping method. Three measurements were made on one occasion, as follows: throughout the cardiac cycle during normal respiration, with the subject breath-holding after maximal inspiration, and with the subject breath-holding after maximal expiration. During normal respiration, portal blood flow was 1.3±0.2 l/min in controls vs 1.0±0.1 l/min in cirrhotics (P<0.0001); while subjects were breath-holding after inspiration, portal blood flow was 1.0±0.2 l/min in controls vs 0.9±0.1 l/min in cirrhotics; and while subjects were breath-holding after expiration, portal blood flow was 1.5±0.2 l/min in controls vs 1.1±0.2 l/min in cirrhotics (P<0.0001). The differences were primarily due to changes in flow velocity. When the magnitude of these hemodynamic changes in the three respiratory conditions was compared in controls and cirrhotics, analysis of variance (ANOVA) showed a significant difference (P<0.0001). In controls, portal blood flow decreased during maximal inspiration relative to flow during normal respiration (-24.6±8.3%). Changes in portal blood flow in controls were greater than in cirrhotics (-13.5±4.5%) (P<0.0001); however, the difference in blood flow increase associated with maximal expiration between the two groups (+11.8±9.4% vs +5.9±11.5%) was not significant. We found that the respiration-induced hemodynamic variation in portal blood flow was less in cirrhotics than in the healthy controls. Portal blood flow measurements made during normal respiration using MR imaging closely reflect nearly physiologic conditions

  12. Kidney motion during free breathing and breath hold for MR-guided radiotherapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Current treatments for renal cell carcinoma have a high complication rate due to the invasiveness of the treatment. With the MRI-linac it may be possible to treat renal tumours non-invasively with high-precision radiotherapy. This is expected to reduce complications. To deliver a static dose distribution, radiation gating will be used. In this study the reproducibility and efficiency of free breathing gating and a breath hold treatment of the kidney was investigated. For 15 patients with a renal lesion the kidney motion during 2 min of free breathing and 10 consecutive expiration breath holds was studied with 2D cine MRI. The variability in kidney expiration position and treatment efficiency for gating windows of 1 to 20 mm was measured for both breathing patterns. Additionally the time trend in free breathing and the variation in expiration breath hold kidney position with baseline shift correction was determined. In 80% of the patients the variation in expiration position during free breathing is smaller than 2 mm. No clinically relevant time trends were detected. The variation in expiration breath hold is for all patients larger than the free breathing expiration variation. Gating on free breathing is, for gating windows of 1 to 5 mm more efficient than breath hold without baseline correction. When applying a baseline correction to the breath hold it increases the treatment efficiency. The kidney position is more reproducible in expiration free breathing than non-guided expiration breath hold. For small gating windows it is also more time efficient. Since free breathing also seems more comfortable for the patients it is the preferred breathing pattern for MRI-Linac treatments of the kidney. (paper)

  13. Kidney motion during free breathing and breath hold for MR-guided radiotherapy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stam, Mette K.; van Vulpen, Marco; Barendrecht, Maurits M.; Zonnenberg, Bernard A.; Intven, Martijn; Crijns, Sjoerd P. M.; Lagendijk, Jan J. W.; Raaymakers, Bas W.

    2013-04-01

    Current treatments for renal cell carcinoma have a high complication rate due to the invasiveness of the treatment. With the MRI-linac it may be possible to treat renal tumours non-invasively with high-precision radiotherapy. This is expected to reduce complications. To deliver a static dose distribution, radiation gating will be used. In this study the reproducibility and efficiency of free breathing gating and a breath hold treatment of the kidney was investigated. For 15 patients with a renal lesion the kidney motion during 2 min of free breathing and 10 consecutive expiration breath holds was studied with 2D cine MRI. The variability in kidney expiration position and treatment efficiency for gating windows of 1 to 20 mm was measured for both breathing patterns. Additionally the time trend in free breathing and the variation in expiration breath hold kidney position with baseline shift correction was determined. In 80% of the patients the variation in expiration position during free breathing is smaller than 2 mm. No clinically relevant time trends were detected. The variation in expiration breath hold is for all patients larger than the free breathing expiration variation. Gating on free breathing is, for gating windows of 1 to 5 mm more efficient than breath hold without baseline correction. When applying a baseline correction to the breath hold it increases the treatment efficiency. The kidney position is more reproducible in expiration free breathing than non-guided expiration breath hold. For small gating windows it is also more time efficient. Since free breathing also seems more comfortable for the patients it is the preferred breathing pattern for MRI-Linac treatments of the kidney.

  14. Evaluation of highly accelerated real-time cardiac cine MRI in tachycardia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bassett, Elwin C; Kholmovski, Eugene G; Wilson, Brent D; DiBella, Edward V R; Dosdall, Derek J; Ranjan, Ravi; McGann, Christopher J; Kim, Daniel

    2014-02-01

    Electrocardiogram (ECG)-gated breath-hold cine MRI is considered to be the gold standard test for the assessment of cardiac function. However, it may fail in patients with arrhythmia, impaired breath-hold capacity and poor ECG gating. Although ungated real-time cine MRI may mitigate these problems, commercially available real-time cine MRI pulse sequences using parallel imaging typically yield relatively poor spatiotemporal resolution because of their low image acquisition efficiency. As an extension of our previous work, the purpose of this study was to evaluate the diagnostic quality and accuracy of eight-fold-accelerated real-time cine MRI with compressed sensing (CS) for the quantification of cardiac function in tachycardia, where it is challenging for real-time cine MRI to provide sufficient spatiotemporal resolution. We evaluated the performances of eight-fold-accelerated cine MRI with CS, three-fold-accelerated real-time cine MRI with temporal generalized autocalibrating partially parallel acquisitions (TGRAPPA) and ECG-gated breath-hold cine MRI in 21 large animals with tachycardia (mean heart rate, 104 beats per minute) at 3T. For each cine MRI method, two expert readers evaluated the diagnostic quality in four categories (image quality, temporal fidelity of wall motion, artifacts and apparent noise) using a Likert scale (1-5, worst to best). One reader evaluated the left ventricular functional parameters. The diagnostic quality scores were significantly different between the three cine pulse sequences, except for the artifact level between CS and TGRAPPA real-time cine MRI. Both ECG-gated breath-hold cine MRI and eight-fold accelerated real-time cine MRI yielded all four scores of ≥ 3.0 (acceptable), whereas three-fold-accelerated real-time cine MRI yielded all scores below 3.0, except for artifact (3.0). The left ventricular ejection fraction (LVEF) measurements agreed better between ECG-gated cine MRI and eight-fold-accelerated real-time cine MRI

  15. Automatically gated image-guided breath-hold IMRT is a fast, precise, and dosimetrically robust treatment for lung cancer patients

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Simeonova-Chergou, Anna; Jahnke, Anika; Siebenlist, Kerstin; Stieler, Florian; Mai, Sabine; Boda-Heggemann, Judit; Wenz, Frederik; Lohr, Frank; Jahnke, Lennart [University Medical Center Mannheim, University of Heidelberg, Department of Radiotherapy and Oncology, Mannheim (Germany)

    2016-03-15

    High-dose radiotherapy of lung cancer is challenging. Tumors may move by up to 2 cm in craniocaudal and anteroposterior directions as a function of breathing cycle. Tumor displacement increases with treatment time, which consequentially increases the treatment uncertainty. This study analyzed whether automatically gated cone-beam-CT (CBCT)-controlled intensity modulated fast deep inspiration breath hold (DIBH) stereotactic body radiation therapy (SBRT) in flattening filter free (FFF) technique and normofractionated lung DIBH intensity-modulated radiotherapy (IMRT)/volumetric-modulated arc therapy (VMAT) treatments delivered with a flattening filter can be applied with sufficient accuracy within a clinically acceptable timeslot. Plans of 34 patients with lung tumors were analyzed. Of these patients, 17 received computer-controlled fast DIBH SBRT with a dose of 60 Gy (5 fractions of 12 Gy or 12 fractions of 5 Gy) in an FFF VMAT technique (FFF-SBRT) every other day and 17 received conventional VMAT with a flattening filter (conv-VMAT) and 2-Gy daily fractional doses (cumulative dose 50-70 Gy). FFF-SBRT plans required more monitor units (MU) than conv-VMAT plans (2956.6 ± 885.3 MU for 12 Gy/fraction and 1148.7 ± 289.2 MU for 5 Gy/fraction vs. 608.4 ± 157.5 MU for 2 Gy/fraction). Total treatment and net beam-on times were shorter for FFF-SBRT plans than conv-VMAT plans (268.0 ± 74.4 s vs. 330.2 ± 93.6 s and 85.8 ± 25.3 s vs. 117.2 ± 29.6 s, respectively). Total slot time was 13.0 min for FFF-SBRT and 14.0 min for conv-VMAT. All modalities could be delivered accurately despite multiple beam-on/-off cycles and were robust against multiple interruptions. Automatically gated CBCT-controlled fast DIBH SBRT in VMAT FFF technique and normofractionated lung DIBH VMAT can be applied with a low number of breath-holds in a short timeslot, with excellent dosimetric accuracy. In clinical routine, these approaches combine optimally reduced lung tissue irradiation with maximal

  16. Breath-hold gadolinium-enhanced MRA : clinical application

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kang, Sung Gwon; Kang, Ji Hee; Kim, Won Hong; Lim, Myung Kwan; Cho, Young Kook; Cho, Soon Gu; Suh, Chang Hae [Inha University Hospital, Inchon (Korea, Republic of)

    1998-05-01

    The purpose of this study is to compare breath-hold gadolinium enhanced MR angiography (MRA) with digital subtraction angiography. Ten patients underwent angiography and breath-hold gadolinium enhanced MRA; the latter performed at 1.5T with 3D FSPGR after a bolus injection of gadopentetate dimeglumine (0.4m mol/kg). Seven of ten pathologic conditions (70%) evaluated by both techniques had a similar appearance. The conditions examined were as follows: the artery feeding renal cell carcinoma(n=2); renal artery stenosis (n=2); pulmonary AVM(n=2); abdominal aortic aneurysm (n=1); atheromatous plaque in the lower abdominal aorta (n=1); an enlarged bronchial artery (n=1); and an aberrant renal artery (n=1). For evaluating an anatomic relationship, a reconstructed 3D image obtained by MRA is more advantageous. Breath hold contrast enhanced MRA is a potentially useful noninvasive screening method for detecting vascular abnormality of the aorta and its branches. (author). 13 refs., 1 tab., 4 figs.

  17. Novel Findings in Breath-Holding Spells

    OpenAIRE

    Azab, Seham F. A.; Siam, Ahmed G.; Saleh, Safaa H.; Elshafei, Mona M.; Elsaeed, Wafaa F.; Arafa, Mohamed A.; Bendary, Eman A.; Farag, Elsayed M.; Basset, Maha A.A.; Ismail, Sanaa M.; Elazouni, Osama M.A.

    2015-01-01

    Abstract The mechanism of breath-holding spells (BHS) is not fully understood and most probably multifactorial; so, this study was designed to clarify the pathophysiology of BHS through assessing some laboratory parameters and electrocardiographic (ECG) changes which might be contributing to the occurrence of the attacks. Another aim of the study was to evaluate the differences in the pathophysiology between pallid and cyanotic types of BHS. This was a prospective study performed in Zagazig U...

  18. Peak flow velocities in the ascending aorta-real-time phase-contrast magnetic resonance imaging vs. cine magnetic resonance imaging and echocardiography.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sohns, Jan M; Kowallick, Johannes T; Joseph, Arun A; Merboldt, K Dietmar; Voit, Dirk; Fasshauer, Martin; Staab, Wieland; Frahm, Jens; Lotz, Joachim; Unterberg-Buchwald, Christina

    2015-10-01

    This prospective study of eight healthy volunteers evaluates peak flow velocities (PFV) in the ascending aorta using real-time phase-contrast magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) in comparison to cine phase-contrast MRI and echocardiography. Flow measurements by echocardiography and cine phase-contrast MRI with breath-holding were performed according to clinical standards. Real-time phase-contrast MRI at 40 ms temporal resolution and 1.3 mm in-plane resolution was based on highly undersampled radial fast low-angle shot (FLASH) sequences with image reconstruction by regularized nonlinear inversion (NLINV). Evaluations focused on the determination of PFV. Linear regressions and Bland-Altman plots were used for comparisons of methods. When averaged across subjects, real-time phase-contrast MRI resulted in PFV of 120±20 cm s(-1) (mean ± SD) in comparison to 122±16 cm s(-1) for cine MRI and 124±20 cm s(-1) for echocardiography. The maximum deviations between real-time phase-contrast MRI and echocardiography ranged from -20 to +14 cm s(-1) (cine MRI: -10 to +12 cm s(-1)). Thus, in general, real-time phase-contrast MRI of cardiac outflow revealed quantitative agreement with cine MRI and echocardiography. The advantages of real-time MRI are measurements during free breathing and access to individual cardiac cycles.

  19. Left-ventricular reduction surgery: pre- and postoperative evaluation by cine magnetic resonance imaging; Linksventrikulaere Volumenreduktion: prae- und postoperative Evaluierung mit der Cine MRT

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kivelitz, D.E.; Enzweiler, C.N.H.; Wiese, T.H.; Lembcke, A.; Hamm, B. [Humboldt-Univ., Berlin (Germany). Inst. fuer Radiologie; Hotz, H.; Konertz, W. [Humboldt-Univ., Berlin (Germany). Klinik fuer Kardiovaskulaere Chirurgie; Borges, A.C.; Baumann, G. [Humboldt-Univ., Berlin (Germany). Klinik und Poliklinik fuer Innere Medizin

    2001-04-01

    Aim: To evaluate the role of cine magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) in the preoperative assessment and postoperative follow-up of patients undergoing left ventricular (LV) reduction surgery. Patients and Methods: 6 patients with cardiomegaly were examined on a 1.5 T MR imager before and after LV reduction surgery. The heart was imaged along the short and long axes using a breath-hold ECG-triggered cine gradient-echo sequence for assessing ventricular and valvular morphology and function and performing volumetry (end-diastolic and end-systolic volumes, ejection fraction). Results: Postoperatively, the mean ejection fraction increased from 21.7% to 33.4% and the enddiastolic and end-systolic left ventricular volumes decreased in all patients (304.0 and 252.5 ml before to 205.0 and 141.9 ml after surgery). Mean myocardial mass decreased slightly from 283.8 g to 242.7 g. Differences were significant for all parameters (p<0.05). MRI allowed for the reliable assessment of postoperative valve morphology and yielded additional findings such as the presence of mitral valve insufficiency or ventricular thrombus. Conclusions: Cine MRI provides relevant information prior to left ventricular reduction surgery and reliably depicts functional and morphological changes in the early postoperative follow-up. (orig.) [German] Ziel: Evaluierung der Wertigkeit der Cine MRT in der praeoperativen Diagnostik und im postoperativen Verlauf nach linksventrikulaerer Volumenreduktion. Patienten und Methoden: 6 Patienten mit Kardiomegalie wurden vor und nach ventrikelverkleinernder Operation an einem 1,5 T MRT untersucht. Zur Beurteilung der Ventrikel- und Klappenmorphologie und Funktion und zur Volumetrie (enddiastolisches und -systolisches Volumen, Ejektionsfraktion) wurde das Herz in der kurzen und den langen Achsen mit einer EKG-getriggerten, atemangehaltenen Cine-Gradienten-Echo-Sequenz untersucht. Ergebnisse: Die mittlere Ejektionsfraktion nahm von 21,7% auf 33,4% postoperativ zu. Das

  20. Cine MR imaging in mitral valve prolapse

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This study was undertaken to assess the ability of cine MR imaging to evaluate the direction, timing, and severity of mitral regurgitation in patients with mitral valve prolapse (MVP). The population of this study was 33 patients with MVP diagnosed by two-dimensional echocardiography and 10 patients with rheumatic mitral valve disease (MSR) for comparison. 7 patients with MVP and 5 with MSR had atrial fibrillation and/or history of congestive heart failure as complications. Mitral regurgitation was graded for severity by color Doppler flow imaging in all patients. Direction and size of systolic flow void in the left atrium were analyzed by contiguous multilevel cine MR images and the maximum volumes of flow void and left atrium were measured. Although flow void was found at the center of the left atrium in most of MSR, it was often directed along the postero-caudal atrial wall in anterior leaflet prolapse and along the anterocranial atrial wall in posterior leaflet prolapse. In MVP, the maximum volume of flow void was often seen in late systole. The maximum volume of flow void and that of left atrium were significantly larger in patients with atrial fibrillation and/or history of congestive heart failure. The length and volume of flow void were increased with clinical severity and degree of regurgitation determined by color Doppler flow imaging. Thus cine MR imaging provides a useful means for detection and semiquantitative evaluation of mitral regurgitation in subjects with MVP. (author)

  1. Double-oblique cine cardiac MR imaging

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A study has been performed analyzing the contrast between the blood pool and myocardium on double oblique long- and short-axis cine MR images using gradient echo fast imaging with steady precession and fast low-angle shot sequences. Inflow of unsaturated spins dominates the contrast behavior of short-axis images. With long-axis imaging, suboptimal contrast is seen in peak systole and early diastole due to partial saturation of spins in the imaging section and anatomic considerations at small ventricular volumes. The effects of echo time, flip angle, motion compensation, and spatial presaturation on the contrast between the blood pool and myocardium are discussed

  2. Comparison of multi-echo dixon methods with volume interpolated breath-hold gradient magnetic resonance imaging in fat-signal fraction quantification of paravaertebral muscle

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    To assess whether multi-echo Dixon magnetic resonance (MR) imaging with simultaneous T2* estimation and correction yields more accurate fat-signal fraction (FF) measurement of the lumbar paravertebral muscles, in comparison with non-T2*-corrected two-echo Dixon or T2*-corrected three-echo Dixon, using the FF measurements from single-voxel MR spectroscopy as the reference standard. Sixty patients with low back pain underwent MR imaging with a 1.5T scanner. FF mapping images automatically obtained using T2*-corrected Dixon technique with two (non-T2*-corrected), three, and six echoes, were compared with images from single-voxel MR spectroscopy at the paravertebral muscles on levels L4 through L5. FFs were measured directly by two radiologists, who independently drew the region of interest on the mapping images from the three sequences. A total of 117 spectroscopic measurements were performed either bilaterally (57 of 60 subjects) or unilaterally (3 of 60 subjects). The mean spectroscopic FF was 14.3 ± 11.7% (range, 1.9-63.7%). Interobserver agreement was excellent between the two radiologists. Lin's concordance correlation between the spectroscopic findings and all the imaging-based FFs were statistically significant (p < 0.001). FFs obtained from the T2*-corrected six-echo Dixon sequences showed a significantly better concordance with the spectroscopic data, with its concordance correlation coefficient being 0.99 and 0.98 (p < 0.001), as compared with two- or three-echo methods. T2*-corrected six-echo Dixon sequence would be a better option than two- or three-echo methods for noninvasive quantification of lumbar muscle fat quantification

  3. Comparison of multi-echo dixon methods with volume interpolated breath-hold gradient magnetic resonance imaging in fat-signal fraction quantification of paravaertebral muscle

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yoo, Yeon Hwa; Kim, Hak Sun; Lee, Young Han [Dept. of Radiology, Gangnam Severance Hospital, Yonsei University College of Medicine, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); and others

    2015-10-15

    To assess whether multi-echo Dixon magnetic resonance (MR) imaging with simultaneous T2{sup *} estimation and correction yields more accurate fat-signal fraction (FF) measurement of the lumbar paravertebral muscles, in comparison with non-T2{sup *}-corrected two-echo Dixon or T2{sup *}-corrected three-echo Dixon, using the FF measurements from single-voxel MR spectroscopy as the reference standard. Sixty patients with low back pain underwent MR imaging with a 1.5T scanner. FF mapping images automatically obtained using T2{sup *}-corrected Dixon technique with two (non-T2{sup *}-corrected), three, and six echoes, were compared with images from single-voxel MR spectroscopy at the paravertebral muscles on levels L4 through L5. FFs were measured directly by two radiologists, who independently drew the region of interest on the mapping images from the three sequences. A total of 117 spectroscopic measurements were performed either bilaterally (57 of 60 subjects) or unilaterally (3 of 60 subjects). The mean spectroscopic FF was 14.3 ± 11.7% (range, 1.9-63.7%). Interobserver agreement was excellent between the two radiologists. Lin's concordance correlation between the spectroscopic findings and all the imaging-based FFs were statistically significant (p < 0.001). FFs obtained from the T2*-corrected six-echo Dixon sequences showed a significantly better concordance with the spectroscopic data, with its concordance correlation coefficient being 0.99 and 0.98 (p < 0.001), as compared with two- or three-echo methods. T2{sup *}-corrected six-echo Dixon sequence would be a better option than two- or three-echo methods for noninvasive quantification of lumbar muscle fat quantification.

  4. CAIPIRINHA-Dixon-TWIST (CDT)-volume-interpolated breath-hold examination (VIBE) for dynamic liver imaging: Comparison of gadoterate meglumine, gadobutrol and gadoxetic acid

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Budjan, Johannes, E-mail: Johannes.Budjan@umm.de [Institute of Clinical Radiology and Nuclear Medicine, University Medical Center Mannheim, Medical Faculty Mannheim—Heidelberg University, Mannheim (Germany); Ong, Melissa; Riffel, Philipp [Institute of Clinical Radiology and Nuclear Medicine, University Medical Center Mannheim, Medical Faculty Mannheim—Heidelberg University, Mannheim (Germany); Morelli, John N. [Russell H. Morgan Department of Radiology and Radiological Science, Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine, Baltimore, MD (United States); Michaely, Henrik J.; Schoenberg, Stefan O.; Haneder, Stefan [Institute of Clinical Radiology and Nuclear Medicine, University Medical Center Mannheim, Medical Faculty Mannheim—Heidelberg University, Mannheim (Germany)

    2014-11-15

    Highlights: • We examined the influence of different clinically used contrast agents on the image quality of a new sequence called CDT-VIBE for dynamic MRI of the liver. • CDT-VIBE is a robust sequence for clinical routine as it provides good image quality regardless of the utilized contrast agent. • In average, more than 3 hepatic arterial dominant phases are acquired with the CDT-VIBE sequence regardless of the contrast agent. - Abstract: Purpose: CAIPIRINHA-Dixon-TWIST (CDT)-VIBE is a robust method for abdominal magnetic resonance imaging providing both high spatial and high temporal resolution. The purpose of this study was to examine the influence of different gadolinium based contrast agents (GBCA) on image quality (IQ) with CDT-VIBE. Materials and methods: In this IRB-approved, retrospective, inter-individual comparison study, 86 patients scanned at 3T were included. Within 28 s, 14 high-resolution 3D datasets were acquired using CDT-VIBE. 37 patients received 0.1 mmol/kg gadoterate meglumine, 28 patients 0.1 mmol/kg gadobutrol, and 19 patients 0.1 mL/kg gadoxetic acid. Two blinded, board-certified radiologists assessed the image quality on a 5 point scale, as well as the number of hepatic arterial dominant (HAD) phases. Results: Regardless of the GBCA utilized, CDT-VIBE resulted in good IQ in terms of best IQ achieved among all 14 datasets (gadobutrol 4.3, gadoterate meglumine 3.9, gadoxetic acid 3.7). With respect to worst IQ, the three groups showed statistically significant differences with gadobutrol receiving the highest rating (3.6) and gadoxetic acid the lowest (2.4) (gadoterate meglumine 3.0; 0.0014 < p < 0.0485). No statistically significant differences were found in the mean number of acquired HAD phases (gadobutrol 3.4, gadoterate meglumine 3.9, gadoxetic acid 3.1; 0.18 < p < 0.57). Conclusion: Different gadolinium-based contrast agents can be utilized for dynamic liver imaging with CDT-VIBE resulting in good image quality.

  5. Cine-MR imaging of the shoulder

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Purpose: Shoulder lesions are usually examined with the joint in only one or two positions. We examined the shoulder with the joint in a variety of positions. We also assessed the application of cine-MR to the detection of instability and impingement. Material and Methods: The cine-MR examinations were performed in 30 patients and 15 healthy volunteers. We used an open 0.2 T system and a closed 1.0 T system. Spoiled gradient echo 2D T1-weighted images and turbo spin-echo T1- and T2-weighted images were obtained with a field of view of 180 mm. The examinations were videotaped and evaluated later. Results: Normal variations of the glenohumeral joint were easy to recognize. Subluxations and luxations of the humeral head as well as rupture of the labrum were identified. It was also possible to identify the labrum with a signal change after arthroscopic refixation. And we were able to objectively assess distances between the osseous structures during dynamic movement. Conclusion: Unlike static MR, cine-MR would appear to be useful in visualizing the capsular ligament complex of the gleno-humeral joint in impingement and instability. It also provides information on dynamic changes and may thus prove to be an important tool for shoulder diagnostics. The method may provide an early diagnosis in the subacromial impingement syndrome. (orig.)

  6. Cine-MR imaging of the shoulder

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Allmann, K.H.; Uhl, M.; Gufler, H.; Kotter, E.; Langer, M. [Univ. Hospital, Freiburg (Germany). Dept. of Diagnostic Radiology; Biebow, N.; Hauer, M.P.; Reichelt, A. [Univ. Hospital, Freiburg (Germany). Dept. of Orthopedic Surgery

    1997-11-01

    Purpose: Shoulder lesions are usually examined with the joint in only one or two positions. We examined the shoulder with the joint in a variety of positions. We also assessed the application of cine-MR to the detection of instability and impingement. Material and Methods: The cine-MR examinations were performed in 30 patients and 15 healthy volunteers. We used an open 0.2 T system and a closed 1.0 T system. Spoiled gradient echo 2D T1-weighted images and turbo spin-echo T1- and T2-weighted images were obtained with a field of view of 180 mm. The examinations were videotaped and evaluated later. Results: Normal variations of the glenohumeral joint were easy to recognize. Subluxations and luxations of the humeral head as well as rupture of the labrum were identified. It was also possible to identify the labrum with a signal change after arthroscopic refixation. And we were able to objectively assess distances between the osseous structures during dynamic movement. Conclusion: Unlike static MR, cine-MR would appear to be useful in visualizing the capsular ligament complex of the gleno-humeral joint in impingement and instability. It also provides information on dynamic changes and may thus prove to be an important tool for shoulder diagnostics. The method may provide an early diagnosis in the subacromial impingement syndrome. (orig.).

  7. Morphologic and functional assessment of vascular abnormalities of the pulmonary vasculature by breath-hold MR techniques

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Purpose: To evaluate breath-hold MR techniques for morphologic and functional assessment of vascular abnormalities of the pulmonary vasculature. Patients and Methods: 13 patients aged 11 to 60 years with different vascular abnormalities of the pulmonary vasculature (5 patients with 16 arteriovenous malformations, 8 patients with partial anomalous pulmonary venous return) underwent MR imaging at 1.5 T. For morphological assessment, a contrast-enhanced 3D MR angiography (ce-MRA) was performed after a timing run. Segmented cine- and velocity-encoded GRE sequences were used for delineation of associated cardiac septal defects and for determination of systemic left-to-right or intrapulmonary shunt volumes. Selective intra arterial digital subtraction angiography, cardiac catheterization, and the intraoperative situs served as reference standards. Results: Ce-MRA allowed for detection of all vascular abnormalities and for anatomic characterization of 14/16 arteriovenous malformations. Flow measurements in the feeding arteries allowed for determination of intrapulmonary shunt volumes in 4/5 patients. Flow measurements performed in the pulmonary arteries and the ascending aorta enabled determination of systemic left-to-right shunting in patients with anomalous pulmonary venous return. Cine-sequences clearly depicted associated cardiac septal defects. Conclusion: Breathhold MR techniques allow for morphological and functional characterization of vascular anomalies of the pulmonary vasculature. Therefore, they are the non-invasive method of choice for planning further treatment. (orig.)

  8. Novel Findings in Breath-Holding Spells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Azab, Seham F.A.; Siam, Ahmed G.; Saleh, Safaa H.; Elshafei, Mona M.; Elsaeed, Wafaa F.; Arafa, Mohamed A.; Bendary, Eman A.; Farag, Elsayed M.; Basset, Maha A.A.; Ismail, Sanaa M.; Elazouni, Osama M.A.

    2015-01-01

    Abstract The mechanism of breath-holding spells (BHS) is not fully understood and most probably multifactorial; so, this study was designed to clarify the pathophysiology of BHS through assessing some laboratory parameters and electrocardiographic (ECG) changes which might be contributing to the occurrence of the attacks. Another aim of the study was to evaluate the differences in the pathophysiology between pallid and cyanotic types of BHS. This was a prospective study performed in Zagazig University Hospitals. Seventy-six children diagnosed with BHS were included as follows: 32 children with cyanotic BHS, 14 children with pallid BHS, and 30 healthy children as a control group. All children were subjected to the following: full history taking, clinical examination, and laboratory work up in the form of CBC, serum iron, ferritin, and zinc levels. Twenty-four hours ambulatory ECG (Holter) recording was also performed. No significant statistical difference was found between cyanotic and pallid groups regarding family history of BHS, severity, and precipitating factors of the attacks. Frequent runs of respiratory sinus arrhythmia (RSA) during 24 hours ECG were significantly higher in children with BHS; the frequency of RSA was significantly correlated with the frequency (severity) of the attacks. Low serum ferritin was significantly associated with BHS groups but not correlated with the severity of the attacks. Autonomic dysregulation evidenced by frequent RSA is considered to be an important cause of BHS in children and is correlated with the frequency of the attacks. Low serum ferritin is additional factor in the pathophysiology. Both pallid and cyanotic BHS are suggested to be types of the same disease sharing the same pathophysiology. PMID:26181556

  9. Acute effects of cannabis on breath-holding duration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Farris, Samantha G; Metrik, Jane

    2016-08-01

    Distress intolerance (an individual's perceived or actual inability to tolerate distressing psychological or physiological states) is associated with cannabis use. It is unknown whether a biobehavioral index of distress intolerance, breath-holding duration, is acutely influenced (increased or decreased) by cannabis. Such information may further inform understanding of the expression of psychological or physiological distress postcannabis use. This within-subjects study examined whether smoked marijuana with 2.7%-3.0% delta-9-tetrahydrocannabinol (THC), relative to placebo, acutely changed duration of breath holding. Participants (n = 88; 65.9% male) were nontreatment-seeking frequent cannabis users who smoked placebo or active THC cigarette on two separate study days and completed a breath-holding task postsmoking. Controlling for baseline breath-holding duration and participant sex, THC produced significantly shorter breath-holding durations relative to placebo. There was a significant interaction of drug administration × frequency of cannabis use, such that THC decreased breath-holding time among less frequent but not among more frequent users. Findings indicate that cannabis may exacerbate distress intolerance (via shorter breath-holding durations). As compared to less frequent cannabis users, frequent users display tolerance to cannabis' acute effects including increased ability to tolerate respiratory distress when holding breath. Objective measures of distress intolerance are sensitive to contextual factors such as acute drug intoxication, and may inform the link between cannabis use and the expression of psychological distress. (PsycINFO Database Record PMID:27454678

  10. Breath-hold times in patients undergoing radiological examinations. Comparison of expiration and inspiration with and without hyperventilation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Background. Breath-holding is necessary for imaging studies of the thorax and abdomen using computed tomography, magnetic resonance imaging or ultrasound examinations. The purpose of this study was to compare the breath-hold times in expiration and inspiration and to evaluate the effects of hyperventilation. Patients and methods. Thirty patients and 19 healthy volunteers participated in this study after informed consent was obtained in all. The breath-hold times were measured in expiration and inspiration before and after hyperventilation. Results. The mean breath-hold times in expiration (patients: 24±9 sec, volunteers: 27±7 sec) were significantly shorter than those in inspiration (patients: 41±20 sec, p<0.001; volunteers: 62±18 sec, p<0.001). Additional hyperventilation resulted in a significant increase (range: 40-60%, p≤0.005) of the mean breathhold times either in expiration and in inspiration and for both patients and volunteers. Conclusions. Although breath-holding in expiration is recommended for various imaging studies particularly of the thorax and of the abdomen, suspending respiration in inspiration enables the patient a considerable longer breath-hold time. (author)

  11. Radiotherapy of lung cancer: the inspiration breath hold with a spirometric monitoring

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A CT acquisition during a free breathing examination generates images of poor quality. It creates an uncertainty on the reconstructed gross tumour volume and dose distribution. The aim of this study is to test the feasibility of a breath hold method applied in all preparation and treatment days. Five patients received a thoracic radiotherapy with the benefit of this procedure. The breathing of the patient was measured with a spirometer. The patient was coached to reproduce a constant level of breath-hold in a deep inspiration. Video glasses helped the patients to fix the breath-hold at the reference level. The patients followed the coaching during preparation and treatment, without any difficulty. The better quality of the CT reconstructed images resulted in an easier contouring. No movements of the gross tumour volume lead to a better coverage. The deep breath hold decreased the volume of irradiated lung. This method improves the reproducibility of the thoracic irradiation. The decrease of irradiated lung volume offers prospects in dose escalation and intensity modulation radiotherapy. (authors)

  12. Detection of viable myocardium by low dose of dobutamine cine MR imaging in miniswine

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    陆敏杰; 赵世华; 韦云青; 王诚; 蒋世良; 黄连军; 张岩; 牟峰; 孟亮; 阮英峁

    2003-01-01

    Objective To evaluate the diagnostic value of dobutamine stress magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) for myocardial viability. Methods Ten male miniswines underwent left ventriculography and coronary angiography, followed by stenosis of the left circumflex coronary artery (LCX) using ameroid constrictor. More than one month later, left ventriculography and coronary angiography were performed again, followed by cine-MRI at rest and during stress with incremental dose of dobutamine 5-20 μg·kg-1·min-1. Traditional and/or breath-hold cine-MRI were used to evaluate regional left ventricular wall motion, corresponding to basal, midventricular and apical short-axis tomograms. Regional wall motion score index (WMSI) was calculated.The miniswines were finally sacrificed for pathological examination. Triphenyl tetrazolium chloride (TTC) delineated myocardial infarction. Microscopy was used to identify myocardial cellular changes. Results One pig died, one pig suffered from aneurysm and another showed no negative findings. The other seven pigs were found with hypokinetic (n=4) or akinetic (n=3) myocardial regions related to stenosed LCX. Their mean WMSI at rest for the lateral and posteroinferior walls (ischemic regions) of the left ventricle was 2.27±0.32, as compared with 1.00±0.00 (P0.05). The pathologic examination showed viable myocardium at the ischemic regions. ConclusionLow-dose dobutamine (5μg·kg-1·min-1) recovers hypokinetic or akinetic myocardial regions, and dobutamine stress MRI can be used to detect myocardial viability.

  13. TH-C-12A-11: Target Correlation of a 3D Surface Surrogate for Left Breast Irradiation Using the Respiratory-Gated Deep-Inspiration Breath-Hold Technique

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Purpose: To evaluate the use of 3D optical surface imaging as a new surrogate for respiratory motion gated deep-inspiration breath-hold (DIBH) technique for left breast cancer patients. Methods: Patients with left-sided breast cancer after lumpectomy or mastectomy were selected as candidates for DIBH technique for their external beam radiation therapy. Treatment plans were created on both free breathing (FB) and DIBH CTs to determine whether DIBH was beneficial in reducing heart doses. The Real-time Position Management (RPM) system was used to acquire patient's breathing trace during DIBH CT acquisition and treatment delivery. The reference 3D surface models from FB and DIBH CTs were generated and transferred to the “AlignRT” system for patient positioning and real-time treatment monitoring. MV Cine images were acquired for each beam as quality assurance for intra-fractional position verification. The chest wall excursions measured on these images were used to define the actual target position during treatment, and to investigate the accuracy and reproducibility of RPM and AlignRT. Results: Reduction in heart dose can be achieved for left-sided breast patients using DIBH. Results showed that RPM has poor correlation with target position, as determined by the MV Cine imaging. This indicates that RPM may not be an adequate surrogate in defining the breath-hold level when used alone. Alternatively, the AlignRT surface imaging demonstrated a better correlation with the actual CW excursion during DIBH. Both the vertical and magnitude real-time deltas (RTDs) reported by AlignRT can be used as the gating parameter, with a recommend threshold of ±3 mm and 5 mm, respectively. Conclusion: 3D optical surface imaging serves as a superior target surrogate for the left breast treatment when compared to RPM. Working together with the realtime MV Cine imaging, they ensure accurate patient setup and dose delivery, while minimizing the imaging dose to patients

  14. TH-C-12A-11: Target Correlation of a 3D Surface Surrogate for Left Breast Irradiation Using the Respiratory-Gated Deep-Inspiration Breath-Hold Technique

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rong, Y; Walston, S [A Quick, Ohio State University, Columbus, OH (United States)

    2014-06-15

    Purpose: To evaluate the use of 3D optical surface imaging as a new surrogate for respiratory motion gated deep-inspiration breath-hold (DIBH) technique for left breast cancer patients. Methods: Patients with left-sided breast cancer after lumpectomy or mastectomy were selected as candidates for DIBH technique for their external beam radiation therapy. Treatment plans were created on both free breathing (FB) and DIBH CTs to determine whether DIBH was beneficial in reducing heart doses. The Real-time Position Management (RPM) system was used to acquire patient's breathing trace during DIBH CT acquisition and treatment delivery. The reference 3D surface models from FB and DIBH CTs were generated and transferred to the “AlignRT” system for patient positioning and real-time treatment monitoring. MV Cine images were acquired for each beam as quality assurance for intra-fractional position verification. The chest wall excursions measured on these images were used to define the actual target position during treatment, and to investigate the accuracy and reproducibility of RPM and AlignRT. Results: Reduction in heart dose can be achieved for left-sided breast patients using DIBH. Results showed that RPM has poor correlation with target position, as determined by the MV Cine imaging. This indicates that RPM may not be an adequate surrogate in defining the breath-hold level when used alone. Alternatively, the AlignRT surface imaging demonstrated a better correlation with the actual CW excursion during DIBH. Both the vertical and magnitude real-time deltas (RTDs) reported by AlignRT can be used as the gating parameter, with a recommend threshold of ±3 mm and 5 mm, respectively. Conclusion: 3D optical surface imaging serves as a superior target surrogate for the left breast treatment when compared to RPM. Working together with the realtime MV Cine imaging, they ensure accurate patient setup and dose delivery, while minimizing the imaging dose to patients.

  15. T2-weighted MR imaging of liver lesions: a prospective evaluation comparing turbo spin-echo, breath-hold turbo spin-echo and half-Fourier turbo spin-echo (HASTE) sequences; Estudio de lesiones hepaticas con imagenes de resonancia magnetica potenciadas en T2: evaluacion prospectiva comparando secuencias turbo eco del espin, turbo eco del espin con respiracion sostenida y half-Fourier turbo eco del espin (HASTE)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Martin, J.; Villajos, M.; Oses, M. J.; Veintemillas, M.; Rue, M.; Puig, J.; Sentis, M. [Fundacion Parc Tauli. Sabadell (Spain)

    2000-07-01

    To compare turbo spin-echo (TSE), breath-hold TSE and half-Fourier acquisition single-shot turbo spin-echo (HASTE) sequences quantitatively and qualitatively in T2-weighted images of liver lesions. The authors evaluated prospectively 89 liver lesions in 73 patients using a 1.0-T magnetic resonance system to compare TSE, breath-hold TSE and HASTE sequences. The quantitative parameters were: lesion-to-liver contrast and lesion-to-liver contrast-to-noise ratio. The qualitative analysis was performed by two observers in consensus who examined four parameters: respiratory artifacts, lesion edge definition, intrahepatic vessel definition and image quality. Repeated measures analysis of variance was utilized to compare the quantitative variables and Friedman's nonparametric test for the qualitative parameters. In quantitative terms, the lesion-to-liver contrast was similar in TSE and breath-hold TSE sequences (2.45{+-}1.44 versus 2.60{+-}1.66), both of which were significantly better than the HASTE sequence (1.12{+-}0.72; p<0.001). The lesion-to-liver contrast-to-noise ratio was significantly higher in the TSE sequence (62.60{+-}46.40 versus 40.22{+-}25.35 versus 50.90{+-}32.10 for TSE, breath-hold TSE and HASTE sequences, respectively; p<0.001). In the qualitative comparisons, the HASTE sequence was significantly better than the TSE and breath-hold TSE sequences (p<0.001) in terms of artifacts and definition of lesion edge and intrahepatic vessels. Image quality was also significantly greater in the HASTE sequence (p<0.001). In quantitative terms, the TSE sequence is better than the breath-hold TSE and HASTE sequences, but there are no movement artifacts in the HASTE sequence, which is also significantly superior to TSE and breath-hold TSE sequences in qualitative terms and, thus, can be employed for T2-weighted images in liver studies. (Author) 17 refs.

  16. Assessment of reproducibility and stability of different breath-hold maneuvres by dynamic MRI: comparison between healthy adults and patients with pulmonary hypertension

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    To assess the stability and reproducibility of different breath-hold levels in healthy volunteers and patients using dynamic MRI (dMRI). In ten healthy volunteers and ten patients with pulmonary hypertension (PH) and normal lung function craniocaudal intrathoracic distances (CCD) were measured during inspiratory and expiratory breath-hold (15 s) (in healthy volunteers additionally at a self-chosen mid-inspiratory breath-hold) using dMRI (trueFISP, three images/s). To evaluate stability and intraobserver reproducibility of the different breath-hold levels, CCDs, time-distance curves, confidence intervals (CIs), Mann-Witney U test and regression equations were calculated. In healthy volunteers there was a substantial decrease of the CCD during the inspiratory breath-hold in contrast to the expiratory breath-hold. The CI at inspiration was 2.84±1.28 in the right and 2.1±0.68 in the left hemithorax. At expiration the CI was 2.54±1.18 and 2.8±1.48. Patients were significantly less able to hold their breath at inspiration than controls (P<0.05). In patients CI was 4.53±4.06 and 3.46±2.21 at inspiration and 4.45±4.23 and 4.76±3.73 at expiration. Intraobserver variability showed no significant differences either in patients or in healthy subjects. Reproducibility was significantly lower at a self-chosen breath-hold level of the healthy volunteers. DMRI is able to differentiate stability and reproducibility of different breath-hold levels. Expiratory breath-hold proved to be more stable than inspiratory breath-hold in healthy volunteers and patients. (orig.)

  17. Assessment of reproducibility and stability of different breath-hold maneuvres by dynamic MRI: comparison between healthy adults and patients with pulmonary hypertension

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Plathow, Christian [German Cancer Research Center Heidelberg, Department of Radiology, Heidelberg (Germany); Eberhard-Karls-University Tuebingen, Department of Diagnostic Radiology, Tuebingen (Germany); Ley, Sebastian; Zaporozhan, Julia; Puderbach, Michael; Eichinger, Monika; Zuna, Ivan; Kauczor, Hans-Ulrich [German Cancer Research Center Heidelberg, Department of Radiology, Heidelberg (Germany); Schoebinger, Max; Meinzer, Hans-Peter [German Cancer Research Center Heidelberg, Department of Medical and Biological Informatics, Heidelberg (Germany); Gruenig, Ekkehard [University of Heidelberg, Department of Internal Medicine III, Heidelberg (Germany)

    2006-01-01

    To assess the stability and reproducibility of different breath-hold levels in healthy volunteers and patients using dynamic MRI (dMRI). In ten healthy volunteers and ten patients with pulmonary hypertension (PH) and normal lung function craniocaudal intrathoracic distances (CCD) were measured during inspiratory and expiratory breath-hold (15 s) (in healthy volunteers additionally at a self-chosen mid-inspiratory breath-hold) using dMRI (trueFISP, three images/s). To evaluate stability and intraobserver reproducibility of the different breath-hold levels, CCDs, time-distance curves, confidence intervals (CIs), Mann-Witney U test and regression equations were calculated. In healthy volunteers there was a substantial decrease of the CCD during the inspiratory breath-hold in contrast to the expiratory breath-hold. The CI at inspiration was 2.84{+-}1.28 in the right and 2.1{+-}0.68 in the left hemithorax. At expiration the CI was 2.54{+-}1.18 and 2.8{+-}1.48. Patients were significantly less able to hold their breath at inspiration than controls (P<0.05). In patients CI was 4.53{+-}4.06 and 3.46{+-}2.21 at inspiration and 4.45{+-}4.23 and 4.76{+-}3.73 at expiration. Intraobserver variability showed no significant differences either in patients or in healthy subjects. Reproducibility was significantly lower at a self-chosen breath-hold level of the healthy volunteers. DMRI is able to differentiate stability and reproducibility of different breath-hold levels. Expiratory breath-hold proved to be more stable than inspiratory breath-hold in healthy volunteers and patients. (orig.)

  18. Reproducibility of diaphragm position assessed with a voluntary breath-holding device

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate the reproducibility of diaphragm position in our new breath-holding radiotherapy for abdominal tumors using image-guided radiation therapy (IGRT) and a voluntary breath-holding device, Abches. Patients treated with abdominal tumors using IGRT with Abches were enrolled. Twenty patients without dementia or severe lung disease were analyzed. Each fraction of all patients was set up with kV cone-beam CT with reference to the vertebral bodies. Before daily treatment, electronic portal imaging device (EPID) images of the diaphragm at breath-holding exhale phase were acquired. The difference in the diaphragm position relative to the vertebral body was analyzed by comparing EPID images and the digitally reconstructed radiograph of the planning CT. We evaluated the reproducibility of two axes: superior-inferior (S-I) and right-left (R-L) with the EPID measurements. The 443 irradiation data sets were analyzed. The interfractional reproducibility of the diaphragm relative to vertebral bodies was 1.7±1.4 mm in the S-I and 1.4±1.2 mm in the R-L direction. This technique has good interfractional reproducibility and visibility of the diaphragm during irradiation. Its use is feasible in the routine clinical setting and irradiation. (author)

  19. Cine magnetic resonance imaging in congenital heart disease

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cine magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) was performed in 33 patients aged 19 days to 18 years (mean 5.1 years), who had congenital heart disease comfirmed at echocardiography or angiography. Prior to cine MRI, gated MRI with spin echo (SE) sequence was perfomed to evaluate cardiac structure. Cine MRI was demonstrated by fast low fip angle shot imaging technique with a 30 deg flip angle, 15 msec echo time, 30∼40 msec pulse repetition time, and 128X128 acquisition matrix. Abnormalities of cardiac structure were extremely well defined in all patients. Intracardiac and intravasucular blood flow were visualized with high signal intensity area, whereas ventricular filling flow and left to right shunt flow through ventricular septal defect and atrial septal defect were visualized with low signal intensity area. However, in the patients who had severe congestive heart failure or respiratory arrhythmia, the good recording of cine MRI was not obtained because of artifacts. Gated MRI with SE sequence provides excellent visualization of fine structures, and cine MRI can provide high spatial resolution imaging of flow dynamic in a variety of congenital heart disease, noninvasively. (author)

  20. Organ perfusion during voluntary pulmonary hyperinflation; a magnetic resonance imaging study

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kyhl, Kasper; Drvis, Ivan; Barak, Otto;

    2016-01-01

    . Myocardial, pulmonary, skeletal muscle, kidney, and liver perfusion were evaluated by magnetic resonance imaging in 10 elite breath-hold divers at rest and during moderate GPI. Cardiac chamber volumes, stroke volume, and thus CO were determined from cardiac short-axis cine images. Organ volumes were assessed...

  1. Cine MR imaging-current use in cardiac diagnosis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This paper reviews the current status of cine MR imaging of the heart with special attention to the assessment of cardiac function. Cine MR provides tomographic sectional images with clear distinction between myocardium and flowing blood, and allows accurate volumetry of the cardiac chambers at specific points of the cardiac cycle. From these volume measurements parameters for the cardiac function, such as stroke volumem, ejection fraction, regurgitant fraction and shunt volum are calculated. While determination of chamber volumes can be done using any imaging plane, regional wall motion and wall thickening are evaluated with the short axis images. These images are readily obtained by orienting the slice selective gradient perpendicular to the long axis of the left ventricle. Left ventricular meridional wall stress is also calculated from cine MR images and noninvasive measurements of peak- and end-systolic pressure. Wall stress is an indicator of myocardial function in response to after load and can be used for monitoring patients with myocardial disease, regurgitant valvular disease and hypertension, and might be used to quantitatively assess the response of these diseases to therapy. Diseases causing hypertrophy of the ventricles, such as valvular stenosis, systemic or pulmonary hypertension and hypertrophic cardiomyopathy, can be monitored with cine MR by measuring the myocardial mass. A signal void from high velocity jets is caused by regurgitant or stenotic valvular lesion as well as flow across ventricular or atrial septal defects. Measurement of the dimension of the signal void have been correlated with the severity of regurgitation and can be used for semi-quantitation of these lesions. Due to the inherent contrast between blood and myocardium, high temporal resolution, and acquisition of tomographic images encompassing the entire heart, cine MR can serve as a comprehensive cardiac imaging modality that provides quantitative evaluation of anatomy and

  2. Clinical and Laboratory Findings of Patients with Breath Holding Spells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Özlem Özdemir

    2009-09-01

    Full Text Available Aim: The aim of this prospective study was to evaluate the clinical characteristics; physical findings, cardiological, hematological and neurological problems; treatment approaches; and the prognosis of children with breath holding spells.Materials and Method: Seventhy patients were included in this study. All patients were evaluated with detailed history and physical examination. Complete blood count, serum iron and iron binding capacity were studied; cardiological (telecardiography, electrocardiography, if necessary echocardiography and event recorder and neurological investigations (electroencephalography were done during the admission. Patients with iron deficiency anemia and iron deficiency were treated with ferrous sulphate orally. In patients with normal hematological values, no medication was used. After a two-month treatment period patients underwent control hematological evaluation. Frequency of the spells, age of disappearance of spells (defined as 6 months without spells, disappearance ratios between the three groups were compared. Results: The percentage of cyanotic, palloric and mixt type of breath holding spells of 70 patients included in the study were 67.1, 14.3 and 18.6, respectively. It was determined that psychogenic factors played a role in 77.1% of our patients. There were iron deficiency anemia in 39 (55.7%, iron deficiency in 12 (17.2% and normal hematological parameters in 19 (27.1% of 70 patients. The QTc values were normal in all of them. EEG’s were normal in 56 (80%, dysrhythmic in 11 (15.7% and pathologic in (4.3%. There was a positive family history of breath holding spells in 44.3% of those with breath holding spells. Conclusion: We determined that there was a correlation between the iron levels and the frequency of spells. The lower the iron levels the higher the frequency of spells. There was a dramatic decrease of 92% in spells with low doses of iron supplementation especially in the anemic group. (Journal of

  3. Reproducibility Evaluation of Deep inspiration breath-hold(DIBH) technique by respiration data and heart position analysis during radiation therapy for Left Breast cancer patients

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jo, Jae Young; Bae, Sun Myung; Yoon, In Ha; Lee, Ho Yeon; Kang, Tae Young; Baek, Geum Mun; Bae, Jae Beom [Dept. of Radiation Oncology, Asan Medical Center, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2014-12-15

    The purpose of this study is reproducibility evaluation of deep inspiration breath-hold(DIBH) technique by respiration data and heart position analysis in radiation therapy for Left Breast cancer patients. Free breathing(FB) Computed Tomography(CT) images and DIBH CT images of three left breast cancer patients were used to evaluate the heart volume and dose during treatment planing system( Eclipse version 10.0, Varian, USA ). The signal of RPM (Real-time Position Management) Respiratory Gating System (version 1.7.5, Varian, USA) was used to evaluate respiration stability of DIBH during breast radiation therapy. The images for measurement of heart position were acquired by the Electronic portal imaging device(EPID) cine acquisition mode. The distance of heart at the three measuring points(A, B, C) on each image was measured by Offline Review (ARIA 10, Varian, USA). Significant differences were found between the FB and DIBH plans for mean heart dose (6.82 vs. 1.91 Gy), heart V{sub 30} (68.57 vs. 8.26 cm{sup 3}), V{sub 20} (76.43 vs. 11.34 cm{sup 3}). The standard deviation of DIBH signal of each patient was ±0.07 cm, ±0.04cm, 0.13 cm{sup 3}, respectively. The Maximum and Minimum heart distance on EPID images were measured as 0.32 m and 0.00 cm. Consequently, using the DIBH technique with radiation therapy for left breast cancer patients is very useful to establish the treatment plan and to reduce the heart dose. In addition, it is beneficial to using the Cine acquisition mode of EPID for the reproducibility evaluation of DIBH.

  4. Portal Venous Blood Flow Quantitative Study with Breath-holding 2D PC and Cine PC MRI in Controls and Cirrhotics%电影相位对比与屏气二维相位对比MRI对肝硬化门静脉血流的对照研究

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    李彩英; 田建明; 刘怀军; 崔彩霞; 黄勃源; 孟令惠

    2007-01-01

    目的 探讨MRI电影法相位对比(Cine PC)与屏气二维相位对比(2D PC)在肝硬化患者和正常志愿者门静脉血流测量中的诊断价值. 资料与方法 对照组为82名志愿者,男45名,女37名,平均年龄26.65岁;肝硬化组24例,男14例,女10例,平均年龄42.00岁.空腹状态下采用Cine PC技术对门静脉血流定量测量,同期采用2D PC技术3种不同屏气状态(正常吸气屏气,呼气屏气,平静呼吸屏气)与其进行比较. 结果 肝硬化患者门静脉血流速度较对照组略减低,除2D PC平静呼吸法,余方法两组差异均无统计学意义,肝硬化组门静脉血流量与对照组比较明显增大(P<0.01),但2D PC吸气屏气技术两者差异无统计学意义.采用相关性分析对屏气2D PC(不同呼吸状态)与Cine PC MRI方法定量门静脉血流速度、血流量,显示两种技术相关性很好(r>0.8;P<0.01),但在对照组行相关性分析,仅呼气后屏气2D PC与Cine PC显示中度相关(r>0.5;P<0.01),吸气后屏气与Cine PC相关性较差(r<0.4). 结论 MRI Cine PC在正常呼吸情况下对门静脉血流行定量测量,接近人体生理状态,适合门静脉血流测量;正常呼吸状态屏气对肝硬化患者门静脉血流影响较正常人小,在肝硬化血流测量中,MRI Cine PC与屏气2D PC MRI法显示很好相关性.屏气2D PC MRI技术提供了一种简便、实用、相对准确的肝硬化门静脉血流测量方法.

  5. Image processing in cine-scintigraphy. Organization of the CINE 200 system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The CINE 200 system, although using a small computer to reduce costs, is shown to be a highly efficient instrument for the processing of scintigraphic images. This was achieved by creating an acquisition and display system branched directly onto the memory, reducing the processing times by the writing of fast micro-programmes, and cutting down the place occupied by the programmes in the live memory by a good organization of these programmes. This internal organization of the system, the insertion and role of the programmes, the data organization and the working procedure are described briefly

  6. Optical measures of changes in cerebral vascular tone during voluntary breath holding and a Sternberg memory task.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tan, Chin Hong; Low, Kathy A; Schneider-Garces, Nils; Zimmerman, Benjamin; Fletcher, Mark A; Maclin, Edward L; Chiarelli, Antonio M; Gratton, Gabriele; Fabiani, Monica

    2016-07-01

    The human cerebral vasculature responds to changes in blood pressure and demands for oxygenation via cerebral autoregulation. Changes in cerebrovascular tone (vasoconstriction and vasodilation) also mediate the changes in blood flow measured by the BOLD fMRI signal. This cerebrovascular reactivity is known to vary with age. In two experiments, we demonstrate that cerebral pulse parameters measured using optical imaging can quantify changes in cerebral vascular tone, both globally and locally. In experiment 1, 51 older adults (age range=55-87) performed a voluntary breath-holding task while cerebral pulse amplitude measures were taken. We found significant pulse amplitude variations across breath-holding periods, indicating vasodilation during, and vasoconstriction after breath holding. The breath-holding index (BHI), a measure of cerebrovascular reactivity (CVR) was derived and found to correlate with age. BHI was also correlated with performance in the Modified Mini-Mental Status Examination, even after controlling for age and education. In experiment 2, the same participants performed a Sternberg task, and changes in regional pulse amplitude between high (set-size 6) and low (set-size 2) task loads were compared. Only task-related areas in the fronto-parietal network (FPN) showed significant reduction in pulse amplitude, indicating vasodilation. Non-task-related areas such as the somatosensory and auditory cortices did not show such reductions. Taken together, these experiments suggest that optical pulse parameters can index changes in brain vascular tone both globally and locally, using both physiological and cognitive load manipulations.

  7. Energy cost and optimisation in breath-hold diving.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Trassinelli, M

    2016-05-01

    We present a new model for calculating locomotion costs in breath-hold divers. Starting from basic mechanics principles, we calculate the work that the diver must provide through propulsion to counterbalance the action of drag, the buoyant force and weight during immersion. Compared to those in previous studies, the model presented here accurately analyses breath-hold divers which alternate active swimming with prolonged glides during the dive (as is the case in mammals). The energy cost of the dive is strongly dependent on these prolonged gliding phases. Here we investigate the length and impacts on energy cost of these glides with respect to the diver characteristics, and compare them with those observed in different breath-hold diving species. Taking into account the basal metabolic rate and chemical energy to propulsion transformation efficiency, we calculate optimal swim velocity and the corresponding total energy cost (including metabolic rate) and compare them with observations. Energy cost is minimised when the diver passes through neutral buoyancy conditions during the dive. This generally implies the presence of prolonged gliding phases in both ascent and descent, where the buoyancy (varying with depth) is best used against the drag, reducing energy cost. This is in agreement with past results (Miller et al., 2012; Sato et al., 2013) where, when the buoyant force is considered constant during the dive, the energy cost was minimised for neutral buoyancy. In particular, our model confirms the good physical adaption of dolphins for diving, compared to other breath-hold diving species which are mostly positively buoyant (penguins for example). The presence of prolonged glides implies a non-trivial dependency of optimal speed on maximal depth of the dive. This extends previous findings (Sato et al., 2010; Watanabe et al., 2011) which found no dependency of optimal speed on dive depth for particular conditions. The energy cost of the dive can be further

  8. Validation of rapid velocity encoded cine imaging of a dynamically complex flow field using turbo block regional interpolation scheme for k space.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kortright, E; Doyle, M; Anayiotos, A S; Walsh, E G; Fuisz, A R; Pohost, G M

    2001-02-01

    Block regional interpolation scheme for k space (BRISK) is a sparse sampling approach to allow rapid magnetic resonance imaging of dynamic events. Rapid velocity encoded cine (VEC) imaging with Turbo BRISK is potentially an important clinical diagnostic technique for cardiovascular diseases. Previously we applied BRISK and Turbo BRISK to imaging pulsatile flow in a straight tube. To evaluate the capabilities of Turbo BRISK imaging in more complex dynamic flow fields such as might exist in the human vasculature, an in vitro curved tube model, similar in geometry to the aortic arch, was fabricated and imaged under pulsatile flow conditions. Velocity maps were obtained using conventional VEC and Turbo BRISK (turbo factors 1 through 5). Comparison of the flow fields obtained with each higher order turbo factor showed excellent agreement with conventional VEC with minimal loss of information. Similarly, flow maps showed good agreement with the profiles from a laser Doppler velocimetry model. Turbo-5 BRISK, for example, allowed a 94% savings in imaging time, reducing the conventional imaging time from over 8 min to a near breath-hold imaging period of 31 s. Turbo BRISK shows excellent promise toward the development of a clinical tool to evaluate complex dynamic intravascular flow fields.

  9. 自由呼吸扩散加权成像与屏气扩散加权成像在肾脏病变方面的对比研究%Free-Breathing Versus Breath-Hold Diffusion-Weighted MRI of Renal Lesions: Comparison of Image Quality and Apparent Diffusion Coefficient Values

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    王海屹; 王佳; 叶慧义; 张旭; 王殿军; 郭爱桃; 钟燕; 王鑫坤

    2011-01-01

    目的 比较肾脏病变自由呼吸扩散加权成像与屏气扩散加权成像在表观弥散系数(ADC)值及图像质量方面的异同.资料与方法 本研究纳入41例经病理结果或临床随访证实患有肾脏疾病的患者.所有患者均在1.5T磁共振扫描仪上进行自由呼吸扩散加权成像及屏气扩散加权成像.两种成像序列方面的参数除激励次数(NEX)之外均相同.两组图像的信噪比(SNR)、对比噪声比(CNR)及相对病变对比度的比较通过Wilcoxon检验进行统计学分析.两组肾实质ADC值及病变ADC值的一致性通过Pearson相关分析及信度分析方法进行分析.结果 自由呼吸扩散加权成像图像的SNR及CNR都显著高于屏气扩散加权成像图像(P<0.01).但两组图像的病变相对对比度差异无统计学意义(P=0.459).两种扩散加权成像方法计算出的肾脏病变ADC值表现出良好的一致性(Pearson相关系数为0.888;信度分析中校正的a系数为0.949,组内相关系数为0.901).两组肾实质ADC值之间亦表现出良好的一致性(Pearson相关系数为0.871;信度分析中校正的a系数为0.931,组内相关系数为0.931).结论 自由呼吸扩散加权成像适用于肾脏病变的评价,特别适用于屏气困难的患者,而且ADC值与屏气扩散加权成像一致性良好.%Purpose To compare free-breathing and breath-hold diffusion-weighted MRI of renal lesions and to assess the coincidence of the apparent diffusion coefficient (ADC) values between the two sequences. Materials and Methods 41 patients were enrolled into this study with 41 renal masses (median diameter, 4.0cm) confirmed by pathology results or follow-up. All patients underwent both free-breathing and breath-hold diffusion-weighted MR imaging (DWI) at a 1.5 T MR system. Both sequences had identical imaging parameters except for signal averages, which were 8 in free-breathing and 2 in breath-hold sequences. Signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) of the kidney

  10. Physiologic AV valvular insufficiency in cine MR imaging

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jang, Yoon Hyung; Kang, Eun Joo; Baik, Seung Kug; Ahn, Woo Hyun; Choi, Han Yong; Kim, Bong Gi [Wallace Memorial Baptist Hospital, Pusan (Korea, Republic of)

    1994-05-15

    To give a help in the interpretation of cardiac cine-MR examination, the extent, shape, and timing of appearance of signal void regions near atrioventricular(A-V) valve prospectively evaluate in the healthy population. Using an axial gradient-echo technique with small flip angle, repetition time(TR) of 36 msec and echo time(TE) of 22 msec, 20 volunteers without known valvular abnormalities undertook cardiac cine-MR imaging including atrioventricular valve areas. Transient signal void was observed within the near the tricuspid(13/20 = 65%) and mitral valves(9/20 = 45%), respectively, which is so called {sup p}hysioloic atrioventricular valvular insufficiency{sup .} Eight subjects revealed the signal void areas near both tricuspid and mitral valves but, 5 subjects did not show any evidence of physiologic insufficiency. This physiologic condition does not extend more than 1 cm proximal to A-V valve plane and is generally observed only during early systole. Its morphology is semilunar or triangular configuration with the base to the valve plane in most cases of normal tricuspid insufficiency and small globular appearance in most cases of normal mitral insufficiency. Awareness of normal signal void areas near the A-V valve and their characteristics is critical in the interpretation of cardiac cine MR examinations and maybe helpful in the study of the normal cardiac physiology.

  11. Dosimetric and clinical advantages of deep inspiration breath-hold (DIBH) during radiotherapy of breast cancer

    OpenAIRE

    Bruzzaniti, Vicente; Abate, Armando; Pinnarò, Paola; D’Andrea, Marco; Infusino, Erminia; Landoni, Valeria; Soriani, Antonella; Giordano, Carolina; Ferraro, Anna Maria; Strigari, Lidia

    2013-01-01

    Background To investigate the potential dosimetric and clinical benefits of Deep Inspiration Breath-Hold (DIBH) technique during radiotherapy of breast cancer compared with Free Breathing (FB). Methods Eight left-sided breast cancer patients underwent a supervised breath hold during treatment. For each patient, two CT scans were acquired with and without breath hold, and virtual simulation was performed for conventional tangential fields, utilizing 6 or 15 MV photon fields. The resulting dose...

  12. The effects of breath-holding on pulmonary regurgitation measured by cardiovascular magnetic resonance velocity mapping

    OpenAIRE

    Babu-Narayan Sonya V; Johansson Bengt; Kilner Philip J

    2009-01-01

    Abstract Background Pulmonary regurgitation is a common and clinically important residual lesion after repair of tetralogy of Fallot. Cardiovascular magnetic resonance (CMR) phase contrast velocity mapping is widely used for measurement of pulmonary regurgitant fraction. Breath-hold acquisitions, usually acquired during held expiration, are more convenient than the non-breath-hold approach, but we hypothesized that breath-holding might affect the amount of pulmonary regurgitation. Methods For...

  13. Breath-hold times in patients undergoing radiological examinations: comparison of expiration and inspiration with and without hyperventilation: primerjava časov po izdihu in po vdihu z ali brez hiperventilacije: Zadrževanje diha pri bolnikih, ki so radiološko preiskovani:

    OpenAIRE

    Groell, Reinhard; Schaffler, Gottfried J; Schloffer, Stephan

    2001-01-01

    Background: Breath-holding is necessary for imaging studies of the thorax and abdomen using computed tomography, magnetic resonance imaging or ultrasound examinations. The purpose of this study was to compare the breath-hold times in expiration and inspiration and to evaluate the effects of hyperventilation.Patients and methods. Thirty patients and 19 healthy volunteers participated in this study after informed consent was obtained in all. The breath-hold times were measured in expiration and...

  14. Longitudinal study of a mouse model of chronic pulmonary inflammation using breath hold gated micro-CT

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    To evaluate the feasibility of using automatic quantitative analysis of breath hold gated micro-CT images to detect and monitor disease in a mouse model of chronic pulmonary inflammation, and to compare image-based measurements with pulmonary function tests and histomorphometry. Forty-nine A/J mice were used, divided into control and inflammation groups. Chronic inflammation was induced by silica aspiration. Fourteen animals were imaged at baseline, and 4, 14, and 34 weeks after silica aspiration, using micro-CT synchronized with ventilator-induced breath holds. Lung input impedance was measured as well using forced oscillation techniques. Five additional animals from each group were killed after micro-CT for comparison with histomorphometry. At all time points, micro-CT measurements show statistically significant differences between the two groups, while first differences in functional test parameters appear at 14 weeks. Micro-CT measurements correlate well with histomorphometry and discriminate diseased and healthy groups better than functional tests. Longitudinal studies using breath hold gated micro-CT are feasible on the silica-induced model of chronic pulmonary inflammation, and automatic measurements from micro-CT images correlate well with histomorphometry, being more sensitive than functional tests to detect lung damage in this model. (orig.)

  15. Longitudinal study of a mouse model of chronic pulmonary inflammation using breath hold gated micro-CT

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Artaechevarria, Xabier; Perez-Martin, Daniel; Munoz-Barrutia, Arrate; Ortiz-de-Solorzano, Carlos [Center for Applied Medical Research, University of Navarra, Cancer Imaging Laboratory, Oncology Division, Pamplona (Spain); Blanco, David; Biurrun, Gabriel de; Montuenga, Luis M. [Center for Applied Medical Research, University of Navarra, Biomarkers Laboratory, Pamplona (Spain); Torres, Juan P. de; Zulueta, Javier J. [Clinica Universidad de Navarra, Pneumology Department, Pamplona (Spain); Bastarrika, Gorka [Clinica Universidad de Navarra, Radiology Department, Pamplona (Spain)

    2010-11-15

    To evaluate the feasibility of using automatic quantitative analysis of breath hold gated micro-CT images to detect and monitor disease in a mouse model of chronic pulmonary inflammation, and to compare image-based measurements with pulmonary function tests and histomorphometry. Forty-nine A/J mice were used, divided into control and inflammation groups. Chronic inflammation was induced by silica aspiration. Fourteen animals were imaged at baseline, and 4, 14, and 34 weeks after silica aspiration, using micro-CT synchronized with ventilator-induced breath holds. Lung input impedance was measured as well using forced oscillation techniques. Five additional animals from each group were killed after micro-CT for comparison with histomorphometry. At all time points, micro-CT measurements show statistically significant differences between the two groups, while first differences in functional test parameters appear at 14 weeks. Micro-CT measurements correlate well with histomorphometry and discriminate diseased and healthy groups better than functional tests. Longitudinal studies using breath hold gated micro-CT are feasible on the silica-induced model of chronic pulmonary inflammation, and automatic measurements from micro-CT images correlate well with histomorphometry, being more sensitive than functional tests to detect lung damage in this model. (orig.)

  16. Usefulness of true FISP cine MR imaging in patients with poor cardiac function

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sakuma, Toshiharu; Yamada, Naoaki; Motooka, Makoto; Enomoto, Naoyuki; Maeshima, Isamu; Matsuda, Kazuhide; Urayama, Shinichi; Ikeo, Miki [National Cardiovascular Center, Suita, Osaka (Japan)

    2002-01-01

    This study was done to assess the value of True FISP cine in patients with poor cardiac function. True FISP cine and FLASH cine imaging were performed on a 1.5 T machine. Both short axis and horizontal long axis imaging sections were used. The imaging sections used a Matrix (120 x 128), FOV (24 x 32 cm), and had a slice thickness of 8 mm. The imaging time for True FISP cine was 8 heart beats and 17 heart beats for FLASH cine. The contrast-to-noise ratio between the blood and myocardium (CNR) was measured at enddiastole and endsystole. The subjects in the study were 10 healty volunteers (average age 26.5{+-}3.2 years) and 12 patients with hypofunction (average age 53.9{+-}13.2 years). In the volunteers, the CNR of the short axis imaging was similar in both True FISP (24.6{+-}3.7) and FLASH (23.4{+-}5.9). In the patients with poor cardiac function however, the CNR of True FISP was larger than FLASH in both the short and long axis. In the short axis (22.7{+-}6.1 vs. 17.9{+-}5.3, P<0.01) and in the long axis (17.4{+-}4.3 vs. 9.3{+-}4.0, P<0.01). We conclude that True FISP cine has a higher contrast in a shorter imaging time than FLASH cine. True FISP cine is especially useful in patients with poor cardiac function. (author)

  17. [Conditioning of affect-induced breath-holding spells].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Noeker, M; Haverkamp, F

    1997-01-01

    Breath holding spells often arise in the context of affectively dramatic conflict situations between mother and child. Assessment by psychopathological screening instruments, however, has not given empirical evidence of an increased psychiatric morbidity in these children. Therefore, in our study we did not concentrate on basic psychopathology but on behavioral variables that might be effective during the ongoing attack episode and, hereby, exert an influence on the risk of chronification (relapse rate). The main goal of this approach is to examine secondary reinforcement effects on the attack behavior according to the learning principle of operant conditioning. Our sample consisted of 28 children and ten siblings as control group. To control for effects of behavioral disorders in the sample, we applied the Marburger Verhaltensliste (MVL) on the level of the child, and the Familienfragebogen (FFBO-III) on the level of family adaptation. The main assessment instrument, however, was the Functional Behavior Analysis (FBA) in order to measure the trigger, reaction and consequence conditions in the course of given attack episodes. MVL and FFBO-III results confirm the lack of basic psychopathology in the patients and their families. The individualized FBA's can be transformed in a taxonomy of five distinct types. All the first three types are triggered by intensive conflict situations and show a high relapse rate (type 1) if the mother reacts in a rewarding manner with positive consequences for the child (reinforcement condition), a dramatically reduced rate (type 2) if the mother reacts neutral (extinction condition), or a heterogeneous pattern (type 3) if the mother reacts punishing (punishment condition). In type 4 (pallid type) and type 5 (triggered spontaneously), respectively, no responsiveness to conditioning effects can be recognized. With respect to parent counselling, a recommendation for a quiet and consequent reaction can be concluded, especially in the case

  18. Reduction of respiratory effects on lung PET imaging with respiratory-gated acquisition associated with breath-hold CT; Reduction des effets de la respiration en imagerie TEP pulmonaire par une acquisition synchronisee a la respiration associee a une TDM en apnee

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Morvan, J.; El Esper, I.; Saidi, L.; Moullart, V.; Daouk, J.; Fin, L.; Bailly, P.; Meyer, M.E. [Hopital Sud, CHU d' Amiens, Service de Medecine Nucleaire et de Traitement de l' Image Medicale, 80 - Amiens (France)

    2007-12-15

    Respiratory motion causes a spread of lesion uptake over a larger area in Positron Emission Tomography (PET) images for moving structures. When CT images are used for attenuation correction of emission data, this motion may alter the quantization of PET images. We present the clinical results of a respiratory-gated PET processing 'CT-based' method, which aims to improve PET-CT co registration by using an additional breath-hold CT (B.H.-CT). The CT-based protocol consisted in a 10-min List Mode respiratory-gated PET acquisition, followed by an end-expiration B.H.-CT acquisition. During these two examinations, the respiratory signal was recorded continuously. Eleven pulmonary lesions were studied. Patients underwent both a standard clinical PET protocol (free breathing) and the CT-based protocol. The respective performances of the CT-based and clinical PET methods were evaluated by comparing the distances between the lesions centroids on PET and CT images. SUV{sub max} (Standardized Uptake Value) and volume variations were also investigated. The CT-based method showed a significant reduction (p = 0.049) of centroid distances (mean relative change versus standard method: 49%). We also noted a higher SUV{sub max} (mean change: 39%). Lesion volumes were significantly lower (p = 0.026) in CT-based PET volumes (mean change: 43%) compared with standard ones. The CT-based method improves PET-CT co registration of pulmonary lesions. This protocol should lead to more accurate attenuation correction and thus improve S.U.V. measurement.

  19. Role of cerebral blood flow in extreme breath holding

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bain Anthony R.

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available The role of cerebral blood flow (CBF on a maximal breath-hold (BH in ultra-elite divers was examined. Divers (n = 7 performed one control BH, and one BH following oral administration of the non-selective cyclooxygenase inhibitor indomethacin (1.2 mg/kg. Arterial blood gases and CBF were measured prior to (baseline, and at BH termination. Compared to control, indomethacin reduced baseline CBF and cerebral delivery of oxygen (CDO2 by about 26% (p < 0.01. Indomethacin reduced maximal BH time from 339 ± 51 to 319 ± 57 seconds (p = 0.04. In both conditions, the CDO2 remained unchanged from baseline to the termination of apnea. At BH termination, arterial oxygen tension was higher following oral administration of indomethacin compared to control (4.05 ± 0.45 vs. 3.44 ± 0.32 kPa. The absolute increase in CBF from baseline to the termination of apnea was lower with indomethacin (p = 0.01. These findings indicate that the impact of CBF on maximal BH time is likely attributable to its influence on cerebral H+ washout, and therefore central chemoreceptive drive to breathe, rather than to CDO2.

  20. Spirometer-controlled cine magnetic resonance imaging used to diagnose tracheobronchomalacia in paediatric patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ciet, Pierluigi; Wielopolski, Piotr; Manniesing, Rashindra; Lever, Sandra; de Bruijne, Marleen; Morana, Giovanni; Muzzio, Pier Carlo; Lequin, Maarten H; Tiddens, Harm A W M

    2014-01-01

    Tracheobronchomalacia (TBM) is defined as an excessive collapse of the intrathoracic trachea. Bronchoscopy is the gold standard for diagnosing TBM; however it has major disadvantages, such as general anaesthesia. Cine computed tomography (CT) is a noninvasive alternative used to diagnose TBM, but its use in children is restricted by ionising radiation. Our aim was to evaluate the feasibility of spirometer-controlled cine magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) as an alternative to cine-CT in a retrospective study. 12 children with a mean age (range) of 12 years (7-17 years), suspected of having TBM, underwent cine-MRI. Static scans were acquired at end-inspiration and expiration covering the thorax using a three-dimensional spoiled gradient echo sequence. Three-dimensional dynamic scans were performed covering only the central airways. TBM was defined as a decrease of the trachea or bronchi diameter >50% at end-expiration in the static and dynamic scans. The success rate of the cine-MRI protocol was 92%. Cine-MRI was compared with bronchoscopy or chest CT in seven subjects. TBM was diagnosed by cine-MRI in seven (58%) out of 12 children and was confirmed by bronchoscopy or CT. In four patients, cine-MRI demonstrated tracheal narrowing that was not present in the static scans. Spirometer controlled cine-MRI is a promising technique to assess TBM in children and has the potential to replace bronchoscopy.

  1. Improving intra-fractional target position accuracy using a 3D surface surrogate for left breast irradiation using the respiratory-gated deep-inspiration breath-hold technique.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yi Rong

    Full Text Available PURPOSE: To evaluate the use of 3D optical surface imaging as a surrogate for respiratory gated deep-inspiration breath-hold (DIBH for left breast irradiation. MATERIAL AND METHODS: Patients with left-sided breast cancer treated with lumpectomy or mastectomy were selected as candidates for DIBH treatment for their external beam radiation therapy. Treatment plans were created on both free breathing (FB and DIBH computed tomography (CT simulation scans to determine dosimetric benefits from DIBH. The Real-time Position Management (RPM system was used to acquire patient's breathing trace during DIBH CT acquisition and treatment delivery. The reference 3D surface models from FB and DIBH CT scans were generated and transferred to the "AlignRT" system for patient positioning and real-time treatment monitoring. MV Cine images were acquired during treatment for each beam as quality assurance for intra-fractional position verification. The chest wall excursions measured on these images were used to define the actual target position during treatment, and to investigate the accuracy and reproducibility of RPM and AlignRT. RESULTS: Reduction in heart dose can be achieved using DIBH for left breast/chest wall radiation. RPM was shown to have inferior correlation with the actual target position, as determined by the MV Cine imaging. Therefore, RPM alone may not be an adequate surrogate in defining the breath-hold level. Alternatively, the AlignRT surface imaging demonstrated a superior correlation with the actual target positioning during DIBH. Both the vertical and magnitude real-time deltas (RTDs reported by AlignRT can be used as the gating parameter, with a recommended threshold of ±3 mm and 5 mm, respectively. CONCLUSION: The RPM system alone may not be sufficient for the required level of accuracy in left-sided breast/CW DIBH treatments. The 3D surface imaging can be used to ensure patient setup and monitor inter- and intra- fractional motions

  2. Cine viability magnetic resonance imaging of the heart without increased scan time.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hassanein, Azza S; Khalifa, Ayman M; Ibrahim, El-Sayed H

    2016-02-01

    Cardiac magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) provides information about myocardial morphology, function, and viability from cine, tagged, and late gadolinium enhancement (LGE) images, respectively. While the cine and tagged images are acquired in a time-resolved fashion, the LGE images are acquired at a single timeframe. The purpose of this work is to develop a method for generating cine LGE images without additional scan time. The motion field is extracted from the tagged images, and is then used to guide the deformation of the infarcted region from the acquired LGE image at the acquired timeframe to any other timeframe. Major techniques for motion estimation, including harmonic phase (HARP) and optical flow analysis, are tested in this work for motion estimation. The proposed method is tested on numerical phantom and images from four human subjects. The generated cine LGE images showed both viability and wall motion information in the same set of images without additional scan time or image misregistration problems. The band-pass optical flow analysis resulted in the most accurate motion estimation compared to other methods, especially HARP, which fails to track points at the myocardial boundary. Infarct transmurality from the generated images showed good agreement with myocardial strain, and wall thickening showed good agreement with that measured from conventional cine images. In conclusion, the developed technique allows for generating cine LGE images that enable simultaneous display of wall motion and viability information. The generated images could be useful for estimating myocardial contractility reserve and for treatment prognosis.

  3. Cine viability magnetic resonance imaging of the heart without increased scan time.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hassanein, Azza S; Khalifa, Ayman M; Ibrahim, El-Sayed H

    2016-02-01

    Cardiac magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) provides information about myocardial morphology, function, and viability from cine, tagged, and late gadolinium enhancement (LGE) images, respectively. While the cine and tagged images are acquired in a time-resolved fashion, the LGE images are acquired at a single timeframe. The purpose of this work is to develop a method for generating cine LGE images without additional scan time. The motion field is extracted from the tagged images, and is then used to guide the deformation of the infarcted region from the acquired LGE image at the acquired timeframe to any other timeframe. Major techniques for motion estimation, including harmonic phase (HARP) and optical flow analysis, are tested in this work for motion estimation. The proposed method is tested on numerical phantom and images from four human subjects. The generated cine LGE images showed both viability and wall motion information in the same set of images without additional scan time or image misregistration problems. The band-pass optical flow analysis resulted in the most accurate motion estimation compared to other methods, especially HARP, which fails to track points at the myocardial boundary. Infarct transmurality from the generated images showed good agreement with myocardial strain, and wall thickening showed good agreement with that measured from conventional cine images. In conclusion, the developed technique allows for generating cine LGE images that enable simultaneous display of wall motion and viability information. The generated images could be useful for estimating myocardial contractility reserve and for treatment prognosis. PMID:26528793

  4. Multi-slice CT for visualization of acute pulmonary embolism: single breath-hold subtraction technique

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wildberger, J.E.; Mahnken, A.H.; Spuentrup, E.; Guenther, R.W. [Dept. of Diagnostic Radiology, Univ. of Technology, Aachen (Germany); Klotz, E.; Ditt, H. [Siemens Medical Solutions, Computed Tomography, Forchheim (Germany)

    2005-01-01

    Purpose: the purpose of our preliminary animal study was to evaluate the feasibility of a new subtraction technique for visualization of perfusion defects within the lung parenchyma in segmental and subsegmental pulmonary embolism (PE). Materials and methods: in three healthy pigs, PE were artificially induced by fresh human clot material. Within a single breath-hold, CT angiography (CTA) was performed on a 16-slice multi-slice CT scanner (SOMATOM Sensation 16; Siemens, Forchheim, Germany) before and after intravenous application of 80 mL of contrast-medium, followed by a saline chaser. Scan parameters were 120 kV and 100 mAs{sub eff.}, using a collimation of 16 x 1.5 mm and a table speed/rot. of 36 mm (pitch: 1.5; rotation time: 0.5 s). A new 3D subtraction technique was developed, which is based on automated segmentation, non-linear spatial filtering and non-rigid registration. Data were analysed using a color-encoded ''compound view'' of parenchymal enhancement and CTA information displayed in axial, coronal and sagittal orientation. Results: subtraction was technically feasible in all three data sets. The mean scan time for each series was 4.7 s, interscan delay was 14.7 s, respectively. Therefore, an average breath-hold of approximately 24 s was required for the overall scanning procedure. Downstream of occluded segmental and subsegmental arteries, perfusion defects were clearly assessable, showing lower or missing enhancement compared to normally perfused lung parenchyma. In all pigs, additional peripheral areas with triangular shaped perfusion defects were delineated, considered typical for PE. Conclusions: our initial results from the animal model studied slow that perfusion imaging of PE is feasible within a single breath-hold. It allows a comprehensive assessment of perfusion deficits as the direct proof of a pulmonary embolus, can be combined with an indirect visual quantification of the density changes in the adjacent lung tissue

  5. SU-E-J-236: Audiovisual Biofeedback Improves Breath-Hold Lung Tumor Position Reproducibility Measured with 4D MRI

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, D; Pollock, S; Keall, P [Radiation Physics Laboratory, Sydney Medical School, The University of Sydney, NSW (Australia); Greer, P [School of Mathematical and Physical Sciences, The University of Newcastle, Newcastle, NSW (Australia); Department of Radiation Oncology, Calvary Mater Newcastle, Newcastle, NSW (Australia); Lapuz, C; Ludbrook, J [Department of Radiation Oncology, Calvary Mater Newcastle, Newcastle, NSW (Australia); Kim, T [Radiation Physics Laboratory, Sydney Medical School, The University of Sydney, NSW (Australia); Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Virginia Health System, Charlottesville, VA (United States)

    2015-06-15

    Purpose: Audiovisual biofeedback breath-hold (AVBH) was employed to reproduce tumor position on inhale and exhale breath-holds for 4D tumor information. We hypothesize that lung tumor position will be more consistent using AVBH compared with conventional breath-hold (CBH). Methods: Lung tumor positions were determined for seven lung cancer patients (age: 25 – 74) during to two separate 3T MRI sessions. A breathhold training session was performed prior to the MRI sessions to allow patients to become comfortable with AVBH and their exhale and inhale target positions. CBH and AVBH 4D image datasets were obtained in the first MRI session (pre-treatment) and the second MRI session (midtreatment) within six weeks of the first session. Audio-instruction (MRI: Siemens Skyra) in CBH and verbal-instruction (radiographer) in AVBH were used. A radiation oncologist contoured the lung tumor using Eclipse (Varian Medical Systems); tumor position was quantified as the centroid of the contoured tumor after rigid registration based on vertebral anatomy across two MRI sessions. CBH and AVBH were compared in terms of the reproducibility assessed via (1) the difference between the two exhale positions for the two sessions and the two inhale positions for the sessions. (2) The difference in amplitude (exhale to inhale) between the two sessions. Results: Compared to CBH, AVBH improved the reproducibility of two exhale (or inhale) lung tumor positions relative to each other by 33%, from 6.4±5.3 mm to 4.3±3.0 mm (p=0.005). Compared to CBH, AVBH improved the reproducibility of exhale and inhale amplitude by 66%, from 5.6±5.9 mm to 1.9±1.4 mm (p=0.005). Conclusions: This study demonstrated that audiovisual biofeedback can be utilized for improving the reproducibility of breath-hold lung tumor position. These results are advantageous towards achieving more accurate emerging radiation treatment planning methods, in addition to imaging and treatment modalities utilizing breath-hold

  6. SU-E-J-236: Audiovisual Biofeedback Improves Breath-Hold Lung Tumor Position Reproducibility Measured with 4D MRI

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Purpose: Audiovisual biofeedback breath-hold (AVBH) was employed to reproduce tumor position on inhale and exhale breath-holds for 4D tumor information. We hypothesize that lung tumor position will be more consistent using AVBH compared with conventional breath-hold (CBH). Methods: Lung tumor positions were determined for seven lung cancer patients (age: 25 – 74) during to two separate 3T MRI sessions. A breathhold training session was performed prior to the MRI sessions to allow patients to become comfortable with AVBH and their exhale and inhale target positions. CBH and AVBH 4D image datasets were obtained in the first MRI session (pre-treatment) and the second MRI session (midtreatment) within six weeks of the first session. Audio-instruction (MRI: Siemens Skyra) in CBH and verbal-instruction (radiographer) in AVBH were used. A radiation oncologist contoured the lung tumor using Eclipse (Varian Medical Systems); tumor position was quantified as the centroid of the contoured tumor after rigid registration based on vertebral anatomy across two MRI sessions. CBH and AVBH were compared in terms of the reproducibility assessed via (1) the difference between the two exhale positions for the two sessions and the two inhale positions for the sessions. (2) The difference in amplitude (exhale to inhale) between the two sessions. Results: Compared to CBH, AVBH improved the reproducibility of two exhale (or inhale) lung tumor positions relative to each other by 33%, from 6.4±5.3 mm to 4.3±3.0 mm (p=0.005). Compared to CBH, AVBH improved the reproducibility of exhale and inhale amplitude by 66%, from 5.6±5.9 mm to 1.9±1.4 mm (p=0.005). Conclusions: This study demonstrated that audiovisual biofeedback can be utilized for improving the reproducibility of breath-hold lung tumor position. These results are advantageous towards achieving more accurate emerging radiation treatment planning methods, in addition to imaging and treatment modalities utilizing breath-hold

  7. Dobutamine cine magnetic resonance imaging after myocardial infarction; Cine Risonanza Magnetica con dobutamina dopo infarto del miocardio

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Giovagnoni, A.; Ligabue, G.; Romagnoli, R. [Modena Univ., Modena (Italy). Scienze Radiologiche, Dipt. di Medicina Interna; Reggio Emilia Univ., Reggio Emilia (Italy). Cattedra di Cardiologia; Rossi, R.; Muia, N.; Modena, M.G. [Modena Univ., Modena (Italy). Dipt. di Scienze Mediche, Oncologiche e Radiologiche; Reggio Emilia Univ. (Italy). Dipt. di Scienze Mediche, Oncologiche e Radiologiche

    1999-12-01

    Dobutamine Cine MRI is a new diagnostic imaging technique in the pretreatment (revascularization) assessment of myocardial infarction patients. In this issue are reported the result of a comparative study of the diagnostic yield of dobutamine Cine MRI with that of stress echocardiography in the assessment of viable myocardium. A new method for analysis of Cine MR images, employing digital subtraction, aimed at decreasing subjectivity in the quantitative assessment of myocardial wall thickening. Twenty-six patients (21 men and 5 women) with a history of myocardial infarction who were scheduled for revascularization were submitted to stress echocardiography and dobutamine Cine MRI to evaluate contractile recovery of the segments considered akinetic or hypo kinetic at baseline echocardiography. Dobutamine was administered in growing doses (5, 10, 15{gamma}/kg/min). 16 segments of the left ventricle in each patient were considered. In the 416 segments studied, it was found that 307 normo kinetic, 64 scarred and 45 viable segments with stress echocardiography, versus 302 normo kinetic, 83 scarred and 31 viable segments with dobutamine MRI. Three months after revascularization 15 patients were examined to check contractile recovery of the segments considered as viable. Echocardiography had 79% sensitivity and 97% specificity, while Cine MRI had 96% and 86%, respectively. In patients with anteroseptal wall myocardial infarction stress echocardiography had 75% sensitivity and 97% specificity. Echocardiography permits to distinguish viable myocardium and scarred myocardial tissue with good sensitivity and specificity, but Cine MRI performs better. Cine MRI has much higher sensitivity than stress echocardiography and thus makes the technique of choice to evaluate viable myocardium in these sites. The digital subtraction technique is as accurate as manual measurements, but reduces the error rate and permits quicker evaluation, particularly in subendocardial thickening

  8. Hemoptysis Due to Breath-Hold Diving Following Chemotherapy and Lung Irradiation

    OpenAIRE

    Gutsche, Markus; Kuschner, Ware G.

    2012-01-01

    Breath-hold diving, also known as free-diving, describes the practice of intentional immersion under water without an external supply of oxygen. Pulmonary hemorrhage with hemoptysis has been reported as a complication of immersion and breath-hold diving in young healthy athletes. We report the case of a 60-year-old man with a history of radiation and chemotherapy for breast carcinoma, who developed the abrupt onset of hemoptysis in the setting of swimming and breath-hold diving. A computed to...

  9. A feasibility study of treatment verification using EPID cine images for hypofractionated lung radiotherapy

    CERN Document Server

    Tang, Xiaoli; Jiang, Steve

    2009-01-01

    We propose a novel approach for potential on-line treatment verification using cine EPID (Electronic Portal Imaging Device) images for hypofractionated lung radiotherapy based on a machine learning algorithm. Hypofractionated radiotherapy requires high precision. It is essential to effectively monitor the target to ensure that the tumor is within the beam aperture. We modeled the treatment verification problem as a two-class classification problem and applied an Artificial Neural Network (ANN) to classify the cine EPID images acquired during the treatment into corresponding classes with the tumor inside or outside of the beam aperture. Training samples were generated for the ANN using digitally reconstructed radiographs (DRRs) with artificially added shifts in tumor location to simulate cine EPID images with different tumor locations. Principal Component Analysis (PCA) was used to reduce the dimensionality of the training samples and cine EPID images acquired during the treatment. The proposed treatment verif...

  10. High-pitch coronary CT angiography in dual-source CT during free breathing vs. breath holding in patients with low heart rates

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bischoff, Bernhard, E-mail: bernhard.bischoff@med.uni-muenchen.de [Institute for Clinical Radiology, Ludwig-Maximilians-University Hospital Munich (Germany); DZHK (German Centre for Cardiovascular Research), Partner Site Munich Heart Alliance, Munich (Germany); Meinel, Felix G. [Institute for Clinical Radiology, Ludwig-Maximilians-University Hospital Munich (Germany); DZHK (German Centre for Cardiovascular Research), Partner Site Munich Heart Alliance, Munich (Germany); Del Prete, Alessandra [Department of Radiology Magrassi-Lanzara, Second University of Naples, Naples (Italy); Reiser, Maximilian F.; Becker, Hans-Christoph [Institute for Clinical Radiology, Ludwig-Maximilians-University Hospital Munich (Germany); DZHK (German Centre for Cardiovascular Research), Partner Site Munich Heart Alliance, Munich (Germany)

    2013-12-01

    Background: Coronary CT angiography (CCTA) is usually performed during breath holding to reduce motion artifacts caused by respiration. However, some patients are not able to follow the breathing commands adequately due to deafness, hearing impairment, agitation or pulmonary diseases. The aim of this study was to evaluate the potential of high-pitch CCTA in free breathing patients when compared to breath holding patients. Methods: In this study we evaluated 40 patients (20 free breathing and 20 breath holding patients) with a heart rate of 60 bpm or below referred for CCTA who were examined on a 2nd generation dual-source CT system. Image quality of each coronary artery segment was rated using a 4-point grading scale (1: non diagnostic–4: excellent). Results: Mean heart rate during image acquisition was 52 ±5 bpm in both groups. There was no significant difference in mean image quality, slightly favoring image acquisition during breath holding (mean image quality score 3.76 ± 0.32 in breath holding patients vs. 3.61 ± 0.45 in free breathing patients; p = 0.411). Due to a smaller amount of injected contrast medium, there was a trend for signal intensity to be slightly lower in free breathing patients, but this was not statistically significant (435 ± 123 HU vs. 473 ± 117 HU; p = 0.648). Conclusion: In patients with a low heart rate who are not able to hold their breath adequately, CCTA can also be acquired during free breathing without substantial loss of image quality when using a high pitch scan mode in 2nd generation dual-source CT.

  11. Cine magnetic resonance imaging for evaluation of cardiac structure and flow dynamics in congenital heart disease

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cine magnetic resonance imaging (Cine MRI) was performed in 20 patients aged 19 days to 13 years (mean 4.0 years), who had congenital heart disease confirmed at echocardiography or angiography. Prior to cine MRI, gated MRI was performed to evaluate for cardiac structure. Cine MRI was demonstrated by fast low fip angle shot imaging technique with a 30deg flip angle, 15 msec echo time, 30-40 msec pulse repetition time, and 128 x 128 acquisition matrix. Abnormalities of cardiac structure were extremely well defined in all patients by gated MRI. Intracardiac or intravascular blood flow were visualized in 17 (85%) of 20 patients by cine MRI. Left to right shunt flow through ventricular septal defect, atrial septal defect, and endocardial cushion defect were visualized with low signal intensity area. Low intensity jets flow through the site of re-coarctation of the aorta were also visualized. However, the good recording of cine MRI was not obtained because of artifacts in 3 of 20 patients (15%) who had severe congestive heart failure or respiratory arrhythmia. Gated MRI provides excellent visualization of fine structure, and cine MRI can provide high spatial resolution imaging of flow dynamic in a variety of congenital heart disease, noninvasively. (author)

  12. Chronic adaptations of lung function in breath-hold diving fishermen

    OpenAIRE

    Cristiane Diniz; Tiago Farias; Mayane Pereira; Caio Pires; Luciana Gonçalves; Patrícia Coertjens; Marcelo Coertjens

    2014-01-01

    Objectives: The aim of this study was to verify and analyze the existence of chronic adaptations of lung function in freediving fishermen whose occupation is artisanal fishing. Material and Methods: This was a cross-sectional study involving 11 breath-hold diving fishermen and 10 non-breath-hold diving fishermen (control) from the village of Bitupitá in the municipality of Barroquinha (Ceará - Brazil). Anthropometric measurements, chest and abdominal circumferences as well as spirometric and ...

  13. The effects of breath-holding on pulmonary regurgitation measured by cardiovascular magnetic resonance velocity mapping

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Babu-Narayan Sonya V

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Pulmonary regurgitation is a common and clinically important residual lesion after repair of tetralogy of Fallot. Cardiovascular magnetic resonance (CMR phase contrast velocity mapping is widely used for measurement of pulmonary regurgitant fraction. Breath-hold acquisitions, usually acquired during held expiration, are more convenient than the non-breath-hold approach, but we hypothesized that breath-holding might affect the amount of pulmonary regurgitation. Methods Forty-three adult patients with a previous repair of tetralogy of Fallot and residual pulmonary regurgitation were investigated with CMR. In each, pulmonary regurgitant fraction was measured from velocity maps transecting the pulmonary trunk, acquired during held expiration, held inspiration, by non-breath-hold acquisition, and also from the difference of right and left ventricular stroke volume measurements. Results Pulmonary regurgitant fraction was lower when measured by velocity mapping in held expiration compared with held inspiration, non-breath-hold or stroke volume difference (30.8 vs. 37.0, 35.6, 35.4%, p = 0.00017, 0.0035, 0.026. The regurgitant volume was lower in held expiration than in held inspiration (41.9 vs. 48.3, p = 0.0018. Pulmonary forward flow volume was larger during held expiration than during non-breath-hold (132 vs. 124 ml, p = 0.0024. Conclusion Pulmonary regurgitant fraction was significantly lower in held expiration compared with held inspiration, free breathing and stroke volume difference. Altered airway pressure could be a contributory factor. This information is relevant if breath-hold acquisition is to be substituted for non-breath-hold in the investigation of patients with a view to re-intervention.

  14. CT scans of the hypopharynx and larynx during inspiration, expiration, breath holding and phonation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    CT scans of the hypopharynx and larynx during inspiration, expiration, breath holding and phonation of the letter E were performed on seven volunteers. Two mm contiguous scans were obtained to span the glottis and supraglottic area. The vocal cords were shown in the paramedian or median position on breath holding and phonation. The ditails of the arytenoid cartilages were better visualized with thin slices. The laryngeal ventricles were demonstrable on phonation scans. (author)

  15. Accelerated phase-contrast cine MRI using k-t SPARSE-SENSE.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Daniel; Dyvorne, Hadrien A; Otazo, Ricardo; Feng, Li; Sodickson, Daniel K; Lee, Vivian S

    2012-04-01

    Phase-contrast (PC) cine MRI is a promising method for assessment of pathologic hemodynamics, including cardiovascular and hepatoportal vascular dynamics, but its low data acquisition efficiency limits the achievable spatial and temporal resolutions within clinically acceptable breath-hold durations. We propose to accelerate PC cine MRI using an approach which combines compressed sensing and parallel imaging (k-t SPARSE-SENSE). We validated the proposed 6-fold accelerated PC cine MRI against 3-fold accelerated PC cine MRI with parallel imaging (generalized autocalibrating partially parallel acquisitions). With the programmable flow pump, we simulated a time varying waveform emulating hepatic blood flow. Normalized root mean square error between two sets of velocity measurements was 2.59%. In multiple blood vessels of 12 control subjects, two sets of mean velocity measurements were in good agreement (mean difference = -0.29 cm/s; lower and upper 95% limits of agreement = -5.26 and 4.67 cm/s, respectively). The mean phase noise, defined as the standard deviation of the phase in a homogeneous stationary region, was significantly lower for k-t SPARSE-SENSE than for generalized autocalibrating partially parallel acquisitions (0.05 ± 0.01 vs. 0.19 ± 0.06 radians, respectively; P cine MRI pulse sequence with k-t SPARSE-SENSE is a promising investigational method for rapid velocity measurement with relatively high spatial (1.7 mm × 1.7 mm) and temporal (∼35 ms) resolutions.

  16. Lack of Correlation Between External Fiducial Positions and Internal Tumor Positions During Breath-Hold CT

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Purpose: For thoracic tumors, if four-dimensional computed tomography (4DCT) is unavailable, the internal margin can be estimated by use of breath-hold (BH) CT scans acquired at end inspiration (EI) and end expiration (EE). By use of external surrogates for tumor position, BH accuracy is estimated by minimizing the difference between respiratory extrema BH and mean equivalent-phase free breathing (FB) positions. We tested the assumption that an external surrogate for BH accuracy correlates with internal tumor positional accuracy during BH CT. Methods and Materials: In 16 lung cancer patients, 4DCT images, as well as BH CT images at EI and EE, were acquired. Absolute differences between BH and mean equivalent-phase (FB) positions were calculated for both external fiducials and gross tumor volume (GTV) centroids as metrics of external and internal BH accuracy, respectively, and the results were correlated. Results: At EI, the absolute difference between mean FB and BH fiducial displacement correlated poorly with the absolute difference between FB and BH GTV centroid positions on CT images (R2 = 0.11). Similarly, at EE, the absolute difference between mean FB and BH fiducial displacements correlated poorly with the absolute difference between FB and BH GTV centroid positions on CT images (R2 = 0.18). Conclusions: External surrogates for tumor position are not an accurate metric of BH accuracy for lung cancer patients. This implies that care should be taken when using such an approach because an incorrect internal margin could be generated.

  17. Application of phase-contrast cine magnetic resonance imaging in endoscopic aqueductoplasty.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Guoqiang; Zheng, Jiaping; Xiao, Qing; Liu, Yunsheng

    2013-06-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the application of phase-contrast cine magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) in endoscopic aqueductoplasty (EA) for patients with obstructive hydrocephalus. The clinical diagnosis of hydrocephalus caused by aqueduct obstruction in 23 patients was confirmed by phase-contrast cine MRI examination. The patients were treated with EA and MRI was repeated during the follow-up. The cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) flow velocity in the aqueduct was measured to determine whether the aqueduct was obstructed. The results of phase-contrast cine MRI examinations indicated that there was no CSF flow in the aqueduct for all patients prior to surgery. Aqueductoplasty was successfully performed in all patients. The results of phase-contrast cine MRI examinations performed a week after surgery demonstrated an average CSF flow velocity of 4.74±1.77 cm/sec. During the follow-up, intracranial hypertension recurred in two patients in whom CSF flow was not observed in the aqueduct by the phase-contrast cine MRI scan. Aqueduct re-occlusion was revealed by an endoscopic exploration. By measuring the CSF flow velocity, phase-contrast cine MRI accurately identifies aqueduct obstruction. Cine MRI is a nontraumatic, simple and reliable method for determining whether the aqueduct is successfully opened following aqueductoplasty.

  18. Cine magnetic resonance imaging in hypertrophic cardiomyopathy. Evaluation of left ventricular wall thickness and systolic function

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cine magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) was performed on 21 patients with hypertrophic cardiomyopathy and left ventricular (LV) regional systolic function was quantitatively evaluated. The visual evaluation of hypertrophic regions and the motion patterns of their walls on cine MR images was possible in most cases. However, this evaluation was subjective and a quantitative analysis was difficult. Septal and posterior wall thickness measured on cine MRI correlated well with those obtained by ultrasound cardiogram (UCG). There was also a good correlation between % thickness of LV wall and its thickness at end diastolic phase. Comparison of % thickness between normal subjects and hypertrophic cardiomyopathies showed a tendency of it being less at the region of more severe hypertrophic change. We conclude that cine MRI is a useful means to analyse the anatomical feature and functional change in hypertrophic cardiomyopathy. (author)

  19. Effects of Incentive Spirometry on Respiratory Motion in Healthy Subjects Using Cine Breathing Magnetic Resonance Imaging

    OpenAIRE

    Kotani, Toshiaki; Akazawa, Tsutomu; Sakuma, Tsuyoshi; Nagaya, Shigeyuki; Sonoda, Masaru; Tanaka, Yuji; Katogi, Takehide; Nemoto, Tetsuharu; Minami, Shohei

    2015-01-01

    Objective To investigate the effectiveness of incentive spirometry on respiratory motion in healthy subjects using cine breathing magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). Methods Ten non-smoking healthy subjects without any history of respiratory disease were studied. Subjects were asked to perform pulmonary training using incentive spirometry every day for two weeks. To assess the effectiveness of this training, pulmonary function tests and cine breathing MRI were performed before starting pulmonar...

  20. A hybrid breath hold and continued respiration-triggered technique for time-resolved 3D MRI perfusion studies in lung cancer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hintze, C. [Deutsches Krebsforschungszentrum (DKFZ), Heidelberg (Germany). Radiologie; Stemmer, A. [Siemens AG (Germany). Healthcare Sector; Bock, M. [Deutsches Krebsforschungszentrum (DKFZ), Heidelberg (DE). Medizinische Physik in der Radiologie] (and others)

    2010-01-15

    Assessment of lung cancer perfusion is impaired by respiratory motion. Imaging times for contrast agent wash-out studies often exceed breath hold capabilities, and respiration triggering reduces temporal resolution. Temporally resolved volume acquisition of entire tumors is required to assess heterogeneity. Therefore, we developed and evaluated an MR measurement technique that exceeds a single breath hold, and provides a variable temporal resolution during acquisition while suspending breath-dependent motion. 20 patients with suspected lung cancer were subjected to perfusion studies using a spoiled 3D gradient echo sequence after bolus injection of 0.07 mmol/kg body weight of Gd-DTPA. 10 acquisitions in expiratory breath hold were followed by 50 navigator-triggered acquisitions under free breathing. Post-processing allowed for co-registration of the 3D data sets. An ROI-based visualization of the signal-time curves was performed. In all cases motion-suspended, time-resolved volume data sets (40 x 33 x 10 cm{sup 3}, voxel size: 2.1 x 2.1 x 5.0 mm{sup 3}) were generated with a variable, initially high temporal resolution (2.25 sec) that was synchronized with the breath pattern and covered up to 8(1)/(2) min. In 7 / 20 cases a remaining offset could be reduced by rigid co-registration. The tumors showed fast wash-in, followed by rapid signal decay (8 / 20) or a plateau. The feasibility of a perfusion study with hybrid breath hold and navigator-triggered time-resolved 3D MRI which combines high initial temporal resolution during breath hold with a long wash-out period under free breathing was demonstrated. (orig.)

  1. A hybrid breath hold and continued respiration-triggered technique for time-resolved 3D MRI perfusion studies in lung cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Assessment of lung cancer perfusion is impaired by respiratory motion. Imaging times for contrast agent wash-out studies often exceed breath hold capabilities, and respiration triggering reduces temporal resolution. Temporally resolved volume acquisition of entire tumors is required to assess heterogeneity. Therefore, we developed and evaluated an MR measurement technique that exceeds a single breath hold, and provides a variable temporal resolution during acquisition while suspending breath-dependent motion. 20 patients with suspected lung cancer were subjected to perfusion studies using a spoiled 3D gradient echo sequence after bolus injection of 0.07 mmol/kg body weight of Gd-DTPA. 10 acquisitions in expiratory breath hold were followed by 50 navigator-triggered acquisitions under free breathing. Post-processing allowed for co-registration of the 3D data sets. An ROI-based visualization of the signal-time curves was performed. In all cases motion-suspended, time-resolved volume data sets (40 x 33 x 10 cm3, voxel size: 2.1 x 2.1 x 5.0 mm3) were generated with a variable, initially high temporal resolution (2.25 sec) that was synchronized with the breath pattern and covered up to 8(1)/(2) min. In 7 / 20 cases a remaining offset could be reduced by rigid co-registration. The tumors showed fast wash-in, followed by rapid signal decay (8 / 20) or a plateau. The feasibility of a perfusion study with hybrid breath hold and navigator-triggered time-resolved 3D MRI which combines high initial temporal resolution during breath hold with a long wash-out period under free breathing was demonstrated. (orig.)

  2. Evaluation of an interactive breath-hold control system in CT-guided lung biopsy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Purpose: In this study we assessed the effect of an interactive breath-hold control system on procedure time and technical success in transthoracic CT-guided lung biopsies. Materials and Methods: in 36 patients (4 female, 32 male, mean age 65 years; range 33 - 88) with a pulmonary nodule, we performed CT-guided biopsy using a 18G Tru-cut needle (Cardinal Health, Dublin, UK) in a 64 row dual-source CT scanner (Somatom Definition, Siemens, Forchheim, Germany) using intermittent imaging of the needle. In half of the patients (2 female, 16 male, mean age 67 years), an interactive breathhold control system (IBC) (Mayo Clinic Medical Devices, USA) was applied. No additional device was used in the control group. Results: the biopsy was visually successful in all patients. The diameter of the target lesion was comparable in both groups (IBC: 30 ± 19 mm; control: 28 ± 15 mm). The number of imaging steps was significantly smaller (p < 0.05) and the intervention time was significantly shorter (p < 0.05) in the IBC group (IBC: 9 ± 5 steps 17 ± 10 min; control: 13 ± 5 steps 26 ± 12 min). Conclusion: application of the IBC unit reduced the intervention time and radiation exposure in CT-guided Tru-cut biopsy of pulmonary nodules. (orig.)

  3. Cine MR imaging of uterine peristalsis in patients with endometriosis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kido, Aki; Togashi, Kaori; Koyama, Takashi; Fujimoto, Ryota [Kyoto University, Department of Diagnostic Imaging and Nuclear Medicine, Graduate School of Medicine, Kyoto (Japan); Nishino, Mizuki [Beth Israel Deaconess Medical Center, Department of Radiology, Kyoto (Japan); Miyake, Kanae; Hayakawa, Katsumi [Kyoto City Hospital, Department of Radiology, Kyoto (Japan); Iwasaku, Kazuhiro [Kyoto City Hospital, Department of Obstetrics and Gynecology, Kyoto (Japan); Fujii, Shingo [Kyoto University, Department of Gynecology and Obstetrics, Kyoto (Japan)

    2007-07-15

    Endometriosis is one of the most important causes of infertility; however the precise mechanism by which it affects female fertility is unclear. The objective of this study was to study the functional aspects of the uterus by evaluating uterine contractility in patients with endometrial cysts of the ovary. The study population was recruited from two institutes and consisted of 26 women (periovulatory (10), luteal (13), and menstrual phase (3); age range: 19-51 years) with untreated endometriosis; the control group consisted of 12 healthy women (age range: 22-41 years). Cine MR imaging obtained by a 1.5T magnet was visually evaluated at 12 x faster than real speed, focusing on the presence of uterine peristalsis, the direction and frequency of peristalsis, and the presence of sustained uterine contractions. Uterine peristalsis was identifiable in 3/10, 3/13, and 3/3 of the endometriosis patients in each menstrual cycle, respectively, and in 11/12, 3/12, and 5/12 of their control subjects. Peristaltic detection rate and frequency were significantly less for the endometriosis group than for the controls in the periovulatory phase only (p<0.05). Sustained contractions were recognized in 19/36 control subjects and in 13/26 endometriosis patients, but the difference was not significant. Uterine peristalsis appears to be suppressed during the periovulatory phase in patients with endometriosis, which may have an adverse effect on sperm transport. (orig.)

  4. Cine MR imaging of uterine peristalsis in patients with endometriosis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Endometriosis is one of the most important causes of infertility; however the precise mechanism by which it affects female fertility is unclear. The objective of this study was to study the functional aspects of the uterus by evaluating uterine contractility in patients with endometrial cysts of the ovary. The study population was recruited from two institutes and consisted of 26 women (periovulatory (10), luteal (13), and menstrual phase (3); age range: 19-51 years) with untreated endometriosis; the control group consisted of 12 healthy women (age range: 22-41 years). Cine MR imaging obtained by a 1.5T magnet was visually evaluated at 12 x faster than real speed, focusing on the presence of uterine peristalsis, the direction and frequency of peristalsis, and the presence of sustained uterine contractions. Uterine peristalsis was identifiable in 3/10, 3/13, and 3/3 of the endometriosis patients in each menstrual cycle, respectively, and in 11/12, 3/12, and 5/12 of their control subjects. Peristaltic detection rate and frequency were significantly less for the endometriosis group than for the controls in the periovulatory phase only (p<0.05). Sustained contractions were recognized in 19/36 control subjects and in 13/26 endometriosis patients, but the difference was not significant. Uterine peristalsis appears to be suppressed during the periovulatory phase in patients with endometriosis, which may have an adverse effect on sperm transport. (orig.)

  5. SU-E-J-234: Application of a Breathing Motion Model to ViewRay Cine MR Images

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Purpose: A respiratory motion model previously used to generate breathing-gated CT images was used with cine MR images. Accuracy and predictive ability of the in-plane models were evaluated. Methods: Sagittalplane cine MR images of a patient undergoing treatment on a ViewRay MRI/radiotherapy system were acquired before and during treatment. Images were acquired at 4 frames/second with 3.5 × 3.5 mm resolution and a slice thickness of 5 mm. The first cine frame was deformably registered to following frames. Superior/inferior component of the tumor centroid position was used as a breathing surrogate. Deformation vectors and surrogate measurements were used to determine motion model parameters. Model error was evaluated and subsequent treatment cines were predicted from breathing surrogate data. A simulated CT cine was created by generating breathing-gated volumetric images at 0.25 second intervals along the measured breathing trace, selecting a sagittal slice and downsampling to the resolution of the MR cines. A motion model was built using the first half of the simulated cine data. Model accuracy and error in predicting the remaining frames of the cine were evaluated. Results: Mean difference between model predicted and deformably registered lung tissue positions for the 28 second preview MR cine acquired before treatment was 0.81 +/− 0.30 mm. The model was used to predict two minutes of the subsequent treatment cine with a mean accuracy of 1.59 +/− 0.63 mm. Conclusion: Inplane motion models were built using MR cine images and evaluated for accuracy and ability to predict future respiratory motion from breathing surrogate measurements. Examination of long term predictive ability is ongoing. The technique was applied to simulated CT cines for further validation, and the authors are currently investigating use of in-plane models to update pre-existing volumetric motion models used for generation of breathing-gated CT planning images

  6. SU-E-J-234: Application of a Breathing Motion Model to ViewRay Cine MR Images

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    O’Connell, D. P.; Thomas, D. H.; Dou, T. H.; Lamb, J. M.; Yang, L.; Low, D. A. [University of California, Los Angeles, Los Angeles, CA (United States)

    2015-06-15

    Purpose: A respiratory motion model previously used to generate breathing-gated CT images was used with cine MR images. Accuracy and predictive ability of the in-plane models were evaluated. Methods: Sagittalplane cine MR images of a patient undergoing treatment on a ViewRay MRI/radiotherapy system were acquired before and during treatment. Images were acquired at 4 frames/second with 3.5 × 3.5 mm resolution and a slice thickness of 5 mm. The first cine frame was deformably registered to following frames. Superior/inferior component of the tumor centroid position was used as a breathing surrogate. Deformation vectors and surrogate measurements were used to determine motion model parameters. Model error was evaluated and subsequent treatment cines were predicted from breathing surrogate data. A simulated CT cine was created by generating breathing-gated volumetric images at 0.25 second intervals along the measured breathing trace, selecting a sagittal slice and downsampling to the resolution of the MR cines. A motion model was built using the first half of the simulated cine data. Model accuracy and error in predicting the remaining frames of the cine were evaluated. Results: Mean difference between model predicted and deformably registered lung tissue positions for the 28 second preview MR cine acquired before treatment was 0.81 +/− 0.30 mm. The model was used to predict two minutes of the subsequent treatment cine with a mean accuracy of 1.59 +/− 0.63 mm. Conclusion: Inplane motion models were built using MR cine images and evaluated for accuracy and ability to predict future respiratory motion from breathing surrogate measurements. Examination of long term predictive ability is ongoing. The technique was applied to simulated CT cines for further validation, and the authors are currently investigating use of in-plane models to update pre-existing volumetric motion models used for generation of breathing-gated CT planning images.

  7. Determination of respiratory phase during acquisition of airway cine MR images

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kalra, Maninder; McConnell, Keith; Amin, Raouf S. [Cincinnati Children' s Hospital, Division of Pulmonary Medicine, Cincinnati, OH (United States); Donnelly, Lane F.; O' Brien, Kendall [Cincinnati Children' s Hospital, Department of Radiology, Cincinnati, OH (United States); Sandhu, Jaskaran [University of Missouri, Department of Psychiatry, Columbia, MO (United States); Johnson, James [Cincinnati Children' s Hospital, Department of Respiratory Care, Cincinnati, OH (United States)

    2006-09-15

    Subjects were imaged on a 1.5-T Signa MRI system using the head-neck vascular coil. An axial fast gradient echo cine, at the base of the second cervical vertebra, was obtained. A total of 128 images were acquired with a rapid image acquisition (one per second) over several respiratory cycles. The analog signal from the MR scanner (RF unblank) was utilized to determine the duration of the cine MR sequence. The phase of respiration was determined by analyzing the nasal air flow connected via pressure tubing to a pressure transducer outside the MR scanner room. We were thus able to determine the phase of respiration during acquisition of individual airway cine MR images. There was a wide range of airway volume measurements over the respiratory cycle with the lowest volume at end expiration and the highest at peak inspiration. (orig.)

  8. Panic disorder in a breath-holding challenge test: a simple tool for a better diagnosis

    OpenAIRE

    Nardi Antonio E.; Nascimento Isabella; Valença Alexandre M; Lopes Fabiana L.; Mezzasalma Marco A; Zin Walter A.

    2003-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: Our aim was to observe if anxiety disorder patients - DSM-IV - respond in a similar way to the induction of panic attacks by a breath-holding challenge test. METHOD: We randomly selected 29 panic disorder (PD) patients, 27 social anxiety disorder (SAD) patients, 21 generalized anxiety disorder (GAD) patients. They were induced to breath-hold for as long as possible four times with two-minute interval between them. Anxiety scales were applied before and after the test. RESULTS: A to...

  9. Effect of Dyspnea Induced by Breath-holding on Maximal Muscular Strength of Patients with COPD

    OpenAIRE

    Shingai, Kazuya; Kanezaki, Masashi

    2014-01-01

    [Purpose] The purpose of the present study was to clarify the effect of dyspnea induced by breath-holding on maximum muscular strength of patients with COPD. [Subjects] This study recruited 14 COPD subjects via public posting. [Methods] Dyspnea was assessed by the modified Borg scale. The subject asked to stop breathing at end-expiration and to hold their breath with a nose clip for as long as possible. Both total breath-holding time and threshold time of dyspnea were measured with a chronogr...

  10. SU-C-19A-01: A Simple Deep Inspiration Breath Hold System

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Purpose: Deep Inspiration Breath Hold (DIBH) Radiation therapy for left sided breast can reduce dose to the lungs and heart. The purpose of this work is to illustrate how to implement a simple method of DIBH for simulation and treatment using equipment readily available in most radiation oncology clinics. Methods: For simulation and treatment, a foam block is placed on the patient's abdomen or chest and a horizontal laser mounted on a movable slide is aimed at the center of the foam block. After a coaching session the block is marked at the average free breathing position and average DIBH position. The position of block relative to laser can be seen by the patient via prism glasses as well as the radiation therapists via a video camera system. Simulation CT scans and treatment delivery are performed under DIBH conditions. Imaging and treatment are performed by manually turning the beam on once the patient has achieved DIBH after being given verbal instructions. Results: Manually triggered imaging was used daily to verify DIBH reproducibility for all patients treated using this system. Sets of before and during port images were used to ensure patient position was appropriate for treatment. Results of the laser on block method were compared to a sister facility using surface mapping techniques for DIBH and the two methods were found to have clinically equivalent reproducibility. Conclusion: The laser and block system was found to be simple to implement and robust during patient treatment. This system can be created from readily available materials at low cost and provides adequate feedback to patient and therapists. During treatment images document the reproducibility of setup and give confidence to clinicians that this method is reproducible from day to day

  11. SU-C-19A-01: A Simple Deep Inspiration Breath Hold System

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rasmussen, B; Kaznowski, L; Blackburn, J; Chu, K [Marquette General Hospital, Marquette, MI (United States); Duelge, J; Baldwin, B; Valenti, M; Hunsader, A [Dickinson County Healthcare System, Iron Mountain, MI (United States)

    2014-06-15

    Purpose: Deep Inspiration Breath Hold (DIBH) Radiation therapy for left sided breast can reduce dose to the lungs and heart. The purpose of this work is to illustrate how to implement a simple method of DIBH for simulation and treatment using equipment readily available in most radiation oncology clinics. Methods: For simulation and treatment, a foam block is placed on the patient's abdomen or chest and a horizontal laser mounted on a movable slide is aimed at the center of the foam block. After a coaching session the block is marked at the average free breathing position and average DIBH position. The position of block relative to laser can be seen by the patient via prism glasses as well as the radiation therapists via a video camera system. Simulation CT scans and treatment delivery are performed under DIBH conditions. Imaging and treatment are performed by manually turning the beam on once the patient has achieved DIBH after being given verbal instructions. Results: Manually triggered imaging was used daily to verify DIBH reproducibility for all patients treated using this system. Sets of before and during port images were used to ensure patient position was appropriate for treatment. Results of the laser on block method were compared to a sister facility using surface mapping techniques for DIBH and the two methods were found to have clinically equivalent reproducibility. Conclusion: The laser and block system was found to be simple to implement and robust during patient treatment. This system can be created from readily available materials at low cost and provides adequate feedback to patient and therapists. During treatment images document the reproducibility of setup and give confidence to clinicians that this method is reproducible from day to day.

  12. Total Removal of Unwanted Harmonic Peaks (TruHARP) MRI for Single Breath-Hold High-Resolution Myocardial Motion and Strain Quantification

    OpenAIRE

    Agarwal, Harsh K.; Prince, Jerry L.; Abd-Elmoniem, Khaled Z.

    2010-01-01

    Current MRI methods for myocardial motion and strain quantification have limited resolution because of Fourier space spectral peak interference. Methods have been proposed to remove this interference in order to improve resolution; however, these methods are clinically impractical due to the prolonged imaging times. In this paper, we propose total removal of unwanted harmonic peaks (TruHARP); a myocardial motion and strain quantification methodology that uses a novel single breath-hold MR ima...

  13. PET/CT-guided percutaneous liver mass biopsies and ablations: Targeting accuracy of a single 20 s breath-hold PET acquisition

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Aim: To determine whether a single 20 s breath-hold positron-emission tomography (PET) acquisition obtained during combined PET/computed tomography (CT)-guided percutaneous liver biopsy or ablation procedures has the potential to target 2-[18F]-fluoro-2-deoxy-D-glucose (FDG)-avid liver masses as accurately as up to 180 s breath-hold PET acquisitions. Materials and methods: This retrospective study included 10 adult patients with 13 liver masses who underwent FDG PET/CT-guided percutaneous biopsies (n = 5) or ablations (n = 5). PET was acquired as nine sequential 20 s, monitored, same-level breath-hold frames and CT was acquired in one monitored breath-hold. Twenty, 40, 60, and 180 s PET datasets were reconstructed. Two blinded readers marked tumour centres on randomized PET and CT datasets. Three-dimensional spatial localization differences between PET datasets and either 180 s PET or CT were analysed using multiple regression analyses. Statistical tests were two-sided and p < 0.05 was considered significant. Results: Targeting differences between 20 s PET and 180 s PET ranged from 0.7–20.3 mm (mean 5.3 ± 4.4 mm; median 4.3) and were not statistically different from 40 or 60 s PET (p = 0.74 and 0.91, respectively). Targeting differences between 20 s PET and CT ranged from 1.4–36 mm (mean 9.6 ± 7.1 mm; median 8.2 mm) and were not statistically different from 40, 60, or 180 s PET (p = 0.84, 0.77, and 0.35, respectively). Conclusion: Single 20 s breath-hold PET acquisitions from PET/CT-guided percutaneous liver procedures have the potential to target FDG-avid liver masses with equivalent accuracy to 180 s summed, breath-hold PET acquisitions and may facilitate strategies that improve image registration and shorten procedure times

  14. Effect of repetitive end-inspiration breath holding on very short-term heart rate variability in healthy humans

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Very short-term heart rate variability (HRV) is thought to reflect dynamic changes in autonomic nervous activity, which is helpful in understanding the role of autonomic nervous function (ANF) in the mechanisms underlying apnea-induced cardiac arrhythmias. The goal of this study was to investigate the effect of repetitive end-inspiration breath holding on very short-term HRV. A total of 32 young healthy participants took part in the experiments. Three trials were performed, each involving seven repetitive end-inspiration breath holding and a 30 s recovery period between breath holding. Durations of breath holding in the three trials were 1:2:3. The study first evaluated the effect of analyzed data lengths on the stability of HRV indices and determined three HRV indices suitable for very short-term analysis. The results showed that in most cases, during breath holding, the square root of the mean squared differences of successive normal RR intervals (rMSSD) was significantly lower, but normalized units of the power in the low frequency band ranging from 0.04 to 0.15 Hz (nLF) and LF/high frequency (HF) were significantly higher than those during corresponding durations under the normal breathing conditions. On the contrary, during recovery after breath holding, rMSSD was significantly higher but nLF and LF/HF were lower than normal. Moreover, the durations of breath holding had no significant influence on the variations of LF/HF. In addition, as participants repeated the breath holding, HRV indices varied non-linearly. HRV changes may indicate sympathetic activation during breath holding and parasympathetic activation during recovery after breath holding. In conjunction with the existing physiological interpretation based on changes in heart rate, the results may imply that breath holding leads to both cardiac sympathetic and parasympathetic activation simultaneously, which may be a possible pathogenic factor of apnea-induced arrhythmias. (paper)

  15. Geometric uncertainties in voluntary deep inspiration breath hold radiotherapy for locally advanced lung cancer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Josipovic, Mirjana; Persson, Gitte Bjørnsen Fredberg; Dueck, Jenny;

    2016-01-01

    BACKGROUND AND PURPOSE: Deep inspiration breath hold (DIBH) increases lung volume and can potentially reduce treatment-related toxicity in locally advanced lung cancer. We estimated geometric uncertainties in visually guided voluntary DIBH and derived the appropriate treatment margins for differe...

  16. Treatment of Chronic Breath-Holding in an Adult with Severe Mental Retardation: A Clinical Case Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reed, Derek D.; Martens, Brian K.

    2008-01-01

    We describe a clinical case study surrounding the behavioral assessment and operant treatment of, an adult with severe mental retardation who engaged in chronic breath-holding. In this clinical case, previous neurological and medical testing had ruled out biological bases for the individual's breath-holding. A functional behavioral assessment…

  17. Breathing adapted radiotherapy for breast cancer: comparison of free breathing gating with the breath-hold technique

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Korreman, Stine Sofia; Pedersen, Anders N; Nøttrup, Trine Jakobi;

    2005-01-01

    , and to compare this respiratory technique with voluntary breath-hold. PATIENTS AND METHODS: 17 patients were CT-scanned during non-coached breathing manoeuvre including free breathing (FB), end-inspiration gating (IG), end-expiration gating (EG), deep inspiration breath-hold (DIBH) and end-expiration breath...

  18. Breathing adapted radiotherapy of breast cancer: reduction of cardiac and pulmonary doses using voluntary inspiration breath-hold

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pedersen, Anders N; Korreman, Stine; Nyström, Håkan;

    2004-01-01

    anterioposterior chest wall excursion. Each patient underwent three scans: during free breathing (FB), voluntary expiration breath-hold (EBH) and voluntary deep inspiration breath-hold (DIBH). For each scan, an optimised treatment plan was designed with conformal tangential fields encompassing the clinical target...

  19. Analysis of 3-D Tongue Motion from Tagged and Cine Magnetic Resonance Images

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xing, Fangxu; Woo, Jonghye; Lee, Junghoon; Murano, Emi Z.; Stone, Maureen; Prince, Jerry L.

    2016-01-01

    Purpose: Measuring tongue deformation and internal muscle motion during speech has been a challenging task because the tongue deforms in 3 dimensions, contains interdigitated muscles, and is largely hidden within the vocal tract. In this article, a new method is proposed to analyze tagged and cine magnetic resonance images of the tongue during…

  20. Effects of breath holding CT scan during mid-expiration on PET/CT

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Objective: To study the effects of breath holding during mid-expiration of CT scan on PET/CT and SUV of lung. Methods: From September 2010 to December 2010, 200 patients including 120 males and 80 females (23-87 (55.01± 11.60) years), who underwent 18F-FDG PET/CT studies were included. Patients were randomly divided into 2 groups using random number table. In breath holding (BH) group (52 males, 48 females, age ranging from 29-83 (55.43±10.38) years), all underwent PET/CT studies with BH CT during mid-expiration.In free breath (FB) group (68 males, 32 females, age ranging from 23-87 (55.68± 12.72) years), all underwent PET/CT studies with FB CT. PET/CT images were analyzed by 1 senior technologist and 2 nuclear physicians. Analysis was carried out for the special registration of PET and CT, SUV of lung tissue on the bottom of lung and respiratory motion artifacts of lung on CT scanning. The diaphragmatic dome showed on the same layer of PET and CT was considered as well-registration between CT and PET. Two-sample t test, χ2 test and one-way analysis of variance were used to analyze data. Results: In BH group, 28% (28/100) of expiratory motion artifacts was observed, which was significantly lower than that of FB group (96%, 96/100; χ2=98.132, P<0.01). In BH group, 40% (80/200) was considered well-registration between CT and PET, which was significantly higher than that of FB group (30%, 60/200; χ2=4.396, P<0.05). There were 3 types of registration between CT and PET: location of diaphragm on CT higher than that on PET, matching between PET and CT, location of diaphragm on PET higher than that on CT. SUV in low lung tissue of these different types were increased one by one, with more significant difference found in BH group (SUVmax: 0.73±0.28, 1.00±0.29, 1.60±0.68; SUVmean: 0.59±0.23, 0.81±0.22, 1.33±0.34; F=21.93, 24.57, both P<0.01) than those in FB group (SUVmax: 0.84±0.36, 1.08±0.27, 1.16±0.24; SUVmean: 0.69±0.29, 0.85±0.20, 0.94±0.24; F=7.23, 6

  1. Experience with MR cholangiopancreatography with use of a fast inversion recovery sequence during a single breath-hold period

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shiono, Takahiro [Dokkyo Univ., Saitama (Japan). Koshigaya Hospital

    1997-11-01

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate the single breath-hold fast inversion recovery sequence (FIR) for depicting the biliary tract. A prospective study was performed in 40 patients with suspected diseases in the biliary tract. MRCP (magnetic resonance cholangiopancreatography) including cholecystograms of diagnostic quality was carried out in 35 patients. Impacted common duct stones were able to be distinguished from malignancies because of their characteristic shapes of obstruction in four of five cases. FIR with thick slices can provide a shorter acquisition time and fewer artifacts with better signal to noise ratio and contrast to noise ratio than MIP images obtained by means of gradient echo methods. MRCP with FIR was a useful adjunctive tool for non-invasive evaluation of patients with obstructive jaundice. (author)

  2. Functional imaging of murine hearts using accelerated self-gated UTE cine MRI.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Motaal, Abdallah G; Noorman, Nils; de Graaf, Wolter L; Hoerr, Verena; Florack, Luc M J; Nicolay, Klaas; Strijkers, Gustav J

    2015-01-01

    We introduce a fast protocol for ultra-short echo time (UTE) Cine magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) of the beating murine heart. The sequence involves a self-gated UTE with golden-angle radial acquisition and compressed sensing reconstruction. The self-gated acquisition is performed asynchronously with the heartbeat, resulting in a randomly undersampled kt-space that facilitates compressed sensing reconstruction. The sequence was tested in 4 healthy rats and 4 rats with chronic myocardial infarction, approximately 2 months after surgery. As a control, a non-accelerated self-gated multi-slice FLASH sequence with an echo time (TE) of 2.76 ms, 4.5 signal averages, a matrix of 192 × 192, and an acquisition time of 2 min 34 s per slice was used to obtain Cine MRI with 15 frames per heartbeat. Non-accelerated UTE MRI was performed with TE = 0.29 ms, a reconstruction matrix of 192 × 192, and an acquisition time of 3 min 47 s per slice for 3.5 averages. Accelerated imaging with 2×, 4× and 5× undersampled kt-space data was performed with 1 min, 30 and 15 s acquisitions, respectively. UTE Cine images up to 5× undersampled kt-space data could be successfully reconstructed using a compressed sensing algorithm. In contrast to the FLASH Cine images, flow artifacts in the UTE images were nearly absent due to the short echo time, simplifying segmentation of the left ventricular (LV) lumen. LV functional parameters derived from the control and the accelerated Cine movies were statistically identical.

  3. An insulin based model to explain changes and interactions in human breath-holding.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dangmann, Rosita

    2015-06-01

    Until now oxygen was thought to be the leading factor of hypoxic conditions. Whereas now it appears that insulin is the key regulator of hypoxic conditions. Insulin seems to regulate the redox state of the organism and to determine the breakpoint of human breath-holding. This new hypoxia-insulin hypotheses might have major clinical relevance. Besides the clinical relevance, this hypothesis could explain, for the first time, why the training of the diaphragm, among other factors, results in an increase in breath-holding performance. Elite freedivers/apnea divers are able to reach static breath-holding times to over 6 min. Untrained persons exhibit an unpleasant feeling after more or less a minute. Breath-holding is stopped at the breakpoint. The partial oxygen pressure as well as the carbon dioxide pressure failed to directly influence the breakpoint in earlier studies. The factors that contribute to the breakpoint are still under debate. Under hypoxic conditions the organism needs more glucose, because it changes from the oxygen consuming pentose phosphate (36 ATP/glucose molecule) to the anaerobic glycolytic pathway (2ATP/glucose molecule). Hence insulin, as it promotes the absorption of glucose, is set in the center of interest regarding hypoxic conditions. This paper provides an insulin based model that could explain the changes and interactions in human breath-holding. The correlation between hypoxia and reactive oxygen species (ROS) and their influence on the sympathetic nerve system and hypoxia-inducible factor 1 alpha (HIF-1α) is dealt with. It reviews as well the direct interrelation of HIF-1α and insulin. The depression of insulin secretion through the vagus nerve activation via inspiration is discussed. Furthermore the paper describes the action of insulin on the carotid bodies and the diaphragm and therefore a possible role in respiration pattern. Freedivers that go over the breakpoint of breath-holding could exhibit seizures and thus the effect of

  4. In vivo proton MRS of normal pancreas metabolites during breath-holding and free-breathing

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Su, T.-H. [Department of Radiology, Beijing Friendship Hospital, Capital Medical University, 95 Yong-An Road, Beijing (China); Jin, E.-H., E-mail: erhujin1@hotmail.com [Department of Radiology, Beijing Friendship Hospital, Capital Medical University, 95 Yong-An Road, Beijing (China); Shen, H. [GE China Company Ltd, Healthcare, General Electric Company, Beijing (China); Zhang, Y.; He, W. [Department of Radiology, Beijing Friendship Hospital, Capital Medical University, 95 Yong-An Road, Beijing (China)

    2012-07-15

    Aim: To characterize normal pancreas metabolites using in vivo proton magnetic resonance spectroscopy ({sup 1}H MRS) at 3 T under conditions of breath-holding and free-breathing. Materials and methods: The pancreases of 32 healthy volunteers were examined using {sup 1}H MRS during breath-holding and free-breathing acquisitions in a single-voxel point-resolved selective spectroscopy sequence (PRESS) technique using a 3 T MRI system. Resonances were compared between paired spectra of the two breathing modes. Furthermore, correlations between lipid (Lip) content and age, body-mass index (BMI), as well as choline (Cho) peak visibility of the normal pancreas were analysed during breath-holding. Results: Twenty-nine pairs of spectra were successfully obtained showing three major resonances, Lip, Cho, cholesterol and the unsaturated parts of the olefinic region of fatty acids (Chol + Unsat). Breath-hold spectra were generally better, with higher signal-to-noise ratios (SNR; Z=-2.646, p = 0.008) and Cho peak visible status (Z=-2.449, p = 0.014). Correlations were significant between spectra acquired by the two breathing modes, especially for Lip height, Lip area, and the area of other peaks at 1.9-4.1 ppm. However, the Lip resonance was significantly different between the spectra of the two breathing modes (p < 0.05). In the breath-holding spectra, there were significant positive correlations between Lip peak height, area, and age (r = 0.491 and 0.521, p = 0.007 and 0.004), but not between Lip peak area and BMI. There was no statistical difference in Cho resonances between males and females. The Lip peak height and area were significantly higher in the Cho peak invisible group than in the Cho peak visible group (t = 2.661 and 2.353, p = 0.030 and 0.043). Conclusion: In vivo{sup 1}H MRS of the normal pancreas at 3 T is technically feasible and can characterize several metabolites. {sup 1}H MRS during breath-holding acquisition is superior to that during free

  5. Clinical usefulness of cardiac cine magnetic resonance imaging in patients with atrial fibrillation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We studied the clinical usefulness of cine mode magnetic resonance (MR) imaging in patients with atrial fibrillation (AF) from aspects of image quality and cardiac function. The signal-to-noise (S/N) ratio in the myocardium was significantly (p<0.05) lower in patients with AF than those with normal sinus rhythm. Two radiologists who did not know any patient's information evaluated the image quality visually by marking method on a scale of 12 points. There was no difference of image quality between the two groups. The standard deviation of R-R interval was significantly (r=-0.92, p<0.001) correlated with the S/N ratio in myocardium. Consequently, it was not favorable to estimate visually cardiac cine MR image in patients with AF, when standard deviation of R-R interval was large. The left ventricular (LV) end diastolic, end systolic and stroke volumes and ejection fraction were closely (r=0.82∼0.95, p<0.05∼0.001) correlated between MR imaging and M-mode echocardiography, respectively. The ability to detect left side valvular regurgitation was almost equal in both MR imaging and color Doppler echocardiography. This result was coincided to previous papers in patients with normal sinus rhythm. In conclusion, cine mode MR imaging was also useful to analyze cardiac function and detect valvular regurgitation in patients with AF. (author)

  6. Facial immersion in cold water enhances cerebral blood velocity during breath-hold exercise in humans

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kjeld, Thomas; Pott, Frank C; Secher, Niels H

    2009-01-01

    perfusion evaluated as the middle cerebral artery mean flow velocity (MCA V(mean)) during exercise in nine male subjects. At rest, a breath hold of maximum duration increased the arterial carbon dioxide tension (Pa(CO(2))) from 4.2 to 6.7 kPa and MCA V(mean) from 37 to 103 cm/s (mean; approximately 178%; P...... exercise, a breath hold increased Pa(CO(2)) from 5.9 to 8.2 kPa (P ... 180-W exercise (from 47 to 53 cm/s), and this increment became larger with facial immersion (76 cm/s, approximately 62%; P 100% increase in MCA V(mean), largely...

  7. Review of deep inspiration breath-hold techniques for the treatment of breast cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Radiation treatment to the left breast is associated with increased cardiac morbidity and mortality. The deep inspiration breath-hold technique (DIBH) can decrease radiation dose delivered to the heart and this may facilitate the treatment of the internal mammary chain nodes. The aim of this review is to critically analyse the literature available in relation to breath-hold methods, implementation, utilisation, patient compliance, planning methods and treatment verification of the DIBH technique. Despite variation in the literature regarding the DIBH delivery method, patient coaching, visual feedback mechanisms and treatment verification, all methods of DIBH delivery reduce radiation dose to the heart. Further research is required to determine optimum protocols for patient training and treatment verification to ensure the technique is delivered successfully

  8. Facial immersion in cold water enhances cerebral blood velocity during breath-hold exercise in humans

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kjeld, Thomas; Pott, Frank C; Secher, Niels H

    2009-01-01

    180-W exercise (from 47 to 53 cm/s), and this increment became larger with facial immersion (76 cm/s, approximately 62%; P brain with a >100% increase in MCA V(mean), largely...... perfusion evaluated as the middle cerebral artery mean flow velocity (MCA V(mean)) during exercise in nine male subjects. At rest, a breath hold of maximum duration increased the arterial carbon dioxide tension (Pa(CO(2))) from 4.2 to 6.7 kPa and MCA V(mean) from 37 to 103 cm/s (mean; approximately 178%; P...... exercise, a breath hold increased Pa(CO(2)) from 5.9 to 8.2 kPa (P

  9. Review of deep inspiration breath-hold techniques for the treatment of breast cancer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Latty, Drew, E-mail: drew.latty@health.nsw.gov.au [Crown Princess Mary Cancer Centre, Westmead Hospital, Sydney, New South Wales (Australia); Stuart, Kirsty E [Crown Princess Mary Cancer Centre, Westmead Hospital, Sydney, New South Wales (Australia); Westmead Breast Cancer Institute, Sydney, New South Wales (Australia); Wang, Wei [Crown Princess Mary Cancer Centre, Westmead Hospital, Sydney, New South Wales (Australia); Westmead Breast Cancer Institute, Sydney, New South Wales (Australia); Nepean Cancer Care Centre, Sydney, New South Wales (Australia); Ahern, Verity [Crown Princess Mary Cancer Centre, Westmead Hospital, Sydney, New South Wales (Australia)

    2015-03-15

    Radiation treatment to the left breast is associated with increased cardiac morbidity and mortality. The deep inspiration breath-hold technique (DIBH) can decrease radiation dose delivered to the heart and this may facilitate the treatment of the internal mammary chain nodes. The aim of this review is to critically analyse the literature available in relation to breath-hold methods, implementation, utilisation, patient compliance, planning methods and treatment verification of the DIBH technique. Despite variation in the literature regarding the DIBH delivery method, patient coaching, visual feedback mechanisms and treatment verification, all methods of DIBH delivery reduce radiation dose to the heart. Further research is required to determine optimum protocols for patient training and treatment verification to ensure the technique is delivered successfully.

  10. EFFECTS OF AQUA AEROBICS AND FLOOR AEROBICS ON BREATH HOLDING TIME AMONG SCHOOL GIRLS

    OpenAIRE

    P.V. Shelvam; S. Arunadevi

    2013-01-01

    The purpose of the study was to find out the effects of aqua aerobics and floor aerobics on breath holding time among school girls. To achieve this purpose of the study, ninety school girls were selected as subjects who were studied Cornation Higher Secondary School, Sivakasi. The selected subjects were aged between 15 to 17 years. The selected subjects were randomly divided into three groups of 30 subjects each group. Group one acted as experimental group I and group two acted as experimenta...

  11. Horses Auto-Recruit Their Lungs by Inspiratory Breath Holding Following Recovery from General Anaesthesia.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Martina Mosing

    Full Text Available This study evaluated the breathing pattern and distribution of ventilation in horses prior to and following recovery from general anaesthesia using electrical impedance tomography (EIT. Six horses were anaesthetised for 6 hours in dorsal recumbency. Arterial blood gas and EIT measurements were performed 24 hours before (baseline and 1, 2, 3, 4, 5 and 6 hours after horses stood following anaesthesia. At each time point 4 representative spontaneous breaths were analysed. The percentage of the total breath length during which impedance remained greater than 50% of the maximum inspiratory impedance change (breath holding, the fraction of total tidal ventilation within each of four stacked regions of interest (ROI (distribution of ventilation and the filling time and inflation period of seven ROI evenly distributed over the dorso-ventral height of the lungs were calculated. Mixed effects multi-linear regression and linear regression were used and significance was set at p<0.05. All horses demonstrated inspiratory breath holding until 5 hours after standing. No change from baseline was seen for the distribution of ventilation during inspiration. Filling time and inflation period were more rapid and shorter in ventral and slower and longer in most dorsal ROI compared to baseline, respectively. In a mixed effects multi-linear regression, breath holding was significantly correlated with PaCO2 in both the univariate and multivariate regression. Following recovery from anaesthesia, horses showed inspiratory breath holding during which gas redistributed from ventral into dorsal regions of the lungs. This suggests auto-recruitment of lung tissue which would have been dependent and likely atelectic during anaesthesia.

  12. Panic disorder in a breath-holding challenge test: a simple tool for a better diagnosis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nardi Antonio E.

    2003-01-01

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVE: Our aim was to observe if anxiety disorder patients - DSM-IV - respond in a similar way to the induction of panic attacks by a breath-holding challenge test. METHOD: We randomly selected 29 panic disorder (PD patients, 27 social anxiety disorder (SAD patients, 21 generalized anxiety disorder (GAD patients. They were induced to breath-hold for as long as possible four times with two-minute interval between them. Anxiety scales were applied before and after the test. RESULTS: A total of 44.8% (n=13 PD patients, 14.8% (n=4 SAD patients, 9.5% (n=2 GAD patients had a panic attack after the test (c²= 21.44, df= 2, p=0.001. There was no heart rate or anxiety levels difference among the groups before and after the test. CONCLUSION: In this breath-holding challenge test the panic disorder patients were more sensitive than other anxiety disorder patients.

  13. Multi-center transferability of a breath-hold T2 technique for myocardial iron assessment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chan Godfrey CF

    2008-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Cardiac iron overload is the leading cause of death in thalassemia major and is usually assessed using myocardial T2* measurements. Recently a cardiovascular magnetic resonance (CMR breath-hold T2 sequence has been developed as a possible alternative. This cardiac T2 technique has good interstudy reproducibility, but its transferability to different centres has not yet been investigated. Methods and Results The breath-hold black blood spin echo T2 sequence was installed and validated on 1.5T Siemens MR scanners at 4 different centres across the world. Using this sequence, 5–10 thalassemia patients from each centre were scanned twice locally within a week for local interstudy reproducibility (n = 34 and all were rescanned within one month at the standardization centre in London (intersite reproducibility. The local interstudy reproducibility (coefficient of variance and mean difference were 4.4% and -0.06 ms. The intersite reproducibility and mean difference between scanners were 5.2% and -0.07 ms. Conclusion The breath-hold myocardial T2 technique is transferable between Siemens scanners with good intersite and local interstudy reproducibility. This technique may have value in the diagnosis and management of patients with iron overload conditions such as thalassemia.

  14. Interfractional Dose Variations in Intensity-Modulated Radiotherapy With Breath-Hold for Pancreatic Cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Purpose: To investigate the interfractional dose variations for intensity-modulated radiotherapy (RT) combined with breath-hold (BH) at end-exhalation (EE) for pancreatic cancer. Methods and Materials: A total of 10 consecutive patients with pancreatic cancer were enrolled. Each patient was fixed in the supine position on an individualized vacuum pillow with both arms raised. Computed tomography (CT) scans were performed before RT, and three additional scans were performed during the course of chemoradiotherapy using a conventional RT technique. The CT data were acquired under EE–BH conditions (BH–CT) using a visual feedback technique. The intensity-modulated RT plan, which used five 15-MV coplanar ports, was designed on the initial BH–CT set with a prescription dose of 39 Gy at 2.6 Gy/fraction. After rigid image registration between the initial and subsequent BH–CT scans, the dose distributions were recalculated on the subsequent BH–CT images under the same conditions as in planning. Changes in the dose–volume metrics of the gross tumor volume (GTV), clinical target volume (CTV = GTV + 5 mm), stomach, and duodenum were evaluated. Results: For the GTV and clinical target volume (CTV), the 95th percentile of the interfractional variations in the maximal dose, mean dose, dose covering 95% volume of the region of structure, and percentage of the volume covered by the 90% isodose line were within ±3%. Although the volume covered by the 39 Gy isodose line for the stomach and duodenum did not exceed 0.1 mL at planning, the volume covered by the 39 Gy isodose line for these structures was up to 11.4 cm3 and 1.8 cm3, respectively. Conclusions: Despite variations in the gastrointestinal state and abdominal wall position at EE, the GTV and CTV were mostly ensured at the planned dose, with the exception of 1 patient. Compared with the duodenum, large variations in the stomach volume receiving high-dose radiation were observed, which might be beyond the negligible

  15. MR and cine-MR imaging in the diagnosis of infantile congenital heart disease

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    朱会英; 韩立新; 黄新华; 王霞

    2001-01-01

    目的评价磁共振成像(MRI)及电影磁共振成像(cine-MRI)在小儿先天性心脏病(简称先心病)中的诊断 价值。方法对34例先心患儿常规行横轴位、冠状位、矢状位成像,并根据诊断需要选择垂直于室间隔的长轴 位、短轴位及平行于室间隔的长轴位。在图像中选择感兴趣的层面做心脏cine-MRI,每个心动周期内采集 16-32帧图像,以动态观察心脏及大血管变化,并与二维超声心动图(2DE)、心血管造影(CAG)及手术结 果进行对照分析。 结果MRI测量6例左向右分流型先心病患儿缺损口或内径值与手术所见相吻合(P=0.924),与2DE呈 正相关(r=0.973),且MRI较2DE更接近手术实测值。MRI及cine-MRI诊断28例复杂型先心病,27例与 手术诊断相一致。 结论MRI能准确显示房、室间隔的缺损、动脉导管未闭部位及内径,cine-MRI能以电影的方式显示间隔 缺损的分流、心脏与大血管血流状况及畸形的病理形态。本组资料证实MRI及cine-MRI是一种安全、无 创的诊断小儿先天性心脏病的检查方法,有较大的临床应用价值。%Objective To assess the effectiveness of magnetic resonanceimaging (MRI) and cine magnetic resonance imaging (cine-MRI) in the diagnosis of infantile congenital heart disease. Methods A total of 34 cases were studied with MRI and cine-MRI. The data were analyzed and compared with those of two-dimensional echocardiography (2DE), cardioangiography (CAG) and surgery. Results The size of the defect or its caliber obtained from MRI in 6 patients with left to right shunt congenital heart disease was compatible with that observed in surgery (P=0.924). Comparison of cine-MRI and CAG in 28 patients with complicated congenital heart disease showed that the diagnosis of 27 cases by cine-MRI was the same as that by CAG. Conclusion Both MRI and cine-MRI play an important role in diagnosing infantile congenital heart disease.

  16. Cine MR imaging in mitral valve prolapse; Study on mitral regurgitation and left atrial volume

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kumai, Toshihiko (Chiba Univ. (Japan). School of Medicine)

    1993-02-01

    This study was undertaken to assess the ability of cine MR imaging to evaluate the direction, timing, and severity of mitral regurgitation in patients with mitral valve prolapse (MVP). The population of this study was 33 patients with MVP diagnosed by two-dimensional echocardiography and 10 patients with rheumatic mitral valve disease (MSR) for comparison. 7 patients with MVP and 5 with MSR had atrial fibrillation and/or history of congestive heart failure as complications. Mitral regurgitation was graded for severity by color Doppler flow imaging in all patients. Direction and size of systolic flow void in the left atrium were analyzed by contiguous multilevel cine MR images and the maximum volumes of flow void and left atrium were measured. Although flow void was found at the center of the left atrium in most of MSR, it was often directed along the postero-caudal atrial wall in anterior leaflet prolapse and along the anterocranial atrial wall in posterior leaflet prolapse. In MVP, the maximum volume of flow void was often seen in late systole. The maximum volume of flow void and that of left atrium were significantly larger in patients with atrial fibrillation and/or history of congestive heart failure. The length and volume of flow void were increased with clinical severity and degree of regurgitation determined by color Doppler flow imaging. Thus cine MR imaging provides a useful means for detection and semiquantitative evaluation of mitral regurgitation in subjects with MVP. (author).

  17. Cardiac Motion During Deep-Inspiration Breath-Hold: Implications for Breast Cancer Radiotherapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Purpose: Many patients with left-sided breast cancer receive adjuvant radiotherapy during deep-inspiration breath hold (DIBH) to minimize radiation exposure to the heart. We measured the displacement of the left anterior descending artery (LAD) and heart owing to cardiac motion during DIBH, relative to the standard tangential fields for left breast cancer radiotherapy. Methods and Materials: A total of 20 patients who had undergone computed tomography-based coronary angiography with retrospective electrocardiographic gating were randomly selected for the present study. The patients underwent scanning during DIBH to control the influence of respiration on cardiac motion. Standard medial and lateral tangential fields were placed, and the LADs were contoured on the systolic- and diastolic-phase computed tomography data sets by the clinicians. Displacement of the LAD during cardiac contractions was calculated in three directions: toward the posterior edge of the treatment fields, left–right, and anteroposterior. Displacement of the entire heart was measured on the maximal and minimal intensity projection computed tomography images. Results: The mean displacement of the LAD from cardiac contraction without the influence of respiration for 20 patients was 2.3 mm (range, 0.7–3.8) toward the posterior edge of the treatment fields, 2.6 mm (range, 1.0–6.8) in the left–right direction, and 2.3 mm (range, 0.6–6.5) in the anteroposterior direction. At least 30% of the LAD volume was displaced >5 mm in any direction in 2 patients (10%), and 5 mm in 10 patients (50%). The extent of displacement of the heart periphery during cardiac motion was negligible near the treatment fields. Conclusions: Displacement of the heart periphery near the treatment fields was negligible during DIBH; however, displacement of the LAD from cardiac contraction varied substantially between and within patients. We recommend maintaining ≥5 mm of distance between the LAD and the field edge for

  18. Fourier modeling of the BOLD response to a breath-hold task: Optimization and reproducibility.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pinto, Joana; Jorge, João; Sousa, Inês; Vilela, Pedro; Figueiredo, Patrícia

    2016-07-15

    Cerebrovascular reactivity (CVR) reflects the capacity of blood vessels to adjust their caliber in order to maintain a steady supply of brain perfusion, and it may provide a sensitive disease biomarker. Measurement of the blood oxygen level dependent (BOLD) response to a hypercapnia-inducing breath-hold (BH) task has been frequently used to map CVR noninvasively using functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI). However, the best modeling approach for the accurate quantification of CVR maps remains an open issue. Here, we compare and optimize Fourier models of the BOLD response to a BH task with a preparatory inspiration, and assess the test-retest reproducibility of the associated CVR measurements, in a group of 10 healthy volunteers studied over two fMRI sessions. Linear combinations of sine-cosine pairs at the BH task frequency and its successive harmonics were added sequentially in a nested models approach, and were compared in terms of the adjusted coefficient of determination and corresponding variance explained (VE) of the BOLD signal, as well as the number of voxels exhibiting significant BOLD responses, the estimated CVR values, and their test-retest reproducibility. The brain average VE increased significantly with the Fourier model order, up to the 3rd order. However, the number of responsive voxels increased significantly only up to the 2nd order, and started to decrease from the 3rd order onwards. Moreover, no significant relative underestimation of CVR values was observed beyond the 2nd order. Hence, the 2nd order model was concluded to be the optimal choice for the studied paradigm. This model also yielded the best test-retest reproducibility results, with intra-subject coefficients of variation of 12 and 16% and an intra-class correlation coefficient of 0.74. In conclusion, our results indicate that a Fourier series set consisting of a sine-cosine pair at the BH task frequency and its two harmonics is a suitable model for BOLD-fMRI CVR measurements

  19. Right ventricular volume and mass determined by cine magnetic resonance imaging in HIV patients with possible right ventricular dysfunction

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kjaer, Andreas; Lebech, Anne-Mette; Gerstoft, Jan;

    2006-01-01

    Impaired right ventricular (RV) function has been reported to occur in patients with HIV when studied by echocardiography. However, for accurate evaluation of RV function and morphology, first-pass radionuclide ventriculography (RNV) and cine magnetic resonance imaging (cine-MRI) are methods...... ventricular ejection fraction (RVEF). To do so, we screened patients with RNV and performed an additional cine-MRI in those with reduced RVEF determined by RNV. Ninety patients with HIV were included. To evaluate the MRI measures exactly we included 18 age- and gender-matched healthy volunteers to establish...

  20. Effect of breath-hold on blood gas analysis in captive Pacific white-sided dolphins (Lagenorhynchus obliquidens).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Terasawa, Fumio; Ohizumi, Hiroshi; Ohshita, Isao

    2010-09-01

    The effect of a breath-hold on blood gas was evaluated in captive Pacific white-sided dolphins (Lagenorhynchus obliquidens). Serial blood collections were performed from a vessel on the ventral surface of the flukes during breath-hold. In total, 178 blood samples were taken from three dolphins for five trials in each animal. During a breath-hold, partial pressure of oxygen (Po₂) decreased from 152.5 to 21.8 mmHg and partial pressure of carbon dioxide (Po₂) conversely increased from 31.8 to 83.6 mmHg. The range of pH was 7.54 to 7.25, suggesting drastic change from alkalemia to acidemia. These wide ranges of blood gas imply a considerable change of oxygen affinity caused by the Bohr effect during breath-hold, which enable effective uptake and distribution of oxygen to metabolizing tissues.

  1. Three-dimensional MRI-linac intra-fraction guidance using multiple orthogonal cine-MRI planes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The introduction of integrated MRI-radiation therapy systems will offer live intra-fraction imaging. We propose a feasible low-latency multi-plane MRI-linac guidance strategy. In this work we demonstrate how interleaved acquired, orthogonal cine-MRI planes can be used for low-latency tracking of the 3D trajectory of a soft-tissue target structure. The proposed strategy relies on acquiring a pre-treatment 3D breath-hold scan, extracting a 3D target template and performing template matching between this 3D template and pairs of orthogonal 2D cine-MRI planes intersecting the target motion path. For a 60 s free-breathing series of orthogonal cine-MRI planes, we demonstrate that the method was capable of accurately tracking the respiration related 3D motion of the left kidney. Quantitative evaluation of the method using a dataset designed for this purpose revealed a translational error of 1.15 mm for a translation of 39.9 mm. We have demonstrated how interleaved acquired, orthogonal cine-MRI planes can be used for online tracking of soft-tissue target volumes. (paper)

  2. Quantifying the Reproducibility of Heart Position During Treatment and Corresponding Delivered Heart Dose in Voluntary Deep Inhalation Breath Hold for Left Breast Cancer Patients Treated With External Beam Radiotherapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Purpose: Voluntary deep inhalation breath hold (VDIBH) reduces heart dose during left breast irradiation. We present results of the first study performed to quantify reproducibility of breath hold using bony anatomy, heart position, and heart dose for VDIBH patients at treatment table. Methods and Materials: Data from 10 left breast cancer patients undergoing VDIBH whole-breast irradiation were analyzed. Two computed tomography (CT) scans, free breathing (FB) and VDIBH, were acquired to compare dose to critical structures. Pretreatment weekly kV orthogonal images and tangential ports were acquired. The displacement difference from spinal cord to sternum across the isocenter between coregistered planning Digitally Reconstructed Radiographs (DRRs) and kV imaging of bony thorax is a measure of breath hold reproducibility. The difference between bony coregistration and heart coregistration was the measured heart shift if the patient is aligned to bony anatomy. Results: Percentage of dose reductions from FB to VDIBH: mean heart dose (48%, SD 19%, p = 0.002), mean LAD dose (43%, SD 19%, p = 0.008), and maximum left anterior descending (LAD) dose (60%, SD 22%, p = 0.008). Average breath hold reproducibility using bony anatomy across the isocenter along the anteroposterior (AP) plane from planning to treatment is 1 (range, 0–3; SD, 1) mm. Average heart shifts with respect to bony anatomy between different breath holds are 2 ± 3 mm inferior, 1 ± 2 mm right, and 1 ± 3 mm posterior. Percentage dose changes from planning to delivery: mean heart dose (7%, SD 6%); mean LAD dose, ((9%, SD 7%)S, and maximum LAD dose, (11%, SD 11%) SD 11%, p = 0.008). Conclusion: We observed excellent three-dimensional bony registration between planning and pretreatment imaging. Reduced delivered dose to heart and LAD is maintained throughout VDIBH treatment.

  3. Quantifying the Reproducibility of Heart Position During Treatment and Corresponding Delivered Heart Dose in Voluntary Deep Inhalation Breath Hold for Left Breast Cancer Patients Treated With External Beam Radiotherapy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    McIntosh, Alyson; Shoushtari, Asal N.; Benedict, Stanley H.; Read, Paul W. [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Virginia, Charlottesville, Virginia (United States); Wijesooriya, Krishni, E-mail: kw5wx@virginia.edu [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Virginia, Charlottesville, Virginia (United States)

    2011-11-15

    Purpose: Voluntary deep inhalation breath hold (VDIBH) reduces heart dose during left breast irradiation. We present results of the first study performed to quantify reproducibility of breath hold using bony anatomy, heart position, and heart dose for VDIBH patients at treatment table. Methods and Materials: Data from 10 left breast cancer patients undergoing VDIBH whole-breast irradiation were analyzed. Two computed tomography (CT) scans, free breathing (FB) and VDIBH, were acquired to compare dose to critical structures. Pretreatment weekly kV orthogonal images and tangential ports were acquired. The displacement difference from spinal cord to sternum across the isocenter between coregistered planning Digitally Reconstructed Radiographs (DRRs) and kV imaging of bony thorax is a measure of breath hold reproducibility. The difference between bony coregistration and heart coregistration was the measured heart shift if the patient is aligned to bony anatomy. Results: Percentage of dose reductions from FB to VDIBH: mean heart dose (48%, SD 19%, p = 0.002), mean LAD dose (43%, SD 19%, p = 0.008), and maximum left anterior descending (LAD) dose (60%, SD 22%, p = 0.008). Average breath hold reproducibility using bony anatomy across the isocenter along the anteroposterior (AP) plane from planning to treatment is 1 (range, 0-3; SD, 1) mm. Average heart shifts with respect to bony anatomy between different breath holds are 2 {+-} 3 mm inferior, 1 {+-} 2 mm right, and 1 {+-} 3 mm posterior. Percentage dose changes from planning to delivery: mean heart dose (7%, SD 6%); mean LAD dose, ((9%, SD 7%)S, and maximum LAD dose, (11%, SD 11%) SD 11%, p = 0.008). Conclusion: We observed excellent three-dimensional bony registration between planning and pretreatment imaging. Reduced delivered dose to heart and LAD is maintained throughout VDIBH treatment.

  4. Accelerated three-dimensional cine phase contrast imaging using randomly undersampled echo planar imaging with compressed sensing reconstruction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Basha, Tamer A; Akçakaya, Mehmet; Goddu, Beth; Berg, Sophie; Nezafat, Reza

    2015-01-01

    The aim of this study was to implement and evaluate an accelerated three-dimensional (3D) cine phase contrast MRI sequence by combining a randomly sampled 3D k-space acquisition sequence with an echo planar imaging (EPI) readout. An accelerated 3D cine phase contrast MRI sequence was implemented by combining EPI readout with randomly undersampled 3D k-space data suitable for compressed sensing (CS) reconstruction. The undersampled data were then reconstructed using low-dimensional structural self-learning and thresholding (LOST). 3D phase contrast MRI was acquired in 11 healthy adults using an overall acceleration of 7 (EPI factor of 3 and CS rate of 3). For comparison, a single two-dimensional (2D) cine phase contrast scan was also performed with sensitivity encoding (SENSE) rate 2 and approximately at the level of the pulmonary artery bifurcation. The stroke volume and mean velocity in both the ascending and descending aorta were measured and compared between two sequences using Bland-Altman plots. An average scan time of 3 min and 30 s, corresponding to an acceleration rate of 7, was achieved for 3D cine phase contrast scan with one direction flow encoding, voxel size of 2 × 2 × 3 mm(3) , foot-head coverage of 6 cm and temporal resolution of 30 ms. The mean velocity and stroke volume in both the ascending and descending aorta were statistically equivalent between the proposed 3D sequence and the standard 2D cine phase contrast sequence. The combination of EPI with a randomly undersampled 3D k-space sampling sequence using LOST reconstruction allows a seven-fold reduction in scan time of 3D cine phase contrast MRI without compromising blood flow quantification.

  5. Chronic adaptations of lung function in breath-hold diving fishermen

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cristiane Diniz

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available Objectives: The aim of this study was to verify and analyze the existence of chronic adaptations of lung function in freediving fishermen whose occupation is artisanal fishing. Material and Methods: This was a cross-sectional study involving 11 breath-hold diving fishermen and 10 non-breath-hold diving fishermen (control from the village of Bitupitá in the municipality of Barroquinha (Ceará - Brazil. Anthropometric measurements, chest and abdominal circumferences as well as spirometric and respiratory muscle strength tests were conducted according to the specifications of the American Thoracic Society/European Respiratory Society (ATS/ERS. In order to compare the measured values versus the predicted values, Student t test was used in the case of parametric test and Wilcoxon test in the case of nonparametric test. To compare the inter-group means Student t test was used for parametric test and Mann-Whitney test for the nonparametric one. The level of significance was set at α = 5%. Results: The forced vital capacity (FVC (4.9±0.6 l vs. 4.3±0.4 l and forced expiratory volume in 1 s (FEV1 (4.0±0.5 l vs. 3.6±0.3 l were, respectively, higher in the group of divers compared to the control group (p ≤ 0.05. Furthermore, in the group of free divers, the measured FVC, FEV1 and FEV1/FVC ratios were significantly greater than the predicted ones. No differences were found between the measured respiratory pressures. Conclusions: These results indicate that breath-hold diving seems to produce chronic adaptations of the respiratory system, resulting in elevated lung volumes with no airway obstruction.

  6. Cine magnetic resonance imaging, computed tomography and ultrasonography in the evaluation of chest wall invasion of lung cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    To assess the usefulness of cine-magnetic resonance imaging (cine-MRI) in the evaluation of chest wall invasion, we compared the results of cine-MRI with those of computed tomography (CT) and ultrasonography (US). Eleven patients were examined who had no pain and who were difficult to diagnose by routine examinations. MRI was performed with a Magnetom SP/4000, 1.5T unit (Siemens, Germany). For cine imaging, continuous turbo-FLUSH (ultra fast low angle shot) images were obtained at an orthogonal section to the chest wall during slow deep breathing. A CT scan was performed using a TCT 900S or Super Helix (Toshiba, Japan) at 1 cm intervals, with section thicknesses of 1 cm throughout the entire chest. US was performed with a model SSA-270A (Toshiba, Japan) with 7.5-MHz linear array scanners (PLF-705S; Toshiba, Japan). Sensitivity, specificity and accuracy were 67%, 75% and 73% for cine MRI, 67%, 63% and 64% for CT, 33%, 75% and 64% for US, respectively. These results indicate that cine MRI is potentially useful for the diagnosis of chest wall invasion of lung cancer. (author)

  7. Technical aspects of the deep inspiration breath-hold technique in the treatment of thoracic cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Purpose: The goal of this paper is to describe our initial experience with the deep inspiration breath-hold (DIBH) technique in conformal treatment of non-small-cell lung cancer with particular emphasis on the technical aspects required for implementation. Methods and Materials: In the DIBH technique, the patient is verbally coached through a modified slow vital capacity maneuver and brought to a reproducible deep inspiration breath-hold level. The goal is to immobilize the tumor and to expand normal lung out of the high-dose region. A physicist or therapist monitors and records patient breathing during simulation, verification, and treatment using a spirometer with a custom computer interface. Examination of internal anatomy during fluoroscopy over multiple breath holds establishes the reproducibility of the DIBH maneuver for each patient. A reference free-breathing CT scan and DIBH planning scan are obtained. To provide an estimate of tumor motion during normal tidal breathing, additional scan sets are obtained at end inspiration and end expiration. These are also used to set the spirometer action levels for treatment. Patient lung inflation is independently verified over the course of treatment by comparing the distance from the isocenter to the diaphragm measured from the DIBH digitally reconstructed radiographs to the distance measured on the portal films. Patient breathing traces obtained during treatment were examined retrospectively to assess the reproducibility of the technique. Results: Data from the first 7 patients, encompassing over 250 treatments, were analyzed. The inferred displacement of the centroid of gross tumor volume from its position in the planning scan, as calculated from the spirometer records in over 350 breath holds was 0.02 ± 0.14 cm (mean and standard deviation). These data are consistent with the displacements of the diaphragm (-0.1 ± 0.4 cm; range, from -1.2 to 1.1 cm) relative to the isocenter, as measured on the (92) portal films

  8. Optimization of parameter settings in cine-MR imaging for diagnosis of swallowing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ohkubo, Mai; Higaki, Takuo; Nishikawa, Keiichi; Otonari-Yamamoto, Mika; Sugiyama, Tetsuya; Ishida, Ryo; Wako, Mamoru; Sano, Tsukasa

    2014-01-01

    Videofluorography is frequently used to evaluate swallowing and is considered the "gold standard" among imaging modalities. This modality, however, has several disadvantages, including radiation exposure and limitations in the detection of soft tissues. Conversely, magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) offers excellent contrast resolution in soft tissue without radiation exposure. A major drawback of MRI in evaluating swallowing, however, is that temporal resolution is poor. The aim of this study was to investigate a new cine-MRI modality. Imaging parameters were optimized and the efficacy of this new technique is discussed. Three techniques for speeding up MRI were combined: true fast imaging with steady state precession, generalized auto-calibrating partially parallel acquisition, and key-hole imaging. The effects of the receiver coils used, receiving bandwidth, slice thickness, and flip angle on each image were determined. The optimal imaging parameters obtained comprised a reduction factor of 2, receiving bandwidth of 1,000 Hz/pixel (repetition time of 151.7 milliseconds and echo time of 1.4 milliseconds), flip angle of 50°, and slice thickness of 6 mm. Neck and spine coils were used. Under these conditions, the new cine-MR imaging technique investigated showed a temporal resolution of 0.1 sec/slice (10 frames/sec). Even with optimized parameter settings, this technique did not allow a true temporal resolution of 30 frames/sec by a large margin. Motion artifacts persisted. Further study is needed on how to speed up this technique. PMID:25212558

  9. Easy Diagnosis of Aortic Invasion in Patients with Lung Cancer Using Cine Magnetic Resonance Imaging

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hidetaka Uramoto

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available Selecting the proper treatment strategy for locally advanced lung cancer, such as T4 tumors, is difficult. Therefore, obtaining an accurate diagnosis of T4 tumors is required. It can be difficult to determine whether the tumor invades adjacent structures. We describe the case of a patient easily diagnosed to be without aortic invasion using cine magnetic resonance imaging (MRI. We herein report the case of an 80-year-old male who presented a lung tumor. The transbronchial lung washing cytology findings were consistent with those of adenocarcinoma. In addition, the computed tomography findings indicated suspected aortic invasion of the lung tumor, as the mass girdled the descending aorta beyond 120° adjoining at a length of 10 cm. However, cine MRI display clearly demonstrated a clear area of isolation between the aorta and lung tissue based on differences in the heart rhythm from the patient's respiratory movements. Therefore, the lesion was clinically diagnosed as a stage IIB (T3N0M0 tumor. Radiation was administered due to the patient's advanced age and comorbidities such as chronic obstructive pulmonary disease. He remains alive without disease progression 6 months after the therapy. Our findings, therefore, indicate the usefulness of easily diagnosing the absence of aortic invasion in patients with lung cancer using cine MRI without the need for a special software program.

  10. Easy Diagnosis of Aortic Invasion in Patients with Lung Cancer Using Cine Magnetic Resonance Imaging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Uramoto, Hidetaka; Kinoshita, Hiroyasu; Nakajima, Yuki; Akiyama, Hirohiko

    2015-01-01

    Selecting the proper treatment strategy for locally advanced lung cancer, such as T4 tumors, is difficult. Therefore, obtaining an accurate diagnosis of T4 tumors is required. It can be difficult to determine whether the tumor invades adjacent structures. We describe the case of a patient easily diagnosed to be without aortic invasion using cine magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). We herein report the case of an 80-year-old male who presented a lung tumor. The transbronchial lung washing cytology findings were consistent with those of adenocarcinoma. In addition, the computed tomography findings indicated suspected aortic invasion of the lung tumor, as the mass girdled the descending aorta beyond 120° adjoining at a length of 10 cm. However, cine MRI display clearly demonstrated a clear area of isolation between the aorta and lung tissue based on differences in the heart rhythm from the patient's respiratory movements. Therefore, the lesion was clinically diagnosed as a stage IIB (T3N0M0) tumor. Radiation was administered due to the patient's advanced age and comorbidities such as chronic obstructive pulmonary disease. He remains alive without disease progression 6 months after the therapy. Our findings, therefore, indicate the usefulness of easily diagnosing the absence of aortic invasion in patients with lung cancer using cine MRI without the need for a special software program.

  11. Whole heart cine MR imaging of pulmonary veins in patients with congenital heart disease. Comparison with Spin Echo MR imaging

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mitsui, Hideaki [Yamagata City Hospital Saiseikan (Japan); Saito, Haruo; Ishibashi, Tadashi; Takahashi, Shoki; Zuguchi, Masayuki; Yamada, Shogo

    2002-01-01

    We evaluated the accuracy of Whole Heart Cine (WHC) magnetic resonance (MR) imaging in the depiction of pulmonary veins (PVs) in patients with congenital heart disease (CHD) compared to that of spin echo (SE) MR imaging. Among our 35 patients, 4 patients had anomalous PV return. Detectability of four PVs on each MR examination images were evaluated. MR imaging is an effective modality for the clarification of PVs, and WHC MR imaging is more useful in delineating PV anomalies than SE MR imaging. (author)

  12. An Atypical Case of Taravana Syndrome in a Breath-Hold Underwater Fishing Champion: A Case Report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andrea Cortegiani

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Dysbaric accidents are usually referred to compressed air-supplied diving. Nonetheless, some cases of decompression illness are known to have occurred among breath-hold (BH divers also, and they are reported in the medical literature. A male BH diver (57 years old, underwater fishing champion, presented neurological disorders as dizziness, sensory numbness, blurred vision, and left frontoparietal pain after many dives to a 30–35 meters sea water depth with short surface intervals. Symptoms spontaneously regressed and the patient came back home. The following morning, pain and neurological impairment occurred again and the diver went by himself to the hospital where he had a generalized tonic-clonic seizure and lost consciousness. A magnetic resonance imaging of the brain disclofsed a cortical T1-weighted hypointense area in the temporal region corresponding to infarction with partial hemorrhage. An early hyperbaric oxygen therapy led to prompt resolution of neurological findings. All clinical and imaging characteristics were referable to the Taravana diving syndrome, induced by repetitive prolonged deep BH dives. The reappearance of neurological signs after an uncommon 21-hour symptom-free interval may suggest an atypical case of Taravana syndrome.

  13. Breath holding duration as a measure of distress tolerance: examining its relation to measures of executive control

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stefan eSütterlin

    2013-07-01

    Full Text Available Recent research considers distress (intolerance as an essential component in the development of various forms of psychopathology. A behavioral task frequently used to assess distress tolerance is the breath holding task. Although breath holding time (BHT has been associated with behavioral outcomes related to inhibitory control (e.g., smoking cessation, the relationship among breath holding and direct measures of executive control has not yet been thoroughly examined. The present study aims to investigate the relationship between a series of executive function tasks and breath holding duration. Furthermore, we assessed the BHT-task’s test-retest reliability in a one-year follow-up. 113 students completed an initial BHT assessment, 58 of which also completed a series of executive function tasks (the Wisconsin Card Sorting Test, the Parametric Go/No-Go task and the N-back memory updating task. A subsample of these students (N = 34 repeated the breath holding task in a second session one year later. Test-retest reliability of the BHT-task over a one year period was high (r = .67, p

  14. Three-dimensional Mr cholangiopancreatography in a Breath hold with sparsity-based reconstruction of highly Undersampled Data1

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chandarana, Hersh; Doshi, Ankur M.; Shanbhogue, Alampady; Babb, James S.; Bruno, Mary T.; Zhao, Tiejun; Raithel, Esther; Zenge, Michael O.; Li, Guobin; Otazo, Ricardo

    2016-01-01

    Purpose To develop a three-dimensional breath-hold (BH) magnetic resonance (MR) cholangiopancreatographic protocol with sampling perfection with application-optimized contrast using different flip-angle evolutions (SPACE) acquisition and sparsity-based iterative reconstruction (SPARSE) of prospectively sampled 5% k-space data and to compare the results with conventional respiratory-triggered (RT) acquisition. Materials and Methods This HIPAA-compliant prospective study was institutional review board approved. Twenty-nine patients underwent conventional RT SPACE and BH–accelerated SPACE acquisition with 5% k-space sampling at 3 T. Spatial resolution and other parameters were matched when possible. BH SPACE images were reconstructed by enforcing joint multicoil sparsity in the wavelet domain (SPARSE-SPACE). Two board-certified radiologists independently evaluated BH SPARSE-SPACE and RT SPACE images for image quality parameters in the pancreatic duct and common bile duct by using a five-point scale. The Wilcoxon signed-rank test was used to compare BH SPARSE-SPACE and RT SPACE images. Results Acquisition time for BH SPARSE-SPACE was 20 seconds, which was significantly (P .05). For reader 1, distal common bile duct scores were significantly higher with BH SPARSE-SPACE acquisition (P = .036). More patients had acceptable or better overall image quality (scores ≥ 3) with BH SPARSE-SPACE than with RT SPACE acquisition, respectively, for the proximal (23 of 29 [79%] vs 22 of 29 [76%]), middle (22 of 29 [76%] vs 18 of 29 [62%]), and distal (20 of 29 [69%] vs 13 of 29 [45%]) pancreatic duct and the proximal (25 of 28 [89%] vs 22 of 28 [79%]) and distal (25 of 28 [89%] vs 24 of 28 [86%]) common bile duct. Conclusion BH SPARSE-SPACE showed similar or superior image quality for the pancreatic and common duct compared with that of RT SPACE despite 17-fold shorter acquisition time. PMID:26982678

  15. Cine Magnetic Resonance Imaging of the Small Bowel: Comparison of Different Oral Contrast Media

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Asbach, P.; Breitwieser, C.; Diederichs, G.; Eisele, S.; Kivelitz, D.; Taupitz, M.; Zeitz, M.; Hamm, B.; Klessen, C. [Charite - Universitatsmedizin Berlin, Charite Campus Mitte, Berlin (Germany). Dept. of Radiology

    2006-11-15

    Purpose: To evaluate several substances regarding small bowel distension and contrast on balanced steady-state free precession (bSSFP) cine magnetic resonance (MR) images. Material and Methods: Luminal contrast was evaluated in 24 volunteers after oral application of two different contrast agent groups leading to either bright lumen (pineapple, blueberry juice) or dark lumen (tap water, orange juice) on T1-weighted images. Bowel distension was evaluated in 30 patients ingesting either methylcellulose or mannitol solution for limiting intestinal absorption. Fifteen patients with duodeno-jejunal intubation served as the control. Quantitative evaluation included measurement of luminal signal intensities and diameters of four bowel segments, qualitative evaluation assessed luminal contrast and distension on a five-point scale. Results: Quantitative and qualitative evaluation of the four contrast agents revealed no significant differences regarding luminal contrast on bSSFP images. Quantitative evaluation revealed significantly lower (P<0.05) small bowel distension for three out of four segments (qualitative evaluation: two out of four segments) for methylcellulose in comparison to the control. Mannitol was found to be equal to the control. Conclusion: Oral ingestion of tap water or orange juice in combination with mannitol is recommended for cine MR imaging of the small bowel regarding luminal contrast and small bowel distension on bSSFP sequences.

  16. Fully automated segmentation of left ventricle using dual dynamic programming in cardiac cine MR images

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jiang, Luan; Ling, Shan; Li, Qiang

    2016-03-01

    Cardiovascular diseases are becoming a leading cause of death all over the world. The cardiac function could be evaluated by global and regional parameters of left ventricle (LV) of the heart. The purpose of this study is to develop and evaluate a fully automated scheme for segmentation of LV in short axis cardiac cine MR images. Our fully automated method consists of three major steps, i.e., LV localization, LV segmentation at end-diastolic phase, and LV segmentation propagation to the other phases. First, the maximum intensity projection image along the time phases of the midventricular slice, located at the center of the image, was calculated to locate the region of interest of LV. Based on the mean intensity of the roughly segmented blood pool in the midventricular slice at each phase, end-diastolic (ED) and end-systolic (ES) phases were determined. Second, the endocardial and epicardial boundaries of LV of each slice at ED phase were synchronously delineated by use of a dual dynamic programming technique. The external costs of the endocardial and epicardial boundaries were defined with the gradient values obtained from the original and enhanced images, respectively. Finally, with the advantages of the continuity of the boundaries of LV across adjacent phases, we propagated the LV segmentation from the ED phase to the other phases by use of dual dynamic programming technique. The preliminary results on 9 clinical cardiac cine MR cases show that the proposed method can obtain accurate segmentation of LV based on subjective evaluation.

  17. Release of erythropoietin and neuron-specific enolase after breath holding in competing free divers

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kjeld, Thomas; Jattu, T; Nielsen, Henrik;

    2015-01-01

    Free diving is associated with extreme hypoxia. This study evaluated the combined effect of maximal static breath holding and underwater swimming on plasma biomarkers of tissue hypoxemia: erythropoietin, neuron-specific enolase and S100B, C-reactive protein, pro-atrial natriuretic peptide......, and troponin T. Venous blood samples were obtained from 17 competing free divers before and 3 h after sessions of static apnea and underwater swimming. The heart was evaluated by echocardiography. Static apnea for 293 ± 78 s (mean ± SD) and subsequent 88 ± 21 m underwater swimming increased plasma...... = 0.549), and troponin T (P = 0.125) remained unchanged and, as assessed by echocardiography, the heart was not affected. In competitive free divers, bouts of static and dynamic apnea increase plasma erythropoietin and neuron-specific enolase, suggesting that renal and neural tissue, rather than...

  18. Application of cine cardiac MR imaging in normal subjects and patients with valvular, coronary artery, and aortic disease

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cine MR imaging was performed on 15 normal subjects and 27 patients with cardiac disease. In normal subjects, high signal intensity of flowing blood contrasted with that of the myocardium. In 16 patients with valvular regurgitation, signal void jet due to turbulence was visualized across the diseased valves. In three IHSS patients, thickened LV myocardium, mitral regurgitant jets, and systolic LV outflow jets were noted. Five patients with myocardial infarction (MI) showed thinning and/or hypokinesis of MI regions. In three patients with Marfan syndrome, aortic dilatation, insufficiency, and flap (one pt) were identified. Cine MR imaging is potentially useful for evaluation of a variety of cardiac diseases

  19. Reproducibility of organ position using voluntary breath-hold method with spirometer for extracranial stereotactic radiotherapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Purpose: To evaluate in healthy volunteers the reproducibility of organ position using a voluntary breath-hold method with a spirometer and the feasibility of this method for extracranial stereotactic radiotherapy in a clinical setting. Methods and materials: For this study, 5 healthy volunteers were enrolled. After training sessions, they held their breath at the end-inspiration and the end-expiration phase under spirometer-based monitoring. Computed tomography (CT) scans were performed twice at each respiratory phase, with a 10-min interval, on 2 separate days. The total number of CT scans was four at each respiratory phase. After CT volume data were transferred to a three-dimensional treatment-planning system, digitally reconstructed radiographs (DRRs) were calculated for anterior-posterior and left-right beams. Verification was performed with DRRs relative to the diaphragm position, bony landmarks, and the isocenter in each healthy volunteer at each respiratory phase. To evaluate intrafraction reproducibility, we measured the distance between diaphragm position and bony landmarks. To evaluate interfraction reproducibility, we measured the distance between diaphragm position and the isocenter. Reproducibility and setup error were defined as the average value of the differences between each DRR with regard to the first DRR. Results: Intrafraction reproducibility of the caudal-cranial direction was 4.0 ± 3.5 mm at the end-inspiration phase and 2.2 ± 2.0 mm at the end-expiration phase. Interfraction reproducibility of the caudal-cranial direction was 5.1 ± 4.8 mm at the end-inspiration phase and 2.1 ± 1.8 mm at the end-expiration phase. The end-expiration phase was more stable than the end-inspiration phase. Conclusions: The voluntary breath-hold method with a spirometer is feasible, with relatively good reproducibility. We are encouraged about the use of this technique clinically for extracranial stereotactic radiotherapy

  20. Clinical features of panic patients sensitive to hyperventilation or breath-holding methods for inducing panic attacks

    OpenAIRE

    A.E. Nardi; A.M. Valença; F.L. Lopes; Nascimento, I.; M.A. Mezzasalma; W.A. Zin

    2004-01-01

    Our aim was to compare the clinical features of panic disorder (PD) patients sensitive to hyperventilation or breath-holding methods of inducing panic attacks. Eighty-five PD patients were submitted to both a hyperventilation challenge test and a breath-holding test. They were asked to hyperventilate (30 breaths/min) for 4 min and a week later to hold their breath for as long as possible, four times with a 2-min interval. Anxiety scales were applied before and after the tests. We selected the...

  1. Iron supplementation reduces the frequency and severity of breath-holding attacks in non-anaemic children

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anthony Zehetner

    2011-11-01

    Full Text Available Iron supplementation reduces the frequency and severity of breath-holding attacks (BHAs, particularly in children with iron deficiency. The issue of iron supplementation is less clear for Westernized children with BHAs who present to an outpatient community clinic and are not iron-deficient. This is the first reported case series of iron-replete children with frequent and disabling breath-holding attacks who have responded to a course of oral iron supplementation. This intervention is safe, improves quality of life for both child and carer, and is significantly cost-effective in terms of health resource utilization.

  2. Breath-hold monitoring and visual feedback for radiotherapy using a charge-coupled device camera and a head-mounted display. System development and feasibility

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The aim of this study was to present the technical aspects of the breath-hold technique with respiratory monitoring and visual feedback and to evaluate the feasibility of this system in healthy volunteers. To monitor respiration, the vertical position of the fiducial marker placed on the patient's abdomen was tracked by a machine vision system with a charge-coupled device camera. A monocular head-mounted display was used to provide the patient with visual feedback about the breathing trace. Five healthy male volunteers were enrolled in this study. They held their breath at the end-inspiration and the end-expiration phases. They performed five repetitions of the same type of 15-s breath-holds with and without a head-mounted display, respectively. A standard deviation of five mean positions of the fiducial marker during a 15-s breath-hold in each breath-hold type was used as the reproducibility value of breath-hold. All five volunteers well tolerated the breath-hold maneuver. For the inspiration breath-hold, the standard deviations with and without visual feedback were 1.74 mm and 0.84 mm, respectively (P=0.20). For the expiration breath-hold, the standard deviations with and without visual feedback were 0.63 mm and 0.96 mm, respectively (P=0.025). Our newly developed system might help the patient achieve improved breath-hold reproducibility. (author)

  3. Initial clinical results for breath-hold CT-based processing of respiratory-gated PET acquisitions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fin, Loic; Daouk, Joel; Morvan, Julie; Esper, Isabelle El; Saidi, Lazhar; Meyer, Marc-Etienne [Amiens University Hospital, Nuclear Medicine Department, Amiens (France); Bailly, Pascal [Amiens University Hospital, Nuclear Medicine Department, Amiens (France); CHU d' Amiens, Service de Medecine Nucleaire, unite TEP, Hopital Sud, Amiens cedex (France)

    2008-11-15

    Respiratory motion causes uptake in positron emission tomography (PET) images of chest structures to spread out and misregister with the CT images. This misregistration can alter the attenuation correction and thus the quantisation of PET images. In this paper, we present the first clinical results for a respiratory-gated PET (RG-PET) processing method based on a single breath-hold CT (BH-CT) acquisition, which seeks to improve diagnostic accuracy via better PET-to-CT co-registration. We refer to this method as ''CT-based'' RG-PET processing. Thirteen lesions were studied. Patients underwent a standard clinical PET protocol and then the CT-based protocol, which consists of a 10-min List Mode RG-PET acquisition, followed by a shallow end-expiration BH-CT. The respective performances of the CT-based and clinical PET methods were evaluated by comparing the distances between the lesions' centroids on PET and CT images. SUV{sub MAX} and volume variations were also investigated. The CT-based method showed significantly lower (p=0.027) centroid distances (mean change relative to the clinical method =-49%; range =-100% to 0%). This led to higher SUV{sub MAX} (mean change =+33%; range =-4% to 69%). Lesion volumes were significantly lower (p=0.022) in CT-based PET volumes (mean change =-39%: range =-74% to -1%) compared with clinical ones. A CT-based RG-PET processing method can be implemented in clinical practice with a small increase in radiation exposure. It improves PET-CT co-registration of lung lesions and should lead to more accurate attenuation correction and thus SUV measurement. (orig.)

  4. Initial clinical results for breath-hold CT-based processing of respiratory-gated PET acquisitions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Respiratory motion causes uptake in positron emission tomography (PET) images of chest structures to spread out and misregister with the CT images. This misregistration can alter the attenuation correction and thus the quantisation of PET images. In this paper, we present the first clinical results for a respiratory-gated PET (RG-PET) processing method based on a single breath-hold CT (BH-CT) acquisition, which seeks to improve diagnostic accuracy via better PET-to-CT co-registration. We refer to this method as ''CT-based'' RG-PET processing. Thirteen lesions were studied. Patients underwent a standard clinical PET protocol and then the CT-based protocol, which consists of a 10-min List Mode RG-PET acquisition, followed by a shallow end-expiration BH-CT. The respective performances of the CT-based and clinical PET methods were evaluated by comparing the distances between the lesions' centroids on PET and CT images. SUVMAX and volume variations were also investigated. The CT-based method showed significantly lower (p=0.027) centroid distances (mean change relative to the clinical method =-49%; range =-100% to 0%). This led to higher SUVMAX (mean change =+33%; range =-4% to 69%). Lesion volumes were significantly lower (p=0.022) in CT-based PET volumes (mean change =-39%: range =-74% to -1%) compared with clinical ones. A CT-based RG-PET processing method can be implemented in clinical practice with a small increase in radiation exposure. It improves PET-CT co-registration of lung lesions and should lead to more accurate attenuation correction and thus SUV measurement. (orig.)

  5. [Research of Left Ventricle Function Analysis Using Real-time Cardiac Magnetic Resonance Imaging].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Fan; He, Yan; Zhang, Jie; Wu, Yin

    2015-12-01

    Real-time free breathing cardiac cine imaging is a reproducible method with shorter acquisition time and without breath-hold for cardiac magnetic resonance imaging. However, the detection of end-diastole and end-systole frames of real-time free breathing cardiac cine imaging for left ventricle function analysis is commonly completed by visual identification, which is time-consuming and laborious. In order to save processing time, we propose a method for semi-automatic identification of end-diastole and end-systole frames. The method fits respiratory motion signal and acquires the expiration phase, end-diastole and end-systole frames by cross correlation coefficient. The procedure successfully worked on ten healthy volunteers and validated by the analysis of left ventricle function compared to the standard breath-hold steady-state free precession cardiac cine imaging without any significant statistical differences. The results demonstrated that the present method could correctly detect end-diastole and end-systole frames. In the future, this technique may be used for rapid left ventricle function analysis in clinic. PMID:27079101

  6. Three-dimensional MRI-linac intra-fraction guidance using multiple orthogonal cine-MRI planes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bjerre, Troels; Crijns, Sjoerd; Rosenschöld, Per Munck af;

    2013-01-01

    The introduction of integrated MRI-radiation therapy systems will offer live intra-fraction imaging. We propose a feasible low-latency multi-plane MRI-linac guidance strategy. In this work we demonstrate how interleaved acquired, orthogonal cine-MRI planes can be used for low-latency tracking...... of the 3D trajectory of a soft-tissue target structure. The proposed strategy relies on acquiring a pre-treatment 3D breath-hold scan, extracting a 3D target template and performing template matching between this 3D template and pairs of orthogonal 2D cine-MRI planes intersecting the target motion path....... For a 60 s free-breathing series of orthogonal cine-MRI planes, we demonstrate that the method was capable of accurately tracking the respiration related 3D motion of the left kidney. Quantitative evaluation of the method using a dataset designed for this purpose revealed a translational error of 1.15 mm...

  7. Evaluation of cardiac dyssynchrony with longitudinal strain analysis in 4-chamber cine MR imaging

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kawakubo, Masateru, E-mail: masateru@med.kyushu-u.ac.jp [Division of Radiology, Department of Medical Technology, Kyushu University Hospital, 3-1-1 Maidashi, Higashi-Ku Fukuoka-city, Fukuoka 812-8582 (Japan); Department of Health Sciences, Graduate School of Medical Sciences, Kyushu University, 3-1-1 Maidashi, Higashi-Ku Fukuoka-city, Fukuoka 812-8582 (Japan); Nagao, Michinobu, E-mail: minagao@radiol.med.kyushu-u.ac.jp [Department of Molecular Imaging and Diagnosis, Graduate School of Medical Sciences, Kyushu University, 3-1-1 Maidashi, Higashi-Ku Fukuoka-city, Fukuoka 812-8582 (Japan); Kumazawa, Seiji, E-mail: s_kmzw@hs.med.kyushu-u.ac.jp [Department of Health Sciences, Faculty of Medical Sciences, Kyushu University, 3-1-1 Maidashi, Higashi-Ku Fukuoka-city, Fukuoka 812-8582 (Japan); Chishaki, Akiko S., E-mail: chishaki@hs.med.kyushu-u.ac.jp [Department of Health Sciences, Faculty of Medical Sciences, Kyushu University, 3-1-1 Maidashi, Higashi-Ku Fukuoka-city, Fukuoka 812-8582 (Japan); Mukai, Yasushi, E-mail: y_mukai@cardiol.med.kyushu-u.ac.jp [Department of Cardiology, Graduate School of Medical Sciences, Kyushu University, 3-1-1 Maidashi, Higashi-Ku Fukuoka-city, Fukuoka 812-8582 (Japan); Nakamura, Yasuhiko, E-mail: yas-nkmr@r-tec.med.kyushu-u.ac.jp [Division of Radiology, Department of Medical Technology, Kyushu University Hospital, 3-1-1 Maidashi, Higashi-Ku Fukuoka-city, Fukuoka 812-8582 (Japan); Honda, Hiroshi, E-mail: honda@radiol.med.kyushu-u.ac.jp [Department of Clinical Radiology, Graduate School of Medical Sciences, Kyushu University, 3-1-1 Maidashi, Higashi-Ku Fukuoka-city, Fukuoka 812-8582 (Japan); Morishita, Junji, E-mail: junjim@med.kyushu-u.ac.jp [Department of Health Sciences, Faculty of Medical Sciences, Kyushu University, 3-1-1 Maidashi, Higashi-Ku Fukuoka-city, Fukuoka 812-8582 (Japan)

    2013-12-01

    Purpose: We investigated the clinical performance of evaluation of cardiac mechanical dyssynchrony with longitudinal strain analysis using four-chamber (4CH) cine magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). Materials and methods: We retrospectively enrolled 73 chronic heart failure patients (41 men, 32 women; mean age, 57 years, NYHA 2, 3, and 4) who underwent a cardiac MRI in the present study. The left ventricular dyssynchrony (LVD) and interventricular dyssynchrony (IVD) indices were calculated by longitudinal strain analysis using 4CH cine MRI. The LVD and IVD indices were compared by the Wilcoxon rank-sum test between the patients with indication for cardiac resynchronization therapy (CRT) (n = 13) and without indication for CRT (n = 60), with LGE (n = 40) and without LGE (n = 27), the CRT responders (n = 8) and non-responders (n = 6), respectively. Results: LVD in the patients with indication for CRT were significantly longer than those without indication for CRT (LVD: 92 ± 65 vs. 28 ± 40 ms, P < .01). LVD and IVD were significantly longer in the patients with LGE than those without LGE (LVD: 54 ± 58 vs. 21 ± 30 ms, P < .01 and IVD: 51 ± 39 vs. 23 ± 34 ms, P < .01). LVD and IVD in the CRT responders were significantly longer than the CRT non-responders (LVD: 126 ± 55 vs. 62 ± 55 ms, P < .01 and IVD: 96 ± 39 vs. 52 ± 40 ms, P < .05). Conclusion: Longitudinal strain analysis with 4CH cine MRI could be useful for clinical examination in the evaluation of cardiac mechanical dyssynchrony.

  8. Right ventricular volume and mass determined by cine magnetic resonance imaging in HIV patients with possible right ventricular dysfunction

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kjaer, Andreas; Lebech, Anne-Mette; Gerstoft, Jan;

    2006-01-01

    ventricular ejection fraction (RVEF). To do so, we screened patients with RNV and performed an additional cine-MRI in those with reduced RVEF determined by RNV. Ninety patients with HIV were included. To evaluate the MRI measures exactly we included 18 age- and gender-matched healthy volunteers to establish......Impaired right ventricular (RV) function has been reported to occur in patients with HIV when studied by echocardiography. However, for accurate evaluation of RV function and morphology, first-pass radionuclide ventriculography (RNV) and cine magnetic resonance imaging (cine-MRI) are methods...... of choice. Studies of RV involvement in patients with HIV are of interest since pulmonary hypertension is a known serious complication of HIV recognized with increasing frequency. The aim of the present study was to characterize cardiac function and geometry in patients with HIV and reduced right...

  9. A size-based emphysema severity index: robust to the breath-hold-level variations and correlated with clinical parameters

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hwang, Jeongeun; Lee, Minho; Lee, Sang Min; Oh, Sang Young; Oh, Yeon-Mok; Kim, Namkug; Seo, Joon Beom

    2016-01-01

    Objective To determine the power-law exponents (D) of emphysema hole-size distributions as a competent emphysema index. Robustness to extreme breath-hold-level variations and correlations with clinical parameters for chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) were investigated and compared to a conventional emphysema index (EI%). Patients and methods A total of 100 patients with COPD (97 males and three females of mean age 67±7.9 years) underwent multidetector row computed tomography scanning at full inspiration and full expiration. The diameters of the emphysematous holes were estimated and quantified with a fully automated algorithm. Power-law exponents (D) of emphysematous hole-size distribution were evaluated. Results The diameters followed a power-law distribution in all cases, suggesting the scale-free nature of emphysema. D of inspiratory and expiratory computed tomography of patients showed intraclass correlation coefficients >0.8, indicating statistically absolute agreement of different breath-hold levels. By contrast, the EI% failed to agree. Bland–Altman analysis also revealed the superior robustness of D to EI%. D also significantly correlated with clinical parameters such as airflow limitation, diffusion capacity, exercise capacity, and quality of life. Conclusion The D of emphysematous hole-size distribution is robust to breath-hold-level variations and sensitive to the severity of emphysema. This measurement may help rule out the confounding effects of variations in breath-hold levels. PMID:27536095

  10. Classifying geometric variability by dominant eigenmodes of deformation in regressing tumours during active breath-hold lung cancer radiotherapy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Badawi, Ahmed M.; Weiss, Elisabeth; Sleeman, William C., IV; Hugo, Geoffrey D.

    2012-01-01

    The purpose of this study is to develop and evaluate a lung tumour interfraction geometric variability classification scheme as a means to guide adaptive radiotherapy and improve measurement of treatment response. Principal component analysis (PCA) was used to generate statistical shape models of the gross tumour volume (GTV) for 12 patients with weekly breath hold CT scans. Each eigenmode of the PCA model was classified as ‘trending’ or ‘non-trending’ depending on whether its contribution to the overall GTV variability included a time trend over the treatment course. Trending eigenmodes were used to reconstruct the original semi-automatically delineated GTVs into a reduced model containing only time trends. Reduced models were compared to the original GTVs by analyzing the reconstruction error in the GTV and position. Both retrospective (all weekly images) and prospective (only the first four weekly images) were evaluated. The average volume difference from the original GTV was 4.3% ± 2.4% for the trending model. The positional variability of the GTV over the treatment course, as measured by the standard deviation of the GTV centroid, was 1.9 ± 1.4 mm for the original GTVs, which was reduced to 1.2 ± 0.6 mm for the trending-only model. In 3/13 cases, the dominant eigenmode changed class between the prospective and retrospective models. The trending-only model preserved GTV and shape relative to the original GTVs, while reducing spurious positional variability. The classification scheme appears feasible for separating types of geometric variability by time trend.

  11. [Value of cine magnetic resonance imaging in the diagnosis and quantification of valvular regurgitation. Comparison with angiography and Doppler echocardiography].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Germain, P; Baruthio, J; Roul, G; Mossard, J M; Bareiss, P; Wecker, D; Chambron, J; Sacrez, A

    1989-10-01

    Thirty-three patients presenting with regurgitation of the mitral valve (19 cases), tricuspid valve (14 cases) or aortic valve (11 cases) documented by angiography (n = 20) and/or doppler-echocardiography (n = 28) were examined by cine-MRI in order to test this method in valvular regurgitation. Sixteen ECG-synchronized cine-MRI images were acquired by the GRASS technique every 40 ms on appropriate projections, with a resistive 0.28 Tesla Bruker magnet. The semiology of normal and pathological blood flow images at cine-MRI is described. Valvular regurgitations present as "signal void" jets the chronology and spatial extension of which depend on the severity of the lesion. The differential diagnosis with physiological flows is discussed. The diagnostic sensitivity of the method was 29/29 when compared with angiography and 29/33 when compared with doppler-echocardiography (2 cases of 1/4 mitral regurgitation and 2 cases 1/4 tricuspid regurgitation were not visible at cine-MRI). The specificity of this method, as can be judged from 104 patients explored, also seems to be satisfactory. The severity of regurgitation was graded from 1 to 4 with the three methods, on the basis of strict criteria. The differences in grade evaluation exceeded +/- 1 point in only one case of mitral regurgitation which was greatly underestimated by the doppler method as compared with angiography and cine-MRI. Thus, cine-MRI is a reliable method to evaluate valvular regurgitations and their severity. It solves the practical problem raised by non-echogenic patients when catheterization is to be postponed or avoided. PMID:2512868

  12. The effect of climbing Mount Everest on spleen contraction and increase in hemoglobin concentration during breath holding and exercise.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Engan, Harald K; Lodin-Sundström, Angelica; Schagatay, Fanny; Schagatay, Erika

    2014-04-01

    Release of stored red blood cells resulting from spleen contraction improves human performance in various hypoxic situations. This study determined spleen volume resulting from two contraction-evoking stimuli: breath holding and exercise before and after altitude acclimatization during a Mount Everest ascent (8848 m). Eight climbers performed the following protocol before and after the climb: 5 min ambient air respiration at 1370 m during rest, 20 min oxygen respiration, 20 min ambient air respiration at 1370 m, three maximal-effort breath holds spaced by 2 min, 10 min ambient air respiration, 5 min of cycling at 100 W, and finally 10 min ambient air respiration. We measured spleen volume by ultrasound and capillary hemoglobin (HB) concentration after each exposure, and heart rate (HR) and arterial oxygen saturation (Sao2) continuously. Mean (SD) baseline spleen volume was unchanged at 213 (101) mL before and 206 (52) mL after the climb. Before the climb, spleen volume was reduced to 184 (83) mL after three breath holds, and after the climb three breath holds resulted in a spleen volume of 132 (26) mL (p=0.032). After exercise, the preclimb spleen volume was 186 (89) mL vs. 112 (389) mL) after the climb (p=0.003). Breath hold duration and cardiovascular responses were unchanged after the climb. We concluded that spleen contraction may be enhanced by altitude acclimatization, probably reflecting both the acclimatization to chronic hypoxic exposure and acute hypoxia during physical work. PMID:24673535

  13. SU-E-J-33: Cardiac Movement in Deep Inspiration Breath-Hold for Left-Breast Cancer Radiotherapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Purpose: The present study was designed to investigate the displacement of heart using Deep Inspiration Breath Hold (DIBH) CT data compared to free-breathing (FB) CT data and radiation exposure to heart. Methods: Treatment planning was performed on the computed tomography (CT) datasets of 20 patients who had received lumpectomy treatments. Heart, lung and both breasts were outlined. The prescribed dose was 50 Gy divided into 28 fractions. The dose distributions in all the plans were required to fulfill the International Commission on Radiation Units and Measurement specifications that include 100% coverage of the CTV with ≥ 95% of the prescribed dose and that the volume inside the CTV receiving > 107% of the prescribed dose should be minimized. Displacement of heart was measured by calculating the distance between center of heart and left breast. For the evaluation of radiation dose to heart, minimum, maximum and mean dose to heart were calculated. Results: The maximum and minimum left-right (LR) displacements of heart were 8.9 mm and 3 mm, respectively. The heart moved > 4 mm in the LR direction in 17 of the 20 patients. The distances between the heart and left breast ranged from 8.02–17.68 mm (mean, 12.23 mm) and 7.85–12.98 mm (mean, 8.97 mm) with DIBH CT and FB CT, respectively. The maximum doses to the heart were 3115 cGy and 4652 cGy for the DIBH and FB CT dataset, respectively. Conclusion: The present study has demonstrated that the DIBH technique could help to reduce the risk of radiation dose-induced cardiac toxicity by using movement of cardiac; away from radiation field. The DIBH technique could be used in an actual treatment room for a few minutes and could effectively reduce the cardiac dose when used with a sub-device or image acquisition standard to maintain consistent respiratory motion

  14. The impact of cine EPID image acquisition frame rate on markerless soft-tissue tracking

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yip, Stephen, E-mail: syip@lroc.harvard.edu; Rottmann, Joerg; Berbeco, Ross [Department of Radiation Oncology, Brigham and Women' s Hospital, Dana-Farber Cancer Institute and Harvard Medical School, Boston, Massachusetts 02115 (United States)

    2014-06-15

    Purpose: Although reduction of the cine electronic portal imaging device (EPID) acquisition frame rate through multiple frame averaging may reduce hardware memory burden and decrease image noise, it can hinder the continuity of soft-tissue motion leading to poor autotracking results. The impact of motion blurring and image noise on the tracking performance was investigated. Methods: Phantom and patient images were acquired at a frame rate of 12.87 Hz with an amorphous silicon portal imager (AS1000, Varian Medical Systems, Palo Alto, CA). The maximum frame rate of 12.87 Hz is imposed by the EPID. Low frame rate images were obtained by continuous frame averaging. A previously validated tracking algorithm was employed for autotracking. The difference between the programmed and autotracked positions of a Las Vegas phantom moving in the superior-inferior direction defined the tracking error (δ). Motion blurring was assessed by measuring the area change of the circle with the greatest depth. Additionally, lung tumors on 1747 frames acquired at 11 field angles from four radiotherapy patients are manually and automatically tracked with varying frame averaging. δ was defined by the position difference of the two tracking methods. Image noise was defined as the standard deviation of the background intensity. Motion blurring and image noise are correlated with δ using Pearson correlation coefficient (R). Results: For both phantom and patient studies, the autotracking errors increased at frame rates lower than 4.29 Hz. Above 4.29 Hz, changes in errors were negligible withδ < 1.60 mm. Motion blurring and image noise were observed to increase and decrease with frame averaging, respectively. Motion blurring and tracking errors were significantly correlated for the phantom (R = 0.94) and patient studies (R = 0.72). Moderate to poor correlation was found between image noise and tracking error with R −0.58 and −0.19 for both studies, respectively. Conclusions: Cine EPID

  15. Heart dose reduction by prone deep inspiration breath hold in left-sided breast irradiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Background and purpose: Cardiac disease has been related to heart dose after left-sided breast radiotherapy. This trial evaluates the heart sparing ability and feasibility of deep inspiration breath hold (DIBH) in the prone position for left-sided whole breast irradiation (WBI). Materials and methods: Twelve patients underwent CT-simulation in supine shallow breathing (SB), supine DIBH, prone SB and prone DIBH. A validation cohort of 38 patients received prone SB and prone DIBH CT-scans; the last 30 patients were accepted for prone DIBH treatment. WBI was planned with a prescription dose of 40.05 Gy. Results: DIBH was able to reduce (p < 0.001) heart dose in both positions, with results for prone DIBH at least as favorable as for supine DIBH. Mean heart dose was lowered from 2.2 Gy for prone SB to 1.3 Gy for prone DIBH (p < 0.001), while preserving the lung sparing ability of prone positioning. Moreover prone DIBH nearly consistently reduced mean heart dose to less then 2 Gy, regardless of breast volume. All patients were able to perform the simulation procedure, 28/30 patients were treated with prone DIBH. Conclusions: This trial demonstrates the ability and feasibility of prone DIBH to acquire optimal heart and lung sparing for left-sided WBI

  16. Spirometer-controlled cine magnetic resonance imaging to diagnose tracheobronchomalacia in pediatric patients

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ciet, Pierluigi; Wielopolski, Piotr; Manniesing, Rashindra;

    2014-01-01

    Tracheobronchomalacia (TBM) is defined as an excessive collapse of the intrathoracic trachea. Bronchoscopy is the gold standard to diagnose TBM, but bronchoscopy has major disadvantages, such as general anaesthesia. Cine-CT is a non-invasive alternative to diagnose TBM, but its use in children...... is restricted by ionizing radiation. Our aim was to evaluate the feasibility of spirometer-controlled cine-MRI as alternative to cine-CT in a retrospective study.12 children (mean 12 years, range 7-17), suspected to have TBM, underwent cine-MRI. Static scans were acquired at end-inspiration and expiration...... covering the thorax using a 3D SPGR sequence. 3D-Dynamic-scans were performed covering only the central airways. TBM was defined as a decrease of the trachea or bronchi diameter greater than 50% at end-expiration in the static and dynamic scans.The success rate of the cine-MRI protocol was 92%. Cine...

  17. Uterine contractions evaluated on cine MR imaging in patients with uterine leiomyomas

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Purpose: Submucosal leiomyoma is one of the most recognized causes of infertility and habitual abortion. The purpose of this study is to evaluate uterine peristalsis, a cycle-related inherent contractility of uterus probably responsible for sperm transport and conservation of pregnancy, in patients with uterine leiomyomas using cine magnetic resonance (MR) imaging. Materials and methods: Study population consisted of 26 female patients (age range: 19-51 years, mean: 41 years), in which 16 patients had submucosal leiomyomas and 10 patients had intramural or subserosal leiomyomas. We prospectively performed MR imaging of the midsagittal plane of uterus using 1.5 T magnet (Symphony, Siemens Medical Systems) with a body array coil, and obtained 60 half-Fourier acquisition single shot turbo spin echo (HASTE) images (Echo time=80 ms, FOV=300 mm, slice thickness 5 mm, matrix 256x256) within 2 min, and displayed them on cine mode at 12x faster than real speed. Evaluated were peristaltic movements at the endometral-myometrial junction and focal myometrial movements, adjacent to leiomyomas, regarding presence, direction, frequency, and conduction. Results: The peristaltic movements were identified in 12/16 patients with submucosal lesions and 10/10 with other leiomyomas. The frequency and direction were cycle-related. Loss of peristalsis was noted adjacent to submucosal myomas in 4/12 patients, but was not in others. Focal myometrial movements were noted in 9/16 patients with submucosal myomas, but not in others. Conclusions: Uterine peristaltic movements were partly interrupted by submucosal leiomoymas, but not by myometrial or subserosal leiomyomas. Loss of peristalsis and focal myometrial movements was noted only adjacent to submucosal leiomyomas. These findings are considered to represent dysfunctional contractility, and may be related with pregnancy loss

  18. Uterine contractions evaluated on cine MR imaging in patients with uterine leiomyomas

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nishino, Mizuki E-mail: mizuki@mbox.kyoto-inet.or.jpnishinomizuki@hotmail.com; Togashi, Kaori; Nakai, Asako; Hayakawa, Katsumi; Kanao, Shotarou; Iwasaku, Kazuhiro; Fujii, Shingo

    2005-01-01

    Purpose: Submucosal leiomyoma is one of the most recognized causes of infertility and habitual abortion. The purpose of this study is to evaluate uterine peristalsis, a cycle-related inherent contractility of uterus probably responsible for sperm transport and conservation of pregnancy, in patients with uterine leiomyomas using cine magnetic resonance (MR) imaging. Materials and methods: Study population consisted of 26 female patients (age range: 19-51 years, mean: 41 years), in which 16 patients had submucosal leiomyomas and 10 patients had intramural or subserosal leiomyomas. We prospectively performed MR imaging of the midsagittal plane of uterus using 1.5 T magnet (Symphony, Siemens Medical Systems) with a body array coil, and obtained 60 half-Fourier acquisition single shot turbo spin echo (HASTE) images (Echo time=80 ms, FOV=300 mm, slice thickness 5 mm, matrix 256x256) within 2 min, and displayed them on cine mode at 12x faster than real speed. Evaluated were peristaltic movements at the endometral-myometrial junction and focal myometrial movements, adjacent to leiomyomas, regarding presence, direction, frequency, and conduction. Results: The peristaltic movements were identified in 12/16 patients with submucosal lesions and 10/10 with other leiomyomas. The frequency and direction were cycle-related. Loss of peristalsis was noted adjacent to submucosal myomas in 4/12 patients, but was not in others. Focal myometrial movements were noted in 9/16 patients with submucosal myomas, but not in others. Conclusions: Uterine peristaltic movements were partly interrupted by submucosal leiomoymas, but not by myometrial or subserosal leiomyomas. Loss of peristalsis and focal myometrial movements was noted only adjacent to submucosal leiomyomas. These findings are considered to represent dysfunctional contractility, and may be related with pregnancy loss.

  19. Computerized method for measurement of displacement vectors of target positions on EPID cine images in stereotactic radiotherapy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arimura, Hidetaka; Anai, Shigeo; Yoshidome, Satoshi; Nakamura, Katsumasa; Shioyama, Yoshiyuki; Nomoto, Satoshi; Honda, Hiroshi; Onizuka, Yoshihiko; Terashima, Hiromi

    2007-03-01

    The purpose of this study was to develop a computerized method for measurement of displacement vectors of target position on electronic portal imaging device (EPID) cine images in a treatment without implanted markers. Our proposed method was based on a template matching technique with cross-correlation coefficient between a reference portal (RP) image and each consecutive portal (CP) image acquired by the EPID. EPID images with 512×384 pixels (pixel size:0.56 mm) were acquired in a cine mode at a sampling rate of 0.5 frame/sec by using an energy of 4, 6, or 10MV on linear accelerators. The displacement vector of the target on each cine image was determined from the position in which took the maximum cross-correlation value between the RP image and each CP image. We applied our method to EPID cine images of a lung phantom with a tumor model simulating respiratory motion, and 5 cases with a non-small cell lung cancer and one case of metastasis. For validation of our proposed method, displacement vectors of a target position calculated by our method were compared with those determined manually by two radiation oncologists. As a result, for lung phantom images, target displacements by our method correlated well with those by the oncologists (r=0.972 - 0.994). Correlation values for 4 cases ranged from 0.854 to 0.991, but the values for the other two cases were 0.609 and 0.644. This preliminary result suggested that our method may be useful for monitoring of displacement vectors of target positions without implanted markers in stereotactic radiotherapy.

  20. Monte Carlo calculations support organ sparing in Deep-Inspiration Breath-Hold intensity-modulated radiotherapy for locally advanced lung cancer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ottosson, Wiviann; Sibolt, Patrik; Larsen, Christina;

    2015-01-01

    Background and purpose: Studies indicate that Deep-Inspiration Breath-Hold (DIBH) is advantageous over Free-Breathing (FB) for locally advanced lung cancer radiotherapy. However, these studies were based on simplified dose calculation algorithms, potentially critical due to the heterogeneous nature...... of the lung region. Using detailed Monte-Carlo (MC) calculations, a comparative study of DIBH vs. FB was therefore designed. Material and methods: Eighteen locally advanced lung cancer patients underwent FB and DIBH CT imaging and treatment planning with the Anisotropic-Analytical-Algorithm (AAA......) for intensity-modulated-radio therapy or volumetric-modulated-arc-therapy using 66 Gy in 33 fractions. All plans were re-calculated with MC. Results: Relative to FB, the total lung volume increased 86.8% in DIBH, while the gross tumor volume decreased 14.8%. MC revealed equally under- and over...

  1. Right-sided cardiac function in healthy volunteers measured by first-pass radionuclide ventriculography and gated blood-pool SPECT: comparison with cine MRI

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kjaer, Andreas; Lebech, Anne-Mette; Hesse, Birger;

    2005-01-01

    and breath-hold cine MRI performed according to standard protocols. RESULTS: Normal ranges for RV ejection fraction (RVEF) defined as mean +/- 2SD were 0.49-0.72, 0.44-0.66 and 0.40-0.69 when measured by MRI, FP and GBPS respectively. Bland-Altman analysis showed a mean difference (bias) between MRI and FP...

  2. 3D cine magnetic resonance imaging of rat lung ARDS using gradient-modulated SWIFT with retrospective respiratory gating

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kobayashi, Naoharu; Lei, Jianxun; Utecht, Lynn; Garwood, Michael; Ingbar, David H.; Bhargava, Maneesh

    2015-03-01

    SWeep Imaging with Fourier Transformation (SWIFT) with gradient modulation and DC navigator retrospective gating is introduced as a 3D cine magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) method for the lung. In anesthetized normal rats, the quasi-simultaneous excitation and acquisition in SWIFT enabled extremely high sensitivity to the fast-decaying parenchymal signals (TE=~4 μs), which are invisible with conventional MRI techniques. Respiratory motion information was extracted from DC navigator signals and the SWIFT data were reconstructed to 3D cine images with 16 respiratory phases. To test this technique's capabilities, rats exposed to > 95% O2 for 60 hours for induction of acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS), were imaged and compared with normal rat lungs (N=7 and 5 for ARDS and normal groups, respectively). SWIFT images showed lung tissue density differences along the gravity direction. In the cine SWIFT images, a parenchymal signal drop at the inhalation phase was consistently observed for both normal and ARDS rats due to lung inflation (i.e. decrease of the proton density), but the drop was less for ARDS rats. Depending on the respiratory phase and lung region, the lungs from the ARDS rats showed 1-24% higher parenchymal signal intensities relative to the normal rat lungs, likely due to accumulated extravascular water (EVLW). Those results demonstrate that SWIFT has high enough sensitivity for detecting the lung proton density changes due to gravity, different phases of respiration and accumulation of EVLW in the rat ARDS lungs.

  3. Deep inspiration breath hold technique reduces heart dose from radiotherapy for left-sided breast cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Adjuvant left breast radiotherapy (ALBR) for breast cancer can result in significant radiation dose to the heart. Current evidence suggests a dose–response relationship between the risk of cardiac morbidity and radiation dose to cardiac volumes. This study explores the potential benefit of utilising a deep inspiration breath hold (DIBH) technique to reduce cardiac doses. Thirty patients with left-sided breast cancer underwent CT-simulation scans in free breathing (FB) and DIBH. Treatment plans were generated using a hybrid intensity-modulated radiation therapy technique with simultaneous integrated boost. A dosimetric comparison was made between the two techniques for the heart, left anterior descending coronary artery (LAD), left lung and contralateral breast. Compared with FB, DIBH resulted in a significant reduction in heart V30 (7.1 vs. 2.4%, P < 0.0001), mean heart dose (6.9 vs. 3.9 Gy, P < 0.001), maximum LAD planning risk volume (PRV) dose, (51.6 vs. 45.6 Gy, P = 0.0032) and the mean LAD PRV dose (31.7 vs. 21.9 Gy, P < 0.001). No significant difference was noted for lung V20, mean lung dose or mean dose to the contralateral breast. The DIBH plans demonstrated significantly larger total lung volumes (1126 vs. 2051 cc, P < 0.0001), smaller maximum heart depth (2.08 vs. 1.17 cm, P < 0.0001) and irradiated heart volume (36.9 vs. 12.1 cc, P < 0.0001). DIBH resulted in a significant reduction in radiation dose to the heart and LAD compared with an FB technique for ALBR. Ongoing research is required to determine optimal cardiac dose constraints and methods of predicting which patients will derive the most benefit from a DIBH technique.

  4. Novel Findings in Breath-Holding Spells: A Cross-Sectional Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Azab, Seham F A; Siam, Ahmed G; Saleh, Safaa H; Elshafei, Mona M; Elsaeed, Wafaa F; Arafa, Mohamed A; Bendary, Eman A; Farag, Elsayed M; Basset, Maha A A; Ismail, Sanaa M; Elazouni, Osama M A

    2015-07-01

    The mechanism of breath-holding spells (BHS) is not fully understood and most probably multifactorial; so, this study was designed to clarify the pathophysiology of BHS through assessing some laboratory parameters and electrocardiographic (ECG) changes which might be contributing to the occurrence of the attacks. Another aim of the study was to evaluate the differences in the pathophysiology between pallid and cyanotic types of BHS. This was a prospective study performed in Zagazig University Hospitals. Seventy-six children diagnosed with BHS were included as follows: 32 children with cyanotic BHS, 14 children with pallid BHS, and 30 healthy children as a control group. All children were subjected to the following: full history taking, clinical examination, and laboratory work up in the form of CBC, serum iron, ferritin, and zinc levels. Twenty-four hours ambulatory ECG (Holter) recording was also performed. No significant statistical difference was found between cyanotic and pallid groups regarding family history of BHS, severity, and precipitating factors of the attacks. Frequent runs of respiratory sinus arrhythmia (RSA) during 24  hours ECG were significantly higher in children with BHS; the frequency of RSA was significantly correlated with the frequency (severity) of the attacks. Low serum ferritin was significantly associated with BHS groups but not correlated with the severity of the attacks. Autonomic dysregulation evidenced by frequent RSA is considered to be an important cause of BHS in children and is correlated with the frequency of the attacks. Low serum ferritin is additional factor in the pathophysiology. Both pallid and cyanotic BHS are suggested to be types of the same disease sharing the same pathophysiology. PMID:26181556

  5. Upper extremity kinematics and body roll during preferred-side breathing and breath-holding front crawl swimming.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Payton, C J; Bartlett, R M; Baltzopoulos, V; Coombs, R

    1999-09-01

    Front crawl swimmers often restrict the number of breaths they take during a race because of the possible adverse effects of the breathing action on resistance or stroke mechanics. The aim of this study was to determine whether differences exist in the kinematics of the trunk and upper extremity used during preferred-side breathing and breath-holding front crawl swimming. Six male swimmers performed trials at their 200 m race pace under breathing and breath-holding conditions. The underwater arm stroke was filmed from the front and side using video cameras suspended over periscope systems. Video recordings were digitized at 50 Hz and the three-dimensional coordinates of the upper extremity obtained using a direct linear transformation algorithm. Body roll angles were obtained by digitizing video recordings of a balsa wood fin attached to the swimmers' backs. The swimmers performed the breathing action without any decrement in stroke length (mean +/- s: breathing 2.24 +/- 0.27 m; breath-holding 2.15 +/- 0.22 m). Stroke widths were similar in the breathing (0.28 +/- 0.07 m) and breath-holding (0.27 +/- 0.07 m) trials, despite swimmers rolling further when taking a breath (66 +/- 5 degrees) than when not (57 +/- 4 degrees). The timing of the four underwater phases of the stroke was also unaffected by the breathing action, with swimmers rolling back towards the neutral position during the insweep phase. In conclusion, the results suggest that front crawl swimmers can perform the breathing action without it interfering with their basic stroke parameters. The insweep phase of the stroke assists body roll and not vice versa as suggested in previous studies.

  6. Accuracy of Dose Delivery in Multiple Breath-Hold Segmented Volumetric Modulated Arc Therapy: A Static Phantom Study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kimiya Noto

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Purpose. Accuracy of dose delivery in multiple breath-hold segmented volumetric modulated arc therapy (VMAT was evaluated in comparison to noninterrupted VMAT using a static phantom. Material and Methods. Five VMAT plans were evaluated. A Synergy linear accelerator (Elekta AB, Stockholm, Sweden was employed. A VMAT delivery sequence was divided into multiple segments according to each of the predefined breath-hold periods (10, 15, 20, 30, and 40 seconds. The segmented VMAT delivery was compared to noninterrupted VMAT delivery in terms of the isocenter dose and pass rates of a dose difference of 1% with a dose threshold of 10% of the maximum dose on a central coronal plane using a two-dimensional dosimeter, MatriXX Evolution (IBA Dosimetry, Schwarzenbruck, Germany. Results. Means of the isocenter dose differences were 0.5%, 0.2%, 0.2%, 0.0%, and 0.0% for the beam-on-times between interrupts of 10, 15, 20, 30, and 40 seconds, respectively. Means of the pass rates were 85%, 99.9%, 100%, 100%, and 100% in the same order as the above. Conclusion. Our static phantom study indicated that the multiple breath-hold segmented VMAT maintains stable and accurate dose delivery when the beam-on-time between interrupts is 15 seconds or greater.

  7. Fast 3-Breath-Hold 3-Dimensional Tagging Cardiac Magnetic Resonance in Patients with Hypertrophic Myocardial Diseases: A Feasibility Study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yasuo Amano

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Tagging CMR has been established as the standard reference for measurement of myocardial strain. The current 2D tagging technique requires multiple breath-holds to cover the whole heart and cannot show the 3D motions of the left ventricle. We performed fast 3-breath-hold 3D tagging with localized tagging preparation and complementary spatial modulation of magnetization in 10 patients with hypertrophic myocardial diseases and 6 normal volunteers. The left wall motion was observed at any view angle, which allowed for the identification of regional and global hypokinesis using the fast 3D tagging. Although a decrease in the circumferential strain and LGE were observed at the basal septum in hypertrophic cardiomyopathy, they were not located together in each patient. In hypertensive heart disease, the decrease in circumferential strain was observed more widely than LGE, and the summed strain of all segments was significantly decreased. The decrease in strain and LGE were observed diffusely in cardiac amyloidosis. In conclusion, fast 3-breath-hold 3D tagging is feasible for the regional and global strain analysis. The location of reduced circumferential strain is not necessarily the same as that of LGE and is related to the global cardiac function in patients with hypertrophic myocardial diseases.

  8. The deep inspiration breath-hold technique in the treatment of inoperable non-small-cell lung cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Purpose: Conventional radiotherapeutic techniques are associated with lung toxicity that limits the treatment dose. Motion of the tumor during treatment requires the use of large safety margins that affect the feasibility of treatment. To address the control of tumor motion and decrease the volume of normal lung irradiated, we investigated the use of three-dimensional conformal radiation therapy (3D-CRT) in conjunction with the deep inspiration breath-hold (DIBH) technique. Methods and Materials: In the DIBH technique, the patient is initially maintained at quiet tidal breathing, followed by a deep inspiration, a deep expiration, a second deep inspiration, and breath-hold. At this point the patient is at approximately 100% vital capacity, and simulation, verification, and treatment take place during this phase of breath-holding. Results: Seven patients have received a total of 164 treatment sessions and have tolerated the technique well. The estimated normal tissue complication probabilities decreased in all patients at their prescribed dose when compared to free breathing. The dose to which patients could be treated with DIBH increased on average from 69.4 Gy to 87.9 Gy, without increasing the risk of toxicity Conclusions: The DIBH technique provides an advantage to conventional free-breathing treatment by decreasing lung density, reducing normal safety margins, and enabling more accurate treatment. These improvements contribute to the effective exclusion of normal lung tissue from the high-dose region and permit the use of higher treatment doses without increased risks of toxicity

  9. Evaluation of ventricular dysfunction using semi-automatic longitudinal strain analysis of four-chamber cine MR imaging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kawakubo, Masateru; Nagao, Michinobu; Kumazawa, Seiji; Yamasaki, Yuzo; Chishaki, Akiko S; Nakamura, Yasuhiko; Honda, Hiroshi; Morishita, Junji

    2016-02-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate ventricular dysfunction using the longitudinal strain analysis in 4-chamber (4CH) cine MR imaging, and to investigate the agreement between the semi-automatic and manual measurements in the analysis. Fifty-two consecutive patients with ischemic, or non-ischemic cardiomyopathy and repaired tetralogy of Fallot who underwent cardiac MR examination incorporating cine MR imaging were retrospectively enrolled. The LV and RV longitudinal strain values were obtained by semi-automatically and manually. Receiver operating characteristic (ROC) analysis was performed to determine the optimal cutoff of the minimum longitudinal strain value for the detection of patients with cardiac dysfunction. The correlations between manual and semi-automatic measurements for LV and RV walls were analyzed by Pearson coefficient analysis. ROC analysis demonstrated the optimal cut-off of the minimum longitudinal strain values (εL_min) for diagnoses the LV and RV dysfunction at a high accuracy (LV εL_min = -7.8 %: area under the curve, 0.89; sensitivity, 83 %; specificity, 91 %, RV εL_min = -15.7 %: area under the curve, 0.82; sensitivity, 92 %; specificity, 68 %). Excellent correlations between manual and semi-automatic measurements for LV and RV free wall were observed (LV, r = 0.97, p cine MR imaging can evaluate LV and RV dysfunction with simply and easy measurements. The strain analysis could have extensive application in cardiac imaging for various clinical cases.

  10. An initial study on the estimation of time-varying volumetric treatment images and 3D tumor localization from single MV cine EPID images

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mishra, Pankaj, E-mail: pankaj.mishra@varian.com; Mak, Raymond H.; Rottmann, Joerg; Bryant, Jonathan H.; Williams, Christopher L.; Berbeco, Ross I.; Lewis, John H. [Brigham and Women' s Hospital, Dana-Farber Cancer Institute and Harvard Medical School, Boston, Massachusetts 02115 (United States); Li, Ruijiang [Department of Radiation Oncology, Stanford University School of Medicine, Stanford, California 94305 (United States)

    2014-08-15

    Purpose: In this work the authors develop and investigate the feasibility of a method to estimate time-varying volumetric images from individual MV cine electronic portal image device (EPID) images. Methods: The authors adopt a two-step approach to time-varying volumetric image estimation from a single cine EPID image. In the first step, a patient-specific motion model is constructed from 4DCT. In the second step, parameters in the motion model are tuned according to the information in the EPID image. The patient-specific motion model is based on a compact representation of lung motion represented in displacement vector fields (DVFs). DVFs are calculated through deformable image registration (DIR) of a reference 4DCT phase image (typically peak-exhale) to a set of 4DCT images corresponding to different phases of a breathing cycle. The salient characteristics in the DVFs are captured in a compact representation through principal component analysis (PCA). PCA decouples the spatial and temporal components of the DVFs. Spatial information is represented in eigenvectors and the temporal information is represented by eigen-coefficients. To generate a new volumetric image, the eigen-coefficients are updated via cost function optimization based on digitally reconstructed radiographs and projection images. The updated eigen-coefficients are then multiplied with the eigenvectors to obtain updated DVFs that, in turn, give the volumetric image corresponding to the cine EPID image. Results: The algorithm was tested on (1) Eight digital eXtended CArdiac-Torso phantom datasets based on different irregular patient breathing patterns and (2) patient cine EPID images acquired during SBRT treatments. The root-mean-squared tumor localization error is (0.73 ± 0.63 mm) for the XCAT data and (0.90 ± 0.65 mm) for the patient data. Conclusions: The authors introduced a novel method of estimating volumetric time-varying images from single cine EPID images and a PCA-based lung motion model

  11. Performance of simultaneous cardiac-respiratory self-gated three-dimensional MR imaging of the heart: initial experience.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Manka, Robert; Buehrer, Martin; Boesiger, Peter; Fleck, Eckart; Kozerke, Sebastian

    2010-06-01

    This study was approved by the local institutional ethics committee, and informed consent was obtained from all volunteers and patients. The objective of the present study was to assess the performance of high-spatial-resolution three-dimensional prospective cardiac-respiratory self-gated (CRSG) magnetic resonance (MR) imaging for determining left ventricular (LV) volumes and mass, as well as right ventricular (RV) volumes, in comparison with standard electrocardiography (ECG)-triggered, two-dimensional multisection, multiple-breath-hold cine imaging. The self-gated method derives cardiac triggering and respiratory gating information prospectively on the basis of additional MR imaging signals acquired in every repetition time and, thereby, eliminates the need for ECG triggering and multiple-breath-hold procedures. Data were acquired in 15 healthy volunteers (mean age, 27.2 years +/- 7.2 [standard deviation]) and 11 patients (mean age, 60.7 years +/- 11.3). The bias between the self-gating and the reference imaging techniques was minimal for all LV and RV parameters (mean values: LV end-diastolic volume, 2.0 mL; LV end-systolic volume, 0.6 mL; RV end-diastolic volume, 2.2 mL; and RV end-systolic volume, 0.8 mL). Prospective CRSG is a valuable alternative to ECG-triggered, multisection, multiple-breath-hold cine imaging of the heart and holds considerable promise for simplifying functional imaging of the heart, particularly in patients who are unable to hold their breath for a long period and patients who show ECG signal disturbances. PMID:20501728

  12. Clinical features of panic patients sensitive to hyperventilation or breath-holding methods for inducing panic attacks

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A.E. Nardi

    2004-02-01

    Full Text Available Our aim was to compare the clinical features of panic disorder (PD patients sensitive to hyperventilation or breath-holding methods of inducing panic attacks. Eighty-five PD patients were submitted to both a hyperventilation challenge test and a breath-holding test. They were asked to hyperventilate (30 breaths/min for 4 min and a week later to hold their breath for as long as possible, four times with a 2-min interval. Anxiety scales were applied before and after the tests. We selected the patients who responded with a panic attack to just one of the tests, i.e., those who had a panic attack after hyperventilating (HPA, N = 24, 16 females, 8 males, mean age ± SD = 38.5 ± 12.7 years and those who had a panic attack after breath holding (BHPA, N = 20, 11 females, 9 males, mean age ± SD = 42.1 ± 10.6 years. Both groups had similar (chi² = 1.28, d.f. = 1, P = 0.672 respiratory symptoms (fear of dying, chest/pain disconfort, shortness of breath, paresthesias, and feelings of choking during a panic attack. The criteria of Briggs et al. [British Journal of Psychiatry, 1993; 163: 201-209] for respiratory PD subtype were fulfilled by 18 (75.0% HPA patients and by 14 (70.0% BHPA patients. The HPA group had a later onset of the disease compared to BHPA patients (37.9 ± 11.0 vs 21.3 ± 12.9 years old, Mann-Whitney, P < 0.001, and had a higher family prevalence of PD (70.8 vs 25.0%, chi² = 19.65, d.f. = 1, P = 0.041. Our data suggest that these two groups - HPA and BHPA patients - may be specific subtypes of PD.

  13. “Lung packing” in breath hold-diving: An impressive case of pulmo–cardiac interaction

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jochen D. Schipke

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available There is a complex interaction between the heart and the lungs. We report on a healthy female who performs breath hold diving at a high, international level. In order to optimize pressure equalization during diving and to increase oxygen available, apneists employed a special breathing maneuver, so called “lung packing”. Based on cardiac MRI we could demonstrate impressive effects of this maneuver on left ventricular geometry and hemodynamics. Beyond the fact, that our findings support the concept of pulmonary –cardiac interrelationship, it should be emphasized, that the reported, extreme breathing maneuver could have detrimental consequences due to reduction of stroke volume and cardiac output.

  14. Reproducibility of small animal cine and scar cardiac magnetic resonance imaging using a clinical 3.0 tesla system

    OpenAIRE

    Manka, Robert; Jahnke, Cosima; Hucko, Thomas; Dietrich, Thore; Gebker, Rolf; Schnackenburg, Bernhard; Graf, Kristof; Paetsch, Ingo

    2013-01-01

    Background To evaluate the inter-study, inter-reader and intra-reader reproducibility of cardiac cine and scar imaging in rats using a clinical 3.0 Tesla magnetic resonance (MR) system. Methods Thirty-three adult rats (Sprague–Dawley) were imaged 24 hours after surgical occlusion of the left anterior descending coronary artery using a 3.0 Tesla clinical MR scanner (Philips Healthcare, Best, The Netherlands) equipped with a dedicated 70 mm solenoid receive-only coil. Left-ventricular (LV) volu...

  15. Impact of low signal intensity assessed by cine magnetic resonance imaging on detection of poorly viable myocardium in patients with prior myocardial infarction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ota, Shingo; Tanimoto, Takashi; Orii, Makoto; Hirata, Kumiko; Shiono, Yasutsugu; Shimamura, Kunihiro; Matsuo, Yoshiki; Yamano, Takashi; Ino, Yasushi; Kitabata, Hironori; Yamaguchi, Tomoyuki; Kubo, Takashi; Tanaka, Atsushi; Imanishi, Toshio; Akasaka, Takashi

    2015-05-13

    Late gadolinium enhancement magnetic resonance imaging (LGE-MRI) has been established as a modality to detect myocardial infarction (MI). However, the use of gadolinium contrast is limited in patients with advanced renal dysfunction. Although the signal intensity (SI) of infarct area assessed by cine MRI is low in some patients with prior MI, the prevalence and clinical significance of low SI has not been evaluated. The aim of this study was to evaluate how low SI assessed by cine MRI may relate to the myocardial viability in patients with prior MI. Fifty patients with prior MI underwent both cine MRI and LGE-MRI. The left ventricle was divided into 17 segments. The presence of low SI and the wall motion score (WMS) of each segment were assessed by cine MRI. The transmural extent of infarction was evaluated by LGE-MRI. LGE was detected in 329 of all 850 segments (39%). The low SI assessed by cine MRI was detected in 105 of 329 segments with LGE (32%). All segments with low SI had LGE. Of all 329 segments with LGE, the segments with low SI showed greater transmural extent of infarction (78 [72 - 84] % versus 53 [38 - 72] %, P cine MRI may be effective for detecting poorly viable myocardium in patients with prior MI.

  16. The UK HeartSpare Study: Randomised evaluation of voluntary deep-inspiratory breath-hold in women undergoing breast radiotherapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Purpose: To determine whether voluntary deep-inspiratory breath-hold (vDIBH) and deep-inspiratory breath-hold with the active breathing coordinator™ (ABCDIBH) in patients undergoing left breast radiotherapy are comparable in terms of normal-tissue sparing, positional reproducibility and feasibility of delivery. Methods: Following surgery for early breast cancer, patients underwent planning-CT scans in vDIBH and ABCDIBH. Patients were randomised to receive one technique for fractions 1–7 and the second technique for fractions 8–15 (40 Gy/15 fractions total). Daily electronic portal imaging (EPI) was performed and matched to digitally-reconstructed radiographs. Cone-beam CT (CBCT) images were acquired for 6/15 fractions and matched to planning-CT data. Population systematic (Σ) and random errors (σ) were estimated. Heart, left-anterior-descending coronary artery, and lung doses were calculated. Patient comfort, radiographer satisfaction and scanning/treatment times were recorded. Within-patient comparisons between the two techniques used the paired t-test or Wilcoxon signed-rank test. Results: Twenty-three patients were recruited. All completed treatment with both techniques. EPI-derived Σ were ⩽1.8 mm (vDIBH) and ⩽2.0 mm (ABCDIBH) and σ ⩽2.5 mm (vDIBH) and ⩽2.2 mm (ABCDIBH) (all p non-significant). CBCT-derived Σ were ⩽3.9 mm (vDIBH) and ⩽4.9 mm (ABCDIBH) and σ ⩽ 4.1 mm (vDIBH) and ⩽ 3.8 mm (ABCDIBH). There was no significant difference between techniques in terms of normal-tissue doses (all p non-significant). Patients and radiographers preferred vDIBH (p = 0.007, p = 0.03, respectively). Scanning/treatment setup times were shorter for vDIBH (p = 0.02, p = 0.04, respectively). Conclusions: vDIBH and ABCDIBH are comparable in terms of positional reproducibility and normal tissue sparing. vDIBH is preferred by patients and radiographers, takes less time to deliver, and is cheaper than ABCDIBH

  17. Fast Determination of Flip Angle and T1 in Hyperpolarized Gas MRI During a Single Breath-Hold

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhong, Jianping; Ruan, Weiwei; Han, Yeqing; Sun, Xianping; Ye, Chaohui; Zhou, Xin

    2016-05-01

    MRI of hyperpolarized media, such as 129Xe and 3He, shows great potential for clinical applications. The optimal use of the available spin polarization requires accurate flip angle calibrations and T1 measurements. Traditional flip angle calibration methods are time-consuming and suffer from polarization losses during T1 relaxation. In this paper, we propose a method to simultaneously calibrate flip angles and measure T1 in vivo during a breath-hold time of less than 4 seconds. We demonstrate the accuracy, robustness and repeatability of this method and contrast it with traditional methods. By measuring the T1 of hyperpolarized gas, the oxygen pressure in vivo can be calibrated during the same breath hold. The results of the calibration have been applied in variable flip angle (VFA) scheme to obtain a stable steady-state transverse magnetization. Coupled with this method, the ultra-short TE (UTE) and constant VFA (CVFA) schemes are expected to give rise to new applications of hyperpolarized media.

  18. Monitoring tumor motion with on-line mega-voltage cone-beam computed tomography imaging in a cine mode

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Reitz, Bodo [Department of Radiation Oncology, Allegheny General Hospital, Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania 15212 (United States); Gayou, Olivier [Department of Radiation Oncology, Allegheny General Hospital, Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania 15212 (United States); Parda, David S [Department of Radiation Oncology, Allegheny General Hospital, Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania 15212 (United States); Miften, Moyed [Department of Radiation Oncology, Allegheny General Hospital, Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania 15212 (United States)

    2008-02-21

    Accurate daily patient localization is becoming increasingly important in external-beam radiotherapy (RT). Mega-voltage cone-beam computed tomography (MV-CBCT) utilizing a therapy beam and an on-board electronic portal imager can be used to localize tumor volumes and verify the patient's position prior to treatment. MV-CBCT produces a static volumetric image and therefore can only account for inter-fractional changes. In this work, the feasibility of using the MV-CBCT raw data as a fluoroscopic series of portal images to monitor tumor changes due to e.g. respiratory motion was investigated. A method was developed to read and convert the CB raw data into a cine. To improve the contrast-to-noise ratio on the MV-CB projection data, image post-processing with filtering techniques was investigated. Volumes of interest from the planning CT were projected onto the MV-cine. Because of the small exposure and the varying thickness of the patient depending on the projection angle, soft-tissue contrast was limited. Tumor visibility as a function of tumor size and projection angle was studied. The method was well suited in the upper chest, where motion of the tumor as well as of the diaphragm could be clearly seen. In the cases of patients with non-small cell lung cancer with medium or large tumor masses, we verified that the tumor mass was always located within the PTV despite respiratory motion. However for small tumors the method is less applicable, because the visibility of those targets becomes marginal. Evaluation of motion in non-superior-inferior directions might also be limited for small tumor masses. Viewing MV-CBCT data in a cine mode adds to the utility of MV-CBCT for verification of tumor motion and for deriving individualized treatment margins.

  19. Monitoring tumor motion with on-line mega-voltage cone-beam computed tomography imaging in a cine mode

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reitz, Bodo; Gayou, Olivier; Parda, David S.; Miften, Moyed

    2008-02-01

    Accurate daily patient localization is becoming increasingly important in external-beam radiotherapy (RT). Mega-voltage cone-beam computed tomography (MV-CBCT) utilizing a therapy beam and an on-board electronic portal imager can be used to localize tumor volumes and verify the patient's position prior to treatment. MV-CBCT produces a static volumetric image and therefore can only account for inter-fractional changes. In this work, the feasibility of using the MV-CBCT raw data as a fluoroscopic series of portal images to monitor tumor changes due to e.g. respiratory motion was investigated. A method was developed to read and convert the CB raw data into a cine. To improve the contrast-to-noise ratio on the MV-CB projection data, image post-processing with filtering techniques was investigated. Volumes of interest from the planning CT were projected onto the MV-cine. Because of the small exposure and the varying thickness of the patient depending on the projection angle, soft-tissue contrast was limited. Tumor visibility as a function of tumor size and projection angle was studied. The method was well suited in the upper chest, where motion of the tumor as well as of the diaphragm could be clearly seen. In the cases of patients with non-small cell lung cancer with medium or large tumor masses, we verified that the tumor mass was always located within the PTV despite respiratory motion. However for small tumors the method is less applicable, because the visibility of those targets becomes marginal. Evaluation of motion in non-superior-inferior directions might also be limited for small tumor masses. Viewing MV-CBCT data in a cine mode adds to the utility of MV-CBCT for verification of tumor motion and for deriving individualized treatment margins.

  20. Computerized method for estimation of the location of a lung tumor on EPID cine images without implanted markers in stereotactic body radiotherapy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arimura, H.; Egashira, Y.; Shioyama, Y.; Nakamura, K.; Yoshidome, S.; Anai, S.; Nomoto, S.; Honda, H.; Toyofuku, F.; Higashida, Y.; Onizuka, Y.; Terashima, H.

    2009-02-01

    The purpose of this study was to develop a computerized method for estimation of the location of a lung tumor in cine images on an electronic portal imaging device (EPID) without implanted markers during stereotactic body radiotherapy (SBRT). Each tumor region was segmented in the first EPID cine image, i.e., reference portal image, based on a multiple-gray level thresholding technique and a region growing technique, and then the image including the tumor region was cropped as a 'tumor template' image. The tumor location was determined as the position in which the tumor template image took the maximum cross-correlation value within each consecutive portal image, which was acquired in cine mode on the EPID in treatment. EPID images with 512 × 384 pixels (pixel size: 0.56 mm) were acquired at a sampling rate of 0.5 frame s-1 by using energies of 4, 6 or 10 MV on linear accelerators. We applied our proposed method to EPID cine images (226 frames) of 12 clinical cases (ages: 51-83, mean: 72) with a non-small cell lung cancer. As a result, the average location error between tumor points obtained by our method and the manual method was 1.47 ± 0.60 mm. This preliminary study suggests that our method based on the tumor template matching technique might be feasible for tracking the location of a lung tumor without implanted markers in SBRT.

  1. Use of expiratory CT pulmonary angiography to reduce inspiration and breath-hold associated artefact: Contrast dynamics and implications for scan protocol

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mortimer, A.M., E-mail: alex_mortimer@hotmail.com [Department of Radiology, Bristol Royal Infirmary, Bristol (United Kingdom); Singh, R.K.; Hughes, J.; Greenwood, R.; Hamilton, M.C.K. [Department of Radiology, Bristol Royal Infirmary, Bristol (United Kingdom)

    2011-12-15

    Aim: To investigate the effects of scanning in expiration during computed tomography pulmonary angiography (CTPA). Materials and methods: One hundred and eighty-one consecutive expiratory CTPA examinations were compared with 145 inspiratory CTPA examinations performed using a standardized protocol through assessment of attenuation seen in the cardiac chambers, pulmonary artery (PA), and ascending aorta. Results: Expiratory scans showed greater attenuation at the pulmonary trunk, right PA, left PA, lobar and segmental PAs (p < 0.05). Expiratory scans showed a lower incidence of transient contrast medium interruption (p < 0.001) and generalized unsatisfactory PA opacification (p < 0.05). Scans with generalized low PA attenuation had lower attenuation in the right ventricle, left heart, and ascending aorta (p < 0.001) suggesting that contrast medium delivery or dilution prior to contrast medium entry into the PA is responsible. Expiratory scans showed lower quality scores (p < 0.001) for depiction of lung parenchyma. Conclusion: Expiratory scanning could be used as an optimal protocol for dedicated PA imaging. However, it suffers from inferior parenchymal imaging and should probably be reserved for failed inspiratory breath-hold CTPA.

  2. Use of expiratory CT pulmonary angiography to reduce inspiration and breath-hold associated artefact: Contrast dynamics and implications for scan protocol

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Aim: To investigate the effects of scanning in expiration during computed tomography pulmonary angiography (CTPA). Materials and methods: One hundred and eighty-one consecutive expiratory CTPA examinations were compared with 145 inspiratory CTPA examinations performed using a standardized protocol through assessment of attenuation seen in the cardiac chambers, pulmonary artery (PA), and ascending aorta. Results: Expiratory scans showed greater attenuation at the pulmonary trunk, right PA, left PA, lobar and segmental PAs (p < 0.05). Expiratory scans showed a lower incidence of transient contrast medium interruption (p < 0.001) and generalized unsatisfactory PA opacification (p < 0.05). Scans with generalized low PA attenuation had lower attenuation in the right ventricle, left heart, and ascending aorta (p < 0.001) suggesting that contrast medium delivery or dilution prior to contrast medium entry into the PA is responsible. Expiratory scans showed lower quality scores (p < 0.001) for depiction of lung parenchyma. Conclusion: Expiratory scanning could be used as an optimal protocol for dedicated PA imaging. However, it suffers from inferior parenchymal imaging and should probably be reserved for failed inspiratory breath-hold CTPA.

  3. Quantification of lung tumor rotation with automated landmark extraction using orthogonal cine MRI images

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The quantification of tumor motion in sites affected by respiratory motion is of primary importance to improve treatment accuracy. To account for motion, different studies analyzed the translational component only, without focusing on the rotational component, which was quantified in a few studies on the prostate with implanted markers. The aim of our study was to propose a tool able to quantify lung tumor rotation without the use of internal markers, thus providing accurate motion detection close to critical structures such as the heart or liver. Specifically, we propose the use of an automatic feature extraction method in combination with the acquisition of fast orthogonal cine MRI images of nine lung patients. As a preliminary test, we evaluated the performance of the feature extraction method by applying it on regions of interest around (i) the diaphragm and (ii) the tumor and comparing the estimated motion with that obtained by (i) the extraction of the diaphragm profile and (ii) the segmentation of the tumor, respectively. The results confirmed the capability of the proposed method in quantifying tumor motion. Then, a point-based rigid registration was applied to the extracted tumor features between all frames to account for rotation. The median lung rotation values were  −0.6   ±   2.3° and  −1.5   ±   2.7° in the sagittal and coronal planes respectively, confirming the need to account for tumor rotation along with translation to improve radiotherapy treatment. (paper)

  4. Quantification of lung tumor rotation with automated landmark extraction using orthogonal cine MRI images

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paganelli, Chiara; Lee, Danny; Greer, Peter B.; Baroni, Guido; Riboldi, Marco; Keall, Paul

    2015-09-01

    The quantification of tumor motion in sites affected by respiratory motion is of primary importance to improve treatment accuracy. To account for motion, different studies analyzed the translational component only, without focusing on the rotational component, which was quantified in a few studies on the prostate with implanted markers. The aim of our study was to propose a tool able to quantify lung tumor rotation without the use of internal markers, thus providing accurate motion detection close to critical structures such as the heart or liver. Specifically, we propose the use of an automatic feature extraction method in combination with the acquisition of fast orthogonal cine MRI images of nine lung patients. As a preliminary test, we evaluated the performance of the feature extraction method by applying it on regions of interest around (i) the diaphragm and (ii) the tumor and comparing the estimated motion with that obtained by (i) the extraction of the diaphragm profile and (ii) the segmentation of the tumor, respectively. The results confirmed the capability of the proposed method in quantifying tumor motion. Then, a point-based rigid registration was applied to the extracted tumor features between all frames to account for rotation. The median lung rotation values were  -0.6   ±   2.3° and  -1.5   ±   2.7° in the sagittal and coronal planes respectively, confirming the need to account for tumor rotation along with translation to improve radiotherapy treatment.

  5. Spirometer-controlled Cine-Magnetic Resonance Imaging for Diagnosis of Tracheobronchomalacia in Pediatric Patients

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ciet, P.; Wielopolski, P.; Manniesing, R.; Lever, S.; Bruijne, M. de; Morana, G.; Muzzio, P.C.; Lequin, M.H.; Tiddens, H.A.W.M.

    2014-01-01

    Tracheobronchomalacia (TBM) is defined as an excessive collapse of the intrathoracic trachea. Bronchoscopy is the gold standard to diagnose TBM, but bronchoscopy has major disadvantages, such as general anaesthesia. Cine-CT is a non-invasive alternative to diagnose TBM, but its use in children is re

  6. Breathing adapted radiotherapy for breast cancer: Comparison of free breathing gating with the breath-hold technique

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Background and purpose: Adjuvant radiotherapy after breast-conserving surgery for breast cancer implies a risk of late cardiac and pulmonary toxicity. This is the first study to evaluate cardiopulmonary dose sparing of breathing adapted radiotherapy (BART) using free breathing gating, and to compare this respiratory technique with voluntary breath-hold. Patients and methods: 17 patients were CT-scanned during non-coached breathing manoeuvre including free breathing (FB), end-inspiration gating (IG), end-expiration gating (EG), deep inspiration breath-hold (DIBH) and end-expiration breath-hold (EBH). The Varian Real-time Position Management system (RPMTM) was used to monitor respiratory movement and to gate the scanner. For each breathing phase, a population based internal margin (IM) was estimated based on average chest wall excursion, and incorporated into an individually optimised three-field mono-isocentric wide tangential photon field treatment plan for each scan. The target included the remaining breast, internal mammary nodes and periclavicular nodes. Results: The mean anteroposterior chest wall excursion during FB was 2.5 mm. For IG and EG, the mean excursions within gating windows were 1.1 and 0.7 mm, respectively, whereas for DIBH and EBH the excursions were 4.1 and 2.6 mm, respectively. For patients with left-sided cancer, the median heart volume receiving more than 50% of the prescription dose was reduced from 19.2% for FB to 2.8% for IG and 1.9% for DIBH, and the median left anterior descending (LAD) coronary artery volume was reduced from 88.9% to 22.4% for IG and 3.6% for DIBH. Simultaneously, the median ipsilateral relative lung volume irradiated to >50% of the prescribed target dose for both right- and left-sided cancers was reduced from 45.6% for FB to 29.5% for IG and 27.7% for DIBH. For EBH and EG, both the irradiated heart, LAD and lung volumes increased compared to FB. Conclusions: This is the first study to demonstrate the dosimetric benefits

  7. Availability of using diaphragm matching in stereotactic body radiotherapy (SBRT) at the time in breath-holding SBRT for liver cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Liver image guided radiation therapy (IGRT) based on bone matching risks generating serious target positioning errors for reasons of lack of reproducibility of expiration breath hold. We therefore investigated the feasibility of 3D image matching between planning CT images and pretreatment cone-beam computed tomography (CBCT) images based on diaphragm surface matching. 27 liver stereotactic body radiotherapy (SBRT) cases in whom trancecatheter arterial chemoembolization (TACE) had been performed in advance of radiotherapy were manually image-matched based on contrast, Lipiodol used in the TACE as the marker of the tumor, and the relative coordinates of the isocenter obtained by contrast matching, defined as the reference coordinate. The target positioning difference between diaphragm matching and bone matching were evaluated by using relative coordinates of the isocenter from the reference obtained for each matching technique. The target positioning error using diaphragm matching and bone matching was 1.31±0.83 and 3.10±2.80 mm in the cranial-caudal (C-C) direction, 1.04±0.95 and 1.62±1.02 mm in the anterior-posterior (A-P) direction, and 0.93±1.19 and 1.12±0.94 mm in the left-right (L-R) direction, respectively. The positioning error due to diaphragm matching was significantly smaller than for bone matching in the C-C direction (p<0.05). IGRT based on diaphragm matching has potential as an alternative image matching technique for the positioning of liver patients. (author)

  8. Robustness of the Voluntary Breath-Hold Approach for the Treatment of Peripheral Lung Tumors Using Hypofractionated Pencil Beam Scanning Proton Therapy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Dueck, Jenny; Knopf, Antje-Christin; Lomax, Antony;

    2016-01-01

    PURPOSE: The safe clinical implementation of pencil beam scanning (PBS) proton therapy for lung tumors is complicated by the delivery uncertainties caused by breathing motion. The purpose of this feasibility study was to investigate whether a voluntary breath-hold technique could limit the delivery...... uncertainties resulting from interfractional motion. METHODS AND MATERIALS: Data from 15 patients with peripheral lung tumors previously treated with stereotactic radiation therapy were included in this study. The patients had 1 computed tomographic (CT) scan in voluntary breath-hold acquired before treatment......=.008) and tumor size (2F, P=.025; 3F, P=.025). Smaller tumors with large baseline shifts were also at risk for reduced V95% (interaction term baseline/size: 2F, P=.005; 3F, P=.002). CONCLUSIONS: The breath-hold approach is a realistic clinical option for treating lung tumors with PBS proton therapy...

  9. Breath-holding spells: Prevalence and risk factors in under 6-year old children at south of Tehran

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    P. Tootoonchi

    2001-05-01

    Full Text Available To determine breath- holding spells (BHS prevalence and risk factors in under 6- year- old children, we interviewed mothers of 400 children in a cross- sectional study in 5 health centers at south of Tehran in autumn 1999. 33 children (8.25% had history of BHS (Male: 19, Female: 14 25 cases were between 2-4 years old (mean: 40±17 months. Seventy percent of cases (23 had onset of attacks after 6 months of age (mean: 10 monthis and the commonest frequency was one spell per month (78.79%. Painful experience and falling and striking the head wee the common triggering factors (79% and 76% respectively and there was significant association between BHS and history of fallin and severe striking of the head. There was no significant associations between BHS and sex, birth weight, birth order, delivery method, type of labor initiating and duration of labor.

  10. A COMPARATIVE STUDY OF PEAK EXPIRATORY FLOW RATE & BREATH HOLDING TIME IN NORMAL & ‘OM’ MEDITATORS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gayatri

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available ABSTRACT: BACKGROUND: ‘ Om’ is the name or symbol of God (Ishwara, Brahman . Either chanting or thinking about ‘Om’ is anecdotall y reported to cause a quite mental state, an d improve the all round performance of the bra in and body. OBJECTIVES: The study design aimed to find the effect of ‘OM meditation’ on Peak expiratory flow rate (PEFR & breath holding time (BHT, among Non-targeted thinkin g (control & Dhyana (‘Om’ meditation groups. METHODS: Source of DATA: 30 healthy male MBBS students (in the age g roup of 18- 20 years of Adichunchanagiri Institute of Med ical Sciences, B.G. Nagara, studying 1 st year MBBS, were included in the study. The group was divided equally into two sub-groups on a random basis (each sub-group consisting 15 st udents. Each of these sub-groups was made to get familiarized with the procedure.

  11. Clinical Feasibility of Using an EPID in cine Mode for Image-Guided Verification of Stereotactic Body Radiotherapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Purpose: To introduce a novel method for monitoring tumor location during stereotactic body radiotherapy (SBRT) while the treatment beam is on by using a conventional electronic portal imaging device (EPID). Methods and Materials: In our clinic, selected patients were treated under a phase I institutional review board-approved SBRT protocol for limited hepatic metastases from solid tumors. Before treatment planning multiple gold fiducial markers were implanted on the periphery of the tumor. During treatment the EPID was used in cine mode to collect the exit radiation and produce a sequence of images for each field. An in-house program was developed for calculating the location of the fiducials and their relative distance to the planned locations. Results: Three case studies illustrate the utility of the technique. Patient A exhibited a systematic shift of 4 mm during one of the treatment beams. Patient B showed an inferior drift of the target of approximately 1 cm from the time of setup to the end of the fraction. Patient C had a poor setup on the first day of treatment that was quantified and accounted for on subsequent treatment days. Conclusions: Target localization throughout each treatment beam can be quickly assessed with the presented technique. Treatment monitoring with an EPID in cine mode is shown to be a clinically feasible and useful tool

  12. SU-E-J-140: Availability of Using Diaphragm Matching in Stereotactic Body Radiotherapy (SBRT) at the Time in Breath-Holding SBRT for Liver Cancer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kawahara, D; Tsuda, S. [Course of Medical and Dental Sciences, Graduate School of Biomedical ' Health Sciences, Hiroshima University (Japan); Section of Radiation Therapy, Department of Clinical Support, Hiroshima University Hospital Health (Japan); Ozawa, S; Ohno, Y.; Kimura, T.; Nagata, Y. [Department of Radiation Oncology, Institute of Biomedical ' Health Science, Hiroshima University (Japan); Nakashima, T.; Aita, M.; Ochi, Y.; Okumura, T.; Masuda, H. [Section of Radiation Therapy, Department of Clinical Support, Hiroshima University Hospital Health (Japan)

    2014-06-01

    Purpose: IGRT based on the bone matching may produce a larger target positioning error in terms of the reproducibility of the expiration breath hold. Therefore, the feasibility of the 3D image matching between planning CT image and pretreatment CBCT image based on the diaphragm matching was investigated. Methods: In fifteen-nine liver SBRT cases, Lipiodol, uptake after TACE was outlined as the marker of the tumor. The relative coordinate of the isocenter obtained by the contrast matching was defined as the reference coordinate. The target positioning difference between diaphragm matching and bone matching were evaluated by the relative coordinate of the isocenter from the reference coordinate obtained by each matching technique. In addition, we evaluated PTV margins by van Herk setup margin formula. Results: The target positioning error by the diaphragm matching and the bone matching was 1.31±0.83 and 3.10±2.80 mm in the cranial-caudal(C-C) direction, 1.04±0.95 and 1.62±1.02 mm in the anterior-posterior(A-P) direction, 0.93±1.19 and 1.12±0.94 mm in the left-right(L-R) direction, respectively. The positioning error by the diaphragm matching was significantly smaller than the bone matching in the C-C direction (p<0.05). The setup margin of diaphragm matching and bone matching that we had calculated based on van Herk margin formula was 4.5mm and 6.2mm(C-C), and 3.6mm and 6.3mm(A-P), and 2.6mm and 4.5mm(L-R), respectively. Conclusion: IGRT based on a diaphragm matching could be one alternative image matching technique for the positioning of the patients with liver tumor.

  13. SU-E-J-140: Availability of Using Diaphragm Matching in Stereotactic Body Radiotherapy (SBRT) at the Time in Breath-Holding SBRT for Liver Cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Purpose: IGRT based on the bone matching may produce a larger target positioning error in terms of the reproducibility of the expiration breath hold. Therefore, the feasibility of the 3D image matching between planning CT image and pretreatment CBCT image based on the diaphragm matching was investigated. Methods: In fifteen-nine liver SBRT cases, Lipiodol, uptake after TACE was outlined as the marker of the tumor. The relative coordinate of the isocenter obtained by the contrast matching was defined as the reference coordinate. The target positioning difference between diaphragm matching and bone matching were evaluated by the relative coordinate of the isocenter from the reference coordinate obtained by each matching technique. In addition, we evaluated PTV margins by van Herk setup margin formula. Results: The target positioning error by the diaphragm matching and the bone matching was 1.31±0.83 and 3.10±2.80 mm in the cranial-caudal(C-C) direction, 1.04±0.95 and 1.62±1.02 mm in the anterior-posterior(A-P) direction, 0.93±1.19 and 1.12±0.94 mm in the left-right(L-R) direction, respectively. The positioning error by the diaphragm matching was significantly smaller than the bone matching in the C-C direction (p<0.05). The setup margin of diaphragm matching and bone matching that we had calculated based on van Herk margin formula was 4.5mm and 6.2mm(C-C), and 3.6mm and 6.3mm(A-P), and 2.6mm and 4.5mm(L-R), respectively. Conclusion: IGRT based on a diaphragm matching could be one alternative image matching technique for the positioning of the patients with liver tumor

  14. NOTE: Dosimetric evaluation of inspiration and expiration breath-hold for intensity-modulated radiotherapy planning of non-small cell lung cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tahir, Bilal A.; Bragg, Christopher M.; Lawless, Sarah E.; Hatton, Matthew Q. F.; Ireland, Rob H.

    2010-04-01

    The purpose of this study was to compare target coverage and lung tissue sparing between inspiration and expiration breath-hold intensity-modulated radiotherapy (IMRT) plans for patients with non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC). In a prospective study, seven NSCLC patients gave written consent to undergo both moderate deep inspiration and end-expiration breath-hold computed tomography (CT), which were used to generate five-field IMRT plans. Dose was calculated with a scatter and an inhomogeneity correction algorithm. The percentage of the planning target volume (PTV) receiving 90% of the prescription dose (PTV90), the volume of total lung receiving >= 10 Gy (V10) and >= 20 Gy (V20) and the mean lung dose (MLD) were compared by the Student's paired t-test. Compared with the expiration plans, the mean ± SD reductions for V10, V20 and MLD on the inspiration plans were 4.0 ± 3.7% (p = 0.031), 2.5 ± 2.3% (p = 0.028) and 1.1 ± 0.7 Gy (p = 0.007), respectively. Conversely, a mean difference of 1.1 ± 1.1% (p = 0.044) in PTV90 was demonstrated in favour of expiration. When using IMRT, inspiration breath-hold can reduce the dose to normal lung tissue while expiration breath-hold can improve the target coverage. The improved lung sparing at inspiration may outweigh the modest improvements in target coverage at expiration.

  15. Incorrect performance of the breath hold method in the old underestimates cerebrovascular reactivity and goes unnoticed without concomitant blood pressure and end-tidal CO(2) registration

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Beek, A. van; Wit, H.M. de; Olde Rikkert, M.G.M.; Claassen, J.A.H.R.

    2011-01-01

    BACKGROUND AND PURPOSE: The breath hold maneuver is a convenient and frequently used method to assess cerebrovascular reactivity (CR). This study aimed to assess feasibility and reproducibility of this method in healthy older persons. METHODS: Twenty-five healthy volunteers, aged 75 (SD 4) years, pe

  16. Breath-hold after forced expiration before removal of the biopsy needle decreased the rate of pneumothorax in CT-guided transthoracic lung biopsy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Min, Lingfeng; Xu, Xingxiang [Subei People' s Hospital of Jiangsu Province, Clinical Medical School of Yangzhou University, Yangzhou 225001, Jiangsu (China); Song, Yong [Jinling Hospital, Nanjing University School of Medical, Nanjing 210002, Jiangsu (China); Issahar, Ben-Dov [Pulmonary Institute, Sheba Medical Center, Sackler Faculty of Medicine, Tel Aviv University, Tel Aviv (Israel); Wu, Jingtao; Zhang, Le; Huang, Qian [Subei People' s Hospital of Jiangsu Province, Clinical Medical School of Yangzhou University, Yangzhou 225001, Jiangsu (China); Chen, Mingxiang, E-mail: chenmx1129@126.com [Subei People' s Hospital of Jiangsu Province, Clinical Medical School of Yangzhou University, Yangzhou 225001, Jiangsu (China)

    2013-01-15

    Purpose: To assess the effect of a breath-hold after forced expiration on the rate of pneumothorax after computed tomography (CT)-guided transthoracic needle biopsy of pulmonary lesions. Materials and methods: Between January 2008 and December 2011, percutaneous CT-guided lung biopsy was performed in 440 patients. Two hundred and twenty-one biopsies were performed without (control group) and two hundred and nineteen biopsies were performed with (study group) the study maneuver – a breath-hold after forced expiratory approach. Multivariate analysis was performed between groups for risk factors for pneumothorax, including patient demographics, lesion characteristics, and biopsy technique. Results: A reduced number of pneumothoraces (18 [8.2%] vs 35 [15.8%]; P = 0.014) but no significant difference in rate of drainage catheter insertions (2 [0.9%] vs (4 [1.8%]; P = 0.418) were noted in the study group as compared with the control group. By logistic regression analysis, three factors significantly and independently affected the risk for pneumothorax including lesion size (transverse and longitudinal diameter), distance from pleura and utilizing or avoiding the breath-hold after deep expiration maneuver. Conclusion: Breath-holding after forced expiration before removal of the biopsy needle during the percutaneous CT-guided transthoracic lung biopsy almost halved the rate of overall pneumothorax. Small lesion size (longitudinal diameter) and the distance from pleura were also predictors of pneumothorax in our study.

  17. Breath-hold after forced expiration before removal of the biopsy needle decreased the rate of pneumothorax in CT-guided transthoracic lung biopsy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Purpose: To assess the effect of a breath-hold after forced expiration on the rate of pneumothorax after computed tomography (CT)-guided transthoracic needle biopsy of pulmonary lesions. Materials and methods: Between January 2008 and December 2011, percutaneous CT-guided lung biopsy was performed in 440 patients. Two hundred and twenty-one biopsies were performed without (control group) and two hundred and nineteen biopsies were performed with (study group) the study maneuver – a breath-hold after forced expiratory approach. Multivariate analysis was performed between groups for risk factors for pneumothorax, including patient demographics, lesion characteristics, and biopsy technique. Results: A reduced number of pneumothoraces (18 [8.2%] vs 35 [15.8%]; P = 0.014) but no significant difference in rate of drainage catheter insertions (2 [0.9%] vs (4 [1.8%]; P = 0.418) were noted in the study group as compared with the control group. By logistic regression analysis, three factors significantly and independently affected the risk for pneumothorax including lesion size (transverse and longitudinal diameter), distance from pleura and utilizing or avoiding the breath-hold after deep expiration maneuver. Conclusion: Breath-holding after forced expiration before removal of the biopsy needle during the percutaneous CT-guided transthoracic lung biopsy almost halved the rate of overall pneumothorax. Small lesion size (longitudinal diameter) and the distance from pleura were also predictors of pneumothorax in our study

  18. The UK HeartSpare Study (Stage IB): Randomised comparison of a voluntary breath-hold technique and prone radiotherapy after breast conserving surgery

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Purpose: To compare mean heart and left anterior descending coronary artery (LAD) doses (NTDmean) and positional reproducibility in larger-breasted women receiving left breast radiotherapy using supine voluntary deep-inspiratory breath-hold (VBH) and free-breathing prone techniques. Materials and methods: Following surgery for early breast cancer, patients with estimated breast volumes >750 cm3 underwent planning-CT scans in supine VBH and free-breathing prone positions. Radiotherapy treatment plans were prepared, and mean heart and LAD doses were calculated. Patients were randomised to receive one technique for fractions 1–7, before switching techniques for fractions 8–15 (40 Gy/15 fractions total). Daily electronic portal imaging and alternate-day cone-beam CT (CBCT) imaging were performed. The primary endpoint was the difference in mean LAD NTDmean between techniques. Population systematic (Σ) and random errors (σ) were estimated. Within-patient comparisons between techniques used Wilcoxon signed-rank tests. Results: 34 patients were recruited, with complete dosimetric data available for 28. Mean heart and LAD NTDmean doses for VBH and prone treatments respectively were 0.4 and 0.7 (p < 0.001) and 2.9 and 7.8 (p < 0.001). Clip-based CBCT errors for VBH and prone respectively were ⩽3.0 mm and ⩽6.5 mm (Σ) and ⩽3.5 mm and ⩽5.4 mm (σ). Conclusions: In larger-breasted women, supine VBH provided superior cardiac sparing and reproducibility than a free-breathing prone position

  19. SU-E-J-112: The Impact of Cine EPID Image Acquisition Frame Rate On Markerless Soft-Tissue Tracking

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yip, S; Rottmann, J; Berbeco, R [Brigham and Women' s Hospital, Boston, MA (United States)

    2014-06-01

    Purpose: Although reduction of the cine EPID acquisition frame rate through multiple frame averaging may reduce hardware memory burden and decrease image noise, it can hinder the continuity of soft-tissue motion leading to poor auto-tracking results. The impact of motion blurring and image noise on the tracking performance was investigated. Methods: Phantom and patient images were acquired at a frame rate of 12.87Hz on an AS1000 portal imager. Low frame rate images were obtained by continuous frame averaging. A previously validated tracking algorithm was employed for auto-tracking. The difference between the programmed and auto-tracked positions of a Las Vegas phantom moving in the superior-inferior direction defined the tracking error (δ). Motion blurring was assessed by measuring the area change of the circle with the greatest depth. Additionally, lung tumors on 1747 frames acquired at eleven field angles from four radiotherapy patients are manually and automatically tracked with varying frame averaging. δ was defined by the position difference of the two tracking methods. Image noise was defined as the standard deviation of the background intensity. Motion blurring and image noise were correlated with δ using Pearson correlation coefficient (R). Results: For both phantom and patient studies, the auto-tracking errors increased at frame rates lower than 4.29Hz. Above 4.29Hz, changes in errors were negligible with δ<1.60mm. Motion blurring and image noise were observed to increase and decrease with frame averaging, respectively. Motion blurring and tracking errors were significantly correlated for the phantom (R=0.94) and patient studies (R=0.72). Moderate to poor correlation was found between image noise and tracking error with R -0.58 and -0.19 for both studies, respectively. Conclusion: An image acquisition frame rate of at least 4.29Hz is recommended for cine EPID tracking. Motion blurring in images with frame rates below 4.39Hz can substantially reduce the

  20. Application of the Karhunen-Loeve transform temporal image filter to reduce noise in real-time cardiac cine MRI

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Real-time dynamic magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) typically sacrifices the signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) to achieve higher spatial and temporal resolution. Spatial and/or temporal filtering (e.g., low-pass filtering or averaging) of dynamic images improves the SNR at the expense of edge sharpness. We describe the application of a temporal filter for dynamic MR image series based on the Karhunen-Loeve transform (KLT) to remove random noise without blurring stationary or moving edges and requiring no training data. In this paper, we present several properties of this filter and their effects on filter performance, and propose an automatic way to find the filter cutoff based on the autocorrelation of the eigenimages. Numerical simulation and in vivo real-time cardiac cine MR image series spanning multiple cardiac cycles acquired using multi-channel sensitivity-encoded MRI, i.e., parallel imaging, are used to validate and demonstrate these properties. We found that in this application, the noise standard deviation was reduced to 42% of the original with no apparent image blurring by using the proposed filter cutoff. Greater noise reduction can be achieved by increasing the length of the image series. This advantage of KLT filtering provides flexibility in the form of another scan parameter to trade for SNR.

  1. The cardiac dose-sparing benefits of deep inspiration breath-hold in left breast irradiation: a systematic review

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Despite technical advancements in breast radiation therapy, cardiac structures are still subject to significant levels of irradiation. As the use of adjuvant radiation therapy after breast-conserving surgery continues to improve survival for early breast cancer patients, the associated radiation-induced cardiac toxicities become increasingly relevant. Our primary aim was to evaluate the cardiac-sparing benefits of the deep inspiration breath-hold (DIBH) technique. An electronic literature search of the PubMed database from 1966 to July 2014 was used to identify articles published in English relating to the dosimetric benefits of DIBH. Studies comparing the mean heart dose of DIBH and free breathing treatment plans for left breast cancer patients were eligible to be included in the review. Studies evaluating the reproducibility and stability of the DIBH technique were also reviewed. Ten studies provided data on the benefits of DIBH during left breast irradiation. From these studies, DIBH reduced the mean heart dose by up to 3.4 Gy when compared to a free breathing approach. Four studies reported that the DIBH technique was stable and reproducible on a daily basis. According to current estimates of the excess cardiac toxicity associated with radiation therapy, a 3.4 Gy reduction in mean heart dose is equivalent to a 13.6% reduction in the projected increase in risk of heart disease. DIBH is a reproducible and stable technique for left breast irradiation showing significant promise in reducing the late cardiac toxicities associated with radiation therapy

  2. Improved heart, lung and target dose with deep inspiration breath hold in a large clinical series of breast cancer patients

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Background and purpose: This study aims at evaluating the effect of deep-inspiration breath hold (DIBH) on target coverage and dose to organs at risk in a large series of breast cancer patients. Materials and methods: Clinical dose plans for 319 breast cancer patients were evaluated: 144 left-sided patients treated with DIBH and 175 free-breathing (FB) patients (83 left-sided and 92 right-sided). All patients received whole breast irradiation with tangential fields, based on a forward-planned intensity-modulated radiation therapy (IMRT) technique. Dose to heart, ipsi-lateral lung and ipsi-lateral breast were assessed and median values compared between patient groups. Results: Comparing group median values, DIBH plans show large reductions of dose to the heart compared with left-sided FB plans; V20Gy (relative volume receiving ⩾20 Gy) for the heart is reduced from 7.8% to 2.3% (−70%, p < 0.0001), V40Gy from 3.4% to 0.3% (−91%, p < 0.0001) and mean dose from 5.2 to 2.7 Gy (−48%, p < 0.0001). Lung dose also shows a small reduction in V20Gy (p < 0.04), while median target coverage is slightly improved (p = 0.0002). Conclusions: In a large series of clinical patients we find that implementation of DIBH in daily clinical practice results in reduced irradiation of heart and lung, without compromising target coverage

  3. The cardiac dose-sparing benefits of deep inspiration breath-hold in left breast irradiation: a systematic review

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Smyth, Lloyd M, E-mail: lloyd.smyth@epworth.org.au [Epworth Radiation Oncology, Level 4, The Epworth Centre, Richmond, Victoria (Australia); Department of Medical Imaging and Radiation Sciences, Faculty of Medicine, School of Biomedical Sciences, Nursing and Health Sciences, Monash University, Clayton, Victoria (Australia); Knight, Kellie A [Department of Medical Imaging and Radiation Sciences, Faculty of Medicine, School of Biomedical Sciences, Nursing and Health Sciences, Monash University, Clayton, Victoria (Australia); Aarons, Yolanda K; Wasiak, Jason [Epworth Radiation Oncology, Level 4, The Epworth Centre, Richmond, Victoria (Australia)

    2015-03-15

    Despite technical advancements in breast radiation therapy, cardiac structures are still subject to significant levels of irradiation. As the use of adjuvant radiation therapy after breast-conserving surgery continues to improve survival for early breast cancer patients, the associated radiation-induced cardiac toxicities become increasingly relevant. Our primary aim was to evaluate the cardiac-sparing benefits of the deep inspiration breath-hold (DIBH) technique. An electronic literature search of the PubMed database from 1966 to July 2014 was used to identify articles published in English relating to the dosimetric benefits of DIBH. Studies comparing the mean heart dose of DIBH and free breathing treatment plans for left breast cancer patients were eligible to be included in the review. Studies evaluating the reproducibility and stability of the DIBH technique were also reviewed. Ten studies provided data on the benefits of DIBH during left breast irradiation. From these studies, DIBH reduced the mean heart dose by up to 3.4 Gy when compared to a free breathing approach. Four studies reported that the DIBH technique was stable and reproducible on a daily basis. According to current estimates of the excess cardiac toxicity associated with radiation therapy, a 3.4 Gy reduction in mean heart dose is equivalent to a 13.6% reduction in the projected increase in risk of heart disease. DIBH is a reproducible and stable technique for left breast irradiation showing significant promise in reducing the late cardiac toxicities associated with radiation therapy.

  4. Identification and Assessment of Paradoxical Ventricular Wall Motion Using ECG Gated Blood Pool Scan - Comparison of cine Loop , Phase Analysis and Paradox Image -

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, Jae Tae; Kim, Gwang Weon; Lee, Kyu Bo; Chung, Byung Chun; Whang, Kee Suk; Chae, Sung Chul; Paek, Wee Hyun; Cheon, Jae Eun [Kyungpook National University School of Medicine, Daegu (Korea, Republic of); Lee, Hyong Woo; Chung, Jin Hong [Yeongnam National University College of Medicine, Daegu (Korea, Republic of)

    1990-07-15

    Sixty-four patients with paradoxical ventricular wall motion noticed both in angiocardiography or 2-dimensional echocardiography were assessed by ECG gated blood pool scan (GBPS). Endless cine loop image, phase and amplitude images and paradox image obtained by visual inspection of each cardiac beat or Fourier transformation of acquired raw data were investigated to determine the incremental value of GBPS with these processing methods for identification of paradoxical ventricular wall motion. The results were as follows:1) Paradoxical wall motions were observed on interventricular septum in 34 cases, left ventricular free wall in 26 and right ventricular wall in 24. Underlying heart diseases were is chemic (23 cases) valvular(9), congenital heart disease (12), cardiomyopathy (5), pericardial effusion(5), post cardiac surgery(3), corpulmonale (2), endocarditis (l) and right ventricular tumor(l). 2) Left ventricular ejection fractions of patients with paradoxical left ventricular wall motion were significantly lower than those with paradoxical septal motion (p <0.005). 3) The sensitivity of each processing methods for detecting paradoxical wall motion was 76.9% by phase analysis, 74.6% by endless cine loop mapping and 68.4% by paradox image manipulation respectively. Paradoxial motions visualized only in phase, paradox or both images were appeared as hypokinesia or akinesia in cine loop image. 4) All events could be identified by at least one of above three processing methods, however only 34 cases (48.4%) showed the paradoxical motions in all of the three images. By these findings, we concluded that simultaneous inspection of all above three processing methods-endless cine loop, phase analysis and paradox image is necessary for accurate identification and assessment of paradoxical ventricular wall motion when performing GBPS.

  5. Deep inspiration breath-hold technique for lung tumors: the potential value of target immobilization and reduced lung density in dose escalation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Purpose/Objective: This study evaluates the dosimetric benefits and feasibility of a deep inspiration breath-hold (DIBH) technique in the treatment of lung tumors. The technique has two distinct features--deep inspiration, which reduces lung density, and breath-hold, which immobilizes lung tumors, thereby allowing for reduced margins. Both of these properties can potentially reduce the amount of normal lung tissue in the high-dose region, thus reducing morbidity and improving the possibility of dose escalation. Methods and Materials: Five patients treated for non-small cell lung carcinoma (Stage IIA-IIIB) received computed tomography (CT) scans under 4 respiration conditions: free-breathing, DIBH, shallow inspiration breath-hold, and shallow expiration breath-hold. The free-breathing and DIBH scans were used to generate 3-dimensional conformal treatment plans for comparison, while the shallow inspiration and expiration scans determined the extent of tumor motion under free-breathing conditions. To acquire the breath-hold scans, the patients are brought to reproducible respiration levels using spirometry, and for DIBH, modified slow vital capacity maneuvers. Planning target volumes (PTVs) for free-breathing plans included a margin for setup error (0.75 cm) plus a margin equal to the extent of tumor motion due to respiration (1-2 cm). Planning target volumes for DIBH plans included the same margin for setup error, with a reduced margin for residual uncertainty in tumor position (0.2-0.5 cm) as determined from repeat fluoroscopic movies. To simulate the effects of respiration-gated treatments and estimate the role of target immobilization alone (i.e., without the benefit of reduced lung density), a third plan is generated from the free-breathing scan using a PTV with the same margins as for DIBH plans. Results: The treatment plan comparison suggests that, on average, the DIBH technique can reduce the volume of lung receiving more than 25 Gy by 30% compared to free

  6. Cardiac cine MRI: Comparison of 1.5 T, non-enhanced 3.0 T and blood pool enhanced 3.0 T imaging

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gerretsen, S.C.; Versluis, B.; Bekkers, S.C.A.M. [Maastricht University Hospital, Department of Radiology, Maastricht (Netherlands); Leiner, T. [Maastricht University Hospital, Department of Radiology, Maastricht (Netherlands)], E-mail: leiner@rad.unimaas.nl

    2008-01-15

    Introduction: Cardiac cine imaging using balanced steady state free precession sequences (bSSFP) suffers from artefacts at 3.0 T. We compared bSSFP cardiac cine imaging at 1.5 T with gradient echo imaging at 3.0 T with and without a blood pool contrast agent. Materials and methods: Eleven patients referred for cardiac cine imaging underwent imaging at 1.5 T and 3.0 T. At 3.0 T images were acquired before and after administration of 0.03 mmol/kg gadofosveset. Blood pool signal-to-noise ratio (SNR), temporal variations in SNR, ejection fraction and myocardial mass were compared. Subjective image quality was scored on a four-point scale. Results: Blood pool SNR increased with more than 75% at 3.0 T compared to 1.5 T (p < 0.001); after contrast administration at 3.0 T SNR increased with 139% (p < 0.001). However, variations in blood pool SNR at 3.0 T were nearly three times as high versus those at 1.5 T in the absence of contrast medium (p < 0.001); after contrast administration this was reduced to approximately a factor 1.4 (p = 0.21). Saturation artefacts led to significant overestimation of ejection fraction in the absence of contrast administration (1.5 T: 44.7 {+-} 3.1 vs. 3.0 T: 50.7 {+-} 4.2 [p = 0.04] vs. 3.0 T post contrast: 43.4 {+-} 2.9 [p = 0.55]). Subjective image quality was highest for 1.5 T (2.8 {+-} 0.3), and lowest for non-enhanced 3.0 T (1.7 {+-} 0.6; p = 0.006). Conclusions: GRE cardiac cine imaging at 3.0 T after injection of the blood pool agent gadofosveset leads to improved objective and subjective cardiac cine image quality at 3.0 T and to the same conclusions regarding cardiac ejection fraction compared to bSSFP imaging at 1.5 T.

  7. Comparison of 16 slice multi-detector computed tomography and breath hold 3D magnetic resonance angiography in the detection of coronary stenosis

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Xin LIU; Zulong CAI; Youquan CAI; Shaohong ZHAO; Ningyu AN; Yuangui GAO

    2006-01-01

    Objective To compare 16-slice multi-detector spiral computed tomography (MDCT) and breathhold 3D magnetic resonance (MR) coronary angiography in the visualization of coronary arteries and the accuracy of detecting significant (> 50%) coronary stenoses in patients with suspected coronary artery disease. Methods Forty patients were examined by 16-slice CT (GE, Lightspeedl6)and MR (GE,Twinspeed) within 3 days; 31 of them underwent conventional coronary angiography (CAG) within 2 weeks after CT and MR scan. CT was performed with 16× 1.25 mm detector collimation, 0.5 s rotation time and images were reconstructed at 60%-75% of the cardiac cycle. MR was performed with breath hold 3D FIESTA (TR4.0 ms, TE1.7 ms, flip angle 65, slice thickness 3 mm, FOV 280 mm, matrix 256× 192). Mean heart rate was 63 ± 5.8 bpm and β-blocker was used in 24 patients. MR and CT image quality was evaluated in 9 coronary segments (RCA1, RCA2, RCA3, LM, LAD1, LAD2, LAD3, LCX1, LCX2) using a four-point grading scale.Sensitivity, specificity, positive predictive value, negative predictive value and accuracy were calculated for detection of significant stenosis using CAG as the gold standard. Results 16-slice CT showed higher image quality in most coronary segments except RCA2.Forty-three segments were diagnosed as significant stenosis by CAG, 36 and 27 of these were correctly detected by CT and MR respectively. Sensitivity, specificity, positive predictive value, and negative predictive value of 16-slice CT and MR for detecting significant stenosis were 83 %, 84 %, 49 %, 97 % and 63 %, 90 %, 55 %, 93 %, respectively. Conclusion Sixteen-slice CT showed higher image quality in most coronary segments excepted for middle RCA. 16-slice CT had higher sensitivity than MR for detection of coronary significant stenosis, whereas MR had higher specificity than CT. Both CT and MR showed high negative predictive value,which is useful for excluding coronary stenosis in symptomatic patients.

  8. Dosimetric study of SIB-IMRT versus SIB-3DCRT for breast cancer with breath-hold gated technique

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Suresh Moorthy

    2013-10-01

    , integral dose, and treatment time. With the use of breath-hold gated technique in IMRT, it can further improve the target coverage and reduction of doses to the heart, lung, and LAD. SIB technique could reduce the overall treatment duration by about one week.----------------------------------Cite this article as:Moorthy S, Sakr H, Hasan S, Samuel J, Al-Janahi S, Murthy N. Dosimetric study of SIB-IMRT versus SIB-3DCRT for breast cancer with breath-hold gated technique. Int J Cancer Ther Oncol 2013;1(1:010110. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.14319/ijcto.0101.10

  9. Evaluation of Vasomotor Reactivity by Transcranial Doppler Sonography: Age and Sex Related Differences in Breath Holding Index in Iranian Population

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    SA Mousavi

    2005-03-01

    Full Text Available Background: The assessment of cerebral vasoreactivity can provide information regarding the reserve capacity of cerebral circulation. Reduction of this property has been found in association with situations predisposing one toward cerebrovascular disease. In this study, we defined the vasoreactivity of brain vesseles according to age and sex of the patients. Methods: In this descriptive study, 289 healthy subjects (without hypertension, diabetes mellitus, obesity, smoking, CHF, CHD, were admitted from January 2004 to June 2004. The population was divided to four groups, according to age and sex (women and men more and less than 30. After determination of each patient’s flow velocity of middle cerebral artery (MCA by mean of a transcranial doppler instrument (TCD, before and after 30s apnea, breath holding index (BHI was calculated. Data was analyzed, using SPSS software. Results: BHI was significantly higher in women than men (0.918±0.40 versus 0.637±0.22; P<0.001. BHI was significantly lower in older (age > 30 women (0.812±0.31 than in younger ( ≤ 30 years women (0.995±0.44; P<0.001 but there was no significant difference between older (age > 30 men (0.62±0.23 and younger ( ≤ 30 years men (0.65±0.20; P > 0.05. Conclusion: The average of BHI was lower in men than in women in total and in all age subgroups. BHI was relatively constant in all age subgroups in men but there was significant decline in BHI by increasing age in women. So despite of many physiologic changes related to aging, vasomotor reactivity remains relatively constant in men but decreases in women. Findings of our study suggest that changes of cerebrovascular vasomotor reactivity in healthy subjects may be related to aging, but they are probably mainly influenced by sex. Keywords: vasomotor reactivity, BHI, TCD

  10. Minimizing Late Effects for Patients With Mediastinal Hodgkin Lymphoma: Deep Inspiration Breath-Hold, IMRT, or Both?

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Purpose: Hodgkin lymphoma (HL) survivors have an increased risk of cardiovascular disease (CD), lung cancer, and breast cancer. We investigated the risk for the development of CD and secondary lung, breast, and thyroid cancer after radiation therapy (RT) delivered with deep inspiration breath-hold (DIBH) compared with free-breathing (FB) using 3-dimensional conformal RT (3DCRT) and intensity modulated RT (IMRT). The aim of this study was to determine which treatment modality best reduced the combined risk of life-threatening late effects in patients with mediastinal HL. Methods and Materials: Twenty-two patients with early-stage mediastinal HL were eligible for the study. Treatment plans were calculated with both 3DCRT and IMRT on both DIBH and FB planning computed tomographic scans. We reported the estimated dose to the heart, lung, female breasts, and thyroid and calculated the estimated life years lost attributable to CD and to lung, breast, and thyroid cancer. Results: DIBH lowered the estimated dose to heart and lung regardless of delivery technique (P<.001). There was no significant difference between IMRT-FB and 3DCRT-DIBH in mean heart dose, heart V20Gy, and lung V20Gy. The mean breast dose was increased with IMRT regardless of breathing technique. Life years lost was lowest with DIBH and highest with FB. Conclusions: In this cohort, 3DCRT-DIBH resulted in lower estimated doses and lower lifetime excess risks than did IMRT-FB. Combining IMRT and DIBH could be beneficial for a subgroup of patients

  11. Involved-node radiotherapy combined with deep-inspiration breath-hold technique in patients with Hodgkin lymphoma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Purpose. - To assess the clinical outcome of the involved-node radiotherapy (INRT) concept with the use of deep-inspiration breath-hold (DIBH) technique in patients with localized supra-diaphragmatic Hodgkin lymphoma. Patients and methods. - All were patients with stage I-II Hodgkin lymphoma and they were treated with chemotherapy prior to irradiation. Radiation treatments were delivered using the involved-node radiotherapy concept according to the European Organization for Research and Treatment of Cancer Guidelines and a spirometer dedicated to DIBH radiotherapy was used for every patient. Results. - Twenty-seven patients with Hodgkin lymphoma (26 patients with primary Hodgkin lymphoma, one with refractory disease), treated from November 2004 to October 2010, were retrospectively analysed. The median age was 27 years (range 16 to 54). Seventeen (63%) patients had stage I-IIA and 10 (37%) had stage I-IIB disease. All patients received two to six cycles of adriamycin, bleomycin, vinblastine and dacarbazine. The median radiation dose to patients was 30,6 Gy (range: 19,8-40). Protection of various organs at risk was satisfactory. Median follow-up, 3-year progression-free and 3-year overall survival were 38 months (range: 7-70), 96% (95% CI: 79-99%) and 95% (95% CI: 75-99%), respectively. Recurrence occurred in one patient (mediastinal in-field relapse). There was one grade 3 acute toxicity (transient pneumonitis). Conclusions. - Our results suggest that patients with localized Hodgkin lymphoma can be safely and efficiently treated using deep-inspiration breath technique and the involved-node radiotherapy concept. Longer follow-up is needed to assess late toxicity, especially for the heart and the coronary arteries. (authors)

  12. The deep inspiration breath hold technique using Abches reduces cardiac dose in patients undergoing left-sided breast irradiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We explored whether the deep inspiration breath hold (DIBH) technique using Abches during left-sided breast irradiation was effective for minimizing the amount of radiation to the heart and lung compared to free breathing (FB). Between February and July 2012, a total of 25 patients with left-sided breast cancer underwent two computed tomography scans each with the DIBH using Abches and using FB after breast-conserving surgery. The scans were retrospectively replanned using standardized criteria for the purpose of this study. The DIBH plans for each patient were compared with FB plans using dosimetric parameters. All patients were successfully treated with the DIBH technique using Abches. Significant differences were found between the DIBH and FB plans for mean heart dose (2.52 vs. 4.53 Gy), heart V30 (16.48 vs. 45.13 cm3), V20 (21.35 vs. 54.55 cm3), mean left anterior descending coronary artery (LAD) dose (16.01 vs. 26.26 Gy, all p 3 of the LAD (41.65 vs. 47.27 Gy, p = 0.017). The mean left lung dose (7.53 vs. 8.03 Gy, p = 0.073) and lung V20 (14.63% vs. 15.72%, p 0.060) of DIBH using Abches were not different significantly compared with FB. We report that the use of a DIBH technique using Abches in breathing adapted radiotherapy for left-sided breast cancer is easily feasible in daily practice and significantly reduces the radiation doses to the heart and LAD, therefore potentially reducing cardiac risk.

  13. Minimizing Late Effects for Patients With Mediastinal Hodgkin Lymphoma: Deep Inspiration Breath-Hold, IMRT, or Both?

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Aznar, Marianne C., E-mail: marianne.camille.aznar@regionh.dk [Department of Oncology, Section of Radiotherapy, Rigshospitalet, University of Copenhagen, Copenhagen (Denmark); Faculty of Sciences, Niels Bohr Institute, and Faculty of Health Sciences, University of Copenhagen, Copenhagen (Denmark); Maraldo, Maja V.; Schut, Deborah A. [Department of Oncology, Section of Radiotherapy, Rigshospitalet, University of Copenhagen, Copenhagen (Denmark); Lundemann, Michael [Department of Oncology, Section of Radiotherapy, Rigshospitalet, University of Copenhagen, Copenhagen (Denmark); Faculty of Sciences, Niels Bohr Institute, and Faculty of Health Sciences, University of Copenhagen, Copenhagen (Denmark); Brodin, N Patrik [Department of Oncology, Section of Radiotherapy, Rigshospitalet, University of Copenhagen, Copenhagen (Denmark); Institute of Onco-Physics, Albert Einstein College of Medicine of Yeshiva University, Bronx, New York (United States); Vogelius, Ivan R. [Department of Oncology, Section of Radiotherapy, Rigshospitalet, University of Copenhagen, Copenhagen (Denmark); Berthelsen, Anne K. [Department of Oncology, Section of Radiotherapy, Rigshospitalet, University of Copenhagen, Copenhagen (Denmark); Department of Clinical Physiology, Nuclear Medicine and PET, Rigshospitalet, University of Copenhagen, Copenhagen (Denmark); Specht, Lena; Petersen, Peter M. [Department of Oncology, Section of Radiotherapy, Rigshospitalet, University of Copenhagen, Copenhagen (Denmark)

    2015-05-01

    Purpose: Hodgkin lymphoma (HL) survivors have an increased risk of cardiovascular disease (CD), lung cancer, and breast cancer. We investigated the risk for the development of CD and secondary lung, breast, and thyroid cancer after radiation therapy (RT) delivered with deep inspiration breath-hold (DIBH) compared with free-breathing (FB) using 3-dimensional conformal RT (3DCRT) and intensity modulated RT (IMRT). The aim of this study was to determine which treatment modality best reduced the combined risk of life-threatening late effects in patients with mediastinal HL. Methods and Materials: Twenty-two patients with early-stage mediastinal HL were eligible for the study. Treatment plans were calculated with both 3DCRT and IMRT on both DIBH and FB planning computed tomographic scans. We reported the estimated dose to the heart, lung, female breasts, and thyroid and calculated the estimated life years lost attributable to CD and to lung, breast, and thyroid cancer. Results: DIBH lowered the estimated dose to heart and lung regardless of delivery technique (P<.001). There was no significant difference between IMRT-FB and 3DCRT-DIBH in mean heart dose, heart V20Gy, and lung V20Gy. The mean breast dose was increased with IMRT regardless of breathing technique. Life years lost was lowest with DIBH and highest with FB. Conclusions: In this cohort, 3DCRT-DIBH resulted in lower estimated doses and lower lifetime excess risks than did IMRT-FB. Combining IMRT and DIBH could be beneficial for a subgroup of patients.

  14. Mind-body relationships in elite apnea divers during breath holding: a study of autonomic responses to acute hypoxemia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marco eLaurino

    2012-03-01

    Full Text Available The mental control of ventilation with all associated phenomena,from relaxation to modulation of emotions, from cardiovascular tometabolic adaptations, constitutes a psychophysiological conditioncharacterizing voluntary breath holding (BH. BH induces severalautonomic responses, involving both autonomic cardiovascular andcutaneous pathways, whose characterization is the main aim ofthis study. Electrocardiogram and skin conductance (SC recordingswere collected from 14 elite divers during three conditions: freebreathing (FB, normoxic phase of BH (NPBH and hypoxic phaseof BH (HPBH. Thus, we compared a set of features describing signaldynamics between the three experimental conditions: from heart ratevariability features (in time and frequency domains and by usingnonlinear methods to rate and shape of spontaneous SC responses.The main result of the study rises by applying a Factor Analysis tothe subset of features significantly changed in the two BH phases.Indeed, the Factor Analysis allowed to uncover the structure of latentfactors which modeled the autonomic response: a factor describingthe autonomic balance, one the information increase rate, and alatter the central nervous system driver. The BH did not disrupt theFB factorial structure, and only few features moved among factors.Factor Analysis indicates that during BH i only the SC described theemotional output, ii the sympathetic tone on heart did not change, iiithe dynamics of interbeats intervals showed an increase of long rangecorrelation that anticipates the HPBH, followed by a drop to a randombehavior. In conclusion, data show that the autonomic control onheart rate and skin conductance are differentially modulated duringBH, which could be related to a more pronounced effect on emotionalcontrol induced by the mental training to BH.

  15. Mechanical indentation improves cerebral blood oxygenation signal quality of functional near-infrared spectroscopy (fNIRS) during breath holding

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vogt, William C.; Romero, Edwin; LaConte, Stephen M.; Rylander, Christopher G.

    2013-03-01

    Functional near-infrared spectroscopy (fNIRS) is a well-known technique for non-invasively measuring cerebral blood oxygenation, and many studies have demonstrated that fNIRS signals can be related to cognitive function. However, the fNIRS signal is attenuated by the skin, while scalp blood content has been reported to influence cerebral oxygenation measurements. Mechanical indentation has been shown to increase light transmission through soft tissues by causing interstitial water and blood flow away from the compressed region. To study the effects of indentation on fNIRS, a commercial fNIRS system with 16 emitter/detector pairs was used to measure cerebral blood oxygenation at 2 Hz. This device used diffuse reflectance at 730 nm and 850 nm to calculate deoxy- and oxy-hemoglobin concentrations. A borosilicate glass hemisphere was epoxied over each sensor to function as both an indenter and a lens. After placing the indenter/sensor assembly on the forehead, a pair of plastic bands was placed on top of the fNIRS headband and strapped to the head to provide uniform pressure and tightened to approx. 15 N per strap. Cerebral blood oxygenation was recorded during a breath holding regime (15 second hold, 15 second rest, 6 cycles) in 4 human subjects both with and without the indenter array. Results showed that indentation increased raw signal intensity by 85 +/- 35%, and that indentation increased amplitude of hemoglobin changes during breath cycles by 313% +/- 105%. These results suggest that indentation improves sensing of cerebral blood oxygenation, and may potentially enable sensing of deeper brain tissues.

  16. Investigation of dose homogeneity for loose helical tomotherapy delivery in the context of breath-hold radiation therapy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Bryan; Kron, Tomas; Battista, Jerry; Van Dyk, Jake

    2005-05-01

    Loose helical delivery is a potential solution to account for respiration-driven tumour motion in helical tomotherapy (HT). In this approach, a treatment is divided into a set of interlaced 'loose' helices commencing at different gantry angles. Each loose helix covers the entire target length in one gantry rotation during a single breath-hold. The dosimetric characteristics of loose helical delivery were investigated by delivering a 6 MV photon beam in a HT-like manner. Multiple scenarios of conventional 'tight' HT and loose helical deliveries were modelled in treatment planning software, and carried out experimentally with Kodak EDR2 film. The advantage of loose helical delivery lies in its ability to produce a more homogeneous dose distribution by eliminating the 'thread' effect—an inherent characteristic of HT, which results in dose modulations away from the axis of gantry rotation. However, loose helical delivery was also subjected to undesirable dose modulations in the direction of couch motion (termed 'beating' effect), when the ratio between the number of beam projections per gantry rotation (n) and pitch factor (p) was a non-integer. The magnitude of dose modulations decreased with an increasing n/p ratio. The results suggest that for the current HT unit (n = 51), dose modulations could be kept under 5% by selecting a pitch factor smaller than 7. A pitch factor of this magnitude should be able to treat a target up to 30 cm in length. Loose helical delivery should increase the total session time only by a factor of 2, while the planning time should stay the same since the total number of beam projections remains unchanged. Considering its dosimetric advantage and clinical practicality, loose helical delivery is a promising solution for the future HT treatments of respiration-driven targets.

  17. Dosimetric evaluation of inspiration and expiration breath-hold for intensity-modulated radiotherapy planning of non-small cell lung cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The purpose of this study was to compare target coverage and lung tissue sparing between inspiration and expiration breath-hold intensity-modulated radiotherapy (IMRT) plans for patients with non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC). In a prospective study, seven NSCLC patients gave written consent to undergo both moderate deep inspiration and end-expiration breath-hold computed tomography (CT), which were used to generate five-field IMRT plans. Dose was calculated with a scatter and an inhomogeneity correction algorithm. The percentage of the planning target volume (PTV) receiving 90% of the prescription dose (PTV90), the volume of total lung receiving ≥ 10 Gy (V10) and ≥ 20 Gy (V20) and the mean lung dose (MLD) were compared by the Student's paired t-test. Compared with the expiration plans, the mean ± SD reductions for V10, V20 and MLD on the inspiration plans were 4.0 ± 3.7% (p = 0.031), 2.5 ± 2.3% (p = 0.028) and 1.1 ± 0.7 Gy (p = 0.007), respectively. Conversely, a mean difference of 1.1 ± 1.1% (p = 0.044) in PTV90 was demonstrated in favour of expiration. When using IMRT, inspiration breath-hold can reduce the dose to normal lung tissue while expiration breath-hold can improve the target coverage. The improved lung sparing at inspiration may outweigh the modest improvements in target coverage at expiration. (note)

  18. Dosimetric evaluation of inspiration and expiration breath-hold for intensity-modulated radiotherapy planning of non-small cell lung cancer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tahir, Bilal A; Bragg, Christopher M [Department of Radiotherapy Physics, Weston Park Hospital, Sheffield Teaching Hospitals NHS Trust (United Kingdom); Lawless, Sarah E; Hatton, Matthew Q F; Ireland, Rob H [Academic Unit of Clinical Oncology, University of Sheffield, Sheffield (United Kingdom)], E-mail: r.ireland@sheffield.ac.uk

    2010-04-21

    The purpose of this study was to compare target coverage and lung tissue sparing between inspiration and expiration breath-hold intensity-modulated radiotherapy (IMRT) plans for patients with non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC). In a prospective study, seven NSCLC patients gave written consent to undergo both moderate deep inspiration and end-expiration breath-hold computed tomography (CT), which were used to generate five-field IMRT plans. Dose was calculated with a scatter and an inhomogeneity correction algorithm. The percentage of the planning target volume (PTV) receiving 90% of the prescription dose (PTV{sub 90}), the volume of total lung receiving {>=} 10 Gy (V{sub 10}) and {>=} 20 Gy (V{sub 20}) and the mean lung dose (MLD) were compared by the Student's paired t-test. Compared with the expiration plans, the mean {+-} SD reductions for V{sub 10}, V{sub 20} and MLD on the inspiration plans were 4.0 {+-} 3.7% (p = 0.031), 2.5 {+-} 2.3% (p = 0.028) and 1.1 {+-} 0.7 Gy (p = 0.007), respectively. Conversely, a mean difference of 1.1 {+-} 1.1% (p = 0.044) in PTV{sub 90} was demonstrated in favour of expiration. When using IMRT, inspiration breath-hold can reduce the dose to normal lung tissue while expiration breath-hold can improve the target coverage. The improved lung sparing at inspiration may outweigh the modest improvements in target coverage at expiration. (note)

  19. Organ perfusion during voluntary pulmonary hyperinflation; a magnetic resonance imaging study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kyhl, Kasper; Drvis, Ivan; Barak, Otto; Mijacika, Tanja; Engstrøm, Thomas; Secher, Niels H; Dujic, Zeljko; Buca, Ante; Madsen, Per Lav

    2016-02-01

    Pulmonary hyperinflation is used by competitive breath-hold divers and is accomplished by glossopharyngeal insufflation (GPI), which is known to compress the heart and pulmonary vessels, increasing sympathetic activity and lowering cardiac output (CO) without known consequence for organ perfusion. Myocardial, pulmonary, skeletal muscle, kidney, and liver perfusion were evaluated by magnetic resonance imaging in 10 elite breath-hold divers at rest and during moderate GPI. Cardiac chamber volumes, stroke volume, and thus CO were determined from cardiac short-axis cine images. Organ volumes were assessed from gradient echo sequences, and organ perfusion was evaluated from first-pass images after gadolinium injection. During GPI, lung volume increased by 5.2 ± 1.5 liters (mean ± SD; P hyperinflation by GPI, CO and organ perfusion, including the myocardium, as well as perfusion of skeletal muscles, are reduced, and yet perfusion of the liver is maintained. Liver perfusion seems to be prioritized when CO decreases during GPI. PMID:26589331

  20. SU-E-T-361: Clinical Benefit of Automatic Beam Gating Mixed with Breath Hold in Radiation Therapy of Left Breast

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Purpose: To investigate the clinical and dosimetric benefits of automatic gating of left breast mixed with breath-hold technique. Methods: Two Active Breathing Control systems, ABC2.0 and ABC3.0, were used during simulation and treatment delivery. The two systems are different such that ABC2.0 is a breath-hold system without beam control capability, while ABC3.0 has capability in both breath-hold and beam gating. At simulation, each patient was scanned twice: one with free breathing (FB) and one with breath hold through ABC. Treatment plan was generated on the CT with ABC. The same plan was also recalculated on the CT with FB. These two plans were compared to assess plan quality. For treatments with ABC2.0, beams with MU > 55 were manually split into multiple subfields. All subfields were identical and shared the total MU. For treatment with ABC3.0, beam splitting was unnecessary. Instead, treatment was delivered in gating mode mixed with breath-hold technique. Treatment delivery efficiency using the two systems was compared. Results: The prescribed dose was 50.4Gy at 1.8Gy/fraction. The maximum heart dose averaged over 10 patients was 46.0±2.5Gy and 24.5±12.2Gy for treatments with FB and with ABC respectively. The corresponding heart V10 was 13.2±3.6% and 1.0±1.6% respectively. The averaged MUs were 99.8±7.5 for LMT, 99.2±9.4 for LLT. For treatment with ABC2.0, normally the original beam was split into 2 subfields. The averaged total time to delivery all beams was 4.3±0.4min for treatments with ABC2.0 and 3.3±0.6min for treatments with ABC3.0 in gating mode. Conclusion: Treatment with ABC tremendously reduced heart dose. Compared to treatments with ABC2.0, gating with ABC3.0 reduced the total treatment time by 23%. Use of ABC3.0 improved the delivery efficiency, and eliminated the possibility of mistreatments. The latter may happen with ABC2.0 where beam is not terminated when breath signal falls outside of the treatment window

  1. Reproducibility of small animal cine and scar cardiac magnetic resonance imaging using a clinical 3.0 tesla system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    To evaluate the inter-study, inter-reader and intra-reader reproducibility of cardiac cine and scar imaging in rats using a clinical 3.0 Tesla magnetic resonance (MR) system. Thirty-three adult rats (Sprague–Dawley) were imaged 24 hours after surgical occlusion of the left anterior descending coronary artery using a 3.0 Tesla clinical MR scanner (Philips Healthcare, Best, The Netherlands) equipped with a dedicated 70 mm solenoid receive-only coil. Left-ventricular (LV) volumes, mass, ejection fraction and amount of myocardial scar tissue were measured. Intra-and inter-observer reproducibility was assessed in all animals. In addition, repeat MR exams were performed in 6 randomly chosen rats within 24 hours to assess inter-study reproducibility. The MR imaging protocol was successfully completed in 32 (97%) animals. Bland-Altman analysis demonstrated high intra-reader reproducibility (mean bias%: LV end-diastolic volume (LVEDV), -1.7%; LV end-systolic volume (LVESV), -2.2%; LV ejection fraction (LVEF), 1.0%; LV mass, -2.7%; and scar mass, -1.2%) and high inter-reader reproducibility (mean bias%: LVEDV, 3.3%; LVESV, 6.2%; LVEF, -4.8%; LV mass, -1.9%; and scar mass, -1.8%). In addition, a high inter-study reproducibility was found (mean bias%: LVEDV, 0.1%; LVESV, -1.8%; LVEF, 1.0%; LV mass, -4.6%; and scar mass, -6.2%). Cardiac MR imaging of rats yielded highly reproducible measurements of cardiac volumes/function and myocardial infarct size on a clinical 3.0 Tesla MR scanner system. Consequently, more widely available high field clinical MR scanners can be employed for small animal imaging of the heart e.g. when aiming at serial assessments during therapeutic intervention studies

  2. Self-gated CINE MRI for combined contrast-enhanced imaging and wall-stiffness measurements of murine aortic atherosclerotic lesions.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Brigit den Adel

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: High-resolution contrast-enhanced imaging of the murine atherosclerotic vessel wall is difficult due to unpredictable flow artifacts, motion of the thin artery wall and problems with flow suppression in the presence of a circulating contrast agent. METHODS AND RESULTS: We applied a 2D-FLASH retrospective-gated CINE MRI method at 9.4T to characterize atherosclerotic plaques and vessel wall distensibility in the aortic arch of aged ApoE(-/- mice after injection of a contrast agent. The method enabled detection of contrast enhancement in atherosclerotic plaques in the aortic arch after I.V. injection of micelles and iron oxides resulting in reproducible plaque enhancement. Both contrast agents were taken up in the plaque, which was confirmed by histology. Additionally, the retrospective-gated CINE method provided images of the aortic wall throughout the cardiac cycle, from which the vessel wall distensibility could be calculated. Reduction in plaque size by statin treatment resulted in lower contrast enhancement and reduced wall stiffness. CONCLUSIONS: The retrospective-gated CINE MRI provides a robust and simple way to detect and quantify contrast enhancement in atherosclerotic plaques in the aortic wall of ApoE(-/- mice. From the same scan, plaque-related changes in stiffness of the aortic wall can be determined. In this mouse model, a correlation between vessel wall stiffness and atherosclerotic lesions was found.

  3. SU-C-210-04: Considerable Pancreatic Tumor Motion During Breath-Hold Measured Using Intratumoral Fiducials On Fluoroscopic Movies

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lens, E; Horst, A van der; Versteijne, E; Tienhoven, G van; Bel, A [Academic Medical Center, Amsterdam (Netherlands)

    2015-06-15

    Purpose: Using a breath hold (BH) technique during radiotherapy of pancreatic tumors is expected to reduce intra-fractional motion. The aim of this study was to evaluate the tumor motion during BH. Methods: In this pilot study, we included 8 consecutive pancreatic cancer patients. All had 2– 4 intratumoral gold fiducials. Patients were asked to perform 3 consecutive 30-second end-inhale BHs on day 5, 10 and 15 of their three-week treatment. During BH, airflow through a mouthpiece was measured using a spirometer. Any inadvertent flow of air during BH was monitored for all patients. We measured tumor motion on lateral fluoroscopic movies (57 in total) made during BH. In each movie the fiducials as a group were tracked over time in superior-inferior (SI) and anterior-posterior (AP) direction using 2-D image correlation between consecutive frames. We determined for each patient the range of intra-BH motion over all movies; we also determined the absolute means and standard deviations (SDs) for the entire patient group. Additionally, we investigated the relation between inadvertent airflow during BH and the intra-BH motion. Results: We found intra-BH tumor motion of up to 12.5 mm (range, 1.0–12.5 mm) in SI direction and up to 8.0 mm (range, 1.0–8.0 mm) in AP direction. The absolute mean motion over the patient population was 4.7 (SD: 3.0) mm and 2.8 (SD: 1.2) mm in the SI and AP direction, respectively. Patients were able to perform stable consecutive BHs; during only 20% of the movies we found very small airflows (≤ 65 ml). These were mostly stepwise in nature and could not explain the continuous tumor motions we observed. Conclusion: We found substantial (up to 12.5 mm) pancreatic tumor motion during BHs. We found minimal inadvertent airflow, seen only during a minority of BHs, and this did not explain the obtained results. This work was supported by the foundation Bergh in het Zadel through the Dutch Cancer Society (KWF Kankerbestrijding) project No. UVA 2011-5271.

  4. CINE CLUB

    CERN Multimedia

    Ciné Club

    2009-01-01

    Main Auditorium CERN jeudi 17 décembre 2009 à 18 h 15 à l’Amphithéâtre principal du CERN (bâtiment 500)   Comme chaque année avant Noël, le CineClub du CERN est heureux d’inviter petits et grands à une projection gratuite du film   LE MONDE DE NEMO (FINDING NEMO) (USA, 2003, Andrew Stanton and Lee Unkrich)   Dans les eaux tropicales de la Grande Barrière de corail, un poisson-clown du nom de Marin mène une existence paisible avec son fils unique, Nemo. Redoutant l’océan et ses risques imprévisibles, il fait de son mieux pour protéger son fils. Comme tous les petits poissons de son âge, celui-ci rêve pourtant d’explorer les mystérieux récifs. Lorsque Nemo disparaît, Marin devient malgré lui le héros d’une qu&a...

  5. Cine club

    CERN Multimedia

    Ciné club

    2010-01-01

    Monday 13 December 2010 at 18:30 / Lundi 13 Décembre 2010 à 18:30 CERN Main Auditorium / Amphithéâtre Principal Comme chaque année avant Noël, le CINE-CLUB du CERN est heureux d’inviter petits et grands à une projection gratuite du film.   Ponyo sur la falaise (Japon, 2008, Hayao Miyazaki) Le petit Sosuke vit avec sa mère sur une haute falaise surplombant la mer. Un beau jour, il découvre sur la plage caillouteuse Ponyo, une petite fille poisson. Ponyo est si fascinée par Sosuke et le monde terrestre que son désir le plus cher est de devenir un être humain. Mais Fujimoto, son magicien de père, n’est pas du tout d’accord avec cette idée et il la force à regagner les profondeurs de l’océan. Bien décidée à revoir Sosuke, Ponyo s’&...

  6. Cine-Club

    CERN Multimedia

    Cine-Club

    2013-01-01

    The CERN CineClub is a meeting point every Thursday for anyone who wants to discover, discuss, and appreciate cinema with people who are truly interested in the art of the moving image. In the actual context where downloading became easier than cooking an egg, one might wonder why bother when it can be watched on any computer. Well, cinema is not an individual activity. What the CineClub offers is a big screen with good quality image and sound. It also offers a careful selection, for allowing people to (re-)discover new and forgotten authors. Finally, it offers the opportunity for meeting people sharing a common interest. So come every Thursday, and see by yourself that watching films can actually be a real party! Every Thursday at 20 h 00 Council Chamber, 503/1-001 Programme June 2013 Science Fiction Cycle “Imagination is more important than knowledge. For knowledge is limited, whereas imagination embraces the entire world, stimulating progress, giving birth to evolution.” 6th June 2...

  7. SU-C-BRF-01: Correlation of DIBH Breath Hold Amplitude with Dosimetric Sparing of Heart and Left Anterior Descending Artery in Left Breast Radiotherapy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Taeho; Reardon, Kelli; Sukovich, Kaitlyn; Crandley, Edwin; Read, Paul; Krishni, Wijesooriya [Radiation Oncology, University of Virginia Health System, Charlottesville, VA (United States)

    2014-06-15

    Purpose: A 7.4% increase in major coronary events per 1 Gy increase in mean heart dose has been reported from the population-based analysis of radiation-induced cardiac toxicity following treatment of left sided breast cancer. Deep inhalation breath-hold (DIBH) is clinically utilized to reduce radiation dose to heart and left anterior descending artery (LAD). We investigated the correlation of dose sparing in heart and LAD with internal DIBH amplitude to develop a quantitative predictive model for expected dose to heart and LAD based on internal breath hold amplitude. Methods: A treatment planning study (Prescription Dose = 50 Gy) was performed on 50 left breast cancer patients underwent DIBH whole breast radiotherapy. Two CT datasets, free breathing (FB) and DIBH, were utilized for treatment planning and for determination of the internal anatomy DIBH amplitude (difference between sternum position at FB and DIBH). The heart and LAD dose between FB and DIBH plans was compared and dose to the heart and LAD as a function of breath hold amplitude was determined. Results: Average DIBH amplitude using internal anatomy was 13.9±4.2 mm. The DIBH amplitude-mean dose reduction correlation is 20%/5mm (0.3 Gy/5mm) for the heart and 18%/5mm (1.1 Gy/5mm) for LAD. The correlation with max dose reduction is 12%/5mm (3.8 Gy/5mm) for the heart and 16%/5mm (3.2 Gy/5mm) for LAD. We found that average dose reductions to LAD from 6.0±6.5 Gy to 2.0±1.6 Gy with DIBH (4.0 Gy reduction: -67%, p < 0.001) and average dose reduction to the heart from 1.3±0.7 Gy to 0.7±0.2 Gy with DIBH (0.6 Gy reduction: -46%, p < 0.001). That suggests using DIBH may reduce the risk of the major coronary event for left sided breast cancer patients. Conclusion: The correlation between breath hold amplitude and dosimetric sparing suggests that dose sparing linearly increases with internal DIBH amplitude.

  8. How to perform and interpret cine MR enterography.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wnorowski, Amelia M; Guglielmo, Flavius F; Mitchell, Donald G

    2015-11-01

    Magnetic resonance (MR) enterography has become a fundamental tool for small bowel evaluation. Multiphasic cine imaging is a useful component of MR enterography evaluation because it provides functional information about bowel motility. Cine MR enterography can be used to evaluate for strictures and adhesions. Bowel motility evaluation has been shown to increase pathologic lesion detection in Crohn's disease and has been incorporated into disease activity scoring systems. Currently, cine MR enterography remains underutilized. The purpose of this article is to outline how to perform and interpret cine MR enterography. The authors describe how to perform a multiphasic balanced steady state free precession sequence using different MR systems and give practical advice on how to display and interpret the cine sequence. Sample cases illustrate how the cine sequence complements standard MR enterography evaluation with T2 -weighted, contrast-enhanced T1 -weighted, and diffusion-weighted imaging.

  9. Flow velocity and volume measurement of superior and inferior mesenteric artery with cine phase contrast magnetic resonance imaging

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The flow velocity and volume of the superior and inferior mesenteric arteries (SMA, IMA) were measured with cine phase contrast magnetic resonance (MR) imaging in five healthy volunteers. Each volunteer was first measured in a fasting state, and then one, two, and three hours after a meal. The average SMA flow volume of the volunteers was 230.3±46.8 ml/min (mean±standard error) during the fasting state, and 714.7±207.7 ml/min, 339.2±85.7 ml/min, and 263.8±21.0 ml/min, respectively, at one, two, and three hours postmeal. The increase at one hour postmeal was statistically significant (p<0.05). The corresponding flow measurements in the IMA were 63.1±11.2 ml/min, 67.6±11.2 ml/min, 57.9±8.6 ml/min, and 53.2±6.8 ml/min. These values do not represent a statistically significant flow volume change in the IMA. In all volunteers, the SMA volumetric flow increased the most one hour after the food challenge (72-400% relative to baseline). Diastolic velocity in the SMA increased significantly one hour postmeal, but systolic velocity did not change significantly. The IMA did not demonstrate a significant change in either systolic or diastolic velocity. The difference between the SMA and IMA in the way of reacting against the food challenge is thought to represent the difference between the requirements of small and large intestine for blood supply after the food challenge. These data demonstrate the possibility of this modality for the assessment of conditions such as chronic mesenteric ischemia. (author)

  10. Accuracy of Routine Treatment Planning 4-Dimensional and Deep-Inspiration Breath-Hold Computed Tomography Delineation of the Left Anterior Descending Artery in Radiation Therapy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    White, Benjamin M., E-mail: benjamin.white@uphs.upenn.edu [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Pennsylvania, Philadelphia, PA (United States); Vennarini, Sabina [L' Unità Operativa di Protonterapia, Azienda Provinciale per i Servizi Sanitari, Trento (Italy); Lin, Lilie; Freedman, Gary [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Pennsylvania, Philadelphia, PA (United States); Santhanam, Anand; Low, Daniel A. [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of California, Los Angeles, California (United States); Both, Stefan [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Pennsylvania, Philadelphia, PA (United States)

    2015-03-15

    Purpose: To assess the feasibility of radiation therapy treatment planning 4-dimensional computed tomography (4DCT) and deep-inspiration breath-hold (DIBH) CT to accurately contour the left anterior descending artery (LAD), a primary indicator of radiation-induced cardiac toxicity for patients undergoing radiation therapy. Methods and Materials: Ten subjects were prospectively imaged with a cardiac-gated MRI protocol to determine cardiac motion effects, including the displacement of a region of interest comprising the LAD. A series of planar views were obtained and resampled to create a 3-dimensional (3D) volume. A 3D optical flow deformable image registration algorithm determined tissue displacement during the cardiac cycle. The measured motion was then used as a spatial boundary to characterize motion blurring of the radiologist-delineated LAD structure for a cohort of 10 consecutive patients enrolled prospectively on a breast study including 4DCT and DIBH scans. Coronary motion–induced blurring artifacts were quantified by applying an unsharp filter to accentuate the LAD structure despite the presence of motion blurring. The 4DCT maximum inhalation and exhalation respiratory phases were coregistered to determine the LAD displacement during tidal respiration, as visualized in 4DCT. Results: The average 90th percentile heart motion for the region of interest was 0.7 ± 0.1 mm (left–right [LR]), 1.3 ± 0.6 mm (superior–inferior [SI]), and 0.6 ± 0.2 mm (anterior–posterior [AP]) in the cardiac-gated MRI cohort. The average relative increase in the number of voxels comprising the LAD contour was 69.4% ± 4.5% for the DIBH. The LAD volume overestimation had the dosimetric impact of decreasing the reported mean LAD dose by 23% ± 9% on average in the DIBH. During tidal respiration the average relative LAD contour increase was 69.3% ± 5.9% and 67.9% ± 4.6% for inhalation and exhalation respiratory phases, respectively. The average 90th

  11. Free-Breathing 3D Imaging of Right Ventricular Structure and Function Using Respiratory and Cardiac Self-Gated Cine MRI

    OpenAIRE

    Yanchun Zhu; Jing Liu; Jonathan Weinsaft; Pascal Spincemaille; Nguyen, Thanh D.; Prince, Martin R.; Shanglian Bao; Yaoqin Xie; Yi Wang

    2015-01-01

    Providing a movie of the beating heart in a single prescribed plane, cine MRI has been widely used in clinical cardiac diagnosis, especially in the left ventricle (LV). Right ventricular (RV) morphology and function are also important for the diagnosis of cardiopulmonary diseases and serve as predictors for the long term outcome. The purpose of this study is to develop a self-gated free-breathing 3D imaging method for RV quantification and to evaluate its performance by comparing it with brea...

  12. Prospective feasibility study of chest X-ray vs. thoracic MRI in breath-hold technique at an open low-field scanner

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Purpose: MR investigations using a breath-hold sequence at an open low-field MR had to be compared to chest X-rays in patients with a wide spectrum of cardio-thoracic pathologies. Material and Methods: 114 patients and three volunteers who actually received a chest X-ray due to different indications underwent triplanar breath-hold (17-20 s) True-FISP sequence using a 0.2 T low-field MR (Siemens Magnetom Open, TR/TE/α: 7.3/3.5/80 , SD: 10 mm, Pixel: 2.18 x 1.41 mm) a mean of 5.1 (±8.2) days later. Results: Signal-to-noise ratio as basics for pattern recognition was 3.2 in nodule, 5.0 in infiltration, and 12.0 in effusion, and therefore True-FISP is usable for the detection of these findings. MRI demonstrated nodules (89% vs. 57%), infiltration (81% vs. 71%), pleural effusions (86% vs. 75%), pericardial effusions (100% vs. 21%) and pulmonary congestion (90% vs. 80%) clearly more frequently compared to chest X-ray. Discussion: MRI of the lung has been implemented successfully at an open low-field MR system. Diagnostic safety and accuracy are at least comparable to those of chest X-ray. The lack of superimposition led to a major improvement in the detection of pericardial effusions and nodules, and an increase in identification of infiltration, pleural effusion, and pulmonary congestion. (orig.)

  13. First report of image integration of cine-angiography with 3D electro-anatomical mapping of the right ventricle in postoperative tetralogy of Fallot.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Russo, Mario Salvatore; Righi, Daniela; Di Mambro, Corrado; Ruoppolo, Valentina; Silvetti, Massimo Stefano; Drago, Fabrizio

    2015-01-01

    Ventricular tachycardia and, more rarely, sudden cardiac death are potential complications affecting the long-term outcome after Tetralogy of Fallot (ToF) repair. Intraventricular septal scar, fibro-fatty substitution around infundibular resection and patchy myocardial fibrosis may provide anatomical substrates of abnormal depolarization and repolarization causing reentrant ventricular arrhythmias. Recently, three-dimensional electro-anatomical mapping (3D EAM) has allowed to investigate the electro-anatomical status of the right ventricle. Radiation exposure during cardiac electrophysiological procedures is still a major concern. We report the first case of 3D mapping of the right ventricle in a postoperative ToF patient performed with a new module of the CARTO® 3 System-the CARTOUnivu™ Module-that combines, simultaneously, fluoroscopic images or cine-angiographic sequences with 3D cardiac mapping to allow real-time visualization of the electrocatheter during the 3D EAM reconstruction. The same volume, previously evaluated with cardiac MRI, was mapped. A perfect match of the diastolic edges of the RV obtained either by cine-loop acquisition during contrast fluoroscopy and by the 3D EAM, was observed. The fluoroscopy time for 3D EAM was 10 s. In conclusion, CARTOUnivu™ Module can integrate, in real time, fluoroscopic images/cine-angiography in virtual biplane view and the 3D EAM allowing a contextual visualization of position and movement of all electrocatheters. This can further increase the accuracy of the 3D EAM in very complex-operated congenital heart diseases, even decreasing radiation exposure.

  14. Trial of quantitative analysis of cardiac function by 3D reconstruction of multislice cine MR images

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yamamoto, Hideki (Okayama Univ. (Japan). Faculty of Education); Sei, Tetsurou; Nakagawa, Tomio; Hiraki, Yoshio

    1994-09-01

    Non-invasive techniques for measuring the dynamic behavior of the left ventricle (LV) can be invaluable tool in the diagnosis of the heart disease. In this paper we present methods for quantitative analysis of cardiac function using a compact magnetic resonance image processing system. A 256 x 256 magnetic resonance transaxial image of the left ventricle in a normal case is obtained. After gray level thresholding and region segmentation, the boundary of the left ventricular chamber is extracted. Then, the boundaries of the left ventricular chamber are displayed three-dimensionally by using the Z-buffer algorithm. Thus, LV volume and ejection fraction are calculated. Here, the value of LV ejection fraction is 60%. These results agree reasonably well with the corresponding data obtained by the echocardiography. (author).

  15. Effect of Maximal Apnoea Easy-Going and Struggle Phases on Subarachnoid Width and Pial Artery Pulsation in Elite Breath-Hold Divers.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pawel J Winklewski

    Full Text Available The aim of the study was to assess changes in subarachnoid space width (sas-TQ, the marker of intracranial pressure (ICP, pial artery pulsation (cc-TQ and cardiac contribution to blood pressure (BP, cerebral blood flow velocity (CBFV and cc-TQ oscillations throughout the maximal breath hold in elite apnoea divers. Non-invasive assessment of sas-TQ and cc-TQ became possible due to recently developed method based on infrared radiation, called near-infrared transillumination/backscattering sounding (NIR-T/BSS.The experimental group consisted of seven breath-hold divers (six men. During testing, each participant performed a single maximal end-inspiratory breath hold. Apnoea consisted of the easy-going and struggle phases (characterised by involuntary breathing movements (IBMs. Heart rate (HR was determined using a standard ECG. BP was assessed using the photoplethysmography method. SaO2 was monitored continuously with pulse oximetry. A pneumatic chest belt was used to register thoracic and abdominal movements. Cerebral blood flow velocity (CBFV was estimated by a 2-MHz transcranial Doppler ultrasonic probe. sas-TQ and cc-TQ were measured using NIR-T/BSS. Wavelet transform analysis was performed to assess cardiac contribution to BP, CBFV and cc-TQ oscillations.Mean BP and CBFV increased compared to baseline at the end of the easy phase and were further augmented by IBMs. cc-TQ increased compared to baseline at the end of the easy phase and remained stable during the IBMs. HR did not change significantly throughout the apnoea, although a trend toward a decrease during the easy phase and recovery during the IBMs was visible. Amplitudes of BP, CBFV and cc-TQ were augmented. sas-TQ and SaO2 decreased at the easy phase of apnoea and further decreased during the IBMs.Apnoea increases intracranial pressure and pial artery pulsation. Pial artery pulsation seems to be stabilised by the IBMs. Cardiac contribution to BP, CBFV and cc-TQ oscillations does not

  16. Motion management within two respiratory-gating windows: feasibility study of dual quasi-breath-hold technique in gated medical procedures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A dual quasi-breath-hold (DQBH) technique is proposed for respiratory motion management (a hybrid technique combining breathing-guidance with breath-hold task in the middle). The aim of this study is to test a hypothesis that the DQBH biofeedback system improves both the capability of motion management and delivery efficiency. Fifteen healthy human subjects were recruited for two respiratory motion measurements (free breathing and DQBH biofeedback breathing for 15 min). In this study, the DQBH biofeedback system utilized the abdominal position obtained using an real-time position management (RPM) system (Varian Medical Systems, Palo Alto, USA) to audio-visually guide a human subject for 4 s breath-hold at EOI and 90% EOE (EOE90%) to improve delivery efficiency. We investigated the residual respiratory motion and the delivery efficiency (duty-cycle) of abdominal displacement within the gating window. The improvement of the abdominal motion reproducibility was evaluated in terms of cycle-to-cycle displacement variability, respiratory period and baseline drift. The DQBH biofeedback system improved the abdominal motion management capability compared to that with free breathing. With a phase based gating (mean ± std: 55  ±  5%), the averaged root mean square error (RMSE) of the abdominal displacement in the dual-gating windows decreased from 2.26 mm of free breathing to 1.16 mm of DQBH biofeedback (p-value = 0.007). The averaged RMSE of abdominal displacement over the entire respiratory cycles reduced from 2.23 mm of free breathing to 1.39 mm of DQBH biofeedback breathing in the dual-gating windows (p-value = 0.028). The averaged baseline drift dropped from 0.9 mm min−1 with free breathing to 0.09 mm min−1 with DQBH biofeedback (p-value = 0.048). The averaged duty-cycle with an 1 mm width of displacement bound increased from 15% of free breathing to 26% of DQBH biofeedback (p-value = 0.003). The study demonstrated that the DQBH

  17. Automatic generation of endocardial surface meshes with 1-to-1 correspondence from cine-MR images

    Science.gov (United States)

    Su, Yi; Teo, S.-K.; Lim, C. W.; Zhong, L.; Tan, R. S.

    2015-03-01

    In this work, we develop an automatic method to generate a set of 4D 1-to-1 corresponding surface meshes of the left ventricle (LV) endocardial surface which are motion registered over the whole cardiac cycle. These 4D meshes have 1- to-1 point correspondence over the entire set, and is suitable for advanced computational processing, such as shape analysis, motion analysis and finite element modelling. The inputs to the method are the set of 3D LV endocardial surface meshes of the different frames/phases of the cardiac cycle. Each of these meshes is reconstructed independently from border-delineated MR images and they have no correspondence in terms of number of vertices/points and mesh connectivity. To generate point correspondence, the first frame of the LV mesh model is used as a template to be matched to the shape of the meshes in the subsequent phases. There are two stages in the mesh correspondence process: (1) a coarse matching phase, and (2) a fine matching phase. In the coarse matching phase, an initial rough matching between the template and the target is achieved using a radial basis function (RBF) morphing process. The feature points on the template and target meshes are automatically identified using a 16-segment nomenclature of the LV. In the fine matching phase, a progressive mesh projection process is used to conform the rough estimate to fit the exact shape of the target. In addition, an optimization-based smoothing process is used to achieve superior mesh quality and continuous point motion.

  18. Assessment of cerebellar pulsation in dogs with and without Chiari-like malformation and syringomyelia using cardiac-gated cine magnetic resonance imaging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Driver, C J; Watts, V; Bunck, A C; Van Ham, L M; Volk, H A

    2013-10-01

    Canine Chiari-like malformation (CM) is characterised by herniation of part of the cerebellum through the foramen magnum. In humans with Chiari type I malformation (CM-I), abnormal pulsation of the cerebellum during the cardiac cycle has been documented and is pivotal to theories for the pathogenesis of syringomyelia (SM). In this retrospective study, cardiac-gated cine balanced fast field echo (bFEE) magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) was used to assess pulsation of the brain in dogs and to objectively measure the degree of cerebellar pulsation with the neck in a flexed position. Overall, 17 Cavalier King Charles Spaniels (CKCS) with CM, including eight with SM and nine without SM, were compared with six small breed control dogs. Linear regions of interest were generated for the length of cerebellar herniation from each phase of the cardiac cycle and the degree of cerebellar pulsation was subsequently calculated. Age, bodyweight and angle of neck flexion were also compared. CKCS with CM and SM had significantly greater pulsation of the cerebellum than control dogs (P=0.003) and CKCS with CM only (P=0.031). There was no significant difference in age, bodyweight and angle of neck flexion between the three groups. Cardiac-gated cine bFEE MRI permitted the dynamic visualisation of cerebellar pulsation in dogs. These findings support the current theories regarding the pathogenesis of SM secondary to CM and further highlight the similarities between canine CM and human CM-I.

  19. Differentiation between focal malignant marrow-replacing lesions and benign red marrow deposition of the spine with T2{sup *}-corrected fat-signal fraction map using a three -echo volume interpolated breath-hold gradient echo dixon sequence

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Yong Pyo; Kim, Sung Jun; Chung, Tae Sub; Yoo, Yeon Hwa; Yoon, Choon Sik [Dept. of Radiology, Gangnam Severance Hospital, Yonsei University College of Medicine, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Kanneengiesser, Stephan [MR Applications Development, Siemens AG, Healthcare Sector, Erlangen (Germany); Paek, Moon Young [Siemens Ltd., Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Song, Ho Taek; Lee, Young Han; Suh, Jin Suck [Dept. of Radiology, Severance Hospital, Yonsei University College of Medicine, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2014-12-15

    To assess the feasibility of T2{sup *}-corrected fat-signal fraction (FF) map by using the three-echo volume interpolated breath-hold gradient echo (VIBE) Dixon sequence to differentiate between malignant marrow-replacing lesions and benign red marrow deposition of vertebrae. We assessed 32 lesions from 32 patients who underwent magnetic resonance imaging after being referred for assessment of a known or possible vertebral marrow abnormality. The lesions were divided into 21 malignant marrow-replacing lesions and 11 benign red marrow depositions. Three sequences for the parameter measurements were obtained by using a 1.5-T MR imaging scanner as follows: three-echo VIBE Dixon sequence for FF; conventional T1-weighted imaging for the lesion-disc ratio (LDR); pre- and post-gadolinium enhanced fat-suppressed T1-weighted images for the contrast-enhancement ratio (CER). A region of interest was drawn for each lesion for parameter measurements. The areas under the curve (AUC) of the parameters and their sensitivities and specificities at the most ideal cutoff values from receiver operating characteristic curve analysis were obtained. AUC, sensitivity, and specificity were respectively compared between FF and CER. The AUCs of FF, LDR, and CER were 0.96, 0.80, and 0.72, respectively. In the comparison of diagnostic performance between the FF and CER, the FF showed a significantly larger AUC as compared to the CER (p = 0.030), although the difference of sensitivity (p = 0.157) and specificity (p = 0.157) were not significant. Fat-signal fraction measurement using T2{sup *}-corrected three-echo VIBE Dixon sequence is feasible and has a more accurate diagnostic performance, than the CER, in distinguishing benign red marrow deposition from malignant bone marrow-replacing lesions.

  20. A quantitative study of CSF pulsatile flow in normal pressure hydrocephalus; An analysis of flow patterns before and after a shunting procedure using cine MR phase imaging

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Katayama, Shinji; Makabe, Tetsuo; Itoh, Takahiko (Okayama Univ. (Japan). School of Medicine) (and others)

    1992-06-01

    In the previous report, we described the visualization and quantitative analysis of a normal CSF pulsatile flow using cine MR phase imaging. In the present study, CSF flow velocities were measured in patients with normal pressure hydrocephalus (NPH) before and after a shunting procedure. All of the healthy subjects showed a similar flow pattern in the time-velocity flow profiles (TVFP). However, patients with NPH showed a variable pattern of TVFP and could be divided into the following four types: Type 0: the CSF flow pattern was similar to that of the healthy subjects. Type I: the caudal peak flow was delayed more than 190 msec on TVFP. Type II: the caudal peak flow was not apparent, but the CSF flow through the aqueduct was remarkable on phase images. Type III: the amplitude of TVFP was very small, and no CSF flow through the aqueduct was identified. The patients with Type III TVFP showed significantly lower NPH scores. The lumbar CSF pressures tended to be high in the patients with Type III TVFP, but nevertheless failed to reach a statistically significant level. The amplitude of TVFP increased in the patients who improved clinically after the shunting procedure. Some of the Type III patients changed into Type II, I, and 0; also, one of the Type II patients changed into a Type I patients after the shunting procedure. We conclude that cine MR phase imaging is useful for analyzing the CSF flow of the patients with NPH before and after the shunting procedure as well as for evaluating shunt patency. (author).

  1. Música y Cine

    OpenAIRE

    Olarte Martínez, Matilde María

    2008-01-01

    Materiales de clase: Introducción a la Historia de la Música en el Cine; partituras de cine mudo; música clásica y cine; textos sobre música incidental. Se Analiza la música utilizada en cinematografía, y el estudio de sus funciones aplicada a la imagen. Audiciones de música incidental y música preexistente de los principales compositores. la música utilizada en cinematografía, y el estudio de sus funciones aplicada a la imagen. Audiciones de música incidental y música preexistente de los ...

  2. Comparison of left ventricular function assessment using phonocardiogram- and electrocardiogram-triggered 2D SSFP CINE MR imaging at 1.5 T and 3.0 T

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Becker, Meike [University Hospital, RWTH Aachen, Department of Diagnostic Radiology, Aachen (Germany); Humboldt-University, Experimental and Clinical Research Center (ECRC), Charite Campus Buch, Berlin (Germany); Frauenrath, Tobias; Hezel, Fabian [University Hospital, RWTH Aachen, Department of Diagnostic Radiology, Aachen (Germany); Berlin Ultrahigh Field Facility, Max-Delbrueck Center for Molecular Medicine, Berlin (Germany); Krombach, Gabriele A.; Kremer, Ute; Koppers, Benedikt [University Hospital, RWTH Aachen, Department of Diagnostic Radiology, Aachen (Germany); Butenweg, Christoph; Goemmel, Andreas [Chair of Structural Statics and Dynamics, RWTH Aachen, Aachen (Germany); Utting, Jane F. [MRI, NHS Grampian, Aberdeen Royal Infirmary, Aberdeen (United Kingdom); Schulz-Menger, Jeanette [Humboldt-University, Working Group Cardiovascular MR, Franz-Volhard-Klinik, Department of Cardiology, HELIOS-Klinikum Berlin-Buch and Charite Campus Buch, Berlin (Germany); Niendorf, Thoralf [University Hospital, RWTH Aachen, Department of Diagnostic Radiology, Aachen (Germany); Humboldt-University, Experimental and Clinical Research Center (ECRC), Charite Campus Buch, Berlin (Germany); Berlin Ultrahigh Field Facility, Max-Delbrueck Center for Molecular Medicine, Berlin (Germany)

    2010-06-15

    As high-field cardiac MRI (CMR) becomes more widespread the propensity of ECG to interference from electromagnetic fields (EMF) and to magneto-hydrodynamic (MHD) effects increases and with it the motivation for a CMR triggering alternative. This study explores the suitability of acoustic cardiac triggering (ACT) for left ventricular (LV) function assessment in healthy subjects (n = 14). Quantitative analysis of 2D CINE steady-state free precession (SSFP) images was conducted to compare ACT's performance with vector ECG (VCG). Endocardial border sharpness (EBS) was examined paralleled by quantitative LV function assessment. Unlike VCG, ACT provided signal traces free of interference from EMF or MHD effects. In the case of correct R-wave recognition, VCG-triggered 2D CINE SSFP was immune to cardiac motion effects - even at 3.0 T. However, VCG-triggered 2D SSFP CINE imaging was prone to cardiac motion and EBS degradation if R-wave misregistration occurred. ACT-triggered acquisitions yielded LV parameters (end-diastolic volume (EDV), end-systolic volume (ESV), stroke volume (SV), ejection fraction (EF) and left ventricular mass (LVM)) comparable with those derived from VCG-triggered acquisitions (1.5 T: ESV{sub VCG} = (56 {+-} 17) ml, EDV{sub VCG} = (151 {+-} 32) ml, LVM{sub VCG} = (97 {+-} 27) g, SV{sub VCG} = (94 {+-} 19) ml, EF{sub VCG} = (63 {+-} 5)% cf. ESV{sub ACT} = (56 {+-} 18) ml, EDV{sub ACT} = (147 {+-} 36) ml, LVM{sub ACT} = (102 {+-} 29) g, SV{sub ACT} = (91 {+-} 22) ml, EF{sub ACT} = (62 {+-} 6)%; 3.0 T: ESV{sub VCG} = (55 {+-} 21) ml, EDV{sub VCG} = (151 {+-} 32) ml, LVM{sub VCG} = (101 {+-} 27) g, SV{sub VCG} = (96 {+-} 15) ml, EF{sub VCG} = (65 {+-} 7)% cf. ESV{sub ACT} = (54 {+-} 20) ml, EDV{sub ACT} = (146 {+-} 35) ml, LVM{sub ACT} = (101 {+-} 30) g, SV{sub ACT} = (92 {+-} 17) ml, EF{sub ACT} = (64 {+-} 6)%). ACT's intrinsic insensitivity to interference from electromagnetic fields renders it suitable for clinical CMR. (orig.)

  3. Deep inspiration breath-hold technique for lung tumors: the potential value of target immobilization and reduced lung density in dose escalation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Purpose/Objective: Lung tumors are subject to movement due to respiratory motion. Conventionally, a margin is applied to the clinical target volume (CTV) to account for this and other treatment uncertainties. The purpose of this study is to evaluate the dosimetric benefits of a deep inspiration breath-hold (DIBH) technique which has two distinct features - deep inspiration which reduces lung density and breath-hold which immobilizes lung tumors. Both properties can potentially reduce the mass of normal lung tissue in the high dose region, thus improving the possibility of dose escalation. Methods and Materials: To study the efficacy of the DIBH technique, CT scans are acquired for each patient under 4 respiration conditions: free-breathing; DIBH; shallow inspiration breath-hold; shallow expiration breath-hold. The free-breathing and DIBH scans are used to generate treatment plans for comparison of standard and DIBH techniques, while the shallow inspiration and expiration scans provide information on the maximum extent of tumor motion under free-breathing conditions. To acquire the breath-hold scans, the patients are brought to reproducible respiration levels using spirometry and slow vital capacity maneuvers. For the treatment plan comparison free-breathing and DIBH planning target volumes (PTVs) are constructed consisting of the CTV plus a margin for setup error and lung tumor motion. For both plans the margin for setup error is the same while the margin for lung tumor motion differs. The margin for organ motion in free-breathing is determined by the maximum tumor excursions in the shallow inspiration and expiration CT scans. For the DIBH, tumor motion is reduced to the extent to which DIBH can be maintained and the margin for any residual tumor motion is determined from repeat fluoroscopic movies, acquired with the patient monitored using spirometry. Three-dimensional treatment plans, generated using apertures based on the free-breathing and DIBH PTVs, are

  4. Small bowel imaging of inflammatory bowel disease

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Emanuele; Casciani; Chiara; De; Vincentiis; Gianfranco; Gualdi

    2015-01-01

    The study of the small bowel(SB) has always beenchallenging both for clinicians and radiologist. It is a long and tortuous tube that can be affected by various pathologies whose signs and symptoms are usually non specific and can mimic other acute abdominal disorders. For these reasons, imaging plays a central role in the diagnosis of the different pathological conditions that can occur. They are important also in the management and follow up of chronic diseases. We expose and evaluate all the radiological methods that are now available for the study of the SB with particular emphasis on the technological improvement of cross-sectional imaging, such as computed tomography(CT) and magnetic resonance imaging(MRI). These techniques have, infact, highly improved in terms of execution times(fast acquisitions images), patients discomfort and radiation dose, for CT, with consequent reduced biological risks. Moreover, the new post-processing options with multiplanar reconstruction and isotropic images have made significant changes in the evaluation of the exams. Especially MRI scans have been improved by the advent of new sequences, such as diffusion weighted imaging and cine-MRI, parallel imaging and breath-hold sequences and can provide excellent soft-tissue contrast without the use of ionizing radiations.

  5. Cine-MR imaging aqueductal CSF flow in normal pressure hydrocephalus syndrome before and after CSF shunt

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Reproducibility of the aqueductal CSF signal intensity on a gradient echo cine-MR sequence exploiting through plane inflow enhancement was tested in 11 patients with normal or dilated ventricles. Seven patients with normal pressure hydrocephalus (NPH) syndrome were investigated with the sequence before and after CSF shunting. Two patients exhibiting central flow void within a hyperintense aqueductal CSF improved after surgery and the flow void disappeared after shunting. One patient with increased maximum and minimum aqueductal CSF signal as compared to 18 healthy controls also improved and the aqueductal CSF signal was considerably decreased after shunting. Three patients with aqueductal CSF values similar to those in the controls did not improve, notwithstanding their maximum aqueductal CSF signals decreasing slightly after shunting. No appreciable aqueductal CSF flow related enhancement consistent with non-communicating hydrocephalus was found in the last NPH patient who improved after surgery. Cine-MR with inflow technique yields a reproducible evaluation of flow-related aqueductal CSF signal changes which might help in identifying shunt responsive NPH patients. These are likely to be those with hyperdynamic aqueductal CSF or aqueductal obstruction. (orig.)

  6. Cine-MR imaging aqueductal CSF flow in normal pressure hydrocephalus syndrome before and after CSF shunt

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mascalchi, M. (Sezione di Radiodiagnostica, Dipt. di Fisiopatologia Clinica, and Dipt. di Scienze Neurologiche, Florence Univ. (Italy)); Arnetoli, G. (Sezione di Radiodiagnostica, Dipt. di Fisiopatologia Clinica, and Dipt. di Scienze Neurologiche, Florence Univ. (Italy)); Inzitari, D. (Sezione di Radiodiagnostica, Dipt. di Fisiopatologia Clinica, and Dipt. di Scienze Neurologiche, Florence Univ. (Italy)); Dal Pozzo, G. (Sezione di Radiodiagnostica, Dipt. di Fisiopatologia Clinica, and Dipt. di Scienze Neurologiche, Florence Univ. (Italy)); Lolli, F. (Sezione di Radiodiagnostica, Dipt. di Fisiopatologia Clinica, and Dipt. di Scienze Neurologiche, Florence Univ. (Italy)); Caramella, D. (Sezione di Radiodiagnostica, Dipt. di Fisiopatologia Clinica, and Dipt. di Scienze Neurologiche, Florence Univ. (Italy)); Bartolozzi, C. (Sezione di Radiodiagnostica, Dipt. di Fisiopatologia Clinica, and Dipt. di Scienze Neurologiche, Florence Univ. (Italy))

    1993-11-01

    Reproducibility of the aqueductal CSF signal intensity on a gradient echo cine-MR sequence exploiting through plane inflow enhancement was tested in 11 patients with normal or dilated ventricles. Seven patients with normal pressure hydrocephalus (NPH) syndrome were investigated with the sequence before and after CSF shunting. Two patients exhibiting central flow void within a hyperintense aqueductal CSF improved after surgery and the flow void disappeared after shunting. One patient with increased maximum and minimum aqueductal CSF signal as compared to 18 healthy controls also improved and the aqueductal CSF signal was considerably decreased after shunting. Three patients with aqueductal CSF values similar to those in the controls did not improve, notwithstanding their maximum aqueductal CSF signals decreasing slightly after shunting. No appreciable aqueductal CSF flow related enhancement consistent with non-communicating hydrocephalus was found in the last NPH patient who improved after surgery. Cine-MR with inflow technique yields a reproducible evaluation of flow-related aqueductal CSF signal changes which might help in identifying shunt responsive NPH patients. These are likely to be those with hyperdynamic aqueductal CSF or aqueductal obstruction. (orig.).

  7. Improved abdominal MRI in non-breath-holding children using a radial k-space sampling technique

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Radial k-space sampling techniques have been shown to reduce motion artifacts in adult abdominal MRI. To compare a T2-weighted radial k-space sampling MRI pulse sequence (BLADE) with standard respiratory-triggered T2-weighted turbo spin echo (TSE) in pediatric abdominal imaging. Axial BLADE and respiratory-triggered turbo spin echo sequences were performed without fat suppression in 32 abdominal MR examinations in children. We retrospectively assessed overall image quality, the presence of respiratory, peristaltic and radial artifact, and lesion conspicuity. We evaluated signal uniformity of each sequence. BLADE showed improved overall image quality (3.35 ± 0.85 vs. 2.59 ± 0.59, P < 0.001), reduced respiratory motion artifact (0.51 ± 0.56 vs. 1.89 ± 0.68, P < 0.001), and improved lesion conspicuity (3.54 ± 0.88 vs. 2.92 ± 0.77, P = 0.006) compared to respiratory triggering turbo spin-echo (TSE) sequences. The bowel motion artifact scores were similar for both sequences (1.65 ± 0.77 vs. 1.79 ± 0.74, P = 0.691). BLADE introduced a radial artifact that was not observed on the respiratory triggering-TSE images (1.10 ± 0.85 vs. 0, P < 0.001). BLADE was associated with diminished signal variation compared with respiratory triggering-TSE in the liver, spleen and air (P < 0.001). The radial k-space sampling technique improved the quality and reduced respiratory motion artifacts in young children compared with conventional respiratory-triggered turbo spin-echo sequences. (orig.)

  8. Improved abdominal MRI in non-breath-holding children using a radial k-space sampling technique

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, Jong Hyuk; Choi, Young Hun; Cheon, Jung Eun; Lee, So Mi; Cho, Hyun Hae; Kim, Woo Sun; Kim, In One [Seoul National University Children' s Hospital, Department of Radiology, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Shin, Su Mi [SMG-SNU Boramae Medical Center, Department of Radiology, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2015-06-15

    Radial k-space sampling techniques have been shown to reduce motion artifacts in adult abdominal MRI. To compare a T2-weighted radial k-space sampling MRI pulse sequence (BLADE) with standard respiratory-triggered T2-weighted turbo spin echo (TSE) in pediatric abdominal imaging. Axial BLADE and respiratory-triggered turbo spin echo sequences were performed without fat suppression in 32 abdominal MR examinations in children. We retrospectively assessed overall image quality, the presence of respiratory, peristaltic and radial artifact, and lesion conspicuity. We evaluated signal uniformity of each sequence. BLADE showed improved overall image quality (3.35 ± 0.85 vs. 2.59 ± 0.59, P < 0.001), reduced respiratory motion artifact (0.51 ± 0.56 vs. 1.89 ± 0.68, P < 0.001), and improved lesion conspicuity (3.54 ± 0.88 vs. 2.92 ± 0.77, P = 0.006) compared to respiratory triggering turbo spin-echo (TSE) sequences. The bowel motion artifact scores were similar for both sequences (1.65 ± 0.77 vs. 1.79 ± 0.74, P = 0.691). BLADE introduced a radial artifact that was not observed on the respiratory triggering-TSE images (1.10 ± 0.85 vs. 0, P < 0.001). BLADE was associated with diminished signal variation compared with respiratory triggering-TSE in the liver, spleen and air (P < 0.001). The radial k-space sampling technique improved the quality and reduced respiratory motion artifacts in young children compared with conventional respiratory-triggered turbo spin-echo sequences. (orig.)

  9. Clinical application of 2D-FIESTA cine imaging in the treatment of lumbar disc herniation%腰椎间盘突出症2D-FIESTA Cine成像的临床应用

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    刘春红; 杜铁桥; 董杰; 李海梅; 张宇

    2011-01-01

    Objective To investigate the clinical application of 2D- fiesta cine imaging in the treatment of lumbar disc herniation.Methods 18 patients with lumbar disc hemiation underwent T1- and T2-weighted Spin-Echo (SE) MR images, fat saturation FSE T2WI, FS-FSE T2WI ( FSE T2WI) cine and Fast Imaging Employing Steady state Acquisition (2D-FIESTA) cine MR imaging.We retrospectively analysed the presentations on 2D-FIESTA cine images of all patients who were confirmed to have lumbar disc herniation through surgical histological examination or follow-up,and compare the scanning time with that of other general sequencing MR imaging.Results 18 patients had 33 affected discs.They were present with low signal on SE TiWI, but medium signal on FS-FSE T2WI, FSE T2WI and FIESTA.Except for showing the condition of the herniated disc, 2D-FIESTA cine could also clearly show the compressed spine nerves.The scanning time of 2D-FIESTA cine was only 13.3% of that of T2WI, and 17.9% of that of T1WI.Thus it was significant that the scanning time of 2D-FIESTA cine was shorter than conventional MRI scan.Conclusions 2D-FIESTA cine can provide valuable information regarding lumbar disc hemiation.It is an effective supplement for conventional MRI.%目的 评价2D-FIESTA cine成像在腰椎间盘突出症中的临床应用价值.方法 18例腰椎间盘突出症患者分别行矢状位SE T1WI,快速SE(FSE)T2WI,脂肪抑制FSE T2WI(fat saturation FSE T2WI,FS-FSE T2WI)及2D-FIESTA(fast imaging employing steady-state acquisition,FIESTA)cine.回顾性分析18例经手术病理或随访证实腰椎间盘突出症的2D-FIESTA cine表现,并与其他常规序列的MR扫描时间进行比较.结果 18例腰椎间盘突出症患者,共33个椎间盘受累.在SE T1WI上,病变均呈低信号,FS-FSE T2WI、FSE T2WI和FIESTA呈中等信号或低信号.2D-FIESTA cine除可动态显示突出椎间盘的情况,并可清楚显示受压的脊神经.2D-FIESTA的扫描时间仅为T2WI的13.3%;为T1WI的17.9%.2D

  10. Early report: Comparison of breath-hold MR excretory urography, Doppler ultrasound and isotope renography in evaluation of symptomatic hydronephrosis in pregnancy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    AIM: To compare assessment by MR excretory urography (MREU), Doppler ultrasound and isotope renography of women with symptomatic hydronephrosis in pregnancy and to define its cause. MATERIALS AND METHODS: Eleven women at 19-34 weeks of gestation were studied prospectively with gadolinium-enhanced breath-hold gradient echo MREU and transabdominal Doppler ultrasound compared with a 'gold standard' of isotope renography employing frusemide challenge. All studies were performed within 24 h, were reported independently in a blinded fashion and employed clearly defined criteria. Obstetric and infant outcomes were obtained. RESULTS: There were no adverse reactions to gadolinium administration in pregnancy and no adverse obstetric or infant outcomes. Three of the 11 women were unable to tolerate the complete MREU protocol. Ultrasound indices could not be used to predict ureteric obstruction as shown by isotope renography. MREU agreed with renographic findings in five of the six cases with obstruction and in two without obstruction. MREU directly demonstrated hydronephrosis to result from extrinsic compression of the ureter between the gravid uterus and iliopsoas muscle. CONCLUSION: MR excretory urography is a promising technique which affords equivalent functional and additional anatomical information to isotope renography. It is more accurate than Doppler ultrasound in the assessment of ureteric obstruction in pregnancy. Spencer, J. A. (2000)

  11. Early report: Comparison of breath-hold MR excretory urography, Doppler ultrasound and isotope renography in evaluation of symptomatic hydronephrosis in pregnancy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Spencer, J.A.; Tomlinson, A.J.; Weston, M.J.; Lloyd, S.N

    2000-06-01

    AIM: To compare assessment by MR excretory urography (MREU), Doppler ultrasound and isotope renography of women with symptomatic hydronephrosis in pregnancy and to define its cause. MATERIALS AND METHODS: Eleven women at 19-34 weeks of gestation were studied prospectively with gadolinium-enhanced breath-hold gradient echo MREU and transabdominal Doppler ultrasound compared with a 'gold standard' of isotope renography employing frusemide challenge. All studies were performed within 24 h, were reported independently in a blinded fashion and employed clearly defined criteria. Obstetric and infant outcomes were obtained. RESULTS: There were no adverse reactions to gadolinium administration in pregnancy and no adverse obstetric or infant outcomes. Three of the 11 women were unable to tolerate the complete MREU protocol. Ultrasound indices could not be used to predict ureteric obstruction as shown by isotope renography. MREU agreed with renographic findings in five of the six cases with obstruction and in two without obstruction. MREU directly demonstrated hydronephrosis to result from extrinsic compression of the ureter between the gravid uterus and iliopsoas muscle. CONCLUSION: MR excretory urography is a promising technique which affords equivalent functional and additional anatomical information to isotope renography. It is more accurate than Doppler ultrasound in the assessment of ureteric obstruction in pregnancy. Spencer, J. A. (2000)

  12. Development and pre-clinical evaluation of a real time monitoring and feedback system for deep inspiration breath hold for stereotactic body radiotherapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Full text: Background. Respiration can cause tumour movements in the thoracic region up to 3 cm. Currently, there are several approaches under development and/or evaluation to minimize the internal margin which is generally applied to account for motion effects. One approach is the deep inspiration breath hold (DIBH) technique to immobilize the target and to deliver a beam during breath hold. Such an approach has the additional advantage of an increased lung volume with decreased lung density. However, the application of respiration-controlled delivery in stereotactic body radiotherapy (SBRT) still remains a challenge and the treatment for the optimal therapeutic benefit (TCP/NTCP) is still under evaluation. technique Material and methods The BrainLAB ExacTrac system was used to monitor deep inspiration for patients immobilized in a stereotactic bodyframe. As in the standard procedure for patient positioning using ExacTrac, several markers are placed on the patient's skin, preferably close to the target position and on the sternum. During training sessions the dominant direction of marker movement was determined. Using an in-house developed interface, online information about respiration movements of the thorax (determined form ExacTrac marker) was displayed. Additionally, a patient feedback system was developed to visualize the respiration cycle to the patient and thus to utilize his/her ability for cooperation. The feedback system was tested with 35 patients undergoing SBRT. In a multislice CT study, the underlying hypothesis that targets can be immobilized with high accuracy with a DIBH maneuver and that ExacTrac marker can be used as surrogate was verified for 16 patients. The DIBH reproducibility and stability were determined from multislice CT studies with multiple (4-5) DIBH maneuvers and from various training sessions with patients. In a subsequent treatment planning study, 13 patients with lung lesion undergoing SBRT treatment underwent additional multi

  13. Breath-holding gadolinium-enhanced three-dimensional MR angiography in the evaluation of patients with vascular reconstruction

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Breath-bolding gadolinium-enhanced three-dimensional MR angiography (MRA) was performed in 20 patients with vascular reconstruction (arterial reconstruction in 18 and venous reconstruction in 2) after administration of 0.1 mmol/kg gadopentetate dimeglumine. A 3D fast gradient echo sequence was employed for MRA. Comparison was made with angiography in 10 patients and with CT in 12 patients. In all patients, the patency of artificial grafts could be assessed on MRA. On the other hand, angiography failed to visualization of an artificial grafts in one of ten cases, the case with venous reconstruction. Postprocessing images of maximum intensity projection allowed evaluation of the anastomotic region from any direction. There were two limitations in MRA; it overestimated the stenosis compared with the results of angiography, and it did not clearly show fluid collection around the artificial grafts. However, MRA has another advantage in that it is applicable to the patients with renal failure or iodine allergy. We concluded MRA has great possibilities in evaluation of artificial grafts if the examiner pays attention to these minor limitations. (author)

  14. Reliability and reproducibility of quantitative assessment of left ventricular function and volumes with 3-slice segmentation of cine steady-state free precession short axis images

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nguyen, Christopher, E-mail: cnguye38@uci.edu [School of Medicine, University of California, Irvine, Orange, CA (United States); Kuoy, Edward, E-mail: ekuoy@uci.edu [School of Medicine, University of California, Irvine, Orange, CA (United States); Ruehm, Stefan, E-mail: sruehm@mednet.ucla.edu [Diagnostic Cardiovascular Imaging, University of California, Los Angeles (United States); Krishnam, Mayil, E-mail: mskrishn@uci.edu [Cardiovascular and Thoracic Imaging, Radiological Sciences, University of California, Irvine, Orange, CA (United States)

    2015-07-15

    Highlights: • Quantitative LV assessment in CMR requires contour tracing of multiple SA images. • Conventional multi-slice method for LV assessment is tedious and time-consuming. • 3-slice segmentation is comparable to multi-slice method in determining LVEF. • 3-slice method is reliable and reproducible in determining LV volumes and mass. • 3-slice method reduces post-processing time compared to multi-slice method. - Abstract: Objectives: Quantitative assessment of left ventricular (LV) functional parameters in cardiac MR requires time-consuming contour tracing across multiple short axis images. This study assesses global LV functional parameters using 3-slice segmentation on steady state free precision (SSFP) cine short axis images and compares the results with conventional multi-slice segmentation of LV. Methods: Data were collected from 61 patients who underwent cardiac MRI for various clinical indications. Semi-automated cardiac MR software was used to trace LV contours both at multiple slices from base to apex as well as just 3 slices (base, mid, and apical) by two readers. Left ventricular ejection fraction (LVEF), LV volumes, and LV mass were calculated using both methods. Results: Bland–Altman plot revealed narrow limits of agreement (−4.4% to 5.1%) between LVEF obtained by the two methods. Bland–Altman analysis showed slightly wider limits of agreement between end-diastolic volumes (−5.0 to 12.0%; −3.9 to 8.5 ml/m{sup 2}), end-systolic volumes (−10.9 to 14.7%; −4.1 to 6.5 ml/m{sup 2}), and LV mass (−5.2 to 12.7%; −4.8 to 10.2 g/m{sup 2}) obtained by the two methods. There was a small mean difference between LV volumes and LV mass obtained using multi-slice and 3-slice segmentation. No statistically significant difference existed between the LV parameters obtained by the two readers using 3-slice segmentation (p > 0.05). Multi-slice assessment required approximately 15 min per study while 3-slice assessment required less than 5

  15. Radiation-induced second malignancies after involved-node radiotherapy with deep-inspiration breath-hold technique for early stage Hodgkin Lymphoma: a dosimetric study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    To estimate the risk of radiation induced second cancers after radiotherapy using deep-inspiration breath-hold (DI) technique with three-dimensional conformal (3DCRT) and volumetric arc therapy (VMAT) for patients with Hodgkin’s lymphoma (HL). Early-stage HL with mediastinal and supraclavicular involvement was studied using an Alderson phantom. A whole body CT was performed and all tissues were delineated. The clinical target volumes and planning target volumes (PTV) were determined according to the German Hodgkin study group guidelines. Free-breathing (FB) technique and DI technique were simulated by different safety margins for the PTV definition. In both cases, 30 Gy in 15 fractions was prescribed. Second cancer risk was estimated for various tissues with a second cancer model including fractionation. When compared with FB-3DCRT, estimated relative life time attributable risk (LAR) of cancer induction after DI-3DCRT was 0.86, 0.76, 0.94 and 0.92 for breast, lung, esophagus and stomach, respectively. With DI-VMAT, the corresponding values were 2.05, 1.29, 1.01, 0.93, respectively. For breast cancer, the LAR observed with DI-VMAT was not substantially distinguishable from the LAR computed for mantle RT with an administered dose of 40 Gy. This study suggests that DI may reduce the LAR of secondary cancers of all OARs and may be a valuable technique when using 3DCRT. Conversely, VMAT may increase substantially the LAR and should be cautiously implemented in clinical practice

  16. Deep inspiration breath-hold technique for left-sided breast cancer: An analysis of predictors for organ-at-risk sparing

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    To identify anatomic and treatment characteristics that correlate with organ-at-risk (OAR) sparing with deep inspiration breath-hold (DIBH) technique to guide patient selection for this technique. Anatomic and treatment characteristics and radiation doses to OARs were compared between free-breathing and DIBH plans. Linear regression analysis was used to identify factors independently predicting for cardiac sparing. We identified 64 patients: 44 with intact breast and 20 postmastectomy. For changes measured directly on treatment planning scans, DIBH plans decreased heart-chest wall length (6.5 vs 5.0 cm, p < 0.001), and increased lung volume (1074.4 vs 1881.3 cm3, p < 0.001), and for changes measured after fields are set, they decreased maximum heart depth (1.1 vs 0.3 cm, p < 0.001) and heart volume in field (HVIF) (9.1 vs 0.9 cm3, p < 0.001). DIBH reduced the mean heart dose (3.4 vs 1.8 Gy, p < 0.001) and lung V20 (19.6% vs 15.3%, p < 0.001). Regression analysis found that only change in HVIF independently predicted for cardiac sparing. We identified patients in the bottom quartile of the dosimetric benefits seen with DIBH and categorized the cause of this “minimal benefit.” Overall, 29% of patients satisfied these criteria for minimal benefit with DIBH and the most common cause was favorable baseline anatomy. Only the reduction in HVIF predicted for reductions in mean heart dose; no specific anatomic surrogate for the dosimetric benefits of DIBH technique could be identified. Most patients have significant dosimetric benefit with DIBH, and this technique should be planned and evaluated for all patients receiving left-sided breast/chest wall radiation

  17. Dosimetric Benefits of Intensity-Modulated Radiotherapy Combined With the Deep-Inspiration Breath-Hold Technique in Patients With Mediastinal Hodgkin's Lymphoma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Purpose: To assess the additional benefits of using the deep-inspiration breath-hold (DIBH) technique with intensity-modulated radiotherapy (IMRT) in terms of the protection of organs at risk for patients with mediastinal Hodgkin’s disease. Methods and Materials: Patients with early-stage Hodgkin’s lymphoma with mediastinal involvement were entered into the study. Two simulation computed tomography scans were performed for each patient: one using the free-breathing (FB) technique and the other using the DIBH technique with a dedicated spirometer. The clinical target volume, planning target volume (PTV), and organs at risk were determined on both computed tomography scans according to the guidelines of the European Organization for Research and Treatment of Cancer. In both cases, 30 Gy in 15 fractions was prescribed. The dosimetric parameters retrieved for the statistical analysis were PTV coverage, mean heart dose, mean coronary artery dose, mean lung dose, and lung V20. Results: There were no significant differences in PTV coverage between the two techniques (FB vs. DIBH). The mean doses delivered to the coronary arteries, heart, and lungs were significantly reduced by 15% to 20% using DIBH compared with FB, and the lung V20 was reduced by almost one third. The dose reduction to organs at risk was greater for masses in the upper part of the mediastinum. IMRT with DIBH was partially implemented in 1 patient. This combination will be extended to other patients in the near future. Conclusions: Radiation exposure of the coronary arteries, heart, and lungs in patients with mediastinal Hodgkin’s lymphoma was greatly reduced using DIBH with IMRT. The greatest benefit was obtained for tumors in the upper part of the mediastinum. The possibility of a wider use in clinical practice is currently under investigation in our department.

  18. Cardiac and pulmonary dose reduction for tangentially irradiated breast cancer, utilizing deep inspiration breath-hold with audio-visual guidance, without compromising target coverage

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Background and purpose. Cardiac disease and pulmonary complications are documented risk factors in tangential breast irradiation. Respiratory gating radiotherapy provides a possibility to substantially reduce cardiopulmonary doses. This CT planning study quantifies the reduction of radiation doses to the heart and lung, using deep inspiration breath-hold (DIBH). Patients and methods. Seventeen patients with early breast cancer, referred for adjuvant radiotherapy, were included. For each patient two CT scans were acquired; the first during free breathing (FB) and the second during DIBH. The scans were monitored by the Varian RPM respiratory gating system. Audio coaching and visual feedback (audio-visual guidance) were used. The treatment planning of the two CT studies was performed with conformal tangential fields, focusing on good coverage (V95>98%) of the planning target volume (PTV). Dose-volume histograms were calculated and compared. Doses to the heart, left anterior descending (LAD) coronary artery, ipsilateral lung and the contralateral breast were assessed. Results. Compared to FB, the DIBH-plans obtained lower cardiac and pulmonary doses, with equal coverage of PTV. The average mean heart dose was reduced from 3.7 to 1.7 Gy and the number of patients with >5% heart volume receiving 25 Gy or more was reduced from four to one of the 17 patients. With DIBH the heart was completely out of the beam portals for ten patients, with FB this could not be achieved for any of the 17 patients. The average mean dose to the LAD coronary artery was reduced from 18.1 to 6.4 Gy. The average ipsilateral lung volume receiving more than 20 Gy was reduced from 12.2 to 10.0%. Conclusion. Respiratory gating with DIBH, utilizing audio-visual guidance, reduces cardiac and pulmonary doses for tangentially treated left sided breast cancer patients without compromising the target coverage

  19. Purine metabolism in response to hypoxic conditions associated with breath-hold diving and exercise in erythrocytes and plasma from bottlenose dolphins (Tursiops truncatus).

    Science.gov (United States)

    del Castillo Velasco-Martínez, Iris; Hernández-Camacho, Claudia J; Méndez-Rodríguez, Lía C; Zenteno-Savín, Tania

    2016-01-01

    In mammalian tissues under hypoxic conditions, ATP degradation results in accumulation of purine metabolites. During exercise, muscle energetic demand increases and oxygen consumption can exceed its supply. During breath-hold diving, oxygen supply is reduced and, although oxygen utilization is regulated by bradycardia (low heart rate) and peripheral vasoconstriction, tissues with low blood flow (ischemia) may become hypoxic. The goal of this study was to evaluate potential differences in the circulating levels of purine metabolism components between diving and exercise in bottlenose dolphins (Tursiops truncatus). Blood samples were taken from captive dolphins following a swimming routine (n=8) and after a 2min dive (n=8). Activity of enzymes involved in purine metabolism (hypoxanthine guanine phosphoribosyl transferase (HGPRT), inosine monophosphate deshydrogenase (IMPDH), xanthine oxidase (XO), purine nucleoside phosphorylase (PNP)), and purine metabolite (hypoxanthine (HX), xanthine (X), uric acid (UA), inosine monophosphate (IMP), inosine, nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide (NAD(+)), adenosine, adenosine monophosphate (AMP), adenosine diphosphate (ADP), ATP, guanosine diphosphate (GDP), guanosine triphosphate (GTP)) concentrations were quantified in erythrocyte and plasma samples. Enzymatic activity and purine metabolite concentrations involved in purine synthesis and degradation, were not significantly different between diving and exercise. Plasma adenosine concentration was higher after diving than exercise (p=0.03); this may be related to dive-induced ischemia. In erythrocytes, HGPRT activity was higher after diving than exercise (p=0.007), suggesting an increased capacity for purine recycling and ATP synthesis from IMP in ischemic tissues of bottlenose dolphins during diving. Purine recycling and physiological adaptations may maintain the ATP concentrations in bottlenose dolphins after diving and exercise.

  20. SU-E-J-32: Calypso(R) and Laser-Based Localization Systems Comparison for Left-Sided Breast Cancer Patients Using Deep Inspiration Breath Hold

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Purpose: Our institution uses a manual laser-based system for primary localization and verification during radiation treatment of left-sided breast cancer patients using deep inspiration breath hold (DIBH). This primary system was compared with sternum-placed Calypso(R) beacons (Varian Medical Systems, CA). Only intact breast patients are considered for this analysis. Methods: During computed tomography (CT) simulation, patients have BB and Calypso(R) surface beacons positioned sternally and marked for free-breathing and DIBH CTs. During dosimetry planning, BB longitudinal displacement between free breathing and DIBH CT determines laser mark (BH mark) location. Calypso(R) beacon locations from the DIBH CT are entered at the Tracking Station. During Linac simulation and treatment, patients inhale until the cross-hair and/or lasers coincide with the BH Mark, which can be seen using our high quality cameras (Pelco, CA). Daily Calypso(R) displacement values (difference from the DIBH-CT-based plan) are recorded.The displacement mean and standard deviation was calculated for each patient (77 patients, 1845 sessions). An aggregate mean and standard deviation was calculated weighted by the number of patient fractions.Some patients were shifted based on MV ports. A second data set was calculated with Calypso(R) values corrected by these shifts. Results: Mean displacement values indicate agreement within 1±3mm, with improvement for shifted data (Table). Conclusion: Both unshifted and shifted data sets show the Calypso(R) system coincides with the laser system within 1±3mm, demonstrating either localization/verification system will Resultin similar clinical outcomes. Displacement value uncertainty unilaterally reduces when shifts are taken into account

  1. Cardiac and pulmonary dose reduction for tangentially irradiated breast cancer, utilizing deep inspiration breath-hold with audio-visual guidance, without compromising target coverage

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vikstroem, Johan; Hjelstuen, Mari H.B.; Mjaaland, Ingvil; Dybvik, Kjell Ivar (Dept. of Radiotherapy, Stavanger Univ. Hospital, Stavanger (Norway)), e-mail: vijo@sus.no

    2011-01-15

    Background and purpose. Cardiac disease and pulmonary complications are documented risk factors in tangential breast irradiation. Respiratory gating radiotherapy provides a possibility to substantially reduce cardiopulmonary doses. This CT planning study quantifies the reduction of radiation doses to the heart and lung, using deep inspiration breath-hold (DIBH). Patients and methods. Seventeen patients with early breast cancer, referred for adjuvant radiotherapy, were included. For each patient two CT scans were acquired; the first during free breathing (FB) and the second during DIBH. The scans were monitored by the Varian RPM respiratory gating system. Audio coaching and visual feedback (audio-visual guidance) were used. The treatment planning of the two CT studies was performed with conformal tangential fields, focusing on good coverage (V95>98%) of the planning target volume (PTV). Dose-volume histograms were calculated and compared. Doses to the heart, left anterior descending (LAD) coronary artery, ipsilateral lung and the contralateral breast were assessed. Results. Compared to FB, the DIBH-plans obtained lower cardiac and pulmonary doses, with equal coverage of PTV. The average mean heart dose was reduced from 3.7 to 1.7 Gy and the number of patients with >5% heart volume receiving 25 Gy or more was reduced from four to one of the 17 patients. With DIBH the heart was completely out of the beam portals for ten patients, with FB this could not be achieved for any of the 17 patients. The average mean dose to the LAD coronary artery was reduced from 18.1 to 6.4 Gy. The average ipsilateral lung volume receiving more than 20 Gy was reduced from 12.2 to 10.0%. Conclusion. Respiratory gating with DIBH, utilizing audio-visual guidance, reduces cardiac and pulmonary doses for tangentially treated left sided breast cancer patients without compromising the target coverage

  2. A comparative analysis of 3D conformal deep inspiratory–breath hold and free-breathing intensity-modulated radiation therapy for left-sided breast cancer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Reardon, Kelli A.; Read, Paul W.; Morris, Monica M. [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Virginia, Charlottesville, VA (United States); Reardon, Michael A. [Department of Radiology, University of Virginia, Charlottesville, VA (United States); Geesey, Constance [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Virginia, Charlottesville, VA (United States); Wijesooriya, Krishni, E-mail: kw5wx@hscmail.mcc.virginia.edu [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Virginia, Charlottesville, VA (United States)

    2013-07-01

    Patients undergoing radiation for left-sided breast cancer have increased rates of coronary artery disease. Free-breathing intensity-modulated radiation therapy (FB-IMRT) and 3-dimensional conformal deep inspiratory–breath hold (3D-DIBH) reduce cardiac irradiation. The purpose of this study is to compare the dose to organs at risk in FB-IMRT vs 3D-DIBH for patients with left-sided breast cancer. Ten patients with left-sided breast cancer had 2 computed tomography scans: free breathing and voluntary DIBH. Optimization of the IMRT plan was performed on the free-breathing scan using 6 noncoplanar tangential beams. The 3D-DIBH plan was optimized on the DIBH scan and used standard tangents. Mean volumes of the heart, the left anterior descending coronary artery (LAD), the total lung, and the right breast receiving 5% to 95% (5% increments) of the prescription dose were calculated. Mean volumes of the heart and the LAD were lower (p<0.05) in 3D-DIBH for volumes receiving 5% to 80% of the prescription dose for the heart and 5% for the LAD. Mean dose to the LAD and heart were lower in 3D-DIBH (p≤0.01). Mean volumes of the total lung were lower in FB-IMRT for dose levels 20% to 75% (p<0.05), but mean dose was not different. Mean volumes of the right breast were not different for any dose; however, mean dose was lower for 3D-DIBH (p = 0.04). 3D-DIBH is an alternative approach to FB-IMRT that provides a clinically equivalent treatment for patients with left-sided breast cancer while sparing organs at risk with increased ease of implementation.

  3. SU-E-J-32: Calypso(R) and Laser-Based Localization Systems Comparison for Left-Sided Breast Cancer Patients Using Deep Inspiration Breath Hold

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Robertson, S [Northwest Medical Physics Center, Lynnwood, WA (United States); Kaurin, D; Sweeney, L [Northwest Medical Physics Center, Lynnwood, WA (United States); Seattle Cancer Care Alliance, Seattle, WA (United States); Kim, J; Fang, L; Tran, A [Seattle Cancer Care Alliance, Seattle, WA (United States); University of Washington Medical Center, Seattle, WA (United States); Holloway, K [Seattle Cancer Care Alliance, Seattle, WA (United States)

    2014-06-01

    Purpose: Our institution uses a manual laser-based system for primary localization and verification during radiation treatment of left-sided breast cancer patients using deep inspiration breath hold (DIBH). This primary system was compared with sternum-placed Calypso(R) beacons (Varian Medical Systems, CA). Only intact breast patients are considered for this analysis. Methods: During computed tomography (CT) simulation, patients have BB and Calypso(R) surface beacons positioned sternally and marked for free-breathing and DIBH CTs. During dosimetry planning, BB longitudinal displacement between free breathing and DIBH CT determines laser mark (BH mark) location. Calypso(R) beacon locations from the DIBH CT are entered at the Tracking Station. During Linac simulation and treatment, patients inhale until the cross-hair and/or lasers coincide with the BH Mark, which can be seen using our high quality cameras (Pelco, CA). Daily Calypso(R) displacement values (difference from the DIBH-CT-based plan) are recorded.The displacement mean and standard deviation was calculated for each patient (77 patients, 1845 sessions). An aggregate mean and standard deviation was calculated weighted by the number of patient fractions.Some patients were shifted based on MV ports. A second data set was calculated with Calypso(R) values corrected by these shifts. Results: Mean displacement values indicate agreement within 1±3mm, with improvement for shifted data (Table). Conclusion: Both unshifted and shifted data sets show the Calypso(R) system coincides with the laser system within 1±3mm, demonstrating either localization/verification system will Resultin similar clinical outcomes. Displacement value uncertainty unilaterally reduces when shifts are taken into account.

  4. Dosimetric Benefits of Intensity-Modulated Radiotherapy Combined With the Deep-Inspiration Breath-Hold Technique in Patients With Mediastinal Hodgkin's Lymphoma

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Paumier, Amaury, E-mail: amaury.paumier@igr.fr [Department of Radiation Oncology, Institut Gustave Roussy, Villejuif (France); Ghalibafian, Mithra; Gilmore, Jennifer [Department of Radiation Oncology, Institut Gustave Roussy, Villejuif (France); Beaudre, Anne [Physics Unit, Institut Gustave Roussy, Villejuif (France); Blanchard, Pierre; El Nemr, Mohammed; Azoury, Farez; Al Hamokles, Hweej [Department of Radiation Oncology, Institut Gustave Roussy, Villejuif (France); Lefkopoulos, Dimitri [Physics Unit, Institut Gustave Roussy, Villejuif (France); Girinsky, Theodore [Department of Radiation Oncology, Institut Gustave Roussy, Villejuif (France)

    2012-03-15

    Purpose: To assess the additional benefits of using the deep-inspiration breath-hold (DIBH) technique with intensity-modulated radiotherapy (IMRT) in terms of the protection of organs at risk for patients with mediastinal Hodgkin's disease. Methods and Materials: Patients with early-stage Hodgkin's lymphoma with mediastinal involvement were entered into the study. Two simulation computed tomography scans were performed for each patient: one using the free-breathing (FB) technique and the other using the DIBH technique with a dedicated spirometer. The clinical target volume, planning target volume (PTV), and organs at risk were determined on both computed tomography scans according to the guidelines of the European Organization for Research and Treatment of Cancer. In both cases, 30 Gy in 15 fractions was prescribed. The dosimetric parameters retrieved for the statistical analysis were PTV coverage, mean heart dose, mean coronary artery dose, mean lung dose, and lung V20. Results: There were no significant differences in PTV coverage between the two techniques (FB vs. DIBH). The mean doses delivered to the coronary arteries, heart, and lungs were significantly reduced by 15% to 20% using DIBH compared with FB, and the lung V20 was reduced by almost one third. The dose reduction to organs at risk was greater for masses in the upper part of the mediastinum. IMRT with DIBH was partially implemented in 1 patient. This combination will be extended to other patients in the near future. Conclusions: Radiation exposure of the coronary arteries, heart, and lungs in patients with mediastinal Hodgkin's lymphoma was greatly reduced using DIBH with IMRT. The greatest benefit was obtained for tumors in the upper part of the mediastinum. The possibility of a wider use in clinical practice is currently under investigation in our department.

  5. Deep inspiration breath-hold technique for left-sided breast cancer: An analysis of predictors for organ-at-risk sparing

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Register, Steven; Takita, Cristiane [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Miami Sylvester Comprehensive Cancer Center, Miami, FL (United States); Reis, Isildinha; Zhao, Wei [Department of Public Health Sciences, University of Miami, Miami, FL (United States); Amestoy, William [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Miami Sylvester Comprehensive Cancer Center, Miami, FL (United States); Wright, Jean, E-mail: jwrigh71@jhmi.edu [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Miami Sylvester Comprehensive Cancer Center, Miami, FL (United States); Department of Radiation Oncology and Molecular Radiation Sciences, Johns Hopkins University, Baltimore, MD (United States)

    2015-04-01

    To identify anatomic and treatment characteristics that correlate with organ-at-risk (OAR) sparing with deep inspiration breath-hold (DIBH) technique to guide patient selection for this technique. Anatomic and treatment characteristics and radiation doses to OARs were compared between free-breathing and DIBH plans. Linear regression analysis was used to identify factors independently predicting for cardiac sparing. We identified 64 patients: 44 with intact breast and 20 postmastectomy. For changes measured directly on treatment planning scans, DIBH plans decreased heart-chest wall length (6.5 vs 5.0 cm, p < 0.001), and increased lung volume (1074.4 vs 1881.3 cm{sup 3}, p < 0.001), and for changes measured after fields are set, they decreased maximum heart depth (1.1 vs 0.3 cm, p < 0.001) and heart volume in field (HVIF) (9.1 vs 0.9 cm{sup 3}, p < 0.001). DIBH reduced the mean heart dose (3.4 vs 1.8 Gy, p < 0.001) and lung V{sub 20} (19.6% vs 15.3%, p < 0.001). Regression analysis found that only change in HVIF independently predicted for cardiac sparing. We identified patients in the bottom quartile of the dosimetric benefits seen with DIBH and categorized the cause of this “minimal benefit.” Overall, 29% of patients satisfied these criteria for minimal benefit with DIBH and the most common cause was favorable baseline anatomy. Only the reduction in HVIF predicted for reductions in mean heart dose; no specific anatomic surrogate for the dosimetric benefits of DIBH technique could be identified. Most patients have significant dosimetric benefit with DIBH, and this technique should be planned and evaluated for all patients receiving left-sided breast/chest wall radiation.

  6. Deep-inspiration breath-hold PET/CT versus free breathing PET/CT and respiratory gating PET for reference. Evaluation in 95 patients with lung cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The objective of this study was to define the factors that correlate with differences in maximum standardized uptake value (SUVmax) in deep-inspiration breath-hold (DIBH) and free breathing (FB) positron emission tomography (PET)/CT admixed with respiratory gating (RG) PET for reference. Patients (n=95) with pulmonary lesions were evaluated at one facility over 33 months. After undergoing whole-body PET/CT, a RG PET and FB PET/CT scans were obtained, followed by a DIBH PET/CT scan. All scans were recorded using a list-mode dynamic collection method with respiratory gating. The RG PET was reconstructed using phase gating without attenuation correction; the FB PET was reconstructed from the RG PET sinogram datasets with attenuation correction. Respiratory motion distance, breathing cycle speed, and waveform of RG PET were recorded. The SUVmax of FB PET/CT and DIBH PET/CT were recorded: the percent difference in SUVmax between the FB and DIBH scans was defined as the %BH-index. The %BH-index was significantly higher for lesions in the lower lung area than in the upper lung area. Respiratory motion distance was significantly higher in the lower lung area than in the upper lung area. A significant relationship was observed between the %BH-index and respiratory motion distance. Waveforms without steady end-expiration tended to show a high %BH-index. Significant inverse relationships were observed between %BH-index and cycle speed, and between respiratory motion distance and cycle speed. Decrease in SUVmax of FB PET/CT was due to tumor size, distribution of lower lung, long respiratory movement at slow breathing cycle speeds, and respiratory waveforms without steady end-expiration. (author)

  7. Reproducibility of The Abdominal and Chest Wall Position by Voluntary Breath-Hold Technique Using a Laser-Based Monitoring and Visual Feedback System

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Purpose: The voluntary breath-hold (BH) technique is a simple method to control the respiration-related motion of a tumor during irradiation. However, the abdominal and chest wall position may not be accurately reproduced using the BH technique. The purpose of this study was to examine whether visual feedback can reduce the fluctuation in wall motion during BH using a new respiratory monitoring device. Methods and Materials: We developed a laser-based BH monitoring and visual feedback system. For this study, five healthy volunteers were enrolled. The volunteers, practicing abdominal breathing, performed shallow end-expiration BH (SEBH), shallow end-inspiration BH (SIBH), and deep end-inspiration BH (DIBH) with or without visual feedback. The abdominal and chest wall positions were measured at 80-ms intervals during BHs. Results: The fluctuation in the chest wall position was smaller than that of the abdominal wall position. The reproducibility of the wall position was improved by visual feedback. With a monitoring device, visual feedback reduced the mean deviation of the abdominal wall from 2.1 ± 1.3 mm to 1.5 ± 0.5 mm, 2.5 ± 1.9 mm to 1.1 ± 0.4 mm, and 6.6 ± 2.4 mm to 2.6 ± 1.4 mm in SEBH, SIBH, and DIBH, respectively. Conclusions: Volunteers can perform the BH maneuver in a highly reproducible fashion when informed about the position of the wall, although in the case of DIBH, the deviation in the wall position remained substantial

  8. Whole left ventricular functional assessment from two minutes free breathing multi-slice CINE acquisition

    Science.gov (United States)

    Usman, M.; Atkinson, D.; Heathfield, E.; Greil, G.; Schaeffter, T.; Prieto, C.

    2015-04-01

    Two major challenges in cardiovascular MRI are long scan times due to slow MR acquisition and motion artefacts due to respiratory motion. Recently, a Motion Corrected-Compressed Sensing (MC-CS) technique has been proposed for free breathing 2D dynamic cardiac MRI that addresses these challenges by simultaneously accelerating MR acquisition and correcting for any arbitrary motion in a compressed sensing reconstruction. In this work, the MC-CS framework is combined with parallel imaging for further acceleration, and is termed Motion Corrected Sparse SENSE (MC-SS). Validation of the MC-SS framework is demonstrated in eight volunteers and three patients for left ventricular functional assessment and results are compared with the breath-hold acquisitions as reference. A non-significant difference (P > 0.05) was observed in the volumetric functional measurements (end diastolic volume, end systolic volume, ejection fraction) and myocardial border sharpness values obtained with the proposed and gold standard methods. The proposed method achieves whole heart multi-slice coverage in 2 min under free breathing acquisition eliminating the time needed between breath-holds for instructions and recovery. This results in two-fold speed up of the total acquisition time in comparison to the breath-hold acquisition.

  9. Left ventricular strain and its pattern estimated from cine CMR and validation with DENSE

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gao, Hao; Allan, Andrew; McComb, Christie; Luo, Xiaoyu; Berry, Colin

    2014-07-01

    Measurement of local strain provides insight into the biomechanical significance of viable myocardium. We attempted to estimate myocardial strain from cine cardiovascular magnetic resonance (CMR) images by using a b-spline deformable image registration method. Three healthy volunteers and 41 patients with either recent or chronic myocardial infarction (MI) were studied at 1.5 Tesla with both cine and DENSE CMR. Regional circumferential and radial left ventricular strains were estimated from cine and DENSE acquisitions. In all healthy volunteers, there was no difference for peak circumferential strain (- 0.18 ± 0.04 versus - 0.18 ± 0.03, p = 0.76) between cine and DENSE CMR, however peak radial strain was overestimated from cine (0.84 ± 0.37 versus 0.49 ± 0.2, p cine were similar to the patterns from DENSE, including the strain evolution related to recovery time and strain patterns related to MI scar extent. Furthermore, cine-derived strain disclosed different strain patterns in MI and non-MI regions, and regions with transmural and non-transmural MI as DENSE. Although there were large variations with radial strain measurements from cine CMR images, useful circumferential strain information can be obtained from routine clinical CMR imaging. Cine strain analysis has potential to improve the diagnostic yield from routine CMR imaging in clinical practice.

  10. Recent experience with design and manufacture of cine lenses

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thorpe, Michael D.; Dalzell, Kristen E.

    2015-09-01

    Modern cine lenses require a high degree of aberration correction over a large and ever expanding image size. At low to medium volume production levels, these highly corrected designs also require a workable tolerance set and compensation scheme for successful manufacture. In this paper we discuss the design and manufacture of cine lenses with reference to current designs both internal and in the patent literature and some experience in design, tolerancing and manufacturing these lenses in medium volume production.

  11. El cine posmoderno

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Edel Cadena Vargas

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available En el presente trabajo se trata de dar respuesta a las siguientes preguntas: ¿cuál es el origen del cine posmoderno?, ¿cuáles son los factores que permiten su creación?, ¿a qué sentimiento responde?

  12. Obstructive sleep apnea screening by NIRS imaging

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kashefi, Feraydune; Watenpaugh, Donald E.; Liu, Hanli

    2007-02-01

    This study aimed at determining cerebral hemodynamic parameters in human subjects during breath holding using near infrared spectroscopy (NIRS). Breath holding serves as a method of simulation OSA (Obstructive Sleep Apnea). Data was acquired non-invasively from 40 subjects, twenty OSA sufferers (10 females, 10 males, age 20-70 years), and twenty normal volunteers (10 females, 10 males, age 20-65 years). Measurements were conducted using a LED Imager (LEDI) during breath holding. In comparing OSA subjects with controls during breath holding, a consistent increase or even a decrease in oxy- ([O IIHb]), deoxy- ([HHb]), total hemoglobin ([tHb]) concentrations, and tissue hemoglobin oxygen saturation (SO II) in the regional brain tissue were observed. The LEDI probe consists of 4 sources and 10 detectors serving as 4 sets of 1 source and 4 detectors each. A three wavelength (730, 805, and 850 nm) LED was used and the wavelengths were switched sequentially. The distance between sources and the source-detector separation were 2.5 cm. Data acquisition consisted of three segments, baseline for one minute, followed by a period of breath holding, and then 2 minutes of recovery time. The duration of the breath holding was subject-dependent. Our investigation proves that NIR spectroscopy could be used as a tool for detecting cerebral hemodynamics and also serves as a method of screening patients with OSA.

  13. Preliminary study of cine phase contrast imaging on CSF flow measurement%磁共振相位对比法电影成像技术在脑脊液测速中的初步研究

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    陈富珍; 雷益; 夏军; 刘晓蕾; 王未

    2015-01-01

    目的:探讨小角度快速激发扰相位梯度回波序列相位对比法电影成像技术在脑脊液测速中的应用价值。方法采用德国Siemens Avanto 1.5T超导磁共振扫描仪,对16例健康志愿者先行头颅MRI检查,再行( Cine phase contrast,Cine PC)相位对比法电影成像技术结合使用外周的指脉或心电门控等技术并应用Argus软件进行数据测量及分析,在横轴位图像上勾画出ROI(感兴趣区),测量中脑导水管在一个心动周期内脑脊液流动的各动力学参数值。结果16例健康人的MRI PC幅值图均清晰显示测量区域的解剖结构,定位准确;相位图( phase image)均可判断脑脊液流动的方向、流速的快慢、信号的强弱,并能应用Argus软件进行数据测量及分析。结论相位对比法电影成像技术结合心电同步采集技术,具有成像速度快、突出T1 WI加权、电影成像的特点,可以作为脑脊液测速的常规扫描技术。%Objective To investigate the application value of Cine phase contrast ( Cine PC) imaging technique with small angle stimulation on spoiled gradient echo.Methods Performed head MRI examinations for 16 healthy volunteers on the 1.5T Siemens Avanto MRI, and then applied Cine PC imaging technique combined with peripheral pulse or ECG trigger.Analyzed the data with the Argus software, and marked the region of interest ( ROI) on the transverse axis of the image to measure the kinetic parameters of cerebrospinal fluid ( CSF) flow at aqueduct of sylvius in a cardiac cycle.Results All PC amplitude images from the 16 healthy volunteers'MRI examinations displayed the exact localization of anatomical structures at the region measured.The direction, velocity and signal strength of CSF flow could all be estimated and analyzed on the phase images by using the Argus software.Conclusions The Cine PC imaging technique combined with ECG synchronous acquisition could be used as general routine

  14. MR image analysis: Longitudinal cardiac motion influences left ventricular measurements

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Berkovic, Patrick [University Hospital Antwerp, Department of Cardiology (Belgium)], E-mail: pberko17@hotmail.com; Hemmink, Maarten [University Hospital Antwerp, Department of Cardiology (Belgium)], E-mail: maartenhemmink@gmail.com; Parizel, Paul M. [University Hospital Antwerp, Department of Radiology (Belgium)], E-mail: paul.parizel@uza.be; Vrints, Christiaan J. [University Hospital Antwerp, Department of Cardiology (Belgium)], E-mail: chris.vrints@uza.be; Paelinck, Bernard P. [University Hospital Antwerp, Department of Cardiology (Belgium)], E-mail: Bernard.paelinck@uza.be

    2010-02-15

    Background: Software for the analysis of left ventricular (LV) volumes and mass using border detection in short-axis images only, is hampered by through-plane cardiac motion. Therefore we aimed to evaluate software that involves longitudinal cardiac motion. Methods: Twenty-three consecutive patients underwent 1.5-Tesla cine magnetic resonance (MR) imaging of the entire heart in the long-axis and short-axis orientation with breath-hold steady-state free precession imaging. Offline analysis was performed using software that uses short-axis images (Medis MASS) and software that includes two-chamber and four-chamber images to involve longitudinal LV expansion and shortening (CAAS-MRV). Intraobserver and interobserver reproducibility was assessed by using Bland-Altman analysis. Results: Compared with MASS software, CAAS-MRV resulted in significantly smaller end-diastolic (156 {+-} 48 ml versus 167 {+-} 52 ml, p = 0.001) and end-systolic LV volumes (79 {+-} 48 ml versus 94 {+-} 52 ml, p < 0.001). In addition, CAAS-MRV resulted in higher LV ejection fraction (52 {+-} 14% versus 46 {+-} 13%, p < 0.001) and calculated LV mass (154 {+-} 52 g versus 142 {+-} 52 g, p = 0.004). Intraobserver and interobserver limits of agreement were similar for both methods. Conclusion: MR analysis of LV volumes and mass involving long-axis LV motion is a highly reproducible method, resulting in smaller LV volumes, higher ejection fraction and calculated LV mass.

  15. Evaluation of flow volume and flow patterns in the patent false lumen of chronic aortic dissections using velocity-encoded cine magnetic resonance imaging

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In 21 patients with chronic aortic dissections and proven patent false lumens, the flow volume and flow patterns in the patent false lumens was evaluated using velocity-encoded cine magnetic resonance imaging (VENC-MRI) and the relationship between the flow characteristics and aortic enlargement was retrospectively examined. Flow patterns in the false lumen were divided into 3 groups: pattern A with primarily antegrade flow (n=6), pattern R with primarily retrograde flow (n=3), and pattern B with bidirectional flow (n=12). In group A, the rate of flow volume in the false lumen compared to the total flow volume in true and false lumens (%TFV) and the average rate of enlargement of the maximum diameter of the dissected aorta per year (ΔD) were significantly greater than in groups R and B (%TFV: 74.1±0.07 vs 15.2±0.03 vs 11.8±0.04, p<0.01; ΔD: 3.62±0.82 vs 0 vs 0.58±0.15 mm/year, p<0.05, respectively). There was a significant correlation between %TFV and ΔD (r=0.79, p<0.0001). Evaluation of flow volume and flow patterns in the patent false lumen using VENC-MRI may be useful for predicting enlargement of the dissected aorta. (author)

  16. Evaluation of flow volume and flow patterns in the patent false lumen of chronic aortic dissections using velocity-encoded cine magnetic resonance imaging

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Inoue, Toshihisa; Watanabe, Shigeru; Sakurada, Hideki; Ono, Katsuhiro; Urano, Miharu; Hijikata, Yasuyoshi; Saito, Isao; Masuda, Yoshiaki [Chiba Univ. (Japan). School of Medicine

    2000-10-01

    In 21 patients with chronic aortic dissections and proven patent false lumens, the flow volume and flow patterns in the patent false lumens was evaluated using velocity-encoded cine magnetic resonance imaging (VENC-MRI) and the relationship between the flow characteristics and aortic enlargement was retrospectively examined. Flow patterns in the false lumen were divided into 3 groups: pattern A with primarily antegrade flow (n=6), pattern R with primarily retrograde flow (n=3), and pattern B with bidirectional flow (n=12). In group A, the rate of flow volume in the false lumen compared to the total flow volume in true and false lumens (%TFV) and the average rate of enlargement of the maximum diameter of the dissected aorta per year ({delta}D) were significantly greater than in groups R and B (%TFV: 74.1{+-}0.07 vs 15.2{+-}0.03 vs 11.8{+-}0.04, p<0.01; {delta}D: 3.62{+-}0.82 vs 0 vs 0.58{+-}0.15 mm/year, p<0.05, respectively). There was a significant correlation between %TFV and {delta}D (r=0.79, p<0.0001). Evaluation of flow volume and flow patterns in the patent false lumen using VENC-MRI may be useful for predicting enlargement of the dissected aorta. (author)

  17. SU-E-T-426: Dose Delivery Accuracy in Breast Field Junction for Free Breath and Deep Inspiration Breath Hold Techniques

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Purpose: The purpose of this work was to verify the accuracy of the dose distribution along the field junction in a half beam irradiation technique for breast cancer patients receiving radiation to the breast or chest wall (CW) and the supraclavicular LN region for both free breathing and deep inspiration breath hold (DIBH) technique. Methods: We performed in vivo measurements for nine breast cancer patients receiving radiation to the breast/CW and to the supraclavicular LN region. Six patients were treated to the left breast/CW using DIBH technique and three patients were treated to the right breast/CW in free breath. We used five microMOSFET dosimeters: three located along the field junction, one located 1 cm above the junction and the fifth microMOSFET located 1 cm below the junction. We performed consecutive measurements over several days for each patient and compared the measurements to the TPS calculation (Eclipse, Varian™). Results: The calculated and measured doses along the junction were 0.97±0.08 Gy and 1.02±0.14 Gy, respectively. Above the junction calculated and measured doses were 0.91±0.08 Gy and 0.98±0.09 Gy respectively, and below the junction calculated and measured doses were 1.70±0.15 Gy and 1.61±0.09 Gy, respectively. All differences were not statistically significant. When comparing calculated and measured doses for DIBH patients only, there was still no statistically significant difference between values for all dosimeter locations. Analysis was done using the Mann-Whitney Rank-Sum Test. Conclusion: We found excellent correlation between calculated doses from the TPS and measured skin doses at the junction of several half beam fields. Even for the DIBH technique, where there is more potential for variance due to depth of breath, there is no over or underdose along the field junction. This correlation validates the TPS, as well an accurate, reproducible patient setup

  18. Comparison of two single-breath-held 3-D acquisitions with multi-breath-held 2-D cine steady-state free precession MRI acquisition in children with single ventricles

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Atweh, Lamya A.; Dodd, Nicholas A.; Krishnamurthy, Ramkumar; Chu, Zili D. [Texas Children' s Hospital, EB Singleton Department of Pediatric Radiology, Cardiovascular Imaging, Houston, TX (United States); Pednekar, Amol [Philips Healthcare, Houston, TX (United States); Krishnamurthy, Rajesh [Texas Children' s Hospital, EB Singleton Department of Pediatric Radiology, Cardiovascular Imaging, Houston, TX (United States); Baylor College of Medicine, Department of Radiology, Houston, TX (United States); Baylor College of Medicine, Department of Pediatrics, Houston, TX (United States)

    2016-05-15

    Breath-held two-dimensional balanced steady-state free precession cine acquisition (2-D breath-held SSFP), accelerated with parallel imaging, is the method of choice for evaluating ventricular function due to its superior blood-to-myocardial contrast, edge definition and high intrinsic signal-to-noise ratio throughout the cardiac cycle. The purpose of this study is to qualitatively and quantitatively compare the two different single-breath-hold 3-D cine SSFP acquisitions using 1) multidirectional sensitivity encoding (SENSE) acceleration factors (3-D multiple SENSE SSFP), and 2) k-t broad-use linear acceleration speed-up technique (3-D k-t SSFP) with the conventional 2-D breath-held SSFP in non-sedated asymptomatic volunteers and children with single ventricle congenital heart disease. Our prospective study was performed on 30 non-sedated subjects (9 healthy volunteers and 21 functional single ventricle patients), ages 12.5 +/- 2.8 years. Two-dimensional breath-held SSFP with SENSE acceleration factor of 2, eight-fold accelerated 3-D k-t SSFP, and 3-D multiple SENSE SSFP with total parallel imaging factor of 4 were performed to evaluate ventricular volumes and mass in the short-axis orientation. Image quality scores (blood myocardial contrast, edge definition and interslice alignment) and volumetric analysis (end systolic volume, end diastolic volume and ejection fraction) were performed on the data sets by experienced users. Paired t-test was performed to compare each of the 3-D k-t SSFP and 3-D multiple SENSE SSFP clinical scores against 2-D breath-held SSFP. Bland-Altman analysis was performed on left ventricle (LV) and single ventricle volumetry. Interobserver and intraobserver variability in volumetric measurements were determined using intraclass coefficients. The clinical scores were highest for the 2-D breath-held SSFP images. Between the two 3-D sequences, 3-D multiple SENSE SSFP performed better than 3-D k-t SSFP. Bland-Altman analysis for volumes

  19. [Study on cine view of relative enhancement ratio map in O2-enhanced MRI].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fujii, Keita; Watanabe, Yasushi; Hanaoka, Shouhei; Motoyoshi, Kouichi; Goto, Masami; Amemiya, Shiori; Ino, Kenji; Akahane, Masaaki; Yano, Keiichi; Ohtomo, Kuni

    2014-11-01

    Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) enables the evaluation of organ structure and function. Oxygen-enhanced MRI (O2-enhanced MRI) is a method for evaluating the pulmonary ventilation function using oxygen as a contrast agent. We created the Cine View of Relative Enhancement Ratio Map (Cine RER map) in O2-enhanced MRI to easily observe the contrast effect for clinical use. Relative enhancement ratio (RER) was determined as the pixel values of the Cine RER map. Moreover, six healthy volunteers underwent O2-enhanced MRI to determine the appropriate scale width of the Cine RER map. We calculated each RER and set 0 to 1.27 as the scale width of the Cine RER map based on the results. The Cine RER map made it possible to observe the contrast effect over time and thus is a convenient tool for evaluating the pulmonary ventilation function in O2-enhanced MRI.

  20. Cine MRI of swallowing in patients with advanced oral or oropharyngeal carcinoma: a feasibility study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kreeft, Anne Marijn; Rasch, Coen R N; Muller, Sara H; Pameijer, Frank A; Hallo, Eeke; Balm, Alfons J M

    2012-06-01

    Treatment of oral and oropharyngeal cancer may cause dysphagia. Purpose is to examine whether cine magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) yields additional information compared to standard examination in the evaluation of posttreatment dysphagia and mobility of oral and oropharyngeal structures. Thirty-four cine MRIs were made in 23 patients with advanced oral and oropharyngeal cancer, consisting of an MR image every 800 ms during swallowing which is compared to videofluoroscopy and quality of life questionnaires. A scoring system was applied to assess mobility on cine MR and videofluoroscopy leading to a score ranging from 9 to 17. Cine MRI of the swallowing in a midsagittal plane visualized the tumor (if located in the same plane), important anatomic structures and surgical reconstructions. Posttreatment mobility on cine MRI and videofluoroscopy was significantly diminished compared to pretreatment, mean pretreatment cine MRI score was 10.8 and posttreatment 12.4 (p = 0.017). Impaired mobility on cine MRI was significantly correlated to more swallowing problems (Spearman's correlation coefficient 0.73, p = 0.04), on videofluoroscopy not. Cine MRI is a promising new technique as an adjunct to standard examinations for evaluation of swallowing in patients with oral and oropharyngeal cancer. Cine MRI directly visualizes the dynamics of swallowing and allows evaluation of pre- and posttreatment differences. Abnormal findings are significantly correlated with subjective swallowing complaints of patients.

  1. Cine e identidades virtuales

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Labrador Ben, Julia María

    2006-12-01

    Full Text Available The subject is the ability the cinema has performed - since its very begining - as a creation instrument of national and transnational identities. In the first place, it covers Spanish cinema since 1938 and right after the end of the Spanish Civil War, II World War Italian-German cinema, Eisenstein’s, Leni Riefenstahl’s, Griffth’s and Ford’s cinema, the role American war and science fiction productions played, as well as the comedies dealing with the divided Berlin subject. The role of computers and video-games and the new cinema positionings that forecast the end of what is real, is studied through films such as Tron, The Lawnmower Man, Johnny Mnemonic, Ghost in the shell, Simone o Matrix.Se estudia la capacidad del cine desde sus orígenes como instrumento de generación de identidades nacionales y transnacionales. Se realiza, en primer lugar, un recorrido por el cine español desde 1938 y tras el final de la guerra civil, el cine italo-alemán de la II Guerra Mundial, el cine de Eisenstein, Leni Riefenstahl, Griffth y Ford, y el papel que jugaron las producciones norteamericanas bélicas y de ciencia ficción, así como las comedias sobre el Berlín dividido. El papel de los ordenadores y los videojuegos, y los nuevos planteamientos cinematográficos que pronostican el final de lo real se estudia a través de películas como Tron, El cortador de césped, Johnny Mnemonic, Ghost in the shell, Simone o Matrix.

  2. Deep inspiration breath-hold (DIBH) radiotherapy in left-sided breast cancer. Dosimetrical comparison and clinical feasibility in 20 patients

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hepp, Rodrigo; Ammerpohl, Mark; Morgenstern, Christina; Erichsen, Patricia [Evangelische Kliniken Gelsenkirchen, Klinik fuer Strahlentherapie und Radioonkologie, Gelsenkirchen (Germany); Nielinger, Lisa [Evangelische Kliniken Gelsenkirchen, Klinik fuer Strahlentherapie und Radioonkologie, Gelsenkirchen (Germany); Hochschule Hamm-Lippstadt, Lippstadt (Germany); Abdallah, Abdallah [Evangelische Kliniken Gelsenkirchen, Klinik fuer Senologie, Gelsenkirchen (Germany); Galalae, Razvan [Evangelische Kliniken Gelsenkirchen, Klinik fuer Strahlentherapie und Radioonkologie, Gelsenkirchen (Germany); Christian-Albrechts-Universitaet zu Kiel, Medizinische Fakultaet, Kiel (Germany)

    2015-09-15

    Adjuvant radiotherapy after breast-conserving surgery (BCS) for breast cancer (BC) is a well-established indication. The risk of ischaemic heart disease after radiotherapy for BC increases linearly with the heart mean dose with no apparent threshold. Radiotherapy to the left breast in deep inspiration breath-hold (DIBH) reduces the dose to the heart. A new linac system with an integrated surface scanner (SS) for DIBH treatments was recently installed in our department. We tested it for potential benefits, safety, patients' acceptance/compliance and associated additional workload. Twenty consecutive patients following BCS for breast carcinoma of the left side were enrolled in our institutional DIBH protocol. We compared dose to the heart and ipsilateral lung (IL) between plans in DIBH and free breathing (FB) using standard defined parameters: mean dose, maximal dose to a volume of 2 cm{sup 3} (D{sub 2} {sub cm} {sup 3}), volume receiving ≥ 5 Gy (V{sub 5}), 10 Gy (V{sub 10}), 15 Gy (V{sub 15}) and 20 Gy (V{sub 20}). Comparison of median calculated dose values was performed using a two-tailed Wilcoxon signed rank test. DIBH was associated with a statistically significant reduction (p < 0.001) in all studied parameters for the heart and the IL. In 16 of 20 patients the heart D{sub 2} {sub cm} {sup 3} was less than 42 Gy in DIBH. In FB the heart D{sub 2} {sub cm} {sup 3} was ≥ 42 Gy in 17 of 20 patients. The median daily treatment time was 9 min. Radiotherapy of the left breast in DIBH using a SS could easily be incorporated into daily routine and is associated with significant dose reduction to the heart and IL. (orig.) [German] Die adjuvante Strahlentherapie nach brusterhaltener Operation (BCS) bei Brustkrebs (BC) ist eine seit langem anerkannte Behandlungsform. Das postradiogene Risiko einer kardialen Ischaemie steigt linear ohne erkennbaren Schwellenwert mit der mittleren Herzdosis. Die Bestrahlung der linken Brust in tiefer Inspiration unter Anhalten der

  3. Cine MRI: a new approach to the diagnosis of scapholunate dissociation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Langner, I.; Eisenschenk, A. [University Medicine Greifswald, Division of Hand Surgery and Functional Microsurgery, Department of Trauma and Reconstructive Surgery, Greifswald (Germany); Fischer, S.; Langner, S. [University Medicine Greifswald, Institute for Diagnostic Radiology and Neuroradiology, Greifswald (Germany)

    2015-08-15

    To evaluate the feasibility of cine MRI for the detection of scapholunate dissociation (SLD) and to compare the sensitivity and specificity of cine MRI with those of cineradiography and arthroscopy. To evaluate feasibility, healthy subjects underwent cine MRI of the wrist. To evaluate sensitivity and specificity, patients with clinically suspected scapholunate ligament (SLL) injury after trauma to the wrist were prospectively included and underwent radiographic examination, cineradiography, and cine MRI. In 25 out of 38 patients, subsequent arthroscopy was performed. Results of cineradiography and cine MRI correlated with those of arthroscopy. Cine MRI was of diagnostic quality in all healthy subjects and patients with good interrater agreement. There was excellent correlation between cineradiography and cine MRI. Scapholunate distance differed significantly between healthy subjects and patients with scapholunate dissociation (p < 0.001), but not between imaging modalities in the patient group. Cine MRI had 85 % sensitivity and 90 % specificity for the detection of SLD. Cine MRI of the wrist is a fast and reliable technique for the detection of SLD with diagnostic accuracy comparable to cineradiography. It can be easily implemented as a routine clinical MRI examination, facilitating diagnostic workup of patients with suspected SLD while avoiding radiation exposure. (orig.)

  4. Cine y Modernismo

    OpenAIRE

    González García, María; Caro Valverde, María Teresa

    2008-01-01

    Unidad Didáctica de Innovación Educativa de proyección semiótica interdisciplinar entre Cine y Literatura aplicada al nivel de Cuarto Curso de Educación Secundaria Obligatoria, de acuerdo con las disposiciones legales de la LOE. Sus actividades de aprendizaje siguen una metodología de iniciación a la investigación para el desarrollo del aprendizaje en competencias comunicativas. Unidad Didáctica de Lengua castellana y Literatura para el nivel educativo de Cuarto Curso de Educación Secundar...

  5. Cine-CT of the mediastinum in pediatric patients

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Eighty-three cine-CT examinations of the mediastinum were performed in children. Lesions imaged include neoplastic, inflammatory, and vascular abnormalities. The 50-msec scan time allowed superb visualization of the heart and airway, minimized motion artifact, allowed examinations to be done with little or no sedation, and permitted optimal opacification of all vascular structures with as little as 0.5 ml/kg of intravenous contrast agent. Scanning time for a 20-section examination is 10 sec. The radiation dose for an equivalent examination is approximately one-tenth that of conventional CT. Cine-CT is an excellent imaging modality for examining the mediastinum in children

  6. Uterine peristalsis evaluated in menorrhagia ifbroid patients by cine magnetic resonance imaging%MRI电影对月经过多子宫肌瘤患者子宫蠕动的研究

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    屈亚林; 吕富荣; 肖智博; 吕发金; 谢惠; 李佳; 赵飞飞

    2016-01-01

    AbstractObjective:To evaluate uterine peristalsis in menorrhagia ifbroid patients by cine magnetic resonance imaging and to investigate the possible inlfuence of leiomyoma locations on uterine peristalsis.Materials and Methods:Thirty menorrhagia ifbroid patients and 30 healthy volunteers participated in this study. MR imaging of uterus in axis T1, axis T2-stir and sagittal T2 and cine MRI were prospectively performed with a 1.5 T scanner during the peri-ovulatory phase. The presence and frequency of normal peristalsis were compared between healthy volunteers and ifbroid patients. The relationships between the locations of fibroids and the types of peristalsis were also analyzed.Results: The presence and frequency of normal peristalsis were signiifcantly decreased in menorrhagia ifbroid patients compared to healthy volunteers (P< 0.01). Menorrhagia ifbroid patients showed a variety of types of peristalsis and patients with submucosal showed no peristalsis.Conclusion: In menorrhagia ifbroid patients, the presence of normal peristalsis is significantly decreased, which is not conducive to the rapid transport of sperm to the fallopian tubes. Cine MRI can facilitate evaluation of uterine peristalsis in menorrhagia fibroid patients and provide useful functional information of uterine peristalsis for clinic.%目的:应用MR电影成像技术(cine MRI)探讨月经过多子宫肌瘤患者排卵期子宫蠕动情况及肌瘤位置对子宫蠕动的影响。材料与方法采用1.5 T MRI仪对30名健康志愿者及30例月经过多子宫肌瘤患者于排卵期行盆腔T1轴面、T2-抑脂轴面、T2矢状面及子宫cine MR扫描。比较健康志愿者与月经过多肌瘤患者子宫正常蠕动存在率及蠕动频率,分析肌瘤位置与蠕动形式的关系。结果月经过多子宫肌瘤患者排卵期子宫正常蠕动存在率及蠕动频率较健康志愿者显著降低,两者均有统计学意义(P值均<0.01),黏膜下肌瘤患者主要表现为无蠕

  7. CineGlob

    CERN Multimedia

    CineGlob

    2014-01-01

    CERN will be hosting the next CineGlobe International Film Festival from March 18 to 23 at the Globe of Science and Innovation with the theme “Beyond the Frontier”, This 4th edition will see 66 short films “inspired by science” in competition, including fiction films as well as documentaries. From Tuesday the 18th to Friday the 21st, special lunch sessions are organized from 12:30 to 13:30. Food will be available for purchase at the tent “Café Cinéma” next to the Globe. Special evenings While the short film screenings are the heart of the festival, every year CineGlobe also organizes compelling special events every night, from feature films to special musical performances: Tuesday 18th: The Swiss premiere of the acclaimed documentary film Particle Fever. Presented by BBC Storyville with Fabiola Gianotti and director Mark Levinson in attendance; Wednesday 19th: The result of the “Story Matter” Hacka...

  8. Kinematic analysis of the knee joint by cine MRI

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Niitsu, Mamoru; Akisada, Masayoshi; Anno, Izumi; Matsumoto, Kunihiko; Kuno, Shin-ya; Miyakawa, Shunpei (Tsukuba Univ., Ibaraki (Japan). Inst. of Clinical Medicine); Inouye, Tamon; Kose, Katsumi

    1989-08-01

    In order to obtain the MR imaging of a moving knee joint, we developed a drive system of the knee. A reciprocating reversible motor with a rope and pulleys drove a knee brace with the knee bending and extending every two seconds. Using photo sensor probe for gating cine acquisition, we got 16-time frames/cycle MR images. Such as articular cartilage, ligaments and synovial fluid, the fine components of a moving knee joint were clearly seen. In a dynamic display, these cine images demonstrated 'actual' movement of the knee joint. Moving joint fluid and defect of anterior cruciate ligament were demonstrated in the case of knee injury. These findings were not seen on static images. Cine MR imaging was also helpful for evaluating the chronic joint disease and ligament reconstruction. Through the use of the present drive system and cine acquisition, dynamic MR imaging of a moving knee joint is clearly demonstrated and it may provide useful information in the kinematic analysis of the normal and pathologic knee. (author).

  9. 电影磁共振成像对左室心脏功能的研究%Study of Left Ventricular Functions with Cine Magnetic Resonance Imaging

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    曾献军; 龚洪翰

    2003-01-01

    目的研究电影磁共振成像(cine-MRI)对左室心脏功能的测定. 资料与方法通过对60名健康成年人进行cine-MRI,并均经询问病史、体格检查、X线胸片、心脏B超等检查确诊为健康者.分别对其测定心脏功能运动指标,其中包括舒张末容积、收缩末容积、每搏输出量、射血分数以及室壁的厚度测量等运动指标. 结果图像能够清晰地显示心室壁形态结构;左室舒张末容积为101.3±14.6ml,收缩末容积为31.9±9.8ml,射血分数69.8±3.9%;左室后壁、室间隔厚度增厚率分别为60.6±13.5%和57.8±14.9%. 结论 cine-MRI对左室心脏功能的评价具有重要的临床价值.

  10. Functional imaging of the lung using a gaseous contrast agent: 3Helium-magnetic resonance imaging

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Current imaging methods of the lung concentrate on morphology as well as on the depiction of the pulmonary parenchyma. The need of an advanced and more subtle imaging technology compared to conventional radiography is met by computed topograhy as the method of choice. Nevertheless, computed tomography yields very limited functional information. This is to be derived from arterial blood gas analysis, spirometry and body plethysmography. These methods, however, lack the scope for regional allocation of any pathology. Magnetic resonance imaging of the lung has been advanced by the use of hyperpolarised 3Helium as an inhaled gaseous contrast agent. The inhalation of the gas provides functional data by distribution, diffusion and relaxation of its hyperpolarised state. Because anatomical landmarks of the lung can be visualised as well, functional information can be linked with regional information. Furthermore, the method provides high spatial and temporal resolution and lacks the potential side-effects of ionising radiation. Four different modalities have been established: 1. Spin density imaging studies the distribution of gas, normally after a single inhalation of contrast gas in inspiratory breath hold. 2. Dynamic cine imaging studies the distribution of gas with respect to regional time constants of pulmonary gas inflow. 3. Diffusion weighted imaging can exhibit the presence and severity of pulmonary airspace enlargement, as in pulmonary emphysema. 4. Oxygen sensitive imaging displays intrapulmonary oxygen partial pressure and its distribution. Currently, the method is limited by comparably high costs and limited availability. As there have been recent developments which might bring this modality closer to clinical use, this review article will comprise the methodology as well as the current state of the art and standard of knowledge of magnetic resonance imaging of the lung using hyperpolarised 3Helium. (orig.)

  11. Cine-Club

    CERN Multimedia

    Cine-Club

    2011-01-01

    Thursday 10 November 2011 at 20:30 CERN Council Chamber The Counterfeiters / Die Fälscher By: Stefan Ruzowitzky (Germany/Austria, 2007) 98 min With: Karl Markovics, August Diel, Devid Striesow The Counterfeiters is the true story of the largest counterfeiting operation in history, set up by the Nazis in 1936. Master counterfeiter Salomon ‘Sally’ Sorowitsch, a Jew without morals, is arrested and sent to Mauthausen concentration camp, where he weasels through by offering his ‘artistic’ services. After transfer to Sachsenhausen he’s given an official alternative: taking ‘artistic’ charge of a cons teams assigned to produce perfect forgeries of allied banknotes for the Third Reich. Survivor Sally accepts, but conscience matters among the team prove no less dangerous then a sadistic jailer, which only the CO may keep in check. Original version German; English subtitles Entrance: 2 CHF Projection from DVD http://cine...

  12. Efeito do broncodilatador no tempo de apneia voluntária máxima em pacientes com distúrbios ventilatórios obstrutivos Bronchodilator effect on maximal breath-hold time in patients with obstructive lung disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Raqueli Biscayno Viecili

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available OBJETIVO: Identificar o papel do broncodilatador no tempo de apneia voluntária máxima em pacientes com distúrbios ventilatórios obstrutivos (DVOs. MÉTODOS: Estudo caso-controle incluindo pacientes com DVOs e grupo controle. Foram realizadas espirometrias antes e após o uso de broncodilatador, assim como testes de apneia respiratória, utilizando-se um microprocessador eletrônico e um pneumotacógrafo como transdutor de fluxo. As curvas de fluxo respiratório foram exibidas em tempo real em um computador portátil, e os tempos de apneia voluntária inspiratória e expiratória máximos (TAVIM e TAVEM, respectivamente foram determinados a partir do sinal adquirido. RESULTADOS: Um total de 35 pacientes com DVOs e 16 controles foram incluídos no estudo. O TAVIM sem o uso de broncodilatador foi significativamente menor no grupo DVO que no grupo controle (22,27 ± 11,81 s vs. 31,45 ± 15,73; p = 0,025, mas essa diferença não foi significativa após o uso de broncodilatador (24,94 ± 12,89 s vs. 31,67 ± 17,53 s. Os valores de TAVEM foram significativamente menores no grupo DVO que no grupo controle antes (16,88 ± 6,58 s vs. 22,09 ± 7,95 s; p = 0,017 e após o uso de broncodilatador (21,22 ± 9,37 s vs. 28,53 ± 12,46 s; p = 0,024. CONCLUSÕES: Estes resultados fornecem uma evidência adicional da utilidade clínica do teste de apneia na avaliação da função pulmonar e do papel do broncodilatador nesse teste.OBJECTIVE: To identify the role of bronchodilators in the maximal breath-hold time in patients with obstructive lung disease (OLD. METHODS: We conducted a case-control study including patients with OLD and a control group. Spirometric tests were performed prior to and after the use of a bronchodilator, as were breath-hold tests, using an electronic microprocessor and a pneumotachograph as a flow transducer. Respiratory flow curves were displayed in real time on a portable computer. The maximal breath-hold times at end

  13. Discursos subversivos en el cine no hablado

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rodríguez Fernández, M.ª del Carmen

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available “Subversive discourses in silent films” aims to analyse the gender transgression that emerges in certain movies of the silent period. These being silent films, their meaning can only be understood from the content of the images. Directors of the silent period were aware of the importance of images and of their power to put across their views to spectators. The field of filmmaking was new but it was not ungendered, and women filmmakers knew that their films were the vehicle to make spectators aware of their feminist positions. Le matelas alcoolique, La souriante Mme. Beudet and Dora Films of America Shorts are examples of this privilege since, although they belong to two periods of silent film history and have different aims, the directors and the films selected are good examples to be revisited with a gender perspective.

    “Discursos subversivos en el cine no hablado” se propone analizar las transgresiones de género que aparecen en algunas películas del cine mudo. Por sus características al tratarse de un cine no hablado, lo que sugieren algunas imágenes es fundamental para entender los significados de las películas. Las directoras de aquella época eran conocedoras de la importancia de las imágenes y del poder que les confería la cámara para expresar sus reivindicaciones al público espectador. El campo de la cinematografía era nuevo, pero tenía género y las directoras sabían que sus películas eran el vehículo para dar a conocer su articulación como feministas. Le matelas alcoolique, La souriante Mme. Beudet y Dora Films of America Shorts son ejemplos de este privilegio puesto que, aunque las películas de esta muestra pertenezcan a dos etapas del cine mudo y de que sus propósitos fueran diferentes, las directoras y las películas seleccionadas son ejemplos merecedores de una revisión con perspectiva de género.

  14. Cine-Club

    CERN Multimedia

    Cine-Club

    2011-01-01

    Lundi 12 décembre 2011 à 18:30 Salle du Conseil Comme chaque année avant Noël, le CINE-CLUB du CERN est heureux d’inviter petits et grands à une projection gratuite du film : Ponyo sur la falaise (Japon, 2008, Hayao Miyazaki) Le petit Sosuke vit avec sa mère sur une haute falaise surplombant la mer. Un beau jour, il découvre sur la plage caillouteuse Ponyo, une petite fille poisson. Ponyo est si fascinée par Sosuke et le monde terrestre que son désir le plus cher est de devenir un être humain. Mais Fujimoto, son magicien de père, n’est pas du tout d’accord avec cette idée et il la force à regagner les profondeurs de l’océan. Bien décidée à revoir Sosuke, Ponyo s’échappe de sa prison sous-marine, mais ce faisant elle déclenche une immense catastroph...

  15. CERN CINE CLUB

    CERN Multimedia

    CERN CINE CLUB

    2010-01-01

    CERN CINE CLUB Thursday 24 June 2010 at 20:30 / Jeudi 24 Juin 2010 à 20:30 CERN Main Auditorium / Amphithéâtre Principal   The Raggedy Rawney By/de : Bob Hoskins (UK, 1988) - 104 min With/avec: Dexter Fletcher, Bob Hoskins, David Hill, Zoe Nathanson, Zoe Wanamaker Bob Hoskins makes his directorial debut with this lyrical, mystical fable about the strength of family and the transcendence of love. When a young military recruit named Tom goes AWOL after his first taste of battle, he must disguise himself with face paint and women’s clothing to avoid being captured by his vengeful commanding officer. He is instead discovered and taken in by Darky, the leader of an eccentric group of traveling gypsies, who thinks he is a «rawney», a half-mad, half-magical woman who brings good fortune. But when Tom begins a love affair with Darky’s daughter, he sets off a chain reaction of events that will soon put all of their lives in grave ...

  16. Movimientos migratorios y cine

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Manuel Galiano León

    2009-12-01

    Full Text Available Nuestro artículo se ha centrado en el estudio de las películas de mayor distribución comercial para ver cómo éstas han representado el tema de la migración y qué reflexiones sugieren. En general, creemos que el reconocimiento por parte del cine de este fenómeno es positivo y que indudablemente constituye una fuente esencial para comprender las realidades migratorias distinguiendo discursos diversos y explicitando intenciones y hechos que intentan ocultarse u olvidarse.__________________ABSTRACT:Our article focuses on the study of the most commercial movies to check the way they present the subject of immigration and which kind of reflections they suggest. In general, we believe that the recognition of the migration phenomena in the cinema world is positive and it is actually an esential source to understand the reality of migration, being able to recognize different discourses and showing intentions and facts which are hidden or forgotten.  

  17. Cine-Club

    CERN Document Server

    CineClub

    2014-01-01

      On the occasion of CERN’s 60th anniversary the CERN CineClub will be showing films from all CERN member states Thursday 10 April 2014 at 20:00 CERN Council Chamber   The Bothersome Man     Directed by Jens Lien (Norway, 2006) 95 minutes   Forty-year-old Andreas arrives in a strange city with no memory of how he got there. He is presented with a job, an apartment-even a beautiful girlfriend. But before long, Andreas notices that something is wrong. The people around him seem cut off from any real emotion, and communicate only in superficialities. All this seems to be governed by a shadowy group of technicians, the ominous Caretakers’, who make sure the city runs smoothly. When they find Andreas is not adjusting to his new life, they keep an increasing watch over his activities...”The Bothersome Man” is a fantastic fable, a parable for modern society’s consumerism and obsession with ap...

  18. Left Ventricle: Fully Automated Segmentation Based on Spatiotemporal Continuity and Myocardium Information in Cine Cardiac Magnetic Resonance Imaging (LV-FAST

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lijia Wang

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available CMR quantification of LV chamber volumes typically and manually defines the basal-most LV, which adds processing time and user-dependence. This study developed an LV segmentation method that is fully automated based on the spatiotemporal continuity of the LV (LV-FAST. An iteratively decreasing threshold region growing approach was used first from the midventricle to the apex, until the LV area and shape discontinued, and then from midventricle to the base, until less than 50% of the myocardium circumference was observable. Region growth was constrained by LV spatiotemporal continuity to improve robustness of apical and basal segmentations. The LV-FAST method was compared with manual tracing on cardiac cine MRI data of 45 consecutive patients. Of the 45 patients, LV-FAST and manual selection identified the same apical slices at both ED and ES and the same basal slices at both ED and ES in 38, 38, 38, and 41 cases, respectively, and their measurements agreed within -1.6±8.7 mL, -1.4±7.8 mL, and 1.0±5.8% for EDV, ESV, and EF, respectively. LV-FAST allowed LV volume-time course quantitatively measured within 3 seconds on a standard desktop computer, which is fast and accurate for processing the cine volumetric cardiac MRI data, and enables LV filling course quantification over the cardiac cycle.

  19. Analysis of blowout fractures using cine mode MRI

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    By observing conventional CT and MRI images, it is difficult to distinguish extension failure from adhesion, bone fracture or damage to the extraocular muscle, any one of which may be the direct cause of the eye movement disturbance accompanying blowout fracture. We therefore carried out dynamic analysis of eye movement disturbance using a cine mode MRI. We put seven fixation points in the gantry of the MRI and filmed eye movement disturbances by the gradient echo method, using a surface coil and holding the vision on each fixation point. We also video recorded the CRT monitor of the MRI to obtain dynamic MRI images. The subjects comprised 5 cases (7-23 years old). In 4 cases, we started orthoptic treatment, saccadic eye movement training, convergence training and fusional amplitude training after surgery, with only orthoptic treatment in the 5 th case. In all cases, fusion area improvement was recognized during training. In 2 cases examined by cine mode MRI before and after surgery, we observed improved eye movement after training, the effectiveness of which was thereby proven. Also, using cine mode MRI we were able to determine the character of incarcerated tissue and the cause of eye movement disturbance. We conclude that it blowout fracture, cine mode MRI may be useful in selecting treatment and observing its effectiveness. (author)

  20. Role of EPI in diagnosing cavernous hemangioma and small HCC : comparison with fast T2-weighted MR Imaging

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Suk; Lee, Jun Woo; Kim, Chang Won; Jung, Hyun Woo; Choi, Sang Yoel; Lee, Suck Hong; Kim, Byung Soo [Pusan National Univeraty Hospital, Pusan (Korea, Republic of)

    1998-05-01

    The purpose of this study is to compare single-shot echo-planar MR imaging (EPI) with breath-hold fast T2-weighted imaging (HASTE or Turbo spin-echo T2WI) for evaluation of the role of EPI in distinguishing small hepatocellular carcinoma from cavernous hemangioma. We retrospectively evaluated MR images of 35 patients (21 cases of small HCC and 14 cases of cavernous hemangioma). EPI and breath-hold fast T2WI images were obtained and compared on the basis of lesion detection sensitivity, lesion-to-liver signal intensity ratio (SIR), contrast ratio (CR), and lesion-to-liver contrast to noise ratio (CNR). For the detection of small HCC, the sensitivity of EPI and breath-hold fast T2WI were equal in 14 of 21 cases (71.4%). The detection sensitivity of cavernous hemangioma with EPI and breath-hold fast T2WI was 100 % (14/14). Mean SIR on breath-hold fast T2WI was 2.02 {+-} 0.45 for small HCC and 3.65 {+-} 0.97 for cavernous hemangioma; on EPI, the corresponding figures were 2.91 {+-} 0.57 for cavernous hemangioma; On EPI, the figures obtained were 2.27 {+-} 0.52 and 6.26 {+-} 2.19, respectively. Mean CNR on breath-hold fast T2WI was 14.24 {+-} 4.098 for small HCC and 50.28 {+-} 10.96 for cavernous hemangioma, while on EPI, the corresponding figures were 13.84 {+-} 3.02 and 45.44 {+-} 11.21. In detecting focal hepatic mass, the sensitivity of EPI and breath-hold fast T2WI are comparable for the diagnosis of small HCC and cavernous hemangioma, EPI can provided additional information. (author). 20 refs., 2 tabs., 4 figs.

  1. Cine y estudios de género: Imagen, representación e ideología. Notas para un abordaje crítico Cinema and gender studies: Image, representation and ideology. Notes for a critical approach

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Paula Laguarda

    2006-12-01

    Full Text Available El cine, en tanto productor de imágenes, representaciones, significados e ideologías, aparece como un terreno óptimo para el rastreo del modo en que se han construido las subjetividades, desde la popularización de esta técnica en las primeras décadas del siglo XX hasta la actualidad. En este sentido ofrece a los estudios de género una fuente de primer orden para el análisis de las representaciones socialmente dominantes acerca de lo femenino y lo masculino y las características asignadas a cada uno; así como la interacción de la categoría de género con otras como clase, etnicidad, nación, domesticidad, educación, ejercicio de la sexualidad y edad. En el artículo se abordan críticamente las principales líneas teóricas que han vinculado cine y feminismo y las posibilidades que éste ofrece a los estudios de género, al permitir la indagación simultánea sobre aspectos textuales (discursivos, narrativos y recursos propios del lenguaje cinematográfico y contextuales (al considerar al cine a la vez como industria cultural y manifestación de la cultura popular.Cinema, as a producer of images, representations, meanings and ideologies, seems to be an optimum territory for tracing the way in which subjectivities had been constructed, sinces the popularization of this technique on the early decades of XX century to the present day. In this sense, cinema provides gender studies with a source of prime order to analyse socially dominant representations about female and male, and the characteristics assigned to each other; such as the interaction between gender category and other like class, ethnicity, nation, domesticity, education, sexuality and age. This article approaches critically to the main theoretical lines that had conected cinema and feminism, and to the possibilities it offers to gender studies, by allowing simultaneous research on textual aspects (discoursive, narrative elements and resources of cinematographic language and

  2. High resolution MR imaging of the fetal heart with cardiac triggering: a feasibility study in the sheep fetus

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yamamura, Jin; Frisch, Michael; Adam, Gerhard; Wedegaertner, Ulrike [University Hospital Hamburg-Eppendorf, Department of Diagnostic and Interventional Radiology, Hamburg (Germany); Schnackenburg, Bernhard; Kooijmann, Hendrik [Philips Medical Systems, Hamburg (Germany); Hecher, Kurt [University Hospital Hamburg-Eppendorf, Department of Obstetrics and Fetal Medicine, Hamburg (Germany)

    2009-10-15

    The aim of this study was to perform fetal cardiac magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) with triggering of the fetal heart beat in utero in a sheep model. All experimental protocols were reviewed and the usage of ewes and fetuses was approved by the local animal protection authorities. Images of the hearts of six pregnant ewes were obtained by using a 1.5-T MR system (Philips Medical Systems, Best, Netherlands). The fetuses were chronically instrumented with a carotid catheter to measure the fetal heart frequency for the cardiac triggering. Pulse wave triggered, breath-hold cine-MRI with steady-state free precession (SSFP) was achieved in short axis, two-, four- and three-chamber views. The left ventricular volume and thus the function were measured from the short axis. The fetal heart frequencies ranged between 130 and 160 bpm. The mitral, tricuspid, aortic, and pulmonary valves could be clearly observed. The foramen ovale could be visualized. Myocardial contraction was shown in cine sequences. The average blood volume at the end systole was 3.4{+-}0.2 ml ({+-} SD). The average volume at end diastole was 5.2{+-}0.2 ml; thus the stroke volumes of the left ventricle in the systole were between 1.7 and 1.9 ml with ejection fractions of 38.6% and 39%, respectively. The pulse wave triggered cardiac MRI of the fetal heart allowed evaluation of anatomical structures and functional information. This feasibility study demonstrates the applicability of MRI for future evaluation of fetuses with complex congenital heart defects, once a noninvasive method has been developed to perform fetal cardiac triggering. (orig.)

  3. High resolution MR imaging of the fetal heart with cardiac triggering: a feasibility study in the sheep fetus

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The aim of this study was to perform fetal cardiac magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) with triggering of the fetal heart beat in utero in a sheep model. All experimental protocols were reviewed and the usage of ewes and fetuses was approved by the local animal protection authorities. Images of the hearts of six pregnant ewes were obtained by using a 1.5-T MR system (Philips Medical Systems, Best, Netherlands). The fetuses were chronically instrumented with a carotid catheter to measure the fetal heart frequency for the cardiac triggering. Pulse wave triggered, breath-hold cine-MRI with steady-state free precession (SSFP) was achieved in short axis, two-, four- and three-chamber views. The left ventricular volume and thus the function were measured from the short axis. The fetal heart frequencies ranged between 130 and 160 bpm. The mitral, tricuspid, aortic, and pulmonary valves could be clearly observed. The foramen ovale could be visualized. Myocardial contraction was shown in cine sequences. The average blood volume at the end systole was 3.4±0.2 ml (± SD). The average volume at end diastole was 5.2±0.2 ml; thus the stroke volumes of the left ventricle in the systole were between 1.7 and 1.9 ml with ejection fractions of 38.6% and 39%, respectively. The pulse wave triggered cardiac MRI of the fetal heart allowed evaluation of anatomical structures and functional information. This feasibility study demonstrates the applicability of MRI for future evaluation of fetuses with complex congenital heart defects, once a noninvasive method has been developed to perform fetal cardiac triggering. (orig.)

  4. Clinical evaluation of X-ray voxel Monte Carlo versus pencil beam-based dose calculation in stereotactic body radiotherapy of lung cancer under normal and deep inspiration breath hold.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Landoni, V; Borzì, G R; Strolin, S; Bruzzaniti, V; Soriani, A; D'Alessio, D; Ambesi, F; Di Grazia, A M; Strigari, L

    2015-06-01

    The purpose of this study is to evaluate the differences between dose distributions calculated with the pencil beam (PB) and X-ray voxel Monte Carlo (MC) algorithms for patients with lung cancer using intensity-modulated radiotherapy (IMRT) or HybridArc techniques. The 2 algorithms were compared in terms of dose-volume histograms, under normal and deep inspiration breath hold, and in terms of the tumor control probability (TCP). The dependence of the differences in tumor volume and location was investigated. Dosimetric validation was performed using Gafchromic EBT3 (International Specialty Products, ISP, Wayne, NJ). Forty-five Computed Tomography (CT) data sets were used for this study; 40 Gy at 8 Gy/fraction was prescribed with 5 noncoplanar 6-MV IMRT beams or 3 to 4 dynamic conformal arcs with 3 to 5 IMRT beams distributed per arc. The plans were first calculated with PB and then recalculated with MC. The difference between the mean tumor doses was approximately 10% ± 4%; these differences were even larger under deep inspiration breath hold. Differences between the mean tumor dose correlated with tumor volume and path length of the beams. The TCP values changed from 99.87% ± 0.24% to 96.78% ± 4.81% for both PB- and MC-calculated plans (P = .009). When a fraction of hypoxic cells was considered, the mean TCP values changed from 76.01% ± 5.83% to 34.78% ± 18.06% for the differently calculated plans (P < .0001). When the plans were renormalized to the same mean dose at the tumor, the mean TCP for oxic cells was 99.05% ± 1.59% and for hypoxic cells was 60.20% ± 9.53%. This study confirms that the MC algorithm adequately accounts for inhomogeneities. The inclusion of the MC in the process of IMRT optimization could represent a further step in the complex problem of determining the optimal treatment plan. PMID:25223324

  5. Manually respiratory-triggered single-shot fast spin-echo: a non-breath-hold T2-weighted method for liver lesion detection

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    To determine whether manual respiratory triggering of a T2-weighted single-shot fast spin-echo sequence (M-SSFSE) improves detection and characterization of liver lesions compared with conventional breath-held single-shot fast spin-echo (C-SSFSE) technique. M-SSFSE is performed by manually triggering a series of single-slice acquisitions through the liver at end of expiration. There were 171 hepatic lesions in 49 patients. Images were random zed and reviewed by 3 radiologists. Lesions were characterized as hemangiomas, cystic or solid. Dynamic gadolinium-enhanced sequences were used as the reference standard. Contrast-to-noise ratios (CNR) were calculated for all le ions that measured 1 cm or more. M-SSFSE was more sensitive than C-SSFSE in the detection of liver lesions (48%-58% v. 37%-46%, p < 0.001). There were no significant differences in the specificity of lesion detection be ween the 2 sequences. Artifacts were significantly less severe for M-SSFSE compared with C-SSFSE (p = 0.001). The CNR was significantly higher for all liver lesions on M-SSFSE compared with C-SSFSE (p < 0.001). M-SSFSE significantly improved hepatic lesion detection and, in particular, improved characterization of solid liver lesions and hemangiomas compared with C-S SSFSE imaging. (author)

  6. Manually respiratory-triggered single-shot fast spin-echo: a non-breath-hold T{sub 2}-weighted method for liver lesion detection

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    O' Riordan, E. [Univ. of Western Ontario, Dept. of Diagnostic Imaging and Nuclear Medicine, London Health Care Sciences, London, Ontario (Canada); Haider, M.A.; O' Malley, M.E.; Khalili, K.; Ibach, K.; Lockwood, G.A.; Bahadorani, B. [Univ. Health Network, Joint Department of Medical Imaging, Toronto, Ontario (Canada)]. E-mail: m.haider@utoronto.ca

    2003-12-01

    To determine whether manual respiratory triggering of a T{sub 2}-weighted single-shot fast spin-echo sequence (M-SSFSE) improves detection and characterization of liver lesions compared with conventional breath-held single-shot fast spin-echo (C-SSFSE) technique. M-SSFSE is performed by manually triggering a series of single-slice acquisitions through the liver at end of expiration. There were 171 hepatic lesions in 49 patients. Images were random zed and reviewed by 3 radiologists. Lesions were characterized as hemangiomas, cystic or solid. Dynamic gadolinium-enhanced sequences were used as the reference standard. Contrast-to-noise ratios (CNR) were calculated for all le ions that measured 1 cm or more. M-SSFSE was more sensitive than C-SSFSE in the detection of liver lesions (48%-58% v. 37%-46%, p < 0.001). There were no significant differences in the specificity of lesion detection be ween the 2 sequences. Artifacts were significantly less severe for M-SSFSE compared with C-SSFSE (p = 0.001). The CNR was significantly higher for all liver lesions on M-SSFSE compared with C-SSFSE (p < 0.001). M-SSFSE significantly improved hepatic lesion detection and, in particular, improved characterization of solid liver lesions and hemangiomas compared with C-S SSFSE imaging. (author)

  7. Dynamic Multiscale Boundary Conditions for 4D CT Images of Healthy and Emphysematous Rat

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jacob, Rick E.; Carson, James P.; Thomas, Mathew; Einstein, Daniel R.

    2013-06-14

    Changes in the shape of the lung during breathing determine the movement of airways and alveoli, and thus impact airflow dynamics. Modeling airflow dynamics in health and disease is a key goal for predictive multiscale models of respiration. Past efforts to model changes in lung shape during breathing have measured shape at multiple breath-holds. However, breath-holds do not capture hysteretic differences between inspiration and expiration resulting from the additional energy required for inspiration. Alternatively, imaging dynamically – without breath-holds – allows measurement of hysteretic differences. In this study, we acquire multiple micro-CT images per breath (4DCT) in live rats, and from these images we develop, for the first time, dynamic volume maps. These maps show changes in local volume across the entire lung throughout the breathing cycle and accurately predict the global pressure-volume (PV) hysteresis.

  8. TCD breath-holding test for evaluation of cerebrovascular reactivity in smoking men%TCD屏气试验评价男性吸烟者的脑血管反应性

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    王晖; 张勇

    2013-01-01

    Objective To apply transcranial doppler (TCD) combined with breath-holding test for evaluat ing cerebrovascular reactivity in healthy smoking men. Methods Thirty healthy smoking men were selected as the smoking group, and 40 healthy non-smoking men were selected as the control group. All the subjects received the ex amination before and after breath-holding test. The velocity of flow and Doppler spectra of bilateral MCA were moni tored by TCD. Then the change rates of mean flow velocity of MCA and pulsatiity index (PI) were calculated to ana lyze the cerebrovascular reactivity (CVR). Results Before breath-holding test, the peak velocity (Vp), end of diastol ic velocity (Vd) and mean flow velocity (Vm) of MCA of the smoking group was significantly slower than those of the control group (P<0.05). Pulsatility index (PI) and resistance index (RI) of the smoking group was significantly higher than those of the control group (P<0.05). After breath-holding test, the peak velocity, end of diastolic velocity and mean flow velocity of MCA of all the subjects all have varying degrees of increase (P<0.01), with the spectrum in creased slowly, pulsatility index (PI) and resistance index (RI) significantly decreased (P<0.01). The change rate of mean flow velocity of MCA in the smoking group [(25.60±3.53)%] was significantly lower than that in the control group (28.54±4.57)%], P<0.01. The change rate of PI in the smoking group [(19.02±4.20)%] was significantly lower than that of the control group [(21.10±4.63)%], P<0.01. Conclusion The cerebrovascular reactivity of healthy men with long-term smoking shows a decreasing trend.%目的 应用经颅多普勒超声(TCD)结合屏气试验评价健康吸烟者的脑血管反应性.方法 应用TCD检查70例健康男性(其中30例吸烟者为吸烟组,40例不吸烟者为对照组)静息状态下及屏气30s后双侧大脑中动脉(MCA)血流速度及频谱形态,计算MCA平均血流速度增加率及搏

  9. Functional imaging of the lung using a gaseous contrast agent: {sup 3}Helium-magnetic resonance imaging; Funktionelle Bildgebung der Lunge mit gasfoermigem Kontrastmittel: {sup 3}Helium-Magnetresonanztomographie

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gast, K.K.; Heussel, C.P. [Klinik mit Poliklinik fuer Radiologie, Klinikum der Johannes Gutenberg-Univ., Mainz (Germany); Schreiber, W.G. [AG Medizinische Physik, Klinik mit Poliklinik fuer Radiologie, Klinikum der Johannes Gutenberg-Univ., Mainz (Germany); Kauczor, H.U. [Deutsches Krebsforschungszentrum (DKFZ), Heidelberg (Germany)

    2005-05-01

    Current imaging methods of the lung concentrate on morphology as well as on the depiction of the pulmonary parenchyma. The need of an advanced and more subtle imaging technology compared to conventional radiography is met by computed topograhy as the method of choice. Nevertheless, computed tomography yields very limited functional information. This is to be derived from arterial blood gas analysis, spirometry and body plethysmography. These methods, however, lack the scope for regional allocation of any pathology. Magnetic resonance imaging of the lung has been advanced by the use of hyperpolarised {sup 3}Helium as an inhaled gaseous contrast agent. The inhalation of the gas provides functional data by distribution, diffusion and relaxation of its hyperpolarised state. Because anatomical landmarks of the lung can be visualised as well, functional information can be linked with regional information. Furthermore, the method provides high spatial and temporal resolution and lacks the potential side-effects of ionising radiation. Four different modalities have been established: 1. Spin density imaging studies the distribution of gas, normally after a single inhalation of contrast gas in inspiratory breath hold. 2. Dynamic cine imaging studies the distribution of gas with respect to regional time constants of pulmonary gas inflow. 3. Diffusion weighted imaging can exhibit the presence and severity of pulmonary airspace enlargement, as in pulmonary emphysema. 4. Oxygen sensitive imaging displays intrapulmonary oxygen partial pressure and its distribution. Currently, the method is limited by comparably high costs and limited availability. As there have been recent developments which might bring this modality closer to clinical use, this review article will comprise the methodology as well as the current state of the art and standard of knowledge of magnetic resonance imaging of the lung using hyperpolarised {sup 3}Helium. (orig.)

  10. La virtualidad educativa del cine y el programa la escuela al cine

    OpenAIRE

    Machuca Ahumada, Rumualdo Antonio

    2012-01-01

    El propósito de esta investigación es desarrollar y potenciar la posibilidad educativa del cine, teóricamente sostenida por la teoría de Jean Mitry y algunos aspectos educativos que ofrece el cine y su concreción en la práctica y la experiencia desarrollada en el sistema educativo chileno, a través del programa La Escuela al Cine y el desarrollo de los cines clubes escolares. En la tesis se defiende la necesidad de potenciar el cine como un fenómeno social, como una herramienta metodoló...

  11. Feasibility of free-breathing, GRAPPA-based, real-time cardiac cine assessment of left-ventricular function in cardiovascular patients at 3 T

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhu, Xiaomei, E-mail: xiaomeizhunanjing@163.com [Institute of Clinical Radiology, Ludwig-Maximilians-University Hospital, Marchioninistrasse 15, 81377 Munich (Germany); Department of Radiology, The First Affiliated Hospital of Nanjing Medical University, 300, Guangzhou Road, 210029 Nanjing, Jiangsu (China); Schwab, Felix, E-mail: flixschwab@googlemail.com [Institute of Clinical Radiology, Ludwig-Maximilians-University Hospital, Marchioninistrasse 15, 81377 Munich (Germany); Marcus, Roy, E-mail: Roy.Marcus@med.uni-muenchen.de [Institute of Clinical Radiology, Ludwig-Maximilians-University Hospital, Marchioninistrasse 15, 81377 Munich (Germany); Hetterich, Holger, E-mail: Holger.Hetterich@med.uni-muenchen.de [Institute of Clinical Radiology, Ludwig-Maximilians-University Hospital, Marchioninistrasse 15, 81377 Munich (Germany); Theisen, Daniel, E-mail: daniel.theisen@me.com [Institute of Clinical Radiology, Ludwig-Maximilians-University Hospital, Marchioninistrasse 15, 81377 Munich (Germany); Kramer, Harald, E-mail: Harald.Kramer@med.uni-muenchen.de [Institute of Clinical Radiology, Ludwig-Maximilians-University Hospital, Marchioninistrasse 15, 81377 Munich (Germany); Notohamiprodjo, Mike, E-mail: Mike.Notohamiprodjo@med.lmu.de [Department of Radiology, University of Tuebingen, Hoppe-Seyler-Str. 3, 72076 Tuebingen (Germany); Schlett, Christopher L., E-mail: Christopher.Schlett@med.uni-heidelberg.de [Department of Radiology, University of Heidelberg, Neuenheimer Feld 110, 69120 Heidelberg (Germany); Nikolaou, Konstantin, E-mail: Konstantin.Nikolaou@med.uni-tuebingen.de [Department of Radiology, University of Tuebingen, Hoppe-Seyler-Str. 3, 72076 Tuebingen (Germany); Reiser, Maximilian F., E-mail: Maximilian.Reiser@med.uni-muenchen.de [Institute of Clinical Radiology, Ludwig-Maximilians-University Hospital, Marchioninistrasse 15, 81377 Munich (Germany); and others

    2015-05-15

    Highlights: • Grappa-based real time cine cardiac MRI is feasible for assessment of left ventricular function. • Significant underestimation of systolic function, peak ejection and filling rates needs to be considered. • Heart rate is the only positive predictor of the deviation of obtained parameters. - Abstract: Objectives: To determine the feasibility of free-breathing, GRAPPA-based, real-time (RT) cine 3 T cardiac magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) with high acceleration factors for the assessment of left-ventricular function in a cohort of patients as compared to conventional segmented cine imaging. Materials and methods: In this prospective cohort study, subjects with various cardiac conditions underwent MRI involving two RT cine sequences (high resolution and low resolution) and standard segmented cine imaging. Standard qualitative and quantitative parameters of left-ventricular function were quantified. Results: Among 25 subjects, 24 were included in the analysis (mean age: 50.5 ± 21 years, 67% male, 25% with cardiomyopathy). RT cine derived quantitative parameters of volumes and left ventricular mass were strongly correlated with segmented cine imaging (intraclass correlation coefficient [ICC]: >0.72 for both RT cines) but correlation for peak ejection and filling rates were moderate to poor for both RT cines (ICC < 0.40). Similarly, RT cines significantly underestimated peak ejection and filling rates (>103.2 ± 178 ml/s). Among patient-related factors, heart rate was strongly predictive for deviation of measurements (p < 0.05). Conclusions: RT cine MRI at 3 T is feasible for qualitative and quantitative assessment of left ventricular function for low and high-resolution sequences but results in significant underestimation of systolic function, peak ejection and filling rates.

  12. Breath-hold technique in conventional APPA or intensity-modulated radiotherapy for Hodgkin's lymphoma. Comparison of ILROG IS-RT and the GHSG IF-RT

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The present study addresses the role of intensity-modulated radiotherapy (IMRT) in contrast to standard RT (APPA) for patients with Hodgkin's lymphoma (HL) with a focus on deep inspiration breath-hold (DIBH) technique and a comparison between the International Lymphoma Radiation Oncology Group (ILROG) Involved Site Radiotherapy (IS-RT) versus the German Hodgkin Study Group (GHSG) Involved Field Radiotherapy (IF-RT). APPA treatment and 2 IMRT plans were compared for 11 patients with HL. Furthermore, treatment with DIBH versus free breathing (FB) and two different treatment volumes, i.e. IF-RT versus IS-RT, were compared. IMRT was planned as a sliding-window technique with 5 and 7 beam angles. For each patient 12 different treatment plans were calculated (132 plans). Following organs at risk (OAR) were analysed: lung, heart, spinal cord, oesophagus, female breast and skin. Comparisons of the different values with regard to dose-volume histograms (DVH), conformity and homogeneity indices were made. IS-RT reduces treatment volumes. With respect to the planning target volume (PTV), IMRT achieves better conformity but the same homogeneity. Regarding the Dmean for the lung, IMRT shows increased doses, while RT in DIBH reduces doses. The IMRT shows improved values for Dmax concerning the spinal cord, whereas the APPA shows an improved Dmean of the lung and the female breast. IS-RT reduces treatment volumes. Intensity-modulated radiotherapy shows advantages in the conformity. Treatment in DIBH also reduces the dose applied to the lungs and the heart. (orig.)

  13. Melodías de cine

    OpenAIRE

    Yébenes Cortés, María del Pilar

    2002-01-01

    El artículo analiza la definición del género musical y establece un recorrido por su historia, observando la evolución del cine musical desde la llegada del cine sonoro, hasta las representaciones contemporáneas. Sin índice de impacto (2002) UEM

  14. SPIO-enhanced MR imaging for HCC detection in cirrhotic patient : comparison of various techniques for optimal sequence selection

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    To compare the efficacy of breathhold and non-breathhold sequences in the detection of hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) in cirrhotic patients using superparamagnetic iron oxide (SPIO)-enhanced MR imaging, and to determine the optimal sequence combination. By means of unenhanced and iron-oxide-enhanced MRI, 29 patients with 49 nodular HCCs were evaluated for the presence of HCC nodules. Twenty-one were male and eight were female, and their ages ranged from 38 to 71 (mean, 56) years. Eight different MR sequences were used, including four non-breath-hold sequences and four breath-hold, and images were obtained before and after the administration of SPIO particles. Non-breath-hold sequences included T2-, proton density-weighted SE, and TSE imaging, while breath-hold sequences comprised T1-weighted fast low-angle shot (T1w FLASH), half-Fourier acquisition single shot turbo spine echo (HASTE), T2-weighted fast imaging with steady-state free precession (T2*wFISP) and T2-weighted breath-hold TSE (T2wBHTSE). Image analysis involved both quantitative and qualitative analysis. The quantitative parameters calculated were signal-to noise (S/N) ratios for livers and tumors, contrast to noise (C/N) ratios for tumors seen on precontrast and postcontrast images, and percentage of signal intensity loss (PSIL) after SPIO injection. Images were analysed qualitatively in terms of image artifacts and lesion conspicuity, and prior to calculating sensitivity, the number of lesions detected using various pulse sequences were counted. SPIO had a marked effect on liver S/N ratio but a minimal effect on tumor S/N ratio. PSIL was best in T2*wFISP images, while T2wSE images showed the second-best results (p less than 0.05). Tumor-to-liver C/N values were also highest with T2*wFISP, while T2wTSE and HASTE images were next. Qualitative study showed that non-breath hold images and FISP were better than breath hold images in terms of lesion conspicuity. The latter, however, were much better than non-breath-hold

  15. SPIO-enhanced MR imaging for HCC detection in cirrhotic patient : comparison of various techniques for optimal sequence selection

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, In Hwan; Lee, Jeong Min; Kwak, Hyo Sung; Kim, Chong Soo; Yu, Hee Chul [Chonbuk National University Hospital, Chonju (Korea, Republic of); Kim, Tae Kon; Lee Soo Tiek [Medical School, Chonbuk National University, Chonju (Korea, Republic of)

    2000-05-01

    To compare the efficacy of breathhold and non-breathhold sequences in the detection of hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) in cirrhotic patients using superparamagnetic iron oxide (SPIO)-enhanced MR imaging, and to determine the optimal sequence combination. By means of unenhanced and iron-oxide-enhanced MRI, 29 patients with 49 nodular HCCs were evaluated for the presence of HCC nodules. Twenty-one were male and eight were female, and their ages ranged from 38 to 71 (mean, 56) years. Eight different MR sequences were used, including four non-breath-hold sequences and four breath-hold, and images were obtained before and after the administration of SPIO particles. Non-breath-hold sequences included T2-, proton density-weighted SE, and TSE imaging, while breath-hold sequences comprised T1-weighted fast low-angle shot (T1w FLASH), half-Fourier acquisition single shot turbo spine echo (HASTE), T2-weighted fast imaging with steady-state free precession (T2{sup *}wFISP) and T2-weighted breath-hold TSE (T2wBHTSE). Image analysis involved both quantitative and qualitative analysis. The quantitative parameters calculated were signal-to noise (S/N) ratios for livers and tumors, contrast to noise (C/N) ratios for tumors seen on precontrast and postcontrast images, and percentage of signal intensity loss (PSIL) after SPIO injection. Images were analysed qualitatively in terms of image artifacts and lesion conspicuity, and prior to calculating sensitivity, the number of lesions detected using various pulse sequences were counted. SPIO had a marked effect on liver S/N ratio but a minimal effect on tumor S/N ratio. PSIL was best in T2{sup *}wFISP images, while T2wSE images showed the second-best results (p less than 0.05). Tumor-to-liver C/N values were also highest with T2{sup *}wFISP, while T2wTSE and HASTE images were next. Qualitative study showed that non-breath hold images and FISP were better than breath hold images in terms of lesion conspicuity. The latter, however, were

  16. Lo diferente : miradas de cine

    OpenAIRE

    Correa García, Ramón Ignacio; Aguaded Gómez, José Ignacio

    2005-01-01

    La presencia de la interculturalidad en los medios de comunicación, y específicamente en el cine, es uno de los principales motores de creación de estados de opinión y conciencia social en la sociedad actual. Los otros y nosotros en las pantallas son reflejo, o más bien espejos, más o menos distorsionados, de una realidad compleja, conformadora de pautas y modelos de vida. En este trabajo se presenta una aproximación al mundo del otro frente al nosotros, a partir de miradas ya canónicas ya di...

  17. Compressed sensing reconstruction of cardiac cine MRI using golden angle spiral trajectories

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tolouee, Azar; Alirezaie, Javad; Babyn, Paul

    2015-11-01

    In dynamic cardiac cine Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI), the spatiotemporal resolution is limited by the low imaging speed. Compressed sensing (CS) theory has been applied to improve the imaging speed and thus the spatiotemporal resolution. The purpose of this paper is to improve CS reconstruction of under sampled data by exploiting spatiotemporal sparsity and efficient spiral trajectories. We extend k-t sparse algorithm to spiral trajectories to achieve high spatio temporal resolutions in cardiac cine imaging. We have exploited spatiotemporal sparsity of cardiac cine MRI by applying a 2D + time wavelet-Fourier transform. For efficient coverage of k-space, we have used a modified version of multi shot (interleaved) spirals trajectories. In order to reduce incoherent aliasing artifact, we use different random undersampling pattern for each temporal frame. Finally, we have used nonuniform fast Fourier transform (NUFFT) algorithm to reconstruct the image from the non-uniformly acquired samples. The proposed approach was tested in simulated and cardiac cine MRI data. Results show that higher acceleration factors with improved image quality can be obtained with the proposed approach in comparison to the existing state-of-the-art method. The flexibility of the introduced method should allow it to be used not only for the challenging case of cardiac imaging, but also for other patient motion where the patient moves or breathes during acquisition.

  18. Assessment of the variations in fat content in normal liver using a fast MR imaging method in comparison with results obtained by spectroscopic imaging

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Irwan, Roy; Edens, Mireille A.; Sijens, Paul E.

    2008-01-01

    A recently published Dixon-based MRI method for quantifying liver fat content using dual-echo breath-hold gradient echo imaging was validated by phantom experiments and compared with results of biopsy in two patients (Radiology 2005;237:1048-1055). We applied this method in ten healthy volunteers an

  19. Accelerated high-frame-rate mouse heart cine-MRI using compressed sensing reconstruction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Motaal, Abdallah G; Coolen, Bram F; Abdurrachim, Desiree; Castro, Rui M; Prompers, Jeanine J; Florack, Luc M J; Nicolay, Klaas; Strijkers, Gustav J

    2013-04-01

    We introduce a new protocol to obtain very high-frame-rate cinematographic (Cine) MRI movies of the beating mouse heart within a reasonable measurement time. The method is based on a self-gated accelerated fast low-angle shot (FLASH) acquisition and compressed sensing reconstruction. Key to our approach is that we exploit the stochastic nature of the retrospective triggering acquisition scheme to produce an undersampled and random k-t space filling that allows for compressed sensing reconstruction and acceleration. As a standard, a self-gated FLASH sequence with a total acquisition time of 10 min was used to produce single-slice Cine movies of seven mouse hearts with 90 frames per cardiac cycle. Two times (2×) and three times (3×) k-t space undersampled Cine movies were produced from 2.5- and 1.5-min data acquisitions, respectively. The accelerated 90-frame Cine movies of mouse hearts were successfully reconstructed with a compressed sensing algorithm. The movies had high image quality and the undersampling artifacts were effectively removed. Left ventricular functional parameters, i.e. end-systolic and end-diastolic lumen surface areas and early-to-late filling rate ratio as a parameter to evaluate diastolic function, derived from the standard and accelerated Cine movies, were nearly identical.

  20. Motion adaptive patch-based low-rank approach for compressed sensing cardiac cine MRI.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yoon, Huisu; Kim, Kyung Sang; Kim, Daniel; Bresler, Yoram; Ye, Jong Chul

    2014-11-01

    One of the technical challenges in cine magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) is to reduce the acquisition time to enable the high spatio-temporal resolution imaging of a cardiac volume within a short scan time. Recently, compressed sensing approaches have been investigated extensively for highly accelerated cine MRI by exploiting transform domain sparsity using linear transforms such as wavelets, and Fourier. However, in cardiac cine imaging, the cardiac volume changes significantly between frames, and there often exist abrupt pixel value changes along time. In order to effectively sparsify such temporal variations, it is necessary to exploit temporal redundancy along motion trajectories. This paper introduces a novel patch-based reconstruction method to exploit geometric similarities in the spatio-temporal domain. In particular, we use a low rank constraint for similar patches along motion, based on the observation that rank structures are relatively less sensitive to global intensity changes, but make it easier to capture moving edges. A Nash equilibrium formulation with relaxation is employed to guarantee convergence. Experimental results show that the proposed algorithm clearly reconstructs important anatomical structures in cardiac cine image and provides improved image quality compared to existing state-of-the-art methods such as k-t FOCUSS, k-t SLR, and MASTeR.

  1. Breath-hold technique in conventional APPA or intensity-modulated radiotherapy for Hodgkin's lymphoma. Comparison of ILROG IS-RT and the GHSG IF-RT

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kriz, Jan; Spickermann, Max; Lehrich, Philipp; Reinartz, Gabriele; Eich, Hans; Haverkamp, Uwe [University of Muenster, Department of Radiation Oncology, Muenster (Germany); Schmidberger, Heinz [University Mainz, Department of Radiation Oncology, Mainz (Germany)

    2015-09-15

    The present study addresses the role of intensity-modulated radiotherapy (IMRT) in contrast to standard RT (APPA) for patients with Hodgkin's lymphoma (HL) with a focus on deep inspiration breath-hold (DIBH) technique and a comparison between the International Lymphoma Radiation Oncology Group (ILROG) Involved Site Radiotherapy (IS-RT) versus the German Hodgkin Study Group (GHSG) Involved Field Radiotherapy (IF-RT). APPA treatment and 2 IMRT plans were compared for 11 patients with HL. Furthermore, treatment with DIBH versus free breathing (FB) and two different treatment volumes, i.e. IF-RT versus IS-RT, were compared. IMRT was planned as a sliding-window technique with 5 and 7 beam angles. For each patient 12 different treatment plans were calculated (132 plans). Following organs at risk (OAR) were analysed: lung, heart, spinal cord, oesophagus, female breast and skin. Comparisons of the different values with regard to dose-volume histograms (DVH), conformity and homogeneity indices were made. IS-RT reduces treatment volumes. With respect to the planning target volume (PTV), IMRT achieves better conformity but the same homogeneity. Regarding the D{sub mean} for the lung, IMRT shows increased doses, while RT in DIBH reduces doses. The IMRT shows improved values for D{sub max} concerning the spinal cord, whereas the APPA shows an improved D{sub mean} of the lung and the female breast. IS-RT reduces treatment volumes. Intensity-modulated radiotherapy shows advantages in the conformity. Treatment in DIBH also reduces the dose applied to the lungs and the heart. (orig.) [German] Ziel dieser Auswertung ist es, die konventionelle APPA-Feldanordnung mit der Intensitaetsmodulierten Radiotherapie (IMRT) bei Patienten mit Hodgkin-Lymphom (HL) zu vergleichen. Ein besonderer Fokus liegt hierbei auf der Bestrahlung in tiefer Inspiration und Atemanhaltetechnik (DIBH). Des Weiteren wurde die ''Involved-site''-Radiotherapie (IS-RT) der International

  2. Cine Computed Tomography Angiography Evaluation of Blood Flow for Full Face Transplant Surgical Planning

    OpenAIRE

    Sisk, Geoffroy C; Kanako K Kumamaru; Schultz, Kurt; Bueno, Ericka M.; Diaz-Siso, J. Rodrigo; GEORGE, Elizabeth; Redjaee, Marta M.; Mitsouras, Dimitrios; Michael L Steigner; Pomahac, Bohdan; Rybicki, Frank J.

    2012-01-01

    Objective: Screening for full face transplantation candidates includes computed tomographic vascular mapping of the external carotid distribution for potential arterial and venous anastomoses. The purpose of this study is to illustrate the benefits and drawbacks of cine computed tomographic imaging for preoperative vascular mapping compared with best arterial and venous phase static images. Methods: Two image data sets were retrospectively created and compared for diagnostic findings. The fir...

  3. Geriatric Chest Imaging: When and How to Image the Elderly Lung, Age-Related Changes, and Common Pathologies

    OpenAIRE

    J. Gossner; Nau, R.

    2013-01-01

    Even in a global perspective, societies are getting older. We think that diagnostic lung imaging of older patients requires special knowledge. Imaging strategies have to be adjusted to the needs of frail patients, for example, immobility, impossibility for long breath holds, renal insufficiency, or poor peripheral venous access. Beside conventional radiography, modern multislice computed tomography is the method of choice in lung imaging. It is especially important to separate the process of ...

  4. TH-A-BRF-04: Intra-Fraction Motion Characterization for Early Stage Rectal Cancer Using Cine-MRI

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kleijnen, J; Asselen, B; Burbach, M; Intven, M; Reerink, O; Philippens, M; Lagendijk, J; Raaymakers, B [University Medical Center Utrecht, Utrecht (Netherlands)

    2014-06-15

    Purpose: To investigate the intra-fraction motion in patients with early stage rectal cancer using cine-MRI. Methods: Sixteen patient diagnosed with early stage rectal cancer underwent 1.5 T MR imaging prior to each treatment fraction of their short course radiotherapy (n=76). During each scan session, three 2D sagittal cine-MRIs were performed: at the beginning (Start), after 9:30 minutes (Mid), and after 18 minutes (End). Each cine-MRI has a duration of one minute at 2Hz temporal resolution, resulting in a total of 3:48 hours of cine-MRI. Additionally, standard T2-weighted (T2w) imaging was performed. Clinical target volume (CTV) an tumor (GTV) were delineated on the T2w scan and transferred to the first time-point of each cine-MRI scan. Within each cine-MRI, the first frame was registered to the remaining frames of the scan, using a non-rigid B-spline registration. To investigate potential drifts, a similar registration was performed between the first frame of the Start and End scans.To evaluate the motion, the distances by which the edge pixels of the delineations move in anterior-posterior (AP) and cranial-caudal (CC) direction, were determined using the deformation field of the registrations. The distance which incorporated 95% of these edge pixels (dist95%) was determined within each cine-MRI, and between Start- End scans, respectively. Results: Within a cine-MRI, we observed an average dist95% for the CTV of 1.3mm/1.5mm (SD=0.7mm/0.6mm) and for the GTV of 1.2mm/1.5mm (SD=0.8mm/0.9mm), in respectively AP/CC. For the CTV motion between the Start and End scan, an average dist95% of 5.5mm/5.3mm (SD=3.1mm/2.5mm) was found, in respectively AP/CC. For the GTV motion, an average dist95% of 3.6mm/3.9mm (SD=2.2mm/2.5mm) was found in AP/CC, respectively. Conclusion: Although intra-fraction motion within a one minute cine-MRI is limited, substantial intra-fraction motion was observed within the 18 minute time period between the Start and End cine-MRI.

  5. Motion prediction in MRI-guided radiotherapy based on interleaved orthogonal cine-MRI

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seregni, M.; Paganelli, C.; Lee, D.; Greer, P. B.; Baroni, G.; Keall, P. J.; Riboldi, M.

    2016-01-01

    In-room cine-MRI guidance can provide non-invasive target localization during radiotherapy treatment. However, in order to cope with finite imaging frequency and system latencies between target localization and dose delivery, tumour motion prediction is required. This work proposes a framework for motion prediction dedicated to cine-MRI guidance, aiming at quantifying the geometric uncertainties introduced by this process for both tumour tracking and beam gating. The tumour position, identified through scale invariant features detected in cine-MRI slices, is estimated at high-frequency (25 Hz) using three independent predictors, one for each anatomical coordinate. Linear extrapolation, auto-regressive and support vector machine algorithms are compared against systems that use no prediction or surrogate-based motion estimation. Geometric uncertainties are reported as a function of image acquisition period and system latency. Average results show that the tracking error RMS can be decreased down to a [0.2; 1.2] mm range, for acquisition periods between 250 and 750 ms and system latencies between 50 and 300 ms. Except for the linear extrapolator, tracking and gating prediction errors were, on average, lower than those measured for surrogate-based motion estimation. This finding suggests that cine-MRI guidance, combined with appropriate prediction algorithms, could relevantly decrease geometric uncertainties in motion compensated treatments.

  6. Significant reductions in heart and lung doses using deep inspiration breath hold with active breathing control and intensity-modulated radiation therapy for patients treated with locoregional breast irradiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Purpose: To evaluate the heart and lung sparing effects of moderate deep inspiration breath hold (mDIBH) achieved using an active breathing control (ABC) device, compared with free breathing (FB) during treatment with deep tangents fields (DT) for locoregional (LR) irradiation of breast cancer patients, including the internal mammary (IM) nodes (IMNs). To compare the DT-mDIBH technique to other standard techniques and to evaluate the dosimetric effect of intensity-modulated radiation therapy (IMRT). Methods and Materials: Fifteen patients (9 left-sided and 6 right-sided lesions) with Stages 0-III breast cancer underwent standard FB and ABC computed tomographic (CT) scans in the treatment position. A dosimetric planning study was performed. In FB, the 9 left-sided patients were planned with a 5-field technique where electron fields covering the IM region were matched to shallow tangents using wedges (South West Oncology Group [SWOG] protocol S9927 technique A). This method was compared with a 3-field DT technique covering the breast and the IMNs (SWOG S9927 technique B). Compensation with IMRT was then compared with wedges for each technique. For the 15 total patients, dosimetric planning using DT with IMRT was then reoptimized on the mDIBH CT data set for comparison. Dose-volume histograms for the clinical target volume (CTV) (including the IMNs), planning target volume (PTV), ipsilateral and contralateral breast, and organs at risk (OAR) were analyzed. In addition, normal tissue complication probabilities (NTCP) for lung and heart, mean lung doses, and the number of monitor units (MUs) for a 1.8 Gy fraction were compared. Results: For the 9 left-sided patients, the mean percentage of heart receiving more than 30 Gy (heart V30) was lower with the 5-field wedged technique than with the DT wedged technique (6.8% and 19.1%, respectively, p<0.004). For the DT technique, the replacement of wedges with IMRT slightly diminished the mean heart V30 to 16.3% (p<0.51). The

  7. Motion-Corrected Free-Breathing Delayed Enhancement Imaging of Myocardial Infarction

    OpenAIRE

    Kellman, Peter; Larson, Andrew C.; Hsu, Li-Yueh; Chung, Yiu-Cho; Simonetti, Orlando P.; McVeigh, Elliot R.; Arai, Andrew E

    2005-01-01

    Following administration of Gd-DTPA, infarcted myocardium exhibits delayed enhancement and can be imaged using an inversion-recovery sequence. A conventional segmented acquisition requires a number of breath-holds to image the heart. Single-shot phase-sensitive inversion-recovery (PSIR) true-FISP may be combined with parallel imaging using SENSE to achieve high spatial resolution. SNR may be improved by averaging multiple motion-corrected images acquired during free breathing. PSIR techniques...

  8. Moto-cine en Madrid – Barajas

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chueca Goitia, Fernando

    1959-05-01

    Full Text Available Madrid, después de Roma, ha sido la segunda capital de Europa que ha construido y puesto en funcionamiento un motocine, es decir, un cine para automóviles, con arreglo a los últimos adelantos que este tipo de espectáculos ha llegado a alcanzar.

  9. Días de Cine (Dziga Vertov)

    OpenAIRE

    Sánchez-Biosca, Vicente

    2014-01-01

    Intervención de V. Sánchez-Biosca en el programa 'Días de Cine' en torno a la figura del cineasta Dziga Vertov: su vinculación vanguardista, sus experimentos con el montaje y el sonido y su relación con el stalinismo.

  10. Tracheomalacia in adults with cystic fibrosis: determination of prevalence and severity with dynamic cine CT.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    McDermott, Shaunagh

    2012-02-01

    PURPOSE: To determine the prevalence and severity of tracheomalacia in adults with cystic fibrosis (CF) by using dynamic cine multidetector computed tomography (CT) and to correlate these findings with pulmonary function test (PFT) results and the severity of parenchymal lung disease. MATERIALS AND METHODS: In this institutional review board-approved HIPAA-compliant study, 40 patients with CF (22 men, 18 women; mean age, 28 years +\\/- 8 [standard deviation]; age range, 18-54 years) prospectively underwent PFTs, standard thin-section CT, and two dynamic cine multidetector CT acquisitions. Ten control subjects underwent dynamic cine multidetector CT. After standard thin-section CT was completed, dynamic cine multidetector CT was performed during a forced expiratory maneuver and during coughing. Dynamic cine multidetector CT images in nine patients were excluded. Maximal inspiratory, dynamic expiratory, and end-expiratory tracheal luminal areas were compared (Student t test) and correlated (Spearman rank) with PFT results and severity of parenchymal lung disease. RESULTS: Mean predicted forced expiratory volume in 1 second (FEV(1)) was 70.6% +\\/- 20.7, and mean Bhalla CT score was 41.8% +\\/- 13.6. In patients with CF, dynamic cine mean tracheal cross-sectional area reduction was 51.7% +\\/- 18.4 (range, 9%-89%) for forced expiratory maneuvers and 68.8% +\\/- 11.7 (range, 18%-88%) for coughing (P = .001). Tracheomalacia was demonstrated in 24 (69%) patients and no control subjects during forced expiratory maneuvers (P = .001) and in 10 (29%) patients and one (10%) control subject during coughing. For end-expiration images, mean tracheal luminal reduction was 16.1% +\\/- 14.0% (range, 0.0%-53.0%), with one patient demonstrating tracheal luminal reduction of more than 50%. There was no correlation between tracheal cross-sectional luminal reduction and either predicted FEV(1) or CT Bhalla score. CONCLUSION: Tracheomalacia depicted at dynamic cine multidetector CT is a

  11. Cine y estudios de género: Imagen, representación e ideología. Notas para un abordaje crítico Cinema and gender studies: Image, representation and ideology. Notes for a critical approach

    OpenAIRE

    Paula Laguarda

    2006-01-01

    El cine, en tanto productor de imágenes, representaciones, significados e ideologías, aparece como un terreno óptimo para el rastreo del modo en que se han construido las subjetividades, desde la popularización de esta técnica en las primeras décadas del siglo XX hasta la actualidad. En este sentido ofrece a los estudios de género una fuente de primer orden para el análisis de las representaciones socialmente dominantes acerca de lo femenino y lo masculino y las características asignadas a ca...

  12. Magnetic resonance imaging in children: common problems and possible solutions for lung and airways imaging

    OpenAIRE

    Ciet, Pierluigi; Tiddens, Harm A. W. M.; Wielopolski, Piotr A.; Wild, Jim M.; Lee, Edward Y.; Morana, Giovanni; Lequin, Maarten H.

    2015-01-01

    Pediatric chest MRI is challenging. High-resolution scans of the lungs and airways are compromised by long imaging times, low lung proton density and motion. Low signal is a problem of normal lung. Lung abnormalities commonly cause increased signal intenstities. Among the most important factors for a successful MRI is patient cooperation, so the long acquisition times make patient preparation crucial. Children usually have problems with long breath-holds and with the concept of quiet breathin...

  13. Espectadores en 3D: ¿El futuro del cine?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Díaz Gandasegui, Vicente

    2011-04-01

    Full Text Available This paper analyses the reintroduction of 3D to the big screen, this time, due to the digital technology and the polarization of the image, the focal depth has become more credible and the interface, in spite of still being present, is more comfortable and effective. The spectacular images attract the spectator to the cinema and captivate them with technological visual development. Simultaneously, 3D is a useful tool to solve contemporary cinema problems with piracy and competition with other media. However, the big question that 3D has to solve is whether the new technology will join the large list of fiascos of the 70’s and 80’s, trying to transform the way of seeing the image, or if it will be a step closer to virtual reality and a cinema of immersion and total interaction.

    El presente artículo analiza la (reintroducción del 3D en nuestras pantallas de cine. Esta vez, gracias a la tecnología digital y a la polarización de la imagen, la profundidad de campo se hace mas creíble y la interfaz, a pesar de seguir presente, ha ganado en comodidad y efectividad. La espectacularidad de las imágenes es el mayor reclamo que hoy presenta el 3D para atraer al espectador a las salas de cine y fascinarle con el desarrollo tecnológico. Al mismo tiempo, el 3D es una herramienta útil para solucionar los problemas surgidos en la industria cinematográfica a raíz de la evolución de la pirateria y la cada vez más compleja competición con otros medios. La gran duda que plantea el 3D es si se sumará a la larga lista de fracasos de los años 70 y 80 por intentar transformar la forma de ver la imagen o supondrá un paso adelante en la pretensión por acercarnos a la realidad virtual y un cine de inmersión e interacción total.

  14. Requirements and Solutions for Archiving Scientific Data at CINES

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coutin, Stephane

    Historically an high-performance computing datacenter, the “Centre Informatique National de l’Enseignement Supérieur” (CINES) has also a mission of long term digital preservation. By coupling those two areas, it became obvious that CINES had to understand and take into account the requirements of scientific communities regarding their data life cycle, and more specifically their archiving requirements. We will present those requirements and describe the platforms CINES proposes for each service class.

  15. 磁共振电影相位对比法监测脑外伤后脑血流动力学改变的研究%Changes of cranial hemodynamic after trauma by phase-contrast cine MR imaging

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    陈懿; 王文浩; 欧阳林; 岳翠; 肖玉辉; 何平; 郏潜新

    2011-01-01

    Objective To evaluate the application of phase-contrast (PC) cine MR imaging in monitoring the changes of cranial hemodynamics after trauma.Methods The 2D PC cine MR imaging was performed on 40 patients with cerebral trauma,admitted to our hospital from September 2010 to December 2010 and considered to have changes of cranial hcmodynamics,and 40 healthy volunteers; and the mean flow velocity,peak systolic velocity and time-averaged mean velocity of cranial segment in the jugular vein,carotid artery and vertebral artery were compared.Results The bilateral mean flow velocity in the jugular vein of patient group was significantly higher than that in the healthy volunteers (P<0.05); and no significant differences were noted in the peak systolic velocity and time-averaged mean velocity of eranial segment in the jugular vein between the 2 groups (P>0.05).And no obvious differences in the mean flow velocity,peak systolic velocity and time-averaged mean velocity of cranial segment in the carotid artery and vertebral artery were noted between the 2 groups (P>0.05).Conclusion The 2D PC cine MR imaging can quantitatively monitor the changes of cranial hemodynamic after trauma in prophase,providing evidence for clinical treatment.%目的 探讨磁共振电影相位对比法在诊断与监测脑外伤后血流动力学改变中的价值. 方法 选取解放军第一七五医院放射科自2010年9月至2010年12月行磁共振二维电影相位对比法成像(MRI 2D-PC Cine)监测的颅脑外伤患者40例,同期40例健康志愿者作为对照组,分析比较外伤组与对照组之间双侧颈内静脉、颈内动脉、椎动脉出颅段平均流速、峰值流速及平均流量速的差异. 结果 外伤组患者双侧颈内静脉平均流速均高于对照组,差异有统计学意义(P<0.05),而2组间峰值流速、平均流量比较差异均无统计学意义(P>0.05);2组之间双侧颈内动脉、椎动脉平均流速、峰值流速及平均流量比较

  16. Alfonso Reyes y el cine del porvenir

    OpenAIRE

    Betina Keizman

    2015-01-01

    Este artículo se propone situar la reflexión de Alfonso Reyes sobre el cine en el marco de las recepciones del primer cine, considerando también cómo esta reflexión se articula en relación con el pensamiento crítico del escritor mexicano. En particular, se analiza el modo en que, por vía de la especulación, Reyes ensaya posibles redefiniciones para una nueva distribución de lo sensible y de las artes, de los valores cognitivos y expresivos de la luz y de los vínculos arte-ciencia. Lo que se l...

  17. Alfonso Reyes y el cine del porvenir

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Betina Keizman

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available Este artículo se propone situar la reflexión de Alfonso Reyes sobre el cine en el marco de las recepciones del primer cine, considerando también cómo esta reflexión se articula en relación con el pensamiento crítico del escritor mexicano. En particular, se analiza el modo en que, por vía de la especulación, Reyes ensaya posibles redefiniciones para una nueva distribución de lo sensible y de las artes, de los valores cognitivos y expresivos de la luz y de los vínculos arte-ciencia. Lo que se lee en Reyes es un esfuerzo por pensar nuevas formas de inventiva que se desprenden (o podrían desprenderse del arte cinematográfico.

  18. Friday Programme for CineGlobe 2015

    CERN Multimedia

    Marcelloni De Oliveira, Claudia

    2015-01-01

    Workshops, apero with filmmakers and short-films inspired by science were the menu of the festival through the day. At night the CineGlobe DOME shown with the 360 degree projections shot-films; among them the avant-premiere of "Phantom of the Universe" - a movie that explains Dark Matter, directed by Joao Pequenao. Meanwhile at the Globe, the audience could enjoy the projections of the sequence of " The Invisible Photograph" .

  19. SU-E-J-192: Verification of 4D-MRI Internal Target Volume Using Cine MRI

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lafata, K; Czito, B; Palta, M; Bashir, M; Yin, F; Cai, J [Duke University Medical Center, Durham, NC (United States)

    2014-06-01

    Purpose: To investigate the accuracy of 4D-MRI in determining the Internal Target Volume (ITV) used in radiation oncology treatment planning of liver cancers. Cine MRI is used as the standard baseline in establishing the feasibility and accuracy of 4D-MRI tumor motion within the liver. Methods: IRB approval was obtained for this retrospective study. Analysis was performed on MR images from four patients receiving external beam radiation therapy for liver cancer at our institution. Eligible patients received both Cine and 4D-MRI scans before treatment. Cine images were acquired sagittally in real time at a slice bisecting the tumor, while 4D images were acquired volumetrically. Cine MR DICOM headers were manipulated such that each respiratory frame was assigned a unique slice location. This approach permitted the treatment planning system (Eclipse, Varian Medical Systems) to recognize a complete respiratory cycle as a “volume”, where the gross tumor was contoured temporally. Software was developed to calculate the union of all frame contours in the structure set, resulting in the corresponding plane of the ITV projecting through the middle of the tumor, defined as the Internal Target Area (ITA). This was repeated for 4D-MRI, at the corresponding slice location, allowing a direct comparison of ITAs obtained from each modality. Results: Four patients have been analyzed. ITAs contoured from 4D-MRI correlate with contours from Cine MRI. The mean error of 4D values relative to Cine values is 7.67 +/− 2.55 %. No single ITA contoured from 4D-MRI demonstrated more than 10.5 % error compared to its Cine MRI counterpart. Conclusion: Motion management is a significant aspect of treatment planning within dynamic environments such as the liver, where diaphragmatic and cardiac activity influence plan accuracy. This small pilot study suggests that 4D-MRI based ITA measurements agree with Cine MRI based measurements, an important step towards clinical implementation. NIH 1R21

  20. Individualized image guided iso-NTCP based liver cancer SBRT

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dawson, Laura A.; Eccles, Cynthia; Craig, Tim [Princess Margaret Hospital, Toronto (Canada). Radiation Medicine Program

    2006-09-15

    A highly individualized stereotactic body radiotherapy (SBRT) strategy was developed to allow a wide spectrum of patients with liver cancer to be treated. This phase I/II study encompasses individualization of immobilization, radiation planning, PTV margin determination, image guidance strategy and prescription dose. Active breathing control breath hold is used to immobilize the liver when feasible. Image guidance strategies include orthogonal MV images and orthogonal kV fluoroscopy using the diaphragm for a surrogate for the liver, and kV cone beam CT using the liver or tumour for guidance. The prescription dose is individualized to maintain the same estimated risk of radiation-induced liver disease (RILD), based on a normal tissue complication probability (NTCP) model, with a maximum permitted dose of 60 Gy in 6 fractions. Since August 2003, 79 patients with hepatocellular carcinoma (33), intrahepatic cholangiocarcinoma (12) and liver metastases (34) were treated. The median tumour volume was 293 cm{sup 3} (2.9-3088 cm{sup 3}). The median prescribed dose was 36.6 Gy (24.0 Gy-57.0 Gy) in 6 fractions. The median effective liver volume irradiated was 45% (9-80%). Sixty percent of patients were treated with breath hold to immobilize their liver. Intra-fraction reproducibility (s) of the liver with repeat breath holds was excellent (1.5?mm); however inter-fraction reproducibility (s) was worse (3.4 mm). Image guidance reduced the residual systematic and random setup errors significantly.

  1. Stable Small Animal Ventilation for Dynamic Lung Imaging to Support Computational Fluid Dynamics Models

    OpenAIRE

    Jacob, Richard E.; Lamm, Wayne J.

    2011-01-01

    Pulmonary computational fluid dynamics models require that three-dimensional images be acquired over multiple points in the dynamic breathing cycle without breath holds or changes in ventilatory mechanics. With small animals, these requirements can result in long imaging times (∼90 minutes), over which lung mechanics, such as compliance, may gradually change if not carefully monitored and controlled. These changes, caused by derecruitment of parenchymal tissue, are manifested as an upward dri...

  2. Breath-holding Test by Transcranial Doppler in Mild Cognitive Impairment with Qi-deficiency and Blood-stasis Syndrome%气虚血瘀型轻度认知障碍患者脑血管反应性与认知功能的关系研究

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    王晔; 张如青

    2013-01-01

    Objective To observe the relationship between cognitive function and cerebrovascular reactivity (CVR) by transcranial Doppler in mild cognitive impairment(MCI) patients with qi - deficiency and blood - stasis syndrome. Methods Breath - holding test were studied with transcranial Doppler ultrasonography in 75 patients. CVR to apnea was calculated by means of the breath - holding index (BHD in the middle cerebral arteries. Cognitive function and parameter of cerebral hemodynamics were observed under different CVR status, and the effect of vascular risk factor on BHI was analyzed. Results There was correlation between mini - mental state examination (MMSE) with latency of P300 in visual and auditory event - related potentials (ERP) among those patients (r=—0. 512, P<0. 01;r= —0. 547,P<0. 01). Between score of MMSE,P2 - P3 of auditory ERP and latency of P300 in visual ERP,there was positive and negative correlation with BHI respectively. Of all the variables considered, the score of MMSE change had the highest correlation with BHI (r=0. 306,P = 0. 008). Cerebral arteriosclerosis had a remarkable effect on BHI. Conclusion The BHI could provide valuable information included individual patient cognitive state,vascular risk factor to influence the disease progression in MCI with qi - deficiency and blood - stasis syndrome.%目的 观察气虚血瘀型轻度认知障碍(mild cognitive impairment,MCI)患者的脑血管反应性(cerebrovascular reactivity,CVR)与认知功能的关系.方法 应用经颅多普勒超声对75例符合诊断标准的患者进行屏气试验检测,观察不同CVR状态下认知功能及脑血流动力学指标的特点,分析血管性危险因素对屏气指数(breath-holding index,BHI)的影响.结果 简易智能量表(mini-mental state examination,MMSE)分值与听觉、视觉事件相关电位(event-related potentials,ERP)的P300潜伏期有显著相关性(r=-0.512,P<0.01;r=-0.547,P<0.01);BHI与MMSE分值、听觉ERP的P2-P3

  3. Evaluation of potential internal target volume of liver tumors using cine-MRI

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Akino, Yuichi, E-mail: akino@radonc.med.osaka-u.ac.jp [Department of Radiation Oncology, Osaka University Graduate School of Medicine, Suita, Osaka 5650871, Japan and Miyakojima IGRT Clinic, Miyakojima-ku, Osaka 5340021 (Japan); Oh, Ryoong-Jin; Masai, Norihisa; Shiomi, Hiroya; Inoue, Toshihiko [Miyakojima IGRT Clinic, Miyakojima-ku, Osaka 5340021 (Japan)

    2014-11-01

    Purpose: Four-dimensional computed tomography (4DCT) is widely used for evaluating moving tumors, including lung and liver cancers. For patients with unstable respiration, however, the 4DCT may not visualize tumor motion properly. High-speed magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) sequences (cine-MRI) permit direct visualization of respiratory motion of liver tumors without considering radiation dose exposure to patients. Here, the authors demonstrated a technique for evaluating internal target volume (ITV) with consideration of respiratory variation using cine-MRI. Methods: The authors retrospectively evaluated six patients who received stereotactic body radiotherapy (SBRT) to hepatocellular carcinoma. Before acquiring planning CT, sagittal and coronal cine-MRI images were acquired for 30 s with a frame rate of 2 frames/s. The patient immobilization was conducted under the same condition as SBRT. Planning CT images were then acquired within 15 min from cine-MRI image acquisitions, followed by a 4DCT scan. To calculate tumor motion, the motion vectors between two continuous frames of cine-MRI images were calculated for each frame using the pyramidal Lucas–Kanade method. The target contour was delineated on one frame, and each vertex of the contour was shifted and copied onto the following frame using neighboring motion vectors. 3D trajectory data were generated with the centroid of the contours on sagittal and coronal images. To evaluate the accuracy of the tracking method, the motion of clearly visible blood vessel was analyzed with the motion tracking and manual detection techniques. The target volume delineated on the 50% (end-exhale) phase of 4DCT was translated with the trajectory data, and the distribution of the occupancy probability of target volume was calculated as potential ITV (ITV {sub Potential}). The concordance between ITV {sub Potential} and ITV estimated with 4DCT (ITV {sub 4DCT}) was evaluated using the Dice’s similarity coefficient (DSC). Results

  4. CineVersum BlackWing Four

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2010-01-01

    从BlackWing One到现在最新推出的BlackWing Four,一直以来C1ndVersum所带来的投影机都受到了不少投影机爱好者的关注,其帅气的外形搭配独特的欧美系画面风格,让人印象深刻。BlackWingFour是Cine Versum最为强悍的家庭影院投影机之一,

  5. Cine Club HDP-X1

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2010-01-01

    HDP-X1是Cine Club所推出的一款高端高清播放机,除了拥有高清视频的播放能力之外,较为特别的地方在于采用了优质的电源电路,以提高传输信号的纯净度,并且整体采用无风扇的散热结构,能实现无噪音的运作。

  6. Machine learning for the automatic localisation of foetal body parts in cine-MRI scans

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bowles, Christopher; Nowlan, Niamh C.; Hayat, Tayyib T. A.; Malamateniou, Christina; Rutherford, Mary; Hajnal, Joseph V.; Rueckert, Daniel; Kainz, Bernhard

    2015-03-01

    Being able to automate the location of individual foetal body parts has the potential to dramatically reduce the work required to analyse time resolved foetal Magnetic Resonance Imaging (cine-MRI) scans, for example, for use in the automatic evaluation of the foetal development. Currently, manual preprocessing of every scan is required to locate body parts before analysis can be performed, leading to a significant time overhead. With the volume of scans becoming available set to increase as cine-MRI scans become more prevalent in clinical practice, this stage of manual preprocessing is a bottleneck, limiting the data available for further analysis. Any tools which can automate this process will therefore save many hours of research time and increase the rate of new discoveries in what is a key area in understanding early human development. Here we present a series of techniques which can be applied to foetal cine-MRI scans in order to first locate and then differentiate between individual body parts. A novel approach to maternal movement suppression and segmentation using Fourier transforms is put forward as a preprocessing step, allowing for easy extraction of short movements of individual foetal body parts via the clustering of optical flow vector fields. These body part movements are compared to a labelled database and probabilistically classified before being spatially and temporally combined to give a final estimate for the location of each body part.

  7. en el cine. Una mirada comparativa

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hammam Mohamad Al_Rifai

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available El artículo aborda la cuestión teórica y práctica en la adaptación del personaje del "macho" de la literatura al cine. La investigación toma como base concreta dos películas mexicanas (El callejón de los milagros y Principio y fin adaptadas de dos novelas árabes homónimas y recurre a las contribuciones de teóricos de la comunicación, la recepción y la narratología para iluminar "desde diferentes perspectivas" al personaje del "macho" en el cine y su origen literario. Las adaptaciones cinematográficas presentan la doble ventaja de poder apreciar al personaje "macho" de las películas a través del personaje de las novelas y viceversa. Como resultado de la investigación, se concluye que en el proceso de una adaptación el cineasta asume el rol de un lector y, por medio de su obra (que pasa por el filtro de su punto de vista ideológico y cultural, nos ofrece una visión que re-simboliza y a la vez cuestiona al personaje en su fuente literaria.

  8. Clinical Applications of Cine Balanced Steady-State Free Precession MRI for the Evaluation of the Subarachnoid Spaces.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, A E; Wilkinson, M D; McGrillen, K M; Stoodley, M A; Magnussen, J S

    2015-12-01

    The purpose of this article is to review the physiology of normal brain and spinal cord motion in the subarachnoid space, principles of cine balanced steady-state free precession (bSSFP) magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), clinical applications, and the pitfalls encountered with this technique. The brain and spinal cord are dynamic structures that move with each heartbeat due to transmitted arterial pulse waves. Conventional MRI sequences do not allow anatomic evaluation of the pulsatile movement of the neural structures in the subarachnoid space due to limitations in temporal resolution. Cine bSSFP MRI uses cardiac gating to evaluate dynamically the brain and spinal cord with high contrast and temporal resolution.Cine bSSFP can be used in the evaluation of idiopathic syringomyelia to assess an underlying treatable cause, including arachnoid bands, which are usually not well visualized with conventional MR sequences due to motion artifact. This MRI technique is also useful in the evaluation of intraspinal and intracranial arachnoid cysts and the degree of mass effect on the cord. Other applications include preoperative and postoperative evaluation of Chiari I malformation and the evaluation of lateral ventricular asymmetry. The major limitation of cine bSSFP is the presence of banding artifacts, which can be reduced by shimming and modifying other scan parameters.

  9. Comparison of cine-MRI and transthoracic echocardiography for the assessment of aortic root diameters in patients with suspected Marfan syndrome

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Patients with Marfan syndrome require repeated imaging for monitoring of aortic root aneurysms. Therefore, we evaluated the agreement and reproducibility of cine-MRI and echocardiography measurements of the sinuses of Valsalva in patients with suspected Marfan syndrome. 51 consecutive patients with suspected Marfan syndrome were prospectively examined using cine-MRI and echocardiography. Two readers independently measured aortic root diameters at the level of the sinuses of Valsalva in both cine-MRI and echocardiography. Statistics included intraclass correlation coefficient, Pearson correlation coefficient, Bland-Altman analysis, and two-sided t-test. In 38 of the 51 individuals (74.5 %), the diagnosis of Marfan syndrome was established according to the criteria of the Ghent-2 nosology. Cine-MRI measurements of the sinuses of Valsalva revealed a strong correlation with echocardiography (r=0.929), but a statistically significant bias of -1.0 mm (p<0.001). The mean absolute diameter for sinuses of Valsalva obtained by cine-MRI was 32.3 ± 5.8 mm as compared to 33.4 ± 5.4 mm obtained by echocardiography. Interobserver agreement of measurements of the sinuses of Valsalva was higher for cine-MRI than for echocardiography (p=0.029). Despite small, but statistically significant differences in terms of agreement and reproducibility, cine-MRI and echocardiographic measurements of aortic root diameters provide comparable results without a significant clinical difference. Therefore both techniques may be used for monitoring of the aortic root in patients with Marfan syndrome.

  10. Comparison of cine-MRI and transthoracic echocardiography for the assessment of aortic root diameters in patients with suspected Marfan syndrome

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bannas, P.; Derlin, T.; Yamamura, J.; Lund, G.; Adam, G. [University Medical Center Hamburg-Eppendorf, Hamburg (Germany). Dept. of Diagnostic and Interventional Radiology; Rybczynski, M.; Sheikhzadeh, S.; Kodolitsch, Y. von [University Medical Center Hamburg-Eppendorf, Hamburg (Germany). Dept. of General and Interventional Cardiology; Groth, M. [University Medical Center Hamburg-Eppendorf, Hamburg (Germany). Section for Pediatric Radiology

    2015-11-15

    Patients with Marfan syndrome require repeated imaging for monitoring of aortic root aneurysms. Therefore, we evaluated the agreement and reproducibility of cine-MRI and echocardiography measurements of the sinuses of Valsalva in patients with suspected Marfan syndrome. 51 consecutive patients with suspected Marfan syndrome were prospectively examined using cine-MRI and echocardiography. Two readers independently measured aortic root diameters at the level of the sinuses of Valsalva in both cine-MRI and echocardiography. Statistics included intraclass correlation coefficient, Pearson correlation coefficient, Bland-Altman analysis, and two-sided t-test. In 38 of the 51 individuals (74.5 %), the diagnosis of Marfan syndrome was established according to the criteria of the Ghent-2 nosology. Cine-MRI measurements of the sinuses of Valsalva revealed a strong correlation with echocardiography (r=0.929), but a statistically significant bias of -1.0 mm (p<0.001). The mean absolute diameter for sinuses of Valsalva obtained by cine-MRI was 32.3 ± 5.8 mm as compared to 33.4 ± 5.4 mm obtained by echocardiography. Interobserver agreement of measurements of the sinuses of Valsalva was higher for cine-MRI than for echocardiography (p=0.029). Despite small, but statistically significant differences in terms of agreement and reproducibility, cine-MRI and echocardiographic measurements of aortic root diameters provide comparable results without a significant clinical difference. Therefore both techniques may be used for monitoring of the aortic root in patients with Marfan syndrome.

  11. The Role of Routine Whole Volume SPECT Reconstruction in Comparison to Cine Raw Data in the Detection of Extracardiac Uptake on Myocardial Perfusion Scans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maharaj, M; Korowlay, N A

    2011-01-01

    The objective of this study was to determine the role of routine whole volume reconstructed single-photon emission tomography (rSPECT) compared to cine raw data to detect extracardiac uptake of Sestamibi (MIBI). In a retrospective study, the myocardial perfusion studies of 426 patients were inspected separately for extracardiac uptake on cine raw data and rSPECT. The acquisition parameters for all the images were done according to departmental protocol. The whole volume SPECT data was selected and processed by HOSEM iterative reconstruction using the HERMES computer software system. The images were assessed by two observers, a student in training and a senior consultant nuclear medicine physician. The overall mean age and standard deviation of the 426 patients at the time of the study was 60 ± 12 years. Statistical analysis was performed using the Kappa and McNemars tests. The clinical significance of the extracardiac uptake was evaluated using hospital folders and /or laboratory results after viewing images. rSPECT detected 25 patients (5.9%) and cine raw data identified 18 patients (4.2%) with extracardiac uptake. All the areas of extracardiac uptake noted on cine raw data were seen on the rSPECT images. Only 21 of the 25 patients had complete 5-year clinical follow-up. The value of the clinical significance of the extracardiac uptake was limited due to the study being retrospective. The proportion of positives identified by rSPECT was significantly larger than those identified by cine raw data (P = 0.0082). Although our study demonstrates that rSPECT is more sensitive than cine raw data in detecting extracardiac uptake, it also shows that there is no benefit in routine whole volume rSPECT in daily clinical practice.

  12. A novel technique for VMAT QA with EPID in cine mode on a Varian TrueBeam linac

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Volumetric modulated arc therapy (VMAT) is a relatively new treatment modality for dynamic photon radiation therapy. Pre-treatment quality assurance (QA) is necessary and many efforts have been made to apply electronic portal imaging device (EPID)-based IMRT QA methods to VMAT. It is important to verify the gantry rotation speed during delivery as this is a new variable that is also modulated in VMAT. In this paper, we present a new technique to perform VMAT QA using an EPID. The method utilizes EPID cine mode and was tested on Varian TrueBeam in research mode. The cine images were acquired during delivery and converted to dose matrices after profile correction and dose calibration. A sub-arc corresponding to each cine image was extracted from the original plan and its portal image prediction was calculated. Several analyses were performed including 3D γ analysis (2D images + gantry angle axis), 2D γ analysis, and other statistical analyses. The method was applied to 21 VMAT photon plans of 3 photon energies. The accuracy of the cine image information was investigated. Furthermore, this method's sensitivity to machine delivery errors was studied. The pass rate (92.8 ± 1.4%) for 3D γ analysis was comparable to those from Delta4 system (99.9 ± 0.1%) under similar criteria (3%, 3 mm, 5% threshold and 2° angle to agreement) at 6 MV. The recorded gantry angle and start/stop MUs were found to have sufficient accuracy for clinical QA. Machine delivery errors can be detected through combined analyses of 3D γ, gantry angle, and percentage dose difference. In summary, we have developed and validated a QA technique that can simultaneously verify the gantry angle and delivered MLC fluence for VMAT treatment.This technique is efficient and its accuracy is comparable to other QA methods. (paper)

  13. Using learned under-sampling pattern for increasing speed of cardiac cine MRI based on compressive sensing principles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zamani, Pooria; Kayvanrad, Mohammad; Soltanian-Zadeh, Hamid

    2012-12-01

    This article presents a compressive sensing approach for reducing data acquisition time in cardiac cine magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). In cardiac cine MRI, several images are acquired throughout the cardiac cycle, each of which is reconstructed from the raw data acquired in the Fourier transform domain, traditionally called k-space. In the proposed approach, a majority, e.g., 62.5%, of the k-space lines (trajectories) are acquired at the odd time points and a minority, e.g., 37.5%, of the k-space lines are acquired at the even time points of the cardiac cycle. Optimal data acquisition at the even time points is learned from the data acquired at the odd time points. To this end, statistical features of the k-space data at the odd time points are clustered by fuzzy c-means and the results are considered as the states of Markov chains. The resulting data is used to train hidden Markov models and find their transition matrices. Then, the trajectories corresponding to transition matrices far from an identity matrix are selected for data acquisition. At the end, an iterative thresholding algorithm is used to reconstruct the images from the under-sampled k-space datasets. The proposed approaches for selecting the k-space trajectories and reconstructing the images generate more accurate images compared to alternative methods. The proposed under-sampling approach achieves an acceleration factor of 2 for cardiac cine MRI.

  14. Thursday Programme of CineGlobe Festival 2015

    CERN Multimedia

    Cugini, Pavel

    2015-01-01

    The CineGlobe Programme on Thursday 26th March 2015 counted with two short-films inspired by science sessions, two workshops on the 360 degree dome, and a special evening show in collaboration with the Mapping Festival, to celebrate the UNESCO Year of Light. The evening open with Diego Blas, CERN theorist, talking about Light, Einstein and the LHC to celebrate the UNESCO International Year of Light. Followed by a performance by the artist YRO_EILE_18. The artist Yro presents Eile, a live installation performance where light, sound, and cinema converge to tell a timeless story. EILE is a live cinema performance, in which yro makes live sound and images with a camera, some microphones and small objects like stones, balls, bits of paper and string.These materials allow him to create videos and sound, which aesthetics are close to abstract cinema and object theater assembled, sampled and grinded . The process is part of the staging itself as well as the film that results. Indescribable Eile is lived as an experie...

  15. Fully automatic segmentation of short and long axis cine cardiac MR

    OpenAIRE

    Breeuwer Marcel; Hautvast Gilion; Mory Benoit; Ciofolo-Veit Cybele; Fradkin Maxim

    2009-01-01

    The authors would like to thank the editor, BioMed Central, for the open access to the publication Detailed abstract + poster International audience We propose a fully automatic method for delineation of the endo- and epicardial contours in SA and LA cine CMR images in order to provide automatic, accurate quantitative left-ventricular functional assessment. The electronic version of this abstract is the complete one and can be found online at: http://jcmr-online.com/content/11/S1/P226

  16. Examination of self-navigating MR-sequences for perfusion imaging of the kidneys; Untersuchung von selbstnavigierenden MR-Sequenzen fuer die Perfusionsbildgebung der Nieren

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lietzmann, Florian; Zoellner, Frank G.; Schad, Lothar R. [Heidelberg Univ. Medizinische Fakultaet Mannheim (Germany). Computerunterstuetzte Klinische Medizin; Michaely, Henrik J. [Heidelberg Univ. Medizinische Fakultaet Mannheim (Germany). Inst. fuer Klinische Radiologie und Nuklearmedizin

    2010-07-01

    Due to the worldwide increasing number of cases of chronic kidney diseases renal imaging - as a non-invasive technique in magnetic resonance imaging - has become a very important tool for an early diagnosis of probable insufficiencies and malfunction. Especially, dynamic contrast enhanced magnetic resonance imaging (DCE-MRI) provides a technique to derive physiological parameters like renal blood flow or glomerular filtration rate. Similar to the entire field of abdominal imaging, the major problems are motion artifacts that primarily arise from the patient's respiration. The self-navigating BLADE-sequence with a post processing motion correction is an approach that does not require breath holding and is therefore also easily applicable to patients who are not able to undergo multiple breath hold examinations. In this work, a T1-weighted BLADE-sequence was optimized to demonstrate the feasibility of this technique to perfusion imaging. The number of phase-encoding lines of one BLADE has a direct impact on the reduction of motion artifacts. In comparison to standard DCE-MRI sequences, the developed BLADE-sequence with optimized number of phase encoding lines could significantly reduce motion artifacts. A quantitative analysis revealed that up to a 50% displacement of the kidneys could be corrected. Therefore, it was demonstrated that dynamic motion corrected measurements without the need of a breath hold-technique are feasible. (orig.)

  17. Upper Airway Volume Segmentation Analysis Using Cine MRI Findings in Children with Tracheostomy Tubes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fricke, Bradley L.; Abbott, M. Bret; Donnelly, Lane F.; Dardzinski, Bernard J.; Poe, Stacy A.; Kalra, Maninder; Amin, Raouf S.; Cotton, Robin T. [Cincinnati Children' s Hospital Medical Center, Cincinnati (United States)

    2007-12-15

    The purpose of this study is to evaluate the airway dynamics of the upper airway as depicted on cine MRI in children with tracheotomy tubes during two states of airflow through the upper airway. Sagittal fast gradient echo cine MR images of the supra-glottic airway were obtained with a 1.5T MRI scanner on seven children with tracheotomy tubes. Two sets of images were obtained with either the tubes capped or uncapped. The findings of the cine MRI were retrospectively reviewed. Volume segmentation of the cine images to compare the airway volume change over time (mean volume, standard deviation, normalized range, and coefficient of variance) was performed for the capped and uncapped tubes in both the nasopharynx and hypopharynx (Signed Rank Test). Graphical representation of the airway volume over time demonstrates a qualitative increased fluctuation in patients with the tracheotomy tube capped as compared to uncapped in both the nasopharyngeal and hypopharyngeal regions of interest. In the nasopharynx, the mean airway volume (capped 2.72 mL, uncapped 2.09 mL, p = 0.0313), the airway volume standard deviation (capped 0.42 mL, uncapped 0.20 mL, p = 0.0156), and the airway volume range (capped 2.10 mL, uncapped 1.09 mL, p = 0.0156) were significantly larger in the capped group of patients. In the hypopharynx, the airway volume standard deviation (capped 1.54 mL, uncapped 0.67 mL, p = 0.0156), and the airway volume range (capped 6.44 mL, uncapped 2.93 mL, p = 0.0156) were significantly larger in the capped tubes. The coefficient of variance (capped 0.37, uncapped 0.26, p = 0.0469) and the normalized range (capped 1.52, uncapped 1.09, p = 0.0313) were significantly larger in the capped tubes. There is a statistically significant change in airway dynamics in children with tracheotomy tubes when breathing via the airway as compared to breathing via the tracheotomy tube.

  18. 21 CFR 892.1620 - Cine or spot fluorographic x-ray camera.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Cine or spot fluorographic x-ray camera. 892.1620... (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES RADIOLOGY DEVICES Diagnostic Devices § 892.1620 Cine or spot fluorographic x-ray camera. (a) Identification. A cine or spot fluorographic x-ray camera is a device intended to...

  19. The use of a cine-technique in the MRT investigation of the temporo-mandibular joint. Die Anwendung der 'Cine-Technik' in der MRT-Diagnostik des Kiefergelenkes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vogl, T.J.; Assal, J. (Univ. Muenchen, Radiologische Klinik Innenstadt (Germany)); Eberhard, D.; Weigl, P.; Randzio, J. (Univ. Muenchen, Klinik und Poliklinik fuer Kieferchirurgie (Germany))

    1992-03-01

    A new cine-technique in a prospective study using rapid gradient echo sequences was evaluated for the MRT investigation of the temporo-mandibular joint. A newly developed hydraulic apparatus was used to produce progressive opening of the jaw and MRT appearances were recorded during predetermined points of mandibular movement. The investigation included 16 normals and 34 patients. A modified gradient echo sequence was combined with an optimised surface coil or a special double coil and this provided good spatial resolution of the articular disc and of the muscular and bony structure. Amongst the abnormal findings were luxation of the disc (15 cases), tears in the disc (5 cases), late effects of internal derangements (12 cases) and condylar hypermobility (7 cases). The new cine-technique provides specific images in any chosen position of the mandible depending on the clinical disability of the patient. (orig.).

  20. Dynamic magnetic resonance imaging in assessing lung function in adolescent idiopathic scoliosis: a pilot study of comparison before and after posterior spinal fusion

    OpenAIRE

    Lam Wynnie WM; Lam Tsz-ping; Li Albert M; Ng Bobby KW; Chu Winnie CW; Cheng Jack CY

    2007-01-01

    Abstract Background Restrictive impairment is the commonest reported pulmonary deficit in AIS, which improves following surgical operation. However, exact mechanism of how improvement is brought about is unknown. Dynamic fast breath-hold (BH)-MR imaging is a recent advance which provides direct quantitative visual assessment of pulmonary function. By using above technique, change in lung volume, chest wall and diaphragmatic motion in AIS patients before and six months after posterior spinal f...

  1. Cine-MRI swallowing evaluation after tongue reconstruction

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hartl, Dana M. [Department of Otolaryngology-Head and Neck Surgery, Institute Gustave Roussy, 39 rue Camille Desmoulins, 94805 Villejuif Cedex (France)], E-mail: dmhartl@aol.com; Kolb, Frederic; Bretagne, Evelyne [Department of Otolaryngology-Head and Neck Surgery, Institute Gustave Roussy, 39 rue Camille Desmoulins, 94805 Villejuif Cedex (France); Bidault, Francois; Sigal, Robert [Department of Radiology, Institut Gustave Roussy, 39 rue Camille Desmoulins, 94805 Villejuif Cedex (France)

    2010-01-15

    Objective: To determine the feasibility of cine-MRI for non-invasive swallowing evaluation after surgery for lingual carcinoma with reconstruction using microvascular free flaps. Methods: Ten patients with stage IV carcinoma of the mobile tongue and/or tongue base treated by surgical resection and reconstruction with a free flap were evaluated after an average of 4.3 years (range: 1.5-11 years), using cine-MRI in 'single-shot fast spin echo' (SSFSE) mode. Fiberoptic laryngoscopy of swallowing was performed before MRI to detect aspiration. The tolerance and ability to complete the exam were noted. The mobilities of the oral and pharyngeal structures visualized were evaluated as normal, reduced or increased. Results: Cine-MRI was well tolerated in all cases; 'dry' swallow was performed for the 2 patients with clinical aspiration. Tongue base-pharyngeal wall contact was observed in 5 cases. An increased anterior tongue recoil, increased mandibular recoil, increased posterior oropharyngeal wall advancement and an increased laryngeal elevation were observed in 4 cases. One case of a passive 'slide' mechanism was observed. Conclusions: Cine-MRI is a safe, non-invasive technique for the evaluation of the mobility of oral and oropharyngeal structures after free-flap reconstruction of the tongue. For selected cases, it may be complementary to clinical examination for evaluation of dysphagia after surgery and free-flap reconstruction. Further technical advances will be necessary before cine-MRI can replace videofluoroscopy, however.

  2. Feasibility study to assess clinical applications of 3-T cine MRI coupled with synchronous audio recording during speech in evaluation of velopharyngeal insufficiency in children

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sagar, Pallavi; Nimkin, Katherine [Massachusetts General Hospital, Department of Radiology, Division of Pediatric Radiology, Boston, MA (United States)

    2014-08-16

    In the past decade, there has been increased utilization of magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) in evaluating and understanding velopharyngeal insufficiency (VPI). To our knowledge, none of the prior studies with MRI has simultaneously linked the audio recordings of speech during cine MRI acquisition with the corresponding images and created a video for evaluating VPI. To develop an MRI protocol with static and cine sequences during phonation to evaluate for VPI in children and compare the findings to nasopharyngoscopy and videofluoroscopy. Five children, ages 8-16 years, with known VPI, who had previously undergone nasopharyngoscopy and videofluoroscopy, were included. MRI examination was performed on a 3-T Siemens scanner. Anatomical data was obtained using an isotropic T2-weighted 3-D SPACE sequence with multiplanar reformation capability. Dynamic data was obtained using 2-D FLASH cine sequences of the airway in three imaging planes during phonation. Audio recordings were captured by a MRI compatible optical microphone. All five cases had MRI and nasopharyngoscopy and four had videofluoroscopy performed. VPI was identified by MRI in all five patients. The location and severity of the velopharyngeal gap, closure pattern, velar size and shape and levator veli palatini (LVP) muscle were identified in all patients. MRI was superior in visualizing the integrity of the LVP muscle. MRI was unable to identify hemipalatal weakness in one case. In a case of stress-induced VPI, occurring only during clarinet playing, cine MRI demonstrated discordant findings of a velopharyngeal gap during phonatory tasks but not with instrument playing. Overall, there was satisfactory correlation among MRI, nasopharyngoscopy and videofluoroscopy findings. Cine MRI of the airway during speech is a noninvasive, well-tolerated diagnostic imaging tool that has the potential to serve as a guide prior to and after surgical correction of VPI. MRI provided superior anatomical detail of the levator

  3. Sexualidad violenta en el cine de Kim Ki-duk

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Daniel Muñoz Ruiz

    2011-07-01

    Full Text Available En sus más de 110 años de vida el cine ha representado la sexualidad humana en todas sus modalidades y desde los más variados puntos de vista. El cine de Kim Ki-duk ha sorprendido y escandalizado al público por su crudeza y, a veces, excesiva violencia. El director surcoreano ha explorado a lo largo de su filmografía el tema del sexo siempre desde puntos de vista dramáticos y hasta truculentos. En sus películas la mayoría de las relaciones sexuales carecen de amor y afecto. Nunca son placenteras. La violación, la prostitución, la violencia de género y las frustraciones sexuales son temas recurrentes en su cine.

  4. Sida y toma de conciencia: un cine comprometido

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eugenio Núñez Ang

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Se aborda el tema de personajes gay, durante mucho tiempo eliminados de la historia del cine; tratados como raros, enfermos mentales, o bien para burlarse de ellos. Con la aparición del sida y las luchas del movimiento gay, la perspectiva cambia y el cine aborda problemas humanos, ajenos a una preferencia sexual estigmatizada. Se hace hincapié en el sida y la toma de conciencia, tanto para la población gay como para los otros.

  5. Lenguaje y contracultura: una mirada al cine de culto

    OpenAIRE

    Carrasco, Alma

    2015-01-01

    El cine de culto, como expresión artística dotada de particularidades de estilo y forma, nace a partir de las identificaciones e interpretaciones del contenido estético y discursivo que lo componen. A partir de esto, se consolida como un nuevo lenguaje que rompe con la estructura del cine clásico y se erige en un eje articulador de la identidad cultural. Lo abordado en este texto apunta a comprender la apropiación que el público realiza y cuáles son algunas de las características que conforma...

  6. Cine Substitution with Arylzinc Reagents: Scope and Mechanistic Studies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barroso, Santiago; Lemaire, Sébastien; Farina, Vittorio; Steib, Andreas K; Blanc, Romain; Knochel, Paul

    2016-04-01

    The unexpected ability of arylzinc reagents bearing electron-donating substituents to react in a Friedel-Crafts fashion (cine) with electrophiles like perpivaloylated glucoside bromide and benzhydryl bromides in competition with organometallic coupling (ipso) is shown. The stereoelectronic factors required to promote the cine reactivity versus the classical ipso, and the mechanism of this alternative pathway, have been investigated. The Wheland intermediate is deprotonated intramolecularly in a 1,2-shift but also in a longer-range shift, leaving in this case the C-Zn untouched. In the latter case, it is possible to take advantage of this result for further functionalization. PMID:26914598

  7. Psicología, cine y educación

    OpenAIRE

    Gómez de Benito, J. Luís

    1996-01-01

    Nos adentramos con este artículo en la doble psicología del arte del cine: la del creador de imágenes y la del espectador. El autor va exponiendo los distintos elementos que crean ambas concluyendo con dos ideas de radical importancia: la capacidad de influenciar a las personas que tiene el séptimo arte y la necesidad absoluta de que esta afirmación no nos lleve a rechazar el cine sino todo lo contrario, a encontrar la forma de enseñar a conocerlo y a ser precavidos ante «embrujo» desde la mi...

  8. Reconfiguración de flujos en el circuito internacional de festivales de cine: el programa "Cine en construcción"

    OpenAIRE

    Campos, Minerva

    2012-01-01

    En el contexto de programas de financiación destinados a determinados cines periféricos y/o minoritarios creados por los festivales de cine y fundaciones asociadas a ellos, este artículo se centra en el programa «Cine en Construcción»: una iniciativa conjunta del Festival Internacional de Cine de San Sebastián y los Rencontres Cinémas d’Amérique Latine de Toulouse creada en 2002 y destinada a la finalización de proyectos latinoamericanos. El artículo se interesa por cómo este tipo de opera...

  9. Evaluation of Large Intracranial Aneurysms with Cine MRA and 3D Contrast-Enhanced MRA

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    朱文珍; 冯定义; 漆剑频; 夏黎明; 王承缘

    2004-01-01

    Summary: The value of combined application of both ECG-gated cine MRA and 3D-CEMRA in the detection of large intracranial aneurysms was evaluated and the findings were compared with those of conventional MRA and DSA. Twenty-four patients with 26 large intraeranial aneurysms underwent MRI and DSA. All these aneurysms, diameter from 15 to 39 mm, were located at internal cerebral artery (n = 12), vertebral artery (n = 3), basilar artery (n = 4), anterior cerebral artery (n =2), middle cerebral artery (n=2), anterior communicate artery (n=2) and posterior communicate artery (n= 1). Thirteen cases of hematoma or cavernoma were studied as control group. All patients were examined on GE 1.5T MR system. ECG-gated eine MRA was performed with 2D multi-phase fast gradient-recalled echo sequence in a single section. All the images were analyzed with signal intensity VS time curve for differentiating intraaneurysmal blood flow from static tissue.The results were analzsed by statistic "t" test. 3D-CEMRA was performed with spoiled gradient-recalled echo and one dose of Gd-DTPA. All data was processed with multi-plannar reformat (MPR)and tomography for the demonstration of aneurysms in detail. All 26 aneurysms were demonstrated successfully by combined application of both cine MRA and 3D-CEMRA. Compared to DSA and conventional 3D-MOTSA, its sensitivity and specificity figures were both 100 %. Cine MRA could differentiate the blood flow from the static tissue. The intensity VS time curves of intraaneurysmal blood flow offered fluctuating form and average signal change between systole and diastole period was about 89.8±37.4; However, under the control group, intraaneurysmal thrombus or cerebral hemorrhage or eavernomas had no significant signal change and the curves offered steady form with the average signal change being about 8.2 ± 6. 3. There was statistically significant difference between the intraaneurysmal blood flow and static tissue (P= 0. 025, <0.05). 3D-CEMRA was very

  10. El devenir del cine musical de Hollywood

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Moreno Cardenal, Luisa

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available Film genres which were defined and developed by Hollywood during the early decades of the 20th century are no longer the same: a hundred years after they were first born, they are undergoing profound changes and a thorough revision. As a result, new sub-genres are emerging and others that were once essential to the identity of film as a mass phenomenon are becoming blurred. One such film genre on the verge of extinction is the musical. This paper briefly traces out the way musicals developed, from their beginnings through to the early years of the 21st century, enabling the keys to their success and their decline to be identified. Some major productions, with outstanding soundtracks or choreography building an interaction between the leading roles, will be especially examined.Los géneros cinematográficos delimitados por la industria de Hollywood a lo largo de las primeras décadas del siglo XX viven, cien años después, un proceso de revisión y metamorfosis que da como resultado el nacimiento de nuevos subgéneros y el desdibujamiento de otros que, durante décadas, tuvieron una entidad inequívoca e imprescindible para entender el cine como espectáculo y fenómeno de masas. Uno de esos géneros en periodo de extinción es el musical. Mostramos aquí un somero recorrido por el devenir del género desde su nacimiento hasta comienzos del siglo XXI, tratando de localizar las claves de su éxito y de su declive y fijándonos especialmente en algunos títulos importantes que cuentan, además de con maravillosas bandas sonoras, con números de baile escenificados para construir la dialéctica entre sus protagonistas.

  11. Clinical usefulness of cine MRI for evaluation of left ventricular volume and diagnosis of heart and great vessel diseases

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kondo, Takeshi; Anno, Hirofumi; Uritani, Tomizo (Fujita-Gakuen Health Univ., Toyoake, Aichi (Japan)) (and others)

    1990-01-01

    ECG-gated cine mode magnetic resonance (MR) imaging was performed in 20 patients with various heart deseases. Left ventricular volume (LVV) and left ventricular ejection fraction (LVEF) were calculated on MR images obtained in left ventricular vertical and horizontal long axis views. The findings were compared with those obtained from left ventriculography. There was a significant positive correlation between MR imaging and ventriculography for both LVV and LVEF (p<0.001). In Marfan syndrome after surgery for dissecting aneurysm of the aorta, MR imaging was capable of visualizing not only the whole aorta in a single plane but also enlargement of the aortic root. It also depicted asynergy and thinned wall of the infarcted myocardium for myocardial infarction; an enlarged left auricle, the thickened septum, and constricted outflow tract for idiopathic hypertrophic subaortic stenosis; shunt flow for ventricular septum defect; and an enlarged aortic root for aortitis syndrome. Using ventriculography as the standard, cine MR imaging was frequently false positive for the detection of mitral regurgitation. There was, however, good concordance between MR imaging and ventriculography in detecting aortic regurgitation. In addition, MR imaging was equivalent to color Doppler technique for detecting valvular regurgitation. (N.K.).

  12. Clinical usefulness of cine MRI for evaluation of left ventricular volume and diagnosis of heart and great vessel diseases

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    ECG-gated cine mode magnetic resonance (MR) imaging was performed in 20 patients with various heart deseases. Left ventricular volume (LVV) and left ventricular ejection fraction (LVEF) were calculated on MR images obtained in left ventricular vertical and horizontal long axis views. The findings were compared with those obtained from left ventriculography. There was a significant positive correlation between MR imaging and ventriculography for both LVV and LVEF (p<0.001). In Marfan syndrome after surgery for dissecting aneurysm of the aorta, MR imaging was capable of visualizing not only the whole aorta in a single plane but also enlargement of the aortic root. It also depicted asynergy and thinned wall of the infarcted myocardium for myocardial infarction; an enlarged left auricle, the thickened septum, and constricted outflow tract for idiopathic hypertrophic subaortic stenosis; shunt flow for ventricular septum defect; and an enlarged aortic root for aortitis syndrome. Using ventriculography as the standard, cine MR imaging was frequently false positive for the detection of mitral regurgitation. There was, however, good concordance between MR imaging and ventriculography in detecting aortic regurgitation. In addition, MR imaging was equivalent to color Doppler technique for detecting valvular regurgitation. (N.K.)

  13. Comprehensive Cardiovascular magnetic resonance of myocardial mechanics in mice using three-dimensional cine DENSE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhong Xiaodong

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Quantitative noninvasive imaging of myocardial mechanics in mice enables studies of the roles of individual genes in cardiac function. We sought to develop comprehensive three-dimensional methods for imaging myocardial mechanics in mice. Methods A 3D cine DENSE pulse sequence was implemented on a 7T small-bore scanner. The sequence used three-point phase cycling for artifact suppression and a stack-of-spirals k-space trajectory for efficient data acquisition. A semi-automatic 2D method was adapted for 3D image segmentation, and automated 3D methods to calculate strain, twist, and torsion were employed. A scan protocol that covered the majority of the left ventricle in a scan time of less than 25 minutes was developed, and seven healthy C57Bl/6 mice were studied. Results Using these methods, multiphase normal and shear strains were measured, as were myocardial twist and torsion. Peak end-systolic values for the normal strains at the mid-ventricular level were 0.29 ± 0.17, -0.13 ± 0.03, and -0.18 ± 0.14 for Err, Ecc, and Ell, respectively. Peak end-systolic values for the shear strains were 0.00 ± 0.08, 0.04 ± 0.12, and 0.03 ± 0.07 for Erc, Erl, and Ecl, respectively. The peak end-systolic normalized torsion was 5.6 ± 0.9°. Conclusions Using a 3D cine DENSE sequence tailored for cardiac imaging in mice at 7 T, a comprehensive assessment of 3D myocardial mechanics can be achieved with a scan time of less than 25 minutes and an image analysis time of approximately 1 hour.

  14. Marruecos: 44 años de cine colonial

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lic. Mohamed Lemrini

    2000-01-01

    Full Text Available Haciendo un poco de historia, el Norte de África conoció una escalada militar colonizadora y un gran interés por las grandes potencias europeas del momento a finales del siglo XIX, coincidiendo precisamente con el nacimiento del cine.

  15. Some Semantic Properties of Romanian Interrogatives: "Care" and "Cine."

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vasiliu, E.

    The aim of this paper is to account for some semantic properties of Romanian interrogatives "ce" and "cine" by establishing some definite correlations between various contextual restrictions governing the use of these interrogative particles and the "meaning" which might be assigned to each of these particles in any context their occurrence is…

  16. [Evaluation of coronary blood flow using digital subtraction technique and cine coronary angiography: a preliminary report].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Uwatoko, M; Miyagi, Y; Nomura, M; Shiga, Y; Koike, A; Tateishi, R; Mitsuguchi, F; Mano, K; Hishida, H; Mizuno, Y

    1988-06-01

    To evaluate coronary circulation in ischemic heart disease, digital image processing with cine coronary angiography was performed. Using time-density curves obtained from individual pixels, images showing the distribution of contrast density and transit time were obtained. To record angiograms, contrast medium was injected into the coronary artery in a steady manner during right atrial pacing. Frames in the end-diastolic phase immediately before the P wave were selected, and digitized into a 512 x 512 x 8 bit matrix using a system composed of a video camera, an analog-to-digital converter, and a computer. These digitized images were then stored in a disk memory. A mask image was prepared before the injection of contrast medium. Subtraction was performed using the mask image and a series of images following contrast injection. The subtracted images were of sufficient quality to permit clear observation of the individual coronary arterial branches. Time-density curves were then determined from these subtracted images. From these curves, time from the onset of contrast injection to its peak density (Tp), time from the peak density to the half peak density (T 1/2) and the attenuation factor of the curves (tau) were derived. Their distributions were expressed as color images. Examples of a normal control and a case of inferior infarction were demonstrated. Blood flow function images with good spatial resolution were thus obtained. This method is useful for evaluating coronary blood flow. PMID:2977791

  17. In vivo X-ray cine-tomography for tracking morphological dynamics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    dos Santos Rolo, Tomy; Ershov, Alexey; van de Kamp, Thomas; Baumbach, Tilo

    2014-03-18

    Scientific cinematography using ultrafast optical imaging is a common tool to study motion. In opaque organisms or structures, X-ray radiography captures sequences of 2D projections to visualize morphological dynamics, but for many applications full four-dimensional (4D) spatiotemporal information is highly desirable. We introduce in vivo X-ray cine-tomography as a 4D imaging technique developed to study real-time dynamics in small living organisms with micrometer spatial resolution and subsecond time resolution. The method enables insights into the physiology of small animals by tracking the 4D morphological dynamics of minute anatomical features as demonstrated in this work by the analysis of fast-moving screw-and-nut-type weevil hip joints. The presented method can be applied to a broad range of biological specimens and biotechnological processes. PMID:24594600

  18. Cine comercial y conocimiento sobre el proceso de morir

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    María Campo-Redondo

    2009-05-01

    Full Text Available El cine como recurso tecnológico para generar conocimientos ha empezado a dar sus frutos. En este artículose presenta los resultados de la inserción del cine en la generación de conocimientos bajo dos vertientes: una teórica,discutiendo la intersección entre la era de la tecnología digital y el modo de crear conocimiento propio de esta era, yotra empírica, describiendo una propuesta de utilización didáctica del “cine comercial” con el fin de analizar el significadode la muerte. Así, el artículo se divide en cinco sub-partes. En primer lugar, se contextualiza la era de la tecnologíadigital en la creación de conocimiento. En segundo lugar, se resalta las ventajas de utilizar el cine en la transmisión deconocimiento, en especial aquel que es difícil de adquirir por la vía experiencial. En tercer lugar, se describe la metodologíautilizada en la aplicación de una propuesta didáctica llevada a cabo con estudiantes de una cátedra de Psicologíadel Desarrollo, en la que la película “Antes de Partir” fue el estímulo sobre el cual se organizó la discusión relacionadacon el fin del ciclo la vida de los seres humanos. En cuarto lugar, se resume los hallazgos más importantes sobre estaexperiencia de investigación, al combinar el cine con aspectos teóricos relacionados con la conceptualización de lamuerte. Por último, se destaca las virtudes de la metodología empleada.

  19. Cine interactivo como estrategia de intervención grupal

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Paola Lauretti

    2009-05-01

    Full Text Available Utilizando el concepto de cine interactivo como agente motor de la relación inter e intra personal, presentamosuna experiencia con un grupo de adultos, con la finalidad de establecer el valor del cine como un recurso útil para laintervención grupal. El método de trabajo descriptivo se desarrolló en varias etapas: 1 aplicación del CuestionarioExploración de Necesidades (CEN del cual se extrajeron los principales temas a tratar; 2 selección, por parte delequipo de investigación, de aquellas películas que mejor se adaptaban a las necesidades detectadas; 3 aplicación delCuestionario Actitud frente al Cine (CAC para sus analizar su actitud antes de iniciar la experiencia; 4 proyecciónde las películas seleccionadas; 5 re aplicación del CAC dos meses después de culminado el proceso, para analizar loscambios operados con relación al cine. Los temas trabajados fueron relación de pareja y relaciones padres-hijos bajola utilización del modelo CAPAS el cual promueve el análisis de las situaciones planteadas en los siguientes pasos: C:comentario general del contenido; A: análisis del problema central; P: proceso de internalización; A: auto reflexión y S:Solución del conflicto. Los resultados apuntan hacia la importancia de considerar el cine como una estrategia valiosaen la intervención en grupos.

  20. Lesion detection value of Cine sequence in the small intestinal Crohn’s disease:a preliminary study%MR 电影成像对小肠克罗恩病变的检出价值

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    徐慧新; 刘伟; 刘希胜; 俞同福; 唐立钧; 徐青

    2015-01-01

    Objective To evaluate the detection rate of lesions of patients with Crohn’s Disease(CD)tusing combining the con-ventional MR and Cine MRE(MR enterography).Methods MRI images of twenty-nine patients with CD confirmed by clinic were analyzed retrospectively.Scan sequences include coronal Cine MRE,and standard MR protocol (FIESTA,SS-FSE,LAVA C+). Two radiologists analyzed the images with double blind method to explored whether there were significant differences existing be-tween having or having not Cine MRE on lesion detection rate (wall thickness,stenosis,comb sign,adhesions,fistulas).Results The number of lesions detected by standard MR combined with Cine MRE compared with standard MR alone were 82/80 (P =0.1 6) for wall thickening,52/43 (P =0.03)for stenosis,6/7 (P =0.36)for the comb sign,5/7(P =0.66)for adhesions,2/2for fistulas re-spectivily.Conclusion It is meaningless to combine Cine MRE with standard MR in lesions detection in patients with CD,Cine ima-ges can accurately determine diseased bowel stenosis,and show the adhesive location.On the basis of standard MR,Cine MRE can be added in patients with CD when necessary.%目的:评价常规小肠 MR 结合 MR 电影动态成像(Cine MRE)能否提高小肠克罗恩病(CD)相关病变的检出率。方法回顾性分析29例经临床证实的 CD 患者的 MRI 资料,扫描序列包括 FIESTA、SS-FSE、LAVA C+等常规静态小肠 MR 序列以及Cine MRE 序列。由2名影像科医生对图像进行双盲法分析,对比有或无 Cine MRE 对于 CD 相关病变(包括肠壁增厚、肠腔狭窄、梳状征、粘连及瘘管)的检出数量有无显著差别。结果单独常规 MR 及增加 Cine MRE 后的病变检出数量分别为:肠壁增厚节段82/80,无统计学差异(P >0.05);肠腔狭窄52/43,有统计学差异(P 0.05);粘连5/7,无统计学差异(P >0.05);瘘管2/2。结论Cine MRE 对于 CD 相关肠壁增厚、梳状征、粘连及瘘管诊断的意义不大,但其能较准确判断病

  1. Percent wall thickness evaluated by Gd-DTPA enhanced cine MRI as an indicator of local parietal movement in hypertrophic cardiomyopathy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hirano, Masaharu [Tokyo Medical Coll. (Japan)

    1998-11-01

    Hypertrophic cardiomyopathy (HCM) is a cardiac disease, the basic pathology of which consists of a decrease in left ventricular dilation compliance due to uneven hypertrophy of the left ventricular wall. Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) is useful in monitoring uneven parietal hypertrophy and kinetics in HCM patients. The present study was undertaken in 47 HCM patients who showed asymmetrical septal hypertrophy to determine if percent thickness can be an indicator of left ventricular local movement using cine MRI. Longest and shortest axis images were acquired by the ECG synchronization method using a 1.5 T MR imager. Cardiac function was analyzed based on longest axis cine images, and telediastolic and telesystolic parietal thickness were measured based on shorter axis cine images at the papillary muscle level. Parietal movement index and percent thickness were used as indicators of local parietal movement. The correlation between these indicators and parietal thickness was evaluated. The percent thickness changed at an earlier stage of hypertrophy than the parietal movement index, thus it is thought to be useful in detecting left ventricular parietal movement disorders at an early stage of HCM. (author)

  2. Cine cone beam CT reconstruction using low-rank matrix factorization: algorithm and a proof-of-princple study

    CERN Document Server

    Cai, Jian-Feng; Gao, Hao; Jiang, Steve B; Shen, Zuowei; Zhao, Hongkai

    2012-01-01

    Respiration-correlated CBCT, commonly called 4DCBCT, provide respiratory phase-resolved CBCT images. In many clinical applications, it is more preferable to reconstruct true 4DCBCT with the 4th dimension being time, i.e., each CBCT image is reconstructed based on the corresponding instantaneous projection. We propose in this work a novel algorithm for the reconstruction of this truly time-resolved CBCT, called cine-CBCT, by effectively utilizing the underlying temporal coherence, such as periodicity or repetition, in those cine-CBCT images. Assuming each column of the matrix $\\bm{U}$ represents a CBCT image to be reconstructed and the total number of columns is the same as the number of projections, the central idea of our algorithm is that the rank of $\\bm{U}$ is much smaller than the number of projections and we can use a matrix factorization form $\\bm{U}=\\bm{L}\\bm{R}$ for $\\bm{U}$. The number of columns for the matrix $\\bm{L}$ constraints the rank of $\\bm{U}$ and hence implicitly imposing a temporal cohere...

  3. Third brain ventricle deformation analysis using fractional differentiation and evolution strategy in brain cine-MRI

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nakib, Amir; Aiboud, Fazia; Hodel, Jerome; Siarry, Patrick; Decq, Philippe

    2010-03-01

    In this paper, we present an original method to evaluate the deformations in the third cerebral ventricle on a brain cine- MR imaging. First, a segmentation process, based on a fractional differentiation method, is directly applied on a 2D+t dataset to detect the contours of the region of interest (i.e. lamina terminalis). Then, the successive segmented contours are matched using a procedure of global alignment, followed by a morphing process, based on the Covariance Matrix Adaptation Evolution Strategy (CMAES). Finally, local measurements of deformations are derived from the previously determined matched contours. The validation step is realized by comparing our results with the measurements achieved on the same patients by an expert.

  4. Desde el cine a la poesía

    OpenAIRE

    Pedroso Herrera, Tomás

    1998-01-01

    Si cine y poesía tienen rasgos comunes y el alumno está mucho más familiarizado con los medios audiovisuales, es presumible suponer que accederá con más facilidad al lenguaje poético por medio del lenguaje cinematográfico. Este artículo intentará ser una explicación sobre cómo paliar este difícil problema: utilizando el lenguaje cinematográfico para explicar el lenguaje poético. En él, el autor apuesta por el mundo del cine como instrumento didáctico privilegiado para explicar a los alumnos p...

  5. Stress cine MRI for detection of coronary artery disease; Stress-Cine-MRT zur Primaeridagnostik der koronaren Herzkrankheit

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sommer, T.; Hofer, U.; Schild, H. [Bonn Univ. (Germany). Radiologische Klinik; Omran, H. [Medizinische Universitaetsklinik II Bonn (Germany)

    2002-05-01

    mainly be explained by the better image quality with sharp delineation of the endocardial and epicardial borders. Currently, stress MRI is already a realistic clinical alternative for the non-invasive assessment of CAD in patients with impaired image quality in echocardiography. (orig.) [German] Belastungsuntersuchungen sind einer der wesentlichen Pfeiler der nicht-invasiven Diagnostik der koronaren Herzkrankheit (KHK). Die Stress-Cine-Magnetresonanztomographie (Stress-MRT) beruht wie die Stressechokardiographie auf dem direkten Nachweis ischaemieinduzierter Wandbewegungsstoerungen. Ihr Einsatz bei kardialen Belastungsuntersuchungen wurde bisher vor allem durch die langen Untersuchungszeiten und die limitierten Ueberwachungsmoeglichkeiten der Patienten eingeschraenkt. Erst seit kurzem wurden durch technische Weiterentwicklungen (insbesondere ult